WorldWideScience

Sample records for carbon stabilized expanded

  1. Lattice expansion of carbon-stabilized expanded austenite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hummelshøj, Thomas Strabo; Christiansen, Thomas; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2010-01-01

    The lattice parameter of expanded austenite was determined as a function of the content of interstitially dissolved carbon in homogeneous, carburized thin stainless steel foils. For the first time this expansion of the face-centered cubic lattice is determined on unstrained austenite. It is found...

  2. Stress and Composition of Carbon Stabilized Expanded Austenite on Stainless Steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Thomas; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2009-01-01

    Low-temperature gaseous carburizing of stainless steel is associated with a colossal supersaturation of the fcc lattice with carbon, without the development of carbides. This article addresses the simultaneous determination of stress and composition profiles in layers of carbon xpanded austenite...... obtained by low-temperature gaseous carburizing of AISI 316. X-ray diffraction was applied for the determination of lattice spacing depth profiles by destructive depth profiling and reconstruction of the original lattice spacing profiles from the measured, diffracted intensity weighted, values. The...... compressive stress depth distributions correlate with the depth distribution of the strain-free lattice parameter, the latter being a measure for the depth distribution of carbon in expanded austenite. Elastically accommodated compressive stress values as high as -2.7 GPa were obtained, which exceeds the...

  3. Extended X-Ray Absorption Fine Structure Investigation of Carbon Stabilized Expanded Austenite and Carbides in Stainless Steel AISI 316

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oddershede, Jette; Christiansen, Thomas; Ståhl, Kenny;

    2011-01-01

    Low temperature carburized AISI 316 stainless steel - carbon expanded austenite - was investigated with EXAFS and synchrotron diffraction together with synthesized carbides of the type M3C2, M7C3 and M23C6. It was found that the chemical environment of carbon expanded austenite is not associated...

  4. Stability of non compact steady and expanding gradient Ricci solitons

    OpenAIRE

    Deruelle, Alix

    2014-01-01

    We study the stability of non compact steady and expanding gradient Ricci solitons. We first show that strict linear stability implies dynamical stability. Then we give various sufficient geometric conditions ensuring the strict linear stability of such gradient Ricci solitons.

  5. Atmospheric gradients and the stability of expanding jets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Numerical simulations of adiabatically expanding slab jets in initial static pressure balance with an external atmosphere have been performed and compared to predictions made by a linear analysis of the stability of expanding jets. It is found that jets are stabilized by jet expansion as predicted by the linear analysis. It is also found that an expanding jet can be destabilized by a positive temperature gradient or temperature jump in the surrounding medium which lowers the Mach number defined by the external sound speed. A temperature gradient or jump is more destabilizing than would be predicted by a linear stability analysis. The enhanced instability compared to an isothermal atmosphere with identical pressure gradient is a result of the reduced external Mach number and a result of a higher jet density relative to the density in the external medium and higher ram speed. Other differences between predictions made by the linear theory and the simulations can be understood qualitatively as a result of a change in wave speed as the wave amplitude increases. 12 refs

  6. Stability of stagnation via an expanding accretion shock wave

    CERN Document Server

    Velikovich, A L; Taylor, B D; Giuliani, J L; Zalesak, S T; Iwamoto, Y

    2016-01-01

    Stagnation of a cold plasma streaming to the center or axis of symmetry via an expanding accretion shock wave is ubiquitous in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and high-energy-density plasma physics, the examples ranging from plasma flows in x-ray-generating Z pinches [Y. Maron et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 035001 (2013)] to the experiments in support of the recently suggested concept of impact ignition in ICF [H. Azechi et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 102, 235002 (2009); M. Murakami et al., Nucl. Fusion 54, 054007 (2014)]. Some experimental evidence indicates that stagnation via an expanding shock wave is stable, but its stability has never been studied theoretically. We present such analysis for the stagnation that does not involve a rarefaction wave behind the expanding shock front and is described by the classic ideal-gas Noh solution in spherical and cylindrical geometry. In either case the stagnated flow has been demonstrated to be stable, initial perturbations exhibiting a power-law, oscillatory or monotonic...

  7. Stability of stagnation via an expanding accretion shock wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velikovich, A. L.; Murakami, M.; Taylor, B. D.; Giuliani, J. L.; Zalesak, S. T.; Iwamoto, Y.

    2016-05-01

    Stagnation of a cold plasma streaming to the center or axis of symmetry via an expanding accretion shock wave is ubiquitous in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and high-energy-density plasma physics, the examples ranging from plasma flows in x-ray-generating Z pinches [Maron et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 035001 (2013)] to the experiments in support of the recently suggested concept of impact ignition in ICF [Azechi et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 102, 235002 (2009); Murakami et al., Nucl. Fusion 54, 054007 (2014)]. Some experimental evidence indicates that stagnation via an expanding shock wave is stable, but its stability has never been studied theoretically. We present such analysis for the stagnation that does not involve a rarefaction wave behind the expanding shock front and is described by the classic ideal-gas Noh solution in spherical and cylindrical geometry. In either case, the stagnated flow has been demonstrated to be stable, initial perturbations exhibiting a power-law, oscillatory or monotonic, decay with time for all the eigenmodes. This conclusion has been supported by our simulations done both on a Cartesian grid and on a curvilinear grid in spherical coordinates. Dispersion equation determining the eigenvalues of the problem and explicit formulas for the eigenfunction profiles corresponding to these eigenvalues are presented, making it possible to use the theory for hydrocode verification in two and three dimensions.

  8. Stability of expanded granular sludge bed process for terylene artificial silk printing and dyeing wastewater treatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUAN Bao-hong

    2005-01-01

    Terylene artificial silk printing and dyeing wastewater(TPD wastewater), containing averaged 710 mg/L terephthalic acid(TA) as the main carbon source and the character pollutant, was subjected to expanded granular sludge bed(EGSB) process. The stability of theEGSB process was firstly conducted by laboratory experiment. TA ionization was the predominated factor influencing the acid-base balance of the system. High concentration of TA in wastewater resulted in sufficient buffering capacity to neutralize the volatile fatty acids(VFA)generated from substrate degradation and provided strong base for anaerobic system to resist the pH decrease below 6.5. VFA and UFA caused almost no inhibition on the anaerobic process and biogas production except that pH was below 6.35 and VFA was at its maximum value. Along with the granulating of the activated sludge, the efficiency of organic removal and production rate of biogas increased gradually and became more stable. After start-up, the efficiency of COD removal increased to 57%-64%, pH stabilized in a range of 7.99-8.04, and production rate of biogas was relatively high and stable. Sludge granulating, suitable influent of pH and loading were responsible for the EGSB stability. The variation of VFA concentration only resulted in neglectable rebound of pH, and the inhibition from VFA could be ignored in EGSB. The EGSB reactor was stable for TPD wastewater treatment.

  9. Preparation and characterization of porous carbon from expanded graphite for high energy density supercapacitor in aqueous electrolyte

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barzegar, Farshad; Bello, Abdulhakeem; Momodu, Damilola; Madito, Moshawe Jack; Dangbegnon, Julien; Manyala, Ncholu

    2016-03-01

    In this work, we present the synthesis of low cost carbon nanosheets derived from expanded graphite dispersed in Polyvinylpyrrolidone, subsequently activated in KOH and finally carbonized in Ar/H2 atmosphere. Interconnected sheet-like structure with low concentration of oxygen (9.0 at.%) and a specific surface area of 457 m2 g-1 was obtained. The electrochemical characterization of the carbon material as supercapacitor electrode in a 2-electrode configuration shows high specific capacitance of 337 F g-1 at a current density of 0.5 A g-1 as well as high energy density of 37.9 Wh kg-1 at a power density of 450 W kg-1. This electrical double layer capacitor electrode also exhibits excellent stability after floating test for 120 h in 6 M KOH aqueous electrolyte. These results suggest that this activated expanded graphite (AEG) material has great potential for high performance electrode in energy storage applications.

  10. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure investigation of nitrogen stabilized expanded austenite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oddershede, Jette; Christiansen, Thomas; Ståhl, Kenny;

    2010-01-01

    As-delivered austenitic stainless steel and nitrogen stabilized expanded austenite, both fully nitrided and denitrided (in H2), were investigated with Cr, Fe and Ni extended X-ray absorption fine structure. The data shows pronounced short-range ordering of Cr and N. For the denitrided specimen the...

  11. Stability of a Bubble Expanding and Translating Through an Inviscid Liquid

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Dinesh Khattar; B B Chakraborty

    2002-05-01

    A bubble expands adiabatically and translates in an incompressible and inviscid liquid. We investigate the number of equilibrium points of the bubble and the nature of stability of the bubble at these points. We find that there is only one equilibrium point and the bubble is stable there.

  12. Extended x-ray absorption fine structure investigation of annealed carbon expanded austenite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oddershede, Jette; Christiansen, Thomas L.; Somers, Marcel A. J.;

    2012-01-01

    Carbon expanded austenite synthesized through carburizing of austenitic stainless steel powder at 380°C was annealed at 470°C and investigated with extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) and synchrotron powder diffraction (SPD). SPD showed that the samples consisted of carbon expanded...... austenite and Hägg carbide, Ξ-M5C2. EXAFS showed that the Cr atoms were mainly present in environments similar to the carbides Hägg Ξ-M5C2 and M23C6. The environments of the Fe and Ni atoms were concluded to be largely metallic austenite. Light optical micrograph of stainless steel AISI 316 gas......-carburized in a temperature regime around 470°C. The surface zone is converted into carbon expanded austenite; the high interstitial content of carbon dissolved in the surface results in highly favorable materials properties. In the present article the local atomic environment of (annealed) carbon expanded...

  13. Determination of Concentration Dependent Diffusion Coefficients of Carbon in Expanded Austenite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hummelshøj, Thomas Strabo; Christiansen, Thomas; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2008-01-01

    Abstract. In the present paper various experimental procedures to experimentally determine the concentration dependent diffusion coefficient of carbon in expanded austenite are evaluated. To this end thermogravimetric carburization was simulated for various experimental conditions and the evaluated...

  14. Impacts of Soil Organic Stability on Carbon Storage in Coastal Wetlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, E. K.; Rosenheim, B. E.

    2015-12-01

    Coastal wetlands store vast amounts of organic carbon, globally, and are becoming increasingly vulnerable to the effects of anthropogenic sea level rise. Recently, we used ramped pyrolysis/oxidation decomposition characteristics as proxies for soil organic carbon (SOC) stability to understand the fate of carbon storage in coastal wetlands (fresh, brackish, and salt marshes) comprising the Mississippi River deltaic plain, undergoing rapid rates of local sea level rise. At equivalent soil depths, we observed that fresh marsh SOC was more thermochemically stable than brackish and salt marsh SOC. The differences in stability imply stronger carbon sequestration potential of fresh marsh soil carbon, compared to that of salt and brackish marshes. Here, we expand upon these results of differential organic carbon stability/reactivity and model how projected changes in salinity due to sea-level rise and other environmental changes will impact carbon storage in this region with implications globally.

  15. The Photochemical Stability of Carbonates on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Richard; Zent, Aaron P.; McKay, Christopher P.

    2006-08-01

    Carbonates, predominately MgCO3, have been spectroscopically identified at a level of 2-5% in martian dust. However, in spite of this observation, and a large number of climate studies that suggest 1 to several bars of CO2 should be sequestered in carbonate rocks, no outcropscale exposures of carbonate have been detected anywhere on Mars to date. To address one hypothesis for this long-standing puzzle, the effect of ultraviolet (UV) light on the stability of calcium carbonate in a simulated martian atmosphere was experimentally investigated. Using 13C-labeled calcite, we found no experimental evidence of the UV photodecomposition of calcium carbonate in a simulated martian atmosphere. Extrapolating the lower limit of detection of our experimental system to an upper limit of carbonate decomposition on Mars yields a quantum efficiency of 3.5 × 10-8 molecules/photon over the wavelength interval of 190-390 nm and a maximum UV photodecomposition rate of 1.2 × 10-13 kg m-2 s-1 from a calcite surface. The maximum loss of bulk calcite due to this process would be 2.5 nm year-1 (Mars year). However, calcite is expected to be thermodynamically stable on the surface of Mars, and potential UV photodecomposition reaction mechanisms indicate that, though calcium carbonate may decompose under vacuum, it would be stable in a CO2 atmosphere. Given the expected stability of carbonate on Mars and our inability to detect carbonate decomposition, we conclude that it is unlikely that the apparent absence of extensive carbonate deposits on the martian surface is due to UV photodecomposition in the current environment.

  16. Expanding the coordination chemistry of donor-stabilized group-14 metalenes

    OpenAIRE

    Cabeza de Marco, Javier Ángel; García Álvarez, Pablo; Polo Coca, Diego

    2013-01-01

    The transformation of an amidinate germylene, equipped with just one accessible lone pair of electrons on the Ge atom, into a bidentate 4-electron donor κ(2)Ge,N-ligand, has been achieved for the first time, opening new doors to the non-carbene-like coordination chemistry of heavier carbene analogues. [Available from: http://www.researchgate.net/publication/233537999_Expanding_the_coordination_chemistry_of_donor-stabilized_group-14_metalenes [accessed Jul 13, 2015].

  17. Fabrication of porous carbon composite material from leaves waste as lightweight expanded carbon aggregate (LECA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulhadi, Rosita, N.; Susanto, Nisa', K.; Wiguna, P. A.; Marwoto, P.; Aji, M. P.

    2016-04-01

    Leaves waste has been used as Lightweight Expanded Carbon Aggregates (LECA) because of its high carbon material. LECA can be used as a water storage media. LECA is low in density so thatits massis very light. Due to its use as a water storage medium, it is important to find out the absorption which occurs in LECA.The LECA's absorption and evaporation rate is affected by the pores. The pores serves to increase water storage ability from LECA. LECA with PEG (pore-forming agent) mass percent variation of 5%, 10%, 15%, 20% and 25% is the focus of this study. LECA fabrication was conducted by mixing the carbon resulting from leaves waste pyrolysis and PEG and PVAc. The characterization of LECA was found out by calculating the porosity, the pore size distribution, absorption rate and evaporation rate. The result of the calculation shows that the higher PEG mass percentage, the higher LECA's porosity, the pore size distribution, absorption rate and evaporation rate. However, the porosity, the pore size distributionand absorption rate will be saturated by 25% PEG mass percent addition.

  18. Protein stability at a carbon nanotube interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaitheeswaran, S.; Garcia, A. E.

    2011-03-01

    The interactions of proteins with solid surfaces occur in a variety of situations. Motivated by the many nanoengineering applications of protein-carbon nanotube hybrids, we investigate the conformational transitions of hen egg white lysozyme adsorbed on a carbon nanotube. Using a Cα structure-based model and replica exchange molecular dynamics, we show how the folding/unfolding equilibrium of the adsorbed protein varies with the strength of its coupling to the surface. The stability of the native state depends on the balance between the favorable entropy and unfavorable enthalpy change on adsorption. In the case of a weakly attractive surface when the former dominates, the protein is stabilized. In this regime, the protein can fold and unfold while maintaining the same binding fraction. With increasing surface attraction, the unfavorable enthalpic effect dominates, the native state is destabilized, and the protein has to extensively unbind before changing states from unfolded to folded. At the highest surface coupling, the entropic penalty of folding vanishes, and a folding intermediate is strongly stabilized. In this intermediate state, the α-domain of lysozyme is disrupted, while the β-sheet remains fully structured. We rationalize the relative stability of the two domains on the basis of the residue contact order.

  19. Carbon stabilization mechanisms in Ecuadorian Andosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Boris; Tonneijck, Femke; Nierop, Klaas; Verstraten, Koos

    2010-05-01

    Volcanic ash soils contain very large stocks of soil organic matter (SOM) per unit area. Consequently, they constitute potential sources or sinks of the greenhouse gas CO2. Whether soils become a net carbon source or sink upon climate and/or land-use change depends on the stability of SOM against decomposition, which is influenced by stabilisation mechanisms in the soil. To clarify the role of chemical and physical carbon stabilisation mechanisms in volcanic ash soils, we applied selective extraction techniques, performed X-ray diffraction analyses of the clay fraction and estimated pore size distributions at various depths in the top- and subsoil along an altitudinal transect in the Ecuadorian Andes. The transect encompassed a sequence of paleosols under natural upper montane forest as well as grassland (páramo). From several soils SOM was further characterized at a molecular level using GC/MS analyses of extractable lipids and Pyrolysis-GC/MS analyses of bulk organic matter. Our results show that organic carbon stocks under forest as well as páramo vegetation roughly doubled global averages for volcanic ash soils. The carbon stabilization mechanisms involved are: i) direct stabilization of SOM in organo-metallic (Al-OM) complexes; ii) indirect protection of SOM through low soil pH and toxic levels of Al; and iii) physical protection of SOM due to a very high microporosity. When examining the organic carbon at a molecular level, interestingly we found extensive degradation of lignin while extractable lipids were preferentially preserved, hinting at fungal degradation in the face of inhibited bacterial decomposition. Both vegetation types contributed to soil acidification, thus increasing SOM accumulation and inducing positive feedbacks. Most types of land-use change will result in immediate and substantial carbon loss to the atmosphere. Our results stress the urgent need to protect the Tropical Andes 'hotspot' from destructive land-use change, not only for the

  20. Dynamic Stability Study of Static Gas Bearing for Small Cryogenic Turbo-Expander

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An experimental method is presented to analyze the dynamic stability of the gas bearing for small cryogenic turbo-expanders. The rotation imbalance response and the shape of the rotor orbit were obtained for different speeds up to 110,000 rpm, and the critical speed of the rotor-bearing system was determined by a Bode diagram. An FFT signal analytical method was applied to identify the resonance frequency, and the waterfall plot was presented. During the whole process of speeding up to the designed speed of 110,000 rpm, the rotor-bearing works stably with no whirl instability, which is validated in a waterfall plot. Also, the tested rotor-bearing model was analyzed theoretically. It was proved that the experimental results were highly consistent with those of theoretical calculations. Thus the experimental method proposed here to analyze the dynamic stability of the gas bearing is feasible. (fusion engineering)

  1. Determination of Concentration Dependent Diffusion Coefficients of Carbon in Expanded Austenite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hummelshøj, Thomas Strabo; Christiansen, Thomas; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    Abstract. In the present paper various experimental procedures to experimentally determine the concentration dependent diffusion coefficient of carbon in expanded austenite are evaluated. To this end thermogravimetric carburization was simulated for various experimental conditions and the evaluated...... composition dependent diffusivity of carbon derived from the simulated experiments was compared with the input data. The most promising procedure for an accurate determination is shown to be stepwise gaseous carburizing of thin foils in a gaseous atmosphere; the finer the stepsize, the more accurate the...

  2. Investigations to the suitability of rapidly expanding plasmas for a short wavelength CW carbon laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    About 5 years ago S.W. Bowen and Ch. Park have suggested a continuous wave plasmadynamic laser at wavelengths of 247.9 nm or lower, by expanding a fully ionized carbon, nitrogen or oxygen plasma in a supersonic nozzle. The same authors also conducted some experiments, expanding an argon/or helium/carbon plasma in an arc heater wind-tunnel and claimed to have found considerable small signal gain factors. Thereupon we decided to perform similar experiments with a specially designed apparatus. However, up to now no positive gain could be detected, using the same methods and similar plasma parameters as Bowen and Park. In the following, some theoretical results are presented on the plasma requirements for obtaining population inversions of the 247.9 nm transition in carbon. These requirements are compared to presently achieved plasma conditions. (orig./WL)

  3. Stabilizing Cloud Feedback Dramatically Expands the Habitable Zone of Tidally Locked Planets

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Jun; Abbot, Dorian S

    2013-01-01

    The habitable zone (HZ) is the circumstellar region where a planet can sustain surface liquid water. Searching for terrestrial planets in the HZ of nearby stars is the stated goal of ongoing and planned extrasolar planet surveys. Previous estimates of the inner edge of the HZ were based on one-dimensional radiative-convective models. The most serious limitation of these models is the inability to predict cloud behavior. Here we use global climate models with sophisticated cloud schemes to show that due to a stabilizing cloud feedback, tidally locked planets can be habitable at twice the stellar flux found by previous studies. This dramatically expands the HZ and roughly doubles the frequency of habitable planets orbiting red dwarf stars. At high stellar flux, strong convection produces thick water clouds near the substellar location that greatly increase the planetary albedo and reduce surface temperatures. Higher insolation produces stronger substellar convection and therefore higher albedo, making this phen...

  4. The colloidal stabilization of carbon with carbon: carbon nanobubbles as both dispersant and glue for carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzmicz, Danuta; Prescher, Simon; Polzer, Frank; Soll, Sebastian; Seitz, Christoph; Antonietti, Markus; Yuan, Jiayin

    2014-01-20

    The superior physical properties of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have led to their broad application. Intrinsically, CNTs tend to agglomerate from hydrophobic interactions, which is highly undesirable for solution processing and device fabrication. Commonly, a stabilizer consisting of organic surfactants or polymers is used to disperse CNTs. Recently, we synthesized nitrogen-doped carbon hollow nanospheres (25-90 nm), termed carbon "nanobubbles". They bear superior dispersability in water and distinctive graphitic order. Herein, we describe the nanobubble-assisted dispersion of CNTs in aqueous solution upon sonication. This process relies on the π-π interaction between the two aromatic carbon nanostructures, which can process their carbon mixture in water into conductive filter membranes, ink, and discs. This stabilization can be extended to other aromatic carbons. In addition, the π-π interaction may create a new type of carbon p-n junction that can be used to improve charge separation. PMID:24311464

  5. Effect of an Internal Heat Exchanger on Performance of the Transcritical Carbon Dioxide Refrigeration Cycle with an Expander

    OpenAIRE

    Zhenying Zhang; Lili Tian; Yanhua Chen; Lirui Tong

    2014-01-01

    The effect of the internal heat exchanger (IHE) on the performance of the transcritical carbon dioxide refrigeration cycle with an expander is analyzed theoretically on the basis of the first and second laws of thermodynamics. The possible parameters affecting system efficiency such as heat rejection pressure, gas cooler outlet temperature, evaporating temperature, expander isentropic efficiency and IHE effectiveness are investigated. It is found that the IHE addition in the carbon dioxide re...

  6. Selective stabilization of aliphatic organic carbon by iron oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhikari, Dinesh; Yang, Yu

    2015-06-01

    Stabilization of organic matter in soil is important for natural ecosystem to sequestrate carbon and mitigate greenhouse gas emission. It is largely unknown what factors govern the preservation of organic carbon in soil, casting shadow on predicting the response of soil to climate change. Iron oxide was suggested as an important mineral preserving soil organic carbon. However, ferric minerals are subject to reduction, potentially releasing iron and decreasing the stability of iron-bound organic carbon. Information about the stability of iron-bound organic carbon in the redox reaction is limited. Herein, we investigated the sorptive interactions of organic matter with hematite and reductive release of hematite-bound organic matter. Impacts of organic matter composition and conformation on its sorption by hematite and release during the reduction reaction were analyzed. We found that hematite-bound aliphatic carbon was more resistant to reduction release, although hematite preferred to sorb more aromatic carbon. Resistance to reductive release represents a new mechanism that aliphatic soil organic matter was stabilized by association with iron oxide. Selective stabilization of aliphatic over aromatic carbon can greatly contribute to the widely observed accumulation of aliphatic carbon in soil, which cannot be explained by sorptive interactions between minerals and organic matter.

  7. Plasma species dynamics in a laser produced carbon plasma expanding in low pressure neutral gas background

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, H. M.; Guzmán, F.; Favre, M.; Bhuyan, H.; Chuaqui, H.; Wyndham, E.

    2012-06-01

    We present time and space resolved spectroscopic observations of a laser produced carbon plasma, in an argon background. An Nd:YAG laser pulse, 370 mJ, 3.5 ns, at 1.06 μm, with a fluence of 6.8 J/cm2, is used to produce a plasma from a solid graphite target, at a base pressure of 0.5 mTorr, and with 80 mTorr Argon background. The spectral emission in the visible is recorded with 15 ns time resolution. 20 ns time resolution plasma imagining, filtered at characteristic carbon species emission wavelengths, is used to study the dynamics of the expanding plasma. Two different fronts with ionic or molecular compositions are seen to detach from de laser target plasma.

  8. Nanocasting Process to Pore-Expanded Ordered Mesoporous Carbons with 2D Hexagonal Mesostructure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chongwen Jiang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Pore-expanded ordered mesoporous carbons with 2D hexagonal mesostructure were synthesized by a simple nanocasting process. We adopted sucrose as carbon precursors, mesoporous silica materials SBA-15 as the hard templates, and hexane as micelle swelling agents. The pore size distribution of OMCs was narrow and centered at 5.4 nm, which is larger than the upper limit of pore diameters typically reported for CMK-3. The BET surface area and mesopore volume of PE-CMK-3 can reach to 1213.47 m2/g and 1.56 cm3/g, respectively, indicating that choosing large pore size materials as template is good for preparation of high performance of OMCs.

  9. Synthesis and CO2 adsorption study of modified MOF-5 with multi-wall carbon nanotubes and expandable graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MOF-5 was synthesized by solvothermal method and its reactivation under anhydrous conditions. This research is conducted to investigate the effect of MOF-5 and MOF-5 modified with multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and expandable graphite (EG) on the performance of CO2 adsorption. The synthesized MOFs were characterized using Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) for surface morphology, Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) for thermal stability, X-ray diffraction (XRD) for crystals plane, Brunauer-Emmet-Teller (BET) for surface area and CO2 adsorption. The result had showed that the modified MOF-5 enhanced the CO2 adsorption compared to the pure MOF-5. The increment in the CO2 uptake capacities of MOF materials was attributed to the decrease in the pore size and enhancement of micropore volume of MOF-5 by multi-walled carbon nanotube and EG incorporation. The BET surface area of the synthesized MOF-5@MWCNTs is more than MOF-5. The CO2 sorption capacities of MOF-5 and MOF-5@MWCNTs were observed to increase from 0.00008 to 0.00048 mol g-1 at 298 K and 1 bar. The modified MOF-5@MWCNTs resulted in the highest CO2 adsorption followed by the modified MOF-5@ EG and lastly, MOF-5

  10. Effect of an Internal Heat Exchanger on Performance of the Transcritical Carbon Dioxide Refrigeration Cycle with an Expander

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenying Zhang

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The effect of the internal heat exchanger (IHE on the performance of the transcritical carbon dioxide refrigeration cycle with an expander is analyzed theoretically on the basis of the first and second laws of thermodynamics. The possible parameters affecting system efficiency such as heat rejection pressure, gas cooler outlet temperature, evaporating temperature, expander isentropic efficiency and IHE effectiveness are investigated. It is found that the IHE addition in the carbon dioxide refrigeration cycle with an expander increases the specific cooling capacity and compression work, and decreases the optimum heat rejection pressure and the expander output power. An IHE addition does not always improve the system performance in the refrigeration cycle with an expander. The throttle valve cycle with IHE provides a 5.6% to 17% increase in maximum COP compared to that of the basic cycle. For the ideal expander cycle with IHE, the maximum COP is approximately 12.3% to 16.1% lower than the maximum COP of the cycle without IHE. Whether the energy efficiency of the cycle by IHE can be improved depends on the isentropic efficiency level of the expander. The use of IHE is only applicable in the cases of lower expander isentropic efficiencies or higher gas cooler exit temperatures for the refrigeration cycle with an expander from the view of energy efficiency.

  11. Structure Stability of Ⅰ-Type Carbon Nanotube Junctions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    夏丹; 袁喆; 李家明

    2002-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes with junctions may play an important role in future ‘nanoelectronics' and future ‘nano devices'.In particular, junctions constructed with metal and semiconducting nanotubes have potential applications. Basedon the orthogonal tight-binding molecular dynamics method, we present our study of the structure stability ofI-type carbon nanotube junctions.

  12. Stimuli-responsive transformation in carbon nanotube/expanding microsphere–polymer composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Our work introduces a class of stimuli-responsive expanding polymer composites with the ability to unidirectionally transform their physical dimensions, elastic modulus, density, and electrical resistance. Carbon nanotubes and core–shell acrylic microspheres were dispersed in polydimethylsiloxane, resulting in composites that exhibit a binary set of material properties. Upon thermal or infrared stimuli, the liquid cores encapsulated within the microspheres vaporize, expanding the surrounding shells and stretching the matrix. The microsphere expansion results in visible dimensional changes, regions of reduced polymeric chain mobility, nanotube tensioning, and overall elastic to plastic-like transformation of the composite. Here, we show composite transformations including macroscopic volume expansion (>500%), density reduction (>80%), and elastic modulus increase (>675%). Additionally, conductive nanotubes allow for remote expansion monitoring and exhibit distinct loading-dependent electrical responses. With the ability to pattern regions of tailorable expansion, strength, and electrical resistance into a single polymer skin, these composites present opportunities as structural and electrical building blocks in smart systems. (paper)

  13. Enhanced Mechanical Stability of Gold Nanotips through Carbon Nanocone Encapsulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cano-Marquez, Abraham G.; Schmidt, Wesller G.; Ribeiro-Soares, Jenaina; Gustavo Cançado, Luiz; Rodrigues, Wagner N.; Santos, Adelina P.; Furtado, Clascidia A.; Autreto, Pedro A. S.; Paupitz, Ricardo; Galvão, Douglas S.; Jorio, Ado

    2015-06-01

    Gold is a noble metal that, in comparison with silver and copper, has the advantage of corrosion resistance. Despite its high conductivity, chemical stability and biocompatibility, gold exhibits high plasticity, which limits its applications in some nanodevices. Here, we report an experimental and theoretical study on how to attain enhanced mechanical stability of gold nanotips. The gold tips were fabricated by chemical etching and further encapsulated with carbon nanocones via nanomanipulation. Atomic force microscopy experiments were carried out to test their mechanical stability. Molecular dynamics simulations show that the encapsulated nanocone changes the strain release mechanisms at the nanoscale by blocking gold atomic sliding, redistributing the strain along the whole nanostructure. The carbon nanocones are conducting and can induce magnetism, thus opening new avenues on the exploitation of transport, mechanical and magnetic properties of gold covered by sp2 carbon at the nanoscale.

  14. Inhibition of surface bound carbonate stabilization of tetragonal zirconia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mette Skovgaard; Almdal, Kristoffer; Lelieveld, A. van

    2011-01-01

    Water is known to initiate a tetragonal to monoclinic phase transformation in zirconia particles. Carbonates on the zirconia surface react with water molecules and hence reduce the transformation rate. This study investigates the possibility of inhibition of the reaction between surface carbonates...... and water in order to increase the transformation rate in the zirconia crystals. It was found possible to limit the reaction by reacting the surface carbonates with alcohols, a thiol and a primary amide prior to reaction with water. It was also concluded that di- and trialcohols are able to stabilize...

  15. Stabilization of ultrafine metal nanocatalysts on thin carbon sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaofang; Cui, Xinrui; Liu, Yiding; Yin, Yadong

    2015-10-01

    A novel strategy was proposed to anchor ultrafine metal nanoparticles (NPs) on thin carbon sheets for highly stable and efficient heterogeneous catalysts. In this facile approach, a dense monolayer of ultrafine AuNPs was sandwiched between a silica core and a resin shell, followed by carbonization of the shell at a high temperature and then selective removal of the silica core. The shrinkage of the shells during carbonization facilitates partial embedment of the AuNPs on the carbon shell surface and provides superior stability against particle sintering during high temperature/mechanical post-treatments and catalytic reactions. It was also found that diffusion of reactants to the surface of AuNPs could be maximized by reducing the thickness of the hollow shells or simply by cracking the shells into thin carbon sheets, both significantly benefiting the catalytic efficiency. The advantages of this ultra-stable architecture together with the densely dispersed catalytic sites were demonstrated by their high stability and superior catalytic activity in reducing hydrophilic 4-nitrophenol and hydrophobic nitrobenzene.A novel strategy was proposed to anchor ultrafine metal nanoparticles (NPs) on thin carbon sheets for highly stable and efficient heterogeneous catalysts. In this facile approach, a dense monolayer of ultrafine AuNPs was sandwiched between a silica core and a resin shell, followed by carbonization of the shell at a high temperature and then selective removal of the silica core. The shrinkage of the shells during carbonization facilitates partial embedment of the AuNPs on the carbon shell surface and provides superior stability against particle sintering during high temperature/mechanical post-treatments and catalytic reactions. It was also found that diffusion of reactants to the surface of AuNPs could be maximized by reducing the thickness of the hollow shells or simply by cracking the shells into thin carbon sheets, both significantly benefiting the

  16. Remarkable crystallization morphologies of poly(4-vinylpyridine on single-walled carbon nanotubes in CO2-expanded liquids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. N. Wei

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Poly(4-vinylpyridine (P4VP is a widely studied polymer for applications in catalysis, humidity sensitive and antimicrobial materials due to its pyridine group exhibiting coordinative reactivity with transition metals. In this work, the non-covalent functionalization of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs with P4VP in CO2-expanded liquids (CXLs is reported. It is found that P4VP stabilized SWCNTs show good dispersion in both organic solvent and aqueous solution (pH = 2. The ability to manipulate the dispersion state of CNTs in water with P4VP will likely benefit many biological applications, such as drug delivery and optical sensors. Furthermore, the structure and morphology of P4VP/SWCNTs composite are examined, with the focus on molecular weight of P4VP (MW-P4VP, the pressure of CXLs and the concentration of P4VP. It is amazing that the P4VP15470 wrapping patterns undergo a notable morphological evolution from dotlike crystals to bottle brush-like, then to compact kebab-like, and then to widely-spaced dotted kebab patterns by facile pressure tuning in the higher polymer concentration series. In other words, the CXLs method enables superior control of the P4VP crystallization patterns on SWCNTs. Meanwhile, the CXL-assisted P4VP crystal growth mechanism on SWCNT is investigated, and the dominating growth mechanism is attributed to ‘size dependent soft epitaxy’ in P4VP15470/SWCNTs composites. We believe these studies would r

  17. EXPANDED IRON UTA SPECTRA-PROBING THE THERMAL STABILITY LIMITS IN AGN CLOUDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferland, G. J.; Lykins, M. L. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40506 (United States); Kisielius, R.; Jonauskas, V. [Institute of Theoretical Physics and Astronomy, Vilnius University, A. Gostauto 12, LT-01108 (Lithuania); Keenan, F. P. [Astrophysics Research Centre, School of Mathematics and Physics, Queen' s University Belfast, Belfast BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); Van Hoof, P. A. M. [Royal Observatory of Belgium, Ringlaan 3, B-1180 Brussel (Belgium); Porter, R. L. [Department of Physics, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602 (United States); Williams, R. J. R., E-mail: gary@pa.uky.edu [AWE plc, Aldermaston, Reading RG7 4PR (United Kingdom)

    2013-04-20

    The Fe unresolved transition arrays (UTAs) produce prominent features in the {approx}15-17 A wavelength range in the spectra of active galactic nuclei (AGNs). Here, we present new calculations of the energies and oscillator strengths of inner-shell lines from Fe XIV, Fe XV, and Fe XVI. These are crucial ions since they are dominant at inflection points in the gas thermal stability curve, and UTA excitation followed by autoionization is an important ionization mechanism for these species. We incorporate these, and data reported in previous papers, into the plasma simulation code Cloudy. This updated physics is subsequently employed to reconsider the thermally stable phases in absorbing media in AGNs. We show how the absorption profile of the Fe XIV UTA depends on density, due to the changing populations of levels within the ground configuration.

  18. Evaluating Stability of Aqueous Multiwalled Carbon Nanotube Nanofluids by Using Different Stabilizers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tun-Ping Teng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The 0.5 wt.% multiwalled carbon nanotubes/water nanofluids (MWNFs were produced by using a two-step synthetic method with different types and concentrations of stabilizers. The static position method, centrifugal sedimentation method, zeta potential measurements, and rheological experiments were used to assess the stability of the MWNFs and to determine the optimal type and fixed MWCNTs-stabilizer concentration of stabilizer. Finally, MWNFs with different concentrations of MWCNTs were produced using the optimal type and fixed concentration ratio of stabilizer, and their stability, thermal conductivity, and pH were measured to assess the feasibility of using them in heat transfer applications. MWNFs containing SDS and SDBS with MWCNTs-stabilizer concentration ratio were 5 : 2 and 5 : 4, respectively, showed excellent stability when they were evaluated by static position, centrifugal sedimentation, zeta potential, and rheological experiments at the same time. The thermal conductivity of the MWNFs indicated that the most suitable dispersing MWNF contained SDBS. MWNFs with MWCNTs concentrations of 0.25, 0.5, and 1.0 wt.% were fabricated using an aqueous SDBS solution. In addition, the thermal conductivity of the MWNFs was found to have increased, and the thermal conductivity values were greater than that of water at 25°C by 3.20%, 8.46%, and 12.49%.

  19. Development of expanded graphite filled natural rubber vulcanizates in presence and absence of carbon black: Mechanical, thermal and morphological properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Fabricate natural rubber based nanocomposites containing expanded graphite (EG). ► Study the effect of EG and modified EG on the properties of natural rubber. ► Comparison of the results of EG/MEG filled and (EG/CB)/(MEG/CB) filled NR vulcanizates. ► EG can reduce the dose of CB in tire application. ► MEG loaded NR vulcanizates in presence and absence of CB show superior properties. -- Abstract: As nanosized expanded graphite (EG) reveals a similar layered structure like organoclay and also it has a high expansion ratio so rubber chains can easily be intercalated into the gallery space. To improve the dispersion of EG in the rubber matrices, primarily the surface modification of the expanded graphite have been done and then the modified expanded graphite (MEG)/polar compatibilizer [epoxidized natural rubber (ENR)] master batch have been prepared by solution mixing method in the laboratory. After that the MEG/ENR master batch have been mixed with bulk natural rubber (NR) in presence and absence of carbon black (CB) in a laboratory scale open two roll mixing mill. Wide angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD) and high resolution transmission electron microscopic (HR-TEM) analysis of the nanocomposites revealed that MEG was intercalated and as well as delaminated in the NR matrix. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) images of the nanocomposites showed very rough surface than the pure NR matrix. In presence of expanded graphite the crack paths are channelized and coincide in one point suggesting the effect of plate like expanded graphite to acts as a barrier. We have got improved mechanical, thermal and dynamic mechanical properties for the MEG and MEG/CB loaded NR compounds compared to EG and EG/CB loaded NR compounds.

  20. Flexible all-carbon photovoltaics with improved thermal stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The structurally robust nature of nanocarbon allotropes, e.g., semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and C60s, makes them tantalizing candidates for thermally stable and mechanically flexible photovoltaic applications. However, C60s rapidly dissociate away from the basal of SWCNTs under thermal stimuli as a result of weak intermolecular forces that “lock up” the binary assemblies. Here, we explore use of graphene nanoribbons (GNRs) as geometrically tailored protecting layers to suppress the unwanted dissociation of C60s. The underlying mechanisms are explained using a combination of molecular dynamics simulations and transition state theory, revealing the temperature dependent disassociation of C60s from the SWCNT basal plane. Our strategy provides fundamental guidelines for integrating all-carbon based nano-p/n junctions with optimized structural and thermal stability. External quantum efficiency and output current–voltage characteristics are used to experimentally quantify the effectiveness of GNR membranes under high temperature annealing. Further, the resulting C60:SWCNT:GNR ternary composites display excellent mechanical stability, even after iterative bending tests. - Graphical abstract: The incorporation of solvent resistant, mechanically flexible and electrically addressable 2-D soft graphene nanoribbons facilitates the assembly of photoconductive carbon nano-p/n junctions for thermally stable and flexible photovoltaic cells.

  1. Flexible all-carbon photovoltaics with improved thermal stability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Chun; Ishihara, Hidetaka; Sodhi, Jaskiranjeet; Chen, Yen-Chang; Siordia, Andrew; Martini, Ashlie; Tung, Vincent C., E-mail: ctung@ucmerced.edu

    2015-04-15

    The structurally robust nature of nanocarbon allotropes, e.g., semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and C{sub 60}s, makes them tantalizing candidates for thermally stable and mechanically flexible photovoltaic applications. However, C{sub 60}s rapidly dissociate away from the basal of SWCNTs under thermal stimuli as a result of weak intermolecular forces that “lock up” the binary assemblies. Here, we explore use of graphene nanoribbons (GNRs) as geometrically tailored protecting layers to suppress the unwanted dissociation of C{sub 60}s. The underlying mechanisms are explained using a combination of molecular dynamics simulations and transition state theory, revealing the temperature dependent disassociation of C{sub 60}s from the SWCNT basal plane. Our strategy provides fundamental guidelines for integrating all-carbon based nano-p/n junctions with optimized structural and thermal stability. External quantum efficiency and output current–voltage characteristics are used to experimentally quantify the effectiveness of GNR membranes under high temperature annealing. Further, the resulting C{sub 60}:SWCNT:GNR ternary composites display excellent mechanical stability, even after iterative bending tests. - Graphical abstract: The incorporation of solvent resistant, mechanically flexible and electrically addressable 2-D soft graphene nanoribbons facilitates the assembly of photoconductive carbon nano-p/n junctions for thermally stable and flexible photovoltaic cells.

  2. Removal of dispersant-stabilized carbon nanotubes by regular coagulants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ni; Liu, Changli; Zhang, Jing; Lin, Daohui

    2012-01-01

    Coagulation followed by sedimentation, as a conventional technique in the water treatment plant, can be the first line of defense against exposures of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) to aquatic organisms and human beings, which has been rarely documented. This study investigated the removal of dispersant-stabilized CNT suspensions by poly aluminum chloride (PACl) and KAl(SO4)2 x 12H2O (alum), with a focus on the effects of dispersant type, coagulant type and dosage. PACl performed better than alum in the removal of tannic acid-, humic acid-, and sodium dodecyl benzenesulfonate-stabilized CNTs, but worse for polyethylene glycol octylphenyl ether (TX100)-stabilized CNTs. Neither coagulant could effectively precipitate cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide-stabilized CNTs. The removal by PACl first increased up to a plateau and then decreased with the continued increase of coagulant dosage. However, the removal rates leveled off but did not decrease after achieving their highest level with the continued addition of alum. The coagulation and flocculation of the CNT suspensions by PACl could be regulated mainly by the mechanism of adsorption charge neutralization, whereas the coagulation by alum mainly involved electrical double-layer compression. PMID:23513676

  3. Removal of dispersant-stabilized carbon nanotubes by regular coagulants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ni Liu; Changli Liu; Jing Zhang; Daohui Lin

    2012-01-01

    Coagulation followed by sedimentation,as a conventional technique in the water treatment plant,can be the first line of defense against exposures of carbon nanotubes(CNTs)to aquatic organisms and human beings,which has been rarely documented.This study investigated the removal of dispersant-stabilized CNT suspensions by poly aluminum chloride(PAC1)and KAI(SO4)2·12H2O (alum),with a focus on the effects of dispersant type,coagulant type and dosage.PAC1 performed better than alum in the removal of tannic acid-,humic acid-,and sodium dodecyl benzenesulfonate-stabilized CNTs,but worse for polyethylene glycol octylphenyl ether(TX100)-stabilized CNTs.Neither coagulant could effectively precipitate cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide-stabilized CNTs.The removal by PAC1 first increased up to a plateau and then decreased with the continued increase of coagulant dosage.However,the removal rates leveled off but did not decrease after achieving their highest level with the continued addition of alum.The coagulation and flocculation of the CNT suspensions by PAC1 could be regulated mainly by the mechanism of adsorption charge neutralization,whereas the coagulation by alum mainly involved electrical double-layer compression.

  4. Strings of polymer microspheres stabilized by oxidized carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Guannan; Zheng, Zheng; Wang, Haitao; Du, Qiangguo; Zhang, Hongdong

    2014-07-15

    Oxidized carbon nanotubes (CNTOs) with hydrophilic oxygen-containing functional groups and hydrophobic conjugated structure are prepared by the oxidation of carbon nanotubes (CNTs). After the polymerization of styrene with CNTOs dispersed in aqueous phase, polystyrene (PS) microspheres with string-like structure are obtained. Thermogravimetic analysis (TGA), differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) and Raman results indicate the strong interaction between the separated PS chains from the oil phase and CNTOs during the initial stage of the polymerization. These adsorbed PS chains on the surface of CNTOs are quickly swollen by the monomer and they grow in size during the further polymerization. The pH value and the ion strength of aqueous phase obviously affect the stability of PS microspheres. The particle size of microspheres is also determined by the pH. We demonstrate that the one-dimensional structure of CNTOs is responsible for the formation of polymer microspheres with special architecture. PMID:24863776

  5. Carbon stabilization mechanisms in soils in the Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Boris; Cammeraat, Erik

    2015-04-01

    The volcanic ash soils of the Andes contain very large stocks of soil organic matter (SOM) per unit area. Consequently, they constitute significant potential sources or sinks of the greenhouse gas CO2. Climate and/or land use change potentially have a strong effect on these large SOM stocks. To clarify the role of chemical and physical stabilisation mechanisms in volcanic ash soils in the montane tropics, we investigated carbon stocks and stabilization mechanisms in the top- and subsoil along an altitudinal transect in the Ecuadorian Andes. The transect encompassed a sequence of paleosols under forest and grassland (páramo), including a site where vegetation cover changed in the last century. We applied selective extraction techniques, performed X-ray diffraction analyses of the clay fraction and estimated pore size distributions at various depths in the top- and subsoil along the transect. In addition, from several soils the molecular composition of SOM was further characterized with depth in the current soil as well as the entire first and the top of the second paleosol using GC/MS analyses of extractable lipids and Pyrolysis-GC/MS analyses of bulk organic matter. Our results show that organic carbon stocks in the mineral soil under forest a páramo vegetation were roughly twice as large as global averages for volcanic ash soils, regardless of whether the first 30cm, 100cm or 200cm were considered. We found the carbon stabilization mechanisms involved to be: i) direct stabilization of SOM in organo-metallic (Al-OM) complexes; ii) indirect protection of SOM through low soil pH and toxic levels of Al; and iii) physical protection of SOM due to a very high microporosity of the soil (Tonneijck et al., 2010; Jansen et al. 2011). When examining the organic carbon at a molecular level, interestingly we found extensive degradation of lignin in the topsoil while extractable lipids were preferentially preserved in the subsoil (Nierop and Jansen, 2009). Both vegetation

  6. Climate-carbon cycle feedbacks under stabilization: uncertainty and observational constraints

    OpenAIRE

    Jones, Chris D.; Cox, Peter M.; Huntingford, Chris

    2011-01-01

    Avoiding ‘dangerous climate change’ by stabilization of atmospheric CO2 concentrations at a desired level requires reducing the rate of anthropogenic carbon emissions so that they are balanced by uptake of carbon by the natural terrestrial and oceanic carbon cycles. Previous calculations of profiles of emissions which lead to stabilized CO2 levels have assumed no impact of climate change on this natural carbon uptake. However, future climate change effects on the land carbon cycle are predict...

  7. Stabilization of carbon in composts and biochars in relation to carbon sequestration and soil fertility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There have been increasing interests in the conversion of organic residues into biochars in order to reduce the rate of decomposition, thereby enhancing carbon (C) sequestration in soils. However energy is required to initiate the pyrolysis process during biochar production which can also lead to the release of greenhouse gasses. Alternative methods can be used to stabilize C in composts and other organic residues without impacting their quality. The objectives of this study include: (i) to compare the rate of decomposition among various organic amendments and (ii) to examine the effect of clay materials on the stabilization of C in organic amendments. The decomposition of a number of organic amendments (composts and biochars) was examined by monitoring the release of carbon-dioxide using respiration experiments. The results indicated that the rate of decomposition as measured by half life (t1/2) varied between the organic amendments and was higher in sandy soil than in clay soil. The half life value ranged from 139 days in the sandy soil and 187 days in the clay soil for poultry manure compost to 9989 days for green waste biochar. Addition of clay materials to compost decreased the rate of decomposition, thereby increasing the stabilization of C. The half life value for poultry manure compost increased from 139 days to 620, 806 and 474 days with the addition of goethite, gibbsite and allophane, respectively. The increase in the stabilization of C with the addition of clay materials may be attributed to the immobilization of C, thereby preventing it from microbial decomposition. Stabilization of C in compost using clay materials did not impact negatively the value of composts in improving soil quality as measured by potentially mineralizable nitrogen and microbial biomass carbon in soil. - Graphical abstract: Stabilization of compost using clay materials (e.g. allophane) enhances carbon sequestration in soils. Highlights: ► Comparison of decomposition rate

  8. Wellbore stability analysis in carbonate reservoir considering anisotropic behaviour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, José; Guevara, Nestor; Coelho, Lucia; Baud, Patrick

    2010-05-01

    Carbonate reservoirs represent a major part of the world oil and gas reserves. In particular, recent discoveries in the pre-salt offshore Brazil place big challenges to exploration and production under high temperatures and pressures (HTHP). During production, the extraction of hydrocarbons reduces pore pressure and thus causes an increase in the effective stress and mechanical compaction in the reservoir. The compactive deformation and failure may be spatially extensive or localized to the vicinity of the wellbore, but in either case the consequences can be economically severe involving surface subsidence, well failure and various production problems. The analysis of wellbore stability and more generally of deformation and failure in carbonate environments hinges upon a relevant constitutive modeling of carbonate rocks over a wide range of porosities, in particular, observed microstructure of samples suggests anisotropic behaviour. In this study, we performed a wellbore stability analysis for a lateral wellbore junction in three dimensions. The complex geometry for the wellbore junction was modeled with tetrahedral finite elements considering a rate independent elastic-plastic isotropic material that presented linear behavior during elastic strain and associated flow rule. A finite element model simulating drilling and production phases were done for field conditions from a deep water reservoir in Campos basin, offshore Brazil. In this context, several scenarios were studied considering true 3D orientation for both in situ stresses and geometry of the wellbore junction itself. We discussed the impact of constitutive modeling, considering anisotropic ductile damage and pressure sensitiveness on the wellbore stability. Parameter values for the analysis were based based on experimental data on two micritic porous carbonates. Series of conventional triaxial experiments were performed at room temperature in dry and wet conditions on samples of Comiso and Tavel

  9. Forestry and the carbon market response to stabilize climate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper investigates the potential contribution of forestry management in meeting a CO2 stabilization policy of 550 ppmv by 2100. In order to assess the optimal response of the carbon market to forest sequestration, we couple two global models. An energy-economy-climate model for the study of climate policies is linked with a detailed forestry model through an iterative procedure to provide the optimal abatement strategy. Results show that forestry is a determinant abatement option and could lead to significantly lower policy costs if included. Linking forestry management to the carbon market has the potential to alleviate the policy burden of 50 ppmv or equivalently of 1/4 deg. C, and to significantly decrease the price of carbon. Biological sequestration will mostly come from avoided deforestation in tropical-forest-rich countries. The inclusion of this mitigation option is demonstrated to crowd out some of the traditional abatement in the energy sector and to lessen induced technological change in clean technologies

  10. Synthesis and CO{sub 2} adsorption study of modified MOF-5 with multi-wall carbon nanotubes and expandable graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ullah, Sami, E-mail: samichemist1@gmail.com, E-mail: azmibustam@petronas.com.my, E-mail: azmish@petronas.com.my, E-mail: lkhlfh@gmail.com, E-mail: hmurshid@gmail.com, E-mail: nadiariazz@gmail.com; Bustam, M. A., E-mail: samichemist1@gmail.com, E-mail: azmibustam@petronas.com.my, E-mail: azmish@petronas.com.my, E-mail: lkhlfh@gmail.com, E-mail: hmurshid@gmail.com, E-mail: nadiariazz@gmail.com; Shariff, A. M., E-mail: samichemist1@gmail.com, E-mail: azmibustam@petronas.com.my, E-mail: azmish@petronas.com.my, E-mail: lkhlfh@gmail.com, E-mail: hmurshid@gmail.com, E-mail: nadiariazz@gmail.com; Elkhalifah, Ali E. I., E-mail: samichemist1@gmail.com, E-mail: azmibustam@petronas.com.my, E-mail: azmish@petronas.com.my, E-mail: lkhlfh@gmail.com, E-mail: hmurshid@gmail.com, E-mail: nadiariazz@gmail.com; Murshid, G., E-mail: samichemist1@gmail.com, E-mail: azmibustam@petronas.com.my, E-mail: azmish@petronas.com.my, E-mail: lkhlfh@gmail.com, E-mail: hmurshid@gmail.com, E-mail: nadiariazz@gmail.com; Riaz, Nadia, E-mail: samichemist1@gmail.com, E-mail: azmibustam@petronas.com.my, E-mail: azmish@petronas.com.my, E-mail: lkhlfh@gmail.com, E-mail: hmurshid@gmail.com, E-mail: nadiariazz@gmail.com [Research Center for Carbon Dioxide Capture, Dept. of Chemical Engineering, Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, Bandar Sri Iskandar, Tronoh 31750 Perak (Malaysia)

    2014-10-24

    MOF-5 was synthesized by solvothermal method and its reactivation under anhydrous conditions. This research is conducted to investigate the effect of MOF-5 and MOF-5 modified with multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and expandable graphite (EG) on the performance of CO{sub 2} adsorption. The synthesized MOFs were characterized using Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) for surface morphology, Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) for thermal stability, X-ray diffraction (XRD) for crystals plane, Brunauer-Emmet-Teller (BET) for surface area and CO{sub 2} adsorption. The result had showed that the modified MOF-5 enhanced the CO{sub 2} adsorption compared to the pure MOF-5. The increment in the CO{sub 2} uptake capacities of MOF materials was attributed to the decrease in the pore size and enhancement of micropore volume of MOF-5 by multi-walled carbon nanotube and EG incorporation. The BET surface area of the synthesized MOF-5@MWCNTs is more than MOF-5. The CO{sub 2} sorption capacities of MOF-5 and MOF-5@MWCNTs were observed to increase from 0.00008 to 0.00048 mol g-1 at 298 K and 1 bar. The modified MOF-5@MWCNTs resulted in the highest CO{sub 2} adsorption followed by the modified MOF-5@ EG and lastly, MOF-5.

  11. Lignin-based carbon fibers: Carbon nanotube decoration and superior thermal stability

    KAUST Repository

    Xu, Xuezhu

    2014-08-23

    Lignin-based carbon fibers (CFs) decorated with carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were synthesized and their structure, thermal stability and wettability were systematically studied. The carbon fiber precursors were produced by electrospinning lignin/polyacrylonitrile solutions. CFs were obtained by pyrolyzing the precursors and CNTs were subsequently grown on the CFs to eventually achieve a CF–CNT hybrid structure. The processes of pyrolysis and CNT growth were conducted in a tube furnace using different conditions and the properties of the resultant products were studied and compared. The CF–CNT hybrid structure produced at 850 °C using a palladium catalyst showed the highest thermal stability, i.e., 98.3% residual weight at 950 °C. A mechanism for such superior thermal stability was postulated based on the results from X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, scanning and transmission electron microscopy, and electron energy loss spectroscopy analyses. The dense CNT decoration was found to increase the hydrophobicity of the CFs.

  12. Carbon nanotubes for stabilization of nanostructured lipid particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaunt, Nicholas P.; Patil-Sen, Yogita; Baker, Matthew J.; Kulkarni, Chandrashekhar V.

    2014-12-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are increasingly studied for innovative biotechnological applications particularly where they are combined with essential biological materials like lipids. Lipids have been used earlier for enhancing the dispersibility of CNTs in aqueous solutions. Here we report a novel application of CNTs for stabilization of internally self-assembled nanostructured lipid particles of 2-5 μm size. Single-walled (pristine) as well as -OH and -COOH functionalized multi-walled CNTs were employed to produce nanostructured emulsions which stayed stable for months and could be re-dispersed after complete dehydration. Concentrations of CNTs employed for stabilization were very low; moreover CNTs were well-decorated with lipid molecules. These features contribute towards reducing their toxicity and improving biocompatibility for biomedical and pharmaceutical applications. Our approach paves the way for future development of combination therapies employing both CNTs and nanostructured lipid self-assembly together as carriers of different drugs.Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are increasingly studied for innovative biotechnological applications particularly where they are combined with essential biological materials like lipids. Lipids have been used earlier for enhancing the dispersibility of CNTs in aqueous solutions. Here we report a novel application of CNTs for stabilization of internally self-assembled nanostructured lipid particles of 2-5 μm size. Single-walled (pristine) as well as -OH and -COOH functionalized multi-walled CNTs were employed to produce nanostructured emulsions which stayed stable for months and could be re-dispersed after complete dehydration. Concentrations of CNTs employed for stabilization were very low; moreover CNTs were well-decorated with lipid molecules. These features contribute towards reducing their toxicity and improving biocompatibility for biomedical and pharmaceutical applications. Our approach paves the way for future development

  13. Thermal stability of carbon nanotubes probed by anchored tungsten nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xianlong Wei, Ming-Sheng Wang, Yoshio Bando and Dmitri Golberg

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The thermal stability of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (CNTs was studied in high vacuum using tungsten nanoparticles as miniaturized thermal probes. The particles were placed on CNTs inside a high-resolution transmission electron microscope equipped with a scanning tunneling microscope unit. The setup allowed manipulating individual nanoparticles and heating individual CNTs by applying current to them. CNTs were found to withstand high temperatures, up to the melting point of 60-nm-diameter W particles (~3400 K. The dynamics of W particles on a hot CNT, including particle crystallization, quasimelting, melting, sublimation and intradiffusion, were observed in real time and recorded as a video. Graphite layers reel off CNTs when melted or premelted W particles revolve along the tube axis.

  14. Harvesting Carbon from Eastern US Forests: Opportunities and Impacts of an Expanding Bioenergy Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah C. Davis

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Eastern forests of the US are valued both as a carbon sink and a wood resource. The amount of biomass that can be harvested sustainably from this biome for bioenergy without compromising the carbon sink is uncertain. Using past literature and previously validated models, we assessed four scenarios of biomass harvest in the eastern US: partial harvests of mixed hardwood forests, pine plantation management, short-rotation woody cropping systems, and forest residue removal. We also estimated the amount and location of abandoned agricultural lands in the eastern US that could be used for biomass production. Greater carbon storage was estimated to result from partial harvests and residue removals than from plantation management and short-rotation cropping. If woody feedstocks were cultivated with a combination of intensive management on abandoned lands and partial harvests of standing forest, we estimate that roughly 176 Tg biomass y−1 (~330,000 GWh or ~16 billion gallons of ethanol could be produced sustainably from the temperate forest biome of the eastern US. This biomass could offset up to ~63 Tg C y−1 that are emitted from fossil fuels used for heat and power generation while maintaining a terrestrial C sink of ~8 Tg C y−1.

  15. Carbon monoxide stability in stored postmortem blood samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunsman, G W; Presses, C L; Rodriguez, P

    2000-10-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning remains a common cause of both suicidal and accidental deaths in the United States. As a consequence, determination of the percent carboxyhemoglobin (%COHb) level in postmortem blood is a common analysis performed in toxicology laboratories. The blood specimens analyzed are generally preserved with either EDTA or sodium fluoride. Potentially problematic scenarios that may arise in conjunction with CO analysis are a first analysis or a reanalysis requested months or years after the initial toxicology testing is completed; both raise the issue of the stability of carboxyhemoglobin in stored postmortem blood specimens. A study was conducted at the Bexar County Medical Examiner's Office to evaluate the stability of CO in blood samples collected in red-, gray-, and purple-top tubes by comparing results obtained at the time of the autopsy and after two years of storage at 3 degrees C using either an IL 282 or 682 CO-Oximeter. The results from this study suggest that carboxyhemoglobin is stable in blood specimens collected in vacutainer tubes, with or without preservative, and stored refrigerated for up to two years. PMID:11043662

  16. Double-walled carbon nanocones: stability and electronic structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brito, Elias; Freitas, Aliliane; Silva, Thiago; Guerra, Thiago; Azevedo, Sergio

    2015-06-01

    We have applied first-principles calculations, based on the density functional theory, to investigate the stability and electronic properties of double-walled carbon nanocones, 60°60°, 120°120° and 60°120° with different rotation angles between the walls. We have shown that the most favorable double-walled nanocone studied here is that of angles of 60°60°, with rotation angle of 36° and distance between apexes of 4.22 Å. We have found that, the interaction between the walls of rotated double-walled nanocones introduce geometric distortion in gap states, such as in Fermi level. These results should have consequences on the field emission properties of double-walled carbon nanocones. Additionally, we also investigated the spin polarization of such structures, and we have found unpaired electrons, which induces a total spin from 1 and 1/2 for 60°60° and 60°120° double cones, respectively.

  17. Carbon Stabilization in Wet Tropical Forest Volcanic Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marin-Spiotta, E.; Chadwick, O.; Kramer, M.

    2008-12-01

    Volcanic soils, particularly Andisols, have high carbon storage capacities due to the accumulation of highly reactive, non-crystalline minerals. Previous research along a pedogenic chronosequence on volcanic lava in Hawai'i found that soils in the intermediate weathering stage, dominated by allophane, contained the largest soil C stocks with slowest turnover rates. Potential mechanisms for long-term soil C stabilization include an accumulation of chemically recalcitrant C, microenvironmental conditions unfavorable for decomposition, and strong sorption of soluble and otherwise labile C to mineral and/or metals. In well-drained soils in wet climates, dissolved organic matter (DOM) is a likely main pathway for the transport of C from the zones of highest microbial activity to deeper mineral horizons. To address the production, transformation, and fate of dissolved organic matter (DOM), we have installed tension and zero tension lysimeters throughout sequentially deeper organic and mineral horizons in an intermediate aged soil (ca. 350k years) under wet (ca. 3000 mm mean annual rainfall) native tropical forest in Hawai'i. The soils are characterized by thick O horizons and Bh horizons 20-30 cm deep, followed by mineral horizons showing redoximorphic features. Bulk soil carbon to nitrogen ratios increase with soil depth, matching that of DOM in the surface organic horizons at 40-50 cm depth. Low pH does not seem to explain this accumulation of C-rich, N-depleted OM, as soils become less acidic with depth. Soil C:N are positively correlated with alumina, oxalate-extractable Al, and dithionite citrate-extractable Al. The greatest source of DOC is the forest floor (Oie), followed by the Oa horizon, and concentrations decrease significantly in the mineral horizons. DOC concentrations increase with total dissolved Al and Fe in the Oie horizon, and with total Fe in solution in the Bg horizon. In the Bh horizon, DOM C:N are negatively correlated with total Al and Fe in

  18. Stabilization of STEP electrolyses in lithium-free molten carbonates

    OpenAIRE

    Licht, Stuart

    2012-01-01

    This communication reports on effective electrolyses in lithium-free molten carbonates. Processes that utilize solar thermal energy to drive efficient electrolyses are termed Solar Thermal Electrochemical Processes (STEP). Lithium-free molten carbonates, such as a sodium-potassium carbonate eutectic using an iridium anode, or a calcium-sodium-potassium carbonate eutectic using a nickel anode, can provide an effective medium for STEP electrolyses. Such electrolyses are useful in STEP carbon ca...

  19. Determination of Effective Particle Density for Sterically Stabilized Carbon Black Particles: Effect of Diblock Copolymer Stabilizer Composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Growney, David J; Fowler, Patrick W; Mykhaylyk, Oleksandr O; Fielding, Lee A; Derry, Matthew J; Aragrag, Najib; Lamb, Gordon D; Armes, Steven P

    2015-08-18

    Two poly(styrene-b-hydrogenated isoprene) (PS-PEP) copolymers and a poly(styrene-b-hydrogenated butadiene) (PS-PB) diblock copolymer of differing polystyrene content (20, 28 or 35 mol %) and molecular weight (117-183 kg mol(-1)) are examined. These copolymers form star-like micelles in n-dodecane, as judged by TEM, DLS, and SAXS studies. At ambient temperature, such micelles are known to adsorb intact onto a model colloidal substrate such as carbon black, conferring a high degree of dispersion (Growney, D. J.; Mykhaylyk, O. O.; Armes, S. P. Langmuir 2014, 30, 6047). Isotherms for micellar adsorption on carbon black at 20 °C are constructed using a supernatant depletion assay based on UV spectroscopy by utilizing the aromatic chromophore in the polystyrene block. Perhaps surprisingly, the diblock copolymer with the lowest polystyrene content has the strongest affinity for the carbon black particles. Assuming that the star-like diblock copolymer micelles adsorb onto carbon black to form hemi-micelles with a stabilizer layer thickness equal to the mean micelle radius, the effective particle density of the resulting sterically stabilized carbon black particles in n-dodecane can be estimated from the SAXS micelle dimensions based on geometric considerations. As an approximation, a spherical core-shell morphology was assumed, and the primary grain size of the carbon black particles was determined to be 74 nm diameter as judged by BET surface area analysis. Using this approach, effective particle densities of 0.90, 0.91, and 0.92 g cm(-3) were calculated for sterically stabilized carbon black particles prepared using the PS-PB20, PS-PEP28, and PS-PEP35 diblock copolymers, respectively. These densities are significantly lower than that of carbon black (1.89 g cm(-3)), which indicates that the sterically stabilized carbon black particles are substantially solvated. Since the rate of sedimentation of the sterically stabilized carbon black particles depends on the density

  20. Carbon Fibers from UV-Assisted Stabilization of Lignin-Based Precursors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng Zhang

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Production of high strength carbon fibers from bio-derived precursors is of topical interest. Recently, we reported on dry-spinning of a partially acetylated softwood kraft lignin to produce carbon fibers with superior properties, but the thermo-oxidative stabilization step required a long time due to a slow heating rate needed to prevent the fibers from being heated too rapidly and sticking to each other. Here we report a rapid strategy of dual UV-thermoxidative stabilization (crosslinking of dry-spun lignin fibers that significantly reduces the stabilization time. The fibers undergo reaction close to the surface such that they can be subsequently thermally stabilized at a rapid heating rate without fibers fusing together, which reduces the total stabilization time significantly from 40 to 4 h. Consequently, the glass transition temperature of UV irradiated fibers was about 15 °C higher than that of fibers without UV treatment. Stabilized fibers were successfully carbonized at 1000 °C and resulting carbon fibers displayed a tensile strength of 900 ± 100 MPa, which is amongst the highest reported for carbon fibers derived from softwood lignin-based precursors. These results establish that UV irradiation is a rapid step that can effectively shorten the total stabilization time for production of lignin-derived carbon fibers.

  1. Stabilization of STEP electrolyses in lithium-free molten carbonates

    CERN Document Server

    Licht, Stuart

    2012-01-01

    This communication reports on effective electrolyses in lithium-free molten carbonates. Processes that utilize solar thermal energy to drive efficient electrolyses are termed Solar Thermal Electrochemical Processes (STEP). Lithium-free molten carbonates, such as a sodium-potassium carbonate eutectic using an iridium anode, or a calcium-sodium-potassium carbonate eutectic using a nickel anode, can provide an effective medium for STEP electrolyses. Such electrolyses are useful in STEP carbon capture, and the production of staples including STEP fuel, iron, and cement.

  2. Stability of Soil Carbon Fractions - Aggregation Versus Mineral Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, C. W.; Koegel-Knabner, I.

    2007-12-01

    Models that seek to describe the dynamics of soil organic C typically distinguish between two or more C fractions according to differences of biochemical and microbial degradation. The rates are a consequence of recalcitrance, accessibility and interactions. Soil aggregation is an important mechanism controlling the accessibility of substrates by microbes and enzymes and thus the dynamics of minerals bound C are interacting with soil aggregate dynamics. In this study we focused on C fractions isolated by particle size fractionation. The main objective of our study was to differentiate between C stabilization of soil fractions due to accessibility/aggregation or to association with minerals. For a detailed understanding of these processes and the sources of respired soil CO2 we combined the measurement of heterotrophic respiration, CO2-13C analyses and radiocarbon dating of the respired CO2 in a long-term laboratory mineralization experiment. For the experiment we took soil material from the A horizon of an Albic Luvisol under Norway spruce forest (Picea abies) in southern Germany. The air dried bulk soil ( 63 µm to 2000 µm - sand, > 6.3 µm to 63 µm - silt and silt/clay fraction NMR spectroscopy was used to analyze the composition of bulk soil and fractions. The incubation of the three fractions and the bulk soil was done for 250 days in triplicate at 20 degree Celsius and 70% of maximal water holding capacity. A relative enrichment of alkyl C and an increase of the alkyl / O/N-alkyl C ratios in the order of sand NMR. On a long term the sand fraction and the bulk soil showed a sustained C bioavailability. For the silt and clay fraction similar respiration rates and a low C bioavailability were detected. The recombined fractions (by calculation) showed 35% higher amounts of respired CO2-C than the bulk soil. This difference accounts for the absence of restricted accessibility due to soil aggregation. Because of the high amounts of mineral bound C the main source

  3. Dynamic surface rearrangement and thermal stability of nitrogen functional groups on carbon nanotubes

    OpenAIRE

    R. Arrigo; Hävecker, M.; Schlögl, R.; Su, D.

    2008-01-01

    Dynamic surface rearrangement and thermal stability of N-functional groups on carbon nanotubes (CNTs), obtained by functionalization of pristine CNTs with NH3, were studied by temperature-programmed XPS and MS: a link between the stability of the functional group and decomposition temperature have been established and a conversion into graphitic nitrogen was observed.

  4. Nanoscale analysis of the morphology and surface stability of calcium carbonate polymorphs

    OpenAIRE

    Sekkal, W.; Zaoui, A.

    2013-01-01

    Under earth surface conditions, in ocean and natural water, calcium carbonate is ubiquitous, forming anhydrous and hydrous minerals. These hydrous phases are of considerable interest for their role as precursors to stable carbonate minerals. Atomistic simulation techniques have been employed here to perform a comprehensive and quantitative study of the structural and energetic stability of dry and hydrous surfaces of calcium carbonate polymorphs using two recently developed forcefields. Resul...

  5. Cumulative carbon as a policy framework for achieving climate stabilization

    OpenAIRE

    Matthews, H. Damon; Solomon, Susan; Pierrehumbert, Raymond

    2012-01-01

    The primary objective of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change is to stabilize greenhouse gas concentrations at a level that will avoid dangerous climate impacts. However, greenhouse gas concentration stabilization is an awkward framework within which to assess dangerous climate change on account of the significant lag between a given concentration level and the eventual equilibrium temperature change. By contrast, recent research has shown that global temperature change c...

  6. Carbonate leaching of uranium and hydrogen peroxide stabilizer therefor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the carbonate leaching process for the solution mining of subterranean uranium containing formations in which an injection well is drilled and completed within the uranium formation; alkaline carbonate uranium leaching solution and sufficient hydrogen peroxide are injected through the injection wells into the formation whereby uranium values are produced from production wells, characterized by providing in the leaching solution a mixture of 1-hydroxyethylidene-1,1-diphosphonic acid and an alkali metal pyrophosphate in a weight ratio of from 1 to 10 to 10 to 1, the amount of said mixture being sufficient to inhibit decomposition of the hydrogen peroxide in said leaching solution

  7. Aggregate structure and stability linked to carbon dynamics in a south Chilean Andisol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huygens, D.; Boeckx, P.; van Cleemput, O.; Godoy, R.; Oyarzún, C.

    2005-02-01

    The extreme vulnerability of soil organic carbon to climate and land use change emphasizes the need for further research in different terrestrial ecosystems. We have studied the aggregate stability and carbon dynamics in a chronosequence of three different land uses in a south Chilean Andisols: a second growth Nothofagus obliqua forest (SGFOR), a grassland (GRASS) and a Pinus radiata plantation (PINUS). The aim of this study was to investigate the role of Al as soil organic matter stabilizing agent in this Andisol. In a case study, we linked differences in carbon dynamics between the three land use treatments to physical protection and recalcitrance of the soil organic matter (SOM). In this study, C aggregate stability and dynamics were studied using size and density fractionation experiments of the SOM, δ13C and total carbon analysis of the different SOM fractions, and mineralization measurements. The results showed that electrostatic attractions between and among Al-oxides and clay minerals are mainly responsible for the stabilization of soil aggregates and the physical protection of the enclosed soil organic carbon. Whole soil C mineralization rate constants were highest for SGFOR and PINUS, followed by GRASS. In contrast, incubation experiments of isolated macro organic matter fractions showed that the recalcitrance of the SOM decreased in another order: PINUS > SGFOR > GRASS. We concluded that physical protection of soil aggregates was the main process determining whole soil C mineralization. Land use changes affected soil organic carbon dynamics in this south Chilean Andisol by altering soil pH and consequently available Al.

  8. Stability of singlet and triplet trions in carbon nanotubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rønnow, Troels Frimodt; Pedersen, Thomas Garm; Cornean, Horia

    2009-01-01

    We investigate singlet and triplet trion states in semiconducting carbon nanotubes using a one-dimensional model. It is concluded that singlet trion states in bind up to 13.5% stronger than exciton states, and that they lower the optical transition energy with up to 50% of the tight binding band...

  9. Stability of singlet and triplet trions in carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ronnow, Troels F. [Department of Physics and Nanotechnology, Skjernvej 4C, 9220 Aalborg Ost (Denmark)], E-mail: tfr@nanophysics.dk; Pedersen, Thomas G. [Department of Physics and Nanotechnology, Skjernvej 4C, 9220 Aalborg Ost (Denmark)], E-mail: tgp@nano.aau.dk; Cornean, Horia D. [Department of Mathematical Sciences, Frederik Bajers Vej 7G, 9220 Aalborg Ost (Denmark)], E-mail: cornean@math.aau.dk

    2009-04-06

    We investigate singlet and triplet trion states in semiconducting carbon nanotubes using a one-dimensional model. It is concluded that singlet trion states in bind up to 13.6% stronger than exciton states, and that they lower the optical transition energy with up to 50% of the tight binding band gap energy.

  10. Stability of singlet and triplet trions in carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigate singlet and triplet trion states in semiconducting carbon nanotubes using a one-dimensional model. It is concluded that singlet trion states in bind up to 13.6% stronger than exciton states, and that they lower the optical transition energy with up to 50% of the tight binding band gap energy.

  11. Synthesis, model and stability of helically coiled carbon nanotubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fejes, Dora; Raffai, Manuella; Hernadi, Klara;

    2013-01-01

    Structural model of helically coiled carbon nanotubes is proposed. It is constructed by means of topological coordinate method. Relaxation and cohesive energy calculation are performed by molecular mechanics, using second-generation bond order potential for hydrocarbons introduced by D. W. Brenne...

  12. Flame retardancy and thermal stability of polyurethane foam composites containing carbon additives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Pyoung-Chan; Kim, Bo-Ram; Jeoung, Sun Kyoung; Lee, Geesoo; Han, San Wook; Kim, Hyunchul; Lee, Ki-Dong; Han, Joo-Kwon

    2016-03-01

    Polyurethane (PU) is an important class of polymers that have wide application in a number of different industrial sectors. The goal of this work was the synthesis of flame-retarded PU foam with expandable graphite (EG) or commercial graphene. The flame retardancy and thermal stability of the foams has been studied through cone calorimeter analysis, the limited oxygen index and thermal conductivity. The presence of expandable graphite brings an improvement in fire behavior. In particular, the limited oxygen index increases in a linear way and the highest limited oxygen index values are obtained for EG-PU foams. The results from the cone calorimeter are in agreement with those of oxygen index; EG filled foams show a considerable decrease of maximum-heat release rate (M-HRR) with respect to unfilled foams. The results of thermal conductivity show that an increase in expandable graphite amount in PU foams lead to an increased conductivity.

  13. Organic carbon stabilization in the fractal pore structure of Andosols

    OpenAIRE

    Chevallier, Tiphaine; Woignier, Thierry; Toucet, Joële; Blanchart, Eric

    2010-01-01

    Despite the outstanding potential of Andosols for soil organic carbon (SOC) sequestration, the importance of the different mechanisms involved in protecting SOC against mineralization is still unclear. Previous studies have described allophane particles as having a fractal structure. One hypothesis is that SOC is adsorbed or trapped in this fractal structure and could be less available to microbes and enzymes. This paper aims to determine the fractal structure of allophanic soils, especially ...

  14. Annealing effect and stability of carbon nanotubes in hydrogen flame

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Annealing of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) by the hydrogen flame in air was investigated in this study. Raman spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy were used to characterize the products. The peak width of Raman spectra decreased with the increase in the annealing time. The CNTs were not stable in the hydrogen flame and the etching rate of the CNTs by hydrogen flame was very high. The hydrogen flame annealing had some effects on improving the crystallinity of CNTs.

  15. Effects of iron-aluminium oxides and organic carbon on aggregate stability of bauxite residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Feng; Li, Yubing; Xue, Shengguo; Hartley, William; Wu, Hao

    2016-05-01

    In order to successfully establish vegetation on bauxite residue, properties such as aggregate structure and stability require improvement. Spontaneous plant colonization on the deposits in Central China over the last 20 years has revealed that natural processes may improve the physical condition of bauxite residues. Samples from three different stacking ages were selected to determine aggregate formation and stability and its relationship with iron-aluminium oxides and organic carbon. The residue aggregate particles became coarser in both dry and wet sieving processes. The mean weight diameter (MWD) and geometry mean diameter (GMD) increased significantly, and the proportion of aggregate destruction (PAD) decreased. Natural stacking processes could increase aggregate stability and erosion resistant of bauxite residues. Free iron oxides and amorphous aluminium oxides were the major forms in bauxite residues, but there was no significant correlation between the iron-aluminium oxides and aggregate stability. Aromatic-C, alkanes-C, aliphatic-C and alkenes-C were the major functional groups present in the residues. With increasing stacking age, total organic carbon content and aggregate-associated organic carbon both increased. Alkanes-C, aliphatic-C and alkenes-C increased and were mainly distributed in macro-aggregates, whereas aromatic-C was mainly distributed in <0.05-mm aggregates. Organic carbon stability in micro-aggregates was higher than that in macro-aggregates and became more stable. Organic carbon contents in total residues, and within different aggregate sizes, were all negatively correlated with PAD. It indicated that organic materials had a more significant effect on macro-aggregate stability and the effects of iron-aluminium oxides maybe more important for stability of micro-aggregates. PMID:26832865

  16. Phosphorus-assisted biomass thermal conversion: reducing carbon loss and improving biochar stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ling; Cao, Xinde; Zheng, Wei; Kan, Yue

    2014-01-01

    There is often over 50% carbon loss during the thermal conversion of biomass into biochar, leading to it controversy for the biochar formation as a carbon sequestration strategy. Sometimes the biochar also seems not to be stable enough due to physical, chemical, and biological reactions in soils. In this study, three phosphorus-bearing materials, H3PO4, phosphate rock tailing (PRT), and triple superphosphate (TSP), were used as additives to wheat straw with a ratio of 1: 0.4-0.8 for biochar production at 500°C, aiming to alleviate carbon loss during pyrolysis and to increase biochar-C stabilization. All these additives remarkably increased the biochar yield from 31.7% (unmodified biochar) to 46.9%-56.9% (modified biochars). Carbon loss during pyrolysis was reduced from 51.7% to 35.5%-47.7%. Thermogravimetric analysis curves showed that the additives had no effect on thermal stability of biochar but did enhance its oxidative stability. Microbial mineralization was obviously reduced in the modified biochar, especially in the TSP-BC, in which the total CO2 emission during 60-d incubation was reduced by 67.8%, compared to the unmodified biochar. Enhancement of carbon retention and biochar stability was probably due to the formation of meta-phosphate or C-O-PO3, which could either form a physical layer to hinder the contact of C with O2 and bacteria, or occupy the active sites of the C band. Our results indicate that pre-treating biomass with phosphors-bearing materials is effective for reducing carbon loss during pyrolysis and for increasing biochar stabilization, which provides a novel method by which biochar can be designed to improve the carbon sequestration capacity. PMID:25531111

  17. Limits to soil carbon stability; Deep, ancient soil carbon decomposition stimulated by new labile organic inputs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soil carbon (C) pools store about one-third of the total terrestrial organic carbon. Deep soil C pools (below 1 m) are thought to be stable due to their low biodegradability, but little is known about soil microbial processes and carbon dynamics below the soil surface, or how global change might aff...

  18. Hydrated salts/expanded graphite composite with high thermal conductivity as a shape-stabilized phase change material for thermal energy storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Hydrated salts were prepared into shape-stabilized phase change materials. • Phase segregation of the hydrated salts was inhibited. • Thermal conductivity of hydrated salts/EG composite was higher than others. - Abstract: A novel shape-stabilized phase change material (PCM) was developed by impregnation of hydrated salts into expanded graphite (EG) and further coated with paraffin wax. It was displayed by scanning electron microscope (SEM) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) measurements that the hydrated salts were filled into pores or adhered onto the flakes of EG by physical interactions, including capillary forces and surface tension. It was revealed from differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) analysis that phase segregation was inhibited and subcooling weakened in the coated composite PCM. The melting and freezing enthalpy of the coated composite PCM can reach 172.3 kJ/kg at 32.05 °C and 140.8 kJ/kg at 17.11 °C, respectively. Also, the results of thermal gravimetric analysis (TG) suggested that the coated composite PCM had good thermal stability in the working temperature range from 25 to 50 °C. Furthermore, the enthalpy loss of melting and freezing was negligible after 100 cycles, indicating its good thermal reliabilities. The thermal conductivity of the coated composite PCM can be as high as 3.643 W/(m K). According to the obtained results, the coated hydrated salts/EG composite PCM enjoys high latent heat, good thermal reliability and high thermal conductivity. Apart from its favorable thermal properties, the cost of the coated hydrated salts/EG composite PCM was quite low, making it promising for low temperature thermal energy storage applications

  19. Aggregate structure and stability linked to carbon dynamics in a south Chilean Andisol

    OpenAIRE

    C. Oyarzún; Godoy, R.; O. Van Cleemput; P. Boeckx; Huygens, D.

    2005-01-01

    International audience The extreme vulnerability of soil organic carbon to climate and land use change emphasizes the need for further research in different terrestrial ecosystems. We have studied the aggregate stability and carbon dynamics in a chronosequence of three different land uses in a south Chilean Andisols: a second growth Nothofagus obliqua forest (SGFOR), a grassland (GRASS) and a Pinus radiata plantation (PINUS). The aim of this study was to investigate the role of Al as soil ...

  20. Stabilization of basic oxygen furnace slag by hot-stage carbonation treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Santos, Rafael; Ling, Da; Sarvaramini, Amin; Guo, Muxing; Elsen, Jan; Larachi, Faïçal; Beaudoin, Georges; Blanpain, Bart; Van Gerven, Tom

    2012-01-01

    Treatment and disposal of Basic Oxygen Furnace (BOF) slag, a residue of the steel production process characterized by high basicity and propensity for heavy metal leaching, is a costly burden on metallurgical plants; a sustainable valorization route is desired. The stabilization of BOF slag utilizing hot-stage carbonation treatment was investigated; this approach envisions carbonation during the hot-to-cold pathway followed by the material after the molten slag is poured and solidified. Three...

  1. Stability and signatures of biexcitons in carbon nanotubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Thomas Garm; Pedersen, Kjeld; Cornean, Horia Decebal;

    2005-01-01

    The linear optical properties of semiconducting carbon nanotubes are dominated by quasi-one-dimensional excitons formed by single electron-hole pairs. Hence, the nonlinear response at high pump levels most likely leads to the formation of exciton complexes involving several electron-hole pairs....... Such complexes would threfore play an important role in e.g. lasing applications. We demonstrate here that the biexciton complex is surprisingly stable for nanotubes in a wide diameter range. Theoretical predictions for the signature of such states in pump-probe spectroscopy are presented....

  2. Molecular dynamics study of the stability of a carbon nanotube atop a catalytic nanoparticle

    OpenAIRE

    Verkhovtsev, Alexey V.; Schramm, Stefan; Solov'yov, Andrey V.

    2014-01-01

    The stability of a single-walled carbon nanotube placed on top of a catalytic nickel nanoparticle is investigated by means of molecular dynamics simulations. As a case study, we consider the $(12,0)$ nanotube consisting of 720 carbon atoms and the icosahedral Ni$_{309}$ cluster. An explicit set of constant-temperature simulations is performed in order to cover a broad temperature range from 400 to 1200 K, at which a successful growth of carbon nanotubes has been achieved experimentally by mea...

  3. High-Throughput Screening of the Asymmetric Decarboxylative Alkylation Reaction of Enolate-Stabilized Enol Carbonates

    KAUST Repository

    Stoltz, Brian

    2010-06-14

    The use of high-throughput screening allowed for the optimization of reaction conditions for the palladium-catalyzed asymmetric decarboxylative alkylation reaction of enolate-stabilized enol carbonates. Changing to a non-polar reaction solvent and to an electron-deficient PHOX derivative as ligand from our standard reaction conditions improved the enantioselectivity for the alkylation of a ketal-protected,1,3-diketone-derived enol carbonate from 28% ee to 84% ee. Similar improvements in enantioselectivity were seen for a β-keto-ester derived- and an α-phenyl cyclohexanone-derived enol carbonate.

  4. Thermal Stability of Zirconia-coated Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Manivannan

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Sol-gel method has been used to coat multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs with zirconia at room temperature and the coated tubes were sintered at high temperature. The samples were characterised by Raman spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction, environmental scanning electron microscope, transmission electron microscopy, and energy-dispersive x-ray analyses. The performance of the coated-MWCNTs was investigated as a function of temperature. The TGA studies indicated that sintering of coated-MWCNTs has improved its oxidation resistance and this improvement is related to the proper selection of sintering temperature.Defence Science Journal, 2010, 60(3, pp.337-342, DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.14429/dsj.60.362

  5. Soil and plant responses to pyrogenic organic matter: carbon stability and symbiotic patterns

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sagrilo, E.

    2014-01-01

    Soil and plant responses to pyrogenic organic matter: carbon stability and symbiotic patterns Edvaldo Sagrilo Summary Pyrogenic organic matter (PyOM), also known as biochar, is the product of biomass combustion under low oxygen concentration. There

  6. Citrate effects on amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) structure, stability, and crystallization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tobler, Dominique Jeanette; Rodriguez Blanco, Juan Diego; Dideriksen, Knud;

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the role of citrate in the crystallization kinetics of amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) is essential to explain the formation mechanisms, stabilities, surface properties, and morphologies of CaCO3 biominerals. It also contributes to deeper insight into fluid-mineral inte...

  7. Thermal stability of catalytically grown multi-walled carbon nanotubes observed in transmission electron microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Cheng-Yu; Liu, Chuan-Pu; Boothroyd, Chris

    2009-01-01

    The thermal stability of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) was assessed in situ by transmission electron microscopy. Upon heating, Ni catalysts in MWC-NTs containing bamboo structures shrank from the tail due to evaporation, leading to additional bamboo formation and tube elongation at 800...

  8. Temperature and Microbial Activity Effects on Soil Carbon Stabilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fissore, C.; van Diepen, L.; Wixon, D.; Marin-Spiotta, E.; Giardina, C. P.

    2014-12-01

    Uncertainties on the importance of environmental controls on soil C stabilization and turnover limit accurate predictions of the rate and magnitude of the response of soils to climate change. Here we report results from a study of interactions among vegetation and soil microbial communities in North American forests across a highly constrained, 22OC gradient mean annual temperature (MAT) as a proxy for understanding changes with climate. Previous work indicated that turnover and amount of labile SOC responded negatively to MAT, whereas stable SOC was insensitive to temperature variation. Hardwood forests stored a larger amount of stable SOC, but with shorter mean residence times than paired pine forests. Our findings suggest that the interaction between vegetation composition and microbial communities may affect SOC accumulation and stabilization responses to rising temperature. To investigate these relationships, we characterized the microbial communities with Phospholipid Fatty Acid (PLFA) analysis. PLFA analyses indicate complex microbial responses to increased MAT and vegetation composition. Microbial biomass declined with MAT in conifer forests and increased in hardwood forests. Relative abundance of actinomycetes increased with MAT for both forest types, and was correlated with amount and turnover of active SOC. The relative abundance of fungi decreased with increasing MAT, while gram+ bacteria increased, such that fungi:bacteria ratio decreased with MAT, with this trend being more pronounced for hardwood cover type. These results are consistent with a long-term warming experiment in a hardwood forest at the Harvard Forest LTER site, where after 12 years of warming the relative abundance of gram positive bacteria and actinomycetes increased, while fungal biomass decreased. In contrast, relationships between microbial groups and the stable fraction of SOC along the gradient were only observed in conifers. Increases in mean residence time of stable SOC were

  9. Crosslinked Carbon Nanotubes/Polyaniline Composites as a Pseudocapacitive Material with High Cycling Stability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Liu

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The poor cycling stability of polyaniline (PANI limits its practical application as a pseudocapacitive material due to the volume change during the charge-discharge procedure. Herein, crosslinked carbon nanotubes/polyaniline (C-CNTs/PANI composites had been designed by the in situ chemical oxidative polymerization of aniline in the presence of crosslinked carbon nanotubes (C-CNTs, which were obtained by coupling of the functionalized carbon nanotubes with 1,4-benzoquinone. The composite showed a specific capacitance of 294 F/g at the scan rate of 10 mV/s, and could retain 95% of its initial specific capacitance after 1000 CV cycles. Such high electrochemical cycling stability resulting from the crosslinked skeleton of the C-CNTs makes them potential electrode materials for a supercapacitor.

  10. Role of carbonates in soil organic matter stabilization in agricultural Mediterranean soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apesteguía, Marcos; Virto, Iñigo; Plante, Alain

    2016-04-01

    Carbonated soils are present in many semiarid areas, where lithogenic and secondary carbonates are important constituents of the soil mineral matrix. The presence of CaCO3 in calcareous soils has been described as an organic matter stabilization agent mainly due to chemical stabilization mechanisms. In two recent studies in the north of Spain the importance of CaCO3 on soil physical characteristics was highlighted, as they were observed to be acting as macroaggregates stabilization agents. A third study was carried out on the same experimental site, with the hypothesis that the observed differences in aggregation may favor organic matter stabilization in carbonate-containing soils. With that aim we studied the soil physical characteristics (water retention and porosity) and the bioavailability of soil organic matter (SOM) in the two contrasting soils in that site, one Typic Calcixerept (CALC) and one Calcic Haploxerept (DECALC). Bioavailability was evaluated trough the measurement of mineralization rates in a 30 days soil incubations. Intact and disaggregated samples were incubated to evaluate the effect of physical protection on SOM bioavailability in whole soil and macroaggregates 2-5 mm samples. Therefore, four fractions of each soil were studied: intact whole soil soil (D-WS), intact macroaggregates 2-5 mm (I-Magg), and disaggregated macroaggregates (D-Magg). Soil organic carbon content was greater in CALC and had smaller mineralization rates during incubation, indicating a smaller organic matter bioavailability for microbial decomposition. However, the greater increment of mineralization observed in DECALC after disaggregation, together with the scarce differences observed in physical characteristics among both soils, indicate that physical protection was not responsible of greater SOM stability in CALC soil. New hypotheses are needed to explain the observed better protection of organic matter in carbonate-rich Mediterranean soils.

  11. Aggregate structure and stability linked to carbon dynamics in a south Chilean Andisol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Oyarzún

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available The extreme vulnerability of soil organic carbon to climate and land use change emphasizes the need for further research in different terrestrial ecosystems. We have studied the aggregate stability and carbon dynamics in a chronosequence of three different land uses in a south Chilean Andisols: a second growth Nothofagus obliqua forest (SGFOR, a grassland (GRASS and a Pinus radiata plantation (PINUS. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of Al as soil organic matter stabilizing agent in this Andisol. In a case study, we linked differences in carbon dynamics between the three land use treatments to physical protection and recalcitrance of the soil organic matter (SOM. In this study, C aggregate stability and dynamics were studied using size and density fractionation experiments of the SOM, δ13C and total carbon analysis of the different SOM fractions, and mineralization measurements. The results showed that electrostatic attractions between and among Al-oxides and clay minerals are mainly responsible for the stabilization of soil aggregates and the physical protection of the enclosed soil organic carbon. Whole soil C mineralization rate constants were highest for SGFOR and PINUS, followed by GRASS. In contrast, incubation experiments of isolated macro organic matter fractions showed that the recalcitrance of the SOM decreased in another order: PINUS > SGFOR > GRASS. We concluded that physical protection of soil aggregates was the main process determining whole soil C mineralization. Land use changes affected soil organic carbon dynamics in this south Chilean Andisol by altering soil pH and consequently available Al.

  12. Iron-mediated stabilization of soil carbon amplifies the benefits of ecological restoration in degraded lands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Lucas C R; Doane, Timothy A; Corrêa, Rodrigo S; Valverde, Vinicius; Pereira, Engil I P; Horwath, William R

    2015-07-01

    Recent observations across a 14-year restoration chronosequence have shown an unexpected accumulation of soil organic carbon in strip-mined areas of central Brazil. This was attributed to the rapid plant colonization that followed the incorporation of biosolids into exposed regoliths, but the specific mechanisms involved in the stabilization of carbon inputs from the vegetation remained unclear. Using isotopic and elemental analyses, we tested the hypothesis that plant-derived carbon accumulation was triggered by the formation of iron-coordinated complexes, stabilized into physically protected (occluded) soil fractions. Confirming this hypothesis, we identified a fast formation of microaggregates shortly after the application of iron-rich biosolids, which was characterized by a strong association between pyrophosphate-extractable iron and plant-derived organic matter. The formation of microaggregates preceded the development of macroaggregates, which drastically increased soil carbon content (-140 Mg C/ha) a few years after restoration. Consistent with previous theoretical work, iron-coordinated organic complexes served as nuclei for aggregate formation, reflecting the synergistic effect of biological, chemical, and physical mechanisms of carbon stabilization in developing soils. Nevertheless, iron was not the only factor affecting soil carbon content. The highest carbon accumulation was observed during the period of highest plant diversity (> 30 species; years 3-6), declining significantly with the exclusion of native species by invasive grasses (years 9-14). Furthermore, the increasing dominance of invasive grasses was associated with a steady decline in the concentration of soil nitrogen and phosphorus per unit of accumulated carbon. These results demonstrate the importance of interdependent ecological and biogeochemical processes, and the role of soil-plant interactions in determining the success of restoration efforts. In contrast with previous but

  13. Aqueous solutions of acidic ionic liquids for enhanced stability of polyoxometalate-carbon supercapacitor electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Chenchen; Zhao, Enbo; Nitta, Naoki; Magasinski, Alexandre; Berdichevsky, Gene; Yushin, Gleb

    2016-09-01

    Nanocomposites based on polyoxometalates (POMs) nanoconfined in microporous carbons have been synthesized and used as electrodes for supercapacitors. The addition of the pseudocapacitance from highly reversible redox reaction of POMs to the electric double-layer capacitance of carbon lead to an increase in specific capacitance of ∼90% at 1 mV s-1. However, high solubility of POM in traditional aqueous electrolytes leads to rapid capacity fading. Here we demonstrate that the use of aqueous solutions of protic ionic liquids (P-IL) as electrolyte instead of aqueous sulfuric acid solutions offers an opportunity to significantly improve POM cycling stability. Virtually no degradation in capacitance was observed in POM-based positive electrode after 10,000 cycles in an asymmetric capacitor with P-IL aqueous electrolyte. As such, POM-based carbon composites may now present a viable solution for enhancing energy density of electrical double layer capacitors (EDLC) based on pure carbon electrodes.

  14. Nucleation and stabilization of carbon-rich structures in interstellar media

    CERN Document Server

    Patra, N; Sadeghpour, H R

    2014-01-01

    We study conditions under which carbon clusters of different sizes form and stabilize. {We describe an approach to equilibrium by simulating tenuous carbon gas dynamics to long times.} First, we use reactive molecular dynamics simulations to describe the nucleation of long chains, large clusters, and complex cage structures in carbon and hydrogen rich interstellar gas phases. We study how temperature, particle density, presence of hydrogen, and carbon inflow affect the nucleation of molecular moieties with different characteristics, in accordance with astrophysical conditions. We extend the simulations to densities which are orders of magnitude lower than current laboratory densities, to temperatures relevant to circumstellar environments of planetary nebulae, and to longtime (microsecond) formation timescales. We correlate cluster size distributions from dynamical simulations with thermodynamic equilibrium intuitions, where at low temperatures and gas densities, entropy plays a significant role.

  15. Organic Carbon Stabilization of Soils Formed on Acidic and Calcareous Bedrocks in Neotropical Alpine Grassland, Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Songyu; Cammeraat, Erik; Jansen, Boris; Cerli, Chiara; Kalbitz, Karsten

    2016-04-01

    Increasing evidence shows that Neotropical alpine ecosystems are vulnerable to global change. Since soils in the alpine grasslands of the Peruvian Andean region have large soil organic carbon (SOC) stocks, profound understanding of soil organic matter (OM) stabilization mechanisms will improve the prediction of the feedback between SOC stocks and global change. It is well documented that poor-crystalline minerals and organo-metallic complexes significantly contribute to the OM stabilization in volcanic ash soils, including those in the Andean region. However, limited research has focused on non-ash soils that also express significant SOC accumulation. A pilot study of Peruvian Andean grassland soils suggests that lithology is a prominent factor for such carbon accumulation. As a consequence of contrasting mineral composition and pedogenic processes in soils formed on different non-volcanic parent materials, differences in OM stabilization mechanisms may be profound and consequently may respond differently to global change. Therefore, our study aims at a further understanding of carbon stocks and OM stabilization mechanisms in soils formed on contrasting bedrocks in the Peruvian Andes. The main objective is to identify and compare the roles that organo-mineral associations and aggregations play in OM stabilization, by a combination of selective extraction methods and fractionations based on density, particle size and aggregates size. Soil samples were collected from igneous acidic and calcareous sedimentary bedrocks in alpine grassland near Cajamarca, Peru (7.17°S, 78.63°W), at around 3700m altitude. Samples were taken from 3 plots per bedrock type by sampling distinguishable horizons until the C horizons were reached. Outcomes confirmed that both types of soil accumulate large amounts of carbon: 405.3±41.7 t/ha of calcareous bedrock soil and 226.0±5.6 t/ha of acidic bedrock soil respectively. In addition, extremely high carbon contents exceeding 90g carbon per

  16. Powder metallurgical nanostructured medium carbon bainitic steel: Kinetics, structure, and in situ thermal stability studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lonardelli, I., E-mail: il244@cam.ac.uk [University of Cambridge, Materials Science and Metallurgy, Pembroke Street, Cambridge CB2 3QZ (United Kingdom); University of Trento, Materials Engineering and Industrial Technologies, via Mesiano 77, 38123 Trento (Italy); Bortolotti, M. [Fondazione Bruno Kessler, via Sommarive 18, 38123 Trento (Italy); Beek, W. van [Swiss-Norwegian Beamlines, ESRF, BP 220, 38043 Grenoble Cedex (France); Girardini, L.; Zadra, M. [K4-Sint, via Dante 300, 38057 Pergine Valsugana (Italy); Bhadeshia, H.K.D.H. [University of Cambridge, Materials Science and Metallurgy, Pembroke Street, Cambridge CB2 3QZ (United Kingdom)

    2012-10-15

    It has been possible to produce incredibly fine plates of bainitic ferrite separated by a percolating network of retained austenite in a medium carbon steel produced by mechanical alloying followed by spark plasma sintering and isothermal heat treatment. This is because the sintering process limits the growth of the austenite grains to such an extent that the martensite-start temperature is suppressed in spite of the medium carbon concentration. Furthermore, the fine austenite grain size accelerates the bainite transformation, which can therefore be suppressed to low temperatures to obtain a nanostructure. Microscopy and in situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction were used to investigate the morphology and the thermal stability of the retained austenite during continuous heating. These latter experiments revealed a gradient of carbon concentration in the retained austenite and a reduced thermal stability in high carbon film-austenite. It was also possible to correlate the evolution of defect density and carbon depletion in both retained austenite and bainitic ferrite during tempering.

  17. Powder metallurgical nanostructured medium carbon bainitic steel: Kinetics, structure, and in situ thermal stability studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It has been possible to produce incredibly fine plates of bainitic ferrite separated by a percolating network of retained austenite in a medium carbon steel produced by mechanical alloying followed by spark plasma sintering and isothermal heat treatment. This is because the sintering process limits the growth of the austenite grains to such an extent that the martensite-start temperature is suppressed in spite of the medium carbon concentration. Furthermore, the fine austenite grain size accelerates the bainite transformation, which can therefore be suppressed to low temperatures to obtain a nanostructure. Microscopy and in situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction were used to investigate the morphology and the thermal stability of the retained austenite during continuous heating. These latter experiments revealed a gradient of carbon concentration in the retained austenite and a reduced thermal stability in high carbon film-austenite. It was also possible to correlate the evolution of defect density and carbon depletion in both retained austenite and bainitic ferrite during tempering.

  18. Radiation stability of carbon-carbon composites after high-temperature neutron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon-carbon composites of fibers (CCCF) differing in construction and structure are investigated in the present work under conditions of neutron irradiation. The minimal cross section of the samples (4 x 4, 5 x 5, 8 x 8 mm) was chosen on the basis of the structural features of the composite and the sizes of the product. The following characteristics were determined for samples before and after irradiation: density, bending, compression strength, dynamic elastic modulus, thermal conductivity, electrical resistivity, thermal coefficient of linear expansion, and unit-cell constant. 1 ref., 1 fig., 1 tab

  19. Surface morphology stabilization by chemical sputtering in carbon nitride film growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buijnsters, J G [Institute for Molecules and Materials (IMM), Radboud University Nijmegen, Toernooiveld 1, 6525 ED Nijmegen (Netherlands); Vazquez, L [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid (CSIC), C/Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz 3, 28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2008-01-07

    We have studied the influence of chemical sputtering effects on the morphology of carbon nitride films grown on silicon substrates by electron cyclotron resonance chemical vapour deposition. This study has been performed by comparing the evolution of their morphology with that of hydrogenated amorphous carbon films grown under similar conditions, where these effects are not present. When chemical sputtering effects operate we observe a film surface stabilization for length scales in the 60-750 nm range after a threshold roughness of about 3-4 nm has been developed. This stabilization is explained on the basis of the re-emission of nitrogen etching species, which is confirmed by growth experiments on microstructured substrates. (fast track communication)

  20. Li-ion capacitors with carbon cathode and hard carbon/stabilized lithium metal powder anode electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, W. J.; Zheng, J. P.

    2012-09-01

    A lithium-ion capacitor was developed using a mixture of stabilized lithium metal powder and hard carbon as the anode electrode, while activated carbon was used as the cathode. A specific energy of approximately 82 Wh kg-1 was obtained based on the weight of electrode materials; however, when the electrolyte, separator, and current collectors were included, the specific energy of an assembled Li-ion capacitor was about 25 Wh kg-1. The capacitor was able to deliver over 60% of the maximum energy at a discharge C-rate of 44C. Through continuous galvanostatic charge/discharge cycling, the capacitance of the Li-ion capacitor degraded less than 3% over 600 cycles.

  1. Expanding subjectivities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundgaard Andersen, Linda; Soldz, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    A major theme in recent psychoanalytic thinking concerns the use of therapist subjectivity, especially “countertransference,” in understanding patients. This thinking converges with and expands developments in qualitative research regarding the use of researcher subjectivity as a tool to understa...

  2. Assessment of Soil Organic Carbon Stability in Agricultural Systems by Using Natural Abundance Signals of Stable Carbon and Nitrogen Isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Information on the stability and age of soil organic matter (SOM) pools is of vital importance for assessing the impact of soil management and environmental factors on SOM, an important part of the global carbon (C) cycle. The terrestrial soil organic C pool, up to a depth of 1 m, contains about 1500 Pg C (Batjes, 1996). This is about 2.5 times more organic C than the vegetation (650 Pg C) and about twice as much as in the atmosphere (750 Pg C) (Batjes, 1998), but the assessment of the stability and age of SOM using 14C radio carbon technique are expensive. Conen et al. (2008) developed a model to estimate the SOM stability based on the isotopic discrimination of 15N natural abundance by soil micro-organisms and the change in C/N ratio during organic matter decomposition, for steady state, Alpine and permanent grasslands. In the framework of the IAEA funded coordinated research project (CRP) on Soil Quality and Nutrient Management for Sustainable Food Production in Mulch based Cropping Systems in sub-Saharan Africa, research was initiated to use this model in agricultural systems for developing a cost effective and affordable technique for Member States to determine the stability of SOM. As part of this research, soil samples were taken and analysed in four long term field experiments, established on soils with low and high SOM, in Austria and Belgium. The participating institutions are the Austrian Agency for Health and Food Safety (AGES), the University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences in Vienna (BOKU), the University of Leuven (KUL), the Soil Service of Belgium (BDB) and the Centre Wallon de Recherches Agronomiques (CRA-W)

  3. Density and Stability of Soil Organic Carbon beneath Impervious Surfaces in Urban Areas

    OpenAIRE

    Wei, Zongqiang; WU, SHAOHUA; Yan, Xiao; Zhou, Shenglu

    2014-01-01

    Installation of impervious surfaces in urban areas has attracted increasing attention due to its potential hazard to urban ecosystems. Urban soils are suggested to have robust carbon (C) sequestration capacity; however, the C stocks and dynamics in the soils covered by impervious surfaces that dominate urban areas are still not well characterized. We compared soil organic C (SOC) densities and their stabilities under impervious surface, determined by a 28-d incubation experiment, with those i...

  4. Chemical stabilization of mine waste with sewage sludge and calcium carbonate residues

    OpenAIRE

    Höckert, Linda

    2007-01-01

    Chemical stabilization of mine waste from Ljusnarsbergsfältet with sewage sludge and calcium carbonate residues Mine waste from Ljusnarsbergsfältet in Kopparberg, Sweden, is considered to constitute a great risk for human health and the surrounding environment. Some of the waste rock consists of sulphide minerals. When sulphide minerals come into contact with dissolved oxygen and precipitation, oxidation may occur resulting in acid mine drainage (AMD) and the release of heavy metals. The purp...

  5. Improved stability of redox enzyme layers on glassy carbon electrodes via covalent grafting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pellissier, Marie; Barriere, Frederic [Universite de Rennes 1, CNRS UMR no. 6226, Sciences Chimiques de Rennes, Equipe MaCSE (France); Downard, Alison J. [MacDiarmid Institute for Advanced Materials and Nanotechnology, Department of Chemistry, University of Canterbury, Christchurch (New Zealand); Leech, Donal [School of Chemistry, National University of Ireland, Galway (Ireland)

    2008-06-15

    One of the challenges in the field of enzymatic biofuel cells is to significantly improve their current limited lifetime. In the present work, we report the covalent immobilization of enzyme layers on glassy carbon electrodes, functionalized via electrochemical reduction of in situ generated aryldiazonium salts bearing carboxylic acid groups. We present the performance and the stability over time of the modified electrodes. For glucose oxidase - modified electrodes, stable catalytic activity is observed for a minimum of 6 weeks. (author)

  6. Effects of three different biochars on aggregate stability, organic carbon mobility and micronutrient bioavailability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartley, William; Riby, Philip; Waterson, James

    2016-10-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated both beneficial and detrimental effects on soil properties from biochar incorporation. Several biochars, with different feedstock origins, were evaluated for their effectiveness at improving soil quality of a sandy agricultural soil. A pot trial was used to investigate aggregate stability and microbial activity, pore water trace element mobility and micronutrient concentrations in grain of spring wheat after incorporation of three biochars. The feedstocks for biochar production were selected because they were established UK waste products, namely oversize woody material from green waste composting facilities, and rhododendron and soft wood material from forest clearance operations. Biochars were incorporated into the soil at a rate of 5% v/v. Aggregate stability was improved following addition of oversize biochar whilst microbial activity increased in all treatments. Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations in soil pore water from biochar-treated soils were raised, whilst micronutrient concentrations in wheat grain grown in the treated soils were significantly reduced. It was concluded that incorporation of biochar to temperate agricultural soils requires caution as it may result in reductions of essential grain micronutrients required for human health, whilst the effect on aggregate stability may be linked to organic carbon functional groups on biochar surfaces and labile carbon released from the char into the soil system. PMID:27444723

  7. Structure and stability of a silicon cluster on sequential doping with carbon atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    AzeezullaNazrulla, Mohammed; Joshi, Krati; Israel, S.; Krishnamurty, Sailaja

    2016-02-01

    SiC is a highly stable material in bulk. On the other hand, alloys of silicon and carbon at nanoscale length are interesting from both technological as well fundamental view point and are being currently synthesized by various experimental groups (Truong et. al., 2015 [26]). In the present work, we identify a well-known silicon cluster viz., Si10 and dope it sequentially with carbon atoms. The evolution of electronic structure (spin state and the structural properties) on doping, the charge redistribution and structural properties are analyzed. It is interesting to note that the ground state SiC clusters prefer to be in the lowest spin state. Further, it is seen that carbon atoms are the electron rich centres while silicon atoms are electron deficient in every SiC alloy cluster. The carbon-carbon bond lengths in alloy clusters are equivalent to those seen in fullerene molecules. Interestingly, the carbon atoms tend to aggregate together with silicon atoms surrounding them by donating the charge. As a consequence, very few Si-Si bonds are noted with increasing concentrations of C atoms in a SiC alloy. Physical and chemical stability of doped clusters is studied by carrying out finite temperature behaviour and adsorbing O2 molecule on Si9C and Si8C2 clusters, respectively.

  8. Molecular dynamics study of the stability of a carbon nanotube atop a catalytic nanoparticle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verkhovtsev, Alexey V.; Schramm, Stefan; Solov'yov, Andrey V.

    2014-09-01

    The stability of a single-walled carbon nanotube placed on top of a catalytic nickel nanoparticle is investigated by means of molecular dynamics simulations. As a case study, we consider the (12,0) nanotube consisting of 720 carbon atoms and the icosahedral Ni309 cluster. An explicit set of constant-temperature simulations is performed in order to cover a broad temperature range from 400 to 1200 K, at which a successful growth of carbon nanotubes has been achieved experimentally by means of chemical vapor deposition. The stability of the system depending on parameters of the involved interatomic interactions is analyzed. It is demonstrated that different scenarios of the nanotube dynamics atop the nanoparticle are possible depending on the parameters of the Ni-C potential. When the interaction is weak the nanotube is stable and resembles its highly symmetric structure, while an increase of the interaction energy leads to the abrupt collapse of the nanotube in the initial stage of simulation. In order to validate the parameters of the Ni-C interaction utilized in the simulations, DFT calculations of the potential energy surface for carbon-nickel compounds are performed. The calculated dissociation energy of the Ni-C bond is in good agreement with the values, which correspond to the case of a stable and not deformed nanotube simulated within the MD approach.

  9. Formate stability and carbonate hydrogenation on strained Cu overlayers on Pt(111)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schumacher, Nana Maria Pii; Andersson, Klas Jerker; Nerlov, Jesper;

    2008-01-01

    Formate (HCOO) synthesis, decomposition and the hydrogenation of carbonate (CO3) on Cu overlayers deposited on a Pt(111) single crystal are investigated to examine the reactivity of a Cu surface under tensile strain with defects present. Formate is synthesized from a 0.5 bar mixture of 70% CO2 and...... a significantly lower decomposition temperature than obtained earlier on pristine Cu(111) (460 K), as well as for thicker Cu layers where we assign an observed decomposition peak at 440 ± 5 K to relaxed, but defect-rich Cu(111). However, the thermal stability of formate on strained and defect......-rich Cu is similar to previous results obtained for supported, and lattice-strained, Cu nanoparticles. The hydrogenation of carbonate produced by 0.3 bar CO2 exposure at room temperature was monitored with XPS and TPD showing a significant loss of carbonate when subjected to 0.2 bar H2 at room temperature...

  10. Nanoscale analysis of the morphology and surface stability of calcium carbonate polymorphs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekkal, W; Zaoui, A

    2013-01-01

    Under earth surface conditions, in ocean and natural water, calcium carbonate is ubiquitous, forming anhydrous and hydrous minerals. These hydrous phases are of considerable interest for their role as precursors to stable carbonate minerals. Atomistic simulation techniques have been employed here to perform a comprehensive and quantitative study of the structural and energetic stability of dry and hydrous surfaces of calcium carbonate polymorphs using two recently developed forcefields. Results show that the dry forms are prone to ductility; while hydrous phases are found to be brittle. The (001) surface of monohydrocalcite appears to be the most stable (0.99 J/m(2)) whereas for the ikaite phase, the (001) surface is the most stable. The corresponding value is 0.2 J/m(2), i.e. even lower than the surface energy of the Beautiful computed morphology pictures are obtained with Xiao's model and are very similar to the observed SEM images. PMID:23545842

  11. Nanoscale analysis of the morphology and surface stability of calcium carbonate polymorphs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekkal, W.; Zaoui, A.

    2013-04-01

    Under earth surface conditions, in ocean and natural water, calcium carbonate is ubiquitous, forming anhydrous and hydrous minerals. These hydrous phases are of considerable interest for their role as precursors to stable carbonate minerals. Atomistic simulation techniques have been employed here to perform a comprehensive and quantitative study of the structural and energetic stability of dry and hydrous surfaces of calcium carbonate polymorphs using two recently developed forcefields. Results show that the dry forms are prone to ductility; while hydrous phases are found to be brittle. The (001) surface of monohydrocalcite appears to be the most stable (0.99 J/m2) whereas for the ikaite phase, the (001) surface is the most stable. The corresponding value is 0.2 J/m2, i.e. even lower than the surface energy of the Beautiful computed morphology pictures are obtained with Xiao's model and are very similar to the observed SEM images.

  12. Transport and deposition of carbon at catchment scale: stabilization mechanisms approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Mena, María; Almagro, María; Díaz-Pereira, Elvira; García-Franco, Noelia; Boix-Fayos, Carolina

    2016-04-01

    Terrestrial sedimentation buries large amounts of organic carbon (OC) annually, contributing to the terrestrial carbon sink. The temporal significance of this sink will strongly depend on the attributes of the depositional environment, but also on the characteristics of the OC reaching these sites and its stability upon deposition. The fate of the redistributed OC will ultimately depend on the mechanisms of its physical and chemical protection against decomposition, its turnover rates and the conditions under which the OC is stored in sedimentary settings. This framework is more complex in Mediterranean river basins where sediments are often redistributed under a range of environmental conditions in ephemeral, intermittent and perennial fluvial courses, sometimes within the same catchment. The OC stabilization mechanisms and their relations with aggregation at different transport and sedimentary deposits is under those conditions highly uncertain. The main objective of this work was to characterize the stabilization and mineralization of OC in sediments in transit (suspended load), at a range of depositional settings (alluvial bars, reservoir sediments) and soils from the source areas in a sub-catchment (111 km2) at the headwaters of the Segura catchment in South East Spain. In order to obtain a deeper knowledge on the predominant stabilization mechanism corresponding to each erosional phase, the following organic carbon fractionation method was carried out: Four aggregate size classes were distinguished by sieving (large and small macroaggregates, free microaggregates, and free silt plus clay fraction), and the microaggregates occluded within macroaggregates (SMm) were isolated. As a further step, an oxidation of the OC occluded in silt plus clay fraction and that of the free silt plus clay fraction was performed to estimate the oxidant resistant OC pool. Measured OC in these fractions can be related to three functional pools: active (free particulate organic

  13. Expanding Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrödinger, E.

    2011-02-01

    Preface; Part I. The de Sitter Universe: 1. Synthetic construction; 2. The reduced model: geodesics; 3. The elliptic interpretation; 4. The static frame; 5. The determination of parallaxes; 6. The Lemaître-Robertson frame; Part II. The Theory of Geodesics: 7. On null geodesics; i. Determination of the parameter for null lines in special cases; ii. Frequency shift; 8. Free particles and light rays in general expanding spaces, flat or hyperspherical; i. Flat spaces; ii. Spherical spaces; iii. The red shift for spherical spaces; Part III. Waves in General Riemannian Space-Time: 9. The nature of our approximation; 10. The Hamilton-Jacobi theory in a gravitational field; 11. Procuring approximate solutions of the Hamilton-Jacobi equation from wave theory; Part IV. Waves in an Expanding Universe: 12. General considerations; 13. Proper vibrations and wave parcels; Bibliography.

  14. Field-Scale Partitioning of Ecosystem Respiration Components Suggests Carbon Stabilization in a Bioenergy Grass Ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, C. K.; Miller, J. N.; Masters, M. D.; Bernacchi, C.; DeLucia, E. H.

    2014-12-01

    Annually-harvested agroecosystems have the potential to be net carbon sinks only if their root systems allocate sufficient carbon belowground and if this carbon is then retained as stable soil organic matter. Soil respiration measurements are the most common approach to evaluate the stability of soil carbon at experimental time scales, but valid inferences require the partitioning of soil respiration into root-derived (current-year C) and heterotrophic (older C) components. This partitioning is challenging at the field scale because roots and soil are intricately mixed and physical separation in impossible without disturbing the fluxes to be measured. To partition soil flux and estimate the C sink potential of bioenergy crops, we used the carbon isotope difference between C3 and C4 plant species to quantify respiration from roots of three C4 grasses (maize, Miscanthus, and switchgrass) grown in a site with a mixed cropping history where respiration from the breakdown of old soil carbon has a mixed C3-C4 signature. We used a Keeling plot approach to partition fluxes both at the soil surface using soil chambers and from the whole field using continuous flow sampling of air within and above the canopy. Although soil respiration rates from perennial grasses were higher than those from maize, the isotopic signature of respired carbon indicated that the fraction of soil CO2 flux attributable to current-year vegetation was 1.5 (switchgrass) to 2 (Miscanthus) times greater in perennials than that from maize, indicating that soil CO2 flux came mostly from roots and turnover of soil organic matter was reduced in the perennial crops. This reduction in soil heterotrophic respiration, combined with the much greater quantities of C allocated belowground by perennial grasses compared to maize, suggests that perennial grasses grown as bioenergy crops may be able to provide an additional climate benefit by acting as carbon sinks in addition to reducing fossil fuel consumption.

  15. Co-composting solid biowastes with alkaline materials to enhance carbon stabilization and revegetation potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Saikat; Bolan, Nanthi S; Seshadri, Balaji; Kunhikrishnan, Anitha; Wijesekara, Hasintha; Xu, Yilu; Yang, Jianjun; Kim, Geon-Ha; Sparks, Donald; Rumpel, Cornelia

    2016-04-01

    Co-composting biowastes such as manures and biosolids can be used to stabilize carbon (C) without impacting the quality of these biowastes. This study investigated the effect of co-composting biowastes with alkaline materials on C stabilization and monitored the fertilization and revegetation values of these co-composts. The stabilization of C in biowastes (poultry manure and biosolids) was examined by their composting in the presence of various alkaline amendments (lime, fluidized bed boiler ash, flue gas desulphurization gypsum, and red mud) for 6 months in a controlled environment. The effects of co-composting on the biowastes' properties were assessed for different physical C fractions, microbial biomass C, priming effect, potentially mineralizable nitrogen, bioavailable phosphorus, and revegetation of an urban landfill soil. Co-composting biowastes with alkaline materials increased C stabilization, attributed to interaction with alkaline materials, thereby protecting it from microbial decomposition. The co-composted biowastes also increased the fertility of the landfill soil, thereby enhancing its revegetation potential. Stabilization of biowastes using alkaline materials through co-composting maintains their fertilization value in terms of improving plant growth. The co-composted biowastes also contribute to long-term soil C sequestration and reduction of bioavailability of heavy metals. PMID:26381784

  16. Co-precipitation Synthesis and Thermal Stability of Zircon Encapsulated Carbon Black

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PENG Cheng, ZHANG Chu-Xin, L? Ming, LI Zhi-Hong, WU Jian-Qing

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Zircon encapsulated carbon black powders were synthesized by a co-precipitation method using TEOS and zirconium oxychloride as starting materials. X-ray diffraction (XRD, scanning electronic microscope (SEM, colorimeter and laser grain size analyzer were used to investigate the phase structure, morphology, thermal stability and size distribution of the prepared composite powders, respectively. The effect of experimental conditions including the pH of the precursor solution, the calcination temperature, the type and amount of mineralizers on their thermal stability was studied by orthogonal test. The optimal conditions were accordingly determined as follows: precursor solution pH=5, calcination temperature 1150¡æ and 5% LiF mineralizer. Under these conditions, zircon encapsulated carbon black with embedded structures can be obtained. The composite powder has high thermal stability and adequate size distribution, and thus it is a good candidate material for black ceramic pigment. When calcined at 1000¡æ in the frit glaze, the powder shows considerable tilting strength.

  17. Mechanochemically Activated, Calcium Oxide-Based, Magnesium Oxide-Stabilized Carbon Dioxide Sorbents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurlov, Alexey; Broda, Marcin; Hosseini, Davood; Mitchell, Sharon J; Pérez-Ramírez, Javier; Müller, Christoph R

    2016-09-01

    Carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) is a promising approach to reduce anthropogenic CO2 emissions and mitigate climate change. However, the costs associated with the capture of CO2 using the currently available technology, that is, amine scrubbing, are considered prohibitive. In this context, the so-called calcium looping process, which relies on the reversible carbonation of CaO, is an attractive alternative. The main disadvantage of naturally occurring CaO-based CO2 sorbents, such as limestone, is their rapid deactivation caused by thermal sintering. Here, we report a scalable route based on wet mechanochemical activation to prepare MgO-stabilized, CaO-based CO2 sorbents. We optimized the synthesis conditions through a fundamental understanding of the underlying stabilization mechanism, and the quantity of MgO required to stabilize CaO could be reduced to as little as 15 wt %. This allowed the preparation of CO2 sorbents that exceed the CO2 uptake of the reference limestone by 200 %. PMID:27529608

  18. Stabilization of amorphous calcium carbonate by phosphate rich organic matrix proteins and by single phosphoamino acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentov, Shmuel; Weil, Simy; Glazer, Lilah; Sagi, Amir; Berman, Amir

    2010-08-01

    Stable amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) is a unique material produced naturally exclusively as a biomineral. It was demonstrated that proteins extracted from biogenic stable ACC induce and stabilize synthetic ACC in vitro. Polyphosphate molecules were similarly shown to induce amorphous calcium carbonate formation in vitro. Accordingly, we tested the hypothesis that biogenic ACC induction and stabilization is mediated by the phosphorylated residues of phosphoproteins. We show that extracellular organic matrix extracted from gastroliths of the red claw crayfish Cherax quadricarinatus induce stable ACC formation in vitro. The proteinaceous fraction of this organic matrix is highly phosphorylated and is incorporated into the ACC mineral phase during precipitation. We have identified the major phosphoproteins of the organic matrix and showed that they have high calcium binding capacity. Based on the above, in vitro precipitation experiments with single phosphoamino acids were performed, indicating that phosphoserine or phosphothreonine alone can induce the formation of highly stable ACC. The results indicate that phosphoproteins may play a major role in the control of ACC formation and stabilization and that their phosphoamino acid moieties are key components in this process. PMID:20416381

  19. Colloidal stability and ecotoxicity of multiwalled carbon nanotubes: Influence of select organic matters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerrillo, Cristina; Barandika, Gotzone; Igartua, Amaya; Areitioaurtena, Olatz; Uranga, Nerea; Mendoza, Gemma

    2016-01-01

    In the last few years, the release of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) into the environment has raised serious concerns regarding their fate and potential impacts. Aquatic organisms constitute an important pathway for their entrance and transfer throughout the food web, and the current demand for standardization of methodologies to analyze the interactions of MWCNTs with them requires aquatic media that represent natural systems. However, the inherent hydrophobicity of MWCNTs and the substances present in natural waters may greatly affect their stability and bioavailability. The present study analyzes the influence of the most referenced synthetic and natural organic matters (Sigma-Aldrich humic acid and Suwannee River natural organic matter) in the agglomeration kinetics and ecotoxicity of MWCNTs, with the aim of determining their suitability to fulfill the current standardization requirements. Natural organic matter provides increased colloidal stability to the MWCNTs' dispersions, which results in higher adverse effects on the key invertebrate organism Daphnia magna. Furthermore, the results obtained with this type of organic matter allow for observation of the important role of the outer diameter and content impurities of MWCNTs in their stability and ecotoxicity on daphnids. Sigma-Aldrich humic acid appeared to alter the response of the organisms to carbon nanotubes compared with that observed in the presence of natural organic matter. PMID:26189503

  20. Partition expanders

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gavinsky, Dmitry; Pudlák, Pavel

    Dagstuhl: Schloss Dagstuhl, Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik, 2014 - (Mayr, E.; Portier, N.), s. 325-336. (Leibniz International Proceedings in Informatics. 25). ISBN 978-3-939897-65-1. ISSN 1868-8969. [International Symposium on Theoretical Aspects of Computer Science (STACS 2014), /31./. Lyon (FR), 05.03.2014-08.03.2014] R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP202/12/G061 Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : partitions * expanders * random graphs Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics http://drops.dagstuhl.de/opus/volltexte/2014/4468/

  1. Molecular dynamics study of the stability of a carbon nanotube atop a catalytic nanoparticle

    CERN Document Server

    Verkhovtsev, Alexey V; Solov'yov, Andrey V

    2014-01-01

    The stability of a single-walled carbon nanotube placed on top of a catalytic nickel nanoparticle is investigated by means of molecular dynamics simulations. As a case study, we consider the $(12,0)$ nanotube consisting of 720 carbon atoms and the icosahedral Ni$_{309}$ cluster. An explicit set of constant-temperature simulations is performed in order to cover a broad temperature range from 400 to 1200 K, at which a successful growth of carbon nanotubes has been achieved experimentally by means of chemical vapor deposition. The stability of the system depending on parameters of the involved interatomic interactions is analyzed. It is demonstrated that different scenarios of the nanotube dynamics atop the nanoparticle are possible depending on the parameters of the Ni-C potential. When the interaction is weak the nanotube is stable and resembles its highly symmetric structure, while an increase of the interaction energy leads to the abrupt collapse of the nanotube in the initial stage of simulation. In order t...

  2. Electrochemical stability of citrate-capped gold nanoparticles electrostatically assembled on amine-modified glassy carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The stability of citrate-capped gold nanoparticles assembled on covalently attached ethylenediamine films on glassy carbon was probed using cyclic voltammetry and scanning electron microscopy. The accessible potential windows in 0.01 M HClO4 and phosphate buffer (pH 7.4) were found to be very similar to those for re-constructed polycrystalline bulk gold. At the nanoparticle electrodes, gold is dissolved at high positive potentials and re-deposited at lower potentials resulting in the formation of fewer, larger particles. The electrografted amine layer does not limit the stability range and citrate-capping groups do not stabilise the nanoparticles to oxidation. In addition to the structural stability of the nanoparticle electrodes, preliminary investigations of the stability of their activity for voltammetric analyses were also undertaken. Repeated voltammetric reduction of H2O2 at the nanoparticle electrodes showed excellent reproducibility indicating that the nanoparticle surface maintained a constant activity for the redox process. In contrast, a re-constructed polycrystalline bulk gold electrode did not exhibit a stable response under the same conditions.

  3. Low temperature superplasticity and thermal stability of a nanostructured low-carbon microalloyed steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, J.; Du, L.-X.; Sun, G.-S.; Xie, H.; Misra, R. D. K.

    2015-12-01

    We describe here for the first time the low temperature superplasticity of nanostructured low carbon steel (microalloyed with V, N, Mn, Al, Si, and Ni). Low carbon nanograined/ultrafine-grained (NG/UFG) bulk steel was processed using a combination of cold-rolling and annealing of martensite. The complex microstructure of NG/UFG ferrite and 50-80 nm cementite exhibited high thermal stability at 500 °C with low temperature elongation exceeding 100% (at less than 0.5 of the absolute melting point) as compared to the conventional fine-grained (FG) counterpart. The low temperature superplasticity is adequate to form complex components. Moreover, the low strength during hot processing is favorable for decreasing the spring back and minimize die loss.

  4. Fluoride enhances transfection activity of carbonate apatite by increasing cytoplasmic stability of plasmid DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → Cytoplasmic stability of plasmid DNA is enhanced by fluoride incorporation into carbonate apatite carrier. → Fluoridated carbonate apatite promotes a robust increase in transgene expression. → Controlled dissolution of fluoridated carbonate apatite in endosomal acidic environment might buffer the endosomes and prevent degradation of the released DNA. -- Abstract: Intracellular delivery of a functional gene or a nucleic acid sequence to specifically knockdown a harmful gene is a potential approach to precisely treat a critical human disease. The intensive efforts in the last few decades led to the development of a number of viral and non-viral synthetic vectors. However, an ideal delivery tool in terms of the safety and efficacy has yet to be established. Recently, we have developed pH-sensing inorganic nanocrystals of carbonate apatite for efficient and cell-targeted delivery of gene and gene-silencing RNA. Here we show that addition of very low level of fluoride to the particle-forming medium facilitates a robust increase in transgene expression following post-incubation of the particles with HeLa cells. Confocal microscopic observation and Southern blotting prove the cytoplasmic existence of plasmid DNA delivered by likely formed fluoridated carbonate apatite particles while degradation of plasmid DNA presumably by cytoplasmic nucleases was noticed following delivery with apatite particles alone. The beneficial role of fluoride in enhancing carbonate apatite-mediated gene expression might be due to the buffering potential of generated fluoridated apatite in endosomal acidic environment, thereby increasing the half-life of delivered plasmid DNA.

  5. Fluoride enhances transfection activity of carbonate apatite by increasing cytoplasmic stability of plasmid DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chowdhury, E.H., E-mail: md.ezharul.hoque@med.monash.edu.my [Jeffrey Cheah School of Medicine and Health Sciences, Monash University Sunway Campus, Jalan Lagoon Selatan, Bandar Sunway, Selangor Darul Ehsan (Malaysia)

    2011-06-17

    Highlights: {yields} Cytoplasmic stability of plasmid DNA is enhanced by fluoride incorporation into carbonate apatite carrier. {yields} Fluoridated carbonate apatite promotes a robust increase in transgene expression. {yields} Controlled dissolution of fluoridated carbonate apatite in endosomal acidic environment might buffer the endosomes and prevent degradation of the released DNA. -- Abstract: Intracellular delivery of a functional gene or a nucleic acid sequence to specifically knockdown a harmful gene is a potential approach to precisely treat a critical human disease. The intensive efforts in the last few decades led to the development of a number of viral and non-viral synthetic vectors. However, an ideal delivery tool in terms of the safety and efficacy has yet to be established. Recently, we have developed pH-sensing inorganic nanocrystals of carbonate apatite for efficient and cell-targeted delivery of gene and gene-silencing RNA. Here we show that addition of very low level of fluoride to the particle-forming medium facilitates a robust increase in transgene expression following post-incubation of the particles with HeLa cells. Confocal microscopic observation and Southern blotting prove the cytoplasmic existence of plasmid DNA delivered by likely formed fluoridated carbonate apatite particles while degradation of plasmid DNA presumably by cytoplasmic nucleases was noticed following delivery with apatite particles alone. The beneficial role of fluoride in enhancing carbonate apatite-mediated gene expression might be due to the buffering potential of generated fluoridated apatite in endosomal acidic environment, thereby increasing the half-life of delivered plasmid DNA.

  6. Influence of methyl functional groups on the stability of cubane carbon cage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katin, Konstantin P.; Prudkovskiy, Vladimir S.; Maslov, Mikhail M.

    2016-07-01

    We present a quantum-chemical study to elucidate the structure, energetics and stability of isolated polymethylcubane molecules C8H8-q(CH3)q. The results obtained by means of originally developed nonorthogonal tight-binding approach are in good agreement with the existed experimental data for solid octamethylcubane C8(CH3)8. The isomerization mechanisms for polymethylcubane family are studied in detail and the minimum energy barriers' heights preventing the decomposition are calculated. The temperature dependence of octamethylcubane molecule lifetime to the decomposition moment was determined by direct molecular dynamics simulation. It is shown that methyl groups destabilize the cubic carbon cage, but less than nitro groups.

  7. High Temperature Stability of Onion-Like Carbon vs Highly Oriented Pyrolytic Graphite

    OpenAIRE

    Latini, Alessandro; Tomellini, Massimo; Lazzarini, Laura; Bertoni, Giovanni; Gazzoli, Delia; Bossa, Luigi; Gozzi, Daniele

    2014-01-01

    The thermodynamic stability of onion-like carbon (OLC) nanostructures with respect to highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) was determined in the interval 765–1030 K by the electromotive force (emf) measurements of solid electrolyte galvanic cell: (Low) Pt|Cr3C2,CrF2,OLC|CaF2s.c.|Cr3C2,CrF2,HOPG|Pt (High). The free energy change of transformation HOPG = OLC was found positive below 920.6 K crossing the zero value at this temperature. Its trend with temperature was well described by a 3rd ...

  8. A carbon nanotube field emission cathode with high current density and long-term stability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calderon-Colon, Xiomara; Zhou, Otto [Curriculum in Applied Science and Engineering, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States); Geng Huaizhi; Gao Bo [Xintek, Incorporated, 7020 Kit Creek Road, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); An Lei; Cao Guohua [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States)

    2009-08-12

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) field emitters are now being evaluated for a wide range of vacuum electronic applications. However, problems including short lifetime at high current density, instability under high voltage, poor emission uniformity, and pixel-to-pixel inconsistency are still major obstacles for device applications. We developed an electrophoretic process to fabricate composite CNT films with controlled nanotube orientation and surface density, and enhanced adhesion. The cathodes have significantly enhanced macroscopic field emission current density and long-term stability under high operating voltages. The application of this CNT electron source for high-resolution x-ray imaging is demonstrated.

  9. Radial stability and configuration transition of carbon nanotubes regulated by enclosed cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radial stability and configuration transition of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with enclosed cores have been studied in this paper by using atomistic simulations. We found that an abnormal transition of CNTs from open to collapse can be regulated by enclosing deformable and rigid cores. The energy barrier for the configuration transition can be reduced by nearly one order of magnitude due to the presence of these cores, i.e., from ∼0.3 eV/Å to ∼0.03 eV/Å. These findings may provide guidance for the design of controllable CNT-based carrier systems for the delivery of drug, gene and fluid

  10. Theoretical studies of "stabilizing" behavior about carbon nanotubes under the electrostatic force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hong-Wei; Hu, Li-Chun; Chang, Chun-Rui

    2013-04-01

    We study the dispersion and stability of carbon nanotube (CNT) suspensions under the electrostatic interactions. The potential energies of van der Waals (vdW) attractions between the CNT themselves are obtained on the continuum Lennard-Jones (LJ) model. The potential energies of electrostatic repulsions are based upon the Yukawa-segment model. We explore the overall interactions mediated by the vdW force and the electrostatic force between two identical, parallel CNTs. Consequently, we preliminarily confirm the accuracy and reliability of the electrostatic model. PMID:23763212

  11. Soil and plant responses to pyrogenic organic matter: carbon stability and symbiotic patterns

    OpenAIRE

    Sagrilo, E.

    2014-01-01

    Soil and plant responses to pyrogenic organic matter: carbon stability and symbiotic patterns Edvaldo Sagrilo Summary Pyrogenic organic matter (PyOM), also known as biochar, is the product of biomass combustion under low oxygen concentration. There is currently a growing interest in research on the use of PyOM as a soil amendment, inspired by the existence of highly fertile, PyOM-rich anthropogenic soils in the Amazon basin. The presence of PyOM in these so-called Amazonian Dark Earths (ADE) ...

  12. Aromaticity as stabilizing element in the bidentate activation for the catalytic reduction of carbon dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Zhenpin; Hausmann, Heike; Becker, Sabine; Wegner, Hermann A

    2015-04-29

    A new transition-metal-free mode for the catalytic reduction of carbon dioxide via bidentate interaction has been developed. In the presence of Li2[1,2-C6H4(BH3)2], CO2 can be selectively transformed to either methane or methanol, depending on the reducing agent. The bidentate nature of binding is supported by X-ray analysis of an intermediate analogue, which experiences special stabilization due to aromatic character in the bidentate interaction. Kinetic studies revealed a first-order reaction rate. The transformation can be conducted without any solvent. PMID:25871326

  13. Effect of carbonation on leachability, strength and microstructural characteristics of KMP binder stabilized Zn and Pb contaminated soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Yan-Jun; Wei, Ming-Li; Reddy, Krishna R; Wu, Hao-liang

    2016-02-01

    This study presents a systematic investigation of effects of carbonation on the contaminant leachability and unconfined compressive strength of KMP stabilized contaminated soils. A field soil spiked with Zn and Pb individually and together is stabilized using a new KMP additive under standard curing conditions and also with carbonation. The KMP additive is composed of oxalic acid-activated phosphate rock, monopotassium phosphate and reactive magnesia. The stabilized soils are tested for acid neutralization capacity, toxic characteristics leaching characteristics, contaminant speciation and unconfined compression strength. X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscope and energy dispersive spectroscopy analyses are performed to assess reaction products. The results demonstrate that carbonation increases both acid buffer capacity index and unconfined compressive strength, but decreases leachability of KMP stabilized soils. These results are interpreted based on the changes in chemical speciation of Zn and Pb and also stability and solubility of the reaction products (metal phosphates and carbonates) formed in the soils. Overall, this study demonstrates that carbonation has positive effects on leachability and strength of the KMP stabilized soils. PMID:26451653

  14. Carbonic anhydrase in Tectona grandis: kinetics, stability, isozyme analysis and relationship with photosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Anita; Kumar, Pramod; Chawhaan, Pravin H; Singh, Sanjay; Ansari, S A

    2006-08-01

    Carbonic anhydrase (CA, EC: 4.2.1.1) activity in teak (Tectona grandis L.f.) was studied to determine its characteristics, kinetics and isozyme patterns. We also investigated effects of leaf age, plant age and genotype on CA activity and gas exchange parameters. Carbonic anhydrase extracted from leaves in 12 mM veronal buffer, pH 7.8, had a K(m) for CO(2) of 15.20 mM and a V(max) of 35,448 U mg(-1) chlorophyll min(-1), which values declined by 50 and 70%, respectively, after 1 week of storage at 4 degrees C. A 15% native polyacrylamide gel revealed the absence of CA isozymes in teak, with only a single CA band of 45 kD molecular mass observed across 10 segregating half-sib families and groups of trees ranging in age from 10 to 25 years. Activity remained stable during the first month in storage at 0 degrees C, but gradually declined to 25% of the initial value after 1 year in storage. During the period of active growth (February-May), maximal CA activity was observed in fully expanded and illuminated leaves. Significant variation was observed in CA activity across 10 1-year-old half-sib families and 21 5-year-old half-sib families. There was a positive correlation between CA activity and photosynthetic rate in a population of 10-year-old trees (P teak genotypes. PMID:16651256

  15. Polypropylene/Expanded Graphite/Carbon Fiber Thermal Conductive Composite%聚丙烯/膨胀石墨/碳纤维导热复合材料

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐睿杰; 雷彩红; 杨志广; 廖敦锃; 刘舜莉

    2012-01-01

    The thermal conductivity, mechanical properties and processing property of polypropylene ( PP)/expanded graphite (EG)/carbon fiber(CF) composite were studied. The results showed that the thermal conductivity of the composite with 20 % content of EC was 2 times that of pure PP,but its melt flow rate was decreased. The PE wax at the weight fraction of 1 % could improve the melt flow rate. When the content of carbon fiber was 5 % , the thermal conductivity reached 0.91 W ? M-1K-1 and was five times of pure PP. The melt flow rate was 1.72 g/10 min and the mechanical properties were good.%研究了聚丙烯(PP)/膨胀石墨(EG)/碳纤维(CF)复合材料的导热、力学以及加工性能.研究发现:当膨胀石墨的质量含量达到20%时,热导率是纯聚丙烯的2倍,但熔体流动性能有所下降;添加1%的聚乙烯蜡可以明显改善体系的熔体流动性能;将膨胀石墨与5%的碳纤维杂化使用,热导率达0.91 W·m-1K-1,是纯聚丙烯的5倍,熔体指数达到1.72 g/10 min,同时该复合材料具有较好的力学性能.

  16. Coaxial carbon@boron nitride nanotube arrays with enhanced thermal stability and compressive mechanical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Lin; Tay, Roland Yingjie; Li, Hongling; Tsang, Siu Hon; Huang, Jingfeng; Tan, Dunlin; Zhang, Bowei; Teo, Edwin Hang Tong; Tok, Alfred Iing Yoong

    2016-06-01

    Vertically aligned carbon nanotube (CNT) arrays have aroused considerable interest because of their remarkable mechanical properties. However, the mechanical behaviour of as-synthesized CNT arrays could vary drastically at a macro-scale depending on their morphologies, dimensions and array density, which are determined by the synthesis method. Here, we demonstrate a coaxial carbon@boron nitride nanotube (C@BNNT) array with enhanced compressive strength and shape recoverability. CNT arrays are grown using a commercially available thermal chemical vapor deposition (TCVD) technique and an outer BNNT with a wall thickness up to 1.37 nm is introduced by a post-growth TCVD treatment. Importantly, compared to the as-grown CNT arrays which deform almost plastically upon compression, the coaxial C@BNNT arrays exhibit an impressive ∼4-fold increase in compressive strength with nearly full recovery after the first compression cycle at a 50% strain (76% recovery maintained after 10 cycles), as well as a significantly high and persistent energy dissipation ratio (∼60% at a 50% strain after 100 cycles), attributed to the synergistic effect between the CNT and outer BNNT. Additionally, the as-prepared C@BNNT arrays show an improved structural stability in air at elevated temperatures, attributing to the outstanding thermal stability of the outer BNNT. This work provides new insights into tailoring the mechanical and thermal behaviours of arbitrary CNT arrays which enables a broader range of applications. PMID:27227818

  17. Stabilization and transformation of amorphous calcium carbonate: structural and kinetic studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Millicent Promise

    Amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) is a common transient precursor in the formation of more stable crystalline calcium carbonate minerals, most notably calcite, vaterite, and aragonite. Formation of ACC from calcium carbonate rich aqueous solution rather than direct crystallization of crystalline polymorphs by organisms provides several advantages: control of morphology, grain size, orientation, hardness, and other bulk properties as well as reduction of energy costs during growth cycles. Despite decades of study, stabilization and transformation mechanisms of synthetic and biogenic ACC remain unclear. In particular, the roles of H2O and inorganic phosphate in ACC structure and transformation, and the variables affecting transformation kinetics and polymorph selection are understudied. In this research, we addressed structure and kinetic behavior of ACC through four complementary investigations: two studies focus on synthetic ACC stabilization and two focus on synthetic and biogenic ACC transformation behavior in solution at ambient temperatures. We explored ACC stabilization via compositional and thermal analyses, X-ray scattering, X-ray absorption spectroscopy, and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Transformation experiments used a novel method of in situ structural analysis that provided quantitative kinetic and structural data and allowed us to visualize the ACC transformation pathway. Results revealed the complexity of H2O structure in ACC samples synthesized from three methods, indicating that the distinct hydrous populations produced define ACC behavior. Transformation kinetics and polymorph selection were strongly affected by the hydration state and type of synthetic ACC reacted. In situ transformation experiments also showed differences in kinetic behavior due to reaction medium. The structural role of hydrous components was again evident in in situ transformation experiments for ACC from a biogenic lobster gastrolith (LG) reacted with water. LG

  18. Heat treatment and mechanical stability behaviour of medium-carbon TRIP-aided bainitic steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Grajcar

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available bainitic transformation on the mechanical stability of retained austenite for medium-carbon TRIP-aided steel.Design/methodology/approach: The examinations were carried out on medium-carbon steel containing 0.55%C and 1.35%Si. The conditions of heat treatment consisted of isothermal quenching of the specimens to a temperature range of 250 to 550°C, where they were held for 600 and 1800 s. Tensile deformation of steel to the given strain equal 0.25, 0.5 and 0.75 of total elongation of samples was conducted in order to determine the kinetics of retained austenite transformation into martensite. The retained fraction of the γ phase was determined by the use of the quantitative X-ray phase analysis.Findings: Increasing the carbon concentration to 0.55% in TRIP-type steels makes possible to obtain very high strength properties without a deterioration of the ductility. The retained austenite of the 19% volume fraction can be obtained after the isothermal quenching of the steel to a temperature of 250°C. In these conditions, the matrix of the steel is the ferritic bainite. The size of regular grains of retained austenite is equal up to 3μm, while the rest of γ phase is present in a form of thin films between individual laths of bainite. Diversification of retained austenite form has a reflection in its mechanical stability, connected with two-stage kinetics of martensitic transformation of γ phase.Research limitations/implications: To determine with more detail the stability of retained austenite the knowledge of lattice parameter changes with an isothermal holding temperature is needed.Practical implications: The proposed heat treatment can be useful for manufacturing reinforced structural elements characterized by high strength and ductile properties in the automobile industry.Originality/value: The developed conditions of the heat treatment concern the medium-carbon TRIP-type bainitic steel, offering higher product of UTS UEl compared with

  19. Stability, carbon resistance, and reactivity toward autothermal reforming of nickel on ceria-based supports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    'Full text:' Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) normally requires a reformer unit, where the fuel such as natural gas, methane, methanol, or ethanol can be reformed to hydrogen before introducing to the main part of fuel cell. Nickel on commercial supports such as Al2O3, MgO, ZrO2 has been widely reported to be used as the reforming catalyst commercially. Carbon formation and catalyst deactivation are always the main problems of using this type of catalyst. It is well established that CeO2 and CeO2-ZrO2 have been applied as the catalysts in a wide variety of reactions involving oxidation or partial oxidation of hydrocarbons (e.g. automotive catalysis). In order to quantify the performance of nickel on CeO2 and CeO2-ZrO2 supports for reformer application, the stabilities toward methane steam reforming and the carbon formation resistance were studied. After 18 hours, nickel on CeO2-ZrO2 with the Ce/Zr ratio of 3/1 presented the best performance in term of stability and activity. It also provided excellent resistance toward carbon formation compared to commercial Ni/Al2O3. The autothermal reforming of methane over Ni catalyst on CeO2 and CeO2-ZrO2 supports were also investigated. Ni/Ce-ZrO2 with the Ce/ Zr ratio of 3/1 also showed the best performance. The kinetics of this reaction was also studied. In the temperature range of 750-900C, the reaction order in methane was always closed to 1. The catalyst showed a slight positive effect of hydrogen and a negative effect of steam on the steam reforming rate. The addition of oxygen increased the steam reforming rate. However, the productions of CO and H2 decreased with increasing oxygen partial pressure. (author)

  20. CONSIDERATIONS REGARDING THE INFLUENCE OF METALIC IONS OF THE STABILITY OF CARBONATES FROM SOILS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Bulgariu

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available The distribution of minor elements in heterogeneous mineral / aqueous solutions systems represent one of important problem, with many applications in environmental geochemistry field. Ours studies was focus on the metal ions distribution in carbonate (CaCO3 / solution systems, from applicability point of view to the estimation of formation conditions and of carbonates stability from soils. On the base of our results obtained by sequential solid / liquid extraction for 17 soil samples and theoretical modeling of CaCO3 / solution systems, and the results from literature we try to develop the McIntire prognosis models and the free Gibbs enthalpy linear correlation model, by the inclusion in calculus relations of distribution coefficients a higher number of factors which effective influenced the thermodynamics and kinetics of interphase distribution processes of metal ions. The established correlations has been used to the estimation of time evolution of carbonate / solution equilibrium under the influence of some metal ions (Cd, Zn, Cu, Pb, Bi, which appear usual as pollutants in soils. The prognosis realized on the base of the established correlations are in agreement with the theoretical modelling results and studies of case for different types of polluted soils with heavy metals.

  1. Enhancement of Electrochemical Stability about Silicon/Carbon Composite Anode Materials for Lithium Ion Batteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Xiao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Silicon/carbon (Si/C composite anode materials are successfully synthesized by mechanical ball milling followed by pyrolysis method. The structure and morphology of the composite are characterized by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscope, respectively. The results show that the composite is composed of Si, flake graphite, and phenolic resin-pyrolyzed carbon, and Si and flake graphite are enwrapped by phenolic resin-pyrolyzed carbon, which can provide not only a good buffering matrix but also a conductive network. The Si/C composite also shows good electrochemical stability, in which the composite anode material exhibits a high initial charge capacity of 805.3 mAh g−1 at 100 mA g−1 and it can still deliver a high charge capacity of 791.7 mAh g−1 when the current density increases to 500 mA g−1. The results indicate that it could be used as a promising anode material for lithium ion batteries.

  2. Plasma fluorination of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes: functionalization and thermal stability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Struzzi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Grafting of fluorine species on carbon nanostructures has attracted interest due to the effective modification of physical and chemical properties of the starting materials. Various techniques have been employed to achieve a controlled fluorination yield; however, the effect of contaminants is rarely discussed, although they are often present. In the present work, the fluorination of vertically aligned multiwalled carbon nanotubes was performed using plasma treatment in a magnetron sputtering chamber with fluorine diluted in an argon atmosphere with an Ar/F2 ratio of 95:5. The effect of heavily diluted fluorine in the precursor gas mixture is investigated by evaluating the modifications in the nanotube structure and the electronic properties upon plasma treatment. The existence of oxygen-based grafted species is associated with background oxygen species present in the plasma chamber in addition to fluorine. The thermal stability and desorption process of the fluorine species grafted on the carbon nanotubes during the fluorine plasma treatment were evaluated by combining different spectroscopic techniques.

  3. Plasma fluorination of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes: functionalization and thermal stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Struzzi, Claudia; Scardamaglia, Mattia; Hemberg, Axel; Petaccia, Luca; Colomer, Jean-François; Snyders, Rony; Bittencourt, Carla

    2015-01-01

    Grafting of fluorine species on carbon nanostructures has attracted interest due to the effective modification of physical and chemical properties of the starting materials. Various techniques have been employed to achieve a controlled fluorination yield; however, the effect of contaminants is rarely discussed, although they are often present. In the present work, the fluorination of vertically aligned multiwalled carbon nanotubes was performed using plasma treatment in a magnetron sputtering chamber with fluorine diluted in an argon atmosphere with an Ar/F2 ratio of 95:5. The effect of heavily diluted fluorine in the precursor gas mixture is investigated by evaluating the modifications in the nanotube structure and the electronic properties upon plasma treatment. The existence of oxygen-based grafted species is associated with background oxygen species present in the plasma chamber in addition to fluorine. The thermal stability and desorption process of the fluorine species grafted on the carbon nanotubes during the fluorine plasma treatment were evaluated by combining different spectroscopic techniques. PMID:26734518

  4. Grazing incidence beam expander

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akkapeddi, P.R.; Glenn, P.; Fuschetto, A.; Appert, Q.; Viswanathan, V.K.

    1985-01-01

    A Grazing Incidence Beam Expander (GIBE) telescope is being designed and fabricated to be used as an equivalent end mirror in a long laser resonator cavity. The design requirements for this GIBE flow down from a generic Free Electron Laser (FEL) resonator. The nature of the FEL gain volume (a thin, pencil-like, on-axis region) dictates that the output beam be very small. Such a thin beam with the high power levels characteristic of FELs would have to travel perhaps hundreds of meters or more before expanding enough to allow reflection from cooled mirrors. A GIBE, on the other hand, would allow placing these optics closer to the gain region and thus reduces the cavity lengths substantially. Results are presented relating to optical and mechanical design, alignment sensitivity analysis, radius of curvature analysis, laser cavity stability analysis of a linear stable concentric laser cavity with a GIBE. Fabrication details of the GIBE are also given.

  5. Thermal stability of alkyl carbonate mixed-solvent electrolytes for lithium ion cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamura, Tetsuya; Kimura, Arihisa; Egashira, Minato; Okada, Shigeto; Yamaki, Jun-Ichi

    The thermal stability of some mixed-solvent electrolytes used in lithium cells was measured by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) using airtight containers. The electrolytes used were ethylene carbonate ( EC)+ diethyl carbonate ( DEC) , EC+ dimethyl carbonate ( DMC) , propylene carbonate (PC)+DEC, and PC+DMC in which was dissolved 1 M LiPF 6 or 1 M LiClO 4. The influence of water addition and lithium metal addition on the thermal behavior of these electrolytes was also investigated. The exothermic peak of LiPF 6 electrolytes containing DEC was found at 255 °C, and the peak temperature of the electrolytes containing DEC was 15-20 °C lower than that of LiPF 6 electrolytes containing DMC. This effect was also observed in the electrolytes including LiClO 4. DMC was found to be more reactive than DEC. The thermal behavior of various kinds of LiPF 6 electrolytes with lithium metal was measured by DSC. The exothermic reaction of 1 M LiPF 6/EC+DEC, 1 M LiPF 6/EC+DMC, and 1 M LiPF 6/PC+DMC with lithium metal began at the melting point of lithium metal because of the break down of the solid electrolyte interface (SEI). The temperature was approximately 180 °C, whereas the self-heating of 1 M LiPF 6/PC+DEC occurred before the melting point of lithium metal. The temperature at which the self-exothermal reaction began was 140 °C. Therefore, the lithium metal in this electrolyte was found to be thermally unstable. When water was added to the above electrolytes with lithium metal, the exothermic reaction began at less than 130 °C, probably due to a collapse of SEI in response to the HF that was a product of the reaction between LiPF 6 and the added water.

  6. Dynamics of Soil Organic Carbon and Aggregate Stability with Grazing Exclusion in the Inner Mongolian Grasslands.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ding Wen

    Full Text Available Grazing exclusion (GE has been deemed as an important approach to enhance the soil carbon storage of semiarid grasslands in China; however, it remains unclear how different organic carbon (OC components in soils vary with the duration of GE. Here, we observed the changing trends of different OC components in soils with increased GE duration in five grassland succession series plots, ranging from free grazing to 31-year GE. Specifically, we measured microbial biomass carbon (MBC, easily oxidizable OC (EOC, water-soluble OC (WSOC, and OC in water stable aggregates (macroaggregates [250-2000 μm], microaggregates [53-250 μm], and mineral fraction [< 53 μm] at 0-20 cm soil depths. The results showed that GE significantly enhanced EOC and WSOC contents in soils, but caused a decline of MBC at the three decade scale. Macroaggregate content (F = 425.8, P < 0.001, OC stored in macroaggregates (F = 84.1, P < 0.001, and the mean weight diameter (MWD of soil aggregates (F = 371.3, P < 0.001 increased linearly with increasing GE duration. These findings indicate that OC stored in soil increases under three-decade GE with soil organic matter (SOM stability improving to some extent. Long-term GE practices enhance the formation of soil aggregates through higher SOM input and an exclusion of animal trampling. Therefore, the practice of GE may be further encouraged to realize the soil carbon sequestration potential of semi-arid grasslands, China.

  7. Dynamics of Soil Organic Carbon and Aggregate Stability with Grazing Exclusion in the Inner Mongolian Grasslands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Ding; He, Nianpeng; Zhang, Jinjing

    2016-01-01

    Grazing exclusion (GE) has been deemed as an important approach to enhance the soil carbon storage of semiarid grasslands in China; however, it remains unclear how different organic carbon (OC) components in soils vary with the duration of GE. Here, we observed the changing trends of different OC components in soils with increased GE duration in five grassland succession series plots, ranging from free grazing to 31-year GE. Specifically, we measured microbial biomass carbon (MBC), easily oxidizable OC (EOC), water-soluble OC (WSOC), and OC in water stable aggregates (macroaggregates [250-2000 μm], microaggregates [53-250 μm], and mineral fraction [< 53 μm]) at 0-20 cm soil depths. The results showed that GE significantly enhanced EOC and WSOC contents in soils, but caused a decline of MBC at the three decade scale. Macroaggregate content (F = 425.8, P < 0.001), OC stored in macroaggregates (F = 84.1, P < 0.001), and the mean weight diameter (MWD) of soil aggregates (F = 371.3, P < 0.001) increased linearly with increasing GE duration. These findings indicate that OC stored in soil increases under three-decade GE with soil organic matter (SOM) stability improving to some extent. Long-term GE practices enhance the formation of soil aggregates through higher SOM input and an exclusion of animal trampling. Therefore, the practice of GE may be further encouraged to realize the soil carbon sequestration potential of semi-arid grasslands, China. PMID:26751370

  8. Spherical nano-SnSb/MCMB/carbon core–shell composite for high stability lithium ion battery anodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A novel multi-step design of spherical nano-SnSb/MCMB/carbon core–shell composite for high stability and long life lithium battery electrodes has been introduced. The core–shell composite was successfully synthesized via co-precipitation and subsequent pyrolysis. The resultant composite sphere consisted of nanosized SnSb alloy and mesophase carbon microbeads (MCMB, 10 μm) embedded in a carbon matrix pyrolyzed from glucose and petroleum pitch, in which the MCMB was treated to be the inner core to offer mechanical support and efficient electron conducting pathway. The composite material exhibited a unique stability with a retention discharge capacity rate of 83.52% with reversible capacity of 422.5 mAh g−1 after 100 cycles and a high initial coulombic efficiency of 83.53%. The enhanced electrochemical performance is attributed to the structural stability of the composite sphere during the charging–discharging process

  9. Stability and vulnerability of organic carbon stored in Japanese forest soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koarashi, J.; Atarashi-Andoh, M.; Ishizuka, S.; Kadono, A.; Moriya, K.; Nakanishi, T.

    2010-12-01

    Accelerated release of carbon previously stored in soils is considered one of the most important positive feedbacks from terrestrial ecosystems to the atmosphere in a future warmer world. The magnitude and timing of this carbon-cycle feedback is, however, highly uncertain largely due to a lack of fundamental understanding of processes that store carbon in soils. A challenge in understanding the processes lies in identifying soil organic carbon (SOC) pools with different turnover times. We used 14C analysis following chemical SOC fractionation to quantify the sizes and turnover times of SOC pools of Japanese forest soils. Soil samples were collected by thin-layer sampling (mostly by 2-cm increment) from the top 20 cm of mineral soils under four deciduous forests with contrasting soil types and vegetations. Overall, the 14C signatures in the chemically separated fractions decreased with depth and chemical stability for all the soils, suggesting older C in deeper soil and chemically recalcitrant fractions. The 14C signatures in acid-extractable SOC fractions showed a bomb-14C contribution in the upper 10 cm soil layers, indicating a significant proportion of the fractions are exchanged with atmospheric CO2 within several decades. In contrast, SOC fractions that were not extracted with acid and base were generally depleted in 14C throughout the profiles. Based on the 14C data, we estimated mean residence times (MRTs) of the fractions, and separated the total soil carbon into SOC pools with different MRT ranges. The total carbon storage of the studied soils ranged from 4.6 to 13.5 kgC m-2, the lowest in a brown forest soil under a temperate larch forest and the highest in a black soil under a cool-temperate beech forest. The 14C-based approach revealed different pictures of the family of MRTs soil by soil. The SOC pools that cycle slowly on timescales of 100-1000 years accounted for 64-94% of the total soil carbon, and the size of the pools strongly correlated with the

  10. Relative stability of soil carbon revealed by shifts in δ15N and C:N ratio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Alewell

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Life on earth drives a continuous exchange of carbon between soils and the atmosphere. Some forms of soil carbon, or organic matter, are more stable and have a longer residence time in soil than others. Relative differences in stability have often been derived from shifts in δ13C (which is bound to a vegetation change from C3 to C4 type or through 14C-dating (which is bound to small sample numbers because of high measurement costs. Here, we propose a new concept based on the increase in δ15N and the decrease in C:N ratio with increasing stability. We tested the concept on grasslands at different elevations in the Swiss Alps. Depending on elevation and soil depth, it predicted mineral-associated organic carbon to be 3 to 73 times more stable than particulate organic carbon. Analysis of 14C-ages generally endorsed these predictions.

  11. Relative stability of soil carbon revealed by shifts in δ15N and C:N ratio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Alewell

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Life on earth drives a continuous exchange of carbon between soils and the atmosphere. Some forms of soil carbon, or organic matter, are more stable and have a longer residence time in soil than others. Relative differences in stability have often been derived from shifts in δ13C (which is bound to a vegetation change from C3 to C4 type or through 14C-dating (which is bound to small sample numbers because of high measurement costs. Here, we propose a new concept based on the increase in δ15N and the decrease in C:N ratio with increasing stability. We tested the concept on grasslands at different elevations in the Swiss Alps. Depending on elevation and soil depth, it predicted mineral-associated organic carbon to be 3 to 73 times more stable than particulate organic carbon. Analysis of 14C-ages generally endorsed these predictions.

  12. Low density polycarbonate-graphene nanocomposite foams produced by supercritical carbon dioxide two-step foaming. Thermal stability

    OpenAIRE

    Gedler, Gabriel; Antunes, Marcelo de Sousa Pais; Velasco Perero, José Ignacio

    2016-01-01

    The thermal stability of low density polycarbonate-graphene nanocomposite foams prepared by supercritical carbon dioxide two-step foaming was investigated. Unfilled polycarbonate foams showed improved thermal stabilities when compared to the unfoamed polycarbonate, as the cellular structure of foams effectively slowed down the heat transfer process. Comparatively, polycarbonate foams with larger cells exhibited the highest delays in the early stage of thermal decomposition. Low density polyca...

  13. Coaxial carbon@boron nitride nanotube arrays with enhanced thermal stability and compressive mechanical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Lin; Tay, Roland Yingjie; Li, Hongling; Tsang, Siu Hon; Huang, Jingfeng; Tan, Dunlin; Zhang, Bowei; Teo, Edwin Hang Tong; Tok, Alfred Iing Yoong

    2016-05-01

    Vertically aligned carbon nanotube (CNT) arrays have aroused considerable interest because of their remarkable mechanical properties. However, the mechanical behaviour of as-synthesized CNT arrays could vary drastically at a macro-scale depending on their morphologies, dimensions and array density, which are determined by the synthesis method. Here, we demonstrate a coaxial carbon@boron nitride nanotube (C@BNNT) array with enhanced compressive strength and shape recoverability. CNT arrays are grown using a commercially available thermal chemical vapor deposition (TCVD) technique and an outer BNNT with a wall thickness up to 1.37 nm is introduced by a post-growth TCVD treatment. Importantly, compared to the as-grown CNT arrays which deform almost plastically upon compression, the coaxial C@BNNT arrays exhibit an impressive ~4-fold increase in compressive strength with nearly full recovery after the first compression cycle at a 50% strain (76% recovery maintained after 10 cycles), as well as a significantly high and persistent energy dissipation ratio (~60% at a 50% strain after 100 cycles), attributed to the synergistic effect between the CNT and outer BNNT. Additionally, the as-prepared C@BNNT arrays show an improved structural stability in air at elevated temperatures, attributing to the outstanding thermal stability of the outer BNNT. This work provides new insights into tailoring the mechanical and thermal behaviours of arbitrary CNT arrays which enables a broader range of applications.Vertically aligned carbon nanotube (CNT) arrays have aroused considerable interest because of their remarkable mechanical properties. However, the mechanical behaviour of as-synthesized CNT arrays could vary drastically at a macro-scale depending on their morphologies, dimensions and array density, which are determined by the synthesis method. Here, we demonstrate a coaxial carbon@boron nitride nanotube (C@BNNT) array with enhanced compressive strength and shape recoverability

  14. Stabilization and incorporation into biomass of specific plant carbons during biodegradation in soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of soil type and incubation period on the biodegradation, incorporation into biomass, and stabilization in humus of 14C-labeled cornstalk and/or wheat straw lignin, polysaccharide, and protein fractions were followed for one year. After 6 months, 56-68%, 6-21%, 71-81%, 63-75%, and 56-68% from wheat straw and from the lignin, polysaccharide, and protein fraction of wheat straw had been lost as CO2, respectively. Loss of CO2 increased only slightly with further incubation. Greater amounts of CO2, especially during the early incubation stages, were evolved from neutral and alkaline soils (pH 7.0, 7.4, 7.8) than from acid soils (pH 5.0, 5.5). After one year, a major portion of the residual C from lignin was recovered in the humic acid fraction, relatively small amounts, 5 to 17% were lost upon acid hydrolysis, and generally <1% was found present in the biomass. Lesser amounts of the polysaccharide and protein carbons were incorporated into the humic acid, 17-20% and 16-27% respectively. Relatively greater amounts of the residual carbons of the polysaccharide and protein were incorporated into the biomass, 4.9-7.8% and 4.6-13.4%, respectively and higher percentages were lost upon acid hydrolysis, 56 to 81%. The results for the whole wheat straw were very similar to those of the protein fraction. Overall, more residual C was stabilized into humic acid in the acid soils than in the neutral soils. (orig.)

  15. An expanded family of dysprosium-scandium mixed-metal nitride clusterfullerenes: the role of the lanthanide metal on the carbon cage size distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Tao; Liu, Fupin; Wang, Song; Zhu, Xianjun; Popov, Alexey A; Yang, Shangfeng

    2015-04-01

    A large family of dysprosium-scandium (Dy-Sc) mixed-metal nitride clusterfullerenes (MMNCFs), Dy(x)Sc(3-x)N@C2n (x = 1, 2, 2n = 68, 70, 76-86) have been successfully synthesized and isolated. Among these, the C70 and C82-based MMNCFs are two new cages that have never been isolated for MMNCFs. Synthesis of Dy(x)Sc(3-x)N@C2n was accomplished by the "selective organic solid" route using guanidinium thiocyanate as the nitrogen source, and their isolation was fulfilled by recycling HPLC. UV/Vis-NIR spectroscopic study indicates that almost all Dy(x)Sc(3-x)N@C2n MMNCFs are kinetically stable fullerenes with optical band gaps beyond 1 eV. This feature is distinctly different to their counterparts Dy3N@C2n (78≤2n≤88), whose for optical band-gaps are below 1 eV for relatively large cages such as C84 and C86. An FTIR spectroscopic study in combination with DFT calculations enables reasonable assignments of the cage isomeric structures of all isolated Dy(x)Sc(3-x)N@C2n (x = 1, 2, 2n = 68, 70, 76-86) MMNCFs. The carbon cage size distribution of Dy(x)Sc(3-x)N@C2n (2n = 68, 70, 76-86) is compared to the reported Dy3N@C2n (78≤2n≤8) homogeneous NCF and Dy(x)Sc(3-x)N@C2n (78≤2n≤88) MMNCF families, revealing that the medium-sized Dy metal plays a crucial role on the expanded cage size distribution of MMNCFs. As a result, Dy(x)Sc(3-x)N@C2n MMNCFs are the largest MMNCF family reported to date. PMID:25712246

  16. Aqueous stabilization of carbon nanotubes: effects of surface oxidization and solution chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Yingchen; Wu, Fengchang; Lin, Daohui; Xing, Baoshan

    2014-03-01

    Surface oxygen functional groups can affect the morphological characteristics, aggregation kinetics, and adsorption capacity of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). However, little is known about the quantitative relationship between oxygen content and the dispersion stability of MWCNTs. To investigate the effects of surface oxidization, MWCNTs were oxidized using concentrated H2SO4/HNO3 acids for 0, 1, 2, 4, and 8 h, respectively. Experimental results showed that the oxygen content of MWCNTs increased with surface oxidization time. Linear correlations were found to exist between the oxygen content, critical coagulation concentration (CCC) for NaCl, and critical coagulation pH values of MWCNTs detected by optical density at 800 nm. The CCC values for CaCl2 increased with oxygen contents for unmodified MWCNTs and lowly oxidized MWCNTs, while which decreased after further increasing the surface oxidization. CCC ratios in the presence of Ca(2+) to Na(+) were consistent with the empirical Schulze-Hardy rule for unmodified MWCNTs and lowly oxidized MWCNTs; however, which were much lower than the expected values for highly oxidized MWCNTs. Fulvic acid can clearly increase the stability of MWCNT suspension with unmodified MWCNTs and lowly oxidized MWCNTs, while it cannot affect the dispersion of highly oxidized MWCNTs. This study implied that the oxidation and presence of fulvic acid will possibly increase the mobility, exposure, bioavailability, and toxicity of MWCNTs. PMID:24323322

  17. Effect of graphitic order on field emission stability of carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We observed current density (J) dependent degradation in field emission current from multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). These degradations are recoverable and can be explained by emission current-induced dislocations along the MWCNTs. MWCNTs grown by thermal chemical vapour deposition (CVD) can emit stable current continuously for at least 1200 min with upper current density limits of ∼0.5 mA cm-2. In contrast, this upper limit is-2 for nanotubes grown by plasma-enhanced CVD (PECVD), although higher J is possible with relatively shorter stability duration. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy indicate higher graphitic order of the thermal CVD grown MWCNTs as compared to PECVD grown MWCNTs. Our study suggests that graphitic order affects their upper performance limits of long-term emission stability, although the effects from adsorbates cannot be completely ignored. These results indicate that field emission cannot be considered as an ideal quantum tunnelling process. The effect of electron transport along CNTs before electron tunnelling must be considered

  18. Surfactant-assisted dispersion of carbon nanotubes: mechanism of stabilization and biocompatibility of the surfactant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanoparticles (NPs) are thermodynamically unstable system and tend to aggregate to reduce free energy. The aggregation property of NPs results in inhomogeneous exposure of cells to NPs resulting in variable cellular responses. Several types of surfactants are used to stabilize NP dispersions and obtain homogenous dispersions. However, the effects of these surfactants, per se, on cellular responses are not completely known. The present study investigated the application of Pluronic F68 (PF68) for obtaining stable dispersion of NPs using carbon nanotubes as model NPs. PF68-stabilized NP suspensions are stable for long durations and do not show signs of aggregation or settling during storage or after autoclaving. The polyethylene oxide blocks in PF68 provide steric hindrance between adjacent NPs leading to stable NP dispersions. Further, PF68 is biocompatible in nature and does not affect integrity of mitochondria, lysosomes, DNA, and nuclei. Also, PF68 neither induce free radical or cytokine production nor does it interfere with cellular uptake mechanisms. The results of the present study suggest that PF68-assisted dispersion of NPs produced suspensions, which are stable after autoclaving. Further, PF68 does not interfere with normal physiological functions suggesting its application in nanomedicine and nanotoxicity evaluation

  19. Plant stimulation of soil microbial community succession: how sequential expression mediates soil carbon stabilization and turnover

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Firestone, Mary [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2015-03-31

    It is now understood that most plant C is utilized or transformed by soil microorganisms en route to stabilization. Hence the composition of microbial communities that mediate decomposition and transformation of root C is critical, as are the metabolic capabilities of these communities. The change in composition and function of the C-transforming microbial communities over time in effect defines the biological component of soil C stabilization. Our research was designed to test 2 general hypotheses; the first two hypotheses are discussed first; H1: Root-exudate interactions with soil microbial populations results in the expression of enzymatic capacities for macromolecular, complex carbon decomposition; and H2: Microbial communities surrounding roots undergo taxonomic succession linked to functional gene activities as roots grow, mature, and decompose in soil. Over the term of the project we made significant progress in 1) quantifying the temporal pattern of root interactions with the soil decomposing community and 2) characterizing the role of root exudates in mediating these interactions.

  20. Stability of carbon nanotube yarn biofuel cell in human body fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Cheong Hoon; Lee, Jae Ah; Choi, Young-Bong; Kim, Hyug-Han; Spinks, Geoffrey M.; Lima, Márcio D.; Baughman, Ray H.; Kim, Seon Jeong

    2015-07-01

    High performance with stability, easy-handling electrodes, and biofluid-flow controllable system with mechanical strength of the biofuel cell can be considered as the critical issues for future human body implant. These three challenges are sufficiently considered by using the effective platform regarding the high surface area from multi-walled carbon nanotube-conducting polymer with poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene), and size/shape dependent flexible yarn electrodes for the implantation of biofuel cell. High power biofuel cell of mW cm-2 range in physiological condition (low glucose-containing phosphate buffered saline solution and human blood serum) controlling the stirring degree is also first demonstrated for future implantation in this study. Biofuel cells for future implantation in human body vitally require long-term stability and high power outputs. We have demonstrated that a high-surface area yarn-based biofuel cell retained over 70% of its initial power output after an extended 20 days period of continuous operation in human blood serum, while delivering a power density of ∼1.0 mW cm-2. Subsequently, our enhanced enzymatic biofuel cell system would be potentially used as an innovative power source for the next generation implantable electronics.

  1. Density and stability of soil organic carbon beneath impervious surfaces in urban areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Zongqiang; Wu, Shaohua; Yan, Xiao; Zhou, Shenglu

    2014-01-01

    Installation of impervious surfaces in urban areas has attracted increasing attention due to its potential hazard to urban ecosystems. Urban soils are suggested to have robust carbon (C) sequestration capacity; however, the C stocks and dynamics in the soils covered by impervious surfaces that dominate urban areas are still not well characterized. We compared soil organic C (SOC) densities and their stabilities under impervious surface, determined by a 28-d incubation experiment, with those in open areas in Yixing City, China. The SOC density (0-20 cm) under impervious surfaces was, on average, 68% lower than that in open areas. Furthermore, there was a significantly (Pdensities of SOC and total nitrogen (N) in the open soils, whereas the correlation was not apparent for the impervious-covered soils, suggesting that the artificial soil sealing in urban areas decoupled the cycle of C and N. Cumulative CO2-C evolved during the 28-d incubation was lower from the impervious-covered soils than from the open soils, and agreed well with a first-order decay model (Ct = C1+C0(1-e-kt)). The model results indicated that the SOC underlying capped surfaces had weaker decomposability and lower turnover rate. Our results confirm the unique character of urban SOC, especially that beneath impervious surface, and suggest that scientific and management views on regional SOC assessment may need to consider the role of urban carbon stocks. PMID:25299685

  2. Longitudinal vibration and stability analysis of carbon nanotubes conveying viscous fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oveissi, Soheil; Toghraie, Davood; Eftekhari, Seyyed Ali

    2016-09-01

    Nowadays, carbon nanotubes (CNT) play an important role in practical applications in fluidic devices. To this end, researchers have studied various aspects of vibration analysis of a behavior of CNT conveying fluid. In this paper, based on nonlocal elasticity theory, single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) is simulated. To investigate and analyze the effect of internal fluid flow on the longitudinal vibration and stability of SWCNT, the equation of motion for longitudinal vibration is obtained by using Navier-Stokes equations. In the governing equation of motion, the interaction of fluid-structure, dynamic and fluid flow velocity along the axial coordinate of the nanotube and the nano-scale effect of the structure are considered. To solve the nonlocal longitudinal vibration equation, the approximate Galerkin method is employed and appropriate simply supported boundary conditions are applied. The results show that the axial vibrations of the nanotubesstrongly depend on the small-size effect. In addition, the fluid flowing in nanotube causes a decrease in the natural frequency of the system. It is obvious that the system natural frequencies reach zero at lower critical flow velocities as the wave number increases. Moreover, the critical flow velocity decreases as the nonlocal parameter increases.

  3. Enhancement of thermal stability of multiwalled carbon nanotubes via different silanization routes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scheibe, B., E-mail: bscheibe@zut.edu.p [Centre of Knowledge Based Nanomaterials and Technologies, Institute of Chemical and Enviroment Engineering, West Pomeranian University of Technology, Szczecin (Poland); Borowiak-Palen, E.; Kalenczuk, R.J. [Centre of Knowledge Based Nanomaterials and Technologies, Institute of Chemical and Enviroment Engineering, West Pomeranian University of Technology, Szczecin (Poland)

    2010-06-18

    This work presents an effect of two different silanization procedures on thermal and structural properties of oxidized and oxidized followed by sodium borohydrate (NaBH{sub 4}) reduction of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). Purified sample was oxidized in a mixture of nitric and sulfuric acids in a reflux. An oxidized material was divided into two batches. The first batch underwent a silanization procedure directly, while the second batch was reduced by NaBH{sub 4} treatment prior to the silanization. The silanization experiments were performed: (A) with {gamma}-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES) at room temperature in acetone (pH {approx}7) and (B) with condensated {gamma}-aminopropyltriethoxysilane at 40 {sup o}C in water (pH 4). The extent of the functionalization of the samples after each procedure was examined by Raman spectroscopy. The vibrational properties of the materials were studied via Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Boehms titration technique was applied to quantify the amount of the functional groups on MWCNTs. The morphology of the pristine and functionalized carbon nanotubes was exposed to high-resolution transmission electron microscopy analysis. The energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis was used to characterize the elemental composition of each sample. The effect of the silanization process on the thermal properties of MWCNTs was investigated by thermogravimetry analysis. Interestingly, the significant increase of the thermal stability of silanized MWCNTs samples in respect to the pristine MWCNTs was observed.

  4. Stabilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad H. Al-Malack

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Fuel oil flyash (FFA produced in power and water desalination plants firing crude oils in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia is being disposed in landfills, which increases the burden on the environment, therefore, FFA utilization must be encouraged. In the current research, the effect of adding FFA on the engineering properties of two indigenous soils, namely sand and marl, was investigated. FFA was added at concentrations of 5%, 10% and 15% to both soils with and without the addition of Portland cement. Mixtures of the stabilized soils were thoroughly evaluated using compaction, California Bearing Ratio (CBR, unconfined compressive strength (USC and durability tests. Results of these tests indicated that stabilized sand mixtures could not attain the ACI strength requirements. However, marl was found to satisfy the ACI strength requirement when only 5% of FFA was added together with 5% of cement. When the FFA was increased to 10% and 15%, the mixture’s strength was found to decrease to values below the ACI requirements. Results of the Toxicity Characteristics Leaching Procedure (TCLP, which was performed on samples that passed the ACI requirements, indicated that FFA must be cautiously used in soil stabilization.

  5. Electrochemical Stability of Carbon Fibers Compared to Metal Foils as Current Collectors for Lithium-Ion Batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martha, Surendra K [ORNL; Dudney, Nancy J [ORNL; Kiggans, Jim [ORNL; Nanda, Jagjit [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    The electrochemical behaviors of highly conductive, fully-graphitic, semi-graphitic and non-graphitic carbon fibers were studied as the cathode current collectors of lithium batteries in standard electrolyte (alkyl carbonate/LiPF6) solutions and compared to bare aluminum (Al). All of these current collectors demonstrate a stable electrochemical behavior within the potential range of 2.5 to 5 V, due to passivation by surface films. Carbon fibers have comparable electrochemical stability of Al and may be used in place Al foil. While the carbon fibers do not contribute any irreversible or extra capacity when they are cycled below 4.5 V, for fully-graphitic and semi-graphitic fibers PF6 intercalation and deintercalation into the carbon fiber may occur when they are cycled at high potentials >4.5 V.

  6. Effects of a carbon implant on thermal stability of Ni0.95(Pt0.05)Si

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of a carbon implant on thermal stability of Ni0.95(Pt0.05)Si films are investigated by implanting carbon of different doses into Si substrates before silicidation with two steps of rapid thermal annealing. Compared with the Ni0.95(Pt0.05)Si films without carbon implanting, the thermal stability of Ni0.95(Pt0.05)Si films with two carbon implant doses are improved 100 °C (1 × 1015 cm−2) and 150 °C (3 × 1015 cm−2), respectively. Through sheet resistance measurement, X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy, we conclude that carbon atoms precipitated at Ni(Pt0.05)Si grain boundaries and Ni0.95(Pt0.05)Si/Si interface account for the improved thermal stability of Ni0.95(Pt0.05)Si films. Furthermore, the presence of C in Ni0.95(Pt0.05)Si films changes the preferred orientation of polycrystalline NiSi which will benefit the practical application of this material. (paper)

  7. High temperature stability of onion-like carbon vs highly oriented pyrolytic graphite.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Latini

    Full Text Available The thermodynamic stability of onion-like carbon (OLC nanostructures with respect to highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG was determined in the interval 765-1030 K by the electromotive force (emf measurements of solid electrolyte galvanic cell: (Low Pt|Cr3C2,CrF2,OLC|CaF2s.c.|Cr3C2,CrF2,HOPG|Pt (High. The free energy change of transformation HOPG = OLC was found positive below 920.6 K crossing the zero value at this temperature. Its trend with temperature was well described by a 3rd degree polynomial. The unexpected too high values of [Formula: see text] jointly to the HR-TEM, STEM and EELS evidences that showed OLC completely embedded in rigid cages made of a Cr3C2/CrF2 matrix, suggested that carbon in the electrodes experienced different internal pressures. This was confirmed by the evaluation under constant volume of [dP/dT by the α/κ ratio for OLC (0.5 MPa K(-1 and HOPG (8 Pa K(-1 where α and κ are the isobaric thermal expansion and isothermal compressibility coefficients, respectively. The temperature dependency of the pressure was derived and utilized to calculate the enthalpy and entropy changes as function of temperature and pressure. The highest value of the internal pressure experienced by OLC was calculated to be about 7 GPa at the highest temperature. At 920.6 K, ΔrH and ΔrS values are 95.8 kJ mol(-1 and 104.1 JK(-1 mol(-1, respectively. The surface contributions to the energetic of the system were evaluated and they were found negligible compared with the bulk terms. As a consequence of the high internal pressure, the values of the enthalpy and entropy changes were mainly attributed to the formation of carbon defects in OLC considered as multishell fullerenes. The change of the carbon defect fraction is reported as a function of temperature.

  8. High temperature stability of onion-like carbon vs highly oriented pyrolytic graphite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latini, Alessandro; Tomellini, Massimo; Lazzarini, Laura; Bertoni, Giovanni; Gazzoli, Delia; Bossa, Luigi; Gozzi, Daniele

    2014-01-01

    The thermodynamic stability of onion-like carbon (OLC) nanostructures with respect to highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) was determined in the interval 765-1030 K by the electromotive force (emf) measurements of solid electrolyte galvanic cell: (Low) Pt|Cr3C2,CrF2,OLC|CaF2s.c.|Cr3C2,CrF2,HOPG|Pt (High). The free energy change of transformation HOPG = OLC was found positive below 920.6 K crossing the zero value at this temperature. Its trend with temperature was well described by a 3rd degree polynomial. The unexpected too high values of [Formula: see text] jointly to the HR-TEM, STEM and EELS evidences that showed OLC completely embedded in rigid cages made of a Cr3C2/CrF2 matrix, suggested that carbon in the electrodes experienced different internal pressures. This was confirmed by the evaluation under constant volume of [dP/dT by the α/κ ratio for OLC (0.5 MPa K(-1)) and HOPG (8 Pa K(-1)) where α and κ are the isobaric thermal expansion and isothermal compressibility coefficients, respectively. The temperature dependency of the pressure was derived and utilized to calculate the enthalpy and entropy changes as function of temperature and pressure. The highest value of the internal pressure experienced by OLC was calculated to be about 7 GPa at the highest temperature. At 920.6 K, ΔrH and ΔrS values are 95.8 kJ mol(-1) and 104.1 JK(-1) mol(-1), respectively. The surface contributions to the energetic of the system were evaluated and they were found negligible compared with the bulk terms. As a consequence of the high internal pressure, the values of the enthalpy and entropy changes were mainly attributed to the formation of carbon defects in OLC considered as multishell fullerenes. The change of the carbon defect fraction is reported as a function of temperature. PMID:25153181

  9. Increase of uncertainty in transient climate response to cumulative carbon emissions after stabilization of atmospheric CO2 concentration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We analyzed a dataset from an experiment of an earth system model of intermediate complexity, focusing on the change in transient climate response to cumulative carbon emissions (TCRE) after atmospheric CO2 concentration was stabilized in the Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP) 4.5. We estimated the TCRE in 2005 at 0.3–2.4 K/TtC for an unconstrained case and 1.1–1.7 K/TtC when constrained with historical and present-day observational data, the latter result being consistent with other studies. The range of TCRE increased when the increase of CO2 concentration was moderated and then stabilized. This is because the larger (smaller) TCRE members yield even greater (less) TCRE. An additional experiment to assess the equilibrium state revealed significant changes in temperature and cumulative carbon emissions after 2300. We also found that variation of land carbon uptake is significant to the total allowable carbon emissions and subsequent change of the TCRE. Additionally, in our experiment, we revealed that equilibrium climate sensitivity (ECS), one of the 12 parameters perturbed in the ensemble experiment, has a strong positive relationship with the TCRE at the beginning of the stabilization and its subsequent change. We confirmed that for participant models in the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5, ECS has a strong positive relationship with TCRE. For models using similar experimental settings, there is a positive relationship with TCRE for the start of the period of stabilization in CO2 concentration, and rate of change after stabilization. The results of this study are influential regarding the total allowable carbon emissions calculated from the TCRE and the temperature increase set as the mitigation target. (letter)

  10. Long-term stabilization of deep soil carbon by fire and burial during early Holocene climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marin-Spiotta, Erika; Chaopricha, Nina T.; Plante, Alain F.; Diefendorf, Aaron F.; Mueller, Carsten W.; Grandy, A. Stuart; Mason, Joseph A.

    2014-06-01

    Buried soils contain large reservoirs of organic carbon at depths that are not typically included in regional and global soil carbon inventories. One such palaeosol, the Brady soil of southwestern Nebraska, USA, is buried under six metres of loess. The Brady soil developed at the land surface on the late-Pleistocene-aged Peoria Loess in a period of warmth and wetness during which dunefields and dust sources across the region were stabilized. Abrupt climate change in the early Holocene led to increased loess deposition that buried the soil. Here, we used spectroscopic and isotopic analyses to determine the composition and stability of organic carbon in the Brady soil. We identify high levels of black carbon, indicating extensive biomass burning. In addition, we found intact vascular plant lipids in soil organic matter with radiocarbon ages ranging from 10,500 to 12,400 cal yr BP, indicating decomposition was slowed by rapid burial at the start of the Holocene. We conclude that landscape disturbance caused by abrupt climate change, fire and the loss of vegetative cover contributed to deep carbon sequestration as the soil was quickly buried under accumulating loess. We suggest that terrestrial soil carbon storage in arid and semi-arid environments could undergo landscape-scale shifts in response to rising temperatures, increased fire activity or drought.

  11. Thermal stability and growth kinetics of the interfacial TiC layer in the Ti alloy/carbon steel system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The thermal stability and growth kinetics of the titanium carbide interfacial layer, formed in the course of the diffusion bonding of low-alloy carbon steel (0.3 wt.% C) and Ti alloy, were investigated. Thermal stability of the titanium carbide interfacial layer was evaluated based on the thermodynamic analysis of the Fe–Ti–C ternary system. Thermodynamic analysis of the Fe–Ti–C system confirmed that the titanium carbide layer is stable in contact with the steel part of the diffusion couple. An experiment with inert markers at the interface confirms that growth kinetics of the TiC layer is governed by carbon diffusion from steel to titanium alloy through the titanium carbide phase. In the 800–950 °C temperature range, carbon diffusion in austenite was found to be a rate-determining step of the titanium carbide layer growth during the initial stage of the interaction (<40 min). For advanced stages, the thickness of the layer depends on two simultaneously occurring processes, namely flow of carbon atoms through the titanium carbide layer and that from the titanium carbide layer into the titanium alloy. The estimated values of the carbon diffusion coefficient and the activation energy of the process reflect the grain boundary mechanism of carbon diffusion through the interfacial layer

  12. Enhanced cycle stability of micro-sized Si/C anode material with low carbon content fabricated via spray drying and in situ carbonization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Micro-sized Si/C composites were fabricated via. spray drying and carbonization. • Multi-morphology carbon was formed in the Si/C composites. • Si/C composite with 5.6 wt.% C provides significant improved cycling stability. • Multi-morphology carbon plays effective role in improving the electrochemical property. • The method provides potential for mass production of superior Si-based anode materials. - Abstract: Micro-sized Si/C composites with in situ introduced carbon of multi-morphology were fabricated via spray drying a suspension of commercial micro-sized Si and citric acid followed by a carbonization. Different ratios of Si to citric acid were used to optimize the composition and structure of the composites and thus the electrochemical performance. Carbon flakes including crooked and flat ones were well dispersed in between the Si particles, forming Si/C composites. Floc-like carbon layers and carbon fragments were also found to cover partially the Si particles. The Si/C composite with a low carbon content of 5.6 wt.% provides an initial reversible capacity of 2700 mA h/g and a capacity of 1860 mA h/g after 60 cycles at a current density of 100 mA/g as anode material for lithium-ion batteries (LIBs), which are much higher than those of pristine Si and the Si/C composites with higher carbon content. The mechanism of the enhancement of electrochemical performance of the micro-sized Si/C composite is discussed. The fabrication method and the structure design of the composites offer valuable potential in developing adaptable Si-based anode materials for industrial applications

  13. Climate, soil texture, and soil types affect the contributions of fine-fraction-stabilized carbon to total soil organic carbon in different land uses across China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Andong; Feng, Wenting; Zhang, Wenju; Xu, Minggang

    2016-05-01

    Mineral-associated organic carbon (MOC), that is stabilized by fine soil particles (i.e., silt plus clay, clay) in soil, highlighting the importance of soil texture in stabilizing organic carbon across various climate zones. In cropland, different fertilization practices and land uses (e.g., upland, paddy, and upland-paddy rotation) significantly altered MOC/TSOC ratios, but not in cropping systems (e.g., mono- and double-cropping) characterized by climatic differences. This study demonstrates that the MOC/TSOC ratio is mainly driven by soil texture, soil types, and related climate and land uses, and thus the variations in MOC/TSOC ratios should be taken into account when quantitatively estimating soil C sequestration potential of silt plus clay particles on a large scale. PMID:26905446

  14. Biochar affects carbon composition and stability in soil: a combined spectroscopy-microscopy study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez-Soriano, Maria C.; Kerré, Bart; Kopittke, Peter M.; Horemans, Benjamin; Smolders, Erik

    2016-01-01

    The use of biochar can contribute to carbon (C) storage in soil. Upon addition of biochar, there is a spatial reorganization of C within soil particles, but the mechanisms remain unclear. Here, we used Fourier transformed infrared-microscopy and confocal laser scanning microscopy to examine this reorganization. A silty-loam soil was amended with three different organic residues and with the biochar produced from these residues and incubated for 237 d. Soil respiration was lower in biochar-amended soils than in residue-amended soils. Fluorescence analysis of the dissolved organic matter revealed that biochar application increased a humic-like fluorescent component, likely associated with biochar-C in solution. The combined spectroscopy-microscopy approach revealed the accumulation of aromatic-C in discrete spots in the solid-phase of microaggregates and its co-localization with clay minerals for soil amended with raw residue or biochar.The co-localization of aromatic-C:polysaccharides-C was consistently reduced upon biochar application. We conclude that reduced C metabolism is an important mechanism for C stabilization in biochar-amended soils. PMID:27113269

  15. Performance and Stability of Supercapacitor Modules based on Porous Carbon Electrodes in Hybrid Powertrain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GONG Xuan; XIE Changjun; ZOU Yaohui; QUAN Shuhai; PIOTR Bujlo; SHEN Di

    2014-01-01

    Hybrid power sources have attracted much attention in the electric vehicle area. Particularly, electric-electric hybrid powertrain system consisting of supercapacitor modules and lithium-ion batteries has been widely applied because of the high power density of supercapacitors. In this study, we design a hybrid powertrain system containing two porous carbon electrode-based supercapacitor modules in parallel and one lithium ion battery pack. With the construction of the testing station, the performance and stability of the used supercapacitor modules are investigated in correlation with the structure of the supercapacitor and the nature of the electrode materials applied. It has been shown that the responding time for voltage vibration from 20 V to 48.5 V during charging or discharging process decreases from about 490 s to 94 s with the increase in applied current from 20 A to 100 A. The capacitance of the capacitor modules is nearly independent on the applied current. With the designed setup, the energy efficiency can reach as high as 0.99. The results described here provide a guidance for material selection of supercapacitors and optimized controlling strategy for hybrid power system applied in electric vehicles.

  16. Graphene-like carbon nitride layers: stability, porosity, band gaps, and magnetic ground states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chacham, Helio; da Silva-Araujo, Joice; Brito, Walber

    In the present work, we investigate the relative stability and electronic properties of carbon nitride (CxNy) graphene-like structures using a combination of a new bond-counting method and density-functional-theory (DFT) first-principles calculations. We obtain analytical and numerical results for the energetics and the morphology of graphene-like CxNy For instance, at high N concentrations, the bond-counting method allows us to search among millions of possible structures, and we find several ones with ab initio formation energies per N atom comparable to, or even smaller than, that of the isolated graphitic N impurity. Those structures are characterized by a variety of nanoporous graphene morphologies. The low-energy C-N structures also present a variety of band gaps, from zero to 1.6 eV, which can be tuned by stoichiometry and porosity. Several structures also present ferro- and antiferromagnetic ground states. We thank support from CNPq, CAPES, and FAPEMIG.

  17. Economic Stability to Papua New Guinea by Contribution in Reducing Carbon Emissions through Support of DC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eshan Ahuja,

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Papua New Guinea is said to be PNG which is one of the most adversely affected small country by the impacts of climate change. Climate Change is one of the biggest challenges facing by them today, its devastation is widespread and intense. This issue has been discussed to evolve a method to support the nation in achieving the goal of emission reduction. The affects include those on Agriculture, Fisheries, Forestry and Tourism which have major contribution towards GDP of the PNG. PNG has a very low economic growth rate according to several economic and social indicators, the performance of the PNG economy since independence has been disappointing. Thus, there is need of taking special attention & responsibilities by giving cooperation by the nations. This is to be done by especially developed ones so as to support the small island nations in adaptation to the impacts of climate change through financial support. Through this act, the Least Developed Countries will achieve economic stability as well as imparting in reduction of carbon emissions. This paper discusses to find a path and sort out the issue. The paper also discusses various negotiating points so as to achieve the said goal mutually and amicably.

  18. Synthesis of hierarchical porous honeycomb carbon for lithium-sulfur battery cathode with high rate capability and long cycling stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • A novel HPHC was prepared by a simple template process. • The HPHC as matrix to load sulfur for Lithium-Sulfur battery cathodes. • S-HPHC cathode shows high rate capability and long cycling stability. • The sulfur-HPHC composite presents electrochemical stability up to 300 cycles at 1.5 C. - Abstract: Sulfur has a high specific capacity of 1675 mAh g−1 as lithium battery cathode, but its rapid capacity fading due to polysulfides dissolution presents a significant challenge for practical applications. Here we report a novel hierarchical porous honeycomb carbon (HPHC) for lithium-sulfur battery cathode with effective trapping of polysulfides. The HPHC was prepared by a simple template process, and a sulfur-carbon composite based on HPHC was synthesized for lithium-sulfur batteries by a melt-diffusion method. It is found that the elemental sulfur was dispersed inside the three-dimensionally hierarchical pores of HPHC based on the analyses. Electrochemical tests reveal that the sulfur-HPHC composite shows high rate capability and long cycling stability as cathode materials. The sulfur-HPHC composite with sulfur content of 66.3 wt% displays an initial discharge capacity of 923 mAh g−1 and a reversible discharge capacity of 564 mAh g−1 after 100 cycles at 2 C charge-discharge rate. In particular, the sulfur-HPHC composite presents a long term cycling stability up to 300 cycles at 1.5 C. The results illustrate that the electrochemical reaction constrained inside the interconnected macro/meso/micropores of HPHC would be the dominant factor for the excellent high rate capability and long cycling stability of the sulfur cathode, and the three-dimensionally honeycomb carbon network would be a promising carbon matrix structure for lithium-sulfur battery cathode

  19. Novel Silicon-Carbon Nanostructures: Electronic structure study on the stability of Si60C2n Clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, A.

    2005-03-01

    The formalism of generalized gradient approximation to density functional theory has been used to study the electronic and geometric structures of Si60C2n fullerene-like nanostructures. In our previous work, we have shown that the additions of carbon atoms increase the stability of smaller silicon cages [1]. In this talk, we will present our results on the addition of two and four carbon atoms on the surface of the Si60 cages by substitution as also inside the cage at various symmetry orientations. Full geometry optimizations have been performed using the Hay-Wadt basis set without any symmetry constraints using the Gaussian 03 suite of programs [2]. Binding energies, ionization potentials, electron affinities and the ``band'' gaps of the stable silicon-carbon fullerene like nanostructures will be presented and discussed in detail. In general, we find that the optimized silicon-carbon fullerene-like cages have increased stability compared to the bare Si60 cage. Possibilities of adding larger carbon clusters to the Si60 structure will also be discussed. *Work supported, in part, by the Welch Foundation, Houston, Texas (Grant No. Y-1525). [1] M. N. Huda and A. K. Ray, Phys. Rev. A 69, 011201(R) (2004); Eur. Phys. J. D 31, 63 (2004). [2] Gaussian 03, M. J. Frisch et al. Gaussian Inc., Pittsburgh, PA.

  20. Iron oxide/carbon microsphere lithium-ion battery electrode with high capacity and good cycling stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iron oxide/carbon composite microspheres were prepared by a simple solution polymerization followed by pyrolysis in flowing nitrogen atmosphere at high temperature. The composites were characterized using various characterization techniques including powder X-ray diffraction, high resolution transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, N2 physical adsorption and the electrochemical performance test. The results show that the iron oxide/carbon composites consist of uniform microspheres with an average diameter of ∼2.1 μm. These iron oxide/carbon composite microspheres exhibit high capacity and good cycle stability when used as a lithium-ion battery anode. When the iron oxide content is 66%, the composite reveals the best electrochemical performance with an initial charge capacity of 730 mAh g−1, and even after ninety cycles the electrode still maintains a capacity of 664 mAh g−1, giving high capacity retention of 91%. The good electrochemical performance of the composite anode is close related with its structure, in which Fe2O3 particles are uniformly dispersed in the spherical carbon matrix; hence the volume change and aggregation of the Fe2O3 particles during lithium ion insertion/extraction process can be effectively hindered by the carbon matrix. On the other hand, carbon itself is an electronic conductor, the carbon layer and Fe2O3 particles connect closely, which ensures a good electrical contact during lithium insertion and extraction.

  1. Activity and stability of immobilized carbonic anhydrase for promoting CO2 absorption into a carbonate solution for post-combustion CO2 capture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, S.; Zhang, Z.; Lu, Y.; Rostam-Abadi, M.; Jones, A.

    2011-01-01

    An Integrated Vacuum Carbonate Absorption Process (IVCAP) currently under development could significantly reduce the energy consumed when capturing CO2 from the flue gases of coal-fired power plants. The biocatalyst carbonic anhydrase (CA) has been found to effectively promote the absorption of CO2 into the potassium carbonate solution that would be used in the IVCAP. Two CA enzymes were immobilized onto three selected support materials having different pore structures. The thermal stability of the immobilized CA enzymes was significantly greater than their free counterparts. For example, the immobilized enzymes retained at least 60% of their initial activities after 90days at 50??C compared to about 30% for their free counterparts under the same conditions. The immobilized CA also had significantly improved resistance to concentrations of sulfate (0.4M), nitrate (0.05M) and chloride (0.3M) typically found in flue gas scrubbing liquids than their free counterparts. ?? 2011 Elsevier Ltd.

  2. Dynamic Relationship Between Biologically Active Soil Organic Carbon and Aggregate Stability in Long-Term Organically Fertilized Soils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Cheng-Liang; XU Jiang-Bing; HE Yuan-Qiu; LIU Yan-Li; FAN Jian-Bo

    2012-01-01

    Biologically active soil organic carbon (BASOC) is an important fraction of soil organic carbon (SOC),but our understanding of the correlation between BASOC and soil aggregate stability is limited.At an ecological experimental station (28° 04′-28° 37′ N,116°41′-117° 09′ E) in Yujiang County,Jiangxi Province,China,we analyzed the dynamic relationship between soil aggregate stability and BASOC content over time in the red soil (Udic Ferrosols) fertilized with a nitrogen-phosphorus-potassium chemical fertilizer (NPK)without manure or with NPK plus livestock manure or green manure.The dynamics of BASOC was evaluated using CO2 efflux,and soil aggregates were separated according to size using a wet-sieving technique.The soils fertilized with NPK plus livestock manure had a significantly higher content of BASOC and an improved aggregate stability compared to the soils fertilized with NPK plus green manure or NPK alone The BASOC contents in all fertilized soils decreased over time The contents of large aggregates (800-2000μm) dramatically decreased over the first 7 d of incubation,but the contents of small aggregates (< 800.μm) either remained the same or increased,depending on the incubation time and specific aggregate sizes.The aggregate stability did not differ significantly at the beginning and end of incubation,but the lowest stability inall fertilized soils occurred in the middle of the incubation,which implied that the soils had a strong resilience for aggregate stability.The change in BASOC content was only correlated with aggregate stability during the first 27 d of incubation.

  3. Soil Organic Matter Stability and Soil Carbon Storage with Changes in Land Use Intensity in Uganda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiemann, L. K.; Grandy, S.; Hartter, J.

    2014-12-01

    As the foundation of soil fertility, soil organic matter (SOM) formation and break-down is a critical factor of agroecosystem sustainability. In tropical systems where soils are quickly weathered, the link between SOM and soil fertility is particularly strong; however, the mechanisms controlling the stabilization and destabilization of SOM are not well characterized in tropical soils. In western Uganda, we collected soil samples under different levels of land use intensity including maize fields, banana plantations and inside an un-cultivated native tropical forest, Kibale National Park (KNP). To better understand the link between land use intensity and SOM stability we measured total soil C and N, and respiration rates during a 369 d soil incubation. In addition, we separated soils into particle size fractions, and mineral adsorbed SOM in the silt (2-50 μm ) and clay (soil C and N have declined by 22 and 48%, respectively, in comparison to uncultivated KNP soils. Incubation data indicate that over the last decade, relatively accessible and labile soil organic carbon (SOC) pools have been depleted by 55-59% in cultivated soils. As a result of this depletion, the chemical composition of SOM has been altered such that clay and silt associated SOM differed significantly between agricultural fields and KNP. In particular, nitrogen containing compounds were in lower abundance in agricultural compared to KNP soils. This suggests that N depletion due to agriculture has advanced to pools of mineral associated organic N that are typically protected from break-down. In areas where land use intensity is relatively greater, increases in polysaccharides and lipids in maize fields compared to KNP indicate increases in microbial residues and decomposition by-products as microbes mine SOM for organic N. Chemical characterization of post-incubation SOM will help us better understand how microbes preferentially break-down SOM. Agricultural intensification over the past decade in

  4. Noncovalent functionalization of carbon nanotubes and graphene with tetraphenylporphyrins: Stability and optical properties from ab-initio calculations

    OpenAIRE

    Orellana, Walter; Correa, J. D.

    2015-01-01

    The stability, electronic and optical properties of single-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and graphene noncovalently functionalized with free-base tetraphenylporphyrin (TPP) molecules is addressed by density functional theory calculations, including corrections to dispersive interactions. We study the TPP physisorption on 42 CNT species, particularly those with chiral indices ($n$,$m$), where $5 \\leq n \\leq 12$ and $0\\leq m\\leq n$. Our results show a quite strong $\\pi$-$\\pi$ interaction betwe...

  5. Electrochemical behaviour of ceramic yttria stabilized zirconia on carbon steel synthesized via sol-gel process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chromate conversion coatings have been widely applied for the corrosion of different metallic substrates. However, the waste containing Cr6+ has many limitations due to the environmental consideration and health hazards. An interesting alternative seems to be the deposition on metallic surface of thin layers of yttria or zirconia or both by the sol-gel process. In this study, Ytttria and Yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ, 8% Y2O3) thin films were used for coating commercial carbon steel substrates by sol-gel method and the dip-coating process. The evolution of organic compounds up to crystallization process as a function of heat treatments was study by FT-IR spectroscopy. The structure and morphology of the coatings were analysed using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The anticorrosion performance of the coatings has been evaluated by using electrochemical techniques in an aggressive media (3.5 wt.% NaCl). The corrosion behaviour of sol-gel method was compared with traditional chromate conversion coatings. Differences in the electrochemical behaviour of YSZ coatings are related to the development of microcracks during the sintering process and to the presence of organic compounds during growth film. Electrochemical results showed that sol-gel YSZ and Y2O3 coatings can act as protective barriers against wet corrosion; however yttria films displayed low adhesion to substrate. The corrosion parameters provide an explanation of the role of each film and show a considerable increase in the corrosion resistance for coated samples in comparison to the bare steel samples.

  6. Electrochemical behaviour of ceramic yttria stabilized zirconia on carbon steel synthesized via sol-gel process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crespo, M.A. Dominguez, E-mail: mdominguezc@ipn.m [Centro de Investigacion en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnologia Avanzada, Unidad Altamira (CICATA-IPN) km 14.5 Carr. Tampico-Puerto Industrial, C.P. 89600, Altamira, Tamaulipas (Mexico); Murillo, A. Garcia; Torres-Huerta, A.M. [Centro de Investigacion en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnologia Avanzada, Unidad Altamira (CICATA-IPN) km 14.5 Carr. Tampico-Puerto Industrial, C.P. 89600, Altamira, Tamaulipas (Mexico); Yanez-Zamora, C. [Estudiante del postgrado en Tecnologia Avanzada del CICATA-IPN, Unidad Altamira, km 14.5, Carr. Tampico-Puerto Industrial. C.P. 89600, Altamira, Tamaulipas (Mexico); Carrillo-Romo, F. de J [Centro de Investigacion en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnologia Avanzada, Unidad Altamira (CICATA-IPN) km 14.5 Carr. Tampico-Puerto Industrial, C.P. 89600, Altamira, Tamaulipas (Mexico)

    2009-08-26

    Chromate conversion coatings have been widely applied for the corrosion of different metallic substrates. However, the waste containing Cr{sup 6+} has many limitations due to the environmental consideration and health hazards. An interesting alternative seems to be the deposition on metallic surface of thin layers of yttria or zirconia or both by the sol-gel process. In this study, Ytttria and Yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ, 8% Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}) thin films were used for coating commercial carbon steel substrates by sol-gel method and the dip-coating process. The evolution of organic compounds up to crystallization process as a function of heat treatments was study by FT-IR spectroscopy. The structure and morphology of the coatings were analysed using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The anticorrosion performance of the coatings has been evaluated by using electrochemical techniques in an aggressive media (3.5 wt.% NaCl). The corrosion behaviour of sol-gel method was compared with traditional chromate conversion coatings. Differences in the electrochemical behaviour of YSZ coatings are related to the development of microcracks during the sintering process and to the presence of organic compounds during growth film. Electrochemical results showed that sol-gel YSZ and Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} coatings can act as protective barriers against wet corrosion; however yttria films displayed low adhesion to substrate. The corrosion parameters provide an explanation of the role of each film and show a considerable increase in the corrosion resistance for coated samples in comparison to the bare steel samples.

  7. Population Evolution of Oxide Inclusions in Ti-stabilized Ultra-low Carbon Steels after Deoxidation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wen YANG; Ying ZHANG; Li-feng ZHANG; Hao-jian DUAN; Li WANG

    2015-01-01

    Population density function (PDF),which can eliminate the arbitrariness caused by the choice of the num-ber and the size of bins compared to the well-used histograms,was introduced to analyze the amount of inclusions. The population evolution of oxide inclusions in forms of PDF in Ti-stabilized ultra-low carbon steels after deoxidation during industrial RH refining and continuous casting processes was analyzed using an automated SEM-EDS system. It was found that after deoxidation till the early stage of casting,the alumina inclusions exhibited a lognormal PDF distribution,and three factors including the existence of a large amount of alumina clusters,the generation of alumi-na from the reduction of Al-Ti-O inclusions and the reoxidation of molten steel were estimated as the reasons.The shape parameterσwas high after deoxidation and then decreased after Ti treatment,indicating that in a short period after deoxidation,the size of alumina inclusions was widely distributed.After Ti treatment,the distribution of inclu-sion size was more concentrated.The scale parameter m decreased with time during the whole refining process,indi-cating that the proportion of large inclusions decreased during refining.Contrarily,the Al-Ti-O inclusions presented a fractal PDF distribution except at the end of casting with fractal dimension D of 4.3,and the constant of propor-tionality C decreased with time during RH refining and increased during casting process.The reoxidation of steel by slag entrapped from ladle was considered as the reason for the lognormal PDF behavior of Al-Ti-O inclusions at the end of casting.

  8. Effect of carbon nanospheres on shape stabilization and thermal behavior of phase change materials for thermal energy storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Introducing novel form-stable PCM of stearic acid (SA)/carbon nanospheres (CNSs). • The highest stabilized SA content is 83 wt% in the SA/CNS composites. • Increasing thermal conductivity of composite phase change material with high amount of latent heat. - Abstract: Stearic acid (SA) is one of the main phase change materials (PCMs) for medium temperature thermal energy storage systems. In order to stabilize the shape and enhance the thermal conductivity of SA, the effects of adding carbon nanospheres (CNSs) as a carbon nanofiller were examined experimentally. The maximum mass fraction of SA retained in CNSs was found as 80 wt% without the leakage of SA in a melted state, even when it was heated over the melting point of SA. The dropping point test shows that there was clearly no liquid leakage through the phase change process at the operating temperature range of the composite PCMs. The thermal stability and thermal properties of composite PCMs were investigated with a thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA) and differential scanning calorimeter (DSC), respectively. The thermal conductivity of the SA/CNS composite was determined by the laser flash method. The thermal conductivity at 35 °C increased about 105% for the highest loading of CNS (50 wt%). The thermal cycling test proved that form-stable composite PCMs had good thermal reliability and chemical durability after 1000 cycles of melting and freezing, which is advantageous for latent heat thermal energy storage (LHTES)

  9. Octahedral core–shell cuprous oxide/carbon with enhanced electrochemical activity and stability as anode for lithium ion batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiang, Jiayuan, E-mail: xjyzju@aliyun.com [Department of Chemistry, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Chen, Zhewei [Department of Chemistry, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Hangzhou No. 2 High School, Hangzhou 310053 (China); Wang, Jianming [Department of Chemistry, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • Core–shell octahedral Cu{sub 2}O/C is prepared by a one-step method. • Carbon shell is amorphous and uniformly decorated at the Cu{sub 2}O octahedral core. • Core–shell Cu{sub 2}O/C exhibits markedly enhanced capability and reversibility. • Carbon shell provides fast ion/electron transfer channel. • Core–shell structure is stable during cycling. - Abstract: Core–shell Cu{sub 2}O/C octahedrons are synthesized by a simple hydrothermal method with the help of carbonization of glucose, which reduces Cu(II) to Cu(I) at low temperature and further forms carbon shell coating at high temperature. SEM and TEM images indicate that the carbon shell is amorphous with thickness of ∼20 nm wrapping the Cu{sub 2}O octahedral core perfectly. As anode of lithium ion batteries, the core–shell Cu{sub 2}O/C composite exhibits high and stable columbic efficiency (98%) as well as a reversible capacity of 400 mAh g{sup −1} after 80 cycles. The improved electrochemical performance is attributed to the novel core–shell structure, in which the carbon shell reduces the electrode polarization and promotes the charge transfer at active material/electrolyte interface, and also acts as a stabilizer to keep the octahedral structure integrity during discharge–charge processes.

  10. Octahedral core–shell cuprous oxide/carbon with enhanced electrochemical activity and stability as anode for lithium ion batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Core–shell octahedral Cu2O/C is prepared by a one-step method. • Carbon shell is amorphous and uniformly decorated at the Cu2O octahedral core. • Core–shell Cu2O/C exhibits markedly enhanced capability and reversibility. • Carbon shell provides fast ion/electron transfer channel. • Core–shell structure is stable during cycling. - Abstract: Core–shell Cu2O/C octahedrons are synthesized by a simple hydrothermal method with the help of carbonization of glucose, which reduces Cu(II) to Cu(I) at low temperature and further forms carbon shell coating at high temperature. SEM and TEM images indicate that the carbon shell is amorphous with thickness of ∼20 nm wrapping the Cu2O octahedral core perfectly. As anode of lithium ion batteries, the core–shell Cu2O/C composite exhibits high and stable columbic efficiency (98%) as well as a reversible capacity of 400 mAh g−1 after 80 cycles. The improved electrochemical performance is attributed to the novel core–shell structure, in which the carbon shell reduces the electrode polarization and promotes the charge transfer at active material/electrolyte interface, and also acts as a stabilizer to keep the octahedral structure integrity during discharge–charge processes

  11. Stabilization of carbon dioxide (CO2) bubbles in micrometer-diameter aqueous droplets and the formation of hollow microparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Tianyi; Fan, Rong; Delgadillo, Luis F; Wan, Jiandi

    2016-04-26

    We report an approach to stabilize carbon dioxide (CO2) gas bubbles encapsulated in micrometer-diameter aqueous drops when water in the aqueous drops is evaporated. CO2-in-water-in-oil double emulsion drops are generated using microfluidic approaches and evaporation is conducted in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) and/or graphene oxide (GO) particles dispersed in the aqueous phase of the double emulsion drops. We examine the roles of the bubble-to-drop size ratio, PVA and GO concentration in the stabilization of CO2 bubbles upon water evaporation and show that thin-shell particles with encapsulated CO2 bubbles can be obtained under optimized conditions. The developed approach offers a new strategy to study CO2 dissolution and stability on the microscale and the synthesis of novel gas-core microparticles. PMID:27025654

  12. Oxygen vacancy induced carbon deposition at the triple phase boundary of the nickel/yttrium-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yanxing; Fu, Zhaoming; Wang, Mingyang; Yang, Zongxian

    2014-09-01

    The carbon deposition at the Triple Phase Boundary (TPB) of the Nickel/Yttrium-Stabilized Zirconia (YSZ) interface is studied using the first-principles method based on density functional theory, with consideration of the interface oxygen vacancy. It is found that the CH fragment (the most stable dissociation products of CH4 on Ni catalyst) can easily diffuse and be trapped at the O vacancy. The trapped CH can dissociate to C and H with a much lower dissociation barrier (0.74 eV) as compared with that (1.39 eV) on the pure Ni (111) surface. Therefore, we propose that the carbon deposition may form easily at the interface oxygen vacancy of TPB as compared with that on the pure Ni (111) surface, which offers new understanding on the carbon deposition of the Ni/YSZ anode of solid oxide fuel cell.

  13. DFT study of Fe-Ni core-shell nanoparticles: Stability, catalytic activity, and interaction with carbon atom for single-walled carbon nanotube growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Zhimin; Wang, Qiang, E-mail: wangqiang@njtech.edu.cn; Shan, Xiaoye; Zhu, Hongjun, E-mail: zhuhj@njtech.edu.cn [Department of Applied Chemistry, College of Science, Nanjing Tech University, Nanjing 211816 (China); Li, Wei-qi [Department of Physics, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Chen, Guang-hui [Department of Chemistry, Shantou University, Shantou, Guangdong 515063 (China)

    2015-02-21

    Metal catalysts play an important role in the nucleation and growth of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). It is essential for probing the nucleation and growth mechanism of SWCNTs to fundamentally understand the properties of the metal catalysts and their interaction with carbon species. In this study, we systematically studied the stability of 13- and 55-atom Fe and Fe-Ni core-shell particles as well as these particles interaction with the carbon atoms using the density functional theory calculations. Icosahedral 13- and 55-atom Fe-Ni core-shell bimetallic particles have higher stability than the corresponding monometallic Fe and Ni particles. Opposite charge transfer (or distribution) in these particles leads to the Fe surface-shell displays a positive charge, while the Ni surface-shell exhibits a negative charge. The opposite charge transfer would induce different chemical activities. Compared with the monometallic Fe and Ni particles, the core-shell bimetallic particles have weaker interaction with C atoms. More importantly, C atoms only prefer staying on the surface of the bimetallic particles. In contrast, C atoms prefer locating into the subsurface of the monometallic particles, which is more likely to form stable metal carbides. The difference of the mono- and bimetallic particles on this issue may result in different nucleation and growth mechanism of SWCNTs. Our findings provide useful insights for the design of bimetallic catalysts and a better understanding nucleation and growth mechanism of SWCNTs.

  14. DFT study of Fe-Ni core-shell nanoparticles: Stability, catalytic activity, and interaction with carbon atom for single-walled carbon nanotube growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metal catalysts play an important role in the nucleation and growth of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). It is essential for probing the nucleation and growth mechanism of SWCNTs to fundamentally understand the properties of the metal catalysts and their interaction with carbon species. In this study, we systematically studied the stability of 13- and 55-atom Fe and Fe-Ni core-shell particles as well as these particles interaction with the carbon atoms using the density functional theory calculations. Icosahedral 13- and 55-atom Fe-Ni core-shell bimetallic particles have higher stability than the corresponding monometallic Fe and Ni particles. Opposite charge transfer (or distribution) in these particles leads to the Fe surface-shell displays a positive charge, while the Ni surface-shell exhibits a negative charge. The opposite charge transfer would induce different chemical activities. Compared with the monometallic Fe and Ni particles, the core-shell bimetallic particles have weaker interaction with C atoms. More importantly, C atoms only prefer staying on the surface of the bimetallic particles. In contrast, C atoms prefer locating into the subsurface of the monometallic particles, which is more likely to form stable metal carbides. The difference of the mono- and bimetallic particles on this issue may result in different nucleation and growth mechanism of SWCNTs. Our findings provide useful insights for the design of bimetallic catalysts and a better understanding nucleation and growth mechanism of SWCNTs

  15. Application of δ13C and δ15N isotopic signatures of organic matter fractions sequentially separated from adjacent arable and forest soils to identify carbon stabilization mechanisms

    OpenAIRE

    Kayler, Z.E.; Kaiser, M; Gessler, A.; Ellerbrock, R. H.; M. Sommer

    2011-01-01

    Identifying the chemical mechanisms behind soil carbon bound in organo-mineral complexes is necessary to determine the degree to which soil organic carbon is stabilized belowground. Analysis of δ13C and δ15N isotopic signatures of stabilized OM fractions along with soil mineral characteristics may yield important information about OM-mineral associations and their processing history. We anlayzed the δ13C and δ15N isotopic signatures from two organic matter (OM) fractio...

  16. Comparing measured and modelled soil carbon: which site-specific variables are linked to high stability?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Andy; Schipanski, Meagan; Ma, Liwang; Ahuja, Lajpat; McNamara, Niall; Smith, Pete; Davies, Christian

    2016-04-01

    Changes in soil carbon (C) stocks have been studied in depth over the last two decades, as net greenhouse gas (GHG) sinks are highlighted to be a partial solution to the causes of climate change. However, the stability of this soil C is often overlooked when measuring these changes. Ultimately a net sequestration in soils is far less beneficial if labile C is replacing more stable forms. To date there is no accepted framework for measuring soil C stability, and as a result there is considerable uncertainty associated with the simulated impacts of land management and land use change when using process-based systems models. However, a recent effort to equate measurable soil C fractions to model pools has generated data that help to assess the impacts of land management, and can ultimately help to reduce the uncertainty of model predictions. Our research compiles this existing fractionation data along with site metadata to create a simplistic statistical model able to quantify the relative importance of different site-specific conditions. Data was mined from 23 published studies and combined with original data to generate a dataset of 100+ land use change sites across Europe. For sites to be included they required soil C fractions isolated using the Zimmermann et al. (2007) method and specific site metadata (mean annual precipitation, MAP; mean annual temperature, MAT; soil pH; land use; altitude). Of the sites, 75% were used to develop a generalized linear mixed model (GLMM) to create coefficients where site parameters can be used to predict influence on the measured soil fraction C stocks. The remaining 25% of sites were used to evaluate uncertainty and validate this empirical model. Further, four of the aforementioned sites were used to simulate soil C dynamics using the RothC, DayCent and RZWQM2 models. A sensitivity analysis (4096 model runs for each variable applying Latin hypercube random sampling techniques) was then used to observe whether these models place

  17. Effect of biochar and compost application on quantity, quality and stability of organic carbon in sandy soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holes, Annamaria; Szegi, Tamas; Fuchs, Marta; Micheli, Erika; Aleksza, Laszlo

    2014-05-01

    Nowadays the amount of waste is increasing as a consequence of civilization development. Significant proportion of municipal waste is biodegradable. For the treatment of these wastes composting and pyrolysis can be one solution. Many studies were published on the effects of composts in soils, but on combined application of biochars and composts only a limited number of articles are available. Total carbon content, water soluble organic carbon content and organic matter quality have decisive role in the utilization of soils. In our study the effects of combined application of biochars and compost on organic carbon quality, quantity and stability were measured in sandy soil. The sandy soil was mixed with different proportions (1w/w%, 2,5w/w%, 5w/w%, 10w/w%) of biochars. Two types of biochars produced by pyrolization were used: plant origin biochar (POB) and animal origin biochar (AOB). 20w/w% urban green compost was mixed into each sample in addition to biochars. After the 30 days of wet incubation soil organic carbon (SOC) content was determined by Walkley-Black method, while for the SOC quality measurements E4/E6 method was used. The dissolved organic carbon (DOC) was extracted from the soil samples by cold water, and determined by titrimetric method. The future purpose of our study is to find the optimal compost-biochar treatment in order to improve soil fertility and maximize crop yield.

  18. Enhancement of Electrochemical Stability about Silicon/Carbon Composite Anode Materials for Lithium Ion Batteries

    OpenAIRE

    Wei Xiao; Chang Miao; Xuemin Yan; Qing Sun; Ping Mei

    2015-01-01

    Silicon/carbon (Si/C) composite anode materials are successfully synthesized by mechanical ball milling followed by pyrolysis method. The structure and morphology of the composite are characterized by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscope, respectively. The results show that the composite is composed of Si, flake graphite, and phenolic resin-pyrolyzed carbon, and Si and flake graphite are enwrapped by phenolic resin-pyrolyzed carbon, which can...

  19. Interactive control of minerals, wildfire, and erosion on soil carbon stabilization in conifer ecosystems of the western U.S.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, C.

    2014-12-01

    Answering the question of what controls the fate and stabilization of organic carbon in forest soils is central to understanding the role of western US ecosystems in mitigating climate change, optimizing forest management, and quantifying local and regional terrestrial carbon budgets. Over half of forest soil C is stored belowground, stabilized by a number of separate, but interacting physical, chemical and biological mechanisms. Here we synthesize data from a series of field and laboratory studies focused on identifying mineral, physical, and landscape position controls on belowground C stabilization mechanisms in western U.S. conifer ecosystems. Results from these studies demonstrate an important for role for short-range-order Fe- and Al-oxyhydroxides and Al-humus complexes in C stabilization, and that the soil mineral assemblage moderates C cycling via control on partitioning of C into physical fractions ("free", "occluded", "mineral") with varying MRT and chemistry. Measures of occluded fraction chemical composition by 13C-NMR indicate this fraction is 2-5 times more enriched in pyrogenic C than the bulk soil and that this fraction is on the order of ~25 to 65% charred materials. Radiocarbon analyses of a large set of conifer soil samples from California and Arizona further indicate the occluded fraction is generally older than either the free light or mineral fraction. In particular, soil C in convergent, water and sediment gathering portions of the landscape are enriched in long MRT charred materials. These results indicate an important role for the interaction of soil mineral assemblage, wildfire, and erosion in controlling belowground C storage and stabilization in western conifer forests. Drought and wildfire are expected to increase with climate change and thus may exert significant control on belowground C storage directly through biochemical and physical changes in aboveground biomass, production of charred materials, and indirectly via post

  20. Carbon Flux and Isotopic Character of Soil and Soil Gas in Stabilized and Active Thaw Slumps in Northwest Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, A.; Crosby, B. T.; Mora, C. I.; Lohse, K. A.

    2012-12-01

    Permafrost soils store nearly half the world's global carbon. Warming of arctic landscape results in permafrost thaw which causes ground subsidence or thermokarst. On hillslopes, these features rapidly and dramatically alter soil structure, temperature, and moisture, as well as the content and quality of soil organic matter. These changes alter both the rate and mechanism of carbon cycling in permafrost soils, making frozen soils available to both anaerobic and aerobic decomposition. In order to improve our predictive capabilities, we use a chronosequence thaw slumps to examine how fluxes from active and stabilized features differ. Our study site is along the Selawik River in northwest Alaska where a retrogressive thaw slump initiated in the spring of 2004. It has grown to a surface area of 50,000 m2. Products of the erosion are stored on the floor of the feature, trapped on a fan or flushed into the Selawik River. North of slump is undisturbed tundra and adjacent to the west is a slump feature that stabilized and is now covered with a second generation of spruce trees. In this 2 year study, we use measurements of CO2 efflux, δC13 in soil profiles and CO2 and CH4 abundance to constrain the response of belowground carbon emissions. We also focused on constraining which environmental factors govern C emissions within each of the above ecosystems. To this end, we measured soil temperature, and moisture, abundance and quality of soil organic carbon (SOC), water content, and bulk carbon compositions. Preliminary data from the summer of 2011 suggest that vegetation composition and soil temperature exert the strong control on CO2 efflux. The floor of the active slump and fan are bare mineral soils and are generally 10 to 15°C warmer than the tundra and stabilized slump. Consistently decreasing δC13 soil gas profiles in the recovered slump confirm that this region is a well-drained soil dominated by C3 vegetation. The δC13 gas profiles for the tundra, active slump

  1. Activity and stability studies of platinized multi-walled carbon nanotubes as fuel cell electrocatalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stamatin, Serban Nicolae; Borghei, Maryam; Dhiman, Rajnish;

    2015-01-01

    A non-covalent functionalization for multi-walled carbon nanotubes has been used as an alternative to the damaging acid treatment. Platinum nanoparticles with similar particle size distribution have been deposited on the surface modified multi-walled carbon nanotubes. The interaction between...

  2. Thermodynamic Stability of LiFeO2 in Molten Carbonate Fuel Cell

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    LiFeO2, as one of candidate cathode materials or additive for molten carbonate fuel cell, has been found to be thermodynamically unstable in CO2 atmosphere at 650℃ (the condition of molten carbonate fuel cell) both by computation and experimental confirmation.

  3. Interannual stability of organic to inorganic carbon production on a coral atoll

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwiatkowski, Lester; Albright, Rebecca; Hosfelt, Jessica; Nebuchina, Yana; Ninokawa, Aaron; Rivlin, Tanya; Sesboüé, Marine; Wolfe, Kennedy; Caldeira, Ken

    2016-04-01

    Ocean acidification has the potential to adversely affect marine calcifying organisms, with substantial ocean ecosystem impacts projected over the 21st century. Characterizing the in situ sensitivity of calcifying ecosystems to natural variability in carbonate chemistry may improve our understanding of the long-term impacts of ocean acidification. We explore the potential for intensive temporal sampling to isolate the influence of carbonate chemistry on community calcification rates of a coral reef and compare the ratio of organic to inorganic carbon production to previous studies at the same location. Even with intensive temporal sampling, community calcification displays only a weak dependence on carbonate chemistry variability. However, across three years of sampling, the ratio of organic to inorganic carbon production is highly consistent. Although further work is required to quantify the spatial variability associated with such ratios, this suggests that these measurements have the potential to indicate the response of coral reefs to ongoing disturbance, ocean acidification, and climate change.

  4. Restoring forest structure and process stabilizes forest carbon in wildfire-prone southwestern ponderosa pine forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurteau, Matthew D; Liang, Shuang; Martin, Katherine L; North, Malcolm P; Koch, George W; Hungate, Bruce A

    2016-03-01

    Changing climate and a legacy of fire-exclusion have increased the probability of high-severity wildfire, leading to an increased risk of forest carbon loss in ponderosa pine forests in the southwestern USA. Efforts to reduce high-severity fire risk through forest thinning and prescribed burning require both the removal and emission of carbon from these forests, and any potential carbon benefits from treatment may depend on the occurrence of wildfire. We sought to determine how forest treatments alter the effects of stochastic wildfire events on the forest carbon balance. We modeled three treatments (control, thin-only, and thin and burn) with and without the occurrence of wildfire. We evaluated how two different probabilities of wildfire occurrence, 1% and 2% per year, might alter the carbon balance of treatments. In the absence of wildfire, we found that thinning and burning treatments initially reduced total ecosystem carbon (TEC) and increased net ecosystem carbon balance (NECB). In the presence of wildfire, the thin and burn treatment TEC surpassed that of the control in year 40 at 2%/yr wildfire probability, and in year 51 at 1%/yr wildfire probability. NECB in the presence of wildfire showed a similar response to the no-wildfire scenarios: both thin-only and thin and burn treatments increased the C sink. Treatments increased TEC by reducing both mean wildfire severity and its variability. While the carbon balance of treatments may differ in more productive forest types, the carbon balance benefits from restoring forest structure and fire in southwestern ponderosa pine forests are clear. PMID:27209781

  5. Chemical stability of hydroxysulphate green rust synthetised in the presence of foreign anions: carbonate, phosphate and silicate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruby, C., E-mail: ruby@lcpme.cnrs-nancy.fr; Gehin, A.; Aissa, R.; Ghanbaja, J.; Abdelmoula, M.; Genin, J.-M. R. [UMR 7564 CNRS-Universite Henri Poincare-Nancy 1, Equipe Microbiologie et Physique and Departement Materiaux et Structures, Laboratoire de Chimie Physique et Microbiologie pour l' Environnement (France)

    2006-01-15

    Hydroxysulphate green rust {l_brace}GR(SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}){r_brace} species were precipitated in the presence of various anions. GR(SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}) is stable at {approx}pH 7 and is transformed into a mixture of magnetite and ferrous hydroxide when the pH raised at {approx}12. In the presence of carbonate species, GR(SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}) is partially transformed into a mixture of magnetite and siderite at {approx}pH 8.5. This transformation is stopped when silicate anions are present in the solution. As already observed for phosphate anions, the adsorption of silicate anions on the lateral faces of the GR(SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}) crystals may explain this stabilization effect. Sulphate anions are easily exchanged by carbonate species at {approx}pH 10.5. In contrast, anionic exchange between sulphate and phosphate anions was not observed.

  6. Size and Promoter Effects on Stability of Carbon-Nanofiber-Supported Iron-Based Fischer–Tropsch Catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    The Fischer–Tropsch Synthesis converts synthesis gas from alternative carbon resources, including natural gas, coal, and biomass, to hydrocarbons used as fuels or chemicals. In particular, iron-based catalysts at elevated temperatures favor the selective production of C2–C4 olefins, which are important building blocks for the chemical industry. Bulk iron catalysts (with promoters) were conventionally used, but these deactivate due to either phase transformation or carbon deposition resulting in disintegration of the catalyst particles. For supported iron catalysts, iron particle growth may result in loss of catalytic activity over time. In this work, the effects of promoters and particle size on the stability of supported iron nanoparticles (initial sizes of 3–9 nm) were investigated at industrially relevant conditions (340 °C, 20 bar, H2/CO = 1). Upon addition of sodium and sulfur promoters to iron nanoparticles supported on carbon nanofibers, initial catalytic activities were high, but substantial deactivation was observed over a period of 100 h. In situ Mössbauer spectroscopy revealed that after 20 h time-on-stream, promoted catalysts attained 100% carbidization, whereas for unpromoted catalysts, this was around 25%. In situ carbon deposition studies were carried out using a tapered element oscillating microbalance (TEOM). No carbon laydown was detected for the unpromoted catalysts, whereas for promoted catalysts, carbon deposition occurred mainly over the first 4 h and thus did not play a pivotal role in deactivation over 100 h. Instead, the loss of catalytic activity coincided with the increase in Fe particle size to 20–50 nm, thereby supporting the proposal that the loss of active Fe surface area was the main cause of deactivation. PMID:27330847

  7. Degradation of lindane and hexachlorobenzene in supercritical carbon dioxide using palladium nanoparticles stabilized in microcellular high-density polyethylene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Bei-Zen; Chen, GuanYu; Yak, HwaKwang; Liao, Weisheng; Chiu, KongHwa; Peng, Shie-Ming

    2016-06-01

    Palladium nanoparticles stabilized in microcellular high-density polyethylene prepared through supercritical foaming, supercritical impregnation, and H2 reduction are used for the hydrodechlorination of lindane and hexachlorobenzene in supercritical carbon dioxide below 100 °C. Both lindane and hexachlorobenzene can be almost 100% transformed to cyclohexane in 1 h. Reaction intermediates, such as lower chlorinated products or benzene, are not observed or exist in trace amount indicating that most of them may undergo reactions without leaving the metal surface. PMID:26994428

  8. Structural stability of hydrogenated amorphous carbon overcoats used in heat-assisted magnetic recording investigated by rapid thermal annealing

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, N.

    2013-01-01

    Ultrathin amorphous carbon (a-C) films are extensively used as protective overcoats of magnetic recording media. Increasing demands for even higher storage densities have necessitated the development of new storage technologies, such as heat-assisted magnetic recording (HAMR), which uses laser-assisted heating to record data on high-stability media that can store single bits in extremely small areas (∼1 Tbit/in.2). Because HAMR relies on locally changing the coercivity of the magnetic medium by raising the temperature above the Curie temperature for data to be stored by the magnetic write field, it raises a concern about the structural stability of the ultrathin a-C film. In this study, rapid thermal annealing (RTA) experiments were performed to examine the thermal stability of ultrathin hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H) films deposited by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition. Structural changes in the a-C:H films caused by RTA were investigated by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, x-ray reflectivity, and conductive atomic force microscopy. The results show that the films exhibit thermal stability up to a maximum temperature in the range of 400-450 °C. Heating above this critical temperature leads to hydrogen depletion and sp 2 clustering. The critical temperature determined by the results of this study represents an upper bound of the temperature rise due to laser heating in HAMR hard-disk drives and the Curie temperature of magnetic materials used in HAMR hard disks. © 2013 American Institute of Physics.

  9. Treatment of coke-oven wastewater with the powdered activated carbon-contact stabilization activated sludge process. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suidan, M.T.; Deady, M.A.; Gee, C.S.

    1983-11-01

    The objective of the study was to determine optimum parameters for the operation of an innovative process train used in the treatment of coke-over wastewater. The treatment process train consisted of a contact-stabilization activated sludge system with powdered activated carbon (PAC) addition, followed by activated sludge nitrification, followed by denitrification in an anoxic filter. The control and operating parameters evaluated during the study were: (a) the average mixed-liquor PAC concentration maintained in the contact-stabilization system, (b) the solids retention time practiced in the contact-stabilization system, and (c) the hydraulic detention time maintained in the contact aeration tank. Three identical treatement process trains were constructed and employed in this study. The coke-oven wastewater used for this investigation was fed to the treatment units at 30% strength. The first part of the study was devoted to determining the interactions between the mixed liquor PAC concentration and the solids retention time in the contact-stabilization tanks. Results showed that optimum overall system performance is attainable when the highest sludge age (30 day) and highest mixed liquor PAC concentration were practiced. During the second phase of the study, all three systems were operated at a 30 day solids retention time while different detention times of 1, 2/3 and 1/3 day were evaluated in the contact tank. PAC addition rates were maintained at the former levels and, consequently, reduced contact times entailed higher mixed liquor carbon concentrations. Once again, the system receiving the highest PAC addition rate of PAC exhibited the best overall performance. This system exhibited no deterioration in process performance as a result of decreased contact detention time. 72 references, 41 figures, 24 tables.

  10. Oxidative Treatment to Improve Coating and Electrochemical Stability of Carbon Fiber Paper with Niobium Doped Titanium Dioxide Sols for Potential Applications in Fuel Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Solution coating of metal oxide layer directly onto carbon paper. • Most uniform Metal oxide coating on functionalized carbon paper. • Highest electrochemical stability for metal oxide coated functionalized carbon paper. - Abstract: Regular hydrophobized carbon paper cannot be used for unitized regenerative fuel cell applications as it corrodes at high potentials on the oxygen electrode side. Reported here are the oxidative treatment and dip-coating of carbon paper (Spectracarb™ 2050A-0850) with Nb-doped TiO2 sols (anatase phase) to increase the corrosion resistance of the carbon paper at the interface between catalyst layer and gas diffusion backing layer. Coating of carbon paper with Nb-doped TiO2 sols generates a reasonably uniform layer of TiO2 and covers the individual carbon fibers well only if the carbon paper is oxidatively functionalized prior to coating. This can be reasoned with a better wetting of the functionalized carbon paper by the sol-gel and the formation of covalent bonds between Ti and the large number of functional groups on the surface of oxidized carbon paper, which is in good agreement with previous observation for carbon nanotubes. The resistance towards oxidation of coated and uncoated samples of untreated and functionalized carbon paper was probed by cyclic voltammetry in 0.5 M aqueous H2SO4 at 1.2 V versus Ag/AgCl for up to 72 hours to mimic the conditions in a unitized regenerative fuel cell. Among these four cases studied here, functionalized carbon paper coated with a layer of Nb-doped TiO2 shows the highest stability towards electrochemical oxidation while uncoated functionalized carbon paper is the least stable due to the large number of available oxidation sites. These results clearly demonstrate that a coating of carbon fibers with TiO2 generates a lasting protection against oxidation under conditions encountered at the oxygen electrode side of unitized regenerative fuel cells

  11. Activated carbon derived from peat soil as a framework for the preparation of shape-stabilized phase change material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work focuses on the preparation of AC (activated carbon) through a physical activation method using peat soil as a precursor, followed by the use of the AC as an inorganic framework for the preparation of SPCM (shape-stabilized phase change material). The SPCM, composed of n-octadecane as the core and AC pores as a framework, was fabricated by a simple impregnation method, with the mass fraction of n-octadecane varying from 10 to 90 wt.%. The AC has a specific surface area of 893 m2 g−1 and an average pore size of 22 Å. The field emission scanning electron microscope images and nitrogen gas adsorption-desorption isotherms shows that the n-octadecane was actually encapsulated into the AC pores. The melting and freezing temperatures of the composite PCM (phase change material) were 30.9 °C and 24.1 °C, respectively, and its corresponding latent heat values were 95.4 Jg−1 and 99.6 Jg−1, respectively. The composite shows a good thermal reliability, even after 1000 melting/freezing cycles. The present research provided a new SPCM material for thermal energy storage as well as some new insights into the design of composite PCM by tailoring the pore structure of AC derived from peat soil, a natural resource. - Highlights: • Activated carbon from peat soil was used as framework. • n-Octadecane/activated carbon composite was fabricated by impregnation method. • The thermal property could be tailor by adjusting pore size of activated carbon. • The shape-stabilized PCM (phase change material) have the potential to be used for thermal energy storage

  12. Stabilization of unstable CGC+ triplex DNA by single-walled carbon nanotubes under physiological conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Song, Yujun; Feng, Lingyan; Ren, Jinsong; Qu, Xiaogang

    2011-01-01

    Triplex formation is a promising strategy for realizing artificially controlling of gene expression, reversible assembly of nanomaterials and DNA nanomachine and single-walled nanotubes (SWNTs) have been widely used as gene and drug delivery vector or as ‘building blocks’ in nano-/microelectronic devices. CGC+ triplex is not as stable as TAT triplex. The poor stability of CGC+ triplex limits its use in vitro and in vivo. There is no ligand that has been reported to selectively stabilize CGC+ ...

  13. Influence of ferrite stabilizing elements and Co on structure and magnetic properties of carbon-encapsulated iron nanoparticles synthesized in thermal plasma jet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Inclusion of ferrite stabilizing elements reduces the diameter of CEINs. • Inclusion of ferrite stabilizing elements increases the amount of austenite. • Inclusion of Al, Ti, Cr and V causes formation of few layer graphene. • Magnetic performance of CEINs can be largely improved by post annealing. - Abstract: The encapsulation of Fe nanoparticles in protective carbon coatings always leads to formation of undesired paramagnetic austenite phase. Various ferrite stabilizing elements were included in the synthesis process to verify whether their inclusion may minimize the austenite content in carbon-encapsulated iron nanoparticles synthesized in thermal plasma jet. Eight ferrite stabilizing elements (Si, Al, Mo, Ti, Zr, Cr, W and V) and one austenite promoting additive (Co) were tested. Their influence on the synthesis yield, phase composition, morphology and magnetic properties of carbon-encapsulated iron nanoparticles was studied. It was found that the addition of ferrite stabilizers strongly influences the diameter distribution, graphitization degree, phase composition and magnetic properties. Contrary to the thermodynamic predictions the inclusion of ferrite stabilizing elements caused a substantial worsening of magnetic performance in carbon-encapsulated iron nanoparticles. It has been also shown that the subsequent heat treatment of carbon-encapsulated iron nanoparticles significantly improves their magnetic properties

  14. [Characteristics of carbon sequestration and apparent stability of new sequestered carbon in forested torrid red soil at dry-hot valley].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Guo-Yong; Li, Kun; Sun, Yong-Yu; Zhang, Chun-Hua

    2012-02-01

    Great concerns about potential for carbon (C) sequestration in forested soil and the stability of the sequestered C have been exerted under the background of global climate change. Organic C density in soil and in soil physical and biochemical fractions at various stages (1991, 1997, 2003 and 2010) in Acacia auriculiformis stand afforested in 1991 were investigated at Dry-Hot Valley via density fractionation and acid hydrolysis. The results showed that organic C density at surface (0-15 cm) and subsurface (15-30 cm) soil layers was 1.40 kg x m(-2) and 0.99 kg x m(-2) after 19 years of afforestation, respectively. The annual C sequestration rates of surface and subsurface soil layers were 37.89 g x (m2 x a)(-1) and 16.84 g x (m2 x a)(-1) during 1991-2010, respectively, and the sequestration was accelerating. The ratio of organic C in heavy fraction to in surface soil was 71.44% in 2003, which was significantly higher than that in 2010 (67.99%). The recalcitrant carbon index (I(RC)) in light fraction was significantly higher than that in heavy fraction at surface or subsurface layers in 2003, but both decreased with aging of plantation, especially I(RC) in light fraction. Approximately 57% - 70% of new sequestered C was protected by physical mechanism and 33-49 percent was biochemical recalcitrant C during the stage from 12 to 19 years after afforestation. The results reveal that forested torrid red soil at Dry-Hot Valley may have a considerable capability of C sequestration. The biochemical stability of physically protected C is lower than the unprotected. Both the stability, however, decreases with the plantation age. PMID:22509596

  15. Stability of carbon nanotubes under electron irradiation: Role of tube diameter and chirality

    OpenAIRE

    Krasheninnikov, A. V.; Banhart, F.; Li, J. X.; Foster, Adam S.; Nieminen, Risto M.

    2005-01-01

    As recent experiments demonstrate, the inner shells of multiwalled carbon nanotubes are more sensitive to electron irradiation than the outer shells. To understand the origin of such counterintuitive behavior, we employ a density-functional-theory based tight-binding method and calculate the displacement threshold energies for carbon atoms in single-walled nanotubes with different diameters and chiralities. We show that the displacement energy and the defect production rate strongly depend on...

  16. Stability and kinetics of uranyl ion complexation by macrocycles in propylene carbonate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A thermodynamic study of uranyl ion complexes formation with different macrocyclic ligands was realized in propylene carbonate as solvent using spectrophotometric and potentiometric techniques. Formation kinetics of two UO2 complexes: a crown ether (18C6) and a coronand (22) was studied by spectrophotometry in propylene carbonate with addition of tetraethylammonium chlorate 0.1M at 250C. Possible structures of complexes in solution are discussed

  17. Plasma fluorination of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes: functionalization and thermal stability

    OpenAIRE

    Claudia Struzzi; Mattia Scardamaglia; Axel Hemberg; Luca Petaccia; Jean-François Colomer; Rony Snyders; Carla Bittencourt

    2015-01-01

    Grafting of fluorine species on carbon nanostructures has attracted interest due to the effective modification of physical and chemical properties of the starting materials. Various techniques have been employed to achieve a controlled fluorination yield; however, the effect of contaminants is rarely discussed, although they are often present. In the present work, the fluorination of vertically aligned multiwalled carbon nanotubes was performed using plasma treatment in a magnetron sputtering...

  18. One-step facile synthesis of carbon-supported PdAu nanoparticles and their electrochemical property and stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: Well-crystallized PdAu alloy nanoparticles with the average size of 2–5 nm supported on Ketjen Black (KB) were successfully fabricated from the metal wire electrodes via a one-step solution plasma process in water at atmospheric pressure. Multi-scan cyclic voltammetry showed they have better electrochemical stability in alkaline than in acidic solution. - Highlights: • Carbon-supported PdAu nanoparticles were fabricated by a solution plasma technique. • As-obtained PdAu nanoparticles were confirmed to be alloy. • PdAu nanoparticles have good electrochemical activities and stabilities. • PdAu nanoparticles in alkaline have better stability than that in acidic solution. - Abstract: Well-crystallized PdAu nanoparticles supported on Ketjen Black (KB) were successfully fabricated when both Pd and Au wires were served as the electrode pair by a solution plasma technique at atmospheric pressure. The synthesis of PdAu nanoparticles was almost simultaneous with their dispersion on KB. As-obtained PdAu nanoparticles were confirmed to be alloy by ultraviolet–visible spectrophotometer, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX) of each particle. PdAu nanoparticles with the average diameter of 2–5 nm were equably distributed on KB. PdAu nanoparticles showed good electrocatalytic activity both in acidic and alkaline solution corresponding to their obvious oxidation and reduction features. PdAu nanoparticles have improved electrochemical stability compared with the electrochemical properties of Pd and Au nanoparticles mixture after long time multi-scan cyclic voltammetry. Multi-scan cyclic voltammetry also presented the PdAu nanoparticles in alkaline solution have better stability than that in acidic solution. Thus as-obtained PdAu alloy nanoparticles would become a promising electrocatalysts for fuel cells or Li-air batteries. This novel process showed its potential applications in designing optimization of

  19. One-step facile synthesis of carbon-supported PdAu nanoparticles and their electrochemical property and stability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Xiulan, E-mail: whoxiulan@163.com [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanjing Tech University (China); Shi, Junjun; Zhang, Jianbo [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanjing Tech University (China); Tang, Weiping [Shanghai Institute of Space Power Sources, Shanghai (China); Zhu, Haikui; Shen, Xiaodong [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanjing Tech University (China); Saito, Nagahiro [Department of Materials, Physics and Energy Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University (Japan)

    2015-01-15

    Graphical abstract: Well-crystallized PdAu alloy nanoparticles with the average size of 2–5 nm supported on Ketjen Black (KB) were successfully fabricated from the metal wire electrodes via a one-step solution plasma process in water at atmospheric pressure. Multi-scan cyclic voltammetry showed they have better electrochemical stability in alkaline than in acidic solution. - Highlights: • Carbon-supported PdAu nanoparticles were fabricated by a solution plasma technique. • As-obtained PdAu nanoparticles were confirmed to be alloy. • PdAu nanoparticles have good electrochemical activities and stabilities. • PdAu nanoparticles in alkaline have better stability than that in acidic solution. - Abstract: Well-crystallized PdAu nanoparticles supported on Ketjen Black (KB) were successfully fabricated when both Pd and Au wires were served as the electrode pair by a solution plasma technique at atmospheric pressure. The synthesis of PdAu nanoparticles was almost simultaneous with their dispersion on KB. As-obtained PdAu nanoparticles were confirmed to be alloy by ultraviolet–visible spectrophotometer, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX) of each particle. PdAu nanoparticles with the average diameter of 2–5 nm were equably distributed on KB. PdAu nanoparticles showed good electrocatalytic activity both in acidic and alkaline solution corresponding to their obvious oxidation and reduction features. PdAu nanoparticles have improved electrochemical stability compared with the electrochemical properties of Pd and Au nanoparticles mixture after long time multi-scan cyclic voltammetry. Multi-scan cyclic voltammetry also presented the PdAu nanoparticles in alkaline solution have better stability than that in acidic solution. Thus as-obtained PdAu alloy nanoparticles would become a promising electrocatalysts for fuel cells or Li-air batteries. This novel process showed its potential applications in designing optimization of

  20. Utilize Cementitious High Carbon Fly Ash (CHCFA) to Stabilize Cold In-Place Recycled (CIR) Asphalt Pavement as Base Coarse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wen, Haifang; Li, Xiaojun; Edil, Tuncer; O' Donnell, Jonathan; Danda, Swapna

    2011-02-05

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the performance of cementitious high carbon fly ash (CHCFA) stabilized recycled asphalt pavement as a base course material in a real world setting. Three test road cells were built at MnROAD facility in Minnesota. These cells have the same asphalt surface layers, subbases, and subgrades, but three different base courses: conventional crushed aggregates, untreated recycled pavement materials (RPM), and CHCFA stabilized RPM materials. During and after the construction of the three cells, laboratory and field tests were carried out to characterize the material properties. The test results were used in the mechanistic-empirical pavement design guide (MEPDG) to predict the pavement performance. Based on the performance prediction, the life cycle analyses of cost, energy consumption, and greenhouse gasses were performed. The leaching impacts of these three types of base materials were compared. The laboratory and field tests showed that fly ash stabilized RPM had higher modulus than crushed aggregate and RPM did. Based on the MEPDG performance prediction, the service life of the Cell 79 containing fly ash stabilized RPM, is 23.5 years, which is about twice the service life (11 years) of the Cell 77 with RPM base, and about three times the service life (7.5 years) of the Cell 78 with crushed aggregate base. The life cycle analysis indicated that the usage of the fly ash stabilized RPM as the base of the flexible pavement can significantly reduce the life cycle cost, the energy consumption, the greenhouse gases emission. Concentrations of many trace elements, particularly those with relatively low water quality standards, diminish over time as water flows through the pavement profile. For many elements, concentrations below US water drinking water quality standards are attained at the bottom of the pavement profile within 2-4 pore volumes of flow.

  1. Hard carbon nanoparticles as high-capacity, high-stability anodic materials for Na-ion batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao, Lifen; Cao, Yuliang; Henderson, Wesley A.; Sushko, Maria L.; Shao, Yuyan; Xiao, Jie; Wang, Wei; Engelhard, Mark H.; Nie, Zimin; Liu, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Hard carbon nanoparticles (HCNP) were synthesized by the pyrolysis of a polyaniline precursor. The measured Na+ cation diffusion coefficient (10-13-10-15cm2s-1) in the HCNP obtained at 1150 °C is two orders of magnitude lower than that of Li+ in graphite (10-10-13-15cm2s-1), indicating that reducing the carbon particle size is very important for improving electrochemical performance. These measurements also enable a clear visualization of the stepwise reaction phases and rate changes which occur throughout the insertion/extraction processes in HCNP, The electrochemical measurements also show that the nano-sized HCNP obtained at 1150 °C exhibited higher practical capacity at voltages lower than 1.2 V (vs. Na/Na⁺), as well as a prolonged cycling stability, which is attributed to an optimum spacing of 0.366 nm between the graphitic layers and the nano particular size resulting in a low-barrier Na+ cation insertion. These results suggest that HCNP is a very promising high-capacity/stability anode for low cost sodium-ion batteries (SIBs).

  2. Assessing the temporal stability of surface functional groups introduced by plasma treatments on the outer shells of carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merenda, Andrea; Ligneris, Elise des; Sears, Kallista; Chaffraix, Thomas; Magniez, Kevin; Cornu, David; Schütz, Jürg A.; Dumée, Ludovic F.

    2016-01-01

    Plasma treatments are emerging as superior efficiency treatment for high surface to volume ratio materials to tune functional group densities and alter crystallinity due to their ability to interact with matter at the nanoscale. The purpose of this study is to assess for the first time the long term stability of surface functional groups introduced across the surface of carbon nanotube materials for a series of oxidative, reductive and neutral plasma treatment conditions. Both plasma duration dose matrix based exposures and time decay experiments, whereby the surface energy of the materials was evaluated periodically over a one-month period, were carried out. Although only few morphological changes across the graphitic planes of the carbon nanotubes were found under the uniform plasma treatment conditions, the time dependence of pertinent work functions, supported by Raman analysis, suggested that the density of polar groups decreased non-linearly over time prior to reaching saturation from 7 days post treatment. This work provides critical considerations on the understanding of the stability of functional groups introduced across high specific surface area nano-materials used for the design of nano-composites, adsorptive or separation systems, or sensing materials and where interfacial interactions are key to the final materials performance. PMID:27507621

  3. Assessing the temporal stability of surface functional groups introduced by plasma treatments on the outer shells of carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merenda, Andrea; Ligneris, Elise Des; Sears, Kallista; Chaffraix, Thomas; Magniez, Kevin; Cornu, David; Schütz, Jürg A.; Dumée, Ludovic F.

    2016-08-01

    Plasma treatments are emerging as superior efficiency treatment for high surface to volume ratio materials to tune functional group densities and alter crystallinity due to their ability to interact with matter at the nanoscale. The purpose of this study is to assess for the first time the long term stability of surface functional groups introduced across the surface of carbon nanotube materials for a series of oxidative, reductive and neutral plasma treatment conditions. Both plasma duration dose matrix based exposures and time decay experiments, whereby the surface energy of the materials was evaluated periodically over a one-month period, were carried out. Although only few morphological changes across the graphitic planes of the carbon nanotubes were found under the uniform plasma treatment conditions, the time dependence of pertinent work functions, supported by Raman analysis, suggested that the density of polar groups decreased non-linearly over time prior to reaching saturation from 7 days post treatment. This work provides critical considerations on the understanding of the stability of functional groups introduced across high specific surface area nano-materials used for the design of nano-composites, adsorptive or separation systems, or sensing materials and where interfacial interactions are key to the final materials performance.

  4. Long-term rice cultivation stabilizes soil organic carbon and promotes soil microbial activity in a salt marsh derived soil chronosequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ping; Liu, Yalong; Li, Lianqing; Cheng, Kun; Zheng, Jufeng; Zhang, Xuhui; Zheng, Jinwei; Joseph, Stephen; Pan, Genxing

    2015-10-01

    Soil organic carbon (SOC) sequestration with enhanced stable carbon storage has been widely accepted as a very important ecosystem property. Yet, the link between carbon stability and bio-activity for ecosystem functioning with OC accumulation in field soils has not been characterized. We assessed the changes in microbial activity versus carbon stability along a paddy soil chronosequence shifting from salt marsh in East China. We used mean weight diameter, normalized enzyme activity (NEA) and carbon gain from straw amendment for addressing soil aggregation, microbial biochemical activity and potential C sequestration, respectively. In addition, a response ratio was employed to infer the changes in all analyzed parameters with prolonged rice cultivation. While stable carbon pools varied with total SOC accumulation, soil respiration and both bacterial and fungal diversity were relatively constant in the rice soils. Bacterial abundance and NEA were positively but highly correlated to total SOC accumulation, indicating an enhanced bio-activity with carbon stabilization. This could be linked to an enhancement of particulate organic carbon pool due to physical protection with enhanced soil aggregation in the rice soils under long-term rice cultivation. However, the mechanism underpinning these changes should be explored in future studies in rice soils where dynamic redox conditions exist.

  5. Synthesis, characterization, and stability of Fe-MCM-41 for production of carbon nanotubes by acetylene pyrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amama, Placidus B; Lim, Sangyun; Ciuparu, Dragos; Yang, Yanhui; Pfefferle, Lisa; Haller, Gary L

    2005-02-24

    Fe-substituted MCM-41 molecular sieves with ca. 1, 2, and 3 wt % Fe were synthesized hydrothermally using different sources of colloidal silica (HiSil and Cab-O-Sil) and characterized by ICP, XRD, N2 physisorption, UV-vis, EPR, TPR, and X-ray absorption. Catalysts synthesized from Cab-O-Sil showed higher structural order and stability than those from HiSil. The local environment of Fe in the mesoporous material as studied by UV-vis reveals the dominance of framework Fe in all the as-synthesized Fe-MCM-41 samples. Dislodgement of some Fe species to extraframework location occurs upon calcination, and this effect is more severe for Fe-MCM-41 (2 wt %) and Fe-MCM-41 (3 wt %), as confirmed by EPR and X-ray absorption. These materials have been used as catalytic templates for the production of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) by acetylene pyrolysis at atmospheric pressure. A relationship between the Fe loading in MCM-41 and the carbon species produced during this reaction has been established. Using our optimized conditions for this system, Fe-MCM-41 with ca. 2 wt % Fe showed the best results with particularly high selectivity for single-wall carbon nanotube (SWNT) production. This catalyst was selective for carbon nanotubes with a low amount of amorphous carbon for a narrow range of temperatures from 1073 to 1123 K. To account for the different selectivity of these catalysts for CNTs production, the local environment and chemical state of Fe in the used catalyst was further probed by X-band EPR. PMID:16851270

  6. Molecular dynamics simulation of expanding infinite matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Multi-fragmentation occurred in an expanding infinite system is studied by using molecular dynamics simulation. To evaluate the secondary decay effect, the time evolution of expanding system is proceeded till all fragments are stabilized completely. The fragment mass distribution from the expansion is compared with a percolation model and the cause of the exponential shape is clarified. The cause of small critical temperature is also discussed. (author)

  7. Stability and chirality effect on twist formation of collapsed double wall carbon nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIAO Jian-liang; LIU Bin; HUANG Yong-gang; HWANG Ke-zhi; YU Min-feng

    2006-01-01

    This study is to reveal the effect of interlayer lattice registry on the formation of collapsed double wall carbon nanotubes (DWCNTs). It is found that collapsed carbon nanotubes can be energetically unstable,metastable or stable,depending mainly on the diameter of the CNT. A fully collapsed DWCNT can adopt different structural morphologies,such as a straight ribbon,a warping ribbon or a twisted ribbon,depending on the chirality of the CNT,which is similar to single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). Different from SWCNTs,this study also shows some unique phenomena in the formation of collapsed DWCNTs. A fully collapsed DWCNT can have different combinations of the interlayer lattice registry effect within the inner and outer tube,thus the outer tube can influence the formation of the collapsed CNT via lattice registry effect,sometimes even dominates the twist of the CNT.

  8. Structures and stability of calcium and magnesium carbonates at mantle pressures

    OpenAIRE

    Pickard, Chris J.; Needs, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    Ab initio random structure searching (AIRSS) and density functional theory methods are used to predict structures of calcium and magnesium carbonate (CaCO$_3$ and MgCO$_3$) at high pressures. We find a previously unknown CaCO$_3$ structure which is more stable than the aragonite and "post aragonite" phases in the range 32--48 GPa. At pressures from 67 GPa to well over 100 GPa the most stable phase is a previously unknown CaCO$_3$ structure of the pyroxene type with fourfold coordinated carbon...

  9. Organic Matter Quality and its Influence on Carbon Turnover and Stabilization in Northern Peatlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turetsky, M. R.; Wieder, R. K.

    2002-12-01

    Peatlands cover 3-5 % of the world's ice-free land area, but store about 33 % of global terrestrial soil carbon. Peat accumulation in northern regions generally is controlled by slow decomposition, which may be limited by cold temperatures and water-logging. Poor organic matter quality also may limit decay, and microbial activity in peatlands likely is regulated by the availability of labile carbon and/or nutrients. Conversely, carbon in recalcitrant soil structures may be chemically protected from microbial decay, particularly in peatlands where carbon can be buried in anaerobic soils. Soil organic matter quality is controlled by plant litter chemical composition and the susceptibility of organic compounds to decomposition through time. There are a number of techniques available for characterizing organic quality, ranging from chemical proximate or elemental analysis to more qualitative methods such as nuclear magenetic resonance, pyrolysis/mass spectroscopy, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. We generally have relied on proximate analysis for quantitative determination of several organic fractions (i.e., water-soluble carbohydrates, soluble nonpolars, water-soluble phenolics, holocellulose, and acid insoluble material). Our approaches to studying organic matter quality in relation to C turnover in peatlands include 1) 14C labelling of peatland vegetation along a latitudinal gradient in North America, allowing us to follow the fate of 14C tracer in belowground organic fractions under varying climates, 2) litter bag studies focusing on the role of individual moss species in litter quality and organic matter decomposition, and 3) laboratory incubations of peat to explore relationships between organic matter quality and decay. These studies suggest that proximate organic fractions vary in lability, but that turnover of organic matter is influenced both by plant species and climate. Across boreal peatlands, measures of soil recalcitrance such as acid

  10. Evaluation of metal oxide and carbonate nanoparticle stability in soybean oil: Implications for controlled release of alkalinity during subsurface remediation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsburg, C. A.; Leach, O. I.; Sebik, J.; Muller, K.

    2011-12-01

    Traditional methods for adjusting groundwater pH rely on injection of aqueous solutes and therefore, amendment distribution is reliant upon aqueous phase flow and transport. This reliance can limit mixing and sustention of amendments within the treatment zone. Oil-in-water emulsions offer an alternative for amendment delivery - one that has potential to enhance control of the distribution and release of buffering agents within the subsurface. Focus here is placed on using metal oxide and carbonate nanoparticles to release alkalinity from soybean oil, a common dispersed phase within emulsions designed to support remediation activities. Batch reactor systems were employed to examine the influence of dispersed phase composition on particle stability and solubility. The stability of uncoated MgO and CaCO3 particles in unmodified soybean oil was explored in a series of sedimentation studies conducted at solid loadings of 0.05, 0.1, and 0.2% mass. Three nominal sizes of MgO particles were examined (20, 50, and 100 nm) and one CaCO3 particle size (60 nm). Results from sedimentation studies conducted over four hours suggest that the viscosity of the soybean oil imparts a kinetic stability, for all sizes of the uncoated MgO and CaCO3 nanoparticles, which is sufficient time for particle encapsulation within oil-in-water emulsions. Based upon these results, the sedimentation of the 50 nm and 100 nm MgO, and 60 nm CaCO3 particles was assessed over longer durations (≥72 hr). Results from these stability tests suggest that the 50 nm and 100 nm MgO particles have greater kinetic stability than the 60 nm CaCO3. Batch studies were also used to assess the influence of n-butanol, a co-solvent hypothesized to aid in controlling the rate of alkalinity release, on phase behavior and metal (Mg2+ and Ca2+) solubility. Phase behavior studies suggest that n-butanol has a limited region of miscibility within the soybean oil-water system. Use of n-butanol and water within this region of

  11. Thermal stability of metallic single-walled carbon nanotubes: an O(N) tight-binding molecular dynamics simulation study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Order(N) tight-binding molecular dynamics (TBMD) simulations are performed to investigate the thermal stability of (10,10) metallic single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). Periodic boundary conditions (PBCs) are applied in the axial direction. The velocity Verlet algorithm along with the canonical ensemble molecular dynamics (NVT) is used to simulate the tubes at the targeted temperatures. The effects of slow and rapid temperature increases on the physical characteristics, structural stability and the energetics of the tube are investigated and compared. Simulations are carried out starting from room temperature and the temperature is raised in steps of 300 K. The stability of the simulated metallic SWCNT is examined at each step before it is heated to higher temperatures. The first indication of structural deformation is observed at 600 K. For higher heat treatments the deformations are more pronounced and the bond-breaking temperature is reached around 2500 K. Gradual (slow) heating and thermal equilibrium (fast heating) methods give the value of radial thermal expansion coefficient in the temperature range between 300 and 600 K as 0.31 x 10-5 and 0.089 x 10-5 K-1, respectively. After 600 K, both methods give the same value of 0.089 x 10-5 K-1. The ratio of the total energy per atom with respect to temperature is found to be 3 x 10-4 eV K-1

  12. Degree of functionalization and stability of fluorine groups fixed to carbon nanotubes and graphite nanoplates by CF4 microwave plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelkader-Fernández, V. K.; Morales-Lara, F.; Melguizo, M.; García-Gallarín, C.; López-Garzón, R.; Godino-Salido, M. L.; López-Garzón, F. J.; Domingo-García, M.; Pérez-Mendoza, M. J.

    2015-12-01

    The fluorination of graphite nanoplates (GNPs) and multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) by CF4 cold plasma is reported. The aim is to analyze the influence of the textural characteristics in the degree of fluorination and in the thermal stability of the fluorine groups. We have used thermal programmed desorption which clearly discriminates the nature of the desorbing species and their stability. The degree of fluorination of both materials is similar up to 20 min of treatment and then it decreases in GNPs at longer treatments. Nevertheless, the fluorine content in MWCNTs keeps increasing after 45 min. This different evolution of the fluorination degree with the time is related to the surface areas. The fluorine bonding is produced not only in defects and irregularities but also on the external graphene sheets of both materials, and it results in up to eight different chemical environments having different thermal stabilities from 150 °C up to temperatures higher than 900 °C. The fluorination increases the electronic states near the Fermi level of the nanotubes whereas it does not affect the electronic properties of graphite nanoplates. It is shown that no intercalation compounds are formed and that the textural characteristics of the materials remain unchanged after fluorination.

  13. Preparation, melting behavior and thermal stability of poly(lactic acid)/poly(propylene carbonate) blends processed by vane extruder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Wei; Chen, Rongyuan; Zhang, Haichen; Qu, Jinping

    2016-03-01

    Poly (lactic acid) (PLA)/Poly (propylene carbonate) (PPC) blends were prepared by vane extruder which is a type of novel polymer processing extruder based on elongation force field. Scanning electron microscope (SEM), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and thermogravimetric (TG) were used respectively to analyze the compatibility, the melting behavior and thermal stability properties of PLA/PPC blends affected by the different content of PPC. The results showed that with the increase of the PPC content, the glass transition temperature of PLA was reduced, and the glass transition temperature of PPC was increased, which indicated that PLA and PPC had partial compatibility. The cold crystallization temperature of PLA increased with the increase of the PPC content, which showed that PPC hindered the cold crystallization process of PLA. The addition of PPC had little impact on the melting process of PLA, and the melting temperature of PLA was almost kept the same value. Thermogravimetric analysis showed that the thermal stability of PPC was worse than that of PLA, the addition of PPC reduced the thermal stability of PLA.

  14. Effects of multiple polyaniline layers immobilized on carbon nanotube and glutaraldehyde on performance and stability of biofuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christwardana, Marcelinus; Kwon, Yongchai

    2015-12-01

    Enzymatic biofuel cell (EBC) employing new catalyst for anode electrode is fabricated. The new catalyst consists of glucose oxidase (GOx), polyaniline (PANI) and carbon nanotube (CNT) that are multiply stacked together and finally the stack layer is surrounded by glutaraldehyde (GA) (GA/[GOx/PANI/CNT]n). To evaluate how the GA/[GOx/PANI/CNT]n layer affects EBC performance and stability, electrochemical characterizations are implemented. Regarding optimization, GA/[GOx/PANI/CNT]3 is determined. For elucidating reaction mechanism between glucose and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) of GA/[GOx/PANI/CNT]3, associated investigations are performed. In the evaluations, drop in reduction current peak of FAD is observed with provisions of glucose and O2, while glucose does not influence FAD reaction without O2, confirming O2 makes mediator role. When the GA/[GOx/PANI/CNT]3 layer is adopted, superior catalytic activity and EBC performance are gained (electron transfer rate constant of 5.1 s-1, glucose sensitivity of 150 ìA mM-1 cm-2, and EBC maximum power density (MPD) of 0.29 mW cm-2). Regarding EBC stability, MPD of EBC adopting GA/[GOx/PANI/CNT]3 maintains up to 93% of their initial value even after four weeks. Although GA is little effective for improving EBC performance, EBC stability is helped by GA due to its adhesion promotion capability with [GOx/PANI/CNT]n layer.

  15. Study of IV B elements carbonate complexes 1. Stability constant of thorium (IV) pentacarbonate complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method for the solvent extraction of thorium (IV) by chelation and neutronic activation analysis, allows the determination of stability constant of thorium (IV) pentacarbonate complexe at an ionic strength of 1.0 and 2.5: log β = 26.2 ± 0.2 and 26.3 ± 0.2. 10 refs

  16. STABILITY EVALUATION OF SULFUR DIOXIDE, NITRIC OXIDE AND CARBON MONOXIDE GASES IN CYLINDERS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The US EPA recommends in their EPA Traceability Protocol 1 and 2 that reactive gases be reanalyzed every six months. The purpose of this study was to assess the stability of selected reactive gases as a function of time to determine the feasibility of extending the recertificatio...

  17. Probing the Interfacial Interaction in Layered-Carbon-Stabilized Iron Oxide Nanostructures: A Soft X-ray Spectroscopic Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hui; Liu, Jinyin; Zhao, Guanqi; Gao, Yongjun; Tyliszczak, Tolek; Glans, Per-Anders; Guo, Jinghua; Ma, Ding; Sun, Xu-Hui; Zhong, Jun

    2015-04-22

    We have stabilized the iron oxide nanoparticles (NPs) of various sizes on layered carbon materials (Fe-oxide/C) that show excellent catalytic performance. From the characterization of X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES), scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) and X-ray magnetic circular dichroism spectroscopy (XMCD), a strong interfacial interaction in the Fe-oxide/C hybrids has been observed between the small iron oxide NPs and layered carbon in contrast to the weak interaction in the large iron oxide NPs. The interfacial interaction between the NPs and layered carbon is found to link with the improved catalytic performance. In addition, the Fe L-edge XMCD spectra show that the large iron oxide NPs are mainly γ-Fe2O3 with a strong ferromagnetic property, whereas the small iron oxide NPs with strong interfacial interaction are mainly α-Fe2O3 or amorphous Fe2O3 with a nonmagnetic property. The results strongly suggest that the interfacial interaction plays a key role for the catalytic performance, and the experimental findings may provide guidance toward rational design of high-performance catalysts. PMID:25839786

  18. A high-porosity carbon molybdenum sulphide composite with enhanced electrochemical hydrogen evolution and stability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Anders B.; Vesborg, Peter C. K.; Chorkendorff, Ib

    2013-01-01

    This work describes a highly active and stable acid activated carbon fibre and amorphous MoSx composite hydrogen evolution catalyst. The increased electrochemical-surface area is demonstrated to cause increased catalyst electrodeposition and activity. These composite electrodes also show an...

  19. Colloidal stability of (functionalised) fullerenes in the presence of dissolved organic carbon and electrolytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.J.H. Haftka; P.S. Bäuerlein; E. Emke; N. Lammertse; D. Belokhovstova; B Hilvering; P. de Voogt; T.L. ter Laak

    2015-01-01

    Carbon-based nanoparticles such as fullerenes have been widely applied in personal care products, drug delivery systems, and solar cells. The properties of nanoparticles have been increasingly studied because of their applications and their potential risks to the environment and human health. Many s

  20. Carbon replacement and stability changes in short-term silvo-pastoralo experiments in Colombian Amazonia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mosquera Vidal, O.; Buurman, P.; Ramirez, B.L.; Amezquita, M.C.

    2012-01-01

    There is little information on the effects of land use change on soil Carbon stocks in Colombian Amazonia. Such information would be needed to assess the impact of this area on the global C cycle and the sustainability of agricultural systems that are replacing native forest. The aim of this study w

  1. Effects of prenatal exposure to nanoparticles titanium dioxide and carbon black on female germline DNA stability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boisen, Anne Mette Zenner

    Particulate air pollution has been associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease and cancer in humans. Air pollution may also adversely affect pregnancy outcome and the integrity of sperm cells DNA. Animal studies have shown that inhalation of air particulates can induce mutations in...... needed. Expanded simple tandem repeat (ESTR) loci in mice are sensitive markers of mutagenic effects resulting from environmental exposures; Studies on adult mice have revealed that while particulate air pollution induced ESTR mutations in premeiotic sperm cells, the female germline was not affected....... Unlike sperm cells that are continuously developed in adulthood, the majority of oocytes are in a dormant state during long periods of adult life and may therefore be less sensitive to mutations. However, female germ cells may be vulnerable during pregnancy when the female germ cells of the fetus when...

  2. Acid–base interaction between carbon black and polyurethane molecules with different amine values: Dispersion stability of carbon black suspension for use in lithium ion battery cathodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The dispersion properties of carbon black (CB) slurries as well as the accompanying electrochemical properties of Li(Ni1/3Co1/3Mn1/3)O2 (NCM) electrodes were investigated by controlling the amine value of polyurethane-based dispersants. The increase in amine value of dispersants leads to an increase in adsorption level on CB surface due to a strong acid/base interaction between dispersants and CB particles, providing the improvement of steric repulsion between particles at the solid–liquid interface. This results in the enhancement of the dispersion stability of CB and the related microstructure of the electrodes. Electrochemical experiments indicated that the rate capabilities and cycle performance of the electrodes are in good agreement with dispersion properties of CB slurries. However, it was found that the excessive addition of the dispersant was deleterious to electrochemical properties because the non-adsorbed dispersants act as an electronic conduction barrier between solid phases. Therefore, it is suggested that the amine value of dispersant and tailored amount of dispersant addition can be key roles for obtaining the optimized dispersion stability of CB and the corresponding excellent electrochemical properties of the cathode

  3. Effect of charge on the stability of single-walled carbon nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LUO; Ji; WU; Jinlei

    2004-01-01

    By using density-functional-theory based DMol3 code, the structure optimizations are performed on a short charged single-walled carbon nanotube. Results show that the total energy of the nanotube exhibits a parabolic variation with respect to the amount of extra charge, and one negatively charged nanotube has the lowest total energy; thus the carbon nanotube has a positive electron affinity. When the charge is small, the variation of the atomic structure of the nanotube is also small, and neglecting the atomic structure variation leads to the qualitatively correct properties of the total energy and the energy of the highest occupied molecular orbital. When the extra charge is large, the end structure of the nanotube will be first affected and form into a trumpet shape. With the increasing of the extra charge, the nanotube end gradually becomes unstable, and this may lead to the ultimate destruction of the nanotube.

  4. Stability of carbonated magmas at the base of the Earth's upper mantle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Sujoy; Ohtani, Eiji; Litasov, Konstantin; Suzuki, Akio; Sakamaki, Tatsuya

    2007-11-01

    We measured the density of carbonated basaltic melt containing 5.0 wt.% CO2 at 2573 K and in the pressure range from 16.0 to 20.0 GPa by using the sink/float method with single crystal diamond as a density marker. We observed sinking of diamond at 19.0 GPa and flotation of diamond at 20.0 GPa and 2573 K. Using the third order Birch-Murnaghan equation of state, the calculated isothermal bulk modulus (K T ) of the carbonated basaltic melt (5.0 wt.% CO2) and its pressure derivative (K') are 16.0 +/- 1.0 GPa and 5.2 +/- 0.2, respectively. Our result implies that magmas can contain up to 3.0-4.0 wt.% CO2 to be denser than the surrounding mantle at the top of the 410 km discontinuity.

  5. Colloidal stability of (functionalised) fullerenes in the presence of dissolved organic carbon and electrolytes

    OpenAIRE

    Haftka, J.J.H.; Bäuerlein, P.S.; Emke, E.; Lammertse, N.; Belokhovstova, D.; Hilvering, B; Voogt, de, P.; Laak, ter, E.A.

    2015-01-01

    Carbon-based nanoparticles such as fullerenes have been widely applied in personal care products, drug delivery systems, and solar cells. The properties of nanoparticles have been increasingly studied because of their applications and their potential risks to the environment and human health. Many studies have focused on the environmental fate and properties of C60. However, there is limited information available on the environmental properties of functionalised fullerenes. This study focuses...

  6. Conductivity and Ambient Stability of Halogen-Doped Carbon Nanotube Fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaier, J. R.; Chirino, C. M.; Chen, M.; Waters, D. L.; Tran, Mai Kim; Headrick, R.; Young, C. C.; Tsentalovich, D.; Whiting, B.; Pasquali, M.; Waarbeek, Ron ter; Otto, Marcin J.

    2014-01-01

    Carbon nanotube fibers were fabricated using a variety of spinning conditions and post-spinning processing with the goal of creating a high-conductivity yet environmentally stable fiber. These fiber variants were then doped with bromine, iodine, iodine chloride, or iodine bromide and their electrical and microstructural properties were characterized. Environmentally stable compounds were synthesized with electrical conductivity greater than 50,000 Scm.

  7. Flow induced vibration and stability analysis of multi wall carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The free vibration and flow induced flutter instability of cantilever multi wall carbon nanotubes conveying fluid are investigated and the nanotubes are modeled as thin-walled beams. The non-classical effects of the transverse shear, rotary inertia, warping inhibition, and van der Waals forces between two walls are incorporated into the structural model. The governing equations and associated boundary conditions are derived using Hamilton's principle. A numerical analysis is carried out by using the extended Galerkin method, which enables us to obtain more accurate solutions compared to the conventional Galerkin method. Cantilevered carbon nanotubes are damped with decaying amplitude for a flow velocity below a certain critical value. However, beyond this critical flow velocity, flutter instability may occur. The variations in the critical flow velocity with respect to both the radius ratio and length of the carbon nanotubes are investigated and pertinent conclusions are outlined. The differences in the vibration and instability characteristics between the Timoshenko beam theory and Euler beam theory are revealed. A comparative analysis of the natural frequencies and flutter characteristics of MWCNTs and SWCNTs is also performed

  8. Flow induced vibration and stability analysis of multi wall carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yun, Kyung Jae [Agency for Defense Development, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Jong Woon [Korean Intellectual Property Office, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sung Kyun [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Song, Oh Seop [Chungnam National Univ., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-12-15

    The free vibration and flow induced flutter instability of cantilever multi wall carbon nanotubes conveying fluid are investigated and the nanotubes are modeled as thin-walled beams. The non-classical effects of the transverse shear, rotary inertia, warping inhibition, and van der Waals forces between two walls are incorporated into the structural model. The governing equations and associated boundary conditions are derived using Hamilton's principle. A numerical analysis is carried out by using the extended Galerkin method, which enables us to obtain more accurate solutions compared to the conventional Galerkin method. Cantilevered carbon nanotubes are damped with decaying amplitude for a flow velocity below a certain critical value. However, beyond this critical flow velocity, flutter instability may occur. The variations in the critical flow velocity with respect to both the radius ratio and length of the carbon nanotubes are investigated and pertinent conclusions are outlined. The differences in the vibration and instability characteristics between the Timoshenko beam theory and Euler beam theory are revealed. A comparative analysis of the natural frequencies and flutter characteristics of MWCNTs and SWCNTs is also performed.

  9. Electrical resistance stability of high content carbon fiber reinforced cement composite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Zai-fu; TANG Zu-quan; LI Zhuo-qiu; QIAN Jue-shi

    2005-01-01

    The influences of curing time, the content of free evaporable water in cement paste, environmental temperature, and alternative heating and cooling on the electrical resistance of high content carbon fiber reinforced cement (CFRC) paste are studied by experiments with specimens of Portland cement 42.5 with 10 mm PAN-based carbon fiber and methylcellulose. Experimental results indicate that the electrical resistance of CFRC increases relatively by 24% within a hydration time of 90 d and almost keeps constant after 14 d, changes hardly with the mass loss of free evaporable water in the concrete dried at 50℃C, increases relatively by 4% when ambient temperature decreases from 15℃ to-20℃, and decreases relatively by 13% with temperature increasing by 88℃. It is suggested that the electric resistance of the CFRC is stable, which is testified by the stable power output obtained by electrifying the CFRC slab with a given voltage. This implies that such kind of high content carbon fiber reinforced cement composite is potentially a desirable electrothermal material for airfield runways and road surfaces deicing.

  10. Evaluation of the retained austenite mechanical stability in the medium-carbon TRIP steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Kokosza

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the inclination to mechanical destabilization of retained austenite in the microstructure of the TRIP steel containing 0.4% C, 1.5% Mn and 1.2% Si.Design/methodology/approach: The new, simple method for evaluating the mechanical stability of retained austenite was proposed, which is based on the bending test and the measurement of volume fraction of retained austenite by X-ray quantitative phase analysis. The relationship between stress and local strain as well as local volume fraction of this phase in selected locations on the surface of the bending sample were revealed.Findings: The applied heat treatment, modified with respect to the classic one, allowed remain approximately 25 vol.% of the retained austenite in the microstructure of the investigated TRIP steel. It was pointed that retained austenite has high mechanical stability if stress is low. Under influence of the higher stress a partial destabilization this phase occurred. It was found that in the examined steel such mechanical destabilization of retained austenite has two - or three-stage nature.Research limitations/implications: Results of this study indicate a significant stability of retained austenite in the investigated TRIP steel. It is advisable to check how will change the stability of this phase when the stress or strain will be higher than those that occurred in this research.Practical implications: The new method of the evaluation of the retained austenite mechanical stability provides the possibility of an easy and effective estimation of this phase tendency to mechanical destabilisation and to martensite transformation in the steel. In addition, this method allows analysing the influence of the stress as well as the strain on changes in this phase volume fraction, which occur during three-point bending.Originality/value: The proposed method may be used for evaluation of susceptibility of retained austenite on transformation

  11. Laboratory Investigations in Support of Carbon Dioxide-in-Water Emulsions Stabilized by Fine Particles for Ocean and Geologic Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dan Golomb; David Ryan; Eugene Barry

    2007-01-08

    Since the submission of our last Semi-annual Report, dated September 2006, the research objectives of this Co-operative Agreement shifted toward geologic sequestration of carbon dioxide. In the period September 2006-February 2007, experiments were conducted in a High-Pressure Batch Reactor (HPBR) for creating emulsions of liquid carbon dioxide (/CO{sub 2})-in-water stabilized by fine particles for geologic sequestration of CO{sub 2}. Also, emulsions were created in water of a binary mixture of liquid carbon dioxide and liquid hydrogen sulfide (/H{sub 2}S), called Acid Gas (AG). This leads to the possibility of safe disposal of AG in deep geologic formations, such as saline aquifers. The stabilizing particles included pulverized limestone (CaCO{sub 3}), unprocessed flyash, collected by an electrostatic precipitator at a local coal-fired power plant, and pulverized siderite (FeCO{sub 3}). Particle size ranged from submicron to a few micrometers. The first important finding is that /CO{sub 2} and /H{sub 2}S freely mix as a binary liquid without phase separation. The next finding is that the mixture of /CO{sub 2} and /H{sub 2}S can be emulsified in water using fine particles as emulsifying agents. Such emulsions are stable over prolonged periods, so it should not be a problem to inject an emulsion into subterranean formations. The advantage of injecting an emulsion into subterranean formations is that it is denser than the pure liquid, therefore it is likely to disperse in the bottom of the geologic formation, rather than buoying upward (called fingering). In such a fashion, the risk of the liquids escaping from the formation, and possibly re-emerging into the atmosphere, is minimized. This is especially important for H{sub 2}S, because it is a highly toxic gas. Furthermore, the emulsion may interact with the surrounding minerals, causing mineral trapping. This may lead to longer sequestration periods than injecting the pure liquids alone.

  12. Storage and stability of organic carbon in soils as related to depth, occlusion within aggregates, and attachment to minerals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Schrumpf

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Conceptual models suggest that stability of organic carbon (OC in soil depends on the source of plant litter, occlusion within aggregates, incorporation in organo-mineral complexes, and location within the soil profile. Density fractionation is a useful tool to study the relevance of OC stabilization in aggregates and in association with minerals, but it has rarely been applied to full soil profiles. We aim to determine factors shaping the depth profiles of physically unprotected and mineral associated OC and test their relevance for OC stability across a range of European soils that vary in vegetation, soil types, parent material, and land use. At each of the 12 study sites, 10 soil cores were sampled to 60 cm depth and subjected to density separation. Bulk soil samples and density fractions (free light fractions – fLF, occluded light fractions – oLF, heavy fractions – HF were analysed for OC, total nitrogen (TN, δ14C, and Δ14C. Bulk samples were also incubated to determine CO2 evolution per g OC in the samples (specific mineralization rates as an indicator for OC stability. Depth profiles of OC in the light fraction (LF-OC matched those of roots for undisturbed grassland and forest sites, suggesting that roots are shaping the depth distribution of LF-OC. Organic C in the HF declined less with soil depth than LF-OC and roots, especially at grassland sites. The decrease in Δ14C (increase in age of HF-OC with soil depth was related to soil pH as well as to dissolved OC fluxes. This indicates that dissolved OC translocation contributes to the formation of subsoil HF-OC and shapes the Δ14C profiles. The LF at three sites were rather depleted in 14C, indicating the presence of fossil material such as coal and lignite, probably inherited from the parent material. At the other sites, modern Δ14C signatures and positive correlations between specific mineralization rates and fLF-OC indicate the fLF is a potentially available energy and

  13. Combining Old and New Stable Isotope Techniques to Evaluate the Impact of Conservation Tillage on Soil Organic Carbon Dynamics and Stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soil organic matter (SOM) is a major carbon pool. It is a crucial factor for soil quality including several soil physical properties and a major nutrient source for crops. It also plays a significant role in the global carbon cycle. Soils can act as a carbon sink or source depending on land use and agricultural management practices. Some practices such as conservation tillage or no-tillage could increase SOM stocks, particularly in the topsoil, but in the long term it remains to be seen if and how this SOM is stabilized (De Clercq et al., 2015; Govaerts et al., 2009). In order to evaluate the sustainability and efficiency of soil carbon sequestration measures and the impact of different management and environmental factors, information on SOM stability and mean residence time (MRT) is required. However, this information on SOM stability and MRT is expensive to determine via radiocarbon dating, precluding a wide spread use of stability measurements in soil science. But alternative methods based on stable carbon and nitrogen isotopes, can provide this information at a fraction of the cost

  14. Comparative study of ageing, heat treatment and accelerated carbonation for stabilization of municipal solid waste incineration bottom ash in view of reducing regulated heavy metal/metalloid leaching

    OpenAIRE

    Santos, Rafael; Mertens, Gilles; Salman, Muhammad; Cizer, Özlem; Gerven, Tom Van

    2013-01-01

    This study compared the performance of four different approaches for stabilization of regulated heavy metal and metalloid leaching from municipal solid waste incineration bottom ash (MSWI-BA): (i) short term (three months) heap ageing, (ii) heat treatment, (iii) accelerated moist carbonation, and (iv) accelerated pressurized slurry carbonation. Two distinct types of MSWI-BA were tested in this study: one originating from a moving-grate furnace incineration operation treating exclusively house...

  15. Functional Stability of a Mixed Microbial Consortium Producing PHA From Waste Carbon Sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David N. Thompson; Erik R. Coats; William A. Smith; Frank J. Loge; Michael P. Wolcott

    2006-04-01

    Polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) represent an environmentally-effective alternative to synthetic thermoplastics; however, current production practices are not sustainable. In this study, PHA production was accomplished in sequencing batch bioreactors utilizing real wastewaters and mixed microbial consortia from municipal activated sludge as inoculum. Polymer production reached 85%, 53%, and 10% of the cell dry weight from methanol-enriched pulp-and-paper mill foul condensate, fermented municipal primary solids, and biodiesel wastewater, respectively. Employing denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis of 16S-rDNA from PCR-amplified DNA extracts, distinctly different communities were observed between and within wastewaters following enrichment. Most importantly, functional stability was maintained despite differing and contrasting microbial populations.

  16. Enhanced thermal stability of multi-walled carbon nanotubes after coating with polyaniline salt

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Morávková, Zuzana; Trchová, Miroslava; Tomšík, Elena; Čechvala, J.; Stejskal, Jaroslav

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 97, č. 8 (2012), s. 1405-1414. ISSN 0141-3910 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA100500902; GA ČR GA202/09/1626; GA ČR GPP108/11/P763; GA ČR GAP205/12/0911 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : carbon nano tubes * polyaniline * nano -composites Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 2.770, year: 2012

  17. Adsorption behavior of perfluorinated sulfonic acid ionomer on highly graphitized carbon nanofibers and their thermal stabilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Shuang Ma; Borghei, Maryam; Dhiman, Rajnish;

    2014-01-01

    A systematic adsorption study of perfluorinated sulfonic acid Nafion® ionomer on ribbon type highly graphitized carbon nanofibers (CNFs) was carried out using 19 fluorine nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Based on the values obtained for the equilibrium constant (Keq., derived from Langmui...... coverage (ΓSmax) of the CNFs is one order of magnitude higher than the one of Vulcan. The large discrepancy is due to the fact that the ionomers are inaccessible to the internal surface area of Vulcan with high micro porosity....

  18. Organic carbon, water repellency and soil stability to slaking at aggregate and intra-aggregate scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordán López, Antonio; García-Moreno, Jorge; Gordillo-Rivero, Ángel J.; Zavala, Lorena M.; Cerdà, Artemi; Alanís, Nancy; Jiménez-Compán, Elizabeth

    2015-04-01

    Water repellency (WR) is a property of some soils that inhibits or delays water infiltration between a few seconds and days or weeks. Inhibited or delayed infiltration contributes to ponding and increases runoff flow generation, often increasing soil erosion risk. In water-repellent soils, water infiltrates preferentially through cracks or macropores, causing irregular soil wetting patterns, the development of preferential flow paths and accelerated leaching of nutrients. Although low inputs of hydrophobic organic substances and high mineralization rates lead to low degrees of WR in cropped soils, it has been reported that conservative agricultural practices may induce soil WR. Although there are many studies at catchment, slope or plot scales very few studies have been carried out at particle or aggregate scale. Intra-aggregate heterogeneity of physical, biological and chemical properties conditions the transport of substances, microbial activity and biochemical processes, including changes in the amount, distribution and chemical properties of organic matter. Some authors have reported positive relationships between soil WR and aggregate stability, since it may delay the entry of water into aggregates, increase structural stability and contribute to reduce soil erosion risk. Organic C (OC) content, aggregate stability and WR are therefore strongly related parameters. In the case of agricultural soils, where both the type of management as crops can influence all these parameters, it is important to evaluate the interactions among them and their consequences. Studies focused on the intra-aggregate distribution of OC and WR are necessary to shed light on the soil processes at a detailed scale. It is extremely important to understand how the spatial distribution of OC in soil aggregates can protect against rapid water entry and help stabilize larger structural units or lead to preferential flow. The objectives of this research are to study [i] the OC content and the

  19. Amphiphilic block copolymer-stabilized PtRu nanoparticles highly dispersed on multi-walled carbon nanotube for methanol oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Dao-Jun; Cai, Peng; You, Jin-Mao

    2012-02-15

    We report a one-pot synthesis of amphiphilic block copolymer-stabilized PtRu nanoparticle modified multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) using RuCl(3)·xH(2)O and H(2)PtCl(6)·6H(2)O as ruthenium and platinum sources, and block copolymer poly(ethylene oxide)-poly(propylene oxide)-poly(ethylene oxide) as stabilizer agent. PtRu alloyed nanoparticles with an average diameter of 4.6nm are well decorated homogeneously on the exterior surfaces of the MWCNTs. The electrochemical catalytic activity for methanol oxidation of PtRu/MWCNTs and commercial PtRu/C (E-TEK) is comparatively investigated using cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometry. It is revealed that the PtRu nanoparticle modified MWCNT samples display an enhanced electrochemical catalytic activity than commercial PtRu/C electrode. These results show that PtRu nanoparticles may find applications to fuel cells. PMID:22104276

  20. Key factors influencing the stability of silane solution during long-term surface treatment on carbon steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: •The corrosion-resistance time of silane films decreases with increasing cycle numbers. •The morphology of silane films prepared from aged solution is inhomogeneous. •Introduction of contamination ions is one reason for the poor property of aged solution. •Consumption of silane is the other reason for the poor property of aged solution. •Fe3+ accumulated is the key factor influencing the property of silane solution. -- Abstract: The mixtures of bis-[trimethoxysilylpropyl]amine and vinyltriacetoxysilane were used for surface treatment of carbon steel, aiming to investigate the factors influencing the stability of silane solution during long-term experiment from two aspects. One is the concentrations of contamination ions, and the other is mass of silane consumed per cycle which is calculated according to concentration of Si measured by silicon molybdenum blue photometry. The results indicate that the accumulation of contamination ions, especially Fe3+, is the main factor leading to the condensation between the Si–OH groups in silane solution, which is responsible for the downward stability of silane solution

  1. Polyaniline-Coated Carbon Nanotube Ultrafiltration Membranes: Enhanced Anodic Stability for In Situ Cleaning and Electro-Oxidation Processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Wenyan; Ronen, Avner; Walker, Sharon; Jassby, David

    2016-08-31

    Electrically conducting membranes (ECMs) have been reported to be efficient in fouling prevention and destruction of aqueous chemical compounds. In the current study, highly conductive and anodically stable composite polyaniline-carbon nanotube (PANI-CNT) ultrafiltration (UF) ECMs were fabricated through a process of electropolymerization of aniline on a CNT substrate under acidic conditions. The resulting PANI-CNT UF ECMs were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, a four-point conductivity probe, cyclic voltammetry, and contact angle goniometry. The utilization of the PANI-CNT material led to significant advantages, including: (1) increased electrical conductivity by nearly an order of magnitude; (2) increased surface hydrophilicity while not impacting membrane selectivity or permeability; and (3) greatly improved stability under anodic conditions. The membrane's anodic stability was evaluated in a pH-controlled aqueous environment under a wide range of anodic potentials using a three-electrode cell. Results indicate a significantly reduced degradation rate in comparison to a CNT-poly(vinyl alcohol) ECM under high anodic potentials. Fouling experiments conducted with bovine serum albumin demonstrated the capacity of the PANI-CNT ECMs for in situ oxidative cleaning, with membrane flux restored to its initial value under an applied potential of 3 V. Additionally, a model organic compound (methylene blue) was electrochemically transformed at high efficiency (90%) in a single pass through the anodically charged ECM. PMID:27525344

  2. Activity, short-term stability (poisoning tolerance) and durability of carbon supported Pt-Pr catalysts for ethanol oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corradini, Patricia G.; Antolini, Ermete; Perez, Joelma

    2014-04-01

    Pt-Pr/C electrocatalysts were prepared by a modified formic acid method, and their activity for carbon monoxide and ethanol oxidation, their short term stability and durability were compared to that of commercial Pt/C and Pt-Sn/C (3:1) catalysts. By derivative voltammetry (DV) it was found that ethanol electro-oxidation takes place by two main pathways at different potentials. It was observed that, in the presence of Pr, ethanol electro-oxidation takes place mostly through the pathway at lower potential, which is the most interesting for fuel cell application. The Pt-Pr/C catalysts were less tolerant to poisoning by ethanol oxidation intermediate species than Pt/C. Durability test by a repetitive potential cycling under Ar atmosphere revealed a good structural stability of Pt-Pr/C catalysts. A repetitive potential cycling under CO atmosphere carried out on the Pt-Pr/C (1:1) catalyst, instead, indicated a structural change, likely by formation of a core-shell structure.

  3. Functional Stability Of A Mixed Microbial Consortia Producing PHA From Waste Carbon Sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David N. Thompson; Erik R. Coats; William A. Smith; Frank J. Loge; Michael P. Wolcott

    2006-04-01

    Polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs), naturally-occurring biological polyesters that are microbially synthesized from a myriad of carbon sources, can be utilized as biodegradable substitutes for petroleum-derived thermoplastics. However, current PHA commercialization schemes are limited by high feedstock costs, the requirement for aseptic reactors, and high separation and purification costs. Bacteria indigenous to municipal waste streams can accumulate large quantities of PHA under environmentally controlled conditions; hence, a potentially more environmentally-effective method of production would utilize these consortia to produce PHAs from inexpensive waste carbon sources. In this study, PHA production was accomplished in sequencing batch bioreactors utilizing mixed microbial consortia from municipal activated sludge as inoculum, in cultures grown on real wastewaters. PHA production averaged 85%, 53%, and 10% of the cell dry weight from methanol-enriched pulp-and-paper mill foul condensate, fermented municipal primary solids, and biodiesel wastewater, respectively. The PHA-producing microbial consortia were examined to explore the microbial community changes that occurred during reactor operations, employing denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) of 16S-rDNA from PCR-amplified DNA extracts. Distinctly different communities were observed both between and within wastewaters following enrichment. More importantly, stable functions were maintained despite the differing and contrasting microbial populations.

  4. Structural stability of transparent conducting films assembled from length purified single-wall carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. M. Harris; G. R. S. Iyer; D. O. Simien; J. A. Fagan; J. Y. Huh; J. Y. Chung; S. D. Hudson; J. Obrzut; J. F. Douglas; C. M. Stafford; E. K. Hobbie

    2011-01-01

    Single-wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) films show significant promise for transparent electronics applications that demand mechanical flexibility, but durability remains an outstanding issue. In this work, thin membranes of length purified single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) are uniaxially and isotropically compressed by depositing them on prestrained polymer substrates. Upon release of the strain, the topography, microstructure, and conductivity of the films are characterized using a combination of optical/fluorescence microscopy, light scattering, force microscopy, electron microscopy, and impedance spectroscopy. Above a critical surface mass density, films assembled from nanotubes of well-defined length exhibit a strongly nonlinear mechanical response. The measured strain dependence reveals a dramatic softening that occurs through an alignment of the SWCNTs normal to the direction of prestrain, which at small strains is also apparent as an anisotropic increase in sheet resistance along the same direction. At higher strains, the membrane conductivities increase due to a compression-induced restoration of conductive pathways. Our measurements reveal the fundamental mode of elasto-plastic deformation in these films and suggest how it might be suppressed.

  5. The Ferrocyanide/Stabilized Carbon System, a New Class of High Rate, Long Cycle Life, Aqueous Electrolyte Batteries

    KAUST Repository

    Huggins, R. A.

    2013-02-21

    Transient energy sources, such as wind and solar systems are getting increased attention. Their integration with the energy distribution grid requires methods for energy storage. The required characteristics of this type of storage are quite different from those for energy storage in portable devices. Size and weight are not so important. Instead, matters such as power, cost, calendar life, cycle life, and safety become paramount. A new family of hexacyanoferrate materials with the same open framework crystal structure as Prussian Blue has been recently developed with characteristics ideally suited for this type of application. Several monovalent cations can be rapidly and reversibly inserted into these materials, with very little crystallographic distortion, leading to high rates and long cycle lives. In addition, a new type of composite negative electrode material has been developed that has the rapid kinetics typical of carbon electrodes, but with a potential that varies little with the state of charge. The result is the development of a new battery system, the ferrocyanide/stabilized carbon, MHCF-SC, system. © 2013 The Electrochemical Society.

  6. Enhanced methanol oxidation activity and stability of Pt particles anchored on carbon-doped TiO2 nanocoating support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Yuan-Hang; Li, Yunfeng; Lv, Ren-Liang; Wang, Tie-Lin; Wang, Wei-Guo; Wang, Cun-Wen

    2015-03-01

    In this work, carbon-doped TiO2 nanocoating (TiO2-C) was prepared by a sol-gel process and employed as the support of Pt nanoparticles for methanol oxidation reaction (MOR). The obtained Pt/TiO2-C catalyst was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and electrochemical measurements. XRD characterization shows that the average crystallite sizes of Pt particles and TiO2-C support are 2.7 and 6.5 nm, respectively. TEM characterizations show that Pt particles are highly dispersed on TiO2 nanocoating, which preserves its nanoscale structure without no apparent sintering after carbon doping. XPS characterization shows that the Pt particles anchored on TiO2-C exhibit positively shifted binding energies of Pt 4f. Cyclic voltammetry (CV) and chronoamperometry (CA) characterizations show that TiO2-C has a greatly enhanced electrical conductivity and Pt/TiO2-C catalyst has better electrocatalytic activity and stability than Pt/C catalyst for MOR, which could be attributed to the high dispersion of Pt particles on TiO2-C support, the strong metal-support interactions between Pt particles and TiO2-C support, and the rich active -OH species on TiO2-C support.

  7. Integrating microbial physiology and physiochemical principles in soils with the MIcrobial-MIneral Carbon Stabilization (MIMICS model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. R. Wieder

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous modeling efforts document divergent responses of microbial explicit soil biogeochemistry models when compared to traditional models that implicitly simulate microbial activity, particularly following environmental perturbations. However, microbial models are needed that capture current soil biogeochemical theories emphasizing the relationships between litter quality, functional differences in microbial physiology, and the physical protection of microbial byproducts in forming stable soil organic matter (SOM. To address these limitations we introduce the MIcrobial-MIneral Carbon Stabilization (MIMICS model. In MIMICS, the turnover of litter and SOM pools are governed by temperature sensitive Michaelis–Menten kinetics and the activity of two physiologically distinct microbial functional types. The production of microbial residues through microbial turnover provides inputs to SOM pools that are considered physically or chemically protected. Soil clay content determines the physical protection of SOM in different soil environments. MIMICS adequately simulates the mean rate of leaf litter decomposition observed at a temperate and boreal forest sites, and captures observed effects of litter quality on decomposition rates. Initial results from MIMICS suggest that soil C storage can be maximized in sandy soils with low-quality litter inputs, whereas high-quality litter inputs may maximize SOM accumulation in finely textured soils that physically stabilize microbial products. Assumptions in MIMICS about the degree to which microbial functional types differ in the production, turnover, and stabilization of microbial residues provides a~mechanism by which microbial communities may influence SOM dynamics in mineral soils. Although further analyses are needed to validate model results, MIMICS allows us to begin exploring theoretical interactions between substrate quality, microbial community abundance, and the formation of stable SOM.

  8. Preparation of Nitrogen and Sulfur dual-doped Mesoporous Carbon for Supercapacitor Electrodes with Long Cycle Stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nitrogen and sulfur dual-doped mesoporous carbons (NSMCs) have been fabricated through a facile template-mediated pyrolyzing method using poly(ethyleneimine) (PEI) as sources of nitrogen (N) and carbon (C), ferrous sulfate(FeSO4 7H2O) as both precursor of sulfur (S) and activation reagent along with nanoscaled silica as sacrificial supports. The composition, morphology, and microstructure of the products are characterized using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, nitrogen sorption analysis and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. It reveals that these NSMCs possess a BET surface area over 1064 m2 g−1and abundant mesoporous structure with pore size ranged from 4 to 20 nm. The atomic percentages of N and S functionalities are found to be 4.00 at.% N and 0.83 at.% S, indication of successful incorporation of both nitrogenand sulfur into carbon network. Benefiting from the aforementioned characteristics, these NSMCs show perfect supercapacitive performances, which have been demonstrated by cyclic voltammetry and constant-current charge/discharge cycling techniques. In 0.5 M H2SO4 electrolyte, the specific capacitance (SC) of the as-prepared NSMCs electrode can reach 280 F/g at a current density of 1 A/g. Even at a high rate capability of 100 A/g, the NSMCs electrode still shows the SC value as high as 232 F/g, retaining 83% of that at 1 A/g. Also, the electrode exhibits excellent charge/discharge cycling stability, and no measurable capacitance losses is observed even after 5000 cycles, making them potentially promising for high-performance energy storage devices

  9. Initial characterization of processes of soil carbon stabilization using forest stand-level radiocarbon enrichment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swanston, C W; Torn, M S; Hanson, P J; Southon, J R; Garten, C T; Hanlon, E M; Ganio, L

    2004-01-15

    Although the rates and mechanisms of soil organic matter (SOM) stabilization are difficult to observe directly, radiocarbon has proven an effective tracer of soil C dynamics, particularly when coupled with practical fractionation schemes. To explore the rates of C cycling in temperate forest soils, we took advantage of a unique opportunity in the form of an inadvertent stand-level {sup 14}C-labeling originating from a local industrial release. A simple density fractionation scheme separated SOM into inter-aggregate particulate organic matter (free light fraction, free LF), particulate organic matter occluded within aggregates (occluded LF), and organic matter that is complexed with minerals to form a dense fraction (dense fraction, DF). Minimal agitation and density separation was used to isolate the free LF. The remaining dense sediment was subjected to physical disruption and sonication followed by density separation to separate it into occluded LF and DF. The occluded LF had higher C concentrations and C:N ratios than the free LF, and the C concentration in both light fractions was ten times that of the DF. As a result, the light fractions together accounted for less than 4% of the soil by weight, but contained 40% of the soil C in the 0-15 cm soil increment. Likewise, the light fractions were less than 1% weight of the 15-30 cm increment, but contained more than 35% of the soil C. The degree of SOM protection in the fractions, as indicated by {Delta}{sup 14}C, was different. In all cases the free LF had the shortest mean residence times. A significant depth by fraction interaction for {sup 14}C indicates that the relative importance of aggregation versus organo-mineral interactions for overall C stabilization changes with depth. The rapid incorporation of {sup 14}C label into the otherwise depleted DF shows that this organo-mineral fraction comprises highly stable material as well as more recent inputs.

  10. Study on expanded graphite/phenolic resin carbon composite bipolar plate%膨胀石墨/酚醛树脂复合材料双极板研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈惠; 刘洪波; 涂文懋; 杨荔; 杨丽; 何月德

    2011-01-01

    Expanded graphite/phenolic resin composite bipolar plates used for polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFC) were prepared through a compression molding process. The conductivity and flexural strength of the composite bipolar plate were measured with four-point probe method and three point bending technique respectively. The influences of resin content, molding pressure, additive content and adding manner of additive on the performance of the composite bipolar plate were investigated. The results show that resin content, molding pressure, additive content and adding manner of additive have a grate influence on the performance of the composite bipolar plate. Resin content of 20%-30% and molding pressure of 10-12 Mpa are appropriate. Influences of carbon black on the properities of composite bipolar plate are complicated. In the range of carbon black used in experiment, the conductivity increases and flexural strength increases firstly and then decreases with the increase of the carbon black. When carbon black is added to resin, the properities of composite bipolar plate are better.%以膨胀石墨为导电骨料、炭黑为添加剂、酚醛树脂为黏结剂,采用模压成形工艺制备质子交换膜燃料电池用膨胀石墨/酚醛树脂复合材料双极板.考察树脂含量、成形压力、添加剂用量及添加剂加入方式对复合材料双极板性能的影响.研究结果表明:上述因素对复合材料双极板的性能影响较大,黏结剂的加入量(质量分数)为20%-30%、压力在10~12 MPa较为合适;炭黑对复合材料双极板的性能影响比较复杂,在实验用炭黑范围内,随着炭黑用量的增加,电导率增大较快,抗折强度先增大后减小;在复合材料的混料过程中,将炭黑添加在树脂中,制备的复合材料双极板性能比炭黑添加在膨胀石墨性能好.

  11. Dispersion stability and exothermic properties of DNA-functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kawaguchi M

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Minoru Kawaguchi1,2, Jun Ohno2,3, Akihito Irie4, Tadao Fukushima2,5, Jun Yamazaki2,6, Naotoshi Nakashima2,71Department of Dental Engineering, Biomaterials Section, Fukuoka Dental College, Sawara-ku, Fukuoka, Japan; 2Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST, Core Research of Evolutional Science and Technology (CREST, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo, Japan; 3Department of Morphological Biology, Pathology Section, Fukuoka Dental College, Sawara-ku, Fukuoka, Japan; 4Department of Oral Rehabilitation, Section of Oral Implantology, Fukuoka Dental College, Sawara-ku, Fukuoka, Japan; 5Department of Dental Engineering, Bioengineering Section, Fukuoka Dental College, Sawara-ku, Fukuoka, Japan; 6Department of Physiological Science and Molecular Biology, Section of cellular and Molecular Regulation, Fukuoka Dental College, Sawara-ku, Fukuoka, Japan; 7Department of Applied Chemistry, Graduate School of Engineering, Kyushu University, Nishi-ku, Fukuoka, JapanAbstract: Carbon nanotubes act as a photon antenna that serves as an effective “molecular heater” around the near-infrared (NIR region. This exothermic generation can be used as a possible heating source for hyperthermia therapy. The current study reports the dispersible and exothermic properties with NIR irradiation for single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs treated with a strong acid (acid-treated SWNTs, and the SWNTs further functionalized with double-stranded DNA (DNA-functionalized SWNTs: DNA-SWNTs. DNA-SWNTs significantly improved the dispersibility of SWNTs when compared with the acid-treated SWNTs. The binding ratio of the acid-treated SWNT and DNA was calculated to be 3.1 (DNA/SWNTs from the phosphorous content in the DNA-SWNT. This interaction of the SWNTs and DNA would contribute to the stable dispersion of the DNA-SWNTs in a culture medium. With NIR irradiation by a halogen lamp light source, the acid-treated SWNTs and the DNA-SWNTs showed strong heat evolution in vitro (in a culture medium and in vivo

  12. Reforestation with native mixed-species plantings in a temperate continental climate effectively sequesters and stabilizes carbon within decades.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Shaun C; Cavagnaro, Timothy R; Mac Nally, Ralph; Paul, Keryn I; Baker, Patrick J; Beringer, Jason; Thomson, James R; Thompson, Ross M

    2015-04-01

    Reforestation has large potential for mitigating climate change through carbon sequestration. Native mixed-species plantings have a higher potential to reverse biodiversity loss than do plantations of production species, but there are few data on their capacity to store carbon. A chronosequence (5-45 years) of 36 native mixed-species plantings, paired with adjacent pastures, was measured to investigate changes to stocks among C pools following reforestation of agricultural land in the medium rainfall zone (400-800 mm yr(-1)) of temperate Australia. These mixed-species plantings accumulated 3.09 ± 0.85 t C ha(-1) yr(-1) in aboveground biomass and 0.18 ± 0.05 t C ha(-1) yr(-1) in plant litter, reaching amounts comparable to those measured in remnant woodlands by 20 years and 36 years after reforestation respectively. Soil C was slower to increase, with increases seen only after 45 years, at which time stocks had not reached the amounts found in remnant woodlands. The amount of trees (tree density and basal area) was positively associated with the accumulation of carbon in aboveground biomass and litter. In contrast, changes to soil C were most strongly related to the productivity of the location (a forest productivity index and soil N content in the adjacent pasture). At 30 years, native mixed-species plantings had increased the stability of soil C stocks, with higher amounts of recalcitrant C and higher C:N ratios than their adjacent pastures. Reforestation with native mixed-species plantings did not significantly change the availability of macronutrients (N, K, Ca, Mg, P, and S) or micronutrients (Fe, B, Mn, Zn, and Cu), content of plant toxins (Al, Si), acidity, or salinity (Na, electrical conductivity) in the soil. In this medium rainfall area, native mixed-species plantings provided comparable rates of C sequestration to local production species, with the probable additional benefit of providing better quality habitat for native biota. These results

  13. On Expanded Cyclic Codes

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Yingquan

    2008-01-01

    The paper has a threefold purpose. The first purpose is to present an explicit description of expanded cyclic codes defined in $\\GF(q^m)$. The proposed explicit construction of expanded generator matrix and expanded parity check matrix maintains the symbol-wise algebraic structure and thus keeps many important original characteristics. The second purpose of this paper is to identify a class of constant-weight cyclic codes. Specifically, we show that a well-known class of $q$-ary BCH codes excluding the all-zero codeword are constant-weight cyclic codes. Moreover, we show this class of codes achieve the Plotkin bound. The last purpose of the paper is to characterize expanded cyclic codes utilizing the proposed expanded generator matrix and parity check matrix. We analyze the properties of component codewords of a codeword and particularly establish the precise conditions under which a codeword can be represented by a subbasis. With the new insights, we present an improved lower bound on the minimum distance of...

  14. Functionalization of Metal-Organic Frameworks for Enhanced Stability under Humid Carbon Dioxide Capture Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andirova, Dinara; Lei, Yu; Zhao, Xiaodan; Choi, Sunho

    2015-10-26

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) have been highlighted recently as promising materials for CO2 capture. However, in practical CO2 capture processes, such as capture from flue gas or ambient air, the adsorption properties of MOFs tend to be harmed by the presence of moisture possibly because of the hydrophilic nature of the coordinatively unsaturated sites (CUSs) within their framework. In this work, the CUSs of the MOF framework are functionalized with amine-containing molecules to prevent structural degradation in a humid environment. Specifically, the framework of the magnesium dioxybenzenedicarboxylate (Mg/DOBDC) MOF was functionalized with ethylenediamine (ED) molecules to make the overall structure less hydrophilic. Structural analysis after exposure to high-temperature steam showed that the ED-functionalized Mg/DOBDC (ED-Mg/DOBDC) is more stable under humid conditions, than Mg/DOBDC, which underwent drastic structural changes. ED-Mg/DOBDC recovered its CO2 adsorption capacity and initial adsorption rate quite well as opposed to the original Mg/DOBDC, which revealed a significant reduction in its capture capacity and kinetics. These results suggest that the amine-functionalization of the CUSs is an effective way to enhance the structural stability of MOFs as well as their capture of humid CO2 . PMID:26367016

  15. Study of the stabilization of uranium dioxide fuel with carbon dioxide gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stabilization of the UO2 is an important step in the manufacturing process of fuel powder. After the reduction the UO2 powder is made chemically passive by slight oxidation to quite a large extent fixed by specifications that allow to storage powder till the sintering process is performed. In this work the UO2 powder is oxidized with a versatile automated physisorption/chemisorption analyzer as to generate adsorption isotherms with different pressures and temperatures of gaseous CO2 sequentially added to the samples. The reduction process is carried out in the same device as to obtain the same fluorite structure UO2.00 to perform control oxidation experiences so to get 2.04 and 2.06 UO2 powder. To check the extend of oxidation of UO2 powder, samples are characterized for O/U ratio analyses. The advantage of using CO2 is the possibility of high temperature controlled oxidative step which definitely is very beneficial for fuel manufacturing from an economic point of view. (author)

  16. Carotenoids, Fatty Acid Composition and Heat Stability of Supercritical Carbon Dioxide-Extracted-Oleoresins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonella Leone

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The risk of chronic diseases has been shown to be inversely related to tomato intake and the lycopene levels in serum and tissue. Cis-isomers represent approximately 50%–80% of serum lycopene, while dietary lycopene maintains the isomeric ratio present in the plant sources with about 95% of all-trans-lycopene. Supercritical CO2 extraction (S-CO2 has been extensively developed to extract lycopene from tomato and tomato processing wastes, for food or pharmaceutical industries, also by using additional plant sources as co-matrices. We compared two S-CO2-extracted oleoresins (from tomato and tomato/hazelnut matrices, which showed an oil-solid bi-phasic appearance, a higher cis-lycopene content, and enhanced antioxidant ability compared with the traditional solvent extracts. Heat-treating, in the range of 60–100 °C, led to changes in the lycopene isomeric composition and to enhanced antioxidant activity in both types of oleoresins. The greater stability has been related to peculiar lycopene isomer composition and to the lipid environment. The results indicate these oleoresins are a good source of potentially healthful lycopene.

  17. Stability of cobalt-carbon high temperature fixed points doped with iron and platinum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kňazovická, L.; Lowe, D.; Machin, G.; Davies, H.; Rani, A.

    2015-04-01

    High temperature fixed points (HTFPs) are stable and repeatable and make comparison of temperature scales possible at a level of uncertainty not previously possible. However, they potentially lack objectivity if the fixed-point temperature is known. Five HTFPs were constructed, one pure Co-C, two Co-C doped with Fe and two Co-C doped with Pt of differing concentrations. The candidate dopants were identified through thermochemical modelling as likely to give maximum temperature shift with minimum increase in melting range. The temperature differences of the doped systems from the pure system were determined and it was found that the addition of Fe depressed the melting temperature and the addition of Pt elevated the melting temperature, qualitatively in line with the thermochemical modelling. The higher concentration doped HTFPs were then aged for approximately 100 h with continuous melting-freezing cycles and the difference to the undoped Co-C HTFP remeasured. These differences were found to agree with those of the unaged results within the measurement uncertainties, confirming artefact stability. It is clear that the doping of HTFPs is a powerful way of constructing stable and reliable high temperature scale comparison artefacts of unknown temperature.

  18. Limestone-particle-stabilized macroemulsion of liquid and supercritical carbon dioxide in water for ocean sequestration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golomb, D; Barry, E; Ryan, D; Lawton, C; Swett, P

    2004-08-15

    When liquid or supercritical CO2 is mixed with an aqueous slurry of finely pulverized (1-20 microm) limestone (CaCO3) in a high-pressure reactor, a macroemulsion is formed consisting of droplets of CO2 coated with a sheath of CaCO3 particles dispersed in water. The coated droplets are called globules. Depending on the globule diameter and the CaCO3 sheath thickness, the globules sink to the bottom of the water column, are neutrally buoyant, or float on top of the water. The CaCO3 particles are lodged at the CO2/ H2O interface, preventing the coalescence of the CO2 droplets, and thus stabilizing the CO2-in-water emulsion. We describe the expected behavior of a CO2/H2O/CaCO3 emulsion plume released in the deep ocean for sequestration of CO2 in the ocean to ameliorate global warming. Depending on the amount of CO2 injected, the dense plume will descend a few hundred meters while entraining ambient seawater until it acquires neutral buoyancy in the stratified ocean. After equilibration, the globules will rain out from the plume toward the ocean bottom. This mode of CO2 release will prevent acidification of the seawater around the release point, which is a major environmental drawback of ocean sequestration of liquid, unemulsified CO2. PMID:15382876

  19. Ultrafine-Grained Structure and its Thermal Stability in Low-Carbon Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korznikov, A. V.; Safarov, I. M.; Galeyev, R. M.; Sergeev, S. N.; Potekaev, A. I.

    2015-11-01

    The influence of annealing temperature on ultrafine-grained structure (UFG) of low-carbon steel 05G2MFB, produced by multiple isothermal forging (MIF) and warm rolling is investigated. Following 1-hour annealing (from 20 to 550°C), the fibrous UFG-structure formed as a result of rolling remains virtually the same. The equiaxial UFG-structure is found to be stable as the annealing temperature is increased up to 600°C. An examination of the resulting UFG-states by the method of electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) provided a way to identify the differences in softening processes for a number of structure types. When the temperature of annealing treatment of as-rolled steel specimens is increased to 600°C, the fraction of low-angle boundaries (LAB) is found to remain at about 56%, while the average grain/subgrain size in the rod cross-section increases from 0.4 to 0.9 μm. In the MIF-processed specimens, an increase in the annealing temperature up to 625°C gives rise to a gradual decrease in the fraction of LAGBs from 53 to 30%, with the average grain/subgrain size increasing from 0.4 to 0.6 μm.

  20. Silicon microfabricated beam expander

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Othman, A., E-mail: aliman@ppinang.uitm.edu.my; Ibrahim, M. N.; Hamzah, I. H.; Sulaiman, A. A. [Faculty of Electrical Engineering, Universiti Teknologi MARA Malaysia, 40450, Shah Alam, Selangor (Malaysia); Ain, M. F. [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Engineering Campus, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Seri Ampangan, 14300,Nibong Tebal, Pulau Pinang (Malaysia)

    2015-03-30

    The feasibility design and development methods of silicon microfabricated beam expander are described. Silicon bulk micromachining fabrication technology is used in producing features of the structure. A high-precision complex 3-D shape of the expander can be formed by exploiting the predictable anisotropic wet etching characteristics of single-crystal silicon in aqueous Potassium-Hydroxide (KOH) solution. The beam-expander consist of two elements, a micromachined silicon reflector chamber and micro-Fresnel zone plate. The micro-Fresnel element is patterned using lithographic methods. The reflector chamber element has a depth of 40 µm, a diameter of 15 mm and gold-coated surfaces. The impact on the depth, diameter of the chamber and absorption for improved performance are discussed.

  1. Storage and stability of organic carbon in soils as related to depth, occlusion within aggregates, and attachment to minerals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Schrumpf

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Conceptual models suggest that stability and age of organic carbon (OC in soil depends on the source of plant litter, occlusion within aggregates, incorporation in organo-mineral complexes, and location within the soil profile. Various tools like density fractionation, mineralization experiments, and radiocarbon analyses have been used to study the importance of these mechanisms. We systematically apply them to a range of European soils to test whether general controls emerge even for soils that vary in vegetation, soil types, parent material, and land use. At each of the 12 study sites, 10 soil cores were sampled in 10 cm depth intervals to 60 cm depth and subjected to density separation. Bulk soil samples and density fractions (free light fractions – fLF, occluded light fractions – oLF, heavy fractions – HF were analysed for OC, total nitrogen (TN, δ13C, and Δ14C. Bulk samples were also incubated to determine mineralizable OC.

    Declining OC-normalized CO2 release and increasing age with soil depth confirm greater stability of OC in subsoils across sites. Depth profiles of LF-OC matched those of roots, which in turn reflect plant functional types in soil profiles not subject to ploughing. Modern Δ14C signatures and positive correlation between mineralizable C and fLF-OC indicate the fLF is an easily available energy and nutrient source for subsurface microbes. Fossil C derived from the geogenic parent material affected the age of OC especially in the LF at three study sites. The overall importance of OC stabilization by binding to minerals was demonstrated by declining OC-normalized CO2 release rates with increasing contributions of HF-OC to bulk soil OC and the low Δ14C values of HF-OC. The stability of HF-OC was greater in subsoils than in topsoils; nevertheless, a portion of HF-OC was active throughout the profile. The decrease in Δ14C (increase

  2. Redox index of soil carbon stability Índice redox de estabilidade do carbono do solo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marihus Altoé Baldotto

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available As an alternative to the relatively complex and expensive spectroscopic methods, the redox properties of humic acids, determined by potentiometric titrations, have been used to evaluate the stability of soil organic C. The objective of the present study was to establish a Redox Index of C Stability (RICS and to correlate it with some properties of the humic acids extracted from different modal soils in Brazil (distinct weathering stages or management to facilitate system comparison. The RICS was efficient for soil comparison and variations were comparable to those of the chemical and spectroscopic methods used for humic acid characterization. The values of soil pH, point of zero salt effect, sum of bases, exchangeable Ca content, weathering index, as well as the humic acid O/C ratio, quinone and semiquinone free radical contents, aromatic C and fluorescence intensity were closely related with the RICS. The RICS was higher in less weathered soils, with more active clays and higher fertility. The RICS values of soils under long-term sugarcane management were ranked in decreasing order: unburned, burned with vinasse, burned without vinasse.Como alternativa aos relativamente complexos e dispendiosos métodos espectroscópicos, as propriedades redox dos ácidos húmicos, determinadas por titulação potenciométrica, vêm sendo usadas na avaliação da estabilidade do C do solo. O objetivo deste estudo foi estabelecer um índice redox de estabilidade do C (RICS e correlacioná-lo com alguns atributos de diferentes solos modais brasileiros (distintos estádios de intemperismo ou manejo, a fim de mais facilmente comparar sistemas. O RICS foi eficiente para comparação de solos e variou similarmente com os métodos químicos e espectroscópicos usados na caracterização dos ácidos húmicos. Os valores de pH, ponto de efeito salino nulo zero, soma de bases, teor de cálcio trocável, índice de intemperismo, bem como de razão entre oxigênio e

  3. Effect of sustainable land management practices on soil aggregation and stabilization of organic carbon in semiarid mediterranean ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Franco, Noelia; Albaladejo, Juan; Almagro, María; Wiesmeier, Martin; Martínez-Mena, María

    2016-04-01

    Arid and semiarid regions represent about 47% of the total land area of the world (UNEP, 1992). At present, there is a priority interest for carbon (C) sequestration in drylands. These areas are considered as very fragile ecosystems with low organic carbon (OC) saturation, and potentially, high capacity for soil OC sequestration. In addition, the restoration of these areas is one of the major challenges for scientists, who will be able to identify and recommended the best land uses and sustainable land management (SLM) practices for soil conservation and mitigation of climate change in these environments. In this regard, in semiarid Mediterranean ecosystems there is an urgent need for the implementation of SLM practices regardless of land-use type (forest, agricultural and shrubland) to maintain acceptable levels of soil organic matter (SOM) and the physico-chemical protection of the OC. Long- and short-term effects of SLM practices on soil aggregation and SOC stabilization were studied in two land uses. The long-term experiment was conducted in a reforestation area with Pinus halepensis Mill., where two afforestation techniques were implemented 20 years ago: a) mechanical terracing with a single application of organic waste of urban soil refuse, and b) mechanical terracing without organic amendment. An adjacent shrubland was considered as the reference plot. The short-term experiment was conducted in a rain-fed almond (Prunus dulcis Mill., var. Ferragnes) orchard where two SLM practices were introduced 4 years ago: a) reduced tillage plus green manure, and b) no tillage. Reduced tillage was considered as the reference plot given that it is the habitual management practice. Four aggregate size classes were differentiated by sieving (large and small macroaggregates, microaggregates, and the silt plus clay fraction), and the microaggregates occluded within small macroaggregates (SMm) were isolated. In addition, different organic C fractions corresponding with active

  4. The kinetic and thermodynamic sorption and stabilization of multiwalled carbon nanotubes in natural organic matter surrogate solutions: The effect of surrogate molecular weight

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Styrene sulfonate (SS) and polystyrene sulfonates (PSSs) were used as surrogates of natural organic matter to study the effect of molecular weight (from 206.2 to 70,000 Da) on their sorption by a multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) and an activated carbon (AC) and on their stabilization of MWCNT suspension. Results indicate that surface-diffusion through the liquid-sorbent boundary was the rate-controlling step of the kinetic sorption of both MWCNTs and AC, and surface-occupying and pore-filling mechanisms respectively dominated the thermodynamic sorption of MWCNTs and AC. Sorption rates and capacities of MWCNTs and AC in molecular concentration of SS and PSS decreased with increasing molecular weight. The PSSs but not SS facilitated the stabilization of MWCNT suspension because of the increased electrosteric repulsion. The PSSs with more monomers had greater capabilities to stabilize the MWCNT suspension, but the capabilities were comparable after being normalized by the total monomer number. -- Highlights: • Surface-diffusion controlled the kinetic sorption of NOM surrogates to MWCNTs and AC. • Surface-occupying mechanism dominates the thermodynamic sorption of MWCNTs. • The sorption in molecular concentration decreased with increasing Mw of the PSSs. • PSS but not SS stabilized MWCNT suspension through electrosteric repulsion. • Stabilization capabilities normalized by monomer number of the PSSs were comparable. -- Molecular weight of NOM influences its sorption on and stabilizing MWCNTs

  5. Structural and elastic properties and stability characteristics of oxygenated carbon nanotubes under physical adsorption of polymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ansari, R., E-mail: r_ansari@guilan.ac.ir [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Guilan, P.O. Box 3756, Rasht (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ajori, S. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Guilan, P.O. Box 3756, Rasht (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rouhi, S. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Langroud Branch, Islamic Azad University, Langroud (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-03-30

    Highlights: • Buckling of functionalized CNTs under physical adsorption of polymer is studied. • Molecular dynamics simulations are employed for the study. • Values of the critical buckling load and critical strain are shown to increase. • Values of Young's modulus and their variations are dependent on adsorbed polymer type. - Abstract: The importance of covalent and non-covalent functionalization approaches for modification the properties of carbon nanotubes is being more widely recognized. To this end, elastic properties and buckling behavior of oxygenated CNT with atomic oxygen and hydroxyl under physical adsorption of PE (Polyethylene) and PEO (Poly (ethylene oxide)) are determined through employing the molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The results demonstrate that non-covalent bonding of polymer on the surface of oxygenated CNT causes reductions in the variations of critical buckling load and critical strain compared to oxygenated CNTs. Critical buckling load and critical strain of oxygenated CNT/polymer are higher than those of oxygenated CNT. Also, it is demonstrated that critical buckling load and critical strain values in the case of oxygenated CNT/polymer are independent of polymer type unlike the value of Young's modulus. It is shown that variations of Young's modulus decrease as PE adsorbed on the surface of oxygenated CNT. Moreover, the presence of oxygen atom on PEO chain leads to bigger variations of Young's modulus with weight percentage of chemisorbed component, i.e. atomic oxygen and hydroxyl. It is also demonstrated that Young's modulus reduces more considerably in the presence of PEO chain compared to PE one.

  6. On Interlayer Stability and High-Cycle Simulator Performance of Diamond-Like Carbon Layers for Articulating Joint Replacements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerstin Thorwarth

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Diamond like carbon (DLC coatings have been proven to be an excellent choice for wear reduction in many technical applications. However, for successful adaption to the orthopaedic field, layer performance, stability and adhesion in physiologically relevant setups are crucial and not consistently investigated. In vitro wear testing as well as adequate corrosion tests of interfaces and interlayers are of great importance to verify the long term stability of DLC coated load bearing implants in the human body. DLC coatings were deposited on articulating lumbar spinal disks made of CoCr28Mo6 biomedical implant alloy using a plasma-activated chemical vapor deposition (PACVD process. As an adhesion promoting interlayer, tantalum films were deposited by magnetron sputtering. Wear tests of coated and uncoated implants were performed in physiological solution up to a maximum of 101 million articulation cycles with an amplitude of ±2° and −3/+6° in successive intervals at a preload of 1200 N. The implants were characterized by gravimetry, inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES and cross section scanning electron microscopy (SEM analysis. It is shown that DLC coated surfaces with uncontaminated tantalum interlayers perform very well and no corrosive or mechanical failure could be observed. This also holds true in tests featuring overload and third-body wear by cortical bone chips present in the bearing pairs. Regarding the interlayer tolerance towards interlayer contamination (oxygen, limits for initiation of potential failure modes were established. It was found that mechanical failure is the most critical aspect and this mode is hypothetically linked to the α-β tantalum phase switch induced by increasing oxygen levels as observed by X-ray diffraction (XRD. It is concluded that DLC coatings are a feasible candidate for near zero wear articulations on implants, potentially even surpassing the performance of ceramic vs

  7. Organo-mineral interactions promote greater soil organic carbon stability under aspen in semi-arid montane forests in Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Miegroet, H.; Roman Dobarco, M.

    2014-12-01

    Forest species influence soil organic carbon (SOC) storage through litter input, which in interaction with soil microclimate, texture and mineralogy, lead to different SOC stabilization and storage patterns. We sampled mineral soil (0-15 cm) across the ecotone between aspen (Populus tremuloides) and mixed conifers stands (Abies lasiocarpa and Pseudotsuga menziesii) in semi-arid montane forests from Utah, to investigate the influence of vegetation vs. site characteristics on SOC stabilization, storage and chemistry. SOC was divided into light fraction (LF), mineral-associated SOC in the silt and clay fraction (MoM), and a dense subfraction > 53 μm (SMoM) using wet sieving and electrostatic attraction. SOC decomposability and solubility was derived from long term laboratory incubations and hot water extractions (HWE). Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) was used to study differences in chemical functional groups in LF and MoM. Vegetation cover did not affect SOC storage (47.0 ± 16.5 Mg C ha-1), SOC decomposability (cumulative CO2-C release of 93.2 ± 65.4 g C g-1 C), or SOC solubility (9.8 ± 7.2 mg C g-1 C), but MoM content increased with presence of aspen [pure aspen (31.2 ± 15.1 Mg C ha-1) > mixed (25.7 ± 8.8 Mg C ha-1) > conifer (22.8 ± 9.0 Mg C ha-1)]. Organo-mineral complexes reduced biological availability of SOC, indicated by the negative correlation between silt+clay (%) and decomposable SOC per gram of C (r = -0.48, p = 0.001) or soluble SOC (r = -0.59, p plant or microbial origin. FTIR spectra clustered by sites with similar parent material rather than by vegetation cover. This suggests that initial differences in litter chemistry between aspen and conifers converged into similar MoM chemistry within sites.

  8. Soil Organic Carbon Storage and Stability in the Aspen-Conifer Ecotone in Montane Forests in Utah, USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mercedes Román Dobarco

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available To assess the potential impact of conifer encroachment on soil organic carbon (SOC dynamics and storage in montane aspen-conifer forests from the interior western US, we sampled mineral soils (0–15 cm across the aspen-conifer ecotones in southern and northern Utah and quantified total SOC stocks, stable SOC (i.e., mineral-associated SOC (MoM, labile SOC (i.e., light fraction (LF, decomposable (CO2 release during long-term aerobic incubations and soluble SOC (hot water extractable organic carbon (HWEOC. Total SOC storage (47.0 ± 16.5 Mg C ha−1 and labile SOC as LF (14.0 ± 7.10 Mg C ha−1, SOC decomposability (cumulative released CO2-C of 5.6 ± 3.8 g C g−1 soil or HWEOC (0.6 ± 0.6 mg C g−1 soil did not differ substantially with vegetation type, although a slight increase in HWEOC was observed with increasing conifer in the overstory. There were statistically significant differences (p = 0.035 in stable MoM storage, which was higher under aspen (31.2 ± 15.1 Mg C ha−1 than under conifer (22.8 ± 9.0 Mg C ha−1, with intermediate values under mixed (25.7 ± 8.8 Mg C ha−1. Texture had the greatest impact on SOC distribution among labile and stable fractions, with increasing stabilization in MoM and decreasing bio-availability of SOC with increasing silt + clay content. Only at lower silt + clay contents (40%–70% could we discern the influence of vegetation on MoM content. This highlights the importance of chemical protection mechanisms for long-term C sequestration.

  9. Enhanced removal of Cd(II) and Pb(II) by composites of mesoporous carbon stabilized alumina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Weichun; Tang, Qiongzhi; Wei, Jingmiao; Ran, Yajun; Chai, Liyuan; Wang, Haiying

    2016-04-01

    A novel adsorbent of mesoporous carbon stabilized alumina (MC/Al2O3) was synthesized through one-pot hard-templating method. The adsorption potential of MC/Al2O3 for Cd(II) and Pb(II) from aqueous solution was investigated compared with the mesoporous carbon. The results indicated the MC/Al2O3 showed excellent performance for Cd(II) and Pb(II) removal, the adsorption capacity reached 49.98 mg g-1 for Cd(II) with initial concentration of 50 mg L-1 and reached 235.57 mg g-1 for Pb(II) with initial concentration of 250 mg L-1, respectively. The kinetics data of Cd(II) adsorption demonstrated that the Cd(II) adsorption rate was fast, and the removal efficiencies with initial concentration of 10 and 50 mg L-1 can reach up 99% within 5 and 20 min, respectively. The pseudo-second-order kinetic model could describe the kinetics of Cd(II) adsorption well, indicating the chemical reaction was the rate-controlling step. The mechanism for Cd(II) and Pb(II) adsorption by MC/Al2O3 was investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and the results indicated that the excellent performance for Cd(II) and Pb(II) adsorption of MC/Al2O3 was mainly attributed to its high surface area and the special functional groups of hydroxy-aluminum, hydroxyl, carboxylic through the formation of strong surface complexation or ion-exchange. It was concluded that MC/Al2O3 can be recognized as an effective adsorbent for removal of Cd(II) and Pb(II) in aqueous solution.

  10. Foundations of Soil Organic Matter Stabilization: Tracing the Influence of Mineralogy on the Initial Sorption of Root-Derived Carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neurath, R.; Nico, P. S.; Pett-Ridge, J.; Firestone, M.

    2014-12-01

    Soils are the largest terrestrial carbon (C) reservoir, storing 2,300 Gt C globally, with the largest C input allocated by plant roots. Many root-derived C inputs are low molecular weight compounds (exudates), although complex C compounds from sloughed off cells and decaying roots also contribute precursors to the soil organic matter (SOM) pool. Root-derived compounds are metabolized by microorganisms, using extracellular enzymes to degrade the more complex C compounds. Thus, products of microbial use of root C may be free in soil solution or occur as microbial cell material. Products of root decomposition are stabilized in soil when C compounds are protected from degradation by (i) chemical recalcitrance, (ii) physical protection by aggregation, or (iii) physical-chemical protection by sorption to mineral surfaces. Previous studies show that sorption of SOM to soil minerals can stabilize C compounds for up to thousands of years. We examined the influence of soil mineralogy on sorption of root-derived C. We hypothesized that differences in specific surface area (SSA) and chemical reactivity of four mineral types: goethite, kaolinite, quartz, as well as native minerals extracted from field soil, are significant controls on the rate, quantity, and composition of mineral-sorbed SOM. Soils were collected at the UC Hopland Research and Extension Center in Hopland, CA and planted in soil microcosms with the common annual grass A. barbata; seeds collected from the field site. Microcosms were incubated in a sealed chamber under 13CO2 (99 atom%) for 8 weeks. Plant photosynthesized-C is allocated to the soil via roots, and with the 13C label, allows us to trace the fate of plant-derived C in the soil. Minerals, which were isolated in 18 μm mesh to exclude roots but not microorganisms, were extracted and measured for total C and 13C atom% after a 12 week growing season of A. barbata. Preliminary FTIR and 13C-NMR analysis show differences in the chemical composition of

  11. Deep, noninvasive imaging and surgical guidance of submillimeter tumors using targeted M13-stabilized single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Debadyuti; Bagley, Alexander F; Na, Young Jeong; Birrer, Michael J; Bhatia, Sangeeta N; Belcher, Angela M

    2014-09-23

    Highly sensitive detection of small, deep tumors for early diagnosis and surgical interventions remains a challenge for conventional imaging modalities. Second-window near-infrared light (NIR2, 950-1,400 nm) is promising for in vivo fluorescence imaging due to deep tissue penetration and low tissue autofluorescence. With their intrinsic fluorescence in the NIR2 regime and lack of photobleaching, single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are potentially attractive contrast agents to detect tumors. Here, targeted M13 virus-stabilized SWNTs are used to visualize deep, disseminated tumors in vivo. This targeted nanoprobe, which uses M13 to stably display both tumor-targeting peptides and an SWNT imaging probe, demonstrates excellent tumor-to-background uptake and exhibits higher signal-to-noise performance compared with visible and near-infrared (NIR1) dyes for delineating tumor nodules. Detection and excision of tumors by a gynecological surgeon improved with SWNT image guidance and led to the identification of submillimeter tumors. Collectively, these findings demonstrate the promise of targeted SWNT nanoprobes for noninvasive disease monitoring and guided surgery. PMID:25214538

  12. Long-term stability of organic carbon-stimulated chromatereduction in contaminated soils, and its relation to manganese redoxstatus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tokunaga, Tetsu K.; Wan, Jiamin; Lanzirotti, Antonio; Sutton,Steve R.; Newville, Matthew; Rao, William

    2007-03-13

    In-situ reduction of toxic Cr(V1) to less hazardous Cr(II1)is becoming a popular strategy for remediating contaminated soils.However, the long term stability of reduced Cr remains to be understood,especially given the common presence of MnfIIIJV) oxides that reoxidizeCr(II1). This 4.6 year laboratory study tracked Cr and Mn redoxtransformations in soils contaminated with Cr(V1) which were then treatedwith different amounts of organic carbon (OC). Changes in Cr and Mnoxidation states within soils were directly and nondestructively measuredusing micro X-ray absorption near edge structure spectroscopy. Chromatereduction was roughly lst-order, and the extent of reduction was enhancedwith higher OC additions. However, significant Cr(||1) reoxidationoccurred in soils exposed to the highest Cr(V1) concentrations (2,560 mgkg"'). Transient Cr(II1) reoxidation up to 420 mg kg1 was measured at 1.1years after OC treatment, followed by further reduction. Chromateconcentrations increased by 220 mg kgm1a t the end of the study (4.6years) in one soil. The causal role that Mn oxidation state had inreoxidizing Cr was supported by trends in Mn K-edge energies. Theseresults provide strong evidence for longterm dependence of soil Croxidation states on balances between OC availability and Mn redoxstatus.

  13. Decline in ribosomal fidelity contributes to the accumulation and stabilization of the master stress response regulator sigmaS upon carbon starvation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fredriksson, Asa; Ballesteros, Manuel; Peterson, Celeste N; Persson, Orjan; Silhavy, Thomas J; Nyström, Thomas

    2007-04-01

    The sigma(S) subunit of RNA polymerase is a master regulator of Escherichia coli that retards cellular senescence and bestows cells with general stress protective functions during growth arrest. We show that mutations and drugs triggering translational errors elevate sigma(S) levels and stability. Furthermore, mutations enhancing translational fidelity attenuate induction of the rpoS regulon and prevent stabilization of sigma(S) upon carbon starvation. Destabilization of sigma(S) by increased proofreading requires the presence of the sigma(S) recognition factor SprE (RssB) and the ClpXP protease. The data further suggest that sigma(S) becomes stabilized upon starvation as a result of ClpP sequestration and this sequestration is enhanced by oxidative modifications of aberrant proteins produced by erroneous translation. ClpP overproduction counteracted starvation-induced stabilization of sigma(S), whereas overproduction of a ClpXP substrate (ssrA-tagged GFP) stabilized sigma(S) in exponentially growing cells. We present a model for the sequence of events leading to the accumulation and activation of sigma(S) upon carbon starvation, which are linked to alterations in both ribosomal fidelity and efficiency. PMID:17403784

  14. Stability and resistance of nickel catalysts for hydrodeoxygenation:carbon deposition and effects of sulfur, potassium, and chlorine in the feed

    OpenAIRE

    Mortensen, Peter Mølgaard; Gardini, Diego; Hudson W. P. Carvalho; Damsgaard, Christian Danvad; Grunwaldt, Jan-Dierk; Jensen, Peter Arendt; Wagner, Jakob Birkedal; Jensen, Anker Degn

    2014-01-01

    The long term stability and resistance toward carbon deposition, sulfur, chlorine, and potassium of Ni/ZrO2 as a catalyst for the hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) of guaiacol in 1-octanol (as a model compound system for bio-oil) has been investigated at 250 degrees C and 100 bar in a trickle bed reactor setup. Without impurities in the feed good stability of the Ni/ZrO2 catalyst could be achieved over more than 100 h of operation, particularly for a sample prepared with small Ni particles, which mini...

  15. Expandable LED array interconnect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Thomas Cheng-Hsin; Keller, Bernd

    2011-03-01

    A light emitting device that can function as an array element in an expandable array of such devices. The light emitting device comprises a substrate that has a top surface and a plurality of edges. Input and output terminals are mounted to the top surface of the substrate. Both terminals comprise a plurality of contact pads disposed proximate to the edges of the substrate, allowing for easy access to both terminals from multiple edges of the substrate. A lighting element is mounted to the top surface of the substrate. The lighting element is connected between the input and output terminals. The contact pads provide multiple access points to the terminals which allow for greater flexibility in design when the devices are used as array elements in an expandable array.

  16. SnO2 nanocrystals deposited on multiwalled carbon nanotubes with superior stability as anode material for Li-ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Jianguo; Yang, Junbing; Abouimrane, Ali; Wang, Dapeng; Amine, Khalil

    2011-10-01

    We report a novel ethylene glycol-mediated solvothermal-polyol route for synthesis of SnO2-CNT nanocomposites, which consist of highly dispersed 3-5 nm SnO2 nanocrystals on the surface of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (CNTs). As anode materials for Li-ion batteries, the nanocomposites showed high rate capability and superior cycling stability with specific capacity of 500 mAh g-1 for up to 300 cycles. The CNTs served as electron conductors and volume buffers in the nanocomposites. This strategy could be extended to synthesize other metal oxides composites with other carbon materials.

  17. Expanding the HAWC Observatory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mori, Johanna [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-08-17

    The High Altitude Water Cherenkov Gamma-Ray Observatory is expanding its current array of 300 water tanks to include 350 outrigger tanks to increase sensitivity to gamma rays above 10 TeV. This involves creating and testing hardware with which to build the new tanks, including photomultiplier tubes, high voltage supply units, and flash analog to digital converters. My responsibilities this summer included preparing, testing and calibrating that equipment.

  18. Trinity (for Expanded Orchestra)

    OpenAIRE

    Winokur, Robert Michael

    2011-01-01

    Trinity is a large-scale piece of program music for a symphony orchestra expanded to include two electric guitars (doubling on acoustic guitar), piano (doubling on Fender Rhodes Electric Piano), electric bass guitar and drumset. The main philosophical impetus for this piece is the programmatic depiction (in the manner of a tone poem) of a concept which is based on and combines archetypal characters drawn primarily from literary sources. This dissertation is titled Trinity and uses the thesi...

  19. Comparative study of ageing, heat treatment and accelerated carbonation for stabilization of municipal solid waste incineration bottom ash in view of reducing regulated heavy metal/metalloid leaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Rafael M; Mertens, Gilles; Salman, Muhammad; Cizer, Özlem; Van Gerven, Tom

    2013-10-15

    This study compared the performance of four different approaches for stabilization of regulated heavy metal and metalloid leaching from municipal solid waste incineration bottom ash (MSWI-BA): (i) short term (three months) heap ageing, (ii) heat treatment, (iii) accelerated moist carbonation, and (iv) accelerated pressurized slurry carbonation. Two distinct types of MSWI-BA were tested in this study: one originating from a moving-grate furnace incineration operation treating exclusively household refuse (sample B), and another originating from a fluid-bed furnace incineration operation that treats a mixture of household and light industrial wastes (sample F). The most abundant elements in the ashes were Si (20-27 wt.%) and Ca (16-19 wt.%), followed by significant quantities of Fe, Al, Na, S, K, Mg, Ti, and Cl. The main crystalline substances present in the fresh ashes were Quartz, Calcite, Apatite, Anhydrite and Gehlenite, while the amorphous fraction ranged from 56 to 73 wt.%. The leaching values of all samples were compared to the Flemish (NEN 7343) and the Walloon (DIN 38414) regulations from Belgium. Batch leaching of the fresh ashes at natural pH showed that seven elements exceeded at least one regulatory limit (Ba, Cr, Cu, Mo, Pb, Se and Zn), and that both ashes had excess basicity (pH > 12). Accelerated carbonation achieved significant reduction in ash basicity (9.3-9.9); lower than ageing (10.5-12.2) and heat treatment (11.1-12.1). For sample B, there was little distinction between the leaching results of ageing and accelerated carbonation with respect to regulatory limits; however carbonation achieved comparatively lower leaching levels. Heat treatment was especially detrimental to the leaching of Cr. For sample F, ageing was ineffective and heat treatment had marginally better results, while accelerated carbonation delivered the most effective performance, with slurry carbonation meeting all DIN limits. Slurry carbonation was deemed the most

  20. Carbon-rich icosahedral boron carbides beyond B4C and their thermodynamic stabilities at high temperature and pressure from first principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ektarawong, A.; Simak, S. I.; Alling, B.

    2016-08-01

    We investigate the thermodynamic stability of carbon-rich icosahedral boron carbide at different compositions, ranging from B4C to B2C , using first-principles calculations. Apart from B4C , generally addressed in the literature, B2.5C , represented by B10C2p (C-C), where Cp and (C-C) denote a carbon atom occupying the polar site of the icosahedral cluster and a diatomic carbon chain, respectively, is predicted to be thermodynamically stable under high pressures with respect to B4C as well as pure boron and carbon phases. The thermodynamic stability of B2.5C is determined by the Gibbs free energy G as a function of pressure p and temperature T , in which the contributions from the lattice vibrations and the configurational disorder are obtained within the quasiharmonic and the mean-field approximations, respectively. The stability range of B2.5C is then illustrated through the p -T phase diagrams. Depending on the temperatures, the stability range of B2.5C is predicted to be within the range between 40 and 67 GPa. At T ≳ 500 K, the icosahedral Cp atoms in B2.5C configurationally disorder at the polar sites. By investigating the properties of B2.5C , e.g., elastic constants and phonon and electronic density of states, we demonstrate that B2.5C is both mechanically and dynamically stable at zero pressure, and is an electrical semiconductor. Furthermore, based on the sketched phase diagrams, a possible route for experimental synthesis of B2.5C as well as a fingerprint for its characterization from the simulations of x-ray powder diffraction pattern are suggested.

  1. Effects of Land Use Practices on the Organic Carbon Content, Cation Exchange Capacity and Aggregate Stability of Soils in the Catchment Zones

    OpenAIRE

    Mosayeb Heshmati; Arifin Abdu; Shamshuddin Jusop; Nik M. Majid

    2011-01-01

    Problem statement: Land use practice leads to changes in the physico-chemical properties of soils, such as Soil Organic Carbon (SOC), Cation Exchange Capacity (CEC) and Soil Aggregate Stability (SAS) that cause soil erosion. Approach: Merek catchment, Iran suffers from land degradation due to poor land use practice. A study was carried out with the objectives: (i) to determine soil nutrient status in different agro-ecological zones in Merek catchment; and (ii) to evaluate the influence of lan...

  2. Application of δ13C and δ15N isotopic signatures of organic matter fractions sequentially separated from adjacent arable and forest soils to identify carbon stabilization mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayler, Z. E.; Kaiser, M.; Gessler, A.; Ellerbrock, R. H.; Sommer, M.

    2011-03-01

    Identifying the chemical mechanisms behind soil carbon bound in organo-mineral complexes is necessary to determine the degree to which soil organic carbon is stabilized belowground. We used the δ13C and δ15N isotopic signatures from two organic matter (OM) fractions from soil to identify the likely binding mechanisms involved. We used OM fractions hypothesized to contain carbon stabilized through organo-mineral complexes: (1) OM separated chemically with sodium pyrophosphate (OM(PY)) and (2) OM stabilized in microstructures found in the chemical extraction residue (OM(ER)). Furthermore, because the OM fractions were separated from five different soils with paired forest and arable land use histories, we could address the impact of land use change on carbon binding and processing mechanisms within these soils. We used partial least squares regression to analyze patterns in the isotopic signature of OM with established proxies of different binding mechanisms. Parsing soil OM into different fractions is a systematic method of dissection, however, we are primarily interested in how OM is bound in soil as a whole, requiring a means of re-assembly. Thus, we implemented the recent zonal framework described by Kleber et al. (2007) to relate our findings to undisturbed soil. The δ15N signature of OM fractions served as a reliable indicator for microbial processed carbon in both arable and forest land use types. The δ13C signature of OM fractions in arable sites did not correlate well with proxies of soil mineral properties while a consistent pattern of enrichment was seen in the δ13C of OM fractions in the forest sites. We found a significant difference in δ13C of pooled OM fractions between the forest and arable land use type although it was relatively small (<1‰). We found different binding mechanisms predominate in each land use type. The isotopic signatures of OM fractions from arable soils were highly related to the clay and silt size particles amount while

  3. Application of δ13C and δ15N isotopic signatures of organic matter fractions sequentially separated from adjacent arable and forest soils to identify carbon stabilization mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Sommer

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Identifying the chemical mechanisms behind soil carbon bound in organo-mineral complexes is necessary to determine the degree to which soil organic carbon is stabilized belowground. We used the δ13C and δ15N isotopic signatures from two organic matter (OM fractions from soil to identify the likely binding mechanisms involved. We used OM fractions hypothesized to contain carbon stabilized through organo-mineral complexes: (1 OM separated chemically with sodium pyrophosphate (OM(PY and (2 OM stabilized in microstructures found in the chemical extraction residue (OM(ER. Furthermore, because the OM fractions were separated from five different soils with paired forest and arable land use histories, we could address the impact of land use change on carbon binding and processing mechanisms within these soils. We used partial least squares regression to analyze patterns in the isotopic signature of OM with established proxies of different binding mechanisms. Parsing soil OM into different fractions is a systematic method of dissection, however, we are primarily interested in how OM is bound in soil as a whole, requiring a means of re-assembly. Thus, we implemented the recent zonal framework described by Kleber et al. (2007 to relate our findings to undisturbed soil. The δ15N signature of OM fractions served as a reliable indicator for microbial processed carbon in both arable and forest land use types. The δ13C signature of OM fractions in arable sites did not correlate well with proxies of soil mineral properties while a consistent pattern of enrichment was seen in the δ13C of OM fractions in the forest sites. We found a significant difference in δ13C of pooled OM fractions between the forest and arable land use type although it was relatively small (<1‰. We found different binding mechanisms predominate in each land use type. The isotopic signatures of OM fractions from arable soils were highly related to the clay and silt size particles

  4. Strong stabilization of liquid amorphous calcium carbonate by ovalbumin: gaining insight into the mechanism of ‘polymer-induced liquid precursor’ processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leiterer, Jork; Pipich, Vitaliy; Barrea, Raul; Tremel, Wolfgang

    2011-01-01

    The impact of the ovo-proteins ovalbumin and lysozyme—present in the first stage of egg shell formation—on the homogeneous formation of the liquid-amorphous calcium carbonate (LACC) precursor, was studied by a combination of complementing methods: in situ WAXS, SANS, XANES, TEM, and immunogold labeling. Lysozyme (pI = 9.3) destabilizes the LACC emulsion whereas the glycoprotein ovalbumin (pI = 4.7) extends the lifespan of the emulsified state remarkably. In the light of the presented data: (a) Ovalbumin is shown to behave commensurable to the ‘polymer-induced liquid precursor’ (PILP) process proposed by Gower et al. Ovalbumin can be assumed to take a key role during eggshell formation where it serves as an effective stabilization agent for transient precursors and prevents undirected mineralization of the eggshell. (b) It is further shown that the emulsified LACC carries a negative surface charge and is electrostatically stabilized. (c) We propose that the liquid amorphous calcium carbonate is affected by polymers by depletion stabilization and de-emulsification rather than ‘induced’ by acidic proteins and polymers during a polymer-induced liquid-precursor process. The original PILP coating effect, first reported by Gower et al., appears to be a result of a de-emulsification process of a stabilized LACC phase. The behavior of the liquid amorphous carbonate phase and the polymer-induced liquid-precursor phase itself can be well described by colloid chemical terms: electrostatic and depletion stabilization and de-emulsification by depletion destabilization. PMID:21736300

  5. Strong stabilization of amorphous calcium carbonate emulsion by ovalbumin: gaining insight into the mechanism of 'polymer-induced liquid precursor' processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Stephan E; Leiterer, Jork; Pipich, Vitaliy; Barrea, Raul; Emmerling, Franziska; Tremel, Wolfgang

    2011-08-17

    The impact of the ovo proteins ovalbumin and lysozyme--present in the first stage of egg shell formation--on the homogeneous formation of the liquid amorphous calcium carbonate (LACC) precursor, was studied by a combination of complementing methods: in situ WAXS, SANS, XANES, TEM, and immunogold labeling. Lysozyme (pI = 9.3) destabilizes the LACC emulsion whereas the glycoprotein ovalbumin (pI = 4.7) extends the lifespan of the emulsified state remarkably. In the light of the presented data: (a) Ovalbumin is shown to behave commensurable to the 'polymer-induced liquid precursor' (PILP) process proposed by Gower et al. Ovalbumin can be assumed to take a key role during eggshell formation where it serves as an effective stabilization agent for transient precursors and prevents undirected mineralization of the eggshell. (b) It is further shown that the emulsified LACC carries a negative surface charge and is electrostatically stabilized. (c) We propose that the liquid amorphous calcium carbonate is affected by polymers by depletion stabilization and de-emulsification rather than 'induced' by acidic proteins and polymers during a so-called polymer-induced liquid-precursor process. The original PILP coating effect, first reported by Gower et al., appears to be a result of a de-emulsification process of a stabilized LACC phase. The behavior of the liquid amorphous carbonate phase and the polymer-induced liquid-precursor phase itself can be well described by colloid chemical terms: electrostatic and depletion stabilization and de-emulsification by depletion destabilization. PMID:21736300

  6. Thermal stability and structural study of the poly(3-hexyl thiophene)/HiPCO single walled carbon nanotubes (P3HT/SWCNT) nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakour, Anass; Baitoul, Mimouna; Faulques, Eric; Wery-Venturini, Jany

    2016-05-01

    In this work we present the effect of HiPCO single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) introduction into the conjugated polymer matrix poly(3-hexyl thiophene) (P3HT) on the structural and thermal stability of these nanocomposites. The P3HT/SWCNT nanocomposite films were prepared using chloroform and chlorobenzene as solvents and optimised ultrasonication duration. The prepared samples were analyzed by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to study the effect of carbon nanotubes on the thermal stability and structure of the polymer matrix. The measurements carried out for different SWCNT loadings show that the thermal stability was enhanced for a 0.5 wt.%, but exhibits a decrease with increasing the SWCNT content. Our results prove the structural enhancement which is in favor of a better organisation for both P3HT chains and carbon nanotubes due to their interaction. Contribution to the topical issue "Materials for Energy Harvesting, Conversion and Storage (ICOME 2015) - Elected submissions", edited by Jean-Michel Nunzi, Rachid Bennacer and Mohammed El Ganaoui

  7. Stability of a carbon gel electrode when used for the electro-assisted removal of ions from brackish water

    OpenAIRE

    Haro Remón, Marta; Rasines, Gloria; Macías, C.; Ovín Ania, María Concepción

    2011-01-01

    [EN] A porous carbon gel obtained from the poly-condensation of resorcinol and formaldehyde was synthesized and used as an electrode material for the capacitive deionization (CDI) of synthetic brackish water. The desalting capacity of this material was evaluated in terms of applied voltage and zero-voltage regeneration over a number of cycles, and compared to that of commercially available carbon materials (powdered activated carbon and activated carbon cloth). Due to an adequate combination ...

  8. The enhanced electrocatalytic activity and stability of supported Pt nanopartciles for methanol electro-oxidation through the optimized oxidation degree of carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Meiling; Zhu, Jianbing; Ge, Junjie; Liu, Changpeng; Xing, Wei

    2015-05-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with different oxidation degrees are synthesized by the modified Hummer's method and used as the support materials for platinum (Pt) catalysts. The effect of their oxidation degree on the catalytic activity and stability of the supported Pt catalysts for methanol electrooxidation is investigated for the first time. The electrocatalytic activity for methanol oxidation reaction increases with increasing the oxidation degree due to more oxygen-containing species introduced to CNTs, which improves the dispersion of Pt nanoparticles and also modifies the electronic structure of Pt catalysts. However, under more severe oxidation condition, the stability of Pt catalysts decreases due to the destruction of graphitic structure of CNTs. Therefore, the optimized treatment condition for the CNTs is mild oxidation, which provides the supported Pt catalysts with both excellent catalytic activity and stability.

  9. Expanding Your Horizon 2015

    CERN Multimedia

    Kaltenhauser, Kristin

    2015-01-01

    Expanding your horizons is a bi-annual “Science Day” for girls aged 11 to 14, held at the University of Geneva on 14 November. The girls had the opportunity to take part in hands-on workshops held by local professional women in the field of science, mathematics, engineering and technology. For the fourth time, CERN was part of this event, offering three workshops as well as a booth at the Discovery Fair, including Higgnite, an interactive visualization of the Higgs Field.

  10. The expanding universe

    CERN Document Server

    Lew, Kristi

    2011-01-01

    People have always been fascinated with the stars above and the universe that contains them. Over the years, astronomers have developed numerous theories to explain how the universe began, how it works, and what its ultimate fate will be. But all of the scientists' questions are far from answered. The Expanding Universe goes beyond the creation of the universe to explain how scientists think the universe works, grows, and changes, including what great thinkers Isaac Newton and Albert Einstein had to say about its fate. Readers will also learn about how researchers are slowly shedding light on

  11. OPTIMIZATION OF THE CATHODE LONG-TERM STABILITY IN MOLTEN CARBONATE FUEL CELLS: EXPERIMENTAL STUDY AND MATHEMATICAL MODELING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hector Colonmer; Prabhu Ganesan; Nalini Subramanian; Dr. Bala Haran; Dr. Ralph E. White; Dr. Branko N. Popov

    2002-09-01

    This project focused on addressing the two main problems associated with state of art Molten Carbonate Fuel Cells, namely loss of cathode active material and stainless steel current collector deterioration due to corrosion. We followed a dual approach where in the first case we developed novel materials to replace the cathode and current collector currently used in molten carbonate fuel cells. In the second case we improved the performance of conventional cathode and current collectors through surface modification. States of art NiO cathode in MCFC undergo dissolution in the cathode melt thereby limiting the lifetime of the cell. To prevent this we deposited cobalt using an electroless deposition process. We also coated perovskite (La{sub 0.8}Sr{sub 0.2}CoO{sub 3}) in NiO thorough a sol-gel process. The electrochemical oxidation behavior of Co and perovskites coated electrodes is similar to that of the bare NiO cathode. Co and perovskite coatings on the surface decrease the dissolution of Ni into the melt and thereby stabilize the cathode. Both, cobalt and provskites coated nickel oxide, show a higher polarization compared to that of nickel oxide, which could be due to the reduced surface area. Cobalt substituted lithium nickel oxide (LiNi{sub 0.8}Co{sub 0.2}O{sub 2}) and lithium cobalt oxide were also studied. LiNi{sub x}Co{sub 1-x}O{sub 2} was synthesized by solid-state reaction procedure using lithium nitrate, nickel hydroxide and cobalt oxalate precursor. LiNi{sub x}Co{sub 1-x}O{sub 2} showed smaller dissolution of nickel than state of art nickel oxide cathode. The performance was comparable to that of nickel oxide. The corrosion of the current collector in the cathode side was also studied. The corrosion characteristics of both SS304 and SS304 coated with Co-Ni alloy were studied. This study confirms that surface modification of SS304 leads to the formation of complex scales with better barrier properties and better electronic conductivity at 650 C. A three

  12. Improved cycling stability of lithium-sulfur batteries using a polypropylene-supported nitrogen-doped mesoporous carbon hybrid separator as polysulfide adsorbent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balach, Juan; Jaumann, Tony; Klose, Markus; Oswald, Steffen; Eckert, Jürgen; Giebeler, Lars

    2016-01-01

    The lithium/sulfur couple is garnering tremendous interest as the next-generation of cost-efficient rechargeable battery systems capable to fulfill emerging energy storage demands. However, the viable commercialization of lithium-sulfur (Li-S) batteries is still an obstacle by fast capacity fading and poor cycling stability mostly caused by the polysulfide shuttle and active sulfur material loss. In this contribution, we show that the surface modification of the commercial polypropylene separator with a nitrogen-doped mesoporous carbon enhances the interfacial interaction between the N-dopants on carbon-coating and the sulfur-related species by coupling interactions. These unique physical and interfacial chemical properties of the N-doped mesoporous carbon-coating promote the chemical adsorption and confinement of lithium (poly)sulfide intermediates in the cathode side, improving the active material utilization and hence the overall electrochemical performance of Li-S batteries: high initial discharge capacity of 1364 mAh g-1 at 0.2C and notable cycling stability with high reversible capacity of 566 mAh g-1 and negligible degradation rate of 0.037% after 1200 cycles at 0.5C. Furthermore, despite the use of a simple-mixed sulfur-carbon black cathode with high-sulfur loading of 3.95 mg cm-2, the cell with a hybrid separator delivers a high areal capacity of ˜3 mAh cm-2.

  13. Thermal stability and oxidizing properties of mixed alkaline earth-alkali molten carbonates: A focus on the lithium-sodium carbonate eutectic system with magnesium additions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • TG/DSC analysis was conducted on magnesium-containing eutectic Li/Na eutectic carbonates. • Magnesium influence on the oxygen solubility properties of carbonate was also experimentally determined at 600 °C and 650 °C. • A reproducible partial decarbonation process in premelting region caused formation of magnesium oxycarbonate-like phases. • The acidobase buffering action of magnesium oxycarbonate species could explain the high basic/oxidizing properties of such carbonate melts. • A general correlation between thermal instability in premelting region and basic/oxidizing melt properties was established. - Abstract: A comparative study on thermal behavior and oxygen solubility properties of eutectic 52/48 lithium/sodium carbonate salt containing minor additions of magnesium up to 10 mol% has been made in order to determine whether a general correlation between these two properties can be found or not. Consecutive TG/DSC heating/cooling thermal cycles carried out under alternating CO2 and N2 gas flows allowed to assign thermal events observed in the premelting region to a partial decarbonation process of the magnesium-alkali mixed carbonates. The observed decarbonation process at 460 °C is believed to come from initial stage of thermal decomposition of magnesium carbonate resulting in the metastable formation of magnesium oxycarbonate-like phases MgO·2MgCO3, in a similar manner as previously reported for lanthanum. Reversible formation and decomposition of the magnesium carbonate phase has been observed under a CO2 gas atmosphere. The intensity of the decomposition process shows a maximum for a 3 mol% MgO addition that gives also the highest oxygen solubility, suggesting therefore that instability thermal analysis in the premelting region can be considered as providing an effective measure of the basicity/oxidizing properties of alkali carbonate melts with magnesium or, in more general terms, with cations that are strong modifiers of the

  14. Adsorption of Carbon Dioxide on Unsaturated Metal Sites in M2 (dobpdc) Frameworks with Exceptional Structural Stability and Relation between Lewis Acidity and Adsorption Enthalpy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Ga Young; Lee, Woo Ram; Jo, Hyuna; Park, Joonho; Song, Jeong Hwa; Lim, Kwang Soo; Moon, Dohyun; Jung, Hyun; Lim, Juhyung; Han, Sang Soo; Jung, Yousung; Hong, Chang Seop

    2016-05-23

    A series of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) M2 (dobpdc) (M=Mn, Co, Ni, Zn; H4 dobpdc=4,4'-dihydroxy-1,1'-biphenyl-3,3'-dicarboxylic acid), with a highly dense arrangement of open metal sites along hexagonal channels were prepared by microwave-assisted or simple solvothermal reactions. The activated materials were structurally expanded when guest molecules including CO2 were introduced into the pores. The Lewis acidity of the open metal sites varied in the order MnZn, as confirmed by C=O stretching bands in the IR spectra, which are related to the CO2 adsorption enthalpy. DFT calculations revealed that the high CO2 binding affinity of transition-metal-based M2 (dobpdc) is primarily attributable to the favorable charge transfer from CO2 (oxygen lone pair acting as a Lewis base) to the open metal sites (Lewis acid), while electrostatic effects, the underlying factor responsible for the particular order of binding strength observed across different transition metals, also play a role. The framework stability against water coincides with the order of Lewis acidity. In this series of MOFs, the structural stability of Ni2 (dobpdc) is exceptional; it endured in water vapor, liquid water, and in refluxing water for one month, and the solid remained intact on exposure to solutions of pH 2-13. The DFT calculations also support the experimental finding that Ni2 (dobpdc) has higher chemical stability than the other frameworks. PMID:27105924

  15. Application of accelerated carbonation with a combination of Na2CO3 and CO2 in cement-based solidification/stabilization of heavy metal-bearing sediment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Quanyuan; Ke, Yujuan; Zhang, Lina; Tyrer, Mark; Hills, Colin D; Xue, Gang

    2009-07-15

    The efficient remediation of heavy metal-bearing sediment has been one of top priorities of ecosystem protection. Cement-based solidification/stabilization (s/s) is an option for reducing the mobility of heavy metals in the sediment and the subsequent hazard for human beings and animals. This work uses sodium carbonate as an internal carbon source of accelerated carbonation and gaseous CO(2) as an external carbon source to overcome deleterious effects of heavy metals on strength development and improve the effectiveness of s/s of heavy metal-bearing sediment. In addition to the compressive strength and porosity measurements, leaching tests followed the Chinese solid waste extraction procedure for leaching toxicity - sulfuric acid and nitric acid method (HJ/T299-2007), German leaching procedure (DIN38414-S4) and US toxicity characteristic leaching procedures (TCLP) have been conducted. The experimental results indicated that the solidified sediment by accelerated carbonation was capable of reaching all performance criteria for the disposal at a Portland cement dosage of 10 wt.% and a solid/water ratio of 1:1. The concentrations of mercury and other heavy metals in the leachates were below 0.10mg/L and 5mg/L, respectively, complying with Chinese regulatory level (GB5085-2007). Compared to the hydration, accelerated carbonation improved the compressive strength of the solidified sediment by more than 100% and reduced leaching concentrations of heavy metals significantly. It is considered that accelerated carbonation technology with a combination of Na(2)CO(3) and CO(2) may practically apply to cement-based s/s of heavy metal-bearing sediment. PMID:19128876

  16. Frictional properties and slip stability of active faults within carbonate-evaporite sequences: The role of dolomite and anhydrite

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scuderi, M.M.; Niemeijer, A.R.; Collettini, C.; Marone, C.

    2013-01-01

    Seismological observations show that many destructive earthquakes nucleate within, or propagate through, thick sequences of carbonates and evaporites. For example, along the Apennines range (Italy) carbonate and evaporite sequences are present at hypocentral depths for recent major earthquakes (5.0<

  17. The Artful Universe Expanded

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The cosmos is an awfully big place and there is no better guide to its vast expanse and fascinating nooks and crannies than John Barrow. A professor of mathematical sciences at Cambridge University, Barrow embodies that rare combination of highly polished writer and expert scientist. His deft touch brings together the disparate threads of human knowledge and weaves them into a tapestry as rich and interesting for the expert as it is for the layperson. The Artful Universe Expanded is an updated edition of this popular book first published in 1995. It explores the deeply profound manner in which natural law and the nature of the cosmos have moulded and shaped us, our cultures and the very form of our arts and music-a new type of 'cosmic' anthropology. The main themes Barrow chooses for revealing this new anthropology are the subjects of evolution, the size of things, the heavens and the nature of music. The book is a large, eclectic repository of knowledge often unavailable to the layperson, hidden in esoteric libraries around the world. It rivals The Da Vinci Code for entertainment value and insights, but this time it is Nature's code that is revealed. It is rare indeed to find common threads drawn through topics as diverse as The Beetles, Bach and Beethoven or between Jackson Pollock, the Aztecs, Kant, Picasso, Byzantine mosaics, uranium-235 and the helix nebula. Barrow unerringly binds them together, presenting them in a stimulating, conversational style that belies the amount of time that must have gone into researching this book. Dip into it at random, or read it from cover to cover, but do read it. The Artful Universe Expanded is an entertaining antidote to the oft-lamented pressures to know more and more about less and less and the apparently inexorable march of specialization. On reading this book one can, for a short time at least, hold in one's mind a vision that unifies science, art and culture and glimpse a universal tapestry of great beauty. (book review)

  18. The Artful Universe Expanded

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bassett, B A [Institute of Cosmology and Gravitation, University of Portsmouth (United Kingdom)

    2005-07-29

    The cosmos is an awfully big place and there is no better guide to its vast expanse and fascinating nooks and crannies than John Barrow. A professor of mathematical sciences at Cambridge University, Barrow embodies that rare combination of highly polished writer and expert scientist. His deft touch brings together the disparate threads of human knowledge and weaves them into a tapestry as rich and interesting for the expert as it is for the layperson. The Artful Universe Expanded is an updated edition of this popular book first published in 1995. It explores the deeply profound manner in which natural law and the nature of the cosmos have moulded and shaped us, our cultures and the very form of our arts and music-a new type of 'cosmic' anthropology. The main themes Barrow chooses for revealing this new anthropology are the subjects of evolution, the size of things, the heavens and the nature of music. The book is a large, eclectic repository of knowledge often unavailable to the layperson, hidden in esoteric libraries around the world. It rivals The Da Vinci Code for entertainment value and insights, but this time it is Nature's code that is revealed. It is rare indeed to find common threads drawn through topics as diverse as The Beetles, Bach and Beethoven or between Jackson Pollock, the Aztecs, Kant, Picasso, Byzantine mosaics, uranium-235 and the helix nebula. Barrow unerringly binds them together, presenting them in a stimulating, conversational style that belies the amount of time that must have gone into researching this book. Dip into it at random, or read it from cover to cover, but do read it. The Artful Universe Expanded is an entertaining antidote to the oft-lamented pressures to know more and more about less and less and the apparently inexorable march of specialization. On reading this book one can, for a short time at least, hold in one's mind a vision that unifies science, art and culture and glimpse a universal tapestry of great

  19. Thermal stability and oxidizing properties of mixed alkaline earth-alkali molten carbonates: A focus on the lithium-sodium carbonate eutectic system with magnesium additions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frangini, Stefano, E-mail: stefano.frangini@enea.it [Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Laboratory (UTRINN-IFC), ENEA CR Casaccia, Via Anguillarese 301, I-00123 Rome (Italy); Scaccia, Silvera [Sustainable Combustion Laboratory (UTTEI-COMSO), ENEA CR Casaccia, Via Anguillarese 301, I-00123 Rome (Italy)

    2013-12-20

    Highlights: • TG/DSC analysis was conducted on magnesium-containing eutectic Li/Na eutectic carbonates. • Magnesium influence on the oxygen solubility properties of carbonate was also experimentally determined at 600 °C and 650 °C. • A reproducible partial decarbonation process in premelting region caused formation of magnesium oxycarbonate-like phases. • The acidobase buffering action of magnesium oxycarbonate species could explain the high basic/oxidizing properties of such carbonate melts. • A general correlation between thermal instability in premelting region and basic/oxidizing melt properties was established. - Abstract: A comparative study on thermal behavior and oxygen solubility properties of eutectic 52/48 lithium/sodium carbonate salt containing minor additions of magnesium up to 10 mol% has been made in order to determine whether a general correlation between these two properties can be found or not. Consecutive TG/DSC heating/cooling thermal cycles carried out under alternating CO{sub 2} and N{sub 2} gas flows allowed to assign thermal events observed in the premelting region to a partial decarbonation process of the magnesium-alkali mixed carbonates. The observed decarbonation process at 460 °C is believed to come from initial stage of thermal decomposition of magnesium carbonate resulting in the metastable formation of magnesium oxycarbonate-like phases MgO·2MgCO{sub 3}, in a similar manner as previously reported for lanthanum. Reversible formation and decomposition of the magnesium carbonate phase has been observed under a CO{sub 2} gas atmosphere. The intensity of the decomposition process shows a maximum for a 3 mol% MgO addition that gives also the highest oxygen solubility, suggesting therefore that instability thermal analysis in the premelting region can be considered as providing an effective measure of the basicity/oxidizing properties of alkali carbonate melts with magnesium or, in more general terms, with cations that are

  20. Investigation of heavy metal (Cu, Pb, Cd, and Cr) stabilization in river sediment by nano-zero-valent iron/activated carbon composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei-fang; Zhang, Jinghui; Zhang, Xiaomao; Wang, Weiya; Li, Yuxiang

    2016-01-01

    Nano-zero-valent iron/activated carbon (nZVI/AC) composite was evaluated for its effectiveness in the stabilization of Cu, Pb, Cd, and Cr in dredged river sediment. Synthetic precipitation leaching procedure (SPLP) and toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) were adopted to compare the effects of nZVI/AC dosage, particle size, time duration, and temperature on heavy metal leachability. The results show that leachability dropped considerably with the addition of nZVI/AC and powdered particles in the size of 0.075-0.18 mm was more effective in stabilization than granular ones. Stabilization effect was stable in long-term and robust against changes in temperature. Tessier sequential extraction revealed that heavy metals were associated with solid particle, inorganic or organic matters in sediment. The addition of nZVI/AC was able to convert relatively weakly bound heavy metals into more strongly bound species and thus reduce the bioavailability and toxicity. Also, the standard potential of heavy metals may decide the mechanism of stabilization process. PMID:26370818

  1. Study of calcium forms and their effect in carbon stabilization in fertile soils by FTIR and XPS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Araujo, J.R.; Assis, K.L.S.; Calil, V.L.; Souza, K.R.; Beltrao, M.S.S.; Sena, L.A.; Archanjo, B.S.; Achete, C.A., E-mail: jraraujo@inmetro.gov.br [Instituto Nacional de Metrologia, Qualidade e Tecnologia (INMETRO), Duque de Caxias, RJ (Brazil). Divisao de Materiais e Metrologia

    2013-07-01

    Organic matter or black carbon atoms of Terra Preta de Indio (Amazonian Dark Earth) soils are composed of oxidized carbon groups as phenols, epoxide, carbonyl and carboxyl groups in their surface. At the pH of soil, carboxylate groups are deprotonated generating carboxylate anions leaving the surface of these soils with negative charges. Calcium cations can interact with oxidized carbon groups by chemisorption interactions lowering the total system energy. In this work, Terra Preta de Indio was examined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Infrared spectroscopy in order to correlate its organic fraction rich in calcium with calcium containing samples. (author)

  2. Carbon-coated Zn2GeO4 on Ni foam as lithium ion battery anodes with exceptional long cycling stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work we have investigated lithium ion battery anodes based on Zn2GeO4, which were directly synthesized on 3D Ni foam substrates and were in situ coated with a conductive carbon layer. The hybrid electrodes exhibited outstanding electrochemical performance, including an exceptional long-term cycling stability with reversible discharge capacity of over 1100 mAh g−1 obtained after being tested for 1000 cycles at 400 mA g−1. This study of hybrid electrodes may present an interesting approach to creating efficient and practical electrodes for energy storage applications

  3. Flexible NiO-Graphene-Carbon Fiber Mats Containing Multifunctional Graphene for High Stability and High Specific Capacity Lithium-Ion Storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhongqi; Zhang, Ming; Zhou, Ji

    2016-05-11

    An electrode's conductivity, ion diffusion rate, and flexibility are critical factors in determining its performance in a lithium-ion battery. In this study, NiO-carbon fibers were modified with multifunctional graphene sheets, resulting in flexible mats. These mats displayed high conductivities, and the transformation of active NiO to inert Ni(0) was effectively prevented at relatively low annealing temperatures in the presence of graphene. The mats were also highly flexible and contained large gaps for the rapid diffusion of ions, because of the addition of graphene sheets. The flexible NiO-graphene-carbon fiber mats achieved a reversible capacity of 750 mA h/g after 350 cycles at a current density of 500 mA/g as the binder-free anodes of lithium-ion batteries. The mats' rate capacities were also higher than those of either the NiO-carbon fibers or the graphene-carbon fibers. This work should provide a new route toward improving the mechanical properties, conductivities, and stabilities of mats using multifunctional graphene. PMID:27088813

  4. Enhanced electrochemical performance and carbon anti-coking ability of solid oxide fuel cells with silver modified nickel-yttrium stabilized zirconia anode by electroless plating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiaoyan; Tian, Yu; Zhang, Jun; Zuo, Wei; Kong, Xiaowei; Wang, Jinghui; Sun, Kening; Zhou, Xiaoliang

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, silver (Ag) particles are introduced into the conventional Ni/YSZ anode by utilizing electroless plating method to improve its carbon anti-coking ability in hydrocarbons. The experimental results show that electrochemical performances of the decorated cells in H2, CH4 and C2H6 are all increased as compared to the cell with unmodified Ni/YSZ anode, which are verified by impedance spectrums as well. The durability experiment is carried out for as long as 24 h at the current density of 0.33 A/cm2 where the modified anode is subjected to dry C2H6 indicating the anti-coking ability of the anode is greatly improved. Scanning electron microscope shows that the slight decreasing in the cell terminal voltage can be attributed to the minimized carbon deposition which maybe resulted from the aggregation of silver particles at high temperature. Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy line scanning results after long-term stability operation of the anode suggest that the carbon deposition can be depressed effectively both inside the anode and on the surface of the anode. Therefore, the results show that silver is a promising candidate material for modifying the Ni/YSZ anode with regard to improving electrochemical performance and suppressing the carbon deposition when taking the hydrocarbons as fuels.

  5. The Artful Universe Expanded

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrow, John D.

    2005-07-01

    Our love of art, writes John Barrow, is the end product of millions of years of evolution. How we react to a beautiful painting or symphony draws upon instincts laid down long before humans existed. Now, in this enhanced edition of the highly popular The Artful Universe , Barrow further explores the close ties between our aesthetic appreciation and the basic nature of the Universe. Barrow argues that the laws of the Universe have imprinted themselves upon our thoughts and actions in subtle and unexpected ways. Why do we like certain types of art or music? What games and puzzles do we find challenging? Why do so many myths and legends have common elements? In this eclectic and entertaining survey, Barrow answers these questions and more as he explains how the landscape of the Universe has influenced the development of philosophy and mythology, and how millions of years of evolutionary history have fashioned our attraction to certain patterns of sound and color. Barrow casts the story of human creativity and thought in a fascinating light, considering such diverse topics as our instinct for language, the origins and uses of color in nature, why we divide time into intervals as we do, the sources of our appreciation of landscape painting, and whether computer-generated fractal art is really art. Drawing on a wide variety of examples, from the theological questions raised by St. Augustine and C.S. Lewis to the relationship between the pure math of Pythagoras and the music of the Beatles, The Artful Universe Expanded covers new ground and enters a wide-ranging debate about the meaning and significance of the links between art and science.

  6. Demands of Expanding Populations and Development Planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Bo

    2010-04-01

    This book is a practical resource for development planners, demographers, and organizations involved with development projects related to improving the well-being and welfare of expanding human populations. Demands of Expanding Populations and Development Planning essentially is a treatment on sustainability and includes a heavy emphasis on major issues of environmental pollution over the last 3 decades. The book's coverage of ecosystems, atmospheric chemistry, water availability and quality, and soils is comprehensive. The author's extensive teaching experience makes this somewhat of an authoritative book on air quality and emissions from natural and anthropogenic sources, volatile heavy metals, carbon monoxide, radon, and nuclear waste. Most of the book focuses on the atmospheric chemistry of air pollution, whether the pollution source is from energy, industrial production, and manufacturing processes or from the treatment of waste products from such processes.

  7. Influence of expander components on the processes at the negative plates of lead-acid cells on high-rate partial-state-of-charge cycling. Part II. Effect of carbon additives on the processes of charge and discharge of negative plates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pavlov, D.; Nikolov, P.; Rogachev, T. [Institute of Electrochemistry and Energy Systems, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Acad. Georgi Bonchev Street, bl. 10, Sofia 1113 (Bulgaria)

    2010-07-15

    Lead-acid batteries operated in the high-rate partial-state-of-charge (HRPSoC) duty rapidly lose capacity on cycling, because of sulfation of the negative plates. As the battery operates from a partially discharged state, the small PbSO{sub 4} crystals dissolve and precipitate onto the bigger crystals. The latter have low solubility and hence PbSO{sub 4} accumulates progressively in the negative plates causing capacity loss. In order to suppress this process, the rate of the charge process should be increased. In a previous publication of ours we have established that reduction of Pb{sup 2+} ions to Pb may proceed on the surface of both Pb and carbon black particles. Hence, the reversibility of the charge-discharge processes improves, which leads to improved cycle life performance of the batteries in the HRPSoC mode. However, not all carbon forms accelerate the charge processes. The present paper discusses the electrochemical properties of two groups of carbon blacks: Printex and active carbons. The influence of Vaniseprse A and BaSO{sub 4} (the other two components of the expander added to the negative plates) on the reversibility of the charge-discharge processes on the negative plates is also considered. It has been established that lignosulfonates are adsorbed onto the lead surface and retard charging of the battery. BaSO{sub 4} has the opposite effect, which improves the reversibility of the processes on cycling and hence prolongs battery life in the HRPSoC duty. It has been established that the cycle life of lead-acid cells depends on the type of carbon black or active carbon added to the negative plates. When the carbon particles are of nano-sizes (<180 nm), the HRPSoC cycle life is between 10,000 and 20,000 cycles. Lignosulfonates suppress this beneficial effect of carbon black and activated carbon additives to about 10,000 cycles. Cells with active carbons have the longest cycle life when they contain also BaSO{sub 4} but no lignosulfonate. A summary of

  8. Crystallization degree change of expanded graphite by milling and annealing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang Qunwei [Key Laboratory for Functional Materials of Fujian Higher Education, Institute of Material Physical Chemistry, Huaqiao University, Quanzhou 362021 (China); Wu Jihuai [Key Laboratory for Functional Materials of Fujian Higher Education, Institute of Material Physical Chemistry, Huaqiao University, Quanzhou 362021 (China)], E-mail: jhwu@hqu.edu.cn; Sun Hui; Fang Shijun [Key Laboratory for Functional Materials of Fujian Higher Education, Institute of Material Physical Chemistry, Huaqiao University, Quanzhou 362021 (China)

    2009-05-05

    Expanded graphite was ball milled with a planetary mill in air atmosphere, and subsequently thermal annealed. The samples were characterized by using X-ray diffraction spectroscopy (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA). It was found that in the milling initial stage (less than 12 h), the crystallization degree of the expanded graphite declined gradually, but after milling more than 16 h, a recrystallization of the expanded graphite toke place, and ordered nanoscale expanded graphite was formed gradually. In the annealing initial stage, the non-crystallization of the graphite occurred, but, beyond an annealing time, recrystallizations of the graphite arise. Higher annealing temperature supported the recrystallization. The milled and annealed expanded graphite still preserved the crystalline structure as raw material and hold high thermal stability.

  9. Potentiometric and spectrophotometric study of the stability of magnesium carbonate and bicarbonate ion pairs to 150 °C and aqueous inorganic carbon speciation and magnesite solubility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefánsson, Andri; Bénézeth, Pascale; Schott, Jacques

    2014-08-01

    The formation constants of magnesium bicarbonate and carbonate ion pairs have been experimentally determined in dilute hydrothermal solutions to 150 °C. Two experimental approaches were applied, potentiometric acid-base titrations at 10-60 °C and spectrophotometric pH measurements using two pH indicators, 2-naphthol and 4-nitrophenol, at 25 and 80-150 °C. At a given temperature, the first and second ionization constants of carbonic acid (K1, K2) and the ion pair formation constants for MgHCO3+(aq) (KMgHCO3+) and MgCO3(aq) (KMgCO3) were simultaneously fitted to the data. Results of this study compare well with previously determined values of K1 and K2. The formation constants of MgHCO3+(aq) and MgCO3(aq) ion pairs increased significantly with increasing temperature, with values of logKMgHCO3+ = 1.14 and 1.75 and of logKMgCO3 = 2.86 and 3.48 at 10 °C and 100 °C, respectively. These ion pairs are important aqueous species under neutral to alkaline conditions in moderately dilute to concentrated Mg-containing solutions, with MgCO3(aq) predominating over CO32-(aq) in solutions at pH >8. The predominance of magnesium carbonate over carbonate is dependent on the concentration of dissolved magnesium and the ratio of magnesium over carbonate. With increasing temperature and at alkaline pH, brucite solubility further reduced the magnesium concentration to levels below 1 mmol kg-1, thus limiting availability of Mg2+(aq) for magnesite precipitation.

  10. Steady state and stability characteristics of natural circulation loops operating with carbon dioxide at supercritical pressures for open and closed loop boundary conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Natural circulation experiments conducted with supercritical carbon dioxide. • The instability observed in the pseudo-critical temperature range of operation. • Instability is found for small power range bounded by upper and lower stable zones. • NOLSTA code predicts very large unstable zone compared to experimental data. • Thermal capacitance model included in NOLSTA code to simulate experimental data. - Abstract: Experiments were conducted in a closed supercritical pressure natural circulation loop (SPNCL) with carbon dioxide as working fluid. Instability was observed in a narrow window of power with the loop operating in the pseudo-critical temperature range (heater inlet temperature in the range of 27–31 °C and heater outlet temperature oscillating from 29 to 45 °C). Only horizontal heater horizontal cooler orientation exhibited instability and that too at low secondary side chilled water mass flow rate, i.e. 10–15 lpm. A computer code NOLSTA has been developed to carry out steady state and stability analysis of open and closed loop natural circulation at supercritical conditions. The code adequately predicts steady state natural circulation performance for both open and closed loop boundary conditions. However, code predicts very large unstable zone for SPNCL, hence pipe wall thermal capacitance models were incorporated in NOLSTA code to simulate the experimental results. The stability predictions by NOLSTA code (with pipe wall thermal capacitance model) have been compared with experimental data available in open literature and experiments conducted in SPNCL

  11. A stability comparison of redox-active layers produced by chemical coupling of an osmium redox complex to pre-functionalized gold and carbon electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The production of stable redox active layers on electrode surfaces is a key factor for the development of practical electronic and electrochemical devices. Here, we report on a comparison of the stability of redox layers formed by covalently coupling an osmium redox complex to pre-functionalized gold and graphite electrode surfaces. Pre-treatment of gold and graphite electrodes to provide surface carboxylic acid groups is achieved via classical thiolate self-assembled monolayer formation on gold surfaces and the electro-reduction of an in situ generated aryldiazonium salt from 4-aminobenzoic acid on gold, glassy carbon and graphite surfaces. These surfaces have been characterized by AFM and electrochemical blocking studies. The surface carboxylate is then used to tether an osmium complex, [Os(2,2'-bipyridyl)2(4-aminomethylpyridine)Cl]PF6, to provide a covalently bound redox active layer, E0'' of 0.29 V (vs. Ag/AgCl in phosphate buffer, pH 7.4), on the pre-treated electrodes. The aryldiazonium salt-treated carbon-based surfaces showed the greatest stability, represented by a decrease of <5% in the peak current for the Os(II/III) redox transition of the immobilized complex over a 3-day period, compared to a decrease of 19% and 14% for the aryldiazonium salt treated and thiolate treated gold surfaces, respectively, over the same period

  12. A stability comparison of redox-active layers produced by chemical coupling of an osmium redox complex to pre-functionalized gold and carbon electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boland, Susan; Foster, Kevin [School of Chemistry, National University of Ireland, Galway (Ireland); Leech, Donal [School of Chemistry, National University of Ireland, Galway (Ireland)], E-mail: donal.leech@nuigalway.ie

    2009-02-28

    The production of stable redox active layers on electrode surfaces is a key factor for the development of practical electronic and electrochemical devices. Here, we report on a comparison of the stability of redox layers formed by covalently coupling an osmium redox complex to pre-functionalized gold and graphite electrode surfaces. Pre-treatment of gold and graphite electrodes to provide surface carboxylic acid groups is achieved via classical thiolate self-assembled monolayer formation on gold surfaces and the electro-reduction of an in situ generated aryldiazonium salt from 4-aminobenzoic acid on gold, glassy carbon and graphite surfaces. These surfaces have been characterized by AFM and electrochemical blocking studies. The surface carboxylate is then used to tether an osmium complex, [Os(2,2'-bipyridyl){sub 2}(4-aminomethylpyridine)Cl]PF{sub 6}, to provide a covalently bound redox active layer, E{sup 0}'' of 0.29 V (vs. Ag/AgCl in phosphate buffer, pH 7.4), on the pre-treated electrodes. The aryldiazonium salt-treated carbon-based surfaces showed the greatest stability, represented by a decrease of <5% in the peak current for the Os(II/III) redox transition of the immobilized complex over a 3-day period, compared to a decrease of 19% and 14% for the aryldiazonium salt treated and thiolate treated gold surfaces, respectively, over the same period.

  13. Thermal conductivity and stability of a three-phase blend of carbon nanotubes, conductive polymer, and silver nanoparticles incorporated into polycarbonate nanocomposites

    KAUST Repository

    Patole, Archana

    2015-04-16

    Metallic and non-metallic nanofillers can be used together in the design of polycarbonate (PC) nanocomposites with improved electrical properties. Here, the preparation of three-phase blend (carbon nanotubes (CNT), silver nanoparticles, and conductive polymer) in a two-step process before incorporation in the PC is reported. First, ethylene diamine functionalized multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNT-EDA) were decorated with Ag nanoparticles. Next, the Ag-decorated CNTs were coated with poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) polystyrene sulfonate (PEDOT:PSS). Due to the high thermal conductivity instrinsic to both metallic and non-metallic phases, it is expected that the thermal properties of the resulting nanocomposite would largely differ from those of pristine PC. We thus investigated in detail how this hybrid conductive blend affected properties such as the glass transition temperature, the thermal stability, and the thermal conductivity of the nanocomposite. It was found that this strategy results in improved thermal conductivity and thermal stability of the material. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Markovian stochastic approximation with expanding projections

    CERN Document Server

    Andrieu, Christophe

    2011-01-01

    Stochastic approximation is a framework unifying many random iterative algorithms occurring in a diverse range of applications. The stability of the process is often difficult to verify in practical applications and the process may even be unstable without additional stabilisation techniques. We study a stochastic approximation procedure with expanding projections similar to Andrad\\'ottir [Oper. Res. 43 (2010) 1037--1048]. We focus on Markovian noise and show the stability and convergence under general conditions. Our framework also incorporates the possibility to use a random step size sequence, which allows us to consider settings with a non-smooth family of Markov kernels. We apply the theory to stochastic approximation expectation maximisation with particle independent Metropolis-Hastings sampling.

  15. Kinetics stabilized doping: computational optimization of carbon-doped anatase TiO2 for visible-light driven water splitting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yi-Yang; Zhang, Shengbai

    2016-01-28

    Using density functional theory calculation we investigate the carbon doping of anatase TiO2, a technique widely studied for visible-light driven water splitting. By a detailed analysis of the thermodynamics of C defects in TiO2, we show that any significant concentration of C dopants in the TiO2 lattice must be a result of non-equilibrium doping, which emphasizes the importance of kinetics stabilized C defects. Based on the band gaps calculated using hybrid density functionals, we exclude the possibility of C occupying Ti lattice sites or interstitial sites to enhance visible-light absorption of TiO2, as extensively discussed in the literature. Also, the recently proposed defect with a CO species occupying two O sites yields a too small band gap for water splitting. Two defects that can effectively reduce the band gap for the water splitting application are identified to be: (1) the CO-VO complex, i.e., a C substituting for O (CO) paired with an O vacancy (VO) and (2) the (C2)2O complex with a C dimer (C2) occupying two neighboring O vacancies. Compared with the CO-VO complex, (C2)2O exhibits strong binding (greater than 2.5 eV) between the two C atoms, which could significantly enhance its kinetic stability to survive from high temperature annealing. With a reduced band gap of about 1.4 eV, carbon dimers could be ideal for kinetic doping of anatase TiO2 to enhance its visible-light activity in photocatalytic reactions. Molecular doping using C2H2 or C2H4 as C precursors has been proposed to introduce the carbon dimers into TiO2. PMID:26725589

  16. Ionic Liquid-Organic Carbonate Electrolyte Blends To Stabilize Silicon Electrodes for Extending Lithium Ion Battery Operability to 100 °C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ababtain, Khalid; Babu, Ganguli; Lin, Xinrong; Rodrigues, Marco-Tulio F; Gullapalli, Hemtej; Ajayan, Pulickel M; Grinstaff, Mark W; Arava, Leela Mohana Reddy

    2016-06-22

    Fabrication of lithium-ion batteries that operate from room temperature to elevated temperatures entails development and subsequent identification of electrolytes and electrodes. Room temperature ionic liquids (RTILs) can address the thermal stability issues, but their poor ionic conductivity at room temperature and compatibility with traditional graphite anodes limit their practical application. To address these challenges, we evaluated novel high energy density three-dimensional nano-silicon electrodes paired with 1-methyl-1-propylpiperidinium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide (Pip) ionic liquid/propylene carbonate (PC)/LiTFSI electrolytes. We observed that addition of PC had no detrimental effects on the thermal stability and flammability of the reported electrolytes, while largely improving the transport properties at lower temperatures. Detailed investigation of the electrochemical properties of silicon half-cells as a function of PC content, temperature, and current rates reveal that capacity increases with PC content and temperature and decreases with increased current rates. For example, addition of 20% PC led to a drastic improvement in capacity as observed for the Si electrodes at 25 °C, with stability over 100 charge/discharge cycles. At 100 °C, the capacity further increases by 3-4 times to 0.52 mA h cm(-2) (2230 mA h g(-1)) with minimal loss during cycling. PMID:27237138

  17. Hindered amine stabilizers as sources of markers of the heterogeneous photooxidation/photostabilization of carbon chain polymers

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pilař, Jan; Pospíšil, Jan

    Hauppauge: Nova Science Publishers, 2011 - (Segewicz, L.; Petrowsky, M.), s. 343-357 ISBN 978-1-60692-928-5 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : polymer photodegradation * polymer photostabilization * hindered amine stabilizers Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry

  18. Impact of short-lived non-CO2 mitigation on carbon budgets for stabilizing global warming

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rogelj, Joeri; Meinshausen, M.; Schaeffer, M.; Knutti, R.; Riahi, Keywan

    2015-01-01

    Limiting global warming to any level requires limiting the total amount of CO2 emissions, or staying within a CO2 budget. Here we assess how emissions from short-lived non-CO2 species like methane, hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs), black-carbon, and sulphates influence these CO2 budgets. Our default case,

  19. Enhanced activity and stability of Pt/TiO2/carbon fuel cell electrocatalyst prepared using a glucose modifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odetola, Christopher; Trevani, Liliana; Easton, E. Bradley

    2015-10-01

    Two TiO2-C composite materials were prepared through a conventional sol gel synthesis using Vulcan XC-72 carbon black. The carbon was initially functionalised to form acid treated Vulcan (ATV) prior to TiO2 deposition. In one composite, the ATV was further modified through glucose adsorption (G-ATV) in order to facilitate the growth of small and uniform TiO2 nanoparticles on the carbon surface. Platinum nanoparticles were deposited on TiO2/G-ATV and TiO2/ATV supports through reduction of H2PtCl6 with NaBH4 at 0 °C. The electrochemical properties of the two composite catalysts were compared with in house Pt/C catalyst. We observed a three-fold increase in TiO2 loading (14 wt%) on glucose doped carbon surface compared with just acid treated support (5 wt%). The beginning of life (BOL) electrochemical active surface area (ECSA) of Pt/14 wt%TiO2/G-ATV catalyst was 40.4 m2 g-1 compared to 37.1 m2 g-1 obtained for Pt on 5 wt% TiO2/ATV despite increased TiO2 loadings on the former. Furthermore these composite catalysts showed enhanced oxygen reduction activity and better durability during accelerated stress tests which was attributed to an electronic interaction between Pt and the TiO2 on the support.

  20. A comparative study on effects of heterotrophic microbial activity on the stability of bivalve and coral carbonate during early diagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Skadi M.; Krause, Stefan; Immenhauser, Adrian; Ritter, Ann-Christin; Gorb, Stanislav N.; Kleinteich, Thomas; Treude, Tina

    2016-04-01

    Following deposition and shallow burial, marine biogenic carbonates are exposed to an environment that is geochemically affected by a manifold of bacterial metabolic redox processes. To allow for comparison of potential microbe-mediated alteration effects on carbonates, we used aragonitic bivalve shell samples and porous aragonitic coral fragments for incubation experiments in oxic- and anoxic seawater media. The media contained marine sediment slurries or bacterial cultures to mimic the natural processes in vitro. The results for anoxic experimental media containing bivalve shell samples or coral fragments displayed considerable changes in carbonate-system parameters (pH, AT, CA, DIC) and divalent-cation ratios (Mg/Ca, Mg/Sr, Sr/Ca) over time. Furthermore, incubated bivalve shell samples were altered in morphology, elemental composition and isotopic signature. Coral-fragment bearing oxic incubations were run at two temperature regimes and divalent-cation ratios of the high-temperature bacterial medium displayed withdrawal of Ca2+ and Sr2+ from the medium, thus indicating microbe-induced secondary aragonite precipitation. Analyses of coral fragments include electron-microprobe mapping and X-ray microtomography to resolve elemental sample composition and pore-space alteration features, respectively. Up to this point our results indicate that heterotrophic bacterial activity has the potential to affect surficial or open pore space in carbonate archives by increasing rates of alteration relative to sterile environments.

  1. Endohedral confinement of a DNA dodecamer onto pristine carbon nanotubes and the stability of the canonical B form

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although carbon nanotubes are potential candidates for DNA encapsulation and subsequent delivery of biological payloads to living cells, the thermodynamical spontaneity of DNA encapsulation under physiological conditions is still a matter of debate. Using enhanced sampling techniques, we show for the first time that, given a sufficiently large carbon nanotube, the confinement of a double-stranded DNA segment, 5′-D(*CP*GP*CP*GP*AP*AP*TP*TP*CP*GP*CP*G)-3′, is thermodynamically favourable under physiological environments (134 mM, 310 K, 1 bar), leading to DNA-nanotube hybrids with lower free energy than the unconfined biomolecule. A diameter threshold of 3 nm is established below which encapsulation is inhibited. The confined DNA segment maintains its translational mobility and exhibits the main geometrical features of the canonical B form. To accommodate itself within the nanopore, the DNA's end-to-end length increases from 3.85 nm up to approximately 4.1 nm, due to a ∼0.3 nm elastic expansion of the strand termini. The canonical Watson-Crick H-bond network is essentially conserved throughout encapsulation, showing that the contact between the DNA segment and the hydrophobic carbon walls results in minor rearrangements of the nucleotides H-bonding. The results obtained here are paramount to the usage of carbon nanotubes as encapsulation media for next generation drug delivery technologies

  2. Temporal change in soil carbon stability at a paired old-growth douglas-fir forest/clear-cut site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forest ecosystems are estimated to contain one-half of the total terrestrial carbon (C) pool (1146 Pg), with two-thirds of this C (787 Pg) residing in forest soils. Given the magnitude of this C pool, it is critical to understand the effects of forest management practices on soil...

  3. Improving the stability and ethanol electro-oxidation activity of Pt catalysts by selectively anchoring Pt particles on carbon-nanotubes-supported-SnO{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, J.J.; Wang, J.S.; Zhao, J.H.; Song, C.Y.; Wang, L.C. [School of Chemical Engineering and Energy, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou (China); Guo, X. [Department of Chemistry, Tsinghua University, Beijing (China)

    2012-10-15

    To improve the stability and activity of Pt catalysts for ethanol electro-oxidation, Pt nanoparticles were selectively deposited on carbon-nanotubes (CNTs)-supported-SnO{sub 2} to prepare Pt/SnO{sub 2}/CNTs and Pt/CNTs was prepared by impregnation method for reference study. X-ray diffraction (XRD) was used to confirm the crystalline structures of Pt/SnO{sub 2}/CNTs and Pt/CNTs. The stabilities of Pt/SnO{sub 2}/CNTs and Pt/CNTs were compared by analyzing the Pt size increase amplitude using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images recorded before and after cyclic voltammetry (CV) sweeping. The results showed that the Pt size increase amplitude is evidently smaller for Pt/SnO{sub 2}/CNTs, indicating the higher stability of Pt/SnO{sub 2}/CNTs. Although both catalysts exhibit degradation of electrochemical active surface area (EAS) after CV sweeping, the EAS degradation for the former is lower, further confirming the higher stability of Pt/SnO{sub 2}/CNTs. CV and potentiostatic current-time curves were recorded for ethanol electro-oxidation on both catalysts before and after CV sweeping and the results showed that the mass specific activity of Pt/CNTs increases more than that of Pt/SnO{sub 2}/CNTs, indicating that Pt/CNTs experiences more severe evolution and is less stable. The calculated area specific activity of Pt/SnO{sub 2}/CNTs is larger than that of Pt/CNTs, indicating SnO{sub 2} can co-catalyze Pt due to plenty of interfaces between SnO{sub 2} and Pt. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  4. Synergistically enhanced stability of highly flexible silver nanowire/carbon nanotube hybrid transparent electrodes by plasmonic welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jongsoo; Woo, Ju Yeon; Kim, Ju Tae; Lee, Byung Yang; Han, Chang-Soo

    2014-07-23

    Here, we report highly transparent and flexible AgNW/SWCNT hybrid networks on PET substrates combined with plasmonic welding for securing ultrahigh stability in mechanical and electrical properties under severe bending. Plasmonic welding produces local heating and welding at the junction of AgNWs and leads strong adhesion between AgNW and SWCNT as well as between hybrid structure and substrate. The initial sheet resistance of plasmon treated AgNW/SWCNT hybrid film was 26 Ω sq(-1), with >90% optical transmittance over the wavelength range 400-2700 nm. Following 200 cycles of convex/concave bending with a bending radius of 5 mm, the sheet resistance changed from 26 to 29 Ω sq(-1). This hybrid structure combined with the plasmonic welding process provided excellent stability, low resistance, and high transparency, and is suitable for highly flexible electronics applications, including touch panels, solar cells, and OLEDs. PMID:24972024

  5. Nanoscale stabilization of zintl compounds: 1D ionic Li-P double helix confined inside a carbon nanotube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Alexander S.; Kar, Tapas; Boldyrev, Alexander I.

    2016-02-01

    One-dimensional (1D) ionic nanowires are extremely rare materials due to the difficulty in stabilizing 1D chains of ions under ambient conditions. We demonstrate here a theoretical prediction of a novel hybrid material, a nanotube encapsulated 1D ionic lithium monophosphide (LiP) chain, featuring a unique double-helix structure, which is very unusual in inorganic chemistry. This nanocomposite has been investigated with density functional theory, including molecular dynamics simulations and electronic structure calculations. We find that the formation of the LiP double-helical nanowire is facilitated by strong interactions between LiP and CNTs resulting in a charge transfer. This work suggests that nanostructured confinement may be used to stabilize other polyphosphide 1D chains, thus opening new ways to study the chemistry of zintl compounds at the nanoscale.One-dimensional (1D) ionic nanowires are extremely rare materials due to the difficulty in stabilizing 1D chains of ions under ambient conditions. We demonstrate here a theoretical prediction of a novel hybrid material, a nanotube encapsulated 1D ionic lithium monophosphide (LiP) chain, featuring a unique double-helix structure, which is very unusual in inorganic chemistry. This nanocomposite has been investigated with density functional theory, including molecular dynamics simulations and electronic structure calculations. We find that the formation of the LiP double-helical nanowire is facilitated by strong interactions between LiP and CNTs resulting in a charge transfer. This work suggests that nanostructured confinement may be used to stabilize other polyphosphide 1D chains, thus opening new ways to study the chemistry of zintl compounds at the nanoscale. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Additional DOS, band structures, and Bader charges for LiP@SWCNTs. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr07713c

  6. Enhanced dispersion stability and mobility of carboxyl-functionalized carbon nanotubes in aqueous solutions through strong hydrogen bonds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dispersion of carbon nanotubes has been heavily studied due to its importance for their technical applications, toxic effects, and environmental impacts. Common electrolytes, such as sodium chloride and potassium chloride, promote agglomeration of nanoparticles in aqueous solutions. On the contrary, we discovered that acetic electrolytes enhanced the dispersion of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) with carboxyl functional group through the strong hydrogen bond, which was confirmed by UV–Vis spectrometry, dispersion observations and aerosolization-quantification method. When concentrations of acetate electrolytes such as ammonium acetate (CH3CO2NH4) and sodium acetate (CH3CO2Na) were lower than 0.03 mol per liter, MWCNT suspensions showed better dispersion and had higher mobility in porous media. The effects by the acetic environment are also applicable to other nanoparticles with the carboxyl functional group, which was demonstrated with polystyrene latex particles as an example

  7. Enhanced dispersion stability and mobility of carboxyl-functionalized carbon nanotubes in aqueous solutions through strong hydrogen bonds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bahk, Yeon Kyoung; He, Xu; Gitsis, Emmanouil; Kuo, Yu-Ying [ETH Zurich, Institute of Environmental Engineering (Switzerland); Kim, Nayoung [EMPA, Building Energy Materials and Components (Switzerland); Wang, Jing, E-mail: jing.wang@ifu.baug.ethz.ch [ETH Zurich, Institute of Environmental Engineering (Switzerland)

    2015-10-15

    Dispersion of carbon nanotubes has been heavily studied due to its importance for their technical applications, toxic effects, and environmental impacts. Common electrolytes, such as sodium chloride and potassium chloride, promote agglomeration of nanoparticles in aqueous solutions. On the contrary, we discovered that acetic electrolytes enhanced the dispersion of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) with carboxyl functional group through the strong hydrogen bond, which was confirmed by UV–Vis spectrometry, dispersion observations and aerosolization-quantification method. When concentrations of acetate electrolytes such as ammonium acetate (CH{sub 3}CO{sub 2}NH{sub 4}) and sodium acetate (CH{sub 3}CO{sub 2}Na) were lower than 0.03 mol per liter, MWCNT suspensions showed better dispersion and had higher mobility in porous media. The effects by the acetic environment are also applicable to other nanoparticles with the carboxyl functional group, which was demonstrated with polystyrene latex particles as an example.

  8. On the stability of carbon nanotube and titania nanowire based catalyst materials:from synthesis to applications

    OpenAIRE

    Rautio, A.-R. (Anne-Riikka)

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Degradation of the support and sintering of catalyst nanoparticles inherently leads to a loss of functionality of catalyst materials in converters and sensors. Malfunction in such devices may lead to serious economic and environmental damage. The quest for novel and sustainable catalyst materials with better durability is thus ongoing. In this thesis, one-dimensional nanomaterials such as carbon nanotubes and titanium dioxide nanowires are studied and compared to their convention...

  9. Single- and double-wall carbon nanotubes fully covered with tetraphenylporphyrins: Stability and optoelectronic properties from ab-initio calculations

    OpenAIRE

    Orellana, Walter

    2015-01-01

    The optoelectronic properties of single- and double-wall carbon nanotubes (CNTs) noncovalently functionalized with tetraphenylporphyrins (TPPs) are addressed by dispersion-corrected ab initio calculations. Five CNT species with different chiralities were considered. We find that the most stable configurations are those where the CNTs are fully covered by TPPs, exhibiting binding energy of about 2~eV/TPP. The semiconducting CNT-TPP compounds show optical response characterized by a strong abso...

  10. The Strontium Isotope Record of Zavkhan Terrane Carbonates: Strontium Isotope Stability Through the Ediacaran-Cambrian Transition

    OpenAIRE

    Petach, Tanya N.

    2015-01-01

    First order trends in the strontium isotopic (87Sr/86Sr) composition of seawater are controlled by radiogenic inputs from the continent and non-radiogenic inputs from exchange at mid-ocean ridges. Carbonates precipitated in seawater preserve trace amounts of strontium that record this isotope ratio and therefore record the relative importance of mid-ocean ridge and weathering chemical inputs to sea water composition. It has been proposed that environmental changes during the Ediacaran-Cambria...

  11. Technology, innovation and the economic costs of ambitious atmospheric stabilization: A modeler's view of the global carbon problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mignone, B. K.

    2007-12-01

    Policies designed to avoid "dangerous anthropogenic interference" with the climate system often focus on targets for atmospheric carbon dioxide between 450 and 550 ppm. At the same time, economic analyses of policies designed to achieve these outcomes yield conflicting results, with the variability in global cost estimates in some recent comparisons spanning more than an order of magnitude. In this talk, I revisit the mitigation cost question in one well-documented integrated assessment model (MERGE), focusing on the sensitivity to the rate of energy efficiency improvements and the availability of future carbon-free energy supply technologies. By considering these effects in isolation, I control for many of the factors that prohibit mechanistic attribution in larger inter-model comparison studies. The results can be interpreted in one of two ways: as uncertainty analysis in which different combinations of parameters represent different possible future worlds outside the control of policy, or alternatively, as policy assessment, in which different collections of assumptions represent the endpoints of deliberate policy intervention. I discuss the latter interpretation in the context of recent political developments and highlight the implications of these results for the design of effective carbon control regimes.

  12. Effects of vegetation restoration on the aggregate stability and distribution of aggregate-associated organic carbon in a typical karst gorge region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. K. Tang

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Changes in soil utilization significantly affect aggregate stability and aggregate-associated soil organic carbon (SOC. A field investigation and indoor analysis were conducted in order to study the soil aggregate stability and organic carbon distribution in the water-stable aggregates (WSA of the bare land (BL, grassland (GL, shrubland (SL, and woodland (WL in a typical karst gorge region. The results indicated that the BL, GL, SL, and WL were dominated by particles with sizes > 5 mm under dry sieving treatment, and that the soil aggregate contents of various sizes decreased as the particle size decreased. In addition, the BL, GL, SL, and WL were predominantly comprised of WSA D of the dry aggregates and water-stable aggregates in the different types of land were ranked, in descending order, as WL > GL > SL > BL. The contents of WSA > 0.25 mm, MWD and GMD increased significantly, in that order, and the percentage of aggregate destruction (PAD and fractal dimensions decreased significantly as the soil aggregate stability improved. The results of this study indicated that, as the SOC contents increased after vegetation restoration, the average SOC content of WL was 2.35, 1.37, and 1.26 times greater than that in the BL, GL, and SL, respectively. The total SOC and SOC associated in WSA of various sizes were the highest at a soil depth of 0–20 cm. In addition, the SOC contents of the WSA increased as the soil aggregate sizes decreased. The SOC contents of the WSA < 0.25 mm were highest except in the bare land, and the SOC contents of the aggregates < 0.25 mm, which ranged from 18.85 to 41.08 %, comprised the majority of the total aggregate SOC contents. The woodland and grassland facilitated WSA stability and SOC protection, thus, promoting the natural restoration of vegetation by reducing artificial disturbances could effectively restore the ecology of and prevent soil erosion in karst regions.

  13. Synergistic effects from graphene and carbon nanotubes endow ordered hierarchical structure foams with a combination of compressibility, super-elasticity and stability and potential application as pressure sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuang, Jun; Dai, Zhaohe; Liu, Luqi; Yang, Zhou; Jin, Ming; Zhang, Zhong

    2015-05-01

    Nanostructured carbon material based three-dimensional porous architectures have been increasingly developed for various applications, e.g. sensors, elastomer conductors, and energy storage devices. Maintaining architectures with good mechanical performance, including elasticity, load-bearing capacity, fatigue resistance and mechanical stability, is prerequisite for realizing these functions. Though graphene and CNT offer opportunities as nanoscale building blocks, it still remains a great challenge to achieve good mechanical performance in their microarchitectures because of the need to precisely control the structure at different scales. Herein, we fabricate a hierarchical honeycomb-like structured hybrid foam based on both graphene and CNT. The resulting materials possess excellent properties of combined high specific strength, elasticity and mechanical stability, which cannot be achieved in neat CNT and graphene foams. The improved mechanical properties are attributed to the synergistic-effect-induced highly organized, multi-scaled hierarchical architectures. Moreover, with their excellent electrical conductivity, we demonstrated that the hybrid foams could be used as pressure sensors in the fields related to artificial skin.Nanostructured carbon material based three-dimensional porous architectures have been increasingly developed for various applications, e.g. sensors, elastomer conductors, and energy storage devices. Maintaining architectures with good mechanical performance, including elasticity, load-bearing capacity, fatigue resistance and mechanical stability, is prerequisite for realizing these functions. Though graphene and CNT offer opportunities as nanoscale building blocks, it still remains a great challenge to achieve good mechanical performance in their microarchitectures because of the need to precisely control the structure at different scales. Herein, we fabricate a hierarchical honeycomb-like structured hybrid foam based on both graphene and

  14. Processable Conducting Polyaniline, Carbon Nanotubes, Graphene and Their Composites

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Kan

    2014-01-01

    Good processability is often required for applications of conducting materials like polyaniline (PANI), carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and graphene. This can be achieved by either physical stabilization or chemical functionalization. Functionalization usually expands the possible applications for the conducting materials depending on the properties of the functional groups. Processable conducting materials can also be combined with other co-dissolving materials to prepare composites with desired che...

  15. Trivalent expanders and hyperbolic surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Ivrissimtzis, Ioannis; Vdovina, Alina

    2012-01-01

    We introduce a family of trivalent expanders which tessellate compact hyperbolic surfaces with large isometry groups. We compare this family with Platonic graphs and modifications of them and prove topological and spectral properties of these families.

  16. Most Blood Biomarkers Related to Vitamin Status, One-Carbon Metabolism, and the Kynurenine Pathway Show Adequate Preanalytical Stability and Within-Person Reproducibility to Allow Assessment of Exposure or Nutritional Status in Healthy Women and Cardiovascular Patients123

    OpenAIRE

    Midttun, Øivind; Townsend, Mary K.; Nygård, Ottar; Tworoger, Shelley S.; Brennan, Paul; Johansson, Mattias; Ueland, Per Magne

    2014-01-01

    Knowledge of stability during sample transportation and changes in biomarker concentrations within person over time are paramount for proper design and interpretation of epidemiologic studies based on a single measurement of biomarker status. Therefore, we investigated stability and intraindividual vs. interindividual variation in blood concentrations of biomarkers related to vitamin status, one-carbon metabolism, and the kynurenine pathway. Whole blood (EDTA and heparin, n = 12) was stored w...

  17. Effect of C–O Bonding on the Stability and Energetics of High-Energy Nitrogen-Carbon Molecules N10C2 and N16C2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas L. Strout

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Molecules consisting of nitrogen have been the subject of much attention due to their potential as high-energy materials. Complex molecules consisting entirely of nitrogen can be subject to rapid decomposition, and therefore other atoms are incorporated into the structure to enhance stability. Previous studies have explored the incorporation of carbon atoms into otherwise all-nitrogen cages molecules. The current study involves two such cages, N10C2 and N16C2, whose structures are derived from N12 and N18, respectively. The N10C2 and N16C2 cages in this study are modified by bonding groups O3 and CO3 to determine the effect on the relative energies between the isomers and on the thermodynamic energy release properties. Energetic trends for N10C2 and N16C2 are calculated and discussed.

  18. The Evolution of Multicomponent Systems at High Pressures: VI. The Thermodynamic Stability of the Hydrogen-Carbon System: The Genesis of Hydrocarbons and the Origin of Petroleum

    CERN Document Server

    Kenney, J F; Bendeliani, N A; Alekseev, V A; Kutcherov, Vladimir G.; Bendeliani, Nikolai A.; Alekseev, Vladimir A.

    2002-01-01

    The spontaneous genesis of hydrocarbons which comprise natural petroleum have been analyzed by chemical thermodynamic stability theory. The constraints imposed upon chemical evolution by the second law of thermodynamics are briefly reviewed; and the effective prohibition of transformation, in the regime of temperatures and pressures characteristic of the near-surface crust of the Earth, of biological molecules into hydrocarbon molecules heavier than methane is recognized. A general, first-principles equation of state has been developed by extending scaled particle theory (SPT) and by using the technique of the factored partition function of the Simplified Perturbed Hard Chain Theory (SPHCT). The chemical potentials, and the respective thermodynamic Affinity, have been calculated for typical components of the hydrogen-carbon (H-C) system over a range pressures between 1-100 kbar, and at temperatures consistent with those of the depths of the Earth at such pressures. The theoretical analyses establish that the ...

  19. Carbothermal synthesis of ordered mesoporous carbon-supported nano zero-valent iron with enhanced stability and activity for hexavalent chromium reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Ying; Hu, Yuchen; Jiang, Baojiang; Zou, Jinlong; Tian, Guohui; Fu, Honggang

    2016-05-15

    Composites of nano zero-valent iron (nZVI) and ordered mesoporous carbon (OMC) are prepared by using simultaneous carbothermal reduction methods. The reactivity and stability of nZVI are expected to be enhanced by embedding it in the ordered pore channels. The structure characteristics of nZVI/OMC and the removal pathway for hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) by nZVI/OMC are investigated. Results show that nZVI/OMC with a surface area of 715.16m(2)g(-1) is obtained at 900°C. nZVI with particle sizes of 20-30nm is uniformly embedded in the OMC skeleton. The stability of nZVI is enhanced by surrounding it with a broad carbon layer and a little γ-Fe is derived from the passivation of α-Fe. Detection of ferric state (Fe 2p3/2, around 711.2eV) species confirms that part of the nZVI on the outer surface is inevitably oxidized by O2, even when unused. The removal efficiency of Cr(VI) (50mgL(-1)) by nZVI/OMC is near 99% within 10min through reduction (dominant mechanism) and adsorption. nZVI/OMC has the advantage in removal efficiency and reusability in comparison to nZVI/C, OMC and nZVI. This study suggests that nZVI/OMC has the potential for remediation of heavy metal pollution in water. PMID:25898797

  20. Amorphous-silicon@silicon oxide/chromium/carbon as an anode for lithium-ion batteries with excellent cyclic stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • A new amorphous-Si@SiOx/Cr/carbon anode composite for lithium-ion batteries is synthesized by a simple method. • At a current density of 100 mA g−1, this as-prepared composite exhibit a stable discharge capacity of about 810 mAh g−1 with good capacity retention up to 200 cycles. Even at a current density of 800 mA g−1, a stable discharge capacity of 570 mAh g−1 can be obtained. • This work creates a new method to improve the electrochemical performance of SiO-based electrode materials. - Abstract: A new amorphous-Si@SiOx/Cr/carbon (a-Si@SiOx/Cr/C) anode composite for lithium-ion batteries is synthesized, using SiO, chromium powder and graphite as starting materials. X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectra (XPS), scanning electron microscope (SEM) and high resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM) are employed to characterize the composition, morphology and microstructure of the composite. Coin-type cells are assembled to investigate the electrochemical behaviors of the as-prepared composites by constant current charge–discharge technique, cyclic voltammetry (CV) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The results show that chromium facilitates the crush of Si@SiOx and graphite during milling, and thus improves their mutual dispersion in the composite. When cycled at 100 mA g−1, the a-Si@SiOx/Cr/C exhibits a stable discharge capacity of about 810 mAh g−1 (calculated on the mass of a-Si@SiOx/Cr/C) with good capacity retention up to 200 cycles. The improved electrochemical performance is attributed to the reduced particle size of a-Si@SiOx and the synergistic effect of carbon and chromium

  1. Active packaged lamb with oxygen scavenger/carbon dioxide emitter sachet: physical-chemical and microbiological stability during refrigerated storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Antonio Trindade

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Lamb meat has been commercialized in Brazil almost exclusively as a frozen product due to the longer shelf life provided by freezing when compared to refrigeration. However, as a result of the current trend of increased demand for convenience products, a need has emerged for further studies to facilitate the marketing of refrigerated lamb cuts. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the contribution of active packaging technology in extending the shelf life of lamb loins (Longissimus lumborum stored under refrigeration (1±1 ° C when compared to the traditional vacuum packaging. For this purpose, two kinds of sachets were employed: oxygen scavenger sachet and oxygen scavenger/carbon dioxide emitter sachet. Experiments were conducted in three treatments: 1 Vacuum (Control, 2 Vacuum + oxygen scavenger sachet and 3 Vacuum + oxygen scavenger/carbon dioxide emitter sachet. Microbiological (counts of anaerobic psychrotrophs, coliform at 45 ° C, coagulase-positive staphylococci, Salmonella and lactic acid bacteria and physical-chemical (thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, objective color, pH value, water loss from cooking and shear force analyses were carried out weekly for a total storage period of 28 days. The experiment was performed three times for all treatments. Results showed that the lamb meat remained stable with respect to the majority of the evaluated physical and chemical indexes and remained within the standards established by Brazilian legislation for pathogenic microorganisms throughout the storage period in all three packaging systems. However, all treatments presented elevated counts of anaerobic psychrotrophic microorganisms and lactic acid bacteria, reaching values above 10(7 CFU/g at 28 days of storage. Thus, under the conditions tested, neither the oxygen scavenger sachet nor the dual function sachet (oxygen scavenger/carbon dioxide emitter were able to extend the shelf life of refrigerated lamb loin when added to this

  2. Super-strengthening and stabilizing with carbon nanotube harnessed high density nanotwins in metals by shock loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Dong; Saei, Mojib; Suslov, Sergey; Jin, Shengyu; Cheng, Gary J.

    2015-10-01

    CNTs reinforced metal composites has great potential due to their superior properties, such as light weight, high strength, low thermal expansion and high thermal conductivity. The current strengthening mechanisms of CNT/metal composite mainly rely on CNTs’ interaction with dislocations and CNT’s intrinsic high strength. Here we demonstrated that laser shock loading the CNT/metal composite results in high density nanotwins, stacking fault, dislocation around the CNT/metal interface. The composites exhibit enhanced strength with excellent stability. The results are interpreted by both molecular dynamics simulation and experiments. It is found the shock wave interaction with CNTs induces a stress field, much higher than the applied shock pressure, surrounding the CNT/metal interface. As a result, nanotwins were nucleated under a shock pressure much lower than the critical values to generate twins in metals. This hybrid unique nanostructure not only enhances the strength, but also stabilize the strength, as the nanotwin boundaries around the CNTs help pin the dislocation movement.

  3. Measuring the influence of Canadian carbon stabilization programs on natural gas exports to the United States via a 'bottom-up' intertemporal spatial price equilibrium model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, we present the results of a study of the impact of Canadian carbon stabilization programs on exports of natural gas to the United States. This work was based on a study conducted for the US Environmental Protection Agency. The Gas Systems Analysis model (GSAM), developed by ICF Consulting for the US Department of Energy, was used to gauge the overall impact of the stabilization programs on the North American natural gas market. GSAM is an intertemporal, spatial price equilibrium (SPE) type model of the North American natural gas system. Salient features of this model include characterization of over 17 000 gas production reservoirs with explicit reservoir-level geologic and economic information used to build up the supply side of the market. On the demand side, four sectors, residential, commercial, industrial and electric power generation, are characterized in the model. Lastly, both above and below ground storage facilities as well as a comprehensive pipeline network are used with the supply and demand side characterizations to arrive at estimates of market equilibrium prices and quantities and flows. 35 refs

  4. Quantum chemical studies on solvents for post-combustion carbon dioxide capture: calculation of pKa and carbamate stability of disubstituted piperazines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangarapu, Satesh; Wierda, Gerben J; Marcelis, Antonius T M; Zuilhof, Han

    2014-06-23

    Piperazine is a widely studied solvent for post-combustion carbon dioxide capture. To investigate the possibilities of further improving this process, the electronic and steric effects of -CH(3), -CH(2)F, -CH(2)OH, -CH(2)NH(2), -COCH3 , and -CN groups of 2,5-disubstituted piperazines on the pKa and carbamate stability towards hydrolysis are investigated by quantum chemical methods. For the calculations, B3LYP, M11L, and spin-component-scaled MP2 (SCS-MP2) methods are used and coupled with the SMD solvation model. The experimental pK(a) values of piperazine, 2-methylpiperazine, and 2,5-dimethylpiperazine agree well with the calculated values. The present study indicates that substitution of -CH(3), -CH(2) NH(2), and -CH(2) OH groups on the 2- and 5-positions of piperazine has a positive impact on the CO(2) absorption capacity by reducing the carbamate stability towards hydrolysis. Furthermore, their higher boiling points, relative to piperazine itself, will lead to a reduction of volatility-related losses. PMID:24782140

  5. Impact of short-lived non-CO2 mitigation on carbon budgets for stabilizing global warming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Limiting global warming to any level requires limiting the total amount of CO2 emissions, or staying within a CO2 budget. Here we assess how emissions from short-lived non-CO2 species like methane, hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs), black-carbon, and sulphates influence these CO2 budgets. Our default case, which assumes mitigation in all sectors and of all gases, results in a CO2 budget between 2011–2100 of 340 PgC for a >66% chance of staying below 2°C, consistent with the assessment of the Fifth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. Extreme variations of air-pollutant emissions from black-carbon and sulphates influence this budget by about ±5%. In the hypothetical case of no methane or HFCs mitigation—which is unlikely when CO2 is stringently reduced—the budgets would be much smaller (40% or up to 60%, respectively). However, assuming very stringent CH4 mitigation as a sensitivity case, CO2 budgets could be 25% higher. A limit on cumulative CO2 emissions remains critical for temperature targets. Even a 25% higher CO2 budget still means peaking global emissions in the next two decades, and achieving net zero CO2 emissions during the third quarter of the 21st century. The leverage we have to affect the CO2 budget by targeting non-CO2 diminishes strongly along with CO2 mitigation, because these are partly linked through economic and technological factors. (letter)

  6. Endohedral confinement of a DNA dodecamer onto pristine carbon nanotubes and the stability of the canonical B form

    CERN Document Server

    Cruz, Fernando J A L; Mota, José P B

    2016-01-01

    Although carbon nanotubes are potential candidates for DNA encapsulation and subsequent delivery of biological payloads to living cells, the thermodynamical spontaneity of DNA encapsulation under physiological conditions is still a matter of debate. Using enhanced sampling techniques, we show for the first time that, given a sufficiently large carbon nanotube, the confinement of a double-stranded DNA segment, 5'-D(*CP*GP*CP*GP*AP*AP*TP*TP*CP*GP*CP*G)-3', is thermodynamically favourable under physiological environments (134 mM, 310 K, 1 bar), leading to DNA-nanotube hybrids with lower free energy than the unconfined biomolecule. A diameter threshold of 3 nm is established below which encapsulation is inhibited. The confined DNA segment maintains its translational mobility and exhibits the main geometrical features of the canonical B form. To accommodate itself within the nanopore, the DNA end-to-end length increases from 3.85 nm up to approximately 4.1 nm, due to a 0.3 nm elastic expansion of the strand termin...

  7. Highly selective determination of cysteine using a composite prepared from multiwalled carbon nanotubes and gold nanoparticles stabilized with calcium crosslinked pectin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We describe a glassy carbon electrode (GCE) modified with gold nanoparticles that were stabilized with calcium-crosslinked pectin (CCLP) and electrodeposited on multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) by cyclic voltammetry. The resulting electrode was used for the selective determination of L-cysteine (L-Cys). Its characterization showed that the CCLP acts as a scaffold to form highly stable, uniform and electrochemically active AuNPs. Electrochemical studies showed the MWCNT to significantly promote the electrodeposition of the CCLP-AuNPs. The new GCE exhibited excellent electrocatalytic ability towards oxidation of L-Cys in showing a lower overpotential and giving a higher oxidation peak current. The diffusion coefficient for the oxidation of L-Cys was calculated to be 3.0 × 10−6 cm2 s−1. This amperometric sensor displays a wide linear range (from 0.1 to 1,000 μM), high sensitivity (0.46 μA μM−1 cm−2) and a detection limit as low as 19 nM (at a signal-to-noise ratio of 3). The sensor was applied to specifically detect L-Cys even in the presence of 500-fold excess of interferents. It also is stable and possesses good repeatability and reproducibity, and was successfully applied to the determination of L-Cys in spiked samples of human serum. (author)

  8. Thermal and structural stability of single- and multi-walled carbon nanotubes up to 1800 °C in Argon studied by Raman spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Highlights: ► Structural stability of carbon nanotubes up to 1800 °C in Argon (∼0.05 MPa). ► Thorough TEM and Raman spectroscopy of as received and heat treated CNTs. ► Analyses on the extent of structural changes during high temperature exposure. ► Discussion on safe upper temperature limit for practical use of SWCNTs and MWCNTs. -- Abstract: Effect of high temperature exposure (up to 1800 °C) on morphology of single- and multi-walled carbon nanotubes in Argon atmosphere has been studied using Raman spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Although, as received nanotubes contained irregular graphene layers and other structural defects, microscopic observations revealed that heat treatment in Argon reduced the defect density and helped proper alignment of graphene layers. Raman spectra of as received and heat treated nanotubes strongly reinforced the microscopic observations. While, D-band to G-band intensity ratio in Raman spectra of 1800 °C heat treated multiwalled nanotubes reduced by ∼43% over as received one, this ratio for heat treated singlewalled nanotubes was ∼27% lower than that of the untreated specimen. Present study suggested that although, multiwalled nanotubes were structurally stable up to 1800 °C in an inert atmosphere having only a few nano-scale defects, singlewalled nanotubes suffered considerable damage at 1800 °C due to much thinner dimension than the former.

  9. High kinetic stability of Zn(II) coordinated by the tris(histidine) unit of carbonic anhydrase towards solvolytic dissociation studied by affinity capillary electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Yosuke; Hoshino, Hitoshi; Iki, Nobuhiko

    2016-08-01

    Solvolytic dissociation rate constants (kd) of bovine carbonic anhydrase II (CA) and its metallovariants (M-CAs, M=Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), Zn(II), and Cd(II)) were estimated by a ligand substitution reaction, which was monitored by affinity capillary electrophoresis to selectively detect the undissociated CAs in the reaction mixture. Using EDTA as the competing ligand for Zn-CA, the dissociation followed the unimolecular nucleophilic substitution (SN1) mechanism with kd=1.0×10(-7)s(-1) (pH7.4, 25°C). The corresponding solvolysis half-life (t1/2) was 80days, showing the exceptionally high kinetic stability of t Zn-CA, in contrast to the highly labile [Zn(II)(H2O)6](2+), where the water exchange rate (kex) is high. This behavior is attributed to the tetrahedral coordination geometry supported by the tris(histidine) unit (His3) of CA. In the case of Co-CA, it showed a somewhat larger kd value (5.7×10(-7)s(-1), pH7.4, 25°C) even though it shares the same tetrahedral coordination environment with Zn-CA, suggesting that the d(7) electronic configuration of Co(II) in the transition state of the dissociation is stabilized by the ligand field. Among M-CAs, only Ni-CA showed a bimolecular nucleophilic substitution (SN2) reaction path in its reaction with EDTA, implying that the large coordination number (6) of Ni(II) in Ni-CA allows EDTA to form an EDTA-Ni-CA intermediate. Overall, kd values roughly correlated with kex values among M-CAs, with the kd value of Zn-CA deviating strongly from the trend and highlighting the exceptionally high kinetic stabilization of Zn-CA by the His3 unit. PMID:27235274

  10. Cyclic hydrogenation stability of γ-hydrides for Ti{sub 25}V{sub 35}Cr{sub 40} alloys doped with carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Chia-Chieh, E-mail: ccshen@saturn.yzu.edu.tw [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Yuan Ze University, Chungli 32003, Taiwan (China); Graduate School of Renewable Energy and Engineering, Yuan Ze University, Chungli 32003, Taiwan (China); Fuel Cell Center, Yuan Ze University, Chungli 32003, Taiwan (China); Li, Hsueh-Chih [Graduate School of Renewable Energy and Engineering, Yuan Ze University, Chungli 32003, Taiwan (China)

    2015-11-05

    An automatic Sievert's apparatus equipped with a temperature-programmed desorption spectrometer was constructed to study the stability of annealed Ti{sub 25}V{sub 35}Cr{sub 40}C{sub x} (x = 0 and 0.1) alloy under cyclic hydrogenation at 6 N H{sub 2}. The specimens were tested at 30 °C with a hydrogen loading of around 1.00 H/M, which enabled the phase transformation from β-to γ-hydrides. After 500 cycles, 83% and 90% of the initial hydrogen capacities were preserved for Ti{sub 25}V{sub 35}Cr{sub 40} and Ti{sub 25}V{sub 35}Cr{sub 40}C{sub 0.1}, respectively. Therefore, a small amount of C doping was effective in reducing the hydrogenation degradation of Ti{sub 25}V{sub 35}Cr{sub 40}. The hydrogenation degradation of Ti{sub 25}V{sub 35}Cr{sub 40} was examined by measuring the P–C isotherms, temperature-programmed desorption spectra, and X-ray diffraction patterns. The degradation was ascribed to intrinsic disproportionation, i.e., Ti{sub 0.25}V{sub 0.35}Cr{sub 0.40} + 0.88H{sub 2} → yTiH{sub 2} + Ti{sub 0.25−y}V{sub 0.35}Cr{sub 0.40}H{sub 1.76–2y}, where the coefficient y indicates the amount of Ti-rich precipitate. The better cyclic hydrogenation stability of Ti{sub 25}V{sub 35}Cr{sub 40}C{sub 0.1} was related to the suppression of intrinsic disproportionation by the presence of carbon atoms in the body-centered-cubic lattice. - Highlights: • The stability of γ-hydride for Ti{sub 25}V{sub 35}Cr{sub 40} alloys was examined for 500 cycles. • The γ-hydride of Ti{sub 25}V{sub 35}Cr{sub 40} alloy degraded by intrinsic disproportionation. • The disproportionation of γ-hydride can be suppressed through carbon inclusion.

  11. Dissolved Organic Matter as a Mechanism for Carbon Stabilization at Depth in Wet Tropical Forest Volcanic Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marin-Spiotta, E.; Kramer, M. G.; Chadwick, O. A.

    2007-12-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) plays an important role in many biological and chemical processes in soils. Our understanding of the types of plant and microbially-derived organic matter that accumulate in soils and the mechanisms responsible for their transformation and stabilization is still limited. In particular, we know very little about how microbial activity and water movement contribute to the production of DOM and the formation of stable C in soils. In well-drained soils under wet climates, DOM is potentially a primary pathway for the transport of C from the surface litter layers and the zones of highest microbial activity to deeper horizons in the soil profile where the potential for long-term storage increases. The mechanisms for long-term stabilization of organic C in deep mineral horizons include an accumulation of chemically recalcitrant C, strong sorption of soluble and otherwise labile C to mineral and/or metals making them inaccessible to decomposers, and microenvironmental conditions (low pH, low O2) which result in incomplete decomposition and persistence of labile C. Although most work to date has focused on the role of dissolved organic C and N (DOC and DON) in the C and N cycles of temperate forests, DOM fluxes may be even more important in forests in the wet tropics, where high rainfall and high primary productivity could lead to greater DOM production. In order to address the role of DOC in the transport and stabilization of C in mineral horizons, we are studying DOC production, transformation, and loss pathways in volcanic soils dominated by highly reactive, non-crystalline minerals (allophane). We are quantifying flux and solute concentrations (C, N, cations, anions) in rainwater, throughfall, and in soil water. We have installed tension and zero tension lysimeters throughout sequentially deeper organic and mineral horizons in an intermediate aged soil (ca. 350k years) under wet (ca. 3000 mm mean annual rainfall) native tropical forest

  12. Carbonate stability in the earth's mantle - A vibrational spectroscopic study of aragonite and dolomite at high pressures and temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraft, Susan; Knittle, Elise; Williams, Quentin

    1991-01-01

    The structural changes of aragonite and dolomite taking place at high pressures and temperatures were investigated by measuring the Raman spectra of these materials to pressures of 23 and 28 GPa (generated in a diamond anvil cell), respectively; in addition, the IR spectra of aragonite were measured to 40 GPa. The spectroscopic data demonstrated that, at 300 K, dolomite and aragonite samples were stable to pressures of 28 and 41 GPa, respectively. No phase transitions were observed following heating of aragonite and dolomite to temperatures of 2000 K and 800 K, respectively. The mode Grueneisen parameters indicate that the carbonate group in these two minerals is relatively insensitive to pressure, with the dominant compaction mechanism being the compression of the Ca and Mg polyhedra.

  13. Stability constants important to the understanding of plutonium in environmental waters, hydroxy and carbonate complexation of PuO2+

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The formation constants for the reactions PuO2+ + H2O = PuO2(OH) + H+ and PuO2+ + CO32 = PuO2(CO3)- were determined in aqueous sodium perchlorate solutions by laser-induced photoacoustic spectroscopy. The molar absorptivity of the PuO2+ band at 569 nm decreased with increasing hydroxide concentration. Similarly, spectral changes occurred between 540 and 580 nm as the carbonate concentration was increased. The absorption data were analyzed by the non-linear least-squares program SQUAD to yield complexation constants. Using the specific ion interaction theory, both complexation constants were extrapolated to zero ionic strength. These thermodynamic complexation constants were combined with the oxidation-reduction potentials of Pu to obtain Eh versus pH diagrams. 120 refs., 35 figs., 12 tabs

  14. Differential response of carbon fluxes to climate in three peatland ecosystems that vary in the presence and stability of permafrost

    Science.gov (United States)

    Euskirchen, Eugenie S; Edgar, C.W.; Turetsky, M.R.; Waldrop, Mark P.; Harden, Jennifer W.

    2016-01-01

    Changes in vegetation and soil properties following permafrost degradation and thermokarst development in peatlands may cause changes in net carbon storage. To better understand these dynamics, we established three sites in Alaska that vary in permafrost regime, including a black spruce peat plateau forest with stable permafrost, an internal collapse scar bog formed as a result of thermokarst, and a rich fen without permafrost. Measurements include year-round eddy covariance estimates of carbon dioxide (CO2), water, and energy fluxes, associated environmental variables, and methane (CH4) fluxes at the collapse scar bog. The ecosystems all acted as net sinks of CO2 in 2011 and 2012, when air temperature and precipitation remained near long-term means. In 2013, under a late snowmelt and late leaf out followed by a hot, dry summer, the permafrost forest and collapse scar bog were sources of CO2. In this same year, CO2 uptake in the fen increased, largely because summer inundation from groundwater inputs suppressed ecosystem respiration. CO2 exchange in the permafrost forest and collapse scar bog was sensitive to warm air temperatures, with 0.5 g C m−2 lost each day when maximum air temperature was very warm (≥29°C). The bog lost 4981 ± 300 mg CH4 m−2 between April and September 2013, indicating that this ecosystem acted as a significant source of both CO2 and CH4 to the atmosphere in 2013. These results suggest that boreal peatland responses to warming and drying, both of which are expected to occur in a changing climate, will depend on permafrost regime.

  15. Soil organic matter dynamics and mechanisms of carbon stabilization in soils with conversion from secondary forest to grassland in central Philippines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarrete, Ian; Lina, Suzette; Corre, Marife; Veldkamp, Edzo; Asio, Victor

    2013-04-01

    Large portions of the deforested areas in Southeast Asia in general and in the Philippines in particular have been replaced by grassland, but the dynamics between the soil organic carbon (OC) inputs after forest conversion into grassland and the original OC are poorly understood. Also, quantitative data on the C stabilization is important to understand, assess and predict the long term effect of land-use change, but soil C stabilization mechanisms are not fully considered important when studying land-use change. We measured the soil OC content to depths of 100 cm in paired forest and grassland plots across soil types (i.e., Ferralsols, Andosols, Alisols) in Leyte, Philippines. The natural 13C abundance of the soil organic matter was also analyzed to distinguish between forest- and grassland-derived OC in the grassland soils. Oxalate- and pyrophosphate extractable iron and aluminum oxide concentrations were also analyzed and the relationships between soil mineral phase variables and the forest- and grassland-derived OC were examined. Forest-derived OC in the grassland soil accounted for 89-99% of the total OC in Ferralsols, 63-79% of the OC total in Andosols and 56-73% of the total OC in Alfisols. The loss of forest-derived soil OC and the accumulation of newly derived OC were higher in Alfisols that was under grassland for long period compared to the other soils. The decrease in the original OC was higher in the surface soil compared to the lower depths regardless of soil types. Oxalate and pyrophosphate extractable iron and aluminum were found to be the best predictors of OC concentrations in the bulk soil, SOC-derived from forest and SOC-derived from grassland in Andosols, whereas a positive relationship between pyrophosphate-extractable iron and aluminum and soil OC was observed in Ferralsols and Alisols. This result suggests that the accumulation of newly derived OC and the subsequent loss of the original OC were driven by the changes in the mineral-stabilized

  16. Investigations of primary and secondary amine carbamate stability by 1H NMR spectroscopy for post combustion capture of carbon dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Carbamate stability constants of series of amines have been measured at (288 to 318) K. ► Standard molar enthalpies and entropies have been determined by van’t Hoff analyses. ► A ΔHmo-ΔSmo plot for carbamate formation gives a linear relationship. ► This relationship provides a guide for the selection of amines for PCC applications. ► Stereochemical effects and intramolecular H-bonding affect carbamate formation. - Abstract: Carbamate formation is one of the major chemical reactions that can occur in solution in the capture of CO2 by amine-based solvents, and carbamate formation makes a significant enthalpy contribution to the absorption-desorption of CO2 that occurs in the absorber/stripper columns of the PCC process. Consequently, the formation of carbamates of selected series of primary and secondary amines over the temperature range (288 to 318) K has been investigated by equilibrium 1H NMR studies, and the stability constants (K9) for the equilibrium: RNH2+HCO3-⇄K9RNHCOO-+H2O are reported. van’t Hoff analyses have resulted in standard molar enthalpies, ΔHmo, and entropies, ΔSmo, of carbamate formation. A ΔHmo-ΔSmo plot generates a linear correlation for carbamate formation (providing a mean standard molar free energy, ΔGmo, for carbamate formation of about −7 kJ · mol−1), and this relationship helps provide a guide to the selection of an amine(s) solvent for CO2 capture, in terms of enthalpy considerations. A linear ΔHmo-ΔSmo plot also occurs for carbamate protonation. The formation of the carbamates has been correlated with systematic changes in composition and structure, and steric effects have been identified by comparing molecular geometries obtained using density functional B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) calculations. Trends in steric effects have been identified in the series of compounds monoethanolamine (MEA), 1-amino-2-propanol, 2-amino-1-propanol (AP) and 2-amino-2-methyl-1-propanol (AMP). In the case of 2

  17. Cosmic strings in an expanding spacetime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigate the stability of a static, infinitely long and straight vacuum string solution under inhomogeneous axisymmetric time-dependent perturbations. We find it to be perturbatively stable. We further extend our work by finding a string solutions in an expanding Universe. The back reaction of the string on the gravitational field has been ignored. The background is assumed to be a Friedman-Robertson-Walker (FRW) cosmology. By numerically integrating the field equations in a radiation and matter dominated models, we discover oscillatory solutions. The possible damping of these oscillations is discussed. For late times the solution becomes identical to the static one studied in the first part of the paper. 19 refs., 8 figs

  18. Spatial Prediction of Soil Aggregate Stability and Aggregate-Associated Organic Carbon Content at the Catchment Scale Using Geostatistical Techniques

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    J.MOHAMMADI; M.H.MOTAGHIAN

    2011-01-01

    The association of organic carbon with secondary parzicles (aggregates) results in its storage and retention in soil. A study was carried out at a catchment covering about 92 km2 to predict spatial variability of soil water-stable aggregates (WSA), mean weight diameter (MWD) of aggregates and organic carbon (OC) content in macro- (> 2 mm), meso- (1-2 mm), and micro-aggregate (< 1 mm) fractions, using geostatistical methods. One hundred and eleven soil samples were c(o)llected at the 0-10 cm depth and fractionated into macro-, meso-, and micro-aggregates by wet sieving. The OC content was determined for each fraction. A greater percentage of water-stable aggregates was found for micro-aggregates, followed by meso-aggregates. Aggregate OC content was greatest in meso-aggregates (9 g kg-1), followed by micro-aggregates (7 g kg-1), while the least OC content was found in macro-aggregates (3 g kg-1). Although a significart effect (P = 0.000) of aggregate size on aggregate OC content was found, however, our findings did not support the model of aggregate hierarchy.Land use had a significant effect (P = 0.073) on aggregate OC content. The coefficients of variation (CVs) for OC contents associated with each aggregate fraction indicated macro-aggregates as the most variable (CV = 71%). Among the aggregate fractions, the micro-aggregate fraction had a lower CV value of 27%. The mean content of WSA ranged from 15% for macro-aggregates to 84% for micro-aggregates. Geostatistical analysis showed that the measured soil variables exhibited differences in their spatial patterns in both magnitude and space at each aggregate size fraction. The relative nugget variance for most aggregate-associated properties was lower than 45%. The range value for the variogram of water-stable aggregates was almost similar (about 3 km) for the three studied aggregate size classes. The range value for the variogram of aggregate-associated OC contents ranged from about 3 km for macro

  19. Heptaphyrins: Expanded porphyrins with seven heterocyclic rings

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Venkataramanarao G Anand; Simi K Pushpan; Sundararaman Venkatraman; Tavarekere K Chandrashekar

    2003-10-01

    Expanded porphyrins containing seven pyrrole/heterocyclic rings linked in a cyclic fashion are termed heptaphyrins. The number of -electrons in heptaphyrins depends on the number of meso carbon bridges used to link the heterocyclic rings, accordingly heptaphyrins with 28-electrons and 30 -electrons are reported to date. Both condensation reactions of the appropriate precursors and acid-catalysed oxidative coupling reactions have been utilized to synthesise the heptaphyrins. The 30 heptaphyrins exhibit rich structural diversity where some of the heterocyclic rings in the macrocycle undergo a 180° ring flipping. An overview of the synthetic methods employed for the synthesis of heptaphyrins, their spectroscopic properties, structural behaviour and aromatic properties are highlighted in this paper.

  20. ERBU, Expanding Rubber Band Universe

    CERN Document Server

    Soares, Domingos

    2015-01-01

    I put forward a simple unidimensional mechanical analogue of the three-dimensional universe models of modern relativistic cosmology. The main goal of the proposal is the appropriate appreciation of the intrinsic relationship between Hubble's law and the homogeneity of expanding relativistic models.

  1. Expanding the eukaryotic genetic code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chin, Jason W; Cropp, T. Ashton; Anderson, J. Christopher; Schultz, Peter G

    2015-02-03

    This invention provides compositions and methods for producing translational components that expand the number of genetically encoded amino acids in eukaryotic cells. The components include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases and unnatural amino acids. Proteins and methods of producing proteins with unnatural amino acids in eukaryotic cells are also provided.

  2. Expanding the eukaryotic genetic code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Jason W.; Cropp, T. Ashton; Anderson, J. Christopher; Schultz, Peter G.

    2013-01-22

    This invention provides compositions and methods for producing translational components that expand the number of genetically encoded amino acids in eukaryotic cells. The components include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases and unnatural amino acids. Proteins and methods of producing proteins with unnatural amino acids in eukaryotic cells are also provided.

  3. Carbon and hydrogen isotopic reversals in deep basin gas: Evidence for limits to the stability of hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burruss, R.C.; Laughrey, C.D.

    2010-01-01

    During studies of unconventional natural gas reservoirs of Silurian and Ordovician age in the northern Appalachian basin we observed complete reversal of the normal trend of carbon isotopic composition, such that ??13C methane (C1) >??13C ethane (C2) >??13C propane (C3). In addition, we have observed isotopic reversals in the ??2H in the deepest samples. Isotopic reversals cannot be explained by current models of hydrocarbon gas generation. Previous observations of partial isotopic reversals have been explained by mixing between gases from different sources and thermal maturities. We have constructed a model which, in addition to mixing, requires Rayleigh fractionation of C2 and C3 to cause enrichment in 13C and create reversals. In the deepest samples, the normal trend of increasing enrichment of 13C and 2H in methane with increasing depth reverses and 2H becomes depleted as 13C becomes enriched. We propose that the reactions that drive Rayleigh fractionation of C2 and C3 involve redox reactions with transition metals and water at late stages of catagenesis at temperatures on the order of 250-300??C. Published ab initio calculated fractionation factors for C-C bond breaking in ethane at these temperatures are consistent with our observations. The reversed trend in ??2H in methane appears to be caused by isotopic exchange with formation water at the same temperatures. Our interpretation that Rayleigh fractionation during redox reactions is causing isotopic reversals has important implications for natural gas resources in deeply buried sedimentary basins. ?? 2010.

  4. Changes in soil organic carbon and aggregate stability after conversion to conservation tillage for seven years in the Huang-Huai-Hai Plain of China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHU Xin; ZHU An-ning; ZHANG Jia-bao; YANG Wen-liang; XIN Xiu-li; ZHANG Xian-feng

    2015-01-01

    Soil aggregate stability and organic carbon (OC) are regarded as effective indicators of soil structure and quality. A long-term ifeld experiment was established in 2006 to examine the inlfuence of til age systems on soil aggregation and OC in a sandy loam soil in the Huang-Huai-Hai Plain of China. The study involved eight treatments:plowing every year with (TS) and without residue (T), plowing every 2 years with (2TS) and without residue (2T), plowing every 4 years with (4TS) and without residue (4T), and no plowing with (NTS) and without residue (NT). In 2013, soil samples were col ected at depths of 0–5, 5–10 and 10–20 cm, and separated into three aggregate-size classes:macroaggregates (>250μm), microaggregates (53–250μm) and the silt+clay fraction (microaggregates>silt+clay fraction. In the 0–5 cm soil layer, concentrations of macroaggregate-associated OC in 2TS, 4TS and NTS were 14, 56 and 83%higher than for T, whereas T had the greatest concentration of OC associated with the silt+clay fraction in the 10–20 cm layer. Soil OC concentrations under 4TS and NTS were signiifcantly higher (P<0.05) than that of T in the 0–10 cm layer. Residue retention promoted formation of macroaggregates, increased macroaggregate-associated OC concentrations and thus increased total soil OC stock. The macroaggregate-associated OC was positively correlated (R2=0.96) with soil OC concentration, while the silt+clay fraction-associated OC was negatively correlated (R2=0.82) with soil OC concentration. The concentration of soil OC was positively correlated with MWD (R2=0.94) and GMD (R2=0.92). We concluded that increasing til age intensity led to a loss of carbon (C)-rich macroaggregates and an increase of C-depleted silt+clay fraction. The conservation til age system, especial y NTS and 4TS, increased soil aggregate stability and promoted OC accumulation in macroaggregates, provided the potential to improve soil C sequestration and soil structure in the Huang

  5. Stearic-acid/carbon-nanotube composites with tailored shape-stabilized phase transitions and light–heat conversion for thermal energy storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • A facile preparation of shape-stabilized composite PCMs for thermal energy storage. • The composite PCMs present tunable phase change temperatures and enthalpy. • Sunlight-driven phase change for photothermal conversion and storage. - Abstract: The development of functional materials with both light–heat conversion and thermal energy storage properties is of crucial importance for efficient utilization of sunlight to meet the growing demand for sustainable energy. In this work, the shape-stabilized phase change composites were designed and prepared by integration of stearic acid (SA) and acid-treated carbon nanotubes (a-CNTs). The a-CNTs not only acted as a flexible matrix but also endowed the composites high light–heat conversion ability. The reversible phase transitions shifted from high temperatures (Tm = 74 °C, Tf = 57 °C) of pure SA to near room temperature (Tm = ∼30 °C, Tf = ∼22 °C) of SA/a-CNTs composites, probably resulting from the strong interface confinement effect. The phase change enthalpy of the SA/a-CNTs composite could also be tailored by changing the mass ratio of SA and a-CNTs. The composites containing SA of 54.2 wt.%, 67.8 wt.% and 79.5 wt.% presented the melting enthalpy of 76.3 J/g, 98.8 J/g and 111.8 J/g, respectively. Moreover, the phase transition of SA/a-CNTs composite could be driven by sunlight for the energy storage/release. Therefore, this research provides a new platform for improving solar utilization, and understanding the phase transition behaviors of organic PCMs in dimensionally confined environments as well

  6. Ocean sequestration of carbon dioxide: modeling the deep ocean release of a dense emulsion of liquid Co2-in-water stabilized by pulverized limestone particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golomb, D; Pennell, S; Ryan, D; Barry, E; Swett, P

    2007-07-01

    The release into the deep ocean of an emulsion of liquid carbon dioxide-in-seawater stabilized by fine particles of pulverized limestone (CaCO3) is modeled. The emulsion is denser than seawater, hence, it will sink deeper from the injection point, increasing the sequestration period. Also, the presence of CaCO3 will partially buffer the carbonic acid that results when the emulsion eventually disintegrates. The distance that the plume sinks depends on the density stratification of the ocean, the amount of the released emulsion, and the entrainment factor. When released into the open ocean, a plume containing the CO2 output of a 1000 MW(el) coal-fired power plant will typically sink hundreds of meters below the injection point. When released from a pipe into a valley on the continental shelf, the plume will sink about twice as far because of the limited entrainment of ambient seawater when the plume flows along the valley. A practical system is described involving a static mixer for the in situ creation of the CO2/seawater/pulverized limestone emulsion. The creation of the emulsion requires significant amounts of pulverized limestone, on the order of 0.5 tons per ton of liquid CO2. That increases the cost of ocean sequestration by about $13/ ton of CO2 sequestered. However, the additional cost may be compensated by the savings in transportation costs to greater depth, and because the release of an emulsion will not acidify the seawater around the release point. PMID:17695916

  7. Land use Effects on Storage, Stability and Structure of Organic Carbon in Soil Density Fractions Revealed by 13C Natural Abundance and CPMAS 13C NMR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flessa, H.; Helfrich, M.; John, B.; Yamashita, T.; Ludwig, B.

    2004-12-01

    The type of land use and soil cultivation are important factors controlling organic carbon storage (SOC) in soils and they can also influence the relative importance, the structure, and the stability of different SOC pools. The objectives of our study were: i) to quantify the SOC stocks in different density fractions (mineral-associated soil organic matter > 2 g cm-3 (Mineral-SOM), free particulate organic matter soils under different land use (spruce forest, grassland, maize, wheat), ii) to determine the structure of these SOC fractions by CPMAS 13C NMR spectroscopy, and iii) to analyse the stability of these SOC fractions in the maize soil on the basis of the stable isotope composition of SOC. The SOC concentration in the A horizon increased in the order wheat (12.7 g kg-1) soil, the particulate organic matter accounted for 52% of the total SOC content. The chemical structure of the soil organic matter (SOM) was influenced by litter quality, the intensity of litter decomposition and the related production and storage of microbially-derived substances. SOM of the acid forest soil was characterized by large amounts of POM with a high content of spruce litter-derived alkyl C. In the biologically more active grassland and maize soil, litter-derived POM was decomposed more rapidly and SOC stocks were dominated by mineral-associated SOM which contained greater proportions of aryl and carbonyl C. The cultivation of the grassland soil induced enhanced mineralization of POM and in particular of mineral-associated SOM. The faster SOC turnover was associated with a relative accumulation of aromatic and carbonyl C structures in the mineral-bound SOM. In all soils, the free particulate organic matter had a smaller proportion of alkyl C and a larger proportion of O-alkyl C than the particulate organic matter occluded in aggregates. The mean age of the SOM in the density fractions of the maize soil increased with increasing aromaticity in the order free POM (22 yr) humification

  8. Potential and barriers for biogas production in Denmark at widely expanded organic farming with focus on the soil carbon content; Potentiale og barrierer for biogasproduktion i Danmark ved omfattende oekologisk jordbrug med fokus paa dyrkningsjordens kulstofforhold

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buch Salomonsen, K.

    2000-06-01

    The Ph.D. thesis describes the influence from continued expansion of organic farming systems to the potential for energy production from biogas in Denmark. The project analyses the consequence from three categories of barriers: 1) Practical barriers, 2) The attitude of organic farmers, and 3) Agricultural biological problems. Economic and political barriers are not examined. When the barriers can be quantified, they are included in the calculation of the maximum biogas potential. When not, the implications of barriers are expressed qualitatively. It has been a particular goal to provide new information on whether agricultural biological problems are a barrier to biogas production in organic farming systems. One important question in this connection is whether biogas production has a negative influence on the soil carbon content compared to composting. This question is investigated by an experiment. The project is based on technical and natural science disciplines, with an interdisciplinary basis ranging over energy planning, agricultural science, microbiology, and crop, and animal operation. (au)

  9. Expanding the Game Design Space

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Lasse Juel; Majgaard, Gunver

    2016-01-01

    This article considers game design research in educational settings. Its focus is on how undergraduate students – particularly engineering students – learn computer game design. From observations conducted during our game design courses we have developed a model of expanded game design space....... It encapsulates the entire development process from the first ideas to the final game with emphasis on game design thinking. Our model of expanded game design space consists of four separate – yet interconnected – layers in the process of game development. The first layer addresses the importance of framing......, providing a clear game design assignment that involves the formulation of intended player experience and a description of game mechanics. The second layer focuses on game design thinking from six different aspects of game design chosen in relation to the framing of the game design assignment. The third...

  10. Expanding the Game Design Space

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Lasse Juel; Majgaard, Gunver

    2016-01-01

    This article considers game design research in educational settings. Its focus is on how undergraduate students – particularly engineering students – learn computer game design. From observations conducted during our game design courses we have developed a model of expanded game design space. It...... encapsulates the entire development process from the first ideas to the final game with emphasis on game design thinking. Our model of expanded game design space consists of four separate – yet interconnected – layers in the process of game development. The first layer addresses the importance of framing...... layer establishes correspondence between formal elements of computer games and the structure of problem-based creativity. It addresses how game design challenges should be formulated and how creative solutions can be measured. The fourth and final layer demonstrates how clear framing can act as a...

  11. Durability of expanded polystyrene mortars

    OpenAIRE

    Ferrándiz Mas, Verónica; García Alcocel, Eva María

    2013-01-01

    The influence of the addition of various types and various concentrations of expanded polystyrene foam (both commercial and recycled) on the durability of Portland cement mortars is studied. In particular, the microstructure is studied utilizing the following methods: capillary absorption of water, mercury intrusion porosimetry, impedance spectroscopy and open porosity. In addition, the effects of heat cycles and freeze–thaw cycles on compressive strength are examined. Scanning electron micro...

  12. Relativistically expanding cylindrical electromagnetic fields

    OpenAIRE

    Gourgouliatos, K. N.

    2009-01-01

    We study relativistically expanding electromagnetic fields of cylindrical geometry. The fields emerge from the side surface of a cylinder and are invariant under translations parallel to the axis of the cylinder. The expansion velocity is in the radial direction and is parametrized by $v=R/(ct)$. We consider force-free magnetic fields by setting the total force the electromagnetic field exerts on the charges and the currents equal to zero. Analytical and semi-analytical separable solutions ar...

  13. Influence of humic acid applications on modulus of rupture, aggregate stability, electrical conductivity, carbon and nitrogen content of a crusting problem soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gümüş, İ.; Şeker, C.

    2015-11-01

    Soil structure is often said to be the key to soil productivity since a fertile soil, with desirable soil structure and adequate moisture supply, constitutes a productive soil. Soil structure influences soil water movement and retention, erosion, crusting, nutrient recycling, root penetration and crop yield. The objective of this work is to study humic acid (HA) application on some physical and chemical properties in weakly structured soils. The approach involved establishing a plot experiment in laboratory conditions. Different rates of HA (control, 0.5, 1, 2 and 4 %) were applied to soil during three incubation periods (21, 42 and 62 days). At the end of the each incubation period, the changes in physicochemical properties were measured. Generally, HA addition increased electrical conductivity values during all incubation periods. HA applications decreased soil modulus of rupture. Application of HA at the rate of 4 % significantly increased soil organic carbon contents. HA applications at the rate of 4 % significantly increased both mean soil total nitrogen content and aggregate stability after three incubation periods (p < 0.05). Therefore, HA has the potential to improve the structure of soil in the short term.

  14. The improvement by a CVD silica coating of the oxidation behaviour of a 20%Cr/25%Ni niobium stabilized stainless steel in carbon dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The improvement of the oxidation behaviour of the 20%Cr-25%Ni-Nb stabilized (20/25/Nb) austenitic stainless steel, in carbon dioxide, by a silica coating, formed by a vapour reaction upon the pre-oxidized steel surface, has been examined at 8250C. The exposure periods extended to 5975 h duration. The silica coating effectiveness increased with its thickness over the range examined, 0.5 to 27 μm. Coatings > approximately 2 μm thick reduced the extent of oxidation by at least a factor of five by providing a barrier to the diffusion of cations outwards and oxidant inwards responsible for oxide growth on the 20/25/Nb steel. In addition, they completely inhibited oxide spallation because oxidation of the steel constituents occurred primarily within the silica coating whose adherence was maintained throughout the exposure. During the prolonged heat treatment of > approximately 2 μm thick silica coated steel, the iron and nickel constituents in the precoating oxide film were reduced by solid-solid reaction with manganese and probably also chromium from the underlying steel. (author)

  15. Structural Coloration Pigments based on Carbon Modified ZnS@SiO2 Nanospheres with Low-Angle Dependence, High Color Saturation, and Enhanced Stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fen; Zhang, Xin; Lin, Ying; Wang, Lei; Zhu, Jianfeng

    2016-02-24

    Vividly structurally colored pigments produced by employing materials with high indices of refraction such as ZnS, TiO2, or ZrO2 have attracted great attention recently. Generally, pigments with high refractive index based on three-dimensional ordered macroporous (3DOM) structures were prepared by a colloidal crystal template method. However, the preparation of 3DOM structures is time-consuming. Moreover, it will also lead to iridescent colors. In this work, structurally colored pigments based on carbon-modified core-shell nanospheres of ZnS@SiO2 were prepared by a homogeneous deposition method, followed by a modified Stöber method and a calcination process. Compared with conventional method, the pigments prepared in our work shows high color saturation, enhanced stability and low angle dependent. Typical paints composed of pigments and ethanol could be spray coated on any substrates without limitation. These core-shell structural coloration pigments have potential applications for displays, colorimetric sensors, and pigments. PMID:26824514

  16. Preparation of Composite of CeO2/TiO2 Supported by Expanded Graphite-Activated Carbon and Its Treatment Ability to Phenol%膨胀石墨-活性炭负载CeO2/TiO2复合材料的制备及其处理苯酚的性能

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    苗峙; 陈志刚; 刘成宝; 陈丰; 付猛; 陈红

    2011-01-01

    采用沉淀工艺制了CT(CeO2/TiO2)催化剂粉,以膨胀石墨基炭/炭复合材料(EGC)为基体,将CT粉以碳膜包覆的形式引入EGC表面,制得了EGC负载CT催化剂粉的CT/EGC复合材料,研究了其对苯酚的处理性能。结果表明:铈钛物质的量比为0.002的CT催化剂粉处理苯酚的效果最好CT/EGC处理苯酚溶液时,CT粉的光催化能力与EGC的吸附作用存在协同效应,提高了营会材料对蓉酚的灰卜殚静粟.%CT catalyst powders (CeO2/TiO2) had been prepared with precipitation process. Taking expanded graphite based carbon/carbon composite (EGC) as matrix, CT powders were introduced on the EGC surface in the form of carbon-coated, and then CT/EGC composites of CT catalyst powders supported by EGC were obtained, and the property for treating phenol of the composite was studied. The results show that the treatment effect was best when the ratio of amount-of-substrance between Ce and Ti in CT catalyst powders was 0. 002. Synergetic effect between CT photo catalytic performance and EGC adsorption was found when CT/EGC was used to treat the phenol solution, which enhanced the treatment effect of the composite towards phenol.

  17. Entanglement in an expanding spacetime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We show that a dynamical spacetime generates entanglement between modes of a quantum field. Conversely, the entanglement encodes information concerning the underlying spacetime structure, which hints at the prospect of applications of this observation to cosmology. Here we illustrate this point by way of an analytically exactly soluble example, that of a scalar quantum field on a two-dimensional asymptotically flat Robertson-Walker expanding spacetime. We explicitly calculate the entanglement in the far future, for a quantum field residing in the vacuum state in the distant past. In this toy universe, it is possible to fully reconstruct the parameters of the cosmic history from the entanglement entropy

  18. Expandable intramedullary nail - experimental biomechanical evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Kajzer

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The paper presents results of experimental analysis of femur and femur – expandable intramedullary nail system. The aim of the work was to determine displacement in three models. In addition, the torsion of the system aiming at determining the moments depending on the torsional angle of the bone was carried out.Design/methodology/approach: Three femurs were selected for studies. The analysis was carried out on the femur – expandable intramedullary nail system. The influence of the loads and displacements on the bone – nail system on the results of experimental analysis was analysed. In order to carry out calculations, three models were selected: model I – bone without fracture gap, model II and III – femur with expansion intramedullary nails – fracture gap was located 100 mm under greater trochanter. The studies were performed on femur models produced by Swedish company Sawbones. The intramedullary „Fixion IM” nails (Ti-6Al-4V alloy were implanted into the bone. Displacements of determinated models were being recorded from the sensors every 100 N from 10 N to 2000 N.Findings: The analyses showed the difference in displacements, depending on the selected models.Research limitations/implications: The limitations were connected with simplification of boundary conditions during analysis which were the result of the simplification of the models. While studying, muscles and ligaments supporting the bone in anatomic position were not taken into consideration. Instead, the system has been loaded with the axial force (compression.Practical implications: The obtained results can be useful in clinical practice. They can be applied in selection of stabilization methods or rehabilitation as well as in describing the biomechanical conditions connected with type of bone fracture obtained from medical imaging.Originality/value: . The work compares the values of displacement of characteristic points of femur (healthy – model I with the

  19. Effects of Land Use Practices on the Organic Carbon Content, Cation Exchange Capacity and Aggregate Stability of Soils in the Catchment Zones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mosayeb Heshmati

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Land use practice leads to changes in the physico-chemical properties of soils, such as Soil Organic Carbon (SOC, Cation Exchange Capacity (CEC and Soil Aggregate Stability (SAS that cause soil erosion. Approach: Merek catchment, Iran suffers from land degradation due to poor land use practice. A study was carried out with the objectives: (i to determine soil nutrient status in different agro-ecological zones in Merek catchment; and (ii to evaluate the influence of land use practices on SOC, CEC and SAS. Results: It was found that soil texture was silty and clay, while soil reaction was alkaline (pH was 7.75. The respective amount of carbonates was 32 and 36% in the top-soil and sub-soil respectively, indicating high level of alkalinity in the soils of the study area. The mean SAS of the surface soil layer for agriculture, rangeland and forest was 53, 61 and 64%, respectively with its mean in the topsoil of agriculture is significantly lower (P≤0.05 than the other zones. SOC level in the agriculture, rangeland and forest were 1.35, 1.56, 2.14 % in the topsoil and 1.03, 1.33 and 1.45%, in the subsoil of the respective areas. The results of t-test and ANOVA analyses showed that SOC means are significantly different from each other within soil depth and among agro-ecological zones. The CEC in the agriculture, rangeland and forest areas were 25.8, 24.6 and 35.1 cmolckg-1 for the top-soil and 31.1, 26.8 and 26.9 cmolckg-1 in the sub-soil, respectively. All the above changes are due to the negative effects of agricultural activities. Conclusion: Improper tillage practice (up-down the slope, conversion of the rangeland and forest to rain-fed areas, crop residue burning, over grazing and forest clearance contribute to reduction in SOC and SAS in the Merek catchment, Iran.

  20. Who discovered the expanding universe?

    CERN Document Server

    Nussbaumer, Harry

    2011-01-01

    Who discovered the expanding universe? Was it Hubble, or Lemaitre, or was it just the end result of a long series of investigations? In this article we summarise the main steps and contributions that led to one of the most exciting discoveries ever made, of which Lemaitre was the principal architect. In 1927 he combined his dynamical solutions of the Einstein equations with astronomical observations to conclude that the universe is expanding. He derived the linear velocity-distance relationship and calculated the first numerical value of what later was called the "Hubble constant". His discovery paper of 1927 was written in French and in 1931 it was translated into English and published in Monthly Notices. However, the translation omits the section where Lemaitre computed the "Hubble constant". Why was that done, and who was responsible? We do not speculate on this question, but present in a very condensed way the facts along the path of discovery. The documented details from primary sources can be found in o...

  1. Expanded retroauricular skin and fascial flap in congenital microtia reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qingguo; Quan, Yuzhu; Su, Yuanda; Shi, Lei; Xie, Yangchun; Liu, Xinhai

    2010-04-01

    The aim of this article is to report the application of expanding retroauricular skin fascia flap, and autogenous costal cartilage for congenital microtia reconstruction. Microtia reconstruction was generally completed in 3 surgical stages. In the first surgical stage, a 50 or 80 mL kidney-shaped tissue expander was inserted subcutaneously in the retroauricular mastoid region. Inflation of saline volume increased up to 60 to 80 mL, and skin flap was expanded for 2 to 3 months postoperatively. In the second surgical stage, removal of tissue expander, formation of retroauricular skin flap, elevation of retroauricular fascia flap, and pedicles of both flaps in remnant ear side were performed. Costal cartilage was harvested from ipsilateral side chest to the ear for reconstruction. The 3D ear framework was sculpted with stabilization of structure, contour and erection. Simultaneously, intermediate full thickness skin graft of 4 x 8 cm was obtained from previous incision site from where costal cartilage was harvested. Cartilage ear framework was anchored between skin flap and fascia flap, and fixed it symmetrically to the opposite normal ear, inferior portion of the ear framework was wrapped by remnant ear lobule, expanded skin flap covered the anterior portion of the framework, fascial flap was draped to the posterior side of framework and helical rim, then fascial flap was surfaced by intermediate full thickness skin graft. Suction drain was inserted and coated between skin flap and framework, drain was removed fifth postoperative day. Tragus construction and conchal excavation with skin graft was performed in the third stage of microtia reconstruction. Between October 2000 and October 2007, 426 cases were diagnosed as unilateral microtia patients and 22 cases were bilateral microtia patients. Therefore, 448 microtia ears were treated with tissue expander and autogenous costal cartilage. In 262 cases, structure of the helix, tragus, conchal excavation

  2. L-tyrosine immobilized on multiwalled carbon nanotubes: a new substrate for thallium separation and speciation using stabilized temperature platform furnace-electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacheco, Pablo H; Gil, Raúl A; Smichowski, Patricia; Polla, Griselda; Martinez, Luis D

    2009-12-10

    An approach for the separation and determination of inorganic thallium species is described. A new sorbent, L-tyrosine-carbon nanotubes (L-tyr-CNTs), was used and applied to the analysis of tap water samples. At pH 5.0, L-tyr was selective only towards Tl(III), while total thallium was determined directly by stabilized temperature platform furnace-electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (STPF-ETAAS). The Tl(III) specie, which was retained by L-tyrosine, was quantitatively eluted from the column with 10% of nitric acid. An on-line breakthrough curve was used to determine the column capacity, which resulted to be 9.00 micromol of Tl(III) g(-1) of L-tyr-CNTs with a molar ratio of 0.14 (moles of Tl bound to moles of L-tyr at pH 5). Transient peak areas revealed that Tl stripping from the column occurred instantaneously. Effects of sample flow rate, concentration and flow rate of the eluent, and interfering ions on the recovery of the analyte were systematically investigated. The detection limit for the determination of total thallium (3sigma) by STPF-ETAAS was 150 ng L(-1). The detection limit (3sigma) for Tl(III) employing the separation system was 3 ng L(-1), with an enrichment factor of 40. The precision of the method expressed as the relative standard deviation (RSD) resulted to be 3.4%. The proposed method was applied to the speciation and determination of inorganic thallium in tap water samples. The found concentrations were in the range of 0.88-0.91 microg L(-1) of Tl(III), and 3.69-3.91 microg L(-1) of total thallium. PMID:19932812

  3. DNA-stabilized silver nanoclusters and carbon nanoparticles oxide: A sensitive platform for label-free fluorescence turn-on detection of HIV-DNA sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Yu-Dan; Xia, Li; Xu, Dang-Dang; Xing, Xiao-Jing; Pang, Dai-Wen; Tang, Hong-Wu

    2016-11-15

    Based on the remarkable difference between the interactions of carbon nanoparticles (CNPs) oxide with single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) and double-stranded DNA (dsDNA), and the fact that fluorescence of DNA-stabilized silver nanoclusters (AgNCs) can be quenched by CNPs oxide, DNA-functionalized AgNCs were applied as label-free fluorescence probes and a novel fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) sensor was successfully constructed for the detection of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) DNA sequences. CNPs oxide were prepared with the oxidation of candle soot, hence it is simple, time-saving and low-cost. The strategy of dual AgNCs probes was applied to improve the detection sensitivity by using dual- probe capturing the same target DNA in a sandwich mode and as the fluorescence donor, and using CNPs oxide as the acceptor. In the presence of target DNA, a dsDNA hybrid forms, leading to the desorption of the ssDNA-AgNCs probes from CNPs oxide, and the recovering of fluorescence of the AgNCs in a HIV-DNA concentration-dependent manner. The results show that HIV-DNA can be detected in the range of 1-50nM with a detection limit of 0.40nM in aqueous buffer. The method is simple, rapid and sensitive with no need of labeled fluorescent probes, and moreover, the design of fluorescent dual-probe makes full use of the excellent fluorescence property of AgNCs and further improves the detection sensitivity. PMID:27295571

  4. Stability and melting relations of Fe3C up to 3 Mbar: Implication for the carbon in the Earth's inner core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, S.; Ohtani, E.; Sakai, T.; Mashino, I.; Kamada, S.; Miyahara, M.; Sakamaki, T.; Hirao, N.; Ohishi, Y.

    2013-12-01

    The Earth's core is regarded as an Fe-Ni alloy but its density is lower than that of pure Fe at the core conditions. Therefore, the Earth's core is supposed to contain light elements and carbon is one of the candidates of the light elements to explain the density deficit of the Earth's core. Nakajima et al. (2009) reported the melting temperature of Fe3C up to around 30 GPa based on textual observations, the chemical analysis of the quenched run products and in situ X-ray diffraction experiments using a Kawai-type multi anvil apparatus. Lord et al. (2009) reported melting temperatures of Fe3C up to 70 GPa, which was determined by the temperature plateau during increasing laser power using a laser-heated diamond anvil cell. They also suggested Fe+Fe7C3 is a stable subsolidus phase. There are obvious discrepancies between the melting curve and the stable subsolidus phase reported by Nakajima et al. (2009) and those reported by Lord et al. (2009). In this study, the melting temperatures of Fe3C and a subsolidus phase relation were determined based on in situ X-ray diffraction experiments and observations of the recovered sample. This study aims to reveal the stability field of Fe3C and the melting temperature of Fe3C and to discuss the behaviors of carbon in the Earth's core. We have performed experiments using a laser-heated diamond anvil cell combined with in situ X-ray diffraction experiment at BL10XU beamline, SPring-8 synchrotron facility. We also conducted quench experiments for observation of the recovered sample at Tohoku University. Synthesized Fe3C or Fe+Fe3C (C = 5.2 wt.%) were sandwiched by NaCl or SiO2 glass layers, which were used as the thermal insulator and the pressure medium. Melting of the sample was determined by disappearance of the X-ray diffraction peaks and textual observations. We determined the melting relation of Fe3C up to 200 GPa by in situ X-ray diffraction experiments and textual observations of recovered samples. The melting temperature

  5. Expanding Human Cognition and Communication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spohrer, Jim [IBM, North Castle, NY (United States); Pierce, Brian M. [Raytheon Co., Waltham, MA (United States); Murray, Cherry A. [Lucent Technologies, Murray Hill, NJ (United States); Golledge, Reginald G. [Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States); Horn, Robert E. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States); Turkle, Sherry [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Yonas, Gerold [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Glicken Turnley, Jessica [Galisteo Consulting Group, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Pollack, Jordan [Brandeis Univ., Waltham, MA (United States); Burger, Rudy [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Robinett, Warren; Wilson, Larry Todd [Inst. of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), Piscataway, NJ (United States); Bainbridge, W. S.; Canton, J.; Kuekes, P.; Loomis, J.; Penz, P.

    2013-01-01

    To be able to chart the most profitable future directions for societal transformation and corresponding scientific research, five multidisciplinary themes focused on major goals have been identified to fulfill the overall motivating vision of convergence described in the previous pages. The first, “Expanding Human Cognition and Communication,” is devoted to technological breakthroughs that have the potential to enhance individuals’ mental and interaction abilities. Throughout the twentieth century, a number of purely psychological techniques were offered for strengthening human character and personality, but evaluation research has generally failed to confirm the alleged benefits of these methods (Druckman and Bjork 1992; 1994). Today, there is good reason to believe that a combination of methods, drawing upon varied branches of converging science and technology, would be more effective than attempts that rely upon mental training alone.

  6. Carbon substituting for oxygen in silicates: A novel mechanism for carbon incorporation in the deep Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armentrout, M. M.; Tavakoli, A.; Ionescu, E.; Mera, G.; Riedel, R.; Navrotsky, A.

    2013-12-01

    Traditionally, carbon in the deep Earth has been thought of in terms of either carbonate at high oxygen fugacities or graphite or diamond under more reducing conditions. However, material science studies of amorphous Si-O-C polymer derived ceramics have demonstrated that carbon can be accommodated as an anion substituting for oxygen in mixed silica tetrahedra. Furthermore these structures are energetically favorable relative to a mixture of crystalline silica, silicon carbide, and graphite by ten or more kJ/g.atom. Thermodynamic stability suggests that these nano-structured composites are a potentially important storage mechanism for carbon under moderately reducing conditions. Here we expand the scope of the previous work by examining the compositional effect of geologically relevant cations (calcium and magnesium) on the thermodynamic stability, nanostructure, and ability to accommodate carbon of these composites. Silicon oxy-carbides doped with magnesium, magnesium and calcium or undoped resisted crystallization at 1100 C under inert atmosphere. 29Si NMR of the samples shows a similar distribution of silicon between end-member and mixed sites (Table 1). Results are presented from studies utilizing NMR, high temperature solution calorimetry, and microprobe. Table 1. Percentages of Si species in each material as determined by 29Si NMR.

  7. Expanding the Trilinos developer community.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heroux, Michael Allen

    2010-10-01

    The Trilinos Project started approximately nine years ago as a small effort to enable research, development and ongoing support of small, related solver software efforts. The 'Tri' in Trilinos was intended to indicate the eventual three packages we planned to develop. In 2007 the project expanded its scope to include any package that was an enabling technology for technical computing. Presently the Trilinos repository contains over 55 packages covering a broad spectrum of reusable tools for constructing full-featured scalable scientific and engineering applications. Trilinos usage is now worldwide, and many applications have an explicit dependence on Trilinos for essential capabilities. Users come from other US laboratories, universities, industry and international research groups. Awareness and use of Trilinos is growing rapidly outside of Sandia. Members of the external research community are becoming more familiar with Trilinos, its design and collaborative nature. As a result, the Trilinos project is receiving an increasing number of requests from external community members who want to contribute to Trilinos as developers. To-date we have worked with external developers in an ad hoc fashion. Going forward, we want to develop a set of policies, procedures, tools and infrastructure to simplify interactions with external developers. As we go forward with multi-laboratory efforts such as CASL and X-Stack, and international projects such as IESP, we will need a more streamlined and explicit process for making external developers 'first-class citizens' in the Trilinos development community. This document is intended to frame the discussion for expanding the Trilinos community to all strategically important external members, while at the same time preserving Sandia's primary leadership role in the project.

  8. An experimental reciprocating expander for cryocooler application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minta, M.; Smith, J. L., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    An experimental reciprocating expander was designed with features appropriate for cryocooler cycles. The expander has a displacer piston, simple valves, and a hydraulic/pneumatic stroking mechanism. The expander has a valve in head configuration with the valves extending out the bottom of the vacuum enclosure while the piston extends out the top. The expander was tested using a CTI 1400 liquefier to supply 13 atm in the temperature range 4.2 to 12 K. Expander efficiency was measured in the range 84 to 93% while operating the apparatus as a supercritical wet expander and in the range 91 to 93% aa a single phase expander. The apparatus can also be modified to operate as a compressor for saturated helium vapor.

  9. Compact Radiometers Expand Climate Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    To gain a better understanding of Earth's water, energy, and carbon cycles, NASA plans to embark on the Soil Moisture Active and Passive mission in 2015. To prepare, Goddard Space Flight Center provided Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) funding to ProSensing Inc., of Amherst, Massachusetts, to develop a compact ultrastable radiometer for sea surface salinity and soil moisture mapping. ProSensing incorporated small, low-cost, high-performance elements into just a few circuit boards and now offers two lightweight radiometers commercially. Government research agencies, university research groups, and large corporations around the world are using the devices for mapping soil moisture, ocean salinity, and wind speed.

  10. Discovery of Uniformly Expanding Universe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cahill R. T.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Saul Perlmutter and the Brian Schmidt – Adam Riess teams reported that their Friedmann-model GR-based analysis of their supernovae magnitude-redshift data re- vealed a new phenomenon of “dark energy” which, it is claimed, forms 73% of the energy / matter density of the present-epoch universe, and which is linked to the further claim of an accelerating expansion of the universe. In 2011 Perlmutter, Schmidt and Riess received the Nobel Prize in Physics “for the discovery of the accelerating ex- pansion of the Universe through observations of distant supernovae”. Here it is shown that (i a generic model-independent analysis of this data reveals a uniformly expanding universe, (ii their analysis actually used Newtonian gravity, and finally (iii the data, as well as the CMB fluctuation data, does not require “dark energy” nor “dark matter”, but instead reveals the phenomenon of a dynamical space, which is absent from the Friedmann model.

  11. 莱钢顶底复吹转炉碳氧积稳定控制技术研究%Research of Carbon Oxygen Product Stability Control Technology on the Long Life Converter in Laiwu Steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高志滨; 温福新; 于亮涛

    2015-01-01

    Through improving the design of bottom blowing air brick process, developing new type of converter slag splashing technology, optimization intelligent of converter steelmaking and bottom blowing model, to realize the combined-blowing converter low carbon oxygen deposition and stability control at a lower level. Using a laser thickness gauge to monitor the furnace type to guarantee the stability of furnace type, prevent the carbon oxygen volume fluctuations and using the static decarburization technology to further reduce carbon and oxygen. After the process implementation, the carbon oxygen volumes of the No.1, No.2 or No.3 converters were controlled in 0.002 5 and the carbon oxygen product of No.4 converter for dephosphorization was controlled in 0.002 3;The average total iron content of the final slag of 4 converters was reduced to 12.83%from 14.38%and the average oxygen content in molten steel at the end of blowing was decreased to 450 × 10-6 from 520 × 10-6. The direct economic benefit of oxygen carbon product stability control technology for long life of converter is 23.9 million Yuan.%通过改进底吹透气砖工艺设计、开发新型转炉溅渣工艺、优化转炉智能炼钢及底吹模型等,实现复吹转炉碳氧积的降低并稳定控制在较低水平;利用激光测厚仪对炉型进行监控,确保炉型稳定,防止碳氧积波动;利用静止脱碳技术进一步降低碳氧积。工艺实施后,1#~3#120 t转炉碳氧积控制在0.0025,4#脱磷炉碳氧积控制在0.0023;4座转炉终渣平均全铁含量由14.38%降为12.83%,吹炼终点钢水氧含量平均由520×10-6降为450×10-6,长寿转炉碳氧积稳定控制技术年直接经济效益2390.04万元。

  12. Expanding the Interaction Equivalency Theorem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brenda Cecilia Padilla Rodriguez

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Although interaction is recognised as a key element for learning, its incorporation in online courses can be challenging. The interaction equivalency theorem provides guidelines: Meaningful learning can be supported as long as one of three types of interactions (learner-content, learner-teacher and learner-learner is present at a high level. This study sought to apply this theorem to the corporate sector, and to expand it to include other indicators of course effectiveness: satisfaction, knowledge transfer, business results and return on expectations. A large Mexican organisation participated in this research, with 146 learners, 30 teachers and 3 academic assistants. Three versions of an online course were designed, each emphasising a different type of interaction. Data were collected through surveys, exams, observations, activity logs, think aloud protocols and sales records. All course versions yielded high levels of effectiveness, in terms of satisfaction, learning and return on expectations. Yet, course design did not dictate the types of interactions in which students engaged within the courses. Findings suggest that the interaction equivalency theorem can be reformulated as follows: In corporate settings, an online course can be effective in terms of satisfaction, learning, knowledge transfer, business results and return on expectations, as long as (a at least one of three types of interaction (learner-content, learner-teacher or learner-learner features prominently in the design of the course, and (b course delivery is consistent with the chosen type of interaction. Focusing on only one type of interaction carries a high risk of confusion, disengagement or missed learning opportunities, which can be managed by incorporating other forms of interactions.

  13. Stability of Axisymmetric Liquid Bridges

    CERN Document Server

    Rubinstein, Boris

    2016-01-01

    We study stability of axisymmetric liquid bridges between two axisymmetric solid bodies in the absence of gravity under arbitrary asymmetric perturbations which are expanded into a set of angular Fourier modes. We determine the stability region boundary for every angular mode in case of both fixed and free contact lines. Application of this approach allows us to demonstrate existence of stable convex nodoid menisci between two spheres.

  14. Effects of pyrolysis temperature on carbon retention and stability of biochar%热解温度对生物质炭碳保留量及稳定性的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李飞跃; 汪建飞; 谢越; 李贺; 李孝良; 李粉茹

    2015-01-01

    以核桃壳为生物质炭生产原料,研究热解温度(200~700℃)对生物质炭产率、元素组成、表面官能团分布及其稳定性的影响,以期探明生物质炭基本性质随热解温度变化的规律,为全面了解生物质炭固碳减排效果提供理论参考。结果表明,生物质炭的C含量随温度升高而增加,H和O元素含量却随温度升高而降低。此外,生物质炭的H/C和O/C随着温度增加而减少。生物质炭的产率及碳保留量随着温度的升高而降低。红外光谱分析结果表明,经过热解核桃壳原材料分子中所含的-C-O和O-CH3基团消失,随着热解温度升高,生物质炭中的烷烃基团-CH逐渐减少,芳香化程度逐渐升高。500℃制备生物质炭的K2Cr2O7和KMnO4氧化碳损失量均最低,分别为10.4%和1.66%。相关分析表明,生物质炭的产率、碳保留量及稳定性与热解温度之间均具有显著相关关系。%Turning biomass wastes into biochar under the conditions of low temperature and limited oxygen has recently proven to be a promising approach for long-term carbon sequestration. However, the ultimate carbon sequestration efficiency of biochar depends not only on the feedstock type and production condition, but also on the environmental conditions of soil. In order to reveal the effects of pyrolysis temperature which is main parameter of biochar production condition on carbon retention and biochar stability, and provide more information for further improvement of carbon sequestration potential by turning biomass into biochar, the characteristics of biochar derived from walnut shell under lab condition were analyzed. During a typical slow pyrolysis process, the biochar was heated at a speed of approximately 20℃/minin a Muffle Furnace under limited oxygen and held at 200-700℃ for 2 h; then, biochar yield, elemental composition, functional groups distribution using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR

  15. Biomechanical testing of a unique built-in expandable anterior spinal internal fixation system

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Chu-Song; Xu, Yan-Fang; Zhang, Yu; Chen, Zhong; Lv, Hai

    2014-01-01

    Background Expandable screws have greater pullout strength than conventional screws. The purpose of this study was to compare the biomechanical stability provided by a new built-in expandable anterior spinal fixation system with that of 2 commonly used anterior fixation systems, the Z-Plate and the Kaneda, in a porcine partial vertebral corpectomy model. Methods Eighteen porcine thoracolumbar spine specimens were randomly divided into 3 groups of 6 each. A vertebral wedge osteotomy was perfor...

  16. Application of an Expanded Sequestration Estimate to the Domestic Energy Footprint of the Republic of Ireland

    OpenAIRE

    Bernadette O’Regan; Richard Moles; Conor Walsh

    2010-01-01

    The need for global comparability has led to the recent standardization of ecological footprint methods. The use of global averages and necessary methodological assumptions has questioned the ability of the ecological footprint to represent local or national specific concerns. This paper attempts to incorporate greater national relevancy by expanding the sequestration estimate used to calculate the annual carbon footprint of domestic Irish energy use. This includes expanding existing study bo...

  17. Agricultural residues and expanded clay in Oncidium baueri Lindl. orchid cultivation

    OpenAIRE

    Matheus Marchezi Mora; Adriane Marinho de Assis; Lilian Yukari Yamamoto; Kathia Fernandes Lopes Pivetta; Ricardo Tadeu Faria

    2015-01-01

    For orchid cultivation in containers is essential to select the right substrate, since this will influence the quality of the final product, it serve as a support for the root system of the plants. This study aimed to evaluate different agricultural residues and expanded clay in Oncidium baueri Lindl. orchid cultivation. The plants were subjected to treatments: pinus husk + carbonized rice husk, pinus husk + coffee husk, pinus husk + fibered coconut, pecan nut husk, expanded clay, fibered coc...

  18. High thermal stability and low density variation of carbon-doped Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5} for phase-change memory application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Wangyang [State Key Laboratory of Functional Materials for Informatics, Shanghai Institute of Micro-system and Information Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200050 (China); University of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100080 (China); Wu, Liangcai, E-mail: wuliangcai@mail.sim.ac.cn; Zhou, Xilin; Rao, Feng; Song, Zhitang, E-mail: ztsong@mail.sim.ac.cn; Yao, Dongning; Yin, Weijun; Song, Sannian; Liu, Bo; Feng, Songlin [State Key Laboratory of Functional Materials for Informatics, Shanghai Institute of Micro-system and Information Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200050 (China); Qian, Bo [Key Laboratory of Nanodevices and Applications, Suzhou Institute of Nano-Tech and Nano-Bionics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Suzhou 215123 (China)

    2014-12-15

    Carbon-doped Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5} (GSTC) film has been experimentally studied as a thermal stable material for high temperature applications. The 10-yr data retention temperature is remarkably increased through C doping. Furthermore, GSTC films have better interface properties after annealing at 410 °C for 30 min. The density variation of GSTC film is significantly improved, which is very important to device reliability. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy results reveal that the thermal stability enhancement of GSTC film attributes to the forming of C-Ge, C-Sb, and C-Te bonds. The perfect thermal stability makes GSTC materials a good candidate in the actual production of phase-change memory.

  19. Synthesis, characterization and properties of polyaniline/expanded vermiculite intercalated nanocomposite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin Jianming; Tang Qunwei; Wu Jihuai; Sun Hui [Key Laboratory of Functional Materials for Fujian Higher Education, Institute of Material Physical Chemistry, Huaqiao University, Quanzhou 362021 (China)], E-mail: jhwu@hqu.edu.cn

    2008-04-15

    The synthesis characterization and conductivities of polyaniline/expanded vermiculite intercalated nanocomposite are presented in this paper. The conductive emeraldine salt form of polyaniline is inserted into the interlayer of expanded vermiculite to produce the nanocomposite with high conductivity. The structures and properties are characterized by transmission electron microscopy x-ray diffraction spectroscopy fourier transform infrared spectroscopy thermogravimetry analysis and by the measurements of conductivity and stability. The results show that an intercalated nanocomposite with high conductivity and stability is obtained. The synthesis conditions are optimized to obtain the highest conductivity which is 6.80 S cm{sup -1}.

  20. Synthesis, characterization and properties of polyaniline/expanded vermiculite intercalated nanocomposite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianming Lin, Qunwei Tang, Jihuai Wu and Hui Sun

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The synthesis characterization and conductivities of polyaniline/expanded vermiculite intercalated nanocomposite are presented in this paper. The conductive emeraldine salt form of polyaniline is inserted into the interlayer of expanded vermiculite to produce the nanocomposite with high conductivity. The structures and properties are characterized by transmission electron microscopy x-ray diffraction spectroscopy fourier transform infrared spectroscopy thermogravimetry analysis and by the measurements of conductivity and stability. The results show that an intercalated nanocomposite with high conductivity and stability is obtained. The synthesis conditions are optimized to obtain the highest conductivity which is 6.80 S cm−1.

  1. Cable Stability

    CERN Document Server

    Bottura, L

    2014-01-01

    Superconductor stability is at the core of the design of any successful cable and magnet application. This chapter reviews the initial understanding of the stability mechanism, and reviews matters of importance for stability such as the nature and magnitude of the perturbation spectrum and the cooling mechanisms. Various stability strategies are studied, providing criteria that depend on the desired design and operating conditions.

  2. Separation of craniopagus twins utilizing tissue expanders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shively, R E; Bermant, M A; Bucholz, R D

    1985-11-01

    An example of craniopagus Siamese twins is presented. The methods used in their separation using skin expanders and scalp flaps to achieve primary closure of the wounds with hair-bearing scalp are outlined. A detailed discussion of the planning and the mathematical considerations of these skin expanders and scalp flaps is included. PMID:4059416

  3. Decay of correlations for nonuniformly expanding systems

    OpenAIRE

    Gouezel, Sebastien

    2004-01-01

    We estimate the speed of decay of correlations for general nonuniformly expanding dynamical systems, using estimates on the time the system takes to become really expanding. Our method can deal with fast decays, such as exponential or stretched exponential. We prove in particular that the correlations of the Alves-Viana map decay in $O(e^{-c \\sqrt{n}})$.

  4. Screw expander for light duty diesel engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-01-01

    Preliminary selection and sizing of a positive displacement screw compressor-expander subsystem for a light-duty adiabatic diesel engine; development of a mathematical model to describe overall efficiencies for the screw compressor and expander; simulation of operation to establish overall efficiency for a range of design parameters and at given engine operating points; simulation to establish potential net power output at light-duty diesel operating points; analytical determination of mass moments of inertia for the rotors and inertia of the compressor-expander subsystem; and preparation of engineering layout drawings of the compressor and expander are discussed. As a result of this work, it was concluded that the screw compressor and expander designed for light-duty diesel engine applications are viable alternatives to turbo-compound systems, with acceptable efficiencies for both units, and only a moderate effect on the transient response.

  5. Expanding Genomics of Mycorrhizal Symbiosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan eKuo

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The mycorrhizal symbiosis between soil fungi and plant roots is a ubiquitous mutualism that plays key roles in plant and soil health, and carbon and nutrient cycles. The symbiosis evolved repeatedly and independently as multiple morphological types (e.g. arbuscular [AM], ectomycorrhizal [ECM] in multiple fungal clades (e.g. phyla Glomeromycota, Ascomycota, Basidiomycota. The accessibility and culturability of many mycorrhizal partners make them ideal models for symbiosis studies. Alongside molecular, physiological, and ecological investigations, sequencing led to the first 3 mycorrhizal fungal genomes, representing 3 fungal phyla and 2 mycorrhizal types. The genome of the ECM basidiomycete Laccaria bicolor showed that the mycorrhizal lifestyle can evolve through loss of plant-degrading enzymes (PDEs and expansion of lineage-specific gene families, including short secreted protein (SSP effectors and other symbiosis genes. The genome of the ECM ascomycete Tuber melanosporum showed that the ECM type can evolve without expansion of gene families in contrast to Laccaria, and thus a different set of symbiosis genes. The genome of the AM glomeromycete Rhizophagus irregularis showed that despite enormous phylogenetic distance and morphological difference from the other 2 fungi, the symbiosis can involve similar solutions as loss of PDEs and mycorrhiza-induced SSPs. The mycorrhizal community is building on these studies with 3 large-scale initiatives. The Mycorrhizal Genomics Initiative (MGI is sequencing 35 genomes of multiple fungal clades and mycorrhizal types for phylogenomic and population analyses. 17 MGI species whose symbiosis is reconstitutable in vitro are targeted for comprehensive transcriptomics of mycorrhiza formation. MGI genomes are seeding a set of 50+ reference fungal genomes for annotating metatranscriptomes sampled from 7 diverse well-described soil sites. These 3 projects address fundamental questions about the nature and role of a

  6. Tissue Expander versus Tissue Expander and Latissimus Flap in Morbidly Obese Breast Reconstruction Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward A. Luce, MD

    2015-03-01

    Conclusion: The loss rate in immediate postmastectomy reconstruction in morbidly obese patients with latissimus flap plus tissue expander was substantially lower than the loss rate in those with breast reconstructed with tissue expander alone.

  7. Metagenome of a Versatile Chemolithoautotroph from Expanding Oceanic Dead Zones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walsh, David A.; Zaikova, Elena; Howes, Charles L.; Song, Young; Wright, Jody; Tringe, Susannah G.; Tortell, Philippe D.; Hallam, Steven J.

    2009-07-15

    Oxygen minimum zones (OMZs), also known as oceanic"dead zones", are widespread oceanographic features currently expanding due to global warming and coastal eutrophication. Although inhospitable to metazoan life, OMZs support a thriving but cryptic microbiota whose combined metabolic activity is intimately connected to nutrient and trace gas cycling within the global ocean. Here we report time-resolved metagenomic analyses of a ubiquitous and abundant but uncultivated OMZ microbe (SUP05) closely related to chemoautotrophic gill symbionts of deep-sea clams and mussels. The SUP05 metagenome harbors a versatile repertoire of genes mediating autotrophic carbon assimilation, sulfur-oxidation and nitrate respiration responsive to a wide range of water column redox states. Thus, SUP05 plays integral roles in shaping nutrient and energy flow within oxygen-deficient oceanic waters via carbon sequestration, sulfide detoxification and biological nitrogen loss with important implications for marine productivity and atmospheric greenhouse control.

  8. Fe-Ni-Cu-C-S phase relations at high pressures and temperatures - The role of sulfur in carbon storage and diamond stability at mid- to deep-upper mantle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuno, Kyusei; Dasgupta, Rajdeep

    2015-02-01

    , and diamond for low-S (≤100 ppm S) domains and between liquid alloy and diamond in high-S (≥150 ppm S) domains. Our findings can explain the observation of Ni-rich sulfide and/or Fe-Ni alloy inclusions in diamond and suggest that diamond stability in the alloy-bearing, reduced mantle does not necessarily require excess C supply from recycled, crustal lithologies. Our prediction of diamond stability in the background, depleted upper mantle, owing to the interaction with mantle sulfides, is also consistent with the carbon isotopic composition of peridotitic diamond (δ13C of - 5 ± 1 ‰), which suggests no significant input from recycled carbon.

  9. Design of Modern Reactors for Synthesis of Thermally Expanded Graphite

    OpenAIRE

    Strativnov, Eugene V.

    2015-01-01

    One of the most progressive trends in the development of modern science and technology is the creation of energy-efficient technologies for the synthesis of nanomaterials. Nanolayered graphite (thermally exfoliated graphite) is one of the key important nanomaterials of carbon origin. Due to its unique properties (chemical and thermal stability, ability to form without a binder, elasticity, etc.), it can be used as an effective absorber of organic substances and a material for seal manufacturi...

  10. Stability Scores: Measuring Coalitional Stability

    OpenAIRE

    Feldman, Michal; Meir, Reshef; Tennenholtz, Moshe

    2011-01-01

    We introduce a measure for the level of stability against coalitional deviations, called \\emph{stability scores}, which generalizes widely used notions of stability in non-cooperative games. We use the proposed measure to compare various Nash equilibria in congestion games, and to quantify the effect of game parameters on coalitional stability. For our main results, we apply stability scores to analyze and compare the Generalized Second Price (GSP) and Vickrey-Clarke-Groves (VCG) ad auctions....

  11. Impact of soybean stover- and pine needle-derived biochars on Pb and As mobility, microbial community, and carbon stability in a contaminated agricultural soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Mahtab; Ok, Yong Sik; Kim, Byung-Yong; Ahn, Jae-Hyung; Lee, Young Han; Zhang, Ming; Moon, Deok Hyun; Al-Wabel, Mohammad I; Lee, Sang Soo

    2016-01-15

    Biochar is gaining attention as a potential soil amendment to remediate and revitalize the contaminated soils. Simultaneous effects of biochar on metals mobility, microbial abundance, bacterial diversity and carbon storage in soil are scarcely addressed. This study assessed the effect of biochars on metal mobility, microbial abundance, bacterial community, and carbon storage in an agricultural soil contaminated with heavy metals. Biochars derived from soybean stover at 300 and 700 °C (S-BC300 and S-BC700, respectively) and pine needles at the same temperatures (P-BC300 and P-BC700, respectively) were used. A maximum reduction of Pb mobility by 95% was observed from a soil treated with S-BC700, associated with precipitation of chloropyromorphite and hydroxylpyromorphite. In contrast, As was desorbed from soil particles because of P competition. The abundance of Gram-positive and negative bacteria, fungi, actinomycetes, and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi increased in the soils treated with biochar produced at 300 °C, possibly due to the high dissolved organic and active organic carbons. Microbial abundance in the soils treated with S-BC700 and P-BC700 was constant due to the existence of fixed or non-labile carbon. Changes to bacterial communities in the biochar-treated soils depended on feedstock type and pyrolysis temperature. Actinobacteria substantially increased whereas Acidobacteria and Chloroflexi decreased in the biochar-treated soils. The non-labile carbon fraction was ∼25 fold higher in the biochar-treated soil than the control soil, indicating long-term carbon storage. PMID:26496843

  12. Mechanism of Fume Suppression and Performance on Asphalt of Expanded Graphite for Pavement under High Temperature Condition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Gang; HE Zhaoyi; HUANG Yangcheng; ZHOU Chao; YUAN Xiaoya

    2014-01-01

    Fume suppression mechanisms and the effect of expanded graphite on the performance of asphalt were studied by applying infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and comprehensive thermal analysis (TG, DSC). The experimental results confirm that asphalt which is mixed with expandable graphite will expand in the process of hot mix, and the expanded graphite layer will swell by the light component in the asphalt. The light component in the asphalt and PAHs adsorption on expanded graphite surface or part of the plug in the expanded graphite layer between plates made nucleation crystallization growth. And the Van der Waals force and the bonding of the lattice can effectively restrain the asphalt fume release. Meanwhile, the expanding agent with oxidative can spread into the asphalt, leading to asphalt oxygenated and plastic abate, while the ductility decreases. Expanded graphite, SBS modifier and environment- friendly plasticizers are used to composite modified asphalt. According to asphalt fume release experiment, normal test of asphalt performance, Brookfield viscosity test, RTFOT test and asphalt mixture tests (high temperature stability, low temperature stability, water stability), it has been proven that the modified asphalt’s performance is better than that of matrix asphalt and equivalent to that of SBS modified asphalt. Furthermore, it has good fume suppression effect.

  13. Glycerol-stabilized NaBH4 reduction at room-temperature for the synthesis of a carbon-supported PtxFe alloy with superior oxygen reduction activity for a microbial fuel cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Glycerol is used as an efficient stabilizer and solvent to synthesis PtxFe alloy. • PtxFe alloy is prepared by simple two-step at room temperature;. • Pt3-Fe/C show the best ORR catalytic performance in both acidic and neutral media;. • PtxFe alloy enhanced ORR activity and durability in microbial fuel cells. - Abstract: Insufficient catalytic activity and durability are the most challenging issues in the commercial deployment of low-temperature fuel cells. In an effort to address these barriers, three carbon-supported PtxFe alloy electrocatalysts with varying Pt:Fe atom ratios (Pt3-Fe/C, Pt2-Fe/C, Pt-Fe/C) were prepared by simple NaBH4 reduction in glycerol at room temperature. All of the prepared PtxFe nanoparticles (NPs) are highly dispersed on a carbon support and show a single-phase face-centered cubic structure with a particle size of approximately 2 nm. The electrocatalytic performances of the synthesized PtxFe alloy catalysts were compared with that of commercial Pt/C by cyclic voltammetry and linear sweep voltammetry; among these NPs, the Pt3-Fe/C catalyst exhibits the highest activity and the best stability for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in both acidic and neutral media. As the cathode catalyst, the maximum power density produced from microbial fuel cell with Pt3-Fe/C (1680 ± 15 mW m−2) was 18% higher than that with conventional Pt/C (1422 ± 18 mW m−2), and the stability of Pt3-Fe/C was greatly improved

  14. Effects of enhancing soil organic carbon sequestration in the topsoil by fertilization on crop productivity and stability: Evidence from long-term experiments with wheat-maize cropping systems in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xubo; Sun, Nan; Wu, Lianhai; Xu, Minggang; Bingham, Ian J; Li, Zhongfang

    2016-08-15

    Although organic carbon sequestration in agricultural soils has been recommended as a 'win-win strategy' for mitigating climate change and ensuring food security, great uncertainty still remains in identifying the relationships between soil organic carbon (SOC) sequestration and crop productivity. Using data from 17 long-term experiments in China we determined the effects of fertilization strategies on SOC stocks at 0-20cm depth in the North, North East, North West and South. The impacts of changes in topsoil SOC stocks on the yield and yield stability of winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) and maize (Zea mays L.) were determined. Results showed that application of inorganic fertilizers (NPK) plus animal manure over 20-30years significantly increased SOC stocks to 20-cm depth by 32-87% whilst NPK plus wheat/maize straw application increased it by 26-38% compared to controls. The efficiency of SOC sequestration differed between regions with 7.4-13.1% of annual C input into the topsoil being retained as SOC over the study periods. In the northern regions, application of manure had little additional effect on yield compared to NPK over a wide range of topsoil SOC stocks (18->50MgCha(-1)). In the South, average yield from manure applied treatments was 2.5 times greater than that from NPK treatments. Moreover, the yield with NPK plus manure increased until SOC stocks (20-cm depth) increased to ~35MgCha(-1). In the northern regions, yield stability was not increased by application of NPK plus manure compared to NPK, whereas in the South there was a significant improvement. We conclude that manure application and straw incorporation could potentially lead to SOC sequestration in topsoil in China, but beneficial effects of this increase in SOC stocks to 20-cm depth on crop yield and yield stability may only be achieved in the South. PMID:27100005

  15. Quantum Chemical Studies on Solvents for Post-Combustion Carbon Dioxide Capture: Calculation of pKa and Carbamate Stability of Disubtituted Piperazines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gangarapu, S.; Wierda, G.J.; Marcelis, A.T.M.; Zuilhof, H.

    2014-01-01

    Piperazine is a widely studied solvent for post-combustion carbon dioxide capture. To investigate the possibilities of further improving this process, the electronic and steric effects of CH3, CH2F, CH2OH, CH2NH2, COCH3, and CN groups of 2,5-disubstituted piperazines on the pKa and carbamate stabili

  16. Ideal Stabilization

    CERN Document Server

    Nesterenko, Mikhail

    2009-01-01

    We define and explore the concept of ideal stabilization. The program is ideally stabilizing if its every state is legitimate. Ideal stabilization allows the specification designer to prescribe with arbitrary degree of precision not only the fault-free program behavior but also its recovery operation. Specifications may or may not mention all possible states. We identify approaches to designing ideal stabilization to both kinds of specifications. For the first kind, we state the necessary condition for an ideally stabilizing solution. On the basis of this condition we prove that there is no ideally stabilizing solution to the leader election problem. We illustrate the utility of the concept by providing examples of well-known programs and proving them ideally stabilizing. Specifically, we prove ideal stabilization of the conflict manager, the alternator, the propagation of information with feedback and the alternating bit protocol.

  17. Dual-action expanded-latch mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, R. A.; Tewell, J. R.; Tobey, W. H.

    1978-01-01

    Single drive actuator operates novel mechanism that expands, attaches to object, and withdraws to latch object firmly to another part. Packaging is extremely simple and compact, and eliminates need for machined parts or close tolerances.

  18. Expanding Patient Options: Minilaparotomy for Hysterectomy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Expanding Patient Options: Minilaparotomy for Hysterectomy Covidien Energy Based Devices Concord, California May 26, 2010 Welcome to this OR ... a procedure that is very cost effective and patient friendly. Our agenda tonight is as follows: I’ ...

  19. Expanding Patient Options: Minilaparotomy for Hysterectomy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... fear that will have some injury to surrounding tissue. There may be some fear of uncontrolled bleeding ... small incision. But once you start expanding the tissues and putting that Alexis retractor in, you actually ...

  20. Expanding Patient Options: Minilaparotomy for Hysterectomy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Expanding Patient Options: Minilaparotomy for Hysterectomy Covidien Energy Based Devices Concord, California May 26, 2010 Welcome to this OR Live program presented by Covidien energy-based devices. Good evening, and thank ...

  1. Expanding Literacy and Integrating Curricula through Dance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birch, James R.

    2000-01-01

    Dance embodies all of the multiple intelligences and uses Sternberg's intellectual components (memory, analysis, creativity, practicality). Integrated into the curriculum, dance can expand literacy and make learning more interactive. (SK)

  2. Aeromechanical stability analysis of COPTER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Sheng K.; Yen, Jing G.

    1988-01-01

    A plan was formed for developing a comprehensive, second-generation system with analytical capabilities for predicting performance, loads and vibration, handling qualities, aeromechanical stability, and acoustics. This second-generation system named COPTER (COmprehensive Program for Theoretical Evaluation of Rotorcraft) is designed for operational efficiency, user friendliness, coding readability, maintainability, transportability, modularity, and expandability for future growth. The system is divided into an executive, a data deck validator, and a technology complex. At present a simple executive, the data deck validator, and the aeromechanical stability module of the technology complex were implemented. The system is described briefly, the implementation of the technology module is discussed, and correlation data presented. The correlation includes hingeless-rotor isolated stability, hingeless-rotor ground-resonance stability, and air-resonance stability of an advanced bearingless-rotor in forward flight.

  3. Expandable intramedullary nail - experimental biomechanical evaluation

    OpenAIRE

    A. Kajzer; W. Kajzer; J. Marciniak

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The paper presents results of experimental analysis of femur and femur – expandable intramedullary nail system. The aim of the work was to determine displacement in three models. In addition, the torsion of the system aiming at determining the moments depending on the torsional angle of the bone was carried out.Design/methodology/approach: Three femurs were selected for studies. The analysis was carried out on the femur – expandable intramedullary nail system. The influence of the lo...

  4. Expanding traumatic intracerebral contusion/hematoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yadav Yad

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Delayed traumatic hematomas and expansion of already detected hematomas are not uncommon. Only few studies are available on risk factors of expanding hematomas. A prospective study was aimed to find out risk factors associated with such traumatic lesions. Materials and Methods: Present study is based on 262 cases of intracerebral hematomas / contusions out of which 43 (16.4% hematomas expanded in size. computerized tomography (CT scan was done in all the patients at the time of admission and within 24 hours of injury. Repeat CT scan was done within 24 hours, 4 days and 7 days. Midline shift if any, prothrombin time, activated partial thromboplastin time, bleeding time, clotting time and platelet counts, Glasgow coma scale at admission and discharge and Glasgow outcome score at 6 months follow up were recorded. Results: Twenty six percent, 11.3 and 0% patients developed expanding hematoma in Glasgow Coma scale (GCS of 8 and below, 9-12 and 13-15 respectively. The chances of expanding hematomas were higher in patients with other associated hematomas (17.4% as compared to isolated hematoma (4.8% (Fisher′s exact results P =0.216. All the cases of expanding hematoma had some degree of midline shift and considerably higher proportion had presence of coagulopathy. The results of logistic regression analysis showed GCS, midline shift and coagulopathy as significant predictors for the expanding hematoma. Thirty nine patients (90.7% of the total expanding hematomas developed within 24 hours of injury. Conclusions: Enlargement of intracerebral hematomas is quite common and majority of them expand early after the injury. These lesions were common in patients with poor GCS, associated hematomas, associated coagulopathy and midline shift.

  5. Expandability, Reversibility, and Optimal Capacity Choice

    OpenAIRE

    Dixit, Avinash K; Robert S. Pindyck

    1998-01-01

    We develop continuous-time models of capacity choice when demand fluctuates stochastically, and the firm's opportunities to expand or contract are limited. Specifically consider costs of investing or disinvesting that vary with time, or with the amount of capacity already installed. The firm's limited opportunities to expand or contract create call and put options on incremental units of capital; we show how the values of these options affect the firm's investment decisions.

  6. Dynamical Model of an Expanding Shell

    OpenAIRE

    Pe'er, Asaf

    2012-01-01

    Expanding blast waves are ubiquitous in many astronomical sources, such as supernovae remnants (SNRs), X-ray emitting binaries (XRBs) and gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). I consider here the dynamics of such an expanding blast wave, both in the adiabatic and the radiative regimes. As the blast wave collects material from the surrounding, it decelerates. A full description of the temporal evolution of the blast wave requires consideration of both the energy density and the pressure of the shocked mate...

  7. Most blood biomarkers related to vitamin status, one-carbon metabolism, and the kynurenine pathway show adequate preanalytical stability and within-person reproducibility to allow assessment of exposure or nutritional status in healthy women and cardiovascular patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Midttun, Oivind; Townsend, Mary K; Nygård, Ottar; Tworoger, Shelley S; Brennan, Paul; Johansson, Mattias; Ueland, Per Magne

    2014-05-01

    Knowledge of stability during sample transportation and changes in biomarker concentrations within person over time are paramount for proper design and interpretation of epidemiologic studies based on a single measurement of biomarker status. Therefore, we investigated stability and intraindividual vs. interindividual variation in blood concentrations of biomarkers related to vitamin status, one-carbon metabolism, and the kynurenine pathway. Whole blood (EDTA and heparin, n = 12) was stored with an icepack for 24 or 48 h, and plasma concentrations of 38 biomarkers were determined. Stability was calculated as change per hour, intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC), and simple Spearman correlation. Within-person reproducibility of biomarkers was expressed as ICC in samples collected 1-2 y apart from 40 postmenopausal women and in samples collected up to 3 y apart from 551 patients with stable angina pectoris. Biomarker stability was similar in EDTA and heparin blood. Most biomarkers were essentially stable, except for choline and total homocysteine (tHcy), which increased markedly. Within-person reproducibility in postmenopausal women was excellent (ICC > 0.75) for cotinine, all-trans retinol, cobalamin, riboflavin, α-tocopherol, Gly, pyridoxal, methylmalonic acid, creatinine, pyridoxal 5'-phosphate, and Ser; was good to fair (ICC of 0.74-0.40) for pyridoxic acid, kynurenine, tHcy, cholecalciferol, flavin mononucleotide, kynurenic acid, xanthurenic acid, 3-hydroxykynurenine, sarcosine, anthranilic acid, cystathionine, homoarginine, 3-hydroxyanthranilic acid, betaine, Arg, folate, total cysteine, dimethylglycine, asymmetric dimethylarginine, neopterin, symmetric dimethylarginine, and Trp; and poor (ICC of 0.39-0.15) for methionine sulfoxide, Met, choline, and trimethyllysine. Similar reproducibilities were observed in patients with coronary heart disease. Thus, most biomarkers investigated were essentially stable in cooled whole blood for up to 48 h and had a

  8. Formation of organic monolayers on hydrogen-terminated silicon surfaces via silicon-carbon bond: effect of terminal groups on stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Functionalization of hydrogen-terminated silicon surfaces with stable and dense aryl-terminated alkyl self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) provides opportunities for the development of low cost organic field effect transistors. In this paper we present results for one such σ-π SAMs, 3-phenylpropyl (C6H5(CH2)3-) SAMs on porous silicon, and compare its stability with octyl (CH3(CH2)7-) SAMs on Si(100). The SAMs were prepared using the Grignard reagent method and characterized using X-ray photoelectron and FT-infrared spectroscopies and contact angle measurements Our results show the 3-phenylpropyl SAMs are not as susceptible to oxidation as the octyl SAMs, and we attribute the increased stability in the former to be due to its more dense structure arising from the π-π stacking of the phenyl rings. Copyright (2005) Australian Institute of Physics

  9. Stability Analysis in a Model of 1,2-dichloroethane Biodegradation by Klebsiella Oxytoca va 8391Immobilized on Granulated Activated Carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borisov, M.; Dimitrova, N.

    2011-11-01

    We consider an ecological model for biodegradation of toxic substances in aquatic and atmospheric biotic systems. The model, which is described by a nonlinear system of four ordinary differential equations, is known to be experimentally validated. We compute the equilibrium points of the model and study their asymptotic stability. The Maple package BifTools is used to calculate one- and two-parameter bifurcations of the equilibrium points.

  10. High capacity and good cycling stability of multi-walled carbon nanotube/SnO2 core-shell structures as anode materials of lithium-ion batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The multi-walled carbon nanotube/SnO2 core-shell structures were fabricated by a wet chemical route. The electrochemical performance of the core-shell structures as anode materials of lithium-ion batteries was investigated. The initial discharge capacity and reversible capacity are up to 1472.7 and 1020.5 mAh g-1, respectively. Moreover, the reversible capacity still remains above 720 mAh g-1 over 35 cycles, and the capacity fading is only 0.8% per cycle. Such high capacities and good cyclability are attributed to SnO2 network structures, excellent mechanical property and good electrical conductivity of the multi-walled carbon nanotubes.

  11. Stabilizing a high-temperature electrochemical silver-carbonate CO2 capture membrane by atomic layer deposition of a ZrO2 overcoat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Peng; Tong, Jingjing; Jee, Youngseok; Huang, Kevin

    2016-07-28

    A high-selectivity and high-flux electrochemical silver-carbonate dual-phase membrane was coated with a nanoscaled ZrO2 layer by atomic layer deposition (ALD) for stable CO2 capture at high-temperature (≥800 °C); the latter has an important implication for direct dry methane reforming with the captured CO2 and O2 for syngas production. PMID:27417536

  12. Uniform carbon layer coated Mn3O4 nanorod anodes with improved reversible capacity and cyclic stability for lithium ion batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Changbin; Yin, Longwei; Xiang, Dong; Qi, Yongxin

    2012-03-01

    A facile one-step solvothermal reaction route to large-scale synthesis of carbon homogeneously wrapped manganese oxide (Mn(3)O(4)@C) nanocomposites for anode materials of lithium ion batteries was developed using manganese acetate monohydrate and polyvinylpyrrolidone as precursors and reactants. The synthesized Mn(3)O(4)@C nanocomposites were characterized by X-ray diffraction, field-emission scanning electron microscopy, high resolution transmission electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and Raman spectroscopy. The synthesized tetragonal structured Mn(3)O(4) (space group I41/amd) samples display nanorodlike morphology, with a width of about 200-300 nm and a thickness of about 15-20 nm. It is shown that the carbon layers with a thickness of 5 nm are homogeneously coated on the Mn(3)O(4) nanorods. It is indicated from lithium storage capacity estimation that the Mn(3)O(4)@C samples display enhanced capacity retention on charge/discharge cycling. Even after 50 cycles, the products remains stable capacity of 473 mA h g(-1), which is as much 3.05 times as that of pure Mn(3)O(4) samples. Because of the low-cost, nonpollution, and stable capacity, the carbon homogeneously coated Mn(3)O(4)@C nanocomposites are promising anode material for lithium ion batteries. PMID:22394097

  13. Effect of Carbonation Curing on Mechanical Strength and Volume Stability of Steel Slag Concrete%碳化养护对钢渣混凝土强度和体积稳定性的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张丰; 莫立武; 邓敏

    2016-01-01

    当前国内外对钢渣的利用率不高,急需拓展经济、高效的钢渣利用途径。以钢渣粉为主要胶凝材料组分,用钢渣砂、钢渣石为集料配制混凝土,采用 CO2进行养护,研究碳化养护对钢渣混凝土强度和体积稳定性能的影响。结果表明:经碳化养护后,混凝土抗压强度显著提高,碳化14 d 强度提高3.2~5.3倍,最高可达65.3 MPa,且碳化时间越长,试件碳化深度越大、pH 值越低、碳化程度越高,混凝土强度也越高。碳化过程中生成碳化产物方解石 CaCO3(碳酸钙镁 CaxMg1–xCO3),使混凝土结构更加致密,吸水率降低。钢渣砂和钢渣石作集料也可被碳化,碳化后钢渣砂、钢渣石混凝土强度高于天然砂、天然石混凝土强度,混凝土体积稳定性得到明显改善。%Currently the utilization ratio of steel-making slag is relatively low, and hence there is a need to seek for new economical ways to use the steel slag. In this study, steel slag concretes were prepared by using ground steel slag powders as partial replacements of Portland cement at different levels and/or using the coarse steel slag directly as aggregates as substitutions of river sands and coarse aggregates. The steel slag concretes were then exposed to CO2 curing to investigate the influences of carbonation on the compressive strength and volume stability of the concretes. The results show that the compressive strengths of steel slag concretes increased significantly after the carbonation curing, which increased by 3.2–5.3 times after 14 d of carbonation and moreover the highest compressive strength reached 65.3 MPa. Prolonging the carbonation curing time facilitated the carbonation reaction, and hence increased the carbonation depths, decreased the pH values and enhanced the strength gain of steel slag concretes. The treatment of CO2 curing decreased the water absorption of concrete specimens due to the microstructure

  14. Carbon dioxide, argon, nitrogen and methane clathrate hydrates: Thermodynamic modelling, investigation of their stability in Martian atmospheric conditions and variability of methane trapping

    OpenAIRE

    Herri, Jean-Michel; Chassefière, Eric

    2012-01-01

    This paper deals with the stability of clahtrate hydrates at low temperature and low pressure in the conditions prevailing in the atmosphere and at the surface of Mars. We fit the classical van der Waals model to compare deviation from experimental results published in the literature. It appears to be acceptable and allows to simulating a Martian gas, CO2 dominated (95.3%) plus nitrogen (2.7%) and argon (2%). The hydrate is a CO2-based hydrate which is unstable during Mars' summer and stable ...

  15. High Area Capacity Lithium-Sulfur Full-cell Battery with Prelitiathed Silicon Nanowire-Carbon Anodes for Long Cycling Stability

    OpenAIRE

    Andreas Krause; Susanne Dörfler; Markus Piwko; Florian M. Wisser; Tony Jaumann; Eike Ahrens; Lars Giebeler; Holger Althues; Stefan Schädlich; Julia Grothe; Andrea Jeffery; Matthias Grube; Jan Brückner; Jan Martin; Jürgen Eckert

    2016-01-01

    We show full Li/S cells with the use of balanced and high capacity electrodes to address high power electro-mobile applications. The anode is made of an assembly comprising of silicon nanowires as active material densely and conformally grown on a 3D carbon mesh as a light-weight current collector, offering extremely high areal capacity for reversible Li storage of up to 9 mAh/cm2. The dense growth is guaranteed by a versatile Au precursor developed for homogenous Au layer deposition on 3D su...

  16. Expanding maps, shrinking targets and hitting times

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We study the (metric) Diophantine approximation properties of uniformly expanding transformations and some non-uniformly expanding transformations, i.e. transformations T(x) with an associated countable (not necessarily finite) partition and a return time function R(x) (constant on the blocks of the partition) so that T-circumflex(x)=TR(x)(x) is uniformly expanding, and we obtain Borel–Cantelli results on hitting times of shrinking targets. Our arguments do not require the so-called big image property for T-circumflex and our results contain most of the diversity of examples of slowly mixing systems. We also obtain, with related techniques, results for one-sided topological Markov chains over a countable alphabet with a Gibbs measure. (paper)

  17. Strong shock in the uniformly expanding medium

    CERN Document Server

    Bisnovatyi-Kogan, G S

    2014-01-01

    Propagation of the strong shock in the flat expanding Friedman universe is investigated using methods of dimension and similarity. Exact analytic solution of self-similar equations is obtained, determining dependences of the radius and velocity of the shock wave on time and radius. It is obtained, that in the expanding medium the velocity of shock decreases as $\\sim t^{-1/5}$, what is slower than the shock velocity in the static uniform medium $\\sim t^{-3/5}$. The radius of the shock wave in the expanding self-gravitating medium increases $\\sim t^{4/5}$, more rapidly than the shock wave radius in the uniform non-gravitating medium $\\sim t^{2/5}$. So, the shock propagates in the direction of decreasing density with larger speed, that in the static medium, due to accelerating action of the decreasing density, even in the presence of a self-gravitation.

  18. Conditions for Emergence, Stability and Change in New Organizations in the Field of Citizens Climate Action

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Figueroa, Maria Josefina

    Climate change represents a crisis of tangible measure and the emergence of a field of action within which acting today needs to be motivated for what can contribute to benefit climate and transform society into a low carbon tomorrow. With the breadth and scope of citizen action on climate change...... expanding worldwide the weight of expectations can be boiled down to two: One refers to their potential for delivering specific mitigation/adaptation goals; the second refers to their organizational potential, stability and the manner in which they can ultimately affect societal transformational change....... This contribution is concerned with the latter. It proposes that using field analysis it is possible to understand conditions of emergence, stability and change in citizen engagement in climate action. The present contribution offers only a preliminary exploration of possibilities for how using field...

  19. Mechanistic Insights into the Enhanced Activity and Stability of Agglomerated Cu Nanocrystals for the Electrochemical Reduction of Carbon Dioxide to n-Propanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Dan; Wong, Nian Tee; Handoko, Albertus Denny; Huang, Yun; Yeo, Boon Siang

    2016-01-01

    The reduction of carbon dioxide (CO2) to n-propanol (CH3CH2CH2OH) using renewable electricity is a potentially sustainable route to the production of this valuable engine fuel. In this study, we report that agglomerates of ∼15 nm sized copper nanocrystals exhibited unprecedented catalytic activity for this electrochemical reaction in aqueous 0.1 M KHCO3. The onset potential for the formation of n-propanol was 200-300 mV more positive than for an electropolished Cu surface or Cu(0) nanoparticles. At -0.95 V (vs RHE), n-propanol was formed on the Cu nanocrystals with a high current density (jn-propanol) of -1.74 mA/cm(2), which is ∼25× larger than that found on Cu(0) nanoparticles at the same applied potential. The Cu nanocrystals were also catalytically stable for at least 6 h, and only 14% deactivation was observed after 12 h of CO2 reduction. Mechanistic studies suggest that n-propanol could be formed through the C-C coupling of carbon monoxide and ethylene precursors. The enhanced activity of the Cu nanocrystals toward n-propanol formation was correlated to their surface population of defect sites. PMID:26740140

  20. [Effect of Long-term Fertilizer Application on the Stability of Organic Carbon in Particle Size Fractions of a Paddy Soil in Zhejiang Province, China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Xia-li; Lu, Kou-ping; Sun, Tao; Zhang, Xiao-kai; He, Li-zhi; Wang, Hai-long

    2015-05-01

    Effects of chemical fertilizers and organic manure on the soil organic carbon (SOC) content in particle size fractions of paddy soil were investigated in a 17-year long-term fertilization field experiment in Zhejiang Province, China. The inherent chemical composition of silt- and clay-associated SOC was evaluated with solid-state 13C-NMR spectroscopy. Compared to CK (no fertilizer treatment), NPKRS (NPK fertilizers plus rice straw) , NPKOM (NPK fertilizers plus organic manure) , NPK (NPK fertilizers) and OM (organic manure alone) treatments significantly (P decomposition rate of SOC. The aromaticity, hydrophobicity and, hence, chemical recalcitrance of silt- and clay-associated SOC in the NPK fertilizer treatments were lower than those of the organically amended plots and unfertilized treatments, indicating decreased recalcitrance of SOC against decomposition. We concluded that long-term application of organic manure combined with chemical fertilizers, either through increased accumulation of both recalcitrant compounds and carbohydrates or reduced decomposition of organic matter, was a sustainable strategy for facilitating carbon accumulation of the paddy soil investigated in this study. PMID:26314136

  1. 2D quasi-ordered nitrogen-enriched porous carbon nanohybrids for high energy density supercapacitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kan, Kan; Wang, Lei; Yu, Peng; Jiang, Baojiang; Shi, Keying; Fu, Honggang

    2016-05-21

    Two-dimensional (2D) quasi-ordered nitrogen-enriched porous carbon (QNPC) nanohybrids, with the characteristics of an ultrathin graphite nanosheet framework and thick quasi-ordered nitrogen-doped carbon cladding with a porous texture, have been synthesized via an in situ polymerization assembly method. In the synthesis, the expandable graphite (EG) is enlarged by an intermittent microwave method, and then aniline monomers are intercalated into the interlayers of the expanded EG with the assistance of a vacuum. Subsequently, the intercalated aniline monomers could assemble on the interlayer surface of the expanded EG, accompanied by the in situ polymerization from aniline monomers to polyaniline. Meanwhile, the expanded EG could be exfoliated to graphite nanosheets. By subsequent pyrolysis and activation processes, the QNPC nanohybrids could be prepared. As supercapacitor electrodes, a typical QNPC12-700 sample derived from the precursor containing an EG content of 12%, with a high level of nitrogen doping of 5.22 at%, offers a high specific capacitance of 305.7 F g(-1) (1 A g(-1)), excellent rate-capability and long-term stability. Notably, an extremely high energy density of 95.7 Wh kg(-1) at a power density of 449.7 W kg(-1) in an ionic liquid electrolyte can be achieved. The unique structural features and moderate heteroatom doping of the QNPC nanohybrids combines electrochemical double layer and faradaic capacitance contributions, which make these nanohybrids ideal candidates as electrode materials for high-performance energy storage devices. PMID:27122446

  2. Li1.2Mn0.54Ni0.13Co0.13O2-Encapsulated Carbon Nanofiber Network Cathodes with Improved Stability and Rate Capability for Li-ion Batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Dingtao; Zhang, Peixin; Li, Yongliang; Ren, Xiangzhong

    2015-06-01

    Li1.2Mn0.54Ni0.13Co0.13O2-encapsulated carbon nanofiber network cathode materials were synthesized by a facile electrospinning method. The microstructures, morphologies and electrochemical properties are characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM), galvonostatic charge/discharge tests, cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), etc. The nanofiber decorated Li1.2Mn0.54Ni0.13Co0.13O2 electrode demonstrated higher coulombic efficiency of 83.5%, and discharge capacity of 263.7 mAh g-1 at 1 C as well as higher stability compared to the pristine particle counterpart. The superior electrochemical performance results from the novel network structure which provides fast transport channels for electrons and lithium ions and the outer carbon acts a protection layer which prevents the inner oxides from reacting with HF in the electrolyte during charge-discharge cycling.

  3. A comparison of redox polymer and enzyme co-immobilization on carbon electrodes to provide membrane-less glucose/O2 enzymatic fuel cells with improved power output and stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rengaraj, Saravanan; Kavanagh, Paul; Leech, Dónal

    2011-12-15

    Glassy carbon and graphite electrodes modified with films of enzyme and osmium redox polymer, cross linked with poly (ethylene glycol) diglycidyl ether, were used for elaboration of a glucose/O(2) enzymatic fuel cell. The redox polymers [Os(4,4'-dimethoxy-2,2'-bipyridine)(2)(polyvinylimidazole)(10)Cl](+) and [Os(4,4'-dichloro-2,2'-bipyridine)(2)(polyvinylimidazole)(10)Cl](+) were selected to facilitate transfer of electrons from the glucose oxidase (GOx) active site to the T1 Cu site of multicopper oxygenases of Trametes hirsuta laccase (ThLacc) and Myrothecium verrucaria bilirubin oxidase (MvBOD). Maximum power density at pH 5.5 of 3.5 μW cm(-2) at a cell voltage of 0.35 V was obtained for an assembled membrane-less fuel cell based on ThLacc on glassy carbon as cathode, in the presence of 0.1 M glucose, 37 °C, with lower power observed at pH 7.4 and 4.5. Replacement of the ThLacc cathode with that of MvBOD produced 10 μW cm(-2) at 0.25 V under pseudo-physiological conditions. Replacement of glassy carbon with graphite as base electrode material resulted in increased redox polymer loading, leading to an increase in power output to 43 μW cm(-2) at 0.25 V under similar conditions. Improved stabilization of biofilms was achieved through covalent anchoring of enzyme and redox polymer on graphite electrodes, derivatized via electrochemical reduction of the diazonium cation generated in situ from p-phenylenediamine. Enzymatic fuel cells using this approach retained 70% power at 24 h, whereas fuel cells prepared without chemical anchoring to graphite retained only 10% of power over the same interval. PMID:22005596

  4. Graphene for Expandable Space Structures Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Graphene's tightly bonded impermeable single atomic layer of carbon offers unrivalled potential for lightweight flexible gas barrier applications. Graphene has been...

  5. Si xC 1- xO 2 alloys: A possible route to stabilize carbon-based silica-like solids?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aravindh, Assa; Arkundato, Artoto; Barman, Sonali; Baroni, Stefano; Bhargava, B. L.; Chandrakumar, K. R. S.; Chen, Wei; Cherian, Roby; Corso, Andrea Dal; Datta, Soumendu; de Gironcoli, Stefano; Dhayal, Suman S.; Dixit, Alok Kumar; Dutta, Sudipta; D'yachkov, Pavel; Floare, Calin Gabriel; Ganguli, Nirmal; Ganguly, Shreemoyee; Gebauer, Ralph; Ghosh, Saurabh; Giannozzi, Paolo; Govind; Hatt, Alison J.; Hembram, K. P. S. S.; Imam, Mighfar; Jayalakshmi, V.; Jayanthi, C. S.; Kelkar, Tuhina; Anil Kumar; Lee, Jun Hee; Lee, Mal-Soon; Lonappan, Dayana; Mahadevan, Priya; Mallajosyula, Sairam Swaroop; Marathe, Madhura; Marzari, Nicola; Melot, Brent; Miller, Nicholas; Morrone, Joseph; Nanavati, Sachin; Nanayakkara, Asiri; Nandi, Prithwish Kumar; Narasimhan, Shobhana; Natarajan, Bhaarati; Parvin, Fahmida; Paul, Sujata; Pradhan, Kalpataru; Praveena, G.; Prasad, Dasari L. V. K.; Poswal, Himanshu K.; Pujari, Bhalchandra; Pushpa, Raghani; Reddy, K. Hari Krishna; Saha, Srijan Kumar; Sbraccia, Carlo; Scandolo, Sandro; Seal, Prasenjit; Shafai, Ghazal S.; Shanavas, K. V.; Simrall, James O. H.; Srirangarajan, Aarti; Srivastava, Vipul; Talati, Mina K.; Tantirungrotechai, Yuthana; Tarafder, Kartick; Thomas, Tiju; Uthayathasan, T.

    2007-11-01

    Novel extended tetrahedral forms of CO 2 have been synthesized recently under high-pressure conditions. We perform ab initio density functional theory calculations to investigate whether doping with Si can extend the stability range of such tetrahedral forms of CO 2 to ambient pressure. Calculations are performed with a simple cubic cell containing eight formula units in a β-cristobalite-like structure. Though we find that all the Si xC 1- xO 2 structures considered by us are thermodynamically unstable with respect to decomposition into the end members at ambient pressures, the energy differences are small, suggesting that it might be possible for such phases to exist in metastable forms. At higher pressures, the heat of formation is found to be negative. The bonding between C and O atoms is more covalent than that between Si and O atoms. We also find indications that some C atoms may prefer three-fold coordination at low pressure.

  6. Thermal stability and long term hydrogen/deuterium release from soft to hard amorphous carbon layers analyzed using in-situ Raman spectroscopy. Comparison with Tore Supra deposits

    CERN Document Server

    Pardanaud, C; Giacometti, G; Mellet, N; Pégourié, B; Roubin, P

    2015-01-01

    The thermal stability of 200 nm thick plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposited a-C:H and a-C:D layers ranging from soft to hard layers has been studied and compared to that of deposits collected on the Tore Supra tokamak plasma facing components by means of in-situ Raman spectroscopy. Linear ramp heating and long term isotherms (from several minutes to 21 days) have been performed and correlations between spectrometric parameters have been found. The information obtained on the sp 2 clustering has been investigated by comparing the G band shift and the 514 nm photon absorption evolution due to the thermal treatment of the layer. The effects of isotopic substitution have also been investigated.

  7. Responsible implementation of expanded carrier screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henneman, Lidewij; Borry, Pascal; Chokoshvili, Davit; Cornel, Martina C; van El, Carla G; Forzano, Francesca; Hall, Alison; Howard, Heidi C; Janssens, Sandra; Kayserili, Hülya; Lakeman, Phillis; Lucassen, Anneke; Metcalfe, Sylvia A; Vidmar, Lovro; de Wert, Guido; Dondorp, Wybo J; Peterlin, Borut

    2016-06-01

    This document of the European Society of Human Genetics contains recommendations regarding responsible implementation of expanded carrier screening. Carrier screening is defined here as the detection of carrier status of recessive diseases in couples or persons who do not have an a priori increased risk of being a carrier based on their or their partners' personal or family history. Expanded carrier screening offers carrier screening for multiple autosomal and X-linked recessive disorders, facilitated by new genetic testing technologies, and allows testing of individuals regardless of ancestry or geographic origin. Carrier screening aims to identify couples who have an increased risk of having an affected child in order to facilitate informed reproductive decision making. In previous decades, carrier screening was typically performed for one or few relatively common recessive disorders associated with significant morbidity, reduced life-expectancy and often because of a considerable higher carrier frequency in a specific population for certain diseases. New genetic testing technologies enable the expansion of screening to multiple conditions, genes or sequence variants. Expanded carrier screening panels that have been introduced to date have been advertised and offered to health care professionals and the public on a commercial basis. This document discusses the challenges that expanded carrier screening might pose in the context of the lessons learnt from decades of population-based carrier screening and in the context of existing screening criteria. It aims to contribute to the public and professional discussion and to arrive at better clinical and laboratory practice guidelines. PMID:26980105

  8. Local symmetries of non-expanding horizons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Local symmetries of a non-expanding horizon have been investigated in the first-order formulation of gravity. When applied to spherically symmetric horizons, only a U(1) subgroup of the Lorentz group survives as a residual local symmetry that one can make use of in constructing an effective theory on the horizon. (paper)

  9. Symmetry reduction on non-expanding horizons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Local symmetries of a non-expanding horizon have been investigated in the 1st order formulation of gravity. When applied to a spherically symmetric horizons, only a U(1) subgroup of the Lorentz group survives as residual local symmetry that one can make use of in constructing an effective theory on the horizon

  10. Expanding CTE Opportunities through Blended Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinstry, Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    The global economy, 21st century skills, knowledge society, college and career readiness, digital and project-based learning are all common terms to educators who are expanding their learning environments beyond the classroom to meet the needs of all students. It is common knowledge that the rapid technological advances of this century have…

  11. Expanding clinical spectrum and broadening therapeutic horizons

    OpenAIRE

    Ombrello, Michael J.; Kastner, Daniel L.

    2011-01-01

    In 2010, important research into the systemic autoinflammatory diseases has confirmed and extended the role of IL-1 inhibition in hereditary autoinflammatory disorders, demonstrated a novel treatment for a dangerous complication, and expanded the spectrum of systemic autoinflammatory diseases while further implicating autoinflammation in the pathophysiology of the metabolic syndrome.

  12. Expanding the applicability of Heallth Technology Assessments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Draborg, Eva; Hansen, Helle Ploug

    2012-01-01

    The objective of the presentation is to expand the foundations of input into policy decision making relying on health technology assessments (HTA). HTAs are primarily based on systematic reviews (SR) and thereby mostly on randomized controlled trials (RCT). RCTs can be distinguished on a continuu...

  13. Descending entropy in expanding the universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portnov, Yuriy A.

    2015-11-01

    Inter-relation between 1-form of nonmetricity and change of entropy in the course of time is considered in the study. It is shown that change of entropy in expanding universe will be always negative. The obtained result contravenes the second law of thermodynamics, however it explains available ordered macrostructures in the universe.

  14. Expanding Your Horizons Conference in Geneva

    CERN Multimedia

    Chromek-Burckhart, Doris

    2011-01-01

    CERN and its experiments participated in Expanding Your Horizons (EYH) in Science and Mathematics conference in Geneva on 12th November. EYH nurture girls' interest in science and math courses to encourage them to consider careers in science, technology, engineering, and math.

  15. Expanded austenite, crystallography and residual stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Thomas; Hummelshøj, Thomas Strabo; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2010-01-01

    The identity of expanded austenite as developing during low temperature nitriding and/or carburising of austenitic stainless steel has been under debate since the very first observation of this phase. In the present article, recent results obtained with (a) homogeneous samples of various uniform ...

  16. Expanded austenite; crystallography and residual stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Thomas; Hummelshøj, Thomas Strabo; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2009-01-01

    The identity of expanded austenite as developing during low temperature nitriding and/or carburizing of austenitic stainless steel has been under debate since the very first observation of this phase. In the present article recent results obtained with i) homogeneous samples of various uniform co...

  17. Expanded austenite; crystallography and residual stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Thomas; Hummelshøj, Thomas Strabo; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    The identity of expanded austenite as developing during low temperature nitriding and/or carburizing of austenitic stainless steel has been under debate since the very first observation of this phase. In the present article recent results obtained with i) homogeneous samples of various uniform co...

  18. Facile synthesis of CdS/C core-shell nanospheres with ultrathin carbon layer for enhanced photocatalytic properties and stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jing; Zhang, Fu; Zhao, Yu-Ling; Guo, Yan-Chuan; Gong, Peijun; Li, Zheng-Quan; Qian, Hai-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we described a facile one-pot hydrothermal process developed to synthesize CdS/C core-shell nanospheres successfully. The as-prepared CdS/C core-shell nanospheres are with 100 nm in diameter and the amorphous carbon shell is with several nanometers in thickness. The phase, morphology and structures of the samples were investigated by X-ray power diffraction (XRD) analyses, field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM, JEOL-6700F) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM, JEOL 3010); respectively. The as-prepared CdS/C core-shell nanospheres showed enhanced photocatalytic properties and photostability compared to the single counterpart of CdS nanospheres owing to the efficiently separation of photogenerated electrons (e-) and holes (h+) derived from the photocatalyst. In addition, the as-prepared CdS/C core-shell nanospheres might find wide application in wastewater treatment, solar cells, lithium ion batteries, etc.

  19. Microbial biomass, microbial diversity, soil carbon storage, and stability after incubation of soil from grass-clover pastures of different age

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller-Stöver, Dorette Sophie; Hauggaard-Nielsen, Henrik; Eriksen, Jørgen;

    2012-01-01

    A laboratory incubation study with clover grass pasture soils of seven different ages (0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and 16 production years) was carried out to determine initial soil carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) stocks and potentials for greenhouse gas emissions (N2O and CO2). Compared with the soil from the......-clover. Low emissions might mainly be due to an early C limitation occurring in the soils from younger pastures, which was also corroborated by decreasing levels of cold water-extractable C and early shifts within the microbial community. However, higher emissions from the old pasture soil were offset by its...... recently established pasture, an increase of total soil C and N was observed along with pasture age. Greenhouse gas emissions were low and not significantly different among the soils from younger pastures (0-5 years), but especially N2O emissions increased markedly in the soil from 16-year-old grass...

  20. Stability constants important to the understanding of plutonium in environmental waters, hydroxy and carbonate complexation of PuO{sub 2}{sup +}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bennett, D A [California Univ., Berkeley, CA (USA). Dept. of Chemistry

    1990-04-20

    The formation constants for the reactions PuO{sub 2}{sup +} + H{sub 2}O = PuO{sub 2}(OH) + H{sup +} and PuO{sub 2}{sup +} + CO{sub 3}{sup 2} = PuO{sub 2}(CO{sub 3}){sup {minus}} were determined in aqueous sodium perchlorate solutions by laser-induced photoacoustic spectroscopy. The molar absorptivity of the PuO{sub 2}{sup +} band at 569 nm decreased with increasing hydroxide concentration. Similarly, spectral changes occurred between 540 and 580 nm as the carbonate concentration was increased. The absorption data were analyzed by the non-linear least-squares program SQUAD to yield complexation constants. Using the specific ion interaction theory, both complexation constants were extrapolated to zero ionic strength. These thermodynamic complexation constants were combined with the oxidation-reduction potentials of Pu to obtain Eh versus pH diagrams. 120 refs., 35 figs., 12 tabs.

  1. Refrigeration generation using expander-generator units

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimenko, A. V.; Agababov, V. S.; Koryagin, A. V.; Baidakova, Yu. O.

    2016-05-01

    The problems of using the expander-generator unit (EGU) to generate refrigeration, along with electricity were considered. It is shown that, on the level of the temperatures of refrigeration flows using the EGU, one can provide the refrigeration supply of the different consumers: ventilation and air conditioning plants and industrial refrigerators and freezers. The analysis of influence of process parameters on the cooling power of the EGU, which depends on the parameters of the gas expansion process in the expander and temperatures of cooled environment, was carried out. The schematic diagram of refrigeration generation plant based on EGU is presented. The features and advantages of EGU to generate refrigeration compared with thermotransformer of steam compressive and absorption types were shown, namely: there is no need to use the energy generated by burning fuel to operate the EGU; beneficial use of the heat delivered to gas from the flow being cooled in equipment operating on gas; energy production along with refrigeration generation, which makes it possible to create, using EGU, the trigeneration plants without using the energy power equipment. It is shown that the level of the temperatures of refrigeration flows, which can be obtained by using the EGU on existing technological decompression stations of the transported gas, allows providing the refrigeration supply of various consumers. The information that the refrigeration capacity of an expander-generator unit not only depends on the parameters of the process of expansion of gas flowing in the expander (flow rate, temperatures and pressures at the inlet and outlet) but it is also determined by the temperature needed for a consumer and the initial temperature of the flow of the refrigeration-carrier being cooled. The conclusion was made that the expander-generator units can be used to create trigeneration plants both at major power plants and at small energy.

  2. Dispersion stability of water soluble ultrafine carbon black in N-methyl morpholine-N-oxide solution%水性超细炭黑在N-甲基吗啉-N-氧化物溶液中的分散稳定性

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张凯; 付少海; 田安丽; 王潮霞; 张霞

    2012-01-01

    The water soluble ultrafine carbon black and encapsulated ultrafine carbon black that were suitable for dope dyeing of Lyocell fiber were prepared by direct dispersing method and emulsion polymerization method, respectively, and the particle size of the ultrafine carbon black obtained with different methods and their dispersion stabilities in the N-methyl morpholine-N-oxide (NMMO) solution were investigated. Experimental results revealed that the average particle size of encapsulated ultrafine carbon black was obviously smaller than that of dispersive ultrafine carbon black and its centrifugal stability and thermal stability in NMMO solution were higher than those of dispersive ultrafine carbon black. The apparent viscosity of NMMO solution decreased when encapsulated carbon was added,and the more amount of encapsulated carbon added,the lower viscosity of NMMO solution was.%采用直接分散法和乳液聚合法分别制备了可用于Lyocell纤维原液着色用的水性分散型超细炭黑和包覆型超细炭黑,研究了不同方法制成的超细炭黑的粒子大小以及在N-甲基吗啉-N-氧化物(NMMO)溶液中的分散稳定性.结果表明:包覆型超细炭黑的平均粒径明显小于分散型超细炭黑,且在NMMO溶液中的离心稳定性和耐热稳定性高于分散型超细炭黑;NMMO溶液中加入包覆型超细炭黑,其黏度明显下降,且加入量越大,黏度下降越明显.

  3. A new alternative to expandable pedicle screws: Expandable poly-ether-ether-ketone shell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demir, Teyfik

    2015-05-01

    Screw pullout is a very common problem in the fixation of sacrum with pedicle screws. The principal cause of this problem is that the cyclic micro motions in the fixation of sacrum are higher than the other regions of the vertebrae that limit the osteo-integration between bone and screw. In addition to that, the bone quality is very poor at sacrum region. This study investigated a possible solution to the pullout problem without the expandable screws' handicaps. Newly designed poly-ether-ether-ketone expandable shell and classical pedicle screws were biomechanically compared. Torsion test, pullout tests, fatigue tests, flexion/extension moment test, axial gripping capacity tests and torsional gripping capacity tests were conducted in accordance with ASTM F543, F1798 and F1717. Standard polyurethane foam and calf vertebrae were used as embedding medium for pullout tests. Classical pedicle screw pullout load on polyurethane foam was 564.8 N compared to the failure load for calf vertebrae's 1264 N. Under the same test conditions, expandable poly-ether-ether-ketone shell system's pullout loads from polyurethane foam and calf vertebrae were 1196.3 and 1890 N, respectively. The pullout values for expandable poly-ether-ether-ketone shell were 33% and 53% higher than classical pedicle screw on polyurethane foam and calf vertebrae, respectively. The expandable poly-ether-ether-ketone shell exhibited endurance on its 90% of yield load. Contrary to poly-ether-ether-ketone shell, classical pedicle screw exhibited endurance on 70% of its yield load. Expandable poly-ether-ether-ketone shell exhibited much higher pullout performance than classical pedicle screw. Fatigue performance of expandable poly-ether-ether-ketone shell is also higher than classical pedicle screw due to damping the micro motion capacity of the poly-ether-ether-ketone. Expandable poly-ether-ether-ketone shell is a safe alternative to all other expandable pedicle screw systems on mechanical perspective

  4. Batch Tests To Determine Activity Distribution and Kinetic Parameters for Acetate Utilization in Expanded-Bed Anaerobic Reactors

    OpenAIRE

    Fox, Peter; Suidan, Makram T.

    1990-01-01

    Batch tests to measure maximum acetate utilization rates were used to determine the distribution of acetate utilizers in expanded-bed sand and expanded-bed granular activated carbon (GAC) reactors. The reactors were fed a mixture of acetate and 3-ethylphenol, and they contained the same predominant aceticlastic methanogen, Methanothrix sp. Batch tests were performed both on the entire reactor contents and with media removed from the reactors. Results indicated that activity was evenly distrib...

  5. Carbon Farming as a Carbon Negative Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, C.; Laird, D.; Hayes, D. J.

    2015-12-01

    Carbon farms have a pivotal role in national and international efforts to mitigate and adapt to climate change. A carbon farm in its broadest sense is one that reduces greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions or captures and holds carbon in vegetation and soils. Their capacity to remove carbon from the air and store it safely and permanently, while providing additional human and ecosystem benefits, means they could contribute significantly to national efforts to stabilize or reduce GHGs. We examine carbon farms in the context of corn and soybean production agriculture. We illustrate, using Iowa data but with relevance across United States corn and soybean production, the potential for carbon farms to reduce human GHG emissions and sequester carbon permanently at a rate that has meaningful impact on global greenhouse gas concentration. Carbon has been viewed as a next generation cash crop in Iowa for over a decade. The carbon farm perspective, however, goes beyond carbon as cash crop to make carbon the center of an entire farm enterprise. The transformation is possible through slight adjustment crop practices mixed with advances in technology to sequester carbon through biochar. We examine carbon balance of Iowa agriculture given only the combination of slight reduction in fertilizer and sequestration by biochar. We find the following. Iowa carbon farms could turn Iowa agriculture into a carbon sink. The estimated range of GHG reduction by statewide implementation of carbon farms is 19.46 to 90.27 MMt CO2-equivalent (CO2-e), while the current agricultural CO2-e emission estimate is 35.38 MMt CO2-e. Iowa carbon farm GHG reduction would exceed Iowa GHG reduction by wind energy (8.7 MMt CO2-e) and could exceed combined reductions from wind energy and corn grain ethanol (10.7 MMt CO2-e; 19.4 MMt CO2-e combined). In fact, Iowa carbon farms alone could exceed GHG reduction from national corn grain ethanol production (39.6 MMt CO2-e). A carbon price accessible to agricultural

  6. Against Stabilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger Mac Ginty

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available This is a polemic against the concept and practice of stabilization as practiced by leading states from the global north in peace support interventions. It is not an argument against stability. Instead, it depicts stabilization as an essentially conservative doctrine that runs counter to its stated aims of enhancing local participation and legitimacy. It is an agenda of control that privileges notions of assimilation with international (western standards and mainstreams the military into peace-support operations. As a result, the value of peace is undercut.

  7. Responses of RAW264.7 macrophages to water-dispersible gold and silver nanoparticles stabilized by metal-carbon σ-bonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Masanori; Toshima, Hirokazu; Yonezawa, Tetsu; Kawai, Koji; Narushima, Takashi; Kaga, Masayuki; Endo, Kazuhiko

    2014-06-01

    Nanometals are currently receiving considerable attention for industrial and biomedical applications, but their potentially hazardous and toxic effects have not been extensively studied. This study evaluated the biological responses of novel water-dispersible gold (Au-NPs) and silver nanoparticles (Ag-NPs) stabilized by Au-C or Ag-C σ-bonds in cultured macrophages (RAW264.7), via analysis of the cell viability, the integrity of the plasma membrane, and the inflammatory and morphological properties. The cultured RAW264.7 was exposed to metal-NPs at various concentrations. The Ag-NPs showed cytotoxicity at high NP concentrations, but the cytotoxic effects of the Au-NPs were smaller than those of the Ag-NPs. For the microscopic analysis, both types of particles were internalized into cells, the morphological changes in the cells which manifested as an expansion of the vesicles' volume, were smaller for the Au-NPs compared with the Ag-NPs. For the Ag-NPs, the endocytosis abilities of the macrophages might have induced harmful effects, because of the expansion of the cell vesicles. Although an inflammatory response was observed for both the Au- and Ag-NPs, the harmful effects of the Au-NPs were smaller than those of the Ag-NPs, with minor morphological changes observed even after internalization of the NPs into the cells. PMID:23784947

  8. Integrating science, economics and law into policy: The case of carbon sequestration in climate change policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Kenneth

    Carbon sequestration, the extraction and storage of carbon from the atmosphere by biomass, could potentially provide a cost-effective means to reduce net greenhouse gas emissions. The claims on behalf of carbon sequestration may be inadvertently overstated, however. Several key observations emerge from this study. First, although carbon sequestration studies all report results in terms of dollars per ton, the definition of that term varies significantly, meaning that the results of various analyses can not be meaningfully compared. Second, when carbon sequestration is included in an energy-economy model of climate change policy, it appears that carbon sequestration could play a major, if not dominant role in a national carbon emission abatement program, reducing costs of emissions stabilization by as much as 80 percent, saving tens of billions of dollars per year. However, the results are very dependant upon landowners' perceived risk. Studies may also have overstated the potential for carbon sequestration because they have not considered the implementation process. This study demonstrates that three factors will reduce the cost-effectiveness of carbon sequestration. First, the implementation costs associated with measurement and governance of the government-private sector relation are higher than in the case of carbon source control. Second, legal constraints limit the range of instruments that the government can use to induce private landowners to expand their carbon sinks. The government will likely have to pay private parties to expand their sinks, or undertake direct government production. In either case, additional revenues will be required, introducing social costs associated with excess burden. Third, because of the very long time involved in developing carbon sinks (up to several decades) the government may not be able to make credible commitments against exactions of one type or another that would effectively reduce the value of private sector investments

  9. High Area Capacity Lithium-Sulfur Full-cell Battery with Prelitiathed Silicon Nanowire-Carbon Anodes for Long Cycling Stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Andreas; Dörfler, Susanne; Piwko, Markus; Wisser, Florian M.; Jaumann, Tony; Ahrens, Eike; Giebeler, Lars; Althues, Holger; Schädlich, Stefan; Grothe, Julia; Jeffery, Andrea; Grube, Matthias; Brückner, Jan; Martin, Jan; Eckert, Jürgen; Kaskel, Stefan; Mikolajick, Thomas; Weber, Walter M.

    2016-01-01

    We show full Li/S cells with the use of balanced and high capacity electrodes to address high power electro-mobile applications. The anode is made of an assembly comprising of silicon nanowires as active material densely and conformally grown on a 3D carbon mesh as a light-weight current collector, offering extremely high areal capacity for reversible Li storage of up to 9 mAh/cm2. The dense growth is guaranteed by a versatile Au precursor developed for homogenous Au layer deposition on 3D substrates. In contrast to metallic Li, the presented system exhibits superior characteristics as an anode in Li/S batteries such as safe operation, long cycle life and easy handling. These anodes are combined with high area density S/C composite cathodes into a Li/S full-cell with an ether- and lithium triflate-based electrolyte for high ionic conductivity. The result is a highly cyclable full-cell with an areal capacity of 2.3 mAh/cm2, a cyclability surpassing 450 cycles and capacity retention of 80% after 150 cycles (capacity loss <0.4% per cycle). A detailed physical and electrochemical investigation of the SiNW Li/S full-cell including in-operando synchrotron X-ray diffraction measurements reveals that the lower degradation is due to a lower self-reduction of polysulfides after continuous charging/discharging. PMID:27319783

  10. Stability analysis of carbon nanotubes based on a novel beam model and Its comparison with Sanders Shell Model and molecular dynamics simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We study the effects of small-scale parameter on the buckling loads and strains of nanobeams, based on nonlocal Timoshenko beam model. However, the lack of higher order boundary conditions leads to inconsistencies in critical buckling loads. In this paper, we apply a novel approach based on nonlocal Timoshenko kinematics, strain gradient approach and variational methods for deriving all classical and higher-order boundary conditions as well as governing equations. Therefore, closed-form and exact critical buckling loads of nanobeams with various end conditions are investigated. Moreover, the dependence of buckling loads on the small-scale parameter as well as shear deformation coefficient is studied using these new boundary conditions. Then, numerical results from this new beam model are presented for carbon nanotubes (CNTs). They illustrate a more accurate buckling response as compared to the previous works. Furthermore, the critical strains are compared with results obtained from molecular dynamic simulations as well as Sanders shell theory and are found to be in good agreement. Results show that unlike the other beam theories, this model can capture correctly the small-scale effects on buckling strains of short CNTs for the shell-type buckling. Moreover, the value of nonlocal constant is calculated for CNTs using molecular dynamic simulation results. (author)

  11. Facile one-step synthesis of nanocomposite based on carbon nanotubes and Nickel-Aluminum layered double hydroxides with high cycling stability for supercapacitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Caihui; Sun, Shiguo; Xu, Yongqian; Yu, Ruijin; Li, Hongjuan

    2016-10-15

    Nickel-Aluminum Layered Double Hydroxide (NiAl-LDH) and nanocomposite of Carbon Nanotubes (CNTs) and NiAl-LDH (CNTs/NiAl-LDH) were prepared by using a facile one-step homogeneous precipitation approach. The morphology, structure and electrochemical properties of the as-prepared CNTs/NiAl-LDH nanocomposite were then systematically studied. According to the galvanostatic charge-discharge curves, the CNTs/NiAl-LDH nanocomposite exhibited a high specific capacitance of 694Fg(-1) at the 1Ag(-1). Furthermore, the specific capacitance of the CNTs/NiAl-LDH nanocomposite still retained 87% when the current density was increased from 1 to 10Ag(-1). These results indicated that the CNTs/NiAl-LDH nanocomposite displayed a higher specific capacitance and rate capability than pure NiAl-LDH. And the participation of CNTs in the NiAl-LDH composite improved the electrochemical properties. Additionally, the capacitance of the CNTs/NiAl-LDH nanocomposite kept at least 92% after 3000cycles at 20Ag(-1), suggesting that the nanocomposite exhibited excellent cycling durability. This strategy provided a facile and effective approach for the synthesis of nanocomposite based on CNTs and NiAl-LDH with enhanced supercapacitor behaviors, which can be potentially applied in energy storage conversion devices. PMID:27405071

  12. On the effect of non-carbon nanostructured supports on the stability of Pt nanoparticles during voltage cycling: A study of TiO2 nanofibres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savych, I.; Bernard d'Arbigny, J.; Subianto, S.; Cavaliere, S.; Jones, D. J.; Rozière, J.

    2014-07-01

    Electrospun carbon and Nb-doped TiO2 nanofibres (CNFs, TNFs) have been investigated as electrocatalyst supports for polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFC). The optimal Nb doping amount has been identified for TNFs, and thermal treatment of titanium oxide fibres optimised to balance the surface area and electronic conductivity requirements. The most highly conducting material is characterised by a high concentration of surface Ti3+ and Nb4+ (and oxygen vacancies). Pt nanoparticles of average diameter of 2.3 nm were loaded onto 10%at Nb doped-TiO2, retained as the best candidate for further electrochemical analysis, and on CNFs, using a microwave-assisted polyol method. Significantly higher electrochemically active surface area was retained after voltage cycling to 1.2 V for Pt supported on TNF (73%) than on CNFs, where only 8% of the original ECSA was conserved after 1000 voltammetric cycles. The mass activity was also slightly higher for the titanium oxide based electrodes in the oxygen reduction reaction.

  13. High Area Capacity Lithium-Sulfur Full-cell Battery with Prelitiathed Silicon Nanowire-Carbon Anodes for Long Cycling Stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Andreas; Dörfler, Susanne; Piwko, Markus; Wisser, Florian M; Jaumann, Tony; Ahrens, Eike; Giebeler, Lars; Althues, Holger; Schädlich, Stefan; Grothe, Julia; Jeffery, Andrea; Grube, Matthias; Brückner, Jan; Martin, Jan; Eckert, Jürgen; Kaskel, Stefan; Mikolajick, Thomas; Weber, Walter M

    2016-01-01

    We show full Li/S cells with the use of balanced and high capacity electrodes to address high power electro-mobile applications. The anode is made of an assembly comprising of silicon nanowires as active material densely and conformally grown on a 3D carbon mesh as a light-weight current collector, offering extremely high areal capacity for reversible Li storage of up to 9 mAh/cm(2). The dense growth is guaranteed by a versatile Au precursor developed for homogenous Au layer deposition on 3D substrates. In contrast to metallic Li, the presented system exhibits superior characteristics as an anode in Li/S batteries such as safe operation, long cycle life and easy handling. These anodes are combined with high area density S/C composite cathodes into a Li/S full-cell with an ether- and lithium triflate-based electrolyte for high ionic conductivity. The result is a highly cyclable full-cell with an areal capacity of 2.3 mAh/cm(2), a cyclability surpassing 450 cycles and capacity retention of 80% after 150 cycles (capacity loss <0.4% per cycle). A detailed physical and electrochemical investigation of the SiNW Li/S full-cell including in-operando synchrotron X-ray diffraction measurements reveals that the lower degradation is due to a lower self-reduction of polysulfides after continuous charging/discharging. PMID:27319783

  14. Application of an Expanded Sequestration Estimate to the Domestic Energy Footprint of the Republic of Ireland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernadette O’Regan

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The need for global comparability has led to the recent standardization of ecological footprint methods. The use of global averages and necessary methodological assumptions has questioned the ability of the ecological footprint to represent local or national specific concerns. This paper attempts to incorporate greater national relevancy by expanding the sequestration estimate used to calculate the annual carbon footprint of domestic Irish energy use. This includes expanding existing study boundaries to include additional carbon pools such as the litter, dead and soil pools. This generated an overall estimate of 4.38 tonnes of carbon per hectare per year (t C/ha/yr, resulting in an ecological footprint estimate of 0.49 hectares per capita (ha/cap The method employed in this paper also incorporated the potential role of grassland as a carbon sink. The caveat that the resultant value is dependent on the choice of study boundary is discussed. Including the lateral movement of carbon embodied in farm products (effectively placing the boundary around the farm gate reduces the estimate of grassland carbon sequestration by approximately 44% to 1.82 t C/ha/yr. When a footprint calculated using an overall sequestration estimate (based on the distribution of Irish grassland and forestry is translated into global hectares (gha, the standardized value is reduced by 35%.

  15. Current stabilizer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A current stabilizer for supplying magnetic lens of β-monochromator at the electron energy up to 1 MeV is described. Stabilization method with use of reference high-stabilized source of direct voltage with switching-in loading (monochromator coil) to circuit of negative feedback of direct-current amplifier with high gain is chosen for stabilization of direct current. The range of current regulation is 0.5 A at available power up to 15 W. Current instability during 10 hour continuous work does not exceed 10-4% that makes it possible to provide instability of electron energy at the monochromator exit using 90Sr+90Y β-nucleide of not more than 10 -4% and number of electrons 2.5x10-4% respectively

  16. Carbohydrate plasma expanders for passive tumor targeting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmann, Stefan; Caysa, Henrike; Kuntsche, Judith;

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the suitability of carbohydrate plasma volume expanders as a novel polymer platform for tumor targeting. Many synthetic polymers have already been synthesized for targeted tumor therapy, but potential advantages of these carbohydrates include...... inexpensive synthesis, constant availability, a good safety profile, biodegradability and the long clinical use as plasma expanders. Three polymers have been tested for cytotoxicity and cytokine activation in cell cultures and conjugated with a near-infrared fluorescent dye: hydroxyethyl starches (HES 200 k......Da and HES 450 kDa) and dextran (DEX 500 kDa). Particle size and molecular weight distribution were determined by asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation (AF4). The biodistribution was investigated non-invasively in nude mice using multispectral optical imaging. The most promising polymer conjugate was...

  17. Transformative Creativity in the Expanded Digital Field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Morten

    , focusing on existence transcending time and space, and the creation of the radical ‘new’. The question is: does transformative creativity today add something new? Is participatory practices brought on by digital technologies inside or outside the complex of modernity? By analyzing examples from new art...... field, which I will call the expanded digital field. The expanded digital field encompasses transformation of societal, cultural, political and individual creativity on three levels (my hypothesis): Technologies become reactive, hence reproduction of creativity becomes the standard for communication......The idea that art may (can/will) transform ‘society’ is not a new one. Some would call it idealism - or an ideology, even – to have anything outside the market create transformation. But changes over the last decade, in the cultural constitution of the world’s global culture and economy, have...

  18. Gravitational instability in a multicomponent expanding medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the Newtonian approximation we consider the gravitational instability of a two- or N-component medium in an expanding universe. The system of density-perturbation equations is solved in the short- and long-wave limits. For small values of the wave vector k, a result obtained for the stationary case continues to hold true: at most there can exist only one unstable mode. If k is kept fixed, the introduction of a perturbation component delta/sub i/ will speed the growth of fluctuations delta/sub j/, provided the adiabatic indices γ/sub i/>γ/sub j/. In the large-k limit, ordinary acoustic waves result. Other components will begin to manifest themselves in the first-order terms when the oscillation amplitude is expanded in powers of k-1: provided γ/sub j/>γ/sub i/> or =4/3, the ith-component amplitude will decay more slowly than otherwise

  19. Radiation testing of the AeroForm co2-based breast tissue expander implant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tissue expanders are used in breast reconstruction after mastectomy to stretch the remaining tissue to create space for placement of permanent breast implants. The AeroForm™ Tissue Expander, developed by AirXpanders™ Inc., contains electronic components designed to activate the release of carbon dioxide from an internal reservoir to inflate the expander. Breast cancer patients who undergo mastectomy and tissue expander/implant-based breast reconstruction may require radiation therapy at doses up to 50–60 Gy while the expander is in place. The ionizing radiation used in postmastectomy radiation therapy interacts with electronic components in medical implants, which may cause degradation in performance above certain levels. Most commercial electronic components used in medical devices, such as complementary metal-oxide semiconductor or bipolar integrated circuits can withstand radiation levels in the 50 Gy range without any performance degradation. Beyond this level, the performance may still be sufficient to guarantee functionality, but this needs to be confirmed at the system and electronic circuit level. We assessed the impact of radiation levels up to 75 Gy on 32 AeroForm™ Tissue Expanders (AirXpanders, Inc., Palo Alto, CA USA) and on the associated internal printed circuit assemblies. The electronics inside the AeroForm™ Tissue Expander implant continued to function properly after exposure to radiation levels up to 75 Gy, which is well above the maximum total dose level typically used in postmastectomy radiation therapy. Standard postmastectomy radiation therapy doses do not damage or affect the functionality of the AeroForm™ Tissue Expander

  20. Perspectives of Expanding Business into Russia

    OpenAIRE

    Samaeva, Naylya

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the thesis was to analyze and evaluate the Russian market taking into account all its advantages and disadvantages and to find out whether it was profitable for the case company Hotel Vip Club International Oy to expand its business into Rus-sia. The study includes theoretical framework covering different essential theories and concepts, information about tourism and hotel related business in Russia, and the pecu-liarities of doing business in Russia including the analyses of t...