WorldWideScience

Sample records for carbon sources

  1. Bioethanol from different Finnish agricultural carbon sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kautola, H.; Kymaelaeinen, M.; Tokeensuu, L.; Alatalo, T. (HAMK University of Applied Sciences, Degree Programme in Biotechnology and Food Engineering, Haemeenlinna (Finland)); Caerdenas, R. (Universidad Central del Ecuador, Facultad Ciencias Quimicas, Escuela de Quimica, Av. America. Ciudadela Universitaria, Quito (Ecuador)); Siukola, K.; Naesi, J. (Suomen Biojalostus Oy, Renko (Finland))

    2007-07-01

    Bioethanol in fuel and its domestic production has become a great issue in Finland during the last few years. There has been discussion about what kind of raw materials should be used and are there any local priorities. In the years 2004-2007 local farmers in Haem e , in southern part of Finland, started to find alternative use for sugar beet due to drastic reduction of domestic sugar production in the near future. This was also the start of the experimental studies on bi oethanol production. The aim of the study was to find out how the change of carbon source will effect on bi oethanol yield. The bioethanol production was studied in laboratory scale using carbon sources of saccharose, glucose, sugar beet juice, sugar beet mash and barley hydrolysates pretreated with amylases, (beta-glucanase and xylanase). The yeast used was Saccharomyces sp. The pre experiments were performed in 250 mL flasks to optimize carbon, nitrogen and salts contents in production medium, also comparing different carbon sources and mixtures. The production was then studied in a 30 liter fermenter running for 36 hours. The preliminary studies showed that barley hydrolysate gave the best result 2,4% in bioethanol concentration during the performed fermentations, and saccharose was the best substrate in shake flask fermentations with a 9,6% bioethanol concentration. (orig.)

  2. Double-walled carbon nanotubes synthesized using carbon black as the dot carbon source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhi-Gang; Li, Feng; Ren, Wen-Cai; Cong, Hongtao; Liu, Chang; Qing Lu, Gao; Cheng, Hui-Ming

    2006-07-01

    Double-walled carbon nanotubes (DWNTs) were synthesized used carbon black as the dot carbon source by a semi-continuous hydrogen arc discharge process. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) observations revealed that most of the tubes were DWNTs with outer and inner diameters in the range of 2.67-4 nm and 1.96-3.21 nm, respectively. Most of the DWNTs were in a bundle form of about 10-30 nm in diameter with high purity (about 70%) from thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA), resonant laser Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and TEM characterizations. It was found that carbon black as the dot carbon source could be easy controlled to synthesize one type of nanotube. A simple process combining oxidation and acid treatment to purify the DWNT bundles was used without damaging the bundles. The structure of carbon black, as the key element for influencing purity, bundle formation and purification of DWNTs, is discussed.

  3. Enhanced biological phosphorus removal with different carbon sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Nan; Zhou, Yan

    2016-06-01

    Enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) process is one of the most economical and sustainable methods for phosphorus removal from wastewater. However, the performance of EBPR can be affected by available carbon sources types in the wastewater that may induce different functional microbial communities in the process. Glycogen accumulating organisms (GAOs) and polyphosphate accumulating organisms (PAOs) are commonly found by coexisting in the EBPR process. Predominance of GAO population may lead to EBPR failure due to the competition on carbon source with PAO without contributing phosphorus removal. Carbon sources indeed play an important role in alteration of PAOs and GAOs in EBPR processes. Various types of carbon sources have been investigated for EBPR performance. Certain carbon sources tend to enrich specific groups of GAOs and/or PAOs. This review summarizes the types of carbon sources applied in EBPR systems and highlights the roles of these carbon sources in PAO and GAO competition. Both single (e.g., acetate, propionate, glucose, ethanol, and amino acid) and complex carbon sources (e.g., yeast extract, peptone, and mixed carbon sources) are discussed in this review. Meanwhile, the environmental friendly and economical carbon sources that are derived from waste materials, such as crude glycerol and wasted sludge, are also discussed and compared. PMID:27087523

  4. Mesoscale inversion of carbon sources and sinks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inverse methods at large scales are used to infer the spatial variability of carbon sources and sinks over the continents but their uncertainties remain large. Atmospheric concentrations integrate the surface flux variability but atmospheric transport models at low resolution are not able to simulate properly the local atmospheric dynamics at the measurement sites. However, the inverse estimates are more representative of the large spatial heterogeneity of the ecosystems compared to direct flux measurements. Top-down and bottom-up methods that aim at quantifying the carbon exchanges between the surface and the atmosphere correspond to different scales and are not easily comparable. During this phD, a mesoscale inverse system was developed to correct carbon fluxes at 8 km resolution. The high resolution transport model MesoNH was used to simulate accurately the variability of the atmospheric concentrations, which allowed us to reduce the uncertainty of the retrieved fluxes. All the measurements used here were observed during the intensive regional campaign CERES of May and June 2005, during which several instrumented towers measured CO2 concentrations and fluxes in the South West of France. Airborne measurements allowed us to observe concentrations at high altitude but also CO2 surface fluxes over large parts of the domain. First, the capacity of the inverse system to correct the CO2 fluxes was estimated using pseudo-data experiments. The largest fraction of the concentration variability was attributed to regional surface fluxes over an area of about 300 km around the site locations depending on the meteorological conditions. Second, an ensemble of simulations allowed us to define the spatial and temporal structures of the transport errors. Finally, the inverse fluxes at 8 km resolution were compared to direct flux measurements. The inverse system has been validated in space and time and showed an improvement of the first guess fluxes from a vegetation model

  5. Source Molecular Effect on Amorphous Carbon Film Deposition

    OpenAIRE

    Kawazoe, Hiroki; Inayoshi, Takanori; Shinohara, Masanori; Matsuda, Yoshinobu; Fujiyama, Hiroshi; Nitta, Yuki; Nakatani, Tatsuyuki

    2009-01-01

    We investigated deposition process of amorphous carbon films using acetylene and methane as a source molecule, by using infrared spectroscopy in multiple internal reflection geometry (MIR-IRAS). We found that deposited film structures were different due to source molecules.

  6. Growth of graphene films from non-gaseous carbon sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tour, James; Sun, Zhengzong; Yan, Zheng; Ruan, Gedeng; Peng, Zhiwei

    2015-08-04

    In various embodiments, the present disclosure provides methods of forming graphene films by: (1) depositing a non-gaseous carbon source onto a catalyst surface; (2) exposing the non-gaseous carbon source to at least one gas with a flow rate; and (3) initiating the conversion of the non-gaseous carbon source to the graphene film, where the thickness of the graphene film is controllable by the gas flow rate. Additional embodiments of the present disclosure pertain to graphene films made in accordance with the methods of the present disclosure.

  7. Shunting arc plasma source for pure carbon ion beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koguchi, H.; Sakakita, H.; Kiyama, S.; Shimada, T.; Sato, Y.; Hirano, Y. [Energy Technology Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-1-1 Umezono, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan)

    2012-02-15

    A plasma source is developed using a coaxial shunting arc plasma gun to extract a pure carbon ion beam. The pure carbon ion beam is a new type of deposition system for diamond and other carbon materials. Our plasma device generates pure carbon plasma from solid-state carbon material without using a hydrocarbon gas such as methane gas, and the plasma does not contain any hydrogen. The ion saturation current of the discharge measured by a double probe is about 0.2 mA/mm{sup 2} at the peak of the pulse.

  8. Shunting arc plasma source for pure carbon ion beama)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koguchi, H.; Sakakita, H.; Kiyama, S.; Shimada, T.; Sato, Y.; Hirano, Y.

    2012-02-01

    A plasma source is developed using a coaxial shunting arc plasma gun to extract a pure carbon ion beam. The pure carbon ion beam is a new type of deposition system for diamond and other carbon materials. Our plasma device generates pure carbon plasma from solid-state carbon material without using a hydrocarbon gas such as methane gas, and the plasma does not contain any hydrogen. The ion saturation current of the discharge measured by a double probe is about 0.2 mA/mm2 at the peak of the pulse.

  9. Shunting arc plasma source for pure carbon ion beam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koguchi, H; Sakakita, H; Kiyama, S; Shimada, T; Sato, Y; Hirano, Y

    2012-02-01

    A plasma source is developed using a coaxial shunting arc plasma gun to extract a pure carbon ion beam. The pure carbon ion beam is a new type of deposition system for diamond and other carbon materials. Our plasma device generates pure carbon plasma from solid-state carbon material without using a hydrocarbon gas such as methane gas, and the plasma does not contain any hydrogen. The ion saturation current of the discharge measured by a double probe is about 0.2 mA∕mm(2) at the peak of the pulse.

  10. Shunting arc plasma source for pure carbon ion beam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koguchi, H; Sakakita, H; Kiyama, S; Shimada, T; Sato, Y; Hirano, Y

    2012-02-01

    A plasma source is developed using a coaxial shunting arc plasma gun to extract a pure carbon ion beam. The pure carbon ion beam is a new type of deposition system for diamond and other carbon materials. Our plasma device generates pure carbon plasma from solid-state carbon material without using a hydrocarbon gas such as methane gas, and the plasma does not contain any hydrogen. The ion saturation current of the discharge measured by a double probe is about 0.2 mA∕mm(2) at the peak of the pulse. PMID:22380206

  11. The source of carbon dioxide for gastric acid production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steer, Howard

    2009-01-01

    The source of carbon dioxide for the chemical reaction leading to the production of gastric acid is unknown. The decarboxylation of an amino acid releases carbon dioxide. Pepsinogens provide a rich source of the amino acid arginine. Both the source of carbon dioxide, arginine, and the consequence of arginine decarboxylation, agmatine, have been studied. The site of carbon dioxide production has been related to the survival of the parietal cell. An immunohistochemical study has been carried out on glycol methacrylate embedded gastric biopsies from the normal stomach of 38 adult patients. The sections have been stained using polyclonal antibody to pepsinogen II, polyclonal antibody to agmatine, and polyclonal antibody to Helicobacter pylori. Pepsinogen II and agmatine are found in the parietal cell canaliculi. This is consistent with the production of carbon dioxide from arginine in the parietal cell canaliculi. Evidence is presented for the decarboxylation of arginine derived from the activation segment of pepsinogen as the source of carbon dioxide for the production of gastric acid. The production of carbon dioxide by the decarboxylation of arginine in the parietal cell canaliculus enables the extracellular hydration of carbon dioxide at the known site of carbonic anhydrase activity. The extracellular production of acid in the canaliculus together with the presence of agmatine helps to explain why the parietal cells are not destroyed during the formation of gastric acid. Agmatine is found in the mucus secreting cells of the stomach and its role in acid protection of the stomach is discussed. Anat Rec, 2009. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc. PMID:18951509

  12. Role of metabolite transporters in source-sink carbon allocation

    OpenAIRE

    Ludewig, Frank; Flügge, Ulf-Ingo

    2013-01-01

    Plants assimilate carbon dioxide during photosynthesis in chloroplasts. Assimilated carbon is subsequently allocated throughout the plant. Generally, two types of organs can be distinguished, mature green source leaves as net photoassimilate exporters, and net importers, the sinks, e.g., roots, flowers, small leaves, and storage organs like tubers. Within these organs, different tissue types developed according to their respective function, and cells of either tissue type are highly compartme...

  13. Role of metabolite transporters in source-sink carbon allocation

    OpenAIRE

    Frank eLudewig; Ulf-Ingo eFlügge

    2013-01-01

    Plants assimilate carbon dioxide during photosynthesis in chloroplasts. Assimilated carbon is subsequently allocated throughout the plant. Generally, two types of organs can be distinguished, mature green source leaves as net photoassimilate exporters, and net importers, the sinks, e.g. roots, flowers, small leaves and storage organs like tubers. Within these organs, different tissue types developed according to their respective function, and cells of either tissue type are highly compartment...

  14. Chemoselective Synthesis of Carbamates using CO2 as Carbon Source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riemer, Daniel; Hirapara, Pradipbhai; Das, Shoubhik

    2016-08-01

    Synthesis of carbamates directly from amines using CO2 as the carbon source is a straightforward and sustainable approach. Herein, we describe a highly effective and chemoselective methodology for the synthesis of carbamates at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. This methodology can also be applied to protect the amino group in amino acids and peptides, and also to synthesize important pharmaceuticals. PMID:27376902

  15. Different carbon sources affect PCB accumulation by marine bivalves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laitano, M V; Silva Barni, M F; Costa, P G; Cledón, M; Fillmann, G; Miglioranza, K S B; Panarello, H O

    2016-02-01

    Pampean creeks were evaluated in the present study as potential land-based sources of PCB marine contamination. Different carbon and nitrogen sources from such creeks were analysed as boosters of PCB bioaccumulation by the filter feeder bivalve Brachidontes rodriguezii and grazer limpet Siphonaria lessoni. Carbon of different source than marine and anthropogenic nitrogen assimilated by organisms were estimated through their C and N isotopic composition. PCB concentration in surface sediments and mollusc samples ranged from 2.68 to 6.46 ng g(-1) (wet weight) and from 1074 to 4583 ng g(-1) lipid, respectively, reflecting a punctual source of PCB contamination related to a landfill area. Thus, despite the low flow of creeks, they should not be underestimated as contamination vectors to the marine environment. On the other hand, mussels PCB bioaccumulation was related with the carbon source uptake which highlights the importance to consider this factor when studying PCB distribution in organisms of coastal systems.

  16. Photoautotrophic microorganisms as a carbon source for temperate soil invertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Olaf; Dyckmans, Jens; Schrader, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    We tested experimentally if photoautotrophic microorganisms are a carbon source for invertebrates in temperate soils. We exposed forest or arable soils to a (13)CO2-enriched atmosphere and quantified (13)C assimilation by three common animal groups: earthworms (Oligochaeta), springtails (Hexapoda) and slugs (Gastropoda). Endogeic earthworms (Allolobophora chlorotica) and hemiedaphic springtails (Ceratophysella denticulata) were highly (13)C enriched when incubated under light, deriving up to 3.0 and 17.0%, respectively, of their body carbon from the microbial source in 7 days. Earthworms assimilated more (13)C in undisturbed soil than when the microbial material was mixed into the soil, presumably reflecting selective surface grazing. By contrast, neither adult nor newly hatched terrestrial slugs (Deroceras reticulatum) grazed on algal mats. Non-photosynthetic (13)CO2 fixation in the dark was negligible. We conclude from these preliminary laboratory experiments that, in addition to litter and root-derived carbon from vascular plants, photoautotrophic soil surface microorganisms (cyanobacteria, algae) may be an ecologically important carbon input route for temperate soil animals that are traditionally assigned to the decomposer channel in soil food web models and carbon cycling studies. PMID:26740559

  17. Methane and carbon at equilibrium in source rocks

    OpenAIRE

    Mango, Frank D

    2013-01-01

    Methane in source rocks may not exist exclusively as free gas. It could exist in equilibrium with carbon and higher hydrocarbons: CH4 + C  Hydrocarbon. Three lines of evidence support this possibility. 1) Shales ingest gas in amounts and selectivities consistent with gas-carbon equilibrium. There is a 50% increase in solid hydrocarbon mass when Fayetteville Shale is exposed to methane (450 psi) under moderate conditions (100°C): Rock-Eval S2 (mg g-1) 8.5 = > 12.5. All light hydrocarbons are i...

  18. Carbon Sources for Polyhydroxyalkanoates and an Integrated Biorefinery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Guozhan; Hill, David J.; Kowalczuk, Marek; Johnston, Brian; Adamus, Grazyna; Irorere, Victor; Radecka, Iza

    2016-01-01

    Polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) are a group of bioplastics that have a wide range of applications. Extensive progress has been made in our understanding of PHAs’ biosynthesis, and currently, it is possible to engineer bacterial strains to produce PHAs with desired properties. The substrates for the fermentative production of PHAs are primarily derived from food-based carbon sources, raising concerns over the sustainability of their production in terms of their impact on food prices. This paper gives an overview of the current carbon sources used for PHA production and the methods used to transform these sources into fermentable forms. This allows us to identify the opportunities and restraints linked to future sustainable PHA production. Hemicellulose hydrolysates and crude glycerol are identified as two promising carbon sources for a sustainable production of PHAs. Hemicellulose hydrolysates and crude glycerol can be produced on a large scale during various second generation biofuels’ production. An integration of PHA production within a modern biorefinery is therefore proposed to produce biofuels and bioplastics simultaneously. This will create the potential to offset the production cost of biofuels and reduce the overall production cost of PHAs. PMID:27447619

  19. Carbon Sources for Polyhydroxyalkanoates and an Integrated Biorefinery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guozhan Jiang

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs are a group of bioplastics that have a wide range of applications. Extensive progress has been made in our understanding of PHAs’ biosynthesis, and currently, it is possible to engineer bacterial strains to produce PHAs with desired properties. The substrates for the fermentative production of PHAs are primarily derived from food-based carbon sources, raising concerns over the sustainability of their production in terms of their impact on food prices. This paper gives an overview of the current carbon sources used for PHA production and the methods used to transform these sources into fermentable forms. This allows us to identify the opportunities and restraints linked to future sustainable PHA production. Hemicellulose hydrolysates and crude glycerol are identified as two promising carbon sources for a sustainable production of PHAs. Hemicellulose hydrolysates and crude glycerol can be produced on a large scale during various second generation biofuels’ production. An integration of PHA production within a modern biorefinery is therefore proposed to produce biofuels and bioplastics simultaneously. This will create the potential to offset the production cost of biofuels and reduce the overall production cost of PHAs.

  20. Carbon Sources for Polyhydroxyalkanoates and an Integrated Biorefinery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Guozhan; Hill, David J; Kowalczuk, Marek; Johnston, Brian; Adamus, Grazyna; Irorere, Victor; Radecka, Iza

    2016-01-01

    Polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) are a group of bioplastics that have a wide range of applications. Extensive progress has been made in our understanding of PHAs' biosynthesis, and currently, it is possible to engineer bacterial strains to produce PHAs with desired properties. The substrates for the fermentative production of PHAs are primarily derived from food-based carbon sources, raising concerns over the sustainability of their production in terms of their impact on food prices. This paper gives an overview of the current carbon sources used for PHA production and the methods used to transform these sources into fermentable forms. This allows us to identify the opportunities and restraints linked to future sustainable PHA production. Hemicellulose hydrolysates and crude glycerol are identified as two promising carbon sources for a sustainable production of PHAs. Hemicellulose hydrolysates and crude glycerol can be produced on a large scale during various second generation biofuels' production. An integration of PHA production within a modern biorefinery is therefore proposed to produce biofuels and bioplastics simultaneously. This will create the potential to offset the production cost of biofuels and reduce the overall production cost of PHAs. PMID:27447619

  1. Effect of carbon source on the denitrification in constructed wetlands

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Songliu; HU Hongying; SUN Yingxue; YANG Jia

    2009-01-01

    The constructed wetlands with different plants in removal of nitrate were investigated.The factors promoting the rates of denitrification including organic carbon, nitrate load, plants in wetlands, pH and water temperature in field were systematically investigated.The results showed that the additional carbon source (glucose) can remarkably improve the nitrate removal ability of the constructed wetland.It demonstrated that the nitrate removal rate can increase from 20% to more than 50% in the summer and from 10% to 30% in the winter, when the nitrate concentration was 30-40 mg/L, the retention time was 24 h and 25 mg/L dissolved organic carbon (DOC) was ploughed into the constructed wetland.However, the nitrite in the constructed wetland accumulated a litter with the supply of the additional carbon source in summer and winter, and it increased from 0.15 to 2 mg/L in the effluent.It was also found that the abilities of plant in adjusting pH and temperature can result in an increase of denitrification in wetlands, and the seasonal change may impact the denitrification.

  2. Fluorescently tuned nitrogen-doped carbon dots from carbon source with different content of carboxyl groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, fluorescent nitrogen-doped carbon dots (NCDs) were tuned via varying the sources with different number of carboxyl groups. Owing to the interaction between amino and carboxyl, more amino groups conjugate the surface of the NCDs by the source with more carboxyl groups. Fluorescent NCDs were tuned via varying the sources with different content of carboxyl groups. Correspondingly, the nitrogen content, fluorescence quantum yields and lifetime of NCDs increases with the content of carboxyl groups from the source. Furthermore, cytotoxicity assay and cell imaging test indicate that the resultant NCDs possess low cytotoxicity and excellent biocompatibility

  3. Fluorescently tuned nitrogen-doped carbon dots from carbon source with different content of carboxyl groups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Hao; Wang, Yun; Dai, Xiao; Zou, Guifu, E-mail: kqzhang@suda.edu.cn, E-mail: zouguifu@suda.edu.cn [College of Physics, Optoelectronics and Energy and Collaborative Innovation Center of Suzhou Nano Science and Technology, Soochow University, Suzhou 215006 (China); Gao, Peng; Zhang, Ke-Qin, E-mail: kqzhang@suda.edu.cn, E-mail: zouguifu@suda.edu.cn; Du, Dezhuang [National Engineering Laboratory for Modern Silk, College of Textile and Clothing Engineering, Soochow University, Suzhou 215123 (China); Guo, Jun [Testing and Analysis Center, Soochow University, Suzhou 215123 (China)

    2015-08-01

    In this study, fluorescent nitrogen-doped carbon dots (NCDs) were tuned via varying the sources with different number of carboxyl groups. Owing to the interaction between amino and carboxyl, more amino groups conjugate the surface of the NCDs by the source with more carboxyl groups. Fluorescent NCDs were tuned via varying the sources with different content of carboxyl groups. Correspondingly, the nitrogen content, fluorescence quantum yields and lifetime of NCDs increases with the content of carboxyl groups from the source. Furthermore, cytotoxicity assay and cell imaging test indicate that the resultant NCDs possess low cytotoxicity and excellent biocompatibility.

  4. Critical review of black carbon and elemental carbon source apportionment in Europe and the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, Nicole L.; Long, Christopher M.

    2016-11-01

    An increasing number of air pollution source apportionment studies in Europe and the United States have focused on the black carbon (BC) fraction of ambient particulate matter (PM) given its linkage with adverse public health and climate impacts. We conducted a critical review of European and US BC source apportionment studies published since 2003. Since elemental carbon (EC) has been used as a surrogate measure of BC, we also considered source apportionment studies of EC measurements. This review extends the knowledge presented in previous ambient PM source apportionment reviews because we focus on BC and EC and critically examine the differences between source apportionment results for different methods and source categories. We identified about 50 BC and EC source apportionment studies that have been conducted in either Europe or the US since 2003, finding a striking difference in the commonly used source apportionment methods between the two regions and variations in the assigned source categories. Using three dominant methodologies (radiocarbon, aethalometer, and macro-tracer methods) that only allow for BC to be broadly apportioned into either fossil fuel combustion or biomass burning source categories, European studies generally support fossil fuel combustion as the dominant ambient BC source, but also show significant biomass burning contributions, in particular in wintertime at non-urban locations. Among US studies where prevailing methods such as chemical mass balance (CMB) and positive matrix factorization (PMF) models have allowed for estimation of more refined source contributions, there are fewer findings showing the significance of biomass burning and variable findings on the relative proportion of BC attributed to diesel versus gasoline emissions. Overall, the available BC source apportionment studies provide useful information demonstrating the significance of both fossil fuel combustion and biomass burning BC emission sources in Europe and the US

  5. Carbon trading and carbon taxation: how to consider biotic sources and sinks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Kyoto Protocol (KP) to the UNFCCC includes land-use change and forestry in the carbon accounting process, limited to afforestation, reforestation and deforestation since 1990, and explicitly provides for the option of using a variety of flexibility mechanisms to meet the greenhouse gas (GHG) reduction targets stipulated in a more cost-efficient manner. Domestically, different countries might adopt different approaches to achieve their emission reduction objectives, such as carbon trading or carbon taxation, and it is not clear to date what the implications for bioenergy use, forestry, and land-use change can be expected to be. With respect to national GHG emissions trading, the main issues studied in this paper are: Should trading of fossil fuel emissions allowances be coupled with trading of biotic credits and debits? Should credits for carbon sequestration in forests be auctioned or grandfathered? Should there be a distinction between a carbon permit issued for an additional biotic sink and those issued for fossil fuel carbon emissions? Is there a difference for biotic carbon sinks and sources between one-time permits and permits that allow a continued release of GHG over some pre-specified time? Should permits be issued only for the carbon-stock changes that count under the KP? With respect to national carbon taxation schemes, two questions are investigated: Should a tax credit be given for afforestation/reforestation (and a tax debit for deforestation)? Should tax credits also be given for projects that sequester carbon but do not count under the KP (such as forest protection rather than forest management)? For both schemes a crucial point is that by the formulation chosen in the KP two different classes of forest are created (i.e. those counted and those not counted under the KP), so that the implications for land prices might be significant. From a conceptual point of view this paper addresses the above-mentioned questions and contrasts some of the major

  6. Role of metabolite transporters in source-sink carbon allocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludewig, Frank; Flügge, Ulf-Ingo

    2013-01-01

    Plants assimilate carbon dioxide during photosynthesis in chloroplasts. Assimilated carbon is subsequently allocated throughout the plant. Generally, two types of organs can be distinguished, mature green source leaves as net photoassimilate exporters, and net importers, the sinks, e.g., roots, flowers, small leaves, and storage organs like tubers. Within these organs, different tissue types developed according to their respective function, and cells of either tissue type are highly compartmentalized. Photoassimilates are allocated to distinct compartments of these tissues in all organs, requiring a set of metabolite transporters mediating this intercompartmental transfer. The general route of photoassimilates can be briefly described as follows. Upon fixation of carbon dioxide in chloroplasts of mesophyll cells, triose phosphates either enter the cytosol for mainly sucrose formation or remain in the stroma to form transiently stored starch which is degraded during the night and enters the cytosol as maltose or glucose to be further metabolized to sucrose. In both cases, sucrose enters the phloem for long distance transport or is transiently stored in the vacuole, or can be degraded to hexoses which also can be stored in the vacuole. In the majority of plant species, sucrose is actively loaded into the phloem via the apoplast. Following long distance transport, it is released into sink organs, where it enters cells as source of carbon and energy. In storage organs, sucrose can be stored, or carbon derived from sucrose can be stored as starch in plastids, or as oil in oil bodies, or - in combination with nitrogen - as protein in protein storage vacuoles and protein bodies. Here, we focus on transport proteins known for either of these steps, and discuss the implications for yield increase in plants upon genetic engineering of respective transporters. PMID:23847636

  7. Role of metabolite transporters in source-sink carbon allocation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank eLudewig

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Plants assimilate carbon dioxide during photosynthesis in chloroplasts. Assimilated carbon is subsequently allocated throughout the plant. Generally, two types of organs can be distinguished, mature green source leaves as net photoassimilate exporters, and net importers, the sinks, e.g. roots, flowers, small leaves and storage organs like tubers. Within these organs, different tissue types developed according to their respective function, and cells of either tissue type are highly compartmentalized. Photoassimilates are allocated to distinct compartments of these tissues in all organs, requiring a set of metabolite transporters mediating this intercompartmental transfer.The general route of photoassimilates can be briefly described as follows. Upon fixation of carbon dioxide in chloroplasts of mesophyll cells, triose phosphates either enter the cytosol for mainly sucrose formation or remain in the stroma to form transiently stored starch which is degraded during the night and enters the cytosol as maltose or glucose to be further metabolized to sucrose. In both cases, sucrose enters the phloem for long distance transport or is transiently stored in the vacuole, or can be degraded to hexoses which also can be stored in the vacuole.In the majority of plant species, sucrose is actively loaded into the phloem via the apoplast. Following long distance transport, it is released into sink organs, where it enters cells as source of carbon and energy. In storage organs, sucrose can be stored, or carbon derived from sucrose can be stored as starch in plastids, or as oil in oil bodies, or - in combination with nitrogen - as protein in protein storage vacuoles and protein bodies.Here, we focus on transport proteins known for either of these steps, and discuss the implications for yield increase in plants upon genetic engineering of respective transporters.

  8. Trace Metal Source Terms in Carbon Sequestration Environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karamalidis, Athanasios K; Torres, Sharon G; Hakala, J Alexandra; Shao, Hongbo; Cantrell, Kirk J; Carroll, Susan

    2012-02-05

    Carbon dioxide sequestration in deep saline and depleted oil geologic formations is feasible and promising, however, possible CO₂ or CO₂-saturated brine leakage to overlying aquifers may pose environmental and health impacts. The purpose of this study was to experimentally define trace metal source terms from the reaction of supercritical CO₂, storage reservoir brines, reservoir and cap rocks. Storage reservoir source terms for trace metals are needed to evaluate the impact of brines leaking into overlying drinking water aquifers. The trace metal release was measured from sandstones, shales, carbonates, evaporites, basalts and cements from the Frio, In Salah, Illinois Basin – Decatur, Lower Tuscaloosa, Weyburn-Midale, Bass Islands and Grand Ronde carbon sequestration geologic formations. Trace metal dissolution is tracked by measuring solution concentrations over time under conditions (e.g. pressures, temperatures, and initial brine compositions) specific to the sequestration projects. Existing metrics for Maximum Contaminant Levels (MCLs) for drinking water as defined by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) were used to categorize the relative significance of metal concentration changes in storage environments due to the presence of CO₂. Results indicate that Cr and Pb released from sandstone reservoir and shale cap rock exceed the MCLs by an order of magnitude while Cd and Cu were at or below drinking water thresholds. In carbonate reservoirs As exceeds the MCLs by an order of magnitude, while Cd, Cu, and Pb were at or below drinking water standards. Results from this study can be used as a reasonable estimate of the reservoir and caprock source term to further evaluate the impact of leakage on groundwater quality.

  9. A Carbon Nanotube Electron Source Based Ionization Vacuum Gauge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Changkun Dong; Ganapati Myneni

    2003-10-01

    The results of fabrication and performance of an ionization vacuum gauge using a carbon nanotube (CNT) electron source are presented. The electron source was constructed with multi-wall nanotubes (MWNT), which were grown using thermal chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process. The electron emission of the source was stable in vacuum pressure up to 10-7 Torr, which is better than the metal field emitters. The measurement linearity of the gauge was better than {+-}10% from 10-6 to 10-10 Torr. The gauge sensitivity of 4 Torr-1 was achieved under 50 {micro}A electron emission in nitrogen. The gauge is expected to find applications in vacuum measurements from 10-7 Torr to below 10-11 Torr.

  10. Optical Performance of Carbon-Nanotube Electron Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jonge, Niels; Allioux, Myriam; Oostveen, Jim T.; Teo, Kenneth B.; Milne, William I.

    2005-05-01

    The figure of merit for the electron optical performance of carbon-nanotube (CNT) electron sources is presented. This figure is given by the relation between the reduced brightness and the energy spread in the region of stable emission. It is shown experimentally that a CNT electron source exhibits a highly stable emission process that follows the Fowler-Nordheim theory for field emission, fixing the relationship among the energy spread, the current, and the radius. The performance of the CNT emitter under realistic operating conditions is compared with state-of-the-art electron point sources. It is demonstrated that the reduced brightness is a function of the tunneling parameter, a measure of the energy spread at low temperatures, only, independent of the geometry of the emitter.

  11. Utilization of carbon sources in a northern Brazilian mangrove ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giarrizzo, Tommaso; Schwamborn, Ralf; Saint-Paul, Ulrich

    2011-12-01

    Carbon and nitrogen stable isotope ratios ( 13C and 15N) and trophic level (TL) estimates based on stomach content analysis and published data were used to assess the contribution of autotrophic sources to 55 consumers in an intertidal mangrove creek of the Curuçá estuary, northern Brazil. Primary producers showed δ 13C signatures ranging between -29.2 and -19.5‰ and δ 15N from 3.0 to 6.3‰. The wide range of the isotopic composition of carbon of consumers (-28.6 to -17.1‰) indicated that different autotrophic sources are important in the intertidal mangrove food webs. Food web segregation structures the ecosystem into three relatively distinct food webs: (i) mangrove food web, where vascular plants contribute directly or indirectly via POM to the most 13C-depleted consumers (e.g. Ucides cordatus and zooplanktivorous food chains); (ii) algal food web, where benthic algae are eaten directly by consumers (e.g. Uca maracoani, mullets, polychaetes, several fishes); (iii) mixed food web where the consumers use the carbon from different primary sources (mainly benthivorous fishes). An IsoError mixing model was used to determine the contributions of primary sources to consumers, based on δ 13C values. Model outputs were very sensitive to the magnitude of trophic isotope fractionation and to the variability in 13C data. Nevertheless, the simplification of the system by a priori aggregation of primary producers allowed interpretable results for several taxa, revealing the segregation into different food webs.

  12. Achieving high performance in intermediate temperature direct carbon fuel cells with renewable carbon as a fuel source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Bamboo fiber and waste paper were pyrolyzed to generate bamboo carbon and waste paper carbon as anode fuels of IT-DCFC. • Superior cell performance was achieved with the waste paper carbon. • The results suggested the high performance was due to the highest thermal reactivity and the catalytic inherent impurities. • Calcite and kaolinite as inherent impurities favored the thermal decomposition and the electrooxidation of carbon. - Abstract: Three kinds of carbon sources obtained from carbon black, bamboo fiber and waste paper were investigated as anode fuels in an intermediate temperature direct carbon fuel cell. The carbon sources were characterized with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, thermal gravimetric analysis, etc. The results indicated that the waste paper carbon was more abundant in calcite and kaolinite, and showed higher thermal reactivity in the intermediate temperature range compared with the other two carbon sources. The cell performance was tested at 650 °C in a hybrid single cell, using Sm0.20Ce0.80O2−x as the electrolyte. As a result, the cell fed with waste paper carbon showed the highest performance among the three carbon sources, with a peak power density of 225 mW cm−2. The results indicated that its inherent impurities, such as calcite and kaolinite, might favor the thermal gasification of renewable carbon sources, which resulted in the enhanced performance of the intermediate temperature direct carbon fuel cell

  13. Ligninolytic Activity of Ganoderma strains on Different Carbon Sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TYPUK ARTININGSIH

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Lignin is a phenylpropanoid polymers with only few carbon bonds might be hydrolized. Due to its complexity, lignin is particularly difficult to decompose. Ganoderma is one of white rot fungi capable of lignin degradation. The ligninolytic of several species Ganoderma growing under different carbon sources was studied under controlled conditions which P. chrysosporium was used as standard comparison.Three types of ligninolytic, namely LiP, MnP, and laccase were assessed quantitatively and qualitatively. Ratio between clear zone and diameter of fungal colony was used for measuring specific activity qualitatively.Four sspecies of Ganoderma showed positive ligninolytic qualitatively that G. lucidum KT2-32 gave the highest ligninolytic. Activity of LiP and MnP in different carbon sources was consistently resulted by G. lucidum KT2-32, while the highest activity of laccase was shown by G. ochrolaccatum SA2-14. Medium of Indulin AT affected production of protein extracellular and induced ligninolytic. Glucose, BMC, and pine sawdust did not affect the activity of ligninolytic. The specific activity of Ganoderma species was found to be higher than the one of P. chrysosporium.

  14. Carbon sources and fates in the Gulf of Papua

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goni, M. A.; Monacci, N. M.; Gisewhite, R. A.; Ogston, A.; Crockett, J.; Nittrouer, C.

    2006-12-01

    Seabed sediments were collected along the particle-dispersal system associated with the Fly River-Gulf of Papua continental margin as part of the source to sink program in Papua New Guinea. Box and kasten cores were collected from the subaqueous delta located adjacent to the mouth of the Fly River as well as from the topset, foreset and bottomset regions of the active clinoform in the northern region of the Gulf of Papua. Analyses of elemental (organic carbon, inorganic carbon, nitrogen), stable isotopic (d13C and d15N), radiocarbon (14C), and biomarker (CuO oxidation products) signatures reveal significant differences in the content and composition of sedimentary organic matter (OM) along the dispersal system. The major sources of OM to the system appear to be remains of vascular plants, soil OM from the drainage basin, and materials derived from autochthonous productivity. The geographical contrasts in the concentrations and accumulation fluxes of these distinct types of allochthonous and autochthonous OM are presented in the context of patterns of sediment transport and deposition within the region. An overall OM budget for the whole dispersal system will be presented and its implication for carbon sequestration in fluvial-dominated continental margins discussed.

  15. Russia's black carbon emissions: focus on diesel sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kholod, Nazar; Evans, Meredydd; Kuklinski, Teresa

    2016-09-01

    Black carbon (BC) is a significant climate forcer with a particularly pronounced forcing effect in polar regions such as the Russian Arctic. Diesel combustion is a major global source of BC emissions, accounting for 25-30 % of all BC emissions. While the demand for diesel is growing in Russia, the country's diesel emissions are poorly understood. This paper presents a detailed inventory of Russian BC emissions from diesel sources. Drawing on a complete Russian vehicle registry with detailed information about vehicle types and emission standards, this paper analyzes BC emissions from diesel on-road vehicles. We use the COPERT emission model (COmputer Programme to calculate Emissions from Road Transport) with Russia-specific emission factors for all types of on-road vehicles. On-road diesel vehicles emitted 21 Gg of BC in 2014: heavy-duty trucks account for 60 % of the on-road BC emissions, while cars represent only 5 % (light commercial vehicles and buses account for the remainder). Using Russian activity data and fuel-based emission factors, the paper also presents BC emissions from diesel locomotives and ships, off-road engines in industry, construction and agriculture, and generators. The study also factors in the role of superemitters in BC emissions from diesel on-road vehicles and off-road sources. The total emissions from diesel sources in Russia are estimated to be 49 Gg of BC and 17 Gg of organic carbon (OC) in 2014. Off-road diesel sources emitted 58 % of all diesel BC in Russia.

  16. Kupier prize lecture: Sources of solar-system carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anders, Edward; Zinner, Ernst

    1994-01-01

    We have tried to deconvolve Solar-System carbon into its sources, on the basis of C-12/C-13 ratios (equivalent to R). Interstellar SiC in meteorites, representing greater than 4.6-Ga-old stardust from carbon stars, is isotopically heavier (bar R = 38 +/- 2) than Solar-System carbon (89), implying that the latter contains an additional, light component. A likely source are massive stars, mainly Type II supernovae and Wolf-Rayet stars, which, being O-rich, eject their C largely as CO rather than carbonaceous dust. The fraction of such light C in the Solar System depends on R(sub light) in the source. For R(sub light) = 180-1025 (as in 'Group 4' meteoritic graphite spherules, which apparently came from massive stars greater than 4.6 Ga ago), the fraction of light C is 0.79-0.61. Similar results are obtained for present-day data on red giants and interstellar gas. Although both have become enriched in C-13 due to galactic evolution (to bar-R = 20 and 57), the fraction of the light component in interstellar gas again is near 0.7. (Here bar R represents the mean of a mixture calculated via atom fractions; it is not identical to the arithmetic mean R). Interstellar graphite, unlike SiC, shows a large peak at R approximately equal 90, near the solar value. Although some of the grains may be of local origin, others show anomalies in other elements and hence are exotic. Microdiamonds, with R = 93, also are exotic on the basis of their Xe and N. Apparently R approximately 90 was a fairly common composition 4.6 Ga ago, of stars as well as the ISM.

  17. Quantification of carbon sources for isoprene emission in poplar leaves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreutzwieseer, J.; Graus, M.; Schnitzler, J. P.; Heizmann, U.; Rennenberg, H.; Hansel, A.

    2003-12-01

    Isoprene is the most abundant volatile organic compound emitted by plants and in particular by trees. Current interest in understanding its biosynthesis in chloroplasts is forced by the important role isoprene plays in atmospheric chemistry. Leaf isoprene formation is closely linked to photosynthesis by a dynamic use of recently fixed photosynthetic precursors in the chloroplast. Under steady state conditions in [13C]CO2 atmosphere approximately 75 % of isoprene became labeled within minutes. The source of unlabeled C is suggested to be of extra-chloroplastidic and/or from starch degradation. In order to test whether these alternative carbon sources - leaf internal C-pools and xylem-transported carbohydrates, contribute to leaf isoprene formation in poplar (Populus tremula x P. alba) on-line proton-transfer-reaction-mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) was used to follow 13C-labeling kinetics.

  18. Regional prediction of carbon isotopes in soil carbonates for Asian dust source tracer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bing; Cui, Xinjuan; Wang, Yaqiang

    2016-10-01

    Dust particles emitted from deserts and semi-arid lands in northern China cause particulate pollution that increases the burden of disease particularly for urban population in East Asia. The stable carbon isotopes (δ13C) of carbonates in soils and dust aerosols in northern China were investigated. We found that the δ13C of carbonates in surface soils in northern China showed clearly the negative correlation (R2 = 0.73) with Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI). Using Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) satellite-derived NDVI, we predicted the regional distribution of δ13C of soil carbonates in deserts, sandy lands, and steppe areas. The predictions show the mean δ13C of -0.4 ± 0.7‰ in soil carbonates in Taklimakan Desert and Gobi Deserts, and the isotope values decrease to -3.3 ± 1.1‰ in sandy lands. The increase in vegetation coverage depletes 13C in soil carbonates, thus the steppe areas are predicted by the lowest δ13C levels (-8.1 ± 1.7‰). The measurements of atmospheric dust samples at eight sites showed that the Asian dust sources were well assigned by the 13C mapping in surface soils. Predicting 13C in large geographical areas with fine resolution offers a cost-effective tracer to monitor dust emissions from sandy lands and steppe areas which show an increasing role in Asian dust loading driven by climate change and human activities.

  19. Barrow Black Carbon Source and Impact Study Final Campaign Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrett, Tate [Baylor Univ., Waco, TX (United States)

    2014-07-01

    The goal of the Barrow Black Carbon Source and Impact (BBCSI) Study was to characterize the concentration and isotopic composition of carbonaceous atmospheric particulate matter (PM) at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement site in Barrow, AK. The carbonaceous component was characterized via measurement of the organic and black carbon (OC and BC) components of the total PM. To facilitate complete characterization of the particulate matter, filter-based collections were used, including a medium volume PM2.5 sampler and a high volume PM10 sampler. Thirty-eight fine (PM2.5) and 49 coarse (PM10) particulate matter fractions were collected at weekly and bi-monthly intervals. The PM2.5 sampler operated with minimal maintenance during the 12 month campaign. The PM10 sampler used for the BBCSI used standard Tisch hi-vol motors which have a known lifetime of ~1 month under constant use; this necessitated monthly maintenance and it is suggested that the motors be upgraded to industrial blowers for future deployment in the Arctic. The BBCSI sampling campaign successfully collected and archived 87 ambient atmospheric particulate matter samples from Barrow, AK from July 2012 to June 2013. Preliminary analysis of the organic and black carbon concentrations has been completed. This campaign confirmed known trends of high BC lasting from the winter through to spring haze periods and low BC concentrations in the summer.

  20. Barrow Black Carbon Source and Impact Study Final Campaign Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrett, Tate

    2014-07-01

    The goal of the Barrow Black Carbon Source and Impact campaign was to characterize the concentration and isotopic composition of carbonaceous atmospheric particulate matter (PM) at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility site in Barrow, Alaska. The carbonaceous component was characterized by measuring the organic and black carbon (OC and BC) components of the total PM. To facilitate complete characterization of the PM, filter-based collections were used, including a medium volume PM2.5 sampler and a high volume PM10 sampler. Thirty-eight fine PM fractions (PM2.5) and 49 coarse (PM10) PM fractions were collected at weekly and bi-monthly intervals. The PM2.5 sampler operated with minimal maintenance during the 12 month campaign. The PM10 sampler used for the Barrow Black Carbon Source and Impact (BBCSI) study used standard Tisch “hi-vol” motors that have a known lifetime of approximately 1 month under constant use; this necessitated monthly maintenance, and it is suggested that, for future deployment in the Arctic, the motors be upgraded to industrial blowers. The BBCSI sampling campaign successfully collected and archived 87 ambient atmospheric PM samples from Barrow, Alaska, from July 2012 to June 2013. Preliminary analysis of the OC and BC concentrations has been completed. This campaign confirmed known trends of high BC lasting from the winter through to spring haze periods and low BC concentrations in the summer. However, the annual OC concentrations had a very different seasonal pattern with the highest concentrations during the summer, lowest concentrations during the fall, and increased concentrations during the winter and spring (Figure 1).

  1. Carbon dioxide as a carbon source in organic transformation: carbon-carbon bond forming reactions by transition-metal catalysts.

    OpenAIRE

    Tsuji, Yasushi; Fujihara, Tetsuaki

    2012-01-01

    Recent carbon-carbon bond forming reactions of carbon dioxide with alkenes, alkynes, dienes, aryl zinc compounds, aryl boronic esters, aryl halides, and arenes having acidic C-H bonds are reviewed in which transition-metal catalysts play an important role.

  2. Black carbon as a carbon source for young soils in a glacier forefield?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckmeier, E.; Pichler, B.; Krebs, R.; Mavris, C.; Egli, M.

    2012-04-01

    Most evident changes in Alpine soils today occur in proglacial areas where existing young soils are continuously developing. Due to climate change, additional areas will become ice-free and subject to weathering and new soil formation. The glacier forefields of the European Alps are continuously exposed since the glaciers reached their maximum expansion in the 1850s. In these proglacial areas, initial soils have started to develop so that they may offer, under optimal conditions, a continuous chronosequence from 0 to 150 year-old soils. The buildup of organic carbon (Corg) in soil is an important factor controlling weathering and the formation of soils. Not only autochthonous but also distant (allochthonous) sources may contribute to the accumulation of soil organic carbon in young soils and surfaces of glacier forefields. Black carbon could be an important component in Alpine soils. However, only little is known about black carbon in very young soils that develop in glacier forefields. The aim of our study was to examine whether black carbon as an allochthonous source of soil organic matter can be detected in the initial soils, and to estimate its relative contribution (as a function of time) to total organic carbon. We investigated surface soil samples (topsoils, A or AO horizon) from 35 sites distributed over the whole proglacial area of Morteratsch, where ideal conditions for a soil chronosequence from 0 to 150 years can be found. Along this sequence, bare till sediments to weakly developed soils (Leptosols) can be encountered. Black carbon concentrations were determined in fine-earth using the benzene polycarboxylic acid (BPCA) marker method as described by Brodowski et al. (2005). We found that the proportion of BPCA-C to total Corg was related to the time since the surface was exposed. The youngest soils (younger than 40 years) contained the highest proportion of BPCA-C (up to 120 g BPCA-C/kg Corg). In these soils, however, the Corg concentrations were very

  3. A Novel Airborne Carbon Isotope Analyzer for Methane and Carbon Dioxide Source Fingerprinting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berman, E. S.; Huang, Y. W.; Owano, T. G.; Leifer, I.

    2014-12-01

    Recent field studies on major sources of the important greenhouse gas methane (CH4) indicate significant underestimation of methane release from fossil fuel industrial (FFI) and animal husbandry sources, among others. In addition, uncertainties still exist with respect to carbon dioxide (CO2) measurements, especially source fingerprinting. CO2 isotopic analysis provides a valuable in situ measurement approach to fingerprint CH4 and CO2as associated with combustion sources, leakage from geologic reservoirs, or biogenic sources. As a result, these measurements can characterize strong combustion source plumes, such as power plant emissions, and discriminate these emissions from other sources. As part of the COMEX (CO2 and MEthane eXperiment) campaign, a novel CO2 isotopic analyzer was installed and collected data aboard the CIRPAS Twin Otter aircraft. Developing methods to derive CH4 and CO2 budgets from remote sensing data is the goal of the summer 2014 COMEX campaign, which combines hyperspectral imaging (HSI) and non-imaging spectroscopy (NIS) with in situ airborne and surface data. COMEX leverages the synergy between high spatial resolution HSI and moderate spatial resolution NIS. The carbon dioxide isotope analyzer developed by Los Gatos Research (LGR) uses LGR's patented Off-Axis ICOS (Integrated Cavity Output Spectroscopy) technology and incorporates proprietary internal thermal control for high sensitivity and optimal instrument stability. This analyzer measures CO2 concentration as well as δ13C, δ18O, and δ17O from CO2 at natural abundance (100-3000 ppm). The laboratory accuracy is ±1.2 ppm (1σ) in CO2 from 370-1000 ppm, with a long-term (1000 s) precision of ±0.012 ppm. The long-term precision for both δ13C and δ18O is 0.04 ‰, and for δ17O is 0.06 ‰. The analyzer was field-tested as part of the COWGAS campaign, a pre-cursor campaign to COMEX in March 2014, where it successfully discriminated plumes related to combustion processes associated with

  4. Size distributions, sources and source areas of water-soluble organic carbon in urban background air

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Timonen

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper represents the results of one year long measurement period of the size distributions of water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC, inorganic ions and gravimetric mass of particulate matter. Measurements were done at an urban background station (SMEAR III by using a micro-orifice uniform deposit impactor (MOUDI. The site is located in northern European boreal region in Helsinki, Finland. The WSOC size distribution measurements were completed with the chemical analysis of inorganic ions, organic carbon (OC and monosaccharide anhydrides from the filter samples (particle aerodynamic diameter smaller than 1 μm, PM1. Gravimetric mass concentration varied during the MOUDI samplings between 3.4 and 55.0 μg m−3 and the WSOC concentrations were between 0.3 and 7.4 μg m−3. On average, water-soluble particulate organic matter (WSPOM, WSOC multiplied by 1.6 to convert the analyzed carbon mass to organic matter mass comprised 25±7.7% and 7.5±3.4% of aerosol PM1 mass and the PM1–10 mass, respectively. Inorganic ions contributed 33±12% and 28±19% of the analyzed PM1 and PM1–10 aerosol mass.

    Five different aerosol categories corresponding to different sources or source areas were identified (long-range transport aerosols, biomass burning aerosols from wild land fires and from small-scale wood combustion, aerosols originating from marine areas and from the clean arctic areas. Categories were identified mainly using levoglucosan concentration level for wood combustion and air mass backward trajectories for other groups. Clear differences in WSOC concentrations and size distributions originating from different sources or source areas were observed, although there are also many other factors which might affect the results. E.g. the local conditions and sources of volatile organic compounds (VOCs and aerosols as well as various transformation processes are likely

  5. Acetic Acid bacteria: physiology and carbon sources oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamlouk, Dhouha; Gullo, Maria

    2013-12-01

    Acetic acid bacteria (AAB) are obligately aerobic bacteria within the family Acetobacteraceae, widespread in sugary, acidic and alcoholic niches. They are known for their ability to partially oxidise a variety of carbohydrates and to release the corresponding metabolites (aldehydes, ketones and organic acids) into the media. Since a long time they are used to perform specific oxidation reactions through processes called "oxidative fermentations", especially in vinegar production. In the last decades physiology of AAB have been widely studied because of their role in food production, where they act as beneficial or spoiling organisms, and in biotechnological industry, where their oxidation machinery is exploited to produce a number of compounds such as l-ascorbic acid, dihydroxyacetone, gluconic acid and cellulose. The present review aims to provide an overview of AAB physiology focusing carbon sources oxidation and main products of their metabolism.

  6. Trends in the sources and sinks of carbon dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Quere, Corrine [University of East Anglia, Norwich, United Kingdom; Raupach, Mike [GCP, Canberra, Australia; Canadell, J.G. [CSIRO Marine and Atmospheric Research; Marland, Gregg [ORNL; Bopp, Laurent [National Center for Scientific Research, Gif-sur-Yvette, France; Ciais, Philippe [Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l' Environement, France; Friedlingstein, Pierre [National Center for Scientific Research, Gif-sur-Yvette, France; Viovy, Nicolas [National Center for Scientific Research, Gif-sur-Yvette, France; Conway, T.J. [NOAA, Boulder, CO; Doney, Scott C. [Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution; Feely, R. A. [NOAA Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory; Foster, Pru [University of Bristol, UK; House, Joanna I [University of Bristol, UK; Prentice, Colin I. [University of Bristol, UK; Gurney, Kevin [Purdue University; Houghton, R.A. [Woods Hole Research Center, Woods Hole, MA; Huntingford, Chris [Center for Ecology and Hydrology, Oxon, England; Levy, Peter E. [Center for Ecology and Hydrology, Midlothian, Scotland; Lomas, M. R. [University of Sheffield; Woodward, F. I. [University of Sheffield; Majkut, Joseph [Princeton University; Sarmiento, Jorge L. [Princeton University; Metzl, Nicolas [University of Paris; Ometto, Jean P [ORNL; Randerson, James T. [University of California, Irvine; Peters, Glen P [Center for International Climate and Energy Research (CICERO), Oslo, Norway; Running, Steven [University of Montana, Missoula; Sitch, Stephen [University of Leeds, UK; Takahashi, Taro [Columbia University; Van der Werf, Guido [Universitate Amsterdam

    2009-12-01

    Efforts to control climate change require the stabilization of atmospheric CO2 concentrations. This can only be achieved through a drastic reduction of global CO2 emissions. Yet fossil fuel emissions increased by 29% between 2000 and 2008, in conjunction with increased contributions from emerging economies, from the production and international trade of goods and services, and from the use of coal as a fuel source. In contrast, emissions from land-use changes were nearly constant. Between 1959 and 2008, 43% of each year's CO2 emissions remained in the atmosphere on average; the rest was absorbed by carbon sinks on land and in the oceans. In the past 50 years, the fraction of CO2 emissions that remains in the atmosphere each year has likely increased, from about 40% to 45%, and models suggest that this trend was caused by a decrease in the uptake of CO2 by the carbon sinks in response to climate change and variability. Changes in the CO2 sinks are highly uncertain, but they could have a significant influence on future atmospheric CO2 levels. It is therefore crucial to reduce the uncertainties.

  7. Carbon Nanotube/Magnesium Composite as a Hydrogen Source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Min Kyu; Se, Kwon Oh; Kim, Min Joong; Hwang, Jae Won; Yoon, Byoung Young; Kwon, Hyuk Sang

    2015-11-01

    Hydrogen produced using the steam reforming process contains sulfur and carbon monoxide that are harmful to the Pt catalyst in proton-exchange-membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs). However, CO-free hydrogen can be generated from the hydrolysis of either Al in strongly alkaline water or Mg in neutral water with chlorides such as sea water. The hydrogen generation rate from the hydrolysis of Mg is extremely slow and linearly proportional to the corrosion rate of Mg in chloride water. In this work, we fabricated a carbon nanotube (CNT)--reinforced Mg--matrix composite by Spark Plasma Sintering as a fast hydrogen generation source for a PEMFC. The CNTs distributed in the Mg matrix act as numerous local cathodes, and hence cause severe galvanic corrosion between the Mg-matrix anode and CNT-cathode in NaCl solution. It was found that the hydrogen generation rate from the hydrolysis of the 5 vol.% CNT/Mg composite is 3300 times faster than that of the Mg without CNTs due primarily to the galvanic corrosion effect.

  8. Do Vermont's Floodplains Constitute an Important Source of Labile Carbon?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perdrial, J. N.; Dolan, A.; Kemsley, M.

    2014-12-01

    Floodplains are extremely heterogeneous landscapes with respect to soil and sediment composition and can present an important source of carbon (C) during floods. For example, stream bank soils and sediments are zones of active erosion and deposition of sediment associated C. Due to the presence of plants, riparian soils contain high amounts of C that is exchanged between stream waters and banks. Abandoned channels and meander wetlands that remain hydrologically connected to the main channel contain high amounts of organic matter that can be flushed into the stream during high discharge. This heterogeneity, result of floodplain geomorphology, land cover and use, can profoundly impact the amount and type of dissolved organic matter (DOM) introduced into streams. In order to assess DOM characteristics leached from heterogeneous floodplain soils, aqueous soil extracts were performed on soil samples representative of different land covers (n=20) at four depths. Extracts were analyzed for dissolved organic C and total dissolved nitrogen with a Shimadzu C analyzer. Colored dissolved organic matter characteristics was measured with the Aqualog Fluorescence Spectrometer and quantified with parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC). Preliminary data from three floodplains in Vermont (Connecticut, Missisquoi and Mad River) show a 3D variability of longitudinal, lateral, and vertical extents on water-extractable, mobile C. Dissolved organic carbon concentrations in meander swamp samples were found up to 9 times higher than in those of soils from agricultural field indicative of an important C source. Although C concentrations in adjacent fields were low, high abundance of labile C (indicated by tryptophan-like fluorescence) in water extracts from fields indicates recent biological production of C. This labile C is easily processed by microbes and transformed to the greenhouse gas CO2. These results provide important information on the contribution and lability of different floodplain

  9. Land use effects on terrestrial carbon sources and sinks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Josep; G.; Canadell

    2002-01-01

    Current and past land use practices are critical in determining the distribution and size of global terrestrial carbon (C) sources and sinks. Althoughfossil fuel emissions dominate the anthropogenic perturbation of the global C cycle, land use still drives the largest portion of anthropogenic emissions in a number of tropical regions of Asia. The size of the emission flux owing to land use change is still the biggest uncertainty in the global C budget. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) reported a flux term of 1.7 PgC@a-1 for 1990-1995 but more recent estimates suggest the magnitude of this source may be only of 0.96 PgC@a-1 for the 1990s. In addition, current and past land use practices are now thought to contribute to a large degree to the northern hemisphere terrestrial sink, and are the dominant driver for some regional sinks. However, mechanisms other than land use change need to be invoked in order to explain the inferred C sink in the tropics. Potential candidates are the carbon dioxide (CO2) fertilization and climate change; fertilization due to nitrogen (N) deposition is believed to be small or nil. Although the potential for managing C sinks is limited, improved land use management and new land uses such as reforestation and biomass fuel cropping, can further enhance current terrestrial C sinks. Best management practices in agriculture alone could sequester 0.4-0.8 PgC per year in soils if implemented globally. New methodologies to ensure verification and permanency of C sequestration need to be developed.

  10. Synthesis of Carbon Nanotubes of Few Walls Using Aliphatic Alcohols as a Carbon Source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Espinosa-Magaña

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanotubes with single and few walls are highly appreciated for their technological applications, regardless of the limited availability due to their high production cost. In this paper we present an alternative process that can lead to lowering the manufacturing cost of CNTs of only few walls by means of the use of the spray pyrolysis technique. For this purpose, ferrocene is utilized as a catalyst and aliphatic alcohols (methanol, ethanol, propanol or butanol as the carbon source. The characterization of CNTs was performed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM and transmission electron microscopy (TEM. The study of the synthesized carbon nanotubes (CNTs show important differences in the number of layers that constitute the nanotubes, the diameter length, the quantity and the quality as a function of the number of carbons employed in the alcohol. The main interest of this study is to give the basis of an efficient synthesis process to produce CNTs of few walls for applications where small diameter is required.

  11. Comparative study on bacterial carbon sources in lake sediments : the role of methanotrophy

    OpenAIRE

    Steger, Kristin; K. Premke; Gudasz, Cristian; Boschker, H.T.S.; Tranvik, Lars J.

    2015-01-01

    Methane-derived carbon can be important in both benthic and pelagic food webs. Either generated in the anaerobic layers of the sediment or in the anaerobic hypolimnion of stratified eutrophic lakes, methane is an excellent carbon source for aerobic methanotrophic bacteria. The very negative methane delta C-13-signal in the methanotrophic biomass provides an excellent opportunity to trace the use of methane-derived carbon in food webs. We studied carbon sources of benthic bacteria in a range o...

  12. Towards a Carbon Nanotube Ionization Source for Planetary Atmosphere Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oza, A. V.; Leblanc, F.; Berthelier, J. J.; Becker, J.; Coulomb, R.; Gilbert, P.; Hong, N. T.; Lee, S.; Vettier, L.

    2015-12-01

    The characterization of planetary exospheres today, relies on the development of a highly efficient ionization source, due to the scant neutral molecules (n atmospheres provide insight on to physical processes known to occur such as: space weathering, magneto-atmosphere interactions, as well as atmospheric escape mechanisms, all of which are being heavily investigated via current 3D Monte Carlo simulations (Turc et al. 2014, Leblanc et al. 2016 in prep) at LATMOS. Validation of these studies will rely on in-situ observations in the coming decades. Neutral detection strongly depends on electron-impact ionization which via conventional cathode-sources, such as thermal filaments (heated up to 2000 K), may only produce the target ionization essential for energy-measurements with large power consumption. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) however are ideal low-power, cold cathodes, when subject to moderate electric fields (E ~ 1 MV / m). We present our current device, a small CNT chip, of emission area 15 mm2, emitting electrons that pass through an anode grid and subsequent electrostatic analyzer. The device currently extracts hundreds of µAmperes with applied external voltages ~ -150 Volts, approaching minimum power consumption plasma sputtering the icy regolith with heavy ions and electrons (keV < E < MeV), producing predominately molecular oxygen (Johnson et al. 2002).

  13. Size distributions, sources and source areas of water-soluble organic carbon in urban background air

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Timonen

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper represents the results of one year long measurement period of the size distributions of water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC, inorganic ions and gravimetric mass of particulate matter. Measurements were done at an urban background station (SMEAR III by using a micro-orifice uniform deposit impactor (MOUDI. The site is located in northern European boreal region in Helsinki, Finland. The WSOC size distribution measurements were completed with the chemical analysis of inorganic ions, organic carbon (OC and monosaccharide anhydrides from the filter samples. During the measurements gravimetric mass in the MOUDI collections varied between 3.4 and 55.0 μg m−3 and the WSOC concentration was between 0.3 and 7.4 μg m−3. On average, water-soluble particulate organic matter (WSPOM, WSOC multiplied by 1.6 comprised 25±7.7% and 7.5±3.4% of aerosol PM1 mass and the PM1−10 mass, respectively. Inorganic ions contributed 33±12% and 28±19% of the analyzed PM1 and PM1−10 aerosol mass.

    Five different aerosol categories corresponding to different sources or source areas were identified (long-range transport aerosols, biomass burning aerosols from wild land fires and from small-scale wood combustion, aerosols originating from marine areas and from the clean arctic areas. Clear differences in WSOC concentrations and size distributions originating from different sources or source areas were observed, although there are also many other factors which might affect the results. E.g. the local conditions and sources of volatile organic compounds (VOCs and aerosols as well as various transformation processes are likely to have an impact on the measured aerosol composition. Using the source categories, it was identified that especially the oxidation products of biogenic VOCs in summer had a clear effect on WSOC concentrations.

  14. Tracing the sources of organic carbon in freshwater systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glendell, Miriam; Meersmans, Jeroen; Barclay, Rachel; Yvon-Durocher, Gabriel; Barker, Sam; Jones, Richard; Hartley, Iain; Dungait, Jennifer; Quine, Timothy

    2016-04-01

    both terrestrial and aquatic sources as recorded in lake sediments to the measured rates of soil erosion and terrestrial & aquatic CO2 respiration rates, this study has paved a way towards a novel and cross-disciplinary approach to investigate and further improve current status of knowledge as regards C-cycling across the entire terrestrial-aquatic continuum. 137Cs was found to be useful to understand the dynamics and spatial pattern of lateral fluxes of sediment & C at the catchment scale, while tracing chemical composition of C using n-alkanes and stable isotopes (δ13C, δ15N) allowed distinguishing between the terrestrial vs. aquatic origin of C and determining main sources of particulate organic carbon in the aquatic environment within the two study catchments.

  15. A study of the ocean source of carbon disulphide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Huixiang

    1999-11-01

    The environmental importance of atmospheric carbon disulphide (CS 2) is recognised by its potential role as a major precursor of carbonyl Sulphide (OCS). The ocean is believed to emit CS2 to air, but large uncertainty may exist in the assessments of sea-to-air fluxes of this compound partly due to the meager database we currently have for CS2 in the ocean. This work is intended to re-assess the flux estimates and to identify and evaluate the potential Sources for Oceanic CS2. CS2 was measured in both the surface and subsurface waters during three cruises: two in the North Atlantic and one in the Pacific Ocean. All the investigated waters were supersaturated in CS2 relative to the atmosphere. Two distinct types of vertical profiles were observed: one in the cool waters of the North Atlantic, characterized by gradual reduction in CS2 with depth, and another in the warm waters of the North Pacific central are. showing the coexistence of subsurface CS2 and chlorophyll maxima. Solar UV-initiated photochemical reactions were identified as a significant source for oceanic CS2. The photo-production rate of CS2 is positively correlated with absorbance at 350 run, suggesting that the reactions are mediated by coloured dissolved organic matter. Laboratory irradiations confirmed that cysteine and cystine are efficient precursors of CS2 and that OH radicals are likely to be important intermediates. CS2 data were collected from axenic monocultures of six species of marine phytoplankton: Chaetoceros calcitrans, Phaeodactylum tricornutum, Phaeocystis sp., Porphyridium purpureum, Synechococcus sp. and Isochrysis sp. For a period of between two weeks and forty days, substantial accumulation Of CS2 was found in the cultures of C. calcitrans, P. tricornutum and Phaeocystis sp. C. calcitrans has a potential for CS2 production about 10 times higher than P. tricornutum or Phaeocystis sp. CS2 formation was strongly dependent on the growth stage of the cultured species. (Abstract shortened

  16. Carbon nanotube based field emission X-ray sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yuan

    This dissertation describes the development of field emission (FE) x-ray sources with a carbon-nanotube (CNT) cathode. Field emission x-rays have advantages over conventional x-rays by replacing the thermionic cathode with a cold cathode so that electrons are emitted at room temperature and emission is voltage controllable. CNTs are found to be excellent electron emitters with low threshold fields and high current density which makes them ideal for generate field emission x-rays. Macroscopic CNT cold cathodes are prepared and the parameters to tune their field emission properties are studied: structure and morphology of CNT cathodes, temperature as well as electronic work function of CNT. Macroscopic CNT cathodes with optimized performance are chosen to build a high-resolution x-ray imaging system. The system can readily generate x-ray radiation with continuous variation of temporal resolution up to nanoseconds and spatial resolution down to 10 micron. Its potential applications for dynamic x-ray imaging and micro-computed tomography are also demonstrated. The performance characteristics of this compact and versatile system are promising for non-destructive testing and for non-invasive small-animal imaging for biomedical research.

  17. USE OF STABLE CARBON ISOTOPE RATIOS OF FATTY ACIDS TO EVALUATE MICROBIAL CARBON SOURCES IN TERRESTRIAL ENVIRONMENTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    We use measurements of the concentration and stable carbon isotopic ratio (D 13C) of individual microbial phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs) in soils as indicators of live microbial biomass levels and microbial carbon source. We found that intensive sugar cane cultivation leads to ...

  18. Young organic matter as a source of carbon dioxide outgassing from Amazonian rivers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayorga, E; Aufdenkampe, A K; Masiello, C A; Krusche, A V; Hedges, J I; Quay, P D; Richey, J E; Brown, T A

    2005-06-23

    Rivers are generally supersaturated with respect to carbon dioxide, resulting in large gas evasion fluxes that can be a significant component of regional net carbon budgets. Amazonian rivers were recently shown to outgas more than ten times the amount of carbon exported to the ocean in the form of total organic carbon or dissolved inorganic carbon. High carbon dioxide concentrations in rivers originate largely from in situ respiration of organic carbon, but little agreement exists about the sources or turnover times of this carbon. Here we present results of an extensive survey of the carbon isotope composition ({sup 13}C and {sup 14}C) of dissolved inorganic carbon and three size-fractions of organic carbon across the Amazonian river system. We find that respiration of contemporary organic matter (less than 5 years old) originating on land and near rivers is the dominant source of excess carbon dioxide that drives outgassing in mid-size to large rivers, although we find that bulk organic carbon fractions transported by these rivers range from tens to thousands of years in age. We therefore suggest that a small, rapidly cycling pool of organic carbon is responsible for the large carbon fluxes from land to water to atmosphere in the humid tropics.

  19. The Effect of Carbon Source and Fluoride Concentrations in the "Streptococcus Mutans" Biofilm Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulino, Tony P.; Andrade, Ricardo O.; Bruschi-Thedei, Giuliana C. M.; Thedei, Geraldo, Jr.; Ciancaglini, Pietro

    2004-01-01

    The main objective of this class experiment is to show the influence of carbon source and of different fluoride concentrations on the biofilm formation by the bacterium "Streptococcus mutans." The observation of different biofilm morphology as a function of carbon source and fluoride concentration allows an interesting discussion regarding the…

  20. Ablation Properties of the Carbon-Based Composites Used in Artificial Heat Source Under Fire Accident

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANG; Xian; HUANG; Jin-ming; ZHOU; Shao-jian; LUO; Zhi-fu

    2012-01-01

    <正>The ablation properties of the carbon-based composites used in artificial heat source under fire accident were investigated by the arc heater. In this work, we tested the carbon-based composites referring to Fig. 1. Their linear/mass ablation ratio and ablation morphologies were studied. The results showed that the carbon-based composites used in artificial heat source behaved well

  1. Investigating effectiveness of activated carbons of natural sources on various supercapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faisal, Md. Shahnewaz Sabit; Rahman, Muhammad M.; Asmatulu, Ramazan

    2016-04-01

    Activated carbon can be produced from natural sources, such as pistachio and acorn shells, which can be an inexpensive and sustainable sources of natural wastes for the energy storage devices, such as supercapacitors. The carbonaceous materials used in this study were carbonized at the temperatures of 700°C and 900°C after the stabilization process at 240°C for two hours. These shells showed approximately 60% carbon yield. Carbonized nutshells were chemically activated using1wt% potassium hydroxide (KOH). Activated carbon powders with polyvinylidene fluoride (PVdF) were used to construct carbon electrodes. A 1M of tetraethylammonium tetrafluoroborate (TEABF4) and propylene carbonate (PC) were used as electrolytes. Electrochemical techniques, such as cyclic voltammetry (CV) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) were used for the characterization of the supercapacitors. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to inspect the surface texture of the activated carbons. Activated pistachio shells carbonized at 700°C showed more porous surface texture than those carbonized at 900°C. Effects of the carbonization temperatures were studied for their electrochemical characteristics. The shells carbonized at 700°C showed better electrochemical characteristics compared to those carbonized at 900°C. The test results provided about 27,083 μF/g specific capacitance at a scan rate of 10mV/s. This study showed promising results for using these activated carbons produced from the natural wastes for supercapacitor applications.

  2. Boreal Lake Sediments as Sources and Sinks of Carbon

    OpenAIRE

    Gudasz, Cristian

    2011-01-01

    Inland waters process large amounts of organic carbon, contributing to CO2 and CH4 emissions, as well as storing organic carbon (OC) over geological timescales. Recently, it has been shown that the magnitude of these processes is of global significance. It is therefore important to understand what regulates OC cycling in inland waters and how is that affected by climate change. This thesis investigates the constraints on microbial processing of sediment OC, as a key factor of the carbon cycli...

  3. Comparative study on bacterial carbon sources in lake sediments: the role of methanotrophy

    OpenAIRE

    Steger, K.; K. Premke; Gudasz, C.; Boschker, H.T.S.; Tranvik, L.J.

    2015-01-01

    Methane-derived carbon can be important in both benthic and pelagic food webs.Either generated in the anaerobic layers of the sediment or in the anaerobic hypolimnion of stratifiedeutrophic lakes, methane is an excellent carbon source for aerobic methanotrophic bacteria.The very negative methane d13C-signal in the methanotrophic biomass provides an excellentopportunity to trace the use of methane-derived carbon in food webs. We studied carbon sourcesof benthic bacteria in a range of Swedish l...

  4. Food sources for the mangrove tree crab aratus pisonii: a carbon isotopic study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muscle tissues from the mangrove tree crab Aratus pisonii was analysed for carbon isotopic composition, in order to trace its major food sources. Potential food sources: mangrove leaves epi phytic green algae, mangrove sediments and open water and mangrove suspended matter; were also analysed. The results show that A. pisonii is basically omnivorous, with major food sources from marine origin. However, mangrove carbon can contribute with 16% to 42% in the crab's diet. (author)

  5. Dissolved black carbon in Antarctic lakes: Chemical signatures of past and present sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Alia L.; Jaffé, Rudolf; Ding, Yan; McKnight, Diane M.

    2016-06-01

    The perennially ice-covered, closed-basin lakes in the McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica, serve as sentinels for understanding the fate of dissolved black carbon from glacial sources in aquatic ecosystems. Here we show that dissolved black carbon can persist in freshwater and saline surface waters for thousands of years, while preserving the chemical signature of the original source materials. The ancient brines of the lake bottom waters have retained dissolved black carbon with a woody chemical signature, representing long-range transport of black carbon from wildfires. In contrast, the surface waters are enriched in contemporary black carbon from fossil fuel combustion. Comparison of samples collected 25 years apart from the same lake suggests that the enrichment in anthropogenic black carbon is recent. Differences in the chemical composition of dissolved black carbon among the lakes are likely due to biogeochemical processing such as photochemical degradation and sorption on metal oxides.

  6. Wetlands as a large carbon source for inland waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abril, Gwenaël; Martinez, Jean-Michel; Artigas, L. Felipe; Moreira-Turcq, Patricia; Benedetti, Marc F.; Vidal, Luciana; Meziane, Tarik; Kim, Jung-Hyun; Bernardes, Marcelo C.; Deborde, Jonathan; Lima Souza, Edivaldo; Albéric, Patrick; Landim de Souza, Marcelo F.; Roland, Fabio

    2014-05-01

    Recent estimates suggests that up to 3 PgC y-1 could be emitted as CO2 from global inland waters, offsetting the carbon uptake by terrestrial ecosystems. It is generally assumed that inland waters emit carbon previously fixed upstream by land plant photosynthesis and subsequently transported downstream with runoff. But the observed carbon fluxes from first-order streams do not account for all of the CO2 outgassing at the scale of entire watersheds. Three-quarters of the world's flooded land are temporary wetlands. However, the contribution of these productive ecosystems to the inland water carbon budget has been largely overlooked. Based on observations in rivers and floodplains of the central Amazon, we suggest that wetlands pump large amounts of atmospheric CO2 into river waters. Indeed, the magnitude of CO2 outgassing in Amazonian waters is spatially and temporally related to their connection with the semi-aquatic vegetation that performs aerial photosynthesis (Flooded forests and floating macrophytes). These wetlands export half of their gross primary production to waters as dissolved CO2 and organic carbon, compared to only a few percent of gross primary production in upland ecosystems. Global carbon budgets should explicitly address temporary or vegetated flooded areas, as these ecosystems combine high aerial primary production with a large and fast carbon export capacity, potentially supporting a significant fraction of CO2 evasion from inland waters.

  7. Production of Feruloyl Esterase from Aspergillus niger by Solid-State Fermentation on Different Carbon Sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiyi Ou

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A mixture of wheat bran with maize bran as a carbon source and addition of (NH4SO4 as nitrogen source was found to significantly increase production of feruloyl esterase (FAE enzyme compared with wheat bran as a sole carbon and nitrogen source. The optimal conditions in conical flasks were carbon source (30 g to water 1 : 1, maize bran to wheat bran 1 : 2, (NH4SO4 1.2 g and MgSO4 70 mg. Under these conditions, FAE activity was 7.68 mU/g. The FAE activity on the mixed carbon sources showed, high activity against the plant cell walls contained in the cultures.

  8. Organic carbon in Antarctic snow: spatial trends and possible sources

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Antony, R.; Mahalinganathan, K.; Thamban, M.; Nair, S.

    ) screw-capped glass bottles under a laminar-flow benchhousedinaC015C176Ccoldroomprocessingfacility.Carewas taken to ensure that the bottles were filled leaving no head space and were tightly sealed in order to minimize contamination from the atmosphere... addressing issues concerning global carbon dynamics. 6,7 Additionally, it has been shown that organic carbon in snow undergoes photochemical reactions, releasing reactive gas-phase species to the overlying atmosphere. 8C010 DespiteitsimportanceinairC0...

  9. Sources and sinks of carbon in boreal ecosystems of interior Alaska: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas A. Douglas

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Boreal ecosystems store large quantities of carbon but are increasingly vulnerable to carbon loss due to disturbance and climate warming. The boreal region in Alaska and Canada, largely underlain by discontinuous permafrost, presents a challenging landscape for itemizing carbon sources and sinks in soil and vegetation. The roles of fire, forest succession, and the presence (or absence of permafrost on carbon cycle, vegetation, and hydrologic processes have been the focus of multidisciplinary research in boreal ecosystems for the past 20 years. However, projections of a warming future climate, an increase in fire severity and extent, and the potential degradation of permafrost could lead to major landscape and carbon cycle changes over the next 20 to 50 years. To assist land managers in interior Alaska in adapting and managing for potential changes in the carbon cycle we developed this review paper by incorporating an overview of the climate, ecosystem processes, vegetation, and soil regimes. Our objective is to provide a synthesis of the most current carbon storage estimates and measurements to guide policy and land management decisions on how to best manage carbon sources and sinks. We surveyed estimates of aboveground and belowground carbon stocks for interior Alaska boreal ecosystems and summarized methane and carbon dioxide fluxes. These data have been converted into similar units to facilitate comparison across ecosystem compartments. We identify potential changes in the carbon cycle with climate change and human disturbance. A novel research question is how compounding disturbances affect carbon sources and sinks associated with boreal ecosystem processes. Finally, we provide recommendations to address the challenges facing land managers in efforts to manage carbon cycle processes. The results of this study can be used for carbon cycle management in other locations within the boreal biome which encompasses a broad distribution

  10. Carbon source from the toroidal pumped limiter during long discharge operation in Tore Supra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dufour, E.; Brosset, C.; Lowry, C.; Bucalossi, J.; Chappuis, P.; Corre, Y.; Desgranges, C.; Guirlet, R.; Gunn, J.; Loarer, T.; Mitteau, R.; Monier-Garbet, P.; Pegourie, B.; Reichle, R.; Thomas, P.; Tsitrone, E. [Association EURATOM-CEA, CEA/DSM/DRFC, CEA-Cadarache, 13 - St Paul-lez-Durance (France); Hogan, J. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, 2 Fusion Energy Division, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Roubin, P.; Martin, C.; Arnas, C. [CNRS-Universite de Provence, LPIIM, UMR 6633, 13 - Marseille (France)

    2005-07-01

    A better understanding of deuterium retention mechanisms requires the knowledge of carbon sources in Tore-Supra. The main source of carbon in the vacuum vessel during long discharges is the toroidal pumped limiter (TPL). This work is devoted to the experimental characterisation of the carbon source from the TPL surface during long discharges using a visible spectroscopy diagnostic. Moreover, we present an attempt to perform a carbon balance over a typical campaign and we discuss it with regards to the deuterium in-vessel inventory deduced from particle balance and the deuterium content of the deposited layers. The study shows that only a third of the estimated deuterium trapped in the vessel is trapped in the carbon deposits. Thus, in the present state of our knowledge and characterisation of the permanent retention, one has to search for mechanisms other than co-deposition to explain the deuterium retention in Tore Supra. (A.C.)

  11. Treatment of hydroponic wastewater by denitrification filters using plant prunings as the organic carbon source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, J B K; Craggs, R J; Sukias, J P S

    2008-05-01

    This study investigated the feasibility of using pre-treated plant liquors as organic carbon sources for the treatment of hydroponic wastewater containing high nitrate-N (>300 mg N/L). The waste plant material was pre-treated to extract organic carbon-rich liquors. When this plant liquor was used as an organic carbon source in denitrification filters at the organic carbon:nitrogen dose rate of 3C:N, nitrate removal efficiencies were >95% and final effluent nitrate concentrations were consistently 140 mg/L) of organic carbon (fBOD5) remained in the final effluents. Therefore, a 'compromise' organic carbon:nitrogen dose rate (2C:N) was trialled, at which nitrate removal efficiencies were maintained at >85%, final effluent nitrate concentrations were consistently below 45 mg N/L, and effluent fBOD5 concentrations were hydroponic wastewater in a denitrification filter. PMID:17714940

  12. FOOD SOURCES AND CARBON BUDGET OF CHINESE PRAWN PENAEUS CHINENSIS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    董双林; 张硕; 王芳

    2002-01-01

    This study deals with contribution of artificial food pellet and natural food to Chinese prawn (Penaeus orientalis) growth in a semiintensive culture pond. The prawn carbon consumption, budget, and the effects of some factors on the budget were investigated. The results showed that 26.2% of P. orientalis growth carbon came from formulated feed at the initial culture stage (when the prawns were 0.06±0.01 g in wet weight), and was 62.5% when the prawns were 9.56±1.04 g. The remaining part of the growth carbon was derived from organic fertilizer and natural food. The highest growth rate occurred at 20×10-3 salinity. Suitable salinity for culturing Chinese prawn was (20-28)×10-3.

  13. Food sources and carbon dudget of chinese prawn Penaeus chinensis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Shuang-Lin; Zhang, Shuo; Wang, Fang

    2002-03-01

    This study deals with contribution of artificial food pellet and natural food to Chinese prawn ( Penaeus orientalis) growth in a semi-intensive culture pond. The prawn carbon consumption, budget, and the effects of some factors on the budget were investigated. The results showed that 26.2% of P. orientalis growth carbon came from formulated feed at the initial culture stage (when the prawns were 0.06±0.01 g in wet weight), and was 62.5% when the prawns were 9.56±1.04 g. The remaining part of the growth carbon was derived from organic fertilizer and natural food. The highest growth rate occurred at 20×10-3 salinity. Suitable salinity for culturing Chinese prawn was (20 28)×10-3.

  14. Quasi-steady carbon plasma source for neutral beam injector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koguchi, H; Sakakita, H; Kiyama, S; Shimada, T; Sato, Y; Hirano, Y

    2014-02-01

    Carbon plasma is successfully sustained during 1000 s without any carrier gas in the bucket type ionization chamber with cusp magnetic field. Every several seconds, seed plasmas having ∼3 ms duration time are injected into the ionization chamber by a shunting arch plasma gun. The weakly ionized carbon plasma ejected from the shunting arch is also ionized by 2.45 GHz microwave at the electron cyclotron resonance surface and the plasma can be sustained even in the interval of gun discharges. Control of the gun discharge interval allows to keep high pressure and to sustain the plasma for long duration.

  15. Quasi-steady carbon plasma source for neutral beam injector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon plasma is successfully sustained during 1000 s without any carrier gas in the bucket type ionization chamber with cusp magnetic field. Every several seconds, seed plasmas having ∼3 ms duration time are injected into the ionization chamber by a shunting arch plasma gun. The weakly ionized carbon plasma ejected from the shunting arch is also ionized by 2.45 GHz microwave at the electron cyclotron resonance surface and the plasma can be sustained even in the interval of gun discharges. Control of the gun discharge interval allows to keep high pressure and to sustain the plasma for long duration

  16. Quasi-steady carbon plasma source for neutral beam injector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koguchi, H; Sakakita, H; Kiyama, S; Shimada, T; Sato, Y; Hirano, Y

    2014-02-01

    Carbon plasma is successfully sustained during 1000 s without any carrier gas in the bucket type ionization chamber with cusp magnetic field. Every several seconds, seed plasmas having ∼3 ms duration time are injected into the ionization chamber by a shunting arch plasma gun. The weakly ionized carbon plasma ejected from the shunting arch is also ionized by 2.45 GHz microwave at the electron cyclotron resonance surface and the plasma can be sustained even in the interval of gun discharges. Control of the gun discharge interval allows to keep high pressure and to sustain the plasma for long duration. PMID:24593646

  17. Nitrate Removal from Drinking Water with Sodium Citrate as Sole Carbon Source

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN Bo; ZHAO Lin; TAN Xin

    2005-01-01

    This paper investigates the effect of using sodium citrate(NaC6H5O6*2H2O)as sole carbon source for nitrate removal from drinking water.With sodium citrate as sole carbon source, batch experiments have been conducted to study the law of denitrification influenced by pH, C/N and temperature. Results show that a denitrification rate reaching 1.32 g NO-3-N /(g Biomass*d) was obtained when pH was at 7.5,C/N at 1.7(atom ratio), and temperature from 20 ℃ to 30 ℃. The results also show that denitrification rate with sodium citrate as carbon source approaches to that with methanol as carbon source.

  18. Comparative study on bacterial carbon sources in lake sediments: the role of methanotrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steger, K.; Premke, K.; Gudasz, C.; Boschker, H.T.S.; Tranvik, L.J.

    2015-01-01

    Methane-derived carbon can be important in both benthic and pelagic food webs.Either generated in the anaerobic layers of the sediment or in the anaerobic hypolimnion of stratifiedeutrophic lakes, methane is an excellent carbon source for aerobic methanotrophic bacteria.The very negative methane d13

  19. Sources of uncertainties in modelling black carbon at the global scale

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vignati, E.; Karl, M.; Krol, M.C.; Wilson, J.; Stier, P.; Cavalli, F.

    2010-01-01

    Our understanding of the global black carbon (BC) cycle is essentially qualitative due to uncertainties in our knowledge of its properties. This work investigates two source of uncertainties in modelling black carbon: those due to the use of different schemes for BC ageing and its removal rate in th

  20. Theoretical study on the carbon nanotube used ashard x—radiation source

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LuJing-Han; QinXi-Jun

    1998-01-01

    Calculations and analyses are made on the interaction between the carbon nanotube and the incident positron of high energy.The results obtained show that it is possible to use carbon nanotube as hard X-radiation source with high intensity and good monochromaticity.

  1. Tracing organic matter sources of estuarine tidal flat nematodes with stable carbon isotopes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moens, T.; Luyten, C.; Middelburg, J.J.; Herman, P.M.J.; Vincx, M.

    2002-01-01

    The present study explores the use of stable carbon isotopes to trace organic matter sources of intertidal nematodes in the Schelde estuary (SW Netherlands). Stable carbon isotope signatures of nematodes from a saltmarsh and 4 tidal flat stations were determined in spring and winter situations, and

  2. The investments in renewable energy sources: do low carbon economies better invest in green technologies?

    OpenAIRE

    Antonio Angelo Romano; Giuseppe Scandurra (eds.)

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study is to analyse the driving of investment in renewable energy sources in low carbon and high carbon economies. To address these issues, a dynamic panel analysis of the renewable investment in a sample of 29 countries was proposed. Results demonstrate that the dynamic of investments in renewable sources is similar in the two panels, and depends by nuclear power generation, GDP and technological efficiency. Results show that countries try to reduce their environmental footpr...

  3. Effect of carbon source type on intracellular stored polymers during endogenous denitritation (ED) treating landfill leachate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Lei; Wang, Shuying; Li, Baikun; Cao, Tianhao; Zhang, Fangzhai; Wang, Zhong; Peng, Yongzhen

    2016-09-01

    Glycogen accumulating organisms (GAOs) capable of storing organic compounds as polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) have been used for endogenous denitritation (ED), but the effect of carbon sources type on nitrogen removal performance of GAOs treating landfill leachate is unclear. In this study, a successful ED system treating landfill leachate (COD/NH4(+)-N (C/N): 4) without external carbon source addition was applied. The mature leachate with C/N of 1 was used as the feeding base solution, with acetate, propionate, and glucose examined as the carbon sources, and their effects on yields and compositions of PHA produced by GAOs were determined and associated with nitrogen removal performance. In the case of sole carbon source, acetate was much easier to be stored than propionate and glucose, which led to a higher nitrogen removal efficiency. Glucose had the lowest amount of PHA storage and led to the lowest performance. In the case of composite carbon sources (two scenarios: acetate + propionate; acetate + propionate + glucose), GAOs stored sufficient PHA and exhibited similar nitrogen removal efficiencies. Moreover, type of carbon source influenced the compositions of PHA. The polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) fraction in PHA was far more than polyhydroxyvalerate (PHV) in all tests. PHV was synthesized only when acetate existed in carbon source. The microbial diversity analysis revealed that Proteobacteria was the most abundant phylum. Among the 108 genera detected in this ED system, the genera responsible for denitritation were Thauera, Paracoccus, Ottowia and Comamonadaceae_unclassified, accounting for 46.21% of total bacteria. Especially, Paracoccus and Comamonadaceae_unclassified transformed the carbon source into PHA for denitritation, and carried out endogenous denitritation. PMID:27232984

  4. Tracing organic matter sources and carbon burial in mangrove sediments over the past 160 years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonneea, Meagan Eagle; Paytan, Adina; Herrera-Silveira, Jorge A.

    2004-10-01

    Mangrove ecosystems may be a source of organic carbon and nutrients to adjacent coastal systems on one hand and provide a sedimentary sink for organic carbon on the other. The balance between these two functions may be sensitive to both natural and anthropogenically induced variability, yet these effects have not been thoroughly evaluated in mangrove ecosystems. We determine organic matter sources and carbon burial rates over the past 160 years in three lagoons on the Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico. Carbon isotopes and C/N elemental ratios are utilized to trace the three sources contributing to sedimentary organic matter, mangroves, seagrasses and phytoplankton, while nitrogen isotopes are used to elucidate potential post-depositional biogeochemical transformations in mangrove lagoon sediments. All three organic matter sources contribute to organic carbon burial. Phytoplankton and mangroves are the dominant sources of organic matter in lagoon bank sediments and seagrasses are a significant source to central lagoon sediments. Organic carbon burial rates are higher at the lagoon fringes, where mangrove vegetation dominates, than in seagrass-dominated mid-lagoon areas. A reduction in mangrove contribution to the sedimentary organic matter pool concurrent with reduced total organic carbon burial rates is observed in the recent past at all three lagoons studied. Natural cycles in sediment organic matter source over the past 160 years are observed in a high-resolution core. These fluctuations correspond to climatic variability in this region, as recorded in deep-sea foraminiferal assemblages. Additional work is required in order to differentiate between recent anthropogenic perturbations and natural variability in organic carbon sources and burial rates within these ecosystems.

  5. Comparison of aerobic denitrifying activity among three cultural species with various carbon sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otani, Y; Hasegawa, K; Hanaki, K

    2004-01-01

    Abilities of three aerobic denitrifiers such as Alcaligenes faecalis, Microvirgula aerodenitrificans and Paracoccus pantotrophus were compared from the viewpoints of nitrate removal efficiency and organic matter utilization. First, the effect of carbon source was investigated. Although nitrate reduction was observed in all strains under aerobic conditions, a change of carbon source considerably affected the denitrification ability. In the case of P. pantotrophus, nitrate and nitrite were completely removed in three days under sodium acetate or leucine as a carbon source. In the case of A. faecalis, sufficient nitrate removal was observed only when sodium acetate or ethanol was added. P. pantotrophus and A. faecalis showed a higher ability of nitrate removal than that of M. aerodenitrificans. Therefore, P. pantotrophus was selected in order to investigate the effects of concentration and repetitive addition of carbon. Sodium acetate was used as a sole carbon source. Nitrate was not reduced when the carbon concentration was below 500 mgC/L. However, when carbon source was added repeatedly, nitrate was reduced under 100 mgC/L after the optical density of the bacterium reached above 1.0. This result indicated that a high enough level of bacterial density was necessary to express aerobic denitrification activity. PMID:15566182

  6. Optimization of an Atmospheric Carbon Source for Extremophile Cyanobacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaubien, Courtney

    This thesis examines the use of the moisture swing resin materials employed at the Center for Negative Carbon Emissions (CNCE) in order to provide carbon dioxide from ambient air to photobioreactors containing extremophile cyanobacteria cultured at the Arizona Center for Algae Technology and Innovation (AzCATI). For this purpose, a carbon dioxide feeding device was designed, built, and tested. The results indicate how much resin should be used with a given volume of algae medium: approximately 500 grams of resin can feed 1% CO2 at about three liters per minute to a ten liter medium of the Galdieria sulphuraria 5587.1 strain for one hour (equivalent to about 0.1 grams of carbon dioxide per hour per seven grams of algae). Using the resin device, the algae grew within their normal growth range: 0.096 grams of ash-free dry weight per liter over a six hour period. Future applications in which the resin-to-algae process can be utilized are discussed.

  7. Intertidal zones as carbon dioxide sources to coastal oceans

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    DileepKumar, M.; George, M.D.; Rajagopal, M.D.

    To understand the factors controlling carbon dioxide (CO sub(2)) exchanges near land-sea boundary diurnal observations have been made twice on CO sub(2) in the air and water in a coastal region. The results suggest that CO sub(2) enrichment...

  8. Distribution of organic carbon and petroleum source rock potential of Cretaceous and lower Tertiary carbonates, South Florida Basin: preliminary results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palacas, James George

    1978-01-01

    Analyses of 134 core samples from the South Florida Basin show that the carbonates of Comanchean age are relatively richer in average organic carbon (0.41 percent) than those of Coahuilan age (0.28 percent), Gulfian age (0.18 percent) and Paleocene age (0.20 percent). They are also nearly twice as rich as the average world, wide carbonate (average 0.24 percent). The majority of carbonates have organic carbons less than 0.30 percent but the presence of many relatively organic rich beds composed of highly bituminous, argillaceous, highly stylolitic, and algal-bearing limestones and dolomites accounts for the higher percentage of organic carbon in some of the stratigraphic units. Carbonate rocks that contain greater than 0.4 percent organic carbon and that might be considered as possible petroleum sources were noted in almost each subdivision of the Coahuilan and Comanchean Series but particularly the units of Fredericksburg 'B', Trinity 'A', Trinity 'F', and Upper Sunniland. Possible source rocks have been ascribed by others to the Lower Sunniland, but lack of sufficient samples precluded any firm assessment in this initial report. In the shallower section of the basin, organic-rich carbonates containing as much as 3.2 percent organic carbon were observed in the lowermost part of the Gulfian Series and carbonate rocks with oil staining or 'dead' and 'live oil' were noted by others in the uppermost Gulfian and upper Cedar Keys Formation. It is questionable whether these shallower rocks are of sufficient thermal maturity to have generated commercial oil. The South Florida basin is still sparsely drilled and produces only from the Sunniland Limestone at an average depth of 11,500 feet (3500 m). Because the Sunniland contains good reservoir rocks and apparently adequate source rocks, and because the success rate of new oil field discoveries has increased in recent years, the chances of finding additional oil reserves in the Sunniland are promising. Furthermore, the

  9. Wintertime ecosystem respiration shifts tundra from carbon sink to carbon source at tundra warming experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, E.; Schuur, E. A.; Natali, S.; Bracho, R.

    2013-12-01

    Northern latitude ecosystems play a significant role in the global carbon (C) budget due to the roughly 1700 Pg of C stored in permafrost soils. As high latitudes warm, previously frozen C is expected to decompose, thereby increasing CO2 fluxes to the atmosphere and potentially creating a positive feedback to climate warming. While warming has been shown to increase plant C uptake during the growing season, these seasonal C gains may be offset on an annual basis by ecosystem respiration (Reco) during the remaining seven months of the year. Here we present research from the Carbon in Permafrost Experimental Heating Research (CiPEHR) project, a tundra ecosystem warming experiment in interior Alaska. We partitioned the non-growing season into three segments: fall (October 1 until first snow), winter (snow-covered period until spring), and spring (snow depth less than 30cm until melt out). During fall, we measured net ecosystem exchange and Reco using a static flux chamber. In winter, we measured Reco using chamber measurements and soda lime. For spring, we modeled fluxes based on known relationships between snow depth and photosynthetic rate of arctic evergreen species. We found that ecosystem warming caused plants to photosynthesize later in fall and increased C uptake during spring but also enhanced respiration during the long winter. We combined these off-season estimates with measurements from growing season auto-chamber data and found that despite the C gained during the growing season, ecosystem warming resulted in net annual C loss for the two years measured. This annual C loss was dependent on the magnitude of wintertime Reco. Our results indicate that snow depth, soil temperature, and day of season are the major determinants of wintertime Reco. Some climate models predict that arctic ecosystems will experience warmer winters with more snow. Thus, despite increased plant productivity during the growing season, we document that increased wintertime temperatures

  10. Development of a stationary carbon emission inventory for Shanghai using pollution source census data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xianzhe; Jiang, Ping; Zhang, Yan; Ma, Weichun

    2016-03-01

    This study utilizes 521,631 activity data points from the 2007 Shanghai Pollution Source Census to compile a stationary carbon emission inventory for Shanghai. The inventory generated from our dataset shows that a large portion of Shanghai's total energy use consists of coal-oriented energy consumption. The electricity and heat production industries, iron and steel mills, and the petroleum refining industry are the main carbon emitters. In addition, most of these industries are located in Baoshan District, which is Shanghai's largest contributor of carbon emissions. Policy makers can use the enterpriselevel carbon emission inventory and the method designed in this study to construct sound carbon emission reduction policies. The carbon trading scheme to be established in Shanghai based on the developed carbon inventory is also introduced in this paper with the aim of promoting the monitoring, reporting and verification of carbon trading. Moreover, we believe that it might be useful to consider the participation of industries, such as those for food processing, beverage, and tobacco, in Shanghai's carbon trading scheme. Based on the results contained herein, we recommend establishing a comprehensive carbon emission inventory by inputting data from the pollution source census used in this study.

  11. Changing sources and sinks of carbon in boreal ecosystems of Interior Alaska: Current and future perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, T. A.; Jones, M.; Hiemstra, C. A.

    2012-12-01

    Future climate scenarios predict a roughly 5°C increase in mean annual air temperatures for the Alaskan Interior over the next 80 years. Increasing temperatures and greater frequency and severity of climate-induced disturbances such as wildfires will be enough to initiate permafrost degradation in many areas of Alaska, leading to major changes in surface hydrology and ecosystem structure and function. This, in turn, is expected to alter the current inventories of carbon sources and sinks in the region and provide a management challenge for carbon itemization efforts. To assist land managers in adapting and planning for potential changes in Interior Alaska carbon cycling we synthesize information on climate, ecosystem processes, vegetation, and soil, permafrost, and hydrologic regimes in Interior Alaska. Our goal is to provide an assessment of the current and likely future regime of Interior Alaska carbon sources and sinks. For our carbon assessment we: 1) synthesize the most recent results from numerous studies on the carbon cycle with a focus on research from the Alaskan boreal biome, 2) assemble a summary of estimates of carbon sources in soil and vegetation in Interior Alaska, 3) categorize carbon sources and sinks for predominant Interior Alaska ecosystems, and 4) identify expected changes in sources and sinks with climate change and human activities. This information is used to provide recommendations on potential actions land managers can take to minimize carbon export from the boreal forest. Though the results from our project are geared primarily toward policy makers and land managers we also provide recommendations for filling research gaps that currently present uncertainty in our understanding of the carbon cycle in boreal forest ecosystems of Interior Alaska.

  12. Dynamic balancing of isoprene carbon sources reflects photosynthetic and photorespiratory responses to temperature stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jardine, Kolby; Chambers, Jeffrey; Alves, Eliane G; Teixeira, Andrea; Garcia, Sabrina; Holm, Jennifer; Higuchi, Niro; Manzi, Antonio; Abrell, Leif; Fuentes, Jose D; Nielsen, Lars K; Torn, Margaret S; Vickers, Claudia E

    2014-12-01

    The volatile gas isoprene is emitted in teragrams per annum quantities from the terrestrial biosphere and exerts a large effect on atmospheric chemistry. Isoprene is made primarily from recently fixed photosynthate; however, alternate carbon sources play an important role, particularly when photosynthate is limiting. We examined the relative contribution of these alternate carbon sources under changes in light and temperature, the two environmental conditions that have the strongest influence over isoprene emission. Using a novel real-time analytical approach that allowed us to examine dynamic changes in carbon sources, we observed that relative contributions do not change as a function of light intensity. We found that the classical uncoupling of isoprene emission from net photosynthesis at elevated leaf temperatures is associated with an increased contribution of alternate carbon. We also observed a rapid compensatory response where alternate carbon sources compensated for transient decreases in recently fixed carbon during thermal ramping, thereby maintaining overall increases in isoprene production rates at high temperatures. Photorespiration is known to contribute to the decline in net photosynthesis at high leaf temperatures. A reduction in the temperature at which the contribution of alternate carbon sources increased was observed under photorespiratory conditions, while photosynthetic conditions increased this temperature. Feeding [2-(13)C]glycine (a photorespiratory intermediate) stimulated emissions of [(13)C1-5]isoprene and (13)CO2, supporting the possibility that photorespiration can provide an alternate source of carbon for isoprene synthesis. Our observations have important implications for establishing improved mechanistic predictions of isoprene emissions and primary carbon metabolism, particularly under the predicted increases in future global temperatures. PMID:25318937

  13. Using hydrocarbon as a carbon source for synthesis of carbon nanotube by electric field induced needle-pulsed plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work different hydrocarbons are used as the carbon source, in the production of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and nano onions. An electric field induced needle pulse arc-discharge reactor is used. The influence of starting carbon on the synthesis of CNTs is investigated. The production efficiency is compared for Acetone, Isopropanol and Naphthalene as simple hydrocarbons. The hydrocarbons are preheated and then pretreated by electric field before being exposed to plasma. The hydrocarbon vapor is injected into plasma through a graphite spout in the cathode assembly. The pulsed plasma takes place between two graphite rods while a strong electric field has been already established alongside the electrodes. The pulse width is 0.3 μs. Mechanism of precursor decomposition is discussed by describing three forms of energy that are utilized to disintegrate the precursor molecules: thermal energy, electric field and kinetic energy of plasma. Molecular polarity of a hydrocarbon is one of the reasons for choosing carbon raw material as a precursor in an electric field induced low power pulsed-plasma. The results show that in order to obtain high quality carbon nanotubes, Acetone is preferred to Isopropanol and Naphthalene. Scanning probe microscopy techniques are used to investigate the products. - Highlights: • We synthesized CNTs (carbon nano tubes) by needle pulsed plasma. • We use different hydrocarbons as carbon source in the production of CNTs. • We investigated the influence of starting carbon on the synthesis of CNTs. • Thermal energy, electric field and kinetic energy are used to break carbon bonds. • Polar hydrocarbon molecules are more efficient than nonpolar ones in production

  14. Study on the threshold value of organic enrichment of carbonate as gas source rocks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XUE; Haitao; LU; Shuangfang; ZHONG; Ningning; WANG; Bo

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, calculations have been performed about gas quantity of generation, adsorption, dissolving in oil, dissolving in water, diffusion of unit area carbonate rocks at different geologic conditions in the Tarim basin. According to the material balance principle, the corresponding organic carbon content when gas started expelling from source rocks with separate phases has been worked out. We regard it as the theoretical threshold value (TOCmin) of gas source rocks under the same geologic condition. Based on the simulating calculation, a fact has been discovered that TOCmin decreases with the increasing source rocks thickness, decreases at the beginning and then increases with the increasing maturity and decreases with the better type of organic matter. TOCmin evaluation table of carbonate gas source rocks in the Tarim basin has been established. Investigations indicate that the TOCmin of carbonate gas source rocks varies greatly with the differences of geologic conditions, and gas source rocks cannot be evaluated with a unified TOC threshold value. And we also establish a preliminary evaluation table of TOC industrial threshold value, TOCgy, of carbonate gas source rocks in the Tarim basin.

  15. Estimating the seasonal carbon source-sink geography of a natural, steady-state terrestrial biosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Box, Elgene O.

    1988-01-01

    The estimation of the seasonal dynamics of biospheric-carbon sources and sinks to be used as an input to global atmospheric CO2 studies and models is discussed. An ecological biosphere model is given and the advantages of the model are examined. Monthly maps of estimated biospheric carbon source and sink regions and estimates of total carbon fluxes are presented for an equilibrium terrestrial biosphere. The results are compared with those from other models. It is suggested that, despite maximum variations of atmospheric CO2 in boreal latitudes, the enormous contributions of tropical wet-dry regions to global atmospheric CO2 seasonality can not be ignored.

  16. Carbon Sources to Authigenic Carbonate Rock at Chemosynthetic Communities: Lower Slope of the Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sassen, R.; Jung, W.; Zhang, C.; Defreitas, D. A.

    2004-12-01

    Flux of biogenic methane, crude oil and associated hydrocarbon gases occurs from the deep subsurface to the seafloor, water column, and atmosphere of the Gulf of Mexico slope. Chemosynthetic communities occur at sites of relatively high gas flux, frequently with gas hydrate, but always with authigenic carbonate rock \\(ACR\\). ACR contains carbonate carbon derived from microbial hydrocarbon oxidation that geologically sequesters much fossil carbon, perturbing the carbon cycle. ACR was collected using the ALVIN from sites with chemosynthetic communities in Alaminos Canyon, Atwater Valley, and the Florida Escarpment areas at water depths as much as 3.3 km. Bulk δ 13C was measured and carbonate petrology used to identify carbonate cements, normal marine carbonate, and non-carbonate components such as metal oxides and sulfides. ACR is depleted in 13C. However, the δ 13C of major hydrocarbon types is typically more depleted in 13C than the associated ACR. For example, the mean δ 13C of biogenic methane seeps in the Gulf slope is -74.0\\permil PDB but the lightest bulk ACR measured in the study area is -46.6\\permil PDB. Carbonate cements from hydrocarbon oxidation are shown to enclose skeletal remains of chemosynthetic fauna such as mussels, clams, as well as other fauna characterized by normal marine carbonate \\(\\sim 0\\permil PDB\\). The best explanation of why the δ 13C of ACR does not closely correspond to that of the hydrocarbon starting products is that normal marine carbon dilutes the δ 13C from hydrocarbon oxidation and thus affects the bulk isotopic properties of ACR.

  17. Could 4 degrees warming change Arctic tundra from carbon sink to carbon source?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torn, M. S.; Abramoff, R. Z.; Chafe, O.; Curtis, J. B.; Smith, L. J.; Wullschleger, S. D.

    2015-12-01

    We have set up a controlled, active warming experiment in permafrost tundra on the North Slope of Alaska. The aim of this micro-warming experiment is to investigate the direct effect of soil warming on microbial decomposition of soil organic matter. We are testing the feasibility of small, short-term, in situ warming that can be run off batteries for distributed deployment and that preserves plant-soil relations and natural variability in wind, temperature, and precipitation. Based on preliminary results, the approach looks promising. One resistance heater cable per plot (25 cm diameter plots) was inserted vertically to 50 cm, spanning the full active layer (maximum thaw depth was 40 cm in 2014). Heaters were turned on August 1, 2015, and heated plots reached the 4ºC warming target within 1-3 days. We are measuring soil microclimate, thaw depth, CO2 and CH4 fluxes, and 14CO2, and microbial composition, as part of the DOE Next Generation Ecosystem Experiments (NGEE-Arctic). Ecosystem respiration increased immediately in the heated plots, and net ecosystem exchange under clear chambers changed from net uptake to net CO2 source in two of the four plots. CH4 flux shifted toward reduced net emissions or greater net uptake in all plots. These rapid responses demonstrate direct changes in decomposition without complications from microbial acclimation, altered community structure or changes in substrate availability. However, future Arctic tundra carbon balance will depend on both short term and long term microbial responses, as well as the links between warming, decomposition, nitrogen mineralization, and plant growth. Thus, we envision that distributed micro-warming plots could be combined with new approaches to aboveground passive warming being developed in NGEE, gradient studies, and modeling.

  18. Electron string ion sources for carbon ion cancer therapy accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Boytsov, A Yu; Donets, E D; Donets, E E; Katagiri, K; Noda, K; Ponkin, D O; Ramzdorf, A Yu; Salnikov, V V; Shutov, V B

    2015-01-01

    The Electron String type of Ion Sources (ESIS) was developed, constructed and tested first in the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research. These ion sources can be the appropriate sources for production of pulsed C4+ and C6+ ion beams which can be used for cancer therapy accelerators. In fact the test ESIS Krion-6T already now at the solenoid magnetic field only 4.6 T provides more than 10^10 C4+ ions per pulse and about 5*10^9 C6+ ions per pulse. Such ion sources could be suitable for application at synchrotrons. It was also found, that Krion-6T can provide more than 10^11 C6+ ions per second at 100 Hz repetition rate, and the repetition rate can be increased at the same or larger ion output per second. This makes ESIS applicable at cyclotrons as well. As for production of 11C radioactive ion beams ESIS can be the most economic kind of ion source. To proof that the special cryogenic cell for pulse injection of gaseous species into electron string was successfully tested using the ESIS Krion-2M.

  19. Mesozoic black shales, source mixing and carbon isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suan, Guillaume

    2016-04-01

    Over the last decades, considerable attention has been devoted to the paleoenvironmental and biogeochemical significance of Mesozoic black shales. Black shale-bearing successions indeed often display marked changes in the organic carbon isotope composition (δ13Corg), which have been commonly interpreted as evidence for dramatic perturbations of global carbon budgets and CO2 levels. Arguably the majority of these studies have discarded some more "local" explanations when interpreting δ13Corg profiles, most often because comparable profiles occur on geographically large and distant areas. Based on newly acquired data and selected examples from the literature, I will show that the changing contribution of organic components with distinct δ13C signatures exerts a major but overlooked influence of Mesozoic δ13Corg profiles. Such a bias occurs across a wide spectrum of sedimentological settings and ages, as shown by the good correlation between δ13Corg values and proxies of kerogen proportions (such as rock-eval, biomarker, palynofacies and palynological data) recorded in Mesozoic marginal to deep marine successions of Triassic, Jurassic and Cretaceous age. In most of these successions, labile, 12C-enriched amorphous organic matter of marine origin dominates strata deposited under anoxic conditions, while oxidation-resistant, 13C-rich terrestrial particles dominate strata deposited under well-oxygenated conditions. This influence is further illustrated by weathering profiles of Toarcian (Lower Jurassic) black shales from France, where weathered areas dominated by refractory organic matter show dramatic 13C-enrichment (and decreased total organic carbon and pyrite contents) compared to non-weathered portions of the same horizon. The implications of these results for chemostratigraphic correlations and pCO2 reconstructions of Mesozoic will be discussed, as well as strategies to overcome this major bias.

  20. A one-step single source route to carbon nanotubes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Tao Cheng; Zhiyong Fang; Guifu Zou; Qixiu Hu; Biao Hu; Xiaozhi Yang; Youjin Zhang

    2006-12-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been synthesized via directly pyrolyzing ferrocene in the autoclave. The nanotubes with several micrometers in length have outer and inner diameters in the range of 40–100 nm and 20–40 nm, respectively. An yield of ∼70% of CNTs can be obtained without any accessorial solvents and catalysts. Experimental results showed that a temperature higher than 600°C in conjunction with proper pressure was favourable for achievement of the nanotubes. The growth mechanism of CNTs was also discussed.

  1. A series of tufted carbon fiber cathodes designed for different high power microwave sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lie; Li, Limin; Zhang, Jun; Zhang, Xiaoping; Wen, Jianchun; Liu, Yonggui

    2008-06-01

    We report the fabrication technique of tufted carbon fiber cathodes for different microwave sources. Three carbon fiber cathodes were constructed, including a planar cathode, an annular cathode, and a cylindrical cathode for radial emission. Experimental investigations on these cathodes were performed in a reflex triode virtual cathode oscillator (vircator), a backward wave oscillator (BWO), and a magnetically insulated transmission line oscillator (MILO), respectively. The pulse duration of microwave emission from the reflex triode vircator was lengthened by using the planar carbon fiber cathode. In the BWO with the annular carbon fiber cathode, the uniform electron beam with a kA /cm2 current density was observed. In addition, carbon fiber has great promise as field emitter for MILOs. These results show that the carbon fiber cathodes can be utilized for electron emission in high power diodes with different structures.

  2. The potential of non-carbon energy sources in developing countries - The case of the PRC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    While developing countries presently account for a small share of the world's carbon emissions, in coming years, the quantity of energy-related CO2 generated by developing nations will surpass the amount produced by industrialized countries. In response to this trend, an increasing amount o attention has been paid to the prospect of reducing emissions in developing countries by exploiting non-carbon energy resources. To date, however, financial constraints have limited the development of non-carbon alternatives; the costs of these sources typically loom far above the costs of conventional forms of energy. Due to its heavy reliance on coal energy, China makes a disproportionately high contribution to global CO2. In 1990, China's energy-related activities consumed 8% of the world's commercial energy, but accounted for 11% of global carbon emissions. While financial constraints will continue to hinder the exploration of non-carbon alternatives, increasing the roles of hydropower, nuclear energy, solar radiation and wind energy could play a major role in curtailing the growth of carbon emissions in the PRC. This paper evaluates the potential for integrating various non-carbon energy sources in China and provides possible strategies for deploying these sources

  3. Evaluation criteria for gas source rocks of marine carbonate in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Zhaoyun; ZHAO Wenzhi; WANG Yunpeng

    2005-01-01

    Hydrocarbon generating and expulsion simulation experiments are carried out using samples artifically matched between the acid-dissolved residue of relatively low-maturity limestone and the original sample. This work makes up for the insufficiency of source rock samples with high abundance of organic matters and low maturity in China. The organic carbon content of the 10 prepared samples varies between 0.15 % and 0.74 %. Pyrolysis data and simulation experiment results of hydrocarbon generating and expulsion, which were obtained by a high-temperature and high-pressure open system, indicate that the lower limit of organic carbon content for marine carbonate rock to generate and expel hydrocarbons is 0.23 %-0.31%. In combination with the numerical analysis of organic carbon in marine carbonate rocks from Tarim Basin, Sichuan Basin, Ordos Basin and North China, as well as the contribution of these gas source rocks to the discovered gas pools, we think that the organic carbon criterion for carbonate gas source rocks should be 0.3%.

  4. Influence of carbon source on alpha-amylase production by Aspergillus oryzae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlsen, Morten; Nielsen, Jens

    2001-01-01

    The influence of the carbon source on a-amylase production by Aspergillus oryzae was quantified in carbon-limited chemostat cultures. The following carbon sources were investigated: maltose, maltodextrin (different chain lengths), glucose, fructose, galactose, sucrose, glycerol, mannitol and acet......The influence of the carbon source on a-amylase production by Aspergillus oryzae was quantified in carbon-limited chemostat cultures. The following carbon sources were investigated: maltose, maltodextrin (different chain lengths), glucose, fructose, galactose, sucrose, glycerol, mannitol...... on sucrose, fructose, glycerol, mannitol and acetate. During growth on acetate there was no production of alpha -amylase, whereas addition of small amounts of glucose resulted in alpha -amylase production. A possible induction by alpha -methyl-D-glucoside during growth on glucose was also investigated......, but this compound was not found to be a better inducer of alpha -amylase production than glucose. The results strongly indicate that besides acting as a repressor via the CreA protein, glucose acts as an inducer....

  5. Organic carbon source and burial during the past one hundred years in Jiaozhou Bay, North China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xuegang; YUAN Huamao; LI Ning; SONG Jinming

    2008-01-01

    Organic carbon (OC), total nitrogen (TN), and 210Pb in core sediment were measured to quantify the burial of organic carbon and the relative importance of allochthonous and autochthonous contributions during the past one hundred years in Jiaozhou Bay, North China. The core sediment was dated using 210Pb chronology, which is the most promising method for estimation of sedimentation rate on a time scale of 100-150 years. The variation of the burial flux of organic carbon in the past one hundred years can be divided into the following three stages: (1) relatively steady before 1980s; (2) increasing rapidly from the 1980s to a peak in the 1990s, and (3) decreasing from the 1990s to the present. The change is consistent with the amount of solid waste and sewage emptied into the bay. The OC:TN ratio was used to evaluate the source of organic carbon in the Jiaozhou Bay sediment. In the inner bay and bay mouth, the organic carbon was the main contributor from terrestrial sources, whereas only about half of organic carbon was contributed from terrestrial source in the outer bay. In the inner bay, the terrestrial source of organic carbon showed a steady change with an increase in the range of 69%-77% before 1990 to 93% in 2000, and then decreased from 2000 because of the decrease in the terrestrial input. In the bay mouth, the percentage of organic carbon from land reached the highest value with 94% in 1994. In the outer bay, the sediment source maintained steady for the past one hundred years.

  6. Mineral Carbonation Potential of CO2 from Natural and Industrial-based Alkalinity Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilcox, J.; Kirchofer, A.

    2014-12-01

    Mineral carbonation is a Carbon Capture and Storage (CSS) technology where gaseous CO2 is reacted with alkaline materials (such as silicate minerals and alkaline industrial wastes) and converted into stable and environmentally benign carbonate minerals (Metz et al., 2005). Here, we present a holistic, transparent life cycle assessment model of aqueous mineral carbonation built using a hybrid process model and economic input-output life cycle assessment approach. We compared the energy efficiency and the net CO2 storage potential of various mineral carbonation processes based on different feedstock material and process schemes on a consistent basis by determining the energy and material balance of each implementation (Kirchofer et al., 2011). In particular, we evaluated the net CO2 storage potential of aqueous mineral carbonation for serpentine, olivine, cement kiln dust, fly ash, and steel slag across a range of reaction conditions and process parameters. A preliminary systematic investigation of the tradeoffs inherent in mineral carbonation processes was conducted and guidelines for the optimization of the life-cycle energy efficiency are provided. The life-cycle assessment of aqueous mineral carbonation suggests that a variety of alkalinity sources and process configurations are capable of net CO2 reductions. The maximum carbonation efficiency, defined as mass percent of CO2 mitigated per CO2 input, was 83% for CKD at ambient temperature and pressure conditions. In order of decreasing efficiency, the maximum carbonation efficiencies for the other alkalinity sources investigated were: olivine, 66%; SS, 64%; FA, 36%; and serpentine, 13%. For natural alkalinity sources, availability is estimated based on U.S. production rates of a) lime (18 Mt/yr) or b) sand and gravel (760 Mt/yr) (USGS, 2011). The low estimate assumes the maximum sequestration efficiency of the alkalinity source obtained in the current work and the high estimate assumes a sequestration efficiency

  7. Carbon Sequestration through Sustainably Sourced Algal Fertilizer: Deep Ocean Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, M. T.

    2014-12-01

    Drawing down carbon from the atmosphere happens in the oceans when marine plants are growing due to the use of carbon dioxide for biological processes and by raising the pH of the water. Macro- and microscopic marine photosynthesizers are limited in their growth by the availability of light and nutrients (nitrogen, phosphorous, iron, etc.) Deep ocean water (DOW), oceanic water from bellow about 1000m, is a natural medium for marine algae, which contains all (except in rare circumstances) necessary components for algal growth and represents over 90% of the volume of the ocean. The introduction of DOW to a tropical or summer sea can increase chlorophyll from near zero to 60 mg per M3 or more. The form of the utilization infrastructure for DOW can roughly be divided into two effective types; the unconstrained release and the open pond system. Unconstrained release has the advantage of having relatively low infrastructure investment and is available to any area of the ocean. The open pond system has high infrastructure costs but enables intensive use of DOW for harvesting macro- and microalgae and sustainable mariculture. It also enables greater concomitant production of DOW's other potential products such as electricity or potable water. However, unlike an unconstrained release the open pond system can capture much of the biomaterial from the water and limits the impact to the surrounding ecosystem. The Tidal Irrigation and Electrical System (TIESystem), is an open pond that is to be constructed on a continental shelf. It harnesses the tidal flux to pump DOW into the pond on the rising tide and then uses the falling tide to pump biologically rich material out of the pond. This biomaterial represents fixed CO2 and can be used for biofuel or fertilizers. The TIESystem benefits from an economy of scale that increases at a rate that is roughly equal to the relationship of the circumference of a circle (the barrier that creates the open pond) to the area of the pond

  8. Characteristics and source of black carbon aerosol over Taklimakan Desert

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FU; S.Joshua

    2010-01-01

    Black carbon(BC) and PM10 in the center of the Taklimakan Desert were online monitored in the whole year of 2007.In addi-tion,TSP samples were also synchronously daily collected by medium-volume samplers with Whatman41 filters in the spring of 2007.BC in the dust aerosol was up to 1.14%of the total mass of PM10.A remarkable seasonal variation of BC in the aerosol was observed in the order of winter>spring>autumn>summer.The peak value of BC appeared at midnight while the lowest one in the evening each day,which was just the reverse of that in the urban area.The contribution of BC to the total mass of PM10 on non-dust storm days was~11 times of that in dust storm.Through back trajectory and principal component analysis,it was found that BC in the dust aerosol over Taklimakan Desert might be attributed to the emission from the anthropogenic activities,including domestic heating,cooking,combustion of oil and natural gas,and the medium-range transport from those oases located in the margins of the desert.The total BC aerosol from the Taklimakan Desert to be transported to the eastward downstream was estimated to be 6.3×104 ton yr-1.

  9. Sources of uncertainties in modelling black carbon at the global scale

    OpenAIRE

    Vignati, E.; Karl, M; M. Krol; Wilson, J.(School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, United Kingdom); Stier, P; F. Cavalli

    2010-01-01

    Our understanding of the global black carbon (BC) cycle is essentially qualitative due to uncertainties in our knowledge of its properties. This work investigates two source of uncertainties in modelling black carbon: those due to the use of different schemes for BC ageing and its removal rate in the global Transport-Chemistry model TM5 and those due to the uncertainties in the definition and quantification of the observations, which propagate through to both the emission inventories, and the...

  10. Morphology and Electrochemical Properties of Thermal Modified Nanoporous Carbon as Electrode of Lithium Power Sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.I. Mandzyuk

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper explored the effect of thermal modification on morphology of porous carbon material and specific energy parameters of lithium power sources formed on it bases. The structural and sorption properties of these materials – specific surface area, micropore surface, total pore volume, micropore volume, average pore diameter, are defined by low-temperature porometry method. The electro-stimulated diffusion coefficient of lithium ions into porous carbon material is calculated on the bases of galvanostatic intermittent titration.

  11. Carbon sources supporting a diverse fish community in a tropical coastal ecosystem (Gazi Bay, Kenya)

    OpenAIRE

    Nyunja, J.; Ntiba, M.; Onyari, J.; Mavuti, K.; K. Soetaert; BOUILLON, S

    2009-01-01

    Interlinked mangrove-seagrass ecosystems are characteristic features of many tropical coastal areas, where they act as feeding and nursery grounds for a variety of fishes and invertebrates. The autotrophic carbon sources supporting fisheries in Gazi bay (Kenya) were studied in three sites, two located in the tidal creeks flowing through extensive mangrove forests, another site located in the subtidal seagrass meadows, approximately 2.5 km away from the forest. Carbon and nitrogen stable isoto...

  12. Biotechnological Production of Docosahexaenoic Acid Using Aurantiochytrium limacinum: Carbon Sources Comparison And Growth Characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergi Abad

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Aurantiochytrium limacinum, a marine heterotrophic protist/microalga has shown interesting yields of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA when cultured with different carbon sources: glucose, pure and crude glycerol. A complete study in a lab-scale fermenter allowed for the characterization and comparison of the growth kinetic parameters corresponding to each carbon source. Artificial Marine Medium (AMM with glucose, pure and crude glycerol offered similar biomass yields. The net growth rates (0.10–0.12 h−1, biomass (0.7–0.8 g cells/g Substrate and product (0.14–0.15 g DHA/g cells yields, as well as DHA productivity were similar using the three carbon sources. Viable potential applications to valorize crude glycerol are envisioned to avoid an environmental problem due to the excess of byproduct.

  13. Sources and delivery of carbon dioxide for enhanced oil recovery. Final report, October 1977--December 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hare, M.; Perlich, H.; Robinson, R.; Shah, M.; Zimmerman, F.

    1978-12-01

    Results are presented from a comprehensive study by Pullman Kellogg, with assistance from Gulf Universities Research Consortium (GURC) and National Cryo-Chemics Incorporated (NCI), of the carbon dioxide supply situation for miscible flooding operations to enhance oil recovery. A survey of carbon dioxide sources within the geographic areas of potential EOR are shown on four regional maps with the tabular data for each region to describe the sources in terms of quantity and quality. Evaluation of all the costs, such as purchase, production, processing, and transportation, associated with delivering the carbon dioxide from its source to its destination are presented. Specific cases to illustrate the use of the maps and cost charts generated in this study have been examined.

  14. Carbon storages in plantation ecosystems in sand source areas of north Beijing, China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiuping Liu

    Full Text Available Afforestation is a mitigation option to reduce the increased atmospheric carbon dioxide levels as well as the predicted high possibility of climate change. In this paper, vegetation survey data, statistical database, National Forest Resource Inventory database, and allometric equations were used to estimate carbon density (carbon mass per hectare and carbon storage, and identify the size and spatial distribution of forest carbon sinks in plantation ecosystems in sand source areas of north Beijing, China. From 2001 to the end of 2010, the forest areas increased more than 2.3 million ha, and total carbon storage in forest ecosystems was 173.02 Tg C, of which 82.80 percent was contained in soil in the top 0-100 cm layer. Younger forests have a large potential for enhancing carbon sequestration in terrestrial ecosystems than older ones. Regarding future afforestation efforts, it will be more effective to increase forest area and vegetation carbon density through selection of appropriate tree species and stand structure according to local climate and soil conditions, and application of proper forest management including land-shaping, artificial tending and fencing plantations. It would be also important to protect the organic carbon in surface soils during forest management.

  15. Influence of natural and novel organic carbon sources on denitrification in forest, degraded urban, and restored streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Organic carbon is important in regulating ecosystem function, and its source and abundance may be altered by urbanization. We investigated shifts in organic carbon quantity and quality associated with urbanization and ecosystem restoration, and its potential effects on denitrific...

  16. Secondary organic carbon quantification and source apportionment of PM10 in Kaifeng, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Lin; FENG Yinchang; WU Jianhui; ZHU Tan; BI Xiaohui; HAN Bo; YANG Weihong; YANG Zhiqiang

    2009-01-01

    During 2005, the filter samples of ambient PM10 from five sites and the source samples of particulate matter were collected in Kaifeng, Henan province of China. Nineteen elements, water-soluble ions, total carbon (TC) and organic carbon (OC) contained in samples were analyzed. Seven contributive source types were identified and their contributions to ambient PM10 were estimated by chemical mass balance (CMB) receptor model. Weak associations between the concentrations of organic carbon and element carbon (EC) were observed during the sampling periods, indicating that there was secondary organic aerosol pollution in the urban atmosphere. An indirect method of "OC/EC minimum ratio" was applied to estimate the concentration of secondary organic carbon (SOC). The results showed that SOC contributed 26.2%, 32.4% and 18.0% of TC in spring, summer-fall and winter respectively, and the annual average SOC concentration was 7.07 μg/m3, accounting for 5.73% of the total mass in ambient PM10. The carbon species concentrations in ambient PM10 were recalculated by subtracting the SOC concentrations from measured concentrations of TC and OC to increase the compatibility of source and receptor measurements for CMB model.

  17. Innovative slow-release organic carbon-source material for groundwater in situ denitrification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dayi; Zhang, Xu; Wang, Yun; Zhou, Guizhong; Li, Guanghe

    2015-01-01

    Slow-release organic carbon-source (SOC) material, a new kind of electron donor for in situ groundwater denitrification, was prepared and evaluated in this study. With starch as a biologically utilized carbon source and polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) as a frame, this material performed controllable carbon release rates and demonstrated stable behaviour during the simulated denitrification process. Raman spectrum analysis showed that the PVA skeleton formed cross-linking network structures for hydrogen-bonded water molecules reset in low temperatures, and the starchy molecules filled in the interspace of the skeleton to form a two-phase interlocking/disperse phase structure. In a static system, carbon release processes followed the Fickian law with (1.294-6.560)×10(-3) mg g(-1) s(-1/2) as the release coefficient. Under domestication and in situ groundwater simulation conditions, SOC material played a favourable role during denitrification, with 1.049±0.165 as an average carbon-nitrogen ratio. The denitrification process followed the law of zero-order kinetics, while the dynamics parameter kN was 0.563-8.753 gN m(-3) d(-1). Generally, SOC material was suggested to be a potential carbon source (electron donor) suitable for in situ groundwater denitrification.

  18. Sources of uncertainties in modelling Black Carbon at the global scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Cavalli

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Our understanding of the global black carbon cycle is essentially qualitative due to uncertainties in our knowledge of the properties of black carbon. This work investigates uncertainties related to modelling black carbon: due to the use of different schemes for BC ageing and its removal rate in the global Transport-Chemistry model TM5 and due to the uncertainties in the definition and quantification of observed black carbon, which propagate through to both the emission inventories, and the measurements used for the model evaluation.

    The schemes for the atmospheric processing of black carbon that have been tested with the model are (i a simple approach considering black carbon as bulk aerosol and a simple treatment in the removal and (ii a more complete description of microphysical aging within an aerosol dynamics model, where removal is coupled to the microphysical properties of the aerosol. In the first approach a fixed 70% of black carbon is scavenged in clouds and removed when rain is present. The second leads to a global average of 40% black carbon that is scavenged in clouds and subsequently removed by rain, thus resulting in a longer lifetime. This difference is reflected in comparisons between both sets of modelled results and the measurements. Close to the sources, both anthropogenic and vegetation fire source regions, the model results do not differ significantly, showing that the emissions are the prevailing mechanism determining the concentrations and the choice of the aerosol scheme does not influence the levels. In more remote areas such as oceanic and polar regions the differences can be orders of magnitude, due to the differences between the two schemes. The more complete description reproduces the seasonal trend of the black carbon observations in those areas, although not always the magnitude of the signal, while the more simplified approach underestimates black carbon concentrations by orders of magnitude.

  19. North America carbon dioxide sources and sinks: magnitude, attribution, and uncertainty

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, Anthony W.; Hayes, Daniel J.; Huntzinger, Deborah N.; West, Tristram O.; Post, W. M.

    2012-12-01

    North America is both a source and sink of atmospheric CO2. Sources, predominately fossil-fuel combustion in the United States along with contributions from deforestation in Mexico, add CO2 to the atmosphere. Most North America ecosystems, particularly regrowing forests in the United States, are sinks for atmospheric CO2. CO2 is removed from the atmosphere in photosynthesis, converted into biomass and stored as carbon in vegetation, soil and wood products. Fossil-fuel emissions dominate the North American source-sink balance. North America is a net source of atmospheric CO2 with ecosystem sinks balancing approximately 35% of fossil-fuel CO2 emissions from North America.

  20. Glyphosate Utilization as the Source of Carbon: Isolation and Identification of new Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Mohsen Nourouzi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Mixed bacteria from oil palm plantation soil (OPS were isolated to investigate their ability to utilize glyphosate as carbon source. Results showed that approximately all of the glyphosate was converted to aminomethyl-phosphonic acid (AMPA (99.5%. It is worthy to note that mixed bacteria were able to degrade only 2% of AMPA to further metabolites. Two bacterial strains i.e. Stenotrophomonas maltophilia and Providencia alcalifaciens were obtained from enrichment culture. Bacterial isolates were cultured individually on glyphosate as a sole carbon source. It was observed that both isolates were able to convert glyphosate to AMPA.

  1. The effect of various carbon sources on the growth of single-celled cyanophyta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avilov, I. A.; Sidorenkova, E. S.

    1983-01-01

    In 19 strains of unicellular blue-green algae, belonging to general Synechococcus, Synechocystis, Aphanocapsa and Aphanothece, the capacity of growth under mixotrophic conditions in mineral media with organic carbon sources (carbohydrates, polyols) was investigated. At moderate light intensity (1200 lx) and 0.5% of carbon source there was revealed: (1) Stimulation of growth; (2) Partial or complete inhibition of growth; (3) No influence of carbohydrate and polyols on the growth of some algae strains. Three physiological groups for the investigated strains have been outlined on the basis of data obtained. The possibility of using the differences revealed in classification of unicellular blue-green algae is discussed.

  2. CO2 mitigation potential of mineral carbonation with industrial alkalinity sources in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchofer, Abby; Becker, Austin; Brandt, Adam; Wilcox, Jennifer

    2013-07-01

    The availability of industrial alkalinity sources is investigated to determine their potential for the simultaneous capture and sequestration of CO2 from point-source emissions in the United States. Industrial alkalinity sources investigated include fly ash, cement kiln dust, and iron and steel slag. Their feasibility for mineral carbonation is determined by their relative abundance for CO2 reactivity and their proximity to point-source CO2 emissions. In addition, the available aggregate markets are investigated as possible sinks for mineral carbonation products. We show that in the U.S., industrial alkaline byproducts have the potential to mitigate approximately 7.6 Mt CO2/yr, of which 7.0 Mt CO2/yr are CO2 captured through mineral carbonation and 0.6 Mt CO2/yr are CO2 emissions avoided through reuse as synthetic aggregate (replacing sand and gravel). The emission reductions represent a small share (i.e., 0.1%) of total U.S. CO2 emissions; however, industrial byproducts may represent comparatively low-cost methods for the advancement of mineral carbonation technologies, which may be extended to more abundant yet expensive natural alkalinity sources. PMID:23738892

  3. Comparative study on CO2 sources in soil developed on carbonate rock and non-carbonate rock in Central Guizhou

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黎廷宇; 王世杰; 郑乐平

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, by using concentration and carbon stable isotope the CO2 sources of soil profiles developed on limestone, dolostone and claystone basements in Central Guizhou, China are comparatively studied. The results show that CO2 concentration of soil profiles developed on different basements is different, having the following sequence: limestone>dolostone>claystone. Below the soil depth of 20 cm from the surface the ? 13C value of CO2 in soil profile developed on limestone ranges from -12.811‰ - -13.492‰(PDB), that in soil profile developed on dolostone varys from -13.212‰ - -14.271‰(PDB) and that in soil profile developed on claystone is about -20.234‰ - -21.485‰(PDB). Taking the carbon isotope of soil organic matter and carbonate rock as two isotopic endmembers, the proportion of soil CO2 generated by dissolution of carbonate rock is calculated, about 21%-25% for soil profile developed on limestone basement, 19%-21% for soil profile developed on dolostone basement. There is almost no influx of CO2 generated by the dissolution of carbonate rock in soil profile developed on claystone basement.

  4. Effect of different carbon sources on the biological phosphorus removal by a sequencing batch reactor using pressurized pure oxygen

    OpenAIRE

    Wei, Jie; Imai, Tsuyoshi; Higuchi, Takaya; Arfarita, Novi; YAMAMOTO, Koichi; Sekine, Masahiko; Kanno, Ariyo

    2014-01-01

    The effect of different carbon source on the efficiency of enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) from synthetic wastewater with acetate and two ratios of acetate/starch as a carbon source was investigated. Three pressurized pure oxygen sequencing batch reactor (POSBR) experiments were operated. The reactors (POSBR1, POSBR2 and POSBR3) were developed and studied at different carbon source ratios of 100% acetate, 75% acetate plus 25% starch and 50% acetate plus 50% starch, respectively....

  5. At neutral pH the chronological lifespan of Hansenula polymorpha increases upon enhancing the carbon source concentrations

    OpenAIRE

    Adam Kawałek; van der Klei, Ida J

    2014-01-01

    Dietary restriction is generally assumed to increase the lifespan in most eukaryotes, including the simple model organism Saccharomyces cerevisiae. However, recent data questioned whether this phenomenon is indeed true for yeast. We studied the effect of reduction of the carbon source concentration on the chronological lifespan of the yeast Hansenula polymorpha using four different carbon sources. Our data indicate that reduction of the carbon source concentration has a negative (glucose, eth...

  6. Immune response and disease resistance of shrimp fed biofloc grown on different carbon sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekasari, Julie; Hanif Azhar, Muhammad; Surawidjaja, Enang H; Nuryati, Sri; De Schryver, Peter; Bossier, Peter

    2014-12-01

    The objective of this study was to document the immunological effects of growing shrimp in biofloc systems. The experiment consisted of four types of biofloc systems in which bioflocs were produced by daily supplementation of four different carbon sources, i.e. molasses, tapioca, tapioca-by-product, and rice bran, at an estimated C/N ratio of 15 and a control system without any organic carbon addition. Each biofloc system was stocked with Pacific white shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei) juveniles that were reared for 49 days. The use of tapioca-by-product resulted in a higher survival (93%) of the shrimp as compared to the other carbon sources and the control. The highest yield and protein assimilation was observed when tapioca was used as the carbon source. After 49 days, phenoloxidase (PO) activity of the shrimp grown in all biofloc systems was higher than that of the shrimp from the control system. Following a challenge test by injection with infectious myonecrosis virus (IMNV), the levels of PO and respiratory burst (RB) activity in the shrimp of all biofloc treatments were higher than that of the challenged shrimp from the control treatment. An increased immunity was also suggested by the survival of the challenged shrimp from the experimental biofloc groups that was significantly higher as compared to the challenged shrimp from the control treatment, regardless of the organic carbon source used to grow the bioflocs. Overall, this study demonstrated that the application of biofloc technology may contribute to the robustness of cultured shrimp by immunostimulation and that this effect is independent of the type of carbon source used to grow the flocs. PMID:25218685

  7. Sources of uncertainties in modelling black carbon at the global scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Vignati

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Our understanding of the global black carbon (BC cycle is essentially qualitative due to uncertainties in our knowledge of its properties. This work investigates two source of uncertainties in modelling black carbon: those due to the use of different schemes for BC ageing and its removal rate in the global Transport-Chemistry model TM5 and those due to the uncertainties in the definition and quantification of the observations, which propagate through to both the emission inventories, and the measurements used for the model evaluation.

    The schemes for the atmospheric processing of black carbon that have been tested with the model are (i a simple approach considering BC as bulk aerosol and a simple treatment of the removal with fixed 70% of in-cloud black carbon concentrations scavenged by clouds and removed when rain is present and (ii a more complete description of microphysical ageing within an aerosol dynamics model, where removal is coupled to the microphysical properties of the aerosol, which results in a global average of 40% in-cloud black carbon that is scavenged in clouds and subsequently removed by rain, thus resulting in a longer atmospheric lifetime. This difference is reflected in comparisons between both sets of modelled results and the measurements. Close to the sources, both anthropogenic and vegetation fire source regions, the model results do not differ significantly, indicating that the emissions are the prevailing mechanism determining the concentrations and the choice of the aerosol scheme does not influence the levels. In more remote areas such as oceanic and polar regions the differences can be orders of magnitude, due to the differences between the two schemes. The more complete description reproduces the seasonal trend of the black carbon observations in those areas, although not always the magnitude of the signal, while the more simplified approach underestimates black carbon concentrations by orders of

  8. Source apportionment of atmospheric particulate carbon in Las Vegas, Nevada,USA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mark C.Green; Judith C.Chow; M.-C.Oliver Chang; L.-W.Antony Chen; Hampden D.Kuhns; Vicken R.Etyemezian; John G.Watson

    2013-01-01

    A study was conducted to quantify wintertime contributions of source types to carbonaceous PM2.5 at four urban sites in the Las Vegas Valley,one of the most rapidly growing urban areas in the southwestern United States.Twenty-four hour average ambient samples were collected for mass,ions,elements,organic carbon (OC),elemental carbon (EC),and trace organic markers analysis.Additional measurements were made to determine diurnal patterns in light-absorbing black carbon (BC) as a marker for combustion sources.Carbonaceous PM sources of on-road gasoline vehicles,on-road diesel vehicles,and off-road diesel engines were characterized with their chemical profiles,as well as fuel-based emission factors,using an In-Plume Sampling System.The Effective Variance Chemical Mass Balance (EV-CMB) source apportionment model was applied to the ambient samples collected,using source profiles developed in this study as well as profiles from other relevant studies.Four main sources contributed to PM2.5 carbon within the Las Vegas Valley:(1) paved road dust,(2) on-road gasoline vehicles,(3) residential wood combustion,and (4) on-road diesel vehicles.CMB estimated that on-road mixed fleet gasoline vehicles are the largest source for OC and EC at all the sites.The contribution of paved road dust to both OC and EC was 5-10% at the four sites.On-road diesel vehicles contribute 22% of the OC and 34% of the EC at a site near the city center,which is located immediately downwind of a major freeway.Residential wood combustion is a more important source than on-road diesel vehicles for two residential neighborhood sites.These results are consistent with our conceptual model,and the research methodology may be applied to studying other urban areas.

  9. Tracking Nonpoint Source Nitrogen and Carbon in Watersheds of Chesapeake Bay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaushal, S.; Pennino, M. J.; Duan, S.; Blomquist, J.

    2012-12-01

    Humans have altered nitrogen and carbon cycles in rivers regionally with important impacts on coastal ecosystems. Nonpoint source nitrogen pollution is a leading contributor to coastal eutrophication and hypoxia. Shifts in sources of carbon impact downstream ecosystem metabolism and fate and transport of contaminants in coastal zones. We used a combination of stable isotopes and optical tracers to investigate fate and transport of nitrogen and carbon sources in tributaries of the largest estuary in the U.S., the Chesapeake Bay. We analyzed isotopic composition of water samples from major tributaries including the Potomac River, Susquehanna River, Patuxent River, and Choptank River during routine and storm event sampling over multiple years. A positive correlation between δ15N-NO3- and δ18O-NO3- in the Potomac River above Washington D.C. suggested denitrification or biological uptake in the watershed was removing agriculturally-derived N during summer months. In contrast, the Patuxent River in Maryland showed elevated δ15N-NO3- (5 - 12 per mil) with no relationship to δ18O-NO3- suggesting the importance of wastewater sources. From the perspective of carbon sources, there were distinct isotopic values of the δ13C-POM of particulate organic matter and fluorescence excitation emission matrices (EEMS) for rivers influenced by their dominant watershed land use. EEMS showed that there were increases in the humic and fulvic fractions of dissolved organic matter during spring floods, particularly in the Potomac River. Stable isotopic values of δ13C-POM also showed rapid depletion suggesting terrestrial carbon "pulses" in the Potomac River each spring. The δ15N-POM peaked to 10 - 15 per mil each spring suggested a potential manure source or result of biological processing within the watershed. Overall, there were considerable changes in sources and transformations of nitrogen and carbon that varied across rivers and that contribute to nitrogen and carbon loads

  10. Stream restoration and sewers impact sources and fluxes of water, carbon, and nutrients in urban watersheds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennino, Michael J.; Kaushal, Sujay S.; Mayer, Paul M.; Utz, Ryan M.; Cooper, Curtis A.

    2016-08-01

    An improved understanding of sources and timing of water, carbon, and nutrient fluxes associated with urban infrastructure and stream restoration is critical for guiding effective watershed management globally. We investigated how sources, fluxes, and flowpaths of water, carbon (C), nitrogen (N), and phosphorus (P) shift in response to differences in urban stream restoration and sewer infrastructure. We compared an urban restored stream with two urban degraded streams draining varying levels of urban development and one stream with upland stormwater management systems over a 3-year period. We found that there was significantly decreased peak discharge in response to precipitation events following stream restoration. Similarly, we found that the restored stream showed significantly lower (p exported most carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus at relatively lower streamflow than the two more urban catchments, which exported most carbon and nutrients at higher streamflow. Annual exports of total carbon (6.6 ± 0.5 kg ha-1 yr-1), total nitrogen (4.5 ± 0.3 kg ha-1 yr-1), and total phosphorus (161 ± 15 kg ha-1 yr-1) were significantly lower in the restored stream compared to both urban degraded streams (p exports. However, nitrate isotope data suggested that 55 ± 1 % of the nitrate in the urban restored stream was derived from leaky sanitary sewers (during baseflow), statistically similar to the urban degraded streams. These isotopic results as well as additional tracers, including fluoride (added to drinking water) and iodide (contained in dietary salt), suggested that groundwater contamination was a major source of urban nutrient fluxes, which has been less considered compared to upland sources. Overall, leaking sewer pipes are a problem globally and our results suggest that combining stream restoration with restoration of aging sewer pipes can be critical to more effectively minimizing urban nonpoint nutrient sources. The sources, fluxes, and flowpaths of groundwater

  11. Production of Medium Chain Length Polyhydroxyalkanoates by Pseudomonas mendocina 0806 from Related and Unrelated Carbon Sources

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    Pseudomonas mendocina strain 0806 isolated from oil-contaminated soil was found to produce medium chain length polyhydroxyalkanoates (mcl PHAs).The mcl PHAs consist of monomers with even numbers of carbon atoms such as hydroxyhexanoate (HHx or C6), hydroxyoctanoate (HO or C8), and/or hydroxydecanoate (HD or C10) as major compositions when the strain was grown on unrelated carbon sources such as glucose, citric acid and related carbon sources such as octanoate, myristic acid or oleic acid.While even and odd number hydroxyalkanoate (HA) monomers were synthesized when tridecanoic acid was used as carbon source.The molar ratio of carbon to nitrogen (RC/N) had strong effects on PHA compositions: the strain produced PHAs with 97%-99% (molar ratio) HD (C10) monomer when grown in a glucose ammonium sulfate medium of RC/N40.It was demonstrated that the molar ratio of HO/HD remained constant in the polymers synthesized from media containing a constant RC/N, regardless of the change of glucose concentration.Up to 3.6 g/L cell dry weight containing 45% (mass fraction) PHAs was produced by the strain grown for 48 h in a medium containing 25 g/L glucose with RC/N of 40.

  12. Effect of carbon source on growth and lipid accumulation in Chlorella sorokiniana GXNN01

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIAO Hongjin; WANG Guangce

    2009-01-01

    Heterotrophic culture of microalgae to develop methods of increasing biomass productivity and storage lipids has brought new insight to commercial biodiesel production. To understand the relationship between heterotrophy and lipid production, the effects of carbon sources on the growth and lipid accumulation of Chlorella sorokiniana GXNN01 was studied. The alga exhibited an increased growth rate in response to the addition of carbon sources, which reached the stationary phase after 48 h at 30°C. In addition, glucose and NaAc had a significant effect on the lipid accumulation during the early-stationary phase. Specifically, the lipid content was 0.237±0.026 g g~(-1) cell dry weight and 0.272±0.041 g L~(-1) when glucose was used as the carbon source, whereas the lipid content reached 0.287±0.018 g g~(-1) cell dry weight and 0.288±0.008 g L~(-1) when NaAc was used as the carbon source. The neutral lipid content was found to first decrease and then increase over time during the growth phase. A glucose concentration of 20 mmol L~(-1) gave the maximal lipid yield and the optimum harvest time was the early-stationary phase.

  13. Silica-Based Carbon Source Delivery for In-situ Bioremediation Enhancement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, L.; Lee, M. H.; Lee, B.; Yang, S.

    2015-12-01

    Colloidal silica aqueous suspensions undergo viscosity increasing and gelation over time under favorable geochemical conditions. This property of silica suspension can potentially be applied to deliver remedial amendments to the subsurface and establish slow release amendment sources for enhanced remediation. In this study, silica-based delivery of carbon sources for in-situ bioremediation enhancement is investigated. Sodium lactate, vegetable oil, ethanol, and molasses have been studied for the interaction with colloidal silica in aqueous suspensions. The rheological properties of the carbon source amendments and silica suspension have been investigated. The lactate-, ethanol-, and molasses-silica suspensions exhibited controllable viscosity increase and eventually became gels under favorable geochemical conditions. The gelation rate was a function of the concentration of silica, salinity, amendment, and temperature. The vegetable oil-silica suspensions increased viscosity immediately upon mixing, but did not perform gelation. The carbon source release rate from the lactate-, ethanol-, and molasses-silica gels was determined as a function of silica, salinity, amendment concentration. The microbial activity stimulation and in-situ bioremediation enhancement by the slow-released carbon from the amendment-silica gels will be demonstrated in future investigations planned in this study.

  14. External Carbon Source Addition as a Means to Control an Activated Sludge Nutrient Removal Process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Isaacs, Steven Howard; Henze, Mogens; Søeberg, Henrik;

    1994-01-01

    In alternating type activated sludge nutrient removal processes, the denitrification rate can be limited by the availability of readily-degradable carbon substrate. A control strategy is proposed by which an easily metabolizable COD source is added directly to that point in the process at which...

  15. Application of carbon isotope for discriminating sources of soil CO2 in karst area, Guizhou

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黎廷宇; 王世杰

    2001-01-01

    Using carbon isotope of soil CO2 this paper discussed the sources of soil CO2 in karst area, Guizhou Province, China. Oxidation-decomposition of organic matter, respiration of plant root and activity of microbe are thought to be the major sources of soil CO2. However, in karst area, the contribution of dissolution of underlying carbonate rock to soil CO2 should be considered as in acidic environment. Atmospheric CO2 is the major composition of soil CO2 in surface layer of soil profiles and its proportion in soil CO2 decreases with increase of soil depth. CO2 produced by dissolution of carbonate rock contributes 34%-46% to soil CO2 below the depth of 10cm in the studied soil profiles covered by grass.

  16. Relative Contributions of Fossil and Contemporary Carbon sources to PM 2.5 Aerosols at Nine IMPROVE Network Sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bench, G; Fallon, S; Schichtel, B; Malm, W; McDade, C

    2006-06-26

    Particulate matter aerosols contribute to haze diminishing vistas and scenery at National Parks and Wilderness Areas within the United States. To increase understanding of the sources of carbonaceous aerosols at these settings, the total carbon loading and {sup 14}C/C ratio of PM 2.5 aerosols at nine IMPROVE (Interagency Monitoring for Protection Of Visual Environments) network sites were measured. Aerosols were collected weekly in the summer and winter at one rural site, two urban sites, five sites located in National Parks and one site located in a Wildlife Preserve. The carbon measurements together with the absence of {sup 14}C in fossil carbon materials and the known {sup 14}C/C levels in contemporary carbon materials were used to derive contemporary and fossil carbon contents of the particulate matter. Contemporary and fossil carbon aerosol loadings varied across the sites and suggest different percentages of carbon source inputs. The urban sites had the highest fossil carbon loadings that comprised around 50% of the total carbon aerosol loading. The Wildlife Preserve and National Park sites together with the rural site had much lower fossil carbon loading components. At these sites, variations in the total carbon aerosol loading were dominated by non-fossil carbon sources. This suggests that reduction of anthroprogenic sources of fossil carbon aerosols may result in little decrease in carbonaceous aerosol loading at many National Parks and rural areas.

  17. Geochemistry of dissolved inorganic carbon in a Coastal Plain aquifer. 2. Modeling carbon sources, sinks, and δ13C evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahon, Peter B.; Chapelle, Francis H.

    1991-01-01

    Stable isotope data for dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), carbonate shell material and cements, and microbial CO2 were combined with organic and inorganic chemical data from aquifer and confining-bed pore waters to construct geochemical reaction models along a flowpath in the Black Creek aquifer of South Carolina. Carbon-isotope fractionation between DIC and precipitating cements was treated as a Rayleigh distillation process. Organic matter oxidation was coupled to microbial fermentation and sulfate reduction. All reaction models reproduced the observed chemical and isotopic compositions of final waters. However, model 1, in which all sources of carbon and electron-acceptors were assumed to be internal to the aquifer, was invalidated owing to the large ratio of fermentation CO2 to respiration CO2 predicted by the model (5–49) compared with measured ratios (two or less). In model 2, this ratio was reduced by assuming that confining beds adjacent to the aquifer act as sources of dissolved organic carbon and sulfate. This assumption was based on measured high concentrations of dissolved organic acids and sulfate in confining-bed pore waters (60–100 μM and 100–380 μM, respectively) relative to aquifer pore waters (from less than 30 μM and 2–80 μM, respectively). Sodium was chosen as the companion ion to organic-acid and sulfate transport from confining beds because it is the predominant cation in confining-bed pore waters. As a result, excessive amounts of Na-for-Ca ion exchange and calcite precipitation (three to four times more cement than observed in the aquifer) were required by model 2 to achieve mass and isotope balance of final water. For this reason, model 2 was invalidated. Agreement between model-predicted and measured amounts of carbonate cement and ratios of fermentation CO2 to respiration CO2 were obtained in a reaction model that assumed confining beds act as sources of DIC, as well as organic acids and sulfate. This assumption was

  18. Methane-derived authigenic carbonates of mid-Cretaceous age in southern Tibet: Types of carbonate concretions, carbon sources, and formation processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Huimin; Chen, Xi; Wang, Chengshan; Zhao, Dekun; Weissert, Helmut

    2016-01-01

    Methane-derived authigenic carbonates with distinctive structures and morphologies have been documented worldwide, but they are rarely found from ancient strata in the Eastern Tethys Ocean. The methane-derived authigenic carbonates found in southern Tibet are developed in calcareous or silty shales of mid-Cretaceous age in the Xigaze forearc basin and in the Tethyan Himalaya tectonic zone. The morphology, mineralogy, elemental geochemistry and composition of carbon and oxygen isotopes of these carbonates are studied in detail. The carbonates have nodular, tubular, and tabular morphologies. They are primarily composed of carbonate cement that binds and partly replaces host sediment grains; host siliciclastic sediments are composed mainly of quartz and plagioclase feldspar; a few foraminifers; and framboidal or subhedral to euhedral pyrite. Carbonate cements dominantly are micritic calcite, with minor contribution of dolomite. Nodular concretions are characterized by depleted δ13C values, commonly ranging from -30‰ to -5‰. The δ13C values show a gradual decrease from the periphery to the center, and the CaO, SiO2, Fe2O3, Al2O3, K2O, and TiO2 contents generally show a gradual change. These features indicate that the nodular concretions grew from an early-formed center toward the periphery, and that the carbon source of the nodular concretions was derived from a mixture of methane, methanogenic CO2, and seawater-dissolved inorganic carbon. The tubular concretions are characterized by δ13C values of -8.85‰ to -3.47‰ in the Shangba Section, and -27.37‰ to -23.85‰ in the upper Gamba Section. Unlike the nodular concretions, the tubular concretions show central conduits, which are possible pathways of methane-rich fluids, suggesting that the cementation of tubular concretions begins at the periphery and proceeds inward. Moreover, the tubular concretions show morphological similarity with the methane-derived carbonate chimneys, pipes and slabs reported in

  19. Advanced Electron Beam Ion Sources (EBIS) for 2-nd generation carbon radiotherapy facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work we analyze how advanced Electron Beam Ion Sources (EBIS) can facilitate the progress of carbon therapy facilities. We will demonstrate that advanced ion sources enable operation of 2-nd generation ion beam therapy (IBT) accelerators. These new accelerator concepts with designs dedicated to IBT provide beams better suited for therapy and, are more cost efficient than contemporary IBT facilities. We will give a sort overview of the existing new IBT concepts and focus on those where ion source technology is the limiting factor. We will analyse whether this limitation can be overcome in the near future thanks to ongoing EBIS development

  20. Comparative study on CO2 sources in soil developed on carbonate rock and non-carbonate rock in Central Guizhou

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黎廷宇; 王世杰; 郑乐平

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, by using concentration and carbon stable isotope the.CO2 sources of soil profiles developed on limestone, dolostone and claystone basements in Central Guizhou, China are comparatively studied. The results show that CO2 concentration of soil profiles developed on different basements is different, having the following sequence: limestone>dolostone>claystone. Below the soil depth of 20 cm from the surface the δ13C value of CO2 in soil profile developed on limestone ranges from -12.811‰ - -13.492‰(PDB), that in soil profile developed on dolostone varys from -13.212‰--14.271‰(PDB) and that in soil profile developed on claystone is about -20.234‰- -21.485‰(PDB). Taking the carbon isotope of soil organic matter and carbonate rock as two isotopic endmembers, the proportion of soil C02 generated by dissolution of carbonate rock is calculated, about 21%-25% for soil profile developed on limestone basement, 19%-21% for soil profile developed on dolostone basement. There is almost no influx of

  1. Morphogenesis and Production of Enzymes by Penicillium echinulatum in Response to Different Carbon Sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Willian Daniel Hahn Schneider

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of different carbon sources on morphology and cellulase and xylanase production of Penicillium echinulatum was evaluated in this work. Among the six carbon sources studied, cellulose and sugar cane bagasse were the most suitable for the production of filter paper activity, endoglucanases, xylanases, and β-glucosidases. However, sucrose and glucose showed β-glucosidase activities similar to those obtained with the insoluble sources. The polyacrylamide gels proved the enzymatic activity, since different standards bands were detected in the media mentioned above. Regarding morphology, it was observed that the mycelium in a dispersed form provided the greatest enzymatic activity, possibly due to greater interaction between the substrate and hyphae. These data are important in understanding the physiology of fungi and could contribute to obtaining enzyme with potential application in the technology of second generation ethanol.

  2. Morphogenesis and production of enzymes by Penicillium echinulatum in response to different carbon sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Willian Daniel Hahn; dos Reis, Laísa; Camassola, Marli; Dillon, Aldo José Pinheiro

    2014-01-01

    The effect of different carbon sources on morphology and cellulase and xylanase production of Penicillium echinulatum was evaluated in this work. Among the six carbon sources studied, cellulose and sugar cane bagasse were the most suitable for the production of filter paper activity, endoglucanases, xylanases, and β-glucosidases. However, sucrose and glucose showed β -glucosidase activities similar to those obtained with the insoluble sources. The polyacrylamide gels proved the enzymatic activity, since different standards bands were detected in the media mentioned above. Regarding morphology, it was observed that the mycelium in a dispersed form provided the greatest enzymatic activity, possibly due to greater interaction between the substrate and hyphae. These data are important in understanding the physiology of fungi and could contribute to obtaining enzyme with potential application in the technology of second generation ethanol.

  3. Biotransformation of Meloxicam by Cunninghamella blakesleeana: Significance of Carbon and Nitrogen Source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shyam Prasad, Gurram; Narasimha Rao, Kollu; Preethi, Rama; Girisham, Sivasri; Reddy, S M

    2011-01-01

    Influence of carbon and nitrogen source, on biotransformation of meloxicam was studied by employing Cunninghamella blakesleeana NCIM 687 with an aim to achieve maximum transformation of meloxicam and in search of new metabolites. The transformation was confirmed by HPLC and based on LC-MS-MS data and previous reports the metabolites were predicted as 5-hydroxymethyl meloxicam, 5-carboxy meloxicam and a novel metabolite. The quantification of metabolites was performed using HPLC peak areas. The results obtained indicate that glucose as carbon source, ammonium nitrate as nitrogen source, were found to be optimum for maximum transformation of meloxicam. The study suggests the significance of these factors in biotransformation of meloxicam using microbial cultures. The fermentation was scaled up to 1 l level. PMID:22282633

  4. Isotopic evidence of magmatism and a sedimentary carbon source at the Endeavour hydrothermal system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, T A; Proskurowski, G; Lilley, M D

    2004-01-07

    Stable and radiocarbon isotope measurements made on CO{sub 2} from high temperature hydrothermal vents on the Endeavour Segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge indicate both magmatic and sedimentary sources of carbon to the hydrothermal system. The Endeavour segment is devoid of overlying sediments and has shown no observable signs of surficial magmatic activity during the {approx}20 years of ongoing studies. The appearance of isotopically heavy, radiocarbon dead CO{sub 2} after a 1999 earthquake swarm requires that this earthquake event was magmatic in origin. Evidence for a sedimentary organic carbon source suggests the presence of buried sediments at the ridge axis. These findings, which represent the first temporally coherent set of radiocarbon measurements from hydrothermal vent fluids, demonstrate the utility of radiocarbon analysis in hydrothermal studies. The existence of a sediment source at Endeavour and the occurrence of magmatic episodes illustrate the extremely complex and evolving nature of the Endeavour hydrothermal system.

  5. The potential of carbon and nitrogen isotopes to conservatively discriminate between subsoil sediment sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laceby, J. Patrick; Olley, Jon

    2013-04-01

    Moreton Bay, in South East Queensland, Australia, is a Ramsar wetland of international significance. A decline of the bay's ecosystem health has been primarily attributed to sediments and nutrients from catchment sources. Sediment budgets for three catchments indicated gully erosion dominates the supply of sediment in Knapp Creek and the Upper Bremer River whereas erosion from cultivated soils is the primary sediment source in Blackfellow Creek. Sediment tracing with fallout-radionuclides confirmed subsoil erosion processes dominate the supply of sediment in Knapp Creek and the Upper Bremer River whereas in Blackfellow Creek cultivated and subsoil sources contribute >90% of sediments. Other sediment properties are required to determine the relative sediment contributions of channel bank, gully and cultivated sources in these catchments. The potential of total organic carbon (TOC), total nitrogen (TN), and carbon and nitrogen stable isotopes (δ13C, δ15N) to conservatively discriminate between subsoil sediment sources is presented. The conservativeness of these sediment properties was examined through evaluating particle size variations in depth core soil samples and investigating whether they remain constant in source soils over two sampling occasions. Varying conservative behavior and source discrimination was observed. TN in the

  6. Denitrification on internal carbon sources in RAS is limited by fibers in fecal waste of rainbow trout

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meriac, A.; Eding, E.H.; Kamstra, A.; Busscher, J.P.; Schrama, J.W.; Verreth, J.A.J.

    2014-01-01

    Denitrification on internal carbon sources offers the advantage to control nitrate levels in recirculating aquaculture systems (RAS) by using the fecal carbon produced within the husbandry system. However, it is not clear to which extent fecal carbon can be utilized by the microbial community within

  7. Effects of Different Carbon Sources and NaBr-KCI on Synthesis of Ti(C,N)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Ti(C,N) was synthesized with the starting materi-als of 76.9% titania white and 23.1% carbon black (graphite or activated carbon),or 40% titania white and 60% amylum,with or without 10% NaBr-KCI,dry moulding and carbon embedded firing at 1 300 ℃ and 1 400 ℃ for 3 h,respectively.Phase composition and microstructure of the synthesized Ti (C,N) were analyzed by XRD,SEM and EPMA.Effects of different carbon sources and NaBr-KCl on the synthesis of Ti (C,N) were investigated.The results show that:(1) Ti (C,N) can be synthesized by using carbon black,graphite,activated carbon or amylum as carbon source separately;(2) Additive NaBr-KCI is more fa-vorable for accelerating the carbothdrmal reduction reac-tion using carbon black or amylum as carbon source;(3) In the presence of NaBr-KCl,particle size of the synthesized Ti (C,N) is 5-8 μm using carbon black as carbon source fired at 1 300 ℃ for 3 h,while that is only 1-3 μm using graphite,activated carbon or amy-lum fired at 1 400 ℃ for 3 h.

  8. Application of biogenic carbon dioxide produced by yeast with different carbon sources for attraction of mosquitoes towards adult mosquito traps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukumaran, D; Ponmariappan, S; Sharma, Atul K; Jha, Hemendra K; Wasu, Yogesh H; Sharma, Ajay K

    2016-04-01

    Surveillance is a prime requisite for controlling arthropod vectors like mosquitoes that transmit diseases such as malaria, dengue and chikungunya. Carbon dioxide (CO2) is one of the main cues from vertebrate breath that attracts mosquitoes towards the host. Hence, CO2 is used as an attractant during surveillance of mosquitoes either from commercial cylinders or dry ice for mosquito traps. In the present study, the biogenic carbon dioxide production was optimized with different carbon sources such as glucose, simple sugar and jaggery with and without yeast peptone dextrose (YPD) media using commercial baker's yeast. The results showed that yeast produced more biogenic CO2 with simple sugar as compared to other carbon sources. Further substrate concentration was optimized for the continuous production of biogenic CO2 for a minimum of 12 h by using 10 g of baker's yeast with 50 g of simple sugar added to 1.5 l distilled water (without YPD media) in a 2-l plastic bottle. This setup was applied in field condition along with two different mosquito traps namely Mosquito Killing System (MKS) and Biogents Sentinel (BGS) trap. Biogenic CO2 from this setup has increased the trapping efficiency of MKS by 6.48-fold for Culex quinquefasciatus, 2.62-fold for Aedes albopictus and 1.5-fold for Anopheles stephensi. In the case of BGS, the efficiency was found to be increased by 3.54-fold for Ae. albopictus, 4.33-fold for An. stephensi and 1.3-fold for Armigeres subalbatus mosquitoes. On the whole, plastic bottle setup releasing biogenic CO2 from sugar and yeast has increased the efficiency of MKS traps by 6.38-fold and 2.74-fold for BGS traps as compared to traps without biogenic CO2. The present study reveals that, among different carbon sources used, simple sugar as a substance (which is economical and readily available across the world) yielded maximum biogenic CO2 with yeast. This setup can be used as an alternative to CO2 cylinder and dry ice in any adult mosquito traps to

  9. Prairie restoration and carbon sequestration: difficulties quantifying C sources and sinks using a biometric approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahill, Kimberly Nicholas; Kucharik, Christopher J; Foley, Jonathan A

    2009-12-01

    We investigated carbon cycling and ecosystem characteristics among two prairie restoration treatments established in 1987 and adjacent cropland, all part of the Conservation Reserve Program in southwestern Wisconsin, USA. We hypothesized that different plant functional groups (cool-season C3 vs. warm-season C4 grasses) between the two prairie restoration treatments would lead to differences in soil and vegetation characteristics and amount of sequestered carbon, compared to the crop system. We found significant (P soil CO2 respiration and above- and belowground productivity, but no significant differences in long-term (approximately 16-year) carbon sequestration. We used a biometric approach aggregating short-term observations of above- and belowground productivity and CO2 respiration to estimate total net primary production (NPP) and net ecosystem production (NEP) using varied methods suggested in the literature. Net ecosystem production is important because it represents the ecosystem carbon sequestration, which is of interest to land managers and policymakers seeking or regulating credits for ecosystem carbon storage. Such a biometric approach would be attractive because it might offer the ability to rapidly assess the carbon source/sink status of an ecosystem. We concluded that large uncertainties in (1) estimating aboveground NPP, (2) determining belowground NPP, and (3) partitioning soil respiration into microbial and plant components strongly affect the magnitude, and even the sign, of NEP estimates made from aggregating its components. A comparison of these estimates across treatments could not distinguish differences in NEP, nor the absolute sign of the overall carbon balance. Longer-term quantification of carbon stocks in the soil, periodically linked to measurements of individual processes, may offer a more reliable measure of the carbon balance in grassland systems, suitable for assigning credits. PMID:20014587

  10. Australian net (1950s-1990) soil organic carbon erosion is an omitted CO2 source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chappell, A.; Webb, N.; Viscarra Rossel, R. A.; Bui, E. N.

    2013-12-01

    The debate about agricultural erosion substantially offsetting fossil fuel emissions and acting as an important source or sink of CO2 is informed by studies of water and tillage erosion at the field scale and extrapolated across regions based on gross erosion. We use ';catchment' scale (~25 km2) estimates of 137Cs-derived net (1950s-1990) soil redistribution of all processes (wind, water and tillage) to calculate the soil organic carbon (SOC) net redistribution across Australia. We include the selective removal of SOC at net eroding locations, SOC enrichment of transported sediment and net depositional locations. We show that the total SOC net redistribution for Australia is -4.06 Tg SOC y-1, a net loss of SOC from the terrestrial ecosystem and 2% of the total carbon stock (0-10 cm) of Australia. Assuming the SOC is mineralised, these losses represent 12% of CO2-e emissions from all carbon pools in Australia and a significant source of uncertainty in the carbon budget SOC net redistribution as a proportion (%) of SOC stocks Calculation of soil organic carbon net (1950s-1990) redistribution and its proportion for land use classes across Australia *Using an equal area projection the area of a pixel is approximately 4.53 km x 4.87 km ≈ 22.03 km2 equivalent to 2203 ha

  11. Denitrification potential enhancement by addition of external carbon sources in a pre-denitrification process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PENG Yong-zhen; MA Yong; WANG Shu-ying

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the denitrification potential enhancement by addition of external carbon sources and to estimate the denitrification potential for the predenitrification system using nitrate utilization rate(NUR)batch tests.It is shown that the denitrification potential Can be substantially increased with the addition of three external carbon sources,i.e.methanol,ethanol,and acetate.and the denitrification rates of ethanol,acetate,and methanol reached up to 9.6,12,and 3.2 mgN/(gVSS·h),respectively,while mat of starch wastewater was only 0.74 mgN/(gVSS·h).By comparison,ethanol was found to be the best extemal carbon source.NUR batch tests with starch wastewater and waste ethanol were carried out.The denitrification potential increased from 5.6 to 16.5 mg NO.-N/L owing to waste ethanol addition.By means of NUR tests,the wastewater characteristics and kinetic parameters can be estimated.which are used to determine the denitrification potential of wastewater,to calculate the denitrification potential of the plant and to predict the nitrate effluent quality,as well as provide information for developing carbon dosage conlxol strategy.

  12. Spatial distribution and sources of organic carbon in the surface sediment of Bosten Lake, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Z. T.; Wang, X. J.; Zhang, E. L.; Zhao, C. Y.; Liu, X. Q.

    2015-11-01

    Lake sediment is an important carbon reservoir. However, little is known on the dynamics and sources of sediment organic carbon in Bosten Lake. We collected 13 surface (0-2 cm) sediment samples in Bosten Lake and analyzed total organic carbon (TOC), total nitrogen (TN), stable carbon isotopic composition in TOC (δ13Corg), and grain size. We found a large spatial variability in TOC content (1.8-4.4 %) and δ 13Corg value (-26.77 to -23.98 ‰). Using a three-end-member mixing model with measured TOC : TN ratio and δ13Corg, we estimated that 54-90 % of TOC was from autochthonous sources. Higher TOC content (> 3.7 %) was found in the east and central-north sections and near the mouth of the Kaidu River, which was attributable to allochthonous, autochthonous plus allochthonous, and autochthonous sources, respectively. The lowest TOC content was found in the mid-west section, which might be a result of high kinetic energy levels. Our study indicated that the spatial distribution of sediment TOC in the Bosten Lake was influenced by multiple and complex processes.

  13. Synthesis of LiFePO_4/C Composite Cathode Materials Using High Surface Area Carbon as Carbon Sources

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    George; Ting-kuo; Fey; Kai-Lun; Chiang

    2007-01-01

    1 Results The pyrolyzed product of peanut shells was utilized as a carbon source to synthesize a LiFePO4/C composite.The advantages of using agricultural wastes such as peanut shells are low costs,easy processing,and environmentally benigness.Peanut shell was first treated with a porogenic agent to produce a precursor with high porosity and surface area (>2 000 m2·g-1).A small amount of precursor was mixed with LiFePO4 fine powders and heated.The optimum calcination process for synthesizing LiFePO4/C co...

  14. Sources of carbon and sulfur nutrition for consumers in three meromictic lakes of New York State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fry, B.; Hayes, J. M. (Principal Investigator)

    1986-01-01

    The trophic importance of bacterioplankton as a source of carbon and sulfur nutrition for consumers in meromictic lakes was tested using stable carbon (delta 13C) and sulfur (delta 34S) isotopic measurements. Studies in three lakes near Syracuse, New York, showed that most consumers ultimately derive their C and S nutrition from a mixture of terrestrial detritus, phytoplankton, and littoral vegetation, rather than from bacterioplankton. Food webs in these meromictic lakes are thus similar to those in other lakes that lack dense populations of bacterioplankton.

  15. Carbon Sources for Yeast Growth as a Precondition of Hydrogen Peroxide Induced Hormetic Phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasylkovska, Ruslana; Petriv, Natalia; Semchyshyn, Halyna

    2015-01-01

    Hormesis is a phenomenon of particular interest in biology, medicine, pharmacology, and toxicology. In this study, we investigated the relationship between H2O2-induced hormetic response in S. cerevisiae and carbon sources in yeast growth medium. In general, our data indicate that (i) hydrogen peroxide induces hormesis in a concentration-dependent manner; (ii) the effect of hydrogen peroxide on yeast reproductive ability depends on the type of carbon substrate in growth medium; and (iii) metabolic and growth rates as well as catalase activity play an important role in H2O2-induced hormetic response in yeast. PMID:26843865

  16. Carbon Sources for Yeast Growth as a Precondition of Hydrogen Peroxide Induced Hormetic Phenotype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruslana Vasylkovska

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Hormesis is a phenomenon of particular interest in biology, medicine, pharmacology, and toxicology. In this study, we investigated the relationship between H2O2-induced hormetic response in S. cerevisiae and carbon sources in yeast growth medium. In general, our data indicate that (i hydrogen peroxide induces hormesis in a concentration-dependent manner; (ii the effect of hydrogen peroxide on yeast reproductive ability depends on the type of carbon substrate in growth medium; and (iii metabolic and growth rates as well as catalase activity play an important role in H2O2-induced hormetic response in yeast.

  17. Tracing carbon sources through aquatic and terrestrial food webs using amino acid stable isotope fingerprinting.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Larsen

    Full Text Available Tracing the origin of nutrients is a fundamental goal of food web research but methodological issues associated with current research techniques such as using stable isotope ratios of bulk tissue can lead to confounding results. We investigated whether naturally occurring δ(13C patterns among amino acids (δ(13CAA could distinguish between multiple aquatic and terrestrial primary production sources. We found that δ(13CAA patterns in contrast to bulk δ(13C values distinguished between carbon derived from algae, seagrass, terrestrial plants, bacteria and fungi. Furthermore, we showed for two aquatic producers that their δ(13CAA patterns were largely unaffected by different environmental conditions despite substantial shifts in bulk δ(13C values. The potential of assessing the major carbon sources at the base of the food web was demonstrated for freshwater, pelagic, and estuarine consumers; consumer δ(13C patterns of essential amino acids largely matched those of the dominant primary producers in each system. Since amino acids make up about half of organismal carbon, source diagnostic isotope fingerprints can be used as a new complementary approach to overcome some of the limitations of variable source bulk isotope values commonly encountered in estuarine areas and other complex environments with mixed aquatic and terrestrial inputs.

  18. Effect of source gas chemistry on tribological performance of diamond-like carbon films.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erdemir, A.; Eryilmaz, O. L.; Fenske, G. R.; Nilufer, I. B.

    1999-08-23

    In this study, we investigated the effects of various source gases (i. e., methane, ethane, ethylene, acetylene and methane + hydrogen) on friction and wear performance of diamond-like carbon (DLC) films. Specifically, we described the anomalous nature and fundamental friction and wear mechanisms of DLC films derived from gas discharge plasmas with very low to very high hydrogen content. The films were deposited on steel substrates by a plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition process at room temperature and the tribological tests were performed in dry nitrogen. The results of tribological tests revealed a close correlation between the friction and wear coefficients of the DLC films and the source gas chemistry. Specifically, films grown in source gases with higher hydrogen-to-carbon ratios had much lower friction coefficients and wear rates than the films derived from source gases with lower hydrogen-to-carbon ratios. The lowest friction coefficient (0.002) was achieved with a film derived from 25% methane--75% hydrogen while the films derived from acetylene had a coefficient of 0.15. Similar correlations were observed on wear rates. Specifically, the films derived from hydrogen rich plasmas had the least wear while the films derived from pure acetylene suffered the highest wear. We used a combination of scanning and transmission electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy to characterize the structural chemistry of the resultant DLC films.

  19. Primary Nutritional Content of Bio-Flocs Cultured with Different Organic Carbon Sources and Salinity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JULIE EKASARI

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Application of bio-flocs technology (BFT in aquaculture offers a solution to avoid environmental impact of high nutrient discharges and to reduce the use of artificial feed. In BFT, excess of nutrients in aquaculture systems are converted into microbial biomass, which can be consumed by the cultured animals as a food source. In this experiment, upconcentrated pond water obtained from the drum filter of a freshwater tilapia farm was used for bio-flocs reactors. Two carbon sources, sugar and glycerol, were used as the first variable, and two different levels of salinity, 0 and 30 ppt, were used as the second variable. Bio-flocs with glycerol as a carbon source had higher total n-6 PUFAs (19.1 + 2.1 and 22.3 + 8.6 mg/g DW at 0 and 30 ppt, respectively than that of glucose (4.0 + 0.1 and 12.6 + 2.5 mg/g DW at 0 and 30 ppt. However, there was no effect of carbon source or salinity on crude protein, lipid, and total n-3 PUFAs contents of the bio-flocs.

  20. Tracing carbon sources through aquatic and terrestrial food webs using amino acid stable isotope fingerprinting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Thomas; Ventura, Marc; Andersen, Nils; O'Brien, Diane M; Piatkowski, Uwe; McCarthy, Matthew D

    2013-01-01

    Tracing the origin of nutrients is a fundamental goal of food web research but methodological issues associated with current research techniques such as using stable isotope ratios of bulk tissue can lead to confounding results. We investigated whether naturally occurring δ(13)C patterns among amino acids (δ(13)CAA) could distinguish between multiple aquatic and terrestrial primary production sources. We found that δ(13)CAA patterns in contrast to bulk δ(13)C values distinguished between carbon derived from algae, seagrass, terrestrial plants, bacteria and fungi. Furthermore, we showed for two aquatic producers that their δ(13)CAA patterns were largely unaffected by different environmental conditions despite substantial shifts in bulk δ(13)C values. The potential of assessing the major carbon sources at the base of the food web was demonstrated for freshwater, pelagic, and estuarine consumers; consumer δ(13)C patterns of essential amino acids largely matched those of the dominant primary producers in each system. Since amino acids make up about half of organismal carbon, source diagnostic isotope fingerprints can be used as a new complementary approach to overcome some of the limitations of variable source bulk isotope values commonly encountered in estuarine areas and other complex environments with mixed aquatic and terrestrial inputs. PMID:24069196

  1. Fine and ultrafine particulate organic carbon in the Los Angeles basin: Trends in sources and composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirmohammadi, Farimah; Hasheminassab, Sina; Saffari, Arian; Schauer, James J; Delfino, Ralph J; Sioutas, Constantinos

    2016-01-15

    In this study, PM2.5 and PM0.18 (particles with dporganic carbons) and individual organic compounds. Concentrations of organic compounds were reported and compared with many previous studies in Central LA to quantify the impact of emissions control measurements that have been implemented for vehicular emissions over the past decades in this area. Moreover, a novel hybrid approach of molecular marker-based chemical mass balance (MM-CMB) analysis was conducted, in which a combination of source profiles that were previously obtained from a Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) model in Central LA, were combined with some traditional source profiles. The model estimated the relative contributions from mobile sources (including gasoline, diesel, and smoking vehicles), wood smoke, primary biogenic sources (including emissions from vegetative detritus, food cooking, and re-suspended soil dust), and anthropogenic secondary organic carbon (SOC). Mobile sources contributed to 0.65 ± 0.25 μg/m(3) and 0.32 ± 0.25 μg/m(3) of PM2.5 OC in Central LA and Anaheim, respectively. Primary biogenic and anthropogenic SOC sources were major contributors to OC concentrations in both size fractions and sites. Un-apportioned OC ("other OC") accounted for an average 8.0 and 26% of PM2.5 OC concentration in Central LA and Anaheim, respectively. A comparison with previous studies in Central LA revealed considerable reduction of EC and OC, along with tracers of mobile sources (e.g. PAHs, hopanes and steranes) as a result of implemented regulations on vehicular emissions. Given the significant reduction of the impacts of mobile sources in the past decade in the LA Basin, the impact of SOC and primary biogenic emissions have a larger relative impact and the new hybrid model allows the impact of these sources to be better quantified.

  2. Amorphous carbon film deposition on inner surface of tubes using atmospheric pressure pulsed filamentary plasma source

    CERN Document Server

    Pothiraja, Ramasamy; Awakowicz, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Uniform amorphous carbon film is deposited on the inner surface of quartz tube having the inner diameter of 6 mm and the outer diameter of 8 mm. A pulsed filamentary plasma source is used for the deposition. Long plasma filaments (~ 140 mm) as a positive discharge are generated inside the tube in argon with methane admixture. FTIR-ATR, XRD, SEM, LSM and XPS analyses give the conclusion that deposited film is amorphous composed of non-hydrogenated sp2 carbon and hydrogenated sp3 carbon. Plasma is characterized using optical emission spectroscopy, voltage-current measurement, microphotography and numerical simulation. On the basis of observed plasma parameters, the kinetics of the film deposition process is discussed.

  3. [Effects of carbon and nitrogen sources on 5-keto-gluconic acid production].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Zhilei; Wang, Hongcui; Wei, Yuqiao; Li, Yanyan; Zhong, Cheng; Jia, Shiru

    2014-01-01

    Gluconobacter oxydans is known to oxidize glucose to gluconic acid (GA), and subsequently, to 2-keto-gluconic acid (2KGA) and 5-keto-gluconic acid (5KGA), while 5KGA can be converted to L-(+)-tartaric acid. In order to increase the production of 5KGA, Gluconobacter oxydans HGI-1 that converts GA to 5KGA exclusively was chosen in this study, and effects of carbon sources (lactose, maltose, sucrose, amylum and glucose) and nitrogen sources (yeast extract, fish meal, corn steep liquor, soybean meal and cotton-seed meal) on 5KGA production were investigated. Results of experiment in 500 mL shake-flask show that the highest yield of 5KGA (98.20 g/L) was obtained using 100 g/L glucose as carbon source. 5KGA reached 100.20 g/L, 109.10 g/L, 99.83 g/L with yeast extract, fish meal and corn steep liquor as nitrogen source respectively, among which the optimal nitrogen source was fish meal. The yield of 5KGA by corn steep liquor is slightly lower than that by yeast extract. For the economic reason, corn steep liquor was selected as nitrogen source and scaled up to 5 L stirred-tank fermentor, and the final concentration of 5KGA reached 93.80 g/L, with its maximum volumetric productivity of 3.48 g/(L x h) and average volumetric productivity of 1.56 g/(L x h). The result obtained in this study showed that carbon and nitrogen sourses for large-scale production of 5KGA by Gluconobacter oxydans HGI-1 were glucose and corn steep liquor, respectively, and the available glucose almost completely (85.93%) into 5KGA.

  4. Direct growth and patterning of multilayer graphene onto a targeted substrate without an external carbon source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Dongseok; Kim, Won-Jun; Lim, Jung Ah; Song, Yong-Won

    2012-07-25

    Using only a simple tube furnace, we demonstrate the synthesis of patterned graphene directly on a designed substrate without the need for an external carbon source. Carbon atoms are absorbed onto Ni evaporator sources as impurities, and incorporated into catalyst layers during the deposition. Heat treatment conditions were optimized so that the atoms diffused out along the grain boundaries to form nanocrystals at the catalyst-substrate interfaces. Graphene patterns were obtained under patterned catalysts, which restricted graphene formation to within patterned areas. The resultant multilayer graphene was characterized by Raman spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy to verify the high crystallinity and two-dimensional nanomorphology. Finally, a metal-semiconductor diode with a catalyst-graphene contact structure were fabricated and characterized to assess the semiconducting properties of the graphene sheets with respect to the display of asymmetric current-voltage behavior. PMID:22709270

  5. Direct growth and patterning of multilayer graphene onto a targeted substrate without an external carbon source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Dongseok; Kim, Won-Jun; Lim, Jung Ah; Song, Yong-Won

    2012-07-25

    Using only a simple tube furnace, we demonstrate the synthesis of patterned graphene directly on a designed substrate without the need for an external carbon source. Carbon atoms are absorbed onto Ni evaporator sources as impurities, and incorporated into catalyst layers during the deposition. Heat treatment conditions were optimized so that the atoms diffused out along the grain boundaries to form nanocrystals at the catalyst-substrate interfaces. Graphene patterns were obtained under patterned catalysts, which restricted graphene formation to within patterned areas. The resultant multilayer graphene was characterized by Raman spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy to verify the high crystallinity and two-dimensional nanomorphology. Finally, a metal-semiconductor diode with a catalyst-graphene contact structure were fabricated and characterized to assess the semiconducting properties of the graphene sheets with respect to the display of asymmetric current-voltage behavior.

  6. Chemical ionization mass spectrometry using carbon nanotube field emission electron sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radauscher, Erich J; Keil, Adam D; Wells, Mitch; Amsden, Jason J; Piascik, Jeffrey R; Parker, Charles B; Stoner, Brian R; Glass, Jeffrey T

    2015-11-01

    A novel chemical ionization (CI) source has been developed based on a carbon nanotube (CNT) field emission electron source. The CNT-based electron source was evaluated and compared with a standard filament thermionic electron source in a commercial explosives trace detection desktop mass spectrometer. This work demonstrates the first reported use of a CNT-based ion source capable of collecting CI mass spectra. Both positive and negative modes were investigated. Spectra were collected for a standard mass spectrometer calibration compound, perfluorotributylamine (PFTBA), as well as trace explosives including trinitrotoluene (TNT), Research Department explosive (RDX), and pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN). The electrical characteristics, lifetime at operating pressure, and power requirements of the CNT-based electron source are reported. The CNT field emission electron sources demonstrated an average lifetime of 320 h when operated in constant emission mode under elevated CI pressures. The ability of the CNT field emission source to cycle on and off can provide enhanced lifetime and reduced power consumption without sacrificing performance and detection capabilities. Graphical Abstract ᅟ. PMID:26133527

  7. Design of an Intense Muon Source with a Carbon and Mercury Target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stratakis, Diktys [Brookhaven; Berg, J. Scott [Brookhaven; Neuffer, David [Fermilab; Ding, Xiaoping [UCLA

    2015-06-01

    In high-intensity sources, muons are produced by firing high energy protons onto a target to produce pions. The pions decay to muons which are captured and accelerated. In the present study, we examine the performance of the channel for two different target scenarios: one based on liquid mercury and another one based on a solid carbon target. We produce distributions with the two different target materials and discuss differences in particle spectrum near the sources. We then propagate the distributions through our capture system and compare the full system performance for the two target types.

  8. Deposition of diamond like carbon films by using a single ion gun with varying beam source

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Jin-qiu; Chen Zhu-ping

    2001-01-01

    Diamond like carbon films have been successfully deposited on the steel substrate, by using a single ion gun with varying beam source. The films may appear blue, yellow and transparent in color, which was found related to contaminants from the sample holder and could be avoided. The thickness of the films ranges from tens up to 200 nanometers, and the hardness is in the range 20 to 30 GPa. Raman analytical results reveal the films are in amorphous structure. The effects of different beam source on the films structure are further discussed.

  9. Distinct carbon sources indicate strong differentiation between tropical forest and farmland bird communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferger, Stefan W; Böhning-Gaese, Katrin; Wilcke, Wolfgang; Oelmann, Yvonne; Schleuning, Matthias

    2013-02-01

    The conversion of forest into farmland has resulted in mosaic landscapes in many parts of the tropics. From a conservation perspective, it is important to know whether tropical farmlands can buffer species loss caused by deforestation and how different functional groups of birds respond to land-use intensification. To test the degree of differentiation between farmland and forest bird communities across feeding guilds, we analyzed stable C and N isotopes in blood and claws of 101 bird species comprising four feeding guilds along a tropical forest-farmland gradient in Kenya. We additionally assessed the importance of farmland insectivores for pest control in C(4) crops by using allometric relationships, C stable isotope ratios and estimates of bird species abundance. Species composition differed strongly between forest and farmland bird communities. Across seasons, forest birds primarily relied on C(3) carbon sources, whereas many farmland birds also assimilated C(4) carbon. While C sources of frugivores and omnivores did not differ between forest and farmland communities, insectivores used more C(4) carbon in the farmland than in the forest. Granivores assimilated more C(4) carbon than all other guilds in the farmland. We estimated that insectivorous farmland birds consumed at least 1,000 kg pest invertebrates km(-2) year(-1). We conclude that tropical forest and farmland understory bird communities are strongly separated and that tropical farmlands cannot compensate forest loss for insectivorous forest understory birds. In tropical farmlands, insectivorous bird species provide a quantitatively important contribution to pest control.

  10. Cassava stillage and its anaerobic fermentation liquid as external carbon sources in biological nutrient removal*

    OpenAIRE

    Bu, Fan; Hu, Xiang; Xie, Li; Zhou, Qi

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of one kind of food industry effluent, cassava stillage and its anaerobic fermentation liquid, on biological nutrient removal (BNR) from municipal wastewater in anaerobic-anoxic-aerobic sequencing batch reactors (SBRs). Experiments were carried out with cassava stillage supernatant and its anaerobic fermentation liquid, and one pure compound (sodium acetate) served as an external carbon source. Cyclic studies indicated that the cassava by-p...

  11. The influence of carbon sources and morphology on nystatin production by Streptomyces noursei

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jonsbu, E.; Mcintyre, Mhairi; Nielsen, Jens

    2002-01-01

    Carbon source nutrition and morphology were examined during cell growth and production of nystatin by Streptomyces noursei ATCC 11455. This strain was able to utilise glucose, fructose, glycerol and soluble starch for cell growth, but failed to grow on media supplemented with galactose, xylose, m...... that this coincided with loss of activity inside the core of the pellets, probably due to diffusion limitation of oxygen or other nutrients....

  12. Can ultrasonically disintegrated activated sludge be exploited as an internal carbon source for denitrification?

    OpenAIRE

    Lambert, Nico; Smets, Ilse; Impe, Jan Van; Dewil, Raf

    2013-01-01

    The recovery of a solubilized sludge carbon source from waste activated sludge by using ultrasonic treatment or a combination of ultrasonic treatment and alkaline hydrolysis was investigated. First the release of sCOD and the associated immediate sludge reduction as a result of the ultrasonic disintegration was experimentally studied. Respirometric data were used to quantify the amount of rapidly biodegradable COD (SS) that was formed during the disintegration process. In the second phase of ...

  13. Organic carbon sources and transformations in mangrove sediments : a Rock-Eval pyrolysis approach

    OpenAIRE

    Marchand, Cyril; Lallier-Vergès, Elisabeth; Disnar, Jean-Robert; Kéravis, Didier

    2008-01-01

    International audience A Rock-Eval pyrolysis study was carried out on sedimentary cores and leaf and woody tissue of vascular plant species from the mangroves of French Guiana. These forests develop on moving mudbanks and have a lifetime limited to few decades before being eroded. Our main purpose was to complete the understanding of carbon cycling in this specific environment using a method that allows monitoring the depth evolution of sources and transformation of organic matter (OM) wit...

  14. Organic carbon in intertidal mangrove forests: sources and utilization by benthic invertebrates

    OpenAIRE

    BOUILLON, S; N. Koedam; Raman, A. V.; Rao, A.V.V.S.; F. Dehairs

    2001-01-01

    In contrast to the large number of studies on the trophic significance of mangrove primary production to the aquatic foodweb, there have been few attempts to provide an overview of the relative importance of different primary carbon sources to invertebrates in the intertidal mangrove habitats. Mangrove sediments from three different mangrove ecosystems (Coringa Wildlife Sanctuary in the Godavari Delta, Andhra Pradesh, India, and Galle and Pambala, Sri Lanka) were analysed for their organic ca...

  15. Optimization of probiotic lactobacillus casei ATCC 334 production using date powder as carbon source

    OpenAIRE

    Shahravy A.; Tabandeh F.; Bambai B.; Zamanizadeh H.R.; Mizani M.

    2012-01-01

    This study was conducted to optimize culture conditions for economic production of a probiotic bacterium, Lactobacillus casei ATCC 334, in which palm date powder was applied for the first time as a low-cost main carbon source. The effect of eleven factors on bacterial growth was investigated using the Taguchi experimental design, and three factors including palm date powder, tryptone and agitation rate were found to be the most significant parameters. The optimum conditions including da...

  16. Deep Sediment-Sourced Methane Contribution to Shallow Sediment Organic Carbon: Atwater Valley, Texas-Louisiana Shelf, Gulf of Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard B. Coffin

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Coastal methane hydrate deposits are globally abundant. There is a need to understand the deep sediment sourced methane energy contribution to shallow sediment carbon relative to terrestrial sources and phytoplankton. Shallow sediment and porewater samples were collected from Atwater Valley, Texas-Louisiana Shelf, Gulf of Mexico near a seafloor mound feature identified in geophysical surveys as an elevated bottom seismic reflection. Geochemical data revealed off-mound methane diffusion and active fluid advection on-mound. Gas composition (average methane/ethane ratio ~11,000 and isotope ratios of methane on the mound (average δ13CCH4(g = −71.2‰; D14CCH4(g = −961‰ indicate a deep sediment, microbial source. Depleted sediment organic carbon values on mound (δ13CSOC = −25.8‰; D14CSOC = −930‰ relative to off-mound (δ13CSOC = −22.5‰; D14CSOC = −629‰ suggest deep sourced ancient carbon is incorporated into shallow sediment organic matter. Porewater and sediment data indicate inorganic carbon fixed during anaerobic oxidation of methane is a dominant contributor to on-mound shallow sediment organic carbon cycling. A simple stable carbon isotope mass balance suggests carbon fixation of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC associated with anaerobic oxidation of hydrate-sourced CH4 contributes up to 85% of shallow sediment organic carbon.

  17. Cassava stillage and its anaerobic fermentation liquid as external carbon sources in biological nutrient removal*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bu, Fan; Hu, Xiang; Xie, Li; Zhou, Qi

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of one kind of food industry effluent, cassava stillage and its anaerobic fermentation liquid, on biological nutrient removal (BNR) from municipal wastewater in anaerobic-anoxic-aerobic sequencing batch reactors (SBRs). Experiments were carried out with cassava stillage supernatant and its anaerobic fermentation liquid, and one pure compound (sodium acetate) served as an external carbon source. Cyclic studies indicated that the cassava by-products not only affected the transformation of nitrogen, phosphorus, poly-β-hydroxyalkanoates (PHAs), and glycogen in the BNR process, but also resulted in higher removal efficiencies for phosphorus and nitrogen compared with sodium acetate. Furthermore, assays for phosphorus accumulating organisms (PAOs) and denitrifying phosphorus accumulating organisms (DPAOs) demonstrated that the proportion of DPAOs to PAOs reached 62.6% (Day 86) and 61.8% (Day 65) when using cassava stillage and its anaerobic fermentation liquid, respectively, as the external carbon source. In addition, the nitrate utilization rates (NURs) of the cassava by-products were in the range of 5.49–5.99 g N/(kg MLVSS∙h) (MLVSS is mixed liquor volatile suspended solids) and 6.63–6.81 g N/(kg MLVSS∙h), respectively. The improvement in BNR performance and the reduction in the amount of cassava stillage to be treated in-situ make cassava stillage and its anaerobic fermentation liquid attractive alternatives to sodium acetate as external carbon sources for BNR processes. PMID:25845364

  18. [Effects of carbon sources, temperature and electron acceptors on biological phosphorus removal].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yun; Xu, Song; Dong, Tao; Wang, Bin-Fan; Wang, Xian-Yao; Peng, Dang-Cong

    2015-02-01

    Effects of carbon sources, temperature and electron acceptors on phosphorus uptake and release were investigated in a pilot-scale oxidation ditch. Phosphorus uptake and release rates were measured with different carbon sources (domestic sewage, sodium acetate, glucose) at 25 degrees C. The results showed that the minimum phosphorus uptake and release rates of glucose were 5.12 mg x (g x h)(-1) and 6.43 mg x (g x h)(-1), respectively, and those of domestic sewage are similar to those of sodium acetate. Phosphorus uptake and release rates increased with the increase of temperature (12, 16, 20 and 25 degrees C) using sodium acetate as carbon sources. Anoxic phosphorus uptake rate decreased with added COD. Electron acceptors (oxygen, nitrate, nitrite) had significant effects on phosphorus uptake rate and their order was in accordance with oxygen > nitrate > nitrite. The mass ratio of anoxic P uptake and N consumption (P(uptake)/N (consumption)) of nitrate and nitrite were 0.96 and 0.65, respectively. PMID:26031087

  19. [Nitrate removal from recirculating aquaculture system using polyhydroxybutyrate-co-hydroxyvalerate as carbon source ].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lanhe; Liu, Lili; Qiu, Tianlei; Gao, Min; Han, Meilin; Yuan, Ding; Wang, Xuming

    2014-09-01

    [ OBJECTIVE] Polyhydroxybutyrate-co-hydroxyvalerate (PHBV) was used as solid carbon source and biofilm carrier to remove nitrate from recirculating aquaculture system (RAS). Dynamics of microbial community structure in biofilm coating on carbon source packed into denitrification reactor were investigated. [METHODS] Polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) was used to analyze the microbial community in biofilm from denitrifiation reactor. Bacteria degrading PHBV were isolated from the reactor using pure culture method. [RESULTS] Nitrate decreased remarkably in the RAS connected with dentrification reactor. In contrast, Nitrate increased continuously in the conventional RAS without dentrification reactor. According to the phylogenetic analysis, the microbes in the biofilm samples from denitrification reactor were divided into Proteobacteria ( p-proteobacteria, γ-proteobacteria and δ- proteobacteria) , Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes. The major advantageous populations were Acidovorax and Bacillus in the 40-day reactor. The advantageous populations in the 150-day reactor were in order of Clostridium, Desulfitobacterium, Dechloromonas, Pseudoxanthomonas and Flavobacterium. Pure cultures of bacteria degrading PHBV isolated from denitrification reactor were classified into Acidovorax, Methylibium, Pseudoxanthomonas and Dechloromonas. [CONCLUSION] Nitrate could be removed effectively from RAS using PHBV as carbon source. Advantageous bacteria and their dynamic changes were ascertained in biofilm from denitrification reactor packed with PHBV. PMID:25522594

  20. Carbon and Nitrogen Sources Influence Tricalcium Phosphate Solubilization and Extracellular Phosphatase Activity by Talaromyces flavus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanoni Rubio, P J; Godoy, M S; Della Mónica, I F; Pettinari, M J; Godeas, A M; Scervino, J M

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this work was to study phosphate (P) solubilization (and the processes involved in this event) by Talaromyces flavus (BAFC 3125) as a function of carbon and/or nitrogen sources. P solubilization was evaluated in NBRIP media supplemented with different carbon (glucose, sorbitol, sucrose, and fructose) and nitrogen (L-asparagine, urea, ammonium sulfate (AS), and ammonium nitrate (AN) combinations. The highest P solubilization was related to the highest organic acid production (especially gluconic acid) and pH drop for those treatments where glucose was present. Also P solubilization was higher when an inorganic nitrogen source was supplemented to the media when compared to an organic one. Although not being present an organic P source, phosphatase activity was observed. This shows that P mineralization and P solubilization can occur simultaneously, and that P mineralization is not induced by the enzyme substrate. The combination that showed highest P solubilization was for AN-glucose. The highest acid phosphatase activity was for AS-fructose, while for alkaline phosphatase were for AS-fructose and AN-fructose. Acid phosphatase activity was higher than alkaline. P solubilization and phosphatase activity (acid and alkaline) were influenced by the different carbon-nitrogen combinations. A better understanding of phosphate-solubilizing fungi could bring a better use of soil P.

  1. The activated sludge metabolic characteristics changing sole carbon source from readily biodegradable acetate to toxic phenol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Changyong; Zhou, Yuexi; Song, Jiamei

    2016-01-01

    A sequencing batch reactor was used to investigate the effect of carbon sources on the metabolism of activated sludge. Acetate and phenol, with the chemical oxygen demand (COD) of 330-350 mg L(-1), was used as the carbon source in Periods I and II, respectively. Acetate decreased in the initial 120 min with the intracellular storage materials (XSTO), extracellular polymeric substances (EPS), and the soluble microbial products (SMP) accumulating to 131.0 mg L(-1), 347.5 mg L(-1), and 35.5 mg L(-1), respectively. Then, XSTO and EPS decreased to 124.5 mg L(-1) and 340.0 mg L(-1), respectively, in the following 120 min. When acetate was replaced by phenol, it could not be used at the beginning due to its toxicity. The XSTO decreased from 142 mg L(-1) to 54.6 mg L(-1) during the aeration period. The EPS had a significant increase, with the highest value of 618.1 mg L(-1), which then decreased to 245.6 mg L(-1) at 240 min. The phenol was gradually degraded with the acclimation and it can be fully degraded 18 d later. Meanwhile, the usage ratio of the internal carbon source decreased. The effluent SMP in Period II was 1.7 times that in Period I.

  2. The activated sludge metabolic characteristics changing sole carbon source from readily biodegradable acetate to toxic phenol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Changyong; Zhou, Yuexi; Song, Jiamei

    2016-01-01

    A sequencing batch reactor was used to investigate the effect of carbon sources on the metabolism of activated sludge. Acetate and phenol, with the chemical oxygen demand (COD) of 330-350 mg L(-1), was used as the carbon source in Periods I and II, respectively. Acetate decreased in the initial 120 min with the intracellular storage materials (XSTO), extracellular polymeric substances (EPS), and the soluble microbial products (SMP) accumulating to 131.0 mg L(-1), 347.5 mg L(-1), and 35.5 mg L(-1), respectively. Then, XSTO and EPS decreased to 124.5 mg L(-1) and 340.0 mg L(-1), respectively, in the following 120 min. When acetate was replaced by phenol, it could not be used at the beginning due to its toxicity. The XSTO decreased from 142 mg L(-1) to 54.6 mg L(-1) during the aeration period. The EPS had a significant increase, with the highest value of 618.1 mg L(-1), which then decreased to 245.6 mg L(-1) at 240 min. The phenol was gradually degraded with the acclimation and it can be fully degraded 18 d later. Meanwhile, the usage ratio of the internal carbon source decreased. The effluent SMP in Period II was 1.7 times that in Period I. PMID:27191552

  3. [Constitutive expression of human angiostatin in Pichia pastoris using glycerol as only carbon source].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Fa-Zhi; Fu, Ce-Yi; Zhang, Tian-Yuan; Luo, Jin-Xian; Zhang, Ai-Lian

    2007-09-01

    Carbon source plays an important role in the constitutive expression of foreign proteins in Pichia pastoris. In present study, glucose , glycerol , methanol and oil acid, was used respectively as the only carbon source to constitutively express hAS in Pichia pastoris GS115 (pGAP9K-AS)in shaking flask. The result shows that oleic acid is the best (163 mg/L) compared with glycerol (83mg/L), glucose (76 mg/L)and methanol (57 mg/L). Since oleic acid is insoluble in water, glycerol was used as the carbon source in the high-density cell culture of GS115 (pGAP9K-AS) in a 30 liter bioreactor and 169 mg/L of angiostatin was obtained after 48h of culture. The expressed angiostatin is immunologically active as shown by Western blotting. The recombinant hAS inhibits bFGF induced CAM angiogenesis and suppresses the growth of B16 melanoma in C57BL/6J mice. The tumor inhibition rate is 90% after 12 days of treatment. Statistics analysis revealed that the tumor volume difference of mice between the hAS group and PBS group is prominent (P < 0.01). PMID:18051873

  4. Thermal hydrolysis of sludge and the use of hydrolysate as carbon source for denitrification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barlindhaug, J.

    1995-10-01

    As a consequence of the North Sea- and the Baltic Sea Treaties as well as the Wastewater Directive of the EU, several large wastewater treatment plants discharging to sensitive receiving waters have to include phosphorus as well as nitrogen removal. This thesis evaluates the so called NTH-process for nutrient removal. In this process pre-precipitation is used in front of a biological nitrogen removal step that is based on a combination of pre- and post-denitrification in moving bed biofilm reactors. The biological step is followed by a final separation step, possibly after coagulant addition. Carbon source for the post denitrification step is made available by hydrolysis of the sludge produced. The idea is that the particulate organic matter, which in a traditional pre-denitrification step would have to be enzymatically hydrolyzed, can be more efficiently hydrolyzed in a concentrated sidestream and used in a post-denitrification step. In the thesis hydrolyzed sludge is used as a carbon source for denitrification. The objective is to investigate the influence of varying hydrolysis conditions on the composition and amount of the thermal hydrolysate produced, as well as the quality of the hydrolysate as a carbon source for denitrification. 201 refs., 78 refs., 53 tabs.

  5. Stable carbon isotope ratios of intact GDGTs indicate heterogeneous sources to marine sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Ann; Hurley, Sarah J.; Walter, Sunita R. Shah; Kusch, Stephanie; Lichtin, Samantha; Zhang, Yi Ge

    2016-05-01

    Thaumarchaeota, the major sources of marine glycerol dibiphytanyl glycerol tetraether lipids (GDGTs), are believed to fix the majority of their carbon directly from dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC). The δ13C values of GDGTs (δ13CGDGT) may be powerful tools for reconstructing variations in the ocean carbon cycle, including paleoproductivity and water mass circulation, if they can be related to values of δ13CDIC. To date, isotope measurements primarily are made on the C40 biphytane skeletons of GDGTs, rather than on complete tetraether structures. This approach erases information revealed by the isotopic heterogeneity of GDGTs within a sample and may impart an isotopic fractionation associated with the ether cleavage. To circumvent these issues, we present δ13C values for GDGTs from twelve recent sediments representing ten continental margin locations. Samples are purified by orthogonal dimensions of HPLC, followed by measurement of δ13C values by Spooling Wire Microcombustion (SWiM)-isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) with 1σ precision and accuracy of ±0.25‰. Using this approach, we confirm that GDGTs, generally around -19‰, are isotopically "heavy" compared to other marine lipids. However, measured δ13CGDGT values are inconsistent with predicted values based on the 13C content of DIC in the overlying water column and the previously-published biosynthetic isotope fractionation for a pure culture of an autotrophic marine thaumarchaeon. In some sediments, the isotopic composition of individual GDGTs differs, indicating multiple source inputs. The data appear to confirm that crenarchaeol primarily is a biomarker for Thaumarchaeota, but its δ13C values still cannot be explained solely by autotrophic carbon fixation. Overall the complexity of the results suggests that both organic carbon assimilation (ca. 25% of total carbon) and multiple source(s) of exogenous GDGTs (contributing generally <30% of input to sediments) are necessary to explain the observed

  6. Production of extracellular ferulic acid esterases by Lactobacillus strains using natural and synthetic carbon sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominik Szwajgier

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Background. Ferulic acid esterases (FAE, EC 3.1.1.73, also known as feruloyl esterases, cinnamic acid esterases or cinnamoyl esterases, belong to a common group of hydrolases distributed in the plant kingdom. Especially the fungal enzymes were very well characterised in the past whereas the enzyme was rarely found in the lactic acid bacteria (LAB strains. It is well known that strong antioxidants free phenolic acids can be released from the dietary fiber by the action of intestinal microflora composed among others also of Lactobacillus strains. The aim of this study was to examine four Lactobacillus strains (L. acidophilus K1, L. rhamnosus E/N, PEN, OXYfor the ability to produce extracellular FAE on different synthetic and natural carbon sources. Material and methods. The LAB strains were grown in the minimal growth media using German wheat bran, rye bran, brewers’ spent grain, isolated larchwood arabinogalactan, apple pectin, corn pectin, methyl ferulate, methyl p-coumarate, methyl syringate or methyl vanillate as the sole carbon source. FAE activity was determined using the post-cultivation supernatants, methyl ferulate and HPLC with UV detection. Results. The highest FAE activity was obtained with L. acidophilus K1 and methyl ferulate (max. 23.34 ±0.05 activity units and methyl p-coumarate (max. 14.96 ±0.47 activity units as carbon sources. L. rhamnosus E/N, OXY and PEN exhibited the limited ability to produce FAE with cinnamic acids methyl esters. Methyl syringate and methyl vanillate (MS and MV were insufficient carbon sources for FAE production. Brewers’ spent grain was the most suitable substrate for FAE production by L. acidophilus K1 (max. 2.64 ±0.06 activity units and L. rhamnosus E/N, OXY and PEN. FAE was also successfully induced by natural substrates rye bran, corn pectin (L. acidophilus K1, German wheat bran and larchwood arabinogalactan (E/N, PEN or German wheat bran and corn pectin (OXY. Conclusions. This study proved the

  7. Comprehensive analysis of the metabolome of Pseudomonas putida S12 grown on different carbon sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Werf, Mariët J; Overkamp, Karin M; Muilwijk, Bas; Koek, Maud M; van der Werff-van der Vat, Bianca J C; Jellema, Renger H; Coulier, Leon; Hankemeier, Thomas

    2008-04-01

    Metabolomics is an emerging, powerful, functional genomics technology that involves the comparative non-targeted analysis of the complete set of metabolites in an organism. We have set-up a robust quantitative metabolomics platform that allows the analysis of 'snapshot' metabolomes. In this study, we have applied this platform for the comprehensive analysis of the metabolite composition of Pseudomonas putida S12 grown on four different carbon sources, i.e. fructose, glucose, gluconate and succinate. This paper focuses on the microbial aspects of analyzing comprehensive metabolomes, and demonstrates that metabolomes can be analyzed reliably. The technical (i.e. sample work-up and analytical) reproducibility was on average 10%, while the biological reproducibility was approximately 40%. Moreover, the energy charge values of the microbial samples generated were determined, and indicated that no biotic or abiotic changes had occurred during sample work-up and analysis. In general, the metabolites present and their concentrations were very similar after growth on the different carbon sources. However, specific metabolites showed large differences in concentration, especially the intermediates involved in the degradation of the carbon sources studied. Principal component discriminant analysis was applied to identify metabolites that are specific for, i.e. not necessarily the metabolites that show those largest differences in concentration, cells grown on either of these four carbon sources. For selected enzymatic reactions, i.e. the glucose-6-phosphate isomerase, triosephosphate isomerase and phosphoglyceromutase reactions, the apparent equilibrium constants (K(app)) were calculated. In several instances a carbon source-dependent deviation between the apparent equilibrium constant (K(app)) and the thermodynamic equilibrium constant (K(eq)) was observed, hinting towards a potential point of metabolic regulation or towards bottlenecks in biosynthesis routes. For glucose-6

  8. Badlands and the Carbon cycle: a significant source of petrogenic organic carbon in rivers and marine environments?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copard, Yoann; Eyrolle-Boyer, Frederique; Radakovitch, Olivier; Poirel, Alain; Raimbault, Patrick; Lebouteiller, Caroline; Gairoard, Stéphanie; Di-Giovanni, Christian

    2016-04-01

    A key issue in the study of carbon biogeochemical cycle is to well constrain each carbon origin in term of fluxes between all C-reservoirs. From continental surfaces to oceans, rivers convey particulate organic carbon originate from the biomass (biospheric OC) and /or from the sedimentary rocks (petrogenic OC). Existence and importance of this petrogenic OC export to oceans was debated for several decades (see Copard et al., 2007 and ref.), but it is now assumed that 20% of the global carbon export to ocean has a geological origin (Galy et al., 2015). The main current challenge is to constrain the major contributors to this petrogenic OC flux. Amongst the expected sedimentary sources of petrogenic OC in rivers, sedimentary rocks forming badlands can be rightly considered as some viable candidates. Indeed these rocks show a strong erosion rate, may exceed 50 kt km-2 y-1 and in addition, shales, marls and argillaceous rocks, frequently forming badlands (see Nadal-Romero et al., 2011 for the Mediterranean area), contain a significant amount of petrogenic OC (frequently over 0.50 wt. %, Ronov and Yaroshevsky 1976). Our work illustrates the contribution of badlands, mainly distributed within the Durance catchment (a main tributary of the Rhône river), in the petrogenic OC export to the Mediterranean Sea. The approach is based on (i) the use of previous and new data on radiogenic carbon, (ii) bulk organic geochemistry (Rock-Eval pyrolysis), (iii) optical quantification of particulate OM (palynofacies), performed on suspended sediments from the Durance, the Rhône rivers and from small rivers draining the badlands. A mean erosion rate of badlands, previously calculated for instrumented catchments (SOERE Draix-Bléone, Graz et al., 2012) was also applied to the badlands disseminated within the Durance catchment. These different methodologies converge to a petrogenic contribution of the OC export to the Mediterranean Sea close to 30 %. Badlands from the Durance catchment

  9. Carbon sources supporting benthic mineralization in mangrove and adjacent seagrass sediments (Gazi Bay, Kenya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Bouillon

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The origin of carbon substrates used by in situ sedimentary bacterial communities was investigated in an intertidal mangrove ecosystem and in adjacent seagrass beds in Gazi bay (Kenya by δ13C analysis of bacteria-specific PLFA (phospholipid fatty acids and bulk organic carbon. Export of mangrove-derived organic matter to the adjacent seagrass-covered bay was evident from sedimentary total organic carbon (TOC and δ13CTOC data. PLFA δ13C data indicate that the substrate used by bacterial communities varied strongly and that exported mangrove carbon was a significant source for bacteria in the adjacent seagrass beds. Within the intertidal mangrove forest, bacterial PLFA at the surface layer (0-1cm typically showed more enriched δ13C values than deeper (up to 10cm sediment layers, suggesting a contribution from microphytobenthos and/or inwelled seagrass material. Under the simplifying assumption that seagrasses and mangroves are the dominant potential end-members, the estimated contribution of mangrove-derived carbon to benthic mineralization in the seagrass beds (16-74% corresponds fairly well to the estimated contribution of mangrove C to the sedimentary organic matter pool (21-71% across different seagrass sites. Based on the results of this study and a compilation of literature data, we suggest that trapping of allochtonous C is a common feature in seagrass beds and often represents a significant source of C for sediment bacteria - both in cases where seagrass C dominates the sediment TOC pool and in cases where external inputs are significant. Hence, it is likely that data on community respiration rates systematically overestimate the role of in situ mineralization as a fate of seagrass production.

  10. Carbon Sources and Sinks in Freshwater and Estuarine Environments of the Arctic Coastal Plain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lougheed, V.; Tarin, G.; Tweedie, C. E.

    2015-12-01

    The source, fate and transport of terrestrially derived carbon as it moves through multiple landscape components (i.e. groundwater, rivers, ponds, wetlands, lakes, lagoons) on a path from land to sea in permafrost-dominated watersheds is poorly understood. Critical to our understanding of Arctic carbon budgets are small, but numerically abundant watersheds that dominate the landscape of the Alaskan Arctic Coastal Plain (ACP), which appears to be changing rapidly in response to climate warming and other environmental changes. This study was designed to understand the contribution of freshwater ecosystems in the Arctic to regional carbon budgets. pCO2 was logged continually in ponds, lakes and streams sites near Barrow, AK and recorded across transects in Elson Lagoon, a coastal lagoon on the Beaufort coast. Average pCO2 of the pond over 2 weeks in August (1196 μatm) was double that of lakes and streams, and four times higher than Elson Lagoon (216 μatm); thus, the Lagoon was acting as a small sink while the pond was a substantial source of CO2 to the atmosphere. The uptake of CO2 in Elson Lagoon, combined with an oversaturation of O2, may be due to enhanced primary productivity caused by freshwater nutrient inputs. Conversely, pCO2, chlorophyll-a and DOC increased substantially in the pond after a large rain event, suggesting that run-off introduced large amounts of terrestrially-derived carbon from groundwater. Further studies are required to elucidate the fate and transport of carbon in the numerically abundant smaller watersheds of the Arctic.

  11. Importance of seagrass as a carbon source for heterotrophic bacteria in a subtropical estuary (Florida Bay)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Clayton J.; Jaffé, Rudolf; Anderson, William T.; Jochem, Frank J.

    2009-11-01

    A stable carbon isotope approach was taken to identify potential organic matter sources incorporated into biomass by the heterotrophic bacterial community of Florida Bay, a subtropical estuary with a recent history of seagrass loss and phytoplankton blooms. To gain a more complete understanding of bacterial carbon cycling in seagrass estuaries, this study focused on the importance of seagrass-derived organic matter to pelagic, seagrass epiphytic, and sediment surface bacteria. Particulate organic matter (POM), seagrass epiphytic, seagrass ( Thalassia testudinum) leaf, and sediment surface samples were collected from four Florida Bay locations with historically different organic matter inputs, macrophyte densities, and primary productivities. Bulk (observed and those reported previously) and compound-specific bacterial fatty acid δ 13C values were used to determine important carbon sources to the estuary and benthic and pelagic heterotrophic bacteria. The δ 13C values of T. testudinum green leaves with epiphytes removed ranged from -9.9 to -6.9‰. Thalassia testudinum δ 13C values were significant more enriched in 13C than POM, epiphytic, and sediment samples, which ranged from -16.4 to -13.5, -16.2 to -9.6, and -16.7 to -11.0‰, respectively. Bacterial fatty acid δ 13C values (measured for br14:0, 15:0, i15:0, a15:0, br17:0, and 17:0) ranged from -25.5 to -8.2‰. Assuming a -3‰ carbon source fractionation from fatty acid to whole bacteria, pelagic, epiphytic, and sediment bacterial δ 13C values were generally more depleted in 13C than T. testudinum δ 13C values, more enriched in 13C than reported δ 13C values for mangroves, and similar to reported δ 13C values for algae. IsoSource mixing model results indicated that organic matter derived from T. testudinum was incorporated by both benthic and pelagic bacterial communities, where 13-67% of bacterial δ 13C values could arise from consumption of seagrass-derived organic matter. The IsoSource model

  12. Development of C{sup 6+} laser ion source and RFQ linac for carbon ion radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sako, T., E-mail: takayuki1.sako@toshiba.co.jp; Yamaguchi, A.; Sato, K. [Toshiba Corporation, Yokohama 235-8522 (Japan); Goto, A.; Iwai, T.; Nayuki, T.; Nemoto, K.; Kayama, T. [Cancer Research Center, Yamagata University Faculty of Medicine, Yamagata 990-9585 (Japan); Takeuchi, T. [Accelerator Engineering Corporation, Chiba 263-0043 (Japan)

    2016-02-15

    A prototype C{sup 6+} injector using a laser ion source has been developed for a compact synchrotron dedicated to carbon ion radiotherapy. The injector consists of a laser ion source and a 4-vane radio-frequency quadrupole (RFQ) linac. Ion beams are extracted from plasma and directly injected into the RFQ. A solenoid guides the low-energy beams into the RFQ. The RFQ is designed to accelerate high-intensity pulsed beams. A structure of monolithic vanes and cavities is adopted to reduce its power consumption. In beam acceleration tests, a solenoidal magnetic field set between the laser ion source and the RFQ helped increase both the peak currents before and after the RFQ by a factor of 4.

  13. Development of C6+ laser ion source and RFQ linac for carbon ion radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sako, T.; Yamaguchi, A.; Sato, K.; Goto, A.; Iwai, T.; Nayuki, T.; Nemoto, K.; Kayama, T.; Takeuchi, T.

    2016-02-01

    A prototype C6+ injector using a laser ion source has been developed for a compact synchrotron dedicated to carbon ion radiotherapy. The injector consists of a laser ion source and a 4-vane radio-frequency quadrupole (RFQ) linac. Ion beams are extracted from plasma and directly injected into the RFQ. A solenoid guides the low-energy beams into the RFQ. The RFQ is designed to accelerate high-intensity pulsed beams. A structure of monolithic vanes and cavities is adopted to reduce its power consumption. In beam acceleration tests, a solenoidal magnetic field set between the laser ion source and the RFQ helped increase both the peak currents before and after the RFQ by a factor of 4.

  14. Development of C⁶⁺ laser ion source and RFQ linac for carbon ion radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sako, T; Yamaguchi, A; Sato, K; Goto, A; Iwai, T; Nayuki, T; Nemoto, K; Kayama, T; Takeuchi, T

    2016-02-01

    A prototype C(6+) injector using a laser ion source has been developed for a compact synchrotron dedicated to carbon ion radiotherapy. The injector consists of a laser ion source and a 4-vane radio-frequency quadrupole (RFQ) linac. Ion beams are extracted from plasma and directly injected into the RFQ. A solenoid guides the low-energy beams into the RFQ. The RFQ is designed to accelerate high-intensity pulsed beams. A structure of monolithic vanes and cavities is adopted to reduce its power consumption. In beam acceleration tests, a solenoidal magnetic field set between the laser ion source and the RFQ helped increase both the peak currents before and after the RFQ by a factor of 4. PMID:26932119

  15. A fine-focusing x-ray source using carbon-nanofiber field emitter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimoto, W.; Sugita, S.; Sakai, Y.; Goto, H.; Watanabe, Y.; Ohga, Y.; Kita, S.; Ohara, T.

    2010-08-01

    A fine-focusing x-ray source has been constructed employing a field electron emitter prepared by growing carbon-nanofibers (CNFs) on a metal tip. The x-ray source is composed of a CNF field electron emitter, an electrostatic lens, two magnetic lenses, and a W-target for generating x-rays by electron impact. The CNFs provided field electrons with a current density of J ˜5×109 A/m2, which was evaluated with the aid of Fowler-Nordheim theory. The electron beam extracted from the CNF emitter was accelerated to the energies of E =10-25 keV, and then focused by the lenses. By recording the x-ray images of test charts, the optimum resolution of the x-ray source was estimated to be approximately Dx=0.5 μm.

  16. Fossil and Nonfossil Sources of Organic and Elemental Carbon Aerosols in the Outflow from Northeast China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan-Lin; Kawamura, Kimitaka; Agrios, Konstantinos; Lee, Meehye; Salazar, Gary; Szidat, Sönke

    2016-06-21

    Source quantification of carbonaceous aerosols in the Chinese outflow regions still remains uncertain despite their high mass concentrations. Here, we unambiguously quantified fossil and nonfossil contributions to elemental carbon (EC) and organic carbon (OC) of total suspended particles (TSP) from a regional receptor site in the outflow of Northeast China using radiocarbon measurement. OC and EC concentrations were lower in summer, representing mainly marine air, than in other seasons, when air masses mostly traveled over continental regions in Mongolia and northeast China. The annual-mean contribution from fossil-fuel combustion to EC was 76 ± 11% (0.1-1.3 μg m(-3)). The remaining 24 ± 11% (0.03-0.42 μg m(-3)) was attributed to biomass burning, with slightly higher contribution in the cold period (∼31%) compared to the warm period (∼21%) because of enhanced emissions from regional biomass combustion sources in China. OC was generally dominated by nonfossil sources, with an annual average of 66 ± 11% (0.5-2.8 μg m(-3)), approximately half of which was apportioned to primary biomass-burning sources (34 ± 6%). In winter, OC almost equally originated from primary OC (POC) emissions and secondary OC (SOC) formation from fossil fuel and biomass-burning sources. In contrast, summertime OC was dominated by primary biogenic emissions as well as secondary production from biogenic and biomass-burning sources, but fossil-derived SOC was the smallest contributor. Distinction of POC and SOC was performed using primary POC-to-EC emission ratios separated for fossil and nonfossil emissions. PMID:27203471

  17. Preparation and Physicochemical Evaluation of Controlled-release Carbon Source Tablet for Groundwater in situ Denitrification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Y.; Kang, J. H.; Yeum, Y.; Han, K. J.; Kim, D. W.; Park, C. W.

    2015-12-01

    Nitric nitrogen could be the one of typical pollution source such asNO3-through domestic sewage, livestock and agricultural wastewater. Resident microflorain aquifer has known to remove the nitric nitrogen spontaneously following the denitration process with the carbon source (CS) as reactant. However, it could be reacted very slowly with the rack of CS and there have been some studies for controlled addition of CS (Ref #1-3). The aim of this study was to prepare the controlled-release carbon source (CR-CS) tablet and to evaluate in vitro release profile for groundwater in situ denitrification. CR-CS tablet could be manufactured by direct compression method using hydraulic laboratory press (Caver® 3850) with 8 mm rounded concave punch/ die.Seven kinds of CR-CS tablet were prepared to determine the nature of the additives and their ratio such as sodium silicate, dicalcium phosphate, bentonite and sand#8.For each formulation, the LOD% and flowability of pre-mixed powders and the hardness of compressed tablets were analyzed. In vitro release study was performed to confirm the dissolution profiles following the USP Apparatus 2 method with Distilled water of 900mL, 20 °C. As a result, for each lubricated powders, they were compared in terms of ability to give an acceptable dry pre-mixed powder for tableting process. The hardness of the compressed tablets is acceptable whatever the formulations tested. After in vitro release study, it could confirm that the different formulations of CR-CS tablet have a various release rate patterns, which could release 100% at 3 hrs, 6 hrs and 12 hrs. The in vitro dissolution profiles were in good correlation of Higuchi release kinetic model. In conclusion, this study could be used as a background for development and evaluation of the controlled-release carbon source (CR-CS) tablet for the purification of groundwater following the in situ denitrification.

  18. Molasses as an efficient low-cost carbon source for biological Cr(VI) removal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michailides, Michail K. [Department of Environmental and Natural Resources Management, University of Patras, 2 G. Seferi Str., GR-30100 Agrinio (Greece); Tekerlekopoulou, Athanasia G., E-mail: atekerle@upatras.gr [Department of Environmental and Natural Resources Management, University of Patras, 2 G. Seferi Str., GR-30100 Agrinio (Greece); Akratos, Christos S.; Coles, Sandra [Department of Environmental and Natural Resources Management, University of Patras, 2 G. Seferi Str., GR-30100 Agrinio (Greece); Pavlou, Stavros [Institute of Chemical Engineering Sciences (FORTH/ICE-HT), Stadiou Str., Platani, P.O. Box 1414, GR-26504 Patras (Greece); Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Patras, GR-26504 Patras (Greece); Vayenas, Dimitrios V. [Department of Environmental and Natural Resources Management, University of Patras, 2 G. Seferi Str., GR-30100 Agrinio (Greece); Institute of Chemical Engineering Sciences (FORTH/ICE-HT), Stadiou Str., Platani, P.O. Box 1414, GR-26504 Patras (Greece)

    2015-01-08

    Highlights: • Suspended and attached growth reactors were examined for Cr(VI) bio-reduction. • Molasses was proved an efficient and very low cost carbon source. • Molasses was more efficient than sugar in enhancing Cr(VI) reduction. • SBR with recirculation was the most proper operating mode. - Abstract: In the present study, indigenous microorganisms from industrial sludge were used to reduce the activity of Cr(VI). Molasses, a by-product of sugar processing, was selected as the carbon source (instead of sugar used in a previous work) as it is a low-cost energy source for bioprocesses. Initially, experiments were carried out in suspended growth batch reactors for Cr(VI) concentrations of 1.5–110 mg/L. The time required for complete Cr(VI) reduction increased with initial Cr(VI) concentration. Initial molasses concentration was also found to influence the Cr(VI) reduction rate. The optimal concentration for all initial Cr(VI) concentrations tested was 0.8 gC/L. Experiments were also carried out in packed-bed reactors. Three different operating modes were used to investigate the optimal performance and efficiency of the filter, i.e. batch, continuous and SBR with recirculation. The latter mode with a recirculation rate of 0.5 L/min lead to significantly high Cr(VI) reduction rates (up to 135 g/m{sup 2} d). The results of this work were compared with those of a similar work using sugar as the carbon source and indicate that molasses could prove a feasible technological solution to a serious environmental problem.

  19. Molasses as an efficient low-cost carbon source for biological Cr(VI) removal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Suspended and attached growth reactors were examined for Cr(VI) bio-reduction. • Molasses was proved an efficient and very low cost carbon source. • Molasses was more efficient than sugar in enhancing Cr(VI) reduction. • SBR with recirculation was the most proper operating mode. - Abstract: In the present study, indigenous microorganisms from industrial sludge were used to reduce the activity of Cr(VI). Molasses, a by-product of sugar processing, was selected as the carbon source (instead of sugar used in a previous work) as it is a low-cost energy source for bioprocesses. Initially, experiments were carried out in suspended growth batch reactors for Cr(VI) concentrations of 1.5–110 mg/L. The time required for complete Cr(VI) reduction increased with initial Cr(VI) concentration. Initial molasses concentration was also found to influence the Cr(VI) reduction rate. The optimal concentration for all initial Cr(VI) concentrations tested was 0.8 gC/L. Experiments were also carried out in packed-bed reactors. Three different operating modes were used to investigate the optimal performance and efficiency of the filter, i.e. batch, continuous and SBR with recirculation. The latter mode with a recirculation rate of 0.5 L/min lead to significantly high Cr(VI) reduction rates (up to 135 g/m2 d). The results of this work were compared with those of a similar work using sugar as the carbon source and indicate that molasses could prove a feasible technological solution to a serious environmental problem

  20. Quantifying Contemporary Terrestrial Carbon Sources and Sinks in the Conterminous United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, S.; Loveland, T.

    2003-12-01

    U.S. land likely accounts for a significant portion of the unidentified global carbon sink, although the magnitude is highly uncertain. The ultimate goal of this study is to quantify the contemporary temporal and spatial patterns of carbon sources and sinks in the conterminous United States from the early 1970s to 2000, and to explain the mechanisms that cause the variability and changes. Because of the difficulty and massive cost for developing land cover change databases for the conterminous United States, we adopt an ecoregion-based sampling approach. Carbon dynamics within thousands of 20 km by 20 km or 10 km by 10 km sampling blocks, stratified by Omernik Level III ecoregions, are simulated using the General Ensemble Biogeochemical Modeling System at the spatial resolution of 60 m by 60 m. The land use change data, providing unprecedented accuracy and consistency, are derived from Landsat imagery for five time points (nominally 1972, 1980, 1986, 1992, and 2000). Mechanisms have been implemented to assimilate data from key national benchmark databases (including the USDA Forest Service­_s Forest Inventory and Analysis data and the USDA­_s agricultural census data). The dynamics of carbon stocks in vegetation, soil, and harvested wood materials are quantified. Results from three ecoregions (i.e., Southeastern Plains, Piedmont, and Northern Piedmont) indicated that the carbon sink strength has been decreasing from the 1970s to 2000. The relative contribution of biomass accumulation to the sink decreased during this period, while those of soil organic carbon and harvested wood materials increased.

  1. Carbon sources supporting benthic mineralization in mangrove and adjacent seagrass sediments (Gazi Bay, Kenya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Dehairs

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available The origin of carbon substrates used by in situ sedimentary bacterial communities was investigated in an intertidal mangrove ecosystem and in adjacent seagrass beds in Gazi bay (Kenya by δ13C analysis of bacteria-specific PLFA (phospholipid fatty acids and bulk organic carbon. Export of mangrove-derived organic matter to the adjacent seagrass-covered bay was evident from sedimentary total organic carbon (TOC and δ13CTOC data. PLFA δ13C data indicate that the substrate used by bacterial communities varied strongly and that exported mangrove carbon was a significant source for bacteria in the adjacent seagrass beds. Within the intertidal mangrove forest, bacterial PLFA at the surface layer (0-1 cm typically showed more enriched δ13C values than deeper (up to 10 cm sediment layers, suggesting a contribution from microphytobenthos and/or inwelled seagrass material. Under the assumption that seagrasses and mangroves are the dominant potential end-members, the estimated contribution of mangrove-derived carbon to benthic mineralization in the seagrass beds (16-74% corresponds fairly well to the estimated contribution of mangrove C to the sedimentary organic matter pool (21-71% across different seagrass sites. Based on these results and a compilation of literature data, we suggest that allochtonous carbon trapped in seagrass beds may often represent a significant fraction of the substrate for benthic mineralization - both in cases where seagrass C dominates the sediment TOC pool and in cases where external inputs are significant. Hence, it is likely that community respiration data systematically overestimate the role of mineralization in the overall seagrass C budget.

  2. Sources of black carbon to the Himalayan-Tibetan Plateau glaciers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chaoliu; Bosch, Carme; Kang, Shichang; Andersson, August; Chen, Pengfei; Zhang, Qianggong; Cong, Zhiyuan; Chen, Bing; Qin, Dahe; Gustafsson, Örjan

    2016-01-01

    Combustion-derived black carbon (BC) aerosols accelerate glacier melting in the Himalayas and in Tibet (the Third Pole (TP)), thereby limiting the sustainable freshwater supplies for billions of people. However, the sources of BC reaching the TP remain uncertain, hindering both process understanding and efficient mitigation. Here we present the source-diagnostic Δ(14)C/δ(13)C compositions of BC isolated from aerosol and snowpit samples in the TP. For the Himalayas, we found equal contributions from fossil fuel (46±11%) and biomass (54±11%) combustion, consistent with BC source fingerprints from the Indo-Gangetic Plain, whereas BC in the remote northern TP predominantly derives from fossil fuel combustion (66±16%), consistent with Chinese sources. The fossil fuel contributions to BC in the snowpits of the inner TP are lower (30±10%), implying contributions from internal Tibetan sources (for example, yak dung combustion). Constraints on BC sources facilitate improved modelling of climatic patterns, hydrological effects and provide guidance for effective mitigation actions. PMID:27552223

  3. Sources of black carbon to the Himalayan–Tibetan Plateau glaciers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chaoliu; Bosch, Carme; Kang, Shichang; Andersson, August; Chen, Pengfei; Zhang, Qianggong; Cong, Zhiyuan; Chen, Bing; Qin, Dahe; Gustafsson, Örjan

    2016-01-01

    Combustion-derived black carbon (BC) aerosols accelerate glacier melting in the Himalayas and in Tibet (the Third Pole (TP)), thereby limiting the sustainable freshwater supplies for billions of people. However, the sources of BC reaching the TP remain uncertain, hindering both process understanding and efficient mitigation. Here we present the source-diagnostic Δ14C/δ13C compositions of BC isolated from aerosol and snowpit samples in the TP. For the Himalayas, we found equal contributions from fossil fuel (46±11%) and biomass (54±11%) combustion, consistent with BC source fingerprints from the Indo-Gangetic Plain, whereas BC in the remote northern TP predominantly derives from fossil fuel combustion (66±16%), consistent with Chinese sources. The fossil fuel contributions to BC in the snowpits of the inner TP are lower (30±10%), implying contributions from internal Tibetan sources (for example, yak dung combustion). Constraints on BC sources facilitate improved modelling of climatic patterns, hydrological effects and provide guidance for effective mitigation actions. PMID:27552223

  4. Culture strategies for lipid production using acetic acid as sole carbon source by Rhodosporidium toruloides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xiang-Feng; Liu, Jia-Nan; Lu, Li-Jun; Peng, Kai-Ming; Yang, Gao-Xiang; Liu, Jia

    2016-04-01

    Rhodosporidium toruloides AS 2.1389 was tested using different concentrations of acetic acid as a low-cost carbon source for the production of microbial lipids, which are good raw materials for biodiesel production. It grew and had higher lipid contents in media containing 4-20 g/L acetic acid as the sole carbon source, compared with that in glucose-containing media under the same culture conditions. At acetic acid concentrations as high as 20 g/L and the optimal carbon-to-nitrogen ratio (C/N) of 200 in a batch culture, the highest biomass production was 4.35 g/L, with a lipid content of 48.2%. At acetic acid concentrations as low as 4 g/L, a sequencing batch culture (SBC) with a C/N of 100 increased biomass production to 4.21 g/L, with a lipid content of 38.6%. These results provide usable culture strategies for lipid production by R. toruloides AS 2.1389 when using diverse waste-derived volatile fatty acids.

  5. Global warming alters carbon sink and source situation of the Tibetan lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, H.; Ni, Q.; Yang, J.; Liu, W.

    2015-12-01

    Global warming would accelerate glacier retreat and permafrost degeneration on the Tibetan Plateau. The carbon stored in permafrost would be released to nearby lakes. However, little is known about how the carbon sink and source situation could be altered and what role the microbial community could play in Tibetan lakes in response to global warming. To fill this knowledge gap, six lakes (Erhai Lake, Qinghai Lake, Tuosu Lake, Gahai Lake, Xiaochaidan Lake and Lake Chaka) on the Tibetan Plateau were studied. In order to compare the seasonal variations in geochemistry and microbial communities, two sampling cruises were performed (May and July of 2015, corresponding to dry and wet seasons, respectively). For each lake, salinity, pH, dissolved organic carbon (DOC), total nitrogen (TN), and chlorophyll were measured for water samples, and salinity and total organic carbon (TOC) were measured for sediments. Chamber-based greenhouse gas flux measurement were performed on the surface of each lake. Microbial communities were analyzed by using MiSeq sequencing technique. The results showed that in response to seasonal variation (from dry to set season), lake surface increased by 5-20% (calculated on the basis of satellite data) and salinity decreased by 4-30% for the studied lakes, suggesting the studied lakes were diluted by precipitations. The DOC contents of the lake waters were almost stable for the studied lakes, whereas TN increased by more than 70% for the lakes with salinity less than 100g/L. In the meanwhile, chlorophyll content increased by more than 180% for lakes with low salinities (Erhai Lake, Qinghai Lake, and Tuosu Lake) and decreased by 17-94% for lakes with high salinities (Gahai Lake, Xiaoxhaidan Lake, and Lake Chaka. This indicated that desalination (precipitation plus glacier melt) would increase carbon fixation potential in Tibetan lakes. Microbial community analyses showed that microbial diversity increased in response to desalination. All in all

  6. INCOME AND ENERGY SOURCES AMONG AGRARIAN HOUSEHOLDS IN NIGERIA: IMPLICATIONS FOR LOW CARBON ENERGY DEVELOPMENT IN LESS DEVELOPED COUNTRIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Mkpado

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Low-carbon power comes from sources that produce fewer greenhouse gases than do traditional means of power generation. It includes zero carbon power generation sources, such as wind power, solar power, geothermal power and (except for fuel preparation nuclear power, as well as sources with lower-level emissions such as natural and petroleum gas, and also technologies that prevent carbon dioxide from being emitted into the atmosphere, such as carbon capture and storage. This article correlated value of income from different sources to energy sources used by agrarian households in Nigeria and drew implications for low carbon development in Africa. It analysis included use of wind power for irrigation purposes, harnessing solar energy for lightening and possible cost implications. Secondary data were collected from Community Based Monitoring System Nigeria Project. Descriptive statistics, correlation and qualitative analysis were employed. The average annual income of agrarian households from different sources such as crop farming, livestock farming, petty trading, forest exploitation, remittance and labour per day was below the poverty line of $1 per day. The source of energy that had the highest number of significant correlation was electrical energy (low carbon electrical energy. It showed the possibility of pooling resources as farmers group to attract grants or equity financing to build wind mills for irrigation. The study recommended use of energy efficient bulbs to reduce CO2 emissions. This requires creating awareness among rural dwellers of the need to make such change.

  7. Preliminary study on preparation of BCNO phosphor particles using citric acid as carbon source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nuryadin, Bebeh W.; Pratiwi, Tripuspita; Faryuni, Irfana D.; Iskandar, Ferry, E-mail: ferry@fi.itb.ac.id; Abdullah, Mikrajuddin; Khairurrijal [Department of Physics, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Institut Teknologi Bandung, Ganesha 10 Bandung, Indonesia 40132 (Indonesia); Ogi, Takashi; Okuyama, Kikuo [Department of Chemical Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Hiroshima University, 1-4-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi Hiroshima, Japan 739-8527 (Japan)

    2015-04-16

    A citric acid was used as a carbon source in the preparation of boron carbon oxy-nitride (BCNO) phosphor particles by a facile process. The preparation process was conducted at relatively low temperature 750 °C and at ambient pressure. The prepared BCNO phosphors showed a high photoluminescence (PL) performance at peak emission wavelength of 470 nm under excitation by a UV light 365 nm. The effects of carbon/boron and nitrogen/boron molar ratios on the PL properties were also investigated. The result showed that the emission spectra with a wavelength peak ranging from 444 nm to 496 nm can be obtained by varying carbon/boron ratios from 0.1 to 0.9. In addition, the observations showed that the BCNO phosphor material has two excitation peaks located at the 365 nm (UV) and 420 nm (blue). Based on these observations, we believe that the citric acid derived BCNO phosphor particles can be a promising inexpensive material for phosphor conversion-based white LED.

  8. Modeling Aerobic Carbon Source Degradation Processes using Titrimetric Data and Combined Respirometric-Titrimetric Data: Experimental Data and Model Structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gernaey, Krist; Petersen, B.; Nopens, I.;

    2002-01-01

    Experimental data are presented that resulted from aerobic batch degradation experiments in activated sludge with simple carbon sources (acetate and dextrose) as substrates. Data collection was done using combined respirometric-titrimetric measurements. The respirometer consists of an open aerate...

  9. Diamond-Like Carbon Film Deposition Using DC Ion Source with Cold Hollow Cathode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. F. Shevchenko

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbon diamond-like thin films on a silicon substrate were deposited by direct reactive ion beam method with an ion source based on Penning direct-current discharge system with cold hollow cathode. Deposition was performed under various conditions. The pressure (12–200 mPa and the plasma-forming gas composition consisting of different organic compounds and hydrogen (C3H8, CH4, Si(CH32Cl2, H2, the voltage of accelerating gap in the range 0.5–5 kV, and the substrate temperature in the range 20–850°C were varied. Synthesized films were researched using nanoindentation, Raman, and FTIR spectroscopy methods. Analysis of the experimental results was made in accordance with a developed model describing processes of growth of the amorphous and crystalline carbon materials.

  10. Widely Tunable Single-Photon Source from a Carbon Nanotube in the Purcell Regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeantet, A.; Chassagneux, Y.; Raynaud, C.; Roussignol, Ph.; Lauret, J. S.; Besga, B.; Estève, J.; Reichel, J.; Voisin, C.

    2016-06-01

    The narrow emission of a single carbon nanotube at low temperature is coupled to the optical mode of a fiber microcavity using the built-in spatial and spectral matching brought by this flexible geometry. A thorough cw and time-resolved investigation of the very same emitter both in free space and in cavity shows an efficient funneling of the emission into the cavity mode together with a strong emission enhancement corresponding to a Purcell factor of up to 5. At the same time, the emitted photons retain a strong sub-Poissonian statistics. By exploiting the cavity feeding effect on the phonon wings, we locked the emission of the nanotube at the cavity resonance frequency, which allowed us to tune the frequency over a 4 THz band while keeping an almost perfect antibunching. By choosing the nanotube diameter appropriately, this study paves the way to the development of carbon-based tunable single-photon sources in the telecom bands.

  11. Tempeh Waste as a Natural, Economical Carbon and Nutrient Source: ED-XRF and NCS Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SITI KHODIJAH CHAERUN

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to determine the elemental composition of three types of waste from tempeh production. They are soybean hull “tempeh waste” after dehulling soybeans, tempeh wastewater after soaking dehulled soybeans in water for 24 h, and tempeh wastewater after boiling dehulled soybeans in water for 30 min. By using ED-XRF analyzer, it was revealed that tempeh waste contained Mg, Si, P, S, K, Ca, Mn, Fe, and Zn. The highest elemental content was K, followed by Ca, P, and Mg. NCS analysis showed that tempeh waste was composed of C, N, and S with C/N ratio of 11.20. The present study provides evidence that both tempeh waste and wastewater are rich in carbon and nutrient contents, thus their potential for both inorganic and organic nutrient and carbon sources for microbial growth in bioremediation or as natural NPK fertilizers is promising.

  12. Batch fermentation model of propionic acid production by Propionibacterium acidipropionici in different carbon sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coral, Jefferson; Karp, Susan Grace; Porto de Souza Vandenberghe, Luciana; Parada, José Luis; Pandey, Ashok; Soccol, Carlos Ricardo

    2008-12-01

    Propionic acid (PA) is widely used as additive in animal feed and also in the manufacturing of cellulose-based plastics, herbicides, and perfumes. Salts of propionic acid are used as preservative in food. PA is mainly produced by chemical synthesis. Nowadays, PA production by fermentation of low-cost industrial wastes or renewable sources has been an interesting alternative. In the present investigation, PA production by Propionibacterium acidipropionici ATCC 4965 was studied using a basal medium with sugarcane molasses (BMSM), glycerol or lactate (BML) in small batch fermentation at 30 and 36 degrees C. Bacterial growth was carried out under low dissolved oxygen concentration and without pH control. Results indicated that P. acidipropionici produced more biomass in BMSM than in other media at 30 degrees C (7.55 g l(-1)) as well as at 36 degrees C (3.71 g l(-1)). PA and biomass production were higher at 30 degrees C than at 36 degrees C in all cases studied. The best productivity was obtained by using BML (0.113 g l(-1) h(-1)), although the yielding of this metabolite was higher when using glycerol as carbon source (0.724 g g(-1)) because there was no detection of acetic acid. By the way, when using the other two carbon sources, acetic acid emerged as an undesirable by-product for further PA purification. PMID:18386184

  13. Production of bacterial cellulose using different carbon sources and culture media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadkazemi, Faranak; Azin, Mehrdad; Ashori, Alireza

    2015-03-01

    In this work, the effects of carbon sources and culture media on the production and structural properties of bacterial cellulose (BC) have been studied. BC nanofibers were synthesized using Gluconacetobacter xylinus strain PTCC 1734. Media used were Hestrin-Schramm (H), Yamanaka (Y), and Zhou (Z). Five different carbon sources, namely date syrup, glucose, mannitol, sucrose, and food-grade sucrose were used in these media. All the produced BC pellicles were characterized in terms of dry weight production, biomass yield, thermal stability, crystallinity and morphology by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), x-ray diffraction (XRD), and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM). The obtained results showed that mannitol lead to the highest yield, followed by sucrose. The highest production efficiency of mannitol might be due to the nitrogen source, which plays an important role. The maximum improvement on the thermal stability of the composites was achieved when mannitol was used in H medium. In addition, the crystallinity was higher in BC formed in H medium compared to other media. FE-SEM micrographs illustrated that the BC pellicles, synthesized in the culture media H and Z, were stable, unlike those in medium Y that were unstable. The micrographs of BC produced in media containing mannitol and sucrose provided evidence of the strong interfacial adhesion between the BC fibers without noticeable aggregates.

  14. BLACK Carbon Emissions from Diesel Sources in the Largest Arctic City: Case Study of Murmansk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, M.; Kholod, N.; Malyshev, V.; Tretyakova, S.; Gusev, E.; Yu, S.; Barinov, A.

    2014-12-01

    Russia has very little data on its black carbon (BC) emissions. Because Russia makes up such a large share of the Arctic, understanding Russian emissions will improve our understanding of overall BC levels, BC in the Arctic and the link between BC and climate change. This paper provides a detailed, bottom-up inventory of BC emissions from diesel sources in Murmansk, Russia, along with uncertainty estimates associated with these emissions. The research team developed a detailed data collection methodology. The methodology involves assessing the vehicle fleet and activity in Murmansk using traffic, parking lot and driver surveys combined with an existing database from a vehicle inspection station and statistical data. The team also assessed the most appropriate emission factors, drawing from both Russian and international inventory methodologies. The researchers also compared fuel consumption using statistical data and bottom-up fuel calculations. They then calculated emissions for on-road transportation, off-road transportation (including mines), diesel generators, fishing and other sources. The article also provides a preliminary assessment of Russia-wide emissions of black carbon from diesel sources.

  15. Alginate Production from Alternative Carbon Sources and Use of Polymer Based Adsorbent in Heavy Metal Removal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Çiğdem Kıvılcımdan Moral

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Alginate is a biopolymer composed of mannuronic and guluronic acids. It is harvested from marine brown algae; however, alginate can also be synthesized by some bacterial species, namely, Azotobacter and Pseudomonas. Use of pure carbohydrate sources for bacterial alginate production increases its cost and limits the chance of the polymer in the industrial market. In order to reduce the cost of bacterial alginate production, molasses, maltose, and starch were utilized as alternative low cost carbon sources in this study. Results were promising in the case of molasses with the maximum 4.67 g/L of alginate production. Alginates were rich in mannuronic acid during early fermentation independent of the carbon sources while the highest guluronic acid content was obtained as 68% in the case of maltose. The polymer was then combined with clinoptilolite, which is a natural zeolite, to remove copper from a synthetic wastewater. Alginate-clinoptilolite beads were efficiently adsorbed copper up to 131.6 mg Cu2+/g adsorbent at pH 4.5 according to the Langmuir isotherm model.

  16. Production of bacterial cellulose using different carbon sources and culture media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadkazemi, Faranak; Azin, Mehrdad; Ashori, Alireza

    2015-03-01

    In this work, the effects of carbon sources and culture media on the production and structural properties of bacterial cellulose (BC) have been studied. BC nanofibers were synthesized using Gluconacetobacter xylinus strain PTCC 1734. Media used were Hestrin-Schramm (H), Yamanaka (Y), and Zhou (Z). Five different carbon sources, namely date syrup, glucose, mannitol, sucrose, and food-grade sucrose were used in these media. All the produced BC pellicles were characterized in terms of dry weight production, biomass yield, thermal stability, crystallinity and morphology by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), x-ray diffraction (XRD), and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM). The obtained results showed that mannitol lead to the highest yield, followed by sucrose. The highest production efficiency of mannitol might be due to the nitrogen source, which plays an important role. The maximum improvement on the thermal stability of the composites was achieved when mannitol was used in H medium. In addition, the crystallinity was higher in BC formed in H medium compared to other media. FE-SEM micrographs illustrated that the BC pellicles, synthesized in the culture media H and Z, were stable, unlike those in medium Y that were unstable. The micrographs of BC produced in media containing mannitol and sucrose provided evidence of the strong interfacial adhesion between the BC fibers without noticeable aggregates. PMID:25498666

  17. Effects of nitrogen and carbon sources on the production of inulinase from strain Bacillus sp. SG113

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavrailov, Simeon; Ivanova, Viara

    2016-03-01

    The effects of the carbon and nitrogen substrates on the growth of Bacillus sp. SG113 strain were studied. The use of organic nitrogen sources (peptone, beef extract, yeast extract, casein) leads to rapid cellular growth and the best results for the Bacillus strain were obtained with casein hydrolysate. From the inorganic nitrogen sources studied, the (NH4) 2SO4 proved to be the best nitrogen source. Casein hydrolysate and (NH4) 2SO4 stimulated the invertase synthesis. In the presence of Jerusalem artichoke, onion and garlic extracts as carbon sources the strain synthesized from 6 to 10 times more inulinase.

  18. Controlled Carbon Source Addition to an Alternating Nitrification-Denitrification Wastewater Treatment Process Including Biological P Removal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Isaacs, Steven Howard; Henze, Mogens

    1995-01-01

    experiments performed in 5 liter bottles indicated that the denitrification rate can be instantaneously increased through the addition of either carbon source. The amount by which the rate was increased depended on the amount of carbon added. In the main experiments performed in a pilot scale alternating...

  19. Carbon Dioxide Capture and Separation Techniques for Gasification-based Power Generation Point Sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pennline, H.W.; Luebke, D.R.; Jones, K.L.; Morsi, B.I. (Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA); Heintz, Y.J. (Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA); Ilconich, J.B. (Parsons)

    2007-06-01

    The capture/separation step for carbon dioxide (CO2) from large-point sources is a critical one with respect to the technical feasibility and cost of the overall carbon sequestration scenario. For large-point sources, such as those found in power generation, the carbon dioxide capture techniques being investigated by the in-house research area of the National Energy Technology Laboratory possess the potential for improved efficiency and reduced costs as compared to more conventional technologies. The investigated techniques can have wide applications, but the research has focused on capture/separation of carbon dioxide from flue gas (post-combustion from fossil fuel-fired combustors) and from fuel gas (precombustion, such as integrated gasification combined cycle or IGCC). With respect to fuel gas applications, novel concepts are being developed in wet scrubbing with physical absorption; chemical absorption with solid sorbents; and separation by membranes. In one concept, a wet scrubbing technique is being investigated that uses a physical solvent process to remove CO2 from fuel gas of an IGCC system at elevated temperature and pressure. The need to define an ideal solvent has led to the study of the solubility and mass transfer properties of various solvents. Pertaining to another separation technology, fabrication techniques and mechanistic studies for membranes separating CO2 from the fuel gas produced by coal gasification are also being performed. Membranes that consist of CO2-philic ionic liquids encapsulated into a polymeric substrate have been investigated for permeability and selectivity. Finally, dry, regenerable processes based on sorbents are additional techniques for CO2 capture from fuel gas. An overview of these novel techniques is presented along with a research progress status of technologies related to membranes and physical solvents.

  20. Optimal Medium Composition to Enhance Poly-β-hydroxybutyrate Production by Ralstonia eutropha Using Cane Molasses as Sole Carbon Source

    OpenAIRE

    Ali Bozorg; Manouchehr Vossoughi; Akhtarolmoluk Kazemi; Iran Alemzadeh

    2015-01-01

    In order to reduce the costs associated with Poly-β-hydroxybutyrate production, growth and Poly-β-hydroxybutyrate production of Ralstonia eutropha were studied in batch culture on different carbon sources. Experiments were designed and conducted to not only lower the cost of Poly-β-hydroxybutyrate production by using inexpensive substrates, but also to increase Poly-β-hydroxybutyrate production by optimizing the culture medium composition. Low cost, abundant carbon sources, including cane mol...

  1. Enhanced biological nutrient removal in modified carbon source division anaerobic anoxic oxic process with return activated sludge pre-concentration☆

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qin Lu; Haiyan Wu; Haoyan Li; Dianhai Yang

    2015-01-01

    A pilot-scale modified carbon source division anaerobic anoxic oxic (AAO) process with pre-concentration of returned activated sludge (RAS) was proposed in this study for the enhanced biological nutrient removal (BNR) of municipal wastewater with limited carbon source. The influent carbon source was fed in step while a novel RAS pre-concentration tank was adopted to improve BNR efficiency, and the effects of an influent carbon source distribution ratio and a RAS pre-concentration ratio were investigated. The results show that the removal efficiency of TN is mainly influenced by the carbon source distribution ratio while the TP removal relies on the RAS pre-concentration ratio. The optimum carbon source distribution ratio and RAS pre-concentration ratio are 60%and 50%, respectively, with an inner recycling ratio of 100%under the optimum steady operation of pilot test, reaching an average effluent TN concentration of 9.8 mg·L−1 with a removal efficiency of 63%and an average TP removal efficiency of 94%. The mechanism of nutrient removal is discussed and the kinetics is analyzed. The results reveal that the optimal carbon source distribution ratio provides sufficient denitrifying carbon source to each anoxic phase, reducing nitrate accumulation while the RAS pre-concentration ratio improves the condition of anaerobic zone to ensure the phosphorus release due to less nitrate in the returned sludge. Therefore, nitrifying bacteria, denitrifying bacteria and phosphorus accumulation organisms play an important role under the optimum condition, enhancing the performance of nutrient removal in this test.

  2. In silico carbon molecular beam epitaxial growth of graphene on the h-BN substrate: carbon source effect on van der Waals epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jonghoon; Varshney, Vikas; Park, Jeongho; Farmer, Barry L.; Roy, Ajit K.

    2016-05-01

    Against the presumption that hexagonal boron-nitride (h-BN) should provide an ideal substrate for van der Waals (vdW) epitaxy to grow high quality graphene films, carbon molecular beam epitaxy (CMBE) techniques using solid carbon sublimation have reported relatively poor quality of the graphene. In this article, the CMBE growth of graphene on the h-BN substrate is numerically studied in order to identify the effect of the carbon source on the quality of the graphene film. The carbon molecular beam generated by the sublimation of solid carbon source materials such as graphite and glassy carbon is mostly composed of atomic carbon, carbon dimers and carbon trimers. Therefore, the graphene film growth becomes a complex process involving various deposition characteristics of a multitude of carbon entities. Based on the study of surface adsorption and film growth characteristics of these three major carbon entities comprising graphite vapour, we report that carbon trimers convey strong traits of vdW epitaxy prone to high quality graphene growth, while atomic carbon deposition is a surface-reaction limited process accompanied by strong chemisorption. The vdW epitaxial behaviour of carbon trimers is found to be substantial enough to nucleate and develop into graphene like planar films within a nanosecond of high flux growth simulation, while reactive atomic carbons tend to impair the structural integrity of the crystalline h-BN substrate upon deposition to form an amorphous interface between the substrate and the growing carbon film. The content of reactive atomic carbons in the molecular beam is suspected to be the primary cause of low quality graphene reported in the literature. A possible optimization of the molecular beam composition towards the synthesis of better quality graphene films is suggested.Against the presumption that hexagonal boron-nitride (h-BN) should provide an ideal substrate for van der Waals (vdW) epitaxy to grow high quality graphene films, carbon

  3. Compound specific radiocarbon analyses to apportion sources of combustion products in sedimentary pyrogenic carbon deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanke, Ulrich M.; Schmidt, Michael W. I.; McIntyre, Cameron P.; Reddy, Christopher M.; Wacker, Lukas; Eglinton, Timothy I.

    2016-04-01

    Pyrogenic carbon (PyC) is a collective term for carbon-rich residues comprised of a continuum of products generated during biomass burning and fossil fuel combustion. PyC is a key component of the global carbon cycle due to its slow intrinsic decomposition rate and its ubiquity in the environment. It can originate from natural or anthropogenic vegetation fires, coal mining, energy production, industry and transport. Subsequently, PyC can be transported over long distances by wind and water and can eventually be buried in sediments. Information about the origin of PyC (biomass burning vs. fossil fuel combustion) deposited in estuarine sediments is scarce. We studied the highly anoxic estuarine sediments of the Pettaquamscutt River (Rhode Island, U.S.) in high temporal resolution over 250 years and found different combustion proxies reflect local and regional sources of PyC (Hanke et al. in review; Lima et al. 2003). The polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) originate from long-range atmospheric transport, whereas bulk PyC, detected as benzene polycarboxylic acids (BPCA), mainly stems from local catchment run-off. However, to unambiguously apportion PyC sources, we need additional information, such as compound specific radiocarbon (14C) measurements. We report 14C data for individual BPCA including error analysis and for combustion-related PAH. First results indicate that biomass burning is the main source of PyC deposits, with additional minor contributions from fossil fuel combustion. References Hanke U.M., T.I. Eglinton, A.L.L. Braun, C. Reddy, D.B. Wiedemeier, M.W.I. Schmidt. Decoupled sedimentary records of combustion: causes and implications. In review. Lima, A. L.; Eglinton, T. I.; Reddy, C. M., High-resolution record of pyrogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon deposition during the 20th century. ES&T, 2003, 37 (1), 53-61.

  4. Rapid biological oxidation of methanol in the tropical Atlantic: significance as a microbial carbon source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. L. Dixon

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Methanol is the second most abundant organic gas in the atmosphere after methane, and is ubiquitous in the troposphere. It plays a significant role in atmospheric oxidant chemistry and is biogeochemically active. Large uncertainties exist about whether the oceans are a source or sink of methanol to the atmosphere. Even less is understood about what reactions in seawater determine its concentration, and hence flux across the sea surface interface. We report here concentrations of methanol between 151–296 nM in parts of the oligotrophic North Atlantic, with corresponding microbial uptake rates between 2–146 nM d−1, suggesting turnover times as low as 1 day (1–25 days in surface waters of the oligotrophic tropical North East Atlantic. Methanol is mainly (≥97% used by microbes for obtaining energy in oligotrophic regions, which contrasts with shelf and coastal areas where between 20–50% can be used for cell growth. Comparisons of microbial methanol oxidation rates with parallel determinations of bacterial leucine uptake suggest that methanol contributes on average 13% to bacterial carbon demand in the central northern Atlantic gyre (maximum of 54%. In addition, the contribution that methanol makes to bacterial carbon demand varies as a power function of chlorophyll a concentrations; suggesting for concentrations <0.2 μg l−1 that methanol can make a significant contribution to bacterial carbon demand. However, our low air to sea methanol flux estimates of 7.2–13 μmol m−2 d−1 suggest that the atmosphere is not a major methanol source. We conclude that there must be a major, as yet unidentified, in situ oceanic methanol source in these latitudes which we suggest is sunlight driven decomposition of organic matter.

  5. EFFECT OF CARBON SOURCES ON FORMATION OF ALPHA-AMYLASE BY BACILLUS STEAROTHERMOPHILUS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    WELKER, N E; CAMPBELL, L L

    1963-10-01

    Welker, N. E. (Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio) and L. Leon Campbell. Effect of carbon sources on formation of alpha-amylase by Bacillus stearothermophilus. J. Bacteriol. 86:681-686. 1963.-A chemically defined medium was devised for use in alpha-amylase induction studies. The addition of 0.1% casein hydrolysate to the chemically defined medium permitted growth on fructose, and with glucose, sucrose, maltose, starch, and glycerol it shortened the lag period and increased both the growth rate and the total enzyme produced. Growth did not occur when gluconate, acetate, or succinate were used as carbon sources. alpha-Amylase was produced during the logarithmic phase of growth; the amount produced was inversely proportional to the rate of growth. The poorer the carbon source for growth (glycerol, k = 0.24; glucose, k = 0.26; sucrose, k = 0.42), the higher was the amount of enzyme produced (glycerol, 109 units/ml; glucose, 103 units/ml; sucrose, 45 units/ml). Cells grown on technical-grade maltose (k = 0.26) or starch (k = 0.42) did not conform to this relationship in that unusually large amounts of alpha-amylase were produced (362 and 225 units/ml, respectively). Cells grown on fructose or sucrose had the same growth rate (k = 0.42), but smaller amounts of alpha-amylase were produced on fructose (fructose, 0 to 4 units/ml; sucrose, 45 units/ml). An intracellular alpha-amylase was not detected in Bacillus stearothermophilus.

  6. Low-cost carbon sources for the production of a thermostable xylanase by Aspergillus niger

    OpenAIRE

    Ana Cláudia Elias Pião Benedetti; Eliana Dantas da Costa; Caio Casale Aragon; Andréa Francisco dos Santos; Antônio José Goulart; Derlene Attili-Angelis; Rubens Monti

    2013-01-01

    A strain of the filamentous fungus Aspergillus niger was isolated and shown to possess extracellular xylanolytic activity. These enzymes have biotechnological potential and can be employed in various industries. This fungus produced its highest xylanase activity in a medium made up of 0.1% CaCO3 , 0.5% NaCl, 0.1% NH4 Cl, 0.5% corn steep liquor and 1% carbon source, at pH 8.0. A lowcost hemicellulose residue (powdered corncob) proved to be an excellent inducer of the A. ni...

  7. Growth of Bacteria on 3-Nitropropionic Acid as a Sole Source of Carbon, Nitrogen, and Energy▿

    OpenAIRE

    Nishino, Shirley F.; Shin, Kwanghee A.; Payne, Rayford B.; Spain, Jim C.

    2010-01-01

    3-Nitropropionic acid (3NPA) is a widespread nitroaliphatic toxin found in a variety of legumes and fungi. Several enzymes have been reported that can transform the compound, but none led to the mineralization of 3NPA. We report here the isolation of bacteria that grow on 3NPA and its anion, propionate-3-nitronate (P3N), as the sole source of carbon, nitrogen, and energy. Experiments with resting cells, cell extracts, and purified enzymes indicate that the pathway involves conversion of 3NPA ...

  8. Stepwise bioprocess for exopolysaccharide production using potato starch as carbon source

    OpenAIRE

    Bhatia, Shashi Kant; Kumar, Narinder; Bhatia, Ravi Kant

    2014-01-01

    Xanthan gum is a biopolymer produced by Xanthomonas sp. XC6. In this study, xanthan gum is produced from potato starch using a stepwise bioprocess design. Potato starch is hydrolyzed using Bacillus sp. having amylase activity and 30.2 g/L reducing sugar was released, while Xanthomonas sp. XC6 can release only 14.5 g/L. Bacillus sp. hydrolyzed potato starch extract was further used as a carbon source for xanthan gum biosynthesis using Xanthomonas sp. XC6. Yeast extract acts as the best nitroge...

  9. The forest as a historic source and sink for carbon dioxide; Skogen som historisk kaella respektive saenka foer koldioxid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kander, A. [Lund Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Economic History

    1996-06-01

    The aim of the present project is to quantify the changes in the growing stock of timber between 1800 and 1985 in order to find out under which periods and to what extent the forest has served as a source resp. sink for carbon dioxide. These data are compared to the carbon dioxide emissions from combustion of fossil fuels under the same period. Another goal of the project is to find the order of magnitude of the effect of other potential sinks and sources for carbon dioxide. 32 refs, 9 figs, 1 tab

  10. Stationary chest tomosynthesis using a carbon nanotube x-ray source array: a feasibility study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Jing; Tucker, Andrew W.; Lee, Yueh Z.; Heath, Michael D.; Wang, Xiaohui; Foos, David H.; Lu, Jianping; Zhou, Otto

    2015-01-01

    Chest tomosynthesis is a low-dose, quasi-3D imaging modality that has been demonstrated to improve the detection sensitivity for small lung nodules, compared to 2D chest radiography. The purpose of this study is to investigate the feasibility and system requirements of stationary chest tomosynthesis (s-DCT) using a spatially distributed carbon nanotube (CNT) x-ray source array, where the projection images are collected by electronically activating individual x-ray focal spots in the source array without mechanical motion of the x-ray source, detector, or the patient. A bench-top system was constructed using an existing CNT field emission source array and a flat panel detector. The tube output, beam quality, focal spot size, system in-plane and in-depth resolution were characterized. Tomosynthesis slices of an anthropomorphic chest phantom were reconstructed for image quality assessment. All 75 CNT sources in the source array were shown to operate reliably at 80 kVp and 5 mA tube current. Source-to-source consistency in the tube current and focal spot size was observed. The incident air kerma reading per mAs was measured as 74.47 uGy mAs-1 at 100 cm. The first half value layer of the beam was 3 mm aluminum. An average focal spot size of 2.5  ×  0.5 mm was measured. The system MTF was measured to be 1.7 cycles mm-1 along the scanning direction, and 3.4 cycles mm-1 perpendicular to the scanning direction. As the angular coverage of 11.6°-34°, the full width at half maximum of the artifact spread function improved greatly from 9.5 to 5.2 mm. The reconstructed tomosynthesis slices clearly show airways and pulmonary vascular structures in the anthropomorphic lung phantom. The results show the CNT source array is capable of generating sufficient dose for chest tomosynthesis imaging. The results obtained so far suggest an s-DCT using a distributed CNT x-ray source array is feasible.

  11. A carbon cluster ion source for mass calibration at TRIGA-TRAP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    TRIGA-TRAP is a high-precision penning trap mass spectrometer installed at the research reactor TRIGA Mainz in order to determine the masses of short-lived fission products and - in addition to that - also the masses of actinide elements ranging from uranium up to californium. In order to determine precisely the masses of the nuclides of interest, the superconducting magnet providing the strong magnetic field for the Penning trap has to be calibrated by measuring the cyclotron frequency of an ion with well-known mass, which is, if possible, an isobaric nuclide of the ion of interest. Therefore, the best possible choice for mass calibration is to use carbon clusters as mass references, as demonstrated at the ISOLTRAP facility at ISOLDE/CERN. A laser ablation ion source for the production of carbon clusters has been developed using a frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser. The design, current status, and results of the production of carbon cluster ions, using C60 and Sigradure registered samples, as well as other ions are presented

  12. Colored dissolved organic matter in shallow estuaries: relationships between carbon sources and light attenuation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oestreich, W.K.; Ganju, Neil Kamal; Pohlman, John; Suttles, Steven

    2016-01-01

    Light availability is of primary importance to the ecological function of shallow estuaries. For example, benthic primary production by submerged aquatic vegetation is contingent upon light penetration to the seabed. A major component that attenuates light in estuaries is colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM). CDOM is often measured via a proxy, fluorescing dissolved organic matter (fDOM), due to the ease of in situ fDOM sensor measurements. Fluorescence must be converted to CDOM absorbance for use in light attenuation calculations. However, this CDOM–fDOM relationship varies among and within estuaries. We quantified the variability in this relationship within three estuaries along the mid-Atlantic margin of the eastern United States: West Falmouth Harbor (MA), Barnegat Bay (NJ), and Chincoteague Bay (MD/VA). Land use surrounding these estuaries ranges from urban to developed, with varying sources of nutrients and organic matter. Measurements of fDOM (excitation and emission wavelengths of 365 nm (±5 nm) and 460 nm (±40 nm), respectively) and CDOM absorbance were taken along a terrestrial-to-marine gradient in all three estuaries. The ratio of the absorption coefficient at 340 nm (m−1) to fDOM (QSU) was higher in West Falmouth Harbor (1.22) than in Barnegat Bay (0.22) and Chincoteague Bay (0.17). The CDOM : fDOM absorption ratio was variable between sites within West Falmouth Harbor and Barnegat Bay, but consistent between sites within Chincoteague Bay. Stable carbon isotope analysis for constraining the source of dissolved organic matter (DOM) in West Falmouth Harbor and Barnegat Bay yielded δ13C values ranging from −19.7 to −26.1 ‰ and −20.8 to −26.7 ‰, respectively. Concentration and stable carbon isotope mixing models of DOC (dissolved organic carbon) indicate a contribution of 13C-enriched DOC in the estuaries. The most likely source of 13C-enriched DOC for the systems we investigated is Spartina cordgrass. Comparison of

  13. Colored dissolved organic matter in shallow estuaries: relationships between carbon sources and light attenuation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oestreich, W. K.; Ganju, N. K.; Pohlman, J. W.; Suttles, S. E.

    2016-02-01

    Light availability is of primary importance to the ecological function of shallow estuaries. For example, benthic primary production by submerged aquatic vegetation is contingent upon light penetration to the seabed. A major component that attenuates light in estuaries is colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM). CDOM is often measured via a proxy, fluorescing dissolved organic matter (fDOM), due to the ease of in situ fDOM sensor measurements. Fluorescence must be converted to CDOM absorbance for use in light attenuation calculations. However, this CDOM-fDOM relationship varies among and within estuaries. We quantified the variability in this relationship within three estuaries along the mid-Atlantic margin of the eastern United States: West Falmouth Harbor (MA), Barnegat Bay (NJ), and Chincoteague Bay (MD/VA). Land use surrounding these estuaries ranges from urban to developed, with varying sources of nutrients and organic matter. Measurements of fDOM (excitation and emission wavelengths of 365 nm (±5 nm) and 460 nm (±40 nm), respectively) and CDOM absorbance were taken along a terrestrial-to-marine gradient in all three estuaries. The ratio of the absorption coefficient at 340 nm (m-1) to fDOM (QSU) was higher in West Falmouth Harbor (1.22) than in Barnegat Bay (0.22) and Chincoteague Bay (0.17). The CDOM : fDOM absorption ratio was variable between sites within West Falmouth Harbor and Barnegat Bay, but consistent between sites within Chincoteague Bay. Stable carbon isotope analysis for constraining the source of dissolved organic matter (DOM) in West Falmouth Harbor and Barnegat Bay yielded δ13C values ranging from -19.7 to -26.1 ‰ and -20.8 to -26.7 ‰, respectively. Concentration and stable carbon isotope mixing models of DOC (dissolved organic carbon) indicate a contribution of 13C-enriched DOC in the estuaries. The most likely source of 13C-enriched DOC for the systems we investigated is Spartina cordgrass. Comparison of DOC source to CDOM : f

  14. The sources of atmospheric black carbon at a European gateway to the Arctic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winiger, P; Andersson, A; Eckhardt, S; Stohl, A; Gustafsson, Ö

    2016-01-01

    Black carbon (BC) aerosols from incomplete combustion of biomass and fossil fuel contribute to Arctic climate warming. Models-seeking to advise mitigation policy-are challenged in reproducing observations of seasonally varying BC concentrations in the Arctic air. Here we compare year-round observations of BC and its δ(13)C/Δ(14)C-diagnosed sources in Arctic Scandinavia, with tailored simulations from an atmospheric transport model. The model predictions for this European gateway to the Arctic are greatly improved when the emission inventory of anthropogenic sources is amended by satellite-derived estimates of BC emissions from fires. Both BC concentrations (R(2)=0.89, P<0.05) and source contributions (R(2)=0.77, P<0.05) are accurately mimicked and linked to predominantly European emissions. This improved model skill allows for more accurate assessment of sources and effects of BC in the Arctic, and a more credible scientific underpinning of policy efforts aimed at efficiently reducing BC emissions reaching the European Arctic. PMID:27627859

  15. Sources and Transformations of Carbon and Nitrogen in the Potomac River Estuary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennino, M. J.; Kaushal, S.; Murthy, S.

    2011-12-01

    Urbanization has altered the transport of nitrogen (N) and carbon (C) in river ecosystems, making it important to understand how rivers are responding to these increased inputs of C and N. This study examines the capacity of a major tributary of the Chesapeake Bay, the Potomac River, to transform N and C inputs from the world's largest advanced wastewater treatment facility (Washington D.C. Water and Sewer Authority). Surface water and effluent samples were collected monthly for one year, along longitudinal transects of the Potomac River. Water samples were analyzed for the major dissolved and particulate forms of C and N. Nitrate stable isotopes were used to trace the fate of wastewater nitrate, as well as how other nitrate sources vary downriver. Sources of carbon downriver were traced using fluorescence spectroscopy, excitation emission matrices (EEMs), and PARAFAC modeling. Historical influent and effluent data on C and N levels were also compared with regional population growth data, climate change data, and long-term interannual records of C and N levels within downstream stations along the Potomac River. Improvements in treatment technology over the past two decades have shown significant decreases in effluent nitrogen levels, with corresponding decreases overtime of nutrients at downstream sampling stations. Levels of nitrate show increases within the vicinity of the wastewater treatment outfall, but decrease rapidly downstream, potentially indicating nutrient uptake and/or denitrification. Total organic carbon levels show a smaller decrease downstream, resulting in an increase in the C:N ratio downstream. Longitudinal river chemistry data also show that dissolved inorganic nitrogen goes down while total organic nitrogen goes up with distance downriver, indicating biological transformations are taking place along the river. Preliminary data from fluorescence EEMs suggested that more humic-like organic matter is important above the wastewater treatment plant

  16. Primary carbon sources for juvenile penaeid shrimps in a mangrove-fringed Bay of Inhaca Island, Mozambique: a dual carbon and nitrogen isotope analysis.

    OpenAIRE

    Macia, A.

    2004-01-01

    A study to estimate the relative importance of mangrove primary carbon and nitrogen sources to five commercial penaeid shrimps species was done at Saco da Inhaca, a non-estuarine mangrove-fringed bay on Inhaca Island, southern Mozambique. Carbon and nitrogen stable isotope ratios were determined in a variety of primary producers (mangroves, epiphytes, phytoplankton and seagrasses), sediments and in five penaeid shrimp species (Penaeus (Fenneropenaeus) indicus, P. japonicus, P. semisulcatus, M...

  17. Electrospun Fibres of Polyhydroxybutyrate Synthesized by Ralstonia eutropha from Different Carbon Sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor U. Irorere

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The properties of PHB may be affected by the carbon source used in its production and this may affect nanofibres made from this polymer by electrospinning. In this study, P(3-HB was produced from glucose, rapeseed oil, and olive oil by Ralstonia eutropha H16. Cell growth and polymer production were higher in olive or rapeseed oil supplemented media compared to glucose supplemented media. FT-IR, 1H-, 13C-NMR, and ESI/MSn confirmed that the synthesized polymers were P(3-HB. SEM micrograph showed the formation of nanofibres from P(3-HB samples with the fibre diameters dependent on the source of the carbon used in polymer synthesis and the concentration of the polymer in the electrospinning solution. GPC showed that P(3-HB from glucose (G-PHB had a higher molecular weight (7.35×105 gmol−1 compared to P(3-HB from rapeseed (R-PHB and olive (O-PHB oil. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC showed that the crystallinity of the electrospun polymers reduces with decreasing polymer concentration with R-PHB having lower crystallinity at all concentrations used. These observation shows that more PHB yield can be obtained using either rapeseed or olive oil compared to glucose with glucose producing polymers of higher molecular weight. It also show that electrospinning could be used to reduce the crystallinity of PHB fibres.

  18. Polygalacturonases from Moniliophthora perniciosa are regulated by fermentable carbon sources and possible post-translational modifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argôlo Santos Carvalho, Heliana; de Andrade Silva, Edson Mario; Carvalho Santos, Stenio; Micheli, Fabienne

    2013-11-01

    We report the first molecular and in silico analysis of Monilophthora perniciosa polygalacturonases (PGs). Three MpPG genes (MpPG1, MpPG2 and MpPG3) were identified and analyzed at transcriptional level, by RT-qPCR, in dikaryotic M. perniciosa mycelium grown on solid-bran based medium and on liquid medium supplemented with different fermentable and non-fermentable carbon sources. The MpPG genes presented different expression patterns suggesting different individual regulation. However, all are mainly regulated by fermentable carbon sources (galactose and mannose). The integrated analysis of PG gene expression and systems biology (using MpG1 and MpG2 orthologs in Neurospora crassa, named NCU06961 and NCU02369, respectively) allowed identifying some possible mechanism of protein regulation during the necrotrophic fungal phase. MpPG1-NCU06961 and MpPG2-NCU02369 directly or indirectly interacted with central and highly connected proteins involved in protein synthesis and protein regulation associated to post-translational modifications, in cell wall metabolism, and in cellular metabolism related to energy production. This analysis also allowed the identification of key proteins for further studies of M. perniciosa development and/or for disease management, such as MpPG2, a pectin methylesterase, an acetolactate synthase and the small ubiquitin-like modifier SMT3-like. PMID:24140149

  19. Castor oil as secondary carbon source for production of sophorolipids using Starmerella bombicola NRRL Y-17069.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajaj, Vinit Kamalkishor; Annapure, Uday S

    2015-01-01

    Sophorolipids (SLs), a prominent member of the biosurfactants family are produced in acidic and/or lactonic form by yeast Starmerella bombicola NRRL Y-17069 when grown on hydrophilic or hydrophobic or both carbon sources. In current study, ricinoleic acid rich castor oil (10%) was used as hydrophobic and glycerol (10%) was used as hydrophilic carbon source. The yields of 24.5 ± 0.25 g/l sophorolipids were analyzed by anthrone and HPLC method which further increased upto 40.24 ± 0.76 g/l sophorolipids using fed batch process at 5L fermenter level. The structures of sophorolipids synthesized on castor oil were elucidated by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometer (LC-MS), (13)C and (1)H NMR. The results indicated that the ricinoleic acid (RA) gets hydroxylated at ω-1 position but incorporated into sophorolipids through already available hydroxyl group at 12(th) position. It resulted in the production of a novel sophorolipids with hydroxyl fatty acid as side chain and has applications as surfactant for novel drug delivery, anti microbial agent, cosmetic ingredient and emulsifier.

  20. Diamondlike carbon deposition on plastic films by plasma source ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Application of pulsed high negative voltage (∼10 μs pulse width, 300-900 pulses per second) to a substrate is found to induce discharge, thereby increasing ion current with an inductively coupled plasma source. This plasma source ion beam implantation (PSII) technique is investigated for the pretreatment and deposition of diamond-like carbon (DLC) thin layer on polyethylene terepthalate (PET) film. Pretreatment of PET with N2 and Ar plasma is expected to provide added barrier effects when coupled with DLC deposition, with possible application to fabrication of PET beverage bottles. PSII treatment using N2 and Ar in separate stages is found to change the color of the PET film, effectively increasing near-ultraviolet absorption. The effects of this pretreatment on the chemical bonding of C, H, and O are examined by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). DLC thin film was successfully deposited on the PET film. The surface of the DLC thin layer is observed to be smooth by scanning electron microscopy, and its structure characteristics are examined by XPS and laser Raman spectroscopy. Subsequent processing using acetylene or acetylene and Ar (20%) produced thin carbon layers that are confirmed to be graphite-dominated DLC. Also, this PSII method is employed in order to deposit the DLC layer on the inside surface of the PET bottle and to reduce oxygen permeation rate by 40%

  1. Diamondlike carbon deposition on plastic films by plasma source ion implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, T.; Yoshida, M.; Shinohara, M.; Takagi, T.

    2002-05-01

    Application of pulsed high negative voltage (~10 μs pulse width, 300-900 pulses per second) to a substrate is found to induce discharge, thereby increasing ion current with an inductively coupled plasma source. This plasma source ion beam implantation (PSII) technique is investigated for the pretreatment and deposition of diamond-like carbon (DLC) thin layer on polyethylene terepthalate (PET) film. Pretreatment of PET with N2 and Ar plasma is expected to provide added barrier effects when coupled with DLC deposition, with possible application to fabrication of PET beverage bottles. PSII treatment using N2 and Ar in separate stages is found to change the color of the PET film, effectively increasing near-ultraviolet absorption. The effects of this pretreatment on the chemical bonding of C, H, and O are examined by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). DLC thin film was successfully deposited on the PET film. The surface of the DLC thin layer is observed to be smooth by scanning electron microscopy, and its structure characteristics are examined by XPS and laser Raman spectroscopy. Subsequent processing using acetylene or acetylene and Ar (20%) produced thin carbon layers that are confirmed to be graphite-dominated DLC. Also, this PSII method is employed in order to deposit the DLC layer on the inside surface of the PET bottle and to reduce oxygen permeation rate by 40%.

  2. Functional Stability Of A Mixed Microbial Consortia Producing PHA From Waste Carbon Sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David N. Thompson; Erik R. Coats; William A. Smith; Frank J. Loge; Michael P. Wolcott

    2006-04-01

    Polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs), naturally-occurring biological polyesters that are microbially synthesized from a myriad of carbon sources, can be utilized as biodegradable substitutes for petroleum-derived thermoplastics. However, current PHA commercialization schemes are limited by high feedstock costs, the requirement for aseptic reactors, and high separation and purification costs. Bacteria indigenous to municipal waste streams can accumulate large quantities of PHA under environmentally controlled conditions; hence, a potentially more environmentally-effective method of production would utilize these consortia to produce PHAs from inexpensive waste carbon sources. In this study, PHA production was accomplished in sequencing batch bioreactors utilizing mixed microbial consortia from municipal activated sludge as inoculum, in cultures grown on real wastewaters. PHA production averaged 85%, 53%, and 10% of the cell dry weight from methanol-enriched pulp-and-paper mill foul condensate, fermented municipal primary solids, and biodiesel wastewater, respectively. The PHA-producing microbial consortia were examined to explore the microbial community changes that occurred during reactor operations, employing denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) of 16S-rDNA from PCR-amplified DNA extracts. Distinctly different communities were observed both between and within wastewaters following enrichment. More importantly, stable functions were maintained despite the differing and contrasting microbial populations.

  3. Health effects of carbon-containing particulate matter: focus on sources and recent research program results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohr, Annette; McDonald, Jacob

    2016-02-01

    Air pollution is a complex mixture of gas-, vapor-, and particulate-phase materials comprised of inorganic and organic species. Many of these components have been associated with adverse health effects in epidemiological and toxicological studies, including a broad spectrum of carbonaceous atmospheric components. This paper reviews recent literature on the health impacts of organic aerosols, with a focus on specific sources of organic material; it is not intended to be a comprehensive review of all the available literature. Specific emission sources reviewed include engine emissions, wood/biomass combustion emissions, biogenic emissions and secondary organic aerosol (SOA), resuspended road dust, tire and brake wear, and cooking emissions. In addition, recent findings from large toxicological and epidemiological research programs are reviewed in the context of organic PM, including SPHERES, NPACT, NERC, ACES, and TERESA. A review of the extant literature suggests that there are clear health impacts from emissions containing carbon-containing PM, but difficulty remains in apportioning responses to certain groupings of carbonaceous materials, such as organic and elemental carbon, condensed and gas phases, and primary and secondary material. More focused epidemiological and toxicological studies, including increased characterization of organic materials, would increase understanding of this issue.

  4. Thermal simulation experiment on the hydrocarbon regeneration of marine carbonate source rock

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI HuiLi; JIN ZhiJun; HE ZhiLiang; QIN JianZhong; SHAO ZhiBing

    2007-01-01

    Hydrocarbon regeneration of marine carbonate source rock was simulated with thermal experiments in a laboratory. The results reveal that hydrocarbon regeneration does not simply continue the primary hydrocarbon generation process, and that, for marine carbonate source rock, discontinuous hydrocarbon generation differs greatly from the continuous generation. Several different features of hydrocarbon regeneration were observed in the experiments. First, the liquid hydrocarbon generation peak was always observed no matter what the initial maturity of the sample was. Moreover, the maturity and the liquid hydrocarbon yield corresponding to the peak varied with the sample's initial maturity. Second, the hydrocarbon regeneration started earlier than the continuous one. In the experiments, the hydrocarbon could be re-generated when the sample maturity did not rise to any great extent. Third, the accumulative hydrocarbon-generating quantity during discontinuous generation was always more than that during continuous generation. And the hydrocarbon-generating quantity varied with the discontinuous generation history. Chemical kinetic analysis suggests that discontinuous hydrocarbon generation should not only be explained by the parallel reaction mechanism but also by the consecutive reaction mechanism which has been ignored in the traditional chemical kinetic model for continuous hydrocarbon generation.

  5. Influence of carbon source and temperature on the denitrifying phosphorus removal process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Yayi; WANG Shuying; PENG Yongzhen; Zhu Guibing; LING Yunfang

    2007-01-01

    To supply the valuable operating parameters for the popular usage of the new denitrifying phosphors removal process,it is essential to study the dominant biochemical reactions and the characteristics of denitriflying phosphorus removing bacteria(DPB).Thus,parallel batch experiments using DPB sludge were carried out to assess the effect of substrates(sewage,HAc,and endogenous carbon source)on denitriflying dephosphorus removal efficiency in this study.The results showed that the initial specific phosphorus release rate increased with the high concentration of the short-chain volatile fatty acids ratio in the influent,and sufficient phosphorus was released by DPB.This improved the subsequent denitrification and phosphorus uptake efficiency.The specific endogenous denitrification mainly relies on the internal carbon source(PHB)stored by poly-P bacteria.Denitrifying phosphorus removing bacteria were very hungry when the internal PHB was consumed.Consequently,the specific endogenous denitrification rate was low and the phosphorus uptake did not happen.On the other hand,in the experiment,the denitrifying phosphorus removal performance under two temperature conditions(8-10℃ and 25-26℃)was also investigated and analyzed.It was found that the lower temperature decreased the specific phosphorus release and uptake rate,but did not inhibit the denitrifying phosphorus removal completely.Therefore,the negative influence of the low temperature on the overall phosphorus removal was not significant.

  6. Effect of carbon source and nitrate concentration on denitrifying phosphorus removal by DPB sludge

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Ya-yi; PENG Yong-zhen; Wang Shu-ying; PAN Mian-li

    2004-01-01

    Effect of added carbon source and nitrate concentration on the denitrifying phosphorus removal by DPB sludge was systematically studied using batch experiments, at the same time the variation of ORP was investigated.Results showed that the denitrifying and phosphorus uptake rate in anoxic phase increased with the high initial anaerobic carbon source addition. However once the initial COD concentration reached a certain level, which was in excess to the PHB saturation of poly-P bacteria, residual COD carried over to anoxic phase inhibited the subsequent denitrifying phosphorus uptake. Simultaneously, phosphate uptake continued until all nitrate was removed, following a slow endogenous release of phosphate. High nitrate concentration in anoxic phase increased the initial denitrifying phosphorus rate. Once the nitrate was exhausted, phosphate uptake changed to release. Moreover, the time of this turning point occurred later with the higher nitrate addition. On the other hand, through on-line monitoring the variation of the ORP with different initial COD concentration , it was found ORP could be used as a control parameter for phosphorus release, but it is impossible to utilize ORP for controlling the denitrificaion and anoxic phosphorus uptake operations.

  7. Reduction of nitrous oxide emissions from partial nitrification process by using innovative carbon source (mannitol).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xinwen; Wang, Xiaoqing; Zhang, Jian; Huang, Xiaoyu; Wei, Dong; Lan, Wei; Hu, Zhen

    2016-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of mannitol as carbon source on nitrogen removal and nitrous oxide (N2O) emission during partial nitrification (PN) process. Laboratory-scale PN sequencing batch reactors (SBRs) were operated with mannitol and sodium acetate as carbon sources, respectively. Results showed that mannitol could remarkably reduce N2O-N emission by 41.03%, without influencing the removal efficiency of NH4(+)-N. However, it has a significant influence on nitrite accumulation ratio (NAR) and TN removal, which were 19.97% and 13.59% lower than that in PN with sodium acetate, respectively. Microbial analysis showed that the introduction of mannitol could increase the abundance of bacteria encoding nosZ genes. In addition, anti-oxidant enzymes (T-SOD, POD and CAT) activities were significantly reduced and the dehydrogenase activity had an obvious increase in mannitol system, indicating that mannitol could alleviate the inhibition of N2O reductase (N2OR) activities caused by high NO2(-)-N concentration. PMID:27423546

  8. Effect of Carbon Sources on the Catalytic Performance of Ni/β-Mo2C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Li-Zhen; Zhao, Shao-Fei; Li, Wei-Shan

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, Ni/β-Mo2C(S) and Ni/β-Mo2C(G) were prepared from solution-derived precursor with two different carbon sources (starch and glucose) and tested as anodic noble-metal-free catalysts in air-cathode microbial fuel cells (MFCs). The carburized catalyst samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM), and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET). The activity of the electrocatalyst towards the oxidation of several common microbial fermentation products (formate, lactate, and ethanol) was studied for MFC based on Klebsiella pneumoniae conditions. The composite MFC anodes were fabricated, and their catalytic behavior was investigated. With different carbon sources, the crystalline structure does not change and the crystallinity and surface area increase. The electrocatalytic experiments show that the Ni/β-Mo2C(G) gives the better bio- and electrocatalytic performance than Ni/β-Mo2C(S) due to its higher crystallinity and BET surface area.

  9. [Effects of mixed carbon sources on glucose oxidase production by recombinant Pichia pastoris].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yina; Gu, Lei; Zhang, Juan; Chen, Jian; Du, Guocheng

    2013-07-01

    Glucose oxidase (GOD) is an important industrial enzyme with many potential applications. In order to increase the production and productivity of GOD by recombinant Pichia pastoris GS115, we investigated the feeding strategies of mixed carbon sources during induction phase, based on results of the optimization of initial cell and methanol concentration on GOD production. The optimal initial cell and methanol concentration were 100 g/L and 18 g/L. During induction phase, the mixed-carbon-sources strategies showed that glycerol, sorbitol or mannitol co-feeding with methanol could enhance GOD production. With mannitol co-feeding (20:1(W/W)), the maximum GOD production and maximum GOD productivity reached 711.3 U/mL and 4.60 U/(mL x h) after an induction period of 156 h. Compared to the control, the enhancements of GOD production and productivity were 66.3% and 67.9%, respectively. Meanwhile, we found an appropriate mannitol co-feeding strategy that would not inhibit the expression of promote. The activity of alcohol oxidase was 8.8 U/g, which was enhanced by 69.2% compared to the control (5.2 U/g). We can use the same optimization process to improve the production of other proteins from recombinant Pichia pastoris by changing the fermentation parameters.

  10. Electron optics simulation for designing carbon nanotube based field emission x-ray source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sultana, Shabana

    In this dissertation, electron optics simulation for designing carbon nanotube (CNT) based field emission x-ray source for medical imaging applications will be presented. However, for design optimization of x-ray tubes accurate electron beam optics simulation is essential. To facilitate design of CNT x-ray sources a commercial 3D finite element software has been chosen for extensive simulation. The results show that a simplified model of uniform electron field emission from the cathode surface is not sufficient when compared to experimental measurements. This necessitated the development of a refined model to describe a macroscopic field emission CNT cathode for electron beam optics simulations. The model emulates the random distribution of CNTs and the associated variation of local field enhancement factor. The main parameter of the model has been derived empirically from the experimentally measured I-V characteristics of the CNT cathode. Simulation results based on this model agree well with experiments which include measurements of the transmission rate and focus spot size. The model provides a consistent simulation platform for optimization of electron beam optics in CNT x-ray source design. A systematic study of electron beam optics in CNT x-ray tubes led to the development of a new generation of compact x-ray source with multiple pixels. A micro focus field emission x-ray source with a variable focal spot size has been fully characterized and evaluated. It has been built and successfully integrated into micro-CT scanners which are capable of dynamic cardiac imaging of free-breathing small animals with high spatial and temporal resolutions. In addition a spatially distributed high power multi-beam x-ray source has also been designed and integrated into a stationary digital breast tomosynthesis (s-DBT) configuration. This system has the potential to reduce the total scan time to 4 seconds and yield superior image quality in breast imaging.

  11. Soil organic carbon dust emission: an omitted global source of atmospheric CO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chappell, Adrian; Webb, Nicholas P; Butler, Harry J; Strong, Craig L; McTainsh, Grant H; Leys, John F; Viscarra Rossel, Raphael A

    2013-10-01

    Soil erosion redistributes soil organic carbon (SOC) within terrestrial ecosystems, to the atmosphere and oceans. Dust export is an essential component of the carbon (C) and carbon dioxide (CO(2)) budget because wind erosion contributes to the C cycle by removing selectively SOC from vast areas and transporting C dust quickly offshore; augmenting the net loss of C from terrestrial systems. However, the contribution of wind erosion to rates of C release and sequestration is poorly understood. Here, we describe how SOC dust emission is omitted from national C accounting, is an underestimated source of CO(2) and may accelerate SOC decomposition. Similarly, long dust residence times in the unshielded atmospheric environment may considerably increase CO(2) emission. We developed a first approximation to SOC enrichment for a well-established dust emission model and quantified SOC dust emission for Australia (5.83 Tg CO(2)-e yr(-1)) and Australian agricultural soils (0.4 Tg CO(2)-e yr(-1)). These amount to underestimates for CO(2) emissions of ≈10% from combined C pools in Australia (year = 2000), ≈5% from Australian Rangelands and ≈3% of Australian Agricultural Soils by Kyoto Accounting. Northern hemisphere countries with greater dust emission than Australia are also likely to have much larger SOC dust emission. Therefore, omission of SOC dust emission likely represents a considerable underestimate from those nations' C accounts. We suggest that the omission of SOC dust emission from C cycling and C accounting is a significant global source of uncertainty. Tracing the fate of wind-eroded SOC in the dust cycle is therefore essential to quantify the release of CO(2) from SOC dust to the atmosphere and the contribution of SOC deposition to downwind C sinks.

  12. Quantification and radiocarbon source apportionment of black carbon in atmospheric aerosols using the CTO-375 method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zencak, Zdenek; Elmquist, Marie; Gustafsson, Örjan

    To make progress towards linking the atmosphere and biogeosphere parts of the black carbon (BC) cycle, a chemothermal oxidation method (CTO-375), commonly applied for isolating BC from complex geomatrices such as soils, sediments and aquatic particles, was applied to investigate the BC also in atmospheric particles. Concentrations and 14C-based source apportionment of CTO-375 based BC was established for a reference aerosol (NIST RM-8785) and for wintertime aerosols collected in Stockholm and in a Swedish background area. The results were compared with thermal-optical (OC/EC) measurements. For NIST RM-8785, a good agreement was found between the BC CTO-375 concentration and the reported elemental carbon (EC) concentration measured by the "Speciation Trends Network—National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health" method (EC NIOSH) with BC CTO-375 of 0.054±0.002 g g -1 and EC NIOSH of 0.067±0.008 g g -1. In contrast, there was an average factor of ca. 20 difference between BC CTO-375 and EC NIOSH for the ambient Scandinavian wintertime aerosols, presumably reflecting a combination of BC CTO-375 isolating only the recalcitrant soot-BC portion of the BC continuum and the EC NIOSH metric inadvertently including some intrinsically non-pyrogenic organic matter. Isolation of BC CTO-375 with subsequent off-line radiocarbon analysis yielded fraction modern values (fM) for total organic carbon (TOC) of 0.93 (aerosols from a Swedish background area), and 0.58 (aerosols collected in Stockholm); whereas the fM for BC CTO-375 isolates were 1.08 (aerosols from a Swedish background area), and 0.87 (aerosols collected in Stockholm). This radiocarbon-based source apportionment suggests that contribution from biomass combustion to cold-season atmospheric BC CTO-375 in Stockholm was 70% and in the background area 88%.

  13. Constraining carbon sources and cycling of endolithic microbial communities in the Atacama Desert

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziolkowski, L. A.; Slater, G. F.; Davila, A.; Wierzchos, J.

    2010-12-01

    The Atacama Desert, one of the driest places on Earth, is considered a suitable analog for the extremely arid, oxidizing conditions on the surface of Mars. Recent observations suggest the presence of evaporitic deposits on the surface of Mars, such as those found in the Atacama. Halites in the Atacama have been shown to be hygroscopic and are colonized by photosynthetic microbes. While there is considerable evidence for the decrease in abundance and diversity of microbes closer to the hyper-arid core of the Atacama, experimental studies have thus far have yet to estimate the sources of carbon to these communities and the rate at which they cycle. To address these questions, we characterized the isotopic composition (13C and 14C) microbial community biomarkers from four distinct sites in the Atacama. Sites ranged from halites in the hyper-arid core (Yungay, Salar Grande) to volcanic rock and gypsum near the Monturaqui Crater. Our analysis of the phospholipids fatty acids (PLFA) and glycolipid fatty acid (GLFA) methyl esters of the endoliths agreed with previous studies: the abundance and diversity of microbes decreases approaching the hyper-arid core. The total PLFA and GLFA concentrations were lower at Yungay than Salar Grande and higher in the gypsum and volcanic rock samples. Changes in the mole percentage distribution of the PLFA and GLFA illustrated that the endolithic communities inhabiting the volcanic rock and gypsum were more complex than those inhabiting the halites. ∂13C of both PLFA and GLFA showed that non-halite lipids were less depleted in 13C than halite-lipids. This suggested a difference in carbon source or cycling. The 14C content of PLFA and GLFA varied by up to 250 per mil. Endolith PLFA and GLFA from the gypsum had radiocarbon signatures comparable to the modern atmosphere, which suggests that the predominant source of carbon to the system is the modern atmosphere and that lipids are cycling rapidly in this system. However, at the other three

  14. Novel ferulic acid esterases from Bifidobacterium sp. produced on selected synthetic and natural carbon sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominik Szwajgier

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Background. Ferulic acid esterases (or feruloyl esterases, a common group of hydrolases are very well distributed in the plant kongdom. The fungal feruloyl esterases were very extensively studied whereas probiotic lactic acid bacteria as the source of this enzyme were generally omitted. Free phenolic acids – strong antioxidants can be released from the dietary fiber by the action of intestinal lactic acid bacteria. The aim of this study was to examine the three probiotic Bifidobacterium strains to produce extracellular FAE on different synthetic and natural carbon sources. Material and methods. Studies were carried out using Bifidibacteriumstrains (B. animalis Bi30, B. catenulatum KD 14 and B. longum KN 29. The strains were cultivated using minimal growth media containing selected natural and synthetic carbon sources: German wheat bran, rye bran, barley spent grain, isolated larchwood arabinogalactan, apple pectin, corn pectin, methyl esters of phenolic acids. The production of extracellular feruloyl esterase was estimated using the post cultivation supernatants and methyl ferulate. The concentration of ferulic acid released from the ester was determined using HPLC with DAD detection. Results. The most efficient bacterial strain for FAE production was B. animalis cultivated in the presence of methyl p-coumarate and methyl ferulate as the main carbon sources (14.95 nmol·ml-1·min-1 and 4.38 nmol·ml-1·min-1, respectively. In the case of each FAE, the highest activity was obtained at 37oC (pH 6.3 in Theorell/Steinhagen buffer (B. animalis Bi30 or in Tris/HCl buffer (B. catenulatum KD14 and B. longum KN29. Taking under consideration all results, it should be noticed that the highest feruloyl esterase activities were obtained using synthetic methyl esters of phenolic acids. Conclusions. The presented resultsbroaden the knowledgeabout the production of the feruloyl esterase by probiotic bacteria. Although the enzyme is only accessory during

  15. Carbon Isotope Ratios Of Carbon Dioxide In The Urban Salt Lake Valley, Utah USA: Source And Long-Term Monitoring Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehleringer, J.; Lai, C.; Strong, C.; Pataki, D. E.; Bowling, D. R.; Schauer, A. J.; Bush, S.

    2011-12-01

    A high-precision, decadal record of carbon isotope ratios in atmospheric carbon dioxide has been produced for the urbanized Salt Lake Valley, Utah USA. These data complement a similar time series of atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations for different locations in the same urban region. This isotopic record includes diurnal and nocturnal observations based on flask (IRMS-based) and continuous (TDL-based) measurement systems. These data reveal repeatable diurnal and seasonal variations in the anthropogenic and biogenic carbon sources that can be used to reconstruct different source inputs. As the Salt Lake Valley is an isolated urban region, the impacts of local anthropogenic inputs can be distinguished from regional patterns as measured by NOAA at the rural Wendover monitoring station 200 km to the west of the Salt Lake Valley. Complementary data, such as vehicle exhaust, emission from power plants and household furnaces, plant and soil organic matter, are also provided to quantify the carbon isotope ratios of the predominant anthropogenic and biogenic sources within the Salt Lake Valley. The combined source and long-term observational values will be made freely available and their utility is discussed for modeling efforts including urban metabolism modeling and atmospheric trace gas modeling.

  16. Effect of Inoculum Age, Carbon and Nitrogen Sources on the Production of Lipase by Candida Cylindracea 2031 in Batch Fermentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. M. Noor

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Production of extracellular lipase by Candida cylindracea DSMZ 2031  was studied in a seven liters batch bioreactor, using palm oil (PO, palmitic acid (PA, lauric acid (LA, olive oil (OO and cooking oil (CO as carbon source.   The effect of  carbon and nitrogen sources  were studied by measuring the lipase activity.  The maximum lipase activity was found to be 12.7 kLU on palm oil as carbon source, urea as nitrogen sources and at 36 h inoculum age. This was achieved at a temperature of 30o C, pH of 6.0, agitation speed of 500 rpm and aeration of 1vvm.

  17. Study on the restitution coefficient of original total organic carbon for high mature marine source rocks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIN Jianzhong; ZHENG Longju; Tenger

    2007-01-01

    On the basis of the results of hydropyrolysis simulations for about 90 different types of immature to mature source rocks selected from about 5 000 marine source rocks in China,along with the natural thermal evolution profiles,the following conclusions were obtained.(1) Total organic carbon (TOC) content of excellent marine source rocks does not change obviously when Ro<0.8% or Ro > 1.3%,and the residual TOC content is decreasing gradually with the maturity increase at 0.8% <Ro< 1.3%.(2) At the high-post mature stage (Ro > 1.3%),the decreased maximums of residual TOC content for the kerogen of sapropel (Ⅰ),Ⅱ1,and Ⅱ are usually 40%,32% and 24%,respectively,and their TOC restitution coefficient is,respectively,1.68,1.48 and 1.32.(3)Both the TOC decreasing amplitude and the restitution coefficient decrease gradually with the decrease of TOC content for the source rocks with low organic matter abundance (usually 0.3% < TOC < 1.0%).The TOC restitution coefficients are,respectively,1.20 and 1.0,when 0.3%<TOC<0.5% and TOC < 0.3%.(4) TOCres.of solid bitumen and shale with high organic matter abundance (TOC > 30%) also require no restitution at the high mature stage.Such kind of TOC restitution is further supported by the coincidence of the decrease of residual TOC with the decreasing of S1 + S2 and the increasing of hydrocarbon quantity during the experimental simulation of hydrocarbon generation and expulsion for marine source rocks (0.3%<TOC&<30%) in natural thermal evolution profiles.

  18. Source rock potential of the organic rich Turonian - Upper Campanian carbonates of northern Lebanon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daher, S. Bou; Littke, R. [RWTH Aachen Univ. (Germany). Energy and Mineral Resources Group (EMR); Nader, F.H. [IFP Energies nouvelles, Paris (France). Dept. of Sedimentology-Stratigraphy

    2013-08-01

    Upper Cretaceous chalks, marls, and shales are arguably the most prolific petroleum source rocks in the eastern Mediterranean region. 209 core samples from the Turonian - Upper Campanian rock succession in north Lebanon were collected and analyzed for their organic matter (OM) content, quality, and maturity. The total organic carbon (TOC) measurements revealed a very good source rock potential for a 150 m interval within the Upper Santonian - Upper Campanian, with an average of 2% TOC. High HI values (average 707 mg/g TOC) characterize these source rocks as type I kerogen and reflect a very good preservation of the organic matter. T{sub max} values (average 421 C) match the other maturity parameters such as vitrinite reflectance (average 0.35%), and all point towards immature organic matter. The equivalent Upper Cretaceous in the offshore Levant basin has enough overburden to have reached maturity. However, the accurate extrapolation of the organic matter quality and quantity to the offshore is yet a challenge with the data at hand. (orig.)

  19. Rapid biological oxidation of methanol in the tropical Atlantic: significance as a microbial carbon source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. L. Dixon

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Methanol is the second most abundant organic gas in the atmosphere after methane, and is ubiquitous in the troposphere. It plays a significant role in atmospheric oxidant chemistry and is biogeochemically active. Large uncertainties exist about whether the oceans are a source or sink of methanol to the atmosphere. Even less is understood about what reactions in seawater determine its concentration, and hence flux across the sea surface interface. We report here concentrations of methanol up to 300 nM, with corresponding microbial uptake rates between 2–146 nM d−1, suggesting turnover times as low as 1 day in surface waters of the oligotrophic tropical North East Atlantic. Comparisons with parallel determinations of bacterial leucine uptake suggest that methanol contributes on average 13% to bacterial carbon demand in the central northern Atlantic gyre (maximum of 54%. However, our low air to sea methanol flux estimates of 7.2–13 μmol m−2 d−1 suggest that the atmosphere is not a major source. We conclude that there must be a major, as yet unidentified, in situ oceanic methanol source in these latitudes which we suggest is sunlight driven decomposition of organic matter.

  20. Burial fluxes and source apportionment of carbon in culture areas of Sanggou Bay over the past 200 years

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Sai; HUANG Jiansheng; YANG Qian; YANG Shu; YANG Guipeng; SUN Yao

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we assessed the burial fluxes and source appointment of different forms of carbon in core sediments collected from culture areas in the Sanggou Bay, and preliminarily analyzed the reasons for the greater proportion of inorganic carbon burial fluxes (BFTIC). The average content of total carbon (TC) in the Sanggou Bay was 2.14%. Total organic carbon (TOC) accounted for a small proportion in TC, more than 65% of which derived from terrigenous organic carbon (Ct), and while the proportion of marine-derived organic carbon (Ca) increased significantly since the beginning of large-scale aquaculture. Total inorganic carbon (TIC) accounted for 60%–75%of TC, an average of which was 60%, with a maximum up to 90% during flourishing periods (1880–1948) of small natural shellfish derived from seashells inorganic carbon (Shell-IC). The TC burial fluxes ranged from 31 g/(m2·a) to 895 g/(m2·a) with an average of 227 g/(m2·a), which was dominated by TIC (about 70%). Shell-IC was the main source of TIC and even TC. As the main food of natural shellfish, biogenic silica (BSi) negatively correlated with BFTIC through affecting shellfish breeding. BFTIC of Sta. S1, influenced greatly by the Yellow Sea Coastal Current, had a certain response to Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO) in some specific periods.

  1. The mitochondrial protein Mcu1 plays important roles in carbon source utilization, filamentation, and virulence in Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Guobo; Wang, Haitao; Liang, Weihong; Cao, Chengjun; Tao, Li; Naseem, Shamoon; Konopka, James B; Wang, Yue; Huang, Guanghua

    2015-08-01

    The fungus Candida albicans is both a pathogen and a commensal in humans. The ability to utilize different carbon sources available in diverse host niches is vital for both commensalism and pathogenicity. N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) is an important signaling molecule as well as a carbon source in C. albicans. Here, we report the discovery of a novel gene MCU1 essential for GlcNAc utilization. Mcu1 is located in mitochondria and associated with multiple energy- and metabolism-related proteins including Por1, Atp1, Pet9, and Mdh1. Consistently, inactivating Por1 impaired GlcNAc utilization as well. Deletion of MCU1 also caused defects in utilizing non-fermentable carbon sources and amino acids. Furthermore, MCU1 is required for filamentation in several inducing conditions and virulence in a mouse systemic infection model. We also deleted TGL99 and GUP1, two genes adjacent to MCU1, and found that the gup1/gup1 mutant exhibited mild defects in the utilization of several carbon sources including GlcNAc, maltose, galactose, amino acids, and ethanol. Our results indicate that MCU1 exists in a cluster of genes involved in the metabolism of carbon sources. Given its importance in metabolism and lack of a homolog in humans, Mcu1 could be a potential target for developing antifungal agents.

  2. Production of Poly(3-Hydroxybutyrate-co-3-Hydroxyhexanoate) Using Aeromonas hydrophila 4AK4 Grown in Mixed Carbon Source

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张瑾; 张广; 陈金春; 华秀英; 陈国强

    2002-01-01

    Aeromonas hydrophila 4AK4 was grown on mixed substrates of soybean oil and lauric acid for the production of polyhydroxyalkanoate copolymer consisting of 3-hydroxybutyrate (3HB) and 3-hydroxyhexanoate (3HHx). A maximal poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyhexanoate) (PHBHHx) content of 49.13% in dry cells was obtained in a shake flask culture. PHBHHx of 6.26 -g/L was produced in a fermentation experiment over 48 -h on a sole carbon source containing 100 -g/L soybean oil, while 12.40 -g/L PHBHHx was produced on a mixed carbon source containing 80 -g/L soybean and 20 g/L lauric acid over the same period of time, resulting in a polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) productivity of 0.25 -g/(L*h). The results show that mixed carbon sources are suitable for industrialized production of PHBHHx from A. hydrophila 4AK4, as the mixed carbon sources also overcome the foaming problem that occurs when lauric acid is employed as a sole carbon source in PHBHHx production.

  3. Radiocarbon based source apportionment of black carbon in the form of PM10 elemental carbon aerosol particles at the Zeppelin Observatory, Svalbard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winiger, Patrik; Andersson, August; Espen Yttri, Karl; Tunved, Peter; Gustafsson, Örjan

    2015-04-01

    Black carbon (BC) aerosol particles are formed from incomplete combustion of fossil fuel and biomass. Transported into the Arctic, they potentially contributes to climate warming. However, there are still large uncertainties related to the climate effects of BC, including aspects of radiative properties, mixing state of the particles, transport, atmospheric lifetime and sources. The current study aims to reduce source uncertainties by applying a top-down (observational) source-diagnostic isotope approach and comparing these to bottom-up (modeling) emission inventories to better constrain the source types and source regions. The use of natural abundance radiocarbon (Δ14C) is a powerful tool to distinguish between fossil (void of 14C) and biomass (contemporary 14C) combustion sources. Due to the well-defined end-members, 14C-measurements (alone) provide high precision (

  4. Effect of photoperiod, light intensity and carbon sources on biomass and lipid productivities of Isochrysis galbana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babuskin, Srinivasan; Radhakrishnan, Kesavan; Babu, Packirisamy Azhagu Saravana; Sivarajan, Meenakshisundaram; Sukumar, Muthusamy

    2014-08-01

    Biomass and lipid productivities of Isochrysis galbana were optimized using nutrients of molasses (4, 8, 12 g l(-1)), glucose (4, 8, 12 g l(-1)), glycerol (4, 8, 12 g l(-1)) and yeast extract (2 g l(-1)). Combinations of carbon sources at different ratios were evaluated in which the alga was grown at three different light intensities (50, 100 and 150 μmol m(-2) s(-1)) under the influence of three different photoperiod cycles (12/12, 18/6 and 24/0 h light/dark). A maximum cell density of 8.35 g l(-1) with 32 % (w/w) lipid was achieved for mixotrophic growth at 100 μmol m(-2) s(-1) and 18/6 h light/dark with molasses/glucose (20:80 w/w). Mixotrophic cultivation using molasses, glucose and glycerol was thus effective for the cultivation of I. galbana.

  5. Effect of Carbon Source with Different Graphitization Degrees on the Synthesis of Diamond

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Wan-Qiang; MA Hong-AN; LI Xiao-Lei; LINAG Zhong-Zhu; LIU Mi-Lan; LI Rui; JIA Xiao-Peng

    2007-01-01

    Using three kinds of graphites with different graphitization degrees as carbon source and Fe-Ni alloy powder as catalyst, the synthesis of diamond crystals is performed in a cubic anvil high-pressure and high-temperature apparatus (SPD-6×1200). Diamond crystals with perfect hexoctahedron shape are successfully synthesized at pressure from 5.0 to 5.5GPa and at temperature from 1570 to 1770K. The synthetic conditions, nucleation, morphology, inclusion and granularity of diamond crystals are studied. The temperature and pressure increase with the increase of the graphitization degree of graphite. The quantity of nucleation and granularity of diamonds decreases with the increase of graphitization degree of graphite under the same synthesis conditions. Moreover, according to the results of the Mossbauer spectrum, the composition of inclusions is mainly Fes C and Fe-Ni alloy phases in diamond crystals synthesized with three kinds of graphites.

  6. Thermoascus aurantiacus CBHI/Cel7A Production in Trichoderma reesei on Alternative Carbon Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benkő, Zsuzsa; Drahos, Eszter; Szengyel, Zsolt; Puranen, Terhi; Vehmaanperä, Jari; Réczey, Kati

    To develop functional enzymes in cellulose hydrolysis at or above 70°C the cellobiohydrolase (CBHI/Cel7A) of Thermoascus aurantiacus was cloned and expressed in Trichoderma reesei Rut-C30 under the strong cbh1 promoter. Cellulase production of the parental strain and the novel strain (RF6026) was examined in submerged fermentation experiments using various carbon sources, which were lactose, Solka Floc 200 cellulose powder, and steam pretreated corn stover. An industrially feasible production medium was used containing only distiller's spent grain, KH2PO4, and (NH4)2SO4. Enzyme production was followed by measurements of protein concentration, total cellulase enzyme activity (filter paper activity), β-glucosidase activity, CBHI activity, and endogenase I (EGI) activity. The Thermoascus CBHI/Cel7A activity was taken as an indication of the heterologous gene expression under the cbh1 promoter.

  7. Synthesis of WC-Co nanocomposites using polymer as carbon source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ceramic-metal composites such as WC-Co are attractive for cutting-tool applications as they have high hardness, chemical inertness and resistance to heat. The properties and performance of these composites can be enhanced by keeping the size of the components on a manometer scale. Synthesis of WC-Co nanocomposites generally involves gas-phase carburization. The authors have developed a novel approach in which a polymer precursor such as polyacrylonitrile serves as an in situ source for carbon. The WC-Co nanocomposites formed are characterized by x-ray diffraction and electron microscopy. The synthesis and processing conditions such as firing temperature, time and atmosphere play a critical role in obtaining phase-pure products

  8. Evaluation of biobutanol production by Clostridium beijerinckii NRRL B-592 using sweet sorghum as carbon source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Jardel Visioli

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In this research it was evaluated the production of biobutanol by Clostridium beijerinckiiNRRL B-592 using sweet sorghum juice as carbon source. Operational variables, like pH and initial inoculum size, as well as supplementation of industrial media with yeast extract and tryptone, were evaluated. The maximum butanol obtained was 2.12g kg-1 using 12.5% of inoculum size, 0.05g 100mL-1 of tryptone and 0.1g 100mL-1 of yeast extract and initial pH of 5.5. The main contribution of this research was to show a systematic procedure for development of a low cost industrial media for biobutanol production from sweet sorghum.

  9. Production of Polyhydroxybutyrate by Bacillus axaraqunsis BIPC01 using Petrochemical Wastewater as Carbon Source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasim Mayeli

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to use petrochemical wastewater as the source of carbon for the production of polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHA in an effort to decrease its cost of production. For this purpose, PHA producing bacteria were isolated from the petrochemical wastewater of Bandar Imam, Iran. The purified colonies were screened for PHA by Sudan Black B and Nile Blue A staining. Among positively stained bacteria, the best PHA producer was selected on the basis of cell growth, PHA content and the monomer composition of PHA. The phenotypic and genotypic identification this isolate showed it to be Bacillus axaraqunsis. The PHA was produced at a cell density of about 9.46 g/l of maximum concentration of 6.33g/l l, corresponding to 66% of cell dry weight. These results showed that B. axaraqunsis BIPC01 could be a potent PHA producer using wastewater for industrial purpose and simultaneously reducing the environmental pollution.

  10. New bioemulsifiers produced by Candida lipolytica using D-glucose and babassu oil as carbon sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vance-Harrop Mabel H.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Candida lipolytica IA 1055 produced extracellular biosurfactants with emulsification activity by fermentation using babassu oil and D-glucose as carbon sources. Natural seawater diluted at 50% supplemented with urea, ammonium sulfate, and phosphate was used as economic basal medium. The best results were achieved with the YSW-B2 medium, which contained urea, ammonium sulfate, and babassu oil and with YSW-B3 medium, which contained urea, ammonium sulfate, phosphate, and babassu oil, kept under fed batch fermentation for 60 hours with 5% of babassu oil. For the two media, the maximum specific growth rates were 0.02 h-1 and 0.04 h-1; the generation times were 34.6 h-1 and 17.3 h-1, and the emulsification activities were 0.666 and 0.158 units, respectively. The molecules of these new bioemulsifiers were contituted of carbohydrates, proteins and lipids.

  11. Regulatory switches for hierarchical use of carbon sources in E. coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth S. Perez-Alfaro

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In this work we study the preferential use of carbon sources in the bacterium Escherichia coli. To that end we engineered transcriptional fusions of the reporter gene gfpmut2, downstream of transcription-factor promoters, and analyzed their activity under several conditions. The chosen transcription factors are known to regulate catabolic operons associated to the consumption of alternative sugars. The obtained results indicate the following hierarchical order of sugar preference in this bacterium: glucose > arabinose > sorbitol > galactose. Further dynamical results allowed us to conjecture that this hierarchical behavior might be operated by at least the following three regulatory strategies: 1 the coordinated activation of the corresponding operons by the global regulator catabolic repressor protein (CRP, 2 their asymmetrical responses to specific and unspecific sugars and, 3 the architecture of the associated gene regulatory networks.

  12. Enhanced biological phosphorus removal. Carbon sources, nitrate as electron acceptor, and characterization of the sludge community

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christensson, M.

    1997-10-01

    Enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) was studied in laboratory scale experiments as well as in a full scale EBPR process. The studies were focused on carbon source transformations, the use of nitrate as an electron acceptor and characterisation of the microflora. A continuous anaerobic/aerobic laboratory system was operated on synthetic wastewater with acetate as sole carbon source. An efficient EBPR was obtained and mass balances over the anaerobic reactor showed a production of 1.45 g poly-{beta}-hydroxyalcanoic acids (PHA), measured as chemical oxygen demand (COD), per g of acetic acid (as COD) taken up. Furthermore, phosphate was released in the anaerobic reactor in a ratio of 0.33 g phosphorus (P) per g PHA (COD) formed and 0.64 g of glycogen (COD) was consumed per g of acetic acid (COD) taken up. Microscopic investigations revealed a high amount of polyphosphate accumulating organisms (PAO) in the sludge. Isolation and characterisation of bacteria indicated Acinetobacter spp. to be abundant in the sludge, while sequencing of clones obtained in a 16S rDNA clone library showed a large part of the bacteria to be related to the high mole % G+C Gram-positive bacteria and only a minor fraction to be related to the gamma-subclass of proteobacteria to which Acinetobacter belongs. Operation of a similar anaerobic/aerobic laboratory system with ethanol as sole carbon source showed that a high EBPR can be achieved with this compound as carbon source. However, a prolonged detention time in the anaerobic reactor was required. PHA were produced in the anaerobic reactor in an amount of 1.24 g COD per g of soluble DOC taken up, phosphate was released in an amount of 0.4-0.6 g P per g PHA (COD) produced and 0.46 g glycogen (COD) was consumed per g of soluble COD taken up. Studies of the EBPR in the UCT process at the sewage treatment plant in Helsingborg, Sweden, showed the amount of volatile fatty acids (VFA) available to the PAO in the anaerobic stage to be

  13. Continental scale Antarctic deposition of sulphur and black carbon from anthropogenic and volcanic sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.-F. Graf

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available While Antarctica is often described as a pristine environment, there is an increasing awareness of the potential threats from local pollution sources including tourist ships and emissions associated with scientific activities. However, to date there has been no systematic attempt to model the impacts of such pollutants at the continental scale. Indeed, until very recently there was not even a sulphur emission budget available for Antarctica. Here we present the first comprehensive study of atmospheric pollution in Antarctica using a limited area chemistry climate model, and a monthly emissions inventory for sulphur from maintenance of research stations, ground and air traffic, shipping and the active Erebus volcano. We find that ship emissions, both sulphurous and black carbon, dominate anthropogenic pollution near the ground. Their prevalence is likely to rise dramatically if recent trends in tourism continue.

  14. Direct growth of graphene on gallium nitride using C2H2 as carbon source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bing; Zhao, Yun; Yi, Xiao-Yan; Wang, Guo-Hong; Liu, Zhi-Qiang; Duan, Rui-Rei; Huang, Peng; Wang, Jun-Xi; Li, Jin-Min

    2016-04-01

    Growing graphene on gallium nitride (GaN) at temperatures greater than 900°C is a challenge that must be overcome to obtain high quality of GaN epi-layers. We successfully met this challenge using C2H2 as the carbon source. We demonstrated that graphene can be grown both on copper and directly on GaN epi-layers. The Raman spectra indicated that the graphene films were about 4-5 layers thick. Meanwhile, the effects of the growth temperature on the growth of the graphene films were systematically studied, and 830°C was found to be the optimum growth temperature. We successfully grew high-quality graphene films directly on gallium nitride.

  15. Continental Scale Antarctic deposition of sulphur and black carbon from anthropogenic and volcanic sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.-F. Graf

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available While Antarctica is often described as a pristine environment, the potential threats from local pollution sources including tourist ships and emissions associated with scientific activities have recently been raised. However, to date there has been no systematic attempt to model the impacts of such pollutants at the continental scale. Indeed, until very recently there was not even a sulphur emission budget available for Antarctica. Here we present the first comprehensive study of atmospheric pollution in Antarctica using a limited area chemistry climate model, and a monthly emissions inventory for sulphur from maintenance of research stations, ground and air traffic, shipping and the active volcano Mt. Erebus. We find that ship emissions, both sulphurous and black carbon, dominate anthropogenic pollution near the ground. These are likely to rise considerably if recent trends in tourism continue.

  16. Brown carbon aerosol in the North American continental troposphere: sources, abundance, and radiative forcing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, J.; Scheuer, E.; Dibb, J.; Diskin, G. S.; Ziemba, L. D.; Thornhill, K. L.; Anderson, B. E.; Wisthaler, A.; Mikoviny, T.; Devi, J. J.; Bergin, M.; Perring, A. E.; Markovic, M. Z.; Schwarz, J. P.; Campuzano-Jost, P.; Day, D. A.; Jimenez, J. L.; Weber, R. J.

    2015-07-01

    Chemical components of organic aerosol (OA) selectively absorb light at short wavelengths. In this study, the prevalence, sources, and optical importance of this so-called brown carbon (BrC) aerosol component are investigated throughout the North American continental tropospheric column during a summer of extensive biomass burning. Spectrophotometric absorption measurements on extracts of bulk aerosol samples collected from an aircraft over the central USA were analyzed to directly quantify BrC abundance. BrC was found to be prevalent throughout the 1 to 12 km altitude measurement range, with dramatic enhancements in biomass-burning plumes. BrC to black carbon (BC) ratios, under background tropospheric conditions, increased with altitude, consistent with a corresponding increase in the absorption Ångström exponent (AAE) determined from a three-wavelength particle soot absorption photometer (PSAP). The sum of inferred BC absorption and measured BrC absorption at 365 nm was within 3 % of the measured PSAP absorption for background conditions and 22 % for biomass burning. A radiative transfer model showed that BrC absorption reduced top-of-atmosphere (TOA) aerosol forcing by ~ 20 % in the background troposphere. Extensive radiative model simulations applying this study background tropospheric conditions provided a look-up chart for determining radiative forcing efficiencies of BrC as a function of a surface-measured BrC : BC ratio and single scattering albedo (SSA). The chart is a first attempt to provide a tool for better assessment of brown carbon's forcing effect when one is limited to only surface data. These results indicate that BrC is an important contributor to direct aerosol radiative forcing.

  17. Carbon sources in the Beaufort Sea revealed by molecular lipid biomarkers and compound specific isotope analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Tolosa

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Molecular lipid biomarkers (hydrocarbons, alcohols, sterols and fatty acids and compound specific isotope analysis of suspended particulate organic matter (SPM and surface sediments of the Mackenzie Shelf and slope (Southeast Beaufort Sea, Arctic Ocean, were studied in summer 2009. The concentrations of the molecular lipid markers, characteristic of known organic matter sources, were grouped and used as proxies to evaluate the relative importance of fresh algal, detrital algal, fossil, C3 terrestrial plants, bacterial and zooplankton material in the sedimentary organic matter (OM.

    Fossil and detrital algal contributions were the major fractions of the freshwater SPM from the Mackenzie River with ~34% each of the total molecular biomarkers. Fresh algal, C3 terrestrial, bacterial and zooplanktonic components represented much lower percentages, 17, 10, 4 and < 1%, respectively. In marine SPM from the Mackenzie slope, the major contributions were fresh and detrital algal components (> 80% with a minor contribution of fossil and C3 terrestrial biomarkers. Characterization of the sediments revealed a major sink of refractory algal material mixed with some fresh algal material, fossil hydrocarbons and a small input of C3 terrestrial sources. In particular, the sediments from the shelf and at the mouth of the Amundsen Gulf presented the highest contribution of detrital algal material (60–75% whereas those from the slope contained the highest proportion of fossil (40% and C3 terrestrial plant material (10%. Overall, considering that the detrital algal material is marine derived, autochthonous sources contributed more than allochthonous sources to the OM lipid pool. Using the ratio of an allochthonous biomarker (normalized to total organic carbon, TOC found in the sediments to those measured at the river mouth water, we estimated that the fraction of terrestrial material preserved in the

  18. Sources of Organic-Carbon in the Littoral of Lake Gloomier as Indicated by Stable Carbon-Isotope and Carbohydrate Compositions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boschker, H.T.S.; Dekkers, E.M.J.; Pel, R.; Cappenberg, T.E.

    1995-01-01

    The relative importance of potential carbon sources in the littoral of Lake Gooimeer, a lake in the centre of the Netherlands, was studied using a combination of C-13/C-12-ratio analysis and carbohydrate composition analysis. The littoral is covered on the land side by a 80 m wide Phragmites austral

  19. The need for “apples-to-apples” comparisons of carbon dioxide source and sink estimates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Daniel; Turner, David

    2012-10-01

    The global land-based carbon dioxide (CO2) sink can be derived from the difference between fossil fuel emissions and the sum of estimated increases of CO2 in the atmosphere and in the ocean [Houghton, 2010]. For the purposes of developing policy to limit CO2 emissions, it is necessary to refine scientific understanding of the land CO2 flux in terms of its spatial and temporal patterns, as well as the underlying drivers. Net ecosystem exchange (NEE) is the commonly used measure of the land flux and is defined as the net vertical exchange of CO2 between a specified horizontal surface and the atmosphere above it over a given period of time. NEE estimates are reported from the atmospheric perspective, such that a positive value represents emissions (a land source) and a negative value represents removals (a land sink). This term represents a seemingly simple concept, and it was given a clear definition as one of the key carbon cycle variables by Chapin et al. [2006]. However, considerable confusion still arises around its usage, and the ambiguity is traceable primarily to the suite of different approaches used to estimate it.

  20. Effect of unconventional carbon sources on biosurfactant production and its application in bioremediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Rakeshkumar M; Mody, Kalpana; Joshi, Nidhi; Mishra, Avinash; Jha, Bhavanath

    2013-11-01

    The potential of an alkaliphilic bacterium Klebsiella sp. strain RJ-03, to utilize different unconventional carbon sources for the production of biosurfactant was evaluated. The biosurfactant produced using corn powder, potato peel powder, Madhuca indica and sugarcane bagasse containing medium, exhibited significantly higher viscosity and maximum reduction in surface tension as compared to other substrates. Among several carbon substrates tested, production of biosurfactant was found to be the highest with corn powder (15.40 ± 0.21 g/l) as compared to others. The comparative chemical characterization of purified biosurfactant was done using advance analytical tools such as NMR, FT-IR, SEM, GPC, MALDI TOF-TOF MS, GC-MS, TG and DSC. Analyses indicated variation in the functional groups, monosaccharide composition, molecular mass, thermostability. Higher yield with cheaper raw materials, noteworthy stress tolerance of CP-biosurfactant toward pH and salt as well as compatibility with chemical surfactants and detergents revealed its potential for commercialization and application in bioremediation. PMID:23994788

  1. Antifungal activity of clotrimazole against Candida albicans depends on carbon sources, growth phase and morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasper, Lydia; Miramón, Pedro; Jablonowski, Nadja; Wisgott, Stephanie; Wilson, Duncan; Brunke, Sascha; Hube, Bernhard

    2015-07-01

    Vulvovaginal candidiasis, a superficial infection caused predominantly by the pathogenic fungus Candida albicans, is frequently treated with clotrimazole. Some drug formulations contain lactate for improved solubility. Lactate may modify C. albicans physiology and drug sensitivity by serving as a carbon source for the fungus and/or affecting local pH. Here, we explored the effects of lactate, in combination with pH changes, on C. albicans proliferation, morphology and clotrimazole sensitivity. Moreover, we determined the influence of growth phase and morphology per se on drug sensitivity. We showed that utilization of lactate as a carbon source did not promote fast fungal proliferation or filamentation. Lactate had no influence on clotrimazole-mediated killing of C. albicans in standard fungal cultivation medium but had an additive effect on the fungicidal clotrimazole action under in vitro vagina-simulative conditions. Moreover, clotrimazole-mediated killing was growth-phase and morphology dependent. Post-exponential cells were resistant to the fungicidal action of clotrimazole, whilst logarithmic cells were sensitive, and hyphae showed the highest susceptibility. Finally, we showed that treatment of pre-formed C. albicans hyphae with sublethal concentrations of clotrimazole induced a reversion to yeast-phase growth. As C. albicans hyphae are considered the pathogenic morphology during mucosal infections, these data suggest that elevated fungicidal activity of clotrimazole against hyphae plus clotrimazole-induced hyphae-to-yeast reversion may help to dampen acute vaginal infections by reducing the relative proportion of hyphae and thus shifting to a non-invasive commensal-like population. In addition, lactate as an ingredient of clotrimazole formulations may potentiate clotrimazole killing of C. albicans in the vaginal microenvironment. PMID:25976001

  2. Nitrification and denitrification in biological activated carbon filter for treating high ammonia source water

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jianguang LIU; Xiaojian ZHANG; Zhansheng WANG

    2008-01-01

    Since the ammonia in the effluent of the tradi-tional water purification process could not meet the supply demand, the advanced treatment of a high concentration of NH4+-N micro-polluted source water by biological activated carbon filter (BACF) was tested. The filter was operated in the downflow manner and the results showed that the remov-ing rate of NH4+-N was related to the influent concentration of NH4+-N. Its removing rate could be higher than 95% when influent concentration was under 1.0 mg/L. It could also decrease with the increasing influent concentration when the NH4+-N concentration was in the range from 1.5-to 4.9 mg/L and the dissolved oxygen (DO) in the infuent was under 10 mg/L, and the minimum removing rate could be 30%. The key factor of restricting nitrifcation in BACF was the influent DO. When the influent NH4+-N concentration was high, the DO in water was almost depleted entirely by the nitrifying and hetetrophic bacteria in the depth of 0.4 m filter and the filter layer was divided into aerobic and anoxic zones. The nitrification and degradation of organic matters existed in the aerobic zone, while the denitrification occurred in the anoxic zone. Due to the limited carbon source, the denitrification could not be carried out properly, which led to the accu-mulation of the denitrification intermediates such as NO2-. In addition to the denitrification bacteria, the nitrification and the heterotrophic bacteria existed in the anoxic zone.

  3. Kinetic study of the hydrocarbon generation from marine carbonate source rocks characterization of products of gas and liquid hydrocarbon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GENG Xinhua; GENG Ansong; XIONG Yongqiang; LIU Jinzhong; ZHANG Haizu; ZHAO Qingfang

    2006-01-01

    The kinetic parameters of hydrocarbon generation from the marine carbonate source rocks were determined and calibrated through kinetic simulating experiment. The kinetic parameters of hydrocarbon generation then were extrapolated to geological condition by using the relative software.The result shows that gaseous hydrocarbons (C1, C2,C3, C4-5) were generated in condition of 150℃<T<220℃(1.0%<Ro <3.0% ). Light hydrocarbons (C6-13)and heavy hydrocarbons ( C13+) were generated in condition of 100 ℃<T<170 ℃ (0.5%<Ro<1.5%). A quantitative reference to examine the natural evolution of hydrocarbon of marine carbonate source rocks can be established through the results. It also provides a new method for evaluating the highly mature marine carbonate source rock more reasonably.

  4. A NMR-Based Carbon-Type Analysis of Diesel Fuel Blends From Various Sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bays, J. Timothy; King, David L.

    2013-05-10

    In collaboration with participants of the Coordinating Research Council (CRC) Advanced Vehicle/Fuels/Lubricants (AVFL) Committee, and project AVFL-19, the characteristics of fuels from advanced and renewable sources were compared to commercial diesel fuels. The main objective of this study was to highlight similarities and differences among the fuel types, i.e. ULSD, renewables, and alternative fuels, and among fuels within the different fuel types. This report summarizes the carbon-type analysis from 1H and 13C{1H} nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) of 14 diesel fuel samples. The diesel fuel samples come from diverse sources and include four commercial ultra-low sulfur diesel fuels (ULSD), one gas-to-liquid diesel fuel (GTL), six renewable diesel fuels (RD), two shale oil-derived diesel fuels, and one oil sands-derived diesel fuel. Overall, the fuels examined fall into two groups. The two shale oil-derived samples and the oil-sand-derived sample closely resemble the four commercial ultra-low sulfur diesels, with SO1 and SO2 most closely matched with ULSD1, ULSD2, and ULSD4, and OS1 most closely matched with ULSD3. As might be expected, the renewable diesel fuels, with the exception of RD3, do not resemble the ULSD fuels because of their very low aromatic content, but more closely resemble the gas-to-liquid sample (GTL) in this respect. RD3 is significantly different from the other renewable diesel fuels in that the aromatic content more closely resembles the ULSD fuels. Fused-ring aromatics are readily observable in the ULSD, SO, and OS samples, as well as RD3, and are noticeably absent in the remaining RD and GTL fuels. Finally, ULSD3 differs from the other ULSD fuels by having a significantly lower aromatic carbon content and higher cycloparaffinic carbon content. In addition to providing important comparative compositional information regarding the various diesel fuels, this report also provides important information about the capabilities of NMR

  5. Antimicrobial Activity of Carbon Nanoparticles Isolated from Natural Sources against Pathogenic Gram-Negative and Gram-Positive Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheena Varghese

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the isolation of carbon nanoparticles (CNPs from kitchen soot, characterization of the CNPs by UV/visible spectroscopy, SEM and XRD, and their antimicrobial action. The antibacterial activity of the isolated carbon nanoparticles was tested against various pathogenic bacterial strains such as Gram-negative Proteus refrigere and Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus haemolyticus. The inhibition zones were measured, and it was found that the carbon nanoparticles isolated from natural sources are active against these Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacterial strains.

  6. Top-down estimate of a large source of atmospheric carbon monoxide associated with fuel combustion in Asia

    OpenAIRE

    Kasibhatla, P.; Arellano, A.; J. A. Logan; Palmer, P.I.; Novelli, P.

    2002-01-01

    Deriving robust regional estimates of the sources of chemically and radiatively important gases and aerosols to the atmosphere is challenging. Here, we focus on carbon monoxide. Using an inverse modeling methodology, we find that the source of carbon monoxide from fossil-fuel and biofuel combustion in Asia during 1994 was 350–380 Tg yr−1, which is 110–140 Tg yr−1 higher than bottom-up estimates derived using traditional inventory-based approaches. This discrepancy points to an important gap i...

  7. DC modeling and the source of flicker noise in passivated carbon nanotube transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sunkook; Kim, Seongmin; Janes, David B; Mohammadi, Saeed; Back, Juhee; Shim, Moonsub

    2010-09-24

    DC and intrinsic low-frequency noise properties of p-channel depletion-mode carbon nanotube field effect transistors (CNT-FETs) are investigated. To characterize the intrinsic noise properties, a thin atomic layer deposited (ALD) HfO(2) gate dielectric is used as a passivation layer to isolate CNT-FETs from environmental factors. The ALD HfO(2) gate dielectric in these high-performance top-gated devices is instrumental in attaining hysteresis-free current-voltage characteristics and minimizes low-frequency noise. Under small drain-source voltage, the carriers in the CNT channel are modulated by the gate electrode and the intrinsic 1/f noise is found to be correlated with charge trapping/detrapping from the oxide substrate as expected. When thermionic emission is the dominant carrier transport mechanism in CNT-FETs under large drain-source voltages, the excess 1/f noise is attributed to the noise stemming from metal-CNT Schottky barrier contacts as revealed by the measurements.

  8. Concentration, sources and flux of dissolved organic carbon of precipitation at Lhasa city, the Tibetan Plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, C.

    2015-12-01

    Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) plays important role in climate system, but few data are available on the Tibetan Plateau (TP). In this study 89 precipitation samples were collected at Lhasa, the largest city of southern Tibet, from March to December 2013. The average concentration and wet deposition fluxes of DOC was 1.10 mg C/L and 0.62 g C m-2.yr-1, respectively. Seasonally, low DOC concentration and high flux appeared during monsoon period, which were in line with heavy precipitation amount, reflecting dilution effect of precipitation for the DOC. Compared to other regions, the values of Lhasa were lower than those of large cites (e.g. Beijing and Seoul) mainly because of less air pollution of Lhasa. The relationship between DOC and ion analysis showed that DOC of Lhasa was derived mainly from the natural sources, followed by burning activities. Furthermore, △14C value of DOC indicated that fossil combustion contributed around 20% of the precipitation DOC of Lhasa, indicating that the atmosphere of Lhasa has been influenced by vehicle emissions. Therefore, although atmosphere of Lhasa is relatively clean, pollutants emitted from local sources cannot be ignored.

  9. Diamondlike carbon deposition on plastic films by plasma source ion implantation

    CERN Document Server

    Tanaka, T; Shinohara, M; Takagi, T

    2002-01-01

    Application of pulsed high negative voltage (approx 10 mu s pulse width, 300-900 pulses per second) to a substrate is found to induce discharge, thereby increasing ion current with an inductively coupled plasma source. This plasma source ion beam implantation (PSII) technique is investigated for the pretreatment and deposition of diamond-like carbon (DLC) thin layer on polyethylene terepthalate (PET) film. Pretreatment of PET with N sub 2 and Ar plasma is expected to provide added barrier effects when coupled with DLC deposition, with possible application to fabrication of PET beverage bottles. PSII treatment using N sub 2 and Ar in separate stages is found to change the color of the PET film, effectively increasing near-ultraviolet absorption. The effects of this pretreatment on the chemical bonding of C, H, and O are examined by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). DLC thin film was successfully deposited on the PET film. The surface of the DLC thin layer is observed to be smooth by scanning electron mic...

  10. Sources of carbon monoxide and formaldehyde in North America determined from high-resolution atmospheric data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. M. Miller

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available We analyze the North American budget for carbon monoxide using data for CO and formaldehyde concentrations from tall towers and aircraft in a model-data assimilation framework. The Stochastic Time-Inverted, Lagrangian Transport model for CO (STILT-CO determines local to regional-scale CO contributions associated with production from fossil fuel combustion, biomass burning, and oxidation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs using an ensemble of Lagrangian particles driven by high resolution assimilated meteorology. In most cases, the model demonstrates high fidelity simulations of hourly surface data from tall towers and point measurements from aircraft, with somewhat less satisfactory performance in coastal regions and when CO from large biomass fires in Alaska and the Yukon Territory influence the continental US.

    Inversions of STILT-CO simulations for CO and formaldehyde show that current inventories of CO emissions from fossil fuel combustion are significantly too high, by almost a factor of three in summer and a factor two in early spring, consistent with recent analyses of data from the INTEX-A aircraft program. Formaldehyde data help to show that sources of CO from oxidation of CH4 and other VOCs represent the dominant sources of CO over North America in summer.

  11. Biosynthetic Pathways of Vibrio succinogenes growing with fumarate as terminal electron acceptor and sole carbon source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronder, M; Mell, H; Stupperich, E; Kröger, A

    1982-05-01

    1. With fumarate as the terminal electron acceptor and either H2 or formate as donor, Vibrio succinogenes could grow anaerobically in a mineral medium using fumarate as the sole carbon source. Both the growth rate and the cell yield were increased when glutamate was also present in the medium. 2. Glutamate was incorporated only into the amino acids of the glutamate family (glutamate, glutamine, proline and arginine) of the protein. The residual cell constituents were synthesized from fumarate. 3. Pyruvate and phosphoenolpyruvate, as the central intermediates of most of the cell constituents, were formed through the action of malic enzyme and phosphoenolpyruvate synthetase. Fructose-1,6-bisphosphate aldolase was present in the bacterium suggesting that this enzyme is involved in carbohydrate synthesis. 4. In the absence of added glutamate the amino acids of the glutamate family were synthesized from fumarate via citrate. The enzymes involved in glutamate synthesis were present. 5. During growth in the presence of glutamate, net reducing equivalents were needed for cell synthesis. Glutamate and not H2 or formate was used as the source of these reducing equivalents. For this purpose part of the glutamate was oxidized to yield succinate and CO2. 6. The alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase involved in this reaction was found to use ferredoxin as the electron acceptor. The ferredoxin of the bacterium was reoxidized by means of a NADP-ferredoxin oxidoreductase. Enzymes catalyzing the reduction of NAD, NADP or ferredoxin by H2 or formate were not detected in the bacterium. PMID:7103660

  12. Global organic carbon emissions from primary sources from 1960 to 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ye; Shen, Huizhong; Chen, Yilin; Zhong, Qirui; Chen, Han; Wang, Rong; Shen, Guofeng; Liu, Junfeng; Li, Bengang; Tao, Shu

    2015-12-01

    In an attempt to reduce uncertainty, global organic carbon (OC) emissions from a total of 70 sources were compiled at 0.1° × 0.1° resolution for 2007 (PKU-OC-2007) and country scale from 1960 to 2009. The compilation took advantage of a new fuel-consumption data product (PKU-Fuel-2007) and a series of newly published emission factors (EFOC) in developing countries. The estimated OC emissions were 32.9 Tg (24.1-50.6 Tg as interquartile range), of which less than one third was anthropogenic in origin. Uncertainty resulted primarily from variations in EFOC. Asia, Africa, and South America had high emissions mainly because of residential biomass fuel burning or wildfires. Per-person OC emission in rural areas was three times that of urban areas because of the relatively high EFOC of residential solid fuels. Temporal trend of anthropogenic OC emissions depended on rural population, and was influenced primarily by residential crop residue and agricultural waste burning. Both the OC/PM2.5 ratio and emission intensity, defined as quantity of OC emissions per unit of fuel consumption for all sources, of anthropogenic OC followed a decreasing trend, indicating continuous improvement in combustion efficiency and control measures.

  13. Source terms; isolation and radiological consequences of carbon-14 waste in the Swedish SFR repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The source term, isolation capacity, and long-term radiological exposure of 14C from the Swedish underground repository for low and intermediate level waste (SFR) is assessed. The prospective amount of 14C in the repository is assumed to be 5 TBq. Spent ion exchange resins will be the dominant source of 14C. The pore water in the concrete repository is expected to maintain a pH of >10.5 for a period of at least 106 y. The cement matrix of the repository will retain most of the 14CO32- initially present. Bacterial production of CO2 and CH4 from degradation of ion-exchange resins and bitumen may contribute to 14C release to the biosphere. However, CH4 contributes only to a small extent to the overall carbon loss from freshwater ecosystems. The individual doses to local and regional individuals peaked with 5x10-3 and regional individuals peaked with 5x10-3 and 8x10-4 μSv y-1 respectively at about 2.4x104 years. A total leakage of 8.4 GBq of 14C from the repository will cause a total collective dose commitment of 1.1 manSv or 130 manSv TBq-1. (authors)

  14. Tracing the sources and spatial distribution of organic carbon in subsoils using a multi-biomarker approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angst, Gerrit; John, Stephan; Mueller, Carsten W.; Kögel-Knabner, Ingrid; Rethemeyer, Janet

    2016-07-01

    Soil organic carbon (SOC) from aboveground and belowground sources has rarely been differentiated although it may drive SOC turnover and stabilization due to a presumed differing source dependent degradability. It is thus crucial to better identify the location of SOC from different sources for the parameterization of SOC models, especially in the less investigated subsoils. The aim of this study was to spatially assess contributions of organic carbon from aboveground and belowground parts of beech trees to subsoil organic carbon in a Dystric Cambisol. Different sources of SOC were distinguished by solvent-extractable and hydrolysable lipid biomarkers aided by 14C analyses of soil compartments carbon to the upper subsoil (leaf- and root-affected zone) indicate that supposedly fast-cycling, leaf-derived SOC may still be of considerable importance below the A-horizon. In the deeper subsoil (root-affected zone), roots were an important source of fresh SOC. Simultaneously, strongly increasing apparent 14C ages (3860 yrs BP) indicate considerable contribution of SOC that may be inherited from the Pleistocene parent material.

  15. Fungal Culture Systems for Production of Antioxidant Phenolics Using Pecan Nut Shells as Sole Carbon Source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel A. Medina

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Many agro-industrial wastes have little or none utilization, when these materials could be a very rich source of several value-added compounds, such as: the pecan nut shells, which contain Antioxidant Phenolic (AP molecules like tannins. Approach: In this study, a bioprocess for the liberation of AP from Pecan Nut Shells (PNS was described. A chemical characterization of raw material was evaluated to determine polyphenolic content of PNS, among other components. Several fungal culture systems were evaluated at 96 h fermentation processes and using PNS as sole carbon source. Solid (SSC and Submerged (SmC fermentations were carried out using three strains of Aspergillus niger. Culture medium was composed of a solid (10-50% and a liquid (90- 50% part in order to complete the 100% of the medium. Results: A high concentration (19% of tannins was found in PNS on a dry basis, from which condensed tannins and their monomers were found as the main fraction (14% of tannins of PNS, also on a dry basis. In the strain selection step, Aspergillus niger GH1 showed better growth on pecan nut shells compared to A. niger PSH strain, therefore, A. niger GH1 was used for later experiments. The highest concentration of AP was obtained with SSC inoculated with spores of A. niger GH1 on the 40% of solids system and in 20% solids system where, among the other systems both presented 114 mg TP g-1 of phenolics liberation at 24 h of fermentation. PNS is an important source of catechin, being this kind of compound which can be liberated in higher proportion compared to other phenolics compounds. Conclusion: This study demonstrated that fermenting PNS represent a good alternative to both use residues and obtaining AP.

  16. Soil warming effect on net ecosystem exchange of carbon dioxide during the transition from winter carbon source to spring carbon sink in a temperate urban lawn

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaoping Zhou; Xiaoke Wang; Lei Tong; Hongxing Zhang; Fei Lu; Feixiang Zheng; Peiqiang Hou; Wenzhi Song; Zhiyun Ouyang

    2012-01-01

    The significant wanning in urban environment caused by the combined effects of global warming and heat island has stimulated widely development of urban vegetations.However,it is less known of the climate feedback of urban lawn in warmed environment.Soil warming effect on net ecosystem exchange (NEE) of carbon dioxide during the transition period from winter to spring was investigated in a temperate urban lawn in Beijing,China.The NEE (negative for uptake) under soil warming treatment (temperature was about 5℃ higher than the ambient treatment as a control) was-0.71 μmol/(m2·sec),the ecosytem was a CO2 sink under soil warming treatment,the lawn ecosystem under the control was a CO2 source (0.13 μmol/(m2·sec)),indicating that the lawn ecosystem would provide a negative feedback to global warming.There was no significant effect of soil warming on nocturnal NEE (i.e.,ecosystem respiration),although the soil temperature sensitivity (Q10) of ecosystem respiration under soil warming treatment was 3.86,much lower than that in the control (7.03).The CO2 uptake was significantly increased by soil warming treatment that was attributed to about 100% increase of α (apparent quantum yield) and Amax (maximutn rate of photosynthesis).Our results indicated that the response of photosynthesis in urban lawn is much more sensitive to global warming than respiration in the transition period.

  17. Molasses as a source of carbon dioxide for attracting the malaria mosquitoes Anopheles gambiae and Anopheles funestus

    OpenAIRE

    Mweresa, C. K.; Omusula, P.; Otieno, B.; Loon, van, R.R.; Takken, W.; Mukabana, W.R.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Most odour baits for haematophagous arthropods contain carbon dioxide (CO2). The CO2 is sourced artificially from the fermentation of refined sugar (sucrose), dry ice, pressurized gas cylinders or propane. These sources of CO2 are neither cost-effective nor sustainable for use in remote areas of sub-Saharan Africa. In this study, molasses was evaluated as a potential substrate for producing CO2 used as bait for malaria mosquitoes. Methods. The attraction of laboratory-reared and w...

  18. Sources and Dynamics of Inorganic Carbon within the Upper Reaches of the Xi River Basin, Southwest China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Junyu

    2016-01-01

    The carbon isotopic composition (δ13C) of dissolved and particulate inorganic carbon (DIC; PIC) was used to compare and analyze the origin, dynamics and evolution of inorganic carbon in two headwater tributaries of the Xi River, Southwest China. Carbonate dissolution and soil CO2 were regarded as the primary sources of DIC on the basis of δ13CDIC values which varied along the Nanpan and Beipan Rivers, from −13.9‰ to 8.1‰. Spatial trends in DIC differed between the two rivers (i.e., the tributaries), in part because factors controlling pCO2, which strongly affected carbonate dissolution, differed between the two river basins. Transport of soil CO2 and organic carbon through hydrologic conduits predominately controlled the levels of pCO2 in the Nanpan River. However, pCO2 along the upper reaches of the Nanpan River also was controlled by the extent of urbanization and industrialization relative to agriculture. DIC concentrations in the highly urbanized upper reaches of the Nanpan River were typical higher than in other carbonate-dominated areas of the upper Xi River. Within the Beipan River, the oxidation of organic carbon is the primary process that maintains pCO2 levels. The pCO2 within the Beipan River was more affected by sulfuric acid from coal industries, inputs from a scenic spot, and groundwater than along the Nanpan River. With regards to PIC, the contents and δ13C values in the Nanpan River were generally lower than those in the Beipan River, indicating that chemical and physical weathering contributes more marine carbonate detritus to the PIC along the Beipan River. The CO2 evasion flux from the Nanpan River was higher than that in the Beipan River, and generally higher than along the middle and lower reaches of the Xi River, demonstrating that the Nanpan River is an important net source of atmospheric CO2 in Southwest China. PMID:27513939

  19. Geochemical identification of coal-sourced oils and interbedded shale-sourced oils as revealed by compound specific carbon isotopic analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    To date, questions remain as to how to differen tiate between coal- and interbedded shale-sourced oils in coal measures. Based on the hypothesis that δ13C value of sedimentary organic matter is controlled by the depositional environment and productivities of biota grown in such depositional setting, this note examines compound specific carbon isotopic profiles from coal and interbedded shale extracts using the gas chromatography-isotope ratio mass spectrometry technique (GC/IRMS). The results show that compound specific carbon isotope values from coal extracts are enriched in 13C relative to that of interbedded shale extracts, and provide useful information in characterizing coal- and interbedded shale-sourced oils in coal measures. An example for its successful application from the Turpan Basin, Northwestern China is presented.

  20. Biological marker characteristics of oils and asphalts from carbonate source rocks in a rapidly subsiding graben, Dead Sea, Israel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rullkötter, Jürgen; Spiro, Baruch; Nissenbaum, Arie

    1985-06-01

    A detailed GC/MS study of biological marker compounds in the saturated and aromatic hydrocarbon fractions of oils and asphalts from the Dead Sea area, Israel, provided decisive information to the solution of a long-lasting controversy by showing that the asphalts are products of early generation in an immature stage from the same type of carbonate source rock which generated more mature oils. The asphalts are not biodegraded residues of the oils. Oils from six different wells, and asphalts from wells, outcrops, and a floating block from the Dead Sea all have very similar sterane and triterpane patterns. They all lack rearranged steranes (diasteranes) indicating a carbonate source matrix and compare reasonably well with a sample of Upper Cretaceous bituminous chalk from Nebi Musa. The main difference between the oils and the asphalts is a significantly higher triaromatic to mono- plus triaromatic steroid hydrocarbon ratio in the former. This is explained as a result of rapid subsidence and heating of their source rock close to the deep parts of the Dead Sea graben. The oils thus were generated in the more deeply buried source rock blocks under the graben fill, whereas the asphalts either originate from an immature source rock section closer to the graben rims or represent an earlier phase of generation and expulsion. This study also provides general information on the evolution of biological markers in carbonate source rocks. Low-activation-energy processes, like isomerisation of steranes, appear to occur much faster at low temperatures than in shales. The high sulfur content and less cross-linking of the biogenic organic matter into a complex kerogen structure are suggested to be responsible for this. Care should be taken when using only sterane isomerisation to assess the maturity of hydrocarbons from carbonate rocks and of carbonate-derived oils.

  1. Enhanced nitrogen removal in a wastewater treatment process characterized by carbon source manipulation with biological adsorption and sludge hydrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hongbo; Zhao, Fang; Mao, Boyang; Wen, Xianghua

    2012-06-01

    An innovative adsorption/nitrification/denitrification/sludge-hydrolysis wastewater treatment process (ENRS) characterized by carbon source manipulation with a biological adsorption unit and a sludge hydrolysis unit was developed to enhance nitrogen removal and reduce sludge production for municipal wastewater treatment. The system presented good performance in pollutants removal, yielding the effluent with average COD, NH(4)(+)-N, TN and TP of 48.5, 0.6, 13.2 and 1.0 mg/L, respectively. Sixty percent of the total carbon source in the influent was concentrated and separated by the quick adsorption of activated sludge, providing the possibilities of reusing waste carbon source in the denitrification tank and accumulating nitrobacteria in the nitrification tank. Low temperature of 6-15 °C and high hydraulic loading rate of 3.0-15.0 m(3)/d did not affect NH(4)(+)-N removal performance, yielding the NH(4)(+)-N of lower 1.0 mg/L in the effluent. Furthermore, 50% of the residual sludge in the ENRS system could be transformed into soluble COD (SCOD) by alkaline thermal hydrolysis with temperature of 60 °C and pH of 11, and the hydrolyzed carbon could completely substitute methanol as a good quality carbon to support high efficient denitrification.

  2. Analysis of oxygen sources and reaction pathways of carbon support corrosion at the cathode in PEMFC using oxygen-18 DEMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Wei [Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, University of Alabama, Box 870203, Tuscaloosa AL 35487-0203 (United States); Lane, Alan M., E-mail: alane@eng.ua.ed [Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, University of Alabama, Box 870203, Tuscaloosa AL 35487-0203 (United States)

    2010-09-01

    Oxygen gas, water used to humidify the gases, and surface oxides originated from the carbon black and catalyst preparation are the three possible oxygen sources contributing to carbon support corrosion (CSC) at the cathode in proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC). To discriminate among them, oxygen was isotopically labeled by replacing regular water with oxygen-18 ({sup 18}O) enriched water (H{sub 2}{sup 18}O, 98%) in differential electrochemical mass spectrometry (DEMS). The DEMS spectra of the cathode exhaust gases O{sub 2}, O{sup 18}O, {sup 18}O{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}, CO{sup 18}O and C{sup 18}O{sub 2} (m/z equal to 32, 34, 36, 44, 46 and 48 correspondingly), sampled by a mass spectrometer during cyclic voltammetry (potential cycled for 100-1400 mV at the rate of 10 mV s{sup -1}) and chronoamperometry, were analyzed to identify the sources of oxygen, identify mechanistic pathways, and classify the surface oxides on carbon for CSC. It was found that water is the main direct oxygen source for CSC. Water reacts with carbon to produce at least three types of carbon surface oxides, which are then further oxidized with water to produce CO{sub 2} in different potential ranges.

  3. Characteristics of a high brightness gaseous field ion source employing tungsten-carbon doped NiAl needles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mousa, Marwan S., E-mail: mmousa@mutah.edu.jo [Department of Physics, Mu' tah University, P.O. Box 7, Al-Karak (Jordan)

    2011-05-15

    We report on the characterization of a high brightness gaseous field ion source using an emitter made of a NiAl needle containing tiny spherical tungsten-carbon precipitates. By field evaporation of such a multiphase alloy, a surface protrusion is formed out of a precipitate, which can act as a small source size field ion emitter. The emission current-voltage characteristics of this emitter were recorded for a variety of parameters. The results obtained suggest that its application as a stable ion source is possible even on long term operation. -- Research highlights: {yields} High brightness gaseous field ion source of precipitation hardened NiAl+W+C emitter. {yields} Emission current-voltage characteristics are recorded for a variety of parameters. {yields} Very small virtual source sizes and energy spreads can be attained. {yields} Results suggest that application as long term stable ion source is possible.

  4. Quantifying sources, transport, deposition, and radiative forcing of black carbon over the Himalayas and Tibetan Plateau

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Rudong; Wang, Hailong; Qian, Yun; Rasch, Philip J.; Easter, Richard C.; Ma, Po-Lun; Singh, Balwinder; Huang, Jianping; Fu, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Black carbon (BC)particles over the Himalayas and Tibetan Plateau (HTP), both airborne and those deposited on snow, have been shown to affect snowmelt and glacier retreat. Since BC over the HTP may originate from a variety of geographical regions and emission sectors, it is essential to quantify the source-receptor relationships of BC in order to understand the contributions of natural and anthropogenic emissions and provide guidance for potential mitigation actions. In this study, we use the Community Atmosphere Model version 5 (CAM5) with a newly developed source tagging technique, nudged towards the MERRA meteorological reanalysis, to characterize the fate of BC particles emitted from various geographical regions and sectors. Evaluated against observations over the HTP and surrounding regions, the model simulation shows a good agreement in the seasonal variation of the near-surface airborne BC concentrations, providing confidence to use this modeling framework for characterizing BC source- receptor relationships. Our analysis shows that the relative contributions from different geographical regions and source sectors depend on seasons and the locations in the HTP. The largest contribution to annual mean BC burden and surface deposition in the entire HTP region is from biofuel and biomass (BB) emissions in South Asia, followed by fossil fuel (FF) emissions from South Asia, then FF from East Asia. The same roles hold for all the seasonal means except for the summer when East Asia FF becomes more important. For finer receptor regions of interest, South Asia BB and FF have the largest impact on BC in Himalayas and Central Tibetan Plateau, while East Asia FF and BB contribute the most to Northeast Plateau in all seasons and Southeast Plateau in the summer. Central Asia and Middle East FF emissions have relatively more important contributions to BC reaching Northwest Plateau, especially in the summer. Although the HTP local emissions only contribute about 10% of BC in

  5. Growth of Arthrobacter sp. strain JBH1 on nitroglycerin as the sole source of carbon and nitrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husserl, Johana; Spain, Jim C; Hughes, Joseph B

    2010-03-01

    Arthrobacter sp. strain JBH1 was isolated from nitroglycerin-contaminated soil by selective enrichment. Detection of transient intermediates and simultaneous adaptation studies with potential intermediates indicated that the degradation pathway involves the conversion of nitroglycerin to glycerol via 1,2-dinitroglycerin and 1-mononitroglycerin, with concomitant release of nitrite. Glycerol then serves as the source of carbon and energy.

  6. Influence of the carbon source on production of cellulases, hemicellulases and pectinases by Trichoderma reesei Rut C-30

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsson, Lisbeth; Christensen, T.M.I.E.; Hansen, K.P.;

    2003-01-01

    The growth and enzyme production by Trichoderma reesei Rut C-30 using different lignocellulosic materials as carbon source were investigated. Cellulose, sugar beet pulp and alkaline extracted sugar beet pulp (resulting in partial removal of hemicellulose, lignin and pectin) or mixtures thereof were...

  7. Metabolomics reveals differences of metal toxicity in cultures of Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes KF707 grown on different carbon sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean Cameron Booth

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Co-contamination of metals and organic pollutants is a global problem as metals interfere with the metabolism of complex organics by bacteria. Based on a prior observation that metal tolerance was altered by the sole carbon source being used for growth, we sought to understand how metal toxicity specifically affects bacteria using an organic pollutant as their sole carbon source. To this end metabolomics was used to compare cultures of Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes KF707 grown on either biphenyl or succinate as the sole carbon source in the presence of either aluminum or copper. Using multivariate statistical analysis it was found that the metals caused perturbations to more cellular processes in the cultures grown on biphenyl than those grown on succinate. Aluminum induced many changes that were indicative of increased oxidative stress as metabolites involved in DNA damage and protection, the Krebs cycle and anti-oxidant production were altered. Copper also caused metabolic changes that were indicative of similar stress, as well as appearing to disrupt other key enzymes such as fumarase. Additionally, both metals caused the accumulation of biphenyl degradation intermediates indicating that they interfered with biphenyl metabolism. Together these results provide a basic understanding of how metal toxicity specifically affects bacteria at a biochemical level during the degradation of an organic pollutant and implicate the catabolism of this carbon source as a major factor that exacerbates metal toxicity.

  8. Metabolomics reveals differences of metal toxicity in cultures of Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes KF707 grown on different carbon sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, Sean C; Weljie, Aalim M; Turner, Raymond J

    2015-01-01

    Co-contamination of metals and organic pollutants is a global problem as metals interfere with the metabolism of complex organics by bacteria. Based on a prior observation that metal tolerance was altered by the sole carbon source being used for growth, we sought to understand how metal toxicity specifically affects bacteria using an organic pollutant as their sole carbon source. To this end metabolomics was used to compare cultures of Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes KF707 grown on either biphenyl (Bp) or succinate (Sc) as the sole carbon source in the presence of either aluminum (Al) or copper (Cu). Using multivariate statistical analysis it was found that the metals caused perturbations to more cellular processes in the cultures grown on Bp than those grown on Sc. Al induced many changes that were indicative of increased oxidative stress as metabolites involved in DNA damage and protection, the Krebs cycle and anti-oxidant production were altered. Cu also caused metabolic changes that were indicative of similar stress, as well as appearing to disrupt other key enzymes such as fumarase. Additionally, both metals caused the accumulation of Bp degradation intermediates indicating that they interfered with Bp metabolism. Together these results provide a basic understanding of how metal toxicity specifically affects bacteria at a biochemical level during the degradation of an organic pollutant and implicate the catabolism of this carbon source as a major factor that exacerbates metal toxicity. PMID:26347721

  9. [Study on degradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) with different additional carbon sources in aged contaminated soil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Chun-Qin; Jiang, Xin; Wang, Fang; Wang, Cong-Ying

    2012-02-01

    This study was conducted with different additional carbon sources (such as: glucose, DL-malic acid, citrate, urea and ammonium acetate) to elucidate the degradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in aged contaminated soil under an indoor simulation experiment. The results showed that the quantity of CO2 emission in different additional carbon sources treatments was obviously much more than that of check treatment in the first week, and the quantity of CO2 emission in DL-malic acid treatment was the largest. The average CO2 production decreased in an order urea > glucose approximately citrate approximately DL-malic acid approximately ammonium acetate > check. Meanwhile, the amount of volatized PAHs in applied carbon sources treatments was significantly less than that in check treatment. The amount of three volatized PAHs decreased in an order phenanthrene > fluoranthene > benzo(b)fluoranthene. Compared with the check treatment, the average degradation rates of the three PAHs were significantly augmented in the supplied carbon sources treatments, in which rates of the three PAHs were much higher in DL-malic acid and urea treatments than those in other treatments. The largest proportion of residual was benzo(b)fluoranthene (from 72% to 81%) among three PAHs compounds, followed by fluoranthene (from 53% to 70% ) and phenanthrene (from 27% to 44%).

  10. Application of central composite design to optimize the amount of carbon source and prebiotics for Bifidobacterium bifidum BB01

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu Guowei

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study was to obtain the optimum proportion of the carbon source and prebiotics for Bifidobacterium bifidum BB01 by the central composite design (CCD. The effect of carbon source (lactose and two prebiotics (inulin and fructooligosaccharides on the BB01 were observed by measuring the OD600 value, pH value and the viable counts at 18h. The final optimized concentrations of carbon source and prebiotics were: lactose 1.6%, inulin 0.26%, and fructooligosaccharides 0.22%. The result indicates that the growth of B. bifidum BB01 shows an significant increase in the optimized culture medium (p < 0.05, the OD600 value reached 1.434 at 18h, which increased 6.58% compared to the control. And the viable counts of B. bifidum BB01 increased 24.36% and reached (2.17±0.06 ×109cfu/mL. The results show that the optimization of the carbon source and prebiotics using CCD in this study is workable and necessary.

  11. Effects of carbon sources, oxygenation and ethanol on the production of inulinase by Kluyveromyces marxianus YX01

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JIAOQI GAO

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Inulinase is one of the most important factors in consolidated bioprocessing, which combines enzyme production, inulin saccharification, and ethanol fermentation into a single process. In our study, inulinase production and cell growth of Kluyveromyces marxianus YX01 under different conditions were studied. Carbon source was shown to be significant on the production of inulinase, because the activity of inulinase was higher using inulin as a carbon source compared with glucose or fructose. The concentration of the carbon source had a repressive effect on the activity of inulinase. When the concentration was increased to 60 g/L, inulinase activity was only 50% compared with carbon source concentration of 20 g/L. Enzyme activity was also strongly influenced by aeration rate. It has been shown that the activity of inulinase and cell growth under anaerobic conditions were maintained at low levels, but aeration at 1.0 vvm (air volume/broth volume minute led to higher activity. Inulinase activity per unit biomass was not significantly different under different aeration rates. Ethanol had a repressive effect on the cell growth. Cells ceased growing when the level of ethanol was greater than 9% (v/v, but ethanol did not affect the activity of secreted inulinase and the enzyme was stable at ethanol concentration up to 15%.

  12. A Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotube-based Biosensor for Monitoring Microcystin-LR in Sources of Drinking Water Supplies

    Science.gov (United States)

    A multi-walled carbon nanotube-based electrochemical biosensor is developed for monitoring microcystin-LR (MC-LR), a toxic cyanobacterial toxin, in sources of drinking water supplies. The biosensor electrodes are fabricated using dense, mm-long multi-walled CNT (MWCNT) arrays gro...

  13. Silurian and Devonian source rocks and crude oils from the western part of Libya: Organic geochemistry, palynology and carbon stratigraphy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elkelani, Mohamed M.A.

    2015-01-01

    The Early Silurian “hot” shales and Late Devonian black shales are major regional oil and gas source rocks in North Africa. Their deposition probably played a major role in global carbon cycling in general because of the large areas of the ocean affected. Comparing the Libyan δ13C record with record

  14. Carbon isotopic characteristics of hydrocarbon gases from coal-measure source rocks--A thermal simulation experiment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Jianjing; HU Huifang; SUN Guoqiang; JI Limin

    2006-01-01

    Gaseous hydrocarbon geochemistry research through a thermal simulation experiment in combination with the natural evolution process in which natural gases were formed from coal-measure source rocks revealed that the δ13C1 values of methane vary from light to heavy along with the increase of thermal evolution degree of coal-measure source rocks, and the δ13C2 values of ethane range from -28.3‰ to -20‰ (PDB). δ13C2 value was -28‰± ( Ro= 0.45% - 0.65%) at the lower thermal evolution stage of coal-measure source rocks. After the rocks entered the main hydrocarbon-generating stage (Ro=0.65% - 1.50%), δ13C2 values generally varied within the range of -26‰ - -23‰±; with further thermal evolution of the rocks the carbon isotopes of ethane became heavier and heavier, but generally less than - 20‰.The partial carbon isotope sequence inversion of hydrogen gases is a characteristic feature of mixing of natural gases of different origins. Under the condition of specially designated type of organic matter, hydrogen source rocks may show this phenomenon via their own evolution.In the lower evolution stages of the rocks, it is mainly determined by organic precursors that gaseous hydrocarbons display partial inversion of the carbon isotope sequence and the carbon isotopic values of ethane are relatively low. These characteristic features also are related to the geochemical composition of primary soluble organic matter.

  15. Oxygen vectors used for S-adenosylmethionine production in recombinant Pichia pastoris with sorbitol as supplemental carbon source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jian-Guo; Wang, Xue-Dong; Zhang, Ji-Ning; Wei, Dong-Zhi

    2008-04-01

    In order to increase the yield of S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) in recombinant Pichia pastoris, a strategy of adding oxygen vectors and supplemental carbon sources was described. Three organic solutions were used as oxygen vectors for SAM accumulation at different concentrations and addition times. Firstly, n-hexane (0.5%) or n-heptane (1.0%) was added after 72 h of cultivation to improve SAM production. Carbon metabolism was scarce during the induction phase because of low methanol concentration. Secondly, sorbitol (1.2%), selected from three candidates (glycerol, lactic acid, and sorbitol), was used as the supplemental carbon source. The yield of SAM was improved significantly (53.26%) at 1.0%n-heptane added at 72 h (48 h induction), 1.2% sorbitol added at 72, 96, and 120 h of cultivation and 1.0% methanol added every 24 h during cultivation.

  16. Fabrication and Properties of SiB6-B4C with Phenolic Resin as a Carbon Source

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Si-B-C ceramic composites were synthesized using SiB6, B4C, and phenolic resin as a carbon source by pressureless sintering in an Ar atmosphere. Then, the Si-B-C ceramic composites were fabricated to determine their potential for applications as high hardness and high temperature composites. The X-ray diffraction patterns of sintered bodies of SiB6-B4C with carbonized phenolic resin can be seen that SiB6 and C changed to B4C and SiC. In this study, it is obtained that carbonized phenolic resin is good addition material as a reaction material comparing to carbon powder at 1683 K for 1 h by pressureless sintering in an Ar atmosphere.

  17. A TEM study of soot, carbon nanotubes, and related fullerene nanopolyhedra in common fuel-gas combustion sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanoparticle aggregates collected by thermophoretic precipitation from natural gas-air and propane-air kitchen stove top flame exhausts, natural gas-air water heater roof-top exhausts, and other common fuel-gas combustion sources were observed by transmission electron microscopy to consist of occasional aggregates of mostly turbostratic carbon spherules, aggregates of crystalline graphite nanoparticles mixed with other fullerene nanoforms; and aggregates of various sizes of multiwall carbon nanotubes and other multishell, fullerene polyhedra for optimal blue-flame combustion. The carbon nanotube structures and end cap variations as well as fullerene polyhedral structures were observed to be the same as those for arc-evaporation produced nanoaggregates. Nanoparticle aggregation or the occurrence of carbon nanoforms always occurred as aggregates with nominal sizes ranging from about 0.5 μm to 1.5 μm

  18. Growth of Hexagonal Columnar Nanograin Structured SiC Thin Films on Silicon Substrates with Graphene–Graphitic Carbon Nanoflakes Templates from Solid Carbon Sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wanshun Zhao

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available We report a new method for growing hexagonal columnar nanograin structured silicon carbide (SiC thin films on silicon substrates by using graphene–graphitic carbon nanoflakes (GGNs templates from solid carbon sources. The growth was carried out in a conventional low pressure chemical vapor deposition system (LPCVD. The GGNs are small plates with lateral sizes of around 100 nm and overlap each other, and are made up of nanosized multilayer graphene and graphitic carbon matrix (GCM. Long and straight SiC nanograins with hexagonal shapes, and with lateral sizes of around 200–400 nm are synthesized on the GGNs, which form compact SiC thin films.

  19. 13C-metabolic flux ratio and novel carbon path analyses confirmed that Trichoderma reesei uses primarily the respirative pathway also on the preferred carbon source glucose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saloheimo Markku

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The filamentous fungus Trichoderma reesei is an important host organism for industrial enzyme production. It is adapted to nutrient poor environments where it is capable of producing large amounts of hydrolytic enzymes. In its natural environment T. reesei is expected to benefit from high energy yield from utilization of respirative metabolic pathway. However, T. reesei lacks metabolic pathway reconstructions and the utilization of the respirative pathway has not been investigated on the level of in vivo fluxes. Results The biosynthetic pathways of amino acids in T. reesei supported by genome-level evidence were reconstructed with computational carbon path analysis. The pathway reconstructions were a prerequisite for analysis of in vivo fluxes. The distribution of in vivo fluxes in both wild type strain and cre1, a key regulator of carbon catabolite repression, deletion strain were quantitatively studied by performing 13C-labeling on both repressive carbon source glucose and non-repressive carbon source sorbitol. In addition, the 13C-labeling on sorbitol was performed both in the presence and absence of sophorose that induces the expression of cellulase genes. Carbon path analyses and the 13C-labeling patterns of proteinogenic amino acids indicated high similarity between biosynthetic pathways of amino acids in T. reesei and yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In contrast to S. cerevisiae, however, mitochondrial rather than cytosolic biosynthesis of Asp was observed under all studied conditions. The relative anaplerotic flux to the TCA cycle was low and thus characteristic to respiratory metabolism in both strains and independent of the carbon source. Only minor differences were observed in the flux distributions of the wild type and cre1 deletion strain. Furthermore, the induction of the hydrolytic gene expression did not show altered flux distributions and did not affect the relative amino acid requirements or relative anabolic

  20. Characteristics of a high brightness gaseous field ion source employing tungsten-carbon doped NiAl needles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mousa, Marwan S

    2011-05-01

    We report on the characterization of a high brightness gaseous field ion source using an emitter made of a NiAl needle containing tiny spherical tungsten-carbon precipitates. By field evaporation of such a multiphase alloy, a surface protrusion is formed out of a precipitate, which can act as a small source size field ion emitter. The emission current-voltage characteristics of this emitter were recorded for a variety of parameters. The results obtained suggest that its application as a stable ion source is possible even on long term operation. PMID:21296502

  1. [Carbon source metabolic diversity of soil microbial community under different climate types in the area affected by Wenchuan earthquake].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guang-Shuai; Lin, Yong-Ming; Ma, Rui-Feng; Deng, Hao-Jun; Du, Kun; Wu, Cheng-Zhen; Hong, Wei

    2015-02-01

    The MS8.0 Wenchuan earthquake in 2008 led to huge damage to land covers in northwest Sichuan, one of the critical fragile eco-regions in China which can be divided into Semi-arid dry hot climate zone (SDHC) and Subtropical humid monsoon climate zone (SHMC). Using the method of Bilog-ECO-microplate technique, this paper aimed to determine the functional diversity of soil microbial community in the earthquake-affected areas which can be divided into undamaged area (U), recover area (R) and damaged area without recovery (D) under different climate types, in order to provide scientific basis for ecological recovery. The results indicated that the average-well-color-development (AWCD) in undamaged area and recovery area showed SDHC > SHMC, which was contrary to the AWCD in the damaged area without recovery. The AWCD of damaged area without recovery was the lowest in both climate zones. The number of carbon source utilization types of soil microbial in SHMC zone was significantly higher than that in SDHC zone. The carbon source utilization types in both climate zones presented a trend of recover area > undamaged area > damaged area without recovery. The carbon source metabolic diversity characteristic of soil microbial community was significantly different in different climate zones. The diversity index and evenness index both showed a ranking of undamaged area > recover area > damaged area without recovery. In addition, the recovery area had the highest richness index. The soil microbial carbon sources metabolism characteristic was affected by soil nutrient, aboveground vegetation biomass and vegetation coverage to some extent. In conclusion, earthquake and its secondary disasters influenced the carbon source metabolic diversity characteristic of soil microbial community mainly through the change of aboveground vegetation and soil environmental factors. PMID:26031097

  2. Chemical kinetics study of hydrocarbon regeneration from organic matter in carbonate source rocks and its significance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU ShuangFang; ZHONG NingNing; XUE HaiTao; PAN ChangChun; LI JiJun; LI HongTao

    2007-01-01

    In the comparison research of hydrocarbon regeneration, a low maturity carbonate source rock is heated to different temperatures in a gold tube to obtain a series of samples with different maturities. Then, the heated samples, before and after extraction, are subjected to Rock-Eval pyrolysis through a thermal simulation of hydrocarbon regeneration in order to inspect pyrolysis characteristics and probe into the characteristics of the chemical kinetics of each sample. The results indicate that, whether hydrocarbon regeneration peak is delayed or advanced, the potential of hydrocarbon regeneration is closely related to the expulsion amount and breakdown maturity of primary hydrocarbon generation. After extraction, the average activation energy of artificially maturated samples increases with the in creasing maturity, but the chemical kinetic properties of un-extracted samples decrease. The calibrated chemical kinetic models that describe extracted and un-extracted samples are applied to the Bohai Bay and the Songliao Basin, and the results indicate that the combination of the two models can explain some contradictory conclusions previously reported. These results also facilitate the quantitative evaluation of the amount of hydrocarbon regeneration by the chemical kinetic method.

  3. Evaluation of gasoline-denatured ethanol as a carbon source for denitrification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazasi, Anna; Boardman, Gregory D; Bott, Charles B

    2013-06-01

    In this study concerning denitrification, the performance of three carbon sources, methanol (MeOH), ethanol (EtOH) and gasoline-denatured ethanol (dEtOH), was compared and evaluated on the basis of treatment efficiency, inhibition potential and cost. The gasoline denaturant considered here contained mostly aliphatic compounds and little of the components that typically boost the octane rating, such as benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylenes. Results were obtained using three lab-scale SBRs operated at SRT of 12.0 +/- 0.9 days. After biomass was acclimated, denitrification rates with dEtOH were similar to those of EtOH (201 +/- 50 and 197 +/- 28 NO3-N/g MLVSS x d, respectively), and higher than those of MeOH (165 +/- 49 mg NO3-N/g MLVSS x d). The denaturant did not affect biomass production, nitrification or denitrification. Effluent soluble COD concentrations were always less than the analytical detection limit. Although the cost of dEtOH ($2.00/kg nitrate removed) was somewhat higher than that of methanol ($1.63/kg nitrate removed), the use of dEtOH is very promising and utilities will have to decide if it is worth paying a little extra to take advantage of its benefits.

  4. Low-cost carbon sources for the production of a thermostable xylanase by Aspergillus niger

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Cláudia Elias Pião Benedetti

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A strain of the filamentous fungus Aspergillus niger was isolated and shown to possess extracellular xylanolytic activity. These enzymes have biotechnological potential and can be employed in various industries. This fungus produced its highest xylanase activity in a medium made up of 0.1% CaCO3 , 0.5% NaCl, 0.1% NH4 Cl, 0.5% corn steep liquor and 1% carbon source, at pH 8.0. A lowcost hemicellulose residue (powdered corncob proved to be an excellent inducer of the A. niger xylanolytic complex. Filtration of the crude culture medium with suspended kaolin was ideal for to clarify the extract and led to partial purification of the xylanolytic activity. The apparent molecular mass of the xylanase was about 32.3 kDa. Maximum enzyme activity occurred at pH 5.0 and 55-60ºC. Apparent Km was 10.41 ± 0.282 mg/mL and Vmax was 3.32 ± 0.053 U/mg protein, with birchwood xylan as the substrate. Activation energy was 4.55 kcal/mol and half-life of the crude enzyme at 60ºC was 30 minutes. Addition of 2% glucose to the culture medium supplemented with xylan repressed xylanase production, but in the presence of xylose the enzyme production was not affected.

  5. Carbon source and myc expression influence the antiproliferative actions of metformin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javeshghani, Shiva; Zakikhani, Mahvash; Austin, Shane; Bazile, Miguel; Blouin, Marie-José; Topisirovic, Ivan; St-Pierre, Julie; Pollak, Michael N

    2012-12-01

    Epidemiologic and experimental data have led to increased interest in possible roles of biguanides in cancer prevention and/or treatment. Prior studies suggest that the primary action of metformin is inhibition of oxidative phosphorylation, resulting in reduced mitochondrial ATP production and activation of AMPK. In vitro, this may lead to AMPK-dependent growth inhibition if AMPK and its effector pathways are intact or to an energetic crisis if these are defective. We now show that the effect of exposure of several transformed cell lines to metformin varies with carbon source: in the presence of glutamine and absence of glucose, a 75% decrease in cellular ATP and an 80% decrease in cell number is typical; in contrast, when glucose is present, metformin exposure leads to increased glycolysis, with only a modest reduction in ATP level and cell number. Overexpression of myc was associated with sensitization to the antiproliferative effects of metformin, consistent with myc involvement in "glutamine addiction". Our results reveal previously unrecognized factors that influence metformin sensitivity and suggest that metformin-induced increase in glycolysis attenuates the antiproliferative effects of the compound. PMID:23041548

  6. Oxidized Polyethylene Wax as a Potential Carbon Source for PHA Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iza Radecka

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available We report on the ability of bacteria to produce biodegradable polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHA using oxidized polyethylene wax (O-PEW as a novel carbon source. The O-PEW was obtained in a process that used air or oxygen as an oxidizing agent. R. eutropha H16 was grown for 48 h in either tryptone soya broth (TSB or basal salts medium (BSM supplemented with O-PEW and monitored by viable counting. Study revealed that biomass and PHA production was higher in TSB supplemented with O-PEW compared with TSB only. The biopolymers obtained were preliminary characterized by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR, gel permeation chromatography (GPC, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC, and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA. The detailed structural evaluation at the molecular level was performed by electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (ESI-MS/MS. The study revealed that, when TSB was supplemented with O-PEW, bacteria produced PHA which contained 3-hydroxybutyrate and up to 3 mol % of 3-hydroxyvalerate and 3-hydroxyhexanoate co-monomeric units. The ESI-MS/MS enabled the PHA characterization when the content of 3-hydroxybutyrate was high and the appearance of other PHA repeating units was very low.

  7. Growth of bacteria on 3-nitropropionic acid as a sole source of carbon, nitrogen, and energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishino, Shirley F; Shin, Kwanghee A; Payne, Rayford B; Spain, Jim C

    2010-06-01

    3-Nitropropionic acid (3NPA) is a widespread nitroaliphatic toxin found in a variety of legumes and fungi. Several enzymes have been reported that can transform the compound, but none led to the mineralization of 3NPA. We report here the isolation of bacteria that grow on 3NPA and its anion, propionate-3-nitronate (P3N), as the sole source of carbon, nitrogen, and energy. Experiments with resting cells, cell extracts, and purified enzymes indicate that the pathway involves conversion of 3NPA to P3N, which upon denitration yields malonic semialdehyde, nitrate, nitrite, and traces of H(2)O(2). Malonic semialdehyde is decarboxylated to acetyl coenzyme A. The gene that encodes the enzyme responsible for the denitration of P3N was cloned and expressed, and the enzyme was purified. Stoichiometry of the reaction indicates that the enzyme is a monooxygenase. The gene sequence is related to a large group of genes annotated as 2-nitropropane dioxygenases, but the P3N monooxygenase and closely related enzymes form a cluster within COG2070 that differs from previously characterized 2-nitropropane dioxygenases by their substrate specificities and reaction products. The results suggest that the P3N monooxygenases enable bacteria to exploit 3NPA in natural habitats as a growth substrate. PMID:20382807

  8. Performance of a 60 F carbon nanotubes-based supercapacitor for hybrid power sources

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaofeng Wang; Dianbo Ruan; Zheng You; Yiqiang Lu; Qiqian Sha

    2005-01-01

    A supercapacitor based on charge storage at the interface between a high surface area carbon nanotube electrode and a LiClO4/PC electrolyte was assembled. The performance of the capacitor depends on not only the material used in the cell but also the construction of the cell. From a constant charge-discharge test, the capacitance of 60 F was obtained. The performance of the power power supercapacitor were demonstrated with a cell of the maximum operating voltage of 2.5 V. A hybrid power source consisting of a lithium ionic battery and the 60 F supercapacitor was demonstrated to power successfully a simulated power load encountered in GSM portable communication equipment. The addition of the supercapacitor to the power train of a cellular phone results in significantly more energy from the battery being used by the load. The experiments indicate that more than 33.8% energy is utilized by load and less stored energy is dissipated within the battery for each charge-discharge cycle.

  9. Straw application in paddy soil enhances methane production also from other carbon sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Q.; Pump, J.; Conrad, R.

    2014-01-01

    Flooded rice fields are an important source of the greenhouse gas methane. Methane is produced from rice straw (RS), soil organic matter (SOM), and rice root organic carbon (ROC). Addition of RS is widely used for ameliorating soil fertility. However, this practice provides additional substrate for CH4 production and results in increased CH4 emission. Here, we found that decomposing RS is not only a substrate of CH4 production, but in addition stimulates CH4 production from SOM and ROC. Apart from accelerating the creation of reduced conditions in the soil environment, RS decomposition resulted in enhancement of SOM-derived CH4 production. In particular, hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis from SOM-derived CO2 was stimulated, presumably by H2 released from RS decomposition. On the other hand, the enhancement of ROC-derived CH4 production after RS application was probably caused by the significant increase of the abundance of methanogenic Archaea in the RS treatment compared with the untreated control. Our results show that traditional management of rice residues exerts a positive feedback on CH4 production from rice fields, thus exacerbating its effect on the global CH4 budget.

  10. Optimization of probiotic lactobacillus casei ATCC 334 production using date powder as carbon source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahravy A.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to optimize culture conditions for economic production of a probiotic bacterium, Lactobacillus casei ATCC 334, in which palm date powder was applied for the first time as a low-cost main carbon source. The effect of eleven factors on bacterial growth was investigated using the Taguchi experimental design, and three factors including palm date powder, tryptone and agitation rate were found to be the most significant parameters. The optimum conditions including date powder concentration, 38 g/L; tryptone concentration, 30 g/L; and an agitation rate of 320 rpm were determined by response surface methodology of Box-Behnken. A third-order polynomial model was suggested to predict the design space following which the predicted values were validated experimentally. The maximum log value of the viable cells in the optimized alternative medium was 9.97 at 24 h of incubation which was comparable to that obtained in the complex and expensive MRS medium (10.06.

  11. Biological phosphate removal using a degradable carbon source produced by hydrothermal treatment of excess sludge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. H. Haraguchi

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available The possibility of reusing excess sludge treated by hydrothermal reaction for the purpose of improving the efficiency of the enhanced biological phosphate removal (EBPR process was investigated. Excess sludge from a fish-processing industry located in Japan was treated in high-temperature and high-pressure water, at a reaction temperature ranging from 200 to 400ºC, a pressure of 1.8 to 30MPa and a constant reaction time of 7 min. For the conditions tested, the results showed that when the reaction temperature was increased the content of readily biodegradable substrate in the total COD Cr increased. In addition, the amount of some volatile fatty acids (VFAs produced by the hydrothermal reaction increased as reaction temperature increased. From the phosphate release tests under anaerobic conditions, it was possible to demonstrate that not only the VFAs, but also the readily and slowly biodegradable substrates are used as potential carbon source by the phosphate-accumulating organisms (PAOs.

  12. Chemical kinetics study of hydrocarbon regeneration from organic matter in carbonate source rocks and its significance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    In the comparison research of hydrocarbon regeneration, a low maturity carbonate source rock is heated to different temperatures in a gold tube to obtain a series of samples with different maturities. Then, the heated samples, before and after extraction, are subjected to Rock-Eval pyrolysis through a thermal simulation of hydrocarbon regeneration in order to inspect pyrolysis characteristics and probe into the characteristics of the chemical kinetics of each sample. The results indicate that, whether hy- drocarbon regeneration peak is delayed or advanced, the potential of hydrocarbon regeneration is closely related to the expulsion amount and breakdown maturity of primary hydrocarbon generation. After extraction, the average activation energy of artificially maturated samples increases with the in- creasing maturity, but the chemical kinetic properties of un-extracted samples decrease. The calibrated chemical kinetic models that describe extracted and un-extracted samples are applied to the Bohai Bay and the Songliao Basin, and the results indicate that the combination of the two models can explain some contradictory conclusions previously reported. These results also facilitate the quantitative evaluation of the amount of hydrocarbon regeneration by the chemical kinetic method.

  13. Sources and mixing state of size-resolved elemental carbon particles in a European megacity: Paris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. M. Healy

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available An Aerosol Time-Of-Flight Mass Spectrometer (ATOFMS was deployed to investigate the size-resolved chemical composition of single particles at an urban background site in Paris, France, as part of the MEGAPOLI winter campaign in January/February 2010. ATOFMS particle counts were scaled to match coincident Twin Differential Mobility Particle Sizer (TDMPS data in order to generate hourly size-resolved mass concentrations for the single particle classes observed. The total scaled ATOFMS particle mass concentration in the size range 150–1067 nm was found to agree very well with the sum of concurrent High-Resolution Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS and Multi-Angle Absorption Photometer (MAAP mass concentration measurements of organic carbon (OC, inorganic ions and black carbon (BC (R2 = 0.91. Clustering analysis of the ATOFMS single particle mass spectra allowed the separation of elemental carbon (EC particles into four classes: (i EC attributed to biomass burning (ECbiomass, (ii EC attributed to traffic (ECtraffic, (iii EC internally mixed with OC and ammonium sulfate (ECOCSOx, and (iv EC internally mixed with OC and ammonium nitrate (ECOCNOx. Average hourly mass concentrations for EC-containing particles detected by the ATOFMS were found to agree reasonably well with semi-continuous quantitative thermal/optical EC and optical BC measurements (r2 = 0.61 and 0.65–0.68 respectively, n = 552. The EC particle mass assigned to fossil fuel and biomass burning sources also agreed reasonably well with BC mass fractions assigned to the same sources using seven-wavelength aethalometer data (r2 = 0.60 and 0.48, respectively, n = 568. Agreement between the ATOFMS and other instrumentation improved noticeably when a period influenced by significantly aged, internally mixed EC particles was removed from the intercomparison. 88% and 12% of EC particle

  14. Sources and mixing state of size-resolved elemental carbon particles in a European megacity: Paris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healy, R. M.; Sciare, J.; Poulain, L.; Kamili, K.; Merkel, M.; Müller, T.; Wiedensohler, A.; Eckhardt, S.; Stohl, A.; Sarda-Estève, R.; McGillicuddy, E.; O'Connor, I. P.; Sodeau, J. R.; Wenger, J. C.

    2012-02-01

    An Aerosol Time-Of-Flight Mass Spectrometer (ATOFMS) was deployed to investigate the size-resolved chemical composition of single particles at an urban background site in Paris, France, as part of the MEGAPOLI winter campaign in January/February 2010. ATOFMS particle counts were scaled to match coincident Twin Differential Mobility Particle Sizer (TDMPS) data in order to generate hourly size-resolved mass concentrations for the single particle classes observed. The total scaled ATOFMS particle mass concentration in the size range 150-1067 nm was found to agree very well with the sum of concurrent High-Resolution Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) and Multi-Angle Absorption Photometer (MAAP) mass concentration measurements of organic carbon (OC), inorganic ions and black carbon (BC) (R2 = 0.91). Clustering analysis of the ATOFMS single particle mass spectra allowed the separation of elemental carbon (EC) particles into four classes: (i) EC attributed to biomass burning (ECbiomass), (ii) EC attributed to traffic (ECtraffic), (iii) EC internally mixed with OC and ammonium sulfate (ECOCSOx), and (iv) EC internally mixed with OC and ammonium nitrate (ECOCNOx). Average hourly mass concentrations for EC-containing particles detected by the ATOFMS were found to agree reasonably well with semi-continuous quantitative thermal/optical EC and optical BC measurements (r2 = 0.61 and 0.65-0.68 respectively, n = 552). The EC particle mass assigned to fossil fuel and biomass burning sources also agreed reasonably well with BC mass fractions assigned to the same sources using seven-wavelength aethalometer data (r2 = 0.60 and 0.48, respectively, n = 568). Agreement between the ATOFMS and other instrumentation improved noticeably when a period influenced by significantly aged, internally mixed EC particles was removed from the intercomparison. 88% and 12% of EC particle mass was apportioned to fossil fuel and biomass burning respectively using the ATOFMS data

  15. Sources and mixing state of size-resolved elemental carbon particles in a European megacity: Paris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. M. Healy

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available An Aerosol Time-Of-Flight Mass Spectrometer (ATOFMS was deployed to investigate the size-resolved chemical composition of single particles at an urban background site in Paris, France, as part of the MEGAPOLI winter campaign in January/February 2010. ATOFMS particle counts were scaled to match coincident Twin Differential Mobility Particle Sizer (TDMPS data in order to generate hourly size-resolved mass concentrations for the single particle classes observed. The total scaled ATOFMS particle mass concentration in the size range 150–1067 nm was found to agree very well with the sum of concurrent High-Resolution Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS and Multi-Angle Absorption Photometer (MAAP mass concentration measurements of organic carbon (OC, inorganic ions and black carbon (BC (R2 = 0.91. Clustering analysis of the ATOFMS single particle mass spectra allowed the separation of elemental carbon (EC particles into four classes: (i EC attributed to biomass burning (ECbiomass, (ii EC attributed to traffic (ECtraffic, (iii EC internally mixed with OC and ammonium sulfate (ECOCSOx, and (iv EC internally mixed with OC and ammonium nitrate (ECOCNOx. Average hourly mass concentrations for EC-containing particles detected by the ATOFMS were found to agree reasonably well with semi-continuous quantitative thermal/optical EC and optical BC measurements (r2 = 0.61 and 0.65–0.68, respectively, n = 552. The EC particle mass assigned to fossil fuel and biomass burning sources also agreed reasonably well with BC mass fractions assigned to the same sources using seven-wavelength aethalometer data (r2 = 0.60 and 0.48, respectively, n = 568. Agreement between the ATOFMS and other instrumentation improved noticeably when a period influenced by significantly aged, internally mixed EC particles was removed from the intercomparison. 88 % and 12 % of EC

  16. Fossil and contemporary sources of organic and elemental carbon at a rural and an urban site in the Netherlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dusek, U.; Monaco, M.; Weijers, E.; Röckmann, T.

    2012-04-01

    Measurement of the radioactive carbon isotope 14C in aerosols can provide a direct estimate of the contribution of fossil fuel sources to aerosol carbon. In aerosol science, measurements of 14C/12C ratios are usually reported as fraction modern (fm), relative to an oxalic acid standard that, by definition, has fm=1. The radiocarbon signature gives a clear distinction between 'modern' carbon sources (fm around 1.1-1.2 for biomass burning and around 1.05 for biogenic secondary organic aerosol) and 'fossil' carbon sources (fm =0 for primary and secondary formation from fossil fuel combustion). High volume filter samples have been collected since February 2011 at Cabauw, a rural location in the Netherlands, and additionally in May and June at two suburban locations around Rotterdam. We report measurements of fm for total carbon (TC), organic carbon (OC), water insoluble OC (WIOC) and thermally refractory carbon (RC) as a proxy for elemental carbon. The carbon fractions are isolated by combusting TC at 650 °C, OC and WIOC at 360 °C. Refractory carbon is defined as the carbon remaining on the filter after water extraction, combustion at 360 °C for 15 min and at 450 °C for 2 minutes. The method has been tested with test substances and real aerosol filters and shows little charring for water-extracted filters. First results of 7 filter samples taken from February - Mai 2011 show fm(OC) generally larger than 0.86 at the rural site, except for one case, when a strongly polluted air mass originating in Eastern Europe reached the site. This indicates a strong contribution of natural sources to OC, even in the Netherlands, a very densely populated country with one of the highest levels of aerosol pollution in Western Europe. In particular, WSOC in the rural springtime aerosol seems to originate almost entirely from contemporary sources. Refractory carbon also showed relatively high fm, generally between 0.3-0.5, except in two cases, when marine air masses reached the site

  17. Tracking development paths: Monitoring driving forces and the impact of carbon-free energy sources in Spain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • The development path of Spain is analysed using an extended Kaya identity. • Effect of carbon free energy sources separated. • Nuclear energy acted to increase emissions as it declined in share. • Renewable energy penetration recently began to reduce carbon emissions. • Future policy must address wider factors of sustainable development. - Abstract: The evolution of the national development path has gravity in determining the future emissions outcomes of all nations. Deep reductions in emissions require a focus not just on energy and mitigation policy but on factors underlying this development. The Kaya identity has been recommended to track national progress with respect to sustainability and carbon emissions in the development path. This study applies an extended Kaya identity to the energy-related carbon emissions of Spain. Implemented through a divisia index decomposition annually from 1990 to 2011, it highlights the impact of factors such as affluence and energy intensity. A marked departure from previous studies is the separation of the effects of the carbon-free energy sources; both renewables and nuclear as fundamental mitigation measures. The results show that affluence and population have acted to increase emissions and energy intensity was increasing until recent years. Fuel substitution has acted to decrease emissions but while renewable energy has reduced emissions with the increasing importance of biomass, wind and solar, the decline in share of nuclear has acted to increase emissions. Implications for the development path and policy are discussed and lessons are relevant both for industrialised and industrialising nations

  18. Land-use and Erosion Source Discrimination of Soil and Carbon Sources to the Logan and Albert Rivers in Australia using Compound Specific Isotope Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The compound specific isotope analysis (CSIA) technique has been used to identify the sources of soil erosion contributing sediment to the Logan-Albert catchment. Soil samples were collected in January 2010 and used to assess the ability of the CSIA technique to discriminate probable sources of soil erosion. Fatty acid and bulk carbon isotope signature (δ13C) were measured. This study has built on a previous sediment tracing study undertaken in 2008 using fallout radionuclides and major/minor element geochemistry. It was found that surface soils from forest, pasture and cultivated land uses are well discriminated using CSIA. Furthermore, sub-surface soil sources associated with channel bank erosion and exposed subsoils (gullies and hillslope scalds) occurring specifically in the mid-western Logan catchment could also be discriminated. The CSIA and bulk carbon δ13C data were used in the IsoSource mixing model to estimate the erosion sources of sediment collected during the January 2008 flood. The results of this analysis were compared with results obtained using other sediment tracers. For the lower Logan River, the CSIA tracing results are consistent with fallout and element geochemistry tracing, with channel bank erosion being confirmed as the major sediment source. However, the significant contribution to Logan River sediment of exposed subsoils originating on hillslopes and drainage lines from the mid-western region of the Logan catchment has also been confirmed by CSIA. This erosion source was not quantified by catchment modelling. In the Albert River catchment about 50% of soil comes from forest land use, although more than half of this soil comes from sub-surface sources. These results have demonstrated that the CSIA technique has the potential to significantly enhance the ability of CSIRO Land and Water sediment tracing studies to determine the extent that different land uses are contributing eroded soil to rivers, thus providing a check on

  19. The combined application of organic sulphur and isotope geochemistry to assess multiple sources of palaeobiochemicals with identical carbon skeletons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohnen, M. E.; Schouten, S.; Sinninghe Damste, J. S.; de Leeuw, J. W.; Merrit, D.; Hayes, J. M.

    1992-01-01

    Five immature sediments from a Messinian evaporitic basin, representing one evaporitic cycle, were studied using molecular organic sulphur and isotope geochemistry. It is shown that a specific carbon skeleton which is present in different "modes of occurrence" ("free" hydrocarbon, alkylthiophene, alkylthiolane, alkyldithiane, alkylthiane, and sulphur-bound in macromolecules) may have different biosynthetic precursors which are possibly derived from different biota. It is demonstrated that the mode of occurrence and the carbon isotopic composition of a sedimentary lipid can be used to "reconstruct" its biochemical precursor. This novel approach of recognition of the suite of palaeobiochemicals present during the time of deposition allows for identification of the biological sources with an unprecedented specificity.

  20. Process characterization and influence of alternative carbon sources and carbon-to-nitrogen ratio on organic acid production by Aspergillus oryzae DSM1863.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochsenreither, Katrin; Fischer, Christian; Neumann, Anke; Syldatk, Christoph

    2014-06-01

    L-Malic acid and fumaric acid are C4 dicarboxylic organic acids and considered as promising chemical building blocks. They can be applied as food preservatives and acidulants in rust removal and as polymerization starter units. Molds of the genus Aspergillus are able to produce malic acid in large quantities from glucose and other carbon sources. In order to enhance the production potential of Aspergillus oryzae DSM 1863, production and consumption rates in an established bioreactor batch-process based on glucose were determined. At 35 °C, up to 42 g/L malic acid was produced in a 168-h batch process with fumaric acid as a by-product. In prolonged shaking flask experiments (353 h), the suitability of the alternative carbon sources xylose and glycerol at a carbon-to-nitrogen (C/N) ratio of 200:1 and the influence of different C/N ratios in glucose cultivations were tested. When using glucose, 58.2 g/L malic acid and 4.2 g/L fumaric acid were produced. When applying xylose or glycerol, both organic acids are produced but the formation of malic acid decreased to 45.4 and 39.4 g/L, respectively. Whereas the fumaric acid concentration was not significantly altered when cultivating with xylose (4.5 g/L), it is clearly enhanced by using glycerol (9.3 g/L). When using glucose as a carbon source, an increase or decrease of the C/N ratio did not influence malic acid production but had an enormous influence on fumaric acid production. The highest fumaric acid concentrations were determined at the highest C/N ratio (300:1, 8.44 g/L) and lowest at the lowest C/N ratio (100:1, 0.7 g/L).

  1. Optimal Medium Composition to Enhance Poly-β-hydroxybutyrate Production by Ralstonia eutropha Using Cane Molasses as Sole Carbon Source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Bozorg

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In order to reduce the costs associated with Poly-β-hydroxybutyrate production, growth and Poly-β-hydroxybutyrate production of Ralstonia eutropha were studied in batch culture on different carbon sources. Experiments were designed and conducted to not only lower the cost of Poly-β-hydroxybutyrate production by using inexpensive substrates, but also to increase Poly-β-hydroxybutyrate production by optimizing the culture medium composition. Low cost, abundant carbon sources, including cane molasses, beet molasses, soya bean, and corn steep liquor were used to investigate the possibility of Poly-β-hydroxybutyrate production in such renewable carbon sources. Based on the experimental results, cane molasses with production of 0.49 g/L Poly-β-hydroxybutyrate was selected as the most efficient carbon source. To improve bacterial growth and Poly-β-hydroxybutyrate production, different chemicals were then used to pretreat the cane molasses. Sulfuric acid, with 33% enhancement in Poly-β-hydroxybutyrate production, revealed the highest efficiency in removing heavy metals and suspended impurities and was used to pretreat cane molasses in the subsequent experiments. Additionally, to make the process even more efficient and ultimately more effective, urea and corn steep liquor were used as nitrogen/minerals and vitamin sources, respectively. Using the Response Surface Methodology and through a 2n factorial Central Composite Design, the medium composition was then optimized, and maximum biomass concentration of 5.03 g/L and Poly-β-hydroxybutyrate concentration of 1.63 g/L were obtained.

  2. Carbon sources supporting benthic mineralization in mangrove and adjacent seagrass sediments (Gazi Bay, Kenya)

    OpenAIRE

    BOUILLON, S; Moens, T.; F. Dehairs

    2004-01-01

    The origin of carbon substrates used by in situ sedimentary bacterial communities was investigated in an intertidal mangrove ecosystem and in adjacent seagrass beds in Gazi bay (Kenya) by δ13C analysis of bacteria-specific PLFA (phospholipid fatty acids) and bulk organic carbon. Export of mangrove-derived organic matter to the adjacent seagrass-covered bay was evident from sedimentary total organic carbon (TOC) and δ13CTOC data. PLFA δ13C data indicate tha...

  3. Biopolymers production with carbon source from the wastes of a beer brewery industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Phoeby Ai Ling

    The main purpose of this study was to assess the potential and feasibility of malt wastes, and other food wastes, such as soy wastes, ice-cream wastes, confectionery wastes, vinegar wastes, milk waste and sesame oil, in the induction of biosynthesis of PHA, in the cellular assembly of novel PHA with improved physical and chemical properties, and in the reduction of the cost of PHA production. In the first part of the experiments, a specific culture of Alcaligenes latus DSM 1124 was selected to ferment several types of food wastes as carbon sources into biopolymers. In addition, the biopolymer production, by way of using malt waste, of microorganisms from municipal activated sludge was also investigated. In the second part, the experiments focused on the synthesis of biopolymer with a higher molecular mass via the bacterial strain, which was selected and isolated from sesame oil, identified as Staphylococcus epidermidis . Molecular weight and molecular weight distribution of PHB were studied by GPC. Molecular weight of PHB produced from various types of food wastes by Alcaligenes latus was higher than using synthetic sucrose medium as nutrient, however, it resulted in the reverse by Staphylococcus epidermidis. Thermal properties of biopolymers were studied by DSC and TG. Using malt wastes as nutrients by Alcaligenes latus gave a higher melting temperature. Using sucrose, confectionery and sesame oil as nutrients by Staphylococcus epidermidis gave higher melting temperature. Optimization was carried out for the recovery of microbial PHB from Alcaligenes latus. Results showed that molecular weight can be controlled by changing the hypochlorite concentration, the ratio of chloroform to hypochlorite solution and the extraction time. In addition, the determination of PHB content by thermogravimetric analysis method with wet cell was the first report in our study. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)

  4. Flax shive as a sources of activated carbon for metals remediation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akin, D. E.

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Flax shive constitutes about 70% of the flax stem and has limited use. Because shive is a lignocellulosic by-product, it can potentially be pyrolyzed and activated to produce an activated carbon. The objective of this study was to create an activated carbon from flax shive by chemical activation in order to achieve significant binding of selected divalent cations (cadmium, calcium, copper, magnesium, nickel, zinc. Shive carbons activated by exposure to phosphoric acid and com-pressed air showed greater binding of cadmium, copper, nickel or zinc than a sulfuric acid-activated flax shive carbon reported in the literature and a commercial, wood-based carbon. Uptake of calcium from a drinking water sample by the shive carbon was similar to commercial drinking water filters that contained cation exchange resins. Magnesium removal by the shive carbon was greater than a commercial drinking water filtration carbon but less than for filters containing cation exchange resins. The results indicate that chemically activated flax shive carbon shows considerable promise as a component in industrial and residential water filtration systems for removal of divalent cations.

  5. Sources of organic carbon in mangrove sediments: variability and possible ecological implications

    OpenAIRE

    Bouillon, Steven; Dahdouh-Guebas, F.; Rao, AVVS; N. Koedam; F. Dehairs

    2005-01-01

    Mangrove sediments from three different mangrove ecosystems (Coringa Wildlife Sanctuary in the Godavari Delta, Andhra Pradesh, India, and Galle and Pambala, south-west Sri Lanka) were analysed for their organic carbon content, elemental ratios (C:N) and carbon stable isotope composition. Organic carbon content (0.6 - 31.7% dry weight), C/N ratios (7.0 - 27.3) and delta(13)C (between -29.4 and -20.6parts per thousand) showed a wide range of values. Lower stocks of organic carbon coincided with...

  6. A source-to-sink perspective on the mobilization, transport, and burial of organic carbon following the 2008 Sichuan earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, A.; Li, G.; Hammond, D. E.; Jin, Z.

    2012-12-01

    The mobilization and fluvial transport of organic carbon is one of the most important geochemical legacies of landslides triggered by extreme events such as major floods or earthquakes. While there is some information about the quantity of carbon carried by rivers under varying flow regimes, and even in the aftermath of single large events, there is little source-to-sink information about the transfer of this carbon through river systems into depositional centers, and about the geochemical transformations following deposition. These processes may be distinct in the aftermath of extreme events because of the association of organic carbon transport with high clastic sediment loads. In this study, we use the legacy of the 2008 Mw 7.9 Wenchuan Earthquake in Sichuan, China, to explore the mobilization, transport, and ultimate fate of organic carbon associated with co-seismic and post-seismic landslides. We focus on Zipingpu Reservoir, which serves as a trap for material carried by the Min Jiang river that drains the epicentral region most dramatically affected by landslides. We use revised landslide and biomass maps to quantify total organic carbon mobilized from hillslopes within the reservoir catchment area. We have collected sediment cores from the reservoir itself, and together with estimates of sedimentation rates constrained by short-lived radionuclide abundances, we construct a budget for the carbon transport into the reservoir based on analyses of sediment solid phase organic C concentrations and isotope ratios. Post-depositional diagenetic alteration is quantified using pore water profiles, including DIC concentration, carbon isotope compositions, and the isotopic composition of methane collected both in-situ from pore waters, and associated with actively bubbling methane seeps.

  7. Importance of different carbon sources for macroinvertebrates and fishes of an interlinked mangrove-mudflat ecosystem (Tanzania)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruitwagen, G.; Nagelkerken, I.; Lugendo, B. R.; Mgaya, Y. D.; Bonga, S. E. Wendelaar

    2010-08-01

    Mangroves function as important shelter and feeding habitats for marine fauna, but the degree to which mangrove-derived carbon contributes to local food webs has long been debated. In this study, stable isotope analysis was used as a technique to elucidate the role of mangrove carbon in the diets of the macroinvertebrate and fish fauna of an intertidal fringing mangrove forest and adjacent intertidal/subtidal mudflats in a macrotidal Tanzanian estuary. The expectation was that sessile species and those with low motility depend to a larger extent on local carbon sources than highly motile species. A clear distinction in δ 13C was present between primary producers from mangrove and mudflat habitats. Macroinvertebrates revealed a gradient in their δ 13C where Sesarma crabs were the only species that directly utilised mangrove carbon by feeding on mangrove leaves/detritus. Uca crabs and the gastropod Littoraria scabra showed a higher dependence on microphytobenthos from the mangrove substratum. Among the fish fauna, the amphibious mudskipper was the only species to which the mangroves were accessible during low tide. Consequently this was the only fish species for which it was clear that it fed in the mangrove habitat, most commonly on mangrove-associated Uca crabs. All other species of sessile as well as motile macroinvertebrates and fish from the mangrove and mudflat habitat showed a high degree of utilisation of mudflat carbon. Overall, mangrove carbon thus contributed little to the mangrove and mudflat food webs, despite the high tidal amplitude and the resulting potential for exchange of carbon and fauna in the estuary studied here. Utilisation of mangrove carbon appears to depend more on the ecology of the species in consideration (e.g., species-specific use of zones within the mangrove habitat) than on their potential motility or tolerance to exposure during low tide.

  8. Assessment of Contribution of Contemporary Carbon Sources to Size-Fractionated Particulate Matter and Time-Resolved Bulk Particulate Matter Using the Measurement of Radiocarbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, H M; Young, T M; Buchholz, B A

    2009-04-16

    This study was motivated by a desire to improve understanding of the sources contributing to the carbon that is an important component of airborne particulate matter (PM). The ultimate goal of this project was to lay a ground work for future tools that might be easily implemented with archived or routinely collected samples. A key feature of this study was application of radiocarbon measurement that can be interpreted to indicate the relative contributions from fossil and non-fossil carbon sources of atmospheric PM. Size-resolved PM and time-resolved PM{sub 10} collected from a site in Sacramento, CA in November 2007 (Phase I) and March 2008 (Phase II) were analyzed for radiocarbon and source markers such as levoglucosan, cholesterol, and elemental carbon. Radiocarbon data indicates that the contributions of non-fossil carbon sources were much greater than that from fossil carbon sources in all samples. Radiocarbon and source marker measurements confirm that a greater contribution of non-fossil carbon sources in Phase I samples was highly likely due to residential wood combustion. The present study proves that measurement of radiocarbon and source markers can be readily applied to archived or routinely collected samples for better characterization of PM sources. More accurate source apportionment will support ARB in developing more efficient control strategies.

  9. Xylem-Transported Glucose as an Additional Carbon Source for Leaf Isoprene Formation in Quercus Robur L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graus, M.; Kreuzwieser, J.; Schnitzler, J.; Wisthaler, A.; Hansel, A.; Rennenberg, H.

    2003-04-01

    Isoprene is emitted from mature, photosynthesizing leaves of many plant species, particularly of trees. Current interest in understanding the biochemical and physiological mechanisms controlling isoprene formation is caused by the important role isoprene plays in atmospheric chemistry. Isoprene reacts with hydroxyl radicals (OH) thereby generating oxidizing agents such as ozone and organic peroxides. Ozone causes significant deterioration in air quality and can pose threats to human health therefore its control is a major goal in Europe and the United States. In recent years, much progress has been made in elucidating the pathways of isoprene biosynthesis. Nevertheless the regulatory mechanisms controlling isoprene emission are not completely understood. Light and temperature appear to be the main factors controlling short-term variations in isoprene emission. Exposure of plants to C-13 labeled carbon dioxide showed instantaneous assimilated carbon is the primary carbon source for isoprene formation. However, variations in diurnal and seasonal isoprene fluxes, which cannot be explained by temperature, light, and leaf development led to the suggestion that alternative carbon sources may exist contributing to isoprene emissions. The aim of the present study was to test whether xylem-transported carbohydrates act as additional sources for isoprene biosynthesis. For this purpose, [U-C-13] alpha-D-glucose was fed to photosynthesizing leaves via the xylem of Quercus robur L. seedlings and the incorporation of glucose derived C-13 into emitted isoprene was monitored in real time using Proton-Transfer-Reaction Mass Spectrometry (PTR-MS). A rapid incorporation of C-13 from xylem-fed glucose into single (mass 70) and double (mass 71) C-13 labeled isoprene molecules was observed after a lag phase of approximately 5 to 10 minutes. This incorporation was temperature dependent and was highest (up to 13% C-13 of total carbon emitted as isoprene) at the temperature optimum of

  10. Sources of Below-Ground Respired Carbon in a Northern Minnesota Ombrotrophic Spruce Bog and the Influence of Heating Manipulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guilderson, T. P.; McFarlane, K. J.; McNicol, G.; Hanson, P. J.; Chanton, J.; Wilson, R.; Bosworth, R.; Singleton, M. J.

    2015-12-01

    A significant uncertainty in future land-surface carbon budgets is the response of wetlands to climate change. A related question is the future net climate (radiative) forcing impact due to ecosystem and environmental change in wetlands. Active wetlands emit both CO2 and CH4 to the atmosphere. CH4 is, over a few decades, a much more potent greenhouse gas than CO2 whereas as a consequence of a much longer atmospheric lifetime, CO2 has a longer 'tail' to its influence. Whether wetlands are a net source or sink of atmospheric carbon under future climate change will depend on the response of the ecosystem to rising temperatures and elevated CO2. The largest uncertainty in future wetland budgets, and its climate forcing, is the stability of the large belowground carbon stocks, often in the form of peat, and the partitioning of CO2 and CH4released via ecosystem respiration. We have characterized the isotopic signatures (14,13C of CO2 and CH4, D-CH4) of the respired carbon used for the production of CO2 and CH4 from the DOE Spruce and Peatland Responses Under Climatic and Environmental Change (SPRUCE) site in the Marcell Experimental Forest, which contains replicated mesocosm manipulations including above/below ground warming and elevated CO2. Deep warming (1-2 m) was initiated in July of 2014 and above ground heating will be initiated in July 2015. Comparison of the respired CO2 and CH4with recently fixed photosynthate, below-ground peat (up to 11,000 years old), and dissolved organic carbon allow us to determine the primary substrates used by the microbial community. Control and pre-perturbed plots are characterized by the consumption and respiration of recently fixed photosynthate and recent (few years to 15 yr) carbon. Although CH4 fluxes have begun to respond to deep-heating, the source of carbon remains similar in the control and perturbed plots. Respired CO2 remains consistent with being sourced from carbon only a few years old. We will present additional data

  11. Modeling Aerobic Carbon Source Degradation Processes using Titrimetric Data and Combined Respirometric-Titrimetric Data: Structural and Practical Identifiability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gernaey, Krist; Petersen, B.; Dochain, D.;

    2002-01-01

    considerably more for dextrose than for acetate degradation models. Noteworthy is the finding that the half-saturation substrate concentrations can be different depending on whether they are estimated from respirometric or titrimetric data. Moreover, this difference appears to be dependent on the carbon source...... the initial substrate concentration S-S(O) is known. The values found correspond to values reported in literature, but, interestingly, also seem able to reflect the occurrence of storage processes when pulses of acetate and dextrose are added. (C) 2002 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.......The structural and practical identifiability of a model for description of respirometric-titrimetric data derived from aerobic batch substrate degradation experiments of a CxHyOz carbon source with activated sludge was evaluated. The model processes needed to describe titrimetric data included...

  12. Determination of carbon isotopic composition of individual light hydrocarbons evolved from pyrolysis of source rocks by using GC-IRMS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The carbon isotopic composition of individual light hydrocarbons generated from source rocks that had been pyrolysed in vacuum glass tube were determined by using the GC-IRMS techniques. The results indicate that abundant CO2 in the pyrolysates has a remarkable effect on the determination of CH4δ13C. Running cryogenically with an initial temperature of -40℃can effectively eliminate the effect. In addition, it conduces to measuring the δ13C of C2+ hydrocarbons by increasing the injection volume and/or absorbing CO2 with the solution of sodium hydroxide.The above measures will help to get the carbon isotopic composition of C1-C7 components, which is of great significance for gas/source rock correlation and for study on the genesis of natural gas.

  13. Effect of different carbon sources on decolourisation of an industrial textile dye under alkaline-saline conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottoni, Cristiane; Lima, Luis; Santos, Cledir; Lima, Nelson

    2014-01-01

    White-rot fungal strains of Trametes versicolor and Phanerochaete chrysosporium were selected to study the decolourisation of the textile dye, Reactive Black 5, under alkaline-saline conditions. Free and immobilised T. versicolor cells showed 100 % decolourisation in the growth medium supplemented with 15 g l(-1) NaCl, pH 9.5 at 30 °C in liquid batch culture. Continuous culture experiments were performed in a fixed-bed reactor using free and immobilised T. versicolor cells and allowed 85-100 % dye decolourisation. The immobilisation conditions for the biomass and the additional supply of carbon sources improved the decolourisation performance during a long-term trial of 40 days. Lignin peroxidase, laccase and glyoxal oxidase activities were detected during the experiments. The laccase activity varied depending on carbon source utilized and glycerol-enhanced laccase activity compared to sucrose during extended growth. PMID:23982200

  14. Biological treatment of acidic coal refuse using sulphate-reducing bacteria with chicken manure as carbon source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Mingliang; Wang, Haixia

    2014-01-01

    The performance of using chicken manure as carbon source to promote sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB) activity within acidic coal refuse to prevent the generation of acidic leachate was investigated in batch and column bioreactors. The bioreactors showed satisfactory performance in biological sulphate reduction, evidenced by the increase in effluent pH, high removal efficiencies of sulphate and metals, and the presence of large numbers of SRB. Scanning electron microscope-energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS) analysis of the formed precipitate indicated the formation of metal sulphides. Chicken manure was observed to play an important role in this treatment, which could not only provide carbon source but also reduce the adverse effect of strong acidity and metal toxicity on SRB activity. Metal removal could be mainly attributed to sulphides precipitation and sorption to chicken manure. This study indicated that SRB with chicken manure could be a novel alternative used for the prevention of acidic leachate from coal refuse. PMID:25189842

  15. Biological marker characteristics of oils and asphalts from carbonate source rocks in a rapidly subsiding graben, Dead Sea, Israel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rullkoetter, J.; Spiro, B.; Nissenbaum, A.

    1985-06-01

    A detailed GC/MS study of biological marker compounds in the saturated and aromatic hydrocarbon fractions of oils and asphalts from the Dead Sea area, Israel, provided decisive information to the solution of a long-lasting controversy by showing that the asphalts are products of early generation in an immature stage from the same type of carbonate source rock which generated more mature oils. The asphalts are not biodegraded residues of the oils. This study also provides general information on the evolution of biological markers in carbonate source rocks. Low-activation-energy processes, like isomerization of steranes, appear to occur much faster at low temperatures than in shales. The high sulfur content and less cross-linking of the biogenic organic matter into a complex kerogen structure are suggested to be responsible for this. 41 references, 8 figures, 2 tables.

  16. Cyanobacteria as a carbon source for zooplankton in eutrophic Lake Taihu, China, measured by

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Kluijver, A.; Yu, J.L.; Houtekamer, M.; Middelburg, J.J.; Liu, Z.W.

    2012-01-01

    Using a combined stable-isotope and fatty-acid approach, we examined carbon-transfer routes from the cyanobacterium Microcystis to zooplankton in eutrophic Lake Taihu, China. Microcystis is generally considered poor food for zooplankton, and we hypothesized that most Microcystis carbon flows to zoop

  17. Land Use Affects Carbon Sources to the Pelagic Food Web in a Small Boreal Lake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinta, Päivi; van Hardenbroek, Maarten; Jones, Roger I; Kankaala, Paula; Rey, Fabian; Szidat, Sönke; Wooller, Matthew J; Heiri, Oliver

    2016-01-01

    Small humic forest lakes often have high contributions of methane-derived carbon in their food webs but little is known about the temporal stability of this carbon pathway and how it responds to environmental changes on longer time scales. We reconstructed past variations in the contribution of methanogenic carbon in the pelagic food web of a small boreal lake in Finland by analyzing the stable carbon isotopic composition (δ13C values) of chitinous fossils of planktivorous invertebrates in sediments from the lake. The δ13C values of zooplankton remains show several marked shifts (approx. 10 ‰), consistent with changes in the proportional contribution of carbon from methane-oxidizing bacteria in zooplankton diets. The results indicate that the lake only recently (1950s) obtained its present state with a high contribution of methanogenic carbon to the pelagic food web. A comparison with historical and palaeobotanical evidence indicates that this most recent shift coincided with agricultural land-use changes and forestation of the lake catchment and implies that earlier shifts may also have been related to changes in forest and land use. Our study demonstrates the sensitivity of the carbon cycle in small forest lakes to external forcing and that the effects of past changes in local land use on lacustrine carbon cycling have to be taken into account when defining environmental and ecological reference conditions in boreal headwater lakes. PMID:27487044

  18. Comprehensive geochemical identification of highly evolved marine carbonate rocks as hydrocarbon-source rocks as exemplified by the Ordos Basin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tenger; LIU; Wenhui; XU; Yongchang; CHEN; Jianfa

    2006-01-01

    This study reversed the developing environments of hydrocarbon-source rocks in the Ordos Basin and evaluated carbonate rocks as hydrocarbon-source rocks and their distributions on account of the fact that China's marine carbonate rocks as hydrocarbon-source rocks are characterized by intensive thermal evolution and relatively low abundance of organic matter, by taking the Lower Paleozoic of the Ordos Basin for example and in light of the calculated enrichment coefficients of trace elements, the REE distribution patterns, the mathematical statistics analysis of elements and carbon isotopes and their three-dimensional diagrammatization in combination with the necessary organic parameters. As for the Ordos Basin, TOC=0.2% is an important boundary value. Studies have shown that in the strata where TOC is greater than 0.2%, Ba is highly enriched with positive δ13Ccarb shifts and δ13Corg less than -28‰, reflecting a thigh paleo-productivity, high burial amounts of organic matter, relatively good hydrocarbon-generating potentiality and intensive REE fractionation. All these indicated that the settlement rates are low and the geological conditions are good for the preservation of organic matter, hence favoring the development of hydrocarbon-source rocks. The Klimory and Wulalik formations show certain regularities in those aspects and, therefore, they can be regarded as the potential effective hydrocarbon-source rocks. In the strata where total TOC is less than 0.2%, the contents of Ba are low, δ13Ccarb values are mostly negative, and δ13Corg values range from -24‰--28‰, demonstrating low burial amounts of organic matter, poor potentialities of hydrocarbon generation, weak REE fractionation and rapid settlement rates. These facts showed that most of the hydrocarbon-source rocks were formed in shallow-water, high-energy oxidizing environments, thus unfavoring the development of hydrocarbon-source rocks. It is feasible to make use of the geochemical method to

  19. Characterization of the dissolved organic matter in sewage effluent of sequence batch reactor: the impact of carbon source

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jin GUO; Feng SHENG; Jianhua GUO; Xiong YANG; Mintao MA; Yongzhen PENG

    2012-01-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) transforma- tion in sequence batch reactor (SBR) fed with carbon sources of different biodegradability was investigated. During the biologic degradation process, the low mole- cular weight (MW) fraction (〈 1 kDa) gradually decreased, while the refractory compounds with higher aromaticity were aggregated. Size exclusion chromatogra- phy (SEC) and fluorescence of excitation emission matrices (EEM) demonstrated that more biopolymers (polysaccharides or proteins) and humic-like substances were presented in the extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) extracted from the SBR fed with sodium acetate or glucose, while the EPS from SBR fed with slowly biodegradable dissolved organic carbon (DOC) substrate- starch had relatively less biopolymers. Comparing the EfOM in sewage effluent of three SBRs, the effluent from SBR fed with starch is more aromatic. Organic carbon with MW 〉 1 kDa as well as the hydrophobic fraction in DOM gradually increased with the carbon sources changing from sodium acetate to glucose and starch. The DOC fractiona- tion and the EEM all demonstrated that EfOM from the effluent of the SBR fed with starch contained more fulvic acid-like substances comparing with the SBR fed with sodium acetate and glucose.

  20. The Effect of Crystallinity of Carbon Source on Mechanically Activated Carbothermic Synthesis of Nano-Sized SiC Powders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moshtaghioun, B. M.; Monshi, A.; Abbasi, M. H.; Karimzadeh, F.

    2013-02-01

    The relevance of the structure of carbon materials and milling on the carbothermic reduction of silica to produce nano-sized silicon carbide (SiC) was studied. Graphite (crystalline) and metallurgical coke (mainly amorphous) were chosen as carbon precursors that were mixed with amorphous pure nano-sized SiO2 and milled for different times. The SiC yield at 1450 °C for l h was influenced by the degree of milling. Extending the milling time increased SiC formation in both cases. Although some extensive milling converted both sources of carbon into amorphous phase, the amount of synthesized SiC from graphite was about 4.5-3 times higher than coke with increased extent of milling. Graphite is converted from stable crystalline state into the amorphous phase, so it absorbs more activation energy of milling and fresher active centers are created, while the already amorphous coke absorbs less energy and thus less fresh active centers are created. This energy difference acts as a driving force, resulting in higher yield of nano-sized SiC when graphite is used as carbon source.

  1. Immobilized Tannin from Sanseviera trifasciata on Carbon as Adsorbent For Iron(II in Polluted Water Source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irfan Hanafi Arif

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The organic-agricultural waste resulted from local farmer or community gardening recently paid public attention. The presence and easily grown of “Lidah Mertua” or Sanseviera trifasciata being focused on potency investigation for its prospecting application. It was reported contain some phenolic and also tannin extracted from aqueous solvents. This paper revealed recent investigation applying of its isolated tannin from leave part to modifying of activated carbon. The previous report published that carbon were able to adsorb some toxic heavy metals. However, it has some limitation including lower capacity adsorption. Impregnated or immobilized the tannin-isolated from S. trifasciata leaves was able to modify the carbon functionality, physical appearance, pores size, and it adsorption capacity. Both Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption mechanism model also disclosed the developed adsorbent mechanism of iron(II adsorption on the adsorbent tannin-immobolized on carbon. The real test using community well drilling water source also gave important finding on the concentration of iron(II contained on water source.

  2. Radiocarbon-based source apportionment of black carbon (BC) in PM 10 aerosols from residential area of suburban Tokyo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, Masao; Kumata, Hidetoshi; Koike, Yasuyo; Tsuzuki, Mikio; Uchida, Tatsuya; Fujiwara, Kitao; Shibata, Yasuyuki

    2010-04-01

    The AMS technique was applied to analyse black carbon (BC), total organic carbon (TOC), and previously reported polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in PM 10 aerosols from a residential area, suburban Tokyo, to determine natural abundance of radiocarbon ( 14C), an ideal tracer to distinguish fossil fuel ( 14C-free) from modern biomass combustion sources of pyrolytic products. The 14C concentrations in BC, isolated using the CTO-375 method, were 42% and 30% pMC (in terms of percent Modern Carbon: pMC) in summer and winter, respectively. The 14C concentrations in BC were also compared with those of compound-class specific 14C content of PAHs previously reported for the same samples: they were 45% and 33% pMC in summer and winter, respectively. The 14C signals of BC were identical to those of high molecular weight (MW ⩾ 226, 5-6 rings) PAHs. The resemblance between 14C signals of BC and PAHs can be referred as a 'certificate' for the validity of the BC isolation method employed in this study. Also, it suggests that 14C-BC approach can be a surrogate for PAHs specific 14C analyses to monitor seasonal source variation of combustion-derived pyrolytic products. On the other hand, 14C contents of total organic carbon in 2004 were 61% and 42% pMC in summer and winter, respectively. This is likely attributed to higher contribution of plant activity in summer.

  3. Characterization of the Primary Starch Utilization Operon in the Obligate Anaerobe Bacteroides fragilis: Regulation by Carbon Source and Oxygen

    OpenAIRE

    Spence, Cheryl; Wells, W. Greg; Smith, C. Jeffrey

    2006-01-01

    The opportunistic pathogen Bacteroides fragilis is a commensal organism in the large intestine, where it utilizes both dietary and host-derived polysaccharides as a source of carbon and energy. In this study, a four-gene operon required for starch utilization was identified. The operon also was found to be oxygen responsive and thus was designated osu for oxygen-induced starch utilization. The first three genes in the operon were predicted to encode outer membrane proteins involved in starch ...

  4. Effect of plant photosynthesis, carbon sources and ammonium availability on nitrogen fixation rates in the rhizosphere of Zostera noltii

    OpenAIRE

    Welsh, Dt; Bourgues, S; Dewit, R; Auby, Isabelle

    1997-01-01

    Rates of nitrogen fixation (measured as acetylene reduction) in the rhizosphere of the seagrass Zostera noltii were highly dependent upon plant photosynthetic activity being significantly stimulated at elevated CO2 concentrations and by light, both in the short-term and over diurnal cycles. Stimulation by light became insignificant when 5 mM sucrose was added to the sediment porewater, indicating that in the absence of added carbon sources, light stimulation was due to direct inputs of plant ...

  5. Biodegradation and utilization of 4-n-nonylphenol by Aspergillus versicolor as a sole carbon and energy source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krupiński, Mariusz; Janicki, Tomasz [Department of Industrial Microbiology and Biotechnology, University of Lodz, Banacha 12/16, 90-237 Łódź (Poland); Pałecz, Bartłomiej [Department of Physical Chemistry, University of Lodz, Pomorska 165, 90-236 Łódź (Poland); Długoński, Jerzy, E-mail: jdlugo@biol.uni.lodz.pl [Department of Industrial Microbiology and Biotechnology, University of Lodz, Banacha 12/16, 90-237 Łódź (Poland)

    2014-09-15

    Highlights: • A. versicolor is able to degrade 4-n-NP as the sole source of carbon and energy. • 4-n-NP removal by A. versicolor was accompanied by the formation of metabolites. • Radioactive experiments show complete 4-n-NP mineralization by A. versicolor. • 4-n-NP initiates heat production in the A. versicolor spores. - Abstract: 4-n-Nonylphenol (4-n-NP) is an environmental pollutant with endocrine-disrupting activities that is formed during the degradation of nonylphenol polyethoxylates, which are widely used as surfactants. Utilization of 4-n-NP by the filamentous fungus Aspergillus versicolor as the sole carbon and energy source was investigated. By means of gas chromatography–mass spectrometry, we showed that in the absence of any carbon source other than 4-n-NP in the medium, A. versicolor completely removed the xenobiotic (100 mg L{sup −1}) after 3 d of cultivation. Moreover, mass spectrometric analysis of intracellular extracts led to the identification of eight intermediates. The mineralization of the xenobiotic in cultures supplemented with 4-n-NP [ring-{sup 14}C(U)] as a growth substrate was also assessed. After 3 d of incubation, approximately 50% of the initially applied radioactivity was recovered in the form of {sup 14}CO{sub 2}, proving that this xenobiotic was completely metabolized and utilized by A. versicolor as a carbon source. Based on microscopic analysis, A. versicolor is capable of germinating spores under such conditions. To confirm these observations, a microcalorimetric method was used. The results show that even the highest amount of 4-n-NP initiates heat production in the fungal samples, proving that metabolic processes were affected by the use of 4-n-NP as an energetic substrate.

  6. The Denitrifying Biological Phosphorus Removal Performance in Anaerobic/Anoxic Sequencing Batch Reactor: The Effect of Carbon Source

    OpenAIRE

    Gürtekin, Engin; Nusret ŞEKERDAĞ

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the effect of carbon source on denitrifying biological phosphorus removal performance in acetate and glucose fed two anaerobic/anoxic sequencinq batch reactor (SBR) was investigated. Glucose and acetate were used as the substrates. In acetate and glucose fed reactors, the COD (Chemical Oxygen Demand) removal efficiencies were 91,90% and PO4-P removal efficiencies were 87,51% respectively. These results shows that the phosphorus removal efficiency is lower in glucose fed reactor.

  7. Biodegradation and utilization of 4-n-nonylphenol by Aspergillus versicolor as a sole carbon and energy source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • A. versicolor is able to degrade 4-n-NP as the sole source of carbon and energy. • 4-n-NP removal by A. versicolor was accompanied by the formation of metabolites. • Radioactive experiments show complete 4-n-NP mineralization by A. versicolor. • 4-n-NP initiates heat production in the A. versicolor spores. - Abstract: 4-n-Nonylphenol (4-n-NP) is an environmental pollutant with endocrine-disrupting activities that is formed during the degradation of nonylphenol polyethoxylates, which are widely used as surfactants. Utilization of 4-n-NP by the filamentous fungus Aspergillus versicolor as the sole carbon and energy source was investigated. By means of gas chromatography–mass spectrometry, we showed that in the absence of any carbon source other than 4-n-NP in the medium, A. versicolor completely removed the xenobiotic (100 mg L−1) after 3 d of cultivation. Moreover, mass spectrometric analysis of intracellular extracts led to the identification of eight intermediates. The mineralization of the xenobiotic in cultures supplemented with 4-n-NP [ring-14C(U)] as a growth substrate was also assessed. After 3 d of incubation, approximately 50% of the initially applied radioactivity was recovered in the form of 14CO2, proving that this xenobiotic was completely metabolized and utilized by A. versicolor as a carbon source. Based on microscopic analysis, A. versicolor is capable of germinating spores under such conditions. To confirm these observations, a microcalorimetric method was used. The results show that even the highest amount of 4-n-NP initiates heat production in the fungal samples, proving that metabolic processes were affected by the use of 4-n-NP as an energetic substrate

  8. Using an explicit emission tagging method in global modeling of source-receptor relationships for black carbon in the Arctic: Variations, sources, and transport pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hailong; Rasch, Philip J.; Easter, Richard C.; Singh, Balwinder; Zhang, Rudong; Ma, Po-Lun; Qian, Yun; Ghan, Steven J.; Beagley, Nathaniel

    2014-11-01

    We introduce an explicit emission tagging technique in the Community Atmosphere Model to quantify source-region-resolved characteristics of black carbon (BC), focusing on the Arctic. Explicit tagging of BC source regions without perturbing the emissions provides a physically consistent and computationally efficient approach to establish source-receptor relationships and transport pathways. Our analysis shows that the contributions of major source regions to the global BC burden are not proportional to the respective emissions due to strong region-dependent removal rates and lifetimes, while the contributions to BC direct radiative forcing show a near-linear dependence on their respective contributions to the burden. Arctic BC concentrations, deposition, and source contributions all have strong seasonal variations. Eastern Asia contributes the most to the wintertime Arctic BC burden, but has much less impact on lower-level concentrations and deposition. Northern Europe emissions are more important to both surface concentration and deposition in winter than in summer. The largest contribution to Arctic BC in the summer is from Northern Asia. Although local emissions contribute less than 10% to the annual mean BC burden and deposition within the Arctic, the per-emission efficiency is much higher than for non-Arctic sources. The interannual variability (1996-2005) due to meteorology is small in annual mean BC burden and radiative forcing but is significant in yearly seasonal means over the Arctic. When a slow aging treatment of BC is introduced, the increase of BC lifetime and burden is source dependent. Global BC forcing-per-burden efficiency also increases primarily due to changes in BC vertical distributions.

  9. sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-Yin Chiang

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we study the simplified models of the ATM (Asynchronous Transfer Mode multiplexer network with Bernoulli random traffic sources. Based on the model, the performance measures are analyzed by the different output service schemes.

  10. Selective cultures for the isolation of biosurfactant producing bacteria: comparison of different combinations of environmental inocula and hydrophobic carbon sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domingues, Patrícia M; Louvado, António; Oliveira, Vanessa; Coelho, Francisco J C R; Almeida, Adelaide; Gomes, Newton C M; Cunha, Angela

    2013-01-01

    The potential of estuarine microniches as reservoirs of biosurfactant-producing bacteria was evaluated by testing different combinations of inocula and hydrophobic carbon sources. Selective cultures using diesel, petroleum, or paraffin as hydrophobic carbon sources were prepared and inoculated with water from the surface microlayer, bulk sediments, and sediment of the rhizosphere of Halimione portulacoides. These inocula were compared regarding the frequency of biosurfactant-producing strains among selected isolates. The community structure of the selective cultures was profiled using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) of the 16S rRNA gene fragments at the end of the incubation. The DGGE profiles corresponding to the communities established in selective cultures at the end of the incubation revealed that communities were different in terms of structural diversity. The highest diversity was observed in the selective cultures containing paraffin (H (') = 2.5). Isolates were obtained from the selective cultures (66) and tested for biosurfactant production by the atomized oil assay. Biosurfactant production was detected in 17 isolates identified as Microbacterium, Pseudomonas, Rhodococcus, and Serratia. The combination of estuarine surface microlayer (SML) water as inoculum and diesel as carbon source seems promising for the isolation of surfactant-producing bacteria. Supplemental materials are available for this article. Go to the publisher's online edition of Preparative Biochemistry and Biotechnology to view the supplemental file. PMID:23379272

  11. Effect of fermentation liquid from food waste as a carbon source for enhancing denitrification in wastewater treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yongmei; Wang, Xiaochang C; Cheng, Zhe; Li, Yuyou; Tang, Jialing

    2016-02-01

    Food wastes were used for anaerobic fermentation to prepare carbon sources for enhancing nitrogen removal in wastewater treatment. Under anaerobic conditions without pH adjustment, the fermentation liquid from food wastes (FLFW) with a high organic acid content was produced at room temperature (25 °C) and initial solid concentration of 13%. Using FLFW as the sole carbon source of artificial wastewater for biological treatment by sequence batch operation, maximized denitrification (with a denitrification rate of V(DN) = 12.89 mg/gVSS h and a denitrification potential of P(DN) = 0.174 gN/gCOD) could be achieved at a COD/TN ratio of 6. The readily biodegradable fraction in the FLFW was evaluated as 58.35%. By comparing FLFW with glucose and sodium acetate, two commonly used chemical carbon sources, FLFW showed a denitrification result similar to sodium acetate but much better than glucose in terms of total nitrogen removal, V(DN), P(DN), organic matter consumption rate (V(COD)) and heterotrophy anoxic yield coefficient (Y(H)).

  12. Efficient production of l-lactic acid using co-feeding strategy based on cane molasses/glucose carbon sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ke; Xu, Ping

    2014-02-01

    L-Lactic acid is an important platform chemical, which ought to be produced under cost control to meet its huge demand. Cane molasses, a waste from sugar manufacturing processes, is hopeful to be utilized as a cheap carbon source for L-lactic acid fermentation. Considering that cane molasses contains nutrients and hazardous substances, efficient production of L-lactic acid was developed by using a co-feeding strategy based on the utilization of cane molasses/glucose carbon sources. Based on the medium optimization with response surface method, 168.3g/L L-lactic acid was obtained by a Bacillus coagulans strain H-1 after 78h fed-batch fermentation, with a productivity of 2.1g/Lh and a yield of 0.88g/g. Since cane molasses is a feasible carbon source, the co-feeding fermentation might be a promising alternative for the economical production of L-lactic acid. PMID:24333698

  13. Synthesis and performances of bio-sourced nanostructured carbon membranes elaborated by hydrothermal conversion of beer industry wastes

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Korhani, Oula; Zaouk, Doumit; Cerneaux, Sophie; Khoury, Randa; Khoury, Antonio; Cornu, David

    2013-03-01

    Hydrothermal carbonization (HTC) process of beer wastes (Almaza Brewery) yields a biochar and homogeneous carbon-based nanoparticles (NPs). The NPs have been used to prepare carbon membrane on commercial alumina support. Water filtration experiments evidenced the quasi-dense behavior of the membrane with no measurable water flux below an applied nitrogen pressure of 6 bar. Gas permeation tests were conducted and gave remarkable results, namely (1) the existence of a limit temperature of utilization of the membrane, which was below 100°C in our experimental conditions, (2) an evolution of the microstructure of the carbon membrane with the operating temperature that yielded to improved performances in gas separation, (3) the temperature-dependent gas permeance should follow a Knudsen diffusion mechanism, and (4) He permeance was increasing with the applied pressure, whereas N2 and CO2 permeances remained stable in the same conditions. These results yielded an enhancement of both the He/N2 and He/CO2 permselectivities with the applied pressure. These promising results made biomass-sourced HTC-processed carbon membranes encouraging candidates as ultralow-cost and sustainable membranes for gas separation applications.

  14. Nested atmospheric inversion for the terrestrial carbon sources and sinks in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, F.; Wang, H. W.; Chen, J. M.; Zhou, L. X.; Ju, W. M.; Ding, A. J.; Liu, L. X.; Peters, W.

    2013-08-01

    In this study, we establish a nested atmospheric inversion system with a focus on China using the Bayesian method. The global surface is separated into 43 regions based on the 22 TransCom large regions, with 13 small regions in China. Monthly CO2 concentrations from 130 GlobalView sites and 3 additional China sites are used in this system. The core component of this system is an atmospheric transport matrix, which is created using the TM5 model with a horizontal resolution of 3° × 2°. The net carbon fluxes over the 43 global land and ocean regions are inverted for the period from 2002 to 2008. The inverted global terrestrial carbon sinks mainly occur in boreal Asia, South and Southeast Asia, eastern America and southern South America. Most China areas appear to be carbon sinks, with strongest carbon sinks located in Northeast China. From 2002 to 2008, the global terrestrial carbon sink has an increasing trend, with the lowest carbon sink in 2002. The inter-annual variation (IAV) of the land sinks shows remarkable correlation with the El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO). The terrestrial carbon sinks in China also show an increasing trend. However, the IAV in China is not the same as that of the globe. There is relatively stronger land sink in 2002, lowest sink in 2006, and strongest sink in 2007 in China. This IAV could be reasonably explained with the IAVs of temperature and precipitation in China. The mean global and China terrestrial carbon sinks over the period 2002-2008 are -3.20 ± 0.63 and -0.28 ± 0.18 PgC yr-1, respectively. Considering the carbon emissions in the form of reactive biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) and from the import of wood and food, we further estimate that China's land sink is about -0.31 PgC yr-1.

  15. Year-round probing of soot carbon and secondary organic carbon contributions and sources to the South Asian Atmospheric Brown Cloud using radiocarbon (14C) measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirillova, Elena; Sheesley, Rebecca J.; Andersson, August; Krusâ, Martin; Safai, P. D.; Budhavant, Krishnakant; Rao, P. S. P.; Praveen, P. S.; Gustafsson, Örjan

    2010-05-01

    South Asia is one region of vital importance for assessing human impact on radiative forcing by atmospheric aerosols. Previous research in the region has indicated that black carbon is a significant component of the regional aerosol load. In contrast, there is more ambiguous information regarding the contribution of secondary organic aerosols (SOA) to the total carbonaceous (TC) aerosol composition. Here we primarily address the SOA component of the South Asian Atmospheric Brown Cloud (ABC) by a combination of measurements of SOA concentrations and the 14C signature of TC. Atmospheric particulate matter was collected during fourteen-month continuous sampling campaigns Jan 2008 - March 2009 at both the Maldives Climate Observatory at Hannimaadho (MCO-H) and at the Sinhagad hilltop sampling site of the Indian Institute of Tropical Meteorology (SIN) in central-western India. The radiocarbon method is an ideal approach to identify fossil sources (14C "dead") compared to biogenic and biomass combustion products (with a contemporary 14C signal). The radiocarbon source apportionment of TC revealed very similar contribution from biogenic/biomass combustion (60-70%) for Indian SIN site and the MCOH receptor regions for much of the year. However, during the summer monsoon season biomass contribution to TC at the Indian Ocean site increases to 70-80%, while it decreases to 40-50% at the Indian site. Source apportionment of a soot carbon (SC) isolate (CTO-375 method; a tracer of black carbon) shows a similar trend. According to preliminary data in summer biomass contribution is higher at the MCOH receptor site (70%) compared to the SIN background site (45%). These unique year-round 14C data will be interpreted in view of the SOA concentration and the varying origin of the air masses.

  16. Identifying potential sources of variability between vegetation carbon storage estimates for urban areas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davies, Zoe G.; Dallimer, Martin; Edmondson, Jill L.;

    2013-01-01

    Although urbanisation is a major cause of land-use change worldwide, towns and cities remain relatively understudied ecosystems. Research into urban ecosystem service provision is still an emerging field, yet evidence is accumulating rapidly to suggest that the biological carbon stores in cities....... Additionally, we quantify the impact that some of these different approaches may have when extrapolating carbon figures derived from surveys up to a city-wide scale. To understand how/why carbon stocks vary within and between cities, researchers need to use more uniform methods to estimate stores and relate...

  17. Using an Explicit Emission Tagging Method in Global Modeling of Source-Receptor Relationships for Black Carbon in the Arctic: Variations, Sources and Transport Pathways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Hailong; Rasch, Philip J.; Easter, Richard C.; Singh, Balwinder; Zhang, Rudong; Ma, Po-Lun; Qian, Yun; Ghan, Steven J.; Beagley, Nathaniel

    2014-11-27

    We introduce an explicit emission tagging technique in the Community Atmosphere Model to quantify source-region-resolved characteristics of black carbon (BC), focusing on the Arctic. Explicit tagging of BC source regions without perturbing the emissions makes it straightforward to establish source-receptor relationships and transport pathways, providing a physically consistent and computationally efficient approach to produce a detailed characterization of the destiny of regional BC emissions and the potential for mitigation actions. Our analysis shows that the contributions of major source regions to the global BC burden are not proportional to the respective emissions due to strong region-dependent removal rates and lifetimes, while the contributions to BC direct radiative forcing show a near-linear dependence on their respective contributions to the burden. Distant sources contribute to BC in remote regions mostly in the mid- and upper troposphere, having much less impact on lower-level concentrations (and deposition) than on burden. Arctic BC concentrations, deposition and source contributions all have strong seasonal variations. Eastern Asia contributes the most to the wintertime Arctic burden. Northern Europe emissions are more important to both surface concentration and deposition in winter than in summer. The largest contribution to Arctic BC in the summer is from Northern Asia. Although local emissions contribute less than 10% to the annual mean BC burden and deposition within the Arctic, the per-emission efficiency is much higher than for major non-Arctic sources. The interannual variability (1996-2005) due to meteorology is small in annual mean BC burden and radiative forcing but is significant in yearly seasonal means over the Arctic. When a slow aging treatment of BC is introduced, the increase of BC lifetime and burden is source-dependent. Global BC forcing-per-burden efficiency also increases primarily due to changes in BC vertical distributions. The

  18. The Effects of Three Mineral Nitrogen Sources and Zinc on Maize and Wheat Straw Decomposition and Soil Organic Carbon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ogunniyi Jumoke Esther; GUO Chun-hui; TIAN Xiao-hong; LI Hong-yun; ZHOU Yang-xue

    2014-01-01

    The incorporation of straw in cultivated ifelds can potentially improve soil quality and crop yield. However, the presence of recalcitrant carbon compounds in straw slow its decomposition rate. The objective of this study was to determine the effects of different nitrogen sources, with and without the application of zinc, on straw decomposition and soil quality. Soils were treated with three different nitrogen sources, with and without zinc: urea (CO(NH2)2), ammonium sulfate ((NH4)2SO4), and ammonium chloride (NH4Cl). The combined treatments were as follows:maize (M) and wheat (W) straw incorporated into urea-, ammonium sulfate-, or ammonium chloride-treated soil (U, S, and C, respectively) with and without zinc (Z) (MU, MUZ, WU, WUZ;MS, MSZ, WS, WSZ;MC, MCZ, WC, WCZ, respectively);straw with zinc only (MZ, WZ);straw with untreated soil (MS, WS);and soil-only or control conditions (NT). The experiment consisted of 17 treatments with four replications. Each pot contained 150 g soil and 1.125 g straw, had a moisture content of 80%of the ifeld capacity, and was incubated for 53 days at 25°C. The rates of CO2-C emission, cumulative CO2-C evolution, total CO2 production in the soils of different treatments were measured to infer decomposition rates. The total organic carbon (TOC), labile organic carbon (LOC), and soil microbial biomass in the soils of different treatments were measured to infer soil quality. All results were signiifcantly different (P<0.05) with the exception of the labile organic carbon (LOC). The maize and wheat straw showed different patterns in CO2 evolution rates. For both straw types, Zn had a synergic effect with U, but an antagonistic effect with the other N sources as determined by the total CO2 produced. The MUZ treatment showed the highest decomposition rate and cumulative CO2 concentration (1 120.29 mg/pot), whereas the WACZ treatment had the lowest cumulative CO2 concentration (1 040.57 mg/pot). The addition of NH4Cl resulted in the

  19. Organic carbon and non-refractory aerosol over the remote Southeast Pacific: oceanic and combustion sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. M. Shank

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Submicron aerosol physical and chemical properties in remote marine air were measured from aircraft over the Southeast Pacific during VOCALS-REx in 2008 and the North Pacific during IMPEX in 2006, and aboard a ship in the Equatorial Pacific in 2009. A High Resolution – Particle Time of Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS measured non-refractory submicron aerosol composition during all campaigns. Sulfate (SO4 and organics (Org, during VOCALS and the cruise show lower absolute values than those reported for previous "clean air" studies. In the marine boundary layer, average concentrations for SO4 were 0.52 μg m−3 for the VOCALS region and 0.85 μg m−3 for the equatorial region while average Org concentrations were 0.10 and 0.07 μg m−3, respectively. Campaign average Org/SO4 ratios were 0.19 (VOCALS and 0.08 (Equatorial Pacific, while previous studies report "clean marine" Org/SO4 ratios between 0.25 and 0.40, and in some cases as high as 3.5. CO and black carbon (BC measurements over the Southeast Pacific provided sensitive indicators of pollution, and were used to identify the least polluted air, which had average concentrations of SO4 and Org of 0.14 and 0.01 μg m−3, respectively, with an average Org/SO4 of 0.10. Furthermore, under cleanest MBL conditions, identified by CO below 60 ppbv, we found a robust linear relationship between Org and combustion derived BC concentrations between 2 and 15 ng m−3, suggesting little to no marine source of submicrometer Org to the atmosphere over the Eastern South Pacific. This suggests that identification of Org in clean marine air may require a BC threshold below 4 ng m−3, an order of magnitude lower than has been used in prior studies. Data from IMPEX was constrained to similar clean air criterion, and resulted in an average Org/SO4 ratio of

  20. Source Contributions to Wintertime Elemental and Organic Carbon in the Western Arctic Based on Radiocarbon and Tracer Apportionment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, T E; Robinson, E M; Usenko, S; Sheesley, R J

    2015-10-01

    To quantify the contributions of fossil and biomass sources to the wintertime Arctic aerosol burden source apportionment is reported for elemental (EC) and organic carbon (OC) fractions of six PM10 samples collected during a wintertime (2012-2013) campaign in Barrow, AK. Radiocarbon apportionment of EC indicates that fossil sources contribute an average of 68 ± 9% (0.01-0.07 μg m(-3)) in midwinter decreasing to 49 ± 6% (0.02 μg m(-3)) in late winter. The mean contribution of fossil sources to OC for the campaign was stable at 38 ± 8% (0.04-0.32 μg m(-3)). Samples were also analyzed for organic tracers, including levoglucosan, for use in a chemical mass balance (CMB) source apportionment model. The CMB model was able to apportion 24-53% and 99% of the OC and EC burdens, respectively, during the campaign, with fossil OC contributions ranging from 25 to 74% (0.02-0.09 μg m(-3)) and fossil EC contributions ranging from 73 to 94% (0.03-0.07 μg m(-3)). Back trajectories identified two major wintertime source regions to Barrow: the Russian and North American Arctic. Atmospheric lifetimes of levoglucosan, ranging from 50 to 320 h, revealed variability in wintertime atmospheric processing of this biomass burning tracer. This study allows for unambiguous apportionment of EC to fossil fuel and biomass combustion sources and intercomparison with CMB modeling. PMID:26325404

  1. The hydrocarbon generation mechanism and the threestage type model of hydrocarbon generation for carbonate source rocks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王兆云; 程克明

    1997-01-01

    The diagenetic mechanism and process of carbonate rocks, which is different to that of clastic rocks, decides the existence of different existing state organic matters in carbonate rocks. This has been verified by both the microscopic observation of organic petrology and the analysis of organic geochemistry of many samples. Based on the hydrous pyrolysis simulation experiment of the low-mature carbonate rocks, the contrasting study on the yield and their geochemistry characteristics of different existing state soluble organic matters of a series of various maturity samples shows that the different existing state organic matters make different contributions to hydrocarbon generation during every evolution state. So that, the hydrocarbon generation process of carbonate rocks can be summarized as the following three stages; the first is the direct degradation of biogenic bitumen macromolecules during the immature stage, the second is the thermal degradation of a large amount of kerogen at the mature stage,

  2. The central and eastern Arabian Sea as a perennial source of atmospheric carbon dioxide

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sarma, V.V.S.S.; DileepKumar, M.; George, M.D.

    Seasonal (winter monsoon, intermonsoon and southwest monsoon) and interannual (between southwest monsoon seasons of 1995 and 1996) variations in total carbon dioxide (TCO sub(2)) and partial pressure of CO sub(2) (pCO sub(2)) were studied...

  3. Sources

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Sources Fondation Pablo Iglesias. Alcala de Henares. Sections : Archives privées de Manuel ArijaArchives extérieuresArchives FNJS de EspañaPrensa Archives Générales de l’Administration. Alcala de Henares. Sections : Opposition au franquismeSig. 653 Sig TOP 82/68.103-68.602.Índice de las cartas colectivas, Relaciones, Cartas al Ministro de Información de Marzo de 1965. c.662. Sources cinématographiques Filmothèque Nationale d’Espagne.NO.DO. N° 1157C. 08/03/1965.aguirre Javier, Blanco vertical....

  4. Results of interagency effort to determine carbon-14 source term in low-level radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A preliminary estimate of the risks from the shallow land disposal of low-level radioactive wastes by EPA in 1984-1985 indicated that Carbon-14 caused virtually all of the risk and that these risks were relatively high. Therefore, an informal interagency group, which included the US Department of Energy, US Geological Survey, US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, and US Environmental Protection Agency, formed in 1985 to obtain up-to-date information on the activity and chemical form of Carbon-14 in the different types of LLW and how Carbon-14 behaves after disposal. The EPA acted as a focal point for collating the information collected by all of the Agencies and will publish a report in Fall 1986 on the results of the Carbon-14 data collection effort. Of particular importance, the study showed that Carbon-14 activity in LLW was overestimated approximately 2000%. This paper summarizes results of the Carbon-14 data collection effort. 40 references, 1 figure, 3 tables

  5. [Optimization Study on the Nitrogen and Phosphorus Removal of Modified Two- sludge System Under the Condition of Low Carbon Source].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wei-qiang; Wang, Dong-bo; Li, Xiao-ming; Yang, Qi; Xu, Qiu-xiang; Zhang, Zhi-bei; Li, Zhi-jun; Xiang, Hai-hong; Wang, Ya-li; Sun, Jian

    2016-04-15

    This paper explored the method of resolving insufficient carbon source in urban sewage by comparing and analyzing denitrification and phosphorus removal (NPR) effect between modified two-sludge system and traditional anaerobic-aerobic-anoxic process under the condition of low carbon source wastewater. The modified two-sludge system was the experimental reactor, which was optimized by adding two stages of micro-aeration (aeration rate 0.5 L · mm⁻¹) in the anoxic period of the original two-sludge system, and multi-stage anaerobic-aerobic-anoxic SBR was the control reactor. When the influent COD, ammonia nitrogen, SOP concentration were respectively 200, 35, 10 mg · L⁻¹, the NPR effect of the experimental reactor was hetter than that of thecontrol reactor with the removal efficiency of TN being 94.8% vs 60.9%, and TP removal being 96.5% vs 75%, respectively. The effluent SOP, ammonia, TN concentration of the experimental reactor were 0.35, 0.50, 1.82 mg · L⁻¹, respectively, which could fully meet the first class of A standard of the Pollutants Emission Standard of Urban Wastewater Treatment Firm (GB 18918-2002). Using the optimized treatment process, the largest amounts of nitrogen and phosphorus removal per unit carbon source (as COD) were 0.17 g · g⁻¹ and 0.048 g · g⁻¹ respectively, which could furthest solve the lower carbon concentration in current municipal wastewater. PMID:27548974

  6. Biosphere as an energy source and carbon trap; Die Biosphaere als Energiequelle und Kohlenstoffsenke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koerner, C. [Universitaet Basel (Switzerland). Botanisches Inst.

    2004-07-01

    Carbon is the material basis of life and also became the core of humanity's fossil fuel based energy system. Each year, mankind emits ca 1% additional CO{sub 2} into the atmospheric CO{sub 2} pool by fossil fuel burning and forest destruction. Part of this CO{sub 2} becomes diluted in ocean water, part is absorbed by plants, but 3 billion tons remain in the air, which already contains ca. 375 ppm of CO{sub 2}, one third more than at the beginning of the industrial revolution. In this contribution I discuss the possibilities to (I) substitute fossil by sustainably produced biofuels, (2) enhance carbon sequestration to the biosphere, and (3) to stimulate plant productivity by elevated CO{sub 2} concentrations. It is shown that in industrialized countries, the realistic bioenergy potential is rather limited (< 5%) and CO{sub 2}-stimulated productivity cannot change this significantly. By far the most effective biological measure to slow down atmospheric CO{sub 2} enrichment is the preservation of old growth forests. It is key to the whole carbon debate that it is the carbon pool size which matters and not the speed by which carbon is pumped through ecosystems or the biosphere. Afforestation and reforestation can never in a timely fashion compensate for the carbon release by logging and burning of existent forests. Extension of forest area is, however, an additional, though slow and one-time (not repeatable) important measure. There is experimental evidence that atmospheric CO{sub 2} enrichment is likely to enhance forest dynamics, particularly in the tropics (liana problem), which can lead to a reduction of this immense carbon reservoir. (orig.)

  7. Soft-to-hard templating to well-dispersed N-doped mesoporous carbon nanospheres via one-pot carbon/silica source copolymerization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qinglu Kong; Lingxia Zhang; Min Wang; Mengli Li; Heliang Yao; Jianlin Shi

    2016-01-01

    Here we report a new approach referred as "softto-hard templating" strategy via the copolymerization of carbon source (dopamine) and silica source (tetraethyl orthosilicate) for the synthesis of well dispersed N-doped mesoporous carbon nanospheres (MCNs),which exhibit high performance for electrochemical supercapacitor.This method overcomes the shortcoming of uncontrolled dispersity and complicated procedures of soft-or hard-tem-plating methods,respectively.Moreover,the synthesized MCNs feature enriched heteroatom N-doping and easy functionalization by noble-metal nanoparticles during the one-pot synthesis.All the above characters make the asprepared MCNs a promising platform in a variety of applications.To demonstrate the applicability of the synthesized nitrogen-doped MCNs,this material has been employed as an electrode for high-performance electrochemical supercapacitor,which shows a capacitance of 223 and 140 F/g at current densities of 0.5 and 10 A/g in 1 mol/L KOH electrolyte,respectively.

  8. Production of Poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyhexanoate) by Recombinant Pseudomonas stutzeri 1317 from Unrelated Carbon Sources

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    魏晓星; 刘峰; 简嘉; 王瑞妍; 陈国强

    2013-01-01

    Synthetic biology promises to simplify the construction of metabolic pathways by assembling the de-tached modules of the whole pathway. This gives new approaches for the microbial production of industrial products such as polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHA). In this study, to produce poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyhexanoate) (PHBHHx) by Pseudomonas stutzeri 1317 from unrelated carbon sources such as glucose, the phaC1-phaZ-phaC2 operon of P. stutzeri 1317 was knocked out to generate the PHA deficient mutant P. stutzeri 1317LF. Then three modules containing phaCAhAReBRe, phaCAhBReGPp and phaCAhPAh were introduced into P. stutzeri 1317LF separately. The shake flask results indicated that the precursor supply and PHA synthase activity were the vital factors for the PHBHHx accumulation of P. stutzeri 1317LF. Furthermore, the PHBHHx accumulation of the recombinants from different carbon resources were performed. The highest PHBHHx content was 23.7% (by mass) with 58.6% (by mole) 3HB fraction. These results provide basis for further improving the PHBHHx accumulation of P. stutzeri from unrelated carbon sources.

  9. Soluble microbial products in pilot-scale drinking water biofilters with acetate as sole carbon source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ying; Ye, Chengsong; Gong, Song; Wei, Gu; Yu, Xin; Feng, Lin

    2013-04-01

    A comprehensive study on formation and characteristics of soluble microbial products (SMP) during drinking water biofiltration was made in four parallel pilot-scale ceramic biofilters with acetate as the substrate. Excellent treatment performance was achieved while microbial biomass and acetate carbon both declined with the depth of filter. The SMP concentration was determined by calculating the difference between the concentration of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), biodegradable dissolved organic carbon (BDOC) and acetate carbon. The results revealed that SMP showed an obvious increase from 0 to 100 cm depth of the filter. A rising specific ultraviolet absorbance (SUVA) was also found, indicating that benzene or carbonyl might exist in these compounds. SMP produced during this drinking water biological process were proved to have weak mutagenicity and were not precursors of by-products of chlorination disinfection. The volatile parts of SMP were half-quantity analyzed and most of them were dicarboxyl acids, others were hydrocarbons or benzene with 16-17 carbon atoms.

  10. Very high temperature chemical vapor deposition of new carbon thin films using organic semiconductor molecular beam sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noguchi, Takuya [Department of Chemistry, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, 113-0033 (Japan); Shimada, Toshihiro, E-mail: shimada@chem.s.u-tokyo.ac.j [Department of Chemistry, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, 113-0033 (Japan); Hanzawa, Akinori; Hasegawa, Tetsuya [Department of Chemistry, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, 113-0033 (Japan)

    2009-11-30

    We carried out the preparation and characterization of new carbon films deposited using an organic molecular beam deposition apparatus with very high substrate temperature (from room temperature to 2670 K), which we newly developed. When we irradiated molecular beam of organic semiconductor perylene tetracarboxylic acid dianhydride (PTCDA) on Y{sub 0.07}Zr{sub 0.93}O{sub 2} (111) at 2170 K, a new carbon material was formed via decomposition and fusing of the molecules. The films were characterized with an atomic force microscope (AFM), Raman spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Zirconium carbide (ZrC) films were identified beneath the topmost carbon layer by XRD and XPS analyses, which results from chemical reactions of the substrate and the molecules. Partially graphitized aromatic rings of PTCDA were observed from Raman spectroscopy. The present technique - very high temperature chemical vapor deposition using organic semiconductor sources - will be useful to study a vast unexplored field of covalent carbon solids.

  11. Remediation of nitrate-contaminated wastewater using denitrification biofilters with straws of ornamental flowers added as carbon source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Junjun; Ma, Luyao; Zhou, Yuanyang; Zhang, Shenghua; Wang, Weilu

    2016-01-01

    Straws of four ornamental flowers (carnation, rose, lily, and violet) were added into denitrification biofilters using gravel as matrix through vertically installed perforated polyvinylchloride pipes to provide organic carbon for the treatment of nitrate-contaminated wastewater operating in batch mode. Removal efficiencies of nitrate and phosphate, as well as temporal variations of nitrogen and carbon during batches 10 and 19, were investigated and assessed. Nitrate removal was efficiently enhanced by the addition of flower straws, but decreased gradually as the organic substances were consumed. Phosphate removal was also improved, although this very limited. High nitrate removal rates were achieved during the initial 12 h in the two batches each lasting for 3 days, along with the depletion of influent dissolved oxygen due to aerobic degradation of the organic compounds. NO2(-)-N of 0.01-2.83 mg/L and NH4(+)-N of 0.02-1.69 mg/L were formed and both positively correlated to the nitrate reduced. Inorganic carbon (IC) concentrations increased during the batches and varied conversely with the nitrate contents, and could be indicative of nitrate removal due to the highly significant positive correlation between NO3(-)-N removed and IC concentration (r(2) = 0.881, p biofilter to treat nitrate-contaminated wastewater, although further optimization of carbon source addition is still required.

  12. 1579 NM Fiber Laser Source for Spaceborne Monitoring of Carbon Dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cézard, Nicolas; Lombard, Laurent; Le Gouët, Julien; Goular, Didier; Bresson, Alexandre; Dolfi-Bouteyre, Agnès; Canat, Guillaume

    2016-06-01

    We report on the development of a 1579 nm pulsed fiber laser source with high peak-power, intended to be used as a lidar source for CO2 monitoring from space. We first discuss water-vapor sensitivity of spaceborne CO2 measurements by lidar and point the interest of the 1579 nm wavelength with that respect. Then we detail the current development status of the pulsed fiber laser source.

  13. 1579 NM Fiber Laser Source for Spaceborne Monitoring of Carbon Dioxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cézard Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We report on the development of a 1579 nm pulsed fiber laser source with high peak-power, intended to be used as a lidar source for CO2 monitoring from space. We first discuss water-vapor sensitivity of spaceborne CO2 measurements by lidar and point the interest of the 1579 nm wavelength with that respect. Then we detail the current development status of the pulsed fiber laser source.

  14. C1-carbon sources for chemical and fuel production by microbial gas fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dürre, Peter; Eikmanns, Bernhard J

    2015-12-01

    Fossil resources for production of fuels and chemicals are finite and fuel use contributes to greenhouse gas emissions and global warming. Thus, sustainable fuel supply, security, and prices necessitate the implementation of alternative routes to the production of chemicals and fuels. Much attention has been focussed on use of cellulosic material, particularly through microbial-based processes. However, this is still costly and proving challenging, as are catalytic routes to biofuels from whole biomass. An alternative strategy is to directly capture carbon before incorporation into lignocellulosic biomass. Autotrophic acetogenic, carboxidotrophic, and methanotrophic bacteria are able to capture carbon as CO, CO2, or CH4, respectively, and reuse that carbon in products that displace their fossil-derived counterparts. Thus, gas fermentation represents a versatile industrial platform for the sustainable production of commodity chemicals and fuels from diverse gas resources derived from industrial processes, coal, biomass, municipal solid waste (MSW), and extracted natural gas. PMID:25841103

  15. Sources of carbon and the evolution of the abundance of CNO elements

    OpenAIRE

    Liang, Y. C.; Zhao, G.; Shi, J. R.

    2001-01-01

    Using the standard infall model of Galactic chemical evolution, we explore the origin of carbon and calculate the abundance evolution of CNO elements for 8 different models of stellar nucleosynthesis yields. The results show that, in the early stage of the Galaxy, massive stars are the main producer of carbon, and that as our Galaxy evolves to the late stage, the longer lived intermediate- and low-mass stars play an increasingly important role, while at the same time, metal-rich Wolf-Rayet st...

  16. Variovorax sp.-mediated biodegradation of the phenyl urea herbicide linuron at micropollutant concentrations and effects of natural dissolved organic matter as supplementary carbon source

    OpenAIRE

    Horemans, Benjamin; Vandermaesen, Joke; Smolders, Erik; Springael, Dirk

    2013-01-01

    In nature, pesticides are often present as micropollutants with concentrations too low for efficient biodegradation and growth of heterotrophic pollutant degrading bacteria. Instead, organic carbon present in environmental dissolved organic matter (eDOM) constitutes the main carbon source in nature. Information on how natural organic carbon affects degradation of pollutants and micropollutants in particular, is however poor. Linuron degrading Variovorax sp. strains SRS16, WDL1 and PBLH6 and a...

  17. Préparation d'échantillons de carbone pour sources d'ions à pulvérisations

    OpenAIRE

    Brissaud, I.; Mouffron, J.P.; Garnier, J M; Michelot, J. L.

    1983-01-01

    Des échantillons de carbone ont été préparés par craquage d'acétylène dans une décharge radiofréquence. Dans une source d'ions négatifs d'un accélérateur tandem, les dépôts permettent d'obtenir un faisceau de 12C- aussi intense qu'avec du graphite pur. Le fractionnement isotopique 13C/12C introduit par le craquage a été mesuré. Les résultats montrent que ces échantillons de carbone peuvent être utilisés pour des expériences de datation par le 14C sur les accélérateurs tandem....

  18. Basalt as a solid source of calcium and alkalinity for the sequestration of carbon dioxide in building materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, N. C.; Westfield, I.; Lu, P.; Bourcier, W. L.; Kendall, T.; Constantz, B. R.

    2010-12-01

    Motivated by the idea of converting waste carbon dioxide into usable building products, Calera Corporation has developed a multi-step process that sequesters CO2 as carbonate minerals in cementitious materials. Process inputs include dissolved divalent cations and alkalinity, both of which can be extracted from basalt. In one mode of the Calera process, the electrochemical production of alkalinity generates large volumes of hydrochloric acid as a by-product, which has been shown to effectively leach divalent cations from basalt while being neutralized by the basalt dissolution reaction. Using a 10:1 1M HCl solution to rock ratio, 3500 ppm Ca was extracted while the initial solution was neutralized to a pH of 2.60 in two weeks at a temperature of 80oC in an anoxic batch reactor. In this scenario, mineral carbonation occurs via three steps: electrochemical production of alkalinity, CO2 absorption by the alkaline stream, then precipitation by mixing the basalt-derived divalent cation stream and the CO2-containing alkaline stream. In a second scenario, alkalinity is extracted from basalt using an alkalinity capacitor, a weak acid. This solution may contain a proton source, such as ammonium chloride, or a hydroxyl acceptor, such as boric acid, but the main design constraint is that the pKa of the capacitor be high enough to deprontonate carbonic acid. The weak acid solution is mixed with basalt in an anoxic batch reactor and the dissolving rock consumes protons from the weak acid, generating the conjugate base. The solution rich in conjugate base then absorbs CO2 and the carbonate-rich solution is mixed with a calcium-rich stream to precipitate carbonate minerals. We have extracted up to 1100 mmol alkalinity per kg rock using an alkalinity capacitor, versus no more than 50 mmol alkalinity per kg rock using DI water as a solvent. Again, carbon sequestration occurs via three steps: alkalinity extraction from basalt, CO2 absorption, and finally carbonate precipitation

  19. Linking mercury, carbon, and nitrogen stable isotopes in Tibetan biota: Implications for using mercury stable isotopes as source tracers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaoyu; Zhang, Qianggong; Wang, Wen-Xiong

    2016-05-06

    Tibetan Plateau is located at a mountain region isolated from direct anthropogenic sources. Mercury concentrations and stable isotopes of carbon, nitrogen, and mercury were analyzed in sediment and biota for Nam Co and Yamdrok Lake. Biotic mercury concentrations and high food web magnification factors suggested that Tibetan Plateau is no longer a pristine site. The primary source of methylmercury was microbial production in local sediment despite the lack of direct methylmercury input. Strong ultraviolet intensity led to extensive photochemical reactions and up to 65% of methylmercury in water was photo-demethylated before entering the food webs. Biota displayed very high Δ(199)Hg signatures, with some highest value (8.6%) ever in living organisms. The δ(202)Hg and Δ(199)Hg in sediment and biotic samples increased with trophic positions (δ(15)N) and %methylmercury. Fish total length closely correlated to δ(13)C and Δ(199)Hg values due to dissimilar carbon sources and methylmercury pools in different living waters. This is the first mercury isotope study on high altitude lake ecosystems that demonstrated specific isotope fractionations of mercury under extreme environmental conditions.

  20. Quantification, morphology and source of humic acid, kerogen and black carbon in offshore marine sediments from Xiamen Gulf, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yanting Chen; Jinping Zhao; Li qianYin; Jinsheng Chen; Dongxing Yuan

    2013-01-01

    Three types of macromolecular organic matters (MOMs),i.e.humic acid (HA),kerogen+black carbon (KB),and black carbon (BC)were extracted from marine sediments of Xiamen Gulf,southeast of China.The chemical composition,morphological property and source of the three extractions were characterized by elemental analyzer/isotope ratio mass spectrometry (EA/IRMS) and scanning electron microscope (SEM).The results showed that KB was the predominant fraction in MOMs,which accounted for 61.79%-89.15% of the total organic content (TOC),while HA consisted less than 5%.The relative high contents of kerogen and BC,and low contents of HA in the samples indicated that anthropogenic input might be the major source of organic matter in marine sediments near the industrial regions.The characterization of SEM,not only revealed morphological properties of the three fractions,but also allowed a better understanding of the source of MOMs.The δ13C values of the three fractions suggested that materials from terrestrial C3 plants were predominant.Furthermore,the anthropogenic activities,such as the discharge of sewage,coal and biomass combustion from industry nearby and agricultural practices within drainage basin of the Jiulong River,were remarkably contributed to the variations in δ13C values of MOMs in the offshore marine sediments.

  1. Linking mercury, carbon, and nitrogen stable isotopes in Tibetan biota: Implications for using mercury stable isotopes as source tracers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaoyu; Zhang, Qianggong; Wang, Wen-Xiong

    2016-05-01

    Tibetan Plateau is located at a mountain region isolated from direct anthropogenic sources. Mercury concentrations and stable isotopes of carbon, nitrogen, and mercury were analyzed in sediment and biota for Nam Co and Yamdrok Lake. Biotic mercury concentrations and high food web magnification factors suggested that Tibetan Plateau is no longer a pristine site. The primary source of methylmercury was microbial production in local sediment despite the lack of direct methylmercury input. Strong ultraviolet intensity led to extensive photochemical reactions and up to 65% of methylmercury in water was photo-demethylated before entering the food webs. Biota displayed very high Δ199Hg signatures, with some highest value (8.6%) ever in living organisms. The δ202Hg and Δ199Hg in sediment and biotic samples increased with trophic positions (δ15N) and %methylmercury. Fish total length closely correlated to δ13C and Δ199Hg values due to dissimilar carbon sources and methylmercury pools in different living waters. This is the first mercury isotope study on high altitude lake ecosystems that demonstrated specific isotope fractionations of mercury under extreme environmental conditions.

  2. Sources and transportation of suspended matter and sediment in the southern Yellow Sea: Evidence from stable carbon isotopes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    The concentrations of total suspended matter (TSM) and the compositions of organic stable carbon isotopes of TSM and bottom sediments were analyzed to study the sources of TSM and sediments and the transportation processes. For this study, 284 TSM samples and 64 sediment ones taken from 67 stations along 7 transects and in 5 layers were collected in the southern Yellow Sea on the cruise in May, 1998. The main sediment transportation pattern in the southern Yellow Sea was obtained by analyzing the distribution characteristics of TSM concentration and particulate organic carbon Δ13c values. It was confirmed from the pattern that the bottom layer plays a more important role than the surface one in the transportation processes of terrigenous material to the central deep-water area of the southern Yellow Sea. The Yellow Sea circulation is an important control factor in determining the sediment transportation pattern in the southern Yellow Sea. The carbon isotope signals of sedimentary organic matter confirmed that the main material in sediments with high sedimentation rate in the Shandong subaqueous delta originated from the modern Yellow River. The terrigenous sediments in the deep-water area of the southern Yellow Sea are mainly from the abandoned Yellow River and the modern Yellow River, and a small portion of them are from the modern Yangtze material. The amount of terrigenous material from Korean Peninsula and its influen- ce range are relatively limited. The conclusions derived from TSM and stable carbon isotopes were further confirmed by another independent material source tracer--PAHs.

  3. Innovative environmental tracer techniques for evaluating sources of spring discharge from a carbonate aquifer bisected by a river.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heilweil, Victor M; Sweetkind, Donald S; Gerner, Steven J

    2014-01-01

    Littlefield Springs discharge about 1.6 m³ /s along a 10-km reach of the Virgin River in northwestern Arizona. Understanding their source is important for salinity control in the Colorado River Basin. Environmental tracers suggest that Littlefield Springs are a mixture of older groundwater from the regional Great Basin carbonate aquifer and modern (post-1950s) seepage from the Virgin River. While corrected ¹⁴C apparent ages range from 1 to 9 ka, large amounts of nucleogenic ⁴He and low ³He/⁴He ratios suggest that the carbonate aquifer component is likely even older Pleistocene recharge. Modeled infiltration of precipitation, hydrogeologic cross sections, and hydraulic gradients all indicate recharge to the carbonate aquifer likely occurs in the Clover and Bull Valley Mountains along the northern part of the watershed, rather than in the nearby Virgin Mountains. This high-altitude recharge is supported by relatively cool noble-gas recharge temperatures and isotopically depleted δ²H and δ¹⁸O. Excess (crustal) SF₆ and ⁴He precluded dating of the modern component of water from Littlefield Springs using SF₆ and ³H/³He methods. Assuming a lumped-parameter model with a binary mixture of two piston-flow components, Cl⁻ /Br⁻, Cl⁻ /F⁻, δ²H, and CFCs indicate the mixture is about 60% Virgin River water and 40% groundwater from the carbonate aquifer, with an approximately 30-year groundwater travel time for Virgin River seepage to re-emerge at Littlefield Springs. This suggests that removal of high-salinity sources upstream of the Virgin River Gorge would reduce the salinity of water discharging from Littlefield Springs into the Virgin River within a few decades.

  4. Source Apportionment of Elemental Carbon Across the San Francisco Bay Area Using Combined Radiocarbon and Chemical Mass Balances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, S.; Fairley, D.; Sheesley, R. J.

    2014-12-01

    The San Francisco Bay Area is impacted by ambient particulate matter (PM) from a variety of sources including motor vehicles, biomass burning, off-road vehicles, industry, and meat cooking. Ambient PM, especially fine PM (diameter less than 2.5μm, PM2.5), is known to negatively impact health. Elemental Carbon (EC) is one of the major constituents of PM2.5. It not only negatively affects health but is also a powerful short-lived climate forcer. The State of California and Bay Area Air Quality Management District (BAAQMD) have made efforts in regulating contribution of EC from diesel trucks and wood burning, respectively. These and other efforts have assisted in significantly reducing the annual average PM2.5 concentrations approximately 30% since 2005 and 70% since 1990. Despite these improvements, to better determine the relative contribution of contemporary vs. fossil carbon, radiocarbon source apportionment of EC was conducted on PM2.5 collected in the Bay Area. Measurements of the abundance of 14C in the EC fractions are used to quantify the relative contributions of fossil carbon (fossil fuel combustion, including motor vehicle exhaust) and contemporary carbon (biomass combustion and meat cooking). This comprehensive study included seven sites in the Bay Area and 12 months of sampling starting November 2011 through October 2012. The samples were composited to represent winter (November-February) and non-winter (March-October). In addition to radiocarbon analysis, Chemical Mass Balance (CMB) analysis using bulk PM2.5 composition and selected trace gases was used to understand the split among gasoline, natural gas, and diesel exhaust. Preliminary apportionment of the seven sites shows roughly equal contributions of fossil fuel and biomass burning/cooking for both winter and non-winter samples. There is evidence that the diesel contribution to EC, in particular, has decreased substantially over the last decade.

  5. Sip4, a Snf1 kinase-dependent transcriptional activator, binds to the carbon source-responsive element of gluconeogenic genes.

    OpenAIRE

    Vincent, O.; Carlson, M

    1998-01-01

    The carbon source-responsive element (CSRE) mediates transcriptional activation of the gluconeogenic genes during growth of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae on non-fermentable carbon sources. Previous studies have suggested that the Cat8 protein activates the expression of CSRE-binding factors. We show here that one of these factors is Sip4, a glucose-regulated C6 zinc cluster activator which was identified by its interaction with the Snf1 protein kinase. We present genetic evidence that Si...

  6. Assessing FPAR Source and Parameter Optimization Scheme in Application of a Diagnostic Carbon Flux Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turner, D P; Ritts, W D; Wharton, S; Thomas, C; Monson, R; Black, T A

    2009-02-26

    The combination of satellite remote sensing and carbon cycle models provides an opportunity for regional to global scale monitoring of terrestrial gross primary production, ecosystem respiration, and net ecosystem production. FPAR (the fraction of photosynthetically active radiation absorbed by the plant canopy) is a critical input to diagnostic models, however little is known about the relative effectiveness of FPAR products from different satellite sensors nor about the sensitivity of flux estimates to different parameterization approaches. In this study, we used multiyear observations of carbon flux at four eddy covariance flux tower sites within the conifer biome to evaluate these factors. FPAR products from the MODIS and SeaWiFS sensors, and the effects of single site vs. cross-site parameter optimization were tested with the CFLUX model. The SeaWiFs FPAR product showed greater dynamic range across sites and resulted in slightly reduced flux estimation errors relative to the MODIS product when using cross-site optimization. With site-specific parameter optimization, the flux model was effective in capturing seasonal and interannual variation in the carbon fluxes at these sites. The cross-site prediction errors were lower when using parameters from a cross-site optimization compared to parameter sets from optimization at single sites. These results support the practice of multisite optimization within a biome for parameterization of diagnostic carbon flux models.

  7. Carbon Mineralization in Two Ultisols Amended with Different Sources and Particle Sizes of Pyrolyzed Biochar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biochar produced during pyrolysis has the potential to enhance soil fertility and reduce greenhouse gas emissions. The influence of biochar properties (e.g., particle size) on both short- and long-term carbon (C) mineralization of biochar remains unclear. There is minimal informa...

  8. Atmospheric black carbon and warming effects influenced by the source and absorption enhancement in central Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nordmann, S.; Cheng, Y.F.; Carmichael, G.R.; Yu, M.; Denier Van Der Gon, H.A.C.; Zhang, Q.; Saide, P.E.; Pöschl, U.; Su, H.; Birmili, W.; Wiedensohler, A.

    2014-01-01

    Particles containing black carbon (BC), a strong absorbing substance, exert a rather uncertain direct and indirect radiative forcing in the atmosphere. To investigate the mass concentration and absorption properties of BC particles over central Europe, the model WRF-Chem was used at a resolution of

  9. Oxalyl chloride as a practical carbon monoxide source for carbonylation reactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Steffen V F; Ulven, Trond

    2015-01-01

    A method for generation of high-quality carbon monoxide by decomposition of oxalyl chloride in an aqueous hydroxide solution is described. The usefulness of the method is demonstrated in the synthesis of heterocycles and for hydroxy-, alkoxy-, amino-, and reductive carbonylation reactions, in sev...

  10. Comparation of Organic and Elemental carbon concentrations in PM2.5 in five Mexican cities: Potencial Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera Murillo, J.; Cardenas, B.; Campos-Ramos, A.; Blanco-Jimenez, S.; Angeles-Garcia, F.

    2011-12-01

    During 2006-2010 the National Center for Environmental Research and Training of the National Institute of Ecology of Mexico, carried out several short field studies in the cities of Salamanca, Gto, Tula, Hgo; Guadalajara, Jal; Toluca, Edo Mex; and Tijuana, BC to determine concentration and chemical compositions of PM2.5. These cities, although different in size population have all important industrial and area sources that contribute to high PM2.5 concentrations and therefore potential health impacts. Chemical analyses included organic and elemental carbon for which DRI Model 2001 Thermal/Optical Carbon Analyzer (Atmoslytic Inc, Calabasas, CA, USA) was used. Highest PM2.5 mass mean concentrations were obtained in Salamanca (46 μg/m3), followed by Toluca (43 μg/m3), Guadalajara (37 μg/m3), Tula (20 μg/m3) and Tijuana (18 μg/m3). For Salamanca and Tula, annual levels exceeded the Mexican PM2.5 annual standard of 15 μg/m3. Total carbonaceous aerosol accounted for 41.4%, 41.1%, 32.3%, 29.5% and 29.1% of PM2.5 mass in Tula, Toluca, Guadalajara, Salamanca and Tijuana, respectively. Higher OC2, OC3 and OC4 carbon fractions were observed in Guadalajara, Tijuana and Toluca, indicating an important contribution of gasoline and diesel vehicles emissions in these cities. As for Tula and Salamanca, cities in which refineries and power plants are present, OC3, OC4, EC1 and EC2 represent the higher fractions which could be attributed to stationary sources that use heavy fuels for their combustion process. UNMIX and PMF analyses were used in order to identify the most important sources that contributes to OC and EC concentrations.

  11. Biosynthesis of chiral 3-hydroxyvalerate from single propionate-unrelated carbon sources in metabolically engineered E. coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Collin H

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ability to synthesize chiral building block molecules with high optical purity is of considerable importance to the fine chemical and pharmaceutical industries. Production of one such compound, 3-hydroxyvalerate (3HV, has previously been studied with respect to the in vivo or in vitro enzymatic depolymerization of biologically-derived co-polymers of poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate. However, production of this biopolymeric precursor typically necessitates the supplementation of a secondary carbon source (e.g., propionate into the culture medium. In addition, previous approaches for producing 3HV have not focused on its enantiopure synthesis, and thus suffer from increased costs for product purification. Results Here, we report the selective biosynthesis of each 3HV stereoisomer from a single, renewable carbon source using synthetic metabolic pathways in recombinant strains of Escherichia coli. The product chirality was controlled by utilizing two reductases of opposing stereoselectivity. Improvement of the biosynthetic pathway activity and host background was carried out to elevate both the 3HV titers and 3HV/3HB ratios. Overall, shake-flask titers as high as 0.31 g/L and 0.50 g/L of (S-3HV and (R-3HV, respectively, were achieved in glucose-fed cultures, whereas glycerol-fed cultures yielded up to 0.19 g/L and 0.96 g/L of (S-3HV and (R-3HV, respectively. Conclusions Our work represents the first report of direct microbial production of enantiomerically pure 3HV from a single carbon source. Continued engineering of host strains and pathway enzymes will ultimately lead to more economical production of chiral 3HV.

  12. [Shortcut Nitrosation-Denitrifying Phosphorus Removal Based on High-quality Carbon Source in Combined Process of CAMBR].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Ji-hui; Wu, Peng; Cheng, Chao-yang; Shen, Yao-liang

    2015-12-01

    The volatile fatty acids (VFAs) are high-quality carbon source which can be utilized in the process of denitrifying phosphorus removal. Therefore, a combined process of anaerobic baffled reactor (ABR) with microbial phase separation and membrane bioreactor (MBR), i. e. CAMBR, with high-quality effluent was investigated in this experiment for highly efficient denitrifying phosphorus removal through providing high-quality carbon source by optimizing operational conditions such as hydraulic retention time (HRT) in the ABR. The results indicated that sufficient high-quality carbon source VFA could be acquired when the HRT of ABR was 4.8 h. The consumption of VFA was 56. 1 mg · L⁻¹ while the release of phosphorus was 10.43 mg · L⁻¹ showing that 5.38 mg of VFA was required to release 1 mg PO₄³⁻-P. Meanwhile, the uptake of phosphorus was 12. 35 mg · L⁻¹, while the uptake of phosphorus of MBR tank was 1.33 mg · L⁻¹. In the process of shortcut nitrification, 0.62 mg NOx⁻-N was needed when 1 mg PO₄³⁻-P was taken up, and 1.67 to 2.04 mg NO₂⁻-N was required when 1 mg PO₄³⁻-P was taken up, and the combined system achieved stable effluent quality. The average removal rates of COD, TN and soluble PO₄³⁻-P were 91%, 84% and 93%, respectively, correspondingly the average effluent concentrations were 30, 7.15 and 0.55 mg · L⁻¹, respectively. The results stated that the CAMBR achieved stable and highly efficient denitrifying phosphorus removal in domestic sewage treatment. PMID:27011991

  13. Stocks and sources of carbon buried in the salt marshes and seagrass beds of Patos Lagoon Estuary, Southern Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Elizabeth; Johnson, Beverly; Dostie, Philip; Copertino, Margareth

    2016-04-01

    This project investigates carbon stocks in salt marshes and seagrass beds in the Patos Lagoon estuary, the largest choked lagoon in the world, located in Southern Brazil. The study was conducted in the mesohaline region, at three shallow shoals. At each shoal, three sediment cores (50 cm deep) and plant biomass samples (above and belowground) were collected along a transect line, spanning from the marsh to seagrass beds (total = 9 sediment cores). The 50cm cores were subsampled and analyzed for organic carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) content, C/N ratios, and the isotope ratios of 13C/12C, and 15N/14N. The organic carbon content of these sediments ranged between 10% (in surface sediments) and 1% (deeper in the core), suggesting that both the salt marshes and seagrass beds in this region are sequestering carbon. Early results indicate that cores taken in marsh dominated by C3 plants (Scirpus maritimus) tended to be the most depleted in 13C with δ13C values around -25‰. Cores taken in marsh dominated by C4 plants (Spartina alterniflora, Spartina densiflora), seagrass beds (Ruppia maritima) , and non vegetated areas were generally isotopically heavier with δ13C values ranging -20‰ to -15‰, indicating a mix of organic sources in the sediments. The δ15N values and C/N ratios both varied with most values falling in a range of 2-8‰ and 7-20 respectively. Analysis of the δ 34S isotope composition of the sediments is currently underway and may provide better information on the relative contributions of macro and micro algae in the sediments. The present data will reveal the carbon stock size, as well as the types and history of organic matter deposition in Patos Lagoon estuary.

  14. Stable Carbon Isotopic Compositions of Methylated-MTTC in Crude Oils from Saline Lacustrine Depositional Environment: Source Implications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Significantly high abundant methyl-MethylTrimethylTridecylChromans (MTTCs) have been detected in aromatic hydrocarbon fractions in crude oils from the Jizhong Depression and Jianghan Basin. The distribution of these compounds is dominated by methyl-MTTC and dimethylMTTC series, which indicate diagenetic products of a hypersaline depositional environment in the early stage and show a low degree of methylation. The occurrence of significantly high abundant methyl-MTTC depends mainly on good preservation conditions with a strongly reductive, hypersaline and water-columned depositional environment and subsequent non-intensive diagenetic transformations. The stable carbon isotopic compositions of the methyl-MTTCs and dimethyl-MTTCs in two samples are far different from the stable carbon isotopic composition of C30 hopane of apparent bacteria biogenesis (up to 4.11‰ and 5.75‰, respectively). This obviously demonstrates that the methyl-MTTC and dimethyl-MTTCs cannot be of bacteria origin, which is different from the previous point of view about non-photosynthetic bacteria products or possible bacteria-reworked products. On the contrary, the stable carbon isotopic compositions of methyi-MTTC and dimethyl-MTTCs in the two samples were similar to that of the samecarbon-numbered n-alkanes (nC27-nC28-nC29), which indicates that they share the same source origin. Especially in the crude oil from the Zhao61 well, stable carbon isotopic compositions are also similar to that of the same carbon-numbered steranes with ααα-20R isomer (mostly less than 0.4‰). In consideration of the results of previous studies on saline lake ecological sedimentation, the authors hold that the methyl-MTTC and dimethyl-MTTCs in the saline lake sediments should be of algal biogenesis origin.

  15. Directive Production of Pullulan by Altering Cheap Source of Carbons and Nitrogen at 5 L Bioreactor Level

    OpenAIRE

    Sheoran, Sunil K.; Kashyap Kumar Dubey; Tiwari, D. P.; Singh, Bhanu P.

    2012-01-01

    In the present paper, attempts have been made to control the production of pullulan by supplementing commercial source of carbons and protein, timely. Pullulan production was regulated by supplying full fat soya flour and hydrolyzed soya extract, individually and in combination. Pullulan quantification was assayed for sensitivity to pullulanase. Aureobasidium pullulans was found to produce 125.7 gL−1 of pullulan. The rotation speed of shake flask, the pH of broth, and the supply of air were m...

  16. Effects of carbon sources and strength of MS medium on germination of somatic embryos of oil palm (Elaeis quineensis Jacq.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aslan Hilae

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Various sources of carbon and strengths of Murashige and Skoog (MS medium were investigated for their effect on oil palm somatic embryo germination or induction of shoots and roots from haustoriumstaged embryos. It was found that the highest percentage of shoot formation was obtained in 0.2 M sorbitol containing basal MS medium. A high concentration of alcohol sugar and reduced strength of MS medium enhanced root formation. A high concentration of sucrose or sorbitol also promoted root formation. Percentage of root formation was the highest (31.25% when excised shoots were cultured on root induction medium supplemented with 0.2 M sucrose.

  17. Physiology of Aspergillus niger in Oxygen-Limited Continuous Cultures: Influence of Aeration, Carbon Source Concentration and Dilution Rate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diano, Audrey; Peeters, J.; Dynesen, Jens Østergaard;

    2009-01-01

    of low oxygen availability, at different carbon source concentrations and at different specific growth rates, on the metabolism of A. niger, using continuous cultures. The results show that there is an increase in the production of tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle intermediates at low oxygen concentrations....... Indeed, at these conditions, a decrease in the mitochondrial respiratory chain activity leads to an accumulation of NADH and to a decreased ATP production which uncouples catabolism and anabolism, influences the intracellular pH and leads to production and excretion of organic acids. Moreover, mannitol...

  18. Understanding sources of carbon from a coastal mangrove forest: Shark River - Everglades National Park

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palya, A. P.; Anderson, W. T.; Jaffe, R.; Swart, P. K.

    2012-12-01

    Tropical and subtropical estuaries, particularly those occupied by mangrove forests, sequester a large amount of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere to be stored in biomass and ultimately in sediments. However, a significant portion of this carbon is lost as dissolved organic carbon (DOC) exported to the ocean. Therefore, the processes that transform and transport DOC within estuarine systems are an important part of the global carbon cycle. Analysis of stable carbon isotopes can provide insight on carbon dynamics in these coastal environments. Although DOC is the largest pool of reduced carbon in the ocean, few measurements of δ13C-DOC have been made for marine waters. Low DOC:DIC ratios and interference from large halide concentrations make such measurements difficult, time consuming, and costly. We have developed an approach that allows for the simultaneous measurement of DOC and δ13C-DOC in marine waters. By coupling a carbon analyzer utilizing a wet chemical oxidation technique to a high sensitivity cavity ring down spectrometer (WCO-CRDS), we are able to analyze δ13C-DOC of marine waters with DOC concentrations as low as 3 ppm C. Our approach uses an ambient atmospheric CO2 CRDS system originally designed to measure at 300 ppm (pCO2) which is an order-of-magnitude more sensitive than standard CRDS systems. This method for seawater analysis was developed by maximizing both the sample and sodium persulfate reagent volumes used in the oxidation reaction, as well as increasing the sodium persulfate concentration. Additionally, we operate the WCO-CRDS system using ultra high purity nitrogen as a carrier gas to prevent the oxidation of halides which reduces damage to the machines. These parameters allow for complete oxidation of the DOC in the sample, which was confirmed using two DOC standards mixed in an artificial seawater with a salinity around 30 g/L, and produces a sufficient volume of CO2 for detection and measurement by the CRDS. This configuration

  19. Carbon dioxide sources and oilfields in a nine-state area of the southwest United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finney, R.E.; Heath, L.J.

    1977-04-01

    Data on the prospective available CO/sub 2/ in a nine-state area of the Southwest were collected from scattered sources and compiled to make the information readily available to operators who may be interested in using CO/sub 2/ techniques for enhanced oilfield recoveries. Maps of the oilfields in the area studied are provided so that location of supply source can be related to possible point of use. The best potential sources of CO/sub 2/ are flue gas from electric generating plants, flue gas from cement plants, output from ammonia plants and natural gas reservoirs. The CO/sub 2/ sources are listed by states and include the operator's name, location name, county, and average available amounts of CO/sub 2/.

  20. Stream restoration and sanitary infrastructure alter sources and fluxes of water, carbon, and nutrients in urban watersheds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennino, M. J.; Kaushal, S. S.; Mayer, P. M.; Utz, R. M.; Cooper, C. A.

    2015-12-01

    An improved understanding of sources and timing of water and nutrient fluxes associated with urban stream restoration is critical for guiding effective watershed management. We investigated how sources, fluxes, and flowpaths of water, carbon (C), nitrogen (N), and phosphorus (P) shift in response to differences in stream restoration and sanitary infrastructure. We compared a restored stream with 3 unrestored streams draining urban development and stormwater management over a 3 year period. We found that there was significantly decreased peak discharge in response to precipitation events following stream restoration. Similarly, we found that the restored stream showed significantly lower monthly peak runoff (9.4 ± 1.0 mm d-1) compared with two urban unrestored streams (ranging from 44.9 ± 4.5 to 55.4 ± 5.8 mm d-1) draining higher impervious surface cover. Peak runoff in the restored stream was more similar to a less developed stream draining extensive stormwater management (13.2 ± 1.9 mm d-1). Interestingly, the restored stream exported most carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus loads at relatively lower streamflow than the 2 more urban streams, which exported most of their loads at higher and less frequent streamflow. Annual exports of total carbon (6.6 ± 0.5 kg ha-1 yr-1), total nitrogen (4.5 ± 0.3 kg ha-1 yr-1), and total phosphorus (161 ± 15 g ha-1 yr-1) were significantly lower in the restored stream compared to both urban unrestored streams (p export. Given that both stream restoration and sanitary pipe repairs both involve extensive channel manipulation, they can be considered simultaneously in management strategies. In addition, ground water can be a major source of nutrient fluxes in urban watersheds, which has been less considered compared with upland sources and storm drains. Goundwater sources, fluxes, and flowpath should also be targeted in efforts to improve stream restoration strategies and prioritize hydrologic "hot spots" along watersheds where

  1. Carbon-13 isotope composition of the mean CO2 source in the urban atmosphere of Krakow, southern Poland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimnoch, Miroslaw; Jasek, Alina; Rozanski, Kazimierz

    2014-05-01

    Quantification of carbon emissions in urbanized areas constitutes an important part of the current research on the global carbon cycle. As the carbon isotopic composition of atmospheric carbon dioxide can serve as a fingerprint of its origin, systematic observations of δ13CO2 and/or Δ14CO2, combined with atmospheric CO2mixing ratio measurements can be used to better constrain the urban sources of this gas. Nowadays, high precision optical analysers based on absorption of laser radiation in the cavity allow a real-time monitoring of atmospheric CO2 concentration and its 13CO2/12CO2 ratio, thus enabling better quantification of the contribution of different anthropogenic and natural sources of this gas to the local atmospheric CO2load. Here we present results of a 2-year study aimed at quantifying carbon isotopic signature of the mean CO2 source and its seasonal variability in the urban atmosphere of Krakow, southern Poland. The Picarro G2101-i CRDS isotopic analyser system for CO2and 13CO2/12CO2 mixing ratio measurements has been installed at the AGH University of Science and Technology campus in July 2011. Air inlet was located at the top of a 20m tower mounted on the roof of the faculty building (ca. 42m a.g.l.), close to the city centre. While temporal resolution of the analyser is equal 1s, a 2-minute moving average was used for calculations of δ13CO2 and CO2 mixing ratio to reduce measurement uncertainty. The measurements were calibrated against 2 NOAA (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration) primary standard tanks for CO2 mixing ratio and 1 JRAC (Jena Reference Air Cylinder) isotope primary standard for δ13C. A Keeling approach based on two-component mass and isotope balance was used to derive daily mean isotopic signatures of local CO2 from individual measurements of δ13CO2 and CO2 mixing ratios. The record covers a 2-year period, from July 2011 to July 2013. It shows a clear seasonal pattern, with less negative and less variable δ13CO2 values

  2. Short-term controls on the age of microbial carbon sources in boreal forest soils

    OpenAIRE

    Czimczik, C; Trumbore, S

    2007-01-01

    [1] One predicted positive feedback of increasing temperatures in the boreal region is carbon (C) loss through enhanced microbial decomposition of soil organic matter (SOM). The degree to which temperature sensitivity for decomposition varies across a range of C-substrates remains uncertain. Using incubations, we tested whether microorganisms shift to more recalcitrant substrates (with longer turnover times) at higher temperatures at low or increased soil moisture. We measured the radiocarbon...

  3. Carbon and nitrogen balance of leaf-eating sesarmid crabs ( Neoepisesarma versicolor) offered different food sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thongtham, Nalinee; Kristensen, Erik

    2005-10-01

    Carbon and nitrogen budgets for the leaf-eating crab, Neoepisesarma versicolor, were established for individuals living on pure leaf diets. Crabs were fed fresh (green), senescent (yellow) and partly degraded (brown) leaves of the mangrove tree Rhizophora apiculata. Ingestion, egestion and metabolic loss of carbon and nitrogen were determined from laboratory experiments. In addition, bacterial abundance in various compartments of the crabs' digestive tract was enumerated after dissection of live individuals. Ingestion and egestion rates (in terms of dry weight) were highest, while the assimilation efficiency was poorest for crabs fed on brown leaves. The low assimilation efficiency was more than counteracted by the high ingestion rate providing more carbon for growth than for crabs fed green and yellow leaves. In any case, the results show that all types of leaves can provide adequate carbon while nitrogen was insufficient to support both maintenance (yellow leaves) and growth (green, yellow and brown leaves). Leaf-eating crabs must therefore obtain supplementary nitrogen by other means in order to meet their nitrogen requirement. Three hypotheses were evaluated: (1) crabs supplement their diet with bacteria and benthic microalgae by ingesting own faeces and/or selective grazing at the sediment surface; (2) assimilation of symbiotic nitrogen-fixing bacteria in the crabs' own intestinal system; and (3) nitrogen storage following occasional feeding on animal tissues (e.g. meiofauna and carcasses). It appears that hypothesis 1 is of limited importance for N. versicolor since faeces and sediment can only supply a minor fraction of the missing nitrogen due to physical constraints on the amount of material the crabs can consume. Hypothesis 2 can be ruled out because tests showed no nitrogen fixation activity in the intestinal system of N. versicolor. It is therefore likely that leaf-eating crabs provide most of their nitrogen requirement from intracellular deposits

  4. Hemicellulose concentration and composition in plant cell walls under extreme carbon source-sink imbalances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaedel, C.; Hoch, G. (Univ. of Basel, Institute of Botany, Basel (Switzerland)); Richter, A.; Bloechl, A. (Univ. of Vienna, Dept. of Chemical Ecology and Ecosystem Research, Vienna (Austria))

    2010-01-15

    Hemicelluloses account for one-quarter of the global dry plant biomass and therefore are the second most abundant biomass fraction after cellulose. Despite their quantitative significance, the responsiveness of hemicelluloses to atmospheric carbon oversupply is still largely unknown, although hemicelluloses could serve as carbon sinks with increasing CO{sub 2} concentrations. This study aimed at clarifying the role hemicelluloses play as carbon sinks, analogous to non-structural carbohydrates (NSC), by experimentally manipulating the plants' carbon supply. Sixteen plant species from four different plant functional types (grasses, herbs, seedlings of broad-leaved trees and conifers) were grown for 2 months in greenhouses at either extremely low (140 ppm), medium (280 ppm) or high (560 ppm) atmospheric CO{sub 2}concentrations, thus inducing situations of massive C-limitation or -oversupply. Above and below ground biomass as wellas NSC significantly increased in all species and tissues with increasing CO{sub 2}concentrations. Increasing CO{sub 2}concentrations had no significant effect on total hemicellulose concentrations in leaves and woody tissues in all species, except for two out of four grass species, where hemicellulose concentrations increased with atmospheric CO{sub 2}supply. Despite the overall stable total hemicellulose concentrations, the monosaccharide spectra of hemicelluloses showed a significant increase in glucose monomers in leaves of woody species as C-supply increased. In summary, total hemicellulose concentrations in de novo built biomass seem to be largely unaffected by changed atmospheric CO{sub 2}concentrations, while significant increases of hemicellulose-derived glucose with increasing CO{sub 2}concentrations in leaves of broad-leaved and conifer tree seedlings showed differential responses among the different hemicellulose classes in response to varying CO{sub 2}concentrations. (author)

  5. Hemicellulose concentration and composition in plant cell walls under extreme carbon source-sink imbalances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schädel, Christina; Richter, Andreas; Blöchl, Andreas; Hoch, Günter

    2010-07-01

    Hemicelluloses account for one-quarter of the global dry plant biomass and therefore are the second most abundant biomass fraction after cellulose. Despite their quantitative significance, the responsiveness of hemicelluloses to atmospheric carbon oversupply is still largely unknown, although hemicelluloses could serve as carbon sinks with increasing CO(2) concentrations. This study aimed at clarifying the role hemicelluloses play as carbon sinks, analogous to non-structural carbohydrates (NSC), by experimentally manipulating the plants' carbon supply. Sixteen plant species from four different plant functional types (grasses, herbs, seedlings of broad-leaved trees and conifers) were grown for 2 months in greenhouses at either extremely low (140 ppm), medium (280 ppm) or high (560 ppm) atmospheric CO(2) concentrations, thus inducing situations of massive C-limitation or -oversupply. Above and belowground biomass as well as NSC significantly increased in all species and tissues with increasing CO(2) concentrations. Increasing CO(2) concentrations had no significant effect on total hemicellulose concentrations in leaves and woody tissues in all species, except for two out of four grass species, where hemicellulose concentrations increased with atmospheric CO(2) supply. Despite the overall stable total hemicellulose concentrations, the monosaccharide spectra of hemicelluloses showed a significant increase in glucose monomers in leaves of woody species as C-supply increased. In summary, total hemicellulose concentrations in de novo built biomass seem to be largely unaffected by changed atmospheric CO(2) concentrations, while significant increases of hemicellulose-derived glucose with increasing CO(2) concentrations in leaves of broad-leaved and conifer tree seedlings showed differential responses among the different hemicellulose classes in response to varying CO(2) concentrations. PMID:20113432

  6. Intertidal salt marshes as an important source of inorganic carbon to the coastal ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhaohui Aleck; Kroeger, Kevin D.; Ganju, Neil K.; Gonneea, Meagan; Chu, Sophie N.

    2016-01-01

    Dynamic tidal export of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) to the coastal ocean from highly productive intertidal marshes and its effects on seawater carbonate chemistry are thoroughly evaluated. The study uses a comprehensive approach by combining tidal water sampling of CO2parameters across seasons, continuous in situ measurements of biogeochemically-relevant parameters and water fluxes, with high-resolution modeling in an intertidal salt marsh of the U.S. northeast region. Salt marshes can acidify and alkalize tidal water by injecting CO2 (DIC) and total alkalinity (TA). DIC and TA generation may also be decoupled due to differential effects of marsh aerobic and anaerobic respiration on DIC and TA. As marsh DIC is added to tidal water, the buffering capacity first decreases to a minimum and then increases quickly. Large additions of marsh DIC can result in higher buffering capacity in ebbing tide than incoming tide. Alkalization of tidal water, which mostly occurs in the summer due to anaerobic respiration, can further modify buffering capacity. Marsh exports of DIC and alkalinity may have complex implications for the future, more acidified ocean. Marsh DIC export exhibits high variability over tidal and seasonal cycles, which is modulated by both marsh DIC generation and by water fluxes. The marsh DIC export of 414 g C m−2 yr−1, based on high-resolution measurements and modeling, is more than twice the previous estimates. It is a major term in the marsh carbon budget and translates to one of the largest carbon fluxes along the U.S. East Coast.

  7. Carbon transformation and the sources of dissolved inorganic carbonate in sediments of a temperate coastal sea, the Baltic Sea: A stable isotope and modelling approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipka, Marko; Liu, Bo; Wegwerth, Antje; Dellwig, Olaf; Winde, Vera; Al-Raei, Abdul M.; Böttcher, Michael E.

    2015-04-01

    Organic matter is mineralized in brackish-marine sediments by microbial activity using predominantly and sulfate as electron acceptors. Under anoxic bottom water conditions, sulfate reduction dominates. Pore water profiles reflect net biogeochemical processes, transformation rates and fluxes of dissolved species across the sediment-water interface. Element fluxes across the sediment-water interface are controlled by different boundary conditions. We present the results of a detailed biogeochemical investigation of interstitial waters from different sediments of the Baltic Sea covering the range of sedimentological and bottom water redox conditions. It was the aim to study the biogeochemical transformation processes and associated element fluxes at the sediment-water-interface and the role of organic matter or methane as potential substrates for microbial activity. Short sediment cores were collected during several research cruises with multicoring devices. Pore waters were analyzed for nutrients, major and trace element concentrations to allow a modelling of net volumetric transformation rates and diffusive element fluxes. Gross sulfate reduction rates were measured in selected cores using incubations with radiotracer. As a tracer for the source of dissolved inorganic carbonate (DIC) the carbon isotope composition was measured. A quantitative interpretation of vertical concentration profiles in the pore waters was performed using different modelling approaches. Element fluxes across the sediment-water interface show a dependence from bottom water redox conditions, sediment compositions, and sedimentation conditions. It is shown that the carbon isotope composition of DIC is a valuable and sensitive parameter in a model-based estimate of the impact of biological and physical mixing of surface sediments. Research is supported by German BMBF within the KÜNO-SECOS project and Leibniz IOW

  8. Determination of primary combustion source organic carbon-to-elemental carbon (OC / EC) ratio using ambient OC and EC measurements: secondary OC-EC correlation minimization method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Cheng; Zhen Yu, Jian

    2016-05-01

    Elemental carbon (EC) has been widely used as a tracer to track the portion of co-emitted primary organic carbon (OC) and, by extension, to estimate secondary OC (SOC) from ambient observations of EC and OC. Key to this EC tracer method is to determine an appropriate OC / EC ratio that represents primary combustion emission sources (i.e., (OC / EC)pri) at the observation site. The conventional approaches include regressing OC against EC within a fixed percentile of the lowest (OC / EC) ratio data (usually 5-20 %) or relying on a subset of sampling days with low photochemical activity and dominated by local emissions. The drawback of these approaches is rooted in its empirical nature, i.e., a lack of clear quantitative criteria in the selection of data subsets for the (OC / EC)pri determination. We examine here a method that derives (OC / EC)pri through calculating a hypothetical set of (OC / EC)pri and SOC followed by seeking the minimum of the coefficient of correlation (R2) between SOC and EC. The hypothetical (OC / EC)pri that generates the minimum R2(SOC,EC) then represents the actual (OC / EC)pri ratio if variations of EC and SOC are independent and (OC / EC)pri is relatively constant in the study period. This Minimum R Squared (MRS) method has a clear quantitative criterion for the (OC / EC)pri calculation. This work uses numerically simulated data to evaluate the accuracy of SOC estimation by the MRS method and to compare with two commonly used methods: minimum OC / EC (OC / ECmin) and OC / EC percentile (OC / EC10 %). Log-normally distributed EC and OC concentrations with known proportion of SOC are numerically produced through a pseudorandom number generator. Three scenarios are considered, including a single primary source, two independent primary sources, and two correlated primary sources. The MRS method consistently yields the most accurate SOC estimation. Unbiased SOC estimation by OC / ECmin and OC / EC10 % only occurs when the left tail of OC / EC

  9. Simulation of diode characteristics of carbon nanotube field-effect transistors with symmetric source and drain contacts

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Jingqi

    2011-09-01

    The diode characteristics of carbon nanotube field-effect transistors (CNTFETs) with symmetric source and drain contacts have been experimentally found at zero gate voltage (Li J. et al., Appl. Phys. Lett., 92 (2008) 133111). We calculate this characteristic using a semiclassical method based on Schottky barrier transistor mechanism. The influences of metal work function, the diameter of the carbon nanotubes and the dielectric thickness on the rectification behavior have been studied. The calculation results show that the metal with a higher work function results in a better diode characteristics for a p-type CNTFET. For single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) with different band gaps, both forward current and reverse current increase with decreasing band gap, but the ratio of forward current to reverse current decreases with decreasing band gap. This result is well consistent with the experimental observations reported previously. The simulation of the dielectric thickness effect indicates that the thinner the dielectric layer, the better the rectification behavior. The CNTFETs without a bottom gate could not show the diode characteristics, which is consistent with the reported experimental observation. © 2011 Europhysics Letters Association.

  10. Dextrose as carbon source in the culture of Litopenaeus vannamei (Boone, 1931 in a zero exchange system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabrina M Suita

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This work compared the use of dextrose and molasses as carbon sources for biofloc development, water quality maintenance, microorganism composition and growth performance of Litopenaeus vannamei juveniles in biofloc technology (BFT. Two treatments, dextrose and molasses, were tested with four replicates each. Carbon was added to achieve a C:N-AT (N-(NH3+NH4+ ratio of 6:1. Physical and chemical water quality variables were monitored daily, and shrimp growth was estimated through periodic biometry. After 30 days, survival, final biomass, and feeding conversion rate (FCR were determined. Dissolved organic carbon, chlorophyll-a, floc volume, total ammonia, nitrite, nitrate and phosphate concentrations, and microorganisms (qualified by groups, were measured every three days. Water quality variables remained within acceptable levels throughout the experimental period, except for nitrite, which reached higher levels than recommended for this species. The use of dextrose resulted in higher water transparency, which influenced the remaining centric diatoms. A superior shrimp performance was observed at this treatment, presumably because of variations on the microbial community. Therefore, it is concluded that the addition of dextrose results in a superior growth performance of L. vannamei when cultured in BFT systems.

  11. An innovative technique to synthesize C-doped MgB2 by using chitosan as the carbon source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Here, we report a new technique to synthesize carbon-doped MgB2 powder. Chitosan was innovatively used as the carbon source during the synthesis of boron from boron oxide. This allowed the introduction of local defects, which later on served as pinning centers in MgB2, in the boron lattice itself, avoiding the traditional and time consuming ways of ex situ MgB2 doping (e.g. ball milling). Two volume percentages of C-doping have been tried and its effect on the superconducting properties, evaluated by magnetic and transport measurements, are discussed here. Morphological analysis by scanning electron microscopy revealed nano-metric grains’ distribution in the boron and MgB2 powder. Mono-filamentary MgB2 wires have been fabricated by an ex situ powder-in-tube technique by using the thus prepared carbon-doped MgB2 and pure MgB2 powders. Transport property measurements on these wires were made and compared with MgB2 wire produced using commercial boron. (fast track communication)

  12. Variability in the carbon isotope composition of individual amino acids in plant proteins from different sources: 1 Leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Anthony H; Kruger, Nicholas J; Hedges, Robert E M; McCullagh, James S O

    2016-05-01

    The natural carbon isotope composition of individual amino acids from plant leaf proteins has been measured to establish potential sources of variability. The plant leaves studied, taken from a range of plant groups (forbs, trees, grasses, and freshwater aquatic plants), showed no significant influence of either season or environment (water and light availability) on their Δδ(13)C values. Plant groups did, however, differ in carbon isotope composition, although no consistent differences were identified at the species level. A discriminant analysis model was constructed which allowed leaves from (1) nettles, (2) Pooideae, (3) other Poales, (4) trees and (5) freshwater higher plants to be distinguished from each other on the basis of their natural abundance (13)C/(12)C ratios of individual amino acids. Differences in carbon isotope composition are known to be retained, to some extent, in the tissues of their consumers, and hence an understanding of compound-specific variation in (13)C/(12)C fractional abundance in plants has the potential to provide dietary insights of value in archaeological and ecological studies. PMID:26948983

  13. Fungal Volatiles Can Act as Carbon Sources and Semiochemicals to Mediate Interspecific Interactions Among Bark Beetle-Associated Fungal Symbionts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cale, Jonathan A; Collignon, R Maxwell; Klutsch, Jennifer G; Kanekar, Sanat S; Hussain, Altaf; Erbilgin, Nadir

    2016-01-01

    Mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae) has killed millions of hectares of pine forests in western North America. Beetle success is dependent upon a community of symbiotic fungi comprised of Grosmannia clavigera, Ophiostoma montium, and Leptographium longiclavatum. Factors regulating the dynamics of this community during pine infection are largely unknown. However, fungal volatile organic compounds (FVOCs) help shape fungal interactions in model and agricultural systems and thus may be important drivers of interactions among bark beetle-associated fungi. We investigated whether FVOCs can mediate interspecific interactions among mountain pine beetle's fungal symbionts by affecting fungal growth and reproduction. Headspace volatiles were collected and identified to determine species-specific volatile profiles. Interspecific effects of volatiles on fungal growth and conidia production were assessed by pairing physically-separated fungal cultures grown either on a carbon-poor or -rich substrate, inside a shared-headspace environment. Fungal VOC profiles differed by species and influenced the growth and/or conidia production of the other species. Further, our results showed that FVOCs can be used as carbon sources for fungi developing on carbon-poor substrates. This is the first report demonstrating that FVOCs can drive interactions among bark beetle fungal symbionts, and thus are important factors in beetle attack success. PMID:27583519

  14. Implications of wall recycling and carbon source locations on core plasma fueling and impurity content in DIII-D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Measurement and modeling of the 2-D poloidal Dα intensity distribution in DIII-D low and medium density L-mode and ELMy H-mode plasmas indicate that hydrogen neutrals predominantly fuel the core from the divertor X-point region. The 2-D distribution of neutral deuterium and low-charge-state carbon were measured in the divertor and the high-field side midplane scrape-off layer (SOL) using tangentially viewing cameras. The emission in the high-field SOL at the equatorial plane was found to be three to four orders of magnitude lower than at the strike points in the divertor, suggesting a strong divertor particle source. Modeling using the UEDGE/DEGAS codes predicted the poloidal fueling distribution to be dependent on the direction of the ion Bx∇B drift. In plasmas with the Bx∇B drift into the divertor stronger fueling from the inner divertor than from the outer is predicted, due to a lower-temperature and higher-density plasma in the inner leg. UEDGE simulations with carbon produced by both physical and chemical sputtering at the divertor plates and walls only are in agreement with a large set of diagnostic data. The simulations indicate flow reversal in the inner divertor that augments the leakage of carbon ions from the divertor into the core. (author)

  15. Nitrogen and carbon source balance determines longevity, independently of fermentative or respiratory metabolism in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Júlia; Leitão-Correia, Fernanda; Sousa, Maria João; Leão, Cecília

    2016-04-26

    Dietary regimens have proven to delay aging and age-associated diseases in several eukaryotic model organisms but the input of nutritional balance to longevity regulation is still poorly understood. Here, we present data on the role of single carbon and nitrogen sources and their interplay in yeast longevity. Data demonstrate that ammonium, a rich nitrogen source, decreases chronological life span (CLS) of the prototrophic Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain PYCC 4072 in a concentration-dependent manner and, accordingly, that CLS can be extended through ammonium restriction, even in conditions of initial glucose abundance. We further show that CLS extension depends on initial ammonium and glucose concentrations in the growth medium, as long as other nutrients are not limiting. Glutamine, another rich nitrogen source, induced CLS shortening similarly to ammonium, but this effect was not observed with the poor nitrogen source urea. Ammonium decreased yeast CLS independently of the metabolic process activated during aging, either respiration or fermentation, and induced replication stress inhibiting a proper cell cycle arrest in G0/G1 phase. The present results shade new light on the nutritional equilibrium as a key factor on cell longevity and may contribute for the definition of interventions to promote life span and healthy aging. PMID:27072582

  16. Nitrogen and carbon source balance determines longevity, independently of fermentative or respiratory metabolism in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Júlia; Leitão-Correia, Fernanda

    2016-01-01

    Dietary regimens have proven to delay aging and age-associated diseases in several eukaryotic model organisms but the input of nutritional balance to longevity regulation is still poorly understood. Here, we present data on the role of single carbon and nitrogen sources and their interplay in yeast longevity. Data demonstrate that ammonium, a rich nitrogen source, decreases chronological life span (CLS) of the prototrophic Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain PYCC 4072 in a concentration-dependent manner and, accordingly, that CLS can be extended through ammonium restriction, even in conditions of initial glucose abundance. We further show that CLS extension depends on initial ammonium and glucose concentrations in the growth medium, as long as other nutrients are not limiting. Glutamine, another rich nitrogen source, induced CLS shortening similarly to ammonium, but this effect was not observed with the poor nitrogen source urea. Ammonium decreased yeast CLS independently of the metabolic process activated during aging, either respiration or fermentation, and induced replication stress inhibiting a proper cell cycle arrest in G0/G1 phase. The present results shade new light on the nutritional equilibrium as a key factor on cell longevity and may contribute for the definition of interventions to promote life span and healthy aging. PMID:27072582

  17. Seasonal variation in sources and processing of particulate organic carbon in the Pearl River estuary, South China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Wei; Ye, Feng; Xu, Shendong; Jia, Guodong

    2015-12-01

    Particulate organic carbon (POC) in the Pearl River estuary (PRE), South China, along a salinity gradient from freshwater to seawater in four months was studied in order to determine its temporal and spatial changes in source and processing. Analytical parameters included chlorophyll-a (Chl-a), POC, and carbon isotopic composition of POC and the dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) (δ13CPOC, δ13CDIC). POC varied greatly from freshwater to seawater, exhibiting a significant power law distribution with a rapid decrease (from >2.5 mg l-1 to <0.9 mg l-1) in a narrow salinity range of 0-5 and then a slow decline to ˜0.4 mg l-1 along the large salinity gradient in the estuary. POC was sourced predominantly from in situ phytoplankton, and hence largely reflective of primary production, in February, August, and November as indicated by mostly lower POC/Chl-a values (<200), and significant correlation between POC and Chl-a, as well as between δ13CPOC and δ13CDIC. But in May, soil-derived OC was dominant in freshwater and low salinity estuarine water, as suggested by low POC% in total suspended substance, low Chl-a values and high POC/Chl-a ratios, and higher δ13CPOC values that was not in parallel with δ13CDIC excursion. The offset between δ13CPOC and phytoplankton δ13C (inferred from δ13CDIC) was trivial or positive in salinity <12, but then became negative downstream, which was likely suggestive of biogeochemical change from net respiration in the upper estuary to net production in the lower and outer estuary. Our results demonstrated that in situ phytoplankton was the dominant source to the estuarine POC pool during most seasons of a year, except in May in the first phase of wet season when rainfall and river flux increased abruptly causing intensive flushing effect. We further suggested that POC may be undergone intensive processing within the PRE, which is important for understanding organic carbon delivery in this vigorous land-ocean interface.

  18. Influence of aeration and carbon source on production of microcin B17 by Escherichia coli ZK650.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, A; Demain, A L

    1997-05-01

    Previous studies [Connell et al. (1987) Mol Microbiol 1: 195-201] have shown that expression of the microcin B17 (MccB17) promoter is inversely related to the growth rate of the culture, when slower growth was brought about by limitation of sources of carbon, nitrogen or phosphorus. When we used oxygen limitation to decrease growth in a glucose-based chemically defined medium, we found specific MccB17 production to be positively related to growth rate and extent. On the other hand, when we examined various nutritional variations of media, specific production of MccB17 showed a negative relationship to growth rate and extent, as would be predicted by the findings of Connell et al. (1987). Glucose, glycerol and acetate were found to repress MccB17 production; succinate was not repressive. Succinate is an excellent carbon source for production of MccB17 since high levels can be used with no or little interference in product synthesis.

  19. Carbon beam extraction with 14.5 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source at Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Cheol Ho; Oh, Byung-Hoon; Chang, Dae-Sik; Jeong, Sun-Chan

    2014-02-01

    A 14.5 GHz Electron Cyclotron Resonance ion source (ECRIS) has been made to produce C4+ beam for using a carbon therapy facility and recently tested at KAERI. Highly charged carbon ions have been successfully extracted. When using only CO2 gas, the beam current of C4+ was almost 14 μA at 15 kV extraction voltage. To get higher current of the C4+ beam, while optimizing confinement magnetic field configuration (e.g., axial strengths at minimum and extraction side), gas-mixing (CO2/He), and biased disk were introduced. When the gas mixing ratio of the CO2/He gas is 1:8 at an operational pressure of 5 × 10-7 mbar and the disk was biased to -150 V relative to the ion source body, the highest current of the C4+ beam was achieved to be 50 μA, more than three times higher than previously observed only with CO2 gas. Some details on the operating conditions of the ECRIS were discussed.

  20. Isolation of bacteria capable of growth with 2-methylisoborneol and geosmin as the sole carbon and energy sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guttman, Lior; van Rijn, Jaap

    2012-01-01

    Using a relatively simple enrichment technique, geosmin and 2-methylisoborneol (MIB)-biodegrading bacteria were isolated from a digestion basin in an aquaculture unit. Comparison of 16S rRNA gene sequences affiliated one of the three isolates with the Gram-positive genus Rhodococcus, while the other two isolates were found to be closely related to the Gram-negative family Comamonadaceae (Variovorax and Comamonas). Growth rates and geosmin and MIB removal rates by the isolates were determined under aerated and nonaerated conditions in mineral medium containing either of the two compounds as the sole carbon and energy source. All isolates exhibited their fastest growth under aerobic conditions, with generation times ranging from 3.1 to 5.7 h, compared to generation times of up to 19.1 h in the nonaerated flasks. Incubation of the isolates with additional carbon sources caused a significant increase in their growth rates, while removal rates of geosmin and MIB were significantly lower than those for incubation with only geosmin or MIB. By fluorescence in situ hybridization, members of the genera Rhodococcus and Comamonas were detected in geosmin- and MIB-enriched sludge from the digestion basin.

  1. Effects of carbon source, phosphorus concentration, and several micronutrients on biomass and geosmin production by Streptomyces halstedii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrader, K K; Blevins, W T

    2001-04-01

    The effects of various carbon sources, phosphorus concentration, and different concentrations of the micronutrients calcium, cobalt, copper, iron, manganese, potassium, and zinc were determined on biomass dry weight production, geosmin production, and geosmin/biomass (G/B) values for Streptomyces halstedii, a geosmin-producing actinomycete isolated from the sediment of an aquaculture pond. Of the substrates tested, maltose as a sole carbon source promoted maximal growth by S. halstedii while mannitol promoted maximal geosmin production, and galactose yielded the highest G/B values. Fish-food pellets and galactose were poor substrates for growth. Increasing phosphorus concentrations enhanced geosmin production and G/B values. Of the seven micronutrients tested, zinc, iron, and copper had the most profound effects on biomass and geosmin production. Increasing zinc concentrations promoted biomass production while inhibiting geosmin production and G/B values; increasing concentrations of copper and iron inhibited biomass and geosmin production. Increased copper concentrations had the greatest effect in preventing growth and geosmin production by S. halstedii.

  2. Fructose as a carbon source induces an aggressive phenotype in MDA-MB-468 breast tumor cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    MONZAVI-KARBASSI, BEHJATOLAH; HINE, R. JEAN; STANLEY, JOSEPH S.; RAMANI, VISHNU PRAKASH; CARCEL-TRULLOLS, JAIME; WHITEHEAD, TRACY L.; KELLY, THOMAS; SIEGEL, ERIC R.; ARTAUD, CECILE; SHAAF, SAEID; SAHA, RINKU; JOUSHEGHANY, FARIBA; HENRY-TILLMAN, RONDA; KIEBER-EMMONS, THOMAS

    2012-01-01

    Aberrant glycosylation is a universal feature of cancer cells, and certain glycan structures are well-known markers for tumor progression. Availability and composition of sugars in the microenvironment may affect cell glycosylation. Recent studies of human breast tumor cell lines indicate their ability to take up and utilize fructose. Here we tested the hypothesis that adding fructose to culture as a carbon source induces phenotypic changes in cultured human breast tumor cells that are associated with metastatic disease. MDA-MB-468 cells were adapted to culture media in which fructose was substituted for glucose. Changes in cell surface glycan structures, expression of genes related to glycan assembly, cytoskeleton F-actin, migration, adhesion and invasion were determined. Cells cultured in fructose expressed distinct cell-surface glycans. The addition of fructose affected sialylation and fucosylation patterns. Fructose feeding also increased binding of leukoagglutinating Phaseolus vulgaris isolectin, suggesting a possible rise in expression of branching β-1, 6 GlcNAc structures. Rhodamine-phalloidin staining revealed an altered F-actin cytoskeletal system. Fructose accelerated cellular migration and increased invasion. These data suggest that changing the carbon source of the less aggressive MDA-MB-468 cell line induced characteristics associated with more aggressive phenotypes. These data could be of fundamental importance due to the markedly increased consumption of sweeteners containing free fructose in recent years, as they suggest that the presence of fructose in nutritional micro-environment of tumor cells may negatively affect the outcome for some breast cancer patients. PMID:20664930

  3. High growth rate of a-SiC:H films using ethane carbon source by HW-CVD method

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mahesh M Kamble; Vaishali S Waman; Sanjay S Ghosh; Azam Mayabadi; Vasant G Sathe; T Shripathi; Habib M Pathan; Sandesh R Jadkar

    2013-12-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon carbide (a-SiC:H) thin films were prepared using pure silane (SiH4) and ethane (C2H6), a novel carbon source, without hydrogen dilution using hot wire chemical vapour deposition (HW-CVD) method at low substrate temperature (200 °C) and at reasonably higher deposition rate (19.5 Å/s < d < 35.2 Å/s). Formation of a-SiC:H films has been confirmed from FTIR, Raman and XPS analysis. Influence of deposition pressure on compositional, structural, optical and electrical properties has been investigated. FTIR spectroscopy analysis revealed that there is decrease in C–H and Si–H bond densities while, Si–C bond density increases with increase in deposition pressure. Total hydrogen content drops from 22.6 to 14.4 at.% when deposition pressure is increased. Raman spectra show increase in structural disorder with increase in deposition pressure. It also confirms the formation of nearly stoichiometric a-SiC:H films. Bandgap calculated using both Tauc’s formulation and absorption at 104 cm-1 shows decreasing trend with increase in deposition pressure. Decrease in refractive index and increase in Urbach energy suggests increase in structural disorder and microvoid density in the films. Finally, it has been concluded that C2H6 can be used as an effective carbon source in HW-CVD method to prepare stoichiometric a-SiC:H films.

  4. Interactions between Bifidobacterium and Bacteroides species in cofermentations are affected by carbon sources, including exopolysaccharides produced by bifidobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rios-Covian, David; Arboleya, Silvia; Hernandez-Barranco, Ana M; Alvarez-Buylla, Jorge R; Ruas-Madiedo, Patricia; Gueimonde, Miguel; de los Reyes-Gavilan, Clara G

    2013-12-01

    Cocultures of strains from two Bifidobacterium and two Bacteroides species were performed with exopolysaccharides (EPS) previously purified from bifidobacteria, with inulin, or with glucose as the carbon source. Bifidobacterium longum NB667 and Bifidobacterium breve IPLA20004 grew in glucose but showed poor or no growth in complex carbohydrates (inulin, EPS E44, and EPS R1), whereas Bacteroides grew well in the four carbon sources tested. In the presence of glucose, the growth of Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron DSM-2079 was inhibited by B. breve, whereas it remained unaffected in the presence of B. longum. Ba. fragilis DSM-2151 contributed to a greater survival of B. longum, promoting changes in the synthesis of short-chain fatty acids (SCFA) and organic acids in coculture with respect to monocultures. In complex carbohydrates, cocultures of bifidobacterium strains with Ba. thetaiotaomicron did not modify the behavior of Bacteroides nor improve the poor growth of bifidobacteria. The metabolic activity of Ba. fragilis in coculture with bifidobacteria was not affected by EPS, but greater survival of bifidobacteria at late stages of incubation occurred in cocultures than in monocultures, leading to a higher production of acetic acid than in monocultures. Therefore, cocultures of Bifidobacterium and Bacteroides can behave differently against fermentable carbohydrates as a function of the specific characteristics of the strains from each species. These results stress the importance of considering specific species and strain interactions and not simply higher taxonomic divisions in the relationship among intestinal microbial populations and their different responses to probiotics and prebiotics. PMID:24077708

  5. Estimate of denitrifying microbiota in tertiary sewage treatment and kinetics of the denitrification process using different sources of carbon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marchetto Margarida

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available A study of the kinetics of denitrification was carried out in the laboratory based on the quantification of N2O, the final product of the activity of denitrifying microorganisms, when the enzymatic reduction of N2O to N2 was blocked by acetylene. Concentrated mixed liquor (sludge from a reactor with intermittent aeration used for sewage treatment was used as the inoculum, while methanol, acetic acid, glucose, effluent sewage from an anaerobic fluidized bed reactor and synthetic substrate simulating domestic sewage were used as carbon sources. The mean concentration of nitrate was 20 mg/L. Maxima of N2O production and NO3- consumption occurred between 0.5h and 2.0h of incubation using all the carbon sources, which characterized the denitrification process. Acetic acid and methanol were responsible for the highest rates of N2O production. The estimated number of denitrifying microorganisms in the reactor with intermittent aeration, using the MPN technique, varied from 10(9 to 10(10 MPN/g VSS, indicating a high potential for the occurrence of denitrification.

  6. Stable carbon isotopes to monitor the CO2 source mix in the urban environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, F. R.; Wu, L.; Ramonet, M.; Broquet, G.; Worthy, D. E. J.

    2014-12-01

    Urban areas are said to be responsible for approximately 71% of fossil fuel CO2 emissions while comprising only two percent of the land area [IEA, 2008]. This limited spatial expansion could facility a monitoring of anthropogenic GHGs from atmospheric observations. As major sources of emissions, cities also have a huge potential to drive emissions reductions. To effectively manage emissions, cities must however, first establish techniques to validate their reported emission statistics. A pilot study which includes continues 13CO2 data from calibrated cavity ring-down spectrometers [Vogel et al. 2013] of two "sister sites" in the vicinity of Toronto, Canada is contrasted to recent observations of 13CO2 observations in Paris during significant pollution events. Using Miller-Tans plots [Miller and Tans, 2003] for our multi-season observations reveals significant changes of the source signatures of night time CO2 emissions which reflect the importance of natural gas burning in Megacities (up to 80% of fossil fuel sources) and show-case the potential of future isotope studies to determine source sectors. Especially the winter data this approach seems suitable to determine the source contribution of different fuel types (natural gas, liquid fuels and coal) which can inform the interpretation of other Greenhouse Gases and air pollution levels.

  7. Effect of Nitrogen Source and Carbon to Nitrogen Ratio on Hydrogen Production using C. acetobutylicum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Sahaid Kalil

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: One of the main factors influenced the bacterial productivity and total yield of hydrogen is the nitrogen source and its concentration. Approach: Using different nitrogen source with different concentration on bacterial productivity of hydrogen showed to affect on both bacterial productivity of hydrogen and biomass concentration. Results: Yeast extract as nitrogen source at concentration of 13 g L-1 was the best organic nitrogen source and resulted in hydrogen yield YP/S of 308 mL g-1 glucose utilized with biomass concentration of 1.1 g L-1, hydrogen yield per biomass YP/X of 280 mL g-1 L-1, biomass per substrate utilized YX/S of 0.22 and produced hydrogen in gram per gram of glucose utilized YH2/S of 0.0275. C/N of 70 enhanced the YP/S from 308-350 mL g?1 glucose utilized with biomass concentration of 1.22 gL-1, YP/X of 287 mL g-1 L-1, YX/S of 0.244 and YH2/S of 0.03125. Conclusion: Nitrogen source with proper C:N ratio enhanced the hydrogen production.

  8. Sources and accumulation of organic carbon in the Pearl River Estuary surface sediment as indicated by elemental, stable carbon isotopic, and carbohydrate compositions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. He

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Organic matter in surface sediments from the upper reach of the Pearl River Estuary and Lingdingyang Bay, as well as the adjacent northern South China Sea shelf was characterized by a variety of techniques, including elemental (C and N, stable carbon isotopic (δ 13C composition, as well as molecular-level analyses. Total organic carbon (TOC content was 1.61±1.20% in the upper reach down to 1.00±0.22% in Lingdingyang Bay and to 0.80±0.10% on the inner shelf and 0.58±0.06% on the outer shelf. δ13C values ranged from −25.11‰ to −21.28‰ across the studied area, with a trend of enrichment seaward. The spatial trend in C/N ratios mirrored that of δ13C, with a substantial decrease in C/N ratio from 10.9±1.3 in the Lingdingyang Bay surface sediments to 6.5±0.09 in the outer shelf surface sediments. Total carbohydrate yields ranged from 22.1 to 26.7 mg (100 mg OC−1, and typically followed TOC concentrations in the estuarine and shelf sediments, suggesting that the relative abundance of total carbohydrate was fairly constant in TOC. Total neutral sugars as detected by the nine major monosaccharides (lyxose, rhamnose, ribose, arabinose, fucose, xylose, galactose, mannose, and glucose yielded between 4.0 and 18.6 mg (100 mg OC−1 in the same sediments, suggesting that a significant amount of carbohydrates were not neutral aldoses. The bulk organic matter properties, isotopic composition and C/N ratios, combined with molecular-level carbohydrate compositions were used to assess the sources and accumulation of terrestrial organic matter in the Pearl River Estuary and the adjacent northern South China Sea shelf. Results showed a mixture of terrestrial riverine organic carbon with in situ phytoplankton organic carbon in the areas studied. Using a two end-member mixing model based on δ13C values and C/N ratios, we estimated that the terrestrial organic carbon contribution to

  9. Projections of multi-gas emissions and carbon sinks, and marginal abatement cost functions modelling for land-use related sources

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graveland C; Bouwman AF; Vries B de; Eickhout B; Strengers BJ; MNV

    2003-01-01

    This report presents estimates of the costs of abatement of greenhouse gas emissions associated with landfills as a source of methane (CH4), sewage as a source of methane and nitrous oxide (CH4 and N2O, respectively) and carbon (C) sequestration in forest plantations. This is done in the form of so-

  10. Influence of carbon source on nutrient removal performance and physical-chemical characteristics of aerobic granular sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lashkarizadeh, Monireh; Yuan, Qiuyan; Oleszkiewicz, Jan A

    2015-01-01

    The impact of carbon source variation on the physical and chemical characteristics of aerobic granular sludge and its biological nutrient (nitrogen and phosphorus) removal performance was investigated. Two identical sequencing batch reactors, R1 and R2, were set up. Granular biomass was cultivated to maturity using acetate-based synthetic wastewater. After mature granules in both reactors with simultaneous chemical oxygen demand (COD), ammonium and phosphorus removal capability were achieved, the feed of R2 was changed to municipal wastewater and R1 was continued on synthetic feed as control. Biological phosphorus removal was completely inhibited in R2 due to lack of readily biodegradable COD; however, the biomass maintained high ammonium and COD removal efficiencies. The disintegration of the granules in R2 occurred during the first two weeks after the change of feed, but it did not have significant impacts on settling properties of the sludge. Re-granulation of the biomass in R2 was then observed within 30 d after granules' disintegration when the biomass acclimated to the new substrate. The granular biomass in R1 and R2 maintained a Sludge Volume Index close to 60 and 47 mL g(-1), respectively, during the experimental period. It was concluded that changing the carbon source from readily biodegradable acetate to the more complex ones present in municipal wastewater did not have significant impacts on aerobic granular sludge characteristics; it particularly did not affect its settling properties. However, sufficient readily biodegradable carbon would have to be provided to maintain simultaneous biological nitrate and phosphorus removal. PMID:25719420

  11. Coupling experimental and field-based approaches to decipher carbon sources in the shell of the great scallop, Pecten maximus (L.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchais, V.; Richard, J.; Jolivet, A.; Flye-Sainte-Marie, J.; Thébault, J.; Jean, F.; Richard, P.; Paulet, Y.-M.; Clavier, J.; Chauvaud, L.

    2015-11-01

    This research investigated how the carbon isotopic composition of food source (δ13Cfood) and dissolved inorganic carbon (δ13CDIC) influences the carbon isotopic composition of Pecten maximus shells (δ13Cshell) under both experimental and natural conditions. The objectives are to better understand the relationship between P. maximus and its environment, and to specifically distinguish conditions under which calcification is influenced by respired CO2 derived from food sources versus conditions in which calcification uses inorganic carbon from seawater. Laboratory experiment investigated carbon incorporation into shell carbonates by maintaining scallops under conditions where the stable carbon isotopic composition of food sources was considerably depleted (-54‰), relative to values observed in the natural environment (-21‰). Laboratory experiment ran for 78 days under three temperature conditions, 15 °C, 21 °C and 25 °C. A survey of the environmental parameters and stable carbon isotopic composition into shell carbonate of natural population of P. maximus was also realized during the same year in the Bay of Brest, France. Data collected from both laboratory experiment and the natural environment confirmed that both δ13CDIC and δ13Cfood influence δ13Cshell values and that organic carbon incorporation (CM) averages about 10% (4.3-6.8% under experimental conditions and 1.9-16.6% in the natural environment). The shift in stable carbon isotopic composition from the uptake of depleted food sources under experimental conditions realized a marked divergence in the predicted equilibrium between calcium carbonate and ambient bicarbonate, relative to the natural environment. This offset was 1.7 ± 0.6‰ for scallops in their natural environment and 2.5 ± 0.5 and 3.2 ± 0.9‰ for scallops under experimental conditions at water temperatures of 15 °C and 21 °C, respectively. The offset of 3‰ for scallops subjected to laboratory experiment could not be explained

  12. Trends and drivers of regional sources and sinks of carbon dioxide over the past two decades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sitch, S.; Friedlingstein, P.; Gruber, N.; Jones, S. D.; Murray-Tortarolo, G.; Ahlström, A.; Doney, S. C.; Graven, H.; Heinze, C.; Huntingford, C.; Levis, S.; Levy, P. E.; Lomas, M.; Poulter, B.; Viovy, N.; Zaehle, S.; Zeng, N.; Arneth, A.; Bonan, G.; Bopp, L.; Canadell, J. G.; Chevallier, F.; Ciais, P.; Ellis, R.; Gloor, M.; Peylin, P.; Piao, S.; Le Quéré, C.; Smith, B.; Zhu, Z.; Myneni, R.

    2013-12-01

    The land and ocean absorb on average over half of the anthropogenic emissions of carbon dioxide (CO2) every year. These CO2 "sinks" are modulated by climate change and variability. Here we use a suite of nine Dynamic Global Vegetation Models (DGVMs) and four Ocean Biogeochemical General Circulation Models (OBGCMs) to quantify the global and regional climate and atmospheric CO2 - driven trends in land and oceanic CO2 exchanges with the atmosphere over the period 1990-2009, attribute these trends to underlying processes, and quantify the uncertainty and level of model agreement. The models were forced with reconstructed climate fields and observed global atmospheric CO2; Land Use and Land Cover Changes are not included for the DGVMs. Over the period 1990-2009, the DGVMs simulate a mean global land carbon sink of -2.4 ± 0.7 Pg C yr-1 with a small significant trend of -0.06 ± 0.03 Pg C yr-2 (increasing sink). Over the more limited period 1990-2004, the ocean models simulate a mean ocean sink of -2.2 ± 0.2 Pg C yr-1 with a trend in the net C uptake that is indistinguishable from zero (-0.01 ± 0.02 Pg C yr-2). The two ocean models that extended the simulations until 2009 suggest a slightly stronger, but still small trend of -0.02 ± 0.01 Pg C yr-2. Trends from land and ocean models compare favourably to the land greenness trends from remote sensing, atmospheric inversion results, and the residual land sink required to close the global carbon budget. Trends in the land sink are driven by increasing net primary production (NPP) whose statistically significant trend of 0.22 ± 0.08 Pg C yr-2 exceeds a significant trend in heterotrophic respiration of 0.16 ± 0.05 Pg C yr-2 - primarily as a consequence of wide-spread CO2 fertilisation of plant production. Most of the land-based trend in simulated net carbon uptake originates from natural ecosystems in the tropics (-0.04 ± 0.01 Pg C yr-2), with almost no trend over the northern land region, where recent warming and

  13. Recent trends and drivers of regional sources and sinks of carbon dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sitch, S.; Friedlingstein, P.; Gruber, N.; Jones, S. D.; Murray-Tortarolo, G.; Ahlström, A.; Doney, S. C.; Graven, H.; Heinze, C.; Huntingford, C.; Levis, S.; Levy, P. E.; Lomas, M.; Poulter, B.; Viovy, N.; Zaehle, S.; Zeng, N.; Arneth, A.; Bonan, G.; Bopp, L.; Canadell, J. G.; Chevallier, F.; Ciais, P.; Ellis, R.; Gloor, M.; Peylin, P.; Piao, S. L.; Le Quéré, C.; Smith, B.; Zhu, Z.; Myneni, R.

    2015-02-01

    The land and ocean absorb on average just over half of the anthropogenic emissions of carbon dioxide (CO2) every year. These CO2 "sinks" are modulated by climate change and variability. Here we use a suite of nine dynamic global vegetation models (DGVMs) and four ocean biogeochemical general circulation models (OBGCMs) to estimate trends driven by global and regional climate and atmospheric CO2 in land and oceanic CO2 exchanges with the atmosphere over the period 1990-2009, to attribute these trends to underlying processes in the models, and to quantify the uncertainty and level of inter-model agreement. The models were forced with reconstructed climate fields and observed global atmospheric CO2; land use and land cover changes are not included for the DGVMs. Over the period 1990-2009, the DGVMs simulate a mean global land carbon sink of -2.4 ± 0.7 Pg C yr-1 with a small significant trend of -0.06 ± 0.03 Pg C yr-2 (increasing sink). Over the more limited period 1990-2004, the ocean models simulate a mean ocean sink of -2.2 ± 0.2 Pg C yr-1 with a trend in the net C uptake that is indistinguishable from zero (-0.01 ± 0.02 Pg C yr-2). The two ocean models that extended the simulations until 2009 suggest a slightly stronger, but still small, trend of -0.02 ± 0.01 Pg C yr-2. Trends from land and ocean models compare favourably to the land greenness trends from remote sensing, atmospheric inversion results, and the residual land sink required to close the global carbon budget. Trends in the land sink are driven by increasing net primary production (NPP), whose statistically significant trend of 0.22 ± 0.08 Pg C yr-2 exceeds a significant trend in heterotrophic respiration of 0.16 ± 0.05 Pg C yr-2 - primarily as a consequence of widespread CO2 fertilisation of plant production. Most of the land-based trend in simulated net carbon uptake originates from natural ecosystems in the tropics (-0.04 ± 0.01 Pg C yr-2), with almost no trend over the northern land region

  14. Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Extraction of Organic Matter from Petroleum Source Rocks and Its Implications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    沈忠民; 周光甲; 等

    1996-01-01

    Organic matter was experimentally extracted by supercritical fluids(CO2+1% isopropanol)from petroleum source rocks of different thermo-maturities at different buried depths in the same stratigraphic unit in the Dongying Basin.The results show that supercritical fluid extraction(SFE)is more effective than Soxhlet extraction(SE),with higher amounts and greater varieties of hydrocarbons and soluble organic matter becoming extractive.The supercritical CO2 extraction is therefore considered more valuable in evaluation of petroleum source rocks and oil resources,particularly those of immature types.

  15. Generation of oxygen, carbon and metallic ion beams by a compact microwave source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A small microwave ion source fabricated from a quartz tube and enclosed externally by a cavity has been operated with different geometries and for various gases in a cw mode. This source has been used to generate oxygen ion beams with energy as low as 5.5 eV. Beam energy spread has been measured to be less than 1 eV. By installing different metal plates on the front extraction electrode, metallic ion beams such as (Be, Cu, Al, etc.) can be produced

  16. Effect of the permafrost thawing on the organic carbon and microbial activity in thermokarst lakes of Western Siberia: important source of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirokova, L. S.; Pokrovsky, O. S.; Kirpotin, S. N.; Dupre, B.

    2008-12-01

    Ongoing processes of the permafrost thawing in Western Siberia are likely to increase the surface of water reservoirs via forming so-called thermokarst lakes, mobilizing the organic carbon (OC) from the soil pool to the rivers and, finally, to the ocean, and thus modifying the fluxes of methane and CO2 to the atmosphere. In order to understand the mechanisms of carbon mobilization and biodegradation during permafrost thawing and to establish the link between the OC and microbial activity in forming thermokarstic lakes, we performed a comparative multidisciplinary study on the biogeochemistry of OC and metals in lakes located in the northern part of Western Siberia. About 10 lakes and small ponds of various size and age were sampled for dissolved and colloidal organic carbon and metals and total bacterial cell number. There is a systematic evolution of DOC, pH, trace elements and biological activity during successions of thermokarst lakes encountered in the present study. At the beginning of permafrost thawing at the scale of several meter size ponds, fast lixiviation of unaltered peat yields significant amount of OC, major and trace elements; the pH of these waters is between 3.5 and 4.0 and the conductivity is 20-30 μS. The intermediate stage of lake formation still preserve low pHs, high DOC and conductivity, even in relatively large, up to 1 km diameter but fast growing lakes. At these stages, there is no any productivity as phytoplankton cannot live in these acidic waters and bacterial mineralization intensity is around 0.3 mg C/L/day both in the surface and bottom horizons. Once the lake border is stabilized, there are no new "unaltered peat" sources and the biological processes start to consume the OC and nutrients. At this stage, there is still no production in the water column (begging of permafrost thawing to oligotrophic/mesotrophic at the final "khasyrey" stage (80 CFU/mL). Two main conclusions can be drawn from this work: 1) At all stages of lake

  17. Detecting regional variability in sources and sinks of carbon dioxide: a synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. J. Dolman

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The current paper reviews the experimental setup of the CarboEurope Experimental Strategy (CERES campaigns with the aim of providing an overview of the instrumentation used, the data-set and associated modelling. It then assesses progress in the field of regional observation and modelling of carbon fluxes, bringing the papers of this special issue into a somewhat broader context of analysis.

    Instrumental progress has been obtained in the field of remotely monitoring from tall towers and the experimental planning. Flux measurements from aircraft are now capable, within some constraints, to provide regular regional observations of fluxes of CO2, latent and sensible heat.

    Considerable effort still needs to be put into calibrating the surface schemes of models, as they have direct impact on the input of energy, moisture and carbon fluxes in the boundary layer. Overall, the mesoscale models appear to be capable of simulating the large scale dynamics of the region, but in the fine detail, like the precise horizontal and vertical CO2 field differences between the models still exist. These errors translate directly into transport uncertainty, when the forward simulations are used in inverse mode. Quantification of this uncertainty, including that of inadequate boundary layer height modelling, still remains a major challenge for state of the art mesoscale models. Progress in inverse models has been slow, but has shown that it is possible to estimate some of the errors involved, and that using the combination of observations. Overall, the capability to produce regional, high-resolution estimates of carbon exchange, exist in potential, but the routine application will require considerable effort, both in the experimental as in the modelling domain.

  18. Industrial residues as an external carbon source in denitrification; Industrielle Reststoffe als externe Kohlenstoffquelle fuer die Denitrifikation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schories, G. [TECON GmbH, Clausthal-Zellerfeld (Germany); Geissen, S.U.; Vogelpohl, A. [Technische Univ. Clausthal, Clausthal-Zellerfeld (Germany). Inst. fuer Thermische Verfahrenstechnik

    1999-07-01

    Biological waste water treatment requires biologically readily degradable carbon in order to permit elimination of as much nitrogen as possible. Often now this type of carbon is no longer present in waste water in an appropriate quantity, so that external carbon must be added. Apart from industrially fabricated substrates, the use of industrial residues and waste products as well as of partial waste water streams with a high organic pollutant load is lately being considered for cost reasons. But this is not altogether harmless. Those partial streams may contain substances that inhibit denitrification, impose an additional burden on subsequent cleaning stages or may even pass them unmodified, so that they are emitted into the environment and pose an ecological hazard potential. Hence, industrial residual products need to be specifically selected for use as an external carbon source in denitrification. A suitable strategy is described and demonstrated by means of different examples. (orig.) [German] In der biologischen Abwasserbehandlung ist fuer eine weitestgehende Stickstoffelimination oftmals biologisch gut abbaubarer Kohlenstoff im Abwasser nicht (mehr) in ausreichendem Masse vorhanden. Dann ist die Zugabe einer sog. externen Kohlenstoffquelle erforderlich. Neben industriell hergestellten Substraten wird in letzter Zeit aus Kostengruenden vielfach der Einsatz industrieller Rest- und Abfallstoffe sowie organisch hochbelasteter Abwasserteilstroeme erwogen. Dies ist jedoch nicht unproblematisch, da in diesen Stoffstroemen auch Substanzen enthalten sein koennen, die die Denitrifikation hemmen, nachfolgende Reinigungsstufen zusaetzlich belasten oder diese sogar unveraendert passsieren, dadurch in die Umwelt emittiert werden und damit moeglicherweise aus oekologischer Sicht ein Gefahrenpotential darstellen koennen. Es muss also eine besondere Auswahl der Pruefung industrieller Reststoffe im Hinblick auf den Einsatz als externe Kohlenstoffquelle in der Denitrifikation

  19. Microbial lipid production by oleaginous yeast Cryptococcus sp. in the batch cultures using corncob hydrolysate as carbon source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To realize the feasibility of biodiesel production from high-lipid cell culture, microbial lipid production by the oleaginous yeasts was studied using glucose and sucrose as carbon source. Among the tested strains, Cryptococcus sp. SM5S05 accumulated the highest levels of intracellular lipids. The crude lipid contents of Cryptococcus sp. cultured in yeast malt agar reached 30% on a dry weight basis. The accumulation of lipids strongly depended on carbon/nitrogen ratio and nitrogen concentration. The highest content of lipids, measured at a carbon/nitrogen ratio of 60–90 and at a nitrogen concentration of 0.2%, was 60–57% lipids in the dry biomass. Batch cultures using corncob hydrolysate demonstrated that there was minimal inhibitory effect with a reducing sugar concentration of 60 g l−1 or higher. Batch cultures of Cryptococcus sp. SM5S05 in the corncob hydrolysate medium with 60 g l−1 glucose resulted in a dry biomass, lipid yields, and content of 12.6 g l−1, 7.6 g l−1, and 60.2%, respectively. The lipids contained mainly long-chain saturated and unsaturated fatty acids with 16 and 18 carbon atoms. The fatty acid profile of Cryptococcus oils was quite similar to that of conventional vegetable oil. The cost of lipid production could be further reduced with corncob hydrolysate being utilized as the raw material for the oleaginous yeast. The results showed that the microbial lipid from Cryptococcus sp. was a potential alternative resource for biodiesel production. - Highlights: • Microbial oil production from oleaginous yeast Cryptococcus sp. was studied. • Accumulation of lipid strongly depended on C/N ratio and nitrogen concentration. • Cultures in hydrolysate medium with 60 g/l glucose resulted in maximum lipid yields. • Maximal lipid content in the Cryptococcus sp. were 60.2% on dried weight basis

  20. Accelerated carbonation of steel slags using CO2 diluted sources: CO2 uptakes and energy requirements

    OpenAIRE

    Renato eBaciocchi; Giulia eCosta; Alessandra ePolettini; Raffaella ePomi; Alessio eStramazzo; Daniela eZingaretti

    2016-01-01

    This work presents the results of carbonation experiments performed on Basic Oxygen Furnace (BOF) steel slag samples employing gas mixtures containing 40 and 10% CO2 vol. simulating the gaseous effluents of gasification and combustion processes respectively, as well as 100% CO2 for comparison purposes. Two routes were tested, the slurry phase (L/S=5 l/kg, T=100 °C and Ptot=10 bar) and the thin film (L/S =0.3-0.4 l/kg, T=50 °C and Ptot=7-10 bar) routes. For each one, the CO2 uptake achieved as...

  1. Polyol synthesis in Aspergillus niger : influence of oxygen availability, carbon and nitrogen sources on the metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diano, Audrey; Bekker-Jensen, S; Dynesen, Jens Østergaard;

    2006-01-01

    viscosity and herebya decrease in masstransfer, especially oxygen transfer. The consequence was a decrease in DOT and the occurrence of a switch between fully aerobic conditions and oxygen-limited conditions. Metabolite quantification showed that polyols were the main metabolic products formed......, erythritol, xylitol, and arabitol were produced as carbon storage compounds when the flux through the PP pathway exceeded the need in ribulose-5-phosphate for the biomass synthesis. Glycerol, erythritol, and xylitol seem to be involved in osmoregulation. Mannitol was produced when the catabolic reduction...

  2. Sources and accumulation of organic carbon in the Pearl River Estuary surface sediment as indicated by elemental, stable carbon isotopic, and carbohydrate compositions

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, B.; Dai, M.; Huang, W.; Liu, Q.; Chen, H.; Xu, L.

    2010-10-01

    Organic matter in surface sediments from the upper reach of the Pearl River Estuary and Lingdingyang Bay, as well as the adjacent northern South China Sea shelf was characterized using a variety of techniques, including elemental (C and N) ratio, bulk stable organic carbon isotopic composition (δ13C), and carbohydrate composition analyses. Total organic carbon (TOC) content was 1.21±0.45% in the upper reach, down to 1.00±0.22% in Lingdingyang Bay and to 0.80±0.10% on the inner shelf and 0.58±0.06% on the outer shelf. δ13C values ranged from -25.1‰ to -21.3‰ in Lingdingyang Bay and the South China Sea shelf, with a trend of enrichment seawards. The spatial trend in C/N ratios mirrored that of δ13C, with a substantial decrease in C/N ratio offshore. Total carbohydrate yields ranged from 22.1 to 26.7 mg (100 mg OC)-1, and typically followed TOC concentrations in the estuarine and shelf sediments. Total neutral sugars, as detected by the nine major monosaccharides (lyxose, rhamnose, ribose, arabinose, fucose, xylose, galactose, mannose, and glucose), were between 4.0 and 18.6 mg (100 mg OC)-1 in the same sediments, suggesting that significant amounts of carbohydrates were not neutral aldoses. Using a two end-member mixing model based on δ13C values and C/N ratios, we estimated that the terrestrial organic carbon contribution to the surface sediment TOC was ca. 78±11% for Lingdingyang Bay, 34±4% for the inner shelf, and 5.5±1% for the outer shelf. The molecular composition of the carbohydrate in the surface sediments also suggested that the inner estuary was rich in terrestrially derived carbohydrates but that their contribution decreased offshore. A relatively high abundance of deoxyhexoses in the estuary and shelf indicated a considerable bacterial source of these carbohydrates, implying that sediment organic matter had undergone extensive degradation and/or transformation during transport. Sediment budget based on calculated regional accumulation rates

  3. Sources and accumulation of organic carbon in the Pearl River Estuary surface sediment as indicated by elemental, stable carbon isotopic, and carbohydrate compositions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. He

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Organic matter in surface sediments from the upper reach of the Pearl River Estuary and Lingdingyang Bay, as well as the adjacent northern South China Sea shelf was characterized using a variety of techniques, including elemental (C and N ratio, bulk stable organic carbon isotopic composition (δ13C, and carbohydrate composition analyses. Total organic carbon (TOC content was 1.21±0.45% in the upper reach, down to 1.00±0.22% in Lingdingyang Bay and to 0.80±0.10% on the inner shelf and 0.58±0.06% on the outer shelf. δ13C values ranged from −25.1‰ to −21.3‰ in Lingdingyang Bay and the South China Sea shelf, with a trend of enrichment seawards. The spatial trend in C/N ratios mirrored that of δ13C, with a substantial decrease in C/N ratio offshore. Total carbohydrate yields ranged from 22.1 to 26.7 mg (100 mg OC−1, and typically followed TOC concentrations in the estuarine and shelf sediments. Total neutral sugars, as detected by the nine major monosaccharides (lyxose, rhamnose, ribose, arabinose, fucose, xylose, galactose, mannose, and glucose, were between 4.0 and 18.6 mg (100 mg OC−1 in the same sediments, suggesting that significant amounts of carbohydrates were not neutral aldoses. Using a two end-member mixing model based on δ13C values and C/N ratios, we estimated that the terrestrial organic carbon contribution to the surface sediment TOC was ca. 78±11% for Lingdingyang Bay, 34±4% for the inner shelf, and 5.5±1% for the outer shelf. The molecular composition of the carbohydrate in the surface sediments also suggested that the inner estuary was rich in terrestrially derived carbohydrates but that their contribution decreased offshore. A relatively high abundance of deoxyhexoses in the estuary and shelf indicated a considerable bacterial source of these carbohydrates, implying that sediment organic matter had undergone extensive degradation and

  4. Utilization of glyphosate as phosphate source: biochemistry and genetics of bacterial carbon-phosphorous lyase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hove-Jensen, Bjarne; Zechel, David L; Jochimsen, Bjarne

    2014-01-01

    After several decades of use of glyphosate, the active ingredient in weed killers such as Roundup, in fields, forests, and gardens, the biochemical pathway of transformation of glyphosate phosphorus to a useful phosphorus source for microorganisms has been disclosed. Glyphosate is a member of a l...

  5. Eggshell powder, a comparable or better source of calcium than purified calcium carbonate: Piglet studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaafsma, A.; Beelen, G.M.

    1999-01-01

    Powdered chicken eggshells might be an interesting and widely available source of calcium. In two studies using piglets we determined the digestibility of calcium from different diets. The first study compared casein-based diets with CaCO3 (CasCC) or eggshell powder (CasES). The second study compare

  6. Radiocarbon-based source apportionment of elemental carbon aerosols at two South Asian receptor observatories over a full annual cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Black carbon (BC) aerosols impact climate and air quality. Since BC from fossil versus biomass combustion have different optical properties and different abilities to penetrate the lungs, it is important to better understand their relative contributions in strongly affected regions such as South Asia. This study reports the first year-round 14C-based source apportionment of elemental carbon (EC), the mass-based correspondent to BC, using as regional receptor sites the international Maldives Climate Observatory in Hanimaadhoo (MCOH) and the mountaintop observatory of the Indian Institute of Tropical Meteorology in Sinhagad, India (SINH). For the highly-polluted winter season (December–March), the fractional contribution to EC from biomass burning (fbio) was 53 ± 5% (n = 6) at MCOH and 56 ± 3% at SINH (n = 5). The fbio for the non-winter remainder was 53 ± 11% (n = 6) at MCOH and 48 ± 8% (n = 7) at SINH. This observation-based constraint on near-equal contributions from biomass burning and fossil fuel combustion at both sites compare with predictions from eight technology-based emission inventory (EI) models for India of (fbio)EI spanning 55–88%, suggesting that most current EI for Indian BC systematically under predict the relative contribution of fossil fuel combustion. A continued iterative testing of bottom-up EI with top-down observational source constraints has the potential to lead to reduced uncertainties regarding EC sources and emissions to the benefit of both models of climate and air quality as well as guide efficient policies to mitigate emissions. (letter)

  7. Carbon Isotopes of Methane in the Atlantic Realm: Links Between Background Station Data and Emission Source Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowry, D.; Fisher, R. E.; Lanoisellé, M.; Nisbet, E. G.

    2011-12-01

    Large networks of cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) instruments to measure mixing ratios of greenhouse gases are currently being developed in wealthier populated regions. However, many major natural source regions are remote from wealthy nations, and there are often great logistical obstacles to setting up and maintaining continuous monitoring of these sources. Thus flux assessments in many regions of the world rely on a few unequally spaced 'background' stations, plus satellite interpolation. This limited network can be supplemented to great effect by methane isotope data to identify emissions from different sources and their region of emission. Ideally both carbon and hydrogen isotope signatures are needed for maximum separation of source groups. However the more complex analytical procedure and larger sample requirements for D/H measurement mean that resources are currently better utilized for high-precision carbon isotope (δ13C) measurement of methane. In particular, NOAA maintains an invaluable isotopic measurement network. Since 2008 the greenhouse gas group at Royal Holloway and partners have been measuring methane in and around the Atlantic region, currently measuring mixing ratios by CRDS at Barra (Scotland), Ascension, and E. Falklands. In addition, regular flask sampling for δ13C of CH4 is underway at these sites, plus Cape Point, South Africa, and Ny-Alesund, Spitzbergen, supplemented by collection at Sable Island, Canada, and sampling campaigns on-board the British Antarctic Survey ship, RRS James Clark Ross, between 50°S and 80°N. Methane mixing ratio and δ13C, when combined with back trajectory analysis, help to identify sources over which the air masses have passed. While the South Atlantic shows little N-S variation in δ13C (predominantly -47.2 to -46.8%) it is punctuated by emission plumes from sources in South America and Africa, and although infrequently sampled, they can in some instances be compared with the isotopic characteristics

  8. Carbon sources and trophic relationships of ice seals during recent environmental shifts in the Bering Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shiway W; Springer, Alan M; Budge, Suzanne M; Horstmann, Lara; Quakenbush, Lori T; Wooller, Matthew J

    2016-04-01

    Dramatic multiyear fluctuations in water temperature and seasonal sea ice extent and duration across the Bering-Chukchi continental shelf have occurred in this century, raising a pressing ecological question: Do such environmental changes alter marine production processes linking primary producers to upper trophic-level predators? We examined this question by comparing the blubber fatty acid (FA) composition and stable carbon isotope ratios of individual FA (δ¹³CFA) of adult ringed seals (Pusa hispida), bearded seals (Erignathus barbatus), spotted seals (Phoca largha), and ribbon seals (Histriophoca fasciata), collectively known as "ice seals," sampled during an anomalously warm, low sea ice period in 2002-2005 in the Bering Sea and a subsequent cold, high sea ice period in 2007-2010. δ¹³C(FA) values, used to estimate the contribution to seals of carbon derived from sea ice algae (sympagic production) relative to that derived from water column phytoplankton (pelagic production), indicated that during the cold period, sympagic production accounted for 62-80% of the FA in the blubber of bearded seals, 51-62% in spotted seals, and 21-60% in ringed seals. Moreover, the δ¹³CFA values of bearded seals indicated a greater incorporation of sympagic FAs during the cold period than the warm period. This result provides the first empirical evidence of an ecosystem-scale effect of a putative change in sympagic production in the Western Arctic. The FA composition of ice seals showed clear evidence of resource partitioning among ringed, bearded, and spotted seals, and little niche separation between spotted and ribbon seals, which is consistent with previous studies. Despite interannual variability, the FA composition of ringed and bearded seals showed little evidence of differences in diet between the warm and cold periods. The findings that sympagic production contributes significantly to food webs supporting ice seals, and that the contribution apparently is less in

  9. Modeling microbial dynamics in heterogeneous environments: growth on soil carbon sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resat, Haluk; Bailey, Vanessa; McCue, Lee Ann; Konopka, Allan

    2012-05-01

    We have developed a new kinetic model to study how microbial dynamics are affected by the heterogeneity in the physical structure of the environment and by different strategies for hydrolysis of polymeric carbon. The hybrid model represented the dynamics of substrates and enzymes using a continuum representation and the dynamics of the cells were modeled individually. Individual-based biological model allowed us to explicitly simulate microbial diversity, and to model cell physiology as regulated via optimal allocation of cellular resources to enzyme synthesis, control of growth rate by protein synthesis capacity, and shifts to dormancy. This model was developed to study how microbial community functioning is influenced by local environmental conditions in heterogeneous media such as soil and by the functional attributes of individual microbes. Microbial community dynamics were simulated at two spatial scales: micro-pores that resemble 6-20-μm size portions of the soil physical structure and in 111-μm size soil aggregates with a random pore structure. Different strategies for acquisition of carbon from polymeric cellulose were investigated. Bacteria that express membrane-associated hydrolase had different growth and survival dynamics in soil pores than bacteria that release extracellular hydrolases. The kinetic differences suggested different functional niches for these two microbe types in cellulose utilization. Our model predicted an emergent behavior in which co-existence of membrane-associated hydrolase and extracellular hydrolases releasing organisms led to higher cellulose utilization efficiency and reduced stochasticity. Our analysis indicated that their co-existence mutually benefits these organisms, where basal cellulose degradation activity by membrane-associated hydrolase-expressing cells shortened the soluble hydrolase buildup time and, when enzyme buildup allowed for cellulose degradation to be fast enough to sustain exponential growth, all the

  10. Methane and organic matter as sources for excess carbon dioxide in intertidal surface sediments of the German Wadden Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böttcher, M. E.; Al-Raei, A. M.; Walpersdorf, E. C.; Heuer, V.; Hinrichs, K.; Hilker, Y.; Engelen, B.; Volkenborn, N.; Segl, M.

    2009-12-01

    The tidal areas of the German Wadden Sea form an important transition zone between the terrestrial and marine environment. Tidal areas represent highly productive marine coastal ecosystems that are under additional influence of riverine inputs. The re-mineralization of organic matter is coupled to reductive processes using oxygen, nitrate, Mn,Fe oxy(hydroxi)des and sulfate as final electron acceptors. Sulfate reduction is involved in the oxidation of DOC and methane, and is the most important anaerobic process leading to a re-flux of CO2 into the water column. CH4 and CO2 are important greenhouse gases. Both are produced in marine sediments but methane fluxes from marine sediments to the water column or the atmosphere are often limited by oxidation. Upon oxidation of organic matter and methane, carbon dioxide is added to pore waters, and both, carbon dioxide and methane may be liberated from intertidal surface sediments into the bottom waters or the atmosphere. Sizes and quality of OM pools and methane concentrations, transport properties as well as biogeochemical processs in intertidal sediments differ in different sediment types (sands, mixed and mud flats). Pore waters and surface sediments from the intertidal of the German Wadden Sea, North Sea, have been analyzed on a seasonal base for a number of (bio)geochemical parameters as, for instance, the contents and isotope composition of TOC, DIC, methane, sulphate reduction rates (SRR), sulfate, sulfide, pyrite, AVS. The typical sediments of the tidal area of Spiekeroog Island have been considered, as sands, mixed and mud flats. The C-13/C-12 partitioning was used to identify the major sources of DIC and key reactions in the coupled C-S cycles. SRR showed a control by season (temperature) and organic matter contents. Bulk organic matter in the surface sediments showed stable carbon isotope data between about -19 and -25 per mil with lighter data found in mixed and mud flats, indicating mixtures between marine and

  11. Fish mercury development in relation to abiotic characteristics and carbon sources in a six-year-old, Brazilian reservoir

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuomola, Leena; Niklasson, Terese [Evolutionary Biology Centre and Department of Limnology, Uppsala University, Norbyvaegen 20, S-752 36 Uppsala (Sweden); Castro e Silva, Edinaldo de [Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Federal de Mato Grosso (UFMT), Av. Fernando C. Costa/sn, 78 090-900 Cuiaba-MT (Brazil); Hylander, Lars D. [Department of Earth Sciences, Air, Water and Landscape Science, Uppsala University, Villavaegen 16, S-752 36 Uppsala (Sweden)], E-mail: Lars.Hylander@hyd.uu.se

    2008-02-01

    omnivorous B. hilarii, having a diet partly based on C{sub 4} plants, and carnivorous S. marginatus as well as piscivorous S. brasiliensis, whose carbon sources are depleted in {sup 13}C. The fact that the species have different carbon sources indicates that they belong to different food chains.

  12. Novel ferulic acid esterases from Bifidobacterium sp. produced on selected synthetic and natural carbon sources

    OpenAIRE

    Dominik Szwajgier; Anna Dmowska

    2010-01-01

    Background. Ferulic acid esterases (or feruloyl esterases), a common group of hydrolases are very well distributed in the plant kongdom. The fungal feruloyl esterases were very extensively studied whereas probiotic lactic acid bacteria as the source of this enzyme were generally omitted. Free phenolic acids – strong antioxidants can be released from the dietary fiber by the action of intestinal lactic acid bacteria. The aim of this study was to examine the three probiotic Bifi...

  13. Rapid biological oxidation of methanol in the tropical Atlantic: significance as a microbial carbon source

    OpenAIRE

    J. L. Dixon; Beale, R; P. D. Nightingale

    2011-01-01

    Methanol is the second most abundant organic gas in the atmosphere after methane, and is ubiquitous in the troposphere. It plays a significant role in atmospheric oxidant chemistry and is biogeochemically active. Large uncertainties exist about whether the oceans are a source or sink of methanol to the atmosphere. Even less is understood about what reactions in seawater determine its concentration, and hence flux across the sea surface interface. We report here concentrations of methanol up t...

  14. Rapid biological oxidation of methanol in the tropical Atlantic: significance as a microbial carbon source

    OpenAIRE

    J. L. Dixon; Beale, R; P. D. Nightingale

    2011-01-01

    Methanol is the second most abundant organic gas in the atmosphere after methane, and is ubiquitous in the troposphere. It plays a significant role in atmospheric oxidant chemistry and is biogeochemically active. Large uncertainties exist about whether the oceans are a source or sink of methanol to the atmosphere. Even less is understood about what reactions in seawater determine its concentration, and hence flux across the sea surface interface. We report here concentrations of methanol betw...

  15. Accelerated Carbonation of Steel Slags Using CO2 Diluted Sources: CO2 Uptakes and Energy Requirements

    OpenAIRE

    Baciocchi, Renato; Costa, Giulia; Polettini, Alessandra; Pomi, Raffaella; Stramazzo, Alessio; Zingaretti, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    This work presents the results of carbonation experiments performed on Basic Oxygen Furnace (BOF) steel slag samples employing gas mixtures containing 40 and 10% CO2 vol. simulating the gaseous effluents of gasification and combustion processes respectively, as well as 100% CO2 for comparison purposes. Two routes were tested, the slurry-phase (L/S = 5 l/kg, T = 100°C and Ptot = 10 bar) and the thin-film (L/S = 0.3–0.4 l kg, T = 50°C and Ptot = 7–10 bar) routes. For each one, the CO2 uptake ac...

  16. Mid IR pulsed light source for laser ultrasonic testing of carbon-fiber-reinforced plastic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatano, H.; Watanabe, M.; Kitamura, K.; Naito, M.; Yamawaki, H.; Slater, R.

    2015-09-01

    A quasi-phase-matched (QPM) optical parametric oscillator (OPO) was developed using a periodically poled Mg-doped stoichiometric LiTaO3 crystal to generate mid-IR light for excitation of laser ultrasound in carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP). The ultrasound generation efficiency was measured at the three different wavelengths that emanate from the OPO: 1.064 μm, 1.59/1.57 μm, and 3.23/3.30 μm. The measurements indicate that mid-IR 3.2-3.3 μm light generates the most efficient ultrasonic waves in CFRP with the least laser damage. We used mid-IR light in conjunction with a laser interferometer to demonstrate the detection of flaws/defects in CFRP such as the existence of air gaps that mimic delamination and voids in CFRP, and the inhomogeneous adhesion of CFRP material to a metal plate was also clearly detected.

  17. Production of extracellular proteases by Mucor circinelloides using D-glucose as carbon source / substrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrade Vânia Sousa

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, some Mucorales species have been reported as protease producers. The production of extracellular proteases by Mucor circinelloides using glucose as substrate was studied. Experiments were carried out with different D-glucose concentrations (40, 60 and 80 g/L. Biomass, pH and protease activity were determined. Although biomass production had reached best yields for the medium containing D-glucose in a concentration of 80 g/L, the enzymatic production was higher when the substrate concentration was reduced to 40 g/L. The yield factor for product on cell growth and the yield factor for product on carbon substrate were higher when the microorganism grew in medium containing 40 g/L glucose. The kinetics parameters suggest that this strain seems to be promising as an alternative microorganism for protease production.

  18. Brain nonoxidative carbohydrate consumption is not explained by export of an unknown carbon source

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Peter; Nyberg, Nils; Jaroszewski, Jerzy W;

    2010-01-01

    Brain activation provokes nonoxidative carbohydrate consumption and during exercise it is dominated by the cerebral uptake of lactate resulting in that up to approximately 1 mmol/ 100 g of glucose equivalents cannot be accounted for by cerebral oxygen uptake. The fate of this 'extra' carbohydrate...... uptake is unknown, but it may be that brain metabolism is balanced by a yet-unidentified substance(s). This study used a nuclear magnetic resonance-based metabolomics approach to plasma samples obtained from the brachial artery and the right internal jugular vein in 16 healthy young males to identify...... carbon species going to and from the brain. We observed a carbohydrate accumulation of 255+/-37 mumol/100 g glucose equivalents at exhaustion not accounted for by the oxygen uptake. Although the cumulated uptake was lower than earlier observed, the results show that glucose and lactate are responsible...

  19. A Novel Reactive Gas Source and Its Application to Carbon Nanotube Film Deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Nan; CHEN Han-Yuan; QIAN Sheng-Fa

    2005-01-01

    @@ Generally, gaseous discharge at pressure higher than 10 kPa will collapse to filamentary form or streamer, which will produce a non-uniform treatment on the sample surface. Thus, atmospheric pressure glow discharge (APGD) is developed. However the realization of the APGD is not obvious, it needs special conditions. We propose a new concept to solve the non-uniformity problem. By using a grid electrode and putting the sample downstream of the discharge plasma, the streamers, instead of striking on sample surface, will strike on the grid, and the neutral active species produced in the discharge diffuse out to reach the sample surface uniformly. Finally, a carbon nanotube (CNT) film was produced to test this new concept.

  20. Study of phase contrast imaging for carbon fiber, polystyrene and lung tissue using monochromatic and polychromatic X-ray sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phase contrast imaging is a new method of radiography in which the information of change in phase of the X-rays as it passes through the object gets reflected in the intensity. This leads to a better sensitivity and contrast than the conventional absorption radiography. In this paper we discuss the simulation studies of phase contrast imaging using monochromatic and polychromatic X-ray point source for simple two- and three-dimensional objects like circular and spherical objects (made up of carbon-fiber, polystyrene and lung tissue). The advantages of refraction contrast images are discussed in terms of contrast and resolution, and a comparison is made with absorption images. The result obtained shows considerable improvement in contrast with phase contrast imaging as compared to conventional absorption radiography. These results also guide us in proper selection of source to object distance, object to detector distance, etc. These results are proposed to be used in our experiment on phase contrast imaging with microfocus X-rays. The technique is going to be very useful in improving the resolution in the X-ray imaging for the composites, and in detection of cracks at micron level resolution. Moreover, if the doses can be controlled by proper selection of the detector or the source, it can have clinical application in the mammography

  1. Determining sources of dissolved organic carbon and disinfection byproduct precursors to the McKenzie River, Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, T.E.C.; Anderson, C.A.; Morgenstern, K.; Downing, B.D.; Pellerin, B.A.; Bergamaschi, B.A.

    2010-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine the main sources of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and disinfection byproduct (DBP) precursors to the McKenzie River, Oregon (USA). Water samples collected from the mainstem, tributaries, and reservoir outflows were analyzed for DOC concentration and DBP formation potentials (trihalomethanes [THMFPs] and haloacetic acids [HAAFPs]). In addition, optical properties (absorbance and fluorescence) of dissolved organic matter (DOM) were measured to provide insight into DOM composition and assess whether optical properties are useful proxies for DOC and DBP precursor concentrations. Optical properties indicative of composition suggest that DOM in the McKenzie River mainstem was primarily allochthonous - derived from soils and plant material in the upstream watershed. Downstream tributaries had higher DOC concentrations than mainstem sites (1.6 ?? 0.4 vs. 0.7 ?? 0.3 mg L-1) but comprised rain event in the fall contributes DOM with high DBP precursor content. Although there was interference in the absorbance spectra in downstream tributary samples, fluorescence data were strongly correlated to DOC concentration (R 2 = 0.98), THMFP (R2 = 0.98), and HAAFP (R2 = 0.96). These results highlight the value of using optical measurements for identifying the concentration and sources of DBP precursors in watersheds, which will help drinking water utilities improve source water monitoring and management programs. Copyright ?? 2010 by the American Society of Agronomy.

  2. Influence of the carbon and nitrogen sources on keratinase production by Myrothecium verrucaria in submerged and solid state cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Gioppo, Nereida Mello Rosa; Moreira-Gasparin, Fabiana G; Costa, Andréa M; Alexandrino, Ana Maria; de Souza, Cristina Giatti Marques; Peralta, Rosane M

    2009-05-01

    Myrothecium verrucaria is a nondermatophytic filamentous fungus able to grow and to produce keratinase in submerged (93.0 +/- 19 U/ml) and solid state (98.8 +/- 7.9 U/ml) cultures in which poultry feather powder (PFP) is the only substrate. The purpose of the present work was to verify how different carbon and nitrogen sources can influence the production of keratinase by this fungus. Addition of carbohydrates, such as glucose and sucrose, caused only slight improvements in keratinase production, but the addition of starch caused a significant improvement (135.0 +/- 25 U/ml). The highest levels of keratinase activity, however, were obtained by supplementing the PFP cultures with cassava bagasse, 168.0 +/- 28 U/ml and 189.0 +/- 26 U/ml in submerged and solid state cultures, respectively. Contrarily, the supplementation of PFP medium with organic or inorganic nitrogen sources, such as casein, soy bean protein, gelatin, ammonium nitrate and alanine, decreased the production of keratinase in both types of cultures (around 20 U/ml), showing that the production of keratinase by M. verrucaria is repressed by nitrogen sources. The results obtained in this work suggest that the association of the two residues PFP plus cassava bagasse could be an excellent option as a cheap culture medium for the production of keratinase in submerged and solid state cultures.

  3. Fabrication and field emission characteristics of a novel planar-gate electron source with patterned carbon nanotubes for backlight units

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Yongai; Lin Tihang; Zeng Xiangyao; Zhou Xiongtu; Guo Tailiang

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the fabrication ofbacklight units (BLUs) for a liquid crystal display (LCD) based on a novel planar-gate electron source with patterned carbon nanotubes (CNTs) formed by electrophoretic deposition.The electric field distributions and electron trajectories of this triode structure are simulated according to Ansys software.The device structure is optimized by supporting numerical simulation.The field emission results show that the emission current depends strongly on the cathode-gate gap and the gate voltage.Direct observation of the luminous images on a phosphor screen reveals that the electron beams undergo a noticeable expansion along the lateral direction with increasing gate voltage,which is in good agreement with the simulation results.The luminous efficiency and luminance of the fabricated device reaches 49.1 lm/W and 5500 cd/m2,respectively.All results indicate that the novel planar-gate electron source with patterned CNTs may lead to practical applications for an electron source based on a flat lamp for BLUs in LCD.

  4. Accelerated carbonation of steel slags using CO2 diluted sources: CO2 uptakes and energy requirements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renato eBaciocchi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This work presents the results of carbonation experiments performed on Basic Oxygen Furnace (BOF steel slag samples employing gas mixtures containing 40 and 10% CO2 vol. simulating the gaseous effluents of gasification and combustion processes respectively, as well as 100% CO2 for comparison purposes. Two routes were tested, the slurry phase (L/S=5 l/kg, T=100 °C and Ptot=10 bar and the thin film (L/S =0.3-0.4 l/kg, T=50 °C and Ptot=7-10 bar routes. For each one, the CO2 uptake achieved as a function of the reaction time was analyzed and on this basis the energy requirements associated to each carbonation route and gas mixture composition were estimated considering to store the CO2 emissions of a medium size natural gas fired power plant (20 MW. For the slurry phase route, maximum CO2 uptakes ranged from around 8% at 10% CO2, to 21.1% (BOF-a and 29.2% (BOF-b at 40% CO2 and 32.5% (BOF-a and 40.3% (BOF-b at 100% CO2. For the thin film route, maximum uptakes of 13% (BOF-c and 19.5% (BOF-d at 40% CO2, and 17.8% (BOF-c and 20.2% (BOF-d at 100% were attained. The energy requirements of the two analyzed process routes appeared to depend chiefly on the CO2 uptake of the slag. For both process route, the minimum overall energy requirements were found for the tests with 40% CO2 flows (i.e. 1400-1600 MJ/t CO2 for the slurry phase and 2220-2550 MJ/t CO2 for the thin film route.

  5. Dissolved organic carbon in Alaskan boreal forest: Sources, chemical characteristics, and biodegradability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickland, K.P.; Neff, J.C.; Aiken, G.R.

    2007-01-01

    The fate of terrestrially-derived dissolved organic carbon (DOC) is important to carbon (C) cycling in both terrestrial and aquatic environments, and recent evidence suggests that climate warming is influencing DOC dynamics in northern ecosystems. To understand what determines the fate of terrestrial DOC, it is essential to quantify the chemical nature and potential biodegradability of this DOC. We examined DOC chemical characteristics and biodegradability collected from soil pore waters and dominant vegetation species in four boreal black spruce forest sites in Alaska spanning a range of hydrologic regimes and permafrost extents (Well Drained, Moderately Well Drained, Poorly Drained, and Thermokarst Wetlands). DOC chemistry was characterized using fractionation, UV-Vis absorbance, and fluorescence measurements. Potential biodegradability was assessed by incubating the samples and measuring CO2 production over 1 month. Soil pore water DOC from all sites was dominated by hydrophobic acids and was highly aromatic, whereas the chemical composition of vegetation leachate DOC varied significantly with species. There was no seasonal variability in soil pore water DOC chemical characteristics or biodegradability; however, DOC collected from the Poorly Drained site was significantly less biodegradable than DOC from the other three sites (6% loss vs. 13-15% loss). The biodegradability of vegetation-derived DOC ranged from 10 to 90% loss, and was strongly correlated with hydrophilic DOC content. Vegetation such as Sphagnum moss and feathermosses yielded DOC that was quickly metabolized and respired. In contrast, the DOC leached from vegetation such as black spruce was moderately recalcitrant. Changes in DOC chemical characteristics that occurred during microbial metabolism of DOC were quantified using fractionation and fluorescence. The chemical characteristics and biodegradability of DOC in soil pore waters were most similar to the moderately recalcitrant vegetation

  6. Internal carbon source from sludge pretreated by microwave-H2O2 for nutrient removal in A2/O-membrane bioreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Rongle; Zhang, Qing; Tong, Juan; Wei, Yuansong; Fan, Yaobo

    2015-01-01

    To improve the nutrient removal, the feasibility was studied for the organics released from sludge pretreated by microwave-H2O2 process (MHP) to be used as internal carbon source in two A2/O-membrane bioreactors (MBRs). The experiments were conducted for the nutrient removal and the membrane fouling. The results showed that the removal efficiencies of TN and TP were improved by 11% and 28.34%, respectively, as C/N ratio was adjusted to 8 by adding the internal carbon source, and the ratio of soluble chemical oxygen demand (sCOD) consumed easily for denitrification was about 46% of the total sCOD in the internal carbon source. The addition of the internal carbon sources did not lead to severe membrane fouling in the experimental A2/O-MBR. It is implied that the organics released from sludge pretreated by MHP could be used as the internal carbon source to enhance the nutrient removal in A2/O-MBRs.

  7. Nitrogen-isotope analysis of groundwater nitrate in carbonate aquifers: Natural sources versus human pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreitler, Charles W.; Browning, Lawrence A.

    1983-02-01

    Results of nitrogen-isotope analyses of nitrate in the waters of the Cretaceous Edwards aquifer in Texas, U.S.A., indicate that the source of the nitrate is naturally-occurring nitrogen compounds in the recharge streams. In contrast, nitrogen isotopes of nitrate in the fresh waters of the Pleistocene Ironshore Formation on Grand Cayman Island, West Indies, indicate that human wastes are the source of the nitrate. The Cretaceous Edwards Limestone is a prolific aquifer that produces principally from fracture porosity along the Balcones Fault Zone. Recharge is primarily by streams crossing the fault zone. Rainfall is ˜ 70 cm yr. -1, and the water table is generally deeper than 30 m below land surface. The δ15 N of 73 samples of nitrate from Edwards waters ranged from + 1.9 to + 10‰ with an average of + 6.2‰. This δ15 N range is within the range of nitrate in surface water in the recharge streams ( δ 15N range = + 1 to + 8.3‰ ) and within the range of nitrate in surface water from the Colorado River, Texas, ( δ 15N range = + 1 to + 11‰ ). No sample was found to be enriched in 15N, which would suggest the presence of nitrate from animal waste ( δ 15N range = + 10 to + 22‰ ). The Ironshore Formation contains a small freshwater lens that is recharged entirely by percolation through the soil. Average rainfall is 165 cm yr. -1, and the water table is within 3 m of land surface. The δ15 N of four nitrate samples from water samples of the Ironshore Formation ranged from + 18 to + 23.9‰, which indicates a cesspool/septictank source of the nitrate. Limestone aquifers in humid environments that are recharged by percolation through the soil appear to be more susceptible to contamination by septic tanks than are aquifers in subhumid environments that feature thick unsaturated sections and are recharged by streams.

  8. Effect of Nitrogen and Carbon Sources on Lipase Production by Penicillium aurantiogriseum

    OpenAIRE

    Lima, Valéria M. G.; Krieger, Nadia; Maria Inez M. Sarquis; Mitchell, David A.; Luiz P. Ramos; José D. Fontana

    2003-01-01

    A wild fungal strain isolated from soybean oil and identified as Penicillium aurantiogriseum initially presented a volumetric lipase activity of 0.4 U/mL in submerged culture in a medium containing 0.5 % yeast extract and 1 % olive oil. Studies were undertaken to improve lipase production. The effect of nitrogen source was studied by adding casein peptone, meat peptone, yeast extract or ammonium sulfate to a medium containing potassium nitrate and other mineral salts. The best yield, of 13 U/...

  9. Atmospheric black carbon and warming effects influenced by the source and absorption enhancement in Central Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Nordmann

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Particles containing black carbon (BC, a strong absorbing substance, exert a rather uncertain direct and indirect radiative forcing in the atmosphere. To investigate the mass concentration and absorption properties of BC particles over Central Europe, the model WRF-Chem was used at a resolution of 12 km in conjunction with a high resolution BC emission inventory (EUCAARI 42-Pan-European Carbonaceous Aerosol Inventory; 1/8° × 1/16°. The model simulation was evaluated using measurements of equivalent soot carbon, absorption coefficients and particle number concentrations at 7 sites within the German Ultrafine Aerosol Network, PM10 mass concentrations from the dense measurement network of the German Federal Environmental Agency at 392 monitoring stations, and aerosol optical depth from MODIS and AERONET. A distinct time period (25 March to 10 April 2009 was chosen, during which the clean marine air mass prevailed in the first week and afterwards the polluted continental air mass mainly from south-east dominated with elevated daily average BC concentration up to 4 μg m−3. The simulated PM10 mass concentration, aerosol number concentration and optical depth were in a good agreement with the observations, while the modelled BC mass concentrations were found to be a factor of 2 lower than the observations. Together with backtrajectories, detailed model bias analyses suggested that the current BC emission in countries to the east and south of Germany might be underestimated by a factor of 5, at least for the simulation period. Running the model with upscaled BC emissions in these regions led to a smaller model bias and a better correlation between model and measurement. On the contrary, the particle absorption coefficient was positively biased by about 20% even when the BC mass concentration was underestimated by around 50%. This indicates that the internal mixture treatment of BC in the WRF-Chem optical calculation is unrealistic in our case

  10. Exposure to Glycolytic Carbon Sources Reveals a Novel Layer of Regulation for the MalT Regulon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvia A. Reimann

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria adapt to changing environments by means of tightly coordinated regulatory circuits. The use of synthetic lethality, a genetic phenomenon in which the combination of two nonlethal mutations causes cell death, facilitates identification and study of such circuitry. In this study, we show that the E. coli ompR malTcon double mutant exhibits a synthetic lethal phenotype that is environmentally conditional. MalTcon, the constitutively active form of the maltose system regulator MalT, causes elevated expression of the outer membrane porin LamB, which leads to death in the absence of the osmoregulator OmpR. However, the presence and metabolism of glycolytic carbon sources, such as sorbitol, promotes viability and unveils a novel layer of regulation within the complex circuitry that controls maltose transport and metabolism.

  11. Investigation of the Makeup, Source, and Removal Strategies for Total Organic Carbon in the Oxygen Generation System Recirculation Loop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Elizabeth M.; Carpenter, Joyce; Roy, Robert J.; Van Keuren, Steve; Wilson, Mark E.

    2015-01-01

    Since 2007, the Oxygen Generation System (OGS) on board the International Space Station (ISS) has been producing oxygen for crew respiration via water electrolysis. As water is consumed in the OGS recirculating water loop, make-up water is furnished by the ISS potable water bus. A rise in Total Organic Carbon (TOC) was observed beginning in February, 2011, which continues through the present date. Increasing TOC is of concern because the organic constituents responsible for the TOC were unknown and had not been identified; hence their impacts on the operation of the electrolytic cell stack components and on microorganism growth rates and types are unknown. Identification of the compounds responsible for the TOC increase, their sources, and estimates of their loadings in the OGA as well as possible mitigation strategies are presented.

  12. Mathematical modeling of enzyme production using Trichoderma harzianum P49P11 and sugarcane bagasse as carbon source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelain, Lucas; da Cruz Pradella, José Geraldo; da Costa, Aline Carvalho

    2015-12-01

    A mathematical model to describe the kinetics of enzyme production by the filamentous fungus Trichoderma harzianum P49P11 was developed using a low cost substrate as main carbon source (pretreated sugarcane bagasse). The model describes the cell growth, variation of substrate concentration and production of three kinds of enzymes (cellulases, beta-glucosidase and xylanase) in different sugarcane bagasse concentrations (5; 10; 20; 30; 40 gL(-1)). The 10 gL(-1) concentration was used to validate the model and the other to parameter estimation. The model for enzyme production has terms implicitly representing induction and repression. Substrate variation was represented by a simple degradation rate. The models seem to represent well the kinetics with a good fit for the majority of the assays. Validation results indicate that the models are adequate to represent the kinetics for a biotechnological process. PMID:26378961

  13. Preparation of Diamond-Like carbon Films in methane by Electron Cyclotron Resonance Microwave Plasma Source Ion Implantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李新; 唐祯安; 马国佳; 吴志猛; 邓新绿

    2003-01-01

    Diamond-like carbon (DLC) films were prepared on Si (100) substrates by ion implantation from an electron cyclotron resonance microwave plasma source. During the implantation, 650 W microwave power was used to produce discharge plasma with methane as working gas, and -20 kV voltage pulses were applied to the substrate holder to accelerate ions in the plasma. Confocal Raman spectra confirmed the DLC characteristics of the films.Fourier-transform infrared characterization indicates that the DLC films were composed of sp3 and sp2 carbonbonded hydrogen. The hardness of the films was evaluated with a Nano Indenter-XP System. The result shows that the highest hardness value was 14.6GPa. The surface rms roughness of the films was as low as 0. 104nm measured with an atomic force microscope. The friction coefficient of the films was checked using a ball-on-disk microtribometer. The average friction coefficient is approximately 0.122.

  14. Degradation of o-chloronitrobenzene as the sole carbon and nitrogen sources by Pseudomonas putida OCNB-1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Haizhen; WEI Chaohai; WAMG Yaqin; HE Qincong; LIANG Shizhong

    2009-01-01

    A bacterial strain that utilized o-chloronitrobenzene (o-CNB) as the sole carbon, nitrogen and energy sources was isolated from an activated sludge collected from an industrial waste treatment plant. It was identified as Pseudomonas putida based on its morphology, physiological, and biochemical characteristics with an automatic biometrical system and the 16S rRNA sequence analysis. Microcosm study showed that the biodegradation of o-CNB was optimized at culture medium pH 8.0 and temperature of 32℃. At these conditions, the strain degraded 85% of o-CNB at a starting concentration of 1.1 mmol/L in 42 h. o-Chloroaniline was identified as the major metabolite with both high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The study showed that o-chloronitrobenzene degradation by Pseudomonas putida OCNB-1 was initiated by aniline dioxyenase, nitrobenzene reductase and catechol-1,2-dioxygenase.

  15. INDUCTION OF ENZYME COCKTAILS BY LOW COST CARBON SOURCES FOR PRODUCTION OF MONOSACCHARIDE-RICH SYRUPS FROM PLANT MATERIALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline T. Gilleran

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The production of cellulases, hemicellulases, and starch-degrading enzymes by the thermophilic aerobic fungus Talaromyces emersonii under liquid state culture on various food wastes was investigated. A comprehensive enzyme screening was conducted, which resulted in the identification of spent tea leaves as a potential substrate for hydrolytic enzyme production. The potent, polysaccharide-degrading enzyme-rich cocktail produced when tea leaves were utilised as sole carbon source was analysed at a protein and mRNA level and shown to exhibit high level production of key cellulose and hemicellulose degrading enzymes. As presented in this paper, the crude enzyme preparation produced after 120 h growth of Talaromyces emersonii on used tea leaves is capable of hydrolysing other lignocellulosic materials into their component monosaccharides, generating high value sugar syrups with a host of industrial applications including conversion to fuels and chemicals.

  16. A bacterium capable of using phytol as its sole carbon source, isolated from algal sediment of Mud Lake, Florida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoag, K B; Bradley, W H; Tousimis, A J; Price, D L

    1969-07-01

    A species of Flavobacterium that consistently attacks pure phytol and can use it as a sole source of carbon has been isolated from the blue-green algal sediment of Mud Lake, Florida. Biochemical tests demonstrate that this bacterium also readily uses various other organic compounds. This bacterium may account for the degradation products of chlorophyll and its side chain phytol, which have been found in the Mud Lake algal sediment. Phytol and its degradation products play a role in Refsum's disease, but phytol is also the most promising precursor of the isoprenoid hydrocarbons found in oil shale of the Green River Formation (Eocene) of Colorado, Utah, and Wyoming. The discovery of this species of Flavobacterium is a significant product of a protracted study of the bacteriology, phycology, zoology, and geochemistry of the algal sediment forming in Mud Lake, which is believed to be a modern analogue of the kind of algal sediment that, through geologic time, became oil shale.

  17. BIOREMEDIATION FOR ACID MINE DRAINAGE: ORGANIC SOLID WASTE AS CARBON SOURCES FOR SULFATE-REDUCING BACTERIA: A REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. N. Jamil

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Biological sulfate reduction has been slowly replacing chemical unit processes to treat acid mine drainage (AMD. Bioremediations for AMD treatment are favored due to their low capital and maintenance cost. This paper describes the available AMD treatment, current SRB commercialization such as THIOPAQ® and BioSulphide® technol