WorldWideScience

Sample records for carbon sinks

  1. Energies and carbon sinks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Kyoto Protocol puts a lot of emphasis on carbon sinks. This emphasis almost obliterates the other potential contributions of biomass in the fight against climatic changes and toward sustainable development. Biomass represents an infinite supply of renewable energy sources which do not increase the levels of carbon in the atmosphere, contribute to energy savings resulting from the use of wood rather than other materials, the sustainable management of soils, the fight against drought, agroforestry from which the production of foods depends, the mitigating of certain extreme climatic occurrences and the protection of dams from increased silting. The industrial revolution contributed to the increase in greenhouse gas emissions. When discussing some of the finer points of the Kyoto Protocol, the focus was placed on carbon sinks. The author indicates that the biomass cycle had to be considered, both in situ and ex situ. Details to this effect are provided, and a section dealing with greenhouse gases other than carbon must be taken into account. The rural environment must be considered globally. The author indicates that in the future, the emissions resulting from the transportation of agricultural products will have to be considered. Within the realm of the policies on sustainable development, the fight against climatic change represents only one aspect. In arid and semi-arid regions, one must take into account meeting the energy needs of the populations, the fight against drought and the preservation of biodiversity. The planting of trees offers multiple advantages apart from being a carbon sink: roughage, wood for burning, protection of soils, etc. A few examples are provided. 8 refs., 3 figs

  2. Carbon sinks in temperate forests

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martin, P.H.; Nabuurs, G.J.; Aubinet, M.; Karjalainen, T.; Vine, E.L.; Kinsman, J.; Heath, L.S.

    2001-01-01

    In addition to being scientifically exciting, commercially important, and environmentally essential, temperate forests have also become a key diplomatic item in international climate negotiations as potential sinks for carbon. This review presents the methods used to estimate carbon sequestration, i

  3. OCEAN CARBON SINKS AND INTERNATIONAL CLIMATE POLICY

    OpenAIRE

    Katrin Rehdanz; Richard S.J. Tol; Patrick Wetzel

    2005-01-01

    Terrestrial sinks have entered the Kyoto Protocol as offsets for carbon sequestration, but ocean sinks have escaped attention. Ocean sinks are as unexplored and uncertain as were the terrestrial sinks at the time of negotiation. It is not unlikely that certain countries will advocate the inclusion of ocean carbon sinks to reduce their emission reduction obligations. We use a simple model of the international market for carbon dioxide emissions to evaluate who would gain or loose from allowing...

  4. Rangelands: a closing carbon sink?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhn, Nikolaus J.

    2016-04-01

    Two thirds of the world's agricultural land is suitable for grazing only. Much of this land has experienced severe erosion due to mismanagement, massive redistribution of soil and sediment, and significant degradation of vegetation. As a consequence, geochemical cycles have changed. Unlike croplands, the impact of degradation on nutrient fluxes is hardly compensated on rangelands, potentially disturbing the carbon cycle because of the declining biomass production and the subsequent conversion of litter into soil organic matter. Over time, the degradation leads to a decline in soil C stocks and, if associated with soil erosion, also to a decline in carbon transfer from soil into sediment sinks. A priory reasoning suggests that during the degradation process, with soil productivity not yet massively affected, the Carbon transfer initially increases because soil erosion rates are also greater than in the non-disturbed system. With most soil degradation in rangelands occurring during the past 200 years, this mechanism on a large part of the global land area could have generated an unintentional terrestrial carbon sink during a time period with increasing industrial CO2 emissions. Using global data on soil degradation, soil erosion, soil carbon stocks and dynamics to simulate their interaction and potential role for rangeland carbon cycles supports the assumption that rangelands may have functioned as a carbon sink, but reveals major uncertainties with regards to the size. This highlights the need to improve our knowledge and understanding of rangeland erosion, landscape change and soil formation, both with regards to the recent past, but also the impacts of their future use and climate.

  5. Ocean carbon sinks and international climate policy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terrestrial vegetation sinks have entered the Kyoto Protocol as offsets for anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions, but ocean sinks have escaped attention. Ocean sinks are as unexplored and uncertain as were the terrestrial sinks at the time of negotiation of the Kyoto Protocol. It is not unlikely that certain countries will advocate the inclusion of ocean carbon sinks to reduce their emission reduction obligations in post-2012 negotiations. We use a simple model of the international market for carbon dioxide emissions to evaluate who would gain or loose from allowing for ocean carbon sinks. Our analysis is restricted to information on anthropogenic carbon sequestration within the exclusive economic zone of a country. We use information on the actual carbon flux and derive the human-induced uptake for the period from 1990 onwards. Like the carbon sequestration of business as usual forest management activities, natural ocean carbon sequestration applies at zero costs. The total amount of anthropogenic ocean carbon sequestration is large, also in the exclusive economic zones. As a consequence, it substantially alters the costs of emission reduction for most countries. Countries such as Australia, Denmark, France, Iceland, New Zealand, Norway and Portugal would gain substantially, and a large number of countries would benefit too. Current net exporters of carbon permits, particularly Russia, would gain less and oppose the inclusion of ocean carbon sinks

  6. Biological control of the terrestrial carbon sink

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.-D. Schulze

    2006-01-01

    plant growth has different reasons depending on the region of the world: anthropogenic nitrogen deposition is the controlling factor in Europe, increasing global temperatures is the main factor in Siberia, and maybe rising CO2 the factor controlling the carbon fluxes in Amazonia. However, this has not lead to increases in net biome productivity, due to associated losses. Also important is the interaction between biodiversity and biogeochemical processes. It is shown that net primary productivity increases with plant species diversity (50% species loss equals 20% loss in productivity. However, in this extrapolation the action of soil biota is poorly understood although soils contribute the largest number of species and of taxonomic groups to an ecosystem. The global terrestrial carbon budget strongly depends on areas with pristine old growth forests which are carbon sinks. The management options are very limited, mostly short term, and usually associated with high uncertainty. Unmanaged grasslands appear to be a carbon sink of similar magnitude as forest, but generally these ecosystems lost their C with grazing and agricultural use. Extrapolation to the future of Earth climate shows that the biota will not be able to balance fossil fuel emissions, and that it will be essential to develop a carbon free energy system in order to maintain the living conditions on earth.

  7. Mesoscale inversion of carbon sources and sinks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inverse methods at large scales are used to infer the spatial variability of carbon sources and sinks over the continents but their uncertainties remain large. Atmospheric concentrations integrate the surface flux variability but atmospheric transport models at low resolution are not able to simulate properly the local atmospheric dynamics at the measurement sites. However, the inverse estimates are more representative of the large spatial heterogeneity of the ecosystems compared to direct flux measurements. Top-down and bottom-up methods that aim at quantifying the carbon exchanges between the surface and the atmosphere correspond to different scales and are not easily comparable. During this phD, a mesoscale inverse system was developed to correct carbon fluxes at 8 km resolution. The high resolution transport model MesoNH was used to simulate accurately the variability of the atmospheric concentrations, which allowed us to reduce the uncertainty of the retrieved fluxes. All the measurements used here were observed during the intensive regional campaign CERES of May and June 2005, during which several instrumented towers measured CO2 concentrations and fluxes in the South West of France. Airborne measurements allowed us to observe concentrations at high altitude but also CO2 surface fluxes over large parts of the domain. First, the capacity of the inverse system to correct the CO2 fluxes was estimated using pseudo-data experiments. The largest fraction of the concentration variability was attributed to regional surface fluxes over an area of about 300 km around the site locations depending on the meteorological conditions. Second, an ensemble of simulations allowed us to define the spatial and temporal structures of the transport errors. Finally, the inverse fluxes at 8 km resolution were compared to direct flux measurements. The inverse system has been validated in space and time and showed an improvement of the first guess fluxes from a vegetation model

  8. Age-dependent forest carbon sink: Estimation via inverse modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Tao; Shi, Peijun; Jia, Gensuo; Dai, Yongjiu; Zhao, Xiang; Shangguan, Wei; Du, Ling; Wu, Hao; Luo, Yiqi

    2015-12-01

    Forests have been recognized to sequester a substantial amount of carbon (C) from the atmosphere. However, considerable uncertainty remains regarding the magnitude and time course of the C sink. Revealing the intrinsic relationship between forest age and C sink is crucial for reducing uncertainties in prediction of forest C sink potential. In this study, we developed a stepwise data assimilation approach to combine a process-based Terrestrial ECOsystem Regional model, observations from multiple sources, and stochastic sampling to inversely estimate carbon cycle parameters including carbon sink at different forest ages for evergreen needle-leaved forests in China. The new approach is effective to estimate age-dependent parameter of maximal light-use efficiency (R2 = 0.99) and, accordingly, can quantify a relationship between forest age and the vegetation and soil C sinks. The estimated ecosystem C sink increases rapidly with age, peaks at 0.451 kg C m-2 yr-1 at age 22 years (ranging from 0.421 to 0.465 kg C m-2 yr-1), and gradually decreases thereafter. The dynamic patterns of C sinks in vegetation and soil are significantly different. C sink in vegetation first increases rapidly with age and then decreases. C sink in soil, however, increases continuously with age; it acts as a C source when the age is less than 20 years, after which it acts as a sink. For the evergreen needle-leaved forest, the highest C sink efficiency (i.e., C sink per unit net primary productivity) is approximately 60%, with age between 11 and 43 years. Overall, the inverse estimation of carbon cycle parameters can make reasonable estimates of age-dependent C sequestration in forests.

  9. A new direction in search of "missing" carbon sinks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    @@ The sink-source imbalance in the global carbon cycle is a "hot spot" for scholars on the subject in the present-day world.So far,the CO2 sink's location,size,variation and the mechanism underlying its ever-changing trend are all controversial topics.Currently,the mainstream research in this aspect is concentrated mainly on the organic carbon's cycle while little,if not,attention is paid to the current status of the inorganic carbon sink.

  10. A large and persistent carbon sink in the world's forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Y.; Birdsey, R.A.; Fang, J.; Houghton, R.; Kauppi, P.E.; Kurz, W.A.; Phillips, O.L.; Shvidenko, A.; Lewis, S.L.; Canadell, J.G.; Ciais, P.; Jackson, R.B.; Pacala, S.W.; McGuire, A.D.; Piao, S.; Rautiainen, A.; Sitch, S.; Hayes, D.

    2011-01-01

    The terrestrial carbon sink has been large in recent decades, but its size and location remain uncertain. Using forest inventory data and long-term ecosystem carbon studies, we estimate a total forest sink of 2.4 ?? 0.4 petagrams of carbon per year (Pg C year-1) globally for 1990 to 2007. We also estimate a source of 1.3 ?? 0.7 Pg C year-1 from tropical land-use change, consisting of a gross tropical deforestation emission of 2.9 ?? 0.5 Pg C year-1 partially compensated by a carbon sink in tropical forest regrowth of 1.6 ?? 0.5 Pg C year-1. Together, the fluxes comprise a net global forest sink of 1.1 ?? 0.8 Pg C year-1, with tropical estimates having the largest uncertainties. Our total forest sink estimate is equivalent in magnitude to the terrestrial sink deduced from fossil fuel emissions and land-use change sources minus ocean and atmospheric sinks.

  11. Timescales for detection of trends in the ocean carbon sink

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinley, Galen A.; Pilcher, Darren J.; Fay, Amanda R.; Lindsay, Keith; Long, Matthew C.; Lovenduski, Nicole S.

    2016-02-01

    The ocean has absorbed 41 per cent of all anthropogenic carbon emitted as a result of fossil fuel burning and cement manufacture. The magnitude and the large-scale distribution of the ocean carbon sink is well quantified for recent decades. In contrast, temporal changes in the oceanic carbon sink remain poorly understood. It has proved difficult to distinguish between air-to-sea carbon flux trends that are due to anthropogenic climate change and those due to internal climate variability. Here we use a modelling approach that allows for this separation, revealing how the ocean carbon sink may be expected to change throughout this century in different oceanic regions. Our findings suggest that, owing to large internal climate variability, it is unlikely that changes in the rate of anthropogenic carbon uptake can be directly observed in most oceanic regions at present, but that this may become possible between 2020 and 2050 in some regions.

  12. Timescales for detection of trends in the ocean carbon sink.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinley, Galen A; Pilcher, Darren J; Fay, Amanda R; Lindsay, Keith; Long, Matthew C; Lovenduski, Nicole S

    2016-02-25

    The ocean has absorbed 41 per cent of all anthropogenic carbon emitted as a result of fossil fuel burning and cement manufacture. The magnitude and the large-scale distribution of the ocean carbon sink is well quantified for recent decades. In contrast, temporal changes in the oceanic carbon sink remain poorly understood. It has proved difficult to distinguish between air-to-sea carbon flux trends that are due to anthropogenic climate change and those due to internal climate variability. Here we use a modelling approach that allows for this separation, revealing how the ocean carbon sink may be expected to change throughout this century in different oceanic regions. Our findings suggest that, owing to large internal climate variability, it is unlikely that changes in the rate of anthropogenic carbon uptake can be directly observed in most oceanic regions at present, but that this may become possible between 2020 and 2050 in some regions. PMID:26911782

  13. Long-term decline of the Amazon carbon sink

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brienen, R. J. W.; Phillips, O. L.; Feldpausch, T. R.; Gloor, E.; Baker, T. R.; Lloyd, J.; Lopez-Gonzalez, G.; Monteagudo-Mendoza, A.; Malhi, Y.; Lewis, S. L.; Vásquez Martinez, R.; Alexiades, M.; Álvarez Dávila, E.; Alvarez-Loayza, P.; Andrade, A.; Aragão, L. E. O. C.; Araujo-Murakami, A.; Arets, E. J. M. M.; Arroyo, L.; Aymard C., G. A.; Bánki, O. S.; Baraloto, C.; Barroso, J.; Bonal, D.; Boot, R. G. A.; Camargo, J. L. C.; Castilho, C. V.; Chama, V.; Chao, K. J.; Chave, J.; Comiskey, J. A.; Cornejo Valverde, F.; da Costa, L.; de Oliveira, E. A.; di Fiore, A.; Erwin, T. L.; Fauset, S.; Forsthofer, M.; Galbraith, D. R.; Grahame, E. S.; Groot, N.; Hérault, B.; Higuchi, N.; Honorio Coronado, E. N.; Keeling, H.; Killeen, T. J.; Laurance, W. F.; Laurance, S.; Licona, J.; Magnussen, W. E.; Marimon, B. S.; Marimon-Junior, B. H.; Mendoza, C.; Neill, D. A.; Nogueira, E. M.; Núñez, P.; Pallqui Camacho, N. C.; Parada, A.; Pardo-Molina, G.; Peacock, J.; Peña-Claros, M.; Pickavance, G. C.; Pitman, N. C. A.; Poorter, L.; Prieto, A.; Quesada, C. A.; Ramírez, F.; Ramírez-Angulo, H.; Restrepo, Z.; Roopsind, A.; Rudas, A.; Salomão, R. P.; Schwarz, M.; Silva, N.; Silva-Espejo, J. E.; Silveira, M.; Stropp, J.; Talbot, J.; Ter Steege, H.; Teran-Aguilar, J.; Terborgh, J.; Thomas-Caesar, R.; Toledo, M.; Torello-Raventos, M.; Umetsu, R. K.; van der Heijden, G. M. F.; van der Hout, P.; Guimarães Vieira, I. C.; Vieira, S. A.; Vilanova, E.; Vos, V. A.; Zagt, R. J.

    2015-03-01

    Atmospheric carbon dioxide records indicate that the land surface has acted as a strong global carbon sink over recent decades, with a substantial fraction of this sink probably located in the tropics, particularly in the Amazon. Nevertheless, it is unclear how the terrestrial carbon sink will evolve as climate and atmospheric composition continue to change. Here we analyse the historical evolution of the biomass dynamics of the Amazon rainforest over three decades using a distributed network of 321 plots. While this analysis confirms that Amazon forests have acted as a long-term net biomass sink, we find a long-term decreasing trend of carbon accumulation. Rates of net increase in above-ground biomass declined by one-third during the past decade compared to the 1990s. This is a consequence of growth rate increases levelling off recently, while biomass mortality persistently increased throughout, leading to a shortening of carbon residence times. Potential drivers for the mortality increase include greater climate variability, and feedbacks of faster growth on mortality, resulting in shortened tree longevity. The observed decline of the Amazon sink diverges markedly from the recent increase in terrestrial carbon uptake at the global scale, and is contrary to expectations based on models.

  14. Trends and regional distributions of land and ocean carbon sinks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. L. Sarmiento

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available We show here an updated estimate of the net land carbon sink (NLS as a function of time from 1960 to 2007 calculated from the difference between fossil fuel emissions, the observed atmospheric growth rate, and the ocean uptake obtained by recent ocean model simulations forced with reanalysis wind stress and heat and water fluxes. Except for interannual variability, the net land carbon sink appears to have been relatively constant at a mean value of −0.27 Pg C yr−1 between 1960 and 1988, at which time it increased abruptly by −0.88 (−0.77 to −1.04 Pg C yr−1 to a new relatively constant mean of −1.15 Pg C yr−1 between 1989 and 2003/7 (the sign convention is negative out of the atmosphere. This result is detectable at the 99% level using a t-test. The land use source (LU is relatively constant over this entire time interval. While the LU estimate is highly uncertain, this does imply that most of the change in the net land carbon sink must be due to an abrupt increase in the land sink, LS = NLS – LU, in response to some as yet unknown combination of biogeochemical and climate forcing. A regional synthesis and assessment of the land carbon sources and sinks over the post 1988/1989 period reveals broad agreement that the Northern Hemisphere land is a major sink of atmospheric CO2, but there remain major discrepancies with regard to the sign and magnitude of the net flux to and from tropical land.

  15. Terrestrial vegetation carbon sinks in China, 1981―2000

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FANG; JingYun; GUO; ZhaoDi; PIAO; ShiLong; CHEN; AnPing

    2007-01-01

    Using China's ground observations, e.g., forest inventory, grassland resource, agricultural statistics, climate, and satellite data, we estimate terrestrial vegetation carbon sinks for China's major biomes between 1981 and 2000. The main results are in the following: (1) Forest area and forest biomass carbon (C) stock increased from 116.5×106 ha and 4.3 Pg C (1 Pg C = 1015 g C) in the early 1980s to 142.8×106 ha and 5.9 Pg C in the early 2000s, respectively. Forest biomass carbon density increased form 36.9 Mg C/ha (1 Mg C = 106 g C) to 41.0 Mg C/ha, with an annual carbon sequestration rate of 0.075 Pg C/a. Grassland, shrub, and crop biomass sequestrate carbon at annual rates of 0.007 Pg C/a, 0.014―0.024 Pg C/a, and 0.0125―0.0143 Pg C/a, respectively. (2) The total terrestrial vegetation C sink in China is in a range of 0.096―0.106 Pg C/a between 1981 and 2000, accounting for 14.6%―16.1% of carbon dioxide (CO2) emitted by China's industry in the same period. In addition, soil carbon sink is estimated at 0.04―0.07 Pg C/a. Accordingly, carbon sequestration by China's terrestrial ecosystems (vegetation and soil) offsets 20.8%―26.8% of its industrial CO2 emission for the study period. (3) Considerable uncertainties exist in the present study, especially in the estimation of soil carbon sinks, and need further intensive investigation in the future.

  16. Feasibility of Haze Governance Based on Carbon Sink Mode

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jie; HE; Quanquan; WANG

    2015-01-01

    In recent years,there are research findings of haze formation in various fields of academic circle. It has proved that causes of haze take on diverse characteristics. Thus,from both the natural and human perspective,haze governance should be diverse. Research conclusions on causes of haze formation mainly focus on special geographical structure,and meteorological factors such as relatively stable atmosphere,high rate of calm wind,high relative humidity and temperature of air,and human factors such as industrial pollution,automotive exhaust emissions,aerosol pollution,eutrophication of soil water,and change of city underlying surface. Carbon sink mode is a new channel for haze governance.In carbon sink mode,it is feasible to regulate relative humidity and temperature in air,enhance global wind,and reduce fine particles and microorganisms of air pollution,so as to reduce haze pollution. Besides,China’s special potential of carbon sink market makes it possible to govern haze on the base of carbon sink.

  17. Nanoporous clay with carbon sink and pesticide trapping properties

    OpenAIRE

    Woignier, Thierry; Duffours, L.; Colombel, P.; Dieudonné, P.

    2015-01-01

    A thorough understanding of the mechanisms and factors involved in the dynamics of organic carbon in soils is required to identify and enhance natural sinks for greenhouse gases. Some tropical soils, such as Andosols, have 3-6 fold higher concentrations of organic carbon than other kinds of soils containing classical clays. In the tropics, toxic pesticides permanently pollute soils and contaminate crops, water resources, and ecosystems. However, not all soils are equal in terms of pesticide c...

  18. Spatial distribution of carbon sources and sinks in Canada's forests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Annual spatial distributions of carbon sources and sinks in Canada's forests at 1 km resolution are computed for the period from 1901 to 1998 using ecosystem models that integrate remote sensing images, gridded climate, soils and forest inventory data. GIS-based fire scar maps for most regions of Canada are used to develop a remote sensing algorithm for mapping and dating forest burned areas in the 25 yr prior to 1998. These mapped and dated burned areas are used in combination with inventory data to produce a complete image of forest stand age in 1998. Empirical NPP age relationships were used to simulate the annual variations of forest growth and carbon balance in 1 km pixels, each treated as a homogeneous forest stand. Annual CO2 flux data from four sites were used for model validation. Averaged over the period 1990-1998, the carbon source and sink map for Canada's forests show the following features: (i) large spatial variations corresponding to the patchiness of recent fire scars and productive forests and (ii) a general south-to-north gradient of decreasing carbon sink strength and increasing source strength. This gradient results mostly from differential effects of temperature increase on growing season length, nutrient mineralization and heterotrophic respiration at different latitudes as well as from uneven nitrogen deposition. The results from the present study are compared with those of two previous studies. The comparison suggests that the overall positive effects of non-disturbance factors (climate, CO2 and nitrogen) outweighed the effects of increased disturbances in the last two decades, making Canada's forests a carbon sink in the 1980s and 1990s. Comparisons of the modeled results with tower-based eddy covariance measurements of net ecosystem exchange at four forest stands indicate that the sink values from the present study may be underestimated

  19. Recent variability of the global ocean carbon sink

    OpenAIRE

    Landschützer, P.; Gruber, N.; Bakker, D. C. E.; Schuster, U.

    2014-01-01

    We present a new observation-based estimate of the global oceanic carbon dioxide (CO2) sink and its temporal variation on a monthly basis from 1998 through 2011 and at a spatial resolution of 1×1. This sink estimate rests upon a neural network-based mapping of global surface ocean observations of the partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2) from the Surface Ocean CO2 Atlas database. The resulting pCO2 has small biases when evaluated against independent observations in the different ocean basins, but la...

  20. Biological Carbon Sinks: Transaction Costs and Governance

    OpenAIRE

    G. Cornelis van Kooten

    2008-01-01

    Activities that remove CO2 from the atmosphere and store it in forest and agricultural ecosystems can generate CO2-offset credits that can thus substitute for CO2 emissions reduction. Are biological CO2-uptake activities competitive with CO2 offsets from reduced fossil fuel use? In this paper, it is argued that transaction costs impose a formidable obstacle to direct substitution of carbon uptake offsets for emissions reduction in trading schemes, and that separate caps should be set for emis...

  1. Land use effects on terrestrial carbon sources and sinks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Josep; G.; Canadell

    2002-01-01

    Current and past land use practices are critical in determining the distribution and size of global terrestrial carbon (C) sources and sinks. Althoughfossil fuel emissions dominate the anthropogenic perturbation of the global C cycle, land use still drives the largest portion of anthropogenic emissions in a number of tropical regions of Asia. The size of the emission flux owing to land use change is still the biggest uncertainty in the global C budget. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) reported a flux term of 1.7 PgC@a-1 for 1990-1995 but more recent estimates suggest the magnitude of this source may be only of 0.96 PgC@a-1 for the 1990s. In addition, current and past land use practices are now thought to contribute to a large degree to the northern hemisphere terrestrial sink, and are the dominant driver for some regional sinks. However, mechanisms other than land use change need to be invoked in order to explain the inferred C sink in the tropics. Potential candidates are the carbon dioxide (CO2) fertilization and climate change; fertilization due to nitrogen (N) deposition is believed to be small or nil. Although the potential for managing C sinks is limited, improved land use management and new land uses such as reforestation and biomass fuel cropping, can further enhance current terrestrial C sinks. Best management practices in agriculture alone could sequester 0.4-0.8 PgC per year in soils if implemented globally. New methodologies to ensure verification and permanency of C sequestration need to be developed.

  2. Primary discussion of a carbon sink in the oceans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Caihua; You, Kui; Ji, Dechun; Ma, Weiwei; Li, Fengqi

    2015-04-01

    As a consequence of global warming and rising sea levels, the oceans are becoming a matter of concern for more and more people because these changes will impact the growth of living organisms as well as people's living standards. In particular, it is extremely important that the oceans absorb massive amounts of carbon dioxide. This paper takes a pragmatic approach to analyzing the oceans with respect to the causes of discontinuities in oceanic variables of carbon dioxide sinks. We report on an application of chemical, physical and biological methods to analyze the changes of carbon dioxide in oceans. Based on the relationships among the oceans, land, atmosphere and sediment with respect to carbon dioxide, the foundation of carbon dioxide in shell-building and ocean acidification, the changes in carbon dioxide in the oceans and their impact on climate change, and so on, a vital conclusion can be drawn from this study. Specifically, under the condition that the oceans are not disturbed by external forces, the oceans are a large carbon dioxide sink. The result can also be inferred by the formula: C=A-B and G=E+F when the marine ecosystem can keep a natural balance and the amount of carbon dioxide emission is limited within the carrying capacity of the oceans.

  3. Stochastic carbon sinks for combating carbon dioxide emissions in the EU

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper carries out numerical calculations on the potential of carbon sinks in the EU Emissions Trading Scheme (ETS) and national commitments under conditions of stochastic carbon dioxide emissions from fossil fuels and carbon sequestration by forests. Chance constraint programming is used to analyze the role of stochastic carbon sinks for national and EU-wide compliance costs. The analytical results show that the inclusion of the carbon sink option can reduce costs for low enough marginal cost and risk discount, but also that costless carbon sinks as by-products from forestry are not part of a cost-effective solution under a high reliability concern. Cost savings are reduced due to risk discounting under a reliability concern, in particular when assigning Chebyshev's inequality as compared with a normal probability distribution. It is also shown that the supply of forest sinks on the market depends on the differences in marginal abatement cost between the trading and the non-trading sectors, and in risk discounting between achievements of the ETS cap and the national commitment. Relatively low marginal abatement cost in the non-trading sector and high risk discounting of national commitment achievements increase the supply of sinks in the market and, hence, reduces the equilibrium price. The empirical application illustrates the importance of risk discounting for the magnitude of cost savings obtained from introducing forest carbon sinks in the EU ETS and national commitments.

  4. Carbon sinks and biomass energy. A study of linkages, options and implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study illustrates the important potential role of bioenergy in meeting carbon abatement requirements, in particular in relation to the Kyoto Protocol's first commitment period (2008-2012), based on carbon substitution and associated carbon sinks. Bioenergy-associated carbon sinks could strongly contribute to the acceptability of carbon sinks as a viable means for carbon abatement. Kyoto Protocol agreements and mechanisms, in particular the Bonn agreement, could prove of great value in stimulating sustainable modern bioenergy schemes. (author)

  5. CO2 Sink Effect Of Concrete Carbonation Spain

    OpenAIRE

    Galan Garcia, Isabel; Andrade Perdrix, Maria del Carmen; Mora Peris, Pedro; San Juan Barbudo, Miguel Angel; Lopez Agüi, Juan Carlos; Prieto Rabade, Miguel

    2010-01-01

    Although carbonation of cement phases is well known, the amount of carbon dioxide combined during the process has been much less investigated. Related to the greenhouse effect much more attention is being paid to the sinks for C 0 2 in order to correctly compute the gases emission during production of materials. In the case of cement a strict calculation should discount the C 0 2 emitted from that fixed by the concrete. This is the aim of present work which is a study of the cement bas...

  6. Trends and regional distributions of land and ocean carbon sinks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. L. Sarmiento

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available We show here a new estimate of the variability and long-term trends in the net land carbon sink from 1960 onwards calculated from the difference between fossil fuel emissions, the observed atmospheric growth rate, and the ocean uptake obtained by recent ocean model simulations forced with reanalysis wind stress and heat and water fluxes. The net land carbon sink appears to have increased by −0.88 (−0.77 to −1.04 Pg C yr−1 after ~1988/1989 from a relatively constant mean of −0.27 Pg C yr−1 before then to −1.15 Pg C yr−1 thereafter (the sign convention is negative out of the atmosphere. This result is significant at the 1% critical level. The increase in net land uptake is partially compensated by a reduction in the expected oceanic uptake, which we estimate from model simulations as about 0.35 (0.26 to 0.49 Pg C yr−1. This implies that the atmospheric growth rate must have decreased by about −0.53 (−0.51 to −0.55 Pg C yr−1 (equivalent to −0.25 ppm yr−1 below what would have been projected if the ocean uptake had continued to grow at the rate expected from a constant climate model and if the net land uptake had continued at its pre-1988/1989 level. A regional synthesis and assessment of the land carbon sources and sinks over the post 1988/1989 period reveals broad agreement that the northern hemisphere land is a major sink of atmospheric CO2, but there remain major discrepancies with regard to the sign and magnitude of the net flux to and from tropical land.

  7. Recent variability of the global ocean carbon sink

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landschützer, P.; Gruber, N.; Bakker, D. C. E.; Schuster, U.

    2014-09-01

    We present a new observation-based estimate of the global oceanic carbon dioxide (CO2) sink and its temporal variation on a monthly basis from 1998 through 2011 and at a spatial resolution of 1°×1°. This sink estimate rests upon a neural network-based mapping of global surface ocean observations of the partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2) from the Surface Ocean CO2 Atlas database. The resulting pCO2 has small biases when evaluated against independent observations in the different ocean basins, but larger randomly distributed differences exist particularly in high latitudes. The seasonal climatology of our neural network-based product agrees overall well with the Takahashi et al. (2009) climatology, although our product produces a stronger seasonal cycle at high latitudes. From our global pCO2 product, we compute a mean net global ocean (excluding the Arctic Ocean and coastal regions) CO2 uptake flux of -1.42 ± 0.53 Pg C yr-1, which is in good agreement with ocean inversion-based estimates. Our data indicate a moderate level of interannual variability in the ocean carbon sink (±0.12 Pg C yr-1, 1σ) from 1998 through 2011, mostly originating from the equatorial Pacific Ocean, and associated with the El Niño-Southern Oscillation. Accounting for steady state riverine and Arctic Ocean carbon fluxes our estimate further implies a mean anthropogenic CO2 uptake of -1.99 ± 0.59 Pg C yr-1 over the analysis period. From this estimate plus the most recent estimates for fossil fuel emissions and atmospheric CO2 accumulation, we infer a mean global land sink of -2.82 ± 0.85 Pg C yr-1 over the 1998 through 2011 period with strong interannual variation.

  8. Dynamic carbon allocation significantly changed land carbon sink and carbon pool sizes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, J.; Yuan, W.

    2015-12-01

    The allocation of photosynthate among the plant components (e.g., leaves, stems, and roots) plays an important role in regulating plant growth, competition, and terrestrial carbon cycle. However, the carbon allocation process is still a weak part in the earth system models (ESMs). In this study, the Integrated BIosphere Simulator (IBIS) model coupled with a dynamic carbon allocation model (IBISAL) is used to explore the impact of carbon allocation on the terrestrial carbon cycle. This dynamic carbon allocation model suggests that plants should allocate the largest part of carbon to the plant components which need to capture the most limiting resources, such as light, water and nitrogen. In comparison to the results of original IBIS model using fixed allocation ratios, the net ecosystem productivity, global biomass and soil organic carbon simulated by IBISAL model decreased by13.4% , 9.9% and 20.8%, respectively . The dynamic allocation scheme tends to benefit roots allocation. Because roots had short turnover times, high roots allocation led to the decreases of global carbon sink and carbon pool sizes. The observations showed that the carbon allocation ratios changed with temperature and precipitation. The dynamic carbon allocation model could reproduce this phenomenon correctly. The results show that the dynamic carbon allocation ratios of boreal evergreen forests and C3 grasses are consistent well with the observations. However, the IBISAL, and another three ESMs (i.e., CESM1-BGC, IPSL-CM5A-MR and NorESM1-ME models) adopting dynamic allocation scheme overestimated the stems allocation of tropical forests. This study shows the substantial influences of carbon allocation on the carbon sink and carbon pool sizes. Therefore, improving estimations of carbon allocation by ESMs are an important and effective path to reduce uncertainties in the global carbon cycle simulation and climate change prediction.

  9. A numerical model for cost effective mitigation of CO₂ in the EU with stochastic carbon sink

    OpenAIRE

    Gren, Ing-Marie; Munnich, Miriam; Carlsson, Mattias; Elofsson, Katarina

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a model for the analysis of the potential of carbon sinks in the EU Emissions Trading Scheme (ETS) under conditions of stochastic carbon sequestration by forest land. A partial equilibrium model is developed which takes into account both the ETS and national commitments. Chance constraint programming is used to analyze the role of stochastic carbon sinks for national and EU-wide costs as well as carbon allowance price. The results show that the inclusion of the carbon sink...

  10. Wind driven changes in the ocean carbon sink

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. C. Swart

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available We estimate the historical ocean carbon sink over 1871 to 2010 using an ocean biogeochemical model driven with observed wind forcing. We focus on the influence of wind and mesoscale eddy changes on the net surface CO2 flux, which are most significant after 1950. The observed wind changes act to reduce the annual ocean carbon sink by 0.009 to 0.023 Pg yr−1 decade−1 over 1950 to 2010, and are consistent with previous studies covering only the latter part of the 20th century. The response of the ocean circulation and the carbon cycle to wind changes is sensitive to the parameterization of mesoscale eddies in our coarse resolution simulations. With a variable eddy transfer coefficient, eddy activity in the Southern Ocean increases in response to intensifying historical winds, partially compensating for direct wind-driven circulation changes. Thus with a variable eddy transfer coefficient the response to wind changes is about 2.5 times smaller than when using a constant coefficient. Finally, we show by comparing six reanalyses over 1980 to 2010 that estimated historical wind trends differ significantly. Through simulations forced with these reanalysis winds we show that the influence of historical wind changes on ocean carbon uptake is highly uncertain and depends on the choice of surface wind forcing product.

  11. How costly are carbon offsets : a meta-analysis of forest carbon sinks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon terrestrial sinks are one of the many proposed mitigation responses to climate change. Carbon sinks are considered to be a low-cost alternative to fuel switching and reduced fossil fuel consumption for reducing atmospheric carbon dioxide emissions. This study examined the costs of sequestering carbon in terrestrial ecosystems via forestry activities. A meta-regression analysis was used to determine which factors influence the costs of carbon sequestration via forest activities. Important concerns about how the Kyoto Protocol may be implemented were also addressed. The meta-regression analysis was used to examine 981 estimates from 55 studies on the cost of creating carbon offsets using forestry. Baseline cost estimates are US$46.62 to 260.29 per tC. Tree planting and agroforestry increases costs by more than 200 per cent. Costs are lowest when post-harvest storage of carbon in wood products is considered, or when biomass is substituted for fossil fuels in energy production. The meta-analysis also considered land use, land-use change and forestry (LULUCF) policies that increase the carbon sink functions of terrestrial ecosystems. The main motive for using sinks in the accounting process is that they avoid the use of expensive controls for the emission of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases. refs., tabs

  12. The ocean carbon sink - impacts, vulnerabilities and challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinze, C.; Meyer, S.; Goris, N.; Anderson, L.; Steinfeldt, R.; Chang, N.; Le Quéré, C.; Bakker, D. C. E.

    2015-06-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) is, next to water vapour, considered to be the most important natural greenhouse gas on Earth. Rapidly rising atmospheric CO2 concentrations caused by human actions such as fossil fuel burning, land-use change or cement production over the past 250 years have given cause for concern that changes in Earth's climate system may progress at a much faster pace and larger extent than during the past 20 000 years. Investigating global carbon cycle pathways and finding suitable adaptation and mitigation strategies has, therefore, become of major concern in many research fields. The oceans have a key role in regulating atmospheric CO2 concentrations and currently take up about 25% of annual anthropogenic carbon emissions to the atmosphere. Questions that yet need to be answered are what the carbon uptake kinetics of the oceans will be in the future and how the increase in oceanic carbon inventory will affect its ecosystems and their services. This requires comprehensive investigations, including high-quality ocean carbon measurements on different spatial and temporal scales, the management of data in sophisticated databases, the application of Earth system models to provide future projections for given emission scenarios as well as a global synthesis and outreach to policy makers. In this paper, the current understanding of the ocean as an important carbon sink is reviewed with respect to these topics. Emphasis is placed on the complex interplay of different physical, chemical and biological processes that yield both positive and negative air-sea flux values for natural and anthropogenic CO2 as well as on increased CO2 (uptake) as the regulating force of the radiative warming of the atmosphere and the gradual acidification of the oceans. Major future ocean carbon challenges in the fields of ocean observations, modelling and process research as well as the relevance of other biogeochemical cycles and greenhouse gases are discussed.

  13. The ocean carbon sink – impacts, vulnerabilities, and challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Heinze

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Carbon dioxide (CO2 is, next to water vapour, considered to be the most important natural greenhouse gas on Earth. Rapidly rising atmospheric CO2 concentrations caused by human actions such as fossil-fuel burning, land-use change or cement production over the past 250 years have given cause for concern that changes in Earth's climate system may progress at a much faster pace and larger extent than during the past 20 000 years. Investigating global carbon cycle pathways and finding suitable mitigation strategies has, therefore, become of major concern in many research fields. The oceans have a key role in regulating atmospheric CO2 concentrations and currently take up about 25% of annual anthropogenic carbon emissions to the atmosphere. Questions that yet need to be answered are what the carbon uptake kinetics of the oceans will be in the future and how the increase in oceanic carbon load will affect its ecosystems and their services. This requires comprehensive investigations, including high-quality ocean carbon measurements on different spatial and temporal scales, the management of data in sophisticated data bases, the application of state-of-the-art Earth system models to provide future projections for given emission scenarios as well as a global synthesis and outreach to policy makers. In this paper, the current understanding of the ocean as an important carbon sink is reviewed with respect to these topics. Emphasis is placed on the complex interplay of different physical, chemical, and biological processes that yield both positive and negative air–sea flux values for natural and anthropogenic CO2 as well as on increased CO2 (uptake as the regulating force of the radiative warming of the atmosphere and the gradual acidification of the oceans. Major future ocean carbon challenges in the fields of ocean observations, modelling, and process research as well as the relevance of other biogeochemical cycles and greenhouse gases are discussed.

  14. How costly are carbon offsets? A meta-analysis of carbon forest sinks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooten, van G.C.; Eagle, A.J.; Manley, J.; Smolak, T.

    2004-01-01

    Carbon terrestrial sinks are seen as a low-cost alternative to fuel switching and reduced fossil fuel use for lowering atmospheric CO2. As a result of agreements reached at Bonn and Marrakech, carbon offsets have taken on much greater importance in meeting Kyoto targets for the first commitment peri

  15. Nanoporous clay with carbon sink and pesticide trapping properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woignier, T.; Duffours, L.; Colombel, P.; Dieudonné, P.

    2015-07-01

    A thorough understanding of the mechanisms and factors involved in the dynamics of organic carbon in soils is required to identify and enhance natural sinks for greenhouse gases. Some tropical soils, such as Andosols, have 3-6 fold higher concentrations of organic carbon than other kinds of soils containing classical clays. In the tropics, toxic pesticides permanently pollute soils and contaminate crops, water resources, and ecosystems. However, not all soils are equal in terms of pesticide contamination or in their ability to transfer pollution to the ecosystem. Andosols are generally more polluted than the other kinds of soils but, surprisingly, they retain and trap more pesticides, thereby reducing the transfer of pesticides to ecosystems, water resources, and crops. Andosols thus have interesting environmental properties in terms of soil carbon sequestration and pesticide retention. Andosols contain a nano porous clay (allophane) with unique structures and physical properties compared to more common clays; these are large pore volume, specific surface area, and a tortuous and fractal porous arrangement. The purpose of this mini review is to discuss the importance of the allophane fractal microstructure for carbon sequestration and pesticide trapping in the soil. We suggest that the tortuous microstructure (which resembles a labyrinths) of allophane aggregates and the associated low accessibility partly explain the poor availability of soil organic matter and of any pesticides trapped in andosols.

  16. Long-period astronomically-forced terrestrial carbon sinks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valero, Luis; Cabrera, Lluís; Sáez, Alberto; Garcés, Miguel

    2016-06-01

    Sequestration of organic matter by peat accumulation constitutes a primary sink for carbon in the global carbon cycle. The processes that control the formation and storage of peat at geological time scales are poorly understood but are of a non-solved issue of fundamental importance for understanding the global climate system. We analyzed a 7 million years long terrestrial record of Late Oligocene age from the As Pontes Basin in Northern Spain, which demonstrates that minima in the 405-kyr and 2.4-Myr eccentricity cycles play a key role in peat formation. Such nodes exhibit reduced precession amplitudes, thus avoiding extremes in seasons and seasonal contrast for a prolonged period of time. In the As Pontes Basin, this orbital configuration is associated with a decrease in siliciclastic sedimentation and enhanced peat formation. Feedbacks between equilibrium landscapes and ecosystem stability will lead to a deceleration of weathering and erosion rates in catchment areas and to minimum and stable sediment flux along the sediment routing system. Mid-latitude peat burial could contribute to disturb the carbon cycle by removing (atmospheric) carbon at times of minimum eccentricity.

  17. Nested atmospheric inversion for the terrestrial carbon sources and sinks in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, F.; Wang, H. W.; Chen, J. M.; Zhou, L. X.; Ju, W. M.; Ding, A. J.; Liu, L. X.; Peters, W.

    2013-08-01

    In this study, we establish a nested atmospheric inversion system with a focus on China using the Bayesian method. The global surface is separated into 43 regions based on the 22 TransCom large regions, with 13 small regions in China. Monthly CO2 concentrations from 130 GlobalView sites and 3 additional China sites are used in this system. The core component of this system is an atmospheric transport matrix, which is created using the TM5 model with a horizontal resolution of 3° × 2°. The net carbon fluxes over the 43 global land and ocean regions are inverted for the period from 2002 to 2008. The inverted global terrestrial carbon sinks mainly occur in boreal Asia, South and Southeast Asia, eastern America and southern South America. Most China areas appear to be carbon sinks, with strongest carbon sinks located in Northeast China. From 2002 to 2008, the global terrestrial carbon sink has an increasing trend, with the lowest carbon sink in 2002. The inter-annual variation (IAV) of the land sinks shows remarkable correlation with the El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO). The terrestrial carbon sinks in China also show an increasing trend. However, the IAV in China is not the same as that of the globe. There is relatively stronger land sink in 2002, lowest sink in 2006, and strongest sink in 2007 in China. This IAV could be reasonably explained with the IAVs of temperature and precipitation in China. The mean global and China terrestrial carbon sinks over the period 2002-2008 are -3.20 ± 0.63 and -0.28 ± 0.18 PgC yr-1, respectively. Considering the carbon emissions in the form of reactive biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) and from the import of wood and food, we further estimate that China's land sink is about -0.31 PgC yr-1.

  18. Nested atmospheric inversion for the terrestrial carbon sources and sinks in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Jiang

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we establish a nested atmospheric inversion system with a focus on China using the Bayesian method. The global surface is separated into 43 regions based on the 22 TransCom large regions, with 13 small regions in China. Monthly CO2 concentrations from 130 GlobalView sites and 3 additional China sites are used in this system. The core component of this system is an atmospheric transport matrix, which is created using the TM5 model with a horizontal resolution of 3° × 2°. The net carbon fluxes over the 43 global land and ocean regions are inverted for the period from 2002 to 2008. The inverted global terrestrial carbon sinks mainly occur in boreal Asia, South and Southeast Asia, eastern America and southern South America. Most China areas appear to be carbon sinks, with strongest carbon sinks located in Northeast China. From 2002 to 2008, the global terrestrial carbon sink has an increasing trend, with the lowest carbon sink in 2002. The inter-annual variation (IAV of the land sinks shows remarkable correlation with the El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO. The terrestrial carbon sinks in China also show an increasing trend. However, the IAV in China is not the same as that of the globe. There is relatively stronger land sink in 2002, lowest sink in 2006, and strongest sink in 2007 in China. This IAV could be reasonably explained with the IAVs of temperature and precipitation in China. The mean global and China terrestrial carbon sinks over the period 2002–2008 are −3.20 ± 0.63 and −0.28 ± 0.18 PgC yr−1, respectively. Considering the carbon emissions in the form of reactive biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs and from the import of wood and food, we further estimate that China's land sink is about −0.31 PgC yr−1.

  19. Ballast minerals and the sinking carbon flux in the ocean: carbon-specific respiration rates and sinking velocities of macroscopic organic aggregates (marine snow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. H. Iversen

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Recent observations have shown that fluxes of ballast minerals (calcium carbonate, opal, and lithogenic material and organic carbon fluxes are closely correlated in the bathypelagic zones of the ocean. Hence it has been hypothesized that incorporation of biogenic minerals within marine aggregates could either protect the organic matter from decomposition and/or increase the sinking velocity via ballasting of the aggregates. Here we present the first combined data on size, sinking velocity, carbon-specific respiration rate, and composition measured directly in three aggregate types; Emiliania huxleyi aggregates (carbonate ballasted, Skeletonema costatum aggregates (opal ballasted, and aggregates made from a mix of both E. huxleyi and S. costatum (carbonate and opal ballasted. Overall average carbon-specific respiration rate was ~0.13 d−1 and did not vary with aggregate type and size. Ballasting from carbonate resulted in 2- to 2.5-fold higher sinking velocities than aggregates ballasted by opal. We compiled literature data on carbon-specific respiration rate and sinking velocity measured in aggregate of different composition and sources. Compiled carbon-specific respiration rates (including this study vary between 0.08 d−1 and 0.20 d−1. Sinking velocity increases with increasing aggregate size within homogeneous sources of aggregates. When compared across different particle and aggregate sources, however, sinking velocity appeared to be independent of particle or aggregate size. The calculated carbon remineralization length scale due to microbial respiration and sinking velocity of mm-large marine aggregates was higher for calcite ballasted aggregates as compared to opal-ballasted aggregates. It varied between 0.0002 m−1 and 0.0030 m−1, and decreased with increasing aggregate size.

  20. Ballast minerals and the sinking carbon flux in the ocean: carbon-specific respiration rates and sinking velocities of macroscopic organic aggregates (marine snow)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iversen, M. H.; Ploug, H.

    2010-05-01

    Recent observations have shown that fluxes of ballast minerals (calcium carbonate, opal, and lithogenic material) and organic carbon fluxes are closely correlated in the bathypelagic zones of the ocean. Hence it has been hypothesized that incorporation of biogenic minerals within marine aggregates could either protect the organic matter from decomposition and/or increase the sinking velocity via ballasting of the aggregates. Here we present the first combined data on size, sinking velocity, carbon-specific respiration rate, and composition measured directly in three aggregate types; Emiliania huxleyi aggregates (carbonate ballasted), Skeletonema costatum aggregates (opal ballasted), and aggregates made from a mix of both E. huxleyi and S. costatum (carbonate and opal ballasted). Overall average carbon-specific respiration rate was ~0.13 d-1 and did not vary with aggregate type and size. Ballasting from carbonate resulted in 2- to 2.5-fold higher sinking velocities than aggregates ballasted by opal. We compiled literature data on carbon-specific respiration rate and sinking velocity measured in aggregate of different composition and sources. Compiled carbon-specific respiration rates (including this study) vary between 0.08 d-1 and 0.20 d-1. Sinking velocity increases with increasing aggregate size within homogeneous sources of aggregates. When compared across different particle and aggregate sources, however, sinking velocity appeared to be independent of particle or aggregate size. The calculated carbon remineralization length scale due to microbial respiration and sinking velocity of mm-large marine aggregates was higher for calcite ballasted aggregates as compared to opal-ballasted aggregates. It varied between 0.0002 m-1 and 0.0030 m-1, and decreased with increasing aggregate size.

  1. Carbon sequestration in sinks. An overview of potential and costs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolshus, Hans H.

    2001-07-01

    Prior to the resumed climate negotiations in Bonn in July this year, it was thought that an agreement on the unresolved crunch issues of the Kyoto Protocol was unrealistic. This was primarily due to the US withdrawal from the Kyoto Protocol, and the failure of the previous climate negotiations that stranded mainly because of disagreement on the inclusion of land use, land-use change, and forestry (LULUCF) activities. The LULUCF issue is controversial in the climate negotiations, but an agreement has now been reached. This paper explores the possible contribution of LULUCF activities in promoting greenhouse gas emissions reductions. A survey on the literature of the potential and cost of LULUCF activities is therefore central. Analysis of the recent climate negotiations is also important. It is clear that the potential for carbon sequestration is large, but there are large variations in the estimates as factors such as land availability and the rate of carbon uptake complicate the calculations. There are also variations in the costs estimates, and economic analysis of LULUCF projects are not easily compared as no standard method of analysis has emerged and come into wide use. Despite the difficulties in comparing the costs of carbon sequestration, it is clear that it is a relatively inexpensive measure. Even though the potential for carbon sequestration is large, its role in reducing emissions of greenhouse gases (GHG) is limited by the Kyoto Protocol. The recent climate negotiations in Bonn and Marrakesh have specified the modalities, rules and guidelines relating to LULUCF activities. One of the main outcomes is that Japan, Canada and Russia are allowed large inclusions of sinks in their GHG emission accounts. (author)

  2. Carbon sequestration in sinks. An overview of potential and costs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prior to the resumed climate negotiations in Bonn in July this year, it was thought that an agreement on the unresolved crunch issues of the Kyoto Protocol was unrealistic. This was primarily due to the US withdrawal from the Kyoto Protocol, and the failure of the previous climate negotiations that stranded mainly because of disagreement on the inclusion of land use, land-use change, and forestry (LULUCF) activities. The LULUCF issue is controversial in the climate negotiations, but an agreement has now been reached. This paper explores the possible contribution of LULUCF activities in promoting greenhouse gas emissions reductions. A survey on the literature of the potential and cost of LULUCF activities is therefore central. Analysis of the recent climate negotiations is also important. It is clear that the potential for carbon sequestration is large, but there are large variations in the estimates as factors such as land availability and the rate of carbon uptake complicate the calculations. There are also variations in the costs estimates, and economic analysis of LULUCF projects are not easily compared as no standard method of analysis has emerged and come into wide use. Despite the difficulties in comparing the costs of carbon sequestration, it is clear that it is a relatively inexpensive measure. Even though the potential for carbon sequestration is large, its role in reducing emissions of greenhouse gases (GHG) is limited by the Kyoto Protocol. The recent climate negotiations in Bonn and Marrakesh have specified the modalities, rules and guidelines relating to LULUCF activities. One of the main outcomes is that Japan, Canada and Russia are allowed large inclusions of sinks in their GHG emission accounts. (author)

  3. Ballast minerals and the sinking carbon flux in the ocean: carbon-specific respiration rates and sinking velocity of marine snow aggregates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iversen, M. H.; Ploug, H.

    2010-09-01

    Recent observations have shown that fluxes of ballast minerals (calcium carbonate, opal, and lithogenic material) and organic carbon fluxes are closely correlated in the bathypelagic zones of the ocean. Hence it has been hypothesized that incorporation of biogenic minerals within marine aggregates could either protect the organic matter from decomposition and/or increase the sinking velocity via ballasting of the aggregates. Here we present the first combined data on size, sinking velocity, carbon-specific respiration rate, and composition measured directly in three aggregate types; Emiliania huxleyi aggregates (carbonate ballasted), Skeletonema costatum aggregates (opal ballasted), and aggregates made from a mix of both E. huxleyi and S. costatum (carbonate and opal ballasted). Overall average carbon-specific respiration rate was ~0.13 d-1 and did not vary with aggregate type and size. Ballasting from carbonate resulted in 2- to 2.5-fold higher sinking velocities than those of aggregates ballasted by opal. We compiled literature data on carbon-specific respiration rate and sinking velocity measured in aggregates of different composition and sources. Compiled carbon-specific respiration rates (including this study) vary between 0.08 d-1 and 0.20 d-1. Sinking velocity increases with increasing aggregate size within homogeneous sources of aggregates. When compared across different particle and aggregate sources, however, sinking velocity appeared to be independent of particle or aggregate size. The carbon-specific respiration rate per meter settled varied between 0.0002 m-1 and 0.0030 m-1, and decreased with increasing aggregate size. It was lower for calcite ballasted aggregates as compared to that of similar sized opal ballasted aggregates.

  4. Ballast minerals and the sinking carbon flux in the ocean: carbon-specific respiration rates and sinking velocity of marine snow aggregates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. H. Iversen

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Recent observations have shown that fluxes of ballast minerals (calcium carbonate, opal, and lithogenic material and organic carbon fluxes are closely correlated in the bathypelagic zones of the ocean. Hence it has been hypothesized that incorporation of biogenic minerals within marine aggregates could either protect the organic matter from decomposition and/or increase the sinking velocity via ballasting of the aggregates. Here we present the first combined data on size, sinking velocity, carbon-specific respiration rate, and composition measured directly in three aggregate types; Emiliania huxleyi aggregates (carbonate ballasted, Skeletonema costatum aggregates (opal ballasted, and aggregates made from a mix of both E. huxleyi and S. costatum (carbonate and opal ballasted. Overall average carbon-specific respiration rate was ~0.13 d−1 and did not vary with aggregate type and size. Ballasting from carbonate resulted in 2- to 2.5-fold higher sinking velocities than those of aggregates ballasted by opal. We compiled literature data on carbon-specific respiration rate and sinking velocity measured in aggregates of different composition and sources. Compiled carbon-specific respiration rates (including this study vary between 0.08 d−1 and 0.20 d−1. Sinking velocity increases with increasing aggregate size within homogeneous sources of aggregates. When compared across different particle and aggregate sources, however, sinking velocity appeared to be independent of particle or aggregate size. The carbon-specific respiration rate per meter settled varied between 0.0002 m−1 and 0.0030 m−1, and decreased with increasing aggregate size. It was lower for calcite ballasted aggregates as compared to that of similar sized opal ballasted aggregates.

  5. Nested atmospheric inversion for the terrestrial carbon sources and sinks in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Jiang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we establish a~nested atmospheric inversion system with a focus on China using the Bayes theory. The global surface is separated into 43 regions based on the 22 TransCom large regions, with 13 small regions in China. Monthly CO2 concentrations from 130 GlobalView sites and a Hong Kong site are used in this system. The core component of this system is atmospheric transport matrix, which is created using the TM5 model with a horizontal resolution of 3° × 2°. The net carbon fluxes over the 43 global land and ocean regions are inverted for the period from 2002 to 2009. The inverted global terrestrial carbon sinks mainly occur in Boreal Asia, South and Southeast Asia, eastern US and southern South America (SA. Most China areas appear to be carbon sinks, with strongest carbon sinks located in Northeast China. From 2002 to 2009, the global terrestrial carbon sink has an increasing trend, with the lowest carbon sink in 2002. The inter-annual variation (IAV of the land sinks shows remarkable correlation with the El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO. However, no obvious trend is found for the terrestrial carbon sinks in China. The IAVs of carbon sinks in China show strong relationship with drought and temperature. The mean global and China terrestrial carbon sinks over the period 2002–2009 are −3.15 ± 1.48 and −0.21 ± 0.23 Pg C yr−1, respectively. The uncertainties in the posterior carbon flux of China are still very large, mostly due to the lack of CO2 measurement data in China.

  6. Assessment Of Carbon Leakage In Multiple Carbon-Sink Projects: ACase Study In Jambi Province, Indonesia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boer, Rizaldi; Wasrin, Upik R.; Hendri, Perdinan; Dasanto,Bambang D.; Makundi, Willy; Hero, Julius; Ridwan, M.; Masripatin, Nur

    2007-06-01

    Rehabilitation of degraded forest land throughimplementation of carbon sink projects can increase terrestrial carbonstock. However, carbon emissions outside the project boundary, which iscommonly referred to as leakage, may reduce or negate the sequestrationbenefits. This study assessed leakage from carbon sink projects thatcould potentially be implemented in the study area comprised of elevensub-districts in the Batanghari District, Jambi Province, Sumatra,Indonesia. The study estimates the probability of a given land use/coverbeing converted into other uses/cover, by applying a logit model. Thepredictor variables were: proximity to the center of the land use area,distance to transportation channel (road or river), area of agriculturalland, unemployment (number of job seekers), job opportunities, populationdensity and income. Leakage was estimated by analyzing with and withoutcarbon sink projects scenarios. Most of the predictors were estimated asbeing significant in their contribution to land use cover change. Theresults of the analysis show that leakage in the study area can be largeenough to more than offset the project's carbon sequestration benefitsduring the period 2002-2012. However, leakage results are very sensitiveto changes of carbon density of the land uses in the study area. Byreducing C-density of lowland and hill forest by about 10 percent for thebaseline scenario, the leakage becomes positive. Further data collectionand refinement is therefore required. Nevertheless, this study hasdemonstrated that regional analysis is a useful approach to assessleakage.

  7. Information technology for studying carbon sink in stemwood of forest ecosystems

    OpenAIRE

    Tokar, O.; Lesiv, M.; Korol, M.

    2014-01-01

    An information technology for calculation of carbon ink in stemwood of forest ecosystems on a territorial basis is developed. This information technology involves interpretation of input data of statistical inventory of forest stands using electronic maps of forestry, formation of databases and processing the data by applying a special algorithm for calculating the carbon sink in stemwood and presenting the results in a form of thematic maps. The estimation of the carbon sink in stemwood is ...

  8. Ecological Meaning and Consideration of Economic Forest Carbon Sinks in China----Take Yan-Shan Chestnut for Example

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Z.; Li, H.; Zhang, W. W.; Liu, S. R.

    Along with our country scientific researchers' study on native forest carbon sinks as well as the summary of the increasing amount of China's forest carbon, With the deepening of our scientists on the study of the national forest carbon sinks, forest carbon sinks has become a favorable support for climate diplomacy. Currently, a lot of work has focused on the carbon cycle, the level of carbon sinks of forest ecosystems, but the characteristics of economic forest carbon sinks are in a blank state. Beijing chestnut is one of the national food strategic security stockpiles, and estimate the potential of economic forest carbon sinks has important scientific significance to the establishment of carbon sink function area, and expansion of sustainable economic and social development of response measures.

  9. Increasing carbon sinks in European forests: effect of afforestation and changes in mean growing stock volume

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vilén, T.; Cienciala, E.; Schelhaas, M.; Verkerk, P.J.; Lindner, M.; Peltola, H.

    2015-01-01

    In Europe, both forest area and growing stock have increased since the 1950s, and European forests have acted as a carbon sink during the last six decades. However, the contribution of different factors affecting the sink is not yet clear. In this study, historical inventory data were combined with

  10. Canada and the Kyoto Protocol: Fact Sheet No. 2 - Removing carbon dioxide: credit for enhancing sinks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canada's position regarding carbon sinks is explained in some detail, explaining the reasons why Canada favours a formal recognition of a comprehensive approach to forest management and the inclusion of agricultural soils in the Kyoto Protocol

  11. A study on China's LUCC and carbon-sink response with remote sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Zhiqiang; Zheng, Xiangyu; Ning, Jicai; Liu, Chaoshun

    2015-09-01

    Based on SPOT VEGETATION NDVI time-series data, multi-phase China's land use / land cover (LULC) data were extracted in this study, where land use degree method and land dynamic degree method were used to analyze the spatial and temporal change characteristics of China's LULC in the latest decade. Moreover, bookkeeping model was applied to analyze the response of China's carbon sink to LUCC. Research conclusions were achieved as follows. China's annual vegetation carbon sink was 0.22- 0.32PgC/year, equivalent to 26% -28% of China's industrial CO2 emissions over the same period. Dynamic changes in woodland and grassland led to carbon sink changed in 11.4-15.7TgC, and the increased carbon sink due to LUCC offset 1.3-1.4% of China's industrial CO2 emissions.

  12. Erosion of organic carbon in the Arctic as a geological carbon dioxide sink.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilton, Robert G; Galy, Valier; Gaillardet, Jérôme; Dellinger, Mathieu; Bryant, Charlotte; O'Regan, Matt; Gröcke, Darren R; Coxall, Helen; Bouchez, Julien; Calmels, Damien

    2015-08-01

    Soils of the northern high latitudes store carbon over millennial timescales (thousands of years) and contain approximately double the carbon stock of the atmosphere. Warming and associated permafrost thaw can expose soil organic carbon and result in mineralization and carbon dioxide (CO2) release. However, some of this soil organic carbon may be eroded and transferred to rivers. If it escapes degradation during river transport and is buried in marine sediments, then it can contribute to a longer-term (more than ten thousand years), geological CO2 sink. Despite this recognition, the erosional flux and fate of particulate organic carbon (POC) in large rivers at high latitudes remains poorly constrained. Here, we quantify the source of POC in the Mackenzie River, the main sediment supplier to the Arctic Ocean, and assess its flux and fate. We combine measurements of radiocarbon, stable carbon isotopes and element ratios to correct for rock-derived POC. Our samples reveal that the eroded biospheric POC has resided in the basin for millennia, with a mean radiocarbon age of 5,800 ± 800 years, much older than the POC in large tropical rivers. From the measured biospheric POC content and variability in annual sediment yield, we calculate a biospheric POC flux of 2.2(+1.3)(-0.9) teragrams of carbon per year from the Mackenzie River, which is three times the CO2 drawdown by silicate weathering in this basin. Offshore, we find evidence for efficient terrestrial organic carbon burial over the Holocene period, suggesting that erosion of organic carbon-rich, high-latitude soils may result in an important geological CO2 sink. PMID:26245581

  13. Carbon trading and carbon taxation: how to consider biotic sources and sinks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Kyoto Protocol (KP) to the UNFCCC includes land-use change and forestry in the carbon accounting process, limited to afforestation, reforestation and deforestation since 1990, and explicitly provides for the option of using a variety of flexibility mechanisms to meet the greenhouse gas (GHG) reduction targets stipulated in a more cost-efficient manner. Domestically, different countries might adopt different approaches to achieve their emission reduction objectives, such as carbon trading or carbon taxation, and it is not clear to date what the implications for bioenergy use, forestry, and land-use change can be expected to be. With respect to national GHG emissions trading, the main issues studied in this paper are: Should trading of fossil fuel emissions allowances be coupled with trading of biotic credits and debits? Should credits for carbon sequestration in forests be auctioned or grandfathered? Should there be a distinction between a carbon permit issued for an additional biotic sink and those issued for fossil fuel carbon emissions? Is there a difference for biotic carbon sinks and sources between one-time permits and permits that allow a continued release of GHG over some pre-specified time? Should permits be issued only for the carbon-stock changes that count under the KP? With respect to national carbon taxation schemes, two questions are investigated: Should a tax credit be given for afforestation/reforestation (and a tax debit for deforestation)? Should tax credits also be given for projects that sequester carbon but do not count under the KP (such as forest protection rather than forest management)? For both schemes a crucial point is that by the formulation chosen in the KP two different classes of forest are created (i.e. those counted and those not counted under the KP), so that the implications for land prices might be significant. From a conceptual point of view this paper addresses the above-mentioned questions and contrasts some of the major

  14. Erosion of Organic Carbon from Permafrost Zones in the Arctic as a Geological Carbon Dioxide Sink

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilton, R. G.; Galy, V.; Gaillardet, J.; Dellinger, M.; Bryant, C.; O'Regan, M.; Gröcke, D. R.; Coxall, H.; Bouchez, J.; Calmels, D.

    2015-12-01

    Soils of the northern high latitudes store carbon over millennial timescales and contain almost double the carbon stock of the atmosphere. The exposure and decomposition of aged organic matter in these soils is a carbon dioxide (CO2) source to the atmosphere. Permafrost thaw over the coming century may result in a significant CO2 release. However, some of this soil organic carbon in permafrost zones can be eroded and input to rivers. If it escapes degradation during river transport and is buried in ocean sediments, it instead contributes to a longer-term (>104 yr), geological CO2sink. Despite this recognition, the erosional flux and fate of particulate organic carbon (POC) in large rivers draining permafrost zones remains poorly constrained. We quantify POC source, flux and fate in the Mackenzie River Basin, the main sediment supplier to the Arctic Ocean, using radiocarbon, stable carbon isotopes and element ratios to correct for rock-derived POC. The eroded biospheric POC has resided in the basin for millennia, with a mean radiocarbon age of 5800±800 yr. Rivers eroding continuous permafrost zones contribute the oldest biospheric POC. Based on the measured biospheric POC content and annual sediment flux, we calculate a biospheric POC flux of 2.2 (+1.3/-0.9) TgC yr-1 from the Mackenzie River to the Arctic Ocean, three times the CO2 drawdown by silicate weathering. Offshore we find evidence for efficient terrestrial carbon burial over the Holocene period. Our findings demonstrate how erosion of organic carbon-rich, high latitude soils can result in a significant geological CO2sink. We postulate that this geological CO2 sink is sensitive to climate conditions in the Arctic. The transfer can operate when high latitudes host carbon stocks in soil, and while rivers can erode and transfer sediments to the Arctic Ocean. Over the last 1Ma, the erosional transfer was likely to have been enhanced during interglacials. We propose that erosion of biospheric carbon by large

  15. Mangrove production and carbon sinks: A revision of global budget estimates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouillon, S.; Borges, A.V.; Castaneda-Moya, E.; Diele, K.; Dittmar, T.; Duke, N.C.; Kristensen, E.; Lee, S.-Y.; Marchand, C.; Middelburg, J.J.; Rivera-Monroy, V. H.; Smith, T. J., III; Twilley, R.R.

    2008-01-01

    Mangrove forests are highly productive but globally threatened coastal ecosystems, whose role in the carbon budget of the coastal zone has long been debated. Here we provide a comprehensive synthesis of the available data on carbon fluxes in mangrove ecosystems. A reassessment of global mangrove primary production from the literature results in a conservative estimate of ???-218 ?? 72 Tg C a-1. When using the best available estimates of various carbon sinks (organic carbon export, sediment burial, and mineralization), it appears that >50% of the carbon fixed by mangrove vegetation is unaccounted for. This unaccounted carbon sink is conservatively estimated at ??? 112 ?? 85 Tg C a-1, equivalent in magnitude to ??? 30-40% of the global riverine organic carbon input to the coastal zone. Our analysis suggests that mineralization is severely underestimated, and that the majority of carbon export from mangroves to adjacent waters occurs as dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC). CO2 efflux from sediments and creek waters and tidal export of DIC appear to be the major sinks. These processes are quantitatively comparable in magnitude to the unaccounted carbon sink in current budgets, but are not yet adequately constrained with the limited published data available so far. Copyright 2008 by the American Geophysical Union.

  16. Mangrove production and carbon sinks: a revision of global budget estimates

    OpenAIRE

    BOUILLON, S; Borges, A. V.; Castañeda-Moya, E.; Diele, K.; Dittmar, T.; Duke, N. C.; Kristensen, E.; Lee, S.; Marchand, C; Middelburg, J. J.; Rivera-Monroy, V.H.; Smith III, T.; Twilley, R.R.

    2008-01-01

    Mangrove forests are highly productive but globally threatened coastal ecosystems, whose role in the carbon budget of the coastal zone has long been debated. Here we provide a comprehensive synthesis of the available data on carbon fluxes in mangrove ecosystems. A reassessment of global mangrove primary production from the literature results in a conservative estimate of similar to 218 +/- 72 Tg C a(-1). When using the best available estimates of various carbon sinks (organic carbon export, s...

  17. Estimating the seasonal carbon source-sink geography of a natural, steady-state terrestrial biosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Box, Elgene O.

    1988-01-01

    The estimation of the seasonal dynamics of biospheric-carbon sources and sinks to be used as an input to global atmospheric CO2 studies and models is discussed. An ecological biosphere model is given and the advantages of the model are examined. Monthly maps of estimated biospheric carbon source and sink regions and estimates of total carbon fluxes are presented for an equilibrium terrestrial biosphere. The results are compared with those from other models. It is suggested that, despite maximum variations of atmospheric CO2 in boreal latitudes, the enormous contributions of tropical wet-dry regions to global atmospheric CO2 seasonality can not be ignored.

  18. The relative contributions of forest growth and areal expansion to forest biomass carbon sinks in China

    OpenAIRE

    Li, P.; Zhu, J.; Hu, H; Guo, Z.; Pan, Y.; R. Birdsey; J. Fang

    2015-01-01

    Forests play a leading role in regional and global terrestrial carbon (C) cycles. Changes in C sequestration within forests can be attributed to areal expansion (increase in forest area) and forest growth (increase in biomass density). Detailed assessment of the relative contributions of areal expansion and forest growth to C sinks is crucial to reveal the mechanisms that control forest C sinks and is helpful for developing sustainable forest management poli...

  19. Sink stimulation of leaf photosynthesis by the carbon costs of rhizobial and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal symbioses

    OpenAIRE

    Kaschuk, G.

    2009-01-01

    Key words: biochemical model of leaf photosynthesis; carbon sink strength; chlorophyll fluorescence; harvest index; leaf protein; leaf senescence; legumes; photosynthetic nutrient use efficiency; Pi recycling; source-sink regulation; ureides One of the most fascinating processes in plant physiology and agronomy is the capability of legumes to associate symbiotically with rhizobial bacteria and arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi. The legumes supply photosynthates in exchange for nitrogen, deriv...

  20. Nitrogen deposition drives the carbon sink of temperate and boreal forests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grassi G

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available A comment is provided on the paper by Magnani et al. on the human influences in the carbon cycle of forests, just published in Nature. The results illustrated by the paper are discussed in the context of the recent scientific and politic debate on the role of carbon sinks in mitigating climate change.

  1. Nitrogen deposition drives the carbon sink of temperate and boreal forests

    OpenAIRE

    Grassi G

    2007-01-01

    A comment is provided on the paper by Magnani et al. on the human influences in the carbon cycle of forests, just published in Nature. The results illustrated by the paper are discussed in the context of the recent scientific and politic debate on the role of carbon sinks in mitigating climate change.

  2. Magnitude, distribution and causes of terrestrial carbon sinks and some implications for policy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent analyses continue to modify our understanding of terrestrial carbon sinks. The sinks are large and variable enough to account for much of the variability in the growth rate of atmospheric CO2. They are distributed throughout both northern mid-latitudes and the tropics. Identification of the factors influencing an observed sink is extremely difficult; methods for attribution are reviewed. Although various ecological mechanisms (e.g. CO2 fertilization, nitrogen deposition, climatic variability) have been shown experimentally to have short-term effects on physiological processes controlling the amount of carbon in terrestrial ecosystems, it is unclear which of these mechanisms has been most important in the past 10-100 years and which will be most important in the future. The decades-long supposition that CO2 fertilization has been a major driver of terrestrial carbon uptake is being challenged. A major portion of the sink in the northern mid-latitudes (although probably not in the tropics) is a result of recovery from past changes in land use and management. To the extent that these direct human actions explain most of the current (and future) sink, attribution and thus accounting become more tractable, but the continued functioning of the sink is limited and largely dependent on deliberate actions (e.g. afforestation, sustainable forest management and preservation). (author)

  3. Mangrove carbon sink. Do burrowing crabs contribute to sediment carbon storage? Evidence from a Kenyan mangrove system

    OpenAIRE

    Anna Andreetta; Marco Fusi; Irene Cameldi; Filippo Cimò; Stefano Carnicelli; Stefano Cannicci

    2014-01-01

    Mangrove ecosystems are acknowledged as a significant carbon reservoir, with a potential key role as carbon sinks. Little however is known on sediment/soil capacity to store organic carbon and the impact of benthic fauna on soil organic carbon (SOC) stock in mangrove C-poor soils. This study aimed to investigate the effects of macrobenthos on SOC storage and dynamic in mangrove forest at Gazi Bay (Kenya). Although the relatively low amount of organic carbon (OC%) in these soils, they resulted...

  4. Combustion of biomass as a global carbon sink

    OpenAIRE

    Ball, Rowena

    2008-01-01

    This note is intended to highlight the important role of black carbon produced from biomass burning in the global carbon cycle, and encourage further research in this area. Consideration of the fundamental physical chemistry of cellulose thermal decomposition suggests that suppression of biomass burning or biasing burning practices to produce soot-free flames must inevitably transfer more carbon to the atmosphere. A simple order-of-magnitude quantitative analysis indicates that black carbon m...

  5. Combustion of biomass as a global carbon sink

    CERN Document Server

    Ball, Rowena

    2008-01-01

    This note is intended to highlight the important role of black carbon produced from biomass burning in the global carbon cycle, and encourage further research in this area. Consideration of the fundamental physical chemistry of cellulose thermal decomposition suggests that suppression of biomass burning or biasing burning practices to produce soot-free flames must inevitably transfer more carbon to the atmosphere. A simple order-of-magnitude quantitative analysis indicates that black carbon may be a significant carbon reservoir that persists over geological time scales.

  6. The atmospheric partial lifetime of carbon tetrachloride with respect to the global soil sink

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhew, Robert C.; Happell, James D.

    2016-03-01

    The magnitude of the terrestrial soil sink for atmospheric carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) remains poorly constrained, with the estimated uncertainty range of CCl4 partial lifetimes between ~110 and 910 years. Field observations are sparse, and there are uncertainties in extrapolating these results to the global scale. Here we add to the published CCl4 fluxes with additional field measurements, and we employ a land cover classification scheme based on Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer measurements that align more closely with the measurement sites to reevaluate the global CCl4 soil sink. We calculate an updated partial lifetime of CCl4 with respect to the soil sink to be 375 (288-536) years, which is 50 to 90% longer than the most recently published best estimates of the soil sink partial lifetime (195 and 245 years). This translates into a longer overall atmospheric lifetime estimate, which is more consistent with the observed atmospheric concentration trend and interhemispheric gradient.

  7. Boreal Lake Sediments as Sources and Sinks of Carbon

    OpenAIRE

    Gudasz, Cristian

    2011-01-01

    Inland waters process large amounts of organic carbon, contributing to CO2 and CH4 emissions, as well as storing organic carbon (OC) over geological timescales. Recently, it has been shown that the magnitude of these processes is of global significance. It is therefore important to understand what regulates OC cycling in inland waters and how is that affected by climate change. This thesis investigates the constraints on microbial processing of sediment OC, as a key factor of the carbon cycli...

  8. The Economics of Including Carbon Sinks in Climate Change Policy- Evaluating the carbon supply curve through afforestation in Latin America

    OpenAIRE

    Benitez, P.C.; Obersteiner, M.

    2003-01-01

    After the inclusion of carbon sinks in the Kyoto Protocol, greenhouse gas mitigation policies account for abatement measurements in both the energy and forestry sectors. This report deals with the development of a methodology for estimating cost-curves of carbon sequestration from afforestation activities and its combination with existing cost-curves of carbon abatement in the energy sector, with an application to the Latin American region. For deriving the carbon supply curves, a bottom-up a...

  9. Sulfurised carbohydrates: An important sedimentary sink for organic carbon?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.; Kok, M.D.; Koster, J.; Schouten, S.

    1998-01-01

    In contrast to the general belief that carbohydrate carbon (CCHO) is preferentially degraded and is not extensively preserved in the sedimentary record, it is shown here that CCHO forms a large fraction of the organic matter (OM) of the total organic carbon (TOC)-rich upper Jurassic Kimmeridge Clay

  10. Valuing external effects of carbon sink in ley production for energy use

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, an attempt is made to calculate the external effects of carbon sink in soil and biomass on land use for ley production. A crop production including ley is compared with the energy obtained from the forest and other crop outputs without ley. Ley production occupies a larger portion of the carbon sink into the soil than the energy obtained either from the forest or from crop production without ley. Considering the amount of energy obtained from living materials, the portion gained from the forest covers a larger sink than the two other crop systems. A carbon sink, which keeps the carbon away from the atmosphere, helps reduce the greenhouse effect. Hence, the value of this effect is calculated by following the overall cost-benefit analysis principles. Furthermore, as the carbon sink will be in use for a very long time, the analysis also covers the issue, importance and choice of discounting rates. Accordingly, it is argued that the social discount rate should be the same as the expected economic growth rate for the actual period in question. For instance, during the last 20 years, the growth rate has been less than 2% per year. From this rate one must subtract environmental costs which were not included in the GDP. Likewise, including the logistic discount rate, the future growth rate may be restricted by environmental legislations. In addition to the choice of social and logistic discount rates, different valuation methods are also discussed. The Swedish Parliament's target for stabilizing the emission rate of carbon dioxide by the year 2000 to the level of 1990 is taken as a basis for valuation. The marginal cost for reaching this target is used as a main valuation method and is calculated at the rate of 0.386 SEK/kg carbon dioxide. 38 refs, 11 figs, 26 tabs

  11. The sustainability of carbon sinks in forests. Studying the sensitivity of forest carbon sinks in the Netherlands, Europe and the Amazon to climate and management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to assess the sustainability of carbon sinks in managed or unmanaged forests of Europe and the Amazon. First, the functioning and seasonal variability of the carbon sink strength in forest ecosystems was analysed in relation to climate variability. For this, existing global data sets of ecosystem fluxes measured by eddy correlation were analysed. A simple, comprehensive empirical model was derived to represent these flux variabilities. Also, new soil respiration measurements were initiated in the Netherlands and Amazonia and their usefulness to understand the uptake- and emission components of carbon exchange was analysed. Then, two long-term forest dynamics models were parameterised (FORSPACE and CENTURY) for Dutch Pinus and Fagus forests, to study the development of forest carbon stocks over a century under different management and climate scenarios. Finally, using the empirical model as well as the long-term models, scenario predictions were made. It turns out that uptake rates are expected to decrease in a climate with higher temperatures, but that storage capacity for carbon can be expected to be slightly enhanced, especially if also the management intensity is carefully tuned down

  12. Changing sources and sinks of carbon in boreal ecosystems of Interior Alaska: Current and future perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, T. A.; Jones, M.; Hiemstra, C. A.

    2012-12-01

    Future climate scenarios predict a roughly 5°C increase in mean annual air temperatures for the Alaskan Interior over the next 80 years. Increasing temperatures and greater frequency and severity of climate-induced disturbances such as wildfires will be enough to initiate permafrost degradation in many areas of Alaska, leading to major changes in surface hydrology and ecosystem structure and function. This, in turn, is expected to alter the current inventories of carbon sources and sinks in the region and provide a management challenge for carbon itemization efforts. To assist land managers in adapting and planning for potential changes in Interior Alaska carbon cycling we synthesize information on climate, ecosystem processes, vegetation, and soil, permafrost, and hydrologic regimes in Interior Alaska. Our goal is to provide an assessment of the current and likely future regime of Interior Alaska carbon sources and sinks. For our carbon assessment we: 1) synthesize the most recent results from numerous studies on the carbon cycle with a focus on research from the Alaskan boreal biome, 2) assemble a summary of estimates of carbon sources in soil and vegetation in Interior Alaska, 3) categorize carbon sources and sinks for predominant Interior Alaska ecosystems, and 4) identify expected changes in sources and sinks with climate change and human activities. This information is used to provide recommendations on potential actions land managers can take to minimize carbon export from the boreal forest. Though the results from our project are geared primarily toward policy makers and land managers we also provide recommendations for filling research gaps that currently present uncertainty in our understanding of the carbon cycle in boreal forest ecosystems of Interior Alaska.

  13. Climate science: Hidden trends in the ocean carbon sink

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilyina, Tatiana

    2016-02-01

    Simulations of the flux of atmospheric carbon dioxide into the ocean show that changes in flux associated with human activities are currently masked by natural climate variations, but will be evident in the near future. See Letter p.469

  14. A new direction in search of "missing" carbon sinks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    @@ A CAS scientist succeeds in developing a new direction for exploring the inorganic carbon cycle of the earth. His creative work was recently reported by the 20th issue of Chinese Science Bulletin in 2007.

  15. Terrestrial sources and sinks of carbon inferred from terrestrial data

    OpenAIRE

    Houghton, R. A.

    2011-01-01

    Two approaches have been used to calculate changes in terrestrial carbon storage with data obtained from terrestrial ecosystems, rather than with atmospheric or oceanographic data. One approach is based on the changes in carbon that result from changes in land use (conversion of forest to agricultural land, abandonment of agricultural land, harvest and regrowth). The other approach uses measurements of forest biomass obtained through forests inventories to determine change directly. These lat...

  16. Lidar-derived estimate and uncertainty of carbon sink in successional phases of woody encroachment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woody encroachment is a globally occurring phenomenon that is thought to contribute significantly to the global carbon (C) sink. The C contribution needs to be estimated at regional and local scales to address large uncertainties present in the global- and continental-scale estimates and guide regio...

  17. Age and climate contribution to observed forest carbon sinks in East Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Shan; Zhou, Tao; Zhao, Xiang; Wu, Donghai; Li, Zheng; Wu, Hao; Du, Ling; Luo, Hui

    2016-03-01

    The observed forest carbon sink, i.e. positive net ecosystem productivity (NEP), in East Asia reported by the eddy covariance flux tower network is an integrated result of forests themselves (e.g. age) and abiotic factors such as climate. However the relative contribution of climate alone to that sink is highly uncertain and has been in debate. In this study we de-trended a primary effect of forest age on carbon sinks by a statistical regression model between NEP and forest ages. Then, modeled residual NEP was regressed against climate factors again so that its relative contribution could be evaluated appropriately in the region. The analysis for data from the 2000s showed that forest age appeared to be the primary impact factor on the carbon sink of the region (R 2 = 0.347), and the mean annual temperature (MAT) was the second (R 2 = 0.23), while the mean annual precipitation effect might not be as apparent as MAT. Particularly for forests in China, climate might contribute to about 31.7% of the total NEP of 0.540 Pg C yr-1. Given that forests in China are relatively young under current climate conditions, we predicted that they would be capable of atmospheric carbon sequestration in the near future.

  18. Carbon sink in Phoebe bournei artificial forest ecosystem

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mingdong MA; Chengde LUO; Hong JIANG; Yuejian LIU; Xi LI

    2009-01-01

    Biomass, carbon content, carbon storage and spatial distribution in the 32-year-old Phoebe bournei artificial forest were measured. The mean biomass of the forest stand was 174.33 t/hm2, among which the arbor layer was 166.73 t/hm2, which accounted for 95.6%. Carbon contents of stems, barks, branches, leaves, root, shrub layer, herb layer, lichen layer and litter layer were 0.5769 g C/g, 0.4654 g C/g, 0.5232 g C/g, 0.4958 g C/g, 0.4931 g C/g, 0.4989 g C/g, 0.4733 g C/g, 0.4143 g C/g, 0.3882 g C/g, respectively. The mean carbon content of soil was 0.0139 g C/g, which reduced gradually along with soil depth. Total carbon storage of the P. bournei stand ecosystem was 227.59 t/hm2, among which the arbor layer accounted for 40.13% (91.33 t/hm2), the shrub layer accounted for 0.17% (0.38 t/hm2), the herb layer accounted for 0.76% (1.71 t/hm2), the lichen layer accounted for 0.28% (0.63 t/hm2), and the litter layer accounted for 0.29% (0.66 t/hm2). Carbon content (0-80 cm) of the forest soil was 58.40% (132.88 t/hm2). Spatial distribution ranking of carbon storage was: soil layer (0-80 cm) > arbor layer > herb layer > litter layer > lichen layer > shrub layer. Net production of the forest stand was 8.5706 t/(hm2-a), in which the arbor layer was 6.6691 t/(hm2-a), and it accounted for 77.82%. Net annual carbon sequestration of the P. bournei stand was 4.2536 t/(hm2 a),and the arbor layer was 3.5736 t/(hm2. a), which accountedfor 84.01%.

  19. Longevity of terrestrial Carbon sinks: effects of soil degradation on greenhouse gas emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhn, Nikolaus J.; Berger, Samuel; Kuonen, Samuel

    2013-04-01

    Soil erosion by water is a key process of soil and land degradation. In addition, significant amounts of nutrients and organic Carbon are moved from eroding source areas to landscape sinks. As a consequence, areas affected by erosion suffer a loss of fertility, while sinks experience the development of a stockpile of the deposited sediment, including soil organic matter and nutrients. The deposited nutrients are largely unavailable for the plants growing in these landscape sediment sinks once the thickness of the deposited layer is greater than the rooting depth of the plants. In addition, the deposited organic matter is decomposed slowly through the pack of sediment. At sites of erosion, nutrients have to be replaced and organic matter content of the soil declines due to a destruction of the A horizon. Over time, the risk of a significant reduction in productivity, for example caused by a loss of top soil with a sufficient water storage capacity for maximum plant growth, leads to a decline in CO2 uptake by photosynthesis. Soil organic matter at eroding sites therefore declines and consequently the sediment that is moved to landscape sinks also has a smaller organic matter content than sediment generated from the non-degraded soil. The sediment sinks, on the other hand, emit an increasing amount of greenhouse gases as a consequence of the increasing amount of organic matter deposited while the upslope area is eroded. Over time, the perceived sink effect of soil erosion for greenhouse gases is therefore replaced with a neutral or positive emission balance of erosion in agricultural landscapes. Such a switch from none or a negative emission balance of agricultural landscapes to a positive balance carries the risk of accelerating climate change. In this study, we tried to estimate the risk associated with ongoing soil degradation and closing landscape soil organic matter sinks. Currently observed global erosion rates were linked to known limitations of soil

  20. The Conditional Sink: Counterfactual Display in the Valuation of a Carbon Offsetting Reforestation Project

    OpenAIRE

    Véra Ehrenstein; Fabian Muniesa

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines counterfactual display in the valuation of carbon offsetting projects. Considered a legitimate way to encourage climate change mitigation, such projects rely on the establishment of procedures for the prospective assessment of their capacity to become carbon sinks. This requires imagining possible worlds and assessing their plausibility. The world inhabited by the project is articulated through conditional formulation and subjected to what we call "counterfactual display":...

  1. Climate change and sustainability of the carbon sink in Maritime salt marshes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chmura, G.L. [McGill Univ., Montreal, PQ (Canada). Dept. of Geography, Global Environmental and Climate Change Centre

    2008-07-01

    Ideal carbon sinks do not emit greenhouse gases (GHGs) and are sustainable with future trends in global warming. This presentation discussed the potential for using Maritime salt marshes as carbon sinks. The marshes are covered with grasses adapted to saline soils. Photosynthesis by the marsh plants and algae fix the carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) directly from the atmosphere. The carbon is then buried by mineral sediment. Wetlands without saline water are known to produce methane. The carbon in salt marsh soils does not significantly decline with depth or time. Salt marshes and mangroves store an average of 210 g of CO{sub 2} per m{sup 2} per year. The tidal floodwaters keep the soils wet, which allows for slow decomposition. Canadian salt marsh soils have increased in thickness at a rate of between 2 to 4 mm per year. Measurement programs have demonstrated the sustainability of inner Bay of Fundy marshes in relation to rising sea levels. Opportunities for carbon sinks also exist in dyked marshes in the region. It was concluded that the salt marshes can account for between 4 to 6 per cent of Canada's targeted reductions under the Kyoto Protocol. tabs., figs.

  2. Carbon emissions and sinks in agro-ecosystems of China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIN; Erda; (林而达); LI; Yue'e; (李月娥); GUO; Liping; (郭李萍)

    2002-01-01

    Besides ruminant animals and their wastes, soil is an important regula ting medium in carbon cycling. The soil can be both a contributor to climate cha nge and a recipient of impacts. In the past, land cultivation has generally resu lted in considerable depletion of soil organic matter and the release of greenho use gases (GHGs) into the atmosphere. The observation in the North-South Transec t of Eastern China showed that climate change and land use strongly impact all s oil processes and GHG exchanges between the soil and the atmosphere. Soil manage ment can restore organic carbon by enhancing soil structure and fertility and by doing so mitigating the negative impacts of atmospheric greenhouses on climate. A wide estimation carried out in China shows that carbon sequestration potentia l is about 77.2 MMt C/a (ranging from 26.1—128.3 MMt C/a) using proposed IPCC a ctivities during the next fifty years.

  3. Uncertainty of upland soil carbon sink estimate for Finland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehtonen, Aleksi; Heikkinen, Juha

    2016-04-01

    Changes in the soil carbon stock of Finnish upland soils were quantified using forest inventory data, forest statistics, biomass models, litter turnover rates, and the Yasso07 soil model. Uncertainty in the estimated stock changes was assessed by combining model and sampling errors associated with the various data sources into variance-covariance matrices that allowed computationally efficient error propagation in the context of Yasso07 simulations. In sensitivity analysis, we found that the uncertainty increased drastically as a result of adding random year-to-year variation to the litter input. Such variation is smoothed out when using periodic inventory data with constant biomass models and turnover rates. Model errors (biomass, litter, understorey vegetation) and the systematic error of total drain had a marginal effect on the uncertainty regarding soil carbon stock change. Most of the uncertainty appears to be related to uncaptured annual variation in litter amounts. This is due to fact that variation in the slopes of litter input trends dictates the uncertainty of soil carbon stock change. If we assume that there is annual variation only in foliage and fine root litter rates and that this variation is less than 10% from year to year, then we can claim that Finnish upland forest soils have accumulated carbon during the first Kyoto period (2008-2012). The results of the study underline superiority of permanent sample plots compared to temporary ones, when soil model litter input trends have been estimated from forest inventory data. In addition, we also found that the use of IPCC guidelines leads to underestimation of the uncertainty of soil carbon stock change. This underestimation of the error results from the guidance to remove inter-annual variation from the model inputs, here illustrated with constant litter life spans. Model assumptions and model input estimation should be evaluated critically, when GHG-inventory results are used for policy planning

  4. Abundance and sinking of particulate black carbon in the western Arctic and Subarctic Oceans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Ziming; Yang, Weifeng; Chen, Min; Zheng, Minfang; Hu, Wangjiang

    2016-01-01

    The abundance and sinking of particulate black carbon (PBC) were examined for the first time in the western Arctic and Subarctic Oceans. In the central Arctic Ocean, high PBC concentrations with a mean of 0.021 ± 0.016 μmol L(-1) were observed in the marginal ice zone (MIZ). A number of parameters, including temperature, salinity and (234)Th/(238)U ratios, indicated that both the rapid release of atmospherically deposited PBC on sea ice and a slow sinking rate were responsible for the comparable PBC concentrations between the MIZ and mid-latitudinal Pacific Ocean (ML). On the Chukchi and Bering Shelves (CBS), PBC concentrations were also comparable to those obtained in the ML. Further, significant deficits of (234)Th revealed the rapid sinking of PBC on the CBS. These results implied additional source terms for PBC in addition to atmospheric deposition and fluvial discharge on the western Arctic shelves. Based on (234)Th/(238)U disequilibria, the net sinking rate of PBC out of the surface water was -0.8 ± 2.5 μmol m(-3) d(-1) (mean ± s.d.) in the MIZ. In contrast, on the shelves, the average sinking rate of PBC was 6.1 ± 4.6 μmol m(-3) d(-1). Thus, the western Arctic Shelf was probably an effective location for burying PBC. PMID:27417410

  5. Quantifying Contemporary Terrestrial Carbon Sources and Sinks in the Conterminous United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, S.; Loveland, T.

    2003-12-01

    U.S. land likely accounts for a significant portion of the unidentified global carbon sink, although the magnitude is highly uncertain. The ultimate goal of this study is to quantify the contemporary temporal and spatial patterns of carbon sources and sinks in the conterminous United States from the early 1970s to 2000, and to explain the mechanisms that cause the variability and changes. Because of the difficulty and massive cost for developing land cover change databases for the conterminous United States, we adopt an ecoregion-based sampling approach. Carbon dynamics within thousands of 20 km by 20 km or 10 km by 10 km sampling blocks, stratified by Omernik Level III ecoregions, are simulated using the General Ensemble Biogeochemical Modeling System at the spatial resolution of 60 m by 60 m. The land use change data, providing unprecedented accuracy and consistency, are derived from Landsat imagery for five time points (nominally 1972, 1980, 1986, 1992, and 2000). Mechanisms have been implemented to assimilate data from key national benchmark databases (including the USDA Forest Service­_s Forest Inventory and Analysis data and the USDA­_s agricultural census data). The dynamics of carbon stocks in vegetation, soil, and harvested wood materials are quantified. Results from three ecoregions (i.e., Southeastern Plains, Piedmont, and Northern Piedmont) indicated that the carbon sink strength has been decreasing from the 1970s to 2000. The relative contribution of biomass accumulation to the sink decreased during this period, while those of soil organic carbon and harvested wood materials increased.

  6. Thermal conductivity from hierarchical heat sinks using carbon nanotubes and graphene nanosheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Chien-Te; Lee, Cheng-En; Chen, Yu-Fu; Chang, Jeng-Kuei; Teng, Hsi-Sheng

    2015-11-01

    The in-plane (kip) and through-plane (ktp) thermal conductivities of heat sinks using carbon nanotubes (CNTs), graphene nanosheets (GNs), and CNT/GN composites are extracted from two experimental setups within the 323-373 K temperature range. Hierarchical three-dimensional CNT/GN frameworks display higher kip and ktp values, as compared to the CNT- and GN-based heat sinks. The kip and ktp values of the CNT/GN-based heat sink reach as high as 1991 and 76 W m-1 K-1 at 323 K, respectively. This improved thermal conductivity is attributed to the fact that the hierarchical heat sink offers a stereo thermal conductive network that combines point, line, and plane contact, leading to better heat transport. Furthermore, the compression treatment provided an efficient route to increase both kip and ktp values. This result reveals that the hierarchical carbon structures become denser, inducing more thermal conductive area and less thermal resistivity, i.e., a reduced possibility of phonon-boundary scattering. The correlation between thermal and electrical conductivity (ε) can be well described by two empirical equations: kip = 567 ln(ε) + 1120 and ktp = 20.6 ln(ε) + 36.1. The experimental results are obtained within the temperature range of 323-373 K, suitably complementing the thermal management of chips for consumer electronics.

  7. Carbon source/sink function of a subtropical, eutrophic lake determined from an overall mass balance and a gas exchange and carbon burial balance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although studies on carbon burial in lake sediments have shown that lakes are disproportionately important carbon sinks, many studies on gaseous carbon exchange across the water-air interface have demonstrated that lakes are supersaturated with CO2 and CH4 causing a net release of CO2 and CH4 to the atmosphere. In order to more accurately estimate the net carbon source/sink function of lake ecosystems, a more comprehensive carbon budget is needed, especially for gaseous carbon exchange across the water-air interface. Using two methods, overall mass balance and gas exchange and carbon burial balance, we assessed the carbon source/sink function of Lake Donghu, a subtropical, eutrophic lake, from April 2003 to March 2004. With the overall mass balance calculations, total carbon input was 14 905 t, total carbon output was 4950 t, and net carbon budget was +9955 t, suggesting that Lake Donghu was a great carbon sink. For the gas exchange and carbon burial balance, gaseous carbon (CO2 and CH4) emission across the water-air interface totaled 752 t while carbon burial in the lake sediment was 9477 t. The ratio of carbon emission into the atmosphere to carbon burial into the sediment was only 0.08. This low ratio indicates that Lake Donghu is a great carbon sink. Results showed good agreement between the two methods with both showing Lake Donghu to be a great carbon sink. This results from the high primary production of Lake Donghu, substantive allochthonous carbon inputs and intensive anthropogenic activity. Gaseous carbon emission accounted for about 15% of the total carbon output, indicating that the total output would be underestimated without including gaseous carbon exchange. - Due to high primary production, substantive allochthonous carbon inputs and intensive anthropogenic acitivity, subtropical, eutrophic Lake Donghu is a great carbon sink

  8. Study visit carbon sinks Peugeot. Evaluation after 5 years and perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the framework of its project of the climatic change control, PSA Peugeot Citroen, decided to involve in the decrease of the carbon dioxide emissions. In parallel to the vehicles consumption decrease and the biofuels utilization, the group developed since 5 years a pilot project of carbon sink. This project aims to study the impact of a trees plantation, at a big scale, on the atmospheric carbon dioxide fixation. This document is a first evaluation after the phase of trees plantation. (A.L.B.)

  9. A district heating system as a sink for carbon dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Within a strategy of carbn dioxide (CO2) abatement, district heating systems, driven by small nuclear heating reactors, could be used not only to deliver sensible heat to the consumers, but also as a CO2-absorber/desorber system for the collection of diffusively scattered CO2-sources. For this, potassium carbonate (K2CO3) is dissolved in the heating system which converts into potassium bicarbonate (KHCO3) when CO2 from flue gases is absorbed. At the heating reactor CO2 is desorbed and disposed of. Hence, a district heating system could work as a 'CO2-collecting system', too. Using this additional feature of a district heating system, its so-called effective, climate-related, CO2-neutrality factor is increased by almost a factor of three compared with the direct substitution effect of the CO2-free nuclear heating energy alone. Such a hybrid system could be of interest in a transitional phase when nuclear district heating energy will penetrate into a yet fossil-fuelled heating market. (orig.)

  10. Upscaling carbon fluxes over the Great Plains grasslands: Sinks and sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li; Wylie, Bruce K.; Ji, Lei; Gilmanov, Tagir G.; Tieszen, Larry L.; Howar, Daniel M.

    2011-01-01

    Previous studies suggested that the grasslands may be carbon sinks or near equilibrium, and they often shift between carbon sources in drought years and carbon sinks in other years. It is important to understand the responses of net ecosystem production (NEP) to various climatic conditions across the U.S. Great Plains grasslands. Based on 15 grassland flux towers, we developed a piecewise regression model and mapped the grassland NEP at 250 m spatial resolution over the Great Plains from 2000 to 2008. The results showed that the Great Plains was a net sink with an averaged annual NEP of 24 ± 14 g C m−2 yr−1, ranging from a low value of 0.3 g C m−2 yr−1 in 2002 to a high value of 47.7 g C m−2 yr−1 in 2005. The regional averaged NEP for the entire Great Plains grasslands was estimated to be 336 Tg C yr−1 from 2000 to 2008. In the 9 year period including 4 dry years, the annual NEP was very variable in both space and time. It appeared that the carbon gains for the Great Plains were more sensitive to droughts in the west than the east. The droughts in 2000, 2002, 2006, and 2008 resulted in increased carbon losses over drought-affected areas, and the Great Plains grasslands turned into a relatively low sink with NEP values of 15.8, 0.3, 20.1, and 10.2 g C m−2 yr−1 for the 4 years, respectively.

  11. Spatio-temporal changes in biomass carbon sinks in China's forests from 1977 to 2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Zhaodi; Hu, Huifeng; Li, Pin; Li, Nuyun; Fang, Jingyun

    2013-07-01

    Forests play a leading role in regional and global carbon (C) cycles. Detailed assessment of the temporal and spatial changes in C sinks/sources of China's forests is critical to the estimation of the national C budget and can help to constitute sustainable forest management policies for climate change. In this study, we explored the spatio-temporal changes in forest biomass C stocks in China between 1977 and 2008, using six periods of the national forest inventory data. According to the definition of the forest inventory, China's forest was categorized into three groups: forest stand, economic forest, and bamboo forest. We estimated forest biomass C stocks for each inventory period by using continuous biomass expansion factor (BEF) method for forest stands, and the mean biomass density method for economic and bamboo forests. As a result, China's forests have accumulated biomass C (i.e., biomass C sink) of 1896 Tg (1 Tg=10(12) g) during the study period, with 1710, 108 and 78 Tg C in forest stands, and economic and bamboo forests, respectively. Annual forest biomass C sink was 70.2 Tg C a(-1), offsetting 7.8% of the contemporary fossil CO2 emissions in the country. The results also showed that planted forests have functioned as a persistent C sink, sequestrating 818 Tg C and accounting for 47.8% of total C sink in forest stands, and that the old-, mid- and young-aged forests have sequestrated 930, 391 and 388 Tg C from 1977 to 2008. Our results suggest that China's forests have a big potential as biomass C sink in the future because of its large area of planted forests with young-aged growth and low C density. PMID:23722235

  12. Monitoring CO2 sources and sinks from space : the Orbiting Carbon Observatory (OCO) Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crisp, David

    2006-01-01

    NASA's Orbiting Carbon Observatory (OCO) will make the first space-based measurements of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) with the precision, resolution, and coverage needed to characterize the geographic distribution of CO2 sources and sinks and quantify their variability over the seasonal cycle. OCO is currently scheduled for launch in 2008. The observatory will carry a single instrument that incorporates three high-resolution grating spectrometers designed to measure the near-infrared absorption by CO2 and molecular oxygen (O2) in reflected sunlight. OCO will fly 12 minutes ahead of the EOS Aqua platform in the Earth Observing System (EOS) Afternoon Constellation (A-Train). The in-strument will collect 12 to 24 soundings per second as the Observatory moves along its orbit track on the day side of the Earth. A small sampling footprint (sinks of CO2. This information could play an important role in monitoring the integrity of large scale CO2 sequestration projects.

  13. Carbon dioxide sink in four different ecosystems in vegetation seasons 2005 and 2006

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Taufarová, Klára; Havránková, Kateřina; Czerný, Radek; Čížková, Hana; Janouš, Dalibor

    Bratislava : Ústav hydrologie SAV, 2007, s. 666-674. ISBN 978-80-89139-13-2. [15. Mezinárodní posterový den a den otevřených dveří Hydrologického ústavu. Bratislava (SK), 15.11.2007] R&D Projects: GA MŠk 2B06068 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60870520 Keywords : Carbon dioxide sink * forest * grassland * wetland * cropland Subject RIV: EF - Botanics

  14. Sources and sinks of carbon in boreal ecosystems of interior Alaska: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Thomas A.; Jones, Miriam C.; Hiemstra, Christopher A.

    2014-01-01

    Boreal regions store large quantities of carbon but are increasingly vulnerable to carbon loss due to disturbance and climate warming. The boreal region, underlain by discontinuous permafrost, presents a challenging landscape for itemizing current and potential carbon sources and sinks in the boreal soil and vegetation. The roles of fire, forest succession, and the presence (or absence) of permafrost on carbon cycle, vegetation, and hydrologic processes have been the focus of multidisciplinary research in this area for the past 20 years. However, projections of a warming future climate, an increase in fire severity and extent, and the potential degradation of permafrost could lead to major landscape process changes over the next 20 to 50 years. This provides a major challenge for predicting how the interplay between land management activities and impacts of climate warming will affect carbon sources and sinks in Interior Alaska. To assist land managers in adapting and managing for potential changes in the Interior Alaska carbon cycle we developed this review paper incorporating an overview of the climate, ecosystem processes, vegetation types, and soil regimes in Interior Alaska with a focus on ramifications for the carbon cycle. Our objective is to provide a synthesis of the most current carbon storage estimates and measurements to support policy and land management decisions on how to best manage carbon sources and sinks in Interior Alaska. To support this we have surveyed relevant peer reviewed estimates of carbon stocks in aboveground and belowground biomass for Interior Alaska boreal ecosystems. We have also summarized methane and carbon dioxide fluxes from the same ecosystems. These data have been converted into the same units to facilitate comparison across ecosystem compartments. We identify potential changes in the carbon cycle with climate change and human disturbance including how compounding disturbances can affect the boreal system. Finally, we provide

  15. Impact of sinking carbon flux on accumulation of deep-ocean carbon in the Northern Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sarma, V.V.S.S.; DileepKumar, M.; Saino, T.

    in primary produc- tion are found to be reflected by sinking fluxes at ~500 m above the bottom within a few days in the Arabian Sea (Honjo et al. 1999; Lee et al. 1998). This suggests a tight coupling between primary production and sinking organic carbon...–13.3 mg m –2 d –1 ; Haake et al. 1993; Lee et al. 1998; Honjo et al. 1999; Ittekkot et al. 1991) compared to other regions in the World Oceans (Table 2). Sinking POC fluxes are found in the North Pacific to be (between 12C176S and 50C176N) 0.43–5.2 mg m –2...

  16. Harvested wood products and carbon sink in a young beech high forest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pilli R

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available According to art. 3.4 of the Kyoto Protocol (KP, Italy has elected forest management as additional human-induced activity to attain the goal of reduction in greenhouse gas emissions. The whole forest area not subjected to afforestation, reforestation or deforestation processes since 1990 will be considered as managed forest. In order to analyse different management strategies, the Carbon-Pro Project, involving 9 partners of the European CADSES area, considered a young beech high forest (ex-coppice, defined as "transitory silvicultural system" as a common case study for the Pre-alps region. Using data collected with forest plans during the period 1983 - 2005, aboveground and belowground forest carbon stock and sink of a specific forest compartment were estimated by the Carbon Stock Method proposed by the IPCC Guidelines. In order to apply this approach 41 trees were cut and a species-specific allometric equation was developed. Considering the aboveground tree biomass, the carbon sink amounts to 1.99 and 1.84 Mg C ha-1 y-1 for the period 1983 - 1994 and 1994 - 2005 respectively. Adding the belowground tree biomass, the estimated sink amounts to 2.59 and 2.39 Mg C ha-1 y-1 for each period. Taking the harvested wood products (firewood, the total carbon sequestration during the second period is 0.16 Mg C ha-1 y-1. The case study highlights the possible rules for the different management strategies. In effect, the utilisation of the entire increase in aboveground biomass as firewood gives an energy substitution effect but, according to the Marrakesh Accords, it cannot be accounted for the KP. On the other hand, an accumulation strategy gives the maximum possible carbon absorption and retention.

  17. Thermal performance of carbon foams used as heat sink for the pixel MVD PANDA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Micro Vertex Detector (MVD) for the PANDA experiment is designed and optimized to reconstruct the D mesons secondary vertices and to provide the maximum acceptance close to the interaction point. The experimental physics goals and setup require sophisticated solutions for the detector integration in order to minimise the material budget. The thermal power produced by the 'on board' read-out electronics is fast removed using carbon foam as heat sink. Two types of carbon foam are under evaluation. The mechanical and thermal property behaviors after neutron irradiation test with neutrons have been studied. Results from finite element thermal analyses and test bench are also presented.

  18. Climatically driven loss of calcium in steppe soil as a sink for atmospheric carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapenis, A.G.; Lawrence, G.B.; Bailey, S.W.; Aparin, B.F.; Shiklomanov, A.I.; Speranskaya, N.A.; Torn, M.S.; Calef, M.

    2008-01-01

    During the last several thousand years the semi-arid, cold climate of the Russian steppe formed highly fertile soils rich in organic carbon and calcium (classified as Chernozems in the Russian system). Analysis of archived soil samples collected in Kemannaya Steppe Preserve in 1920, 1947, 1970, and fresh samples collected in 1998 indicated that the native steppe Chernozems, however, lost 17-28 kg m-2 of calcium in the form of carbonates in 1970-1998. Here we demonstrate that the loss of calcium was caused by fundamental shift in the steppe hydrologic balance. Previously unleached soils where precipitation was less than potential evapotranspiration are now being leached due to increased precipitation and, possibly, due to decreased actual evapotranspiration. Because this region receives low levels of acidic deposition, the dissolution of carbonates involves the consumption of atmospheric CO2. Our estimates indicate that this climatically driven terrestrial sink of atmospheric CO2 is ???2.1-7.4 g C m-2 a-1. In addition to the net sink of atmospheric carbon, leaching of pedogenic carbonates significantly amplified seasonal amplitude of CO2 exchange between atmosphere and steppe soil. Copyright 2008 by the American Geophysical Union.

  19. Role of Carbonic Anhydrase as an Activator in Carbonate Rock Dissolution and Its Implication for Atmospheric CO2 Sink

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘再华

    2001-01-01

    The conversion of CO2 into H+ and is a relatively slow reaction. Hence, its kinetics may be rate determining in carbonate rock dissolution. Carbonic anhydrase (CA), which is widespread in nature, was used to catalyze the CO2 conversion process in dissolution experiments of limestone and dolomite. It was found that the rate of dissolution increases by a factor of about 10 after the addition of CA at a high CO2 partial pressure (Pco2) for limestone and about 3 at low Pco2 for dolomite. This shows that reappraisal is necessary for the importance of chemical weathering (including carbonate rock dissolution and silicate weathering) in the atmospheric CO2 sink and the mysterious missing sink in carbon cycling. It is doubtless that previous studies of weathering underestimated weathering rates due to the ignorance of CA as an activator in weathering, thus the contribution of weathering to the atmospheric CO2 sink is also underestimated. This finding also shows the need to examine the situ distribution and activity of CA in different waters and to investigate the role of CA in weathering.``

  20. Carbon monoxide pollution experiment. I - A solution to the carbon monoxide sink anomaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grenda, R. N.; Bortner, M. H.; Lebel, P. J.; Davies, J. H.; Dick, R.

    1971-01-01

    The observed lack of a high rate of growth in global CO concentration implies that there is some sink mechanism for destroying the CO as rapidly as it is being produced. A program is described which is intended to develop both the experiment concept and the remote sensor required to measure atmospheric CO with sufficient accuracy to locate the sink, whether it be at the earth's surface or in the upper atmosphere. The program calls for the development of a remote sensor which can look for surface sinks by mapping the vertical CO burden in the atmosphere on a daily basis, and which can look for an upper atmospheric sink by means of measurements of total CO in a horizontal path through the limb of the earth's atmosphere, using the sun as the source.

  1. The relative contributions of forest growth and areal expansion to forest biomass carbon sinks in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, P.; Zhu, J.; Hu, H.; Guo, Z.; Pan, Y.; Birdsey, R.; Fang, J.

    2015-06-01

    Forests play a leading role in regional and global terrestrial carbon (C) cycles. Changes in C sequestration within forests can be attributed to areal expansion (increase in forest area) and forest growth (increase in biomass density). Detailed assessment of the relative contributions of areal expansion and forest growth to C sinks is crucial to reveal the mechanisms that control forest C sinks and is helpful for developing sustainable forest management policies in the face of climate change. Using the Forest Identity concept and forest inventory data, this study quantified the spatial and temporal changes in the relative contributions of forest areal expansion and increased biomass growth to China's forest C sinks from 1977 to 2008. Over the last 30 years, the areal expansion of forests was a larger contributor to C sinks than forest growth for all forests and planted forests in China (74.6 vs. 25.4 % for all forests, and 62.4 vs. 37.8 % for plantations). However, for natural forests, forest growth made a larger contribution than areal expansion (60.4 vs. 39.6 %). The relative contribution of forest growth of planted forests showed an increasing trend from an initial 25.3 to 61.0 % in the later period of 1998 to 2003, but for natural forests, the relative contributions were variable without clear trends owing to the drastic changes in forest area and biomass density over the last 30 years. Our findings suggest that afforestation can continue to increase the C sink of China's forests in the future subject to persistently-increasing forest growth after establishment of plantation.

  2. The relative contributions of forest growth and areal expansion to forest biomass carbon sinks in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Li

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Forests play a leading role in regional and global terrestrial carbon (C cycles. Changes in C sequestration within forests can be attributed to areal expansion (increase in forest area and forest growth (increase in biomass density. Detailed assessment of the relative contributions of areal expansion and forest growth to C sinks is crucial to reveal the mechanisms that control forest C sinks and is helpful for developing sustainable forest management policies in the face of climate change. Using the Forest Identity concept and forest inventory data, this study quantified the spatial and temporal changes in the relative contributions of forest areal expansion and increased biomass growth to China's forest C sinks from 1977 to 2008. Over the last 30 years, the areal expansion of forests was a larger contributor to C sinks than forest growth for all forests and planted forests in China (74.6 vs. 25.4 % for all forests, and 62.4 vs. 37.8 % for plantations. However, for natural forests, forest growth made a larger contribution than areal expansion (60.4 vs. 39.6 %. The relative contribution of forest growth of planted forests showed an increasing trend from an initial 25.3 to 61.0 % in the later period of 1998 to 2003, but for natural forests, the relative contributions were variable without clear trends owing to the drastic changes in forest area and biomass density over the last 30 years. Our findings suggest that afforestation can continue to increase the C sink of China's forests in the future subject to persistently-increasing forest growth after establishment of plantation.

  3. Global Carbon-Sink Sensitivity to Nitrogen: New Niches for Model-Data Symbiosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, S. J.; Gerber, S.

    2011-12-01

    To predict global environmental change it is crucial to determine the response of primary production to "CO2 fertilization". Dynamic global land models (DGLMs) are used to predict this long-term carbon (C) sink, but considerable disparity exists between the results obtained from different models. Constraining this divergence is necessary to reduce the uncertainty in our projections. To this end, recent model refinements have attempted to account for the important role that nitrogen (N) limitation plays in primary productivity. However, DGLMs rely on vast amounts of data, and thus far the focus has been on C. There is consequentially a paucity of global N data to support model benchmarking and forcing. Ideally, we strive to use model simulations and data collection symbiotically; each benefiting the other, and reciprocating in turn. It would therefore be valuable to know which measurable N variables would support better benchmarking that also improves C-sink predictions. This work endeavors to identify the optimal choice of 1) benchmark data to better constrain long-term C-sink predictions, and 2) the variables that should be measured, or measured better, to support these benchmarks, with particular attention paid to N in both cases. Here we use LM3V, a state of the art DGLM with coupled C-N cycling, to determine which processes most strongly control long-term C-sink. Concurrent sensitivity analyses are being performed to identify which of the model variables commonly used in benchmarking, or under consideration for future benchmarking (i.e. N variables), exhibit sensitivities that correlate with those identified for C-sink. Preliminary results indicate that long-term C-sink is strongly affected by factors that determine input or retention of N, as well as stoichiometric relationships. This sensitivity is most apparent as a long-term cumulative effect. At shorter time-scales many of the model outputs commonly used in benchmarking show relative insensitivity to these

  4. An observational study of the carbon-sink strength of East Asian subtropical evergreen forests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Relatively little is known about the effects of regional warming on the carbon cycle of subtropical evergreen forest ecosystems, which are characterized by year-round growing season and cold winters. We investigated the carbon balance in three typical East Asia subtropical evergreen forests, using eddy flux, soil respiration and leaf-level measurements. Subtropical evergreen forests maintain continuous, high rates of photosynthetic activity, even during winter cold periods. Warm summers enhance photosynthetic rates in a limited way, because overall ecosystem productivity is primarily restrained by radiation levels during the warm period. Conversely, warm climates significantly enhance the respiratory carbon efflux. The finding of lower sensitivity of photosynthesis relative to that of respiration suggests that increased temperature will weaken the carbon-sink strength of East Asia subtropical evergreen forests. (letter)

  5. Is the subarctic landscape still a carbon sink? Evidence from a detailed catchment balance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundin, Erik J.; Klaminder, Jonatan; Giesler, Reiner; Persson, Andreas; Olefeldt, David; Heliasz, Michal; Christensen, Torben R.; Karlsson, Jan

    2016-03-01

    Climate warming raises the question whether high-latitude landscape still function as net carbon (C) sinks. By compiling an integrated C balance for an intensely studied subarctic catchment, we show that this catchment's C balance is not likely to be a strong current sink of C, a commonly held assumption. In fact, it is more plausible (71% probability) that the studied catchment functions as a C source (-11 ± 20 g C m-2 yr-1). Analyses of individual fluxes indicate that soil and aquatic C losses offset C sequestering in other landscape components (e.g., peatlands and aboveground forest biomass). Our results stress the importance of fully integrated catchment C balance estimates and highlight the importance of upland soils and their interaction with the aquatic network for the catchment C balance.

  6. Strong carbon sink of monsoon tropical seasonal forest in Southern Vietnam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshcherevskaya, Olga; Anichkin, Alexandr; Avilov, Vitaly; Duy Dinh, Ba; Luu Do, Phong; Huan Tran, Cong; Kurbatova, Julia

    2014-05-01

    Comparison between anthropogenic emission of carbon dioxide and atmospheric carbon pool change displays that only half of emitted CO2 remains in air, leaving so-called 'missing sink' of carbon. Terrestrial biosphere and ocean accumulate each about a half of this value (Gifford, 1994). Forest biomes play the decisive role in 'missing sink' because of high primary production flux and large carbon pool. Almost all the sink belongs to boreal forests, because warming and wetting coupled with increasing CO2 concentration and N deposition gives more favorable conditions for boreal ecosystems. On the contrary, tropical climate changes effect on forests is not obvious, probably cause more drought conditions; tropical forests suffer from 1.2 % per year area reduction and disturbance. Whether primary tropical forests act as carbon sink is still unclear. Biomass inventories at 146 forest plots across all the tropics in 1987-1997 revealed low carbon sink in humid forests biomass of 49 (29-66; 95% C.I.) g C m-2 year-1 on average (Malhi, 2010). Estimates for undisturbed African forests are close to global (Ciais et al., 2008). Eddy covariance (EC) observations with weak-turbulence correction in Amazonia reveal near-zero or small negative (i.e. sink) balance (Clark, 2004). Three EC sites in SE Asia primary forests give near-zero balance again (Saigusa et al., 2008; Kosugi et al., 2012). There are two main groups of explanations of moderate tropical carbon sink: (a) recovering of large-disturbance in the past or (b) response to current atmospheric changes: increase of CO2 concentration and/or climate change. So, strong carbon accumulation is not common for primary tropical forests. In this context sink of 402 g C m-2 in 2012 at EC station of Nam Cat Tien (NCT), Southern Vietnam (N 11°27', E 107°24', 134 m a.s.l.) in primary monsoon tropical forest looks questionably. EC instrument set at NCT consists of CSAT3 sonic anemometer and LI-7500A open-path gas analyzer. All the standard

  7. Carbon sinks in mitigating climate change. Evaluation with models of varying scope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pohjola, J.

    2010-07-01

    This dissertation examines the economywide and sectoral impacts of emissions reduction targets and policy measures implemented to mitigate climate change. The special attention is given to analysis of carbon sinks and their role in achieving the emission limits. The analysis is based on applying numerical methods. The emphasis of the methods is on the computable general equilibrium modeling, while the stand level model describing the behavior of the forest owner is applied in one of the essays. The first essay describes the computable general equilibrium (CGE) model for Finland built by the author. The novelty of the model is to include endogenous carbon sequestration with timber supply and incentives to increase carbon sinks in a CGE framework. This enables the evaluation of the importance of forest carbon sequestration in achieving the given emission target. The marginal cost curves for reducing fossil fuel emissions and emissions from wood are calculated in the study. The results suggest that with small reductions of net emissions it is cost-efficient to reduce only the emissions from fossil fuels, while when stabilizing the net emissions to the level of year 1990 nearly half of the emission reduction is achieved by increasing the carbon sink. Although the reduction is larger in terms of net emissions than gross emissions, the carbon tax needed to achieve the reduction is lower in case of net emission reduction. The welfare loss is of similar magnitude in both cases. The study provides the sensitivity analysis related to the parameter values and assumptions in the model.The second essay provides the detailed analysis on economywide, sectoral and trade impacts of inclusion of carbon sinks in the Kyoto protocol. The focus of the analysis is on the special treatment for Canada and Japan that allows them larger sinks. The analysis is performed with the multi-region computable general equilibrium model GTAP-E. Carbon sinks are modeled exogenously by adjusting the

  8. Can Earth System Models Explain the observed 20th Century Global Carbon Sink?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stouffer, R. J.; Shevliakova, E.; Malyshev, S.; Krasting, J. P.; Pacala, S.; Dunne, J. P.; John, J. G.

    2012-12-01

    Various authors have estimated the net global land carbon flux as a residual from the global budget of atmospheric, oceanic and fossil fuel carbon fluxes. Recently, Tans (2009) used this method to estimate the globally averaged net land carbon inventory changes method from 1850 to near present day. Using ocean model estimates of the oceanic carbon fluxes, he showed the land being a net source of carbon until around 1940, but after that becoming a net sink, with an uncertainty dominated by the net oceanic carbon flux trajectory (~15%; Sabine et al 2004). Recently Ballantyne et al (2012) produced updated estimates of the net carbon fluxes changes from 1960 until present day. They show that the net carbon flux uptake, land plus ocean, increases from around 2 PgC/yr in 1960 to about 5 PgC/yr in 2010. We compare these observationally based estimates with results from the GFDL Earth System Models (ESMs). We show that both GFDL ESMs store too much carbon in the atmosphere, about a 10 to 20 ppm error by 2005. The models have slightly higher mean values than the Tans (2009) oceanic carbon storage changes but fall within the Sabine et al. (2004) uncertainty estimate. While the general shape of the net land carbon changes in Tans (2009) is well simulated by the ESMs, the ESM sign change in land flux occurs about 15-25years later. By 2010, the models simulate the oceanic carbon uptake as ~2.7 PgC/yr, and the land uptake as ~1 PgC/yr for a total of ~4PgC/yr. The land uptake value varies with ensemble member giving evidence for the role of variability in understanding the past carbon changes. This analysis gives us confidence in the models estimates of the climate-carbon feedbacks. The model results will then be analyzed to determine the various causes of those changes.

  9. Assessing Canada's Forest Carbon Sinks from 1901 TO 2008 BY Combining Inventory with Climate Data (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, J. M.; Wu, C.; Gonsamo, A.; Kurz, W.; Hember, R.; Price, D. T.; Boisvenue, C.; Zhang, F.; Chang, K.

    2013-12-01

    larger interannual variability because it is affected by both disturbance and climate. The impact of climate at the RU level is generally positive (increased sink) due to warming, but sometimes negative due to water stress. Averaged over Canada, climate warming induced a longer growing season by about one week from 1901 to 2008, enhancing the annual forest carbon sink by about 42×30 TgC y-1 over the period from 1990 to 2008, while CO2 and nitrogen fertilization effects each also contributed about the same amount to Canada's forest carbon sink.

  10. Tropical secondary forests regenerating after shifting cultivation in the Philippines uplands are important carbon sinks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukul, Sharif A.; Herbohn, John; Firn, Jennifer

    2016-03-01

    In the tropics, shifting cultivation has long been attributed to large scale forest degradation, and remains a major source of uncertainty in forest carbon accounting. In the Philippines, shifting cultivation, locally known as kaingin, is a major land-use in upland areas. We measured the distribution and recovery of aboveground biomass carbon along a fallow gradient in post-kaingin secondary forests in an upland area in the Philippines. We found significantly higher carbon in the aboveground total biomass and living woody biomass in old-growth forest, while coarse dead wood biomass carbon was higher in the new fallow sites. For young through to the oldest fallow secondary forests, there was a progressive recovery of biomass carbon evident. Multivariate analysis indicates patch size as an influential factor in explaining the variation in biomass carbon recovery in secondary forests after shifting cultivation. Our study indicates secondary forests after shifting cultivation are substantial carbon sinks and that this capacity to store carbon increases with abandonment age. Large trees contribute most to aboveground biomass. A better understanding of the relative contribution of different biomass sources in aboveground total forest biomass, however, is necessary to fully capture the value of such landscapes from forest management, restoration and conservation perspectives.

  11. Tropical secondary forests regenerating after shifting cultivation in the Philippines uplands are important carbon sinks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukul, Sharif A; Herbohn, John; Firn, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    In the tropics, shifting cultivation has long been attributed to large scale forest degradation, and remains a major source of uncertainty in forest carbon accounting. In the Philippines, shifting cultivation, locally known as kaingin, is a major land-use in upland areas. We measured the distribution and recovery of aboveground biomass carbon along a fallow gradient in post-kaingin secondary forests in an upland area in the Philippines. We found significantly higher carbon in the aboveground total biomass and living woody biomass in old-growth forest, while coarse dead wood biomass carbon was higher in the new fallow sites. For young through to the oldest fallow secondary forests, there was a progressive recovery of biomass carbon evident. Multivariate analysis indicates patch size as an influential factor in explaining the variation in biomass carbon recovery in secondary forests after shifting cultivation. Our study indicates secondary forests after shifting cultivation are substantial carbon sinks and that this capacity to store carbon increases with abandonment age. Large trees contribute most to aboveground biomass. A better understanding of the relative contribution of different biomass sources in aboveground total forest biomass, however, is necessary to fully capture the value of such landscapes from forest management, restoration and conservation perspectives. PMID:26951761

  12. Trends and drivers of regional sources and sinks of carbon dioxide over the past two decades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sitch, S.; Friedlingstein, P.; Gruber, N.; Jones, S. D.; Murray-Tortarolo, G.; Ahlström, A.; Doney, S. C.; Graven, H.; Heinze, C.; Huntingford, C.; Levis, S.; Levy, P. E.; Lomas, M.; Poulter, B.; Viovy, N.; Zaehle, S.; Zeng, N.; Arneth, A.; Bonan, G.; Bopp, L.; Canadell, J. G.; Chevallier, F.; Ciais, P.; Ellis, R.; Gloor, M.; Peylin, P.; Piao, S.; Le Quéré, C.; Smith, B.; Zhu, Z.; Myneni, R.

    2013-12-01

    The land and ocean absorb on average over half of the anthropogenic emissions of carbon dioxide (CO2) every year. These CO2 "sinks" are modulated by climate change and variability. Here we use a suite of nine Dynamic Global Vegetation Models (DGVMs) and four Ocean Biogeochemical General Circulation Models (OBGCMs) to quantify the global and regional climate and atmospheric CO2 - driven trends in land and oceanic CO2 exchanges with the atmosphere over the period 1990-2009, attribute these trends to underlying processes, and quantify the uncertainty and level of model agreement. The models were forced with reconstructed climate fields and observed global atmospheric CO2; Land Use and Land Cover Changes are not included for the DGVMs. Over the period 1990-2009, the DGVMs simulate a mean global land carbon sink of -2.4 ± 0.7 Pg C yr-1 with a small significant trend of -0.06 ± 0.03 Pg C yr-2 (increasing sink). Over the more limited period 1990-2004, the ocean models simulate a mean ocean sink of -2.2 ± 0.2 Pg C yr-1 with a trend in the net C uptake that is indistinguishable from zero (-0.01 ± 0.02 Pg C yr-2). The two ocean models that extended the simulations until 2009 suggest a slightly stronger, but still small trend of -0.02 ± 0.01 Pg C yr-2. Trends from land and ocean models compare favourably to the land greenness trends from remote sensing, atmospheric inversion results, and the residual land sink required to close the global carbon budget. Trends in the land sink are driven by increasing net primary production (NPP) whose statistically significant trend of 0.22 ± 0.08 Pg C yr-2 exceeds a significant trend in heterotrophic respiration of 0.16 ± 0.05 Pg C yr-2 - primarily as a consequence of wide-spread CO2 fertilisation of plant production. Most of the land-based trend in simulated net carbon uptake originates from natural ecosystems in the tropics (-0.04 ± 0.01 Pg C yr-2), with almost no trend over the northern land region, where recent warming and

  13. Recent trends and drivers of regional sources and sinks of carbon dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sitch, S.; Friedlingstein, P.; Gruber, N.; Jones, S. D.; Murray-Tortarolo, G.; Ahlström, A.; Doney, S. C.; Graven, H.; Heinze, C.; Huntingford, C.; Levis, S.; Levy, P. E.; Lomas, M.; Poulter, B.; Viovy, N.; Zaehle, S.; Zeng, N.; Arneth, A.; Bonan, G.; Bopp, L.; Canadell, J. G.; Chevallier, F.; Ciais, P.; Ellis, R.; Gloor, M.; Peylin, P.; Piao, S. L.; Le Quéré, C.; Smith, B.; Zhu, Z.; Myneni, R.

    2015-02-01

    The land and ocean absorb on average just over half of the anthropogenic emissions of carbon dioxide (CO2) every year. These CO2 "sinks" are modulated by climate change and variability. Here we use a suite of nine dynamic global vegetation models (DGVMs) and four ocean biogeochemical general circulation models (OBGCMs) to estimate trends driven by global and regional climate and atmospheric CO2 in land and oceanic CO2 exchanges with the atmosphere over the period 1990-2009, to attribute these trends to underlying processes in the models, and to quantify the uncertainty and level of inter-model agreement. The models were forced with reconstructed climate fields and observed global atmospheric CO2; land use and land cover changes are not included for the DGVMs. Over the period 1990-2009, the DGVMs simulate a mean global land carbon sink of -2.4 ± 0.7 Pg C yr-1 with a small significant trend of -0.06 ± 0.03 Pg C yr-2 (increasing sink). Over the more limited period 1990-2004, the ocean models simulate a mean ocean sink of -2.2 ± 0.2 Pg C yr-1 with a trend in the net C uptake that is indistinguishable from zero (-0.01 ± 0.02 Pg C yr-2). The two ocean models that extended the simulations until 2009 suggest a slightly stronger, but still small, trend of -0.02 ± 0.01 Pg C yr-2. Trends from land and ocean models compare favourably to the land greenness trends from remote sensing, atmospheric inversion results, and the residual land sink required to close the global carbon budget. Trends in the land sink are driven by increasing net primary production (NPP), whose statistically significant trend of 0.22 ± 0.08 Pg C yr-2 exceeds a significant trend in heterotrophic respiration of 0.16 ± 0.05 Pg C yr-2 - primarily as a consequence of widespread CO2 fertilisation of plant production. Most of the land-based trend in simulated net carbon uptake originates from natural ecosystems in the tropics (-0.04 ± 0.01 Pg C yr-2), with almost no trend over the northern land region

  14. An old-growth subtropical Asian evergreen forest as a large carbon sink

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Zheng-Hong; Zhang, Yi-Ping; Schaefer, Douglas; Yu, Gui-Rui; Liang, Naishen; Song, Qing-Hai

    2011-03-01

    Old-growth forests are primarily found in mountain ranges that are less favorable or accessible for land use. Consequently, there are fewer scientific studies on old-growth forests. The eddy covariance method has been widely used as an alternative approach to studying an ecosystem's carbon balance, but only a few eddy flux sites are located in old-growth forest. This fact will hinder our ability to test hypotheses such as whether or not old-growth forests are carbon neutral. The eddy covariance approach was used to examine the carbon balance of a 300-year-old subtropical evergreen broadleaved forest that is located in the center of the largest subtropical land area in the world. The post-QA/QC (quality assurance and control) eddy covariance based NEP was ˜ 9 tC ha -1 yr -1, which suggested that this forest acts as a large carbon sink. The inventory data within the footprint of the eddy flux show that ˜6 tC ha -1 yr -1 was contributed by biomass and necromass. The large-and-old trees sequestered carbon. Approximately 60% of the biomass increment is contributed by the growth of large trees (DBH > 60 cm). The high-altitude-induced low temperature and the high diffusion-irradiation ratio caused by cloudiness were suggested as two reasons for the large carbon sink in the forest we studied. To analyze the complex structure and terrain of this old-growth forest, this study suggested that biometric measurements carried out simultaneously with eddy flux measurements were necessary.

  15. Biogeophysical feedbacks enhance Arctic terrestrial carbon sink in regional Earth system dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Zhang

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Continued warming of the Arctic will likely accelerate terrestrial carbon (C cycling by increasing both uptake and release of C. There are still large uncertainties in modelling Arctic terrestrial ecosystems as a source or sink of C. Most modelling studies assessing or projecting the future fate of C exchange with the atmosphere are based an either stand-alone process-based models or coupled climate–C cycle general circulation models, in either case disregarding biogeophysical feedbacks of land surface changes to the atmosphere. To understand how biogeophysical feedbacks will impact on both climate and C budget over Arctic terrestrial ecosystems, we apply the regional Earth system model RCA-GUESS over the CORDEX-Arctic domain. The model is forced with lateral boundary conditions from an GCMs CMIP5 climate projection under the RCP 8.5 scenario. We perform two simulations with or without interactive vegetation dynamics respectively to assess the impacts of biogeophysical feedbacks. Both simulations indicate that Arctic terrestrial ecosystems will continue to sequester C with an increased uptake rate until 2060s–2070s, after which the C budget will return to a weak C sink as increased soil respiration and biomass burning outpaces increased net primary productivity. The additional C sinks arising from biogeophysical feedbacks are considerable, around 8.5 Gt C, accounting for 22% of the total C sinks, of which 83.5% are located in areas of Arctic tundra. Two opposing feedback mechanisms, mediated by albedo and evapotranspiration changes respectively, contribute to this response. Albedo feedback dominates over winter and spring season, amplifying the near-surface warming by up to 1.35 K in spring, while evapotranspiration feedback dominates over summer exerting the evaporative cooling by up to 0.81 K. Such feedbacks stimulate vegetation growth with an earlier onset of growing-season, leading to compositional changes in woody plants and vegetation

  16. Ozone pollution effects on the land carbon sink in the future greenhouse world

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unger, N.; Yue, X.

    2015-12-01

    Ozone pollution has huge impacts on the carbon balance in the United States, Europe and China. While terrestrial ecosystems provide an important sink for surface ozone through stomatal uptake, this process damages photosynthesis, reduces plant growth and biomass accumulation, and affects stomatal control over plant transpiration of water vapor. Effective mitigation of climate change by stabilizing atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations requires improved understanding of ozone effects on the land carbon sink. Future effects of ozone pollution on the land carbon sink are largely unknown. We apply multiple observational datasets in combination with the Yale Interactive Terrestrial Biosphere (YIBs) model to quantify ozone vegetation damage in the present climatic state and for a broad range of possible futures. YIBs includes a mechanistic ozone damage model that affects both photosynthetic rate and stomatal conductance for low or high ozone plant sensitivity. YIBs is embedded in the NASA GISS ModelE2 global chemistry-climate model to allow a uniquely informed integration of plant physiology, atmospheric chemistry, and climate. The YIBs model has been extensively evaluated using land carbon flux measurements from 145 flux tower sites and multiple satellite products. Chronic ozone exposure in the present day reduces GPP by 11-23%, NPP by 8-16%, stomatal conductance by 8-17% and leaf area index by 2-5% in the summer time eastern United States. Similar response magnitudes are found in Europe but almost doubled damage effects occur in hotspots in eastern China. We investigate future ozone vegetation damage within the context of multiple global change drivers (physical climate change, carbon dioxide fertilization, human energy and agricultural emissions, human land use) at 2050 following the IPCC RCP2.6 and RCP8.5 scenarios. In the RCP8.5 world at 2050, growing season average GPP and NPP are reduced by 20-40% in China and 5-20% in the United States due to the global rise

  17. The forest as a historic source and sink for carbon dioxide; Skogen som historisk kaella respektive saenka foer koldioxid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kander, A. [Lund Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Economic History

    1996-06-01

    The aim of the present project is to quantify the changes in the growing stock of timber between 1800 and 1985 in order to find out under which periods and to what extent the forest has served as a source resp. sink for carbon dioxide. These data are compared to the carbon dioxide emissions from combustion of fossil fuels under the same period. Another goal of the project is to find the order of magnitude of the effect of other potential sinks and sources for carbon dioxide. 32 refs, 9 figs, 1 tab

  18. Monitoring Network Confirms Land Use Change is a Substantial Component of the Forest Carbon Sink in the eastern United States

    OpenAIRE

    C. W. Woodall; Walters, B. F.; J. W. Coulston; A. W. D’Amato; G. M. Domke; Russell, M. B; P. A. Sowers

    2015-01-01

    Quantifying forest carbon (C) stocks and stock change within a matrix of land use (LU) and LU change is a central component of large-scale forest C monitoring and reporting practices prescribed by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). Using a region–wide, repeated forest inventory, forest C stocks and stock change by pool were examined by LU categories. In eastern US forests, LU change is a substantial component of C sink strength (~37% of forest sink strength) only secondary ...

  19. Detecting a Terrestrial Biosphere Sink for Carbon Dioxide: Interannual Ecosystem Modeling for the Mid-1980s

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, Christopher S.; Klooster, Steven A.; Brooks, Vanessa; Gore, Warren J. (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    There is considerable uncertainty as to whether interannual variability in climate and terrestrial ecosystem production is sufficient to explain observed variation in atmospheric carbon content over the past 20-30 years. In this paper, we investigated the response of net CO2 exchange in terrestrial ecosystems to interannual climate variability (1983 to 1988) using global satellite observations as drivers for the NASA-CASA (Carnegie-Ames-Stanford Approach) simulation model. This computer model of net ecosystem production (NEP) is calibrated for interannual simulations driven by monthly satellite vegetation index data (NDVI) from the NOAA Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) at 1 degree spatial resolution. Major results from NASA-CASA simulations suggest that from 1985 to 1988, the northern middle-latitude zone (between 30 and 60 degrees N) was the principal region driving progressive annual increases in global net primary production (NPP; i.e., the terrestrial biosphere sink for carbon). The average annual increase in NPP over this predominantly northern forest zone was on the order of +0.4 Pg (10 (exp 15) g) C per year. This increase resulted mainly from notable expansion of the growing season for plant carbon fixation toward the zonal latitude extremes, a pattern uniquely demonstrated in our regional visualization results. A net biosphere source flux of CO2 in 1983-1984, coinciding with an El Nino event, was followed by a major recovery of global NEP in 1985 which lasted through 1987 as a net carbon sink of between 0.4 and 2.6 Avg C per year. Analysis of model controls on NPP and soil heterotrophic CO2 fluxes (Rh) suggests that regional warming in northern forests can enhance ecosystem production significantly. In seasonally dry tropical zones, periodic drought and temperature drying effects may carry over with at least a two-year lag time to adversely impact ecosystem production. These yearly patterns in our model-predicted NEP are consistent in

  20. Photosynthetic properties of boreal bog plant species and their contribution to ecosystem level carbon sink

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korrensalo, Aino; Hájek, Tomas; Alekseychik, Pavel; Rinne, Janne; Vesala, Timo; Mehtätalo, Lauri; Mammarella, Ivan; Tuittila, Eeva-Stiina

    2016-04-01

    Boreal bogs have a low number of plant species, but a large diversity of growth forms. This heterogeneity might explain the seasonally less varying photosynthetic productivity of these ecosystems compared to peatlands with vegetation consisting of fewer growth forms. The differences in photosynthetic properties within bog species and phases of growing season has not been comprehensively studied. Also the role of different plant species for the ecosystem level carbon (C) sink function is insufficiently known. We quantified the seasonal variation of photosynthetic properties in bog plant species and assessed how this variation accounts for the temporal variation in the ecosystem C sink. Photosynthetic light response of 11 vascular plant and 8 Sphagnum moss species was measured monthly over the growing season of 2013. Based on the species' light response parameters, leaf area development and areal coverage, we estimated the ecosystem level gross photosynthesis rate (PG) over the growing season. The level of upscaled PG was verified by comparing it to the ecosystem gross primary production (GPP) estimate calculated based on eddy covariance (EC) measurements. Although photosynthetic parameters differed within plant species and months, these differences were of less importance than expected for the variation in ecosystem level C sink. The most productive plant species at the ecosystem scale were not those with the highest maximum potential photosynthesis per unit of leaf area (Pmax), but those having the largest areal coverage. Sphagnum mosses had 35% smaller Pmax than vascular plants, but had higher photosynthesis at the ecosystem scale throughout the growing season. The contribution of the bog plant species to the ecosystem level PG differed over the growing season. The seasonal variation in ecosystem C sink was mainly controlled by phenology. Sedge PG had a sharp mid-summer peak, but the PG of evergreen shrubs and Sphagna remained rather stable over the growing season

  1. Carbon fiber reinforced copper as heat sink material for divertor applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long carbon fiber reinforced copper (CFR-Cu) is a promising candidate for heat sink materials for fusion application, as this class of materials provides a good thermal conductivity and a low coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE). The latter is especially important to overcome the problems of CTE mismatch when joining e.g. carbon tiles to copper. The aim of this work is to demonstrate the fabrication of plates as well as tubes of CFR-Cu with the desired thermophysical properties, and finally to design a demonstrator mock-up based on a CFR-Cu tube with an inlay of un-reinforced copper and/or a steel liner. (author)

  2. Monitoring CO2 sources and sinks from space : the Orbiting Carbon Observatory (OCO) Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crisp, David

    2006-01-01

    NASA's Orbiting Carbon Observatory (OCO) will make the first space-based measurements of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) with the precision, resolution, and coverage needed to characterize the geographic distribution of CO2 sources and sinks and quantify their variability over the seasonal cycle. OCO is currently scheduled for launch in 2008. The observatory will carry a single instrument that incorporates three high-resolution grating spectrometers designed to measure the near-infrared absorption by CO2 and molecular oxygen (O2) in reflected sunlight. OCO will fly 12 minutes ahead of the EOS Aqua platform in the Earth Observing System (EOS) Afternoon Constellation (A-Train). The in-strument will collect 12 to 24 soundings per second as the Observatory moves along its orbit track on the day side of the Earth. A small sampling footprint (CO2. This information could play an important role in monitoring the integrity of large scale CO2 sequestration projects.

  3. Prairie restoration and carbon sequestration: difficulties quantifying C sources and sinks using a biometric approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahill, Kimberly Nicholas; Kucharik, Christopher J; Foley, Jonathan A

    2009-12-01

    We investigated carbon cycling and ecosystem characteristics among two prairie restoration treatments established in 1987 and adjacent cropland, all part of the Conservation Reserve Program in southwestern Wisconsin, USA. We hypothesized that different plant functional groups (cool-season C3 vs. warm-season C4 grasses) between the two prairie restoration treatments would lead to differences in soil and vegetation characteristics and amount of sequestered carbon, compared to the crop system. We found significant (P soil CO2 respiration and above- and belowground productivity, but no significant differences in long-term (approximately 16-year) carbon sequestration. We used a biometric approach aggregating short-term observations of above- and belowground productivity and CO2 respiration to estimate total net primary production (NPP) and net ecosystem production (NEP) using varied methods suggested in the literature. Net ecosystem production is important because it represents the ecosystem carbon sequestration, which is of interest to land managers and policymakers seeking or regulating credits for ecosystem carbon storage. Such a biometric approach would be attractive because it might offer the ability to rapidly assess the carbon source/sink status of an ecosystem. We concluded that large uncertainties in (1) estimating aboveground NPP, (2) determining belowground NPP, and (3) partitioning soil respiration into microbial and plant components strongly affect the magnitude, and even the sign, of NEP estimates made from aggregating its components. A comparison of these estimates across treatments could not distinguish differences in NEP, nor the absolute sign of the overall carbon balance. Longer-term quantification of carbon stocks in the soil, periodically linked to measurements of individual processes, may offer a more reliable measure of the carbon balance in grassland systems, suitable for assigning credits. PMID:20014587

  4. Hemicellulose concentration and composition in plant cell walls under extreme carbon source-sink imbalances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaedel, C.; Hoch, G. (Univ. of Basel, Institute of Botany, Basel (Switzerland)); Richter, A.; Bloechl, A. (Univ. of Vienna, Dept. of Chemical Ecology and Ecosystem Research, Vienna (Austria))

    2010-01-15

    Hemicelluloses account for one-quarter of the global dry plant biomass and therefore are the second most abundant biomass fraction after cellulose. Despite their quantitative significance, the responsiveness of hemicelluloses to atmospheric carbon oversupply is still largely unknown, although hemicelluloses could serve as carbon sinks with increasing CO{sub 2} concentrations. This study aimed at clarifying the role hemicelluloses play as carbon sinks, analogous to non-structural carbohydrates (NSC), by experimentally manipulating the plants' carbon supply. Sixteen plant species from four different plant functional types (grasses, herbs, seedlings of broad-leaved trees and conifers) were grown for 2 months in greenhouses at either extremely low (140 ppm), medium (280 ppm) or high (560 ppm) atmospheric CO{sub 2}concentrations, thus inducing situations of massive C-limitation or -oversupply. Above and below ground biomass as wellas NSC significantly increased in all species and tissues with increasing CO{sub 2}concentrations. Increasing CO{sub 2}concentrations had no significant effect on total hemicellulose concentrations in leaves and woody tissues in all species, except for two out of four grass species, where hemicellulose concentrations increased with atmospheric CO{sub 2}supply. Despite the overall stable total hemicellulose concentrations, the monosaccharide spectra of hemicelluloses showed a significant increase in glucose monomers in leaves of woody species as C-supply increased. In summary, total hemicellulose concentrations in de novo built biomass seem to be largely unaffected by changed atmospheric CO{sub 2}concentrations, while significant increases of hemicellulose-derived glucose with increasing CO{sub 2}concentrations in leaves of broad-leaved and conifer tree seedlings showed differential responses among the different hemicellulose classes in response to varying CO{sub 2}concentrations. (author)

  5. Hemicellulose concentration and composition in plant cell walls under extreme carbon source-sink imbalances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schädel, Christina; Richter, Andreas; Blöchl, Andreas; Hoch, Günter

    2010-07-01

    Hemicelluloses account for one-quarter of the global dry plant biomass and therefore are the second most abundant biomass fraction after cellulose. Despite their quantitative significance, the responsiveness of hemicelluloses to atmospheric carbon oversupply is still largely unknown, although hemicelluloses could serve as carbon sinks with increasing CO(2) concentrations. This study aimed at clarifying the role hemicelluloses play as carbon sinks, analogous to non-structural carbohydrates (NSC), by experimentally manipulating the plants' carbon supply. Sixteen plant species from four different plant functional types (grasses, herbs, seedlings of broad-leaved trees and conifers) were grown for 2 months in greenhouses at either extremely low (140 ppm), medium (280 ppm) or high (560 ppm) atmospheric CO(2) concentrations, thus inducing situations of massive C-limitation or -oversupply. Above and belowground biomass as well as NSC significantly increased in all species and tissues with increasing CO(2) concentrations. Increasing CO(2) concentrations had no significant effect on total hemicellulose concentrations in leaves and woody tissues in all species, except for two out of four grass species, where hemicellulose concentrations increased with atmospheric CO(2) supply. Despite the overall stable total hemicellulose concentrations, the monosaccharide spectra of hemicelluloses showed a significant increase in glucose monomers in leaves of woody species as C-supply increased. In summary, total hemicellulose concentrations in de novo built biomass seem to be largely unaffected by changed atmospheric CO(2) concentrations, while significant increases of hemicellulose-derived glucose with increasing CO(2) concentrations in leaves of broad-leaved and conifer tree seedlings showed differential responses among the different hemicellulose classes in response to varying CO(2) concentrations. PMID:20113432

  6. Global warming alters carbon sink and source situation of the Tibetan lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, H.; Ni, Q.; Yang, J.; Liu, W.

    2015-12-01

    Global warming would accelerate glacier retreat and permafrost degeneration on the Tibetan Plateau. The carbon stored in permafrost would be released to nearby lakes. However, little is known about how the carbon sink and source situation could be altered and what role the microbial community could play in Tibetan lakes in response to global warming. To fill this knowledge gap, six lakes (Erhai Lake, Qinghai Lake, Tuosu Lake, Gahai Lake, Xiaochaidan Lake and Lake Chaka) on the Tibetan Plateau were studied. In order to compare the seasonal variations in geochemistry and microbial communities, two sampling cruises were performed (May and July of 2015, corresponding to dry and wet seasons, respectively). For each lake, salinity, pH, dissolved organic carbon (DOC), total nitrogen (TN), and chlorophyll were measured for water samples, and salinity and total organic carbon (TOC) were measured for sediments. Chamber-based greenhouse gas flux measurement were performed on the surface of each lake. Microbial communities were analyzed by using MiSeq sequencing technique. The results showed that in response to seasonal variation (from dry to set season), lake surface increased by 5-20% (calculated on the basis of satellite data) and salinity decreased by 4-30% for the studied lakes, suggesting the studied lakes were diluted by precipitations. The DOC contents of the lake waters were almost stable for the studied lakes, whereas TN increased by more than 70% for the lakes with salinity less than 100g/L. In the meanwhile, chlorophyll content increased by more than 180% for lakes with low salinities (Erhai Lake, Qinghai Lake, and Tuosu Lake) and decreased by 17-94% for lakes with high salinities (Gahai Lake, Xiaoxhaidan Lake, and Lake Chaka. This indicated that desalination (precipitation plus glacier melt) would increase carbon fixation potential in Tibetan lakes. Microbial community analyses showed that microbial diversity increased in response to desalination. All in all

  7. Carbon cycling under 300 years of land use change: importance of the secondary vegetation sink

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shevliakova, Elena; Pacala, Stephen W.; Malyshev, Sergey; Hurtt, George C.; Milly, P.C.D.; Caspersen, John P.; Sentman, Lori T.; Fisk, Justin P.; Wirth, Christian; Crevoisier, Cyril

    2009-01-01

    We have developed a dynamic land model (LM3V) able to simulate ecosystem dynamics and exchanges of water, energy, and CO2 between land and atmosphere. LM3V is specifically designed to address the consequences of land use and land management changes including cropland and pasture dynamics, shifting cultivation, logging, fire, and resulting patterns of secondary regrowth. Here we analyze the behavior of LM3V, forced with the output from the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (GFDL) atmospheric model AM2, observed precipitation data, and four historic scenarios of land use change for 1700-2000. Our analysis suggests a net terrestrial carbon source due to land use activities from 1.1 to 1.3 GtC/a during the 1990s, where the range is due to the difference in the historic cropland distribution. This magnitude is substantially smaller than previous estimates from other models, largely due to our estimates of a secondary vegetation sink of 0.35 to 0.6 GtC/a in the 1990s and decelerating agricultural land clearing since the 1960s. For the 1990s, our estimates for the pastures' carbon flux vary from a source of 0.37 to a sink of 0.15 GtC/a, and for the croplands our model shows a carbon source of 0.6 to 0.9 GtC/a. Our process-based model suggests a smaller net deforestation source than earlier bookkeeping models because it accounts for decelerated net conversion of primary forest to agriculture and for stronger secondary vegetation regrowth in tropical regions. The overall uncertainty is likely to be higher than the range reported here because of uncertainty in the biomass recovery under changing ambient conditions, including atmospheric CO2 concentration, nutrients availability, and climate. Copyright 2009 by the American Geophysical Union.

  8. 12 Years of NPK Addition Diminishes Carbon Sink Potential of a Nutrient Limited Peatland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larmola, T.; Bubier, J. L.; Juutinen, S.; Moore, T. R.

    2011-12-01

    Peatlands store about a third of global soil carbon. Our aim was to study whether the vegetation feedbacks of nitrogen (N) deposition lead to stronger carbon sink or source in a nutrient limited peatland ecosystem. We investigated vegetation structure and ecosystem CO2 exchange at Mer Bleue Bog, Canada, that has been fertilized for 7-12 years. We have applied 5 and 20 times ambient annual wet N deposition (0.8 g N m-2) with or without phosphorus (P) and potassium (K). Gross photosynthesis, ecosystem respiration and net CO2 exchange (NEE) were measured weekly during the growing season using chamber technique. Under the highest N(PK) treatments, the light saturated photosynthesis (PSmax) was reduced by 20-30% compared to the control treatment, whereas under moderate N and PK additions PSmax slightly increased or was similar to the control. The ecosystem respiration showed similar trends among the treatments, but changes in the rates were less pronounced. High nutrient additions led to up to 65% lower net CO2 uptake than that in the control: In the NPK plots with cumulative N additions of 70, 19, and 0 g N m-2, the daytime NEE in May-July 2011 averaged 0.8 (se. 0.3), 2.0 (se. 0.4), and 2.4 (se. 0.3) μmol m-2 s-1, respectively. In the N only plots with cumulative N additions of 45, 19, and 0 g N m-2, the daytime NEE in May-July 2011 averaged 0.8 (se. 0.2), 2.6 (se. 0.4), and 1.8 (se. 0.3) μmol m-2 s-1, respectively. The reduced plant photosynthetic capacity and diminished carbon sink potential in the highest nutrient treatments correlated with the loss of peat mosses and were not compensated for by the increased vascular plant biomass that has mainly been allocated to woody shrub stems.

  9. The Great Karoo region of South Africa: A carbon source or sink?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhn, Nikolaus; Greenwood, Philip; Kuhn, Brigitte; Boardman, John; Foster, Ian; Meadows, Mike

    2014-05-01

    Work undertaken in the seasonally arid upland areas of the Great Karoo region of South Africa has established a link between land degradation and overgrazing that began approximately 200 years ago when European farmers first settled the area. In response to changing land use, coupled with shifting rainfall patterns, parts of the landscape are now characterised by badlands on footslopes of valley-sides and complex gully systems on valley floors. Limited precipitation and agricultural intensification, particularly from around the 1920s onwards, resulted in a growing demand for water, and led to the construction of many small reservoirs, most of which are now in-filled with sediment. Whilst the deposited material has provided a means of linking catchment-scale responses to land use changes over the last ca. 100 years, the influence of land degradation on erosion and deposition of soil-associated carbon (C) has received only limited attention. Despite a reversion to extensive agriculture and reduced livestock densities in certain areas, limited vegetation regrowth suggests that soil rehabilitation will be a long-term process. This communication presents preliminary results from an investigation to determine whether land degradation in the Karoo has resulted in a shift from a net sink of C to a net source of C. Sediment deposits from a silted-up reservoir in a small dry valley system was analysed for varying physicochemical parameters. Total Carbon (TC) content was recorded and the sharp decrease in total C content with decreasing depth suggests that land degradation during and after post-European settlement probably led to accelerated erosion of the relatively fertile surface soils, and this presumably resulted in the rapid in-filling of reservoirs with carbon-rich surface material. Overall, the results indicate a sharp decline in soil organic matter (SOM) of eroded material, presumably as a consequence of land degradation. This suggests that in landscapes such as the

  10. Factoring out natural and indirect human effects on terrestrial carbon sources and sinks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The capacity to partition natural, indirect, and direct human-induced effects on terrestrial carbon (C) sources and sinks is necessary to be able to predict future terrestrial C dynamics and thus their influence on atmospheric CO2 growth. However, it will take a number of years before we can better attribute quantitative estimates of the contribution of various C processes to the net C balance. In a policy context, factoring out natural and indirect human-induced effects on C sources and sinks from the direct human-induced influences, is seen as a requirement of a C accounting approach that establishes a clear and unambiguous connection between human activities and the assignment of C credits and debits. We present options for factoring out various groups of influences including climate variability, CO2 and N fertilization, and legacies from forest management. These are: (1) selecting longer accounting or measurement periods to reduce the effects of inter-annual variability; (2) correction of national inventories for inter-annual variability; (3) use of activity-based accounting and C response curves; (4) use of baseline scenarios or benchmarks at the national level; (5) stratification of the landscape into units with distinct average C stocks. Other, more sophisticated modeling approaches (e.g., demographic models in combination with forest inventories; process-based models) are possible options for future C accounting systems but their complexity and data requirements make their present adoption more difficult in an inclusive international C accounting system

  11. Lidar-derived estimate and uncertainty of carbon sink in successional phases of woody encroachment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankey, Temuulen; Shrestha, Rupesh; Sankey, Joel B.; Hardgree, Stuart; Strand, Eva

    2013-01-01

    Woody encroachment is a globally occurring phenomenon that contributes to the global carbon sink. The magnitude of this contribution needs to be estimated at regional and local scales to address uncertainties present in the global- and continental-scale estimates, and guide regional policy and management in balancing restoration activities, including removal of woody plants, with greenhouse gas mitigation goals. The objective of this study was to estimate carbon stored in various successional phases of woody encroachment. Using lidar measurements of individual trees, we present high-resolution estimates of aboveground carbon storage in juniper woodlands. Segmentation analysis of lidar point cloud data identified a total of 60,628 juniper tree crowns across four watersheds. Tree heights, canopy cover, and density derived from lidar were strongly correlated with field measurements of 2613 juniper stems measured in 85 plots (30 × 30 m). Aboveground total biomass of individual trees was estimated using a regression model with lidar-derived height and crown area as predictors (Adj. R2 = 0.76, p 2. Uncertainty in carbon storage estimates was examined with a Monte Carlo approach that addressed major error sources. Ranges predicted with uncertainty analysis in the mean, individual tree, aboveground woody C, and associated standard deviation were 0.35 – 143.6 kg and 0.5 – 1.25 kg, respectively. Later successional phases of woody encroachment had, on average, twice the aboveground carbon relative to earlier phases. Woody encroachment might be more successfully managed and balanced with carbon storage goals by identifying priority areas in earlier phases of encroachment where intensive treatments are most effective.

  12. Can a bog drained for forestry be a stronger carbon sink than a natural bog forest?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Hommeltenberg

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This study compares the CO2 exchange of a natural bog forest, and of a bog drained for forestry in the pre-alpine region of southern Germany. The sites are separated by only ten kilometers, they share the same formation history and are exposed to the same climate and weather conditions. In contrast, they differ in land use history: at the Schechenfilz site a natural bog-pine forest (Pinus mugo rotundata grows on an undisturbed, about 5 m thick peat layer; at Mooseurach a planted spruce forest (Picea abies grows on drained and degraded peat (3.4 m. The net ecosystem exchange of CO2 (NEE at both sites has been investigated for two years (July 2010 to June 2012, using the eddy covariance technique. Our results indicate that the drained, forested bog at Mooseurach is a much stronger carbon dioxide sink (−130 ± 31 and −300 ± 66 g C m−2 a−1 in the first and second year respectively than the natural bog forest at Schechenfilz (−53 ± 28 and −73±38 g C m−2 a−1. The strong net CO2 uptake can be explained by the high gross primary productivity of the spruces that over-compensates the two times stronger ecosystem respiration at the drained site. The larger productivity of the spruces can be clearly attributed to the larger LAI of the spruce site. However, even though current flux measurements indicate strong CO2 uptake of the drained spruce forest, the site is a strong net CO2 source, if the whole life-cycle, since forest planting is considered. We determined the difference between carbon fixation by the spruces and the carbon loss from the peat due to drainage since forest planting. The estimate resulted in a strong carbon release of +156 t C ha−1 within the last 44 yr, means the spruces would need to grow for another 100 yr, at the current rate, to compensate the peat loss of the former years. In contrast, the natural bog-pine ecosystem has likely been a small but consistent carbon sink for decades, which our results suggest is very

  13. Can a bog drained for forestry be a stronger carbon sink than a natural bog forest?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hommeltenberg, J.; Schmid, H. P.; Drösler, M.; Werle, P.

    2014-07-01

    This study compares the CO2 exchange of a natural bog forest, and of a bog drained for forestry in the pre-Alpine region of southern Germany. The sites are separated by only 10 km, they share the same soil formation history and are exposed to the same climate and weather conditions. In contrast, they differ in land use history: at the Schechenfilz site a natural bog-pine forest (Pinus mugo ssp. rotundata) grows on an undisturbed, about 5 m thick peat layer; at Mooseurach a planted spruce forest (Picea abies) grows on drained and degraded peat (3.4 m). The net ecosystem exchange of CO2 (NEE) at both sites has been investigated for 2 years (July 2010-June 2012), using the eddy covariance technique. Our results indicate that the drained, forested bog at Mooseurach is a much stronger carbon dioxide sink (-130 ± 31 and -300 ± 66 g C m-2 a-1 in the first and second year, respectively) than the natural bog forest at Schechenfilz (-53 ± 28 and -73 ± 38 g C m-2 a-1). The strong net CO2 uptake can be explained by the high gross primary productivity of the 44-year old spruces that over-compensates the two-times stronger ecosystem respiration at the drained site. The larger productivity of the spruces can be clearly attributed to the larger plant area index (PAI) of the spruce site. However, even though current flux measurements indicate strong CO2 uptake of the drained spruce forest, the site is a strong net CO2 source when the whole life-cycle since forest planting is considered. It is important to access this result in terms of the long-term biome balance. To do so, we used historical data to estimate the difference between carbon fixation by the spruces and the carbon loss from the peat due to drainage since forest planting. This rough estimate indicates a strong carbon release of +134 t C ha-1 within the last 44 years. Thus, the spruces would need to grow for another 100 years at about the current rate, to compensate the potential peat loss of the former years. In

  14. Carbon Sources and Sinks in Freshwater and Estuarine Environments of the Arctic Coastal Plain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lougheed, V.; Tarin, G.; Tweedie, C. E.

    2015-12-01

    The source, fate and transport of terrestrially derived carbon as it moves through multiple landscape components (i.e. groundwater, rivers, ponds, wetlands, lakes, lagoons) on a path from land to sea in permafrost-dominated watersheds is poorly understood. Critical to our understanding of Arctic carbon budgets are small, but numerically abundant watersheds that dominate the landscape of the Alaskan Arctic Coastal Plain (ACP), which appears to be changing rapidly in response to climate warming and other environmental changes. This study was designed to understand the contribution of freshwater ecosystems in the Arctic to regional carbon budgets. pCO2 was logged continually in ponds, lakes and streams sites near Barrow, AK and recorded across transects in Elson Lagoon, a coastal lagoon on the Beaufort coast. Average pCO2 of the pond over 2 weeks in August (1196 μatm) was double that of lakes and streams, and four times higher than Elson Lagoon (216 μatm); thus, the Lagoon was acting as a small sink while the pond was a substantial source of CO2 to the atmosphere. The uptake of CO2 in Elson Lagoon, combined with an oversaturation of O2, may be due to enhanced primary productivity caused by freshwater nutrient inputs. Conversely, pCO2, chlorophyll-a and DOC increased substantially in the pond after a large rain event, suggesting that run-off introduced large amounts of terrestrially-derived carbon from groundwater. Further studies are required to elucidate the fate and transport of carbon in the numerically abundant smaller watersheds of the Arctic.

  15. The economics of including carbon sinks in climate change policy. Evaluating the carbon supply-curve through afforestation in Latin America

    OpenAIRE

    Benìtez-Ponce, P.C.

    2003-01-01

    After the inclusion of carbon sinks in the Kyoto Protocol, greenhouse gas mitigation policies should account for abatement measurements in both the energy and forestry sectors. This report deals with the development of a methodology for estimating cost-curves of carbon sequestration with afforestation activities and its combination with existing cost-curves of carbon abatement in the energy sector, with an application to the Latin American region. For deriving the carbon supply-curves, a bott...

  16. SIMULATED CARBON SINK RESPONSE OF SHORTGRASS STEPPE, TALLGRASS PRAIRIE AND FOREST ECOSYSTEMS TO RISING [CO2], TEMPERATURE AND NITROGEN INPUT

    Science.gov (United States)

    The response of plant ecosystems to environmental change will determine whether the terrestrial biosphere will remain a substantial carbon sink or become a source during the next century. We use two ecosystem models, the Generic Decomposition And Yield model (G’DAY) and the daily time step version o...

  17. Land-use change and carbon sinks: Econometric estimation of the carbon sequestration supply function; FINAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Increased attention by policy makers to the threat of global climate change has brought with it considerable interest in the possibility of encouraging the expansion of forest area as a means of sequestering carbon dioxide. The marginal costs of carbon sequestration or, equivalently, the carbon sequestration supply function will determine the ultimate effects and desirability of policies aimed at enhancing carbon uptake. In particular, marginal sequestration conts are the critical statistic for identifying a cost-effective policy mix to mitigate net carbon dioxide emissions. We develop a framework for conducting an econometric analysis of land use for the forty-eight contiguous United States and employing it to estimate the carbon sequestration supply function. By estimating the opportunity costs of land on the basis of econometric evidence of landowners' actual behavior, we aim to circumvent many of the shortcomings of previous sequestration cost assessments. By conducting the first nationwide econometric estimation of sequestration costs, endogenizing prices for land-based commodities, and estimating land-use transition probabilities in a framework that explicitly considers the range of land-use alternatives, we hope to provide better estimates eventually of the true costs of large-scale carbon sequestration efforts. In this way, we seek to add to understanding of the costs and potential of this strategy for addressing the threat of global climate change

  18. Land-use change and carbon sinks: Econometric estimation of the carbon sequestration supply function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lubowski, Ruben N.; Plantinga, Andrew J.; Stavins, Robert N.

    2001-01-01

    Increased attention by policy makers to the threat of global climate change has brought with it considerable interest in the possibility of encouraging the expansion of forest area as a means of sequestering carbon dioxide. The marginal costs of carbon sequestration or, equivalently, the carbon sequestration supply function will determine the ultimate effects and desirability of policies aimed at enhancing carbon uptake. In particular, marginal sequestration costs are the critical statistic for identifying a cost-effective policy mix to mitigate net carbon dioxide emissions. We develop a framework for conducting an econometric analysis of land use for the forty-eight contiguous United States and employing it to estimate the carbon sequestration supply function. By estimating the opportunity costs of land on the basis of econometric evidence of landowners' actual behavior, we aim to circumvent many of the shortcomings of previous sequestration cost assessments. By conducting the first nationwide econometric estimation of sequestration costs, endogenizing prices for land-based commodities, and estimating land-use transition probabilities in a framework that explicitly considers the range of land-use alternatives, we hope to provide better estimates eventually of the true costs of large-scale carbon sequestration efforts. In this way, we seek to add to understanding of the costs and potential of this strategy for addressing the threat of global climate change.

  19. Stable carbon isotope ratios of plankton carbon and sinking organic matter from the Atlantic sector of the Southern Ocean

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The stable carbon isotope composition of particulate organic carbon (POC) from plankton, sediment trap material and surface sediments from the Atlantic sector of the Southern Ocean were determined. Despite low and constant water temperatures, large variations in the delta13C values of plankton were measured. 13C enrichments of up to 10promille coincided with a change in the diatom assemblage and a two-fold increase in primary production. Increased CO2 consumption as a result of rapid carbon fixation may result in diffusion limitation reducing the magnitude of the isotope fractionation. The delta13C values of plankton from sea-ice cores display a relationship with the chlorophyll a content. High 'ice-algae' biomass, in combination with a limited exchange with the surrounding seawater, results in values of about -18 to -20promille. It is assumed that these values are related to a reduced CO2 availability in the sea-ice system. In comparison with plankton, sinking krill faeces sampled by traps can be enriched by 2-5promille in 13C (e.g. central Bransfield Strait). In contrast, the transport of particles in other faeces, diatom aggregates or chains may result in minor isotope changes (e.g. Drake Passage, Powell Basin, NW Weddell Sea). A comparison between the δ13C values of sinking matter and those of surface sediments reveals that 13C enrichments of up to 3-4promille may occur at the sediment-water boundary layer. These isotopic changes are attributed to high benthic respiration rates. (author). 44 refs.; 6 figs

  20. The economics of including carbon sinks in climate change policy. Evaluating the carbon supply-curve through afforestation in Latin America

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Benìtez-Ponce, P.C.

    2003-01-01

    After the inclusion of carbon sinks in the Kyoto Protocol, greenhouse gas mitigation policies should account for abatement measurements in both the energy and forestry sectors. This report deals with the development of a methodology for estimating cost-curves of carbon sequestration with afforestati

  1. Carbon Tetrachloride (CCl4) in the Atmosphere: A Mystery Between Sources and Sinks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reimann, S.; Newman, P. A.; Liang, Q.; Rigby, M. L.; Kuijpers, L.

    2013-12-01

    Carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) is an ozone depleting substance and therefore has been banned from usage under the Montreal Protocol. However, it is still allowed for contained use in industrial processes as so-called feedstock substance, where emissions should be negligible. The regulation of CCl4 in the Montreal Protocol suggests that, presently, emission should be zero, and that CCl4 ought to be declining exponentially depending on its atmospheric lifetime. Although atmospheric CCl4 concentrations are declining, the rate is slower than expected, suggesting that there is an unknown source of CCl4 or that the combined partial lifetimes in different environmental compartments (atmosphere, ocean, soil) are slower than our understood processes. In the last years there were increasing discrepancies between emissions reported under the Montreal Protocol ('bottom-up method') and those which are inferred from measurements at global background sites ('top-down method'). In 2012 the potential gap in global emissions between the two methods widened to several ten thousand tons per year. In order to close this gap several possibilities were tested with atmospheric models and results are verified against the global trends and the interhemispheric gradients. 1) Existing data from sources and sinks were fed into the models to test the incompatibility of the existing emission data with the observed atmospheric observation for CCl4. 2) A newly revised 44-year steady-state atmospheric lifetime was assessed. This new lifetime together with an improved uncertainty has been carefully evaluated within a lifetime assessment for ODSs and related substances under SPARC (Stratosphere-troposphere Processes And their Role in Climate). The new atmospheric lifetime is substantially longer than the 35-years which were used in WMO (2011) for the atmosphere alone. However, estimates of soil sinks (195 yr) and ocean sinks (81 yr) lead to a best-estimated global lifetime of only 25 years, comparable

  2. Land-Use Change and Carbon Sinks: Econometric Estimation of the Carbon Sequestration Supply Function

    OpenAIRE

    Plantinga, Andrew J.; Robert N. Stavins; Ruben N. Lubowski

    2005-01-01

    When and if the United States chooses to implement a greenhouse gas reduction program, it will be necessary to decide whether carbon sequestration policies, such as those that promote forestation and discourage deforestation, should be part of the domestic portfolio of compliance activities. We investigate the cost of forest-based carbon sequestration. In contrast with previous approaches, we econometrically examine micro-data on revealed landowner preferences, modeling six major private land...

  3. A comprehensive estimate of recent carbon sinks in China using both top-down and bottom-up approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Fei; Chen, Jing; Zhou, Linxi; Ju, Weimin; Zhang, Huifang; Machida, Toshinobu; Ciais, Philippe; Peters, Wouter; Wang, Hengmao; Chen, Baozhang; Liu, Linxin; Zhang, Chunhua; Matsueda, Hidekazu; Sawa, Yousuke

    2016-04-01

    Atmospheric inversions use measurements of atmospheric CO2 gradients to constrain regional surface fluxes. Current inversions indicate a net terrestrial CO2 sink in China between 0.16 and 0.35 PgC/yr. The uncertainty of these estimates is as large as the mean because the atmospheric network historically contained only one high altitude station in China. Here, we revisit the calculation of the terrestrial CO2 flux in China, excluding emissions from fossil fuel burning and cement production, by using two inversions with three new CO2 monitoring stations in China as well as aircraft observations over Asia. We estimate a net terrestrial CO2 uptake of 0.39-0.51 PgC/yr with a mean of 0.45 PgC/yr in 2006-2009. After considering the lateral transport of carbon in air and water and international trade, the annual mean carbon sink is adjusted to 0.35 PgC/yr. To evaluate this top-down estimate, we constructed an independent bottom-up estimate based on ecosystem data, and giving a net land sink of 0.33 PgC/yr. This demonstrates closure between the top-down and bottom-up estimates. Both top-down and bottom-up estimates give a higher carbon sink than previous estimates made for the 1980s and 1990s, suggesting a trend towards increased uptake by land ecosystems in China.

  4. A comprehensive estimate of recent carbon sinks in China using both top-down and bottom-up approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Fei; Chen, Jing M.; Zhou, Lingxi; Ju, Weimin; Zhang, Huifang; Machida, Toshinobu; Ciais, Philippe; Peters, Wouter; Wang, Hengmao; Chen, Baozhang; Liu, Lixin; Zhang, Chunhua; Matsueda, Hidekazu; Sawa, Yousuke

    2016-02-01

    Atmospheric inversions use measurements of atmospheric CO2 gradients to constrain regional surface fluxes. Current inversions indicate a net terrestrial CO2 sink in China between 0.16 and 0.35 PgC/yr. The uncertainty of these estimates is as large as the mean because the atmospheric network historically contained only one high altitude station in China. Here, we revisit the calculation of the terrestrial CO2 flux in China, excluding emissions from fossil fuel burning and cement production, by using two inversions with three new CO2 monitoring stations in China as well as aircraft observations over Asia. We estimate a net terrestrial CO2 uptake of 0.39-0.51 PgC/yr with a mean of 0.45 PgC/yr in 2006-2009. After considering the lateral transport of carbon in air and water and international trade, the annual mean carbon sink is adjusted to 0.35 PgC/yr. To evaluate this top-down estimate, we constructed an independent bottom-up estimate based on ecosystem data, and giving a net land sink of 0.33 PgC/yr. This demonstrates closure between the top-down and bottom-up estimates. Both top-down and bottom-up estimates give a higher carbon sink than previous estimates made for the 1980s and 1990s, suggesting a trend towards increased uptake by land ecosystems in China.

  5. Monitoring Network Confirms Land Use Change is a Substantial Component of the Forest Carbon Sink in the eastern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodall, C. W.; Walters, B. F.; Coulston, J. W.; D'Amato, A. W.; Domke, G. M.; Russell, M. B.; Sowers, P. A.

    2015-12-01

    Quantifying forest carbon (C) stocks and stock change within a matrix of land use (LU) and LU change is a central component of large-scale forest C monitoring and reporting practices prescribed by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). Using a region-wide, repeated forest inventory, forest C stocks and stock change by pool were examined by LU categories. In eastern US forests, LU change is a substantial component of C sink strength (~37% of forest sink strength) only secondary to that of C accumulation in forests remaining forest where their comingling with other LUs does not substantially reduce sink strength. The strongest sinks of forest C were study areas not completely dominated by forests, even when there was some loss of forest to agriculture/settlement/other LUs. Long-term LU planning exercises and policy development that seeks to maintain and/or enhance regional C sinks should explicitly recognize the importance of maximizing non-forest to forest LU changes and not overlook management and conservation of forests located in landscapes not currently dominated by forests.

  6. Integrated Behavior of Carbon and Copper Alloy Heat Sink Under Different Heat Loads and Cooling Conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Hua; Li Jiangang; Chen Junling; Hu Jiansheng

    2005-01-01

    An actively water-cooled limiter has been designed for the long pulse operation of an HT-7 device, by adopting an integrated structure-doped graphite and a copper alloy heat sink with a super carbon sheet serving as a compliant layer between them. The behaviors of the integrated structure were evaluated in an electron beam facility under different heat loads and cooling conditions. The surface temperature and bulk temperature distribution were carefully measured by optical pyrometers and thermocouples under a steady state heat flux of 1 to 5 MW/m2 and a water flow rate of 3 m3/h, 4.5 m3/h and 6 m3/h, respectively. It was found that the surface temperature increased rapidly with the heat flux rising, but decreased only slightly with the water flow rate rising. The surface temperature reached approximately 1200℃ at 5 MW/m2 of heat flux and 6 ms/h of water flow. The primary experimental results indicate that the integrated design meets the requirements for the heat expelling capacity of the HT-7 device. A set of numerical simulations was also completed, whose outcome was in good accord with the experimental results.

  7. Carbonate precipitation in artificial soils as a sink for atmospheric carbon dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turnover of C in soils is the dominant flux in the global C cycle and is responsible for transporting 20 times the quantity of anthropogenic emissions each year. This paper investigates the potential for soils to be modified with Ca-rich materials (e.g. demolition waste or basic slag) to capture some of the transferred C as geologically stable CaCO3. To test this principal, artificial soil known to contain Ca-rich minerals (Ca silicates and portlandite) was analysed from two sites across NE England, UK. The results demonstrate an average C content of 30 ± 15.3 Kg C m-2 stored as CaCO3, which is three times the expected organic C content and that it has accumulated at a rate of 25 ± 12.8 t C ha-1 a-1 since 1996. Isotopic analysis of the carbonates gave values between -6.4 per mille and -27.5 per mille for δ13C and -3.92 per mille and -20.89 per mille for δ18O, respectively (against V-PDB), which suggests that a combination of carbonate formation mechanisms are operating including the hydroxylation of gaseous CO2 in solution, and the sequestration of degraded organic C with minor remobilisation/precipitation of lithogenic carbonates. This study implies that construction/development sites may be designed with a C capture function to sequester atmospheric C into the soil matrix with a maximum global potential of 290 Mt C a-1.

  8. The potential of willow and poplar plantations as carbon sinks in Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A large share, estimated at 12–25%, of the annual anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions is attributed to global deforestation. Increasing the forested areas therefore has a positive impact on carbon (C) sequestration and mitigation of high atmospheric CO2 concentrations. Fast-growing species, such as willow and poplar, are of high interest as producers of biomass for fuel, but also as C sinks. The present study estimated the rate of C sequestration in biomass and soil in willow and poplar plantations. Calculations were based on above- and below-ground biomass production data from field experiments, including fine root turnover, litter decomposition rates, and production levels from commercial plantations. Accumulation of C in woody biomass, above and below ground, was estimated at 76.6–80.1 Mg C ha−1 and accumulation of C in the soil at 9.0–10.3 Mg C ha−1 over the first 20–22 years. The average rates of C sequestration were 3.5–4.0 Mg C ha−1 yr−1 in woody biomass, and 0.4–0.5 Mg C ha−1 yr−1 in the soil. If 400,000 ha of abandoned arable land in Sweden were planted with willow and poplar, about 1.5 Tg C would be sequestered annually in woody biomass and 0.2 Tg C in soils. This would be nearly one tenth of the annual anthropogenic emissions of C in Sweden today. These calculations show the potential of fast-growing plantations on arable land to mitigate the effect of high CO2 concentrations over a short time span. Knowledge gaps were found during the calculation process and future research areas were suggested. -- Highlights: ► Poplars and willows as producers of biomass for fuel and as C sinks. ► Calculation of C sequestration rates in biomass and soil in willow and poplar plantations. ► Increasing forested areas has positive impact on high CO2 levels. ► Willow and poplar plantations on arable land mitigate anthropogenic CO2 emissions.

  9. Can the application of biochar during arable and forestry plantation create an ongoing carbon sink and increase plant productivity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, M. J.; Worrall, F.

    2009-04-01

    This study is based at the National Trust Wallington estate in Northumberland, NE England, an agricultural estate where land-management options are being considered in an attempt to enhance current land carbon stocks. The aim of this research is to identify if biochar (charcoal produced from biomass) can provide an opportunity to create a perpetual carbon sink as apposed to a transitionary sink associated with other land-use changes currently under consideration? The main issues under investigation are: can biochar be ploughed into arable soils to create a long term carbon sink? Can biochar be ploughed into organic rich forest soils to create a long term carbon sink? Will the application of biochar increase crop productivity, increasing photosynthesis and carbon sequestration further still? In order for the estate to become carbon neutral through biochar application alone it was calculated that 3312 Kg/ha/year of biochar would need to be applied to the current area of arable land. This however is based on the assumption that all of the biochar added is stable and will remain in the soil, and assumes that addition does not lead to increased CO2 emissions from the organic matter already present. This study presents the results of weekly soil respiration measurements currently being made on 24 lysimeters filled with arable and forestry soils and 4 levels of charcoal treatment. Levels of treatment were chosen to assess the impact of applying biochar on a yearly basis and any negative impacts which may result from very high eventual concentrations. The following levels of charcoal were applied: 0 Kg/hectare, 6250 Kg/hectare, 62500 Kg/hectare, 87 500 Kg/hectare. The lysimeters containing 0 Kg/ha act as a control, the lysimeters containing 6250 Kg/hectare allow assessment of the impacts of 2 years of addition, 62 500Kg/ha the impact of 18 years of addition, and 87 500kg/ha the impact of 26 years of addition. The study will also present the results of plant productivity

  10. The Southern Ocean as a constraint to reduce uncertainty in future ocean carbon sinks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessler, A.; Tjiputra, J.

    2016-04-01

    Earth system model (ESM) simulations exhibit large biases compares to observation-based estimates of the present ocean CO2 sink. The inter-model spread in projections increases nearly 2-fold by the end of the 21st century and therefore contributes significantly to the uncertainty of future climate projections. In this study, the Southern Ocean (SO) is shown to be one of the hot-spot regions for future uptake of anthropogenic CO2, characterized by both the solubility pump and biologically mediated carbon drawdown in the spring and summer. We show, by analyzing a suite of fully interactive ESMs simulations from the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 5 (CMIP5) over the 21st century under the high-CO2 Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP) 8.5 scenario, that the SO is the only region where the atmospheric CO2 uptake rate continues to increase toward the end of the 21st century. Furthermore, our study discovers a strong inter-model link between the contemporary CO2 uptake in the Southern Ocean and the projected global cumulated uptake over the 21st century. This strong correlation suggests that models with low (high) carbon uptake rate in the contemporary SO tend to simulate low (high) uptake rate in the future. Nevertheless, our analysis also shows that none of the models fully capture the observed biophysical mechanisms governing the CO2 fluxes in the SO. The inter-model spread for the contemporary CO2 uptake in the Southern Ocean is attributed to the variations in the simulated seasonal cycle of surface pCO2. Two groups of model behavior have been identified. The first one simulates anomalously strong SO carbon uptake, generally due to both too strong a net primary production and too low a surface pCO2 in December-January. The second group simulates an opposite CO2 flux seasonal phase, which is driven mainly by the bias in the sea surface temperature variability. We show that these biases are persistent throughout the 21st century, which highlights the

  11. Assessing the carbon sink of afforestation with the Carbon Budget Model at the country level: an example for Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pilli R

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available In the context of the Kyoto Protocol, the mandatory accounting of Afforestation and Reforestation (AR activities requires estimating the forest carbon (C stock changes for any direct human-induced expansion of forest since 1990. We used the Carbon Budget Model (CBM to estimate C stock changes and emissions from fires on AR lands at country level. Italy was chosen because it has one of the highest annual rates of AR in Europe and the same model was recently applied to Italy’s forest management area. We considered the time period 1990-2020 with two case studies reflecting different average annual rates of AR: 78 kha yr-1, based on the 2013 Italian National Inventory Report (NIR, official estimates, and 28 kha yr-1, based on the Italian Land Use Inventory System (IUTI estimates. We compared these two different AR rates with eight regional forest inventories and three independent local studies. The average annual C stock change estimated by CBM, excluding harvest or natural disturbances, was equal to 1738 Gg C yr-1 (official estimates and 630 Gg C yr-1 (IUTI estimates. Results for the official estimates are consistent with the estimates reported by Italy to the KP for the period 2008-2010; for 2011 our estimates are about 20% higher than the country’s data, probably due to different assumptions on the fire disturbances, the AR rate and the dead wood and litter pools. Furthermore, our analysis suggests that: (i the impact on the AR sink of different assumptions of species composition is small; (ii the amount of harvest provided by AR has been negligible for the past (< 3% and is expected to be small in the near future (up to 8% in 2020; (iii forest fires up to 2011 had a small impact on the AR sink (on average, < 100 Gg C yr-1. Finally the comparison of the historical AR rates reported by NIR and IUTI with other independent sources gives mixed results: the regional inventories support the AR rates reported by the NIR, while some local studies

  12. Role of transitory carbon reserves during adjustment to climate variability and source-sink imbalances in oil palm (Elaeis guineensis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legros, S; Mialet-Serra, I; Clement-Vidal, A; Caliman, J-P; Siregar, F A; Fabre, D; Dingkuhn, M

    2009-10-01

    Oil palm (Elaeis guineensis Jacq.) is a perennial, tropical, monocotyledonous plant characterized by simple architecture and low phenotypic plasticity, but marked by long development cycles of individual phytomers (a pair of one leaf and one inflorescence at its axil). Environmental effects on vegetative or reproductive sinks occur with various time lags depending on the process affected, causing source-sink imbalances. This study investigated how the two instantaneous sources of carbon assimilates, CO(2) assimilation and mobilization of transitory non-structural carbohydrate (NSC) reserves, may buffer such imbalances. An experiment was conducted in Indonesia during a 22-month period (from July 2006 to May 2008) at two contrasting locations (Kandista and Batu Mulia) using two treatments (control and complete fruit pruning treatment) in Kandista. Measurements included leaf gas exchange, dynamics of NSC reserves and dynamics of structural aboveground vegetative growth (SVG) and reproductive growth. Drought was estimated from a simulated fraction of transpirable soil water. The main sources of variation in source-sink relationships were (i) short-term reductions in light-saturated leaf CO(2) assimilation rate (A(max)) during seasonal drought periods, particularly in Batu Mulia; (ii) rapid responses of SVG rate to drought; and (iii) marked lag periods between 16 and 29 months of environmental effects on the development of reproductive sinks. The resulting source-sink imbalances were buffered by fluctuations in NSC reserves in the stem, which mainly consisted of glucose and starch. Starch was the main buffer for sink variations, whereas glucose dynamics remained unexplained. Even under strong sink limitation, no negative feedback on A(max) was observed. In conclusion, the different lag periods for environmental effects on assimilate sources and sinks in oil palm are mainly buffered by NSC accumulation in the stem, which can attain 50% (dw:dw) in stem tops. The resulting

  13. Inter-annual variability of the carbon dioxide oceanic sink south of Tasmania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Borges

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available We compiled a large data-set from 22 cruises spanning from 1991 to 2003, of the partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2 in surface waters over the continental shelf (CS and adjacent open ocean (43° to 46° S; 145° to 150° E, south of Tasmania. Climatological seasonal cycles of pCO2 in the CS, the subtropical zone (STZ and the subAntarctic zone (SAZ are described and used to determine monthly pCO2 anomalies. These are used in combination with monthly anomalies of sea surface temperature (SST to investigate inter-annual variations of SST and pCO2. Monthly anomalies of SST (as intense as 2°C are apparent in the CS, STZ and SAZ, and are indicative of strong inter-annual variability that seems to be related to large-scale coupled atmosphere-ocean oscillations. Anomalies of pCO2 normalized to a constant temperature are negatively related to SST anomalies. A reduced winter-time vertical input of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC during phases of positive SST anomalies, related to a poleward shift of westerly winds, and a concomitant local decrease in wind stress is the likely cause of the negative relationship between pCO2 and SST anomalies. The observed pattern is an increase of the sink for atmospheric CO2 associated with positive SST anomalies, although strongly modulated by inter-annual variability of wind speed. Assuming that phases of positive SST anomalies are indicative of the future evolution of regional ocean biogeochemistry under global warming, we show using a purely observational based approach that some provinces of the Southern Ocean could provide a potential negative feedback on increasing atmospheric CO2.

  14. Functional Diversity of Boreal Bog Plant Species Decreases Seasonal Variation of Ecosystem Carbon Sink Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korrensalo, A.

    2015-12-01

    Species diversity has been found to decrease the temporal variance of productivity of a plant community, and diversity in species responses to environmental factors seems to make a plant community more stable in changing conditions. Boreal bogs are nutrient poor peatland ecosystems where the number of plant species is low but the species differ greatly in their growth form. In here we aim to assess the role of the variation in photosynthesis between species for the temporal variation in ecosystem carbon sink function. To quantify the photosynthetic properties and their seasonal variation for different bog plant species we measured photosynthetic parameters and stress-inducing chlorophyll fluorescence of vascular plant and Sphagnum moss species in a boreal bog over a growing season. We estimated monthly gross photosynthesis (PG) of the whole study site based on species level light response curves and leaf area development. The estimated PG was further compared with a gross primary production (GPP) estimate measured by eddy covariance (EC) technique. The sum of upscaled PG estimates agreed well with the GPP estimate measured by the EC technique. The contributions of the species and species groups to the ecosystem level PG changed over the growing season. The sharp mid-summer peak in sedge PG was balanced by more stable PG of evergreen shrubs and Sphagna. Species abundance rather than differences in photosynthetic properties between species and growth forms determined the most productive plants on the ecosystem scale. Sphagna had lower photosynthesis and clorophyll fluorescence than vascular plants but were more productive on the ecosystem scale throughout the growing season due to their high areal coverage. These results show that the diversity of growth forms stabilizes the seasonal variation of the ecosystem level PG in an ombrotrophic bog ecosystem. This may increase the resilience of the ecosystem to changing environmental conditions.

  15. A groundwater conceptual model and karst-related carbon sink for a glacierized alpine karst aquifer, Southwestern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Cheng; Liu, Zaihua; Yang, Jianwen; Yang, Rui

    2015-10-01

    In the Jade Dragon Snow Mountain (JDSM) region, Yunnan Province, SW China, an extensive hydrochemical and stable isotopic study of a glacierized alpine karst aquifer was conducted during the period, 2011-2014. The objectives of the study were: first, to establish a conceptual hydrogeological model of the karst groundwater system; second, to estimate the proportion of extra glacier melt water infiltrating the karst aquifer that is being induced by the regional climate warming; third, to calculate the karst-related flux of carbon into the karst aquifer. Knowledge of the local hydrogeological background from previous work was the starting point of the hydrochemical and stable isotopic study. Some representative spring waters and recharge waters (i.e. glacier melt water and rainwater) were investigated both spatially and temporally by hydrochemical and isotopic techniques, including analysis of major and some minor ions and O and H stable isotopes. A conceptual hydrogeological model of a fracture-diffuse flow karst groundwater aquifer was proposed. The proportion of glacier melt water infiltrating into the karst aquifer was estimated by using the karst spring as a natural pluviometer, and with stable isotope analysis. Results show that (1) the JDSM karst aquifer is a diffuse flow system; (2) it has a number of discharge areas, and the Jinsha River is the karst drainage base level; (3) the proportion of the glacier melt water penetrating the karst aquifer is 29%; and (4) the karst-related carbon sink is 26.67 ± 3.44 t km-2 a-1 (as CO2), which is lower than that in non-glacierized karst aquifers but over ten times larger than the carbon sink flux from silicate weathering in non-karst areas, showing the control of both climate and lithology on the rock weathering-related carbon sink and the significance of carbonate weathering in the global carbon cycle.

  16. Strengthening Carbon Sinks in Urban Soils to Mitigate and Adapt to Climate Change (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, K.

    2010-12-01

    long industrial history and devastations during World War II. In most surface soils in Stuttgart, however, OM was dominated by plant litter derived compounds but in one urban soil anthropogenic OM and black carbon (BC) dominated soil organic carbon (SOC) as indicated by bloch decay solid-state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Artifacts such as municipal solid waste, construction waste, and fragments of charcoal, coal and glass were also found in urban forest soil profiles to 1-m depth in Columbus, OH. To this depth, about 150 Mg SOC ha-1 were stored and, thus, more than in urban forest soils of Baltimore, MD, and New York City, NY. However, the contribution of litter derived vs. artifact derived OM compounds such as BC has not been assessed for urban soils in the U.S.. In summary, studies on biogeochemical cycles in urban ecosystems must include the entire soil profile as anthropogenic activities may create Technosols with properties not encountered in soils of natural ecosystems. As urban ecosystems are major sources of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2), Technosols may be tailor-made to imitate natural soils with high SOC pools and long carbon mean residence times. Thus, the C sink in urban soils must be strengthened to mitigate and adapt urban ecosystems to abrupt climate change.

  17. Latitudinal distribution of the sources and sinks of atmospheric carbon dioxide derived from surface observations and an atmospheric transport model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tans, Pieter P.; Conway, Thomas J.; Nakazawa, Takakiyo

    1989-04-01

    Determination of the present global budget of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) from the small and persistent concentration gradients that exist in the atmosphere is discussed. The CO2 concentration at any site results from a combination of two factors: local sources or sinks and long-range transport. To separate these two effects, an atmospheric transport model is needed. The extensive sets of global CO2 measurements of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) Geophysical Monitoring for Climatic Change (GMCC) division and of the Upper Atmosphere and Space Research Laboratory of Tohoku University are combined with a two-dimensional transport model to derive, in an "inverse" calculation, the latitudinal and seasonal distributions of sources and sinks of CO2 necessary to reproduce the observed concentrations. The model transport parameters were previously derived from a three-dimensional general circulation model. It is found that the southern oceans are a sink of carbon of 0.8-1.5 Gt yr-1 (1 Gt equals 1015g) and that the equatorial areas are a source to the atmosphere of 1.4-2.8 Gt yr-1. Tropical deforestation as a major source of CO2 must be smaller than that because the oceans account for a significant part of the equatorial flux. There seems to be significant seasonality in the sources and sinks of CO2, both in the tropics and in the southern oceans. The seasonal net ecosystem production north of 25°N is found to be 6.2-8.2 Gt of carbon, but these estimates are probably somewhat too low. The source deduction problem is difficult to solve, especially for the middle and high latitudes in the northern hemisphere. This is due to a lack of observations over the continents, which occupy more than half of the global area at these latitudes and are the regions where the sources and sinks are most intense. Evidence is found in the results obtained for the GMCC and Tohoku data that the longitudinal variability of the data is large enough, even in

  18. Greenhouse gas flux measurements in a forestry-drained peatland indicate a large carbon sink

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Lohila

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Drainage for forestry purposes increases the depth of the oxic peat layer and leads to increased growth of shrubs and trees. Concurrently, the production and uptake of the greenhouse gases carbon dioxide (CO2, methane (CH4 and nitrous oxide (N2O change: due to the accelerated decomposition of peat in the presence of oxygen, drained peatlands are generally considered to lose peat carbon (C. We measured CO2 exchange with the eddy covariance (EC method above a drained nutrient-poor peatland forest in southern Finland for 16 months in 2004–2005. The site, classified as a dwarf-shrub pine bog, had been ditched about 35 years earlier. CH4 and N2O fluxes were measured at 2–5-week intervals with the chamber technique. Drainage had resulted in a relatively little change in the water table level, being on average 40 cm below the ground in 2005. The annual net ecosystem exchange was −870 ± 100 g CO2 m−2 yr−1 in the calendar year 2005, indicating net CO2 uptake from the atmosphere. The site was a small sink of CH4 (−0.12 g CH4 m−2 yr−1 and a small source of N2O (0.10 g N2O m−2 yr−1. Photosynthesis was detected throughout the year when the air temperature exceeded −3 °C. As the annual accumulation of C in the above and below ground tree biomass (175 ± 35 g C m−2 was significantly lower than the accumulation observed by the flux measurement (240 ± 30 g C m−2, about 65 g C m−2 yr−1 was likely to have accumulated as organic matter into the peat soil. This is a higher average accumulation rate than previously reported for natural northern peatlands, and the first time C accumulation has been shown by EC measurements to occur in a forestry-drained peatland. Our results suggest that forestry

  19. Pyrogenic carbon in wildfire ash: characteristics and potential as C sink

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santin, C.; Doerr, S. H.; Shakesby, R. A.; Bryant, R.; Sheridan, G. J.; Lane, P. N. J.; Smith, H. G.; Bell, T. L.

    2012-04-01

    Forest fires release substantial amounts of carbon (C). Much of this is emitted to the atmosphere, but some is deposited within an ash layer on the ground as pyrogenic C (PyC; also termed black carbon or biochar). PyC production is increasingly considered an important mechanism for C sequestration, but the current knowledge about its generation, mobilization and degradation is still limited. One area of limited knowledge is the quantity and characteristics of C deposited in ash from wildfires, which is crucial to understanding the fate of PyC in the environment and specifically its role as a C sink. Here we analyze C stocks, forms and recalcitrance in the ash layer deposited after the extreme 2009 'Black Saturday' wildfires in Victoria, Australia. Sampling was carried out in three mixed-species eucalypt sites, where both canopy and understorey were almost completely consumed, and in five temperate rainforests sites, where the high canopy remained largely unaffected, but the understorey was consumed by fire. On average, 5.9 t ha-1 of C were transferred from vegetation to the ash layer in the eucalypt forest. In the rainforest, despite lower ash loads, higher C contents in ash resulted in higher deposition of PyC (average: 8.1 t ha-1). As regards C forms, most of the PyC contained in ash was organic C (OC >97%). Of this OC, 6-26% was particulate, and, consequently, especially susceptible to be mobilized by water erosion. Water-soluble OC represented only the 0.2-0.4% of PyC in ash. This pool should not be neglected since it is likely to contain polyaromatic hydrocarbons; a potential threat to water quality. Chemical oxidation of the organic component of the ash suggests that the pyrogenic nature of ash OC gives it a high resistance to degradation. After 400 h of chemical oxidation, 24-52% OC did remain. These findings suggest that PyC contained in wildfire ash, particularly when incorporated into soils or sediments, could make an important contribution to long-term C

  20. Pengaruh Aerasi dan Sumber Nutrien terhadap Kemampuan Alga Filum Chlorophyta dalam Menyerap Karbon (Carbon Sink) untuk Mengurangi Emisi CO2 di Kawasan Perkotaan

    OpenAIRE

    Lancur Setoaji; Joni Hermana

    2013-01-01

    Penelitian terkait mitigasi pemanasan global, khususnya dalam penyerapan karbon dioksida (CO2), menjadi fokus utama di kalangan ilmuwan dunia. Secara alamiah, karbon dioksida dapat diserap oleh tumbuhan hijau, laut, karbonasi batuan kapur, dan alga. Pigmen hijau dalam alga atau klorofil dapat menyerap karbon dioksida dalam proses fotosintesis. Alga memiliki pertumbuhan yang sangat cepat sehingga cocok digunakan sebagai carbon sink. Penelitian terkait carbon sink ini bertujuan untuk menentukan...

  1. An important atomic process in the CVD growth of graphene: Sinking and up-floating of carbon atom on copper surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    By density functional theory (DFT) calculations, the early stages of the growth of graphene on copper (1 1 1) surface are investigated. At the very first time of graphene growth, the carbon atom sinks into subsurface. As more carbon atoms are adsorbed nearby the site, the sunken carbon atom will spontaneously form a dimer with one of the newly adsorbed carbon atoms, and the formed dimer will up-float on the top of the surface. We emphasize the role of the co-operative relaxation of the co-adsorbed carbon atoms in facilitating the sinking and up-floating of carbon atoms. In detail: when two carbon atoms are co-adsorbed, their co-operative relaxation will result in different carbon–copper interactions for the co-adsorbed carbon atoms. This difference facilitates the sinking of a single carbon atom into the subsurface. As a third carbon atom is co-adsorbed nearby, it draws the sunken carbon atom on top of the surface, forming a dimer. Co-operative relaxations of the surface involving all adsorbed carbon atoms and their copper neighbors facilitate these sinking and up-floating processes. This investigation is helpful for the deeper understanding of graphene synthesis and the choosing of optimal carbon sources or process.

  2. Phenology and carbon dioxide source/sink strength of a subalpine grassland in response to an exceptionally short snow season

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Changes in snow cover depth and duration predicted by climate change scenarios are expected to strongly affect high-altitude ecosystem processes. This study investigates the effect of an exceptionally short snow season on the phenology and carbon dioxide source/sink strength of a subalpine grassland. An earlier snowmelt of more than one month caused a considerable advancement (40 days) of the beginning of the carbon uptake period (CUP) and, together with a delayed establishment of the snow season in autumn, contributed to a two-month longer CUP. The combined effect of the shorter snow season and the extended CUP led to an increase of about 100% in annual carbon net uptake. Nevertheless, the unusual environmental conditions imposed by the early snowmelt led to changes in canopy structure and functioning, with a reduction of the carbon sequestration rate during the snow-free period. (letter)

  3. 关于碳汇统计测度的研究%Study on the Statistics Measurement of Carbon Sink

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王佐仁; 肖建勇

    2013-01-01

      气候变化主要是大气中以CO2为主体的温室气体的增加所引起,虽然CO2温室效应强度比其他气体小,但其构成了温室气体最主要的成分,对全球温室效应起着主要的作用。文章主要从碳汇的角度对CO2排放与吸收进行统计测量,分析了森林碳汇、湿地碳汇和海洋碳汇的测定方法,同时指出:海洋系统的碳汇功能与陆地系统的碳汇功能一样,对CO2的吸收固定有着重要的作用。%Climate change is caused by the increase of greenhouse gases in which the carbon dioxide occupied the main body in the atmosphere .CO2 plays a major role to the global greenhouse effect although it is smaller than other gases .This paper studies the absorption and fixed of CO 2 from the perspective of carbon sink on CO2 emission and absorption .At the same time ,it points out :marine carbon sink function of the system and land carbon sink function of the system have the same important role to absorb and fixation of CO2 .

  4. 关于碳汇统计测度的研究%Study on the Statistics Measurement of Carbon Sink

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王佐仁; 肖建勇

    2013-01-01

    Climate change is caused by the increase of greenhouse gases in which the carbon dioxide occupied the main body in the atmosphere .CO2 plays a major role to the global greenhouse effect although it is smaller than other gases .This paper studies the absorption and fixed of CO 2 from the perspective of carbon sink on CO2 emission and absorption .At the same time ,it points out :marine carbon sink function of the system and land carbon sink function of the system have the same important role to absorb and fixation of CO2 .%  气候变化主要是大气中以CO2为主体的温室气体的增加所引起,虽然CO2温室效应强度比其他气体小,但其构成了温室气体最主要的成分,对全球温室效应起着主要的作用。文章主要从碳汇的角度对CO2排放与吸收进行统计测量,分析了森林碳汇、湿地碳汇和海洋碳汇的测定方法,同时指出:海洋系统的碳汇功能与陆地系统的碳汇功能一样,对CO2的吸收固定有着重要的作用。

  5. Study visit carbon sinks Peugeot. Evaluation after 5 years and perspectives; Visite d'etude Puits de Carbone Peugeot. Bilan a 5 ans et perspectives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grosso, M.; Sao Nicolau, F

    2005-07-01

    In the framework of its project of the climatic change control, PSA Peugeot Citroen, decided to involve in the decrease of the carbon dioxide emissions. In parallel to the vehicles consumption decrease and the biofuels utilization, the group developed since 5 years a pilot project of carbon sink. This project aims to study the impact of a trees plantation, at a big scale, on the atmospheric carbon dioxide fixation. This document is a first evaluation after the phase of trees plantation. (A.L.B.)

  6. A modern analog for carbonate source-to-sink sedimentary systems: the Glorieuses archipelago and adjacent basin (SW Indian Ocean)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorry, S.; Jouet, G.; Prat, S.; Courgeon, S.; Le Roy, P.; Camoin, G.; Caline, B.

    2014-12-01

    This study presents the geomorphological and sedimentological analysis of a modern carbonate source-to-sink system located north of Madagascar (SW Indian Ocean). The sedimentary system is composed of an isolated carbonate platform sited on top of a seamount rising steeply from the seabed located at 3000 m water depth. The slope of the seamount is incised by canyons, and meandering channels occur above lobbed sedimentary bodies at the foot of the slope. The dataset consists of dredges, sediment piston cores, swath bathymetry and seismic (sparker and 2D high-resolution) lines collected from inner platform (less than 5 m deep) to the adjacent deep sedimentary basin. Particle size analysis and composition of carbonate grains are used to characterize the distribution and heterogeneity of sands accumulated on the archipelago. Main results show that composition of carbonate sediments is dominated by segments of Halimeda, large benthic foraminifera, coral debris, molluscs, echinoderms, bryozoans and sponges. According to the shape and the position of sandwaves and intertidal sandbars developed in the back-barrier reef, the present organization of these well-sorted fine-sand accumulations appears to be strongly influenced by flood tidal currents. Seismic lines acquired from semi-enclosed to open lagoon demonstrate that most of the sediment is exported and accumulated along the leeward margin of the platform, which is connected to a canyon network incising the outer slope. Following the concept of highstand shedding of carbonate platforms (Schlager et al., 1994), excess sediment is exported by plumes and gravity flows to the adjacent deep sea where it feeds a carbonate deep-sea fan. Combined observations from platform to basin allow to explain how the Glorieuses carbonate source to sink system has evolved under the influence of climate and of relative sea-level changes since the last interglacial.

  7. Sub-grid scale representation of vegetation in global land surface schemes: implications for estimation of the terrestrial carbon sink

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. R. Melton

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Terrestrial ecosystem models commonly represent vegetation in terms of plant functional types (PFTs and use their vegetation attributes in calculations of the energy and water balance and to investigate the terrestrial carbon cycle. To accomplish these tasks, two approaches for PFT spatial representation are widely used: "composite" and "mosaic". The impact of these two approaches on the global carbon balance has been investigated with the Canadian Terrestrial Ecosystem Model (CTEM v 1.2 coupled to the Canadian Land Surface Scheme (CLASS v 3.6. In the composite (single-tile approach, the vegetation attributes of different PFTs present in a grid cell are aggregated and used in calculations to determine the resulting physical environmental conditions (soil moisture, soil temperature, etc. that are common to all PFTs. In the mosaic (multi-tile approach, energy and water balance calculations are performed separately for each PFT tile and each tile's physical land surface environmental conditions evolve independently. Pre-industrial equilibrium CLASS-CTEM simulations yield global totals of vegetation biomass, net primary productivity, and soil carbon that compare reasonably well with observation-based estimates and differ by less than 5% between the mosaic and composite configurations. However, on a regional scale the two approaches can differ by > 30%, especially in areas with high heterogeneity in land cover. Simulations over the historical period (1959–2005 show different responses to evolving climate and carbon dioxide concentrations from the two approaches. The cumulative global terrestrial carbon sink estimated over the 1959–2005 period (excluding land use change (LUC effects differs by around 5% between the two approaches (96.3 and 101.3 Pg, for the mosaic and composite approaches, respectively and compares well with the observation-based estimate of 82.2 ± 35 Pg C over the same period. Inclusion of LUC causes the estimates of the

  8. Sub-grid scale representation of vegetation in global land surface schemes: implications for estimation of the terrestrial carbon sink

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. R. Melton

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Terrestrial ecosystem models commonly represent vegetation in terms of plant functional types (PFTs and use their vegetation attributes in calculations of the energy and water balance as well as to investigate the terrestrial carbon cycle. Sub-grid scale variability of PFTs in these models is represented using different approaches with the "composite" and "mosaic" approaches being the two end-members. The impact of these two approaches on the global carbon balance has been investigated with the Canadian Terrestrial Ecosystem Model (CTEM v 1.2 coupled to the Canadian Land Surface Scheme (CLASS v 3.6. In the composite (single-tile approach, the vegetation attributes of different PFTs present in a grid cell are aggregated and used in calculations to determine the resulting physical environmental conditions (soil moisture, soil temperature, etc. that are common to all PFTs. In the mosaic (multi-tile approach, energy and water balance calculations are performed separately for each PFT tile and each tile's physical land surface environmental conditions evolve independently. Pre-industrial equilibrium CLASS-CTEM simulations yield global totals of vegetation biomass, net primary productivity, and soil carbon that compare reasonably well with observation-based estimates and differ by less than 5% between the mosaic and composite configurations. However, on a regional scale the two approaches can differ by > 30%, especially in areas with high heterogeneity in land cover. Simulations over the historical period (1959–2005 show different responses to evolving climate and carbon dioxide concentrations from the two approaches. The cumulative global terrestrial carbon sink estimated over the 1959–2005 period (excluding land use change (LUC effects differs by around 5% between the two approaches (96.3 and 101.3 Pg, for the mosaic and composite approaches, respectively and compares well with the observation-based estimate of 82.2 ± 35 Pg C over the same

  9. Analysis of ecosystem controls on soil carbon source-sink relationships in the northwest Great Plains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Z.; Liu, S.; Johnston, C.A.; Liu, J.; Tieszen, L.L.

    2006-01-01

    Our ability to forecast the role of ecosystem processes in mitigating global greenhouse effects relies on understanding the driving forces on terrestrial C dynamics. This study evaluated the controls on soil organic C (SOC) changes from 1973 to 2000 in the northwest Great Plains. SOC source-sink relationships were quantified using the General Ensemble Biogeochemical Modeling System (GEMS) based on 40 randomly located 10 ?? 10 km2 sample blocks. These sample blocks were aggregated into cropland, grassland, and forestland groups based on land cover composition within each sample block. Canonical correlation analysis indicated that SOC source-sink relationship from 1973 to 2000 was significantly related to the land cover type while the change rates mainly depended on the baseline SOC level and annual precipitation. Of all selected driving factors, the baseline SOC and nitrogen levels controlled the SOC change rates for the forestland and cropland groups, while annual precipitation determined the C source-sink relationship for the grassland group in which noticeable SOC sink strength was attributed to the conversion from cropped area to grass cover. Canonical correlation analysis also showed that grassland ecosystems are more complicated than others in the ecoregion, which may be difficult to identify on a field scale. Current model simulations need finther adjustments to the model input variables for the grass cover-dominated ecosystems in the ecoregion. Copyright 2006 by the American Geophysical Union.

  10. Greenhouse gas flux measurements in a forestry-drained peatland indicate a large carbon sink

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Lohila

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Drainage for forestry purposes changes the conditions in the peat and leads to increased growth of shrubs and trees. Concurrently, the production and uptake of the greenhouse gases carbon dioxide (CO2, methane (CH4 and nitrous oxide (N2O are likely to change: due to the accelerated decomposition of oxic peat, drained peatlands are generally considered to loose peat carbon (C. We measured CO2 exchange with the eddy covariance (EC method above a drained nutrient-poor peatland forest in Southern Finland for 16 months in 2004–2005. The site, classified as a dwarf-shrub pine bog, had been ditched about 35 years earlier. CH4 and N2O fluxes were measured at 2–5 week intervals with the chamber technique. Drainage had resulted in a relatively little change in the water table level, being on average 40 cm below the ground in 2005. The annual net ecosystem exchange was −870 g CO2 m−2 yr−1 in the calendar year 2005, varying from −810 to −900 g CO2 m−2 yr−1 during the 16 month period under investigation. The site was a small sink of CH4 (−0.12 g CH4 m−2 yr−1 and a small source of N2O (0.10 g N2O m−2 yr−1. Photosynthesis was detected throughout the year when the air temperature exceeded −3 °C. As the annual accumulation of C in the above and below ground tree biomass (550 g CO2 m−2 was significantly less than the net exchange of CO2, about 300 g CO2 m−2 yr−1 (~80 g C m−2 was likely to have accumulated as organic matter into the peat soil. This is a higher average accumulation rate than previously reported for natural northern peatlands, and the first time C accumulation has been shown, by EC measurements, to occur in a drained

  11. Enrichment Planting in Secondary Forests: a Promising Clean Development Mechanism to Increase Terrestrial Carbon Sinks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Potvin

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available With the increasing need to reduce greenhouse gas concentrations, afforestation and reforestation (A/R projects are being implemented under the Kyoto Clean Development Mechanism (CDM and under the voluntary carbon (C market. The specific objective of A/R C projects is to enhance terrestrial sinks. They could also provide low-income communities in developing countries with a source of revenue, as well as a number of ecological and social services. However, feasibility issues have hindered implementation of A/R CDMs. We propose enrichment planting (EP in old fallow using high-value native timber species as a land-use alternative and a small-scale C projects opportunity. We present EP in the context of ongoing work in a poor indigenous community in eastern Panama. We consider economic risks and advantages and concordance with existing modalities under the compliance market. The potential storage capacity for EP at the site of our study was ~113 Mg C ha-1, which is comparable to other land uses with high C storage, such as industrial teak plantations and primary forest. Because secondary forests show high aboveground biomass production, C projects using EP could harness large amounts of atmospheric C while improving diversity. Carbon projects using EP can also provide high levels of social, cultural, and ecological services by planting native tree species of traditional importance to local communities and preserving most of the secondary forest’s ecological attributes. Therefore, EP planting could be considered as a way to promote synergies between two UN Conventions: climate change and biodiversity. SÍNTESIS Con la necesidad apremiante de reducción de los gases de efecto invernadero, proyectos de aforestación y reforestación (A/R pueden implementarse bajo el Mecanismo de Desarrollo Limpio del Protocolo de Kyoto (MDL o en el contexto del mercado voluntario. El objetivo especifico de los mercados de carbono, voluntario o de compromiso, es de

  12. Assessment of the soil organic carbon sink in a project for the conversion of farmland to forestland: a case study in Zichang county, Shaanxi, China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lan Mu

    Full Text Available The conversion of farmland to forestland not only changes the ecological environment but also enriches the soil with organic matter and affects the global carbon cycle. This paper reviews the influence of land use changes on the soil organic carbon sink to determine whether the Chinese "Grain-for-Green" (conversion of farmland to forestland project increased the rate of SOC content during its implementation between 1999 and 2010 in the hilly and gully areas of the Loess Plateau in north-central China. The carbon sink was quantified, and the effects of the main species were assessed. The carbon sink increased from 2.26×106 kg in 1999 to 8.32×106 kg in 2010 with the sustainable growth of the converted areas. The black locust (Robinia pseudoacacia L. and alfalfa (Medicago sativa L. soil increased SOC content in the top soil (0-100 cm in the initial 7-yr period, while the sequestration occurred later (>7 yr in the 100-120 cm layer after the "Grain-for-Green" project was implemented. The carbon sink function measured for the afforested land provides evidence that the Grain-for-Green project has successfully excavated the carbon sink potential of the Shaanxi province and served as an important milestone for establishing an effective organic carbon management program.

  13. A neural network-based estimate of the seasonal to inter-annual variability of the Atlantic Ocean carbon sink

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Landschützer, P.; Gruber, N.; Bakker, D.C.E.;

    2013-01-01

    –18° N, 0.11 ± 0.07 Pg C yr–1), and uptake in the subtropical/temperate South Atlantic south of 18° S (–0.16 ± 0.06 Pg C yr–1), consistent with recent studies. We find the strongest seasonal variability of the CO2 flux in the temperature driven subtropical North Atlantic, with uptake in winter......The Atlantic Ocean is one of the most important sinks for atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2), but this sink is known to vary substantially in time. Here we use surface ocean CO2 observations to estimate this sink and the temporal variability from 1998 to 2007 in the Atlantic Ocean. We benefit from (i......) a continuous improvement of the observations, i.e., the Surface Ocean CO2 Atlas (SOCAT) v1.5 database and (ii) a newly developed technique to interpolate the observations in space and time. In particular, we use a 2 step neural network approach to reconstruct basin-wide monthly maps of the sea surface partial...

  14. Bridging Political Expectations and Scientific Limitations in Climate Risk Management. On the Uncertain Effects of International Carbon Sink Policies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loevbrand, E. [Environmental Science Section, Department of Biology and Environmental Science, Kalmar University, SE-391 82 Kalmar (Sweden)

    2004-12-01

    Despite great advances in carbon cycle research during the past decade the climatic impact of terrestrial ecosystems is still highly uncertain. Although contemporary studies suggest that the terrestrial biosphere has acted as a net sink to atmospheric carbon during the past two decades, the future role of terrestrial carbon pools is most difficult to foresee. When land use change and forestry activities were included into the Kyoto Protocol in 1997, the requirements for scientific precision increased significantly. At the same time the political expectations of carbon sequestration as climate mitigation strategy added uncertainties of a social kind to the study of land-atmosphere carbon exchange that have been difficult to address by conventional scientific methods. In this paper I explore how the failure to take into account the effects of direct human activity in scientific projections of future terrestrial carbon storage has resulted in a simplified appreciation of the risks embedded in a global carbon sequestration scheme. I argue that the social limits to scientific analysis must be addressed in order to accommodate these risks in future climate governance and to enable continued scientific authority in the international climate regime.

  15. Carbon sinks: An analysis of the economic potential in a mangrove forest of the Colombian Pacific

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the present article the author examines the problem of climate change from the perspective offered by the so called flexibility mechanisms introduced by the Kyoto Protocol. The pollution reduction at targeted levels is expected to be achieved at minimum economic costs which are socially acceptable in an exchange market for CO2 sinks. With this system many developing countries are to participate with the promise of an eco-systemic functionality of natural forests as sources of CO2 sequestration. It is shown that the potential benefits derived from the forest conservation market as CO2 sinks is not consistent with social costs or opportunity costs incurred in by many communities, as it is the case of the Colombian south pacific region. In this imbalance, an important role is played by transaction costs which in fact determine the part of the pie corresponding to the community and the bureaucracy.

  16. Grain Sink Strength Related to Carbon Staying in the Leaves of Hybrid Wheat XN901

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GONG Yue-hua; JI Xiao-hui; GAO Jun-feng

    2009-01-01

    XN901 is a K-type three-line hybrid wheat with a high yield potential,and its leaves and stem remaining green during grain maturation,suggesting much assimilate stay in leaves and stem.The grain water content,grain volume,carbohydrate content,and enzyme activity of sucose metabolism in the grain,as well as source-sink relationship were studied in order to investigate the physiological reason of the assimilate remaining in leaves and stem at the late stage.The results showed that the hybrid grains had more water and soluble sugar,higher activities of acid invertase and sucrose synthase at the early stage that led to a faster expansion growth,greater grain volume and faster starch synthesis at the early to mid stage of grain development.Also it had a longer period for actively filling.As a result,the grain weight and yield of the hybrid were increased by 14 and 15% respectively compared to that of Shaan 229.Additionally,the biomass of XN901 was 41.7% more than that of control,but its harvest index was 9% lower than Shaan 229.However,its lower activity of sucrose synthase indicated a lower sink activity at the late stage,resulting in a slow rate of filling and starch synthesis.Also,the hybrid wheat XN901 had a large source-sink ratio.It is the main reason for much assimilate remaining in the straw at the late stage and lower harvest index.Strengthening the sink activity and raising the harvest index should be the key means of improving the yield of hybrid wheat.

  17. A neural network-based estimate of the seasonal to inter-annual variability of the Atlantic Ocean carbon sink

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Landschützer

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The Atlantic Ocean is one of the most important sinks for atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2, but this sink is known to vary substantially in time. Here we use surface ocean CO2 observations to estimate this sink and the temporal variability from 1998 to 2007 in the Atlantic Ocean. We benefit from (i a continuous improvement of the observations, i.e., the Surface Ocean CO2 Atlas (SOCAT v1.5 database and (ii a newly developed technique to interpolate the observations in space and time. In particular, we use a 2 step neural network approach to reconstruct basin-wide monthly maps of the sea surface partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2 at a resolution of 1° × 1°. From those, we compute the air–sea CO2 flux maps using a standard gas exchange parameterization and high-resolution wind speeds. The neural networks fit the observed pCO2 data with a root mean square error (RMSE of about 10 μatm and with almost no bias. A check against independent time series data reveals a larger RMSE of about 17 μatm. We estimate a decadal mean uptake flux of –0.45 ± 0.15 Pg C yr–1 for the Atlantic between 44° S and 79° N, representing the sum of a strong uptake north of 18° N (–0.39 ± 0.10 Pg C yr–1, outgassing in the tropics (18° S–18° N, 0.11 ± 0.07 Pg C yr–1, and uptake in the subtropical/temperate South Atlantic south of 18° S (–0.16 ± 0.06 Pg C yr–1, consistent with recent studies. We find the strongest seasonal variability of the CO2 flux in the temperature driven subtropical North Atlantic, with uptake in winter and outgassing in summer. The seasonal cycle is antiphased in the subpolar latitudes relative to the subtropics largely as a result of the biologically driven winter-to-summer drawdown of CO2. Over the analysis period (1998 to 2007 sea surface pCO2 increased faster than that of the atmosphere in large areas poleward of 40° N, but many other parts of the North Atlantic increased more slowly, resulting in a barely changing Atlantic

  18. A neural network-based estimate of the seasonal to inter-annual variability of the Atlantic Ocean carbon sink

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landschützer, P.; Gruber, N.; Bakker, D. C. E.; Schuster, U.; Nakaoka, S.; Payne, M. R.; Sasse, T. P.; Zeng, J.

    2013-11-01

    The Atlantic Ocean is one of the most important sinks for atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2), but this sink has been shown to vary substantially in time. Here we use surface ocean CO2 observations to estimate this sink and the temporal variability from 1998 through 2007 in the Atlantic Ocean. We benefit from (i) a continuous improvement of the observations, i.e. the Surface Ocean CO2 Atlas (SOCAT) v1.5 database and (ii) a newly developed technique to interpolate the observations in space and time. In particular, we use a two-step neural network approach to reconstruct basin-wide monthly maps of the sea surface partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2) at a resolution of 1° × 1°. From those, we compute the air-sea CO2 flux maps using a standard gas exchange parameterization and high-resolution wind speeds. The neural networks fit the observed pCO2 data with a root mean square error (RMSE) of about 10 μatm and with almost no bias. A check against independent time-series data and new data from SOCAT v2 reveals a larger RMSE of 22.8 μatm for the entire Atlantic Ocean, which decreases to 16.3 μatm for data south of 40° N. We estimate a decadal mean uptake flux of -0.45 ± 0.15 Pg C yr-1 for the Atlantic between 44° S and 79° N, representing the sum of a strong uptake north of 18° N (-0.39 ± 0.10 Pg C yr-1), outgassing in the tropics (18° S-18° N, 0.11 ± 0.07 Pg C yr-1), and uptake in the subtropical/temperate South Atlantic south of 18° S (-0.16 ± 0.06 Pg C yr-1), consistent with recent studies. The strongest seasonal variability of the CO2 flux occurs in the temperature-driven subtropical North Atlantic, with uptake in winter and outgassing in summer. The seasonal cycle is antiphased in the subpolar latitudes relative to the subtropics largely as a result of the biologically driven winter-to-summer drawdown of CO2. Over the 10 yr analysis period (1998 through 2007), sea surface pCO2 increased faster than that of the atmosphere in large areas poleward of 40° N

  19. Interactions Between Biogenic Silica (BSiO2) and Organic Carbon (POC) During the Recycling of Sinking Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriceau, B.; Goutx, M.; Guigue, C.; Tamburini, C.; Lee, C.; Armstrong, R. A.; Duflos, M.; Charriere, B.; Ragueneau, O.

    2006-12-01

    Despite recent progress in understanding the ocean's role in the global carbon cycle, we are not yet able to predict the response of ecosystems to climate change and feedbacks of the ocean onto atmospheric CO2. In particular, particle flux dynamics must be represented more faithfully in ocean models. We know that particulate organic carbon (POC) flux is associated with ballast minerals (BSiO2, CaCO3), but the processes controlling the interactions between carbon and ballast minerals during decomposition must be explored further. The present study aims to provide a better understanding of interactions between carbon and BSiO2 during mineralization of sinking particles. Previous studies have provided evidence that the degradation of the external membrane by bacteria increase the BSiO2 dissolution rate. Alternatively, it has been hypothesized that biogenic silica could protect carbon from degradation. To test this hypothesis, an in-vitro batch experiment using the diatom Skeletonema costatum was conducted. In this experiment, carbon degradation, bacterial growth, and BSiO2 dissolution were followed simultaneously. To identify the processes involved and the types of carbon that eventually interact with BSiO2 during mineralization, the concentrations of different lipids and amino acids were also measured. A strong increase of the degradation rate constant of the POC and PON was observed after dissolution of 40 % of initial BSiO2. This increase is associated to a peak of glycine in total amino acids and a switch between free and attached bacteria. These results suggest that carbon degradation is increased when enough of the frustule is dissolved to uncover the glycine contain inside the frustule, this amino acid may trigger an increase in the concentration of attached bacteria, which may in turn increase the degradation rate constant of organic carbon.

  20. Terrestrial Carbon Sinks in the Brazilian Amazon and Cerrado Region Predicted from MODIS Satellite Data and Ecosystem Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, C.; Klooster, S.; Huete, A.; Genovese, V.; Bustamante, M.; Ferreira, L. Guimaraes; deOliveira, R. C., Jr.; Zepp, R.

    2009-01-01

    A simulation model based on satellite observations of monthly vegetation cover from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) was used to estimate monthly carbon fluxes in terrestrial ecosystems of Brazilian Amazon and Cerrado regions over the period 2000-2004. Net ecosystem production (NEP) flux for atmospheric CO2 in the region for these years was estimated. Consistently high carbon sink fluxes in terrestrial ecosystems on a yearly basis were found in the western portions of the states of Acre and Rondonia and the northern portions of the state of Par a. These areas were not significantly impacted by the 2002-2003 El Nino event in terms of net annual carbon gains. Areas of the region that show periodically high carbon source fluxes from terrestrial ecosystems to the atmosphere on yearly basis were found throughout the state of Maranhao and the southern portions of the state of Amazonas. As demonstrated though tower site comparisons, NEP modeled with monthly MODIS Enhanced Vegetation Index (EVI) inputs closely resembles the measured seasonal carbon fluxes at the LBA Tapajos tower site. Modeling results suggest that the capacity for use of MODIS Enhanced Vegetation Index (EVI) data to predict seasonal uptake rates of CO2 in Amazon forests and Cerrado woodlands is strong.

  1. A shift of thermokarst lakes from carbon sources to sinks during the Holocene epoch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter Anthony, K. M.; Zimov, S. A.; Grosse, G.; Jones, Miriam C.; Anthony, P.; Chapin, F. S., III; Finlay, J. C.; Mack, M. C.; Davydov, S.; Frenzel, P.F.; Frolking, S.

    2014-01-01

    Thermokarst lakes formed across vast regions of Siberia and Alaska during the last deglaciation and are thought to be a net source of atmospheric methane and carbon dioxide during the Holocene epoch1,2,3,4. However, the same thermokarst lakes can also sequester carbon5, and it remains uncertain whether carbon uptake by thermokarst lakes can offset their greenhouse gas emissions. Here we use field observations of Siberian permafrost exposures, radiocarbon dating and spatial analyses to quantify Holocene carbon stocks and fluxes in lake sediments overlying thawed Pleistocene-aged permafrost. We find that carbon accumulation in deep thermokarst-lake sediments since the last deglaciation is about 1.6 times larger than the mass of Pleistocene-aged permafrost carbon released as greenhouse gases when the lakes first formed. Although methane and carbon dioxide emissions following thaw lead to immediate radiative warming, carbon uptake in peat-rich sediments occurs over millennial timescales. We assess thermokarst-lake carbon feedbacks to climate with an atmospheric perturbation model and find that thermokarst basins switched from a net radiative warming to a net cooling climate effect about 5,000 years ago. High rates of Holocene carbon accumulation in 20 lake sediments (47±10 grams of carbon per square metre per year; mean±standard error) were driven by thermokarst erosion and deposition of terrestrial organic matter, by nutrient release from thawing permafrost that stimulated lake productivity and by slow decomposition in cold, anoxic lake bottoms. When lakes eventually drained, permafrost formation rapidly sequestered sediment carbon. Our estimate of about 160petagrams of Holocene organic carbon in deep lake basins of Siberia and Alaska increases the circumpolar peat carbon pool estimate for permafrost regions by over 50 per cent (ref. 6). The carbon in perennially frozen drained lake sediments may become vulnerable to mineralization as permafrost disappears7

  2. Secondary forests as temporary carbon sinks? The economic impact of accounting methods on reforestation projects in the tropics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olschewski, Roland [Institute of Forest Economics, Georg-August-University Goettingen, Buesgenweg 5, D-37077 (Germany); Benitez, Pablo C. [BIO-SYS Project, Georg-August-University Goettingen, San Salvador E7-134, Quito (Ecuador)

    2005-11-15

    Tropical forestry is often not competitive with agricultural land uses such as pasture for cattle ranching. Additional revenues from carbon sequestration generated by the Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) of the Kyoto Protocol can change this situation. In three different zones of north-western Ecuador, minimum compensation payments for carbon sequestration were determined, which would make reforestation a feasible land-use alternative. Based on our findings that these minimum prices depend on the net benefit of the respective land-use alternatives, and on the accounting regimes for CDM sink projects, we applied the accounting rules for temporary and long-term Certified Emission Reductions (CER) to two reforestation projects: forest plantation and natural regrowth of secondary forest. A comparison of these alternatives showed that secondary forest is an attractive alternative under both accounting regimes because of its low establishment costs and relative early timber revenues. After identifying the zone most suitable for carbon sink projects, we calculated net benefits of land-use changes in the event that certain prices for emission reductions were actually paid. We found that secondary forest becomes economically attractive, if the price of permanent credits is above $4.5/tCO{sub 2}, whereas forest plantations require permanent CER prices of $7.0/tCO{sub 2}. In both cases, the results are within the price margins forecasted by various institutions for the first commitment period of the Kyoto Protocol. The presented methodology is meant to support the decision making process on the supply side of a future CER market. Opportunity costs of land-use changes have to be analyzed carefully before deciding in favor of long binding forestry projects. Assigning temporary credits to naturally regrown secondary forests could-although excluded from CDM during the first commitment period-combine the advantages of a flexible accounting regime with the positive economic and

  3. Sinking Jelly-Carbon Unveils Potential Environmental Variability along a Continental Margin

    OpenAIRE

    Mario Lebrato; Juan-Carlos Molinero; Cartes, Joan E.; Domingo Lloris; Frédéric Mélin; Laia Beni-Casadella

    2013-01-01

    Particulate matter export fuels benthic ecosystems in continental margins and the deep sea, removing carbon from the upper ocean. Gelatinous zooplankton biomass provides a fast carbon vector that has been poorly studied. Observational data of a large-scale benthic trawling survey from 1994 to 2005 provided a unique opportunity to quantify jelly-carbon along an entire continental margin in the Mediterranean Sea and to assess potential links with biological and physical variables. Biomass depos...

  4. Enhancement of Terrestrial Carbon Sinks through the Reclamation of Abandoned Mined Lands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gary Kronrad

    2004-10-31

    This project will determine the optimal forest management method to employ for each of the major commercial tree species so that profitability of timber production only or the combination of timber production and carbon sequestration is maximized. The goal of this project is to achieve DOE's long-term cost goal of sequestering carbon at $10 or less per ton. Because the potential of a forest ecosystem to sequester carbon depends on the species, site quality and management regimes utilized, this project will determine how to optimize carbon sequestration by determining how to optimally manage each species, given a range of site qualities and economic variables. This project also will determine the effects of a carbon credit market on the method and profitability of forest management, the cost of sequestering carbon, and the amount of carbon that can be sequestered. Information from this project will be used to produce user-friendly manuals which will contain economic and biological data for each of the species. These manuals will inform landowners and forest managers how to manage forests for timber and/or carbon credits, how to maximize financial returns, how much money can be earned, and how much carbon can be stored. Manuals will be disseminated through state and federal agricultural extension services and the forest service of each state, and will be published in forest landowner magazines.

  5. Climate change and JI options for India - a carbon-sink approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three approaches to producing carbon dioxide arising from the Framework Convention on Climate Change are discussed. These are emission cap approach, fiscal or carbon tax and joint implementation. These are examined from an Indian perspective. More work on the economic, sociological and political aspects is recommended. (UK)

  6. Sinking jelly-carbon unveils potential environmental variability along a continental margin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Lebrato

    Full Text Available Particulate matter export fuels benthic ecosystems in continental margins and the deep sea, removing carbon from the upper ocean. Gelatinous zooplankton biomass provides a fast carbon vector that has been poorly studied. Observational data of a large-scale benthic trawling survey from 1994 to 2005 provided a unique opportunity to quantify jelly-carbon along an entire continental margin in the Mediterranean Sea and to assess potential links with biological and physical variables. Biomass depositions were sampled in shelves, slopes and canyons with peaks above 1000 carcasses per trawl, translating to standing stock values between 0.3 and 1.4 mg C m(2 after trawling and integrating between 30,000 and 175,000 m(2 of seabed. The benthopelagic jelly-carbon spatial distribution from the shelf to the canyons may be explained by atmospheric forcing related with NAO events and dense shelf water cascading, which are both known from the open Mediterranean. Over the decadal scale, we show that the jelly-carbon depositions temporal variability paralleled hydroclimate modifications, and that the enhanced jelly-carbon deposits are connected to a temperature-driven system where chlorophyll plays a minor role. Our results highlight the importance of gelatinous groups as indicators of large-scale ecosystem change, where jelly-carbon depositions play an important role in carbon and energy transport to benthic systems.

  7. Mangrove production and carbon sinks: a revision of global budget estimates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouillon, S.; Borges, A.V.; Castañeda-Moya, E.; Diele, K.; Dittmar, T.; Duke, N.C.; Kristensen, E.; Lee, S.; Marchand, C.; Middelburg, J.J.; Rivera-Monroy, V.H.; Smith III, T.; Twilley, R.R.

    2008-01-01

    Mangrove forests are highly productive but globally threatened coastal ecosystems, whose role in the carbon budget of the coastal zone has long been debated. Here we provide a comprehensive synthesis of the available data on carbon fluxes in mangrove ecosystems. A reassessment of global mangrove pri

  8. Offset of the potential carbon sink from boreal forestation by decreases in surface albedo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon uptake by forestation is one method proposed to reduce net carbon dioxide emissions to the atmosphere and so limit the radiative forcing of climate change. But the overall impact of forestation on climate will also depend on other effects associated with the creation of new forests. In particular the albedo of a forested landscape is generally lower than that of cultivated land, especially when snow is lying, and decreasing albedo exerts a positive radiative forcing on climate. Here I simulate the radiative forcings associated with changes in surface albedo as a result of forestation in temperate and boreal forest areas, and translate these forcings into equivalent changes in local carbon stock for comparison with estimated carbon sequestration potentials. I suggest that in many boreal forest areas, the positive forcing induced by decreases in albedo can offset the negative forcing that is expected from carbon sequestration. Some high-latitude forestation activities may therefore increase climate change, rather that mitigating it as intended

  9. Contribution of Oxygenic Photosynthesis to Palaeo-Oceanic Organic Carbon Sink Fluxes in Early Cambrian Upper Yangtze Shallow Sea:Evidence from Black Shale Record

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kunyu Wu; Tingshan Zhang; Yang Yang; Yuchuan Sun; Daoxian Yuan

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT:The extensive transgression that occurred on the Yangtze Plate in Early Cambrian led to a massive organic carbon pool in the Niutitang Formation. A black shale core section from 3 251.08 to 3 436.08 m beneath the Earth’s surface was studied to estimate the contribution of oxygenic photosyn-thesis to organic carbon sink fluxes in Early Cambrian Upper Yangtze shallow sea. Results indicate that the oxygenic photosynthesis played the most important role in carbon fixation in Early Cambrian. Or-ganic carbon sink was mainly contributed by photosynthetic microorganisms, e.g., cyanobacteria, algae and archaea. The Niutitang Formation was formed in a deep anoxic marine shelf sedimentary envi-ronment at a sedimentation rate of ~0.09±0.03 mm/yr. The initial TOC abundance in Niutitang shale ranged from 0.18%to 7.09%, with an average of 2.15%. In accordance with the sedimentation rate and initial TOC abundance, organic carbon sink fluxes were calculated and found to range from 0.21 to 8.10×103 kg/km2·yr-1, especially the organic carbon sink fluxes in depth between 3 385 and 3 470 m range from 3.80 to 8.10×103 kg/km2·yr-1, with an average of~6.03×103 kg/km2·yr-1, which is much high-er than that of contemporary marine sediments. The organic carbon sink fluxes of Niutitang shale are equal to 0.56 to 21.61×103 kg/km2·yr-1 net oxygen emitted into the Early Cambrian ocean and atmos-phere, this emitted oxygen may have significantly promoted the oxygen level of the Earth’s surface and diversification of metazoans.

  10. Radiocarbon evidence for a smaller oceanic carbon dioxide sink than previously believed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiocarbon produced naturally in the upper atmosphere or artificially during nuclear weapons testing is the main tracer used to validate models of oceanic carbon cycling, in particular the exchange of carbon dioxide with the atmosphere and the mixing parameters within the ocean itself. Here we test the overall consistency of exchange fluxes between all relevant compartments in a simple model of the global carbon cycle, using measurements of the long-term tropospheric CO2 concentration and radiocarbon composition, the bomb 14C inventory in the stratosphere and a compilation of bomb detonation dates and strengths. (author)

  11. Do the rubber plantations in tropical China act as large carbon sinks?

    OpenAIRE

    Song Q-H; Tan Z-H; Zhang Y-P; Sha L-Q; Deng X-B; Deng Y; Zhou W-J; Zhao J-F; Zhao J-B; Zhang X; Zhao W; Yu G-R; Sun X-M; Liang N-S

    2014-01-01

    The regrowth of tropical secondary forests and plantations can not offset the carbon release caused by tropical deforestation, consequently determining net carbon losses on tropical lands. However, large uncertainties remain in relation to this assumption. Here, we used a biometric method to estimate the net dry matter production and net ecosystem production in a rubber forest, the most widespread plantation type in tropical Southeast Asia. According to biometric estimates made during the stu...

  12. ECONOMIC VALUE OF THE CARBON SINK SERVICES OF TROPICAL SECONDARY FORESTS AND ITS MANAGEMENT IMPLICATIONS

    OpenAIRE

    Ramirez, Octavio A.; Carpio, Carlos E.; Ortiz, Rosalba; Finnegan, Brian

    2000-01-01

    This paper explores the economic feasibility secondary forest regeneration and conservation as an alternative to help address global warming. Detailed measurements of tropical secondary forests through time, in different ecological zones of Costa Rica, are used for estimating carbon storage models. The paper addresses key issues in the international discussion about cross- and within-country compensation for carbon storage services and illustrates a method to compute/predict their economic va...

  13. Source or sink? A preliminary analysis of carbon flows in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The carbon cycle of the US is poorly understood from a quantitative standpoint, partly because impacts on the carbon cycle have not figured heavily in natural resource management decisions. Indeed, swiftly changing and sometimes contradictory public policies, a basic lack of biological information on long-term resource trends, and the unknowns surrounding the potential impacts of such exogenous variables as global warming and acid rain suggest the need for great caution in estimating the effects and cost-effectiveness of alternative approaches to carbon storage. What scientists do know now is best summarized by land-use type: i.e., forests, agriculture, pasture and urban uses. Although land uses in the US are relatively well tracked, major uncertainties remain with respect to the net carbon flows associated with the changes that continue to take place. It is virtually certain that forests, especially timberlands, are the nation's largest storehouses of biotic carbon, but a variety of questions need answers before the size and direction of net carbon flows can be estimated

  14. Manipulating biotic carbon sources and sinks for climate change mitigation: can science keep up with practice?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The potential for natural C sinks to be manipulated by human means to mitigate climate change has been discussed in the environmental literature for more than a decade. There now appears to be little doubt that changes in global land-use and land management practices could significantly slow the accumulation of CO2 in the atmosphere. As a result, some forward-thinking companies and governmental bodies are acting now upon the biotic mitigation literature by developing actual mitigation projects. It is now national policy in the United States to encourage such activities. The future of C offsets, however, is unclear, due in large measure to lagging scientific knowledge. Large-scale private action likely will await regulatory signals that action will be accepted as a legitimate mitigation measure, perhaps providing retroactive regulatory credit, a source of tradeable emission entitlements, or credit against yet-to-be-established C taxes. The practical potential of most biotic mitigation approaches is unknown, and the entire concept remains subject to political challenge domestically and abroad. The ability to predict C benefits of individual mitigation projects is often tenuous and subject to debate. To allow expansion of C offset practices as quickly as possible, and hopefully to fund projects with many ancillary environmental and economic benefits, policy makers and project developers desperately need physical and social science data to be provided in a useable form. 25 refs., 1 tab

  15. Terrestrial carbon sink observed from space: variation of growth rates and seasonal cycle amplitudes in response to interannual surface temperature variability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Schneising

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The terrestrial biosphere is currently acting as a net carbon sink on the global scale exhibiting significant interannual variability in strength. To reliably predict the future strength of the land sink and its role in atmospheric CO2 growth the underlying processes and their response to a changing climate need to be well understood. In particular, better knowledge of the impact of key climate variables like temperature or precipitation on the biospheric carbon reservoir is essential. It is demonstrated using nearly a decade of SCIAMACHY nadir measurements that years with higher temperatures during the growing season can be robustly associated with larger growth rates in atmospheric CO2 and smaller seasonal cycle amplitudes for northern mid-latitudes. We find linear relationships between warming and CO2 growth as well as seasonal cycle amplitude at the 98% significance level. This suggests that the terrestrial carbon sink is less efficient at higher temperatures, which might lead to future sink saturation via a positive carbon-climate feedback. Quantitatively, the covariation between the annual CO2 growth rates derived from SCIAMACHY data and warm season surface temperature anomaly amounts to 1.25±0.32 ppm yr−1 K−1 for the Northern Hemisphere where the bulk of the terrestrial carbon sink is located. In comparison, the relation is less pronounced in the Southern Hemisphere. The covariation of the seasonal cycle amplitudes derived from satellite and temperature anomaly is −1.30±0.31 ppm K−1 for the north temperate zone. These estimates are consistent with those from the CarbonTracker data assimilated CO2 data product indicating that the temperature dependence of the model surface fluxes is realistic.

  16. Enhanced Australian carbon sink despite increased wildfire during the 21st century

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Climate projections show Australia becoming significantly warmer during the 21st century, and precipitation decreasing over much of the continent. Such changes are conventionally considered to increase wildfire risk. Nevertheless, we show that burnt area increases in southern Australia, but decreases in northern Australia. Overall the projected increase in fire is small (0.72–1.31% of land area, depending on the climate scenario used), and does not cause a decrease in carbon storage. In fact, carbon storage increases by 3.7–5.6 Pg C (depending on the climate scenario used). Using a process-based model of vegetation dynamics, vegetation–fire interactions and carbon cycling, we show increased fire promotes a shift to more fire-adapted trees in wooded areas and their encroachment into grasslands, with an overall increase in forested area of 3.9–11.9%. Both changes increase carbon uptake and storage. The increase in woody vegetation increases the amount of coarse litter, which decays more slowly than fine litter hence leading to a relative reduction in overall heterotrophic respiration, further reducing carbon losses. Direct CO2 effects increase woody cover, water-use efficiency and productivity, such that carbon storage is increased by 8.5–14.8 Pg C compared to simulations in which CO2 is held constant at modern values. CO2 effects tend to increase burnt area, fire fluxes and therefore carbon losses in arid areas, but increase vegetation density and reduce burnt area in wooded areas. (letter)

  17. Implications of albedo changes following afforestation on the benefits of forests as carbon sinks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirschbaum, M. U. F.; Whitehead, D.; Dean, S. M.; Beets, P. N.; Shepherd, J. D.; Ausseil, A.-G. E.

    2011-12-01

    Increased carbon storage with afforestation leads to a decrease in atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration and thus decreases radiative forcing and cools the Earth. However, afforestation also changes the reflective properties of the surface vegetation from more reflective pasture to relatively less reflective forest cover. This increase in radiation absorption by the forest constitutes an increase in radiative forcing, with a warming effect. The net effect of decreased albedo and carbon storage on radiative forcing depends on the relative magnitude of these two opposing processes. We used data from an intensively studied site in New Zealand's Central North Island that has long-term, ground-based measurements of albedo over the full short-wave spectrum from a developing Pinus radiata forest. Data from this site were supplemented with satellite-derived albedo estimates from New Zealand pastures. The albedo of a well-established forest was measured as 13 % and pasture albedo as 20 %. We used these data to calculate the direct radiative forcing effect of changing albedo as the forest grew. We calculated the radiative forcing resulting from the removal of carbon from the atmosphere as a decrease in radiative forcing of -104 GJ tC-1 yr-1. We also showed that the observed change in albedo constituted a direct radiative forcing of 2759 GJ ha-1 yr-1. Thus, following afforestation, 26.5 tC ha-1 needs to be stored in a growing forest to balance the increase in radiative forcing resulting from the observed albedo change. Measurements of tree biomass and albedo were used to estimate the net change in radiative forcing as the newly planted forest grew. Albedo and carbon-storage effects were of similar magnitude for the first four to five years after tree planting, but as the stand grew older, the carbon storage effect increasingly dominated. Averaged over the whole length of the rotation, the changes in albedo negated the benefits from increased carbon storage by 17-24 %.

  18. Climate-driven shifts in continental net primary production implicated as a driver of a recent abrupt increase in the land carbon sink

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buermann, Wolfgang; Beaulieu, Claudie; Parida, Bikash; Medvigy, David; Collatz, George J.; Sheffield, Justin; Sarmiento, Jorge L.

    2016-03-01

    The world's ocean and land ecosystems act as sinks for anthropogenic CO2, and over the last half century their combined sink strength grew steadily with increasing CO2 emissions. Recent analyses of the global carbon budget, however, have uncovered an abrupt, substantial ( ˜ 1 PgC yr-1) and sustained increase in the land sink in the late 1980s whose origin remains unclear. In the absence of this prominent shift in the land sink, increases in atmospheric CO2 concentrations since the late 1980s would have been ˜ 30 % larger than observed (or ˜ 12 ppm above current levels). Global data analyses are limited in regards to attributing causes to changes in the land sink because different regions are likely responding to different drivers. Here, we address this challenge by using terrestrial biosphere models constrained by observations to determine if there is independent evidence for the abrupt strengthening of the land sink. We find that net primary production significantly increased in the late 1980s (more so than heterotrophic respiration), consistent with the inferred increase in the global land sink, and that large-scale climate anomalies are responsible for this shift. We identify two key regions in which climatic constraints on plant growth have eased: northern Eurasia experienced warming, and northern Africa received increased precipitation. Whether these changes in continental climates are connected is uncertain, but North Atlantic climate variability is important. Our findings suggest that improved understanding of climate variability in the North Atlantic may be essential for more credible projections of the land sink under climate change.

  19. Estimates of Historical Global Sources and Sinks of Carbon from Land Cover and Land Use Changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, T. K.; Yang, X.; Jain, A. K.

    2009-12-01

    A geographically explicit terrestrial carbon and nitrogen cycle component of the Integrated Science Assessment Model (ISAM) is used to examine the response of plant and soil carbon stocks to historical land cover and land use changes (LCLUCs). The ISAM model is forced with three different LCLUC datasets for cropland and pastureland coupled with observed atmospheric CO2, temperature, precipitation data and estimated changes in N deposition. The model also considers wood harvesting on primary and secondary forests. The objective of this study is to evaluate uncertainties in the land use emissions by forcing a single terrestrial model with three different LCLUC datasets. This approach allows us to isolate the LCLUC data related uncertainties from the model related uncertainties in the terrestrial carbon fluxes. The evaluation of three alternative data sets for historical changes in LCLUC is important because the flux associated with land cover change is responsible for substantial uncertainty in net land-atmosphere flux for the recent decades.

  20. Wood Fuel or Carbon Sink? Aspects of Forestry in the Climate Question

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper discusses and contrasts two main roles of forestry in light of the debate on the global climate. As the main problem is related to the increases of the CO2-concentration in the atmosphere, forests may be viewed as part of the alleviation of the problem through their function as (1) a source of biomass for energy production, which may replace fossil fuels and thus indirectly reduce CO2-emissions, and as (2) carbon storage, since a growing forest extracts atmospheric CO2 and fixes it as carbon in biomass. In the Scandinavian forestry, logging residues are increasingly being used for energy production. In this paper the value of forests as a source of bioenergy is added to the traditional timber value. Formulated as a joint production model within the Faustmann framework, the effect of this addition on the optimal rotation length is discussed. Based on data for spruce, the dominant species in the Scandinavian forestry, it is demonstrated that the rotation length is shortened compared to the standard Faustmann model. Shorter rotation length implies less carbon storage. Therefore, in this model without explicit regard to the social carbon storage value of the forest, the gains in terms of the climate problem from utilisation of forest biomass for energy production are being diminished by the value of reduced carbon storage. The carbon value of the forest is then added to complete the model, with the effect of increasing the rotation length, a result that is well known in the literature. Finally, the empirical effects of the interaction of these two climate-related value elements of the forest are discussed

  1. Economic Value of the Carbon Sink Services of Tropical Secondary Forests and Its Management Implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper explores the economic feasibility of secondary forest regeneration and conservation as an alternative in the campaign addressing the problem of global warming. Detailed measurements of tropical secondary forests over time, in different ecological zones of Costa Rica, are used to evaluate carbon storage models. The paper addresses key issues in the international discussion about cross- and within-country compensation for carbon storage services and illustrates a method to compute/predict their economic value over time under a variety of scenarios. The procedure is applicable to other developing countries where secondary forest growth is increasingly important

  2. ENHANCEMENT OF TERRESTRIAL CARBON SINKS THROUGH RECLAMATION OF ABANDONED MINE LANDS IN THE APPALACHIAN REGION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gary D. Kronrad

    2002-12-01

    The U.S.D.I. Office of Surface Mining (OSM) estimates that there are approximately 1 million acres of abandoned mine land (AML) in the Appalachian region. AML lands are classified as areas that were inadequately reclaimed or were left unreclaimed prior to the passage of the 1977 Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act, and where no federal or state laws require any further reclamation responsibility to any company or individual. Reclamation and afforestation of these sites have the potential to provide landowners with cyclical timber revenues, generate environmental benefits to surrounding communities, and sequester carbon in the terrestrial ecosystem. Through a memorandum of understanding, the OSM and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) have decided to investigate reclaiming and afforesting these lands for the purpose of mitigating the negative effects of anthropogenic carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. This study determined the carbon sequestration potential of northern red oak (Quercus rubra L.), one of the major reclamation as well as commercial species, planted on West Virginia AML sites. Analyses were conducted to (1) calculate the total number of tons that can be stored, (2) determine the cost per ton to store carbon, and (3) calculate the profitability of managing these forests for timber production alone and for timber production and carbon storage together. The Forest Management Optimizer (FORMOP) was used to simulate growth data on diameter, height, and volume for northern red oak. Variables used in this study included site indices ranging from 40 to 80 (base age 50), thinning frequencies of 0, 1, and 2, thinning percentages of 20, 25, 30, 35, and 40, and a maximum rotation length of 100 years. Real alternative rates of return (ARR) ranging from 0.5% to 12.5% were chosen for the economic analyses. A total of 769,248 thinning and harvesting combinations, net present worths, and soil expectation values were calculated in this study. Results indicate that

  3. Are soils of Iowa USA currently a carbon sink or source? Simulated changes in SOC stock from 1972 to 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, S.; Tan, Z.; Li, Z.; Zhao, S.; Yuan, W.

    2011-01-01

    Upscaling the spatial and temporal changes in carbon (C) stocks and fluxes from sites to regions is a critical and challenging step toward improving our understanding of the dynamics of C sources and sinks over large areas. This study simulated soil organic C (SOC) dynamics within 0-100cm depth of soils across the state of Iowa in the USA from 1972 to 2007 using the General Ensemble biogeochemical Modeling System (GEMS). The model outputs with variation coefficient were analyzed and assembled from simulation unit to the state scale based upon major land use types at annual step. Results from this study indicate that soils (within a depth of 0-100cm) in Iowa had been a SOC source at a rate of 190??380kg Cha-1yr-1. This was likely caused by the installation of a massive drainage system which led to the release of SOC from deep soil layers previously protected under poor drainage conditions. The annual crop rotation was another major force driving SOC variation and resulted in spatial variability of annual budgets in all croplands. Annual rate of change of SOC stocks in all land types depended significantly on the baseline SOC levels; soils with higher SOC levels tended to be C sources, and those with lower levels tended to be C sinks. Management practices (e.g., conservation tillage and residue management practices) slowed down the C emissions from Iowa soils, but could not reverse the general trend of net SOC loss in view of the entire state due mainly to a high level of baseline SOC stocks. ?? 2010 Elsevier B.V.

  4. Spherical and ellipsoidal cavities in European sandstones: a product of sinking carbonate dissolution front

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Adamovič, Jiří; Mikuláš, Radek; Navrátil, Tomáš

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 59, Supplement 1 (2015), s. 123-149. ISSN 0372-8854 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA300130806; GA ČR GA13-28040S Institutional support: RVO:67985831 Keywords : symmetrical cavities * solutional landforms * cavernous weathering * tafoni * sandstone * concretions * carbonate dissolution front Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy Impact factor: 0.734, year: 2014

  5. Dynamics of carbon dioxide transport in a multiple sink network (GHGT-11)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veltin, J.; Belfroid, S.P.C.

    2013-01-01

    As Carbon Capture and Storage slowly gets accepted and integrated as a mean for cleaner utilization of fossil fuels, the integration of capture, transport and storage becomes a key component to properly design a CO2 network. While the boundary conditions set by the capture and storage units have bee

  6. Implications of albedo changes following afforestation on the benefits of forests as carbon sinks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. U. F. Kirschbaum

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Increased carbon storage with afforestation leads to a decrease in atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration and thus decreases radiative forcing and cools the Earth. However, land-use change also changes the reflective properties of the surface vegetation from more reflective pasture to relatively less reflective forest cover. This increase in radiation absorption by the forest constitutes an increase in radiative forcing, with a warming effect. The net effect of decreased albedo and carbon storage on radiative forcing depends on the relative magnitude of these two opposing processes.

    We used data from an intensively studied site in New Zealand's Central North Island that has long-term, ground-based measurements of albedo over the full short-wave spectrum from a developing Pinus radiata forest. Data from this site were supplemented with satellite-derived albedo estimates from New Zealand pastures. The albedo of a well-established forest was measured as 13 % and pasture albedo as 20 %. We used these data to calculate the direct radiative forcing effect of changing albedo as the forest grew.

    We calculated the radiative forcing resulting from the removal of carbon from the atmosphere as a decrease in radiative forcing of −104 GJ tC−1 yr−1. We also showed that the observed change in albedo constituted a direct radiative forcing of 2759 GJ ha−1 yr−1. Thus, following afforestation, 26.5 tC ha−1 needs to be stored in a growing forest to balance the increase in radiative forcing resulting from the observed albedo change. Measurements of tree biomass and albedo were used to estimate the net change in radiative forcing as the newly planted forest grew. Albedo and carbon-storage effects were of similar magnitude for the first four to five years after tree planting, but as the stand grew older, the carbon storage effect increasingly dominated. Averaged over the whole

  7. Implications of albedo changes following afforestation on the benefits of forests as carbon sinks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. U. F. Kirschbaum

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Increased carbon storage with afforestation leads to a decrease in atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration and thus decreases radiative forcing and cools the Earth. However, afforestation also changes the reflective properties of the surface vegetation from more reflective pasture to relatively less reflective forest cover. This increase in radiation absorption by the forest constitutes an increase in radiative forcing, with a warming effect. The net effect of decreased albedo and carbon storage on radiative forcing depends on the relative magnitude of these two opposing processes.

    We used data from an intensively studied site in New Zealand's Central North Island that has long-term, ground-based measurements of albedo over the full short-wave spectrum from a developing Pinus radiata forest. Data from this site were supplemented with satellite-derived albedo estimates from New Zealand pastures. The albedo of a well-established forest was measured as 13 % and pasture albedo as 20 %. We used these data to calculate the direct radiative forcing effect of changing albedo as the forest grew.

    We calculated the radiative forcing resulting from the removal of carbon from the atmosphere as a decrease in radiative forcing of −104 GJ tC−1 yr−1. We also showed that the observed change in albedo constituted a direct radiative forcing of 2759 GJ ha−1 yr−1. Thus, following afforestation, 26.5 tC ha−1 needs to be stored in a growing forest to balance the increase in radiative forcing resulting from the observed albedo change. Measurements of tree biomass and albedo were used to estimate the net change in radiative forcing as the newly planted forest grew. Albedo and carbon-storage effects were of similar magnitude for the first four to five years after tree planting, but as the stand grew older, the carbon storage effect increasingly dominated. Averaged over the whole

  8. The Arctic CH4 sink and its implications for the permafrost carbon feedbacks to the global climate system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juncher Jørgensen, Christian; Christiansen, Jesper; Mariager, Tue; Hugelius, Gustaf

    2016-04-01

    Using atmospheric methane (CH4), certain soil microbes are able to sustain their metabolism, and in turn remove this powerful greenhouse gas from the atmosphere. While the process of CH4 oxidation is a common feature in most natural and unmanaged ecosystems in temperate and boreal ecosystems, the interactions between soil physical properties and abiotic process drivers, net landscape exchange and spatial patterns across Arctic drylands remains highly uncertain. Recent works show consistent CH4 comsumption in upland dry tundra soils in Arctic and High Arctic environments (Christiansen et al., 2014, Biogeochemistry 122; Jørgensen et al., 2015, Nature Geoscience 8; Lau et al., 2015, The ISME Journal 9). In these dominantly dry or barren soil ecosystems, CH4 consumption has been observed to significantly exceed the amounts of CH4 emitted from adjacent wetlands. These observations point to a potentially important but largely overlooked component of the global soil-climate system interaction and a counterperspective to the conceptual understanding of the Arctic being a only a source of CH4. However, due to our limited knowledge of spatiotemporal occurrence of CH4 consumption across a wider range of the Arctic landscape we are left with substantial uncertainites and an overall unconstrained range estimate of this terrestrial CH4 sink and its potential effects on permafrost carbon feedback to the atmospheric CH4 concentration. To address this important knowledge gap and identify the most relevant spatial scaling parameters, we studied in situ CH4 net exchange across a large landscape transect on West Greenland. The transect representated soils formed from the dominant geological parent materials of dry upland tundra soils found in the ice-free land areas of Western Greenland, i.e. 1) granitic/gneissic parent material, 2) basaltic parent material and 3) sedimentary deposits. Results show that the dynamic variations in soil physical properties and soil hydrology exerts an

  9. New models for estimating the carbon sink capacity of Spanish softwood species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruiz-Peinado, R.; Rio, M. del; Montero, G.

    2011-07-01

    Quantifying the carbon balance in forests is one of the main challenges in forest management. Forest carbon stocks are usually estimated indirectly through biomass equations applied to forest inventories, frequently considering different tree biomass components. The aim of this study is to develop systems of equations for predicting tree biomass components for the main forest softwood species in Spain: Abies alba Mill., A. pinsapo Boiss., Juniperus thurifera L., Pinus canariensis Sweet ex Spreng., P. halepensis Mill., P. nigra Arn., P. pinaster Ait., P. pinea L., P. sylvestris L., P. uncinata Mill. For each species, a system of additive biomass models was fitted using seemingly unrelated regression. Diameter at the breast height and total height were used as independent variables. Diameter appears in all component models, while tree height was included in the stem component model of all species and in some branch component equations. Total height was included in order to improve biomass estimations at different sites. These biomass models were compared to previously available equations in order to test their accuracy and it was found that they yielded better fitting statistics in all cases. Moreover, the models fulfil the additivity property. We also developed root:shoot ratios in order to determine the partitioning into aboveground and belowground biomass. A number of differences were found between species, with a minimum of 0.183 for A. alba and a maximum of 0.385 for P. uncinata. The mean value for the softwood species studied was 0.265. Since the Spanish National Forest Inventory (NFI) records species, tree diameter and height of sample trees, these biomass models and ratios can be used to accurately estimate carbon stocks from NFI data. (Author) 55 refs.

  10. New models for estimating the carbon sink capacity of Spanish softwood species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quantifying the carbon balance in forests is one of the main challenges in forest management. Forest carbon stocks are usually estimated indirectly through biomass equations applied to forest inventories, frequently considering different tree biomass components. The aim of this study is to develop systems of equations for predicting tree biomass components for the main forest softwood species in Spain: Abies alba Mill., A. pinsapo Boiss., Juniperus thurifera L., Pinus canariensis Sweet ex Spreng., P. halepensis Mill., P. nigra Arn., P. pinaster Ait., P. pinea L., P. sylvestris L., P. uncinata Mill. For each species, a system of additive biomass models was fitted using seemingly unrelated regression. Diameter at the breast height and total height were used as independent variables. Diameter appears in all component models, while tree height was included in the stem component model of all species and in some branch component equations. Total height was included in order to improve biomass estimations at different sites. These biomass models were compared to previously available equations in order to test their accuracy and it was found that they yielded better fitting statistics in all cases. Moreover, the models fulfil the additivity property. We also developed root:shoot ratios in order to determine the partitioning into aboveground and belowground biomass. A number of differences were found between species, with a minimum of 0.183 for A. alba and a maximum of 0.385 for P. uncinata. The mean value for the softwood species studied was 0.265. Since the Spanish National Forest Inventory (NFI) records species, tree diameter and height of sample trees, these biomass models and ratios can be used to accurately estimate carbon stocks from NFI data. (Author) 55 refs.

  11. Nested atmospheric inversion for the terrestrial carbon sources and sinks in China

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang, F; Wang, H. W.; Chen, J M; L. X. Zhou; W. M. Ju; Peters, W.

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we establish a~nested atmospheric inversion system with a focus on China using the Bayes theory. The global surface is separated into 43 regions based on the 22 TransCom large regions, with 13 small regions in China. Monthly CO2 concentrations from 130 GlobalView sites and a Hong Kong site are used in this system. The core component of this system is atmospheric transport matrix, which is created using the TM5 model with a horizontal resolution of 3° × 2°. The net carbon fluxes...

  12. Seagrass meadow carbon sink and amplification of the carbon sink for eelgrass bed in Sanggou Bay%桑沟湾大叶藻海草床生态系统碳汇扩增力的估算

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高亚平; 方建光; 唐望; 张继红; 任黎华; 杜美荣

    2013-01-01

    Seagrass meadows occupy less than 0. 2% of the area of the world's oceans but are estimated to contribute 10% of the yearly estimated organic carbon burial. Globally, seagrass ecosystems could store as much as 19. 9 Pg organic carbon. The high carbon storage capacity in seagrass meadows may result from the high primary production of seagrass meadows and their capacity to filter out particles from the water column and store them in soils. Eelgrass, Zostera marina is one of the common seagrass species in the northern hemisphere. Investigation in Sanggou Bay showed that the bi-omass of eelgrass varied between 313. 5 and 769. 3 g DW/m2 from 2011 to 2012, with the maximum of 738. 1 g DW/m2 in summer. Primary production was about 2. 0~6. 4 g DW/m2 · d and tissue carbon content was 35. 5% in the plant. Stored carbon in the eelgrass meadow from primary production was about 543. 5 gC/m2 · yr. Biomass of algal epiphyte was small, with a wet weight of 21. 2 g/m2 and contributed 30 g C/m2 · yr carbon storage. As a Ruditapes philippinarum stock enhancement area, the carbon sink contribution from the clam was 63. 15g C/m2 · Yr. In addition, when other carbon source, such as stripped particles was considered, the carbon pool capacity was 1 180 g C/m2 · Yr and the whole of the bed can reach 290 Mg C/yr.%2010~2011年对桑沟湾楮岛海区大叶藻床的调查研究显示,其生物量年度变化为313.5~769.3g DW/m2,在夏季达到最高值;初级生产力年度内为2.0~6.4 gDW/m2·d;总组织含碳量为35.5%;来自海草初级生产力的固碳贡献约为543.5 g C/m2·yr.大叶藻附着植物生物量较小,年平均约为21.2 g/m2,固碳贡献约30 g C/m2·yr;作为菲律宾蛤仔增殖场,来自蛤仔的固碳贡献约63.15g C/m2·yr,此外,参照已有研究的数据,将来自草床捕获颗粒的碳贡献等计算在内,桑沟湾大叶藻床扩增固碳量为1 180g C/m2·yr,总量达290Mg C/yr.

  13. Review on worldwide study of ocean biological carbon sink%国际海洋生物碳汇研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘慧; 唐启升

    2011-01-01

    Ocean is the biggest carbon sink in the world. The total carbon load of the ocean is 39× 1012t, which is 93% of total global carbon load, and about 53 times of carbon load of the atmosphere. Carbon in the ocean will either join in the biogeochemical cycle again, or be preserved for long periods; while some of the carbon will be stored in the seabed forever. According to the Blue Carbon report by UN, about 55% global biological carbon or green carbon capture is accomplished by marine organisms. These marine organisms include phytoplankton, bacteria, seaweeds, salt marshes and mangroves. Marine plants or flora have high capacity and efficiency for carbon sequestration. The findings on marine biological carbon sink by worldwide studies are reviewed in this paper.Major mechanisms governing the marine biological carbon sink are described, along with its present status and approaches for its restoration. Additionally, the function of seaweed and bivalves mariculture as components of fisheries carbon sink is evaluated.%海洋是地球上最大的碳库.整个海洋中蓄积的碳总量达到39×1012t,占全球碳总量的93%,约为大气的53倍.这些碳或重新进入生物地球化学循环,或被长期储存起来;而其中一部分被永久地储存在海底.根据联合国报告,地球上超过一半(55%)的生物碳或是绿色碳捕获是由海洋生物完成的,这些海洋生物包括浮游生物、细菌、海藻、盐沼植物和红树林.本文综述了近年国际上对海洋生物碳汇的研究结果,阐述了海洋生物固碳的机制、海洋生物碳汇的现状及其修复措施,同时评价和论述了海水贝藻养殖作为渔业碳汇的地位与作用.

  14. Passive Vaporizing Heat Sink

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowles, TImothy R.; Ashford, Victor A.; Carpenter, Michael G.; Bier, Thomas M.

    2011-01-01

    A passive vaporizing heat sink has been developed as a relatively lightweight, compact alternative to related prior heat sinks based, variously, on evaporation of sprayed liquids or on sublimation of solids. This heat sink is designed for short-term dissipation of a large amount of heat and was originally intended for use in regulating the temperature of spacecraft equipment during launch or re-entry. It could also be useful in a terrestrial setting in which there is a requirement for a lightweight, compact means of short-term cooling. This heat sink includes a hermetic package closed with a pressure-relief valve and containing an expendable and rechargeable coolant liquid (e.g., water) and a conductive carbon-fiber wick. The vapor of the liquid escapes when the temperature exceeds the boiling point corresponding to the vapor pressure determined by the setting of the pressure-relief valve. The great advantage of this heat sink over a melting-paraffin or similar phase-change heat sink of equal capacity is that by virtue of the =10x greater latent heat of vaporization, a coolant-liquid volume equal to =1/10 of the paraffin volume can suffice.

  15. Carbon dioxide power cycles using liquid natural gas as heat sink

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liquefied natural gas (LNG) is recognized as a source of usable cryogenic exergy for power cycles. The performance of conventional cycles are calculated. A binary steam-Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) at 550 deg. C has an efficiency of about 52%, somewhat higher than that of a nitrogen Brayton cycle (50.7% at 700 deg. C). Carbon dioxide is recognized as an almost ideal medium for implementing single fluid condensation cycles. Its proven practical use both at low temperature (by the refrigeration industry) and at high temperature (by the nuclear reactor industry) makes it suitable for direct utilization without any extended preliminary research. A carbon dioxide cycle in its basic configuration featuring a pump, a regenerator, a heater and a condenser is much simpler than the binary steam-ORC cycle but has a lower efficiency (around 47%). All condensing cycles (ORC,CO2,...) exhibit a limited capability of exploiting the whole cryogenic exergy of LNG in that they cannot heat the natural gas at temperatures above the condensation temperature. This drawback is fully overcome in nitrogen Brayton cycles which can heat LNG up to ambient temperature. Slightly modifying the basic CO2 cycle so that it can partially use free thermal energy from sea water increases efficiency to 51%. Multiple condensation cycles allow a better overall performance at the cost of a more complex layout. Compound CO2 cycles, featuring also a gas compressor, exhibit an improved thermodynamics by reducing the temperature difference within the regenerator, with the result of increasing the overall efficiency at values better than those of both binary and Brayton cycles. At 600 deg. C top temperature, for example, a compound cycle at 100 bar maximum pressure has an efficiency of 55.3% (52.3% for a binary steam-ORC cycle at 550 deg. C, 150 bar steam parameters; 46.5% for the nitrogen cycle at 600 deg. C top temperature).

  16. Managing carbon sinks in rubber (Hevea brasilensis plantation by changing rotation length in SW China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed Moazzam Nizami

    Full Text Available Extension of the rotation length in forest management has been highlighted in Article 3.4 of the Kyoto Protocol to help the countries in their commitments for reduction in greenhouse gas emissions. CO2FIX Model Ver.3.2 was used to examine the dynamics of carbon stocks (C stocks in a rubber plantation in South Western China with the changing rotation lengths. To estimate the efficiency of increasing the rotation length as an Article 3.4 activity, study predicted that the rubber production and C stocks of the ecosystem increased with the increasing rotation (25, 30, 35, 40 and 45 years. While comparing the pace of growth both in economical (rubber production and ecological (C stocks terms in each rotation, 40 years rotation length showed maximum production and C stocks. After elongation of 40 year rotation to four consecutive cycles, it was concluded that the total C stocks of the ecosystem were 186.65 Mg ha(-1. The longer rotation lengths showed comparatively increased C stocks in below ground C stock after consecutive four rotations. The pace of C input (Mg C ha(-1 yr(-1 and rubber production indicated that 40 years rotation is best suited for rubber plantation. The study has developed carbon mitigation based on four rotation scenarios. The possible stimulated increase in C stocks of the entire ecosystem after consecutive long rotations indicated that the emphasis must be paid on deciding the rotation of rubber plantation in SW China for reporting under article 3.4 of the Kyoto Protocol.

  17. Vapotron as heat sink for flat high-conductivity unidirectional carbon-fiber-composite tiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two vapotrons from the Joint European Torus (JET) actively cooled divertor design have been fitted by the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute with unidirectional high-conductivity carbon-fiber-composite tiles and have been tested in the JET Neutral Beam Test Bed. The test section showed excellent uniformity and accepted power densities up to 30 MW/m2 for equilibrium pulses. The surface temperature was 1100 degree C at 20 MW/m2. One tile detached at a power density of 25MW/m2. A total of just under 300 pulses at power densities mostly between 20 and 30 MW/m2 have been fired onto the test sections without additional failure. The hydraulic parameters were as follows: water inlet temperature, 15 to 20 degree C; average water pressure in the component, 0.4 and 0.69 MPa; flow velocity, 6.9 and 7.5 m/s. 8 refs., 15 figs., 1 tab

  18. A significant carbon sink in temperate forests in Beijing: based on 20-year field measurements in three stands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, JianXiao; Hu, XueYang; Yao, Hui; Liu, GuoHua; Ji, ChenJun; Fang, JingYun

    2015-11-01

    Numerous efforts have been made to characterize forest carbon (C) cycles and stocks in various ecosystems. However, long-term observation on each component of the forest C cycle is still lacking. We measured C stocks and fluxes in three permanent temperate forest plots (birch, oak and pine forest) during 2011–2014, and calculated the changes of the components of the C cycle related to the measurements during 1992–1994 at Mt. Dongling, Beijing, China. Forest net primary production in birch, oak, and pine plots was 5.32, 4.53, and 6.73 Mg C ha-1 a-1, respectively. Corresponding net ecosystem production was 0.12, 0.43, and 3.53 Mg C ha-1 a-1. The C stocks and fluxes in 2011–2014 were significantly larger than those in 1992–1994 in which the biomass C densities in birch, oak, and pine plots increased from 50.0, 37.7, and 54.0 Mg C ha-1 in 1994 to 101.5, 77.3, and 110.9 Mg C ha-1 in 2014; soil organic C densities increased from 207.0, 239.1, and 231.7 Mg C ha-1 to 214.8, 241.7, and 238.4 Mg C ha-1; and soil heterotrophic respiration increased from 2.78, 3.49, and 1.81 Mg C ha-1 a-1 to 5.20, 4.10, and 3.20 Mg C ha-1 a-1. These results suggest that the mountainous temperate forest ecosystems in Beijing have served as a carbon sink in the last two decades. These observations of C stocks and fluxes provided field-based data for a long-term study of C cycling in temperate forest ecosystems. PMID:26501378

  19. A significant carbon sink in temperate forests in Beijing: based on 20-year field measurements in three stands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, J.

    2015-12-01

    Numerous efforts have been made to characterize the forest carbon (C) cycles and stocks. However, long-term observation-based quantification on each component of the forest C cycle and its change is still lacking. We measured C stocks and fluxes in three permanent temperate forest plots (birch, oak and pine forest plots) during 2011-2014 and calculated the changes of the C cycle components related to the measurements during 1992-1994 in Mt. Dongling, Beijing, China. Our results showed that forest net primary production in birch, oak and pine plots were 5.32, 4.53 and 6.73 Mg C ha-1 yr-1, respectively. The corresponding net ecosystem production were 0.12, 0.43 and 3.53 Mg C ha-1 yr-1. The C stocks and fluxes in 2011-2014 were significantly larger than those in 1992-1994: the biomass C densities in birch, oak and pine plots increased from 50.0, 37.7 and 54.0 Mg C ha-1 in 1994 to 101.5, 77.3 and 110.9 Mg C ha-1 in 2014; soil organic C densities from 207.0, 239.1 and 231.7 Mg C ha-1 to 214.8, 241.7 and 238.4 Mg C ha-1; and soil heterotrophic respiration from 2.78, 3.49 and 1.81 Mg C ha-1 yr-1 to 5.20, 4.10 and 3.20 Mg C ha-1 yr-1. These results suggest that the mountainous temperate forest ecosystems are a carbon sink in the recent two decades. These observations of C densities and fluxes provided field-based data for long-term study of C cycling in temperate forest ecosystems.

  20. Sources and sinks of carbonyl sulfide in a mountain grassland and relationships to the carbon dioxide exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spielmann, Felix M.; Kitz, Florian; Hammerle, Albin; Gerdel, Katharina; Wohlfahrt, Georg

    2016-04-01

    The trace gas carbonyl sulfide (COS) has been proposed as a tracer for canopy gross primary production (GPP), canopy transpiration and stomatal conductance of plant canopies in the last few years. COS enters the plant leaf through the stomata and diffuses through the intercellular space, the cell wall, the plasma membrane and the cytosol like CO2. It is then catalyzed by the enzyme carbonic anhydrase (CA) in a one-way reaction to H2S and CO2. This one-way flux into the leaf makes COS a promising tracer for the GPP. However there is growing evidence, that plant leaves aren't the only contributors to the ecosystem flux of COS. Therefor the COS uptake of soil microorganisms also containing CA and abiotic COS production might have to be accounted for when using COS as a tracer at the ecosystem scale. The overarching objective of this study was to quantify the relationship between the ecosystem-scale exchange of COS, CO2 and H2O and thus to test for the potential of COS to be used as a tracer for the plant canopy CO2 and H2O exchange. More specifically we aimed at quantifying the contribution of the soil to the ecosystem-scale COS exchange in order to understand complications that may arise due to a non-negligible soil COS exchange. In May 2015 we set up our quantum cascade laser (QCL) (Aerodyne Research Inc., MA, USA) at a temperate mountain grassland in Stubai Valley close to the village of Neustift, Austria. Our site lies at the valley bottom and is an intensively managed mountain grassland, which is cut 3-4 times a year. With the QCL we were able to measure concurrently the concentrations of COS, CO2, H2O (and CO) at a frequency of 10 Hz with minimal noise. This allowed us to conduct ecosystem-scale eddy covariance measurements. The eddy covariance flux measurements revealed that the COS uptake continues at night, which we confirmed was not caused by soil microorganisms, as the soil exchange was close to neutral during nighttime. Instead, the nocturnal COS uptake

  1. Geochemistry of dissolved inorganic carbon in a Coastal Plain aquifer. 2. Modeling carbon sources, sinks, and δ13C evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahon, Peter B.; Chapelle, Francis H.

    1991-01-01

    Stable isotope data for dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), carbonate shell material and cements, and microbial CO2 were combined with organic and inorganic chemical data from aquifer and confining-bed pore waters to construct geochemical reaction models along a flowpath in the Black Creek aquifer of South Carolina. Carbon-isotope fractionation between DIC and precipitating cements was treated as a Rayleigh distillation process. Organic matter oxidation was coupled to microbial fermentation and sulfate reduction. All reaction models reproduced the observed chemical and isotopic compositions of final waters. However, model 1, in which all sources of carbon and electron-acceptors were assumed to be internal to the aquifer, was invalidated owing to the large ratio of fermentation CO2 to respiration CO2 predicted by the model (5–49) compared with measured ratios (two or less). In model 2, this ratio was reduced by assuming that confining beds adjacent to the aquifer act as sources of dissolved organic carbon and sulfate. This assumption was based on measured high concentrations of dissolved organic acids and sulfate in confining-bed pore waters (60–100 μM and 100–380 μM, respectively) relative to aquifer pore waters (from less than 30 μM and 2–80 μM, respectively). Sodium was chosen as the companion ion to organic-acid and sulfate transport from confining beds because it is the predominant cation in confining-bed pore waters. As a result, excessive amounts of Na-for-Ca ion exchange and calcite precipitation (three to four times more cement than observed in the aquifer) were required by model 2 to achieve mass and isotope balance of final water. For this reason, model 2 was invalidated. Agreement between model-predicted and measured amounts of carbonate cement and ratios of fermentation CO2 to respiration CO2 were obtained in a reaction model that assumed confining beds act as sources of DIC, as well as organic acids and sulfate. This assumption was

  2. Carbon storage and carbon sink of mangrove wetland: Research progress%红树林湿地碳储量及碳汇研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张莉; 郭志华; 李志勇

    2013-01-01

    红树林是生长在热带和亚热带地区潮间带的特殊的湿地森林,在防风固田、促进淤泥沉积、抵御海啸和台风等自然灾害和保护海岸线方面起着重要的作用.全球约有红树林152000 km2,占陆地森林面积的0.4%,我国约有230 km2.热带红树林湿地的碳储量平均高达1023 Mg C·hm-2,全球红树林湿地的碳汇能力在0.18 ~0.228 Pg C·a-1.影响红树林碳储量和碳汇能力的主要因子除了植物种类组成以外,气温、海水温度、海水盐度、土壤理化性质、大气C02浓度及人类干扰等均有着重要作用.红树林湿地碳储量、碳汇能力的研究方法以实测法为基础,包括异速方程、遥感反演和模型模拟等.研究红树林湿地碳储量及碳汇能力,有利于深入认识红树林湿地碳循环过程及其调控机制,对红树林湿地的保护和合理利用具有重要意义.%Mangrove forest is a special wetland forest growing in the inter-tidal zone of tropical and subtropical regions, playing important roles in windbreak, promoting silt sedimentation, resisting extreme events such as cyclones and tsunamis, and protecting coastline, etc. The total area of global mangrove forests is about 152000 km , only accounting for 0. 4% of all forest area. There are about 230 km mangrove forests in China. The mangrove forests in the tropics have an average carbon storage as high as 1023 Mg·hm-2 , and the global mangrove forests can sequestrate about 0. 18-0.228 Pg C·a-1 . In addition to plant species composition, a variety of factors such as air temperature, seawater temperature and salinity, soil physical and chemical properties, atmospheric CO2 concentration, and human activities have significant effects on the carbon storage and sink ability of mangrove forests. Many approaches based on field measurements, including allometric equations, remote sensing, and model simulation, are applied to quantify the carbon storage and sink ability of mangrove

  3. The Arctic CH4 sink and its implications for the permafrost carbon feedbacks to the global climate system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juncher Jørgensen, Christian; Christiansen, Jesper; Mariager, Tue; Hugelius, Gustaf

    2016-04-01

    Using atmospheric methane (CH4), certain soil microbes are able to sustain their metabolism, and in turn remove this powerful greenhouse gas from the atmosphere. While the process of CH4 oxidation is a common feature in most natural and unmanaged ecosystems in temperate and boreal ecosystems, the interactions between soil physical properties and abiotic process drivers, net landscape exchange and spatial patterns across Arctic drylands remains highly uncertain. Recent works show consistent CH4 comsumption in upland dry tundra soils in Arctic and High Arctic environments (Christiansen et al., 2014, Biogeochemistry 122; Jørgensen et al., 2015, Nature Geoscience 8; Lau et al., 2015, The ISME Journal 9). In these dominantly dry or barren soil ecosystems, CH4 consumption has been observed to significantly exceed the amounts of CH4 emitted from adjacent wetlands. These observations point to a potentially important but largely overlooked component of the global soil-climate system interaction and a counterperspective to the conceptual understanding of the Arctic being a only a source of CH4. However, due to our limited knowledge of spatiotemporal occurrence of CH4 consumption across a wider range of the Arctic landscape we are left with substantial uncertainites and an overall unconstrained range estimate of this terrestrial CH4 sink and its potential effects on permafrost carbon feedback to the atmospheric CH4 concentration. To address this important knowledge gap and identify the most relevant spatial scaling parameters, we studied in situ CH4 net exchange across a large landscape transect on West Greenland. The transect representated soils formed from the dominant geological parent materials of dry upland tundra soils found in the ice-free land areas of Western Greenland, i.e. 1) granitic/gneissic parent material, 2) basaltic parent material and 3) sedimentary deposits. Results show that the dynamic variations in soil physical properties and soil hydrology exerts an

  4. Forest carbon sink and potentials analysis in Guizhou province%贵州省森林碳汇及潜力分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    尹晓芬; 王灏; 贾斌; 贾斌英

    2012-01-01

    区域层面的森林碳汇估算研究有利于为整体层面持续固碳增汇的森林经营提供科学参考,评估森林碳汇对减少区域内碳排放的贡献。采用温室气体清单估算法,对2000、2005和2010年贵州省森林碳汇进行估算,分别为1538.0万t、2244.7万t、2431.4万tCO2当量,呈稳定增长趋势,占全省碳排放量的10.32%~14.47%。贵州省尚有161.70万hm2宜林地,如果能用于发展碳汇林业,每年可吸收CO2 237.9万t,30年内将吸收CO2达7137.0万t。贵州省正处于碳排放增长阶段,相对于森林碳汇而言,本区域碳减排工作任重道远,森林碳汇能力有很大的提升空间。%Forest carbon sink estimation research at regional level provided scientific reference for sustaining forest management based on carbon sequestration increase in general and is beneficial to the estimation on contribution of forest carbon sink to reduction of carbon emission in the area. The greenhouse gas inventory estimation method was used to estimate the forest carbon sink of Guizhou province in' years of 2000, 2005 and 2010. The forest carbon sink of Guizhou province was increased to 22,447, 000, 24,314,000 tons (CO2e) from 15,380, 000, showed a steady rising tendency and accounted for 10.32%-14.4% of carbon emission of the whole province. There are 1,617,000 hm2 of land suitable for forest in Guizhou province, and if all the land is used for developing carbon sink foreslry, 2,379, 000 tons of CO2 will be absorbed every year, and 71,370,000 tons of CO2 will be absorbed within 30 years. Guizhou province is in the increasing stage of carbon emission; and for forest carbon sink, the task of carbon emission reduction of Guizhou province still has a long wayto go, and forest carbon capability can be improved to a large extent.

  5. Inclusion of ecologically based trait variation in plant functional types reduces the projected land carbon sink in an earth system model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verheijen, Lieneke M; Aerts, Rien; Brovkin, Victor; Cavender-Bares, Jeannine; Cornelissen, Johannes H C; Kattge, Jens; van Bodegom, Peter M

    2015-08-01

    Earth system models demonstrate large uncertainty in projected changes in terrestrial carbon budgets. The lack of inclusion of adaptive responses of vegetation communities to the environment has been suggested to hamper the ability of modeled vegetation to adequately respond to environmental change. In this study, variation in functional responses of vegetation has been added to an earth system model (ESM) based on ecological principles. The restriction of viable mean trait values of vegetation communities by the environment, called 'habitat filtering', is an important ecological assembly rule and allows for determination of global scale trait-environment relationships. These relationships were applied to model trait variation for different plant functional types (PFTs). For three leaf traits (specific leaf area, maximum carboxylation rate at 25 °C, and maximum electron transport rate at 25 °C), relationships with multiple environmental drivers, such as precipitation, temperature, radiation, and CO2 , were determined for the PFTs within the Max Planck Institute ESM. With these relationships, spatiotemporal variation in these formerly fixed traits in PFTs was modeled in global change projections (IPCC RCP8.5 scenario). Inclusion of this environment-driven trait variation resulted in a strong reduction of the global carbon sink by at least 33% (2.1 Pg C yr(-1) ) from the 2nd quarter of the 21st century onward compared to the default model with fixed traits. In addition, the mid- and high latitudes became a stronger carbon sink and the tropics a stronger carbon source, caused by trait-induced differences in productivity and relative respirational costs. These results point toward a reduction of the global carbon sink when including a more realistic representation of functional vegetation responses, implying more carbon will stay airborne, which could fuel further climate change. PMID:25611824

  6. Assessment of the Soil Organic Carbon Sink in a Project for the Conversion of Farmland to Forestland: A Case Study in Zichang County, Shaanxi, China

    OpenAIRE

    Mu, Lan; Liang, Yinli; Han, Ruilian

    2014-01-01

    The conversion of farmland to forestland not only changes the ecological environment but also enriches the soil with organic matter and affects the global carbon cycle. This paper reviews the influence of land use changes on the soil organic carbon sink to determine whether the Chinese “Grain-for-Green” (conversion of farmland to forestland) project increased the rate of SOC content during its implementation between 1999 and 2010 in the hilly and gully areas of the Loess Plateau in north-cent...

  7. Moderate topsoil erosion rates constrain the magnitude of the erosion-induced carbon sink and agricultural productivity losses on the Chinese Loess Plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, J.; Van Oost, K.; Chen, L.; Govers, G.

    2015-09-01

    Despite a multitude of studies, erosion rates as well as the contribution of different processes on Chinese Loess Plateau (CLP) remain uncertain. This makes it impossible to correctly assess the impact of conservation programs and the magnitude of the erosion-induced carbon sink. We used a novel approach, based on field evidence, to reassess erosion rates on the CLP before and after conservation measures were implemented. Our results show that the current average topsoil erosion rate is 3-9 times lower than earlier estimates suggested: most sediments are mobilised by gully erosion and/or landsliding. Under 2005 conditions, the combination of topsoil erosion, gully erosion and landslides mobilised 0.81 ± 0.23 Gt yr-1 of sediments and 4.77 ± 1.96 Tg yr-1 of soil organic carbon (SOC): the latter number sets the maximum magnitude of the erosion-induced carbon sink, which is ca. 4 times lower than other recent estimates suggest. The sediment fluxes we calculate are consistent with sediment yields measured in the Yellow River. The conservation programs implemented from the 1950s onwards reduced topsoil erosion from 0.51 ± 0.13 to 0.30 ± 0.08 Gt yr-1 while SOC mobilisation was reduced from 7.63 ± 3.52 to 4.77 ± 1.96 Tg C. Prior to 1950, a geomorphological equilibrium existed whereby the amount of sediment and carbon exported to the Bohai sea was similar to the amount of sediment eroded on the CLP, so that the erosion-induced carbon sink nearly equalled the amount of mobilised SOC. Conservation efforts and reservoir construction have disrupted this equilibrium and most eroded sediments and carbon are now stored on land where part of the SOC may decompose, thereby potentially lowering the strength of the erosion-induced carbon sink. Despite the fact that average topsoil losses on the CLP are still relatively high, the current level of topsoil erosion on the CLP is no major threat to the agricultural productivity of the area, mainly because fertilizer application has

  8. Re-establishing marshes can return carbon sink functions to a current carbon source in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta of California, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Robin L.; Fujii, Roger

    2011-01-01

    . Decomposition rates were related to differences in hydrologic conditions, including water temperature, pH, dissolved oxygen concentration, and availability of alternate electron acceptors. The study showed that marsh re-establishment with permanent, low energy, shallow flooding can limit oxidation of organic soils, thus, effectively turning subsiding land from atmospheric carbon sources to carbon sinks, and at the same time reducing flood vulnerability.

  9. Characteristics of carbon cycles and mechanism of carbon sink in inland fishery ecosystem%内陆渔业生态系统的碳循环特征及碳汇机制

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨健; 苏彦平; 刘洪波; 戈贤平

    2012-01-01

    Inland fishery carbon sink (IFCS)refers to the process and mechanism in which fishery organisms absorb and sequestrate CO2 sequestrate CO2 in the water and remove it from the water, and consequently, inland carbon sink fishery (ICSF) will be any fishery activity that effectively promotes a relative increase of IFCS. Phytoplankton fixes CO2 through photosynthesis and converts it into organic carbon. Quite much of it is taken up by major freshwater herbivorous and filter-feeding fish and mussels, and accordingly, carbon can be cascaded through aquatic food webs and removed by capture fisheries and aqua-culture. Therefore, ICSF can not only provide large quantities of nutritious food, but also play a critical role in carbon sequestration and removal. Carbon in freshwater ecosystems can be made up of different chemical components, like particulate organic and inorganic carbon, dissolved inorganic and organic carbon, which are convertible with high dynamics. It is noteworthy that unsustainable fishing related activities will jeopardize the potential capacities and even ecosystem services of IFCS. Therefore, the importance of IFCS and ICSF must be highlighted. A more recent study suggested that aquaculture ponds (110 830 km2) sequester an estimated 16.6 million tonnes/year of carbon globally, and the most carbon sequestration occurs in Asia and particularly in China (94% and 55.9% of global aquaculture pond area, respectively). Fishery will be the only controllable industry that is possible to effectively increase the carbon sink capacity in aquatic ecosystem, and the carbon sink fishery will be the only carbon sink industry in aquatic ecosystem. To better understand the mechanism of carbon sink/source, the current focus of study should be on the natural laws of carbon cycles in inland fishery ecosystem (including natural waters and ponds), form conversion between different chemical components, the carbon footprint for each of the different inland fisheries and

  10. Improvement of soil carbon sink by cover crops in olive orchards under semiarid conditions. Influence of the type of soil and weed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Márquez-García

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The olive tree is one of the most important crops in Spain, and the main one in the region of Andalusia. Most orchards are rain-fed, with high slopes where conventional tillage (CT is the primary soil management system used. These conditions lead to high erosion and a significant transport of organic carbon (OC. Moreover, soil tillage accelerates the oxidation of the OC. Cover crops (CC are the conservation agriculture (CA approach for woody crops. They are grown in-between tree rows to protect the soil against water erosion and their organic residues also help to increase the soil carbon (C sink. Soil and OC losses associated to the sediment were measured over four seasons (2003-07 using micro-plots for the collection of runoff and sediment in five experimental fields located in rain-fed olive orchards in Andalusia. Two soil management systems were followed, CC and CT. Furthermore, the changes in soil C in both systems were analyzed at a depth of 0-25 cm. CC reduced erosion by 80.5%, and also OC transport by 67.7%. In addition, Cover crops increased soil C sink by 12.3 Mg ha-1 year-1 of carbon dioxide (CO2 equivalent, with respect to CT. CC in rainfed olive orchards in a Mediterranean climate could be an environmental friendly and profitable system for reducing erosion and increasing the soil C sink. However, C fixing rate is not regular, being very high for the initial years after shifting from CT to CC and gradually decreasing over time.

  11. Improvement of soil carbon sink by cover crops in olive orchards under semiarid conditions. Influence of the type of soil and weed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marquez-Garcia, F.; Gonzalez-Sanchez, E. J.; Castro-Garcia, S.; Ordonez-Fernandez, R.

    2013-06-01

    The olive tree is one of the most important crops in Spain, and the main one in the region of Andalusia. Most orchards are rain-fed, with high slopes where conventional tillage (CT) is the primary soil management system used. These conditions lead to high erosion and a significant transport of organic carbon (OC). Moreover, soil tillage accelerates the oxidation of the OC. Cover crops (CC) are the conservation agriculture (CA) approach for woody crops. They are grown in-between tree rows to protect the soil against water erosion and their organic residues also help to increase the soil carbon (C) sink. Soil and OC losses associated to the sediment were measured over four seasons (2003-07) using micro-plots for the collection of runoff and sediment in five experimental fields located in rain-fed olive orchards in Andalusia. Two soil management systems were followed, CC and CT. Furthermore, the changes in soil C in both systems were analyzed at a depth of 0-25 cm. CC reduced erosion by 80.5%, and also OC transport by 67.7%. In addition, CC increased soil C sink by 12.3 Mg ha{sup -}1 year{sup -}1 of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) equivalent, with respect to CT. Cover crops in rainfed olive orchards in a Mediterranean climate could be an environmental friendly and profitable system for reducing erosion and increasing the soil C sink. However, C fixing rate is not regular, being very high for the initial years after shifting from CT to CC and gradually decreasing over time. (Author) 57 refs.

  12. Erosion of soil organic carbon at high latitudes and its delivery to Arctic Ocean sediments: New source to sink insight from radiocarbon dating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilton, Robert; Galy, Valier; Gaillardet, Jerome; Dellinger, Mathieu; Bryant, Charlotte; O'Regan, Matt; Grocke, Darren; Coxall, Helen

    2016-04-01

    Soils of the northern high latitudes store carbon over thousands of years and contain almost double the carbon stock of the atmosphere. Erosion processes can mobilise this pre-aged soil organic carbon from the landscape and supply it to rivers. If it escapes degradation during river transport and is delivered to the coastal ocean, this carbon may be sequestered for much longer periods of time (>104 yr) as a geological CO2 sink. Despite this recognition, the erosional flux and fate of particulate organic carbon (POC) in large rivers draining the high latitudes remains poorly constrained. Using radiocarbon activity, we quantify POC source, flux and fate in the Mackenzie River, the main sediment supplier to the Arctic Ocean. When combined with stable carbon isotopes and element ratios, the radiocarbon activity of POC allows us to distinguish inputs of POC from sedimentary rocks and quantify the average age of biospheric POC (from vegetation and soil) transported through the river system. We find that the eroded biospheric POC has resided in the basin for millennia, with a mean radiocarbon age of 5800±800 years. This is much older than large tropical rivers where we have equivalent data (Amazon River, Ganges River), and likely reflects the longer residence time of organic matter in cold, wet, high latitude soils. Based on the measured biospheric POC content and annual sediment flux, we calculate a biospheric POC flux of 2.2 (+1.3/-0.9) TgC yr‑1 from the Mackenzie River. This is the largest input of aged organic carbon to the Arctic Ocean, more than the combined POC flux from the Eurasian Rivers. Offshore, we use a marine core to investigate organic carbon burial over the Holocene period. Radiocarbon measurements of bulk organic carbon reveal a significant offset from benthic foraminifera radiocarbon ages throughout the core, which is dependent upon the grain size of the sediments. Organic matter in sediments >63μm are offset from foraminifera by ˜ 6,000 14C years

  13. A Novel Approach to Estimation of Time-Variable Surface Sources and Sinks of Carbon Dioxide Using Empirical Orthogonal Functions and the Kalman Filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuravlev, Ruslan; Khattatov, Boris; Kiryushov, Boris; Lukyanov, Alexander; Maksyutov, Shamil

    2010-05-01

    It is well known that greenhouse gases and, in particular, greenhouse gases of anthropogenic origin, influence the Earth climate to a great extend. Accurate estimates of strengths, and spatial and time variability of the surface sources and sinks of greenhouse gases are thus of great interest to both the scientific community and the policy makers. Carbon dioxide, (CO2), is the most important greenhouse gas of anthropogenic origin that affects radiative balance of the atmosphere and, eventually, the climate. Observations of CO2 concentrations in the atmosphere demonstrated short-time variability and spatial patterns reflecting influence of time-variable regional sources and sinks. The objective of this study is to estimate absolute contributions of various geographical regions to the total carbon dioxide budget at relatively short time scales and in a computationally efficient manner. A traditional approach to this problem includes dividing the Earth's surface by a number of non-overlapping regions and estimating the sources and sinks for each one of them. One of the most well-known and successful experiments following this approach was Transcom 3 [1], which used 22 distinct regions. In subsequent work of P. Patra et al. [3], the number of the regions has been increased to 64. In both cases, monthly mean CO2 surface emissions have been successfully estimated using ground based observations of carbon dioxide concentrations. Recently, (Feng et al, 2009 [3]), 144 distinct regions have been used and the time scale of carbon dioxide variability was reduced to 8 days using satellite observations of CO2. While very successful, the abovementioned approach relies on somewhat arbitrary division of the Earth surface to discrete regions. Refining the results would necessitate increasing the number of regions, and thus computational requirements, which in some cases might prove to be impractical. We propose an approach based on representing the surface emissions of carbon

  14. The Role of Forestry Sinks in the CDM - Analysing the Effects of Policy Decisions on the Carbon Market

    OpenAIRE

    Jung, Martina

    2003-01-01

    The details on rules and modalities for the inclusion of forestry projects in the Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) are one of the last non resolved implementation issues of the Kyoto Protocol. We examine in detail the implications of different policy decisions concerning the inclusion of CDM forestry sink enhancement projects in the first commitment period of the climate regime (2008-2012). Our analysis is based on the development of marginal forestry cost curves which are implemented into t...

  15. Pengaruh Aerasi dan Sumber Nutrien terhadap Kemampuan Alga Filum Chlorophyta dalam Menyerap Karbon (Carbon Sink untuk Mengurangi Emisi CO2 di Kawasan Perkotaan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lancur Setoaji

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Penelitian terkait mitigasi pemanasan global, khususnya dalam penyerapan karbon dioksida (CO2, menjadi fokus utama di kalangan ilmuwan dunia. Secara alamiah, karbon dioksida dapat diserap oleh tumbuhan hijau, laut, karbonasi batuan kapur, dan alga. Pigmen hijau dalam alga atau klorofil dapat menyerap karbon dioksida dalam proses fotosintesis. Alga memiliki pertumbuhan yang sangat cepat sehingga cocok digunakan sebagai carbon sink. Penelitian terkait carbon sink ini bertujuan untuk menentukan kemampuan rata-rata serapan CO2 oleh alga di kawasan perkotaan dan menentukan pengaruh aerasi dan variasi sumber N terhadap pertumbuhan dan perkembangan alga. Penelitian ini dilakukan dalam skala laboratorium menggunakan reaktor dengan proses batch. Sampel alga yang digunakan didapatkan dari hasil pengembangbiakan yang bersumber dari perairan di kawasan perkotaan. Penelitian ini menggunakan dua variabel uji, yaitu aerasi dan sumber nutrien. Jumlah karbon dioksida yang diserap didapatkan dari perbandingan stoikiometri pada reaksi fotosintesis.  Berdasarkan perbandingan stoikiometri tersebut diketahui bahwa 1 gram sel alga yang terbentuk sebanding dengan 1,92 gram CO2 yang diserap. Dari hasil penelitian, alga dengan penambahan pupuk urea dapat menyerap 4,87 mg CO2/hari dalam kondisi tanpa aerasi atau 3,84 mg CO2/hari dengan aerasi. Sedangkan alga dengan penambahan pupuk NPK dapat menyerap 3,61 mg CO2/hari dalam kondisi tanpa aerasi atau 3,01 mg CO2/hari dengan aerasi.

  16. Examining early-diagenetic processes as a chief sink for carbonate in the aftermath of the Triassic-Jurassic crisis: Hettangian concretions of Muller Canyon, NV, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritterbush, K. A.; Loyd, S. J.; Corsetti, F. A.; Bottjer, D. J.; Berelson, W.

    2015-12-01

    Tectonic, climate, and biotic changes across the Triassic-Jurassic transition appear to have resulted in a "carbonate gap" in the rock record of many shallow marine environments. Ecological state changes documented in near-shore settings in both Tethys and Panthassa show an earliest Jurassic switch to sponge-dominated biosiliceous sedimentation regimes. The Sunrise Formation exposed in the Gabbs Valley Range of Nevada (USA) records a peculiar juxtaposition of Hettangian carbonate-rich strata that contain demosponge spicules as the primary bioclast. It is unclear 1) why biocalcifiers were not recorded in higher abundance in this near-shore back-arc basin setting; 2) why carbonates formed following a biosiliceous regime; and 3) what the lithology indicates about post-extinction marine geochemical dynamics. Detailed sedimentological, paleontological, and geochemical analyses were applied to a 20-m thick sequence of limestone and chert in the Muller Canyon area, which is the Auxiliary Stratotype for the Triassic/Jurassic boundary. Concretion anatomy, bioclast microfacies, and oxygen and carbon isotopic signatures all indicate the Hettangian limestones are chiefly diagenetic concretions that all formed very shallowly, some essentially at the sediment-water interface. We infer that local bottom waters and/or pore waters were supersaturated with respect to calcium carbonate and that this contributed to widespread concretion sedimentation independent of biomineralization. Ecological incumbency of the demosponge meadows may have been supported by concurrent augmentation of marine silica concentration and this apparently proved inhospitable to re-colonization of benthic biocalcifying macrofauna. Together the biotic and lithologic consequences of the extinction represent million-year scale ecological restructuring and highlight early diagenetic precipitation as a major sink in long-term regional carbonate cycling. Perhaps the widespread 'carbonate gap' is actually a gap in

  17. 广东省能源消费碳排放与森林碳汇的研究%Research on the Carbon Emission and Forest Carbon Sink in Energy Consumption of Guangdong Province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    石洪艾; 严敏悦

    2015-01-01

    以广东省为研究对象 ,选取1992~2012年时间区间 ,利用枟IPCC 2006国家温室气体清单指南枠中的碳排放计算公式和能源排放系数缺省值 ,从碳源和碳汇两个源头分析了广东省的碳排放强度.结果表明 :广东省以煤炭和石油为主的能源消费结构有所改善 ,碳强度逐年下降 ,能源利用率有所提高.1992~2012年间 ,广东省的碳排放量随着广东省GDP增长而增加 ,年均增长率为7% ;森林碳汇量逐年增加 ,年均增长率为4% ,森林碳汇的增加得益于森林蓄积量 ,而非森林面积 ,广东省仍存在较大的碳汇缺口.%Taking the Guangdong province as study object ,We select the article selects the time interval from 1992-to 2012 years of Guangdong Province and uses of the computational formulas of carbon emission and coefficients defaults of energy emissions in "IPCC2006 National Greenhouse Gas Inventories" to analyzes the carbon emissions intensity of Guangdong province from the aspects of carbon sources and sinks.The results indicate that the coal and oil-based energy consumption structure of Guangdong has improved ,and the carbon intensity declines while the , energy utilization rate has improved.Between 1992 and 2012 ,the carbon emissions of Guangdong increased at an average annual growth rate of 7% with the GDP growth;forest carbon sink increased every year with an average annual growth rate of 4%.The increases of forest carbon sink benefits from the forest stock volume rather than the forest area.However ,there are still large gaps in carbon sinks of Guangdong province.

  18. The dynamic of the annual carbon allocation to wood in European tree species is consistent with a combined source-sink limitation of growth: implications for modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillemot, J.; Martin-StPaul, N. K.; Dufrene, E.; Francois, C.; Soudani, K.; Ourcival, J. M.; Delpierre, N.

    2015-05-01

    The extent to which wood growth is limited by carbon (C) supply (i.e. source control) or by cambial activity (i.e. sink control) will strongly determine the responses of trees to global changes. Nevertheless, the physiological processes that are responsible for limiting forest growth are still a matter of debate. The aim of this study was to evaluate the key determinants of the annual C allocation to wood along large soil and climate regional gradients over France. The study was conducted for five tree species representative of the main European forest biomes (Fagus sylvatica, Quercus petraea, Quercus ilex, Quercus robur and Picea abies). The drivers of stand biomass growth were assessed on both inter-site and inter-annual scales. Our data set comprised field measurements performed at 49 sites (931 site-years) that included biometric measurements and a variety of stand characteristics (e.g. soil water holding capacity, leaf area index). It was complemented with process-based simulations when possible explanatory variables could not be directly measured (e.g. annual and seasonal tree C balance, bioclimatic water stress indices). Specifically, the relative influences of tree C balance (source control), direct environmental control (water and temperature controls of sink activity) and allocation adjustments related to age, past climate conditions, competition intensity and soil nutrient availability on growth were quantified. The inter-site variability in the stand C allocation to wood was predominantly driven by age-related decline. The direct effects of temperature and water stress on sink activity (i.e. effects independent from their effects on the C supply) exerted a strong influence on the annual stand wood growth in all of the species considered, including deciduous temperate species. The lagged effect of the past environmental conditions (e.g. the previous year's water stress and low C uptake) significantly affected the annual C allocation to wood. The C supply

  19. Hydrologically-driven variations in the karst-related carbon sink fluxes: Insights from high-resolution monitoring of three karst catchments in Southwest China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Cheng; Liu, Zaihua; Zhao, Min; Yang, Rui

    2016-02-01

    Rainfall (P), discharge (Q), water temperature, pH, and specific electrical conductivity (EC) of the three karst catchments, Banzhai, Huanghou and Houzhai, with different land uses and carbonate lithologies but similar subtropical monsoonal climate, in Guizhou Province, Southwest China, were monitored with CTDP 300 high-resolution multi-parameter data loggers during the period of May 2007-October 2013. In addition, HCO3- and calcium concentrations were titrated in the field and the other major ions determined in the laboratory once every one or two months. Simple linear regression models were used to link the continuous chemical data to in situ measured data to estimate the concentration of HCO3-, the CO2 partial pressures and the calcite saturation indices on the high-resolution logger data. Continuous karst-related carbon sink fluxes (CSFs) were also estimated with the continuous Q and HCO3- concentrations in each catchment area. The primary goal of this study is to understand how discharge and HCO3- concentration determine the CSFs at the storm scale, seasonal scale and annual scale, and to estimate the CSFs for the three studied catchments. Results show that the variation in runoff (river discharge) played a more important role in controlling the CSFs than the variation in HCO3- for all the karst catchments, because of the chemostatic behavior of HCO3- in the catchments. Soil coverage, vegetation and bedrock lithology determined the CSFs by controlling the proportion of precipitation that recharges groundwater (and thus Q), and controlling the soil CO2 productivity (and thus HCO3-). The average CSFs in the Banzhai, Huanghou and Houzhai karst catchments were 29 ± 3, 33 ± 5 and 39 ± 8 t-CO2 km-2 a-1, respectively, which are 15 times higher than those CSFs by silicate weathering in the silicate-rock catchments with similar hydrology, showing the dominant role of carbonate weathering in the rock-weathering-related carbon sink. The interannual change in CSFs was

  20. Response of carbon assimilation and chlorophyll fluorescence to soybean leaf phosphorus across CO2: Alternative electron sink, nutrient efficiency and critical concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Shardendu K; Reddy, Vangimalla R

    2015-10-01

    To evaluate the response of CO2 assimilation rate (PN) and various chlorophyll fluorescence (CF) parameters to phosphorus (P) nutrition, soybean plants were grown in controlled environment with sufficient (0.50mM) and deficient (0.10 and 0.01 mM) phosphate (P) supply under ambient and elevated CO2 (aCO2, 400 and eCO2, 800 μmol mol(-1), respectively). Measurements were made at ambient (21%) and low (2%) O2 concentrations. Results showed strong correlation of leaf P concentration with PN and CF parameters. The P deficiency showed parallel decreases in PN, and CF parameters including quantum efficiency (Fv'/Fm'), quantum yield of photosystem II (ΦPSII), electron transport rate (JF), and photochemical quenching (qP). The Fv'/Fm' decreased as a result of greater decline in maximal (Fm') than minimal (Fo') fluorescence. The eCO2 stimulated PN especially under higher leaf P concentrations. Low O2 also stimulated PN but only at aCO2. The photosynthetic carbon reduction (PCR, signified by PN) and photorespiratory carbon oxidation cycles (PCO, signified photorespiration as indicated by ratio of JF to gross PN and % increase in PN at 2% O2) was the major electron sinks. However, the presence of alternative electron sink was also evident as determined by the difference between the electron transport calculated from chlorophyll fluorescence and gas exchange measurements. Alternative electron sink declined at lower leaf P concentration suggesting its minor role in photochemical energy consumption, thus dissipation of the excess excitation pressure of PSII reaction center under P deficiency. The JF/PG and % increase in PN at 2 versus 21% O2 remained consistent across leaf P concentration suggesting PCO cycle as an important mechanism to dissipate excess excitation energy in P deficient leaves. The severe decline of Fv'/Fm', ΦPSII, JF and qP under P deficiency also suggested the occurrences of excess radiant energy dissipation by non-photochemical quenching mechanisms. Critical

  1. In situ measurement of mesopelagic particle sinking rates and the control of carbon transfer to the ocean interior during the Vertical Flux in the Global Ocean (VERTIGO) voyages in the North Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trull, T. W.; Bray, S. G.; Buesseler, K. O.; Lamborg, C. H.; Manganini, S.; Moy, C.; Valdes, J.

    2008-07-01

    Among the parameters affecting carbon transfer to the ocean interior, particle sinking rates vary three orders of magnitude and thus more than primary production, f-ratios, or particle carbon contents [e.g., Boyd, P.W., Trull, T.W., 2006. Understanding the export of marine biogenic particles: is there consensus? Progress in Oceanography 4, 276-312, doi:10.1016/j.pocean.2006.10.007]. Very few data have been obtained from the mesopelagic zone where the majority of carbon remineralization occurs and the attenuation of the sinking flux is determined. Here, we report sinking rates from ˜300 m depth for the subtropical (station ALOHA, June 2004) and subarctic (station K2, July 2005) North Pacific Ocean, obtained from short (6.5 day) deployments of an indented rotating sphere (IRS) sediment trap operating as an in situ settling column [Peterson, M.L., Wakeham, S.G., Lee, C., Askea, M.A., Miquel, J.C., 2005. Novel techniques for collection of sinking particles in the ocean and determining their settling rates. Limnology and Oceanography Methods 3, 520-532] to separate the flux into 11 sinking-rate fractions ranging from >820 to >2 m d -1 that are collected by a carousel for further analysis. Functioning of the IRS trap was tested using a novel programming sequence to check that all particles have cleared the settling column prior to the next delivery of particles by the 6-hourly rotation cycle of the IRS. There was some evidence (from the flux distribution among the cups and photomicroscopy of the collected particles) that very slow-sinking particles may have been under-collected because they were unable to penetrate the brine-filled collection cups, but good evidence for appropriate collection of fast-settling fractions. Approximately 50% of the particulate organic carbon (POC) flux was sinking at greater than 100 m d -1 at both stations. At ALOHA, more than 15% of the POC flux sank at >820 m d -1, but low fluxes make this uncertain, and precluded resolution of particles

  2. Converging estimates of the forest carbon sink; a comparison of the carbon sink of Scots pine forest in The Netherlands as presented by the eddy covariance and the forest inventory method

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schelhaas, M.J.; Nabuurs, G.J.; Jans, W.W.P.; Moors, E.J.; Sabaté, S.; Daamen, W.P.

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare estimates of the net ecosystem exchange (NEE) by two different methods for a small pine forest in the Netherlands. The inventory-based carbon budgeting method estimated the average NEE for 1997-2001 at 202 g C per mr per year, with a confidence interval of 138-27

  3. Ion association in water solution of soil and vadose zone of chestnut saline solonetz as a driver of terrestrial carbon sink

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batukaev, Abdul-Malik A.; Endovitsky, Anatoly P.; Andreev, Andrey G.; Kalinichenko, Valery P.; Minkina, Tatiana M.; Dikaev, Zaurbek S.; Mandzhieva, Saglara S.; Sushkova, Svetlana N.

    2016-03-01

    The assessment of soil and vadose zone as the drains for carbon sink and proper modeling of the effects and extremes of biogeochemical cycles in the terrestrial biosphere are the key components to understanding the carbon cycle, global climate system, and aquatic and terrestrial system uncertainties. Calcium carbonate equilibrium causes saturation of solution with CaCO3, and it determines its material composition, migration and accumulation of salts. In a solution electrically neutral ion pairs are formed: CaCO30, CaSO40, MgCO30, and MgSO40, as well as charged ion pairs CaHCO3+, MgHCO3+, NaCO3-, NaSO4-, CaOH+, and MgOH+. The calcium carbonate equilibrium algorithm, mathematical model and original software to calculate the real equilibrium forms of ions and to determine the nature of calcium carbonate balance in a solution were developed. This approach conducts the quantitative assessment of real ion forms of solution in solonetz soil and vadose zone of dry steppe taking into account the ion association at high ionic strength of saline soil solution. The concentrations of free and associated ion form were calculated according to analytical ion concentration in real solution. In the iteration procedure, the equations were used to find the following: ion material balance, a linear interpolation of equilibrium constants, a method of ionic pairs, the laws of initial concentration preservation, operating masses of equilibrium system, and the concentration constants of ion pair dissociation. The coefficient of ion association γe was determined as the ratio of ions free form to analytical content of ion γe = Cass/Can. Depending on soil and vadose zone layer, concentration and composition of solution in the ionic pair's form are 11-52 % Ca2+; 22.2-54.6 % Mg2+; 1.1-10.5 % Na+; 3.7-23.8 HCO3-, 23.3-61.6 % SO42-, and up to 85.7 % CO32-. The carbonate system of soil and vadose zone water solution helps to explain the evolution of salted soils, vadose and saturation zones, and

  4. Comprehensive Study of Carbonaceous Species in Arctic Snow: from Snow Type to Carbon Sources and Sinks in the Snowpack

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voisin, D.; Cozic, J.; Houdier, S.; Barret, M.; Jaffrezo, J. L.; King, M. D.; Beine, H. J.; Domine, F.

    2012-04-01

    Carbonaceous species play critical roles in the interaction of snow with the overlying atmosphere. Elemental or Black Carbon strongly increases solar energy uptake and snow melt, therefore influencing the snow-climate feedback loop. Carbonyls and complex organic molecules such as Humic Like Substances also absorb UV and visible light, therefore influencing photochemistry and light penetration depths in the snowpack. It has been proposed that some of those complex organic molecules, acting as electron donors in photochemical reactions might change the photolysis paths of nitric acid from NO / NO2 to HONO. Yet, comprehensive investigations of the organic matter in arctic snowpack are scarce, and often limited to a few specific species. Such a comprehensive representation of carbonaceous species in Arctic snow is the focus of the present work, lead during the OASIS field campaign in Barrow and focuses on major classes of carbonaceous species, defined operationally: Elemental Carbon (EC), which is close to BC; Water Insoluble Organic Carbon (WInOC); Dissolved Organic Carbon (DOC), which altogether represent the Total Carbon Content (TCC) of the snowpack. Among DOC species, we will more particularly focus on HUmic LIke Substances (HULIS), C2 - C5 dicarboxylic acids and short chain aldehydes, as these compounds are most particularly involved in snow photochemistry, especially HULIS, whose optical properties (UV-Vis absorbance) are measured and discussed. In order to link observed concentrations to physico-chemical processes in the snow pack, we use snow type as a morphological marker of those processes and of the snowpack's history. Similarly, as the different classes of compounds measured are differently affected by the physical processes that lead the transformation of the snowpack, they can be used to probe into those processes. This strategy enables us to discuss in a common framework physical and chemical processes affecting carbonaceous species and the snowpack

  5. 上海地区土壤碳汇功能评估%Evaluation of Soil Carbon Sinks in Shanghai

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵敏; 胡静; 汤庆合

    2012-01-01

    With the rapid development of urbanization,the land use changes had been intensified,which affected soil organic carbon stock.To explore how urbanization effected on soil carbon sequestration,taking Shanghai as example,which was the most rapid development of urbanization in China,the second soil survey data of Shanghai,the farmland survey data in Shanghai between the year 2004 and the year 2005 ,and the field sampling in the year 2009 were used to analyze the variation characters of soil organic carbon.It was found that the average content of soil organic carbon did not change significantly,but the soil organic carbon pool decreased.Thereby,the soil worked as a kind of carbon source,rather than carbon.It was the obvious features of the urbanization to land use changes that the planting structure changed from rice fields to dry land crops for planting vegetable,fruit,and seedlings in some suburban areas.While the organic carbon contents of paddy soil were higher than that of forest and vegetable garden,so planting structure changes had a major impact on soil organic carbon content.Mean while,farming systems,tillage pattern,fertilizer and other agricultural management practices also influenced the changes of soil organic carbon content.As far as the urban green space,it did not make up the loss of soil organic carbon lead by urbanization.%利用上海市第二次土壤普查资料,2004年-2005年上海耕地地力调查资料,以及2009年实地调查采样、实验分析获得的数据,研究了3个时期上海土壤有机碳的变化特征.结果表明,20多年来上海土壤有机碳平均含量没有明显变化,土壤有机碳库逐渐减小,从而使得上海城市化过程中土壤成为一种碳源,而不是碳汇.城市郊区以扩大蔬菜、果树、苗木种植为特征的旱地作物种植方式代替水稻田,是城市化影响土地利用类型变化的明显特征,而水稻田土壤有机碳含量高于林地、菜地.种植结构的变化对土壤

  6. A study of seasonal and yearly modulation on carbon dioxide sources and sinks, with a particular attention to the Boreal Atlantic Ocean

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With the intention of identifying and monitoring space and time patterns of carbon dioxide sources and sinks, the seasonal fields of atmospheric CO2 concentration over an area covering Europe, the Boreal Atlantic, and North Africa have been computed by using CO2 observations measured at one or two remote sites in conjunction with the backward air trajectories crossing the same observation sites. The air trajectories have been calculated by means of the wind speed fields provided by the ECMWF (European Centre of Medium-range Weather Forecast, of Reading, UK) analyses (T213/L31 model) on a regular grid, while the atmospheric CO2 concentrations have been measured at two alpine European stations, located in the free atmosphere, far from the influence of local industrial pollution. A modified version of the statistical receptor-to-source-oriented-model (hereafter, source-oriented model) of Stohl (Atmos. Environ. 30 (1998) 947), using the above-mentioned air trajectories, has then been applied to reconstruct the spatial distribution fields of atmospheric CO2. This source-oriented methodology belongs to a family of models which are simpler and easier to use than the more powerful and widespread inverse models and can allow a reliable deduction of the location of sources and sinks of gas tracers. We have applied this kind of model in order to identify source and sink macro-regions of CO2 over the above-mentioned area in the period 1993-1998. The CO2 observing stations of Plateau Rosa (3480 m a.s.l., in the western Alps) and Zugspite (2937 m, in the eastern Alps) have been considered particularly fit for this purpose, because of their location in high orography areas, allowing to monitor values of atmospheric CO2 concentrations representative of fairly well-mixed air, not affected by some local influences (industries, urban emissions, etc.). In this way, it can be assumed that possible maxima or minima observed in the trend of measured gas concentration can be due to

  7. Terrestrial Carbon Sinks in the Brazilian Amazon and Cerrado Region Predicted from MODIS Satellite Data and Ecosystem Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    A simulation model based on satellite observations of monthly vegetation cover from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) was used to estimate monthly carbon fluxes in terrestrial ecosystems of Brazilian Amazon and Cerrado regions over the period 2000-2004. Pr...

  8. 稻田周年减排增汇技术研究%Study on techniques of mitigating GHG emissions and increasing carbon sink in paddy field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    白朴; 张国平; 曾玮; 白若琦; 张春泉; 卢华金

    2015-01-01

    On the basis of research and practice on crop cultivation for many years and in terms of saving energy,mitigating GHG emissions,increasing carbon sink and improving production efficiency,the authors dis-cuss the comprehensive supporting techniques such as optimization of planting patterns,popularization of low-car-bon and high-yield superior varieties,precise fertilization,water-saving irrigation,and scientific control of disease and insect pest so as to realize the round-year low carbon cultivation objective of both increase in the output and benefit in paddy field and substantial decrease in the direct and indirect GHG emissions.%基于多年作物栽培研究与实践,从稻田周年节能、减排、增汇、增产、增效的角度,论述了种植模式优化、低碳高产优质品种推广、精确减量施肥、节水节能灌溉、病虫害科学防治等综合性配套技术,以实现兼顾稻田周年产出和效益增加,温室气体直接排放与间接排放均大幅度下降的低碳栽培目标。

  9. Sink or link? The bacterial role in benthic carbon cycling in the Arabian sea oxygen minimum zone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Pozzato

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The bacterial loop, the consumption of dissolved organic matter (DOM by bacteria and subsequent transfer of bacterial carbon to higher trophic levels, plays a prominent role in pelagic aquatic food webs. However, its role in sedimentary ecosystems is not well documented. Here we present the results of isotope tracer experiments performed under in situ oxygen conditions in sediments from inside and outside the Arabian Sea Oxygen Minimum Zone (OMZ to study the importance of the microbial loop in this setting. Particulate organic matter, added as phytodetritus, was processed by bacteria, protozoa and metazoans, while dissolved organic matter was processed only by bacteria and there was very little, if any, transfer to higher trophic levels within the experimental period. This lack of significant transfer of bacterial-derived carbon to metazoan consumers indicates that the bacterial loop is rather inefficient in these sediments. Moreover, metazoans directly consume labile particulate organic matter resources and thus compete with bacteria for phytodetritus.

  10. Evidence for alternative electron sinks to photosynthetic carbon assimilation in the high mountain plant species Ranunculus glacialis

    OpenAIRE

    Streb, P; Josse, Eve-Marie; Gallouet, E; Baptist, F.; Kuntz, M; Cornic, G.

    2005-01-01

    The high mountain plant species Ranunculus glacialis has a low antioxidative scavenging capacity and a low activity of thermal dissipation of excess light energy despite its growth under conditions of frequent light and cold stress. In order to examine whether this species is protected from over-reduction by matching photosystem II (PSII) electron transport (ETR) and carbon assimilation, both were analysed simultaneously at various temperatures and light intensities using infrared gas absorpt...

  11. Sink or link? The bacterial role in benthic carbon cycling in the Arabian Sea's oxygen minimum zone

    OpenAIRE

    L Pozzato; van Oevelen, D.; Moodley, L.; Soetaert, K.; J. J. Middelburg

    2013-01-01

    The bacterial loop, the consumption of dissolved organic matter (DOM) by bacteria and subsequent transfer of bacterial carbon to higher trophic levels, plays a prominent role in pelagic food webs. However, its role in sedimentary ecosystems is not well documented. Here we present the results of isotope tracer experiments performed under in situ oxygen conditions in sediments from inside and outside the Arabian Sea’s oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) to study the importance of the microbial loop in th...

  12. Near-Channel Sources and Sinks along a Mountainous Stream: Establishing the Controls and Time Scales of the Lateral Transfer of Sediment and Carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gartner, J. D.; Renshaw, C. E.

    2015-12-01

    River channels exchange sediment, carbon, and other matter with hillslopes and floodplains. An ongoing challenge is to quantify the time and length scales of these lateral interactions, and to establish physical controls on direction of transfer. Here we investigate whether downstream changes in stream power (Ω) can predict near-channel sources or sinks of matter on decadal time scales in a case study of Mink Brook, a 50 km2 watershed in New Hampshire, USA. Building on the Exner equation, we hypothesize that reaches with downstream increases in stream power (Ω↑) exhibit near-channel deposition and accumulation of organic matter, and reaches of downstream decreases in stream power (Ω↓) exhibit near-channel erosion and stripping of organic matter. We measured 210Pbex inventory (an indicator of erosion versus deposition), organic matter inventory, grain size, and depth of alluvium/colluvium in 29 soil pits at 6 cross sections along the brook. Sites had equivalent total Ω for a given storm event. However, 3 cross sections exhibited Ω↑, and 3 exhibited Ω↓. All cross sections showed a general trend of stripping of organic matter and fine sediment particles in the channel, paired with loading of matter at the ~2-year flood elevation. From the ~2- to ~25-year flood elevation, a marked difference appeared between sites. The Ω↑ cross sections exhibited several locations of erosion and stripping of organic matter, as evidenced by low 210Pbex inventories (70 to 1,000 bq m-2), low organic matter inventories (17 to 219 kg m-2), and thin alluvial cover (average 23 cm). The low 210Pbex inventories, below the characteristic 6,000 bq m-2 of stable soil profiles in this region, suggest no areas had consistent deposition over the last century. In contrast, the Ω↓ cross sections exhibited deposition of fine particles and organic matter from the ~2- to ~25-year flood elevation, as evidenced by elevated 210Pbex inventories (up to 9,100 bq m-2), elevated organic matter

  13. Advancing Understanding of the Role of Belowground Processes in Terrestrial Carbon Sinks trhrough Ground-Penetrating Radar. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Day, Frank P. [Old Dominion Univ., Norfolk, VA (United States)

    2015-02-06

    Coarse roots play a significant role in belowground carbon cycling and will likely play an increasingly crucial role in belowground carbon sequestration as atmospheric CO2 levels continue to rise, yet they are one of the most difficult ecosystem parameters to quantify. Despite promising results with ground-penetrating radar (GPR) as a nondestructive method of quantifying biomass of coarse roots, this application of GPR is in its infancy and neither the complete potential nor limitations of the technology have been fully evaluated. The primary goals and questions of this study fell into four groups: (1) GPR methods: Can GPR detect change in root biomass over time, differentiate live roots from dead roots, differentiate between coarse roots, fine roots bundled together, and a fine root mat, remain effective with varied soil moisture, and detect shadowed roots (roots hidden below larger roots); (2) CO2 enrichment study at Kennedy Space Center in Brevard County, Florida: Are there post-fire legacy effects of CO2 fertilization on plant carbon pools following the end of CO2application ? (3) Disney Wilderness Study: What is the overall coarse root biomass and potential for belowground carbon storage in a restored longleaf pine flatwoods system? Can GPR effectively quantify coarse roots in soils that are wetter than the previous sites and that have a high percentage of saw palmetto rhizomes present? (4) Can GPR accurately represent root architecture in a three-dimensional model? When the user is familiar with the equipment and software in a setting that minimizes unsuitable conditions, GPR is a relatively precise, non-destructive, useful tool for estimating coarse root biomass. However, there are a number of cautions and guidelines that should be followed to minimize inaccuracies or situations that are untenable for GPR use. GPR appears to be precise as it routinely predicts highly similar values for a given area across multiple

  14. The Oceanic Sink for Anthropogenic CO2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabine, Chris [NOAA, Seattle, WA; Feely, R. A. [NOAA Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory; Gruber, N. [ETH Zurich, Switzerland; Key, Robert [Princeton University; Lee, K. [Pohang University of Science and Technology (POSTECH), Pohang, Republic of Korea; Bullister, J.L. [NOAA Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory; Wanninkhof, R. [Atlantic Oceanographic & Meteorological Laboratory, NOAA; Wong, C. S. [Institute of Ocean Sciences, Climate Chemistry Laboratory, Sidney, BC Canada; Wallace, D.W.R. [IFM-GEOMAR, Leibniz Institute for Marine Sciences, Chemical Oceanography, Kiel, Germany; Tilbrook, B. [CSIRO Marine and Atmospheric Research; Millero, F. J. [University of Miami; Peng, T.-H. [Atlantic Oceanographic & Meteorological Laboratory, NOAA; Kozyr, Alexander [ORNL; Ono, Tsueno [Frontier Research System for Global Change/Institute for Global Change Research, Japan; Rios, Aida F. [Instituto de Investigaciones Marinas, Consejo Superior de Investigationes Cientificas, Spain

    2004-01-01

    Using inorganic carbon measurements from an international survey effort in the 1990s and a tracer-based separation technique, we estimate a global oceanic anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) sink for the period from 1800 to 1994 of 118 19 petagrams of carbon. The oceanic sink accounts for ~48% of the total fossil-fuel and cement-manufacturing emissions, implying that the terrestrial biosphere was a net source of CO2 to the atmosphere of about 39 28 petagrams of carbon for this period. The current fraction of total anthropogenic CO2 emissions stored in the ocean appears to be about one-third of the long-term potential.

  15. Enhanced ozone strongly reduces carbon sink strength of adult beech (Fagus sylvatica) - Resume from the free-air fumigation study at Kranzberg Forest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ground-level ozone (O3) has gained awareness as an agent of climate change. In this respect, key results are comprehended from a unique 8-year free-air O3-fumigation experiment, conducted on adult beech (Fagus sylvatica) at Kranzberg Forest (Germany). A novel canopy O3 exposure methodology was employed that allowed whole-tree assessment in situ under twice-ambient O3 levels. Elevated O3 significantly weakened the C sink strength of the tree-soil system as evidenced by lowered photosynthesis and 44% reduction in whole-stem growth, but increased soil respiration. Associated effects in leaves and roots at the gene, cell and organ level varied from year to year, with drought being a crucial determinant of O3 responsiveness. Regarding adult individuals of a late-successional tree species, empirical proof is provided first time in relation to recent modelling predictions that enhanced ground-level O3 can substantially mitigate the C sequestration of forests in view of climate change. - Empirical proof corroborates substantial mitigation of carbon sequestration in the tree-soil system of a forest site under enhanced O3 impact for adult beech.

  16. Data-based estimates of the ocean carbon sink variability – first results of the Surface Ocean pCO2 Mapping intercomparison (SOCOM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Rödenbeck

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Using measurements of the surface-ocean CO2 partial pressure (pCO2 and 14 different pCO2 mapping methods recently collated by the Surface Ocean pCO2 Mapping intercomparison (SOCOM initiative, variations in regional and global sea–air CO2 fluxes have been investigated. Though the available mapping methods use widely different approaches, we find relatively consistent estimates of regional pCO2 seasonality, in line with previous estimates. In terms of interannual variability (IAV, all mapping methods estimate the largest variations to occur in the Eastern equatorial Pacific. Despite considerable spead in the detailed variations, mapping methods with closer match to the data also tend to be more consistent with each other. Encouragingly, this includes mapping methods belonging to complementary types – taking variability either directly from the pCO2 data or indirectly from driver data via regression. From a weighted ensemble average, we find an IAV amplitude of the global sea–air CO2 flux of 0.31 PgC yr−1 (standard deviation over 1992–2009, which is larger than simulated by biogeochemical process models. On a decadal perspective, the global CO2 uptake is estimated to have gradually increased since about 2000, with little decadal change prior to 2000. The weighted mean total ocean CO2 sink estimated by the SOCOM ensemble is consistent within uncertainties with estimates from ocean-interior carbon data or atmospheric oxygen trends.

  17. Research on forest vegetation carbon stock dynamics and capacity of raising carbon sink in Xishuangbanna%西双版纳森林植被碳储量动态与增汇潜力研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张修玉; 许振成; 王俊能; 宋巍巍; 秦建桥; 胡习邦; 张婉璐; 邹洁

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate forest carbon stock dynamics and carbon sink capacity of regional forest scientifically is of great significance to terrestrial carbon cycle.Based on the method of biomass expansion factor function, this paper studied forest carbon stock dynamics and carbon sink capacity of Xishuangbanna in the period of 1993-2006, and the results showed that, (1) in the period of 1993-1994, total forest vegetation carbon stock was 60 770 378.37 t.Carbon sink increment all ranged as oak forest > production forest > pinus khasys > other broad leaved forest > alder forest, and carbon density of main forest type was 15.08~74.76 t·hm-2.In the period of 2005-2006, total forest vegetation carbon stock was 62 347 715.19 t, which increased by 2.60% compared with the period of 1993-1994.Cink increment all ranged as other broad leaved forest > production forest > oak forest > pinus khasys > alder forest >fir forest > other needle forest, and carbon density of main forest type was 8.60~70.90 t·hm-2.(2) In the period of 2005-2006, total forest vegetation carbon stock of Jinghong was 23 299 801.23 t, and carbon density of main forest type was 8.78~73.35 t· hm-2.Total forest vegetation carbon stock of Menghai was 14058 043.42 t, and carbon density of main forest type was 7.95~59.51 t·hm-2.And total forest vegetation carbon stock of Mengla was 25 050 562.32 t, and carbon density of main forest type was 8.46~98.73 t·hm-2.Undoubtedly, forest vegetation in Xishuangbanna played an important role in carbon sequestrating, and the effect of carbon sink had been in rising trend during the year of 1993-2006.%科学评估区域森林碳储量动态与增汇潜力对理解陆地碳循环具有重要的意义.本文基于生物量转换因子连续函数法,对西双版纳1993-2006年间森林植被碳储量与碳汇潜力进行了研究,结果表明,(1)西双版纳1993-1994年间森林植被整体碳储量为60770 378.37 t,

  18. Carbon Sink Function of Filter-feeding Fish in Freshwater Fisheries%滤食性鱼类在淡水渔业中的碳汇作用初探

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈中祥; 牟振波

    2011-01-01

    气候变暖威胁人类的生存与发展,减少CO2等温室气体的排放,发展低碳经济,缓解全球气候变暖的低碳经济是人类的共识。滤食性鱼类通过滤食浮游生物,间接降低大气中的CO2浓度而发挥碳汇作用。本文描述了一个不投饵的淡水生态系统的碳循环,探讨了滤食性鱼类在淡水生态系统中的碳汇作用,依据2009年全国水产养殖相关统计数据,估算了全国滤食性鱼类养殖的年碳汇量,为淡水渔业的低碳发展提供新思路,以推进现代化渔业的科学健康发展。%Climate warming has been a world-concerned global problem.It brings a series of serious consequences,greatly impacts human survival and development.To reduce carbon dioxide emissions and mitigate global warming,the development of the low carbon economy based on low energy consumption,low pollution and low emission has been our common sense.Fixing and sequestrating greenhouse gases by biological carbon sink is one of the most economical and effective ways.By filtering plankton,filter-feeding fish can reduce indirectly atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration and exert carbon sink function.The paper described carbon cycle of freshwater ecosystem without feeding,and presented carbon sink function of filter-feeding fish.At last,carbon sink amount of filter-feeding fish is evaluated based on 2009 relevant statistics of Chinese aquaculture.The research will make a good preparation for low carbon development of freshwater fisheries,and impel the scientific and healthy development of modern fisheries.

  19. Microbiological monitoring of carbon dioxide storage in a subsurface saline aquifer in Ketzin/Germany within the scope of CO2SINK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wandrey, M.; Morozova, D.; Zemke, K.; Lerm, S.; Scherf, A.-K.; Vieth, A.; Würdemann, H.; Co2SINK Group

    2009-04-01

    Within the scope of the EU project CO2SINK (www.co2sink.org) a research facility in Ketzin (Germany, west of Berlin) is operated to store CO2 in a saline subsurface aquifer (Würdemann et al., EGU General Assembly 2009). In order to examine the influence of CO2 storage on the environment a comprehensive monitoring program is applied at this site including molecular and microbiological investigations. With the injection of CO2 into the geological formation chemical and physical reservoir characteristics are changed. This may influence the composition and activities of the deep biosphere at the storage horizon. Mineral precipitation, dissolution and corrosion of reservoir casing may be consequences, influencing permeability and long-term stability of the reservoir. The objective of the microbial monitoring program is the characterisation of the microbial community (biocenosis) in fluid samples, as well as in samples from reservoir and cap rock before and during CO2storage using molecular biological methods. 16S rRNA taxonomic studies, Fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH), and RealTime PCR are used to examine the composition of the biocenosis. First results of fluid sampling revealed that the microbial community of the saline aquifer is dominated by haloalkaliphilic fermentative bacteria and extremophilic organisms, coinciding with reduced conditions, high salinity and pressure. RealTime RT-PCR of selected genes and the creation and analysis of cDNA libraries will allow the prediction of microbial metabolic activities. In addition, the analysis of organic and inorganic components of the samples will add to the knowledge of possible metabolic shifts during CO2 storage. In order to simulate the storage conditions in situ, long term laboratory experiments in high pressure incubators have been set up using original rock cores from Ketzin. Since DNA and RNA analysis techniques are very sensitive, contamination entries from the adjacent environment have to be excluded

  20. Data-based estimates of the ocean carbon sink variability - first results of the Surface Ocean pCO2 Mapping intercomparison (SOCOM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rödenbeck, C.; Bakker, D. C. E.; Gruber, N.; Iida, Y.; Jacobson, A. R.; Jones, S.; Landschützer, P.; Metzl, N.; Nakaoka, S.; Olsen, A.; Park, G.-H.; Peylin, P.; Rodgers, K. B.; Sasse, T. P.; Schuster, U.; Shutler, J. D.; Valsala, V.; Wanninkhof, R.; Zeng, J.

    2015-12-01

    Using measurements of the surface-ocean CO2 partial pressure (pCO2) and 14 different pCO2 mapping methods recently collated by the Surface Ocean pCO2 Mapping intercomparison (SOCOM) initiative, variations in regional and global sea-air CO2 fluxes are investigated. Though the available mapping methods use widely different approaches, we find relatively consistent estimates of regional pCO2 seasonality, in line with previous estimates. In terms of interannual variability (IAV), all mapping methods estimate the largest variations to occur in the eastern equatorial Pacific. Despite considerable spread in the detailed variations, mapping methods that fit the data more closely also tend to agree more closely with each other in regional averages. Encouragingly, this includes mapping methods belonging to complementary types - taking variability either directly from the pCO2 data or indirectly from driver data via regression. From a weighted ensemble average, we find an IAV amplitude of the global sea-air CO2 flux of 0.31 PgC yr-1 (standard deviation over 1992-2009), which is larger than simulated by biogeochemical process models. From a decadal perspective, the global ocean CO2 uptake is estimated to have gradually increased since about 2000, with little decadal change prior to that. The weighted mean net global ocean CO2 sink estimated by the SOCOM ensemble is -1.75 PgC yr-1 (1992-2009), consistent within uncertainties with estimates from ocean-interior carbon data or atmospheric oxygen trends.

  1. Data-based estimates of the ocean carbon sink variability - results of the Surface Ocean pCO2 Mapping intercomparison (SOCOM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rödenbeck, Christian; Bakker, Dorothee; Gruber, Nicolas; Iida, Yosuke; Jacobson, Andy; Jones, Steve; Landschützer, Peter; Metzl, Nicolas; Nakaoka, Shin-ichiro; Olsen, Are; Park, Geun-Ha; Peylin, Philippe; Rodgers, Keith; Sasse, Tristan; Schuster, Ute; Shutler, James; Valsala, Vinu; Wanninkhof, Rik; Zeng, Jiye

    2016-04-01

    Using measurements of the surface-ocean COtwo partial pressure (pCOtwo) from the SOCAT and LDEO data bases and 14 different pCOtwo mapping methods recently collated by the Surface Ocean pCOtwo Mapping intercomparison (SOCOM) initiative, variations in regional and global sea-air COtwo fluxes are investigated. Though the available mapping methods use widely different approaches, we find relatively consistent estimates of regional pCOtwo seasonality, in line with previous estimates. In terms of interannual variability (IAV), all mapping methods estimate the largest variations to occur in the Eastern equatorial Pacific. Despite considerable spread in the detailed variations, mapping methods that fit the data more closely also tend to agree more closely with each other in regional averages. Encouragingly, this includes mapping methods belonging to complementary types - taking variability either directly from the pCOtwo data or indirectly from driver data via regression. From a weighted ensemble average, we find an IAV amplitude of the global sea-air COtwo flux of IAVampl (standard deviation over AnalysisPeriod), which is larger than simulated by biogeochemical process models. On a decadal perspective, the global ocean COtwo uptake is estimated to have gradually increased since about 2000, with little decadal change prior to that. The weighted mean net global ocean COtwo sink estimated by the SOCOM ensemble is -1.75 UPgCyr (AnalysisPeriod), consistent within uncertainties with estimates from ocean-interior carbon data or atmospheric oxygen trends. Using data-based sea-air COtwo fluxes in atmospheric COtwo inversions also helps to better constrain land-atmosphere COtwo fluxes.

  2. THERMAL ANALYSIS OF CPU WITH COMPOSITE PIN FIN HEAT SINKS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.Mohan

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes about pin fin and slot parallel plate heat sinks with copper and carbon carbon composite(CCC base plate material mounted on CPU’s. The parameters such as fin geometry, base plate material, base plate thickness, number of fins, fin thickness are considered and primarily in this paper fin geometry, base platethicknesses, base plate materials are optimized for improving the thermal performance of a heat sink in the next generation. In this research work, the thermal model of the computer system with various fin geometry heat sink design has been selected and the fluid flow, thermal flow characteristics of heat sinks have been studied. The plate, pin and Elliptical fin geometry heat sinks have been used with base plate to enhance the heat dissipation. In this study a complete computer chassis with different heat sinks are investigated and the performances of the heat sinks are compared.

  3. Photosynthesis, respiration, and carbon turnover in sinking marine snow from surface waters of Southern California Bight: implications for the carbon cycle in the ocean

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ploug, H.; Grossart, HP; Azam, F.;

    1999-01-01

    techniques. Both the respiration rate per aggregate volume and the bacterial densities decreased with increasing aggregate size. The respiration rates normalized to the number of bacteria in single aggregates were 7.4 to 70 fmol C cell(-1) d(-1). The aggregate community respired 433 to 984 ng C d(-1) per...... aggregate in darkness, which yielded a turnover time of 8 to 9 d for the total organic carbon in aggregates. Thus, marine snow is not only a vehicle for vertical flux of organic matter; the aggregates are also hotspots of microbial respiration which cause a fast and efficient respiratory turnover of...

  4. How Capillary Rafts Sink

    CERN Document Server

    Protiere, S; Aristoff, J; Stone, H

    2010-01-01

    We present a fluid dynamics video showing how capillary rafts sink. Small objects trapped at an interface are very common in Nature (insects walking on water, ant rafts, bubbles or pollen at the water-air interface, membranes...) and are found in many multiphase industrial processes. Thanks to Archimedes principle we can easily predict whether an object sinks or floats. But what happens when several small particles are placed at an interface between two fluids. In this case surface tension also plays an important role. These particles self-assemble by capillarity and thus form what we call a "capillary raft". We show how such capillary rafts sink for varying sizes of particles and define how this parameter affects the sinking process.

  5. Field studies on the formation of sinking CO2 particles for ocean carbon sequestration: effects of injector geometry on particle density and dissolution rate and model simulation of plume behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riestenberg, David E; Tsouris, Costas; Brewer, Peter G; Peltzer, Edward T; Walz, Peter; Chow, Aaron C; Adams, E Eric

    2005-09-15

    We have carried out the second phase of field studies to determine the effectiveness of a coflow injector which mixes liquid CO2 and ambient seawater to produce a hydrate slurry as a possible CO2 delivery method for ocean carbon sequestration. The experiments were carried out at ocean depths of 1000-1300 m in Monterey Bay, CA, using a larger injector than that initially employed under remotely operated vehicle control and imaging of the product. Solidlike composite particles comprised of water, solid CO2 hydrate, and liquid CO2 were produced in both studies. In the recent injections, the particles consistently sank at rates of approximately 5 cm s(-1). The density of the sinking particles suggested that approximately 40% of the injected CO2 was converted to hydrate, while image analysis of the particle shrinking rate indicated a CO2 dissolution rate of 0.76-1.29 micromol cm(-2) s(-1). Plume modeling of the hydrate composite particles suggests that while discrete particles may sink 10-70 m, injections with CO2 mass fluxes of 1-1000 kg s(-1) would result in sinking plumes 120-1000 m belowthe injection point. PMID:16201660

  6. Discussion and Analysis of Forest Sustainable Management in Thousand-isle Lake Area Based on the Forest Carbon Sink%基于森林碳汇的千岛湖区森林可持续经营探析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐高福

    2012-01-01

      千岛湖作为国家级重点风景名胜区、国家级森林公园、国家级重点湿地,不论从森林景观角度还是从生态角度看,其地位均十分重要,人们对千岛湖区山水资源管护,尤其是发挥森林碳汇在森林可持续经营中的作用更为关切和敏感。通过对千岛湖森林资源现状及其森林碳汇的影响分析,结合多年的森林经营经验,根据国家有关政策,并借鉴相关研究成果,提出了基于森林碳汇的千岛湖区森林可持续经营的实施途径和经营措施%  Thousand-isle Lake as a national key scenic spot, a national forest park, a national key wetland, its status is very important no matter from the perspective of forest landscape or from ecological. People are more concerned and sensitive to landscape resources management in Thousand-isle Lake area, especially the function of forest carbon sink in forest sustainable management. Through the impact analysis of Thousand-isle Lake forest resources current situation and its forest carbon sink, combined with years of forest management experience, according to the national policy, and using relevant research results for reference, put forward the implementation methods, basic principle and measures of forest sustainable management in Thousand-isle Lake area based on the forest carbon sink.

  7. Petrophysical laboratory invertigations of carbon dioxide storage in a subsurface saline aquifer in Ketzin/Germany within the scope of CO2SINK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zemke, K.; Kummmerow, J.; Wandrey, M.; Co2SINK Group

    2009-04-01

    Since June of 2008 carbon dioxide has been injected into a saline aquifer at the Ketzin test site [Würdemann et al., this volume]. The food grade CO2 is injected into a sandstone zone of the Stuttgart formation at ca. 650 m depth at 35°C reservoir temperature and 62 bar reservoir pressure. With the injection of CO2 into the geological formation, chemical and physical reservoir characteristics are changed depending on pressure, temperature, fluid chemistry and rock composition. Fluid-rock interaction could comprise dissolution of non-resistant minerals in CO2-bearing pore fluids, cementing of the pore space by precipitating substances from the pore fluid, drying and disintegration of clay minerals and thus influence of the composition and activities of the deep biosphere. To testing the injection behaviour of CO2 in water saturated rock and to evaluate the geophysical signature depending on the thermodynamic conditions, flow experiments with water and CO2 have been performed on cores of the Stuttgart formation from different locations including new wells of ketzin test site. The studied core material is an unconsolidated fine-grained sandstone with porosity values from 15 to 32 %. Permeability, electrical resistivity, and sonic wave velocities and their changes with pressure, saturation and time have been studied under simulated in situ conditions. The flow experiments conducted over several weeks with brine and CO2 showed no significant changes of resistivity and velocity and a slightly decreasing permeability. Pore fluid analysis showed mobilization of clay and some other components. A main objective of the CO2Sink laboratory program is the assessment of the effect of long-term CO2 exposure on reservoir rocks to predict the long-term behaviour of geological CO2 storage. For this CO2 exposure experiments reservoir rock samples were exposed to CO2 saturated reservoir fluid in corrosion-resistant high pressure vessels under in situ temperature and pressure

  8. Assessment of carbon dioxide sink/source in the oceanic areas: the results of 1982-84 investigation. Final technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The oceanic CO2 sink/source relationships over the tropical Atlantic Ocean, the eastern North and South Pacific Ocean, and the Ross Sea were investigated. The net CO2 flux across the air-sea interface over these areas was estimated. Measurements of the Kr-85 in atmospheric samples collected over the central Pacific along the 1550W meridian were initiated. Based on the measurements of the difference between the pCO2 values in the surface ocean water and the atmosphere and of the radon-222 distribution in the upper water column, we have found that the average net flux for the Atlantic equatorial belt, 100N-100S, is 1.3 moles CO2/m2.y out of the ocean, when our measurements were made in November 1982 through February 1983. The surface water pCO2 data obtained over the eastern North and South Pacific during the period, October 1983 through January 1984, show that the equatorial zone between 20N and 80S is an intense CO2 source area, whereas a 100 wide belt coinciding with the area between the Subtropical and Antarctic Convergence Zones is a strong CO2 sink area. The temperate gyre area located north of about 50N and that located between 80S and 350S are nearly in equilibrium with atmospheric CO2. The surface water pCO2 data obtained in the Southern Ocean during the past ten or more years suggest strongly the existence of an intense CO2 sink zone, the Circumpolar Low pCO2 Zone, which is about 100 wide in latitude and centered at about 500S surrounding the Antarctica Continent. The surface water of the Ross Sea is found to be a strong CO2 sink during the period January 23 through February 12, 1984. Because of contamination problems, no reliable data for atmospheric krypton-85 have been obtained. 23 refs., 22 figs., 3 tabs

  9. Copepods use chemical trails to find sinking marine snow aggregates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lombard, Fabien; Koski, Marja; Kiørboe, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Copepods are major consumers of sinking marine particles and hence reduce the efficiency of the biological carbon pump. Their high abundance on marine snow suggests that they can detect sinking particles remotely. By means of laboratory observations, we show that the copepod Temora longicornis ca...

  10. The Potential of Increasing Carbon Sink and Policy Recommendations Carried Out of Nanchang Garden Plants%南昌市园林植物增汇潜力及分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李华; 陈飞平

    2011-01-01

    园林植物每年通过吸收并固定大气中的二氧化碳,对净化城市空气、减少空气中二氧化碳含量、维护良好的城市人居环境、维持城市碳氧平衡和生态平衡起到了重要作用.通过对南昌市碳排放与碳吸收的分析,以及南昌市园林植物增汇潜力的分析,提出了提高园林植物增汇能力的建议.%The garden plants played an important role in purifying urban air, reducing carbon dioxide, maintaining city living environment, balancing carbon and oxygen in the town through the absorption of carbon dioxide. Based on the analysis of carbon emissions and carbon absorption and the potential of increasing carbon sink of health and garden plants in Nanchang, recommendations of improving the ability of garden plants were mentioned.

  11. Inventory of U.S. Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Sinks: an overview of planned improvements to the methodologies and activity data used to develop the carbon estimates in the Land Use, Land-use Change, and Forestry (LULUCF) sector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirth, T. C.; Shrestha, G.; Baranski, M.

    2015-12-01

    The Inventory of U.S. Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Sinks provides a complete assessment of GHG emissions and removals for submission to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC). The sectors covered in the inventory include Energy; Industrial Processes and Product Use; Agriculture; Land Use, Land-use Change and Forestry (LULUCF); and Waste. The LULUCF sector currently represents a net carbon sink of 885.5 MMT CO2 Equivalent for 2013, but this estimate is expected to be refined over time as a number of existing and planned improvements to the methodologies and activity data used to develop the LULUCF estimates are implemented in the U.S. GHG Inventory. This presentation provides an overview of these planned improvements including (1) a new approach for reconciling the land survey data sets used to represent the U.S. land base, (2) a modification of the forest carbon estimation methods, (3) incorporation of new NRCS data from the Conservation Effects Assessment Project (CEAP), and (4) inclusion of new guidance based on the recently released IPCC Wetlands Supplement.

  12. Study on the Balance Between Carbon Source/Sink and Ecological Surplus Using CASA Model in Yulin%基于CASA模型的榆林碳源/汇平衡与生态盈余研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张艳芳; 朱妮

    2013-01-01

    [Objective]From the perspective of ecological balance, this paper mainly studied the influences and mechanism of carbon source and sink and its ecological effect under the 'Grain for Green Project ' and the key base construction of energy and chemical industry in Yulin so as to provide a scientific basis for reduction of carbon emission and increase of carbon sink.[Method]The estimation and analysis in this paper are based on carbon emission model, CASA model, carbon sequestration and oxygen release model as well as energy consumption statistics, MODIS-NDVI, meteorological data, etc.. [Result] Carbon emission of fossil energy consumption increased significantly in Yulin, with a cumulative emission of 8 576.66 104t from 2005 to 2009. Raw coal consumption was the main carbon source. The total carbon emission in Shenmu, Fugu and Yuyang counties accounted for more than 95%of the whole area. The mean value of NPP (net primary productivity, NPP) increased slightly at the average speed of 6 gC·m-2 each year from 2005 to 2009. NPP of Jiaxian, Mizhi and Zizhou counties grew significantly. The mean value of NPP showed a pattern of higher in the south and east, while lower in north and west and the regions which had lower value of NPP centered around Yuyang from northeast to southwest. The amount of CO2 fixed by vegetation was 11 429.3×104 t in Yulin from 2005 to 2009. Overall, the amount of carbon fixation was greater than that of carbon emission in Yulin from 2005 to 2009 and the differences would increase year by year, showing an increasing tendency of ecological surplus levels. Meanwhile, the balance between carbon source and sink and its ecological surplus displayed significant space differences. Shenmu, Fugu and Yuyang counties were the major areas of reducing carbon emission and increasing carbon sink and its ecological surplus level fluctuated significantly and ecological state declined year by year.[Conclusion]The“Grain for Green Project”would help to increase

  13. THERMAL ANALYSIS OF CPU WITH COMPOSITE PIN FIN HEAT SINKS

    OpenAIRE

    Mohan, R; Dr.P.Govindarajan

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes about pin fin and slot parallel plate heat sinks with copper and carbon carbon composite(CCC) base plate material mounted on CPU’s. The parameters such as fin geometry, base plate material, base plate thickness, number of fins, fin thickness are considered and primarily in this paper fin geometry, base platethicknesses, base plate materials are optimized for improving the thermal performance of a heat sink in the next generation. In this research work, the thermal model o...

  14. Study on Phase Characteristics and Spatial Differences of Chinese Agricultural Carbon Sinks%我国农作物碳汇的阶段特征与空间差异研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李波; 张俊飚

    2013-01-01

    Crop carbon cycle for terrestrial ecosystem carbon cycle and global climate change impact can not be ignored.The paper estimates and analyzes the history of the main crops carbon sinks stage characteristics and spatial differences.It was found that from 1991 to 2008,Chinese crop of carbon sinks present ‘bat-type' wave upward trend in 1991 increased to 553.452 million tons to 743.868 million tons in 2008,that an increase of 34.41%.In 2008 Chinese agricultural carbon sinks with distinctive characteristics of spatial differences:the firstly class Ⅰ is mainly agricultural province or sugar crop province,which concentrated in the northeast,east,central and southwest regions,and the amount of carbon above 3 000million tons; secondly class Ⅱ is agricultural underdeveloped area,which mainly distributed in central,northwest and southwest regions,and the amount of carbon between 10~30 million tons; thirdly class Ⅲ is mainly for municipalities,agricultural less developed area,shortage of arable land region,which concentrated on the southeast coast,southwest and northwest regions,and the amount of carbon under 10 million tons.%农作物碳汇对陆地生态系统碳循环以及全球气候变化有着不容忽视的影响.测算并分析了中国主要农作物碳汇的历史阶段特征和空间差异,结果表明,1991~2008年中国农作物碳汇量呈现“蝙蝠型”波动上升趋势,由1991年的55 345.2万t增加至2008年的74 386.8万t,增长了34.41%.2008年农作物碳汇的空间差异特征明显:第Ⅰ类主要为农业大省或者是糖类作物大省,主要分布于东北、华东、华中及西南地区,碳汇量在3 000万t以上;第Ⅱ类主要为农业次发达区域,主要分布于华中、西北及西南地区,碳汇量在1000万~3 000万t;第Ⅲ类主要为直辖市、农业欠发达地区或耕地紧缺地区,主要分布于东南沿海、西南及西北地区,碳汇量在1 000万t以下.

  15. Carbonate deposits in marine fish intestines: contribution of marine fish cultures to carbon sink fisheries%鱼类肠道的碳酸盐结晶物:海水鱼类养殖在碳汇渔业中的地位和作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吕为群; 陈阿琴; 刘慧

    2012-01-01

    鱼类是一个迄今尚未被认知的非常重要的微细碳酸盐沉积物的来源,对海洋固碳有着重要作用,这个发现直接影响到碳汇渔业的内涵.本研究介绍了海洋硬骨鱼类渗透压调节机制及鱼类肠道碳酸盐结晶形成与其肠细胞膜上物质转运之间的关系,着重阐述了鱼类肠道碳酸盐结晶的特征,并论述了通过对特定区域内鱼类生物量和碳酸盐排泄率数据的研究,估计出全球海洋鱼类每年可产生大约1.1亿t的碳酸钙,在海洋总碳酸盐岩泥中占14%以上.研究重点论述了海水鱼类固碳的独特优势潜力,同时,提出为了更好地确定海水鱼类养殖在碳汇渔业中的地位和作用,有必要对主要海水养殖鱼类肠道碳酸结晶物的形成量及其调控机制,碳收支动态模型进行研究,进而合理地估算和测定海水鱼类养殖的碳汇量.%A variety of marine ecosystems play an important role in the ocean biological carbon sink. More and more often, people are paying closer attention to impacts of marine fish on carbon cycle. Recent studies showed that marine fishes produce and excrete various forms of precipitated calcium carbonate with high magnesium content from their guts. Precipitation occurs as a by-product of the osmoregulatory requirement of teleosts to continuously drink Ca- and Mg-rich seawater. Using the Bahamian archipelago site specific fish biomass and carbonate excretion rate data, scientists estimated that marine fishes produce about l.lxlO9 kg CaCCVyear as mud-grade carbonate, and it is potential sediment constituent. Marine fishes contribute over 14% to total estimated global carbonate mud production. Therefore, marine fishes represent a hitherto unrecognized but significant source of fine-grained carbonate sediment, and affect coastal carbon sink capacity. This directly affects connotation of carbon sink fisheries. The carbon budget of marine fishes culture may influence carbon source and carbon

  16. The effect of glyphosate on import into a sink leaf of sugar beet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The basis for glyphosate inducted limitation of carbon import into developing leaves was studied in sugar beet. To separate the effects of the herbicide on export from those on import, glyphosate was supplied to a developing leaf from two exporting source leaves which fed the sink leaf. Carbon import into the sink leaf was determined by supplying 14CO2 to a third source leaf which also supplies carbon to the monitored sink leaf. Import into the sink leaf decreased within 2 to 3 h after glyphosate application, even though photosynthesis and export in the source leaf supplying 14C were unaffected. Reduced import into the sink leaf was accompanied by increased import by the tap root. Elongation of the sink leaf was only slightly decreased following arrival of glyphosate. Photosynthesis by the sink leaf was not inhibited. The results to data support the view that import is slowed by the inhibition of synthesis of structural or storage compounds in the developing leaves

  17. Subsurface Water as Natural CO2 Sink

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In aquifer recharge areas, groundwater mineralization acts as an important sink for CO2 (assessed at 100 Mtco2/a on a European scale). An isotopic study of C fluxes in the unsaturated zone of a sand carbonate aquifer shows that the physical and geochemical processes controlling CO2 abstraction induce changes in the isotopic composition of both dissolved and matrix carbonates. An integrated record of these fluxes toward the aquifers is evidenced through isotopic investigation of the recharge areas. It is evidenced that the unsaturated zone represents an archive of pristine conditions, and would help to quantify downward C fluxes and environmental changes related to this CO2 abstraction process. (author)

  18. Economics of fossil fuel substitution and wood product sinks when trees are planted to sequester carbon on agricultural lands in western Canada

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooten, van G.C.; Krcmar-Nozic, E.; Stennes, B.; Gorkom, van R.

    1999-01-01

    To meet its international commitment to reduce CO2 output by 7% from the 1990 level by 2012, Canada will rely to some extent on terrestrial carbon uptake, particularly afforestation of marginal agricultural land. The economics of afforestation is examined for northeastern British Columbia and all of

  19. Electromagnetic Energy Sink

    CERN Document Server

    Valagiannopoulos, Constantinos A; Simovski, Constantin R; Tretyakov, Sergei A; Maslovski, Stanislav I

    2015-01-01

    The ideal black body fully absorbs all incident rays, that is, all propagating waves created by arbitrary sources. The known idealized realization of a black body is the perfectly matched layer (PML), widely used in numerical electromagnetics. However, ideal black bodies and PMLs do not interact with evanescent fields existing near any finite-size source, and the energy stored in these fields cannot be harvested. Here we introduce the concept of the ideal conjugate matched layer (CML), which fully absorbs energy of both propagating and evanescent fields of sources acting as an ideal sink for electromagnetic energy. Conjugate matched absorbers have exciting application potentials, as resonant attractors of electromagnetic energy into the absorber volume. We derive the conditions on the constitutive parameters of media which can serve as CML materials, numerically study the performance of planar and cylindrical CML and discuss possible realizations of such materials as metal-dielectric composites.

  20. Can climate variability contribute to the ``missing'' CO2 sink?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Aiguo; Fung, Inez Y.

    1993-09-01

    The contemporary carbon budget for the atmosphere requires a large "missing" carbon sink to balance anthropogenic carbon inputs. We investigated climatic effects on carbon exchanges between the atmosphere and the undisturbed biosphere and assessed the possible contribution of climate variability to the carbon sink. Empirical models and global temperature and precipitation data sets were used in the study. It was found that climate perturbations during 1940-1988 caused considerable variations in plant productivity and soil respiration. The different sensitivities of the fluxes to climate perturbations led to a significant carbon accumulation in the biosphere. The cumulative carbon sink for the period 1950-1984 (˜20±5 GtC or 1012 kg C) was predominantly located in mid-latitudes in the northern hemisphere (30°-60°N) and could amount to half of the missing CO2 sink as derived from deconvolution analyses. Our results indicate that climate variations have unequal impacts on biospheric carbon fluxes from different ecosystems and imply that caution must be exercised in generalizing in situ observations to the globe.

  1. Inclusion of ecologically based trait variation in plant functional types reduces the projected land carbon sink in an earth system model

    OpenAIRE

    Verheijen, L.; R. Aerts; V. Brovkin; CAVENDER-BARES, J.; Cornelissen, J; Kattge, J.; van Bodegom, P.

    2015-01-01

    Earth system models demonstrate large uncertainty in projected changes in terrestrial carbon budgets. The lack of inclusion of adaptive responses of vegetation communities to the environment has been suggested to hamper the ability of modeled vegetation to adequately respond to environmental change. In this study, variation in functional responses of vegetation has been added to an earth system model (ESM) based on ecological principles. The restriction of viable mean trait values of vegetati...

  2. Soil C:N stoichiometry controls carbon sink partitioning between above-ground tree biomass and soil organic matter in high fertility forests

    OpenAIRE

    Alberti G; Vicca S; Inglima I; Belelli-Marchesini L; Genesio L; Miglietta F; Marjanovic H; Martinez C.; Matteucci G; D’Andrea E; Peressotti A; Petrella F; Rodeghiero M; Cotrufo MF

    2015-01-01

    The release of organic compounds from roots is a key process influencing soil carbon (C) dynamics and nutrient availability in terrestrial ecosystems. Through this process, plants stimulate microbial activity and soil organic matter (SOM) mineralization thus releasing nitrogen (N) that sustains gross and net primary production (GPP and NPP, respectively). Root inputs also contribute to SOM formation. In this study, we quantified the annual net root-derived C input to soil (Net-Croot) across s...

  3. Combining FLUXNET data with atmospheric CO2 observations in a global data assimilation framework to study variability of carbon sources and sinks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asrar, G.; Zeng, N.; Kalnay, E.; Penny, S.; Kang, J. S.; Fung, I. Y.

    2014-12-01

    In recent years, observations of the carbon cycle in the atmosphere and on land have all intensified dramatically, including FLUXNET network that measures surface fluxes of water, heat and CO2, and space-based CO2 observations from SCHIAMACHI, AIRS, GOSAT and OCO2, and other remotely sensed observations of terrestrial ecosystems attributes such as vegetation indices and fluorescence. Yet such data are often used independently and in isolated fashion, thus missing their potential complementary features. We describe a novel joint land-atmosphere data assimilation system that will simultaneously handle multiple modeling components and multiple streams of data. This challenging task is achieved using the Local-Ensemble-Transform-Kalman Filter (LETKF) that has been shown to be a powerful tool in a variety of atmosphere, ocean and carbon data assimilation settings. It includes a number of advanced features, including quantification of transport error using ensemble meteorological analysis, variable localization, and up-scaling flux tower via a footprint observation operator. The system offers an opportunity to combine the 'top-down' atmosphere approach that gives best large-scale constraint with the 'bottom-up' ground-based approach that depicts smaller scale processes and their changes. We will present some initial results using the atmospheric models SPEEDY, GEOSChem, and the terrestrial ecosystem model VEGAS.

  4. Technical Note: A novel approach to estimation of time-variable surface sources and sinks of carbon dioxide using empirical orthogonal functions and the Kalman filter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Zhuravlev

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available In this work we propose an approach to solving a source estimation problem based on representation of carbon dioxide surface emissions as a linear combination of a finite number of pre-computed empirical orthogonal functions (EOFs. We used National Institute for Environmental Studies (NIES transport model for computing response functions and Kalman filter for estimating carbon dioxide emissions. Our approach produces results similar to these of other models participating in the TransCom3 experiment.

    Using the EOFs we can estimate surface fluxes at higher spatial resolution, while keeping the dimensionality of the problem comparable with that in the regions approach. This also allows us to avoid potentially artificial sharp gradients in the fluxes in between pre-defined regions. EOF results generally match observations more closely given the same error structure as the traditional method.

    Additionally, the proposed approach does not require additional effort of defining independent self-contained emission regions.

  5. Carbon Monitoring System Flux Estimation and Attribution: Impact of ACOS-GOSAT X(CO2) Sampling on the Inference of Terrestrial Biospheric Sources and Sinks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Junjie; Bowman, Kevin W.; Lee, Memong; Henze, David K.; Bousserez, Nicolas; Brix, Holger; Collatz, G. James; Menemenlis, Dimitris; Ott, Lesley; Pawson, Steven; Jones, Dylan; Nassar, Ray

    2014-01-01

    Using an Observing System Simulation Experiment (OSSE), we investigate the impact of JAXA Greenhouse gases Observing SATellite 'IBUKI' (GOSAT) sampling on the estimation of terrestrial biospheric flux with the NASA Carbon Monitoring System Flux (CMS-Flux) estimation and attribution strategy. The simulated observations in the OSSE use the actual column carbon dioxide (X(CO2)) b2.9 retrieval sensitivity and quality control for the year 2010 processed through the Atmospheric CO2 Observations from Space algorithm. CMS-Flux is a variational inversion system that uses the GEOS-Chem forward and adjoint model forced by a suite of observationally constrained fluxes from ocean, land and anthropogenic models. We investigate the impact of GOSAT sampling on flux estimation in two aspects: 1) random error uncertainty reduction and 2) the global and regional bias in posterior flux resulted from the spatiotemporally biased GOSAT sampling. Based on Monte Carlo calculations, we find that global average flux uncertainty reduction ranges from 25% in September to 60% in July. When aggregated to the 11 land regions designated by the phase 3 of the Atmospheric Tracer Transport Model Intercomparison Project, the annual mean uncertainty reduction ranges from 10% over North American boreal to 38% over South American temperate, which is driven by observational coverage and the magnitude of prior flux uncertainty. The uncertainty reduction over the South American tropical region is 30%, even with sparse observation coverage. We show that this reduction results from the large prior flux uncertainty and the impact of non-local observations. Given the assumed prior error statistics, the degree of freedom for signal is approx.1132 for 1-yr of the 74 055 GOSAT X(CO2) observations, which indicates that GOSAT provides approx.1132 independent pieces of information about surface fluxes. We quantify the impact of GOSAT's spatiotemporally sampling on the posterior flux, and find that a 0.7 gigatons of

  6. Sinking coastal cities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erkens, G.; Bucx, T.; Dam, R.; de Lange, G.; Lambert, J.

    2015-11-01

    In many coastal and delta cities land subsidence now exceeds absolute sea level rise up to a factor of ten. A major cause for severe land subsidence is excessive groundwater extraction related to rapid urbanization and population growth. Without action, parts of Jakarta, Ho Chi Minh City, Bangkok and numerous other coastal cities will sink below sea level. Land subsidence increases flood vulnerability (frequency, inundation depth and duration of floods), with floods causing major economic damage and loss of lives. In addition, differential land movement causes significant economic losses in the form of structural damage and high maintenance costs for (infra)structure. The total damage worldwide is estimated at billions of dollars annually. As subsidence is often spatially variable and can be caused by multiple processes, an assessment of subsidence in delta cities needs to answer questions such as: what are the main causes? What is the current subsidence rate and what are future scenarios (and interaction with other major environmental issues)? Where are the vulnerable areas? What are the impacts and risks? How can adverse impacts be mitigated or compensated for? Who is involved and responsible to act? In this study a quick-assessment of subsidence is performed on the following mega-cities: Jakarta, Ho Chi Minh City, Dhaka, New Orleans and Bangkok. Results of these case studies will be presented and compared, and a (generic) approach how to deal with subsidence in current and future subsidence-prone areas is provided.

  7. TRIZ理论在蒸发法处理稀土碳沉废水中的应用%TRIZ theory in the evaporation process of rare earth carbon sink waste water

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马丽佳; 柳召刚; 李梅; 赵治华

    2013-01-01

    The theory of inventive problem solving (TRIZ) is the systematic method to guide people to make innovation, to solve engineering problems. Using the principle of evolutionary and conflict solving at tech nology system of TRIZ .The method of steam ammonia three times treatment processing carbon sink wastewater from rare earth process were analyzed. Finding the method of the processing turn to the dynamic, ideal, har monious. The design suggestions for the technical conflict in the processing was made.%发明问题解决理论(TRIZ)是指导人们进行发明创新、解决工程问题的系统化的方法学体系。运用TRIZ中技术系统进化法则和冲突解决原理,对三效蒸氨法处理稀土碳沉废水工艺进行了分析,提出了三效蒸氨系统向动态化、理想化、协调化进化的方法,并对于系统中存在的技术冲突提出了设计建议。

  8. Changes of the CO2 sources and sinks in a polluted urban area (southern Poland) over the last decade, derived from the carbon isotope composition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Time series of δ-14C, δ13C, and concentration of atmospheric CO2 covering the last 12 years are available at the Krakow sampling site (southern Poland) representing an urban area exposed to anthropogenic pollution of both local and regional origin. Observations covering the time period 1983-1994 show a linear decrease of the C-13/C-12 ratio. The decreasing tendency in the case of C- 14 (δ14C, 227 parts per thousand in January 1983) is weaker with a broad minimum in 1991 (δ14C = 124 parts per thousand) and subsequent gradual increase by about 10 parts per thousand, coinciding with a substantial reduction of coal consumption in Poland (26% reduction in 1991-1994 for heat and electricity production), partly compensated in agglomerations by increased gas consumption. The 12-year record of the CO2 concentration in Krakow points to a constant value fluctuating at a higher level (average: 373 ppm) reaching a maximum yearly average of 376 ppm. These carbon isotope signatures were used for the separation of fossils from biogenic and 'background' components, reflecting the strength of relevant sources

  9. The role of plantation sinks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper it is argued that in the long term biofuel should play a significant role in global climate policy. Recent technological developments, as well as sustainable development criteria, would favour growing biofuel in community- scale plantations in developing countries. It is also pointed out that the lead times involved in growing biofuels are so great that the inclusion of biofuel plantation sinks in the CDM for the first commitment period would be desirable. It is suggested that to meet opposition to the inclusion of plantation sinks in the first commitment period plantation, sinks should be linked to biofuels technology development and production, and a biofuels obligation for plantation sink projects in the CDM should be established. (Author)

  10. Carbon Sink in Natural Swamp Forest Ecosystems in Lesser Xing' an Mountains%小兴安岭天然森林沼泽生态系统碳汇功能

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周文昌; 牟长城; 刘夏; 顾韩

    2012-01-01

    A survey was conducted to quantitatively evaluate the potential of carbon sink in live types of natural swamp forests in Lesser Xing' an Mountains, Northeast China. Biomass of the swamp forests was determined by setting up standard plots at Youhao Forestry Bureau of Yichun City. Soil fluxes of CO, and CH4 were measured by static opaque chamber and gas chroma-tography techniques. Regression models for biomass were established for predicting net primary productivity of trees. Results showed that the carbon concentration of all plant species in the five types of swamp forests ranged torn 40.2% to 49.3%. The net carbon fixed by plants in Alnus sibirica swamp, Betula platyphylla swamp, Larix gmelinii-Carex schmidtii swamp, L gmeti-nii-moss swamp, and L. gmelinii-Sphagrum spp. swamp were 161.20, 273.56, 242.18, 205.02, and 295.33 g · m-2 · a-1, respectively. The carbon emissions from soils, including conversion of CH4 into carbon, in A. sibinca swamp, B. platyphyllu swamp, L gmelinii-C. schmidtii swamp, L. gmelinii-miass swamp and L. gmelinii-Sphagnum spp. swamp were 226.49, 253.57, 191.86, 169.53 and 127.33 g ·m-2 · a-1, respectively. The CO2-C sinks in B. platyphylla swamp, L gmeli-nii-C. schmidtii swamp, L. gmelinii-moss swamp, and L. gmelinii-Sphagman spp. swamp were 19.99, 50.32, 35.49 and 168.00 g · m-2 · a-1, respectively, while the source of CO2-C from A. sibirica swamp was 65. 29 g · m-2 · a-1.%为了定量评价小兴安岭森林沼泽生态系统碳汇潜力,在伊春市友好林业局岭峰林场设立了标准地,采用静态暗箱—气相色谱法测量土壤CO2和CH4的排放通量,调查小兴安岭5种天然森林沼泽生物量,并建立了生物量回归模型,以推测乔木净初级生产力.研究结果表明:5种森林沼泽各类植被物种碳质量分数范围为40.2%~49.3%,毛赤杨(Alnus sibirica)沼泽、白桦(Betula platyphylla)沼泽、落叶松(Larix gmelinii—苔草(Carex schmidtii)沼泽、落叶松—藓类(Moss)沼

  11. ECONOMIC EVALUATION OF CO2 STORAGE AND SINK ENHANCEMENT OPTIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bert Bock; Richard Rhudy; Howard Herzog; Michael Klett; John Davison; Danial G. De La Torre Ugarte; Dale Simbeck

    2003-02-01

    This project developed life-cycle costs for the major technologies and practices under development for CO{sub 2} storage and sink enhancement. The technologies evaluated included options for storing captured CO{sub 2} in active oil reservoirs, depleted oil and gas reservoirs, deep aquifers, coal beds, and oceans, as well as the enhancement of carbon sequestration in forests and croplands. The capture costs for a nominal 500 MW{sub e} integrated gasification combined cycle plant from an earlier study were combined with the storage costs from this study to allow comparison among capture and storage approaches as well as sink enhancements.

  12. Taking credit : Canada and the role of sinks in international climate negotiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report serves as a guide in explaining the significant, but complicated role that terrestrial carbon sinks play in international climate negotiations and the continuing need for major reductions in greenhouse gas emissions. The role that terrestrial carbon sinks should play in the Kyoto Climate Change Protocol was one of the main reasons for impasse in negotiations at the treaty talks in the Hague in November 2000. The issue is based on the allowance of countries to receive credits under the Kyoto Protocol for using forests and lands to absorb and store carbon. Storing carbon could be part of a menu of options to slow the build-up of atmospheric carbon dioxide levels. However, it was argued that without strong crediting rules and guidelines, countries like Canada could use interpretations that would allow them to weaken the emission reduction commitments made under the Protocol. This paper explained why some countries support expansive crediting of sinks and others are strongly opposed to their inclusion in the Protocol. The paper also provided a technical explanation of the science of sinks and the carbon cycle upon which policy decisions must be based. The five chapters of the report were entitled: (1) sinks and international climate negotiations, (2) counting carbon in the industrialized world, (3) counting carbon in the developing world, (4) terrestrial carbon sinks as carbon offset mechanisms, and (5) effects of land use practices and climate change on carbon exchange in terrestrial ecosystems. A decision regarding the allowance of carbon sinks will be reached in the talks scheduled for the end of July 2001 in Bonn, Germany. refs., tabs., figs

  13. Inventory of Alabama greenhouse gas emissions and sinks: 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Chumeng; Herz, W.J.; Griffin, R.A. [Univ. of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL (United States)

    1996-12-31

    Greenhouse gas concentrations in the atmosphere have been increasing since the industrial revolution. Worldwide efforts are being made to study anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions. This study quantified the anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions in Alabama in 1990. Alabama anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions and sinks from 13 sources were studied. 1990 Alabama total anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions and sinks were estimated to be 153.42 and 21.66 million tons of carbon dioxide equivalent. As a result, the net total greenhouse gas emissions were estimated to be 131.76 million tons of carbon dioxide equivalent. Fossil fuel combustion is the major source of emissions, representing approximately 78 percent. Coal mining and landfills are other two significant emission sources, representing approximately 10 and 6 percent of the total emissions respectively. Forests in Alabama represent the major sink, offsetting approximately 14 percent of the total emissions. On a per capita basis, Alabama`s emission rate is 32.3 tons of carbon dioxide equivalent per capita in 1990, compared to the national per capita average of 23.4 tons of carbon dioxide equivalent. The high emission rate is attributed to higher emissions than the national average from fossil fuel combustion, from coal mining and landfills in Alabama.

  14. Recovery of trees from drought depends on belowground sink control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagedorn, Frank; Joseph, Jobin; Peter, Martina; Luster, Jörg; Pritsch, Karin; Geppert, Uwe; Kerner, Rene; Molinier, Virginie; Egli, Simon; Schaub, Marcus; Liu, Jian-Feng; Li, Maihe; Sever, Krunoslav; Weiler, Markus; Siegwolf, Rolf T W; Gessler, Arthur; Arend, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Climate projections predict higher precipitation variability with more frequent dry extremes(1). CO2 assimilation of forests decreases during drought, either by stomatal closure(2) or by direct environmental control of sink tissue activities(3). Ultimately, drought effects on forests depend on the ability of forests to recover, but the mechanisms controlling ecosystem resilience are uncertain(4). Here, we have investigated the effects of drought and drought release on the carbon balances in beech trees by combining CO2 flux measurements, metabolomics and (13)CO2 pulse labelling. During drought, net photosynthesis (AN), soil respiration (RS) and the allocation of recent assimilates below ground were reduced. Carbohydrates accumulated in metabolically resting roots but not in leaves, indicating sink control of the tree carbon balance. After drought release, RS recovered faster than AN and CO2 fluxes exceeded those in continuously watered trees for months. This stimulation was related to greater assimilate allocation to and metabolization in the rhizosphere. These findings show that trees prioritize the investment of assimilates below ground, probably to regain root functions after drought. We propose that root restoration plays a key role in ecosystem resilience to drought, in that the increased sink activity controls the recovery of carbon balances. PMID:27428669

  15. Sink-to-Sink Coordination Framework Using RPL: Routing Protocol for Low Power and Lossy Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meer M. Khan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available RPL (Routing Protocol for low power and Lossy networks is recommended by Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF for IPv6-based LLNs (Low Power and Lossy Networks. RPL uses a proactive routing approach and each node always maintains an active path to the sink node. Sink-to-sink coordination defines syntax and semantics for the exchange of any network defined parameters among sink nodes like network size, traffic load, mobility of a sink, and so forth. The coordination allows sink to learn about the network condition of neighboring sinks. As a result, sinks can make coordinated decision to increase/decrease their network size for optimizing over all network performance in terms of load sharing, increasing network lifetime, and lowering end-to-end latency of communication. Currently, RPL does not provide any coordination framework that can define message exchange between different sink nodes for enhancing the network performance. In this paper, a sink-to-sink coordination framework is proposed which utilizes the periodic route maintenance messages issued by RPL to exchange network status observed at a sink with its neighboring sinks. The proposed framework distributes network load among sink nodes for achieving higher throughputs and longer network’s life time.

  16. Chemical transport modeling of potential atmospheric CO2 sinks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The potential for carbon dioxide (CO2) sequestration via engineered chemical sinks is investigated using a three dimensional chemical transport model (CTM). Meteorological and chemical constraints for flat or vertical systems that would absorb CO2 from the atmosphere, as well as an example chemical system of calcium hydroxide (Ca(OH)2) proposed by Elliott et al. [Compensation of atmospheric CO2 buildup through engineered chemical sinkage, Geophys. Res. Lett. 28 (2001) 1235] are reviewed. The CTM examines land based deposition sinks, with 4ox5o latitude/longitude resolution at various locations, and deposition velocities (v). A maximum uptake of ∼20 Gton (1015 g) C yr-1 is attainable with v>5 cm s -1 at a mid-latitude site. The atmospheric increase of CO2 (3 Gton yr-1) can be balanced by an engineered sink with an area of no more than 75,000 km2 at v of 1 cm s-1. By building the sink upwards or splitting this area into narrow elements can reduce the active area by more than an order of magnitude as discussed in Dubey at el. [31]. (author)

  17. Large CO2 Sinks: Their role in the mitigation of greenhouse gases from an international, national (Canadian) and provincial (Alberta) perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Significant reduction of CO2 emissions on a global scale may be achieved by reduction of energy intensity, by reduction of carbon intensity or by capture and storage of CO2. A portfolio of these methods is required to achieve the large reductions required; of which utilization of carbon sinks (i.e. material, geosphere and biosphere) will be an important player. Material sinks will probably only play a minor role as compared to biosphere and geosphere sinks in storage of CO2. Biosphere sinks are attractive because they can sequester CO2 from a diffuse source whereas geosphere sinks require a pure waste stream of CO2 (obtained by using expensive separation methods). On the other hand, environmental factors and storage time favor geosphere sinks. It is expected that a combination of the two will be used in order to meet emission reduction targets over the next 100 yr.A critical look is taken at capacities, retention/residence times, rates of uptake and relative cost of utilization of biosphere and geosphere sinks at three scales - global, national (Canada) and provincial (Alberta). Biosphere sinks considered are oceans, forests and soils. Geosphere sinks considered are enhanced oil recovery, coal beds, depleted oil and gas reservoirs and deep aquifers. The largest sinks are oceans and deep aquifers. The other biosphere and geosphere sinks have total capacities approximately of an order of lower magnitude. The sinks that will probably be used first are those that are economically viable such as enhanced oil-recovery, agriculture, forestry and possibly enhanced coalbed methane-recovery. The other sinks will be used when these options have been exhausted or are not available or a penalty (e.g. carbon tax) exists. Although the data tabulated for these sinks is only regarded as preliminary, it provides a starting point for assessment of the role of large sinks in meeting greenhouse gas emission reduction targets. (Copyright (c) 1998 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All

  18. Causes of sinks near Tucson, Arizona, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, J.P.; Pool, D.R.; Konieczki, A.D.; Carpenter, M.C.

    1998-01-01

    Land subsidence in the form of sinks has occurred on and near farmlands near Tucson, Pima County, Arizona, USA. The sinks occur in alluvial deposits along the flood plain of the Santa Cruz River, and have made farmlands dangerous and unsuitable for farming. More than 1700 sinks are confined to the flood plain of the Santa Cruz River and are grouped along two north-northwestward-trending bands that are approximately parallel to the river and other flood-plain drainages. An estimated 17,000 m3 of sediment have been removed in the formation of the sinks. Thirteen trenches were dug to depths of 4-6 m to characterize near-surface sediments in sink and nonsink areas. Sediments below about 2 m included a large percentage of dispersive clays in sink areas. Sediments in nonsink areas contain a large component of medium- to coarse-grained, moderately to well sorted sand that probably fills a paleochannel. Electromagnetic surveys support the association of silts and clays in sink areas that are highly electrically conductive relative to sand in nonsink areas. Sinks probably are caused by the near-surface process of subsurface erosion of dispersive sediments along pre-existing cracks in predominantly silt and clay sediments. The pre-existing cracks probably result from desiccation or tension that developed during periods of water-table decline and channel incision during the past 100 years or in earlier periods.

  19. Point-defect sources and sinks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The role played by sources and sinks of point defects is of importance in understanding a wide range of physical phenomena. The problem of the efficiency (eta) of a sink (or sources) and its relationship to the super (or sub) saturation of point defects which drives the process is considered. A qualitative discussion is given of the atomic mechanisms by which the following defects act as sources and sinks: (a) the free surface; (b) voids; (c) dislocation loops; and (d) grain boundaries. Examples of specific values of eta are given for different experimental situations

  20. Not all calcite ballast is created equal: differing effects of foraminiferan and coccolith calcite on the formation and sinking of aggregates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Schmidt

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Correlation between particulate organic carbon (POC and calcium carbonate sinking through the deep ocean has led to the idea that ballast provided by calcium carbonate is important for the export of POC from the surface ocean. While this idea is certainly to some extent true, it is worth considering in more nuance, for example, examining the different effects on the aggregation and sinking of POC of small, non-sinking calcite particles like coccoliths and large, rapidly sinking calcite like planktonic foraminiferan tests. We have done that here in a simple experiment carried out in roller tanks that allow particles to sink continuously without being impeded by container walls. Coccoliths were efficiently incorporated into aggregates that formed during the experiment, increasing their sinking speed compared to similarly sized aggregates lacking added calcite ballast. The foraminiferan tests, which sank as fast as 700 m d−1, became associated with only very minor amounts of POC. In addition, when they collided with other, larger, foraminferan-less aggregates, they fragmented them into two smaller, more slowly sinking aggregates. While these effects were certainly exaggerated within the confines of the roller tanks, they clearly demonstrate that calcium carbonate ballast is not just calcium carbonate ballast- different forms of calcium carbonate ballast have notably different effects on POC aggregation, sinking, and export.

  1. A molecular-genetic approach to studying source-sink interactions in Arabidopsis thaliana. Final report, April 1, 1995--March 31, 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gibson, S.I.

    1998-11-01

    The ultimate goal of this research is to elucidate the molecular mechanisms by which the complex interactions between sources and sinks of fixed carbon are controlled in plants. As soluble sugar levels have been shown to play a vital role in a variety of source-sink interactions, a key aspect of the authors research is to determine the role of sugar-regulated gene expression in mediating source-sink interactions. In addition, as a critical aspect of source-sink interactions is the channeling of fixed carbon into different storage forms, they have pursued the findings that fumaric acid represents a significant form of storage carbon in Arabidopsis thaliana and other plant species. In the future, a better understanding of the mechanisms by which interactions between sources and sinks of fixed carbon are coordinated will be a pre-requisite to developing more rationale approaches to improving harvest indices in crop species.

  2. Topology Optimization of Thermal Heat Sinks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klaas Haertel, Jan Hendrik; Engelbrecht, Kurt; Lazarov, Boyan Stefanov;

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, topology optimization is applied to optimize the cooling performance of thermal heat sinks. The coupled two-dimensional thermofluid model of a heat sink cooled with forced convection and a density-based topology optimization including density filtering and projection are implemented...... in COMSOL Multiphysics. The optimization objective is to minimize the heat sink’s temperature for a prescribed pressure drop and fixed heat generation. To conduct the optimization, COMSOL’s Optimization Module with GCMMA as the optimization method is used. The implementation of this topology...... optimization approach in COMSOL Multiphysics is described in this paper and results for optimized two-dimensional heat sinks are presented. Furthermore, parameter studies regarding the effect of the prescribed pressure drop of the system on Reynolds number and realized heat sink temperature are presented and...

  3. Flooding and sinking of nuclear merchant ships

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In contrast to land-based power plants for ship reactors the marine environment brings up the peril of sinking. But this peril is low for nuclear ships with its high safety standard. An evaluation of casualties from 1964 - 1974 for ships>8000 GRT allows to estimate a very low sink probability for nuclear ships in the range of 10-7 to 10-8 p.a. In spite of this low probability a sinking cannot be excluded absolutely. Therefore passive means must be provided for sinking in deep waters: to maintain the integrity of at least one enclosure as activity barrier; to supply seawater into the safety containment for decay heat removal. For sinking in shallow waters and flooding at least one of the redundant decay heat removal systems including power supply stays operable. A mathematical tool is available for the design of flood openings of sufficient cross sections to flood the containment and to reach a pressure balance in case of postulated sinking in deep waters of any depth

  4. Sinking rates of phytoplankton in the Changjiang (Yangtze River) estuary: A comparative study between Prorocentrum dentatum and Skeletonema dorhnii bloom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Shujin; Sun, Jun; Zhao, Qibiao; Feng, Yuanyuan; Huang, Daji; Liu, Sumei

    2016-02-01

    Sinking rates of phytoplankton community with variable taxonomic composition in the offshore Changjiang (Yangtze River) estuary were measured during two cruises in spring and summer, 2011. A homogenous-sample method SETCOL was used to determine the sinking rates. Phytoplankton community was dominated by dinoflagellates in spring and diatoms in summer, and two species Prorocentrum dentatum and Skeletonema dorhnii formed algal blooms in the survey area during the two cruises, respectively. Phytoplankton sinking rates ranged from 0.13 to 1.04 m day- 1 (average = 0.61 ± 0.24 m day- 1) in spring and 0.28 to 1.71 m day- 1 (average = 0.80 ± 0.34 m day- 1) in summer. In the surface layer, phytoplankton sinking rates at the P. dentatum bloom stations in spring were lower than that at the S. dorhnii bloom stations in summer. No significant correlation was found between phytoplankton sinking rates and most of the environmental parameters during the two cruises, except for temperature and nitrite concentration in summer. A significant correlation was observed between phytoplankton sinking rates and phytoplankton community structure in the surface layers: the higher dominance of diatom in the phytoplankton community corresponded to higher phytoplankton sinking rate. Therefore, the phytoplankton community structure other than the environmental parameters, is the important factor to affect the sinking rates greatly. The consequent carbon flux caused by phytoplankton sinking was estimated, and results suggested that the carbon flux to bottom water during the S. dorhnii bloom (average = 63.13 ± 48.16 mg C m- 2 day- 1) in summer was about 2.4 fold of that during the P. dentatum bloom (average = 26.10 ± 26.25 mg C m- 2 day- 1) in spring. These findings provide us some insight in understanding the carbon export contributed by marine phytoplankton in the coastal sea, where frequent phytoplankton blooms and high following carbon export occur.

  5. Sources, sinks, trends, and opportunities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Each year the emission of greenhouse gases commits the earth to a warming of 0.02 to 0.06 degrees C. Many of these gases are released as by-products of fossil fuel combustion. The remainder are produced as a result of forest clearing in the tropics or agriculture or industrial activities. Carbon dioxide (CO2) is the most important greenhouse gas, contributing about half of global heating. In addition, there are what are known as the non-CO2 greenhouse gases: methane (CH4), nitrous oxide (N2O), freon CFC-12 (CF2Cl2), freon CFC-11 (CF3Cl), and tropospheric ozone (O3). Carbon monoxide and the nitrogen gases, increase the amount of methane and ozone in the troposphere. There are also about 15 or 20 other greenhouse gases of lesser importance. This paper reviews the sources of some of these greenhouse gases, analyzes trends in their emissions, and suggests means through which greenhouse gas emissions can be limited

  6. The CO2SINK Boreholes for Geological Storage Testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Förster

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Europe’s first onshore scientific carbon dioxide storage testing project CO2SINK (CO2 Storage by Injection into a Natural saline aquifer at Ketzin is performed in a saline aquifer in NE Germany. The major objectives of CO2SINK are the advancement of the science and practical processes for underground storage of carbon dioxide, and the provision of operational field results to aid in the development of standards for CO2 geological storage. Three boreholes (one injection well and two observation wells have been drilled in2007, each to a depth of about 800 m. The wells are completed as “smart” wells containing a variety of permanent downhole sensing equipment, which has proven its functionality during its baseline surveys. The injection of CO2 is scheduled for spring 2008 and is intended to last up to two years to allow for monitoring of migration and fate of the injected gas through a combination of downhole monitoring with surface geophysical surveys. This report summarizeswell design, drilling, coring, and completion operations.

  7. The potential contribution of sinks to meeting Kyoto Protocol commitments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Missfeldt, F.; Haites, E.

    2001-01-01

    The Kyoto Protocol to the climate convention makes provision for sink enhancement activities to contribute to meeting the greenhouse gas emissions limitation commitments of industrialised countries. This paper analyses the potential contribution of sink enhancement activities to meeting commitments...... of sinks lowers emission reductions implemented in industrialised countries and reduces non-sink activity under the Clean Development Mechanism....

  8. Important aspects of sinks for linking emission trading systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirsbrunner, Simon; Taenzler, Dennis; Reuster, Lena [Adelphi Research gGmbH, Berlin (Germany)

    2011-06-15

    The discussion on how to design policy instruments to reduce emissions and enhance removals from land use, land use change, and forestry is likely to be a key feature of a future global climate protection framework and will also influence the design of an emerging global carbon market. By analyzing different ETSs it turns out that very specific provisions are in place to deal with carbon sinks. Different instruments, eligible activities and standards reflect the prevailing emissions profile and cultural preferences of a geographic area. The inclusion of forestry in a cap, for instance, makes provisions on additionality and non-permanence obsolete, but increases the relevance of other issues such as accounting and enforcement. (orig.)

  9. Landfills as sinks for (hazardous) substances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharff, Heijo

    2012-12-01

    The primary goal of waste regulations is to protect human health and the environment. This requires the removal from the material cycle of those materials that cannot be processed without harm. Policies to promote recycling hold a risk that pollutants are dispersed. Materials have an environmental impact during their entire life cycle from extraction through production, consumption and recycling to disposal. Essentially there are only two routes for pollutants that cannot be rendered harmless: storage in sinks or dispersion into the environment. Many sinks do not contain substances absolutely, but result in slow dispersion. Dispersion leads to exposure and impact to human health and the environment. It is therefore important to assess the impact of the release to the environment. Based on various sources this paper discusses important material flows and their potential impact. This is compared with the intentions and achievements of European environmental and resource policy. The polluter pays principle is being implemented in Europe, but lags behind implementation of waste management regulations. As long as producers are allowed to add hazardous substances to their products and don't take their products back, it is in society's best interest to carefully consider whether recycling or storage in a sink is the better solution. This requires further development of life-cycle assessment tools and harmonization of regulations. In many cases the sink is unavoidable. Landfills as sinks will be needed in the future. Fail-safe design and construction as well as sustainable management of landfills must be further developed. PMID:23129607

  10. Heat pipe cooling system with sensible heat sink

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverstein, Calvin C.

    1988-01-01

    A heat pipe cooling system which employs a sensible heat sink is discussed. With this type of system, incident aerodynamic heat is transported via a heat pipe from the stagnation region to the heat sink and absorbed by raising the temperature of the heat sink material. The use of a sensible heat sink can be advantageous for situations where the total mission heat load is limited, as it is during re-entry, and a suitable radiation sink is not available.

  11. Stable isotope ratio (13C/12C mass spectrometry to evaluate carbon sources and sinks: changes and trends during the decomposition of vegetal debris from eucalyptus clone plantations (NW Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Fernandez

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Vegetal debris is known to participate in key soil processes such as the formation of soil organic matter (OM, also being a potential source of greenhouse gases to the atmosphere. However, its contribution to the isotopic composition of both the soil OM and the atmospheric carbon dioxide is not clear yet. Hence, the main objective of the present research is to understand the isotopic 13C changes and trends that take place during the successive biodegradative stages of decomposing soil organic inputs. By incubating bulk plant tissues for several months under laboratory controlled conditions, the kinetics of the CO2 releases and shifts in the 13C natural abundance of the solid residues were investigated using litter samples coming from forest plantations with a different clone (Anselmo: 1st clonal generation attained by morphological selection and Odiel: 2nd clonal generation genetically obtained of Eucalyptus globulus Labill. developed over granitic or schistic bedrocks and located in northwestern Spain. Significant isotopic variations with time were observed, probably due to the isotopically heterogeneous composition of these complex substrates in conjunction with the initial selective consumption of more easily degradable 13C-differentiated compounds during the first stages of the biodegradation, while less available or recalcitrant litter components were decomposed at later stages of biodegradation, generating products that have their own specific isotopic signatures. These results, which significantly differ depending on the type of clone, suggest that caution must be exercised when interpreting carbon isotope studies (at natural abundance levels since perturbations associated with the quality or chemical composition of the organic debris from different terrestrial ecosystems can have an important effect on the carbon stable isotope dynamics.

  12. Carbon sink potential of multistrata agroforestry systems at Atlantic Rain Forest Potencial de sistemas agroflorestais multiestrata para sequestro de carbono em áreas de ocorrência de Floresta Atlântica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luís Cláudio Maranhão Froufe

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available

    Carbon storage of agroforestry systems, regenerated areas, conventional agriculture and pasture was evaluated at Alto Ribeira Valley region, São Paulo State, Brazil, in different compartments of Land-use systems (LUS. In soil, classified as Entisols and Inceptisols, we found similarities among all LUS, dued to their low contents of organic carbon, and similar values of bulk density. The total carbon stocked on land-use systems, greater amounts were determined on regenerated areas (115.78 Mg ha-1, followed by agroforestry systems (75.38 Mg ha-1, agriculture (47.07 Mg ha-1, and pasture (36.01 Mg ha-1. Despite their conservative characteristic, the silvicultural practices of multistrata agroforestry systems have to be improved for forest production and carbon sequestration.

    doi: 10.4336/2011.pfb.31.66.143

    Foi avaliado o estoque de carbono no solo, serapilheira, biomassa arbórea e biomassa herbácea de SAFs multiestratos, em comparação a capoeiras em diferentes estágios de regeneração, sistemas agrícolas convencionais e pastagem, todos na região do Alto Vale do Ribeira, SP. Nos Neossolos e Cambissolos, com baixos teores de carbono orgânico e similaridade dos valores de densidade aparente, as capoeiras contribuíram com 115,78 Mg ha-1 de carbono total estocado, seguidas dos SAFs (75,37 Mg ha-1, das áreas agrícolas (47,07 Mg ha-1 e das pastagens (36,01 Mg ha-1. Apesar do grande potencial de sequestro de carbono dos SAFs, há necessidade de melhoria em suas práticas silviculturais.

    doi: 10.4336/2011.pfb.31.66.143

  13. Towards robust regional estimates of CO_2 sources and sinks using atmospheric transport models

    OpenAIRE

    Gurney, Kevin Robert; Randerson, James

    2002-01-01

    Information about regional carbon sources and sinks can be derived from variations in observed atmospheric CO_2 concentrations via inverse modelling with atmospheric tracer transport models. A consensus has not yet been reached regarding the size and distribution of regional carbon fluxes obtained using this approach, partly owing to the use of several different atmospheric transport models. Here we report estimates of surface–atmosphere CO_2 fluxes from an intercomparison of atmospheric CO_2...

  14. Towards robust regional estimates of CO2 sources and sinks using atmospheric transport models

    OpenAIRE

    Randerson, JT; Gurney, KR; Law, RM; Denning, AS; Rayner, PJ; Baker, D.; Bousquet, P.; Bruhwiler, L.; Chen, YH; Ciais, P.; Fan, S.; Fung, IY; Gloor, M.; Heimann, M.; Higuchi, K

    2002-01-01

    Information about regional carbon sources and sinks can be derived from variations in observed atmospheric CO2 concentrations via inverse modelling with atmospheric tracer transport models. A consensus has not yet been reached regarding the size and distribution of regional carbon fluxes obtained using this approach, partly owing to the use of several different atmospheric transport models(1-9). Here we report estimates of surface- atmosphere CO2 fluxes from an intercomparison of atmospheric ...

  15. DNA Persistence in Sink Drain Environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winder, Eric M.; Bonheyo, George T.

    2015-07-31

    Biofilms are organized structures composed mainly of cells and extracellular polymeric substances produced by the constituent microorganisms. Ubiquitous in nature, biofilms have an innate ability to capture and retain passing material and may therefore act as natural collectors of contaminants or signatures of upstream activities. To determine the persistence and detectability of DNA passing through a sink drain environment, Bacillus anthracis strain Ames35 was cultured (6.35 x 107 CFU/mL), sterilized, and disposed of by addition to a sink drain apparatus with an established biofilm.

  16. Nitrogen sink in a small forested watershed of subtropical China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Laiming Huang; Jinling Yang; Ganlin Zhang

    2011-01-01

    Global nitrogen (N) emission and deposition have been increased rapidly due to massive mobilization of N which may have longreaching impacts on ecosystems. Many agricultural and forest ecosystems have been identified as secondary N sources. In the present study, the input-output budget of inorganic N in a small forested watershed of subtropical China was investigated. Inorganic N wet deposition and discharge by stream water were monitored from March, 2007 to February, 2009. The concentrations and fluxes of inorganic N in wet precipitation and stream water and net retention of N were calculated. Global N input by dry deposition and biological fixation and N output by denitrification for forested watersheds elsewhere were reported as references to evaluate whether the studied forested watershed is a source or a sink for N. The results show that the inorganic N output by the stream water is mainly caused by NO3--N even though the input is dominated by NH4+-N. The mean flux of inorganic N input by wet precipitation and output by stream water is 1.672 and 0.537 g N/(m2·yr), respectively, which indicates that most of inorganic N input is retained in the forested watershed. Net retention of inorganic N reaches 1.135 g N/(m2·yr) considering wet precipitation as the main input and stream water as the main output. If N input by dry deposition and biological fixation and output by denitrification are taken into account, this subtropical forested watershed currently acts as a considerable sink for N, with a net sink ranging from 1.309 to 1.913 g N/(m2·yr)which may enhance carbon sequestration of the terrestrial ecosystem.

  17. Carbon stocks and sinks in forestry for the unitéd Kingdom greenhouse gas inventory. COST E21 Workshop. Contribution of forests and forestry to mitigate greenhouse effects. Joensuu (Finland. 28-30 Sep 2000

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milne R.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Afforestation in the UK has been significant and continuing since 1920 (up to 30,000 ha per year. Planting data is used to drive a dynamic process-based carbon accounting model (C-Flow to estimate removals of atmospheric CO2 to these forests. It is assumed that the afforestation can be represented by the characteristics of Sitka spruce for conifers and beech for broadleaves. The present area of forest considered for these estimates is 1.6 millions ha. In 1990 the uptake to trees, litter, soil and products was 2.6 terragramme C, rising to 2.8 terragramme C in 1998. Deforestation is believed to be small. Supporting measurements show that the model predicts long term uptake by conifers well but that losses from planted peat shortly after establishment need further consideration. Process modelling of beech growth suggests that it is primarily dependant on atmospheric CO2 concentration and not on stomatal control per se. UK research priorities relevant to preparation of GHG (greenhouse gas Inventories are presented.

  18. Limited sinking of Phaeocystis during a 12 days sediment trap study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Christian; Iversen, Morten; Klaas, Christine; Metfies, Katja

    2016-07-01

    There is a controversy discussion about the contribution of the genus Phaeocystis to the vertical carbon export with evidence for and against sedimentation of Phaeocystis. So far, the presence of Phaeocystis in sinking matter was investigated with methods depending on morphological features (microscopy) and fast degradable substances (biochemical analyses). In this study, we determine the occurrence and abundance of Phaeocystis antarctica in short-term sediment traps and the overlying water column during a 12-day time period in the Atlantic sector of the Southern Ocean with 454-pyrosequencing and microscopy counting. In the sediment trap samples, we only found few sequences belonging to Phaeocystis, which was not reflecting the situation in the water column above. The cell counts showed the same results. We conclude that Phaeocystis cells are not generally transported downwards by active sinking or other sinking processes. PMID:27176935

  19. The declining uptake rate of atmospheric CO2 by land and ocean sinks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. R. Raupach

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Through 1959–2012, an airborne fraction (AF of 0.44 of total anthropogenic CO2 emissions remained in the atmosphere, with the rest being taken up by land and ocean CO2 sinks. Understanding of this uptake is critical because it greatly alleviates the emissions reductions required for climate mitigation, and also reduces the risks and damages that adaptation has to embrace. An observable quantity that reflects sink properties more directly than the AF is the CO2 sink rate (kS, the combined land–ocean CO2 sink flux per unit excess atmospheric CO2 above preindustrial levels. Here we show from observations that kS declined over 1959–2012 by a factor of about 1 / 3, implying that CO2 sinks increased more slowly than excess CO2. Using a carbon–climate model, we attribute the decline in kS to four mechanisms: slower-than-exponential CO2 emissions growth (~ 35% of the trend, volcanic eruptions (~ 25%, sink responses to climate change (~ 20%, and nonlinear responses to increasing CO2, mainly oceanic (~ 20%. The first of these mechanisms is associated purely with the trajectory of extrinsic forcing, and the last two with intrinsic, feedback responses of sink processes to changes in climate and atmospheric CO2. Our results suggest that the effects of these intrinsic, nonlinear responses are already detectable in the global carbon cycle. Although continuing future decreases in kS will occur under all plausible CO2 emission scenarios, the rate of decline varies between scenarios in non-intuitive ways because extrinsic and intrinsic mechanisms respond in opposite ways to changes in emissions: extrinsic mechanisms cause kS to decline more strongly with increasing mitigation, while intrinsic mechanisms cause kS to decline more strongly under high-emission, low-mitigation scenarios as the carbon–climate system is perturbed further from a near-linear regime.

  20. The multiple fates of sinking particles in the North Atlantic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, James R.; Edwards, Bethanie R.; Thamatrakoln, Kimberlee; Ossolinski, Justin E.; DiTullio, Giacomo R.; Bidle, Kay D.; Doney, Scott C.; Van Mooy, Benjamin A. S.

    2015-09-01

    The direct respiration of sinking organic matter by attached bacteria is often invoked as the dominant sink for settling particles in the mesopelagic ocean. However, other processes, such as enzymatic solubilization and mechanical disaggregation, also contribute to particle flux attenuation by transferring organic matter to the water column. Here we use observations from the North Atlantic Ocean, coupled to sensitivity analyses of a simple model, to assess the relative importance of particle-attached microbial respiration compared to the other processes that can degrade sinking particles. The observed carbon fluxes, bacterial production rates, and respiration by water column and particle-attached microbial communities each spanned more than an order of magnitude. Rates of substrate-specific respiration on sinking particle material ranged from 0.007 ± 0.003 to 0.173 ± 0.105 day-1. A comparison of these substrate-specific respiration rates with model results suggested sinking particle material was transferred to the water column by various biological and mechanical processes nearly 3.5 times as fast as it was directly respired. This finding, coupled with strong metabolic demand imposed by measurements of water column respiration (729.3 ± 266.0 mg C m-2 d-1, on average, over the 50 to 150 m depth interval), suggested a large fraction of the organic matter evolved from sinking particles ultimately met its fate through subsequent remineralization in the water column. At three sites, we also measured very low bacterial growth efficiencies and large discrepancies between depth-integrated mesopelagic respiration and carbon inputs.

  1. Regulation of assimilate import into sink organs: Update on molecular drivers of sink strength

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saadia eBihmidine

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Recent developments have altered our view of molecular mechanisms that determine sink strength, defined here as the capacity of non-photosynthetic structures to compete for import of photoassimilates. We review new findings from diverse systems, including stems, seeds, flowers, and fruits. An important advance has been the identification of new transporters and facilitators with major roles in the accumulation and equilibration of sugars at a cellular level. Exactly where each exerts its effect varies among systems. Sugarcane and sweet sorghum stems, for example, both accumulate high levels of sucrose, but may do so via different paths. The distinction is central to strategies for targeted manipulation of sink strength using transporter genes, and shows the importance of system-specific analyses. Another major advance has been the identification of deep hypoxia as a feature of normal grain development. This means that molecular drivers of sink strength in endosperm operate in very low oxygen levels, and under metabolic conditions quite different than previously assumed. Successful enhancement of sink strength has nonetheless been achieved in grains by up-regulating genes for starch biosynthesis. Additionally, our understanding of sink strength is enhanced by awareness of the dual roles played by invertases (INV, not only in sucrose metabolism, but also in production of the hexose sugar signals that regulate cell-cycle and cell-division programs. These contributions of INV to cell expansion and division prove to be vital for establishment of young sinks ranging from flowers to fruit. Since INV genes are themselves sugar-responsive feast genes, they can mediate a feed-forward enhancement of sink strength when assimilates are abundant. Greater overall productivity and yield have thus been attained in key instances, indicating that even broader enhancements may be achievable as we discover the detailed molecular mechanisms that drive sink strength

  2. Is there a decrease in the sink of atmospheric CO2 in the Nordic seas?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is well known that the seas off Norway sink a lot of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere, mainly because of the large heat loss from the sea in the area, which makes CO2 more soluble in the water. Whether this sink has increased after the industrial revolution and thereby contributes to slowing down the increase of atmospheric CO2 is uncertain. That is, it is uncertain whether there is a sink of anthropogenic CO2. There are indications that the opposite is true, that the sink of CO2 in this area has slowed down along with the rise in the concentration of atmospheric CO2. Storing of anthropogenic CO2, however, takes place at higher latitudes where deep-water formation occurs, such as in the Nordic seas, where water that is saturated with anthropogenic CO2 is transported down in the deep sea and becomes shielded from the atmosphere. Model calculations show that increased CO2 in the atmosphere will reduce the sink of this gas in the Nordic seas. This conclusion is supported by observations from the Barents Sea

  3. The dynamics of exploitation in ensembles of source and sink

    OpenAIRE

    Friedrich, T.

    2012-01-01

    The ensemble is a new entity on a higher level of complexity composed of source and sink. When substrate is transferred from source to sink within the transfer space or the ensemble space non-linearity is observed. Saturating production functions of source and sink in combination with linear cost functions generate superadditivity and subadditivity in the productivity of the ensemble. In a reaction chain the source produces a product that will be used by the sink to produce a different pr...

  4. Source-sink relationships in radish plant

    OpenAIRE

    Z. Starck; UBYSZ, L.

    2015-01-01

    The problem of source-sink relationships in di- and tetraploidal radish plants grown in. hydroponic cultures was investigated in two stages of their development: with intensively growing swollen hypocotyl and in the period of actively accumulating nutrients in the storage organ. It was found, that the proportion, between the mass of organs, their RGR and NAR was very similar in di- and tetraploidal populations, probably owing to a similar rate of photosynthesis and pattern of assimilates dist...

  5. Seeking a geochemical identifier for authigenic carbonate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ming-Yu; Zheng, Yong-Fei; Zhao, Yan-Yan

    2016-03-01

    Authigenic carbonate was recently invoked as a third major global carbon sink in addition to primary marine carbonate and organic carbon. Distinguishing the two carbonate sinks is fundamental to our understanding of Earth's carbon cycle and its role in regulating the evolution of atmospheric oxygen. Here, using microscale geochemical measurements of carbonates in Early Triassic strata, we show that the growth of authigenic carbonate follows a different trajectory from primary marine carbonate in a cross-plot of uranium concentration and carbon isotope composition. Thus, a combination of the two geochemical variables is able to distinguish between the two carbonate sinks. The temporal distribution of authigenic carbonates in the Early Triassic strata suggests that the increase in the extent of carbonate authigenesis acted as a negative feedback to the elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration.

  6. Wood - a carbon depot

    OpenAIRE

    Lipušček, Igor; Tišler, Vesna

    2003-01-01

    The article examines the global movement of carbon dioxide, the most important greenhouse gas due to its large quantities. We studied the carbon cycle with possibilities of its extension, and analysed the mechanisms that remove carbon dioxide from the atmosphere and bind it into solid substances for a longer period of time. The focus was on carbon dioxide sink into biomass and carbon deposit in wood. On the basis of wood component data and chemical analysis of the components, we calculated th...

  7. Reconciling apparent inconsistencies in estimates of terrestrial CO2 sources and sinks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The magnitude and location of terrestrial carbon sources and sinks remains subject to large uncertainties. Estimates of terrestrial CO2 fluxes from ground-based inventory measurements typically find less carbon uptake than inverse model calculations based on atmospheric CO2 measurements, while a wide range of results have been obtained using models of different types. However, when full account is taken of the processes, pools, time scales and geographic areas being measured, the different approaches can be understood as complementary rather than inconsistent, and can provide insight as to the contribution of various processes to the terrestrial carbon budget. For example, quantitative differences between atmospheric inversion model estimates and forest inventory estimates in northern extratropical regions suggest that carbon fluxes to soils (often not accounted for in inventories), and into non-forest vegetation, may account for about half of the terrestrial uptake. A consensus of inventory and inverse methods indicates that, in the 1980s, northern extratropical land regions were a large net sink of carbon, and the tropics were approximately neutral (albeit with high uncertainty around the central estimate of zero net flux). The terrestrial flux in southern extratropical regions was small. Book-keeping model studies of the impacts of land-use change indicated a large source in the tropics and almost zero net flux for most northern extratropical regions; similar land use change impacts were also recently obtained using process-based models. The difference between book-keeping land-use change model studies and inversions or inventories was previously interpreted as a 'missing' terrestrial carbon uptake. Land-use change studies do not account for environmental or many management effects (which are implicitly included in inventory and inversion methods). Process-based model studies have quantified the impacts of CO2 fertilisation and climate change in addition to land

  8. Reconciling apparent inconsistencies in estimates of terrestrial CO2 sources and sinks

    Science.gov (United States)

    House, J. I.; Prentice, I. C.; Ramankutty, N.; Houghton, R. A.; Heimann, M.

    2003-04-01

    The magnitude and location of terrestrial carbon sources and sinks remains subject to large uncertainties. Estimates of terrestrial CO2 fluxes from ground-based inventory measurements typically find less carbon uptake than inverse model calculations based on atmospheric CO2 measurements, while a wide range of results have been obtained using models of different types. However, when full account is taken of the processes, pools, time scales and geographic areas being measured, the different approaches can be understood as complementary rather than inconsistent, and can provide insight as to the contribution of various processes to the terrestrial carbon budget. For example, quantitative differences between atmospheric inversion model estimates and forest inventory estimates in northern extratropical regions suggest that carbon fluxes to soils (often not accounted for in inventories), and into non-forest vegetation, may account for about half of the terrestrial uptake. A consensus of inventory and inverse methods indicates that, in the 1980s, northern extratropical land regions were a large net sink of carbon, and the tropics were approximately neutral (albeit with high uncertainty around the central estimate of zero net flux). The terrestrial flux in southern extratropical regions was small. Book-keeping model studies of the impacts of land-use change indicated a large source in the tropics and almost zero net flux for most northern extratropical regions; similar land use change impacts were also recently obtained using process-based models. The difference between book-keeping land-use change model studies and inversions or inventories was previously interpreted as a "missing" terrestrial carbon uptake. Land-use change studies do not account for environmental or many management effects (which are implicitly included in inventory and inversion methods). Process-based model studies have quantified the impacts of CO2 fertilisation and climate change in addition to land

  9. The changing carbon cycle of the coastal ocean

    OpenAIRE

    Bauer, James E; Cai, Wei-Jun; Raymond, Peter A.; Bianchi, Thomas S.; Hopkinson, Charles S.; Regnier, Pierre A. G.

    2013-01-01

    The carbon cycle of the coastal ocean is a dynamic component of the global carbon budget. But the diverse sources and sinks of carbon and their complex interactions in these waters remain poorly understood. Here we discuss the sources, exchanges and fates of carbon in the coastal ocean and how anthropogenic activities have altered the carbon cycle. Recent evidence suggests that the coastal ocean may have become a net sink for atmospheric carbon dioxide during post-industrial times. Continued ...

  10. Changing global carbon cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The increase in atmospheric carbon dioxide (C02) is the single largest human perturbation on the earth's radiative balance contributing to climate change. Its rate of change reflects the balance between anthropogenic carbon emissions and the dynamics of a number of terrestrial and ocean processes that remove or emit C02. It is the long term evolution of this balance that will determine to large extent the speed and magnitude of the human induced climate change and the mitigation requirements to stabilise atmospheric C02 concentrations at any given level. In this talk, we show new trends in global carbon sources and sinks, with particularly focus on major shifts occurring since 2000 when the growth rate of atmospheric C02 has reached its highest level on record. The acceleration in the C02 growth results from the combination of several changes in properties of the carbon cycle, including: acceleration of anthropogenic carbon emissions; increased carbon intensity of the global economy, and decreased efficiency of natural carbon sinks. We discuss in more detail some of the possible causes of the reduced efficiency of natural carbon sinks on land and oceans, such as the decreased net sink in the Southern Ocean and on terrestrial mid-latitudes due to world-wide occurrence of drought. All these changes reported here characterise a carbon cycle that is generating stronger than expected climate forcing, and sooner than expected

  11. Source-sink relationships in radish plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Starck

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The problem of source-sink relationships in di- and tetraploidal radish plants grown in. hydroponic cultures was investigated in two stages of their development: with intensively growing swollen hypocotyl and in the period of actively accumulating nutrients in the storage organ. It was found, that the proportion, between the mass of organs, their RGR and NAR was very similar in di- and tetraploidal populations, probably owing to a similar rate of photosynthesis and pattern of assimilates distribution. The high variability of swollen hypocotyls size is slightly correlated with the size of the whole aerial part and is not correlated with the rate of photosynthesis in leaves. Partial defoliation of radish plants did not affect the rate of photosynthesis of the remaining leaves. Only in the cotyledones the oldest donors of 14C-assimilates, a slight compensation of photosynthesis was reported. It may suggest, that the rate of photosynthesis in radish plants is not under the control of sink activity. The size of the storage organ have determined in some extent its attractive force and influenced the amount of 14C-assimilates exported from their donors. Translocation of photosynthates from the young, still growing leaves was conditioned mainly by their retention power. Therefore, in young radish plants cotyledons were the main donor of 14C-assimilates.

  12. Atmospheric carbon dioxide and the global carbon cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trabalka, J R [ed.

    1985-12-01

    This state-of-the-art volume presents discussions on the global cycle of carbon, the dynamic balance among global atmospheric CO2 sources and sinks. Separate abstracts have been prepared for the individual papers. (ACR)

  13. Sink-oriented Dynamic Location Service Protocol for Mobile Sinks with an Energy Efficient Grid-Based Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyunseung Choo

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Sensor nodes transmit the sensed information to the sink through wireless sensor networks (WSNs. They have limited power, computational capacities and memory. Portable wireless devices are increasing in popularity. Mechanisms that allow information to be efficiently obtained through mobile WSNs are of significant interest. However, a mobile sink introduces many challenges to data dissemination in large WSNs. For example, it is important to efficiently identify the locations of mobile sinks and disseminate information from multi-source nodes to the multi-mobile sinks. In particular, a stationary dissemination path may no longer be effective in mobile sink applications, due to sink mobility. In this paper, we propose a Sink-oriented Dynamic Location Service (SDLS approach to handle sink mobility. In SDLS, we propose an Eight-Direction Anchor (EDA system that acts as a location service server. EDA prevents intensive energy consumption at the border sensor nodes and thus provides energy balancing to all the sensor nodes. Then we propose a Location-based Shortest Relay (LSR that efficiently forwards (or relays data from a source node to a sink with minimal delay path. Our results demonstrate that SDLS not only provides an efficient and scalable location service, but also reduces the average data communication overhead in scenarios with multiple and moving sinks and sources.

  14. Sink-oriented Dynamic Location Service Protocol for Mobile Sinks with an Energy Efficient Grid-Based Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Hyeonjae; Park, Kwangjin; Hwang, Dae-Joon; Choo, Hyunseung

    2009-01-01

    Sensor nodes transmit the sensed information to the sink through wireless sensor networks (WSNs). They have limited power, computational capacities and memory. Portable wireless devices are increasing in popularity. Mechanisms that allow information to be efficiently obtained through mobile WSNs are of significant interest. However, a mobile sink introduces many challenges to data dissemination in large WSNs. For example, it is important to efficiently identify the locations of mobile sinks and disseminate information from multi-source nodes to the multi-mobile sinks. In particular, a stationary dissemination path may no longer be effective in mobile sink applications, due to sink mobility. In this paper, we propose a Sink-oriented Dynamic Location Service (SDLS) approach to handle sink mobility. In SDLS, we propose an Eight-Direction Anchor (EDA) system that acts as a location service server. EDA prevents intensive energy consumption at the border sensor nodes and thus provides energy balancing to all the sensor nodes. Then we propose a Location-based Shortest Relay (LSR) that efficiently forwards (or relays) data from a source node to a sink with minimal delay path. Our results demonstrate that SDLS not only provides an efficient and scalable location service, but also reduces the average data communication overhead in scenarios with multiple and moving sinks and sources. PMID:22573964

  15. Implementing and comparing sink particles in AMR and SPH

    CERN Document Server

    Federrath, Christoph; Seifried, Daniel; Clark, Paul C; Klessen, Ralf S

    2010-01-01

    We implemented sink particles in the Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR) code FLASH to model the gravitational collapse and accretion in turbulent molecular clouds and cores. Sink particles are frequently used to measure properties of star formation in numerical simulations, such as the star formation rate and efficiency, and the mass distribution of stars. We show that a sole density threshold for sink particle creation is insufficient in case of supersonic flows, because the density can exceed the threshold in strong shocks that do not necessarily lead to local collapse. Additional physical collapse indicators have to be considered. We apply our AMR sink particle module to the formation of a star cluster, and compare it to a Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) code with sink particles. Our comparison shows encouraging agreement of gas and sink particle properties.

  16. Optimal Sinks Deployment and Packet Scheduling for Wireless Sensor Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Achir, Nadjib; Muhlethaler, Paul

    2014-01-01

    International audience —In this paper we propose an optimal deployment and distributed packet scheduling of multi-sink Wireless Sensors networks (WNSs). This work is devoted to computing the optimal deployment of sinks for a given maximum number of hops between nodes and sinks. We also propose an optimal distributed packet scheduling in order to estimate the minimum energy consumption. We consider the energy consumed due to reporting, forwarding and overhearing. In contrast to reporting an...

  17. How do sinking phytoplankton species manage to persist?

    OpenAIRE

    Huisman, J.; Arrayás, M.; Ebert, Ute; Sommeijer, Ben

    2001-01-01

    Phytoplankton requires light for photosynthesis, but most phytoplankton species are heavier than water and sink. How can these sinking species persist? Here we show, by means of an advection-diffusion-reaction equation of light-limited phytoplankton, that the answer lies in the turbulent motion of water that re-disperses phytoplankton over the vertical water column. More specifically, we show that there is a turbulence window sustaining sinking phytoplankton species. If turbulent diffusion is...

  18. Physics of sinking and selection of plankton cell size

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sciascia, R., E-mail: r.sciascia@isac.cnr.it [Institute of Atmospheric Sciences and Climate, CNR, Corso Fiume, 4, 10133 Torino (Italy); Doctorate Program in Fluid Dynamics, Politecnico di Torino (Italy); De Monte, S. [CNRS, UMR 7625 “Ecologie et Evolution”, Paris, F-75005 (France); Université Pierre et Marie Curie-Paris 6, UMR 7625 “Ecologie et Evolution”, Paris, F-75005 (France); Institut de Biologie de l' Ecole Normale Supérieure, UMR 7625 “Ecologie et Evolution”, Paris, F-75005 (France); Provenzale, A. [Institute of Atmospheric Sciences and Climate, CNR, Corso Fiume, 4, 10133 Torino (Italy)

    2013-02-04

    Gravitational sinking in the water column is known to affect size composition of planktonic communities. One important driver toward the reduction of plankton size is the fact that larger cells tend to sink faster below the euphotic layer. In this work, we discuss the role of gravitational sinking in driving cell size selection, showing that the outcome of phytoplankton competition is determined by the dependence of sinking velocity on cell size, shape, and on the temporal variability associated with turbulence. This opens a question on whether regional modulations of the turbulence intensity could affect size distribution of planktonic communities.

  19. Sources and sinks of stratospheric water vapor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A tutorial review of the understanding of stratospheric H2O and the processes controlling it is presented. Paradoxes posed by currently available observational data are cited and suggestions made as to how they might be resolved. Such resolution appears to require: that the bulk of our current data provides unrepresentative and misleading vertical and latitudinal H2O gradients immediately downstream from the tropical tropopause; and, that there exists within the troposphere a mechanism different from or in addition to the tropical tropopause cold trap for drying air to the mixing ratios found in the lower stratosphere. Satisfaction of these requirements will reconcile much heretofore puzzling observational data and will obviate the necessity for a stratospheric sink for H2O

  20. Rock displacements measured during URL shaft sinking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During sinking of the Canadian Underground Research Laboratory (URL) shaft, borehole extensometers were used to obtain rock displacement measurements and a tape extensometer was used to measure total convergences. The instruments, instrument modifications, and methods used are described. The measurements are summarized and assessed, with particular emphasis on the influence of natural fractures on rock-mass response and the performance of the instrumentation. Displacements varied from 0.09 mm to 1.75 mm. The frequency of sub-vertical fractures in the rock appeared to be the main factor causing the variation in the measured displacements. Although the displacement instrumentation met certain operational requirement well, lack of precision was a problem. Displacement instrumentation used in future URL experiments should have more measuring points, greater sensitivity, and greater accuracy to better measure small displacements

  1. Modeling the Energy Performance of Event-Driven Wireless Sensor Network by Using Static Sink and Mobile Sink

    OpenAIRE

    Mitsuji Matsumoto; Jiehui Chen; Salim, Mariam B.

    2010-01-01

    Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs) designed for mission-critical applications suffer from limited sensing capacities, particularly fast energy depletion. Regarding this, mobile sinks can be used to balance the energy consumption in WSNs, but the frequent location updates of the mobile sinks can lead to data collisions and rapid energy consumption for some specific sensors. This paper explores an optimal barrier coverage based sensor deployment for event driven WSNs where a dual-sink model was de...

  2. Sink-oriented Dynamic Location Service Protocol for Mobile Sinks with an Energy Efficient Grid-Based Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Hyunseung Choo; Dae-Joon Hwang; Kwangjin Park; Hyeonjae Jeon

    2009-01-01

    Sensor nodes transmit the sensed information to the sink through wireless sensor networks (WSNs). They have limited power, computational capacities and memory. Portable wireless devices are increasing in popularity. Mechanisms that allow information to be efficiently obtained through mobile WSNs are of significant interest. However, a mobile sink introduces many challenges to data dissemination in large WSNs. For example, it is important to efficiently identify the locations of mobile sinks a...

  3. Quantification of net carbon flux from plastic greenhouse vegetable cultivation: A full carbon cycle analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plastic greenhouse vegetable cultivation (PGVC) has played a vital role in increasing incomes of farmers and expanded dramatically in last several decades. However, carbon budget after conversion from conventional vegetable cultivation (CVC) to PGVC has been poorly quantified. A full carbon cycle analysis was used to estimate the net carbon flux from PGVC systems based on the combination of data from both field observations and literatures. Carbon fixation was evaluated at two pre-selected locations in China. Results suggest that: (1) the carbon sink of PGVC is 1.21 and 1.23 Mg C ha-1 yr-1 for temperate and subtropical area, respectively; (2) the conversion from CVC to PGVC could substantially enhance carbon sink potential by 8.6 times in the temperate area and by 1.3 times in the subtropical area; (3) the expansion of PGVC usage could enhance the potential carbon sink of arable land in China overall. - Highlights: → We used full carbon (C) cycle analysis to estimate the net C flux from cultivation. → The plastic greenhouse vegetable cultivation system in China can act as a C sink. → Intensified agricultural practices can generate C sinks. → Expansion of plastic greenhouse vegetable cultivation can enhance regional C sink. - The conversion from conventional vegetable cultivation to plastic greenhouse vegetable cultivation could substantially enhance carbon sink potential by 8.6 and 1.3 times for temperate and subtropical area, respectively.

  4. The significance of carbon-enriched dust for global carbon accounting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soil carbon stores amount to 54% of the terrestrial carbon pool and twice the atmospheric carbon pool, but soil organic carbon (SOC) can be transient. There is an ongoing debate about whether soils are a net source or sink of carbon, and understanding the role of aeolian processes in SOC erosion, tr...

  5. Aggregation and sinking behaviour of resuspended fluffy layer material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziervogel, Kai; Forster, Stefan

    2005-09-01

    The influence of pelagic diatom addition ( Skeletonema costatum) on aggregation dynamics of resuspended fluffy layer material containing natural microorganism assemblages (bacteria and pennate diatoms) was studied during two roller table experiments. Sediment samples were taken at a fine sand site (16 m water depth) located in Mecklenburg Bight, south-western Baltic Sea. Fluff was experimentally resuspended from sediment cores and aggregation processes with and without S. costatum were studied in rotating tanks. Total particulate matter was incorporated into artificial aggregates in equal shares after both roller table experiments. However, biogenic parameters (particulate organic carbon, particulate organic nitrogen, and carbohydrate equivalents), as well as cell numbers of bacteria and pennate diatoms were found in higher percentages in S. costatum aggregates compared to aggregates without S. costatum. Transparent exopolymer particles were apparently irrelevant in the aggregation process during both experiments. Settling velocities of S. costatum aggregates exceeding 1000 μm in diameter showed a significantly higher mean settling velocity compared to aggregates without S. costatum of the same size. The pronounced effect of pelagic diatoms on aggregation processes of fluff in terms of particle attributes, size, and therewith sinking velocities could be demonstrated and may lead to further insight into near bed particle transport in coastal waters.

  6. Investigating the sources and sinks of water of Congo's wetlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paiva, R. C. D.; O'Loughlin, F.; Alsdorf, D. E.; Durand, M. T.; Beighley, E., II; Calmant, S.; Lee, H.; Santos Da Silva, J.

    2014-12-01

    The Congo is the second largest river basin in the world and indeed there is still a lot to be investigated about the hydrology of this system. This region presents extensive wetlands that may play an important role on the hydrology, carbon and ecological dynamics of the Congo. However, previous studies indicate that these wetlands behave differently from the Amazon, other major rainforest basin, and how water enters and leaves the Cuvette Centrale wetland is still to be quantified. We investigate the sources and sinks of water to the Congo's wetlands. Our analyses range from simple examinations of precipitation and evaporation historical data to remote sensing datasets and 2 D hydrodynamic modelling of Congo wetlands. Early results show that water levels at wetlands are usually higher than adjacent Congo River water levels and amplitude of variation is considerably smaller. Also, floodplain channels are not observed in this region indicating that surface flows are diffusive. Mean annual precipitation range from 1600 to 2000 mm/year, evapotranspiration estimates are approximately 1100 mm/year while some estimates of groundwater recharge indicate values larger than 300 mm/year. These assessments suggest that volumes coming from local water balance could flood the wetlands to depths of only a few centimeters. Preliminary 2D hydrodynamic simulations show that water coming from main rivers produces at upstream areas can flood only a small part of wetland, mainly alongside these rivers.

  7. Grain boundary strength as point defect sink strength

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sink strength of spherical grain boundary as an absolutely absorbing surface and as finite thickness wall consisting of the edge dislocations are considered. The values of the grain boundary sink strength are shown to be critically dependent on the point defect recombination degree

  8. Sinking in Quicksand: An Applied Approach to the Archimedes Principle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, G. M.; Evans, S. C.; Moreno-Atanasio, R.

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to present a laboratory experiment that explains the phenomenon of sinking in quicksand simulated as a fluidized bed. The paper demonstrates experimentally and theoretically that the proportion of a body that sinks in quicksand depends on the volume fraction of solids and the density of the body relative to the…

  9. Changes in the Arctic Ocean CO2 sink (1996-2007): A regional model analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manizza, M.; Follows, M. J.; Dutkiewicz, S.; Menemenlis, D.; Hill, C. N.; Key, R. M.

    2013-12-01

    The rapid recent decline of Arctic Ocean sea ice area increases the flux of solar radiation available for primary production and the area of open water for air-sea gas exchange. We use a regional physical-biogeochemical model of the Arctic Ocean, forced by the National Centers for Environmental Prediction/National Center for Atmospheric Research atmospheric reanalysis, to evaluate the mean present-day CO2 sink and its temporal evolution. During the 1996-2007 period, the model suggests that the Arctic average sea surface temperature warmed by 0.04°C a-1, that sea ice area decreased by ˜0.1 × 106 km2 a-1, and that the biological drawdown of dissolved inorganic carbon increased. The simulated 1996-2007 time-mean Arctic Ocean CO2 sink is 58 ± 6 Tg C a-1. The increase in ice-free ocean area and consequent carbon drawdown during this period enhances the CO2 sink by ˜1.4 Tg C a-1, consistent with estimates based on extrapolations of sparse data. A regional analysis suggests that during the 1996-2007 period, the shelf regions of the Laptev, East Siberian, Chukchi, and Beaufort Seas experienced an increase in the efficiency of their biological pump due to decreased sea ice area, especially during the 2004-2007 period, consistent with independently published estimates of primary production. In contrast, the CO2 sink in the Barents Sea is reduced during the 2004-2007 period due to a dominant control by warming and decreasing solubility. Thus, the effect of decreasing sea ice area and increasing sea surface temperature partially cancel, though the former is dominant.

  10. CO2 capture and sequestration source-sink match optimization in Jing-Jin-Ji region of China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhong ZHENG; Dan GAO; Linwei MA; Zheng LI; Weidou NI

    2009-01-01

    Carbon dioxide capture and sequestration (CCS) is considered to be an important option for climate change mitigation. A key problem for the implementation of CCS technology is the source-sink match design and optimization when considering both economic and envir-onmental requirement. This paper presents a generic-optimization-based model for the strategic planning and design of future CCS source-sink matching. The features and capabilities of the model are illustrated through a detailed case study for the Jing-Jin-Ji (Beijing, Tianjin and Hebei Province) region in China. It shows how the model helps make a compromise in arriving at a strategic decision for CCS source-sink matching by providing the tradeoff frontiers between economic and environmental perfor-mance, and the features of match solutions with the best economic performance or with the best environmental performance.

  11. Vibration suppression of composite laminated plate with nonlinear energy sink

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ye-Wei; Zhang, Hao; Hou, Shuai; Xu, Ke-Fan; Chen, Li-Qun

    2016-06-01

    The composite laminated plate is widely used in supersonic aircraft. So, there are many researches about the vibration suppression of composite laminated plate. In this paper, nonlinear energy sink (NES) as an effective method to suppress vibration is studied. The coupled partial differential governing equations of the composite laminated plate with the nonlinear energy sink (NES) are established by using the Hamilton principle. The fourth-order Galerkin discrete method is used to truncate the partial differential equations, which are solved by numerical integration method. Meanwhile study about the precise effectiveness of the nonlinear energy sink (NES) by discussing the different installation location of the nonlinear energy sink (NES) at the same speed. The results indicate that the nonlinear energy sink (NES) can significantly suppress the severe vibration of the composite laminated plate with speed wind loadings in to protect the composite laminated plate from excessive vibration.

  12. European land CO2 sink influenced by NAO and East-Atlantic Pattern coupling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastos, Ana; Janssens, Ivan A; Gouveia, Célia M; Trigo, Ricardo M; Ciais, Philippe; Chevallier, Frédéric; Peñuelas, Josep; Rödenbeck, Christian; Piao, Shilong; Friedlingstein, Pierre; Running, Steven W

    2016-01-01

    Large-scale climate patterns control variability in the global carbon sink. In Europe, the North-Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) influences vegetation activity, however the East-Atlantic (EA) pattern is known to modulate NAO strength and location. Using observation-driven and modelled data sets, we show that multi-annual variability patterns of European Net Biome Productivity (NBP) are linked to anomalies in heat and water transport controlled by the NAO-EA interplay. Enhanced NBP occurs when NAO and EA are both in negative phase, associated with cool summers with wet soils which enhance photosynthesis. During anti-phase periods, NBP is reduced through distinct impacts of climate anomalies in photosynthesis and respiration. The predominance of anti-phase years in the early 2000s may explain the European-wide reduction of carbon uptake during this period, reported in previous studies. Results show that improving the capability of simulating atmospheric circulation patterns may better constrain regional carbon sink variability in coupled carbon-climate models. PMID:26777730

  13. Quantifying the Sources and Sinks of Greenhouse Gases: What Does It Take to Satisfy Scientific and Decision-Making Needs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, K. J.; Keller, K.; Ogle, S. M.; Smith, S.

    2014-12-01

    Changes in the sources and sinks of greenhouse gases (GHGs) are key drivers of anthropogenic climate change. It is hence not surprising that current and emerging U.S. governmental science priorities and programs focused on climate change (e.g. a U.S. Carbon Cycle Science Plan; the U.S. Carbon Cycle Science Program, the U.S. Global Change Research Program, Executive Order 13653 'Preparing the U.S. for the Impacts of Climate Change') all call for an improved understanding of these sources and sinks.. Measurements of the total atmospheric burden of these gases are well established, but measurements of their sources and sinks are difficult to make over spatial and temporal scales that are relevant for scientific and decisionmaking needs. Quantifying the uncertainty in these measurements is particularly challenging. This talk reviews the intersection of the state of knowledge of GHG sources and sinks, focusing in particular on CO2 and CH4, and science and decision-making needs for this information. Different science and decision-making needs require differing levels of uncertainty. A number of high-priority needs (early detection of changes in the Earth system, projections of future climate, support of markets or regulations) often require a high degree of accuracy and/or precision. We will critically evaluate current U.S. planning to documents to infer current perceived needs for GHG source/sink quantification, attempting to translate these needs into quantitative uncertainty metrics. We will compare these perceived needs with the current state of the art of GHG source/sink quantification, including the apparent pattern of systematic differences between so-called "top down" and "bottom-up" flux estimates. This comparison will enable us to identify where needs can be readily satisfied, and where gaps in technology exist. Finally, we will examine what steps could be taken to close existing gaps.

  14. Understanding the role of sink patches in source-sink metapopulations: reed warbler in an agricultural landscape

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Foppen, R.P.B.; Chardon, J.P.; Liefveld, W.

    2000-01-01

    Populations in agricultural landscapes often occur in source-sink situations: small patches of marginal habitat (sinks) are supported by an immigration flux from larger patches of high-quality habitat (sources). We sought to demonstrate that this situation occurs for Reed Warblers (Acrocephalus scir

  15. Mined-out areas need not sink

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estonia's most important mineral resource - oil-shale or kukersite - has been mined for long years. In spite of the decrease in oil-shale production over recent years, mining for this important raw material of the power and chemical industries will have to be continued. For various reasons, in the near future the prevalent role will be played by underground mining. Unfortunately, this method, as well as open-cast pit mining, has done much damage to nature in North-East Estonia. The best measure to lower the cost and diminish the negative effects of mining will probably be filling the shafts and pits with either mechanical gangue or some petrifying material. Experiments carried out in the Viru and Kivioli mines have yielded good results; the sinking of the ground lessens, the mining losses of oil-shale and the pollution of ground water are reduced and the ground water cone of depression is narrowed. At the same time the application of this method also has some negative aspects: it increases the cost of production and creates a need for procuring additional machinery. (author)

  16. Thermal Transport Model for Heat Sink Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chervenak, James A.; Kelley, Richard L.; Brown, Ari D.; Smith, Stephen J.; Kilbourne, Caroline a.

    2009-01-01

    A document discusses the development of a finite element model for describing thermal transport through microcalorimeter arrays in order to assist in heat-sinking design. A fabricated multi-absorber transition edge sensor (PoST) was designed in order to reduce device wiring density by a factor of four. The finite element model consists of breaking the microcalorimeter array into separate elements, including the transition edge sensor (TES) and the silicon substrate on which the sensor is deposited. Each element is then broken up into subelements, whose surface area subtends 10 10 microns. The heat capacity per unit temperature, thermal conductance, and thermal diffusivity of each subelement are the model inputs, as are the temperatures of each subelement. Numerical integration using the Finite in Time Centered in Space algorithm of the thermal diffusion equation is then performed in order to obtain a temporal evolution of the subelement temperature. Thermal transport across interfaces is modeled using a thermal boundary resistance obtained using the acoustic mismatch model. The document concludes with a discussion of the PoST fabrication. PoSTs are novel because they enable incident x-ray position sensitivity with good energy resolution and low wiring density.

  17. IMPLEMENTATION OF SINK PARTICLES IN THE ATHENA CODE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We describe the implementation and tests of sink particle algorithms in the Eulerian grid-based code Athena. The introduction of sink particles enables the long-term evolution of systems in which localized collapse occurs, and it is impractical (or unnecessary) to resolve the accretion shocks at the centers of collapsing regions. We discuss the similarities and differences of our methods compared to other implementations of sink particles. Our criteria for sink creation are motivated by the properties of the Larson-Penston collapse solution. We use standard particle-mesh methods to compute particle and gas gravity together. Accretion of mass and momenta onto sinks is computed using fluxes returned by the Riemann solver. A series of tests based on previous analytic and numerical collapse solutions is used to validate our method and implementation. We demonstrate use of our code for applications with a simulation of planar converging supersonic turbulent flow, in which multiple cores form and collapse to create sinks; these sinks continue to interact and accrete from their surroundings over several Myr.

  18. The dominant role of semi-arid ecosystems in the trend and variability of the land CO2 sink

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahlström, Anders; Raupach, Michael R.; Schurgers, Guy;

    2015-01-01

    The growth rate of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations since industrialization is characterized by large interannual variability, mostly resulting from variability in CO2 uptake by terrestrial ecosystems (typically termed carbon sink). However, the contributions of regional ecosystems...... to that variability are not well known. Using an ensemble of ecosystem and land-surface models and an empirical observation-based product of global gross primary production, we show that the mean sink, trend, and interannual variability in CO2 uptake by terrestrial ecosystems are dominated by distinct biogeographic...

  19. Nitrous oxide sinks and emissions in boreal aquatic networks in Québec

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soued, C.; Del Giorgio, P. A.; Maranger, R.

    2016-02-01

    Inland waters are important sites of nitrogen processing, and represent a significant component of the global budget of nitrous oxide, a powerful greenhouse gas. Measurements have focused on nitrogen-rich temperate rivers, with low-nitrogen freshwater systems at high latitudes receiving less attention. Here we measured surface water nitrous oxide partial pressures and calculated fluxes across 321 rivers, lakes and ponds in three boreal regions of Québec, Canada. Fluxes to the atmosphere ranged from -23.1 to 115.7 μmol m-2 d-1, with high variability among ecosystem types, regions and seasons. Surprisingly, over 40% of the systems sampled were under-saturated in nitrous oxide during the summer, and one region’s aquatic network was a net atmospheric sink. Fluxes could not be predicted from the relatively narrow range in nitrogen concentrations, but the aquatic systems acting as sinks tended to have lower pH, higher dissolved organic carbon and lower oxygen concentrations. Given the large variability in observed fluxes, we estimate that high-latitude aquatic networks may emit from -0.07 to 0.20 Tg N2O-N yr-1. The potential of boreal aquatic networks to act as net atmospheric nitrous oxide sinks highlights the extensive uncertainty in our understanding of global freshwater nitrous oxide budgets.

  20. Plant Responses to Rising Carbon Dioxide and Nitrogen Relations

    OpenAIRE

    Bloom, Arnold J.

    2009-01-01

    The responses of higher plants to rising carbon dioxide concentration in the atmosphere are strongly dependent on their ability to acquire mineral nitrogen, ammonium and nitrate. Elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide limits both sources and sinks of plant mineral nitrogen. With regard to sources, elevated carbon dioxide stimulates microbial immobilization and inhibits nitrogen fixation. With regard to sinks, elevated carbon dioxide inhibits nitrate assimilation into amino acids within the shoo...

  1. Modeling the Energy Performance of Event-Driven Wireless Sensor Network by Using Static Sink and Mobile Sink

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitsuji Matsumoto

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs designed for mission-critical applications suffer from limited sensing capacities, particularly fast energy depletion. Regarding this, mobile sinks can be used to balance the energy consumption in WSNs, but the frequent location updates of the mobile sinks can lead to data collisions and rapid energy consumption for some specific sensors. This paper explores an optimal barrier coverage based sensor deployment for event driven WSNs where a dual-sink model was designed to evaluate the energy performance of not only static sensors, but Static Sink (SS and Mobile Sinks (MSs simultaneously, based on parameters such as sensor transmission range r and the velocity of the mobile sink v, etc. Moreover, a MS mobility model was developed to enable SS and MSs to effectively collaborate, while achieving spatiotemporal energy performance efficiency by using the knowledge of the cumulative density function (cdf, Poisson process and M/G/1 queue. The simulation results verified that the improved energy performance of the whole network was demonstrated clearly and our eDSA algorithm is more efficient than the static-sink model, reducing energy consumption approximately in half. Moreover, we demonstrate that our results are robust to realistic sensing models and also validate the correctness of our results through extensive simulations.

  2. Quantifying global terrestrial carbon influx and storage as stimulated by an increase in atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration

    OpenAIRE

    Luo, Yiqi

    1997-01-01

    EXTRACT (SEE PDF FOR FULL ABSTRACT): Measurements of spatial and temporal distributions of carbon dioxide concentration and carbon-13/carbon-12 ratio in the atmosphere suggest a strong biospheric carbon sink in terrestrial ecosystems. Quantifying the sink, however, has become an enormous challenge for Earth system scientists because of great uncertainties associated with biological variation and environmental heterogeneity in the ecosystems. This paper presents an approach that uses two d...

  3. Source-sink landscape theory and its ecological significance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Exploring the relatiouships between landscape pattern and ecological processes is the key topic of landscape ecology,for which,a large number of indices as well as landscape pattern analysis model were developed.However,one problem faced by landscape ecologists is that it is hard to link the landscape indices with a specific ecological process.Linking landscape pattern and ecological processes has become a challenge for landscape ecologists."Source" and "sink" are common concepts used in air pollution research,by which the movement direction and pattern of different pollutants in air can be clearly identified.In fact,for any ecological process,the research can be considered as a balance between the source and the sink in space.Thus,the concepts of "source" and "sink" could be implemented to the research of landscape pattern and ecological processes.In this paper,a theory of sourcesink landscape was proposed,which include:(1) In the research of landscape pattern and ecological process,all landscape types can be divided into two groups,"source"landscape and "sink" landscape."Source" landscape contributes positively to the ecological process,while "sink" landscape is unhelpful to the ecological process.(2) Both landscapes are recognized with regard to the specific ecological process."Source" landscape in a target ecological process may change into a "sink"landscape as in another ecological process.Therefore,the ecological process should be determined before "source"or "sink" landscape were defined.(3) The key point to distinguish "source" landscape from "sink" landscape is to quantify the effect of landscape on ecological process.The positive effect is made by "source" landscape,and the negative effect by "sink" landscape.(4) For the same ecological process,the contribution of "source" landscapes may vary,and it is the same to the "sink"landscapes.It is required to determine the weight of each landscape type on ecological processes.(5) The sourcesink principle can be

  4. Multiple Mobile Sinks Positioning in Wireless Sensor Networks for Buildings

    OpenAIRE

    Ben Saad, Leila; Tourancheau, Bernard

    2009-01-01

    Best Paper Award International audience Real deployment of wireless sensor networks inside build- ings is a very challenging. In fact, in such networks, a large number of small sensor devices suffer from limited energy supply. These sensors have to observe and monitor their in-door environment, and then to report the data collected to a nearest information collector, referred to as the sink node. Sensor nodes which are far away from the sink relay their data via multiple hops to reach t...

  5. Intrinsic and extrinsic drivers of source–sink dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Heinrichs, Julie A.; Lawler, Joshua J.; Schumaker, Nathan H.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Many factors affect the presence and exchange of individuals among subpopulations and influence not only the emergence, but the strength of ensuing source–sink dynamics within metapopulations. Yet their relative contributions remain largely unexplored. To help identify the characteristics of empirical systems that are likely to exhibit strong versus weak source–sink dynamics and inform their differential management, we compared the relative roles of influential factors in strengthenin...

  6. Dynamics of forced system with vibro-impact energy sink

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gendelman, O. V.; Alloni, A.

    2015-12-01

    The paper treats forced response of primary linear oscillator with vibro-impact energy sink. This system exhibits some features of dynamics, which resemble forced systems with other types of nonlinear energy sinks, such as steady-state and strongly modulated responses. However, the differences are crucial: in the system with vibro-impact sink the strongly modulated response consists of randomly distributed periods of resonant and non-resonant motion. This salient feature allows us to identify this type of dynamic behavior as chaotic strongly modulated response (CSMR). It is demonstrated, that the CSMR exists due to special structure of a slow invariant manifold (SIM); the latter is derived in a course of a multiple-scale analysis of the system. In the considered system, this manifold has only one stable and one unstable branch. This feature defines new class of universality for the nonlinear energy sinks. Very different physical system with topologically similar SIM - the oscillator with rotational energy sink - also exhibits CSMRs. In the system with the vibro-impact sink, such responses are observed even for very low level of the external forcing. This feature makes such system viable for possible energy harvesting applications.

  7. Production, oxygen respiration rates, and sinking velocity of copepod fecal pellets: Direct measurements of ballasting by opal and calcite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ploug, H.; Iversen, M.H.; Koski, Marja; Buitenhuis, E.T.

    2008-01-01

    sp., T. weissflogii, and E. huxleyi, respectively. The average carbon-specific respiration rate was 0.15 d(-1) independent on diet (range: 0.08-0.21 d(-1)). Because of ballasting of opal and calcite, sinking velocities were significantly higher for pellets produced on T. weissflogii (322 +/- 169 m d......Production, oxygen uptake, and sinking velocity of copepod fecal pellets egested by Temora longicornis were measured using a nanoflagellate (Rhodomonas sp.), a diatom (Thalassiosira weissflogii), or a coccolithophorid (Emiliania huxleyi) as food sources. Fecal pellet production varied between 0......(-1)) and E. huxleyi (200 +/- 93 m d(-1)) than on Rhodomonas sp. (35 +/- 29 m d(-1)). Preservation of carbon was estimated to be approximately 10-fold higher in fecal pellets produced when T. longicornis was fed E. huxleyi or T. weissflogii rather than Rhodomonas sp. Our study directly demonstrates...

  8. Why productive upwelling areas are often sources rather than sinks of CO2? – a comparative study on eddy upwellings in the South China Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Jiao

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Marine upwelling regions are known to be productive in carbon fixation and thus thought to be sinks of CO2, whereas many upwelling areas in the ocean are actually sources rather than sinks of CO2. To address this paradox, multiple biogeochemical parameters were investigated at two cyclonic-eddy-induced upwelling sites CE1 and CE2 in the western South China Sea. The results showed that upwelling can exert significant influences on biological activities in the euphotic zone and can either increase or decrease particulate organic carbon (POC export flux depending on upwelling conditions such as the magnitude, timing, and duration of nutrient input and consequent microbial activities. At CE2 the increase of phytoplankton biomass caused by the upwelled nutrients resulted in increase of POC export flux compared to non-eddy reference sites, while at CE1 the microbial respiration of organic carbon stimulated by the upwelled nutrients significantly contributed to the attenuation of POC export flux, aggravating outgassing of CO2. These results suggest that on top of upwelled dissolved inorganic carbon release, microbial activities stimulated by upwelled nutrients and phytoplankton labile organic carbon can play a critical role for a marine upwelling area to be a source rather than a sink of CO2. Meanwhile, we point out that even though an upwelling region is outgassing, carbon sequestration still takes place through the POC-based biological pump as well as the refractory dissolved organic carbon (RDOC-based microbial carbon pump.

  9. On Mobility Management in Multi-Sink Sensor Networks for Geocasting of Queries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tüysüz Erman, Aysegül; Dilo, Arta; Hoesel, van Lodewijk; Havinga, Paul

    2011-01-01

    In order to efficiently deal with location dependent messages in multi-sink wireless sensor networks (WSNs), it is key that the network informs sinks what geographical area is covered by which sink. The sinks are then able to efficiently route messages which are only valid in particular regions of t

  10. 78 FR 21596 - Drawn Stainless Steel Sinks From the People's Republic of China: Countervailing Duty Order

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-11

    ... Countervailing Duty Determination, 78 FR 13017 (February 26, 2013). \\2\\ See Drawn Stainless Steel Sinks from... International Trade Administration Drawn Stainless Steel Sinks From the People's Republic of China... duty order on drawn stainless steel sinks (``drawn sinks'') from the People's Republic of China...

  11. Assessing net ecosystem carbon exchange of U S terrestrial ecosystems by integrating eddy covariance flux measurements and satellite observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhuang, Qianlai [Purdue University; Law, Beverly E. [Oregon State University; Baldocchi, Dennis [University of California, Berkeley; Ma, Siyan [University of California, Berkeley; Chen, Jiquan [University of Toledo, Toledo, OH; Richardson, Andrew [Harvard University; Melillo, Jerry [Marine Biological Laboratory; Davis, Ken J. [Pennsylvania State University; Hollinger, D. [USDA Forest Service; Wharton, Sonia [University of California, Davis; Falk, Matthias [University of California, Davis; Paw, U. Kyaw Tha [University of California, Davis; Oren, Ram [Duke University; Katulk, Gabriel G. [Duke University; Noormets, Asko [North Carolina State University; Fischer, Marc [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Verma, Shashi [University of Nebraska; Suyker, A. E. [University of Nebraska, Lincoln; Cook, David R. [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Sun, G. [USDA Forest Service; McNulty, Steven G. [USDA Forest Service; Wofsy, Steve [Harvard University; Bolstad, Paul V [University of Minnesota; Burns, Sean [University of Colorado, Boulder; Monson, Russell K. [University of Colorado, Boulder; Curtis, Peter [Ohio State University, The, Columbus; Drake, Bert G. [Smithsonian Environmental Research Center, Edgewater, MD; Foster, David R. [Harvard University; Gu, Lianhong [ORNL; Hadley, Julian L. [Harvard University; Litvak, Marcy [University of New Mexico, Albuquerque; Martin, Timothy A. [University of Florida, Gainesville; Matamala, Roser [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Meyers, Tilden [NOAA, Oak Ridge, TN; Oechel, Walter C. [San Diego State University; Schmid, H. P. [Indiana University; Scott, Russell L. [USDA ARS; Torn, Margaret S. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL)

    2011-01-01

    More accurate projections of future carbon dioxide concentrations in the atmosphere and associated climate change depend on improved scientific understanding of the terrestrial carbon cycle. Despite the consensus that U.S. terrestrial ecosystems provide a carbon sink, the size, distribution, and interannual variability of this sink remain uncertain. Here we report a terrestrial carbon sink in the conterminous U.S. at 0.63 pg C yr 1 with the majority of the sink in regions dominated by evergreen and deciduous forests and savannas. This estimate is based on our continuous estimates of net ecosystem carbon exchange (NEE) with high spatial (1 km) and temporal (8-day) resolutions derived from NEE measurements from eddy covariance flux towers and wall-to-wall satellite observations from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). We find that the U.S. terrestrial ecosystems could offset a maximum of 40% of the fossil-fuel carbon emissions. Our results show that the U.S. terrestrial carbon sink varied between 0.51 and 0.70 pg C yr 1 over the period 2001 2006. The dominant sources of interannual variation of the carbon sink included extreme climate events and disturbances. Droughts in 2002 and 2006 reduced the U.S. carbon sink by 20% relative to a normal year. Disturbances including wildfires and hurricanes reduced carbon uptake or resulted in carbon release at regional scales. Our results provide an alternative, independent, and novel constraint to the U.S. terrestrial carbon sink.

  12. Phase Change Material Heat Sink for an ISS Flight Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Gregory; Stieber, Jesse; Sheth, Rubik; Ahlstrom, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    A flight experiment is being constructed to utilize the persistent microgravity environment of the International Space Station (ISS) to prove out operation of a microgravity compatible phase change material (PCM) heat sink. A PCM heat sink can help to reduce the overall mass and volume of future exploration spacecraft thermal control systems (TCS). The program is characterizing a new PCM heat sink that incorporates a novel phase management approach to prevent high pressures and structural deformation that often occur with PCM heat sinks undergoing cyclic operation in microgravity. The PCM unit was made using brazed aluminum construction with paraffin wax as the fusible material. It is designed to be installed into a propylene glycol and water cooling loop, with scaling consistent with the conceptual designs for the Orion Multipurpose Crew Vehicle. This paper reports on the construction of the PCM heat sink and on initial ground test results conducted at UTC Aerospace Systems prior to delivery to NASA. The prototype will be tested later on the ground and in orbit via a self-contained experiment package developed by NASA Johnson Space Center to operate in an ISS EXPRESS rack.

  13. Temperate Forest Methane Sink Diminished by Tree Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Megonigal, P.; Pitz, S.

    2015-12-01

    Global budgets ascribe 4-10% of atmospheric CH4 sinks to upland soils and assume that soils are the sole surface for CH4 exchange between upland forests and the atmosphere. The prevailing dogma that upland forests are sinks of atmospheric CH4 was challenged a decade ago by large discrepancies in bottom-up versus top-down models of CH4 concentrations over upland forests that are still unexplained. Evidence of a novel abiotic mechanism for CH4 production from plant tissue is too small to explain the discrepancy. Alternative hypotheses for this observation have been proposed, but not tested. Here we demonstrate that CH4 is emitted from the stems of dominant tree species in an upland forest. Tree emissions occur throughout the growing season while soils adjacent to the trees are consuming CH4, challenging the concept that forests are uniform sinks of CH4. Scaling by stem surface area showed the forest to be a net CH4 source during a wet sample in June and a reduced CH4 sink by 5% annually. High frequency measurements revealed diurnal cycling in the rate of CH4 emissions, pointing to soils as the CH4 source and transpiration as the most likely pathway for CH4 transport. We propose the forests are smaller CH4 sinks than previously estimated due to stem emissions. Stem emissions may be particularly important in upland tropical forests characterized by high rainfall and transpiration, resolving differences between models and measurements.

  14. Can a Sinking Metallic Diapir Generate a Dynamo?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaeffer, N.; Monteux, J.; Amit, H.; Cardin, P.

    2012-12-01

    Metallic diapirs may have strongly contributed to core formations during the first million years of planetary evolutions. The length-scales of these diapirs can range from several centimetres to several hundred kilometres. The aim of this study is to determine whether the dynamics enhanced by the diapir sinking can drive a dynamo and to characterize the required conditions on the size of the diapir, the mantle viscosity and the planetary latitude at which the diapir sinks. We impose a classical Hadamard flow solution for the motion at the interface between a sinking diapir and a viscous mantle on dynamical simulations that account for rotational and inertial effects in order to model the flow within the diapir. The flows are confined to a velocity layer with a thickness that decreases with increasing rotation rate. This decrease depends on the initial latitude of the diapir. This 3D flow is then used as input for kinematic dynamo simulations to determine the critical magnetic Reynolds number for dynamo onset. Our results demonstrate that the flow pattern occurring inside a diapir sinking through a partially molten mantle within a rotating planet can generate a magnetic field. This dynamo generation is more favourable for a large diapir sinking from the equator than from the planet's rotational pole.

  15. Sink strength calculations of dislocations and loops using OKMC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: •The sink strength for dislocations and loops are calculated using OKMC. •The master curves for the 1D to 3D defect migration transition are well reproduced. •We find that OKMC and theory are in good agreement for low volume fractions. -- Abstract: We calculate the sink strength of dislocations and toroidal absorbers using Object Kinetic Monte Carlo and compare with the theoretical expressions. We get good agreement for dislocations and loop-shaped absorbers of 3D migrating defects, provided that the volume fraction is low, and fair agreements for dislocations with 1D migrating defects. The master curve for the 3D to 1D transition is well reproduced with loop-shaped absorbers and fairly well with dislocations. We conclude that, on the one hand, the master curve is correct for a wide range of sinks and that, on the other, OKMC techniques inherently take correctly into account the strengths of sinks of any shape, provided that an effective way of appropriately inserting the sinks to be studied can be found

  16. Origin and decomposition of sinking particulate organic matter in the deep water column inferred from the vertical distributions of its δ15N, δ13 and δ14

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakatsuka, Takeshi; Handa, Nobuhiko; Harada, Naomi; Sugimoto, Tatsuhiro; Imaizumi, Shigemi

    1997-12-01

    Sinking particles were analyzed for their nitrogen isotopic ratio δ15N) of total particulate nitrogen (PN), stable carbon isotopic ratio ( δ13C) and radioactive isotopic ratio ( δ14C) of total particulate organic carbon (POC), at three different latitudinal (temperate, subpolar and equatorial) and geomorphological (trench, proximal abyssal plain and distal abyssal plain) sites in the western North Pacific Ocean using year-long time series sediment trap systems, to clarify the common vertical trends of the isotopic signals in deep water columns. Although the δ15N and δ13C values of sinking particulate organic matter (POM) were partly affected by the resuspension of sedimentary POM from the sea floor, especially in the trench, the changes in δ15N and δ13C values owing to the resuspension could be corrected by calculation of the isotopic mass balance from δ14C of sinking POC. After this correction, common downward decreasing trends in δ15N and δ13C values were obtained in the deep water columns, irrespective of the latitudes and depths. These coincidental isotopic signals between δ15N and δ13C values provide new constraints for the decomposition process of sinking POM, such as the preferential degradation of 15N- and 13C-rich compounds and the successive re-formation of the sinking particles by higher trophic level organisms in the deep water column.

  17. A Comprehensive Study of Data Collection Schemes Using Mobile Sinks in Wireless Sensor Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Abdul Waheed Khan; Abdul Hanan Abdullah; Mohammad Hossein Anisi; Javed Iqbal Bangash

    2014-01-01

    Recently sink mobility has been exploited in numerous schemes to prolong the lifetime of wireless sensor networks (WSNs). Contrary to traditional WSNs where sensory data from sensor field is ultimately sent to a static sink, mobile sink-based approaches alleviate energy-holes issues thereby facilitating balanced energy consumption among nodes. In mobility scenarios, nodes need to keep track of the latest location of mobile sinks for data delivery. However, frequent propagation of sink topolog...

  18. Coupled transport and reaction kinetics control the nitrate source-sink function of hyporheic zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarnetske, Jay P.; Haggerty, Roy; Wondzell, Steven M.; Bokil, Vrushali A.; GonzáLez-Pinzón, Ricardo

    2012-11-01

    The fate of biologically available nitrogen (N) and carbon (C) in stream ecosystems is controlled by the coupling of physical transport and biogeochemical reaction kinetics. However, determining the relative role of physical and biogeochemical controls at different temporal and spatial scales is difficult. The hyporheic zone (HZ), where groundwater-stream water mix, can be an important location controlling N and C transformations because it creates strong gradients in both the physical and biogeochemical conditions that control redox biogeochemistry. We evaluated the coupling of physical transport and biogeochemical redox reactions by linking an advection, dispersion, and residence time model with a multiple Monod kinetics model simulating the concentrations of oxygen (O2), ammonium (NH4), nitrate (NO3), and dissolved organic carbon (DOC). We used global Monte Carlo sensitivity analyses with a nondimensional form of the model to examine coupled nitrification-denitrification dynamics across many scales of transport and reaction conditions. Results demonstrated that the residence time of water in the HZ and the uptake rate of O2 from either respiration and/or nitrification determined whether the HZ was a source or a sink of NO3 to the stream. We further show that whether the HZ is a net NO3 source or net NO3 sink is determined by the ratio of the characteristic transport time to the characteristic reaction time of O2 (i.e., the Damköhler number, DaO2), where HZs with DaO2 < 1 will be net nitrification environments and HZs with DaO2 ≪ 1 will be net denitrification environments. Our coupling of the hydrologic and biogeochemical limitations of N transformations across different temporal and spatial scales within the HZ allows us to explain the widely contrasting results of previous investigations of HZ N dynamics which variously identify the HZ as either a net source or sink of NO3. Our model results suggest that only estimates of residence times and O2uptake rates

  19. The carbon cycle in the old-growth forests

    OpenAIRE

    Motta R

    2008-01-01

    According to a recent paper published in Nature (Luyssaert et al. 2008) the old-growth forests remove carbon dioxide from the atmosphere and should be considered an important carbon sink at the planetary level. This finding is discussed both in relation to the traditional hypothesis that considered the old-growth forests "neutral" in the carbon balance, and in relation to the present and future importance of this sink at the local and at the planetary level.

  20. Review of tribological sinks in six major industries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imhoff, C.H.; Brown, D.R.; Hane, G.J.; Hutchinson, R.A.; Erickson, R.; Merriman, T.; Gruber, T.; Barber, S.

    1985-09-01

    Friction and material wear occur throughout all industries and are involved in many processes within each industry. These conditions make assessing tribological activity overall in industry very complex and expensive. Therefore, a research strategy to obtain preliminary information on only the most significant industrial tribological sinks was defined. The industries examined were selected according to both the magnitude of overall energy consumption (particularly machine drive) and the known presence of significant tribological sinks. The six industries chosen are as follows: mining, agriculture, primary metals, chemicals/refining, food, and pulp and paper. They were reviewed to identify and characterize the major tribology sinks. It was concluded that wear losses are greater than friction losses, and that reducing wear rates would improve industrial productivity.

  1. Two decades of ocean CO2 sink and variability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atmospheric CO2 has increased at a nearly identical average rate of 3.3 and 3.2 Pg C/yr for the decades of the 1980s and the 1990s, in spite of a large increase in fossil fuel emissions from 5.4 to 6.3 Pg C/yr. Thus, the sum of the ocean and land CO2 sinks was 1 Pg C/yr larger in the 1990s than in to the 1980s. Here we quantify the ocean and land sinks for these two decades using recent atmospheric inversions and ocean models. The ocean and land sinks are estimated to be, respectively, 0.3 (0.1 to 0.6) and 0.7 (0.4 to 0.9) Pg C/yr larger in the 1990s than in the 1980s. When variability less than 5 yr is removed, all estimates show a global oceanic sink more or less steadily increasing with time, and a large anomaly in the land sink during 1990-1994. For year-to-year variability, all estimates show 1/3 to 1/2 less variability in the ocean than on land, but the amplitude and phase of the oceanic variability remain poorly determined. A mean oceanic sink of 1.9 Pg C/yr for the 1990s based on O2 observations corrected for ocean outgassing is supported by these estimates, but an uncertainty on the mean value of the order of ±0.7 Pg C/yr remains. The difference between the two decades appears to be more robust than the absolute value of either of the two decades

  2. Degraded Land Restoration in Reinstating CH4 Sink

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Jay Shankar; Gupta, Vijai K.

    2016-01-01

    Methane (CH4), a potent greenhouse gas, contributes about one third to the global green house gas emissions. CH4-assimilating microbes (mostly methanotrophs) in upland soils play very crucial role in mitigating the CH4 release into the atmosphere. Agricultural, environmental, and climatic shifts can alter CH4 sink profiles of soils, likely through shifts in CH4-assimilating microbial community structure and function. Landuse change, as forest and grassland ecosystems altered to agro-ecosystems, has already attenuated the soil CH4 sink potential, and are expected to be continued in the future. We hypothesized that variations in CH4 uptake rates in soils under different landuse practices could be an indicative of alterations in the abundance and/or type of methanotrophic communities in such soils. However, only a few studies have addressed to number and methanotrophs diversity and their correlation with the CH4 sink potential in soils of rehabilitated/restored lands. We focus on landuse practices that can potentially mitigate CH4 gas emissions, the most prominent of which are improved cropland, grazing land management, use of bio-fertilizers, and restoration of degraded lands. In this perspective paper, it is proposed that restoration of degraded lands can contribute considerably to improved soil CH4 sink strength by retrieving/conserving abundance and assortment of efficient methanotrophic communities. We believe that this report can assist in identifying future experimental directions to the relationships between landuse changes, methane-assimilating microbial communities and soil CH4 sinks. The exploitation of microbial communities other than methanotrophs can contribute significantly to the global CH4 sink potential and can add value in mitigating the CH4 problems. PMID:27379053

  3. Degraded Land Restoration in Reinstating CH4 Sink.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Jay Shankar; Gupta, Vijai K

    2016-01-01

    Methane (CH4), a potent greenhouse gas, contributes about one third to the global green house gas emissions. CH4-assimilating microbes (mostly methanotrophs) in upland soils play very crucial role in mitigating the CH4 release into the atmosphere. Agricultural, environmental, and climatic shifts can alter CH4 sink profiles of soils, likely through shifts in CH4-assimilating microbial community structure and function. Landuse change, as forest and grassland ecosystems altered to agro-ecosystems, has already attenuated the soil CH4 sink potential, and are expected to be continued in the future. We hypothesized that variations in CH4 uptake rates in soils under different landuse practices could be an indicative of alterations in the abundance and/or type of methanotrophic communities in such soils. However, only a few studies have addressed to number and methanotrophs diversity and their correlation with the CH4 sink potential in soils of rehabilitated/restored lands. We focus on landuse practices that can potentially mitigate CH4 gas emissions, the most prominent of which are improved cropland, grazing land management, use of bio-fertilizers, and restoration of degraded lands. In this perspective paper, it is proposed that restoration of degraded lands can contribute considerably to improved soil CH4 sink strength by retrieving/conserving abundance and assortment of efficient methanotrophic communities. We believe that this report can assist in identifying future experimental directions to the relationships between landuse changes, methane-assimilating microbial communities and soil CH4 sinks. The exploitation of microbial communities other than methanotrophs can contribute significantly to the global CH4 sink potential and can add value in mitigating the CH4 problems. PMID:27379053

  4. Degraded land restoration in reinstating CH4 sink

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jay Shankar eSingh

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Methane (CH4, a potent greenhouse gas, contributes about one third to the global green house gases emissions. CH4 assimilating microbes (mostly methanotrophs in upland soils play very crucial role in mitigating the CH4 release to the atmosphere. Agricultural, environmental and climatic shifts can alter CH4 sink profiles of soils, likely through shifts in CH4 assimilating microbial community structure and function. Landuse change, as forest and grassland ecosystems altered to agro-ecosystems, has already attenuated the soil CH4 sink potential, and are expected to be continued in the future. We hypothesized that variations in CH4 uptake rates in soils under different landuse practices could be an indicative of alterations in the abundance and/or type of methanotrophic communities in such soils. However, only a few studies have addressed to number and methanotrophs diversity and their correlation with the CH4 sink potential in soils of rehabilitated/restored lands. We focus on landuse practices can potentially mitigate CH4 gas emissions, the most prominent of which are improved cropland, grazing land management, use of bio-fertilizers and restoration of degraded lands. In this perspective paper, it is proposed that restoration of degraded lands can contribute considerably to improved soil CH4 sink strength by retrieving/conserving abundance and assortment of efficient methanotrophic communities. We believe that this report can assist in identifying future experimental directions to the relationships between landuse changes, methane-assimilating microbial communities and soil CH4 sinks. The exploitation of microbial communities other than methanotrophs can contribute significantly to the global CH4 sink potential and can add value in

  5. Basin-wide investigation of terrestrial biomarker source to sink transport along a major modern fluvial system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freymond, C.; Peterse, F.; Filip, F.; Eglinton, T. I.

    2014-12-01

    Organic carbon discharged by rivers and buried in continental margin sediments represents an important carbon sink and a valuable record of information on past environmental variations on the continents. In this context, it is crucial to understand the sources of carbon in river basins and the factors that influence biomarker signals during transport from the continental source to the oceans. In this study, we adopt a source-to-sink approach where concentration and compositional variations in branched glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraethers (brGDGTs), plant wax fatty acids and lignin phenols in fine-grained (soil bacterial membrane lipids that has been shown to record local environmental parameters, reflect the trend of increasing air temperature along the course of the Danube. This trend suggests an increasing contribution of soil organic carbon from tributaries with a more continental and warmer climate in the lower Danube basin to the OC that is finally delivered to the delta. More detailed insights into the evolution of the organic carbon composition within the Danube river basin will stem from compound-specific δD, δ13C and ultimately 14C measurements on terrestrial biomarkers in riverbank and suspended sediments.

  6. Combining stable isotope and carbohydrate analyses in phloem sap and fine roots to study seasonal changes of source-sink relationships in a Mediterranean beech forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scartazza, Andrea; Moscatello, Stefano; Matteucci, Giorgio; Battistelli, Alberto; Brugnoli, Enrico

    2015-08-01

    Carbon isotope composition (δ(13)C) and carbohydrate content of phloem sap and fine roots were measured in a Mediterranean beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) forest throughout the growing season to study seasonal changes of source-sink relationships. Seasonal variations of δ(13)C and content of phloem sap sugars, collected during the daylight period, reflected the changes in soil and plant water status. The correlation between δ(13)C and content of phloem sap sugars, collected from plants belonging to different social classes, was significantly positive only during the driest month of July. In this month, δ(13)C of phloem sap sugars was inversely related to the increment of trunk radial growth and positively related to δ(13)C of fine roots. We conclude that the relationship between δ(13)C and the amount of phloem sap sugars is affected by a combination of causes, such as sink strength, tree social class, changes in phloem anatomy and transport capacity, and phloem loading of sugars to restore sieve tube turgor following the reduced plant water potential under drought conditions. However, δ(13)C and sugar composition of fine roots suggested that phloem transport of leaf sucrose to this belowground component was not impaired by mild drought and that sucrose was in a large part allocated towards fine roots in July, depending on tree social class. Hence, fine roots could represent a functional carbon sink during the dry seasonal periods, when transport and use of assimilates in other sink tissues are reduced. These results indicate a strict link between above- and belowground processes and highlight a rapid response of this Mediterranean forest to changes in environmental drivers to regulate source-sink relationships and carbon sink capacity. PMID:26093372

  7. Boreal forests can have a remarkable role in reducing greenhouse gas emissions locally: Land use-related and anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions and sinks at the municipal level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanhala, Pekka; Bergström, Irina; Haaspuro, Tiina; Kortelainen, Pirkko; Holmberg, Maria; Forsius, Martin

    2016-07-01

    Ecosystem services have become an important concept in policy-making. Carbon (C) sequestration into ecosystems is a significant ecosystem service, whereas C losses can be considered as an ecosystem disservice. Municipalities are in a position to make decisions that affect local emissions and therefore are important when considering greenhouse gas (GHG) mitigation. Integrated estimations of fluxes at a regional level help local authorities to develop land use policies for minimising GHG emissions and maximising C sinks. In this study, the Finnish national GHG accounting system is modified and applied at the municipal level by combining emissions and sinks from agricultural land, forest areas, water bodies and mires (land use-related GHG emissions) with emissions from activities such as energy production and traffic (anthropogenic GHG emissions) into the LUONNIKAS calculation tool. The study area consists of 14 municipalities within the Vanajavesi catchment area located in Southern Finland. In these municipalities, croplands, peat extraction sites, water bodies and undrained mires are emission sources, whereas forests are large carbon sinks that turn the land use-related GHG budget negative, resulting in C sequestration into the ecosystem. The annual land use-related sink in the study area was 78tCO2eqkm(-2) and 2.8tCO2eq per capita. Annual anthropogenic GHG emissions from the area amounted to 250tCO2eqkm(-2) and 9.2tCO2eq per capita. Since forests are a significant carbon sink and the efficiency of this sink is heavily affected by forest management practices, forest management policy is a key contributing factor for mitigating municipal GHG emissions. PMID:26994793

  8. Sinking failure of scour protection at wind turbine foundation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sumer, B. Mutlu; Nielsen, Anders W.

    2013-01-01

    This paper summarises the results of an experimental study on scour protection around offshore wind turbine foundations, with special emphasis on the sinking failure of the scour protection work in Horns Rev 1 offshore wind farm (Denmark). The paper reviews previous results obtained by the author...... (AN), and is organised as follows. Section 2 addresses flow around a pile with a scour protection. Section 3 looks at the initiation of sand motion beneath scour protection. Section 4 discusses sediment motion beneath scour protection and resulting sinking. Section 5 investigates the Horns Rev 1 case...

  9. How do sink and source activities influence the reproduction and vegetative growth of spring ephemeral herbs under different light conditions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunmonu, Ninuola; Kudo, Gaku

    2014-07-01

    Spring ephemeral herbs inhabiting deciduous forests commonly complete reproduction and vegetative growth before canopy closure in early summer. Effects of shading by early canopy closure on reproductive output and vegetative growth, however, may vary depending on the seasonal allocation patterns of photosynthetic products between current reproduction and storage for future growth in each species. To clarify the effects of sink-source balance on seed production and bulb growth in a spring ephemeral herb, Gagea lutea, we performed a bract removal treatment (source reduction) and a floral-bud removal treatment (sink reduction) under canopy and open conditions. Leaf carbon fixations did not differ between the forest and open sites and among treatments. Bract carbon fixations were also similar between sites but tended to decrease when floral buds were removed. Seed production was higher under open condition but decreased by the bract-removal treatment under both light conditions. In contrast, bulb growth was independent of light conditions and the bract-removal treatment but increased greatly by the bud-removal treatment. Therefore, leaves and bracts acted as specialized source organs for vegetative and reproductive functions, respectively, but photosynthetic products by bracts were flexibly used for bulb growth when plants failed to set fruits. Extension of bright period was advantageous for seed production (i.e., source limited) but not for vegetative growth (i.e., sink limited) in this species. PMID:24879401

  10. Sinking fluxes of minor and trace elements in the North Pacific Ocean measured during the VERTIGO program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamborg, C. H.; Buesseler, K. O.; Lam, P. J.

    2008-07-01

    As part of the Vertical Transport in the Global Ocean (VERTIGO) program, we collected and analyzed sinking particles using sediment traps at three depths in the oceanic mesopelagic zone and at two biogeochemically contrasting sites (N. Central Pacific at ALOHA; N. Pacific Western Subarctic Gyre at K2). In this paper, we present the results of minor and trace element determinations made on these samples. Minor and trace elements in the sinking material showed 2 trends in flux with depth: increasing and constant. The sinking particulate phase of some elements (Al, Fe, Mn) was dominated by material of lithogenic origin and exhibited flux that was constant with depth and consistent with eolian dust inputs (ALOHA), or increasing in flux with depth as a result of lateral inputs from a shelf (K2). This shelf-derived material also appears to have been confined to very small particles, whose inherent sinking rates are slow, and residence time within the mesopelagic "twilight zone" would be consequently long. Furthermore, the flux of this material did not change with substantial changes in the rain of biogenic material from the surface (K2), suggesting mechanistic decoupling from the flux of organic carbon and macronutrients. Micronutrient (Fe, Co, Zn and Cu) fluxes examined in a 1-D mass balance suggest widely differing sources and sinks in the water column as well as impacts from biological uptake and regeneration. For example, total Fe fluxes into and out of the euphotic zone appeared to be dominated by lithogenic material and far exceed biological requirements. The export flux of Fe, however, appeared to be balanced by the eolian input of soluble Fe. For Zn and Cu, the situation is reversed, with atmospheric inputs insufficient to support fluxes, and the cycling therefore dominated by the draw down of an internal pool. For Co, the situation lies in between, with important, but ultimately insufficient atmospheric inputs.

  11. Microbial community structure in three deep-sea carbonate crusts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijs, S. K.; Aloisi, G.; Bouloubassi, I.; Pancost, R. D.; Pierre, C.; Damste, J. S. Sinninghe; Gottschal, J. C.; van Elsas, J. D.; Forney, L. J.

    2006-01-01

    Carbonate crusts in marine environments can act as sinks for carbon dioxide. Therefore, understanding carbonate crust formation could be important for understanding global warming. In the present study, the microbial communities of three carbonate crust samples from deep-sea mud volcanoes in the eas

  12. The use of segregated heat sink structures to achieve enhanced passive cooling for outdoor wireless devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Flaherty, K.; Punch, J.

    2014-07-01

    Environmental standards which govern outdoor wireless equipment can stipulate stringent conditions: high solar loads (up to 1 kW/m2), ambient temperatures as high as 55°C and negligible wind speeds (0 m/s). These challenges result in restrictions on power dissipation within a given envelope, due to the limited heat transfer rates achievable with passive cooling. This paper addresses an outdoor wireless device which features two segregated heat sink structures arranged vertically within a shielded chimney structure: a primary sink to cool temperature-sensitive components; and a secondary sink for high power devices. Enhanced convective cooling of the primary sink is achieved due to the increased mass flow within the chimney generated by the secondary sink. An unshielded heat sink was examined numerically, theoretically and experimentally, to verify the applicability of the methods employed. Nusselt numbers were compared for three cases: an unshielded heat sink; a sink located at the inlet of a shield; and a primary heat sink in a segregated structure. The heat sink, when placed at the inlet of a shield three times the length of the sink, augmented the Nusselt number by an average of 64% compared to the unshielded case. The Nusselt number of the primary was found to increase proportionally with the temperature of the secondary sink, and the optimum vertical spacing between the primary and secondary sinks was found to be close to zero, provided that conductive transfer between the sinks was suppressed.

  13. The use of segregated heat sink structures to achieve enhanced passive cooling for outdoor wireless devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Environmental standards which govern outdoor wireless equipment can stipulate stringent conditions: high solar loads (up to 1 kW/m2), ambient temperatures as high as 55°C and negligible wind speeds (0 m/s). These challenges result in restrictions on power dissipation within a given envelope, due to the limited heat transfer rates achievable with passive cooling. This paper addresses an outdoor wireless device which features two segregated heat sink structures arranged vertically within a shielded chimney structure: a primary sink to cool temperature-sensitive components; and a secondary sink for high power devices. Enhanced convective cooling of the primary sink is achieved due to the increased mass flow within the chimney generated by the secondary sink. An unshielded heat sink was examined numerically, theoretically and experimentally, to verify the applicability of the methods employed. Nusselt numbers were compared for three cases: an unshielded heat sink; a sink located at the inlet of a shield; and a primary heat sink in a segregated structure. The heat sink, when placed at the inlet of a shield three times the length of the sink, augmented the Nusselt number by an average of 64% compared to the unshielded case. The Nusselt number of the primary was found to increase proportionally with the temperature of the secondary sink, and the optimum vertical spacing between the primary and secondary sinks was found to be close to zero, provided that conductive transfer between the sinks was suppressed.

  14. LiDAR-derived carbon estimates in encroaching juniper woodlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woody encroachment is thought to contribute significantly to the global carbon (C) sink. The global- and continental-scale estimates of this contribution, however, have large uncertainties. The woody encroachment contribution to the C sink needs to be estimated at regional and local scales to addres...

  15. Mycorrhizal mediation of soil organic carbon decomposition under elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Significant effort in global change research has recently been directed towards assessing the potential of soil as a carbon sink under future atmospheric carbon dioxide scenarios. Attention has focused on the impact of elevated carbon dioxide on plant interactions with mycorrhizae, a symbiotic soil...

  16. The carbon budget of the North Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Vieira Borges

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available A carbon budget has been established for the North Sea, a shelf sea of the NW European continental shelf. The air-sea exchange of CO2 has been assessed as closing term of the budget. The carbon exchange fluxes with the North Atlantic Ocean dominate the gross carbon budget. The net carbon budget – more relevant to the issue of the contribution of the coastal ocean to the marine carbon cycle – is dominated by the carbon inputs from rivers, the Baltic Sea and the atmosphere. The dominant carbon sink is the final export to the North Atlantic Ocean. The North Sea acts as a sink for organic carbon. More than 90% of the CO2 taken up from the atmosphere is exported to the North Atlantic Ocean making the North Sea a highly efficient continental shelf pump for carbon.

  17. Effects of Heterogeneous Sink Distribution on Void Swelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leffers, Torben; Volobuyev, A. V.; Gann, V. V.;

    1986-01-01

    different shells by a finite-difference method. From these concentrations the local and the average swelling rate and the dependence of this effect of the heterogeneities in sink distribution on swelling rate and the dependence of this effect on various structural parameters are investigated....

  18. Coulomb sink effect on coarsening of metal nanostructures on surfaces

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yong HAN; Feng LIU

    2008-01-01

    We discuss Coulomb effects on the coarsening of metal nanostructures on surfaces. We have proposed a new concept of a "Coulomb sink" [Phys. Rev. Lett., 2004, 93: 106102] to elucidate the effect of Coulomb charging on the coarsening of metal mesas grown on semiconductor surfaces. A charged mesa, due to its reduced chemical potential, acts as a Coulomb sink and grows at the expense of neighboring neu-tral mesas. The Coulomb sink provides a potentially useful method for the controlled fabrication of metal nanostructures. In this article, we will describe in detail the proposed physical models, which can explain qualitatively the most salient fea-tures of coarsening of charged Pb mesas on the Si(111) sur-face, as observed by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). We will also describe a method of precisely fabricating large-scale nanocrystals with well-defined shape and size. By using the Coulomb sink effect, the artificial center-full-hol-lowed or half-hollowed nanowells can be created.

  19. Intrinsic and extrinsic drivers of source-sink dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    1. Many factors affect the presence and exchange of individuals among subpopulations and influence not only the emergence, but the strength of ensuing source-sink dynamics within metapopulations, yet their relative contributions remain largely unexplored. 2. To help identify the...

  20. Sinking Maps: A Conceptual Tool for Visual Metaphor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giampa, Joan Marie

    2012-01-01

    Sinking maps, created by Northern Virginia Community College professor Joan Marie Giampa, are tools that teach fine art students how to construct visual metaphor by conceptually mapping sensory perceptions. Her dissertation answers the question, "Can visual metaphor be conceptually mapped in the art classroom?" In the Prologue, Giampa…

  1. Development of an operations evaluation system for sinking EDM

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lauwers, B.; Oosterling, J.A.J.; Vanderauwera, W.

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the development and validation of an operations evaluation system for sinking EDM operations. Based on a given workpiece geometry (e.g. mould), regions to be EDM'ed are automatically indentified. For a given electrode configuration, consisting of one or more regions, EDM machini

  2. Source to sink transport and regulation by environmental factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Remi eLemoine

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Source-to-sink transport of sugar is one of the major determinants of plant growth and relies on the efficient and controlled distribution of sucrose (and some other sugars such as raffinose and polyols across plant organs through the phloem. However, sugar transport through the phloem can be affected by many environmental factors that alter source/sink relationships. In this paper, we summarize current knowledge about the phloem transport mechanisms and review the effects of several abiotic (water and salt stress, mineral deficiency, CO2, light, temperature, air and soil pollutants and biotic (mutualistic and pathogenic microbes, viruses, aphids and parasitic plants factors. Concerning abiotic constraints, alteration of the distribution of sugar among sinks is often reported, with some sinks as roots favoured in case of mineral deficiency. Many of these constraints impair the transport function of the phloem but the exact mechanisms are far from being completely known. Phloem integrity can be disrupted (e.g. by callose deposition and under certain conditions, phloem transport is affected, earlier than photosynthesis. Photosynthesis inhibition could result from the increase in sugar concentration due to phloem transport decrease. Biotic interactions (aphids, fungi, viruses… also affect crop plant productivity. Recent breakthroughs have identified some of the sugar transporters involved in these interactions on the host and pathogen sides. The different data are discussed in relation to the phloem transport pathways. When possible, the link with current knowledge on the pathways at the molecular level will be highlighted.

  3. Vivianite is a major sink for phosphorus in methanogenic coastal surface sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egger, Matthias; Jilbert, Tom; Behrends, Thilo; Rivard, Camille; Slomp, Caroline P.

    2015-11-01

    Studies of authigenic phosphorus (P) minerals in marine sediments typically focus on authigenic carbonate fluorapatite, which is considered to be the major sink for P in marine sediments and can easily be semi-quantitatively extracted with the SEDEX sequential extraction method. The role of other potentially important authigenic P phases, such as the reduced iron (Fe) phosphate mineral vivianite (Fe(II)3(PO4)*8H2O) has so far largely been ignored in marine systems. This is, in part, likely due to the fact that the SEDEX method does not distinguish between vivianite and P associated with Fe-oxides. Here, we show that vivianite can be quantified in marine sediments by combining the SEDEX method with microscopic and spectroscopic techniques such as micro X-ray fluorescence (μXRF) elemental mapping of resin-embedded sediments, as well as scanning electron microscope-energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM-EDS) and powder X-ray diffraction (XRD). We further demonstrate that resin embedding of vertically intact sediment sub-cores enables the use of synchrotron-based microanalysis (X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy) to differentiate between different P burial phases in aquatic sediments. Our results reveal that vivianite represents a major burial sink for P below a shallow sulfate/methane transition zone in Bothnian Sea sediments, accounting for 40-50% of total P burial. We further show that anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) drives a sink-switching from Fe-oxide bound P to vivianite by driving the release of both phosphate (AOM with sulfate and Fe-oxides) and ferrous Fe (AOM with Fe-oxides) to the pore water allowing supersaturation with respect to vivianite to be reached. The vivianite in the sediment contains significant amounts of manganese (∼4-8 wt.%), similar to vivianite obtained from freshwater sediments. Our results indicate that methane dynamics play a key role in providing conditions that allow for vivianite authigenesis in coastal

  4. Lifetime Optimization of a Multiple Sink Wireless Sensor Network through Energy Balancing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tapan Kumar Jain

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The wireless sensor network consists of small limited energy sensors which are connected to one or more sinks. The maximum energy consumption takes place in communicating the data from the nodes to the sink. Multiple sink WSN has an edge over the single sink WSN where very less energy is utilized in sending the data to the sink, as the number of hops is reduced. If the energy consumed by a node is balanced between the other nodes, the lifetime of the network is considerably increased. The network lifetime optimization is achieved by restructuring the network by modifying the neighbor nodes of a sink. Only those nodes are connected to a sink which makes the total energy of the sink less than the threshold. This energy balancing through network restructuring optimizes the network lifetime. This paper depicts this fact through simulations done in MATLAB.

  5. Towards a more realistic sink particle algorithm for the RAMSES code

    CERN Document Server

    Bleuler, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    We present a new sink particle algorithm developed for the Adaptive Mesh Refinement code RAMSES. Our main addition is the use of a clump finder to identify density peaks and their associated regions (the peak patches). This allows us to unambiguously define a discrete set of dense molecular cores as potential sites for sink particle formation. Furthermore, we develop a new scheme to decide if the gas in which a sink could potentially form, is indeed gravitationally bound and rapidly collapsing. This is achieved using a general integral form of the virial theorem, where we use the curvature in the gravitational potential to correctly account for the background potential. We detail all the necessary steps to follow the evolution of sink particles in turbulent molecular cloud simulations, such as sink production, their trajectory integration, sink merging and finally the gas accretion rate onto an existing sink. We compare our new recipe for sink formation to other popular implementations. Statistical properties...

  6. Deadline-Aware Energy-Efficient Query Scheduling in Wireless Sensor Networks with Mobile Sink

    OpenAIRE

    Murat Karakaya

    2013-01-01

    Mobile sinks are proposed to save sensor energy spent for multihop communication in transferring data to a base station (sink) in Wireless Sensor Networks. Due to relative low speed of mobile sinks, these approaches are mostly suitable for delay-tolerant applications. In this paper, we study the design of a query scheduling algorithm for query-based data gathering applications using mobile sinks. However, these kinds of applications are sensitive to delays due to specified query deadlines. Th...

  7. Tracking Mobile Sinks via Analysis of Movement Angle Changes in WSNs

    OpenAIRE

    Guisong Yang; Huifen Xu; Xingyu He; Gang Wang; Naixue Xiong; Chunxue Wu

    2016-01-01

    Existing methods for tracking mobile sinks in Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs) often incur considerable energy consumption and overhead. To address this issue, we propose a Detour-Aware Mobile Sink Tracking (DAMST) method via analysis of movement angle changes of mobile sinks, for collecting data in a low-overhead and energy efficient way. In the proposed method, while a mobile sink passes through a region, it appoints a specific node as a region agent to collect information of the whole regio...

  8. Delay-tolerant data collection in sensor networks with mobile sinks

    OpenAIRE

    Wohlers, Felix Ricklef Scriven; Trigoni, Niki

    2012-01-01

    Collecting data from sensor nodes to designated sinks is a common and challenging task in a wide variety of wireless sensor network (WSN) applications, ranging from animal monitoring to security surveillance. A number of approaches exploiting sink mobility have been proposed in recent years: some are proactive, in that sensor nodes push their read- ings to storage nodes from where they are collected by roaming mobile sinks, whereas others are reactive, in that mobile sinks pull readings from ...

  9. On Mobility Management in Multi-Sink Sensor Networks for Geocasting of Queries

    OpenAIRE

    Paul Havinga; Ayşegül Tüysüz Erman; Lodewijk van Hoesel; Arta Dilo

    2011-01-01

    In order to efficiently deal with location dependent messages in multi-sink wireless sensor networks (WSNs), it is key that the network informs sinks what geographical area is covered by which sink. The sinks are then able to efficiently route messages which are only valid in particular regions of the deployment. In our previous work (see the 5th and 6th cited documents), we proposed a combined coverage area reporting and geographical routing protocol for location dependent messages, for exam...

  10. Numerical evaluation of dislocation loop sink strengths: A phase-field approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rouchette, H., E-mail: Hadrien.Rouchette@ed.univ-lille1.fr [Unité Matériaux et Transformations (UMET), UMR CNRS 8207, Université Lille 1, 59655 Villeneuve d’Ascq (France); Thuinet, L., E-mail: Ludovic.Thuinet@univ-lille1.fr [Unité Matériaux et Transformations (UMET), UMR CNRS 8207, Université Lille 1, 59655 Villeneuve d’Ascq (France); Legris, A. [Unité Matériaux et Transformations (UMET), UMR CNRS 8207, Université Lille 1, 59655 Villeneuve d’Ascq (France); Ambard, A.; Domain, C. [EDF R& D MMC, Électricité de France, 77810 Moret-sur-Loing (France)

    2015-06-01

    A phase-field method is applied to compute the sink strength of dislocation loops in irradiated materials. This model enables to consider various sink geometries and long range elastic interactions between dislocation loops and migrating defects. Our results show that the analytical solutions underestimate the sink strength of loops. In addition, the influence of elasticity on sink strength increases with the loop radius. Finally, there is a significant effect of the dislocation line configuration enhanced by elasticity.

  11. Reburial of fossil organic carbon in marine sediments

    OpenAIRE

    Dickens, Angela F.; Gélinas, Yves; Masiello, Caroline A.; Wakeham, Stuart; Hedges, John I.

    2004-01-01

    Marine sediments act as the ultimate sink for organic carbon, sequestering otherwise rapidly cycling carbon for geologic timescales. Sedimentary organic carbon burial appears to be controlled by oxygen exposure time in situ, and much research has focused on understanding the mechanisms of preservation of organic carbon. In this context, combustion-derived black carbon has received attention as a form of refractory organic carbon that may be preferentially preserved in soils and sediments. How...

  12. Finite element simulation of sink pass round tubes using Ansys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagarkar M.P.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Modeling and simulation of metal forming processes are increasingly in demand from the industry as the resulting models are found to be valuable tools considering the optimization of the existing and development of new processes. By the application of modeling and simulation techniques, it is possible to reduce the number of time-consuming experiments such as prototyping. Seamless tubes of various sizes and shapes are manufactured by various processes like sinking, fixed plug, floating plug, moving mandrel, cold working and hot working. The present work deals with the simulation of round tubes while passing through the sink pass, using ANSYS software. The simulation results are the displacement and von Mises stresses. The procedure can be used to improve the product quality and to study the effect of various parameters like die angle on the product quality.

  13. Scale effects of nitrate sinks and sources in stream networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuetz, Tobias; Weiler, Markus; Gascuel-Odoux, Chantal

    2014-05-01

    Increasing N-fertilizer applications in agricultural catchments are considered as one of the major sources for dissolved nitrate-nitrogen (NO3-N) in surface water. While NO3-N mobilization pathways depend on catchment's pedological and hydrogeological characteristics and its runoff generation processes, in-stream retention and removal processes depend on local/reach-scale conditions such as weather, discharge, channel morphology, vegetation, shading or hyporheic exchange and others. However, knowledge is still limited to scale up locally observable retention and removal processes to larger stream networks to understand the spatial and temporal dynamics of in-stream NO3-N concentrations. Relevant processes to consider explicitly are the effects of 'hot spots', dominant NO3-N sources (e.g. sub-catchments, 'critical source areas') or specific NO3-N sinks (e.g. riparian wetlands and stream reaches with high biogeochemical activity). We studied these processes in a 1.7 km2 agricultural headwater catchment, where distinct locations of groundwater inflow (a dense artificial drainage network) and a predominantly impervious streambed allowed separating mixing and dilution processes as well as in-stream retention and removal processes. During two summer seasons we conducted a set (25) of stream network wide (stream water and drainage water) synoptic sampling campaigns including climate parameters, discharge, channel geomorphology, vegetation, stream water chemistry and physical water parameters (dissolved oxygen concentration, water temperatures, electrical conductivity, pH). Analyzing these data sets we were able to determine a) time variant NO3-N concentrations and loads for all sub-catchments (sources), b) time variant in-stream removal rates for all stream reaches (sinks) and c) the hierarchical order of all contributing NO3-N sinks and sources and their time variant influence on total NO3-N export. Climate parameters, discharge, channel geomorphology, vegetation, stream

  14. Finite element simulation of sink pass round tubes using Ansys

    OpenAIRE

    Nagarkar M.P.; Zaware R.N.; Ghalme S.G.

    2012-01-01

    Modeling and simulation of metal forming processes are increasingly in demand from the industry as the resulting models are found to be valuable tools considering the optimization of the existing and development of new processes. By the application of modeling and simulation techniques, it is possible to reduce the number of time-consuming experiments such as prototyping. Seamless tubes of various sizes and shapes are manufactured by various processes like sinking, fixed plug, floating ...

  15. Vibration Mitigation of Nonlinear Vibrating Structures using Nonlinear Energy Sinks

    OpenAIRE

    Viguié, Régis; Peeters, Maxime; Kerschen, Gaëtan; Golinval, Jean-Claude

    2008-01-01

    The tuned mass damper (TMD) is a simple and efficient device, but it is only effective when it is precisely tuned to the frequency of a vibration mode. Because nonlinear vibrating structures have resonant frequencies that vary with the amount of total energy in the system, the efficiency of a TMD is questionable in this case. In the present study, the performance of an essentially nonlinear attachment, termed a nonlinear energy sink (NES), is assessed. It is shown that, unlike the TMD, an ...

  16. Sinking of Ne-22 in Liquid White Dwarf Interiors

    OpenAIRE

    Deloye, Christopher J.; Bildsten, Lars

    2002-01-01

    We assess the impact of the trace element Ne-22 on the cooling and seismology of a liquid C/O white dwarf (WD). Due to this element's neutron excess, it sinks towards the interior as the liquid WD cools. The gravitational energy released slows the WD's cooling by 0.5-1.6 Gyr. In addition the Ne-22 abundance gradient changes the periods of the high radial order g-modes at the 1% level.

  17. Stochastic optimization models for a single-sink transportation problem

    OpenAIRE

    Maggioni, Francesca; Kaut, Michal; Bertazzi, Luca

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we study a single-sink transportation problem in which the production capacity of the suppliers and the demand of the single customer are stochastic. Shipments are performed by capacitated vehicles, which have to be booked in advance, before the realization of the production capacity and the demand. Once the production capacity and the demand are revealed, there is an option to cancel some of the booked vehicles against a cancellation fee. If the quantity shipped from the suppli...

  18. Predator transitory spillover induces trophic cascades in ecological sinks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Casini, Michele; Blenckner, Thorsten; Möllmann, Christian;

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the effects of cross-system fluxes is fundamental in ecosystem ecology and biological conservation. Source-sink dynamics and spillover processes may link adjacent ecosystems by movement of organisms across system boundaries. However, effects of temporal variability in these cross-sy...... in structuring natural systems. The integration of regional and local processes is central to predict species and ecosystem responses to future climate changes and ongoing anthropogenic disturbances...

  19. Pristine mangrove creek waters are a sink of nitrous oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maher, Damien T.; Sippo, James Z.; Tait, Douglas R.; Holloway, Ceylena; Santos, Isaac R.

    2016-05-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is an important greenhouse gas, but large uncertainties remain in global budgets. Mangroves are thought to be a source of N2O to the atmosphere in spite of the limited available data. Here we report high resolution time series observations in pristine Australian mangroves along a broad latitudinal gradient to assess the potential role of mangroves in global N2O budgets. Surprisingly, five out of six creeks were under-saturated in dissolved N2O, demonstrating mangrove creek waters were a sink for atmospheric N2O. Air-water flux estimates showed an uptake of 1.52 ± 0.17 μmol m‑2 d‑1, while an independent mass balance revealed an average sink of 1.05 ± 0.59 μmol m‑2 d‑1. If these results can be upscaled to the global mangrove area, the N2O sink (~2.0 × 108 mol yr‑1) would offset ~6% of the estimated global riverine N2O source. Our observations contrast previous estimates based on soil fluxes or mangrove waters influenced by upstream freshwater inputs. We suggest that the lack of available nitrogen in pristine mangroves favours N2O consumption. Widespread and growing coastal eutrophication may change mangrove waters from a sink to a source of N2O to the atmosphere, representing a positive feedback to climate change.

  20. Pristine mangrove creek waters are a sink of nitrous oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maher, Damien T; Sippo, James Z; Tait, Douglas R; Holloway, Ceylena; Santos, Isaac R

    2016-01-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is an important greenhouse gas, but large uncertainties remain in global budgets. Mangroves are thought to be a source of N2O to the atmosphere in spite of the limited available data. Here we report high resolution time series observations in pristine Australian mangroves along a broad latitudinal gradient to assess the potential role of mangroves in global N2O budgets. Surprisingly, five out of six creeks were under-saturated in dissolved N2O, demonstrating mangrove creek waters were a sink for atmospheric N2O. Air-water flux estimates showed an uptake of 1.52 ± 0.17 μmol m(-2) d(-1), while an independent mass balance revealed an average sink of 1.05 ± 0.59 μmol m(-2) d(-1). If these results can be upscaled to the global mangrove area, the N2O sink (~2.0 × 10(8) mol yr(-1)) would offset ~6% of the estimated global riverine N2O source. Our observations contrast previous estimates based on soil fluxes or mangrove waters influenced by upstream freshwater inputs. We suggest that the lack of available nitrogen in pristine mangroves favours N2O consumption. Widespread and growing coastal eutrophication may change mangrove waters from a sink to a source of N2O to the atmosphere, representing a positive feedback to climate change. PMID:27172603

  1. Littoral drift sources and sinks along the Indian coast

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Chandramohan, P.; Jena, B.K.; SanilKumar, V.

    COMMUNICATIONS CURRENT SCIENCE, VOL. 81, NO. 3, 10 AUGUST 2001 Littoral drift sources and sinks along the Indian coast P. Chandramohan ?,# , B. K. Jena ?,* and V. Sanil Kumar ?,? ? Ocean Engineering Division, National Institute of Oceanography....2 ? 10 12 kg, which a c counts roughly 10 per cent of the global sediment flux to the world ocean 6 . The major and medium rivers of I n dia are shown in Figure 1. Th e average annual runoff RESEARCH COMMUNICATIONS CURRENT SCIENCE, VOL. 81, NO...

  2. 78 FR 13017 - Drawn Stainless Steel Sinks From the People's Republic of China: Final Affirmative Countervailing...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-26

    ...; Countervailing Duties, 62 FR 27296, 27323 (May 19, 1997). \\6\\ See Drawn Stainless Steel Sinks From the People's... International Trade Administration Drawn Stainless Steel Sinks From the People's Republic of China: Final... countervailable subsidies are being provided to producers and exporters of drawn stainless steel sinks (``SS...

  3. 77 FR 18211 - Drawn Stainless Steel Sinks From the People's Republic of China: Initiation of Countervailing...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-27

    ... International Trade Administration Drawn Stainless Steel Sinks From the People's Republic of China: Initiation...'') petition concerning imports of drawn stainless steel sinks from the People's Republic of China (``PRC... Antidumping and Countervailing Duties Against Drawn Stainless Steel Sinks from the People's Republic of...

  4. 77 FR 60673 - Drawn Stainless Steel Sinks From the People's Republic of China: Antidumping Duty Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-04

    ... International Trade Administration Drawn Stainless Steel Sinks From the People's Republic of China: Antidumping...'') preliminarily determines that drawn stainless steel sinks (``drawn sinks'') from the People's Republic of China... unfinished, regardless of type of finish, gauge, or grade of stainless steel. Mounting clips,...

  5. Sinking of armour layer around a vertical cylinder exposed to waves and current

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Anders Wedel; Probst, Thomas; Petersen, Thor Ugelvig;

    2015-01-01

    The mechanisms of the sinking of a scour protection adjacent to a monopile are described in this paper, together with the determination of the equilibrium sinking depth in various wave and combined wave and current conditions based on physical model tests.Sinking of the rocks may ultimately lead ...

  6. The sinking of the Soviet Mike class nuclear powered submarine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this preliminary study is to assess the quantities of the longer-lived or persistent radioactive materials, or source terms, that have been lost at sea with the sinking of the Soviet MIKE class submarine off Bear Island on 7 April 1989. The report arrives at an assessment of the amount of radioactivity and compares this to the quantities of radioactive materials dumped by the UK from 1953 to 1982 at which time sea dumping of radioactive wastes was suspended by international resolve. This comparison can be used to assess the relative significance of the sinking of this submarine. The study does not extrapolate the estimated radioactive source terms to an environmental or radiological significance of the sinking, although it is concluded that unless the submarine is recovered intact from the ocean floor, the by far greater part of the radioactive materials on board will disperse to the marine environment at some future time, if they are not doing so already. (author)

  7. Rapid prediction of floating and sinking components of raw coal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Guanghui; Kuang Yali; Wang Zhangguo; Ji Li; Wang Ying

    2012-01-01

    A model that rapidly predicts the density components of raw coal is described.It is based on a three-grade fast float/sink test.The recent comprehensive monthly floating and sinking data are used for comparison.The predicted data are used to draw washability curves and to provide a rapid evaluation of the effect from heavy medium induced separation.Thirty-one production shifts worth of fast float/sink data and the corresponding quick ash data are used to verify the model.The results show a small error with an arithmetic average of 0.53 and an absolute average error of 1.50.This indicates that this model has high precision.The theoretical yield from the washability curves is 76.47% for the monthly comprehensive data and 81.31% using the model data.This is for a desired cleaned coal ash of 9%.The relative error between these two is 6.33%,which is small and indicates that the predicted data can be used to rapidly evaluate the separation effect of gravity separation equipment.

  8. 16-BIT RCA Implementation Using Current Sink Restorer Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tirumalasetty Venkata Rao

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the design of a 16-BIT Ripple Carry Adder (RCA in Branch-Based Logic and Pass-Transistor logic (BBL-PT, a static design style that minimizes the internal node capacitances. This feature is used to lower the dynamic power dissipation, while maintaining good speed performances. And, we proposed a modified level restorer using current sink restorer structure for branch-based logic and pass-transistor (BBL-PT full adder [1]. In BBL-PT full adder, there lies a drawback i.e. voltage step existence of, which could be eliminated in the proposed logic by using the current sink restorer. The proposed ripple carry adder is compared with the conventional static CMOS logic and BBL-PT RCAs, demonstrated the good delay performance. The performance of the 16-bit RCA based on proposed BBL-PT cell with current sink restorer structure and other conventional RCA structures are examined using PSPICE and the model parameters of a 0.13 µm CMOS process.

  9. Quantifying terrestrial ecosystem carbon dynamics in the Jinsha watershed, upper Yangtze, China from 1975 to 2000.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Shuqing; Liu, Shuguang; Yin, Runsheng; Li, Zhengpeng; Deng, Yulin; Tan, Kun; Deng, Xiangzheng; Rothstein, David; Qi, Jiaguo

    2010-03-01

    Quantifying the spatial and temporal dynamics of carbon stocks in terrestrial ecosystems and carbon fluxes between the terrestrial biosphere and the atmosphere is critical to our understanding of regional patterns of carbon budgets. Here we use the General Ensemble biogeochemical Modeling System to simulate the terrestrial ecosystem carbon dynamics in the Jinsha watershed of China's upper Yangtze basin from 1975 to 2000, based on unique combinations of spatial and temporal dynamics of major driving forces, such as climate, soil properties, nitrogen deposition, and land use and land cover changes. Our analysis demonstrates that the Jinsha watershed ecosystems acted as a carbon sink during the period of 1975-2000, with an average rate of 0.36 Mg/ha/yr, primarily resulting from regional climate variation and local land use and land cover change. Vegetation biomass accumulation accounted for 90.6% of the sink, while soil organic carbon loss before 1992 led to a lower net gain of carbon in the watershed, and after that soils became a small sink. Ecosystem carbon sink/source patterns showed a high degree of spatial heterogeneity. Carbon sinks were associated with forest areas without disturbances, whereas carbon sources were primarily caused by stand-replacing disturbances. It is critical to adequately represent the detailed fast-changing dynamics of land use activities in regional biogeochemical models to determine the spatial and temporal evolution of regional carbon sink/source patterns. PMID:19296154

  10. Lifetime Optimization of a Multiple Sink Wireless Sensor Network through Energy Balancing

    OpenAIRE

    Tapan Kumar Jain; Davinder Singh Saini; Sunil Vidya Bhooshan

    2015-01-01

    The wireless sensor network consists of small limited energy sensors which are connected to one or more sinks. The maximum energy consumption takes place in communicating the data from the nodes to the sink. Multiple sink WSN has an edge over the single sink WSN where very less energy is utilized in sending the data to the sink, as the number of hops is reduced. If the energy consumed by a node is balanced between the other nodes, the lifetime of the network is considerably increased. The net...

  11. A Thesis on Design Optimization of Heat Sink in Power Electronics

    OpenAIRE

    P.Chennakesavarao; P.Srihari

    2014-01-01

    The heat sinks are used in electronic systems to remove heat from the chip and effectively transfer it to the ambient. The heat sink geometry is designed by the mechanical engineers with the primary aim of reducing the thermal resistance of the heat sink for better cooling in the electronic systems. Due to the proximity of the heat sink with the ICs, the RF fields created by RF currents in the ICs/PCBs gets coupled to heat sinks. Hence, the coupled RF current can cause radiate...

  12. The impact of agricultural soil erosion on the global carbon cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Oost, Kristof; Quine, T.A.; Govers, G.; De Gryze, S.; Six, J.; Harden, J.W.; Ritchie, J.C.; McCarty, G.W.; Heckrath, G.; Kosmas, C.; Giraldez, J.V.; Marques Da Silva, J.R.; Merckx, R.

    2007-01-01

    Agricultural soil erosion is thought to perturb the global carbon cycle, but estimates of its effect range from a source of 1 petagram per year -1 to a sink of the same magnitude. By using caesium-137 and carbon inventory measurements from a large-scale survey, we found consistent evidence for an erosion-induced sink of atmospheric carbon equivalent to approximately 26% of the carbon transported by erosion. Based on this relationship, we estimated a global carbon sink of 0.12 (range 0.06 to 0.27) petagrams of carbon per year-1 resulting from erosion in the world's agricultural landscapes. Our analysis directly challenges the view that agricultural erosion represents an important source or sink for atmospheric CO2.

  13. Relation between kernel chalkiness formation and source-sink characteristics in early indica rice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three early indica rice varieties (Oryza sativa L. sp. indica) with markedly difference of kernel chalkiness at three sowing dates were used to study the net assimilation ratio of flag leaf, source-sink ratio and sink activity by using 14C isotope tracer technique. The results show significant correlations between source-sink characteristics of rice plant and rice kernel chalkiness. The net assimilation ratio of flag leaf, source-sink ratio and sink activity (radioactivity ratio of grain) of less chalkiness varieties were found to be obviously higher than that of more chalkiness varieties. Therefore, higher photosynthetic efficiency, proper source-sink ratio and stronger sink activity are the key factors of good quality grain with less or no chalkiness. By analyzing the partitioning percentage of 14C-assimilates in rice plants of more chalkiness varieties, it was supposed that assimilates exporting from mesophyll cells or loading into phloem were partly blocked

  14. The Biological carbon pump in the North Atlantic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sanders, Richard; Henson, Stephanie A.; Koski, Marja; De La Rocha, Christina L.; Painter, Stuart C.; Poulton, Alex J.; Riley, Jennifer; Salihoglu, Baris; Visser, Andre; Yool, Andrew; Bellerby, Richard; Martin, Adrian P.

    Mediated principally by the sinking of organic rich particles from the upper ocean, the Biological Carbon Pump (BCP) is a significant component of the global carbon cycle. It transfers roughly 11 Gt C yr−1 into the ocean’s interior and maintains atmospheric carbon dioxide at significantly lower...

  15. Ultrasound-Intensified Mineral Carbonation

    OpenAIRE

    Santos, Rafael; François, Davy; Mertens, Gilles; Elsen, Jan; Van Gerven, Tom

    2013-01-01

    Several aspects of ultrasound-assisted mineral carbonation were investigated in this work. The objectives were to intensify the CO2 sequestration process to improve reaction kinetics and maximal conversion. Stainless steel slags, derived from the Argon Oxygen Decarburization (AOD) and Continuous Casting / Ladle Metallurgy (CC/LM) refining steps, were used for assessing the technical feasibility of this concept, as they are potential carbon sinks and can benefit from reduction in alkalinity (p...

  16. Carbon capture and storage & the optimal path of the carbon tax

    OpenAIRE

    Lontzek, Thomas S.; Rickels, Wilfried

    2008-01-01

    In the presence of rising carbon concentrations more attention should be given to the role of the oceans as a sink for atmospheric carbon. We do so by setting up a simple dynamic global carbon cycle model with two reservoirs containing atmosphere and two ocean layers. The net flux between these reservoirs is determined by the relative reservoir size and therefore constitutes a more appropriate description of the carbon cycle than a proportional decay assumption. We exploit the specific featur...

  17. Genetic differences in fruit-set patterns are determined by differences in fruit sink strength and a source : sink threshold for fruit set

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wubs, A.M.; Ma, Y.T.; Heuvelink, E.; Marcelis, L.F.M.

    2009-01-01

    Background and Aims: Fruit set in indeterminate plant species largely depends on the balance between source and sink strength. Plants of these species show fluctuations in fruit set during the growing season. It was tested whether differences in fruit sink strength among the cultivars explained the

  18. Development of a sink-source interaction model for the growth of short-rotation coppice willow and in silico exploration of genotype×environment effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerasuolo, M; Richter, G M; Richard, B; Cunniff, J; Girbau, S; Shield, I; Purdy, S; Karp, A

    2016-02-01

    Identifying key performance traits is essential for elucidating crop growth processes and breeding. In Salix spp., genotypic diversity is being exploited to tailor new varieties to overcome environmental yield constraints. Process-based models can assist these efforts by identifying key parameters of yield formation for different genotype×environment (G×E) combinations. Here, four commercial willow varieties grown in contrasting environments (west and south-east UK) were intensively sampled for growth traits over two 2-year rotations. A sink-source interaction model was developed to parameterize the balance of source (carbon capture/mobilization) and sink formation (morphogenesis, carbon allocation) during growth. Global sensitivity analysis consistently identified day length for the onset of stem elongation as most important factor for yield formation, followed by various 'sink>source' controlling parameters. In coastal climates, the chilling control of budburst ranked higher compared with the more eastern climate. Sensitivity to drought, including canopy size and rooting depth, was potentially growth limiting in the south-east and west of the UK. Potential yields increased from the first to the second rotation, but less so for broad- than for narrow-leaved varieties (20 and 47%, respectively), which had established less well initially (-19%). The establishment was confounded by drought during the first rotation, affecting broad- more than narrow-leaved canopy phenotypes (-29%). The analysis emphasized quantum efficiency at low light intensity as key to assimilation; however, on average, sink parameters were more important than source parameters. The G×E pairings described with this new process model will help to identify parameters of sink-source control for future willow breeding. PMID:26663471

  19. Outreach and education with a concurrent movie "Sinking of Japan"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaoka, K.; Tsuji, H.; Doi, K.

    2006-12-01

    In the summer of 2006, the Japanese movie 'Sinking of Japan (Nihon Chinbotsu)" was released as a remake of the original movie in 33 years ago. The movie, based on the very popular SF novel of the same title, shows human action in the helpless crisis of Japan that is rapidly sinking into sea. Unexpected acceleration of plate subduction and mantle convection cause rapid sinking of Japan, accompanying disastrous earthquakes, tsunamis and volcanic eruptions. Genial but eccentric scientist (Professor of Earthquake Research Institute (ERI), Univ. of 'Toto') with submersible pilots fights against the disaster to help the people in Japanese archipelago. We are asked to help to check the scientific aspect of the movie in creating it. We accepted their offer in the following reasons. The original novel and movie in 33 years ago was very popular and more than 400 copies of the book are sold and about 6.5 million people went to theaters to see the movie. Therefore, the new movie was easily expected to get a big hit and we will have a rare opportunity to get a public interest to earth science. During the first run of the movie we operated 'Q and A' for the earth science of 'Sinking of Japan' on the web site of Earthquake Research Institute (ERI), University of Tokyo. The web site is linked to the official site of the movie, and major Japanese newspapers wrote about the 'Q and A' as an interesting action of ERI. Due to the efficient advertisement, more than 200 questions are submitted and more than 70 answers are listed on the web. More than 800,000 hits are counted to the site, showing wide range of interest to this topic. About half of the questions are on the scientific and disaster aspect of the movie. Half of the rest are on real disasters such as earthquakes or volcanic eruptions. Questions to be answered are selected so as to attract much interest not only to earth science but to the story of the movie itself to keep fun for the readers. As the movie and 'Q and A' are

  20. Evaluation of nitrous acid sources and sinks in urban outflow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gall, Elliott T.; Griffin, Robert J.; Steiner, Allison L.; Dibb, Jack; Scheuer, Eric; Gong, Longwen; Rutter, Andrew P.; Cevik, Basak K.; Kim, Saewung; Lefer, Barry; Flynn, James

    2016-02-01

    Intensive air quality measurements made from June 22-25, 2011 in the outflow of the Dallas-Fort Worth (DFW) metropolitan area are used to evaluate nitrous acid (HONO) sources and sinks. A two-layer box model was developed to assess the ability of established and recently identified HONO sources and sinks to reproduce observations of HONO mixing ratios. A baseline model scenario includes sources and sinks established in the literature and is compared to scenarios including three recently identified sources: volatile organic compound-mediated conversion of nitric acid to HONO (S1), biotic emission from the ground (S2), and re-emission from a surface nitrite reservoir (S3). For all mechanisms, ranges of parametric values span lower- and upper-limit values. Model outcomes for 'likely' estimates of sources and sinks generally show under-prediction of HONO observations, implying the need to evaluate additional sources and variability in estimates of parameterizations, particularly during daylight hours. Monte Carlo simulation is applied to model scenarios constructed with sources S1-S3 added independently and in combination, generally showing improved model outcomes. Adding sources S2 and S3 (scenario S2/S3) appears to best replicate observed HONO, as determined by the model coefficient of determination and residual sum of squared errors (r2 = 0.55 ± 0.03, SSE = 4.6 × 106 ± 7.6 × 105 ppt2). In scenario S2/S3, source S2 is shown to account for 25% and 6.7% of the nighttime and daytime budget, respectively, while source S3 accounts for 19% and 11% of the nighttime and daytime budget, respectively. However, despite improved model fit, there remains significant underestimation of daytime HONO; on average, a 0.15 ppt/s unknown daytime HONO source, or 67% of the total daytime source, is needed to bring scenario S2/S3 into agreement with observation. Estimates of 'best fit' parameterizations across lower to upper-limit values results in a moderate reduction of the unknown

  1. Mechanisms and rates of bacterial colonization of sinking aggregates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiørboe, Thomas; Grossart, H.P.; Ploug, H.;

    2002-01-01

    Quantifying the rate at which bacteria colonize aggregates is a key to understanding microbial turnover of aggregates. We used encounter models based on random walk and advection-diffusion considerations to predict colonization rates from the bacteria's motility patterns (swimming speed, tumbling...... (0 to 2 s(-1)). The rates at which these bacteria colonized artificial aggregates (stationary and sinking) largely agreed with model predictions. We report several findings. (i) Motile bacteria rapidly colonize aggregates, whereas nonmotile bacteria do not. 00 Flow enhances colonization rates. (iii...

  2. Recent findings on sinks for sulfide in gravity sewer networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Asbjørn Haaning; Hvitved-Jacobsen, Thorkild; Vollertsen, Jes

    2006-01-01

    Sulfide buildup in sewer networks is associated with several problems, including health impacts, corrosion of sewer structures and odor nuisance. In recent years, significant advances in the knowledge of the major processes governing sulfide buildup in sewer networks have been made. This paper...... summarizes this newly obtained knowledge and emphasizes important implications of the findings. Model simulations of the in-sewer processes important for the sulfur cycle showed that sulfide oxidation in the wetted biofilm is typically the most important sink for dissolved sulfide in gravity sewers. However...

  3. CVD Diamond Sink Application in High Power 3D MCMs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Kuo-jun; JIANG Chang-shun; LI Cheng-yue

    2005-01-01

    As electronic packages become more compact, run at faster speeds and dissipate more heat, package designers need more effective thermal management materials. CVD diamond, because of its high thermal conductivity, low dielectric loss and its great mechanical strength, is an excellent material for three dimensional (3D) multichip modules (MCMs) in the next generation compact high speed computers and high power microwave components. In this paper, we have synthesized a large area freestanding diamond films and substrates, and polished diamond substrates, which make MCMs diamond film sink becomes a reality.

  4. Solubility trapping in formation water as dominant CO(2) sink in natural gas fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilfillan, Stuart M V; Lollar, Barbara Sherwood; Holland, Greg; Blagburn, Dave; Stevens, Scott; Schoell, Martin; Cassidy, Martin; Ding, Zhenju; Zhou, Zheng; Lacrampe-Couloume, Georges; Ballentine, Chris J

    2009-04-01

    Injecting CO(2) into deep geological strata is proposed as a safe and economically favourable means of storing CO(2) captured from industrial point sources. It is difficult, however, to assess the long-term consequences of CO(2) flooding in the subsurface from decadal observations of existing disposal sites. Both the site design and long-term safety modelling critically depend on how and where CO(2) will be stored in the site over its lifetime. Within a geological storage site, the injected CO(2) can dissolve in solution or precipitate as carbonate minerals. Here we identify and quantify the principal mechanism of CO(2) fluid phase removal in nine natural gas fields in North America, China and Europe, using noble gas and carbon isotope tracers. The natural gas fields investigated in our study are dominated by a CO(2) phase and provide a natural analogue for assessing the geological storage of anthropogenic CO(2) over millennial timescales. We find that in seven gas fields with siliciclastic or carbonate-dominated reservoir lithologies, dissolution in formation water at a pH of 5-5.8 is the sole major sink for CO(2). In two fields with siliciclastic reservoir lithologies, some CO(2) loss through precipitation as carbonate minerals cannot be ruled out, but can account for a maximum of 18 per cent of the loss of emplaced CO(2). In view of our findings that geological mineral fixation is a minor CO(2) trapping mechanism in natural gas fields, we suggest that long-term anthropogenic CO(2) storage models in similar geological systems should focus on the potential mobility of CO(2) dissolved in water. PMID:19340078

  5. Effect of CO2 on the properties and sinking velocity of aggregates of the coccolithophore Emiliania huxleyi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biermann, A.; Engel, A.

    2010-03-01

    Coccolithophores play an important role in organic matter export due to their production of the mineral calcite that can act as ballast. Recent studies indicated that calcification in coccolithophores may be affected by changes in seawater carbonate chemistry. We investigated the influence of CO2 on the aggregation and sinking behaviour of the coccolithophore Emiliania huxleyi (PML B92/11) during a laboratory experiment. The coccolithophores were grown under low (~180 μatm), medium (~380 μatm), and high (~750 μatm) CO2 conditions. Aggregation of the cells was promoted using roller tables. Size and settling velocity of aggregates were determined during the incubation using video image analysis. Our results indicate that aggregate properties are sensitive to changes in the degree of ballasting, as evoked by ocean acidification. Average sinking velocity was highest for low CO2 aggregates (~1292 m d-1) that also had the highest particulate inorganic to particulate organic carbon (PIC/POC) ratio. Lowest PIC/POC ratios and lowest sinking velocity (~366 m d-1) at comparable sizes were observed for aggregates of the high CO2 treatment. Aggregates of the high CO2 treatment showed a 4-fold lower excess density (~4.2×10-4 g cm-3) when compared to aggregates from the medium and low CO2 treatments (~1.7 g×10-3 cm-3). We also observed that more aggregates formed in the high CO2 treatment, and that those aggregates contained more bacteria than aggregates in the medium and low CO2 treatment. If applicable to the future ocean, our findings suggest that a CO2 induced reduction of the calcite content of aggregates could weaken the deep export of organic matter in the ocean, particularly in areas dominated by coccolithophores.

  6. How reservoirs alter drinking water quality: Organic matter sources, sinks, and transformations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, Tamara E.C.; Bergamaschi, Brian A.; Hernes, Peter J.; Doctor, Daniel H.; Kendall, Carol; Downing, Bryan D.; Losee, Richard F.

    2011-01-01

    Within reservoirs, production, transformation, and loss of dissolved organic matter (DOM) occur simultaneously. While the balance between production and loss determines whether a reservoir is a net sink or source of DOM, changes in chemical composition are also important because they affect DOM reactivity with respect to disinfection by-product (DBP) formation. The composition of the DOM pool also provides insight into DOM sources and processing, which can inform reservoir management. We examined the concentration and composition of DOM in San Luis Reservoir, a large off-stream impoundment of the California State Water Project. We used a wide array of DOM chemical tracers including dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentration, trihalomethane and haloacetic acid formation potentials (THMFP and HAAFP, respectively), absorbance properties, isotopic composition, lignin phenol content, and structural groupings determined by 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). There were periods when the reservoir was a net source of DOC due to the predominance of algal production (summer), a net sink due to the predominance of degradation (fall–winter), and balanced between production and consumption (spring). Despite only moderate variation in bulk DOC concentration (3.0–3.6 mg C/L), changes in DOM composition indicated that terrestrial-derived material entering the reservoir was being degraded and replaced by aquatic-derived DOM produced within the reservoir. Substantial changes in the propensity of the DOM pool to form THMs and HAAs illustrate that the DBP precursor pool was not directly coupled to bulk DOC concentration and indicate that algal production is an important source of DBP precursors. Results suggest reservoirs have the potential to attenuate DOM amount and reactivity with respect to DBP precursors via degradative processes; however, these benefits can be decreased or even negated by the production of algal-derived DOM.

  7. Soil Methane Sink Capacity Response to a Long-Term Wildfire Chronosequence in Northern Sweden.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niall P McNamara

    Full Text Available Boreal forests occupy nearly one fifth of the terrestrial land surface and are recognised as globally important regulators of carbon (C cycling and greenhouse gas emissions. Carbon sequestration processes in these forests include assimilation of CO2 into biomass and subsequently into soil organic matter, and soil microbial oxidation of methane (CH4. In this study we explored how ecosystem retrogression, which drives vegetation change, regulates the important process of soil CH4 oxidation in boreal forests. We measured soil CH4 oxidation processes on a group of 30 forested islands in northern Sweden differing greatly in fire history, and collectively representing a retrogressive chronosequence, spanning 5000 years. Across these islands the build-up of soil organic matter was observed to increase with time since fire disturbance, with a significant correlation between greater humus depth and increased net soil CH4 oxidation rates. We suggest that this increase in net CH4 oxidation rates, in the absence of disturbance, results as deeper humus stores accumulate and provide niches for methanotrophs to thrive. By using this gradient we have discovered important regulatory controls on the stability of soil CH4 oxidation processes that could not have not been explored through shorter-term experiments. Our findings indicate that in the absence of human interventions such as fire suppression, and with increased wildfire frequency, the globally important boreal CH4 sink could be diminished.

  8. Carbon Farming as a Carbon Negative Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, C.; Laird, D.; Hayes, D. J.

    2015-12-01

    Carbon farms have a pivotal role in national and international efforts to mitigate and adapt to climate change. A carbon farm in its broadest sense is one that reduces greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions or captures and holds carbon in vegetation and soils. Their capacity to remove carbon from the air and store it safely and permanently, while providing additional human and ecosystem benefits, means they could contribute significantly to national efforts to stabilize or reduce GHGs. We examine carbon farms in the context of corn and soybean production agriculture. We illustrate, using Iowa data but with relevance across United States corn and soybean production, the potential for carbon farms to reduce human GHG emissions and sequester carbon permanently at a rate that has meaningful impact on global greenhouse gas concentration. Carbon has been viewed as a next generation cash crop in Iowa for over a decade. The carbon farm perspective, however, goes beyond carbon as cash crop to make carbon the center of an entire farm enterprise. The transformation is possible through slight adjustment crop practices mixed with advances in technology to sequester carbon through biochar. We examine carbon balance of Iowa agriculture given only the combination of slight reduction in fertilizer and sequestration by biochar. We find the following. Iowa carbon farms could turn Iowa agriculture into a carbon sink. The estimated range of GHG reduction by statewide implementation of carbon farms is 19.46 to 90.27 MMt CO2-equivalent (CO2-e), while the current agricultural CO2-e emission estimate is 35.38 MMt CO2-e. Iowa carbon farm GHG reduction would exceed Iowa GHG reduction by wind energy (8.7 MMt CO2-e) and could exceed combined reductions from wind energy and corn grain ethanol (10.7 MMt CO2-e; 19.4 MMt CO2-e combined). In fact, Iowa carbon farms alone could exceed GHG reduction from national corn grain ethanol production (39.6 MMt CO2-e). A carbon price accessible to agricultural

  9. Seagrass meadows as a globally significant carbonate reservoir

    OpenAIRE

    Mazarrasa, I.; Marbà, N.; C. E. Lovelock; O. Serrano; P. S. Lavery; Fourqurean, J.W.; Kennedy, H.; M. A. Mateo; D. Krause-Jensen; A. D. L. Steven; Duarte, C. M.

    2015-01-01

    There has been growing interest in quantifying the capacity of seagrass ecosystems to act as carbon sinks as a natural way of offsetting anthropogenic carbon emissions to the atmosphere. However, most of the efforts have focused on the particulate organic carbon (POC) stocks and accumulation rates and ignored the particulate inorganic carbon (PIC) fraction, despite important carbonate pools associated with calcifying organisms inhabiting the meadows, such as epiphytes and be...

  10. A comprehensive study of data collection schemes using mobile sinks in wireless sensor networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Abdul Waheed; Abdullah, Abdul Hanan; Anisi, Mohammad Hossein; Bangash, Javed Iqbal

    2014-01-01

    Recently sink mobility has been exploited in numerous schemes to prolong the lifetime of wireless sensor networks (WSNs). Contrary to traditional WSNs where sensory data from sensor field is ultimately sent to a static sink, mobile sink-based approaches alleviate energy-holes issues thereby facilitating balanced energy consumption among nodes. In mobility scenarios, nodes need to keep track of the latest location of mobile sinks for data delivery. However, frequent propagation of sink topological updates undermines the energy conservation goal and therefore should be controlled. Furthermore, controlled propagation of sinks' topological updates affects the performance of routing strategies thereby increasing data delivery latency and reducing packet delivery ratios. This paper presents a taxonomy of various data collection/dissemination schemes that exploit sink mobility. Based on how sink mobility is exploited in the sensor field, we classify existing schemes into three classes, namely path constrained, path unconstrained, and controlled sink mobility-based schemes. We also organize existing schemes based on their primary goals and provide a comparative study to aid readers in selecting the appropriate scheme in accordance with their particular intended applications and network dynamics. Finally, we conclude our discussion with the identification of some unresolved issues in pursuit of data delivery to a mobile sink. PMID:24504107

  11. The carbon is down the hole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Each year, about 7.1 billions of tons of carbon are released by human activities and industries, from which 5.5 come from the combustion of fossil fuels and 1.6 is a direct consequence of deforestation. However, less than half of this carbon is kept by the atmosphere in its CO2 form and contributes to the anthropic greenhouse effect. The rest is necessarily absorbed by carbon sinks, some of them located in the oceans and responsible for the disappearing of about 2 billions of tons of carbon, and the others probably located in the continental biosphere and in particular in the vegetal biomass and the organic matter of soils. This additional storage is probably located in the northern hemisphere between 30 deg. N and 60 deg. N. The distinction between the continental and oceanic sinks is made according to the concentration ratios of carbon 12 and carbon 13 isotopes. (J.S.)

  12. Developing Carbon Sequestration Forestry for Mitigating Climate Change: Practice and Management of Carbon Sequestration Forestry in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    By elaborating the functions and effects of forestry in mitigating climate change, introducing the concepts and significance of forest carbon sink, forestry carbon sequestration, and carbon sequestration forestry, and summarizing the practices of carbon sequestration forestry in China, the paper came up with the outline for strengthening the management of carbon sequestration forestry, i.e. implementing the Climate Change Forestry Action Plan, reinforcing the accounting and monitoring of national forest car...

  13. An underestimated methane sink in Arctic mineral soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Y.; Medvigy, D.; Stackhouse, B. T.; Lau, M.; Onstott, T. C.; Jørgensen, C. J.; Elberling, B.; Emmerton, C. A.; St Louis, V. L.; Moch, J.

    2015-12-01

    Atmospheric methane has more than doubled since the industrial revolution, yet the sources and sinks are still poorly constrained. Though soil methane oxidation is the largest terrestrial methane sink, it is inadequately represented in current models. We have conducted laboratory analysis of mineral cryosol soils from Axel Heiberg Island in the Canadian high arctic. Microcosm experiments were carried out under varying environmental conditions and used to parameterize methane oxidation models. One-meter long intact soil cores were also obtained from Axel Heiberg Island and analyzed in the laboratory. A controlled core thawing experiment was carried out, and observed methane fluxes were compared to modeled methane fluxes. We find that accurate model simulation of methane fluxes needs to satisfy two requirements:(1) microbial biomass needs to be dynamically simulated, and (2) high-affinity methanotrophs need to be represented. With these 2 features, our model is able to reproduce observed temperature and soil moisture sensitivities of high affinity methanotrophs, which are twice as sensitive to temperature than the low affinity methanotrophs and are active under saturated moisture conditions. The model is also able to accurately reproduce the time rate of change of microbial oxidation of atmospheric methane. Finally, we discuss the remaining biases and uncertainties in the model, and the challenges of extending models from the laboratory scale to the landscape scale.

  14. CO2 Sink/Source in the Indonesian Seas

    KAUST Repository

    Kartadikaria, Aditya

    2015-04-01

    Two distinct CO2 sink/source characteristics appeared from the compiled observed data 1984-2013 in the tropical Indonesian seas. The western part persistently emits CO2 to the atmosphere, while the eastern is rather dynamic which emits and absorbs smaller amount of CO2 to and from atmosphere, respectively. The segregation is proximal to the virtual Wallace line, where in the continental shelf is located. Lower salinity and higher silicate condition in the western part influenced the higher pCO2 condition in Java Sea. Temperature is found to have a limited influence to control different characteristic in the west and east, but SST change of 2.0 0C during La Ninã condition effectively reduced the source amount of CO2 by 50% compared to Normal year condition. Yet, during La Ninã, higher wind speed increases CO2 flux twice compared to Normal year. In the continental shelf area where CO2 sink area is found, 29 years data showed that pCO2 trend is increasing ±0.6-3.8 μatm/year. From this study, the overall areas have a significant source of CO2 of approximately 10 - 24 μatm.

  15. Carbon cycle makeover

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Canfield, Donald Eugene; Kump, Lee R.

    2013-01-01

    remaining in sediments after respiration leave a residual of oxygen in the atmosphere. The source of oxygen to the atmosphere represented by organic matter burial is balanced by oxygen sinks associated with rock weathering and chemical reaction with volcanic gases. This is the long-term carbon and oxygen...... geochemical cycle. But Earth is an old planet, and oxygen levels have changed through time (2). On page 540 of this issue, Schrag et al. (3) challenge the most commonly used geochemical approach to assess long-term changes in the coupled oxygen and carbon cycles....

  16. Estimating carbon stock in secondary forests: decisions and uncertainties associated with allometric biomass models.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Breugel, van M.; Ransijn, J.; Craven, D.; Bongers, F.; Hall, J.

    2011-01-01

    Secondary forests are a major terrestrial carbon sink and reliable estimates of their carbon stocks are pivotal for understanding the global carbon balance and initiatives to mitigate CO2 emissions through forest management and reforestation. A common method to quantify carbon stocks in forests is t

  17. LPTA: Location Predictive and Time Adaptive Data Gathering Scheme with Mobile Sink for Wireless Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuan Zhu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper exploits sink mobility to prolong the lifetime of sensor networks while maintaining the data transmission delay relatively low. A location predictive and time adaptive data gathering scheme is proposed. In this paper, we introduce a sink location prediction principle based on loose time synchronization and deduce the time-location formulas of the mobile sink. According to local clocks and the time-location formulas of the mobile sink, nodes in the network are able to calculate the current location of the mobile sink accurately and route data packets timely toward the mobile sink by multihop relay. Considering that data packets generating from different areas may be different greatly, an adaptive dwelling time adjustment method is also proposed to balance energy consumption among nodes in the network. Simulation results show that our data gathering scheme enables data routing with less data transmission time delay and balance energy consumption among nodes.

  18. Energy efficient privacy preserved data gathering in wireless sensor networks having multiple sinks

    OpenAIRE

    Bahşi, Hayretdin; Bahsi, Hayretdin; Levi, Albert

    2009-01-01

    Wireless sensor networks (WSNs) generally have a many-to-one structure so that event information flows from sensors to a unique sink. In recent WSN applications, many-tomany structures are evolved due to need for conveying collected event information to multiple sinks at the same time. This study proposes an anonymity method bases on k-anonymity for preventing record disclosure of collected event information in WSNs. Proposed method takes the anonymity requirements of multiple sinks into cons...

  19. Support of multiple sinks via a virtual root for the RPL routing protocol

    OpenAIRE

    Carels, David; Derdaele, Niels; De Poorter, Eli; Vandenberghe, Wim; Moerman, Ingrid; Demeester, Piet

    2014-01-01

    Data acquisition in large wireless sensor networks consisting of only a single sink can typically lead to scalability and energy efficiency issues. A solution to this problem is the deployment of multiple sinks in the network. This approach is however not supported by the popular sensor network routing protocol, IPv6 routing protocol for low-power and lossy networks (RPL). This paper describes a method to support the usage of multiple sinks for RPL in accordance to the limited guidelines of R...

  20. An Efficient Data-Gathering Scheme for Heterogeneous Sensor Networks via Mobile Sinks

    OpenAIRE

    Po-Liang Lin; Ren-Song Ko

    2012-01-01

    Typical Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs) use static sinks to collect data from all sensor nodes via multihop forwarding. This results in the hot spot problem since the nodes close to the sink have a tendency to consume more energy in relaying data from other nodes. Many approaches using mobile sinks have been proposed to prevent this problem, but these approaches still suffer from the buffer overflow problem due to the limited memory capacity of the sensor nodes. This paper proposes an approac...

  1. HUMS: An Autonomous Moving Strategy for Mobile Sinks in Data-Gathering Sensor Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Yanzhong Bi; Limin Sun; Jian Ma; Na Li; Canfeng Chen; Imran Ali Khan

    2007-01-01

    Sink mobility has attracted much research interest in recent years because it can improve network performance such as energy efficiency and throughput. An energy-unconscious moving strategy is potentially harmful to the balance of the energy consumption among sensor nodes so as to aggravate the hotspot problem of sensor networks. In this paper, we propose an autonomous moving strategy for the mobile sinks in data-gathering applications. In our solution, a mobile sink approaches the nodes with...

  2. Towards an Efficient Positioning of Mobile Sinks in Wireless Sensor Networks inside Buildings

    OpenAIRE

    Ben Saad, Leila; Tourancheau, Bernard

    2009-01-01

    International audience Recent years have witnessed an increasing need for wireless sensor networks in a wide range of applications specially for buildings automation. In such networks, many sensor nodes relay the sensed data hop by hop towards the nearest sink. The sensors closest to the sinks drain their energy much faster than distant nodes because they carry heavier traffic which causes prematurely the end of the network lifetime. Relocating the sinks can solve this problem by distribut...

  3. Towards an Optimal Positioning of Multiple Mobile Sinks in WSNs for Buildings

    OpenAIRE

    Ben Saad, Leila; Tourancheau, Bernard

    2009-01-01

    International audience The need for wireless sensor networks is rapidly growing in a wide range of applications specially for buildings automation. In such networks, a large number of sensors with limited energy supply are in charge of relaying the sensed data hop by hop to the nearest sink. The sensors closest to the sinks deplete their energy much faster than distant nodes because they carry heavy traffic which causes prematurely the end of the network lifetime. Employing mobile sinks ca...

  4. Proactive Data Dissemination in Wireless Sensor Networks with Uncontrolled Sink Mobility

    OpenAIRE

    Vecchio, Massimo; Carneiro Viana, Aline; Ziviani, Artur; Friedman, Roy

    2009-01-01

    This paper investigates Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs) with mobile sinks that collect data from sensors by following uncontrolled trajectories. In particular, the paper focuses on proactive data dissemination strategies in which the trajectory of the mobile sink is unknown to the sensors. These strategies attempt to obtain a good trade-off between the number of sensors the mobile sinks has to visit in order to collect representative data of all sensors, and the communication effort required ...

  5. Reduction of heat sink common-mode currents in switching mode power supply circuits

    OpenAIRE

    J. Kulanayagam; Hagmann, J. H.; K. F. Hoffmann; S. Dickmann

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, a new filter design for a heat sink is presented. The parasitic couplings between electric power devices and the heat sink are responsible for common-mode currents. The main focus is on the reduction of these currents to reduce the heat sink radiation. For this purpose a new filter design is proposed. In addition, experimental results are shown to validate the proposed filter.

  6. Reduction of heat sink common-mode currents in switching mode power supply circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulanayagam, J.; Hagmann, J. H.; Hoffmann, K. F.; Dickmann, S.

    2011-08-01

    In this paper, a new filter design for a heat sink is presented. The parasitic couplings between electric power devices and the heat sink are responsible for common-mode currents. The main focus is on the reduction of these currents to reduce the heat sink radiation. For this purpose a new filter design is proposed. In addition, experimental results are shown to validate the proposed filter.

  7. SINK REPOSITIONING OPTIMIZATION TECHNIQUE USING PARTICLE SWARM OPTIMIZATION IN WIRELESS SENSOR NETWORKS

    OpenAIRE

    Ms. Prerana Shrivastava*

    2016-01-01

    In today’s wireless sensor networks mobile sinks plays an important role in data transmission and reception. Therefore it becomes very important to estimate the optimized position of the mobile sinks in order to improve the overall efficiency of the wireless sensor networks. In this paper, the particle swarm optimization technique has been used for the estimation of the position of the mobile sinks and its impact on the various performance factors of the wireless sensor network has been...

  8. Numerically Investigating the Effects of Cross Links in Scaled Microchannel Heat Sinks

    OpenAIRE

    DANG, M; Hassan, I.

    2007-01-01

    Submitted on behalf of EDA Publishing Association (http://irevues.inist.fr/handle/2042/5920) International audience Thermal management for high performance of miniaturized electronic devices using microchannel heat sinks has recently become of interest to researchers and industry. Obtaining heat sink designs with uniform flow distribution is strongly desired. A number of experimental studies have been conducted to seek appropriate designs for microchannel heat sinks. However, pursuing t...

  9. Pressure drop across micro-pin heat sinks under boiling conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Koşar, Ali; Kosar, Ali; Özdemir, Mehmed Rafet; Ozdemir, Mehmed Rafet; Keskinöz, Mehmet; Keskinoz, Mehmet

    2009-01-01

    Two-phase pressure drop was studied in four different micro pin fin heat sinks. Micro pin fin heat sinks used in the current studies were operated under boiling conditions using water and R-123 as working fluids. It was observed that once boiling was initiated severe temperature fluctuations and flow oscillations were recorded for three of the micro pin fin heat sinks, which was characterized as unstable boiling. Pressure drop signals were presented just before and after the unstable boili...

  10. Erosion of soil organic carbon: implications for carbon sequestration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Oost, Kristof; Van Hemelryck, Hendrik; Harden, Jennifer W.

    2009-01-01

    Agricultural activities have substantially increased rates of soil erosion and deposition, and these processes have a significant impact on carbon (C) mineralization and burial. Here, we present a synthesis of erosion effects on carbon dynamics and discuss the implications of soil erosion for carbon sequestration strategies. We demonstrate that for a range of data-based parameters from the literature, soil erosion results in increased C storage onto land, an effect that is heterogeneous on the landscape and is variable on various timescales. We argue that the magnitude of the erosion term and soil carbon residence time, both strongly influenced by soil management, largely control the strength of the erosion-induced sink. In order to evaluate fully the effects of soil management strategies that promote carbon sequestration, a full carbon account must be made that considers the impact of erosion-enhanced disequilibrium between carbon inputs and decomposition, including effects on net primary productivity and decomposition rates.

  11. A Comprehensive Study of Data Collection Schemes Using Mobile Sinks in Wireless Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul Waheed Khan

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Recently sink mobility has been exploited in numerous schemes to prolong the lifetime of wireless sensor networks (WSNs. Contrary to traditional WSNs where sensory data from sensor field is ultimately sent to a static sink, mobile sink-based approaches alleviate energy-holes issues thereby facilitating balanced energy consumption among nodes. In mobility scenarios, nodes need to keep track of the latest location of mobile sinks for data delivery. However, frequent propagation of sink topological updates undermines the energy conservation goal and therefore should be controlled. Furthermore, controlled propagation of sinks’ topological updates affects the performance of routing strategies thereby increasing data delivery latency and reducing packet delivery ratios. This paper presents a taxonomy of various data collection/dissemination schemes that exploit sink mobility. Based on how sink mobility is exploited in the sensor field, we classify existing schemes into three classes, namely path constrained, path unconstrained, and controlled sink mobility-based schemes. We also organize existing schemes based on their primary goals and provide a comparative study to aid readers in selecting the appropriate scheme in accordance with their particular intended applications and network dynamics. Finally, we conclude our discussion with the identification of some unresolved issues in pursuit of data delivery to a mobile sink.

  12. Guaranteed Delivery in k-Anycast Routing in Multi-SinkWireless Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Nathalie Mitton; David Simplot-Ryl; Jun Zheng

    2013-01-01

    In k-anycasting, a sensor wants to report event information to any k sinks in the network. In this paper, we describe KanGuRou, the first position-based energy efficient k-anycast routing which guarantees the packet delivery to k sinks as long as the connected component that contains s also contains at least k sinks. A node s running KanGuRou first computes a tree including k sinks with weight as low as possible. If this tree has m ≥ 1 edges originated at node s, s duplicates the message m ti...

  13. Guaranteed Delivery in k-Anycast Routing in Multi-Sink Wireless Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Mitton, Nathalie; Simplot-Ryl, David; Zheng, Jun

    2013-01-01

    International audience In k-anycasting, a sensor wants to report event information to any k sinks in the network. In this paper, we describe KanGuRou, the rst position-based energy e cient k-anycast routing which guarantees the packet delivery to k sinks as long as the connected component that contains s also contains at least k sinks. A node s running KanGuRou rst computes a tree including k sinks with weight as low as possible. If this tree has m 1 edges originated at node s, s duplicate...

  14. Deadline-aware energy-efficient query scheduling in Wireless Sensor Networks with mobile sink.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakaya, Murat

    2013-01-01

    Mobile sinks are proposed to save sensor energy spent for multihop communication in transferring data to a base station (sink) in Wireless Sensor Networks. Due to relative low speed of mobile sinks, these approaches are mostly suitable for delay-tolerant applications. In this paper, we study the design of a query scheduling algorithm for query-based data gathering applications using mobile sinks. However, these kinds of applications are sensitive to delays due to specified query deadlines. Thus, the proposed scheduling algorithm aims to minimize the number of missed deadlines while keeping the level of energy consumption at the minimum. PMID:23818833

  15. Carbapenemase-bearing Klebsiella spp. in sink drains: investigation into the potential advantage of copper pipes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soothill, J S

    2016-06-01

    Sink drains have long been known to harbour pathogenic bacteria and efforts such as heated sink traps have been made to control them. Sink outlet pipes have been implicated in outbreaks of infection by multi-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae. To investigate whether a change to copper pipes might prevent cross-infection, sections of standard sink outlet pipe were left in containers of water to which multi-resistant human strains of K. pneumoniae had been added. Bacterial counts from the water of containers to which copper pipe had been added were lower than those from containers to which PVC (polyvinyl chloride) pipe had been added. PMID:27112043

  16. Enhancement of heat exchange by on-chip engineered heat sink structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Yonuk; Dresselhaus, Paul D.; Benz, Samuel P.

    2007-03-01

    We report a method for improving heat exchange between cryo- cooled high power consuming devices and coolant. We fabricated a micro-machined monolithic heat sink structure on a high integration density superconducting Josephson device, and studied the effect of the heat sink on cooling of the device in detail. The monolithic heat sink structure showed a significant enhancement of cooling efficiency, which markedly improved the chip operation. The detailed mechanism of the enhancement still needs further modeling and study in order to optimize the design of the heat sink structure.

  17. A large CO2 sink enhanced by eutrophication in a tropical coastal embayment (Guanabara Bay, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotovicz, L. C., Jr.; Knoppers, B. A.; Brandini, N.; Costa Santos, S. J.; Abril, G.

    2015-03-01

    In contrast to its small surface area, the coastal zone plays a disproportionate role in the global carbon cycle. Carbon production, transformation, emission and burial rates at the land-ocean interface are still poorly known, especially in tropical regions. Surface water pCO2 and ancillary parameters were monitored during nine field campaigns between April 2013 and April 2014 in Guanabara Bay, a tropical eutrophic to hypertrophic semi-enclosed estuarine embayment surrounded by the city of Rio de Janeiro, SE-Brazil. Water pCO2 varied between 22 and 3715 ppmv in the Bay showing spatial, diurnal and seasonal trends that mirrored those of dissolved oxygen (DO) and Chlorophyll a (Chl a). Marked pCO2 undersaturation was prevalent in the shallow, confined and thermally stratified waters of the upper bay, whereas pCO2 oversaturation was restricted to sites close to the small river mouths and small sewage channels, which covered only 10% of the bay's area. Substantial daily variations in pCO2 (up to 395 ppmv between dawn and dusk) were also registered and could be integrated temporally and spatially for the establishment of net diurnal, seasonal and annual CO2 fluxes. In contrast to other estuaries worldwide, Guanabara Bay behaved as a net sink of atmospheric CO2, a property enhanced by the concomitant effects of strong radiation intensity, thermal stratification, and high availability of nutrients, which promotes phytoplankton development and net autotrophy. In the inner part of the bay, the calculated annual CO2 sink (-19.6 mol C m2 yr-1) matched the organic carbon burial in the sediments reported in the literature. The carbon sink and autotrophy of Guanabara Bay was driven by planktonic primary production promoted by eutrophication, and by its typology of marine embayment lacking the classical extended estuarine mixing zone, in contrast to river-dominated estuarine systems, which are generally net heterotrophic and CO2 emitters. Our results show that global CO2

  18. A large CO2 sink enhanced by eutrophication in a tropical coastal embayment (Guanabara Bay, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. C. Cotovicz Jr.

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In contrast to its small surface area, the coastal zone plays a disproportionate role in the global carbon cycle. Carbon production, transformation, emission and burial rates at the land–ocean interface are still poorly known, especially in tropical regions. Surface water pCO2 and ancillary parameters were monitored during nine field campaigns between April 2013 and April 2014 in Guanabara Bay, a tropical eutrophic to hypertrophic semi-enclosed estuarine embayment surrounded by the city of Rio de Janeiro, SE-Brazil. Water pCO2 varied between 22 and 3715 ppmv in the Bay showing spatial, diurnal and seasonal trends that mirrored those of dissolved oxygen (DO and Chlorophyll a (Chl a. Marked pCO2 undersaturation was prevalent in the shallow, confined and thermally stratified waters of the upper bay, whereas pCO2 oversaturation was restricted to sites close to the small river mouths and small sewage channels, which covered only 10% of the bay's area. Substantial daily variations in pCO2 (up to 395 ppmv between dawn and dusk were also registered and could be integrated temporally and spatially for the establishment of net diurnal, seasonal and annual CO2 fluxes. In contrast to other estuaries worldwide, Guanabara Bay behaved as a net sink of atmospheric CO2, a property enhanced by the concomitant effects of strong radiation intensity, thermal stratification, and high availability of nutrients, which promotes phytoplankton development and net autotrophy. In the inner part of the bay, the calculated annual CO2 sink (−19.6 mol C m2 yr-1 matched the organic carbon burial in the sediments reported in the literature. The carbon sink and autotrophy of Guanabara Bay was driven by planktonic primary production promoted by eutrophication, and by its typology of marine embayment lacking the classical extended estuarine mixing zone, in contrast to river-dominated estuarine systems, which are generally net heterotrophic and CO2 emitters. Our results show that

  19. Carbon dioxide in Arctic and subarctic regions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gosink, T. A.; Kelley, J. J.

    1981-03-01

    A three year research project was presented that would define the role of the Arctic ocean, sea ice, tundra, taiga, high latitude ponds and lakes and polar anthropogenic activity on the carbon dioxide content of the atmosphere. Due to the large physical and geographical differences between the two polar regions, a comparison of CO/sub 2/ source and sink strengths of the two areas was proposed. Research opportunities during the first year, particularly those aboard the Swedish icebreaker, YMER, provided additional confirmatory data about the natural source and sink strengths for carbon dioxide in the Arctic regions. As a result, the hypothesis that these natural sources and sinks are strong enough to significantly affect global atmospheric carbon dioxide levels is considerably strengthened. Based on the available data we calculate that the whole Arctic region is a net annual sink for about 1.1 x 10/sup 15/ g of CO/sub 2/, or the equivalent of about 5% of the annual anthropogenic input into the atmosphere. For the second year of this research effort, research on the seasonal sources and sinks of CO/sub 2/ in the Arctic will be continued. Particular attention will be paid to the seasonal sea ice zones during the freeze and thaw periods, and the tundra-taiga regions, also during the freeze and thaw periods.

  20. Nongovernmental valorization of carbon dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) is considered the largest contributor to the greenhouse gas effect. Most attempts to manage the flow of CO2 or carbon into our environment involve reducing net emissions or sequestering the gas into long-lived sinks. Using CO2 as a chemical feedstock has a long history, but using it on scales that might impact the net emissions of CO2 into the atmosphere has not generally been considered seriously. There is also a growing interest in employing our natural biomes of carbon such as trees, vegetation, and soils as storage media. Some amelioration of the net carbon emissions into the atmosphere could be achieved by concomitant large withdrawals of carbon. This report surveys the potential and limitations in employing carbon as a resource for organic chemicals, fuels, inorganic materials, and in using the biome to manage carbon. The outlook for each of these opportunities is also described

  1. CURRENT TECHNOLOGY AND INNOVATIONS IN FREEZE SHAFT SINKING IN CHINA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张铭; 翁家杰; 夏正明

    1991-01-01

    This paper gives a brief review of the development of shaft sinking by artificial ground freezing since 1949 when new China was founded. Several shaft freezing schemes which have been successfully applied from the economic and safe viewpoints are presented. Current technology and some innovative techniques,especially the shah lining which have experienced major improvements over the last four decades,are briefly reviewed. The technique of the in-situ pour concrete incorporating ailica fume with higher early strength under low temperature curing conditions is described. The temperature field in shah freezing and its finite difference solution are given in this paper. A recently developed method combining freeze wall model test with back analysis technique based on numerical simulation is also described.

  2. Transport of defense compounds from source to sink

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Morten Egevang; Nour-Eldin, Hussam Hassan; Halkier, Barbara Ann

    2015-01-01

    Plants synthesize a plethora of defense compounds crucial for their survival in a challenging and changing environment. Transport processes are important for shaping the distribution pattern of defense compounds, albeit focus hitherto has been mostly on their biosynthetic pathways. A recent ident...... distribution patterns and source-sink relations. We focus on lessons learned from glucosinolate transport that may apply to transport of other defense compounds and discuss future avenues in the emerging field of defense compound transport.......Plants synthesize a plethora of defense compounds crucial for their survival in a challenging and changing environment. Transport processes are important for shaping the distribution pattern of defense compounds, albeit focus hitherto has been mostly on their biosynthetic pathways. A recent...... identification of two glucosinolate transporters represents a breakthrough in our understanding of glucosinolate transport in Arabidopsis and has advanced knowledge in transport of defense compounds. In this review, we discuss the role of the glucosinolate transporters in establishing dynamic glucosinolate...

  3. Experimental and Numerical Analysis of Electronics Heat Sink

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad F. Ismail, Mirghani I. Ahmed, and Yousif A. Abakr

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Cooling of electronic components continues to attract many research and development activities towards achieving an effective way of cooling. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD tools may be considered as a cheap substitute for expensive experimental testing methods. In this work the cooling of a simulated electronic board was modeled using FLUENTTM CFD software, and experimental procedures were followed to validate the estimated results, and to understand the factors that would affect the software capability to predict the actual measured values. Results showed good agreement between the simulation and experimental results. The software was found to be capable to predict the exact values at the locations where the temperature values were similar to the board mean temperature. The maximum percentage error was found to be limited to 4.7%, and the capability of the software to estimate the exact measured values was found to be affected by the function of thermal wake generation. Keywords: CFD, Electronic cooling, Heat sink, Simulation

  4. Investigation of heat sink of endothermic hydrocarbon fuels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Yong-sheng; LIN Rui-sen

    2005-01-01

    Endothermic hydrocarbon fuels are advanced coolants for high-temperature structures of spacecraft. No data of tested-cooling-ability of endothermic fuels have been broadly discussed in literature. In this work a high-temperature flow calorimeter was designed, and the cooling capacity of six different hydrocarbon fuels were measured. Experimental results showed that these hydrocarbon fuels have capacity for cooling high-temperature structures, and that the cooling capacity of fuel N-1 can reach 3.15 M J/kg, which can nearly satisfy the requirement of thermal management for a Mach 3 cruise aircraft, whose heat sink requirement is about 3.5 M J/kg. The endothermic velocity of hydrocarbon fuels was also measured by the calorimeter.

  5. Dust deposition: iron source or sink? A case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Ye

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available A significant decrease of dissolved iron (DFe concentration has been observed after dust addition into mesocosms during the DUst experiment in a low Nutrient low chlorophyll Ecosystem (DUNE, carried out in the summer of 2008. Due to low biological productivity at the experiment site, biological consumption of iron can not explain the magnitude of DFe decrease. To understand processes regulating the observed DFe variation, we simulated the experiment using a one-dimensional model of the Fe biogeochemical cycle, coupled with a simple ecosystem model. Different size classes of particles and particle aggregation are taken into account to describe the particle dynamics. DFe concentration is regulated in the model by dissolution from dust particles and adsorption onto particle surfaces, biological uptake, and photochemical mobilisation of particulate iron.

    The model reproduces the observed DFe decrease after dust addition well. This is essentially explained by particle adsorption and particle aggregation that produces a high export within the first 24 h. The estimated particle adsorption rates range between the measured adsorption rates of soluble iron and those of colloidal iron, indicating both processes controlling the DFe removal during the experiment. A dissolution timescale of 3 days is used in the model, instead of an instantaneous dissolution, underlining the importance of dissolution kinetics on the short-term impact of dust deposition on seawater DFe.

    Sensitivity studies reveal that initial DFe concentration before dust addition was crucial for the net impact of dust addition on DFe during the DUNE experiment. Based on the balance between abiotic sinks and sources of DFe, a critical DFe concentration has been defined, above which dust deposition acts as a net sink of DFe, rather than a source. Taking into account the role of excess iron binding ligands and biotic processes, the critical DFe concentration might be applied to

  6. Dust deposition: iron source or sink? A case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Ye

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available A significant decrease of dissolved iron (DFe concentration has been observed after dust addition into mesocosms during the DUst experiment in a low Nutrient low chlorophyll Ecosystem (DUNE, carried out in the summer of 2008. To understand the processes regulating the observed DFe variation, we simulated the experiment by a one-dimensional model of the Fe biogeochemical cycle, coupled with a simple ecosystem model. Different size classes of particles and particle aggregation are taken into account to describe the particle dynamics. DFe concentration is regulated in the model by dissolution from dust particles and adsorption onto particle surfaces, biological uptake, and photochemical mobilisation of particulate iron. The model reproduces the observed DFe decrease after dust addition well, choosing particle adsorption rates of 30, 150 and 750 m3 kg−1 d−1 for particles of different size classes. These adsorption rates range between the measured adsorption rates of soluble iron and those of colloidal iron, indicating both processes controlling the DFe removal during the experiment. Sensitivity studies reveal that initial DFe concentration before dust addition was crucial for the net impact of dust addition on DFe during the DUNE experiment. From the balance between sinks and sources of DFe, a critical DFe concentration, above which dust deposition acts as a net sink of DFe, rather than a source, has been estimated for the DUNE experiment. Taking into account the role of excess iron binding ligands, this concept of a critical DFe concentration might be applied to explain the short-term variability of DFe after natural dust deposition.

  7. Mapping geological storage prospectivity of CO2 for the world's sedimentary basins and regional source to sink matching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Most hydrocarbon producing sedimentary basins as well as many non-petroliferous sedimentary basins will be potential sites for carbon dioxide (CO2) storage. The degree to which geological storage of CO2 will be implemented in the future will depend on the geographical and technical relationships between emission sites and storage locations, and the economic drivers that affect the implementation for each source to sink match. Despite many attempts to estimate the world's total storage potential for CO2 in terms of capacity, there are inherent uncertainties associated with delivering such an output. As such, maps have yet to be published on the global distribution of the most likely areas for CO2 storage. However, it is possible to make a preliminary estimate of where the world's CO2 storage potential might be located by comparing detailed assessments that have been done for a few locations with geological data on hydrocarbon potential. The acquired information can provide insight as to which regions will be likely to provide the most technically and economically viable CO2 storage sites by overlaying this geological data with the locations of the world's current large stationary energy CO2 emissions point sources. This paper reviewed datasets from the Australian and United States Geological Surveys in terms of matching CO2 sources with suitable geological provinces. Some regions have significant prospectivity with good source to sink matches, while others may require longer transport distances between sources and sinks, at higher costs. The latter may need to plan for the future and reduce costs by locating new emission sites closer to storage sites, or by potentially considering hub or industrial ecosystem approaches. It was suggested that access to the development of centralized storage locations for a region could become a critical component to any future involving large scale implementation of geological storage of CO2 technology. 8 refs., 6 figs

  8. Concentrations and abundance ratios of long-chain alkenones and glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraethers in sinking particles south of Java

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wenwen; Mohtadi, Mahyar; Schefuß, Enno; Mollenhauer, Gesine

    2016-06-01

    In this study, we obtained concentrations and abundance ratios of long-chain alkenones and glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraethers (GDGTs) in a one-year time-series of sinking particles collected with a sediment trap moored from December 2001 to November 2002 at 2200 m water depth south of Java in the eastern Indian Ocean. We investigate the seasonality of alkenone and GDGT fluxes as well as the potential habitat depth of the Thaumarchaeota producing the GDGTs entrained in sinking particles. The alkenone flux shows a pronounced seasonality and ranges from 1 μg m-2 d-1 to 35 μg m-2 d-1. The highest alkenone flux is observed in late September during the Southeast monsoon, coincident with high total organic carbon fluxes as well as high net primary productivity. Flux-weighted mean temperature for the high flux period using the alkenone-based sea-surface temperature (SST) index U37K‧ is 26.7 °C, which is similar to satellite-derived Southeast (SE) monsoon SST (26.4 °C). The GDGT flux displays a weaker seasonality than that of the alkenones. It is elevated during the SE monsoon period compared to the Northwest (NW) monsoon and intermonsoon periods (approximately 2.5 times), which is probably related to seasonal variation of the abundance of Thaumarchaeota, or to enhanced export of GDGTs by aggregation with sinking phytoplankton detritus. Flux-weighted mean temperature inferred from the GDGT-based TEX86H index is 26.2 °C, which is 1.8 °C lower than mean annual (ma) SST but similar to SE monsoon SST. As the time series of TEX86H temperature estimates, however, does not record a strong seasonal amplitude, we infer that TEX86H reflects ma upper thermocline temperature at approximately 50 m water depth.

  9. [Seagrass ecosystems: contributions to and mechanisms of carbon sequestration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Guang-Long; Lin, Hsing-Juh; Li, Zong-Shan; Fan, Hang-Qing; Zhou, Hao-Lang; Liu, Guo-Hua

    2014-06-01

    The ocean's vegetated habitats, in particular seagrasses, mangroves and salt marshes, each capture and store a comparable amount of carbon per year, forming the Earth's blue carbon sinks, the most intense carbon sinks on the planet. Seagrass meadows, characterized by high primary productivity, efficient water column filtration and sediment stability, have a pronounced capacity for carbon sequestration. This is enhanced by low decomposition rates in anaerobic seagrass sediments. The carbon captured by seagrass meadows contributes significantly to the total blue carbon. At a global scale, seagrass ecosystems are carbon sink hot spots and have profound influences on the global carbon cycle. This importance combined with the many other functions of seagrass meadows places them among the most valuable ecosystems in the world. Unfortunately, seagrasses are declining globally at an alarming rate owing to anthropogenic disturbances and climate change, making them also among the most threatened ecosystems on the Earth. The role of coastal systems in carbon sequestration has received far too little attention and thus there are still many uncertainties in evaluating carbon sequestration of global seagrass meadows accurately. To better assess the carbon sequestration of global seagrass ecosystems, a number of scientific issues should be considered with high priorities: 1) more accurate measurements of seagrass coverage at national and global levels; 2) more comprehensive research into species- and location-specific carbon sequestration efficiencies; 3) in-depth exploration of the effects of human disturbance and global climate change on carbon capture and storage by seagrass ecosystems. PMID:25223044

  10. On Mobility Management in Multi-Sink Sensor Networks for Geocasting of Queries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Havinga

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available In order to efficiently deal with location dependent messages in multi-sink wireless sensor networks (WSNs, it is key that the network informs sinks what geographical area is covered by which sink. The sinks are then able to efficiently route messages which are only valid in particular regions of the deployment. In our previous work (see the 5th and 6th cited documents, we proposed a combined coverage area reporting and geographical routing protocol for location dependent messages, for example, queries that are injected by sinks. In this paper, we study the case where we have static sinks and mobile sensor nodes in the network. To provide up-to-date coverage areas to sinks, we focus on handling node mobility in the network. We discuss what is a better method for updating the routing structure (i.e., routing trees and coverage areas to handle mobility efficiently: periodic global updates initiated from sinks or local updates triggered by mobile sensors. Simulation results show that local updating perform very well in terms of query delivery ratio. Local updating has a better scalability to increasing network size. It is also more energy efficient than ourpreviously proposed approach, where global updating in networks have medium mobility rate and speed.

  11. Distributed Cluster Based Routing Technique with Multiple Sinks for Wireless Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Manisekaran

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem Statement: In order to reduce or minimize energy consumption and to improve bandwidth utilization in Wireless Sensor Networks (WSN, it was essential to consider its architecture in the network topology, power consumption, data rate and fault tolerance. Our objective is to formulate an effective cluster formation of nodes with multiple sinks to reduce power consumption and minimize the data loss. Approach: In this study, we propose to design a distributed cluster based routing technique in which multiple sinks were deployed. Initially the average distance between the sensor nodes and the sink was calculated and the nodes send their location information to the neighboring sinks. The sinks were updated this information at every time interval. The optimal sink places could be found using the global information based method. After sinking deployment, the information of each cluster was transmitted to other cluster using a gateway. The information gathered by the sink was transmitted to other clusters using a gateway. Results: By simulation results, we show that our proposed technique was enhanced the packet delivery ratio while reducing the energy consumption and delay. Conclusion: Our proposed approach minimizes the power consumption and data losses.

  12. 78 FR 13019 - Drawn Stainless Steel Sinks From the People's Republic of China: Investigation, Final Determination

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-26

    ... Drawn Stainless Steel Sinks From the People's Republic of China: Antidumping Duty Investigation, 77 FR... Fair Value, 77 FR 17436, 17438 (March 26, 2012). \\43\\ See Drawn Stainless Steel Sinks from the People's... Fair Value, 73 FR 33985 (June 16, 2008) (``Steel Nails''). \\22\\ See Multilayered Wood Flooring from...

  13. 77 FR 46717 - Drawn Stainless Steel Sinks From the People's Republic of China: Preliminary Affirmative...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-06

    ... International Trade Administration Drawn Stainless Steel Sinks From the People's Republic of China: Preliminary... of the notice of initiation in the Federal Register.\\1\\ \\1\\ See Drawn Stainless Steel Sinks from the People's Republic of China: Initiation of Countervailing Duty Investigation, 77 FR 18211 (March 27,...

  14. 77 FR 58355 - Drawn Stainless Steel Sinks From the People's Republic of China: Countervailing Duty Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-20

    ... Countervailing Duty Determination: Drawn Stainless Steel Sinks From the People's Republic of China, 77 FR 46717...: Initiation of Countervailing Duty Investigation, 77 FR 18211 (March 27, 2012), and, also, see Drawn Stainless Steel Sinks From the People's Republic of China: Initiation of Antidumping Duty Investigation, 77...

  15. About the problem of CO2 sink into the surface water Kazakhstan reservoirs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calculation of CO2 sink into Kazakhstan water reservoirs shows, that it occurs basically into large basins - Caspian (69.7·103 G g) and Aral (28.6 ·103 G g) Seas. On other part of reservoirs (likes, basins, rivers) it is only 0.4 % of summary CO2 sink. (author)

  16. Lift Enhancement of a Vortex-Sink Attached to a Flat Plate

    CERN Document Server

    Xia, Xi; Mohseni, Kamran

    2012-01-01

    As observed in natural fliers, stabilized vortices on the surface of an airfoil or wing could provide lift enhancement. Similar concept can be applied in fixed lifting surfaces. Potential flow theory is employed to model lift enhancement by attaching a vortex-sink pair to the top surface of a flat plate in a pseudo-steady flow. Using this flow model, a parametric study on the location of the vortex-sink pair is performed in order to optimize lift enhancement. Lift coefficient calculations are presented for a range of vortex-sink positions, vortex-sink strengths, and flat-plate angles of attack. It is shown that beyond the lift contribution terms due to the vortex-sink strength, lift enhancement could be also achieved by a translating velocity of the vortex-sink in a non-equilibrium position. This vortex-sink velocity term is more pronounced when the vortex-sink is placed close to the top surface of the flat-plate near the leading or the trailing edges of the flat plate. It is concluded that increasing the vor...

  17. A certain number of problems about mechanized construction of sinking and driving engineering in uranium mine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author evaluates the history and development orientation about mechanized construction of sinking and driving engineering in uranium mine at home and abroad, explains the necessity for setting-up of sinking and driving engineering mechanized construction company, and analyses the application feasibility of raising drilling machine

  18. Role of sink-source relationships in chrysanthemum flower size and total biomass production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carvalho, S.M.P.; Heuvelink, E.; Harbinson, J.; Kooten, van O.

    2006-01-01

    The present work was aimed at understanding and quantifying the effect of sink-source relationships on flower size, using chrysanthemum as a model system. Sink/source ratio was manipulated by flower bud removal (leaving one, two or four flowers, and a control), axillary shoot removal, and varying da

  19. Blue carbon stocks in Baltic Sea eelgrass (Zostera marina) meadows

    OpenAIRE

    Röhr, Maria Emilia; Boström, Christoffer; Canal-Vergés, Paula; Holmer, Marianne

    2016-01-01

    Although seagrasses cover only a minor fraction of the ocean seafloor, their carbon sink capacity account for nearly one-fifth of the oceanic carbon burial and thus play a critical structural and functional role in many coastal ecosystems. We sampled 10 eelgrass (Zostera marina) meadows in Finland and 10 in Denmark to explore the seagrass carbon stocks (Corg stock) and the carbon accumulation (Corg accumulation) in the Baltic Sea area. The study sites represent a gradient from sheltered to ex...

  20. A stochastic, Lagrangian model of sinking biogenic aggregates in the ocean (SLAMS 1.0): model formulation, validation and sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jokulsdottir, Tinna; Archer, David

    2016-04-01

    We present a new mechanistic model, stochastic, Lagrangian aggregate model of sinking particles (SLAMS) for the biological pump in the ocean, which tracks the evolution of individual particles as they aggregate, disaggregate, sink, and are altered by chemical and biological processes. SLAMS considers the impacts of ballasting by mineral phases, binding of aggregates by transparent exopolymer particles (TEP), zooplankton grazing and the fractal geometry (porosity) of the aggregates. Parameterizations for age-dependent organic carbon (orgC) degradation kinetics, and disaggregation driven by zooplankton grazing and TEP degradation, are motivated by observed particle fluxes and size spectra throughout the water column. The model is able to explain observed variations in orgC export efficiency and rain ratio from the euphotic zone and to the sea floor as driven by sea surface temperature and the primary production rate and seasonality of primary production. The model provides a new mechanistic framework with which to predict future changes on the flux attenuation of orgC in response to climate change forcing.