WorldWideScience

Sample records for carbon products precursors

  1. Production of activated carbon from a new precursor: Molasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legrouri, K.; Ezzine, M.; Ichcho, S.; Hannache, H.; Denoyel, R.; Pailler, R.; Naslain, R.

    2005-03-01

    Activated carbon has been prepared from molasses, a natural precursor of vegetable origin resulting from the sugar industry in Morocco. The preparation of the activated carbon from the molasses has been carried out by impregnation of the precursor with sulfuric acid, followed by carbonization. The adsorption capacity, the BET surface area, and the pore volume of the activated carbon were determined. The micropore volume was assessed by Dubinin- Radushkevich (DR) equation. The activated materials are mainly microporous and show the type I isotherm of the Brunauer classification for nitrogen adsorption. The activation in steam yielded a carbon that contains both micropores and supermicropores. Analysis of the nitrogen isotherm by BET and DR methods established that most of obtained carbons are highly microporous, with high surface areas (≥ 1200 m2/g) and very low mesoporosity.

  2. PRODUCTION AND SCREENING OF CARBON PRODUCTS PRECURSORS FROM COAL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caulton L. Irwin

    2001-05-31

    The authors have examined effects of blending a raw coal extract (EXT) with an extracted coal-tar pitch (ECTP). Previous reports were concerned with the addition of 15 wt% EXT, or less, on the physical characteristics of the blend and on the development of optical texture following carbonization. Two additional blends of ECTP and EXT were prepared at the 30 and 50 wt% EXT content using a procedure already described. The characteristics of the blends are presented. The density for these blended materials is not much different than the density for the blends reported earlier. The softening point temperature for the 30 wt% EXT increased to over 200 C while the softening point temperature for the 50 wt% EXT blend was too high to be determined by the Mettler method. Coke yields approximately follow the law of mixtures. The optical texture of the green cokes for the 30 and 50 wt% EXT blends is shown. Though the optical texture of the green cokes was not significantly affected where the level of EXT is 15 wt% or less, larger proportions of EXT exert a marked reduction in anisotropy. The co-processing of coal with petroleum residues or other heavy hydrocarbons at elevated temperature and pressure has received considerable attention in the research community as a means to upgrade simultaneously coal and byproducts. Heavy hydrocarbons can function as sources of hydrogen, as well as performing as a medium for dissolution and dispersion of coal fragments. However, the focus of much of the prior research has been on developing fuels, distillable liquids, or synthetic crudes. Comparatively little effort has been deliberately directed toward the production of heavier, non-distillable materials which could perform as binder and extender pitches, impregnants, or feedstocks for cokes and other carbons.

  3. Preparation and evaluation of coal extracts as precursors for carbon and graphite products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zondlo, J.W.; Stiller, A.W.; Stansberry, P.G. [West Virginia Univ., Morgantown, WV (United States)] [and others

    1996-08-01

    A coal extraction process coupled with coal hydrotreatment has been shown capable of producing suitable precursors for a variety of commercially important carbon and graphite products. The N-methylpyrolidone (NMP) extracts of hydrotreated coals have been analytically and chemically characterized and shown to have properties acceptable for use as binder and impregnation pitch. Mesophase formation studies have demonstrated their capability for producing both needle and anode grade coke as well as precursors for mesophase pitch fibers. A graphite artifact has been produced using a coal extract as a binder and coke derived from the extract as a filler. Further evaluation of the extract materials is being carried out by industrial members of the Carbon Products Consortium.

  4. Dissolved Organic Carbon and Disinfection By-Product Precursor Release from Managed Peat Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleck, J.A.; Bossio, D.A.; Fujii, R.

    2004-01-01

    A wetland restoration demonstration project examined the effects of a permanently flooded wetland on subsidence of peat soils. The project, started in 1997, was done on Twitchell Island, in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta of California. Conversion of agricultural land to a wetland has changed many of the biogeochemical processes controlling dissolved organic carbon (DOC) release from the peat soils, relative to the previous land use. Dissolved organic C in delta waters is a concern because it reacts with chlorine, added as a disinfectant in municipal drinking waters, to form carcinogenic disinfection byproducts (DBPs), including trihalomethanes (THMs) and haloacetic acids (HAAs). This study explores the effects of peat soil biogeochemistry on DOC and DBP release under agricultural and wetland management. Results indicate that organic matter source, extent of soil organic matter decomposition, and decomposition pathways all are factors in THM formation. The results show that historical management practices dominate the release of DOC and THM precursors. However, within-site differences indicate that recent management decisions can contribute to changes in DOC quality and THM precursor formation. Not all aromatic forms of carbon are highly reactive and certain environmental conditions produce the specific carbon structures that form THMs. Both HAA and THM precursors are elevated in the DOC released under wetland conditions. The findings of this study emphasize the need to further investigate the roles of organic matter sources, microbial decomposition pathways, and decomposition status of soil organic matter in the release of DOC and DBP precursors from delta soils under varying land-use practices.

  5. Production of activated carbon from a new precursor molasses by activation with sulphuric acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legrouri, K; Khouya, E; Ezzine, M; Hannache, H; Denoyel, R; Pallier, R; Naslain, R

    2005-02-14

    Activated carbon has been prepared from molasses, a natural precursor of vegetable origin resulting from the sugar industry in Morocco. The preparation of the activated carbon from the molasses has been carried out by impregnation of the precursor with sulphuric acid, followed by carbonisation at varying conditions (temperature and gas coverage) in order to optimize preparation parameters. The influence of activation conditions was investigated by determination of adsorption capacity of methylene blue and iodine, the BET surface area, and the pore volume of the activated carbon were determined while the micropore volume was determined by the Dubinin-Radushkevich (DR) equation. The activated materials are mainly microporous and reveal the type I isotherm of the Brunauer classification for nitrogen adsorption. The activated carbons properties in this study were found for activation of the mixture (molasses/sulphuric acid) in steam at 750 degrees C. The samples obtained in this condition were highly microporous, with high surface area (> or =1200 m2/g) and the maximum adsorption capacity of methylene blue and iodine were 435 and 1430 mg/g, respectively.

  6. Biochar as potential sustainable precursors for activated carbon production: Multiple applications in environmental protection and energy storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Xiao-Fei; Liu, Shao-Bo; Liu, Yun-Guo; Gu, Yan-Ling; Zeng, Guang-Ming; Hu, Xin-Jiang; Wang, Xin; Liu, Shao-Heng; Jiang, Lu-Hua

    2017-03-01

    There is a growing interest of the scientific community on production of activated carbon using biochar as potential sustainable precursors pyrolyzed from biomass wastes. Physical activation and chemical activation are the main methods applied in the activation process. These methods could have significantly beneficial effects on biochar chemical/physical properties, which make it suitable for multiple applications including water pollution treatment, CO2 capture, and energy storage. The feedstock with different compositions, pyrolysis conditions and activation parameters of biochar have significant influences on the properties of resultant activated carbon. Compared with traditional activated carbon, activated biochar appears to be a new potential cost-effective and environmentally-friendly carbon materials with great application prospect in many fields. This review not only summarizes information from the current analysis of activated biochar and their multiple applications for further optimization and understanding, but also offers new directions for development of activated biochar.

  7. Ozone-biological activated carbon integrated treatment for removal of precursors of halogenated nitrogenous disinfection by-products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Wenhai; Gao, Naiyun; Yin, Daqiang; Deng, Yang; Templeton, Michael R

    2012-03-01

    Pilot-scale tests were performed to reduce the formation of several nitrogenous and carbonaceous disinfection by-products (DBPs) with an integrated ozone and biological activated carbon (O(3)-BAC) treatment process following conventional water treatment processes (coagulation-sedimentation-filtration). Relative to the conventional processes alone, O(3)-BAC significantly improved the removal of turbidity, dissolved organic carbon, UV(254), NH(4)(+) and dissolved organic nitrogen from 98-99%, 58-72%, 31-53%, 16-93% and 35-74%, respectively, and enhanced the removal efficiency of the precursors for the measured DBPs. The conventional process was almost ineffective in removing the precursors of trichloronitromethane (TCNM) and dichloroacetamide (DCAcAm). Ozonation could not substantially reduce the formation of DCAcAm, and actually increased the formation potential of TCNM; it chemically altered the molecular structures of the precursors and increased the biodegradability of N-containing organic compounds. Consequently, the subsequent BAC filtration substantially reduced the formation of the both TCNM and DCAcAm, thus highlighting a synergistic effect of O(3) and BAC. Additionally, O(3)-BAC was effective at controlling the formation of the total organic halogen, which can be considered as an indicator of the formation of unidentified DBPs.

  8. PEEK: An excellent precursor for activated carbon production for high temperature application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cansado, I.P.P.; Goncalves, F.A.M.M.; Nabais, J.M.V.; Ribeiro Carrott, M.M.L.; Carrott, P.J.M. [Centro de Quimica de Evora and Departamento de Quimica, Universidade de Evora, Colegio Luis Antonio Verney, 7000-671 Evora (Portugal)

    2009-02-15

    A series of activated carbons (AC) with high apparent surface area and very high micropore volumes were prepared from granulated PEEK (poly[oxy-1,4-phenylene-oxy-1,4-phenylene-carbonyl-1,4-phenylene]) by physical activation with CO{sub 2} at different temperatures and different activation times. The carbonisation yields at 873, 1073 and 1173 K were 57, 52 and 51%. As the activation temperature increased, between 873 and 1173 K, the burn-off, the micropore volume and mean pore size increased too. Those prepared at 1173 K, with 74% burn-off, present an extremely high apparent surface area (2874 m{sup 2} g{sup -} {sup 1}) and a very high micropore volume (1.27 cm{sup 3} g{sup -} {sup 1}). The presence of pyrone groups, identified by FTIR, on the AC surface corroborates the prevalence of a basic point of zero charge, always higher than 9.2. The thermal stability was checked by thermogravimetric analysis and as the carbonisation temperature increased the thermal stability of the char increased too. All AC obtained from PEEK by physical activation at 1173 K are thermally resistant, as at 1073 K the loss of the initial mass was less than 15%. The collective results confirm that PEEK is an excellent precursor for preparing AC with a high carbonisation yield, a high micropore volume and apparent surface area and a very high resistance at elevated temperature. (author)

  9. Production and application of synthetic precursors labeled with carbon-11 and fluorine-18

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferrieri, R.A.

    2001-04-02

    It is evident from this chapter that there is enormous flexibility both in the selection of the nature of the radioisotope and ways to generate it, as well as in the selection of the labeling precursor to appropriately attach that radioisotope to some larger biomolecule of interest. The arsenal of radiolabeling precursors now available to the chemist is quite extensive, and without a doubt will continue to grow as chemists develop new ones. However, the upcoming years will perhaps reflect a greater effort in refining existing methods for preparing some of those precursors that are already available to us. For example, the use of solid-phase reactions to accomplish in a single step what would normally take several using conventional solvent-based reactions has already been shown to work in many occasions. The obvious advantage here is that processes become more amenable to system automation thus affording greater reliability in day-to-day operations. There are perhaps other technologies in science that have yet to be realized by the chemist in the PET laboratory that could provide a similar or even a greater benefit. One only needs to be open to new ideas, and imaginative enough to apply them to the problems at hand.

  10. Catalysts in syntheses of carbon and carbon precursors

    OpenAIRE

    Mochida, Isao; Yoon, Seong-Ho; Qiao, Wenming

    2006-01-01

    Carbon materials have been applied in different fields because of their unique performances. Naturally, the physical and chemical structures of carbon precursors and carbon materials decide their properties and applications. Catalysts play a very important role in the synthesis of carbon precursors and carbon materials by controlling the molecular and compositional chemistry at the transformation of organic substrates into carbon through carbonaceous intermediates. Carbon materials of high pe...

  11. Synthesis of carbon nanotubes using natural carbon precursor: Castor oil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raziah, A. Z.; Junizah, A. R.; Saifuddin, N.

    2012-09-01

    Castor oil has long been an article of commerce due to its versatility as it is widely used as a starting material for many industrial chemical products because of its unique structure. In this study, carbon nanotubes has been synthesized by thermal decomposition of castor oil in nitrogen atmosphere at 300-400δC using custom-made microwave processing unit. The precursor material was catalyzed by iron clusters originating from the addition of ferrocene. The morphology and characterization of the CNTs were studied and discussed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM).

  12. COAL DERIVED MATRIX PITCHES FOR CARBON-CARBON COMPOSITE MANUFACTURE/PRODUCTION OF FIBERS AND COMPOSITES FROM COAL-BASED PRECURSORS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peter G. Stansberry; John W. Zondlo

    2001-07-01

    The Consortium for premium Carbon Products from Coal, with funding from the US Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory continue with the development of innovative technologies that will allow coal or coal-derived feedstocks to be used in the production of value-added carbon materials. In addition to supporting eleven independent projects during budget period 3, three meetings were held at two separate locations for the membership. The first was held at Nemacolin Woodlands Resort on May 15-16, 2000. This was followed by two meetings at Penn State, a tutorial on August 11, 2000 and a technical progress meeting on October 26-27.

  13. Sources of Dissolved Organic Carbon and Disinfection By-Product Precursors to the McKenzie River: Use of absorbance and fluorescence spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, T. E.; Anderson, C.; Morgenstern, K.; Downing, B. D.; Bergamaschi, B. A.

    2009-12-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) is a constituent of concern with respect to drinking water quality because it reacts upon chlorination to form disinfection byproducts (DBPs). The amount of DBPs that form is a function of both the amount and type of DOM undergoing treatment. Currently, the EPA regulates two classes of DBPs - trihalomethanes and haloacetic acids. This study was initiated to determine the main sources of NOM and disinfection by-product (DBP) precursors to the McKenzie River which is the sole water source for approximately 200,000 people in Eugene, Oregon (USA). Water samples collected from upstream, reservoir, tributary inputs and mainstem sites were analyzed for dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentration and DBP formation potential. In addition, absorbance and fluorescence properties were determined to provide insight into DOC quality and assess whether these measurements can serve as useful proxies for DOC concentration and trihalomethane and haloacetic acid formation potentials (THMFP and HAAFP, respectively). Overall, raw water concentrations of DOC (water quality. Water exiting two flood control reservoirs from upstream tributaries, Cougar and Blue River, also had higher DOC concentrations than the upstream site, however qualitative data did not support a significant source from in situ algal production. Due to the interference in absorbance likely due to the presence of iron in downstream tributaries, absorbance was not as strong of a predictor of DOC concentration as fluorescence (R2 = 0.73 vs. 0.92). Furthermore, fluorescence data was strongly correlated to THMFP (R2 = 0.95) and HAAFP (R2 = 0.93). Findings from this study indicate that use of optical measurements has great promise in identifying watershed sources of DOC and DBP precursors. In particular, continuous in situ fluorescence data may help drinking water utilities develop effective source water monitoring and management programs.

  14. Carbon fibers: precursor systems, processing, structure, and properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Erik; Steudle, Lisa M; Ingildeev, Denis; Spörl, Johanna M; Buchmeiser, Michael R

    2014-05-19

    This Review gives an overview of precursor systems, their processing, and the final precursor-dependent structure of carbon fibers (CFs) including new developments in precursor systems for low-cost CFs. The following CF precursor systems are discussed: poly(acrylonitrile)-based copolymers, pitch, cellulose, lignin, poly(ethylene), and new synthetic polymeric precursors for high-end CFs. In addition, structure-property relationships and the different models for describing both the structure and morphology of CFs will be presented.

  15. Coal-based carbon foams. Influence of the precursor coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montserrat Calvo; Roberto Garcia; Sabino R. Moinelo [Instituto Nacional del Carbon (CSIC), Oviedo (Spain)

    2007-07-01

    Carbon foams were obtained from several bituminous coals with different plasticity and volatile matter content by a two-stage thermal process. The first stage, a controlled carbonisation treatment under pressure at 450-500{sup o}C, is responsible for the final textural properties of the foam. In the second stage the carbonisation product was baked at 1100{sup o}C. The foams produced display a macroporous texture with plasticity, volatile matter content and maceral composition of the precursor coals having an influence on the apparent density and the pore size of the resultant porous products. 7 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  16. DSC Study on the Polyacrylonitrile Precursors for Carbon Fibers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wangxi ZHANG; Musen LI

    2005-01-01

    Different polyacrylonitrile (PAN) precursor fibers that displayed various thermal properties were studied by using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Results showed that some commercial PAN precursor fibers displayed double separated peaks and these fibers were of high quality because of their process stability during their conversion to carbon fibers of high performance. Some fabrication processes, such as spinning, drawing, could not apparently change the DSC features of a PAN precursor fiber. It was concluded that the thermal properties of a PAN precursor fiber was mainly determined from its comonomer content type and compositions.

  17. Treatment of Lignin Precursors to Improve their Suitability for Carbon Fibers: A Literature Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul, Ryan [GrafTech International Holdings Inc.; Naskar, Amit [Oak Ridge National Laboratory; Gallego, Nidia [Oak Ridge National Laboratory; Dai, Xuliang [GrafTech International Holdings Inc.; Hausner, Andrew [GrafTech International Holdings Inc.

    2015-04-17

    Lignin has been investigated as a carbon fiber precursor since the 1960s. Although there have been a number of reports of successful lignin-based carbon fiber production at the lab scale, lignin-based carbon fibers are not currently commercially available. This review will highlight some of the known challenges, and also the reported methods for purifying and modifying lignin to improve it as a precursor. Lignin can come from different sources (e.g. hardwood, softwood, grasses) and extraction methods (e.g. organosolv, kraft), meaning that lignin can be found with a diversity of purity and structure. The implication of these conditions on lignin as carbon fiber precursor is not comprehensively known, especially as the lignin landscape is evolving. The work presented in this review will help guide the direction of a project between GrafTech and ORNL to develop lignin carbon fiber technology, as part of a cooperative agreement with the DOE Advanced Manufacturing Office.

  18. Method for the preparation of carbon fiber from polyolefin fiber precursor, and carbon fibers made thereby

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naskar, Amit Kumar; Hunt, Marcus Andrew; Saito, Tomonori

    2015-08-04

    Methods for the preparation of carbon fiber from polyolefin fiber precursor, wherein the polyolefin fiber precursor is partially sulfonated and then carbonized to produce carbon fiber. Methods for producing hollow carbon fibers, wherein the hollow core is circular- or complex-shaped, are also described. Methods for producing carbon fibers possessing a circular- or complex-shaped outer surface, which may be solid or hollow, are also described.

  19. Carbon membranes precursor, preparation, and funtionalization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barsema, Jonathan Nathaniel

    2004-01-01

    In this thesis we study the preparation of Carbon Molecular Sieve (CMS) membranes for the separation of gases. The gases are separated based on their size difference and affinity for the membrane material.

  20. Atomic scale simulation of carbon nanotube nucleation from hydrocarbon precursors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalilov, Umedjon; Bogaerts, Annemie; Neyts, Erik C

    2015-12-22

    Atomic scale simulations of the nucleation and growth of carbon nanotubes is essential for understanding their growth mechanism. In spite of over twenty years of simulation efforts in this area, limited progress has so far been made on addressing the role of the hydrocarbon growth precursor. Here we report on atomic scale simulations of cap nucleation of single-walled carbon nanotubes from hydrocarbon precursors. The presented mechanism emphasizes the important role of hydrogen in the nucleation process, and is discussed in relation to previously presented mechanisms. In particular, the role of hydrogen in the appearance of unstable carbon structures during in situ experimental observations as well as the initial stage of multi-walled carbon nanotube growth is discussed. The results are in good agreement with available experimental and quantum-mechanical results, and provide a basic understanding of the incubation and nucleation stages of hydrocarbon-based CNT growth at the atomic level.

  1. Carbon molecular sieve membranes prepared from porous fiber precursor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barsema, Jonathan N.; Vegt, van der N.F.A.; Koops, G.H.; Wessling, M.

    2002-01-01

    Carbon molecular sieve (CMS) membranes are usually prepared from dense polymeric precursors that already show intrinsic gas separation properties. The rationale behind this approach is that the occurrence of any kind of initial porosity will deteriorate the final CMS performance. We will show that i

  2. Sol-gel precursors and products thereof

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warren, Scott C.; DiSalvo, Jr., Francis J.; Weisner, Ulrich B.

    2017-02-14

    The present invention provides a generalizable single-source sol-gel precursor capable of introducing a wide range of functionalities to metal oxides such as silica. The sol-gel precursor facilitates a one-molecule, one-step approach to the synthesis of metal-silica hybrids with combinations of biological, catalytic, magnetic, and optical functionalities. The single-source precursor also provides a flexible route for simultaneously incorporating functional species of many different types. The ligands employed for functionalizing the metal oxides are derived from a library of amino acids, hydroxy acids, or peptides and a silicon alkoxide, allowing many biological functionalities to be built into silica hybrids. The ligands can coordinate with a wide range of metals via a carboxylic acid, thereby allowing direct incorporation of inorganic functionalities from across the periodic table. Using the single-source precursor a wide range of functionalized nanostructures such as monolith structures, mesostructures, multiple metal gradient mesostructures and Stober-type nanoparticles can be synthesized. ##STR00001##

  3. Preparation of carbon nanotubes by ethanol catalytic combustion technique using nickel salt as catalyst precursor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Fei; ZOU Xiao-ping; CHENG Jin; ZHANG Hong-dan; REN Peng-fei

    2006-01-01

    A simple growth technique of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) by combustion of ethanol was developed. In the experiment,copper plate was employed as substrate,nickel nitrate (Ni(NO3)2) and nickel chloride (NiCl2) as catalyst precursor,and ethanol as carbon source. The cleaned copper substrate was dipped into catalyst precursor solution for mounting catalyst precursor particles. The dip-coated substrate was then placed into ethanol flame for about 10 min after drying. The black wool-like production grown on copper plate was obtained. This route is called an ethanol catalytic combustion(ECC) process. The black powders were characterized by means of scanning electron microscopy(SEM),transmission electron microscopy(TEM),energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer(EDS) and Raman spectroscopy. The results show that the techique is much simpler and more economical to meet the future broader applications.

  4. Conversion of lignin precursors to carbon fibers with nanoscale graphitic domains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chatterjee, Sabornie [ORNL; Jones, Eric B [ORNL; Clingenpeel, Amy [National High Magnetic Field Laboratory (Magnet Lab), Florida; McKenna, Amy [National High Magnetic Field Laboratory (Magnet Lab), Florida; Rios, Orlando [ORNL; McNutt, Nicholas W [ORNL; Keffer, David J. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Johs, Alexander [ORNL

    2014-08-04

    Lignin is one of the most abundant and inexpensive natural biopolymers. It can be efficiently converted to low cost carbon fiber, monolithic structures or powders that could be used directly in the production of anodes for lithium-ion batteries. In this work, we report processing parameters relevant for the conversion of lignin precursors into electrochemically active carbon fibers, the impact of lignin precursor modification on melt processing and the microstructure of the final carbon material. The conversion process encompasses melt spinning of the lignin precursor, oxidative stabilization and a low temperature carbonization step in a nitrogen/hydrogen atmosphere. To assess electrochemical performance, we determined resistivities of individual carbon fiber samples and characterized the microstructure by scanning electron microscopy and neutron diffraction. The chemical modification and subsequent thermomechanical processing methods reported here are effective for conversion into carbon fibers while preserving the macromolecular backbone structure of lignin. Modification of softwood lignin produced functionalities and rheological properties that more closely resemble hardwood lignin thereby enabling the melt processing of softwood lignin in oxidative atmospheres (air). Structural characterization of the carbonized fibers reveals nanoscale graphitic domains that are linked to enhanced electrochemical performance.

  5. Carbon films produced from ionic liquid carbon precursors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Sheng; Luo, Huimin; Lee, Je Seung

    2013-11-05

    The invention is directed to a method for producing a film of porous carbon, the method comprising carbonizing a film of an ionic liquid, wherein the ionic liquid has the general formula (X.sup.+a).sub.x(Y.sup.-b).sub.y, wherein the variables a and b are, independently, non-zero integers, and the subscript variables x and y are, independently, non-zero integers, such that ax=by, and at least one of X.sup.+ and Y.sup.- possesses at least one carbon-nitrogen unsaturated bond. The invention is also directed to a composition comprising a porous carbon film possessing a nitrogen content of at least 10 atom %.

  6. Carbon Fibers from UV-Assisted Stabilization of Lignin-Based Precursors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng Zhang

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Production of high strength carbon fibers from bio-derived precursors is of topical interest. Recently, we reported on dry-spinning of a partially acetylated softwood kraft lignin to produce carbon fibers with superior properties, but the thermo-oxidative stabilization step required a long time due to a slow heating rate needed to prevent the fibers from being heated too rapidly and sticking to each other. Here we report a rapid strategy of dual UV-thermoxidative stabilization (crosslinking of dry-spun lignin fibers that significantly reduces the stabilization time. The fibers undergo reaction close to the surface such that they can be subsequently thermally stabilized at a rapid heating rate without fibers fusing together, which reduces the total stabilization time significantly from 40 to 4 h. Consequently, the glass transition temperature of UV irradiated fibers was about 15 °C higher than that of fibers without UV treatment. Stabilized fibers were successfully carbonized at 1000 °C and resulting carbon fibers displayed a tensile strength of 900 ± 100 MPa, which is amongst the highest reported for carbon fibers derived from softwood lignin-based precursors. These results establish that UV irradiation is a rapid step that can effectively shorten the total stabilization time for production of lignin-derived carbon fibers.

  7. Strategies towards Novel Carbon Fiber Precursors: the Research Results on the Synthesis of PAN Copolymers via AGET ATRP and on Lignin as a Precursor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spyridon Soulis

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work is the presentation of two different approximations for improving the production of carbon fibers through the introduction of alternative precursors. The first approach concerns the development of novel polyacrylonitrile block copolymers through activators’ generated by electron transfer-atom transfer radical polymerization (AGET-ATRP reaction mechanism in microemulsion; the novel polymers are envisaged to contain a structure that will be more efficiently oxidatively stabilized and/or carbonized, with the ultimate target of CFs with improved properties. The second approximation aims at the introduction of lignin as efficient CFs precursor; this approach aims at reducing the cost of the process and increasing the production yield. Pyrolysis together with oxidative stabilization of lignin were investigated, as well as the effects on structure and thermal behavior of blending with thermoplastics. Thus far, both these methodologies exhibited significant potential and will be further developed towards full scale industrial application.

  8. Surface Study of Carbon Nanotubes Prepared by Thermal-CVD of Camphor Precursor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azira, A. A.; Rusop, M.

    2010-03-01

    Surface morphology study on the influence of starting carbon materials by using thermal chemical vapor deposition (Thermal-CVD) to produced carbon nanotubes (CNTs) is investigated. The CNTs derived from camphor were synthesized as the precursor material due to low sublimation temperature, which indirectly maybe cost effective. The major parameters are also evaluated in order to obtain high-yield and high-quality CNTs. The prepared CNTs are examined using field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and high resolution transmission electron microscope (HR-TEM) to determine the microstructure of nanocarbons. The FESEM investigation of the CNTs formed on the support catalysts provides evidence that camphor is suitable as a precursor material for nanotubes formation. The high-temperature graphitization process induced by the Thermal-CVD enables the hydrocarbons to act as carbon sources and changes the aromatic species into the layered graphite structure of CNTs. The camphoric hydrocarbons not only found acts as the precursors but also enhances the production rate and the quality of CNTs.

  9. Waste polyvinylchloride derived pitch as a precursor to develop carbon fibers and activated carbon fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, W M; Yoon, S H; Mochida, I; Yang, J H

    2007-01-01

    Polyvinylchloride (PVC) was successfully recycled through the solvent extraction from waste pipe with an extraction yield of ca. 86%. The extracted PVC was pyrolyzed by a two-stage process (260 and 410 degrees C) to obtain free-chlorine PVC based pitch through an effective removal of chlorine from PVC during the heat-treatment. As-prepared pitch (softening point: 220 degrees C) was spun, stabilized, carbonized into carbon fibers (CFs), and further activated into activated carbon fibers (ACFs) in a flow of CO2. As-prepared CFs show comparable mechanical properties to commercial CFs, whose maximum tensile strength and modulus are 862 MPa and 62 GPa, respectively. The resultant ACFs exhibit a high surface area of 1200 m2/g, narrow pore size distribution and a low oxygen content of 3%. The study provides an effective insight to recycle PVC from waste PVC and develop a carbon precursor for high performance carbon materials such as CFs and ACFs.

  10. DFT Thermodynamic Research of the Pyrolysis Mechanism of the Carbon Matrix Precursor Toluene for Carbon Material

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Based on the experiments, the standard enthalpy △H of the possible pyrolysis reactions of the carbon matrix precursor toluene was investigated by means of DFT method UB3LYP/ 3-21G* (based on semi-empirical method UAM1 and ab initio method UHF/3-21G* ). The com putation results with UB3LYP/3-21G* coincide with the experimental values well. Then, the mechanism for all types of the pyrolysis reactions of toluene was studied by UB3LYP/3-2lG*. The geometries of the reactant and the product radicals were optimized, meanwhile, the standard thermodynamic parameters of the pyrolysis reaction at different temperatures (298, 773, 843, 963 and 1 073 K) were calculated. The thermodynamic computation result shows that when the pyrolysis temperature of toluene is lower than 963 K, the reaction path supported by thermody namics is that the C-H bond of the methyl on the benzene ring breaks and bitoluene form, while the temperature increases (about 1 073 K), the thermodynamic calculation result turns to sup port the reaction path producing phenyl radicals and methyl radicals. This mechanism is in accord with the experiments.

  11. Production of carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Journet, C.; Bernier, P.

    Carbon nanostructures such as single-walled and multi-walled nanotubes (SWNTs and MWNTs) or graphitic polyhedral nanoparticles can be produced using various methods. Most of them are based on the sublimation of carbon under an inert atmosphere, such as the electric arc discharge process, the laser ablation method, or the solar technique. But chemical methods can also be used to synthesize these kinds of carbon materials: the catalytic decomposition of hydrocarbons, the production by electrolysis, the heat treatment of a polymer, the low temperature solid pyrolysis, or the in situ catalysis.

  12. Preparation of carbon monoliths having tailored pore structure from porous polymer precursors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lagasse, R.R.

    1993-04-01

    This work concerns preparing tailored porous carbon monoliths by pyrolyzing porous polymer precursors. Prior work in this laboratory (1) demonstrated that a low density (0.05 g/cm{sup 3}), high void fraction (97 vol%) carbon monolith could be prepared by pyrolyzing a porous poly(acrylonitrile) (PAN) precursor. A higher density, more robust carbon material is preferred for certain applications, such as electrodes for electrochemical devices. The present work demonstrates that porous carbon monoliths having mass density of 0.7 g/cm{sup 3} can be prepared from a porous PAN precursor if the pyrolysis is controlled carefully. The macropore structure of the carbon is adjusted by changing the pore structure of the PAN precursor, and the finer scale structure (such as the crystallite size L{sub c}) is adjusted by varying the pyrolysis or heat treatment temperature.

  13. Preparation of carbon monoliths having tailored pore structure from porous polymer precursors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lagasse, R.R.

    1993-01-01

    This work concerns preparing tailored porous carbon monoliths by pyrolyzing porous polymer precursors. Prior work in this laboratory (1) demonstrated that a low density (0.05 g/cm[sup 3]), high void fraction (97 vol%) carbon monolith could be prepared by pyrolyzing a porous poly(acrylonitrile) (PAN) precursor. A higher density, more robust carbon material is preferred for certain applications, such as electrodes for electrochemical devices. The present work demonstrates that porous carbon monoliths having mass density of 0.7 g/cm[sup 3] can be prepared from a porous PAN precursor if the pyrolysis is controlled carefully. The macropore structure of the carbon is adjusted by changing the pore structure of the PAN precursor, and the finer scale structure (such as the crystallite size L[sub c]) is adjusted by varying the pyrolysis or heat treatment temperature.

  14. Effects of catalyst precursors on carbon nanowires by using ethanol catalytic combustion technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENG Jin; ZOU Xiao-ping; LI Fei; ZHANG Hong-dan; REN Peng-fei

    2006-01-01

    Iron nitrate,nickel nitrate and cobalt nitrate were used as catalyst precursors to study their effects on carbon nanowires synthesized by ethanol catalytic combustion (ECC) process. The as-grown carbon nanowires were characterized by means of scanning electron microscopy,transmission electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy. The results show that relatively uniform nanowires will be formed when the catalyst precursor is iron nitrate:while helical structure or disordered structure will be formed when the catalyst precursor is nickel nitrate or cobalt nitrate.

  15. Comparative Study on Preparing Carbon Fibers Based on PAN Precursors with Different Comonomers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Two different PAN precursors with various comonomers were wet-spun.The properties and struc tural changes of PAN precursors and their evolution during preoxidation and carbonization process were characterized by the use of DSC, FTIR and traditional parameters, e g, tensile strength.It is demonstrated that acrylamide( AAM) is very effective to make the DSC peak be separated compared to methyl acrylate( MA ).As a result,carbon fibers developed from AAM-contained precursors have a better tetacity compared to those developed from MAcontained ones.

  16. CRADA Final Report for CRADA Number NFE-10-02991 "Development and Commercialization of Alternative Carbon Precursors and Conversion Technologies"

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norris, Rober [ORNL; Paulauskas, Felix [ORNL; Naskar, Amit [ORNL; Kaufman, Michael [ORNL; Yarborough, Ken [ORNL; Derstine, Chris [The Dow Chemical Company

    2013-10-01

    The overall objective of the collaborative research performed by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the Dow Chemical Company under this Cooperative Research And Development Agreement (CRADA NFE-10-02991) was to develop and establish pathways to commercialize new carbon fiber precursor and conversion technology. This technology is to produce alternative polymer fiber precursor formulations as well as scaled energy-efficient advanced conversion technology to enable continuous mode conversion to obtain carbonized fibers that are technically and economically viable in industrial markets such as transportation, wind energy, infrastructure and oil drilling applications. There have been efforts in the past to produce a low cost carbon fiber. These attempts have to be interpreted against the backdrop of the market needs at the time, which were strictly military aircraft and high-end aerospace components. In fact, manufacturing costs have been reduced from those days to current practice, where both process optimization and volume production have enabled carbon fiber to become available at prices below $20/lb. However, the requirements of the lucrative aerospace market limits further price reductions from current practice. This approach is different because specific industrial applications are targeted, most specifically wind turbine blade and light vehicle transportation, where aircraft grade carbon fiber is not required. As a result, researchers are free to adjust both manufacturing process and precursor chemistry to meet the relaxed physical specifications at a lower cost. This report documents the approach and findings of this cooperative research in alternative precursors and advanced conversion for production of cost-effective carbon fiber for energy missions. Due to export control, proprietary restrictions, and CRADA protected data considerations, specific design details and processing parameters are not included in this report.

  17. Effect of a constructed wetland on disinfection byproducts: Removal processes and production of precursors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostad, C.E.; Martin, B.S.; Barber, L.B.; Leenheer, J.A.; Daniel, S.R.

    2000-01-01

    The fate of halogenated disinfection byproducts (DBPs) in treatment wetlands and the changes in the DBP formation potential as wastewater treatment plant (WWTP)-derived water moves through the wetlands were investigated. Wetland inlet and outlet samples were analyzed for total organic halide (TOX), trihalomethanes (TH M), haloacetic acids (HAA), dissolved organic carbon (DOC), and UV absorbance. Removal of DBPs by the wetland ranged from 13 to 55% for TOX, from 78 to 97% for THM, and from 67 to 96% for HAA. The 24-h and 7-day nonpurgeable total organic halide (NPTOX), THM, and HAA formation potential yields were determined at the inlet and outlet of these wetlands. The effect of wetlands on the production of DBP precursors and their DBP-formation potential yield from wastewater was dramatic. The wetlands increased DBP yield up to a factor of almost 30. Specific changes in the DOC precursors were identified using 13C NMR spectroscopy.The fate of halogenated disinfection byproducts (DBPs) in treatment wetlands and the changes in the DBP formation potential as wastewater treatment plant (WWTP)-derived water moves through the wetlands were investigated. Wetland inlet and outlet samples were analyzed for total organic halide (TOX), trihalomethanes (THM), haloacetic acids (HAA), dissolved organic carbon (DOC), and UV absorbance. Removal of DBPs by the wetland ranged from 13 to 55% for TOX, from 78 to 97% for THM, and from 67 to 96% for HAA. The 24-h and 7-day nonpurgeable total organic halide (NPTOX), THM, and HAA formation potential yields were determined at the inlet and outlet of these wetlands. The effect of wetlands on the production of DBP precursors and their DBP-formation potential yield from wastewater was dramatic. The wetlands increased DBP yield up to a factor of almost 30. Specific changes in the DOC precursors were identified using 13C NMR spectroscopy.

  18. Toward biotechnological production of adipic acid and precursors from biorenewables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polen, Tino; Spelberg, Markus; Bott, Michael

    2013-08-20

    Adipic acid is the most important commercial aliphatic dicarboxylic acid in the chemical industry and is primarily used for the production of nylon-6,6 polyamide. The current adipic acid market volume is about 2.6 million tons/y and the average annual demand growth rate forecast to stay at 3-3.5% worldwide. Hitherto, the industrial production of adipic acid is carried out by petroleum-based chemo-catalytic processes from non-renewable fossil fuels. However, in the past years, efforts were made to find alternative routes for adipic acid production from renewable carbon sources by biotechnological processes. Here we review the approaches and the progress made toward bio-based production of adipic acid.

  19. Removal of soluble microbial products as the precursors of disinfection by-products in drinking water supplies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jin-Lin; Li, Xiao-Yan

    2015-01-01

    Water pollution worsens the problem of disinfection by-products (DBPs) in drinking water supply. Biodegradation of wastewater organics produces soluble microbial products (SMPs), which can be important DBP precursors. In this laboratory study, a number of enhanced water treatment methods for DBP control, including enhanced coagulation, ozonation, and activated carbon adsorption, were evaluated for their effectiveness in treating SMP-containing water for the DBP reduction purpose. The results show that enhanced coagulation with alum could remove SMPs only marginally and decrease the DBP formation potential (DBPFP) of the water by less than 20%. Although ozone could cause destruction of SMPs in water, the overall DBPFP of the water did not decrease but increased after ozonation. In contrast, adsorption by granular activated carbon could remove the SMP organics from water by more than 60% and reduce the DBPFP by more than 70%. It is apparent that enhanced coagulation and ozonation are not suitable for the removal of SMPs as DBP precursors from polluted water, although enhanced coagulation has been commonly used to reduce the DBP formation caused by natural organic matter. In comparison, activated carbon adsorption is shown as a more effective means to remove the SMP content from water and hence to control the wastewater-derived DBP problem in water supply.

  20. Unveiling carbon dimers and their chains as precursor of graphene growth on Ru(0001)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Min; Zhang, Yan-Fang; Huang, Li; Pan, Yi; Wang, Yeliang; Ding, Feng; Lin, Yuan; Du, Shi-Xuan; Gao, Hong-Jun

    2016-09-01

    Carbon precursor that forms on the catalyst surface by the dissociation of feedstock gas plays an important role in the controllable growth of graphene on metal substrates. However, the configuration about the precursor has so far remained elusive. Here, we report the direct observation of uniformly structured precursor units and their chain formation at the nucleation stage of graphene growing on Ru(0001) substrate by using scanning tunneling microscopy. Combining this experimental information with density function theory calculations, the atomic-resolved structures of carbon precursor are characterized as adsorbed CH2 segments on the substrate. The dissociated carbon feedstock molecules or radicals further react to form nonplanar -[C2H4]- chains adsorbed on hexagonal-close-packed hollow sites of the Ru(0001) substrate before incorporating into the graphene island. These findings reveal that CH2 and nonplanar -[C2H4]- segments act as precursors in graphene growth and are helpful to improve the quality and the domain size of desired graphene by precursor or feedstock control.

  1. New PHA products using unrelated carbon sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matias, Fernanda; de Andrade Rodrigues, Maria Filomena

    2011-10-01

    Polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHA) are natural polyesters stored by a wide range of bacteria as carbon source reserve. Due to its chemical characteristics and biodegradability PHA can be used in chemical, medical and pharmaceutical industry for many human purposes. Over the past years, few Burkholderia species have become known for production of PHA. Aside from that, these bacteria seem to be interesting for discovering new PHA compositions which is important to different industrial applications. In this paper, we introduce two new strains which belong either to Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) or genomovar-type, Burkholderia cepacia SA3J and Burkholderia contaminans I29B, both PHA producers from unrelated carbon sources. The classification was based on 16S rDNA and recA partial sequence genes and cell wall fatty acids composition. These two strains were capable to produce different types of PHA monomers or precursors. Unrelated carbon sources were used for growth and PHA accumulation. The amount of carbon source evaluated, or mixtures of them, was increased with every new experiment until it reaches eighteen carbon sources. As first bioprospection experiments staining methods were used with colony fluorescent dye Nile Red and the cell fluorescent dye Nile Blue A. Gas chromatography analysis coupled to mass spectrometry was used to evaluate the PHA composition on each strain cultivated on different carbon sources. The synthesized polymers were composed by short chain length-PHA (scl-PHA), especially polyhydroxybutyrate, and medium chain length-PHA (mcl-PHA) depending on the carbon source used.

  2. AN INITIAL EVALUATION OF POLY(VINYLACETYLENE) AS A CARBON-FIBER PRECURSOR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MAVINKURVE, A; VISSER, S; PENNINGS, AJ

    1995-01-01

    Poly(vinylacetylene) obtained by the selective polymerization of monovinylacetylene through the vinyl group has been investigated for its use as an alternative precursor for carbon fibers. The low yield of char obtained on pyrolysis of the polymer in an inert atmosphere was improved dramatically by

  3. Process optimization and empirical modeling for electrospun polyacrylonitrile (PAN) nanofiber precursor of carbon nanofibers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gu, S.Y.; Ren, J.; Vancso, G.J.

    2005-01-01

    Ultrafine fibers were spun from polyacrylonitrile (PAN)/N,N-dimethyl formamide (DMF) solution as a precursor of carbon nanofibers using a homemade electrospinning set-up. Fibers with diameter ranging from 200 nm to 1200 nm were obtained. Morphology of fibers and distribution of fiber diameter were i

  4. Ag-functionalized carbon molecular-sieve membranes based on polyelectrolyte/polyimide blend precursors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barsema, Jonathan N.; Vegt, van der Nico F.A.; Koops, Geert Henk; Wessling, Matthias

    2005-01-01

    We prepared dense flat-sheet Ag-functionalized carbon molecular-sieve (CMS) membranes from blends of P84 co-polyimide and a sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone) with a Ag+ counterion (AgSPEEK). These blends offer the possibility of producing new functionalized precursor structures, which were previou

  5. Effect of different carbon precursors on properties of LiFePO4/C

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    肖政伟; 张英杰; 胡国荣

    2015-01-01

    The anoxic decomposition and influence of carbon precursors on the properties of LiFePO4/C prepared by using Fe2O3 were investigated. X-ray powder diffractometry, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and carbon content and charge–discharge tests were applied to the characterization of the as-synthesized cathodes. Partial carbon is lost in the anaerobic decomposition of organic precursors and a high hydrogen content leads to a high residual carbon rate. Pyromellitic anhydride and citric acid participate in reactions before and in ball-milling. All the chosen carbon precursors are capable of producing LiFePO4 with high degree of crystallinity and purity. The carbon derived fromα-D-glucose, pyromellitic anhydride, soluble starch, citric acid and polyacrylamide has a loose and porous texture in LiFePO4/C which forms conduction on and between LiFePO4 particles. LiFePO4/C prepared by usingα-D-glucose, pyromellitic anhydride, citric acid and sucrose exhibits appreciable electrochemical performance. Graphite alone is able to enhance the electrochemical performance of LiFePO4 to a limited extent but incapable of preparing practical cathode.

  6. Classification of carbon materials for developing structure-properties relationships based on the aggregate state of the precursors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Oleksiy V. Khavryuchenko; Volodymyr D.Khavryuchenko

    2014-01-01

    Modern carbon science lacks an efficient structure-related classi-fication of materials. We present an approach based on dividing carbon materials by the aggregate state of the precursor. The common features in the structure of carbon particles that allow putting them into a group are discussed, with particular attention to the potential energy stored in the carbon structure from differ-ent rates of relaxation during the synthesis and prearrangement of structural motifs due to the effect of the precursor structure.

  7. Removal of N-nitrosodimethylamine precursors with powdered activated carbon adsorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beita-Sandí, Wilson; Ersan, Mahmut Selim; Uzun, Habibullah; Karanfil, Tanju

    2016-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to examine the roles of powdered activated carbon (PAC) characteristics (i.e., surface chemistry, pore size distribution, and surface area) in the removal of N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) formation potential (FP) in surface and wastewater-impacted waters. Also, the effects of natural attenuation of NDMA precursors in surface waters, NDMA FP concentration, and carbon dose on the removal of NDMA FP by PAC were evaluated. Finally, the removal of NDMA FP by PAC at two full-scale DWTPs was monitored. Wastewater-impacted and surface water samples were collected to conduct adsorption experiments using different PACs and activated carbon fibers (ACFs) with a wide range of physicochemical characteristics. The removal efficiency of NDMA FP by PAC was significantly higher in wastewater-impacted than surface waters. Adsorbable NDMA precursors showed a size distribution in the waters tested; the adsorbable fraction included precursors accessing the pore size regions of 10-20 Å and carbons showed higher removal of NDMA FP than acidic carbons on a surface area basis. The overall removal of NDMA FP by PAC on a mass basis depended on the surface area, pore size distribution and pHPZC. Thus, PACs with hybrid characteristics (micro and mesoporous), higher surface areas, and basic surface chemistry are more likely to be effective for NDMA precursor control by PAC adsorption. The application of PAC in DWTPs for taste and odor control resulted in an additional 20% removal of NDMA FP for the PAC doses of 7-10 mg/L. The natural attenuation of NDMA precursors through a combination of processes (biodegradation, photolysis and adsorption) decreased their adsorbability and removal by PAC adsorption.

  8. Effect of Post-spinning Modification on the PAN Precursors and Resulting Carbon Fibers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Wangxi; LIU Jie

    2006-01-01

    The impregnation of a special grade PAN precursor fibers was carried out in a 8 wt% KMnO4 aqueous solution to obtain modified PAN precursor fibers. The effects of modification on the chemical structure and the mechanical properties of precursor fibers thermally stabilized and their resulting carbon fibers were characterized by the combination use of densities, wide-angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), elemental analysis (EA), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and scanning electron microscope (SEM), etc. KMnO4 as a strong oxidizer can swell, oxidize and corrode the skin of a precursor fiber,and transform C(=)N groups to C=N ones, meanwhile, it can decrease the crystal size increase the orientation index and the crystallinity index, furthermore it can increase the densities of modified PAN precursors and resulting thermally stabilized fibers. As a result, the carbon fibers developed from modified PAN fibers show an improvement in tensile strength of 31.25 % and an improvement in elongation of 77.78 %, but a decrease of 16.52 % in Young's modulus.

  9. Controlled chemical stabilization of polyvinyl precursor fiber, and high strength carbon fiber produced therefrom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naskar, Amit K.

    2016-12-27

    Method for the preparation of carbon fiber, which comprises: (i) immersing functionalized polyvinyl precursor fiber into a liquid solution having a boiling point of at least 60.degree. C.; (ii) heating the liquid solution to a first temperature of at least 25.degree. C. at which the functionalized precursor fiber engages in an elimination-addition equilibrium while a tension of at least 0.1 MPa is applied to the fiber; (iii) gradually raising the first temperature to a final temperature that is at least 20.degree. C. above the first temperature and up to the boiling point of the liquid solution for sufficient time to convert the functionalized precursor fiber to a pre-carbonized fiber; and (iv) subjecting the pre-carbonized fiber produced according to step (iii) to high temperature carbonization conditions to produce the final carbon fiber. Articles and devices containing the fibers, including woven and non-woven mats or paper forms of the fibers, are also described.

  10. Adsorption of N-nitrosodimethylamine precursors by powdered and granular activated carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanigan, David; Zhang, Jinwei; Herckes, Pierre; Krasner, Stuart W; Chen, Chao; Westerhoff, Paul

    2012-11-20

    Activated carbon (AC) has been shown to remove precursors of halogenated disinfection byproducts. Granular and powdered activated carbon (GAC, PAC) were investigated for their potential to adsorb N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) precursors from blends of river water and effluent from a wastewater treatment plant (WWTP). At bench scale, waters were exposed to lignite or bituminous AC, either as PAC in bottle point experiments or as GAC in rapid small-scale column tests (RSSCTs). NDMA formation potential (FP) was used as a surrogate for precursor removal. NDMA FP was reduced by 37, 59, and 91% with 3, 8, and 75 mg/L of one PAC, respectively, with a 4-h contact time. In RSSCTs and in full-scale GAC contactors, NDMA FP removal always exceeded that of the bulk dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and UV absorbance at 254 nm. For example, whereas DOC breakthrough exceeded 90% of its influent concentration after 10,000 bed volumes of operation in an RSSCT, NDMA FP was less than 40% of influent concentration after the same bed life of the GAC. At full or pilot scale, high NDMA FP reduction ranging from >60 to >90% was achieved across GAC contactors, dependent upon the GAC bed life and/or use of a preoxidant (chlorine or ozone). In all experiments, NDMA formation was not reduced to zero, which suggests that although some precursors are strongly sorbed, others are not. This is among the first studies to show that AC is capable of adsorbing NDMA precursors, but further research is needed to better understand NDMA precursor chemical properties (e.g., hydrophobicity, molecular size) and evaluate how best to incorporate this finding into full-scale designs and practice.

  11. Reducing carbon dioxide to products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cole, Emily Barton; Sivasankar, Narayanappa; Parajuli, Rishi; Keets, Kate A

    2014-09-30

    A method reducing carbon dioxide to one or more products may include steps (A) to (C). Step (A) may bubble said carbon dioxide into a solution of an electrolyte and a catalyst in a divided electrochemical cell. The divided electrochemical cell may include an anode in a first cell compartment and a cathode in a second cell compartment. The cathode may reduce said carbon dioxide into said products. Step (B) may adjust one or more of (a) a cathode material, (b) a surface morphology of said cathode, (c) said electrolyte, (d) a manner in which said carbon dioxide is bubbled, (e), a pH level of said solution, and (f) an electrical potential of said divided electrochemical cell, to vary at least one of (i) which of said products is produced and (ii) a faradaic yield of said products. Step (C) may separate said products from said solution.

  12. Method for production of carbon nanofiber mat or carbon paper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naskar, Amit K.

    2015-08-04

    Method for the preparation of a non-woven mat or paper made of carbon fibers, the method comprising carbonizing a non-woven mat or paper preform (precursor) comprised of a plurality of bonded sulfonated polyolefin fibers to produce said non-woven mat or paper made of carbon fibers. The preforms and resulting non-woven mat or paper made of carbon fiber, as well as articles and devices containing them, and methods for their use, are also described.

  13. Influence of hydrogen on chemical vapour synthesis of different carbon nanostructures using propane as precursor and nickel as catalyst

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R K Sahoo; H Mamgain; C Jacob

    2014-10-01

    The role of hydrogen in the catalytic chemical vapour deposition of carbon nanotubes using sputtered nickel thin film as a catalyst is explained in this work. The growth of different carbon nanostructures with the variation in the precursor gas content was studied by keeping all other process parameters constant and using sputtered Ni thin film as a catalyst. The catalyst granule size, its external morphology and the resulting products were analysed. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs), carbon nanofibres (CNFs) and carbon nanoribbons (CNRs) were observed under different growth conditions. The different conditions of growth leading to form tubes, fibres or ribbons were analysed by varying the flow ratio of propane and hydrogen gas during the high temperature growth. Scanning and transmission electron microscopies confirmed the above structures under different growth conditions. The role of hydrogen on the surface passivation behaviour of the Ni catalyst and its correlative effect on the growth of carbon nanostructures is analysed. This direct approach can, in principle, be used to synthesize different types of carbon nanostructures by tailoring the hydrogen concentration.

  14. Deposition of calcium carbonate films by a polymer-induced liquid-precursor (PILP) process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gower, Laurie B.; Odom, Damian J.

    2000-03-01

    A polypeptide additive has been used to transform the solution crystallization of calcium carbonate to a solidification process of a liquid-phase mineral precursor. In situ observations reveal that polyaspartate induces liquid-liquid phase separation of droplets of a mineral precursor. The droplets deposit on the substrate and coalesce to form a coating, which then solidifies into calcitic tablets and films. Transition bars form during the amorphous to crystalline transition, leading to sectorization of calcite tablets, and the defect textures and crystal morphologies are atypical of solution grown crystals. The formation of nonequilibrium crystal morphologies using an acidic polypeptide may have implications in the field of biomineralization, and the environmentally friendly aspects of this polymer-induced liquid-precursor (PILP) process may offer new techniques for aqueous-based processing of ceramic films, coatings, and particulates.

  15. Biological carbon precursor to diagenetic siderite with spherical structures in iron formations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köhler, Inga; Konhauser, Kurt O; Papineau, Dominic; Bekker, Andrey; Kappler, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    During deposition of Precambrian iron formation, the combined sedimentation of ferrihydrite and phytoplankton biomass should have facilitated Fe(III) reduction during diagenesis. However, the only evidence for this reaction in iron formations is the iron and carbon isotope values preserved in the authigenic ferrous iron-containing minerals. Here we show experimentally that spheroidal siderite, which is preserved in many iron formation and could have been precursor to rhombohedral or massive siderite, forms by reacting ferrihydrite with glucose (a proxy for microbial biomass) at pressure and temperature conditions typical of diagenesis (170 °C and 1.2 kbar). Depending on the abundance of siderite, we found that it is also possible to draw conclusions about the Fe(III):C ratio of the initial ferrihydrite-biomass sediment. Our results suggest that spherical to rhombohedral siderite structures in deep-water, Fe-oxide iron formation can be used as a biosignature for photoferrotrophy, whereas massive siderite reflects high cyanobacterial biomass loading in highly productive shallow-waters.

  16. New PHA products using unrelated carbon sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Matias

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHA are natural polyesters stored by a wide range of bacteria as carbon source reserve. Due to its chemical characteristics and biodegradability PHA can be used in chemical, medical and pharmaceutical industry for many human purposes. Over the past years, few Burkholderia species have become known for production of PHA. Aside from that, these bacteria seem to be interesting for discovering new PHA compositions which is important to different industrial applications. In this paper, we introduce two new strains which belong either to Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc or genomovar-type, Burkholderia cepacia SA3J and Burkholderia contaminans I29B, both PHA producers from unrelated carbon sources. The classification was based on 16S rDNA and recA partial sequence genes and cell wall fatty acids composition. These two strains were capable to produce different types of PHA monomers or precursors. Unrelated carbon sources were used for growth and PHA accumulation. The amount of carbon source evaluated, or mixtures of them, was increased with every new experiment until it reaches eighteen carbon sources. As first bioprospection experiments staining methods were used with colony fluorescent dye Nile Red and the cell fluorescent dye Nile Blue A. Gas chromatography analysis coupled to mass spectrometry was used to evaluate the PHA composition on each strain cultivated on different carbon sources. The synthesized polymers were composed by short chain length-PHA (scl-PHA, especially polyhydroxybutyrate, and medium chain length-PHA (mcl-PHA depending on the carbon source used.

  17. DEVELOPMENT OF ACTIVATED CARBONS FROM COAL COMBUSTION BY-PRODUCTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harold H. Schobert; M. Mercedes Maroto-Valer; Zhe Lu

    2003-09-30

    The increasing role of coal as a source of energy in the 21st century will demand environmental and cost-effective strategies for the use of coal combustion by-products (CCBPs), mainly unburned carbon in fly ash. Unburned carbon is nowadays regarded as a waste product and its fate is mainly disposal, due to the present lack of efficient routes for its utilization. However, unburned carbon is a potential precursor for the production of adsorbent carbons, since it has gone through a devolatilization process while in the combustor, and therefore, only requires to be activated. Accordingly, the principal objective of this work was to characterize and utilize the unburned carbon in fly ash for the production of activated carbons. The unburned carbon samples were collected from different combustion systems, including pulverized utility boilers, a utility cyclone, a stoker, and a fluidized bed combustor. LOI (loss-on-ignition), proximate, ultimate, and petrographic analyses were conducted, and the surface areas of the samples were characterized by N2 adsorption isotherms at 77K. The LOIs of the unburned carbon samples varied between 21.79-84.52%. The proximate analyses showed that all the samples had very low moisture contents (0.17 to 3.39 wt %), while the volatile matter contents varied between 0.45 to 24.82 wt%. The elemental analyses show that all the unburned carbon samples consist mainly of carbon with very little hydrogen, nitrogen, sulfur and oxygen In addition, the potential use of unburned carbon as precursor for activated carbon (AC) was investigated. Activated carbons with specific surface area up to 1075m{sup 2}/g were produced from the unburned carbon. The porosity of the resultant activated carbons was related to the properties of the unburned carbon feedstock and the activation conditions used. It was found that not all the unburned carbon samples are equally suited for activation, and furthermore, their potential as activated carbons precursors could be

  18. Minimizing activated carbons production cost

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stavropoulos, G.G.; Zabaniotou, A.A. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Univ. P. O. Box 1520, 54006, Thessaloniki (Greece)

    2009-07-15

    A detailed economic evaluation of activated carbons production process from various raw materials is undertaken using the conventional economic indices (ROI, POT, and NPV). The fundamental factors that affect production cost were taken into account. It is concluded that for an attractive investment in activated carbons production one should select the raw material with the highest product yield, adopt a chemical activation production scheme and should base product price on product-surface area (or more generally on product adsorption capacity for the adsorbate in consideration). A raw material that well meets the above-mentioned criteria is petroleum coke but others are also promising (charcoals, and carbon black). Production cost then can be optimized by determining its minimum value of cost that results from the intercept between the curves of plant capacity and raw material cost - if any. Taking into account the complexity of such a techno-economic analysis, a useful suggestion could be to start the evaluations from a plant capacity corresponding to the break-even point, i. e. the capacity at which income equals production cost. (author)

  19. Densification and microstructure of carbon/carbon composites prepared by chemical vapor infiltration using ethanol as precursor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Chemical vapor infiltration of carbon fiber felts with uniform initial bulk density of 0.47 g·cm-3 was investigated at the ethanol partial pressures of 5-20 kPa,as well as the temperatures of 1050,1100,1150 and 1200°C.Ethanol,diluted by nitrogen,was employed as the precursor of pyrolytic carbon.Polarized light microscopy(PLM),scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction were adopted to study the texture of pyrolytic carbon deposited at various temperatures.A change from medium-to high-textured pyrolytic carbon was observed in the sample infiltrated at 1050°C.Whereas,homogeneous high-textured pyrolytic carbons were deposited at the temperatures of 1100,1150 and 1200°C.Extinction angles of 19°-21° were determined for different regions in the samples densified at the temperatures ranging from 1100 to 1200°C.Scanning electron microscopy of the fracture surface after bending test indicated that the prepared carbon/carbon composite samples exhibited a pseudo-plastic fracture behavior.In addition,fracture behavior of the carbon/carbon samples was obviously effected by their infiltration temperature.The fracture mode of C/C composites was transformed from shearing failure to tensile breakage with increasing infiltration temperature. Results of this study show that ethanol is a promising carbon source to synthesize carbon/carbon composites with homogeneously high-textured pyrolytic carbon over a wide range of temperatures(from 1100 to 1200°C).

  20. Effects of Escherichia coli on mixotrophic growth of Chlorella minutissima and production of biofuel precursors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brendan T Higgins

    Full Text Available Chlorella minutissima was co-cultured with Escherichia coli in airlift reactors under mixotrophic conditions (glucose, glycerol, and acetate substrates to determine possible effects of bacterial contamination on algal biofuel production. It was hypothesized that E. coli would compete with C. minutissima for nutrients, displacing algal biomass. However, C. minutissima grew more rapidly and to higher densities in the presence of E. coli, suggesting a symbiotic relationship between the organisms. At an initial 1% substrate concentration, the co-culture produced 200-587% more algal biomass than the axenic C. minutissima cultures. Co-cultures grown on 1% substrate consumed 23-737% more of the available carbon substrate than the sum of substrate consumed by E. coli and C. minutissima alone. At 1% substrate, total lipid and starch productivity were elevated in co-cultures compared to axenic cultures indicating that bacterial contamination was not detrimental to the production of biofuel precursors in this specific case. Bio-fouling of the reactors observed in co-cultures and acid formation in all mixotrophic cultures, however, could present challenges for scale-up.

  1. Biochemical precursor effects on the fatty acid production in cell suspension cultures of Theobroma cacao L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parra, O; Gallego, A M; Urrea, A; Rojas, L F; Correa, C; Atehortúa, L

    2017-02-01

    Cocoa butter (CB) is composed of 96% palmitic, stearic, oleic, linoleic and linolenic fatty acids that are responsible for the hardness, texture and fusion properties of chocolate. Through in vitro plant cell culture it is possible to modify CB lipid profiles and to study the fatty acid biosynthesis pathway on a subcellular level, evaluating fundamental aspects to enhance in vitro fatty acid production in a specific and controlled way. In this research, culture media was supplemented with acetate, biotin, pyruvate, bicarbonate and glycerol at three different concentrations and the effects on the biomass production (g/L), cell viability, and fatty acids profile and production was evaluated in in vitro cell suspensions culture. It was found that biotin stimulated fatty acid synthesis without altering cell viability and cell growth. It was also evident a change in the lipid profile of cell suspensions, increasing middle and long chain fatty acids proportion, which are unusual to those reported in seeds; thus implying that it is possible to modify lipid profiles according to the treatment used. According to the results of sucrose gradients and enzyme assays performed, it is proposed that cacao cells probably use the pentose phosphate pathway, mitochondria being the key organelle in the carbon flux for the synthesis of reductant power and fatty acid precursors.

  2. New organometallic salts as precursors for the functionalization of carbon nanotubes with metallic nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alonso-Nunez, G., E-mail: galonso@cnyn.unam.mx; Garza, L. Morales de la; Rogel-Hernandez, E.; Reynoso, E. [Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Centro de Nanociencias y Nanotecnologia (Mexico); Licea-Claverie, A.; Felix-Navarro, R. M. [Instituto Tecnologico de Tijuana, Centro de Graduados e Investigacion (Mexico); Berhault, G. [UMR 5256 CNRS-Universite de Lyon, Institut de Recherches sur la Catalyse et l' Environnement de Lyon (France); Paraguay-Delgado, F. [Centro de Investigacion en Materiales Avanzados S. C. (Mexico)

    2011-09-15

    New organometallic salts were synthesized in aqueous solution and were used as precursors for the functionalization of carbon nanotubes (CNT) by metallic nanoparticles. The precursors were obtained by reaction between HAuCl{sub 4}, (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}PtCl{sub 6}, (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}PdCl{sub 6}, or (NH{sub 4}){sub 3}RhCl{sub 6} with cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB). The as-obtained (CTA){sub n}Me{sub x}Cl{sub y} salts (with Me = Au, Pt, Pd, Rh) were characterized by Fourier-transform infra-red (FTIR) spectroscopy, {sup 1}H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, and thermogravimetric analysis. These precursors were then used to synthesize metallic nanoparticles of Au, Pt, Pd, and Rh over multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT). Characterization by scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and thermogravimetric analysis under air reveals that the CNT-supported catalysts exhibit high loading and good dispersion of the metallic nanoparticles with small average particle sizes. The present preparation procedure therefore allows obtaining high densities of small metallic nanoparticles at the surface of MWCNT.

  3. Production and characterization of granular activated carbon from activated sludge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Al-Qodah

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study, activated sludge was used as a precursor to prepare activated carbon using sulfuric acid as a chemical activation agent. The effect of preparation conditions on the produced activated carbon characteristics as an adsorbent was investigated. The results indicate that the produced activated carbon has a highly porous structure and a specific surface area of 580 m²/g. The FT-IR analysis depicts the presence of a variety of functional groups which explain its improved adsorption behavior against pesticides. The XRD analysis reveals that the produced activated carbon has low content of inorganic constituents compared with the precursor. The adsorption isotherm data were fitted to three adsorption isotherm models and found to closely fit the BET model with R² equal 0.948 at pH 3, indicating a multilayer of pesticide adsorption. The maximum loading capacity of the produced activated carbon was 110 mg pesticides/g adsorbent and was obtained at this pH value. This maximum loading was found experimentally to steeply decrease as the solution pH increases. The obtained results show that activated sludge is a promising low cost precursor for the production of activated carbon.

  4. Engineering Clostridium acetobutylicum for production of kerosene and diesel blendstock precursors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bormann, Sebastian; Baer, Zachary C; Sreekumar, Sanil; Kuchenreuther, Jon M; Dean Toste, F; Blanch, Harvey W; Clark, Douglas S

    2014-09-01

    Processes for the biotechnological production of kerosene and diesel blendstocks are often economically unattractive due to low yields and product titers. Recently, Clostridium acetobutylicum fermentation products acetone, butanol, and ethanol (ABE) were shown to serve as precursors for catalytic upgrading to higher chain-length molecules that can be used as fuel substitutes. To produce suitable kerosene and diesel blendstocks, the butanol:acetone ratio of fermentation products needs to be increased to 2-2.5:1, while ethanol production is minimized. Here we show that the overexpression of selected proteins changes the ratio of ABE products relative to the wild type ATCC 824 strain. Overexpression of the native alcohol/aldehyde dehydrogenase (AAD) has been reported to primarily increase ethanol formation in C. acetobutylicum. We found that overexpression of the AAD(D485G) variant increased ethanol titers by 294%. Catalytic upgrading of the 824(aad(D485G)) ABE products resulted in a blend with nearly 50wt%≤C9 products, which are unsuitable for diesel. To selectively increase butanol production, C. beijerinckii aldehyde dehydrogenase and C. ljungdhalii butanol dehydrogenase were co-expressed (strain designate 824(Cb ald-Cl bdh)), which increased butanol titers by 27% to 16.9gL(-1) while acetone and ethanol titers remained essentially unaffected. The solvent ratio from 824(Cb ald-Cl bdh) resulted in more than 80wt% of catalysis products having a carbon chain length≥C11 which amounts to 9.8gL(-1) of products suitable as kerosene or diesel blendstock based on fermentation volume. To further increase solvent production, we investigated expression of both native and heterologous chaperones in C. acetobutylicum. Expression of a heat shock protein (HSP33) from Bacillus psychrosaccharolyticus increased the total solvent titer by 22%. Co-expression of HSP33 and aldehyde/butanol dehydrogenases further increased ABE formation as well as acetone and butanol yields. HSP33 was

  5. Precise precursor rebalancing for isoprenoids production by fine control of gapA expression in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Juyoung; Lim, Jae Hyung; Kim, Se Yeon; Im, Dae-Kyun; Seok, Joo Yeon; Lee, Seung-Jae V; Oh, Min-Kyu; Jung, Gyoo Yeol

    2016-11-01

    Biosynthesis of isoprenoids via the 1-deoxy-D-xylulose-5-phosphate (DXP) pathway requires equimolar glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate and pyruvate to divert carbon flux toward the products of interest. Here, we demonstrate that precursor balancing is one of the critical steps for the production of isoprenoids in Escherichia coli. First, the implementation of the synthetic lycopene production pathway as a model system and the amplification of the native DXP pathway were accomplished using synthetic constitutive promoters and redesigned 5'-untranslated regions (5'-UTRs). Next, fine-controlled precursor balancing was investigated by tuning phosphoenolpyruvate synthase (PpsA) or glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH). The results showed that tuning-down of gapA improved the specific lycopene content by 45% compared to the overexpression of ppsA. The specific lycopene content in the strains with down-regulated gapA increased by 97% compared to that in the parental strain. Our results indicate that gapA is the best target for precursor balancing to increase biosynthesis of isoprenoids.

  6. Heat Transport in the Precursor of Carbon and Metallic Wire Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hare, Jack; Lebedev, Sergey; Bennett, Matthew; Bland, Simon; Burdiak, Guy; Suttle, Lee; Suzuki-Vidal, Francisco; Swadling, George; Velikovich, Alexander

    2014-10-01

    The complex interplay between the transport of heat and magnetic fields in high- β, magnetised plasmas is crucial to the feasibility of Magnetised Liner Inertial Fusion (MagLIF). We consider using the precursor plasma in a cylindrical wire array to reach the relevant dimensionless parameters for the initial state of the MagLIF plasma. The precursor is a hot, dense, stable plasma formed on the axis by the collision of material ablated from the wires. Simple models show that an axial magnetic field of ~ 5 T could magnetise the precursor (ωeτe ~ 10) at high-beta (β ~ 10). In this regime, the Nernst term may dominate the transport of the magnetic field, affecting the heat transport. The experiments are conducted on MAGPIE (1.4 MA, 250 ns rise time). Metallic wire arrays are standard, but to reduce radiative losses and the electron-ion thermalisation time, we will also consider carbon in the form of 0.3 mm diameter graphite rods. The axial magnetic field can either be provided by external coils or by the drive current. We study the evolution of the plasma density and temperature using laser interferometry and Schlieren imaging, an optical streak camera and Thomson scattering. The magnetic field can be studied using fibre-based polarimetry.

  7. Bulk scale production of carbon nanofibers in an economical way

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajarao, Ravindra; Bhat, Badekai Ramachandra

    2012-12-01

    An economical route for the scalable production of carbon nanofibers (CNFs) on a sodium chloride support has been developed. CNFs have been synthesized by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method by using metal formate as catalyst precursors at 680°C. Products were characterized by SEM, TEM, Raman spectroscopy and XRD method. By thermal analysis, the purity of the as grown products and purified products were determined. This method avoids calcination and reduction process which was employed in commercial catalysts such as metal oxide or nitrate. The problems such as detrimental effect, environmental and even cost have been overcome by using sodium chloride as support. The yield of CNFs up to 7800 wt.% relative to the nickel catalyst has been achieved in the growth time of 15 min. The advantage of this synthesis technique is the simplicity and use of easily available low cost precursors.

  8. Self-Templated Synthesis of Mesoporous Carbon from Carbon Tetrachloride Precursor for Supercapacitor Electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Duihai; Hu, Shi; Dai, Fang; Yi, Ran; Gordin, Mikhail L; Chen, Shuru; Song, Jiangxuan; Wang, Donghai

    2016-03-23

    A high-surface-area mesoporous carbon material has been synthesized using a self-templating approach via reduction of carbon tetrachloride by sodium potassium alloy. The advantage is the reduction-generated salt templates can be easily removed with just water. The produced mesoporous carbon has a high surface area and a narrow pore size distribution. When used as a supercapacitor electrode, this material exhibits a high specific capacitance (259 F g(-1)) and excellent cycling performance (>92% capacitance retention for 6000 cycles).

  9. The Multiple Effects of Precursors on the Properties of Polymeric Carbon Nitride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wendong Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Polymeric graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3N4 materials were prepared by direct pyrolysis of thiourea, dicyandiamide, melamine, and urea under the same conditions, respectively. In order to investigate the effects of precursors on the intrinsic physicochemical properties of g-C3N4, a variety of characterization tools were employed to analyze the samples. The photocatalytic activity of the samples was evaluated by the removal of NO in gas phase under visible light irradiation. The results showed that the as-prepared CN-T (from thiourea, CN-D (from dicyandiamide, CN-M (from melamine, and CN-U (from urea exhibited significantly different morphologies and microstructures. The band gaps of CN-T, CN-D, CN-M, and CN-U were 2.51, 2.58, 2.56, and 2.88 eV, respectively. Both thermal stability and yield are in the following order: CN-M > CN-D > CN-T > CN-U. The photoactivity of CN-U (31.9% is higher than that of CN-T (29.6%, CN-D (22.2%, and CN-M (26.8%. Considering the cost, toxicity, and yield of the precursors and the properties of g-C3N4, the best precursor for preparation of g-C3N4 was melamine. The present work could provide new insights into the selection of suitable precursor for g-C3N4 synthesis and in-depth understanding of the microstructure-dependent photocatalytic activity of g-C3N4.

  10. Removal of disinfection by-product precursors with ozone-UV advanced oxidation process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, A; Bérubé, P R

    2005-05-01

    The efficacy of using ozone (O3), ultraviolet irradiation (UV) and the combined O3-UV advanced oxidation process (AOP) to remove 2 classes of disinfection by-product (DBP) precursors from raw surface water samples have been evaluated and compared. In particular, trihalomethane and haloacetic acids formation potentials were measured. Laboratory batch scale experiments were carried out as a function of ozone and UV dosage in order to study the removal kinetics. It is concluded that the combined O3-UV AOP is more effective than either the ozone or UV treatment alone. Ozone-UV AOP is capable of mineralizing up to 50% of the total organic carbon from the raw source water at an ozone dose of 0.62+/-0.019 mg O3/mL and a UV dose of 1.61 W s/cm2. In addition, O3-UV AOP can reduce trihalomethane formation potential by roughly 80% and haloacetic acids formation potential by roughly 70% at the same ozone and UV dosage.

  11. Enhanced cathode performance of nano-sized lithium iron phosphate composite using polytetrafluoroethylene as carbon precursor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avci, Ercan

    2014-12-01

    Herein we report a facile and efficient solid state synthesis of carbon coated lithium iron phosphate (LiFePO4/C) cathode material achieved through the pyrolysis of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE). The current investigation is comparatively analyzed with the results of the composites of LiFePO4/C (LFP/C) synthesized using polystyrene-block-polybutadiene (PS-b-PBD), polyethyhylene (PE) and sucrose as carbon precursors. The optimized LFP/CPTFE composite is synthesized at 700 °C using 10 wt.% PTFE. The composite exhibits remarkable improvement in capacity, cyclability and rate capability compared to those of LFP/C synthesized using (PS-b-PBD), PE and sucrose. The specific discharge capacities as high as 166 mA h g-1 (theoretical capacity: 170 mA h g-1) at 0.2 C and 114 mA h g-1 at 10 C rates were achieved with LFP/CPTFE. In addition, the composite exhibits a long-term cycling stability with the capacity loss of only 11.4% after 1000 cycles. PTFE shifts the size distribution of the composite to nanometer scale (approximately 120 nm), however the addition of sucrose and other polymers do not have such an effect. According to TEM and XPS analysis, LFP/CPTFE particles are mostly coated with a few nanometers thick carbon layer forming a core-shell structure. Residual carbon does not contain fluorine.

  12. Mechanisms of Carbon Nanotube Production by Laser Ablation Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Carl D.; Arepalli, Sivaram; Nikolaev, Pavel; Smalley, Richard E.; Nocholson, Leonard S. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    We will present possible mechanisms for nanotube production by laser oven process. Spectral emission of excited species during laser ablation of a composite graphite target is compared with that of laser irradiated C60 vapor. The similarities in the transient and spectral data suggest that fullerenes are intermediate precursors for nanotube formation. The confinement of the ablation products by means of a 25-mm diameter tube placed upstream of the target seems to improve the production and purity of nanotubes. Repeated laser pulses vaporize the amorphous/graphitic carbon and possibly catalyst particles, and dissociate fullerenes yielding additional feedstock for SWNT growth.

  13. "Design and application of a data-independent precursor and product ion repository."

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thalassinos, K.; Vissers, J.P.; Tenzer, S.; Levin, Y.; Thompson, J.W.; Daniel, D.; Mann, D.; Delong, M.R.; Moseley, M.A.; America, A.H.P.; Ottens, A.K.; Cavey, G.S.; Efstathiou, G.; Scrivens, J.H.; Langridge, J.I.; Geromanos, S.J.

    2012-01-01

    The functional design and application of a data-independent LC-MS precursor and product ion repository for protein identification, quantification, and validation is conceptually described. The ion repository was constructed from the sequence search results of a broad range of discovery experiments i

  14. Simple Microwave-Assisted Synthesis of Carbon Nanotubes Using Polyethylene as Carbon Precursor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Kure

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, a quick and effective method to synthesize carbon nanotubes (CNTs is reported; a commercial microwave oven of 600 W at 2.45 GHz was utilized to synthesize CNTs from plasma catalytic decomposition of polyethylene. Polyethylene and silicon substrate coated with iron (III nitrate were placed in the reaction chamber to form the synthesis stock. The CNTs were synthesized at 750°C under atmospheric pressure of 0.81 mbar. Raman spectroscopy and field emission scanning electron microscope revealed the quality and entangled bundles of mixed CNTs from which the diameters of the CNTs were calculated to be between 1.03 and 25.00 nm. High resolution transmission electron microscope further showed that the CNTs obtained by this method are graphitized. Energy dispersive X-ray analysis and thermogravimetric analysis revealed above 98% carbon purity.

  15. Poly(borosiloxanes as precursors for carbon fiber ceramic matrix composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renato Luiz Siqueira

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Ceramic matrix composites (CMCs, constituted of a silicon boron oxycarbide (SiBCO matrix and unidirectional carbon fiber rods as a reinforcement phase, were prepared by pyrolysis of carbon fiber rods wrapped in polysiloxane (PS or poly(borosiloxane (PBS matrices. The preparation of the polymeric precursors involved hydrolysis/condensation reactions of alkoxysilanes in the presence and absence of boric acid, with B/Si atomic ratios of 0.2 and 0.5. Infrared spectra of PBS showed evidence of Si-O-B bonds at 880 cm-1, due to the incorporation of the crosslinker trigonal units of BO3 in the polymeric network. X ray diffraction analyses exhibited an amorphous character of the resulting polymer-derived ceramics obtained by pyrolysis up to 1000 °C under inert atmosphere. The C/SiBCO composites showed better thermal stability than the C/SiOC materials. In addition, good adhesion between the carbon fiber and the ceramic phase was observed by SEM microscopy

  16. The effect of synthesis time on graphene growth from palm oil as green carbon precursor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salifairus, M. J.; Hamid, S. B. Abd; Alrokayan, Salman A. H.; Khan, Haseeb A.; Rusop, M.

    2016-07-01

    Graphene is the new material that arises after carbon nanotubes (CNTs) era and has extraordinary optical, electronic and mechanical properties compared to CNTs. The 2D graphene is the sp2 carbon allotropes compared to other dimensionality. It also can be in three forms that are zero-dimensional, one-dimensional or three-dimensional. The different dimensionality also called fullerenes, nanotubes and graphite. Therefore, the graphene is known as centre potential materials in expanding research area than others ever. The 2cm × 2cm silicon wafer was seeded with nickel (Ni) at different thickness by using sputter coater. The palm oil, carbon source, was placed in the precursor furnace and the silicon was placed in the second furnace (deposition furnace). The palm oil will mix with Nitrogen gas was used as carrier gas in the CVD under certain temperature and pressure to undergo pyrolysis proses. The deposition temperature was set at 1000 °C. The deposition time varied from 3 minutes, 5 minutes and 7 minutes. The graphene was growth at ambient pressure in the CVD system. Electron microscopy and Raman Spectrometer revealed the structural properties and surface morphology of the grapheme on the substrate. The D and G band appear approximately at 1350 cm-1 and 1850 cm-1. It can be concluded that the growth of graphene varies at different deposition time.

  17. Mechanisms and kinetics study on the trihalomethanes formation with carbon nanoparticle precursors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Tingting; Wang, Yingying; Yang, Xin; Wang, Wei; Guo, Haonan; Xiong, Xinyu; Gao, Rui; Wuli, Xiati; Adeleye, Adeyemi S; Li, Yao

    2016-07-01

    With lots of carbon nanoparticles (CNPs) applied in the industry, the possibilities of their environmental release have received much attention. As the CNPs may enter drinking water systems, and persist in water and wastewater treatment systems, their possible reaction with disinfectants should be studied. In this study, the formation of trihalomethanes (THMs) with 5 types of carbon nanotubes (CNTs), graphene oxide (GO) and reduced graphene oxide (rGO) was investigated. All CNPs could act as precursors of THMs in aqueous phase. Total concentrations of THMs formed with CNPs varied from 0.24 to 0.95 μM, much lower than that formed from chlorinated Suwannee River Natural Organic Matter (SRNOM) (approximately 9 μM). The kinetics of THMs formation with GO was 0.0814 M(-1) s(-1), which is higher than most of the chlorinated humic acid obtained from different natural waters. The study indicates that during chlorination, C-Cl bond could be formed on the surface of CNPs. However, carbon atoms at the middle of two meta-positioned OH groups on the benzene ring are more active and may prefer to form THMs with chlorine oxidation. The influences of pH and reactant doses on the formation of THMs were also discussed.

  18. Methyl ricinoleate as platform chemical for simultaneous production of fine chemicals and polymer precursors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupé, Antoine; Achard, Mathieu; Fischmeister, Cédric; Bruneau, Christian

    2012-11-01

    The modification of methyl ricinoleate by etherification of the hydroxyl group was accomplished by using a nonclassical ruthenium-catalyzed allylation reaction and also by esterification. Methyl ricinoleate derivatives were engaged in ring-closing metathesis (RCM) reactions leading to biosourced 3,6-dihydropyran and α,β-unsaturated lactone derivatives with concomitant production of polymer precursors. Sequential RCM/hydrogenation and RCM/cross-metathesis were also implemented as a straightforward method for the synthesis of tetrahydropyran and lactone derivatives as well as valuable monomers (i.e., polyamide precursors).

  19. Continuous-Flow O-Alkylation of Biobased Derivatives with Dialkyl Carbonates in the Presence of Magnesium-Aluminium Hydrotalcites as Catalyst Precursors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cattelan, Lisa; Perosa, Alvise; Riello, Piero; Maschmeyer, Thomas; Selva, Maurizio

    2017-01-31

    The base-catalysed reactions of OH-bearing biobased derivatives (BBDs) including glycerol formal, solketal, glycerol carbonate, furfuryl alcohol and tetrahydrofurfuryl alcohol with non-toxic dialkyl carbonates (dimethyl and diethyl carbonate) were explored under continuous-flow (CF) conditions in the presence of three Na-exchanged Y- and X-faujasites (FAUs) and four Mg-Al hydrotalcites (HTs). Compared to previous etherification protocols mediated by dialkyl carbonates, the reported procedure offers substantial improvements not only in terms of (chemo)selectivity but also for the recyclability of the catalysts, workup, ease of product purification and, importantly, process intensification. Characterisation studies proved that both HT30 and KW2000 hydrotalcites acted as catalyst precursors: during the thermal activation pre-treatments, the typical lamellar structure of the hydrotalcite was broken down gradually into a MgO-like phase (periclase) or rather a magnesia-alumina solid solution, which was the genuine catalytic phase.

  20. Removal of precursors for disinfection by-products (Dbps)--differences between ozone- and OH-radical-induced oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleiser, G; Frimmel, F H

    2000-06-22

    Pre-oxidation is often applied to reduce the formation of disinfection by-products (DBPs). The aim of pre-oxidation is to remove the centers of natural organic matter (NOM) which are responsible for the formation of DBPs. In this paper, the differences between ozone- and OH-radical-induced oxidation to remove DBP-precursors are compared. The experiments were done with water of the River Ruhr (Germany) with a concentration of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) of 2 mg/l. Ozonation was able to remove DBP precursors selectively. After application of an absorbed ozone mass of 1.5 mg/mg DOC, a reduction in the formation potential for (THM-FP) and in the formation potential for organic halogen adsorbable on activated carbon (AOX-FP) down to 68 and 73% of the initial concentration was achieved, respectively. A removal of NOM was not achieved using absorbed ozone masses between 0.5 and 1.5 mg/mg DOC. In the hydrogen peroxide/UV process, in which OH-radicals are the reactive species, an increase in the THM concentration was measured after application of this process with short irradiation times. The maximum value of the THM-FP was 20% higher than the initial THM-FP. After an irradiation time of 1,050 min and a hydrogen peroxide consumption of 5.6 mg/l, the THM-FP and AOX-FP decreased to 75 and 71% of the initial formation potential, respectively. There was no selective removal of DBP precursors because the DOC concentration decreased also to 75% of the initial DOC-concentration after 1,050 min of irradiation.

  1. Nano-SiC implantation into the structure of carbon/graphite materials made by pyrolysis (carbonization) of the precursor system coal tar pitch/poly(dimethylsiloxane)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Czosnek, C.; Wolszczak, J.; Drygas, M.; Gora, M.; Janik, J.F. [AGH University of Science & Technology, Krakow (Poland). Faculty of Fuels & Energy

    2004-03-01

    Conversion of the air-cured poly(dimethylsiloxane) to SiC during co-pyrolysis with a coal tar pitch is studied with reference to the related SiO{sub 2}/pitch system. Each binary mixture is first homogenized at 160{sup o}C followed by carbonization at 500{sup o}C under argon to afford initial carbonizates. In both cases, one part of the initial carbonizate is further pyrolyzed at 1300{sup o}C and another part at 1650{sup o}C under an argon flow resulting in composite products. All products are studied with FT-IR, XRD, and XPS spectroscopic methods supplemented with SEM and 'wet' Si-analyses, when applicable. Carbothermally assisted conversion of both silicon precursors to nanocrystalline SiC embedded in the evolving C-matrix, i.e. nano-SiC/C composites, is evident only after the 1650{sup o}C carbonization stage.

  2. Scalable synthesis of aligned carbon nanotubes bundles using green natural precursor: neem oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar Rajesh

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Practical application of aligned carbon nanotubes (ACNTs would have to be determined by a matter of its economical and large-scale preparation. In this study, neem oil (also named Margoaa oil, extracted from the seeds of the neem--Azadirachta indica was used as carbon source to fabricate the bundles of ACNTs. ACNTs have been synthesized by spray pyrolysis of neem oil and ferrocene mixture at 825°C. The major components of neem oil are hydrocarbon with less amount of oxygen, which provided the precursor species in spray pyrolysis growth of CNTs. The bundles of ACNTs have been grown directly inside the quartz tube. The as-grown ACNTs have been characterized through Raman spectroscopy, scanning and transmission electron microscopic (SEM/TEM techniques. SEM images reveal that the bundles of ACNTs are densely packed and are of several microns in length. High-resolution TEM analysis reveals these nanotubes to be multi-walled CNTs. These multi-walled CNTs were found to have inner diameter between 15 and 30 nm. It was found that present technique gives high yield with high density of bundles of ACNTs.

  3. Pre-hydrolysed ethyl silicate as an alternative precursor for SiO{sub 2}-coated carbon nanofibers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrena, M.I., E-mail: ibarrena@quim.ucm.es [Departamento de Ciencia de los Materiales e Ingenieria Metalurgica, Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Av. Complutense s/n, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Gomez de Salazar, J.M.; Soria, A.; Matesanz, L. [Departamento de Ciencia de los Materiales e Ingenieria Metalurgica, Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Av. Complutense s/n, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2011-11-15

    This work reported basically aims at understanding the extent of SiO{sub 2}-coated carbon nanofibers using two different sol-gel precursors for the silicate glass. The silicate precursors employed were tetraethoxysilane (TEOS) and pre-hydrolysed ethyl silicate. The first route consisted in an acid hydrolysis and polycondensation of the TEOS and the second one in a polycondensation of the pre-hydrolysed ethyl silicate. The techniques of Fourier Infra Red spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction were used to characterize the materials obtained. Both kinds of SiO{sub 2} precursor can coat the CNF effectively. However, the use of pre-hydrolysed ethyl silicate (faster gelation times and higher surface areas) can be considered a low-cost and facile alternative with respect to the use of TEOS, to obtain industrially silica-coated carbon nanofibers.

  4. Combined metabolic engineering of precursor and co-factor supply to increase α-santalene production by Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scalcinati Gionata

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sesquiterpenes are a class of natural products with a diverse range of attractive industrial proprieties. Due to economic difficulties of sesquiterpene production via extraction from plants or chemical synthesis there is interest in developing alternative and cost efficient bioprocesses. The hydrocarbon α-santalene is a precursor of sesquiterpenes with relevant commercial applications. Here, we construct an efficient Saccharomyces cerevisiae cell factory for α-santalene production. Results A multistep metabolic engineering strategy targeted to increase precursor and cofactor supply was employed to manipulate the yeast metabolic network in order to redirect carbon toward the desired product. To do so, genetic modifications were introduced acting to optimize the farnesyl diphosphate branch point, modulate the mevalonate pathway, modify the ammonium assimilation pathway and enhance the activity of a transcriptional activator. The approach employed resulted in an overall α-santalene yield of a 0.0052 Cmmol (Cmmol glucose-1 corresponding to a 4-fold improvement over the reference strain. This strategy, combined with a specifically developed continuous fermentation process, led to a final α-santalene productivity of 0.036 Cmmol (g biomass-1 h-1. Conclusions The results reported in this work illustrate how the combination of a metabolic engineering strategy with fermentation technology optimization can be used to obtain significant amounts of the high-value sesquiterpene α-santalene. This represents a starting point toward the construction of a yeast “sesquiterpene factory” and for the development of an economically viable bio-based process that has the potential to replace the current production methods.

  5. DFT Thermodynamic Research of the Pyrolysis Mechanism of the Carbon Matrix Precursor Toluene for Carbon Material

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG; Hui

    2001-01-01

    [1]Deutsch S. , Keieger K. A. , J. Phy. Chem, 66(19), 1 569(1962)[2]Ooya sugirou, Kobayashi Hiroshi. , Inoue Masahide, et al. , Chem. Technology, 72, 1 300(1969)[3]Ruden A. P. , Vestnik Ko. , Moskov Univ. Ser, 15(5), 69(1969)[4]WANG Yi-Gui, SUN Chang-Jun, DENG Cong-Hao. Science in China (Series B), 28(5), 431(1998)[5]YANG Ming-Li, SUN Ze-Min, YAN Guo-Sen. Chemical Journal of Chinese Universities, 20(3). 450(1999)[6]WANG Hui, ZHAI Gao-hong, YANG Hai-feng, et al. , Chem. J. of Chinese Universities, 22(5), 800(2001)[7]WANG Hui, LUO Rui-Ying, YANG Yan-Qing, et al. , Chinese Journal of Materials Research, 18(4), 10(2000)[8]ZHAI Gao-Hong, WANG Hui, RAN Xing-Quan, et al. , Materials Science and Engineering, (2000)[9]WANG Hui, ZHAI Gao-Hong, RAN Xing-Quan, et al., Chinese Journal of Inorganic Chemistry, 16(6), 879(2000)[10]Ljubisa R. R. , Murthy Karra., Kristina Skokova. , et al. , Carbon. , 36(12), 1 841(1998)[11]Becke D., Density-functional Thermochemistry. Ⅲ. The Role of Exact Exchange, J. Chem. Phys. , 98, 5 648(1993)[12]Bicout D. , Field M. , Quantum Mechanical Simulation Method For Studing Biological System(Les Houches Workship). Springer-Verlag, Berlin, 1 (1995)[13]Frisch M. J.,Trucks G. W. , Schlegel H. B., et al. , Gaussian 98, Revision A. 6, Gaussian, Inc., Pittsburgh PA, 1998[14]Eugene S., Domalski and Elizalzeth D. H. , J. Phys. Chem. , 17, 1 637 (1988)[15]Sharon G. L. , Joel F. L. and Rhoda D. L. , J. Phys. Chem. , 13, 695(1984)[16]Cleveland, David, R. L. (Editor-in-Chief), CRC. Handbook of Chem. and Phy. , (77th Edition), CEC Press INC, 1996-1997:9-27[17]FU Xian-Cai, CHEN Rui-Hua. Physical Chemistry, People Education Press, Beijing, a. 132; b. 191; c. 366(1982)[18]WANG Hui, YANG Hai-fegng, ZHAI Gao-hong, et al. , Acta Chemica Sinca, (1), 17(2001)

  6. Carbon dioxide production in animal houses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Søren; Blanes-Vidal, Victoria; Joergensen, H.

    2008-01-01

    This article deals with carbon dioxide production from farm animals; more specifically, it addresses the possibilities of using the measured carbon dioxide concentration in animal houses as basis for estimation of ventilation flow (as the ventilation flow is a key parameter of aerial emissions from...... animal houses). The investigations include measurements in respiration chambers and in animal houses, mainly for growing pigs and broilers. Over the last decade a fixed carbon dioxide production of 185 litres per hour per heat production unit, hpu (i.e. 1000 W of the total animal heat production at 20o......C) has often been used. The article shows that the carbon dioxide production per hpu increases with increasing respiration quotient. As the respiration quotient increases with body mass for growing animals, the carbon dioxide production per heat production unit also increases with increased body mass...

  7. Reduction of Precursors of Chlorination By-products in Drinking Water Using Fluidized-bed Biofilm Reactor at Low Temperature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHU-GUANG XIE; DONG-HUI WEN; DONG-WEN SHI; XIAO-YAN TANG

    2006-01-01

    Objective To investigate the reduction of chlorination by-products (CBPs) precursors using the fluidized-bed biofilm reactor (FBBR). Methods Reduction of total organic carbon (TOC), ultraviolet absorbance (UV254), trihalomethane (THM)formation potential (THMFP), haloacetic acid (HAA) formation potential (HAAFP), and ammonia in FBBR were evaluated in detail. Results The reduction of TOC or UV254 was low, on average 12.6% and 4.7%, respectively, while the reduction of THMFP and HAAFP was significant. The reduction of ammonia was 30%-40% even below 3℃, however, it could quickly rise to over 50% above 3℃. Conclusions The FBBR effectively reduces CBPs and ammonia in drinking water even at low temperature and seems to be a very promising and competitive drinking water reactor for polluted surface source waters, especially in China.

  8. Pyrolitic carbon from biomass precursors as anode materials for lithium batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephan, A. Manuel [School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Chonbuk National University, Chonju 561-756 (Korea, Republic of); Central Electrochemical Research Institute, Karaikudi 630006 (India); Kumar, T. Prem [Central Electrochemical Research Institute, Karaikudi 630006 (India); Ramesh, R. [Central Electrochemical Research Institute, Karaikudi 630006 (India); Thomas, Sabu [School of Chemical Sciences, Mahatma Gandhi University, Kottayam 686560 (India); Jeong, Soo Kyung [School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Chonbuk National University, Chonju 561-756 (Korea, Republic of); Nahm, Kee Suk [School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Chonbuk National University, Chonju 561-756 (Korea, Republic of)]. E-mail: nahmks@chonbuk.ac.kr

    2006-08-25

    Disordered carbonaceous materials were synthesized by the pyrolysis of banana fibers treated with pore-forming substances such as ZnCl{sub 2} and KOH. X-ray diffraction studies indicated a carbon structure with a large number of disorganized single layer carbon sheets. Addition of porogenic agent led to remarkable changes in the structure and morphology of the carbonaceous products. The product obtained with ZnCl{sub 2} treatment gave first-cycle lithium insertion and de-insertion capacities of 3325 and 400 mAh g{sup -1}, respectively. Lower capacities only could be realized in the subsequent cycles, although the coulombic efficiency increased upon cycling, which in the 10th cycle was 95%.

  9. Correlation of precursor and product ions in single-stage high resolution mass spectrometry. A tool for detecting diagnostic ions and improving the precursor elemental composition elucidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borràs, S. [Departament de Química Analítica, Universitat de Barcelona, Martí i Franquès 1-11, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Kaufmann, A., E-mail: anton.kaufmann@klzh.ch [Official Food Control Authority, Fehrenstrasse 15, 8032 Zürich (Switzerland); Companyó, R. [Departament de Química Analítica, Universitat de Barcelona, Martí i Franquès 1-11, 08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2013-04-15

    Highlights: ► We are describing a technique to spot ions which are derived from each other. ► Single stage high resolution data is used. ► This “in silicon” technique is compared to conventional precursor scan. ► Some applications for this technique are presented. -- Abstract: Monitoring of common diagnostic fragments is essential for recognizing molecules which are members of a particular compound class. Up to now, unit resolving tandem quadrupole mass spectrometers, operating in the precursor ion scan mode, have been typically used to perform such analysis. By means of high-resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS) a much more sensitive and selective detection can be achieved. However, using a single-stage HRMS instrument, there is no unequivocal link to the corresponding precursor ion, since such instrumentation does not permit a previous precursor selection. Thus, to address this limitation, an in silico approach to locate precursor ions, based on diagnostic fragments, was developed. Implemented as an Excel macro, the algorithm rapidly assembles and surveys exact mass data to provide a list of feasible precursor candidates according to the correlation of the chromatographic peak shape profile and other additional filtering criteria (e.g. neutral losses and isotopes). The macro was tested with two families of veterinary drugs, sulfonamides and penicillins, which are known to yield diagnostic product ions when fragmented. Data sets obtained from different food matrices (fish and liver), both at high and low concentration of the target compounds, were investigated in order to evaluate the capabilities and limitations of the reported approach. Finally, other possible applications of this technique, such as the elucidation of elemental compositions based on product ions and corresponding neutral losses, were also presented and discussed.

  10. Production Scale-Up or Activated Carbons for Ultracapacitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Steven D. Dietz

    2007-01-10

    Transportation use accounts for 67% of the petroleum consumption in the US. Electric and hybrid vehicles are promising technologies for decreasing our dependence on petroleum, and this is the objective of the FreedomCAR & Vehicle Technologies Program. Inexpensive and efficient energy storage devices are needed for electric and hybrid vehicle to be economically viable, and ultracapacitors are a leading energy storage technology being investigated by the FreedomCAR program. The most important parameter in determining the power and energy density of a carbon-based ultracapacitor is the amount of surface area accessible to the electrolyte, which is primarily determined by the pore size distribution. The major problems with current carbons are that their pore size distribution is not optimized for liquid electrolytes and the best carbons are very expensive. TDA Research, Inc. (TDA) has developed methods to prepare porous carbons with tunable pore size distributions from inexpensive carbohydrate based precursors. The use of low-cost feedstocks and processing steps greatly lowers the production costs. During this project with the assistance of Maxwell Technologies, we found that an impurity was limiting the performance of our carbon and the major impurity found was sulfur. A new carbon with low sulfur content was made and found that the performance of the carbon was greatly improved. We also scaled-up the process to pre-production levels and we are currently able to produce 0.25 tons/year of activated carbon. We could easily double this amount by purchasing a second rotary kiln. More importantly, we are working with MeadWestvaco on a Joint Development Agreement to scale-up the process to produce hundreds of tons of high quality, inexpensive carbon per year based on our processes.

  11. A carbon sink pathway increases carbon productivity in cyanobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, John W K; Atsumi, Shota

    2015-05-01

    The burning of fossil reserves, and subsequent release of carbon into the atmosphere is depleting the supply of carbon-based molecules used for synthetic materials including plastics, oils, medicines, and glues. To provide for future society, innovations are needed for the conversion of waste carbon (CO2) into organic carbon useful for materials. Chemical production directly from photosynthesis is a nascent technology, with great promise for capture of CO2 using sunlight. To improve low yields, it has been proposed that photosynthetic capacity can be increased by a relaxation of bottlenecks inherent to growth. The limits of carbon partitioning away from growth within the cell and the effect of partitioning on carbon fixation are not well known. Here we show that expressing genes in a pathway between carbon fixation and pyruvate increases partitioning to 2,3-butanediol (23BD) and leads to a 1.8-fold increase in total carbon yield in the cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942. Specific 2,3-butanediol production increases 2.4-fold. As partitioning increases beyond 30%, it leads to a steep decline in total carbon yield. The data suggests a local maximum for carbon partitioning from the Calvin Benson cycle that is scalable with light intensity.

  12. Ozone production in four major cities of China: sensitivity to ozone precursors and heterogeneous processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. K. Xue

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Despite a large volume of research over a number of years, our understandings of the key precursors that control tropospheric ozone production and the impacts of heterogeneous processes remain incomplete. In this study, we analyze measurements of ozone and its precursors made at rural/suburban sites downwind of four large Chinese cities – Beijing, Shanghai, Guangzhou and Lanzhou. At each site the same measurement techniques were utilized and a photochemical box model based on the Master Chemical Mechanism (v3.2 was applied, to minimize uncertainties in comparison of the results due to differences in methodology. All four cities suffered from severe ozone pollution. At the rural site of Beijing, export of the well-processed urban plumes contributed to the extremely high ozone levels (up to an hourly value of 286 ppbv, while the pollution observed at the suburban sites of Shanghai, Guangzhou and Lanzhou was characterized by intense in-situ ozone production. The major anthropogenic hydrocarbons were alkenes and aromatics in Beijing and Shanghai, aromatics in Guangzhou, and alkenes in Lanzhou. The ozone production was found to be in a VOCs-limited regime in both Shanghai and Guangzhou, and a mixed regime in Lanzhou. In Shanghai, the ozone formation was most sensitive to aromatics and alkenes, while in Guangzhou aromatics were the predominant ozone precursors. In Lanzhou, either controlling NOx or reducing emissions of olefins from the petrochemical industry would mitigate the local ozone production. The potential impacts of several heterogeneous processes on the ozone formation were assessed. The hydrolysis of dinitrogen pentoxide (N2O5, uptake of the hydroperoxyl radical (HO2 on particles, and surface reactions of NO2 forming nitrous acid (HONO present considerable sources of uncertainty in the current studies of ozone chemistry. Further efforts are urgently required to better understand these processes and refine atmospheric models.

  13. A survey on levels and seasonal changes of assimilable organic carbon (AOC) and its precursors in drinking water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohkouchi, Yumiko; Ly, Bich Thuy; Ishikawa, Suguru; Aoki, Yusuke; Echigo, Shinya; Itoh, Sadahiko

    2011-10-01

    In Japan, customers' concerns about chlorinous odour in drinking water have been increasing. One promising approach for reducing chlorinous odour is the minimization of residual chlorine in water distribution, which requires stricter control of organics to maintain biological stability in water supply systems. In this investigation, the levels and seasonal changes of assimilable organic carbon (AOC) and its precursors in drinking water were surveyed to accumulate information on organics in terms of biological stability. In tap water samples purified through rapid sand filtration processes, the average AOC concentration was 174 microgC/L in winter and 60 microgC/L in summer. This difference seemed to reflect the seasonal changes of AOC in the natural aquatic environment. On the other hand, very little or no AOC could be removed after use of an ozonation-biological activated carbon (BAC) process. Especially in winter, waterworks should pay attention to BAC operating conditions to improve AOC removal. The storage of BAC effluent with residual chlorine at 0.05-0.15 mgCl2/L increased AOC drastically. This result indicated the possibility that abundant AOC precursors remaining in the finished water could contribute to newly AOC formation during water distribution with minimized residual chlorine. Combined amino acids, which remained at roughly equivalent to AOC in finished water, were identified as major AOC precursors. Prior to minimization of residual chlorine, enhancement of the removal abilities for both AOC and its precursors would be necessary.

  14. Putrescine production from different amino acid precursors by lactic acid bacteria from wine and cider.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costantini, Antonella; Pietroniro, Roberta; Doria, Francesca; Pessione, Enrica; Garcia-Moruno, Emilia

    2013-07-01

    The aim of this work was to study the production of biogenic amines and particularly putrescine in lactic acid bacteria (LAB) related to wine and cider. We applied an analytical protocol that involves the use of PCR and TLC techniques to determine the production of putrescine from different precursors. Moreover, we also studied the ability of the Lactobacillus and Pediococcus tested to produce histamine and tyramine. The results showed that the majority of the Lactobacillus brevis analyzed harbour both AgDI and tdc genes and are tyramine and putrescine producers. Conversely, among the other LAB tested, only one Lactobacillus hilgardii and one Pediococcus pentosaceus produced putrescine. The AgDI gene was also detected in two other LAB (Lactobacillus mali and Pediococcus parvulus), but no putrescine production was observed. Finally, hdc gene and histamine production were found in strains (L. hilgardii 5211, isolated from wine, and Lactobacillus casei 18, isolated from cider) that were not putrescine producers.

  15. Additions of precursors and elicitors improve geranylgeraniol production in Croton stellatopilosus callus cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juraithip Wungsintaweekul

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Strategies for enhancing GGOH production in Croton stellatopilosus callus culture included additions of precursors (sodium acetate-NA, sodium pyruvate-NP, mevalonic acid lactone-MVA and elicitors (methyl jasmonate-MJ, acetylsalicylic acid-ASA, yeast extract-YE. Treated cells were evaluated for their GGOH contents by GC-FID and compared with the nontreated cells as controls. Additions of NA (25 mg/L, NP (50 mg/L and MVA (100 mg/L resulted in an enhancement of GGOH productivity to 0.61 mg/g DW, 0.52 mg/g DW and 0.70 mg/g DW, respectively, compared to the control culture (0.29 mg/g DW. Callus cultures elicited with MJ at 30 mg/L for 24 h stimulated GGOH production to 0.35 mg/g DW compared to the control culture (0.07 mg/g DW. Cells also responded to ASA (20 mg/L, 2 days and YE (0.25 g/L, 4 days and produced GGOH contents of 0.46 mg/g DW and 1.37 mg/g DW, respectively. This study has shown that isoprenoid precursors and conventional elicitors enhanced GGOH production in the C. stellatopilosus callus culture.

  16. Ion-assisted precursor dissociation and surface diffusion: Enabling rapid, low-temperature growth of carbon nanofibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denysenko, I.; Ostrikov, K.

    2007-06-01

    Growth kinetics of carbon nanofibers in a hydrocarbon plasma is studied. In addition to gas-phase and surface processes common to chemical vapor deposition, the model includes (unique to plasma-exposed catalyst surfaces) ion-induced dissociation of hydrocarbons, interaction of adsorbed species with incoming hydrogen atoms, and dissociation of hydrocarbon ions. It is shown that at low, nanodevice-friendly process temperatures the nanofibers grow via surface diffusion of carbon adatoms produced on the catalyst particle via ion-induced dissociation of a hydrocarbon precursor. These results explain a lower activation energy of nanofiber growth in a plasma and can be used for the synthesis of other nanoassemblies.

  17. Overview of the carbon products consortium (CPC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Irwin, C.L. [West Virginia Univ., Morgantown, WV (United States)

    1996-08-01

    The Carbon Products Consortium (CPC) is an industry, university, government cooperative research team which has evolved over the past seven years to produce and evaluate coal-derived feedstocks for carbon products. The members of the Carbon Products Consortium are UCAR Carbon Company, Koppers Industries, CONOCO, Aluminum Company of America, AMOCO Polymers, and West Virginia University. The Carbon and Insulation Materials Technology Group at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Fiber Materials Inc., and BASF Corporation are affiliates of the CPC. The initial work on coal-derived nuclear graphites was supported by a grant to WVU, UCAR Carbon, and ORNL from the U.S. DOE New Production Reactor program. More recently, the CPC program has been supported through the Fossil Energy Materials program and through PETC`s Liquefaction program. The coal processing technologies involve hydrogenation, extraction by solvents such as N-methyl pyrolidone and toluene, material blending, and calcination. The breadth of carbon science expertise and manufacturing capability available in the CPC enables it to address virtually all research and development issues of importance to the carbon products industry.

  18. Improvement of the riboflavin production by engineering the precursor biosynthesis pathways in Escherichia coli

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhibo Xu; Zhenquan Lin; Zhiwen Wang; Tao Chen

    2015-01-01

    3,4-Dihydroxy-2-butanone 4-phosphate (DHBP) and GTP are the precursors for riboflavin biosynthesis. In this research, improving the precursor supply for riboflavin production was attempted by overexpressing ribB and engineering purine pathway in a riboflavin-producing Escherichia coli strain. Initially, ribB gene was overexpressed to increase the flux from ribulose 5-phosphate (Ru-5-P) to DHBP. Then ndk and gmk genes were overexpressed to enhance GTP supply. Subsequently, a R419L mutation was introduced into purA to reduce the flux from IMP to AMP. Finally, co-overexpression of mutant purF and prs genes further increased riboflavin production. The final strain RF18S produced 387.6 mg riboflavin · L−1 with a yield of 44.8 mg riboflavin per gram glucose in shake-flask fermentations. The final titer and yield were 72.2%and 55.6%higher than those of RF01S, respectively. It was concluded that simultaneously engineering the DHBP synthase and GTP biosynthetic pathway by rational metabolic engineering can efficiently boost riboflavin production in E. coli.

  19. Potential of jackfruit peel as precursor for activated carbon prepared by microwave induced NaOH activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foo, K Y; Hameed, B H

    2012-05-01

    The feasibility of preparing activated carbon (JPAC) from jackfruit peel, an industrial residue abundantly available from food manufacturing plants via microwave-assisted NaOH activation was explored. The influences of chemical impregnation ratio, microwave power and radiation time on the properties of activated carbon were investigated. JPAC was examined by pore structural analysis, scanning electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, nitrogen adsorption isotherm, elemental analysis, surface acidity/basicity and zeta potential measurements. The adsorptive behavior of JPAC was quantified using methylene blue as model dye compound. The best conditions resulted in JPAC with a monolayer adsorption capacity of 400.06 mg/g and carbon yield of 80.82%. The adsorption data was best fitted to the pseudo-second-order equation, while the adsorption mechanism was well described by the intraparticle diffusion model. The findings revealed the versatility of jackfruit peels as good precursor for preparation of high quality activated carbon.

  20. A Novel Partially Biobased PAN-Lignin Blend as a Potential Carbon Fiber Precursor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Özgür Seydibeyoğlu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Blends of polyacrylonitrile (PAN and lignin were prepared with three different lignin types by solution blending and solution casting. Among three types of lignin, one type was chosen and different blend concentrations were prepared and casted. The casted blend films were characterized chemically with fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR, and thermally with thermogravimetric analysis (TGA. The mechanical properties of the blends were measured using dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA. FTIR analysis shows an excellent interaction of PAN and lignin. The interaction of the lignins and PAN was confirmed by TGA analysis. The DMA results reveal that the lignin enhance the mechanical properties of PAN at room temperature and elevated temperatures. The blend structure and morphology were observed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM. SEM images show that excellent polymer blends were prepared. The results show that it is possible to develop a new precursor material with a blend of lignin and PAN. These studies show that the side product of paper and cellulosic bioethanol industries, namely, lignin can be used for new application areas.

  1. High-level production of amorpha-4,11-diene, a precursor of the antimalarial agent artemisinin, in Escherichia coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroko Tsuruta

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Artemisinin derivatives are the key active ingredients in Artemisinin combination therapies (ACTs, the most effective therapies available for treatment of malaria. Because the raw material is extracted from plants with long growing seasons, artemisinin is often in short supply, and fermentation would be an attractive alternative production method to supplement the plant source. Previous work showed that high levels of amorpha-4,11-diene, an artemisinin precursor, can be made in Escherichia coli using a heterologous mevalonate pathway derived from yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae, though the reconstructed mevalonate pathway was limited at a particular enzymatic step. METHODOLOGY/ PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: By combining improvements in the heterologous mevalonate pathway with a superior fermentation process, commercially relevant titers were achieved in fed-batch fermentations. Yeast genes for HMG-CoA synthase and HMG-CoA reductase (the second and third enzymes in the pathway were replaced with equivalent genes from Staphylococcus aureus, more than doubling production. Amorpha-4,11-diene titers were further increased by optimizing nitrogen delivery in the fermentation process. Successful cultivation of the improved strain under carbon and nitrogen restriction consistently yielded 90 g/L dry cell weight and an average titer of 27.4 g/L amorpha-4,11-diene. CONCLUSIONS/ SIGNIFICANCE: Production of >25 g/L amorpha-4,11-diene by fermentation followed by chemical conversion to artemisinin may allow for development of a process to provide an alternative source of artemisinin to be incorporated into ACTs.

  2. Pyrolysis of furfural-acetone resin as matrix precursor for new carbon materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    In order to increase the understanding of the pyrolysis mechanism,Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and thermogravimetry-mass spectrometric coupling technique (TG-MS) were used to study the pyrolysis behavior of furfural-acetone resin used for new carbon materials.The curing and carbonization mechanisms of furfural-acetone resin were mainly investigated;structural changes and volatile products evolved during pyrolysis were analyzed.The results indicate that,during pyrolysis of furfural-acetone resin adding 7% (mass fraction) phosphorous acid as curing agent,the rupture of C-O bond in the five-membered heterocycle firstly takes place to release oxygen atoms and then does the C--H bond,which enable the molecular chain to cross-link and condense,then lead to the formation of three dimensional networking structure.With the increase of pyrolyzing temperature,the scission of methyl and the opening of furan ring are generated.As a result,the recomposition of molecular chain structure isgenerated and a hexatomic fused ring containing double bonds is built.The main volatile products during pyrolysis of furfuralacetone resin are H2O,and a small mount of CO,CO2 and CH4.At elevated temperatures,dehydrogenation takes place and hydrogen gas is evolved.

  3. Expansion of ribosomally produced natural products: a nitrile hydratase- and Nif11-related precursor family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitchell Douglas A

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A new family of natural products has been described in which cysteine, serine and threonine from ribosomally-produced peptides are converted to thiazoles, oxazoles and methyloxazoles, respectively. These metabolites and their biosynthetic gene clusters are now referred to as thiazole/oxazole-modified microcins (TOMM. As exemplified by microcin B17 and streptolysin S, TOMM precursors contain an N-terminal leader sequence and C-terminal core peptide. The leader sequence contains binding sites for the posttranslational modifying enzymes which subsequently act upon the core peptide. TOMM peptides are small and highly variable, frequently missed by gene-finders and occasionally situated far from the thiazole/oxazole forming genes. Thus, locating a substrate for a particular TOMM pathway can be a challenging endeavor. Results Examination of candidate TOMM precursors has revealed a subclass with an uncharacteristically long leader sequence closely related to the enzyme nitrile hydratase. Members of this nitrile hydratase leader peptide (NHLP family lack the metal-binding residues required for catalysis. Instead, NHLP sequences display the classic Gly-Gly cleavage motif and have C-terminal regions rich in heterocyclizable residues. The NHLP family exhibits a correlated species distribution and local clustering with an ABC transport system. This study also provides evidence that a separate family, annotated as Nif11 nitrogen-fixing proteins, can serve as natural product precursors (N11P, but not always of the TOMM variety. Indeed, a number of cyanobacterial genomes show extensive N11P paralogous expansion, such as Nostoc, Prochlorococcus and Cyanothece, which replace the TOMM cluster with lanthionine biosynthetic machinery. Conclusions This study has united numerous TOMM gene clusters with their cognate substrates. These results suggest that two large protein families, the nitrile hydratases and Nif11, have been retailored for

  4. Polymer-clay nanocomposites as precursors of nanostructured carbon materials for electrochemical devices: templating effect of clays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Saavedra, Rocío; Darder, Margarita; Gómez-Avilés, Almudena; Aranda, Pilar; Ruiz-Hitzky, Eduardo

    2008-04-01

    The present work introduces a comparative study on the use of polymer nanocomposites containing clay minerals of different structure, such as montmorillonite and sepiolite as host solids for the templating synthesis of carbon-like materials from different organic precursors. Carbon-clay nanocomposites were obtained by polymerization of either acrylonitrile or sucrose previously inserted in the pores of the clay minerals, followed by their further thermal transformation in carbon-like compounds. Acid treatment of the resulting carbon-clay nanocomposites removes the inorganic templates giving carbon-like materials with different textural features. Polymer-clay, carbon-clay and carbon-like materials have been characterized by applying spectroscopic techniques as FTIR and in situ EIS (electrochemical impedance spectroscopy) and other structural, textural and analytical tools (chemical analysis, XRD, SEM-EDX, TEM-EDX, N2 adsorption isotherms,...). Electrochemical properties of these carbon-clay nanocomposites, as well as their templated carbonaceous materials and their use as electrode materials of different electrochemical devices such as rechargeable Li-batteries, supercapacitors and electrochemical sensors, are also discussed.

  5. Alumina Carbon Refractory Products for Continuous Casting

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    @@ 1 Scope This standard specifies the classification.techni-cal requirements,test methods,inspection rules,packing,marking,transportation,storage and quality certificate of alumina carbon refractory products for continuous casting.

  6. Caveolin-1 interacts with the Gag precursor of murine leukaemia virus and modulates virus production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koester Mario

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Retroviral Gag determines virus assembly at the plasma membrane and the formation of virus-like particles in intracellular multivesicular bodies. Thereby, retroviruses exploit by interaction with cellular partners the cellular machineries for vesicular transport in various ways. Results The retroviral Gag precursor protein drives assembly of murine leukaemia viruses (MLV at the plasma membrane (PM and the formation of virus like particles in multivesicular bodies (MVBs. In our study we show that caveolin-1 (Cav-1, a multifunctional membrane-associated protein, co-localizes with Gag in a punctate pattern at the PM of infected NIH 3T3 cells. We provide evidence that Cav-1 interacts with the matrix protein (MA of the Gag precursor. This interaction is mediated by a Cav-1 binding domain (CBD within the N-terminus of MA. Interestingly, the CBD motif identified within MA is highly conserved among most other γ-retroviruses. Furthermore, Cav-1 is incorporated into MLV released from NIH 3T3 cells. Overexpression of a GFP fusion protein containing the putative CBD of the retroviral MA resulted in a considerable decrease in production of infectious retrovirus. Moreover, expression of a dominant-negative Cav-1 mutant affected retroviral titres significantly. Conclusion This study demonstrates that Cav-1 interacts with MLV Gag, co-localizes with Gag at the PM and affects the production of infectious virus. The results strongly suggest a role for Cav-1 in the process of virus assembly.

  7. DEVELOPMENT OF CARBON PRODUCTS FROM LOW-RANK COALS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edwin S. Olson

    2001-07-01

    The goal of this project is to facilitate the production of carbon fibers from low-rank coal (LRC) tars. To this end, the effect of demineralization on the tar yields and composition was investigated using high-sodium and high-calcium lignites commonly mined in North Dakota. These coals were demineralized by ion exchange with ammonium acetate and by cation dissolution with nitric acid. Two types of thermal processing were investigated for obtaining suitable precursors for pitch and fiber production. Initially, tars were produced by simple pyrolysis of the set of samples at 650 C. Since these experiments produced little usable material from any of the samples, the coals were heated at moderate temperatures (380 and 400 C) in tetralin solvent to form and extract the plastic material (metaplast) that forms at these temperatures.

  8. The production of carbon nanotubes from carbon dioxide: challenges and opportunities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Geoffrey S. Simate; Sunny E. Iyuke; Sehliselo Ndlovu; Clarence S. Yah; Lubinda F. Walubita

    2010-01-01

    Recent advances in the production of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are reviewed with an emphasis on the use of carbon dioxide (CO2) as a sole source of carbon. Compared to the most widely used carbon precursors such as graphite, methane, acetylene, ethanol, ethylene,and coal-derived hydrocarbons, CO2 is competitively cheaper with relatively high carbon yield content. However, CNT synthesis from CO2 is a newly emerging technology, and hence it needs to be explored further. A theoretical and analytical comparison of the currently existing CNT-CO2 synthesis techniques is given including a review of some of the process parameters (i.e., temperature, pressure, catalyst, etc.) that affect the CO2 reduction rate. Such analysis indicates that there is still a fundamental need to further explore the following aspects so as to realize the full potential of CO2 based CNT technology: (1) the CNT-CO2 synthesis and formation mechanism,(2) catalytic effects of transitional metals and mechanisms, (3) utilization of metallocenes in the CNT-CO2 reactions, (4) applicability of ferrite-organometallic compounds in the CNT-CO2 synthesis reactions, and (5) the effects of process parameters such as temperature,etc.

  9. Modeling of the HiPco process for carbon nanotube production. I. Chemical kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dateo, Christopher E.; Gokcen, Tahir; Meyyappan, M.

    2002-01-01

    A chemical kinetic model is developed to help understand and optimize the production of single-walled carbon nanotubes via the high-pressure carbon monoxide (HiPco) process, which employs iron pentacarbonyl as the catalyst precursor and carbon monoxide as the carbon feedstock. The model separates the HiPco process into three steps, precursor decomposition, catalyst growth and evaporation, and carbon nanotube production resulting from the catalyst-enhanced disproportionation of carbon monoxide, known as the Boudouard reaction: 2 CO(g)-->C(s) + CO2(g). The resulting detailed model contains 971 species and 1948 chemical reactions. A second model with a reduced reaction set containing 14 species and 22 chemical reactions is developed on the basis of the detailed model and reproduces the chemistry of the major species. Results showing the parametric dependence of temperature, total pressure, and initial precursor partial pressures are presented, with comparison between the two models. The reduced model is more amenable to coupled reacting flow-field simulations, presented in the following article.

  10. PRODUCTION OF CARBON PRODUCTS USING A COAL EXTRACTION PROCESS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dady Dadyburjor; Philip R. Biedler; Chong Chen; L. Mitchell Clendenin; Manoj Katakdaunde; Elliot B. Kennel; Nathan D. King; Liviu Magean; Peter G. Stansberry; Alfred H. Stiller; John W. Zondlo

    2004-08-31

    This Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory sponsored project developed carbon products, using mildly hydrogenated solvents to extract the organic portion of coal to create synthetic pitches, cokes, carbon foam and carbon fibers. The focus of this effort was on development of lower cost solvents, milder hydrogenation conditions and improved yield in order to enable practical production of these products. This technology is needed because of the long-term decline in production of domestic feedstocks such as petroleum pitch and coal tar pitch. Currently, carbon products represents a market of roughly 5 million tons domestically, and 19 million tons worldwide. Carbon products are mainly derived from feedstocks such as petroleum pitch and coal tar pitch. The domestic supply of petroleum pitch is declining because of the rising price of liquid fuels, which has caused US refineries to maximize liquid fuel production. As a consequence, the long term trend has a decline in production of petroleum pitch over the past 20 years. The production of coal tar pitch, as in the case of petroleum pitch, has likewise declined significantly over the past two decades. Coal tar pitch is a byproduct of metallurgical grade coke (metcoke) production. In this industry, modern metcoke facilities are recycling coal tar as fuel in order to enhance energy efficiency and minimize environmental emissions. Metcoke production itself is dependent upon the production requirements for domestic steel. Hence, several metcoke ovens have been decommissioned over the past two decades and have not been replaced. As a consequence sources of coal tar are being taken off line and are not being replaced. The long-term trend is a reduction in coal tar pitch production. Thus import of feedstocks, mainly from Eastern Europe and China, is on the rise despite the relatively large transportation cost. To reverse this trend, a new process for producing carbon products is needed. The process must be

  11. Production of a Mouse Antiserum to Bacteroides fragilis Enterotoxin Using a Recombinant Enterotoxin Precursor

    OpenAIRE

    Sandini, Silvia; d'Abusco, Anna Scotto; La Valle, Roberto; Pantosti, Annalisa

    2001-01-01

    The precursor of the Bacteroides fragilis metalloprotease enterotoxin was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli, which was not able to process the precursor into the biologically active enterotoxin. Mouse antiserum elicited to the recombinant precursor reacted with the purified enterotoxin and with a crude enterotoxin preparation from an enterotoxigenic strain. The antiserum neutralized the cytotoxic activity of the enterotoxin in HT-29 cells.

  12. Fatty acids and algal lipids as precursors of chlorination by-products

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan Liang; Yuen Shan Lui; Huachang Hong

    2012-01-01

    Six common algal fatty acids (FAs) with different numbers of double bonds,lipophilic fractions and proteins extracted from the diatom Navicula pelliculosa and algal cells were chlorinated to evaluate their potential in generating disinfection by-products (DBPs).The result showed that the more double bonds in the FAs,the higher the amounts of chloroform and dichloroacetic acid (DCAA) produced,but such a pattern was not observed for trichloroacetic acid (TCAA).Based on the previously reported composition of fatty acids in algal lipids,the DBP generation potentials of algal lipids were calculated.These predicted values were much lower than those measured in the chlorinated algal lipophilic fraction,suggesting unknown lipophilic fraction(s) served as potent DBPs precursors.Another calculation attempted to predict DBP production in algal cells based on algal lipid and protein composition,given quantified measured DBP production per unit algal lipid and proteins.The analysis showed that the observed DBP production was similar to that predicted (< 35% difference),suggesting that algal biochemical compositions may serve as a bioindicator for preliminary estimation of chloroform,DCAA and TCAA formation upon chlorinating algae.

  13. Some new psychoactive substances: precursor chemicals and synthesis-driven end-products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Michael

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes some of the new classes of 'designer drugs' being encountered today by forensic scientists and law enforcement agencies in Europe, the United States, and Australia. In particular, it concentrates on new cathinone derivatives, the tryptamines, new-generation phenethylamines, and some of the synthetic cannabinoids. The synthetic approaches towards many of these designer drugs including a discussion of the chemical precursors used in the syntheses are presented. Many of today's so-called designer drugs exist as a result of legitimate research into medical conditions and the natural product chemistry. A link between synthetic approaches published in the open scientific and medical literature and the exploitation of this research by clandestine manufacture of drugs for illicit purposes is drawn.

  14. Integrated electricity and carbon monoxide production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griffiths, J.

    1994-03-23

    In a process for the production of carbon monoxide and electric power in an IGCC with the removal of sulphur compounds, between the outlet of quenched gas from a partial oxidation unit and a fuel inlet to a combined cycle gas turbine there is a permeable membrane unit to separate a non-permeable stream, which is utilised as a source of carbon monoxide, and a permeate stream, which is used as fuel for the gas turbine of the combined cycle unit. (author)

  15. Arborisidine and Arbornamine, Two Monoterpenoid Indole Alkaloids with New Polycyclic Carbon-Nitrogen Skeletons Derived from a Common Pericine Precursor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Suet-Pick; Chong, Kam-Weng; Lim, Kuan-Hon; Lim, Siew-Huah; Low, Yun-Yee; Kam, Toh-Seok

    2016-04-01

    Two new monoterpene indole alkaloids, characterized by previously unencountered natural product skeletons, viz., arborisidine (1), incorporating indolizidine and cyclohexanone moieties fused to an indole unit, and arbornamine (2), incorporating an unprecedented 6/5/6/5/6 "arbornane" skeleton (distinct from the eburnan or tacaman skeleton), were isolated from a Malayan Kopsia arborea. The structures of the alkaloids were determined based on analysis of the NMR and MS data. Possible biogenetic pathways to these alkaloids from a common pericine precursor (3) are presented.

  16. Effects of metabolic pathway precursors and polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) on poly-(gamma)-glutamic acid production by Bacillus subtilis BL53.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Cesaro, Alessandra; da Silva, Suse Botelho; Ayub, Marco Antônio Záchia

    2014-09-01

    The aims of this study were to evaluate the effects of the addition of metabolic precursors and polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) as an oxygen carrier to cultures of Bacillus subtilis BL53 during the production of γ-PGA. Kinetics analyses of cultivations of different media showed that B. subtilis BL53 is an exogenous glutamic acid-dependent strain. When the metabolic pathway precursors of γ-PGA synthesis, L-glutamine and a-ketoglutaric acid, were added to the culture medium, production of the biopolymer was increased by 20 % considering the medium without these precursors. The addition of 10 % of the oxygen carrier PDMS to cultures caused a two-fold increase in the volumetric oxygen mass transfer coefficient (kLa), improving γ-PGA production and productivity. Finally, bioreactor cultures of B. subtilis BL53 adopting the combination of optimized medium E, added of glutamine, α-ketoglutaric acid, and PDMS, showed a productivity of 1 g L(-1) h(-1) of g-PGA after only 24 h of cultivation. Results of this study suggest that the use of metabolic pathway precursors glutamine and a-ketolgutaric acid, combined with the addition of PDMS as an oxygen carrier in bioreactors, can improve γ-PGA production and productivity by Bacillus strains .

  17. Catalytic synthesis of nitrogen-doped multi-walled carbon nanotubes using layered double hydroxides as catalyst precursors

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Yong Cao; Yun Zhao; Qingxia Li; Qingze Jiao

    2009-03-01

    The nitrogen (N)-doped carbon (CN) nanotubes were synthesized by pyrolysis of ethylenediamine with Ni1.07Mg1.01AlO3.58, Ni1.99Mg0.29AlO3.78, and Ni2.31Mg0.08AlO3.89 mixed oxides as catalysts at 650°C. Those mixed oxides were obtained by calcination of corresponding layered double hydroxide precursors (LDHs). Structure and composition of LDHs and mixed oxides were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Inductively coupled plasma spectrum. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and transmission electron microscope were used to characterize the N content, proportion of pyridine-like N structure and morphology of CN nanotubes. The results showed that the tubes grown with Ni2.31Mg0.08AlO3.89 as catalysts had more obvious bamboo-like structure, larger diameter than those grown with Ni1.07Mg1.01AlO3.58 and Ni1.99Mg0.29AlO3.78. The N content and proportion of graphitic-like N structures increased with the content of Ni2+ increasing in LDH precursors. The morphology, N content and pyridine-like N structures for CN nanotubes can be controlled to a certain extent by varying the content of Ni2+ in LDH precursors.

  18. SiC/SiC composite fabricated with carbon nanotube interface layer and a novel precursor LPVCS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Shuang, E-mail: zhsh6007@126.com [Science and Technology on Advanced Ceramic Fibers and Composites Laboratory, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha 410073 (China); School of Mechanical, Aerospace, and Civil Engineering, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Zhou, Xingui; Yu, Jinshan [Science and Technology on Advanced Ceramic Fibers and Composites Laboratory, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha 410073 (China); Mummery, Paul [School of Mechanical, Aerospace, and Civil Engineering, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom)

    2014-02-15

    Highlights: • The CNTs were distributed uniformly on the SiC fibers in the fabric by CVD process. • The microstructural evolution of the CNTs interface coating was studied. • The closed porosity was investigated by X-ray tomography. • The liquid precursor LPVCS exhibited high densification efficiency. - Abstract: Continuous SiC fiber reinforced SiC matrix composites (SiC/SiC) have been studied as promising candidate materials for nuclear applications. Three-dimensional SiC/SiC composite was fabricated via polymer impregnation and pyrolysis (PIP) process using carbon nanotubes (CNTs) as the interface layer and LPVCS as the polymer precursor. The microstructural evolution of the fiber/matrix interface was studied. The porosity, mechanical properties, thermal and electrical conductivities of the SiC/SiC composite were investigated. The results indicated that the high densification efficiency of the liquid precursor LPVCS resulted in a low porosity of the SiC/SiC composite. The SiC/SiC composite exhibited non-brittle fracture behavior, however, bending strength and fracture toughness of the composite were relatively low because of the absence of CNTs as the interface layer. The thermal and electrical conductivities of the SiC/SiC composite were low enough to meet the requirements desired for flow channel insert (FCI) applications.

  19. Synthesis of Nitrogen-Doped Carbon Nanocoils with Adjustable Morphology using Ni–Fe Layered Double Hydroxides as Catalyst Precursors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomohiro Iwasaki

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nitrogen-doped carbon nanocoils (CNCs with adjusted morphologies were synthesized in a one-step catalytic chemical vapour deposition (CVD process using acetoni‐ trile as the carbon and nitrogen source. The nickel iron oxide/nickel oxide nanocomposites, which were derived from nickel–iron layered double hydroxide (LDH precur‐ sors, were employed as catalysts for the synthesis of CNCs. In this method, precursor-to-catalyst transformation, catalyst activation, formation of CNCs, and nitrogen doping were all performed in situ in a single process. The morphology (coil diameter, coil pitch, and fibre diameter and nitrogen content of the synthesized CNCs was indi‐ vidually adjusted by modulation of the catalyst composi‐ tion and CVD reaction temperature, respectively. The adjustable ranges of the coil diameter, coil pitch, fibre diameter, and nitrogen content were confirmed to be approximately 500±100 nm, 600±100 nm, 100±20 nm, and 1.1±0.3 atom%, respectively.

  20. Nickel-carbon nanocomposites prepared using castor oil as precursor: A novel catalyst for ethanol steam reforming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carreño, Neftalí L. V.; Garcia, Irene T. S.; Raubach, Cristiane W.; Krolow, Mateus; Santos, Cláudia C. G.; Probst, Luiz F. D.; Fajardo, Humberto V.

    A novel and simple method to prepare nickel-based catalysts for ethanol steam reforming is proposed. The present method was developed using castor oil as a precursor. The results clarify that the nickel-carbon (Ni/C) catalyst has a high activity for ethanol steam reforming. It was observed that the catalytic behavior could be modified according to the experimental conditions employed. Moreover, it is interesting to note that the increase in the catalytic activity of the Ni/C nanocomposite over time, at 500 and 600 °C of reaction temperature, may be associated with the formation of filamentous carbon. The preliminary results indicate that the novel methodology used, led to the obtainment of materials with important properties that can be extended to applications in different catalytic process.

  1. Mesoporous and carbon hybrid structures from layered molecular precursors for Li-ion battery application: the case of β-In2S3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ming-Jian; Tian, Lei-Lei; Li, Shuankui; Lin, Ling-Piao; Pan, Feng

    2016-04-04

    A new method was demonstrated to construct mesoporous and carbon hybrid structures of β-In2S3 from the thermal decomposition of layered molecular precursors. When applied to LIBs, they all exhibit good cycling stability and excellent rate performance due to the great uniformity of mesopores and pyrolysis carbon distributed in the materials.

  2. Mass Production of Carbon Nanofibers Using Microwave Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mubarak, N M; Abdullah, E C; Sahu, J N; Jayakumar, N S; Ganesan, P

    2015-12-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNFs) were produced by gas phase single stage microwave assisted chemical vapour deposition (MA-CVD) using ferrocene as a catalyst and acetylene (C2H2) and hydrogen (H2) as precursor gases. The effect of the process parameters such as microwave power, radiation time, and gas ratio of C2H2/H2 was investigated. The CNFs were characterized using scanning and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). Results reveal that the optimized conditions for CNF production were 1000 W reaction power, 35 min radiation time, and 0.8 gas ratio of C2H2/H2. TEM analyses revealed that the uniformly dispersed CNFs diameters ranging from 115-131 nm. The TGA analysis showed that the purity of CNF produced was 93%.

  3. Effects of cobalt precursor on pyrolyzed carbon-supported cobalt-polypyrrole as electrocatalyst toward oxygen reduction reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Xianxia; Hu, Xin-Xin; Ding, Xin-Long; Kong, Hai-Chuan; Sha, Hao-Dong; Lin, He; Wen, Wen; Shen, Guangxia; Guo, Zhi; Ma, Zi-Feng; Yang, Yong

    2013-11-01

    A series of non-precious metal electrocatalysts, namely pyrolyzed carbon-supported cobalt-polypyrrole, Co-PPy-TsOH/C, are synthesized with various cobalt precursors, including cobalt acetate, cobalt nitrate, cobalt oxalate, and cobalt chloride. The catalytic performance towards oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) is comparatively investigated with electrochemical techniques of cyclic voltammogram, rotating disk electrode and rotating ring-disk electrode. The results are analyzed and discussed employing physiochemical techniques of X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, inductively coupled plasma, elemental analysis, and extended X-ray absorption fine structure. It shows that the cobalt precursor plays an essential role on the synthesis process as well as microstructure and performance of the Co-PPy-TsOH/C catalysts towards ORR. Among the studied Co-PPy-TsOH/C catalysts, that prepared with cobalt acetate exhibits the best ORR performance. The crystallite/particle size of cobalt and its distribution as well as the graphitization degree of carbon in the catalyst greatly affects the catalytic performance of Co-PPy-TsOH/C towards ORR. Metallic cobalt is the main component in the active site in Co-PPy-TsOH/C for catalyzing ORR, but some other elements such as nitrogen are probably involved, too.

  4. Nucleation and Epitaxy-Mediated Phase Transformation of a Precursor Cadmium Carbonate Phase at the Calcite/Water Interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riechers, Shawn L.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Kerisit, Sebastien N.

    2017-02-24

    Mineral nucleation can be catalyzed by the presence of mineral substrates; however, the mechanisms of heterogeneous nucleation remain poorly understood. A combination of in situ time-sequenced measurements and nano-manipulation experiments were performed using atomic force microscopy (AFM) to probe the mechanisms of heteroepitaxial nucleation of otavite (CdCO3) on calcite (CaCO3) single crystals that exposed the (10-14) surface. Otavite and calcite are isostructural carbonates that display a 4% lattice mismatch, based on their (10-14) surface areas. AFM observations revealed a two-stage process in the nucleation of cadmium carbonate surface precipitates. As evidenced by changes in height, shape, growth behavior, and friction signal of the precipitates, a precursor phase was observed to initially form on the surface and subsequently undergo an epitaxy-mediated phase transformation to otavite, which then grew epitaxially. Nano-manipulation experiments, in which the applied force was increased progressively until precipitates were removed from the surface, showed that adhesion of the precursor phase to the substrate was distinctively weaker than that of the epitaxial phase, consistent with that of an amorphous phase. These findings demonstrate for the first time that heterogeneous mineral nucleation can follow a non-classical pathway like that found in homogenous aqueous conditions.

  5. Modeling of HiPco Process for Carbon Nanotube Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gokcen, T.; Dateo, C. E.; Meyyappan, M.; Colbert, D. T.; Smith, D. T.; Smith, K.; Smalley, R. E.; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    High-pressure carbon monoxide (HiPco) reactor, developed at Rice University, is used to produce single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT) from gas-phase reactions of iron carbonyl and nickel carbonyl in carbon monoxide at high pressures (10 - 100 atm). Computational modeling is used to better understand the HiPco process. In the present model, decomposition of the precursor, metal cluster formation and growth, and carbon nanotube growth are addressed. Decomposition of precursor molecules is necessary to initiate metal cluster formation. The metal clusters serve as catalysts for carbon nanotube growth. Diameter of metal clusters and number of atoms in these clusters are some of the essential information for predicting carbon nanotube formation and growth, which is then modeled by Boudouard reaction (2CO ---> C(s) + CO2) with metal catalysts. The growth kinetic model is integrated with a two-dimensional axisymmetric reactor flow model to predict reactor performance.

  6. Comparative proteomics analysis of engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae with enhanced biofuel precursor production.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoling Tang

    Full Text Available The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae was metabolically modified for enhanced biofuel precursor production by knocking out genes encoding mitochondrial isocitrate dehydrogenase and over-expression of a heterologous ATP-citrate lyase. A comparative iTRAQ-coupled 2D LC-MS/MS analysis was performed to obtain a global overview of ubiquitous protein expression changes in S. cerevisiae engineered strains. More than 300 proteins were identified. Among these proteins, 37 were found differentially expressed in engineered strains and they were classified into specific categories based on their enzyme functions. Most of the proteins involved in glycolytic and pyruvate branch-point pathways were found to be up-regulated and the proteins involved in respiration and glyoxylate pathway were however found to be down-regulated in engineered strains. Moreover, the metabolic modification of S. cerevisiae cells resulted in a number of up-regulated proteins involved in stress response and differentially expressed proteins involved in amino acid metabolism and protein biosynthesis pathways. These LC-MS/MS based proteomics analysis results not only offered extensive information in identifying potential protein-protein interactions, signal pathways and ubiquitous cellular changes elicited by the engineered pathways, but also provided a meaningful biological information platform serving further modification of yeast cells for enhanced biofuel production.

  7. Room-temperature synthesis of soluble, fluorescent carbon nanoparticles from organogel precursors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Néabo, Jules Roméo; Vigier-Carrière, Cécile; Rondeau-Gagné, Simon; Morin, Jean-François

    2012-10-18

    Carbon nanoparticles were obtained at room temperature by irradiating an organogel made from a 1,8-diaryloctatetrayne derivative in chloroform. During the topochemical polymerization, the morphology of the gel changes from fibers to soluble, yellow fluorescent nanoparticles in high yield. Analyses suggest that the resulting nanoparticles are made of amorphous graphitic carbon.

  8. Formation and transformation of a short range ordered iron carbonate precursor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dideriksen, Knud; Frandsen, Cathrine; Bovet, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    Fe(II)-carbonates, such as siderite, form in environments where O2 is scarce, e.g., during marine sediment diagenesis, corrosion and possibly CO2 sequestration, but little is known about their formation pathways. We show that early precipitates from carbonate solutions containing 0.1M Fe(II) with...

  9. Integrating Steel Production with Mineral Carbon Sequestration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klaus Lackner; Paul Doby; Tuncel Yegulalp; Samuel Krevor; Christopher Graves

    2008-05-01

    The objectives of the project were (i) to develop a combination iron oxide production and carbon sequestration plant that will use serpentine ores as the source of iron and the extraction tailings as the storage element for CO2 disposal, (ii) the identification of locations within the US where this process may be implemented and (iii) to create a standardized process to characterize the serpentine deposits in terms of carbon disposal capacity and iron and steel production capacity. The first objective was not accomplished. The research failed to identify a technique to accelerate direct aqueous mineral carbonation, the limiting step in the integration of steel production and carbon sequestration. Objective (ii) was accomplished. It was found that the sequestration potential of the ultramafic resource surfaces in the US and Puerto Rico is approximately 4,647 Gt of CO2 or over 500 years of current US production of CO2. Lastly, a computer model was developed to investigate the impact of various system parameters (recoveries and efficiencies and capacities of different system components) and serpentinite quality as well as incorporation of CO2 from sources outside the steel industry.

  10. Development of Ni-Based Catalysts Derived from Hydrotalcite-Like Compounds Precursors for Synthesis Gas Production via Methane or Ethanol Reforming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ya-Li Du

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available As a favorably clean fuel, syngas (synthesis gas production has been the focus of concern in past decades. Substantial literatures reported the syngas production by various catalytic reforming reactions particularly in methane or ethanol reforming. Among the developed catalysts in these reforming processes, Ni-based catalysts from hydrotalcite-like compounds (HTLcs precursors have drawn considerable attention for their preferable structural traits. This review covers the recent literature reporting syngas production with Ni-based catalysts from HTLc precursors via methane or ethanol reforming. The discussion was initiated with catalyst preparation (including conventional and novel means, followed by subsequent thermal treatment processes, then composition design and the addition of promoters in these catalysts. As Ni-based catalysts have thermodynamic potential to deactivate because of carbon deposition or metal sintering, measures for dealing with these problems were finally summarized. To obtain optimal catalytic performances and resultantly better syngas production, based on analyzing the achievements of the references, some perspectives were finally proposed.

  11. The effect of calcination on reactive milling of anthracite as potential precursor for graphite production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burgess-Clifford, Caroline E.; Van Essendelft, Dirk T. [The EMS Energy Institute, C211 Coal Utilization Laboratory, Penn State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Narayanan, Deepa L. [Puget Sound Energy, 10885 NE 4th PSE-09S, Bellevue, WA 98004 (United States); Jain, Puja; Lueking, Angela D. [Department of Energy and Mineral Engineering, Pennsylvania State University, 120 Hosler, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Sakti, Apurba [School of Earth Atmospheric and Environmental Sciences, University of Manchester, Manchester (United Kingdom)

    2009-12-15

    The effect of a pretreatment using reactive ball milling and calcination on the graphitizability of an anthracite coal is explored. A thermal anneal of Buck Mountain anthracite at 1400 C in argon increased the L{sub c} crystallite dimension (from 12 to 20 A) and led to an increase in the oxidation temperature of the product. Ball milling of the coal reduced particle size with a nominal effect on carbon order and the degree of graphitization after the 1400 C thermal anneal (L{sub c} from 18 to 29 A). Ball milling in cyclohexene led to a substantial increase in the graphitizability at 1400 C (L{sub c} from 12 to 50 A). The enhanced reactivity was due to both carbon structure and introduced metal. The products of the mechano-chemical pretreatment and thermal anneal consisted of nanographene ribbons and multi-walled nanopolyhedral particles. It oxidized at moderate temperatures and had a high (74.3%) degree of graphitization based on X-ray diffraction analysis; the derived material has potential as filler for production of graphite. (author)

  12. Effect of ozonation and UV irradiation with direct filtration on disinfection and disinfection by-product precursors in drinking water treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amirsardari, Y; Yu, Q; Willams, P

    2001-09-01

    Pilot plant studies were conducted to evaluate the effect of pre-ozonation and ultraviolet irradiation on disinfection, disinfection by-product precursors and water quality in a direct filtration water treatment system. Disinfection parameters including total coliforms, faecal coliforms and heterotrophic plate count were investigated. Total organic carbon (TOC), trihalomethanes (THMs), total organic halides (TOX), filtered water turbidity and colour were also evaluated. It was found that advanced pre-oxidation processes (ozonation and UV irradiation) significantly increase the level of disinfection of raw water. Removal of total trihalomethanes and total organic halides precursors improved with ozonation and UV irradiation, compared to no oxidation treatment in direct filtration and/or in conventional water treatment. All coliforms (total and faecal) were completely destroyed by ozonation alone, and also with ozonation in conjunction with UV irradiation. However, the heterotrophic plate count was not significantly reduced at an ozone residual concentration of 0.1 mg l(-1). This suggests that disinfection efficiency is strongly influenced by competition reactions of organic and inorganic compounds with ozone. Precursors of total trihalomethanes and total organic halides were reduced by 90% and 98%, respectively, with advanced pre-oxidation processes. Water quality parameters were improved by the pre-ozonation and UV irradiation treatment system.

  13. Modeling of the HiPco process for carbon nanotube production. II. Reactor-scale analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gokcen, Tahir; Dateo, Christopher E.; Meyyappan, M.

    2002-01-01

    The high-pressure carbon monoxide (HiPco) process, developed at Rice University, has been reported to produce single-walled carbon nanotubes from gas-phase reactions of iron carbonyl in carbon monoxide at high pressures (10-100 atm). Computational modeling is used here to develop an understanding of the HiPco process. A detailed kinetic model of the HiPco process that includes of the precursor, decomposition metal cluster formation and growth, and carbon nanotube growth was developed in the previous article (Part I). Decomposition of precursor molecules is necessary to initiate metal cluster formation. The metal clusters serve as catalysts for carbon nanotube growth. The diameter of metal clusters and number of atoms in these clusters are some of the essential information for predicting carbon nanotube formation and growth, which is then modeled by the Boudouard reaction with metal catalysts. Based on the detailed model simulations, a reduced kinetic model was also developed in Part I for use in reactor-scale flowfield calculations. Here this reduced kinetic model is integrated with a two-dimensional axisymmetric reactor flow model to predict reactor performance. Carbon nanotube growth is examined with respect to several process variables (peripheral jet temperature, reactor pressure, and Fe(CO)5 concentration) with the use of the axisymmetric model, and the computed results are compared with existing experimental data. The model yields most of the qualitative trends observed in the experiments and helps to understanding the fundamental processes in HiPco carbon nanotube production.

  14. ON THE IMPROVEMENT OF THE PODOPHYLLOTOXIN PRODUCTION BY PHENYLPROPANOID PRECURSOR FEEDING TO CELL-CULTURES OF PODOPHYLLUM-HEXANDRUM ROYLE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANUDEN, W; PRAS, N; MALINGRE, TM

    1990-01-01

    In order to improve the production of the cytotoxic lignan podophyllotoxin, seven precursors from the phenylpropanoid-routing and one related compound were fed to cell suspension cultures derived from the rhizomes of Podophyllum hexandrum Royle. These cell cultures were able to convert only coniferi

  15. Effect of the nature the carbon precursor on the physico-chemical characteristics of the resulting activated carbon materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jimenez, Vicente, E-mail: vicente.jimenez@uclm.es [Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Departamento de Ingenieria Quimica, Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha, 13071 Ciudad Real (Spain); Sanchez, Paula; Valverde, Jose Luis [Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Departamento de Ingenieria Quimica, Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha, 13071 Ciudad Real (Spain); Romero, Amaya [Escuela Tecnica Agricola, Departamento de Ingenieria Quimica, Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha, 13071 Ciudad Real (Spain)

    2010-11-01

    Carbon materials, including amorphous carbon, graphite, carbon nanospheres (CNSs) and different types of carbon nanofibers (CNFs) [platelet, herringbone and ribbon], were chemically activated using KOH. The pore structure of carbon materials was analyzed using N{sub 2}/77 K adsorption isotherms. The presence of oxygen groups was analyzed by temperature programmed desorption in He and acid-base titration. The structural order of the materials was studied by X-ray diffraction and temperature programmed oxidation. The morphology and diameter distribution of CNFs and CNSs were characterized by transmission electron microscopy. The materials were also characterized by temperature-desorption programmed of H{sub 2} and elemental composition. The ways in which the different structures were activated are described, showing the type of pores generated. Relationships between carbon yield, removed carbon, activation degree and graphitic character were also examined. The oxygen content in the form of oxygen-containing surface groups increased after the activation giving qualitative information about them. The average diameter of both CNFs and CNSs was decreased after the activation process as consequence of the changes produced on the material surface.

  16. Production and Peripheral Roles of 5-HTP, a Precursor of Serotonin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuhiro Nakamura

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine [5-HT] has been implicated in a variety of physiological and pathological functions. Multiple steps of enzyme reactions enable biosynthesis of 5-HT. The first and rate-limiting step of the reaction is the synthesis of 5-hydroxy-L-tryptophan (5-HTP from L-tryptophan. This step is dictated by an enzyme, tryptophan hydroxylase (TPH. TPH requires 6R-L-erythro-5,6,7,8-tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4 as a co-substrate of TPH. 5-HTP has been simply regarded as a precursor of 5-HT and it is believed that the biological significance of 5-HTP is essentially ascribed to the production of 5-HT. However, recent works shed light on the specific functions of 5-HTP in the periphery. In this review article, we focus on the specific roles of exogenous 5-HTP as well as the endogenous 5-HTP in the gut epithelial cells. Since systemic treatment with 5-HTP is applied to patients with lower 5-HT levels, the studies on the specific role of 5-HTP might create an opportunity to explore the effects of exogenously-applied 5-HTP in the gut in man.

  17. Activated carbon from thermo-compressed wood and other lignocellulosic precursors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Capart, R.

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available The effects of thermo-compression on the physical properties such as bulk density, mass yield, surface area, and also adsorption capacity of activated carbon were studied. The activated carbon samples were prepared from thermo-compressed and virgin fir-wood by two methods, a physical activation with CO2 and a chemical activation with KOH. A preliminary thermo-compression method seems an easy way to confer to a tender wood a bulk density almost three times larger than its initial density. Thermo-compression increased yield regardless of the mode of activation. The physical activation caused structural alteration, which enhanced the enlargement of micropores and even their degradation, leading to the formation of mesopores. Chemical activation conferred to activated carbon a heterogeneous and exclusively microporous nature. Moreover, when coupled to chemical activation, thermo-compression resulted in a satisfactory yield (23%, a high surface area (>1700 m2.g-1, and a good adsorption capacity for two model pollutants in aqueous solution: methylene blue and phenol. Activated carbon prepared from thermo-compressed wood exhibited a higher adsorption capacity for both the pollutants than did a commercial activated carbon.

  18. Alignment of muscle precursor cells on the vertical edges of thick carbon nanotube films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, Ian; Gestmann, Ingo; Wright, Andrew C

    2013-10-01

    The development of scaffolds and templates is an essential aspect of tissue engineering. We show that thick (>0.5 mm) vertically aligned carbon nanotube films, made by chemical vapour deposition, can be used as biocompatible substrates for the directional alignment of mouse muscle cells where the cells grow on the exposed sides of the films. Ultra high resolution scanning electron microscopy reveals that the films themselves consist mostly of small diameter (10 nm) multi-wall carbon nanotubes of wavy morphology with some single wall carbon nanotubes. Our findings show that for this alignment to occur the nanotubes must be in pristine condition. Mechanical wiping of the films to create directional alignment is detrimental to directional bioactivity. Larger areas for study have been formed from a composite of multiply stacked narrow strips of nanotubes wipe-transferred onto elastomer supports. These composite substrates appear to show a useful degree of alignment of the cells.

  19. A free energy study of carbon clusters on Ir(111): Precursors to graphene growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tetlow, H.; Ford, I. J.; Kantorovich, L.

    2017-01-01

    It is widely accepted that the nucleation of graphene on transition metals is related to the formation of carbon clusters of various sizes and shapes on the surface. Assuming a low concentration of carbon atoms on a crystal surface, we derive a thermodynamic expression for the grand potential of the cluster of N carbon atoms, relative to a single carbon atom on the surface (the cluster work of formation). This is derived taking into account both the energetic and entropic contributions, including structural and rotational components, and is explicitly dependent on the temperature. Then, using ab initio density functional theory, we calculate the work of formation of carbon clusters CN on the Ir(111) surface as a function of temperature considering clusters with up to N = 16 C atoms. We consider five types of clusters (chains, rings, arches, top-hollow, and domes), and find, in agreement with previous zero temperature studies, that at elevated temperatures the structure most favoured depends on N, with chains and arches being the most likely at N 10 . Our calculations reveal the work of formation to have a much more complex character as a function of the cluster size than one would expect from classical nucleation theory: for typical conditions, the work of formation displays not one but two nucleation barriers, at around N = 4-5 and N = 9-11. This suggests, in agreement with existing LEEM data, that five atom carbon clusters, along with C monomers, must play a pivotal role in the nucleation and growth of graphene sheets, whereby the formation of large clusters is achieved from the coalescence of smaller clusters (Smoluchowski ripening). Although the main emphasis of our study is on thermodynamic aspects of nucleation, the pivotal role of kinetics of transitions between different cluster types during the nucleation process is also discussed for a few cases as illustrative examples.

  20. Very high carbon delta -doping concentration in AlxGa1 - xAs grown by metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy using trimethylaluminum as a doping precursor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, G.; Petravić, M.; Jagadish, C.

    1996-04-01

    Using trimethylaluminum (TMAl) or trimethylgallium (TMGa) as a doping precursor, carbon δ-doped AlxGa1-xAs has been grown in metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy. Compared to TMGa, TMAl exhibits very high carbon δ-doping efficiency. The best hole profile of carbon δ-doped Al0.3Ga0.7As grown at 580 °C using TMAl as a doping precursor has a peak hole density of 1.6×1019 cm-3 for a full width at half-maximum of 85 Å with most of the incorporated carbon atoms being electrically active. When TMGa is used as the doping precursor, the hole density of carbon δ-doped AlxGa1-xAs significantly increases with an increase of the Al mole fraction. By comparison, the use of TMAl almost induces independence of the hole density on the Al mole fraction. The hole density of carbon δ-doped Al0.3Ga0.7As weakly increases when reducing the δ-doping temperature regardless of the doping precursors. The hole density of carbon δ-doped Al0.3Ga0.7As grown at 580 °C is proportionally associated with the moles of TMGa or TMAl totally input during a δ-doping step. Using heavily carbon δ-doped layers in Al0.3Ga0.7As, a carbon δ-doped pipi doping superlattice possessing a bulk-doped-like hole profile with an average hole density of 1.1×1019 cm-3 is therefore demonstrated as an alternative with unique advantages over other conventional carbon bulk-doping approaches.

  1. Photoinduced crystallization of calcium carbonate from a homogeneous precursor solution in the presence of partially hydrolyzed poly(vinyl alcohol)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishio, Takashi; Naka, Kensuke

    2015-04-01

    Photoinduced crystallization of calcium carbonate (CaCO3) was demonstrated by the photodecarboxylation of ketoprofen (KP, 2-(3-benzoylphenyl)propionic acid) under alkaline conditions (pH 10). In this method, a homogeneous solution comprising KP, calcium chloride, ammonia, and partially hydrolyzed poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVAPS, degree of saponification: 86.5-89.0 mol %) was used as the precursor solution and was exposed to ultraviolet (UV) irradiation for different time periods. Thermogravimetric analysis of the obtained xerogels showed that increasing the UV irradiation time increased the amount of CaCO3 formed and the complete conversion of calcium ions to calcite was achieved after 50 min of UV irradiation. Furthermore, solid phase analyses suggested that nanometer-to-micron-sized calcite crystals were formed and dispersed in the obtained PVAPS matrix.

  2. Investigation of isotopic linkages between precursor materials and the improvised high explosive product hexamethylene triperoxide diamine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lock, C.M.; Brust, G.M.H.; Breukelen, M. van; Dalmolen, J.; Koeberg, M.; Stoker, D.A.

    2012-01-01

    The results of isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) on hexamethylene triperoxide diamine (HMTD) and its precursor hexamethylenetetramine (hexamine) is presented. HMTD was prepared from hexamine using several different sources of hexamine under both controlled laboratory conditions and in field exp

  3. Properties and degradability of hydrothermal carbonization products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eibisch, Nina; Helfrich, Mirjam; Don, Axel; Mikutta, Robert; Kruse, Andrea; Ellerbrock, Ruth; Flessa, Heinz

    2013-09-01

    Biomass carbonized via hydrothermal carbonization (HTC) yields a liquid and a carbon (C)-rich solid called hydrochar. In soil, hydrochars may act as fertilizers and promote C sequestration. We assumed that the chemical composition of the raw material (woodchips, straw, grass cuttings, or digestate) determines the properties of the liquid and solid HTC products, including their degradability. Additionally, we investigated whether easily mineralizable organic components adsorbed on the hydrochar surface influence the degradability of the hydrochars and could be removed by repetitive washing. Carbon mineralization was measured as CO production over 30 d in aerobic incubation experiments with loamy sand. Chemical analysis revealed that most nutrients were preferably enriched in the liquid phase. The C mineralization of hydrochars from woodchips (2% of total C added), straw (3%), grass (6%), and digestate (14%) were dependent on the raw material carbonized and were significantly lower (by 60-92%; < 0.05) than the mineralization of the corresponding raw materials. Washing of the hydrochars significantly decreased mineralization of digestate-hydrochar (up to 40%) but had no effect on mineralization rates of the other three hydrochars. Variations in C mineralization between different hydrochars could be explained by multiple factors, including differences in the O/C-H/C ratios, C/N ratios, lignin content, amount of oxygen-containing functional groups, and pH. In contrast to the solids, the liquid products were highly degradable, with 61 to 89% of their dissolved organic C being mineralized within 30 d. The liquids may be treated aerobically (e.g., for nutrient recovery).

  4. Graphene nanoribbons production from flat carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melo, W. S.; Guerini, S.; Diniz, E. M., E-mail: eduardo.diniz@ufma.br [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal do Maranhão, São Luís - MA 65080-805 (Brazil)

    2015-11-14

    Graphene nanoribbons are of great interest for pure and applied sciences due to their unique properties which depend on the nanoribbon edges, as, for example, energy gap and antiferromagnetic coupling. Nevertheless, the synthesis of nanoribbons with well-defined edges remains a challenge. To collaborate with this subject, here we propose a new route for the production of graphene nanoribbons from flat carbon nanotubes filled with a one-dimensional chain of Fe atoms by first principles calculations based on density functional theory. Our results show that Fe-filled flat carbon nanotubes are energetically more stable than non flattened geometries. Also we find that by hydrogenation or oxygenation of the most curved region of the Fe-filled flat armchair carbon nanotube, it occurred a spontaneous production of zigzag graphene nanoribbons which have metallic or semiconducting behavior depending on the edge and size of the graphene nanoribbon. Such findings can be used to create a new method of synthesis of regular-edge carbon nanoribbons.

  5. Evaluation of novalak resins as a precursor for fabrication of carbon - carbon composites. Pt. 1. Optimization of curing states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sedghi, A.; Golestani Fard, F. [Iran Univ. of Science and Technology, Narmak, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Dept. of Material Engineering

    1997-09-01

    Curing of novalak resin has been investigated by applying different thermal analysis methods and solvent extraction technique. Results revealed that cure can be optimized by finding the critical steps in cure and hold resin in these steps for appropriate time. Best results were also achieved by using resins which contained lower free phenol and hexamine amount. Application of pressure is necessary in initial stages of cure but found to be harmful in the final stages. It was also found that due to the defects produced in the final stages of curing, this process cannot be completed and long time post cure should be applied on these resins. By applying a special curing regime, it was proved that defects during pyrolysis stage could be decreased profoundly and a carbon residue of more than 67 percent expected. The results are explained by emphasis on carbon - carbon applications. (orig.)

  6. Product carbon footprint developments and gaps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kronborg Jensen, Jesper

    2012-01-01

    to the existing literature of green supply chain management. Findings - The multiple initiatives for standardization each improve the understanding of standardized methods of conducting PCF. At the same time, however, important differences exist between the standards in terms of the modelling framework to be used......Purpose - Over the last decade, multiple initiatives have been undertaken to learn how to capture the carbon footprint of a supply chain at a product level. The purpose of this paper is to focus on the process of standardization to secure consistency of product carbon footprinting (PCF......) and to outline how the current developments in PCF support the need for a standardized method to measure and report environmental performance in supply chains. Design/methodology/approach - This paper is based on a literature review and a review of international standards for PCF which brings knowledge of PCF...

  7. Use of organic precursors and graphenes in the controlled synthesis of carbon-containing nanomaterials for energy storage and conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shubin; Bachman, Robert E; Feng, Xinliang; Müllen, Klaus

    2013-01-15

    The development of high-performance electrochemical energy storage and conversion devices, including supercapacitors, lithium-ion batteries, and fuel cells, is an important step on the road to alternative energy technologies. Carbon-containing nanomaterials (CCNMs), defined here as pure carbon materials and carbon/metal (oxide, hydroxide) hybrids with structural features on the nanometer scale, show potential application in such devices. Because of their pronounced electrochemical activity, high chemical and thermal stability and low cost, researchers are interested in CCNMs to serve as electrodes in energy-related devices. Various all-carbon materials are candidates for electrochemical energy storage and conversion devices. Furthermore, carbon-based hybrid materials, which consist of a carbon component with metal oxide- or metal hydroxide-based nanostructures, offer the opportunity to combine the attractive properties of these two components and tune the behavior of the resulting materials. As such, the design and synthesis of CCNMs provide an attractive route for the construction of high-performance electrode materials. Studies in these areas have revealed that both the composition and the fabrication protocol employed in preparing CCNMs influence the morphology and microstructure of the resulting material and its electrochemical performance. Consequently, researchers have developed several synthesis strategies, including hard-templated, soft-templated, and template-free synthesis of CCNMs. In this Account, we focus on recent advances in the controlled synthesis of such CCNMs and the potential of the resulting materials for energy storage or conversion applications. The Account is divided into four major categories based on the carbon precursor employed in the synthesis: low molecular weight organic or organometallic molecules, hyperbranched or cross-linked polymers consisting of aromatic subunits, self-assembling discotic molecules, and graphenes. In each case

  8. Photochemical production of carbon disulphide in seawater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Huixiang; Moore, Robert M.; Miller, William L.

    1998-03-01

    It is generally accepted that the ocean is an important source for atmospheric CS2, which makes a major contribution to the formation of COS in the atmosphere. The processes producing CS2 in seawater, however, are essentially unknown. We report for the first time to our knowledge that marine photochemical reactions are identified as a significant source for oceanic CS2. Apparent quantum yield spectra of CS2 production were obtained using water samples collected in the northeast Atlantic. Results indicate that it is mainly UV solar radiation (290-340 nm) which is responsible for CS2 photoproduction. The photoproduction rate of CS2 is positively correlated with absorbance at 350 nm, suggesting that the reactions are mediated by chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM). Laboratory irradiations have confirmed that cysteine and cystine are efficient precursors of CS2 and that OH radicals are likely to be important intermediates. Both the field survey and laboratory work point to similar mechanisms for photochemical production of CS2 and COS in marine waters. A CS2 production rate of 0.49 Tg yr-1 for the world oceans has been estimated using the quantum yield spectra from this work and the sea surface light field provided by Leifer [1988]. This estimate is of the same order of magnitude as the present estimate of the CS2 flux from the ocean to the atmosphere based on surface saturation and wind speed.

  9. Synthesis of highly fluorescent hydrophobic carbon dots by hot injection method using Paraplast as precursor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talib, Abou [Doctoral Degree Program in Marine Biotechnology, National Sun Yat-Sen University, Kaohsiung 80424, Taiwan (China); Pandey, Sunil [Department of Chemistry, National Sun Yat-Sen University, 70, Lien-Hai Road, Kaohsiung 80424, Taiwan (China); Center for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, National Sun Yat-Sen University, 70, Lien-Hai Road, Kaohsiung 80424, Taiwan (China); Thakur, Mukeshchand [Department of Chemistry, National Sun Yat-Sen University, 70, Lien-Hai Road, Kaohsiung 80424, Taiwan (China); Wu, Hui-Fen, E-mail: hui@faculty.nsysu.edu.tw [Department of Chemistry, National Sun Yat-Sen University, 70, Lien-Hai Road, Kaohsiung 80424, Taiwan (China); Center for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, National Sun Yat-Sen University, 70, Lien-Hai Road, Kaohsiung 80424, Taiwan (China); Doctoral Degree Program in Marine Biotechnology, National Sun Yat-Sen University, Kaohsiung 80424, Taiwan (China); School of Pharmacy, College of Pharmacy, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung 800, Taiwan (China); Institute of Medical Science and Technology, National Sun Yat-Sen University, Kaohsiung, 80424, Taiwan (China)

    2015-03-01

    We have reported synthesis of bright blue colored hydrophobic carbon dots (hC-dots) using highly pure blend of polymers called Paraplast. We developed a hot injection method for making nearly monodispersed hC-dots with a diameter in a range: 5–30 nm as confirmed by high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). The involvement of various functional groups was confirmed by Fourier transform infra-red (FTIR) spectroscopy. These hC-dots were incubated with breast cancer stem cells in order to check the entry as well as biological imaging. The cells were analyzed using epifluorescent microscopy. hC-dots showed concentration dependent cytotoxicity (LD{sub 50}: 50 mg/ml) and could be used for bioimaging even at lower concentration (0.5 mg/ml). hC-dots were found to be versatile agents for peeping inside the cells which could also be used for delivery of water insoluble chemotherapeutic agents to variety of solid tumors. - Highlights: • Synthesis of hydrophobic carbon dots from polymer based Paraplast • Deep blue color under the influence of UV light • Typical optical properties used for biological imaging • Biological imaging of breast cancer stem cells revealing potential of carbon dots.

  10. Acetate production enhancement from carbon dioxide reduction by using modified cathode materials in microbial electrosynthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aryal, Nabin; Halder, Arnab; Zhang, Minwei

    in the bioelectrochemical System (BES). The MES reactor can power with the solar photovoltaic system and harvest light energy to multi-carbon compounds to make it artificial photosynthesis system. Nevertheless, chemical production rate should be optimized for the commercialization of MES technology. Interestingly, it has......Microbial electrosynthesis (MES) is one of the emerging biosustainable technologies for the biological conversion of carbon dioxide to the value-added chemical precursor. The electro autotrophic bacteria fix CO2 via Wood-Ljungdahl pathway, accepting the electron derived from the cathode...... been demonstrated that the productivity was enhanced with the modified cathode surfaces by improving microbe-electrode electron transfer. Here, we have tested the different cathode materials for the improvement of acetate production from carbon dioxide and their behavior for the biofilm formation...

  11. Simulations of the Dynamics of Precursor Organic and Prebiotic Carbon-rich Moleculess

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, David William; Sadeghpour, Hossein

    2015-01-01

    Not only has mid-IR imaging revealed an extraordinary variety of carbon-rich molecules present in the galaxy, but also that they can be seen in a host of different astronomical bodies; from HII regions to planetary nebula, and from young stellar objects to old post-AGB sources. The range of organic species discovered so far include PAHs, fullerenes, long chain hydrocarbons and carbonaceous clusters, some of which are biologically important. There's strong evidence that much of the terrestrial water was delivered to Earth during the Late Heavy Bombardment (LHB) approximately 3.8 - 4.1 Gyr ago [1]. Comparisons of the deuterium-hydrogen ratio of the Vienna Mean Standard Ocean Water and comets like Harley 2, have revealed a striking similarity​ [2]​​. It's not without reason to assume that prebiotic molecules may have been delivered to Earth​, too. ​In this work, reactive molecular dynamics simulations ​[3] are performed to probe the formation of carbon-rich molecules and clusters on graphitic surfaces. The simulations are run over a range of temperatures, densities and carbonaceous surfaces and a comparison is made of the distribution of chain and cluster formation in the gas and condensed phases. Results from these simulations will be presented.[1]. Hartmann, W. K., Ryder, G., Dones, L. & Grinspoon, D. in Origin of the Earth and Moon (eds Canup, R. & Righter, K.) 493--512 (Univ. Arizona Press, Tucson, 2000).[​2]. Hartogh P. et al. Ocean-like water in the Jupiter-family comet 103P/Hartley 2. Nature 478, 218-220 (2011).[3]. Patra N. P. Kral, and H. R. Sadeghpour. Nucleation and stabilization of carbon-rich structures in interstellar media', Astrophysical Journal 785, 6(2014); doi:10.1088/0004-637X/785/1/6.​

  12. Metal-Catalyzed Alkynylation of Brominated Polyphenylenes. Thermoset Precursors of High Density Monolithic Glassy Carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-11-22

    melting events at 152 and 1750C on the first heating scan to 2300C. While the char yield for 4a was only 50% by TGA analysis , the charred material was...after TGA analysis was also a black powder, again indicating that no flow had occurred. The char had a density of 1.59 g/cc. 1 I Polymers 16b and 16c had...material appeared as shiny black droplets after TGA analysis . The charred carbon material from 19a had a density of 1.56 g/cc. Polymers 19b and 19c

  13. Lignin – an alternative precursor for sustainable and cost-effective automotive carbon fiber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hendrik Mainka

    2015-07-01

    Furthermore, the process ability and demonstrators as well as the suitability for high volume production of the developed processes are main issues for successful implementation in future lightweight vehicle concepts.

  14. Carbon molecular sieve gas separation membranes based on an intrinsically microporous polyimide precursor

    KAUST Repository

    Ma, Xiaohua

    2013-10-01

    We report the physical characteristics and gas transport properties for a series of pyrolyzed membranes derived from an intrinsically microporous polyimide containing spiro-centers (PIM-6FDA-OH) by step-wise heat treatment to 440, 530, 600, 630 and 800 C, respectively. At 440 C, the PIM-6FDA-OH was converted to a polybenzoxazole and exhibited a 3-fold increase in CO2 permeability (from 251 to 683 Barrer) with a 50% reduction in selectivity over CH4 (from 28 to 14). At 530 C, a distinct intermediate amorphous carbon structure with superior gas separation properties was formed. A 56% increase in CO2-probed surface area accompanied a 16-fold increase in CO2 permeability (4110 Barrer) over the pristine polymer. The graphitic carbon membrane, obtained by heat treatment at 600 C, exhibited excellent gas separation properties, including a remarkable CO2 permeability of 5040 Barrer with a high selectivity over CH4 of 38. Above 600 C, the strong emergence of ultramicroporosity (<7 Å) as evidenced by WAXD and CO2 adsorption studies elicits a prominent molecular sieving effect, yielding gas separation performance well above the permeability-selectivity trade-off curves of polymeric membranes. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Viral precursor protein P3 and its processed products perform discrete and essential functions in the poliovirus RNA replication complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spear, Allyn; Ogram, Sushma A; Morasco, B Joan; Smerage, Lucia Eisner; Flanegan, James B

    2015-11-01

    The differential use of protein precursors and their products is a key strategy used during poliovirus replication. To characterize the role of protein precursors during replication, we examined the complementation profiles of mutants that inhibited 3D polymerase or 3C-RNA binding activity. We showed that 3D entered the replication complex in the form of its precursor, P3 (or 3CD), and was cleaved to release active 3D polymerase. Furthermore, our results showed that P3 is the preferred precursor that binds to the 5'CL. Using reciprocal complementation assays, we showed that one molecule of P3 binds the 5'CL and that a second molecule of P3 provides 3D. In addition, we showed that a second molecule of P3 served as the VPg provider. These results support a model in which P3 binds to the 5'CL and recruits additional molecules of P3, which are cleaved to release either 3D or VPg to initiate RNA replication.

  16. Preferred carbon precursors for lipid labelling in the heterotrophic endosperm of developing oat (Avena sativa L.) grains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimberg, Åsa

    2014-10-01

    Oat (Avena sativa L.) is unusual among the cereal grains in storing high amounts of oil in the endosperm; up to 90% of total grain oil. By using oat as a model species for oil metabolism in the cereal endosperm, we can learn how to develop strategies to redirect carbon from starch to achieve high-oil yielding cereal crops. Carbon precursors for lipid synthesis were compared in two genetically close oat cultivars with different endosperm oil content (about 6% and 10% of grain dw, medium-oil; MO, and high-oil; HO cultivar, respectively) by supplying a variety of (14)C-labelled substrates to the grain from both up- and downstream parts of glycolysis, either through detached oat panicles in vitro or by direct injection in planta. When supplied by direct injection, (14)C from acetate was identified to label the lipid fraction of the grain to the highest extent among substrates tested; 46% of net accumulated (14)C, demonstrating its applicability as a marker for lipids in the endosperm. Time course analyses of injected (14)C acetate during grain development suggested a more efficient transfer of fatty acids from polar lipids to triacylglycerol in the HO as compared to the MO cultivar, and turnover of triacylglycerol was suggested to not play a major role for the final oil content of oat grain endosperm despite the low amount of protective oleosins in this tissue. Moreover, availability of light was shown to drastically affect grain net carbon accumulation from (14)C-sucrose when supplied through detached panicles for the HO cultivar.

  17. Catalysts for Efficient Production of Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Ted X.; Dong, Yi

    2009-01-01

    Several metal alloys have shown promise as improved catalysts for catalytic thermal decomposition of hydrocarbon gases to produce carbon nanotubes (CNTs). Heretofore almost every experiment on the production of carbon nanotubes by this method has involved the use of iron, nickel, or cobalt as the catalyst. However, the catalytic-conversion efficiencies of these metals have been observed to be limited. The identification of better catalysts is part of a continuing program to develop means of mass production of high-quality carbon nanotubes at costs lower than those achieved thus far (as much as $100/g for purified multi-wall CNTs or $1,000/g for single-wall CNTs in year 2002). The main effort thus far in this program has been the design and implementation of a process tailored specifically for high-throughput screening of alloys for catalyzing the growth of CNTs. The process includes an integral combination of (1) formulation of libraries of catalysts, (2) synthesis of CNTs from decomposition of ethylene on powders of the alloys in a pyrolytic chemical-vapor-decomposition reactor, and (3) scanning- electron-microscope screening of the CNTs thus synthesized to evaluate the catalytic efficiencies of the alloys. Information gained in this process is put into a database and analyzed to identify promising alloy compositions, which are to be subjected to further evaluation in a subsequent round of testing. Some of these alloys have been found to catalyze the formation of carbon nano tubes from ethylene at temperatures as low as 350 to 400 C. In contrast, the temperatures typically required for prior catalysts range from 550 to 750 C.

  18. Is carbonyl sulfide a precursor for carbon disulfide in vegetation and soil? Interconversion of carbonyl sulfide and carbon disulfide in fresh grain tissues in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Y

    1999-05-01

    The interconversion of carbonyl sulfide (COS) and carbon disulfide (CS(2)) was studied in the roots and shoots of barley and chickpeas. Ratios of conversion gases, K, 40 h after the addition of COS or CS(2) are recorded. The proportion of COS converted to each of CS(2), CO, and H(2)S and the proportion of CS(2) converted to COS were greater in roots than in shoots. More COS was converted to CS(2) than CS(2) to COS in roots and shoots of barley and chickpeas. The amount of COS converted to H(2)S and CO was 8 times the amount converted to CS(2) in barley and 3-4 times the amount in chickpeas. Carbonyl sulfide may be a precursor for CS(2) in vegetation and soil, just as the reverse is true in the atmosphere. These two different results might form a cycle of COS and CS(2).

  19. Production of activated carbon from TCR char

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenzel, Fabian; Heberlein, Markus; Klinner, Tobias; Hornung, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    The utilization of char for adsorptive purposes is known since the 18th century. At that time the char was made of wood or bones and used for decoloration of fluids. In the 20th century the production of activated carbon in an industrial scale was started. The today's raw materials for activated carbon production are hard coal, peat, wood or coconut shells. All these materials entail costs especially the latter. Thus, the utilization of carbon rich residues (biomass) is an interesting economic opportunity because it is available for no costs or even can create income. The char is produced by thermo-catalytic reforming (TCR®). This process is a combination of an intermediate pyrolysis and subsequently a reforming step. During the pyrolysis step the material is decomposed in a vapor and a solid carbon enriched phase. In the second step the vapor and the solid phase get in an intensive contact and the quality of both materials is improved via the reforming process. Subsequently, the condensables are precipitated from the vapor phase and a permanent gas as well as oil is obtained. Both are suitable for heat and power production which is a clear advantage of the TCR® process. The obtained biochar from the TCR® process has special properties. This material has a very low hydrogen and oxygen content. Its stability is comparable to hard coal or anthracite. Therefore it consists almost only of carbon and ash. The latter depends from input material. Furthermore the surface structure and area can be influenced during the reforming step. Depending from temperature and residence time the number of micro pores and the surface area can be increased. Preliminary investigations with methylene blue solution have shown that a TCR® char made of digestate from anaerobic digestion has adsorptive properties. The decoloration of the solution was achieved. A further influencing factor of the adsorption performance is the particle size. Based on the results of the preliminary tests a

  20. Dry Process for Manufacturing Hybridized Boron Fiber/Carbon Fiber Thermoplastic Composite Materials from a Solution Coated Precursor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belvin, Harry L. (Inventor); Cano, Roberto J. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    An apparatus for producing a hybrid boron reinforced polymer matrix composite from precursor tape and a linear array of boron fibers. The boron fibers are applied onto the precursor tapes and the precursor tape processed within a processing component having an impregnation bar assembly. After passing through variable-dimension forming nip-rollers, the precursor tape with the boron fibers becomes a hybrid boron reinforced polymer matrix composite. A driving mechanism is used to pulled the precursor tape through the method and a take-up spool is used to collect the formed hybrid boron reinforced polymer matrix composite.

  1. Synthesis of highly fluorescent hydrophobic carbon dots by hot injection method using Paraplast as precursor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talib, Abou; Pandey, Sunil; Thakur, Mukeshchand; Wu, Hui-Fen

    2015-03-01

    We have reported synthesis of bright blue colored hydrophobic carbon dots (hC-dots) using highly pure blend of polymers called Paraplast. We developed a hot injection method for making nearly monodispersed hC-dots with a diameter in a range: 5-30nm as confirmed by high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). The involvement of various functional groups was confirmed by Fourier transform infra-red (FTIR) spectroscopy. These hC-dots were incubated with breast cancer stem cells in order to check the entry as well as biological imaging. The cells were analyzed using epifluorescent microscopy. hC-dots showed concentration dependent cytotoxicity (LD50: 50mg/ml) and could be used for bioimaging even at lower concentration (0.5mg/ml). hC-dots were found to be versatile agents for peeping inside the cells which could also be used for delivery of water insoluble chemotherapeutic agents to variety of solid tumors.

  2. Development of Low Cost Gas Atomization of Precursor Powders for Simplified ODS Alloy Production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Iver [Ames Lab., Ames, IA (United States)

    2014-08-05

    A novel gas atomization reaction synthesis (GARS) method was developed in this project to enable production (at our partner’s facility) a precursor Ni-Cr-Y-Ti powder with a surface oxide and an internal rare earth (RE) containing intermetallic compound (IMC) phase. Consolidation and heat-treatment experiments were performed at Ames Lab to promote the exchange of oxygen from the surface oxide to the RE intermetallic to form nano-metric oxide dispersoids. Alloy selection was aided by an internal oxidation and serial grinding experiments at Ames Lab and found that Hf-containing alloys may form more stable dispersoids than Ti-containing alloy, i.e., the Hf-containing system exhibited five different oxide phases and two different intermetallics compared to the two oxide phases and one intermetallic in the Ti-containing alloys. Since the simpler Ti-containing system was less complex to characterize, and make observations on the effects of processing parameters, the Ti-containing system was selected by Ames Lab for experimental atomization trials at our partner. An internal oxidation model was developed at Ames Lab and used to predict the heat treatment times necessary for dispersoid formation as a function of powder size and temperature. A new high-pressure gas atomization (HPGA) nozzle was developed at Ames Lab with the aim of promoting fine powder production at scales similar to that of the high gas-flow and melt-flow of industrial atomizers. The atomization nozzle was characterized using schlieren imaging and aspiration pressure testing at Ames Lab to determine the optimum melt delivery tip geometry and atomization pressure to promote enhanced secondary atomization mechanisms. Six atomization trials were performed at our partner to investigate the effects of: gas atomization pressure and reactive gas concentration on the particle size distribution (PSD) and the oxygen content of the resulting powder. Also, the effect on the rapidly solidified microstructure (as a

  3. Combining UHPLC-High Resolution MS and Feeding of Stable Isotope Labeled Polyketide Intermediates for Linking Precursors to End Products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klitgaard, Andreas; Frandsen, Rasmus John Normand; Holm, Dorte Koefoed

    2015-01-01

    We present the results from stable isotope labeled precursor feeding studies combined with ultrahigh performance liquid chromatography-high resolution mass spectrometry for the identification of labeled polyketide (PK) end-products. Feeding experiments were performed with 13C8-6-methylsalicylic...... spp., YWA1 was shown to be incorporated into aurofusarin, rubrofusarin, and antibiotic Y. In A. niger, benzoic acid was shown to be incorporated into asperrubrol. Incorporation levels of 0.7–20% into the end-products were detected in wild-type strains. Thus, stable isotope labeling is a promising...

  4. Characterization of pharmaceuticals and personal care products as N-nitrosodimethylamine precursors during disinfection processes using free chlorine and chlorine dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ai; Li, Yongmei; Song, Yun; Lv, Juan; Yang, Juan

    2014-07-15

    The worldwide detection of pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) in aquatic environment and drinking water has caused wide concern in recent years. The possibility for concurrent formation of N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) during disinfection has become another significant concern for water quality. This study demonstrates that a group of PPCPs containing amine groups can serve as NDMA precursors during free chlorine or chlorine dioxide (ClO2) chlorination processes. Selected PPCPs after screening by NDMA yield were further investigated for NDMA formation conditions. High disinfectant dose and initial PPCP concentration resulted in relatively high NDMA formation potential. Linear kinetic models were developed for NDMA formation during chlorination of selected PPCPs. Although the PPCP precursors were removed significantly during chlorination, they were not completely mineralized based on the total organic carbon (TOC) loss. The existence of another possible pathway for direct formation of NDMA from tertiary amine during chlorination was indicated, in which dimethylamine (DMA) was not involved. It is recommended to control the initial PPCP concentrations prior to disinfection and to shorten the contact time to reduce the NDMA formation. ClO2 is suggested to be a proper disinfectant in order to reduce the NDMA formation.

  5. Silicon nanocrystal production through non-thermal plasma synthesis: a comparative study between silicon tetrachloride and silane precursors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasar-Inceoglu, Ozgul; Lopez, Thomas; Farshihagro, Ebrahim; Mangolini, Lorenzo

    2012-06-01

    Silicon nanocrystals with sizes between 5 and 10 nm have been produced in a non-thermal plasma reactor using silicon tetrachloride as precursor. We demonstrate that high-quality material can be produced with this method and that production rates as high as 140 mg h-1 can be obtained, with a maximum precursor utilization rate of roughly 50%. Compared to the case in which particles are produced using silane as the main precursor, the gas composition needs to be modified and hydrogen needs to be added to the mixture to enable the nucleation and growth of the powder. The presence of chlorine in the system leads to the production of nanoparticles with a chlorine terminated surface which is significantly less robust against oxidation in air compared to the case of a hydrogen terminated surface. We also observe that significantly higher power input is needed to guarantee the formation of crystalline particles, which is a consequence not only of the different gas-phase composition, but also of the influence of chlorine on the stability of the crystalline structure.

  6. The Development and Application of Two-Chamber Reactors and Carbon Monoxide Precursors for Safe Carbonylation Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friis, Stig D; Lindhardt, Anders T; Skrydstrup, Troels

    2016-04-19

    , an array of low-pressure carbonylations were developed applying only near stoichiometric amounts of carbon monoxide. Importantly, carbon isotope variants of the CO precursors, such as (13)COgen, Sila(13)COgen, or even (14)COgen, provide a simple means for performing isotope-labeling syntheses. Finally, the COware applicability has been extended to reactions with other gases, such as hydrogen, CO2, and ethylene including their deuterium and (13)C-isotopically labeled versions where relevant. The COware system has been repeatedly demonstrated to be a valuable reactor for carrying out a wide number of transition metal-catalyzed transformations, and we believe this technology will have a significant place in many organic research laboratories.

  7. MOLTEN CARBONATE FUEL CELL PRODUCT DESIGN IMPROVEMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    H.C. Maru; M. Farooque

    2003-03-01

    The program efforts are focused on technology and system optimization for cost reduction, commercial design development, and prototype system field trials. The program is designed to advance the carbonate fuel cell technology from full-size field test to the commercial design. FuelCell Energy, Inc. (FCE) is in the later stage of the multiyear program for development and verification of carbonate fuel cell based power plants supported by DOE/NETL with additional funding from DOD/DARPA and the FuelCell Energy team. FCE has scaled up the technology to full-size and developed DFC{reg_sign} stack and balance-of-plant (BOP) equipment technology to meet product requirements, and acquired high rate manufacturing capabilities to reduce cost. FCE has designed submegawatt (DFC300A) and megawatt (DFC1500 and DFC3000) class fuel cell products for commercialization of its DFC{reg_sign} technology. A significant progress was made during the reporting period. The reforming unit design was optimized using a three-dimensional stack simulation model. Thermal and flow uniformities of the oxidant-In flow in the stack module were improved using computational fluid dynamics based flow simulation model. The manufacturing capacity was increased. The submegawatt stack module overall cost was reduced by {approx}30% on a per kW basis. An integrated deoxidizer-prereformer design was tested successfully at submegawatt scale using fuels simulating digester gas, coal bed methane gas and peak shave (natural) gas.

  8. Photobiological hydrogen production and carbon dioxide sequestration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berberoglu, Halil

    Photobiological hydrogen production is an alternative to thermochemical and electrolytic technologies with the advantage of carbon dioxide sequestration. However, it suffers from low solar to hydrogen energy conversion efficiency due to limited light transfer, mass transfer, and nutrient medium composition. The present study aims at addressing these limitations and can be divided in three parts: (1) experimental measurements of the radiation characteristics of hydrogen producing and carbon dioxide consuming microorganisms, (2) solar radiation transfer modeling and simulation in photobioreactors, and (3) parametric experiments of photobiological hydrogen production and carbon dioxide sequestration. First, solar radiation transfer in photobioreactors containing microorganisms and bubbles was modeled using the radiative transport equation (RTE) and solved using the modified method of characteristics. The study concluded that Beer-Lambert's law gives inaccurate results and anisotropic scattering must be accounted for to predict the local irradiance inside a photobioreactor. The need for accurate measurement of the complete set of radiation characteristics of microorganisms was established. Then, experimental setup and analysis methods for measuring the complete set of radiation characteristics of microorganisms have been developed and successfully validated experimentally. A database of the radiation characteristics of representative microorganisms have been created including the cyanobacteria Anabaena variabilis, the purple non-sulfur bacteria Rhodobacter sphaeroides and the green algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii along with its three genetically engineered strains. This enabled, for the first time, quantitative assessment of the effect of genetic engineering on the radiation characteristics of microorganisms. In addition, a parametric experimental study has been performed to model the growth, CO2 consumption, and H 2 production of Anabaena variabilis as functions of

  9. RESEARCH ON CARBON PRODUCTS FROM COAL USING AN EXTRACTIVE PROCESS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peter G. Stansberry; Alfred H. Stiller; John W. Zondlo; Chong Chen; Brian Bland; David Fenton

    2002-03-31

    extraction products indicated that they had the requisite properties of viable carbon-product precursors.

  10. Method for production of polymer and carbon nanofibers from water-soluble polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spender, Jonathan; Demers, Alexander L; Xie, Xinfeng; Cline, Amos E; Earle, M Alden; Ellis, Lucas D; Neivandt, David J

    2012-07-11

    Nanometer scale carbon fibers (carbon nanofibers) are of great interest to scientists and engineers in fields such as materials science, composite production, and energy storage due to their unique chemical, physical, and mechanical properties. Precursors currently used for production of carbon nanofibers are primarily from nonrenewable resources. Lignin is a renewable natural polymer existing in all high-level plants that is a byproduct of the papermaking process and a potential feedstock for carbon nanofiber production. The work presented here demonstrates a process involving the rapid freezing of an aqueous lignin solution, followed by sublimation of the resultant ice, to form a uniform network comprised of individual interconnected lignin nanofibers. Carbonization of the lignin nanofibers yields a similarly structured carbon nanofiber network. The methodology is not specific to lignin; nanofibers of other water-soluble polymers have been successfully produced. This nanoscale fibrous morphology has not been observed in traditional cryogel processes, due to the relatively slower freezing rates employed compared to those achieved in this study.

  11. Restoration of a Freshwater Wetland on Subsided Peat Soils: Potential Effects on Release of Dissolved Organic Carbon and Disinfection Byproduct Precursors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleck, J.; Fujii, R.; Bossio, D.

    2002-12-01

    In 1997, a wetland restoration demonstration project began on Twitchell Island in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta (Delta), California, to examine the effects of a permanently flooded, freshwater wetland on peat soil subsidence. Conversion from agriculture to wetland has changed many of the biogeochemical processes controlling dissolved organic carbon (DOC) production, release, and transport from the peat soils, relative to the previous agricultural land uses. This study explores the effects of agricultural and wetland management on peat soil biogeochemistry of DOC and disinfection byproduct (DBP) precursor release. DBPs [e.g. trihalomethanes (THMs)] form when chlorine reacts with the natural organic matter present in source drinking water. Many DBPs are carcinogenic and mutagenic and pose a potential threat to more than 22 million Californians whose drinking water is diverted from the Delta. Results indicate that previous drainage practices substantially affected the quantity of water-soluble DOC currently extractable from Delta peat soils and ranged from 0.40 mg C (carbon)/g soil for well-drained soils to 0.76 mg C/g soil for poorly drained soils. Present management also affects the propensity of this DOC to form DBPs. The following values for DBP formation were measured for a variety of soil types and depths (all values are medians in mmole THMs produced/mole C): well-drained agricultural field (7.7 plow layer, 7.9 below plow layer), poorly drained agricultural field (7.0 plow layer, 8.7 below plow layer), open-water wetland (12.8 sediment, 10.1 underlying soil), and vegetated wetland (11.3 sediment, 7.7 underlying soil). Sources of organic matter inputs and decomposition pathways seem to be important factors in DBP precursor formation and release when DOC loadings are of similar magnitude. These results indicate that soil conditions have a greater effect on DOC and DBP loadings than any differences caused by conversion from agriculture to wetland, which is of

  12. Production and Peripheral Roles of 5-HTP, a Precursor of Serotonin

    OpenAIRE

    Kazuhiro Nakamura; Hiroyuki Hasegawa

    2009-01-01

    Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine [5-HT]) has been implicated in a variety of physiological and pathological functions. Multiple steps of enzyme reactions enable biosynthesis of 5-HT. The first and rate-limiting step of the reaction is the synthesis of 5-hydroxy-L-tryptophan (5-HTP) from L-tryptophan. This step is dictated by an enzyme, tryptophan hydroxylase (TPH). TPH requires 6R-L-erythro-5,6,7,8-tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) as a co-substrate of TPH. 5-HTP has been simply regarded as a precursor...

  13. Molecular precursor derived silicon boron carbonitride/carbon nanotube and silicon oxycarbide/carbon nanotube composite nanowires for energy based applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhandavat, Romil

    Molecular precursor derived ceramics (also known as polymer-derived ceramics or PDCs) are high temperature glasses that have been studied for applications involving operation at elevated temperatures. Prepared from controlled thermal degradation of liquid-phase organosilicon precursors, these ceramics offer remarkable engineering properties such as resistance to crystallization up to 1400 °C, semiconductor behavior at high temperatures and intense photoluminescence. These properties are a direct result of their covalent bonded amorphous network and free (-sp2) carbon along with mixed Si/B/C/N/O bonds, which otherwise can not be obtained through conventional ceramic processing techniques. This thesis demonstrates synthesis of a unique core/shell type nanowire structure involving either siliconboroncarbonitride (SiBCN) or siliconoxycarbide (SiOC) as the shell with carbon nanotube (CNT) acting as the core. This was made possible by liquid phase functionalization of CNT surfaces with respective polymeric precursor (e.g., home-made boron-modified polyureamethylvinylsilazane for SiBCN/CNT and commercially obtained polysiloxane for SiOC/CNT), followed by controlled pyrolysis in inert conditions. This unique architecture has several benefits such as high temperature oxidation resistance (provided by the ceramic shell), improved electrical conductivity and mechanical toughness (attributed to the CNT core) that allowed us to explore its use in energy conversion and storage devices. The first application involved use of SiBCN/CNT composite as a high temperature radiation absorbant material for laser thermal calorimeter. SiBCN/CNT spray coatings on copper substrate were exposed to high energy laser beams (continuous wave at 10.6 mum 2.5 kW CO2 laser, 10 seconds) and resulting change in its microstructure was studied ex-situ. With the aid of multiple techniques we ascertained the thermal damage resistance to be 15 kW/cm -2 with optical absorbance exceeding 97%. This represents

  14. Reduced translocation of cadmium from roots is associated with increased production of phytochelatins and their precursors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhter, Fardausi; McGarvey, Brian; Macfie, Sheila M

    2012-12-15

    Cadmium (Cd) is a non-essential trace element and its environmental concentrations are approaching toxic levels, especially in some agricultural soils. Understanding how and where Cd is stored in plants is important for ensuring food safety. In this study, we examined two plant species that differ in the distribution of Cd among roots and leaves. Lettuce and barley were grown in nutrient solution under two conditions: chronic (4 weeks) exposure to a low, environmentally relevant concentration (1.0 μM) of Cd and acute (1 h) exposure to a high concentration (5.0 mM) of Cd. Seedlings grown in solution containing 1.0 μM CdCl₂ did not show symptoms of toxicity and, at this concentration, 77% of the total Cd was translocated to leaves of lettuce, whereas only 24% of the total Cd was translocated to barley leaves. We tested the hypothesis that differential accumulation of Cd in roots and leaves is related to differential concentrations of phytochelatins (PCs), and its precursor peptides. The amounts of PCs and their precursor peptides in the roots and shoots were measured using HPLC. Each of PC₂₋₄ was synthesized in the barley root upon chronic exposure to Cd and did not increase further upon acute exposure. In the case of lettuce, no PCs were detected in the root given either Cd treatment. The high amounts of PCs produced in barley root could have contributed to preferential retention of Cd in barley roots.

  15. Activated carbon preparation with pore nanosized from biomass precursors; Preparacao de carvoes ativados com poros de dimensoes nanometricas a partir de precursores de biomassa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Capobianco, Gino [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). Fac. de Engenharia Mecanica. Dept. de Planejamento de Sistemas Energeticos; Coutinho, Aparecido dos Reis [Universidade Metodista de Piracicaba, SP (Brazil). Lab. de Materiais Carbonosos; Luengo, Carlos Alberto [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica Gleb Wataghin. Grupo Combustiveis Alternativos

    2004-07-01

    Here are reported preliminary tests using pinnus wood, mesocarpo of green coconut and macadamia shell. They are carbonized and later physically activated with CO{sub 2} or chemically with ZnCl{sub 2}. The resulting activated carbons (AC) are characterized with scanning electronic microscopy, the BET method for determination of the specific surface area-ASE, real density-DR, helium picnometry among others. The results indicate macadamia shell originates better AC, with average micropores in the range of 1,2-1,6 nm, apparent density of 1,08 g/cm{sup 3}, and ASE-BET 1400m{sup 2}/g. Then, these AC have the possibility to be applied in NG storage. (author)

  16. Carbon footprints and carbon stocks reveal climate-friendly coffee production

    OpenAIRE

    Rikxoort, Henk; Schroth, Götz; Läderach, Peter; Rodríguez-Sánchez, Beatriz

    2014-01-01

    International audience; Coffee production is impacting the climate by emitting greenhouse gasses. Coffee production is also vulnerable to climate change. As a consequence, the coffee sector is interested in climate-friendly forms of coffee production, but there is no consensus of what exactly this implies. Therefore, we studied two aspects of the climate impact of coffee production: the standing carbon stocks in the production systems and the product carbon footprint, which measures the green...

  17. Direct electrochemical production of Ti-10W alloys from mixed oxide preform precursors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dring, K. [Imperial College London, Department of Materials, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: kevin.dring@imperial.ac.uk; Bhagat, R. [Imperial College London, Department of Materials, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Jackson, M. [Imperial College London, Department of Materials, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Dashwood, R. [Imperial College London, Department of Materials, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Inman, D. [Imperial College London, Department of Materials, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

    2006-08-10

    Ti-W alloys were produced via electrochemical reduction of TiO{sub 2}-WO{sub 3} mixed oxide preforms in a pre-electrolysed, molten calcium chloride electrolyte at 1173 K. Electrolysis voltages of 1500-3200 mV were applied for times ranging from 6 to 24 h across a graphite anode and Grade 2 commercial purity (CP) titanium cathodic current collector, which supported the ceramic precursors. Low-oxygen, homogeneous material was subsequently water washed and characterized to determine the level of residual species remaining from the reduction process, such as Cl and Ca. The microstructure (porosity and microchemistry) of the reduced material and microstructural examination of the mixed oxide feedstock (particle morphology, size and chemistry) were characterized using a field emission gun scanning electron microscope (FEG-SEM) with backscattered electron imaging (BSE) and X-ray energy dispersive spectrometry (X-EDS)

  18. Continuous production of carbon nanotubes and diamond films by swirled floating catalyst chemical vapour deposition method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.E. Iyuke

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Various techniques for the synthesis of carbon nanotubes (CNTs are being developed to meet an increasing demand as a result of their versatile applications. Swirled floating catalyst chemical vapour deposition (SFCCVD is one of these techniques. This method was used to synthesise CNTs on a continuous basis using acetylene gas as a carbon source, ferrocene dissolved in xylene as a catalyst precursor, and both hydrogen and argon as carrier gases. Transmission electron microscopy analyses revealed that a mixture of single and multi-wall carbon nanotubes and other carbon nanomaterials were produced within the pyrolytic temperature range of 900–1 100°C and acetylene flow rate range of 118–370 ml min–1. Image comparison of raw and purified products showed that low contents of iron particles and amorphous carbon were contained in the synthesised carbon nanotubes. Diamond films were produced at high ferrocene concentration, hydrogen flow rate and pyrolysis temperatures, while carbon nanoballs were formed and attached to the surface of theCNTs at low ferrocene content and low pyrolysis temperature.

  19. High-time resolved measurements of biogenic and anthropogenic secondary organic aerosol precursors and products in urban air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, Rosa M.; Doskey, Paul V.

    2016-04-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs), which are present in the atmosphere entirely in the gas phase are directly emitted by biogenic (~1089 Tg yr-1) and anthropogenic sources (~185 Tg yr-1). However, the sources and molecular speciation of intermediate VOCs (IVOCs), which are for the most part also present almost entirely in the gas phase, are not well characterized. The VOCs and IVOCs participate in reactions that form ozone and semivolatile OC (SVOC) that partition into the aerosol phase. Formation and evolution of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) are part of a complex dynamic process that depends on the molecular speciation and concentration of VOCs, IVOCs, primary organic aerosol (POA), and the level of oxidants (NO3, OH, O3). The current lack of understanding of OA properties and their impact on radiative forcing, ecosystems, and human health is partly due to limitations of models to predict SOA production on local, regional, and global scales. More accurate forecasting of SOA production requires high-temporal resolution measurement and molecular characterization of SOA precursors and products. For the subject study, the IVOCs and aerosol-phase organic matter were collected using the high-volume sampling technique and were analyzed by multidimensional gas chromatography with time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GCxGC-ToFMS). The IVOCs included terpenes, terpenoids, n-alkanes, branched alkanes, isoprenoids, alkylbenzenes, cycloalkylbenzenes, PAH, alkyl PAH, and an unresolved complex mixture (UCM). Diurnal variations of OA species containing multiple oxygenated functionalities and selected SOA tracers of isorprene, α-pinene, toluene, cyclohexene, and n-dodecane oxidation were also quantified. The data for SOA precursor and oxidation products presented here will be useful for evaluating the ability of molecular-specific SOA models to forecast SOA production in and downwind of urban areas.

  20. Enhanced production of Monacolin K by addition of precursors and surfactants in submerged fermentation of Monascus purpureus 9901.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jun; Wang, Yuan-Long; Lu, Li-Ping; Zhang, Bo-Bo; Xu, Gan-Rong

    2014-01-01

    The main problem in Monacolin K (MK) production by submerged fermentation of Monascus purpureus is low productivity. In this study, on one hand, addition of precursors was used to activate the biosynthesis of MK. When 4.0 g/L of sodium citrate was supplemented at the 48th H of the fermentation, the final MK production reached to 1,658.9 ± 28.5 mg/L after 20 day of fermentation, which was improved by 52.6% compared with that of the control. On the other hand, addition of surfactants could increase the permeability of cell membrane, thus driving more intracellular metabolites secreted into the fermentation broth and alleviating the product inhibition. When 40.0 g/L of Triton X-100 was added at the beginning of the fermentation, the final MK production reached to 2,026.0 ± 30.4 mg/L after 20 day of fermentation, which was improved by 84.9% compared with that of the control. These results are helpful to provide some new insights into the biosynthetic regulation on MK production; the approach can be applied to other fungal fermentation processes for enhancing production of useful metabolites.

  1. Effect of precursors feeding and media manipulation on production of novel anticancer pro-drug camptothecin from endophytic fungus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amna, Touseef; Amina, Musarat; Sharma, P R; Puri, S C; Al-Youssef, Hanan M; Al-Taweel, Areej M; Qazi, G N

    2012-10-01

    We have established methodology for the isolation and characterization of a novel endophytic fungus from the inner bark of medicinal plant Nothapodytes foetida, which produced camptothecin in Sabouraud broth (SB) under shake flask conditions. Camptothecin and its related compounds are at present obtained by extraction from intact plants, but fungal endopytes may be an alternative source of production. In present study we have observed the effect of different nutrient combinations and precursors (tryptophan, tryptamine, geraniol, citral, mevalonic acid and leucine) on the accumulation of camptothecin by endophytic fungus Entrophospora infrequens. The precursors were fed either alone or in combinations (tryptophan and geraniol, tryptophan and citral, tryptophan and mevalonic acid, tryptophan and leucine). The highest camptothecin content was observed in the range of 503 ± 25µg/100g dry cell mass in Sabouraud medium. Camptothecin content in the medium was increased by 2.5 folds by the presence of tryptophan and leucine whereas the production with trytophan was also significantly different from other treatments. Furthermore, the effect of fungal camptothecin on the morphology of human cancer cell lines was also studied. The treated cells showed reduction in size, condensation of nucleus and the protoplasmic extensions were reduced. All these characteristics are found in apoptotic cells.

  2. RESEARCH OF LIMY AND CARBONATE SYSTEM OF SUGAR PRODUCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. G. Kulneva

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Influence of рН and temperature on activity of suspension of lime and carbonate in sugar production is investigated. Possibility of decrease in a consumption of reagents on purification of production sugar solutions is established.

  3. Intensification to reduce the carbon footprint of smallholder milk production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Udo, Henk; Weiler, Viola; Modupeore, Ogun; Viets, Theo; Oosting, Simon

    2016-01-01

    Will the intensification of cattle-keeping lower the carbon footprint of milk production in resource-poor environments? The authors included the multiple functions of cattle in carbon footprint estimates of milk production in farming systems with different degrees of intensification in Kenya. The

  4. Optimization of engineered production of the glucoraphanin precursor dihomomethionine in Nicotiana benthamiana

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Crocoll, Christoph; Mirza, Nadia Muhammad Akram; Reichelt, Michael;

    2016-01-01

    Glucosinolates are natural products characteristic of the Brassicales order, which include vegetables such as cabbages and the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. Glucoraphanin is the major glucosinolate in broccoli and associated with the health-promoting effects of broccoli consumption. Toward our...... goal of creating a rich source of glucoraphanin for dietary supplements, we have previously reported the feasibility of engineering glucoraphanin in Nicotiana benthamiana through transient expression of glucoraphanin biosynthetic genes from A. thaliana (Mikkelsen et al., 2010). As side-products, we...... to a ninefold increase compared to the highest production of this intermediate, as previously reported (Mikkelsen et al., 2010). The increased DHM production without increasing leucine-derived side-product levels provides new metabolic engineering strategies for improved glucoraphanin production...

  5. Synthesis of carbon nanotubes by catalytic pyrolysis method with Feitknecht compound as precursor of NiZnAl catalyst

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan Xiaoqi; Liu Quanrun; Zhang Songlin; Zhang Kun; Chen Jiuling; Li Yongdan

    2004-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes are synthesized by catalytic pyrolysis method with a kind of new type catalyst--nickel-zinc-alumina catalyst prepared from Feitknecht compound. Tubular carbon nanotubes, bamboo-shaped carbon naotubes, herringbone carbon nanotubues and branched carbon nanotubes are all found formed at moderate temperature. It is important for the formation of quasi-liquid state of the metal nanoparticles at the tip of carbon naotubes during the growth of carbon nanotubes to lead to different kinds of carbon nanotubes. It is likely that the addition of zinc make the activity of nickel catalyst after calcinations and reduction changed strangely.

  6. Optimization of engineered production of the glucoraphanin precursor dihomomethionine in Nicotiana benthamiana

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Crocoll, Christoph; Mirza, Nadia Muhammad Akram; Reichelt, Michael;

    2016-01-01

    of the large subunit (LSU1) of the heterodimeric isopropylmalate isomerase and (2) coexpression of BAT5 transporter for efficient transfer of intermediates across the chloroplast membrane. We succeeded in raising dihomomethionine (DHM) levels to a maximum of 432 nmol g(-1) fresh weight that is equivalent...... to a ninefold increase compared to the highest production of this intermediate, as previously reported (Mikkelsen et al., 2010). The increased DHM production without increasing leucine-derived side-product levels provides new metabolic engineering strategies for improved glucoraphanin production...

  7. Beneficial Use of Carbon Dioxide in Precast Concrete Production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shao, Yixin [McGill Univ., Montreal, QC (Canada)

    2014-06-26

    The feasibility of using carbon dioxide as feedstock in precast concrete production is studied. Carbon dioxide reacts with calcium compounds in concrete, producing solid calcium carbonates in binding matrix. Two typical precast products are examined for their capacity to store carbon dioxide during the production. They are concrete blocks and fiber-cement panels. The two products are currently mass produced and cured by steam. Carbon dioxide can be used to replace steam in curing process to accelerate early strength, improve the long-term durability and reduce energy and emission. For a reaction within a 24-hour process window, the theoretical maximum possible carbon uptake in concrete is found to be 29% based on cement mass in the product. To reach the maximum uptake, a special process is developed to promote the reaction efficiency to 60-80% in 4-hour carbon dioxide curing and improve the resistance to freeze-thaw cycling and sulfate ion attack. The process is also optimized to meet the project target of $10/tCO2 in carbon utilization. By the use of self-concentrating absorption technology, high purity CO2 can be produced at a price below $40/t. With low cost CO2 capture and utilization technologies, it is feasible to establish a network for carbon capture and utilization at the vicinity of carbon sources. If all block produces and panel producers in United States could adopt carbon dioxide process in their production in place of steam, carbon utilization in these two markets alone could consume more than 2 Mt CO2/year. This capture and utilization process can be extended to more precast products and will continue for years to come.

  8. Soluble microbial products in pilot-scale drinking water biofilters with acetate as sole carbon source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ying; Ye, Chengsong; Gong, Song; Wei, Gu; Yu, Xin; Feng, Lin

    2013-04-01

    A comprehensive study on formation and characteristics of soluble microbial products (SMP) during drinking water biofiltration was made in four parallel pilot-scale ceramic biofilters with acetate as the substrate. Excellent treatment performance was achieved while microbial biomass and acetate carbon both declined with the depth of filter. The SMP concentration was determined by calculating the difference between the concentration of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), biodegradable dissolved organic carbon (BDOC) and acetate carbon. The results revealed that SMP showed an obvious increase from 0 to 100 cm depth of the filter. A rising specific ultraviolet absorbance (SUVA) was also found, indicating that benzene or carbonyl might exist in these compounds. SMP produced during this drinking water biological process were proved to have weak mutagenicity and were not precursors of by-products of chlorination disinfection. The volatile parts of SMP were half-quantity analyzed and most of them were dicarboxyl acids, others were hydrocarbons or benzene with 16-17 carbon atoms.

  9. Influence of Cobalt Precursor on Efficient Production of Commercial Fuels over FTS Co/SiC Catalyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Raquel de la Osa

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available β-SiC-supported cobalt catalysts have been prepared from nitrate, acetate, chloride and citrate salts to study the dependence of Fischer–Tropsch synthesis (FTS on the type of precursor. Com/SiC catalysts were synthetized by vacuum-assisted impregnation while N2 adsorption/desorption, XRD, TEM, TPR, O2 pulses and acid/base titrations were used as characterization techniques. FTS catalytic performance was carried out at 220 °C and 250 °C while keeping constant the pressure (20 bar, space velocity (6000 Ncm3/g·h and syngas composition (H2/CO:2. The nature of cobalt precursor was found to influence basic behavior, extent of reduction and metallic particle size. For β-SiC-supported catalysts, the use of cobalt nitrate resulted in big Co crystallites, an enhanced degree of reduction and higher basicity compared to acetate, chloride and citrate-based catalysts. Consequently, cobalt nitrate provided a better activity and selectivity to C5+ (less than 10% methane was formed, which was centered in kerosene-diesel fraction (α = 0.90. On the contrary, catalyst from cobalt citrate, characterized by the highest viscosity and acidity values, presented a highly dispersed distribution of Co nanoparticles leading to a lower reducibility. Therefore, a lower FTS activity was obtained and chain growth probability was shortened as observed from methane and gasoline-kerosene (α = 0.76 production when using cobalt citrate.

  10. Effects of humoral factors on amplification of nonrecognizable erythrocytic and granulocytic precursors. [Rats, radiation effects on blood cell production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cronkite, E P; Carsten, A L; Cohen, R; Miller, M E; Moccia, G

    1978-01-01

    The purpose of these studies was to evaluate the effects of humoral factors on amplification of nonrecognizable erythrocytic and granulocytic precursors using the in vivo plasma clot diffusion chamber and the in vitro plasma clot culture methods. Plasma erythropoietin levels changes in the reticulocyte concentration and hematocrits of irradiated and non-irradiated Long-Evans rats exposed to hypoxia were also determined. While erythropoietin plasma levels appeared to effect BFU-E and CFU-E growth, results suggest erythropoietin may not be the sole regulator of red cell production and that inhibitors or chalone-like mechanisms may be involved. Measurements made on granulocyte precursors treated with CSF containing L-cell conditioned medium revealed granulocytic colonies and burst-like formations, similar to those seen for erythrocytic growth. There is strong evidence suggesting that CSF is a regulator of granulopoiesis; however, it is not the sole regulator and it appears that inhibitors may play an in vivo role. Growth of colonies with cell numbers not a power of 2 implies either asymmetric nitosis due to loss of genetic information required for continuing division, or differences in concentration of, or ability to recognize inhibitory factors. These possibilities are examined on the basis of results using in vivo and in vitro culture techniques.

  11. Production of non-proteinogenic amino acids from α-keto acid precursors with recombinant Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ju-Yeon; Lee, Young-A; Wittmann, Christoph; Park, Jin-Byung

    2013-11-01

    In the present work, Corynebacterium glutamicum was metabolically engineered for the enantioselective synthesis of non-proteinogenic amino acids as valuable building blocks for pharmaceuticals and agrochemicals. The novel bio-catalytic activity of C. glutamicum was obtained by heterologous expression of the branched chain aminotransferase IlvE from Escherichia coli. Upon this modification, the recombinant cells converted the α-keto acid precursor 2-(3-hydroxy-1-adamantyl)-2-oxoethanoic acid (HOAE) into the corresponding amino acid 2-(3-hydroxy-1-adamantyl)-(2S)-amino ethanoic acid (HAAE). Similarly, also L-tert-leucine could be obtained from trimethyl pyruvate indicating a broader applicability of the novel strategy. In both cases, the amino group donor glutamate was supplied from the endogenous metabolism of the recombinant producer. Hereby, the uptake of the precursor and secretion of the product was supported by an enhanced cell permeability through treatment of ethambutol, which inhibits arabinosyl transferases involved in cell wall biosynthesis. The excretion of HAAE into the reaction medium was linked to the secretion of glutamate, indicating a similar mechanism for the export of both compounds. On the other hand, the efflux of L-tert-leucine appeared to be driven by active transport. Subsequent bioprocess engineering enabled HAAE and L-tert-leucine to be produced at a rate of 0.21 and 0.42 mmol (g dry cells)⁻¹  h⁻¹, respectively up to a final product titer of 40 mM. Beyond the given examples, integrated metabolic and cell envelop engineering might extend the production of a variety of other non-proteinogenic amino acids as well as chiral amines by C. glutamicum.

  12. Optimization of the IPP precursor supply for the production of lycopene, decaprenoxanthin and astaxanthin by Corynebacterium glutamicum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabine A.E. Heider

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The biotechnologically relevant bacterium C. glutamicum, currently used for the million ton-scale production of amino acids for the food and feed industries, is pigmented due to synthesis of the rare cyclic C50 carotenoid decaprenoxanthin and its glucosides. The precursors of carotenoid biosynthesis, isopenthenyl pyrophosphate (IPP and its isomer dimethylallyl pyrophosphate (DMAPP, are synthesized in this organism via the methylerythritol phosphate (MEP or non-mevalonate pathway. Terminal pathway engineering in recombinant C. glutamicum permitted the production of various nonnative C50 and C40 carotenoids. Here, the role of engineering isoprenoid precursor supply for lycopene production by C. glutamicum was characterized. Overexpression of dxs encoding the enzyme that catalyzes the first committed step of the MEP-pathway by chromosomal promoter exchange in a prophage-cured, genome-reduced C. glutamicum strain improved lycopene formation. Similarly, an increased IPP supply was achieved by chromosomal integration of two artificial operons comprising MEP pathway genes under the control of a constitutive promoter. Combined overexpression of dxs and the other six MEP pathways genes in C. glutamicum strain LYC3-MEP was not synergistic with respect to improving lycopene accumulation. Based on C. glutamicum strain LYC3-MEP astaxanthin could be produced in the mg per g cell dry weight range when the endogenous genes crtE, crtB and crtI for conversion of geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate to lycopene were coexpressed with the genes for lycopene cyclase and β-carotene hydroxylase from Pantoea ananatis and carotene C(4 oxygenase from Brevundimonas aurantiaca.

  13. Production of carbon nano-tubes via CCVD method and their corrosion protection performance in epoxy based coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raza, M. A.; Ghauri, F. A.; Awan, M. S.; Farooq, A.; Ahmad, R.

    2016-08-01

    Good yield of carbon products was obtained by catalytic chemical vapor deposition (CCVD) technique using 100-500mg of ferrocene catalyst at temperature of 900 °C and acetylene flow rate of 150-200cc/min. The effects of amount of ferrocene, temperature and hydrocarbons precursors on the yield of carbon nanomaterial's was calculated and characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM) andenergy- dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). Good yield of carbon nanomaterials primarily consisted of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and carbon nanoparticles was obtained. CNTs obtained after purification were dispersed in epoxy resin to produce composite coatings which were coated on stainless steel 316L. The coated stainless steel samples’ corrosion behavior was studied using open circuit potential (OCP), cyclic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) techniques. Results showed that epoxy coating containing 4 wt. % of CNTs offered improved corrosion resistance to stainless steel.

  14. Optimization of engineered production of the glucoraphanin precursor dihomo-methionine in Nicotiana benthamiana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph eCrocoll

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Glucosinolates are natural products characteristic of the Brassicales order which include vegetables such as cabbages and the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. Glucoraphanin is the major glucosinolate in broccoli and associated with the health-promoting effects of broccoli consumption. Towards our goal of creating a rich source of glucoraphanin for dietary supplements, we have previously reported the feasibility of engineering glucoraphanin in Nicotiana benthaminana through transient expression of glucoraphanin biosynthetic genes from Arabidopsis thaliana (Mikkelsen et al., 2010. As side-products, we obtained 5-8 fold higher levels of chain-elongated leucine-derived glucosinolates, not found in the native plant. Here, we investigated two different strategies to improve engineering of the methionine chain elongation part of the glucoraphanin pathway in N. benthamiana: 1 co-expression of the large subunit (LSU1 of the heterodimeric isopropylmalate isomerase, and 2 co-expression of BAT5 transporter for efficient transfer of intermediates across the chloroplast membrane. We succeeded in raising dihomo-methionine (DHM levels to a maximum of 432 nmol*g-1 fresh weight which is equivalent to a 9-fold increase compared to the highest production of this intermediate previously reported (Mikkelsen et al., 2010. The increased DHM production without increasing leucine-derived side-product levels provides new metabolic engineering strategies for improved glucoraphanin production in a heterologous host.

  15. MOLTEN CARBONATE FUEL CELL PRODUCT DESIGN IMPROVEMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    H.C. Maru; M. Farooque

    2005-03-01

    The program was designed to advance the carbonate fuel cell technology from full-size proof-of-concept field test to the commercial design. DOE has been funding Direct FuelCell{reg_sign} (DFC{reg_sign}) development at FuelCell Energy, Inc. (FCE, formerly Energy Research Corporation) from an early state of development for stationary power plant applications. The current program efforts were focused on technology and system development, and cost reduction, leading to commercial design development and prototype system field trials. FCE, in Danbury, CT, is a world-recognized leader for the development and commercialization of high efficiency fuel cells that can generate clean electricity at power stations, or at distributed locations near the customers such as hospitals, schools, universities, hotels and other commercial and industrial applications. FCE has designed three different fuel cell power plant models (DFC300A, DFC1500 and DFC3000). FCE's power plants are based on its patented DFC{reg_sign} technology, where a hydrocarbon fuel is directly fed to the fuel cell and hydrogen is generated internally. These power plants offer significant advantages compared to the existing power generation technologies--higher fuel efficiency, significantly lower emissions, quieter operation, flexible siting and permitting requirements, scalability and potentially lower operating costs. Also, the exhaust heat by-product can be used for cogeneration applications such as high-pressure steam, district heating and air conditioning. Several sub-MW power plants based on the DFC design are currently operating in Europe, Japan and the US. Several one-megawatt power plant design was verified by operation on natural gas at FCE. This plant is currently installed at a customer site in King County, WA under another US government program and is currently in operation. Because hydrogen is generated directly within the fuel cell module from readily available fuels such as natural gas and

  16. Forest and wood products role in carbon sequestration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sampson, R.N.

    1997-12-31

    An evaluation of the use of U.S. forests and forest products for carbon emission mitigation is presented. The current role of forests in carbon sequestration is described in terms of regional differences and forest management techniques. The potential for increasing carbon storage by converting marginal crop and pasture land, increasing timberland growth, reducing wildfire losses, and changing timber harvest methods is examined. Post-harvest carbon flows, environmental impacts of wood products, biomass energy crops, and increased use of energy-conserving trees are reviewed for their potential in reducing or offsetting carbon emissions. It is estimated that these techniques could offset 20 to 40 percent of the carbon emitted annually in the U.S. 39 refs., 5 tabs.

  17. Effect of carbon and nitrogen sources on carotenoids production by native strain of Aurantiochytrium Ch25

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahdiye Esmizade

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Microorganisms produce carotenoids as a part of their response to environmental stresses. Carotenoids have many applications in human health, such as antioxidant, anti-cancer, light protection activity and as a precursor for hormones. Materials and methods: In this study, the effect of different carbon and nitrogen sources was evaluated on carotenoids production by native Aurantiochytrium strain. The effects of different carbon and nitrogen sources were studied on biomass and carotenoid production. Then, carotenoids were extracted and analyzed by TLC, spectrophotometry and HPLC methods. Results: Results showed that glycerol is the best carbon source for production of high carotenoids content. Selected medium contained: glycerol (1.5% v/v, peptone (1g/l, yeast extract (1g/l and 50% of sea water. Total carotenoids content was 134.8 µg/g CDW in this medium. TLC analysis showed that the extracted carotenoid is included: beta-carotene, astaxanthin monoester, astaxanthin diester and free astaxanthin. The results of HPLC analysis showed presence of astaxanthin, canthaxanthin, echinenone and β-carotene in the carotenoid extract. Discussion and conclusion: In this research, production of carotenoids was investigated in native strain of Aurantiochytrium and carotenoids profile was included astaxanthin, canthaxanthin, β-carotene and echinenone.

  18. Asymmetric synthesis of amino acid precursors in interstellar complex organics by circularly polarized light

    OpenAIRE

    Takano, Yoshinori; Takahashi, Jun-ichi; Kaneko, Takeo; Marumo, Katsumi; Kobayashi, Kensei

    2007-01-01

    The asymmetric synthesis of amino acid precursors from complex organics have been performed. A gaseous mixture of carbon monoxide, ammonia and water (molecules which are among those identified in the interstellar medium) was irradiated with 3.0 MeV protons to obtain amino acid precursors within high-molecular-weight complex organics of up to 3,000 Da. The amino acid precursor products synthesized were then irradiated with right (R-) or left (L-) ultraviolet circularly polarized light (UV-CPL)...

  19. High-performance zno transistors processed via an aqueous carbon-free metal oxide precursor route at temperatures between 80-180 °c

    KAUST Repository

    Lin, Yenhung

    2013-06-25

    An aqueous and carbon-free metal-oxide precursor route is used in combination with a UV irradiation-assisted low-temperature conversion method to fabricate low-voltage ZnO transistors with electron mobilities exceeding 10 cm2/Vs at temperatures <180°C. Because of its low temperature requirements the method allows processing of high-performance transistors onto temperature sensitive substrates such as plastic. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Process for the production of sodium carbonate anhydrate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oosterhof, H.; Van Rosmalen, G.M.; Witkamp, G.J.; De Graauw, J.

    2000-01-01

    The invention is directed to a process for the production of sodium carbonate-anhydrate having a bulk density of at least 800 kg/m<3>, said process comprising: providing a suspension of solid sodium carbonate and/or solid sodium bicarbonate and/or solid double salts at least comprising one of

  1. Optical monitoring of Disinfection By-product Precursors with Fluorescence Excitation-Emission Mapping (F-EEM): Practical Application Issues for Drinking, Waste and Reuse Water Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmore, A. M.

    2012-12-01

    Drinking water, wastewater and reuse plants must deal with regulations associated with bacterial contamination and halogen disinfection procedures that can generate harmful disinfection by-products (DBPs) including trihalomethanes (THMs), haloacetic acids (HOAAs) and other compounds. The natural fluorescent chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) is regulated as the major DBP precursor. This study outlines the advantages and current limitations associated with optical monitoring of water treatment processes using tcontemporary Fluorescence Excitation-Emission Mapping (F-EEM). The F-EEM method coupled with practical peak indexing and multi-variate analyses is potentially superior in terms of cost, speed and sensitivity over conventional total organic carbon (TOC) meters and specific UV-absorbance (SUVA) measurements. Hence there is strong interest in developing revised environmental regulations around the F-EEM technique instruments which can incidentally simultaneously measure the SUVA and DOC parameters. Importantly, the F-EEM technique, compared to the single-point TOC and SUVA signals can resolve CDOM classes distinguishing those that strongly cause DBPs. The F-EEM DBP prediction method can be applied to surface water sources to evaluate DBP potential as a function of the point sources and reservoir depth profiles. It can also be applied in-line to rapidly adjust DOC removal processes including sedimentation-flocculation, microfiltration, reverse-osmosis, and ozonation. Limitations and interferences for F-EEMs are discussed including those common to SUVA and TOC in contrast to the advantages including that F-EEMs are less prone to interferences from inorganic carbon and metal contaminations and require little if any chemical preparation. In conclusion, the F-EEM method is discussed in terms of not only the DBP problem but also as a means of predicting (concurrent to DBP monitoring) organic membrane fouling in water-reuse and desalination plants.

  2. Accounting for forest carbon pool dynamics in product carbon footprints: Challenges and opportunities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newell, Joshua P., E-mail: jpnewell@umich.edu [School of Natural Resources and Environment, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor (United States); Vos, Robert O., E-mail: vos@usc.edu [Spatial Sciences Institute, University of Southern California (United States)

    2012-11-15

    Modification and loss of forests due to natural and anthropogenic disturbance contribute an estimated 20% of annual greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions worldwide. Although forest carbon pool modeling rarely suggests a 'carbon neutral' flux profile, the life cycle assessment community and associated product carbon footprint protocols have struggled to account for the GHG emissions associated with forestry, specifically, and land use generally. Principally, this is due to underdeveloped linkages between life cycle inventory (LCI) modeling for wood and forest carbon modeling for a full range of forest types and harvest practices, as well as a lack of transparency in globalized forest supply chains. In this paper, through a comparative study of U.S. and Chinese coated freesheet paper, we develop the initial foundations for a methodology that rescales IPCC methods from the national to the product level, with reference to the approaches in three international product carbon footprint protocols. Due to differences in geographic origin of the wood fiber, the results for two scenarios are highly divergent. This suggests that both wood LCI models and the protocols need further development to capture the range of spatial and temporal dimensions for supply chains (and the associated land use change and modification) for specific product systems. The paper concludes by outlining opportunities to measure and reduce uncertainty in accounting for net emissions of biogenic carbon from forestland, where timber is harvested for consumer products. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Typical life cycle assessment practice for consumer products often excludes significant land use change emissions when estimating carbon footprints. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The article provides a methodology to rescale IPCC guidelines for product-level carbon footprints. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Life cycle inventories and product carbon footprint protocols need more comprehensive land

  3. 一种适于碳纳米管制备的绿色前驱体%A green precursor for carbon nanotube synthesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    S.Paul; S.K.Samdarshi

    2011-01-01

    The present work aims to explore a natural renewable precursor for the synthesis of multiwalled carbon nanotubes ( MWCNTs), conforming to the principles of green chemistry. MWCNTs were synthesized by chemical vapor deposition using a natural renewable precursor ( coconut oil). Nitrogen gas was used as an inert atmosphere as well as a carrier for the evaporated precursor (flow rate: 100mL/min). The synthesized MWCNTs are characterized by scanning and transmission electron microscopy, electron dispersive X-ray analysis, and Raman spectroscopy. The diameters of the synthesized nanotubes are in the range of 80 nm to 90 nm under optimum conditions.%根据绿色化学原理尝试探索一种合成多壁碳纳米管的天然可再生前驱体.应用化学气相沉积(CVD)法,采用一种天然可再生前躯体(椰仁油),通过系列步骤合成了MWCNTs.氮气既作为气化前驱体载气(气体流速:100mL/min)又维持合成在惰性氛围中进行.合成的MWCNTs使用SEM、EDX、TEM和Raman表征,最佳条件下得到的碳纳米管直径为80nm~90nm.

  4. Effects of Globalisation on Carbon Footprints of Products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herrmann, Ivan Tengbjerg; Hauschild, Michael Zwicky

    2009-01-01

    Outsourcing of production from the industrialised countries to the newly industrialised economies holds the potential to increase wealth in both places, but what are the environmental costs of the globalised manufacturing systems? This paper looks into the changes in carbon footprint...... of manufactured products when production is moved from United Kingdom or Denmark to China and uses environmental input-output analysis to calculate the carbon footprint in the bilateral trade between these countries. The results show that differences between the European and Chinese production systems can lead...

  5. Synthesis of Ni/Mg/Al Layered Double Hydroxides and Their Use as Catalyst Precursors in the Preparation of Carbon Nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Yun; JIAO Qing-ze; LIANG Ji; LI Chun-hua

    2005-01-01

    Ni/Mg/Al layered double hydroxides(LDHs) with different n(Ni):n(Mg):n(Al) ratio values were prepared via a coprecipitation reaction. Then Ni/Mg/Al mixed oxides were obtained by calcination of these LDHs precursors. Carbon nanotubes were produced in the catalytic decomposition of propane over the Ni/Mg/Al mixed oxide catalysts. The quality of as-made nanotubes was investigated by SEM and TEM. The nanotubes were multiwall with a high length-diameter ratio and appeared to be flexible. The catalytic activities of these mixed oxides increased with increasing the Ni content. The Ni/Mg/Al mixed oxide with the highest Ni content [n(Ni)/n(Mg)/n(Al)=1/1/1] showed the highest activity and the carbon nanotubes grown on its surface had the best quality.

  6. Corn stalks char from fast pyrolysis as precursor material for preparation of activated carbon in fluidized bed reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhiqi; Wu, Jingli; He, Tao; Wu, Jinhu

    2014-09-01

    Corn stalks char from fast pyrolysis was activated by physical and chemical activation process in a fluidized bed reactor. The structure and morphology of the carbons were characterized by N2 adsorption and SEM. Effects of activation time and activation agents on the structure of activation carbon were investigated. The physically activated carbons with CO2 have BET specific surface area up to 880 m(2)/g, and exhibit microporous structure. The chemically activated carbons with H3PO4 have BET specific surface area up to 600 m(2)/g, and exhibit mesoporous structure. The surface morphology shows that physically activated carbons exhibit fibrous like structure in nature with long ridges, resembling parallel lines. Whereas chemically activated carbons have cross-interconnected smooth open pores without the fibrous like structure.

  7. Future productivity and carbon storage limited by terrestrial nutrient availability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieder, William R.; Cleveland, Cory C.; Smith, W. Kolby; Todd-Brown, Katherine

    2015-06-01

    The size of the terrestrial sink remains uncertain. This uncertainty presents a challenge for projecting future climate-carbon cycle feedbacks. Terrestrial carbon storage is dependent on the availability of nitrogen for plant growth, and nitrogen limitation is increasingly included in global models. Widespread phosphorus limitation in terrestrial ecosystems may also strongly regulate the global carbon cycle, but explicit considerations of phosphorus limitation in global models are uncommon. Here we use global state-of-the-art coupled carbon-climate model projections of terrestrial net primary productivity and carbon storage from 1860-2100 estimates of annual new nutrient inputs from deposition, nitrogen fixation, and weathering; and estimates of carbon allocation and stoichiometry to evaluate how simulated CO2 fertilization effects could be constrained by nutrient availability. We find that the nutrients required for the projected increases in net primary productivity greatly exceed estimated nutrient supply rates, suggesting that projected productivity increases may be unrealistically high. Accounting for nitrogen and nitrogen-phosphorus limitation lowers projected end-of-century estimates of net primary productivity by 19% and 25%, respectively, and turns the land surface into a net source of CO2 by 2100. We conclude that potential effects of nutrient limitation must be considered in estimates of the terrestrial carbon sink strength through the twenty-first century.

  8. The anode performance of the hard carbon for the lithium ion battery derived from the oxygen-containing aromatic precursors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimoto, Hiroyuki; Tokumitsu, Katsuhisa; Mabuchi, Akihiro; Chinnasamy, Natarajan; Kasuh, Takahiro

    The hard carbon is attractive for the Li ion secondary battery because of its higher capacity than the theoretical value of 372 Ah kg -1 based on the composition of stage 1 Li-intercalated graphite, LiC 6. However, the structure of hard carbon as an anode has not been optimized and the reaction mechanism also has not been clarified in detail. In the present study, the structure of hard carbon derived from oxygen-containing coal tar pitch was investigated by X-ray diffraction, small angle scattering and density measurement, and the relationship between the structure of hard carbon and its anode performance was discussed.

  9. PRODUCTION OF BORON DOPED SINGLE WALLED CARBON NANOTUBES VIA DIFFERENT PRECURSORS

    OpenAIRE

    ERICK COSTA E SILVA TALARICO

    2012-01-01

    Nanotubo de Carbono é um alótropo do Carbono cujo caráter 1D confere-lhe propriedades mecânicas, eletrônicas, térmicas, ópticas excepcionais. Por isso que cientistas têm estudado este material intensamente, tanto do ponto de vista teórico, como de um ponto de vista experimental. Um dos interesses de pesquisa experimental é se conseguir produzir de forma controlada Nanotubos de Carbono com propriedades otimizadas, para aplicações específicas. Outra linha de pesquisa experimen...

  10. Management options to reduce the carbon footprint of livestock products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hermansen, John Erik; Kristensen, Troels

    2011-01-01

    conclude that the most important mitigation options include - better feed conversion at the system level, - use of feeds that increase soil carbon sequestration versus carbon emission, - ensure that the manure produced substitutes for synthetic fertilizer, and - use manure for bio-energy production......Livestock products carry a large carbon footprint compared with other foods, and thus there is a need to focus on how to reduce it. The major contributing factors are emissions related to feed use and manure handling as well as the nature of the land required to produce the feed in question. We can....... Basically, it is important to make sure that all beneficial interactions in the livestock system are optimized instead of focusing only on animal productivity. There is an urgent need to arrive at a sound framework for considering the interaction between land use and carbon footprints of foods....

  11. Carbon Footprint Analysis for a GRAPE Production Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirca, C.; Marras, S.; Masia, S.; Duce, P.; Zara, P.; Spano, D.

    2013-12-01

    Agriculture activities can play a double role in emitting or sequestering carbon from the atmosphere. Mitigation of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in agriculture is one of the most urgent research subjects in the framework of enhancing environmental stewardship. However, little is known about the role of the agriculture in the global carbon balance, since most of the studies applied the Eddy Covariance technique in natural or semi-natural ecosystems to investigate their role in mitigate the anthropogenic carbon release. The application of the Eddy Covariance technique in agricultural systems could greatly improve our knowledge about their role on the global carbon budget and help in modeling the related processes. In addition, there is a growing request from producers, trade companies, and customers on the assessment of the environmental impact of a production process related to agricultural high quality products. In recent years, particular attention was put on the estimation of GHG emissions deriving from productive processes. In this context, a useful tool is the Life Cycle Assessment (LCA), which represents a methodology to estimate GHG emissions related to the entire life cycle of a product. The Carbon Footprint (CF) analysis represents a subset of the LCA, which only considers CO2 emissions with an impact on climate change. With respect to the wine industry, most of studies focused on the CF analysis related to the wine making process in the cellar, while a few studies analyzed the GHG emissions related to the grape production. The aim of this work was to quantify the CO2 emissions due to the grape production and emphasize the double role of a vineyard as a carbon sink or source. An Eddy Covariance station was set up in a representative vineyard located in the Mediterranean Basin (Sardinia, Italy) to measure the net carbon exchange between the surface and the atmosphere. The CF analysis was also conducted to compute the carbon balance of the grape production

  12. Whole-body protein turnover in peritoneal dialysis patients: A comparison of the [15N]glycine end product and the [13C]leucine precursor methods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.L. Tjiong (Hoey Lan); R. Swart (Roel); T. Rietveld (Trinet); J.L.D. Wattimena (Josias); W.C.J. Hop (Wim); M.W.J.A. Fieren (Marien); J.W. van den Berg (Jacobus)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractBackground. Two well-described methods for measuring whole-body protein turnover (WBPT) are the precursor method using a primed continuous infusion of [1-13C]leucine and the end-product method with a single oral dose of [15N]glycine. We previously measured the effects of amino acid (AA)-

  13. Net carbon flux in organic and conventional olive production systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeid Mohamad, Ramez; Verrastro, Vincenzo; Bitar, Lina Al; Roma, Rocco; Moretti, Michele; Chami, Ziad Al

    2014-05-01

    Agricultural systems are considered as one of the most relevant sources of atmospheric carbon. However, agriculture has the potentiality to mitigate carbon dioxide mainly through soil carbon sequestration. Some agricultural practices, particularly fertilization and soil management, can play a dual role in the agricultural systems regarding the carbon cycle contributing to the emissions and to the sequestration process in the soil. Good soil and input managements affect positively Soil Organic Carbon (SOC) changes and consequently the carbon cycle. The present study aimed at comparing the carbon footprint of organic and conventional olive systems and to link it to the efficiency of both systems on carbon sequestration by calculating the net carbon flux. Data were collected at farm level through a specific and detailed questionnaire based on one hectare as a functional unit and a system boundary limited to olive production. Using LCA databases particularly ecoinvent one, IPCC GWP 100a impact assessment method was used to calculate carbon emissions from agricultural practices of both systems. Soil organic carbon has been measured, at 0-30 cm depth, based on soil analyses done at the IAMB laboratory and based on reference value of SOC, the annual change of SOC has been calculated. Substracting sequestrated carbon in the soil from the emitted on resulted in net carbon flux calculation. Results showed higher environmental impact of the organic system on Global Warming Potential (1.07 t CO2 eq. yr-1) comparing to 0.76 t CO2 eq. yr-1 in the conventional system due to the higher GHG emissions caused by manure fertilizers compared to the use of synthetic foliar fertilizers in the conventional system. However, manure was the main reason behind the higher SOC content and sequestration in the organic system. As a resultant, the organic system showed higher net carbon flux (-1.7 t C ha-1 yr-1 than -0.52 t C ha-1 yr-1 in the conventional system reflecting higher efficiency as a

  14. In situ Diagnostics During Carbon Nanotube Production by Laser Ablation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arepalli, Sivaram

    1999-01-01

    The preliminary results of spectral analysis of the reaction zone during the carbon nanotube production by laser ablation method indicate synergetic dependence on dual laser setup. The emission spectra recorded from different regions of the laser ablated plume at different delay times from the laser pulses are used to map the temperatures of C2 and C3. These are compared with Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF) spectra also obtained during production to model the growth mechanism of carbon nanotubes. Experiments conducted to correlate the spectral features with nanotube yields as a function of different production parameters will be discussed.

  15. Design of a "green" one-step catalytic production of epsilon-caprolactam (precursor of nylon-6).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, John Meurig; Raja, Robert

    2005-09-27

    The ever-increasing industrial demand for nylon-6 (polycaprolactam) necessitates the development of environmentally benign methods of producing its precursor, epsilon-caprolactam, from cyclohexanone. It is currently manufactured in two popular double-step processes, each of which uses highly aggressive reagents, and each generates substantial quantities of largely unwanted ammonium sulfate as by-product. Here we describe a viable laboratory-scale, single-step, solvent-free process of producing epsilon-caprolactam using a family of designed bifunctional, heterogeneous, nanoporous catalysts containing isolated acidic and redox sites, which smoothly convert cyclohexanone to epsilon-caprolactam with selectivities in the range 65-78% in air and ammonia at 80 degrees C. The catalysts are microporous (pore diameter 7.3 A) aluminophosphates in which small fractions of the Al(III)O4(5-) and P(V)O4(3-) tetrahedra constituting the 4-connected open framework are replaced by Co(III)PO4(5-) and Si(IV)O4(4-) tetrahedra, which become the loci of the redox and acidic centers, respectively. The catalysts may be further optimized, and already may be so designed as to generate selectivities of approximately 80% for the intermediate oxime, formed from NH2OH, which is produced in situ within the pore system. The advantages of such designed heterogeneous catalysts, and their application to a range of other chemical conversions, are also adumbrated.

  16. DOC, Color and Disinfection By-Product Precursor Dynamics along an Urbanization Gradient, Croton Water Supply System, New York, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassett, J. M.; Mitchell, M. J.; Burns, D. A.; Heisig, P. M.

    2005-05-01

    Hydrologic processes in suburban watersheds and their effects on water quality warrant investigation. Biweekly and storm samples were collected and analyzed for base cations, selected anions, and DOC over a one-year period at the outlet of three small (37 - 55 ha) watersheds (one forested, two with different degrees of suburban development) in the Croton Watershed, southeastern New York. Less frequent sampling for Pt/Co color and disinfection by-product precursors (DBPs) were also conducted. Median baseflow concentrations (>3 days since rainfall) of DOC were similar, ranging from 2.1 to 1.8 to 1.7 mg L -1 for the most urbanized to the forested watershed, respectively. On a unit area load basis (kg ha-1 yr-1), the range was from 8.9 to 6.4 to 5.1, again from most urbanized to forested watershed. All three watersheds showed similar storm responses, with evidence for a flushing mechanism in that DOC concentration increased with increasing discharge. Pt/Co color and DBPs (determined as both total trihalomethane and total haloacetic acid formation potentials) showed similar storm behavior, although the range of response was greater than observed for DOC, suggesting a labile DOC fraction was mobilized during storm events. The more urbanized watersheds tended to favor brominated over chlorinated forms of DBPs; the reasons for this are unclear.

  17. Acute Exposure to a Precursor of Advanced Glycation End Products Induces a Dual Effect on the Rat Pancreatic Islet Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghada Elmhiri

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. Chronic diseases are the leading cause of death worldwide. Advanced glycation end products, known as AGEs, are a major risk factor for diabetes onset and maintenance. Methylglyoxal (MG, a highly reactive metabolite of glucose, is a precursor for the generation of endogenous AGEs. Methods. In this current study we incubated in vitro pancreatic islets from adult rats in absence or presence of MG (10 μmol/l with different concentrations of glucose and different metabolic components (acetylcholine, epinephrine, potassium, forskolin, and leucine. Results. Different effects of MG on insulin secretion were evidenced. In basal glucose stimulation (5.6 mM, MG induced a significant (P<0.05 increase of insulin secretion. By contrast, in higher glucose concentrations (8.3 mM and 16.7 mM, MG significantly inhibited insulin secretion (P<0.05. In the presence of potassium, forskolin, and epinephrine, MG enhanced insulin secretion (P<0.05, while when it was incubated with acetylcholine and leucine, MG resulted in a decrease of insulin secretion (P<0.05. Conclusion. We suggest that MG modulates the secretion activity of beta-cell depending on its level of stimulation by other metabolic factors. These results provide insights on a dual acute effect of MG on the pancreatic cells.

  18. Production of activated carbon from rice husk Vietnam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korobochkin, V. V.; Tu, N. V.; Hieu, N. M.

    2016-09-01

    This work is dedicated to the production of activated carbon from rice husk from Delta of the Red River in Viet Nam. At the first stage, carbonization of a rice husk was carried out to obtain material containing 43.1% carbon and 25 % silica with a specific surface area of 51.5 m2/g. After separating of silica (the second stage), the specific surface area of the product increased to 204 m2/g and the silica content decreased to 1.23% by weight as well. The most important stage in the formation of the porous structure of the material is the activation. The products with the high specific surface area in the range of 800-1345 m2/g were obtained by activation of carbonized product with water vapour or carbon dioxide at temperatures of 700 °C and 850 °C, with varying the flow rate of the activating agent and activation time. The best results were achieved by activation of carbon material with water vapour at the flow rate of 0.08 dm3/min per 500 g of material and the temperature of 850 °C.

  19. Create a Consortium and Develop Premium Carbon Products from Coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frank Rusinko; John Andresen; Jennifer E. Hill; Harold H. Schobert; Bruce G. Miller

    2006-01-01

    The objective of these projects was to investigate alternative technologies for non-fuel uses of coal. Special emphasis was placed on developing premium carbon products from coal-derived feedstocks. A total of 14 projects, which are the 2003 Research Projects, are reported herein. These projects were categorized into three overall objectives. They are: (1) To explore new applications for the use of anthracite in order to improve its marketability; (2) To effectively minimize environmental damage caused by mercury emissions, CO{sub 2} emissions, and coal impounds; and (3) To continue to increase our understanding of coal properties and establish coal usage in non-fuel industries. Research was completed in laboratories throughout the United States. Most research was performed on a bench-scale level with the intent of scaling up if preliminary tests proved successful. These projects resulted in many potential applications for coal-derived feedstocks. These include: (1) Use of anthracite as a sorbent to capture CO{sub 2} emissions; (2) Use of anthracite-based carbon as a catalyst; (3) Use of processed anthracite in carbon electrodes and carbon black; (4) Use of raw coal refuse for producing activated carbon; (5) Reusable PACs to recycle captured mercury; (6) Use of combustion and gasification chars to capture mercury from coal-fired power plants; (7) Development of a synthetic coal tar enamel; (8) Use of alternative binder pitches in aluminum anodes; (9) Use of Solvent Extracted Carbon Ore (SECO) to fuel a carbon fuel cell; (10) Production of a low cost coal-derived turbostratic carbon powder for structural applications; (11) Production of high-value carbon fibers and foams via the co-processing of a low-cost coal extract pitch with well-dispersed carbon nanotubes; (12) Use of carbon from fly ash as metallurgical carbon; (13) Production of bulk carbon fiber for concrete reinforcement; and (14) Characterizing coal solvent extraction processes. Although some of the

  20. Production of dispersed nanometer sized YAG powders from alkoxide, nitrate and chloride precursors and spark plasma sintering to transparency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suarez, M., E-mail: m.suarez@cinn.e [Departamento de Materiales Nanoestructurados, Centro de Investigacion en Nanomateriales y Nanotecnologia (CINN), Principado de Asturias - Consejo superior de Investigaciones Cientificas (CSIC) - Universidad de Oviedo - UO, Parque Tecnologico de Asturias, 33428 Llanera, Asturias (Spain); Fernandez, A. [Fundacion ITMA, Parque Tecnologico de Asturias, 33428, Llanera (Spain); Menendez, J.L.; Torrecillas, R. [Departamento de Materiales Nanoestructurados, Centro de Investigacion en Nanomateriales y Nanotecnologia (CINN), Principado de Asturias - Consejo superior de Investigaciones Cientificas (CSIC) - Universidad de Oviedo - UO, Parque Tecnologico de Asturias, 33428 Llanera, Asturias (Spain)

    2010-03-18

    Yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG) was synthesized from different starting materials, i.e., alkoxide, nitrate and chloride precursors. The conversion steps from the precursors to crystalline YAG were studied by Raman spectroscopy. Dispersed YAG powders were formed at a relatively low temperature, around 800 {sup o}C by the chlorides route, whereas alkoxide precursors needed firing over 900 {sup o}C and nitrates even over 1100 {sup o}C. Lyophilized YAG gel was sintered to transparency by the spark plasma sintering method at 1500 {sup o}C with in-line transmittances close to 60% at 680 nm and over 80% in the infrared range.

  1. Low carbon fuel and chemical production from waste gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simpson, S.; Liew, F.M.; Daniell, J.; Koepke, M. [LanzaTech, Ltd., Auckland (New Zealand)

    2012-07-01

    LanzaTech has developed a gas fermentation platform for the production of alter native transport fuels and commodity chemicals from carbon monoxide, hydrogen and carbon dioxide containing gases. LanzaTech technology uses these gases in place of sugars as the carbon and energy source for fermentation thereby allowing a broad spectrum of resources to be considered as an input for product synthesis. At the core of the Lanzatech process is a proprietary microbe capable of using gases as the only carbon and energy input for product synthesis. To harness this capability for the manufacture of a diverse range of commercially valuable products, the company has developed a robust synthetic biology platform to enable a variety of novel molecules to be synthesised via gas fermentation. LanzaTech initially focused on the fermentation of industrial waste gases for fuel ethanol production. The company has been operating pilot plant that uses direct feeds of steel making off gas for ethanol production for over 24 months. This platform technology has been further successfully demonstrated using a broad range of gas inputs including gasified biomass and reformed natural gas. LanzaTech has developed the fermentation, engineering and control systems necessary to efficiently convert gases to valuable products. A precommercial demonstration scale unit processing steel mill waste gases was commissioned in China during the 2{sup nd} quarter of 2012. Subsequent scale-up of this facility is projected for the 2013 and will represent the first world scale non-food based low carbon ethanol project. More recently LanzaTech has developed proprietary microbial catalysts capable of converting carbon dioxide in the presence of hydrogen directly to value added chemicals, where-in CO{sub 2} is the sole source of carbon for product synthesis. Integrating the LanzaTech technology into a number of industrial facilities, such as steel mills, oil refineries and other industries that emit Carbon bearing

  2. Capacity and production planning with carbon emission constraints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Song, Shuang; Govindan, Kannan; Xu, Lei

    2017-01-01

    This paper builds a two-stage, stochastic model to study capacity expansion problem in logistics under cap-and-trade and carbon tax regulations. The optimal capacity expansion and production decisions are obtained, and the effects of carbon emission regulations on capacity expansion are studied....... Through analytical study and a real case numerical analysis, we find that the carbon tax exhibits different impacts on optimal capacity expansion decisions in low tax rate and high tax rate, and the volatility of capacity investment cost has a larger impact on optimal capacity expansion than...

  3. The arginine deiminase pathway of koji bacteria is involved in ethyl carbamate precursor production in soy sauce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jiran; Fang, Fang; Chen, Jian; Du, Guocheng

    2014-09-01

    Ethyl carbamate (EC) is a group 2A carcinogen generated from a few precursors in many fermented foods and alcoholic beverages. Citrulline, urea, carbamoyl phosphate, and ethanol are common precursors detected in fermented foods. In this study, citrulline was proved to be the main EC precursor in soy sauce, which was found to be accumulated in moromi mash period and correlated with the utilization of arginine by koji bacteria. Six koji isolates belonging to three genera were identified to be able to accumulate citrulline via the arginine deiminase (ADI) pathway. Among these strains, only Pediococcus acidilactici retained high activities in synthesis and accumulation of citrulline in the presence of high concentration of sodium chloride. These results suggested that P. acidilactici is responsible for the accumulation of citrulline, one of the EC precursors, in the process of soy sauce fermentation.

  4. Nrt1 and Tna1-Independent Export of NAD+ Precursor Vitamins Promotes NAD+ Homeostasis and Allows Engineering of Vitamin Production

    OpenAIRE

    Peter Belenky; Rebecca Stebbins; Bogan, Katrina L.; Evans, Charles R.; Charles Brenner

    2011-01-01

    NAD(+) is both a co-enzyme for hydride transfer enzymes and a substrate of sirtuins and other NAD(+) consuming enzymes. NAD(+) biosynthesis is required for two different regimens that extend lifespan in yeast. NAD(+) is synthesized from tryptophan and the three vitamin precursors of NAD(+): nicotinic acid, nicotinamide and nicotinamide riboside. Supplementation of yeast cells with NAD(+) precursors increases intracellular NAD(+) levels and extends replicative lifespan. Here we show that both ...

  5. Effect of precursor on the pore structure of carbon foams%前驱体对炭泡沫孔结构的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    闵振华; 曹敏; 张书; 王秀丹; 王永刚

    2007-01-01

    Carbon foams were prepared from coal tar pitch, petroleum mesophase pitch, and AR pitch. The molecular weights of the precursors were determined by gel permeation chromatography. Foam structure, average pore diameter and pore diameter distribution were investigated by scanning electron and optical microscopy. It was found that coal tar pitch could not be used as-received to prepare useful carbon foams because of their higher quinoline insoluble (QI) fraction. The carbon foams with homogeneous open pores and microscopic domains were obtained from AR pitch and petroleum mesophase pitch. Carbon foams prepared from AR pitch exhibited a smaller average pore diameter (212 μm),thinner cell walls, a narrower pore diameter distribution ( 180 -300 μm), higher open-cell ratio, and better ligaments compared with those from the other pitches. It is concluded that a precursor with low molecular weight, narrow molecular weight distribution, and low QI content is favorable for the preparation of carbon foams.%分别以煤沥青、石油中间相沥青和AR沥青为前驱体制备炭泡沫材料.采用GPC测定前驱体分子量,SEM观察所制炭泡沫的孔结构,光学显微镜测量所制炭泡沫的孔径及其分布.结果发现,由于煤焦油沥青不含中间相,且QI含量较高,导致在实验条件下不能直接制备出合格的炭泡沫.以石油中间相沥青和AR沥青为原料均能制备出具有分布均匀开孔结构,且微观各向异性的炭泡沫.由AR沥青制备的炭泡沫呈现平均孔径较小(212 μm)、孔壁较薄、孔径分布较窄(180 μm~300 μm)、开孔率较高、以及韧带排列较规整等特点,表明低QI含量、低分子量且分布较窄的前驱体有利于发泡.

  6. Analysis on Availability of the Carbon Element in Alcohol Production

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭素荣; 蒋大和; 寇刘秀; 陆雍森

    2006-01-01

    According to the concept of circular economy, the mass integration of alcohol production was investigated though the analysis of the carbon element contained in raw material cassava. Through the mass integration, the distillage wastewater turned into carbon resource and produced a great deal of by-product biogas while its chemical oxygen demand (COD) was reduced from 50000 mg/L to not more than 300 mg/L, the local secondary effluent standards, and other by-products such as CO2 (liquidized) and fusel oil were recovered. In the way, the consumption of raw material was only 2.2 tons cassava to produce 1 ton alcohol (96%, ψ) in the case study, much lower than the average level 2.92 t/t in China. The carbon element balance for production of alcohol was made through testing the concentrations of the carbon element of all mass flows. The results showed that the mass integration helped the availability of the carbon element increased from 44.74% to 64.75%.

  7. The production of phytolith-occluded carbon in China's forests: implications to biogeochemical carbon sequestration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Zhaoliang; Liu, Hongyan; Li, Beilei; Yang, Xiaomin

    2013-09-01

    The persistent terrestrial carbon sink regulates long-term climate change, but its size, location, and mechanisms remain uncertain. One of the most promising terrestrial biogeochemical carbon sequestration mechanisms is the occlusion of carbon within phytoliths, the silicified features that deposit within plant tissues. Using phytolith content-biogenic silica content transfer function obtained from our investigation, in combination with published silica content and aboveground net primary productivity (ANPP) data of leaf litter and herb layer in China's forests, we estimated the production of phytolith-occluded carbon (PhytOC) in China's forests. The present annual phytolith carbon sink in China's forests is 1.7 ± 0.4 Tg CO2  yr(-1) , 30% of which is contributed by bamboo because the production flux of PhytOC through tree leaf litter for bamboo is 3-80 times higher than that of other forest types. As a result of national and international bamboo afforestation and reforestation, the potential of phytolith carbon sink for China's forests and world's bamboo can reach 6.8 ± 1.5 and 27.0 ± 6.1 Tg CO2  yr(-1) , respectively. Forest management practices such as bamboo afforestation and reforestation may significantly enhance the long-term terrestrial carbon sink and contribute to mitigation of global climate warming.

  8. JV Task 90 - Activated Carbon Production from North Dakota Lignite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steven Benson; Charlene Crocker; Rokan Zaman; Mark Musich; Edwin Olson

    2008-03-31

    The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) has pursued a research program for producing activated carbon from North Dakota lignite that can be competitive with commercial-grade activated carbon. As part of this effort, small-scale production of activated carbon was produced from Fort Union lignite. A conceptual design of a commercial activated carbon production plant was drawn, and a market assessment was performed to determine likely revenue streams for the produced carbon. Activated carbon was produced from lignite coal in both laboratory-scale fixed-bed reactors and in a small pilot-scale rotary kiln. The EERC was successfully able to upgrade the laboratory-scale activated carbon production system to a pilot-scale rotary kiln system. The activated carbon produced from North Dakota lignite was superior to commercial grade DARCO{reg_sign} FGD and Rheinbraun's HOK activated coke product with respect to iodine number. The iodine number of North Dakota lignite-derived activated carbon was between 600 and 800 mg I{sub 2}/g, whereas the iodine number of DARCO FGD was between 500 and 600 mg I{sub 2}/g, and the iodine number of Rheinbraun's HOK activated coke product was around 275 mg I{sub 2}/g. The EERC performed both bench-scale and pilot-scale mercury capture tests using the activated carbon made under various optimization process conditions. For comparison, the mercury capture capability of commercial DARCO FGD was also tested. The lab-scale apparatus is a thin fixed-bed mercury-screening system, which has been used by the EERC for many mercury capture screen tests. The pilot-scale systems included two combustion units, both equipped with an electrostatic precipitator (ESP). Activated carbons were also tested in a slipstream baghouse at a Texas power plant. The results indicated that the activated carbon produced from North Dakota lignite coal is capable of removing mercury from flue gas. The tests showed that activated carbon with the greatest

  9. Preparation of Pt-Re/Vulcan carbon nanocomposites using a single-source molecular precursor and relative performance as a direct methanol fuel cell electrooxidation catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Angela D; Deluga, Gregg A; Moore, Joshua T; Vergne, Matthew J; Hercules, David M; Kenik, Edward A; Lukehart, C M

    2004-09-01

    Pt-Re/Vulcan carbon powder nanocomposites have been prepared with total metal loadings of 18 wt.% and 40 wt.% using a new non-cluster (1:1)-PtRe bimetallic precursor as the source of metal. Pt-Re nanoparticles having an average diameter of ca. 6 nm and atomic stoichiometry near 1:1 are formed. TEM, on-particle HR-EDS, and powder XRD data are consistent with the formation of Pt-Re alloy nanoparticles having a hexagonal unit cell with cell constants of a = 2.77 A and c = 4.47 A. A nanocomposite prepared at higher total metal loading under more rigorous thermal treatment also contains Pt-Re alloy nanoparticles having a fcc unit cell structure (a = 3.95 A). The precise dependence of Pt-Re nanocrystal structure on the thermal history of the nanocomposite specimen has not been investigated in detail. While these Pt-Re/carbon nanocomposites are active as anode catalysts in operating direct methanol fuel cells, the measured performance is less than that of commercial Pt-Ru/carbon catalysts and has marginal practical importance.

  10. Carbon nano structures: Production and characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beig Agha, Rosa

    L'objectif de ce memoire est de preparer et de caracteriser des nanostructures de carbone (CNS -- Carbon Nanostructures, en licence a l'Institut de recherche sur l'hydrogene, Quebec, Canada), un carbone avec un plus grand degre de graphitisation et une meilleure porosite. Le Chapitre 1 est une description generale des PEMFCs (PEMFC -- Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Fuel Cell) et plus particulierement des CNS comme support de catalyseurs, leur synthese et purification. Le Chapitre 2 decrit plus en details la methode de synthese et la purification des CNS, la theorie de formation des nanostructures et les differentes techniques de caracterisation que nous avons utilises telles que la diffraction aux rayons-X (XRD -- X-ray diffraction), la microscopie electronique a transmission (TEM -- transmission electron microscope ), la spectroscopie Raman, les isothermes d'adsorption d'azote a 77 K (analyse BET, t-plot, DFT), l'intrusion au mercure, et l'analyse thermogravimetrique (TGA -- thermogravimetric analysis). Le Chapitre 3 presente les resultats obtenus a chaque etape de la synthese des CNS et avec des echantillons produits a l'aide d'un broyeur de type SPEXRTM (SPEX/CertiPrep 8000D) et d'un broyeur de type planetaire (Fritsch Pulverisette 5). La difference essentielle entre ces deux types de broyeur est la facon avec laquelle les materiaux sont broyes. Le broyeur de type SPEX secoue le creuset contenant les materiaux et des billes d'acier selon 3 axes produisant ainsi des impacts de tres grande energie. Le broyeur planetaire quant a lui fait tourner et deplace le creuset contenant les materiaux et des billes d'acier selon 2 axes (plan). Les materiaux sont donc broyes differemment et l'objectif est de voir si les CNS produits ont les memes structures et proprietes. Lors de nos travaux nous avons ete confrontes a un probleme majeur. Nous n'arrivions pas a reproduire les CNS dont la methode de synthese a originellement ete developpee dans les laboratoires de l'Institut de

  11. Biological productivity and carbon cycling in the Arctic Ocean

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Primary production, bacterial production, particulate organic carbon fluxes and organic carbon burial rates were quantified during the summer period of 1999 in the Arctic Ocean via 14C uptake, 3H uptake, 234Th/238U disequilibrium and 210Pbex dating, respectively. The integrated primary production in the water column was as high as 197 mmolC/(m2@d) in the Chukchi shelf and was 3.8 mmolC/(m2@d) in the Canada Basin. These rates are higher than those reported previously. The ratios of bacterial production to primary production in the study region were higher than 0.5, indicating that microbial activity is not depressed but important in cold Arctic waters. 234Th/238U disequilibria were evident at the station in the Canada Basin. The presence of significant 234Th deficiency suggested that scavenging and removal processes are also important to biogeochemical cycles of trace elements in the Arctic Ocean. Particulate organic carbon export flux was estimated to be 1.0 mmolC/(m2@d). Measurements of sediment excess 210Pb profile in the Chukchi shelf allowed us to estimate the amount of organic carbon buried in the bottom sediment, which ranged from 25 to 35 mmolC/(m2@d) and represented about 59%-82% of the mean primary production in the euphotic zone. Overall, our results indicated that the Arctic Ocean has active carbon cycling and is not a biological desert as previously believed. Therefore, the Arctic Ocean may play an important role in the global carbon cycle and climate change.

  12. Calcium Carbonate Production by Coccolithophorid Alge in Long Term Carbon Dioxide Sequestration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    V. J. Fabry

    2006-09-30

    Predictions of increasing levels of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and the specter of global warming have intensified research efforts to identify ways to sequester carbon. A number of novel avenues of research are being considered, including bioprocessing methods to promote and accelerate biosequestration of CO{sub 2} from the environment through the growth of organisms such as coccolithophorids, which are capable of sequestering CO{sub 2} relatively permanently. Calcium and magnesium carbonates are currently the only proven, long-term storage reservoirs for carbon. Whereas organic carbon is readily oxidized and releases CO{sub 2} through microbial decomposition on land and in the sea, carbonates can sequester carbon over geologic time scales. This proposal investigates the use of coccolithophorids--single-celled, marine algae that are the major global producers of calcium carbonate--to sequester CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants. Cultivation of coccolithophorids for calcium carbonate (CaCO{sub 3}) precipitation is environmentally benign and results in a stable product with potential commercial value. Because this method of carbon sequestration does not impact natural ecosystem dynamics, it avoids controversial issues of public acceptability and legality associated with other options such as direct injection of CO{sub 2} into the sea and ocean fertilization. Consequently, cultivation of coccolithophorids could be carried out immediately and the amount of carbon sequestered as CaCO{sub 3} could be readily quantified. The significant advantages of this approach warrant its serious investigation. The major goals of the proposed research are to identify the growth conditions that will result in the maximum amount of CO{sub 2} sequestration through coccolithophorid calcite production and to evaluate the costs/benefits of using coccolithophorid cultivation ponds to abate CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants.

  13. CALCIUM CARBONATE PRODUCTION BY COCCOLITHOPHORID ALGAE IN LONG TERM, CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    V.J. Fabry

    2004-10-30

    Predictions of increasing levels of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and the specter of global warming have intensified research efforts to identify ways to sequester carbon. A number of novel avenues of research are being considered, including bioprocessing methods to promote and accelerate biosequestration of CO{sub 2} from the environment through the growth of organisms such as coccolithophorids, which are capable of sequestering CO{sub 2} relatively permanently. Calcium and magnesium carbonates are currently the only proven, long-term storage reservoirs for carbon. Whereas organic carbon is readily oxidized and releases CO{sub 2} through microbial decomposition on land and in the sea, carbonates can sequester carbon over geologic time scales. This proposal investigates the use of coccolithophorids--single-celled, marine algae that are the major global producers of calcium carbonate--to sequester CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants. Cultivation of coccolithophorids for calcium carbonate (CaCO{sub 3}) precipitation is environmentally benign and results in a stable product with potential commercial value. Because this method of carbon sequestration does not impact natural ecosystem dynamics, it avoids controversial issues of public acceptability and legality associated with other options such as direct injection of CO{sub 2} into the sea and ocean fertilization. Consequently, cultivation of coccolithophorids could be carried out immediately and the amount of carbon sequestered as CaCO{sub 3} could be readily quantified. The significant advantages of this approach warrant its serious investigation. The major goals of the proposed research are to identify the growth conditions that will result in the maximum amount of CO{sub 2} sequestration through coccolithophorid calcite production and to evaluate the costs/benefits of using coccolithophorid cultivation ponds or bioreactors to abate CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants.

  14. CALCIUM CARBONATE PRODUCTION BY COCCOLITHOPHORID ALGAE IN LONG TERM CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    V. J. Fabry

    2003-10-30

    Predictions of increasing levels of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and the specter of global warming have intensified research efforts to identify ways to sequester carbon. A number of novel avenues of research are being considered, including bioprocessing methods to promote and accelerate biosequestration of CO{sub 2} from the environment through the growth of organisms such as coccolithophorids, which are capable of sequestering CO{sub 2} relatively permanently. Calcium and magnesium carbonates are currently the only proven, long-term storage reservoirs for carbon. Whereas organic carbon is readily oxidized and releases CO{sub 2} through microbial decomposition on land and in the sea, carbonates can sequester carbon over geologic time scales. This proposal investigates the use of coccolithophorids--single-celled, marine algae that are the major global producers of calcium carbonate--to sequester CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants. Cultivation of coccolithophorids for calcium carbonate (CaCO{sub 3}) precipitation is environmentally benign and results in a stable product with potential commercial value. Because this method of carbon sequestration does not impact natural ecosystem dynamics, it avoids controversial issues of public acceptability and legality associated with other options such as direct injection of CO{sub 2} into the sea and ocean fertilization. Consequently, cultivation of coccolithophorids could be carried out immediately and the amount of carbon sequestered as CaCO{sub 3} could be readily quantified. The significant advantages of this approach warrant its serious investigation. The major goals of the proposed research are to identify the growth conditions that will result in the maximum amount of CO{sub 2} sequestration through coccolithophorid calcite production and to evaluate the costs/benefits of using coccolithophorid cultivation ponds or bioreactors to abate CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants.

  15. CALCIUM CARBONATE PRODUCTION BY COCCOLITHAPHORID ALGAE IN LONG TERM, CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    V. J.Fabry

    2004-01-30

    Predictions of increasing levels of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and the specter of global warming have intensified research efforts to identify ways to sequester carbon. A number of novel avenues of research are being considered, including bioprocessing methods to promote and accelerate biosequestration of CO{sub 2} from the environment through the growth of organisms such as coccolithophorids, which are capable of sequestering CO{sub 2} relatively permanently. Calcium and magnesium carbonates are currently the only proven, long-term storage reservoirs for carbon. Whereas organic carbon is readily oxidized and releases CO{sub 2} through microbial decomposition on land and in the sea, carbonates can sequester carbon over geologic time scales. This proposal investigates the use of coccolithophorids--single-celled, marine algae that are the major global producers of calcium carbonate--to sequester CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants. Cultivation of coccolithophorids for calcium carbonate (CaCO{sub 3}) precipitation is environmentally benign and results in a stable product with potential commercial value. Because this method of carbon sequestration does not impact natural ecosystem dynamics, it avoids controversial issues of public acceptability and legality associated with other options such as direct injection of CO{sub 2} into the sea and ocean fertilization. Consequently, cultivation of coccolithophorids could be carried out immediately and the amount of carbon sequestered as CaCO{sub 3} could be readily quantified. The significant advantages of this approach warrant its serious investigation. The major goals of the proposed research are to identify the growth conditions that will result in the maximum amount of CO{sub 2} sequestration through coccolithophorid calcite production and to evaluate the costs/benefits of using coccolithophorid cultivation ponds to abate CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants.

  16. CALCIUM CARBONATE PRODUCTION BY COCCOLITHOPHORID ALGAE IN LONG TERM, CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    V.J. Fabry

    2004-04-26

    Predictions of increasing levels of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and the specter of global warming have intensified research efforts to identify ways to sequester carbon. A number of novel avenues of research are being considered, including bioprocessing methods to promote and accelerate biosequestration of CO{sub 2} from the environment through the growth of organisms such as coccolithophorids, which are capable of sequestering CO{sub 2} relatively permanently. Calcium and magnesium carbonates are currently the only proven, long-term storage reservoirs for carbon. Whereas organic carbon is readily oxidized and releases CO{sub 2} through microbial decomposition on land and in the sea, carbonates can sequester carbon over geologic time scales. This proposal investigates the use of coccolithophorids single-celled, marine algae that are the major global producers of calcium carbonate to sequester CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants. Cultivation of coccolithophorids for calcium carbonate (CaCO{sub 3}) precipitation is environmentally benign and results in a stable product with potential commercial value. Because this method of carbon sequestration does not impact natural ecosystem dynamics, it avoids controversial issues of public acceptability and legality associated with other options such as direct injection of CO{sub 2} into the sea and ocean fertilization. Consequently, cultivation of coccolithophorids could be carried out immediately and the amount of carbon sequestered as CaCO{sub 3} could be readily quantified. The significant advantages of this approach warrant its serious investigation. The major goals of the proposed research are to identify the growth conditions that will result in the maximum amount of CO{sub 2} sequestration through coccolithophorid calcite production and to evaluate the costs/benefits of using coccolithophorid cultivation ponds to abate CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants.

  17. Carbon footprint and ammonia emissions of California beef production systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stackhouse-Lawson, K R; Rotz, C A; Oltjen, J W; Mitloehner, F M

    2012-12-01

    Beef production is a recognized source of greenhouse gas (GHG) and ammonia (NH(3)) emissions; however, little information exists on the net emissions from beef production systems. A partial life cycle assessment (LCA) was conducted using the Integrated Farm System Model (IFSM) to estimate GHG and NH(3) emissions from representative beef production systems in California. The IFSM is a process-level farm model that simulates crop growth, feed production and use, animal growth, and the return of manure nutrients back to the land to predict the environmental impacts and economics of production systems. Ammonia emissions are determined by summing the emissions from animal housing facilities, manure storage, field applied manure, and direct deposits of manure on pasture and rangeland. All important sources and sinks of methane, nitrous oxide, and carbon dioxide are predicted from primary and secondary emission sources. Primary sources include enteric fermentation, manure, cropland used in feed production, and fuel combustion. Secondary emissions occur during the production of resources used on the farm, which include fuel, electricity, machinery, fertilizer, and purchased animals. The carbon footprint is the net exchange of all GHG in carbon dioxide equivalent (CO(2)e) units per kg of HCW produced. Simulated beef production systems included cow-calf, stocker, and feedlot phases for the traditional British beef breeds and calf ranch and feedlot phases for Holstein steers. An evaluation of differing production management strategies resulted in ammonia emissions ranging from 98 ± 13 to 141 ± 27 g/kg HCW and carbon footprints of 10.7 ± 1.4 to 22.6 ± 2.0 kg CO(2)e/kg HCW. Within the British beef production cycle, the cow-calf phase was responsible for 69 to 72% of total GHG emissions with 17 to 27% from feedlot sources. Holstein steers that entered the beef production system as a by-product of dairy production had the lowest carbon footprint because the emissions

  18. Tracking urban carbon footprints from production and consumption perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jianyi; Hu, Yuanchao; Cui, Shenghui; Kang, Jiefeng; Ramaswami, Anu

    2015-05-01

    Cities are hotspots of socio-economic activities and greenhouse gas emissions. The aim of this study was to extend the research range of the urban carbon footprint (CF) to cover emissions embodied in products traded among regions and intra-city sectors. Using Xiamen City as a study case, the total urban-related emissions were evaluated, and the carbon flows among regions and intra-city sectors were tracked. Then five urban CF accountings were evaluated, including purely geographic accounting (PGA), community-wide infrastructure footprint (CIF), and consumption-based footprint (CBF) methods, as well as the newly defined production-based footprint (PBF) and purely production footprint (PPF). Research results show that the total urban-related emissions of Xiamen City in 2010 were 55.2 Mt CO2e/y, of which total carbon flow among regions or intra-city sectors accounted for 53.7 Mt CO2e/y. Within the total carbon flow, import and export respectively accounted for 59 and 65%, highlighting the importance of emissions embodied in trade. By regional trade balance, North America and Europe were the largest net carbon exported-to regions, and Mainland China and Taiwan the largest net carbon imported-from regions. Among intra-sector carbon flows, manufacturing was the largest emission-consuming sector of the total urban carbon flow, accounting for 77.4, and 98% of carbon export was through industrial products trade. By the PBF, PPF, CIF, PGA and CBF methods, the urban CFs were respectively 53.7 Mt CO2e/y, 44.8 Mt CO2e/y, 28.4 Mt CO2e/y, 23.7 Mt CO2e/y, and 19.0 Mt CO2e/y, so all of the other four CFs were higher than the CBF. All of these results indicate that urban carbon mitigation must consider the supply chain management of imported goods, the production efficiency within the city, the consumption patterns of urban consumers, and the responsibility of the ultimate consumers outside the city.

  19. A noble and single source precursor for the synthesis of metal-rich sulphides embedded in an N-doped carbon framework for highly active OER electrocatalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barman, Barun Kumar; Nanda, Karuna Kar

    2016-04-21

    Here, we demonstrate a green and environment-friendly pyrolysis route for the synthesis of metal-rich sulphide embedded in an N-doped carbon (NC) framework in the absence of sulphide ions (S(2-)). The metal-chelate complex (tris(ethylenediamine) metal(ii) sulfate) serves as a new and single source precursor for the synthesis of earth abundant and non-precious hybrid structures such as metal-rich sulphides Co9S8@NC and Ni3S2@NC when M(II) = Co(2+) and Ni(2+) and counter sulphate (SO4(2-)) ions are the source of S. Both the hybrids show superior OER activity as compared to commercial RuO2.

  20. Improvements in Production of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balzano, Leandro; Resasco, Daniel E.

    2009-01-01

    A continuing program of research and development has been directed toward improvement of a prior batch process in which single-walled carbon nanotubes are formed by catalytic disproportionation of carbon monoxide in a fluidized-bed reactor. The overall effect of the improvements has been to make progress toward converting the process from a batch mode to a continuous mode and to scaling of production to larger quantities. Efforts have also been made to optimize associated purification and dispersion post processes to make them effective at large scales and to investigate means of incorporating the purified products into composite materials. The ultimate purpose of the program is to enable the production of high-quality single-walled carbon nanotubes in quantities large enough and at costs low enough to foster the further development of practical applications. The fluidized bed used in this process contains mixed-metal catalyst particles. The choice of the catalyst and the operating conditions is such that the yield of single-walled carbon nanotubes, relative to all forms of carbon (including carbon fibers, multi-walled carbon nanotubes, and graphite) produced in the disproportionation reaction is more than 90 weight percent. After the reaction, the nanotubes are dispersed in various solvents in preparation for end use, which typically involves blending into a plastic, ceramic, or other matrix to form a composite material. Notwithstanding the batch nature of the unmodified prior fluidized-bed process, the fluidized-bed reactor operates in a continuous mode during the process. The operation is almost entirely automated, utilizing mass flow controllers, a control computer running software specific to the process, and other equipment. Moreover, an important inherent advantage of fluidized- bed reactors in general is that solid particles can be added to and removed from fluidized beds during operation. For these reasons, the process and equipment were amenable to

  1. Cerebrolysin decreases amyloid-beta production by regulating amyloid protein precursor maturation in a transgenic model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rockenstein, Edward; Torrance, Magdalena; Mante, Michael; Adame, Anthony; Paulino, Amy; Rose, John B; Crews, Leslie; Moessler, Herbert; Masliah, Eliezer

    2006-05-15

    Cerebrolysin is a peptide mixture with neurotrophic effects that might reduce the neurodegenerative pathology in Alzheimer's disease (AD). We have previously shown in an amyloid protein precursor (APP) transgenic (tg) mouse model of AD-like neuropathology that Cerebrolysin ameliorates behavioral deficits, is neuroprotective, and decreases amyloid burden; however, the mechanisms involved are not completely clear. Cerebrolysin might reduce amyloid deposition by regulating amyloid-beta (Abeta) degradation or by modulating APP expression, maturation, or processing. To investigate these possibilities, APP tg mice were treated for 6 months with Cerebrolysin and analyzed in the water maze, followed by RNA, immunoblot, and confocal microscopy analysis of full-length (FL) APP and its fragments, beta-secretase (BACE1), and Abeta-degrading enzymes [neprilysin (Nep) and insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE)]. Consistent with previous studies, Cerebrolysin ameliorated the performance deficits in the spatial learning portion of the water maze and reduced the synaptic pathology and amyloid burden in the brains of APP tg mice. These effects were associated with reduced levels of FL APP and APP C-terminal fragments, but levels of BACE1, Notch1, Nep, and IDE were unchanged. In contrast, levels of active cyclin-dependent kinase-5 (CDK5) and glycogen synthase kinase-3beta [GSK-3beta; but not stress-activated protein kinase-1 (SAPK1)], kinases that phosphorylate APP, were reduced. Furthermore, Cerebrolysin reduced the levels of phosphorylated APP and the accumulation of APP in the neuritic processes. Taken together, these results suggest that Cerebrolysin might reduce AD-like pathology in the APP tg mice by regulating APP maturation and transport to sites where Abeta protein is generated. This study clarifies the mechanisms through which Cerebrolysin might reduce Abeta production and deposition in AD and further supports the importance of this compound in the potential treatment of early AD.

  2. Using Carbon Isotopes in Cenozoic Soil Carbonates to Quantify Primary Productivity from Mid-Latitude Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caves, J. K.; Kramer, S. H.; Ibarra, D. E.; Chamberlain, C. P.

    2015-12-01

    The carbon isotope composition of pedogenic carbonates (δ13Ccarb) from paleosols has been extensively used as a proxy to estimate atmospheric pCO2 over the Phanerozoic. However, a number of other factors - including the concentration of plant-respired CO2 and the isotopic composition of both atmospheric and plant-respired carbon - influence the δ13C of pedogenic carbonates. For example, δ13Ccarb records from the mid-latitudes in central Asia and western North America show increasing trends in δ13Ccarb despite decreasing pCO2 during the late Cenozoic, which suggests that other factors play an important role in determining the isotopic composition of pedogenic carbonates. Instead, we suggest that these records are primarily recording changes in primary productivity rather than changes in atmospheric pCO2 and therefore propose a novel use of paleosol carbonate records to understand paleo-ecosystem dynamics. Here, we compile existing paleosol carbonate records, and present three new records from Wyoming, to estimate soil respiration and primary productivity in western North America during the Paleogene and early Neogene. We observe both an overall increase in δ13Ccarb after the early Eocene, and spatially heterogeneous δ13Ccarb values across western US basins. We combine this δ13Ccarb data with compilations of atmospheric pCO2 to estimate soil respiration and plant productivity. The long-term increase in δ13Ccarb indicates a decrease in plant productivity as conditions became more arid across much of the western US, congruent with both records of regional uplift and of global cooling. Furthermore, significant spatial heterogeneity in δ13Ccarb indicates that regional factors, such as the presence of paleolakes and/or local paleotopography may have provided a second-order control on local and regional productivity. Thus, our results provide a first-order estimate linking changes in primary productivity with regional tectonics and global climatic change.

  3. A Carbon Arc Apparatus For Production Of Nanotubes In Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alford, J. M.; Mason, G. R.; Feikema, D. A.

    2003-01-01

    Although many methods are available for production of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs), the conventional carbon arc process remains the most popular due to its simplicity and large production rate. However, high temperatures inside the carbon arc generate strong buoyancy driven convection, and it is hypothesized that the non-uniform environment created by this flow will have large effects on the growth and morphology of SWNTs produced by the arc process. Indeed, using normal gravity experiments, Marin et al. have demonstrated that changes in the buoyant convection plume produced by altering the arc electrode orientation can be used to change the diameter distribution of the SWNTs produced; an effect they attribute to changes in the temperature of the local nanotube growth environment. While these experiments present convincing evidence that buoyant convection has a strong effect on nanotube growth, normal gravity experiments are severely limited in scope. The ideal way to study the effect of buoyancy on SWNT production is to remove it completely. Toward this goal, a microgravity carbon arc reactor has been designed for use in the NASA Glenn 2.2 and 5 second drop towers. Although simple in principle, conventional carbon arc machines, which generally employ large reaction chambers and require heavy duty welding power supplies capable of supplying kilowatts of power, are not suitable for microgravity experiments. Here we describe a miniature carbon arc machine for SWNT production that fits into a conventional drop rig for use on the NASA Glenn 2.2 and 5 second drop towers, but that has a performance (production rate) that is better than most large ground-based machines.

  4. Molten carbonate fuel cell product design improvement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    P. Voyentzie; T. Leo; A. Kush; L. Christner; G. Carlson; C. Yuh

    1998-12-20

    Drawing on the manufacture, field test, and post-test experience of the sixteen Santa Clara Demonstration Project (SCDP) stacks, ERC is finalizing the next generation commercial entry product design. The second generation cells are 50% larger in area, 40% lighter on equal geometric area basis, and 30% thinner than the earlier design. These improvements have resulted in doubling of the full-height stack power. A low-cost and high-strength matrix has also been developed for improving product ruggedness. The low-cost advanced cell design incorporating these improvements has been refined through six short stack tests. Power production per cell of two times the SCDP maximum power operation, over ten thermal cycles, and overall operating flexibility with respect to load and thermal changes have been demonstrated in these short stack tests. An internally insulated stack enclosure has been designed and fabricated to eliminate the need for an inert gas environment during operation. ERC has acquired the capability for testing 400kW full-height direct fuel ceil (DFC) stack and balance-of-plant equipment. With the readiness of the power plant test facility, the cell package design, and the stack module, full-height stack testing has begun. The first full- height stack incorporating the post-SCDP second generation design was completed. The stack reached a power level of 253 kW, setting a world record for the highest power production from the advanced fuel cell system. Excellent performance uniformity at this power level affirmed manufacturing reproducibility of the components at the factory. This unoptimized small size test has achieved pipeline natural gas to DC electricity conversion efficiency of 47% (based on lower heating value - LHV) including the parasitic power consumed by the BOP equipment; that should translate to more than 50% efficiency in commercial operation, before employing cogeneration. The power plant system also operated smoothly. With the success of this

  5. Jilin Chemical Fiber Group Launches Its Largest Carbon Fiber Preject

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Flora

    2011-01-01

    China's carbon fiber precursor production line with 5,000 tons of annual output was put into operation in Jilin Chemical Fiber Group on November 18th this year, creating the maximum production capacity currently in China, for which Jilin Chemical Fiber Group become China's largest carbon fiber precursor production base, The smooth operation of the project has laid a solid foundation for promoting China's carbon fiber industry steady, rapid, and healthy development,

  6. Elevated carbon dioxide and ozone alter productivity and ecosystem carbon content in northern temperate forests

    OpenAIRE

    Talhelm, Alan F.; Pregitzer, Kurt S.; Kubiske, Mark E.; Zak, Donald R.; Campany, Courtney E.; Burton, Andrew J; Dickson, Richard E; Hendrey, George R; Isebrands, J G; Lewin, Keith F; Nagy, John; Karnosky, David F.

    2014-01-01

    Three young northern temperate forest communities in the north-central United States were exposed to factorial combinations of elevated carbon dioxide (CO2) and tropospheric ozone (O3) for 11 years. Here, we report results from an extensive sampling of plant biomass and soil conducted at the conclusion of the experiment that enabled us to estimate ecosystem carbon (C) content and cumulative net primary productivity (NPP). Elevated CO2 enhanced ecosystem C content by 11%, whereas elevated O3 d...

  7. Sequestration of carbon dioxide with hydrogen to useful products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, Michael W. W.; Kelly, Robert M.; Hawkins, Aaron B.; Menon, Angeli Lal; Lipscomb, Gina Lynette Pries; Schut, Gerrit Jan

    2017-03-07

    Provided herein are genetically engineered microbes that include at least a portion of a carbon fixation pathway, and in one embodiment, use molecular hydrogen to drive carbon dioxide fixation. In one embodiment, the genetically engineered microbe is modified to convert acetyl CoA, molecular hydrogen, and carbon dioxide to 3-hydroxypropionate, 4-hydroxybutyrate, acetyl CoA, or the combination thereof at levels greater than a control microbe. Other products may also be produced. Also provided herein are cell free compositions that convert acetyl CoA, molecular hydrogen, and carbon dioxide to 3-hydroxypropionate, 4-hydroxybutyrate, acetyl CoA, or the combination thereof. Also provided herein are methods of using the genetically engineered microbes and the cell free compositions.

  8. Assessment of carbon pools in production forest, Pahang, Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azian, M.; Nizam, M. S.; Samsudin, M.; Ismail, P.

    2016-11-01

    Forest is one of the main sources of carbon stock. Forest plays a key role in sustainable management by providing different aspects of forest ecosystem such as source of timber products, provide of clean water, food sources, etc. A study was conducted to assess carbon pools in selected production forest of Pahang, Malaysia. There are five main types of carbon pools that are recognized available in the forest, i.e. aboveground biomass (AGB), belowground biomass (BGB), deadwood, litter and soil; that these components of carbon pools can accumulate and release carbon into the atmosphere. Five sites with different years of logging period representing status of the forest were selected (i.e. before logging (PU), immediate after logging (P0), after 10 (P10), 20 (P20) and 30 (P30) years of logging). Twenty plots of 0.25 ha (50 m × 50 m) each were established with a total sampling area of 1.0 ha at each site. All trees with ≥10 cm diameter at breast height (dbh) were tagged, identified and measured. Soil at 0-30 cm, litter and dead wood were sampled and collected in every each of sub-plots to determine and assess carbon stocks within sites. The results indicated that AGB carbon had highest portion of carbon compared to soil, BGB, deadwood and litter, which comprised about 63% of the total carbon pools. It was followed by soil and BGB that comprised about 22% and 13%, respectively. Deadwood and litter contributes the same percentage which is about 1%. In terms of status of the forest, AGB contained the highest carbon which is range from 110.49 tC ha-1 to 164.49 tC ha-1 compared with soil (33.72 tC ha-1 to 68.51 tC ha-1), BGB tC ha-1 to 34 tC ha-1), deadwood (1.57 tC ha-1 to 5.55 tC ha-1) and litter (1.42 tC ha-1 to 2.19 tC ha-1). Results from this study will be very helpful as baseline of carbon storage in different status of forest from before harvesting to logged-over forest and the impact of harvesting on the carbon stock in Pahang and Peninsular Malaysia as a whole.

  9. Extending shikimate pathway for the production of muconic acid and its precursor salicylic acid in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yuheng; Sun, Xinxiao; Yuan, Qipeng; Yan, Yajun

    2014-05-01

    cis,cis-Muconic acid (MA) and salicylic acid (SA) are naturally-occurring organic acids having great commercial value. MA is a potential platform chemical for the manufacture of several widely-used consumer plastics; while SA is mainly used for producing pharmaceuticals (for example, aspirin and lamivudine) and skincare and haircare products. At present, MA and SA are commercially produced by organic chemical synthesis using petro-derived aromatic chemicals, such as benzene, as starting materials, which is not environmentally friendly. Here, we report a novel approach for efficient microbial production of MA via extending shikimate pathway by introducing the hybrid of an SA biosynthetic pathway with its partial degradation pathway. First, we engineered a well-developed phenylalanine producing Escherichia coli strain into an SA overproducer by introducing isochorismate synthase and isochorismate pyruvate lyase. The engineered strain is able to produce 1.2g/L of SA from simple carbon sources, which is the highest titer reported so far. Further, the partial SA degradation pathway involving salicylate 1-monoxygenase and catechol 1,2-dioxygenase is established to achieve the conversion of SA to MA. Finally, a de novo MA biosynthetic pathway is assembled by integrating the established SA biosynthesis and degradation modules. Modular optimization enables the production of up to 1.5g/L MA within 48h in shake flasks. This study not only establishes an efficient microbial platform for the production of SA and MA, but also demonstrates a generalizable pathway design strategy for the de novo biosynthesis of valuable degradation metabolites.

  10. Improving the process of I carbonation in sugar production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Golybin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Of the total effect of the removal of non-sugars 30–36 % achieved in modern schemes extract purification, a large proportion removed by adsorption of calcium carbonate particles formed in the process of carbonation. To improve the efficiency of the purification steps juice we have proposed a two-stage carbonation I cleaned juice. Holding two stages I saturation at high pH juice is justified in view of the efficiency of adsorption treatment with calcium carbonate. To quantify the proposed option saturation performed laboratory research on plant juices derived from beet varying quality, with the definition of quality indicators to be cleansed juice at all stages of processing the raw juice in warm preliming, the combined main liming, I and II carbonation. Indicators were evaluated for juice in the sugar industry accepted methods. In comparison with the standard version of the proposed two-stage version of I carbonation with intermediate filtration improves filtration performance carbonated juice on 24–26 %, reduce the color of the purified juice to 17–23 %, the content of calcium in the 22–24 %, improve the overall treatment effect 16–19 % (relative. Improving the quality of the purified juice ensures the production of white sugar of standard quality, an increase in the cleaning effect of diffusion juice reduces the loss of sucrose in the molasses and increases the yield of the final commercial product. The proposed version of the separation processes of thermochemical conversion of non-sugars will create conditions for maximum removal by adsorption of their decay products, particularly dyes.

  11. Method for creating high carbon content products from biomass oil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Reginald; Seames, Wayne

    2012-12-18

    In a method for producing high carbon content products from biomass, a biomass oil is added to a cracking reactor vessel. The biomass oil is heated to a temperature ranging from about 100.degree. C. to about 800.degree. C. at a pressure ranging from about vacuum conditions to about 20,700 kPa for a time sufficient to crack the biomass oil. Tar is separated from the cracked biomass oil. The tar is heated to a temperature ranging from about 200.degree. C. to about 1500.degree. C. at a pressure ranging from about vacuum conditions to about 20,700 kPa for a time sufficient to reduce the tar to a high carbon content product containing at least about 50% carbon by weight.

  12. Roll-to-Roll production of carbon nanotubes based supercapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jingyi; Childress, Anthony; Karakaya, Mehmet; Roberts, Mark; Arcilla-Velez, Margarita; Podila, Ramakrishna; Rao, Apparao

    2014-03-01

    Carbon nanomaterials provide an excellent platform for electrochemical double layer capacitors (EDLCs). However, current industrial methods for producing carbon nanotubes are expensive and thereby increase the costs of energy storage to more than 10 Wh/kg. In this regard, we developed a facile roll-to-roll production technology for scalable manufacturing of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) with variable density on run-of-the-mill kitchen Al foils. Our method produces MWNTs with diameter (heights) between 50-100 nm (10-100 μm), and a specific capacitance as high as ~ 100 F/g in non-aqueous electrolytes. In this talk, the fundamental challenges involved in EDLC-suitable MWNT growth, roll-to-roll production, and device manufacturing will be discussed along with electrochemical characteristics of roll-to-roll MWNTs. Research supported by NSF CMMI Grant1246800.

  13. Carbon dioxide production during mechanical ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henneberg, S; Söderberg, D; Groth, T;

    1987-01-01

    studied CO2 production (VCO2) and oxygen consumption (VO2) in mechanically ventilated ICU patients, where CO2 stores were altered by: a) changing minute ventilation by 15%, b) reducing body temperature, and c) changing the level of sedation. Expired gases went through a mixing chamber and were analyzed...... continuously by a mass spectrometer. Signals from this instrument, together with gas-volume signals from the ventilator, were fed to a computer for calculation of VO2 and VCO2. Twenty to 120 min were required to reach a stable level, depending on the patient's size and circulatory response. Similar results...... were obtained by computer simulation using a five-compartment model of CO2 stores. These experiments indicate that measuring VO2 (for calculation of metabolic respiratory quotient [RQ]) in ventilated patients should occur after the patients maintain a 60-min period of stable body temperature...

  14. Field windbreaks for bioenergy production and carbon sequestration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tree windbreaks are a multi-benefit land use with the ability to mitigate climate change by modifying the local microclimate for improved crop growth and sequestering carbon in soil and biomass. Agroforestry practices are also being considered for bioenergy production by direct combustion or produci...

  15. Trade, production fragmentation, and China's carbon dioxide emissions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dietzenbacher, Erik; Pei, Jiansuo; Yang, Cuihong

    2012-01-01

    An input-output framework is adopted to estimate China's carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions as generated by its exports in 2002. More than one half of China's exports are related to international production fragmentation. These processing exports generate relatively little value added but also relativel

  16. Clean Hydrogen Production. Carbon Dioxide Free Alternatives. Project Phisico2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia-Fierro, J. L.; Gonzalez, C.; Serrano, D.; Penelas, G.; Romero, M.; Marcos, M. J.; Rodriguez, C.

    2006-07-01

    The main goal of the PHISICO2 project, funded and promoted by Comunidad de Madrid, is the evaluation and optimisation of three different processes for the clean hydrogen production without carbon dioxide emission. Solar energy and associated Technologies are proposed to be jointly employed with the aim of improving the process efficiency and reducing the production costs. As a transition to the non-fossil fuel hydrogen economy, the thermocatalytic CO2-free production of hydrogen from natural gas will be considered. One of the most promising alternatives of this process is to develop a cheap and stable carbon-based catalyst able to efficiently decompose methane into a CO2-free hydrogen stream and solid carbon. Thus, not only pure hydrogen can be obtained through but also carbon with specific properties and commercial value can be produced. Another option to be explored is the splitting of water by means of solar light by means of two different approaches: (i) photodissociation promoted by semiconductor catalysts and (ii) thermochemical cycles in which a specific mixed oxide is first thermally reduced by sunlight and then reoxidized by steam in a second step with the parallel production of hydrogen. Indeed, option (i) implies necessarily the development of semiconductors with appropriate band-gap able to decompose water into hydrogen and oxygen in an efficient manner. Another critical issue will be the development of a strategy/concept that allows efficient separation of hydrogen and oxygen within the cell. In option (ii), the development of stable ferrites which act as the redox element of the cycle is also an important challenge. Finally, a 5 kW prototype solar engine water splitting, based on the mentioned thermochemical cycle, will developed and tested using concentrated solar light as an energy source. Moreover, thermodynamic and kinetic studies, reactor design, process optimisation, economical studies and comparison with conventional hydrogen production systems

  17. Biomimetic mineralization of CaCO3 on a phospholipid monolayer: from an amorphous calcium carbonate precursor to calcite via vaterite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Junwu; Wang, Zhining; Tang, Yecang; Yang, Shihe

    2010-04-06

    A phospholipid monolayer, approximately half the bilayer structure of a biological membrane, can be regarded as an ideal model for investigating biomineralization on biological membranes. In this work on the biomimetic mineralization of CaCO(3) under a phospholipid monolayer, we show the initial heterogeneous nucleation of amorphous calcium carbonate precursor (ACC) nanoparticles at the air-water interface, their subsequent transformation into the metastable vaterite phase instead of the most thermodynamically stable calcite phase, and the ultimate phase transformation to calcite. Furthermore, the spontaneity of the transformation from vaterite to calcite was found to be closely related to the surface tension; high surface pressure could inhibit the process, highlighting the determinant of surface energy. To understand better the mechanisms for ACC formation and the transformation from ACC to vaterite and to calcite, in situ Brewster angle microscopy (BAM), ex situ scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction analysis were employed. This work has clarified the crystallization process of calcium carbonate under phospholipid monolayers and therefore may further our understanding of the biomineralization processes induced by cellular membranes.

  18. Design of a “green” one-step catalytic production of ε-caprolactam (precursor of nylon-6)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, John Meurig; Raja, Robert

    2005-01-01

    The ever-increasing industrial demand for nylon-6 (polycaprolactam) necessitates the development of environmentally benign methods of producing its precursor, ε-caprolactam, from cyclohexanone. It is currently manufactured in two popular double-step processes, each of which uses highly aggressive reagents, and each generates substantial quantities of largely unwanted ammonium sulfate as by-product. Here we describe a viable laboratory-scale, single-step, solvent-free process of producing ε-caprolactam using a family of designed bifunctional, heterogeneous, nanoporous catalysts containing isolated acidic and redox sites, which smoothly convert cyclohexanone to ε-caprolactam with selectivities in the range 65–78% in air and ammonia at 80°C. The catalysts are microporous (pore diameter 7.3 Å) aluminophosphates in which small fractions of the \\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document} \\begin{equation*}{\\mathrm{Al}}^{{\\mathrm{III}}}{\\mathrm{O}}_{4}^{5-}\\end{equation*}\\end{document} and \\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document} \\begin{equation*}{\\mathrm{P}}^{{\\mathrm{V}}}{\\mathrm{O}}_{4}^{3-}\\end{equation*}\\end{document} tetrahedra constituting the 4-connected open framework are replaced by \\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document} \\begin{equation*}{\\mathrm{Co}}^{{\\mathrm{III}}}{\\mathrm{PO}}_{4}^{5-}\\end{equation*}\\end{document} and \\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage

  19. Artemisinin production and precursor ratio in full grown Artemisia annua L. plants subjected to external stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Anders; Verstappen, Francel; Bouwmeester, Harro

    2013-01-01

    was examined on the concentrations of AN and its immediate precursors in leaves, and these concentrations were related to densities and sizes of the glandular trichomes (GT). Plants were stress treated weekly five times by sandblasting or spraying with salicylic acid, chitosan oligosaccharide, H2O2, and Na...

  20. Biogenic carbon fluxes from global agricultural production and consumption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolf, Julie; West, Tristram O.; Le Page, Yannick LB; Kyle, G. Page; Zhang, Xuesong; Collatz, George; Imhoff, Marc L.

    2015-10-01

    Quantification of biogenic carbon fluxes from agricultural lands is needed to generate comprehensive bottom-up estimates of net carbon exchange for global and regional carbon monitoring. We estimated global agricultural carbon fluxes associated with annual crop net primary production (NPP), harvested biomass, and consumption of biomass by humans and livestock. These estimates were combined for a single estimate of net carbon exchange (NCE) and spatially distributed to 0.05 degree resolution using MODIS satellite land cover data. Global crop NPP in 2011 was estimated at 5.25 ± 0.46 Pg C yr-1, of which 2.05 ± 0.05 Pg C yr-1 was harvested and 0.54 Pg C yr-1 was collected from crop residues for livestock fodder. Total livestock feed intake in 2011 was 2.42 ± 0.21 Pg C yr-1, of which 2.31 ± 0.21 Pg C yr-1 was emitted as CO2, 0.07 ± 0.01 Pg C yr-1 was emitted as CH4, and 0.04 Pg C yr-1 was contained within milk and egg production. Livestock grazed an estimated 1.27 Pg C yr-1 in 2011, which constituted 52.4% of total feed intake. Global human food intake was 0.57 ± 0.03 Pg C yr-1 in 2011, the majority of which is respired as CO2. Completed global cropland carbon budgets accounted for the ultimate use of ca. 80% of harvested biomass. The spatial distribution of these fluxes may be used for global carbon monitoring, estimation of regional uncertainty, and for use as input to Earth system models.

  1. Impact of bioenergy production on carbon storage and soil functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prays, Nadia; Franko, Uwe

    2016-04-01

    An important renewable energy source is methane produced in biogas plants (BGPs) that convert plant material and animal excrements to biogas and a residue (BGR). If the plant material stems from crops produced specifically for that purpose, a BGP have a 'footprint' that is defined by the area of arable land needed for the production of these energy crops and the area for distributing the BGRs. The BGR can be used to fertilize these lands (reducing the need for carbon and nitrogen fertilizers), and the crop land can be managed to serve as a carbon sink, capturing atmospheric CO2. We focus on the ecological impact of different BGPs in Central Germany, with a specific interest in the long-term effect of BGR-fertilization on carbon storage within the footprint of a BGP. We therefore studied nutrient fluxes using the CANDY (CArbon and Nitrogen Dynamics) model, which processes site-specific information on soils, crops, weather, and land management to compute stocks and fluxes of carbon and nitrogen for agricultural fields. We used CANDY to calculated matter fluxes within the footprints of BGPs of different sizes, and studied the effect of the substrate mix for the BGP on the carbon dynamics of the soil. This included the land requirement of the BGR recycling when used as a fertilizer: the footprint of a BGP required for the production of the energy crop generally differs from its footprint required to take up its BGR. We demonstrate how these findings can be used to find optimal cropping choices and land management for sustainable soil use, maintaining soil fertility and other soil functions. Furthermore, site specific potentials and limitations for agricultural biogas production can be identified and applied in land-use planning.

  2. A luminescent supramolecular assembly composed of a single-walled carbon nanotube and a molecular magnet precursor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Safar, G. A. M., E-mail: gamsafar@yahoo.com.br; Simoes, T. R. G. [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Departamento de Quimica (Brazil); Paula, A. M. de [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Departamento de Fisica (Brazil); Gratens, X.; Chitta, V. A. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade de Sao Paulo (Brazil); Stumpf, H. O. [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Departamento de Quimica (Brazil)

    2013-02-15

    Magnetism of supramolecular assemblies of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTS) with a magnetic dinuclear molecule is investigated. Raman, optical absorption and confocal fluorescence images are used to probe the interaction of the dinuclear compound and the SWCNT. The supramolecular assembly shows antiferromagnetism, on the contrary to the case when strong electronic doping of the SWCNT occurs, yielding a spin-glass system, and contrary to the case of the dinuclear molecular crystal, which is ferromagnetic. The SWCNT imposes the antiferromagnetic order to the dinuclear molecule, corroborating recent findings that antiferromagnetism is present in pure SWCNTs. Two theoretical models are used to fit the data, both yielding good fitting results. The nanoparticle size range is around 2-10 nm.

  3. SYNGAS PRODUCTION FROM CO2-REFORMING OF CH4 OVER SOL-GEL SYNTHESIZED Ni-Co/Al2O3-MgO-ZrO2 NANOCATALYST: EFFECT OF ZrO2 PRECURSOR ON CATALYST PROPERTIES AND PERFORMANCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Mehdi Sajjadi

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Ni-Co/Al2O3-MgO-ZrO2 nanocatalyst with utilization of two different zirconia precursors, namely, zirconyl nitrate hydrate (ZNH and zirconyl nitrate solution (ZNS, was synthesized via the sol-gel method. The physiochemical properties of nanocatalysts were characterized by XRD, FESEM, EDX, BET and FTIR analyses and employed for syngas production from CO2-reforming of CH4. XRD patterns, exhibiting proper crystalline structure and homogeneous dispersion of active phase for the nanocatalyst ZNS precursor employed (NCAMZ-ZNS. FESEM and BET results of NCAMZ-ZNS presented more uniform morphology and smaller particle size and consequently higher surface areas. In addition, average particle size of NCAMZ-ZNS was 15.7 nm, which is close to the critical size for Ni-Co catalysts to avoid carbon formation. Moreover, FESEM analysis indicated both prepared samples were nanoscale. EDX analysis confirmed the existence of various elements used and also supported the statements made in the XRD and FESEM analyses regarding dispersion. Based on the excellent physiochemical properties, NCAMZ-ZNS exhibited the best reactant conversion across all of the evaluated temperatures, e.g. CH4 and CO2 conversions were 97.2 and 99% at 850 ºC, respectively. Furthermore, NCAMZ-ZNS demonstrated a stable yield with H2/CO close to unit value during the 1440 min stability test.

  4. Study on Product Line of PANCF Precursor Fiber%PAN基碳纤维原丝生产线的研发

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高占勇

    2011-01-01

    简介了聚丙烯腈(PAN)基碳纤维的特点以及PAN基碳纤维原丝质量的重要性。重点分析了3个PAN基碳纤维原丝生产线流程方案的设备排布特点、部分工艺参数、总体设计要求以及单元机的结构特征。最后指出PAN基碳纤维原丝生产线上主要单元机的研发难点。%The characteristic of PAN-CF and the fundamentality of PAN-CF precursor fiber quality were introduced briefly. The arrangement feature, technological parameter, and overall design requirement of three projects about PAN-CF precursor fiber product line were analyzed. In addition, the structure feature of unit machine was also analyzed. Finally, the study difficulty of main unit machine on PAN-CF precursor fiber product line was also discussed.

  5. A novel method for production of activated carbon from waste tea by chemical activation with microwave energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emine Yagmur; Meryem Ozmak; Zeki Aktas [Ankara University, Ankara (Turkey). Faculty of Engineering

    2008-11-15

    This study presents the production of activated carbon from waste tea. Activated carbons were prepared by phosphoric acid activation with and without microwave treatment and carbonisation of the waste tea under nitrogen atmosphere at various temperatures and different phosphoric acid/precursor impregnation ratios. The surface properties of the activated carbons were investigated by elemental analysis, BET surface area, SEM, FTIR. Prior to heat treatment conducted in a furnace, the mixture of the waste tea and H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} was treated with microwave heating. The maximum BET surface area was 1157 m{sup 2}/g for the sample treated with microwave energy and then carbonised at 350{sup o}C. In case of application of conventional method, the BET surface area of the resultant material was 928.8 m{sup 2}/g using the same precursor and conditions. According to the Dubinin-Radushkevich (DR) method the micropore surface area for the sample treated with microwave energy was higher than the sample obtained from the conventional method. Results show that microwave heating reasonably influenced the micropore surface area of the samples as well as the BET surface area. The samples activated were also characterised in terms of the cumulative pore and micropore volumes according to the BJH, DR and t-methods, respectively. 35 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs.

  6. Activated Carbon by Co-pyrolysis and Steam Activation from Particle Board and Melamine Formaldehyde Resin: Production, Adsorption Properties and Techno Economic Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenny Vanreppelen

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available One of the top strategic objectives and research areas in Europe is recovering wood from processing and end of life products. However, there are still several "contaminated" wood products that are not or only partly reused/recycled. Particle board waste which is contaminated with aminoplasts is one of these products. In addition, a considerable amount of aminoplast waste resinis produced for the production of particle board that cannot be re-used or recycled. The chemical properties of these wastes (high nitrogen content of 5.9 wt% and 54.1 wt% for particle board and melamine formaldehyde respectively make them ideal precursors for the production of nitrogenised activated carbon. The profitability of the produced activated carbon is investigated by calculating the net present value, the minimum selling price and performing a Monte Carlo sensitivity analysis. Encouraging results for a profitable production are obtained even though the current assumptions start from a rather pessimistic scenario.

  7. Catalytic Graphitization for Preparation of Porous Carbon Material Derived from Bamboo Precursor and Performance as Electrode of Electrical Double-Layer Capacitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsubota, Toshiki; Maguchi, Yuta; Kamimura, Sunao; Ohno, Teruhisa; Yasuoka, Takehiro; Nishida, Haruo

    2015-12-01

    The combination of addition of Fe (as a catalyst for graphitization) and CO2 activation (a kind of gaseous activation) was applied to prepare a porous carbon material from bamboo powder (a waste product of superheated steam treatment). Regardless of the heat treatment temperature, many macropores were successfully formed after the heating process by removal of Fe compounds. A turbostratic carbon structure was generated in the Fe-added sample heated at 850°C. It was confirmed that the added Fe acted as a template for pore formation. Moreover, it was confirmed that the added Fe acted as a catalyst for graphitization. The resulting electrochemical performance as the electrode of an electrical double-layer capacitor, as demonstrated by cyclic voltammetry, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, and charge-discharge testing, could be explained based on the graphitization and activation effects. Addition of Fe could affect the electrical properties of carbon material derived from bamboo.

  8. cGMP production of patient-specific iPSCs and photoreceptor precursor cells to treat retinal degenerative blindness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiley, Luke A; Burnight, Erin R; DeLuca, Adam P; Anfinson, Kristin R; Cranston, Cathryn M; Kaalberg, Emily E; Penticoff, Jessica A; Affatigato, Louisa M; Mullins, Robert F; Stone, Edwin M; Tucker, Budd A

    2016-07-29

    Immunologically-matched, induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)-derived photoreceptor precursor cells have the potential to restore vision to patients with retinal degenerative diseases like retinitis pigmentosa. The purpose of this study was to develop clinically-compatible methods for manufacturing photoreceptor precursor cells from adult skin in a non-profit cGMP environment. Biopsies were obtained from 35 adult patients with inherited retinal degeneration and fibroblast lines were established under ISO class 5 cGMP conditions. Patient-specific iPSCs were then generated, clonally expanded and validated. Post-mitotic photoreceptor precursor cells were generated using a stepwise cGMP-compliant 3D differentiation protocol. The recapitulation of the enhanced S-cone phenotype in retinal organoids generated from a patient with NR2E3 mutations demonstrated the fidelity of these protocols. Transplantation into immune compromised animals revealed no evidence of abnormal proliferation or tumor formation. These studies will enable clinical trials to test the safety and efficiency of patient-specific photoreceptor cell replacement in humans.

  9. Nrt1 and Tna1-independent export of NAD+ precursor vitamins promotes NAD+ homeostasis and allows engineering of vitamin production.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Belenky

    Full Text Available NAD(+ is both a co-enzyme for hydride transfer enzymes and a substrate of sirtuins and other NAD(+ consuming enzymes. NAD(+ biosynthesis is required for two different regimens that extend lifespan in yeast. NAD(+ is synthesized from tryptophan and the three vitamin precursors of NAD(+: nicotinic acid, nicotinamide and nicotinamide riboside. Supplementation of yeast cells with NAD(+ precursors increases intracellular NAD(+ levels and extends replicative lifespan. Here we show that both nicotinamide riboside and nicotinic acid are not only vitamins but are also exported metabolites. We found that the deletion of the nicotinamide riboside transporter, Nrt1, leads to increased export of nicotinamide riboside. This discovery was exploited to engineer a strain to produce high levels of extracellular nicotinamide riboside, which was recovered in purified form. We further demonstrate that extracellular nicotinamide is readily converted to extracellular nicotinic acid in a manner that requires intracellular nicotinamidase activity. Like nicotinamide riboside, export of nicotinic acid is elevated by the deletion of the nicotinic acid transporter, Tna1. The data indicate that NAD(+ metabolism has a critical extracellular element in the yeast system and suggest that cells regulate intracellular NAD(+ metabolism by balancing import and export of NAD(+ precursor vitamins.

  10. Nrt1 and Tna1-independent export of NAD+ precursor vitamins promotes NAD+ homeostasis and allows engineering of vitamin production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belenky, Peter; Stebbins, Rebecca; Bogan, Katrina L; Evans, Charles R; Brenner, Charles

    2011-05-11

    NAD(+) is both a co-enzyme for hydride transfer enzymes and a substrate of sirtuins and other NAD(+) consuming enzymes. NAD(+) biosynthesis is required for two different regimens that extend lifespan in yeast. NAD(+) is synthesized from tryptophan and the three vitamin precursors of NAD(+): nicotinic acid, nicotinamide and nicotinamide riboside. Supplementation of yeast cells with NAD(+) precursors increases intracellular NAD(+) levels and extends replicative lifespan. Here we show that both nicotinamide riboside and nicotinic acid are not only vitamins but are also exported metabolites. We found that the deletion of the nicotinamide riboside transporter, Nrt1, leads to increased export of nicotinamide riboside. This discovery was exploited to engineer a strain to produce high levels of extracellular nicotinamide riboside, which was recovered in purified form. We further demonstrate that extracellular nicotinamide is readily converted to extracellular nicotinic acid in a manner that requires intracellular nicotinamidase activity. Like nicotinamide riboside, export of nicotinic acid is elevated by the deletion of the nicotinic acid transporter, Tna1. The data indicate that NAD(+) metabolism has a critical extracellular element in the yeast system and suggest that cells regulate intracellular NAD(+) metabolism by balancing import and export of NAD(+) precursor vitamins.

  11. Mineral carbonation of phosphogypsum waste for production of useful carbonate and sulfate salts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannu-Petteri eMattila

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Phosphogypsum (CaSO4·2H2O waste is produced in large amounts during phosphoric acid (H3PO4 production. Minor quantities are utilized in construction or agriculture, while most of the material is stockpiled, creating an environmental challenge to prevent pollution of natural waters. In principle, the gypsum waste could be used to capture several hundred Mt of carbon dioxide (CO2. For example, when gypsum is converted to ammonium sulfate ((NH42SO4 with ammonia (NH3 and CO2, also solid calcium carbonate (CaCO3 is generated. The ammonium sulfate can be utilized as a fertilizer or in other mineral carbonation processes that use magnesium silicate-based rock as feedstock, while calcium carbonate has various uses as e.g. filler material. The reaction extent of the described process was studied by thermodynamic modeling and experimentally as a function of reactant concentrations and temperature. Other essential properties such as purity and quality of the solid products are also followed. Conversion efficiencies of >95% calcium from phosphogypsum to calcium carbonate are obtained. Scalenohedral, rhombohedral and prismatic calcite particles can be produced, though the precipitates contain certain contaminants such as rare earth metals and sulfur from the gypsum. A reverse osmosis membrane cartridge is also tested as an alternative and energy-efficient method of concentrating the ammonium sulfate salt solution instead of the traditional evaporation of the process solution.

  12. The role of carbonic anhydrase in hepatic glucose production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Ibrahim Salihu

    2016-12-14

    Considerable efforts are being made daily to discover novel therapeutic targets to better understand the mechanism for designing drugs in treating diabetes. Inhibition of hepatic gluconeogenesis by metformin remains the first line of oral therapy for managing type 2 diabetes. The link between rise in blood lactate level and reduction of hepatic glucose production with metformin usage remains to be determined. Carbonic anhydrase is proposed to be the link connecting blood lactate accumulation and inhibition of hepatic gluconeogenesis and thus could serve as a new therapeutic target for reducing hepatic glucose production. Understanding the link between rise in blood lactate level and the role of carbonic anhydrase in lactate uptake will be essential towards the development of a promising new antidiabetic medication.

  13. CREAT A CONSORTIUM AND DEVELOP PREMIUM CARBON PRODUCTS FROM COAL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John M. Andresen

    2003-08-01

    The Consortium for Premium Carbon Products from Coal, with funding from the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory and matching funds from industry and academic institutions continued to excel in developing innovative technologies to use coal and coal-derived feedstocks to produce premium carbon product. During Budget Period 5, eleven projects were supported and sub-contracted were awarded to seven organizations. The CPCPC held two meetings and one tutorial at various locations during the year. Budget Period 5 was a time of growth for CPCPC in terms of number of proposals and funding requested from members, projects funded and participation during meetings. Although the membership was stable during the first part of Budget Period 5 an increase in new members was registered during the last months of the performance period.

  14. Environmental remediation and conversion of carbon dioxide (CO(2)) into useful green products by accelerated carbonation technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Mihee; Han, Gi-Chun; Ahn, Ji-Whan; You, Kwang-Suk

    2010-01-01

    This paper reviews the application of carbonation technology to the environmental industry as a way of reducing carbon dioxide (CO(2)), a green house gas, including the presentation of related projects of our research group. An alternative technology to very slow natural carbonation is the co-called 'accelerated carbonation', which completes its fast reaction within few hours by using pure CO(2). Carbonation technology is widely applied to solidify or stabilize solid combustion residues from municipal solid wastes, paper mill wastes, etc. and contaminated soils, and to manufacture precipitated calcium carbonate (PCC). Carbonated products can be utilized as aggregates in the concrete industry and as alkaline fillers in the paper (or recycled paper) making industry. The quantity of captured CO(2) in carbonated products can be evaluated by measuring mass loss of heated samples by thermo-gravimetric (TG) analysis. The industrial carbonation technology could contribute to both reduction of CO(2) emissions and environmental remediation.

  15. Development of a fermentation process based on a defined medium for the production of pregallidermin, a nontoxic precursor of the lantibiotic gallidermin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medaglia, Giovanni; Panke, Sven

    2010-06-01

    In this work, a defined medium was developed and optimized for the mutant strain Staphylococcus gallinarum DeltaP, which produces pregallidermin (PGDM), a nontoxic precursor of the lantibiotic gallidermin (GDM). The availability of a defined medium is a prerequisite for a rational process development and the investigation of medium effects on final product concentration, yield, and volumetric productivity. We identified four vitamins and three metal ions as essential for growth and PGDM production with S. gallinarum DeltaP. The strain was capable of growing without any added amino acids, but the addition of proline had a strong growth-stimulatory effect. The concentrations of all essential compounds were balanced in a continuous culture using a medium-shift technique. Based on this balanced medium, a fed-batch process was developed in which S. gallinarum DeltaP was grown up to a biomass concentration of 67 g l(-1) and produced 1.95 g l(-1) PGDM, equivalent to 0.57 mM. In the fermentation broth, we identified other GDM precursors in addition to those with a 12 or 14-amino-acid-long leader peptide that had been observed previously. Including those precursors with shorter leader sequences, the final concentration would correspond to 0.69 mM. In molar terms, this represents a roughly fourfold or fivefold increase, respectively, over established, complex medium-based gallidermin production processes (Kempf et al. 2000). With the same medium and feed protocol, the maximum concentration of mature GDM produced by wild-type S. gallinarum Tü 3928 was only 0.08 mM.

  16. Natural Product Polyamines That Inhibit Human Carbonic Anhydrases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohan A. Davis

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Natural product compound collections have proven an effective way to access chemical diversity and recent findings have identified phenolic, coumarin, and polyamine natural products as atypical chemotypes that inhibit carbonic anhydrases (CAs. CA enzymes are implicated as targets of variable drug therapeutic classes and the discovery of selective, drug-like CA inhibitors is essential. Just two natural product polyamines, spermine and spermidine, have until now been investigated as CA inhibitors. In this study, five more complex natural product polyamines 1–5, derived from either marine sponge or fungi, were considered for inhibition of six different human CA isozymes of interest in therapeutic drug development. All compounds share a simple polyamine core fragment, either spermine or spermidine, yet display substantially different structure activity relationships for CA inhibition. Notably, polyamines 1–5 were submicromolar inhibitors of the cancer drug target CA IX, this is more potent than either spermine or spermidine.

  17. Ratio of Pion Kaon Production in Proton Carbon Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lebedev, Andrey V. [Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2007-05-01

    The ratio of pion-kaon production by 120 GeV/c protons incident on carbon target is presented. The data was recorded with the Main Injector Particle Production experiment at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. Production ratios of K++, K--, K-/K+, and π-+ are measured in 24 bins in longitudinal momentum from 20 to 90 GeV/c and transverse momentum up to 2 GeV/c. The measurement is compared to existing data sets, particle production Monte Carlo results from FLUKA-06, parametrization of proton-beryllium data at 400/450 GeV/c, and ratios measured by the MINOS experiment on the NuMI target.

  18. Characterization of a polyketide synthase in Aspergillus niger whose product is a precursor for both dihydroxynaphthalene (DHN) melanin and naphtho-γ-pyrone.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiang, Yi Ming; Meyer, Kristen M; Praseuth, Michael; Baker, Scott E; Bruno, Kenneth S; Wang, Clay C

    2010-12-06

    The genome sequencing of the fungus Aspergillus niger, an industrial workhorse, uncovered a large cache of genes encoding enzymes thought to be involved in the production of secondary metabolites yet to be identified. Identification and structural characterization of many of these predicted secondary metabolites are hampered by their low concentration relative to the known A. niger metabolites such as the naphtho-γ-pyrone family of polyketides. We deleted a nonreducing PKS gene in A. niger strain ATCC 11414, a daughter strain of A. niger ATCC strain 1015 whose genome was sequenced by the DOE Joint Genome Institute. This PKS encoding gene is a predicted ortholog of alb1 from Aspergillus fumigatus which is responsible for production of YWA1, a precursor of fungal DHN melanin. Our results show that the A. niger alb1 PKS is responsible for the production of the polyketide precursor for DHN melanin biosynthesis. Deletion of alb1 elimnates the production of major metabolites, naphtho-γ-pyrones. The generation of an A. niger strain devoid of naphtho-γ-pyrones will greatly facilitate the elucidation of cryptic biosynthetic pathways in this organism.

  19. CH4, CO, and H2O spectroscopy for the Sentinel-5 Precursor mission: an assessment with the Total Carbon Column Observing Network measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. O. Wennberg

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The TROPOspheric Monitoring Instrument (TROPOMI will be part of ESA's Sentinel-5 Precursor (S5P satellite platform scheduled for launch in 2015. TROPOMI will monitor methane and carbon monoxide concentrations in the Earth's atmosphere by measuring spectra of back-scattered sunlight in the short-wave infrared (SWIR. S5P will be the first satellite mission to rely uniquely on the spectral window at 4190–4340 cm−1 (2.3 μm to retrieve CH4 and CO. In this study, we investigated if the absorption features of the three relevant molecules CH4, CO, and H2O are adequately known. To this end, we retrieved total columns of CH4, CO, and H2O from absorption spectra measured by two ground-based Fourier transform spectrometers that are part of the Total Carbon Column Observing Network (TCCON. The retrieval results from the 4190–4340 cm−1 range at the TROPOMI resolution (0.45 cm−1 were then compared to the CH4 results obtained from the 6000 cm−1 region, and the CO results obtained from the 4190–4340 cm−1 region at the higher TCCON resolution (0.02 cm−1. For TROPOMI-like settings, we were able to reproduce the CH4 columns to an accuracy of 0.3% apart from a constant bias of 1%. The CO retrieval accuracy was, through interference, systematically influenced by the shortcomings of the CH4 and H2O spectroscopy. In contrast to CH4, the CO column error also varied significantly with atmospheric H2O content. Unaddressed, this would introduce seasonal and latitudinal biases to the CO columns retrieved from TROPOMI measurements. We therefore recommend further effort from the spectroscopic community to be directed at the H2O and CH4 spectroscopy in the 4190–4340 cm−1 region.

  20. CH4, CO, and H2O spectroscopy for the Sentinel-5 Precursor mission: an assessment with the Total Carbon Column Observing Network measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. O. Wennberg

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The TROPOspheric Monitoring Instrument (TROPOMI will be part of ESA's Sentinel-5 Precursor (S5P satellite platform scheduled for launch in 2015. TROPOMI will monitor methane and carbon monoxide concentrations in the Earth's atmosphere by measuring spectra of back-scattered sunlight in the short-wave infrared (SWIR. S5P will be the first satellite mission to rely uniquely on the spectral window at 4190–4340 cm−1 (2.3 μm to retrieve CH4 and CO. In this study, we investigated if the absorption features of the three relevant molecules CH4, CO, and H2O are adequately known. To this end, we retrieved total columns of CH4, CO, and H2O from absorption spectra measured by two ground-based Fourier transform spectrometers that are part of the Total Carbon Column Observing Network (TCCON. The retrieval results from the 4190–4340 cm−1 range at the TROPOMI resolution (0.45 cm−1 were then compared to the CH4 results obtained from the 6000 cm−1 region, and the CO results obtained from the 4190–4340 cm−1 region at the higher TCCON resolution (0.02 cm−1. For TROPOMI-like settings, we were able to reproduce the CH4 columns to an accuracy of 0.3% apart from a constant bias of 1%. The CO retrieval accuracy was, through interference, systematically influenced by the shortcomings of the CH4 and H2O spectroscopy. In contrast to CH4, the CO column error also varied significantly with atmospheric H2O content. Unaddressed, this would introduce seasonal and latitudinal biases to the CO columns retrieved from TROPOMI measurements. We therefore recommend further effort from the spectroscopic community to be directed at the H2O and CH4 spectroscopy in the 4190–4340 cm−1 region.

  1. Synthesis of nano-sized ceria (CeO2 particles via a cerium hydroxy carbonate precursor and the effect of reaction temperature on particle morphology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majid Farahmandjou

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Cerium oxide (CeO2 or ceria has been shown to be an interesting support material for noble metals in catalysts designed for emission control, mainly due to its oxygen storage capacity. Ceria nanoparticles were prepared by precipitation method. The precursor materials used in this research were cerium nitrate hexahydrate (as a basic material, potassium carbonate and potassium hydroxide (as precipitants. The morphological properties were characterized by high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM, scanning electron microscopy (SEM and X-ray diffraction (XRD, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR and UV-Vis spectrophotometer. XRD results showed face centered cubic CeO2 nanoparticles for annealed nanoparticles at 1000°C. SEM measurement showed that by increasing the calcinations temperature from 200 to 600°C, the crystallite size decreased from 90 to 28 nm. The SEM results showed that the size of the CeO2 nanoparticles decreased with increasing temperature. The particle size of CeO2 was around 25 nm as estimated by XRD technique and direct HRTEM observation. SEM and TEM studies showed that the morphology of the prepared powder was sphere-like with a narrow size distribution. The sharp peaks in FTIR spectrum determined the purity of CeO2 nanoparticles and absorbance peak of UV-Vis spectrum showed the small band gap energy of 3.26 ev.

  2. Spirobisindane-based polyimide as efficient precursor of thermally-rearranged and carbon molecular sieve membranes for enhanced propylene/propane separation

    KAUST Repository

    Swaidan, Ramy Jawdat

    2016-09-02

    High performance thermally-rearranged (TR) and carbon molecular sieve (CMS) membranes made from an intrinsically microporous polymer precursor PIM-6FDA-OH are reported for the separation of propylene from propane. Thermal rearrangement of PIM-6FDA-OH to the corresponding polybenzoxazole (PBO) membrane resulted in a pure-gas C3H6/C3H8 selectivity of 15 and C3H6 permeability of 14 Barrer, positioning it above the polymeric C3H6/C3H8 upper bound. For the first time, the C3H6/C3H8 mixed-gas properties of a TR polymer were investigated and showed a C3H6 permeability of 11 Barrer and C3H6/ C3H8 selectivity of 11, essentially independent of feed pressure up to 5 bar. The CMS membrane made by treatment at 600 C showed further improvement in performance as demonstrated with a pure-gas C3H8/C3H8 selectivity of 33 and a C3H6 permeability of 45 Barrer. The mixed-gas C3H6/C3H8 selectivity dropped from 24 to 17 from 2 to 5 bar feed pressure due to a decrease in C3H6 permeability most likely caused by competitive sorption without any evidence of plasticization. (C) 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. 78 FR 15376 - Determinations: Corrosion-Resistant Carbon Steel Flat Products From Germany and Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-11

    ... COMMISSION Determinations: Corrosion-Resistant Carbon Steel Flat Products From Germany and Korea On the basis... Korea and the antidumping duty orders on corrosion-resistant carbon steel flat products from Germany and... Corrosion-Resistant Carbon Steel Flat Products from Germany and Korea: Investigation Nos. 701-TA-350 and...

  4. 40 CFR 415.300 - Applicability; description of the calcium carbonate production subcategory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... resulting from the production of calcium carbonate by the milk of lime process and by the recovery process... calcium carbonate production subcategory. 415.300 Section 415.300 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Calcium Carbonate Production Subcategory § 415.300 Applicability; description of...

  5. Apparatus for hydrogen and carbon production via carbon aerosol-catalyzed dissociation of hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muradov, Nazim Z. (Inventor); Smith, Franklyn (Inventor); Tabatabaie-Raissi, Ali (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A novel process and apparatus is disclosed for sustainable, continuous production of hydrogen and carbon by catalytic dissociation or decomposition of hydrocarbons at elevated temperatures using in-situ generated carbon particles. Carbon particles are produced by decomposition of carbonaceous materials in response to an energy input. The energy input can be provided by at least one of a non-oxidative and oxidative means. The non-oxidative means of the energy input includes a high temperature source, or different types of plasma, such as, thermal, non-thermal, microwave, corona discharge, glow discharge, dielectric barrier discharge, or radiation sources, such as, electron beam, gamma, ultraviolet (UV). The oxidative means of the energy input includes oxygen, air, ozone, nitrous oxide (NO.sub.2) and other oxidizing agents. The method, apparatus and process of the present invention is applicable to any gaseous or liquid hydrocarbon fuel and it produces no or significantly less CO.sub.2 emissions compared to conventional processes.

  6. Carbon Footprint of Tree Nuts Based Consumer Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Volpe

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This case study shows results of a calculation of carbon footprint (CFP resulting from the production of nuts added value products for a large consumer market. Nuts consumption is increasing in the world and so is the consumer awareness of the environmental impact of goods, hence the calculation of greenhouse gas (GHG emissions of food production is of growing importance for producers. Calculation of CO2eq emissions was performed for all stages of the production chain to the final retail point for flour, grains, paste, chocolate covered nuts and spreadable cream produced from almonds, pistachios and hazelnuts grown and transformed in Italy and for peanuts grown in Argentina and transformed in Italy. Data from literature was used to evaluate CFP of raw materials, emissions from transport and packing were calculated using existing models, while emissions deriving from transformation were calculated empirically by multiplying the power of production lines (electrical and/or thermal by its productivity. All values were reported in kg of CO2 equivalent for each kg of packed product (net weight. Resulting values ranged between 1.2 g of CO2/kg for a 100 g bag of almond to 4.8 g of CO2/kg for the 100 g bag of chocolate covered almond. The calculation procedure can be well used for similar cases of large consumer food productions.

  7. Preparation and characterization of Cu(In,Ga)(Se,S){sub 2} thin films from electrodeposited precursors for hydrogen production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leisch, Jennifer E.; Bhattacharya, Raghu N.; Teeter, Glenn; Turner, John A. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, CO 80401-3393 (United States)

    2004-02-06

    Semiconducting Cu(In,Ga)(Se,S){sub 2} thin films were made from electrodeposited Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} precursors, followed by physical vapor deposition of In{sub 2}S{sub 3}, Ga, and Se. The bandgaps of these materials were found to be between 1.6 and 2.0eV, which spans the optimal bandgap necessary for application for the top junction in photovoltaic multijunction devices and for unassisted water photolysis. These films were characterized by electron-probe microanalysis, scanning Auger spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and photocurrent spectroscopy.

  8. DEVELOPMENT OF CONTINUOUS SOLVENT EXTRACTION PROCESSES FOR COAL DERIVED CARBON PRODUCTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elliot B. Kennel; Stephen P. Carpenter; Dady Dadyburjor; Manoj Katakdaunde; Liviu Magean; Peter G. Stansberry; Alfred H. Stiller; John W. Zondlo

    2005-06-08

    The purpose of this DOE-funded effort is to develop continuous processes for solvent extraction of coal for the production of carbon products. These carbon products include materials used in metals smelting, especially in the aluminum and steel industries, as well as porous carbon structural material referred to as ''carbon foam'' and carbon fibers. During this reporting period, efforts have focused on the development of continuous processes for hydrogenation as well as continuous production of carbon foam and coke.

  9. A new technology for production of high thickness carbon/carbon composites for launchers application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albano, Marta; Delfini, Andrea; Pastore, Roberto; Micheli, Davide; Marchetti, Mario

    2016-11-01

    Carbon-Carbon (C/C) composites are known for their extraordinary stability and excellent mechanical properties, almost unchanged at high temperatures. Among the several advanced applications, C/C based materials can be used in engines as nozzle throat section for launchers. In particular, the main feature for such employment is the material high resistance in extreme thermal environment. On the other hand, large-size items are required for this kind of purposes, thus introducing criticalities in terms of material uniformity and final overall properties. Up to now, there no standard for the production of high thickness C/C structures. In this paper a novel manufacturing method is analyzed, following each phase of the process, from the carbon fiber preform design and preparation to the carbon densification by chemical vapor infiltration method. Five preforms of large dimensions with different characteristics have been manufactured and infiltrated. The realized prototypes have been then analyzed by means of mechanical, physical and morphological tests. Aim of the results of this preliminary work is to establish a set of guidelines for a well-defined high thickness C/C production method.

  10. Solar production of catalytic filamentous carbon by thermal decomposition of hydrocarbons and carbon monoxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirillov, V.A.; Kuvshinov, G.G.; Mogilnykh, Yu.I. [Boreskov Institute of Catalysis, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Reller, A. [University of Hamburg (Germany); Steinfeld, A.; Weidenkaff, A.; Meier, A. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1999-08-01

    Concentrated solar radiation was used as the clean source of process heat for the production of Catalytic Filamentous Carbon (CFC) by thermal decomposition of gaseous hydrocarbons and by CO disproportionation in the presence of small metal catalyst particles. Depending on the catalyst, two different types of CFC, namely nano tubes and nano fibers, were obtained in solar experiments at the PSI solar furnace. (author) 2 figs., 1 tab., 7 refs.

  11. Production of carbon molecular sieves from illinois coals. An assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lizzio, Anthony A.; Rostam-Abadi, Massoud

    1991-01-01

    Chars were produced from an Illinois No. 2 bituminous coal under various pyrolysis and activation conditions and tested for their molecular sieve properties. The amount of N2 compared to the amount of CO2 adsorbed by each char was used as a preliminary indicator of its molecular sieve properties. This relatively simple, but apparently useful test was confirmed by successfully characterizing the well-known molecular sieve properties of a commercial zeolite and molecular sieve carbon. In addition, coal chars having relatively high surface areas (800-1800 m2/g) were produced and tested for their molecular sieving capabilities. These carbon materials, which have high adsorption capacities and relatively narrow pore size distributions, should be ideal candidates for the commercial production of CMS.

  12. Calcium carbonate production response to future ocean warming and acidification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. J. Pinsonneault

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2 emissions are acidifying the ocean, affecting calcification rates in pelagic organisms, and thereby modifying the oceanic carbon and alkalinity cycles. However, the responses of pelagic calcifying organisms to acidification vary widely between species, contributing uncertainty to predictions of atmospheric CO2 and the resulting climate change. At the same time, ocean warming caused by rising CO2 is expected to drive increased growth rates of all pelagic organisms, including calcifiers. It thus remains unclear whether anthropogenic CO2 emissions will ultimately increase or decrease pelagic calcification rates. Here, we assess the importance of this uncertainty by introducing a dependence of calcium carbonate (CaCO3 production on calcite saturation state (ΩCaCO3 in an intermediate complexity coupled carbon-climate model. In a series of model simulations, we examine the impact of several variants of this dependence on global ocean carbon cycling between 1800 and 3500 under two different CO2 emissions scenarios. Introducing a calcification-saturation state dependence has a significant effect on the vertical and surface horizontal alkalinity gradients, as well as on the removal of alkalinity from the ocean through CaCO3 burial. These changes result in an additional oceanic uptake of carbon when calcification depends on ΩCaCO3 (of up to 270 Pg C, compared to the case where calcification does not depend on acidification. In turn, this response causes a reduction of global surface air temperature of up to 0.4 °C in year 3500. Different versions of the model produced varying results, and narrowing this range of uncertainty will require better understanding of both temperature and acidification effects on pelagic calcifiers. Nevertheless, our results suggest that alkalinity observations can be used

  13. Calcium carbonate production response to future ocean warming and acidification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. J. Pinsonneault

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2 emissions are acidifying the ocean, affecting calcification rates in pelagic organisms and thereby modifying the oceanic alkalinity cycle. However, the responses of pelagic calcifying organisms to acidification vary widely between species, contributing uncertainty to predictions of atmospheric CO2 and the resulting climate change. Meanwhile, ocean warming caused by rising CO2 is expected to drive increased growth rates of all pelagic organisms, including calcifiers. It thus remains unclear whether anthropogenic CO2 will ultimately increase or decrease the globally-integrated pelagic calcification rate. Here, we assess the importance of this uncertainty by introducing a variable dependence of calcium carbonate (CaCO3 production on calcite saturation state (ΩCaCO3 in the University of Victoria Earth System Climate Model, an intermediate complexity coupled carbon-climate model. In a series of model simulations, we examine the impact of this parameterization on global ocean carbon cycling under two CO2 emissions scenarios, both integrated to the year 3500. The simulations show a significant sensitivity of the vertical and surface horizontal alkalinity gradients to the parameterization, as well as the removal of alkalinity from the ocean through CaCO3 burial. These sensitivities result in an additional oceanic uptake of carbon when calcification depends on ΩCaCO3 (of up to 13 % of total carbon emissions, compared to the case where calcification is insensitive to acidification. In turn, this response causes a reduction of global surface air temperature of up to 0.4 °C in year 3500, a 13 % reduction in the amplitude of warming. Narrowing these uncertainties will require better understanding of both temperature and acidification effects on pelagic calcifiers. Preliminary examination suggests that

  14. DEVELOPMENT OF CONTINUOUS SOLVENT EXTRACTION PROCESSES FOR COAL DERIVED CARBON PRODUCTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elliot B. Kennel; Quentin C. Berg; Stephen P. Carpenter; Dady Dadyburjor; Jason C. Hissam; Manoj Katakdaunde; Liviu Magean; Abha Saddawi; Alfred H. Stiller; John W. Zondlo

    2006-03-07

    The purpose of this DOE-funded effort is to develop continuous processes for solvent extraction of coal for the production of carbon products. The largest applications are those which support metals smelting, such as anodes for aluminum smelting and electrodes for arc furnaces. Other carbon products include materials used in creating fuels for the Direct Carbon Fuel Cell, metals smelting, especially in the aluminum and steel industries, as well as porous carbon structural material referred to as ''carbon foam'' and carbon fibers. During this reporting period, efforts have focused on the development of carbon electrodes for Direct Carbon Fuel Cells (DCFC), and on carbon foam composites used in ballistic armor, as well as the hydrotreatment of solvents used in the basic solvent extraction process. A major goal is the production of 1500 pounds of binder pitch, corresponding to about 3000 pounds of hydrotreated solvent.

  15. Operation Mechanism of Farmers’ Professional Cooperatives from the Point of Low-Carbon Agricultural Products

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    We firstly take a look at internal logic of cluster development of low-carbon agricultural products.In combination with operation features of farmers’ professional cooperatives and actual requirements for cluster development of low-carbon agricultural products;we elaborate establishing benefit allocation mechanism,bearing education and training functions,forming low-carbon value,building low-carbon identification system,as well as realizing low-carbon value.According to these situations,we systematically analyze operation mechanism of farmers’ professional cooperatives suitable for cluster development of low-carbon agricultural products.To promote cluster development of low-carbon agricultural products,we put forward following suggestions,including government guidance and encouragement,social acceptance and active cooperation,and integration into global low-carbon development system to share benefit of low-carbon development.

  16. Production of carbon molecular sieves from palm shell through carbon deposition from methane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammadi Maedeh

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The possibility of production of carbon molecular sieve (CMS from palm shell as a waste lignocellulosic biomass was investigated. CMS samples were prepared through heat treatment processes including carbonization, physiochemical activation and chemical vapor deposition (CVD from methane. Methane was pyrolyzed to deposit fine carbon on the pore mouth of palm shell-based activated carbon to yield CMS. All the deposition experiments were performed at 800 ºC, while the methane flow rate (100, 200, 300 mL min-1 CH4 diluted in 500 mL min-1 N2 and deposition time (30 to 60 min were the investigated parameters. The textural characteristics of the CMSs were assessed by N2 adsorption. The largest BET surface area (752 m2 g-1, micropore surface area (902.2 m2 g-1 and micropore volume (0.3466 cm3 g-1 was obtained at the CH4 flow rate of 200 mL min-1 and deposition time of 30 min. However, prolonging the deposition time to 45 min yielded in a micropouros CMS with a narrow pore size distribution.

  17. High surface area carbon and process for its production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanos, Jimmy; Burress, Jacob; Pfeifer, Peter; Rash, Tyler; Shah, Parag; Suppes, Galen

    2016-12-13

    Activated carbon materials and methods of producing and using activated carbon materials are provided. In particular, biomass-derived activated carbon materials and processes of producing the activated carbon materials with prespecified surface areas and pore size distributions are provided. Activated carbon materials with preselected high specific surface areas, porosities, sub-nm (carbon consumption and metallic potassium intercalation into the carbon lattice during the activation process.

  18. Electro-oxidation of methanol in alkaline conditions using Pd–Ni nanoparticles prepared from organometallic precursors and supported on carbon vulcan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manzo-Robledo, A., E-mail: amanzor@ipn.mx [UPALM, Laboratorio de Electroquímica y Corrosión, Escuela Superior de Ingeniería Química e Industrias Extractivas-IPN (Mexico); Costa, Natália J. S. [Universidade de São Paulo, Instituto de Química (Brazil); Philippot, K. [CNRS, LCC, Laboratoire de Chimie de Coordination (France); Rossi, Liane M. [Universidade de São Paulo, Instituto de Química (Brazil); Ramírez-Meneses, E. [Universidad Iberoamericana, Departamento de Ingeniería y Ciencias Químicas (Mexico); Guerrero-Ortega, L. P. A. [UPALM, Laboratorio de Electroquímica y Corrosión, Escuela Superior de Ingeniería Química e Industrias Extractivas-IPN (Mexico); Ezquerra-Quiroga, S. [Universidad Iberoamericana, Departamento de Ingeniería y Ciencias Químicas (Mexico)

    2015-12-15

    Oxidation of low-molecular weight alcohols as energy sources using metal nanoparticles has attracted considerable interest for use as a power source in portable electronic devices. In this work, a series of mono- and bimetallic nanoparticles based on palladium and nickel (Pd, Pd{sub 90}Ni{sub 10}, Pd{sub 50}Ni{sub 50}, Pd{sub 10}Ni{sub 90}, and Ni) have been synthesized from organometallic precursors, namely tris(dibenzylideneacetone) dipalladium(0), Pd{sub 2}(dba){sub 3}, and bis(1,5-cyclooctadiene)nickel(0), Ni(cod){sub 2}. Well-defined metal particles in the nanometric scale from 4.2 to 6.3 nm were observed by transmission electron microscopy. The as-prepared nanoparticles were mixed with a carbon Vulcan matrix (10 % wt. of the catalyst in turn) for investigation as electrocatalysts in methanol oxidation reaction (MOR) in alkaline conditions. The i–E profiles from cyclic voltammetry for the monometallic systems indicated a redox process attributed only to palladium or nickel, as expected. With the bimetallic nanomaterials, the redox process and the i–E characteristics are functions of the amount of nickel associated to palladium. From a fundamental point of view, it has been established that the OH ions’ interfacial interaction and the MOR kinetics are affected by the presence of nickel (decreasing the faradic current) as supported by the current versus potential profiles obtained as a function of methanol concentration and with temperature variation.

  19. Life Cycle Analysis of Carbon Flow and Carbon Footprint of Harvested Wood Products of Larix principis-rupprechtii in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Lun

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Larix principis-rupprechtii is a native tree species in North China with a large distribution; and its harvested timbers can be used for producing wood products. This study focused on estimating and comparing carbon flows and carbon footprints of different harvested wood products (HWPs from Larix principis-ruppechtii based on the life cycle analysis (from seedling cultivation to HWP final disposal. Based on our interviews and surveys, the system boundary in this study was divided into three processes: the forestry process, the manufacturing process, and the use and disposal process. By tracking carbon flows of HWPs along the entire life cycle, we found that, for one forest rotation period, a total of 26.81 tC/ha sequestered carbon was transferred into these HWPs, 66.2% of which were still stored in the HWP when the rotation period had ended; however, the HWP carbon storage decreased to 0.25 tC/ha (only 0.9% left in the 100th year after forest plantation. The manufacturing process contributed more than 90% of the total HWP carbon footprint, but it was still smaller than the HWP carbon storage. In terms of the carbon storage and the carbon footprint, construction products had the largest net positive carbon balance compared to furniture and panel products. In addition, HWP are known to have a positive impact on global carbon mitigation because they can store parts of the sequestered carbon for a certain period of time and they have a substitution effect on carbon mitigation. Furthermore, there still exist great opportunities for carbon mitigation from HWPs through the use of cleaner energy and increasing the utilization efficiency of wood fuel.

  20. Spatial Estimation of Timber Production and Carbon in Harvested Wood Products Using Remote Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, P. Y.; Baiocchi, G.; Huang, C.

    2014-12-01

    Accurate estimation of the annual production of different kinds of timbers at different locations has many science and policy implications. For example, timber type information is needed for accurate estimation of the amount and life cycle of carbon stored in the harvested wood product (HWP) pool, and possible transport of carbon in wood products through trade. Several attempts have been made to estimate the carbon storage in the HWP, regardless which approach to use, information of the annual timber production are required. A statistic model has been developed to estimate the annual roundwood production at the county level. The inputs of the model includes forest disturbance area calculated using the VCT algorithm derived from the Landsat time series stack, a forest type map, and timber product output (TPO) data collected from wood processing mills by the USFS. The model is applied to North Carolina, a state with a large forestry sector and where harvesting and logging are a primary forest disturbance type. Ten-fold cross validation were done to the preliminary estimation for each type of HWP. The root mean square errors range between 13.6 and 31.5 for hardwood types; and between 1.3 and 55.6 for softwood types. The model is empirical as it depends on the local information on forest disturbance, forest types, and the amount of the roundwood output. However, the approach of the model can be used to apply to other areas with the local information provided. The result can be served as a starting point in spatial estimation of carbon storage in HWP.

  1. Production of carbon molecular sieves from Illinois coal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lizzio, A.A.; Rostam-Abadi, M.

    1993-01-01

    Carbon molecular sieves (CMS) have become an increasingly important class of adsorbents for application in the separation of gas molecules that vary in size and shape. A study is in progress at the Illinois State Geological Survey to determine whether Illinois basin coals are suitable feedstocks for the production of CMS and to evaluate their potential application in gas separation processes of commercial importance. Chars were prepared from Illinois coal in a fixed-bed reactor under a wide range of heat treatment and activation conditions. The effects of various coal/char pretreatments, including coal demineralization, preoxidation, char activation, and carbon deposition, on the molecular sieve properties of the chars were also investigated. Chars with commercially significant BET surface areas of 1500 m2/g were produced by chemical activation using potassium hydroxide as the activant. These high-surface-area (HSA) chars had more than twice the adsorption capacity of commercial carbon and zeolite molecular sieves. The kinetics of adsorption of various gases, e.g., N2, O2, CO2, CH4, CO and H2, on these chars at 25??C was measured. The O2/N2 molecular sieve properties of one char prepared without chemical activation were similar to those of a commercial CMS. On the other hand, the O2/N2 selectivity of the HSA char was comparable to that of a commercial activated carbon, i.e., essentially unity. Carbon deposition, using methane as the cracking gas, increased the O2/N2 selectivity of the HSA char, but significantly decreased its adsorption capacity. Several chars showed good potential for efficient CO2/CH4 separation; both a relatively high CO2 adsorption capacity and CO2/CH4 selectivity were achieved. The micropore size distribution of selected chars was estimated by equilibrium adsorption of carbon dioxide, n-butane and iso-butane at O??C. The extent of adsorption of each gas corresponded to the effective surface area contained in pores with diameters greater than 3

  2. Sustainable production of green feed from carbon dioxide and hydrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landau, Miron V; Vidruk, Roxana; Herskowitz, Moti

    2014-03-01

    Carbon dioxide hydrogenation to form hydrocarbons was conducted on two iron-based catalysts, prepared according to procedures described in the literature, and on a new iron spinel catalyst. The CO2 conversion measured in a packed-bed reactor was limited to about 60% because of excessive amounts of water produced in this process. Switching to a system of three packed-bed reactors in series with interim removal of water and condensed hydrocarbons increased CO2 conversion to as much as 89%. The pure spinel catalyst displayed a significantly higher activity and selectivity than those of the other iron catalysts. This process produces a product called green feed, which is similar in composition to the product of a high-temperature, iron-based Fischer–Tropsch process from syngas. The green feed can be readily converted into renewable fuels by well-established technologies.

  3. One carbon metabolism in anaerobic bacteria: Regulation of carbon and electron flow during organic acid production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeikus, J.G.; Jain, M.

    1993-12-31

    The project deals with understanding the fundamental biochemical mechanisms that physiologically control and regulate carbon and electron flow in anaerobic chemosynthetic bacteria that couple metabolism of single carbon compounds and hydrogen to the production of organic acids (formic, acetic, butyric, and succinic) or methane. The authors compare the regulation of carbon dioxide and hydrogen metabolism by fermentation, enzyme, and electron carrier analysis using Butyribacterium methylotrophicum, Anaeroblospirillum succiniciproducens, Methanosarcina barkeri, and a newly isolated tri-culture composed of a syntrophic butyrate degrader strain IB, Methanosarcina mazei and Methanobacterium formicicum as model systems. To understand the regulation of hydrogen metabolism during butyrate production or acetate degradation, hydrogenase activity in B. methylotrophicum or M. barkeri is measured in relation to growth substrate and pH; hydrogenase is purified and characterized to investigate number of hydrogenases; their localization and functions; and, their sequences are determined. To understand the mechanism for catabolic CO{sub 2} fixation to succinate the PEP carboxykinase enzyme and gene of A. succiniciproducens are purified and characterized. Genetically engineered strains of Escherichia coli containing the phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) carboxykinase gene are examined for their ability to produce succinate in high yield. To understand the mechanism of fatty acid degradation by syntrophic acetogens during mixed culture methanogenesis formate and hydrogen production are characterized by radio tracer studies. It is intended that these studies provide strategies to improve anaerobic fermentations used for the production of organic acids or methane and, new basic understanding on catabolic CO{sub 2} fixation mechanisms and on the function of hydrogenase in anaerobic bacteria.

  4. Metabolic engineering of Escherichia coli for the production of putrescine: a four carbon diamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Zhi-Gang; Xia, Xiao-Xia; Lee, Sang Yup

    2009-11-01

    A four carbon linear chain diamine, putrescine (1,4-diaminobutane), is an important platform chemical having a wide range of applications in chemical industry. Biotechnological production of putrescine from renewable feedstock is a promising alternative to the chemical synthesis that originates from non-renewable petroleum. Here we report development of a metabolically engineered strain of Escherichia coli that produces putrescine at high titer in glucose mineral salts medium. First, a base strain was constructed by inactivating the putrescine degradation and utilization pathways, and deleting the ornithine carbamoyltransferase chain I gene argI to make more precursors available for putrescine synthesis. Next, ornithine decarboxylase, which converts ornithine to putrescine, was amplified by a combination of plasmid-based and chromosome-based overexpression of the coding genes under the strong tac or trc promoter. Furthermore, the ornithine biosynthetic genes (argC-E) were overexpressed from the trc promoter, which replaced the native promoter in the genome, to increase the ornithine pool. Finally, strain performance was further improved by the deletion of the stress responsive RNA polymerase sigma factor RpoS, a well-known global transcription regulator that controls the expression of ca. 10% of the E. coli genes. The final engineered E. coli strain was able to produce 1.68 g L(-1) of putrescine with a yield of 0.168 g g(-1) glucose. Furthermore, high cell density cultivation allowed production of 24.2 g L(-1) of putrescine with a productivity of 0.75 g L(-1) h(-1). The strategy reported here should be useful for the bio-based production of putrescine from renewable resources, and also for the development of strains capable of producing other diamines, which are important as nitrogen-containing platform chemicals.

  5. Burners and combustion apparatus for carbon nanomaterial production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alford, J. Michael; Diener, Michael D.; Nabity, James; Karpuk, Michael

    2007-10-09

    The invention provides improved burners, combustion apparatus, and methods for carbon nanomaterial production. The burners of the invention provide sooting flames of fuel and oxidizing gases. The condensable products of combustion produced by the burners of this invention produce carbon nanomaterials including without limitation, soot, fullerenic soot, and fullerenes. The burners of the invention do not require premixing of the fuel and oxidizing gases and are suitable for use with low vapor pressure fuels such as those containing substantial amounts of polyaromatic hydrocarbons. The burners of the invention can operate with a hot (e.g., uncooled) burner surface and require little, if any, cooling or other forms of heat sinking. The burners of the invention comprise one or more refractory elements forming the outlet of the burner at which a flame can be established. The burners of the invention provide for improved flame stability, can be employed with a wider range of fuel/oxidizer (e.g., air) ratios and a wider range of gas velocities, and are generally more efficient than burners using water-cooled metal burner plates. The burners of the invention can also be operated to reduce the formation of undesirable soot deposits on the burner and on surfaces downstream of the burner.

  6. Photorespiration and carbon limitation determine productivity in temperate seagrasses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pimchanok Buapet

    Full Text Available The gross primary productivity of two seagrasses, Zostera marina and Ruppia maritima, and one green macroalga, Ulva intestinalis, was assessed in laboratory and field experiments to determine whether the photorespiratory pathway operates at a substantial level in these macrophytes and to what extent it is enhanced by naturally occurring shifts in dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC and O2 in dense vegetation. To achieve these conditions in laboratory experiments, seawater was incubated with U. intestinalis in light to obtain a range of higher pH and O2 levels and lower DIC levels. Gross photosynthetic O2 evolution was then measured in this pretreated seawater (pH, 7.8-9.8; high to low DIC:O2 ratio at both natural and low O2 concentrations (adjusted by N2 bubbling. The presence of photorespiration was indicated by a lower gross O2 evolution rate under natural O2 conditions than when O2 was reduced. In all three macrophytes, gross photosynthetic rates were negatively affected by higher pH and lower DIC. However, while both seagrasses exhibited significant photorespiratory activity at increasing pH values, the macroalga U. intestinalis exhibited no such activity. Rates of seagrass photosynthesis were then assessed in seawater collected from the natural habitats (i.e., shallow bays characterized by high macrophyte cover and by low DIC and high pH during daytime and compared with open baymouth water conditions (where seawater DIC is in equilibrium with air, normal DIC, and pH. The gross photosynthetic rates of both seagrasses were significantly higher when incubated in the baymouth water, indicating that these grasses can be significantly carbon limited in shallow bays. Photorespiration was also detected in both seagrasses under shallow bay water conditions. Our findings indicate that natural carbon limitations caused by high community photosynthesis can enhance photorespiration and cause a significant decline in seagrass primary production in shallow

  7. Photorespiration and carbon limitation determine productivity in temperate seagrasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buapet, Pimchanok; Rasmusson, Lina M; Gullström, Martin; Björk, Mats

    2013-01-01

    The gross primary productivity of two seagrasses, Zostera marina and Ruppia maritima, and one green macroalga, Ulva intestinalis, was assessed in laboratory and field experiments to determine whether the photorespiratory pathway operates at a substantial level in these macrophytes and to what extent it is enhanced by naturally occurring shifts in dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and O2 in dense vegetation. To achieve these conditions in laboratory experiments, seawater was incubated with U. intestinalis in light to obtain a range of higher pH and O2 levels and lower DIC levels. Gross photosynthetic O2 evolution was then measured in this pretreated seawater (pH, 7.8-9.8; high to low DIC:O2 ratio) at both natural and low O2 concentrations (adjusted by N2 bubbling). The presence of photorespiration was indicated by a lower gross O2 evolution rate under natural O2 conditions than when O2 was reduced. In all three macrophytes, gross photosynthetic rates were negatively affected by higher pH and lower DIC. However, while both seagrasses exhibited significant photorespiratory activity at increasing pH values, the macroalga U. intestinalis exhibited no such activity. Rates of seagrass photosynthesis were then assessed in seawater collected from the natural habitats (i.e., shallow bays characterized by high macrophyte cover and by low DIC and high pH during daytime) and compared with open baymouth water conditions (where seawater DIC is in equilibrium with air, normal DIC, and pH). The gross photosynthetic rates of both seagrasses were significantly higher when incubated in the baymouth water, indicating that these grasses can be significantly carbon limited in shallow bays. Photorespiration was also detected in both seagrasses under shallow bay water conditions. Our findings indicate that natural carbon limitations caused by high community photosynthesis can enhance photorespiration and cause a significant decline in seagrass primary production in shallow waters.

  8. Carbon footprint of Canadian dairy products: calculations and issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergé, X P C; Maxime, D; Dyer, J A; Desjardins, R L; Arcand, Y; Vanderzaag, A

    2013-09-01

    The Canadian dairy sector is a major industry with about 1 million cows. This industry emits about 20% of the total greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from the main livestock sectors (beef, dairy, swine, and poultry). In 2006, the Canadian dairy herd produced about 7.7 Mt of raw milk, resulting in about 4.4 Mt of dairy products (notably 64% fluid milk and 12% cheese). An integrated cradle-to-gate model (field to processing plant) has been developed to estimate the carbon footprint (CF) of 11 Canadian dairy products. The on-farm part of the model is the Unified Livestock Industry and Crop Emissions Estimation System (ULICEES). It considers all GHG emissions associated with livestock production but, for this study, it was run for the dairy sector specifically. Off-farm GHG emissions were estimated using the Canadian Food Carbon Footprint calculator, (cafoo)(2)-milk. It considers GHG emissions from the farm gate to the exit gate of the processing plants. The CF of the raw milk has been found lower in western provinces [0.93 kg of CO2 equivalents (CO2e)/L of milk] than in eastern provinces (1.12 kg of CO2e/L of milk) because of differences in climate conditions and dairy herd management. Most of the CF estimates of dairy products ranged between 1 and 3 kg of CO2e/kg of product. Three products were, however, significantly higher: cheese (5.3 kg of CO2e/kg), butter (7.3 kg of CO2e/kg), and milk powder (10.1 kg of CO2e/kg). The CF results depend on the milk volume needed, the co-product allocation process (based on milk solids content), and the amount of energy used to manufacture each product. The GHG emissions per kilogram of protein ranged from 13 to 40 kg of CO2e. Two products had higher values: cream and sour cream, at 83 and 78 kg of CO2e/kg, respectively. Finally, the highest CF value was for butter, at about 730 kg of CO2e/kg. This extremely high value is due to the fact that the intensity indicator per kilogram of product is high and that butter is almost exclusively

  9. Production and characterization of ZnO nanoparticles and porous particles by ultrasonic spray pyrolysis using a zinc nitrate precursor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebin, Burçak; Arıg, Elif; Özkal, Burak; Gürmen, Sebahattin

    2012-07-01

    ZnO nanoparticles and porous particles were produced by an ultrasonic spray pyrolysis method using a zinc nitrate precursor at various temperatures under air atmosphere. The effects of reaction temperature on the size and morphology of ZnO particles were investigated. The samples were characterized by energy dispersive spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy. ZnO particles were obtained in a hexagonal crystal structure and the crystallite shapes changed from spherical to hexagonal by elevating the reaction temperature. The crystallite size grew by increasing the temperature, in spite of reducing the residence time in the heated zone. ZnO nanoparticles were obtained at the lowest reaction temperature and ZnO porous particles, formed by aggregation of ZnO nanoparticles due to effective sintering, were prepared at higher temperatures. The results showed that the properties of ZnO particles can be controlled by changing the reaction temperature in the ultrasonic spray pyrolysis method.

  10. Conformational changes induced by the A21G Flemish mutation in the amyloid precursor protein lead to increased Aβ production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Tzu-Chun; Hu, Yi; Kienlen-Campard, Pascal; El Haylani, Laetitia; Decock, Marie; Van Hees, Joanne; Fu, Ziao; Octave, Jean-Noel; Constantinescu, Stefan N; Smith, Steven O

    2014-03-04

    Proteolysis of the β C-terminal fragment (β-CTF) of the amyloid precursor protein generates the Aβ peptides associated with Alzheimer's disease. Familial mutations in the β-CTF, such as the A21G Flemish mutation, can increase Aβ secretion. We establish how the Flemish mutation alters the structure of C55, the first 55 residues of the β-CTF, using FTIR and solid-state NMR spectroscopy. We show that the A21G mutation reduces β sheet structure of C55 from Leu17 to Ala21, an inhibitory region near the site of the mutation, and increases α-helical structure from Gly25 to Gly29, in a region near the membrane surface and thought to interact with cholesterol. Cholesterol also increases Aβ peptide secretion, and we show that the incorporation of cholesterol into model membranes enhances the structural changes induced by the Flemish mutant, suggesting a common link between familial mutations and the cellular environment.

  11. Managing Commercial Tree Species for Timber Production and Carbon Sequestration: Management Guidelines and Financial Returns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gary D. Kronrad

    2006-09-19

    A carbon credit market is developing in the United States. Information is needed by buyers and sellers of carbon credits so that the market functions equitably and efficiently. Analyses have been conducted to determine the optimal forest management regime to employ for each of the major commercial tree species so that profitability of timber production only or the combination of timber production and carbon sequestration is maximized. Because the potential of a forest ecosystem to sequester carbon depends on the tree species, site quality and management regimes utilized, analyses have determined how to optimize carbon sequestration by determining how to optimally manage each species, given a range of site qualities, discount rates, prices of carbon credits and other economic variables. The effects of a carbon credit market on the method and profitability of forest management, the cost of sequestering carbon, the amount of carbon that can be sequestered, and the amount of timber products produced has been determined.

  12. Advances in Production and Applications of Carbon Nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Xilai; Wei, Fei

    2017-02-01

    Recent decades have witnessed many breakthroughs in research on carbon nanotubes (CNTs), particularly regarding controllable synthesis, production scale-up, and application advances for this material. This sp (2)-bonded nanocarbon uniquely combines extreme mechanical strength, exceptionally high electrical conductivity, as well as many other superior properties, making it highly attractive for fundamental research and industrial applications. Synthesis and mass production form the solid basis for high-volume applications of CNTs. During recent decades, CNT production capacity has reached more than thousands of tons per year, greatly decreasing the price of CNTs. Although the unique physiochemical properties of an individual CNT are stated repeatedly, manifestation of such unique properties in a macroscopic material, e.g., realization of high-strength CNT fibers, remains a great challenge. If such challenges are solved, many critical applications will be enabled. Herein we review the critical progress in the development of synthesis and scaled-up production methods for CNTs, and discuss advances in their applications. Scientific problems and technological challenges are discussed together.

  13. Production of Poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyhexanoate) by Recombinant Pseudomonas stutzeri 1317 from Unrelated Carbon Sources

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    魏晓星; 刘峰; 简嘉; 王瑞妍; 陈国强

    2013-01-01

    Synthetic biology promises to simplify the construction of metabolic pathways by assembling the de-tached modules of the whole pathway. This gives new approaches for the microbial production of industrial products such as polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHA). In this study, to produce poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyhexanoate) (PHBHHx) by Pseudomonas stutzeri 1317 from unrelated carbon sources such as glucose, the phaC1-phaZ-phaC2 operon of P. stutzeri 1317 was knocked out to generate the PHA deficient mutant P. stutzeri 1317LF. Then three modules containing phaCAhAReBRe, phaCAhBReGPp and phaCAhPAh were introduced into P. stutzeri 1317LF separately. The shake flask results indicated that the precursor supply and PHA synthase activity were the vital factors for the PHBHHx accumulation of P. stutzeri 1317LF. Furthermore, the PHBHHx accumulation of the recombinants from different carbon resources were performed. The highest PHBHHx content was 23.7% (by mass) with 58.6% (by mole) 3HB fraction. These results provide basis for further improving the PHBHHx accumulation of P. stutzeri from unrelated carbon sources.

  14. Rapid synthesis of macrocycles from diol precursors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wingstrand, Magnus; Madsen, Charlotte Marie; Clausen, Mads Hartvig

    2009-01-01

    A method for the formation of synthetic macrocycles with different ring sizes from diols is presented. Reacting a simple diol precursor with electrophilic reagents leads to a cyclic carbonate, sulfite or phosphate in a single step in 25-60% yield. Converting the cyclization precursor to a bis-ele...

  15. Effect of dissolved carbon dioxide on penicillin fermentations: mycelial growth and penicillin production. [Penicillium chrysogenum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ho, C.S.; Smith, M.D.

    1986-01-01

    The effect of dissolved carbon dioxide on the specific growth rate and the penicillin production rate of Penicillium chrysogenum was examined experimentally. The dissolved carbon dioxide was found to inhibit the specific growth rate and the penicillin production rate when the aerated submerged penicillin fermentation was exposed to influent gases of 12.6 and 20% carbon dioxide, respectively. Upon exposure to influent gases of 3 and 5% carbon dioxide, no pronounced metabolic inhibition was noted.

  16. Two key polymorphisms in a newly discovered allele of the Vitis vinifera TPS24 gene are responsible for the production of the rotundone precursor α-guaiene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drew, Damian Paul; Andersen, Trine Bundgaard; Sweetman, Crystal; Møller, Birger Lindberg; Ford, Christopher; Simonsen, Henrik Toft

    2016-02-01

    Rotundone was initially identified as a grape-derived compound responsible for the peppery aroma of Shiraz wine varieties. It has subsequently been found in black and white pepper and several other spices. Because of its potent aroma, the molecular basis for rotundone formation is of particular relevance to grape and wine scientists and industry. We have identified and functionally characterized in planta a sesquiterpene synthase, VvGuaS, from developing grape berries, and have demonstrated that it produces the precursor of rotundone, α-guaiene, as its main product. The VvGuaS enzyme is a novel allele of the sesquiterpene synthase gene, VvTPS24, which has previously been reported to encode VvPNSeInt, an enzyme that produces a variety of selinene-type sesquiterpenes. This newly discovered VvTPS24 allele encodes an enzyme 99.5% identical to VvPNSeInt, with the differences comprising just 6 out of the 561 amino acid residues. Molecular modelling of the enzymes revealed that two of these residues, T414 and V530, are located in the active site of VvGuaS within 4 Å of the binding-site of the substrate, farnesyl pyrophosphate. Mutation of these two residues of VvGuaS into the corresponding polymorphisms in VvPNSeInt results in a complete functional conversion of one enzyme into the other, while mutation of each residue individually produces an intermediate change in the product profile. We have therefore demonstrated that VvGuaS, an enzyme responsible for production of the rotundone precursor, α-guaiene, is encoded by a novel allele of the previously characterized grapevine gene VvTPS24 and that two specific polymorphisms are responsible for functional differences between VvTPS24 alleles.

  17. Iron oxide nanoparticles embedded in activated carbons prepared from hydrothermally treated waste biomass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Wenming; Björkman, Eva; Yun, Yifeng; Lilliestråle, Malte; Hedin, Niklas

    2014-03-01

    Particles of iron oxide (Fe3O4 ; 20–40 nm) were embedded within activated carbons during the activation of hydrothermally carbonized (HTC) biomasses in a flow of CO2. Four different HTC biomass samples (horse manure, grass cuttings, beer production waste, and biosludge) were used as precursors for the activated carbons. Nanoparticles of iron oxide formed from iron catalyst included in the HTC biomasses. After systematic optimization, the activated carbons had specific surface areas of about 800 m2g1. The pore size distributions of the activated carbons depended strongly on the degree of carbonization of the precursors. Activated carbons prepared from highly carbonized precursors had mainly micropores, whereas those prepared from less carbonized precursors contained mainly mesopores. Given the strong magnetism of the activated carbon–nano-Fe3O4 composites, they could be particularly useful for water purification.

  18. Carbon dioxide production during cardiopulmonary bypass: pathophysiology, measure and clinical relevance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranucci, Marco; Carboni, Giovanni; Cotza, Mauro; de Somer, Filip

    2017-01-01

    Carbon dioxide production during cardiopulmonary bypass derives from both the aerobic metabolism and the buffering of lactic acid produced by tissues under anaerobic conditions. Therefore, carbon dioxide removal monitoring is an important measure of the adequacy of perfusion and oxygen delivery. However, routine monitoring of carbon dioxide removal is not widely applied. The present article reviews the main physiological and pathophysiological sources of carbon dioxide, the available techniques to assess carbon dioxide production and removal and the clinically relevant applications of carbon dioxide-related variables as markers of the adequacy of perfusion during cardiopulmonary bypass.

  19. Production and detection of carbon dioxide on Iapetus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Eric E.; Brown, Robert H.

    2011-04-01

    Cassini VIMS detected carbon dioxide on the surface of Iapetus during its insertion orbit. We evaluated the CO 2 distribution on Iapetus and determined that it is concentrated almost exclusively on Iapetus' dark material. VIMS spectra show a 4.27-μm feature with an absorption depth of 24%, which, if it were in the form of free ice, requires a layer 31 nm thick. Extrapolating for all dark material on Iapetus, the total observable CO 2 would be 2.3 × 10 8 kg. Previous studies note that free CO 2 is unstable at 10 AU over geologic timescales. Carbon dioxide could, however, be stable if trapped or complexed, such as in inclusions or clathrates. While complexed CO 2 has a lower thermal volatility, loss due to photodissociation by UV radiation and gravitational escape would occur at a rate of 2.6 × 10 7 kg year -1. Thus, Iapetus' entire inventory of surface CO 2 could be lost within a few decades. The high loss/destruction rate of CO 2 requires an active source. We conducted experiments that generated CO 2 by UV radiation of simulated icy regolith under Iapetus-like conditions. The simulated regolith was created by flash-freezing degassed water, crushing it into sub-millimeter sized particles, and then mixing it with isotopically labeled amorphous carbon ( 13C) dust. These samples were placed in a vacuum chamber and cooled to temperatures between 50 K and 160 K. The samples were irradiated with UV light, and the products were measured using a mass spectrometer, from which we measured 13CO 2 production at a rate of 2.0 × 10 12 mol s -1. Extrapolating to Iapetus and adjusting for the solar UV intensity and Iapetus' surface area, we calculated that CO 2 production for the entire surface would be 1.1 × 10 7 kg year -1, which is only a factor of two less than the loss rate. As such, UV photochemical generation of CO 2 is a plausible source of the detected CO 2.

  20. DEVELOPMENT OF CONTINUOUS SOLVENT EXTRACTION PROCESSES FOR COAL DERIVED CARBON PRODUCTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elliot B. Kennel; Stephen P. Carpenter; Dady Dadyburjor; Manoj Katakdaunde; Liviu Magean; Peter G. Stansberry; Alfred H. Stiller; John W. Zondlo

    2005-08-11

    The purpose of this DOE-funded effort is to develop continuous processes for solvent extraction of coal for the production of carbon products. These carbon products include materials used in metals smelting, especially in the aluminum and steel industries, as well as porous carbon structural material referred to as ''carbon foam'' and carbon fibers. During this reporting period, efforts have focused on the facility modifications for continuous hydrotreating, as well as developing improved protocols for producing synthetic pitches.

  1. Production and behaviour of aluminium foams with different density by AlSi12 precursor; Fabricacion y comportamiento de espumas de aluminio con diferente densidad a partir de un precursor AlSi12

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gutierrez-Vazquez, J. A.; Onoro, J.

    2010-07-01

    Closed cell aluminium foams were prepared by powder metallurgical method in three different ranges of density using AlSi12 precursor. The objective has been to determine by means of tests the effect that has the density of these materials regarding its mechanical behaviour. The used precursor contained 0.4% of foaming agent of titanium hydride (TiH{sub 2}), mixed with aluminum and silicon in appropriate amounts to achieve the commercial composition of the AlSi12 precursor. Once cut the samples thermal treatments of foaming were made of 630 degree centigrade to 750 degree centigrade, by 3 to 20 minutes. The best solidification conditions were determined to avoid the collapse by means of forced air. The samples were prepared with the same weight to different densities, having itself obtained that the best mechanical behaviour was achieved in the high density foams, of 0.70 to 0.81 g/cm{sup 3}. (Author) 26 refs.

  2. Electrochemical device for converting carbon dioxide to a reaction product

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masel, Richard I.; Chen, Qingmei; Liu, Zengcai; Kutz, Robert

    2016-11-01

    An electrochemical device converts carbon dioxide to a reaction product. The device includes an anode and a cathode, each comprising a quantity of catalyst. The anode and cathode each has reactant introduced thereto. A polymer electrolyte membrane is interposed between the anode and the cathode. At least a portion of the cathode catalyst is directly exposed to gaseous carbon dioxide during electrolysis. The average current density at the membrane is at least 20 mA/cm.sup.2, measured as the area of the cathode gas diffusion layer that is covered by catalyst, and CO selectivity is at least 50% at a cell potential of 3.0 V. In some embodiments, the polymer electrolyte membrane comprises a polymer in which a constituent monomer is (p-vinylbenzyl)-R, where R is selected from the group consisting of imidazoliums, pyridiniums and phosphoniums. In some embodiments, the polymer electrolyte membrane is a Helper Membrane comprising a polymer containing an imidazolium ligand, a pyridinium ligand, or a phosphonium ligand.

  3. MEDIA OPTIMIZATION FOR BIOPROTEINS PRODUCTION FROM CHEAPER CARBON SOURCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. JAMAL

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available There are high demands for animal and human food supply especially protein, which is an important dietary component. Agricultural wastes, cheap carbon sources- which are rich and have high energy, can be used for producing the value added bioprotein. A lab scale study was carried out to optimize the media composition for bioprotein production from a cheaper carbon source - wheat flour using potential strain, which was selected earlier by screening different microorganisms. The performance of the selected strain was enhanced by media optimization with varied substrate concentration, nitrogen sources and nutrient supplementation according to the central composite design from STATISTICA software. Statistical optimization was carried out to evaluate the polynomial regression model through effect of linear, quadratic and interaction of the factors. The maximum biomass produced was 21.89 g/L with optimum fermentation conditions of wheat flour (4 g/L, nitrogen concentration (0.5 g/L, nutrient concentration (0.1 g/L, and four days of fermentation.

  4. High surface area carbon and process for its production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romanos, Jimmy; Burress, Jacob; Pfeifer, Peter; Rash, Tyler; Shah, Parag; Suppes, Galen

    2016-12-13

    Activated carbon materials and methods of producing and using activated carbon materials are provided. In particular, biomass-derived activated carbon materials and processes of producing the activated carbon materials with prespecified surface areas and pore size distributions are provided. Activated carbon materials with preselected high specific surface areas, porosities, sub-nm (<1 nm) pore volumes, and supra-nm (1-5 nm) pore volumes may be achieved by controlling the degree of carbon consumption and metallic potassium intercalation into the carbon lattice during the activation process.

  5. Carbon disulphide production in laboratory cultures of marine phytoplankton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Huixiang; Scarratt, Michael G.; Moore, Robert M.

    Carbon disulphide (CS 2) data were collected from axenic monocultures of six species of marine phytoplankton. The tested species included Chaetoceros calcitrans, Phaeodactylum tricornutum, Phaeocystis sp., Porphyridium purpureum, Synechococcus sp. and Isochrysis sp. For a period of between two weeks and forty days, substantial accumulation of CS 2 was found in the cultures of C. calcitrans, P. tricornutum and Phaeocystis sp., whereas the change of CS 2 concentration in the remaining cultures was insignificant. C. calcitrans had a potential for CS 2 production about 10 times higher than P. tricornutum or Phaeocystis sp. The formation of the compound was strongly dependent on the physiological state of the cultured species. More investigation is needed to elucidate the mechanisms responsible for the formation of this sulphur compound in these cultures.

  6. Improving Jet Reactor Configuration for Production of Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Povitsky, Alex

    2000-01-01

    The jet mixing reactor has been proposed for the industrial production of fullerene carbon nanotubes. Here we study the flowfield of this reactor using the SIMPLER algorithm. Hot peripheral jets are used to enhance heating of the central jet by mixing with the ambiance of reactor. Numerous configurations of peripheral jets with various number of jets, distance between nozzles, angles between the central jet and a peripheral jets, and twisted configuration of nozzles are considered. Unlike the previous studies of jet mixing, the optimal configuration of peripheral jets produces strong non-uniformity of the central jet in a cross-section. The geometrical shape of reactor is designed to obtain a uniform temperature of a catalyst.

  7. Lactulose production from cheese whey using recyclable catalyst ammonium carbonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Yeong Hwan; Sung, Mina; Han, Jong-In

    2016-04-15

    Ammonium carbonate ((NH4)2CO3) was used as an alkaline catalyst of lactulose production from cheese whey. Maximum yield of 29.6% was obtained at reaction time of 28.44 min, (NH4)2CO3 of 0.76% at 97°C. During reaction, (NH4)2CO3 was fully decomposed to NH3 and CO2, and these gases were recovered. To boost up NH3 recovery, various methods such as heating, aeration, and pH adjustment were applied. The optimal condition for the purpose of NH3 retrieval was temperature of up to 60°C alongside aeration. Easy separation and recovery make (NH4)2CO3 a catalyst alternative to common alkaline chemicals especially for the weak alkaline reaction.

  8. MID Max: LC-MS/MS Method for Measuring the Precursor and Product Mass Isotopomer Distributions of Metabolic Intermediates and Cofactors for Metabolic Flux Analysis Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCloskey, Douglas; Young, Jamey D; Xu, Sibei; Palsson, Bernhard O; Feist, Adam M

    2016-01-19

    The analytical challenges to acquire accurate isotopic data of intracellular metabolic intermediates for stationary, nonstationary, and dynamic metabolic flux analysis (MFA) are numerous. This work presents MID Max, a novel LC-MS/MS workflow, acquisition, and isotopomer deconvolution method for MFA that takes advantage of additional scan types that maximizes the number of mass isotopomer distributions (MIDs) that can be acquired in a given experiment. The analytical method was found to measure the MIDs of 97 metabolites, corresponding to 74 unique metabolite-fragment pairs (32 precursor spectra and 42 product spectra) with accuracy and precision. The compounds measured included metabolic intermediates in central carbohydrate metabolism and cofactors of peripheral metabolism (e.g., ATP). Using only a subset of the acquired MIDs, the method was found to improve the precision of flux estimations and number of resolved exchange fluxes for wild-type E. coli compared to traditional methods and previously published data sets.

  9. Establishment of the carbon label mechanism of coal chemical products based oncarbon footprint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Bishan

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT After redefining the carbon footprint and carbon label, the paper analyzesthe significance of the carbon labels under the background of the low carbon economy development, and establishes the concept of model of the carbon labels mechanism to chemical products. At the same time, the paper quantitatively studies carbon label data sourceof three kinds of coal chemical industry power products, which are fromhaving not CCS technologies of supercritical boiler of coal, using CCS technologies of supercritical boiler of coal and adopting CCS and IGCC technologies to power generation in CCI. Based on the three kinds of differences, the paper puts forward of establishing the carbon labels mechanism of chemical products under the low carbon consumption.

  10. Porous graphitic carbon nitride synthesized via direct polymerization of urea for efficient sunlight-driven photocatalytic hydrogen production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuewei; Liu, Jinghai; Wu, Guan; Chen, Wei

    2012-09-07

    Energy captured directly from sunlight provides an attractive approach towards fulfilling the need for green energy resources on the terawatt scale with minimal environmental impact. Collecting and storing solar energy into fuel through photocatalyzed water splitting to generate hydrogen in a cost-effective way is desirable. To achieve this goal, low cost and environmentally benign urea was used to synthesize the metal-free photocatalyst graphitic carbon nitride (g-C₃N₄). A porous structure is achieved via one-step polymerization of the single precursor. The porous structure with increased BET surface area and pore volume shows a much higher hydrogen production rate under simulated sunlight irradiation than thiourea-derived and dicyanamide-derived g-C₃N₄. The presence of an oxygen atom is presumed to play a key role in adjusting the textural properties. Further improvement of the photocatalytic function can be expected with after-treatment due to its rich chemistry in functionalization.

  11. Carbon footprint calculation of Finnish greenhouse products; Kasvihuonetuotteiden ilmastovaikutuslaskenta. Loppuraportti

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yrjaenaeinen, H.; Silvenius, F.; Kaukoranta, T.; Naekkilae, J.; Saerkkae, L.; Tuhkanen, E.-M.

    2013-02-01

    This report presents the results of climate impact calculations for five products produced in Finnish greenhouses: tomatoes, cucumbers, salad crops, tulips and Elatior begonias. The study employed 16 greenhouses for the investigation; two greenhouses each for the tulips and the begonias and four each for the tomatoes, cucumbers and salad crops. Based on these calculations a greenhouse gas calculator was developed for greenhouse cultivators. The calculator is available at internet in www.kauppapuutarhaliitto.fi {yields} hiilijalanjaelki. In terms of environmental impacts this study concentrated on the climate impacts of the investigated products, and the calculations were made for the most significant greenhouse gases: carbon dioxide, methane and nitrous oxide. The following processes were included in the system boundaries: plant growing, manufacturing of lime, fertilizers and pesticides, manufacturing and disposal of pots, carbon dioxide production, irrigation, lighting, thermal curtains and cooling systems, the production and use of electricity and heat energy, distribution of products by the growers, other transportation, end-of-life and recycling. Processes excluded from the study were: distribution by other actors, retail functions, the consumer stage, and maintenance and manufacturing of infrastructure. The study used MTT's calculation model for the climate impact of food products excluding distribution and retail processes. The greenhouses selected for the study had some variation in their energy profiles and growing seasons. In addition, scenarios were created for different energy sources by using the average figures from this study. Monthly energy consumption values were also obtained from a number of the greenhouses and these were used to assess the variations in climate impact for different seasons. According to the results of the study the use of energy is the most significant source of climate impact of greenhouse products. In the tomato farms the

  12. Carbon footprint of dairy goat milk production in New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Kimberly; Symes, Wymond; Garnham, Malcolm

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the cradle-to-farm gate carbon footprint of indoor and outdoor dairy goat farming systems in New Zealand, identifying hotspots and discussing variability and methodology. Our study was based on the International Organization for Standardization standards for life cycle assessment, although only results for greenhouse gas emissions are presented. Two functional units were included: tonnes of CO2-equivalents (CO2e) per hectare (ha) and kilograms of CO2e per kilogram of fat- and protein-corrected milk (FPCM). The study covered 5 farms, 2 farming systems, and 3yr. Two methods for the calculation of enteric methane emissions were assessed. The Lassey method, as used in the New Zealand greenhouse gas inventory, provided a more robust estimate of emissions from enteric fermentation and was used in the final calculations. The alternative dry matter intake method was shown to overestimate emissions due to use of anecdotal assumptions around actual consumption of feed. Economic allocation was applied to milk and co-products. Scenario analysis was performed on the allocation method, nitrogen content of manure, manure management, and supplementary feed choice. The average carbon footprint for the indoor farms (n=3) was 11.05 t of CO2e/ha and 0.81kg of CO2e/kg of FPCM. For the outdoor farms (n=2), the average was 5.38 t of CO2e/ha and 1.03kg of CO2e/kg of FPCM. The average for all 5 farms was 8.78 t of CO2e/ha and 0.90kg of CO2e/kg of FPCM. The results showed relatively high variability due to differences in management practices between farms. The 5 farms covered 10% of the total dairy goat farms but may not be representative of an average farm. Methane from enteric fermentation was a major emission source. The use of supplementary feed was highly variable but an important contributor to the carbon footprint. Nitrous oxide can contribute up to 18% of emissions. Indoor goat farming systems produced milk with a significantly higher carbon

  13. The Carbon Reduction Effect of the Trade of Paper Products in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Feng; FENG; Heliang; HUANG; Pei; ZHANG; Siying; CHEN

    2015-01-01

    Through using the data of import and export trading of China’s paper products in 2012,we utilize the method of volume source biomass equation and net primary productivity( NPP) to calculate the carbon reduction effect of papermaking raw materials trade,and utilize the method of IPCC guidelines for inventories to calculate the carbon emission effect of paper and paper products trade. The results show that the distinctive characteristics of China’s paper products trade has resulted in the dual effects on the domestic carbon emissions. On the one hand,large imports of paper-making raw materials make China reduce domestic forest felling,with the effect of carbon emission reduction. On the other hand,net exports of paper and paper products increase the domestic carbon emissions,with the effect of carbon emission. The carbon emission reduction effect of China’s paper-making raw materials trade is obvious and up to 19. 0211 million tons. This is equal to the total volume of 180. 5709 million cubic meters forest’s annual carbon sequestration. The carbon emission effect of paper and paper products trade is only 0. 5136 million tons,which is not significant compared with the former. In general,China’s paper product trade causes the significant effect on carbon emission reduction.

  14. An integrated new product development framework - an application on green and low-carbon products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chun-Yu; Lee, Amy H. I.; Kang, He-Yau

    2015-03-01

    Companies need to be innovative to survive in today's competitive market; thus, new product development (NPD) has become very important. This research constructs an integrated NPD framework for developing new products. In stage one, customer attributes (CAs) and engineering characteristics (ECs) for developing products are collected, and fuzzy interpretive structural modelling (FISM) is applied to understand the relationships among these critical factors. Based on quality function deployment (QFD), a house of quality is then built, and fuzzy analytic network process (FANP) is adopted to calculate the relative importance of ECs. In stage two, fuzzy failure mode and effects analysis (FFMEA) is applied to understand the potential failures of the ECs and to determine the importance of ECs with respect to risk control. In stage three, a goal programming (GP) model is constructed to consider the outcome from the FANP-QFD, FFMEA and other objectives, in order to select the most important ECs. Due to pollution and global warming, environmental protection has become an important topic. With both governments and consumers developing environmental consciousness, successful green and low-carbon NPD provides an important competitive advantage, enabling the survival or renewal of firms. The proposed framework is implemented in a panel manufacturing firm for designing a green and low-carbon product.

  15. Elevated carbon dioxide and ozone alter productivity and ecosystem carbon content in northern temperate forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talhelm, Alan F; Pregitzer, Kurt S; Kubiske, Mark E; Zak, Donald R; Campany, Courtney E; Burton, Andrew J; Dickson, Richard E; Hendrey, George R; Isebrands, J G; Lewin, Keith F; Nagy, John; Karnosky, David F

    2014-08-01

    Three young northern temperate forest communities in the north-central United States were exposed to factorial combinations of elevated carbon dioxide (CO2 ) and tropospheric ozone (O3 ) for 11 years. Here, we report results from an extensive sampling of plant biomass and soil conducted at the conclusion of the experiment that enabled us to estimate ecosystem carbon (C) content and cumulative net primary productivity (NPP). Elevated CO2 enhanced ecosystem C content by 11%, whereas elevated O3 decreased ecosystem C content by 9%. There was little variation in treatment effects on C content across communities and no meaningful interactions between CO2 and O3 . Treatment effects on ecosystem C content resulted primarily from changes in the near-surface mineral soil and tree C, particularly differences in woody tissues. Excluding the mineral soil, cumulative NPP was a strong predictor of ecosystem C content (r(2) = 0.96). Elevated CO2 enhanced cumulative NPP by 39%, a consequence of a 28% increase in canopy nitrogen (N) content (g N m(-2) ) and a 28% increase in N productivity (NPP/canopy N). In contrast, elevated O3 lowered NPP by 10% because of a 21% decrease in canopy N, but did not impact N productivity. Consequently, as the marginal impact of canopy N on NPP (∆NPP/∆N) decreased through time with further canopy development, the O3 effect on NPP dissipated. Within the mineral soil, there was less C in the top 0.1 m of soil under elevated O3 and less soil C from 0.1 to 0.2 m in depth under elevated CO2 . Overall, these results suggest that elevated CO2 may create a sustained increase in NPP, whereas the long-term effect of elevated O3 on NPP will be smaller than expected. However, changes in soil C are not well-understood and limit our ability to predict changes in ecosystem C content.

  16. Application of simple fed-batch technique to high-level secretory production of insulin precursor using Pichia pastoris with subsequent purification and conversion to human insulin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chugh Dipti

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The prevalence of diabetes is predicted to rise significantly in the coming decades. A recent analysis projects that by the year 2030 there will be ~366 million diabetics around the world, leading to an increased demand for inexpensive insulin to make this life-saving drug also affordable for resource poor countries. Results A synthetic insulin precursor (IP-encoding gene, codon-optimized for expression in P. pastoris, was cloned in frame with the Saccharomyces cerevisiae α-factor secretory signal and integrated into the genome of P. pastoris strain X-33. The strain was grown to high-cell density in a batch procedure using a defined medium with low salt and high glycerol concentrations. Following batch growth, production of IP was carried out at methanol concentrations of 2 g L-1, which were kept constant throughout the remaining production phase. This robust feeding strategy led to the secretion of ~3 gram IP per liter of culture broth (corresponding to almost 4 gram IP per liter of cell-free culture supernatant. Using immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography (IMAC as a novel approach for IP purification, 95% of the secreted product was recovered with a purity of 96% from the clarified culture supernatant. Finally, the purified IP was trypsin digested, transpeptidated, deprotected and further purified leading to ~1.5 g of 99% pure recombinant human insulin per liter of culture broth. Conclusions A simple two-phase cultivation process composed of a glycerol batch and a constant methanol fed-batch phase recently developed for the intracellular production of the Hepatitis B surface antigen was adapted to secretory IP production. Compared to the highest previously reported value, this approach resulted in an ~2 fold enhancement of IP production using Pichia based expression systems, thus significantly increasing the efficiency of insulin manufacture.

  17. Regulation of ROS Production and Vascular Function by Carbon Monoxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoon Kyung Choi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbon monoxide (CO is a gaseous molecule produced from heme by heme oxygenase (HO. CO interacts with reduced iron of heme-containing proteins, leading to its involvement in various cellular events via its production of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS. CO-mediated ROS production initiates intracellular signal events, which regulate the expression of adaptive genes implicated in oxidative stress and functions as signaling molecule for promoting vascular functions, including angiogenesis and mitochondrial biogenesis. Therefore, CO generated either by exogenous delivery or by HO activity can be fundamentally involved in regulating mitochondria-mediated redox cascades for adaptive gene expression and improving blood circulation (i.e., O2 delivery via neovascularization, leading to the regulation of mitochondrial energy metabolism. This paper will highlight the biological effects of CO on ROS generation and cellular redox changes involved in mitochondrial metabolism and angiogenesis. Moreover, cellular mechanisms by which CO is exploited for disease prevention and therapeutic applications will also be discussed.

  18. Parametric Study of Carbon Nanotube Production by Laser Ablation Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arepalli, Sivaram; Nikolaev, Pavel; Holmes, William; Hadjiev, Victor; Scott, Carl

    2002-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes form a new class of nanomaterials that are presumed to have extraordinary mechanical, electrical and thermal properties. The single wall nanotubes (SWNTs) are estimated to be 100 times stronger than steel with 1/6th the weight; electrical carrying capacity better than copper and thermal conductivity better than diamond. Applications of these SWNTs include possible weight reduction of aerospace structures, multifunctional materials, nanosensors and nanoelectronics. Double pulsed laser vaporization process produces SWNTs with the highest percentage of nanotubes in the output material. The normal operating conditions include a green laser pulse closely followed by an infrared laser pulse. Lasers ab late a metal-containing graphite target located in a flow tube maintained in an oven at 1473K with argon flow of 100 sccm at a 500 Torr pressure. In the present work a number of production runs were carried out, changing one operating condition at a time. We have studied the effects of nine parameters, including the sequencing of the laser pulses, pulse separation times, laser energy densities, the type of buffer gas used, oven temperature, operating pressure, flow rate and inner flow tube diameters. All runs were done using the same graphite target. The collected nanotube material was characterized by a variety of analytical techniques including scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Raman and thermo gravimetric analysis (TGA). Results indicate trends that could be used to optimize the process and increase the efficiency of the production process.

  19. Snapshot prediction of carbon productivity, carbon and protein content in a Southern Ocean diatom using FTIR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sackett, Olivia; Petrou, Katherina; Reedy, Brian; Hill, Ross; Doblin, Martina; Beardall, John; Ralph, Peter; Heraud, Philip

    2016-02-01

    Diatoms, an important group of phytoplankton, bloom annually in the Southern Ocean, covering thousands of square kilometers and dominating the region's phytoplankton communities. In their role as the major food source to marine grazers, diatoms supply carbon, nutrients and energy to the Southern Ocean food web. Prevailing environmental conditions influence diatom phenotypic traits (for example, photophysiology, macromolecular composition and morphology), which in turn affect the transfer of energy, carbon and nutrients to grazers and higher trophic levels, as well as oceanic biogeochemical cycles. The paucity of phenotypic data on Southern Ocean phytoplankton limits our understanding of the ecosystem and how it may respond to future environmental change. Here we used a novel approach to create a 'snapshot' of cell phenotype. Using mass spectrometry, we measured nitrogen (a proxy for protein), total carbon and carbon-13 enrichment (carbon productivity), then used this data to build spectroscopy-based predictive models. The models were used to provide phenotypic data for samples from a third sample set. Importantly, this approach enabled the first ever rate determination of carbon productivity from a single time point, circumventing the need for time-series measurements. This study showed that Chaetoceros simplex was less productive and had lower protein and carbon content during short-term periods of high salinity. Applying this new phenomics approach to natural phytoplankton samples could provide valuable insight into understanding phytoplankton productivity and function in the marine system.

  20. Rapid Development of Carbon Fiber Industry in Jilin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, Jilin Carbon Fiber Industrial Zone in Liaoning Province has seen a rapid development, forming a complete industrial chain from precursor to carbonization, and then to products. Along with the promotion of a large number of carbon fiber in

  1. Combined UV treatment and ozonation for the removal of by-product precursors in swimming pool water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cheema, Waqas Akram; Kaarsholm, Kamilla Marie Speht; Andersen, Henrik Rasmus

    2017-01-01

    Both UV treatment and ozonation are used to reduce different types of disinfection by-products (DBPs) in swimming pools. UV treatment is the most common approach, as it is particularly efficient at removing combined chlorine. However, the UV treatment of pool water increases chlorine reactivity...... and the formation of chloro-organic DBPs such as trihalomethanes. Based on the similar selective reactivity of ozone and chlorine, we hypothesised that the created reactivity to chlorine, as a result of the UV treatment of dissolved organic matter in swimming pool water, might also be expressed as increased...... for a new treatment method for swimming pools....

  2. Dutch (organic) agriculture, carbon sequestration and energy production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burgt, van der G.J.H.M.; Staps, S.; Timmermans, B.

    2010-01-01

    Carbon sequestration in soils is often mentioned in the discussions about climate changes. In this paper the opportunities for carbon sequestration in Dutch agriculture are discussed at farm and national level. Farm internal carbon sources are already completely used in livestock farming. The effect

  3. Influence of carbon source on alpha-amylase production by Aspergillus oryzae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlsen, Morten; Nielsen, Jens

    2001-01-01

    The influence of the carbon source on a-amylase production by Aspergillus oryzae was quantified in carbon-limited chemostat cultures. The following carbon sources were investigated: maltose, maltodextrin (different chain lengths), glucose, fructose, galactose, sucrose, glycerol, mannitol and acet......The influence of the carbon source on a-amylase production by Aspergillus oryzae was quantified in carbon-limited chemostat cultures. The following carbon sources were investigated: maltose, maltodextrin (different chain lengths), glucose, fructose, galactose, sucrose, glycerol, mannitol...... and acetate. A. oryzae did not grow on galactose as the sole carbon source, but galactose was co-metabolized together with glucose. Relative to that on low glucose concentration (below 10 mg/l), productivity was found to be higher during growth on maltose and maltodextrins, whereas it was lower during growth...

  4. Yarn spun from carbon nanotube forests: Production, structure, properties and applications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Menghe Miao

    2013-01-01

    The discovery ofdrawable carbon nanotube forests opened up the possibility of constructing a wide range of pure carbon nanotube macrostructures and sparked interests in developing applications from these structures,especially pure carbon nanotube yarns.This review examines the various facets of the drawable carbon nanotube forests,synthesis and drawability,and their resulting yarns,structure,production,properties and applications.The structure,formation and properties of carbon nanotube yarns are compared with those of conventional textile yarns in order to obtain a better understanding of the science,structural mechanics and processing technology involved in carbon nanotube yarns.

  5. Techno-economic evaluation of different CO2-based processes for dimethyl carbonate production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kongpanna, Pichayapan; Pavarajarn, Varong; Gani, Rafiqul;

    2015-01-01

    In this work, several chemical processes for production of dimethyl carbonate (DMC) based on CO2 utilization are evaluated. Four CO2-based processes for production of DMC are considered: (1) direct synthesis from CO2 and methanol; (2) synthesis from urea; (3) synthesis from propylene carbonate...... carbonate route > urea route > propylene carbonate route > direct synthesis from CO2. Therefore, only the urea and ethylene carbonate routes are further investigated by comparing their performances with the commercial BAYER process on the basis of kg of DMC produced at a specific purity. The ethylene...... option produces ethylene glycol as a valuable by-product. Based on the above and other performance criteria, the ethylene carbonate route is found to be a highly promising green process for DMC production. © 2014 The Institution of Chemical Engineers....

  6. DEVELOPMENT OF CONTINUOUS SOLVENT EXTRACTION PROCESSES FOR COAL DERIVED CARBON PRODUCTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dady B. Dadyburjor; Mark E. Heavner; Manoj Katakdaunde; Liviu Magean; J. Joshua Maybury; Alfred H. Stiller; Joseph M. Stoffa; John W. Zondlo

    2006-08-01

    The purpose of this DOE-funded effort is to develop continuous processes for solvent extraction of coal for the production of carbon products. The largest applications are those which support metals smelting, such as anodes for aluminum smelting and electrodes for arc furnaces. Other carbon products include materials used in creating fuels for the Direct Carbon Fuel Cell, and porous carbon structural material referred to as ''carbon foam'' and carbon fibers. During this reporting period, hydrotreatment of solvent was completed in preparation for pitch fabrication for graphite electrodes. Coal digestion has lagged but is expected to be complete by next quarter. Studies are reported on coal dissolution, pitch production, foam synthesis using physical blowing agents, and alternate coking techniques.

  7. Interconnected Hierarchical Porous Carbon from Lignin-Derived Byproducts of Bioethanol Production for Ultra-High Performance Supercapacitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Liming; You, Tingting; Zhou, Tian; Zhou, Xia; Xu, Feng

    2016-06-08

    The advent of bioethanol production has generated abundant lignin-derived byproducts which contain proteins and polysaccharides. These byproducts are inapplicable for direct material applications. In this study, lignin-derived byproducts were used for the first time as carbon precursors to construct an interconnected hierarchical porous nitrogen-doped carbon (HPNC) via hydrothermal treatment and activation. The obtained HPNC exhibited favorable features for supercapacitor applications, such as hierarchical bowl-like pore structures, a large specific surface area of 2218 m(2) g(-1), a high electronic conductivity of 4.8 S cm(-1), and a nitrogen doping content of 3.4%. HPNC-based supercapacitors in a 6 M KOH aqueous electrolyte exhibited high-rate performance with a high specific capacitance of 312 F g(-1) at 1 A g(-1) and 81% retention at 80 A g(-1) as well as an excellent cyclic life of 98% initial capacitance after 20 000 cycles at 10 A g(-1). Moreover, HPNC-based supercapacitors in the ionic liquid electrolyte of EMI-BF4 displayed an enhanced energy density of 44.7 Wh kg(-1) (remaining 74% of max value) at an ultrahigh power density of 73.1 kW kg(-1). The proposed strategy may facilitate lignin utilization and lead to a green bioethanol production process.

  8. Marine bacterial transparent exopolymer particles (TEP) and TEP precursors: Characterization and RO fouling potential

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Sheng

    2015-10-31

    This paper investigated the characteristics and membrane fouling potential of bacterial transparent exopolymer particles (TEP)/TEP precursors released from two marine bacteria, Pseudidiomarina homiensis (P. homiensis) and Pseudoalteromonas atlantica (P. atlantica), isolated from the Red Sea. Results showed that both bacteria grew at the similar rate, but the production of TEP/TEP precursors from P. atlantica was higher than that from P. homiensis. During the 168. h of incubation time, production rates of TEP/TEP precursors from P. atlantica and P. homiensis were 0.30 and 0.08 xanthan gum eq. mg/L-h, respectively. Isolated bacterial TEP precursors were mainly biopolymer, and P. atlantica produced a significantly higher concentration of biopolymer than that produced by P. homiensis. TEP/TEP precursors from both marine bacteria possessed protein-like material and were very similar in composition to previously reported foulants isolated from a fouled reverse osmosis (RO) membrane. Bacterial TEP/TEP precursors mostly consisted of aliphatic hydrocarbon from amino acids and amide group carbon of proteins (around 55%). Bacterial TEP precursors caused obvious fouling on RO membranes, which may create an ideal environment for bacteria attachment and promote to biofouling.

  9. Production of uroporphyrinogen III, which is the common precursor of all tetrapyrrole cofactors, from 5-aminolevulinic acid by Escherichia coli expressing thermostable enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hibino, Aiko; Petri, René; Büchs, Jochen; Ohtake, Hisao

    2013-08-01

    Uroporphyrinogen III (urogen III) was produced from 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA), which is a common precursor of all metabolic tetrapyrroles, using thermostable ALA dehydratase (ALAD), porphobilinogen deaminase (PBGD), and urogen III synthase (UROS) of Thermus thermophilus HB8. The UROS-coding gene (hemD₂) of T. thermophilus HB8 was identified by examining the gene product for its ability to produce urogen III in a coupled reaction with ALAD and PBGD. The genes encoding ALAD, PBGD, and UROS were separately expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3). To inactivate indigenous mesophilic enzymes, the E. coli transformants were heated at 70 °C for 10 min. The bioconversion of ALA to urogen III was performed using a mixture of heat-treated E. coli transformants expressing ALAD, PBGD, and UROS at a cell ratio of 1:1:1. When the total cell concentration was 7.5 g/l, the mixture of heat-treated E. coli transformants could convert about 88 % 10 mM ALA to urogen III at 60 °C after 4 h. Since eight ALA molecules are required for the synthesis of one porphyrin molecule, approximately 1.1 mM (990 mg/l) urogen III was produced from 10 mM ALA. The present technology has great potential to supply urogen III for the biocatalytic production of vitamin B₁₂.

  10. Sustainability: The capacity of smokeless biomass pyrolysis for energy production, global carbon capture and sequestration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Application of modern smokeless biomass pyrolysis for biochar and biofuel production is potentially a revolutionary approach for global carbon capture and sequestration at gigatons of carbon (GtC) scales. A conversion of about 7% of the annual terrestrial gross photosynthetic product (120 GtC y-1) i...

  11. Impact of Manaus City on the Amazon Green Ocean atmosphere: ozone production, precursor sensitivity and aerosol load

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Kuhn

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available As a contribution to the Large-Scale Biosphere-Atmosphere Experiment in Amazonia – Cooperative LBA Airborne Regional Experiment (LBA-CLAIRE-2001 field campaign in the heart of the Amazon Basin, we analyzed the temporal and spatial dynamics of the urban plume of Manaus City during the wet-to-dry season transition period in July 2001. During the flights, we performed vertical stacks of crosswind transects in the urban outflow downwind of Manaus City, measuring a comprehensive set of trace constituents including O3, NO, NO2, CO, VOC, CO2, and H2O. Aerosol loads were characterized by total aerosol number concentration (CN and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN concentrations, and light scattering properties. Measurements over pristine rainforest areas during the campaign showed low levels of pollution from biomass burning or industrial emissions, representative of wet season background conditions. The urban plume of Manaus City was found to be joined by plumes from power plants south of the city, all showing evidence of very strong photochemical ozone formation. One episode is discussed in detail, where a threefold increase in ozone mixing ratios in the atmospheric boundary layer occurred within a 100 km travel distance downwind of Manaus. Observation-based estimates of the ozone production rates in the plume reached 15 ppb h−1.

    Within the plume core, aerosol concentrations were strongly enhanced, with ΔCN/ΔCO ratios about one order of magnitude higher than observed in Amazon biomass burning plumes. ΔCN/ΔCO ratios tended to decrease with increasing transport time, indicative of a significant reduction in particle number by coagulation, and without substantial new particle nucleation occurring within the time/space observed. While in the background atmosphere a large fraction of the total particle number served as CCN (about 60–80% at 0.6% supersaturation, the CCN/CN ratios within

  12. Impact of Manaus City on the Amazon Green Ocean atmosphere: ozone production, precursor sensitivity and aerosol load

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Kuhn

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available As a contribution to the Large-Scale Biosphere-Atmosphere Experiment in Amazonia – Cooperative LBA Airborne Regional Experiment (LBA-CLAIRE-2001 field campaign in the heart of the Amazon Basin, we analyzed the temporal and spatial dynamics of the urban plume of Manaus City during the wet-to-dry season transition period in July 2001. During the flights, we performed vertical stacks of crosswind transects in the urban outflow downwind of Manaus City, measuring a comprehensive set of trace constituents including O3, NO, NO2, CO, VOC, CO2, and H2O. Aerosol loads were characterized by concentrations of total aerosol number (CN and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN, and by light scattering properties. Measurements over pristine rainforest areas during the campaign showed low levels of pollution from biomass burning or industrial emissions, representative of wet season background conditions. The urban plume of Manaus City was found to be joined by plumes from power plants south of the city, all showing evidence of very strong photochemical ozone formation. One episode is discussed in detail, where a threefold increase in ozone mixing ratios within the atmospheric boundary layer occurred within a 100 km travel distance downwind of Manaus. Observation-based estimates of the ozone production rates in the plume reached 15 ppb h−1.

    Within the plume core, aerosol concentrations were strongly enhanced, with ΔCN/ΔCO ratios about one order of magnitude higher than observed in Amazon biomass burning plumes. ΔCN/ΔCO ratios tended to decrease with increasing transport time, indicative of a significant reduction in particle number by coagulation, and without substantial new particle nucleation occurring within the time/space observed. While in the background atmosphere a large fraction of the total particle number served as CCN (about 60–80% at 0.6% supersaturation, the CCN/CN ratios within the

  13. Greenhouse gas emissions in milk and dairy product chains: Improving the carbon footprint of dairy products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flysjoe, A.M.

    2012-11-01

    The present PhD project has focused on some of the most critical methodological aspects influencing GHG emission estimates of milk and dairy products and how the methodology can be improved. In addition, the Carbon Footprint (CF) for different types of dairy products has been analysed. Based on these results, mitigation options have been identified along the entire dairy value chain. The key methodological challenges analysed in the present study are: estimation of CH{sub 4} and N{sub 2}O emissions, assessment of CO{sub 2} emissions from land use change (LUC), co-product handling, and definition of the functional unit. Estimates of the biogenic emissions CH{sub 4} and N{sub 2}O are associated with large uncertainties due to the complexity and natural variation in biological processes. Accounting for these variations resulted in a {+-}30-50% variation in the CF for milk in Sweden and New Zealand (excluding emissions from LUC). The inclusion of emissions from LUC can drastically affect the CF of dairy products, and different models can even provide contradictory results. Thus, it is suggested that emissions associated with LUC are reported separately and that underlying assumptions are clearly explained. Accounting for the by-product beef is decisive for the CF of milk, and when designing future strategies for the dairy sector, milk and meat production needs to be addressed in an integrated approach. It is shown that an increase in milk yield per cow does not necessarily result in a lower CF of milk, when taking into account the alternative production of the by-product beef. This demonstrates that it is important to investigate interactions between different product chains, i.e. to apply system thinking. The CF of dairy products from Arla Foods analysed in the present study range from: 1.2-5.5 kg CO{sub 2}e per kg fresh dairy products, 7.3-10.9 kg CO{sub 2}e per kg butter and butter blends, 4.5-9.9 kg CO{sub 2}e per kg cheese, and 1.0-17.4 kg CO{sub 2}e per kg milk

  14. New natural product carbonic anhydrase inhibitors incorporating phenol moieties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karioti, Anastasia; Ceruso, Mariangela; Carta, Fabrizio; Bilia, Anna-Rita; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2015-11-15

    Carbonic anhydrases (CAs, EC 4.2.1.1) catalyze the fundamental reaction of CO2 hydration in all living organisms, being actively involved in the regulation of a plethora of patho/physiological conditions. They represent a typical example of enzyme convergent evolution, as six genetically unrelated families of such enzymes were described so far. The need to find selective CA inhibitors (CAIs) triggered the investigation of natural product libraries, which proved to be a valid source of agents with such an activity, as demonstrated for the phenols, polyamines and coumarins. Herein we report an in vitro inhibition study of human (h) CA isoforms hCAs I, II, IV, VII and XII with a panel of natural polyphenols including flavones, flavonols, flavanones, flavanols, isoflavones and depsides, some of which extracted from Quercus ilex and Salvia miltiorrhiza. Several of the investigated derivatives showed interesting inhibition activity and selectivities for inhibiting some important isoforms over the off-target ones hCA I and II.

  15. Elevated carbon dioxide and ozone alter productivity and ecosystem carbon content in northern temperate forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talhelm, Alan F; Pregitzer, Kurt S; Kubiske, Mark E; Zak, Donald R; Campany, Courtney E; Burton, Andrew J; Dickson, Richard E; Hendrey, George R; Isebrands, J G; Lewin, Keith F; Nagy, John; Karnosky, David F

    2014-01-01

    Three young northern temperate forest communities in the north-central United States were exposed to factorial combinations of elevated carbon dioxide (CO2) and tropospheric ozone (O3) for 11 years. Here, we report results from an extensive sampling of plant biomass and soil conducted at the conclusion of the experiment that enabled us to estimate ecosystem carbon (C) content and cumulative net primary productivity (NPP). Elevated CO2 enhanced ecosystem C content by 11%, whereas elevated O3 decreased ecosystem C content by 9%. There was little variation in treatment effects on C content across communities and no meaningful interactions between CO2 and O3. Treatment effects on ecosystem C content resulted primarily from changes in the near-surface mineral soil and tree C, particularly differences in woody tissues. Excluding the mineral soil, cumulative NPP was a strong predictor of ecosystem C content (r2 = 0.96). Elevated CO2 enhanced cumulative NPP by 39%, a consequence of a 28% increase in canopy nitrogen (N) content (g N m−2) and a 28% increase in N productivity (NPP/canopy N). In contrast, elevated O3 lowered NPP by 10% because of a 21% decrease in canopy N, but did not impact N productivity. Consequently, as the marginal impact of canopy N on NPP (ΔNPP/ΔN) decreased through time with further canopy development, the O3 effect on NPP dissipated. Within the mineral soil, there was less C in the top 0.1 m of soil under elevated O3 and less soil C from 0.1 to 0.2 m in depth under elevated CO2. Overall, these results suggest that elevated CO2 may create a sustained increase in NPP, whereas the long-term effect of elevated O3 on NPP will be smaller than expected. However, changes in soil C are not well-understood and limit our ability to predict changes in ecosystem C content. PMID:24604779

  16. Application of thermal analysis techniques in activated carbon production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnals, G.L.; DeBarr, J.A.; Rostam-Abadi, M.; Lizzio, A.A.; Brady, T.A.

    1996-01-01

    Thermal analysis techniques have been used at the ISGS as an aid in the development and characterization of carbon adsorbents. Promising adsorbents from fly ash, tires, and Illinois coals have been produced for various applications. Process conditions determined in the preparation of gram quantities of carbons were used as guides in the preparation of larger samples. TG techniques developed to characterize the carbon adsorbents included the measurement of the kinetics of SO2 adsorption, the performance of rapid proximate analyses, and the determination of equilibrium methane adsorption capacities. Thermal regeneration of carbons was assessed by TG to predict the life cycle of carbon adsorbents in different applications. TPD was used to determine the nature of surface functional groups and their effect on a carbon's adsorption properties.

  17. Carbon molecular sieve membrane from a microporous spirobisindane-based polyimide precursor with enhanced ethylene/ethane mixed-gas selectivity

    KAUST Repository

    Salinas, Octavio

    2017-01-13

    Ethylene is typically produced by steam cracking of various hydrocarbon feedstocks. The gaseous products are then separated in a demethanizer followed by a deethanizer unit and finally sent to a C splitter for the final purification step. Cryogenic distillation of ethylene from ethane is the most energy-intensive unit operation process in the chemical industry. Therefore, the development of more energy-efficient processes for ethylene purification is highly desirable. Membrane-based separation has been proposed as an alternative option for replacement or debottlenecking of C splitters but current polymer membrane materials exhibit insufficient mixed-gas CH/CH selectivity (<7) to be technically and economically attractive. In this work, a highly selective carbon molecular sieve (CMS) membrane derived from a novel spirobisindane-based polyimide of intrinsic microporosity (PIM-6FDA) was developed and characterized. PIM-6FDA showed a single-stage degradation process under an inert nitrogen atmosphere which commenced at ∼480 °C. The CMS formed by pyrolysis at 800 °C had a diffusion/size-sieving-controlled morphology with a mixed-gas (50% CH/50% CH) ethylene/ethane selectivity of 15.6 at 20 bar feed pressure at 35 °C. The mixed-gas ethylene/ethane selectivity is the highest reported value for CMS-type membranes to date.

  18. Thermocatalytic process for CO.sub.2-free production of hydrogen and carbon from hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muradov, Nazim Z.

    2011-08-23

    A novel process and apparatus are disclosed for sustainable CO.sub.2-free production of hydrogen and carbon by thermocatalytic decomposition (dissociation, pyrolysis, cracking) of hydrocarbon fuels over carbon-based catalysts in the absence of air and/or water. The apparatus and thermocatalytic process improve the activity and stability of carbon catalysts during the thermocatalytic process and produce both high purity hydrogen (at least, 99.0 volume %) and carbon, from any hydrocarbon fuel, including sulfurous fuels. In a preferred embodiment, production of hydrogen and carbon is achieved by both internal and external activation of carbon catalysts. Internal activation of carbon catalyst is accomplished by recycling of hydrogen-depleted gas containing unsaturated and aromatic hydrocarbons back to the reactor. External activation of the catalyst can be achieved via surface gasification with hot combustion gases during catalyst heating. The process and apparatus can be conveniently integrated with any type of fuel cell to generate electricity.

  19. Feasibility study of production of radioactive carbon black or carbon nanotubes in cyclotron facilities for nanobioscience applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas, K; Simonelli, F; Holzwarth, U; Cydzik, I; Bulgheroni, A; Gibson, N; Kozempel, J

    2013-03-01

    A feasibility study regarding the production of radioactive carbon black and nanotubes has been performed by proton beam irradiation. Experimental and theoretical excitation functions of the nuclear reaction (nat)C(p,x)(7)Be in the proton energy range 24-38 MeV are reported, with an acceptable agreement. We have demonstrated that sufficient activities of (7)Be radioisotope can be produced in carbon black and nanotube that would facilitate studies of their possible impact on human and environment.

  20. Statins reduce amyloid β-peptide production by modulating amyloid precursor protein maturation and phosphorylation through a cholesterol-independent mechanism in cultured neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosaka, Ai; Araki, Wataru; Oda, Akiko; Tomidokoro, Yasushi; Tamaoka, Akira

    2013-03-01

    Statins, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitors, have been reported to attenuate amyloid-β peptide (Aβ) production in various cellular models. However, the mechanisms by which statins affect neuronal Aβ production have not yet been clarified. Here, we investigated this issue in rat primary cortical neurons using two statins, pitavastatin (PV) and atorvastatin (AV). Treatment of neurons with 0.2-2.5 μM PV or AV for 4 days induced a concentration- and time-dependent reduction in the secretion of both Aβ40 and Aβ42. Moreover, Western blot analyses of cell lysates showed that treatment with PV or AV significantly reduced expression levels of the mature form of amyloid precursor protein (APP) and Thr668-phosphorylated APP (P-APP), but not immature form of APP; the decreases in P-APP levels were more notable than those of mature APP levels. The statin treatment did not alter expression of BACE1 (β-site APP-cleaving enzyme 1) or γ-secretase complex proteins (presenilin 1, nicastrin, APH-1, and PEN-2). In neurons overexpressing APP via recombinant adenoviruses, PV or AV similarly reduced Aβ secretion and the levels of mature APP and P-APP. Statins also markedly reduced cellular cholesterol content in neurons in a concentration-dependent manner. Co-treatment with mevalonate reversed the statin-induced decreases in Aβ secretion and mature APP and P-APP levels, whereas co-treatment with cholesterol did not, despite recovery of cellular cholesterol levels. Finally, cell-surface biotinylation experiments revealed that both statins significantly reduced the levels of cell-surface P-APP without changing those of cell surface mature APP. These results suggest that statins reduce Aβ production by selectively modulating APP maturation and phosphorylation through a mechanism independent of cholesterol reduction in cultured neurons.

  1. Magnéli phases Ti{sub 4}O{sub 7} and Ti{sub 8}O{sub 15} and their carbon nanocomposites via the thermal decomposition-precursor route

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conze, S., E-mail: susan.conze@ikts.fraunhofer.de [Fraunhofer Institute for Ceramic Technologies and Systems IKTS, Winterbergstr. 28, 01277 Dresden (Germany); Veremchuk, I. [Max-Planck-Institut für Chemische Physik fester Stoffe, Nöthnitzer Straße 40, 01187 Dresden (Germany); Reibold, M. [Technical University of Dresden, Zum Triebenberg 50, 01328 Dresden (Zaschendorf) (Germany); Matthey, B.; Michaelis, A. [Fraunhofer Institute for Ceramic Technologies and Systems IKTS, Winterbergstr. 28, 01277 Dresden (Germany); Grin, Yu. [Max-Planck-Institut für Chemische Physik fester Stoffe, Nöthnitzer Straße 40, 01187 Dresden (Germany); Kinski, I. [Fraunhofer Institute for Ceramic Technologies and Systems IKTS, Winterbergstr. 28, 01277 Dresden (Germany)

    2015-09-15

    A new synthetic approach for producing nano-powders of the Magnéli phases Ti{sub 4}O{sub 7}, Ti{sub 8}O{sub 15} and their carbon nanocomposites by thermal decomposition-precursor route is proposed. The formation mechanism of the single-phase carbon nanocomposites (Ti{sub 4}O{sub 7}/C and Ti{sub 8}O{sub 15}/C) from metal–organic precursors is studied using FT-IR, elemental analysis, TG, STA-MS and others. The synthesis parameters and conditions were optimized to prepare the target oxides with the desired microstructure and physical properties. The electrical and transport properties of Ti{sub 4}O{sub 7}/C and Ti{sub 8}O{sub 15}/C are investigated. These nano-materials are n-type semiconductors with relatively low thermal conductivity in contrast to the bulk species. The nanostructured carbon nanocomposites of Magnéli phases achieve a low thermal conductivity close to 1 W/m K at RT. The maximum ZT{sub 570} {sub °C} values are 0.04 for Ti{sub 4}O{sub 7}/C powder nanocomposite and 0.01 for Ti{sub 8}O{sub 15}/C bulk nanocomposite. - Graphical abstract: From the precursor to the produced titanium oxide pellet and its microstructure (SEM, TEM micrographs) as well as results of phase and thermoelectric analyses. - Highlights: • Magnéli phases Ti{sub 4}O{sub 7}/Ti{sub 8}O{sub 15} via thermal decomposition-precursor route is proposed. • The formation mechanism of the nanocomposites Ti{sub 4}O{sub 7}/C and Ti{sub 8}O{sub 15}/C are investigated. • Microstructure of Ti{sub 4}O{sub 7}/C and Ti{sub 8}O{sub 15}/C are examined. • The electrical and transport properties of Ti{sub 4}O{sub 7}/C and Ti{sub 8}O{sub 15}/C are investigated. • The maximum figure of mertit ZT{sub 570} {sub °C} of Ti{sub 4}O{sub 7}/C and Ti{sub 8}O{sub 15}/C are 0.01 and 0.04.

  2. Disequilibrium δ18O values in microbial carbonates as a tracer of metabolic production of dissolved inorganic carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thaler, Caroline; Millo, Christian; Ader, Magali; Chaduteau, Carine; Guyot, François; Ménez, Bénédicte

    2017-02-01

    both disequilibrium effects are triggered by the metabolic production of CO2, which is common in many microbially-mediated carbonation processes, leads us to propose that metabolically-induced offsets from isotopic equilibrium in microbial carbonates may be more common than previously considered. Therefore, precaution should be taken when using the oxygen isotope signature of microbial carbonates for diagenetic and paleoenvironmental reconstructions.

  3. Ionic liquids as precursors for highly luminescent, surface-different nitrogen-doped carbon dots used for label-free detection of Cu2+/Fe3+ and cell imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Andong; Zhao, Chuanqi; Li, Meng; Ren, Jinsong; Qu, Xiaogang

    2014-01-27

    Carbon nanodots (C-Dots) have attracted much attention in recent years due to their low cost, ready scalability, excellent chemical stability, biocompatibility and multicolor luminescence. Here, we report a facile strategy for producing highly luminescent, surface-different nitrogen-doped carbon dots (C-Dots) by using different ionic liquids (ILs). Intriguingly, the surface-different C-Dots show different selectivity for Cu(2+) and Fe(3+). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first example which shows that ILs are excellent precursors for producing luminescent nanomaterial used for detection of different metal ions. The resultant nitrogen-doped C-Dots are highly photoluminescent and can be used for multicolor bioimaging. Most notable, by taking different ILs as precursors, we obtain surface-different C-Dots, which can be directly used for selective detection of Cu(2+) and Fe(3+) without any modification. These C-Dots based sensors exhibit high sensitivity and selectivity and the sensing process can be easily accomplished with one-step rapid operation. More importantly, compared with other method using QDs, organic dyes and organic solvent, this strategy is much more eco-friendly. This work may offer a new approach for developing low cost and sensitive C-Dots-based sensors for biological and environmental applications.

  4. DEVELOPMENT OF CONTINUOUS SOLVENT EXTRACTION PROCESSES FOR COAL DERIVED CARBON PRODUCTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elliot B. Kennel; Chong Chen; Dady Dadyburjor; Liviu Magean; Peter G. Stansberry; Alfred H. Stiller; John W. Zondlo

    2005-07-13

    The purpose of this DOE-funded effort is to develop continuous processes for solvent extraction of coal for the production of carbon products. These carbon products include materials used in metals smelting, especially in the aluminum and steel industries, as well as porous carbon structural material referred to as ''carbon foam'' and carbon fibers. The Hydrotreatment Facility is being prepared for trials with coal liquids. Raw coal tar distillate trials have been carried out by heating coal tar in the holding tank in the Hydrotreatment Facility. The liquids are centrifuged to warm the system up in preparation for the coal liquids. The coal tar distillate is then recycled to keep the centrifuge hot. In this way, the product has been distilled such that a softening point of approximately 110 C is reached. Then an ash test is conducted.

  5. Production of β-globin and adult hemoglobin following G418 treatment of erythroid precursor cells from homozygous β039 thalassemia patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvatori, Francesca; Breveglieri, Giulia; Zuccato, Cristina; Finotti, Alessia; Bianchi, Nicoletta; Borgatti, Monica; Feriotto, Giordana; Destro, Federica; Canella, Alessandro; Brognara, Eleonora; Lampronti, Ilaria; Breda, Laura; Rivella, Stefano; Gambari, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    In several types of thalassemia (including β039-thalassemia), stop codon mutations lead to premature translation termination and to mRNA destabilization through nonsense-mediated decay. Drugs (for instance aminoglycosides) can be designed to suppress premature termination, inducing a ribosomal readthrough. These findings have introduced new hopes for the development of a pharmacologic approach to the cure of this disease. However, the effects of aminoglycosides on globin mRNA carrying β-thalassemia stop mutations have not yet been investigated. In this study, we have used a lentiviral construct containing the β039- thalassemia globin gene under control of the β-globin promoter and a LCR cassette. We demonstrated by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) analysis the production of β-globin by K562 cell clones expressing the β039-thalassemia globin gene and treated with G418. More importantly, after FACS and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analyses, erythroid precursor cells from β039-thalassemia patients were demonstrated to be able to produce β-globin and adult hemoglobin after treatment with G418. This study strongly suggests that ribosomal readthrough should be considered a strategy for developing experimental strategies for the treatment of β0-thalassemia caused by stop codon mutations. PMID:19810011

  6. Production of beta-globin and adult hemoglobin following G418 treatment of erythroid precursor cells from homozygous beta(0)39 thalassemia patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvatori, Francesca; Breveglieri, Giulia; Zuccato, Cristina; Finotti, Alessia; Bianchi, Nicoletta; Borgatti, Monica; Feriotto, Giordana; Destro, Federica; Canella, Alessandro; Brognara, Eleonora; Lampronti, Ilaria; Breda, Laura; Rivella, Stefano; Gambari, Roberto

    2009-11-01

    In several types of thalassemia (including beta(0)39-thalassemia), stop codon mutations lead to premature translation termination and to mRNA destabilization through nonsense-mediated decay. Drugs (for instance aminoglycosides) can be designed to suppress premature termination, inducing a ribosomal readthrough. These findings have introduced new hopes for the development of a pharmacologic approach to the cure of this disease. However, the effects of aminoglycosides on globin mRNA carrying beta-thalassemia stop mutations have not yet been investigated. In this study, we have used a lentiviral construct containing the beta(0)39-thalassemia globin gene under control of the beta-globin promoter and a LCR cassette. We demonstrated by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) analysis the production of beta-globin by K562 cell clones expressing the beta(0)39-thalassemia globin gene and treated with G418. More importantly, after FACS and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analyses, erythroid precursor cells from beta(0)39-thalassemia patients were demonstrated to be able to produce beta-globin and adult hemoglobin after treatment with G418. This study strongly suggests that ribosomal readthrough should be considered a strategy for developing experimental strategies for the treatment of beta(0)-thalassemia caused by stop codon mutations. Am. J. Hematol., 2009. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  7. Methane cracking over commercial carbons for hydrogen production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Sarada Prasad, Vivek Dhand, V. Himabindu Y. Anjaneyulu

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available A bench scale unit has been designed and developed indigenously for producing hydrogen from methane in the presence of a catalyst. Five number carbon samples (two carbon blacks and three activated carbons of different origin procured from Indian market have been investigated in the bench scale unit with stainless steel continuous fixed bed reactor at a constant temperature of 850 0C and space velocity (VHSV of 1.62 Lit/hr.g. Among all the five samples, activated carbon produced from coconut shells with BET surface area of 1185 m2/g showed promising activity with a sustainability factor (R1/R0 of 0.33 and initial activity (R0 of 0.623 mmol/min.g of catalyst. Accumulated carbon yield (over a period of four hours of the above catalyst is 564 mg/g of catalyst.

  8. Porous graphitic carbon nitride synthesized via direct polymerization of urea for efficient sunlight-driven photocatalytic hydrogen production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuewei; Liu, Jinghai; Wu, Guan; Chen, Wei

    2012-08-01

    Energy captured directly from sunlight provides an attractive approach towards fulfilling the need for green energy resources on the terawatt scale with minimal environmental impact. Collecting and storing solar energy into fuel through photocatalyzed water splitting to generate hydrogen in a cost-effective way is desirable. To achieve this goal, low cost and environmentally benign urea was used to synthesize the metal-free photocatalyst graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3N4). A porous structure is achieved via one-step polymerization of the single precursor. The porous structure with increased BET surface area and pore volume shows a much higher hydrogen production rate under simulated sunlight irradiation than thiourea-derived and dicyanamide-derived g-C3N4. The presence of an oxygen atom is presumed to play a key role in adjusting the textural properties. Further improvement of the photocatalytic function can be expected with after-treatment due to its rich chemistry in functionalization.Energy captured directly from sunlight provides an attractive approach towards fulfilling the need for green energy resources on the terawatt scale with minimal environmental impact. Collecting and storing solar energy into fuel through photocatalyzed water splitting to generate hydrogen in a cost-effective way is desirable. To achieve this goal, low cost and environmentally benign urea was used to synthesize the metal-free photocatalyst graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3N4). A porous structure is achieved via one-step polymerization of the single precursor. The porous structure with increased BET surface area and pore volume shows a much higher hydrogen production rate under simulated sunlight irradiation than thiourea-derived and dicyanamide-derived g-C3N4. The presence of an oxygen atom is presumed to play a key role in adjusting the textural properties. Further improvement of the photocatalytic function can be expected with after-treatment due to its rich chemistry in

  9. Combined hydrogen production and storage with subsequent carbon crystallization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lueking, Angela D; Gutierrez, Humberto R; Fonseca, Dania A; Narayanan, Deepa L; Van Essendelft, Dirk; Jain, Puja; Clifford, Caroline E B

    2006-06-21

    We provide evidence of low-temperature hydrogen evolution and possible hydrogen trapping in an anthracite coal derivative, formed via reactive ball milling with cyclohexene. No molecular hydrogen is added to the process. Raman-active molecular hydrogen vibrations are apparent in samples at atmospheric conditions (300 K, 1 bar) for samples prepared 1 year previously and stored in ambient air. Hydrogen evolves slowly at room temperature and is accelerated upon sample heating, with a first increase in hydrogen evolution occurring at approximately 60 degrees C. Subsequent chemical modification leads to the observation of crystalline carbons, including nanocrystalline diamond surrounded by graphene ribbons, other sp2-sp3 transition regions, purely graphitic regions, and a previously unidentified crystalline carbon form surrounded by amorphous carbon. The combined evidence for hydrogen trapping and carbon crystallization suggests hydrogen-induced crystallization of the amorphous carbon materials, as metastable hydrogenated carbons formed via the high-energy milling process rearrange into more thermodynamically stable carbon forms and molecular hydrogen.

  10. Control of precursor maturation and disposal is an early regulative mechanism in the normal insulin production of pancreatic β-cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Wang

    Full Text Available The essential folding and maturation process of proinsulin in β-cells is largely uncharacterized. To analyze this process, we improved approaches to immunoblotting, metabolic labeling, and data analysis used to determine the proportion of monomers and non-monomers and changes in composition of proinsulin in cells. We found the natural occurrence of a large proportion of proinsulin in various non-monomer states, i.e., aggregates, in normal mouse and human β-cells and a striking increase in the proportion of proinsulin non-monomers in Ins2(+/Akita mice in response to a mutation (C96Y in the insulin 2 (Ins2 gene. Proinsulin emerges in monomer and abundant dual-fate non-monomer states during nascent protein synthesis and shows heavy and preferential ATP/redox-sensitive disposal among secretory proteins during early post-translational processes. These findings support the preservation of proinsulin's aggregation-prone nature and low relative folding rate that permits the plentiful production of non-monomer forms with incomplete folding. Thus, in normal mouse/human β-cells, proinsulin's integrated maturation and degradation processes maintain a balance of natively and non-natively folded states, i.e., proinsulin homeostasis (PIHO. Further analysis discovered the high susceptibility of PIHO to cellular energy and calcium changes, endoplasmic reticulum (ER and reductive/oxidative stress, and insults by thiol reagent and cytokine. These results expose a direct correlation between various extra-/intracellular influences and (atypical integrations of proinsulin maturation and disposal processes. Overall, our findings demonstrated that the control of precursor maturation and disposal acts as an early regulative mechanism in normal insulin production, and its disorder is crucially linked to β-cell failure and diabetes pathogenesis.

  11. Simultaneous Screening of Glutathione and Cyanide Adducts Using Precursor Ion and Neutral Loss Scans-Dependent Product Ion Spectral Acquisition and Data Mining Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jian, Wenying; Liu, Hua-Fen; Zhao, Weiping; Jones, Elliott; Zhu, Mingshe

    2012-05-01

    Drugs can be metabolically activated to soft and hard electrophiles, which are readily trapped by glutathione (GSH) and cyanide (CN), respectively. These adducts are often detected and structurally characterized using separate tandem mass spectrometry methods. We describe a new method for simultaneous screening of GSH and CN adducts using precursor ion (PI) and neutral loss (NL) scans-dependent product ion spectral acquisition and data mining tools on an triple quadrupole linear ion trap mass spectrometry. GSH, potassium cyanide, and their stable isotope labeled analogues were incubated with liver microsomes and a test compound. Negative PI scan of m/z 272 for detection of GSH adducts and positive NL scans of 27 and 29 Da for detection of CN adducts were conducted as survey scans to trigger acquisition of enhanced resolution (ER) spectrum and subsequent enhanced product ion (EPI) spectrum. Post-acquisition data mining of EPI data set using NL filters of 129 and 27 Da was then performed to reveal the GSH adducts and CN adducts, respectively. Isotope patterns and EPI spectra of the detected adducts were utilized for identification of their molecular weights and structures. The effectiveness of this method was evaluated by analyzing reactive metabolites of nefazodone formed from rat liver microsomes. In addition to known GSH- and CN-trapped reactive metabolites, several new CN adducts of nefazodone were identified. The results suggested that current approach is highly effective in the analysis of both soft and hard reactive metabolites and can be used as a high-throughput method in drug discovery.

  12. Caribbean-wide decline in carbonate production threatens coral reef growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Chris T; Murphy, Gary N; Kench, Paul S; Smithers, Scott G; Edinger, Evan N; Steneck, Robert S; Mumby, Peter J

    2013-01-01

    Global-scale deteriorations in coral reef health have caused major shifts in species composition. One projected consequence is a lowering of reef carbonate production rates, potentially impairing reef growth, compromising ecosystem functionality and ultimately leading to net reef erosion. Here, using measures of gross and net carbonate production and erosion from 19 Caribbean reefs, we show that contemporary carbonate production rates are now substantially below historical (mid- to late-Holocene) values. On average, current production rates are reduced by at least 50%, and 37% of surveyed sites were net erosional. Calculated accretion rates (mm year(-1)) for shallow fore-reef habitats are also close to an order of magnitude lower than Holocene averages. A live coral cover threshold of ~10% appears critical to maintaining positive production states. Below this ecological threshold carbonate budgets typically become net negative and threaten reef accretion. Collectively, these data suggest that recent ecological declines are now suppressing Caribbean reef growth potential.

  13. Synthetic Strategies toward Natural Products Containing Contiguous Stereogenic Quaternary Carbon Atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Büschleb, Martin; Dorich, Stéphane; Hanessian, Stephen; Tao, Daniel; Schenthal, Kyle B; Overman, Larry E

    2016-03-18

    Strategies for the total synthesis of complex natural products that contain two or more contiguous stereogenic quaternary carbon atoms in their intricate structures are reviewed with 12 representative examples. Emphasis has been put on methods to create quaternary carbon stereocenters, including syntheses of the same natural product by different groups, thereby showcasing the diversity of thought and individual creativity. A compendium of selected natural products containing two or more contiguous stereogenic quaternary carbon atoms and key reactions in their total or partial syntheses is provided in the Supporting Information.

  14. Carbon emissions from U.S. ethylene production under climate change policies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruth, Matthias; Amato, Anthony D; Davidsdottir, Brynhildur

    2002-01-15

    This paper presents the results from a dynamic computer model of U.S. ethylene production, designed to explore implications of alternative climate change policies for the industry's energy use and carbon emissions profiles. The model applies to the aggregate ethylene industry but distinguishes its main cracker types, fuels used as feedstocks and for process energy, as well as the industry's capital vintage structure and vintage-specific efficiencies. Results indicate that policies which increase the cost of carbon of process energy-such as carbon taxes or carbon permit systems-are relatively blunt instruments for cutting carbon emissions from ethylene production. In contrast, policies directly affecting the relative efficiencies of new to old capital-such as R&D stimuli or accelerated depreciation schedules-may be more effective in leveraging the industry's potential for carbon emissions reductions.

  15. Natural Gas Based Electricity Production and Low Carbon Technology Options

    Science.gov (United States)

    Concerns regarding air quality, global climate change, and the national energy security impacts of the intensive use of fossil fuels and their environmental impacts in the power generation sector have raised interest in alternative low carbon electricity generation technology and...

  16. Process Reengineering of Cold Chain Logistics of Agricultural Products Based on Low-carbon Economy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    Through the process analysis of cold chain logistics of agricultural products,we find that cold chain logistics of agricultural products contradict the development model of low-carbon economy to some extent.We apply the development idea of low-carbon economy,introduce the thirdparty logistics companies,establish distribution center of cold chain logistics of agricultural products,and strengthen information sharing,to reengineer the process of cold chain logistics of agricultural products in China.The results show that applying low-carbon economy to process reengineering of cold chain logistics of agricultural products,has advantages of increasing added value of products,promoting scale merit and abating lag,plays a role in promoting emission reduction,high efficiency and environmental protection in the process of cold chain logistics of agricultural products in China.

  17. Hydrogen production using thermocatalytic decomposition of methane on Ni30/activated carbon and Ni30/carbon black.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srilatha, K; Viditha, V; Srinivasulu, D; Ramakrishna, S U B; Himabindu, V

    2016-05-01

    Hydrogen is an energy carrier of the future need. It could be produced from different sources and used for power generation or as a transport fuel which mainly in association with fuel cells. The primary challenge for hydrogen production is reducing the cost of production technologies to make the resulting hydrogen cost competitive with conventional fuels. Thermocatalytic decomposition (TCD) of methane is one of the most advantageous processes, which will meet the future demand, hence an attractive route for COx free environment. The present study deals with the production of hydrogen with 30 wt% of Ni impregnated in commercially available activated carbon and carbon black catalysts (samples coded as Ni30/AC and Ni30/CB, respectively). These combined catalysts were not attempted by previous studies. Pure form of hydrogen is produced at 850 °C and volume hourly space velocity (VHSV) of 1.62 L/h g on the activity of both the catalysts. The analysis (X-ray diffraction (XRD)) of the catalysts reveals moderately crystalline peaks of Ni, which might be responsible for the increase in catalytic life along with formation of carbon fibers. The activity of carbon black is sustainable for a longer time compared to that of activated carbon which has been confirmed by life time studies (850 °C and 54 sccm of methane).

  18. Production of single-walled carbon nanotube grids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauge, Robert H; Xu, Ya-Qiong; Pheasant, Sean

    2013-12-03

    A method of forming a nanotube grid includes placing a plurality of catalyst nanoparticles on a grid framework, contacting the catalyst nanoparticles with a gas mixture that includes hydrogen and a carbon source in a reaction chamber, forming an activated gas from the gas mixture, heating the grid framework and activated gas, and controlling a growth time to generate a single-wall carbon nanotube array radially about the grid framework. A filter membrane may be produced by this method.

  19. Continuous Production of Carbon Nanotubes by Using Moving Bed Reactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    High-quality carbon nanotubes were continuously produced by using moving bed reactor. The studies of scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy reveal their homogeneity both in inner (~ 10 nm) and outer diameter (20-40 nm) of the tubes. The studies of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and the oxidation of carbon nanotubes in air demonstrate that the tubes have good graphitic degree.

  20. 77 FR 24221 - Corrosion-Resistant Carbon Steel Flat Products From Germany and Korea; Notice of Commission...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-23

    ... COMMISSION Corrosion-Resistant Carbon Steel Flat Products From Germany and Korea; Notice of Commission... countervailing duty order on corrosion-resistant carbon steel flat products from Korea and the antidumping duty orders on corrosion- resistant carbon steel flat products from Germany and Korea would be likely to...

  1. 77 FR 31877 - Corrosion-Resistant Carbon Steel Flat Products From Germany and Korea; Scheduling of Full Five...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-30

    ... COMMISSION Corrosion-Resistant Carbon Steel Flat Products From Germany and Korea; Scheduling of Full Five... duty order on corrosion-resistant carbon steel flat products from Korea and the antidumping duty orders on corrosion- resistant carbon steel flat products from Germany and Korea would be likely to lead...

  2. 77 FR 301 - Corrosion-Resistant Carbon Steel Flat Products From Germany and Korea: Institution of Five-Year...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-04

    ... COMMISSION Corrosion-Resistant Carbon Steel Flat Products From Germany and Korea: Institution of Five-Year Reviews Concerning the Countervailing Duty Order on Corrosion-Resistant Carbon Steel Flat Products From Korea and the Antidumping Duty Orders on Corrosion-Resistant Carbon Steel Flat Products From Germany...

  3. 78 FR 55057 - Corrosion-Resistant Carbon Steel Flat Products from the Republic of Korea: Preliminary Results of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-09

    ... International Trade Administration Corrosion-Resistant Carbon Steel Flat Products from the Republic of Korea... antidumping duty order on corrosion-resistant carbon steel flat products (CORE) from the Republic of Korea.... See Corrosion-Resistant Carbon Steel Flat Products from Germany and the Republic of Korea:...

  4. 76 FR 3613 - Corrosion-Resistant Carbon Steel Flat Products From the Republic of Korea: Final Results of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-20

    ... International Trade Administration Corrosion-Resistant Carbon Steel Flat Products From the Republic of Korea... review of the countervailing duty (CVD) order on corrosion-resistant carbon steel flat products (CORE..., 2008. See Corrosion-Resistant Carbon Steel Flat Products from the Republic of Korea:...

  5. 77 FR 72827 - Corrosion-Resistant Carbon Steel Flat Products From Germany and the Republic of Korea: Final...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-06

    ... International Trade Administration Corrosion-Resistant Carbon Steel Flat Products From Germany and the Republic... on certain corrosion- resistant carbon steel flat products (``CORE'') from Germany and the Republic... Reviews'' section of this notice. \\1\\ Corrosion-Resistant Carbon Steel Flat Products From Germany and...

  6. Metabolic engineering of carbon and redox flow in the production of small organic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakker, Chandresh; Martínez, Irene; Li, Wei; San, Ka-Yiu; Bennett, George N

    2015-03-01

    The review describes efforts toward metabolic engineering of production of organic acids. One aspect of the strategy involves the generation of an appropriate amount and type of reduced cofactor needed for the designed pathway. The ability to capture reducing power in the proper form, NADH or NADPH for the biosynthetic reactions leading to the organic acid, requires specific attention in designing the host and also depends on the feedstock used and cell energetic requirements for efficient metabolism during production. Recent work on the formation and commercial uses of a number of small mono- and diacids is discussed with redox differences, major biosynthetic precursors and engineering strategies outlined. Specific attention is given to those acids that are used in balancing cell redox or providing reduction equivalents for the cell, such as formate, which can be used in conjunction with metabolic engineering of other products to improve yields. Since a number of widely studied acids derived from oxaloacetate as an important precursor, several of these acids are covered with the general strategies and particular components summarized, including succinate, fumarate and malate. Since malate and fumarate are less reduced than succinate, the availability of reduction equivalents and level of aerobiosis are important parameters in optimizing production of these compounds in various hosts. Several other more oxidized acids are also discussed as in some cases, they may be desired products or their formation is minimized to afford higher yields of more reduced products. The placement and connections among acids in the typical central metabolic network are presented along with the use of a number of specific non-native enzymes to enhance routes to high production, where available alternative pathways and strategies are discussed. While many organic acids are derived from a few precursors within central metabolism, each organic acid has its own special requirements for high

  7. The Environmental Impact of Industrial Bamboo Products: Life-cycle Assessment and Carbon Sequestration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vogtlander, J.G.; Van der Lugt, P.

    2014-01-01

    This report gives a Life-Cycle Assessment (LCA) and carbon footprint analysis on a selection of industrial bamboo products. The LCA is made for cradle-to-gate, plus the end-of-life stages of the bamboo products. For end-of-life it is assumed that 90% of the bamboo products are incinerated in an elec

  8. Bioenergy by-products as soil amendments? Implications for carbon sequestration and greenhuise gas emissions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cayuela, M.L.; Oenema, O.; Kuikman, P.J.; Bakker, R.R.; Groenigen, van J.W.

    2010-01-01

    An important but little understood aspect of bioenergy production is its overall impact on soil carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) cycling. Increased energy production from biomass will inevitably lead to higher input of its by-products to the soil as amendments or fertilizers. However, it is still unclear

  9. Mangrove production and carbon sinks: a revision of global budget estimates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouillon, S.; Borges, A.V.; Castañeda-Moya, E.; Diele, K.; Dittmar, T.; Duke, N.C.; Kristensen, E.; Lee, S.; Marchand, C.; Middelburg, J.J.; Rivera-Monroy, V.H.; Smith III, T.; Twilley, R.R.

    2008-01-01

    Mangrove forests are highly productive but globally threatened coastal ecosystems, whose role in the carbon budget of the coastal zone has long been debated. Here we provide a comprehensive synthesis of the available data on carbon fluxes in mangrove ecosystems. A reassessment of global mangrove pri

  10. Mangrove production and carbon sinks: A revision of global budget estimates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouillon, S.; Borges, A.V.; Castaneda-Moya, E.; Diele, K.; Dittmar, T.; Duke, N.C.; Kristensen, E.; Lee, S.-Y.; Marchand, C.; Middelburg, J.J.; Rivera-Monroy, V. H.; Smith, T. J.; Twilley, R.R.

    2008-01-01

    Mangrove forests are highly productive but globally threatened coastal ecosystems, whose role in the carbon budget of the coastal zone has long been debated. Here we provide a comprehensive synthesis of the available data on carbon fluxes in mangrove ecosystems. A reassessment of global mangrove primary production from the literature results in a conservative estimate of ???-218 ?? 72 Tg C a-1. When using the best available estimates of various carbon sinks (organic carbon export, sediment burial, and mineralization), it appears that >50% of the carbon fixed by mangrove vegetation is unaccounted for. This unaccounted carbon sink is conservatively estimated at ??? 112 ?? 85 Tg C a-1, equivalent in magnitude to ??? 30-40% of the global riverine organic carbon input to the coastal zone. Our analysis suggests that mineralization is severely underestimated, and that the majority of carbon export from mangroves to adjacent waters occurs as dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC). CO2 efflux from sediments and creek waters and tidal export of DIC appear to be the major sinks. These processes are quantitatively comparable in magnitude to the unaccounted carbon sink in current budgets, but are not yet adequately constrained with the limited published data available so far. Copyright 2008 by the American Geophysical Union.

  11. Liquefaction of oak tree bark with different biomass/phenol mass ratios and utilizing bio-based polyols for carbon foam production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozbay, N.; Yargic, A. S.

    2017-02-01

    Carbon foam is sponge like carbonaceous material with low density, high conductivity and high strength; which is used in various applications such as catalyst supports, membrane separations, high thermally conductive heat sinks, energy absorption materials, high temperature thermal insulation. Coal or fossil oils are conventionally used to fabricate pitch, phenolic resin and polyurethane as carbon foam precursor. Biomass liquefaction is a developing technique to convert biomass resources into the industrial chemicals. In this study, oak tree bark was liquefied under mild conditions with different mass ratio of biomass/phenol; and the liquefaction product was used as polyol to produce porous resin foams. Obtained resin foams were carbonized at 400 °C, and then activated at 800 °C under nitrogen atmosphere. Structure evaluation of resin foams, carbonized foams and activated carbon foams from liquefied oak tree bark was investigated by using elemental analysis, x-ray diffraction, nitrogen adsorption/desorption isotherms, scanning electron microscopy, bulk density and compressive strength tests.

  12. GHG emissions of green coffee production : toward a standard methodology for carbon footprinting : report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sevenster, M.; Verhagen, A.

    2010-01-01

    In this project, the scope for product specific rules for carbon footprinting of (green) coffee is investigated and a proposal is drafted for further work toward actual definition and implementation of such a standard.

  13. Production of activated carbons from waste tire--process design and economical analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Danny C K; Mui, Edward L K; Lau, Ken S T; McKay, Gordon

    2004-01-01

    The process design and economic analysis of process plants to produce activated carbons from waste tires and coal have been performed. The potential range of products from each process has been considered, namely for waste tire--pyro-gas, active carbon, carbon black and pyro-oil; for coal--pyro-gas and active carbons. Sensitivity analyses have been carried out on the main process factors; these are product price, production capacity, total production cost, capital investment and the tipping fee. Net present values for the two plants at various discount factors have been determined and the internal rates of return have been determined as 27.4% and 18.9% for the waste tire plant and the coal plant, respectively.

  14. Ozone precursors have regionally variable effect on radiative forcing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Colin

    2013-02-01

    When released near the surface, carbon monoxide, assorted nitrogen oxides (NOx ), and nonmethane hydrocarbons (NMHC) contribute to the production of ozone, a key component of photochemical smog, which is known to have serious deleterious effects on human health. However, when ozone gets lifted into the troposphere, it is a greenhouse gas. That these ozone precursors have such a dual-pronged effect—affecting both human health and the global radiation budget—suggests that mitigating their emissions could be a potential method to both improve air quality and dampen the rate of anthropogenic climate change.

  15. Carbonate Production by Benthic Communities on Shallow Coralgal Reefs of Abrolhos Bank, Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Reis, Vanessa Moura; Karez, Cláudia Santiago; Mariath, Rodrigo; de Moraes, Fernando Coreixas; de Carvalho, Rodrigo Tomazetto; Brasileiro, Poliana Silva; Bahia, Ricardo da Gama; Lotufo, Tito Monteiro da Cruz; Ramalho, Laís Vieira; de Moura, Rodrigo Leão; Francini-Filho, Ronaldo Bastos; Pereira-Filho, Guilherme Henrique; Thompson, Fabiano Lopes; Bastos, Alex Cardoso; Salgado, Leonardo Tavares; Amado-Filho, Gilberto Menezes

    2016-01-01

    The abundance of reef builders, non-builders and the calcium carbonate produced by communities established in Calcification Accretion Units (CAUs) were determined in three Abrolhos Bank shallow reefs during the period from 2012 to 2014. In addition, the seawater temperature, the irradiance, and the amount and composition of the sediments were determined. The inner and outer reef arcs were compared. CAUs located on the inner reef shelf were under the influence of terrigenous sediments. On the outer reefs, the sediments were composed primarily of marine biogenic carbonates. The mean carbonate production in shallow reefs of Abrolhos was 579 ± 98 g m-2 y-1. The builder community was dominated by crustose coralline algae, while the non-builder community was dominated by turf. A marine heat wave was detected during the summer of 2013–2014, and the number of consecutive days with a temperature above or below the summer mean was positively correlated with the turf cover increase. The mean carbonate production of the shallow reefs of Abrolhos Bank was greater than the estimated carbonate production measured for artificial structures on several other shallow reefs of the world. The calcimass was higher than the non-calcareous mass, suggesting that the Abrolhos reefs are still in a positive carbonate production balance. Given that marine heat waves produce an increase of turf cover on the shallow reefs of the Abrolhos, a decrease in the cover represented by reef builders and shifting carbonate production are expected in the near future. PMID:27119151

  16. Estimate of carbonate production by scleractinian corals at Luhuitou fringing reef, Sanya, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI Qi; ZHAO MeiXia; ZHANG QiaoMin; YU KeFu; CHEN TianRan; LI Shu; WANG HanKui

    2009-01-01

    Carbonate production by scleractinian corals not only maintains coral reef growth, but also represents an important source of atmospheric carbon dioxide. In this paper the carbonate production by scler-actinian corals at Luhuitou fringing reef, Sanya, Hainan Island, China, is investigated with an ecological census-based method. Averaged carbonate production is 1.16±0.55 kg·m-2·a-1 and 3.52±1.32 kg·m-2·a-1 on the reef flat and reef slope, respectively, depending on the composition and distribution of corals and the intergeneric difference of skeletal growth. In response to the rapidly increasing hu-man impacts, coral carbonate production has decreased by 80%-89% at this fringing reef since the 1960s; as a result, the reef accretion rate declined and became lower than the rate of sea level rise. Further development of the Luhuitou fringing reef will switch significantly from lateral extension sea-wards to vertical growth, reflecting a response of coral reef bio-geomorphic process to strong human impacts under the background of global sea level rise. In addition, decrease in coral carbonate pro-duction reduced CO2 release from this fringing reef. In the future, it is likely that the role played by coral reefs, especially of fringing reefs, in the ocean and even in the global carbon cycle will be modified or weakened by the increasing human impacts.

  17. Carbonate Production by Benthic Communities on Shallow Coralgal Reefs of Abrolhos Bank, Brazil.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Moura Dos Reis

    Full Text Available The abundance of reef builders, non-builders and the calcium carbonate produced by communities established in Calcification Accretion Units (CAUs were determined in three Abrolhos Bank shallow reefs during the period from 2012 to 2014. In addition, the seawater temperature, the irradiance, and the amount and composition of the sediments were determined. The inner and outer reef arcs were compared. CAUs located on the inner reef shelf were under the influence of terrigenous sediments. On the outer reefs, the sediments were composed primarily of marine biogenic carbonates. The mean carbonate production in shallow reefs of Abrolhos was 579 ± 98 g m-2 y-1. The builder community was dominated by crustose coralline algae, while the non-builder community was dominated by turf. A marine heat wave was detected during the summer of 2013-2014, and the number of consecutive days with a temperature above or below the summer mean was positively correlated with the turf cover increase. The mean carbonate production of the shallow reefs of Abrolhos Bank was greater than the estimated carbonate production measured for artificial structures on several other shallow reefs of the world. The calcimass was higher than the non-calcareous mass, suggesting that the Abrolhos reefs are still in a positive carbonate production balance. Given that marine heat waves produce an increase of turf cover on the shallow reefs of the Abrolhos, a decrease in the cover represented by reef builders and shifting carbonate production are expected in the near future.

  18. Operation Mechanism of Farmers’ Professional Cooperatives from the Point of Low-Carbon Agricultural Products

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    We firstly take a look at internal logic of cluster development of low-carbon agricultural products. In combination with operation features of farmers’ professional cooperatives and actual requirements for cluster development of low-carbon agricultural products; we elaborate establishing benefit allocation mechanism, bearing education and training functions, forming low-carbon value, building low-carbon identification system, as well as realizing low-carbon value. According to these situati...

  19. Efeito da adição de precursores na produção de alcaloide anticancerígeno usando a técnica de planejamento experimental Effect of the precursor addition on the anticancer alkaloid production using experimental design methodology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oselys Rodriguez Justo

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of precursors on the anticancer alkaloid production by submerged fermentation using M. anisopliae 3935 was studied, according to complete experimental design 2² with three central points. The results showed that lysine was the most important variable, however, when both lysine and glucose were added to the fermentation medium, the alkaloid production reached, approximately, 17 mg L-1 after 120 hours of fermentation. Then, the scale-up of the process was carried out and these results were confirmed. Finally, 35 mg L-1 of alkaloid at 192 h were attained after increment of added aminoacid lysine.

  20. Methane Production and Carbon Capture by Hydrate Swapping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mu, Liang; von Solms, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    gas molecules in the structural lattice. In this work, we quantitatively investigate the swapping behavior from injection of pure carbon dioxide and the (CO2 + N2) binary gas mixture through artificial hydrate-bearing sandstone samples by use of a core-flooding experimental apparatus. A total of 13...... of pure carbon dioxide in swapping methane from its hydrate phase; the methane recovery efficiency in brine water systems is enhanced relative to pure water systems. The replenishment of a fresh (CO2 + N2) gas mixture into the vapor phase can be considered as an efficient extraction method because 46...... in small hydrate cages, as long as the equilibrium formation pressure of (CO2 + N2) binary gas hydrate is below that of methane hydrate, even though adding nitrogen to carbon dioxide reduces the thermodynamic driving force for the formation of a new hydrate. When other conditions are similar, the methane...

  1. Comparing Carbon and Water Footprints for Beef Cattle Production in Southern Australia

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Stand-alone environmental indicators based on life cycle assessment (LCA), such as the carbon footprint and water footprint, are becoming increasingly popular as a means of directing sustainable production and consumption. However, individually, these metrics violate the principle of LCA known as comprehensiveness and do not necessarily provide an indication of overall environmental impact. In this study, the carbon footprints for six diverse beef cattle production systems in southern Austral...

  2. Optimizing root system architecture in biofuel crops for sustainable energy production and soil carbon sequestration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    To, Jennifer Pc; Zhu, Jinming; Benfey, Philip N; Elich, Tedd

    2010-09-08

    Root system architecture (RSA) describes the dynamic spatial configuration of different types and ages of roots in a plant, which allows adaptation to different environments. Modifications in RSA enhance agronomic traits in crops and have been implicated in soil organic carbon content. Together, these fundamental properties of RSA contribute to the net carbon balance and overall sustainability of biofuels. In this article, we will review recent data supporting carbon sequestration by biofuel crops, highlight current progress in studying RSA, and discuss future opportunities for optimizing RSA for biofuel production and soil carbon sequestration.

  3. Sustainability Concept in Decision-Making: Carbon Tax Consideration for Joint Product Mix Decision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Hsien Tsai

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Carbon emissions are receiving greater scrutiny in many countries due to international forces to reduce anthropogenic global climate change. Carbon taxation is one of the most common carbon emission regulation policies, and companies must incorporate it into their production and pricing decisions. Activity-based costing (ABC and the theory of constraints (TOC have been applied to solve product mix problems; however, a challenging aspect of the product mix problem involves evaluating joint manufactured products, while reducing carbon emissions and environmental pollution to fulfill social responsibility. The aim of this paper is to apply ABC and TOC to analyze green product mix decision-making for joint products using a mathematical programming model and the joint production data of pharmaceutical industry companies for the processing of active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs in drugs for medical use. This paper illustrates that the time-driven ABC model leads to optimal joint product mix decisions and performs sensitivity analysis to study how the optimal solution will change with the carbon tax. Our findings provide insight into ‘sustainability decisions’ and are beneficial in terms of environmental management in a competitive pharmaceutical industry.

  4. The effect of carbon coating thickness on the capacity of LiFePO{sub 4}/C composite cathodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Yung-Da; Fey, George Ting-Kuo [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, National Central University, Chung-Li 32054 (China); Kao, Hsien-Ming [Department of Chemistry, National Central University, Chung-Li 32054 (China)

    2009-04-01

    Two types of carbon source and precursor mixing pellets were employed simultaneously to prepare the LiFePO{sub 4}/C composite materials: Type I using the LiFePO{sub 4} precursor with 20 wt.% polystyrene (PS) as a primary carbon source, and Type II using the LiFePO{sub 4} precursor with 50 wt.% malonic acid as a secondary carbon vapor source. During final sintering, a Type I pellet was placed down-stream and Type II precursor pellet(s) was(were) placed upstream next to a Type I precursor pellet in a quartz-tube furnace. The carbon-coated product of the sintered Type I precursor pellet was obtained by using both PS and malonic acid as carbon sources. When two Type II pellets were used as a carbon vapor source (defined as Product-2), a more uniform film between 4 and 8 nm was formed, as shown in the TEM images. In the absence of a secondary carbon source (defined as Product-0), the discharge capacity of Product-0 was 137 mAh g{sup -1} with 100 cycles at a 0.2C-rate, but Product-2 demonstrated a high capacity of 151 mAh g{sup -1} with 400 cycles. Our results indicate that electrochemical properties of LiFePO{sub 4} are correlated to the amount of carbon and its coating thickness and uniformity. (author)

  5. Empirical Research on China’s Carbon Productivity Decomposition Model Based on Multi-Dimensional Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianchang Lu

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Based on the international community’s analysis of the present CO2 emissions situation, a Log Mean Divisia Index (LMDI decomposition model is proposed in this paper, aiming to reflect the decomposition of carbon productivity. The model is designed by analyzing the factors that affect carbon productivity. China’s contribution to carbon productivity is analyzed from the dimensions of influencing factors, regional structure and industrial structure. It comes to the conclusions that: (a economic output, the provincial carbon productivity and energy structure are the most influential factors, which are consistent with China’s current actual policy; (b the distribution patterns of economic output, carbon productivity and energy structure in different regions have nothing to do with the Chinese traditional sense of the regional economic development patterns; (c considering the regional protectionism, regional actual situation need to be considered at the same time; (d in the study of the industrial structure, the contribution value of industry is the most prominent factor for China’s carbon productivity, while the industrial restructuring has not been done well enough.

  6. Methane and carbon dioxide ratio in excreted air for quantification of the methane production from ruminants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Jørgen; Bjerg, Bjarne Schmidt; Hvelplund, Torben

    2010-01-01

    This technical note presents a simple, fast, reliable and cheap method to estimate the methane (CH4) production from animals by using the CH4 and carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations in air near the animals combined with an estimation of the total CO2 production from information on intake of metab......This technical note presents a simple, fast, reliable and cheap method to estimate the methane (CH4) production from animals by using the CH4 and carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations in air near the animals combined with an estimation of the total CO2 production from information on intake...

  7. Sustainable Production of Cannabinoids with Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Technologies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Perrotin-Brunel, H.

    2011-01-01

    This thesis concerns the production of natural compounds from plant material for pharmaceutical and food applications. It describes the production (extraction and isolation) of cannabinoids, the active components present in cannabis. Many cannabinoids have medicinal properties but not all cannabinoi

  8. Brief Analysis on the Production & Operation Situation of Chinese Carbon Black Industry in the First Half Year

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    At present, there are about 120 carbon black manufacturing enterprises in China with the production capacity of 3.41 million tons, accounting for 78% of the total production capacity of the country, in which there are 31 carbon black enterprises with the production capacity of over 50,000 tons. Compared with the international carbon black industry, our carbon black industry has a low intensification.

  9. Precursor of advanced glycation end products mediates ER-stress-induced caspase-3 activation of human dermal fibroblasts through NAD(PH oxidase 4.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danielle T Loughlin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The precursor for advanced glycation end products, 3-deoxyglucosone (3DG is highly upregulated in skin explants of diabetic cutaneous wounds, and has been shown to negatively impact dermal fibroblasts, which are crucial in wound remodeling. 3DG induces apoptosis however; the mechanisms involved in the apoptotic action of 3DG in the pathogenesis of diabetic chronic wounds are poorly understood. Therefore, we sought to delineate novel mechanisms involved with the 3DG-collagen induced apoptosis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using human dermal fibroblasts, we demonstrated that 3DG-modified collagen induces oxidative stress and caspase-3 activation. Oxidative stress was found to be dependent on the upregulation of NAD(PH oxidase 4 (Nox4, a reactive oxygen species (ROS Nox homologue, triggering endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress, as assessed by the ER stress-induced apoptosis marker Growth Arrest and DNA Damage-inducible gene 153 (GADD153. We demonstrated that 3DG-collagen activated GADD153 via phosphorylation of p38 mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK, and this was dependent on upstream ROS. Inhibition of ROS and/or p38 MAPK abrogated 3DG-collagen induced caspase-3 activation. Our investigations also demonstrated that 3DG-collagen-induced caspase-3 activation did not signal through the canonical receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE but through integrin alpha1beta1. To further verify the role of integrins, neutralization of integrins alpha1beta1 prevented 3DG-collagen-induced upregulation of ROS, GADD153, and caspase-3 activation; suggesting that 3DG-collagen signaling to the fibroblast is dependent on integrins alpha1beta1. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Taken together, these findings demonstrate for the first time that a RAGE independent mechanism is involved in 3DG-collagen-induced apoptosis. Moreover, the ER stress pathway through activation of Nox4 by integrins alpha1beta1 plays a key role in 3DG-collagen-induced caspase

  10. Joint production of timber, carbon, and wildlife habitat in the Canadian boreal plains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCarney, G.R.; Adamowicz, W.L. [Alberta Univ., Edmonton, AB (Canada). Dept. of Rural Economy; Armstrong, G.W. [Alberta Univ., Edmonton, AB (Canada). Dept. of Renewable Resources

    2008-06-15

    The relationships between forest carbon management, sustained timber yield, and the maintenance of wildlife habitats in the Canadian Boreal plain region were investigated. The aim of the study was to provide an estimation of the costs and challenges faced by forest managers in Canada's Boreal mixedwood region. The study used a model that previously analyzed the joint production of timber supplies and wildlife habitats using a natural disturbance model. A carbon budget model was used to separate biomass and dead organic matter carbon pools for individual forest cover types. An extensive marginal cost analysis of the production trade-offs between timber, carbon, and wildlife habitat was conducted. Results were used to demonstrate the potential for cost thresholds in timber supply and carbon sequestration. Thresholds were linked to switch-points in multiple use and specialized land management practices. Results showed that the optimal allocation of sequestered carbon across forest cover type differed with habitat constraints versus timber and carbon management alone. Results indicated that national policy discussions concerning carbon market regulations may wish to consider the potential for thresholds in production cost. Benefits of the management approach were influenced by ecological parameters, harvest flow regulations, and financial incentives for timber supply. 54 refs., 1 tab., 7 figs.

  11. Production of carbon nanotubes by the magnetron DC sputtering method

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Antonenko, SV; Mal'tsev, SN

    2005-01-01

    Carbon films containing multiwall nanotubes were produced by the magnetron de sputtering method. A graphite disc with Y and Ni catalyst plates was used as a target. The structural and morphological properties of the films were investigated using a JEM 2000EXII transmission electron microscope. The f

  12. Carbon dioxide concentration in Mediterranean greenhouses : how much lost production?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stanghellini, C.; Incrocci, L.; Gazquez, J.C.; Dimauro, B.

    2008-01-01

    In the absence of artificial supply of carbon dioxide in the greenhouse environment, the CO2 absorbed in the process of photosynthesis must ultimately come from the external ambient through the ventilation openings. This requires that the CO2 concentration within the house must be lower than the ext

  13. Interannual stability of organic to inorganic carbon production on a coral atoll

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwiatkowski, Lester; Albright, Rebecca; Hosfelt, Jessica; Nebuchina, Yana; Ninokawa, Aaron; Rivlin, Tanya; Sesboüé, Marine; Wolfe, Kennedy; Caldeira, Ken

    2016-04-01

    Ocean acidification has the potential to adversely affect marine calcifying organisms, with substantial ocean ecosystem impacts projected over the 21st century. Characterizing the in situ sensitivity of calcifying ecosystems to natural variability in carbonate chemistry may improve our understanding of the long-term impacts of ocean acidification. We explore the potential for intensive temporal sampling to isolate the influence of carbonate chemistry on community calcification rates of a coral reef and compare the ratio of organic to inorganic carbon production to previous studies at the same location. Even with intensive temporal sampling, community calcification displays only a weak dependence on carbonate chemistry variability. However, across three years of sampling, the ratio of organic to inorganic carbon production is highly consistent. Although further work is required to quantify the spatial variability associated with such ratios, this suggests that these measurements have the potential to indicate the response of coral reefs to ongoing disturbance, ocean acidification, and climate change.

  14. A Comparison of Carbon Footprint and Production Cost of Different Pasta Products Based on Whole Egg and Pea Flour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonia Nette

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Feed and food production are inter alia reasons for high greenhouse gas emissions. Greenhouse gas emissions could be reduced by the replacement of animal components with plant components in processed food products, such as pasta. The main components currently used for pasta are semolina, and water, as well as additional egg. The hypothesis of this paper is that the substitution of whole egg with plant-based ingredients, for example from peas, in such a product might lead to reduced greenhouse gas emissions (GHG and thus a reduced carbon footprint at economically reasonable costs. The costs and carbon footprints of two pasta types, produced with egg or pea protein, are calculated. Plant protein–based pasta products proved to cause 0.57 kg CO2 equivalents (CO2eq (31% per kg pasta less greenhouse gas emissions than animal-based pasta, while the cost of production increases by 10% to 3.00 €/kg pasta.

  15. On the Importance of Noncovalent Carbon-Bonding Interactions in the Stabilization of a 1D Co(II) Polymeric Chain as a Precursor of a Novel 2D Coordination Polymer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Pampi; Konar, Saugata; Lama, Prem; Das, Kinsuk; Bauzá, Antonio; Frontera, Antonio; Mukhopadhyay, Subrata

    2016-07-14

    A new cobalt(II) coordination polymer 2 with μ1,5 dicyanamide (dca) and a bidentate ligand 3,5-dimethyl-1-(2'-pyridyl)pyrazole (pypz) is prepared in a stepwise manner using the newly synthesized one-dimensional linear Co(II) coordination polymer 1 as a precursor. The structural and thermal characterizations elucidate that the more stable complex 2 shows a two-dimensional layer structural feature. Here, Co(II) atoms with μ1,5 dicyanamido bridges are linked by the ligand pypz forming a macrocyclic chain that runs along the crystallographic 'c' axis having 'sql' (Shubnikov notation) net topology with a 4-connected uninodal node having point symbol {4(4).6(2)}. The remarkable noncovalent carbon-bonding contacts detected in the X-ray structure of compound 1 are analyzed and characterized by density functional theory calculations and the analysis of electron charge density (atoms in molecules).

  16. Organic carbon production, mineralization and preservation on the Peruvian margin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. W. Dale

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Carbon cycling in Peruvian margin sediments (11° S and 12° S was examined at 16 stations from 74 m on the inner shelf down to 1024 m water depth by means of in situ flux measurements, sedimentary geochemistry and modeling. Bottom water oxygen was below detection limit down to ca. 400 m and increased to 53 μM at the deepest station. Sediment accumulation rates and benthic dissolved inorganic carbon fluxes decreased rapidly with water depth. Particulate organic carbon (POC content was lowest on the inner shelf and at the deep oxygenated stations (< 5% and highest between 200 and 400 m in the oxygen minimum zone (OMZ, 15–20%. The organic carbon burial efficiency (CBE was unexpectedly low on the inner shelf (< 20% when compared to a global database, for reasons which may be linked to the frequent ventilation of the shelf by oceanographic anomalies. CBE at the deeper oxygenated sites was much higher than expected (max. 81%. Elsewhere, CBEs were mostly above the range expected for sediments underlying normal oxic bottom waters, with an average of 51 and 58% for the 11° S and 12° S transects, respectively. Organic carbon rain rates calculated from the benthic fluxes alluded to a very efficient mineralization of organic matter in the water column, with a Martin curve exponent typical of normal oxic waters (0.88 ± 0.09. Yet, mean POC burial rates were 2–5 times higher than the global average for continental margins. The observations at the Peruvian margin suggest that a lack of oxygen does not affect the degradation of organic matter in the water column but promotes the preservation of organic matter in marine sediments.

  17. Microbial Methane Production Associated with Carbon Steel Corrosion in a Nigerian Oil Field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mand, Jaspreet; Park, Hyung S; Okoro, Chuma; Lomans, Bart P; Smith, Seun; Chiejina, Leo; Voordouw, Gerrit

    2015-01-01

    Microbially influenced corrosion (MIC) in oil field pipeline systems can be attributed to many different types of hydrogenotrophic microorganisms including sulfate reducers, methanogens and acetogens. Samples from a low temperature oil reservoir in Nigeria were analyzed using DNA pyrotag sequencing. The microbial community compositions of these samples revealed an abundance of anaerobic methanogenic archaea. Activity of methanogens was demonstrated by incubating samples anaerobically in a basal salts medium, in the presence of carbon steel and carbon dioxide. Methane formation was measured in all enrichments and correlated with metal weight loss. Methanogens were prominently represented in pipeline solids samples, scraped from the inside of a pipeline, comprising over 85% of all pyrosequencing reads. Methane production was only witnessed when carbon steel beads were added to these pipeline solids samples, indicating that no methane was formed as a result of degradation of the oil organics present in these samples. These results were compared to those obtained for samples taken from a low temperature oil field in Canada, which had been incubated with oil, either in the presence or in the absence of carbon steel. Again, methanogens present in these samples catalyzed methane production only when carbon steel was present. Moreover, acetate production was also found in these enrichments only in the presence of carbon steel. From these studies it appears that carbon steel, not oil organics, was the predominant electron donor for acetate production and methane formation in these low temperature oil fields, indicating that the methanogens and acetogens found may contribute significantly to MIC.

  18. Microbial methane production associated with carbon steel corrosion in a Nigerian oil field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaspreet eMand

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Microbially influenced corrosion (MIC in oil field pipeline systems can be attributed to many different types of hydrogenotrophic microorganisms including sulfate reducers, methanogens and acetogens. Samples from a low temperature oil reservoir in Nigeria were analyzed using DNA pyrotag sequencing. The microbial community compositions of these samples revealed an abundance of anaerobic methanogenic archaea. Activity of methanogens was demonstrated by incubating samples anaerobically in a basal salts medium, in the presence of carbon steel and carbon dioxide. Methane formation was measured in all enrichments and correlated with metal weight loss. Methanogens were prominently represented in pipeline solids samples, scraped from the inside of a pipeline, comprising over 85% of all pyrosequencing reads. Methane production was only witnessed when carbon steel beads were added to these pipeline solids samples, indicating that no methane was formed as a result of degradation of the oil organics present in these samples. These results were compared to those obtained for samples taken from a low temperature oil field in Canada, which had been incubated with oil, either in the presence or in the absence of carbon steel. Again, methanogens present in these samples catalyzed methane production only when carbon steel was present. Moreover, acetate production was also found in these enrichments only in the presence of carbon steel. From these studies it appears that carbon steel, not oil organics, was the predominant electron donor for acetate production and methane formation in these low temperature oil fields, indicating that the methanogens and acetogens found may contribute significantly to MIC.

  19. Applying the polarity rapid assessment method to characterize nitrosamine precursors and to understand their removal by drinking water treatment processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Xiaobin; Bei, Er; Li, Shixiang; Ouyang, Yueying; Wang, Jun; Chen, Chao; Zhang, Xiaojian; Krasner, Stuart W; Suffet, I H Mel

    2015-12-15

    Some N-nitrosamines (NAs) have been identified as emerging disinfection by-products during water treatment. Thus, it is essential to understand the characteristics of the NA precursors. In this study, the polarity rapid assessment method (PRAM) and the classical resin fractionation method were studied as methods to fractionate the NA precursors during drinking water treatment. The results showed that PRAM has much higher selectivity for NA precursors than the resin approach. The normalized N-nitrosodimethylamine formation potential (NDMA FP) and N-nitrosodiethylamine (NDEA) FP of four resin fractions was at the same level as the average yield of the bulk organic matter whereas that of the cationic fraction by PRAM showed 50 times the average. Thus, the cationic fraction was shown to be the most important NDMA precursor contributor. The PRAM method also helped understand which portions of the NA precursor were removed by different water treatment processes. Activated carbon (AC) adsorption removed over 90% of the non-polar PRAM fraction (that sorbs onto the C18 solid phase extraction [SPE] cartridge) of NDMA and NDEA precursors. Bio-treatment removed 80-90% of the cationic fraction of PRAM (that is retained on the cation exchange SPE cartridge) and 40-60% of the non-cationic fractions. Ozonation removed 50-60% of the non-polar PRAM fraction of NA precursors and transformed part of them into the polar fraction. Coagulation and sedimentation had very limited removal of various PRAM fractions of NA precursors.

  20. Production of activated carbons from pyrolysis of waste tires impregnated with potassium hydroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, H; Lin, Y C; Hsu, L Y

    2000-11-01

    Activated carbons were produced from waste tires using a chemical activation method. The carbon production process consisted of potassium hydroxide (KOH) impregnation followed by pyrolysis in N2 at 600-900 degrees C for 0-2 hr. The activation method can produce carbons with a surface area (SA) and total pore volume as high as 470 m2/g and 0.57 cm3/g, respectively. The influence of different parameters during chemical activation, such as pyrolysis temperature, holding time, and KOH/tire ratio, on the carbon yield and the surface characteristics was explored, and the optimum preparation conditions were recommended. The pore volume of the resulting carbons generally increases with the extent of carbon gasified by KOH and its derivatives, whereas the SA increases with degree of gasification to reach a maximum value, and then decreases upon further gasification.

  1. Reduced carbon emission estimates from fossil fuel combustion and cement production in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhu; Guan, Dabo; Wei, Wei; Davis, Steven J; Ciais, Philippe; Bai, Jin; Peng, Shushi; Zhang, Qiang; Hubacek, Klaus; Marland, Gregg; Andres, Robert J; Crawford-Brown, Douglas; Lin, Jintai; Zhao, Hongyan; Hong, Chaopeng; Boden, Thomas A; Feng, Kuishuang; Peters, Glen P; Xi, Fengming; Liu, Junguo; Li, Yuan; Zhao, Yu; Zeng, Ning; He, Kebin

    2015-08-20

    Nearly three-quarters of the growth in global carbon emissions from the burning of fossil fuels and cement production between 2010 and 2012 occurred in China. Yet estimates of Chinese emissions remain subject to large uncertainty; inventories of China's total fossil fuel carbon emissions in 2008 differ by 0.3 gigatonnes of carbon, or 15 per cent. The primary sources of this uncertainty are conflicting estimates of energy consumption and emission factors, the latter being uncertain because of very few actual measurements representative of the mix of Chinese fuels. Here we re-evaluate China's carbon emissions using updated and harmonized energy consumption and clinker production data and two new and comprehensive sets of measured emission factors for Chinese coal. We find that total energy consumption in China was 10 per cent higher in 2000-2012 than the value reported by China's national statistics, that emission factors for Chinese coal are on average 40 per cent lower than the default values recommended by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, and that emissions from China's cement production are 45 per cent less than recent estimates. Altogether, our revised estimate of China's CO2 emissions from fossil fuel combustion and cement production is 2.49 gigatonnes of carbon (2 standard deviations = ±7.3 per cent) in 2013, which is 14 per cent lower than the emissions reported by other prominent inventories. Over the full period 2000 to 2013, our revised estimates are 2.9 gigatonnes of carbon less than previous estimates of China's cumulative carbon emissions. Our findings suggest that overestimation of China's emissions in 2000-2013 may be larger than China's estimated total forest sink in 1990-2007 (2.66 gigatonnes of carbon) or China's land carbon sink in 2000-2009 (2.6 gigatonnes of carbon).

  2. Reduced carbon emission estimates from fossil fuel combustion and cement production in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhu; Guan, Dabo; Wei, Wei; Davis, Steven J.; Ciais, Philippe; Bai, Jin; Peng, Shushi; Zhang, Qiang; Hubacek, Klaus; Marland, Gregg; Andres, Robert J.; Crawford-Brown, Douglas; Lin, Jintai; Zhao, Hongyan; Hong, Chaopeng; Boden, Thomas A.; Feng, Kuishuang; Peters, Glen P.; Xi, Fengming; Liu, Junguo; Li, Yuan; Zhao, Yu; Zeng, Ning; He, Kebin

    2015-08-01

    Nearly three-quarters of the growth in global carbon emissions from the burning of fossil fuels and cement production between 2010 and 2012 occurred in China. Yet estimates of Chinese emissions remain subject to large uncertainty; inventories of China's total fossil fuel carbon emissions in 2008 differ by 0.3 gigatonnes of carbon, or 15 per cent. The primary sources of this uncertainty are conflicting estimates of energy consumption and emission factors, the latter being uncertain because of very few actual measurements representative of the mix of Chinese fuels. Here we re-evaluate China's carbon emissions using updated and harmonized energy consumption and clinker production data and two new and comprehensive sets of measured emission factors for Chinese coal. We find that total energy consumption in China was 10 per cent higher in 2000-2012 than the value reported by China's national statistics, that emission factors for Chinese coal are on average 40 per cent lower than the default values recommended by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, and that emissions from China's cement production are 45 per cent less than recent estimates. Altogether, our revised estimate of China's CO2 emissions from fossil fuel combustion and cement production is 2.49 gigatonnes of carbon (2 standard deviations = +/-7.3 per cent) in 2013, which is 14 per cent lower than the emissions reported by other prominent inventories. Over the full period 2000 to 2013, our revised estimates are 2.9 gigatonnes of carbon less than previous estimates of China's cumulative carbon emissions. Our findings suggest that overestimation of China's emissions in 2000-2013 may be larger than China's estimated total forest sink in 1990-2007 (2.66 gigatonnes of carbon) or China's land carbon sink in 2000-2009 (2.6 gigatonnes of carbon).

  3. 78 FR 16832 - Corrosion-Resistant Carbon Steel Flat Products From Germany and the Republic of Korea: Revocation...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-19

    ... International Trade Administration Corrosion-Resistant Carbon Steel Flat Products From Germany and the Republic... corrosion-resistant carbon steel flat products (``CORE'') from Germany and the Republic of Korea (``Korea...-Year (``Sunset'') Review, 77 FR 85 (January 3, 2012). \\2\\ See Corrosion-Resistant Carbon Steel...

  4. 77 FR 44213 - Corrosion-Resistant Carbon Steel Flat Products From Germany and the Republic of Korea...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-27

    ... International Trade Administration Corrosion-Resistant Carbon Steel Flat Products From Germany and the Republic... certain corrosion-resistant carbon steel flat products (``CORE'') from Germany and the Republic of Korea..., Director, Office 3, on ``Sunset Reviews of the Antidumping Duty Orders on Corrosion-Resistant Carbon...

  5. 77 FR 13093 - Corrosion-Resistant Carbon Steel Flat Products From the Republic of Korea: Final Results of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-05

    ... International Trade Administration Corrosion-Resistant Carbon Steel Flat Products From the Republic of Korea... administrative review of the countervailing duty (``CVD'') order on corrosion-resistant carbon steel flat... Review'' below. \\1\\ See Corrosion-Resistant Carbon Steel Flat Products from the Republic of...

  6. 76 FR 77775 - Corrosion-Resistant Carbon Steel Flat Products from the Republic of Korea: Extension of Time...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-14

    ... International Trade Administration Corrosion-Resistant Carbon Steel Flat Products from the Republic of Korea... countervailing duty order on corrosion-resistant carbon steel flat products from the Republic of Korea covering the period January 1, 2009, through December 31, 2009. See Corrosion-Resistant Carbon Steel...

  7. Effect of an hyperbaric nitrogen narcotic ambience on arginine and citrulline levels, the precursor and co-product of nitric oxide, in rat striatum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallée, Nicolas; Rissoe, Jean-Jacques; Blatteau, Jean-Eric

    2011-07-05

    Previous studies performed in the laboratory have shown that nitrogen narcosis induces a decrease in striatal glutamate and dopamine levels. Although we stimulated the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor, an important glutamate receptor required for motor and locomotor activity managed by the striatum, and demonstrated that the receptor was effective when exposed to nitrogen at 3MPa, it was not possible to return the striatal glutamate level to its base values. We conclude that it was the striatopetal neurons of the glutamatergic pathways that were mainly affected in this hyperbaric syndrome, without understanding the principal reasons. Hence we sought to establish what happens in the vicinity of the plasma membrane, downstream the NMDA-Receptor, and we used the hypothesis that there could be neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) disturbances. A microdialysis study was performed in rat striatum in order to analyse levels of citrulline, the NO co-product, and arginine, the NO precursor. Those both NO metabolites were detectable with an HPLC coupled to a fluorimetric detector. Exposure to pressurized nitrogen induced a reduction in citrulline (-18.9%) and arginine (-10.4%) levels. Under the control normobaric conditions, the striatal NMDA infusion enhanced the citrulline level (+85.6%), whereas under 3 MPa of nitrogen, the same NMDA infusion did not change the citrulline level which remains equivalent to that of the baseline. The level of arginine increased (+45.7%) under normobaric conditions but a decrease occurred in pressurized nitrogen (-51.6%). Retrodialysis with Saclofen and KCl in the prefrontal cortex under normobaric conditions led to an increase in striatal levels of citrulline (+30.5%) and a decrease in arginine levels (-67.4%). There was no significant difference when nitrogen at 3MPa was added. To conclude, the synthesis of citrulline/NO is reduced in nitrogen narcosis while it seems possible to activate it artificially by infusion. We have suggested

  8. Effect of an hyperbaric nitrogen narcotic ambience on arginine and citrulline levels, the precursor and co-product of nitric oxide, in rat striatum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vallée Nicolas

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Previous studies performed in the laboratory have shown that nitrogen narcosis induces a decrease in striatal glutamate and dopamine levels. Although we stimulated the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA receptor, an important glutamate receptor required for motor and locomotor activity managed by the striatum, and demonstrated that the receptor was effective when exposed to nitrogen at 3MPa, it was not possible to return the striatal glutamate level to its base values. We conclude that it was the striatopetal neurons of the glutamatergic pathways that were mainly affected in this hyperbaric syndrome, without understanding the principal reasons. Hence we sought to establish what happens in the vicinity of the plasma membrane, downstream the NMDA-Receptor, and we used the hypothesis that there could be neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS disturbances. A microdialysis study was performed in rat striatum in order to analyse levels of citrulline, the NO co-product, and arginine, the NO precursor. Those both NO metabolites were detectable with an HPLC coupled to a fluorimetric detector. Exposure to pressurized nitrogen induced a reduction in citrulline (-18.9% and arginine (-10.4% levels. Under the control normobaric conditions, the striatal NMDA infusion enhanced the citrulline level (+85.6%, whereas under 3 MPa of nitrogen, the same NMDA infusion did not change the citrulline level which remains equivalent to that of the baseline. The level of arginine increased (+45.7% under normobaric conditions but a decrease occurred in pressurized nitrogen (-51.6%. Retrodialysis with Saclofen and KCl in the prefrontal cortex under normobaric conditions led to an increase in striatal levels of citrulline (+30.5% and a decrease in arginine levels (-67.4%. There was no significant difference when nitrogen at 3MPa was added. To conclude, the synthesis of citrulline/NO is reduced in nitrogen narcosis while it seems possible to activate it artificially by infusion

  9. Carbon Fiber from Biomass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milbrandt, Anelia [Clean Energy Manufacturing Analysis Center, Godlen, CO (United States); Booth, Samuel [Clean Energy Manufacturing Analysis Center, Godlen, CO (United States)

    2016-09-01

    Carbon fiber (CF), known also as graphite fiber, is a lightweight, strong, and flexible material used in both structural (load-bearing) and non-structural applications (e.g., thermal insulation). The high cost of precursors (the starting material used to make CF, which comes predominately from fossil sources) and manufacturing have kept CF a niche market with applications limited mostly to high-performance structural materials (e.g., aerospace). Alternative precursors to reduce CF cost and dependence on fossil sources have been investigated over the years, including biomass-derived precursors such as rayon, lignin, glycerol, and lignocellulosic sugars. The purpose of this study is to provide a comprehensive overview of CF precursors from biomass and their market potential. We examine the potential CF production from these precursors, the state of technology and applications, and the production cost (when data are available). We discuss their advantages and limitations. We also discuss the physical properties of biomass-based CF, and we compare them to those of polyacrylonitrile (PAN)-based CF. We also discuss manufacturing and end-product considerations for bio-based CF, as well as considerations for plant siting and biomass feedstock logistics, feedstock competition, and risk mitigation strategies. The main contribution of this study is that it provides detailed technical and market information about each bio-based CF precursor in one document while other studies focus on one precursor at a time or a particular topic (e.g., processing). Thus, this publication allows for a comprehensive view of the CF potential from all biomass sources and serves as a reference for both novice and experienced professionals interested in CF production from alternative sources.

  10. Economic Evaluations for the Carbon Dioxide-involved Production of High-value Chemicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ji Hyun; Lee, Dong Woog; Jang, Se Gyu; Kwak, No-Sang; Lee, In Young; Jang, Kyung Ryoung; Shim, Jae-Goo [KEPCO Research Institute, Daejon (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Jong Shin [Korea East-West Power Co. LTD, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-06-15

    Economic evaluation of the manufacturing technology of high-value chemicals through the carbonation reaction of carbon dioxide contained in the flue gas was performed, and analysis of the IRR (Internal Rate of Return) and whole profit along the production plan of the final product was conducted. Through a carbonation reaction with sodium hydroxide that is generated from electrolysis and by using carbon dioxide in the combustion gas that is generated in the power plant, it is possible to get a high value products such as sodium bicarbonate compound and also to reduce the carbon dioxide emission simultaneously. The IRR (Internal Rate of Return) and NPV (Net Present Value) methods were used for the economic evaluation of the process which could handle carbon dioxide of 100 tons per day in the period of the 20 years of plant operation. The results of economic evaluation showed that the IRR of baseline case of technology was 67.2% and the profit that obtained during the whole operation period (20 years) was 346,922 million won based on NPV value. When considering ETS due to the emissions trading enforcement that will be activated in 2015, the NPV was improved to a 6,000 million won. Based on this results, it could be concluded that this CO2 carbonation technology is an cost-effective technology option for the reduction of greenhouse gas.

  11. Pd clusters supported on amorphous, low-porosity carbon spheres for hydrogen production from formic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulushev, Dmitri A; Bulusheva, Lyubov G; Beloshapkin, Sergey; O'Connor, Thomas; Okotrub, Alexander V; Ryan, Kevin M

    2015-04-29

    Amorphous, low-porosity carbon spheres on the order of a few micrometers in size were prepared by carbonization of squalane (C30H62) in supercritical CO2 at 823 K. The spheres were characterized and used as catalysts' supports for Pd. Near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure studies of the spheres revealed sp(2) and sp(3) hybridized carbon. To activate carbons for interaction with a metal precursor, often oxidative treatment of a support is needed. We showed that boiling of the obtained spheres in 28 wt % HNO3 did not affect the shape and bulk structure of the spheres, but led to creation of a considerable amount of surface oxygen-containing functional groups and increase of the content of sp(2) hybridized carbon on the surface. This carbon was seen by scanning transmission electron microscopy in the form of waving graphene flakes. The H/C atomic ratio in the spheres was relatively high (0.4) and did not change with the HNO3 treatment. Palladium was deposited by impregnation with Pd acetate followed by reduction in H2. This gave uniform Pd clusters with a size of 2-4 nm. The Pd supported on the original C spheres showed 2-3 times higher catalytic activity in vapor phase formic acid decomposition and higher selectivity for H2 formation (98-99%) than those for the catalyst based on the HNO3 treated spheres. Using of such low-porosity spheres as a catalyst support should prevent mass transfer limitations for fast catalytic reactions.

  12. Synthesis of Two-Dimensional CoS1.097/Nitrogen-Doped Carbon Nanocomposites Using Metal-Organic Framework Nanosheets as Precursors for Supercapacitor Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Feifei; Zhao, Meiting; Yu, Yifu; Chen, Bo; Huang, Ying; Yang, Jian; Cao, Xiehong; Lu, Qipeng; Zhang, Xiao; Zhang, Zhicheng; Tan, Chaoliang; Zhang, Hua

    2016-06-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) metal-organic framework (MOF) nanosheets are attracting increasing research interest. Here, for the first time, we report the facile synthesis of 2D porphyrin paddlewheel framework-3 (PPF-3) MOF nanosheets with thickness of ca. 12-43 nm. Through the simultaneous sulfidation and carbonization of PPF-3 MOF nanosheets, we have prepared the 2D nanocomposite of CoS1.097 nanoparticles (NPs) and nitrogen-doped carbon, referred to as CoSNC, in which the CoS1.097 NPs with size of ca. 10 nm are embedded in the nitrogen-doped carbon matrix. As a proof-of-concept application, the obtained 2D CoSNC nanocomposite is used as an electrode material for a supercapacitor, which exhibits a specific capacitance of 360.1 F g(-1) at a current density of 1.5 A g(-1). Moreover, the composite electrode also shows high rate capability. Its specific capacitance delivered at a current density of 30.0 A g(-1) retains 56.8% of the value at 1.5 A g(-1).

  13. Life Cycle Assessment as a Tool to Enhance the Environmental Performanceof Carbon Nanotube Products: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    The importance of evaluating the environmental performance of emerging carbon nanotube (CNT) products from a life cycle perspective is emphasized in this work. Design, development and deployment of CNT products offer many potential benefits to society, but not without negative im...

  14. Occupational Exposure to Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes During Commercial Production Synthesis and Handling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuijpers, Eelco; Bekker, Cindy; Fransman, Wouter; Brouwer, Derk; Tromp, Peter; Vlaanderen, Jelle; Godderis, Lode; Hoet, Peter; Lan, Qing; Silverman, Debra; Vermeulen, Roel; Pronk, Anjoeka

    2016-01-01

    The world-wide production of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) has increased substantially in the last decade, leading to occupational exposures. There is a paucity of exposure data of workers involved in the commercial production of CNTs. The goals of this study were to assess personal exposure to multi-wall

  15. Natural carbon isotopes used to study methane consumption and production in soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ambus, Per; Andersen, Bertel Lohmann; Kemner, Marianne;

    2002-01-01

    Changes in the isotopic composition of carbon can be used to reveal simultaneous occurrence of methane production and oxidation in soil. The method is conducted in laboratory jar experiments as well as in the field by using flux chambers. Simultaneous occurrence of production and oxidation...

  16. Carbon-10: Example of cyclotron production of positron emitters as an open research field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alves, F.; Lima, J.J.P.; Nickles, R.J.

    2007-01-01

    This paper supports the thesis that significant improvement of PET output response to clinical questions can be achieved by innovation in radionuclide production. Moreover, that development can be performed with the resources available at a clinical centre. Carbon-10 production parameters studies...

  17. Improving farming practices reduces the carbon footprint of spring wheat production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Yantai; Liang, Chang; Chai, Qiang; Lemke, Reynald L; Campbell, Con A; Zentner, Robert P

    2014-11-18

    Wheat is one of the world's most favoured food sources, reaching millions of people on a daily basis. However, its production has climatic consequences. Fuel, inorganic fertilizers and pesticides used in wheat production emit greenhouse gases that can contribute negatively to climate change. It is unknown whether adopting alternative farming practices will increase crop yield while reducing carbon emissions. Here we quantify the carbon footprint of alternative wheat production systems suited to semiarid environments. We find that integrating improved farming practices (that is, fertilizing crops based on soil tests, reducing summerfallow frequencies and rotating cereals with grain legumes) lowers wheat carbon footprint effectively, averaging -256 kg CO2 eq ha(-1) per year. For each kg of wheat grain produced, a net 0.027-0.377 kg CO2 eq is sequestered into the soil. With the suite of improved farming practices, wheat takes up more CO2 from the atmosphere than is actually emitted during its production.

  18. Electrobiocommodities: powering microbial production of fuels and commodity chemicals from carbon dioxide with electricity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lovley, DR; Nevin, KP

    2013-06-01

    Electricity can be an energy source for microbially catalyzed production of fuels and other organic commodities from carbon dioxide. These electrobiocommodities (E-BCs) can be produced directly via electrode-to-microbe electron transfer or indirectly with electrochemically generated electron donors such as H-2 or formate. Producing E-BCs may be a more efficient and environmentally sustainable strategy for converting solar energy to biocommodities than approaches that rely on biological photosynthesis. A diversity of microbial physiologies could potentially be adapted for E-BC production, but to date acetogenic microorganisms are the only organisms shown to covert electrically generated low potential electrons and carbon dioxide into multi-carbon organic products with high recovery of electrons in product. Substantial research and development will be required for E-BC commercialization.

  19. DEVELOPMENT OF CONTINUOUS SOLVENT EXTRACTION PROCESSES FOR COAL DERIVED CARBON PRODUCTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elliot B. Kennel; Philip L. Biedler; Chong Chen; Dady Dadyburjor; Liviu Magean; Peter G. Stansberry; Alfred H. Stiller; John W. Zondlo

    2005-06-23

    The purpose of this DOE-funded effort is to develop continuous processes for solvent extraction of coal for the production of carbon products. These carbon products include materials used in metals smelting, especially in the aluminum and steel industries, as well as porous carbon structural material referred to as ''carbon foam'' and carbon fibers. There are a number of parameters which are important for the production of acceptable cokes, including purity, structure, density, electrical resistivity, thermal conductivity etc. From the standpoint of a manufacturer of graphite electrodes such as GrafTech, one of the most important parameters is coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE). Because GrafTech material is usually fully graphitized (i.e., heat treated at 3100 C), very high purity is automatically achieved. The degree of graphitization controls properties such as CTE, electrical resistivity, thermal conductivity, and density. Thus it is usually possible to correlate these properties using a single parameter. CTE has proven to be a useful index for the quality of coke. Pure graphite actually has a slightly negative coefficient of thermal expansion, whereas more disordered carbon has a positive coefficient.

  20. Modulating the direction of carbon flow in Escherichia coli to improve l-tryptophan production by inactivating the global regulator FruR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lina; Duan, Xuguo; Wu, Jing

    2016-08-10

    The fructose repressor (FruR) affects carbon flux through the central metabolic pathways of Escherichia coli. In this study, l-tryptophan production in Escherichia coli FB-04 was improved by knocking out the fruR gene, thereby inactivating FruR. This fruR knockout strain, E. coli FB-04(ΔfruR), not only exhibited higher growth efficiency, it also showed substantially improved l-tryptophan production. l-tryptophan production by E. coli FB-04(ΔfruR) and l-tryptophan yield per glucose were increased by 62.5% and 52.4%, respectively, compared with the parent E. coli FB-04. Metabolomics analysis showed that the fruR knockout significantly enhances metabolic flow through glycolysis, the pentose phosphate pathway and the TCA cycle, increasing levels of critical precursors and substrates for l-tryptophan biosynthesis. These results indicate that fruR deletion should enhance l-tryptophan production and improve the efficiency of carbon source utilization independent of genetic background.

  1. Carbonic anhydrase in Escherichia coli. A product of the cyn operon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guilloton, M B; Korte, J J; Lamblin, A F; Fuchs, J A; Anderson, P M

    1992-02-25

    The product of the cynT gene of the cyn operon in Escherichia coli has been identified as a carbonic anhydrase. The cyn operon also includes the gene cynS, encoding the enzyme cyanase. Cyanase catalyzes the reaction of cyanate with bicarbonate to give ammonia and carbon dioxide. The carbonic anhydrase was isolated from an Escherichia coli strain overexpressing the cynT gene and characterized. The purified enzyme was shown to contain 1 Zn2+/subunit (24 kDa) and was found to behave as an oligomer in solution; the presence of bicarbonate resulted in partial dissociation of the oligomeric enzyme. The kinetic properties of the enzyme are similar to those of carbonic anhydrases from other species, including inhibition by sulfonamides and cyanate. The amino acid sequence shows a high degree of identity with the sequences of two plant carbonic anhydrases. but not with animal and algal carbonic anhydrases. Since carbon dioxide formed in the bicarbonate-dependent decomposition of cyanate diffuses out of the cell faster than it would be hydrated to bicarbonate, the apparent function of the induced carbonic anhydrase is to catalyze hydration of carbon dioxide and thus prevent depletion of cellular bicarbonate.

  2. Impact of gas products around the anode on the performance of a direct carbon fuel cell using a carbon/carbonate slurry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Hirotatsu; Umehara, Daisuke; Hanamura, Katsunori

    2016-10-01

    This paper investigates the impact of gas products around the anode on cell performance via an in situ observation. In a direct carbon fuel cell used this study, the anode is inserted into the carbon/carbonate slurry. The current-voltage (I-V) curves are measured before and after a long discharge in the constant current discharge mode. An in situ observation shows that the anode is almost completely covered by gas bubbles when the voltage becomes nearly 0 V in the constant current discharge at 40 mA/cm2; this indicates that gas products such as CO2 prevent the carbon particles and ions from reaching the anode. Meanwhile, the long discharge at 20 mA/cm2 is achieved for 30 min, even though the anode is covered by the CO2 bubbles at 15 min. The I-V curves at 1 min after the termination of the long discharge at 20 mA/cm2 are lower than those prior to the long discharge. The overpotential significantly increases at higher current densities, where mass transport becomes the limiting process. The cell performance is significantly influenced by the gas products around the anode.

  3. Water availability limits tree productivity, carbon stocks, and carbon residence time in mature forests across the western US

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berner, Logan T.; Law, Beverly E.; Hudiburg, Tara W.

    2017-01-01

    Water availability constrains the structure and function of terrestrial ecosystems and is projected to change in many parts of the world over the coming century. We quantified the response of tree net primary productivity (NPP), live biomass (BIO), and mean carbon residence time (CRT = BIO / NPP) to spatial variation in water availability in the western US. We used forest inventory measurements from 1953 mature stands (> 100 years) in Washington, Oregon, and California (WAORCA) along with satellite and climate data sets covering the western US. We summarized forest structure and function in both domains along a 400 cm yr-1 hydrologic gradient, quantified with a climate moisture index (CMI) based on the difference between precipitation and reference evapotranspiration summed over the water year (October-September) and then averaged annually from 1985 to 2014 (CMIwy). Median NPP, BIO, and CRT computed at 10 cm yr-1 intervals along the CMIwy gradient increased monotonically with increasing CMIwy across both WAORCA (rs = 0.93-0.96, p changes over the western US, though these data sets tended to plateau in the wettest areas, suggesting that additional efforts are needed to better quantify NPP and BIO from satellites in high-productivity, high-biomass forests. Our results illustrate that long-term average water availability is a key environmental constraint on tree productivity, carbon storage, and carbon residence time in mature forests across the western US, underscoring the need to assess potential ecosystem response to projected warming and drying over the coming century.

  4. Hard carbon as anode material in lithium batteries: Synthesis and characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baertsch, M.C.; Schmid, L.; Baiker, A.; Novak, P.

    2003-03-01

    Hard carbon is a possible alternative as negative electrode material for rechargeable lithium-ion batteries. A fast production of hard carbon can be reached if the curing time of the precursor is short. Due to the promising results from literature regarding epoxy resin as precursor we produced hard carbon from a commercially available fast-setting epoxy resin. The surface area and pore structure properties of the carbon powder were investigated with gas adsorption methods. The carbon particle size distribution was ana-lysed with a laser diffraction instrument. (author)

  5. Propellant and Terrestrial Fuel Production from Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Build and test in a relevant environment a Mars propellant production plant of an appropriate scale for an initial demonstration on Mars. It will produce sufficient...

  6. Production of O/1S/ from photodissociation of carbon dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, G. M.

    1972-01-01

    The production efficiency was measured with the aid of a method based on the detection of the OI (5577 A) 'green' line. A sodium salicylate screen was used to monitor the intensity of the photons. Measurements at each of several individual wavelengths are conducted. The relative production efficiencies are shown in a graph. The absolute scale for the efficiency was determined in essentially the same way as in the Cameron band work reported by Lawrence (1972).

  7. Greater soil carbon stocks and faster turnover rates with increasing agricultural productivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanderman, Jonathan; Creamer, Courtney; Baisden, W. Troy; Farrell, Mark; Fallon, Stewart

    2017-01-01

    Devising agricultural management schemes that enhance food security and soil carbon levels is a high priority for many nations. However, the coupling between agricultural productivity, soil carbon stocks and organic matter turnover rates is still unclear. Archived soil samples from four decades of a long-term crop rotation trial were analyzed for soil organic matter (SOM) cycling-relevant properties: C and N content, bulk composition by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, amino sugar content, short-term C bioavailability assays, and long-term C turnover rates by modeling the incorporation of the bomb spike in atmospheric 14C into the soil. After > 40 years under consistent management, topsoil carbon stocks ranged from 14 to 33 Mg C ha-1 and were linearly related to the mean productivity of each treatment. Measurements of SOM composition demonstrated increasing amounts of plant- and microbially derived SOM along the productivity gradient. Under two modeling scenarios, radiocarbon data indicated overall SOM turnover time decreased from 40 to 13 years with increasing productivity - twice the rate of decline predicted from simple steady-state models or static three-pool decay rates of measured C pool distributions. Similarly, the half-life of synthetic root exudates decreased from 30.4 to 21.5 h with increasing productivity, indicating accelerated microbial activity. These findings suggest that there is a direct feedback between accelerated biological activity, carbon cycling rates and rates of carbon stabilization with important implications for how SOM dynamics are represented in models.

  8. Renewable phenols production by catalytic microwave pyrolysis of Douglas fir sawdust pellets with activated carbon catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bu, Quan; Lei, Hanwu; Wang, Lu; Wei, Yi; Zhu, Lei; Liu, Yupeng; Liang, Jing; Tang, Juming

    2013-08-01

    The effects of different activated carbon (AC) catalysts based on various carbon sources on products yield and chemical compositions of upgraded pyrolysis oils were investigated using microwave pyrolysis of Douglas fir sawdust pellets. Results showed that high amounts of phenols were obtained (74.61% and 74.77% in the upgraded bio-oils by DARCO MRX (wood based) and DARCO 830 (lignite coal based) activated carbons, respectively). The catalysts recycling test of the selected catalysts indicated that the carbon catalysts can be reused for at least 3-4 times and produced high concentrations of phenol and phenolic compounds. The chemical reaction mechanism for phenolics production during microwave pyrolysis of biomass was analyzed.

  9. Utilization of compressed natural gas for the production of carbon nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kim-Yang Lee; Wei-Ming Yeoh; Siang-Piao Chai; Abdul Rahman Mohamed

    2012-01-01

    The present work aims at utilizing compressed natural gas (CNG) as carbon source for the synthesis of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) over CoO-MoO/Al2O3 catalyst via catalytic chemical vapor deposition (CCVD) method.The as-produced carbonaceous product was characterized by thermal gravimetric analyzer (TGA),scanning electron microscopy (SEM),transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Raman spectroscopy.The experimental finding shows that CNTs were successfully produced from CNG while carbon nanofibers (CNFs) were formed as the side products.In addition,the catalytic activity and lifetime were found sustained and prolonged,as compared with using high purity methane as carbon source.The present study suggests an alternative route which can effectively produce CNTs and CNFs using low cost CNG.

  10. Whole-cell fungal transformation of precursors into dyes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jarosz-Wilkołazka Anna

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chemical methods of producing dyes involve extreme temperatures and unsafe toxic compounds. Application of oxidizing enzymes obtained from fungal species, for example laccase, is an alternative to chemical synthesis of dyes. Laccase can be replaced by fungal biomass acting as a whole-cell biocatalyst with properties comparable to the isolated form of the enzyme. The application of the whole-cell system simplifies the transformation process and reduces the time required for its completion. In the present work, four fungal strains with a well-known ability to produce laccase were tested for oxidation of 17 phenolic and non-phenolic precursors into stable and non-toxic dyes. Results An agar-plate screening test of the organic precursors was carried out using four fungal strains: Trametes versicolor, Fomes fomentarius, Abortiporus biennis, and Cerrena unicolor. Out of 17 precursors, nine were transformed into coloured substances in the presence of actively growing fungal mycelium. The immobilized fungal biomass catalyzed the transformation of 1 mM benzene and naphthalene derivatives in liquid cultures yielding stable and non-toxic products with good dyeing properties. The type of fungal strain had a large influence on the absorbance of the coloured products obtained after 48-hour transformation of the selected precursors, and the most effective was Fomes fomentarius (FF25. Whole-cell transformation of AHBS (3-amino-4-hydroxybenzenesulfonic acid into a phenoxazinone dye was carried out in four different systems: in aqueous media comprising low amounts of carbon and nitrogen source, in buffer, and in distilled water. Conclusions This study demonstrated the ability of four fungal strains belonging to the ecological type of white rot fungi to transform precursors into dyes. This paper highlights the potential of fungal biomass for replacing isolated enzymes as a cheaper industrial-grade biocatalyst for the synthesis of dyes and other

  11. Overview of the amorphous precursor phase strategy in biomineralization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Steve WEINER; Julia MAHAMID; Yael POLITI; Yurong MA; Lia ADDADI

    2009-01-01

    It was assumed for a long time that organisms produce minerals directly from a saturated solution. A few exceptions were known,including the well documented mineralized teeth of the chiton. In 1997 it was demon-stratedthat sea urchin larvae form their calcitic spicules by first depositing a highly unstable mineral phase called amorphous cualcium carbonate.This other phgyla has since been shown to be used by anlmals from other phyla and for both aragonita and calcite Recent evidence shows that vertebrate bone mineral may also be formed via a precursor phase of amorphous calcium carbonate. This strategy thus appears to be widespread The challenge now is to understand the mechanisms by which these unstable phases are initially formed,how they are temporarily stabilized and how they are destabilized and trans form into a crystalline mature product.

  12. The NOAA Carbon America Program A Focus on Products for Decision- Support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, J. H.; Hofmann, D. J.; Tans, P. P.; Peters, W.; Andrews, A. E.; Sweeny, C.; Montzka, S. A.

    2006-12-01

    If society is to manage or reduce carbon emissions in the future, reliable and accurate information on atmospheric carbon dioxide levels for verification of emission reductions will be needed on local, regional, and global scales. The current global carbon dioxide observing network operated by NOAA/ESRL provides a foundation for monitoring and understanding carbon dioxide. For example, atmospheric measurements in Europe suggest that emissions inventories of methane are substantial underestimates. An expanded U.S. Carbon Cycle Atmospheric Observing System is being implemented. Carbon America will consist of approximately 24 aircraft and 12 tall towers obtaining concentrations of carbon gases and other trace species. This observing system needs to be capable of quantitative attribution of all major contributors to the carbon budget of the continent, both manmade and natural. Successful mitigation strategies need independent and credible assessments of their efficacy. Managing carbon emissions will require the involvement of industry, financial markets, and governments at all levels. Without good information, governments will be slow to act, private investments will likely be less than optimal, and financial markets will not develop as they might need to. The atmospheric data and the methods used to derive sources and sinks will be fully open and available in up-to-date form to scientists, the general public, and policymakers. This presentation will provide an overview of NOAA`s role in the North American Carbon Program, our current accomplishments, our plans for the future network, and the currently expected products, services, and information that derive from these and other associated studies. Today's products, while useful, will be eclipsed by those of tomorrow, which will focus heavily on regional emissions expressed on seasonal or shorter time-scales, and will provide needed information for improved predictions in the future.

  13. Synthesis of phenolic precursor-based porous carbon beads in situ dispersed with copper-silver bimetal nanoparticles for antibacterial applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khare, Prateek; Sharma, Ashutosh; Verma, Nishith

    2014-03-15

    Copper (Cu) and silver (Ag) bimetal-dispersed polymeric beads (~0.7 mm) were synthesized by suspension polymerization using phenol and formaldehyde monomers. The Cu:Ag bimetal nanoparticles (Nps) were incorporated into the polymeric matrix at the incipience of gel formation during polymerization using an anionic surfactant. The prepared bimetal-doped polymeric beads were carbonized, activated using steam, and reduced in a hydrogen atmosphere to produce metal Nps-doped porous carbon beads. The prepared bimetal (Cu and Ag) Nps-doped beads exhibited significantly larger anti-bacterial activities than single-(Cu or Ag) metal-doped beads for both gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus and gram-negative Escherichia coli bacteria. The prepared materials contained the total optimized amounts of Cu and Ag. These amounts were smaller (approximately half) than the amount of single metal (Cu or Ag) required for preparing single-metal-doped beads. Although Cu Nps exhibit lesser antibacterial activity than Ag Nps, it enhanced the porosity of the beads. The prepared bimetal beads remained effective for 120 h, completely inhibiting the bacterial growth, and therefore, they are potential antibacterial agents for water purification.

  14. Graphene crystal growth by thermal precipitation of focused ion beam induced deposition of carbon precursor via patterned-iron thin layers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rius Gemma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, relevant advances on graphene as a building block of integrated circuits (ICs have been demonstrated. Graphene growth and device fabrication related processing has been steadily and intensively powered due to commercial interest; however, there are many challenges associated with the incorporation of graphene into commercial applications which includes challenges associated with the synthesis of this material. Specifically, the controlled deposition of single layer large single crystal graphene on arbitrary supports, is particularly challenging. Previously, we have reported the first demonstration of the transformation of focused ion beam induced deposition of carbon (FIBID-C into patterned graphitic layers by metal-assisted thermal treatment (Ni foils. In this present work, we continue exploiting the FIBID-C approach as a route for graphene deposition. Here, thin patterned Fe layers are used for the catalysis of graphenization and graphitization. We demonstrate the formation of high quality single and few layer graphene, which evidences, the possibility of using Fe as a catalyst for graphene deposition. The mechanism is understood as the minute precipitation of atomic carbon after supersaturation of some iron carbides formed under a high temperature treatment. As a consequence of the complete wetting of FIBID-C and patterned Fe layers, which enable graphene growth, the as-deposited patterns do not preserve their original shape after the thermal treatment

  15. Characterization of the major reactions during conversion of lignin to carbon fiber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hendrik Mainka

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Lightweight design is an essential part of the overall Volkswagen strategy for reducing the CO2 emissions. The use of carbon fiber offers an enormous lightweight potential. In comparison to steel enabling a mass reduction of up to 70% in automotive parts without a degradation of the functionalities is possible. Today, the use of carbon fiber is limited in mass series applications of the automotive industry by the cost of the conventional C-fiber precursor polyacrylonitrile (PAN. 50% of the cost of a conventional carbon fiber already belongs to the cost of the PAN precursor. Lignin as a precursor for carbon fiber production can realize enormous savings in cost. For qualifying lignin-based carbon fiber for automotive mass production a detailed characterization of this new material is necessary. Therefore, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy are used. Using the results of these experiments, the major reactions during conversion of lignin to carbon fiber are proposed.

  16. Seagrass productivity: the effect of light on carbon uptake

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, S.L.; McRoy, C.P.

    1982-08-01

    Productivity, as estimated by /sup 14/C uptake, was determined as a function of irradiance for six North American seagrasses (Thalassia testudinum Banks ex. Koenig, Syringodium filiforme Kuetz, Halodule wrightii Aschers., Halophila engelmanni Aschers., Phyllospadix scouleri Hook and Ruppia maritima L.s.l.) from temperature, subtropical and tropical environments. Light versus productivity curves were typical of those of aquatic plants. Seagrasses achieved high rates of uptake (up to 17.31 mg C (g dry)-1 h-1) and exhibited high saturation irradiances (greater than or equal to 40% surface irradiance). Within each environment half-saturation and saturation irradiances were similar, indicating no competition for light in the production systems of the various species. Between environments maximum productivity and saturation irradiances changed as a function of the differing irradiance. When rates were normalized for ambient irradiance, there were no differences in maximum rates, except for plants from Texas. In the subtropics and tropics where several species co-exist in the same seagrass bed, two types of responses occurred, corresponding to climax versus colonizer species. The difference in the responses appeared in the initial and maximum rates and in sensitivity to high irradiance. Productivity of seagrasses can be estimated, with certain limitations, from light measurements using the equations of Michaelis-Menten and Steele. (Refs. 35).

  17. Production of Carbon Nanofibers Using a CVD Method with Lithium Fluoride as a Supported Cobalt Catalyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Manafi

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanofibers (CNFs have been synthesized in high yield (>70% by catalytic chemical vapor deposition (CCVD on Co/LiF catalyst using acetylene as carbon source. A novel catalyst support (LiF is reported for the first time as an alternative for large-scale production of carbon nanofibers while purification process of nanofibers is easier. In our experiment, the sealed furnace was heated at 700∘C for 0.5 hour (the heating rate was 10∘C/min and then cooled to room temperature in the furnace naturally. Catalytic chemical vapor deposition is of interest for fundamental understanding and improvement of commercial synthesis of carbon nanofibers (CNFs. The obtained sample was sequentially washed with ethanol, dilutes acid, and distilled water to remove residual impurities, amorphous carbon materials, and remaining of catalyst, and then dried at 110∘C for 24 hours. The combined physical characterization through several techniques, such as high-resolution transmission electron microscope (TEM, scanning electron microscope (SEM, thermogarvimetric analysis (TGA, and zeta-sizer and Raman spectroscopy, allows determining the geometric characteristic and the microstructure of individual carbon nanofibers. Catalytic chemical vapor deposition is of interest for fundamental understanding and improvement of commercial synthesis of carbon nanofibers (CNFs. As a matter of fact, the method of CCVD guarantees the production of CNFs for different applications.

  18. Biorefineries of carbon dioxide: From carbon capture and storage (CCS) to bioenergies production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheah, Wai Yan; Ling, Tau Chuan; Juan, Joon Ching; Lee, Duu-Jong; Chang, Jo-Shu; Show, Pau Loke

    2016-09-01

    Greenhouse gas emissions have several adverse environmental effects, like pollution and climate change. Currently applied carbon capture and storage (CCS) methods are not cost effective and have not been proven safe for long term sequestration. Another attractive approach is CO2 valorization, whereby CO2 can be captured in the form of biomass via photosynthesis and is subsequently converted into various form of bioenergy. This article summarizes the current carbon sequestration and utilization technologies, while emphasizing the value of bioconversion of CO2. In particular, CO2 sequestration by terrestrial plants, microalgae and other microorganisms are discussed. Prospects and challenges for CO2 conversion are addressed. The aim of this review is to provide comprehensive knowledge and updated information on the current advances in biological CO2 sequestration and valorization, which are essential if this approach is to achieve environmental sustainability and economic feasibility.

  19. Laser ablation process for single-walled carbon nanotube production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arepalli, Sivaram

    2004-01-01

    Different types of lasers are now routinely used to prepare single-walled carbon nanotubes. The original method developed by researchers at Rice University used a "double-pulse laser oven" process. Several researchers have used variations of the lasers to include one-laser pulse (green or infrared), different pulse widths (ns to micros as well as continuous wave), and different laser wavelengths (e.g., CO2, or free electron lasers in the near to far infrared). Some of these variations are tried with different combinations and concentrations of metal catalysts, buffer gases (e.g., helium), oven temperatures, flow conditions, and even different porosities of the graphite targets. This article is an attempt to cover all these variations and their relative merits. Possible growth mechanisms under these different conditions will also be discussed.

  20. Eroding forest carbon sinks following thinning for combined fire prevention and bioenergy production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudiburg, T. W.; Law, B. E.; Luyssaert, S.

    2010-12-01

    Temperate forest annual net uptake of CO2 from the atmosphere is equivalent to ~16% of the annual fossil fuel emissions in the United States. Mitigation strategies to reduce emissions of carbon dioxide have lead to investigation of alternative sources of energy including forest biomass. The prospect of forest derived bioenergy has led to implementation of new forest management strategies based on the assumption that they will reduce total CO2 emissions to the atmosphere by simultaneously reducing the risk of wildfire and substituting for fossil fuels. Using Forest Inventory Analysis (FIA) plot data, regional supplemental plot data, and remote sensing products we determined the carbon stocks and fluxes of West Coast forests under current and proposed management scenarios for a 20 year treatment period. Varying biofuels thinning treatments designed to meet multiple objectives emphasizing fire prevention, economic gain, or energy production were applied to determine the resulting net carbon balance and bioenergy potential. Contrary to the management objectives, we find that increased removals result in substantial decreases in forest carbon stocks and Net Biome Production (NBP) and increased emissions. Thinning forests for energy production is not carbon neutral. Emissions are estimated to increase over the 20-year period because preventive thinning removals exceed the CO2 that would have been emitted due to wildfires, fossil fuel inputs are required for harvest and manufacturing, and use of woody biomass in short-lived products emits large quantities of CO2 to the atmosphere. It has the net effect of releasing otherwise sequestered carbon to the atmosphere, which may effectively reduce ongoing carbon uptake by forests and as a result, increase net greenhouse gas emissions, undermining the objective of greenhouse gas reductions over the next several decades.

  1. Resource Efficiency and Carbon Footprint Minimization in Manufacture of Plastic Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Sabaliauskaitė

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Efficient resource management, waste prevention, as well as renewable resource consumption promote sustainable production and lower greenhouse gas emissions to the environment when manufacturing plastic products.The paper presents the analysis of the efficiency of resources and the potential of carbon footprint minimization in manufacture of plastic products by means of implementation of wood-plastic composite (WPC production. The analysis was performed using life cycle assessment and material flow analysis methodology. To devise the solution for better management of resources and minimization of carbon footprint, the environmental impacts of polyvinyl chloride (PVC and WPC wall panels through their life cycle were assessed, as well as the detailed material flow analyses of the PVC and WPC in production stages were carried out.The life cycle assessment has revealed that carbon footprints throughout life cycle of 1 kg of WPC wall panel are 37 % lower than those of the same weight of PVC wall panel product. Both products have a major impact on the environment during their production phase, while during this phase WPC wall panel has 35 % smaller carbon footprint and even 47 % smaller during disposal stages than those of the PVC wall panel.The results of material flow analysis have shown that recycling and reuse of production spoilage reduce the need of PVC secondary resources for PVC panels and primary WPC resources for WPC panel production.For better resource efficiency, the conceptual model of material flow management has been proposed. As WPC products are made of primary WPC granules, which are imported from abroad, the model suggests to produce the WPC granules at the company using collected PVC secondary materials (PVC stocks. It would lower environmental costs and environmental impact, increase the efficiency of resources, and diminish dependence on suppliers.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.erem.67.1.6587

  2. Resource Efficiency and Carbon Footprint Minimization in Manufacture of Plastic Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamilė Sabaliauskaitė

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Efficient resource management, waste prevention, as well as renewable resource consumption promote sustainable production and lower greenhouse gas emissions to the environment when manufacturing plastic products. The paper presents the analysis of the efficiency of resources and the potential of carbon footprint minimization in manufacture of plastic products by means of implementation of wood-plastic composite (WPC production. The analysis was performed using life cycle assessment and material flow analysis methodology. To devise the solution for better management of resources and minimization of carbon footprint, the environmental impacts of polyvinyl chloride (PVC and WPC wall panels through their life cycle were assessed, as well as the detailed material flow analyses of the PVC and WPC in production stages were carried out. The life cycle assessment has revealed that carbon footprint throughout life cycle of 1 kg of WPC wall panel is 37 % lower than those of the same weight of PVC wall panel product. Both products have a major impact on the environment during their production phase, while during this phase WPC wall panel has 35 % smaller carbon footprint and even 47 % smaller during disposal stages than those of the PVC wall panel. The results of material flow analysis have shown that recycling and reuse of production spoilage reduce the need of PVC secondary resources for PVC panels and primary WPC resources for WPC panel production. For better resource efficiency, the conceptual model of material flow management has been proposed. As WPC products are made of primary WPC granules, which are imported from abroad, the model suggests to produce the WPC granules at the company using collected PVC secondary materials (PVC stocks. It would lower environmental costs and environmental impact, increase the efficiency of resources, and diminish dependence on suppliers.

  3. Effect of Different Carbon Source on Expression of Carotenogenic Genes and Astaxanthin Production in Xanthophyllomyces dendrorhous

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Wu

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The present research gives an insight into astaxanthin production, as well as transcription differences of four key carotenogenic genes, in Xanthophyllomyces dendrorhous when cultured with various carbon sources and soybean oil as co-substrates. Glucose was found to be the carbon source with best culture growth and astaxanthin production and the addition of 2% (v/v soybean oil resulted in even higher astaxanthin producing. In addition, four carotenogenic genes encoding geranylgeranyl diphosphate synthase (crtE, phytoene desaturase (crtl, phytoene synthase lycopene cyclase(crtYB, and astaxanthin synthetase (ast, respectively, were demonstrated to be associated with different transcription levels under various substrates. The present study suggests the effectiveness of manipulating the metabolic regulation by using different carbon sources, in order to improve the production of astaxanthin.

  4. 77 FR 45576 - Certain Hot-Rolled Carbon Steel Flat Products From the People's Republic of China: Preliminary...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-01

    ... Fair Value, and Affirmative Critical Circumstances, In Part: Certain Lined Paper Products From the... Than Fair Value: Certain Hot-Rolled Carbon Steel Flat Products From the People's Republic of China, 66... Hot-Rolled Carbon Steel Flat Products From the People's Republic of China: Preliminary Results of...

  5. H{sub 2} production from methane pyrolysis over commercial carbon catalysts: Kinetic and deactivation study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serrano, D.P.; Botas, J.A. [Chemical and Environmental Technology Department, ESCET, Rey Juan Carlos University, C/Tulipan s/n, 28933 Mostoles (Spain); IMDEA Energia, C/Tulipan s/n, 28933 Mostoles (Spain); Guil-Lopez, R. [Chemical and Environmental Technology Department, ESCET, Rey Juan Carlos University, C/Tulipan s/n, 28933 Mostoles (Spain)

    2009-05-15

    Hydrogen production from catalytic methane decomposition (DeCH{sub 4}) is a simple process to produce high purity hydrogen with no formation of carbon oxides (CO or CO{sub 2}). However, to completely avoid those emissions, the catalyst must not be regenerated. Therefore, it is necessary to use inexpensive catalysts, which show low deactivation during the process. Use of carbon materials as catalysts fulfils these requirements. Methane decomposition catalysed by a number of commercial carbons has been studied in this work using both constant and variable temperature experiments. The results obtained showed that the most active catalyst at short reaction times was activated carbon, but it underwent a fast deactivation due to the deposition of the carbon formed from methane cracking. On the contrary, carbon blacks, and especially the CB-bp sample, present high reaction rates for methane decomposition at both short and long reaction times. Carbon nanotubes exhibit a relatively low activity in spite of containing significant amounts of metals. The initial loss of activity observed with the different catalysts is attributed mainly to the blockage of their micropores due to the deposition of the carbon formed during the reaction. (author)

  6. Low Carbon Technology Options for the Natural Gas Electricity Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    The ultimate goal of this task is to perform environmental and economic analysis of natural gas based power production technologies (different routes) to investigate and evaluate strategies for reducing emissions from the power sector. It is a broad research area. Initially, the...

  7. Earthquakes: hydrogeochemical precursors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingebritsen, Steven E.; Manga, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Earthquake prediction is a long-sought goal. Changes in groundwater chemistry before earthquakes in Iceland highlight a potential hydrogeochemical precursor, but such signals must be evaluated in the context of long-term, multiparametric data sets.

  8. Polyethylene-Based Carbon Fibers by the Use of Sulphonation for Stabilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gisa Wortberg

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Polyethylene has great potential as an alternative material for carbon fiber production. Polyethylene can be processed in the economic melt spinning process. These precursors are prepared for the subsequent process step of carbonization by using chemical stabilization (sulphonation. The strategy is to adjust these precursor properties by the melt spinning process, thus resulting in a precursor, which can be stabilized sufficiently by sulphonation. The objective is to find the correlation between precursor properties and the results of the sulphonation. In this paper, the chemical stabilization is described and the results of the chemical stabilization are discussed. The novelty in this paper is that the results of the sulphonation are brought in correlation with the precursor properties. It can be shown that the filament diameter and the polymer structure (e.g., the crystallinity of the precursor have an influence on the sulphonation process.

  9. Farm and product carbon footprints of China's fruit production--life cycle inventory of representative orchards of five major fruits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Ming; Cheng, Kun; Yue, Qian; Yan, Yu; Rees, Robert M; Pan, Genxing

    2016-03-01

    Understanding the environmental impacts of fruit production will provide fundamental information for policy making of fruit consumption and marketing. This study aims to characterize the carbon footprints of China's fruit production and to figure out the key greenhouse gas emissions to cut with improved orchard management. Yearly input data of materials and energy in a full life cycle from material production to fruit harvest were obtained via field visits to orchards of five typical fruit types from selected areas of China. Carbon footprint (CF) was assessed with quantifying the greenhouse gas emissions associated with the individual inputs. Farm and product CFs were respectively predicted in terms of land use and of fresh fruit yield. Additionally, product CFs scaled by fruit nutrition value (vitamin C (Vc) content) and by the economic benefit from fruit production were also evaluated. The estimated farm CF ranged from 2.9 to 12.8 t CO2-eq ha(-1) across the surveyed orchards, whereas the product CF ranged from 0.07 to 0.7 kg CO2-eq kg(-1) fruit. While the mean product CFs of orange and pear were significantly lower than those of apple, banana, and peach, the nutrition-scaled CF of orange (0.5 kg CO2-eq g(-1) Vc on average) was significantly lower than others (3.0-5.9 kg CO2-eq g(-1) Vc). The income-scaled CF of orange and pear (1.20 and 1.01 kg CO2-eq USD(-1), respectively) was higher than apple, banana, and peach (0.87~0.39 kg CO2-eq USD(-1)). Among the inputs, synthetic nitrogen fertilizer contributed by over 50 % to the total greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, varying among the fruit types. There were some tradeoffs in product CFs between fruit nutrition value and fruit growers' income. Low carbon production and consumption policy and marketing mechanism should be developed to cut down carbon emissions from fruit production sector, with balancing the nutrition value, producer's income, and climate change mitigation.

  10. Identification of glucose kinase-dependent and -independent pathways for carbon control of primary metabolism, development and antibiotic production in Streptomyces coelicolor by quantitative proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gubbens, Jacob; Janus, Marleen; Florea, Bogdan I; Overkleeft, Herman S; van Wezel, Gilles P

    2012-12-01

    Members of the soil-dwelling prokaryotic genus Streptomyces are indispensable for the recycling of complex polysaccharides, and produce a wide range of natural products. Nutrient availability is a major determinant for the switch to development and antibiotic production in streptomycetes. Carbon catabolite repression (CCR), a main signalling pathway underlying this phenomenon, was so far considered fully dependent on the glycolytic enzyme glucose kinase (Glk). Here we provide evidence of a novel Glk-independent pathway in Streptomyces coelicolor, using advanced proteomics that allowed the comparison of the expression of some 2000 proteins, including virtually all enzymes for central metabolism. While CCR and inducer exclusion of enzymes for primary and secondary metabolism and precursor supply for natural products is mostly mediated via Glk, enzymes for the urea cycle, as well as for biosynthesis of the γ-butyrolactone Scb1 and the responsive cryptic polyketide Cpk are subject to Glk-independent CCR. Deletion of glkA led to strong downregulation of biosynthetic proteins for prodigionins and calcium-dependent antibiotic (CDA) in mannitol-grown cultures. Repression of bldB, bldN, and its target bldM may explain the poor development of S. coelicolor on solid-grown cultures containing glucose. A new model for carbon catabolite repression in streptomycetes is presented.

  11. Activated carbon from pyrolysis of brewer's spent grain: Production and adsorption properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanreppelen, Kenny; Vanderheyden, Sara; Kuppens, Tom; Schreurs, Sonja; Yperman, Jan; Carleer, Robert

    2014-07-01

    Brewer's spent grain is a low cost residue generated by the brewing industry. Its chemical composition (high nitrogen content 4.35 wt.%, fibres, etc.) makes it very useful for the production of added value in situ nitrogenised activated carbon. The composition of brewer's spent grain revealed high amounts of cellulose (20.8 wt.%), hemicellulose (48.78 wt.%) and lignin (11.3 wt.%). The fat, ethanol extractives and ash accounted for 8.17 wt.%, 4.7 wt.% and 3.2 wt.%, respectively. Different activated carbons were produced in a lab-scale pyrolysis/activation reactor by applying several heat and steam activation profiles on brewer's spent grain. Activated carbon yields from 16.1 to 23.6 wt.% with high N-contents (> 2 wt.%) were obtained. The efficiency of the prepared activated carbons for phenol adsorption was studied as a function of different parameters: pH, contact time and carbon dosage relative to two commercial activated carbons. The equilibrium isotherms were described by the non-linear Langmuir and Freundlich models, and the kinetic results were fitted using the pseudo-first-order model and the pseudo-second-order model. The feasibility of an activated carbon production facility (onsite and offsite) that processes brewer's spent grain for different input feeds is evaluated based on a techno-economic model for estimating the net present value. Even though the model assumptions start from a rather pessimistic scenario, encouraging results for a profitable production of activated carbon using brewer's spent grain are obtained.

  12. Synthesis of precursor the base of indene for polyelectrolyte an membrane production for application in fuel cell; Sintese de precursores a base de indeno para producao de polieletrolitos e membranas para uso em celula a combustivel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brum, F.J.B.; Laux, F.N.; Haack, M.S.; Forte, M.M.C. [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul. Escola de Engenharia, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil)

    2010-07-01

    Monomers with vinyl bond can be polymerized via a cationic mechanism using acid catalysts. This study aimed to obtain homo and copolymers of styrene and indene via cationic mechanism and the functionalization of sulfonic groups to the production of membranes for fuel cells. Polymers and poly electrolytes were characterized by infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and gel permeation chromatography (GPC/SEC). The degree of sulfonation of the polymers was determined by titration and evaluated for these films to the degree of swelling in water, ion exchange capacity and analysis of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. Membranes prepared with polyindene and PVA were tested in an apparatus of the fuel cell. (author)

  13. Carbon stars and galactic chemical evolution: production of s-elements and wind heterogeneities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Laverny, P [Observatoire de la Cote d' Azur, Dept. Cassiopee, UMR 6202, Nice (France)], E-mail: laverny@oca.eu

    2008-12-15

    Cool carbon stars found on the asymptotic giant branch are characterized by their production of specific chemical species and by strong but complex winds. This is illustrated below by (i) discussing their production of s-elements in the Milky Way and in neighbour satellite galaxies and (ii) describing the strong heterogeneities observed in the massive dusty circumstellar envelope of the nearby carbon star IRC+10216. Some similarities existing between the inner clumpy envelope of IRC+10216 with the dusty clumps recently detected around the more evolved variable stars of R Coronae Borealis type are also discussed.

  14. Linear extension rates and gross carbonate production of Acropora cervicornis at Coral Gardens, Belize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peeling, E.; Greer, L.; Lescinsky, H.; Humston, R.; Wirth, K. R.; Baums, I. B.; Curran, A.

    2014-12-01

    Branching Acropora coral species have fast growth and carbonate production rates, and thus have functioned as important reef-building species throughout the Pleistocene and Holocene. Recently, net carbonate production (kg CaCO3 m-2 year-1) has been recognized as an important measure of reef health, especially when monitoring endangered species, such as Acropora cervicornis. This study examines carbonate production in a thriving population of A. cervicornis at the Coral Gardens reef in Belize. Photographic surveys were conducted along five transects of A. cervicornis-dominated reefs from 2011-2014. Matching photographs from 2013 and 2014 were scaled to 1 m2 and compared to calculate 84 individual A. cervicornis linear extension rates across the reef. Linear extension rates averaged 12.4 cm/yr and were as high as 17 cm/yr in some areas of the reef. Carbonate production was calculated two ways. The first followed the standard procedure of multiplying percent live coral cover, by the linear extension rate and skeletal density. The second used the number of live coral tips per square meter in place of percent live coral multiplied by the average cross-sectional area of the branches. The standard method yielded a carbonate production rate of 113 kg CaCO3 m-2 year-1 for the reef, and the tip method yielded a rate of 6 kg m-2 year-1. We suggest that the tip method is a more accurate measure of production, because A. cervicornis grows primarily from the live tips, with only limited radial growth and resheeting over dead skeleton. While this method omits the contributions of radial growth and resheeting, and is therefore somewhat of an underestimate, our future work will quantify these aspects of growth in a more complete carbonate budget. Still, our estimate suggests a carbonate production rate per unit area of A. cervicornis that is on par with other Caribbean coral species, rather than two orders of magnitude higher as reported by Perry et al (2013). Although gross coral

  15. Solid olive waste in environmental cleanup: oil recovery and carbon production for water purification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Hamouz, Amer; Hilal, Hikmat S; Nassar, Nashaat; Mardawi, Zahi

    2007-07-01

    A potentially-economic three-fold strategy, to use solid olive wastes in water purification, is presented. Firstly, oil remaining in solid waste (higher than 5% of waste) was recovered by the Soxhlet extraction technique, which can be useful for the soap industry. Secondly, the remaining solid was processed to yield relatively high-surface area active carbon (AC). Thirdly, the resulting carbon was employed to reversibly adsorb chromate ions from water, aiming to establish a water purification process with reusable AC. The technique used here enabled oil recovery together with the production of a clean solid, suitable for making AC. This process also has the advantage of low production cost.

  16. Algal biomass production and carbon fixation from flue gas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Ling; ZHU Jing

    2016-01-01

    Algal biofuel has established as one of renewable energy. In this study, Nannochloropsis salina was cultured to test feasibility of biomass production and CO2 fixation from flue gas. Firstly, cultivation was conducted under different light intensity. Results showed that the highest dry biomass of 1.25±0.061 g/L was achieved at light intensity of 10klux, while the highest total lipids was 33.677±1.9% at light intensity of 15klux. The effect of mercury on algae growth was also investigated, the algae growth was serious limited at the presence of mercury, and there was no any difference at the range of 10-50 ug/m3. These results provide useful information for algal biomass production and CO2 fixation from flue gas.

  17. Production of carbon-rich presolar grains from massive stars

    CERN Document Server

    Pignatari, M; Timmes, F X; de Boer, R J; Thielemann, F -K; Fryer, C; Heger, A; Herwig, F; Hirschi, R

    2013-01-01

    About a year after core collapse supernova, dust starts to condense in the ejecta. In meteorites, a fraction of C-rich presolar grains (e.g., silicon carbide (SiC) grains of Type-X and low density graphites) are identified as relics of these events, according to the anomalous isotopic abundances. Several features of these abundances remain unexplained and challenge the understanding of core-collapse supernovae explosions and nucleosynthesis. We show, for the first time, that most of the measured C-rich grain abundances can be accounted for in the C-rich material from explosive He burning in core-collapse supernovae with high shock velocities and consequent high temperatures. The inefficiency of the $^{12}$C($\\alpha$,$\\gamma$)$^{16}$O reaction relative to the rest of the $\\alpha$-capture chain at $T > 3.5\\times10^8 \\mathrm{K}$ causes the deepest He-shell material to be carbon rich and silicon rich, and depleted in oxygen. The isotopic ratio predictions in part of this material, defined here as the C/Si zone, a...

  18. Technoeconomical analysis of the co-production of hydrogen energy and carbon materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra, Zuimdie

    HECAM (Hydrogen Energy and Carbon Materials) is a new energy production strategy. The main paradigm of HECAM is that energy extracted from the carbon in hydrocarbon fuels is not worth the production of carbon dioxide. The hydrocarbon fuel is heated in an oxygen free environment and it is chemically decomposed by the heat into gases (mostly hydrogen and methane), small quantities of liquid (light oil and tar), and a solid residue containing carbon and ash (char or coke). More quantities of hydrocarbons will need to be used, but less carbon dioxide will be produced. HECAM is going to compete with steam methane reforming (SMR) to produce hydrogen. HECAM with thermocatalytic decomposition of methane and efficient sensible heat recovery has a production cost per gigajoule of hydrogen about 9% higher than SMR, but will produce about half the carbon dioxide emissions that SMR produces. If HECAM with efficient sensible heat recovery is used to produce electricity in a power plant, it will have a comparable electricity production cost and carbon dioxide emissions to a natural gas combined cycle (NGCC) power plant. The byproduct coke is not a waste residue, but a valuable co-product. Uses for the byproduct coke material may be carbon sequestration, mine land restoration, additive to enhance agricultural soils, low sulfur and mercury content heating fuel for power plants, new construction materials, or carbon-base industrial materials. This study investigated the use of byproduct coke for new construction materials. HECAM concrete substitute (HCS) materials will have a comparable cost with concrete when the cost of the raw materials is $65 per metric ton of HCS produced. HECAM brick substitute (HBS) materials will have 20% higher cost per brick than clay bricks. If the HECAM byproduct coke can be formed into bricks as a product of the HECAM process, the manufacture of HBS bricks will be cheaper and may be cost competitive with clay bricks. The results of this analysis are

  19. Greenhouse gas and carbon profile of the u.s. Forest products industry value chain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heath, Linda S; Maltby, Van; Miner, Reid; Skog, Kenneth E; Smith, James E; Unwin, Jay; Upton, Brad

    2010-05-15

    A greenhouse gas and carbon accounting profile was developed for the U.S. forest products industry value chain for 1990 and 2004-2005 by examining net atmospheric fluxes of CO(2) and other greenhouse gases (GHGs) using a variety of methods and data sources. Major GHG emission sources include direct and indirect (from purchased electricity generation) emissions from manufacturing and methane emissions from landfilled products. Forest carbon stocks in forests supplying wood to the industry were found to be stable or increasing. Increases in the annual amounts of carbon removed from the atmosphere and stored in forest products offset about half of the total value chain emissions. Overall net transfers to the atmosphere totaled 91.8 and 103.5 TgCO(2)-eq. in 1990 and 2005, respectively, although the difference between these net transfers may not be statistically significant. Net transfers were higher in 2005 primarily because additions to carbon stored in forest products were less in 2005. Over this same period, energy-related manufacturing emissions decreased by almost 9% even though forest products output increased by approximately 15%. Several types of avoided emissions were considered separately and were collectively found to be notable relative to net emissions.

  20. Climate seasonality limits leaf carbon assimilation and wood productivity in tropical forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Fabien H.; Hérault, Bruno; Bonal, Damien; Stahl, Clément; Anderson, Liana O.; Baker, Timothy R.; Becker, Gabriel Sebastian; Beeckman, Hans; Boanerges Souza, Danilo; Botosso, Paulo Cesar; Bowman, David M. J. S.; Bräuning, Achim; Brede, Benjamin; Irving Brown, Foster; Julio Camarero, Jesus; Barbosa Camargo, Plínio; Cardoso, Fernanda C. G.; Alvim Carvalho, Fabrício; Castro, Wendeson; Koloski Chagas, Rubens; Chave, Jérome; Chidumayo, Emmanuel N.; Clark, Deborah A.; Capellotto Costa, Flavia Regina; Couralet, Camille; Henrique da Silva Mauricio, Paulo; Dalitz, Helmut; Resende de Castro, Vinicius; Eloisa de Freitas Milani, Jaçanan; Consuelo de Oliveira, Edilson; de Souza Arruda, Luciano; Devineau, Jean-Louis; Drew, David M.; Dünisch, Oliver; Durigan, Giselda; Elifuraha, Elisha; Fedele, Marcio; Ferreira Fedele, Ligia; Figueiredo Filho, Afonso; Guimarães Finger, César Augusto; César Franco, Augusto; Lima Freitas Júnior, João; Galvão, Franklin; Gebrekirstos, Aster; Gliniars, Robert; Maurício Lima de Alencastro Graça, Paulo; Griffiths, Anthony D.; Grogan, James; Guan, Kaiyu; Homeier, Jürgen; Raquel Kanieski, Maria; Khoon Kho, Lip; Koenig, Jennifer; Valerio Kohler, Sintia; Krepkowski, Julia; Pires Lemos-Filho, José; Lieberman, Diana; Lieberman, Milton Eugene; Lisi, Claudio Sergio; Longhi Santos, Tomaz; López Ayala, José Luis; Eijji Maeda, Eduardo; Malhi, Yadvinder; Maria, Vivian R. B.; Marques, Marcia C. M.; Marques, Renato; Maza Chamba, Hector; Mbwambo, Lawrence; Liana Lisboa Melgaço, Karina; Mendivelso, Hooz Angela; Murphy, Brett P.; O'Brien, Joseph J.; Oberbauer, Steven F.; Okada, Naoki; Pélissier, Raphaël; Prior, Lynda D.; Alejandro Roig, Fidel; Ross, Michael; Rodrigo Rossatto, Davi; Rossi, Vivien; Rowland, Lucy; Rutishauser, Ervan; Santana, Hellen; Schulze, Mark; Selhorst, Diogo; Rodrigues Silva, Williamar; Silveira, Marcos; Spannl, Susanne; Swaine, Michael D.; Julio Toledo, José; Toledo, Marcos Miranda; Toledo, Marisol; Toma, Takeshi; Tomazello Filho, Mario; Valdez Hernández, Juan Ignacio; Verbesselt, Jan; Aparecida Vieira, Simone; Vincent, Grégoire; Volkmer de Castilho, Carolina; Volland, Franziska; Worbes, Martin; Bolzan Zanon, Magda Lea; Aragão, Luiz E. O. C.

    2016-04-01

    The seasonal climate drivers of the carbon cycle in tropical forests remain poorly known, although these forests account for more carbon assimilation and storage than any other terrestrial ecosystem. Based on a unique combination of seasonal pan-tropical data sets from 89 experimental sites (68 include aboveground wood productivity measurements and 35 litter productivity measurements), their associated canopy photosynthetic capacity (enhanced vegetation index, EVI) and climate, we ask how carbon assimilation and aboveground allocation are related to climate seasonality in tropical forests and how they interact in the seasonal carbon cycle. We found that canopy photosynthetic capacity seasonality responds positively to precipitation when rainfall is < 2000 mm yr-1 (water-limited forests) and to radiation otherwise (light-limited forests). On the other hand, independent of climate limitations, wood productivity and litterfall are driven by seasonal variation in precipitation and evapotranspiration, respectively. Consequently, light-limited forests present an asynchronism between canopy photosynthetic capacity and wood productivity. First-order control by precipitation likely indicates a decrease in tropical forest productivity in a drier climate in water-limited forest, and in current light-limited forest with future rainfall < 2000 mm yr-1.

  1. Synthesis and characterization of poly(divinylbenzene)-coated magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles as precursor for the formation of air-stable carbon-coated iron crystalline nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boguslavsky, Yonit; Margel, Shlomo

    2008-01-01

    Maghemite (gamma-Fe2O3) nanoparticles of 15 +/- 3 nm diameter were prepared by nucleation of gelatin/iron oxide followed by growth of gamma-Fe2O3 films onto these nuclei. The gamma-Fe2O3 nanoparticles were coated with polydivinylbenzene (PDVB) by emulsion polymerization of divinylbenzene (DVB) in an aqueous continuous phase containing the gamma-Fe2O3 nanoparticles. The PDVB-coated gamma-Fe2O3 nanoparticles, dispersed in water, were separated from homo-PDVB nanoparticles using the high gradient magnetic field (HGMF) technique. The influence of DVB concentration on the amount of PDVB coating, on the size and size distribution of the coated gamma-Fe2O3 nanoparticles and on their magnetic properties, has been investigated. Air-stable carbon-coated iron (alpha-Fe/C) crystalline nanoparticles of 41 +/- 12 nm diameter have been prepared by annealing the PDVB-coated gamma-Fe2O3 nanoparticles at 1050 degrees C in an inert atmosphere. These nanoparticles exhibit high saturation magnetization value (83 emu g(-1)) and excellent resistance to oxidation. Characterization of the PDVB-coated gamma-Fe2O3 and of the alpha-Fe/C nanoparticles has been accomplished by TEM, HRTEM, DLS, FTIR, XRD, thermal analysis, zeta-potential, and magnetic measurements.

  2. Joint Optimal Production Planning for Complex Supply Chains Constrained by Carbon Emission Abatement Policies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Longfei He

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We focus on the joint production planning of complex supply chains facing stochastic demands and being constrained by carbon emission reduction policies. We pick two typical carbon emission reduction policies to research how emission regulation influences the profit and carbon footprint of a typical supply chain. We use the input-output model to capture the interrelated demand link between an arbitrary pair of two nodes in scenarios without or with carbon emission constraints. We design optimization algorithm to obtain joint optimal production quantities combination for maximizing overall profit under regulatory policies, respectively. Furthermore, numerical studies by featuring exponentially distributed demand compare systemwide performances in various scenarios. We build the “carbon emission elasticity of profit (CEEP” index as a metric to evaluate the impact of regulatory policies on both chainwide emissions and profit. Our results manifest that by facilitating the mandatory emission cap in proper installation within the network one can balance well effective emission reduction and associated acceptable profit loss. The outcome that CEEP index when implementing Carbon emission tax is elastic implies that the scale of profit loss is greater than that of emission reduction, which shows that this policy is less effective than mandatory cap from industry standpoint at least.

  3. Brazilian natural fiber (jute as raw material for activated carbon production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CARLA F.S. ROMBALDO

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Jute fiber is the second most common natural cellulose fiber worldwide, especially in recent years, due to its excellent physical, chemical and structural properties. The objective of this paper was to investigate: the thermal degradation of in natura jute fiber, and the production and characterization of the generated activated carbon. The production consisted of carbonization of the jute fiber and activation with steam. During the activation step the amorphous carbon produced in the initial carbonization step reacted with oxidizing gas, forming new pores and opening closed pores, which enhanced the adsorptive capacity of the activated carbon. N2 gas adsorption at 77K was used in order to evaluate the effect of the carbonization and activation steps. The results of the adsorption indicate the possibility of producing a porous material with a combination of microporous and mesoporous structure, depending on the parameters used in the processes, with resulting specific surface area around 470 m2.g–1. The thermal analysis indicates that above 600°C there is no significant mass loss.

  4. Carbon nanotube prepared from carbon monoxide by CVD method and its application as electrode materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    AN Yuliang; YUAN Xia; CHENG Shinan; GEN Xin

    2006-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes with larger inner diameter were synthesized by the chemical vapor deposition of carbon monoxide (CO) on iron catalyst using H2S as promoting agent.It is found that the structure and morphology of carbon nanotubes can be tailored, to some degree, by varying the experimental conditions such as precursor components and process parameters.The results show that the presence of H2S may play key role for growing Y-branched carbon nanotubes.The products were characterized by SEM, TEM, and Raman spectroscopy, respectively.Furthermore, the obtained carbon nanotubes were explored as electrode materials for supercapacitor.

  5. Predicting long-term carbon mineralization and trace gas production from thawing permafrost of Northeast Siberia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knoblauch, Christian; Beer, Christian; Sosnin, Alexander; Wagner, Dirk; Pfeiffer, Eva-Maria

    2013-04-01

    The currently observed Arctic warming will increase permafrost degradation followed by mineralization of formerly frozen organic matter to carbon dioxide (CO2 ) and methane (CH4 ). Despite increasing awareness of permafrost carbon vulnerability, the potential long-term formation of trace gases from thawing permafrost remains unclear. The objective of the current study is to quantify the potential long-term release of trace gases from permafrost organic matter. Therefore, Holocene and Pleistocene permafrost deposits were sampled in the Lena River Delta, Northeast Siberia. The sampled permafrost contained between 0.6% and 12.4% organic carbon. CO2 and CH4 production was measured for 1200 days in aerobic and anaerobic incubations at 4 °C. The derived fluxes were used to estimate parameters of a two pool carbon degradation model. Total CO2 production was similar in Holocene permafrost (1.3 ± 0.8 mg CO2 -C gdw(-1) aerobically, 0.25 ± 0.13 mg CO2 -C gdw(-1) anaerobically) as in 34 000-42 000-year-old Pleistocene permafrost (1.6 ± 1.2 mg CO2 -C gdw(-1) aerobically, 0.26 ± 0.10 mg CO2 -C gdw(-1) anaerobically). The main predictor for carbon mineralization was the content of organic matter. Anaerobic conditions strongly reduced carbon mineralization since only 25% of aerobically mineralized carbon was released as CO2 and CH4 in the absence of oxygen. CH4 production was low or absent in most of the Pleistocene permafrost and always started after a significant delay. After 1200 days on average 3.1% of initial carbon was mineralized to CO2 under aerobic conditions while without oxygen 0.55% were released as CO2 and 0.28% as CH4 . The calibrated carbon degradation model predicted cumulative CO2 production over a period of 100 years accounting for 15.1% (aerobic) and 1.8% (anaerobic) of initial organic carbon, which is significantly less than recent estimates. The multiyear time series from the incubation experiments helps to more reliably constrain projections of future

  6. Research on Earthquake Precursor in E-TEC: A Study on Land Surface Thermal Anomalies Using MODIS LST Product in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, W. Y.; Wu, M. C.

    2014-12-01

    Taiwan has been known as an excellent natural laboratory characterized by rapid active tectonic rate and high dense seismicity. The Eastern Taiwan Earthquake Research Center (E-TEC) is established on 2013/09/24 in National Dong Hwa University and collaborates with Central Weather Bureau (CWB), National Center for Research on Earthquake Engineering (NCREE), National Science and Technology Center for Disaster Reduction (NCDR), Institute of Earth Science of Academia Sinica (IES, AS) and other institutions (NCU, NTU, CCU) and aims to provide an integrated platform for researchers to conduct the new advances on earthquake precursors and early warning for seismic disaster prevention in the eastern Taiwan, as frequent temblors are most common in the East Taiwan rift valley. E-TEC intends to integrate the multi-disciplinary observations and is equipped with stations to monitor a wide array of factors of quake precursors, including seismicity, GPS, strain-meter, ground water, geochemistry, gravity, electromagnetic, ionospheric density, thermal infrared remote sensing, gamma radiation etc, and will maximize the value of the data for researches with the range of monitoring equipment that enable to predict where and when the next devastated earthquake will strike Taiwan and develop reliable earthquake prediction models. A preliminary study on earthquake precursor using monthly Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Land Surface Temperature (LST) data before 2013/03/27 Mw6.2 Nantou earthquake in Taiwan is presented. Using the statistical analysis, the result shows the peak of the anomalous LST that exceeds a standard deviation of LST appeared on 2013/03/09 and became less or none anomalies observed on 2013/03/16 before the main-shock, which is in consist with the phenomenon observed by other researchers. This preliminary experimental result shows that the thermal anomalies reveal the possibility to associate surface thermal phenomena before the strong earthquakes.

  7. Bicarbonate-based Integrated Carbon Capture and Algae Production System with alkalihalophilic cyanobacterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Zhanyou; Xie, Yuxiao; Elloy, Farah; Zheng, Yubin; Hu, Yucai; Chen, Shulin

    2013-04-01

    An extremely alkalihalophilic cyanobacteria Euhalothece ZM001 was tested in the Bicarbonate-based Integrated Carbon Capture and Algae Production System (BICCAPS), which utilize bicarbonate as carbon source for algae culture and use the regenerated carbonate to absorb CO2. Culture conditions including temperature, inoculation rate, medium composition, pH, and light intensity were investigated. A final biomass concentration of 4.79 g/L was reached in tissue flask culture with 1.0 M NaHCO3/Na2CO3. The biomass productivity of 1.21 g/L/day was achieved under optimal conditions. When pH increased from 9.55 to 10.51, 0.256 M of inorganic carbon was consumed during the culture process. This indicated sufficient carbon can be supplied as bicarbonate to the culture. This study proved that a high biomass production rate can be achieved in a BICCAPS. This strategy can also lead to new design of photobioreactors that provides an alternative supply of CO2 to sparging.

  8. ENHANCED HYDROGEN ECONOMICS VIA COPRODUCTION OF FUELS AND CARBON PRODUCTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kennel, Elliot B; Bhagavatula, Abhijit; Dadyburjor, Dady; Dixit, Santhoshi; Garlapalli, Ravinder; Magean, Liviu; Mukkha, Mayuri; Olajide, Olufemi A; Stiller, Alfred H; Yurchick, Christopher L

    2011-03-31

    This Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory sponsored research effort to develop environmentally cleaner projects as a spin-off of the FutureGen project, which seeks to reduce or eliminate emissions from plants that utilize coal for power or hydrogen production. New clean coal conversion processes were designed and tested for coproducing clean pitches and cokes used in the metals industry as well as a heavy crude oil. These new processes were based on direct liquefaction and pyrolysis techniques that liberate volatile liquids from coal without the need for high pressure or on-site gaseous hydrogen. As a result of the research, a commercial scale plant for the production of synthetic foundry coke has broken ground near Wise, Virginia under the auspices of Carbonite Inc. This plant will produce foundry coke by pyrolyzing a blend of steam coal feedstocks. A second plant is planned by Quantex Energy Inc (in Texas) which will use solvent extraction to coproduce a coke residue as well as crude oil. A third plant is being actively considered for Kingsport, Tennessee, pending a favorable resolution of regulatory issues.

  9. Carbon Balance and Contribution of Harvested Wood Products in China Based on the Production Approach of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunyi Ji

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The carbon sequestration of harvested wood products (HWP plays an important role in climate mitigation. Accounting the carbon contribution of national HWP carbon pools has been listed as one of the key topics for negotiation in the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change. On the basis of the revised Production Approach of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (2013 (IPCC, this study assessed the accounting of carbon stock and emissions from the HWP pool in China and then analyzed its balance and contribution to carbon mitigation from 1960 to 2014. Research results showed that the accumulated carbon stock in China’s HWP carbon pool increased from 130 Teragrams Carbon (TgC in 1960 to 705.6 TgC in 2014. The annual increment in the carbon stock rose from 3.2 TgC in 1960 to 45.2 TgC in 2014. The category of solid wood products accounted for approximately 95% of the annual amount. The reduction in carbon emissions was approximately twelve times that of the emissions from the HWP producing and processing stage during the last decade. Furthermore, the amount of carbon stock and emission reduction increased from 23 TgC in 1960 to 76.1 TgC in 2014. The annual contribution of HWP could compensate for approximately 2.9% of the national carbon dioxide emissions in China.

  10. Ancient low–molecular-weight organic acids in permafrost fuel rapid carbon dioxide production upon thaw

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, Travis W.; Wickland, Kimberly P.; Spencer, Robert G. M.; McKnight, Diane M.; Striegl, Robert G.

    2015-01-01

    Northern permafrost soils store a vast reservoir of carbon, nearly twice that of the present atmosphere. Current and projected climate warming threatens widespread thaw of these frozen, organic carbon (OC)-rich soils. Upon thaw, mobilized permafrost OC in dissolved and particulate forms can enter streams and rivers, which are important processors of OC and conduits for carbon dioxide (CO2) to the atmosphere. Here, we demonstrate that ancient dissolved organic carbon (DOC) leached from 35,800 y B.P. permafrost soils is rapidly mineralized to CO2. During 200-h experiments in a novel high–temporal-resolution bioreactor, DOC concentration decreased by an average of 53%, fueling a more than sevenfold increase in dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) concentration. Eighty-seven percent of the DOC loss to microbial uptake was derived from the low–molecular-weight (LMW) organic acids acetate and butyrate. To our knowledge, our study is the first to directly quantify high CO2 production rates from permafrost-derived LMW DOC mineralization. The observed DOC loss rates are among the highest reported for permafrost carbon and demonstrate the potential importance of LMW DOC in driving the rapid metabolism of Pleistocene-age permafrost carbon upon thaw and the outgassing of CO2 to the atmosphere by soils and nearby inland waters.

  11. Carbon-rich dust production in metal-poor galaxies in the Local Group

    CERN Document Server

    Sloan, G C; Lagadec, E; van Loon, J Th; Kraemer, K E; McDonald, I; Groenewegen, M A T; Wood, P R; Bernard-Salas, J; Zijlstra, A A

    2012-01-01

    We have observed a sample of 19 carbon stars in the Sculptor, Carina, Fornax, and Leo I dwarf spheroidal galaxies with the Infrared Spectrograph on the Spitzer Space Telescope. The spectra show significant quantities of dust around the carbon stars in Sculptor, Fornax, and Leo I, but little in Carina. Previous comparisons of carbon stars with similar pulsation properties in the Galaxy and the Magellanic Clouds reve