WorldWideScience

Sample records for carbon nutrient pools

  1. Genetics by Nutrient Availability Interactions on Short-term Carbon Pools and Fluxes in Young Pinus taeda Plantations

    OpenAIRE

    Tyree, Michael Christopher

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this research was to determine how genetics and nutrient availability influence C cycling in intensively managed southern pine forests. This work consisted of a two year field and a complimentary one year greenhouse study each split into above- and belowground pools and fluxes. Both the greenhouse and field experiment showed differences between contrasting genotypes in gas exchange parameters and C partitioning patterns, but genetic by nutrient availability interactions wer...

  2. Effects of litter addition and warming on soil carbon, nutrient pools and microbial communities in a subarctic heath ecosystem

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rinnan, Riikka; Michelsen, Anders; Jonasson, Sven Evert

    2008-01-01

    Climatic warming leads to the expansion of deciduous shrubs and trees in the Arctic. This leads to higher leaf litter inputs, which together with warming may alter the rate of carbon and nutrient cycling in the arctic ecosystems. We assessed effects of factorial warming and additional litter on t...... more to the soil and litter moisture conditions than to the change in the quality of the organic matter....... on the soil ecosystem of a subarctic heath in a 7-year-long field experiment. Fine root biomass, dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and total C concentration increased in response to warming, which probably was a result of the increased vegetation cover. Litter addition increased the concentration of inorganic P...... proportion of biomarkers for Gram-positive bacteria. The combined warming plus litter addition treatment decreased the soil water content in the uppermost 5 cm soil, which was a likely reason for many interactions between the effects of warming and litter addition. The soil organic matter quality...

  3. Characterisation of the Permafrost Carbon Pool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhry, P.; Grosse, G.; Harden, J.W.; Hugelius, G.; Koven, C.D.; Ping, C.-L.; Schirrmeister, L.; Tarnocai, C.

    2013-01-01

    The current estimate of the soil organic carbon (SOC) pool in the northern permafrost region of 1672 Petagrams (Pg) C is much larger than previously reported and needs to be incorporated in global soil carbon (C) inventories. The Northern Circumpolar Soil Carbon Database (NCSCD), extended to include the range 0–300 cm, is now available online for wider use by the scientific community. An important future aim is to provide quantitative uncertainty ranges for C pool estimates. Recent studies have greatly improved understanding of the regional patterns, landscape distribution and vertical (soil horizon) partitioning of the permafrost C pool in the upper 3 m of soils. However, the deeper C pools in unconsolidated Quaternary deposits need to be better constrained. A general lability classification of the permafrost C pool should be developed to address potential C release upon thaw. The permafrost C pool and its dynamics are beginning to be incorporated into Earth System models, although key periglacial processes such as thermokarst still need to be properly represented to obtain a better quantification of the full permafrost C feedback on global climate change.

  4. Soil carbon pools in different pasture systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco M. Cardozo, Jr.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to assess the carbon pools of a tropical soil where the native forest was replaced with different pasture systems. We studied five pasture production systems, including four monoculture systems with forage grasses such as Andropogon, Brachiaria, Panicum, and Cynodon, and an agroforestry system as well as a native vegetation plot. Greater availability of fulvic acid was detected in the agroforestry system as compared with that in the other systems. Higher lability of C was detected in the Andropogon system during the dry and rainy seasons and during the dry season in Cynodon. During the dry season, all pastures systems showed deficits in the net removal of atmospheric CO2. The structure and practices of the agroforestry system enables more carbon to be sequestered in the soil as compared with the monoculture pasture, suggesting that it is an important practice to mitigate climatic change and to improve soil quality.

  5. Depleted soil carbon and nitrogen pools beneath impervious surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urban soils and vegetation contain large pools of carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) and may sequester these elements at considerable rates; however, there have been no systematic studies of the composition of soils beneath the impervious surfaces that dominate urban areas. This has made it impossible to reliably estimate the net impact of urbanization on terrestrial C and N pools. In this study, we compared open area and impervious-covered soils in New York City and found that the C and N content of the soil (0–15 cm) under impervious surfaces was 66% and 95% lower, respectively. Analysis of extracellular enzyme activities in the soils suggests that recalcitrant compounds dominate the organic matter pool under impervious surfaces. If the differences between impervious-covered and open area soils represent a loss of C and N from urban ecosystems, the magnitude of these losses could offset sequestration in other parts of the urban landscape. - The soils beneath impervious surfaces are depleted in C and N, which may have implications for the energy and nutrient balance of urban ecosystems.

  6. Hunting Nutrients and Trapping Carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soil fertility is enhanced directly by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) efficiently absorbing the maximum amount of nutrients available and indirectly by formation of stabilized soil aggregates. Glomalin is sticky, not easily soluble substance, on AMF hyphae and provides a protective coating to b...

  7. Carbon isotopes in terrestrial ecosystem pools and CO2 fluxes.

    OpenAIRE

    Bowling, DR; Pataki, DE; Randerson, JT

    2008-01-01

    Stable carbon isotopes are used extensively to examine physiological, ecological, and biogeochemical processes related to ecosystem, regional, and global carbon cycles and provide information at a variety of temporal and spatial scales. Much is known about the processes that regulate the carbon isotopic composition (delta(13)C) of leaf, plant, and ecosystem carbon pools and of photosynthetic and respiratory carbon dioxide (CO(2)) fluxes. In this review, systematic patterns and mechanisms unde...

  8. Does carbon dioxide pool or stream in the subsurface?

    CERN Document Server

    Cardoso, Silvana S S

    2014-01-01

    Pools of carbon dioxide are found in natural geological accumulations and in engineered storage in saline aquifers. It has been thought that once this CO2 dissolves in the formation water, making it denser, convection streams would transport it efficiently to depth, but this may not be so. Here, we assess the impact of natural chemical reactions between the dissolved CO2 and the rock formation on the convection streams in the subsurface. We show that, while in carbonate rocks the streaming of dissolved carbon dioxide persists, the chemical interactions in silicate-rich rocks may curb this transport drastically and even inhibit it altogether. New laboratory experiments confirm the curtailing of convection by reaction. Wide and narrow streams of dense carbon-rich water are shut-off gradually as reaction strength increases until all transport of the pooled carbon dioxide occurs by slow molecular diffusion. These results show that the complex fluid dynamic and kinetic interactions between pooled carbon dioxide an...

  9. Monitoring changes in soil organic carbon pools, nitrogen, phosphorus, and sulfur under different agricultural management practices in the tropics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Bibhash C; Datta, Siba Prasad; Rattan, Raj K; Singh, Anil K

    2010-12-01

    Soil organic matter not only affects sustainability of agricultural ecosystems, but also extremely important in maintaining overall quality of environment as soil contains a significant part of global carbon stock. Hence, we attempted to assess the influence of different tillage and nutrient management practices on various stabilized and active soil organic carbon pools, and their contribution to the extractable nitrogen phosphorus and sulfur. Our study confined to the assessment of impact of agricultural management practices on the soil organic carbon pools and extractable nutrients under three important cropping systems, viz. soybean-wheat, maize-wheat, and rice-wheat. Results indicated that there was marginal improvement in Walkley and Black content in soil under integrated and organic nutrient management treatments in soybean-wheat, maize-wheat, and rice-wheat after completion of four cropping cycles. Improvement in stabilized pools of soil organic carbon (SOC) was not proportional to the applied amount of organic manures. While, labile pools of SOC were increased with the increase in amount of added manures. Apparently, green manure (Sesbania) was more effective in enhancing the lability of SOC as compared to farmyard manure and crop residues. The KMnO(4)-oxidizable SOC proved to be more sensitive and consistent as an index of labile pool of SOC compared to microbial biomass carbon. Under different cropping sequences, labile fractions of soil organic carbon exerted consistent positive effect on the extractable nitrogen, phosphorus, and sulfur in soil. PMID:20069448

  10. Intracellular Metabolite Pool Changes in Response to Nutrient Depletion Induced Metabolic Switching in Streptomyces coelicolor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Wentzel

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available A metabolite profiling study of the antibiotic producing bacterium Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2 has been performed. The aim of this study was to monitor intracellular metabolite pool changes occurring as strains of S. coelicolor react to nutrient depletion with metabolic re-modeling, so-called metabolic switching, and transition from growth to secondary metabolite production phase. Two different culture media were applied, providing depletion of the key nutrients phosphate and L-glutamate, respectively, as the triggers for metabolic switching. Targeted GC-MS and LC-MS methods were employed to quantify important primary metabolite groups like amino acids, organic acids, sugar phosphates and other phosphorylated metabolites, and nucleotides in time-course samples withdrawn from fully-controlled batch fermentations. A general decline, starting already in the early growth phase, was observed for nucleotide pools and phosphorylated metabolite pools for both the phosphate and glutamate limited cultures. The change in amino acid and organic acid pools were more scattered, especially in the phosphate limited situation while a general decrease in amino acid and non-amino organic acid pools was observed in the L-glutamate limited situation. A phoP deletion mutant showed basically the same metabolite pool changes as the wild-type strain M145 when cultivated on phosphate limited medium. This implies that the inactivation of the phoP gene has only little effect on the detected metabolite levels in the cell. The energy charge was found to be relatively constant during growth, transition and secondary metabolite production phase. The results of this study and the employed targeted metabolite profiling methodology are directly relevant for the evaluation of precursor metabolite and energy supply for both natural and heterologous production of secondary metabolites in S. coelicolor.

  11. NUTRIENTS POOL IN CONSORTIA OF Eucalyptus urograndis, Acacia mearnsii AND Zea mays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcio Viera

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available http://dx.doi.org/10.5902/1980509810543This study aimed to determine the nutrient pool in monospecific and mixed stands of Eucalyptus urograndis and Acacia mearnsii in a consortium with Zea mays.The amount determination of nutrients of forest species was carried out in the treatments: 100E (100% of eucalyptus; 100A (100% of black wattle and 50E:50A (50% of eucalyptus + 50% of black-wattle. On the other hand, for corn, it was carried out in all treatments (100E; 100A, 50E:50A; 75E:25A – 75% of eucalyptus + 25% black-wattle and 25E:75A – 25% of eucalyptus + 75% of black wattle. The delimitation adopted was the one of a randomized block with three replications. The magnitude of the nutrient pool in the agrossilvicultural systems biomass was: N> K > Ca > Mg > P > S, for macronutrients, and Mn > Fe > Zn > B > Cu, for micronutrients. Due to the great export of nutrients through the corn harvest, residues should be kept and it is necessary to make a nutritional reposition, mainly with P, N, K, S and Zn in the following crops, because of the higher amount that are exported with the extraction of the corn tang, which reaches 75.3; 60.6; 59.9; 55.8 e 53.8%, respectively, in relation to the total stocked in the biomass.

  12. Effects of nitrogen additions on biomass, stoichiometry and nutrient pools of moss Rhytidium rugosum in a boreal forest in Northeast China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Global nitrogen (N) deposition has been enhanced with anthropogenic N emissions, and its impacts on mosses are receiving more and more attention. This study investigates how N deposition influence the biomass and stoichiometry of moss Rhytidium rugosum, using a 3-year N enrichment experiment with 0, 2, 5 and 10 g N m−2 yr−1 in a boreal forest in Northeast China. Low N additions caused an N redundancy and moderate to high N additions resulted in a biomass loss. N additions reduced biomass ratios of green to brown tissues and increased N and phosphorus (P) contents, suggesting changes in photosynthetic capacity and litter decomposition. Biomass N pools showed a unimodal response to the N additions, and P pools decreased under moderate and high N additions. Our findings indicate significant stoichiometric and biomass changes caused by N deposition may lead to a substantial carbon and nutrient loss in boreal moss carpets. - Highlights: • Effects of N deposition on moss biomass and stoichiometry were investigated. • N deposition reduced biomass ratios of green to brown moss tissues. • N deposition increased N and P contents in moss tissues. • N deposition caused significant changes of moss carbon and nutrient pools. - Significant stoichiometric and biomass changes of mosses can be caused by N deposition and may lead to a substantial carbon and nutrient loss in boreal moss carpets

  13. Dynamic carbon allocation significantly changed land carbon sink and carbon pool sizes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, J.; Yuan, W.

    2015-12-01

    The allocation of photosynthate among the plant components (e.g., leaves, stems, and roots) plays an important role in regulating plant growth, competition, and terrestrial carbon cycle. However, the carbon allocation process is still a weak part in the earth system models (ESMs). In this study, the Integrated BIosphere Simulator (IBIS) model coupled with a dynamic carbon allocation model (IBISAL) is used to explore the impact of carbon allocation on the terrestrial carbon cycle. This dynamic carbon allocation model suggests that plants should allocate the largest part of carbon to the plant components which need to capture the most limiting resources, such as light, water and nitrogen. In comparison to the results of original IBIS model using fixed allocation ratios, the net ecosystem productivity, global biomass and soil organic carbon simulated by IBISAL model decreased by13.4% , 9.9% and 20.8%, respectively . The dynamic allocation scheme tends to benefit roots allocation. Because roots had short turnover times, high roots allocation led to the decreases of global carbon sink and carbon pool sizes. The observations showed that the carbon allocation ratios changed with temperature and precipitation. The dynamic carbon allocation model could reproduce this phenomenon correctly. The results show that the dynamic carbon allocation ratios of boreal evergreen forests and C3 grasses are consistent well with the observations. However, the IBISAL, and another three ESMs (i.e., CESM1-BGC, IPSL-CM5A-MR and NorESM1-ME models) adopting dynamic allocation scheme overestimated the stems allocation of tropical forests. This study shows the substantial influences of carbon allocation on the carbon sink and carbon pool sizes. Therefore, improving estimations of carbon allocation by ESMs are an important and effective path to reduce uncertainties in the global carbon cycle simulation and climate change prediction.

  14. Assessing Actual and Potential Organic Carbon Pools in Southern Taiga and Forest-Steppe Ecosystems of Russia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernova, Olga; Ryzhova, Irina; Podvezennaya, Marina

    2014-05-01

    Recent debates on climate changes showed the importance of maintaining natural cycles of nutrients and preserving extensive areas of natural ecosystems to ensure sustainability of the biosphere. The size and distribution of nutrient pools within ecosystems are the key characteristics of the biological cycle reflecting changes in the functioning of natural systems. Carbon pools assessed in similar land-use types by different researchers are often poorly comparable due to various calculation algorithms, sampling techniques and sets of field data used. Model-based assessments often yield results that significantly depart from calculations based on actual field data. We estimated the actual and potential natural carbon pools using potential natural vegetation maps, soil maps, up-to-date statistics and results of regional studies. Organic carbon pools in biomass, forest litter, peat and soil were calculated for most typical natural (ecosystems, which experienced the least effect of historic land use) and modern ecosystems for two administrative regions of Russia: 1. Kursk region characterized by high productive natural steppe vegetation with predominance of chernozems - the country's most fertile soils, which were extensively transformed by agricultural activity; 2. Kostroma region, sparsely populated area with still abundant southern taiga forests. The average characteristics of vegetation productivity for natural and some human-modified ecosystems such as coniferous (pine, spruce) and noble broadleaf (oak, linden) forests, swamps, bogs, steppes, bottomland meadows, secondary forests, hayfields, pastures were calculated using the Database on the Productivity of Ecosystems in North Eurasia. The biological productivity of present-day forests and carbon pools in biomass were calculated using the program for assessing forest carbon budget (ROBUL model). Similar characteristics were used for agricultural areas. They were averaged according to crop rotations and recalculated

  15. Underestimation of boreal soil carbon stocks by mathematical soil carbon models linked to soil nutrient status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ťupek, Boris; Ortiz, Carina A.; Hashimoto, Shoji; Stendahl, Johan; Dahlgren, Jonas; Karltun, Erik; Lehtonen, Aleksi

    2016-08-01

    Inaccurate estimate of the largest terrestrial carbon pool, soil organic carbon (SOC) stock, is the major source of uncertainty in simulating feedback of climate warming on ecosystem-atmosphere carbon dioxide exchange by process-based ecosystem and soil carbon models. Although the models need to simplify complex environmental processes of soil carbon sequestration, in a large mosaic of environments a missing key driver could lead to a modeling bias in predictions of SOC stock change.We aimed to evaluate SOC stock estimates of process-based models (Yasso07, Q, and CENTURY soil sub-model v4) against a massive Swedish forest soil inventory data set (3230 samples) organized by a recursive partitioning method into distinct soil groups with underlying SOC stock development linked to physicochemical conditions.For two-thirds of measurements all models predicted accurate SOC stock levels regardless of the detail of input data, e.g., whether they ignored or included soil properties. However, in fertile sites with high N deposition, high cation exchange capacity, or moderately increased soil water content, Yasso07 and Q models underestimated SOC stocks. In comparison to Yasso07 and Q, accounting for the site-specific soil characteristics (e. g. clay content and topsoil mineral N) by CENTURY improved SOC stock estimates for sites with high clay content, but not for sites with high N deposition.Our analysis suggested that the soils with poorly predicted SOC stocks, as characterized by the high nutrient status and well-sorted parent material, indeed have had other predominant drivers of SOC stabilization lacking in the models, presumably the mycorrhizal organic uptake and organo-mineral stabilization processes. Our results imply that the role of soil nutrient status as regulator of organic matter mineralization has to be re-evaluated, since correct SOC stocks are decisive for predicting future SOC change and soil CO2 efflux.

  16. Carbon pool and biomass dynamics associated with deforestation, land use, and agricultural abandonment in the neotropics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauffman, J Boone; Hughes, R Flint; Heider, Chris

    2009-07-01

    Current rates of deforestation and the resulting C emissions in the tropics exceed those of secondary forest regrowth and C sequestration. Changing land-use strategies that would maintain standing forests may be among the least expensive of climate change mitigation options. Further, secondary tropical forests have been suggested to have great value for their potential to sequester atmospheric C. These options require an understanding of and capability to quantify C dynamics at landscape scales. Because of the diversity of physical and biotic features of tropical forests as well as approaches and intensities of land uses within the neotropics, there are tremendous differences in the capacity of different landscapes to store and sequester C. Major gaps in our current knowledge include quantification of C pools, rates and patterns of biomass loss following land-cover change, and quantification of the C storage potential of secondary forests following abandonment. In this paper we present a synthesis and further analyses from recent studies that describe C pools, patterns of C decline associated with land use, and rates of C accumulation following secondary-forest establishment--all information necessary for climate-change mitigation options. Ecosystem C pools of Neotropical primary forests minimally range from approximately 141 to 571 Mg/ha, demonstrating tremendous differences in the capacity of different forests to store C. Most of the losses in C and nutrient pools associated with conversion occur when fires are set to remove the slashed forest to prepare sites for crop or pasture establishment. Fires burning slashed primary forests have been found to result in C losses of 62-80% of prefire aboveground pools in dry (deciduous) forest landscapes and 29-57% in wet (evergreen) forest landscapes. Carbon emissions equivalent to the aboveground primary-forest pool arise from repeated fires occurring in the first 4 to 10 years following conversion. Feedbacks of climate

  17. Pedogenic carbonates and carbon pools in gypsiferous soils of a semiarid Mediterranean environment in south Italy

    OpenAIRE

    Laudicina, V. A.; Dipartimento dei Sistemi Agro-Ambientali, Università degli Studi di Palermo, Viale delle Scienze 13, 90128 Palermo, Italy; Scalenghe, R.; Dipartimento dei Sistemi Agro-Ambientali, Università degli Studi di Palermo, Viale delle Scienze 13, 90128 Palermo, Italy; Pisciotta, A.; Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Sezione Palermo, Palermo, Italia; Parello, F.; Dipartimento di Scienza della Terra e del Mare, Università degli Studi di Palermo, Via Archirafi 36, 90123 Palermo, Italy; Dazzi, C.; Dipartimento dei Sistemi Agro-Ambientali, Università degli Studi di Palermo, Viale delle Scienze 13, 90128 Palermo, Italy

    2013-01-01

    Soil carbonates are key features in soils of arid and semiarid environment, playing an important role from pedogenetic, landscape history, paleoclimatic and environmental points of view. The objectives of this work were (i) to study pathways of pedogenic carbonate (PC) formation, (ii) to distinguish between lithogenic and pedogenic inorganic C by using the natural C isotope abundance, and (iii) to estimate the soil C pools in a gypsiferous semiarid Mediterranean environment (Sicil...

  18. Characterizing the Spatial Pattern of Soil Carbon and Nitrogen Pools in the Turkey Lakes Watershed: A Comparison of Regression Techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There is considerable spatial heterogeneity in organic carbon (C), total nitrogen (N), and potentially mineralizable nitrogen (PMN) pools in the soils of the Turkey Lakes Watershed. We hypothesized that topography regulates the spatial pattern of these pools through a combination of static factors (slope, aspect and elevation), which influence radiation, temperature and moisture conditions, and dynamic factors (catenary position,profile and planar curvature), which influence the transport of materials downslope. We used multiple linear regression (MLR)and tree regression (TR) models as exploratory techniques to determine if there was a topographic basis for the spatial pattern of the C, N and PMN pools. The MLR and TR models predicted similar integrated totals (i.e., within 5% of each other) but dissimilar spatial patterns of the pools. For the combined litter, fibric and hemic layer, the MLR models explained a significant portion of the variance (R2 = 0.38, 0.23 and0.28 for C, N and PMN, respectively), however, the residuals were large and biased (the smallest contents were over-predicted and the largest contents were under-predicted). The TR models (9-branch), in contrast, explained a greater portion of the variance (R2 = 0.75, 0.67 and 0.62 for C, N and PMN, respectively) and the residuals were smaller and unbiased. Based on our sampling strategy, the models suggested that static factors were most important in predicting the spatial pattern of the nutrient pools. However, a nested sampling strategy that included scales where both static (among hillslopes) and dynamic (within hillslope) factors result in a systematic variation in soil nutrient pools may have improved the predictive ability of the models

  19. Nutrient demand interacts with legume maturity to affect rumen pool sizes in dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kammes, K L; Ying, Y; Allen, M S

    2012-05-01

    Effects of legume maturity on dry matter intake (DMI), milk production, ruminal fermentation and pool sizes, and digestion and passage kinetics, and the relationship of these effects with preliminary DMI (pDMI) were evaluated using 16 ruminally and duodenally cannulated Holstein cows in a crossover design with a 14-d preliminary period and two 17-d treatment periods. During the preliminary period, the pDMI of individual cows ranged from 22.9 to 30.0 kg/d (mean=25.9 kg/d) and the 3.5% fat-corrected milk yield ranged from 34.1 to 68.2 kg/d (mean=43.7 kg/d). Experimental treatments were diets containing alfalfa silage harvested either a) early-cut, less mature (EC) or b) late-cut, more mature (LC) as the sole forage. Early- and late-cut alfalfa contained 40.8 and 53.1% neutral detergent fiber (NDF) and 23.7 and 18.1% crude protein, respectively. Forage:concentrate ratios were 53:47 and 42:58 for EC and LC, respectively; both diets contained approximately 22% forage NDF and 27% total NDF. Preliminary DMI, an index of nutrient demand, was determined during the last 4d of the preliminary period when cows were fed a common diet and used as a covariate. Main effects of alfalfa maturity and their interaction with pDMI were tested by ANOVA. Alfalfa maturity and its interaction with pDMI did not affect milk yield but EC increased DMI compared with LC; thus, EC had lower efficiency of milk production than LC. The EC diet decreased milk fat concentration more per kilogram of pDMI increase than the LC diet, but milk fat yield was not affected. The lower concentration and faster passage rate of indigestible NDF for EC resulted in lower rumen pools of indigestible NDF, total NDF, and dry matter than did LC, which EC increased at a slower rate than did LC as pDMI increased. The EC diet decreased starch intake and increased ruminal pH compared with the LC diet. The rate of ruminal starch digestion was related to level of intake, but this did not affect ruminal or postruminal starch

  20. Characteristics of carbonate gas pool and multistage gas pool formation history of Hetianhe gas field, Tarim Basin, Northwest China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Hetianhe is a big carbonate gas field which is found and demonstrated in the period of "Chinese National Ninth 5-Year Plan". The proved reserve of Hetianhe gas field is over 600×108 m3. Its main producing layers are Carboniferous bioclastic limestone and Ordovician carbonate composed of buried hill. The former is stratified gas pool with water around its side, and the latter is massive gas pool with water in its bottom. The gases in the gas pools belong to dry gases with normal temperature and pressure systems. Based on the correlation of gas and source rock, the gases are mainly generated from Cambrian source rocks. According to the researches on source rock and structure evolution, and the observations on the thin section to reservoir bitumen and the studies on homogenization temperature of fluid inclusions, the gas pool has been identified and divided into three formation periods. The first is Late Caledonian when the oil generated from the Cambrian source rocks and migrated along faults, as a form of liquid facies into Ordovician carbonate reservoir and accumulated there. After that, the crust uplifted, the oil reservoir had been destroyed. The second is Late Hercynian when condensate gases generated from the Cambrian source rocks and migrated into Ordovician reservoir, as a form of liquid facies. Since the fractures had reached P strata, so the trap might have a real poor preservation condition, and the large-scale gas pool formation had not happened. The third gas reservoir formation period occurred in Himalaya. The fractures on both sides of Hetianhe gas field developed violently under the forces of compression, and thus the present fault horst formed. The dry gases generated from Cambrian source rocks and migrated upwards as the form of gas facies into Ordovician and Carboniferous reservoirs, and the large gas pool as discovered at present was formed finally.

  1. A global model of carbon-nutrient interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Berrien, III; Gildea, Patricia; Vorosmarty, Charles; Mellilo, Jerry M.; Peterson, Bruce J.

    1985-01-01

    The global biogeochemical model presented has two primary objectives. First, it characterizes natural elemental cycles and their linkages for the four elements significant to Earth's biota: C, N, S, and P. Second, it describes changes in these cycles due to human activity. Global nutrient cycles were studied within the drainage basins of several major world rivers on each continent. The initial study region was the Mississippi drainage basin, concentrating on carbon and nitrogen. The model first establishes the nutrient budgets of the undisturbed ecosystems in a study region. It then uses a data set of land use histories for that region to document the changes in these budgets due to land uses. Nutrient movement was followed over time (1800 to 1980) for 30 ecosystems and 10 land use categories. A geographically referenced ecological information system (GREIS) was developed to manage the digital global data bases of 0.5 x 0.5 grid cells needed to run the model: potential vegetation, drainage basins, precipitation, runoff, contemporary land cover, and FAO soil maps of the world. The results show the contributions of land use categories to river nutrient loads on a continental scale; shifts in nutrient cycling patterns from closed, steady state systems to mobile transient or open, steady state systems; soil organic matter depletion patterns in U.S. agricultural lands; changing nutrient ratios due to land use changes; and the effect of using heavy fertilizer on aquatic systems.

  2. Carbon storage in seagrass soils: long-term nutrient history exceeds the effects of near-term nutrient enrichment

    OpenAIRE

    Armitage, A. R.; J. W. Fourqurean

    2016-01-01

    The carbon sequestration potential in coastal soils is linked to aboveground and belowground plant productivity and biomass, which in turn, is directly and indirectly influenced by nutrient input. We evaluated the influence of long-term and near-term nutrient input on aboveground and belowground carbon accumulation in seagrass beds, using a nutrient enrichment (nitrogen and phosphorus) experiment embedded within a naturally occurring, long-term gradient of phosphorus availab...

  3. Carbon storage in seagrass soils: long-term nutrient history exceeds the effects of near-term nutrient enrichment

    OpenAIRE

    Armitage, A. R.; J. W. Fourqurean

    2015-01-01

    The carbon sequestration potential in coastal soils is linked to aboveground and belowground plant productivity and biomass, which in turn, is directly and indirectly influenced by nutrient input. We evaluated the influence of long-term and near-term nutrient input on aboveground and belowground carbon accumulation in seagrass beds, using a nutrient enrichment (nitrogen and phosphorus) experiment embedded within a naturally occurring, long-term gradient of phosphorus availab...

  4. Carbon and nitrogen pools and mineralization rates in boreal forest soil after stump harvesting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaarakka, Lilli; Hyvönen, Riitta; Strömgren, Monika; Palviainen, Marjo; Persson, Tryggve; Olsson, Bengt A.; Helmisaari, Heljä-Sisko

    2016-04-01

    The use of forest-derived biomass has steadily increased in the Finland and Sweden during the past decades. Thus, more intensive forest management practices are becoming more common in the region, such as whole-tree harvesting, both above- and belowground. Stump harvesting causes a direct removal of carbon (C) in the form of biomass from the stand and can cause extensive soil disturbance, which in turn can result in increased C mineralization. In this study, the effects of stump harvesting on soil C and nitrogen (N) mineralization, and soil surface disturbance were studied at two different clear-felled Norway spruce (Picea abies) stands in Central Finland. The treatments were conventional stem-only harvesting combined with mounding (WTH) and stump harvesting (i.e. complete tree harvesting) combined with mounding (WTH+S). Logging residues were removed from all study sites. Soil samples down to a depth of 20 cm were systematically collected from the different soil disturbance surfaces (undisturbed soil, the mounds and the pits) 12-13 years after final harvest. Soil samples were incubated in the laboratory to determine the C and N mineralization rates. In addition, total C and N pools were estimated for each disturbance class and soil layer. Soil C and N pools were lower following stump harvesting, however, no statistically significant treatment effect was detected. Instead, C mineralization responses to treatment intensity was site-specific. C/N-ratio and organic matter content were significantly affected by harvest intensity. The observed changes in C and N pools appear to be related to the intrinsic variation of the surface disturbance and soil characteristics, and harvesting per se, rather than treatment intensity. Long-term studies are however needed to draw long-term conclusions whether stump harvesting significantly changes soil C and nutrient dynamics.

  5. Soil Iron Content as a Predictor of Carbon and Nutrient Mobilization in Rewetted Fens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emsens, Willem-Jan; Aggenbach, Camiel J. S.; Schoutens, Ken; Smolders, Alfons J. P.; Zak, Dominik; van Diggelen, Rudy

    2016-01-01

    Rewetted, previously drained fens often remain sources rather than sinks for carbon and nutrients. To date, it is poorly understood which soil characteristics stimulate carbon and nutrient mobilization upon rewetting. Here, we assess the hypothesis that a large pool of iron in the soil negatively affects fen restoration success, as flooding-induced iron reduction (Fe3+ to Fe2+) causes a disproportionate breakdown of organic matter that is coupled with a release of inorganic compounds. We collected intact soil cores in two iron-poor and two iron-rich drained fens, half of which were subjected to a rewetting treatment while the other half was kept drained. Prolonged drainage led to the mobilization of nitrate (NO3-, > 1 mmol L-1) in all cores, regardless of soil iron content. In the rewetted iron-rich cores, a sharp increase in pore water iron (Fe) concentrations correlated with concentrations of inorganic carbon (TIC, > 13 mmol L-1) and dissolved organic carbon (DOC, > 16 mmol L-1). Additionally, ammonium (NH4+) accumulated up to phytotoxic concentrations of 1 mmol L-1 in the pore water of the rewetted iron-rich cores. Disproportionate mobilization of Fe, TIC, DOC and NH4+ was absent in the rewetted iron-poor cores, indicating a strong interaction between waterlogging and iron-mediated breakdown of organic matter. Concentrations of dissolved phosphorus (P) rose slightly in all cores upon rewetting, but remained low throughout the experiment. Our results suggest that large pools of iron in the top soil of drained fens can hamper the restoration of the fen’s sink-service for ammonium and carbon upon rewetting. We argue that negative effects of iron should be most apparent in fens with fluctuating water levels, as temporary oxygenation allows frequent regeneration of Fe3+. We conclude that rewetting of iron-poor fens may be more feasible for restoration. PMID:27050837

  6. MICROAGREGADOS ESTÁVEIS E RESERVA DE NUTRIENTES EM LATOSSOLO VERMELHO SOB PASTAGEM EM REGIÃO DE CERRADO STABLE MICROAGGREGATES AND NUTRIENT POOL IN OXISOL UNDER PASTURE IN SAVANNAH REGION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurício Paulo Ferreira Fontes

    2011-04-01

    highly weathered soils. With the objective of better understanding the nutrients distribution in microaggregates of fine-sand (200-50 ?m and coarse-silt (50-20 ?m, in a Rhodic Haplustox, the present study utilized an adapted physical fractionation procedure with mineralogical and chemical characterization. Part of the soil fractions was characterized as microaggregates formed by clay and silt minerals, with high macro and micronutrients contents. P, Cu, Mn, and Zn were more efficiently accumulated in the microaggregates and less susceptive to removal by the weathering and leaching actions, when compared to K and Mg. Higher C contents were found in the superficial horizon microaggregates (50-20 ?m, showing evidences of an efficient physical protection against mineralization. Macro and micronutrients pools (total contents, in the 200-50 ?m and 50-20 ?m microaggregates, corresponded to 5-19% of the total soil nutrients content, and 24-26% of the total soil carbon was seized by those microaggregates. Although these microaggregates present a low capacity to store nutrients, they become an important and highly stable compartment to preserve nutrients, as far as physical degradation and weathering and leaching are concerned.

    KEY-WORDS: Soil aggregation; physical fractionation; macronutrients; micronutrients; organic matter storage.

  7. Carbon storage in seagrass soils: long-term nutrient history exceeds the effects of near-term nutrient enrichment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armitage, A. R.; Fourqurean, J. W.

    2016-01-01

    The carbon sequestration potential in coastal soils is linked to aboveground and belowground plant productivity and biomass, which in turn, is directly and indirectly influenced by nutrient input. We evaluated the influence of long-term and near-term nutrient input on aboveground and belowground carbon accumulation in seagrass beds, using a nutrient enrichment (nitrogen and phosphorus) experiment embedded within a naturally occurring, long-term gradient of phosphorus availability within Florida Bay (USA). We measured organic carbon stocks in soils and above- and belowground seagrass biomass after 17 months of experimental nutrient addition. At the nutrient-limited sites, phosphorus addition increased the carbon stock in aboveground seagrass biomass by more than 300 %; belowground seagrass carbon stock increased by 50-100 %. Soil carbon content slightly decreased ( ˜ 10 %) in response to phosphorus addition. There was a strong but non-linear relationship between soil carbon and Thalassia testudinum leaf nitrogen : phosphorus (N : P) or belowground seagrass carbon stock. When seagrass leaf N : P exceeded an approximate threshold of 75 : 1, or when belowground seagrass carbon stock was less than 100 g m-2, there was less than 3 % organic carbon in the sediment. Despite the marked difference in soil carbon between phosphorus-limited and phosphorus-replete areas of Florida Bay, all areas of the bay had relatively high soil carbon stocks near or above the global median of 1.8 % organic carbon. The relatively high carbon content in the soils indicates that seagrass beds have extremely high carbon storage potential, even in nutrient-limited areas with low biomass or productivity.

  8. Forest sector carbon budget of the United States: Carbon pools and flux under alternative policy options

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The document presents a model of the current and future carbon budget associated with the forest ecosystems of the contermious U.S. The focus is on effects of economic and environmental policy changes for the period of 1990-2040. In the study, the concept of forest ecosystem has been expanded to forest sector by including biomass that has been physically removed (harvested) for human use. The potential effects of climate change have not been incorporated; however, current research is directed at addressing this question. The specific objectives of the report are to: (1) Develop a methodology for quantifying the current and future forest sector carbon budget for the US, (2) Apply the methodology to quantify the current status of carbon pools and flux within the US forest sector, (3) Apply the methodology to several scenarios based on alternative policy options, and (4) Identify gaps and deficiencies in the data and in the modeling approaches that require further effort

  9. Accounting for forest carbon pool dynamics in product carbon footprints: Challenges and opportunities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Modification and loss of forests due to natural and anthropogenic disturbance contribute an estimated 20% of annual greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions worldwide. Although forest carbon pool modeling rarely suggests a ‘carbon neutral’ flux profile, the life cycle assessment community and associated product carbon footprint protocols have struggled to account for the GHG emissions associated with forestry, specifically, and land use generally. Principally, this is due to underdeveloped linkages between life cycle inventory (LCI) modeling for wood and forest carbon modeling for a full range of forest types and harvest practices, as well as a lack of transparency in globalized forest supply chains. In this paper, through a comparative study of U.S. and Chinese coated freesheet paper, we develop the initial foundations for a methodology that rescales IPCC methods from the national to the product level, with reference to the approaches in three international product carbon footprint protocols. Due to differences in geographic origin of the wood fiber, the results for two scenarios are highly divergent. This suggests that both wood LCI models and the protocols need further development to capture the range of spatial and temporal dimensions for supply chains (and the associated land use change and modification) for specific product systems. The paper concludes by outlining opportunities to measure and reduce uncertainty in accounting for net emissions of biogenic carbon from forestland, where timber is harvested for consumer products. - Highlights: ► Typical life cycle assessment practice for consumer products often excludes significant land use change emissions when estimating carbon footprints. ► The article provides a methodology to rescale IPCC guidelines for product-level carbon footprints. ► Life cycle inventories and product carbon footprint protocols need more comprehensive land use-related accounting. ► Interdisciplinary collaboration linking the LCA and

  10. Nutrient Budgets in Successional Northern Hardwood Forests: Uncertainty in soil, root, and tree concentrations and pools (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanai, R. D.; Bae, K.; Levine, C. R.; Lilly, P.; Vadeboncoeur, M. A.; Fatemi, F. R.; Blum, J. D.; Arthur, M.; Hamburg, S.

    2013-12-01

    Ecosystem nutrient budgets are difficult to construct and even more difficult to replicate. As a result, uncertainty in the estimates of pools and fluxes are rarely reported, and opportunities to assess confidence through replicated measurements are rare. In this study, we report nutrient concentrations and contents of soil and biomass pools in northern hardwood stands in replicate plots within replicate stands in 3 age classes (14-19 yr, 26-29 yr, and > 100 yr) at the Bartlett Experimental Forest, USA. Soils were described by quantitative soil pits in three plots per stand, excavated by depth increment to the C horizon and analyzed by a sequential extraction procedure. Variation in soil mass among pits within stands averaged 28% (coefficient of variation); variation among stands within an age class ranged from 9-25%. Variation in nutrient concentrations were higher still (averaging 38%, within element, depth increment, and extraction type), perhaps because the depth increments contained varying proportions of genetic horizons. To estimate nutrient contents of aboveground biomass, we propagated model uncertainty through allometric equations, and found errors ranging from 3-7%, depending on the stand. The variation in biomass among plots within stands (6-19%) was always larger than the allometric uncertainties. Variability in measured nutrient concentrations of tree tissues were more variable than the uncertainty in biomass. Foliage had the lowest variability (averaging 16% for Ca, Mg, K, N and P within age class and species), and wood had the highest (averaging 30%), when reported in proportion to the mean, because concentrations in wood are low. For Ca content of aboveground biomass, sampling variation was the greatest source of uncertainty. Coefficients of variation among plots within a stand averaged 16%; stands within an age class ranged from 5-25% CV, including uncertainties in tree allometry and tissue chemistry. Uncertainty analysis can help direct research

  11. Effects of Conversion from Boreal Forest to Arctic Steppe on Soil Communities and Ecosystem Carbon Pools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, P. D.; Natali, S.; Schade, J. D.; Zimov, N.; Zimov, S. A.

    2014-12-01

    The end of the Pleistocene marked the extinction of a great variety of arctic megafauna, which, in part, led to the conversion of arctic grasslands to modern Siberian larch forest. This shift may have increased the vulnerability of permafrost to thawing because of changes driven by the vegetation shift; the higher albedo of grassland and low insulation of snow trampled by animals may have decreased soil temperatures and reduced ground thaw in the grassland ecosystem, resulting in protection of organic carbon in thawed soil and permafrost. To test these hypothesized impacts of arctic megafauna, we examined an experimental reintroduction of large mammals in northeast Siberia, initiated in 1988. Pleistocene Park now contains 23 horses, three musk ox, one bison, and several moose in addition to the native fauna. The park is 16 square km with a smaller enclosure (animals spend most of their time and our study was focused. We measured carbon-pools in forested sites (where scat surveys showed low animal use), and grassy sites (which showed higher use), within the park boundaries. We also measured thaw depth and documented the soil invertebrate communities in each ecosystem. There was a substantial difference in number of invertebrates per kg of organic soil between the forest (600 ± 250) and grassland (300 ± 250), though these differences were not statistically significant they suggest faster nutrient turnover in the forest or a greater proportion of decomposition by invertebrates than other decomposers. While thaw depth was deeper in the grassland (60 ± 4 cm) than in the forest (40 ± 6 cm), we did not detect differences in organic layer depth or percent organic matter between grassland and forest. However, soil in the grassland had higher bulk density, and higher carbon stocks in the organic and mineral soil layers. Although deeper thaw depth in the grassland suggests that more carbon is available to microbial decomposers, ongoing temperature monitoring will help

  12. Differential mobilization of terrestrial carbon pools in Eurasian Arctic river basins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Feng, X.; Vonk, J.E.; van Dongen, B.E.; Gustafsson, Ö.; Semiletov, I.P.; Dudarev, O.V.; Wang, Z.; Montluçon, D.B.; Wacker, L.; Eglinton, T.I.

    2013-01-01

    Mobilization of Arctic permafrost carbon is expected to increase with warming-induced thawing. However, this effect is challenging to assess due to the diverse processes controlling the release of various organic carbon (OC) pools from heterogeneous Arctic landscapes. Here, by radiocarbon dating var

  13. Carbon pools of an intact forest in Gabon

    OpenAIRE

    Gautam, Sishir; Pietsch, Stephan A

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Quantitative and qualitative loss of tropical forests prompted international policy agendas to slow down forest loss through reducing emissions from deforestation and forest degradation (REDD)+, ensuring carbon offset payments to developing countries. So far, many African countries lack reliable forest carbon data and monitoring systems as required by REDD+. In this study, we estimate the carbon stocks of a naturally forested landscape unaffected by direct human impact. We used data ...

  14. Does density fractionation of SOC represent chemically different carbon pools?

    OpenAIRE

    Mulvaney, Michael J.; Graham, M.; Xia, K.; Barrera, Victor H.; Botello, Rubén; Saavedra, Ana Karina; Mamani, P.

    2012-01-01

    Organic matter stabilization is thought to be a process of physical protection and chemical recalcitrance. The determination of recalcitrant soil organic carbon (SOC) often relies on operational definitions provided by various fractionation techniques, usually particle size or density fractionation. However, it is unknown if these operational definitions represent true chemical recalcitrance.

  15. Use of mathematical models for assessing the pool and dynamics of carbon in forest soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komarov, A. S.

    2008-12-01

    The contribution of forest soils to the total carbon budget and to the emission of greenhouse gases is an important problem involved in many international programs, including the Kyoto Protocol. Direct measurements of the carbon pool in forest soils and its changes are slow and expensive; therefore, mathematical models are proposed in different countries for describing the dynamics of soil organic matter (SOM). The models differ in complexity and consider different processes of SOM mineralization and humification. The input parameters include model coefficients (these are usually the rates of decomposition and humification of different SOM compartments) and the initial values for different SOM pools. The coefficients can be estimated in special laboratory and field experiments, but the characteristics of the initial values for different SOM pools are usually absent. In this case, some assumptions about the character of SOM accumulation, which depends on forest vegetation, are used. The most realistic is the use of databases on the pools of carbon and other elements related to the types of forest or habitat conditions, including the primarily water regime and soil fertility. Under some suppositions, the agreement conditions between the main parameters of the SOM and forest vegetation can be formulated to assess the initial SOM pools in the forest litter and mineral horizons of the soil. An example of assessing the prediction of forest soil dynamics in Leningrad oblast was considered.

  16. Sample distillation/graphitization system for carbon pool analysis by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A facility at the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL), Washington, DC, has been developed to extract, trap, cryogenically distill and graphitize carbon from a suite of organic and inorganic carbon pools for analysis by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). The system was developed to investigate carbon pools associated with the formation and stability of methane hydrates. However, since the carbon compounds found in hydrate fields are ubiquitous in aquatic ecosystems, this apparatus is applicable to a number of oceanographic and environmental sample types. Targeted pools are dissolved methane, dissolved organic carbon (DOC), dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), solid organic matrices (e.g., seston, tissue and sediments), biomarkers and short chained (C1-C5) hydrocarbons from methane hydrates. In most instances, the extraction, distillation and graphitization events are continuous within the system, thus, minimizing the possibility of fractionation or contamination during sample processing. A variety of methods are employed to extract carbon compounds and convert them to CO2 for graphitization. Dissolved methane and DIC from the same sample are sparged and cryogenically separated before the methane is oxidized in a high temperature oxygen stream. DOC is oxidized to CO2 by 1200 W ultraviolet photo-oxidation lamp, and solids oxidized in sealed, evacuated tubes. Hydrocarbons liberated from the disassociation of gas hydrates are cryogenically separated with a cryogenic temperature control unit, and biomarkers separated and concentrated by preparative capillary gas chromatography (PCGC). With this system, up to 20 samples, standards or blanks can be processed per day

  17. Variations in ecosystem structure, carbon, and nutrient storage along a fertility gradient in tropical savanna of southern Mato Grosso, Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vourlitis, G. L.; Lobo, F. D.; Lawrence, S.; Holt, K.; Pinto Junior, O. B.; Dalmagro, H. J.; Nogueira, J. D.

    2013-12-01

    Brazilian savanna (cerrado) is composed of vegetation and soil types that are spatially variable, and links between cerrado physiognomy and soil properties are poorly understood. To reduce this uncertainty, we measured the plant community structure and carbon (C) and nutrient (N, P, K, and Ca) stocks in aboveground wood, foliage, and litter, and soil (0-50 cm) pools in a variety of cerrado vegetation types located in the Cuiaba Basin and the Pantanal, Mato Grosso, Brazil. We hypothesized that aboveground and surface soil C and nutrient stocks would be correlated with soil fertility and vegetation structure (including tree species composition, density and tree species diversity). Our results indicate that aboveground woody (AGW), foliage, and soil C stocks were significantly (p < 0.05) correlated with indices of soil fertility but not texture. Since AGWC was the largest C pool, total ecosystem C stocks increase significantly as a function of soil fertility. Similarly, AGWC and foliage C stocks were significantly correlated with tree species diversity (H'), but not soil texture. These data suggest that small-scale (m2-ha) variations in soil fertility are important controls on ecosystem C storage in Brazilian cerrado, and that ecosystem C and nutrient storage is positively related to tree species diversity. These results are qualitatively similar to those reported for tropical forests across regional fertility gradients in the Amazon Basin. These results have implications for the maintenance of soil C storage and fertility and tree species diversity in cerrado.

  18. Dynamics associated with total aboveground biomass, C, nutrient pools, and biomass burning of primary forest and pasture in Rondo‸nia, Brazil during SCAR-B

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guild, Liane S.; Kauffman, J. Boone; Ellingson, Lisa J.; Cummings, Dian L.; Castro, Elmar A.; Babbitt, Ron E.; Ward, Darold E.

    1998-12-01

    Burning of slashed tropical forests and pastures is among the most significant global sources of atmospheric emissions, yet the composition of the fuels and fires that creates these emissions is not well characterized. As part of the Smoke, Clouds, and Radiation-Brazil (SCAR-B) experiment, we measured total aboveground biomass (TAGB) as well as carbon, nitrogen, and sulfur pools in one cattle pasture and two slashed primary forests in Rondônia, Brazil. These pools were measured before and immediately after fires. From these data, we calculated the quantities of biomass and elements lost to the atmosphere during biomass burning. Prefire biomass in the pasture was 66 Mg ha-1; fire consumed 31% of this mass. Woody debris from the forest that occupied this site 12 years previously comprised 81% of the pasture prefire TAGB. Elemental inputs into the atmosphere (site losses) from the pasture fire were 9 Mg C ha-1, 88 kg N ha-1, and 5 kg S ha-1. Combining previous studies with this one, we calculate that the mean TAGB of Amazonian pastures is 74 Mg ha-1 with a mean combustion factor of 46%. Mean nutrient losses from pasture fires in Amazonia are 14 Mg C ha-1, 199 kg N ha-1, and 16 kg S ha-1. The TAGB of the two slashed primary forests before fire was 355 and 399 Mg ha-1 and following fire was 188 and 185 Mg ha-1 (i.e., a combustion factor of 47 and 54%), respectively. Combining this study with other studies of Amazon slashed primary forests, we calculate that the mean TAGB is 349 Mg ha-1 and the mean combustion factor is 48%. Total elemental losses arising from the primary forest slash fires in this study were notably higher than losses from the pasture site: 79 and 102 Mg C ha-1; 1019 and 1196 kg N ha-1; and 87 and 96 kg S ha-1. From this study combined with previous research in Rondônia and Pará, we calculate that mean nutrient losses from primary forest slash fires are 88 Mg C ha-1, 1181 kg N ha-1, and 107 kg S ha-1. As rates of deforestation are remaining high in

  19. Carbon Pools and Poverty Peaks in Lao PDR

    OpenAIRE

    Hett, Cornelia; Heinimann, Andreas; Epprecht, Michael; Messerli, Peter; Hurni, Kaspar

    2012-01-01

    Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and forest Degradation and enhancing forest carbon stocks in developing countries (REDD+) is heavily promoted in Laos. REDD+ is often perceived as an opportunity to jointly address climate change and poverty and, therefore, could come timely for Laos to combine its prominent national target of poverty eradication with global climate mitigation efforts. Countrywide planning of the right approaches to REDD+ combined wi...

  20. Carbon isotope anomaly in the major plant C1 pool and its global biogeochemical implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. T. G. Hamilton

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available We report that the most abundant C1 units of terrestrial plants, the methoxyl groups of pectin and lignin, have a unique carbon isotope signature exceptionally depleted in 13C. Plant-derived C1 volatile organic compounds (VOCs are also anomalously depleted in 13C compared with Cn+1 VOCs. The results confirm that the plant methoxyl pool is the predominant source of biospheric C1 compounds of plant origin such as methanol, chloromethane and bromomethane. Furthermore this pool, comprising ca. 2.5% of carbon in plant biomass, represents an important substrate for methanogenesis and could be a significant source of isotopically light methane entering the atmosphere. Our findings have significant implications for the use of carbon isotope ratios in elucidation of global carbon cycling. Moreover methoxyl groups could act as markers for biological activity in organic matter of terrestrial and extraterrestrial origin.

  1. Carbon isotope anomaly in the major plant C1 pool and its global biogeochemical implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Keppler

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available We report that the most abundant C1 units of terrestrial plants, the methoxyl groups of pectin and lignin, have a unique carbon isotope signature exceptionally depleted in 13C. Plant-derived C1 volatile organic compounds (VOCs are also anomalously depleted in 13C compared with Cn+1 VOCs. The results confirm that the plant methoxyl pool is the predominant source of biospheric C1 compounds of plant origin such as methanol, chloromethane and bromomethane. Furthermore this pool, comprising ca 2.5% of carbon in plant biomass, could be an important substrate for methanogenesis and thus be envisaged as a possible source of isotopically light methane entering the atmosphere. Our findings have significant implications for the use of carbon isotope ratios in elucidation of global carbon cycling. Moreover methoxyl groups could act as markers for biological activity in organic matter of terrestrial and extraterrestrial origin.

  2. Preliminary estimation of bryophyte biomass and carbon pool from three contrasting different vegetation types

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Singh, M.K.; Juhász, A.; Csintalan, Z.; Kaligaric, M.; Marek, Michal V.; Urban, Otmar; Tuba, Z.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 33, č. 1 (2005), s. 267-270. ISSN 0133-3720 Grant ostatní: EU(CZ) HPRI-CT-2002-00197 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60870520 Keywords : bryophyte * carbon pool * rain forest Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 0.320, year: 2005

  3. The terrestrial carbon inventory on the Savannah River Site: Assessing the change in Carbon pools 1951-2001.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dai, Zhaohua; Trettin, Carl, C.; Parresol, Bernard, R.

    2011-11-30

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) has changed from an agricultural-woodland landscape in 1951 to a forested landscape during that latter half of the twentieth century. The corresponding change in carbon (C) pools associated land use on the SRS was estimated using comprehensive inventories from 1951 and 2001 in conjunction with operational forest management and monitoring data from the site.

  4. Impacts of traditional land use practices on soil organic carbon and nitrogen pools of mountain ecosystems in Nepal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giri, Anjana; Katzensteiner, Klaus

    2010-05-01

    Crop production, animal husbandry and forestry are three closely interlinked components of land use systems in the mountains of Nepal. Forests are the major source of fuel wood, construction materials, fodder and litter. The latter is used as a bedding material for livestock and forms an important component of farmyard manure. In addition forest grazing by cattle is a common practice. Excessive extraction of biomass from the forest leads to a decline of soil organic matter and nutrient contents. On the landscape scale these negative effects will partly be compensated by positive effects on soil organic matter and nutrient stocks of arable soils. The experimental data base for a quantification of such effects at the scale of communities is however poor, in particular for Nepal. Understanding the impact of subsistence farming on ecosystems is imperative in order to recommend successful and sustainable land management practices. The aim of our study is to quantify effects of land use on carbon and nitrogen pools and fluxes for mountain communities in Nepal. Results of a case study in the buffer zone area of the Sagarmatha National Park are presented. The potential vegetation comprises mixed forests of Quercus semicarpifolia, Rhododendron arboreum and Tsuga dumosa. Carbon and nitrogen stocks in soil and vegetation were quantified for three different land use types, namely: forest with low human impact, forests with high human impact and agricultural land. The scale of disturbance of the forests has been classified by visual estimation considering the percentage of litter raked, number of lopped trees, and grazing intensity assessed by signs of trampling and the number of trails. After stratification of the community area, 20 plots of 10 m radius were established (17 forest plots, 3 plots for arable land) where biometric data of the vegetation were determined and sub-samples were taken for chemical analyses. Organic layers (litter remaining after litter raking) and soil

  5. Preliminary study on different nutrient pools supplies for the phytoplankton growth in the Jiaozhou Bay in China in the fall of 2004

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Dan; SUN Jun; SONG Shuqun; LUAN Qingshan; Joey McMurdie

    2007-01-01

    The source and significance of two nutrients, nitrogen and phosphorous, were investigated by a modified dilution method performed on seawater samples from the Jiaozhou Bay, in autumn 2004. This modified dilution method accounted for the phytoplankton growth rate, microzooplankton grazing mortality rate, the internal and external nutrient pools, as well as nutrient supplied through remineralization by microzooplankton. The results indicated that the phytoplankton net growth rate increased in turn from inside the bay, to outside the bay, to in the Xiaogang Harbor. The phytoplankton maximum growth rates and microzooplankton grazing mortality rates were 1.14 and 0.92 d-1 outside the bay, 0.42 and 0.32 d-1 inside the bay and 0.98 and 0.62 d-1 in the harbor respectively. Outside the bay, the remineralized nitrogen (Kr=24.49) had heavy influence on the growth of the phytoplankton. Inside the bay, the remineralized phosphorus(Kr=3.49) strongly affected the phytoplankton growth. In the harbor, the remineralized phosphorus (Kr=3.73) was in larger demand by phytoplankton growth. The results demonstrated that the different nutrients pools supplied for phytoplankton growth were greatly in accordance with the phytoplankton community structure, microzooplankton grazing mortality rates and environmental conditions. It is revealed that nutrient remineralization is much more important for the phytoplankton growth in the Jiaozhou Bay than previously believed.

  6. Dissolved organic carbon pools and export from the coastal ocean

    KAUST Repository

    Barrón, Cristina

    2015-10-21

    The distribution of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentration across coastal waters was characterized based on the compilation of 3510 individual estimates of DOC in coastal waters worldwide. We estimated the DOC concentration in the coastal waters that directly exchange with open ocean waters in two different ways, as the DOC concentration at the edge of the shelf break and as the DOC concentration in coastal waters with salinity close to the average salinity in the open ocean. Using these estimates of DOC concentration in the coastal waters that directly exchange with open ocean waters, the mean DOC concentration in the open ocean and the estimated volume of water annually exchanged between coastal and open ocean, we estimated a median ± SE (and average ± SE) global DOC export from coastal to open ocean waters ranging from 4.4 ± 1.0 Pg C yr−1 to 27.0 ± 1.8 Pg C yr−1 (7.0 ± 5.8 Pg C yr−1 to 29.0 ± 8.0 Pg C yr−1) depending on the global hydrological exchange. These values correspond to a median and mean median (and average) range between 14.7 ± 3.3 to 90.0 ± 6.0 (23.3 ± 19.3 to 96.7 ± 26.7) Gg C yr−1 per km of shelf break, which is consistent with the range between 1.4 to 66.1 Gg C yr−1 per km of shelf break of available regional estimates of DOC export. The estimated global DOC export from coastal to open ocean waters is also consistent with independent estimates of the net metabolic balance of the coastal ocean. The DOC export from the coastal to the open ocean is likely to be a sizeable flux and is likely to be an important term in the carbon budget of the open ocean, potentially providing an important subsidy to support heterotrophic activity in the open ocean.

  7. Dissolved organic carbon pools and export from the coastal ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrón, Cristina; Duarte, Carlos M.

    2015-10-01

    The distribution of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentration across coastal waters was characterized based on the compilation of 3510 individual estimates of DOC in coastal waters worldwide. We estimated the DOC concentration in the coastal waters that directly exchange with open ocean waters in two different ways, as the DOC concentration at the edge of the shelf break and as the DOC concentration in coastal waters with salinity close to the average salinity in the open ocean. Using these estimates of DOC concentration in the coastal waters that directly exchange with open ocean waters, the mean DOC concentration in the open ocean and the estimated volume of water annually exchanged between coastal and open ocean, we estimated a median ± SE (and average ± SE) global DOC export from coastal to open ocean waters ranging from 4.4 ± 1.0 Pg C yr-1 to 27.0 ± 1.8 Pg C yr-1 (7.0 ± 5.8 Pg C yr-1 to 29.0 ± 8.0 Pg C yr-1) depending on the global hydrological exchange. These values correspond to a median and mean median (and average) range between 14.7 ± 3.3 to 90.0 ± 6.0 (23.3 ± 19.3 to 96.7 ± 26.7) Gg C yr-1 per km of shelf break, which is consistent with the range between 1.4 to 66.1 Gg C yr-1 per km of shelf break of available regional estimates of DOC export. The estimated global DOC export from coastal to open ocean waters is also consistent with independent estimates of the net metabolic balance of the coastal ocean. The DOC export from the coastal to the open ocean is likely to be a sizeable flux and is likely to be an important term in the carbon budget of the open ocean, potentially providing an important subsidy to support heterotrophic activity in the open ocean.

  8. Molecular investigations into a globally important carbon pool: Permafrost-protected carbon in Alaskan soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldrop, M.P.; Wickland, K.P.; White, Rickie; Berhe, A.A.; Harden, J.W.; Romanovsky, V.E.

    2010-01-01

    The fate of carbon (C) contained within permafrost in boreal forest environments is an important consideration for the current and future carbon cycle as soils warm in northern latitudes. Currently, little is known about the microbiology or chemistry of permafrost soils that may affect its decomposition once soils thaw. We tested the hypothesis that low microbial abundances and activities in permafrost soils limit decomposition rates compared with active layer soils. We examined active layer and permafrost soils near Fairbanks, AK, the Yukon River, and the Arctic Circle. Soils were incubated in the lab under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Gas fluxes at -5 and 5 ??C were measured to calculate temperature response quotients (Q10). The Q10 was lower in permafrost soils (average 2.7) compared with active layer soils (average 7.5). Soil nutrients, leachable dissolved organic C (DOC) quality and quantity, and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of the soils revealed that the organic matter within permafrost soils is as labile, or even more so, than surface soils. Microbial abundances (fungi, bacteria, and subgroups: methanogens and Basidiomycetes) and exoenzyme activities involved in decomposition were lower in permafrost soils compared with active layer soils, which, together with the chemical data, supports the reduced Q10 values. CH4 fluxes were correlated with methanogen abundance and the highest CH4 production came from active layer soils. These results suggest that permafrost soils have high inherent decomposability, but low microbial abundances and activities reduce the temperature sensitivity of C fluxes. Despite these inherent limitations, however, respiration per unit soil C was higher in permafrost soils compared with active layer soils, suggesting that decomposition and heterotrophic respiration may contribute to a positive feedback to warming of this eco region. Published 2010. This article is a US Government work and is in the public domain in the

  9. Nutrient demand interacts with legume particle length to affect digestion responses and rumen pool sizes in dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kammes, K L; Ying, Y; Allen, M S

    2012-05-01

    Effects of legume particle length on dry matter intake (DMI), milk production, ruminal fermentation and pool sizes, and digestion and passage kinetics, and the relationship of these effects with preliminary DMI (pDMI) were evaluated using 13 ruminally and duodenally cannulated Holstein cows in a crossover design with a 14-d preliminary period and two 19-d treatment periods. During the preliminary period, pDMI of individual cows ranged from 22.8 to 32.4 kg/d (mean=26.5 kg/d) and 3.5% fat-corrected milk yield ranged from 22.9 to 62.4 kg/d (mean=35.1 kg/d). Experimental treatments were diets containing alfalfa silage chopped to (1) 19 mm (long cut, LC) or (2) 10 mm (short cut, SC) theoretical length of cut as the sole forage. Alfalfa silages contained approximately 43% neutral detergent fiber (NDF); diets contained approximately 47% forage and 20% forage NDF. Preliminary DMI, an index of nutrient demand, was determined during the last 4 d of the preliminary period, when cows were fed a common diet, and used as a covariate. Main effects of legume particle length and their interaction with pDMI were tested by ANOVA. Alfalfa particle length and its interaction with pDMI did not affect milk yield or rumen pH. The LC diet decreased milk fat concentration more per kilogram of pDMI increase than the SC diet and increased yields of milk fat and fat-corrected milk less per kilogram of pDMI increase than the SC diet, resulting in a greater benefit for LC at low pDMI and for SC at high pDMI. The LC diet tended to decrease DMI compared with the SC diet. Ruminal digestion and passage rates of feed fractions did not differ between LC and SC and were not related to level of intake. The LC diet tended to decrease the rate of ruminal turnover for NDF but increased NDF rumen pools at a slower rate than the SC diet as pDMI increased. This indicated that the faster NDF turnover rate did not counterbalance the higher DMI for SC, resulting in larger NDF rumen pools for SC than LC. As p

  10. Revisiting soil carbon and nitrogen sampling: quantitative pits versus rotary cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide and its feedbacks with global climate have sparked renewed interest in quantifying ecosystem carbon (C) budgets, including quantifying belowground pools. Belowground nutrient budgets require accurate estimates of soil mass, coarse fragment content, and nutrient ...

  11. Effects of Management on Soil Carbon Pools in California Rangeland Ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silver, W. L.; Ryals, R.; Lewis, D. J.; Creque, J.; Wacker, M.; Larson, S.

    2008-12-01

    Rangeland ecosystems managed for livestock production represent the largest land-use footprint globally, covering more than one-quarter of the world's land surface (Asner et al. 2004). In California, rangelands cover an estimated 17 million hectares or approximately 40% of the land area (FRAP 2003). These ecosystems have considerable potential to sequester carbon (C) in soil and offset greenhouse gas emissions through changes in land management practices. Climate policies and C markets may provide incentives for rangeland managers to pursue strategies that optimize soil C storage, yet we lack a thorough understanding of the effects of management on soil C pools in rangelands over time and space. We sampled soil C pools on rangelands in a 260 km2 region of Marin and Sonoma counties to determine if patterns in soil C storage exist with management. Replicate soil samples were collected from 35 fields that spanned the dominant soil orders, plant communities, and management practices in the region while controlling for slope and bioclimatic zone (n = 1050). Management practices included organic amendments, intensive (dairy) and extensive (other) grazing practices, and subsoiling. Soil C pools ranged from approximately 50 to 140 Mg C ha-1 to 1 m depth, with a mean of 99 ± 22 (sd) Mg C ha-1. Differences among sites were due primarily to C concentrations, which exhibited a much larger coefficient of variation than bulk density at all depths. There were no statistically significant differences among the dominant soil orders. Subsoiling appeared to significantly increase soil C content in the top 50 cm, even though subsoiling had only occurred for the first time the previous Nov. Organic amendments also appeared to greatly increase soil C pools, and was the dominant factor that distinguished soil C pools in intensive and extensive land uses. Our results indicate that management has the potential to significantly increase soil C pools. Future research will determine the

  12. Allocation to carbon storage pools in Norway spruce saplings under drought and low CO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Henrik; McDowell, Nate G; Trumbore, Susan

    2015-03-01

    Non-structural carbohydrates (NSCs) are critical to maintain plant metabolism under stressful environmental conditions, but we do not fully understand how NSC allocation and utilization from storage varies with stress. While it has become established that storage allocation is unlikely to be a mere overflow process, very little empirical evidence has been produced to support this view, at least not for trees. Here we present the results of an intensively monitored experimental manipulation of whole-tree carbon (C) balance (young Picea abies (L.) H Karst.) using reduced atmospheric [CO2] and drought to reduce C sources. We measured specific C storage pools (glucose, fructose, sucrose, starch) over 21 weeks and converted concentration measurement into fluxes into and out of the storage pool. Continuous labeling ((13)C) allowed us to track C allocation to biomass and non-structural C pools. Net C fluxes into the storage pool occurred mainly when the C balance was positive. Storage pools increased during periods of positive C gain and were reduced under negative C gain. (13)C data showed that C was allocated to storage pools independent of the net flux and even under severe C limitation. Allocation to below-ground tissues was strongest in control trees followed by trees experiencing drought followed by those grown under low [CO2]. Our data suggest that NSC storage has, under the conditions of our experimental manipulation (e.g., strong progressive drought, no above-ground growth), a high allocation priority and cannot be considered an overflow process. While these results also suggest active storage allocation, definitive proof of active plant control of storage in woody plants requires studies involving molecular tools. PMID:25769339

  13. Mitochondrial DNA Replication Defects Disturb Cellular dNTP Pools and Remodel One-Carbon Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikkanen, Joni; Forsström, Saara; Euro, Liliya; Paetau, Ilse; Kohnz, Rebecca A; Wang, Liya; Chilov, Dmitri; Viinamäki, Jenni; Roivainen, Anne; Marjamäki, Päivi; Liljenbäck, Heidi; Ahola, Sofia; Buzkova, Jana; Terzioglu, Mügen; Khan, Nahid A; Pirnes-Karhu, Sini; Paetau, Anders; Lönnqvist, Tuula; Sajantila, Antti; Isohanni, Pirjo; Tyynismaa, Henna; Nomura, Daniel K; Battersby, Brendan J; Velagapudi, Vidya; Carroll, Christopher J; Suomalainen, Anu

    2016-04-12

    Mitochondrial dysfunction affects cellular energy metabolism, but less is known about the consequences for cytoplasmic biosynthetic reactions. We report that mtDNA replication disorders caused by TWINKLE mutations-mitochondrial myopathy (MM) and infantile onset spinocerebellar ataxia (IOSCA)-remodel cellular dNTP pools in mice. MM muscle shows tissue-specific induction of the mitochondrial folate cycle, purine metabolism, and imbalanced and increased dNTP pools, consistent with progressive mtDNA mutagenesis. IOSCA-TWINKLE is predicted to hydrolyze dNTPs, consistent with low dNTP pools and mtDNA depletion in the disease. MM muscle also modifies the cytoplasmic one-carbon cycle, transsulfuration, and methylation, as well as increases glucose uptake and its utilization for de novo serine and glutathione biosynthesis. Our evidence indicates that the mitochondrial replication machinery communicates with cytoplasmic dNTP pools and that upregulation of glutathione synthesis through glucose-driven de novo serine biosynthesis contributes to the metabolic stress response. These results are important for disorders with primary or secondary mtDNA instability and offer targets for metabolic therapy. PMID:26924217

  14. Water-Extractable Carbon Pools and Microbial Biomass Carbon in Sodic Water-Irrigated Soils Amended with Gypsum and Organic Manures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    O.P.CHOUDHARY; J.K.GILL; BIJAY-SINGH

    2013-01-01

    Microbial biomass carbon (MBC),a small fraction of soil organic matter,has a rapid turnover rate and is a reservoir of labile nutrients.The water-extractable carbon pools provide a fairly good estimate of labile C present in soil and can be easily quantified.Changes in soil MBC and water-extractable organic carbon pools were studied in a 14-year long-term experiment in plots of rice-wheat rotation irrigated with canal water (CW),sodic water (SW,10-12.5 mmolc L-1 residual sodium carbonate),and SW amended with gypsum with or without application of organic amendments including farmyard manure (FYM),green manure (GM),and wheat straw (WS).Irrigation with SW increased soil exchangeable sodium percentage by more than 13 times compared to irrigation with CW.Sodic water irrigation significantly decreased hot water-extractable organic carbon (HWOC) from 330 to 286 mg kg-1 soil and cold water-extractable organic carbon (CWOC) from 53 to 22 mg kg-1 soil in the top 0-7.5 cm soil layer.In the lower soil layer (7.5-15 cm),reduction in HWOC was not significant.Application of gypsum alone resulted in a decrease in HWOC in the SW plots,whereas an increase was recorded in the SW plots with application of both gypsum and organic amendments in both the soil layers.Nevertheless,application of gypsum and organic amendments increased the mean CWOC as compared with application of gypsum alone.CWOC was significantly correlated with MBC but did not truly reflect the changes in MBC in the treatments with gypsum and organic amendments applied.For the treatments without organic amendments,HWOC was negatively correlated with MBC (r =-0.57*)in the 0-7.5 cm soil layer,whereas for the treatments with organic amendments,both were positively correlated.Irrigation with SW significantly reduced the rice yield by 3 t ha-1 and the yield of rice and wheat by 5 t ha-1 as compared to irrigation with canal water.Application of amendments significantly increased rice and wheat yields.Both the rice yield and

  15. Seasonal dynamics of carbon and nutrients from two contrasting tropical floodplain systems in the Zambezi River basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuijdgeest, A. L.; Zurbrügg, R.; Blank, N.; Fulcri, R.; Senn, D. B.; Wehrli, B.

    2015-12-01

    the wet season. Stable carbon isotopes suggested that inputs from the inundated floodplain to the particulate organic-matter pool were important during the wet season, whereas permanent vegetation contributed to the material transported during the dry season. This study revealed effects of dam construction on organic-matter and nutrient dynamics on the downstream floodplain that only become visible after longer periods, and it highlights how floodplains act as large biogeochemical reactors that can behave distinctly differently from the entire catchment.

  16. Source Material and Concentration of Wildfire-Produced Pyrogenic Carbon Influence Post-Fire Soil Nutrient Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas A. Michelotti

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Pyrogenic carbon (PyC is produced by the thermal decomposition of organic matter in the absence of oxygen (O. PyC affects nutrient availability, may enhance post-fire nitrogen (N mineralization rates, and can be a significant carbon (C pool in fire-prone ecosystems. Our objectives were to characterize PyC produced by wildfires and examine the influence that contrasting types of PyC have on C and N mineralization rates. We determined C, N, O, and hydrogen (H concentrations and atomic ratios of charred bark (BK, charred pine cones (PC, and charred woody debris (WD using elemental analysis. We also incubated soil amended with BK, PC, and WD at two concentrations for 60 days to measure C and N mineralization rates. PC had greater H/C and O/C ratios than BK and WD, suggesting that PC may have a lesser aromatic component than BK and WD. C and N mineralization rates decreased with increasing PyC concentrations, and control samples produced more CO2 than soils amended with PyC. Soils with PC produced greater CO2 and had lower N mineralization rates than soils with BK or WD. These results demonstrate that PyC type and concentration have potential to impact nutrient dynamics and C flux to the atmosphere in post-fire forest soils.

  17. Evaluating soil organic carbon and nutrient storage in a sustainable forest chestnut management context

    OpenAIRE

    Patrício, Maria do Sameiro; Nunes, Luís; Pereira, Ermelinda

    2013-01-01

    Forests fix carbon dioxide from the atmosphere and sequester it in biomass, timber products and soils (stock effect). Soil organic carbon (SOC) is the major stock of the terrestrial biosphere with great importance for the balance of carbon at the global scale. Nowadays, a reliable estimate of the stored C, in the mineral soil pool of forest ecosystems, is of great importance in helping Governments to make decisions in carrying out the Kyoto Protocol. In this study the quantification of C and ...

  18. Marine microalgae growth and carbon partitioning as a function of nutrient availability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Tomásia; Fernandes, Igor; Andrade, Carlos A P; Cordeiro, Nereida

    2016-08-01

    To understand in which way the structural differences of three marine microalgae (Nannochloropsis gaditana, Rhodomonas marina and Isochrysis sp.) affect their carbon partitioning, growth and applicability; a stoichiometric imbalance was imposed by steady carbon and other nutrients variation. Towards high nutrients concentrations/low carbon availability a decrease of 12-51% in C/N microalgae ratio was observed and maximum cell densities were achieved. Moreover, linear correlation between the nutrient input and microalgae protein content were observed. The macromolecular ratios pointed that carbohydrate was the main contributor for the C/N decrement. Although lipid content in R. marina remained constant throughout the experiment, a rise of 37-107% in N. gaditana and Isochrysis sp. was verified. Lipid fractions revealed high percentages of glycolipids in all microalgae (57-73% of total lipids). The present study shows an easy way to understand and modulate microalgae carbon partitioning relying on the field of application. PMID:27179298

  19. Quantification of functional soil organic carbon pools in a chronosequence of land abandonment in southern Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trigalet, Sylvain; Gabarrón-Galeote, Miguel A.; Van Oost, Kristof; van Wesemael, Bas

    2015-04-01

    Land abandonment is the dominant land use change in the Mediterranean, and determines the soil organic carbon (SOC) as the vegetation recovers during secondary succession. The rate of SOC recovery is influenced by environmental factors such as precipitation, soil properties or other local factors. Using aerial photographs taken in 1956, 1977, 1984, 1998, 2001 and 2009, a chronosequence of crop land abandonment was designed and topsoil samples were taken at each stage of recovery in a region North of Málaga. As SOC is a mixture of functional pools, it is important to isolate organic carbon with distinct functional properties to better understand the overall dynamic over decades. Using fractionation scheme introduced by Zimmermann et al. (2007), five fractions were isolated based on particle size, density and resistance: particulate organic matter (POM), dissolved organic carbon (DOC), SOC linked to silt and clay (s & c), SOC attached to sand particles or occluded in aggregates (S+A) and a chemically resistant fraction obtained by NaOCl oxidation (rSOC). Although there were no significant changes in particle-size distribution between the recovery stages (except for the croplands), there was a significant increase of S+A fraction over time (16 to 38%) at the expense of the s & c fraction (84 to 58%), indicating aggregation processes. Carbon concentrations within fractions S+A or rSOC did not change over time. Rather, carbon associated with silt and clay particles (s &c) was significantly affected after a few decades of abandonment. It increased from 5.7 gC.kg-1 in croplands to 10.3 gC.kg-1 in semi-natural plots. The chronosequence showed that carbon can be stored in more stable fractions. Taking into account active carbon (DOC + POM) and intermediate carbon (s & c, S+A) as indicators for carbon dynamics, we showed that the proportion of active carbon increased from 11% to 34% within the chronosequence. On the other hand, the proportion of slow cycling carbon

  20. The significance of organic carbon and nutrient export from peatland-dominated landscapes subject to disturbance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Waldron

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available The terrestrial-aquatic interface is a crucial environment in which to consider the fate of exported terrestrial carbon in the aquatic system. To a large extent the fate of dissolved organic carbon (DOC may be controlled by nutrient availability. However, peat-dominated headwater catchments are normally considered of low nutrient status and thus there is little data on the interaction of DOC and nutrients. Here we present nutrient and DOC data exported from two UK catchments, both dominated by peat headwaters, but of differing land-use. Glen Dye is a moorland with no trees; Whitelee has partially forested peats and peaty podzols, and is now undergoing development to host Europe's largest on-shore windfarm, the Whitelee Windfarm. There are significant linear relationships between DOC and soluble reactive phosphorus and nitrate concentrations in the drainage waters, but inter-catchment differences exist. Changes in the pattern of nutrient and carbon export in Whitelee suggest that disturbance of peatlands soils can impact the receiving water and that nutrient export does not increase in a stoichiometric manner that will promote increase in biomass. As such the changes are more likely to cause increased aquatic respiration, and thus lead to higher dissolved CO2 concentrations (and therefore CO2 efflux. Hence disturbance of terrestrial carbon stores may also impact the gaseous carbon cycle. Confirming the source of carbon and nutrients in these study sites is not possible. However, nearby 14C measurements are in keeping with other published literature values from similar sites which show C in DOM exported from peatlands is predominantly modern, and thus supports an interpretation that nutrients, additional to carbon, are derived from shallow soils. Estimates of organic carbon loss from Whitelee catchments to the drainage waters suggest a system where losses are approaching likely sequestration rates. We suggest

  1. Carbon pool analysis of methane hydrate regions in the seafloor by accelerator mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Accelerator mass spectrometry for 14C was applied to the study of carbon pools associated with methane hydrate formations found in the seafloor at two continental margin sites. The Gulf of Mexico (GOM) site contains thermogenically produced methane that is ancient and thus free of 14C. The Cascadia Margin site contains biogenically produced methane, so may contain some 14C. This work reports on the 14C content of organic matter in the sediment at the GOM site, and of the methane in hydrates from both sites. In the GOM, the surface sediments contained ancient organic matter that was from 20% to 60% of the total organic carbon content. At both sites, the collected hydrates contained essentially no 14C

  2. Pelagic community production and carbon-nutrient stoichiometry under variable ocean acidification in an Arctic fjord

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Silyakova

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Net community production (NCP and carbon to nutrient uptake ratios were studied during a large-scale mesocosm experiment on ocean acidification in Kongsfjorden, western Svalbard, during June–July 2010. Nutrient depleted fjord water with natural plankton assemblages, enclosed in nine mesocosms of ~ 50 m3 in volume, was exposed to pCO2 levels ranging initially from 185 to 1420 μatm. NCP estimations are the cumulative change in dissolved inorganic carbon concentrations after accounting for gas exchange and total alkalinity variations. Stoichiometric coupling between inorganic carbon and nutrient net uptake is shown as a ratio of NCP to a cumulative change in inorganic nutrients. Phytoplankton growth was stimulated by nutrient addition half way through the experiment and three distinct peaks in chlorophyll a concentration were observed during the experiment. Accordingly, the experiment was divided in three phases. Cumulative NCP was similar in all mesocosms over the duration of the experiment. However, in phases I and II, NCP was higher and in phase III lower at elevated pCO2. Due to relatively low inorganic nutrient concentration in phase I, C : N and C : P uptake ratios were calculated only for the period after nutrient addition (phase II and phase III. For the total post-nutrient period (phase II + phase III ratios were close to Redfield, however they were lower in phase II and higher in phase III. Variability of NCP, C : N and C : P uptake ratios in different phases reflects the effect of increasing CO2 on phytoplankton community composition and succession. The phytoplankton community was composed predominantly of haptophytes in phase I, prasinophytes, dinoflagellates, and cryptophytes in phase II, and haptophytes, prasinophytes, dinoflagellates and chlorophytes in phase III (Schulz et al., 2013. Increasing ambient inorganic carbon concentrations have also been shown to promote primary production and carbon assimilation. For this study, it is

  3. Stress differentially impacts reserve pools and root exudation: implications for ecosystem functioning and carbon balance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landhäusser, Simon; Karst, Justine; Wiley, Erin; Gaster, Jacob

    2016-04-01

    Environmental stress can influence carbon assimilation and the accumulation and distribution of carbon between growth, reserves, and exudation; however, it is unclear how these processes vary by different stress types. Partitioning of carbon to growth and reserves in plants might also vary between different organs. Roots reserves are of particular interest as they link the plant with the soil carbon cycle through exudation. Simple models of diffusion across concentration gradients predict the more C reserves in roots, the more C should be exuded from roots. However, the mechanisms underlying the accumulation and loss of C from roots may differ depending on the stress experienced by the plants. In a controlled study we tested whether different types of stresses (shade, cold soil, and drought) have differential effects on the distribution, abundance, and form (sugar vs. starch) of carbohydrates in seedlings, and whether these changes alone could explain differences in root exudation between stress types. Non-structural carbohydrate (NSC) concentration and pool sizes varied by stress type and between organs. Mass-specific C exudation increased with fine root sugar concentration; however, stress type affected exudation independently of reserve concentration. Seedlings exposed to cold soils exuded the most C on a per root mass basis followed by shade and drought. Through 13C labeling, we also found that depending on the stress type, aspen seedlings may be less able to control the loss of C to the soil compared with unstressed seedlings, resulting in more C leaked to the rhizosphere. The loss of C beyond that predicted by simple concentration gradients might have important implications for ecosystem functioning and carbon balance. If stressed plants lose proportionally more carbon to the soil, existing interactions between plants and soils may decouple under stress, and may include unexpected C fluxes between trees, soils and the atmosphere with a changing climate.

  4. Photomicrobial fuel cell (PFC) for simultaneous organic carbon, nutrients removal and energy production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Yifeng; Safa, Jafar; Angelidaki, Irini

    2014-01-01

    illumination, stable power density of 68±5 mW/m2 and biomass of 0.56±0.02 g/L were generated at initial algae concentration of 3.5 g/L. Accordingly, the removal efficiency of organic carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus was 99.6%, 87.6% and 69.8%, respectively. Mass balance analysis suggested the main removal......A sediment-type photomicrobial fuel cell (PFC), based on the synergistic interaction between microalgae (Chlorella vulgaris) and electrochemically active bacteria, was developed to remove carbon and nutrients from wastewater, and produce electricity and algal biomass simultaneously. Under...... power generation, carbon and nutrients removal was not significantly affected after changing the light/dark photoperiod from 24 h/0 h to 10 h/14 h. This work represents the first successful attempt to develop an effective bacteria-algae coupled system, capable for extracting energy and removing carbon...

  5. Nutrient limitation reduces land carbon uptake in simulations with a model of combined carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus cycling

    OpenAIRE

    Goll, D. S.; V. Brovkin; Parida, B.R.; Reick, C. H.; Kattge, J.; Reich, P. B.; van Bodegom, P.M.; Niinemets, Ü.

    2012-01-01

    Terrestrial carbon (C) cycle models applied for climate projections simulate a strong increase in net primary productivity (NPP) due to elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration during the 21st century. These models usually neglect the limited availability of nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P), nutrients that commonly limit plant growth and soil carbon turnover. To investigate how the projected C sequestration is altered when stoichiometric constraints on C cycling are consid...

  6. Effect of Nutrient/Carbon Supplements on Biological Phosphate and Nitrate Uptake by Protozoan Isolates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akpor, O. B.; Momba, M. N. B.; Okonkwo, J.

    This study was aimed at investigating the effect of nine different nutrient/carbon supplements in mixed liquor on nutrient uptake ability of three wastewater protozoan isolates, which have previously been screened for phosphate and nitrate uptake efficiency. The results revealed that over 50% of phosphate was removed in the presence of sodium acetate, glucose or sucrose. Similarly, nitrate uptake of over 60% was observed in the presence of sodium acetate, sodium succinate, glucose or sucrose. These trends were common in all the isolates. Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD) removal in the mixed liquor was only found to be significantly removed in mixed liquors that were supplemented with glucose, sucrose or sodium succinate. In the presence of sodium acetate, COD was observed to increase. The findings of this investigation have revealed that nutrient uptake and COD removal by the test protozoan isolates may be dependent primarily on the initial nutrient supplement in mixed liquor.

  7. Impacts of pine and eucalyptus plantations on carbon and nutrients stocks and fluxes in miombo forests ecosystems

    OpenAIRE

    Guedes, Benard

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge of how commercial pine and eucalyptus plantations affect soil carbon and nutrient status is important in Mozambique, where incentives are available to increase the area of forest plantations and also to conserve mature miombo forests. Tree species growing on similar sites may affect ecosystem carbon differently if they allocate carbon to aboveground and belowground parts at different rates. Moreover, changes in ecosystem carbon and nutrient status are closely correlated. This thesis...

  8. Quantifying the pluri-centennial soil organic carbon pool using Rock-Eval pyrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cécillon, Lauric; Baudin, François; Chenu, Claire; Christensen, Bent T.; Houot, Sabine; Kätterer, Thomas; Lutfalla, Suzanne; Macdonald, Andy; van Oort, Folkert; Plante, Alain F.; Savignac, Florence; Soucémarianadin, Laure; Barré, Pierre

    2016-04-01

    amount (5 to 95%) of CH, CO and CO2 gas had evolved during the RE6 pyrolysis and oxidation steps. These RE6 predictors were used in a random forest (RF) multivariate regression model to predict the proportion of the pluri-centennial SOC pool. Our RE6-RF model showed an excellent predictive performance: out-of-bag R²=0.93, out-of-bag error=6% of total SOC (n=86); validation R²=0.96, prediction error=5% of total SOC (n=20). We then applied our RE6-RF model on 50 cropland and forest topsoils (0-30cm) with contrasting geo-pedology (region of Grignon, FR). Despite its wide heterogeneity, this new sample set was within the prediction range of our RE6-RF model. The RE6-RF predicted proportion of the pluri-centennial SOC pool was consistently higher in cropland than in forest soils (porganic carbon reservoir. Our study positions RE6 pyrolysis as a meaningful tool to quantify the pluri-centennial SOC pool, with the ability of detecting its landscape-scale heterogeneities.

  9. Quantifying the pluri-centennial soil organic carbon pool using Rock-Eval pyrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cécillon, Lauric; Baudin, François; Chenu, Claire; Christensen, Bent T.; Houot, Sabine; Kätterer, Thomas; Lutfalla, Suzanne; Macdonald, Andy; van Oort, Folkert; Plante, Alain F.; Savignac, Florence; Soucémarianadin, Laure; Barré, Pierre

    2016-04-01

    amount (5 to 95%) of CH, CO and CO2 gas had evolved during the RE6 pyrolysis and oxidation steps. These RE6 predictors were used in a random forest (RF) multivariate regression model to predict the proportion of the pluri-centennial SOC pool. Our RE6-RF model showed an excellent predictive performance: out-of-bag R²=0.93, out-of-bag error=6% of total SOC (n=86); validation R²=0.96, prediction error=5% of total SOC (n=20). We then applied our RE6-RF model on 50 cropland and forest topsoils (0-30cm) with contrasting geo-pedology (region of Grignon, FR). Despite its wide heterogeneity, this new sample set was within the prediction range of our RE6-RF model. The RE6-RF predicted proportion of the pluri-centennial SOC pool was consistently higher in cropland than in forest soils (pparent material (p=0.001), indicating a clear geochemical control on the pluri-centennial soil organic carbon reservoir. Our study positions RE6 pyrolysis as a meaningful tool to quantify the pluri-centennial SOC pool, with the ability of detecting its landscape-scale heterogeneities.

  10. Epiphyte dynamics and carbon metabolism in a nutrient enriched Mediterranean seagrass ( Posidonia oceanica ) ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apostolaki, Eugenia T.; Holmer, Marianne; Marbà, Núria; Karakassis, Ioannis

    2011-08-01

    The study aimed at examining the relationship between epiphyte dynamics and carbon metabolism in seagrass ecosystems under nutrient enrichment. Temporal variability of epiphytes and factors controlling their dynamics (i.e. environmental conditions, substratum availability, substratum stability and herbivore pressure) were assessed in a fish farm impacted and an unaffected Mediterranean seagrass ( Posidonia oceanica) meadow in the Aegean Sea (Greece). The factors controlling epiphyte dynamics responded differently to nutrient enrichment and partly interacted, rendering their cumulative effect on epiphyte load difficult to elucidate. Yet epiphytes accumulated on seagrass leaves near to the fish farm throughout the year, contributing 2 times more in above-ground biomass at cages than the control station. Reduction in substratum availability (i.e. decrease in leaf biomass) and increase in herbivore pressure affected epiphyte load, albeit their effects were not strong enough to counterbalance the effect of nutrient input from fish farm effluents. Moderate yet continuous nutrient input possibly stimulated epiphyte growth in excess of herbivory, shifting the control of epiphytes from top-down to bottom-up. Epiphyte accumulation affected carbon metabolism in the seagrass ecosystem by contributing to enhanced dissolved organic carbon (DOC) release, but seagrass loss was so acute that increased epiphyte cover could not counterbalance the decrease in community carbon production which was mainly driven by seagrass decline.

  11. Maternal one-carbon nutrient intake and cancer risk in offspring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietary intake of one-carbon nutrients, particularly folate, vitamin B2 (riboflavin), vitamin B6, vitamin B12, and choline have been linked to the risk of cancers of the colon and breast in both human and animal studies. More recently, experimental and epidemiological data have emerged to suggest t...

  12. Carbon and nitrogen nutrient balance signaling in plants

    OpenAIRE

    Zheng, Zhi-Liang

    2009-01-01

    Cellular carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) metabolism must be tightly coordinated to sustain optimal growth and development for plants and other cellular organisms. Furthermore, C/N balance is also critical for the ecosystem response to elevated atmospheric CO2. Despite numerous physiological and molecular studies in C/N balance or ratio response, very few genes have been shown to play important roles in C/N balance signaling. During recent five years, exciting progress was made through genetic and...

  13. Distribution and origin of suspended matter and organic carbon pools in the Tana River Basin, Kenya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Tamooh

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available We studied patterns in organic carbon pools and their origin in the Tana River Basin (Kenya, in February 2008 (dry season, September–November 2009 (wet season, and June–July 2010 (end of wet season, covering the full continuum from headwater streams to lowland mainstream sites. A consistent downstream increase in total suspended matter (TSM, 0.6 to 7058 mg l−1 and particulate organic carbon (POC, 0.23 to 119.8 mg l−1 was observed during all three sampling campaigns, particularly pronounced below 1000 m above sea level, indicating that most particulate matter exported towards the coastal zone originated from the mid and low altitude zones rather than from headwater regions. This indicates that the cascade of hydroelectrical reservoirs act as an extremely efficient particle trap. Although 7Be / 210Pbxs ratios/age of suspended sediment do not show clear seasonal variation, the gradual downstream increase of suspended matter during end of wet season suggests its origin is caused by inputs of older sediments from bank erosion and/or river sediment resuspension. During wet season, higher TSM concentrations correspond with relatively young suspended matter, suggesting a contribution from recently eroded material. With the exception of reservoir waters, POC was predominantly of terrestrial origin as indicated by generally high POC : chlorophyll a (POC : Chl a ratios (up to ~41 000. Stable isotope signatures of POC (δ13CPOC ranged between −32 and −20‰ and increased downstream, reflecting an increasing contribution of C4-derived carbon in combination with an expected shift in δ13C for C3 vegetation towards the more semi-arid lowlands. δ13C values in sediments from the main reservoir (−19.5 to −15.7‰ were higher than those found in any of the riverine samples, indicating selective retention of particles associated with C4

  14. Temporal Variability of Carbon and Nutrient Budgets from a Tropical Lagoon in Chiku, Southwestern Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, J.-J.; Kuo, F.

    2002-05-01

    Biogeochemical processes and budgets of carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus from the semi-enclosed Chiku Lagoon were constructed through periodic observations and modelling. During the investigation, samples were mostly collected bimonthly, and hydrochemical properties, inorganic and organic nutrients (DIN, DON, DIP, DOP, Dsi (dissolved silica)) and organic carbon (DOC, POC) from waters associated with the lagoon were measured. The water exchange time of Chiku Lagoon ranges from 1·0 d (June 1997) to 8·5 d (January 1997) with an annual mean of 5·0 d. The residence time of nutrients varies with water exchange time, and is about 2-5 d longer than the water exchange time. Terrestrial inputs and lagoon distributions of nutrients varied in time and space based on the time scale of sampling. Thus, carbon and nutrient budgets were prepared for each sampling period and then combined to form annual budgets, which differed significantly from those modelled from annual means of various parameters. The annual removal of terrestrial nutrient inputs to the lagoon system is 69·4, 47·0, 27·7 and 42·0%, respectively, for DIN, DON, DIP and DOP. Consequently, the nonconservative flux of dissolved inorganic phosphorus (ΔDIP) from the lagoon is around -0·1 mole m-2 yr-1, that is equivalent to an internal organic carbon sink of 11 mol C m-2 yr-1. This organic carbon budget indicates that the lagoon is an autotrophic system where photosynthesis exceeds respiration (p-r> 0). This carbon sink is one of largest reported from world's lagoons, and its large size may result from the abundant nutrients in the lagoon. However, although the Chiku Lagoon is estimated to remove 4·7 mol C m-2 yr-1 carbonate through oyster calcification, it emits an equivalent amount of CO2 into the system. Despite net nitrogen fixation being observed during some periods, denitrification exceeds nitrogen fixation throughout the period of observation [(nfix-denit)=-1·4 mole N m-2 yr-1].

  15. Distribution and origin of suspended sediments and organic carbon pools in the Tana River Basin, Kenya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Tamooh

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available We studied patterns in organic carbon pools and their origin in the Tana River Basin (Kenya, in February 2008 (dry season, September–November 2009 (wet season, and June–July 2010 (end of wet season, and covering the full continuum from headwater streams to lowland mainstream sites. A consistent downstream increase in total suspended matter (TSM, 0.6 to 7058 mg l−1 and particulate organic carbon (POC, 0.23 to 119.8 mg l−1 was observed during all three sampling campaigns, particularly pronounced below 1000 m above sea level, indicating that most particulate matter exported towards the coastal zone originated from the mid and low altitude zones rather than from headwater regions. This indicates that the cascade of hydroelectrical reservoirs act as an extremely efficient particle trap. The decrease in 7Be/210Pbxs ratios of TSM downstream (range: 0.43 to 1.93 during the wet season indicated that the increasing sediment load in the lower Tana was largely due to recent surface erosion. During lower flow conditions, however, the gradual longitudinal increase in TSM coincided was more variable 7Be/210Pbxs ratios (0 to 4.5, suggesting that bank erosion and/or remobilisation of older sediments are the sources of the increasing TSM concentrations downstream. With the exception of reservoir waters, POC was predominantly of terrestrial origin as indicated by generally high POC/Chl-a ratios (up to ∼ 41 000. Stable isotope signatures of POC (δ13CPOC ranged between –32 and –20 ‰ and increased downstream, reflecting an increasing contribution of C4-derived carbon in combination with an expected shift in δ13C for C3 vegetation towards the more semi-arid lowlands. Sediments from the main reservoir (Masinga showed δ13C values higher (–19.5 to –15.7 ‰ than found in any of the riverine samples, indicating

  16. Functional soil organic carbon pools for major soil units and land uses in southern Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kögel-Knabner, Ingrid; Wiesmeier, Martin

    2015-04-01

    Soil management, especially the type and intensity of land use, affect the carbon cycle to a high extent as they modify carbon sequestration in a specific soil. Thus man is intervening in the natural carbon cycle on a global scale. In our study, the amount of active, intermediate and passive SOC pools was determined for major soil types and land uses of Bavaria in southern Germany. Our SOC inventory revealed only slightly lower total SOC stocks in cropland soils compared to forest soils, when both top- and subsoils were considered. In cropland and grassland soils around 90% of total SOC stocks can be assigned to the intermediate and passive SOC pool. High SOC stocks in grassland soils are partly related to a higher degree of soil aggregation compared to cropland soils. The contribution of intermediate SOC in cropland soils was similar to that in grassland soils due to an increased proportion of SOM associated with silt and clay particles. The cultivation-induced loss of SOC due to aggregate disruption is at least partly compensated by increased formation of organo-mineral associations as a result of tillage that continuously promotes the contact of crop residues with reactive mineral surfaces. Contrary, forest soils were characterized by distinctly lower proportions of intermediate and passive SOC and a high amount of active SOC in form of litter and particulate organic matter which accounted for almost 40% of total SOC stocks. The determination of the current SOC content of silt and clay fractions for major soil units and land uses allowed an estimation of the C saturation deficit corresponding to the long-term C sequestration potential. The results showed that cropland soils have a low level of C saturation of around 50% and could store considerable amounts of additional SOC. A relatively high C sequestration potential was also determined for grassland soils. In contrast, forest soils had a low C sequestration potential as they were almost C saturated. The high

  17. Variation of biomass and carbon pools with forest type in temperate forests of Kashmir Himalaya, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dar, Javid Ahmad; Sundarapandian, Somaiah

    2015-02-01

    An accurate characterization of tree, understory, deadwood, floor litter, and soil organic carbon (SOC) pools in temperate forest ecosystems is important to estimate their contribution to global carbon (C) stocks. However, this information on temperate forests of the Himalayas is lacking and fragmented. In this study, we measured C stocks of tree (aboveground and belowground biomass), understory (shrubs and herbaceous), deadwood (standing and fallen trees and stumps), floor litter, and soil from 111 plots of 50 m × 50 m each, in seven forest types: Populus deltoides (PD), Juglans regia (JR), Cedrus deodara (CD), Pinus wallichiana (PW), mixed coniferous (MC), Abies pindrow (AP), and Betula utilis (BU) in temperate forests of Kashmir Himalaya, India. The main objective of the present study is to quantify the ecosystem C pool in these seven forest types. The results showed that the tree biomass ranged from 100.8 Mg ha(-1) in BU forest to 294.8 Mg ha(-1) for the AP forest. The understory biomass ranged from 0.16 Mg ha(-1) in PD forest to 2.36 Mg ha(-1) in PW forest. Deadwood biomass ranged from 1.5 Mg ha(-1) in PD forest to 14.9 Mg ha(-1) for the AP forest, whereas forest floor litter ranged from 2.5 Mg ha(-1) in BU and JR forests to 3.1 Mg ha(-1) in MC forest. The total ecosystem carbon stocks varied from 112.5 to 205.7 Mg C ha(-1) across all the forest types. The C stocks of tree, understory, deadwood, litter, and soil ranged from 45.4 to 135.6, 0.08 to 1.18, 0.7 to 6.8, 1.1 to 1.4, and 39.1-91.4 Mg ha(-1), respectively, which accounted for 61.3, 0.2, 1.4, 0.8, and 36.3 % of the total carbon stock. BU forest accounted 65 % from soil C and 35 % from biomass, whereas PD forest contributed only 26 % from soil C and 74 % from biomass. Of the total C stock in the 0-30-cm soil, about 55 % was stored in the upper 0-10 cm. Soil C stocks in BU forest were significantly higher than those in other forests. The variability of C pools of different ecosystem components is

  18. Large carbon and nitrogen pools in subsoil of acid sulphate soils, a potential source for greenhouse gas emissions?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Virtanen, S.; Šimek, Miloslav; Krištůfek, Václav; Simojoki, A.; Yli-Halla, M.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 3 (2011), s. 227. ISSN 1653-2015. [NJF Congress: Food , Feed, Fuel and Fun /24./, Nordic Feed Science Conference /2./. 14.06.2011-16.06.2011, Uppsala] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60660521 Keywords : large carbon and nitrogen pools * acid sulphate soils * greenhouse gas emissions Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour

  19. An experimental study on the effects of nutrient enrichment on organic carbon persistence in the western Pacific oligotrophic gyre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, J.; Jiao, N.; Tang, K.

    2014-09-01

    Carbon sequestration in the ocean is of great concern with respect to the mitigation of global warming. How to hold the fixed organic carbon in the presence of tremendous numbers of heterotrophic microorganisms in marine environments is the central issue. We previously hypothesized that excessive nutrients would ultimately decrease the storage of organic carbon in marine environments. To test this, a series of in situ nutrient enrichment incubation experiments were conducted at a site (17.59° N, 127.00° E) within the western Pacific oligotrophic gyre. Five treatments were employed: glucose (Glu), algal exudation organic material (EOM), nitrate (N) and phosphate (P), N and P in combination with glucose and a control with no added nutrients. The results showed that the dissolved organic carbon consumption rates and bacterial community specific growth rates were enhanced by inorganic nutrient enrichment treatments during the initial 48 h incubation. At the end of 14 days of incubation, about one-third (average 3.3 μmol C kg-1) more organic carbon was respired in the glucose-enriched incubation with the addition of inorganic nutrients compared to that without. In contrast, when nutrients were limiting, glucose could not be efficiently used by the bacteria and thus it remained in the environment. These results suggest that repletion of inorganic nutrients could facilitate microbial consumption of organic carbon and thus has a significant impact on carbon cycling in the environment.

  20. Soil Organic Carbon Pools Under Switchgrass Grown as a Bioenergy Crop Compared to Other Conventional Crops

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    F.G.DOU; F.M.HONS; W.R.OCUMPAUGH; J.C.READ; M.A.HUSSEY; J.P.MUIR

    2013-01-01

    Switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) has been proposed as a sustainable bioenergy crop because of its high yield potential,adaptation to marginal sites,and tolerance to water and nutrient limitations.A better understanding of the potential effects of biomass energy crop production practices on soil biological properties and organic matter dynamics is critical to its production.Our objective was to evaluate changes in C pools under a warm-season perennial switchgrass in different soils compared to typically-grown crops collected at College Station,Dallas,and Stephenville,TX in February 2001.Sampling depths were 0-5,5-15,and 15-30 cm.Switchgrass increased soil organic C (SOC),soil microbial biomass C (SMBC),mineralizable C,and particulate organic matter C (POM-C) compared to conventional cropping systems.Soil C concentrations were in the order:long-term coastal bermudagrass [Cynodon dactylon (L.) Pers.] > switchgrass or kleingrass (Panicum coloratum L.) planted in 1992 > switchgrass 1997 > conventional cropping systems.Soil C concentrations tended to increase with increasing clay content.Greater microbial biomass C followed the order of Dallas >College Station > Stephenville,and ranged from approximately 180 mg C kg-1 soil at Stephenville to 1900 mg C kg-1 soil at Dallas.Particulate organic C was more sensitive than other fractions to management,increasing as much as 6-fold under long-term coastal bermudagrass compared to conventional cropping systems.Our study indicated that conversion of conventional cropping systems into switchgrass production can sequestrate more SOC and improve soil biological properties in the southern USA.

  1. soil carbon pools within oak forest is endangered by global climate change in central mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Oliva, Felipe; Merino, Agustín; González-Rodriguez, Antonio; Chávez-Vergara, Bruno; Tapia-Torres, Yunuen; Oyama, Ken

    2016-04-01

    Forest soil represents the main C pool in terrestrial ecosystems. In particular, temperate forest ecosystems play an important role in the C budget among tropical countries, such as Mexico. For example, the temperate forest ecosystem contains higher C contents on average (295 Mg C ha-1) than the soil C associated with other ecosystems in Mexico (between 56 to 287 Mg C ha-1). At a regional scale, oak forest has the highest C content (460 Mg C ha-1) among the forest ecosystem in Michoacán State at Central Mexico. At the local scale, the soil C content is strongly affected by the composition of organic matter produced by the plant species. The oak species are very diverse in Mexico, distributed within two sections: Quercus sensu stricto and Lobatae. The oak species from Quercus s.s. section produced litterfall with lower concentrations of recalcitrant and thermostable compounds than oak species from Lobatae section, therefore the soil under the former species had higher microbial activity and nutrient availability than the soil under the later species. However, the forest fragment with higher amount of oak species from Quercus s.s. section increases the amount of soil C contents. Unfortunately, Quercus species distribution models for the central western region of Mexico predict a decrease of distribution area of the majority of oak species by the year 2080, as a consequence of higher temperatures and lower precipitation expected under climate change scenarios. Additionally to these scenarios, the remnant oak forest fragments suffer strong degradation due to uncontrolled wood extraction and deforestation. For this reason, the conservation of oak forest fragments is a priority to mitigate the greenhouse gases emission to the atmosphere. In order to enhance the protection of these forest fragments it is required that the society identify the ecosystem services that are provided by these forest fragments.

  2. Proximate and ultimate controls on carbon and nutrient dynamics of small agricultural catchments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Zahra; Abbott, Benjamin W.; Troccaz, Olivier; Baudry, Jacques; Pinay, Gilles

    2016-03-01

    Direct and indirect effects from human activity have dramatically increased nutrient loading to aquatic inland and estuarine ecosystems. Despite an abundance of studies investigating the impact of agricultural activity on water quality, our understanding of what determines the capacity of a watershed to remove or retain nutrients remains limited. The goal of this study was to identify proximate and ultimate controls on dissolved organic carbon and nutrient dynamics in small agricultural catchments by investigating the relationship between catchment characteristics, stream discharge, and water chemistry. We analyzed a 5-year, high-frequency water chemistry data set from three catchments in western France ranging from 2.3 to 10.8 km2. The relationship between hydrology and solute concentrations differed between the three catchments and was associated with hedgerow density, agricultural activity, and geology. The catchment with thicker soil and higher surface roughness had relatively invariant carbon and nutrient chemistry across hydrologic conditions, indicating high resilience to human disturbance. Conversely, the catchments with smoother, thinner soils responded to both intra- and interannual hydrologic variation with high concentrations of phosphate (PO43-) and ammonium (NH4+) in streams during low flow conditions and strong increases in dissolved organic carbon (DOC), sediment, and particulate organic matter during high flows. Despite contrasting agricultural activity between catchments, the physical context (geology, topography, and land-use configuration) appeared to be the most important determinant of catchment solute dynamics based on principle components analysis. The influence of geology and accompanying topographic and geomorphological factors on water quality was both direct and indirect because the distribution of agricultural activity in these catchments is largely a consequence of the geologic and topographic context. This link between inherent

  3. Carbon sequestration and nutrient reserves under differen t land use systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Ivanilda Aguiar

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the contribution of agroforestry (AFS and traditional systems to carbon sequestration and nutrient reserves in plants, litter and soil. The study was carried out in the semiarid region of Brazil in a long-term experiment on an experimental farm of the goat and sheep section of the Brazilian Agricultural Research Corporation (Embrapa. Two agroforestry systems were investigated: agrosilvopastoral (ASP and forest-pasture areas (SP as well as traditional agriculture management (TM, two areas left fallow after TM (six fallow years - F6 and nine fallow years - F9 and one area of preserved Caatinga vegetation (CAT. Soil, litter and plants were sampled from all areas and the contents of C, N, P, K, Ca and Mg per compartment determined. The AFS (ASP and SP had higher nutrient stocks than the traditional and intermediate stocks compared to the preserved Caatinga. In the ASP, a relevant part of the nutrients extracted by crops is returned to the system by constant inputs of litter, weeding of herbaceous vegetation and cutting of the legume crops. After fallow periods of six and nine years, carbon and nutrient stocks in the compartments soil, litter and herbaceous plants were similar to those of the preserved Caatinga (CAT, but still lower than under natural conditions in the woody vegetation.

  4. Tempeh Waste as a Natural, Economical Carbon and Nutrient Source: ED-XRF and NCS Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SITI KHODIJAH CHAERUN

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to determine the elemental composition of three types of waste from tempeh production. They are soybean hull “tempeh waste” after dehulling soybeans, tempeh wastewater after soaking dehulled soybeans in water for 24 h, and tempeh wastewater after boiling dehulled soybeans in water for 30 min. By using ED-XRF analyzer, it was revealed that tempeh waste contained Mg, Si, P, S, K, Ca, Mn, Fe, and Zn. The highest elemental content was K, followed by Ca, P, and Mg. NCS analysis showed that tempeh waste was composed of C, N, and S with C/N ratio of 11.20. The present study provides evidence that both tempeh waste and wastewater are rich in carbon and nutrient contents, thus their potential for both inorganic and organic nutrient and carbon sources for microbial growth in bioremediation or as natural NPK fertilizers is promising.

  5. [Soil organic carbon pools and their turnover under two different types of forest in Xiao-xing'an Mountains, Northeast China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Fei; Jiang, Hang; Cui, Xiao-yang

    2015-07-01

    Soil samples collected from virgin Korean pine forest and broad-leaved secondary forest in Xiaoxing'an Mountains, Northeast China were incubated in laboratory at different temperatures (8, 18 and 28 °C) for 160 days, and the data from the incubation experiment were fitted to a three-compartment, first-order kinetic model which separated soil organic carbon (SOC) into active, slow, and resistant carbon pools. Results showed that the soil organic carbon mineralization rates and the cumulative amount of C mineralized (all based on per unit of dry soil mass) of the broad-leaved secondary forest were both higher than that of the virgin Korean pine forest, whereas the mineralized C accounted for a relatively smaller part of SOC in the broad-leaved secondary forest soil. Soil active and slow carbon pools decreased with soil depth, while their proportions in SOC increased. Soil resistant carbon pool and its contribution to SOC were both greater in the broad-leaved secondary forest soil than in the virgin Korean pine forest soil, suggesting that the broad-leaved secondary forest soil organic carbon was relatively more stable. The mean retention time (MRT) of soil active carbon pool ranged from 9 to 24 d, decreasing with soil depth; while the MRT of slow carbon pool varied between 7 and 24 a, increasing with soil depth. Soil active carbon pool and its proportion in SOC increased linearly with incubation temperature, and consequently, decreased the slow carbon pool. Virgin Korean pine forest soils exhibited a higher increasing rate of active carbon pool along temperature gradient than the broad-leaved secondary forest soils, indicating that the organic carbon pool of virgin Korean pine forest soil was relatively more sensitive to temperature change. PMID:26710615

  6. Cassava stillage and its anaerobic fermentation liquid as external carbon sources in biological nutrient removal*

    OpenAIRE

    Bu, Fan; Hu, Xiang; Xie, Li; Zhou, Qi

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of one kind of food industry effluent, cassava stillage and its anaerobic fermentation liquid, on biological nutrient removal (BNR) from municipal wastewater in anaerobic-anoxic-aerobic sequencing batch reactors (SBRs). Experiments were carried out with cassava stillage supernatant and its anaerobic fermentation liquid, and one pure compound (sodium acetate) served as an external carbon source. Cyclic studies indicated that the cassava by-p...

  7. Plant allocation of carbon to defense as a function of herbivory, light and nutrient availability

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeAngelis, Donald L.; Ju, Shu; Liu, Rongsong; Bryant, John P.; Gourley, Stephen A.

    2012-01-01

    We use modeling to determine the optimal relative plant carbon allocations between foliage, fine roots, anti-herbivore defense, and reproduction to maximize reproductive output. The model treats these plant components and the herbivore compartment as variables. Herbivory is assumed to be purely folivory. Key external factors include nutrient availability, degree of shading, and intensity of herbivory. Three alternative functional responses are used for herbivory, two of which are variations on donor-dependent herbivore (models 1a and 1b) and one of which is a Lotka–Volterra type of interaction (model 2). All three were modified to include the negative effect of chemical defenses on the herbivore. Analysis showed that, for all three models, two stable equilibria could occur, which differs from most common functional responses when no plant defense component is included. Optimal strategies of carbon allocation were defined as the maximum biomass of reproductive propagules produced per unit time, and found to vary with changes in external factors. Increased intensity of herbivory always led to an increase in the fractional allocation of carbon to defense. Decreases in available limiting nutrient generally led to increasing importance of defense. Decreases in available light had little effect on defense but led to increased allocation to foliage. Decreases in limiting nutrient and available light led to decreases in allocation to reproduction in models 1a and 1b but not model 2. Increases in allocation to plant defense were usually accompanied by shifts in carbon allocation away from fine roots, possibly because higher plant defense reduced the loss of nutrients to herbivory.

  8. Soil organic carbon pools and stocks in permafrost-affected soils on the tibetan plateau.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corina Dörfer

    Full Text Available The Tibetan Plateau reacts particularly sensitively to possible effects of climate change. Approximately two thirds of the total area is affected by permafrost. To get a better understanding of the role of permafrost on soil organic carbon pools and stocks, investigations were carried out including both discontinuous (site Huashixia, HUA and continuous permafrost (site Wudaoliang, WUD. Three organic carbon fractions were isolated using density separation combined with ultrasonic dispersion: the light fractions (1.6 g cm(-3 of mineral associated organic matter (MOM. The fractions were analyzed for C, N, and their portion of organic C. FPOM contained an average SOC content of 252 g kg(-1. Higher SOC contents (320 g kg(-1 were found in OPOM while MOM had the lowest SOC contents (29 g kg(-1. Due to their lower density the easily decomposable fractions FPOM and OPOM contribute 27% (HUA and 22% (WUD to the total SOC stocks. In HUA mean SOC stocks (0-30 cm depth account for 10.4 kg m(-2, compared to 3.4 kg m(-2 in WUD. 53% of the SOC is stored in the upper 10 cm in WUD, in HUA only 39%. Highest POM values of 36% occurred in profiles with high soil moisture content. SOC stocks, soil moisture and active layer thickness correlated strongly in discontinuous permafrost while no correlation between SOC stocks and active layer thickness and only a weak relation between soil moisture and SOC stocks could be found in continuous permafrost. Consequently, permafrost-affected soils in discontinuous permafrost environments are susceptible to soil moisture changes due to alterations in quantity and seasonal distribution of precipitation, increasing temperature and therefore evaporation.

  9. The significance of organic carbon and nutrient export from peatland-dominated landscapes subject to disturbance, a stoichiometric perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Waldron

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The terrestrial-aquatic interface is a crucial environment in which to consider the fate of exported terrestrial carbon in the aquatic system. Here the fate of dissolved organic carbon (DOC may be controlled by nutrient availability. However, peat-dominated headwater catchments are normally of low nutrient status and thus there is little data on how DOC and nutrient export co-varies. We present nutrient and DOC data for two UK catchments dominated by peat headwaters. One, Whitelee, is undergoing development for Europe's largest windfarm. Glen Dye by comparison is relatively undisturbed. At both sites there are significant linear relationships between DOC and soluble reactive phosphorus and nitrate concentrations in the drainage waters. However, inter-catchment differences exist. Changes in the pattern of nutrient and carbon export at Whitelee reveal that landscape disturbance associated with windfarm development impacts the receiving waters, and that nutrient export does not increase in a stoichiometric manner that will promote increase in microbial biomass but rather supports aquatic respiration. In turn greater CO2 efflux may prevail. Hence disturbance of terrestrial carbon stores may impact the both the aquatic and gaseous carbon cycle. We suggest estimates of aquatic carbon export should inform the decision-making process prior to development in ecosystems and catchments with high terrestrial carbon storage.

  10. Long-term effects of organic and inorganic nutrient sources on soil organic carbon and major nutrients in Vertisols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aladakatti, Y. R.; Hallikeri, S. S.; Nandagavi, R. A.

    2012-04-01

    Field experiment conducted over 10 years at the University of Agricultural Sciences, Dharwad, India, assessed the long-term effects of various sources of organics (farmyard manure {FYM}, vermicompost and cotton crop residue) in conjunction with graded levels of inorganic fertilizers on the soil organic carbon (SOC), available major nutrients and seed cotton yield in cotton- (groundnut - winter Sorghum) rotation system. Main plots comprised FYM (10 Mg/ha), vermicompost (2.5 Mg/ha), cotton crop residue (2.5 Mg/ha) and combination of these organics in various proportions with an absolute control (no organics). No inorganic fertilizes, 50 and 100 % of the recommended dose of fertilizers (RDF) were assigned to the sub plots. The organics were applied every year during rainy season and the inorganic fertilizers as per the University recommended dose to each crop. Initial SOC, available N, P and K were 0.68%, 220, 22.5 and 403 kg/ha, respectively. Results indicated that at the end of tenth year of crop rotation, application of FYM, vermicompost and cotton crop residue either alone or in combination increased the SOC (0.68 to 0.81%), available N (220 to 308 kg/ha), P (22.5 to 33.0 kg/ha) and K (403 to 530 kg/ha) compared to the control plot where no organics were applied. SOC in the control treatment decreased to 0.52% at the end of tenth year from 0.68%. Averaged over five cropping cycles, application of FYM gave significantly higher yields of seed cotton, groundnut pods and sorghum grain over all other organic sources. During fifth cycle of cotton crop or 10th year of rotation, application of FYM along with 100% RDF resulted in the highest productivity and was similar to FYM + 50 % RDF, indicating a saving of 50% chemical fertilizer in these crops. Combination of cotton crop residue and vermicompost were next best alternative sources of organics after FYM in order of preference. Our studies suggest that in the scarcity of good quality manure such as FYM, cotton crop

  11. Active carbon-pools in rhizosphere of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) grown under elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration in a Typic Haplustept in sub-tropical India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Study on active and labile carbon-pools can serve as a clue for soil organic carbon dynamics on exposure to elevated level of CO2. Therefore, an experimental study was conducted in a Typic Haplustept in sub-tropical semi-arid India with wheat grown in open top chambers at ambient (370 μmol mol-1) and elevated (600 μmol mol-1) concentrations of atmospheric CO2. Elevated atmospheric CO2 caused increase in yield and carbon uptake by all plant parts, and their preferential partitioning to root. Increases in fresh root weight, volume and length have also been observed. Relative contribution of medium-sized root to total root length increased at the expense of very fine roots at elevated CO2 level. All active carbon-fractions gained due to elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration, and the order followed their relative labilities. All the C-pools have recorded a significant increase over initial status, and are expected to impart short-to-medium-term effect on soil carbon sequestration. - The elevation in atmospheric CO2 concentration can potentially increase the active carbon-pools in wheat rhizosphere in the semi-arid India

  12. Carbon sequestration and plant nutrients in soil in different land types in Thingvellir Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svavarsdóttir, María; Gísladóttir, Guðrún; Mankasingh, Utra

    2015-04-01

    Special properties of volcanic soils (andisol) that is most common in Iceland can sequestrate considerably more carbon (C) that other types of soils. A mellow developed andisol with natural ecosystem such as birch forest or grass- and heathland is presumably to be fertile and sequestrate a lot of carbon. Coniferous tree species have been imported to Iceland for large scale utilisation in Icelandic forestry and is therefore an imported species/ecosystem. Abroad it has been noticed that coniferous trees acidify soil and change the properties of the soil so other species cannot thrive in it. The Icelandic Forest service is aiming tenfold the coverage of forests in Iceland before the year 2100 but about 50% of tree species that the institution uses is coniferous species. It is therefore important to research the soil due to the plant types that are planted in the soil. The aim of this project is to compare soil properties, soil nutrients and soil sequestration in heathland, birch forest and coniferous forest in Thingvellir national park in Iceland. Heathland and birch forest represent the natural ecosystem but coniferous forest imported ecosystem. Carbon (C) in soil will be measured, proportion of carbon and nitrogen (C:N), respiration from soil (CO2) and live green biomass and organic matter in the soil. The speed of decomposition of organic matter will be estimated. Important nutrients, pH and cation exchange capacity will be measured among other physical properties as bulk density, grain size and water holding capacity of the soil.

  13. Ecosystem modelling of carbon, nutrients and radionuclides in lake Eckarfjaerden, Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the next few years, the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co (SKB) perform site investigations at two sites in Sweden for a future underground repository of spent nuclear fuel. For the safety assessment of the repository, methods based on systems and landscape ecology was developed to understand the radionuclide flow at the site using site-specific data. In this part of the project a mechanistic mass-balance model for carbon and nutrients between the components of the Lake Eckarfjaerden was developed. The lake has been thoroughly monitored for water chemistry, biota, geo-morphometry and water flows etc. to enable site-specific process-oriented dose modelling. The modelling of carbon and nutrients was based on ecosystem processes such as primary production, respiration and consumption. C-14 was modelled in proportion to the circulation of non-radioactive carbon in the ecosystem, whereas the modelling of other radionuclides included two radionuclide specific mechanisms in addition to the ecological processes. The radionuclide uptake by plants was modelled with an uptake function based on conventional uptake factors related to the primary production rate of the plants. The transfer of radionuclides from plants to animals in the ecosystem was modelled in proportion to the consumption rate of the grazer/predator, the concentration in the plant/prey and a specific radionuclide excretion rate related to the rate of carbon and nutrients excreted. The results were compared with traditional dose assessment models. We believe that this method has a large potential to be used either directly in assessment modelling or to produce site-specific transfer factors for more conventional models, which is especially valuable when future changes of the environment needs to be taken into account. (author)

  14. Ideas and perspectives: why Holocene thermokarst sediments of the Yedoma region do not increase the northern peatland carbon pool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hugelius, G.; Kuhry, P.; Tarnocai, C.

    2015-11-01

    Permafrost deposits in the Beringian Yedoma region store large amounts of organic carbon (OC). Walter Anthony et al. (2014) describe a previously unrecognized pool of 159 Pg OC accumulated in Holocene thermokarst sediments deposited in Yedoma region alases (thermokarst depressions). They claim that these alas sediments increase the previously recognized circumpolar permafrost peat OC pool by 50 %. It is stated that previous integrated studies of the permafrost OC pool have failed to account for these deposits because the Northern Circumpolar Soil Carbon Database (NCSCD) is biased towards non-alas field sites and that the soil maps used in the NCSCD underestimate coverage of organic permafrost soils. Here we evaluate these statements against a brief literature review, existing datasets on Yedoma region soil OC storage and independent field-based and geospatial datasets of peat soil distribution in the Siberian Yedoma region. Our findings are summarised in three main points. Firstly, the sediments described by Walter Anthony et al. are primarily mineral lake sediments and do not match widely used international scientific definitions of peat or organic soils. They can therefore not be considered an addition to the circumpolar peat carbon pool. Secondly, independent field data and geospatial analyses show that the Siberian Yedoma regions is dominated by mineral soils, not peatlands. Thus, there is no evidence to suggest any systematic bias in the NCSCD field data or maps. Thirdly, there is spatial overlap between these Holocene thermokarst sediments and previous estimates of permafrost soil and sediment OC stocks. These carbon stocks were already accounted for by previous studies and cannot be added to the permafrost OC count. We suggest that statements made in Walter Anthony et al. (2014) resulted from misunderstandings caused by conflicting definitions and terminologies across different geoscientific disciplines. A careful cross-disciplinary review of terminologies

  15. A Case Study of Carbon Pools Under Three Different Land-Uses in Panama

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Potvin, C. [Department of Biology, McGill University, 1205 Dr Penfield, Montreal, H3A 1B1 (Canada); Whidden, E. [Department of Geography, McGill University, 805 Sherbrooke Str. West, Montreal, H3A 2K6 (Canada); Moore, T. [Centre for Climate and Global Change Research, McGill University, 1205 Dr Penfield, Montreal, H3A 1B1 (Canada)

    2004-12-01

    This paper examines changes in carbon (C) pools associated with land-use, synthesizing data from two experiments dealing with different aspects of tree plantation establishment in Central Panama. First, we analysed soil profiles in a grazed pasture and an adjacent 5-year-old teak (Tectona grandis) plantation. There were small differences in soil C mass in the top 10 cm of the pasture and the plantation, though analysis of paired profiles suggested larger differences at greater depth. Analysis of the 13C signatures in the pasture soils and litter showed that 90% to 95% of the organic matter in the surface 5 cm was derived from C4 pasture plants, over the 45 years since the pasture was converted from forest. Comparison of the 13C signatures in the pasture and teak plantation profiles indicated substantial replacement of C4-derived organic matter with the dominantly C3-derived plantation tissues. Organic matter turnover times in the upper 10 cm of the soils ranged from 8 to 34 years and from 11 to 58 years in the upper 30 cm, depending on topographic location. We also present preliminary results, and technical challenges, for an eddy covariance experiment set up to provide a direct comparison between a grazed pasture and a native tree plantation. The two ecosystems studied are estimated to be small CO2 sinks, 92 g,C,m-2 yr-1 for the pasture, and 57 g,C,m-2 yr-1 for native species plantation in the first year after establishment. The pastures response to seasonal change was more pronounced, both in term of CO2 fluxes and in term of herbaceous productivity, than the plantations response. The storage below ground systems contained up 40% of the total sapling biomass.

  16. Carbon pools and flows during lab-scale degradation of old landfilled waste under different oxygen and water regimes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • 40 year old waste from an old MSW landfill was incubated in LSR experiments. • Carbon balances for anaerobic and aerobic waste degradation were established. • The transformation of carbon pools during waste degradation was investigated. • Waste aeration resulted in the formation of a new, stable organic carbon pool. • Water addition did not have a significant effect on aerobic waste degradation. - Abstract: Landfill aeration has been proven to accelerate the degradation of organic matter in landfills in comparison to anaerobic decomposition. The present study aims to evaluate pools of organic matter decomposing under aerobic and anaerobic conditions using landfill simulation reactors (LSR) filled with 40 year old waste from a former MSW landfill. The LSR were operated for 27 months, whereby the waste in one pair was kept under anaerobic conditions and the four other LSRs were aerated. Two of the aerated LSR were run with leachate recirculation and water addition and two without. The organic carbon in the solid waste was characterized at the beginning and at the end of the experiments and major carbon flows (e.g. TOC in leachate, gaseous CO2 and CH4) were monitored during operation. After the termination of the experiments, the waste from the anaerobic LSRs exhibited a long-term gas production potential of more than 20 NL kg−1 dry waste, which corresponded to the mineralization of around 12% of the initial TOC (67 g kg−1 dry waste). Compared to that, aeration led to threefold decrease in TOC (32–36% of the initial TOC were mineralized), without apparent differences in carbon discharge between the aerobic set ups with and without water addition. Based on the investigation of the carbon pools it could be demonstrated that a bit more than 10% of the initially present organic carbon was transformed into more recalcitrant forms, presumably due to the formation of humic substances. The source of anaerobic

  17. Carbon pools and flows during lab-scale degradation of old landfilled waste under different oxygen and water regimes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brandstätter, Christian, E-mail: bran.chri@gmail.com; Laner, David, E-mail: david.laner@tuwien.ac.at; Fellner, Johann, E-mail: johann.fellner@tuwien.ac.at

    2015-06-15

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • 40 year old waste from an old MSW landfill was incubated in LSR experiments. • Carbon balances for anaerobic and aerobic waste degradation were established. • The transformation of carbon pools during waste degradation was investigated. • Waste aeration resulted in the formation of a new, stable organic carbon pool. • Water addition did not have a significant effect on aerobic waste degradation. - Abstract: Landfill aeration has been proven to accelerate the degradation of organic matter in landfills in comparison to anaerobic decomposition. The present study aims to evaluate pools of organic matter decomposing under aerobic and anaerobic conditions using landfill simulation reactors (LSR) filled with 40 year old waste from a former MSW landfill. The LSR were operated for 27 months, whereby the waste in one pair was kept under anaerobic conditions and the four other LSRs were aerated. Two of the aerated LSR were run with leachate recirculation and water addition and two without. The organic carbon in the solid waste was characterized at the beginning and at the end of the experiments and major carbon flows (e.g. TOC in leachate, gaseous CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4}) were monitored during operation. After the termination of the experiments, the waste from the anaerobic LSRs exhibited a long-term gas production potential of more than 20 NL kg{sup −1} dry waste, which corresponded to the mineralization of around 12% of the initial TOC (67 g kg{sup −1} dry waste). Compared to that, aeration led to threefold decrease in TOC (32–36% of the initial TOC were mineralized), without apparent differences in carbon discharge between the aerobic set ups with and without water addition. Based on the investigation of the carbon pools it could be demonstrated that a bit more than 10% of the initially present organic carbon was transformed into more recalcitrant forms, presumably due to the formation of humic substances

  18. Impacts of Modernizing Urban Stormwater Systems on Nutrient and Carbon Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filippelli, G. M.; Jacinthe, P. A.; Druschel, G.

    2015-12-01

    Over 200 cities throughout the U.S. are undergoing the painful and expensive transition from Combined Sewer Outflows (CSOs) to modern stormwater systems. The infrastructure of CSOs is frequently a century old, with a design adapted to stormwater conditions of smaller, more pervious cities. Normal rainfall events of less 1 cm per hour can now exceed the CSO capacities in many urban sub-watersheds, leading to streamwater conditions that exceed human health standards for pathogens. Although much focus has been placed on the plumbing aspects of urban stormwater modernization, less has been focused on local, and indeed regional, implications of nutrient and carbon dynamic changes. Indianapolis, Indiana, with a metropolitan population of over 1 million, is a case study of CSO modernization. Most CSO systems in the city were built almost 100 years ago, and the city has experienced classic patterns of growth of impervious surface area, population growth, and enhanced use of chemical fertilizers. The result of these changes has been frequent failure of the CSO system, and release of sewage water into suburban and urban streams, rivers and reservoirs. Driven largely by modern environmental regulations, the city is now "footing the bill" for a century of poor planning and growth, with the real costs seen by ratepayers in the form of steeply growing wastewater fees. The mitigation approach to this problem is largely one of subsurface engineering on a mega scale, with less attention (i.e., money) placed on complementary land-use and nutrient management efforts on the surface. Several examples illustrate the relatively straightforward nature of changing plumbing, in contrast to the complex result of these changes on nutrient pathways, and the implications that this has on oxygenation, nutrient cycling, and carbon release/sequestration dynamics in riparian and urban reservoir systems.

  19. Proximate and ultimate controls on carbon and nutrient dynamics of small agricultural catchments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Z.; Abbott, B. W.; Troccaz, O.; Baudry, J.; Pinay, G.

    2015-09-01

    Direct and indirect effects from agriculture, urbanization, and resource extraction have dramatically increased nutrient loading to aquatic inland and estuarine ecosystems. The capacity of a watershed to remove or retain nutrients is a function of biotic and abiotic conditions across the terrestrial-aquatic gradient including soil, groundwater, riparian zone, and surface water. The goal of this study was to identify proximate and ultimate controls on dissolved organic carbon and nutrient dynamics in small agricultural catchments. We analysed a five-year, high frequency water chemistry dataset from 3 catchments ranging from 2.3 to 10.8 km2 in northwestern France. Catchments differed in the relationship between hydrology and solute concentrations, associated with catchment characteristics such as hedgerow density, agricultural activity, and geology. The catchment with thicker soil and higher surface roughness appeared to have greater transient storage and residence time, buffering the catchment to fluctuations in water chemistry, reflected in relatively invariant carbon and nutrient chemistry across hydrologic conditions. Conversely, the catchments with smoother, thinner soils responded to both intra- and inter-annual hydrologic variation with high concentrations of PO43- and NH4+ during low flow conditions and strong increases in DOC, sediment, and particulate organic matter during high flows. Despite contrasting agricultural activity between catchments, the physical context (geology, topography, and land use) appeared to be the most important determinant of catchment solute dynamics based on principle components analysis. The influence of geology and accompanying topographic and geomorphological factors on elemental fluxes is both direct and indirect because the distribution of agricultural activity in these catchments is largely a consequence of the geologic and topographic context. This link between inherent catchment buffering capacity and probability of human

  20. Organic nutrient enrichment in the oligotrophic ocean: Impacts on remineralization, carbon sequestration, and community structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackey, K. R.; Paytan, A.; Post, A. F.

    2007-12-01

    In oligotrophic seas where inorganic nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) are below the limits of detection, organic forms of these nutrients may constitute greater than 90% of the total N and P in the euphotic zone. The combined enzymatic activity of phytoplankton and heterotrophic bacteria determines the rate of nutrient remineralization, thereby influencing phytoplankton growth rates and carbon sequestration in these regions. In this study we investigated the effects of fertilization with ammonium (NH4), nitrate (NO3), nitrite (NO2), and phosphate (PO4) as well as various forms of organic N (urea, glycine) and P (deoxyribonucleic acid, 2- aminoethyl phosphonic acid, phytic acid) on the growth and taxonomic composition of the phytoplankton community in the Gulf of Aqaba, Red Sea. The impacts of these changes on nutrient cycling and biological assimilation were also assessed. Organic N additions led to phytoplankton growth when given together with PO4, yielding 2-3 fold increases in chlorophyll a (Chl a) and cell density relative to initial levels. Moreover, our results show that addition of NH4 or NO3 led to accumulation of extra-cellular NO2, suggesting that incomplete assimilatory reduction of NO3 by phytoplankton as well as chemoautotrophic oxidation of NH4 by ammonium oxidizing microbes contributed to NO2 formation. These findings conflict with earlier studies in the Gulf that attributed NO2 formation solely to the phytoplankton community. Organic P additions also led to 2-3 fold increases in Chl a and cell density relative to initial levels when given together with NH4 and NO3. Compared to other P additions, DNA led to the rapid accumulation of extra-cellular PO4, indicating substantial nucleotidase activity in excess of the amount needed to meet phytoplankton growth requirements. These results show the importance and interconnectivity of phytoplankton and heterotrophic bacteria communities in contributing to nutrient cycling and carbon sequestration in

  1. Nutrient amendment does not increase mineralisation of sequestered carbon during incubation of a nitrogen limited mangrove soil

    KAUST Repository

    Keuskamp, Joost A.

    2013-02-01

    Mangrove forests are sites of intense carbon and nutrient cycling, which result in soil carbon sequestration on a global scale. Currently, mangrove forests receive increasing quantities of exogenous nutrients due to coastal development. The present paper quantifies the effects of nutrient loading on microbial growth rates and the mineralisation of soil organic carbon (SOC) in two mangrove soils contrasting in carbon content. An increase in SOC mineralisation rates would lead to the loss of historically sequestered carbon and an enhanced CO2 release from these mangrove soils.In an incubation experiment we enriched soils from Avicennia and Rhizophora mangrove forests bordering the Red Sea with different combinations of nitrogen, phosphorus and glucose to mimic the effects of wastewater influx. We measured microbial growth rates as well as carbon mineralisation rates in the natural situation and after enrichment. The results show that microbial growth is energy limited in both soils, with nitrogen as a secondary limitation. Nitrogen amendment increased the rate at which labile organic carbon was decomposed, while it decreased SOC mineralisation rates. Such an inhibitory effect on SOC mineralisation was not found for phosphorus enrichment.Our data confirm the negative effect of nitrogen enrichment on the mineralisation of recalcitrant carbon compounds found in other systems. Based on our results it is not to be expected that nutrient enrichment by itself will cause degradation of historically sequestered soil organic carbon in nitrogen limited mangrove forests. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.

  2. Benthic biogeochemical cycling, nutrient stoichiometry, and carbon and nitrogen mass balances in a eutrophic freshwater bay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klump, J.V.; Fitzgerald, S.A.; Waplesa, J.T.

    2009-01-01

    Green Bay, while representing only ,7% of the surface area and ??1.4% of the volume of Lake Michigan, contains one-third of the watershed of the lake, and receives approximately one-third of the total nutrient loading to the Lake Michigan basin, largely from the Fox River at the southern end of the bay. With a history of eutrophic conditions dating back nearly a century, the southern portion of the bay behaves as an efficient nutrient and sediment trap, sequestering much of the annual carbon and nitrogen input within sediments accumulating at up to 1 cm per year. Depositional fluxes of organic matter varied from ??0.1 mol C m-2 yr-1 to >10 mol C m-2 yr-1 and were both fairly uniform in stoichiometric composition and relatively labile. Estimates of benthic recycling derived from pore-water concentration gradients, whole-sediment incubation experiments, and deposition-burial models of early diagenesis yielded an estimated 40% of the carbon and 50% of the nitrogen recycled back into the overlying water. Remineralization was relatively rapid with ??50% of the carbon remineralized within <15 yr of deposition, and a mean residence time for metabolizable carbon and nitrogen in the sediments of 20 yr. On average, organic carbon regeneration occurred as 75% CO2, 15% CH4, and 10% dissolved organic carbon (DOC). Carbon and nitrogen budgets for the southern bay were based upon direct measurements of inputs and burial and upon estimates of export and production derived stoichiometrically from a coupled phosphorus budget. Loadings of organic carbon from rivers were ??3.7 mol m-2 yr-1, 80% in the form of DOC and 20% as particulate organic carbon. These inputs were lost through export to northern Green Bay and Lake Michigan (39%), through sediment burial (26%), and net CO2 release to the atmosphere (35%). Total carbon input, including new production, was 4.54 mol m-2 C yr-1, equivalent to ??10% of the gross annual primary production. Nitrogen budget terms were less well quantified

  3. An experimental study on the effects of nutrient enrichment on organic carbon storage in western Pacific oligotrophic gyre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, J.; Jiao, N.; Tang, K.

    2014-02-01

    Carbon sequestration in the ocean is of great concern with respect to the mitigation of global warming. How to hold the fixed organic carbon in the presence of tremendous heterotrophic microorganisms in marine environments is the central issue. We have previously hypothesized that excessive nutrients would ultimately decrease the storage of organic carbon in marine environments. To test it out, a series of in situ nutrient enrichment incubation experiments were conducted at a site (17.59° N, 127.00° E) within the Western Pacific oligotrophic gyre. Five treatments were employed: glucose or algal exudation organic material (EOM) and nitrate and phosphate were added alone or in combination to approximate final concentrations of 10 μmol C kg-1, 1 μmol N kg-1 and 0.11 μmol P kg-1 respectively. The results showed that the dissolved organic carbon (DOC) consumption rates and bacterial community specific growth rates were enhanced by inorganic nutrients enrichment treatments during the initial 48 h incubation. At the end of 14 days incubation, about 1/3 (average 3.29 μmol C kg-1) more organic carbon was respired from the glucose enriched incubation with addition of inorganic nutrients compared to that without addition of inorganic nutrients. In the case no essential nutrients were available, even glucose could not be efficiently used by bacteria and thus remained in the environment. These results suggest that repletion of inorganic nutrients has negative impacts on carbon preservation, presumably due to elevated nutrient-stimulated bacterial metabolism and respiration, which is meaningful for potential coastal water management and worth for further studies.

  4. An experimental study on the effects of nutrient enrichment on organic carbon storage in western Pacific oligotrophic gyre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Liu

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Carbon sequestration in the ocean is of great concern with respect to the mitigation of global warming. How to hold the fixed organic carbon in the presence of tremendous heterotrophic microorganisms in marine environments is the central issue. We have previously hypothesized that excessive nutrients would ultimately decrease the storage of organic carbon in marine environments. To test it out, a series of in situ nutrient enrichment incubation experiments were conducted at a site (17.59° N, 127.00° E within the Western Pacific oligotrophic gyre. Five treatments were employed: glucose or algal exudation organic material (EOM and nitrate and phosphate were added alone or in combination to approximate final concentrations of 10 μmol C kg−1, 1 μmol N kg−1 and 0.11 μmol P kg−1 respectively. The results showed that the dissolved organic carbon (DOC consumption rates and bacterial community specific growth rates were enhanced by inorganic nutrients enrichment treatments during the initial 48 h incubation. At the end of 14 days incubation, about 1/3 (average 3.29 μmol C kg−1 more organic carbon was respired from the glucose enriched incubation with addition of inorganic nutrients compared to that without addition of inorganic nutrients. In the case no essential nutrients were available, even glucose could not be efficiently used by bacteria and thus remained in the environment. These results suggest that repletion of inorganic nutrients has negative impacts on carbon preservation, presumably due to elevated nutrient-stimulated bacterial metabolism and respiration, which is meaningful for potential coastal water management and worth for further studies.

  5. 12 Years of NPK Addition Diminishes Carbon Sink Potential of a Nutrient Limited Peatland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larmola, T.; Bubier, J. L.; Juutinen, S.; Moore, T. R.

    2011-12-01

    Peatlands store about a third of global soil carbon. Our aim was to study whether the vegetation feedbacks of nitrogen (N) deposition lead to stronger carbon sink or source in a nutrient limited peatland ecosystem. We investigated vegetation structure and ecosystem CO2 exchange at Mer Bleue Bog, Canada, that has been fertilized for 7-12 years. We have applied 5 and 20 times ambient annual wet N deposition (0.8 g N m-2) with or without phosphorus (P) and potassium (K). Gross photosynthesis, ecosystem respiration and net CO2 exchange (NEE) were measured weekly during the growing season using chamber technique. Under the highest N(PK) treatments, the light saturated photosynthesis (PSmax) was reduced by 20-30% compared to the control treatment, whereas under moderate N and PK additions PSmax slightly increased or was similar to the control. The ecosystem respiration showed similar trends among the treatments, but changes in the rates were less pronounced. High nutrient additions led to up to 65% lower net CO2 uptake than that in the control: In the NPK plots with cumulative N additions of 70, 19, and 0 g N m-2, the daytime NEE in May-July 2011 averaged 0.8 (se. 0.3), 2.0 (se. 0.4), and 2.4 (se. 0.3) μmol m-2 s-1, respectively. In the N only plots with cumulative N additions of 45, 19, and 0 g N m-2, the daytime NEE in May-July 2011 averaged 0.8 (se. 0.2), 2.6 (se. 0.4), and 1.8 (se. 0.3) μmol m-2 s-1, respectively. The reduced plant photosynthetic capacity and diminished carbon sink potential in the highest nutrient treatments correlated with the loss of peat mosses and were not compensated for by the increased vascular plant biomass that has mainly been allocated to woody shrub stems.

  6. Analysis of carbon and nutrient storage of dry tropical forest of chhattisgarh using satellite data

    OpenAIRE

    Thakur, T. K.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to characterize the carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium in the Barnowpara Sanctuary, Raipur district, Chhattisgarh, India through the use of satellite remote sensing and GIS The total storage of nutrients in vegetation (OS + US + GS) varied from 105.1 to 560.69 kg ha−1 in N, 4.09 kg ha−1 to 49.59 kg ha−1 in P, 24.59 kg ha−1 to 255.58 kg ha−1 for K and 7310 to 4836 kg ha−1 for C in different forest types. They we...

  7. External Carbon Source Addition as a Means to Control an Activated Sludge Nutrient Removal Process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Isaacs, Steven Howard; Henze, Mogens; Søeberg, Henrik; Kymmel, Mogens

    1994-01-01

    In alternating type activated sludge nutrient removal processes, the denitrification rate can be limited by the availability of readily-degradable carbon substrate. A control strategy is proposed by which an easily metabolizable COD source is added directly to that point in the process at which...... denitrification momentarily occurs. This approach serves to increase the denitrification rate on demand, thereby allowing the accumulation of nitrate and nitrite during periods of peak nitrogen loading to be reduced or avoided. A pilot plant demonstration of the control strategy using acetate as COD source is...

  8. Microbial respiration per unit microbial biomass increases with carbon-to-nutrient ratios in soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spohn, Marie; Chodak, Marcin

    2015-04-01

    The ratio of carbon-to-nutrient in forest floors is usually much higher than the ratio of carbon-to-nutrient that soil microorganisms require for their nutrition. In order to understand how this mismatch affects carbon cycling, the respiration rate per unit soil microbial biomass carbon - the metabolic quotient (qCO2) - was studied. This was done in a field study (Spohn and Chodak, 2015) and in a meta-analysis of published data (Spohn, 2014). Cores of beech, spruce, and mixed spruce-beech forest soils were cut into slices of 1 cm from the top of the litter layer down to 5 cm in the mineral soil, and the relationship between the qCO2 and the soil carbon-to-nitrogen (C:N) and the soil carbon-to-phosphorus (C:P) ratio was analyzed. We found that the qCO2 was positively correlated with soil C:N ratio in spruce soils (R = 0.72), and with the soil C:P ratio in beech (R = 0.93), spruce (R = 0.80) and mixed forest soils (R = 0.96). We also observed a close correlation between the qCO2 and the soil C concentration in all three forest types. Yet, the qCO2 decreased less with depth than the C concentration in all three forest types, suggesting that the change in qCO2 is not only controlled by the soil C concentration. We conclude that microorganisms increase their respiration rate per unit biomass with increasing soil C:P ratio and C concentration, which adjusts the substrate to their nutritional demands in terms of stoichiometry. In an analysis of literature data, I tested the effect of the C:N ratio of soil litter layers on microbial respiration in absolute terms and per unit microbial biomass C. For this purpose, a global dataset on the microbial respiration rate per unit microbial biomass C - termed the metabolic quotient (qCO2) - was compiled form literature data. It was found that the qCO2 in the soil litter layers was positively correlated with the litter C:N ratio and negatively related with the litter nitrogen (N) concentration. The positive relation between the qCO2

  9. Heterogeneity of soil carbon pools and fluxes in a channelized and a restored floodplain section (Thur River, Switzerland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Samaritani

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to their spatial complexity and dynamic nature, floodplains provide a wide range of ecosystem functions. However, because of flow regulation, many riverine floodplains have lost their characteristic heterogeneity. Restoration of floodplain habitats and the rehabilitation of key ecosystem functions has therefore become a major goal of environmental policy. Many important ecosystem functions are linked to organic carbon (C dynamics in riparian soils. The fundamental understanding of the factors that drive the processes involved in C cycling in heterogeneous and dynamic systems such as floodplains is however only fragmentary.

    We quantified soil organic C pools (microbial C and water extractable organic C and fluxes (soil respiration and net methane production in functional process zones of adjacent channelized and widened sections of the Thur River, NE Switzerland, on a seasonal basis. The objective was to assess how spatial heterogeneity and temporal variability of these pools and fluxes relate to physicochemical soil properties on one hand, and to soil environmental conditions and flood disturbance on the other hand.

    Overall, factors related to seasonality and flooding (temperature, water content, organic matter input affected soil C dynamics more than soil properties did. Coarse-textured soils on gravel bars in the restored section were characterized by low base-levels of organic C pools due to low TOC contents. However, frequent disturbance by flood pulses led to high heterogeneity with temporarily and locally increased pools and soil respiration. By contrast, in stable riparian forests, the finer texture of the soils and corresponding higher TOC contents and water retention capacity led to high base-levels of C pools. Spatial heterogeneity was low, but major floods and seasonal differences in temperature had additional impacts on both pools and fluxes. Soil properties and base levels of C pools in the dam foreland of the

  10. Heterogeneity of soil carbon pools and fluxes in a channelized and a restored floodplain section (Thur River, Switzerland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Samaritani

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Due to their spatial complexity and dynamic nature, floodplains provide a wide range of ecosystem functions. However, because of flow regulation, many riverine floodplains have lost their characteristic heterogeneity. Restoration of floodplain habitats and the rehabilitation of key ecosystem functions, many of them linked to organic carbon (C dynamics in riparian soils, has therefore become a major goal of environmental policy. The fundamental understanding of the factors that drive the processes involved in C cycling in heterogeneous and dynamic systems such as floodplains is however only fragmentary.

    We quantified soil organic C pools (microbial C and water extractable organic C and fluxes (soil respiration and net methane production in functional process zones of adjacent channelized and widened sections of the Thur River, NE Switzerland, on a seasonal basis. The objective was to assess how spatial heterogeneity and temporal variability of these pools and fluxes relate to physicochemical soil properties on one hand, and to soil environmental conditions and flood disturbance on the other hand.

    Overall, factors related to seasonality and flooding (temperature, water content, organic matter input affected soil C dynamics more than soil properties did. Coarse-textured soils on gravel bars in the restored section were characterized by low base-levels of organic C pools due to low TOC contents. However, frequent disturbance by flood pulses led to high heterogeneity with temporarily and locally increased C pools and soil respiration. By contrast, in stable riparian forests, the finer texture of the soils and corresponding higher TOC contents and water retention capacity led to high base-levels of C pools. Spatial heterogeneity was low, but major floods and seasonal differences in temperature had additional impacts on both pools and fluxes. Soil properties and base levels of C pools in the dam foreland of the channelized section

  11. Nutrient limitation reduces land carbon uptake in simulations with a model of combined carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus cycling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. S. Goll

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Terrestrial carbon (C cycle models applied for climate projections simulate a strong increase in net primary productivity (NPP due to elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration during the 21st century. These models usually neglect the limited availability of nitrogen (N and phosphorus (P, nutrients that commonly limit plant growth and soil carbon turnover. To investigate how the projected C sequestration is altered when stoichiometric constraints on C cycling are considered, we incorporated a P cycle into the land surface model JSBACH (Jena Scheme for Biosphere–Atmosphere Coupling in Hamburg, which already includes representations of coupled C and N cycles.

    The model reveals a distinct geographic pattern of P and N limitation. Under the SRES (Special Report on Emissions Scenarios A1B scenario, the accumulated land C uptake between 1860 and 2100 is 13% (particularly at high latitudes and 16% (particularly at low latitudes lower in simulations with N and P cycling, respectively, than in simulations without nutrient cycles. The combined effect of both nutrients reduces land C uptake by 25% compared to simulations without N or P cycling. Nutrient limitation in general may be biased by the model simplicity, but the ranking of limitations is robust against the parameterization and the inflexibility of stoichiometry. After 2100, increased temperature and high CO2 concentration cause a shift from N to P limitation at high latitudes, while nutrient limitation in the tropics declines. The increase in P limitation at high-latitudes is induced by a strong increase in NPP and the low P sorption capacity of soils, while a decline in tropical NPP due to high autotrophic respiration rates alleviates N and P limitations. The quantification of P limitation remains challenging. The poorly constrained processes of soil P sorption and biochemical mineralization are identified as the main uncertainties in the strength of P limitation

  12. Anaerobic digestion technologies for closing the domestic water, carbon and nutrient cycles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammes, F; Kalogo, Y; Verstraete, W

    2000-01-01

    Sustainable wastewater treatment requires that household wastewater is collected and treated separately from industrial wastewater and rainwater run-offs. This separate treatment is, however, still inadequate, as more than 70% of the nutrients and much of the chemical oxygen demand (COD) and potential pathogens of a domestic sewage system are confined to the few litres of black water (faeces, urine and toilet water). Whilst grey water can easily be filter treated and re-used for secondary household purposes, black water requires more intensive treatment due to its high COD and microbial (pathogens) content. Recently developed vacuum/dry toilets produce a nutrient rich semi-solid waste stream, which, with proper treatment, offers the possibility of nutrient, carbon, water and energy recovery. This study investigates the terrestrial applicability of Life Support System (LSS) concepts as a framework for future domestic waste management. The possibilities of treating black water together with other types of human-generated solid waste (biowastes/mixed wastes) in an anaerobic reactor system at thermophilic conditions, as well as some post treatment alternatives for product recovery and re-use, are considered. Energy can partially be recovered in the form of biogas produced during anaerobic digestion. The system is investigated in the form of theoretical mass balances, together with an assessment of the current feasibility of this technology and other post-treatment alternatives. PMID:11381993

  13. Ideas and perspectives: Holocene thermokarst sediments of the Yedoma permafrost region do not increase the northern peatland carbon pool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hugelius, Gustaf; Kuhry, Peter; Tarnocai, Charles

    2016-04-01

    Permafrost deposits in the Beringian Yedoma region store large amounts of organic carbon (OC). Walter Anthony et al. (2014) describe a previously unrecognized pool of 159 Pg OC accumulated in Holocene thermokarst sediments deposited in Yedoma region alases (thermokarst depressions). They claim that these alas sediments increase the previously recognized circumpolar permafrost peat OC pool by 50 %. It is stated that previous integrated studies of the permafrost OC pool have failed to account for these deposits because the Northern Circumpolar Soil Carbon Database (NCSCD) is biased towards non-alas field sites and that the soil maps used in the NCSCD underestimate coverage of organic permafrost soils. Here we evaluate these statements against a brief literature review, existing data sets on Yedoma region soil OC storage and independent field-based and geospatial data sets of peat soil distribution in the Siberian Yedoma region. Our findings are summarized in three main points. Firstly, the sediments described by Walter Anthony et al. (2014) are primarily mineral lake sediments and do not match widely used international scientific definitions of peat or organic soils. They can therefore not be considered an addition to the circumpolar peat carbon pool. We also emphasize that a clear distinction between mineral and organic soil types is important since they show very different vulnerability trajectories under climate change. Secondly, independent field data and geospatial analyses show that the Siberian Yedoma region is dominated by mineral soils, not peatlands. Thus, there is no evidence to suggest any systematic bias in the NCSCD field data or maps. Thirdly, there is spatial overlap between these Holocene thermokarst sediments and previous estimates of permafrost soil and sediment OC stocks. These carbon stocks were already accounted for by previous studies and they do not significantly increase the known circumpolar OC pool. We suggest that these inaccurate

  14. Two pools of old carbon in a volcanic-ash soil revealed by sequential density fractionation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagai, R.; Shirato, Y.; Uchida, M.; Hiradate, S.

    2010-12-01

    Volcanic-ash soils are often darker and hold significantly greater amounts of organic matter (OM) than non-volcanic soils presumably because inorganic constituents unique to such soil (e.g., poorly-crystalline minerals and dissolved aluminum) have high capacity to stabilize OM. It has been shown that carbon (C) in Japanese volcanic-ash soils can be quite old (>1000 yr) even at surface horizons. Yet little information is available on how the old C is stabilized in soil matrix. Fractionation of soil according to particle density is an effective approach to distinguish the OM of different degrees of mineral associations and to elucidate SOM stabilization processes. Here we examined a surface (Ap) horizon of an allophanic Andisol in central Japan by isolating six density fractions (from F1: 2.5 g/cc). Almost half of total C was distributed to F4 (2.0-2.25 g/cc), 26% of total C to F3 (1.8-2.0 g/cc), 10-12% to F2 (1.6-1.8 g/cc) and F5 (2.25-2.5 g/cc), and 3-4% to F1 and F6, respectively. The concentration of allophane was also highest in F4 then F3, implying that allophane-OM association is the main form of OM present in this soil. In accord with the reports on other soil types, C-14 age generally increased with particle density from F1 (modern) to F5 (1300 yr libby age) and slightly declined to F6 (1000 yr). The clear exception to this trend was the old C age (1300 yr) of 1.6-1.8 g/cc fraction. Following results suggested the presence of char in this fraction: (i) C:N ratio was the highest (22), (ii) aromatic-C:O-alkyl-C ratio nearly doubled from F1 to F2, and (iii) large numbers of small, dark fragments were microscopically observed along with plant detritus fragments. In contrast to F2, equally-old C in F5 (2.25-2.5 g/cc) appear to be strongly altered by microbial process and bound to mineral particles. F5 had lower C:N ratio of 9.7 and was more enriched in N-15 (+5 per mill) and C-13 (+2 per mill) compared to F2. The presence of contrasting forms of old C suggest

  15. Evergreen shrub traits and peatland carbon cycling under high nutrient load

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larmola, Tuula; Bui, Vi; Bubier, Jill L.; Wang, Meng; Murphy, Meaghan; Moore, Tim R.

    2016-04-01

    The reactive nitrogen (N) assimilated by plants is usually invested in chlorophyll to improve light harvesting capacity and in soluble proteins such as Rubisco to enhance carbon (C) assimilation. We studied the effects of simulated atmospheric N deposition on different traits of two evergreen shrubs Chamaedaphne calyculata and Rhododendron groenlandicum in a nutrient-poor Mer Bleue Bog, Canada that has been fertilized with N as NO3 and NH4 (2-8 times ambient annual wet deposition) with or without phosphorus (P) and potassium (K) for 7-12 years. We examined how nutrient addition influences the plant performance at leaf and canopy level and linked the trait responses with ecosystem C cycling. At the leaf level, we measured physiological and biochemical traits: CO2 exchange and chlorophyll fluorescence, an indicator of plant stress in terms of light harvesting capacity; and to study changes in photosynthetic nutrient use efficiency, we also determined the foliar chlorophyll, N, and P contents. At the canopy level, we examined morphological and phenological traits: growth responses and leaf longevity during two growing seasons. Regardless of treatment, the majority of leaves showed no signs of stress in terms of light harvesting capacity. The plants were N saturated: with increasing foliar N content, the higher proportion of N was not used in photosynthesis. Foliar net CO2 assimilation rates did not differ significantly among treatments, but the additions of N, P, and K together resulted in higher respiration rates. The analysis of the leaf and canopy traits showed that the two shrubs had different strategies: C. calyculata was more responsive to nutrient additions, more deciduous-like, whereas R. groenlandicum maintained evergreen features under nutrient load, shedding its leaves even later in the season. In all, simulated atmospheric N deposition did not benefit the photosynthetic apparatus of the dominant shrubs, but resulted in higher foliar respiration

  16. Fertilization Affects Biomass Production of Suaeda salsa and Soil Organic Carbon Pool in East Coastal Region of China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MENG Qing-feng; YANG Jing-song; YAO Rong-jiang; LIU Guang-ming; YU Shi-peng

    2013-01-01

    Land use practice significantly affects soil properties. Soil is a major sink for atmospheric carbon, and soil organic carbon (SOC) is considered as an essential indicator of soil quality. The objective of this study was to assess the effects of N and P applied to Suaeda salsa on biomass production, SOC concentration, labile organic carbon (LOC) concentration, SOC pool and carbon management index (CMI) as well as the effect of the land use practice on soil quality of coastal tidal lands in east coastal region of China. The study provided relevant references for coastal exploitation, tidal land management and related study in other countries and regions. The field experiment was laid out in a randomized complete block design, consisting of four N-fertilization rates (0 (N0), 60 (N1), 120 (N2) and 180 kg ha-1 (N3)), three P-fertilization rates (0 (P0), 70 (P1) and 105 kg ha-1 (P2)) and bare land without vegetation. N and P applied to S. salsa on coastal tidal lands significantly affected biomass production (above-ground biomass and roots), bulk density (ρb), available N and P, SOC, LOC, SOC pool and CMI. Using statistical analysis, significantly interactions in N and P were observed for biomass production and the dominant factor for S. salsa production was N in continuous 2-yr experiments. There were no significant interactions between N and P for SOC concentration, LOC concentration and SOC pool. However, significant interaction was obtained for CMI at the 0-20 cm depth and N played a dominant role in the variation of CMI. There were significant improvements for soil measured attributes and parameters, which suggested that increasing the rates of N and P significantly decreasedρb at the 0-20 cm depth and increased available N and P, SOC, LOC, SOC pool as well as CMI at both the 0-20 and 20-40 cm depth, respectively. By correlation analysis, there were significantly positive correlations between biomass (above-ground biomass and roots) and SOC as well as LOC in

  17. Atmospheric deposition as a source of carbon and nutrients to barren, alpine soils of the Colorado Rocky Mountains

    OpenAIRE

    N. Mladenov; Williams, M. W.; Schmidt, S K; Cawley, K.

    2012-01-01

    Many alpine areas are experiencing intense deglaciation, biogeochemical changes driven by temperature rise, and changes in atmospheric deposition. There is mounting evidence that the water quality of alpine streams may be related to these changes, including rising atmospheric deposition of carbon (C) and nutrients. Given that barren alpine soils can be severely C limited, we evaluated the magnitude and chemical quality of atmospheric deposition of C and nutrients to an alpine site, the Green ...

  18. Changes in Organic Carbon and Nutrient Contents of Highly Productive Paddy Soils in Yujiang County of Jiangxi Province, China and Their Environmental Application

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Zhong-pei; ZHANG Tao-lin; CHEN Bi-yun

    2006-01-01

    Paddy field is an important land use in subtropical China. Development of high soil fertility and productivity is the management goal of paddy field. Fertilization and management practices have not only influenced the status of organic matter and nutrients in the soil but also affected the environmental quality. This article investigates the contents of organic carbon and the nutrients, and the change over the last 20 years in highly productive paddy soils and their environmental application. Field soils were sampled and the analytical results were compared with the corresponding values in the Second Soil Survey in Yujiang County of Jiangxi Province, China. The results showed that surface soils at a depth of 0-10 cm in highly productive paddy fields in Yujiang County of Jiangxi Province had contents of organic carbon (20.2 ± 3.88) g kg-1, total nitrogen (2.09 ± 0.55) g kg-1, and available phosphorus (42.7 ± 32.7) mg kg-1, respectively,which were all at very rich levels. Over the last 20 years, the organic carbon pool of the highly productive paddy soils reached a steady state. Total N and available P significantly increased, whereas available K changed a little. The amount and percentage of P immobilization in the surface soil (0-10 cm) of highly productive paddy fields were (142.7 ± 41.1) mg kg-1and (36.2± 10.4)% of added P, and CEC (7.93 ± 1.32) cmol kg-1. These two parameters were not higher than the mean values of paddy soils and upland red soils in the areas. Results also showed that fertilizer P in highly productive paddy soils had a high mobility and was prone to move toward a water body, which is the main source of nutrients causing eutrophication.Because of a weak K-fixing capacity, the available K content was not high in highly productive paddy soils. This suggests that attention should be paid to the K balance and the increase of soil K pool.

  19. Mercury concentrations and pools in four Sierra Nevada forest sites, and relationships to organic carbon and nitrogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Obrist

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available This study presents data on mercury (Hg concentrations, stochiometric relations to carbon (C and nitrogen (N, and Hg pool sizes in four Sierra Nevada forest sites of similar exposure and precipitation regimes, and hence similar atmospheric deposition, to evaluate how ecosystem parameters control Hg retention in ecosystems. In all four sites, the largest amounts of Hg reside in soils which account for 94–98% of ecosystem pools. Hg concentrations and Hg/C ratios increase in the following order: Green Needles/Leavesr2=0.58 and N and C (r2=0.64 in decomposing litter, but a positive correlation between litter Hg and N (r2=0.70. These inverse relations may reflect preferential retention of N and Hg over C during decomposition, or may be due to older age of decomposed litter layers which are exposed to longer-term atmospheric Hg deposition in the field. The results indicate that litter Hg levels depend on decomposition stage and may not follow generally observed positive relationships between Hg and organic C.

    Mineral soil layers show strong positive correlations of Hg to C across all sites and soil horizons (r2=0.83, but Hg concentrations are even more closely related to N with a similar slope to that observed in litter (r2=0.92. Soil N levels alone explain over 90% of Hg pool sizes across the four Sierra Nevada forest sites. This suggests that soil organic N and C groups provide sorption sites for Hg to retain atmospheric deposition. However, the patterns could be due to indirect relationships where high soil N and C levels reflect high ecosystem productivity which leads to corresponding high atmospheric Hg deposition inputs via leaf litterfall and plant senescence. Our results also show that two of the sites previously affected by

  20. A Comparison of the Role of Episode Nutrient Supply on Pathways of Carbon in Upwelling Regimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, M. E.

    1997-01-01

    Nutrient supply is episode in the ocean even in regions of fairly high and continuous nutrient supply, such as coastal upwelling regimes. The structure of the ecosystem depends on nutrient availability and the different requirements of phytoplankton cells.

  1. The role of isotopes in studying nutrient and organic matter dynamics in livestock/cropping systems, with emphasis on carbon and nitrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    information on the root carbon pools and turnover rates for different plant systems. In livestock research, isotopes have been used to determine the relative conversion of dietary nutrients into animal produce, animal tissues, dung and urine. However, this is more commonly determined using non-isotopic studies with stall fed animals and nutrient analysis of the various components. Isotopic studies of this kind are most valuable for detailed research tracing nutrient conversion into specific animal components or metabolites. Several studies have used 15N-enriched plant material fed to animals to generate 15N-labelled excreta for research on the fate of excreta N. Quality of the feed source for livestock can have a marked effect on the relative conversion of feed N into animal produce, dung or urine. While this has been well researched in intensive livestock systems in developed countries, there is much less information on the fate of feed N consumed by animals in developing countries where poor quality feed sources may be used. In the latter, more than half of the consumed N can be excreted in dung and this represents an important potential source of N and other nutrients for recycling onto crops. The system of animal management influences the recovery of nutrients in manure. In developing countries, such as in Africa, animals may be penned continuously and the manure is collected, stored and applied onto cropping areas. The storage method and treatment of manure (e.g. straw may be mixed with it) will influence the temporal availability of nutrients after application to soil. Detailed research is required to better understand the variability in N supply from manures in relation to feed quality and to develop practical recommendation systems for their optimum use in cropping systems. The stable isotopes 15N and 13C can play a valuable role in such research programmes. Research requirements in developing counties should be based on local knowledge and identification of specific

  2. Marine ecosystem community carbon and nutrient uptake stoichiometry under varying ocean acidification during the PeECE III experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. G. J. Bellerby

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Inorganic carbon and nutrient biogeochemical responses were studied during the 2005 Pelagic Ecosystem CO2 Enrichment (PeECE III study. Inverse analysis of the temporal inorganic carbon dioxide system and nutrient variations was used to determine the net community stoichiometric uptake characteristics of a natural pelagic ecosystem production perturbed over a range of pCO2 scenarios (350, 700 and 1050 μatm. Nutrient uptake showed no sensitivity to CO2 treatment. There was enhanced carbon production relative to nutrient consumption in the higher CO2 treatments which was positively correlated with the initial CO2 concentration. There was no significant calcification response to changing CO2 in Emiliania huxleyi by the peak of the bloom and all treatments exhibited low particulate inorganic carbon production (~15 μmol kg−1. With insignificant air-sea CO2 exchange across the treatments, the enhanced carbon uptake was due to increase organic carbon production. The inferred cumulative C:N:P stoichiometry of organic production increased with CO2 treatment from 1:6.3:121 to 1:7.1:144 to 1:8.25:168 at the height of the bloom. This study discusses how ocean acidification may incur modification to the stoichiometry of pelagic production and have consequences for ocean biogeochemical cycling.

  3. Spatial and temporal variability in nutrients and carbon uptake during 2004 and 2005 in the eastern equatorial Pacific Ocean

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palacz, A. P.; Chai, F.

    2012-01-01

    The Eastern Equatorial Pacific plays a great role in the global carbon budget due to its enhanced biological productivity linked to the equatorial upwelling. However, as confirmed by the Equatorial Biocomplexity cruises in 2004 and 2005, nutrient upwelling supply varies strongly, also due to the......-temporal variability in primary productivity. We demonstrate for the first time that Tropical Instability Waves can be directly linked to increased NO3 and Si(OH)4 upwelling supply and enhanced nutrient and carbon uptake, in particular by large phytoplankton such as diatoms. In order to fully...

  4. Carbon Source and Placement Effects on Soil Aggregation and C Pools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soil organic C is an important soil property having implications for nutrient cycling, soil water dynamics, and soil physical structure. A field study was initiated in 2002 to determine if quality and placement of C affected soil organic C and soil aggregation. Sources of C included none, sugar, flo...

  5. Direct membrane-carbonation photobioreactor producing photoautotrophic biomass via carbon dioxide transfer and nutrient removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun-Woo; Cheng, Jing; Rittmann, Bruce E

    2016-03-01

    An advanced-material photobioreactor, the direct membrane-carbonation photobioreactor (DMCPBR), was tested to investigate the impact of directly submerging a membrane carbonation (MC) module of hollow-fiber membranes inside the photobioreactor. Results demonstrate that the DMCPBR utilized over 90% of the supplied CO2 by matching the CO2 flux to the C demand of photoautotrophic biomass growth. The surface area of the submerged MC module was the key to control CO2 delivery and biomass productivity. Tracking the fate of supplied CO2 explained how the DMCPBR reduced loss of gaseous CO2 while matching the inorganic carbon (IC) demand to its supply. Accurate fate analysis required that the biomass-associated C include soluble microbial products as a sink for captured CO2. With the CO2 supply matched to the photosynthetic demand, light attenuation limited the rate microalgal photosynthesis. The DMCPBR presents an opportunity to improve CO2-deliver efficiency and make microalgae a more effective strategy for C-neutral resource recovery. PMID:26771923

  6. Cassava stillage and its anaerobic fermentation liquid as external carbon sources in biological nutrient removal*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bu, Fan; Hu, Xiang; Xie, Li; Zhou, Qi

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of one kind of food industry effluent, cassava stillage and its anaerobic fermentation liquid, on biological nutrient removal (BNR) from municipal wastewater in anaerobic-anoxic-aerobic sequencing batch reactors (SBRs). Experiments were carried out with cassava stillage supernatant and its anaerobic fermentation liquid, and one pure compound (sodium acetate) served as an external carbon source. Cyclic studies indicated that the cassava by-products not only affected the transformation of nitrogen, phosphorus, poly-β-hydroxyalkanoates (PHAs), and glycogen in the BNR process, but also resulted in higher removal efficiencies for phosphorus and nitrogen compared with sodium acetate. Furthermore, assays for phosphorus accumulating organisms (PAOs) and denitrifying phosphorus accumulating organisms (DPAOs) demonstrated that the proportion of DPAOs to PAOs reached 62.6% (Day 86) and 61.8% (Day 65) when using cassava stillage and its anaerobic fermentation liquid, respectively, as the external carbon source. In addition, the nitrate utilization rates (NURs) of the cassava by-products were in the range of 5.49–5.99 g N/(kg MLVSS∙h) (MLVSS is mixed liquor volatile suspended solids) and 6.63–6.81 g N/(kg MLVSS∙h), respectively. The improvement in BNR performance and the reduction in the amount of cassava stillage to be treated in-situ make cassava stillage and its anaerobic fermentation liquid attractive alternatives to sodium acetate as external carbon sources for BNR processes. PMID:25845364

  7. Morphology, Organic Carbon and Dissolved Nutrients in Groundwater Table in Two Benchmark Wetlands Sites in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adesola Olutayo Olaleye

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Wetland soils in two benchmark sites located in the tall/grass land savanna (Edozhigi and in the Rain Forest (Ibadan were selected in order to study the soil morphological characteristics, organic carbon contents, and the nutrient dynamics (P, Ca, Mg, Fe, and NH4-N in the ground water table when rice was planted. Morphologically these soils are gleyed, mottled, with a hue of 10 YR, and low chroma that reflects poor drainage (i.e. aquic soil moisture regime. The soils are deep; more than 1.20 m in depth. The soil organic carbon was high in the surface soils (between 0.6 and 2.15% and fluctuated irregularly with depth. In addition, the ground water table fluctuated between 40-80 cm depth within all the soils at both sites. Following soil submergence, water soluble P, Ca, Mg, Fe, and NH4-H increased in the first week and began to decline as from the 56 – 70 days after transplanting (DAT which coincided with the tillering stage of rice plants. The Nitrate-N concentration was very low (<4 mg/l at both sites. This flooding during the rainy seasons would benefit rice plants and the high organic carbon contents in the soils could be a substantial factor in the maintenance of these soils for the cultivation of arable crops during the dry seasons.

  8. Carbon Monoxide Fumigation Improved the Quality, Nutrients, and Antioxidant Activities of Postharvest Peach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaoying Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Peaches (Prunus persica cv. Yanhong were fumigated with carbon monoxide (CO at 0, 0.5, 5, 10, and 20 μmol/L for 2 hours. The result showed that low concentration CO (0.5–10 μmol/L might delay the decrease of firmness and titrable acid content, restrain the increase of decay incidence, and postpone the variation of soluble solids content, but treating peaches with high concentration CO (20 μmol/L demonstrated adverse effects. Further research exhibited that exogenous CO could induce the phenylalnine ammonialyase activity, maintain nutrient contents such as Vitamin C, total flavonoid, and polyphenol, and enhance antioxidant activity according to reducing power and 2,2-diphenyl-1-(2,4,6-trinitrophenyl hydrazyl radical scavenging activity. Treating peaches with appropriate concentration CO was beneficial to the quality, nutrients, and antioxidant activity of postharvest peaches during storage time. Therefore, CO fumigation might probably become a novel method to preserve postharvest peach and other fruits in the future.

  9. Interactions between biomass energy technologies and nutrient and carbon balances at the farm level

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joergensen, Uffe; Molt Petersen, B. [Danish Inst. of Agricultural Science, Dept. of Agroecology, Tjele (Denmark)

    2006-08-15

    Biomass energy is by far the largest renewable energy source in the world (IEA Renewable information (www.iea.org)). Biomass utilisation is closely linked to management and sustainability issues of forestry and agriculture. Carbon is extracted from forests and agriculture to bioenergy facilities, from where it is partly or fully emitted as CO{sub 2} and thus no longer available for sustaining soil organic matter content. Nutrients are extracted as well and, depending of the conversion technology, they may be recycled to farmland or lost as gaseous emissions. Thus, we must be able to describe these effects, and to suggest strategies to alleviate adverse effects on farm sustainability and on the environment. By choosing intelligent combinations of cropping systems and energy conversion technologies, win-win solutions may be achieved. This paper illustrates, via three cases, some agricultural impacts of choice of biomass technology and describes an intriguing possibility for recycling municipal or industrial wastes through the bioenergy chain. (au)

  10. The response of ecosystem carbon pools to management approaches that increase the growth of loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, J. G.; Bacon, A. R.; Bracho, R. G.; Grunwald, S.; Gonzalez-Benecke, C. A.; Jokela, E. J.; Markewitz, D.; Cucinella, J.; Akers, K.; Ross, C. W.; Peter, G. F.; Fox, T. D.; Martin, T.; Kane, M.

    2015-12-01

    Extending from Virginia to east Texas in the southeastern United States, managed pine forests are an important component of the region's carbon cycle. One objective of the Pine Integrated Network: Education, Mitigation, and Adaptation project (PINEMAP) is to improve estimates of how ecosystem carbon pools respond to the management strategies used to increase the growth of loblolly pine forests. Experimental studies (108 total) that had historically been used to understand forest productivity and stand dynamics by university-forest industry cooperatives have now been measured for the carbon stored in the trees, coarse-wood, forest floor, understory and soils to 1-meter (0-10 cm, 10-20 cm, 20-50 cm, and 50-100 cm). The age of the studied forests ranged from 4-26 years at the time of sampling, with 26 years very near the period when these forests are commonly harvested. The study sites encapsulated a wide regional range in precipitation (1080 mm -1780 mm) and potential evapotranspiration (716 mm - 1200 mm). The most prevalent three soil orders measured were Ultisols (62%), Alfisols (19%), and Spodosols (10%) with Entisols, Inceptisols and 1 Histosol making up the remainder (9%). Across all study sites, 455 experimental plots were measured. The plots had as a treatment either fertilization, competition control, and stand density control (thinning), including every possible combination of treatments and also 'no treatment'. The most common treatment regime, at 36% of the total number of plots, was the combination of competition control, fertilization, and thinning. The distribution of treatments relative to soils and climate prevented a simple analysis of single treatment effects and instead necessitated an examination how the carbon accumulation rate in wood, which is commonly measured and modeled in these forests, corresponded to the response of other C pools (e.g. forest floor and soil).

  11. Long-term fertilization alters chemically-separated soil organic carbon pools: Based on stable C isotope analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dou, Xiaolin; He, Ping; Cheng, Xiaoli; Zhou, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Quantification of dynamics of soil organic carbon (SOC) pools under the influence of long-term fertilization is essential for predicting carbon (C) sequestration. We combined soil chemical fractionation with stable C isotope analyses to investigate the C dynamics of the various SOC pools after 25 years of fertilization. Five types of soil samples (0-20, 20-40 cm) including the initial level (CK) and four fertilization treatments (inorganic nitrogen fertilizer, IN; balanced inorganic fertilizer, NPK; inorganic fertilizer plus farmyard manure, MNPK; inorganic fertilizer plus corn straw residue, SNPK) were separated into recalcitrant and labile fractions, and the fractions were analysed for C content, C:N ratios, δ13C values, soil C and N recalcitrance indexes (RIC and RIN). Chemical fractionation showed long-term MNPK fertilization strongly increased the SOC storage in both soil layers (0-20 cm = 1492.4 gC m2 and 20-40 cm = 1770.6 gC m2) because of enhanced recalcitrant C (RC) and labile C (LC). The 25 years of inorganic fertilizer treatment did not increase the SOC storage mainly because of the offsetting effects of enhanced RC and decreased LC, whereas no clear SOC increases under the SNPK fertilization resulted from the fast decay rates of soil C.

  12. Potential Hydrological Responses, and Carbon and Nitrogen Pools of a Two Distinct Watersheds to Rainfall and Brush Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, R. L.; Fares, A.; Awal, R.; Johnson, A. B.

    2014-12-01

    Investigating the effects of brush management on hydrologic fluxes, in the parts of the Texas where brush is a dominant component of the landscape is essential for the State of Texas's water management strategy and planning. The main goal of this study is to test the performance of brush management as an effective approach for protecting soil quality (carbon and nitrogen pools), and water resources management and planning. Specifically, this work reports on the potential i) hydrological response and ii) carbon and nitrogen pools of two watersheds, one in Colorado River Basin (arid) and the second one in Neches River Basin (humid), to brush management (uniform thinning vs. clear cutting) simulated using Regional Hydro-ecological Simulation System (RHESSys) model and site specific input data. The selected watersheds have similar potential evapotranspiration level, but their average elevations are 600 m and 250 m for the arid and humid watersheds, respectively. Results are showing that light thinning alone may not be enough to significantly impact water yield and soil quality. They further indicate that the streamflow response to brush reduction is a non-linear positive response.

  13. The decadal state of the terrestrial carbon cycle: Global retrievals of terrestrial carbon allocation, pools, and residence times.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloom, A Anthony; Exbrayat, Jean-François; van der Velde, Ivar R; Feng, Liang; Williams, Mathew

    2016-02-01

    The terrestrial carbon cycle is currently the least constrained component of the global carbon budget. Large uncertainties stem from a poor understanding of plant carbon allocation, stocks, residence times, and carbon use efficiency. Imposing observational constraints on the terrestrial carbon cycle and its processes is, therefore, necessary to better understand its current state and predict its future state. We combine a diagnostic ecosystem carbon model with satellite observations of leaf area and biomass (where and when available) and soil carbon data to retrieve the first global estimates, to our knowledge, of carbon cycle state and process variables at a 1° × 1° resolution; retrieved variables are independent from the plant functional type and steady-state paradigms. Our results reveal global emergent relationships in the spatial distribution of key carbon cycle states and processes. Live biomass and dead organic carbon residence times exhibit contrasting spatial features (r = 0.3). Allocation to structural carbon is highest in the wet tropics (85-88%) in contrast to higher latitudes (73-82%), where allocation shifts toward photosynthetic carbon. Carbon use efficiency is lowest (0.42-0.44) in the wet tropics. We find an emergent global correlation between retrievals of leaf mass per leaf area and leaf lifespan (r = 0.64-0.80) that matches independent trait studies. We show that conventional land cover types cannot adequately describe the spatial variability of key carbon states and processes (multiple correlation median = 0.41). This mismatch has strong implications for the prediction of terrestrial carbon dynamics, which are currently based on globally applied parameters linked to land cover or plant functional types. PMID:26787856

  14. Regulation of phytoplankton carbon to chlorophyll ratio by light, nutrients and temperature in the equatorial Pacific Ocean: a basin-scale model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. J. Wang

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The complex effects of light, nutrients and temperature lead to a variable carbon to chlorophyll (C:Chl ratio in phytoplankton cells. Using field data collected in the equatorial Pacific, we derived a new dynamic model with a non-steady C:Chl ratio as a function of irradiance, nitrate, iron, and temperature. The dynamic model is implemented into a basin-scale ocean circulation-biogeochemistry model and tested in the equatorial Pacific Ocean. The model reproduces well the general features of phytoplankton dynamics in this region. For instance, the simulated deep chlorophyll maximum (DCM is much deeper in the western warm pool (~100 m than in the eastern equatorial Pacific (~50 m. The model also shows the ability to reproduce chlorophyll, including not only the zonal, meridional and vertical variations, but also the interannual variability. This study demonstrates that combination of nitrate and iron regulates the spatial and temporal variations in the phytoplankton C:Chl ratio. Particularly, nitrate is responsible for the high C:Chl ratio in the western warm pool while iron is responsible for the frontal features in the C:Chl ratio between the warm pool and the upwelling region. In addition, iron plays a dominant role in regulating the spatial and temporal variations of the C:Chl ratio in the central and eastern equatorial Pacific. While temperature has a relatively small effect on the C:Chl ratio, light is primarily responsible for the vertical decrease of phytoplankton C:Chl ratio in the euphotic zone.

  15. Impact of tillage intensity on carbon and nitrogen pools in surface and subsurface soils of three long-term field experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, Michael; Piegholdt, Christiane; Andruschkewitsch, Rouven; Linsler, Deborah; Koch, Heinz-Josef; Ludwig, Bernard

    2014-05-01

    Management options such as the intensity of tillage are known to influence amount and turnover of soil organic matter. However, less information is available about the influence of the tillage intensity on individual soil organic matter pools of different turnover dynamics analyzed for surface and subsurface soils. We took surface (0-5 cm) and subsurface (5-25 cm) soil samples from no tillage (NT), reduced tillage (RT), and conventional tillage (CT) systems of three long-term field experiments in Germany. The labile, intermediate and stable C and N pool sizes were determined based on the combined application of a decomposition experiment and a physical-chemical separation procedure. For the surface soils, we found higher stocks of the labile C and N pool under NT and RT compared to CT. In case of a change from conventional to no-tillage systems, our results indicate an increase of labile C and N pools for the analyzed agricultural surface soils from 8 to 18% of the organic C and from 10% to 21% of the total N after 19 to 21 years. This timespan should be taken into consideration within the evaluation of potential benefits from an increase in labile OM for nutrient supply and productivity especially within the development of more sustainably managed agro-ecosystems. The reverse effect was observed for the labile C pool in subsurface soils where an increase from 6 to 10% of the organic C with increasing tillage intensity was observed. Such increase might contribute to an improved nutrient supply in subsurface soils under intensive tillage systems. The intermediate C and N pools in the surface and the subsurface soils are with 76 to 84% of the organic C and with 75 to 83% of the total N quantitatively much more important for the OM dynamics than the stable or labile pools. However, only for the surface soils were the stocks of the intermediate N and C pools distinctly larger for NT than for CT. The stocks of the stable C and N pools were not affected by the tillage

  16. Variability in the carbon isotopic composition of foliage carbon pools (soluble carbohydrates, waxes) and respiration fluxes in southeastern U.S. pine forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortazavi, Behzad; Conte, Maureen H.; Chanton, Jeffrey P.; Weber, J. C.; Martin, Timothy A.; Cropper, Wendell P., Jr.

    2012-06-01

    We measured the δ13C of assimilated carbon (foliage organic matter (δCOM), soluble carbohydrates (δCSC), and waxes (δCW)) and respiratory carbon (foliage (δCFR), soil (δCSR) and ecosystem 13CO2 (δCER)) for two years at adjacent ecosystems in the southeastern U.S.: a regenerated 32 m tall mature Pinus palustrisforest, and a mid-rotation 13 m tallPinus elliottii stand. Carbon pools and foliage respiration in P. palustris were isotopically enriched by 2‰ relative to P. elliottii. Despite this enrichment, mean δCER values of the two sites were nearly identical. No temporal trends were apparent in δCSC, δCFR, δCSR and δCER. In contrast, δCOM and δCW at both sites declined by approximately 2‰ over the study. This appears to reflect the adjustment in the δ13C of carbon storage reserves used for biosynthesis as the trees recovered from a severe drought prior to our study. Unexpectedly, the rate of δ13C decrease in the secondary C32-36 n-alkanoic acid wax molecular cluster was twice that observed forδCOM and the predominant C22-26 compound cluster, and provides new evidence for parallel but separate wax chain elongation systems utilizing different carbon precursor pools in these species. δCFR and δCER were consistently enriched relative to assimilated carbon but, in contrast to previous studies, showed limited variations in response to changes in vapor pressure deficit (D). This limited variability in respiratory fluxes and δCSC may be due to the shallow water table as well as the deep taproots of pines, which limit fluctuations in photosynthetic discrimination arising from changes in D.

  17. Oxygen, carbon, and nutrients in the oligotrophic eastern subtropical North Atlantic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Kähler

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The Beta Triangle, a region of the oligotrophic subtropical eastern North Atlantic Ocean, is notorious for its enigmatic oxygen, carbon, and nitrogen balances, in which nutrient supply is said to explain only a fraction of production necessary for estimated carbon export. Rates of dissolved organic carbon accumulation and dissolved organic nitrogen utilization in surface water and an assessment of oxygen utilized, organic matter consumed, and nitrate and phosphate regenerated in subsurface water, show that conventional production estimates miss substantial shares of biotic production.

    The shallow export of total organic carbon, predominantly dissolved (DOC, by subduction is responsible for about 50–70% of apparent oxygen utilization in subsurface water between the base of the surface layer at ca. 140 m and ca. 195 m depth, but it is insignificant below. Additionally, there is an estimated accumulation of 1.0 to 1.75 mol DOC m−2 a−1 in surface water. Including DOC dynamics in its carbon balance reveals the surface of this ultra-oligotrophic part of the ocean to be net autotrophic.

    Increasing subsurface values of excess nitrogen (DINxs imply the export of nitrogen from surface water stemming from production not exclusively fuelled by new nitrate supplied from below. Total organic nitrogen (almost exclusively dissolved, DON is consumed in the surface layer at a rate estimated at 0.13 to 0.23 mol m−2 a−1. There is no variation in dissolved organic phosphorus (DOP in the same direction. DON utilization thus contributes to the pronounced subsurface DINxs signature.

    DOC export and accumulation are important in the carbon balance in surface and near-surface water. DON utilization and, probably, N2 fixation contribute significant amounts to the nitrogen supply of surface water. These processes can close part of the enigmatic carbon and nitrogen balances in the

  18. Oxygen, carbon, and nutrients in the oligotrophic eastern subtropical North Atlantic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Kähler

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The Beta Triangle, a region of the oligotrophic subtropical eastern North Atlantic Ocean, is notorious for its enigmatic oxygen, carbon, and nitrogen balances, in which nutrient supply is said to explain only a fraction of production necessary for estimated carbon export. Rates of dissolved organic carbon accumulation and dissolved organic nitrogen utilization in surface water and an assessment of oxygen utilized, organic matter consumed, and nitrate and phosphate regenerated in subsurface water, show that conventional production estimates miss substantial shares of biotic production.

    The shallow export of total organic carbon, predominantly dissolved (DOC, by subduction is responsible for about 50–70% of apparent oxygen utilization in subsurface water between the base of the surface layer at ca. 140 m and ca. 195 m depth, but it is insignificant below. Additionally, there is an estimated accumulation of 1.0 to 1.75 mol DOC m−2 a−1 in surface water. Including DOC dynamics in its carbon balance reveals the surface of this ultra-oligotrophic part of the ocean to be autotrophic.

    Subsurface excess nitrogen (DINxs regeneration implies the utilization of nitrogen in surface water in addition to new nitrate supplied from below. Total organic nitrogen (almost exclusively dissolved, DON is consumed in the surface layer at a rate estimated at 0.13 to 0.23 mol m−2 a−1. There is no variation in dissolved organic phosphorus (DOP in the same direction. DON utilization thus contributes to the pronounced subsurface DINxs signature.

    DOC export and accumulation are important in the carbon balance in surface and near-surface water. DON utilization and, probably, N2 fixation contribute significant amounts to the nitrogen supply of surface water. These processes can close part of the enigmatic carbon and nitrogen balances in the Beta Triangle. There are, however, no

  19. Overestimated biomass carbon pools of the northern mid- and high latitude forests

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fang Jingyun,; Brown, S.; Tang Yanhong,; Nabuurs, G.J.; Wang Xiangping,; Shen Haihua,

    2006-01-01

    The biomass carbon (C) stock of forests is one of key parameters for the study of regional and global carbon cycles. Literature reviews shows that inventory-based forest C stocks documented for major countries in the middle and high northern latitudes fall within a narrow range of 36-56 Mg C ha(-1)

  20. Spatial and temporal variability in nutrients and carbon uptake during 2004 and 2005 in the eastern equatorial Pacific Ocean

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palacz, A. P.; Chai, F.

    2012-01-01

    The eastern equatorial Pacific plays a great role in the global carbon budget due to its enhanced biological productivity linked to the equatorial upwelling. However, as confirmed by the Equatorial Biocomplexity cruises in 2004 and 2005, nutrient upwelling supply varies strongly, partly due to the...

  1. Dynamics of nutrients, total organic carbon, prokaryotes and viruses in onboard incubations of cold-water corals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maier, C.; de Kluijver, A.; Agis, M.; Brussaard, C.P.D.; van Duyl, F.C.; Weinbauer, M.G.

    2011-01-01

    The potential influence of the cold-water corals (CWCs) Lophelia pertusa and Madrepora oculata on the dynamics of inorganic nutrient and total organic carbon (TOC) concentrations and the abundances of prokaryotes and viruses in bottom water was assessed in onboard incubation experiments. Ammonium, n

  2. MOTOR 2.0: module for transformation of organic matter and nutrients in soil; user guide and technical documentation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Assinck, F.B.T.; Rappoldt, C.

    2004-01-01

    MOTOR is a MOdule describing the Transformation of Organic matteR and nutrients in soil. It calculates the transformations between pools of organic matter and mineral nitrogen in soil. Pools are characterized by a carbon and nitrogen content and can be labelled. MOTOR is a flexible tool because the

  3. Organic Acids: The Pools of Fixed Carbon Involved in Redox Regulation and Energy Balance in Higher Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igamberdiev, Abir U.; Eprintsev, Alexander T.

    2016-01-01

    Organic acids are synthesized in plants as a result of the incomplete oxidation of photosynthetic products and represent the stored pools of fixed carbon accumulated due to different transient times of conversion of carbon compounds in metabolic pathways. When redox level in the cell increases, e.g., in conditions of active photosynthesis, the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle in mitochondria is transformed to a partial cycle supplying citrate for the synthesis of 2-oxoglutarate and glutamate (citrate valve), while malate is accumulated and participates in the redox balance in different cell compartments (via malate valve). This results in malate and citrate frequently being the most accumulated acids in plants. However, the intensity of reactions linked to the conversion of these compounds can cause preferential accumulation of other organic acids, e.g., fumarate or isocitrate, in higher concentrations than malate and citrate. The secondary reactions, associated with the central metabolic pathways, in particularly with the TCA cycle, result in accumulation of other organic acids that are derived from the intermediates of the cycle. They form the additional pools of fixed carbon and stabilize the TCA cycle. Trans-aconitate is formed from citrate or cis-aconitate, accumulation of hydroxycitrate can be linked to metabolism of 2-oxoglutarate, while 4-hydroxy-2-oxoglutarate can be formed from pyruvate and glyoxylate. Glyoxylate, a product of either glycolate oxidase or isocitrate lyase, can be converted to oxalate. Malonate is accumulated at high concentrations in legume plants. Organic acids play a role in plants in providing redox equilibrium, supporting ionic gradients on membranes, and acidification of the extracellular medium. PMID:27471516

  4. Carbon mineralization and nutrient availability in calcareous sandy soils amended with woody waste biochar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Naggar, Ahmed H; Usman, Adel R A; Al-Omran, Abdulrasoul; Ok, Yong Sik; Ahmad, Mahtab; Al-Wabel, Mohammad I

    2015-11-01

    Many studies have reported the positive effect of biochar on soil carbon sequestration and soil fertility improvement in acidic soils. However, biochar may have different impacts on calcareous sandy soils. A 90-day incubation experiment was conducted to quantify the effects of woody waste biochar (10 g kg(-1)) on CO2-C emissions, K2SO4-extractable C and macro-(N, P and K) and micro-(Fe, Mn, Zn and Cu) nutrient availability in the presence or absence of poultry manure (5 g kg(-1) soil). The following six treatments were applied: (1) conocarpus (Conocarpus erectus L.) waste (CW), (2) conocarpus biochar (BC), (3) poultry manure (PM), (4) PM+CW, (5) PM+BC and (6) untreated soil (CK). Poultry manure increased CO2-C emissions and K2SO4-extractable C, and the highest increases in CO2-C emission rate and cumulative CO2-C and K2SO4-extractable C were observed for the PM+CW treatment. On the contrary, treatments with BC halted the CO2-C emission rate, indicating that the contribution of BC to CO2-C emissions is negligible compared with the soils amended with CW and PM. Furthermore, the combined addition of PM+BC increased available N, P and K compared with the PM or BC treatments. Overall, the incorporation of biochar into calcareous soils might have benefits in carbon sequestration and soil fertility improvement. PMID:26037818

  5. Spatial distribution of the soil carbon pool in a Holm oak dehesa in Spain

    OpenAIRE

    Simón Cid, Nuria; Montes Pita, Fernando; Díaz-Pines López de los Mozos, Eugenio; Benavides Calvo, Raquel; Roig Gómez, Sonia; Rubio Sánchez, Agustín

    2013-01-01

    Aims Dehesas are agroforestry systems characterized by scattered trees among pastures, crops and/or fallows. A study at a Spanish dehesa has been carried out to estimate the spatial distribution of the soil organic carbon stock and to assess the influence of the tree cover. Methods The soil organic carbon stock was estimated from the five uppermost cm of themineral soil with high spatial resolution at two plots with different grazing intensities. The Universal Krigi...

  6. The combined effects of thinning and prescribed fire on carbon and nutrient budgets in a Jeffrey pine forest

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Dale W. [University of Nevada, Reno; Murphy, James D. [University of Nevada, Reno; Walker, Roger F. [University of Nevada, Reno; Miller, Watkins W. [University of Nevada, Reno; Glass, D. W. [University of Nevada, Reno; Todd Jr, Donald E [ORNL

    2008-09-01

    Both burning and harvesting cause carbon and nutrient removals from forest ecosystems, but few studies have addressed the combination of these effects. For a Pinus jeffreyii forest in the Sierra Nevada Mountains of California, we posed the question: what are the relative impacts of thinning and subsequent burning on carbon and nutrient removals? The thinning methods included whole-tree thinning (WT, where all aboveground biomass was removed) cut to length (CTL, where branches and foliage were left on site in a slash mat on top of skid trails) and no harvest (CONT). Total C and nutrient exports with thinning and burning were greater in the WT and CTL than in the CONT treatments. Total C and N removals were approximately equal for the WT and CTL treatments, although harvesting dominated exports in the WT treatment and burning dominated exports in the CTL treatment. Total removals of P, K, Ca, Mg and S were greatest in the WT treatments, where harvesting dominated removals. Comparisons of nutrient removals with ecosystem capital and calculations of potential replenishment by atmospheric deposition suggested that N is the nutrient likely to be most depleted by harvesting and burning treatments.

  7. Long-Term Manure Amendments Enhance Soil Aggregation and Carbon Saturation of Stable Pools in North China Plain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DU Zhang-liu; WU Wen-liang; ZHANG Qing-zhong; GUO Yan-bin; MENG Fan-qiao

    2014-01-01

    Organic amendment is considered as an effective way to increase soil organic carbon (SOC) stock in croplands. To better understand its potential for SOC sequestration, whether SOC saturation could be observed in an intensive agricultural ecosystem receiving long-term composted manure were examined. Different SOC pools were isolated by physical fractionation techniques of a Cambisol soil under a long-term manure experiment with wheat-maize cropping in North China Plain. A ifeld experiment was initiated in 1993, with 6 treatments including control (i.e., without fertilization), chemical fertilizer only, low rate of traditional composted manure (7.5 t ha-1), high rate of traditional composted manure (15 t ha-1), low rate of bio-composted manure (7.5 t ha-1) and high rate of bio-composted manure (15 t ha-1). The results showed that consecutive (for up to 20 years) composted manure amendments signiifcantly improved soil macro-aggregation, aggregate associated SOC concentration, and soil structure stability. In detail, SOC concentration in the sand-sized fraction (>53μm) continued to increase with manure application rate, while the silt (2-53μm) and clay (250μm) was the fraction in which SOC continued to increase with increasing manure application rate. In contrast, the chemical and physical protected C pools (i.e., micro-aggregates and silt-clay occluded in the small macro-aggregates) exhibited no additional C sequestration when the manure application rate was increased. It can be concluded that repeated manure amendments can increase soil macro-aggregation and lead to the increase in relatively stable C pools, showing hierarchical saturation behavior in the intensive cropping system of North China Plain.

  8. Exogenous nutrients and carbon resource change the responses of soil organic matter decomposition and nitrogen immobilization to nitrogen deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Ping; Wan, Song-Ze; Fang, Xiang-Min; Wang, Fang-Chao; Chen, Fu-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    It is unclear whether exogenous nutrients and carbon (C) additions alter substrate immobilization to deposited nitrogen (N) during decomposition. In this study, we used laboratory microcosm experiments and (15)N isotope tracer techniques with five different treatments including N addition, N+non-N nutrients addition, N+C addition, N+non-N nutrients+C addition and control, to investigate the coupling effects of non-N nutrients, C addition and N deposition on forest floor decomposition in subtropical China. The results indicated that N deposition inhibited soil organic matter and litter decomposition by 66% and 38%, respectively. Soil immobilized (15)N following N addition was lowest among treatments. Litter (15)N immobilized following N addition was significantly higher and lower than that of combined treatments during the early and late decomposition stage, respectively. Both soil and litter extractable mineral N were lower in combined treatments than in N addition treatment. Since soil N immobilization and litter N release were respectively enhanced and inhibited with elevated non-N nutrient and C resources, it can be speculated that the N leaching due to N deposition decreases with increasing nutrient and C resources. This study should advance our understanding of how forests responds the elevated N deposition. PMID:27020048

  9. Fermentation as a first step in carbon and nutrient recovery in regenerative life support systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luther, Amanda; Lasseur, Christophe; Rebeyre, Pierre; Clauwaert, Peter; Rabaey, Korneel; Ronsse, Frederik; Zhang, Dong Dong; López Barreiro, Diego; Prins, Wolter

    2016-07-01

    Long term manned space missions, such as the establishment of a base on Mars, will require a regenerative means of supplying the basic resources (i.e., food, water, oxygen) necessary to support human life. The MELiSSA-loop is a closed loop compartmentalized artificial aquatic ecosystem designed to recover water, carbon, and nutrients from solid organic wastes (e.g., inedible food waste and feces) for the regeneration of food and oxygen for humans. The first step in this loop is a strictly anaerobic fermentation unit operated as a membrane bioreactor. In this step the aim is to maximize the hydrolysis of complex organic compounds into simple molecules (CO2, ammonia, volatile fatty acids, …) which can be consumed by plants and bacteria downstream to produce food again. Optimal steady state fermentation of a standardized homogeneous mixture of beets, lettuce, wheat straw, toilet paper, feces, and water was demonstrated to recover approximately 50% of the influent carbon as soluble organics in the effluent through anaerobic fermentation. Approximately 10% of the influent COD was converted to CO2, with the remaining ~40% retained as a mixture of undigested solids and biomass. Approximately 50% of the influent nitrogen was recovered in the effluent, 97% of which was in the form of ammonia. Similar results have been obtained at both lab and pilot scale. With only 10% of the carbon driven to CO2 through this fermentation, a major challenge at this moment for the MELiSSA-loop is closing the carbon cycle, by completely oxidizing the carbon in the organic waste and non-edible parts of the plant into CO2 for higher plants and algae to fix again for food production. To further improve the overall degradation we are investigating the integration of a high temperature and pressure, sub- or near critical water conditions to improve the degradation of fibrous material with the addition of an oxidant (hydrogen peroxide, H2O2) under sub- or near critical conditions to further

  10. Belowground carbon pools and dynamics in China's warm temperate and sub-tropical deciduous forests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. W. Xiao

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available We report the first estimates of pools and dynamics of microbes, roots, plant litter and soil organic carbon (SOC in three dominant types of China's vast deciduous forest area: Betula platyphylla, Quercus liaotungensis, and Quercus aliena varacuteserrata. Organic matter degradation rates overshadowed litter inputs as the main determinant of the soil carbon stocks. Across the three forests, rates of litter decomposition were also indicative for turnover rates of SOC. Litter and SOC decay was faster in the sub-tropical than in the warm-temperate forests. Among the latter, SOC turnover was highest in the forest producing the higher-quality litter. Microbial biomass was, as expected, correlated with SOC content. Microbial activity, in contrast, was highest at the sub-tropical forest, despite the lower SOC availability, lower fraction of labile SOC, and lower soil microbial biomass. These results may contribute to increased understanding of controls over belowground carbon cycling in deciduous forests.

  11. Marine ecosystem community carbon and nutrient uptake stoichiometry under varying ocean acidification during the PeECE III experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. G. J. Bellerby

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Changes to seawater inorganic carbon and nutrient concentrations in response to the deliberate CO2 perturbation of natural plankton assemblages were studied during the 2005 Pelagic Ecosystem CO2 Enrichment (PeECE III experiment. Inverse analysis of the temporal inorganic carbon dioxide system and nutrient variations was used to determine the net community stoichiometric uptake characteristics of a natural pelagic ecosystem perturbed over a range of pCO2 scenarios (350, 700 and 1050 μatm. Nutrient uptake showed no sensitivity to CO2 treatment. There was enhanced carbon production relative to nutrient consumption in the higher CO2 treatments which was positively correlated with the initial CO2 concentration. There was no significant calcification response to changing CO2 in Emiliania huxleyi by the peak of the bloom and all treatments exhibited low particulate inorganic carbon production (~15 μmol kg−1. With insignificant air-sea CO2 exchange across the treatments, the enhanced carbon uptake was due to increase organic carbon production. The inferred cumulative C:N:P stoichiometry of organic production increased with CO2 treatment from 1:6.3:121 to 1:7.1:144 to 1:8.25:168 at the height of the bloom. This study discusses how ocean acidification may incur modification to the stoichiometry of pelagic production and have consequences for ocean biogeochemical cycling.

  12. The Practical Asymmetric Syntheses of Key Chiral Intermediates of Chiral Drug from Four-Carbon Chiral Pool

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MI; AiQiao

    2001-01-01

    (S)-or (R)-2-Amino-4-phenylbutyric acid and (S)-or (R)-2-hydroxy-4-phenylbutyric acid and their ethyl esters are key chiral intermediates for the preparation of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEI) and other chiral drugs. Their practically asymmetric synthetic methods in large scale from four-carbon chiral pool, commercially available L-aspartic acid and L-malic acid, will be presented (as scheme).  (S)-2-Amino-4-phenylbutyric acid and its ethyl ester hydrochloride were prepared from the easily available L-aspartic acid via activation by forming anhydride hydrochloride, Friedel-Crafts reaction with benzene, hydrogenolysis and esterification with ethanol in the presence of thionyl chloride in overall yield of 80% and 73.6% respectively with 99% ee. We first used amino acid anhydride hydrochloride as the acylating agent in Friedel-Crafts reaction without racemization. [1]……

  13. The Practical Asymmetric Syntheses of Key Chiral Intermediates of Chiral Drug from Four-Carbon Chiral Pool

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    @@ (S)-or (R)-2-Amino-4-phenylbutyric acid and (S)-or (R)-2-hydroxy-4-phenylbutyric acid and their ethyl esters are key chiral intermediates for the preparation of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEI) and other chiral drugs. Their practically asymmetric synthetic methods in large scale from four-carbon chiral pool, commercially available L-aspartic acid and L-malic acid, will be presented (as scheme). (S)-2-Amino-4-phenylbutyric acid and its ethyl ester hydrochloride were prepared from the easily available L-aspartic acid via activation by forming anhydride hydrochloride, Friedel-Crafts reaction with benzene, hydrogenolysis and esterification with ethanol in the presence of thionyl chloride in overall yield of 80% and 73.6% respectively with 99% ee. We first used amino acid anhydride hydrochloride as the acylating agent in Friedel-Crafts reaction without racemization. [1

  14. How drought severity constrains GPP and its partitioning among carbon pools in a Quercus ilex coppice?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Rambal

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The partitioning of photosynthates toward biomass compartments has a crucial role in the carbon sink function of forests. Few studies have examined how carbon is allocated toward plant compartments in drought prone forests. We analyzed the fate of GPP in relation to yearly water deficit in an old evergreen Mediterranean Quercus ilex coppice severely affected by water limitations. Gross and net carbon fluxes between the ecosystem and the atmosphere were measured with an eddy-covariance flux tower running continuously since 2001. Discrete measurements of litterfall, stem growth and fAPAR allowed us to derive annual productions of leaves, wood, flowers and acorns and an isometric relationship between stem and belowground biomass has been used to estimate perennial belowground growth. By combining eddy-covariance fluxes with annual productions we managed to close a C budget and derive values of autotrophic and heterotrophic respirations, NPP and carbon use efficiency (CUE, the ratio between NPP and GPP. Average values of yearly NEP, GPP and Reco were 282, 1259 and 977 g C m−2. The corresponding ANPP components were 142.5, 26.4 and 69.6 g C m−2 for leaves, reproductive effort (flowers and fruits and stems. Gross and net carbon exchange between the ecosystem and the atmosphere were affected by annual water deficit. Partitioning to the different plant compartments was also impacted by drought, with a hierarchy of responses going from the most affected, the stem growth, to the least affected, the leaf production. The average CUE was 0.40, which is well in the range for Mediterranean-type forest ecosystems. CUE tended to decrease more slightly in response to drought than GPP and NPP, probably due to drought-acclimation of autotrophic respiration. Overall, our results provide a baseline for modeling the inter-annual variations of carbon fluxes and allocation in this widespread Mediterranean ecosystem and highlight the value of maintaining continuous

  15. Enhanced biological nutrient removal in modified carbon source division anaerobic anoxic oxic process with return activated sludge pre-concentration☆

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qin Lu; Haiyan Wu; Haoyan Li; Dianhai Yang

    2015-01-01

    A pilot-scale modified carbon source division anaerobic anoxic oxic (AAO) process with pre-concentration of returned activated sludge (RAS) was proposed in this study for the enhanced biological nutrient removal (BNR) of municipal wastewater with limited carbon source. The influent carbon source was fed in step while a novel RAS pre-concentration tank was adopted to improve BNR efficiency, and the effects of an influent carbon source distribution ratio and a RAS pre-concentration ratio were investigated. The results show that the removal efficiency of TN is mainly influenced by the carbon source distribution ratio while the TP removal relies on the RAS pre-concentration ratio. The optimum carbon source distribution ratio and RAS pre-concentration ratio are 60%and 50%, respectively, with an inner recycling ratio of 100%under the optimum steady operation of pilot test, reaching an average effluent TN concentration of 9.8 mg·L−1 with a removal efficiency of 63%and an average TP removal efficiency of 94%. The mechanism of nutrient removal is discussed and the kinetics is analyzed. The results reveal that the optimal carbon source distribution ratio provides sufficient denitrifying carbon source to each anoxic phase, reducing nitrate accumulation while the RAS pre-concentration ratio improves the condition of anaerobic zone to ensure the phosphorus release due to less nitrate in the returned sludge. Therefore, nitrifying bacteria, denitrifying bacteria and phosphorus accumulation organisms play an important role under the optimum condition, enhancing the performance of nutrient removal in this test.

  16. Turnover of soil carbon pools following addition of switchgrass-derived biochar to four soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    The amendment of soils with biochar may improve plant growth and sequester carbon, especially in marginal soils not suitable for the majority of commodity production. While biochar can persist in soils, it is not clear whether its persistence is affected by soil type. Moreover, we know little of how...

  17. Effect of slurry application and one season of cropping on aggregates and carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus pools in grassland soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linsler, D.; Geisseler, D.; Taube, F.; Loges, R.; Ludwig, B.

    2012-04-01

    The temporal dynamics of one season of cropping and slurry application in grassland soils on phosphorus (P), nitrogen (N) and carbon (C) pools are not completely understood. The objective was to study the long-term effects of one season of cropping and five years (2005-2010) of slurry application on soil organic matter (SOM), water stable aggregates and total and labile pools of C, N and P in grassland soils. Soil samples were taken in April 2010 at three depths (0 - 10 cm, 10 - 25 cm and 25 - 40 cm) from loamy sandy soils five years after the insertion of one season of cropping and the commencement of fertilization with cattle slurry. Treatments included permanent grassland (PG, since 1994) and tillage of a grassland followed by one season of winter wheat and grassland (WW). The plots were split and received either cattle slurry totalling 240 kg N per ha and year (+) or no slurry fertilization (-). The application of slurry over a period of five years led to only slightly higher organic C stocks in the corresponding PG and WW treatments. The application of slurry did have a positive effect on the contents of the large macroaggregates (aggregates >2000 µm) in the soil profile (0 - 40 cm), but had a negative effect on the other two macroaggregate size classes (aggregate size classes 1000 - 2000 µm and 250 - 1000 µm). Furthermore, the SOM contents of the free light fraction were 37 - 66% higher in the unfertilized plots in the top 25 cm soil depth. For the occluded light fraction this effect was also visible, but less pronounced. This might be an effect of the different plant species' composition between the fertilized and unfertilized plots. The fertilization had a positive effect on the labile pools of C, N and P, whereas the effects on the total pools were very small. The one season of cropping five years before sampling led to 10% and 11% lower organic C stocks in the WW than in the PG treatments in the soil profile of the fertilized and unfertilized plots

  18. Dynamics of carbon pools in post-agrogenic sandy soils of southern taiga of Russia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyuri Dmitriy I

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Until recently, a lot of arable lands were abandoned in many countries of the world and, especially, in Russia, where about half a million square kilometers of arable lands were abandoned in 1961-2007. The soils at these fallows undergo a process of natural restoration (or self-restoration that changes the balance of soil organic matter (SOM supply and mineralization. Results A soil chronosequence study, covering the ecosystems of 3, 20, 55, 100, and 170 years of self-restoration in southern taiga zone, shows that soil organic content of mineral horizons remains relatively stable during the self-restoration. This does not imply, however, that SOM pools remain steady. The C/N ratio of active SOM reached steady state after 55 years, and increased doubly (from 12.5 - 15.6 to 32.2-33.8. As to the C/N ratio of passive SOM, it has been continuously increasing (from 11.8-12.7 to 19.0-22.8 over the 170 years, and did not reach a steady condition. Conclusion The results of the study imply that soil recovery at the abandoned arable sandy lands of taiga is incredibly slow process. Not only soil morphological features of a former ploughing remained detectable but also the balance of soil organic matter input and mineralization remained unsteady after 170 years of self-restoration.

  19. Simultaneous carbon and nutrient removal in an airlift loop reactor under a limited filamentous bulking state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Ming; Zhang, Yalei; Zhou, Xuefei; Su, Yimin; Zhang, Min; Zhang, Ke

    2013-02-01

    Airlift loop reactors (ALRs) are important bioreactors for wastewater treatment. However, few studies have investigated the application of an ALR for simultaneous carbon and nutrient removal, especially for activated sludge systems. This study evaluated the performance of integrated nitrogen, phosphorus and COD removal in an ALR with a low height-to-diameter ratio in a limited filamentous bulking (LFB) state (SVI of 180-220mL/g). The average removal efficiencies for COD, NH(4)(+)-N, TN and TP were 91%, 92%, 86% and 94%, respectively. Additional research showed that only under the LFB state, the appropriate distribution of dissolved oxygen inside the ALR was established to promote a well-balanced aerobic and anoxic/anaerobic state. In addition, the macro-gradient of the substrate concentration at the inlet and the heavier bio-P sludge density compensated for the proliferation of filaments. Hence, the stable LFB state was achieved by balancing the floc-forming bacteria and the filamentous bacteria in the ALR. PMID:23313686

  20. Effects of fresh and aged biochars from pyrolysis and hydrothermal carbonization on nutrient sorption in agricultural soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gronwald, M.; Don, A.; Tiemeyer, B.; Helfrich, M.

    2015-01-01

    Leaching of nutrients from agricultural soils causes major environmental problems that may be reduced with biochar amendments to the soils. Biochars are characterised by a high adsorption capacity, i.e., they may retain nutrients such nitrate and ammonium. However, biochar properties strongly depend on feedstock and the production process. We investigated the nutrient retention capacity of biochars derived from pyrolysis (pyrochar) as well as from hydrothermal carbonization (hydrochar; produced at 200 and 250 °C) from three different feedstocks (digestates, Miscanthus, woodchips) mixed into different soil substrates (sandy loam and silty loam). Moreover, we investigated the influence of biochar degradation on its nutrient retention capacity using a seven-month in-situ field incubation of pyrochar and hydrochar. Pyrochars showed the highest ability to retain nitrate, ammonium and phosphate, with pyrochar from woodchips being particularly efficient in nitrate adsorption. Ammonium adsorption of pyrochars was controlled by the soil type of the soil-biochar mixture. We found some ammonium retention on sandy soils, but no pyrochar effect or even ammonium leaching from the loamy soil. The phosphate retention capacity of pyrochars strongly depended on the pyrochar feedstock with large phosphate leaching from digestate-derived pyrochar and some adsorption capacity from woodchip-derived pyrochar. Application of hydrochars to agricultural soils caused small, and often not significant, effects on nutrient retention. In contrast, some hydrochars did increase the leaching of nutrients compared to the non-amended control soil. We found a surprisingly rapid loss of the biochars' adsorption capacity after field application of the biochars. For all sites and for hydrochar and pyrochar, the adsorption capacity was reduced by 60-80% to less or no nitrate and ammonium adsorption. Thus, our results cast doubt on the efficiency of biochar applications to temperate zone soils to minimize

  1. Effects of fresh and aged chars from pyrolysis and hydrothermal carbonization on nutrient sorption in agricultural soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gronwald, M.; Don, A.; Tiemeyer, B.; Helfrich, M.

    2015-06-01

    Leaching of nutrients from agricultural soils causes major environmental problems that may be reduced with amendments of chars derived from pyrolysis (pyrochars) or hydrothermal carbonization (hydrochars). Chars are characterized by a high adsorption capacity - i.e. they may retain nutrients such as nitrate and ammonium. However, the physicochemical properties of the chars and hence their sorption capacity likely depend on feedstock and the production process. We investigated the nutrient retention capacity of pyrochars and hydrochars from three different feedstocks (digestates, Miscanthus, woodchips) mixed into different soil substrates (sandy loam and silty loam). Moreover, we investigated the influence of char degradation on its nutrient retention capacity using a 7-month in situ field incubation of pyrochar and hydrochar mixed into soils at three different field sites. Pyrochars showed the highest ability to retain nitrate, ammonium and phosphate, with pyrochar from woodchips being particularly efficient in nitrate adsorption. Ammonium adsorption of pyrochars was controlled by the soil type of the soil-char mixture. We found some ammonium retention on sandy soils, but no pyrochar effect or even ammonium leaching from the loamy soil. The phosphate retention capacity of pyrochars strongly depended on the pyrochar feedstock with large phosphate leaching from digestate-derived pyrochar and some adsorption capacity from woodchip-derived pyrochar. Application of hydrochars to agricultural soils caused small, and often not significant, effects on nutrient retention. In contrast, some hydrochars did increase the leaching of nutrients compared to the non-amended control soil. We found a surprisingly rapid loss of the chars' adsorption capacity after field application of the chars. For all sites and for hydrochar and pyrochar, the adsorption capacity was reduced by 60-80 % to less or no nitrate and ammonium adsorption. Thus, our results cast doubt on the efficiency of

  2. Biomass production, nutrient cycling, and carbon fixation by Salicornia brachiata Roxb.: A promising halophyte for coastal saline soil rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathore, Aditya P; Chaudhary, Doongar R; Jha, Bhavanath

    2016-08-01

    In order to increase our understanding of the interaction of soil-halophyte (Salicornia brachiata) relations and phytoremediation, we investigated the aboveground biomass, carbon fixation, and nutrient composition (N, P, K, Na, Ca, and Mg) of S. brachiata using six sampling sites with varying characteristics over one growing season in intertidal marshes. Simultaneously, soil characteristics and nutrient concentrations were also estimated. There was a significant variation in soil characteristics and nutrient contents spatially (except pH) as well as temporally. Nutrient contents in aboveground biomass of S. brachiata were also significantly differed spatially (except C and Cl) as well as temporally. Aboveground biomass of S. brachiata ranged from 2.51 to 6.07 t/ha at maturity and it was positively correlated with soil electrical conductivity and available Na, whereas negatively with soil pH. The K/Na ratio in plant was below one, showing tolerance to salinity. The aboveground C fixation values ranged from 0.77 to 1.93 C t/ha at all six sampling sites. This study provides new understandings into nutrient cycling-C fixation potential of highly salt-tolerant halophyte S. brachiata growing on intertidal soils of India. S. brachiata have a potential for amelioration of the salinity due to higher Na bioaccumulation factor. PMID:26852782

  3. The components and carbon isotope of the gases in inclusions in reservoir layers of Upper Paleozoic gas pools in the Ordos Basin,China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The components and carbon isotope of gases in inclusions are one of the most important geochemical indexes for gas pools.The analysis results of the components and carbon isotope of gases from inclusions in reservoir layers of Upper Palaeozoic gas pools in the Ordos Basin show that most inclusions grown in reservoir sandstone are primary inclusions.There is only a little difference about the components and carbon isotope between the well gases and the secondary inclusions gases.This indicated that the epigenetic change of gas pools is little.This difference between the well gases and the secondary inclusions gases is caused by two reasons:(i)The well gases come from several disconnected sand bodies buried in a segment of depth,while the inclusion gases come from a point of depth.(ii)The secondary inclusions trapped the gases generated in the former stage of source rock gas generation,and the well gases are the mixed gases generated in all the stages.It is irresponsible to reconstruct the palaeo-temperature and palaeo-pressure under which the gas pool formed using carbon dioxide inclusions.

  4. Effects of Savanna trees on soil nutrient limitation and carbon-sequestration potential in dry season

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Joscha; Gütlein, Adrian; Sierra Cornejo, Natalia; Kiese, Ralf; Hertel, Dietrich; Kuzyakov, Yakov

    2016-04-01

    Semi-arid savannah ecosystems are under strong pressure from climate and land-use changes, especially around populous areas like Mt. Kilimanjaro region. Savannah vegetation consists of grassland with isolated trees and is therefore characterized by high spatial variation of canopy cover and aboveground biomass. Both are major regulators for soil ecological parameters and soil-atmospheric trace gas exchange (CO2, N2O, CH4), especially in water limited environments. The spatial distribution of these parameters and the connection between above and belowground processes are important to understand and predict ecosystem changes and estimate its vulnerability. Our objective was to determine spatial trends and changes of soil parameters and trace-gas fluxes and relate their variability to the vegetation structure. We chose three trees from each of the two most dominant species (Acacia nilotica and Balanites aegyptiaca). For each tree, we selected transects with total nine sampling points under and outside the crown. At each sampling point we measured soil and plant biomass carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) content, δ13C, microbial biomass C and N, soil respiration, available nutrients, pH, cation exchange capacity (CEC) as well as belowground biomass, soil temperature and soil water content. Contents and stocks of C and N fractions, Ca2+, K+ and total CEC decreased up to 50% outside the crown. This was unaffected by the tree species, tree size or other tree characteristics. Water content was below the permanent wilting point and independent from tree cover. In all cases tree litter inputs had far a closer C:N ratio than C4-grass litter. Microbial C:N ratio and CO2 efflux was about 30% higher in open area and strongly dependent on mineral N availability. This indicates N limitation and low microbial C use efficiency in soil under open area. We conclude that the spatial structure of aboveground biomass in savanna ecosystems leads to a spatial redistribution of nutrient

  5. Nitrogen and carbon pools in an agricultural soil amended with natural and NH4-enriched K-Chabazite zeolitite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferretti, Giacomo; Faccini, Barbara; Vittori Antisari, Livia; Di Giuseppe, Dario; Massimo, Coltorti

    2015-04-01

    Nitrogen and Carbon pools in a reclaimed agricultural soil amended with 5 to 15 Kg m-2 of natural and NH4-enriched (K-Chabazite) zeolitites have been investigated. Zeolitites were enriched by means of static exchange with a swine slurry in a prototype (ZeoLIFE Project, www.zeolife.it). The experimental field is located in the Po Delta plain near Codigoro (Ferrara, Italy), it extends over an area of about 6 ha and it was divided in six parcels. The field has been heavily fertilized with chemical fertilizers and livestock sewage since 1960. Nowadays the area is part of the Nitrate Vulnerable Zones (Nitrate Directive 91/676/CEE) and a maximum annual input of 170 Kg-N ha-1 must be respected. With respect to the control parcels, at the end of the agronomic year, sorghum yield was 4% and 14% higher in the parcels treated with natural zeolitite and in that treated with NH4-enriched zeolitite, respectively. This notwithstanding the N fertilizers reduction from 30% in the former to 50% in the latter. Beside the yield improvement, N and C pools are affected by the use of zeolitite and relevant changes have been noticed. i) δ15N ratios in both soil (total and fixed N-NH4 inside the clay interlayer and zeolite exchange sites) and different organs of the sorghum crops show that the N-NH4 stocked in the enriched zeolitite has been transferred to the crops and preferentially stocked in the leaves with respect to the N-NH4 provided by chemical fertilizer. ii) The active role of fixed N-NH4 pool in mineral nutrition of the crops and its replacement can be due to inorganic N fertilizers (Urea and Diammonium Phosphate). This pool in fact decreased during the crops growth, suggesting that it represented an important contribution to the active N pool in the soil. iii) Due to the high N content in this agricultural field, no significant total N decrease was observed during the growing season, which is also responsible for the low C/N ratio in the soil. After the N input from NH4

  6. Dynamics of nutrients, total organic carbon, prokaryotes and viruses in onboard incubations of cold-water corals

    OpenAIRE

    Maier, C.; de Kluijver, A.; M. Agis; C. P. D. Brussaard; van Duyl, F.C.; Weinbauer, M.G.

    2011-01-01

    The potential influence of the cold-water corals (CWCs) Lophelia pertusa and Madrepora oculata on the dynamics of inorganic nutrient and total organic carbon (TOC) concentrations and the abundances of prokaryotes and viruses in bottom water was assessed in onboard incubation experiments. Ammonium, nitrite, dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN), dissolved inorganic phosphorus (DIP) and TOC concentrations and N:P ratios were typically higher in incubation wate...

  7. Long-term impacts of land-use change on dynamics of tropical soil carbon and nitrogen pools

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Jing-cheng; HUANG Jian-hui; PAN Qing-min; TANG Jian-wei; HAN Xing-guo

    2004-01-01

    Land-use changes, especially the conversion of native forest vegetation to cropland and plantations intropical region, can alter soil C and N pools and N availability for plant uptake. Deforestation, followed by shiftingcultivation and establishment of rubber tree plantation, is a common land-use change in Xishuangbanna, southwestChina. However the influence of this kind of land-use change on soil C and N dynamics in this region remains poorlyunderstood. This study was conducted to assess the effects of land-use change on soil C and N pools. Soil sampleswere collected on five adjacent plots, which belong to three land-use types including secondary forest-an acuminatebanana( Musa itinerans) secondary forest and a male bamboo( Dendrocalamus membranaceae) secondary forest,shifting cultivation, and rubber tree ( Hevea brasiliensis (H. B. K. ) Muell. Arg. ) plantation (one plot is 3-year-old,and another is 7-year-old). We measured soil bulk density (BP), pH value, moisture content and concentrations ofsoil organic carbon(SOC), total soil nitrogen(TSN), and inorganic N(NO-3 -N and NH~ -N) at 0-3, 3-20, 20-40and 40-60 cm depths, and calculated C and N pools in 0-20, 20-40, 40-60, and 0-60 cm soil layers.Compared with the adjacent secondary forests, shifting cultivation and establishment of rubber tree plantationsresulted in significant decline in concentrations and stocks of SOC and TSN in 0-20 and 0-60 cm soil layers, andincrease in pH and bulk density at 0-3, 3-20, and 20-40 cm depths. Soil moisture content decreased only in 0-20 cm surface soils in shifting cultivation and plantations. The dynamics of mineral N was much more complex,which had different trends among depths and ecosystems. Compared with the secondary forests, SOC stocks in 0-20 cm surface soils in shifting cultivation and rubber tree plantations(3-year-old plantation and 7-year-old plantation)decreased by 34.0%, 33%, and 23%; and TSN stocks decreased by 32.2%, 20.4%, and 20.4%, respectively,whereas the

  8. The Irminger Sea and the Iceland Sea time series measurements of sea water carbon and nutrient chemistry 1983–2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Olafsson

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the ways and means of assembling and quality controling the Irminger Sea and Iceland Sea time-series biogeochemical data which are included in the CARINA data set. The Irminger Sea and the Iceland Sea are hydrographically different regions where measurements of sea water carbon and nutrient chemistry were started in 1983. The sampling is seasonal, four times a year. The carbon chemistry is studied with measurements of the partial pressure of carbon dioxide in seawater, pCO2, and total dissolved inorganic carbon, TCO2. The carbon chemistry data are for surface waters only until 1991 when water column sampling was initiated. Other measured parameters are salinity, dissolved oxygen and the inorganic nutrients nitrate, phosphate and silicate. Because of the CARINA criteria for secondary quality control, depth >1500 m, the IRM-TS could not be included in the routine QC and the IS-TS only in a limited way. However, with the information provided here, the quality of the data can be assessed, e.g. on the basis of the results obtained with the use of reference materials.

  9. The Irminger Sea and the Iceland Sea time series measurements of sea water carbon and nutrient chemistry 1983–2006

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Olafsson

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the ways and means of assembling and quality controling the Irminger Sea and Iceland Sea time-series biogeochemical data which are included in the CARINA data set. The Irminger Sea and the Iceland Sea are hydrographically different regions where measurements of sea water carbon and nutrient chemistry were started in 1983. The sampling is seasonal, four times a year. The carbon chemistry is studied with measurements of the partial pressure of carbon dioxide in seawater, pCO2, and total dissolved inorganic carbon, TCO2. The carbon chemistry data are for surface waters only until 1994 when water column sampling was initiated. Other measured parameters are salinity, dissolved oxygen and the inorganic nutrients nitrate, phosphate and silicate. Because of the CARINA criteria for secondary quality control, depth >1500 m, the IRM-TS could not be included in the routine QC and the IS-TS only in a limited way. However, with the information provided here, the quality of the data can be assessed e.g. on the basis of the results obtained with the use of reference materials.

  10. Abundance and Dynamics of Soil Labile Carbon Pools Under Different Types of Forest Vegetation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Pei-Kun; XU Qiu-Fang

    2006-01-01

    Soil organic matter (SOM) in forest ecosystems is not only important to global carbon (C) storage but also to sustainable management of forestland with vegetation types, being a critical factor in controlling the quantity and dynamics of SOM. In this field experiment soil plots with three replicates were selected from three forest vegetation types: broadleaf,Masson pine (Pinus massoniana Lamb.), and Chinese fir (Cunninghamia lanceolata Hook.). Soil total organic C (TOC),two easily oxidizable C levels (EOC1 and EOC2, which were oxidized by 66.7 mmol L-1 K2Cr2O7 at 130-140 ℃ and333 mmol L-1 KMnO4 at 25 ℃, respectively), microbial biomass C (MBC), and water-soluble organic C (WSOC)were analyzed for soil samples. Soil under the broadleaf forest stored significantly higher TOC (P ≤ 0.05). Because of its significantly larger total soil C storage, the soil under the broadleaf forest usually had significantly higher levels (P ≤ 0.05)of the different labile organic carbons, EOC1, EOC2, MBC, and WSOC; but when calculated as a percentage of TOC each labile C fraction of the broadleaf forest was significantly lower (P ≤ 0.05) than one of the other two forests. Under all the three vegetation types temperature as well as quality and season of litter input generally affected the dynamics of different organic C fractions in soils, with EOC1, EOC2, and MBC increasing closely following increase in temperature,whereas WSOC showed an opposite trend.

  11. Soil Carbon and Nutrient Changes Associated with Deforestation for Pasture in Southern Costa Rica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huth, Timothy J.; Porder, Stephen; Chaves, Joaquin; Whiteside, Jessica H.

    2012-01-01

    We assessed the effects of deforestation on soil carbon (C) and nutrient stocks in the premontane landscape near Las Cruces Biological Station in southern Costa Rica, where forests were cleared for pasture in the mid-1960s. We excavated six soil pits to a depth of 1 m in both pasture and primary forest, and found that C stocks were 20 kg C per square meters in both settings. Nevertheless, soil delta C-13 suggests 50 percent of the forest-derived soil C above 40 cm depth has turned over since deforestation. Soil nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) stocks derived from the soil pits were not significantly different between land uses (P = 0.43 and 0.61, respectively). At a larger spatial scale, however, the ubiquity of ruts produced by cattle-induced erosion indicates that there are substantial soil effects of grazing in this steep landscape. Ruts averaged 13 cm deep and covered 45 percent of the landscape, and thus are evidence of the removal of 0.7 Mg C/ ha/yr, and 70, 9 and 40 kg/ha/yr of N, P and potassium (K), respectively. Subsoils in this region are 10 times less C- and N-rich, and 2 times less P- and K-rich than the topsoil. Thus, rapid topsoil loss may lead to a decline in pasture productivity in the coming decades. These data also suggest that the soil C footprint of deforestation in this landscape may be determined by the fate of soil C as it is transported downstream, rather than C turnover in situ.

  12. Variable nutrient stoichiometry (carbon:nitrogen:phosphorus) across trophic levels determines community and ecosystem properties in an oligotrophic mangrove system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharler, U M; Ulanowicz, R E; Fogel, M L; Wooller, M J; Jacobson-Meyers, M E; Lovelock, C E; Feller, I C; Frischer, M; Lee, R; McKee, K; Romero, I C; Schmit, J P; Shearer, C

    2015-11-01

    Our study investigated the carbon:nitrogen:phosphorus (C:N:P) stoichiometry of mangrove island of the Mesoamerican Barrier Reef (Twin Cays, Belize). The C:N:P of abiotic and biotic components of this oligotrophic ecosystem was measured and served to build networks of nutrient flows for three distinct mangrove forest zones (tall seaward fringing forest, inland dwarf forests and a transitional zone). Between forest zones, the stoichiometry of primary producers, heterotrophs and abiotic components did not change significantly, but there was a significant difference in C:N:P, and C, N, and P biomass, between the functional groups mangrove trees, other primary producers, heterotrophs, and abiotic components. C:N:P decreased with increasing trophic level. Nutrient recycling in the food webs was highest for P, and high transfer efficiencies between trophic levels of P and N also indicated an overall shortage of these nutrients when compared to C. Heterotrophs were sometimes, but not always, limited by the same nutrient as the primary producers. Mangrove trees and the primary tree consumers were P limited, whereas the invertebrates consuming leaf litter and detritus were N limited. Most compartments were limited by P or N (not by C), and the relative depletion rate of food sources was fastest for P. P transfers thus constituted a bottleneck of nutrient transfer on Twin Cays. This is the first comprehensive ecosystem study of nutrient transfers in a mangrove ecosystem, illustrating some mechanisms (e.g. recycling rates, transfer efficiencies) which oligotrophic systems use in order to build up biomass and food webs spanning various trophic levels. PMID:26183835

  13. An experimental study on pool boiling characteristics of carbon nano tube (CNT) and fullerene (C-60) nanofluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In recent years, it was found that pool boiling critical heat flux (CHF) increases in nanofluids. The CHF conditions are important for safe and economic design of many heat transfer units including nuclear reactor. In this study, our objective is to evaluate the impact of Carbone Nano Tubes (Singlewalled CNTs and Multiwalled CNTs) and Fullerene (C-60) nanofluids at different particle concentration on pool boiling critical heat flux experimentally at saturated conditions. Multiwalled CNT and fullerene (C-60) added in the pure water at three volume concentrations (0.01%, 0.001%, and 0.0001%). Singlewalled CNT nanoparticles added in the pure water at two volume concentrations (0.0005%, and 0.0001%). For the dispersion of nanoparticles in pure water, several treatments were performed. Multiwalled CNTs and Fullerene (C-60) prepared using acid treatment, meanwhile two treatment are using for Singlewalled CNTs: (1)Singlewalled CNTs prepared using polymer treatment, (2)Singlewalled CNTs prepared using pre polymerization of micelle treatment. The zeta potential of CNTs and Fullerene nanofluids were in the range of 13-71 mV. The zeta potential of nanofluids was constant for more than one month. It concludes that the treatment has been succeeded produces water dispersible CNTs and Fullerene nanofluids with good stability. The critical heat flux (CHFs) of the solution is enhanced greatly for all nanofluids. Enhanced (∼167.9%) CHF was observed for solutions with Multiwalled CNT nanoparticles with concentration 0.01 vol%. Enhanced (∼109.4%) CHF was observed for solutions with Singlewalled CNT nanoparticles with concentration 0.0005 vol%. Enhanced (∼108.9%) CHF was observed for solutions with Fullerene nanoparticles with concentration 0.01 vol%. The pool boiling Heat Transfer Coefficient (HTCs) of the CNTs nanofluids are lower than those of pure water in the entire nucleate boiling regime. On the other hand, the pool boiling HTCs of Fullerene nanofluids are higher than

  14. Effects of experimental nitrogen deposition on peatland carbon pools and fluxes: a modelling analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Y.; Blodau, C.; Moore, T. R.; Bubier, J.; Juutinen, S.; Larmola, T.

    2015-01-01

    Nitrogen (N) pollution of peatlands alters their carbon (C) balances, yet long-term effects and controls are poorly understood. We applied the model PEATBOG to explore impacts of long-term nitrogen (N) fertilization on C cycling in an ombrotrophic bog. Simulations of summer gross ecosystem production (GEP), ecosystem respiration (ER) and net ecosystem exchange (NEE) were evaluated against 8 years of observations and extrapolated for 80 years to identify potential effects of N fertilization and factors influencing model behaviour. The model successfully simulated moss decline and raised GEP, ER and NEE on fertilized plots. GEP was systematically overestimated in the model compared to the field data due to factors that can be related to differences in vegetation distribution (e.g. shrubs vs. graminoid vegetation) and to high tolerance of vascular plants to N deposition in the model. Model performance regarding the 8-year response of GEP and NEE to N input was improved by introducing an N content threshold shifting the response of photosynthetic capacity (GEPmax) to N content in shrubs and graminoids from positive to negative at high N contents. Such changes also eliminated the competitive advantages of vascular species and led to resilience of mosses in the long-term. Regardless of the large changes of C fluxes over the short-term, the simulated GEP, ER and NEE after 80 years depended on whether a graminoid- or shrub-dominated system evolved. When the peatland remained shrub-Sphagnum-dominated, it shifted to a C source after only 10 years of fertilization at 6.4 g N m-2 yr-1, whereas this was not the case when it became graminoid-dominated. The modelling results thus highlight the importance of ecosystem adaptation and reaction of plant functional types to N deposition, when predicting the future C balance of N-polluted cool temperate bogs.

  15. Effects of experimental nitrogen deposition on peatland carbon pools and fluxes: a modeling analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Wu

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Nitrogen (N pollution of peatlands alters their carbon (C balances, yet long-term effects and controls are poorly understood. We applied the model PEATBOG to analyze impacts of long-term nitrogen (N fertilization on C cycling in an ombrotrophic bog. Simulations of summer gross ecosystem production (GEP, ecosystem respiration (ER and net ecosystem exchange (NEE were evaluated against 8 years of observations and extrapolated for 80 years to identify potential effects of N fertilization and factors influencing model behavior. The model successfully simulated moss decline and raised GEP, ER and NEE on fertilized plots. GEP was systematically overestimated in the model compared to the field data due to high tolerance of Sphagnum to N deposition in the model. Model performance regarding the 8 year response of GEP and NEE to N was improved by introducing an N content threshold shifting the response of photosynthesis capacity to N content in shrubs and graminoids from positive to negative at high N contents. Such changes also eliminated the competitive advantages of vascular species and led to resilience of mosses in the long-term. Regardless of the large changes of C fluxes over the short-term, the simulated GEP, ER and NEE after 80 years depended on whether a graminoid- or shrub-dominated system evolved. When the peatland remained shrub-Sphagnum dominated, it shifted to a C source after only 10 years of fertilization at 6.4 g N m−2 yr−1, whereas this was not the case when it became graminoid-dominated. The modeling results thus highlight the importance of ecosystem adaptation and reaction of plant functional types to N deposition, when predicting the future C balance of N-polluted cool temperate bogs.

  16. Effect of land-use changes and site variables on surface soil organic carbon pool at Mediterranean Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-hashim, Mohamed; Elsayed, Mohamed; Belal, Abd-ElAziz

    2016-02-01

    Soil organic carbon pool (SOCP) is affected by several factors particularly soil type, climate, topography, crop management, and anthropogenic factors. The study was carried out to clarify relationships between SOCP under different soil types and land-use changes in the Mediterranean region. Data of 26 pedons were investigated in Tanta catchment, middle Nile Delta, Egypt (30°45 N, 30°55 E), that the collected soil samples covered different soil types and land-uses. There were significant differences of SOCP among soils: loam and clay loams were rather similar. Clay soils were the most extensive and have mean SOCP of 4.08 ± 1.41 kg C m-2. The highest SOCP of 7.07 kg C m-2 was in clay loam soil associated with bare soil, while the lowest of 2.57 kg C m-2 in sandy clay loam soil associated with bare soil. Losing cropland showed highest increase from 1990 to 2015 with increasing urban encroachment by 15.3%. The overall average results of SOCP in cropland area showed 53.85 Mg C ha-1 under different soils. Losing the arable lands to urbanization resulted in a decrease of 285.421 Gg C of SOCP. With the decrease in SOCP sequestrated within the soil surface, carbon dioxide would be emitted to the atmosphere. The emitted CO2 resulted from losing the cropland equal to 1047.5 Gg CO2. Land-use changes have marked impact on surface SOCP and C sequestration.

  17. Vertical and horizontal variation of carbon pools and fluxes in soil profile of wet southern taiga in European Russia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santruckova, H.; Kastovska, E.; Liveckova, M. (Univ. of South Bohemia, Faculty of science, Branisovska (CZ)); Kozlov, D. (Lomonosov Moscow State Univ., Geographical Dept., Moscow (Russian Federation)); Kurbatova, J.; Tatarinov, F. (A.N. Severtson Inst. of ecology and evolution RAS, Moscow (Russian Federation)); Shibistova, O. (V.N.Sukachev Forest Inst., Krasnoyarsk (Russian Federation)); Lloyd, J. (Earth and Biosphere Inst., Univ. of Leeds (United Kingdom))

    2010-10-22

    Vertical and horizontal distributions of soil organic carbon, potential microbial activity and basic soil properties were studied in a boreal mixed forest (Central Forest Reserve, TVER region) to elucidate whether the soil CO{sub 2}-efflux is related to basic soil properties that affect the C pool and activity. Soil cores (0-100 cm depth) were taken from two transects every 50 meters (44 points) immediately after completion of soil CO{sub 2}-efflux measurements. Soil was separated into layers and moisture, bulk density, root density and bacterial counts were determined within one day after soil was taken. Microbial respiration, biomass, CN contents and pH were measured within few months. The variability in the soil CO{sub 2}-efflux and microbial activity was mainly explained by soil bulk density. Results further indicate that laboratory measurements of microbial respiration can represent heterotrophic soil respiration of a distinctive ecosystem in natural conditions, if microbial respiration is measured after the effect of soil handling disappears. (orig.)

  18. Assessing and Synthesizing the Last Decade of Research on the Major Pools and Fluxes of the Carbon Cycle in the US and North America: An Interagency Governmental Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavallaro, N.; Shrestha, G.; Stover, D. B.; Zhu, Z.; Ombres, E. H.; Deangelo, B.

    2015-12-01

    The 2nd State of the Carbon Cycle Report (SOCCR-2) is focused on US and North American carbon stocks and fluxes in managed and unmanaged systems, including relevant carbon management science perspectives and tools for supporting and informing decisions. SOCCR-2 is inspired by the US Carbon Cycle Science Plan (2011) which emphasizes global scale research on long-lived, carbon-based greenhouse gases, carbon dioxide and methane, and the major pools and fluxes of the global carbon cycle. Accordingly, the questions framing the Plan inform this report's topical roadmap, with a focus on US and North America in the global context: 1) How have natural processes and human actions affected the global carbon cycle on land, in the atmosphere, in the oceans and in the ecosystem interfaces (e.g. coastal, wetlands, urban-rural)? 2) How have socio-economic trends affected the levels of the primary carbon-containing gases, carbon dioxide and methane, in the atmosphere? 3) How have species, ecosystems, natural resources and human systems been impacted by increasing greenhouse gas concentrations, the associated changes in climate, and by carbon management decisions and practices? To address these aspects, SOCCR-2 will encompass the following broad assessment framework: 1) Carbon Cycle at Scales (Global Perspective, North American Perspective, US Perspective, Regional Perspective); 2) Role of carbon in systems (Soils; Water, Oceans, Vegetation; Terrestrial-aquatic Interfaces); 3) Interactions/Disturbance/Impacts from/on the carbon cycle. 4) Carbon Management Science Perspective and Decision Support (measurements, observations and monitoring for research and policy relevant decision-support etc.). In this presentation, the Carbon Cycle Interagency Working Group and the U.S. Global Change Research Program's U.S. Carbon Cycle Science Program Office will highlight the scientific context, strategy, structure, team and production process of the report, which is part of the USGCRP's Sustained

  19. Interactions between plant nutrients, water and carbon dioxide as factors limiting crop yields

    OpenAIRE

    Gregory, P. J.; Simmonds, L.P.; Warren, G. P.

    1997-01-01

    Biomass production of annual crops is often directly proportional to the amounts of radiation intercepted, water transpired and nutrients taken up. In many places the amount of rainfall during the period of rapid crop growth is less than the potential rate of evaporation, so that depletion of stored soil water is commonplace. The rate of mineralization of nitrogen (N) from organic matter and the processes of nutrient loss are closely related to the availability of soil water. Results from Ken...

  20. Pharmacia and biological functionalities of nutrient broth dispersed multi-walled carbon nanotubes:A novel drug delivery system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    A new drug delivery system was developed using the interaction of nutrient broth treated multi-walled carbon nanotubes(NBT-MWCNTs) and cefotaxime sodium(CTX) as a model.Investigated factors of the drug delivery system include dispersion effect,biocompatibility of NBT-MWCNTs,pharmacodynamic effect and delivery efficiency in vitro.It was found that MWCNTs can be well dispersed in the nutrient broth and stable at least for one week at 4 °C.The formed NBT-MWCNTs suspension scarcely exhibits toxicity to E.coli at concentrations lower than 10.24 μg/mL,but displays enhanced pharmacodynamic effect of CTX via its bridge effect and targeted transport.Compared with general acid treated MWCNTs(AT-MWCNTs),our present NBT-MWCNTs show good biocompatibility,enhanced pharmacodynamic effect,and high delivery efficiency.

  1. Variation and control of soil organic carbon and other nutrients in permafrost regions on central Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The variation and control of soil organic carbon (SOC) and other nutrients in permafrost regions are critical for studying the carbon cycle and its potential feedbacks to climate change; however, they are poorly understood. Soil nutrients samples at depths of 0–10, 10–20, 20–30, and 30–40 cm, were sampled eight times in 2009 in alpine swamp meadow, alpine meadow and alpine steppe in permafrost regions of the central Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau. SOC and total nitrogen (TN) in the alpine swamp meadow and meadow decreased with soil depth, whereas the highest SOC content in the alpine steppe was found at depths of 20–30 cm. The vertical profiles of total and available phosphorus (P) and potassium (K) were relatively uniform for all the three grassland types. Correlation and linear regression analyses showed that soil moisture (SM) was the most important parameter for the vertical variation of SOC and other soil nutrients, and that belowground biomass (BGB) was the main source of SOC and TN. The spatial variations (including seasonal variation) of SOC and TN at plot scale were large. The relative deviation of SOC ranged from 7.18 to 41.50 in the alpine swamp meadow, from 2.88 to 35.91 in the alpine meadow, and from 9.33 to 68.38 in the alpine steppe. The spatial variations in the other soil nutrients varied among different grassland types. The most important factors for spatial variations (including seasonal variation) of SOC, TN, total P, available P, and both total and available K were: SM, SM and temperature, SM, air temperature, and SM and BGB, respectively. The large variation in the three grassland types implies that spatial variation at plot scale should be considered when estimating SOC storage and its dynamics. (letter)

  2. Biomass estimation by allometric relationships, nutrients, and carbon associated to heart-of-palm plantations in Costa Rica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peach palm (Bactris gasipaes) agroecosystems constitute a productive and sustainable land use for the humid tropics. Allometric methods allow to predict biomass non-destructively at any time and, subsequently, to determine the span of growth phases, biomass and nutrient pools, and economic yields. The overall goals of this study were to obtain and validate predictive functions of aboveground dry biomass, and to relate standing biomass with heart-of-palm yields as well. Towards this purpose, peach palm shoots were harvested and separated into components: foliage, petiole and stem, in the Atlantic region of Costa Rica. A non-linear seemingly unrelated regression (NSUR) procedure, which simultaneously fits the component equations that predict leaf, petiole and stem in order to assure biomass additivity, was used to generate the allometric equations. Basal diameter (BD) was a more effective predictor of biomass than height to the fork between the spear leaf and the first fully expanded leaf, total height and number of leaves. Regression models explained 70-89% of the variance in biomass components (foliage, petiole and stem) or total shoot biomass. Three growth stages were identified: establishment (0-1 years), fast growth (1-3 or 1-8 years depending on plant density) and maturity (> 8 years). Nutrient contents associated to above- and below-ground biomass were measured. For above-ground biomass nutrient contents were N (up to 150 kg ha-1)>K (up to 119 kg ha-1)>Ca (up to 45 kg ha-1)>Mg=S=P (between 15-17 kg ha-1). The below-ground biomass: above-ground biomass ratio increased with the plantation age

  3. Evaluating our understanding of the biological carbon pump using the transport matrix method and global nutrient distributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardello, Raffaele; Martin, Adrian; Khatiwala, Samar; Kriest, Iris; Henson, Stephanie; Dunne, John; Totterdell, Ian; Allen, Icarus; Yool, Andrew

    2015-04-01

    Global net primary production by marine phytoplankton plays a key role in the Earth system, fuelling the marine ecosystem and supporting resources such as fisheries. A fraction of the resulting organic material sinks out of the euphotic zone as 'export production', sequestering large amounts of carbon at depth, away from the atmosphere. Model studies have demonstrated that atmospheric pCO2 concentrations can be very sensitive to small changes in the depth at which this organic material is remineralised into CO2 and nutrients. The accuracy of parameterisations for remineralisation has often been assessed by direct comparison of simulated and sparse observed fluxes of sinking material. The consequences of remineralisation, i.e. the global distribution of inorganic nutrients, provide a much stronger test of our knowledge concerning the impact of remineralisation on ocean nutrient cycles because they are much more densely sampled. In this study, we investigate how alternative paradigms for the Biological Carbon Pump (BCP) have distinctive signatures in the consequent global distribution of nutrients. We compare several combinations of parameterisations for export production and remineralisation within two different representations of ocean circulation using the Transport Matrix Method (Khatiwala, 2007). Export production is represented using an NPZD-DOP model (Kriest et al., 2010) and three remote sensing-derived estimates while remineralisation is represented by either constant or spatially variable values of the Martin's curve exponent (Martin et al., 1987). In order to evaluate the ability of each export-remineralisation combination to correctly represent the BCP, we introduce a set of diagnostics to allow the intercomparison between in-situ data and simulations. These diagnostics are based on both nutrient fields and water masses and are designed to minimize the influence of biases originating from the representation of ocean circulation on the model

  4. Sediment-water column fluxes of carbon, oxygen and nutrients in Bedford Basin, Nova Scotia, inferred from 224Ra measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Horne

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Exchanges between sediment pore waters and the overlying water column play a significant role in the chemical budgets of many important chemical constituents. Quantification of such benthic fluxes requires explicit knowledge of the sediment properties and biogeochemistry. Alternatively, changes in water column properties near the sediment-water column interface can be exploited to gain insight into the sediment biogeochemistry and benthic fluxes. Here, we apply a 1-D diffusive mixing model to near-bottom water column profiles of 224Ra activity in order to yield vertical eddy diffusivities (KZ, based upon which we assess the diffusive exchange of inorganic carbon (DIC, nutrients and oxygen (O2, across the sediment-water interface in a coastal inlet, Bedford Basin, Nova Scotia, Canada. Near-bottom observations of DIC, O2 and nutrients provide flux ratios similar to Redfield values, suggesting that benthic respiration of primarily marine organic matter is the dominant driver. Furthermore, we did not observe any significant release of alkalinity (AT from the sediments to the overlying water column, providing further insight into the dominant reactions taking place within sediments: the respiration of organic matter occurs largely under aerobic conditions or products of anaerobic processes are reoxidized quickly in oxygenated layers of the sediments. Finally, comparison with other carbon sources reveal the observed benthic DIC release as a significant contributor to the Bedford Basin carbon system.

  5. Rock Outcrops Redistribute Organic Carbon and Nutrients to Nearby Soil Patches in Three Karst Ecosystems in SW China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dianjie; Shen, Youxin; Li, Yuhui; Huang, Jin

    2016-01-01

    Emergent rock outcrops are common in terrestrial ecosystems. However, little research has been conducted regarding their surface function in redistributing organic carbon and nutrient fluxes to soils nearby. Water that fell on and ran off 10 individual rock outcrops was collected in three 100 × 100 m plots within a rock desertification ecosystem, an anthropogenic forest ecosystem, and a secondary forest ecosystem between June 2013 and June 2014 in Shilin, SW China. The concentrations of total organic carbon (TOC), total nitrogen (N), total phosphorus (P), and potassium (K) in the water samples were determined during three seasons, and the total amounts received by and flowing out from the outcrops were calculated. In all three ecosystems, TOC and N, P, and K were found throughout the year in both the water received by and delivered to nearby soil patches. Their concentrations and amounts were generally greater in forested ecosystems than in the rock desertification ecosystem. When rock outcrops constituted a high percentage (≥ 30%) of the ground surface, the annual export of rock outcrop runoff contributed a large amount of organic carbon and N, P, and K nutrients to soil patches nearby by comparison to the amount soil patches received via atmospheric deposition. These contributions may increase the spatial heterogeneity of soil fertility within patches, as rock outcrops of different sizes, morphologies, and emergence ratios may surround each soil patch. PMID:27509199

  6. Basin-Scale Exports vs. Coastal Delivery of Carbon, Nutrients and Particulates Above and Below Arctic River Deltas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Striegl, R. G.; Tank, S. E.; Weeks, G.; Holmes, R. M.; McClelland, J. W.

    2014-12-01

    Recent studies have substantially improved our understanding of water, sediment and materials exports by arctic rivers. Seasonality of exports, particularly during the spring freshet, is better quantified, as are the inland sources of water and sediment discharge and the source and chemical character of other material exports, including carbon and nutrients. Measurements on small rivers discharging directly to the Arctic Ocean and lacking complex deltas can accurately quantify local inputs to coastal regions. However, the majority of hydrologic inputs to the Arctic Ocean derive from 6 major Eurasian and North American rivers. Water, sediment, and chemical exports from these rivers are typically measured above head of tide, far inland, and commonly above large river deltas. These deltas settle particles and provide favorable environments for deposition, storage, and biogeochemical consumption, production, and transformation of aquatic carbon and nutrients. Consequently, basin exports measured above river deltas likely misrepresent actual delivery to coastal regions. In addition to accumulating sediment, observed and modeled arctic delta effects include enrichment of the organic content of suspended solids, increased dissolved organic carbon and nitrogen (DOC; DON) concentration, decreased inorganic nutrient concentration, and settling and likely increased bioavailability of particle associated contaminants, such as mercury. Increased DOC concentration in the Mackenzie River delta has also been associated with a change in DOC quality, with increased potential for biodegradation of DOC and decreased potential for photodegradation of DOC from head of tide to within the delta. For the most part, assessments of differences between head of tide basin exports and coastal delivery tend to be qualitative rather than quantitative, largely because of difficulties quantifying tidally affected flow. This points to the need to resolve data gaps, improve quantitative assessments

  7. Sulfur, carbon and nutrient dynamics from rice straw in flooded and non-flooded soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plant residues are an important source of C in soil and nutrients for crops in agricultural systems. In tropical agricultural systems the decomposition of crop residues and green manures is often too fast to sustain soil organic matter at an acceptable level and hence soil C concentrations fall as a result of cropping, despite residue retention (Whitbread et al., 1999). In systems such as ric/wheat where the soil redox changes markedly between seasons important changes in soil microflora and chemistry occurs which affects C turnover rates. Maximum efficiency of nutrient utilisation occurs when nutrients released from organic residues synchronise with the plant demand. Knowledge on the decomposition rate and amount of nutrient released from residues will enable management systems to be devised to utilise these organic residues more effectively. As for C the change in soil moisture between rice and the dry season crop has important implications for the S nutrition of crops. As so called 'high analysis' fertilisers replace fertilisers such as single superphosphate and ammonium sulfate the supply of S to cropping systems is reducing at the same time as crop demand is increasing. This means that crops are increasingly reliant on S recycled from crop residues. Oxidation of elemental S was greater under non-flooded than under flooded conditions in the crop grown immediately after application. Similarly, surface placement resulted in greater oxidation than deep placement. Non-flooded fallow period between crops there was considerable oxidation of elemental S in the previously flooded pots. These results indicate that maximum efficiency of S utilisation from elemental S will come from surface application, which contrasts markedly with N. The uncoupling between C and nutrient release indicates that significant proportions of the nutrients present in rice straw are in a soluble form which can be leached from the decomposing plant litter, independent of microbial activity

  8. Assessment of carbon pools in two soils from the Campania region (Southwest, Italy) under different forest types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez-Romero, Marta; Papa, Stefania; Lozano-García, Beatriz; Parras-Alcántara, Luis; González-Pérez, José A.; Jordán, Antonio; Zavala, Lorena M.; González-Vila, Francisco J.; Coppola, Elio

    2014-05-01

    Soil is the largest carbon reservoir of terrestrial ecosystems, this reservoir is not inert, but it is constantly in a dynamic phase of accumulation an depletion. After the addition, in the soil, of organic residues of different origin and nature, two processes can occur in charge of SOM (Soil Organic Matter) during the pedogenesis: mineralization and humification. The accumulation of SOM in soil is controlled by the balance between carbon inputs and losses through mineralization and/or leaching. In particular the humification process leads to the formation of organic compounds (in some cases even complex organo-mineral) chemically stable able to distribute itself in the soil second rules of site-specific pedogenesis. The transport process along the profile can take very different forms which may extend in the formation of Bh horizons of accumulation in depth also strongly cemented (so-called ortstein). The transport process along the profile occurs for the occurrence of certain conditions such as deposition of high amounts of organic residues on the top of the profile, high porosity of the soil for the presence of coarse solid fractions (coarse sands or skeleton) that determinate a strong infiltrating capacity of the circulating waters, extreme temperatures can slow or stop the process of mineralization and/or humification in one intermediate step of the degradation process releasing organic metabolites with high or medium solubility and high loads of percolating water related to intense rainfall. The nature of the forest cover influence the quantity and quality of the organic materials deposited with marked differences between coniferous and deciduous especially in relation to resistance to degradation and production of intermediate metabolites. Two soils from Campania region located in Monte Santa Croce (Caserta, Italy) with andic properties, different forest cover (pine and chestnut) and that meets the requirements of the place and pedological formation

  9. Investigating Pathways of Nutrient and Energy Flows Through Aquatic Food Webs Using Stable Isotopes of Carbon and Nitrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon and nitrogen stable isotopes can provide valuable insights into pathways of nutrient and energy flows in aquatic ecosystems. Carbon stable isotopes are principally used to trace pathways of organic matter transfer through aquatic food webs, particularly with regard to identifying the dominant sources of nutrition for aquatic biota. Stable isotopes of carbon have been widely used to answer one of the most pressing questions in aquatic food web ecology - to what degree do in-stream (autochthonous) and riparian (allochthonous) sources of energy fuel riverine food webs? In conjunction with carbon stable isotopes, nitrogen stable isotopes have been used to determine the trophic position of consumers and to identify the number of trophic levels in aquatic food webs. More recently, stable nitrogen isotopes have been recommended as indicators of anthropogenic disturbances. Specifically, agricultural land uses and/or sewage effluent discharge have been shown to significantly increase δ15N signatures in primary producers and higher order consumers in freshwater, estuarine and marine environments. Together, carbon and nitrogen stable isotopes can be used to examine natural food web functions as well as the degree to which human modifications to catchments and aquatic environments can influence aquatic ecosystem function. (author)

  10. Carbon, nutrient and trace metal cycling in sandy sediments: A comparison of high-energy beaches and backbarrier tidal flats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reckhardt, Anja; Beck, Melanie; Seidel, Michael; Riedel, Thomas; Wehrmann, Achim; Bartholomä, Alexander; Schnetger, Bernhard; Dittmar, Thorsten; Brumsack, Hans-Jürgen

    2015-06-01

    In order to evaluate the importance of coastal sandy sediments and their contribution to carbon, nutrient and metal cycling we investigated two beach sites on Spiekeroog Island, southern North Sea, Germany, and a tidal flat margin, located in Spiekeroog's backbarrier area. We also analyzed seawater and fresh groundwater on Spiekeroog Island, to better define endmember concentrations, which influence our study sites. Intertidal sandy flats and beaches are characterized by pore water advection. Seawater enters the sediment during flood and pore water drains out during ebb and at low tide. This pore water circulation leads to continuous supply of fresh organic substrate to the sediments. Remineralization products of microbial degradation processes, i.e. nutrients, and dissolved trace metals from the reduction of particulate metal oxides, are enriched in the pore water compared to open seawater concentrations. The spatial distribution of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), nutrients (PO43-, NO3-, NO2-, NH4+, Si(OH)4 and total alkalinity), trace metals (dissolved Fe and Mn) as well as sulfate suggests that the exposed beach sites are subject to relatively fast pore water advection, which leads to organic matter and oxygen replenishment. Frequent pore water exchange further leads to comparatively low nutrient concentrations. Sulfate reduction does not appear to play a major role during organic matter degradation. High nitrate concentrations indicate that redox conditions are oxic within the duneward freshwater influenced section, while ammonification, denitrification, manganese and iron reduction seem to prevail in the ammonium-dominated seawater circulation zone. In contrast, the sheltered tidal flat margin site exhibits a different sedimentology (coarser beach sands versus finer tidal flat sands) and nutrients, dissolved manganese and DOC accumulate in the pore water. Ammonium is the dominant pore water nitrogen species and intense sulfate reduction leads to the formation

  11. Carbon storage and nutrient mobilization from soil minerals by deep roots and rhizospheres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Callesen, Ingeborg; Harrison, Robert; Stupak, Inge;

    2016-01-01

    Roots mobilize nutrients via deep soil penetration and rhizosphere processes inducing weathering of primary minerals. These processes contribute to C transfer to soils and to tree nutrition. Assessments of these characteristics and processes of root systems are important for understanding long...

  12. The stoichiometric ratio during biological removal of inorganic carbon and nutrient in the Mississippi River plume and adjacent continental shelf

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W.-J. Huang

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The stoichiometric ratios of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC and nutrients during biological removal have been widely assumed to follow the Redfield ratios (especially the C/N ratio in large river plume ecosystems. However, this assumption has not been systematically examined and documented because DIC and nutrients are rarely studied simultaneously in a river plume area, a region in which they can be affected by strong river-ocean mixing as well as intense biological activity. We examined stoichiometric ratios of DIC, total alkalinity (TA, and nutrients (NO3, PO43− and Si(OH4 data during biological removal in the Mississippi River plume and adjacent continental shelf in June 2003 and August 2004 with biological removals defined as the difference between measured values and values predicted on the basis of conservative mixing determined using a multi-endmember mixing model. Despite complex physical and biogeochemical influences, relationships between DIC and nutrients were strongly dependent on salinity range and geographic location, and influenced by biological removal. Lower C/Si and N/Si ratios in one nearshore area were attributed to a potential silicate source induced by water exchange with coastal salt marshes. When net biological uptake was separated from river-ocean mixing and the impact of marshes and bays excluded, stoichiometric ratios of C/N/Si were similar to the Redfield ratios, thus supporting the applicability of the Redfield-type C/N/Si ratios as a principle in river-plume biogeochemical models.

  13. Perdas de solo, água, nutrientes e carbono orgânico em Cambissolo e Latossolo sob chuva natural Soil, water, nutrients and organic carbon losses from inceptisol and Oxisol under natural rainfall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Marcos da Silva

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available A erosão hídrica é responsável por perdas de nutrientes e carbono dos solos agrícolas. A minimização das perdas de solo, água, nutrientes e carbono orgânico constitui importante aspecto do planejamento conservacionista. Os objetivos deste trabalho foram avaliar as perdas, por erosão hídrica, de solo, água, nutrientes e carbono orgânico em Cambissolo Háplico Tb distrófico típico (CXbd e Latossolo Vermelho distroférrico típico (LVdf. As coletas foram realizadas depois de cada evento de chuva considerada erosiva. As perdas médias anuais de solo foram de 205,65 Mg ha-1 para o CXbd e de 14,90 Mg ha-1 para o LVdf. As perdas médias anuais de água foram 369 mm para o CXbd e 113 mm para o LVdf, representando, respectivamente, 28,67% e 8,78% do total precipitado. Os atributos mineralógicos, químicos e físicos e o relevo de ocorrência desses solos explicam satisfatoriamente os resultados obtidos. O CXbd apresentou as maiores perdas de nutrientes e carbono orgânico. O carbono orgânico foi encontrado em maior quantidade no sedimento erodido, evidenciado pelo caráter seletivo da erosão.Water erosion is responsible for considerable losses of nutrients and organic carbon from agricultural soils. The reduction of soil, water, nutrients and organic carbon losses constitutes an important aspect of the conservation planning. The objectives of this work were to evaluate the soil, water, nutrients and organic carbon losses from a Typic Dystrochept (TD and a Rhodic Hapludox (RH. The samplings were performed after each considered erosive rain event. The mean annual soil losses were 205.65 Mg ha-1 for the TD and 14.90 Mg ha-1 for the RH. The mean annual water losses were 369 mm for the TD and 113 mm for the RH, representing 28.67% and 8.78% of the total precipitation, respectively. The mineralogical, chemical and physical attributes and the relief where these soils occur satisfactorily explain the obtained results. The TD presents higher

  14. Effect of nutrient enrichment on the source and composition of sediment organic carbon in tropical seagrass beds in the South China Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Songlin; Jiang, Zhijian; Zhang, Jingping; Wu, Yunchao; Lian, Zhonglian; Huang, Xiaoping

    2016-09-15

    To assess the effect of nutrient enrichment on the source and composition of sediment organic carbon (SOC) beneath Thalassia hemprichii and Enhalus acoroides in tropical seagrass beds, Xincun Bay, South China Sea, intertidal sediment, primary producers, and seawater samples were collected. No significant differences on sediment δ(13)C, SOC, and microbial biomass carbon (MBC) were observed between T. hemprichii and E. acoroides. SOC was mainly of autochthonous origin, while the contribution of seagrass to SOC was less than that of suspended particulate organic matter, macroalgae and epiphytes. High nutrient concentrations contributed substantially to SOC of seagrass, macroalgae, and epiphytes. The SOC, MBC, and MBC/SOC ratio in the nearest transect to fish farming were the highest. This suggested a more labile composition of SOC and shorter turnover times in higher nutrient regions. Therefore, the research indicates that nutrient enrichment could enhance plant-derived contributions to SOC and microbial use efficiency. PMID:27334726

  15. Seasonal dynamics of carbon and nutrients from two contrasting tropical floodplain systems in the Zambezi River Basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. L. Zuijdgeest

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Floodplains are important biogeochemical reactors during fluvial transport of carbon and nutrient species towards the oceans. In the tropics and subtropics pronounced rainfall seasonality results in highly dynamic floodplain biogeochemistry. Massive construction of hydropower dams, however, has significantly altered the hydrography and chemical characteristics of many (subtropical rivers. In this study, we compare organic matter and nutrient biogeochemistry of two large, contrasting floodplains in the Zambezi River Basin in Southern Africa, the Barotse Plains and the Kafue Flats. Both systems are of comparable size, but differ in anthropogenic influence: while the Barotse Plains are still relatively pristine, the Kafue Flats are bordered by two hydropower dams. While the Barotse Plains retain particles during the wet season, annual yields of particulate organic carbon and nitrogen are higher than previously reported for the Zambezi and other tropical rivers. Enhanced wet-season runoff adds soil-derived dissolved organic carbon and nitrogen to the Zambezi River, with a corresponding increase in the Barotse Plains. Soil-derived organic matter dominates the particulate phase year-round in the Barotse Plains, and a varying influence of C3- and C4-plant vegetation can be observed throughout the year. In contrast to the Barotse Plains, net export of particulate matter from the Kafue Flats has been observed during the wet season, but over an annual cycle, the Kafue Flats are effectively accumulating dissolved carbon and nutrients. In the Kafue Flats, the runoff-induced increase in dissolved organic carbon and nitrogen concentrations is delayed by the upstream dam operation. The dam reservoir also causes a shift in the source of the particulate organic matter – from soil-derived during the dry season to aquatically produced in the wet season – in the downstream Kafue Flats. Spatial zonation in vegetation and temporal flooding dynamics in the Kafue

  16. Allocation of atmospheric CO2 into labile sub-surface carbon pools: a stable isotope labelling approach in a tundra wetland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rüggen, Norman; Knoblauch, Christian; Pfeiffer, Eva-Maria

    2015-04-01

    Greenhouse gas emissions from permafrost-affected wetlands are intensively studied due to their important role in the global carbon cycle. There are concerns of increasing methane and carbon dioxide fluxes from tundra wetlands due to permafrost degradation and hydrology changes in a warming Arctic. Understanding the sub-surface carbon pool interactions will improve the prediction on how trace gas fluxes from these ecosystems will respond to changing environmental conditions. Partitioning the sources of greenhouse gas fluxes will help to evaluate the quantitative role of recently produced plant photosynthates. Furthermore, partitioning allows separating respiration of long-term stored organic matter and freshly produced plant products. This knowledge is crucial for understanding the response of greenhouse gas fluxes in such wetlands to environmental changes. An in situ 13CO2 pulse-labelling experiment has been conducted in the northeast Siberian tundra (Samoylov island, Lena river delta) in August 2013 to quantify interactions among sub-surface carbon pools (DIC, DOC, CH4) in three depths (6, 16 and 36 cm) of the active layer. The experimental site was a low-centred polygon centre in a polygonal tundra landscape, with a sedge-moss (Carex-Scorpidium) plant association. The water table was at the soils' surface and the permafrost table in a depth of 50 cm. After the system has been 13CO2 pulse labelled, all three studied subsurface carbon pools (CH4, DIC and DOC) were clearly 13C-enriched, which accounts for atmospheric C incorporated into these pools. One day after the labelling, in 6 cm depth 1.5 percent of DIC and 0.1 percent of CH4were replaced by label C, which then steadily declined over a ten days period. The label C content of DOC increased gradually over the same period. In 16 cm depth, the label C increased gradually after labelling in both DIC and CH4. Label C was found in DIC and CH4 even in a depth of 36 cm, although in less pronounced concentrations

  17. Modeling the Effect of External Carbon Source Addition under Different Electron Acceptor Conditions in Biological Nutrient Removal Activated Sludge Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xiang; Wisniewski, Kamil; Czerwionka, Krzysztof; Zhou, Qi; Xie, Li; Makinia, Jacek

    2016-02-16

    The aim of this study was to expand the International Water Association Activated Sludge Model No. 2d (ASM2d) to predict the aerobic/anoxic behavior of polyphosphate accumulating organisms (PAOs) and "ordinary" heterotrophs in the presence of different external carbon sources and electron acceptors. The following new aspects were considered: (1) a new type of the readily biodegradable substrate, not available for the anaerobic activity of PAOs, (2) nitrite as an electron acceptor, and (3) acclimation of "ordinary" heterotrophs to the new external substrate via enzyme synthesis. The expanded model incorporated 30 new or modified process rate equations. The model was evaluated against data from several, especially designed laboratory experiments which focused on the combined effects of different types of external carbon sources (acetate, ethanol and fusel oil) and electron acceptors (dissolved oxygen, nitrate and nitrite) on the behavior of PAOs and "ordinary" heterotrophs. With the proposed expansions, it was possible to improve some deficiencies of the ASM2d in predicting the behavior of biological nutrient removal (BNR) systems with the addition of external carbon sources, including the effect of acclimation to the new carbon source. PMID:26783836

  18. A Numerical Study of the Effect of Periodic Nutrient Supply on Pathways of Carbon in a Coastal Upwelling Regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Mary-Elena

    1998-01-01

    A size-based ecosystem model was modified to include periodic upwelling events and used to evaluate the effect of episodic nutrient supply on the standing stock, carbon uptake, and carbon flow into mesozooplankton grazing and sinking flux in a coastal upwelling regime. Two ecosystem configurations were compared: a single food chain made up of net phytoplankton and mesozooplankton (one autotroph and one heterotroph, A1H1), and three interconnected food chains plus bacteria (three autotrophs and four heterotrophs, A3H4). The carbon pathways in the A1H1 simulations were under stronger physical control than those of the A3H4 runs, where the small size classes are not affected by frequent upwelling events. In the more complex food web simulations, the microbial pathway determines the total carbon uptake and grazing rates, and regenerated nitrogen accounts for more than half of the total primary production for periods of 20 days or longer between events. By contrast, new production, export of carbon through sinking and mesozooplankton grazing are more important in the A1H1 simulations. In the A3H4 simulations, the turnover time scale of the autotroph biomass increases as the period between upwelling events increases, because of the larger contribution of slow-growing net phytoplankton. The upwelling period was characterized for three upwelling sites from the alongshore wind speed measured by the NASA Scatterometer (NSCAT) and the corresponding model output compared with literature data. This validation exercise for three upwelling sites and a downstream embayment suggests that standing stock, carbon uptake and size fractionation were best supported by the A3H4 simulations, while the simulated sinking fluxes are not distinguishable in the two configurations.

  19. Sediment-water column fluxes of carbon, oxygen and nutrients in Bedford Basin, Nova Scotia, inferred from 224Ra measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Horne

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Exchanges between sediment pore waters and the overlying water column play a significant role in the chemical budgets of many important chemical constituents. Direct quantification of such benthic fluxes requires explicit knowledge of the sediment properties and biogeochemistry. Alternatively, changes in water-column properties near the sediment-water interface can be exploited to gain insight into the sediment biogeochemistry and benthic fluxes. Here, we apply a 1-D diffusive mixing model to near-bottom water-column profiles of 224Ra activity in order to yield vertical eddy diffusivities (KZ, based upon which we assess the diffusive exchange of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC, nutrients and oxygen (O2, across the sediment-water interface in a coastal inlet, Bedford Basin, Nova Scotia, Canada. Numerical model results are consistent with the assumptions regarding a constant, single benthic source of 224Ra, the lack of mixing by advective processes, and a predominantly benthic source and sink of DIC and O2, respectively, with minimal water-column respiration in the deep waters of Bedford Basin. Near-bottom observations of DIC, O2 and nutrients provide flux ratios similar to Redfield values, suggesting that benthic respiration of primarily marine organic matter is the dominant driver. Furthermore, a relative deficit of nitrate in the observed flux ratios indicates that denitrification also plays a role in the oxidation of organic matter, although its occurrence was not strong enough to allow us to detect the corresponding AT fluxes out of the sediment. Finally, comparison with other carbon sources reveal the observed benthic DIC release as a significant contributor to the Bedford Basin carbon system.

  20. The Relationship of Triacylglycerol and Starch Accumulation to Carbon and Energy Flows during Nutrient Deprivation in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juergens, Matthew T; Disbrow, Bradley; Shachar-Hill, Yair

    2016-08-01

    Because of the potential importance of algae for green biotechnology, considerable effort has been invested in understanding their responses to nitrogen deprivation. The most frequently invoked reasons proposed for the accumulation of high cellular levels of triacylglycerol (TAG) and starch are variants of what may be termed the "overflow hypothesis." According to this, growth inhibition results in the rate of photosynthetic energy and/or carbon input exceeding cellular needs; the excess input is directed into the accumulation of TAG and/or starch to prevent damage. This study was aimed at providing a quantitative dataset and analysis of the main energy and carbon flows before and during nitrogen deprivation in a model system to assess alternative explanations. Cellular growth, biomass, starch, and lipid levels as well as several measures of photosynthetic function were recorded for cells of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii cultured under nine different autotrophic, mixotrophic, and heterotrophic conditions during nutrient-replete growth and for the first 4 d of nitrogen deprivation. The results of a (13)C labeling time course indicated that in mixotrophic culture, starch is predominantly made from CO2 and fatty acid synthesis is largely supplied by exogenous acetate, with considerable turnover of membrane lipids, so that total lipid rather than TAG is the appropriate measure of product accumulation. Heterotrophic cultures accumulated TAG and starch during N deprivation, showing that these are not dependent on photosynthesis. We conclude that the overflow hypothesis is insufficient and suggest that storage may be a more universally important reason for carbon compound accumulation during nutrient deprivation. PMID:27325664

  1. Treatment of sludge containing nitro-aromatic compounds in reed-bed mesocosms – Water, BOD, carbon and nutrient removal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► It is necessary to improve existing and develop new sludge management techniques. ► One method is dewatering and biodegradation of compounds in constructed wetlands. ► The result showed high reduction of all tested parameters after treatment. ► Plants improve degradation and Phragmites australis is tolerant to xenobiotics. ► The amount of sludge could be reduced by 50–70%. - Abstract: Since the mid-1970s, Sweden has been depositing 1 million ton d.w sludge/year, produced at waste water treatment plants. Due to recent legislation this practice is no longer a viable method of waste management. It is necessary to improve existing and develop new sludge management techniques and one promising alternative is the dewatering and treatment of sludge in constructed wetlands. The aim of this study was to follow reduction of organic carbon, BOD and nutrients in an industrial sludge containing nitro-aromatic compounds passing through constructed small-scale wetlands, and to investigate any toxic effect such as growth inhibition of the common reed Phragmites australis. The result showed high reduction of all tested parameters in all the outgoing water samples, which shows that constructed wetlands are suitable for carbon and nutrient removal. The results also showed that P. australis is tolerant to xenobiotics and did not appear to be affected by the toxic compounds in the sludge. The sludge residual on the top of the beds contained low levels of organic carbon and is considered non-organic and could therefore be landfilled. Using this type of secondary treatment method, the amount of sludge could be reduced by 50–70%, mainly by dewatering and biodegradation of organic compounds.

  2. Soil organic carbon stocks in estuarine and marine mangrove ecosystems are driven by nutrient colimitation of P and N.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Christian; Weiss, Joanna; Boy, Jens; Iskandar, Issi; Mikutta, Robert; Guggenberger, Georg

    2016-07-01

    Mangroves play an important role in carbon sequestration, but soil organic carbon (SOC) stocks differ between marine and estuarine mangroves, suggesting differing processes and drivers of SOC accumulation. Here, we compared undegraded and degraded marine and estuarine mangroves in a regional approach across the Indonesian archipelago for their SOC stocks and evaluated possible drivers imposed by nutrient limitations along the land-to-sea gradients. SOC stocks in natural marine mangroves (271-572 Mg ha(-1) m(-1)) were much higher than under estuarine mangroves (100-315 Mg ha(-1) m(-1)) with a further decrease caused by degradation to 80-132 Mg ha(-1) m(-1). Soils differed in C/N ratio (marine: 29-64; estuarine: 9-28), δ (15)N (marine: -0.6 to 0.7‰; estuarine: 2.5 to 7.2‰), and plant-available P (marine: 2.3-6.3 mg kg(-1); estuarine: 0.16-1.8 mg kg(-1)). We found N and P supply of sea-oriented mangroves primarily met by dominating symbiotic N2 fixation from air and P import from sea, while mangroves on the landward gradient increasingly covered their demand in N and P from allochthonous sources and SOM recycling. Pioneer plants favored by degradation further increased nutrient recycling from soil resulting in smaller SOC stocks in the topsoil. These processes explained the differences in SOC stocks along the land-to-sea gradient in each mangrove type as well as the SOC stock differences observed between estuarine and marine mangrove ecosystems. This first large-scale evaluation of drivers of SOC stocks under mangroves thus suggests a continuum in mangrove functioning across scales and ecotypes and additionally provides viable proxies for carbon stock estimations in PES or REDD schemes. PMID:27547332

  3. Transport of sediments, carbon and nutrients in areas of reforestation and grassland based on simulated rainfall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adilson Pinheiro

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate the soil losses, as well as carbon and chemical samples in runoff through areas of pine (Pinus taeda, eucalyptus (Eucalyptus dunni and a consortium of pasture with oat (Avena stringosa and ryegrass (Lolium multiflorium in the Fragosos river basin, in Concordia, SC. For this, rainfall simulations with mean intensities of 94 mm h-1 were conducted in September and November 2011, in plots of 1 m2 established in the three areas. Runoff, loads carried of the sediment, and carbon and chemical concentrations were quantified in the experiment. The results showed that the concentrations of sediment and organic carbon were higher in the eucalyptus area. The largest concentrations of chemicals for all areas were nitrate, calcium, magnesium and potassium. Total carbon, organic carbon, sediment and nitrate were transported in higher loads in the eucalyptus area. With the exception of nitrate and chloride, the chemical loads carried were higher in the pasture area.

  4. Response of dissolved carbon and nitrogen concentrations to moderate nutrient additions in a tropical montane forest of south Ecuador

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velescu, Andre; Valarezo, Carlos; Wilcke, Wolfgang

    2016-05-01

    In the past two decades, the tropical montane rain forests in south Ecuador experienced increasing deposition of reactive nitrogen mainly originating from Amazonian forest fires, while Saharan dust inputs episodically increased deposition of base metals. Increasing air temperature and unevenly distributed rainfall have allowed for longer dry spells in a perhumid ecosystem. This might have favored mineralization of dissolved organic matter (DOM) by microorganisms and increased nutrient release from the organic layer. Environmental change is expected to impact the functioning of this ecosystem belonging to the biodiversity hotspots of the Earth. In 2007, we established a nutrient manipulation experiment (NUMEX) to understand the response of the ecosystem to moderately increased nutrient inputs. Since 2008, we have continuously applied 50 kg ha-1 a-1 of nitrogen (N), 10 kg ha-1 a-1 of phosphorus (P), 50 kg + 10 kg ha-1 a-1 of N and P and 10 kg ha-1 a-1 of calcium (Ca) in a randomized block design at 2000 m a.s.l. in a natural forest on the Amazonia-exposed slopes of the south Ecuadorian Andes. Nitrogen concentrations in throughfall increased following N+P additions, while separate N amendments only increased nitrate concentrations. Total organic carbon (TOC) and dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) concentrations showed high seasonal variations in litter leachate and decreased significantly in the P and N+P treatments, but not in the N treatment. Thus, P availability plays a key role in the mineralization of DOM. TOC/DON ratios were narrower in throughfall than in litter leachate but their temporal course did not respond to nutrient amendments. Our results revealed an initially fast, positive response of the C and N cycling to nutrient additions which declined with time. TOC and DON cycling only change if N and P supply are improved concurrently, while NO3-N leaching increases only if N is separately added. This indicates co-limitation of the microorganisms by N and P

  5. Response of dissolved carbon and nitrogen concentrations to moderate nutrient additions in a tropical montane forest of south Ecuador

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andre eVelescu

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In the past two decades, the tropical montane rain forests in south Ecuador experienced increasing deposition of reactive nitrogen mainly originating from Amazonian forest fires, while Saharan dust inputs episodically increased deposition of base metals. Increasing air temperature and unevenly distributed rainfall have allowed for longer dry spells in a perhumid ecosystem. This might have favored mineralization of dissolved organic matter (DOM by microorganisms and increased nutrient release from the organic layer. Environmental change is expected to impact the functioning of this ecosystem belonging to the biodiversity hotspots of the Earth.In 2007, we established a nutrient manipulation experiment (NUMEX to understand the response of the ecosystem to moderately increased nutrient inputs. Since 2008, we have continuously applied 50 kg ha-1 a-1 of nitrogen (N, 10 kg ha-1 a-1 of phosphorus (P, 50 kg + 10 kg ha-1 a-1 of N and P and 10 kg ha-1 a-1 of calcium (Ca in a randomized block design at 2000 m a.s.l. in a natural forest on the Amazonia-exposed slopes of the south Ecuadorian Andes.Nitrogen concentrations in throughfall increased following N+P additions, while separate N amendments only increased nitrate concentrations. Total organic carbon (TOC and dissolved organic nitrogen (DON concentrations showed high seasonal variations in litter leachate and decreased significantly in the P and N+P treatments, but not in the N treatment. Thus, P availability plays a key role in the mineralization of DOM. TOC/DON ratios were narrower in throughfall than in litter leachate but their temporal course did not respond to nutrient amendments.Our results revealed an initially fast, positive response of the C and N cycling to nutrient additions which declined with time. TOC and DON cycling only change if N and P supply are improved concurrently, while NO3-N leaching increases only if N is separately added. This indicates co-limitation of the microorganisms by N

  6. Long-term frequent prescribed fire decreases surface soil carbon and nitrogen pools in a wet sclerophyll forest of Southeast Queensland, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muqaddas, Bushra; Zhou, Xiaoqi; Lewis, Tom; Wild, Clyde; Chen, Chengrong

    2015-12-01

    Prescribed fire is one of the most widely-used management tools for reducing fuel loads in managed forests. However the long-term effects of repeated prescribed fires on soil carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) pools are poorly understood. This study aimed to investigate how different fire frequency regimes influence C and N pools in the surface soils (0-10 cm). A prescribed fire field experiment in a wet sclerophyll forest established in 1972 in southeast Queensland was used in this study. The fire frequency regimes included long unburnt (NB), burnt every 2 years (2yrB) and burnt every 4 years (4yrB), with four replications. Compared with the NB treatment, the 2yrB treatment lowered soil total C by 44%, total N by 54%, HCl hydrolysable C and N by 48% and 59%, KMnO4 oxidizable C by 81%, microbial biomass C and N by 42% and 33%, cumulative CO2-C by 28%, NaOCl-non-oxidizable C and N by 41% and 51%, and charcoal-C by 17%, respectively. The 4yrB and NB treatments showed no significant differences for these soil C and N pools. All soil labile, biologically active and recalcitrant and total C and N pools were correlated positively with each other and with soil moisture content, but negatively correlated with soil pH. The C:N ratios of different C and N pools were greater in the burned treatments than in the NB treatments. This study has highlighted that the prescribed burning at four year interval is a more sustainable management practice for this subtropical forest ecosystem. PMID:26196067

  7. Dynamics of nutrients, total organic carbon, prokaryotes and viruses in onboard incubations of cold-water corals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maier, C.; de Kluijver, A.; Agis, M.; Brussaard, C. P. D.; van Duyl, F. C.; Weinbauer, M. G.

    2011-09-01

    The potential influence of the cold-water corals (CWCs) Lophelia pertusa and Madrepora oculata on the dynamics of inorganic nutrient and total organic carbon (TOC) concentrations and the abundances of prokaryotes and viruses in bottom water was assessed in onboard incubation experiments. Ammonium, nitrite, dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN), dissolved inorganic phosphorus (DIP) and TOC concentrations and N:P ratios were typically higher in incubation water with corals than in controls, whereas nitrate concentrations did not reveal a clear trend. Mucus release (normalized to coral surface) was estimated by the net increase rate of TOC concentrations and averaged 23 ± 6 mg C m-2 h-1 for L. pertusa and 21 ± 8 mg C m-2 h-1 for M. oculata. Prokaryotic and viral abundance and turnover rates were typically stimulated in incubation water with corals. This estimated prokaryotic stimulation averaged 6.0 ± 3.0 × 109 cells m-2 h-1 for L. pertusa and 8.4 ± 2.9 × 109 cells m-2 h-1 for M. oculata, whereas the estimated viral stimulation averaged 15.6 ± 12.7 × 109 particles m-2 h-1 for L. pertusa and 4.3 ± 0.4 × 109 particles m-2 h-1 M. oculata. Our data suggest that prokaryotes and viruses are released from corals and that nutrient and mucus release enhanced prokaryotic and viral production. The result of this stimulation could be a fuelling of bottom water in CWC reefs with nutrients and organic matter and consequently an enhancement of microbe-mediated processes.

  8. Production of dissolved organic carbon by Arctic plankton communities: Responses to elevated carbon dioxide and the availability of light and nutrients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulton, Alex J.; Daniels, Chris J.; Esposito, Mario; Humphreys, Matthew P.; Mitchell, Elaine; Ribas-Ribas, Mariana; Russell, Benjamin C.; Stinchcombe, Mark C.; Tynan, Eithne; Richier, Sophie

    2016-05-01

    The extracellular release of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) by phytoplankton is a potentially important source of labile organic carbon for bacterioplankton in pelagic ecosystems. In the context of increasing seawater partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2), via the oceanic absorption of elevated atmospheric CO2 (ocean acidification), several previous studies have reported increases to the relative amount of carbon fixed into particulates, via primary production (PP), and dissolved phases (DOC). During the summer of 2012 we measured DOC production by phytoplankton communities in the Nordic seas of the Arctic Ocean (Greenland, Norwegian and Barents Sea) from both in situ sampling and during three bioassay experiments where pCO2 levels (targets ~550 μatm, ~750 μatm, ~1000 μatm) were elevated relative to ambient conditions. Measurements of DOC production and PP came from 24 h incubations and therefore represent net DOC production rates, where an unknown portion of the DOC released has potentially been utilised by heterotrophic organisms. Production of DOC (net pDOC) by in situ communities varied from 0.09 to 0.64 mmol C m-3 d-1 (average 0.25 mmol C m-3 d-1), with comparative rates in two of the experimental bioassays (0.04-1.23 mmol C m-3 d-1) and increasing dramatically in the third (up to 5.88 mmol C m-3 d-1). When expressed as a fraction of total carbon fixation (i.e., PP plus pDOC), percentage extracellular release (PER) was 14% on average (range 2-46%) for in situ measurements, with PER in the three bioassays having a very similar range (2-50%). A marked increase in pDOC (and PER) was only observed in one of the bioassays where nutrient levels (nitrate, silicic acid) dropped dramatically relative to starting (ambient) concentrations; no pCO2 treatment effect on pDOC (or PER) was evident across the three experiments. Examination of in situ net pDOC (and PER) found significant correlations with decreasing silicic acid and increasing euphotic zone depth, indicating that

  9. DNA pooling base genome-wide association study identifies variants at NRXN3 associated with delayed encephalopathy after acute carbon monoxide poisoning.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenqiang Li

    Full Text Available Delayed encephalopathy after acute carbon monoxide poisoning (DEACMP is more characteristic of anoxic encephalopathy than of other types of anoxia. Those who have the same poisoning degree and are of similar age and gender have a greater risk of getting DEACMP. This has made it clear that there are obvious personal differences. Genetic factors may play a very important role. The authors performed a genome-wide association study involving pooling of DNA obtained from 175 patients and 244 matched acute carbon monoxide poisoning without delayed encephalopathy controls. The Illumina HumanHap 660 Chip array was used for DNA pools. Allele frequencies of all SNPs were compared between delayed encephalopathy after acute carbon monoxide poisoning and control groups and ranked. A total of 123 SNPs gave an OR >1.4. Of these, 46 mapped in or close to known genes. Forty-eight SNPs located in 19 genes were associated with DEACMP after correction for 5% FDR in the genome-wide association of pooled DNA. Two SNPs (rs11845632 and rs2196447 locate in the Neurexin 3 gene were selected for individual genotyping in all samples and another cohort consisted of 234 and 271 controls. There were significant differences in the genotype and allele frequencies of rs11845632 and rs2196447 between the DEACMP group and controls group (all P-values <0.05. This study describes a positive association between Neurexin 3 and controls in the Han Chinese population, and provides genetic evidence to support the susceptibility of DEACMP, which may be the resulting interaction of environmental and genetic factors.

  10. Effect of carbon dioxide enrichment on radish production using Nutrient Film Technique (NFT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackowiak, C. L.; Ruffe, L. M.; Yorio, N. C.; Wheeler, R. M.

    1994-01-01

    Radish plants (Raphanus sativus L. cvs. Cherry Belle, Giant White Globe, and Early Scarlet Globe) were grown in four different CO2 enriched environments, 0.04, 0.10, 0.50, and 1.00 kPa (400, 1000, 5000, 10000 ppm). Cultivar responses to CO2 treatments varied, where cv. Cherry Belle showed no significant response to CO2 enrichment, cv. Giant White Globe was moderately affected and Early Scarlet Globe was strongly affected. Enrichment at 0.10 kPa led to greater root dry matter (DM) than 1.00 kPa for cv. Giant White Glove, whereas 0.10 kPa produced greater storage root, shoot, and root DM than 1.00 kPa for cv. Early Scarlet Globe. The data suggest that 1.00 kPa CO2 may be detrimental to the growth of certain radish cultivars. Root:shoot ratios tended to increase with increasing CO2 concentration. Water use efficiency (g biomass/kg H2O) increased with increasing CO2 enrichment, up to 0.5 kPa but then declined at the 1.00 kPa treatment. The total nitric acid used to maintain nutrient solution pH was lowest at the 1.00 kPa treatment as well, suggesting a decreased demand of nutrients by the plants at the highest CO2 level.

  11. Models for transport and fate of carbon, nutrients and point source released radionuclides to an aquatic ecosystem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumblad, Linda [Stockholm Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Systems Ecology; Kautsky, Ulrik [Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co., Stockholm (Sweden)

    2004-09-01

    In this report three ecosystem models are described in terms of structure, initial data, and results. All models are dynamic, mass-balanced and describe the transport and fate of elements in an open aquatic ecosystem. The models are based on ecologically sound principles, provide model results with high resolution and transparency, and are constrained by the nutrient dynamics of the ecosystem itself. The processes driving the transport in all the models are both the biological processes such as primary production, consumption, respiration and excretion, and abiotic e.g. water exchange and air-sea exchange. The first model, the CNP-model, describes the distribution and fluxes of carbon and nutrients for the coastal ecosystem off Forsmark. The second model, the C-14 model, is an extension of the CNP-model and describes the transport and distribution of hypothetically released C-14 from the underground repository SFR-1 to the ecosystem above. The third model, the RN-model, is a generic radionuclide flow model that models the transport and distribution of radionuclides other than C-14 hypothetically discharged to the ecosystem. The model also analyses the importance of some radionuclide specific mechanisms for the radionuclide flow. The generic radionuclide model is also based on the CNP-model, but has radionuclide specific mechanisms connected to each compartment.

  12. Models for transport and fate of carbon, nutrients and point source released radionuclides to an aquatic ecosystem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this report three ecosystem models are described in terms of structure, initial data, and results. All models are dynamic, mass-balanced and describe the transport and fate of elements in an open aquatic ecosystem. The models are based on ecologically sound principles, provide model results with high resolution and transparency, and are constrained by the nutrient dynamics of the ecosystem itself. The processes driving the transport in all the models are both the biological processes such as primary production, consumption, respiration and excretion, and abiotic e.g. water exchange and air-sea exchange. The first model, the CNP-model, describes the distribution and fluxes of carbon and nutrients for the coastal ecosystem off Forsmark. The second model, the C-14 model, is an extension of the CNP-model and describes the transport and distribution of hypothetically released C-14 from the underground repository SFR-1 to the ecosystem above. The third model, the RN-model, is a generic radionuclide flow model that models the transport and distribution of radionuclides other than C-14 hypothetically discharged to the ecosystem. The model also analyses the importance of some radionuclide specific mechanisms for the radionuclide flow. The generic radionuclide model is also based on the CNP-model, but has radionuclide specific mechanisms connected to each compartment

  13. Carbon and nutrients output by harvesting Acacia mearnsii De Wild to four years old at the central Depression, RS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Vinicius Winckler Caldeira

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to estimate the content and export of carbon, macro and micronutrients in the different components (leaf, alive and dead branch, bark, wood and roots of the Acacia mearnsii trees with 4 years old of age in Arroio dos Ratos-RS, in order to provide the forest management, based on the criterion of minimum export of nutrients. After determining the diameter distribution and its division into diameter classes (seven classes, three trees were selected in each classes. Using the 21 trees felled, the biomass of different components of trees was stimated. It was observed that wood, which represents about 64% of the biomass, contains 50% of accumulated Ca, 21% N, 27% P, 30% K, 37% Mg, 45% of S, 25% B, 37% Cu, 9% Fe, 26% Mg and 41% Zn. While the leaf, which represents 3% of total biomass, contains 20; 18; 12; 5; 10; 10; 17; 18; 5; 19 and 6% N, P, K, Ca, Mg, S, B, Cu, Fe, Mg and Zn, respectively. The export of nutrients from the crops of A. mearnsii can be minimized with retention of crop residues on the soil removal only of wood and bark.

  14. Physical and bacterial controls on inorganic nutrients and dissolved organic carbon during a sea ice growth and decay experiment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, J.; Delille, B.; Kaartokallio, H.;

    2014-01-01

    We investigated how physical incorporation, brine dynamics and bacterial activity regulate the distribution of inorganic nutrients and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in artificial sea ice during a 19-day experiment that included periods of both ice growth and decay. The experiment was performed...... major changes in DOC concentrations. (3) Different forms of DOC have different properties and hence incorporation efficiencies. In particular, the terrestrially-derived DOC from the river water was less efficiently incorporated into sea ice than the DOC in the seawater. Therefore the main factors...... regulating the distribution of the dissolved compounds within sea ice are clearly a complex interaction of brine dynamics, biological activity and in the case of dissolved organic matter, the physico-chemical properties of the dissolved constituents themselves....

  15. Vernal Pools

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — This is a polygon layer representing existing vernal pool complexes in California's Central Valley, as identified and mapped by Dr. Robert F. Holland. The purpose...

  16. Changes in carbon pool and stand structure of a native subtropical mangrove forest after inter-planting with exotic species Sonneratia apetala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Weizhi; Yang, Shengchang; Chen, Luzhen; Wang, Wenqing; Du, Xiaona; Wang, Canmou; Ma, Yan; Lin, Guangxuan; Lin, Guanghui

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we compared stand structure, biomass and soil carbon pools, and litterfall production between a mixed mangrove forest consisting of Aegiceras corniculatum inter-planted with the exotic Sonneratia apetala and a native monospecific forest dominated by A. corniculatum in the intertidal area of Zhanjiang, Guangdong Province, southeast China. The goal of this study was to test the hypothesis that inter-planting fast growing exotic mangrove S. apetala into subtropical native mangrove forests will significantly increase C sequestration. Although the tree heights and basal diameters of S. apetala were significantly higher than those of A. corniculatum, the density of the 12-year-old S. apetala trees in the mixed forest was much smaller than that of A. corniculatum in the monospecific forest. In contrast to several previous studies on S. apetala forests planted directly on mangrove-free mudflats, the mixed mangrove forest showed no significant difference in either standing biomass or soil carbon pools from the native monospecific mangrove forest (p = 0.294 and 0.073, respectively) twelve years after inter-planting with S. apetala. Moreover, carbon cycling was likely speeded up after inter-planting S. apetala due to higher litterfall input and lower C/N ratio. Thus, inter-planting fast-growing S. apetala into native mangrove forest is not an effective way to increase carbon sequestration in this subtropical mangrove forest. Given that exotic plant species may exert negative impact on native mangrove species and related epifauna, this fast-growing mangrove species is not suitable for mangrove plantation projects aiming mainly at enhancing carbon sequestration. PMID:24618793

  17. Changes in carbon pool and stand structure of a native subtropical mangrove forest after inter-planting with exotic species Sonneratia apetala.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weizhi Lu

    Full Text Available In this study, we compared stand structure, biomass and soil carbon pools, and litterfall production between a mixed mangrove forest consisting of Aegiceras corniculatum inter-planted with the exotic Sonneratia apetala and a native monospecific forest dominated by A. corniculatum in the intertidal area of Zhanjiang, Guangdong Province, southeast China. The goal of this study was to test the hypothesis that inter-planting fast growing exotic mangrove S. apetala into subtropical native mangrove forests will significantly increase C sequestration. Although the tree heights and basal diameters of S. apetala were significantly higher than those of A. corniculatum, the density of the 12-year-old S. apetala trees in the mixed forest was much smaller than that of A. corniculatum in the monospecific forest. In contrast to several previous studies on S. apetala forests planted directly on mangrove-free mudflats, the mixed mangrove forest showed no significant difference in either standing biomass or soil carbon pools from the native monospecific mangrove forest (p = 0.294 and 0.073, respectively twelve years after inter-planting with S. apetala. Moreover, carbon cycling was likely speeded up after inter-planting S. apetala due to higher litterfall input and lower C/N ratio. Thus, inter-planting fast-growing S. apetala into native mangrove forest is not an effective way to increase carbon sequestration in this subtropical mangrove forest. Given that exotic plant species may exert negative impact on native mangrove species and related epifauna, this fast-growing mangrove species is not suitable for mangrove plantation projects aiming mainly at enhancing carbon sequestration.

  18. Organic carbon and nutrients (N, P in surface soil horizons in a non-glaciated catchment, SW Spitsbergen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szymański Wojciech

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Organic carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus in the soils of the High Arctic play an important role in the context of global warming, biodiversity, and richness of tundra vegetation. The main aim of the present study was to determine the content and spatial distribution of soil organic carbon (SOC, total nitrogen (Ntot, and total phosphorus (Ptot in the surface horizons of Arctic soils obtained from the lower part of the Fuglebekken catchment in Spitsbergen as an example of a small non-glaciated catchment representing uplifted marine terraces of the Svalbard Archipelago. The obtained results indicate that surface soil horizons in the Fuglebekken catchment show considerable differences in content of SOC, Ntot, and Ptot. This mosaic is related to high variability of soil type, local hydrology, vegetation (type and quantity, and especially location of seabird nesting colony. The highest content of SOC, Ntot, and Ptot occurs in soil surface horizons obtained from sites fertilized by seabird guano and located along streams flowing from the direction of the seabird colony. The content of SOC, Ntot, and Ptot is strongly negatively correlated with distance from seabird colony indicating a strong influence of the birds on the fertility of the studied soils and indirectly on the accumulation of soil organic matter. The lowest content of SOC, Ntot, and Ptot occurs in soil surface horizons obtained from the lateral moraine of the Hansbreen glacier and from sites in the close vicinity of the lateral moraine. The content of Ntot, Ptot, and SOC in soil surface horizons are strongly and positively correlated with one another, i.e. the higher the content of nutrients, the higher the content of SOC. The spatial distribution of SOC, Ntot, and Ptot in soils of the Hornsund area in SW Spitsbergen reflects the combined effects of severe climate conditions and periglacial processes. Seabirds play a crucial role in nutrient enrichment in these weakly developed soils.

  19. Impacts of multiwalled carbon nanotubes on nutrient removal from wastewater and bacterial community structure in activated sludge.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reti Hai

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The increasing use of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs will inevitably lead to the exposure of wastewater treatment facilities. However, knowledge of the impacts of MWCNTs on wastewater nutrient removal and bacterial community structure in the activated sludge process is sparse. AIMS: To investigate the effects of MWCNTs on wastewater nutrient removal, and bacterial community structure in activated sludge. METHODS: Three triplicate sequencing batch reactors (SBR were exposed to wastewater which contained 0, 1, and 20 mg/L MWCNTs. MiSeq sequencing was used to investigate the bacterial community structures in activated sludge samples which were exposed to different concentrations of MWCNTs. RESULTS: Exposure to 1 and 20 mg/L MWCNTs had no acute (1 day impact on nutrient removal from wastewater. After long-term (180 days exposure to 1 mg/L MWCNTs, the average total nitrogen (TN removal efficiency was not significantly affected. TN removal efficiency decreased from 84.0% to 71.9% after long-term effects of 20 mg/L MWCNTs. After long-term exposure to 1 and 20 mg/L MWCNTs, the total phosphorus removal efficiencies decreased from 96.8% to 52.3% and from 98.2% to 34.0% respectively. Further study revealed that long-term exposure to 20 mg/L MWCNTs inhibited activities of ammonia monooxygenase and nitrite oxidoreductase. Long-term exposure to 1 and 20 mg/L MWCNTs both inhibited activities of exopolyphosphatase and polyphosphate kinase. MiSeq sequencing data indicated that 20 mg/L MWCNTs significantly decreased the diversity of bacterial community in activated sludge. Long-term exposure to 1 and 20 mg/L MWCNTs differentially decreased the abundance of nitrifying bacteria, especially ammonia-oxidizing bacteria. The abundance of PAOs was decreased after long-term exposure to 20 mg/L MWCNTs. The abundance of glycogen accumulating organisms (GAOs was increased after long-term exposure to 1 mg/L MWCNTs. CONCLUSION: MWCNTs have adverse effects on

  20. A Mixed Green Micro-Algal Model (MAMO) – Model Identification And Calibration Using Synthetic Medium And Nutrient Rich Carbon Depleted Wastewater

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sæbø, M.; Valverde Perez, Borja; Van Wagenen, Jonathan;

    , we present a mathematical model, accounting for photoautotrophic and heterotrophic algal growth, nutrient uptake and storage in a mixed microalgae culture cultivated on nutrient rich carbon depleted (NRCD) wastewater. The process model is developed as an extension to the Activated Sludge Model 2d......The reuse of wastewater resources via micro-algal cultivation is a cost-effective and sustainable solution for third generation biofuel production. A process model, describing photobioreactor operation – also in combination with activated sludge processes, however, is still missing. In this paper......, ASM2d (Henze et al., 1999), and thus it also accounts for bacterial growth in the photobioreactor. We assess the factors, influencing algae growth and nutrient uptake, including macro-nutrient availability and light irradiance rate. Model parameters were estimated through microplate screenings and a...

  1. Carbon and nitrogen pools in soil and vegetation at afforestation of a cutover peatland; Kol- och kvaevefoerraad i mark och vegetation vid beskogning av en avslutad torvtaekt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nilsson, Torbjoern; Lundin, Lars

    2006-02-15

    There are a number of land-use alternatives for cutover peat areas after finished peat cutting. One land-use alternative is afforestation. In this investigation it was studied how drainage, soil treatments including fertilization, and plantation affected the carbon storage 20 years later. The studied area is located on the mire Flakmossen in the county of Vaermland, SW Sweden. Peat was harvested on 34 hectare of this mire up to 1945. The major part of the cutover area was abandoned until 1982 when after-use activities started. The depth of the remaining peat varied between a few decimeters up to about two meters. Prior to any soil measures, determination of peatland conditions was carried out. Important to this investigation was, a priori, the carbon store, i.e. remaining peat thickness was crucial. Therefore, peat depth was thoroughly investigated on 14 hectares of the cutover area in summer 1983. The remaining peat was also sampled at different depths within 18 plots of the whole cutover peat area. These samples were analyzed on i.a. concentrations of carbon and nitrogen. As bulk density also was determined, the amounts of carbon and nitrogen in the remaining peat could be estimated. A very good correlation was found between peat depth and the carbon pool in the peat. After-use activities included two afforestation projects that in the beginning of the 1980's were set up on the abandoned peat cutover area. One project was a conventional pine plantation on 19 hectares, where the effects of different drain spacings and PK-fertilizer doses were studied. The other project was an intensively managed forest experiment carried out on 14 hectares. This area was first drained and then fertilized with on average 23 tonnes of wood fly ash, 0.4 tonnes of raw phosphate and 0.25 tonnes of superphosphate per hectares. The applied fertilizers and the uppermost 30-40 cm of the peat were then mixed by a tractor-drawn rotovator in one meter wide strips. In these strips, on the

  2. Costs of Defense and a Test of the Carbon-Nutrient Balance and Growth-Differentiation Balance Hypotheses for Two Co-Occurring Classes of Plant Defense

    OpenAIRE

    Massad, Tara Joy; Dyer, Lee A.; Vega C., Gerardo

    2012-01-01

    One of the goals of chemical ecology is to assess costs of plant defenses. Intraspecific trade-offs between growth and defense are traditionally viewed in the context of the carbon-nutrient balance hypothesis (CNBH) and the growth-differentiation balance hypothesis (GDBH). Broadly, these hypotheses suggest that growth is limited by deficiencies in carbon or nitrogen while rates of photosynthesis remain unchanged, and the subsequent reduced growth results in the more abundant resource being in...

  3. Biological cycling of carbon and nitrogen to reduce agricultural pollution by nutrients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbon and nitrogen are two key elements of global significance, playing large roles in the production of food, feed, fiber, and fuel for human existence, as well as providing numerous other ecosystem services. Although nitrogen is often a limiting element in natural systems, it can become a pollut...

  4. Increasing addition of autochthonous to allochthonous carbon in nutrient-rich aquatic systems stimulates carbon consumption but does not alter bacterial community composition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Attermeyer

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Dissolved organic carbon (DOC concentrations – mainly of terrestrial origin – are increasing worldwide in inland waters. The biodegradability of the DOC varies depending on quantity and chemical quality. Heterotrophic bacteria are the main consumers of DOC and thus determine DOC temporal dynamics and availability for higher trophic levels. It is therefore crucial to understand the processes controlling the bacterial turnover of additional allochthonous and autochthonous DOC in aquatic systems. Our aim was to study bacterial carbon (C turnover with respect to DOC quantity and chemical quality using both allochthonous and autochthonous DOC sources. We incubated a natural bacterial community with allochthonous C (13C-labeled beech leachate and increased concentrations and pulses (intermittent occurrence of organic matter input of autochthonous C (algae lysate. We then determined bacterial carbon consumption, activities, and community composition together with the carbon flow through bacteria using stable C isotopes. The chemical analysis of single sources revealed differences in aromaticity and fractions of low and high molecular weight substances (LMWS and HMWS, respectively between allochthonous and autochthonous C sources. In parallel to these differences in chemical composition, we observed a higher availability of allochthonous C as evidenced by increased DOC consumption and bacterial growth efficiencies (BGE when solely allochthonous C was provided. In treatments with mixed sources, rising concentrations of added autochthonous DOC resulted in a further, significant increase in bacterial DOC consumption from 52 to 68% when nutrients were not limiting. This rise was accompanied by a decrease in the humic substances (HS fraction and an increase in bacterial biomass. Stable C isotope analyses of phospholipid fatty acids (PLFA and respired dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC supported a preferential assimilation of autochthonous C and respiration

  5. Transport of sediments, carbon and nutrients in areas of reforestation and grassland based on simulated rainfall

    OpenAIRE

    Adilson Pinheiro; Vander Kaufmann; Danieli Schneiders; Rafael Gotardo

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the soil losses, as well as carbon and chemical samples in runoff through areas of pine (Pinus taeda), eucalyptus (Eucalyptus dunni) and a consortium of pasture with oat (Avena stringosa) and ryegrass (Lolium multiflorium) in the Fragosos river basin, in Concordia, SC. For this, rainfall simulations with mean intensities of 94 mm h-1 were conducted in September and November 2011, in plots of 1 m2 established in the three areas. Runoff, loads carried...

  6. Influence of carbon source on nutrient removal performance and physical-chemical characteristics of aerobic granular sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lashkarizadeh, Monireh; Yuan, Qiuyan; Oleszkiewicz, Jan A

    2015-01-01

    The impact of carbon source variation on the physical and chemical characteristics of aerobic granular sludge and its biological nutrient (nitrogen and phosphorus) removal performance was investigated. Two identical sequencing batch reactors, R1 and R2, were set up. Granular biomass was cultivated to maturity using acetate-based synthetic wastewater. After mature granules in both reactors with simultaneous chemical oxygen demand (COD), ammonium and phosphorus removal capability were achieved, the feed of R2 was changed to municipal wastewater and R1 was continued on synthetic feed as control. Biological phosphorus removal was completely inhibited in R2 due to lack of readily biodegradable COD; however, the biomass maintained high ammonium and COD removal efficiencies. The disintegration of the granules in R2 occurred during the first two weeks after the change of feed, but it did not have significant impacts on settling properties of the sludge. Re-granulation of the biomass in R2 was then observed within 30 d after granules' disintegration when the biomass acclimated to the new substrate. The granular biomass in R1 and R2 maintained a Sludge Volume Index close to 60 and 47 mL g(-1), respectively, during the experimental period. It was concluded that changing the carbon source from readily biodegradable acetate to the more complex ones present in municipal wastewater did not have significant impacts on aerobic granular sludge characteristics; it particularly did not affect its settling properties. However, sufficient readily biodegradable carbon would have to be provided to maintain simultaneous biological nitrate and phosphorus removal. PMID:25719420

  7. Carbon pools in a montane old-growth Norway spruce ecosystem in Bohemian Forest: Effects of stand age and elevation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Seedre, M.; Kopáček, Jiří; Janda, P.; Bače, R.; Svoboda, M.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 346, June (2015), s. 106-113. ISSN 0378-1127 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP504/12/1218 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : carbon dynamics * soil carbon * spruce biomass C * dead root C * unmanaged ecosystem Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 2.660, year: 2014

  8. Carbon Monoxide Fumigation Improved the Quality, Nutrients, and Antioxidant Activities of Postharvest Peach

    OpenAIRE

    Shaoying Zhang; Ying Li; Fei Pei

    2014-01-01

    Peaches (Prunus persica cv. Yanhong) were fumigated with carbon monoxide (CO) at 0, 0.5, 5, 10, and 20 μmol/L for 2 hours. The result showed that low concentration CO (0.5–10 μmol/L) might delay the decrease of firmness and titrable acid content, restrain the increase of decay incidence, and postpone the variation of soluble solids content, but treating peaches with high concentration CO (20 μmol/L) demonstrated adverse effects. Further research exhibited that exogenous CO could induce the ph...

  9. Dynamics of nutrients, total organic carbon, prokaryotes and viruses in onboard incubations of cold-water corals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Maier

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The potential influence of the cold-water corals (CWCs Lophelia pertusa and Madrepora oculata on the dynamics of inorganic nutrient and total organic carbon (TOC concentrations and the abundances of prokaryotes and viruses in bottom water was assessed in onboard incubation experiments. Ammonium, nitrite, dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN, dissolved inorganic phosphorus (DIP and TOC concentrations and N:P ratios were typically higher in incubation water with corals than in controls, whereas nitrate concentrations did not reveal a clear trend. Mucus release (normalized to coral surface was estimated by the net increase rate of TOC concentrations and averaged 23 ± 6 mg C m−2 h−1 for L. pertusa and 21 ± 8 mg C m−2 h−1 for M. oculata. Prokaryotic and viral abundance and turnover rates were typically stimulated in incubation water with corals. This estimated prokaryotic stimulation averaged 6.0 ± 3.0 × 109 cells m−2 h−1 for L. pertusa and 8.4 ± 2.9 × 109 cells m−2 h−1 for M. oculata, whereas the estimated viral stimulation averaged 15.6 ± 12.7 × 109 particles m−2 h−1 for L. pertusa and 4.3 ± 0.4 × 109 particles m−2 h−1 M. oculata. Our data suggest that prokaryotes and viruses are released from corals and that nutrient and mucus release enhanced prokaryotic and viral production. The result of this stimulation could be a fuelling of bottom water in CWC reefs with nutrients and organic matter and consequently an enhancement of microbe-mediated processes.

  10. Dynamics of nutrients, total organic carbon, prokaryotes and viruses in onboard incubations of cold-water corals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Maier

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The potential influence of the cold-water corals (CWCs Lophelia pertusa and Madrepora oculata on the dynamics of inorganic nutrient and total organic carbon (TOC concentrations and the abundances of prokaryotes and viruses in bottom water was assessed in onboard incubation experiments. Ammonium, nitrite, dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN, dissolved inorganic phosphorus (DIP and TOC concentrations and N:P ratios were typically higher in incubation water with corals than in controls, whereas nitrate concentrations did not reveal a clear trend. Mucus release (normalized to coral surface was estimated by the net increase rate of TOC concentrations and averaged 23 ± 6 mg C m−2 h−1 for L. pertusa and 21 ± 8 mg C m−2 h−1 for M. oculata. Prokaryotic and viral abundance and turnover rates were typically stimulated in incubation water with corals. This prokaryotic stimulation averaged 6.0 ± 3.0 × 109 cells m−2 h−1 for L. pertusa and 8.4 ± 2.9 ×109 cells m−2 h−1 for M. oculata, whereas the viral stimulation averaged 15.6 ± 12.7 × 109 particles m−2 h−1 for L. pertusa and 4.3 ± 0.4 × 109 particles m−2 h−1 M. oculata. Our data suggest that prokaryotes and viruses are released from corals and that nutrient and mucus release enhanced prokaryotic and viral production. The result of this stimulation could be a fuelling of bottom water in CWC reefs with nutrients and organic matter and consequently an enhancement of microbe-mediated processes.

  11. Nutrients and carbon fluxes in the estuaries of major rivers flowing into the tropical Atlantic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moacyr Cunha De Araujo

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge of the seasonal variability of river discharge and the concentration of nutrients in the estuary waters of large rivers flowing into the tropical Atlantic contributes to a better understanding of the biogeochemical processes that occur in adjacent coastal and ocean systems. The monthly averaged variations of the physical and biogeochemical contributions of the Orinoco, Amazon, São Francisco, Paraíba do Sul (South America, Volta, Niger and Congo (Africa Rivers are estimated from models or observations. The results indicate that these rivers deliver approximately 0.1 Pg C yr-1 in its dissolved organic (DOC 0.046 Pg C yr-1 and inorganic (DIC 0.053 Pg C yr-1 forms combined. These values represent 27.3% of the global DOC and 13.2% of the global DIC delivered by rivers into the world’s oceans. Estimations of the air-sea CO2 fluxes indicate a slightly higher atmospheric liberation for the African systems compared with the South American estuaries (+10.67 mmol m-2 day-1 and +5.48 mmol m-2 day-1, respectively. During the high river discharge periods, the fluxes remained positive in all of the analyzed systems (average +128 mmol m-2 day-1, except at the mouth of the Orinoco River, which continued to act as a sink for CO2. During the periods of low river discharges, the mean CO2 efflux decreased to +5.29 mmol m-2 day-1. The updated and detailed review presented here contributes to the accurate quantification of CO2 input into the atmosphere and to ongoing studies on the oceanic modeling of biogeochemical cycles in the tropical Atlantic.

  12. Stream restoration and sanitary infrastructure alter sources and fluxes of water, carbon, and nutrients in urban watersheds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. J. Pennino

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available An improved understanding of sources and timing of water and nutrient fluxes associated with urban stream restoration is critical for guiding effective watershed management. We investigated how sources, fluxes, and flowpaths of water, carbon (C, nitrogen (N, and phosphorus (P shift in response to differences in stream restoration and sanitary infrastructure. We compared a restored stream with 3 unrestored streams draining urban development and stormwater management over a 3 year period. We found that there was significantly decreased peak discharge in response to precipitation events following stream restoration. Similarly, we found that the restored stream showed significantly lower monthly peak runoff (9.4 ± 1.0 mm d−1 compared with two urban unrestored streams (ranging from 44.9 ± 4.5 to 55.4 ± 5.8 mm d−1 draining higher impervious surface cover. Peak runoff in the restored stream was more similar to a less developed stream draining extensive stormwater management (13.2 ± 1.9 mm d−1. Interestingly, the restored stream exported most carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus loads at relatively lower streamflow than the 2 more urban streams, which exported most of their loads at higher and less frequent streamflow. Annual exports of total carbon (6.6 ± 0.5 kg ha−1 yr−1, total nitrogen (4.5 ± 0.3 kg ha−1 yr−1, and total phosphorus (161 ± 15 g ha−1 yr−1 were significantly lower in the restored stream compared to both urban unrestored streams (p < 0.05 and similar to the stream draining stormwater management. Although stream restoration appeared to potentially influence hydrology to some degree, nitrate isotope data suggested that 55 ± 1 % of the nitrate in the restored stream was derived from leaky sanitary sewers (during baseflow, similar to the unrestored streams. Longitudinal synoptic surveys of water and nitrate isotopes along all 4 watersheds suggested the importance of urban groundwater contamination from leaky piped

  13. Plant root-driven hydraulic redistribution, root nutrient uptake and carbon exudation interact with soil properties to generate rhizosphere resource hotspots that vary in space and time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espeleta, J. F.; Neumann, R. B.; Cardon, Z. G.; Mayer, K. U.; Rastetter, E. B.

    2014-12-01

    Hydraulic redistribution (HR) of soil water by plants occurs in seasonally dry ecosystems worldwide. During drought, water flows from deep moist soil, through plant roots, into dry (often litter-rich) upper soil layers. Using modeling, we explored how physical transport processes driven by transpiration and hydraulic redistribution interact with root physiology (nutrient uptake and carbon exudation) and soil properties (soil texture and cation exchange) to influence nitrogen and carbon concentrations in the rhizosphere. At the single root scale, we modeled a 10-cm radial soil domain, and simulated solute transport, soil cation exchange, and root exudation and nutrient uptake under two water flow patterns: daytime transpiration without nighttime HR, and daytime transpiration with nighttime HR. During HR, water efflux flushed solutes away from the root, diluting the concentrations of key nutrients like nitrate. The transport of cations by transpiration in the day and their accumulation near the root led to competitive desorption of ammonium from soil further from the root and generation of hotspots of ammonium availability at night. HR influenced the spatial and temporal patterns of these hotspots and their intensity. They were also influenced by soil properties of texture and cation exchange capacity. This dynamic resource landscape caused by diel cycling between transpiration and hydraulic redistribution presents a stage for greater complexity of microbial interactions. We are currently embedding a microbial community and small food web into this rhizosphere model in order to explore how organisms responsible for nutrient and soil carbon cycling respond to these fluctuating resource regimes.

  14. Pooling Resources

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DING WENLEI

    2010-01-01

    @@ While the 1997 Asian financial crisis gave birth to the Chiang Mai Initiative,a foreign currency reserve pool to address short-term liquidity difficulties in the region,the 2008global financial crisis promoted Asian political leaders,bankers and scholars to seek closer regional financial cooperation based on the initiative's framework.

  15. Delta ¹³C depleted oceans before the termination 2: More nutrient-rich deep-water formation or light-carbon transfer?

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Banakar, V.K.

    Sciences Vol. 34(3), September 2005, pp. 249-258 δ 13 C depleted oceans before the Termination 2: More nutrient-rich deep-water formation or light-carbon transfer? Virupaxa K. Banakar Geological Oceanography Division, National Institute... on foraminiferal δ 13 C distribution and other sedimentary proxies 1-17 . In the last two decades of palaeoclimate research, the North Atlantic Deep Water (NADW: nutrient-depleted, δ 13 C-enriched) driven thermohaline circulation has emerged as the major inter...

  16. Effects of vegetation structure on soil carbon, nutrients and greenhouse gas exchange in a savannah ecosystem of Mount Kilimanjaro Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, J.

    2015-12-01

    The savannah biome is a hotspot for biodiversity and wildlife conservation in Africa and recently got in the focus of research on carbon sequestration. Savannah ecosystems are under strong pressure from climate and land-use change, especially around populous areas like the Mt. Kilimanjaro region. Savannah vegetation consists of grassland with isolated trees and is therefore characterized by high spatial variation of canopy cover, aboveground biomass and root structure. The canopy structure is a major regulator for soil ecological parameters and soil-atmospheric trace gas exchange (CO2, N2O, CH4) in water limited environments. The spatial distribution of these parameters and the connection between above and belowground processes are important to understand and predict ecosystem changes and estimate its vulnerability. Our objective was to determine spatial trends and changes of soil parameters and relate their variability to the vegetation structure. We chose three trees from each of the two most dominant species (Acacia nilotica and Balanites aegyptiaca) in our research area. For each tree, we selected transects with nine sampling points of the same relative distances to the stem. At these each sampling point a soil core was taken and separated in 0-10 cm and 10-30 cm depth. We measured soil carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) storage, microbial biomass C and N, Natural δ13C, soil respiration, available nutrients, pH, cation exchange capacity (CEC) as well as root biomass and -density, soil temperature and soil water content. Concentrations and stocks of C and N fractions, CEC and K+ decreased up to 50% outside the crown covered area. Microbial C:N ratio and CO2 efflux was about 30% higher outside the crown. This indicates N limitation and low C use efficiency in soil outside the crown area. We conclude that the spatial structure of aboveground biomass in savanna ecosystems leads to a spatial variance in nutrient limitation. Therefore, the capability of a savanna ecosystem

  17. Atmospheric deposition as a source of carbon and nutrients to barren, alpine soils of the Colorado Rocky Mountains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Mladenov

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Many alpine areas are experiencing intense deglaciation, biogeochemical changes driven by temperature rise, and changes in atmospheric deposition. There is mounting evidence that the water quality of alpine streams may be related to these changes, including rising atmospheric deposition of carbon (C and nutrients. Given that barren alpine soils can be severely C limited, we evaluated the magnitude and chemical quality of atmospheric deposition of C and nutrients to an alpine site, the Green Lake 4 catchment in the Colorado Rocky Mountains. Using a long term dataset (2002–2010 of weekly atmospheric wet deposition and snowpack chemistry, we found that volume weighted mean dissolved organic carbon (DOC concentrations were approximately 1.0 mg L−1and weekly concentrations reached peaks as high at 6–10 mg L−1 every summer. Total dissolved nitrogen concentration also peaked in the summer, whereas total dissolved phosphorus and calcium concentrations were highest in the spring. Relationships among DOC concentration, dissolved organic matter (DOM fluorescence properties, and nitrate and sulfate concentrations suggest that pollutants from nearby urban and agricultural sources and organic aerosols derived from sub-alpine vegetation may influence high summer DOC wet deposition concentrations. Interestingly, high DOC concentrations were also recorded during "dust-in-snow" events in the spring. Detailed chemical and spectroscopic analyses conducted for samples collected in 2010 revealed that the DOM in many late spring and summer samples was less aromatic and polydisperse and of lower molecular weight than that of winter and fall samples and, therefore, likely to be more bioavailable to microbes in barren alpine soils. Bioavailability experiments with different types of atmospheric C sources are needed to better evaluate the substrate quality of atmospheric C inputs. Our C budget estimates for the Green Lake 4 catchment suggest

  18. Assessing offsets between the δ13C of sedimentary components and the global exogenic carbon pool across early Paleogene carbon cycle perturbations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sluijs, A.; Dickens, G.R.

    2012-01-01

    Negative stable carbon isotope excursions (CIEs) across the Paleocene–Eocene thermal maximum (PETM; ∼56 Ma) range between 2‰ and 7‰, even after discounting sections with truncated records. Individual carbon isotope records differ in shape and magnitude from variations in the global exogenic carbon c

  19. Changes in Carbon Pools 50 Years after Reversion of a Landscape Dominated by Agriculture to Managed Forests in the Upper Southeastern Atlantic Coastal Plain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Z.; Trettin, C.; Parresol, B. R.; Li, C.

    2010-12-01

    The landscape of the upper coastal plain of South Carolina in the late 1940’s was typified by rural agricultural communities and farms comprising cleared fields and mixed-use woodlots. Approximately 80,000 ha of that landscape was appropriated by the US Government in the early 1950’s to form the Savannah River Site which is now managed by the US Dept. of Energy. The US Forest Service was engaged to reforest the agricultural parcels, 40% of the tract, and to develop sustainable management practices for the woodlots and restored areas. As part of the acquisition process in 1951, a complete inventory of the land and forest resources were conducted. In 2001, an intensive forest survey was conducted which encompassed 90% of the tract, detailing the above-ground biomass pools. We’ve used those inventories in conjunction with soil resource data to assemble a carbon balance sheet encompassing the above and belowground carbon pools over the 50 year period. We’ve also employed inventories on forest removals, forest burning and runoff to estimate fluxes from the landscape over the same period. There was a net sequestration of 5,486 Gg of C in forest vegetation over the 50 yr. period (1.5 Mg ha-1 yr-1), with carbon density increasing from 6.3 to 83.3 Mg ha-1. The reforestation of the agricultural land and the increased density of the former woodlots was the cause of the gain. Fifty years after imposition of silvicultural prescriptions, the forest composition has changed from being dominated by hardwoods to pine. The forest floor increased by 311 Gg carbon. Fluxes in form of harvested wood and oxidation from burning were 24% and 10% respectively of the net gain in vegetative biomass. These findings document real changes in carbon storage on a landscape that was changed from mixed agricultural use to managed forests, and they suggest responses that should be similar if reforestation for biofuels production is expanded.

  20. Increased feeding and nutrient excretion of adult Antarctic krill, Euphausia superba, exposed to enhanced carbon dioxide (CO₂.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grace K Saba

    Full Text Available Ocean acidification has a wide-ranging potential for impacting the physiology and metabolism of zooplankton. Sufficiently elevated CO(2 concentrations can alter internal acid-base balance, compromising homeostatic regulation and disrupting internal systems ranging from oxygen transport to ion balance. We assessed feeding and nutrient excretion rates in natural populations of the keystone species Euphausia superba (Antarctic krill by conducting a CO(2 perturbation experiment at ambient and elevated atmospheric CO(2 levels in January 2011 along the West Antarctic Peninsula (WAP. Under elevated CO(2 conditions (∼672 ppm, ingestion rates of krill averaged 78 µg C individual(-1 d(-1 and were 3.5 times higher than krill ingestion rates at ambient, present day CO(2 concentrations. Additionally, rates of ammonium, phosphate, and dissolved organic carbon (DOC excretion by krill were 1.5, 1.5, and 3.0 times higher, respectively, in the high CO(2 treatment than at ambient CO(2 concentrations. Excretion of urea, however, was ∼17% lower in the high CO(2 treatment, suggesting differences in catabolic processes of krill between treatments. Activities of key metabolic enzymes, malate dehydrogenase (MDH and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH, were consistently higher in the high CO(2 treatment. The observed shifts in metabolism are consistent with increased physiological costs associated with regulating internal acid-base equilibria. This represents an additional stress that may hamper growth and reproduction, which would negatively impact an already declining krill population along the WAP.

  1. QUANTIFYING FOREST ABOVEGROUND CARBON POOLS AND FLUXES USING MULTI-TEMPORAL LIDAR A report on field monitoring, remote sensing MMV, GIS integration, and modeling results for forestry field validation test to quantify aboveground tree biomass and carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee Spangler; Lee A. Vierling; Eva K. Stand; Andrew T. Hudak; Jan U.H. Eitel; Sebastian Martinuzzi

    2012-04-01

    Sound policy recommendations relating to the role of forest management in mitigating atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) depend upon establishing accurate methodologies for quantifying forest carbon pools for large tracts of land that can be dynamically updated over time. Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) remote sensing is a promising technology for achieving accurate estimates of aboveground biomass and thereby carbon pools; however, not much is known about the accuracy of estimating biomass change and carbon flux from repeat LiDAR acquisitions containing different data sampling characteristics. In this study, discrete return airborne LiDAR data was collected in 2003 and 2009 across {approx}20,000 hectares (ha) of an actively managed, mixed conifer forest landscape in northern Idaho, USA. Forest inventory plots, established via a random stratified sampling design, were established and sampled in 2003 and 2009. The Random Forest machine learning algorithm was used to establish statistical relationships between inventory data and forest structural metrics derived from the LiDAR acquisitions. Aboveground biomass maps were created for the study area based on statistical relationships developed at the plot level. Over this 6-year period, we found that the mean increase in biomass due to forest growth across the non-harvested portions of the study area was 4.8 metric ton/hectare (Mg/ha). In these non-harvested areas, we found a significant difference in biomass increase among forest successional stages, with a higher biomass increase in mature and old forest compared to stand initiation and young forest. Approximately 20% of the landscape had been disturbed by harvest activities during the six-year time period, representing a biomass loss of >70 Mg/ha in these areas. During the study period, these harvest activities outweighed growth at the landscape scale, resulting in an overall loss in aboveground carbon at this site. The 30-fold increase in sampling density

  2. Pool scrubbing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Source Term Project in the Third Frame Work Programme of the European Union Was conducted under and important joined effort on pool scrubbing research. CIEMAT was the Task Manager of the project and several other organizations participated in it: JRC-Ispra, NNC Limited, RUB-NES and UPM. The project was divided into several tasks. A peer review of the models in the pool scrubbing codes SPARC90 and BUSCA-AUG92 was made, considering the different aspects in the hydrodynamic phenomenology, particle retention and fission product vapor abortions. Several dominant risk accident sequences were analyzed with MAAP, SPARC90 and BUSCA-AUG92 codes, and the predictions were compared. A churn-turbulent model was developed for the hydrodynamic behaviour of the pool. Finally, an experimental programme in the PECA facility of CIEMAT was conducted in order to study the decontamination factor under jet injection regime, and the experimental observations were compared with the SPARC and BUSCA codes. (Author)

  3. Effects of Inorganic Nutrients and Dissolved Organic Carbon on Oxygen Demand in Select Rivers in Northern Utah

    OpenAIRE

    Crawford, Joseph L

    2013-01-01

    Sewage, agricultural runoff, and atmospheric deposition have greatly increased the amount of nutrients (largely nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P)) in surface water nationwide. Excess nutrients are associated with algal blooms and dissolved oxygen depletion in many water bodies, but linkages between nutrients and dissolved oxygen have been largely correlative. Biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) is a regulated water quality parameter that is aimed at describing the amount of oxygen consumed during t...

  4. Biochar soil amendment for waste-stream diversion, nutrient holding capacity, and carbon sequestration in two contrasting soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deem, L. M.; Crow, S. E.; Deenik, J. L.; Penton, C. R.; Yanagida, J.

    2013-12-01

    Biochar is organic matter that has been pyrolized under low oxygen conditions for use as a soil amendment. Currently biochar is viewed as a way to improve soil quality (e.g., increased nutrient and water holding capacity) and increase in soil carbon (C) sequestration. The use of biochar in soil is not new, yet little is known about the underlying mechanisms that control the interactions between biochar and soil following amendment. In the past, the effects of biochar addition on crop yields, soil properties and greenhouse gas (GHG) fluxes in both in-situ and controlled experiments have produced inconsistent results. These discrepancies may be uncovered in part by chemical and physical characterization of the biochar prior to amendment and identification of soil- and biochar-specific interactions. Furthermore, a more holistic consideration of the system may demonstrate the virtues of biochar amendment beyond the typical considerations of yield and gas flux. We expect that as the differences between the physical and chemical properties of the biochar and the soil increase, the impact on the soil quality metrics will also increase. For this study, we used a waste product (i.e., anaerobic digester sludge) biochar with 81.5% C, pH of 10.44, pH-independent charge for anion exchange capacity (AEC) and a pH-dependent charge for cation exchange capacity (CEC), 4.14% moisture content and 25.75 cmol¬c /kg exchangeable base cations. This biochar was incorporated into both a low and a high fertility Hawaiian field soil to quantitate biochar effects on crop yield, soil pH, CEC, AEC, hot and cold water extractable C and nitrogen, bulk density, phosphorus, soil microbial ecology, and GHG flux in varying soil conditions. Compared to the higher fertility soil, we hypothesized that the low fertility soil would demonstrate a greater increase in soil quality, including higher pH, CEC and water holding capacity. Two crop management practices were included with each soil: traditional

  5. One-carbon metabolism nutrient status and plasma S-adenosylmethionine concentrations in middle-aged and older Chinese in Singapore

    OpenAIRE

    Inoue-Choi, Maki; Nelson, Heather H.; Robien, Kim; Arning, Erland; Bottiglieri, Teodoro; Koh, Woon-Puay; Yuan, Jian-Min

    2012-01-01

    S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) is a primary methyl donor for the methylation of many molecules including DNA. DNA methylation is believed to play an important role in functions of cells and genes. Dietary, genetic and metabolic factors that influence systematic SAM levels are not fully understood. We conducted cross-sectional analysis to evaluate associations between plasma concentrations of one-carbon metabolism nutrients and metabolites and plasma SAM concentrations using healthy individuals wi...

  6. The carbon storage regulator (Csr) system exerts a nutrient-specific control over central metabolism in Escherichia coli strain nissle 1917

    OpenAIRE

    Revelles, Olga; Millard, Pierre; Nougayrede, Jean-Philippe; Dobrindt, Ulrich; Oswald, Eric; Létisse, Fabien; Portais, Jean-Charles

    2013-01-01

    The role of the post-transcriptional carbon storage regulator (Csr) system in nutrient utilization and in the control of the central metabolism in E. coli reference commensal strain Nissle 1917 was investigated. Analysis of the growth capabilities of mutants altered for various components of the Csr system (csrA51, csrB, csrC and csrD mutations) showed that only the protein CsrA - the key component of the system - exerts a marked role in carbon nutrition. Attenuation of CsrA activity in the c...

  7. The carbon storage regulator (Csr system exerts a nutrient-specific control over central metabolism in Escherichia coli strain Nissle 1917.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Revelles

    Full Text Available The role of the post-transcriptional carbon storage regulator (Csr system in nutrient utilization and in the control of the central metabolism in E. coli reference commensal strain Nissle 1917 was investigated. Analysis of the growth capabilities of mutants altered for various components of the Csr system (csrA51, csrB, csrC and csrD mutations showed that only the protein CsrA - the key component of the system - exerts a marked role in carbon nutrition. Attenuation of CsrA activity in the csrA51 mutant affects the growth efficiency on a broad range of physiologically relevant carbon sources, including compounds utilized by the Entner-Doudoroff (ED pathway. Detailed investigations of the metabolomes and fluxomes of mutants and wild-type cells grown on carbon sources representative of glycolysis and of the ED pathway (glucose and gluconate, respectively, revealed significant re-adjusting of central carbon metabolism for both compounds in the csrA51 mutant. However, the metabolic re-adjusting observed on gluconate was strikingly different from that observed on glucose, indicating a nutrient-specific control of metabolism by the Csr system.

  8. The carbon storage regulator (Csr) system exerts a nutrient-specific control over central metabolism in Escherichia coli strain Nissle 1917.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revelles, Olga; Millard, Pierre; Nougayrède, Jean-Philippe; Dobrindt, Ulrich; Oswald, Eric; Létisse, Fabien; Portais, Jean-Charles

    2013-01-01

    The role of the post-transcriptional carbon storage regulator (Csr) system in nutrient utilization and in the control of the central metabolism in E. coli reference commensal strain Nissle 1917 was investigated. Analysis of the growth capabilities of mutants altered for various components of the Csr system (csrA51, csrB, csrC and csrD mutations) showed that only the protein CsrA - the key component of the system - exerts a marked role in carbon nutrition. Attenuation of CsrA activity in the csrA51 mutant affects the growth efficiency on a broad range of physiologically relevant carbon sources, including compounds utilized by the Entner-Doudoroff (ED) pathway. Detailed investigations of the metabolomes and fluxomes of mutants and wild-type cells grown on carbon sources representative of glycolysis and of the ED pathway (glucose and gluconate, respectively), revealed significant re-adjusting of central carbon metabolism for both compounds in the csrA51 mutant. However, the metabolic re-adjusting observed on gluconate was strikingly different from that observed on glucose, indicating a nutrient-specific control of metabolism by the Csr system. PMID:23840455

  9. Estimation of the carbon pool in soil and above-ground biomass within mangrove forests in Southeast Mexico using allometric equations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jesús Jaime Guerra-Santos; Rosa María Cerón-Bretón; Julia Griselda Cerón-Bretón; Diana Lizett Damián-Hernández; Reyna Cristina Sánchez-Junco; Emma del Carmen Guevara Carrió

    2014-01-01

    We report the results of carbon stored in soil and aboveground biomass from the most important area of mangroves in Mexico, with dominant vegetation of Red mangrove (Rhizophora mangle L.), Black mangrove (Avicennia germinans L.), white mangrove (Laguncularia racemosa Gaertn.) and button mangrove (Conocarpus erectus L.). We sampled soils with high fertility during the dry season in 2009 and 2010 at three sites on Atasta Peninsula, Campeche. We used allometric equations to estimate above ground biomass (AGB) of trees. AGB was higher in C. erectus (253.18±32.17 t⋅ha-1), lower in A. germinans (161.93±12.63 t⋅ha-1), and intermediate in R. mangle (181.70±16.58 t⋅ha-1) and L. racemosa (206.07±19.12 t⋅ha-1). Of the three studied sites, the highest absolute value for AGB was 279.72 t⋅ha-1 in button mangrove forest at any single site. Carbon stored in soil at the three sites ranged from 36.80±10.27 to 235.77±66.11 t⋅ha-1. The Tukey test (p <0.05) made for AGB was higher for black mangrove showed significant differences in soil carbon content between black mangrove and button mangrove. C. erectus had higher AGB compared with the other species. A. germinans trees had lower AGB because they grew in hypersaline environments, which reduced their development. C. erectus grew on higher ground where soils were richer in nutrients. AGB tended to be low in areas near the sea and increased with distance from the coast. A. germinans usually grew on recently deposited sediments. We assumed that all sites have the same potential to store carbon in soil, and then we found that there were no significant differences in carbon content between the three samples sites: all sites had potential to store carbon for long periods. Carbon storage at the three sampling sites in the state of Campeche, Mexico, was higher than that reported for other locations.

  10. Impact of a large tropical reservoir on riverine transport of sediment, carbon, and nutrients to downstream wetlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunz, Manuel J.; Wüest, Alfred; Wehrli, Bernhard; Landert, Jan; Senn, David B.

    2011-12-01

    Large dams can have major ecological and biogeochemical impacts on downstream ecosystems such as wetlands and riparian habitats. We examined sediment removal and carbon (C), nitrogen (N), and phosphorus (P) cycling in Itezhi-Tezhi Reservoir (ITT; area = 364 km2, hydraulic residence time = 0.7 yr), which is located directly upstream of a high ecological value floodplain ecosystem (Kafue Flats) in the Zambezi River Basin. Field investigations (sediment cores, sediment traps, water column samples), mass balance estimates, and a numerical biogeochemical reservoir model were combined to estimate N, P, C, and sediment removal, organic C mineralization, primary production, and N fixation. Since dam completion in 1978, 330 × 103 tons (t) of sediment and 16 × 103, 1.5 × 103, 200 t of C, N, and P, respectively, have accumulated annually in ITT sediments. Approximately 50% of N inputs and 60% of P inputs are removed by the reservoir, illustrating its potential in decreasing nutrients to the downstream Kafue Flats floodplain. The biogeochemical model predicted substantial primary production in ITT (˜280 g C m-2 yr-1), and significant N-fixation (˜30% for the total primary production) was required to support primary production due to marginal inputs of inorganic N. Model simulations indicate that future hydropower development in the reservoir, involving the installation of turbines driven by hypolimnetic water, will likely result in the delivery of low-oxygen waters to downstream ecosystems and increased outputs of dissolved inorganic N and P by a factor of ˜4 and ˜2 compared to current dam management, respectively.

  11. The impacts of drainage, nutrient status and management practice on the full carbon balance of grasslands on organic soils in a maritime temperate zone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Renou-Wilson

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Temperate grasslands on organic soils are diverse due to edaphic properties but also to regional management practices and this heterogeneity is reflected in the wide range of greenhouse gas flux values reported in the literature. In Ireland, most grasslands on organic soils were drained several decades ago and are managed as extensive pastures with little or no fertilisation. This study describes a two-year study of the net ecosystem carbon balance (NECB of two such sites. We determined greenhouse gas (GHG fluxes and waterborne carbon emissions in a nutrient rich grassland and compared it with values measured from two nutrient poor organic soils: a deep drained and a shallow drained site. GHG fluxes (CO2, CH4 and N2O were determined using the chamber technique, and fluvial C fluxes were estimated by combining drainage water concentrations and flows. The nutrient rich site was an annual source of CO2 (NEE 233 g C m−2yr−1, CH4 neutral, and a small source of nitrous oxide (1.6 kg N2O-N ha−1yr−1. NEE at the shallow drained site was −89 and −99 g C m−2yr−1 in Years 1 and 2 respectively, and NEE at the deep drained site was +85 and −26 g C m−2yr−1 respectively. Low CH4 emissions (1.3 g C m−2yr−1 were recorded at the shallow drained nutrient poor site. Fluvial exports from the nutrient rich site totalled 69.8 g C m−2yr−1 with 54% as dissolved organic C (DOC. Waterborne C losses from the nutrient poor site reflected differences in annual runoff totalling 44 g C m−2yr−1 in Year 1 and 30.8 g C m−2yr−1 in Year 2. The NECB of the nutrient rich grassland was 663 g C m−2yr−1 with biomass exports being the major component accounting for 53%. The NECB of the nutrient poor deep drained site was less than half of the nutrient rich site (2 year mean 267 g C m−2yr−1. Although NEE at the nutrient poor shallow drained site was negative in both years, high biomass export meant it was a net C source (2 year mean NECB 103 g

  12. A data base of crop nutrient use, water use, and carbon dioxide exchange in a 2O square meter growth chamber: I. Wheat as a case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, R. M.; Berry, W. L.; Mackowiak, C.; Corey, K. A.; Sager, J. C.; Heeb, M. M.; Knott, W. M.

    1993-01-01

    A data set is given describing the daily nutrient uptake, gas exchange, environmental conditions, and carbon (C), and nutrient partitioning at harvest for the entire canopy and root system of a wheat crop (Triticum aestivum, cv. Yecora Rojo). The data were obtained from a 20 m2 stand of wheat plants grown from planting to maturity in a closed, controlled environment, and include daily nutrient uptake [macronutrients, nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P), potassium (K), calcium (Ca), magnesium (Mg), and sulfur (S); and micronutrients, iron (Fe), boron (B), manganese (Mn), zinc (Zn), copper (Cu), and molybdenum (Mo)], canopy carbon dioxide (CO2) exchange rates, and transpiration. Environmental factors such as relative humidity, air temperature, nutrient solution temperature, pH and electrical conductivity, and photoperiod were controlled in the chamber to specific set points. A detailed description of biomass yield for each of the 64 plant growth trays comprising the 20 m2 of growth area is also provided, and includes dry weights of grain, straw, chaff, and roots, along with the concentration of nutrients in different plant tissues and the percent carbohydrate, fat, and protein. To our knowledge, this information represents one of the most extensive data sets available for a canopy of wheat grown from seed to maturity under controlled environmental and nutritional conditions, and thus may provide useful information for model development and validation. A methods section is included to qualify any assumptions that might be required for the use of the data in plant growth models, along with a daily event calendar indicating when adjustments in set points and occasional equipment or sensor failures occurred.

  13. The Contribution of the Long-term Carbon Pool to Nighttime Foliage Respiration as Revealed by a Year-long C-13 Labeling Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, M.; Mortazavi, B.; Chanton, J.

    2005-12-01

    , with the steepest change measured during the initial 10 days following exposure to ambient CO2. Three days following exposure to ambient CO2 nearly 90% of nighttime respired CO2 consisted of labeled carbon. The contribution of the labeled pool to nighttime foliage respiration declined to 5% at day 35 following exposure to ambient CO2. These results indicate the presence of a carbon pool with a residence time much longer than that previously reported which contributes to nighttime foliage respiration. Future attempts in relating dCf to environmental variables will need to consider the presence of this older carbon pool and its contribution to foliage respiration.

  14. Assessment of marine-derived nutrients in the Copper River Delta, Alaska, using natural abundance of the stable isotopes of nitrogen, sulfur, and carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kline, Thomas C.; Woody, Carol Ann; Bishop, Mary Anne; Powers, Sean P.; Knudsen, E. Eric

    2007-01-01

    We performed nitrogen, sulfur, and carbon stable isotope analysis (SIA) on maturing and juvenile anadromous sockeye and coho salmon, and periphyton in two Copper River delta watersheds of Alaska to trace salmonderived nutrients during 2003–2004. Maturing salmon were isotopically enriched relative to alternate freshwater N, S, and C sources as expected, with differences consistent with species trophic level differences, and minor system, sex, and year-to-year differences, enabling use of SIA to trace these salmon-derived nutrients. Periphyton naturally colonized, incubated, and collected using Wildco Periphtyon Samplers in and near spawning sites was 34S- and 15N-enriched, as expected, and at all freshwater sites was 13C-depleted. At nonspawning and coho-only sites, periphyton 34S and 15N was generally low. However, 34S was low enough at some sites to be suggestive of sulfate reduction, complicating the use of S isotopes. Juvenile salmon SIA ranged in values consistent with using production derived from re-mineralization as well as direct utilization, but only by a minority fraction of coho salmon. Dependency on salmon-derived nutrients ranged from relatively high to relatively low, suggesting a space-limited system. No one particular isotope was found to be superior for determining the relative importance of salmon-derived nutrients.

  15. Low soil temperature inhibits the effect of high nutrient supply on photosynthetic response to elevated carbon dioxide concentration in white birch seedlings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ambebe, T.F.; Dang, Q.L.; Li, J. [Lakehead Univ., Thunder Bay, ON (Canada). Faculty of Forestry and the Forest Environment

    2010-02-15

    White birch seedlings were exposed to various nutrient regimes and ambient and elevated temperatures in order to investigate the interactive effects of soil temperature and nutrient availability on the responses of photosynthesis to elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) concentrations. The experiments were conducted at 5, 15, and 25 degrees C and increased to 7, 17, and 27 degrees C over a period of 3 months in environment-controlled greenhouses. The study showed that elevated CO{sub 2} increased net photosynthetic rates; instantaneous water use efficiency; internal-to-ambient CO{sub 2} concentration ratio; triose phosphate utilization; and photosynthetic linear electron transport to carboxylation. Actual photochemical efficiency of photosystem 2 was decreased, as well as the fraction of total linear electron transport partitioned to oxygenation, and leaf nitrogen (N) concentration. Low soil temperatures suppressed transpiration rates and increased the fraction of total linear electron transport partitioned to oxygenation. No significant CO{sub 2} effects were observed under low soil temperatures at any nutrient level. Results of the study supported the hypothesis that lower soil temperatures reduce the positive effect of high nutrient supplies on the response of net photosynthetic rates to elevated CO{sub 2}. 84 refs., 1 tab., 4 figs.

  16. The use of food waste as a carbon source for on-site treatment of nutrient-rich blackwater from an office block.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tannock, Simon J C; Clarke, William P

    2016-09-01

    Wastewater from office blocks is typically dominated by blackwater and is therefore concentrated and nutrient-rich. A pilot plant was operated for 260 days, receiving 300 L d(-1) of wastewater directly from an office building to determine whether nutrient removal could be achieved using food waste (FW) as a supplemental carbon source. The pilot plant consisted of a 600 L prefermenter and a 600 L membrane bioreactor that was operated as a sequential batch reactor in order to cycle through anoxic, anaerobic and aerobic phases. The influent wastewater Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD)/N/P was, on average, 1438/275/40 mg L(-1), considerably higher than typical municipal wastewater. Treatment trials on the wastewater alone showed that the COD was only marginally sufficient to exhaust nitrate, and initiate anaerobic conditions required for phosphate removal. The addition of 15 kg d(-1) of macerated FW increased the average influent COD/N/P concentrations to 20,072/459/66 mg L(-1). The suitability of FW as a carbon source was demonstrated by denitrification to NOx-N concentration of supplementation were 7/50/13 mg L(-1) which equates to 99%, 89% and 80% COD/N/P removal, respectively, meeting the highest nutrient removal efficiency standards stipulated by state jurisdictions for on-site systems in the USA. PMID:26853844

  17. Oxygen, carbon, and nutrient exchanges at the sediment-water interface in the Mar Piccolo of Taranto (Ionian Sea, southern Italy).

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Vittor, Cinzia; Relitti, Federica; Kralj, Martina; Covelli, Stefano; Emili, Andrea

    2016-07-01

    In the shallow environment, the nutrient and carbon exchanges at the sediment-water interface contribute significantly to determine the trophic status of the whole water column. The intensity of the allochthonous input in a coastal environment subjected to strong anthropogenic pressures determines an increase in the benthic oxygen demand leading to depressed oxygen levels in the bottom waters. Anoxic conditions resulting from organic enrichment can enhance the exchange of nutrients between sediments and the overlying water. In the present study, carbon and nutrient fluxes at the sediment-water interface were measured at two experimental sites, one highly and one moderately contaminated, as reference point. In situ benthic flux measurements of dissolved species (O2, DIC, DOC, N-NO3 (-), N-NO2 (-), N-NH4 (+), P-PO4 (3-), Si-Si(OH)4, H2S) were conducted using benthic chambers. Furthermore, undisturbed sediment cores were collected for analyses of total and organic C, total N, and biopolymeric carbon (carbohydrates, proteins, and lipids) as well as of dissolved species in porewaters and supernatant in order to calculate the diffusive fluxes. The sediments were characterized by suboxic to anoxic conditions with redox values more negative in the highly contaminated site, which was also characterized by higher biopolymeric carbon content (most of all lipids), lower C/N ratios and generally higher diffusive fluxes, which could result in a higher release of contaminants. A great difference was observed between diffusive and in situ benthic fluxes suggesting the enhancing of fluxes by bioturbation and the occurrence of biogeochemically important processes at the sediment-water interface. The multi-contamination of both inorganic and organic pollutants, in the sediments of the Mar Piccolo of Taranto (declared SIN in 1998), potentially transferable to the water column and to the aquatic trophic chain, is of serious concern for its ecological relevance, also considering the

  18. A review on the role of organic inputs in maintaining the soil carbon pool of the terrestrial ecosystem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Satya Sundar; Kim, Ki-Hyun; Das, Subhasish; Uchimiya, Minori; Jeon, Byong Hun; Kwon, Eilhann; Szulejko, Jan E

    2016-02-01

    Among the numerous sources of greenhouse gases, emissions of CO2 are considerably affected by changes in the extent and type of land use, e.g., intensive agriculture, deforestation, urbanization, soil erosion, or wetland drainage. As a feasible option to control emissions from the terrestrial ecosystems, the scientific community has explored the possibility of enhancing soil carbon (C) storage capacity. Thus, restoration of damaged lands through conservation tillage, crop rotation, cover cropping, reforestation, sub-soiling of compacted lands, sustainable water management practices, and organic manuring are the major antidotes against attenuation of soil organic C (SOC) stocks. In this research, we focused on the effect of various man-made activities on soil biotic organics (e.g., green-, farm-yard manure, and composts) to understand how C fluxes from various sources contribute to the establishment of a new equilibrium in the terrestrial ecosystems. Although such inputs substitute a portion of chemical fertilizers, they all undergo activities that augment the rate and extent of decay to deplete the SOC bank. Here, we provide perspectives on the balancing factors that control the mineralization rate of organic matter. Our arguments are placed in the background of different land use types and their impacts on forests, agriculture, urbanization, soil erosion, and wetland destruction. PMID:26686074

  19. Annual water, sediment, nutrient, and organic carbon fluxes in river basins: A global meta-analysis as a function of scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutema, M.; Chaplot, V.; Jewitt, G.; Chivenge, P.; Blöschl, G.

    2015-11-01

    Process controls on water, sediment, nutrient, and organic carbon exports from the landscape through runoff are not fully understood. This paper provides analyses from 446 sites worldwide to evaluate the impact of environmental factors (MAP and MAT: mean annual precipitation and temperature; CLAY and BD: soil clay content and bulk density; S: slope gradient; LU: land use) on annual exports (RC: runoff coefficients; SL: sediment loads; TOCL: organic carbon losses; TNL: nitrogen losses; TPL: phosphorus losses) from different spatial scales. RC was found to increase, on average, from 18% at local scale (in headwaters), 25% at microcatchment and subcatchment scale (midreaches) to 41% at catchment scale (lower reaches of river basins) in response to multiple factors. SL increased from microplots (468 g m-2 yr-1) to plots (901 g m-2 yr-1), accompanied by decreasing TOCL and TNL. Climate was a major control masking the effects of other factors. For example, RC, SL, TOCL, TNL, and TPL tended to increase with MAP at all spatial scales. These variables, however, decreased with MAT. The impact of CLAY, BD, LU, and S on erosion variables was largely confined to the hillslope scale, where RC, SL, and TOCL decreased with CLAY, while TNL and TPL increased. The results contribute to better understanding of water, nutrient, and carbon cycles in terrestrial ecosystems and should inform river basin modeling and ecosystem management. The important role of spatial climate variability points to a need for comparative research in specific environments at nested spatiotemporal scales.

  20. Production and action of an Aspergillus phoenicis enzymatic pool using different carbon sources Produção e ação de um pool enzimático de Aspergillus phoenicis com fontes de carbono diferentes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivian Machado Benassi

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Aspergillus phoenicis is an interesting heat tolerant fungus that can synthesize enzymes with several applications in the food industry due to its great hydrolytic potential. In this work, the fungus produced high enzymatic levels when cultivated on inexpensive culture media consisting of flakes from different origins such as cassava flour, wheat fibre, crushed soybean, agro-industrial wastes, starch, glucose or maltose. Several enzymatic systems were produced from these carbon sources, but amylase was the most evident, followed by pectinase and xylanase. Traces of CMCases, avicelase, lipase, β-xylosidase, β-glucosidase and α-glucosidase activities were also detected. Amylases were produced on rye flakes, starch, oat flakes, corn flakes, cassava flour and wheat fibre. Significant amylolytic levels were produced in the culture medium with glucose or when this sugar was exhausted, suggesting an enzyme in the constitutive form. Cassava flour, rye, oats, barley and corn flakes were also used as substrates in the hydrolytic reactions, aiming to verify the liberation potential of reducing sugars. Corn flakes induced greater liberation of reducing sugars as compared to the others. Thin layer chromatography of the reaction end products showed that the hydrolysis of cassava flour liberated maltooligosaccharides, but cassava flour and corn, rye, oats and barley flakes were hydrolyzed to glucose. These results suggested the presence of glucoamylase and α-amylase as part of the enzymatic pool of A. phoencis.Aspergillus phoenicis é um fungo termotolerante interessante, uma vez que pode sintetizar enzimas com diversas aplicações em indústrias alimentícias em função de seu grande potencial de hidrólise. Neste trabalho, verificou-se que esse fungo produziu níveis enzimáticos elevados, quando o mesmo foi cultivado em meio de cultura de baixo custo, constituído de flocos de diferentes origens, como farinha de mandioca, fibra de trigo, soja

  1. 施肥对长白落叶松苗木养分库氮磷吸收及利用的影响%Effects of fertilization on uptake and availability of N and P nutrient pool of Larix olgensis seedlings.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    康瑶瑶; 刘勇; 马履一; 李国雷; 祝燕; 马跃

    2011-01-01

    In order to explore luxury nutrient uptake of the seedlings prior to field planting under conventional fertilizing regimes, Larix olgensis seedlings (one-year old) were selected as materials. Biomass,concentrations and contents of N and P of two-year old seedlings were tested under different fertilization treatments. The nutrient use efficiency and vector nomogram of N and P were also analyzed. The results show that the amount of fertilizer significantly affected the biomass(Ppool =0.0285; Pintact =0.0325), P concentration(Ppool = 0.0022; Pintact = 0.0418) and P content (Ppool = 0.0043; Pi = 0.0301).Biomass and nitrogen transferring to nutrient pool occurred with low values of nutrient use efficiency.Vector analysis indicated that N deficiency and P in dilution status were observed in both nutrient pool and intact seedlings. In order to induce luxury nutrient uptake of seedlings, fertilization regimes should be optimized by conducting both exponential N nutrient loading during growth period and fertilization of P in late-season. Simultaneously, nutrient pool strength could be selected as an indicator for seedling performance after planting.%为探讨传统施肥量是否使出圃长白落叶松苗木体内养分达剑养分奢养阶段,以长白落叶松1年生播种苗为实验材料,设定不同施肥量实验,对2年生移栽苗木的生物量、N和P的养分浓度及含量进行检验,并结合养分吸收利用效率和N、P的矢量情况进行分析.结果表明:2种施肥量处理对其养分库和全株的生物量(P=0.028 5;P=0.032 5)、P的养分浓度(P=0.002 2;P=0.041 8)及P的含量(P=0.004 3;P=0.030 1)影响显著,且存在生物量和N素向养分库转移的现象,养分吸收利用参数值均较低.矢量分析结果显示,整株和养分库中N素均处于养分缺乏状态,而P素处于养分稀释状态.建议生产部门对其传统施肥方式进行转变,对其生长季中指数施N肥和晚季追施P肥,以使苗木达到奢养的阶段,

  2. Hawaii ESI: POOLS (Anchialine Pool Points)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for anchialine pools in Hawaii. Anchialine pools are small, relatively shallow coastal ponds that occur...

  3. Seasonal variability of carbon dioxide, nutrients and oxygen in the northern North Atlantic surface water: observations and a model*

    OpenAIRE

    Peng, Tsung-Hung; Takahashi, Taro; Broecker, Wallace S.; Olafsson, Jon

    2011-01-01

    The seasonal variation of various surface water properties has been monitored at a station located at about 120 miles south of the Iceland-Greenland sill during the two-year period, March 1983 through May 1985. These properties include the temperature, salinity, mixedlayer depth, partial pressure of CO2 in seawater and the concentrations of dissolved total CO2, oxygen and nutrients. It was observed that during the summer, the C02 partial pressure and the concentrations of CO2 and nutrients in...

  4. Differences in nutrient concentrations and resources between seagrass communities on carbonate and terrigenous sediments in South Sulawesi, Indonesia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erftemeijer, P.L.A.

    1994-01-01

    Water column, sediment and plant parameters were studied in six tropical seagrass beds in South Sulawesi, Indonesia, to evaluate the relation between seagrass bed nutrient concentrations and sediment type. Coastal seagrass beds on terrigenous sediments had considerably higher biomass of phytoplankto

  5. Silicon pools in human impacted soils of temperate zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandevenne, F. I.; Barão, L.; Ronchi, B.; Govers, G.; Meire, P.; Kelly, E. F.; Struyf, E.

    2015-09-01

    Besides well-known effects of climate and parent material on silicate weathering the role of land use change as a driver in the global silicon cycle is not well known. Changes in vegetation cover have altered reservoirs of silicon and carbon in plants and soils. This has potential consequences for plant-Si availability, agricultural yields, and coastal eutrophication, as Si is a beneficial element for many crop plants and an essential nutrient for diatom growth. We here examined the role of sustained and intensive land use and human disturbance on silicon (Si) pool distribution in soils with similar climatological and bulk mineralogical characteristics. We show that land use impacts both biogenic and nonbiogenic Si pools. While biogenic Si strongly decreases along the land use change gradient (from forest to croplands), pedogenic silica fractions (e.g. pedogenic clays) increase in topsoils with a long duration of cultivation and soil disturbance. Our results suggest that nonbiogenic Si pools might compensate for the loss of reactive biogenic silicon in temperate zones.

  6. Interactive Effects of Climate Change and Decomposer Communities on the Stabilization of Wood-Derived Carbon Pools: Catalyst for a New Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Resh, Sigrid C. [Michigan Technological University

    2014-11-17

    Globally, forest soils store ~two-thirds as much carbon (C) as the atmosphere. Although wood makes up the majority of forest biomass, the importance of wood contributions to soil C pools is unknown. Even with recent advances in the mechanistic understanding of soil processes, integrative studies tracing C input pathways and biological fluxes within and from soils are lacking. Therefore, our research objectives were to assess the impact of different fungal decay pathways (i.e., white-rot versus brown-rot)—in interaction with wood quality, soil temperature, wood location (i.e., soil surface and buried in mineral soil), and soil texture—on the transformation of woody material into soil CO2 efflux, dissolved organic carbon (DOC), and soil C pools. The use of 13C-depleted woody biomass harvested from the Rhinelander, WI free-air carbon dioxide enrichment (Aspen-FACE) experiment affords the unique opportunity to distinguish the wood-derived C from other soil C fluxes and pools. We established 168 treatment plots across six field sites (three sand and three loam textured soil). Treatment plots consisted of full-factorial design with the following treatments: 1. Wood chips from elevated CO2, elevated CO2 + O3, or ambient atmosphere AspenFACE treatments; 2. Inoculated with white rot (Bjerkandera adusta) or brown rot (Gloeophyllum sepiarium) pure fungal cultures, or the original suite of endemic microbial community on the logs; and 3. Buried (15cm in soil as a proxy for coarse roots) or surface applied wood chips. We also created a warming treatment using open-topped, passive warming chambers on a subset of the above treatments. Control plots with no added wood (“no chip control”) were incorporated into the research design. Soils were sampled for initial δ13C values, CN concentrations, and bulk density. A subset of plots were instrumented with lysimeters for sampling soil water and temperature data loggers for measuring soil temperatures. To determine the early

  7. Dominant role of eddies and filaments in the offshore transport of carbon and nutrients in the California Current System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagai, Takeyoshi; Gruber, Nicolas; Frenzel, Hartmut; Lachkar, Zouhair; McWilliams, James C.; Plattner, Gian-Kasper

    2015-08-01

    The coastal upwelling region of the California Current System (CalCS) is a well-known site of high productivity and lateral export of nutrients and organic matter, yet neither the magnitude nor the governing processes of this offshore transport are well quantified. Here we address this gap using a high-resolution (5 km) coupled physical-biogeochemical numerical simulation (ROMS). The results reveal (i) that the offshore transport is a very substantial component of any material budget in this region, (ii) that it reaches more than 800 km into the offshore domain, and (iii) that this transport is largely controlled by mesoscale processes, involving filaments and westward propagating eddies. The process starts in the nearshore areas, where nutrient and organic matter-rich upwelled waters pushed offshore by Ekman transport are subducted at the sharp lateral density gradients of upwelling fronts and filaments located at ˜25-100 km from the coast. The filaments are very effective in transporting the subducted material further offshore until they form eddies at their tips at about 100-200 km from the shore. The cyclonic eddies tend to trap the cold, nutrient, and organic matter-rich waters of the filaments, whereas the anticyclones formed nearby encapsulate the low nutrient and low organic matter waters around the filament. After their detachment, both types of eddies propagate further in offshore direction, with a speed similar to that of the first baroclinic mode Rossby waves, providing the key mechanism for long-range transport of nitrate and organic matter from the coast deep into the offshore environment.

  8. Increased Feeding and Nutrient Excretion of Adult Antarctic Krill, Euphausia superba, Exposed to Enhanced Carbon Dioxide (CO2)

    OpenAIRE

    Saba, Grace K.; Oscar Schofield; Joseph J Torres; Erica H Ombres; Steinberg, Deborah K.

    2012-01-01

    Ocean acidification has a wide-ranging potential for impacting the physiology and metabolism of zooplankton. Sufficiently elevated CO(2) concentrations can alter internal acid-base balance, compromising homeostatic regulation and disrupting internal systems ranging from oxygen transport to ion balance. We assessed feeding and nutrient excretion rates in natural populations of the keystone species Euphausia superba (Antarctic krill) by conducting a CO(2) perturbation experiment at ambient and ...

  9. Rhizosphere priming: a nutrient perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Feike Auke Dijkstra; Yolima eCarrillo; Elise ePendall; Morgan, Jack A.

    2013-01-01

    Rhizosphere priming is the change in decomposition of soil organic matter (SOM) caused by root activity. Rhizosphere priming plays a crucial role in soil carbon (C) dynamics and their response to global climate change. Rhizosphere priming may be affected by soil nutrient availability, but rhizosphere priming itself can also affect nutrient supply to plants. These interactive effects may be of particular relevance in understanding the sustained increase in plant growth and nutrient supply i...

  10. Ecosystem partitioning of 15N-glycine after long-term climate and nutrient manipulations, plant clipping and addition of labile carbon in a subarctic heath tundra

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Pernille Lærkedal; Michelsen, Anders; Jonasson, Sven Evert

    2008-01-01

    Low temperatures and high soil moisture restrict cycling of organic matter in arctic soils, but also substrate quality, i.e. labile carbon (C) availability, exerts control on microbial activity. Plant exudation of labile C may facilitate microbial growth and enhance microbial immobilization of......, microorganisms and plants. There were few effects of long-term warming and fertilization on soil and plant pools. However, fertilization increased soil and plant N pools and increased pool dilution of the added 15N label. In all treatments, microbes immobilized a major part of the added 15N shortly after label...... addition. However, plants exerted control on the soil inorganic N concentrations and recovery of total dissolved 15N (TD15N), and likewise the microbes reduced these soil pools, but only when fed with labile C. Soil microbes in clipped plots were primarily C limited, and the findings of reduced N...

  11. One Carbon Metabolism, Fetal Growth and Long Term Consequences

    OpenAIRE

    Kalhan, Satish C.

    2013-01-01

    One carbon metabolism, or methyl transfer, is critical for metabolism in all cells, is involved in the synthesis of purines, pyrimidines, in the methylation of numerous substrates, proteins, DNA and RNA, and in the expression of a number of genes. Serine is the primary endogenous methyl donor to the one carbon pool. Perturbations in methyl transfer due to nutrient and hormonal changes can have profound effect on cell function, growth and proliferation. It is postulated that at critical stages...

  12. Acclimation of tree function and structure to climate change and implications to forest carbon and nutrient balances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hari, P.; Nissinen, A.; Berninger, F. [Helsinki Univ. (Finland). Dept. of Forest Ecology] [and others

    1996-12-31

    Before large-scale anthropogenetic emissions the environmental factors have been rather stable for thousands of years, varying yearly, seasonally and daily in rather regular manners around some mean values. In this century the emissions of CO{sub 2}, sulphur and nitrogen from society to atmosphere are changing both atmospheric and soil environment at rates not experienced before. The fluxes to soil affect the contents of plant available nutrients and solubility of toxic compounds in the forest soil. Additionally, the chemical state of soil environment is coupled to tree growth, litter production and nutrient uptake as well as to the activity of biological organisms in soil, which decompose litter and release nutrients from it. Trees have developed effective regulation systems to cope with the environment during the evolution. The resulting acclimations improve the functioning of the trees if the environmental factors remain within their range of variation during the evolution. Outside the range the results of the regulation are unpredictable. The acclimative changes caused by the action of the regulation system may considerably change the response of trees to present environmental change. The analysis of the effects of present environmental change on forests requires simultaneous treatment of the atmosphere, forest soils and trees. Each of these components is dominated by its own features. The analyze of material and energy fluxes connect them to each other. The aim of this research is to analyse changes in the forest soils and reactions of trees to changes in the atmosphere and forest soils under a common theoretical framework, enabling combination of the obtained results into a holistic analysis of the response of forests to the present environmental change

  13. Effects of sulfate deposition on pore water dissolved organic carbon, nutrients, and microbial enzyme activities in a northern peatland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Export of dissolved organic carbon from lakes and streams has increased throughout Europe and North America over the past several decades. One possible cause is altered deposition chemistry; specifically, decreasing sulfate inputs leading to changes in ionic strength and dissolve...

  14. Temperature, salinity, nutrients, carbon, and other profile data collected worldwide as part of the CARINA project (NODC Accession 0057766)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The CARINA (CARbon dioxide IN the Atlantic Ocean) data synthesis project is an international collaborative effort of the EU IP CARBOOCEAN, and US partners. It has...

  15. Nutrient, organic carbon, and chloride concentrations and loads in selected Long Island Sound tributaries—Four decades of change following the passage of the Federal Clean Water Act

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullaney, John R.

    2016-01-01

    Trends in long-term water-quality and streamflow data from 14 water-quality monitoring sites in Connecticut were evaluated for water years 1974–2013 and 2001–13, coinciding with implementation of the Clean Water Act of 1972 and the Connecticut Nitrogen Credit Exchange program, as part of an assessment of nutrient and chloride concentrations and loads discharged to Long Island Sound. In this study, conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Connecticut Department of Energy and Environmental Protection, data were evaluated using a recently developed methodology of weighted regressions with time, streamflow, and season. Trends in streamflow were evaluated using a locally weighted scatterplot smoothing method. Annual mean streamflow increased at 12 of the 14 sites averaging 8 percent during the entire study period, primarily in the summer months, and increased by an average of 9 percent in water years 2001–13, primarily during summer and fall months. Downward trends in flow-normalized nutrient concentrations and loads were observed during both periods for most sites for total nitrogen, total Kjeldahl nitrogen, nitrite plus nitrate nitrogen, total phosphorus, and total organic carbon. Average flow-normalized loads of total nitrogen decreased by 23.9 percent for the entire period and 10.9 percent for the period of water years 2001‒13. Major factors contributing to decreases in flow-normalized loads and concentrations of these nutrients include improvements in wastewater treatment practices, declining atmospheric wet deposition of nitrogen, and changes in land management and land use.

  16. Costs of defense and a test of the carbon-nutrient balance and growth-differentiation balance hypotheses for two co-occurring classes of plant defense.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tara Joy Massad

    Full Text Available One of the goals of chemical ecology is to assess costs of plant defenses. Intraspecific trade-offs between growth and defense are traditionally viewed in the context of the carbon-nutrient balance hypothesis (CNBH and the growth-differentiation balance hypothesis (GDBH. Broadly, these hypotheses suggest that growth is limited by deficiencies in carbon or nitrogen while rates of photosynthesis remain unchanged, and the subsequent reduced growth results in the more abundant resource being invested in increased defense (mass-balance based allocation. The GDBH further predicts trade-offs in growth and defense should only be observed when resources are abundant. Most support for these hypotheses comes from work with phenolics. We examined trade-offs related to production of two classes of defenses, saponins (triterpenoids and flavans (phenolics, in Pentaclethra macroloba (Fabaceae, an abundant tree in Costa Rican wet forests. We quantified physiological costs of plant defenses by measuring photosynthetic parameters (which are often assumed to be stable in addition to biomass. Pentaclethra macroloba were grown in full sunlight or shade under three levels of nitrogen alone or with conspecific neighbors that could potentially alter nutrient availability via competition or facilitation. Biomass and photosynthesis were not affected by nitrogen or competition for seedlings in full sunlight, but they responded positively to nitrogen in shade-grown plants. The trade-off predicted by the GDBH between growth and metabolite production was only present between flavans and biomass in sun-grown plants (abundant resource conditions. Support was also only partial for the CNBH as flavans declined with nitrogen but saponins increased. This suggests saponin production should be considered in terms of detailed biosynthetic pathway models while phenolic production fits mass-balance based allocation models (such as the CNBH. Contrary to expectations based on the two

  17. Costs of defense and a test of the carbon-nutrient balance and growth-differentiation balance hypotheses for two co-occurring classes of plant defense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massad, Tara Joy; Dyer, Lee A; Vega C, Gerardo

    2012-01-01

    One of the goals of chemical ecology is to assess costs of plant defenses. Intraspecific trade-offs between growth and defense are traditionally viewed in the context of the carbon-nutrient balance hypothesis (CNBH) and the growth-differentiation balance hypothesis (GDBH). Broadly, these hypotheses suggest that growth is limited by deficiencies in carbon or nitrogen while rates of photosynthesis remain unchanged, and the subsequent reduced growth results in the more abundant resource being invested in increased defense (mass-balance based allocation). The GDBH further predicts trade-offs in growth and defense should only be observed when resources are abundant. Most support for these hypotheses comes from work with phenolics. We examined trade-offs related to production of two classes of defenses, saponins (triterpenoids) and flavans (phenolics), in Pentaclethra macroloba (Fabaceae), an abundant tree in Costa Rican wet forests. We quantified physiological costs of plant defenses by measuring photosynthetic parameters (which are often assumed to be stable) in addition to biomass. Pentaclethra macroloba were grown in full sunlight or shade under three levels of nitrogen alone or with conspecific neighbors that could potentially alter nutrient availability via competition or facilitation. Biomass and photosynthesis were not affected by nitrogen or competition for seedlings in full sunlight, but they responded positively to nitrogen in shade-grown plants. The trade-off predicted by the GDBH between growth and metabolite production was only present between flavans and biomass in sun-grown plants (abundant resource conditions). Support was also only partial for the CNBH as flavans declined with nitrogen but saponins increased. This suggests saponin production should be considered in terms of detailed biosynthetic pathway models while phenolic production fits mass-balance based allocation models (such as the CNBH). Contrary to expectations based on the two defense

  18. Formation models of narine carbonate natural gas pools in the deep part of the Sichuan basin, China%四川盆地深层海相碳酸盐岩气藏成藏模式

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙玮; 刘树根; 徐国盛; 王国芝; 袁海锋; 黄文明

    2011-01-01

    the main sources of hydrocarbons for today' s (remaining) gas pools (gas preservation centers). The deep marine carbonate natural gas pools in Sichuan basin principally mean that their reservoir rocks were deposited before Late Triassic and buried deeper than 4500m, which can be classified into two types according to the coupling relationships between the gas generation centers, gas accumulation centers and preservation gas centers. One type is called the primary natural gas pools, whose preservation centers were located at the same stratigraphical unit with the gas generation centers and gas accumulation centers. The other type is called the second natural gas pools, whose gas preservation centers were located at the different stratigraphical unit from the gas generation centers and gas accumulation centers. Most of gas both in the primary and the second gas pools is from oil crack. The reservoir rocks of the primary natural gas pools contain lots of bitumen generated by the crack of oil, but there is not bitumen in the reservoir rocks of the second natural gas pools. There are four formation models of the primary natural gas pools in the deep part of the Sichuan basin; (1) an accumulation mode with the 'three centers' being superimposed; (2) an accumulation mode with 'the preservation center' disintegrated; (3) an accumulation mode with the 'three centers' migrated for a short distance; (4) a destruction mode with the preservation center lost The accumulation ratio of gas from oil cracking gradually decreases to zero from accumulation mode (1) to destruction mode (4). The key factors of gas accumulation and preservation were occurrence of rich hydrocarbon sources and good preservation conditions for the gas pools. The key factor forming the second natural gas pools is cross-flow of gas, which is from the destruction of previously underlain gas pools. Therefore the accumulation mode with the ' three centers' being superimposed and the accumulation mode with ' the

  19. Salinity and nutrient contents of tidal water affects soil respiration and carbon sequestration of high and low tidal flats of Jiuduansha wetlands in different ways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yu; Wang, Lei; Fu, Xiaohua; Yan, Jianfang; Wu, Jihua; Tsang, Yiufai; Le, Yiquan; Sun, Ying

    2016-09-15

    Soils were collected from low tidal flats and high tidal flats of Shang shoal located upstream and Xia shoal located downstream with different tidal water qualities, in the Jiuduansha wetland of the Yangtze River estuary. Soil respiration (SR) in situ and soil abiotic and microbial characteristics were studied to clarify the respective differences in the effects of tidal water salinity and nutrient levels on SR and soil carbon sequestration in low and high tidal flats. In low tidal flats, higher total nitrogen (TN) and lower salinity in the tidal water of Shang shoal resulted in higher TN and lower salinity in its soils compared with Xia shoal. These would benefit β-Proteobacteria and Anaerolineae in Shang shoal soil, which might have higher heterotrophic microbial activities and thus soil microbial respiration and SR. In low tidal flats, where soil moisture was high and the major carbon input was active organic carbon from tidal water, increasing TN was a more important factor than salinity and obviously enhanced soil microbial heterotrophic activities, soil microbial respiration and SR. While, in high tidal flats, higher salinity in Xia shoal due to higher salinity in tidal water compared with Shang shoal benefited γ-Proteobacteria which might enhance autotrophic microbial activity, and was detrimental to β-Proteobacteria in Xia shoal soil. These might have led to lower soil microbial respiration and thus SR in Xia shoal compared with Shang shoal. In high tidal flats, where soil moisture was relatively lower and the major carbon input was plant biomass that was difficult to degrade, soil salinity was the major factor restraining microbial activities, soil microbial respiration and SR. PMID:27208721

  20. Production and action of an Aspergillus phoenicis enzymatic pool using different carbon sources Produção e ação de um pool enzimático de Aspergillus phoenicis com fontes de carbono diferentes

    OpenAIRE

    Vivian Machado Benassi; Rosymar Coutinho de Lucas; Michele Michelin; João Atílio Jorge; Héctor Francisco Terenzi; Maria de Lourdes Teixeira de Moraes Polizeli

    2012-01-01

    Aspergillus phoenicis is an interesting heat tolerant fungus that can synthesize enzymes with several applications in the food industry due to its great hydrolytic potential. In this work, the fungus produced high enzymatic levels when cultivated on inexpensive culture media consisting of flakes from different origins such as cassava flour, wheat fibre, crushed soybean, agro-industrial wastes, starch, glucose or maltose. Several enzymatic systems were produced from these carbon sources, but a...

  1. Tillage, crop residue, and nutrient management effects on soil organic carbon sequestration in rice-based cropping systems: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sequestration of soil organic carbon (SOC) is one of the major agricultural strategies to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions, enhance food security, and improve agricultural sustainability. This paper synthesizes the much-needed state-of-knowledge on the effects of management practices, such as tilla...

  2. Swimming pool cleaner poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swimming pool cleaner poisoning occurs when someone swallows this type of cleaner, touches it, or breathes in ... The harmful substances in swimming pool cleaner are: Bromine ... copper Chlorine Soda ash Sodium bicarbonate Various mild acids

  3. Swimming pool granuloma

    Science.gov (United States)

    A swimming pool granuloma is a long-term (chronic) skin infection. It is caused by the bacteria Mycobacterium marinum . ... A swimming pool granuloma occurs when water containing Mycobacterium marinum bacteria enters a break in the skin. Signs of ...

  4. Mapping the transition from catalyst-pool to bamboo-like growth-mechanism in vertically-aligned free-standing films of carbon nanotubes filled with Fe3C: The key role of water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boi, Filippo S.; Wang, Shanling; He, Yi

    2016-08-01

    The control of carbon nanotube growth has challenged researchers for more than a decade due to the complex parameters-control necessary in the commonly used CVD approaches. Here we show that a direct transition from the catalyst-pool growth mechanism characterized by graphene-caps in the direction of growth to a bamboo-shaped mechanism characterized by the repetition of periodic elongated graphitic compartments is present when controlled quantities of water are added to ferrocene/dichlorobenzene. Our results suggest that water-addition allows enhancing the level of stress accumulated under the graphitic nanotubes-cap.

  5. The science of pooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilbert, E.

    1995-10-01

    The pooling of data from radon studies is described. Pooling refers to the analysis of original data from several studies, not meta-analysis in which summary measures from published data are analyzed. A main objective for pooling is to reduce uncertainty and to obtain more precise estimates of risk than would be available from any single study.

  6. Impact of continental runoff and melted sea ice on spatial distribution of carbonate parameters and nutrients in the Kara and Laptev Seas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polukhin, Alexander; Kostyleva, Anna; Protsenko, Elizaveta; Stepanova, Svetlana; Yakubov, Shamil; Makkaveev, Petr

    2016-04-01

    It is well-known that the Kara and Laptev seas are strongly affected by large amount of fresh water coming from the great Siberian rivers (the Ob' River, the Yenisei River and the Lena River). Expeditions of the Shirshov Institute of Oceanology were directed on investigation of freshening of these two Arctic seas. We have large collection of data (CTD, nutrients, carbonate system parameters) from the Kara Sea expeditions (1993, 2007, 2011, 2013, 2014 years) and the newest data from the last expedition to the Kara and Laptev Seas in 2015. Employment of these materials along with archival data on mentioned seas gives us an opportunity to trace variability of hydrochemical parameters in conditions of changing climate. From year to year in our expeditions we see reduction of sea-ice cover on the water area of the Kara Sea, changes in freshwater discharge and different seasonal variability of hydrochemical structure under influence of continental runoff. Moreover we notice some falling of carbonate system parameters such as pH and alkalinity. Hereby we can estimate processes of acidification in the Russian Arctic and reveal main stressors. This work is supported by Russian Science Foundation (project №14-50-00095).

  7. Effectiveness of submersed angiosperm-epiphyte complexes on exchange of nutrients and organic carbon in littoral systems. III. Refractory organic carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mickle, A.M.; Wetzel, R.G.

    1979-01-01

    Refractory dissolved organic compounds, consisting mainly of fulvic acids labelled with /sup 14/C of aquatic plant origin, were added to the inlet stream water of a hardwater lake and passed through two continuously, very slowly flowing (3 1/24 h) littoral systems. System I contained a natural stand of Scripus subterminalis Torr. and System II contained Myriophyllum heterophyllum Michx. Macrophytic epiphytes were left intact. Control systems, containing similar sediments without macrophytes, received identical treatments. Dissolved organic carbon (DOC), both labelled and unlabelled, of inflow and outflow water was fractionated into several molecular weight fractions; uv absorption and fluorescence of dissolved organic matter, particulate organic carbon (POC), and major cationic concentrations were also analyzed in inflowing and outflowing water. The pathways of the labelled refractory organic carbon amendments were followed in the water, the plant foliage and roots, epiphytes, and the sediments.

  8. The response of nutrient assimilation and biochemical composition of Arctic seaweeds to a nutrient input in summer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordillo, Francisco J L; Aguilera, José; Jiménez, Carlos

    2006-01-01

    Twenty-one species of macroalgae (four Chlorophyta, eight Rhodophyta, and nine Phaeophyta) from the Kongsfjord (Norwegian Arctic) were examined for their response to nutrient enrichment (nitrate and phosphate) in the summer period. The enzymatic activities related to nutrient assimilation, external carbonic anhydrase (CAext, EC 4.2.1.1), nitrate reductase (NR, EC 1.6.6.1), and alkaline phosphatase (AP, EC 3.1.3.1), as well as the biochemical composition (total C and N, soluble carbohydrates, soluble proteins, and pigments) were measured. CAext activity was present in all species, and showed a general decrease after nutrient enrichment. Inversely, NR activity increased in most of the species examined. Changes in pigment ratios pointed to the implication of light harvesting system in the acclimation strategy. Despite enzymatic and pigmentary response, the Arctic seaweeds can be regarded as not being N-limited even in summer, as shown by the slight effect of nutrient enrichment on biochemical composition. The exception being the nitrophilic species Monostroma arcticum and, to a lesser extent, Acrosiphonia sp. For the rest of the species studied, changes in total internal C and N, soluble proteins, soluble carbohydrates, pigment content, and the internal pool of inorganic N were recorded only for particular species and no general pattern was shown. Acclimation to unexpected nutrient input seemed to ensure the maintenance of a stable biomass composition, rather than an optimized use of the newly available resource (except for the nitrophilic species). This indicates a high degree of resilience of the algal community to a disruption in the natural nutrient availability pattern. PMID:16829547

  9. Interfacing carbon nanotubes (CNT) with plants: enhancement of growth, water and ionic nutrient uptake in maize ( Zea mays) and implications for nanoagriculture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, D. K.; Dasgupta-Schubert, N.; Villaseñor Cendejas, L. M.; Villegas, J.; Carreto Montoya, L.; Borjas García, S. E.

    2014-06-01

    The application of nano-biotechnology to crop-science/agriculture (`nanoagriculture') is a recent development. While carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been shown to dramatically improve germination of some comestible plants, deficiencies in consistency of behavior and reproducibility arise, partially from the variability of the CNTs used. In this work, factory-synthesized multi-walled-CNTs (MWCNTs) of quality-controlled specifications were seen to enhance the germinative growth of maize seedlings at low concentrations but depress it at higher concentrations. Growth enhancement principally arose through improved water delivery by the MWCNT. Polarized EDXRF spectrometry showed that MWCNTs affect mineral nutrient supply to the seedling through the action of the mutually opposing forces of inflow with water and retention in the medium by the ion-CNT transient-dipole interaction. The effect varied with ion type and MWCNT concentration. The differences of the Fe tissue concentrations when relatively high equimolar Fe2+ or Fe3+ was introduced, implied that the ion-CNT interaction might induce redox changes to the ion. The tissue Ca2+ concentration manifested as the antipode of the Fe2+ concentration indicating a possible cationic exchange in the cell wall matrix. SEM images showed that MWCNTs perforated the black-layer seed-coat that could explain the enhanced water delivery. The absence of perforations with the introduction of FeCl2/FeCl3 reinforces the idea of the modification of MWCNT functionality by the ion-CNT interaction. Overall, in normal media, low dose MWCNTs were seen to be beneficial, improving water absorption, plant biomass and the concentrations of the essential Ca, Fe nutrients, opening a potential for possible future commercial agricultural applications.

  10. The OSU1/QUA2/TSD2-encoded putative methyltransferase is a critical modulator of carbon and nitrogen nutrient balance response in Arabidopsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Gao

    Full Text Available The balance between carbon (C and nitrogen (N nutrients must be tightly coordinated so that cells can optimize their opportunity for metabolism, growth and development. However, the C and N nutrient balance perception and signaling mechanism remains poorly understood. Here, we report the isolation and characterization of two allelic oversensitive to sugar 1 mutants (osu1-1, osu1-2 in Arabidopsis thaliana. Using the cotyledon anthocyanin accumulation and root growth inhibition assays, we show that the osu1 mutants are more sensitive than wild-type to both of the imbalanced C/N conditions, high C/low N and low C/high N. However, under the balanced C/N conditions (low C/low N or high C/high N, the osu1 mutants have similar anthocyanin levels and root lengths as wild-type. Consistently, the genes encoding two MYB transcription factors (MYB75 and MYB90 and an Asn synthetase isoform (ASN1 are strongly up-regulated by the OSU1 mutation in response to high C/low N and low C/high N, respectively. Furthermore, the enhanced sensitivity of osu1-1 to high C/low N with respect to anthocyanin accumulation but not root growth inhibition can be suppressed by co-suppression of MYB75, indicating that MYB75 acts downstream of OSU1 in the high C/low N imbalance response. Map-based cloning reveals that OSU1 encodes a member of a large family of putative methyltransferases and is allelic to the recently reported QUA2/TSD2 locus identified in genetic screens for cell-adhesion-defective mutants. Accumulation of OSU1/QUA2/TSD2 transcript was not regulated by C and N balance, but the OSU1 promoter was slightly more active in the vascular system. Taken together, our results show that the OSU1/QUA2/TSD2-encoded putative methyltransferase is required for normal C/N nutrient balance response in plants.

  11. Decreased carbon and nutrient input to boreal lakes from particulate organic matter following riparian clear-cutting

    Science.gov (United States)

    France, Robert; Culbert, Heather; Peters, Robert

    1996-07-01

    The plankton communities of oligotrophic Canadian Shield lakes are strongly regulated by the allochthonous supply of total phosphorus (TP) and dissolved organic carbon (DOC), a proportion of both of which originate from particulate organic matter. Although decreased inputs of allochthonous leaf litter have been documented for small streams whose riparian forests have been removed, no such data exist for boreal lakes. Through estimates of airborne litter input from forested and clear-cut shorelines and laboratory measurements of concentrations released from leaf leachate, we determined that riparian deforestation resulted in reductions of DOC from 17.8 to 0.4 g/m shoreline/yr and of TP from 2.9 to 0.3 g/m shoreline/yr. Previous predictive models indicate that such reductions may be substantial enough to decrease basic metabolic processes of lake plankton communities by as much as 9% in primary production and 17% in respiration.

  12. Methane production and diurnal variation measured in dairy cows and predicted from fermentation pattern and nutrient or carbon flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brask, Maike; Weisbjerg, Martin Riis; Hellwing, Anne Louise Frydendahl;

    2015-01-01

    . Interactions between feed components, VFA absorption rates and variation between animals seemed to be factors that were complicating the accurate prediction of CH(4). Using a ruminal carbon balance appeared to predict CH(4) production just as well as calculations based on rumen digestion of individual....... In the present study, a data set was compiled from the results of three intensive respiration chamber trials with lactating rumen and intestinal fistulated Holstein cows, including measurements of rumen and intestinal digestion, rumen fermentation parameters and CH(4) production. Two approaches were...... for the deviance. Dietary carbohydrate composition and rumen carbohydrate digestion were the main sources of inaccuracies for both models. Furthermore, differences were related to rumen ammonia concentration with the DOM model and to rumen pH and dietary fat with the DCARB model. Adding these...

  13. Effectiveness of submersed angiosperm--epiphyte complexes on exchange of nutrients and organic carbon in littoral systems. II. Dissolved organic carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mickle, A.M.; Wetzel, R.G.

    1978-01-01

    Dissolved organic carbon concentrations, UV absorption, and fluorescence were measured daily for several weeks in water from an inlet stream of a hardwater lake before and after passing through three continuously, very slowly flowing (31/24 h) littoral systems. System I contained a natural stand of Scirpus subterminalis Torr. and Systems II and III contained Myriophyllum heterophyllum Michx. Macrophytic epiphytes were left intact. Dissolved organic matter of inflow and outflow water from System III was fractionated into several molecular weight fractions. Dissolved organic carbon concentrations and UV absorption increased as inflow water passed through all three littoral systems. This increase consisted only of organic compounds of >1000 molecular weight. Fluorescence increased in outflow waters of Systems I and III, but consistently decreased in System II. During periods of rainfall, but not snowfall, all three parameters in inflow water increased significantly. All three littoral systems were effective in dampening these higher concentrations; only slight increases appeared in the outflows.

  14. A mechanistic soil biogeochemistry model with explicit representation of microbial and macrofaunal activities and nutrient cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatichi, Simone; Manzoni, Stefano; Or, Dani; Paschalis, Athanasios

    2016-04-01

    The potential of a given ecosystem to store and release carbon is inherently linked to soil biogeochemical processes. These processes are deeply connected to the water, energy, and vegetation dynamics above and belowground. Recently, it has been advocated that a mechanistic representation of soil biogeochemistry require: (i) partitioning of soil organic carbon (SOC) pools according to their functional role; (ii) an explicit representation of microbial dynamics; (iii) coupling of carbon and nutrient cycles. While some of these components have been introduced in specialized models, they have been rarely implemented in terrestrial biosphere models and tested in real cases. In this study, we combine a new soil biogeochemistry model with an existing model of land-surface hydrology and vegetation dynamics (T&C). Specifically the soil biogeochemistry component explicitly separates different litter pools and distinguishes SOC in particulate, dissolved and mineral associated fractions. Extracellular enzymes and microbial pools are explicitly represented differentiating the functional roles of bacteria, saprotrophic and mycorrhizal fungi. Microbial activity depends on temperature, soil moisture and litter or SOC stoichiometry. The activity of macrofauna is also modeled. Nutrient dynamics include the cycles of nitrogen, phosphorous and potassium. The model accounts for feedbacks between nutrient limitations and plant growth as well as for plant stoichiometric flexibility. In turn, litter input is a function of the simulated vegetation dynamics. Root exudation and export to mycorrhiza are computed based on a nutrient uptake cost function. The combined model is tested to reproduce respiration dynamics and nitrogen cycle in few sites where data were available to test plausibility of results across a range of different metrics. For instance in a Swiss grassland ecosystem, fine root, bacteria, fungal and macrofaunal respiration account for 40%, 23%, 33% and 4% of total belowground

  15. Effect of elevated CO2 on organic matter pools and fluxes in a summer Baltic Sea plankton community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, A. J.; Bach, L. T.; Schulz, K.-G.; Boxhammer, T.; Czerny, J.; Achterberg, E. P.; Hellemann, D.; Trense, Y.; Nausch, M.; Sswat, M.; Riebesell, U.

    2015-10-01

    Ocean acidification is expected to influence plankton community structure and biogeochemical element cycles. To date, the response of plankton communities to elevated CO2 has been studied primarily during nutrient-stimulated blooms. In this CO2 manipulation study, we used large-volume (~ 55 m3) pelagic in situ mesocosms to enclose a natural summer, post-spring-bloom plankton assemblage in the Baltic Sea to investigate the response of organic matter pools to ocean acidification. The carbonate system in the six mesocosms was manipulated to yield average fCO2 ranging between 365 and ~ 1230 μatm with no adjustment of naturally available nutrient concentrations. Plankton community development and key biogeochemical element pools were subsequently followed in this nitrogen-limited ecosystem over a period of 7 weeks. We observed higher sustained chlorophyll a and particulate matter concentrations (~ 25 % higher) and lower inorganic phosphate concentrations in the water column in the highest fCO2 treatment (1231 μatm) during the final 2 weeks of the study period (Phase III), when there was low net change in particulate and dissolved matter pools. Size-fractionated phytoplankton pigment analyses indicated that these differences were driven by picophytoplankton (early in the experiment during an initial warm and more productive period with overall elevated chlorophyll a and particulate matter concentrations. However, the influence of picophytoplankton on bulk organic matter pools was masked by high biomass of larger plankton until Phase III, when the contribution of the small size fraction (< 2 μm) increased to up to 90 % of chlorophyll a. In this phase, a CO2-driven increase in water column particulate carbon did not lead to enhanced sinking material flux but was instead reflected in increased dissolved organic carbon concentrations. Hence ocean acidification may induce changes in organic matter partitioning in the upper water column during the low-nitrogen summer period

  16. Ash recycling to spruce and beech stands effects on nutrients, growth, nitrogen dynamics and carbon balance; Askaaterfoering till gran- och bokbestaand - effekter paa naering, tillvaext, kvaevedynamik och kolbalans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thelin, Gunnar

    2006-03-15

    Ash recycling is an important part in a modern, sustainable forestry, especially in whole-tree harvest systems. Nutrients lost at harvest are returned to the forest with the wood-ash. In the project the effects of ash treatment on needle and leaf chemistry, tree growth, soil chemistry, soil water chemistry, and carbon and nitrogen dynamics were studied on 23 Norway spruce sites in south-western Sweden and in ten European beech sites in Scania, southern Sweden. On some of the sites there were previously established ash recycling experiments, but on a majority of the sites ash recycling was performed without experimental lay-out and ash and control plots were established afterwards. The most common dose was two tons of self hardened crushed wood-ash and two tons of Mg-lime. On average seven to eight years after ash recycling the results were 1. increased exchangeable stores of base cations in the soil in the beech and the spruce stands 2. increased base saturation in the beech and the spruce stands and increased BC/Al in the spruce stands 3. increased concentrations and ratios to N of P, Ca, Zn, and S in the needles, the increased P-values are especially important since P is close to or below deficiency levels in a majority of the spruce stands 4. decreased K-concentration in the beech leaves 5. increased tree growth with on average 14 % in the ash treated spruce stands compared to the control plots 6. increased carbon and nitrogen amounts in the biomass in the spruce stands 7. tendencies towards increased amounts of carbon and nitrogen in the soil in the beech stands and no effect in the soil in the spruce stands 8. increased concentrations of Ca, Mg, and SO{sub 4} and no effect on ANC in the soil water 9. no effect on potential net mineralization but increased potential nitrification rates 10. decreased concentration of nitrate in the soil water in the beech stands and no effect in the spruce stands 11. lower system N losses in the beech stands and possibly in the

  17. The resource pooling principle

    OpenAIRE

    Wischik, Damon; Handley, Mark; Bagnulo, Marcelo

    2008-01-01

    Since the ARPAnet, network designers have built localized mechanisms for statistical multiplexing, load balancing, and failure resilience, often without understanding the broader implications. These mechanisms are all types of resource pooling, whichmeans making a collection of resources behave like a single pooled resource. We believe that the natural evolution of the Internet is that it should achieve resource pooling by harnessing the responsiveness of multipath-capable end systems. We arg...

  18. Cold pool dissipation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Leah D.; Heever, Susan C.

    2016-02-01

    The mechanisms by which sensible heat fluxes (SHFs) alter cold pool characteristics and dissipation rates are investigated in this study using idealized two-dimensional numerical simulations and an environment representative of daytime, dry, continental conditions. Simulations are performed with no SHFs, SHFs calculated using a bulk formula, and constant SHFs for model resolutions with horizontal (vertical) grid spacings ranging from 50 m (25 m) to 400 m (200 m). In the highest resolution simulations, turbulent entrainment of environmental air into the cold pool is an important mechanism for dissipation in the absence of SHFs. Including SHFs enhances cold pool dissipation rates, but the processes responsible for the enhanced dissipation differ depending on the SHF formulation. The bulk SHFs increase the near-surface cold pool temperatures, but their effects on the overall cold pool characteristics are small, while the constant SHFs influence the near-surface environmental stability and the turbulent entrainment rates into the cold pool. The changes to the entrainment rates are found to be the most significant of the SHF effects on cold pool dissipation. SHFs may also influence the timing of cold pool-induced convective initiation by altering the environmental stability and the cold pool intensity. As the model resolution is coarsened, cold pool dissipation is found to be less sensitive to SHFs. Furthermore, the coarser resolution simulations not only poorly but sometimes wrongly represent the SHF impacts on the cold pools. Recommendations are made regarding simulating the interaction of cold pools with convection and the land surface in cloud-resolving models.

  19. Prospects for optimizing soil microbial functioning to improve plant nutrient uptake and soil carbon sequestration under elevated CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, M.; Pendall, E. G.

    2013-12-01

    Potential to mitigate climate change through increasing plant productivity and its carbon (C) input to soil may be limited by soil nitrogen (N) availability. Using a novel 13C-CO2 and 15N-soil dual labeling method, we investigated whether plant growth-promoting bacteria would interact with atmospheric CO2 concentration to alter plant productivity and soil C storage. We grew Bouteloua gracilis under ambient (380 ppm) or elevated CO2 (700 ppm) in climate-controlled chambers, and plant individuals were grown with or without Pseudomonas fluorescens inoculum, which can produce N catabolic enzymes. We observed that both eCO2 and P. fluorescens increased plant productivity and its C allocation to soil. P. fluorescens relative to eCO2 enhanced plant N uptake from soil organic matter, which highly correlated with soil N enzyme activities and rhizosphere exudate C. More importantly, P. fluorescens increased microbial biomass and deceased specific microbial respiration in comparison with eCO2. These results indicate that application of plant growth-promoting bacteria can increase microbial C utilization efficiency with subsequent N mineralization from soil organic matter, and may improve plant N availability and soil C sequestration. Together, our findings highlight the potential of plant growth-promoting bacteria for global change mitigation by terrestrial ecosystems.

  20. Estuarine Biogeochemical Dynamics of Nutrients and Organic Carbon in the Columbia River: Observing Transformations Using a Biogeochemical Sensor Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Needoba, J. A.; Peterson, T. D.; Riseman, S.; Wilkin, M.; Baptista, A. M.

    2015-12-01

    The Columbia River estuary is an ecosystem dominated by both a large river discharge and strong tidal forcing that creates fast currents, intense and variable physical stratification, low water residence times, and large gradients in salinity, temperature and water quality across the river to ocean boundary. Assessing ecosystem function and biogeochemical cycling in this environment is hampered by the inherent variability in both temporal and spatial timescales. In recent years the NSF Science and Technology Center for Coastal Margin Observation and Prediction has established a comprehensive in situ observation network that spans the estuarine gradient and captures variability associated with tides, diel cycles, episodic events, and seasonal changes in the river and ocean end-members. Here we describe the major patterns of variability in nitrate, orthophosphate, fluorescent dissolved organic carbon and related variables that demonstrate the dominant physical forcing and the biogeochemical hotspots within the ecosystem. These hotspots include intertidal lateral bays, the tidal freshwater river, and the estuarine turbidity maxima. Improved understanding of the role of these estuarine hotspots has informed ecosystem stewardship activities related to juvenile salmon survival, hypoxia, and food web structure.

  1. The deep-sea glass sponge Lophophysema eversa harbours potential symbionts responsible for the nutrient conversions of carbon, nitrogen and sulfur.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Ren-Mao; Sun, Jin; Cai, Lin; Zhang, Wei-Peng; Zhou, Guo-Wei; Qiu, Jian-Wen; Qian, Pei-Yuan

    2016-09-01

    Glass sponge (Hexactinellida, Porifera) is a special lineage because of its unique tissue organization and skeleton material. Structure and physiology of glass sponge have been extensively studied. However, our knowledge of the glass sponge-associated microbial community and of the interaction with the host is rather limited. Here, we performed genomic studies on the microbial community in the glass sponge Lophophysema eversa in seamount. The microbial community was dominated by an ammonia-oxidizing archaeum (AOA), a nitrite-oxidizing bacterium (NOB) and a sulfur-oxidizing bacterium (SOB), all of which were autotrophs. Genomic analysis on the AOA, NOB and SOB in the sponge revealed specific functional features of sponge-associated microorganisms in comparison with the closely related free-living relatives, including chemotaxis, phage defence, vitamin biosynthesis and nutrient uptake among others, which are related to ecological functions. The three autotrophs play essential roles in the cycles of carbon, nitrogen and sulfur in the microenvironment inside the sponge body, and they are considered to play symbiotic roles in the host as scavengers of toxic ammonia, nitrite and sulfide. Our study extends knowledge regarding the metabolism and the evolution of chemolithotrophs inside the invertebrate body. PMID:26637128

  2. Temporal variability of carbon and nutrient burial, sediment accretion, and mass accumulation over the past century in a carbonate platform mangrove forest of the Florida Everglades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breithaupt, Joshua L.; Smoak, Joseph M.; Smith, Thomas J.; Sanders, Christian J.

    2014-10-01

    The objective of this research was to measure temporal variability in accretion and mass sedimentation rates (including organic carbon (OC), total nitrogen (TN), and total phosphorous (TP)) from the past century in a mangrove forest on the Shark River in Everglades National Park, USA. The 210Pb Constant Rate of Supply model was applied to six soil cores to calculate annual rates over the most recent 10, 50, and 100 year time spans. Our results show that rates integrated over longer timeframes are lower than those for shorter, recent periods of observation. Additionally, the substantial spatial variability between cores over the 10 year period is diminished over the 100 year record, raising two important implications. First, a multiple-decade assessment of soil accretion and OC burial provides a more conservative estimate and is likely to be most relevant for forecasting these rates relative to long-term processes of sea level rise and climate change mitigation. Second, a small number of sampling locations are better able to account for spatial variability over the longer periods than for the shorter periods. The site average 100 year OC burial rate, 123 ± 19 (standard deviation) g m-2 yr-1, is low compared with global mangrove values. High TN and TP burial rates in recent decades may lead to increased soil carbon remineralization, contributing to the low carbon burial rates. Finally, the strong correlation between OC burial and accretion across this site signals the substantial contribution of OC to soil building in addition to the ecosystem service of CO2 sequestration.

  3. Temporal variability of carbon and nutrient burial, sediment accretion, and mass accumulation over the past century in a carbonate platform mangrove forest of the Florida Everglades.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breithaupt, Josh L.; Smoak, Joseph M.; Smith, Thomas J., III; Sanders, Christian J.

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this research was to measure temporal variability in accretion and mass sedimentation rates (including organic carbon (OC), total nitrogen (TN), and total phosphorous (TP)) from the past century in a mangrove forest on the Shark River in Everglades National Park, USA. The 210Pb Constant Rate of Supply model was applied to six soil cores to calculate annual rates over the most recent 10, 50, and 100 year time spans. Our results show that rates integrated over longer timeframes are lower than those for shorter, recent periods of observation. Additionally, the substantial spatial variability between cores over the 10 year period is diminished over the 100 year record, raising two important implications. First, a multiple-decade assessment of soil accretion and OC burial provides a more conservative estimate and is likely to be most relevant for forecasting these rates relative to long-term processes of sea level rise and climate change mitigation. Second, a small number of sampling locations are better able to account for spatial variability over the longer periods than for the shorter periods. The site average 100 year OC burial rate, 123 ± 19 (standard deviation) g m-2yr-1, is low compared with global mangrove values. High TN and TP burial rates in recent decades may lead to increased soil carbon remineralization, contributing to the low carbon burial rates. Finally, the strong correlation between OC burial and accretion across this site signals the substantial contribution of OC to soil building in addition to the ecosystem service of CO2 sequestration.

  4. Pseudomonas aeruginosa RRALC3 Enhances the Biomass, Nutrient and Carbon Contents of Pongamia pinnata Seedlings in Degraded Forest Soil.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parthasarathy Radhapriya

    Full Text Available The study was aimed at assessing the effects of indigenous Plant Growth Promoting Bacterium (PGPB on the legume Pongamia pinnata in the degraded soil of the Nanmangalam Reserve Forest (NRF under nursery conditions. In total, 160 diazotrophs were isolated from three different nitrogen-free semi-solid media (LGI, Nfb, and JMV. Amongst these isolates, Pseudomonas aeruginosa RRALC3 exhibited the maximum ammonia production and hence was selected for further studies. RRALC3 was found to possess multiple plant growth promoting traits such as nitrogen accumulation (120.6ppm; it yielded a positive amplicon with nifH specific primers, tested positive for Indole Acetic Acid (IAA; 18.3μg/ml and siderophore production, tested negative for HCN production and was observed to promote solubilization of phosphate, silicate and zinc in the plate assay. The 16S rDNA sequence of RRALC3 exhibited 99% sequence similarity to Pseudomonas aeruginosa JCM5962. Absence of virulence genes and non-hemolytic activity indicated that RRALC3 is unlikely to be a human pathogen. When the effects of RRALC3 on promotion of plant growth was tested in Pongamia pinnata, it was observed that in Pongamia seedlings treated with a combination of RRALC3 and chemical fertilizer, the dry matter increased by 30.75%. Nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium uptake increased by 34.1%, 27.08%, and 31.84%, respectively, when compared to control. Significant enhancement of total sugar, amino acids and organic acids content, by 23.4%, 29.39%, and 26.53% respectively, was seen in the root exudates of P. pinnata. The carbon content appreciated by 4-fold, when fertilized seedlings were treated with RRALC3. From the logistic equation, the rapid C accumulation time of Pongamia was computed as 43 days longer than the control when a combination of native PGPB and inorganic fertilizer was applied. The rapid accumulation time of N, P and K in Pongamia when treated with the same combination as above was 15, 40 and

  5. Pseudomonas aeruginosa RRALC3 Enhances the Biomass, Nutrient and Carbon Contents of Pongamia pinnata Seedlings in Degraded Forest Soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radhapriya, Parthasarathy; Ramachandran, Andimuthu; Anandham, Rangasamy; Mahalingam, Sundararajan

    2015-01-01

    The study was aimed at assessing the effects of indigenous Plant Growth Promoting Bacterium (PGPB) on the legume Pongamia pinnata in the degraded soil of the Nanmangalam Reserve Forest (NRF) under nursery conditions. In total, 160 diazotrophs were isolated from three different nitrogen-free semi-solid media (LGI, Nfb, and JMV). Amongst these isolates, Pseudomonas aeruginosa RRALC3 exhibited the maximum ammonia production and hence was selected for further studies. RRALC3 was found to possess multiple plant growth promoting traits such as nitrogen accumulation (120.6ppm); it yielded a positive amplicon with nifH specific primers, tested positive for Indole Acetic Acid (IAA; 18.3μg/ml) and siderophore production, tested negative for HCN production and was observed to promote solubilization of phosphate, silicate and zinc in the plate assay. The 16S rDNA sequence of RRALC3 exhibited 99% sequence similarity to Pseudomonas aeruginosa JCM5962. Absence of virulence genes and non-hemolytic activity indicated that RRALC3 is unlikely to be a human pathogen. When the effects of RRALC3 on promotion of plant growth was tested in Pongamia pinnata, it was observed that in Pongamia seedlings treated with a combination of RRALC3 and chemical fertilizer, the dry matter increased by 30.75%. Nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium uptake increased by 34.1%, 27.08%, and 31.84%, respectively, when compared to control. Significant enhancement of total sugar, amino acids and organic acids content, by 23.4%, 29.39%, and 26.53% respectively, was seen in the root exudates of P. pinnata. The carbon content appreciated by 4-fold, when fertilized seedlings were treated with RRALC3. From the logistic equation, the rapid C accumulation time of Pongamia was computed as 43 days longer than the control when a combination of native PGPB and inorganic fertilizer was applied. The rapid accumulation time of N, P and K in Pongamia when treated with the same combination as above was 15, 40 and 33 days longer

  6. Impact of mangroves and an agriculture-dominated hinterland on the carbon and nutrient biogeochemistry in the Segara Anakan Lagoon, Java, Indonesia.

    OpenAIRE

    Moll, Regine

    2011-01-01

    The Segara Anakan Lagoon on Java, Indonesia, is mainly threatened by sedimentation and mangrove tree logging. The lagoon size decreased by >50% since the 1970´s due to high sedimentation loads from the Citanduy River and therefore the agriculture-dominated hinterland. The nutrient concentrations were significantly higher during the rainy season and mainly derived from the Citanduy River. Also mangrove leaves leached high amounts of nutrients into the system. However, the nutrient concentratio...

  7. Plant biodiversity and soil nitrogen and carbon pools changes as a result of nitrogen deposition at permanent pine plots in Central Russia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komarov, Alexander; Priputina, Irina; Zubkova, Elena; Shanin, Vladimir

    2014-05-01

    We present results of analysis of increased rates of atmospheric nitrogen deposition observed in Central Russia between 1960 and 2010, and dealt with air pollution by NOx, on a biodiversity and main pools of C and N in pine forests of Moscow region, Russia. Shifts in nitrogen availability of three pine plots have been analyzed using presence/absence records on dynamics of understory plant communities (chronosequence consisting of four surveys from 1959-61 up to 2003) and a set of specialist plant species as bioindicators of soil richness. Atmospheric N loads received by ecosystems in 1950-1960 were estimated equal 5-7 kg ha-1 yr-1 with N-NH4 prevalence. In 1975-1990, NOx were more severe air contaminants that increased the N loads up to 15-20 kg ha-1 yr-1. Because of the economic decline of soon after 1990, general air pollution and the N deposition rates in Moscow region reduced, but a short time later started to increase again. We assume that those changes might be caused by atmospheric N input rates and to examine this assumption (i) analyze of species composition in understory has been done using Ellenberg indicator values and Tsyganov interval ecological scales developed for European Russia, and (ii) modeling of dynamics of main C and N pools in forest have been additionally carried out using EFIMOD and ROMUL models. Two nitrogen deposition scenarios have been simulated: (i) the steady background rate of N deposition equal to the one in the middle of last century, and (ii) the real ambient level of N depositions in last 50 yrs. Results have confirmed changes of understory species composition sustaining an eutrophication have been revealed in all plots. Number of specialists which mark rich soil conditions increases from 1950 and reaches maximum at 1990 for all plots. There is a difference between sample plots. Increasing number of specialists for rich conditions is very expressed for the richest mixed pine-lime stand and mixed pine-oak stand. Number of

  8. Strategies for chemically healthy public swimming pools

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kamilla Marie Speht

    overview of the strategies which can be used to achieve microbiological safe water with low levels of DBPs to ensure healthy environment for bathers. There are different approaches to achieve healthy environment in public swimming pools which in this thesis are divided into three strategies: alternatives...... to chlorination, removal of precursors and DBPs, and inhibition of the DBP formation. None of the alternative disinfection agents which are used for private swimming pools are applicable for public swimming pools. Thus chlorine is the most likely future disinfectant in public swimming pools. The...... compound which is less reactive towards chlorine. Ozone is also able to remove combined chlorine and other DBPs but the reaction is slow. Activated carbon is able to adsorb precursors and DBPs except chloramines which are removed by catalytic reaction. Formation of DBPs is unavoidable. However, the...

  9. The impact of nitrogen and phosphorous limitation on the estimated terrestrial carbon balance and warming of land use change over the last 156 yr

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Q. Zhang

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available We examine the impact of land use and land cover change (LULCC over the period from 1850 to 2005 using an Earth System Model that incorporates nitrogen and phosphorous limitation on the terrestrial carbon cycle. We compare the estimated CO2 emissions and warming from land use change in a carbon only version of the model with those from simulations including nitrogen and phosphorous limitation. If we omit nutrients, our results suggest LULCC cools on the global average by about 0.1 °C. Including nutrients reduces this cooling to ~ 0.05 °C. Our results also suggest LULCC has a major impact on total land carbon over the period 1850–2005. In carbon only simulations, the inclusion of LULCC decreases the total additional land carbon stored in 2005 from around 210 Pg C to 85 Pg C. Including nitrogen and phosphorous limitation also decreases the scale of the terrestrial carbon sink to 80 Pg C. In particular, adding LULCC on top of the nutrient limited simulations changes the sign of the terrestrial carbon flux from a sink to a source (12 Pg C. The CO2 emission from LULCC from 1850 to 2005 is estimated to be 130 Pg C for carbon only simulation, or 97 Pg C if nutrient limitation is accounted for in our model. The difference between these two estimates of CO2 emissions from LULCC largely results from the weaker response of photosynthesis to increased CO2 and smaller carbon pool sizes, and therefore lower carbon loss from plant and wood product carbon pools under nutrient limitation. We suggest that nutrient limitation should be accounted in simulating the effects of LULCC on the past climate and on the past and future carbon budget.

  10. On nutrients and trace metals: Effects from Enhanced Weathering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amann, T.; Hartmann, J.

    2015-12-01

    The application of rock flour on suitable land ("Enhanced Weathering") is one proposed strategy to reduce the increase of atmospheric CO2 concentrations. At the same time it is an old and established method to add fertiliser and influence soil properties. Investigations of this method focused on the impact on the carbonate system, as well as on engineering aspects of a large-scale application, but potential side effects were never discussed quantitatively. We analysed about 120,000 geochemically characterised volcanic rock samples from the literature. Applying basic statistics, theoretical release rates of nutrients and potential contaminants by Enhanced Weathering were evaluated for typical rock types. Applied rock material can contain significant amounts of essential or beneficial nutrients (potassium, phosphorus, micronutrients). Their release can partly cover the demand of major crops like wheat, rice or corn, thereby increasing crop yield on degraded soils. However, the concentrations of considered elements are variable within a specific rock type, depending on the geological setting. High heavy metal concentrations are found in (ultra-) basic rocks, the class with the highest CO2 drawdown potential. More acidic rocks contain less or no critical amounts, but sequester less CO2. Findings show that the rock selection determines the capability to supply significant amounts of nutrients, which could partly substitute industrial mineral fertiliser usage. At the same time, the release of harmful trace element has to be considered. Through careful selection of regionally available rocks, benefits could be maximised and drawbacks reduced. The deployment of Enhanced Weathering to sequester CO2 and to ameliorate soils necessitates an ecosystem management, considering the release and fate of weathered elements in plants, soils and water. Cropland with degraded soils would benefit while having a net negative CO2 effect, while other carbon dioxide removal strategies, like

  11. PDA: Pooled DNA analyzer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Chin-Yu

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Association mapping using abundant single nucleotide polymorphisms is a powerful tool for identifying disease susceptibility genes for complex traits and exploring possible genetic diversity. Genotyping large numbers of SNPs individually is performed routinely but is cost prohibitive for large-scale genetic studies. DNA pooling is a reliable and cost-saving alternative genotyping method. However, no software has been developed for complete pooled-DNA analyses, including data standardization, allele frequency estimation, and single/multipoint DNA pooling association tests. This motivated the development of the software, 'PDA' (Pooled DNA Analyzer, to analyze pooled DNA data. Results We develop the software, PDA, for the analysis of pooled-DNA data. PDA is originally implemented with the MATLAB® language, but it can also be executed on a Windows system without installing the MATLAB®. PDA provides estimates of the coefficient of preferential amplification and allele frequency. PDA considers an extended single-point association test, which can compare allele frequencies between two DNA pools constructed under different experimental conditions. Moreover, PDA also provides novel chromosome-wide multipoint association tests based on p-value combinations and a sliding-window concept. This new multipoint testing procedure overcomes a computational bottleneck of conventional haplotype-oriented multipoint methods in DNA pooling analyses and can handle data sets having a large pool size and/or large numbers of polymorphic markers. All of the PDA functions are illustrated in the four bona fide examples. Conclusion PDA is simple to operate and does not require that users have a strong statistical background. The software is available at http://www.ibms.sinica.edu.tw/%7Ecsjfann/first%20flow/pda.htm.

  12. Implications of elevated CO2 on pelagic carbon fluxes in an Arctic mesocosm study – an elemental mass balance approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Czerny

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies on the impacts of ocean acidification on pelagic communities have identified changes in carbon to nutrient dynamics with related shifts in elemental stoichiometry. In principle, mesocosm experiments provide the opportunity of determining temporal dynamics of all relevant carbon and nutrient pools and, thus, calculating elemental budgets. In practice, attempts to budget mesocosm enclosures are often hampered by uncertainties in some of the measured pools and fluxes, in particular due to uncertainties in constraining air–sea gas exchange, particle sinking, and wall growth. In an Arctic mesocosm study on ocean acidification applying KOSMOS (Kiel Off-Shore Mesocosms for future Ocean Simulation, all relevant element pools and fluxes of carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus were measured, using an improved experimental design intended to narrow down the mentioned uncertainties. Water-column concentrations of particulate and dissolved organic and inorganic matter were determined daily. New approaches for quantitative estimates of material sinking to the bottom of the mesocosms and gas exchange in 48 h temporal resolution as well as estimates of wall growth were developed to close the gaps in element budgets. However, losses elements from the budgets into a sum of insufficiently determined pools were detected, and are principally unavoidable in mesocosm investigation. The comparison of variability patterns of all single measured datasets revealed analytic precision to be the main issue in determination of budgets. Uncertainties in dissolved organic carbon (DOC, nitrogen (DON and particulate organic phosphorus (POP were much higher than the summed error in determination of the same elements in all other pools. With estimates provided for all other major elemental pools, mass balance calculations could be used to infer the temporal development of DOC, DON and POP pools. Future elevated pCO2 was found to enhance net autotrophic community carbon

  13. Estoques totais de carbono orgânico e seus compartimentos em argissolo sob floresta e sob milho cultivado com adubação mineral e orgânica Total stocks of organic carbon and its pools in acrisols under forest and under maize cultivated with mineral and organic fertilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. F. C. Leite

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Os estoques de matéria orgânica do solo e seus compartimentos são importantes na disponibilidade de nutrientes, agregação do solo e no fluxo de gases de efeito estufa entre a superfície terrestre e a atmosfera. Os objetivos deste estudo foram: (a avaliar os efeitos de sistemas de produção de milho sob adubação orgânica e mineral nos estoques totais de carbono orgânico (COT e nitrogênio (NT e de compartimentos de carbono (C orgânico, em um Argissolo Vermelho-Amarelo, e (b estimar a contribuição desses sistemas no seqüestro ou emissão de CO2 atmosférico. Os sistemas de produção, durante 16 anos, constaram de combinações entre dois níveis (0 e 1 de composto orgânico, nas doses de 0 e 40 m³ ha-1 (AO, e três níveis (0, 1 e 2 de adubo mineral, nas doses de 0, 250 (AM1, e 500 kg ha-1 (AM2 da fórmula 4-14-8. Uma área sob Floresta Atlântica (FA adjacente ao experimento foi amostrada e usada como referência de um estado de equilíbrio. Os sistemas de produção em que o composto orgânico foi adicionado apresentaram maiores estoques de COT, NT, carbono da fração leve (C FL e carbono lábil (C L do que os sistemas sem adubação ou apenas com adubação mineral, o que confirma a adubação orgânica como estratégia de manejo importante para a melhoria da qualidade do solo. No entanto, no solo sob FA, os estoques de COT, NT e dos compartimentos de C foram maiores do que aqueles observados nos sistemas de produção. Em virtude da maior sensibilidade, os estoques dos compartimentos do C FL e do C L foram reduzidos em maior intensidade do que os estoques de COT, razão por que podem ser usados como indicadores da interferência antrópica ou das mudanças no manejo sobre o estado da matéria orgânica do solo.Soil organic matter and its different pools have key importance in nutrient availability, soil aggregation, and in the greenhouse gas fluxes between the earth surface and the atmosphere. The objectives of this study

  14. Vitamin D Pooling Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Vitamin D Pooling Project of Rarer Cancers brought together investigators from 10 cohorts to conduct a large prospective epidemiologic study of the association between vitamin D status and seven rarer cancers.

  15. Swimming Pool Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Spread the Word Shop AAP Find a Pediatrician Safety & Prevention Immunizations All Around At Home At Play ... Español Text Size Email Print Share Swimming Pool Safety Page Content ​What is the best way to ...

  16. Pools for the Handicapped.

    Science.gov (United States)

    American School and University, 1979

    1979-01-01

    Three institutions in Ohio now stress hydrotherapy and water recreation as important parts of individual educational programs for the handicapped. Specially designed and adapted pools provide freedom of movement and ego building as well as physical education and recreation. (Author)

  17. Dynamics of a producer-grazer model incorporating the effects of excess food nutrient content on grazer's growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peace, Angela; Wang, Hao; Kuang, Yang

    2014-09-01

    Modeling under the framework of ecological stoichiometric allows the investigation of the effects of food quality on food web population dynamics. Recent discoveries in ecological stoichiometry suggest that grazer dynamics are affected by insufficient food nutrient content (low phosphorus (P)/carbon (C) ratio) as well as excess food nutrient content (high P:C). This phenomenon is known as the "stoichiometric knife edge." While previous models have captured this phenomenon, they do not explicitly track P in the producer or in the media that supports the producer, which brings questions to the validity of their predictions. Here, we extend a Lotka-Volterra-type stoichiometric model by mechanistically deriving and tracking P in the producer and free P in the environment in order to investigate the growth response of Daphnia to algae of varying P:C ratios. Bifurcation analysis and numerical simulations of the full model, that explicitly tracks phosphorus, lead to quantitative different predictions than previous models that neglect to track free nutrients. The full model shows that the fate of the grazer population can be very sensitive to excess nutrient concentrations. Dynamical free nutrient pool seems to induce extreme grazer population density changes when total nutrient is in an intermediate range. PMID:25124765

  18. Rhizosphere priming: a nutrient perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhizosphere priming is the change in decomposition of soil organic matter (SOM) caused by root activity. Rhizosphere priming plays a crucial role in soil carbon (C) dynamics and their response to global climate change. Rhizosphere priming may be affected by soil nutrient availability, but rhizospher...

  19. Stade NPP. Dismantling of the reactor pool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scharf, Daniel; Dziwis, Joachim [E.ON Anlagenservice GmbH Nukleartechnik, Gelsenkirchen (Germany); Kemp, Lutz-Hagen [KKW Stade GmbH und Co. oHG, Stade (Germany)

    2012-11-01

    Within the scope of the 4{sup th} partial decommissioning permission of Stade NPP the activated and contaminated structures of the reactor pool had to be dismantled in order to gain a completely non-radioactive reactor pool area for the subsequent clearance measurement of the reactor building. In order to achieve the aim it was intended to remove the activated pool liner sheets, its activated framework and several contaminated ventilation channels made of stainless steel, the concrete walls of the reactor pool entirely or in parts depending on their activation level, as well as the remaining activated carbon steel structures of the reactor pool bottom. Embedded in the concrete walls there were several highly contaminated excore tubes and the contaminated pool top edge, which were intended to be removed to its full extent. The contract of the Stade NPP initiated reactor pool dismantling project had been awarded to E.ON Anlagenservice GmbH (EAS) and its subsupplier sat. Kerntechnik GmbH for the concrete dismantling works and was performed as follows. In order to minimize the radiation level in the main working area in accordance with the ALARA principle, the liner sheets and middle parts of its framework were removed by means of angle grinders first, as they were the most dose rate relevant parts. As a result the primary average radiation level in the reactor pool (measured in a distance of 500 mm from the walls) was lowered from 40 {mu}Sv/h to less than 2 {mu}Sv/h. After the minimization of the radiation level in the working area the main dismantling step started with the cutting of the reactor pool walls in blocks by means of diamond rope cutters. Once a concrete block was cut out, it was transported into the fuel pool by means of a crane and crane fork, examined radiologically, marked area by area and segmented to debris by means of an electrical excavator with a hydraulic chisel. Afterwards the debris and carbon steel parts were fractioned and packed for further

  20. Stade NPP. Dismantling of the reactor pool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Within the scope of the 4th partial decommissioning permission of Stade NPP the activated and contaminated structures of the reactor pool had to be dismantled in order to gain a completely non-radioactive reactor pool area for the subsequent clearance measurement of the reactor building. In order to achieve the aim it was intended to remove the activated pool liner sheets, its activated framework and several contaminated ventilation channels made of stainless steel, the concrete walls of the reactor pool entirely or in parts depending on their activation level, as well as the remaining activated carbon steel structures of the reactor pool bottom. Embedded in the concrete walls there were several highly contaminated excore tubes and the contaminated pool top edge, which were intended to be removed to its full extent. The contract of the Stade NPP initiated reactor pool dismantling project had been awarded to E.ON Anlagenservice GmbH (EAS) and its subsupplier sat. Kerntechnik GmbH for the concrete dismantling works and was performed as follows. In order to minimize the radiation level in the main working area in accordance with the ALARA principle, the liner sheets and middle parts of its framework were removed by means of angle grinders first, as they were the most dose rate relevant parts. As a result the primary average radiation level in the reactor pool (measured in a distance of 500 mm from the walls) was lowered from 40 μSv/h to less than 2 μSv/h. After the minimization of the radiation level in the working area the main dismantling step started with the cutting of the reactor pool walls in blocks by means of diamond rope cutters. Once a concrete block was cut out, it was transported into the fuel pool by means of a crane and crane fork, examined radiologically, marked area by area and segmented to debris by means of an electrical excavator with a hydraulic chisel. Afterwards the debris and carbon steel parts were fractioned and packed for further treatment

  1. MICROBIAL ENZYME ACTIVITY FOR CHARACTERIZING NUTRIENT LOADING TO GREAT LAKES COASTAL WETLANDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Energy and material flows in aquatic ecosystems are mediated by microbial carbon and nutrient cycling. Extracellular enzymes produced by the microbial community aid in the degradation of organic matter and the resultant acquisition of limiting nutrients. Organic carbon sequestrat...

  2. Labeling of carbon pools in Bradyrhizobium japonicum and Rhizobium leguminosarum bv viciae bacteroids following incubation of intact nodules with 14CO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of the work reported here was to ascertain that the patterns of labeling seen in isolated bacteroids also occurred in bacteroids in intact nodules and to observe early metabolic events following exposure of intact nodules to 14CO2. Intact nodules of soybean (Glycine max L. Merr. cv Ripley) inoculated with Bradyrhizobium japonicum USDA 110 and pea (Pisum sativum L. cv Progress 9) inoculated with Rhizobium leguminosarum by viciae isolate 128C53 were detached and immediately fed 14CO2 for 1 to 6 min. Bacteroids were purified from these nodules in 5 to 7 min after the feeding period. In the cytosol from both soybean and pea nodules, malate had the highest radioactivity, followed by citrate and aspartate. In peas, asparagine labeling equaled that of aspartate. In B. japonicum bacteroids, malate was the most rapidly labeled compound, and the rate of glutamate labeling was 67% of the rate of malate labeling. Aspartate and alanine were the next most rapidly labeled compounds. R. leguminosarum bacteroids had very low amounts of 14C and, after a 1-min feeding, malate contained 90% of the radioactivity in the organic acid fraction. Only a trace of activity was found in aspartate, whereas the rate of glutamate and alanine labeling approached that of malate after 6 min of feeding. Under the conditions studied, malate was the major form of labeled carbon supplied to both types of bacteroids. These results with intact nodules confirm our earlier results with isolated bacteroids, which showed that a significant proportion of provided labeled substrate, such as malate, is diverted to glutamate. This supports the conclusion that microaerobic conditions in nodules influence carbon metabolism in bacteroids. (author)

  3. Phosphorus mobilization by sulfide oxidation in carbonate sediments from seagrass and unvegetated sites in the US Virgin Islands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Henning; Pedersen, Ole; Koch, M. R.;

    sources of nutrients compared to pristine sites. These results, along with those from our earlier studies in Florida Bay, a carbonate seagrass-dominated estuary, highlight the potential importance of P release from acid dissolution of carbonate-bound P pools. Session #:046 Date: 01-29-09 Time: 16:45......PHOSPHORUS MOBILIZATION BY SULFIDE OXIDATION IN CARBONATE SEDIMENTS FROM SEAGRASS AND UNVEGETATED SITES IN THE US VIRGIN ISLANDS Sulfide produced by sulfate reduction (SR) can be oxidized by seagrass root O2 flux in shallow carbonate sediments low in Fe. The sulfuric acid produced from sulfide...

  4. The Future of Pooling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Peter C.; Fone, Martin

    1997-01-01

    Discusses seven propositions underlying the strategies that insurance pools can, will, and must pursue: (1) risk management versus risk financing; (2) elimination of windfall advantages; (3) the maintenance of market-dominant status; (4) cost leadership; (5) client focus; (6) innovation and diversification; and (7) leadership challenges. A sidebar…

  5. Liquid sodium pool fires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experimental sodium pool combustion results have led to a definition of the combustion kinetics, and have revealed the hazards of sodium-concrete contact reactions and the possible ignition of organic matter (paint) by hydration of sodium peroxide aerosols. Analysis of these test results shows that the controlling mechanism is sodium evaporation diffusion. (author)

  6. Partitioning of carbon sources among functional pools to investigate short-term priming effects of biochar in soil: A (13)C study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerré, Bart; Hernandez-Soriano, Maria C; Smolders, Erik

    2016-03-15

    Biochar sequesters carbon (C) in soils because of its prolonged residence time, ranging from several years to millennia. In addition, biochar can promote indirect C-sequestration by increasing crop yield while, potentially, reducing C-mineralization. This laboratory study was set up to evaluate effects of biochar on C-mineralization with due attention to source appointment by using (13)C isotope signatures. An arable soil (S) (7.9g organic C, OCkg(-1)) was amended (single dose of 10gkg(-1) soil) with dried, grinded maize stover (leaves and stalks), either natural (R) or (13)C enriched (R*), and/or biochar (B/B*) prepared from the maize stover residues (450°C). Accordingly, seven different combinations were set up (S, SR, SB, SR*, SB*, SRB*, SR*B) to trace the source of C in CO2 (180days), dissolved organic-C (115days) and OC in soil aggregate fractions (90days). The application of biochar to soil reduced the mineralization of native soil organic C but the effect on maize stover-C mineralization was not consistent. Biochar application decreased the mineralization of the non-enriched maize stover after 90days, this being consistent with a significant reduction of dissolved organic C concentration from 45 to 18mgL(-1). However, no significant effect was observed for the enriched maize stover, presumably due to differences between the natural and enriched materials. The combined addition of biochar and enriched maize stover significantly increased (twofold) the presence of native soil organic C or maize derived C in the free microaggregate fraction relative to soil added only with stover. Although consistent effects among C sources and biochar materials remains elusive, our outcomes indicate that some biochar products can reduce mineralization and solubilization of other sources of C while promoting their physical protection in soil particles. PMID:26780129

  7. 高端有机碳营养:腐植酸优势定位的新高度%High Level Organic Carbon Nutrient:A New Level of Humic Acid’s Advantage Position

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    廖宗文; 刘可星; 毛小云

    2014-01-01

    The use of Organic carbon fertilizer in farm land and greenhouse could eliminate the stress of carbon on plant yield and quality. In this paper, some concepts were corrected and clariifcated based on the intrudunction of classiifca-tion of nutrientof humic acid organic carbon fertilizer and the concept of organic carbon nutrient. The development of organic carbon fertilizer showed nice prospect in future.%有机碳肥广泛用于大田及大棚,可有效地消除碳短板对作物产量和质量的抑制。本文主要介绍了腐植酸有机碳肥的分类、养分以及有机碳营养的概念,深入研究了腐植酸的有机碳营养作用,并提出了一些有待纠正或澄清的概念。有机碳营养的研究及有机碳肥的开发具有广阔的前景。

  8. Erosão hídrica em um Nitossolo Háplico submetido a diferentes sistemas de manejo sob chuva simulada. II - Perdas de nutrientes e carbono orgânico Water erosion on an Hapludox submitted to different soil managements under simulated rainfall. II - Nutrient and organic carbon losses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Bertol

    2004-12-01

    -0,025 m de profundidade do solo de onde o sedimento foi removido.Water erosion extracts nutrients from farming areas and causes soil impoverishment and environmental contamination outside the erosion site. A rotating-boom rainfall simulator operated at a constant rainfall intensity of 64 mm h-1 and 0.2083 MJ ha-1 mm-1 kinetic energy was used to investigate nutrient and organic carbon losses by water erosion and related parameters in six management systems in corn and bean crops. The experiments were carried out on a clayey loam structured soil (Hapludox with 0.165 m m-1 average slope on the Southern Plateau of Santa Catarina State, Brazil, from March 2001 to April 2003. Three rainfall simulations were applied to the corn and three to the bean crop according to the following treatments: plowing + disking (bare soil (SSC, corn and bean crop under plowing + disking on desiccated residue (PCO, corn and bean crop under no-tillage on desiccated residue on previously prepared soil (SDI, corn and bean crop under no-tillage on desiccated residue on never prepared soil (SDD, corn and bean crop under no-tillage on burned residue on never prepared soil (SDQ, and improved native pasture (CNM. Results showed that nutrients and organic carbon concentrations in runoff sediments were higher under conservation tillage than conventional tillage, while the total losses presented inverse behavior. In the water of the runoff, NH4+ and NO3- concentrations and losses were higher in the corn than in bean while P was lower. K concentrations were higher in corn and losses lower. Soil impoverishment rates were generally close to the unit for nutrients and organic carbon. Nutrients and organic carbon concentrations in erosion sediments were linearly and positively correlated with the chemical composition of the 0-0.025 m soil layer.

  9. Backfitting swimming pool reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calculations based on measurements in a critical assembly, and experiments to disclose fuel element surface temperatures in case of accidents like stopping of primary coolant flow during full power operation, have shown that the power of the swimming pool type research reactor FRG-2 (15 MW, operating since 1967) might be raised to 21 MW within the present rules of science and technology, without major alterations of the pool buildings and the cooling systems. A backfitting program is carried through to adjust the reactor control systems of FRG-2 and FRG-1 (5 MW, housed in the same reactor hall) to the present safety rules and recommendations, to ensure FRG-2 operation at 21 MW for the next decade. (author)

  10. CERN Electronics Pool presentations

    CERN Multimedia

    2011-01-01

    The CERN Electronics Pool has organised a series of presentations in collaboration with oscilloscope manufacturers. The last one will take place according to the schedule below.   Time will be available at the end of the presentation to discuss your personal needs. The Agilent presentation had to be postponed and will be organised later. -     Lecroy: Thursday, 24 November 2011, in 530-R-030, 14:00 to 16:30.

  11. Swimming Pools and Molluscum Contagiosum

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Travelers' Health: Smallpox & Other Orthopoxvirus-Associated Infections Poxvirus Swimming Pools Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir The ... often ask if molluscum virus can spread in swimming pools. There is also concern that it can ...

  12. Large molten pool heat transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This workshop on large molten pool heat transfer is composed of 5 sessions which titles are: feasibility of in-vessel core debris cooling; experiments on molten pool heat transfer; calculational efforts on molten pool convection; heat transfer to the surrounding water, experimental techniques; future experiments and ex-vessel studies (RASPLAV, TOLBIAC, BALI, SULTAN, CORVIS, VULCANO, CORINE programs)

  13. Impacts of post-harvest slash and live-tree retention on biomass and nutrient stocks in Populus tremuloides Michx.-dominated forests, northern Minnesota, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klockow, Paul A.; D'Amato, Anthony W.; Bradford, John B.

    2013-01-01

    Globally, there is widespread interest in using forest-derived biomass as a source of bioenergy. While conventional timber harvesting generally removes only merchantable tree boles, harvesting biomass feedstock can remove all forms of woody biomass (i.e., live and dead standing woody vegetation, downed woody debris, and stumps) resulting in a greater loss of biomass and nutrients as well as more severe habitat alteration. To investigate the potential impacts of this practice, this study examined the initial impacts (pre- and post-harvest) of various levels of slash and live-tree retention on biomass and nutrient stocks, including carbon (C), nitrogen (N), calcium (Ca), potassium (K), and phosphorus (P), in Populus tremuloides Michx.-dominated forests of northern Minnesota, USA. Treatments examined included three levels of slash retention, whole-tree harvest (WTH), 20% slash retention (20SR), and stem-only harvest (SOH), factored with three levels of green-tree retention, no trees retained (NONE), dispersed retention (DISP), and aggregate retention (AGR). Slash retention was the primary factor affecting post-harvest biomass and nutrient stocks, including woody debris pools. Compared to the unharvested control, stocks of biomass, carbon, and nutrients, including N, Ca, K, and P, in woody debris were higher in all treatments. Stem-only harvests typically contained greater biomass and nutrient stocks than WTH, although biomass and nutrients within 20SR, a level recommended by biomass harvesting guidelines in the US and worldwide, generally did not differ from WTH or SOH. Biomass in smaller-diameter slash material (typically 2.5-22.5 cm in diameter) dominated the woody debris pool following harvest regardless of slash retention level. Trends among treatments in this diameter range were generally similar to those in the total woody debris pool. Specifically, SOH contained significantly greater amounts of biomass than WTH while 20SR was not different from either WTH or

  14. Production possibility frontiers in phototroph:heterotroph symbioses: trade-offs in allocating fixed carbon pools and the challenges these alternatives present for understanding the acquisition of intracellular habitats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MalcolmS.Hill

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Intracellular habitats have been invaded by a remarkable diversity of organisms, and strategies employed to successfully reside in another species’ cellular space are varied. Common selective pressures may be experienced in symbioses involving phototrophic symbionts and heterotrophic hosts. Here I refine and elaborate the Arrested Phagosome Hypothesis that proposes a mechanism that phototrophs use to gain access to their host’s intracellular habitat. I employ the economic concept of production possibility frontiers (PPF as a useful heuristic to clearly define the trade-offs that an intracellular phototroph is likely to face as it allocates photosynthetically-derived pools of energy. Fixed carbon can fuel basic metabolism/respiration, it can support mitotic division, or it can be translocated to the host. Excess photosynthate can be stored for future use. Thus, gross photosynthetic productivity can be divided among these four general categories, and natural selection will favor phenotypes that best match the demands presented to the symbiont by the host cellular habitat. The PPF highlights trade-offs that exist between investment in growth (i.e., mitosis or residency (i.e., translocating material to the host. Insights gained from this perspective might help explain phenomena such as coral bleaching because deficits in photosynthetic production are likely to diminish a symbiont’s ability to “afford” the costs of intracellular residency. I highlight deficits in our current understanding of host:symbiont interactions at the molecular, genetic, and cellular level, and I also discuss how semantic differences among scientists working with different symbiont systems may diminish the rate of increase in our understanding of phototrophic-based associations. I argue that adopting interdisciplinary (in this case, inter-symbiont-system perspectives will lead to advances in our general understanding of the phototrophic symbiont’s intracellular

  15. Modeling greenhouse gas emissions (CO2, N2O, CH4) from managed arable soils with a fully coupled hydrology-biogeochemical modeling system simulating water and nutrient transport and associated carbon and nitrogen cycling at catchment scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klatt, Steffen; Haas, Edwin; Kraus, David; Kiese, Ralf; Butterbach-Bahl, Klaus; Kraft, Philipp; Plesca, Ina; Breuer, Lutz; Zhu, Bo; Zhou, Minghua; Zhang, Wei; Zheng, Xunhua; Wlotzka, Martin; Heuveline, Vincent

    2014-05-01

    The use of mineral nitrogen fertilizer sustains the global food production and therefore the livelihood of human kind. The rise in world population will put pressure on the global agricultural system to increase its productivity leading most likely to an intensification of mineral nitrogen fertilizer use. The fate of excess nitrogen and its distribution within landscapes is manifold. Process knowledge on the site scale has rapidly grown in recent years and models have been developed to simulate carbon and nitrogen cycling in managed ecosystems on the site scale. Despite first regional studies, the carbon and nitrogen cycling on the landscape or catchment scale is not fully understood. In this study we present a newly developed modelling approach by coupling the fully distributed hydrology model CMF (catchment modelling framework) to the process based regional ecosystem model LandscapeDNDC for the investigation of hydrological processes and carbon and nitrogen transport and cycling, with a focus on nutrient displacement and resulting greenhouse gas emissions in a small catchment at the Yanting Agro-ecological Experimental Station of Purple Soil, Sichuan province, China. The catchment hosts cypress forests on the outer regions, arable fields on the sloping croplands cultivated with wheat-maize rotations and paddy rice fields in the lowland. The catchment consists of 300 polygons vertically stratified into 10 soil layers. Ecosystem states (soil water content and nutrients) and fluxes (evapotranspiration) are exchanged between the models at high temporal scales (hourly to daily) forming a 3-dimensional model application. The water flux and nutrients transport in the soil is modelled using a 3D Richards/Darcy approach for subsurface fluxes with a kinematic wave approach for surface water runoff and the evapotranspiration is based on Penman-Monteith. Biogeochemical processes are modelled by LandscapeDNDC, including soil microclimate, plant growth and biomass allocation

  16. The Productive Ligurian Pool

    CERN Document Server

    Casella, E; Couvelard, X; Caldeira, R M A

    2011-01-01

    In contrast with the behavior of the eddies in the open-ocean, the sub-mesoscale eddies generated in the constricted Ligurian Basin (NW Mediterranean), are unproductive but their combined effect, arranged in a rim-like fashion, contributes to the containment of a Productive Ligurian Pool (PLP). Data de- rived from MODIS satellite sensor showed persistent higher chlorophyll con- centrations in the centre of the basin, concurrent with high EKE values in its surroundings, derived from AVISO altimetry merged products. This sug- gested that this 'productive pool' is maintained by the intense (sub)mesoscale eddy activity in the rim. Numerical realistic experiments, using a Regional Ocean Model System, forced by MERCATOR and by a high-resolution COSMO- l7 atmospheric model, also showed that most of the sub-mesoscale eddies, during 2009 and 2010, are concentrated in the rim surrounding the basin, contributing to the formation of a basin-scale cyclonic gyre. We hypothesized that the interaction between eddies in the r...

  17. COLPEX - Cold Pool Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, H.; Price, J.; Horlacher, V.; Sheridan, P. F.; Vosper, S. B.; Brown, A. R.; Mobbs, S. D.; Ross, A. N.

    2009-04-01

    Planning has started towards designing a new field campaign aimed at studying the behaviour of the boundary layer over complex terrain. Of specific interest is the formation of cold-pools in valleys during stable night-time conditions. The field campaign will run continuously until the end of the winter in 2009/10. The experiment will make use of a wide variety of ground-based sensors including turbulence towers, automatic weather stations, Doppler lidar, radiation sensors and soil temperature probes. We also hope to deploy an instrumented car and a tethered balloon facility for limited periods. Data from the field campaign will be used for a number of purposes. Firstly, to increase our understanding of how the valley cold pools form and why, for instance, some valleys offer a more favourable environment for their formation than others. Secondly, to investigate the formation and dissipation of fog in complex terrain. Thirdly, the data set will also be used to help validate and develop the Met Office Unified Model at high resolution. An area for the experiment has been identified in the Shropshire/Powis area of the UK where a network of valleys and low hills exist with a typical valley width of ~1.5km and hill top to valley floor heights of 75-200m. 0m.

  18. Increased accumulation of polyhydroxybutyrate in divergent cyanobacteria under nutrient-deprived photoautotrophy: An efficient conversion of solar energy and carbon dioxide to polyhydroxybutyrate by Calothrix scytonemicola TISTR 8095.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaewbai-Ngam, Auratai; Incharoensakdi, Aran; Monshupanee, Tanakarn

    2016-07-01

    The cellular PHB content was determined in 137 strains of cyanobacteria representing 88 species in 26 genera under six photoautotrophic nutrient conditions. One hundred and thirty-four strains were PHB producers. The PHB contents of these 134 strains were subtle under normal growth condition, but were significantly increased in 63 strains under nitrogen deprivation (-N), a higher frequency than with phosphate and/or potassium and all-nutrient deprivation. A high PHB accumulation was not associated with any particular evolutionary groups, but was strain specific. The filamentous Calothrix scytonemicola TISTR 8095 produced 356.5±63.4mg/L PHB under -N from a biomass of 1396.6±66.1mg/L, giving a PHB content of 25.4±3.5% (w/w dry weight). This PHB productivity is equivalent to the CO2 consumption of 729.2±129.8mg/L. The maximum energy conversion from solar energy to PHB obtained by C. scytonemicola TISTR 8095 was 1.42±0.30%. PMID:27130227

  19. NATIVE PLANTS FOR OPTIMIZING CARBON SEQUESTRATION IN RECLAIMED LANDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    P. UNKEFER; M. EBINGER; ET AL

    2001-02-01

    Carbon emissions and atmospheric concentrations are expected to continue to increase through the next century unless major changes are made in the way carbon is managed. Managing carbon has emerged as a pressing national energy and environmental need that will drive national policies and treaties through the coming decades. Addressing carbon management is now a major priority for DOE and the nation. One way to manage carbon is to use energy more efficiently to reduce our need for major energy and carbon source-fossil fuel combustion. Another way is to increase our use of low-carbon and carbon free fuels and technologies. A third way, and the focus of this proposal, is carbon sequestration, in which carbon is captured and stored thereby mitigating carbon emissions. Sequestration of carbon in the terrestrial biosphere has emerged as the principle means by which the US will meet its near-term international and economic requirements for reducing net carbon emissions (DOE Carbon Sequestration: State of the Science. 1999; IGBP 1998). Terrestrial carbon sequestration provides three major advantages. First, terrestrial carbon pools and fluxes are of sufficient magnitude to effectively mitigate national and even global carbon emissions. The terrestrial biosphere stores {approximately}2060 GigaTons of carbon and transfers approximately 120 GigaTons of carbon per year between the atmosphere and the earth's surface, whereas the current global annual emissions are about 6 GigaTons. Second, we can rapidly and readily modify existing management practices to increase carbon sequestration in our extensive forest, range, and croplands. Third, increasing soil carbon is without negative environment consequences and indeed positively impacts land productivity. The terrestrial carbon cycle is dependent on several interrelationships between plants and soils. Because the soil carbon pool ({approximately}1500 Giga Tons) is approximately three times that in terrestrial vegetation

  20. Choosing Nutrient Dense Foods

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Bales, Ph.D., R.D.: So what nutrient density does is allow you to choose between closely ... enough calories for the day, either way, nutrient density is a very important concept.

  1. Choosing Nutrient Dense Foods

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... beneficial nutrients. For example, fruits and vegetables not only offer important vitamins and minerals, but also provide ... ingredient of a nutrient-dense diet. They not only provide vitamins and minerals but also fiber. Dr. ...

  2. Choosing Nutrient Dense Foods

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... are high in nutrients and low in calories. Eating this way is especially important as you age. ... nutrients and not empty calories. Narrator: This means eating foods that contain vitamins, minerals, complex carbohydrates, lean ...

  3. Choosing Nutrient Dense Foods

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... variety of nutrients from a variety of food groups. A balanced approach is best. Narrator: Dietary guidelines ... your daily calorie level. Each of the food groups contains a variety of beneficial nutrients. For example, ...

  4. Macroinvertebrate community assembly in pools created during peatland restoration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Lee E; Ramchunder, Sorain J; Beadle, Jeannie M; Holden, Joseph

    2016-11-01

    Many degraded ecosystems are subject to restoration attempts, providing new opportunities to unravel the processes of ecological community assembly. Restoration of previously drained northern peatlands, primarily to promote peat and carbon accumulation, has created hundreds of thousands of new open water pools. We assessed the potential benefits of this wetland restoration for aquatic biodiversity, and how communities reassemble, by comparing pool ecosystems in regions of the UK Pennines on intact (never drained) versus restored (blocked drainage-ditches) peatland. We also evaluated the conceptual idea that comparing reference ecosystems in terms of their compositional similarity to null assemblages (and thus the relative importance of stochastic versus deterministic assembly) can guide evaluations of restoration success better than analyses of community composition or diversity. Community composition data highlighted some differences in the macroinvertebrate composition of restored pools compared to undisturbed peatland pools, which could be used to suggest that alternative end-points to restoration were influenced by stochastic processes. However, widely used diversity metrics indicated no differences between undisturbed and restored pools. Novel evaluations of restoration using null models confirmed the similarity of deterministic assembly processes from the national species pool across all pools. Stochastic elements were important drivers of between-pool differences at the regional-scale but the scale of these effects was also similar across most of the pools studied. The amalgamation of assembly theory into ecosystem restoration monitoring allows us to conclude with more certainty that restoration has been successful from an ecological perspective in these systems. Evaluation of these UK findings compared to those from peatlands across Europe and North America further suggests that restoring peatland pools delivers significant benefits for aquatic fauna by

  5. Invertebrate-mediated nutrient loading increases growth of an intertidal macroalga

    OpenAIRE

    Bracken, Matthew E. S.

    2004-01-01

    Even in nitrogen-replete ecosystems, microhabitats exist where local-scale nutrient limitation occurs. For example, coastal waters of the northeastern Pacific Ocean are characterized by high nitrate concentrations associated with upwelling. However, macroalgae living in high-zone tide pools on adjacent rocky shores are isolated from this upwelled nitrate for extended periods of time, leading to nutrient limitation. When high-intertidal pools are isolated during low tide, invertebrate-excreted...

  6. Mineralization and carbon turnover in subarctic heath soil as affected by warming and additional litter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rinnan, Riikka; Michelsen, Anders; Baath, Erland;

    2007-01-01

    carbon turnover (measured as changes in the pools during a growing-season-long field incubation of soil cores in situ). The mainly N limited bacterial communities had shifted slightly towards limitation by C and P in response to seven growing seasons of warming. This and the significantly increased...... bacterial growth rate under warming may partly explain the observed higher C loss from the warmed soil. This is furthermore consistent with the less dramatic increase in the contents of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and dissolved organic N (DON) in the warmed soil than in the soil from ambient temperature...... during the field incubation. The added litter did not affect the carbon content, but it was a source of nutrients to the soil, and it also tended to increase bacterial growth rate and net mineralization of P. The inorganic N pool decreased during the field incubation of soil cores, especially in the...

  7. The boom in power pools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In connection with the liberalization of the power market there is euphoria in all parts of the world concerning the establishment of power pools. Power pools are to afford the transparency necessary when competition is fiercer, and have benefits for both buyers and vendors. But the technical community expects only a few to have great chances of survival. In Europe, for instance, only one leading power pool is expected to survive in the long term. It will set the power rate index for all players in the market. The other pools might establish themselves in regional niche markets. (orig.)

  8. Strategic inputs into patent pools

    OpenAIRE

    Baron, Justus; Delcamp, Henry

    2010-01-01

    This article explores what factors determine the decision of a patent pool to accept new inputs. We propose a dynamic analysis of 1337 U.S. patent inputs into 7 important pools. This analysis highlights a trade-off between firm and patent characteristics as the determinants of inclusion of patents into pools. For instance we prove that firms already member of the pool or holding large patent portfolios are able to include lower quality patents. These findings can be explained both by bargaini...

  9. Modelling the impact of nitrogen deposition, climate change and nutrient limitations on tree carbon sequestration in Europe for the period 1900-2050

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We modelled the combined effects of past and expected future changes in climate and nitrogen deposition on tree carbon sequestration by European forests for the period 1900-2050. Two scenarios for deposition (current legislation and maximum technically feasible reductions) and two climate scenarios (no change and SRES A1 scenario) were used. Furthermore, the possible limitation of forest growth by calcium, magnesium, potassium and phosphorus is investigated. The area and age structure of the forests was assumed to stay constant to observations during the period 1970-1990. Under these assumptions, the simulations show that the change in forest growth and carbon sequestration in the past is dominated by changes in nitrogen deposition, while climate change is the major driver for future carbon sequestration. However, its impact is reduced by nitrogen availability. Furthermore, limitations in base cations, especially magnesium, and in phosphorus may significantly affect predicted growth in the future. - A modelling exercise indicates that nitrogen deposition was the main factor that enhanced tree carbon sequestration in Europe in the past, while climate change will do so in the future - Highlights: → European tree C sequestration 1900-2050 has been modelled as function of N deposition and climate. → N deposition drove tree C sequestration in the past, climate will do it in the future. → The impact of climate change will be limited by N, but also base cation and P availability.

  10. Model of large pool fires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A two zone entrainment model of pool fires is proposed to depict the fluid flow and flame properties of the fire. Consisting of combustion and plume zones, it provides a consistent scheme for developing non-dimensional scaling parameters for correlating and extrapolating pool fire visible flame length, flame tilt, surface emissive power, and fuel evaporation rate. The model is extended to include grey gas thermal radiation from soot particles in the flame zone, accounting for emission and absorption in both optically thin and thick regions. A model of convective heat transfer from the combustion zone to the liquid fuel pool, and from a water substrate to cryogenic fuel pools spreading on water, provides evaporation rates for both adiabatic and non-adiabatic fires. The model is tested against field measurements of large scale pool fires, principally of LNG, and is generally in agreement with experimental values of all variables

  11. Seawater nutrient and carbonate ion concentrations recorded as P/Ca, Ba/Ca, and U/Ca in the deep-sea coral D. dianthus

    OpenAIRE

    Anagnostou, Eleni; Sherrell, Robert M; Gagnon, Alex; LaVigne, Michele; Field, M Paul; William F. McDonough

    2011-01-01

    As paleoceanographic archives, deep sea coral skeletons offer the potential for high temporal resolution and precise absolute dating, but have not been fully investigated for geochemical reconstructions of past ocean conditions. Here we assess the utility of skeletal P/Ca, Ba/Ca and U/Ca in the deep sea coral D. dianthus as proxies of dissolved phosphate (remineralized at shallow depths), dissolved barium (trace element with silicate-type distribution) and carbonate ion concentrations, respec...

  12. The significance of carbon-enriched dust for global carbon accounting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soil carbon stores amount to 54% of the terrestrial carbon pool and twice the atmospheric carbon pool, but soil organic carbon (SOC) can be transient. There is an ongoing debate about whether soils are a net source or sink of carbon, and understanding the role of aeolian processes in SOC erosion, tr...

  13. Diversity effects in early- and mid-successional species pools along a nitrogen gradient

    OpenAIRE

    Wacker, L.; Baudois, O; Eichenberger-Glinz, S; B. Schmid

    2009-01-01

    Biodiversity experiments with grassland species have shown that plant productivity commonly increases with species richness and that this increase can be stronger in nutrient-rich than in nutrient-poor environments. It has been suggested that these effects are due to functional diversity among species. To investigate this, we established five early- and five mid-successional pools of six species each, expecting stronger effects in the latter. The 10 six-species mixtures and the 60 correspondi...

  14. Beech carbon productivity as driver of ectomycorrhizal abundance and diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Druebert, Christine; Lang, Christa; Valtanen, Kerttu; Polle, Andrea

    2009-08-01

    We tested the hypothesis that carbon productivity of beech (Fagus sylvatica) controls ectomycorrhizal colonization, diversity and community structures. Carbon productivity was limited by long-term shading or by girdling. The trees were grown in compost soil to avoid nutrient deficiencies. Despite severe limitation in photosynthesis and biomass production by shading, the concentrations of carbohydrates in roots were unaffected by the light level. Shade-acclimated plants were only 10% and sun-acclimated plants were 74% colonized by ectomycorrhiza. EM diversity was higher on roots with high than at roots with low mycorrhizal colonization. Evenness was unaffected by any treatment. Low mycorrhizal colonization had no negative effects on plant mineral nutrition. In girdled plants mycorrhizal colonization and diversity were retained although (14)C-leaf feeding showed almost complete disruption of carbon transport from leaves to roots. Carbohydrate storage pools in roots decreased upon girdling. Our results show that plant carbon productivity was the reason for and not the result of high ectomycorrhizal diversity. We suggest that ectomycorrhiza can be supplied by two carbon routes: recent photosynthate and stored carbohydrates. Storage pools may be important for ectomycorrhizal survival when photoassimilates were unavailable, probably feeding preferentially less carbon demanding EM species as shifts in community composition were found. PMID:19344334

  15. A pool type liquid helium cryopump

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Design and fabrication details of a pool type Liquid Helium Cryopump are described. It has got a liquid helium capacity of 5 litres and a/ pumping surface area of about 450 sq. cms. Three types of baffles having different geometries are used for radiation shield. Effect on pumping speed for argon, carbon dioxide and nitrogen gas using the baffles is determined at various pressures. The circular array baffle geometry provides the maximum pumping speed. Using circular array type baffle the maximum pumping speed for nitrogen, argon and carbon dioxide are 2700 1/s, 3600 1/s, 2550 1/s respectively at a pressure of 6.0 x 10-4 torr. The ultimate pressure obtained is 3.0 x 10-8 torr. (author)

  16. Pooling techniques for bioassay screening

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pooling techniques commonly are used to increase the throughput of samples used for screening purposes. While advantages of such techniques are increased analytical efficiency and cost savings, the sensitivity of measurements decreases because it is inversely proportional to the number of samples m the pools. Consequently, uncertainties in estimates of dose and risk which are based on the results of pooled samples increase as the number of samples in the pools increases m all applications. However, sensitivities may not be seriously degraded, for example, in urinanalysis, if the samples in the pools are of known time duration, or if the fraction of some attribute of the grab urine samples to that m a 24-hour composite is known (e.g., mass, specific gravity, creatinine, or volume, per 24-h interval). This paper presents square and cube pooling schemes that greatly increase throughput and can considerably reduce analytical costs (on a sample basis). The benefit-cost ratios for 5x5 square and 5x5x5 cube pooling schemes are 2.5 and 8.3, respectively. Three-dimensional and higher arrayed pooling schemes would result in even greater economies; however, significant improvements in analytical sensitivity are required to achieve these advantages. These are various other considerations for designing a pooling scheme, where the number of dimensions and of samples in the optimum array are influenced by: 1) the minimal detectable amount (MDA) of the analytical processes, 2) the screening dose-rate requirements, 3) the maximum masses or volumes of the composite samples that can be analyzed, 4) the information already available from results of composite analysis, and 5) the ability of an analytical system to guard against both false negative and false positive results. Many of these are beyond the scope of this paper but are being evaluated. (author)

  17. Global pulses of organic carbon burial in deep-sea sediments during glacial maxima

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartapanis, Olivier; Bianchi, Daniele; Jaccard, Samuel L.; Galbraith, Eric D.

    2016-02-01

    The burial of organic carbon in marine sediments removes carbon dioxide from the ocean-atmosphere pool, provides energy to the deep biosphere, and on geological timescales drives the oxygenation of the atmosphere. Here we quantify natural variations in the burial of organic carbon in deep-sea sediments over the last glacial cycle. Using a new data compilation of hundreds of sediment cores, we show that the accumulation rate of organic carbon in the deep sea was consistently higher (50%) during glacial maxima than during interglacials. The spatial pattern and temporal progression of the changes suggest that enhanced nutrient supply to parts of the surface ocean contributed to the glacial burial pulses, with likely additional contributions from more efficient transfer of organic matter to the deep sea and better preservation of organic matter due to reduced oxygen exposure. These results demonstrate a pronounced climate sensitivity for this global carbon cycle sink.

  18. Calcification generates protons for nutrient and bicarbonate uptake

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConnaughey, T. A.; Whelan, J. F.

    1997-03-01

    The biosphere's great carbonate deposits, from caliche soils to deep-sea carbonate oozes, precipitate largely as by-products of autotrophic nutrient acquisition physiologies. Protons constitute the critical link: Calcification generates protons, which plants and photosynthetic symbioses use to assimilate bicarbonate and nutrients. A calcium ATPase-based "trans" mechanism underlies most biological calcification. This permits high calcium carbonate supersaturations and rapid carbonate precipitation. The competitive advantages of calcification become especially apparent in light and nutrient-deficient alkaline environments. Calcareous plants often dominate the lower euphotic zone in both the benthos and the plankton. Geographically and seasonally, massive calcification concentrates in nutrient-deficient environments including alkaline soils, coral reefs, cyanobacterial mats and coccolithophorid blooms. Structural and defensive uses for calcareous skeletons are sometimes overrated.

  19. Use of by-products rich in carbon and nitrogen as a nutrient source to produce Bacillus thuringiensis (Berliner)-based bio pesticide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The amount and sources of carbon and nitrogen used to produce Bacillus thuringiensis (Berliner)-based biopesticide may influence the quality of the fi nal product. The objective of this research was to test different levels of carbon and nitrogen: medium 1 - 1.5% maize glucose + 0.5% soy fl our, medium 2 - 3.0% maize glucose + 1.0% soy flour, medium 3 - 1.0% maize glucose + 3.0% soy fl our and medium 4 - Luria Bertani (LB) + salts (FeSO4, ZnSO4, MnSO4, MgSO4). The seed culture was produced in LB medium plus salt, under agitation (200 rpm) for 18h at 30 deg C. The strain 344 of Bt was used (B. thuringiensis var tolworthi - belonging to the EMBRAPA's Bt Bank). The pH was measured at regular intervals, and After culturing for 96h, the pH of the four tested media was basified (6.91 and 8.15), the number of spores yielded 4.39 x 109 spores/ml in medium 3, where the amount of protein is high. The dry biomass weight accumulated in media 3 was 39.3 g/l. Mortality of 2-day-old larvae Spodoptera frugiperda (J.E. Smith) was 100% when using Bt produced in media 3 and 4. CL50 for medium 3 was 8.4 x 106 spores/ml. All tested media were satisfactory to Bt growth, and medium 3 was the most promising to be used on a large scale Bt-based biopesticide production. (author)

  20. Use of by-products rich in carbon and nitrogen as a nutrient source to produce Bacillus thuringiensis (Berliner)-based bio pesticide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valicente, Fernando H. [EMBRAPA Milho e Sorgo, Sete Lagoas, MG (Brazil)]. E-mail: valicent@cnpms.embrapa.br; Mourao, Andre H.C. [Curso de Meio Ambiente, Sete Lagoas, MG (Brazil)

    2008-11-15

    The amount and sources of carbon and nitrogen used to produce Bacillus thuringiensis (Berliner)-based biopesticide may influence the quality of the fi nal product. The objective of this research was to test different levels of carbon and nitrogen: medium 1 - 1.5% maize glucose + 0.5% soy fl our, medium 2 - 3.0% maize glucose + 1.0% soy flour, medium 3 - 1.0% maize glucose + 3.0% soy fl our and medium 4 - Luria Bertani (LB) + salts (FeSO{sub 4}, ZnSO{sub 4}, MnSO{sub 4}, MgSO{sub 4}). The seed culture was produced in LB medium plus salt, under agitation (200 rpm) for 18h at 30 deg C. The strain 344 of Bt was used (B. thuringiensis var tolworthi - belonging to the EMBRAPA's Bt Bank). The pH was measured at regular intervals, and After culturing for 96h, the pH of the four tested media was basified (6.91 and 8.15), the number of spores yielded 4.39 x 10{sup 9} spores/ml in medium 3, where the amount of protein is high. The dry biomass weight accumulated in media 3 was 39.3 g/l. Mortality of 2-day-old larvae Spodoptera frugiperda (J.E. Smith) was 100% when using Bt produced in media 3 and 4. CL{sub 50} for medium 3 was 8.4 x 10{sup 6} spores/ml. All tested media were satisfactory to Bt growth, and medium 3 was the most promising to be used on a large scale Bt-based biopesticide production. (author)

  1. ENERGY STAR Certified Pool Pumps

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Certified models meet all ENERGY STAR requirements as listed in the Version 1.0 ENERGY STAR Program Requirements for Pool Pumps that are effective as of February...

  2. Hydrological and chemical budgets of a mire pool formed on alluvial lowland of Hokkaido, northern Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kizuka, Toshikazu; Yamada, Hiroyuki; Hirano, Takashi

    2011-04-01

    SummaryMire pools - permanently water-filled depressions on peatlands - provide important habitats for myriad organisms. Recently, water balance change and eutrophication resulting from agricultural development are increasingly evident in mire pools of alluvial lowlands. Conservation of mire pool hydrochemistry is necessary. We investigated the hydrological and chemical budgets of a pristine mire pool, Akanuma Pool (95,280 m 2 area; 1.8 m mean depth), located in Kushiro Mire in Hokkaido, northern Japan, during its ice-free period (April-November) in 2007-2008. Thereby we elucidated the hydrochemical characteristics of mire pools formed on alluvial lowlands. Surface water inflow and surface water outflow dominated the hydrological budget, respectively representing 18.3 and 20.2 mm day -1. Groundwater seepage through the pool bottom and surface water inflow mainly supplied the lake water with total nitrogen and Ca 2+. Total phosphorus was supplied mostly by groundwater seepage through the bottom. These chemical constituents were run off from the pool mostly by surface water outflow. The input and output fluxes of water were 16-20 times greater than those of North American mire pools because of Hokkaido's higher values of precipitation minus evapotranspiration ( P- ET). Moreover, the Ca 2+ input into the Akanuma Pool was several times greater than those reported from North American studies. Alluvial mineral soil under the peat layer supplied large amounts of nutrients and mineral ions including Ca 2+. These results demonstrate that Hokkaido mire pools' hydrochemical characteristics differ greatly from those of pools in North America. Furthermore, each hydrological budget component maintained a constant fraction throughout the two year study period, although the absolute flow rate varied concomitantly with the precipitation level. Maintaining this budget stability is important for the conservation of mire pool hydrochemistry.

  3. Grundfoss: Chlorination of Swimming Pools

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjorth, Poul G.; Hogan, John; Andreassen, Viggo

    1998-01-01

    Grundfos asked for a model, describing the problem of mixing chemicals, being dosed into water systems, to be developed. The application of the model should be dedicated to dosing aqueous solution of chlorine into swimming pools.......Grundfos asked for a model, describing the problem of mixing chemicals, being dosed into water systems, to be developed. The application of the model should be dedicated to dosing aqueous solution of chlorine into swimming pools....

  4. Metaproteogenomics reveals the soil microbial communities active in nutrient cycling processes under different tree species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keiblinger, Katharina Maria; Masse, Jacynthe; Zühlke, Daniela; Riedel, Katharina; Zechmeister-Boltenstern, Sophie; Prescott, Cindy E.; Grayston, Sue

    2016-04-01

    Tree species exert strong effects on microbial communities in litter and soil and may alter rates of soil processes fundamental to nutrient cycling and carbon fluxes (Prescott and Grayston 2013). However, the influence of tree species on decomposition processes are still contradictory and poorly understood. An understanding of the mechanisms underlying plant influences on soil processes is important for our ability to predict ecosystem response to altered global/environmental conditions. In order to link microbial community structure and function to forest-floor nutrient cycling processes, we sampled forest floors under western redcedar (Thuja plicata), Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) and Sitka spruce (Picea sitchensis) grown in nutrient-poor sites in common garden experiments on Vancouver island (Canada). We measured forest-floor total N, total C, initial NH4+ and NO3‑ concentrations, DOC, Cmic and Nmic. Gross rates of ammonification and NH4+ consumption were measured using the 15N pool-dilution method. Organic carbon quality was assessed through FTIR analyses. Microbial community structure was analysed by a metaproteogenomic approach using 16S and ITS amplification and sequencing with MiSeq platform. Proteins were extracted and peptides characterized via LC-MS/MS on a Velos Orbitrap to assess the active microbial community. Different microbial communities were active under the three tree species and variation in process rates were observed and will be discussed. This research provides new insights on microbial processes during organic matter decomposition. The metaproteogenomic approach enables us to investigate these changes with respect to possible effects on soil C-storage at even finer taxonomic resolution.

  5. Nutrient Processing in Urban Headwater Streams and Floodplains Following Restoration (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMillan, S. K.; Noe, G. B.; Tuttle, A. K.; Jennings, G. M.

    2013-12-01

    Efforts are underway in multiple metropolitan regions to restore degraded urban streams by engineering channels to improve stability and geomorphic complexity, replanting riparian vegetation and connecting floodplains. While extensive research has been conducted on the capacity for riparian zones to buffer nutrient loads in natural systems, we know relatively little about their influence on water chemistry in restored streams. Similarly, low-order streams have long been recognized as hot spots for nutrient transformations with instream modifications during restoration seeking to reestablish these functions. Through this research, we investigated the time trajectory for recovery of both instream and floodplain nutrient transformations in series of restored streams in North Carolina, USA with a range of restoration ages and design approaches. Rates of N and P net mineralization and denitrifying enzyme activity in floodplain sediments were positively correlated with monthly sedimentation rates and soil carbon pools. Multiple linear regression analysis of seasonal reach scale nitrate (1.4-116 mg m-2 h-1) and phosphate (1.0 - 97 mg m-2 h-1) uptake rates highlighted the importance of background concentration and temperature but also sediment carbon, which was closely correlated with canopy cover and restoration age. Similar patterns were observed in seasonal measurements of denitrification rates in streambed sediments that were significant higher near geomorphic features with either greater hyporheic flow or deposition of organic matter (average of 4.87×0.45 mg m-2 h-1 compared to 3.26×0.27 mg m-2 h-1, pproject matures have the potential to greatly influence biogeochemical processes in multiple ways and thereby overall water quality.

  6. Pool impacts of Leidenfrost drop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darbois Texier, Baptiste; Maquet, Laurent; Dorbolo, Stephane; Dehandschoewercker, Eline; Pan, Zhao; Truscott, Tadd

    2015-11-01

    This work concerns the impact of a droplet made of a volatile liquid (typically HFE) on a pool of an other liquid (typically silicone oil) which temperature is above the boiling point of the drop. Depending on the properties of the two liquids and the impacting conditions, four different regimes are observed. For low impacting speeds, the droplet bounces on the surface of the bath and finally levitates above it in a Leidenfrost state. Such a regime occurs as soon as the pool temperature exceeds the boiling point of the drop. This observation means that there is no threshold in temperature for a Leidenfrost effect on a liquid surface contrary to the case of a solid substrate. For intermediate impacting velocities, the pinch-off of the surface of the pool entraps the drop in the liquid bulk. The entrapped drop is separated from the pool by a layer of its own vapour in a similar way of antibulles. For increasing impacting speeds, the vapour layer between the drop and the pool does not hold during the pinch-off event. The contact of the drop with the hot liquid provokes a sudden and intense evaporation. At very large impacting speeds, the drop rapidely contacts the pool, spreads and finally induces a hemi-spherical cavity. In the end, these four different regimes are summarized in a Froud-Weber diagram which boundaries are discussed.

  7. Response of carbon assimilation and chlorophyll fluorescence to soybean leaf phosphorus across CO2: Alternative electron sink, nutrient efficiency and critical concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Shardendu K; Reddy, Vangimalla R

    2015-10-01

    To evaluate the response of CO2 assimilation rate (PN) and various chlorophyll fluorescence (CF) parameters to phosphorus (P) nutrition, soybean plants were grown in controlled environment with sufficient (0.50mM) and deficient (0.10 and 0.01 mM) phosphate (P) supply under ambient and elevated CO2 (aCO2, 400 and eCO2, 800 μmol mol(-1), respectively). Measurements were made at ambient (21%) and low (2%) O2 concentrations. Results showed strong correlation of leaf P concentration with PN and CF parameters. The P deficiency showed parallel decreases in PN, and CF parameters including quantum efficiency (Fv'/Fm'), quantum yield of photosystem II (ΦPSII), electron transport rate (JF), and photochemical quenching (qP). The Fv'/Fm' decreased as a result of greater decline in maximal (Fm') than minimal (Fo') fluorescence. The eCO2 stimulated PN especially under higher leaf P concentrations. Low O2 also stimulated PN but only at aCO2. The photosynthetic carbon reduction (PCR, signified by PN) and photorespiratory carbon oxidation cycles (PCO, signified photorespiration as indicated by ratio of JF to gross PN and % increase in PN at 2% O2) was the major electron sinks. However, the presence of alternative electron sink was also evident as determined by the difference between the electron transport calculated from chlorophyll fluorescence and gas exchange measurements. Alternative electron sink declined at lower leaf P concentration suggesting its minor role in photochemical energy consumption, thus dissipation of the excess excitation pressure of PSII reaction center under P deficiency. The JF/PG and % increase in PN at 2 versus 21% O2 remained consistent across leaf P concentration suggesting PCO cycle as an important mechanism to dissipate excess excitation energy in P deficient leaves. The severe decline of Fv'/Fm', ΦPSII, JF and qP under P deficiency also suggested the occurrences of excess radiant energy dissipation by non-photochemical quenching mechanisms. Critical

  8. Offsetting China's CO2 Emissions by Soil Carbon Sequestration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fossil fuel emissions of carbon (C) in China in 2000 was about 1 Pg/yr, which may surpass that of the U.S. (1.84 Pg C) by 2020. Terrestrial C pool of China comprises about 35 to 60 Pg in the forest and 120 to 186 Pg in soils. Soil degradation is a major issue affecting 145 Mha by different degradative processes, of which 126 Mha are prone to accelerated soil erosion. Similar to world soils, agricultural soils of China have also lost 30 to 50% or more of the antecedent soil organic carbon (SOC) pool. Some of the depleted SOC pool can be re-sequestered through restoration of degraded soils, and adoption of recommended management practices. The latter include conversion of upland crops to multiple cropping and rice paddies, adoption of integrated nutrient management (INM) strategies, incorporation of cover crops in the rotations cycle and adoption of conservation-effective systems including conservation tillage. A crude estimated potential of soil C sequestration in China is 119 to 226 Tg C/y of SOC and 7 to 138 Tg C/y for soil inorganic carbon (SIC) up to 50 years. The total potential of soil C sequestration is about 12 Pg, and this potential can offset about 25% of the annual fossil fuel emissions in China

  9. Soil Carbon Sequestration Impacts on Global Climate Change and Food Security

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lal, R.

    2004-06-01

    The carbon sink capacity of the world's agricultural and degraded soils is 50 to 66% of the historic carbon loss of 42 to 78 gigatons of carbon. The rate of soil organic carbon sequestration with adoption of recommended technologies depends on soil texture and structure, rainfall, temperature, farming system, and soil management. Strategies to increase the soil carbon pool include soil restoration and woodland regeneration, no-till farming, cover crops, nutrient management, manuring and sludge application, improved grazing, water conservation and harvesting, efficient irrigation, agroforestry practices, and growing energy crops on spare lands. An increase of 1 ton of soil carbon pool of degraded cropland soils may increase crop yield by 20 to 40 kilograms per hectare (kg/ha) for wheat, 10 to 20 kg/ha for maize, and 0.5 to 1 kg/ha for cowpeas. As well as enhancing food security, carbon sequestration has the potential to offset fossil-fuel emissions by 0.4 to 1.2 gigatons of carbon per year, or 5 to 15% of the global fossil-fuel emissions.

  10. Insects, infestations and nutrient fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalzik, B.

    2012-04-01

    Forest ecosystems are characterized by a high temporal and spatial variability in the vertical transfer of energy and matter within the canopy and the soil compartment. The mechanisms and controlling factors behind canopy processes and system-internal transfer dynamics are imperfectly understood at the moment. Seasonal flux diversities and inhomogeneities in throughfall composition have been reported from coniferous and deciduous forests, and in most cases leaf leaching has been considered as principle driver for differences in the amount and quality of nutrients and organic compounds (Tukey and Morgan 1963). Since herbivorous insects and the processes they initiate received less attention in past times, ecologists now emphasize the need for linking biological processes occurring in different ecosystem strata to explain rates and variability of nutrient cycling (Bardgett et al. 1998, Wardle et al. 2004). Consequently, herbivore insects in the canopies of forests are increasingly identified to play an important role for the (re)cycling and availability of nutrients, or, more generally, for the functioning of ecosystems not only in outbreak situations but also at endemic (non-outbreak) density levels (Stadler et al. 2001, Hunter et al. 2003). Before, little attention was paid to insect herbivores when quantifying element and energy fluxes through ecosystems, although the numerous and different functions insects fulfill in ecosystems (e.g. as pollinators, herbivores or detritivores) were unanimously recognized (Schowalter 2000). Amongst the reasons for this restraint was the argument that the total biomass of insects tends to be relatively low compared to the biomass of trees or the pool of soil organic matter (Ohmart et al. 1983). A second argument which was put forward to justify the inferior role of insects in nutrient cycling were the supposed low defoliation losses between 5-10% of the annual leaf biomass, or net primary production, due to insect herbivory under

  11. Effects of arbuscular mycorrhizae on tomato yield, nutrient uptake, water relations, and soil carbon dynamics under deficit irrigation in field conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowles, Timothy M; Barrios-Masias, Felipe H; Carlisle, Eli A; Cavagnaro, Timothy R; Jackson, Louise E

    2016-10-01

    Plant strategies to cope with future droughts may be enhanced by associations between roots and soil microorganisms, including arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi. But how AM fungi affect crop growth and yield, together with plant physiology and soil carbon (C) dynamics, under water stress in actual field conditions is not well understood. The well-characterized mycorrhizal tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) genotype 76R (referred to as MYC+) and the mutant nonmycorrhizal tomato genotype rmc were grown in an organic farm with a deficit irrigation regime and control regime that replaced evapotranspiration. AM increased marketable tomato yields by ~25% in both irrigation regimes but did not affect shoot biomass. In both irrigation regimes, MYC+ plants had higher plant nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) concentrations (e.g. 5 and 24% higher N and P concentrations in leaves at fruit set, respectively), 8% higher stomatal conductance (gs), 7% higher photosynthetic rates (Pn), and greater fruit set. Stem water potential and leaf relative water content were similar in both genotypes within each irrigation regime. Three-fold higher rates of root sap exudation in detopped MYC+ plants suggest greater capacity for water uptake through osmotic driven flow, especially in the deficit irrigation regime in which root sap exudation in rmc was nearly absent. Soil with MYC+ plants also had slightly higher soil extractable organic C and microbial biomass C at anthesis but no changes in soil CO2 emissions, although the latter were 23% lower under deficit irrigation. This study provides novel, field-based evidence for how indigenous AM fungi increase crop yield and crop water use efficiency during a season-long deficit irrigation and thus play an important role in coping with increasingly limited water availability in the future. PMID:27266519

  12. Historical storage budgets of organic carbon, nutrient and contaminant elements in saltmarsh sediments: Biogeochemical context for managed realignment, Humber Estuary, UK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biogeochemical data from Welwick marsh (Humber Estuary, UK), an actively accreting saltmarsh, provides a decadal-centennial-scale natural analogue for likely future biogeochemical storage effects of managed realignment sites accreting either intertidal muds or saltmarsh. Marsh topographic profiles and progradation history from aerial photographs were combined with 137Cs and niobium contamination history to establish and verify chronology and sediment mass accumulation. These data, combined with down-core measurements of particulate organic carbon (Corg), organic nitrogen (Norg), particle reactive phosphorus and selected contaminant metal (Zn, Pb, Cu, As and Nb) contents were then used to calculate sediment and chemical storage terms and to quantify changes in these over time. These data are used to help predict likely future biogeochemical storage changes at managed realignment sites in the estuary. The net effect of returning some 26 km2 of reclaimed land to intertidal environments now (about 25% of the maximum possible realignment storage identified for the estuary) could result in the storage of some 40,000 tonnes a-1 of sediment which would also bury about 800 tonnes a-1 of Corg and 40 tonnes a-1 of Norg. Particulate contaminant P burial would be around 25 tonnes a-1 along with ∼ 6 tonnes a-1 contaminant Zn, 3 tonnes a-1 contaminant Pb, and ∼ 1 tonnes a-1 contaminant As and Cu. The study also shows that reclamation activities in the outer estuary since the mid-1700s has prevented, in total, the deposition of about 10 million tonnes of sediment, along with 320,000 tonnes of Corg and 16,000 tonnes of Norg. The study provides a mid-1990s baseline against which future measurements at the site can determine changes in burial fluxes and improvement or deterioration in contaminant metal contents of the sediments. The data are directly relevant for local managed realignment sites but also broadly indicative for sites generally on the European North Sea Coast

  13. Nutrient release, recovery and removal from waste sludge of a biological nutrient removal system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yi; Zheng, Shu-Jian; Pei, Li-Ying; Ke, Li; Peng, Dang-Cong; Xia, Si-Qing

    2014-01-01

    The uncontrolled release of nutrients from waste sludge results in nitrogen and phosphorus overloading in wastewater treatment plants when supernatant is returned to the inlet. A controlled release, recovery and removal of nutrient from the waste sludge of a Biological Nutrient Removal system (BNR) are investigated. Results showed that the supernatant was of high mineral salt, high electrical conductivity and poor biodegradability, in addition to high nitrogen and phosphorus concentrations after the waste sludge was hydrolysed through sodium dodecyl sulphate addition. Subsequently, over 91.8% of phosphorus and 10.5% of nitrogen in the supernatants were extracted by the crystallization method under the conditions of 9.5 pH and 400 rpm. The precipitate was mainly struvite according to X-ray diffraction and morphological examination. A multistage anoxic-oxic Moving Bed Biofilm Reactor (MBBR) was then adopted to remove the residual carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus in the supernatant. The MBBR exhibited good performance in simultaneously removing carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus under a short aeration time, which accounted for 31.25% of a cycle. Fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis demonstrated that nitrifiers presented mainly in floc, although higher extracellular polymeric substance content, especially DNA, appeared in the biofilm. Thus, a combination of hydrolysis and precipitation, followed by the MBBR, can complete the nutrient release from the waste sludge of a BNR system, recovers nutrients from the hydrolysed liquor and removes nutrients from leftovers effectively. PMID:25176308

  14. Quantitative partition of protein, carbohydrate and fat pools in growing pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chwalibog, André; Thorbek, G

    1995-01-01

    A model combining data from balance experiments with data from oxidation of nutrients demonstrating the pools of protein, carbohydrate and fat and their partition in the body was presented. Data from more than 200 experiments with growing pigs were used to fill up the "black boxes" in the model a...

  15. NblA1/A2-Dependent Homeostasis of Amino Acid Pools during Nitrogen Starvation in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiyota, Hiroshi; Hirai, Masami Yokota; Ikeuchi, Masahiko

    2014-01-01

    Nutrient balance is important for photosynthetic growth and biomass production in microalgae. Here, we investigated and compared metabolic responses of amino acid pools to nitrogen and sulfur starvation in a unicellular model cyanobacterium, Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, and its mutant nblA1/A2. It is known that NblA1/A2-dependent and -independent breakdown of abundant photosynthetic phycobiliproteins and other cellular proteins supply nutrients to the organism. However, the contribution of the NblA1/A2-dependent nutrient supply to amino acid pool homeostasis has not been studied. Our study demonstrates that changes in the pool size of many amino acids during nitrogen starvation can be categorized as NblA1/A2-dependent (Gln, Glu, glutathione, Gly, Ile, Leu, Met, Phe, Pro, Ser, Thr, Tyr and Val) and NblA1/A2-independent (Ala, Asn, Lys, and Trp). We also report unique changes in amino acid pool sizes during sulfur starvation in wild type and the mutant and found a generally marked increase in the Lys pool in cyanobacteria during nutrient starvation. In conclusion, the NblA1/A2-dependent protein turnover contributes to the maintenance of many amino acid pools during nitrogen starvation. PMID:24983765

  16. Acanthamoeba species in Swimming Pools of Cairo, Egypt.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Al-Herrawy

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The free-living amoebae Acanthamoeba spp. have been recognized as etiologic agents of amoebic encephalitis, keratitis, otitis, lung lesions and other skin infections mainly in immuno-compromised individuals. The purpose of this study is to detect the presence of Acanthamoeba in swimming pools in Egypt using a polymerase chain reaction (PCR method.Water samples were collected from 10 different swimming pools in Cairo, Egypt. Samples were cultured on non-nutrient agar for the detection of Acanthamoeba isolates that were confirmed by PCR amplification using genus specific primers. The molecularly confirmed Acanthamoeba isolates were morphologically identified to the species level.Members of genus Acanthamoeba were detected in 49.2% of the examined swimming-pool water samples. Morphologically, six Acanthamoeba species were isolated from the examined swimming pool water namely A. polyphaga, A.castellanii, A. rhysodes, A. mauritaniensis, A. royreba and A. triangularis. All the identified species of Acanthamoeba were molecularly confirmed to be related to the genus Acanthamoeba.The isolated species of Acanthamoeba could provoke variable degrees of infections to the swimmers. The culture method is cheaper and easier than PCR techniques that are faster for the detection of free-living amoebae.

  17. HYDROLOGY AND LANDSCAPE CONNECTIVITY OF VERNAL POOLS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernal pools are shaped by hydrologic processes which influence many aspects of pool function. The hydrologic budget of a pool can be summarized by a water balance equation that relates changes in the amount of water in the pool to precipitation, ground- and surface-water flows, ...

  18. 21 CFR 1250.89 - Swimming pools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Swimming pools. 1250.89 Section 1250.89 Food and... SANITATION Sanitation Facilities and Conditions on Vessels § 1250.89 Swimming pools. (a) Fill and draw swimming pools shall not be installed or used. (b) Swimming pools of the recirculation type shall...

  19. Choosing Nutrient Dense Foods

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... like processed meats and go for lean, freshly cooked meats. Narrator: Consider varying your sources of protein ... to think about the nutrient value of the foods you eat. Dr. Connie W. Bales, Ph.D., ...

  20. Choosing Nutrient Dense Foods

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... eat. Are they primarily nutrient-dense, like these, [ photos of melon, red bell pepper, oatmeal ] or are they mostly calorie dense, like these? [ photos of butter crackers, bacon, coffee cake ] Some older ...

  1. Choosing Nutrient Dense Foods

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... coffee cake ] Some older adults answer the question this way: Richard: In the summertime, like now, fruit ... high in nutrients and low in calories. Eating this way is especially important as you age. Dr. ...

  2. Choosing Nutrient Dense Foods

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... eat lots of them every day, usually in dishes that Richard prepares. Richard: When we are eating ... 100 calories that you obtain from a fruit dish, you might have only a few nutrients and ...

  3. Choosing Nutrient Dense Foods

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... consume, it’s important to think about the nutrient value of the foods you eat. Dr. Connie W. ... foods, the one that is the best nutritional value for you. So for 100 calories that you ...

  4. Choosing Nutrient Dense Foods

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... you eat. Are they primarily nutrient-dense, like these, [ photos of melon, red bell pepper, oatmeal ] or are they mostly calorie dense, like these? [ photos of butter crackers, bacon, coffee cake ] Some ...

  5. Choosing Nutrient Dense Foods

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of butter crackers, bacon, coffee cake ] Some older adults answer the question this way: Richard: In the ... is okay. Narrator: Richard and Gloria are older adults who choose to eat nutrient-dense foods, foods ...

  6. Choosing Nutrient Dense Foods

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... put some cheese in it. And with my diet, an ounce of cheese is okay. Narrator: Richard ... of all ages, older adults should consume a diet that includes a variety of nutrients from a ...

  7. Cold adaptation increases rates of nutrient flow and metabolic plasticity during cold exposure in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Caroline M; McCue, Marshall D; Sunny, Nishanth E; Szejner-Sigal, Andre; Morgan, Theodore J; Allison, David B; Hahn, Daniel A

    2016-09-14

    Metabolic flexibility is an important component of adaptation to stressful environments, including thermal stress and latitudinal adaptation. A long history of population genetic studies suggest that selection on core metabolic enzymes may shape life histories by altering metabolic flux. However, the direct relationship between selection on thermal stress hardiness and metabolic flux has not previously been tested. We investigated flexibility of nutrient catabolism during cold stress in Drosophila melanogaster artificially selected for fast or slow recovery from chill coma (i.e. cold-hardy or -susceptible), specifically testing the hypothesis that stress adaptation increases metabolic turnover. Using (13)C-labelled glucose, we first showed that cold-hardy flies more rapidly incorporate ingested carbon into amino acids and newly synthesized glucose, permitting rapid synthesis of proline, a compound shown elsewhere to improve survival of cold stress. Second, using glucose and leucine tracers we showed that cold-hardy flies had higher oxidation rates than cold-susceptible flies before cold exposure, similar oxidation rates during cold exposure, and returned to higher oxidation rates during recovery. Additionally, cold-hardy flies transferred compounds among body pools more rapidly during cold exposure and recovery. Increased metabolic turnover may allow cold-adapted flies to better prepare for, resist and repair/tolerate cold damage. This work illustrates for the first time differences in nutrient fluxes associated with cold adaptation, suggesting that metabolic costs associated with cold hardiness could invoke resource-based trade-offs that shape life histories. PMID:27605506

  8. Nutrient Driven Topology Optimization

    OpenAIRE

    Satha, Ganarupan

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this thesis is to investigate how a biological structure changes its shape and boundary under different cases of load if flow of nutrients is included, since nutrient flow has not been taken into account in previous studies. In order to simulate such a scenario we construct a model by using topology optimization (the SIMP model) and a balance law which is suitable for biological structures. Moreover, the model is derived by using an analogy with the dissipation inequality and Colem...

  9. Monitoring pool-tail fines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunte, K.; Potyondy, J. P.; Abt, S. R.; Swingle, K. W.

    2010-12-01

    Fine sediment deposited in pool-tail areas of mountain streams is often measured to monitor changes in the supply of fines (e.g., by dam removal, bank erosion, or watershed effects including fires and road building) or to assess the status and trend of aquatic ecosystems. Grid counts, pebble counts, and volumetric bedmaterial samples are typically used to quantify pool-tail fines. Grid-count results exhibit a high degree of variability not only among streams and among operators, but also among crews performing a nearly identical procedure (Roper et al. 2010). Variability is even larger when diverse methods are employed, each of which quantifies fines in a different way: grid counts visually count surface fines on small patches within the pool-tail area, pebble counts pick up and tally surface particles along (riffle) transects, and volumetric samples sieve out fines from small-scale bulk samples; and even when delimited to pool-tail areas, individual methods focus on different sampling locales. Two main questions were analyzed: 1) Do pool-tail fines exhibit patterns of spatial variability and are some grid count schemes more likely to provide accurate results than others. 2) How and why does the percentage of fines vary among grid counts, pebble counts, and volumetric samples. In a field study, grids were placed at 7 locales in two rows across the wetted width of 10 pool tails in a 14-m wide 3rd order coarse gravel-bed mountain stream with banks, sometimes interrupted by a secondary peak of fines within the central half of the wetted width. Among the five sampling schemes tested, grid counts covering the wetted width with 7 locales produced the highest accuracy and the least variability among the pools of the reach. Pebble counts between the two waterlines indicated 2-3 times more fines than grid counts, likely because grid counts did not extend exactly up to the waterline. However, when confined to the central 50% of the wetted width, grid counts indicated 1.2 and

  10. Tree root systems and nutrient mobilization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boyle, Jim; Rob, Harrison; Raulund-Rasmussen, Karsten;

    Roots mobilize nutrients via deep penetration and rhizosphere processes inducing weathering of primary minerals. These contribute to C transfer to soils and to tree nutrition. Assessments of these characteristics and processes of root systems are important for understanding long-term supplies of...... some of the world’s most productive intensively managed forests, including Brazil and the Southeast and Pacifi c Northwest regions of the United States, have shown that root systems are often several meters in depth, and often extend deeper than soil is sampled. Large amounts of carbon are also...... nutrient elements essential for forest growth and resilience. Research and techniques have signifi cantly advanced since Olof Tamm’s 1934 base mineral index for Swedish forest soils, and basic nutrient budget estimates for whole-tree harvesting systems of the 1970s. Recent research in areas that include...

  11. Patent Pools: Intellectual Property Rights and Competition

    OpenAIRE

    Rodriguez, Victor

    2010-01-01

    Patent pools do not correct all problems associated with patent thickets. In this respect, patent pools might not stop the outsider problem from striking pools. Moreover, patent pools can be expensive to negotiate, can exclude patent holders with smaller numbers of patents or enable a group of major players to form a cartel that excludes new competitors. For all the above reasons, patent pools are subject to regulatory clearance because they could result in a monopoly. The aim of this article...

  12. Role of nutrient cycling and herbivory in regulating periphyton communities in laboratory streams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mulholland, P.J.; Steinman, A.D.; Palumbo, A.V.; Elwood, J.W. (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, TN (United States)); Kirschtel, D.B. ( University of Louisville, KY (United States))

    1992-01-01

    In this study the authors examined the role of nutrient cycling and herbivory in regulating stream periphyton communities. Population, community, and ecosystem-level properties were studied in laboratory stream channels that had nutrient inputs reduced compared to channels where ambient nutrient levels were maintained. They reduced nutrient inputs in four of eight channels by recirculating 90% of the flow, whereas the other four channels received once-through flow of spring water. They examined the interaction between herbivory and nutrients by varying the number of snails (Elimia clavaeformis) among streams with different nutrient input regimes. Reduction in nutrient input via recirculation resulted in lower concentrations of nutrients in the water but did not result in significant differences in biomass, carbon fixation, or algal taxonomic composition. However, herbivory had large effects on these characteristics by reducing biomass and areal rates of carbon fixation and simplifying periphyton taxonomy and physiognomy. Lower rates of nutrient input significantly affected characteristics associated with nutrient cycling. Streams with reduced nutrient inputs had lower periphyton nutrient contents, higher ratios of total:net uptake of P from water, and higher rates of phosphatase activity than streams with ambient nutrient inputs. However, the effects of reduced nutrient input on cycling characteristics were reduced or eliminated by intense herbivory.

  13. Recapturing nutrients from dairy waste using biochar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkhot, D.; Ghezzehei, T. A.; Berhe, A. A.

    2009-12-01

    Biochar or biomass derived black carbon is known to be highly resistant to decomposition with half-life periods ranging from hundreds of years to millennia. It is also reported to enhance soil productivity due to high nutrient retention and favorable effects on soil pH, water retention capacity as well as microbial population. Brazilian Terra Preta soils have shown the potential of biochar for long-term carbon sequestration capacity and productivity of soil and many researchers have now focused on utilizing this phenomenon to create fertile, carbon-rich soils, called Terra Preta Nova. Although the highly adsorptive nature of biochar is well characterized, the potential for using biochar in environmental cleanup efforts is relatively unexplored. Dairy waste is a source of significant water pollution because it introduces excess nutrients such as phosphates and nitrates into the soil and water system. Since many soils have limited capacity to retain nitrate and phosphate, especially for long periods of time, the utility of dairy waste manure to enhance soil fertility and nutrient availability to plants is limited. Here, we present results from a project that we started to determine the potential of biochar to recover the excess nutrients from dairy flushed manure. In this initial study, a commercially available biochar amendment was ground and used in a batch sorption experiment with the dairy flushed manure from a local dairy in Merced, California. Four manure dilutions viz. 10, 25, 50 and 100%, and three shaking times, viz. 1, 12 and 24 hours were used for this study. We then calculated the amount of ammonia, nitrate and phosphate adsorbed by the biochar using differences in nutrient concentrations before and after the sorption experiment. Biochar showed significant capacity of adsorbing these nutrients, suggesting a potential for controlling the dairy pollution. The resulting enriched biochar can potentially act as a slow release fertilizer and enhance soil

  14. The nucleate pool boiling dilemma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is shown that the scatter of experimental data is due to the history and machining finish of the heated surface. All experimental pool boiling data published to date, which does not specify precisely the characteristics of the heated surface cannot be expected to provide reliable design information. (U.K.)

  15. EP BICYCLE POOL - VIGNETTES 2002

    CERN Multimedia

    EP-SMI Help Desk

    2002-01-01

    The vignettes (insurance certificates) for 2002 become obligatory from 1 June. If you have a bicycle from the EP Pool, please bring it to the EP-SMI Help Desk (Building 124) on any working day up to 31 May between 8h.30 - 12h.00 or 13h.30 - 17h.30. EP-SMI Help Desk

  16. The Role of Genetic Polymorphisms as Related to One-Carbon Metabolism, Vitamin B6, and Gene–Nutrient Interactions in Maintaining Genomic Stability and Cell Viability in Chinese Breast Cancer Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiayu Wu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Folate-mediated one-carbon metabolism (FMOCM is linked to DNA synthesis, methylation, and cell proliferation. Vitamin B6 (B6 is a cofactor, and genetic polymorphisms of related key enzymes, such as serine hydroxymethyltransferase (SHMT, methionine synthase reductase (MTRR, and methionine synthase (MS, in FMOCM may govern the bioavailability of metabolites and play important roles in the maintenance of genomic stability and cell viability (GSACV. To evaluate the influences of B6, genetic polymorphisms of these enzymes, and gene–nutrient interactions on GSACV, we utilized the cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay (CBMN and PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP techniques in the lymphocytes from female breast cancer cases and controls. GSACV showed a significantly positive correlation with B6 concentration, and 48 nmol/L of B6 was the most suitable concentration for maintaining GSACV in vitro. The GSACV indexes showed significantly different sensitivity to B6 deficiency between cases and controls; the B6 effect on the GSACV variance contribution of each index was significantly higher than that of genetic polymorphisms and the sample state (tumor state. SHMT C1420T mutations may reduce breast cancer susceptibility, whereas MTRR A66G and MS A2756G mutations may increase breast cancer susceptibility. The role of SHMT, MS, and MTRR genotype polymorphisms in GSACV is reduced compared with that of B6. The results appear to suggest that the long-term lack of B6 under these conditions may increase genetic damage and cell injury and that individuals with various genotypes have different sensitivities to B6 deficiency. FMOCM metabolic enzyme gene polymorphism may be related to breast cancer susceptibility to a certain extent due to the effect of other factors such as stress, hormones, cancer therapies, psychological conditions, and diet. Adequate B6 intake may be good for maintaining genome health and preventing breast cancer.

  17. The Role of Genetic Polymorphisms as Related to One-Carbon Metabolism, Vitamin B6, and Gene-Nutrient Interactions in Maintaining Genomic Stability and Cell Viability in Chinese Breast Cancer Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiayu; Xu, Weijiang; Zhou, Tao; Cao, Neng; Ni, Juan; Zou, Tianning; Liang, Ziqing; Wang, Xu; Fenech, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Folate-mediated one-carbon metabolism (FMOCM) is linked to DNA synthesis, methylation, and cell proliferation. Vitamin B6 (B6) is a cofactor, and genetic polymorphisms of related key enzymes, such as serine hydroxymethyltransferase (SHMT), methionine synthase reductase (MTRR), and methionine synthase (MS), in FMOCM may govern the bioavailability of metabolites and play important roles in the maintenance of genomic stability and cell viability (GSACV). To evaluate the influences of B6, genetic polymorphisms of these enzymes, and gene-nutrient interactions on GSACV, we utilized the cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay (CBMN) and PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) techniques in the lymphocytes from female breast cancer cases and controls. GSACV showed a significantly positive correlation with B6 concentration, and 48 nmol/L of B6 was the most suitable concentration for maintaining GSACV in vitro. The GSACV indexes showed significantly different sensitivity to B6 deficiency between cases and controls; the B6 effect on the GSACV variance contribution of each index was significantly higher than that of genetic polymorphisms and the sample state (tumor state). SHMT C1420T mutations may reduce breast cancer susceptibility, whereas MTRR A66G and MS A2756G mutations may increase breast cancer susceptibility. The role of SHMT, MS, and MTRR genotype polymorphisms in GSACV is reduced compared with that of B6. The results appear to suggest that the long-term lack of B6 under these conditions may increase genetic damage and cell injury and that individuals with various genotypes have different sensitivities to B6 deficiency. FMOCM metabolic enzyme gene polymorphism may be related to breast cancer susceptibility to a certain extent due to the effect of other factors such as stress, hormones, cancer therapies, psychological conditions, and diet. Adequate B6 intake may be good for maintaining genome health and preventing breast cancer. PMID:27347936

  18. The Role of Genetic Polymorphisms as Related to One-Carbon Metabolism, Vitamin B6, and Gene–Nutrient Interactions in Maintaining Genomic Stability and Cell Viability in Chinese Breast Cancer Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiayu; Xu, Weijiang; Zhou, Tao; Cao, Neng; Ni, Juan; Zou, Tianning; Liang, Ziqing; Wang, Xu; Fenech, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Folate-mediated one-carbon metabolism (FMOCM) is linked to DNA synthesis, methylation, and cell proliferation. Vitamin B6 (B6) is a cofactor, and genetic polymorphisms of related key enzymes, such as serine hydroxymethyltransferase (SHMT), methionine synthase reductase (MTRR), and methionine synthase (MS), in FMOCM may govern the bioavailability of metabolites and play important roles in the maintenance of genomic stability and cell viability (GSACV). To evaluate the influences of B6, genetic polymorphisms of these enzymes, and gene–nutrient interactions on GSACV, we utilized the cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay (CBMN) and PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) techniques in the lymphocytes from female breast cancer cases and controls. GSACV showed a significantly positive correlation with B6 concentration, and 48 nmol/L of B6 was the most suitable concentration for maintaining GSACV in vitro. The GSACV indexes showed significantly different sensitivity to B6 deficiency between cases and controls; the B6 effect on the GSACV variance contribution of each index was significantly higher than that of genetic polymorphisms and the sample state (tumor state). SHMT C1420T mutations may reduce breast cancer susceptibility, whereas MTRR A66G and MS A2756G mutations may increase breast cancer susceptibility. The role of SHMT, MS, and MTRR genotype polymorphisms in GSACV is reduced compared with that of B6. The results appear to suggest that the long-term lack of B6 under these conditions may increase genetic damage and cell injury and that individuals with various genotypes have different sensitivities to B6 deficiency. FMOCM metabolic enzyme gene polymorphism may be related to breast cancer susceptibility to a certain extent due to the effect of other factors such as stress, hormones, cancer therapies, psychological conditions, and diet. Adequate B6 intake may be good for maintaining genome health and preventing breast cancer. PMID:27347936

  19. Protection of Neuronal Diversity at the Expense of Neuronal Numbers during Nutrient Restriction in the Drosophila Visual System

    OpenAIRE

    Elodie Lanet; Alex P. Gould; Cédric Maurange

    2013-01-01

    Summary Systemic signals provided by nutrients and hormones are known to coordinate the growth and proliferation of different organs during development. However, within the brain, it is unclear how these signals influence neural progenitor divisions and neuronal diversity. Here, in the Drosophila visual system, we identify two developmental phases with different sensitivities to dietary nutrients. During early larval stages, nutrients regulate the size of the neural progenitor pool via insuli...

  20. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Safety Network Community Outreach Resource Center CO Poster Contest Toy Recall Statistics Pool Safely Home / Safety Education / ... VIDEO CPSC announces winners of carbon monoxide poster contest View the blog SAFETY GUIDE Clues You Can ...

  1. Temperature, salinity, nutrients, freons, oxygen, currents (ADCP), underway and other measurements collected in the Gulf of Mexico and Atlantic as part of the Gulf of Mexico and East Coast Carbon Cruise (GOMECC) 2007 (NODC Accession 0066603)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — GOMECC Gulf of Mexico and East Coast Carbon Cruise(RB 07-05). North American Carbon Program (NACP) Gulf of Mexico and East Coast Carbon (GOMECC) Cruise on board the...

  2. A Consensual Linear Opinion Pool

    CERN Document Server

    Carvalho, Arthur

    2012-01-01

    We propose a pooling method to aggregate expert opinions. Intuitively, it works as if the experts were continuously updating their opinions in order to accommodate the expertise of others. Each updated opinion takes the form of a linear opinion pool, where the weight that an expert assigns to a peer's opinion is inversely related to the distance between their opinions. In other words, experts are assumed to prefer opinions that are close to their own opinions. We prove that such an updating process leads to consensus, i.e., the experts all converge towards the same opinion. Further, we show that if experts are rewarded using the quadratic scoring rule, then the above mentioned assumption follows naturally. We empirically demonstrate the efficacy of our method using real-world data.

  3. Impacts of light shading and nutrient enrichment geo-engineering approaches on the productivity of a stratified, oligotrophic ocean ecosystem

    OpenAIRE

    Hardman-mountford, Nick J.; Polimene, Luca; Hirata, Takafumi; Brewin, Robert J. W.; Aiken, Jim

    2013-01-01

    Geo-engineering proposals to mitigate global warming have focused either on methods of carbon dioxide removal, particularly nutrient fertilization of plant growth, or on cooling the Earth's surface by reducing incoming solar radiation (shading). Marine phytoplankton contribute half the Earth's biological carbon fixation and carbon export in the ocean is modulated by the actions of microbes and grazing communities in recycling nutrients. Both nutrients and light are essential for photosynthesi...

  4. Microalgal and cyanobacterial cultivation: the supply of nutrients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markou, Giorgos; Vandamme, Dries; Muylaert, Koenraad

    2014-11-15

    Microalgae and cyanobacteria are a promising new source of biomass that may complement agricultural crops to meet the increasing global demand for food, feed, biofuels and chemical production. Microalgae and cyanobacteria cultivation does not interfere directly with food production, but care should be taken to avoid indirect competition for nutrient (fertilizer) supply. Microalgae and cyanobacteria production requires high concentrations of essential nutrients (C,N,P,S,K,Fe, etc.). In the present paper the application of nutrients and their uptake by microalgae and cyanobacteria is reviewed. The main focus is on the three most significant nutrients, i.e. carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus; however other nutrients are also reviewed. Nutrients are generally taken up in the inorganic form, but several organic forms of them are also assimilable. Some nutrients do not display any inhibition effect on microalgal or cyanobacterial growth, while others, such as NO2 or NH3 have detrimental effects when present in high concentrations. Nutrients in the gaseous form, such as CO2 and NO face a major limitation which is related mainly to their mass transfer from the gaseous to the liquid state. Since the cultivation of microalgae and cyanobacteria consumes considerable quantities of nutrients, strategies to improve the nutrient application efficiency are needed. Additionally, a promising strategy to improve microalgal and cyanobacterial production sustainability is the utilization of waste streams by recycling of waste nutrients. However, major constraints of using waste streams are the reduction of the range of the biomass applications due to production of contaminated biomass and the possible low bio-availability of some nutrients. PMID:25113948

  5. Changing nutrient stoichiometry affects phytoplankton production, DOP accumulation and dinitrogen fixation - a mesocosm experiment in the eastern tropical North Atlantic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, J.; Löscher, C. R.; Neulinger, S. C.; Reichel, A. F.; Loginova, A.; Borchard, C.; Schmitz, R. A.; Hauss, H.; Kiko, R.; Riebesell, U.

    2016-02-01

    Ocean deoxygenation due to climate change may alter redox-sensitive nutrient cycles in the marine environment. The productive eastern tropical North Atlantic (ETNA) upwelling region may be particularly affected when the relatively moderate oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) deoxygenates further and microbially driven nitrogen (N) loss processes are promoted. Consequently, water masses with a low nitrogen to phosphorus (N : P) ratio could reach the euphotic layer, possibly influencing primary production in those waters. Previous mesocosm studies in the oligotrophic Atlantic Ocean identified nitrate availability as a control of primary production, while a possible co-limitation of nitrate and phosphate could not be ruled out. To better understand the impact of changing N : P ratios on primary production and N2 fixation in the ETNA surface ocean, we conducted land-based mesocosm experiments with natural plankton communities and applied a broad range of N : P ratios (2.67-48). Silicic acid was supplied at 15 µmol L-1 in all mesocosms. We monitored nutrient drawdown, biomass accumulation and nitrogen fixation in response to variable nutrient stoichiometry. Our results confirmed nitrate to be the key factor determining primary production. We found that excess phosphate was channeled through particulate organic matter (POP) into the dissolved organic matter (DOP) pool. In mesocosms with low inorganic phosphate availability, DOP was utilized while N2 fixation increased, suggesting a link between those two processes. Interestingly this observation was most pronounced in mesocosms where nitrate was still available, indicating that bioavailable N does not necessarily suppress N2 fixation. We observed a shift from a mixed cyanobacteria-proteobacteria dominated active diazotrophic community towards a diatom-diazotrophic association of the Richelia-Rhizosolenia symbiosis. We hypothesize that a potential change in nutrient stoichiometry in the ETNA might lead to a general shift within

  6. Essential vernal pool habitat action plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Vernal pool ecosystem conservation and recovery requires the recovery team to develop methods to determine the distribution of vernal pool types throughout the...

  7. Nutrient-substituted hydroxyapatites: synthesis and characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golden, D. C.; Ming, D. W.

    1999-01-01

    Incorporation of Mg, S, and plant-essential micronutrients into the structure of synthetic hydroxyapatite (HA) may be advantageous for closed-loop systems, such as will be required on Lunar and Martian outposts, because these apatites can be used as slow-release fertilizers. Our objective was to synthesize HA with Ca, P, Mg, S, Fe, Cu, Mn, Zn, Mo, B, and Cl incorporated into the structure, i.e., nutrient-substituted apatites. Hydroxyapatite, carbonate hydroxyapatite (CHA), nutrient-substituted hydroxyapatite (NHA), and nutrient-substituted carbonate hydroxyapatite (NCHA) were synthesized by precipitating from solution. Chemical and mineralogical analysis of precipitated samples indicated a considerable fraction of the added cations were incorporated into HA, without mineral impurities. Particle size of the HA was in the 1 to 40 nm range, and decreased with increased substitution of nutrient elements. The particle shape of HA was elongated in the c-direction in unsubstituted HA and NHA but more spherical in CHA and NCHA. The substitution of cations and anions in the HA structure was confirmed by the decrease of the d[002] spacing of HA with substitution of ions with an ionic radius less than that of Ca or P. The DTPA-extractable Cu ranged from 8 to 8429 mg kg-1, Zn ranged from 57 to 1279 mg kg-1, Fe from 211 to 2573 mg kg-1, and Mn from 190 to 1719 mg kg-1, depending on the substitution level of each element in HA. Nutrient-substituted HA has the potential to be used as a slow-release fertilizer to supply micronutrients, S, and Mg in addition to Ca and P.

  8. Choosing Nutrient Dense Foods

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Narrator: Think about the foods you eat. Are they primarily nutrient-dense, like these, [ photos of melon, red bell pepper, oatmeal ] or are ... crackers, bacon, coffee cake ] Some older adults answer the question this way: Richard: In the summertime, like ...

  9. Choosing Nutrient Dense Foods

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... variety of beneficial nutrients. For example, fruits and vegetables not only offer important vitamins and minerals, but also provide phytochemicals, natural compounds like beta carotene and lycopene that may promote good health. Dr. Connie W. Bales, Ph.D., R.D.: ...

  10. Choosing Nutrient Dense Foods

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Narrator: Think about the foods you eat. Are they primarily nutrient-dense, like these, [ photos of melon, red bell pepper, oatmeal ] or are they mostly ... the summertime, like now, fruit is my favorite food. So I eat probably more fruit than anything ...

  11. Carbon Mineralization and Nitrogen Transformation During a Long Term Permafrost Incubation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmon, V. G.; Mack, M. C.; Schuur, E. A. G.

    2014-12-01

    As the limiting nutrient in warming high latitude ecosystems, nitrogen (N) is expected to play a key role in determining the future balance between permafrost carbon (C) losses and increased C sequestration by plants. During decomposition, nitrogen previously locked in soil organic matter is released into the soil solution in the form of dissolved organic molecules following depolymerization by extracellular enzymes. These dissolved organic forms of N can be consumed by the soil microbial community and incorporated in their biomass or mineralized if they are in excess of microbial demand. Once mineralized and released into the soil solutions, N can be lost from the soil system via denitrification. In well drained, low N tussock tundra, however, this pathway is unlikely. Dissolved inorganic N (DIN) and dissolved organic N (DON) are both biologically available to arctic plants. Understanding how the size of these pools changes with depth and continuing decomposition is therefore crucial to projecting the C balance of high latitude systems in a warmer future. N transformations associated with decomposition may differ greatly in surface soils, where a large labile C pool is present and soil has a high C:N ratio, versus deep soils that have a relatively small labile C pool and a lower C:N ratio. In this experiment, the relationship between N availability and C release from permafrost soils was addressed with a 225 day soil incubation performed at 15°C. Seven soil cores were collected from undisturbed, well drained tussock tundra and were partitioned into ten centimeter depth intervals to a depth of 80 cm. Carbon dioxide (CO2) fluxes were measured throughout the incubation period and were used to assess cumulative carbon losses and determine the size of the labile C pool. Destructive harvests at days 16,34,55,83, 143 and 225 were performed and pools of plant available DON and DIN were measured using 2M KCl extractions. At day 225 the microbial biomass N pool was also

  12. Photodegradation alleviates the lignin bottleneck for carbon turnover in terrestrial ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, Amy T; Méndez, M Soledad; Ballaré, Carlos L

    2016-04-19

    A mechanistic understanding of the controls on carbon storage and losses is essential for our capacity to predict and mitigate human impacts on the global carbon cycle. Plant litter decomposition is an important first step for carbon and nutrient turnover, and litter inputs and losses are essential in determining soil organic matter pools and the carbon balance in terrestrial ecosystems. Photodegradation, the photochemical mineralization of organic matter, has been recently identified as a mechanism for previously unexplained high rates of litter mass loss in arid lands; however, the global significance of this process as a control on carbon cycling in terrestrial ecosystems is not known. Here we show that, across a wide range of plant species, photodegradation enhanced subsequent biotic degradation of leaf litter. Moreover, we demonstrate that the mechanism for this enhancement involves increased accessibility to plant litter carbohydrates for microbial enzymes. Photodegradation of plant litter, driven by UV radiation, and especially visible (blue-green) light, reduced the structural and chemical bottleneck imposed by lignin in secondary cell walls. In leaf litter from woody species, specific interactions with UV radiation obscured facilitative effects of solar radiation on biotic decomposition. The generalized effect of sunlight exposure on subsequent microbial activity, mediated by increased accessibility to cell wall polysaccharides, suggests that photodegradation is quantitatively important in determining rates of mass loss, nutrient release, and the carbon balance in a broad range of terrestrial ecosystems. PMID:27044070

  13. Algal remediation of CO₂ and nutrient discharges: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judd, Simon; van den Broeke, Leo J P; Shurair, Mohamed; Kuti, Yussuf; Znad, Hussein

    2015-12-15

    The recent literature pertaining to the application of algal photobioreactors (PBRs) to both carbon dioxide mitigation and nutrient abatement is reviewed and the reported data analysed. The review appraises the influence of key system parameters on performance with reference to (a) the absorption and biological fixation of CO2 from gaseous effluent streams, and (b) the removal of nutrients from wastewaters. Key parameters appraised individually with reference to CO2 removal comprise algal speciation, light intensity, mass transfer, gas and hydraulic residence time, pollutant (CO2 and nutrient) loading, biochemical and chemical stoichiometry (including pH), and temperature. Nutrient removal has been assessed with reference to hydraulic residence time and reactor configuration, along with C:nutrient ratios and other factors affecting carbon fixation, and outcomes compared with those reported for classical biological nutrient removal (BNR). Outcomes of the review indicate there has been a disproportionate increase in algal PBR research outputs over the past 5-8 years, with a significant number of studies based on small, bench-scale systems. The quantitative impacts of light intensity and loading on CO2 uptake are highly dependent on the algal species, and also affected by solution chemical conditions such as temperature and pH. Calculations based on available data for biomass growth rates indicate that a reactor CO2 residence time of around 4 h is required for significant CO2 removal. Nutrient removal data indicate residence times of 2-5 days are required for significant nutrient removal, compared with footprint is at least two orders of magnitude greater than a classical BNR plant. It is concluded that the combined carbon capture/nutrient removal process relies on optimisation of a number of process parameters acting synergistically, principally microalgal strain, C:N:P load and balance, CO2 and liquid residence time, light intensity and quality, temperature, and

  14. Influence of Anthropogenic Nutrient Additions on Greenhouse Gas Production Rates at Water-soil Interfaces in an Urban Dominated Estuary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brigham, B. A.; O'Mullan, G. D.; Bird, J. A.

    2014-12-01

    The tidal Hudson River Estuary (HRE) receives significant inputs of readily dissolvable carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) from incomplete wastewater treatment and sewer overflow during storm events associated with NYC and other urban centers. Nutrient deposition may alter C utilization in the estuarine water column, associated sediments and surrounding wetlands. In these anaerobic systems, we hypothesize that microbial activity is limited by the availability of easily-degradable C (not electron acceptors), which acts as a co-metabolite and provides energy for organic matter decomposition. Sporadic transport of highly C enriched storm derived runoff may substantially enhance greenhouse gas (GHG) production rates through the utilization of stored C pools. To test our hypothesis carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) process rates (1) were evaluated from soil cores removed from three distinct HRE wetland sites (Saw Mill Creek, Piermont, and Iona Island Marsh(s)) across a salinity gradient and incubated under varying nutrient treatments. Further, CO2 and CH4 surface water effluxes (2) were quantified from multiple river cruises spanning two years at varying distance from nutrient sources associated with NYC. Incubation experiments from wetland soil core experiments demonstrated that readily degradable C but not inorganic N additions stimulated GHG production (200 - 350 ug C g-1 of dry soil day-1) threefold compared to negative controls. The HRE was found to be both a CO2 and CH4 source under all conditions. The greatest GHG efflux (300 - 3000 nmoles C m-2 day-1) was quantified in mid-channel, tributary, and near shore sites in close proximity to NYC which following precipitation events demonstrated 2-20X increased GHG efflux. These results demonstrate that anthropogenic C additions associated with dense urban centers have the potential to enhance anaerobic microbial degradation of organic matter and subsequent GHG production.

  15. Nutrient Environments Influence Competition among Aspergillus flavus Genotypes

    OpenAIRE

    Mehl, Hillary L.; Cotty, Peter J.

    2013-01-01

    The population dynamics of Aspergillus flavus, shaped in part by intraspecific competition, influence the likelihood and severity of crop aflatoxin contamination. Competition for nutrients may be one factor modulating intraspecific interactions, but the influences of specific types and concentrations of nutrients on competition between genotypes of A. flavus have not been investigated. Competition between paired A. flavus isolates on agar media was affected by varying concentrations of carbon...

  16. Nutrient balances in the forest energy cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    or wood in fuel mixture). Losses of P at harvesting, fuel storage or transportation, and contamination (soil) or additions of lime are possible causes. To a less extent, also K losses seem to occur in the process. On average, the recommended highest dose of ash to forest (3000 kg d.w./ha) over-compensate for alkalinity but under-compensate for K and P. There is thus a risk that standard values of ash doses will not result in the target compensation, in particular if the aim is to compensate for specific elements. The nutrient compensation needs can be defined to two levels (compensate for slash, or for slash and stem harvesting, respectively), and to four aims: (1) improve forest tree nutrient status and growth, (2) increase base saturation of forest soils and increase soil nutrient pools, (3) increase alkalinity in run-off water to counteract acidification of surface waters, and (4) as a complement to nitrogen fertilisation. Increasing the alkalinity of soils and soil water is the aim that can be most easily reached by ash application, due to the relatively high Ca and Mg contents in ashes. Compensation of ash for K losses is complicated by the high mobility of K ion in ecosystems and because its high solubility even in stabilised ashes. K in logging residues and ashes tend to be leached out and lost. Management for maintaining high availability of K in forest ecosystems should include several aspects, in particular the de sign of clear-fellings, timing of ash recycling and handling of slash and ashes. Compensation for P by application of stabilised wood-ashes is normally in efficient in the short time perspective, due to low P content in ashes and the bonding of P into poorly soluble apatite. However, in the long run P in ashes may improve forest P nutrition. New research is needed to estimate P-fluxes associated with harvesting, storage and transport of forest biomass in realistic situations, and to evaluate if P availability will be deteriorated in the long run

  17. 7 CFR 1033.7 - Pool plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... its route distribution in this marketing area for 3 consecutive months or if the plant is required to... 7 Agriculture 9 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Pool plant. 1033.7 Section 1033.7 Agriculture... Handling Definitions § 1033.7 Pool plant. Pool plant means a plant, unit of plants, or system of plants...

  18. 7 CFR 1030.7 - Pool plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... its route distribution in this marketing area for 3 consecutive months or if the plant is required to... 7 Agriculture 9 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Pool plant. 1030.7 Section 1030.7 Agriculture... Handling Definitions § 1030.7 Pool plant. Pool plant means a plant, unit of plants, or system of plants...

  19. 7 CFR 1131.7 - Pool plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... its route distribution in this marketing area for 3 consecutive months or if the plant is required to... 7 Agriculture 9 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Pool plant. 1131.7 Section 1131.7 Agriculture... Handling Definitions § 1131.7 Pool plant. Pool Plant means a plant or unit of plants specified...

  20. 7 CFR 1032.7 - Pool plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... a majority of its route distribution in this marketing area for 3 consecutive months or if the plant... 7 Agriculture 9 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Pool plant. 1032.7 Section 1032.7 Agriculture... Handling Definitions § 1032.7 Pool plant. Pool plant means a plant, unit of plants, or system of plants...

  1. Climate change increases riverine carbon outgassing while export to the ocean remains uncertain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langerwisch, F.; Walz, A.; Rammig, A.; Tietjen, B.; Thonicke, K.; Cramer, W.

    2015-08-01

    Carbon fluxes in the Amazon Basin are considerably influenced by annual flooding during which terrigenous organic material is imported to the river. This regular interaction affects carbon pools within the riverine system, terrestrial carbon, and carbon exported to the ocean and released to the atmosphere. The processes of generation, conversion, and transport of organic carbon in this coupled terrigenous-riverine system strongly interact and are climate-sensitive, yet their response to climate change is still largely unknown. To quantify climate change effects on carbon pools and on carbon fluxes within the river and to the ocean and the atmosphere, we developed the riverine carbon model RivCM, which is directly coupled to the well-established dynamic vegetation and hydrology model LPJmL. We show here that RivCM successfully reproduces observed values in exported carbon and riverine carbon concentration. We evaluate future changes in riverine carbon by applying RivCM for climate forcing from five climate models and three CO2 emission scenarios (SRES). We find that climate change causes a doubling of riverine organic carbon in the Southern and Western basin while reducing it by 20 % in the eastern and northern parts. In contrast, the amount of riverine inorganic carbon shows a 2- to 3-fold increase in the entire basin, independent of the SRES scenario. The export of carbon to the atmosphere increases as well with an average of about 30 %. In contrast, changes in future export of organic carbon to the Atlantic Ocean depend on the SRES scenario and are projected to either decrease by about 8.9 % (SRES A1B) or increase by about 9.1 % (SRES A2). Such changes in the terrigenous-riverine system could have local and regional impacts on the carbon budget of the whole Amazon Basin and parts of the Atlantic Ocean. Changes in the riverine carbon could lead to a shift in the riverine nutrient supply and pH, while changes in the exported carbon to the ocean leads to changes in

  2. Climate change increases riverine carbon outgassing while export to the ocean remains uncertain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Langerwisch

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Carbon fluxes in the Amazon Basin are considerably influenced by annual flooding during which terrigenous organic material is imported to the river. This regular interaction affects carbon pools within the riverine system, terrestrial carbon, and carbon exported to the ocean and released to the atmosphere. The processes of generation, conversion, and transport of organic carbon in this coupled terrigenous–riverine system strongly interact and are climate-sensitive, yet their response to climate change is still largely unknown. To quantify climate change effects on carbon pools and on carbon fluxes within the river and to the ocean and the atmosphere, we developed the riverine carbon model RivCM, which is directly coupled to the well-established dynamic vegetation and hydrology model LPJmL. We show here that RivCM successfully reproduces observed values in exported carbon and riverine carbon concentration. We evaluate future changes in riverine carbon by applying RivCM for climate forcing from five climate models and three CO2 emission scenarios (SRES. We find that climate change causes a doubling of riverine organic carbon in the Southern and Western basin while reducing it by 20 % in the eastern and northern parts. In contrast, the amount of riverine inorganic carbon shows a 2- to 3-fold increase in the entire basin, independent of the SRES scenario. The export of carbon to the atmosphere increases as well with an average of about 30 %. In contrast, changes in future export of organic carbon to the Atlantic Ocean depend on the SRES scenario and are projected to either decrease by about 8.9 % (SRES A1B or increase by about 9.1 % (SRES A2. Such changes in the terrigenous–riverine system could have local and regional impacts on the carbon budget of the whole Amazon Basin and parts of the Atlantic Ocean. Changes in the riverine carbon could lead to a shift in the riverine nutrient supply and pH, while changes in the exported carbon to the ocean

  3. Effects of Pinus tabulaeformis Carr.plantation density on soil organic carbon and nutrients characteristics in rocky mountain area of northern China%林分密度对华北土石山区油松人工林土壤有机碳及养分特征的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    任丽娜; 王海燕; 丁国栋; 高广磊; 杨晓娟

    2012-01-01

    Soil is the common but precious natural resource that sustains the survival and development of human beings and our society. As a vital link of global carbon cycle, it is the largest carbon pool of terrestrial ecosystem. During the past two decades, Chinese government has been implementing an unprecedented large-scale afforestation program that played a key role on the cumulative carbon sequestration. Hence, it is of great importance to study the effects of forest management (e. G. Thinning, stand density) on Boil organic carbon (SOC) characteristics for mitigating climate changing effects. In this paper, we reported a thinning trial of Pinus tabulaeformis Carr. Plantations and analyzed its effects on SOC and soil nutrients characteristics in Mulan - Weichang, Hebei Province of northern China. The Pinus tabulaeformis Carr. Plantations with six densities (540, 650, 1 084, 1 104, 1 408, 1 860 3 stem/hm2) after thinning were selected to study SOC content and density, soil nutrient contents and their correlations. As a prerequisite, site conditions including aspect, slope, slope position, etc, stand age of 40 years old, trees' growth status and forest management approaches were kept the same or similar before the thinning trial. Correlation analysis, single factor analysis of variance (ANOVA) and multiple comparisons were carried out with SPSS 18.0. The study indicated that as follows;(1) the SOC content and density was characteristic of vertically descending, both decreasing significantly with the increase of soil depth; the SOC content and density were not consistent when the stand density increased from 540 stem/hm2 to 1 860 trees/hm2, and ranged from 10. 56 to 21. 21 g/kg1 ,and from 5.48 to 11.70 kg/m3, respectively. (2) Stand density has significant effects on the SOC content and density. Significant differences were found for the Pinus tabulaeformis Carr. Plantation at the density of 1 408 trees/hm2 with those of 650 and 1 860 trees/hm2, but there were no

  4. 不同量秸秆覆盖还田对土壤活性有机碳及碳库管理指数的影响%Effects of Different Rates of Straw Mulching and Returning to Field on Soil Labile Organic Carbon and Carbon Pool Management Index

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蔡太义; 黄会娟; 黄耀威; 路文涛; 贾志宽; 杨宝平

    2012-01-01

    A field experiment(2007-2010) was conducted at the Heyang Dryland Farming Experimental Station in Shaanxi Province of China to determine the effects of straw mulch rates on soil labile organic matter(LOC),carbon management index(CMI) and spring maize(Zea mays L.) yield.Maize straw at rates of 0(CK),4500(S1),9000(S2) and 13500 kg/hm2(S3) was placed on field plots.The results indicated that soil organic carbon(TOC) content of S1,S2 and S3 treatments increased by 5.08%,14.12% and 28.03%,respectively,compared with the CK at 0-20 cm soil layer;the LOC content increased by 19.20%,44.02% and 23.50%,respectively;the CMI increased by 20.94%,46.86% and 50.21%,respectively.Spring maize yield was found significantly(P0.05) related to the LOC and CMI,while showed no significant correlations with the TOC.It was concluded that the LOC and CMI could reflect more rapidly and objectively the effects of different rates of straw mulch on soil carbon pool and maize yields more than TOC for the Weibei Dry Highland in China,besides,the treatment with 9000 kg/hm2 of straw mulch is preferable.%为探明渭北旱塬不同秸秆覆盖量对春玉米田土壤活性有机碳(LOC)、碳库管理指数(CMI)和作物产量的影响,于2007—2010年在陕西合阳县旱农试验站进行定位试验,以不覆盖为对照(CK),设置了3个水平秸秆覆盖量处理:4 500 kg/hm2(S1)、9 000 kg/hm2(S2)和13 500 kg/hm2(S3)。结果表明,0~20 cm土层,与CK相比,S1、S2和S3总有机碳(TOC)质量分数分别提高5.08%、14.12%和28.03%(P〈0.05);活性有机碳(LOC)分别显著提高19.20%、44.02%和23.50%(P〈0.05);碳库管理指数(CMI)分别显著提高20.94%、46.86%和50.21%(P〈0.05)。春玉米产量分别与LOC和CMI显著相关(P〈0.05),而与TOC则无显著相关性。研究表明,LOC和CMI较TOC更能灵敏、客观地反映渭北旱塬不同量秸秆覆盖还田对土

  5. Limits to soil carbon stability; Deep, ancient soil carbon decomposition stimulated by new labile organic inputs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soil carbon (C) pools store about one-third of the total terrestrial organic carbon. Deep soil C pools (below 1 m) are thought to be stable due to their low biodegradability, but little is known about soil microbial processes and carbon dynamics below the soil surface, or how global change might aff...

  6. POOL development status and production experience

    CERN Document Server

    Chytracek, R; Frank, M; Girone, M; Govi, G; Moscicki, J T; Papadopoulos, I; Schmücker, H; Karr, K; Malon, D; Vaniachine, A; Tanenbaum, W; Xie, Z; Barrass, T; Cioffi, C; IT

    2005-01-01

    The pool of persistent objects for LHC (POOL) project, part of the large Hadron collider (LHC) computing grid (LCG), is now entering its third year of active development. POOL provides the baseline persistency framework for three LHC experiments. It is based on a strict component model, insulating experiment software from a variety of storage technologies. This paper gives a brief overview of the POOL architecture, its main design principles and the experience gained with integration into LHC experiment frameworks. It also presents recent developments in the POOL works areas of relational database abstraction and object storage into relational database management systems (RDBMS) systems.

  7. Estimation of postfire nutrient loss in the Florida everglades.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Y; Miao, S L; Gu, B; Li, Y C

    2009-01-01

    Postfire nutrient release into ecosystem via plant ash is critical to the understanding of fire impacts on the environment. Factors determining a postfire nutrient budget are prefire nutrient content in the combustible biomass, burn temperature, and the amount of combustible biomass. Our objective was to quantitatively describe the relationships between nutrient losses (or concentrations in ash) and burning temperature in laboratory controlled combustion and to further predict nutrient losses in field fire by applying predictive models established based on laboratory data. The percentage losses of total nitrogen (TN), total carbon (TC), and material mass showed a significant linear correlation with a slope close to 1, indicating that TN or TC loss occurred predominantly through volatilization during combustion. Data obtained in laboratory experiments suggest that the losses of TN, TC, as well as the ratio of ash total phosphorus (TP) concentration to leaf TP concentration have strong relationships with burning temperature and these relationships can be quantitatively described by nonlinear equations. The potential use of these nonlinear models relating nutrient loss (or concentration) to temperature in predicting nutrient concentrations in field ash appear to be promising. During a prescribed fire in the northern Everglades, 73.1% of TP was estimated to be retained in ash while 26.9% was lost to the atmosphere, agreeing well with the distribution of TP during previously reported wild fires. The use of predictive models would greatly reduce the cost associated with measuring field ash nutrient concentrations. PMID:19643746

  8. Bone nutrients for vegetarians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangels, Ann Reed

    2014-07-01

    The process of bone mineralization and resorption is complex and is affected by numerous factors, including dietary constituents. Although some dietary factors involved in bone health, such as calcium and vitamin D, are typically associated with dairy products, plant-based sources of these nutrients also supply other key nutrients involved in bone maintenance. Some research suggests that vegetarian diets, especially vegan diets, are associated with lower bone mineral density (BMD), but this does not appear to be clinically significant. Vegan diets are not associated with an increased fracture risk if calcium intake is adequate. Dietary factors in plant-based diets that support the development and maintenance of bone mass include calcium, vitamin D, protein, potassium, and soy isoflavones. Other factors present in plant-based diets such as oxalic acid and phytic acid can potentially interfere with absorption and retention of calcium and thereby have a negative effect on BMD. Impaired vitamin B-12 status also negatively affects BMD. The role of protein in calcium balance is multifaceted. Overall, calcium and protein intakes in accord with Dietary Reference Intakes are recommended for vegetarians, including vegans. Fortified foods are often helpful in meeting recommendations for calcium and vitamin D. Plant-based diets can provide adequate amounts of key nutrients for bone health. PMID:24898231

  9. National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference - Find Nutrient Value of Common Foods by Nutrient

    Science.gov (United States)

    United States Department of Agriculture Agricultural Research Service National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference Release 28 NDL Home Food ... Food Groups: Sort by: Measure by: * required field ​ National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference Release 28 slightly revised May, ...

  10. CARINA: nutrient data in the Atlantic Ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Tanhua

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Data on carbon and carbon-relevant hydrographic and hydrochemical parameters from previously non-publicly available cruise data sets in the Arctic, Atlantic and Southern Ocean have been retrieved and merged to a new database: CARINA (CARbon IN the Atlantic. These data have gone through rigorous quality control (QC procedures to assure the highest possible quality and consistency. The data for most of the measured parameters in the CARINA data base were objectively examined in order to quantify systematic differences in the reported values, i.e. secondary quality control. Systematic biases found in the data have been corrected in the data products, i.e. three merged data files with measured, calculated and interpolated data for each of the three CARINA regions; Arctic, Atlantic and Southern Ocean. Out of a total of 188 cruise entries in the CARINA database, 98 were conducted in the Atlantic Ocean and of these 84 cruises report nitrate values, 79 silicate, and 78 phosphate. Here we present details of the secondary QC for nutrients for the Atlantic Ocean part of CARINA. Procedures of quality control, including crossover analysis between cruises and inversion analysis of all crossover data are briefly described. Adjustments were applied to the nutrient values for 43 of the cruises in the Atlantic Ocean region. With these adjustments the CARINA database is consistent both internally as well as with GLODAP data, an oceanographic data set based on the World Hydrographic Program in the 1990s (Key et al., 2004. Based on our analysis we estimate the internal accuracy of the CARINA-ATL nutrient data to be: nitrate 1.5%; phosphate 2.6%; silicate 3.1%. The CARINA data are now suitable for accurate assessments of, for example, oceanic carbon inventories and uptake rates and for model validation.

  11. Nitrogen Alters Fungal Communities in Boreal Forest Soil: Implications for Carbon Cycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, S. D.; Treseder, K. K.

    2005-12-01

    One potential effect of climate change in high latitude ecosystems is to increase soil nutrient availability. In particular, greater nitrogen availability could impact decomposer communities and lead to altered rates of soil carbon cycling. Since fungi are the primary decomposers in many high-latitude ecosystems, we used molecular techniques and field surveys to test whether fungal communities and abundances differed in response to nitrogen fertilization in a boreal forest ecosystem. We predicted that fungi that degrade recalcitrant carbon would decline under nitrogen fertilization, while fungi that degrade labile carbon would increase, leading to no net change in rates of soil carbon mineralization. The molecular data showed that basidiomycete fungi dominate the active fungal community in both fertilized and unfertilized soils. However, we found that fertilization reduced peak mushroom biomass by 79%, although most of the responsive fungi were ectomycorrhizal and therefore their capacity to degrade soil carbon is uncertain. Fertilization increased the activity of the cellulose-degrading enzyme beta-glucosidase by 78%, while protease activity declined by 39% and polyphenol oxidase, a lignin-degrading enzyme, did not respond. Rates of soil respiration did not change in response to fertilization. These results suggest that increased nitrogen availability does alter the composition of the fungal community, and its potential to degrade different carbon compounds. However, these differences do not affect the total flux of CO2 from the soil, even though the contribution to CO2 respiration from different carbon pools may vary with fertilization. We conclude that in the short term, increased nitrogen availability due to climate warming or nitrogen deposition is more likely to alter the turnover of individual carbon pools rather than total carbon fluxes from the soil. Future work should determine if changes in fungal community structure and associated differences in

  12. Linking spatial patterns of soil redistribution traced with 137Cs and soil nutrients in a Mediterranean mountain agroecosystem (NE Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quijano, Laura; Gaspar, Leticia; Navas, Ana

    2016-04-01

    Mediterranean mountain agroecosystems are prone to soil loss mainly due to the accelerated erosion as a consequence of human induced changes from agriculture and grazing practices over the last centuries and the climatic conditions (i.e. irregular and scarce precipitations and drought periods). Soil erosion leads to soil degradation inducing the loss of soil functions. The progressive decline of soil functions thereof soil quality is associated to a decrease of soil productivity and can threat the sustainability of cultivated soils. The use of fallout 137Cs as a soil movement tracer provides useful data to identify areas where loss and gain of 137Cs occurs and that of soil. This study aims to address soil movement and soil nutrient dynamics closely related to the status of soil degradation. A rain-fed cereal field (1.6 ha) representative of Mediterranean mountain agricultural landscapes (42°25'41''N 1°13'8''W) was selected to examine the effects of soil redistribution processes on the spatial variability of soil organic carbon (SOC) and nitrogen (SON) and their relationships with soil properties and topographic characteristics. From the hydrological point of view, the field is isolated due to the effect of landscape features and man-made structures. Climate is continental Mediterranean with an average annual rainfall of 500 mm and soils are Calcisols. The reference inventories of 137Cs and soil nutrients were established from 21 soil samples collected in nearby undisturbed areas under typical Mediterranean vegetation cover. A total of 156 bulk soil samples (30-50 cm depth) and 156 topsoil samples (5 cm) were collected on a 10 m grid. 137Cs and soil nutrients loss and gain areas were identified by comparing the reference inventories with the values of inventories at the sampling points. A new approach to characterize and measure active (ACF) and stable (SCF) carbon fraction contents by using a dry combustion method based on the oxidation temperature of carbon

  13. A shift of thermokarst lakes from carbon sources to sinks during the Holocene epoch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter Anthony, K. M.; Zimov, S. A.; Grosse, G.; Jones, Miriam C.; Anthony, P.; Chapin, F. S., III; Finlay, J. C.; Mack, M. C.; Davydov, S.; Frenzel, P.F.; Frolking, S.

    2014-01-01

    Thermokarst lakes formed across vast regions of Siberia and Alaska during the last deglaciation and are thought to be a net source of atmospheric methane and carbon dioxide during the Holocene epoch1,2,3,4. However, the same thermokarst lakes can also sequester carbon5, and it remains uncertain whether carbon uptake by thermokarst lakes can offset their greenhouse gas emissions. Here we use field observations of Siberian permafrost exposures, radiocarbon dating and spatial analyses to quantify Holocene carbon stocks and fluxes in lake sediments overlying thawed Pleistocene-aged permafrost. We find that carbon accumulation in deep thermokarst-lake sediments since the last deglaciation is about 1.6 times larger than the mass of Pleistocene-aged permafrost carbon released as greenhouse gases when the lakes first formed. Although methane and carbon dioxide emissions following thaw lead to immediate radiative warming, carbon uptake in peat-rich sediments occurs over millennial timescales. We assess thermokarst-lake carbon feedbacks to climate with an atmospheric perturbation model and find that thermokarst basins switched from a net radiative warming to a net cooling climate effect about 5,000 years ago. High rates of Holocene carbon accumulation in 20 lake sediments (47±10 grams of carbon per square metre per year; mean±standard error) were driven by thermokarst erosion and deposition of terrestrial organic matter, by nutrient release from thawing permafrost that stimulated lake productivity and by slow decomposition in cold, anoxic lake bottoms. When lakes eventually drained, permafrost formation rapidly sequestered sediment carbon. Our estimate of about 160petagrams of Holocene organic carbon in deep lake basins of Siberia and Alaska increases the circumpolar peat carbon pool estimate for permafrost regions by over 50 per cent (ref. 6). The carbon in perennially frozen drained lake sediments may become vulnerable to mineralization as permafrost disappears7

  14. Implications of carbon dust emission for terrestrail carbon cycling and carbon accounting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wind erosion preferentially removes the finest carbon- and nutrient-rich soil fractions, and consequently its role may be significant within terrestrial carbon (C) cycles. However, the impacts of wind erosion on soil organic carbon (SOC) redistribution are not considered in most carbon cycle models,...

  15. Alcohol intake and ovarian cancer risk : A pooled analysis of 10 cohort studies

    OpenAIRE

    Genkinger, J.M.; Hunter, D. J.; Spiegelman, D; Anderson, K. E.; Buring, J. E.; Freudenheim, J. L.; Goldbohm, R. A.; Harnack, L.; Hankinson, S E; Larsson, S C; Leitzmann, M; McCullough, M.L.; Marshall, J.; Miller, A.B.; Rodriguez, C.

    2006-01-01

    Alcohol has been hypothesized to promote ovarian carcinogenesis by its potential to increase circulating levels of estrogen and other hormones; through its oxidation byproduct, acetaldehyde, which may act as a cocarcinogen; and by depletion of folate and other nutrients. Case-control and cohort studies have reported conflicting results relating alcohol intake to ovarian cancer risk. We conducted a pooled analysis of the primary data from ten prospective cohort studies. The analysis included 5...

  16. Formation Laws of Inorganic Gas Pools in the Northern Jiangsu Basin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    In the Northern Jiangsu basin there are high pure CO2 gas pools, low condensed oil-containing CO2 gas pools, high condensed oil-containing CO2 gas pools and He-containing natural gas pools, with the d 13Cco2 (PDB) values ranging from - 2.87to - 6.50 3He/4He 3.71×10- 6 to 6.42×10- 6, R/Ra 2.64 to 4.5, 40Ar/36Ar 705 to 734, belonging to typical mantle source inorganic gas pools which are related to young magmatic activity. The gas layers occur in two major reservoir-caprock systems, the terrestrial Meso-Cenozoic clastic rock system and the marine Meso-Palaeozoic carbonate rock-clastic rock system. Controlled by the difference in the scale of traps in the two reservoir-caprock systems, large and medium-scale inorganic gas pools are formed in the marine Meso-Palaeozoic Group and only small ones are formed in the terrestrial Meso-Cenozoic strata. Inorganic gas pools in this basin are distributed along the two deep lithospheric faults on the west and south boundaries of the basin. Gas pools are developed at the intersected part of the ENE-trending faults that control the half graben and the E-W tenso-shear faults, mainly distributed near the Es1, Ny1 and Ny2-Q basalt eruption centres.

  17. Nutrient density of beverages in relation to climate impact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annika Smedman

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The food chain contributes to a substantial part of greenhouse gas (GHG emissions and growing evidence points to the urgent need to reduce GHGs emissions worldwide. Among suggestions were proposals to alter food consumption patterns by replacing animal foods with more plant-based foods. However, the nutritional dimensions of changing consumption patterns to lower GHG emissions still remains relatively unexplored. This study is the first to estimate the composite nutrient density, expressed as percentage of Nordic Nutrition Recommendations (NNR for 21 essential nutrients, in relation to cost in GHG emissions of the production from a life cycle perspective, expressed in grams of CO2-equivalents, using an index called the Nutrient Density to Climate Impact (NDCI index. The NDCI index was calculated for milk, soft drink, orange juice, beer, wine, bottled carbonated water, soy drink, and oat drink. Due to low-nutrient density, the NDCI index was 0 for carbonated water, soft drink, and beer and below 0.1 for red wine and oat drink. The NDCI index was similar for orange juice (0.28 and soy drink (0.25. Due to a very high-nutrient density, the NDCI index for milk was substantially higher (0.54 than for the other beverages. Future discussion on how changes in food consumption patterns might help avert climate change need to take both GHG emission and nutrient density of foods and beverages into account.

  18. Livermore pool-type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Livermore Pool-Type Reactor (LPTR) has served a dual purpose since 1958--as an instrument for fundamental research and as a tool for measurement and calibration. Our early efforts centered on neutron-diffraction, fission, and capture gamma-ray studies. During the 1960's it was used for extensive calibration work associated with radiochemical and physical measurements on nuclear-explosive tests. Since 1970 the principal applications have been for trace-element measurements and radiation-damage studies. Today's research program is dominated by radiochemical studies of the shorter-lived fission products and by research on the mechanisms of radiation damage. Trace-element measurement for the National Uranium Resource Evaluation (NURE) program is the major measurement application today

  19. A simplified analytical model for pool swell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vapour suppression pool is being used in the containment of PHWR's to limit the pressure and temperature build-up in the containment following a LOCA. The discharge of high pressure water due to LOCA flashes into steam in the drywell, causes a rapid pressure build-up and forces an air-steam mixture into the suppression pool via the vent system. The containment and the pool internal structures need to withstand the hydrodynamic loading due to jet impingement and general motion of the pool water during the water clearing phase from the vents, the loads associated with pool swell in the subsequent air-clearing phase and those due to chugging - the oscillatory condensation of steam - apart from the general thermodynamic loading due to the mass and energy releases from the LOCA. This paper presents a simplified analytical model for pool swell assuming that the bubble is spherical in shape and it migrates vertically. (orig./HP)

  20. Employee reactions to talent pool membership

    OpenAIRE

    Swailes, Stephen; Blackburn, Michelle

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Despite a large literature on talent management there is very little research on the comparative attitudes of employees in talent pools with those not in talent pools. This is an important omission as employee reactions should influence how effective talent programmes are and how they can be designed and evaluated. Consequently, this paper explores the work-related attitudes of employees who are members and non-members of talent pools. Design: Matched samples of employees worki...

  1. Multi-bank loan pool contracts

    OpenAIRE

    Gintschel, Andreas; Hackethal, Andreas

    2004-01-01

    We show that multi-bank loan pools improve the risk-return profile of banks? loan business. Banks write simple contracts on the proceeds from pooled loan portfolios, taking into account the free-rider problems in joint loan production. Thus, banks benefit greatly from diversifying credit risk while limiting the efficiency loss due to adverse incentives. We present calibration results that the formation of loan pools reduce the volatility in default rates, proxying for credit risk, of particip...

  2. Nutrient depletion in Bacillus subtilis biofilms triggers matrix production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many types of bacteria form colonies that grow into physically robust and strongly adhesive aggregates known as biofilms. A distinguishing characteristic of bacterial biofilms is an extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) matrix that encases the cells and provides physical integrity to the colony. The EPS matrix consists of a large amount of polysaccharide, as well as protein filaments, DNA and degraded cellular materials. The genetic pathways that control the transformation of a colony into a biofilm have been widely studied, and yield a spatiotemporal heterogeneity in EPS production. Spatial gradients in metabolites parallel this heterogeneity in EPS, but nutrient concentration as an underlying physiological initiator of EPS production has not been explored. Here, we study the role of nutrient depletion in EPS production in Bacillus subtilis biofilms. By monitoring simultaneously biofilm size and matrix production, we find that EPS production increases at a critical colony thickness that depends on the initial amount of carbon sources in the medium. Through studies of individual cells in liquid culture we find that EPS production can be triggered at the single-cell level by reducing nutrient concentration. To connect the single-cell assays with conditions in the biofilm, we calculate carbon concentration with a model for the reaction and diffusion of nutrients in the biofilm. This model predicts the relationship between the initial concentration of carbon and the thickness of the colony at the point of internal nutrient deprivation. (paper)

  3. Current operating practices of nuclear insurance pools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper discusses the nuclear pooling system and co-operation between the pools, present practice and capacity, with a breakdown of the limits for third party liability and material damage. The author also describes the relationship between the pools and the nuclear operators (the policyholders), and concludes that the nuclear pools have been successful in serving the interests of their member companies, their policyholders and the governments as they have provided a stable insurance market by making available capacity in amounts that had never before been assembled and placed at risk in a single location. 2 tabs

  4. Guide for decontaminating swimming pool at schools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Because of TEPCO Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant accident due to the Great East Japan Earthquake, a huge amount of radioactive materials was widely dispersed and precipitated into the environment. Swimming pools in Fukushima prefectures were contaminated with the radioactives. We JAEA carried out several demonstration tests to decontaminate the radioactives and discharge the pool water safely. We concluded the results obtained from the tests as 'Guide for decontaminating Swimming Pool at School' and released it quickly. Following this, we also released the guide in English. This manuscript, as an experimental report of the swimming pool water decontamination, is consisted from the guide in Japanese and English prepared. (author)

  5. Plant Litter Decomposition and Nutrient Release in Peatlands

    OpenAIRE

    Bragazza, Luca; Buttler, Alexandre; Siegenthaler, Andy; Mitchell, Edward A. D.

    2010-01-01

    Decomposition of plant litter is a crucial process in controlling the carbon balance of peatlands. Indeed, as long as the rate of litter decomposition remains lower than the rate of above- and belowground litter production, a net accumulation of peat and, thus, carbon will take place. In addition, decomposition controls the release of important nutrients such as nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium, the availability of which affects the structure and the functioning of plant communities. This ...

  6. Hyporheic Exchange in Gravel-Bed Rivers with Pool-Riffle Morphology: A 3D Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonina, D.; Buffington, J. M.

    2004-12-01

    The hyporheic zone is a saturated band of sediment that surrounds river flow and forms a linkage between the river and the aquifer. It is a rich ecotone where benthic, hyporheic, and groundwater species temporarily or permanently reside. Head gradients along the streambed draw river water into the hyporheic zone and expel pore water into the stream. This process, known as hyporheic exchange, is important for delivering nutrients, oxygen and other solutes to the sediment, and for washing away waste products to support this ecotone. It is an essential component of the carbon and nitrogen cycles, and it controls in-stream contaminant transport. Although hyporheic exchange has been studied in sand-bed rivers with two-dimensional dune morphology, few studies have been conducted for gravel-bed rivers with three-dimensional pool-riffle geometry. The hyporheic zone of gravel-bed rivers is particularly important for salmonids, many of which are currently at risk world wide. Salmon and trout lay their eggs within the hyporheic zone for incubation. After hatching, the alevins live in the gravel before emerging into the stream. The upwelling and downwelling hyporheic fluxes are intense in these streams due to the highly permeable sediment and strong head variations forced by shallow flow over high-amplitude bed forms. Moreover, gravel-bed rivers show a wide range of flow regimes that change seasonally and have strong effects on hyporheic exchange. To study this exchange, we used four sets of pool-riffle geometries in twelve recirculating flume experiments. We kept a constant bed-form wavelength, but changed the bed-form amplitude and imposed three discharges, covering a wide range of hydraulic and geometric characteristics. Hyporheic exchange was predicted from a three-dimensional model based on bedform-induced pumping transport, where the boundary head profile is the pressure head distribution at the sediment interface, measured with an array of mini-piezometers buried within

  7. Solids and nutrient removal from flushed swine manure using polyacrylamide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Most of the organic nutrient elements (nitrogen and phosphorus) and carbon compounds (COD) in liquid swine manure are contained in fine suspended particles. Flocculation treatment with polyacrylamide (PAM) followed by screening if on the best methods to separate the liquid fraction

  8. Nutrient allocation strategies across a simplified heterogeneous African smallholder farm

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rowe, E.C.; Wijk, van M.T.; Ridder, de N.; Giller, K.E.

    2006-01-01

    In smallholder farms throughout subSaharan Africa, it is a common pattern for some fields to receive substantial inputs of fertilisers and manure, but others to receive nutrient inputs infrequently or never. A soil and crop model, SCAN, based on annual summary of carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus dyna

  9. Impact of Soil Biochar Applications on Nutrient Leaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soil applications of biochar, a co-product of lignocellulosic bioenergy production using the pyrolysis platform, has been proposed as a potential means of sequestering carbon, improving soil quality and of returning plant nutrients removed from soils by the harvesting of biomass crops. We used soil ...

  10. Clay content drives carbon stocks in soils under a plantation of Eucalyptus saligna Labill. in southern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanise Luisa Sausen

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Soil carbon accumulation is largely dependent on net primary productivity. To our knowledge, there have been no studies investigating the dynamics of carbon accumulation in weathered subtropical soils, especially in managed eucalyptus plantations. We quantified the seasonal input of leaf litter, the leaf decomposition rate and soil carbon stocks in an commercial plantation of Eucalyptus saligna Labill. in southern Brazil. Our goal was to evaluate, through multiple linear regression, the influence that certain chemical characteristics of litter, as well as chemical and physical characteristics of soil, have on carbon accumulation in soil organic matter fractions. Variables related to the chemical composition of litter were not associated with the soil carbon stock in the particulate and mineral fractions. However, certain soil characteristics were significantly associated with the carbon stock in both fractions. The concentrations of nutrients associated with plant growth and productivity, such as phosphorus, sulfur, copper and zinc, were associated with variations in the labile carbon pool (particulate fraction. Clay content was strongly associated with the carbon stock in the mineral fraction. The carbon accumulation and stabilization in weathered subtropical Ultisol seems to be mainly associated with the intrinsic characteristics of the soil, particularly clay content, rather than with the quantity, chemical composition or decomposition rate of the litter.

  11. Sulfur cycling in two Dutch moorland pools.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marnette, E.C.L.

    1993-01-01

    Due to atmospheric acid deposition, the chemistry of many moorland pools has changed, resulting in changes in their fauna and flora. Most moorland pools are sensitive to acid loading because underlying and surrounding soils are low in chemical buffering capacity. Biological processes in the sediment

  12. Wading bird guano enrichment of soil nutrients in tree islands of the Florida Everglades.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irick, Daniel L; Gu, Binhe; Li, Yuncong C; Inglett, Patrick W; Frederick, Peter C; Ross, Michael S; Wright, Alan L; Ewe, Sharon M L

    2015-11-01

    Differential distribution of nutrients within an ecosystem can offer insight of ecological and physical processes that are otherwise unclear. This study was conducted to determine if enrichment of phosphorus (P) in tree island soils of the Florida Everglades can be explained by bird guano deposition. Concentrations of total carbon, nitrogen (N), and P, and N stable isotope ratio (δ(15)N) were determined on soil samples from 46 tree islands. Total elemental concentrations and δ(15)N were determined on wading bird guano. Sequential chemical extraction of P pools was also performed on guano. Guano contained between 53.1 and 123.7 g-N kg(-1) and 20.7 and 56.7 g-P kg(-1). Most of the P present in guano was extractable by HCl, which ranged from 82 to 97% of the total P. Total P of tree islands classified as having low or high P soils averaged 0.71 and 40.6 g kg(-1), respectively. Tree island soil with high total P concentration was found to have a similar δ(15)N signature and total P concentration as bird guano. Phosphorus concentrations and δ(15)N were positively correlated in tree island soils (r = 0.83, p< 0.0001). Potential input of guano with elevated concentrations of N and P, and (15)N enriched N, relative to other sources suggests that guano deposition in tree island soils is a mechanism contributing to this pattern. PMID:26057723

  13. Nutrient Cycling Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peter A. Pryfogle

    2005-09-01

    The particular goal of this study is to develop measurement techniques for understanding how consortia of organisms from geothermal facilities utilize sulfur and iron for metabolic activity; and in turn, what role that activity plays in initiating or promoting the development of a biofilm on plant substrates. Sulfur cycling is of interest because sulfur is produced in the resource. Iron is found in some of the steel formulations used in plant components and is also added as chemical treatment for reducing sulfide emissions from the plants. This report describes the set-up and operation of a bioreactor for evaluating the response of colonies of geothermal organisms to changes in nutrient and environmental conditions. Data from initial experiments are presented and plans for future testing is discussed.

  14. Nutrient loading alters the performance of key nutrient exchange mutualisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shantz, Andrew A; Lemoine, Nathan P; Burkepile, Deron E

    2016-01-01

    Nutrient exchange mutualisms between phototrophs and heterotrophs, such as plants and mycorrhizal fungi or symbiotic algae and corals, underpin the functioning of many ecosystems. These relationships structure communities, promote biodiversity and help maintain food security. Nutrient loading may destabilise these mutualisms by altering the costs and benefits each partner incurs from interacting. Using meta-analyses, we show a near ubiquitous decoupling in mutualism performance across terrestrial and marine environments in which phototrophs benefit from enrichment at the expense of their heterotrophic partners. Importantly, heterotroph identity, their dependence on phototroph-derived C and the type of nutrient enrichment (e.g. nitrogen vs. phosphorus) mediated the responses of different mutualisms to enrichment. Nutrient-driven changes in mutualism performance may alter community organisation and ecosystem processes and increase costs of food production. Consequently, the decoupling of nutrient exchange mutualisms via alterations of the world's nitrogen and phosphorus cycles may represent an emerging threat of global change. PMID:26549314

  15. Effects of Different Soil Conservation Measures on Soil Organic Carbon Pools in Nectarine Orchard%水保措施对油桃园土壤有机碳库及其组分的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王义祥; 黄毅斌; 叶菁; 王成己; 翁伯琦; 应朝阳

    2014-01-01

    Soil organic carbon(C)is greatly influenced by soil management practices. Here we compared the effects of different soil conser-vation measures on soil organic C fractions in nectarine orchard. There were three soil management practices:slope plus clean tillage(T1), terrace plus clean tillage(T2)and terrace plus sod culture(Arachis pintoi mulching)(T3). Soil organic C content in T3 orchard was 46.5%higher than in T1 and 15.3% higher than in T2. Compared with T1, the contents of particulate organic C(POC), light fraction of organic C (LFOC), dissolved organic C(DOC)and microbial biomass C(MBC)increased by 17.6%, 60.4%, 6.5%and 42.2% in T2 orchard, and 30.9%, 112.7%, 24.3% and 45.3% in T3 , respectively. Resistant organic C content in T3 was over 39% greater than in T1 or T2. Our results show that sod culture would increase soil organic C and improve soil fertility.%以福建尤溪玉池果园水土流失定位观测点为平台,研究了不同水保工程措施对油桃园土壤有机碳及其组分的影响。结果表明,梯台清耕和梯台生草模式油桃园土壤有机碳密度较顺坡清耕模式分别提高18.3%和34.7%。梯台生草模式土壤有机碳含量分别比顺坡清耕和梯台清耕模式提高15.3%和46.5%,颗粒有机碳、轻组有机碳、可溶性有机碳和微生物量碳含量分别提高了17.6%和30.9%、60.4%和112.7%、6.5%和24.3%、42.2%和45.3%,说明生草栽培措施有利于改良果园土壤结构,提高土壤肥力。梯台生草模式土壤惰性有机碳含量也比顺坡清耕和梯台清耕模式分别提高39.1%和39.0%,说明生草栽培也可促进果园土壤稳定性碳库的增加。

  16. Hydromorphological control of nutrient cycling in complex river floodplain systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hein, T.; Bondar-Kunze, E.; Felkl, M.; Habersack, H.; Mair, M.; Pinay, G.; Tritthart, M.; Welti, N.

    2009-04-01

    Riparian zones and floodplains are key components within river ecosystems controlling nutrient cycling by promoting transformation processes and thus, act as biogeochemical hot spots. The intensity of these processes depends on the exchange conditions (the connectivity) with the main channel and the morphological setting of the water bodies. At the landscape scale, three interrelated principles of hydromorphological dynamics can be formulated regarding the cycling and transfer of carbon and nutrients in large rivers ecosystems: a) The mode of carbon and nutrient delivery affects ecosystem functioning; b) Increasing residence time and contact area impact nutrient transformation; c) Floods and droughts are natural events that strongly influence pathways of carbon and nutrient cycling. These three principles of hydromorphological dynamics control the nutrient uptake and retention and are linked over different temporal and spatial scales. All three factors can be strongly affected by natural disturbances or anthropogenic impacts, through a change in either the water regime or the geomorphologic setting of the river valley. Any change in natural water regimes will affect the biogeochemistry of riparian zones and floodplains as well as their ability to cycle and mitigate nutrient fluxes originating from upstream and/or upslope. Especially these areas have been altered by river regulation and land use changes over the last 200 years leading to the deterioration of the functioning of these compartments within the riverine landscape. The resulting deficits have prompted rehabilitation and restoration measures aiming to increase the spatial heterogeneity, the complexity, of these ecosystems. Yet, a more integrated approach is needed considering the present status of nutrient dynamics and the effects of restoration measures at different scales. The present paper analyses the effects of river side-arm restoration on ecosystem functions within the side-arm and highlights

  17. Ripples in a superconducting tidal pool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The behaviour of electrons in a metal is often compared to that of water in a pool. An empty pool is like a material that has all of its electrons removed. As electrons are 'poured' into the metal, they first occupy the lowest energies available - the bottom of the pool - and eventually fill up to the Fermi energy, the top of the pool. At this point we no longer discuss electrons but quasiparticles. These are electrons that have modified properties due to their interactions within the material. Waves in a pool can be excited, and their properties will depend on the depth of the water. Similarly in a metal, quasiparticles behave like waves that have a material-dependent dispersion relation between their energy and their wavevector, which specifies their direction and wavelength. This simple analogy also hints at an indirect method of measuring the dispersion relation of a metal, and hence the myriad of properties that depend on it. (U.K.)

  18. Report on fuel pool water loss tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zalenski, R.F. [West Valley Nuclear Services Co., West Valley, NY (United States)

    1995-12-31

    To resolve potential concerns on the integrity of the fuel storage pool at the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP), a highly accurate testing technique was developed to quantify water losses from the pool. The fuel pool is an unlined, single wall, reinforced concrete structure containing approximately 818,000 gallons of water. Since an initial test indicated that water losses could possibly be attributed solely to evaporation, a cover was suspended and sealed over the pool to block evaporation losses. High accuracy water level and temperature instrumentation was procured and installed. The conclusions of this report indicate that unaccounted-for water losses from the pool are insignificant and there is no detectable leakage within the range of test accuracy.

  19. Aboveground and belowground responses to nutrient additions and herbivore exclusion in Arctic tundra ecosystems in northern Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, J. C.; Gough, L.; Simpson, R.; Johnson, D. R.

    2011-12-01

    The Arctic has experienced significant increased regional warming over the past 30 years. Warming generally increases tundra soil nutrient availability by creating a more favorable environment for plant growth, decomposition and nutrient mineralization. Aboveground there has been a "greening" of the Arctic with increased net primary productivity (NPP), and an increase in woody vegetation. Concurrent with the changes aboveground has been an increase in root growth at lower depths and a loss of soil organic C (40 -100 g C m-2 yr-1). Given that arctic soils contain 14% of the global soil C pool, understanding the mechanisms behind shifts of this magnitude that are changing arctic soils from a net sink to a net source of atmospheric C is critical. We took an integrated multi-trophic level approach to examine how altering soil nutrients and mammalian herbivore activity affects vegetation, soil fauna, and microbial communities as well as soil physical characteristics in moist acidic (MAT) and dry heath (DH) tundra. Our work was conducted at the Arctic LTER site in northern Alaska. We sampled the nutrient (controls and annual N+P additions) and herbivore (controls and exclosures) manipulations established in 1996 after 10 years of treatment. Models that incorporated the biomass estimates from the field were used to characterize the trophic structure of the belowground food web and to estimate carbon flux among soil organisms and C-mineralization rates. Both MAT and DH exhibited significant increases in NPP and root growth and changes in vegetation structure with transitions from a mixed community to deciduous shrubs in MAT and from lichens to grasses and shrubs in DH, with nutrient additions and herbivore exclosures. Belowground responses to the treatments were dependent on ecosystem type, but exposed alterations in trophic structure that included changes in microbial biomass, the establishment of microbivorous enchytreaids, increases in root-feeding nematodes, and

  20. Pool scrubbing models for iodine components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, K. [Battelle Ingenieurtechnik GmbH, Eschborn (Germany)

    1996-12-01

    Pool scrubbing is an important mechanism to retain radioactive fission products from being carried into the containment atmosphere or into the secondary piping system. A number of models and computer codes has been developed to predict the retention of aerosols and fission product vapours that are released from the core and injected into water pools of BWR and PWR type reactors during severe accidents. Important codes in this field are BUSCA, SPARC and SUPRA. The present paper summarizes the models for scrubbing of gaseous Iodine components in these codes, discusses the experimental validation, and gives an assessment of the state of knowledge reached and the open questions which persist. The retention of gaseous Iodine components is modelled by the various codes in a very heterogeneous manner. Differences show up in the chemical species considered, the treatment of mass transfer boundary layers on the gaseous and liquid sides, the gas-liquid interface geometry, calculation of equilibrium concentrations and numerical procedures. Especially important is the determination of the pool water pH value. This value is affected by basic aerosols deposited in the water, e.g. Cesium and Rubidium compounds. A consistent model requires a mass balance of these compounds in the pool, thus effectively coupling the pool scrubbing phenomena of aerosols and gaseous Iodine species. Since the water pool conditions are also affected by drainage flow of condensate water from different regions in the containment, and desorption of dissolved gases on the pool surface is determined by the gas concentrations above the pool, some basic limitations of specialized pool scrubbing codes are given. The paper draws conclusions about the necessity of coupling between containment thermal-hydraulics and pool scrubbing models, and proposes ways of further simulation model development in order to improve source term predictions. (author) 2 tabs., refs.

  1. Pool scrubbing models for iodine components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pool scrubbing is an important mechanism to retain radioactive fission products from being carried into the containment atmosphere or into the secondary piping system. A number of models and computer codes has been developed to predict the retention of aerosols and fission product vapours that are released from the core and injected into water pools of BWR and PWR type reactors during severe accidents. Important codes in this field are BUSCA, SPARC and SUPRA. The present paper summarizes the models for scrubbing of gaseous Iodine components in these codes, discusses the experimental validation, and gives an assessment of the state of knowledge reached and the open questions which persist. The retention of gaseous Iodine components is modelled by the various codes in a very heterogeneous manner. Differences show up in the chemical species considered, the treatment of mass transfer boundary layers on the gaseous and liquid sides, the gas-liquid interface geometry, calculation of equilibrium concentrations and numerical procedures. Especially important is the determination of the pool water pH value. This value is affected by basic aerosols deposited in the water, e.g. Cesium and Rubidium compounds. A consistent model requires a mass balance of these compounds in the pool, thus effectively coupling the pool scrubbing phenomena of aerosols and gaseous Iodine species. Since the water pool conditions are also affected by drainage flow of condensate water from different regions in the containment, and desorption of dissolved gases on the pool surface is determined by the gas concentrations above the pool, some basic limitations of specialized pool scrubbing codes are given. The paper draws conclusions about the necessity of coupling between containment thermal-hydraulics and pool scrubbing models, and proposes ways of further simulation model development in order to improve source term predictions. (author) 2 tabs., refs

  2. Dissolved organic carbon (DOC in Arctic ground ice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Fritz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Thermal permafrost degradation and coastal erosion in the Arctic remobilize substantial amounts of organic carbon (OC and nutrients which have been accumulated in late Pleistocene and Holocene unconsolidated deposits. Their vulnerability to thaw subsidence, collapsing coastlines and irreversible landscape change is largely due to the presence of large amounts of massive ground ice such as ice wedges. However, ground ice has not, until now, been considered to be a source of dissolved organic carbon (DOC, dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC and other elements, which are important for ecosystems and carbon cycling. Here we show, using geochemical data from a large number of different ice bodies throughout the Arctic, that ice wedges have the greatest potential for DOC storage with a maximum of 28.6 mg L−1 (mean: 9.6 mg L−1. Variation in DOC concentration is positively correlated with and explained by the concentrations and relative amounts of typically terrestrial cations such as Mg2+ and K+. DOC sequestration into ground ice was more effective during the late Pleistocene than during the Holocene, which can be explained by rapid sediment and OC accumulation, the prevalence of more easily degradable vegetation and immediate incorporation into permafrost. We assume that pristine snowmelt is able to leach considerable amounts of well-preserved and highly bioavailable DOC as well as other elements from surface sediments, which are rapidly stored in ground ice, especially in ice wedges, even before further degradation. In the Yedoma region ice wedges represent a significant DOC (45.2 Tg and DIC (33.6 Tg pool in permafrost areas and a fresh-water reservoir of 4172 km3. This study underlines the need to discriminate between particulate OC and DOC to assess the availability and vulnerability of the permafrost carbon pool for ecosystems and climate feedback upon mobilization.

  3. Operation and maintenance techniques of pool and pool water purification system in IMEF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    IMEF pool is used pass way between pool and hot cell in order to inlet and outlet of fuel pin in cask. All operation is performed conforming with naked eyes. Therefore floating matter is filtered so as to easy under water handling. Also radioactivity in pool water is controlled according to the nuclear law, radioactivity ration maintained less than 15mR/hr on pool side. Perfect operation and maintenance can be achieved well trained operator. Result obtained from the perfection can give more influence over restrain, spreading contamination of radioactivity materials. This report describes operation and maintenance technique of pool water purification system in IMEF. (Author). 7 refs., 13 figs

  4. Nutrient Needs of Young Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willenberg, Barbara; Hemmelgarn, Melinda

    1991-01-01

    Explains the nutritional requirements of children and adolescents, and the physiological roles of the major nutrients. Details the nutrient needs of young athletes, including pre- and postgame meals and fluid replacement. Discusses eating disorders and obesity. Advocates a diet rich in complex carbohydrates. (BC)

  5. Use of Select Nutrients to Foster Wellness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassel, Russell N.

    1987-01-01

    Discusses how to be healthy through one's diet. Lists 20 nutrients necessary for one's well being and explains role of each nutrient. Describes how nutrients complement one another and asserts that the right combination of nutrients can sometimes substitute for medication. Also lists 20 diagnostic categories of problems and suggests nutrients to…

  6. Mechanisms of microbial carbon sequestration in the ocean – future research directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Jiao

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews progress on understanding biological carbon sequestration in the ocean with special reference to the microbial formation and transformation of recalcitrant dissolved organic carbon (RDOC, the microbial carbon pump (MCP. We propose that RDOC is a relative concept with a wide continuum of recalcitrance. Most RDOC compounds maintain their levels of recalcitrance only in a specific environmental context (RDOCt. The ocean RDOC pool also contains compounds that may be inaccessible to microbes due to their extremely low concentration (RDOCc. This differentiation allows us to appreciate the linkage between microbial source and RDOC composition on a range of temporal and spatial scales. Analyses of biomarkers and isotopic records show intensive MCP processes in the anoxic Proterozoic oceans when the MCP could have played a significant role in regulating climate. Understanding the dynamics of the MCP in conjunction with the better constrained biological pump (BP over geological timescales could help to predict future climate trends. Integration of the MCP and the BP will require new research approaches and opportunities. Major goals include understanding the interactions between particulate organic carbon (POC and RDOC that contribute to sequestration efficiency, and the concurrent determination of the chemical composition of organic carbon, microbial community composition and enzymatic activity. Molecular biomarkers and isotopic tracers should be employed to link water column processes to sediment records, as well as to link present-day observations to paleo-evolution. Ecosystem models need to be developed based on empirical relationships derived from bioassay experiments and field investigations in order to predict the dynamics of carbon cycling along the stability continuum of POC and RDOC under potential global change scenarios. We propose that inorganic nutrient input to coastal waters may reduce the capacity for carbon

  7. Review on Periphyton as Mediator of Nutrient Transfer in Aquatic Ecosystems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surjya K. Saikia

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available In the studies of aquatic ecology, periphyton has been uncared for despite its vital role in nutrient uptake and transfer to the upper trophic organisms. Being the component of food chain as attached organism it takes part in nutrient cycling in the ecosystem like that of suspended planktonic counterparts. The present review, with an aim to understand the role of periphyton in nutrient transfer from benthic environment to upper trophic level, focuses many aspects of periphyton-nutrient relationship based on available literatures. It also attempts to redefine periphyton, as a part of biofilm, harboring nutrient components like protein, fat and carbohydrate preferably in its extracellular polymeric substance (EPS, cyanobacteria, diatom and other algal communities. In addition to physical processes, nutrient uptake by periphyton is catalyzed by enzymes like Nitrogen Reductase and Alkaline Phosphatase from the environment. This uptake and transfer is further regulated by periphytic C: nutrient (N or P stoichiometry, colonization time, distribution of periphyton cover on sediments and macrophytes, macronutrient concentration, grazing, sloughing, temperature, and advective transport. The Carbon (C sources of periphyton are mainly dissolve organic matter and photosynthetic C that enters into higher trophic levels through predation and transfers as C-rich nutrient components. Despite of emerging interests on utilizing periphyton as nutrient transfer tool in aquatic ecosystem, the major challenges ahead for modern aquatic biologists lies on determining nutrient uptake and transfer rate of periphyton, periphytic growth and simulating nutrient models of periphyton to figure a complete energy cycle in aquatic ecosystem.

  8. Salmon nutrients are associated with the phylogenetic dispersion of riparian flowering-plant assemblages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurteau, Leslie A; Mooers, Arne Ø; Reynolds, John D; Hocking, Morgan D

    2016-02-01

    A signature of nonrandom phylogenetic community structure has been interpreted as indicating community assembly processes. Significant clustering within the phylogenetic structure of a community can be caused by habitat filtering due to low nutrient availability. Nutrient limitation in temperate Pacific coastal rainforests can be alleviated to some extent by marine nutrient subsidies introduced by migrating salmon, which leave a quantitative signature on the makeup of plant communities near spawning streams. Thus, nutrient-mediated habitat filtering could be reduced by salmon nutrients. Here, we ask how salmon abundance affects the phylogenetic structure of riparian flowering plant assemblages across 50 watersheds in the Great Bear Rainforest of British Columbia, Canada. Based on a regional pool of 60 plant species, we found that assemblages become more phylogenetically dispersed and species poor adjacent to streams with higher salmon spawning density. In contrast, increased phylogenetic clumping and species richness was seen in sites with low salmon density, with steeper slopes, further from the stream edge, and within smaller watersheds. These observations are all consistent with abiotic habitat filtering and biotic competitive exclusion acting together across local and landscape-scale gradients in nutrient availability to structure assembly of riparian flowering plants. In this case, rich salmon nutrients appear to release riparian flowering-plant assemblages from the confines of a low-nutrient habitat filter that drives phylogenetic clustering. PMID:27145619

  9. Experimental investigation of passive pool mixing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After the initial blow-down phase of a hypothetical design basis accident or severe accident in the General Electric Simplified Boiling Water Reactor (SBWR), heat is added to the suppression pool by gas-vapor flow through the isolation condenser (IC) and passive containment cooler (PCC) vent lines. The exit of the vent lines is fairly shallow (on the order of 0.75 meters) in order to enhance IC/PCC operation. The surface temperature of a pool increases when heat is injected. The magnitude of increase depends on the amount of the pool involved in heat absorption and thermal gradients in the absorbing region. Thermal stratification occurs because a rising plume carries the energy of the vented gas-vapor to the pool surface and, as a result, only the region of the pool above the injection point is involved in heat absorption. This experimental investigation demonstrated the feasibility of using the IC/PCC vent flow to drive pool mixing. A passive mixer was designed and constructed on the basis of buoyancy and momentum utilization. The mixer was sized to represent one in a system of several mixers which could be implemented in the SBWR. The experimental results show that the potential exists to involve a significant amount of the suppression pool in heat absorption using a passive mixer

  10. SAFETY AND MANAGEMENT OF SWIMING POOLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cemal GÜNDOĞDU

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study,it was investigated the situation related to the safety and management of swimming pools belongs to municipality This study was planned to determine the present situation related to the safety and management of open,half-olympic and closed swimming pools which are especially used for sports activities,to find out the deficiencies in practise and to overcome these.Our study included totally 80 open,closed,olympic, half-olympic public swimming pools(the pools that belongs to municipality,private administration and university,the colleges connected to the ministry of education, Military schools and police college.In our research,search,natural observation and meeting methods were used.In accordance with this aim the checklist questions,which were prepared for health and safety controls in swimming pools, were tested on the people by face-to-face meeting method. While the statistical evaluation of the available results were being done,frequency and percentage dispersion obtained from checklist was found.It was found that the 52 % of the training and lifeguard choise of the pools in Turkey,64 % of the emergency action equipment,71 % of the signs and signboards for the safety of the pool,75 % of the pool edge and its surroundings are not suitable for the standards and that these threaten the swimmers health importantly.Consequently,we are in the opinion that the pool staff should receive the periodical training about the first aid and using emergency situation equipment.And it is necessary that the Ministry Responsible for sports,Ministry of Interior,Ministry of Health,Ministry of Tourism be cooperate with water sports federations and the related civil society organizationsKey Words: .

  11. Nutrient and media recycling in heterotrophic microalgae cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowrey, Joshua; Armenta, Roberto E; Brooks, Marianne S

    2016-02-01

    In order for microalgae-based processes to reach commercial production for biofuels and high-value products such as omega-3 fatty acids, it is necessary that economic feasibility be demonstrated at the industrial scale. Therefore, process optimization is critical to ensure that the maximum yield can be achieved from the most efficient use of resources. This is particularly true for processes involving heterotrophic microalgae, which have not been studied as extensively as phototrophic microalgae. An area that has received significant conceptual praise, but little experimental validation, is that of nutrient recycling, where the waste materials from prior cultures and post-lipid extraction are reused for secondary fermentations. While the concept is very simple and could result in significant economic and environmental benefits, there are some underlying challenges that must be overcome before adoption of nutrient recycling is viable at commercial scale. Even more, adapting nutrient recycling for optimized heterotrophic cultures presents some added challenges that must be identified and addressed that have been largely unexplored to date. These challenges center on carbon and nitrogen recycling and the implications of using waste materials in conjunction with virgin nutrients for secondary cultures. The aim of this review is to provide a foundation for further understanding of nutrient recycling for microalgae cultivation. As such, we outline the current state of technology and practical challenges associated with nutrient recycling for heterotrophic microalgae on an industrial scale and give recommendations for future work. PMID:26572520

  12. Application of controlled nutrient release to permeable reactive barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freidman, Benjamin L; Gras, Sally L; Snape, Ian; Stevens, Geoff W; Mumford, Kathryn A

    2016-03-15

    The application of controlled release nutrient (CRN) materials to permeable reactive barriers to promote biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in groundwater was investigated. The longevity of release, influence of flow velocity and petroleum hydrocarbon concentration on nutrient release was assessed using soluble and ion exchange CRN materials; namely Polyon™ and Zeopro™. Both CRN materials, assessed at 4 °C and 23 °C, demonstrated continuing release of nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium (N-P-K) at 3500 bed volumes passing, with longer timeframes of N-P-K release at 4 °C. Zeopro™-activated carbon mixtures demonstrated depletion of N-P-K prior to 3500 bed volumes passing. Increased flow velocity was shown to lower nutrient concentrations in Polyon™ flow cells while nutrient release from Zeopro™ was largely unchanged. The presence of petroleum hydrocarbons, at 1.08 mmol/L and 3.25 mmol/L toluene, were not shown to alter nutrient release from Polyon™ and Zeopro™ across 14 days. These findings suggest that Polyon™ and Zeopro™ may be suitable CRN materials for application to PRBs in low nutrient environments. PMID:26735866

  13. Airways disorders and the swimming pool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bougault, Valérie; Boulet, Louis-Philippe

    2013-08-01

    Concerns have been expressed about the possible detrimental effects of chlorine derivatives in indoor swimming pool environments. Indeed, a controversy has arisen regarding the possibility that chlorine commonly used worldwide as a disinfectant favors the development of asthma and allergic diseases. The effects of swimming in indoor chlorinated pools on the airways in recreational and elite swimmers are presented. Recent studies on the influence of swimming on airway inflammation and remodeling in competitive swimmers, and the phenotypic characteristics of asthma in this population are reviewed. Preventative measures that could potentially reduce the untoward effects of pool environment on airways of swimmers are discussed. PMID:23830132

  14. The Role of Nuclear Insurance Pools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since fifty years insurers respond to the need of both governments and the electricity industry to provide financial protection to cover the perils presented by the use of nuclear energy for peaceful purposes. This paper aims at explaining what difficulties had to be solved in order to enable insurers to provide such protection, that as a solution to these difficulties Nuclear Insurance Pools were formed, how such pools operate and what security they provide. Thereby not only a number of universal principles underlying nuclear pool insurance will be explained, but also some differences in the characteristics of such insurance per group of countries. (author)

  15. LCG POOL development status and production experience

    CERN Document Server

    Chytracek, Radovan; Cioffi, Carmine; Düllmann, Dirk; Frank, Markus; Girone, Maria; Govi, Giacomo; Karr, Kristo; Malon, David; Moscicki, Jakub T; Papadopoulos, Ioannis M; Schmücker, H; Tanenbaum, William; Vaniachine, A; Xie Zhen

    2004-01-01

    The POOL project, as a part of the LHC Computing Grid (LCG), is now entering its third year of active development POOL provides the baseline persistency framework for three LHC experiment and is based on a strict component model, insulating experiment software from a variety of storage technology choices. This paper gives a brief overview of the POOL architecture, its main design principles and the experience gained with integration into LHC experiment frameworks. In also presents recent developments in the area of relational database abstraction and object storage into RDBMS systems.

  16. Weld pool visual sensing without external illumination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Jinchao; Fan, Zhun; Olsen, Soren Ingvor;

    2011-01-01

    Visual sensing in arc welding has become more and more important, but still remains challenging because of the harsh environment with extremely strong illumination from the arc. This paper presents a low-cost camera-based sensor system, without using external Illumination, but nevertheless able to...... sense and model the weld pool. Central is a carefully selected optical filtering as well as an active contour-based tracking of the weld pool boundary. The system is able to extract the 2D shape of the weld pool in real time. The reported experiments show the feasibility of this approach....

  17. Laser surveillance systems for fuel storage pools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Laser Surveillance System (LASSY) as a new safeguards device has been developed under the IAEA research contract No. 3458/RB at the Atominstitut Wien using earlier results by S. Fiarman. This system is designed to act as a sheet of light covering spent fuel assemblies in spent fuel storage pools. When movement of assemblies takes place, LASSY detects and locates the position of the movement in the pool and when interrogated, presents a list of pool positions and times of movement to the safeguards inspector. A complete prototype system was developed and built. Full scale tests showed the principal working capabilities of a LASSY underwater

  18. Nutrient availability and phytoplankton nutrient limitation across a gradient of atmospheric nitrogen deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elser, J.J.; Kyle, M.; Steuer, L.; Nydick, K.R.; Baron, J.S.

    2009-01-01

    Atmospheric nitrogen (N) deposition to lakes and watersheds has been increasing steadily due to various anthropogenic activities. Because such anthropogenic N is widely distributed, even lakes relatively removed from direct human disturbance are potentially impacted. However, the effects of increased atmospheric N deposition on lakes are not well documented, We examined phytoplankton biomass, the absolute and relative abundance of limiting nutrients (N and phosphorus [P]), and phytoplankton nutrient limitation in alpine lakes of the Rocky Mountains of Colorado (USA) receiving elevated (>6 kg N??ha-1??yr-1) or low (atmospheric N deposition. Highdeposition lakes had higher NO3-N and total N concentrations and higher total N : total P ratios. Concentrations of chlorophyll and seston carbon (C) were 2-2.5 times higher in highdeposition relative to low-deposition lakes, while high-deposition lakes also had higher seston C:N and C:P (but not N:P) ratios. Short-term enrichment bioassays indicated a qualitative shift in the nature of phytoplankton nutrient limitation due to N deposition, as highdeposition lakes had an increased frequency of primary P limitation and a decreased frequency and magnitude of response to N and to combined N and P enrichment. Thus elevated atmospheric N deposition appears to have shifted nutrient supply from a relatively balanced but predominantly N-deficient regime to a more consistently P-limited regime in Colorado alpine lakes. This adds to accumulating evidence that sustained N deposition may have important effects on lake phytoplankton communities and plankton-based food webs by shifting the quantitative and qualitative nature of nutrient limitation. ?? 2009 by the Ecological Society of America.

  19. Estimation of soil nutrients in L.vannamei culture ponds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunalan B

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Pond soil plays an important role in regulating the concentration of nutrients in the pond water. Shrimps normally live on or near the bottom, are exposed to conditions on the pond bottom. The present study was attempted to study the soil nutrients in the L.vannamei culture ponds. In the present study total carbon, total nitrogen and calcium were increasing considerably in almost all the ponds of Tamilnadu. The increment of total carbon was maximum in the ponds at Pattukottai and minimum in Marakanam. Similarly the increment of total nitrogen was maximum in Tranquebar and minimum in Parangipettai. Calcium was increased maximum in Marakanam and minimum in Tranquebar. However, boron, cadmium, cobalt, chromium, copper, iron, magnesium, manganese, nickel, lead, zinc showed decreasing trend when compared to beginning and end of the culture. The total carbon was increased maximum in the ponds of Orissa and it was minimum in Bhimavaram. Total nitrogen was increased maximum in Bhimavaram and minimum was in Gudur. Calcium was maximum in Gudur and minimum in Orissa. Other nutrients followed similar trend as in Tamilnadu. The present study strongly recommends the shrimp farmer to concentrate In every culture likely to enhance the bottom soil by adding some extra nutrient to the soil.

  20. Sequestration of Carbon in Mycorrhizal Fungi Under Nitrogen Fertilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treseder, K. K.; Turner, K. M.

    2005-12-01

    Mycorrhizal fungi are root symbionts that facilitate plant uptake of soil nutrients in exchange for plant carbohydrates. They grow in almost every terrestrial ecosystem on earth, form relationships with about 80% of plant species, and receive 10 to 20% of the carbon fixed by their host plants. As such, they could potentially sequester a significant amount of carbon in ecosystems. We hypothesized that nitrogen fertilization would decrease carbon storage in mycorrhizal fungi, because plants should reduce investment of carbon in mycorrhizal fungi when nitrogen availability is high. We measured the abundance of two major groups of mycorrhizal fungi, arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) and ectomycorrhizal (ECM) fungi, in control and nitrogen-fertilized plots within three boreal ecosystems of inland Alaska. The ecosystems represented different recovery stages following severe fire, and comprised a young site dominated by AM fungi, an old site dominated by ECM fungi, and an intermediate site co-dominated by both groups. Pools of mycorrhizal carbon included root-associated AM and ECM structures, soil-associated AM hyphae, and soil-associated glomalin. Glomalin is a glycoprotein produced only by AM fungi. It is present in the cell walls of AM hyphae, and then is deposited in the soil as the hyphae senesce. Nitrogen significantly altered total mycorrhizal carbon pools, but its effect varied by site (site * N interaction, P = 0.05). Under nitrogen fertilization, mycorrhizal carbon was reduced from 99 to 50 g C m2 in the youngest site, was increased from 124 to 203 g C m2 in the intermediate-aged site, and remained at 35 g C m2 in the oldest site. The changes in total mycorrhizal carbon stocks were driven mostly by changes in glomalin (site * N interaction, P = 0.05), and glomalin stocks were strongly correlated with AM hyphal abundance (P P = 0.001), as did root-associated ECM structures (P = 0.021). The amount of carbon sequestered within living mycorrhizal structures (0.013 to 0

  1. 雷州半岛红树林边缘效应及其对海岸有机碳库的影响%Edge effects of mangrove boundaries and their impact on organic carbon pool along the coast of Leizhou Peninsula

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨娟; JAY Gao; 刘宝林; ALAN Cheung; 王铎; 张苇

    2012-01-01

    As one of the most important interfaces of material cycle, energy and species flows between coastal wetlands and adjacent waters; mangrove forest edge is of great scientific importance in understanding the interaction between different ecosystems, biogeomorphogical processes and dynamics of soil organic carbon pool in coastal areas. In order to determine the edge effects and their impact on the soil organic carbon pool, 4 coastal landform types of mangrove distribution area in the east coast of Leizhou Peninsula were selected for investigation. Three subzones of barren flat, forest edge and forest interior were then further indentified in each landform type. The forest structure in the edge and interior, as well as the e-daphic physiochemical features for all three subzones were investigated in low tide in August, 2011. Different patterns of vegetation and soil physiochemical indicators were compared among the 4 mangrove land-forms. Generally, the edge effect on vegetation was characterized by relatively lower canopy height, leaf area index and species richness in the forest edge than the interior (except the estuarial mangroves). Vegetation coverage decreased with landforms in the forest edge as estuary(QL)> inner bay(TF)> island(TC) > wave hit bench(TJ), coinciding with the degree of wave and storm hit to the areas. The edge effect on soil physicochemical properties in most cases (except TF, the inner bay) showed soil pH, mean grain size in the forest edge were less than that in the barren flat, while redox potential, salinity showed higher on the contrary. But these soil properties in the forest interiors were largely variable among different land-forms, since they could be sensitive to the effects of vegetation succession behind the forest edge and mic-rotopography as well. However the SOC (surface soil organic carbon content) and soil organic carbon density increased significantly from the barren flat to the interior in each type of the landforms. Principal

  2. Protection, energy and nutrients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mata, L

    1984-05-01

    The advantages of breastfeeding are briefly summarized and some strategies for promoting breastfeeding, based on the results of recently conducted studies on Costa Rica and the Philippines, are described. Advantages of breastfeeding include 1) the presence of elements in human milk which provide protection against infectious diseases and other substances which make it difficult for bacteria to survive; 2) the electrolyte composition of breast milk makes it unnecessay to provide infants with water, thereby reducing the risks associated with drinking contaminated water; and 3) the biochemical composition of human milk which reduces the risk of aminoacid imbalance and facilitates the absorption of irom, zinc and other elements. Breastfeeding also encourages closer contact between the mother and the infant and facilitates the bonding process. In addition, breastfeeding is economically less costly than bottle feeding. Despite these advantages there is a trend toward bottle feeding in developing countries. Only traditional rural societies, eg, Bangladesh, Peru, and zaire, at present car