WorldWideScience

Sample records for carbon nitrides

  1. Boron nitride converted carbon fiber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rousseas, Michael; Mickelson, William; Zettl, Alexander K.

    2016-04-05

    This disclosure provides systems, methods, and apparatus related to boron nitride converted carbon fiber. In one aspect, a method may include the operations of providing boron oxide and carbon fiber, heating the boron oxide to melt the boron oxide and heating the carbon fiber, mixing a nitrogen-containing gas with boron oxide vapor from molten boron oxide, and converting at least a portion of the carbon fiber to boron nitride.

  2. Amorphous Carbon-Boron Nitride Nanotube Hybrids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae Woo (Inventor); Siochi, Emilie J. (Inventor); Wise, Kristopher E. (Inventor); Lin, Yi (Inventor); Connell, John (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A method for joining or repairing boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs). In joining BNNTs, the nanotube structure is modified with amorphous carbon deposited by controlled electron beam irradiation to form well bonded hybrid a-C/BNNT structures. In repairing BNNTs, the damaged site of the nanotube structure is modified with amorphous carbon deposited by controlled electron beam irradiation to form well bonded hybrid a-C/BNNT structures at the damage site.

  3. A chromium nitride/carbon nitride containing graphitic carbon nanocapsule hybrid as a Pt-free electrocatalyst for oxygen reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Lu; Wang, Lei; Yu, Peng; Zhao, Dongdong; Tian, Chungui; Feng, He; Ma, Jing; Fu, Honggang

    2015-08-11

    Chromium nitride nanoparticles supported on graphitic carbon nanocapsules containing carbon nitride (CrN/GC) have been synthesized by a solvothermal-assisted ion-exchange route. As a Pt-free catalyst, the CrN/GC hybrid exhibits superior activity, stability, methanol immunity and a dominant 4-electron pathway towards oxygen reduction reaction. PMID:26145711

  4. Preparation of carbon-nitride bulk samples in the presence of seed carbon-nitride films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A procedure was developed for preparing bulk carbon-nitride crystals from polymeric α-C3N4.2 at high pressure and high temperature in the presence of seeds of crystalline carbon-nitride films prepared by using a high-voltage discharge plasma combined with pulsed laser ablation of a graphite target. The samples were evaluated by using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), infrared (IR) spectroscopy, Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), secondary-ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Notably, XPS studies of the film composition before and after thermobaric treatments demonstrated that the nitrogen composition in the α-C3N4.2 material, which initially contained more than 58 % nitrogen, decreased during the annealing process and reached a common, stable composition of ∼ 45 %. The thermobaric experiments were performed at 10 - 77 kbar and 350 - 1200 .deg. C.

  5. Synthesis of hollow carbon nitride microspheres by an electrodeposition method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hollow carbon nitride microspheres have been synthesized using a novel liquid phase electrodeposition technique. The microspheres are composed of numerous nanoparticles with size of about 5-30 nm. The diameters of the spheres range from 800 nm to 1.1 μm, and shell thickness is about 80-250 nm. This is the first attempt to synthesize carbon nitride with specific nanostructure by the electrodeposition method, which is proved to be facile and effective, and can be performed in an atmospheric environment and at a rather low temperature. The hollow carbon nitride may have potential applications as lubrication, catalysis, biomolecule adsorption, drug delivery, electronic materials, etc. in the future.

  6. Laser ablation of molecular carbon nitride compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a method for the preparation of thin films on sapphire substrates of the carbon nitride precursors dicyandiamide (C2N4H4), melamine (C3N6H6), and melem (C6N10H6), using the femtosecond-pulsed laser deposition technique (femto-PLD) at different temperatures. The depositions were carried out under high vacuum with a femtosecond-pulsed laser. The focused laser beam is scanned on the surface of a rotating target consisting of the pelletized compounds. The resulting polycrystalline, opaque films were characterized by X-ray powder diffraction, infrared, Raman, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, photoluminescence, SEM, and MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry measurements. The crystal structures and optical/spectroscopic results of the obtained rough films largely match those of the bulk materials

  7. Laser ablation of molecular carbon nitride compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, D., E-mail: d.fischer@fkf.mpg.de [Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research, Heisenbergstr. 1, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Schwinghammer, K. [Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research, Heisenbergstr. 1, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Department of Chemistry, University of Munich, LMU, Butenandtstr. 5-13, 81377 Munich (Germany); Nanosystems Initiative Munich (NIM) and Center for Nanoscience (CeNS), 80799 Munich (Germany); Sondermann, C. [Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research, Heisenbergstr. 1, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Department of Chemistry, University of Munich, LMU, Butenandtstr. 5-13, 81377 Munich (Germany); Lau, V.W.; Mannhart, J. [Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research, Heisenbergstr. 1, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Lotsch, B.V. [Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research, Heisenbergstr. 1, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Department of Chemistry, University of Munich, LMU, Butenandtstr. 5-13, 81377 Munich (Germany); Nanosystems Initiative Munich (NIM) and Center for Nanoscience (CeNS), 80799 Munich (Germany)

    2015-09-15

    We present a method for the preparation of thin films on sapphire substrates of the carbon nitride precursors dicyandiamide (C{sub 2}N{sub 4}H{sub 4}), melamine (C{sub 3}N{sub 6}H{sub 6}), and melem (C{sub 6}N{sub 10}H{sub 6}), using the femtosecond-pulsed laser deposition technique (femto-PLD) at different temperatures. The depositions were carried out under high vacuum with a femtosecond-pulsed laser. The focused laser beam is scanned on the surface of a rotating target consisting of the pelletized compounds. The resulting polycrystalline, opaque films were characterized by X-ray powder diffraction, infrared, Raman, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, photoluminescence, SEM, and MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry measurements. The crystal structures and optical/spectroscopic results of the obtained rough films largely match those of the bulk materials.

  8. Anti corrosion layer for stainless steel in molten carbonate fuel cell - comprises phase vapour deposition of titanium nitride, aluminium nitride or chromium nitride layer then oxidising layer in molten carbonate electrolyte

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2000-01-01

    Forming an anticorrosion protective layer on a stainless steel surface used in a molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) - comprises the phase vapour deposition (PVD) of a layer comprising at least one of titanium nitride, aluminium nitride or chromium nitride and then forming a protective layer in situ...... by replacement of the nitride ions with oxide ions in the molten carbonate electrolyte....

  9. Radiofrequency cold plasma nitrided carbon steel: Microstructural and micromechanical characterizations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → C38 carbon steel samples were plasma nitrided using a radiofrequency (rf) nitrogen plasma discharge. → RF plasma treatment enables nitriding for non-heated substrates. → The morphological and chemical analyses show the formation of a uniform thickness on the surface of the nitrided C38 steel. → Nitrogen plasma active species diffuse into the samples and lead to the formation of FexN. → The increase in microhardness values for nitrided samples with plasma processing time is interpreted by the formation of a thicker nitrided layer on the steel surface. - Abstract: In this work, C38 carbon steel was plasma nitrided using a radiofrequency (rf) nitrogen plasma discharge on non-heated substrates. General characterizations were performed to compare the chemical compositions, the microstructures and hardness of the untreated and plasma treated surfaces. The plasma nitriding was carried out on non-heated substrates at a pressure of 16.8 Pa, using N2 gas. Surface characterizations before and after N2 plasma treatment were performed by means of the electron probe microanalysis (EPMA), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Vickers microhardness measurements. The morphological and chemical analysis showed the formation of a uniform structure on the surface of the nitrided sample with enrichment in nitrogen when compared to untreated sample. The thickness of the nitride layer formed depends on the treatment time duration and is approximately 14 μm for 10 h of plasma treatment. XPS was employed to obtain chemical-state information of the plasma nitrided steel surfaces. The micromechanical results show that the surface microhardness increases as the plasma-processing time increases to reach, 1487 HV0.005 at a plasma processing time of 8 h.

  10. DFT Studies on Electronic Structures of Boro-Nitride-Carbon Nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN Ming; HUANG Chun-Hui

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, the configurations of Boro-Nitride-Carbon nanotubes with BNC2 composition were optimized by ROHF method. According to the density functional theory, the electronic structures of Boro-Nitride-Carbon nanotubes were calculated by DFT/ROB3LYP method. By analyzing the energy gap, density of electronic state and bonding maps of atoms, the conductive properties of Boro-Nitride-Carbon nanotubes were obtained, and compared with those of carbon nanotubes and other Boro-Nitride nanotubes.

  11. Symmetric organization of self-assembled carbon nitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A scheme for creating 'flower-like' nanostructures of carbon nitride is described that involves the self-assembly of nanocrystals following laser ablation of a solid graphite target immersed in aqueous ammonia solution. The primary nanocrystals possess rod-like symmetry, and then self-assemble upon drying to form nanoleaf or nanopetal shaped structures. Samples were characterized using x-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), x-ray photoelectron microscopy (XPS) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The analyses confirmed their composition to be consistent with that of crystalline β-phase carbon nitride. The morphologies of the carbon nitride nanostructures depended strongly on the synthesis conditions and upon the conditions under which the aqueous suspension of ablated particles were dried

  12. Templateless Infrared Heating Process for Fabricating Carbon Nitride Nanorods with Efficient Photocatalytic H2 Evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hui-Jun; Qian, Dong-Jin; Chen, Meng

    2015-11-18

    The bottom-up fabrication of carbon nitride nanorods is realized through the direct infrared heating of dicyandiamide. The approach requires no templates or extra organics. The controlled infrared heating has a major influence on the morphology of the obtained carbon nitrides. The precursors assemble into carbon nitride nanorods at low power levels, and they grow into nanoplates at high power levels. The formation mechanism of the carbon nitride nanorods is proposed to be a kinetically driven process, and the photocatalytic activity of the carbon nitride nanorods prepared at 50% power for hydrogen evolution is about 2.9 times that of carbon nitride nanoplates at 100% power. Structural, optical, and electronic analysis demonstrates that the enhancement is primarily attributed to the elimination of structural defects and the improved charge-carrier separation in highly condensed and oriented carbon nitride nanorods. PMID:26501184

  13. Structure, Mechanics and Synthesis of Nanoscale Carbon and Boron Nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinaldo, Steven G.

    This thesis is divided into two parts. In Part I, we examine the properties of thin sheets of carbon and boron nitride. We begin with an introduction to the theory of elastic sheets, where the stretching and bending modes are considered in detail. The coupling between stretching and bending modes is thought to play a crucial role in the thermodynamic stability of atomically-thin 2D sheets such as graphene. In Chapter 2, we begin by looking at the fabrication of suspended, atomically thin sheets of graphene. We then study their mechanical resonances which are read via an optical transduction technique. The frequency of the resonators was found to depend on their temperature, as was their quality factor. We conclude by offering some interpretations of the data in terms of the stretching and bending modes of graphene. In Chapter 3, we look briefly at the fabrication of thin sheets of carbon and boron nitride nanotubes. We examine the structure of the sheets using transmission and scanning electron microscopy (TEM and SEM, respectively). We then show a technique by which one can make sheets suspended over a trench with adjustable supports. Finally, DC measurements of the resistivity of the sheets in the temperature range 600 -- 1400 C are presented. In Chapter 4, we study the folding of few-layer graphene oxide, graphene and boron nitride into 3D aerogel monoliths. The properties of graphene oxide are first considered, after which the structure of graphene and boron nitride aerogels is examined using TEM and SEM. Some models for their structure are proposed. In Part II, we look at synthesis techniques for boron nitride (BN). In Chapter 5, we study the conversion of carbon structures of boron nitride via the application of carbothermal reduction of boron oxide followed by nitridation. We apply the conversion to a wide variety of morphologies, including aerogels, carbon fibers and nanotubes, and highly oriented pyrolytic graphite. In the latter chapters, we look at the

  14. Preparation and characterization of morph-genetic aluminum nitride/carbon composites from filter paper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morph-genetic aluminum nitride/carbon composites with cablelike structure were prepared from filter paper template through the surface sol-gel process and carbothermal nitridation reaction. The resulting materials have a hierarchical structure originating from the morphology of cellulose paper. The aluminum nitride/carbon composites have the core-shell microstructure, the core is graphitic carbon, and the shell is aluminum nitride nanocoating formed by carbothermal nitridation reduction of alumina with the interfacial carbon in nitrogen atmosphere. Scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and transmission electron microscope were employed to characterize the structural morphology and phase compositions of the final products

  15. Synthesis of graphitic carbon nitride by reaction of melamine and uric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → Graphitic carbon nitrides by CVD of melamine and uric acid on alumina. → The building blocks of carbon nitrides are heptazine nuclei. → Composite particles with alumina core and carbon nitride coating. - Abstract: Graphitic carbon nitrides were synthesized starting from melamine and uric acid. Uric acid was chosen because it thermally decomposes, and reacts with melamine by condensation at temperatures in the range of 400-600 deg. C. The reagents were mixed with alumina and subsequently the samples were treated in an oven under nitrogen flux. Alumina favored the deposition of the graphitic carbon nitrides layers on the exposed surface. This method can be assimilated to an in situ chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Infrared (IR) spectra, as well as X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns, are in accordance with the formation of a graphitic carbon nitride with a structure based on heptazine blocks. These carbon nitrides exhibit poor crystallinity and a nanometric texture, as shown by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis. The thermal degradation of the graphitic carbon nitride occurs through cyano group formation, and involves the bridging tertiary nitrogen and the bonded carbon, which belongs to the heptazine ring, causing the ring opening and the consequent network destruction as inferred by connecting the IR and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) results. This seems to be an easy and promising route to synthesize graphitic carbon nitrides. Our final material is a composite made of an alumina core covered by carbon nitride layers.

  16. Tuning the optical response in carbon doped boron nitride nanodots

    KAUST Repository

    Mokkath, Junais Habeeb

    2014-09-04

    Time dependent density functional theory and the hybrid B3LYP functional are used to investigate the structural and optical properties of pristine and carbon doped hexagonal boron nitride nanodots. In agreement with recent experiments, the embedded carbon atoms are found to favor nucleation. Our results demonstrate that carbon clusters of different shapes promote an early onset of absorption by generating in-gap states. The nanodots are interesting for opto-electronics due to their tunable optical response in a wide energy window. We identify cluster sizes and shapes with optimal conversion efficiency for solar radiation and a wide absorption range form infrared to ultraviolet. This journal is

  17. Nanoporous Carbon Nitride: A High Efficient Filter for Seawater Desalination

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Weifeng; Yang, Yanmei; Zhou, Hongcai; Zhang, Xiaoming; Zhao, Mingwen

    2015-01-01

    The low efficiency of commercially-used reverse osmosis (RO) membranes has been the main obstacle in seawater desalination application. Here, we report the auspicious performance, through molecular dynamics simulations, of a seawater desalination filter based on the recently-synthesized graphene-like carbon nitride (g-C2N) [Nat. Commun., 2015, 6, 6486]. Taking advantage of the inherent nanopores and excellent mechanical properties of g-C2N filter, highly efficient seawater desalination can be...

  18. On new allotropes and nanostructures of carbon nitrides

    OpenAIRE

    Bojdys, Michael Janus

    2010-01-01

    In the first section of the thesis graphitic carbon nitride was for the first time synthesised using the high-temperature condensation of dicyandiamide (DCDA) – a simple molecular precursor – in a eutectic salt melt of lithium chloride and potassium chloride. The extent of condensation, namely next to complete conversion of all reactive end groups, was verified by elemental microanalysis and vibrational spectroscopy. TEM- and SEM-measurements gave detailed insight into the well-defined morpho...

  19. Observation of high stressed hydrogenated carbon nitride films by SLEEM

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mikmeková, Eliška; Müllerová, Ilona; Sobota, Jaroslav

    Brno : Institute of Scientific Instruments AS CR, v.v.i, 2012 - (Mika, F.), s. 43-44 ISBN 978-80-87441-07-7. [International Seminar on Recent Trends in Charged Particle Optics and Surface Physics Instrumentation /13./. Skalský dvůr (CZ), 25.06.2012-29.06.2012] Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : SLEEM * hydrogenated carbon nitride films Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering

  20. Photoluminescence and Raman Spectroscopy Studies of Carbon Nitride Films

    OpenAIRE

    Hernández-Torres, J.; Gutierrez-Franco, A.; P. G. González; L. García-González; Hernandez-Quiroz, T.; Zamora-Peredo, L.; V.H. Méndez-García; A. Cisneros-de la Rosa

    2016-01-01

    Amorphous carbon nitride films with N/C ratios ranging from 2.24 to 3.26 were deposited by reactive sputtering at room temperature on corning glass, silicon, and quartz as substrates. The average chemical composition of the films was obtained from the semiquantitative energy dispersive spectroscopy analysis. Photoluminescence measurements were performed to determine the optical band gap of the films. The photoluminescence spectra displayed two peaks: one associated with the substrate and the ...

  1. Chemical preparation and shock wave compression of carbon nitride precursors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two synthetic routes have been developed to produce high-molecular-weight organic precursors containing a high weight fraction of nitrogen. One of the precursors is a pyrolysis residue of melamine-formaldehyde resin. The second precursor is the byproduct of an unusual low-temperature combustion reaction of tetrazole and its sodium salt. These precursors have been shock compressed under typical conditions for diamond and wurtzite boron nitride synthesis in an attempt to recover a new ultrahard carbon nitride. The recovered material has been analyzed by X-ray diffraction, FTIR, and Raman microprobe analysis. Diamond is present in the recovered material. This diamond is well ordered relative to diamond shock synthesized from carbonaceous starting materials

  2. Mathematical Model of Prediction of Nitrogen Pickup in Nitriding Process of Low Carbon Ferromanganese

    OpenAIRE

    Ghali, Saeed

    2014-01-01

    Low carbon ferromanganese was nitrided through gas-solid reaction. The nitriding process has been carried out on lab scale at temperature range 800°C–950°C at different nitrogen pressures. Temperature, time, and partial nitrogen pressure of nitriding process of fine low carbon ferromanganese were investigated. Nitrogen content, in weight percent, was more than 9%. MATLAB software was used to derive mathematical model to predict nitrogen content as a function of temperature and nitrogen pressu...

  3. Plasma-Chemical Synthesis of Nanosized Powders-Nitrides, Carbides, Oxides, Carbon Nanotubes and Fullerenes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this article the plasma-chemical synthesis of nanosized powders (nitrides, carbides, oxides, carbon nanotubes and fullerenes) is reviewed. Nanosized powders - nitrides, carbides, oxides, carbon nanotubes and fullerenes have been successfully produced using different techniques, technological apparatuses and conditions for their plasma-chemical synthesis. (plasma technology)

  4. Preparation and characterization of boron nitride/carbon fiber composite with high specific surface area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boron nitride can be used as a good catalyst carrier because of its high thermal conductivity and chemical stability. However, a high specific surface area of boron nitride is still desirable. In this work, a carbon fiber composite coated with boron nitride villous nano-film was prepared, and was also characterized by means of scanning electron microscopy, high resolution transmission electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller analysis. The results indicated that the carbon fibers were covered by uniform villous boron nitride films whose thickness was about 150 - 200 nm. The specific surface area of the boron nitride/carbon fiber composite material was 96 m2 g-1, which was markedly improved compared with conventional boron nitride materials. (orig.)

  5. Nanoporous Carbon Nitride: A High Efficient Filter for Seawater Desalination

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Weifeng; Zhou, Hongcai; Zhang, Xiaoming; Zhao, Mingwen

    2015-01-01

    The low efficiency of commercially-used reverse osmosis (RO) membranes has been the main obstacle in seawater desalination application. Here, we report the auspicious performance, through molecular dynamics simulations, of a seawater desalination filter based on the recently-synthesized graphene-like carbon nitride (g-C2N) [Nat. Commun., 2015, 6, 6486]. Taking advantage of the inherent nanopores and excellent mechanical properties of g-C2N filter, highly efficient seawater desalination can be achieved by modulating the nanopores under tensile strain. The water permeability can be improved by two orders of magnitude compared to RO membranes, which offers a promising approach to the global water shortage solution.

  6. Carbon nanotube quantum dots on hexagonal boron nitride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baumgartner, A., E-mail: andreas.baumgartner@unibas.ch; Abulizi, G.; Gramich, J.; Schönenberger, C. [Institute of Physics, University of Basel, Klingelbergstrasse 82, 4056 Basel (Switzerland); Watanabe, K.; Taniguchi, T. [National Institute for Material Science, 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba 305-0044 (Japan)

    2014-07-14

    We report the fabrication details and low-temperature characteristics of carbon nanotube (CNT) quantum dots on flakes of hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) as substrate. We demonstrate that CNTs can be grown on hBN by standard chemical vapor deposition and that standard scanning electron microscopy imaging and lithography can be employed to fabricate nanoelectronic structures when using optimized parameters. This proof of concept paves the way to more complex devices on hBN, with more predictable and reproducible characteristics and electronic stability.

  7. Generation and Characteristics of IV-VI transition Metal Nitride and Carbide Nanoparticles using a Reactive Mesoporous Carbon Nitride

    KAUST Repository

    Alhajri, Nawal Saad

    2016-02-22

    Interstitial nitrides and carbides of early transition metals in groups IV–VI exhibit platinum-like electronic structures, which make them promising candidates to replace noble metals in various catalytic reactions. Herein, we present the preparation and characterization of nano-sized transition metal nitries and carbides of groups IV–VI (Ti, V, Nb, Ta, Cr, Mo, and W) using mesoporous graphitic carbon nitride (mpg-C3N4), which not only provides confined spaces for restricting primary particle size but also acts as a chemical source of nitrogen and carbon. We studied the reactivity of the metals with the template under N2 flow at 1023 K while keeping the weight ratio of metal to template constant at unity. The produced nanoparticles were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction, CHN elemental analysis, nitrogen sorption, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. The results show that Ti, V, Nb, Ta, and Cr form nitride phases with face centered cubic structure, whereas Mo and W forme carbides with hexagonal structures. The tendency to form nitride or carbide obeys the free formation energy of the transition metal nitrides and carbides. This method offers the potential to prepare the desired size, shape and phase of transition metal nitrides and carbides that are suitable for a specific reaction, which is the chief objective of materials chemistry.

  8. Electronic structure of carbon-boron nitride nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanginés-Mendoza, Raúl; Martinez, Edgar

    2013-03-01

    Structures of carbon and boron nitride nanotubes (CNTs, BNNTs) are quite similar, conversely, electronic properties are radically different from each other. Carbon nanotubes, whose electronic properties can be either metallic or semiconducting depending on their chiral structure, boron nitride nanotubes are always semiconductors with bandgaps over 4 eV. We have looked to hybrid systems, to predict a new kind of nanostructures with novel electronic properties. In this way, we explore the electronic properties of C-BN nanotubes. In particular, we studied the electronic structure of armchair C-BN nanotubes. The calculations were performed using the pseudopotential LCAO method with a Generalized Gradient Approximation for the exchange-correlation energy functional. The band structure of most of these systems have semiconductor character with an indirect gap smaller than its analogous BNNTs. In addition, the most prominent feature of these systems is the existence of flat bands both at the valence band top and at the conduction band minimum. Such flat bands results in sharp and narrow peaks on the total density of states. The behavior of these flat bands mainly indicates that electrons are largely localized. Thus, a detailed analysis on the electronic band structure shows that hybridization between those orbitals on the interfaces is responsible to exhibit localization effects on the hybrid systems.This research was supported by Conacyt under Grant No. 133022.

  9. Electrophoretic Deposition of Carbon Nitride Layers for Photoelectrochemical Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jingsan; Shalom, Menny

    2016-05-25

    Electrophoretic deposition (EPD) is used for the growth of carbon nitride (C3N4) layers on conductive substrates. EPD is fast, environmentally friendly, and allows the deposition of negatively charged C3N4 with different compositions and chemical properties. In this method, C3N4 can be deposited on various conductive substrates ranging from conductive glass and carbon paper to nickel foam possessing complex 3D geometries. The high flexibility of this approach enables us to readily tune the photophysical and photoelectronic properties of the C3N4 electrodes. The advantage of this method was further illustrated by the tailored construction of a heterostructure between two complementary C3N4, with marked photoelectrochemical activity. PMID:27148889

  10. Optomechanical and Crystallization Phenomena Visualized with 4D Electron Microscopy: Interfacial Carbon Nanotubes on Silicon Nitride

    OpenAIRE

    Flannigan, David J.; Zewail, Ahmed H.

    2010-01-01

    With ultrafast electron microscopy (UEM), we report observation of the nanoscopic crystallization of amorphous silicon nitride, and the ultrashort optomechanical motion of the crystalline silicon nitride at the interface of an adhering carbon nanotube network. The in situ static crystallization of the silicon nitride occurs only in the presence of an adhering nanotube network, thus indicating their mediating role in reaching temperatures close to 1000 °C when exposed to a train of laser pulse...

  11. Optical and Electronic Properties of 2D Graphitic Carbon-Nitride and Carbon Enriched Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Therrien, Joel; Li, Yancen; Schmidt, Daniel; Masaki, Michael; Syed, Abdulmannan

    The two-dimensional form of graphitic carbon-nitride (gCN) has been successfully synthesized using a simple CVD process. In it's pure form, the carbon to nitrogen ratio is 0.75. By adding a carbon bearing gas to the growth environment, the C/N ratio can be increased, ultimately reaching the pure carbon form: graphene. Unlike attempts at making a 2D alloy system out of BCN, the CN system does not suffer from phase segregation and thus forms a homogeneous alloy. The synthesis approach and electronic and optical properties will be presented for the pure gCN and a selection of alloy compositions.

  12. Graphitic carbon nitride "reloaded": emerging applications beyond (photo)catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jian; Wang, Hongqiang; Antonietti, Markus

    2016-04-21

    Despite being one of the oldest materials described in the chemical literature, graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3N4) has just recently experienced a renaissance as a highly active photocatalyst, and the metal-free polymer was shown to be able to generate hydrogen under visible light. The semiconductor nature of g-C3N4 has triggered tremendous endeavors on its structural manipulation for enhanced photo(electro)chemical performance, aiming at an affordable clean energy future. While pursuing the stem of g-C3N4 related catalysis (photocatalysis, electrocatalysis and photoelectrocatalysis), a number of emerging intrinsic properties of g-C3N4 are certainly interesting, but less well covered, and we believe that these novel applications outside of conventional catalysis can be favorably exploited as well. Thanks to the general efforts devoted to the exploration and enrichment of g-C3N4 based chemistry, the boundaries of this area have been possibly pushed far beyond what people could imagine in the beginning. This review strives to cover the achievements of g-C3N4 related materials in these unconventional application fields for depicting the broader future of these metal-free and fully stable semiconductors. This review starts with the general protocols to engineer g-C3N4 micro/nanostructures for practical use, and then discusses the newly disclosed applications in sensing, bioimaging, novel solar energy exploitation including photocatalytic coenzyme regeneration, templating, and carbon nitride based devices. Finally, we attempt an outlook on possible further developments in g-C3N4 based research. PMID:26864963

  13. Field Emission from Amorphous carbon Nitride Films Deposited on silicon Tip Arrays

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李俊杰; 郑伟涛; 孙龙; 卞海蛟; 金曾孙; 赵海峰; 宋航; 孟松鹤; 赫晓东; 韩杰才

    2003-01-01

    Amorphous carbon nitride films (a-CNx) were deposited on silicon tip arrays by rf magnetron sputtering in pure nitrogen atmosphere. The field emission property of carbon nitride films on Si tips was compared with that of carbon nitride on silicon wafer. The results show that field emission property of carbon nitride films deposited on silicon tips can be improved significantly in contrast with that on wafer. It can be explained that field emission is sensitive to the local curvature and geometry, thus silicon tips can effectively promote field emission property of a-CNx films. In addition, the films deposited on silicon tips have a smaller effective work function ( F = 0.024 eV)of electron field emission than that on silicon wafer ( F = 0.060 e V), which indicates a significant enhancement of the ability of electron field emission from a-CNx films.

  14. Phenyl-Modified Carbon Nitride Quantum Dots with Distinct Photoluminescence Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Qianling; Xu, Jingsan; Wang, Xiaoyu; Li, Lidong; Antonietti, Markus; Shalom, Menny

    2016-03-01

    A novel type of quantum dot (Ph-CN) is manufactured from graphitic carbon nitride by "lining" the carbon nitride structure with phenyl groups through supramolecular preorganization. This approach requires no chemical etching or hydrothermal treatments like other competing nanoparticle syntheses and is easy and safe to use. The Ph-CN nanoparticles exhibit bright, tunable fluorescence, with a high quantum yield of 48.4 % in aqueous colloidal suspensions. Interestingly, the observed Stokes shift of approximately 200 nm is higher than the maximum values reported for carbon nitride based fluorophores. The high quantum yield and the large Stokes shift are related to the structural surface organization of the phenyl groups, which affects the π-electron delocalization in the conjugated carbon nitride networks and induces colloidal stability. The remarkable performance of the Ph-CN nanoparticles in imaging is demonstrated by a simple incubation study with HeLa cells. PMID:26880237

  15. Evidence for a low-compressibility carbon nitride polymorph elaborated at ambient pressure and mild temperature

    OpenAIRE

    Goglio, Graziella; Foy, Denis; Pechev, Stanislav; Majimel, Jérôme; Demazeau, Gérard; Guignot, Nicolas; Andrault, Denis

    2009-01-01

    International audience Superhard materials like diamond are essential for abrasive or cutting tool applications. In this way, carbon nitrides are of relevant interest because they are expected to exhibit exceptional mechanical properties, high values of bulk modulus being predicted. A smart and simple method was used to synthesize carbon nitrides and allowed elaborating a low-compressibility polymorph. The processing consists in the decomposition of commercial thiosemicarbazide (H2NC(S)N2H...

  16. Hydrogen Storage in Boron Nitride and Carbon Nanomaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeo Oku

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Boron nitride (BN nanomaterials were synthesized from LaB6 and Pd/boron powder, and the hydrogen storage was investigated by differential thermogravimetric analysis, which showed possibility of hydrogen storage of 1–3 wt%. The hydrogen gas storage in BN and carbon (C clusters was also investigated by molecular orbital calculations, which indicated possible hydrogen storage of 6.5 and 4.9 wt%, respectively. Chemisorption calculation was also carried out for B24N24 cluster with changing endohedral elements in BN cluster to compare the bonding energy at nitrogen and boron, which showed that Li is a suitable element for hydrogenation to the BN cluster. The BN cluster materials would store H2 molecule easier than carbon fullerene materials, and its stability for high temperature would be good. Molecular dynamics calculations showed that a H2 molecule remains stable in a C60 cage at 298 K and 0.1 MPa, and that pressures over 5 MPa are needed to store H2 molecules in the C60 cage.

  17. Photoluminescence and Raman Spectroscopy Studies of Carbon Nitride Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Hernández-Torres

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Amorphous carbon nitride films with N/C ratios ranging from 2.24 to 3.26 were deposited by reactive sputtering at room temperature on corning glass, silicon, and quartz as substrates. The average chemical composition of the films was obtained from the semiquantitative energy dispersive spectroscopy analysis. Photoluminescence measurements were performed to determine the optical band gap of the films. The photoluminescence spectra displayed two peaks: one associated with the substrate and the other associated with CNx films located at ≈2.13±0.02 eV. Results show an increase in the optical band gap from 2.11 to 2.15 eV associated with the increase in the N/C ratio. Raman spectroscopy measurements showed a dominant D band. ID/IG ratio reaches a maximum value for N/C ≈ 3.03 when the optical band gap is 2.12 eV. Features observed by the photoluminescence and Raman studies have been associated with the increase in the carbon sp2/sp3 ratio due to presence of high nitrogen content.

  18. Ligand-Free Noble Metal Nanocluster Catalysts on Carbon Supports via "Soft" Nitriding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ben; Yao, Huiqin; Song, Wenqiao; Jin, Lei; Mosa, Islam M; Rusling, James F; Suib, Steven L; He, Jie

    2016-04-13

    We report a robust, universal "soft" nitriding method to grow in situ ligand-free ultrasmall noble metal nanocatalysts (UNMN; e.g., Au, Pd, and Pt) onto carbon. Using low-temperature urea pretreatment at 300 °C, soft nitriding enriches nitrogen-containing species on the surface of carbon supports and enhances the affinity of noble metal precursors onto these supports. We demonstrated sub-2-nm, ligand-free UNMNs grown in situ on seven different types of nitrided carbons with no organic ligands via chemical reduction or thermolysis. Ligand-free UNMNs supported on carbon showed superior electrocatalytic activity for methanol oxidation compared to counterparts with surface capping agents or larger nanocrystals on the same carbon supports. Our method is expected to provide guidelines for the preparation of ligand-free UNMNs on a variety of supports and, additionally, to broaden their applications in energy conversion and electrochemical catalysis. PMID:27014928

  19. Nanotribological performance of fullerene-like carbon nitride films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flores-Ruiz, Francisco Javier; Enriquez-Flores, Christian Ivan [Centro de Investigación y Estudios Avanzados (CINVESTAV) IPN, Unidad Querétaro, Lib. Norponiente 2000, Real de Juriquilla, C.P. 76230, Querétaro, Qro., México (Mexico); Chiñas-Castillo, Fernando, E-mail: fernandochinas@gmail.com [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Instituto Tecnológico de Oaxaca, Oaxaca, Oax. Calz. Tecnológico No. 125, CP. 68030, Oaxaca, Oax. (Mexico); Espinoza-Beltrán, Francisco Javier [Centro de Investigación y Estudios Avanzados (CINVESTAV) IPN, Unidad Querétaro, Lib. Norponiente 2000, Real de Juriquilla, C.P. 76230, Querétaro, Qro., México (Mexico)

    2014-09-30

    Highlights: • Fullerene-like CNx samples show an elastic recovery of 92.5% and 94.5% while amorphous CNx samples had only 75% elastic recovery. • Fullerene-like CNx films show an increment of 34.86% and 50.57% in fractions of C 1s and N 1s. • Fullerene-like CNx samples show a lower friction coefficient compared to amorphous CNx samples. • Friction reduction characteristics of fullerene-like CNx films are strongly related to the increase of sp{sup 3} CN bonds. - Abstract: Fullerene-like carbon nitride films exhibit high elastic modulus and low friction coefficient. In this study, thin CNx films were deposited on silicon substrate by DC magnetron sputtering and the tribological behavior at nanoscale was evaluated using an atomic force microscope. Results show that CNx films with fullerene-like structure have a friction coefficient (CoF ∼ 0.009–0.022) that is lower than amorphous CNx films (CoF ∼ 0.028–0.032). Analysis of specimens characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy shows that films with fullerene-like structure have a higher number of sp{sup 3} CN bonds and exhibit the best mechanical properties with high values of elastic modulus (E > 180 GPa) and hardness (H > 20 GPa). The elastic recovery determined on specimens with a fullerene-like CNx structure was of 95% while specimens of amorphous CNx structure had only 75% elastic recovery.

  20. Mesoporous Metal-Containing Carbon Nitrides for Improved Photocatalytic Activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Luo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Graphitic carbon nitrides (g-C3N4 have attracted increasing interest due to their unusual properties and promising applications in water splitting, heterogeneous catalysis, and organic contaminant degradation. In this study, a new method was developed for the synthesis of mesoporous Fe contained g-C3N4 (m-Fe-C3N4 photocatalyst by using SiO2 nanoparticles as hard template and dicyandiamide as precursor. The physicochemical properties of m-Fe-C3N4 were thoroughly investigated. The XRD and XPS results indicated that Fe was strongly coordinated with the g-C3N4 matrix and that the doping and mesoporous structure partially deteriorated its crystalline structure. The UV-visible absorption spectra revealed that m-Fe-C3N4 with a unique electronic structure displays an increased band gap in combination with a slightly reduced absorbance, implying that mesoporous structure modified the electronic properties of g-Fe-C3N4. The photocatalytic activity of m-Fe-C3N4 for photodegradation of Rhodamine B (RhB was much higher than that of g-Fe-C3N4, clearly demonstrating porous structure positive effect.

  1. Mechanical properties of hybrid boron nitride-carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jin; Wang, Chengyuan

    2016-04-01

    Hybrid boron nitride-carbon nanotubes (BN-CNTs) have attracted considerable attention in recent research. In this effort, molecular dynamics simulations were performed to study the fundamentals of BN-CNTs in tensile tests, i.e. Young’s modulus and fracture strength (strain). Particular attention was paid to the influence of the atomic structure, hybrid style, and BN concentration on the tensile properties. The morphological changes were also investigated for the BN-CNTs at the onset of fracture. It is noted that the Young’s modulus of BN-CNTs decreases almost linearly with increasing the BN concentration with a rate of change independent of the hybrid style. In contrast, the sensitivity of the fracture strength and fracture strain to the variation of BN concentration depends strongly on the hybrid style of BN-CNTs. These results are expected to significantly expand the knowledge of the elastic and fracture properties of novel nanostructures and facilitate their applications in bandgap-engineering.

  2. Synthesis of beta carbon nitride nanosized crystal through mechanochemical reaction

    CERN Document Server

    Yin Long Wei; Liu Yu Xian; Sui Jin Ling; Wang Jing Min

    2003-01-01

    Nanosized beta carbon nitride (beta-C sub 3 N sub 4), of grain size several tens of nanometres, has been synthesized by mechanochemical reaction processing. The low-cost synthetic method developed facilitates the novel and effective synthesis of nanosized crystalline beta-C sub 3 N sub 4 (a = 6.36 A, c = 4.648 A) powders. The graphite powders were first milled to a nanoscale state, then the nanosized graphite powders were milled in an atmosphere of NH sub 3 gas. It was found that nanosized beta-C sub 3 N sub 4 was formed after high-energy ball milling under an NH sub 3 atmosphere. After thermal annealing, the shape of the beta-C sub 3 N sub 4 changes from flake-like to sphere-like. The nanosized beta-C sub 3 N sub 4 formed was characterized by x-ray diffraction, Fourier transformation infrared spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. A solid-gas reaction mechanism was proposed for the formation of nanosized beta-C sub 3 N sub 4 at room temperature induced by mechanochemical activation.

  3. Conformational analysis and electronic structure of chiral carbon and carbon nitride nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiano Geraldo de Faria

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Geometry and electronic structure of chiral carbon and carbon nitride (CNx nanotubes were investigated through quantum chemical methods. Finite nanotubes with diameters ranging from 5 to 10 Å and containing up to 500 atoms were considered. CNx structures were built through random substitution of carbon atoms by nitrogen. The molecules were fully optimized by semi-empirical quantum chemical method (PM3. Our results show that the energy associated with nitrogen incorporation depends strongly upon the tube helicity and diameter. The doping of nanotubes with nitrogen contributes to reduce the stress caused by the small diameter of the studied systems. Density of States (DOS results for pure carbon and CNx nanostructures, obtained through DFT and Hartree-Fock calculations, were analyzed. The introduction of nitrogen in the tube produce states in the gap region which characterizes the metallic behavior, as expected for these systems after N-doping.

  4. Crystalline and amorphous carbon nitride films produced by high-energy shock plasma deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High-energy shock plasma deposition techniques are used to produce carbon-nitride films containing both crystalline and amorphous components. The structures are examined by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, parallel-electron-energy loss spectroscopy and electron diffraction. The crystalline phase appears to be face-centered cubic with unit cell parameter approx. a=0.63nm and it may be stabilized by calcium and oxygen at about 1-2 at % levels. The carbon atoms appear to have both trigonal and tetrahedral bonding for the crystalline phase. There is PEELS evidence that a significant fraction of the nitrogen atoms have sp2 trigonal bonds in the crystalline phase. The amorphous carbon-nitride film component varies from essentially graphite, containing virtually no nitrogen, to amorphous carbon-nitride containing up to 10 at % N, where the fraction of sp3 bonds is significant. 15 refs., 5 figs

  5. Recent progress in the synthesis and characterization of amorphous and crystalline carbon nitride coatings

    CERN Document Server

    Widlow, I

    2000-01-01

    This review summarizes our most recent findings in the structure and properties of amorphous and crystalline carbon nitride coatings, synthesized by reactive magnetron sputtering. By careful control of the plasma conditions via proper choice of process parameters such as substrate bias, target power and gas pressure, one can precisely control film structure and properties. With this approach, we were able to produce amorphous carbon nitride films with controlled hardness and surface roughness. In particular, we can synthesize ultrathin (1 nm thick) amorphous carbon nitride films to be sufficiently dense and uniform that they provide adequate corrosion protection for hard disk applications. We demonstrated the strong correlation between ZrN (111) texture and hardness in CN sub x /ZrN superlattice coatings. Raman spectroscopy and near-edge X-ray absorption show the predominance of sp sup 3 -bonded carbon in these superlattice coatings.

  6. Supramolecular intermediates in the synthesis of polymeric carbon nitride from melamine cyanurate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The adduct of melamine and cyanuric acid (MCA) was used in past research to produce polymeric carbon nitride and precursors. The reaction yield was considerably incremented by the addition of sulfuric acid. The polymeric carbon nitride formation occurs around 450 °C at temperatures above the sublimation of the adduct components, which occurs around 400 °C. In this report the effect of sulfuric acid on MCA was investigated. It was found that the MCA rosette supramolecular channel structures behave as a solid solvent able to host small molecules, such as sulfuric acid, inside these channels and interact with them. Therefore, the sulfuric acid effect was found to be close to that of a solute that causes a temperature increment of the “solvent sublimation” enough to allowing the formation of polymeric carbon nitride to occur. Sulfate ions are presumably hosted in the rosette channels of MCA as shown by simulations. - Graphical abstract: The blend of melamine cyanurate and sulfuric acid behaves like a solution so that melamine cyanurate decomposition is shifted to temperatures high enough to react and form polymeric carbon nitride. - Highlights: • The adduct of melamine and cyanuric acid behaves as a solid solvent. • The blend of sulfuric acid and melamine cyanurate behaves like a solution. • Melamine cyanurate decomposition is shifted to higher temperatures by sulfuric acid. • The formation of polymeric carbon nitride occurs for these higher temperatures

  7. Supramolecular intermediates in the synthesis of polymeric carbon nitride from melamine cyanurate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dante, Roberto C., E-mail: rcdante@yahoo.com [Facultad de Mecánica, Escuela Politécnica Nacional (EPN), Ladrón de Guevara E11-253, Quito (Ecuador); Sánchez-Arévalo, Francisco M. [Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de Mexico, Apdo. Postal 70-360, Cd. Universitaria, Mexico D.F. 04510 (Mexico); Chamorro-Posada, Pedro [Dpto. de Teoría de la Señal y Comunicaciones e IT, Universidad de Valladolid, ETSI Telecomunicación, Paseo Belén 15, 47011 Valladolid (Spain); Vázquez-Cabo, José [Dpto. de Teoría de la Señal y Comunicaciones, Universidad de Vigo, ETSI Telecomunicación, Lagoas Marcosende s/n, Vigo (Spain); Huerta, Lazaro [Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de Mexico, Apdo. Postal 70-360, Cd. Universitaria, Mexico D.F. 04510 (Mexico); Lartundo-Rojas, Luis [Centro de Nanociencias y Micro y Nanotecnologías—IPN, Luis Enrique Erro s/n, U. Prof. Adolfo López Mateos, 07738 Ciudad de Mexico, Distrito Federal (Mexico); Santoyo-Salazar, Jaime [Departamento de Física, Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados del Instituto Politécnico Nacional, CINVESTAV-IPN, Apdo. Postal 14-740, Mexico D.F. 07360 (Mexico); and others

    2015-03-15

    The adduct of melamine and cyanuric acid (MCA) was used in past research to produce polymeric carbon nitride and precursors. The reaction yield was considerably incremented by the addition of sulfuric acid. The polymeric carbon nitride formation occurs around 450 °C at temperatures above the sublimation of the adduct components, which occurs around 400 °C. In this report the effect of sulfuric acid on MCA was investigated. It was found that the MCA rosette supramolecular channel structures behave as a solid solvent able to host small molecules, such as sulfuric acid, inside these channels and interact with them. Therefore, the sulfuric acid effect was found to be close to that of a solute that causes a temperature increment of the “solvent sublimation” enough to allowing the formation of polymeric carbon nitride to occur. Sulfate ions are presumably hosted in the rosette channels of MCA as shown by simulations. - Graphical abstract: The blend of melamine cyanurate and sulfuric acid behaves like a solution so that melamine cyanurate decomposition is shifted to temperatures high enough to react and form polymeric carbon nitride. - Highlights: • The adduct of melamine and cyanuric acid behaves as a solid solvent. • The blend of sulfuric acid and melamine cyanurate behaves like a solution. • Melamine cyanurate decomposition is shifted to higher temperatures by sulfuric acid. • The formation of polymeric carbon nitride occurs for these higher temperatures.

  8. Influence of plasma nitriding on the hardness of AISI 304 and low carbon steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nitriding with plasma/ion nitriding technique for surface treatment of AISI 304 and low carbon steel as a machine component material has been done. Surface treatment is meant to improve the surface quality of metal especially its hardness. To reach the optimum condition it has been done a variation of nitriding pressure, while to analyse the result it has been done the hardness and microstructure test, and the nitrogen content. Result of the test indicates that: the optimum hardness obtained at 1.8 mbar of pressure that is 624.9 VHN or 2.98 times while the initial hardness is 210.3 VHN for AISI 304 and 581.6 VHN or 3.07 times compare with initial hardness 142.9 VHN for low carbon steel. The thickness of nitride layer for AISI 304 and low carbon steel is around 30 µm. Nitrogen contents after nitriding are 10.74% mass or 30.32% atom for AISI 304 and 6.81% mass or 21.76% atom for low carbon steel. (author)

  9. Preparation of carbon nitride materials by polycondensation of the single-source precursor aminodichlorotriazine (ADCT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon nitride, usually described as C3N4 or CNx (x > 1), has been reported to form disordered network structures. In this work we describe a new synthesis route using 2-amino-4,6-dichloro-s-triazine (ADCT) as a single-source precursor, adopting single step and two step decompositions. During two step polycondensation ADCT is first heated in a closed system and than fully condensed under vacuum. Our reactions yielded carbon nitride materials having compositions near C3N4. The obtained carbon nitride occurs as a brown, amorphous solid according to X-ray and electron diffraction experiments. Moreover, infrared spectra and results from 13C-NMR measurements indicate evidence for the presence of bridged heptazine and triazine units in the structure

  10. Self-Sensitized Carbon Nitride Microspheres for Long-Lasting Visible-Light-Driven Hydrogen Generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Quan; Gao, Ziwei; Xue, Can

    2016-07-01

    A new type of metal-free photocatalyst is reported having a microsphere core of oxygen-containing carbon nitride and self-sensitized surfaces by covalently linked polymeric triazine dyes. These self-sensitized carbon nitride microspheres exhibit high visible-light activities in photocatalytic H2 generation with excellent stability for more than 100 h reaction. Comparing to the traditional g-C3 N4 with activities terminated at 450 nm, the polymeric triazine dyes on the carbon nitride microsphere surface allow for effective wide-range visible-light harvesting and extend the H2 generation activities up to 600 nm. It is believed that this new type of highly stable self-sensitized metal-free structure opens a new direction of future development of low-cost photocatalysts for efficient and long-term solar fuels production. PMID:27225827

  11. Stoichiometric carbon nitride synthesized by ion beam sputtering and post nitrogen ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Carbon nitride films have been deposited on Si (100) by ion beam sputtering a vitreous graphite target with nitrogen and argon ions with and without concurrent N2 ion bombardment at room temperature. The sputtering beam energy was 1000 eV and the assisted beam energy was 300 eV with ion / atom arrival ratio ranging from 0.5 to 5. The carbon nitride films were deposited both as single layer directly on silicon substrate and as multilayer between two layers of stoichiometric amorphous silicon nitride and polycrystalline titanium nitride. The deposited films were implanted ex-situ with 30 keV nitrogen ions with various doses ranging from 1E17 to 4E17 ions.cm-2 and 2 GeV xenon ion with a dose of 1E12 ions.cm-2 . The nitrogen concentration of the films was measured with Rutherford Backscattering (RBS), Secondary Neutral Mass Spectrometry (SNMS) and Parallel Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy (PEELS). The nitrogen concentration for as deposited sample was 34 at% and stoichiometric carbon nitride C3N4 was achieved by post nitrogen implantation of the multi-layered films. Post bombardment of single layer carbon nitride films lead to reduction in the total nitrogen concentration. Carbon K edge structure obtained from PEELS analysis suggested that the amorphous C3N4 matrix was predominantly sp2 bonded. This was confirmed by Fourier Transforrn Infra-Red Spectroscopy (FTIR) analysis of the single CN layer which showed the nitrogen was mostly bonded with carbon in nitrile (C≡N) and imine (C=N) groups. The microstructure of the film was determined by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) which indicated that the films were amorphous

  12. Investigation on uranium and plutonium nitrides with low oxygen and carbon contents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uranium nitride (UN) and uranium-plutonium nitride (UO.8Pu0.2N) with various oxygen impurity levels, up to 20.000 10-6 weight ratio, was studied. The strong affinity of these nitrides for the oxygen avoids to synthesize pure compounds (no oxygen) by direct combination of the elements or from hydride. The process expected to be used in nuclear fuel industry was chosen. The nitride was prepared by carboreduction and nitridation of the oxide, then ground with different amounts of oxide. The powder obtained was cold pressed and sintered (T = 17200C - 18000C ; t > 15 hours). Analysis of carbon and oxygen content, X ray diffraction measurements, ceramography and electronprobe microanalysis were used to characterize the pellets. The main results are: The oxide (UO2 or MO2) forms at temperatures higher than about 11500C, an oxinitride in contact with nitride matrix (UN or MN), only under nitrogen. This oxinitride, isomorphous with UO2 crystal, is stable up to 17500C with nitride matrix, under a pressure of 1 bar. During the cooling the oxinitride is decomposed in UO2 and U2N3+x. This mixed oxinitride of U and Pu was observed for the first time. The plutonium content of this solid solution is twice smaller than in the nitride matrix. The solubility limit of oxygen in the UN and U0.8Pu0.2N is less than 1000.10-6 weight ratio. This value is lower than published results. The lattice parameter of UN increases in ratio with carbon content, but no noticeable influence of oxygen was detected. This lattice parameter, for UN saturated with oxygen, is 0.48887 ± 5.10-5 nm

  13. Thermally activated reactions of boron nitride nanotubes with C60 fullerene: a Raman study of boron nitride-carbon nanotube composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Boron nitride nanotubes (BNNT) are topological analogues to single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNT). LiKEX the latter one expects that boron nitride nanotubes can be filled with fullerenes to maKEX BN-carbon peapods. This opens new possibilities of generating nanostructures with interesting physical properties. BNNTs were first heat treated in air to open the ends and to remove excess boron particles. We analysed and refined the filling process for SWCNTs and applied it to the BNNTs. For the carbon system critical conditions were determined for opening of tube ends. Filling with C60 fullerene via vapour phase was applied. Subsequently high temperature treatment was performed to transform the fullerenes in a carbon nanotube. We performed multi-frequency Raman spectroscopy to follow the process. Some spectral features of the reaction product in the low frequency range may be assigned to small diameter carbon nanotubes inside the boron nitride nanotubes. (author)

  14. Hydrogen production using zinc-doped carbon nitride catalyst irradiated with visible light

    OpenAIRE

    Bing Yue, Qiuye Li, Hideo Iwai, Tetsuya Kako and Jinhua Ye

    2011-01-01

    Recently, graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3N4) has been investigated as a photocatalyst for water splitting and organic dye degradation. In this study, we have developed a simple soft-chemical method of doping Zn into g-C3N4 to prepare a metal-containing carbon nitride. The doping was confirmed by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and diffusion reflectance spectra revealed a significant red shift in the absorption edge of Zn/g-C3N4. This hybrid material shows high photocatalytic activity and goo...

  15. Structural investigation of two carbon nitride solids produced by cathodic arc deposition and nitrogen implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merchant, A.R.; McCulloch, D.; McKenzie, D.R.; Yin, Y.; Gerstner, E.G. [New South Wales Univ., Kensington, NSW (Australia)

    1996-12-31

    Carbon nitride materials have been the focus of research efforts worldwide. Most materials studied have been amorphous, with only a few groups claiming to have found a crystalline material. In this paper, carbon nitride materials prepared by two different techniques are analysed, and found to be remarkably similar in bonding and structure. The materials appear to have a primarily sp{sup 2} bonded carbon structure with a lower bond length than found in an amorphous carbon. This is explained by nitrogen substituting into `rings` to a saturation level of about one nitrogen per three carbon atoms. No evidence was found for a crystalline structure of formula C{sub 3}N{sub 4}, or any amorphous derivative of it. 16 refs., 1 tab., 5 figs.

  16. Structural investigation of two carbon nitride solids produced by cathodic arc deposition and nitrogen implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon nitride materials have been the focus of research efforts worldwide. Most materials studied have been amorphous, with only a few groups claiming to have found a crystalline material. In this paper, carbon nitride materials prepared by two different techniques are analysed, and found to be remarkably similar in bonding and structure. The materials appear to have a primarily sp2 bonded carbon structure with a lower bond length than found in an amorphous carbon. This is explained by nitrogen substituting into 'rings' to a saturation level of about one nitrogen per three carbon atoms. No evidence was found for a crystalline structure of formula C3N4, or any amorphous derivative of it. 16 refs., 1 tab., 5 figs

  17. Effects of experimental conditions on the growth of vertically aligned carbon nitride nanocone arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vertically aligned carbon nitride nanocone (CNNC) arrays were prepared on Ni-covered (100) silicon wafers by an abnormal glow discharge plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition method. In order to control the growth of the CNNC arrays, the distance of the anode tip to the substrate surface was adjusted for it affected the contents and activities of the species in the plasmas leading to the CNNC growth. Based on the characterization of the as-grown thin films and the analysis of the growth environments, the effects of the experimental conditions on the growth of the CNNC arrays were studied and their growth mechanism was discussed. The tip−substrate distance strongly affects the CNNC growth. Under appropriate experimental conditions, the vertically-aligned and intact CNNC arrays with the β-C3N4 microstructure and the minimum tip curvature diameter of only 3–4 nm could be fabricated. This kind of CNNC arrays have many potential applications, such as tips for microscopes, electron-emitting units in field emission displays, electron-capture electrodes of solar cells etc. - Highlights: ►Vertically aligned carbon nitride nanocone arrays were prepared. ►An abnormal glow discharge plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition method. ►Tip-substrate distance strongly affects the growth of carbon nitride nanocones. ►The growth mechanism of carbon nitride nanocones is discussed

  18. Cobalt oxide and nitride particles supported on mesoporous carbons as composite electrocatalysts for dye-sensitized solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ming; Shao, Leng-Leng; Gao, Ze-Min; Ren, Tie-Zhen; Yuan, Zhong-Yong

    2015-07-01

    The composite electrocatalysts of cobalt oxide/mesoporous carbon and cobalt nitride/mesoporous carbon are synthesized via a convenient oxidation and subsequent ammonia nitridation of cobalt particles-incorporated mesoporous carbon, respectively. The cobalt oxide and nitride particles are uniformly imbedded in mesoporous carbon matrix, forming the unique composites with high surface area and mesopore architecture, and the resultant composites are evaluated as counter electrode materials, exhibiting good catalytic activity for the reduction of triiodide. The composites of cobalt nitride and mesoporous carbon are superior to the counterparts of cobalt oxide and mesoporous carbon in catalyzing the triiodide reduction, and the dye-sensitized solar cell with the composites achieves an optimum power conversion efficiency of 5.26%, which is comparable to the one based on the conventional Pt counter electrode (4.88%).

  19. β-Sialon Produced by Carbon Thermal Nitriding Reaction of Bauxite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    β-Sialon was produced by carbon thermal nitriding reaction in N2 gas atmosphere when the mixtures of bauxite and anthracite were put into vertical furnace. According to the mass loss of raw materials and the result of X-ray diffration (XRD) of products, the influences of the process parameters on the compositions and relative contents of products, such as the fixed carbon content, the flow of N2, the soaking time and the temperature, were researched.

  20. Cross-sectional STEM study of cathodic arc deposited amorphous carbon and carbon-nitride films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The VG601 high resolution dedicated Scanning Transmission Electron Microscope (STEM) located at the University of Sydney has the capability of providing structural information with a spatial resolution of less than one nanometre. Compositional information can be obtained using either Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS) or Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy. Each characteristic absorption edge in EELS also exhibits structure which provides information on the atomic environment of the absorbing atom. The combination of EELS and STEM therefore provides a powerful tool for analysing structure at the nanometre scale. In this work we investigate the structure of cathodic arc deposited carbon and carbon-nitride films using this EELS/STEM combination. By preparing the films in cross-section and collecting a number of spectra in a line through the film thickness (line profile), it is possible to investigate the deposition process in great detail since variations in structure with depth in the film provide information on the 'history' of film growth. In the case of carbon based materials, this technique provides a direct measure of the variations in both density and proportion of diamond-like bonding. These measurements will be used to help understand the mechanisms of film growth by cathodic arc deposition

  1. Self-assembly of graphitic carbon nitride nanosheets–carbon nanotube composite for electrochemical simultaneous determination of catechol and hydroquinone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: Schematic diagram of hydrothermal synthesis graphitic carbon nitride nanosheets-carbon nanotube composite and theirs application for electrochemical sensing catechol and hydroquinone. - Highlights: • Self-assembly of graphitic carbon nitride nanosheets-carbon nanotube composite. • CNNS-CNT show more stronger conductivity than CNNS and CNT. • CNNS-CNT has been performed for detection of catechol and hydroquinone. • The probe was applied to detect practical samples with satisfactory results. - Abstract: In this paper, three-dimensional (3D) graphitic carbon nitride nanosheets-carbon nanotube (CNNS-CNT) composite was synthesized via hydrothermal reaction of 2D CNNS and 1D CNT-COOH by π-π stacking and electrostatic interactions. This CNNS-CNT composite was characterized by transmission electron microscope, scanning electron microscope, x-ray diffraction and fourier-transform infrared. In addition, the CNNS-CNT composite displayed excellent conductivity comparing with CNNS and CNT-COOH monomer. This composite was applied for electrochemical simultaneous determination of catechol (CC) and hydroquinone (HQ) with good sensitivity, wide linear range and low detection limit. In addition, this CNNS-CNT composite modified electrode was also applied to detect practical samples with satisfactory results

  2. Graphitic carbon nitride nanosheets doped graphene oxide for electrochemical simultaneous determination of ascorbic acid, dopamine and uric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: Schematic drawing of electrochemical oxidize AA, DA and UA on graphitic carbon nitride nanosheets-graphene oxide composite modified electrode. - Highlights: • Synthesize g-C3N4, GO and CNNS-GO composite. • CNNS-GO composite was the first time for simultaneous determination of AA, DA and UA. • CNNS-GO/GCE displays fantastic selectivity and sensitivity for AA, DA and UA. • CNNS-GO/GCE was applied to detect real sample with satisfactory results. - Abstract: Graphitic carbon nitride nanosheets with a graphite-like structure have strong covalent bonds between carbon and nitride atoms, and nitrogen atoms in the carbon architecture can accelerate the electron transfer and enhance electrical properties effectually. The graphitic carbon nitride nanosheets-graphene oxide composite was synthesized. And the electrochemical performance of the composite was investigated by cyclic voltammetry and differential pulse voltammetry ulteriorly. Due to the synergistic effects of layer-by-layer structures by π-π stacking or charge-transfer interactions, graphitic carbon nitride nanosheets-graphene oxide composite can improved conductivity, electro-catalytic and selective oxidation performance. The proposed graphitic carbon nitride nanosheets-graphene oxide composite modified electrode was employed for simultaneous determination of ascorbic acid, dopamine and uric acid in their mixture solution, it exhibited distinguished sensitivity, wide linear range and low detection limit. Moreover, the modified electrode was applied to detect urine and dopamine injection sample, and then the samples were spiked with certain concentration of three substances with satisfactory recovery results

  3. Optomechanical and crystallization phenomena visualized with 4D electron microscopy: interfacial carbon nanotubes on silicon nitride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flannigan, David J; Zewail, Ahmed H

    2010-05-12

    With ultrafast electron microscopy (UEM), we report observation of the nanoscopic crystallization of amorphous silicon nitride, and the ultrashort optomechanical motion of the crystalline silicon nitride at the interface of an adhering carbon nanotube network. The in situ static crystallization of the silicon nitride occurs only in the presence of an adhering nanotube network, thus indicating their mediating role in reaching temperatures close to 1000 degrees C when exposed to a train of laser pulses. Under such condition, 4D visualization of the optomechanical motion of the specimen was followed by quantifying the change in diffraction contrast of crystalline silicon nitride, to which the nanotube network is bonded. The direction of the motion was established from a tilt series correlating the change in displacement with both the tilt angle and the response time. Correlation of nanoscopic motion with the picosecond atomic-scale dynamics suggests that electronic processes initiated in the nanotubes are responsible for the initial ultrafast optomechanical motion. The time scales accessible to UEM are 12 orders of magnitude shorter than those traditionally used to study the optomechanical motion of carbon nanotube networks, thus allowing for distinctions between the different electronic and thermal mechanisms to be made. PMID:20377202

  4. High quality boron carbon nitride/ZnO-nanorods p-n heterojunctions based on magnetron sputtered boron carbon nitride films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boron carbon nitride (BCN) films were synthesized on Si (100) and fused silica substrates by radio-frequency magnetron sputtering from a B4C target in an Ar/N2 gas mixture. The BCN films were amorphous, and they exhibited an optical band gap of ∼1.0 eV and p-type conductivity. The BCN films were over-coated with ZnO nanorod arrays using hydrothermal synthesis to form BCN/ZnO-nanorods p-n heterojunctions, exhibiting a rectification ratio of 1500 at bias voltages of ±5 V

  5. Applicability of carbon and boron nitride nanotubes as biosensors: Effect of biomolecular adsorption on the transport properties of carbon and boron nitride nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Xiaoliang; Mukhopadhyay, Saikat; Gowtham, S.; Pandey, Ravindra; Karna, Shashi P.

    2013-04-01

    The effect of molecular adsorption on the transport properties of single walled carbon and boron nitride nanotubes (CNTs and BNNTs) is investigated using density functional theory and non-equilibrium Green's function methods. The calculated I-V characteristics predict noticeable changes in the conductivity of semiconducting BNNTs due to physisorption of nucleic acid base molecules. Specifically, guanine which binds to the side wall of BNNT significantly enhances its conductivity by introducing conduction channels near the Fermi energy of the bioconjugated system. For metallic CNTs, a large background current masks relatively small changes in current due to the biomolecular adsorption. The results therefore suggest the suitability of BNNTs for biosensing applications.

  6. Co-implantation of carbon and nitrogen into silicon dioxide for synthesis of carbon nitride materials

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, M B; Nuesca, G; Moore, R

    2002-01-01

    Materials synthesis of carbon nitride has been attempted with co-implantation of carbon and nitrogen into thermally grown SiO sub 2. Following implantation of C and N ions to doses of 10 sup 1 sup 7 cm sup - sup 2 , thermal annealing of the implanted SiO sub 2 sample was conducted at 1000 degree sign C in an N sub 2 ambient. As evidenced in Fourier transform infrared measurements and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, different bonding configurations between C and N, including C-N single bonds, C=N double bonds and C=N triple bonds, were found to develop in the SiO sub 2 film after annealing. Chemical composition profiles obtained with secondary ion mass spectroscopy were correlated with the depth information of the chemical shifts of N 1s core-level electrons, allowing us to examine the formation of C-N bonding for different atomic concentration ratios between N and C. X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy showed no sign of the formation of crystalline C sub 3 N sub 4 precipitates in the SiO ...

  7. Activation of peroxymonosulfate by graphitic carbon nitride loaded on activated carbon for organic pollutants degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Mingyu; Gao, Long; Li, Jun; Fang, Jia; Cai, Wenxuan; Li, Xiaoxia; Xu, Aihua

    2016-10-01

    Graphitic carbon nitride supported on activated carbon (g-C3N4/AC) was prepared through an in situ thermal approach and used as a metal free catalyst for pollutants degradation in the presence of peroxymonosulfate (PMS) without light irradiation. It was found that g-C3N4 was highly dispersed on the surface of AC with the increase of surface area and the exposition of more edges and defects. The much easier oxidation of C species in g-C3N4 to CO was also observed from XPS spectra. Acid Orange 7 (AO7) and other organic pollutants could be completely degraded by the g-C3N4/AC catalyst within 20min with PMS, while g-C3N4+PMS and AC+PMS showed no significant activity for the reaction. The performance of the catalyst was significantly influenced by the amount of g-C3N4 loaded on AC; but was nearly not affected by the initial solution pH and reaction temperature. In addition, the catalysts presented good stability. A nonradical mechanism accompanied by radical generation (HO and SO4(-)) in AO7 oxidation was proposed in the system. The CO groups play a key role in the process; while the exposure of more N-(C)3 group can further increase its electron density and basicity. This study can contribute to the development of green materials for sustainable remediation of aqueous organic pollutants. PMID:27214000

  8. Hydrogen production using zinc-doped carbon nitride catalyst irradiated with visible light

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bing Yue, Qiuye Li, Hideo Iwai, Tetsuya Kako and Jinhua Ye

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3N4 has been investigated as a photocatalyst for water splitting and organic dye degradation. In this study, we have developed a simple soft-chemical method of doping Zn into g-C3N4 to prepare a metal-containing carbon nitride. The doping was confirmed by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and diffusion reflectance spectra revealed a significant red shift in the absorption edge of Zn/g-C3N4. This hybrid material shows high photocatalytic activity and good stability for hydrogen evolution from an aqueous methanol solution under visible light irradiation (λ≥420 nm. The hydrogen evolution rate was more than 10 times higher for a 10%-Zn/g-C3N4 sample (59.5 μmol h−1 than for pure g-C3N4. The maximum quantum yield was 3.2% at 420 nm.

  9. Hydrogen production using zinc-doped carbon nitride catalyst irradiated with visible light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently, graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3N4) has been investigated as a photocatalyst for water splitting and organic dye degradation. In this study, we have developed a simple soft-chemical method of doping Zn into g-C3N4 to prepare a metal-containing carbon nitride. The doping was confirmed by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and diffusion reflectance spectra revealed a significant red shift in the absorption edge of Zn/g-C3N4. This hybrid material shows high photocatalytic activity and good stability for hydrogen evolution from an aqueous methanol solution under visible light irradiation (λ≥420 nm). The hydrogen evolution rate was more than 10 times higher for a 10%-Zn/g-C3N4 sample (59.5 μmol h-1) than for pure g-C3N4. The maximum quantum yield was 3.2% at 420 nm.

  10. Ammonia-induced robust photocatalytic hydrogen evolution of graphitic carbon nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Pengju; Zhao, Jianghong; Qiao, Wei; Li, Li; Zhu, Zhenping

    2015-11-01

    We report a new and effective method to prepare high activity graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3N4) by a simple ammonia etching treatment. The obtained g-C3N4 displays a high BET surface area and enhanced electron/hole separation efficiency. The hydrogen evolution rates improved from 52 μmol h-1 to 316.7 μmol h-1 under visible light.We report a new and effective method to prepare high activity graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3N4) by a simple ammonia etching treatment. The obtained g-C3N4 displays a high BET surface area and enhanced electron/hole separation efficiency. The hydrogen evolution rates improved from 52 μmol h-1 to 316.7 μmol h-1 under visible light. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr05570a

  11. Conductive Graphitic Carbon Nitride as an Ideal Material for Electrocatalytically Switchable CO2 Capture

    OpenAIRE

    Xin Tan; Liangzhi Kou; Tahini, Hassan A.; Smith, Sean C.

    2015-01-01

    Good electrical conductivity and high electron mobility of the sorbent materials are prerequisite for electrocatalytically switchable CO2 capture. However, no conductive and easily synthetic sorbent materials are available until now. Here, we examined the possibility of conductive graphitic carbon nitride (g-C4N3) nanosheets as sorbent materials for electrocatalytically switchable CO2 capture. Using first-principle calculations, we found that the adsorption energy of CO2 molecules on g-C4N3 n...

  12. One Dimensional Graphitic Carbon Nitrides as Effective Metal-Free Oxygen Reduction Catalysts

    OpenAIRE

    Muhammad Tahir; Nasir Mahmood; Jinghan Zhu; Asif Mahmood; Butt, Faheem K.; Syed Rizwan; Imran Aslam; Tanveer, M.; Faryal Idrees; Imran Shakir; Chuanbao Cao; Yanglong Hou

    2015-01-01

    To explore the effect of morphology on catalytic properties of graphitic carbon nitride (GCN), we have studied oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) performance of two different morphologies of GCN in alkaline media. Among both, tubular GCN react with dissolved oxygen in the ORR with an onset potential close to commercial Pt/C. Furthermore, the higher stability and excellent methanol tolerance of tubular GCN compared to Pt/C emphasizes its suitability for fuel cells.

  13. 2D to 3D transition of polymeric carbon nitride nanosheets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The transition from a prevalent turbostratic arrangement with low planar interactions (2D) to an array of polymeric carbon nitride nanosheets with stronger interplanar interactions (3D), occurring for samples treated above 650 °C, was detected by terahertz-time domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS). The simulated 3D material made of stacks of shifted quasi planar sheets composed of zigzagged polymer ribbons, delivered a XRD simulated pattern in relatively good agreement with the experimental one. The 2D to 3D transition was also supported by the simulation of THz-TDS spectra obtained from quantum chemistry calculations, in which the same broad bands around 2 THz and 1.5 THz were found for 2D and 3D arrays, respectively. This transition was also in accordance with the tightening of the interplanar distance probably due to an interplanar π bond contribution, as evidenced also by a broad absorption around 2.6 eV in the UV–vis spectrum, which appeared in the sample treated at 650 °C, and increased in the sample treated at 700 °C. The band gap was calculated for 1D and 2D cases. The value of 3.374 eV for the 2D case is, within the model accuracy and precision, in a relative good agreement with the value of 3.055 eV obtained from the experimental results. - Graphical abstract: 2D lattice mode vibrations and structural changes correlated with the so called “2D to 3D transition”. - Highlights: • A 2D to 3D transition has been detected for polymeric carbon nitride. • THz-TDS allowed us to discover and detect the 2D to 3D transition of polymeric carbon nitride. • We propose a structure for polymeric carbon nitride confirming it with THz-TDS

  14. 2D to 3D transition of polymeric carbon nitride nanosheets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chamorro-Posada, Pedro [Dpto. de Teoría de la Señal y Comunicaciones e IT, Universidad de Valladolid, ETSI Telecomunicación, Paseo Belén 15, 47011 Valladolid (Spain); Vázquez-Cabo, José [Dpto. de Teoría de la Señal y Comunicaciones, Universidad de Vigo, ETSI Telecomunicación, Lagoas Marcosende s/n, Vigo (Spain); Sánchez-Arévalo, Francisco M. [Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales (IIM), Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Apdo. Postal 70–360, Cd. Universitaria, México D.F. 04510 (Mexico); Martín-Ramos, Pablo [Dpto. de Teoría de la Señal y Comunicaciones e IT, Universidad de Valladolid, ETSI Telecomunicación, Paseo Belén 15, 47011 Valladolid (Spain); Laboratorio de Materiales Avanzados (Advanced Materials Laboratory) ETSIIAA, Universidad de Valladolid, Avenida de Madrid 44, 34004 Palencia (Spain); Martín-Gil, Jesús; Navas-Gracia, Luis M. [Laboratorio de Materiales Avanzados (Advanced Materials Laboratory) ETSIIAA, Universidad de Valladolid, Avenida de Madrid 44, 34004 Palencia (Spain); Dante, Roberto C., E-mail: rcdante@yahoo.com [Laboratorio de Materiales Avanzados (Advanced Materials Laboratory) ETSIIAA, Universidad de Valladolid, Avenida de Madrid 44, 34004 Palencia (Spain)

    2014-11-15

    The transition from a prevalent turbostratic arrangement with low planar interactions (2D) to an array of polymeric carbon nitride nanosheets with stronger interplanar interactions (3D), occurring for samples treated above 650 °C, was detected by terahertz-time domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS). The simulated 3D material made of stacks of shifted quasi planar sheets composed of zigzagged polymer ribbons, delivered a XRD simulated pattern in relatively good agreement with the experimental one. The 2D to 3D transition was also supported by the simulation of THz-TDS spectra obtained from quantum chemistry calculations, in which the same broad bands around 2 THz and 1.5 THz were found for 2D and 3D arrays, respectively. This transition was also in accordance with the tightening of the interplanar distance probably due to an interplanar π bond contribution, as evidenced also by a broad absorption around 2.6 eV in the UV–vis spectrum, which appeared in the sample treated at 650 °C, and increased in the sample treated at 700 °C. The band gap was calculated for 1D and 2D cases. The value of 3.374 eV for the 2D case is, within the model accuracy and precision, in a relative good agreement with the value of 3.055 eV obtained from the experimental results. - Graphical abstract: 2D lattice mode vibrations and structural changes correlated with the so called “2D to 3D transition”. - Highlights: • A 2D to 3D transition has been detected for polymeric carbon nitride. • THz-TDS allowed us to discover and detect the 2D to 3D transition of polymeric carbon nitride. • We propose a structure for polymeric carbon nitride confirming it with THz-TDS.

  15. Facile fabrication of boron nitride nanosheets-amorphous carbon hybrid film for optoelectronic applications

    KAUST Repository

    Wan, Shanhong

    2015-01-01

    A novel boron nitride nanosheets (BNNSs)-amorphous carbon (a-C) hybrid film has been deposited successfully on silicon substrates by simultaneous electrochemical deposition, and showed a good integrity of this B-C-N composite film by the interfacial bonding. This synthesis can potentially provide the facile control of the B-C-N composite film for the potential optoelectronic devices. This journal is

  16. Microwave-assisted polyol synthesis of carbon nitride dots from folic acid for cell imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Weiwei; Gu, Wei; Ye, Ling; Guo, Chenyang; Su, Su; Xu, Pinxiang; Xue, Ming

    2014-01-01

    A green, one-step microwave-assisted polyol synthesis was employed to prepare blue luminescent carbon nitride dots (CNDs) using folic acid molecules as both carbon and nitrogen sources. The as-prepared CNDs had an average size of around 4.51 nm and could be well dispersed in water. Under excitation at 360 nm, the CNDs exhibited a strong blue luminescence and the quantum yield was estimated to be 18.9%, which is greater than that of other reported CNDs. Moreover, the CNDs showed low cytotoxicity and could efficiently label C6 glioma cells, demonstrating their potential in cell imaging. PMID:25382977

  17. Thermal conduction mechanisms in isotope-disordered boron nitride and carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savic, Ivana; Mingo, Natalio; Stewart, Derek

    2009-03-01

    We present first principles studies which determine dominant effects limiting the heat conduction in isotope-disordered boron nitride and carbon nanotubes [1]. Using an ab initio atomistic Green's function approach, we demonstrate that localization cannot be observed in the thermal conductivity measurements [1], and that diffusive scattering is the dominant mechanism which reduces the thermal conductivity [2]. We also give concrete predictions of the magnitude of the isotope effect on the thermal conductivities of carbon and boron nitride single-walled nanotubes [2]. We furthermore show that intershell scattering is not the main limiting mechanism for the heat flow through multi-walled boron nitride nanotubes [1], and that heat conduction restricted to a few shells leads to the low thermal conductivities experimentally measured [1]. We consequently successfully compare the results of our calculations [3] with the experimental measurements [1]. [1] C. W. Chang, A. M. Fennimore, A. Afanasiev, D. Okawa, T. Ikuno, H. Garcia, D. Li, A. Majumdar, A. Zettl, Phys. Rev. Lett. 2006, 97, 085901. [2] I. Savic, N. Mingo, D. A. Stewart, Phys. Rev. Lett. 2008, 101, 165502. [3] I. Savic, D. A. Stewart, N. Mingo, to be published.

  18. Oxygen Reduction Electrocatalysts Based on Coupled Iron Nitride Nanoparticles with Nitrogen-Doped Carbon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Jung Park

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Aimed at developing a highly active and stable non-precious metal electrocatalyst for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR, a novel FexNy/NC nanocomposite—that is composed of highly dispersed iron nitride nanoparticles supported on nitrogen-doped carbon (NC—was prepared by pyrolyzing carbon black with an iron-containing precursor in an NH3 atmosphere. The influence of the various synthetic parameters such as the Fe precursor, Fe content, pyrolysis temperature and pyrolysis time on ORR performance of the prepared iron nitride nanoparticles was investigated. The formed phases were determined by experimental and simulated X-ray diffraction (XRD of numerous iron nitride species. We found that Fe3N phase creates superactive non-metallic catalytic sites for ORR that are more active than those of the constituents. The optimized Fe3N/NC nanocomposite exhibited excellent ORR activity and a direct four-electron pathway in alkaline solution. Furthermore, the hybrid material showed outstanding catalytic durability in alkaline electrolyte, even after 4,000 potential cycles.

  19. Effect of Nitridation Time on the Surface Hardness of Medium Carbon Steels (AISI 1045)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It has been investigated the effect of nitridation time on the surface hardness of medium carbon steels (AISI 1045). Parameters determining to the results were flow rate of the nitrogen gas, temperature and time. In this experiments, sample having diameter of 15 mm, thick 2 mm placed in tube of glass with diameter 35 mm heated 550 oC, flow rate and temperature were kept constants, 100 cc/minutes and 550 oC respectively, while the time were varied from 5, 10, 20 and 30 hours. It was found, that for the nitridation time of 5, 10, 20, and 30 hours, the surface hardness increased from 145 VHN to, 23.7, 296.8, 382.4 and 426.1 VHN, respectively. (author)

  20. Direct growth of graphene on gallium nitride using C2H2 as carbon source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bing; Zhao, Yun; Yi, Xiao-Yan; Wang, Guo-Hong; Liu, Zhi-Qiang; Duan, Rui-Rei; Huang, Peng; Wang, Jun-Xi; Li, Jin-Min

    2016-04-01

    Growing graphene on gallium nitride (GaN) at temperatures greater than 900°C is a challenge that must be overcome to obtain high quality of GaN epi-layers. We successfully met this challenge using C2H2 as the carbon source. We demonstrated that graphene can be grown both on copper and directly on GaN epi-layers. The Raman spectra indicated that the graphene films were about 4-5 layers thick. Meanwhile, the effects of the growth temperature on the growth of the graphene films were systematically studied, and 830°C was found to be the optimum growth temperature. We successfully grew high-quality graphene films directly on gallium nitride.

  1. Effect of applied dc bias voltage on composition, chemical bonding and mechanical properties of carbon nitride films prepared by PECVD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Hong-xuan; XU Tao; HAO Jun-ying; CHEN Jian-min; ZHOU Hui-di; XUE Qun-ji; LIU Hui-wen

    2004-01-01

    Carbon nitride films were deposited on Si (100) substrates using plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) technique from CH4 and N2 at different applied dc bias voltage. The microstructure, composition and chemical bonding of the resulting films were characterized by Raman spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The mechanical properties such as hardness and elastic modulus of the films were evaluated using nano-indentation. As the results, the Raman spectra, showing the G and D bands, indicate the amorphous structure of the films. XPS and FTIR measurements demonstrate the existence of various carbon-nitride bonds in the films and the hydrogenation of carbon nitride phase. The composition ratio of N to C, the nano-hardness and the elastic modulus of the carbon nitride films increase with increasing dc bias voltage and reach the maximums at a dc bias voltage of 300 V, then they decrease with further increase of the dc bias voltage. Moreover, the XRD analyses indicate that the carbon nitride film contains some polycrystalline C3N4 phase embedded in the amorphous matrix at optimized deposition condition of dc bias voltage of 300 V.

  2. Chemically Modulated Carbon Nitride Nanosheets for Highly Selective Electrochemiluminescent Detection of Multiple Metal-ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhixin; Shang, Qiuwei; Shen, Yanfei; Zhang, Linqun; Zhang, Yuye; Lv, Yanqin; Li, Ying; Liu, Songqin; Zhang, Yuanjian

    2016-06-01

    Chemical structures of two-dimensional (2D) nanosheet can effectively control the properties thus guiding their applications. Herein, we demonstrate that carbon nitride nanosheets (CNNS) with tunable chemical structures can be obtained by exfoliating facile accessible bulk carbon nitride (CN) of different polymerization degree. Interestingly, the electrochemiluminescence (ECL) properties of as-prepared CNNS were significantly modulated. As a result, unusual changes for different CNNS in quenching of ECL because of inner filter effect/electron transfer and enhancement of ECL owing to catalytic effect were observed by adding different metal ions. On the basis of this, by using various CNNS, highly selective ECL sensors for rapid detecting multiple metal-ions such as Cu(2+), Ni(2+), and Cd(2+) were successfully developed without any labeling and masking reagents. Multiple competitive mechanisms were further revealed to account for such enhanced selectivity in the proposed ECL sensors. The strategy of preparing CNNS with tunable chemical structures that facilely modulated the optical properties would open a vista to explore 2D carbon-rich materials for developing a wide range of applications such as sensors with enhanced performances. PMID:27187874

  3. Microwave-assisted polyol synthesis of carbon nitride dots from folic acid for cell imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guan WW

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Weiwei Guan,1,* Wei Gu,2,* Ling Ye,2 Chenyang Guo,1 Su Su,1 Pinxiang Xu,1,3 Ming Xue1,3 1Department of Pharmacology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Capital Medical University, Beijing, People’s Republic of China; 2Department of Chemical Biology, School of Chemical Biology and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Capital Medical University, Beijing, People’s Republic of China; 3Beijing Laboratory for Biomedical Detection Technology and Instrument, Beijing, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: A green, one-step microwave-assisted polyol synthesis was employed to prepare blue luminescent carbon nitride dots (CNDs using folic acid molecules as both carbon and nitrogen sources. The as-prepared CNDs had an average size of around 4.51 nm and could be well dispersed in water. Under excitation at 360 nm, the CNDs exhibited a strong blue luminescence and the quantum yield was estimated to be 18.9%, which is greater than that of other reported CNDs. Moreover, the CNDs showed low cytotoxicity and could efficiently label C6 glioma cells, demonstrating their potential in cell imaging. Keywords: carbon nitride dots (CNDs, folic acid, photoluminescence, cell imaging

  4. Substrate temperature influence on the trombogenicity in amorphous carbon nitride thin coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galeano-Osorio, D. S.; Vargas, S.; López-Córdoba, L. M.; Ospina, R.; Restrepo-Parra, E.; Arango, P. J.

    2010-10-01

    Carbon nitride thin films were obtained through plasma assisted physical vapor deposition technique by pulsed arc, varying the substrate temperature and investigating the influence of this parameter on the films hemocompatibility. For obtaining approaches of blood compatibility, environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM) was used in order to study the platelets adherence and their morphology. Moreover, the elemental chemical composition was determined by using energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), finding C, N and O. The coatings hemocompatibility was evaluated by in vitro thrombogenicity test, whose results were correlated with the microstructure and roughness of the films obtained. During the films growth process, the substrate temperature was varied, obtaining coatings under different temperatures, room temperature ( Troom), 100 °C, 150 °C and 200 °C. Parameters as interelectrodic distance, voltage, work pressure and number of discharges, were remained constant. By EDS, carbon and nitrogen were found in the films. Visible Raman spectroscopy was used, and it revealed an amorphous lattice, with graphitic process as the substrate temperature was increased. However, at a critical temperature of 150 °C, this tendency was broken, and the film became more amorphous. This film showed the lowest roughness, 2 ± 1 nm. This last characteristic favored the films hemocompatibility. Also, it was demonstrated that the blood compatibility of carbon nitride films obtained were affected by the ID/ IG or sp 3/sp 2 ratio and not by the absolute sp 3 or sp 2 concentration.

  5. Substrate temperature influence on the trombogenicity in amorphous carbon nitride thin coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon nitride thin films were obtained through plasma assisted physical vapor deposition technique by pulsed arc, varying the substrate temperature and investigating the influence of this parameter on the films hemocompatibility. For obtaining approaches of blood compatibility, environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM) was used in order to study the platelets adherence and their morphology. Moreover, the elemental chemical composition was determined by using energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), finding C, N and O. The coatings hemocompatibility was evaluated by in vitro thrombogenicity test, whose results were correlated with the microstructure and roughness of the films obtained. During the films growth process, the substrate temperature was varied, obtaining coatings under different temperatures, room temperature (Troom), 100 deg. C, 150 deg. C and 200 deg. C. Parameters as interelectrodic distance, voltage, work pressure and number of discharges, were remained constant. By EDS, carbon and nitrogen were found in the films. Visible Raman spectroscopy was used, and it revealed an amorphous lattice, with graphitic process as the substrate temperature was increased. However, at a critical temperature of 150 deg. C, this tendency was broken, and the film became more amorphous. This film showed the lowest roughness, 2 ± 1 nm. This last characteristic favored the films hemocompatibility. Also, it was demonstrated that the blood compatibility of carbon nitride films obtained were affected by the ID/IG or sp3/sp2 ratio and not by the absolute sp3 or sp2 concentration.

  6. Substrate temperature influence on the trombogenicity in amorphous carbon nitride thin coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galeano-Osorio, D.S.; Vargas, S.; Lopez-Cordoba, L.M.; Ospina, R. [Laboratorio de Fisica del Plasma, Universidad Nacional de Colombia Sede Manizales, Km. 9 via al Magdalena, Manizales (Colombia); Restrepo-Parra, E., E-mail: erestrepopa@unal.edu.co [Laboratorio de Fisica del Plasma, Universidad Nacional de Colombia Sede Manizales, Km. 9 via al Magdalena, Manizales (Colombia); Arango, P.J. [Laboratorio de Fisica del Plasma, Universidad Nacional de Colombia Sede Manizales, Km. 9 via al Magdalena, Manizales (Colombia)

    2010-10-01

    Carbon nitride thin films were obtained through plasma assisted physical vapor deposition technique by pulsed arc, varying the substrate temperature and investigating the influence of this parameter on the films hemocompatibility. For obtaining approaches of blood compatibility, environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM) was used in order to study the platelets adherence and their morphology. Moreover, the elemental chemical composition was determined by using energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), finding C, N and O. The coatings hemocompatibility was evaluated by in vitro thrombogenicity test, whose results were correlated with the microstructure and roughness of the films obtained. During the films growth process, the substrate temperature was varied, obtaining coatings under different temperatures, room temperature (T{sub room}), 100 deg. C, 150 deg. C and 200 deg. C. Parameters as interelectrodic distance, voltage, work pressure and number of discharges, were remained constant. By EDS, carbon and nitrogen were found in the films. Visible Raman spectroscopy was used, and it revealed an amorphous lattice, with graphitic process as the substrate temperature was increased. However, at a critical temperature of 150 deg. C, this tendency was broken, and the film became more amorphous. This film showed the lowest roughness, 2 {+-} 1 nm. This last characteristic favored the films hemocompatibility. Also, it was demonstrated that the blood compatibility of carbon nitride films obtained were affected by the I{sub D}/I{sub G} or sp{sup 3}/sp{sup 2} ratio and not by the absolute sp{sup 3} or sp{sup 2} concentration.

  7. Carbon nanotubes with atomic impurities on boron nitride sheets under applied electric fields

    OpenAIRE

    Kang, Seoung-Hun; Kim, Gunn; Kwon, Young-Kyun

    2013-01-01

    We perform first-principles calculations to investigate the structural and electronic properties of metal-doped (10, 0) carbon nanotubes (CNTs) on a single hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) sheet in the presence of an external electric field. We consider K, Cl and Ni atoms as dopants to study the dependence of the electronic properties of the CNT on doping polarity and concentration. The electric field strength is varied from -0.2 V/\\AA to +0.2 V/\\AA to explore the effects of an external electric...

  8. Synthesis and Characterization of Zinc Phthalocyanine/Meso porous Carbon Nitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work, zinc phthalocyanine (ZnPc) was impregnated onto meso porous carbon nitride (m-C3N4) to expand the absorption to longer wavelength than that of the bare m-C3N4. The characterization result showed that the synthesized m-C3N4 was thermally stable until 450 degree Celsius. The presence of ZnPc on the m-C3N4 was confirmed from the respective diffraction patterns and absorption spectra. Thus, it is expected that the ZnPc/ m- C3N4 would be a potential photo catalyst for reactions conducted under visible light irradiation. (author)

  9. Thermal and quantum phase slips in niobium-nitride nanowires based on suspended carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuda, Kohei; Moriyama, Satoshi; Morita, Yoshifumi; Komatsu, Katsuyoshi; Takagi, Tasuku; Hashimoto, Takayuki; Miki, Norihisa; Tanabe, Takasumi; Maki, Hideyuki

    2016-05-01

    Superconducting nanowires have attracted considerable attention due to their unique quantum-mechanical properties, as well as their potential as next-generation quantum nanodevices, such as single-photon detectors, phase-slip (PS) qubits, and other hybrid structures. In this study, we present the results of one-dimensional (1D) superconductivity in nanowires fabricated by coating suspended carbon nanotubes with a superconducting thin niobium nitride (NbN) film. In the resistance-temperature characteristic curves, hallmarks of 1D superconductivity with PS events are observed with unconventional negative magnetoresistance. We also confirm that a crossover occurs between thermal and quantum PSs as the temperature is lowered.

  10. Coaxial nanocable: silicon carbide and silicon oxide sheathed with boron nitride and carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang; Suenaga; Colliex; Iijima

    1998-08-14

    Multielement nanotubes comprising multiple phases, with diameters of a few tens of nanometers and lengths up to 50 micrometers, were successfully synthesized by means of reactive laser ablation. The experimentally determined structure consists of a beta-phase silicon carbide core, an amorphous silicon oxide intermediate layer, and graphitic outer shells made of boron nitride and carbon layers separated in the radial direction. The structure resembles a coaxial nanocable with a semiconductor-insulator-metal (or semiconductor-insulator-semiconductor) geometry and suggests applications in nanoscale electronic devices that take advantage of this self-organization mechanism for multielement nanotube formation. PMID:9703508

  11. Deposit of thin films of nitrided amorphous carbon using the laser ablation technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is reported the synthesis and characterization of thin films of amorphous carbon (a-C) nitrided, deposited by laser ablation in a nitrogen atmosphere at pressures which are from 4.5 x 10 -4 Torr until 7.5 x 10 -2 Torr. The structural properties of the films are studied by Raman spectroscopy obtaining similar spectra at the reported for carbon films type diamond. The study of behavior of the energy gap and the ratio nitrogen/carbon (N/C) in the films, shows that the energy gap is reduced when the nitrogen incorporation is increased. It is showed that the refraction index of the thin films diminish as nitrogen pressure is increased, indicating the formation of graphitic material. (Author)

  12. Simulation of single-electron state density for one-wall nanotubes from carbon and boron nitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The single-electron density is calculated for all possible geometrical configurations of the one-wall nanotubes from carbon and boron nitride. The calculation is accomplished through the numerical differentiation of the two-dimensional dispersion ratios for the graphite and hexagonal boron nitride by all permitted values of the wave vector. The π-electron approximation was applied. Good agreement of the energy gaps between the symmetrical singularities in the density of the single-electron states and experimental data obtained through the method of the resonance combination light scattering is demonstrated by the example of the concrete carbon nanotubes

  13. Interface study between nanostructured tantalum nitride films and carbon nanotubes grown by chemical vapour deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Our paper deals with the understanding of the carbon nanotubes growth parameters following the use of specific thin nitride buffer films. • For a large choice of buffer, we use ultra thin films elaborated by the very new method: high power pulsed magnetron sputtering; it allows a larger nitrogen incorporation in the films and lead to out of equilibrium phase formation. • Then by a multiscale investigation, developing a structural, a chemical and a morphology approach, we lead to some conclusion on the correlation between the phase transition for the buffer and morphology transition for the CNTs. • That is a new and deep approach. - Abstract: We present the role of nitrogen content in tantalum nitride ultra-thin buffers, on the carbon nanotubes (CNTs) growth by chemical vapour deposition at 850 °C, assisted by ferrocene as catalyst source. Tantalum nitride (TaNx) films with a very large range of concentration x = [0, 1.8] and various nanostructures, from amorphous Ta(N) to Ta3N5, were deposited by Highly Pulsed Plasma Magnetron Sputtering. The buffer films are characterized after heat treatment at 850 °C, and after the CNT growth, by wide angle X-ray scattering in grazing incidence and scanning electron microscopy. The CNT diameter explored by transition electron microscopy shows an all-out value for under stoichiometric thin films (Ta1-N1−δ, Ta3-N5−δ) and a minimum value just above the stoichiometric phases (Ta1-N1+δ, Ta3-N5+δ). Firstly one shows that the buffer films under the heat treatment present surface modification highly dependent on their initial state, which influences the catalyst particles diffusion. Secondly at the stoichiometric TaN phase we show that a specific ternary phase FeTa2O6 is formed at the interface CNT/buffer, not present in the other cases, leading to a special CNT growth condition

  14. Large quantity production of carbon and boron nitride nanotubes by mechano-thermal process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Nanotube materials including carbon and boron nitride have excellent properties compared with bulk materials. The seamless graphene cylinders with a high length to diameter ratio make them as superstrong fibers. A high amount of hydrogen can be stored into nanotubes as future clean fuel source. Theses applications require large quantity of nanotubes materials. However, nanotube production in large quantity, fully controlled quality and low costs remains challenges for most popular synthesis methods such as arc discharge, laser heating and catalytic chemical decomposition. Discovery of new synthesis methods is still crucial for future industrial application. The new low-temperature mechano-thermal process discovered by the current author provides an opportunity to develop a commercial method for bulk production. This mechano-thermal process consists of a mechanical ball milling and a thermal annealing processes. Using this method, both carbon and boron nitride nanotubes were produced. I will present the mechano-thermal method as the new bulk production technique in the conference. The lecture will summarise main results obtained. In the case of carbon nanotubes, different nanosized structures including multi-walled nanotubes, nanocells, and nanoparticles have been produced in a graphite sample using a mechano-thermal process, consisting of I mechanical milling at room temperature for up to 150 hours and subsequent thermal annealing at 1400 deg C. Metal particles have played an important catalytic effect on the formation of different tubular structures. While defect structure of the milled graphite appears to be responsible for the formation of small tubes. It is found that the mechanical treatment of graphite powder produces a disordered and microporous structure, which provides nucleation sites for nanotubes as well as free carbon atoms. Multiwalled carbon nanotubes appear to grow via growth of the (002) layers during thermal annealing. In the case of BN

  15. Zr N and Zr O2 production by zirconium carbon nitridation (Zr Si O4)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Structural ceramics based on nitrides, oxynitrides like, Zr N-Si3 N4 and Zr O2 Si2 O N2 have good thermal and mechanical properties, with curves in technological applications. Many obtention methods are propose, but carbonitriding reactions (carbon reduction and simultaneous nitriding) of zircon (Zr O2 Si O2) may be interest because a low cost raw material is used. In this work the carbonitriding of zircon and the principal reaction conditions: carbon quantity, N2 flow, temperature and reaction time are studied. The phases formed were followed using XRD and the weight loss of the samples. The final products were: Zr N with low content of Si C and/or Si3 N4 or the monoclinic form of Zr O2. The products be obtained can be predicted according to the reaction conditions employed. During the reaction Si O(g) loss is observed and silica can be completely eliminated if reaction conditions are adjusted. (author)

  16. Mechanical and Structural Properties of Graphene-like Carbon Nitride Sheets

    CERN Document Server

    de Sousa, J M; Perim, E; Bizao, R A; Galvao, Douglas S

    2016-01-01

    Carbon nitride-based nanostructures have attracted special attention (from theory and experiments) due to their remarkable electromechanical properties. In this work we have investigated the mechanical properties of some graphene-like carbon nitride membranes through fully atomistic reactive molecular dynamics simulations. We have analyzed three different structures of these CN families, the so-called graphene-based g-CN, triazine-based g-C3N4 and heptazine-based g-C3N4. The stretching dynamics of these membranes was studied for deformations along their two main axes and at three different temperatures: 10K, 300K and 600K. We show that g-CN membranes have the lowest ultimate fracture strain value, followed by heptazine-based and triazine-based ones, respectively. This behavior can be explained in terms of their differences in terms of density values, topologies and types of chemical bonds. The dependency of the fracture patterns on the stretching directions is also discussed.

  17. An alkali treating strategy for the colloidization of graphitic carbon nitride and its excellent photocatalytic performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Fuxing; Yan, Jing; Zhou, Chenjuan; Chen, Binhe; Li, Peiran; Chen, Zhi; Dong, Xiaoping

    2016-04-15

    The colloid of graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3N4) was of great importance for practical application. Herein we introduced an alkali treatment route to efficiently colloidize g-C3N4 under mild conditions by destroying the hydrogen bonds between linearly polymeric melon chains and hydrolyzing partial C−NH−C bonds linked two tri-s-triazine units. The obtained colloidal suspension was extremely stable due to its negative charges on surface, and the particle size of several hundred nanometers and the nanobelt-like morphology were revealed by electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering technologies. The structural, optical and functional group analysis demonstrated that the structure of CN heterocycles was preserved after the alkali treatment, and the produced colloidal g-C3N4 can be re-assembled by an electrostatic interaction. Moreover, contributing to the reduced electron-hole recombination, the photocatalytic performance of restacked carbon nitride colloids had more enhanced photocatalytic performance than bulk g-C3N4. PMID:26835580

  18. Li and Na Co-decorated carbon nitride nanotubes as promising new hydrogen storage media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yu Sheng [Center of Clean Energy and Quantum Structures, and School of Physics and Engineering, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou, Henan, 450052 (China); College of Mathematics and Information Science, North China University of Water Resources and Electric Power, Zhengzhou, Henan, 450011 (China); Li, Meng; Wang, Fei; Sun, Qiang [Center of Clean Energy and Quantum Structures, and School of Physics and Engineering, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou, Henan, 450052 (China); Jia, Yu, E-mail: jiayu@zzu.edu.cn [Center of Clean Energy and Quantum Structures, and School of Physics and Engineering, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou, Henan, 450052 (China)

    2012-01-09

    The capacity of Li and Na co-decorated carbon nitride nanotube (CNNT) for hydrogen storage is studied using first-principles density functional theory. The results show that with two H{sub 2} molecules attached to per Li and four H{sub 2} molecules per Na the Li and Na co-decorated CNNT gains a gravimetric density of H{sub 2} as high as 9.09 wt% via electrostatic interaction without the clustering of the deposited metal atoms (at T=0 K). The average adsorption energy of hydrogen molecule is in the range of 0.09–0.22 eV/H{sub 2}, which is suitable for practical hydrogen storage at ambient temperatures. -- Highlights: ► Li and Na co-decorated carbon nitride nanotubes as hydrogen storage media. ► The gravimetric density of H{sub 2} is 9.09 wt%. ► The average adsorption energy of hydrogen molecule is 0.09–0.22 eV/H{sub 2}. ► It can operate under ambient thermodynamic conditions.

  19. Highly Efficient Quantum Sieving in Porous Graphene-like Carbon Nitride for Light Isotopes Separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Yuanyuan; Li, Feng; Zhou, Hongcai; Zhao, Mingwen

    2016-01-01

    Light isotopes separation, such as 3He/4He, H2/D2, H2/T2, etc., is crucial for various advanced technologies including isotope labeling, nuclear weapons, cryogenics and power generation. However, their nearly identical chemical properties made the separation challenging. The low productivity of the present isotopes separation approaches hinders the relevant applications. An efficient membrane with high performance for isotopes separation is quite appealing. Based on first-principles calculations, we theoretically demonstrated that highly efficient light isotopes separation, such as 3He/4He, can be reached in a porous graphene-like carbon nitride material via quantum sieving effect. Under moderate tensile strain, the quantum sieving of the carbon nitride membrane can be effectively tuned in a continuous way, leading to a temperature window with high 3He/4He selectivity and permeance acceptable for efficient isotopes harvest in industrial application. This mechanism also holds for separation of other light isotopes, such as H2/D2, H2/T2. Such tunable quantum sieving opens a promising avenue for light isotopes separation for industrial application.

  20. Integrated oxygen-doping and dye sensitization of graphitic carbon nitride for enhanced visible light photodegradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shizhen; Sun, Hongqi; Ang, H M; Tade, Moses O; Wang, Shaobin

    2016-08-15

    Graphitic carbon nitride (GCN) is a promising metal-free photocatalyst while suffering from low charge mobility induced inefficient photocatalysis. In this work, oxygen doping was employed to enhance the photodegradation of organic pollutants in water on graphitic carbon nitride (GCNO) under visible light. For further absorption extension, four organic dyes (Eosin-Y, Perylene, Nile-red and Coumarin) were adopted to dye-sensitize the GCNO photocatalyst. It was found that O-doping can promote dye sensitization, which was dependent on the type of dyes and influenced the photodegradation efficiencies of methylene blue (MB) and phenol. Nile-red sensitized GCNO presented the best activity in MB degradation under λ>480nm irradiations while Eosin-Y showed the best sensitization performance for phenol degradation under λ>420nm light source. However, dye sensitization was not effective for enhanced pollutant degradation on GCN without O-doping. UV-vis diffuse reflectance spectra (UV-vis DRS), photoluminescence (PL) spectra, and photocurrent analyses were applied to investigate the mechanism of carriers' transfer, which indicated that dye molecules could inject extra electrons into GCNO energy band and the energy dislocation could suppress electron/hole recombination, enhancing photocatalytic performances. PMID:27218807

  1. Preparation of carbon nitride fine powder by laser induced gas-phase reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandrescu, R.; Huisken, F.; Pugna, G.; Crunteanu, A.; Petcu, S.; Cojocaru, S.; Cireasa, R.; Morjan, I.

    We present the possibility of carbon nitride fine powder synthesis by sensitized laser pyrolysis of acethylene/nitrous oxide/ammonia mixtures. The powders were analyzed using X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and IR transmission measurements. It was found that nitrogen was incorporated in powders and that in the carbon-nitrogen phases formed, the presence of the triple bonded C≡N was not detected. The majority of X-ray diffraction data suggests the presence of a mixture of the predicted α- and β-C3N4 structure, with an α-C3N4-like form being prevalent. The powders were found to be slightly contaminated by SF6 sensitizer products. Our results suggest that by improving the experimental parameters this contamination might be reduced and that the laser pyrolysis method offers possibilities for production of CxNy materials, with controlled composition.

  2. Surface morphology stabilization by chemical sputtering in carbon nitride film growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buijnsters, J G [Institute for Molecules and Materials (IMM), Radboud University Nijmegen, Toernooiveld 1, 6525 ED Nijmegen (Netherlands); Vazquez, L [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid (CSIC), C/Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz 3, 28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2008-01-07

    We have studied the influence of chemical sputtering effects on the morphology of carbon nitride films grown on silicon substrates by electron cyclotron resonance chemical vapour deposition. This study has been performed by comparing the evolution of their morphology with that of hydrogenated amorphous carbon films grown under similar conditions, where these effects are not present. When chemical sputtering effects operate we observe a film surface stabilization for length scales in the 60-750 nm range after a threshold roughness of about 3-4 nm has been developed. This stabilization is explained on the basis of the re-emission of nitrogen etching species, which is confirmed by growth experiments on microstructured substrates. (fast track communication)

  3. In Situ Mechanical Property Measurements of Amorphous Carbon-Boron Nitride Nanotube Nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae-Woo; Lin, Yi; Nunez, Jennifer Carpena; Siochi, Emilie J.; Wise, Kristopher E.; Connell, John W.; Smith, Michael W.

    2011-01-01

    To understand the mechanical properties of amorphous carbon (a-C)/boron nitride nanotube (BNNT) nanostructures, in situ mechanical tests are conducted inside a transmission electron microscope equipped with an integrated atomic force microscope system. The nanotube structure is modified with amorphous carbon deposited by controlled electron beam irradiation. We demonstrate multiple in situ tensile, compressive, and lap shear tests with a-C/BNNT hybrid nanostructures. The tensile strength of the a-C/BNNT hybrid nanostructure is 5.29 GPa with about 90 vol% of a-C. The tensile strength and strain of the end-to-end joint structure with a-C welding is 0.8 GPa and 5.2% whereas the lap shear strength of the side-by-side joint structure with a-C is 0.25 GPa.

  4. Improvement of orthodontic friction by coating archwire with carbon nitride film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei Songbo [State Key Laboratory of Tribology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Shao Tianmin, E-mail: shaotm@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Tribology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Ding Peng [Department of Orthodontics, Peking University School and Hospital of Stomatology, Beijing 100081 (China)

    2011-10-01

    In order to reduce frictional resistance between archwire and bracket during orthodontic tooth movement, carbon nitride (CNx) thin films were deposited on the surface of archwires with ion beam assisted deposition (IBAD). The energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometer (EDS) analysis showed that the CNx film was successfully deposited on the surface of the orthodontic wires. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis suggested that the deposited CNx film was sp{sup 2} carbon dominated structures, and diversiform bonds (N-C, N{identical_to}C, et al.) coexisted in the film. The friction tests indicated that the CNx film significantly reduced the wire-bracket friction both in ambient air and in artificial saliva. The sp{sup 2}C rich structure of the CNx film as well as its protection function for the archwire was responsible for the low friction of the wire-bracket sliding system.

  5. Improvement of orthodontic friction by coating archwire with carbon nitride film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to reduce frictional resistance between archwire and bracket during orthodontic tooth movement, carbon nitride (CNx) thin films were deposited on the surface of archwires with ion beam assisted deposition (IBAD). The energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometer (EDS) analysis showed that the CNx film was successfully deposited on the surface of the orthodontic wires. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis suggested that the deposited CNx film was sp2 carbon dominated structures, and diversiform bonds (N-C, N≡C, et al.) coexisted in the film. The friction tests indicated that the CNx film significantly reduced the wire-bracket friction both in ambient air and in artificial saliva. The sp2C rich structure of the CNx film as well as its protection function for the archwire was responsible for the low friction of the wire-bracket sliding system.

  6. In situ mechanical property measurements of amorphous carbon-boron nitride nanotube nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae-Woo; Carpena Núñez, Jennifer; Siochi, Emilie J.; Wise, Kristopher E.; Lin, Yi; Connell, John W.; Smith, Michael W.

    2012-01-01

    To understand the mechanical properties of amorphous carbon (a-C)/boron nitride nanotube (BNNT) nanostructures, in situ mechanical tests are conducted inside a transmission electron microscope equipped with an integrated atomic force microscope system. The nanotube structure is modified with amorphous carbon deposited by controlled electron beam irradiation. We demonstrate multiple in situ tensile, compressive, and lap shear tests with a-C/BNNT hybrid nanostructures. The tensile strength of the a-C/BNNT hybrid nanostructure is 5.29 GPa with about 90 vol% of a-C. The tensile strength and strain of the end-to-end joint structure with a-C welding is 0.8 GPa and 5.2% whereas the lap shear strength of the side-by-side joint structure with a-C is 0.25 GPa.

  7. Hollow porous carbon nitride immobilized on carbonized nanofibers for highly efficient visible light photocatalytic removal of NO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hongxin; Chen, Dongyun; Li, Najun; Xu, Qingfeng; Li, Hua; He, Jinghui; Lu, Jianmei

    2016-06-01

    With the deterioration of air quality, great efforts were devoted to designing various photocatalysts for effective removal of NOx in air. However, the present photocatalysts have a fatal problem of low photocatalytic efficiency. In this work, a hollow porous carbon nitride nanosphere coupled with reduced graphene oxide (HCNS/rGO) was exploited as a visible-light photocatalyst to remove nitrogen monoxide in air at a low concentration (600 ppb level) under irradiation of an energy saving lamp. HCNS/rGO showed a NO removal ratio of 64%, which was superior to that of most other visible-light photocatalysts. The excellent photocatalytic ability of HCNS/rGO originates from the hollow porous morphology of HCNS and the grafted rGO on the surface. HCNS/rGO was immobilized on porous carbonized polymer nanofibers to obtain a photocatalytic membrane without affecting photocatalytic efficiency. Furthermore, the membrane showed excellent photochemical stability and recyclability. PMID:27245319

  8. Electron beam generation and structure of defects in carbon and boron nitride nano-tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nature and role of defects is of primary importance to understand the physical properties of C and BN (boron nitride) single walled nano-tubes (SWNTs). Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is a well known powerful tool to study the structure of defects in materials. However, in the case of SWNTs, the electron irradiation of the TEM may knock out atoms. This effect may alter the native structure of the tube, and has also been proposed as a potential tool for nano-engineering of nano-tubular structures. Here we develop a theoretical description of the irradiation mechanism. First, the anisotropy of the emission energy threshold is obtained via density functional based calculations. Then, we numerically derive the total Mott cross section for different emission sites of carbon and boron nitride nano-tubes with different chiralities. Using a dedicated STEM (Scanning Transmission Electron Microscope) microscope with experimental conditions optimised on the basis of derived cross-sections, we are able to control the generation of defects in nano-tubular systems. Either point or line defects can be obtained with a spatial resolution of a few nanometers. The structure, energetics and electronics of point and line defects in BN systems have been investigated. Stability of mono- and di- vacancy defects in hexagonal boron nitride layers is investigated, and their activation energies and reaction paths for diffusion have been derived using the nudged elastic band method (NEB) combined with density functional based techniques. We demonstrate that the appearance of extended linear defects under electron irradiation is more favorable than a random distribution of point defects and this is due to the existence of preferential sites for atom emission in the presence of pre-existing defects, rather than thermal vacancy nucleation and migration. (author)

  9. Electron beam generation and structure of defects in carbon and boron nitride nano-tubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zobelli, A

    2007-10-15

    The nature and role of defects is of primary importance to understand the physical properties of C and BN (boron nitride) single walled nano-tubes (SWNTs). Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is a well known powerful tool to study the structure of defects in materials. However, in the case of SWNTs, the electron irradiation of the TEM may knock out atoms. This effect may alter the native structure of the tube, and has also been proposed as a potential tool for nano-engineering of nano-tubular structures. Here we develop a theoretical description of the irradiation mechanism. First, the anisotropy of the emission energy threshold is obtained via density functional based calculations. Then, we numerically derive the total Mott cross section for different emission sites of carbon and boron nitride nano-tubes with different chiralities. Using a dedicated STEM (Scanning Transmission Electron Microscope) microscope with experimental conditions optimised on the basis of derived cross-sections, we are able to control the generation of defects in nano-tubular systems. Either point or line defects can be obtained with a spatial resolution of a few nanometers. The structure, energetics and electronics of point and line defects in BN systems have been investigated. Stability of mono- and di- vacancy defects in hexagonal boron nitride layers is investigated, and their activation energies and reaction paths for diffusion have been derived using the nudged elastic band method (NEB) combined with density functional based techniques. We demonstrate that the appearance of extended linear defects under electron irradiation is more favorable than a random distribution of point defects and this is due to the existence of preferential sites for atom emission in the presence of pre-existing defects, rather than thermal vacancy nucleation and migration. (author)

  10. Merging Single-Atom-Dispersed Silver and Carbon Nitride to a Joint Electronic System via Copolymerization with Silver Tricyanomethanide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zupeng; Pronkin, Sergey; Fellinger, Tim-Patrick; Kailasam, Kamalakannan; Vilé, Gianvito; Albani, Davide; Krumeich, Frank; Leary, Rowan; Barnard, Jon; Thomas, John Meurig; Pérez-Ramírez, Javier; Antonietti, Markus; Dontsova, Dariya

    2016-03-22

    Herein, we present an approach to create a hybrid between single-atom-dispersed silver and a carbon nitride polymer. Silver tricyanomethanide (AgTCM) is used as a reactive comonomer during templated carbon nitride synthesis to introduce both negative charges and silver atoms/ions to the system. The successful introduction of the extra electron density under the formation of a delocalized joint electronic system is proven by photoluminescence measurements, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy investigations, and measurements of surface ζ-potential. At the same time, the principal structure of the carbon nitride network is not disturbed, as shown by solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy analysis. The synthesis also results in an improvement of the visible light absorption and the development of higher surface area in the final products. The atom-dispersed AgTCM-doped carbon nitride shows an enhanced performance in the selective hydrogenation of alkynes in comparison with the performance of other conventional Ag-based materials prepared by spray deposition and impregnation-reduction methods, here exemplified with 1-hexyne. PMID:26863408

  11. Hollow porous carbon nitride immobilized on carbonized nanofibers for highly efficient visible light photocatalytic removal of NO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hongxin; Chen, Dongyun; Li, Najun; Xu, Qingfeng; Li, Hua; He, Jinghui; Lu, Jianmei

    2016-06-01

    With the deterioration of air quality, great efforts were devoted to designing various photocatalysts for effective removal of NOx in air. However, the present photocatalysts have a fatal problem of low photocatalytic efficiency. In this work, a hollow porous carbon nitride nanosphere coupled with reduced graphene oxide (HCNS/rGO) was exploited as a visible-light photocatalyst to remove nitrogen monoxide in air at a low concentration (600 ppb level) under irradiation of an energy saving lamp. HCNS/rGO showed a NO removal ratio of 64%, which was superior to that of most other visible-light photocatalysts. The excellent photocatalytic ability of HCNS/rGO originates from the hollow porous morphology of HCNS and the grafted rGO on the surface. HCNS/rGO was immobilized on porous carbonized polymer nanofibers to obtain a photocatalytic membrane without affecting photocatalytic efficiency. Furthermore, the membrane showed excellent photochemical stability and recyclability.With the deterioration of air quality, great efforts were devoted to designing various photocatalysts for effective removal of NOx in air. However, the present photocatalysts have a fatal problem of low photocatalytic efficiency. In this work, a hollow porous carbon nitride nanosphere coupled with reduced graphene oxide (HCNS/rGO) was exploited as a visible-light photocatalyst to remove nitrogen monoxide in air at a low concentration (600 ppb level) under irradiation of an energy saving lamp. HCNS/rGO showed a NO removal ratio of 64%, which was superior to that of most other visible-light photocatalysts. The excellent photocatalytic ability of HCNS/rGO originates from the hollow porous morphology of HCNS and the grafted rGO on the surface. HCNS/rGO was immobilized on porous carbonized polymer nanofibers to obtain a photocatalytic membrane without affecting photocatalytic efficiency. Furthermore, the membrane showed excellent photochemical stability and recyclability. Electronic supplementary information

  12. Constructing a novel carbon nitride/polyaniline/ZnO ternary heterostructure with enhanced photocatalytic performance using exfoliated carbon nitride nanosheets as supports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandiselvi, Kannusamy; Fang, Huaifang; Huang, Xiubo; Wang, Jingyu; Xu, Xiaochan; Li, Tao

    2016-08-15

    Graphitic carbon nitride (CN) is an emerging photocatalyst with promising prospect, but presently it still falls short on photocatalytic efficiency and photoresponsive range. We herein constructed a novel ternary heterostructure by hybridization of conducting polymer and semiconductor with CN. The exfoliated two dimension CN nanosheets (CN-NSs) are superior to bulk CN as both catalysts and supporting materials. Most recently, there are few reports involving the construction of heterojunction photocatalysts using CN-NSs as supports. The improvement of charge separation efficiency, specific surface area and visible light harvesting is simultaneously achieved in such a novel ternary heterostructure due to the synergetic effect of polyaniline (PANI) and ZnO coupling. As a result, the CN-NS/PANI/ZnO photocatalyst possesses excellent visible photocatalytic performance for MB and 4-CP degradation with a rate constant of 0.026 and 0.0049min(-1), which is about 3.6 and 3.3 times of CN, respectively. The enhanced mechanism is proposed based on the confirmation of OH and h(+) as main oxidative species. Overall, this work can not only yield high-efficient visible photocatalysts but also provide deeper insight into the enhanced mechanisms of CN-NS-based ternary heterostructure. PMID:27107237

  13. Wetting behaviour of carbon nitride nanostructures grown by plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Carbon nitride films were prepared by using radio frequency plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition system by altering the electrode distance. • The effect of electrode distance on surface morphology, surface roughness, chemical bonding and hydrophobic behaviour has been studied. • Hydrophobic behaviour were studied by measuring contact angle and calculating surface energy. • CNx nanostructures show super-hydrophobic behaviour. • We report a tunable transition of hydrophilic to super-hydrophobic behaviour of film as electrode distance is reduced. - Abstract: Tuning the wettability of various coating materials by simply controlling the deposition parameters is essential for various specific applications. In this work, carbon nitride (CNx) films were deposited on silicon (1 1 1) substrates using radio-frequency plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition employing parallel plate electrode configuration. Effects of varying the electrode distance (DE) on the films’ structure and bonding properties were investigated using Field emission scanning electron microscopy, Atomic force microscopy, Fourier transform infrared and X-ray photoemission spectroscopy. The wettability of the films was analyzed using water contact angle measurements. At high DE, the CNx films’ surface was smooth and uniform. This changed into fibrous nanostructures when DE was decreased. Surface roughness of the films increased with this morphological transformation. Nitrogen incorporation increased with decrease in DE which manifested the increase in both relative intensities of C=N to C=C and N−H to O−H bonds. sp2-C to sp3-C ratio increased as DE decreased due to greater deformation of sp2 bonded carbon at lower DE. The films’ characteristics changed from hydrophilic to super-hydrophobic with the decrease in DE. Roughness ratio, surface porosity and surface energy calculated from contact angle measurements were strongly dependent on the morphology, surface

  14. Dielectric response of carbon and boron nitride nanotubes from first-principles calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozinsky, Boris; Marzari, Nicola

    2007-03-01

    We present a complete characterization of the dielectric response of isolated single- and multi-wall carbon (CNT) and boron-nitride nanotubes (BNNT) using first-principles calculations and density-functional theory. The longitudinal polarizability of a nanotube is sensitive to the band gap and its radius, and in multi-wall nanotubes and bundles it is trivially given by the sum of the polarizabilities of the constituent tubes. The transverse polarizability of both types of nanotubes is insensitive to band gap and chirality and depends only on the radius. However, the transverse response and screening properties of BNNTs are qualitatively different from those of metallic and semiconducting CNTs. The fundamental differences in electronic properties of the two materials are inherited from the corresponding two-dimensional sheets - graphene and boron-nitride. The screening of the external field in CNTs is stronger than in BNNTs and has a different radius dependence. The transverse response in BNNTs is found to be that of an insulator, while in CNTs it is intermediate between metallic and semiconducting. Our results have practical implications for selective growth of different types of nanotubes using aligning electric fields and for Raman characterization of nanotubes.

  15. Magnetic graphitic carbon nitride anion exchanger for specific enrichment of phosphopeptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Gang-Tian; He, Xiao-Mei; Chen, Xi; Hussain, Dilshad; Ding, Jun; Feng, Yu-Qi

    2016-03-11

    Anion-exchange chromatography (AEX) is one of the chromatography-based methods effectively being used for phosphopeptide enrichment. However, the development of AEX materials with high specificity toward phosphopeptides is still less explored as compared to immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC) or metal oxide affinity chromatography (MOAC). In this work, magnetic graphitic carbon nitride (MCN) was successfully prepared and introduced as a promising AEX candidate for phosphopeptide enrichment. Due to the extremely abundant content of nitrogen with basic functionality on the surface, this material kept excellent retention for phosphopeptides at pH as low as 1.8. Benefiting from the large binding capacity at such low pH, MCN showed remarkable specificity to capture phosphopeptides from tryptic digests of standard protein mixtures as well as nonfat milk and human serum. In addition, MCN was also applied to selective enrichment of phosphopeptides from the tryptic digests of rat brain lysate and 2576 unique phosphopeptides were successfully identified. PMID:26884140

  16. Influence of oxygen impurity on electronic properties of carbon and boron nitride nanotubes: A comparative study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Ram Sevak, E-mail: singh915@gmail.com [Department of Physics, National Institute of TechnologyKurukshetra 136119 (Haryana) (India)

    2015-11-15

    Influence of oxygen impurity on electronic properties of carbon and boron nitride nanotubes (CNTs and BNNTs) is systematically studied using first principle calculations based on density functional theory. Energy band structures and density of states of optimized zigzag (5, 0), armchair (3, 3), and chiral (4, 2) structures of CNT and BNNT are calculated. Oxygen doping in zigzag CNT exhibits a reduction in metallicity with opening of band gap in near-infrared region while metallicity is enhanced in armchair and chiral CNTs. Unlike oxygen-doped CNTs, energy bands are drastically modulated in oxygen-doped zigzag and armchair BNNTs, showing the nanotubes to have metallic behaviour. Furthermore, oxygen impurity in chiral BNNT induces narrowing of band gap, indicating a gradual modification of electronic band structure. This study underscores the understanding of different electronic properties induced in CNTs and BNNTs under oxygen doping, and has potential in fabrication of various nanoelectronic devices.

  17. Influence of oxygen impurity on electronic properties of carbon and boron nitride nanotubes: A comparative study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Influence of oxygen impurity on electronic properties of carbon and boron nitride nanotubes (CNTs and BNNTs) is systematically studied using first principle calculations based on density functional theory. Energy band structures and density of states of optimized zigzag (5, 0), armchair (3, 3), and chiral (4, 2) structures of CNT and BNNT are calculated. Oxygen doping in zigzag CNT exhibits a reduction in metallicity with opening of band gap in near-infrared region while metallicity is enhanced in armchair and chiral CNTs. Unlike oxygen-doped CNTs, energy bands are drastically modulated in oxygen-doped zigzag and armchair BNNTs, showing the nanotubes to have metallic behaviour. Furthermore, oxygen impurity in chiral BNNT induces narrowing of band gap, indicating a gradual modification of electronic band structure. This study underscores the understanding of different electronic properties induced in CNTs and BNNTs under oxygen doping, and has potential in fabrication of various nanoelectronic devices

  18. Invisible Security Ink Based on Water-Soluble Graphitic Carbon Nitride Quantum Dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Zhiping; Lin, Tianran; Lin, Lihua; Lin, Sen; Fu, Fengfu; Wang, Xinchen; Guo, Liangqia

    2016-02-18

    Stimuli-responsive photoluminescent (PL) materials have been widely used as fluorescent ink for data security applications. However, traditional fluorescent inks are limited in maintaining the secrecy of information because the inks are usually visible by naked eyes either under ambient light or UV-light illumination. Here, we introduced metal-free water-soluble graphitic carbon nitride quantum dots (g-CNQDs) as invisible security ink for information coding, encryption, and decryption. The information written by the g-CNQDs is invisible in ambient light and UV light, but it can be readable by a fluorescence microplate reader. Moreover, the information can be encrypted and decrypted by using oxalic acid and sodium bicarbonate as encryption reagent and decryption reagent, respectively. Our findings provide new opportunities for high-level information coding and protection by using water-soluble g-CNQDs as invisible security ink. PMID:26797811

  19. Photocatalytically Active Oligomeric Graphitic Carbon Nitride: Conformational Flexibility, Electronic Levels, Carrier Localization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, Volker; Lau, Vincent; Botari, Tiago; Huhn, William; Lotsch, Bettina V.

    2015-03-01

    Polymers consisting of bridged heptazine units (often called ``graphitic carbon nitride'' or ``g-C3N4'') show considerable promise as photocatalysts for solar hydrogen evolution. Recent experimental evidence suggests that oligomeric rather than fully polymerized ``g-C3N4'' exhibits increased intrinsic photocatalytic activity. Using density-functional theory (DFT; van der Waals corrected PBE functional for conformers, hybrid DFT and GW for electronic levels), we show that considerable conformational flexibility exists for the heptazine trimers and tetramers. Analysis of HOMO and LUMO locations as well as trends in photocatalytic activity among heptazine oligomers and polymers reveals the NH2 groups of the oligomers as potential charge-transfer sites. We show that conformational variations of the oligomers can lead to significant, electrostatically motivated carrier localization effects. We suggest that NH2 side groups and the intrinsic conformational variations of the oligomeric species lead to the observed enhanced catalytic activity.

  20. Influence of oxygen impurity on electronic properties of carbon and boron nitride nanotubes: A comparative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ram Sevak Singh

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Influence of oxygen impurity on electronic properties of carbon and boron nitride nanotubes (CNTs and BNNTs is systematically studied using first principle calculations based on density functional theory. Energy band structures and density of states of optimized zigzag (5, 0, armchair (3, 3, and chiral (4, 2 structures of CNT and BNNT are calculated. Oxygen doping in zigzag CNT exhibits a reduction in metallicity with opening of band gap in near-infrared region while metallicity is enhanced in armchair and chiral CNTs. Unlike oxygen-doped CNTs, energy bands are drastically modulated in oxygen-doped zigzag and armchair BNNTs, showing the nanotubes to have metallic behaviour. Furthermore, oxygen impurity in chiral BNNT induces narrowing of band gap, indicating a gradual modification of electronic band structure. This study underscores the understanding of different electronic properties induced in CNTs and BNNTs under oxygen doping, and has potential in fabrication of various nanoelectronic devices.

  1. CMOS Humidity Sensor System Using Carbon Nitride Film as Sensing Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaestagir Chowdhury

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available An integrated humidity sensor system with nano-structured carbon nitride film as humidity sensing material is fabricated by a 0.8 μm analog mixed CMOS process. The integrated sensor system consists of differential humidity sensitive field effect transistors (HUSFET, temperature sensor, and operational amplifier. The process contains two poly, two metal and twin well technology. To form CNx film on Si3N4/Si substrate, plasma etching is performed to the gate area as well as trenches. CNx film is deposited by reactive RF magnetron sputtering method and patterned by the lift-off technique. The drain current is proportional to the dielectric constant, and the sensitivity is 2.8 ㎂/%RH.

  2. Ultra fine carbon nitride nanocrystals synthesized by laser ablation in liquid solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crystalline carbon nitride nanopowders and nanorods have been successfully synthesized at room temperature and pressure using the novel technique of pulsed laser ablation of a graphite target in liquid ammonia solution. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), selected area electron diffraction (SAED), and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) were used to systematically study the morphology, nanostructure and chemical bonding. The experimental composition and structure of the nanoparticles are consistent with the theoretical calculations for α-C3N4. After 2 h ablation the particles had a size distribution ∼8-12 nm, whereas after 5 h ablation the particles had grown into nanorod-like structures with a crystalline C3N4 tip. A formation mechanism for these nanorods is proposed whereby nanoparticles are first synthesized via rapid formation of an embryonic particle, followed by a slow growth, eventually leading to a one-dimensional nanorod structure

  3. Boron Nitride Coated Carbon Nanotube Arrays with Enhanced Compressive Mechanical Property

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Lin; Tay, Roland Yingjie; Li, Hongling; Tsang, Siu Hon; Tan, Dunlin; Zhang, Bowei; Tok, Alfred Iing Yoong; Teo, Edwin Hang Tong

    Vertically aligned carbon nanotube (CNT) array is one of the most promising energy dissipating materials due to its excellent temperature invariant mechanical property. However, the CNT arrays with desirable recoverability after compression is still a challenge. Here, we report on the mechanical enhancement of the CNT arrays reinforced by coating with boron nitride (BN) layers. These BN coated CNT (BN/CNT) arrays exhibit excellent compressive strength and recoverability as compared to those of the as-prepared CNT arrays which totally collapsed after compression. In addition, the BN coating also provides better resistance to oxidation due to its intrinsic thermal stability. This work presented here opens a new pathway towards tuning mechanical behavior of any arbitrary CNT arrays for promising potential such as damper, vibration isolator and shock absorber applications.

  4. Interacting Carbon Nitride and Titanium Carbide Nanosheets for High-Performance Oxygen Evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Tian Yi; Cao, Jian Liang; Jaroniec, Mietek; Qiao, Shi Zhang

    2016-01-18

    Free-standing flexible films, constructed from two-dimensional graphitic carbon nitride and titanium carbide (with MXene phase) nanosheets, display outstanding activity and stability in catalyzing the oxygen-evolution reaction in alkaline aqueous system, which originates from the Ti-N(x) motifs acting as electroactive sites, and the hierarchically porous structure with highly hydrophilic surface. With this excellent electrocatalytic ability, comparable to that of the state-of-the-art precious-/transition-metal catalysts and superior to that of most free-standing films reported to date, they are directly used as efficient cathodes in rechargeable zinc-air batteries. Our findings reveal that the rational interaction between different two-dimensional materials can remarkably promote the oxygen electrochemistry, thus boosting the entire clean energy system. PMID:26629779

  5. Harvesting solar light with crystalline carbon nitrides for efficient photocatalytic hydrogen evolution

    KAUST Repository

    Bhunia, Manas Kumar

    2014-08-14

    Described herein is the photocatalytic hydrogen evolution using crystalline carbon nitrides (CNs) obtained by supramolecular aggregation followed by ionic melt polycondensation (IMP) using melamine and 2,4,6-triaminopyrimidine as a dopant. The solid state NMR spectrum of 15N-enriched CN confirms the triazine as a building unit. Controlling the amount and arrangements of dopants in the CN structure can dramatically enhance the photocatalytic performance for H2 evolution. The polytriazine imide (PTI) exhibits the apparent quantum efficiency (AQE) of 15% at 400 nm. This method successfully enables a substantial amount of visible light to be harvested for H2 evolution, and provides a promising route for the rational design of a variety of highly active crystalline CN photocatalysts. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Turbostratic-like carbon nitride coatings deposited by industrial-scale direct current magnetron sputtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon nitride thin films were deposited by direct current magnetron sputtering in an industrial-scale equipment at different deposition temperatures and substrate bias voltages. The films had N/(N + C) atomic fractions between 0.2 and 0.3 as determined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Raman spectroscopy provided insight into the ordering and extension of the graphite-like clusters, whereas nanoindentation revealed information on the mechanical properties of the films. The internal compressive film stress was evaluated from the substrate bending method. At low deposition temperatures the films were amorphous, whereas the film deposited at approximately 380 °C had a turbostratic-like structure as confirmed by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy images. The turbostratic-like film had a highly elastic response when subjected to nanoindentation. When a CrN interlayer was deposited between the film and the substrate, XPS and Raman spectroscopy indicated that the turbostratic-like structure was maintained. However, it was inconclusive whether the film still exhibited an extraordinary elastic recovery. An increased substrate bias voltage, without additional heating and without deposition of an interlayer, resulted in a structural ordering, although not to the extent of a turbostratic-like structure. - Highlights: • Carbon nitride films were deposited by industrial-scale magnetron sputtering. • The deposition temperature and the substrate bias voltage were varied. • A turbostratic-like structure was obtained at an elevated deposition temperature. • The turbostratic-like film exhibited a very high elastic recovery. • The influence of a CrN interlayer on the film properties was investigated

  7. Synthesis of carbon nitride powder by selective etching of TiC0.3N0.7 in chlorine-containing atmosphere at moderate temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We reported the synthesis of carbon nitride powder by extracting titanium from single inorganic precursor TiC0.3N0.7 in chlorine-containing atmosphere at ambient pressure and temperature not exceeding 500 deg. C. The TiC0.3N0.7 crystalline structure acted as a template, supplying active carbon and nitrogen atoms for carbon nitride when it was destroyed in chlorination. X-ray diffraction data showed that the obtained carbon nitride powders were amorphous, which was in good agreement with transmission electron microscope analysis. The composition and structure of carbon nitride powders were analyzed by employing Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Results indicated that disorder structure was most likely for the carbon nitride powders and the N content depended greatly on the chlorination temperature. Thermal analysis in flowing N2 indicated that the mass loss started from 300 deg. C and the complete decomposition occurred at around 650 deg. C, confirming the low thermal stability of the carbon nitride material.

  8. Nano-solenoid: helicoid carbon-boron nitride hetero-nanotube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zi-Yue; Miao, Chunyang; Guo, Wanlin

    2013-11-01

    As a fundamental element of a nanoscale passive circuit, a nano-inductor is proposed based on a hetero-nanotube consisting of a spiral carbon strip and a spiral boron nitride strip. It is shown by density functional theory associated with nonequilibrium Green function calculations that the nanotube exhibits attractive transport properties tunable by tube chirality, diameter, component proportion and connection manner between the two strips, with excellent `OFF' state performance and high current on the order of 10-100 μA. All the hetero-nanotubes show negative differential resistance. The transmission peaks of current are absolutely derived from the helicoid carbon strips or C-BN boundaries, giving rise to a spiral current analogous with an energized nano-solenoid. According to Ampere's Law, the energized nano-solenoid can generate a uniform and tremendous magnetic field of more than 1 tesla, closing to that generated by the main magnet of medical nuclear magnetic resonance. Moreover, the magnitude of magnetic field can be easily modulated by bias voltage, providing great promise for a nano-inductor to realize electromagnetic conversion at the nanoscale.As a fundamental element of a nanoscale passive circuit, a nano-inductor is proposed based on a hetero-nanotube consisting of a spiral carbon strip and a spiral boron nitride strip. It is shown by density functional theory associated with nonequilibrium Green function calculations that the nanotube exhibits attractive transport properties tunable by tube chirality, diameter, component proportion and connection manner between the two strips, with excellent `OFF' state performance and high current on the order of 10-100 μA. All the hetero-nanotubes show negative differential resistance. The transmission peaks of current are absolutely derived from the helicoid carbon strips or C-BN boundaries, giving rise to a spiral current analogous with an energized nano-solenoid. According to Ampere's Law, the energized nano

  9. Encapsulation of cisplatin as an anti-cancer drug into boron-nitride and carbon nanotubes: Molecular simulation and free energy calculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roosta, Sara; Hashemianzadeh, Seyed Majid; Ketabi, Sepideh

    2016-10-01

    Encapsulation of cisplatin anticancer drug into the single walled (10, 0) carbon nanotube and (10, 0) boron-nitride nanotube was investigated by quantum mechanical calculations and Monte Carlo Simulation in aqueous solution. Solvation free energies and complexation free energies of the cisplatin@ carbon nanotube and cisplatin@ boron-nitride nanotube complexes was determined as well as radial distribution functions of entitled compounds. Solvation free energies of cisplatin@ carbon nanotube and cisplatin@ boron-nitride nanotube were -4.128kcalmol(-1) and -2457.124kcalmol(-1) respectively. The results showed that cisplatin@ boron-nitride nanotube was more soluble species in water. In addition electrostatic contribution of the interaction of boron- nitride nanotube complex and solvent was -281.937kcalmol(-1) which really more than Van der Waals and so the electrostatic interactions play a distinctive role in the solvation free energies of boron- nitride nanotube compounds. On the other hand electrostatic part of the interaction of carbon nanotube complex and solvent were almost the same as Van der Waals contribution. Complexation free energies were also computed to study the stability of related structures and the free energies were negative (-374.082 and -245.766kcalmol(-1)) which confirmed encapsulation of drug into abovementioned nanotubes. However, boron-nitride nanotubes were more appropriate for encapsulation due to their larger solubility in aqueous solution. PMID:27287103

  10. 非晶碳氮纳米尖端的微结构和发光机理%Microstructure and Photoluminescence Mechanism of Amorphous Carbon Nitride Nanotips

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王必本; 谢焕玲; 陈玉安; 董国波

    2012-01-01

    利用等离子体增强热丝化学气相沉积系统,用CH4、H2和N2为反应气体,在Si衬底上制备了碳氮纳米尖端.用扫描电子显微镜和显微Raman光谱仪对其进行了表征.在室温下测试了它的发光性能,发光谱由中心约为406 nm和506 nm的两条发光带组成.根据Raman散射谱,对其微结构进行了分析.结合非晶碳氮薄膜的结构和发光机理,分析了它的发光性能.%Carbon nitride nanotips were prepared on silicon substrate in plasma-enhanced hot fila ment chemical vapor deposition system, in which methane, hydrogen and nitrogen were used as the reaction gases. The carbon nitride nanotips were characterized by scanning electron microscopy and micro-Raman spectroscopy. The photoluminescence of the carbon nitride nanotips was measured at room temperature and the photoluminescence spectrum shows two emission bands at 406 and 506 nm. Combined with the Raman spectrum, the microstructure of the carbon nitride was analyzed. Ac cording to the structure and photoluminescence mechanism of amorphous carbon nitride films, the photoluminescence of carbon nitride nanotips was studied.

  11. Carbon nitride films by RF plasma assisted PLD: Spectroscopic and electronic analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon nitride (CNx) thin films have been grown on Si by 193 nm ArF ns pulsed laser ablation of a pure graphite target in a low pressure atmosphere of a RF generated N2 plasma and compared with samples grown by PLD in pure nitrogen atmosphere. Composition, structure and bonding of the deposited materials have been evaluated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and Raman scattering. Significant chemical and micro-structural changes have been registered, associated to different nitrogen incorporation in the two types of films analyzed. The intensity of the reactive activated species is, indeed, increased by the presence of the bias confined RF plasma, as compared to the bare nitrogen atmosphere, thus resulting in a different nitrogen uptake in the growing films. The process has been also investigated by some preliminary optical emission studies of the carbon plume expanding in the nitrogen atmosphere. Optical emission spectroscopy reveals the presence of many excited species like C+ ions, C atoms, C2, N2; and CN radicals, and N2+ molecular ions, whose relative intensity appears to be increased in the presence of the RF plasma. The films were also characterised for electrical properties by the 'four-probe-test method' determining sheet resistivity and correlating surface conductivity with chemical composition.

  12. Synthesis and characterization of thin films of nitrided amorphous carbon deposited by laser ablation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this work is the synthesis and characterization of thin films of amorphous carbon (a-C) and thin films of nitrided amorphous carbon (a-C-N) using the laser ablation technique for their deposit. For this purpose, the physical properties of the obtained films were studied as function of diverse parameters of deposit such as: nitrogen pressure, power density, substrate temperature and substrate-target distance. For the characterization of the properties of the deposited thin films the following techniques were used: a) Raman spectroscopy which has demonstrated being a sensitive technique to the sp2 and sp3 bonds content, b) Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy which allows to know semi-quantitatively way the presence of the elements which make up the deposited films, c) Spectrophotometry, for obtaining the absorption spectra and subsequently the optical energy gap of the deposited material, d) Ellipsometry for determining the refraction index, e) Scanning Electron Microscopy for studying the surface morphology of thin films and, f) Profilemetry, which allows the determination the thickness of the deposited thin films. (Author)

  13. Coaxial carbon@boron nitride nanotube arrays with enhanced thermal stability and compressive mechanical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Lin; Tay, Roland Yingjie; Li, Hongling; Tsang, Siu Hon; Huang, Jingfeng; Tan, Dunlin; Zhang, Bowei; Teo, Edwin Hang Tong; Tok, Alfred Iing Yoong

    2016-06-01

    Vertically aligned carbon nanotube (CNT) arrays have aroused considerable interest because of their remarkable mechanical properties. However, the mechanical behaviour of as-synthesized CNT arrays could vary drastically at a macro-scale depending on their morphologies, dimensions and array density, which are determined by the synthesis method. Here, we demonstrate a coaxial carbon@boron nitride nanotube (C@BNNT) array with enhanced compressive strength and shape recoverability. CNT arrays are grown using a commercially available thermal chemical vapor deposition (TCVD) technique and an outer BNNT with a wall thickness up to 1.37 nm is introduced by a post-growth TCVD treatment. Importantly, compared to the as-grown CNT arrays which deform almost plastically upon compression, the coaxial C@BNNT arrays exhibit an impressive ∼4-fold increase in compressive strength with nearly full recovery after the first compression cycle at a 50% strain (76% recovery maintained after 10 cycles), as well as a significantly high and persistent energy dissipation ratio (∼60% at a 50% strain after 100 cycles), attributed to the synergistic effect between the CNT and outer BNNT. Additionally, the as-prepared C@BNNT arrays show an improved structural stability in air at elevated temperatures, attributing to the outstanding thermal stability of the outer BNNT. This work provides new insights into tailoring the mechanical and thermal behaviours of arbitrary CNT arrays which enables a broader range of applications. PMID:27227818

  14. Metal-functionalized single-walled graphitic carbon nitride nanotubes: a first-principles study on magnetic property

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shenoy Vivek

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The magnetic properties of metal-functionalized graphitic carbon nitride nanotubes were investigated based on first-principles calculations. The graphitic carbon nitride nanotube can be either ferromagnetic or antiferromagnetic by functionalizing with different metal atoms. The W- and Ti-functionalized nanotubes are ferromagnetic, which are attributed to carrier-mediated interactions because of the coupling between the spin-polarized d and p electrons and the formation of the impurity bands close to the band edges. However, Cr-, Mn-, Co-, and Ni-functionalized nanotubes are antiferromagnetic because of the anti-alignment of the magnetic moments between neighboring metal atoms. The functionalized nanotubes may be used in spintronics and hydrogen storage.

  15. Effects of applied radio frequency power on low-temperature catalytic-free nanostructured carbon nitride films by rf PECVD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritikos, Richard; Othman, Maisara; Abdul Rahman, Saadah

    2016-06-01

    Low-temperature catalytic-free carbon nitride, CN x nanostructured thin films were produced by using radio frequency (rf) plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition employing a parallel-plate electrode configuration. The effects of varying applied rf power, P rf (30-100 W), on the formation of these structures were studied. Aligned nanostructured CN x films were produced at P rf as low as 40 W, but uniform highly vertical-aligned CN x nanorods were produced at P rf of 60 and 80 W. This was induced by the presence of high ion bombardment on the growing films and the preferential bonding of isonitrile to aromatic bonds in the nanostructures. It was also observed that nitrogen incorporation is highest in this range and the structure and bonding in the nanostructure reflects those of typical polymeric/amorphous carbon nitride films.

  16. The thermal conductivity of embedded nano-aluminum nitride-doped multi-walled carbon nanotubes in epoxy composites containing micro-aluminum nitride particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amino-functionalized nano-aluminum nitride (nano-AlN) particles were doped onto the surfaces of chlorinated multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) to act as fillers in thermally conducting composites. These synthesized materials were embedded in epoxy resin. Then, the untreated micro-aluminum nitride (micro-AlN) particles were added to this resin, whereby the composites filled with nano-AlN-doped MWCNTs (0, 0.5, 1, 1.5, 2 wt%) and micro-AlN (25.2, 44.1, 57.4 vol%) were fabricated. As a result, the thermal diffusivity and conductivity of all composites continuously improved with increasing nano-AlN-doped MWCNT content and micro-AlN filler loading. The thermal conductivity reached its maximum, which was 31.27 times that of the epoxy alone, when 2 wt% nano-AlN-doped MWCNTs and 57.4 vol% micro-AlN were added to the epoxy resin. This result is due to the high aspect ratio of the MWCNTs and the surface polarity of the doped nano-AlN and micro-AlN particles, resulting in the improved thermal properties of the epoxy composite. (paper)

  17. The thermal conductivity of embedded nano-aluminum nitride-doped multi-walled carbon nanotubes in epoxy composites containing micro-aluminum nitride particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Seran; Im, Hyungu; Kim, Jooheon

    2012-02-01

    Amino-functionalized nano-aluminum nitride (nano-AlN) particles were doped onto the surfaces of chlorinated multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) to act as fillers in thermally conducting composites. These synthesized materials were embedded in epoxy resin. Then, the untreated micro-aluminum nitride (micro-AlN) particles were added to this resin, whereby the composites filled with nano-AlN-doped MWCNTs (0, 0.5, 1, 1.5, 2 wt%) and micro-AlN (25.2, 44.1, 57.4 vol%) were fabricated. As a result, the thermal diffusivity and conductivity of all composites continuously improved with increasing nano-AlN-doped MWCNT content and micro-AlN filler loading. The thermal conductivity reached its maximum, which was 31.27 times that of the epoxy alone, when 2 wt% nano-AlN-doped MWCNTs and 57.4 vol% micro-AlN were added to the epoxy resin. This result is due to the high aspect ratio of the MWCNTs and the surface polarity of the doped nano-AlN and micro-AlN particles, resulting in the improved thermal properties of the epoxy composite.

  18. Unique Static Magnetic and Dynamic Electromagnetic Behaviors in Titanium Nitride/Carbon Composites Driven by Defect Engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Chunhong Gong; Hongjie Meng; Xiaowei Zhao; Xuefeng Zhang; Laigui Yu; Jingwei Zhang; Zhijun Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Recently, the defect-induced static magnetic behaviours of nanomaterials have been a cutting-edge issue in diluted magnetic semiconductor materials. However, the dynamic magnetic properties of nanomaterials are commonly ignored if their bulk counterparts are non-magnetic. In the present research, titanium nitride-carbon (TiN/C) nanocomposites were found to exhibit both static and dynamic magnetic properties that vary in the opposite trend. Moreover, novel unconventional electromagnetic resona...

  19. Polymeric Graphitic Carbon Nitride Doped with CuO Dispersed on Dealuminated Clinoptilolite (CuO/HCP): Synthesis and Characterisation

    OpenAIRE

    Saheed Olalekan Sanni; Omoruyi Gold Idemudia

    2015-01-01

    CuO dispersed on dealuminated clinoptilolite (CuO/HCP) and further doped with polymeric graphitic carbon nitride (CuO/HCP-g-C3N4) was synthesized through 2 facile routes: precipitation method for CuO/HCP and impregnation through ultrasonication method for the hybrid composite material. The hybrid composite material crystalline phase, surface morphology, and structural and thermal properties were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersive X-r...

  20. Iron-Doped Carbon Nitride-Type Polymers as Homogeneous Organocatalysts for Visible Light-Driven Hydrogen Evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Lin-Feng; Wen, Ting; Xu, Jing-Yin; Zhai, Xin-Ping; Zhao, Min; Hu, Guo-Wen; Chen, Peng; Wang, Qiang; Zhang, Hao-Li

    2016-01-13

    Graphitic carbon nitrides have appeared as a new type of photocatalyst for water splitting, but their broader and more practical applications are oftentimes hindered by the insolubility or difficult dispersion of the material in solvents. We herein prepared novel two-dimensional (2D) carbon nitride-type polymers doped by iron under a mild one-pot method through preorganizing formamide and citric acid precursors into supramolecular structures, which eventually polycondensed into a homogeneous organocatalyst for highly efficient visible light-driven hydrogen evolution with a rate of ∼16.2 mmol g(-1) h(-1) and a quantum efficiency of 0.8%. Laser photolysis and electrochemical impedance spectroscopic measurements suggested that iron-doping enabled strong electron coupling between the metal and the carbon nitride and formed unique electronic structures favoring electron mobilization along the 2D nanomaterial plane, which might facilitate the electron transfer process in the photocatalytic system and lead to efficient H2 evolution. In combination with electrochemical measurements, the electron transfer dynamics during water reduction were depicted, and the earth-abundant Fe-based catalyst may open a sustainable strategy for conversion of sunlight into hydrogen energy and cope with current challenging energy issues worldwide. PMID:26650485

  1. Formation of Silicon/Carbon Core-Shell Nanowires Using Carbon Nitride Nanorods Template and Gold Catalyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilyani Putri Jamal

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this experiment, silicon/carbon (Si/C core-shell nanowires (NWs were synthesized using gold nanoparticles (Au NPs coated carbon nitride nanorods (CN NRs as a template. To begin with, the Au NPs coated CN NRs were prepared by using plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition assisted with hot-wire evaporation technique. Fourier transform infrared spectrum confirms the C–N bonding of the CN NRs, while X-ray diffraction pattern indicates the crystalline structure of the Au NPs and amorphous structure of the CN NRs. The Au NPs coated CN NRs were thermally annealed at temperature of 800°C in nitrogen ambient for one hour to induce the growth of Si/C core-shell NWs. The growth mechanism for the Si/C core-shell NWs is related to the nitrogen evolution and solid-liquid-solid growth process which is a result of the thermal annealing. The formation of Si/C core-shell NWs is confirmed by electron spectroscopic imaging analysis.

  2. Transition-metal embedded carbon nitride monolayers: high-temperature ferromagnetism and half-metallicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhuri, Indrani; Kumar, Sourabh; Mahata, Arup; Rawat, Kuber Singh; Pathak, Biswarup

    2016-07-01

    High-temperature ferromagnetic materials with planar surfaces are promising candidates for spintronics applications. Using state-of-the-art density functional theory (DFT) calculations, transition metal (TM = Cr, Mn, and Fe) incorporated graphitic carbon nitride (TM@gt-C3N4) systems are investigated as possible spintronics devices. Interestingly, ferromagnetism and half-metallicity were observed in all of the TM@gt-C3N4 systems. We find that Cr@gt-C3N4 is a nearly half-metallic ferromagnetic material with a Curie temperature of ~450 K. The calculated Curie temperature is noticeably higher than other planar 2D materials studied to date. Furthermore, it has a steel-like mechanical stability and also possesses remarkable dynamic and thermal (500 K) stability. The calculated magnetic anisotropy energy (MAE) in Cr@gt-C3N4 is as high as 137.26 μeV per Cr. Thereby, such material with a high Curie temperature can be operated at high temperatures for spintronics devices.High-temperature ferromagnetic materials with planar surfaces are promising candidates for spintronics applications. Using state-of-the-art density functional theory (DFT) calculations, transition metal (TM = Cr, Mn, and Fe) incorporated graphitic carbon nitride (TM@gt-C3N4) systems are investigated as possible spintronics devices. Interestingly, ferromagnetism and half-metallicity were observed in all of the TM@gt-C3N4 systems. We find that Cr@gt-C3N4 is a nearly half-metallic ferromagnetic material with a Curie temperature of ~450 K. The calculated Curie temperature is noticeably higher than other planar 2D materials studied to date. Furthermore, it has a steel-like mechanical stability and also possesses remarkable dynamic and thermal (500 K) stability. The calculated magnetic anisotropy energy (MAE) in Cr@gt-C3N4 is as high as 137.26 μeV per Cr. Thereby, such material with a high Curie temperature can be operated at high temperatures for spintronics devices. Electronic supplementary information (ESI

  3. Graphitic carbon nitride nanosheet-based multicolour fluorescent nanoprobe for multiplexed analysis of DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We demonstrate that nanosheets composed of graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3N4) can serve as a low-cost and efficient fluorescent nanoprobe for the multiplexed detection of DNA in solution. The strategy is based on the finding that g-C3N4 is capable of binding dye-labeled single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) which results in quenching of the fluorescence of the dye. If target DNA hybridizes with dye-labeled ssDNA, the interaction between dye-labeled ssDNA and g-C3N4 is weakened, and this results in desorption of the dsDNA from the surface of the g-C3N4 and in recovery of fluorescence. The large surface area of g-C3N4 nanosheets allows for simultaneous quenching of multicolor DNA probes labeled with different dyes, leading to the development of multiplexed DNA sensors for the detection of multiple DNA targets in a single solution. By using one 15-mer DNA fragment and one 18-mer DNA fragment as proof-of-principle analytes, the method displayed good analytical performance. The limits of detection are 75 and 62 pM, respectively. The method is simple and sensitive, and was used to detect DNA in serum samples. We perceive that this method represents a new approach towards multiplexed assays for applications in DNA monitoring, clinical diagnosis, and in the detection of genetic disorders. (author)

  4. Graphene-like carbon nitride layers: stability, porosity, band gaps, and magnetic ground states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chacham, Helio; da Silva-Araujo, Joice; Brito, Walber

    In the present work, we investigate the relative stability and electronic properties of carbon nitride (CxNy) graphene-like structures using a combination of a new bond-counting method and density-functional-theory (DFT) first-principles calculations. We obtain analytical and numerical results for the energetics and the morphology of graphene-like CxNy For instance, at high N concentrations, the bond-counting method allows us to search among millions of possible structures, and we find several ones with ab initio formation energies per N atom comparable to, or even smaller than, that of the isolated graphitic N impurity. Those structures are characterized by a variety of nanoporous graphene morphologies. The low-energy C-N structures also present a variety of band gaps, from zero to 1.6 eV, which can be tuned by stoichiometry and porosity. Several structures also present ferro- and antiferromagnetic ground states. We thank support from CNPq, CAPES, and FAPEMIG.

  5. Time-Resolved Study on Xanthene Dye-Sensitized Carbon Nitride Photocatalytic Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Huiyu; Li, Shuang; Lu, Rong; Yu, Anchi

    2015-10-01

    Dye sensitization is a promising strategy to extend the visible light absorption of carbon nitride (C3N4) and increase the photocatalytic hydrogen evolution efficiency of C3N4 under visible light irradiation. However, the interaction dynamics between C3N4 and a sensitized dye has not been reported in the literature. Herein, we selected four commonly used xanthene dyes such as fluorescein, dibromofluorescein, eosin Y, and erythrosine B and prepared their corresponding dye-sensitized-C3N4 composites. For the first time, we derived the electron transfer rate from the LUMO of each photoexcited xanthene dye to the conduction band of C3N4 using picoesecond time-resolved fluorescence measurements. We also obtained the reduction potentials of all selected xanthene dyes and C3N4 with cyclic voltammetry measurements. The cyclic voltammetry measurements gave a consistent result with the picosecond time-resolved fluorescence measurements. Besides, the possibility of the selected xanthene dye as an acceptor for the hole of the photoexcited C3N4 was also discussed. We believe this study is significant for the researcher to understanding the fundamental aspects in the xanthene dye-sensitized-C3N4 photocatalytic systems. PMID:26389679

  6. Carbon nitride nanotube as a sensor for alkali and alkaline earth cations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Adsorption of alkali and alkaline earth cations on a CN nanotube studied by DFT. ► The alkaline cation adsorption may raise potential barrier of the electron emission. ► The tube may act as a sensor in the presence of alkali and alkaline cations. - Abstract: Adsorption of several alkali (Li+, Na+, and K+) and alkaline earth (Be2+, Mg2+, and Ca2+) cations on the surface of a zigzag (9, 0) carbon nitride nanotube has been investigated using density functional theory. It has been found that almost all of the cations prefer to be strongly chemisorbed at the center of porous site of the tube surface. The adsorption of alkaline cations much more influences the electronic properties of the tube, in comparison with the alkali ones, so that it is transformed from an intrinsic semiconductor with HOMO/LUMO energy gap of 4.02 eV to extrinsic p-type one with the gap of 0.54–1.94 eV. The alkaline cation adsorption may significantly raise potential barrier of the electron emission from the tube surface, hence impeding the field emission. It has been also concluded that the electrical sensitivity of the tube toward the cations may be in the order: Be2+ ≫ Mg2+ ≫ Ca2+ ≫ Li+ ∼ Na+ ∼ K+.

  7. The investigation of carbon nitride films prepared at various arc currents by vacuum cathode arc method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The carbon nitride films have been prepared in the arc currents range of 20-60 A at the Ar/N2 atmosphere of 50/400 sccm by the vacuum cathode arc deposition method. The properties of the films were characterized by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and nanoindentation. The N concentration showed a maximum of 35 at% at 20 A and decreased gradually with the arc currents. The films below 40 A consisted of linear polymeric-like component and sp2 graphitic cluster. With the increasing of the arc current from 20 to 40 A, the ID/IG rose and the photoluminescence (PL) fell gradually, which resulted from the development of the sp2 graphitic phase and the decrease of the polymeric-like phase. As a result, the CC bonds increased and sp3CN and sp2CN decreased. Above 40 A, with the increasing of arc currents, ID/IG fell and the PL increased gradually, which reflected the decreasing of sp2 graphitic phase and the modification of C and N atoms in sp2 cluster. The CC bonds and sp3CN fell and the sp2CN rose. The nanohardness of films showed increasing tendency with the arc currents. The variation of the relative ratio and the average energy of N-containing species and C-containing species at the atmosphere would be responsible for the change in the properties of films. (author)

  8. Theoretical investigation of methane adsorption onto boron nitride and carbon nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoud Darvish Ganji, Amir Mirnejad and Ali Najafi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Methane adsorption onto single-wall boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs and carbon nanotubes (CNTs was studied using the density functional theory within the generalized gradient approximation. The structural optimization of several bonding configurations for a CH4 molecule approaching the outer surface of the (8,0 BNNT and (8,0 CNT shows that the CH4 molecule is preferentially adsorbed onto the CNT with a binding energy of −2.84 kcal mol−1. A comparative study of nanotubes with different diameters (curvatures reveals that the methane adsorptive capability for the exterior surface increases for wider CNTs and decreases for wider BNNTs. The introduction of defects in the BNNT significantly enhances methane adsorption. We also examined the possibility of binding a bilayer or a single layer of methane molecules and found that methane molecules preferentially adsorb as a single layer onto either BNNTs or CNTs. However, bilayer adsorption is feasible for CNTs and defective BNNTs and requires binding energies of −3.00 and −1.44 kcal mol−1 per adsorbed CH4 molecule, respectively. Our first-principles findings indicate that BNNTs might be an unsuitable material for natural gas storage.

  9. Detection of Ag(+) using graphite carbon nitride nanosheets based on fluorescence quenching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, Wei; Zhang, Hao; Yu, Qing; Shi, Meijuan; Shuang, Shaomin; Cai, Zongwei; Choi, Martin M F

    2016-12-01

    The graphite carbon nitride (g-C3N4) nanosheets were synthesized and applied for the detection of Ag(+) ion in aqueous solutions. Transmission electron microscopy, Fourier infrared spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction, ultraviolet/visible and photoluminescence spectroscopy were used for characterization of g-C3N4 nanosheets. The fluorescence intensity of g-C3N4 nanosheets decreases with the increase in the concentration of Ag(+). The fluorescence probe can be applied for detection of Ag(+). The results show that it has high selectivity to Ag(+) and exhibits a good linearity over the concentration range 0.020-2.0μM with a detection limit of 27nM. Most cations do not have any interference on the detection of Ag(+). The quenching process is assessed and discussed. Finally, the g-C3N4 nanosheets have been successfully used for the detection of Ag(+) in real water samples. The recoveries of spiked water samples are >97%. PMID:27348047

  10. Interior edges induced half-metallic ferromagnetism in graphitic carbon nitride structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We study the magnetic properties of graphitic carbon nitride, g-C4N3. A microscopic tight-binding model incorporated with the Hatree mean-field approach is adopted, showing that the g-C4N3 exhibits the significant ferromagnetism induced from the edge states. These edge states appearing on the zigzag boundaries not only ffdeorm the flat band but also upon proper hole doping provide the electrons with single polarized spin exciting to the Dirac linear bands and causes g-C4N3 half-metallic. The half-metallicity survives at room temperature and does not require strong Coulomb repulsion for induction. The ferromagnetism of these states yielding the half-metallicity refers to the broken or imperfectness of the honeycomb lattice structure; specifically, the ferromagnetic states are formed on the zigzag boundaries surrounding the vacancies in the imperfect (some lattice points being missed or removed) honeycomb lattice. We thus indicate that the half-metallicity should be generally reachable in materials of this kind of structure. - Author-Highlights: • The ferromagnetism of g-C4N3 is generated on the zigzag edges of imperfect honeycomb lattice. • The hole doped g-C4N3 is half-metallic at room temperature. • The half-metallicity of g-C4N3 prefers to be induced in stronger Coulomb repulsion

  11. Self-floating graphitic carbon nitride/zinc phthalocyanine nanofibers for photocatalytic degradation of contaminants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Tiefeng; Ni, Dongjing; Chen, Xia; Wu, Fei; Ge, Pengfei; Lu, Wangyang; Hu, Hongguang; Zhu, ZheXin; Chen, Wenxing

    2016-11-01

    The effective elimination of micropollutants by an environmentally friendly method has received extensive attention recently. In this study, a photocatalyst based on polyacrylonitrile (PAN)-supported graphitic carbon nitride coupled with zinc phthalocyanine nanofibers (g-C3N4/ZnTcPc/PAN nanofibers) was successfully prepared, where g-C3N4/ZnTcPc was introduced as the catalytic entity and the PAN nanofibers were employed as support to overcome the defects of easy aggregation and difficult recycling. Herein, rhodamine B (RhB), 4-chlorophenol and carbamazepine (CBZ) were selected as the model pollutants. Compared with the typical hydroxyl radical-dominated catalytic system, g-C3N4/ZnTcPc/PAN nanofibers displayed the targeted adsorption and degradation of contaminants under visible light or solar irradiation in the presence of high additive concentrations. According to the results of the radical scavenging techniques and the electron paramagnetic resonance technology, the degradation of target substrates was achieved by the attack of active species, including photogenerated hole, singlet oxygen, superoxide radicals and hydroxyl radicals. Based on the results of ultra-performance liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry, the role of free radicals on the photocatalytic degradation intermediates was identified and the final photocatalytic degradation products of both RhB and CBZ were some biodegradable small molecules. PMID:27239724

  12. Coaxial carbon@boron nitride nanotube arrays with enhanced thermal stability and compressive mechanical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Lin; Tay, Roland Yingjie; Li, Hongling; Tsang, Siu Hon; Huang, Jingfeng; Tan, Dunlin; Zhang, Bowei; Teo, Edwin Hang Tong; Tok, Alfred Iing Yoong

    2016-05-01

    Vertically aligned carbon nanotube (CNT) arrays have aroused considerable interest because of their remarkable mechanical properties. However, the mechanical behaviour of as-synthesized CNT arrays could vary drastically at a macro-scale depending on their morphologies, dimensions and array density, which are determined by the synthesis method. Here, we demonstrate a coaxial carbon@boron nitride nanotube (C@BNNT) array with enhanced compressive strength and shape recoverability. CNT arrays are grown using a commercially available thermal chemical vapor deposition (TCVD) technique and an outer BNNT with a wall thickness up to 1.37 nm is introduced by a post-growth TCVD treatment. Importantly, compared to the as-grown CNT arrays which deform almost plastically upon compression, the coaxial C@BNNT arrays exhibit an impressive ~4-fold increase in compressive strength with nearly full recovery after the first compression cycle at a 50% strain (76% recovery maintained after 10 cycles), as well as a significantly high and persistent energy dissipation ratio (~60% at a 50% strain after 100 cycles), attributed to the synergistic effect between the CNT and outer BNNT. Additionally, the as-prepared C@BNNT arrays show an improved structural stability in air at elevated temperatures, attributing to the outstanding thermal stability of the outer BNNT. This work provides new insights into tailoring the mechanical and thermal behaviours of arbitrary CNT arrays which enables a broader range of applications.Vertically aligned carbon nanotube (CNT) arrays have aroused considerable interest because of their remarkable mechanical properties. However, the mechanical behaviour of as-synthesized CNT arrays could vary drastically at a macro-scale depending on their morphologies, dimensions and array density, which are determined by the synthesis method. Here, we demonstrate a coaxial carbon@boron nitride nanotube (C@BNNT) array with enhanced compressive strength and shape recoverability

  13. Bond strengths of New Carbon-nitride-Related material C2N2(CH2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new carbon-nitride-related material C2N2(CH2) nanopletelet was synthesized by subjecting a precursor C3N4HxOy+Au in a laser-heating diamond anvil cell (LHDAC) to the pressure of 40 GPa and the temperature of 1200-2000 K. The synthesized C2N2(CH2) was accordingly found to be an orthorhombic unit cell of the space group Cmc21 with lattice constants a = 7.625Å, b = 4.490Å, and c = 4.047Å. The bulk modulus B0 was determined to be B0 = 258 ± 3.4 GPa, only the 60 % that of the diamond. C2N2(CH2) consists of the tetrahedrally coordinated C with three C-N single bond and the one C-C single bond, and the bridging carbon with the C-CH2-C bond. The C-N single bond length of the tetrahedron ranges from 1.444 to 1.503 Å. This bond length is close to the C-N single bond of 1.447 to 1.458 Å in the superhard β-C3N4. The compressibility of the C-N and C-C single bond of C2N2(CH2) ranges from 0.976 to 0.982 with the pressure of 30 GPa. These values are very close to the compressibility of the C-N and C-C single bond of 0.978 to 0.982 in β-C3N4, cubic-C3N4, and diamond.

  14. The effect of nitrogen incorporation on the bonding structure of hydrogenated carbon nitride films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work describes the composition and bonding structure of hydrogenated carbon nitride (a-CNx:H) films synthesized by electron cyclotron resonance chemical vapor deposition using as precursor gases argon, methane, and nitrogen. The composition of the films was derived from Rutherford backscattering and elastic recoil detection analysis and the bonding structure was examined by infrared (IR) spectroscopy and x-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy (XANES). By varying the nitrogen to methane ratio in the applied gas mixture, polymeric a-CNx:H films with N/C contents varying from 0.06 to 0.49 were obtained. Remarkably, the H content of the films (∼40 at. %) was rather unaffected by the nitrogenation process. The different bonding states as detected in the measured XANES C(1s) and N(1s) spectra have been correlated with those of a large number of reference samples. The XANES and IR spectroscopy results indicate that N atoms are efficiently incorporated into the amorphous carbon network and can be found in different bonding environments, such as pyridinelike, graphitelike, nitrilelike, and amino groups. The nitrogenation of the films results in the formation of N-H bonding environments at the cost of C-H structures. Also, the insertion of N induces a higher fraction of double bonds in the structure at the expense of the linear polymerlike chains, hence resulting in a more cross-linked solid. The formation of double bonds takes place through complex C=N structures and not by formation of graphitic aromatic rings. Also, the mechanical and tribological properties (hardness, friction, and wear) of the films have been studied as a function of the nitrogen content. Despite the major modifications in the bonding structure with nitrogen uptake, no significant changes in these properties are observed

  15. ERDA characterization of carbon nitride films deposited by hollow cathode discharge process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The interest in carbon nitride (CN) thin films stems from the theoretical work of Liu and Cohen predicting the extreme hardness of this material, comparable to or greater than that of diamond. The growth of CN thin films employing various deposition techniques such as plasma chemical vapor deposition, sputtering, laser ablation, ion assisted dynamic mixing and low energy ion implantation has been reported. This contribution presents some results about the characterization of CNx films using elastic recoil detection analysis (ERDA) technique. CN films were deposited on silicon substrates by electron beam evaporation of pure graphite in a nitrogen environment. A hollow cathode discharge in arc regime was used both for evaporating a graphite target and for generating a high density plasma in the vicinity of the substrate. The main deposition parameters were as follows: gas (N2) pressure, 10-2 - 5.10-2 mbar; hollow cathode discharge power, 2.5 - 5 kW; substrate negative bias voltage, 0-150 V; graphite evaporation rate, 0.08 - 0.2 g/min; deposition duration, 15-60 min. The ERDA measurements were carried out at the Tandem accelerator of IFIN-HH using a 63Cu10+ beam at 80 MeV. The samples were mounted in a scattering target chamber with a vacuum higher than 5 x 10-5 Torr. The detector consisted in a compact ΔE(gas)-E(solid) telescope, placed at 30 angle with respect to the beam. The elements of the main interests were C and N. The measured Δ E -E spectra for two samples prepared in different conditions are presented. A quantitative analysis of the C and N energy spectra using our program SURFAN have been carried out for the these samples. It shows that the nitrogen to carbon atomic concentration ratio is close to 0.3. The nitrogen content is lower than that expected for the ideal β - C3N4 solid. (authors)

  16. Tungsten nitride nanorods array grown on carbon cloth as an efficient hydrogen evolution cathode at all pH values

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is highly desired but still remains a challenging task to develop efficient non-noble-metal hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) electrocatalysts operating efficiently under all pH conditions. In this paper, tungsten nitride nanorods array was developed on carbon cloth (WN NA/CC) through nitridation of corresponding WO3 NA/CC precursor with NH3 as an efficient 3D hydrogen evolution cathode with strong durability in acidic solutions. It needs overpotential of 198 mV to achieve current density of 10 mA cm−2 and it maintains its catalytic activity for at least 60 h. This electrode also performs well under both neutral and alkaline conditions. In addition, this electrode shows nearly 100% Faradaic efficiency at all pH values

  17. Preparation and characterization of silicon nitride (Si−N)-coated carbon fibers and their effects on thermal properties in composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: We report preparation and characterization of silicon nitride (Si−N)-coated carbon fibers and their effects on thermal properties in composites. Thermally composites showed enhanced thermal conductivity increasing from up to 59% by the thermal network. - Highlights: • A new method of Si−N coating on carbon fibers was reported. • Silane layer were successfully converted to Si−N layer on carbon fiber surface. • Si−N formation was confirmed by FT-IR, XPS, and EDX. • Thermal conductivity of Si−N coated CF composites were enhanced to 0.59 W/mK. - Abstract: This study investigates the effect of silicon nitride (Si−N)-coated carbon fibers on the thermal conductivity of carbon-fiber-reinforced epoxy composite. The surface properties of the Si−N-coated carbon fibers (SiNCFs) were observe using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and the thermal stability was analyzed using thermogravimetric analysis. SiNCFs were fabricated through the wet thermal treatment of carbon fibers (Step 1: silane finishing of the carbon fibers; Step 2: high-temperature thermal treatment in a N2/NH3 environment). As a result, the Si−N belt was exhibited by SEM. The average thickness of the belt were 450–500 nm. The composition of Si−N was the mixture of Si−N, Si−O, and C−Si−N as confirmed by XPS. Thermal residue of the SiNCFs in air was enhanced from 3% to 50%. Thermal conductivity of the composites increased from 0.35 to 0.59 W/mK after Si−N coating on carbon surfaces

  18. Preparation and characterization of silicon nitride (Si−N)-coated carbon fibers and their effects on thermal properties in composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyeon-Hye [R& D Division, Korea Institute of Carbon Convergence Technology, Jeonju 561-844 (Korea, Republic of); Nano& Advanced Materials Engineering, Jeonju University, Jeonju 560-759 (Korea, Republic of); Han, Woong [R& D Division, Korea Institute of Carbon Convergence Technology, Jeonju 561-844 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Hae-seong [Nano& Advanced Materials Engineering, Jeonju University, Jeonju 560-759 (Korea, Republic of); Min, Byung-Gak [Department of Polymer Science & Engineering, Korea National University of Transportation, Chungju 380-702 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Byung-Joo, E-mail: ap2-kbj@hanmail.net [R& D Division, Korea Institute of Carbon Convergence Technology, Jeonju 561-844 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    Graphical abstract: We report preparation and characterization of silicon nitride (Si−N)-coated carbon fibers and their effects on thermal properties in composites. Thermally composites showed enhanced thermal conductivity increasing from up to 59% by the thermal network. - Highlights: • A new method of Si−N coating on carbon fibers was reported. • Silane layer were successfully converted to Si−N layer on carbon fiber surface. • Si−N formation was confirmed by FT-IR, XPS, and EDX. • Thermal conductivity of Si−N coated CF composites were enhanced to 0.59 W/mK. - Abstract: This study investigates the effect of silicon nitride (Si−N)-coated carbon fibers on the thermal conductivity of carbon-fiber-reinforced epoxy composite. The surface properties of the Si−N-coated carbon fibers (SiNCFs) were observe using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and the thermal stability was analyzed using thermogravimetric analysis. SiNCFs were fabricated through the wet thermal treatment of carbon fibers (Step 1: silane finishing of the carbon fibers; Step 2: high-temperature thermal treatment in a N{sub 2}/NH{sub 3} environment). As a result, the Si−N belt was exhibited by SEM. The average thickness of the belt were 450–500 nm. The composition of Si−N was the mixture of Si−N, Si−O, and C−Si−N as confirmed by XPS. Thermal residue of the SiNCFs in air was enhanced from 3% to 50%. Thermal conductivity of the composites increased from 0.35 to 0.59 W/mK after Si−N coating on carbon surfaces.

  19. Chemical bonding in hard and elastic amorphous carbon-nitride films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gammon, Wesley Jason

    In this study, the chemical bonding in hard and elastic amorphous carbon nitride (a-CNx) films is investigated with x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and 15N, 13C, and 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The films were deposited by DC Magnetron sputtering in a pure nitrogen discharge on Si(001) substrates at 300--400°C. Nanoindentation measurements reveal an elastic modulus of ˜50 GPa and a hardness of ˜5 GPa, thus confirming our films are highly elastic but resist plastic deformation. Our 13C NMR study demonstrates the absence of sp 3-bonded carbon in this material. Collectively, our N(1s) XPS, 13C NMR, and 15N NMR data suggest a film-bonding model that has an aromatic carbon structure with sp2-hybridized nitrogen incorporated in heterocyclic rings. We demonstrate that the nitrogen bonding is predominantly in configurations similar to those in pyridine and pyrrole. In addition, the data indicate that the a-CNx films prepared for this study have low hydrogen content, but are hydrophilic. Specifically, results from 15N and 13C cross polarization (CP) and 1H magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR experiments suggest that nitrogen sites are susceptible to protonation from water absorbed during sample preparation for the NMR experiments. The sensitivity of the surface of a-CNx to water absorption may impact tribological applications for this material. In accord with our XPS and NMR spectroscopic studies on a-CN x films, we propose a film-structure model consisting of buckled graphitic planes that are cross-linked together by sp2 hybridized carbons. The curvature and cross-linking is attributed to a type of compound defect, which is formed by placing a pentagon next to single-atom vacancy in a graphite layer. Our proposed film structure is called the pentagon-with-vacancy-defect (5VD) model. Using Hartree-Fock calculations, we show that the 5VD, film-structure model is compatible with our XPS, NMR, and nanoindentation measurements and with previous

  20. Investigation of the formation of Al, Fe, N intermetallic phases during Al pack cementation followed by plasma nitriding on plain carbon steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • The surface hardness is increased about eight times. • Increasing nitriding time and temperature caused strengthening the Al diffused zone. • The inward diffusion of nitrogen and outward diffusion of iron changed aluminized zone microstructure. • Surface aluminum oxides are reduced by plasma nitriding in low pressure chamber with nitrogen and hydrogen in gas mixture. - Abstract: Plain carbon steels are not suitable for nitriding as they form an extremely brittle case that spalls off readily, and the hardness increment of the diffusion zone is small. In this research, the effect of plasma nitriding time and temperature variation on the microstructure of the pack cemented aluminized plain carbon steel is investigated. All samples were aluminized at 900 °C for 2 h; the aluminized samples were subsequently plasma nitrided at 500 °C, 550 °C and 600 °C for 2.5, 5, 7.5 and 10 h. The phases formed on the sample surface were detected by X-ray diffraction (XRD). The cross section and samples surface were investigated by optical and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Microhardness test was conducted to determine hardness change from the surface to the sample core. Results showed that by aluminizing the steel, Fe3Al phases as well as Fe–Al solid solution were formed on the surface and some aluminum rich precipitates were formed in solid solution grain boundaries. Plasma nitriding of the aluminized layer caused the formation of aluminum and iron nitride (AlN, Fe4N) on the sample surface. Consequently, surface hardness was improved up to about eight times. By increasing the nitriding temperature and time, aluminum-rich precipitates dissociated. Moreover, due to the diffusion of nitrogen through aluminized region during ion nitriding, iron and aluminum nitrides were formed in aluminized grain boundaries. Increasing nitriding time and temperature lead to the growth of these nitrides in the grain boundaries of the substrate. This phenomenon results in

  1. Novel phosphorus doped carbon nitride modified TiO2 nanotube arrays with improved photoelectrochemical performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Jingyang; Geng, Ping; Li, Xinyong; Zhao, Qidong; Quan, Xie; Chen, Guohua

    2015-10-01

    Novel phosphorus-doped graphitic-carbon nitride (P-C3N4) modified vertically aligned TiO2 nanotube arrays (NTs) were designed and synthesized. They can significantly enhance the conduction and utilization of photogenerated charge carriers of TiO2 NTs. The heterostructure was successfully fabricated through a three-step process: electrochemical anodization and wet-dipping followed by thermal polymerization. The prepared P-C3N4/TiO2 NTs exhibit enhanced light-absorption characteristics and improved charge separation and transfer ability, thus resulting in a 3-fold photocurrent (1.98 mA cm-2 at 0 V vs. Ag/AgCl) compared with that of pure TiO2 NTs (0.66 mA cm-2 at 0 V vs. Ag/AgCl) in 1 M NaOH solution. The prepared P-C3N4/TiO2 NT photoelectrodes also present excellent photocatalytic and photoelectrocatalytic capabilities in the degradation of methylene blue (MB). The kinetic rate of P-C3N4/TiO2 NTs in the photoelectrocatalytic process for MB is 2.7 times that of pristine TiO2 NTs. Furthermore, the prepared sample was used as a photoanode for solar-driven water splitting, giving a H2 evolution rate of 36.6 μmol h-1 cm-2 at 1.0 V vs. RHE under simulated solar light illumination. This novel structure with a rational design for a visible light response shows potential for metal free materials in photoelectrochemical applications.Novel phosphorus-doped graphitic-carbon nitride (P-C3N4) modified vertically aligned TiO2 nanotube arrays (NTs) were designed and synthesized. They can significantly enhance the conduction and utilization of photogenerated charge carriers of TiO2 NTs. The heterostructure was successfully fabricated through a three-step process: electrochemical anodization and wet-dipping followed by thermal polymerization. The prepared P-C3N4/TiO2 NTs exhibit enhanced light-absorption characteristics and improved charge separation and transfer ability, thus resulting in a 3-fold photocurrent (1.98 mA cm-2 at 0 V vs. Ag/AgCl) compared with that of pure TiO2 NTs (0

  2. Carbon nitride nanotube as a sensor for alkali and alkaline earth cations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beheshtian, Javad [Department of Chemistry, Shahid Rajaee Teacher Training University, P.O. Box: 16875-163, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Baei, Mohammad T. [Department of Chemistry, Azadshahr Branch, Islamic Azad University, Azadshahr, Golestan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Bagheri, Zargham [Physics Group, Science Department, Islamic Azad University, Islamshahr Branch, P.O. Box: 33135-369, Islamshahr, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Peyghan, Ali Ahmadi, E-mail: ahmadi.iau@gmail.com [Young Researchers Club, Islamic Azad University, Islamshahr Branch, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Adsorption of alkali and alkaline earth cations on a CN nanotube studied by DFT. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The alkaline cation adsorption may raise potential barrier of the electron emission. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The tube may act as a sensor in the presence of alkali and alkaline cations. - Abstract: Adsorption of several alkali (Li{sup +}, Na{sup +}, and K{sup +}) and alkaline earth (Be{sup 2+}, Mg{sup 2+}, and Ca{sup 2+}) cations on the surface of a zigzag (9, 0) carbon nitride nanotube has been investigated using density functional theory. It has been found that almost all of the cations prefer to be strongly chemisorbed at the center of porous site of the tube surface. The adsorption of alkaline cations much more influences the electronic properties of the tube, in comparison with the alkali ones, so that it is transformed from an intrinsic semiconductor with HOMO/LUMO energy gap of 4.02 eV to extrinsic p-type one with the gap of 0.54-1.94 eV. The alkaline cation adsorption may significantly raise potential barrier of the electron emission from the tube surface, hence impeding the field emission. It has been also concluded that the electrical sensitivity of the tube toward the cations may be in the order: Be{sup 2+} Much-Greater-Than Mg{sup 2+} Much-Greater-Than Ca{sup 2+} Much-Greater-Than Li{sup +} {approx} Na{sup +} {approx} K{sup +}.

  3. Novel band gap-tunable K–Na co-doped graphitic carbon nitride prepared by molten salt method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: K and Na ions co-doped into g-C3N4 crystal lattice can tune the position of CB and VB potentials, influence the structural and optical properties, and thus improve the photocatalytic degradation and mineralization ability. - Highlights: • K, Na co-doped g-C3N4 was prepared in KCl/NaCl molten salt system. • The structural and optical properties of g-C3N4 were greatly influenced by co-doping. • The position of VB and CB can be tuned by controlling the weight ratio of eutectic salts to melamine. • Co-doped g-C3N4 showed outstanding photodegradation ability, mineralization ability, and catalytic stability. - Abstract: Novel band gap-tunable K–Na co-doped graphitic carbon nitride was prepared by molten salt method using melamine, KCl, and NaCl as precursor. X-ray diffraction (XRD), N2 adsorption, Scanning electron microscope (SEM), UV–vis spectroscopy, Photoluminescence (PL), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were used to characterize the prepared catalysts. The CB and VB potentials of graphitic carbon nitride could be tuned from −1.09 and +1.55 eV to −0.29 and +2.25 eV by controlling the weight ratio of eutectic salts to melamine. Besides, ions doping inhibited the crystal growth of graphitic carbon nitride, enhanced the surface area, and increased the separation rate of photogenerated electrons and holes. The visible-light-driven Rhodamine B (RhB) photodegradation and mineralization performances were significantly improved after K–Na co-doping

  4. Novel band gap-tunable K–Na co-doped graphitic carbon nitride prepared by molten salt method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Jiannan [Institute of Eco-environmental Sciences, Liaoning Shihua University, Fushun 113001 (China); School of Environmental and Biological Engineering, Liaoning Shihua University, Fushun 113001 (China); Ma, Lin [School of Petrochemical Engineering, Liaoning Shihua University, Fushun 113001 (China); Wang, Haoying; Zhao, Yanfeng [School of Environmental and Biological Engineering, Liaoning Shihua University, Fushun 113001 (China); Zhang, Jian [School of Petrochemical Engineering, Liaoning Shihua University, Fushun 113001 (China); Hu, Shaozheng, E-mail: hushaozhenglnpu@163.com [Institute of Eco-environmental Sciences, Liaoning Shihua University, Fushun 113001 (China)

    2015-03-30

    Graphical abstract: K and Na ions co-doped into g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} crystal lattice can tune the position of CB and VB potentials, influence the structural and optical properties, and thus improve the photocatalytic degradation and mineralization ability. - Highlights: • K, Na co-doped g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} was prepared in KCl/NaCl molten salt system. • The structural and optical properties of g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} were greatly influenced by co-doping. • The position of VB and CB can be tuned by controlling the weight ratio of eutectic salts to melamine. • Co-doped g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} showed outstanding photodegradation ability, mineralization ability, and catalytic stability. - Abstract: Novel band gap-tunable K–Na co-doped graphitic carbon nitride was prepared by molten salt method using melamine, KCl, and NaCl as precursor. X-ray diffraction (XRD), N{sub 2} adsorption, Scanning electron microscope (SEM), UV–vis spectroscopy, Photoluminescence (PL), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were used to characterize the prepared catalysts. The CB and VB potentials of graphitic carbon nitride could be tuned from −1.09 and +1.55 eV to −0.29 and +2.25 eV by controlling the weight ratio of eutectic salts to melamine. Besides, ions doping inhibited the crystal growth of graphitic carbon nitride, enhanced the surface area, and increased the separation rate of photogenerated electrons and holes. The visible-light-driven Rhodamine B (RhB) photodegradation and mineralization performances were significantly improved after K–Na co-doping.

  5. A Monolithically Integrated Gallium Nitride Nanowire/Silicon Solar Cell Photocathode for Selective Carbon Dioxide Reduction to Methane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yichen; Fan, Shizhao; AlOtaibi, Bandar; Wang, Yongjie; Li, Lu; Mi, Zetian

    2016-06-20

    A gallium nitride nanowire/silicon solar cell photocathode for the photoreduction of carbon dioxide (CO2 ) is demonstrated. Such a monolithically integrated nanowire/solar cell photocathode offers several unique advantages, including the absorption of a large part of the solar spectrum and highly efficient carrier extraction. With the incorporation of copper as the co-catalyst, the devices exhibit a Faradaic efficiency of about 19 % for the 8e(-) photoreduction to CH4 at -1.4 V vs Ag/AgCl, a value that is more than thirty times higher than that for the 2e(-) reduced CO (ca. 0.6 %). PMID:27128407

  6. Highly Efficient Photocatalytic H2 Evolution from Water using Visible Light and Structure-Controlled Graphitic Carbon Nitride.

    OpenAIRE

    Martin, D. J.; Qiu, K.; Shevlin, S. A.; Handoko, A. D.; Chen, X.; Guo, Z.; Tang, J.

    2014-01-01

    The major challenge of photocatalytic water splitting, the prototypical reaction for the direct production of hydrogen by using solar energy, is to develop low-cost yet highly efficient and stable semiconductor photocatalysts. Herein, an effective strategy for synthesizing extremely active graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3 N4 ) from a low-cost precursor, urea, is reported. The g-C3 N4 exhibits an extraordinary hydrogen-evolution rate (ca. 20 000 μmol h(-1)  g(-1) under full arc), which leads to ...

  7. Sulfur doping effects on the electronic and geometric structures of graphitic carbon nitride photocatalyst: insights from first principles

    OpenAIRE

    Stolbov, Sergey; Zuluaga, Sebastian

    2012-01-01

    We present here results of our first principles studies of the sulfur doping effects on the electronic and geometric structures of graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3N4). Using the Ab initio thermodynamics approach combined with some kinetic analysis, we reveal the favorable S-doping configurations By analyzing the valence charge densities of the doped and un-doped systems, we find that sulfur partially donates its px- and py- electrons to the system with some back donation to the S pz-states. To ...

  8. Preparation of Poly(p-phenylene sulfi de)/Carbon Composites with Enhanced Thermal Conductivity and Electrical Insulativity via Hybrids of Boron Nitride and Carbon Fillers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Jieli; WANG Jinwen; CHEN Feng

    2015-01-01

    The present work enhanced the thermal conductivity of poly(p-phenylene sulfi de)/expanded graphites and poly(p-phenylene sulfi de)/carbon nanotubes, by incorporating composites with hexagonal boron nitride, which simultaneously succeeded in raising the electrical conductivity of the systems. A two-step mechanical processing method which includes rotating solid-state premixing and inner mixing was adopted to improve dispersion of the hybrids, contributing to the formation of an interspered thermal conductive network. Similar synergic effect in thermal conductivity enhancement was discovered in the hybrid systems regardless of the dimension difference between the two carbonfi llers. Such is postulated to be the one satisfying advantage generated by the afore-mentioned network; the other is the insulativity of the hybrid systems given by the effective blockage of hexagonal boron nitride as an insulating material in our network.

  9. Facile One-Step Synthesis of Hybrid Graphitic Carbon Nitride and Carbon Composites as High-Performance Catalysts for CO2 Photocatalytic Conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yangang; Bai, Xia; Qin, Hengfei; Wang, Fei; Li, Yaguang; Li, Xi; Kang, Shifei; Zuo, Yuanhui; Cui, Lifeng

    2016-07-13

    Utilizing and reducing carbon dioxide is a key target in the fight against global warming. The photocatalytic performance of bulk graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3N4) is usually limited by its low surface area and rapid charge carrier recombination. To develop g-C3N4 more suitable for photocatalysis, researchers have to enlarge its surface area and accelerate the charge carrier separation. In this work, novel hybrid graphitic carbon nitride and carbon (H-g-C3N4/C) composites with various carbon contents have been developed for the first time by a facile one-step pyrolysis method using melamine and natural soybean oil as precursors. The effect of carbon content on the structure of H-g-C3N4/C composites and the catalytic activity for the photoreduction of CO2 with H2O were investigated. The results indicated that the introduction of carbon component can effectively improve the textural properties and electronic conductivity of the composites, which exhibited imporved photocatalytic activity for the reduction of CO2 with H2O in comparison with bulk g-C3N4. The highest CO and CH4 yield of 22.60 μmol/g-cat. and 12.5 μmol/g-cat., respectively, were acquired on the H-g-C3N4/C-6 catalyst with the carbon content of 3.77 wt % under 9 h simulated solar irradiation, which were more than twice as high as that of bulk g-C3N4. The remarkably increased photocatalytic performance arises from the synergistic effect of hybrid carbon and g-C3N4. PMID:27112547

  10. Structural investigations of local non-homogeneities in thermally treated nitrided layers in carbon steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to improve steel performance in some applications the nitrided layers in steel may be subjected to additional heat treatment. One of the forms of such treatment is the incorporate quench hardening from the diphase α-γ area on the Fe-C diagram. This treatment results in secondary diffusion of nitrogen into the base metal, decompose of the surface nitride layer and an increase in the thickness of the hardened layer. An incomplete α-γ transition creates zones of varied bainite-martensite structures with varying nitrogen concentration and hardness. (author)

  11. Direct electrochemistry of cytochrome c immobilized on titanium nitride/multi-walled carbon nanotube composite for amperometric nitrite biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haldorai, Yuvaraj; Hwang, Seung-Kyu; Gopalan, Anantha-Iyengar; Huh, Yun Suk; Han, Young-Kyu; Voit, Walter; Sai-Anand, Gopalan; Lee, Kwang-Pill

    2016-05-15

    In this report, titanium nitride (TiN) nanoparticles decorated multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNTs) nanocomposite is fabricated via a two-step process. These two steps involve the decoration of titanium dioxide nanoparticles onto the MWCNTs surface and a subsequent thermal nitridation. Transmission electron microscopy shows that TiN nanoparticles with a mean diameter of ≤ 20 nm are homogeneously dispersed onto the MWCNTs surface. Direct electrochemistry and electrocatalysis of cytochrome c immobilized on the MWCNTs-TiN composite modified on a glassy carbon electrode for nitrite sensing are investigated. Under optimum conditions, the current response is linear to its concentration from 1 µM to 2000 µM with a sensitivity of 121.5 µA µM(-1)cm(-2) and a low detection limit of 0.0014 µM. The proposed electrode shows good reproducibility and long-term stability. The applicability of the as-prepared biosensor is validated by the successful detection of nitrite in tap and sea water samples. PMID:26748372

  12. Dendritic Tip-on Polytriazine-Based Carbon Nitride Photocatalyst with High Hydrogen Evolution Activity

    KAUST Repository

    Bhunia, Manas Kumar

    2015-11-23

    Developing stable, ubiquitous and efficient water-splitting photocatalyst material that has extensive absorption in the visible-light range is desired for a sustainable solar energy-conversion device. We herein report a triazine-based carbon nitride (CN) material with different C/N ratios achieved by varying the monomer composition ratio between melamine (Mel) and 2,4,6-triaminopyrimidine (TAP). The CN material with a different C/N ratio was obtained through a two-step synthesis protocol: starting with the solution state dispersion of the monomers via hydrogen-bonding supramolecular aggregate, followed by a salt-melt high temperature polycondensation. This protocol ensures the production of a highly crystalline polytriazine imide (PTI) structure con-sisting of a copolymerized Mel-TAP network. The observed bandgap narrowing with an increasing TAP/Mel ratio is well simulated by density functional theory (DFT) calculations, revealing a positive shift in the valence band upon substitution of N with CH in the aromatic rings. Increasing the TAP amount could not maintain the crystalline PTI structure, consistent with DFT calculation showing the repulsion associated with additional C-H introduced in the aromatic rings. Due to the high exciton binding energy calculated by DFT for the obtained CN, the cocatalyst must be close to any portion of the material to assist the separation of excit-ed charge carriers for an improved photocatalytic performance. The photocatalytic activity was improved by providing a dendritic tip-on-like shape grown on a porous fibrous silica KCC-1 spheres, and highly dispersed Pt nanoparticles (<5 nm) were photodepos-ited to introduce heterojunction. As a result, the Pt/CN/KCC-1 photocatalyst exhibited an apparent quantum efficiency (AQE) as high as 22.1 ± 3% at 400 nm and the silica was also beneficial for improving photocatalytic stability. The results obtained by time-resolved transient absorption spectroscopy measurements were consistent with

  13. Hetero-junctions of Boron Nitride and Carbon Nanotubes: Synthesis and Characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yap, Yoke Khin

    2013-03-14

    Hetero-junctions of boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are expected to have appealing new properties that are not available from pure BNNTs and CNTs. Theoretical studies indicate that BNNT/CNT junctions could be multifunctional and applicable as memory, spintronic, electronic, and photonics devices with tunable band structures. This will lead to energy and material efficient multifunctional devices that will be beneficial to the society. However, experimental realization of BNNT/CNT junctions was hindered by the absent of a common growth technique for BNNTs and CNTs. In fact, the synthesis of BNNTs was very challenging and may involve high temperatures (up to 3000 degree Celsius by laser ablation) and explosive chemicals. During the award period, we have successfully developed a simple chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technique to grow BNNTs at 1100-1200 degree Celsius without using dangerous chemicals. A series of common catalyst have then been identified for the synthesis of BNNTs and CNTs. Both of these breakthroughs have led to our preliminary success in growing two types of BNNT/CNT junctions and two additional new nanostructures: 1) branching BNNT/CNT junctions and 2) co-axial BNNT/CNT junctions, 3) quantum dots functionalized BNNTs (QDs-BNNTs), 4) BNNT/graphene junctions. We have started to understand their structural, compositional, and electronic properties. Latest results indicate that the branching BNNT/CNT junctions and QDs-BNNTs are functional as room-temperature tunneling devices. We have submitted the application of a renewal grant to continue the study of these new energy efficient materials. Finally, this project has also strengthened our collaborations with multiple Department of Energy's Nanoscale Science Research Centers (NSRCs), including the Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences (CNMS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and the Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies (CINTs) at Sandia National Laboratories and Los

  14. Influence of cubic boron nitride grinding on the fatigue strengths of carbon steels and a nickel-base superalloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawagoishi, N.; Chen, Q.; Kondo, E. [Kagoshima Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Engineering; Goto, M. [Oita Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Engineering; Nisitani, H. [Kyushu Sangyo Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1999-04-01

    The influence of cubic boron nitride (CBN) grinding on fatigue strength was investigated on an annealed carbon steel, a quenched and tempered carbon steel at room temperature, and a nickel-base superalloy, Inconel 718, at room temperature and 500 C. The results were discussed from several viewpoints, including surface roughness, residual stress, and work hardening or softening due to CBN grinding. The fatigue strength increased upon CBN grinding at room temperature, primarily because of the generation of compressive residual stress in the surface region. However, in the case of Inconel 718, this marked increase in the fatigue strength tended to disappear at the elevated temperature due to the release of compressive residual stress and the decrease of crack growth resistance at an elevated temperature.

  15. The Effect of Mesoporous Carbon Nitride Modification by Titanium Oxide Nanoparticles on Photocatalytic Degradation of 1,3-Dinitrobenzene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyyed Ershad Moradi

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, well ordered, mesoporous carbon nitride (MCN sorbent with uniform mesoporous wall, high surface area and pore volume has been fabricated using the simple polymerization reaction between ethylene diamine and carbon tetrachloride in mesoporous silica media, and then modified by TiO2 nanoparticles (Ti-MCN. The structural order and textural properties of the nanoporous materials were studied by XRD, elemental analysis, and nitrogen adsorption–desorption experiments. Photodegradation experiments for 1,3-dinitrobenzene were conducted in batch mode, the Ti-MCN catalysts were found to be more active compared to the free TiO2 nanoparticles for 1,3-dinitrobenzene degradation.

  16. Fabrication of particular structures of hexagonal boron nitride and boron-carbon-nitrogen layers by anisotropic etching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vishwakarma, Riteshkumar; Sharma, Subash; Shinde, Sachin M.; Sharma, Kamal P.; Thangaraja, Amutha; Kalita, Golap; Tanemura, Masaki

    2016-05-01

    Anisotropic etching of hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) and boron-carbon-nitrogen (BCN) basal plane can be an exciting platform to develop well-defined structures with interesting properties. Here, we developed an etching process of atomically thin h-BN and BCN layers to fabricate nanoribbons (NRs) and other distinct structures by annealing in H2 and Ar gas mixture. BCN and h-BN films are grown on Cu foil by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) using solid camphor and ammonia borane as carbon, nitrogen and boron source, respectively. Formation of micron size well-defined etched holes and NRs are obtained in both h-BN and BCN layers by the post growth annealing process. The etching process of h-BN and BCN basal plane to fabricate NRs and other structures with pronounced edges can open up new possibilities in 2D hybrid materials.

  17. Effect of aluminium nitride precipitation on recrystallisation kinetic in low carbon batch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An important feature of aluminium killed steels is the strong influence that aluminium nitride precipitates produce in both the mechanical properties and the final micro-structural characteristics of the steel. This influence is related to the different stages of the fabrication process. This paper de las with a study of the effects of aluminium nitrides on the kinetics of recrystallisation. Different heat treatments were carried out, in one case to dissolve AIN, and in the other in order to precipitate AIN. These steels were subjected to cold rolling, followed by a batch annealing process. The recrystallised fraction was measured, thus obtaining the kinetic curves. The activation energy for recrystallisation was computed in each case. The results showed that AIN precipitation during recrystallisation produces a delay in recrystallisation kinetics through a change in the activation energy value. (Author) 29 refs

  18. Tribological behaviors of diamond-like carbon coatings on plasma nitrided steel using three BN-containing lubricants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jia Zhengfeng [State Key Laboratory of Solid Lubrication, Lanzhou Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 18 Tianshui Middle Road, Lanzhou 73000 (China); College of Materials Science and Engineering, Liaocheng University, Liaocheng 252059 (China); Graduate School of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 10039 (China); Wang Peng [State Key Laboratory of Solid Lubrication, Lanzhou Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 18 Tianshui Middle Road, Lanzhou 73000 (China); Xia Yanqiu, E-mail: xiayanqiu@yahoo.com [State Key Laboratory of Solid Lubrication, Lanzhou Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 18 Tianshui Middle Road, Lanzhou 73000 (China); Zhang Haobo; Pang Xianjuan [State Key Laboratory of Solid Lubrication, Lanzhou Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 18 Tianshui Middle Road, Lanzhou 73000 (China); Graduate School of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 10039 (China); Li Bin [State Key Laboratory of Solid Lubrication, Lanzhou Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 18 Tianshui Middle Road, Lanzhou 73000 (China)

    2009-04-15

    In this work, diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings were deposited on plasma nitrided AISI 1045 steel by magnetron sputtering. Three BN-containing additives and molybdenum dithiocarbamate (MoDTC) were added to poly-alpha-olefin (PAO) as additives. The additive content (mass fraction) in PAO was fixed at 0.5 wt%. The friction and wear characters of DLC coatings on nitrided steel discs sliding against AISI 52100 steel balls were tested under the lubricated conditions. It was found that borate esters have a higher load carrying capacity and much better anti-wear and friction-reducing ability than that of MoDTC. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were employed to explore the properties of the worn surface and the mechanism of friction and wear. According to the XPS analysis, the adsorbed organic N-containing compounds and BN are, possibly, the primary reason for the novel borate esters to possess a relatively constant coefficient of friction and lower wear rate. On the other hand, possibly, the MoDTC molecules break down during sliding and produce many Mo-oxides, and then the Mo-oxides destroy the DLC coating because of its sharp edge crystalline solid structure. After destroying the DLC coating, the MoDTC react with metals and form MoS{sub 2} tribofilm, and decrease coefficient of friction of rubbing pairs.

  19. Tribological behaviors of diamond-like carbon coatings on plasma nitrided steel using three BN-containing lubricants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Zheng-feng; Wang, Peng; Xia, Yan-qiu; Zhang, Hao-bo; Pang, Xian-juan; Li, Bin

    2009-04-01

    In this work, diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings were deposited on plasma nitrided AISI 1045 steel by magnetron sputtering. Three BN-containing additives and molybdenum dithiocarbamate (MoDTC) were added to poly-alpha-olefin (PAO) as additives. The additive content (mass fraction) in PAO was fixed at 0.5 wt%. The friction and wear characters of DLC coatings on nitrided steel discs sliding against AISI 52100 steel balls were tested under the lubricated conditions. It was found that borate esters have a higher load carrying capacity and much better anti-wear and friction-reducing ability than that of MoDTC. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were employed to explore the properties of the worn surface and the mechanism of friction and wear. According to the XPS analysis, the adsorbed organic N-containing compounds and BN are, possibly, the primary reason for the novel borate esters to possess a relatively constant coefficient of friction and lower wear rate. On the other hand, possibly, the MoDTC molecules break down during sliding and produce many Mo-oxides, and then the Mo-oxides destroy the DLC coating because of its sharp edge crystalline solid structure. After destroying the DLC coating, the MoDTC react with metals and form MoS 2 tribofilm, and decrease coefficient of friction of rubbing pairs.

  20. Tribological behaviors of diamond-like carbon coatings on plasma nitrided steel using three BN-containing lubricants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work, diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings were deposited on plasma nitrided AISI 1045 steel by magnetron sputtering. Three BN-containing additives and molybdenum dithiocarbamate (MoDTC) were added to poly-alpha-olefin (PAO) as additives. The additive content (mass fraction) in PAO was fixed at 0.5 wt%. The friction and wear characters of DLC coatings on nitrided steel discs sliding against AISI 52100 steel balls were tested under the lubricated conditions. It was found that borate esters have a higher load carrying capacity and much better anti-wear and friction-reducing ability than that of MoDTC. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were employed to explore the properties of the worn surface and the mechanism of friction and wear. According to the XPS analysis, the adsorbed organic N-containing compounds and BN are, possibly, the primary reason for the novel borate esters to possess a relatively constant coefficient of friction and lower wear rate. On the other hand, possibly, the MoDTC molecules break down during sliding and produce many Mo-oxides, and then the Mo-oxides destroy the DLC coating because of its sharp edge crystalline solid structure. After destroying the DLC coating, the MoDTC react with metals and form MoS2 tribofilm, and decrease coefficient of friction of rubbing pairs.

  1. The function-led design of Z-scheme photocatalytic systems based on hollow carbon nitride semiconductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Dandan; Pang, Chenyang; Wang, Xinchen

    2015-12-21

    A ternary photocatalyst has been successfully constructed through the integration of Au, CdS and hollow carbon nitride nanospheres (HCNS), where Au nanoparticles were designed to shuttle interparticle transfer of charge carriers between CdS and HCNS photosensitizers to establish two-photon (Z-scheme) photocatalytic tandem systems for solar fuel production. The solid-state CdS-Au-HCNS Z-scheme nanocomposites were efficient for H2 evolution (with a quantum yield of 8.7% at 420 nm) and CO2 reduction catalysis with visible light irradiation. This work further proves the feasibility of employing hollow conjugated polymer photocatalysts in the function-led design of artificial Z-type photosynthetic machinery on soft material interfaces. PMID:26473176

  2. Facile synthesis of nanorod-type graphitic carbon nitride/Fe2O3 composite with enhanced photocatalytic performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jiangpeng; Li, Changqing; Cong, Jingkun; Liu, Ziwei; Zhang, Hanzhuo; Liang, Mei; Gao, Junkuo; Wang, Shunli; Yao, Juming

    2016-06-01

    Here we report a facile synthesis of nanorod-type graphitic carbon nitride/Fe2O3 composite (Fe2O3-g-C3N4) by using Fe-melamine supramolecular framework as precursor. The chemical and optical properties of the nanocomposites are well-characterized. The Fe2O3-g-C3N4 nanocomposite demonstrated excellent photocatalytic activities under visible light due to the efficient utilization of sunlight and the construction of Z-scheme electron transfer pathway. The results indicated that it could be a promising approach for the preparation of efficient g-C3N4 nanocomposites photocatalysts by using metal-melamine supramolecular framework as precursors.

  3. Highly selective hydrogenation of phenol and derivatives over a Pd@carbon nitride catalyst in aqueous media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yong; Yao, Jia; Li, Haoran; Su, Dangsheng; Antonietti, Markus

    2011-03-01

    Cyclohexanone is an important intermediate in the manufacture of polyamides in chemical industry, but direct selective hydrogenation of phenol to cyclohexanone under mild conditions is a challenge. We report here a catalyst made of Pd nanoparticles supported on a mesoporous graphitic carbon nitride, Pd@mpg-C(3)N(4), which was shown to be highly active and promoted the selective formation of cyclohexanone under atmospheric pressure of hydrogen in aqueous media without additives. Conversion of 99% and a selectivity higher than 99% were achieved within 2 h at 65 °C. The reaction can be accelerated at higher temperature, but even at room temperature, 99% conversion and 96% selectivity could still be obtained. The generality of the Pd@mpg-C(3)N(4) catalyst for this reaction was demonstrated by selective hydrogenation of other hydroxylated aromatic compounds with similar performance. PMID:21294506

  4. Unique Static Magnetic and Dynamic Electromagnetic Behaviors in Titanium Nitride/Carbon Composites Driven by Defect Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Chunhong; Meng, Hongjie; Zhao, Xiaowei; Zhang, Xuefeng; Yu, Laigui; Zhang, Jingwei; Zhang, Zhijun

    2016-01-01

    Recently, the defect-induced static magnetic behaviours of nanomaterials have been a cutting-edge issue in diluted magnetic semiconductor materials. However, the dynamic magnetic properties of nanomaterials are commonly ignored if their bulk counterparts are non-magnetic. In the present research, titanium nitride-carbon (TiN/C) nanocomposites were found to exhibit both static and dynamic magnetic properties that vary in the opposite trend. Moreover, novel unconventional electromagnetic resonance behaviour was demonstrated in TiN/C systems, and their permeability and permittivity show similar trend. This is challenging for the traditional understanding of electromagnetism and makes it possible to achieve an appropriate balance between the permeability and permittivity simultaneously in a simple system. Hopefully, the results could provide some valuable clues to revealing the magnetism and electromagnetism of nanostructures. PMID:26739853

  5. Photosensitization of Carbon Nitride Photoelectrodes with CdS: A Novel Architecture with Highly Efficient Photocatalytic Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaosong Zhou

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available CdS with well-defined crystallinity is anchored on carbon nitride photoelectrodes by a successive chemical bath deposition. And the as-synthesized samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, ultraviolet-visible diffuse reflection spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and photoluminescence spectroscopy techniques. The effect of the amount of CdS on the catalytic activity for the degradation of acid Orange II is investigated under visible light irradiation. Results show that the photoelectrodes composed of CdS/CN exhibit much higher catalytic activity than pure CN photoelectrodes. A possible photocatalytic mechanism of the CdS/CN electrodes is proposed under visible light irradiation.

  6. Graphene-analogue carbon nitride: novel exfoliation synthesis and its application in photocatalysis and photoelectrochemical selective detection of trace amount of Cu2+

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Hui; Yan, Jia; She, Xiaojie; Xu, Li; Xia, Jiexiang; Xu, Yuanguo; Song, Yanhua; Huang, Liying; Li, Huaming

    2014-01-01

    Graphene-analogue nanostructures defined as a new kind of promising materials with unique electronic, surface and optical properties have received much attention in the fields of catalysis, energy storage, sensing and electronic devices. Due to the distinctive structure characteristics of the graphene-analogue materials, they brought novel and amazing properties. Herein, graphene-analogue carbon nitride (GA-C3N4) was synthesized by high-yield, large-scale thermal exfoliation from the graphitic C3N4-based intercalation compound. Graphene-analogue carbon nitride exhibited 2D thin-layer structure with 6-9 atomic thickness, a high specific surface area of 30.1 m2 g-1, increased photocurrent responses and improved electron transport ability, which could give rise to enhancing the photocatalytic activity and stability. The graphene-analogue carbon nitride had a new features that could make it suitable as a sensor for Cu2+ determination. So GA-C3N4 is a new but promising candidate for heavy metal ions (Cu2+) determination in water environment. The photocatalytic mechanism and photoelectrochemical selective sensing of Cu2+ were also discussed.Graphene-analogue nanostructures defined as a new kind of promising materials with unique electronic, surface and optical properties have received much attention in the fields of catalysis, energy storage, sensing and electronic devices. Due to the distinctive structure characteristics of the graphene-analogue materials, they brought novel and amazing properties. Herein, graphene-analogue carbon nitride (GA-C3N4) was synthesized by high-yield, large-scale thermal exfoliation from the graphitic C3N4-based intercalation compound. Graphene-analogue carbon nitride exhibited 2D thin-layer structure with 6-9 atomic thickness, a high specific surface area of 30.1 m2 g-1, increased photocurrent responses and improved electron transport ability, which could give rise to enhancing the photocatalytic activity and stability. The graphene

  7. Residual stresses and mechanical properties of amorphous carbon films on 40 CAD 6-12 plasma nitrided steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text.An investigation has been carried out to study the effect of deposition time and benzene flow rate on residual stresses level, morphological, hardness, adhesion strength and friction coefficient of carbon films. Amorphous hydrogenated carbon a-c:H films were deposited on plasma nitrided layers (ε+γ') of 40 CAD 6-12 steel substrate using Microwave Electron Cyclotron Resonance Plasma Assisted Chemical Vapour Deposition nethod with benzene/Argon gas as precursor. The coatings have been deposited at different temperatures 350 and 520 degree celsius for times 3,5,60 and 120 minutes under different pressures ranging from 10-3 to 10-5 mbar. A wide range of thickness values of the amorphous carbon layers (0.4 up 15 μm) was formed as function of the deposition conditions and precursors, when the bias voltage (-200V) and microwave power (300 W) were kept constant. Stress behavior in carbon films has been investigated by x-ray diffraction measurement using the sin2Ψ technique. The type and the value of stress have shown a strong dependence of film thickness and the benzene flow rate (σ= -259 ÷ 5 MPa). Scratch tests revealed that they possess excellent adhesion strength and exhibit both low values of friction coefficient and roughness. The has been concluded than the micro hardness measurements results are not influenced by the coating thickness. The hardness of the coatings is normally below 30 GPa for coatings with 7 sccm of benzene flow rate. The carbon films were characterized by SEM and Raman spectroscopy

  8. Effect of pressure on the deposition of hydrogen-free amorphous carbon and carbon nitride films by the pulsed cathodic arc discharge method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hydrogen-free amorphous carbon (a-C) and carbon nitride (a-C:N) films were deposited using the pulsed cathodic arc discharge at different argon and nitrogen pressures. The surface and mechanical properties of these films were found to strongly depend on the gas pressure. The tetrahedral amorphous carbon and hard a-C:N films with smooth surfaces (rms roughness: 0.15 nm) were prepared at lower gas pressures (-2 Pa). Incorporation of an increasing amount of nitrogen in a-C:N films caused a decrease in film hardness. All the films were covered with the thin (0.3-2 nm) graphite-like surface layers. The film hardness was correlated to the soft surface layer thickness, and the films with thinner surface layers exhibit higher hardness. The mean energies of pulsed plasma beams were measured as the functions of argon and nitrogen pressures. The mean energies of plasma beams decrease in an exponential fashion with increasing gas pressure due to the carbon ion collisions with the neutral gas species. The effects of mean energies of deposited species on the film deposition were explained in terms of the thermal spike migration of surface atoms. The formation of graphite-like surface layers is associated with the low-energy deposition process. The low-energy (10 eV) species may produce the strong thermal spike at film surface, and contribute to the formation of sp3 bonded structure at a sp3 bonded matrix

  9. Separation and concentration of natural products by fast forced adsorption using well-dispersed velvet-like graphitic carbon nitride with response surface methodology optimisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Xinru; Zhu, Jun; Zhang, Yue; Xia, Qian; Bi, Wentao; Yang, Xiaodi; Yang, Jinfei

    2016-07-01

    Well-dispersed velvet-like graphitic carbon nitride nanoparticles with a large surface area were prepared and utilized for separation and concentration of bioactive compounds from fruit extracts by fast (20s) forced adsorption. The large surface area, enhanced non-covalent interactions of this nanoparticle with bioactive compounds and good dispersity in different solvents benefited its application as a good sorbent. To evaluate their adsorption capabilities, these carbon nitride nanoparticles were used for separation and concentration of flavonoids from fruit extracts by a forced-adsorption dispersive solid phase extraction method. The combined use of this nanoparticle and our experimental conditions showed excellent precision (3.6-4.7%) and sensitivity (limits of detection (S/N=3): 0.6-3.75ng/mL). This research provides an alternative strategy to prepare suitable sorbents for adsorption, separation and concentration of various compounds from different extracts. PMID:27154656

  10. Influence of the power on the processes controlling the formation of ECR-CVD carbon nitride films from CH{sub 4}/Ar/N{sub 2} plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camero, M [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid (CSIC), 28049 Madrid (Spain); Gordillo-Vazquez, F J [Instituto de Optica (CSIC), Serrano 121, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Ortiz, J [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid (CSIC), 28049 Madrid (Spain); Gomez-Aleixandre, C [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid (CSIC), 28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2004-02-01

    Carbon nitride films have been synthesized by means of electron cyclotron resonance chemical vapour deposition (ECR-CVD) using different power values (50-212 W) at constant pressure conditions (0.03 mbar). Optical emission spectroscopy and mass spectrometry were used for the characterization of the plasma. The films were analysed using energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopies. It was found that all signal peaks in the optical emission spectra increased monotonically following the increase in microwave power. Moreover, we have observed that the radiative emission from the 4p({sup 2}p{sub 9}) resonant state of Ar is the most affected by CH{sub 4} addition to a pure argon plasma. The latter suggests that a Penning mechanism controls the activation of CH{sub 4} molecules with increasing power levels at relatively low pressures. Besides, the increase of excited N atoms indicates a higher activity of the etching mechanisms of carbon nitride films with increasing power.

  11. Nickel as a co-catalyst for photocatalytic hydrogen evolution on graphitic-carbon nitride (sg-CN): what is the nature of the active species?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indra, Arindam; Menezes, Prashanth W; Kailasam, Kamalakannan; Hollmann, Dirk; Schröder, Marc; Thomas, Arne; Brückner, Angelika; Driess, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    The nature of a nickel-based co-catalyst deposited on a sol-gel prepared porous graphitic-carbon nitride (sg-CN), for photocatalytic H2 production from water, has been investigated. The formation of the active catalytic species, charge separation and recombination of the photogenerated electrons and holes during photochemical H2 evolution has been determined for the first time using in situ EPR spectroscopy. PMID:26498497

  12. Graphene-analogue carbon nitride: novel exfoliation synthesis and its application in photocatalysis and photoelectrochemical selective detection of trace amount of Cu²⁺.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Hui; Yan, Jia; She, Xiaojie; Xu, Li; Xia, Jiexiang; Xu, Yuanguo; Song, Yanhua; Huang, Liying; Li, Huaming

    2014-01-01

    Graphene-analogue nanostructures defined as a new kind of promising materials with unique electronic, surface and optical properties have received much attention in the fields of catalysis, energy storage, sensing and electronic devices. Due to the distinctive structure characteristics of the graphene-analogue materials, they brought novel and amazing properties. Herein, graphene-analogue carbon nitride (GA-C₃N₄) was synthesized by high-yield, large-scale thermal exfoliation from the graphitic C₃N₄-based intercalation compound. Graphene-analogue carbon nitride exhibited 2D thin-layer structure with 6-9 atomic thickness, a high specific surface area of 30.1 m(2) g(-1), increased photocurrent responses and improved electron transport ability, which could give rise to enhancing the photocatalytic activity and stability. The graphene-analogue carbon nitride had a new features that could make it suitable as a sensor for Cu(2+) determination. So GA-C₃N₄ is a new but promising candidate for heavy metal ions (Cu(2+)) determination in water environment. The photocatalytic mechanism and photoelectrochemical selective sensing of Cu(2+) were also discussed. PMID:24309635

  13. Single Atom (Pd/Pt) Supported on Graphitic Carbon Nitride as an Efficient Photocatalyst for Visible-Light Reduction of Carbon Dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Guoping; Jiao, Yan; Waclawik, Eric R; Du, Aijun

    2016-05-18

    Reducing carbon dioxide to hydrocarbon fuel with solar energy is significant for high-density solar energy storage and carbon balance. In this work, single atoms of palladium and platinum supported on graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3N4), i.e., Pd/g-C3N4 and Pt/g-C3N4, respectively, acting as photocatalysts for CO2 reduction were investigated by density functional theory calculations for the first time. During CO2 reduction, the individual metal atoms function as the active sites, while g-C3N4 provides the source of hydrogen (H*) from the hydrogen evolution reaction. The complete, as-designed photocatalysts exhibit excellent activity in CO2 reduction. HCOOH is the preferred product of CO2 reduction on the Pd/g-C3N4 catalyst with a rate-determining barrier of 0.66 eV, while the Pt/g-C3N4 catalyst prefers to reduce CO2 to CH4 with a rate-determining barrier of 1.16 eV. In addition, deposition of atom catalysts on g-C3N4 significantly enhances the visible-light absorption, rendering them ideal for visible-light reduction of CO2. Our findings open a new avenue of CO2 reduction for renewable energy supply. PMID:27116595

  14. A graphitic hollow carbon nitride nanosphere as a novel photochemical internalization agent for targeted and stimuli-responsive cancer therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chaoqun; Chen, Zhaowei; Wang, Zhenzhen; Li, Wei; Ju, Enguo; Yan, Zhengqing; Liu, Zhen; Ren, Jinsong; Qu, Xiaogang

    2016-06-01

    As a novel technique, photochemical internalization (PCI) has been employed as a new approach to overcome endo/lysosomal restriction, which is one of the main difficulties in both drug and gene delivery. However, the complicated synthesis procedure (usually requiring the self-assembly of polymers, photosensitizers and cargos) and payload specificity greatly limit its further application. In this paper, we employ a highly fluorescent graphitic hollow carbon nitride nanosphere (GHCNS) to simultaneously serve as a PCI photosensitizer, an imaging agent and a drug carrier. The surface modification of GHCNS with multifunctional polysaccharide hyaluronic acid (HA) endows the system with colloidal stability, biocompatibility and cancer cell targeting ability. After CD44 receptor-mediated endocytosis, the nanosystem is embedded in endo/lysosomal vesicles and HA could be specially degraded by hyaluronidase (Hyal), inducing open pores. In the following, with visible light illumination, GHCNS could produce ROS that effectively induced lipid peroxidation and caused endo/lysosomal membrane break, accelerating the cytoplasmic release of the drug in the targeted and irradiated cells. As a result, significantly increased therapeutic potency and specificity against cancer cells could be achieved.As a novel technique, photochemical internalization (PCI) has been employed as a new approach to overcome endo/lysosomal restriction, which is one of the main difficulties in both drug and gene delivery. However, the complicated synthesis procedure (usually requiring the self-assembly of polymers, photosensitizers and cargos) and payload specificity greatly limit its further application. In this paper, we employ a highly fluorescent graphitic hollow carbon nitride nanosphere (GHCNS) to simultaneously serve as a PCI photosensitizer, an imaging agent and a drug carrier. The surface modification of GHCNS with multifunctional polysaccharide hyaluronic acid (HA) endows the system with colloidal

  15. Graphitic carbon nitride nanosheet@metal-organic framework core-shell nanoparticles for photo-chemo combination therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Rui; Zhang, Jinfeng; Wang, Yu; Chen, Xianfeng; Zapien, J. Antonio; Lee, Chun-Sing

    2015-10-01

    Recently, nanoscale metal-organic frameworks (NMOFs) have started to be developed as a promising platform for bioimaging and drug delivery. On the other hand, combination therapies using multiple approaches are demonstrated to achieve much enhanced efficacy. Herein, we report, for the first time, core-shell nanoparticles consisting of a photodynamic therapeutic (PDT) agent and a MOF shell while simultaneously carrying a chemotherapeutic drug for effective combination therapy. In this work, core-shell nanoparticles of zeolitic-imadazolate framework-8 (ZIF-8) as shell embedded with graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3N4) nanosheets as core are fabricated by growing ZIF-8 in the presence of g-C3N4 nanosheets. Doxorubicin hydrochloride (DOX) is then loaded into the ZIF-8 shell of the core-shell nanoparticles. The combination of the chemotherapeutic effects of DOX and the PDT effect of g-C3N4 nanosheets can lead to considerably enhanced efficacy. Furthermore, the red fluorescence of DOX and the blue fluorescence of g-C3N4 nanosheets provide the additional function of dual-color imaging for monitoring the drug release process.Recently, nanoscale metal-organic frameworks (NMOFs) have started to be developed as a promising platform for bioimaging and drug delivery. On the other hand, combination therapies using multiple approaches are demonstrated to achieve much enhanced efficacy. Herein, we report, for the first time, core-shell nanoparticles consisting of a photodynamic therapeutic (PDT) agent and a MOF shell while simultaneously carrying a chemotherapeutic drug for effective combination therapy. In this work, core-shell nanoparticles of zeolitic-imadazolate framework-8 (ZIF-8) as shell embedded with graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3N4) nanosheets as core are fabricated by growing ZIF-8 in the presence of g-C3N4 nanosheets. Doxorubicin hydrochloride (DOX) is then loaded into the ZIF-8 shell of the core-shell nanoparticles. The combination of the chemotherapeutic effects of DOX

  16. Effects of substrate bias voltage and target sputtering power on the structural and tribological properties of carbon nitride coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Pengfei, E-mail: wangpf@szu.edu.cn [Institute of Nanosurface Science and Engineering, College of Mechatronics and Control Engineering, Shenzhen University, Shenzhen 518060 (China); Institute of Fluid Science, Tohoku University, Katahira 2-1-1, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Takeno, Takanori [Laboratory of Nanointerface Engineering, Division of Mechanical Engineering, Tohoku University, Aoba 6-6-1, Aramaki, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan); Fontaine, Julien [Laboratoire de Tribologie et Dynamique des Systèmes, UMR 5513 – CNRS/Ecole Centrale de Lyon, Bâtiment H10, 36 Avenue Guy de Collongue, 69134 Écully Cedex (France); Aono, Masami [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Defense Academy, 1-10-20 Hashirimizu, Yokosuka, Kanagawa 239-8686 (Japan); Adachi, Koshi [Laboratory of Nanointerface Engineering, Division of Mechanical Engineering, Tohoku University, Aoba 6-6-1, Aramaki, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan); Miki, Hiroyuki [Center for Interdisciplinary Research, Tohoku University, Aoba 6-3, Aramaki, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8578 (Japan); Takagi, Toshiyuki [Institute of Fluid Science, Tohoku University, Katahira 2-1-1, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan)

    2014-06-01

    Effects of substrate bias voltage and target sputtering power on the structural and tribological properties of carbon nitride (CN{sub x}) coatings are investigated. CN{sub x} coatings are fabricated by a hybrid coating process with the combination of radio frequency plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (RF PECVD) and DC magnetron sputtering at various substrate bias voltage and target sputtering power in the order of −400 V 200 W, −400 V 100 W, −800 V 200 W, and −800 V 100 W. The deposition rate, N/C atomic ratio, and hardness of CN{sub x} coatings as well as friction coefficient of CN{sub x} coating sliding against AISI 52100 pin in N{sub 2} gas stream decrease, while the residual stress of CN{sub x} coatings increases with the increase of substrate bias voltage and the decrease of target sputtering power. The highest hardness measured under single stiffness mode of 15.0 GPa and lowest residual stress of 3.7 GPa of CN{sub x} coatings are obtained at −400 V 200 W, whereas the lowest friction coefficient of 0.12 of CN{sub x} coatings is achieved at −800 V 100 W. Raman and XPS analysis suggest that sp{sup 3} carbon bonding decreases and sp{sup 2} carbon bonding increases with the variations in substrate bias voltage and target sputtering power. Optical images and Raman characterization of worn surfaces confirm that the friction behavior of CN{sub x} coatings is controlled by the directly sliding between CN{sub x} coating and steel pin. Therefore, the reduction of friction coefficient is attributed to the decrease of sp{sup 3} carbon bonding in the CN{sub x} coating. It is concluded that substrate bias voltage and target sputtering power are effective parameters for tailoring the structural and tribological properties of CN{sub x} coatings. - Highlights: • Various CN{sub x} coatings are produced using a unique hybrid coating process. • Structural and tribological properties of CN{sub x} coatings are investigated. • The lowest friction

  17. Characterization of hydrogenated amorphous carbon nitride particles and coatings obtained in a CH4/N2 radiofrequency discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hydrogenated amorphous carbon nitride (a-CN x:H) particles and coatings have been prepared in a CH4/N2 13.56 MHz radiofrequency discharge. Particles and films have been examined by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and by infrared (IR) absorption spectroscopy for different nitrogen contents. SEM micrographs show that the dust particles are spherical with diameters in the range 0.2-4 μm. The surface morphology of the particles is strongly modified with the increase of the nitrogen content in the gas mixture. In the particle and film IR spectra, four predominant absorption bands have been observed. They reveal the presence of C-H, C=C, C=N and/or N-H (1300-1800 cm-1), -C≡N and -N≡C (2000-2300 cm-1), C-H (2800-3100 cm-1) and N-H and/or O-H (3200-3600 cm-1) bonds. These absorption bands are studied in order to determine the influence of the nitrogen incorporation

  18. Significant enhancement of photoreactivity of graphitic carbon nitride catalysts under acidic conditions and the underlying H(+)-mediated mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xue-Song; Tian, Ke; Hu, Jian-Yang; Jiang, Hong

    2015-12-01

    Graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3N4) is an emerging photocatalyst for organic pollutants degradation owing to its excellent stability and metal-free property. In this study, the photocatalytic activity of acidified g-C3N4 (ag-C3N4) was systematically investigated using rhodamine B (rhB) as a model organic pollutant. The results showed the photoreactivity of ag-C3N4 is significantly enhanced with the decrease of pH values. The apparent rate constant (kapp) of rhB degradation over ag-C3N4 is 11.59×10(-3)min(-1) at pH7.0 and it increases to 103.50×10(-3)min(-1) at pH3.0 under visible light. A series of analyses demonstrate that the photodegradation mechanism is a combination of a H(+)-promoted generation of OH and elevation of the redox potential of conduct band of C3N4. The change of surface properties of C3N4 caused by pH variation also affects the degradation of some zwitterionic compounds by changing the adsorption orientation of pollutants. The revealed mechanism of visible light-C3N4-rhB system is meaningful to broaden the usage of C3N4 to the photodegradation of other organic pollutants. PMID:26172516

  19. Phosphorus-Doped Carbon Nitride Tubes with a Layered Micro-nanostructure for Enhanced Visible-Light Photocatalytic Hydrogen Evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Shien; Deng, Zhaopeng; Li, Mingxia; Jiang, Baojiang; Tian, Chungui; Pan, Qingjiang; Fu, Honggang

    2016-01-26

    Phosphorus-doped hexagonal tubular carbon nitride (P-TCN) with the layered stacking structure was obtained from a hexagonal rod-like single crystal supramolecular precursor (monoclinic, C2/m). The production process of P-TCN involves two steps: 1) the precursor was prepared by self-assembly of melamine with cyanuric acid from in situ hydrolysis of melamine under phosphorous acid-assisted hydrothermal conditions; 2) the pyrolysis was initiated at the center of precursor under heating, thus giving the hexagonal P-TCN. The tubular structure favors the enhancement of light scattering and active sites. Meanwhile, the introduction of phosphorus leads to a narrow band gap and increased electric conductivity. Thus, the P-TCN exhibited a high hydrogen evolution rate of 67 μmol h(-1) (0.1 g catalyst, λ >420 nm) in the presence of sacrificial agents, and an apparent quantum efficiency of 5.68 % at 420 nm, which is better than most of bulk g-C3 N4 reported. PMID:26692105

  20. Synthesis of a graphitic carbon nitride nanocomposite with magnetite as a sorbent for solid phase extraction of phenolic acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have developed a facile in-situ growth method for the deposition of magnetite (Fe3O4) particles on the surface of a graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3N4) nanosheet. The material was characterized by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and thermogravimetric analysis. The high affinity of g-C3N4 for phenolic acids in combination with the magnetism of Fe3O4 provides an efficient means for magnetic solid phase extraction. The adsorption, desorption and recoveries were examined. Under optimized conditions, the method has limits of detection in the range from 17.5–42.6 ng mL−1 (at an S/N of 3), and precisions from 2.8–3.8 % (for n = 5). The method was successfully applied to the determination of protocatechuic, caffeic, and ferulic acids in Salicornia herbacea L. plant extracts. Recoveries ranged from 92.4–99.5 %. (author)

  1. Facile and Scale Up Synthesis of Red Phosphorus-Graphitic Carbon Nitride Heterostructures for Energy and Environment Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, Sajid Ali; Ansari, Mohammad Omaish; Cho, Moo Hwan

    2016-06-01

    The development of heterostructured materials for efficient solar energy conversion and energy storage devices are essential for practical applications. In this study, a simple and relatively inexpensive method was used to improve the visible light-driven photocatalytic activity and electrochemical supercapacitor behavior of the graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3N4) by elemental red phosphorus (RPh). The as-prepared RPh-g-C3N4 was characterized in detail using a range of spectroscopic techniques to understand the structure, morphology, chemical interaction, and chemical state of the materials. The visible light-driven photocatalytic activity and supercapacitive electrode performance were assessed by the photodegradation of model colored, non-colored organic pollutants, and electrochemical half-cell measurements, respectively. The RPh-g-C3N4 heterostructure with 30 weight percent of RPh exhibited remarkably high photocatalytic activity for the degradation of pollutants compared to the bare constituent materials, which was further confirmed by the photoelectrochemical study under similar visible photoirradiation conditions. The RPh-g-C3N4 heterostructure supercapacitor electrode displayed a high capacitance of 465 F/g and excellent cyclic stability with capacitance retention of 90% after 1000 cycles at a current of 10 A/g. The superior performance was attributed mainly to the narrow band gap, high surface area, capacitive nature of RPh, and nitrogen-rich skeleton of g-C3N4.

  2. Torsional properties of hexagonal boron nitride nanotubes, carbon nanotubes and their hybrid structures: A molecular dynamics study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiong, Qi-lin, E-mail: xiongql@hust.edu.cn [Department of Mechanics, Huazhong University of Science & Technology, 1037 Luoyu Road, Wuhan 430074 (China); Hubei Key Laboratory of Engineering Structural Analysis and Safety Assessment, Luoyu Road 1037, Wuhan 430074 (China); Tian, Xiao Geng [State Key Laboratory for Mechanical Structure Strength and Vibration, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710049 (China)

    2015-10-15

    The torsional mechanical properties of hexagonal single-walled boron nitride nanotubes (SWBNNTs), single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), and their hybrid structures (SWBN-CNTs) are investigated using molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. Two approaches - force approach and energy approach, are adopted to calculate the shear moduli of SWBNNTs and SWCNTs, the discrepancy between two approaches is analyzed. The results show that the shear moduli of single-walled nanotubes (SWNTs), including SWBNNTs and SWCNTs are dependent on the diameter, especially for armchair SWNTs. The armchair SWNTs show the better ability of resistance the twisting comparable to the zigzag SWNTs. The effects of diameter and length on the critical values of torque of SWNTs are obtained by comparing the torsional behaviors of SWNTs with different diameters and different lengths. It is observed that the MD results of the effect of diameter and length on the critical values of torque agrees well with the prediction of continuum shell model. The shear modulus of SWBN-CNT has a significant dependence on the percentages of SWCNT and the hybrid style has also an influence on shear modulus. The critical values of torque of SWBN-CNTs increase with the increase of the percentages of SWCNT. This phenomenon can be interpreted by the function relationship between the torque of different bonds (B-N-X, C-C-X, C-B-X, C-N-X) and the angles of bonds.

  3. Torsional properties of hexagonal boron nitride nanotubes, carbon nanotubes and their hybrid structures: A molecular dynamics study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi-lin Xiong

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The torsional mechanical properties of hexagonal single-walled boron nitride nanotubes (SWBNNTs, single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs, and their hybrid structures (SWBN-CNTs are investigated using molecular dynamics (MD simulation. Two approaches - force approach and energy approach, are adopted to calculate the shear moduli of SWBNNTs and SWCNTs, the discrepancy between two approaches is analyzed. The results show that the shear moduli of single-walled nanotubes (SWNTs, including SWBNNTs and SWCNTs are dependent on the diameter, especially for armchair SWNTs. The armchair SWNTs show the better ability of resistance the twisting comparable to the zigzag SWNTs. The effects of diameter and length on the critical values of torque of SWNTs are obtained by comparing the torsional behaviors of SWNTs with different diameters and different lengths. It is observed that the MD results of the effect of diameter and length on the critical values of torque agrees well with the prediction of continuum shell model. The shear modulus of SWBN-CNT has a significant dependence on the percentages of SWCNT and the hybrid style has also an influence on shear modulus. The critical values of torque of SWBN-CNTs increase with the increase of the percentages of SWCNT. This phenomenon can be interpreted by the function relationship between the torque of different bonds (B-N-X, C-C-X, C-B-X, C-N-X and the angles of bonds.

  4. Light emission in forward and reverse bias operation in OLED with amorphous silicon carbon nitride thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, R.; Cremona, M.; Achete, C. A.

    2011-01-01

    Amorphous silicon carbon nitride (a-SiC:N) thin films deposited by magnetron sputtering were used in the structure of an organic light emitting diode (OLED), obtaining an OLED operating in forward and reverse bias mode. The device consist of the heterojunction structure ITO/a-SiC:N/Hole Transport Layer (HTL)/ Electron Transport Layer (ETL)/a-SiC:N/Al. As hole transporting layer was used a thin film of 1-(3-methylphenyl)-1,2,3,4 tetrahydroquinoline - 6 - carboxyaldehyde - 1,1'- diphenylhydrazone (MTCD), while the tris(8-hydroxyquinoline aluminum) (Alq3) is used as electron transport and emitting layer. A significant increase in the voltage operation compared to the conventional ITO/MTCD/Alq3/Al structure was observed, so the onset of electroluminescence occurs at about 22 V in the forward and reverse bias mode of operation. The electroluminescence spectra is similar in both cases, only slightly shifted 0.14 eV to lower energies in relation to the conventional device.

  5. Non-enzymatic photoelectrochemical sensing of hydrogen peroxide using hierarchically structured zinc oxide hybridized with graphite-like carbon nitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hierarchically structured ZnO hybridized with graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3N4) is introduced as a new material for non-enzymatic photoelectrochemical sensing of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). It is based on the measurement of the decrease in the photocurrent produced by H2O2 which consumes the photoinduced electrons ejected by the ZnO/g-C3N4 composite. The g-C3N4 has a beneficial effect in extending the band width of light absorption of ZnO into the visible region and to promote the separation of the photoinduced carriers. This results in an enhanced photocurrent and high-sensitivity. The ZnO/g-C3N4 composite was characterized by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffractometry, X-ray photoelectron spectrometry, and UV–vis spectrophotometry. Under the optimized condition, the sensor has a linear response to hydrogen peroxide in the 1.3–79.8 nM concentration range, and the detection limit is 0.38 nM. The sensor is sensitive, selective, stable and can be fabricated at low costs. (author)

  6. Carbon nitride deposition onto steel substrates by radio frequency plasma assisted pulsed laser deposition with substrate heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon nitride (CNx) films are promising candidates for tribological application due to its low friction coefficient. However, the adhesion strength of the film on steel substrate was poor at elevated temperature during deposition. In this study, CNx film was fabricated on bearing steel (SUJ2) and austenitic stainless steel (AISI304) substrates with radio frequency (RF) plasma assisted pulsed laser deposition in nitrogen gas atmosphere. Adhesion strength of the film on the steel substrates was improved by blasting or polishing of the substrate surface before deposition. Thick CNx film was deposited on the steel substrates by substrate heating and substrate pretreatment. The atomic composition ratio of N/C and the bonding ratio of sp3 / (sp2 + sp3) increased with substrate temperature. Maximum atomic composition ratio of N/C was 0.155 on SUJ2 substrate and 0.171 on AISI304 substrate at 40 W of RF power and 673 K of substrate temperature. The maximum adhesion strength of 14.8 MPa was obtained at blasted SUJ2 substrate. The maximum knoop hardness of 8.94 GPa and the lowest friction coefficient of 0.072 were obtained on SUJ2 substrate with polished no. 150 at 40 W of RF power and 673 K of substrate temperature.

  7. Carbon nitride deposition onto steel substrates by radio frequency plasma assisted pulsed laser deposition with substrate heating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yasui, Toshiaki, E-mail: yasui@me.tut.ac.jp [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Toyohashi University of Technology, 1-1 Hibarigaoka, Tempaku, Toyohashi, Aichi 441-8580 (Japan); Kimura, Shingo [Department of Production Systems Engineering, Toyohashi University of Technology, 1-1 Hibarigaoka, Tempaku, Toyohashi, Aichi 441-8580 (Japan); Nishikawa, Ryutaro; Fukumoto, Masahiro [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Toyohashi University of Technology, 1-1 Hibarigaoka, Tempaku, Toyohashi, Aichi 441-8580 (Japan)

    2012-11-15

    Carbon nitride (CNx) films are promising candidates for tribological application due to its low friction coefficient. However, the adhesion strength of the film on steel substrate was poor at elevated temperature during deposition. In this study, CNx film was fabricated on bearing steel (SUJ2) and austenitic stainless steel (AISI304) substrates with radio frequency (RF) plasma assisted pulsed laser deposition in nitrogen gas atmosphere. Adhesion strength of the film on the steel substrates was improved by blasting or polishing of the substrate surface before deposition. Thick CNx film was deposited on the steel substrates by substrate heating and substrate pretreatment. The atomic composition ratio of N/C and the bonding ratio of sp{sup 3} / (sp{sup 2} + sp{sup 3}) increased with substrate temperature. Maximum atomic composition ratio of N/C was 0.155 on SUJ2 substrate and 0.171 on AISI304 substrate at 40 W of RF power and 673 K of substrate temperature. The maximum adhesion strength of 14.8 MPa was obtained at blasted SUJ2 substrate. The maximum knoop hardness of 8.94 GPa and the lowest friction coefficient of 0.072 were obtained on SUJ2 substrate with polished no. 150 at 40 W of RF power and 673 K of substrate temperature.

  8. Facile fabrication of novel porous graphitic carbon nitride/copper sulfide nanocomposites with enhanced visible light driven photocatalytic performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xi; Li, Huankun; Wu, Yuxin; Wu, Hanshuo; Wu, Laidi; Tan, Pengfei; Pan, Jun; Xiong, Xiang

    2016-08-15

    In this work, a novel organic-inorganic heterostructured photocatalyst: porous graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3N4) hybrid with copper sulfide (CuS) had been synthesized via a precipitation-deposition method at low temperature for the first time. UV-vis spectroscopy revealed the porous g-C3N4/CuS nanocomposites showed a strong and broad visible light absorption. Furthermore, the g-C3N4/CuS nanocomposites showed higher photocatalytic activity in the photodegradation of various organic dyes than that of pure g-C3N4 and CuS, and the selected sample of g-C3N4/CuS-2 exhibited the best photocatalytic activity under visible light. The good photocatalytic activity could be ascribed to the matching of the g-C3N4 and CuS band gap energies. Besides, photoluminescent spectra and photoelectrochemical measurements also proved that the CuS/g-C3N4 could greatly enhance the charge generation and suppress the charge recombination of photogenerated carriers. According to the experimental result, a possible photocatalytic mechanism has been proposed. Due to the high stability, the porous g-C3N4/CuS could be applied in the field of environmental remediation. Our work highlights that coupling semiconductors with well-matched band energies provides a facile way to improve the photocatalytic activity. PMID:27209398

  9. First-principles study of hydrogen storage on Ti (Sc)-decorated boron-carbon-nitride sheet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song Nahong [College of Computer and Information Engineering, Henan University of Economics and Law, Zhengzhou 450002 (China); Wang Yusheng [College of Mathematics and Information Science, North China University of Water Resources and Electric Power, Zhengzhou, Henan 450011 (China); Center of Clean Energy and Quantum Structures, School of Physics and Engineering, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou, Henan 450052 (China); Sun Qiang [Center of Clean Energy and Quantum Structures, School of Physics and Engineering, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou, Henan 450052 (China); Jia Yu, E-mail: xxwysheng@163.com [Center of Clean Energy and Quantum Structures, School of Physics and Engineering, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou, Henan 450052 (China)

    2012-12-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The gravimetric densities of H{sub 2} are 7.6 wt% and 7.8 wt%, respectively. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The average adsorption energy of hydrogen molecule is in the range of 0.4-0.56 eV/H{sub 2} (0.13-0.27 eV/H{sub 2}). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It can operate under ambient thermodynamic conditions. - Abstract: Ab initio first-principles calculations are carried out to investigate Ti (Sc)-decorated two-dimensional boron-carbon-nitride (BC{sub 2}N) sheets for their application as hydrogen storage materials. The results show that with four H{sub 2} molecules attached to per metal atom the Ti (Sc)-decorated BC{sub 2}N can store up to 7.6 wt% (7.8 wt%) of hydrogen in molecular form. The Kubas interaction and the polarization mechanism lead to the adsorption energy within the range of 0.4-0.56 eV/H{sub 2} (0.13-0.27 eV/H{sub 2}), which is suitable for ambient temperature hydrogen storage.

  10. Light emission in forward and reverse bias operation in OLED with amorphous silicon carbon nitride thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reyes, R [Facultad de Ingenieria Quimica y Textil, Universidad Nacional de Ingenieria, Av. Tupac Amaru SN, Lima (Peru); Cremona, M [Departamento de Fisica, PontifIcia Universidade Catolica de Rio de Janeiro, PUC-Rio, Cx. Postal 38071, Rio de Janeiro, RJ, CEP 22453-970 (Brazil); Achete, C A, E-mail: rreyes@uni.edu.pe [Departamento de Engenheria Metalurgica e de Materiais, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Cx. Postal 68505, Rio de Janeiro, RJ, CEP 21945-970 (Brazil)

    2011-01-01

    Amorphous silicon carbon nitride (a-SiC:N) thin films deposited by magnetron sputtering were used in the structure of an organic light emitting diode (OLED), obtaining an OLED operating in forward and reverse bias mode. The device consist of the heterojunction structure ITO/a-SiC:N/Hole Transport Layer (HTL)/ Electron Transport Layer (ETL)/a-SiC:N/Al. As hole transporting layer was used a thin film of 1-(3-methylphenyl)-1,2,3,4 tetrahydroquinoline - 6 - carboxyaldehyde - 1,1'- diphenylhydrazone (MTCD), while the tris(8-hydroxyquinoline aluminum) (Alq{sub 3}) is used as electron transport and emitting layer. A significant increase in the voltage operation compared to the conventional ITO/MTCD/Alq{sub 3}/Al structure was observed, so the onset of electroluminescence occurs at about 22 V in the forward and reverse bias mode of operation. The electroluminescence spectra is similar in both cases, only slightly shifted 0.14 eV to lower energies in relation to the conventional device.

  11. Origin of photoactivity in graphitic carbon nitride and strategies for enhancement of photocatalytic efficiency: insights from first-principles computations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Haijun; Zuo, Xueqin; Tang, Huaibao; Li, Guang; Zhou, Zhen

    2015-03-01

    The origin of the photoactivity in graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3N4) and the strategies for improving its photocatalytic efficiency were systematically investigated using first-principles computations. We found that g-C3N4 composed of tri-s-triazine units (g-CN1) is preferable in photocatalysis, owing to its visible-light absorption and appropriate band edge potentials. Despite the benefit of nanocrystallization of g-CN1, excessively minimized and passivated g-CN1 nanosheets (g-CN1NSs) should be inhibited, due to the intensely broadened band gaps in these structures. C- or N-vacancies in g-CN1NSs lead to gap states and smaller band widths, which should also be restrained. Compared with C substitution in B doped g-CN1NSs, N-substitution is favourable for enhancing the photoactivity of g-CN1NSs, due to the red-shift light absorption and the absence of gap states within this structure. Both WTe2 coupled and CdSe cluster loaded g-CN1NSs have decreased band gaps and directly separated carriers, which are beneficial to promote the photoactivity of g-CN1NSs. Among these modified g-CN1NS photocatalysts, WTe2 coupled g-CN1NSs are more preferable, as a result of their smaller band gap, free gap states and more rapid migration of excitons. PMID:25648139

  12. Polymeric Graphitic Carbon Nitride Doped with CuO Dispersed on Dealuminated Clinoptilolite (CuO/HCP: Synthesis and Characterisation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saheed Olalekan Sanni

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available CuO dispersed on dealuminated clinoptilolite (CuO/HCP and further doped with polymeric graphitic carbon nitride (CuO/HCP-g-C3N4 was synthesized through 2 facile routes: precipitation method for CuO/HCP and impregnation through ultrasonication method for the hybrid composite material. The hybrid composite material crystalline phase, surface morphology, and structural and thermal properties were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, energy-dispersive X-ray analysis (EDAX, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR, and thermal analysis. The formation of the hybrid composite material was confirmed by XRD showing crystalline phase of CuO and g-C3N4 present on the surface of dealuminated clinoptilolite (HCP. SEM images analysis depicts no aggregation of the mixed metal oxide semiconductor nanoparticles at the center of HCP. The hybrid composite material, CuO/HCP-g-C3N4, with a good homogeneously dispersed metal oxide conductor having excellent catalytic activities has been synthesized.

  13. Torsional properties of hexagonal boron nitride nanotubes, carbon nanotubes and their hybrid structures: A molecular dynamics study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The torsional mechanical properties of hexagonal single-walled boron nitride nanotubes (SWBNNTs), single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), and their hybrid structures (SWBN-CNTs) are investigated using molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. Two approaches - force approach and energy approach, are adopted to calculate the shear moduli of SWBNNTs and SWCNTs, the discrepancy between two approaches is analyzed. The results show that the shear moduli of single-walled nanotubes (SWNTs), including SWBNNTs and SWCNTs are dependent on the diameter, especially for armchair SWNTs. The armchair SWNTs show the better ability of resistance the twisting comparable to the zigzag SWNTs. The effects of diameter and length on the critical values of torque of SWNTs are obtained by comparing the torsional behaviors of SWNTs with different diameters and different lengths. It is observed that the MD results of the effect of diameter and length on the critical values of torque agrees well with the prediction of continuum shell model. The shear modulus of SWBN-CNT has a significant dependence on the percentages of SWCNT and the hybrid style has also an influence on shear modulus. The critical values of torque of SWBN-CNTs increase with the increase of the percentages of SWCNT. This phenomenon can be interpreted by the function relationship between the torque of different bonds (B-N-X, C-C-X, C-B-X, C-N-X) and the angles of bonds

  14. Large-scale production of graphitic carbon nitride with outstanding nitrogen photofixation ability via a convenient microwave treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Huiqiang; Shi, Zhenyu; Li, Shuang; Liu, Na

    2016-08-01

    A convenient microwave treatment for synthesizing graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3N4) with outstanding nitrogen photofixation ability under visible light is reported. X-ray diffraction (XRD), N2 adsorption, UV-vis spectroscopy, SEM, N2-TPD, EPR, photoluminescence (PL) and photocurrent measurements were used to characterize the prepared catalysts. The results indicate that microwave treatment can form many irregular pores in as-prepared g-C3N4, which causes the increased surface area and separation rate of electrons and holes. More importantly, microwave treatment causes the formation of many nitrogen vacancies in as-prepared g-C3N4. These nitrogen vacancies not only serve as active sites to adsorb and activate N2 molecules but also promote interfacial charge transfer from catalysts to N2 molecules, thus significantly improving the nitrogen photofixation ability. Moreover, the present process is a convenient method for large-scale production of g-C3N4 which is significantly important for the practical application.

  15. Construction of carbon quantum dots/proton-functionalized graphitic carbon nitride nanocomposite via electrostatic self-assembly strategy and its application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jian, Xuan; Liu, Xian; Yang, Hui-min; Li, Jia-gang; Song, Xiu-li; Dai, Hong-yan; Liang, Zhen-hai

    2016-05-01

    Carbon quantum dots (CQDs) and graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3N4), as advanced metal-free material catalysts have been the focus of considerable attention because of their superior photocatalytic activities. In this study, we developed a novel approach to obtain CQDs/g-C3N4 nanocomposite with effective interfacial contact by incorporating negatively charged CQDs and tailor-made proton-functionalized g-C3N4via the electrostatic self-assembly strategy. Then, the morphology and microstructure of the new nanocomposite were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), ultraviolet-visible diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The CQDs and proton-functionalized g-C3N4 nanocomposite exhibited excellent electron transfer properties though electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), significantly enhanced photoactivity in the photoelectrochemical i-t curve test and degradation of methylene blue solution under visible light irradiation. These results demonstrated that the electrostatic self-assembly strategy process is a promising method of fabricating uniform metal-free material catalysts for an extensive range of applications.

  16. Durable ultrathin silicon nitride/carbon bilayer overcoats for magnetic heads: The role of enhanced interfacial bonding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pole tip recession (PTR) is one of the major issues faced in magnetic tape storage technology, which causes an increase in the magnetic spacing and hence signal loss during data readback. Despite efforts to reduce the magnetic spacing, PTR, and surface wear on the heads by using protective overcoats, most of them either employ complex fabrication processes and approaches do not provide adequate protection to the head or are too thick (∼10–20 nm), especially for future high density tape storage. In this work, we discuss an approach to reduce the PTR and surface wear at the head by developing an ultrathin ∼7 nm bilayer overcoat of silicon/silicon nitride (Si/SiNx) and carbon (C), which is totally fabricated by a cost-effective and industrial-friendly magnetron sputtering process. When compared with a monolithic C overcoat of similar thickness, the electrically insulating Si/SiNx/C bilayer overcoat was found to provide better wear protection for commercial tape heads, as demonstrated by Auger electron spectroscopic analyses after wear tests with commercial tape media. Although the microstructures of carbon in the monolithic and bilayer overcoats were similar, the improved wear durability of the bilayer overcoat was attributed to the creation of extensive interfacial bonding of Si and N with the C overcoat and the alumina-titanium carbide composite head substrate, as predicted by time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry and confirmed by in-depth X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analyses. This study highlights the pivotal role of enhanced interfaces and interfacial bonding in developing ultrathin yet wear-durable overcoats for tape heads

  17. Durable ultrathin silicon nitride/carbon bilayer overcoats for magnetic heads: The role of enhanced interfacial bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, Reuben J.; Dwivedi, Neeraj; Zhang, Lu; Zhang, Zheng; Lim, Christina Y. H.; Tripathy, S.; Bhatia, Charanjit S.

    2015-01-01

    Pole tip recession (PTR) is one of the major issues faced in magnetic tape storage technology, which causes an increase in the magnetic spacing and hence signal loss during data readback. Despite efforts to reduce the magnetic spacing, PTR, and surface wear on the heads by using protective overcoats, most of them either employ complex fabrication processes and approaches do not provide adequate protection to the head or are too thick (˜10-20 nm), especially for future high density tape storage. In this work, we discuss an approach to reduce the PTR and surface wear at the head by developing an ultrathin ˜7 nm bilayer overcoat of silicon/silicon nitride (Si/SiNx) and carbon (C), which is totally fabricated by a cost-effective and industrial-friendly magnetron sputtering process. When compared with a monolithic C overcoat of similar thickness, the electrically insulating Si/SiNx/C bilayer overcoat was found to provide better wear protection for commercial tape heads, as demonstrated by Auger electron spectroscopic analyses after wear tests with commercial tape media. Although the microstructures of carbon in the monolithic and bilayer overcoats were similar, the improved wear durability of the bilayer overcoat was attributed to the creation of extensive interfacial bonding of Si and N with the C overcoat and the alumina-titanium carbide composite head substrate, as predicted by time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry and confirmed by in-depth X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analyses. This study highlights the pivotal role of enhanced interfaces and interfacial bonding in developing ultrathin yet wear-durable overcoats for tape heads.

  18. Durable ultrathin silicon nitride/carbon bilayer overcoats for magnetic heads: The role of enhanced interfacial bonding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeo, Reuben J.; Dwivedi, Neeraj; Bhatia, Charanjit S., E-mail: elebcs@nus.edu.sg [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, National University of Singapore, Singapore, Singapore 117583 (Singapore); Zhang, Lu [Institute of Microelectronics (IME), A*STAR (Agency for Science, Technology, and Research), 11 Science Park Road, Singapore Science Park II, Singapore, Singapore 117685 (Singapore); Zhang, Zheng; Tripathy, S. [Institute of Materials Research and Engineering (IMRE), A*STAR (Agency for Science, Technology, and Research), 3 Research Link, Singapore, Singapore 117602 (Singapore); Lim, Christina Y. H. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National University of Singapore, Singapore, Singapore 117575 (Singapore)

    2015-01-28

    Pole tip recession (PTR) is one of the major issues faced in magnetic tape storage technology, which causes an increase in the magnetic spacing and hence signal loss during data readback. Despite efforts to reduce the magnetic spacing, PTR, and surface wear on the heads by using protective overcoats, most of them either employ complex fabrication processes and approaches do not provide adequate protection to the head or are too thick (∼10–20 nm), especially for future high density tape storage. In this work, we discuss an approach to reduce the PTR and surface wear at the head by developing an ultrathin ∼7 nm bilayer overcoat of silicon/silicon nitride (Si/SiN{sub x}) and carbon (C), which is totally fabricated by a cost-effective and industrial-friendly magnetron sputtering process. When compared with a monolithic C overcoat of similar thickness, the electrically insulating Si/SiN{sub x}/C bilayer overcoat was found to provide better wear protection for commercial tape heads, as demonstrated by Auger electron spectroscopic analyses after wear tests with commercial tape media. Although the microstructures of carbon in the monolithic and bilayer overcoats were similar, the improved wear durability of the bilayer overcoat was attributed to the creation of extensive interfacial bonding of Si and N with the C overcoat and the alumina-titanium carbide composite head substrate, as predicted by time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry and confirmed by in-depth X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analyses. This study highlights the pivotal role of enhanced interfaces and interfacial bonding in developing ultrathin yet wear-durable overcoats for tape heads.

  19. The influence of Cu-doping on aluminum nitride, silicon carbide and boron nitride nanotubes’ ability to detect carbon dioxide; DFT study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahdavifar, Zabiollah; Abbasi, Nasibeh

    2014-02-01

    In this research, the potential use of Cu-functionalized [4,4] silicon carbide (SiC), aluminum nitride (AlN) and boron nitride (BN) single-walled nanotubes as nanodevices for CO2 monitoring is investigated. It is found that Cu-doping the different sites of the considered nanotubes and combining these nanotubes with CO2 gas molecules are both exothermic processes, and the relaxed geometries are stable. Our results reveal that the CO2 gas molecules can be strongly physisorbed on the Cu-doped nanotubes, accompanied by large adsorption energy. Compared with the weak adsorption of CO2 molecule onto pristine BNNT and SiCNT, the CO2 molecule tends to be strongly physisorbed onto Cu-decorated BNNT and SiCNT with an appreciable adsorption energy. Furthermore, the results indicate that Cu-functionalized SiCNT is more favorable than Cu-doped BNNT and AlNNT structures for CO2 adsorption. Natural bond orbital analysis indicates that the adsorption of a CO2 molecule onto Cu-doped nanotubes is influenced by the electronic conductance and mechanical properties of the nanotube, which could serve as a signal for a gas sensor. It appears that the considerable charge transfer from the Cu-doped nanotubes to a CO2 molecule reduces the energy gap. These observations suggest that the Cu-doped-SiCNT, -BNNT and -AlNNT can be introduced as promising candidates for gas sensor devices that detect CO2 molecules.

  20. Preparation of new titanium nitride-carbon nanocomposites in supercritical benzene and their oxygen reduction activity in alkaline medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • TiN/C/graphene composite (SIV) was synthesized using supercritical benzene medium. • SIV catalyst shows high ORR activity due to both TiN and graphene phases. • SIV improves ORR via a mainly 4-electron pathway to form water and around 16% H2O2. • SIV exhibits high stability due to reduce H2O2 and prevent surface poisoning. - Abstract: Titanium nitride-carbon nanocomposites are synthesized by the reaction of TiCl4 and NaN3 in supercritical benzene medium that also serves as a carbon source. The as-prepared precursors (SI, SII) are subjected to several heat treatments (SIII–SV). The synthesized nanoparticles are characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The samples are tested as electrocatalyst for oxygen reduction reaction in an alkaline electrolyte. It is shown that the electrocatalytic properties of the synthesized nanoparticles are highly dependent on the heat treatment atmosphere and duration. The heat treatment under ammonia atmosphere at 1000 °C for 10 h (SIV) increased the ORR mass activity from −0.64 (SI) to −1.28 mA mg−1 (SIV) at −0.6 V vs. SCE. Moreover, the heat treated sample (SIV) shows almost twice ORR mass activity as commercial TiN. Rotating disk electrode (RDE) measurements exhibit ORR on commercial TiN proceeds via two parallel pathways including two and four electrons, resulting in almost 60% H2O2 production, while SIV sample improves ORR by reducing H2O2 formation to almost 16%. The high ORR activity and stability of the sample SIV are mainly due to (i) random layer structure of carbon that combines through a hybrid state with TiN nanoparticles, (ii) unstoichiometric nitrogen and oxygen doped into TiN lattice, and (iii) higher electrochemical surface area. Moreover, the possible pathways of carbon phase formation in vicinity of

  1. Study of carbon nitride compounds synthesised by co-implantation of 13C and 14N in copper at different temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research highlights: → Simultaneous implantation of 13C and 14N in copper were performed to synthesise CNx compounds. → The formation of fullerene-like CNx compounds was highlighted by XPS and TEM. → Only about 20% of the implanted 14N atoms are contained in the FL CxNy structures. → The exceeding of implanted nitrogen precipitates in large N2 gas bubbles. → A growth model for the FL CxNy structures is proposed. - Abstract: Carbon nitride compounds have been synthesised in copper by simultaneous high fluence (1018 at. cm-2) implantation of 13C and 14N ions. During the implantation process, the substrate temperature was maintained at 25, 250, 350 or 450 deg. C. Depth profiles of 13C and 14N were determined using the non-resonant nuclear reactions (NRA) induced by a 1.05 MeV deuteron beam. The retained doses were deduced from NRA measurements and compared to the implanted fluence. The chemical bonds between carbon and nitrogen were studied as a function of depth and temperature by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The curve fitting of C 1s and N 1s core level photoelectron spectra reveal different types of C-N bonds and show the signature of N2 molecules. The presence of nitrogen gas bubbles in copper was highlighted by mass spectroscopy. The structure of carbon nitride compounds was characterised by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). For that purpose, cross-sectional samples were prepared using a focused ion beam (FIB) system. TEM observations showed the presence of small amorphous carbon nitride 'nano-capsules' and large gas bubbles in copper. Based on our observations, we propose a model for the growth of these nano-objects. Finally, the mechanical properties of the implanted samples were investigated by nano-indentation.

  2. Tribological properties of ion beam deposited diamond-like carbon film on silicon nitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present article reports on the physical characterization and tribological properties of diamond-like carbon (DLC) films deposited on structural Si3N4 substrates. The films were deposited by the direct ion beam deposition technique. The ion beam was produced by plasma discharge of pre-mixed methane and hydrogen gas in a Kaufman-type ion source. The deposited films were found to be amorphous and contained about 70% carbon and 30% hydrogen. The friction coefficient of an uncoated Si3N4 ball on a DLC coated Si3N4 disc starts at about 0.2, then decreases rapidly to 0.1-0.15 with increasing sliding distance. Increasing humidity results in a slight increase in friction coefficient, but a significant decrease in wear factor. The wear factor for the tests at ≅60% rh (relative humidity) are about an order of magnitude smaller than the tests at 3% rh. (orig.)

  3. Corrosion resistance and electrical properties of carbon/chromium-titanium-nitride multilayer coatings on stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Kai; Li, Zhuguo; Lu, Fenggui; Huang, Jian; Cai, Xun; Wu, Yixiong

    2014-03-01

    High electrical conductivity and corrosion resistance are central to advances in wider application of metallic bipolar plates in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC). In this study, C/Cr-Ti-N multilayer coatings are deposited by physical vapor deposition and the effect of Cr:Ti ratio on the corrosion resistance and interfacial contact resistance (ICR) are systematically investigated. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) result shows that the carbon layer is compact and uniform. Excellent corrosion resistance of 0.127 μA cm-2 current density at operating voltage in PEMFC cathode environment and low ICR of 2.03 mΩ-cm2 at compaction force of 150 N cm-2 are achieved when Cr:Ti ratio is 2:4 and 3:3, respectively. The significant enhancement in surface conductivity is probably because that the current comes from carbon paper is homogenized by two electrically conductive layers and flows to the passive film with much more contact area. After polarization, ICR increase to 3.07 mΩ-cm2 and 3.02 mΩ-cm2 in the simulated PEMFC cathode and anode environment, respectively. However, the Raman spectroscopy results disclose that the bonding type of top carbon film before and after polarization shows little difference. The results indicate that C/Cr-Ti-N multilayer coating with Cr:Ti ratio of 2:4 achieves the optimal composition.

  4. Investigations of cobalt and carbon codoping in gallium nitride for spintronic applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Extensive theoretical investigations have been carried out to study the ferromagnetic properties of transition metal doped wurtzite GaN using the Tight Binding Linear Muffin-tin Orbital (TBLMTO) method within the density functional theory. The present calculation reveals ferromagnetism in cobalt doped GaN when one gallium is replaced by cobalt in a 3×3×2 supercell of GaN, which gives rise to a cobalt concentration of 2.77%. The system is half-metallic with a magnetic moment of 4.0 μB. When Co is bonded with one carbon, there is a drastic decrease in magnetic moment and the system becomes metallic. When Co dimer is introduced via nitrogen which corresponds to the Co concentration of 5.5% the magnetic moment is 3.99 μB and the system is half-metallic. Same trend is observed when Co is bonded via nitrogen with unequal distance. When cobalt dimer is formed via carbon, the moment becomes 2.95 μB and it shows metallic character. For dimer via carbon with unequal distance, the moment is 3.0 μB and the system becomes semiconductor. For higher percentage of cobalt dopant the system shows metallic character. C and Co doped GaN samples have been synthesized experimentally and characterized with X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, micro-Raman and superconducting quantum interface device measurements. The observed results are correlated with the theoretical studies. - Highlights: ► DFT theory studies on Co and C doped GaN. ► Synthesis and characterization of pure and codoped GaN. ► Correlation between theoretical and experimental results. ► Applications in the field of Spintronics.

  5. Deposit of thin films of nitrided amorphous carbon using the laser ablation technique; Deposito de peliculas delgadas de carbono amorfo nitrurado utilizando la tecnica de ablacion laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rebollo, P.B.; Escobar A, L.; Camps C, E. [Departamento de Fisica, Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, C.P. 52045 Salazar, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Haro P, E.; Camacho L, M.A. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana Iztapalapa (Mexico); Muhl S, S. [Instituto de Investigacion en Materiales, UNAM (Mexico)

    2000-07-01

    It is reported the synthesis and characterization of thin films of amorphous carbon (a-C) nitrided, deposited by laser ablation in a nitrogen atmosphere at pressures which are from 4.5 x 10 {sup -4} Torr until 7.5 x 10 {sup -2} Torr. The structural properties of the films are studied by Raman spectroscopy obtaining similar spectra at the reported for carbon films type diamond. The study of behavior of the energy gap and the ratio nitrogen/carbon (N/C) in the films, shows that the energy gap is reduced when the nitrogen incorporation is increased. It is showed that the refraction index of the thin films diminish as nitrogen pressure is increased, indicating the formation of graphitic material. (Author)

  6. Amorphous carbon nitride as an alternative electrode material in electroanalysis: Simultaneous determination of dopamine and ascorbic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Medeiros, Roberta A., E-mail: roantigo@hotmail.com [Departamento de Química, Universidade Federal de São Carlos, C.P. 676, 13560-970 São Carlos, SP (Brazil); Matos, Roberto [Departamento de Química, Universidade Federal de São Carlos, C.P. 676, 13560-970 São Carlos, SP (Brazil); Benchikh, Abdelkader [LECVE, Faculté de la Technologie, Département de Génie des Procédés, Université Abderrahmane MIRA, Béjaïa (Algeria); LISE UPR 15 du CNRS, Université Pierre et Marie Curie, 4, Place Jussieu, 75005 Paris (France); Saidani, Boualem [LECVE, Faculté de la Technologie, Département de Génie des Procédés, Université Abderrahmane MIRA, Béjaïa (Algeria); Debiemme-Chouvy, Catherine [LISE UPR 15 du CNRS, Université Pierre et Marie Curie, 4, Place Jussieu, 75005 Paris (France); Deslouis, Claude, E-mail: claude.deslouis@upmc.fr [LISE UPR 15 du CNRS, Université Pierre et Marie Curie, 4, Place Jussieu, 75005 Paris (France); Rocha-Filho, Romeu C.; Fatibello-Filho, Orlando [Departamento de Química, Universidade Federal de São Carlos, C.P. 676, 13560-970 São Carlos, SP (Brazil)

    2013-10-03

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •a-CN{sub x} films are a new class of electrodic carbon materials that present several properties similar to those of BDD films. •a-CN{sub x} and BDD were used as working electrodes for simultaneous determination of DA and AA. •Electrochemical pretreatments on a-CN{sub x} or BDD modified the nature of the surface terminations. •An anodic pretreatment in 0.1 mol L{sup −1} KOH was necessary to attain an adequate separation of the DA and AA oxidation potential peaks. •For the first time in the literature, the use of an a-CN{sub x} electrode in a complete electroanalytical procedure is reported. -- Abstract: Boron-doped diamond (BDD) films are excellent electrode materials, whose electrochemical activity for some analytes can be tuned by controlling their surface termination, most commonly either to predominantly hydrogen or oxygen. This tuning can be accomplished by e.g. suitable cathodic or anodic electrochemical pretreatments. Recently, it has been shown that amorphous carbon nitride (a-CN{sub x}) films may present electrochemical characteristics similar to those of BDD, including the influence of surface termination on their electrochemical activity toward some analytes. In this work, we report for the first time a complete electroanalytical method using an a-CN{sub x} electrode. Thus, an a-CN{sub x} film deposited on a stainless steel foil by DC magnetron sputtering is proposed as an alternative electrode for the simultaneous determination of dopamine (DA) and ascorbic acid (AA) in synthetic biological samples by square-wave voltammetry. The obtained results are compared with those attained using a BDD electrode. For both electrodes, a same anodic pretreatment in 0.1 mol L{sup −1} KOH was necessary to attain an adequate and equivalent separation of the DA and AA oxidation potential peaks of about 330 mV. The detection limits obtained for the simultaneous determination of these analytes using the a-CN{sub x

  7. Carbon Nitride-Aromatic Diimide-Graphene Nanohybrids: Metal-Free Photocatalysts for Solar-to-Hydrogen Peroxide Energy Conversion with 0.2% Efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kofuji, Yusuke; Isobe, Yuki; Shiraishi, Yasuhiro; Sakamoto, Hirokatsu; Tanaka, Shunsuke; Ichikawa, Satoshi; Hirai, Takayuki

    2016-08-10

    Solar-to-chemical energy conversion is a challenging subject for renewable energy storage. In the past 40 years, overall water splitting into H2 and O2 by semiconductor photocatalysis has been studied extensively; however, they need noble metals and extreme care to avoid explosion of the mixed gases. Here we report that generating hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) from water and O2 by organic semiconductor photocatalysts could provide a new basis for clean energy storage without metal and explosion risk. We found that carbon nitride-aromatic diimide-graphene nanohybrids prepared by simple hydrothermal-calcination procedure produce H2O2 from pure water and O2 under visible light (λ > 420 nm). Photoexcitation of the semiconducting carbon nitride-aromatic diimide moiety transfers their conduction band electrons to graphene and enhances charge separation. The valence band holes on the semiconducting moiety oxidize water, while the electrons on the graphene moiety promote selective two-electron reduction of O2. This metal-free system produces H2O2 with solar-to-chemical energy conversion efficiency 0.20%, comparable to the highest levels achieved by powdered water-splitting photocatalysts. PMID:27439985

  8. Self-assembly graphitic carbon nitride quantum dots anchored on TiO2 nanotube arrays: An efficient heterojunction for pollutants degradation under solar light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Jingyang; Zhu, Lin; Geng, Ping; Chen, Guohua

    2016-10-01

    In this study, an efficient heterojunction was constructed by anchoring graphitic carbon nitride quantum dots onto TiO2 nanotube arrays through hydrothermal reaction strategy. The prepared graphitic carbon nitride quantum dots, which were prepared by solid-thermal reaction and sequential dialysis process, act as a sensitizer to enhance light absorption. Furthermore, it was demonstrated that the charge transfer and separation in the formed heterojunction were significantly improved compared with pristine TiO2. The prepared heterojunction was used as a photoanode, exhibiting much improved photoelectrochemical capability and excellent photo-stability under solar light illumination. The photoelectrocatalytic activities of prepared heterojunction were demonstrated by degradation of RhB and phenol in aqueous solution. The kinetic constants of RhB and phenol degradation using prepared photoelectrode are 2.4 times and 4.9 times higher than those of pristine TiO2, respectively. Moreover, hydroxyl radicals are demonstrated to be dominant active radicals during the pollutants degradation. PMID:27232727

  9. Carbon Nitride Thin Films Deposited by Plasma Assisted Nd∶YAG Laser Ablation of Graphite in N2+H2 Atmosphere

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Wei; WANG Shufang; ZHANG Lianshui; LI Xiaowei; FU Guangsheng

    2001-01-01

    Carbon nitride thin films are deposited on silicon wafers by 532 nm Nd∶YAG laser ablation of graphite in the N2+H2 atmosphere assisted by a dc glow discharge plasma at a higher gas pressure of about 4.0 kPa. The properties of the thin films are investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The results show that the deposited films are composed of α-C3N4, β-C3N4 phase and have the N/C atomic ratio of 2.01. The optical emission spectroscopy (OES) studies indicate that the introduction of a dc glow discharge and the adoption of a higher gas pressure during the film deposition are favorable to the net generation of the atomic N, CN radicals and N+2 in B2Σ+u excited state in the plasma, which are considered to play a major role in the synthesis of carbon nitride.

  10. Role of interfacial carbon layer in the thermal diffusivity/conductivity of silicon carbide fiber-reinforced reaction-bonded silicon nitride matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatt, Hemanshu; Donaldson, Kimberly Y.; Hasselman, D. P. H.; Bhatt, Ramakrishna T.

    1992-01-01

    Experiments were carried out on samples of reaction-bonded silicon nitride uniaxially reinforced by SiC monofilaments with and without a 3-micron-thick carbon-rich coating. It is found that a combination of a carbon coatings on the fibers and an interfacial gap due to the thermal expansion mismatch in the composite can significantly (by a factor of 2) lower the effective thermal diffusivity in the direction transverse to the fiber. At atmospheric pressure, gaseous conduction across the interfacial gap makes a significant contribution to the heat transfer across the interface, indicated by significantly lower values of the effective thermal diffusivity under vacuum than in nitrogen or helium at atmospheric pressure.

  11. Hot pressing aluminum nitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experiment was performed on the hot pressing of aluminum nitride, using three kinds of powder which are: a) made by electric arc method, b) made by nitrifying aluminum metal powder, and c) made from alumina and carbon in nitrogen atmosphere. The content of oxygen of these powders was analyzed by activation analysis using high energy neutron irradiation. The density of hot pressed samples was classified into two groups. The high density group contained oxygen more than 3 wt. %, and the low density group contained about 0.5 wt %. Typical density vs. temperature curves have a bending point near 1,5500C, and the sample contains iron impurity of 0.5 wt. %. Needle crystals were found to grow near 1,5500C by VLS mechanism, and molten iron acts a main part of mechanism as a liquid phase. According to the above-mentioned curve, the iron impurity in aluminum nitride prevents densification. The iron impurity accelerates crystal growth. Advance of densification may be expected by adding iron impurity, but in real case, the densification is delayed. Densification and crystal growth are greatly accelerated by oxygen impurity. In conclusion, more efforts must be made for the purification of aluminum nitride. In the present stage, the most pure nitride powder contains about 0.1 wt. % of oxygen, as compared with good silicon carbide crystals containing only 10-5 wt. % of nitrogen. (Iwakiri, K.)

  12. Structural, electronic and magnetic properties of 3d transition metals embedded graphene-like carbon nitride sheet: A DFT + U study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shuai; Chi, Runze; Li, Chong; Jia, Yu

    2016-03-01

    Using first-principles calculations, we have investigated the structural, electronic and magnetic properties of 3d transition-metals (TMs) embedded two dimensional graphene-like carbon nitride sheet (TMs@g-CN). Our results show that TMs embed in the cavity of g-CN sheet regularly and keep intact of the planar structure, though there is Jahn-Teller distortion inevitably. Additionally, the nonmagnetic and semiconducting sheet can be significantly modulated to be magnetic and metallic behaviors induced by the resonant impurity states between TMs 3d and g-CN 2p orbitals. Moreover, we also explore the magnetic coupling of TMs@g-CN and find that it varies dramatically with the change of the distance between TMs, i.e., from ferromagnetic (FM) to antiferromagnetic (AFM) transition. Finally, the underlying physical mechanism of the above findings is discussed.

  13. Solar-Driven Reduction of Aqueous Protons Coupled to Selective Alcohol Oxidation with a Carbon Nitride-Molecular Ni Catalyst System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasap, Hatice; Caputo, Christine A; Martindale, Benjamin C M; Godin, Robert; Lau, Vincent Wing-Hei; Lotsch, Bettina V; Durrant, James R; Reisner, Erwin

    2016-07-27

    Solar water-splitting represents an important strategy toward production of the storable and renewable fuel hydrogen. The water oxidation half-reaction typically proceeds with poor efficiency and produces the unprofitable and often damaging product, O2. Herein, we demonstrate an alternative approach and couple solar H2 generation with value-added organic substrate oxidation. Solar irradiation of a cyanamide surface-functionalized melon-type carbon nitride ((NCN)CNx) and a molecular nickel(II) bis(diphosphine) H2-evolution catalyst (NiP) enabled the production of H2 with concomitant selective oxidation of benzylic alcohols to aldehydes in high yield under purely aqueous conditions, at room temperature and ambient pressure. This one-pot system maintained its activity over 24 h, generating products in 1:1 stoichiometry, separated in the gas and solution phases. The (NCN)CNx-NiP system showed an activity of 763 μmol (g CNx)(-1) h(-1) toward H2 and aldehyde production, a Ni-based turnover frequency of 76 h(-1), and an external quantum efficiency of 15% (λ = 360 ± 10 nm). This precious metal-free and nontoxic photocatalytic system displays better performance than an analogous system containing platinum instead of NiP. Transient absorption spectroscopy revealed that the photoactivity of (NCN)CNx is due to efficient substrate oxidation of the material, which outweighs possible charge recombination compared to the nonfunctionalized melon-type carbon nitride. Photoexcited (NCN)CNx in the presence of an organic substrate can accumulate ultralong-lived "trapped electrons", which allow for fuel generation in the dark. The artificial photosynthetic system thereby catalyzes a closed redox cycle showing 100% atom economy and generates two value-added products, a solar chemical, and solar fuel. PMID:27337491

  14. Configurable three-dimensional boron nitride-carbon architecture and its tunable electronic behavior with stable thermal performances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loeblein, Manuela; Tay, Roland Yingjie; Tsang, Siu Hon; Ng, Wei Beng; Teo, Edwin Hang Tong

    2014-08-13

    Recent developments of 3D-graphene and 3D-boron-nitride have become of great interest owing to their potential for ultra-light flexible electronics. Here we demonstrate the first synthesis of novel 3D-BNC hybrids. By specifically controlling the compositions of C and BN, new fascinating properties are observed, such as highly tunable electrical conductivity, controllable EMI shielding properties, and stable thermal conductivity. This ultra-light hybrid opens up many new applications such as for electronic packaging and thermal interface materials (TIMs). PMID:24789084

  15. A comparative study on carbon, boron-nitride, boron-phosphide and silicon-carbide nanotubes based on surface electrostatic potentials and average local ionization energies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esrafili, Mehdi D; Behzadi, Hadi

    2013-06-01

    A density functional theory study was carried out to predict the electrostatic potentials as well as average local ionization energies on both the outer and the inner surfaces of carbon, boron-nitride (BN), boron-phosphide (BP) and silicon-carbide (SiC) single-walled nanotubes. For each nanotube, the effect of tube radius on the surface potentials and calculated average local ionization energies was investigated. It is found that SiC and BN nanotubes have much stronger and more variable surface potentials than do carbon and BP nanotubes. For the SiC, BN and BP nanotubes, there are characteristic patterns of positive and negative sites on the outer lateral surfaces. On the other hand, a general feature of all of the systems studied is that stronger potentials are associated with regions of higher curvature. According to the evaluated surface electrostatic potentials, it is concluded that, for the narrowest tubes, the water solubility of BN tubes is slightly greater than that of SiC followed by carbon and BP nanotubes. PMID:23408252

  16. Robust non-carbon titanium nitride nanotubes supported Pt catalyst with enhanced catalytic activity and durability for methanol oxidation reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    By the combination of solvothermal alcoholysis and post-nitriding method, titanium nitride nanotubes (TiN NTs), with high surface area, hollow and interior porous structure are prepared successfully and used at a support for Pt nanoparticles. The TiN NTs supported Pt (Pt/TiN NTs) catalyst displays enhanced activity and durability towards methanol oxidation reaction (MOR) compared with the commercial Pt/C (E-TEK) catalyst. X ray diffraction (XRD), nitrogen adsorption/desorption, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurements are performed to investigate the physicochemical properties of the synthesized catalyst. SEM and TEM images reveal that the wall of the TiN NTs is porous and Pt nanoparticles supported on the dendritic TiN nanocrystals exhibit small size and good dispersion. Effects of inherent corrosion-resistant, tubular and porous nanostructures and electron transfer due to the strong metal–support interactions of TiN NTs contribute to the enhanced catalytic activity and stability of Pt/TiN NTs towards the MOR

  17. Synthesis of chromium nitride powder by carbo-thermal nitriding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fine chromium nitride powders were synthesized by carbo-thermal nitriding from Cr2O3 and carbon black. Thermal nitriding reaction of Cr2O3 and carbon black mixture was investigated by TG-DTA. The products were identified by XRD. Cr3C2 and Cr2 (CN) were formed in the early stage of the reaction, but finally they changed into Cr2N and CrN. Lab-scale syntheses of Cr2N and CrN were carried out using an electric tube furnace. Cr2N was synthesized by firing the mixed powder at 1393 K for 1 hr under nitrogen and hydrogen mixed gas flow, whereas CrN was synthesized by sequentially nitriding of Cr2N at 1173 K. The both synthesized powders showed homogeneous morphology with narrow particle size distribution and average size of about 1 μm. Cr2N and CrN contained 11 and 20 % of nitrogen respectively, sub percents of oxygen and carbon. (author)

  18. Small-Sized Tungsten Nitride Particles Strongly Anchored on Carbon Nanotubes and their Use as Supports for Pt for Methanol Electro-oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yuan; Yan, Haijing; Zhou, Xiaoguang; Li, Mingxia; Fu, Honggang

    2015-12-01

    The anchoring of small-sized WN (tungsten nitride) nanoparticles (NPs) with good dispersion on carbon nanotubes (CNTs) offers an effective means of obtaining promising materials for use in electrocatalysis. Herein, an effective method based on grinding treatment followed by a nitridation process is proposed to realize this goal. In the synthesis, a solution containing H4 [SiO4 (W3 O9 )4 ] (SiW12 ) and CNTs modified with polyethylenimine (PEI-CNTs) was ground to dryness. Small-sized WN NPs were anchored onto the CNTs with good dispersion after calcination under NH3 . Under hydrothermal assembly conditions (absence of grinding), WN particles of larger size and with inferior dispersion were obtained, demonstrating the important role of the grinding process. The benefit of the small-sized WN has been demonstrated by using WN/CNTs as a support for Pt to catalyze the methanol electro-oxidation reaction. The mass activity of Pt-WN/CNTs-G-70 (where G denotes the grinding treatment, and 70 is the loading amount (%) of WN in the WN/CNTs) was evaluated as about 817 mA mg(-1) Pt , better that those of commercial Pt/C (340 mA mg(-1) Pt ) and Pt/CNTs (162 mA mg(-1) Pt ). The Pt-WN/CNTs-G also displayed good CO tolerance. In contrast, Pt-WN/CNTs prepared without the grinding process displayed an activity of 344 mA mg(-1) Pt , verifying the key role of grinding treatment in the preparation of WN/CNTs with good co-catalytic effect. PMID:26503799

  19. Effect of nitriding/nanostructuration of few layer graphene supported iron-based particles; catalyst in graphene etching and carbon nanofilament growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baaziz, Walid; Melinte, Georgian; Ersen, Ovidiu; Pham-Huu, Cuong; Janowska, Izabela

    2014-08-14

    Stable, highly faceted and dispersed iron nitride particles supported on few layer graphene are obtained by ammonia decomposition on iron-based particles at the temperature commonly used for the synthesis of N-doped CNTs and graphene etching. The TEM/EELS analysis reveals nitrogen diffusion in a bulk of the particles. The resulting facet FeNx catalyst exhibits high activity in the etching of graphene, which is assisted by catalyst reorganization. Ammonia decomposition is used for the first time for graphene etching, while the highly faceted catalyst has an impact on the etched channels structures. According to the shape of the active planes of the catalyst, the etching results in sharp "V" channel ends and often "step-like" edges. The FeNx morphology proves previously reported triangularisation of arches in highly N-doped carbon nanotubes. The conditioning of the catalyst by its shaping and nitrogen incorporation is investigated additionally in the carbon nanostructure formation, for decomposition of ethane. The herringbone CNFs, "hollow" bamboo-like CNFs/CNTs or CNTs are effectively observed. PMID:24964374

  20. Synthesis and characterization of thin films of nitrided amorphous carbon deposited by laser ablation; Sintesis y caracterizacion de peliculas delgadas de carbono amorfo nitrurado, depositadas por ablacion laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rebollo P, B

    2001-07-01

    The objective of this work is the synthesis and characterization of thin films of amorphous carbon (a-C) and thin films of nitrided amorphous carbon (a-C-N) using the laser ablation technique for their deposit. For this purpose, the physical properties of the obtained films were studied as function of diverse parameters of deposit such as: nitrogen pressure, power density, substrate temperature and substrate-target distance. For the characterization of the properties of the deposited thin films the following techniques were used: a) Raman spectroscopy which has demonstrated being a sensitive technique to the sp{sup 2} and sp{sup 3} bonds content, b) Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy which allows to know semi-quantitatively way the presence of the elements which make up the deposited films, c) Spectrophotometry, for obtaining the absorption spectra and subsequently the optical energy gap of the deposited material, d) Ellipsometry for determining the refraction index, e) Scanning Electron Microscopy for studying the surface morphology of thin films and, f) Profilemetry, which allows the determination the thickness of the deposited thin films. (Author)

  1. Adsorption of carbon monoxide on boroxol-ring-doped zigzag boron nitride nanotube: Electronic study via DFT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahedi, Ehsan; Yari, Maryam; Bahmanpour, Hooman

    2016-04-01

    Previous works have already demonstrated that reactivity and sensitivity of boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) toward gas molecules can be modified by impurity. In this work, three nitrogen atoms of BNNT (7,0) are replaced with oxygen to study the adsorption of CO molecule through the surface of boroxol ring with different adsorption patterns, including side-on and end-on. All calculations have been done using the DFT-B3LYP/6-31G * level of theory, and their electronic energies are corrected by gCP and D3 correction terms. The calculated binding energies are large, which indicates that CO molecule undergoes chemical adsorption. NBO results showed that the charge transfer occurs from the tube to the gas molecule, which can slightly change the electronic properties of the tube. Density of state (DOS) and partial DOS (PDOS) analysis revealed that adsorption of CO molecule on the boroxol ring position is covalent in nature. The Laplacian of electron density, Lagrangian kinetic energy density, Hamiltonian kinetic energy density, and potential energy density at bond critical points between the tube and CO indicate that the interaction between the tube and CO molecule is covalent in nature. Topological analysis of the electron localization function shows that electrons in the new formed bonds are approximately localized, meaning that the nature of the adsorption process is chemical covalent.

  2. High-pressure and high-temperature synthesis of rhenium carbide using rhenium and nanoscale amorphous two-dimensional carbon nitride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nozomu Yasui

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Both Re2C and Re2N are ultra incompressible and have a bulk modulus of about 400 GPa. These materials are synthesized under high pressure and high temperature. The synthesis pressures are about 10 GPa or below for Re2C and 20–30 GPa for Re2N. If the synthesis pressure of Re2N was about 10 GPa or below, a large volume high-pressure cell like a multi-anvil apparatus can be used to synthesize Re2N. To realize this, a proper solid nitrogen source is needed instead of liquid or gas nitrogen. We used a precursor of a mixture of rhenium and home-made nanoscale amorphous two-dimensional carbon nitride as a solid nitrogen source. Consequently, the synthesis reaction produced Re2C but not Re2N. We characterized the synthesized Re2C by various techniques including high-pressure x-ray diffraction (XRD. The bulk modulus B0 of the synthesized Re2C under hydrostatic conditions was estimated to be 385.7 ± 18.0 GPa. This value is a little smaller than the previous data. When the pressure medium became non-hydrostatic, the peculiar compression behaviour occurred; the rate of broadening of XRD lines increased and the compression became negligible in the range of a few GPa. The reason for this peculiar behaviour is not known.

  3. Ultrasensitive photoelectrochemical determination of chromium(VI) in water samples by ion-imprinted/formate anion-incorporated graphitic carbon nitride nanostructured hybrid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Tian; Yang, Xiaomin; Zhang, Lizhi; Gong, Jingming

    2016-07-15

    A rapid and highly sensitive photoelectrochemical (PEC) method has been proposed for the determination of trace amounts of chromium in water samples under visible-light irradiation. Here, a unique nanostructured hybrid of formate anion incorporated graphitic carbon nitride (F-g-C3N4) is smartly integrated with a Cr(VI) ion-imprinted polymer (IIP) as a photoactive electrode (denoted as IIP@F-g-C3N4). The nanohybrid of F-g-C3N4 exhibits an enhanced charge separation with substantially improved PEC responses versus g-C3N4. The newly designed IIP@F-g-C3N4 PEC sensor exhibits high sensitivity and selectivity for the determination of Cr(VI) because it offers efficient photogenerated electron reduction toward Cr(VI). The PEC analysis is highly linear over Cr(VI) concentrations ranging from 0.01 to 100.00ppb with a detection limit of 0.006ppb (S/N=3). Our approach can be used to detect Cr(VI), Cr(III) and the total chromium level in aqueous solution through oxidation of Cr(III) to Cr(VI) and the determination of the total chromium as Cr(VI). In practical applications, this low-cost and sensitive assay has been successfully applied for speciation determination of chromium in environmental water samples. PMID:27017396

  4. Improvement of visible light-induced photocatalytic performance by Cr-doped SrTiO3-carbon nitride intercalation compound (CNIC) composite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨明; 金效齐

    2016-01-01

    Novel organic−inorganic composite photocatalyst offers new opportunities in the practical applications of photocatalysis. Novel visible light-induced Cr-doped SrTiO3–carbon nitride intercalation compound (CNIC) composite photocatalysts were synthesized. The composite photocatalyst was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, UV-vis diffuse reflection spectroscopy, photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy, and BET surface area analyzer. The photocatalytic oxidation ability of the novel composite photocatalyst was evaluated using methyl orange (MO) as a target pollutant. The photocatalysts exhibited a significantly enhanced photocatalytic performance in degrading MO. For maximizing the photodegradation activity of the composite photocatalysts, the optimal CNIC content was determined. The improved photocatalytic activity of the as-prepared Cr-doped SrTiO3–CNIC composite photocatalyst may be attributed to the enhancement of photo-generated electron–hole separations at the interface.

  5. Electrospinning Directly Synthesized Porous TiO2 Nanofibers Modified by Graphitic Carbon Nitride Sheets for Enhanced Photocatalytic Degradation Activity under Solar Light Irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhikari, Surya Prasad; Awasthi, Ganesh Prasad; Kim, Han Joo; Park, Chan Hee; Kim, Cheol Sang

    2016-06-21

    We report a direct approach to the fabrication of a composite made of porous TiO2 nanofibers (NFs) and graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3N4) sheets, by means of an angled two-nozzle electrospinning combined with calcination process. Different wt % amounts of g-C3N4 particles in a polymer solution from one nozzle and TiO2 precursors containing the same polymer solution from another nozzle were electrospun and deposited on the collector. Structural characterizations confirm a well-defined morphology of the TiO2/g-C3N4 composite in which the TiO2 NFs are uniformly attached on the g-C3N4 sheet. This proper attachment of TiO2 NFs on the g-C3N4 sheets occurred during calcination. The prepared composites showed the enhanced photocatalytic activity over the photodegradation of rhodamine B and reactive black 5 under natural sunlight. Here, the synergistic effect between the g-C3N4 sheets and the TiO2 NFs having anisotropic properties enhanced the photogenerated electron-hole pair separation and migration, which was confirmed by the measurement of photoluminescence spectra, cyclic voltammograms, and electrochemical impedance spectra. The direct synthesis approach that is established here for such kinds of sheetlike structure and porous NFs composites could provide new insights for the design of high-performance energy conversion catalysts. PMID:27254544

  6. Influence of deposition parameters on surface roughness and mechanical properties of boron carbon nitride coatings synthesized by ion beam assisted deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boron carbon nitride (BCN) coatings were deposited on Si(100) wafers and Si3N4 disks by using ion beam assisted deposition from a boron carbide target. The BCN coatings were synthesized by the reaction between boron and carbon vapor as well as nitrogen ion simultaneously. The influence of deposition parameters such as ion acceleration voltage, ion acceleration current density and deposition ratio on the surface roughness and mechanical properties of the BCN coatings was investigated. The surface roughness was determined by using atomic force microscopy and the mechanical properties of the BCN coatings were evaluated by nano-indentation tests and friction tests in N2 gas. The composition and chemical bonding of the BCN coatings were analyzed by using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The results showed that the lower deposition rate, the smaller surface roughness and higher nano-hardness the BCN coatings were. The BCN coating with the smoothest surface (R a = 0.25 nm and R P-V = 2.8 nm) and the highest nanohardness of 33 GPa as well as excellent friction property were obtained at 0.5 nm/s and the nitrogen ions were generated at 2.0 kV and 60 μA/cm2, and the chemical composition of this BCN coating was 49 at.% B, 42 at.% C and 9 at.% N. Moreover, there were several bonding states such as B-N, B-C and C-N with B-C-N hybridization in this BCN coating

  7. Surface decoration of amine-rich carbon nitride with iron nanoparticles for arsenite (As(III)) uptake: The evolution of the Fe-phases under ambient conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiou, Y; Mouzourakis, E; Bourlinos, A B; Zboril, R; Karakassides, M A; Douvalis, A P; Bakas, Th; Deligiannakis, Y

    2016-07-15

    A novel hybrid material (gC3N4-rFe) consisting of amine-rich graphitic carbon nitride (gC3N4), decorated with reduced iron nanoparticles (rFe) is presented. XRD and TEM show that gC3N4-rFe bears aggregation-free Fe-nanoparticles (10nm) uniformly dispersed over the gC3N4 surface. In contrast, non-supported iron nanoparticles are strongly aggregated, with non-uniform size distribution (20-100nm). (57)Fe-Mössbauer spectroscopy, dual-mode electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and magnetization measurements, allow a detailed mapping of the evolution of the Fe-phases after exposure to ambient O2. The as-prepared gC3N4-rFe bears Fe(2+) and Fe° phases, however only after long exposure to ambient O2, a Fe-oxide layer is formed around the Fe° core. In this [Fe°/Fe-oxide] core-shell configuration, the gC3N4-rFe hybrid shows enhanced As(III) uptake capacity of 76.5mgg(-1), i.e., ca 90% higher than the unmodified carbonaceous support, and 300% higher than the non-supported Fe-nanoparticles. gC3N4-rFe is a superior As(III) sorbent i.e., compared to its single counterparts or vs. graphite/graphite oxide or activated carbon analogues (11-36mgg(-1)). The present results demonstrate that the gC3N4 matrix is not simply a net that holds the particles, but rather an active component that determines particle formation dynamics and ultimately their redox profile, size and surface dispersion homogeneity. PMID:27037479

  8. Modeling the kinetics of the nitriding and nitrocarburizing of iron

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Somers, Marcel A. J.; Mittemeijer, Eric J.

    1998-01-01

    The growth kinetics of the iron-nitride compound layer during nitriding and nitrocarburizing of pure iron has been investigated for various temperatures and various combinations of imposed nitrogen and carbon activities. The results indicate that no local equilibrium occurs at the gas/solid inter...

  9. Cadmium sulfide/graphitic carbon nitride heterostructure nanowire loading with a nickel hydroxide cocatalyst for highly efficient photocatalytic hydrogen production in water under visible light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Zhiping; Sun, Zijun; Liu, Xiang; Jia, Hongxing; Du, Pingwu

    2016-02-01

    Photocatalytic hydrogen production from water in a noble-metal-free system has attracted much attention in recent years. Herein we report on the use of core/shell cadmium sulfide/graphitic carbon nitride (CdS/g-C3N4) heterojunction nanorods modified by nickel hydroxide (Ni(OH)2) as a highly efficient photocatalyst for visible light-driven hydrogen production from water. Due to efficient separation of the photoexcited charge carriers in the CdS/g-C3N4 core/shell nanorods and the synergistic effect of Ni(OH)2, the optimal hydrogen evolution rate over Ni(OH)2-CdS/g-C3N4 is 115.18 μmol h-1 mg-1 under visible light irradiation (λ > 420 nm), which is ~26 times higher than the CdS/g-C3N4 nanorod composite without Ni(OH)2 and ~7 times better than the 0.5 wt% Pt-CdS/g-C3N4 nanorod composite. The apparent quantum efficiency is ~16.7% at an excitation of 450 nm. During photocatalysis, no degradation of Ni(OH)2 was observed based on the XPS data, indicating that it is a robust cocatalyst. Moreover, the present photocatalyst showed excellent photocatalytic stability for hydrogen production and the turnover number (TON) reached ~24 600 over 90 hours.Photocatalytic hydrogen production from water in a noble-metal-free system has attracted much attention in recent years. Herein we report on the use of core/shell cadmium sulfide/graphitic carbon nitride (CdS/g-C3N4) heterojunction nanorods modified by nickel hydroxide (Ni(OH)2) as a highly efficient photocatalyst for visible light-driven hydrogen production from water. Due to efficient separation of the photoexcited charge carriers in the CdS/g-C3N4 core/shell nanorods and the synergistic effect of Ni(OH)2, the optimal hydrogen evolution rate over Ni(OH)2-CdS/g-C3N4 is 115.18 μmol h-1 mg-1 under visible light irradiation (λ > 420 nm), which is ~26 times higher than the CdS/g-C3N4 nanorod composite without Ni(OH)2 and ~7 times better than the 0.5 wt% Pt-CdS/g-C3N4 nanorod composite. The apparent quantum efficiency is ~16.7% at an

  10. A facile one-pot synthesis of carbon nitride dots-reduced graphene oxide nanocomposites for simultaneous enhanced detecting of dopamine and uric acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ziyin; Zheng, Xiaohui; Li, Zhi; Zheng, Jianbin

    2016-08-01

    In this study, we described the facile synthesis of carbon nitride dots-reduced graphene oxide nanocomposites (CNDs-rGO) and their application for the enhanced electrochemical determination of dopamine (DA) and uric acid (UA). CNDs-rGO were synthesized for the first time through a green and facile one-step approach, carried out by hydrothermal heat-treatment of an aqueous solution containing GO and chitosan without introduction of other reducing agents or surface modifier. Then, the morphology and composition of CNDs-rGO nanocomposites were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. TEM observations revealed that CNDs with a size of about 5.0 nm were homogeneously and densely distributed on the surface of rGO. Electrochemical investigations indicated that CNDs-rGO nanocomposites exhibited an excellent performance toward DA and UA. The linear range for DA was estimated to be from 80 nM to 227 μM with a sensitivity of 154.3 μA mM(-1) cm(-2) and a low detection limit of 0.03 μM. Meanwhile, the linear range for UA was estimated to be from 80 nM to 328 μM with a high sensitivity of 178.1 μA mM(-1) cm(-2) and a low detection limit of 0.05 μM. Therefore, CNDs-rGO nanocomposites showed great application potential for constructing electrochemical sensors for the detection of DA and UA. PMID:27284588

  11. Electron Cloud in Steel Beam Pipe vs Titanium Nitride Coated and Amorphous Carbon Coated Beam Pipes in Fermilab's Main Injector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Backfish, Michael

    2013-04-01

    This paper documents the use of four retarding field analyzers (RFAs) to measure electron cloud signals created in Fermilab’s Main Injector during 120 GeV operations. The first data set was taken from September 11, 2009 to July 4, 2010. This data set is used to compare two different types of beam pipe that were installed in the accelerator. Two RFAs were installed in a normal steel beam pipe like the rest of the Main Injector while another two were installed in a one meter section of beam pipe that was coated on the inside with titanium nitride (TiN). A second data run started on August 23, 2010 and ended on January 10, 2011 when Main Injector beam intensities were reduced thus eliminating the electron cloud. This second run uses the same RFA setup but the TiN coated beam pipe was replaced by a one meter section coated with amorphous carbon (aC). This section of beam pipe was provided by CERN in an effort to better understand how an aC coating will perform over time in an accelerator. The research consists of three basic parts: (a) continuously monitoring the conditioning of the three different types of beam pipe over both time and absorbed electrons (b) measurement of the characteristics of the surrounding magnetic fields in the Main Injector in order to better relate actual data observed in the Main Injector with that of simulations (c) measurement of the energy spectrum of the electron cloud signals using retarding field analyzers in all three types of beam pipe.

  12. An expanded family of dysprosium-scandium mixed-metal nitride clusterfullerenes: the role of the lanthanide metal on the carbon cage size distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Tao; Liu, Fupin; Wang, Song; Zhu, Xianjun; Popov, Alexey A; Yang, Shangfeng

    2015-04-01

    A large family of dysprosium-scandium (Dy-Sc) mixed-metal nitride clusterfullerenes (MMNCFs), Dy(x)Sc(3-x)N@C2n (x = 1, 2, 2n = 68, 70, 76-86) have been successfully synthesized and isolated. Among these, the C70 and C82-based MMNCFs are two new cages that have never been isolated for MMNCFs. Synthesis of Dy(x)Sc(3-x)N@C2n was accomplished by the "selective organic solid" route using guanidinium thiocyanate as the nitrogen source, and their isolation was fulfilled by recycling HPLC. UV/Vis-NIR spectroscopic study indicates that almost all Dy(x)Sc(3-x)N@C2n MMNCFs are kinetically stable fullerenes with optical band gaps beyond 1 eV. This feature is distinctly different to their counterparts Dy3N@C2n (78≤2n≤88), whose for optical band-gaps are below 1 eV for relatively large cages such as C84 and C86. An FTIR spectroscopic study in combination with DFT calculations enables reasonable assignments of the cage isomeric structures of all isolated Dy(x)Sc(3-x)N@C2n (x = 1, 2, 2n = 68, 70, 76-86) MMNCFs. The carbon cage size distribution of Dy(x)Sc(3-x)N@C2n (2n = 68, 70, 76-86) is compared to the reported Dy3N@C2n (78≤2n≤8) homogeneous NCF and Dy(x)Sc(3-x)N@C2n (78≤2n≤88) MMNCF families, revealing that the medium-sized Dy metal plays a crucial role on the expanded cage size distribution of MMNCFs. As a result, Dy(x)Sc(3-x)N@C2n MMNCFs are the largest MMNCF family reported to date. PMID:25712246

  13. Graphitic carbon nitrides modified hollow fiber solid phase microextraction for extraction and determination of uric acid in urine and serum coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Ying-pei; Chen, Juan; Qi, Huan-yang; Shi, Yan-ping

    2015-11-01

    An elevated uric acid (UA) in urine or serum can affect renal function and blood pressure, which is an indicator of gout, cardiovascular and renal diseases, hypertension, etc. In this work, a new type of mixed matrix membrane (MMM), based on graphitic carbon nitrides (g-CNs) and hollow fiber (HF), was prepared and combined with solid phase microextraction (SPME) mode to determine UA in urine and serum followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS). The porous g-CNs were dispersed in ammonia, and then the exfoliated g-CNs nanosheets were held in the pores of HF by capillary forces and sonification. The prepared g-CNs modified HF (g-CNs-HF) was immersed in biofluid directly to extract UA with SPME mode and the solvent-free mode is convenient for further derivatization and analysis. To achieve the highest extraction efficiency (EF), main extraction and derivatization parameters, such as g-CNs-HF immobilizing time, sonification power and time of extraction, derivatization and desorption time, were optimized. Under the optimum extraction conditions, a favorable linearity of UA was obtained in the range 0.1-200μgmL(-1) with correlation coefficients higher than 0.9990, and the average recoveries at three spiked levels of UA in urine and serum ranged from 80.7% to 121.6%, from 84.7% to 101.1%, respectively. The obtained results demonstrated the developed g-CNs-HF-SPME is a simple, rapid, cost-effective, solvent-free method for the analysis of UA in biofluid. PMID:26444336

  14. Layer by layer assembly of catalase and amine-terminated ionic liquid onto titanium nitride nanoparticles modified glassy carbon electrode: Study of direct voltammetry and bioelectrocatalytic activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saadati, Shagayegh [Department of Chemistry, University of Kurdistan, P.O. Box 416, Sanandaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Salimi, Abdollah, E-mail: absalimi@uok.ac.ir [Department of Chemistry, University of Kurdistan, P.O. Box 416, Sanandaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Research Center for Nanotechnology, University of Kurdistan, P.O. Box 416, Sanandaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hallaj, Rahman; Rostami, Amin [Department of Chemistry, University of Kurdistan, P.O. Box 416, Sanandaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2012-11-13

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Catalase and amine-terminated ionic liquid were immobilized to GC/TiNnp with LBL assembly method. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer First a thin layer of NH{sub 2}-IL is covalently attached to GC/TiNnp electrode using electro-oxidation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer With alternative assemble of IL and catalase with positive and negative charged, multilayer was formed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Immobilized catalase shows excellent electrocatalytic activity toward H{sub 2}O{sub 2} reduction. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Biosensor response is directly correlated to the number of bilayers. - Abstract: A novel, simple and facile layer by layer (LBL) approach is used for modification of glassy carbon (GC) electrode with multilayer of catalase and nanocomposite containing 1-(3-Aminopropyl)-3-methylimidazolium bromide (amine terminated ionic liquid (NH{sub 2}-IL)) and titanium nitride nanoparticles (TiNnp). First a thin layer of NH{sub 2}-IL is covalently attached to GC/TiNnp electrode using electro-oxidation method. Then, with alternative self assemble positively charged NH{sub 2}-IL and negatively charged catalase a sensitive H{sub 2}O{sub 2} biosensor is constructed, whose response is directly correlated to the number of bilayers. The surface coverage of active catalase per bilayer, heterogeneous electron transfer rate constant (k{sub s}) and Michaelis-Menten constant (K{sub M}) of immobilized catalase were 3.32 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -12} mol cm{sup -2}, 5.28 s{sup -1} and 1.1 mM, respectively. The biosensor shows good stability, high reproducibility, long life-time, and fast amperometric response with the high sensitivity of 380 {mu}A mM{sup -1} cm{sup -2} and low detection limit of 100 nM at concentration range up to 2.1 mM.

  15. Ag2CrO4 nanoparticles loaded on two-dimensional large surface area graphite-like carbon nitride sheets: simple synthesis and excellent photocatalytic performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Lei; Liang, Lin; Wang, Fangxiao; Liu, Mengshuai; Sun, Jianmin

    2016-04-01

    Graphite-like carbon nitride (g-C3N4) with a large surface area was prepared through thermal condensation of guanidine hydrochloride at 650 °C. Various amounts of silver chromate (Ag2CrO4) nanoparticles with small size were highly loaded on the g-C3N4 by a simple co-precipitation method at room temperature. The chemical constituents, surface structure and optical properties of the resultant Ag2CrO4/g-C3N4 composites were thoroughly characterized. And the photocatalytic performances were evaluated by degradation of Rhodamine B (RhB) and phenol, the experimental results indicated that the as-prepared Ag2CrO4/g-C3N4 composites presented excellent photocatalytic activity under visible-light irradiation. With the mass ratio of Ag2CrO4 to g-C3N4 at 1 : 2, the Ag2CrO4/g-C3N4 composites exhibited optimal photocatalytic activity for degrading RhB, approximately 6.1 and 10.4 times higher than those on pure g-C3N4 and bare Ag2CrO4 particles. The improved photocatalytic activity was mainly attributed to the combined effect including the larger surface area, highly dispersed smaller Ag2CrO4 nanoparticles, stronger visible absorption and higher charge separation efficiency of the Ag2CrO4/g-C3N4 composites. Moreover, the possible mechanism for the photocatalytic activity was tentatively proposed. PMID:26937621

  16. Carbon diffusion in uncoated and titanium nitride coated iron substrates during microwave plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition of diamond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auger Electron Spectroscopy has been employed to investigate the effectiveness of thin films of TiN as barriers to carbon diffusion during Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) of diamond onto Fe substrates. Auger Depth Profiling was used to monitor the C concentration in the TiN layer, through the interface and into the substrate both before and after CVD diamond deposition. The results show that a layer of TiN only 250 Angstroems thick is sufficient to inhibit soot formation on the Fe surface and C diffusion into the Fe bulk. 14 refs., 4 figs

  17. Pull-test adhesion measurements of diamondlike carbon films on silicon carbide, silicon nitride, aluminum oxide, and zirconium oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hydrogenated amorphous carbon or diamondlike carbon (DLC) films were formed by 400 eV methane (CH4) ion bombardment of various smooth and rough ceramics, as well as ceramics coated with a layer of Si or Ti. Adhesion was measured by a bonded-pin method. Excellent adhesion was measured for smooth SiC and Si3N4, but adhesion of DLC to smooth Al2O3 and ZrO2 was negligible. The use of a Si bonding interlayer produced good adhesion to all the substrates, but a Ti layer was ineffective due to poor bonding between the DLC film and Ti. Bulk thermodynamic calculations are not directly applicable to bonding at the interface because the interface is two dimensional and the compositions of interfacial phases are generally not known. If the standard enthalpy ΔH degree for the reaction between CH4 and the substrate material is calculated under the assumption that a carbide phase is produced, a relationship is seen between the reaction enthalpy and the relative adhesion. Large positive enthalpies are associated with poor adhesion; negative or small positive enthalpies are associated with good adhesion. This relation between enthalpy and adhesion was also observed for DLC deposited on Si. The lack of adhesion to the Ti was attributed to inadvertent formation of a surface oxide layer that rendered the enthalpy for the reaction with CH4 positive

  18. Graphitic Carbon Nitride (g-C3N4)-Based Photocatalysts for Artificial Photosynthesis and Environmental Remediation: Are We a Step Closer To Achieving Sustainability?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Wee-Jun; Tan, Lling-Lling; Ng, Yun Hau; Yong, Siek-Ting; Chai, Siang-Piao

    2016-06-22

    As a fascinating conjugated polymer, graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3N4) has become a new research hotspot and drawn broad interdisciplinary attention as a metal-free and visible-light-responsive photocatalyst in the arena of solar energy conversion and environmental remediation. This is due to its appealing electronic band structure, high physicochemical stability, and "earth-abundant" nature. This critical review summarizes a panorama of the latest progress related to the design and construction of pristine g-C3N4 and g-C3N4-based nanocomposites, including (1) nanoarchitecture design of bare g-C3N4, such as hard and soft templating approaches, supramolecular preorganization assembly, exfoliation, and template-free synthesis routes, (2) functionalization of g-C3N4 at an atomic level (elemental doping) and molecular level (copolymerization), and (3) modification of g-C3N4 with well-matched energy levels of another semiconductor or a metal as a cocatalyst to form heterojunction nanostructures. The construction and characteristics of each classification of the heterojunction system will be critically reviewed, namely metal-g-C3N4, semiconductor-g-C3N4, isotype g-C3N4/g-C3N4, graphitic carbon-g-C3N4, conducting polymer-g-C3N4, sensitizer-g-C3N4, and multicomponent heterojunctions. The band structures, electronic properties, optical absorption, and interfacial charge transfer of g-C3N4-based heterostructured nanohybrids will also be theoretically discussed based on the first-principles density functional theory (DFT) calculations to provide insightful outlooks on the charge carrier dynamics. Apart from that, the advancement of the versatile photoredox applications toward artificial photosynthesis (water splitting and photofixation of CO2), environmental decontamination, and bacteria disinfection will be presented in detail. Last but not least, this comprehensive review will conclude with a summary and some invigorating perspectives on the challenges and future directions

  19. Density functional theory predictions for blue luminescence and nonlinear optical properties of carbon-doped gallium nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, XiaoLin; Zhang, YongFan; Zhuang, NaiFeng; Li, JunQian

    2010-12-01

    The TD-B3LYP method and the plane-wave formalism of DFT method were applied to predict the blue luminescence and nonlinear optical effect of C-doped GaN, respectively. The introduction of carbon dopant will generate different acceptor or donor levels, which are mainly composed by p electronic state, within the energy gap of GaN. Exploring the calculated luminescence spectra based on the optimized excited-state structure, C N:GaN exhibits high luminescence intensity and has nice monochromatic property. In addition, the corresponding second-order nonlinear optical coefficients are considerable, χ(2)xzx=-15.07 pm/V and χ(2)zzz=26.91 pm/V, which are about 28 times and 50 times of the second-order optical coefficient of KDP crystal.

  20. Low-temperature growth of low friction wear-resistant amorphous carbon nitride thin films by mid-frequency, high power impulse, and direct current magnetron sputtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The potential of different magnetron sputtering techniques for the synthesis of low friction and wear resistant amorphous carbon nitride (a-CNx) thin films onto temperature-sensitive AISI52100 bearing steel, but also Si(001) substrates was studied. Hence, a substrate temperature of 150 °C was chosen for the film synthesis. The a-CNx films were deposited using mid-frequency magnetron sputtering (MFMS) with an MF bias voltage, high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) with a synchronized HiPIMS bias voltage, and direct current magnetron sputtering (DCMS) with a DC bias voltage. The films were deposited using a N2/Ar flow ratio of 0.16 at the total pressure of 400 mPa. The negative bias voltage, Vs, was varied from 20 to 120 V in each of the three deposition modes. The microstructure of the films was characterized by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and selected area electron diffraction, while the film morphology was investigated by scanning electron microscopy. All films possessed an amorphous microstructure, while the film morphology changed with the bias voltage. Layers grown applying the lowest substrate bias of 20 V exhibited pronounced intercolumnar porosity, independent of the sputter technique. Voids closed and dense films are formed at Vs ≥ 60 V, Vs ≥ 100 V, and Vs = 120 V for MFMS, DCMS, and HiPIMS, respectively. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy revealed that the nitrogen-to-carbon ratio, N/C, of the films ranged between 0.2 and 0.24. Elastic recoil detection analysis showed that Ar content varied between 0 and 0.8 at. % and increased as a function of Vs for all deposition techniques. All films exhibited compressive residual stress, σ, which depends on the growth method; HiPIMS produces the least stressed films with values ranging between −0.4 and −1.2 GPa for all Vs, while CNx films deposited by MFMS showed residual stresses up to −4.2 GPa. Nanoindentation showed a significant increase in film

  1. Low-temperature growth of low friction wear-resistant amorphous carbon nitride thin films by mid-frequency, high power impulse, and direct current magnetron sputtering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bakoglidis, Konstantinos D., E-mail: konba@ifm.liu.se; Schmidt, Susann; Garbrecht, Magnus; Ivanov, Ivan G.; Jensen, Jens; Greczynski, Grzegorz; Hultman, Lars [Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology (IFM), Linköping University, SE-581 83 Linköping (Sweden)

    2015-09-15

    The potential of different magnetron sputtering techniques for the synthesis of low friction and wear resistant amorphous carbon nitride (a-CN{sub x}) thin films onto temperature-sensitive AISI52100 bearing steel, but also Si(001) substrates was studied. Hence, a substrate temperature of 150 °C was chosen for the film synthesis. The a-CN{sub x} films were deposited using mid-frequency magnetron sputtering (MFMS) with an MF bias voltage, high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) with a synchronized HiPIMS bias voltage, and direct current magnetron sputtering (DCMS) with a DC bias voltage. The films were deposited using a N{sub 2}/Ar flow ratio of 0.16 at the total pressure of 400 mPa. The negative bias voltage, V{sub s}, was varied from 20 to 120 V in each of the three deposition modes. The microstructure of the films was characterized by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and selected area electron diffraction, while the film morphology was investigated by scanning electron microscopy. All films possessed an amorphous microstructure, while the film morphology changed with the bias voltage. Layers grown applying the lowest substrate bias of 20 V exhibited pronounced intercolumnar porosity, independent of the sputter technique. Voids closed and dense films are formed at V{sub s} ≥ 60 V, V{sub s} ≥ 100 V, and V{sub s} = 120 V for MFMS, DCMS, and HiPIMS, respectively. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy revealed that the nitrogen-to-carbon ratio, N/C, of the films ranged between 0.2 and 0.24. Elastic recoil detection analysis showed that Ar content varied between 0 and 0.8 at. % and increased as a function of V{sub s} for all deposition techniques. All films exhibited compressive residual stress, σ, which depends on the growth method; HiPIMS produces the least stressed films with values ranging between −0.4 and −1.2 GPa for all V{sub s}, while CN{sub x} films deposited by MFMS showed residual stresses up to −4.2

  2. Surface characterization of a decarburized and nitrided steel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calliari, Irene; Dabalà, Manuele; Zanesco, Marzia; Bernardo, Enrico; Olmi, Filippo; Vagelli, Gloria

    2006-08-01

    This article describes the effects of surface controlled decarburization on the structure of a nitrided steel. Samples of quenched and tempered 40CrMo4 steel were decarburized by air heat treatment (800-900 degrees C) at different depths and submitted to gaseous nitriding. The microstructure of surface layers after decarburization and nitriding were investigated by optical (OM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The nitrogen and carbon profiles in the diffusion layers were determined by a scanning electron microscope equipped with a wavelength dispersive spectrometer (EPMA-WDS). The effect of nitriding was determined by microhardness measurements. The increasing of time and temperature of decarburization slightly affect the surface hardness values, while case hardness depths decrease. In all the specimens, the nitriding depth, as determined by the WDS nitrogen profile, is larger than the one determined by the hardness profile. PMID:16842649

  3. Molybdenum nitride nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molybdenum nitride nanotubes were prepared by depositing nitride film on anodized aluminum oxide (AAO) template by atomic layer deposition and then etching away the template with sodium hydroxide solution. The effect of deposition parameters on film growth and the properties of the nanotubes was investigated. The maximum depth of intrusion of the molybdenum nitride film into the AAO pores was found to be 20 μm, achieved with 7-second precursor pulses. Precursor diffusion into the AAO pores dominated over the intrusion. Three different architectures of molybdenum nitride nanotubes were isolated. Separated nanotubes were found when the template was etched in an ultrasonic bath, while bundling dominated when template etching was conducted without ultrasound. When the nitride-coated AAO template was mounted onto a steel plate before etching the nanotubes remained on the surface with the tips strongly intertwined

  4. Platinum nanoparticles decorated robust binary transition metal nitride-carbon nanotubes hybrid as an efficient electrocatalyst for the methanol oxidation reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Guohe; Fu, Zhenggao; Sun, Dalei; Pan, Zhanchang; Xiao, Chumin; Wu, Shoukun; Chen, Chun; Hu, Guanghui; Wei, Zhigang

    2016-09-01

    Titanium cobalt nitride (TiCoN)-CNTs hybrid support is prepared by a facile and efficient method, including a one-pot solvothermal process followed by a nitriding process, and this hybrid support is further decorated with Pt nanoparticles to catalyze the oxidation of methanol. The catalyst is characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and electrochemical measurements. Notably, Pt/CNTs@TiCoN catalyst exhibits a much higher mass activity and durability than that of the conventional Pt/C (JM) for methanol oxidation. The experimental data indicates that the CNTs@TiCoN hybrid support combines the merits of the CNTs's high conductivity and the superb corrosion resistance of external TiCoN coating.

  5. Nitrogen Availability Of Nitriding Atmosphere In Controlled Gas Nitriding Processes

    OpenAIRE

    Michalski J; Burdyński K.; Wach P.; Łataś Z.

    2015-01-01

    Parameters which characterize the nitriding atmosphere in the gas nitriding process of steel are: the nitriding potential KN, ammonia dissociation rate α and nitrogen availabilitymN2. The article discusses the possibilities of utilization of the nitriding atmosphere’s nitrogen availability in the design of gas nitriding processes of alloyed steels in atmospheres derived from raw ammonia, raw ammonia diluted with pre-dissociated ammonia, with nitrogen, as well as with both nitrogen and pre-dis...

  6. A DFT study of planar vs. corrugated graphene-like carbon nitride (g-C3N4) and its role in the catalytic performance of CO2 conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azofra, Luis Miguel; MacFarlane, Douglas R; Sun, Chenghua

    2016-07-21

    Graphene-like carbon nitride (g-C3N4), a metal-free 2D material that is of interest as a CO2 reduction catalyst, is stabilised by corrugation in order to minimise the electronic repulsions experienced by the N lone pairs located in their structural holes. This conformational change not only stabilises the Fermi level in comparison with the totally planar structure, but also increases the potential depth of the π-holes, representing the active sites where the catalytic CO2 conversion takes place. Finally, as a result of corrugation, our DFT-D3 calculations indicate that the reaction Gibbs free energy for the first H(+)/e(-) addition decreases by 0.49 eV with respect to the totally planar case, suggesting that corrugation not only involves the material's stabilisation but also enhances the catalytic performance for the selective production of CO/CH3OH. PMID:27339031

  7. Monolithic Gyroidal Mesoporous Mixed Titanium–Niobium Nitrides

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Mesoporous transition metal nitrides are interesting materials for energy conversion and storage applications due to their conductivity and durability. We present ordered mixed titanium–niobium (8:2, 1:1) nitrides with gyroidal network structures synthesized from triblock terpolymer structure-directed mixed oxides. The materials retain both macroscopic integrity and mesoscale ordering despite heat treatment up to 600 °C, without a rigid carbon framework as a support. Furthermore, the gyroidal lattice parameters were varied by changing polymer molar mass. This synthesis strategy may prove useful in generating a variety of monolithic ordered mesoporous mixed oxides and nitrides for electrode and catalyst materials. PMID:25122534

  8. Gas nitriding of high vanadium steels—experiments and simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsson, Henrik; Ågren, John

    2004-09-01

    Four experimental high vanadium alloys were gas nitrided in an ammonia-nitrogen atmosphere. The microstructure and concentration gradients have been investigated by means of several techniques. The nitriding process has been tentatively simulated using the DICTRA software. A precise process simulation does not seem possible at present; the reason for this is discussed. Instead, bounds for the carbon and nitrogen concentration profiles were obtained by applying different simulation conditions.

  9. Vertical transport in graphene-hexagonal boron nitride heterostructure devices

    OpenAIRE

    Samantha Bruzzone; Demetrio Logoteta; Gianluca Fiori; Giuseppe Iannaccone

    2015-01-01

    Research in graphene-based electronics is recently focusing on devices based on vertical heterostructures of two-dimensional materials. Here we use density functional theory and multiscale simulations to investigate the tunneling properties of single- and double-barrier structures with graphene and few-layer hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) or hexagonal boron carbon nitride (h-BC2N). We find that tunneling through a single barrier exhibit a weak dependence on energy. We also show that in double...

  10. Consistency Improvement of some steel types by plasma nitriding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plasma nitriding is a powerful technique for modifying the phase-structure of the material surface layers, which affect the mechanical, physical and chemical properties of material. The effect of plasma nitriding on the surface properties of three types of steel (low carbon, AISI-304 and H13 (hardened)) has been investigated. The steel samples were plasma nitrided in vacuum of 10-1Pa with gas mixture of (N2, H2) at 530 Centigrade degree for a duration of 14 hours. Vickers microhardness measurements and XRD phase analysis of the treated and untreated samples were carried out. The diffraction patterns of treated steels revealed that new phases of γ-Fe4N, ε-Fe3N and (Fe,Cr)2N were formed. The maximum treated depths were about 5, 6 and 45 μm for low carbon, AISI-304 and H13 (hardened) nitrided steel respectively. The microhardness was increased by about 150%, 200% and 140% for low carbon, AISI-304 and H13 nitrided samples respectively. This increase in surface hardness could be attributed to formation of new nitride phases. (authors)

  11. Boron nitride composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuntz, Joshua D.; Ellsworth, German F.; Swenson, Fritz J.; Allen, Patrick G.

    2016-02-16

    According to one embodiment, a composite product includes hexagonal boron nitride (hBN), and a plurality of cubic boron nitride (cBN) particles, wherein the plurality of cBN particles are dispersed in a matrix of the hBN. According to another embodiment, a composite product includes a plurality of cBN particles, and one or more borate-containing binders.

  12. Nitrogen Availability Of Nitriding Atmosphere In Controlled Gas Nitriding Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michalski J.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Parameters which characterize the nitriding atmosphere in the gas nitriding process of steel are: the nitriding potential KN, ammonia dissociation rate α and nitrogen availabilitymN2. The article discusses the possibilities of utilization of the nitriding atmosphere’s nitrogen availability in the design of gas nitriding processes of alloyed steels in atmospheres derived from raw ammonia, raw ammonia diluted with pre-dissociated ammonia, with nitrogen, as well as with both nitrogen and pre-dissociated ammonia. The nitriding processes were accomplished in four series. The parameters selected in the particular processes were: process temperature (T, time (t, value of nitriding potential (KN, corresponding to known dissociation rate of the ammonia which dissociates during the nitriding process (α. Variable parameters were: nitrogen availability (mN2, composition of the ingoing atmosphere and flow rate of the ingoing atmosphere (FIn.

  13. Abnormal Nitride Morphologies upon Nitriding Iron-Based Substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meka, Sai Ramudu; Mittemeijer, Eric Jan

    2013-06-01

    Nitriding of iron-based components is a very well-known surface engineering method for bringing about great improvement of the mechanical and chemical properties. An overview is presented of the strikingly different nitride morphologies developing upon nitriding iron-based alloy substrates. Observed abnormal morphologies are the result of intricate interplay of the thermodynamic and kinetic constraints for the nucleation and growth of both alloying element nitride particles in the matrix and iron nitrides at the surface of the substrate. Alloying elements having strong Me-N interaction, such as Cr, V, and Ti, precipitate instantaneously as internal Me-nitrides, thus allowing the subsequent nucleation and growth of "normal" layer-type iron nitride. Alloying elements having weak Me-N interaction, such as Al, Si, and Mo, and simultaneously having low solubility in iron nitride, obstruct/delay the nucleation and growth of iron nitrides at the surface, thus leading to very high nitrogen supersaturation over an extended depth range from the surface. Eventually, the nucleation and growth of "abnormal" plate-type iron nitride occurs across the depth range of high nitrogen supersaturation. On this basis, strategies can be devised for tuned development of specific nitride morphologies at the surface of nitrided components.

  14. Properties of minor actinide nitrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present status of the research on properties of minor actinide nitrides for the development of an advanced nuclear fuel cycle based on nitride fuel and pyrochemical reprocessing is described. Some thermal stabilities of Am-based nitrides such as AmN and (Am, Zr)N were mainly investigated. Stabilization effect of ZrN was cleary confirmed for the vaporization and hydrolytic behaviors. New experimental equipments for measuring thermal properties of minor actinide nitrides were also introduced. (author)

  15. Metal Nitrides for Plasmonic Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naik, Gururaj V.; Schroeder, Jeremy; Guler, Urcan;

    2012-01-01

    Metal nitrides as alternatives to metals such as gold could offer many advantages when used as plasmonic material. We show that transition metal nitrides can replace metals providing equally good optical performance for many plasmonic applications.......Metal nitrides as alternatives to metals such as gold could offer many advantages when used as plasmonic material. We show that transition metal nitrides can replace metals providing equally good optical performance for many plasmonic applications....

  16. Continuous SiC-fiber reinforcement of reaction bonded silicon nitride (RBSN)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes the reinforcement of RBSN by carbon-coated SiC continous fibers (SCS-6, Textron). The comparison of conventional long-time nitridation with a newly developed short-time nitridation procedure shows that the former procedure causes partial fiber degradation whereas the fibers of the latter remain stable. Composites produced via short-time nitridation exhibit favourable stress-strain behaviour due to optimized fiber/matrix bonding. Stress values corresponding to the failure of short-time nitridized composites increased linearly with the fiber content up to about 850 MPa at of 19 vol.%. (orig.)

  17. Crystallo-chemistry of actinide nitrides (U1-yPuy)N and effect of impurities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Investigations on actinide nitrides has been done in our Laboratories for Fast Breeder Reactors since the seventies and some properties are reported to show the interest for these fuels. Today, the actinide nitrides are reconsidered as possible fuels for the future fission reactors (GFR and LMFR selected by the international forum Generation IV). The results of new investigations on crystal structure of mixed mono-nitrides (U,Pu)N, and the effects of oxygen and carbon contaminations on this structure are presented. The cubic 'NaCl-fcc' type structure of actinide nitrides AnN with space group O5/h-Fm3m does not respect the 'Vegard law' model for the mixed nitrides (U1-yPuy)N. These nitrides are usually considered with strong metallic character associated with partial ionic bonding, but the ionic contribution in the An-N bonding determined in this work is very important and near 41.6% for UN and PuN. From results published on resistivity of mixed nitrides, the data on bonding must be also modified for partial covalence. This is in good agreement with the experimental lattice parameters which are not compatible with dominant metallic bonding. The numbers of bonding electrons in the nitrides (U1-yPuy)N are reevaluated and the low values proposed comparatively with those previously published confirm the strong ionic character with high concentration of An3+ ions. The solubility of oxygen and carbon in actinide nitrides (U1-yPuy)N are discussed from measurements on volume concentration of actinide oxide phase, total oxygen and carbon contents, and lattice parameter of nitrides. The oxygen solubility limit in UN is near 1000 ppm, with a lightly higher value of 1200 ppm for the mixed nitride (U0.8Pu0.2)N. The effects of oxygen or carbon atoms in the lattice of (U1-yPuy)N are analysed

  18. Magnetron sputter deposition of low-stress, carbon-containing cubic boron nitride films using Ar-N2-CH4 gas mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cubic boron nitride (c-BN) films produced by PVD and plasma-assisted CVD techniques typically exhibit undesired high compressive stresses. One of the effective and feasible methods to reduce stress and hence improve film adhesion has been a controlled addition of a third element into the film during deposition. In the present study, BN films were grown on to silicon substrates using reactive magnetron sputtering with a hexagonal BN target. An auxiliary flow of methane was mixed into argon and nitrogen as the working gas. The deposition was conducted at various methane flow rates at 400 oC substrate temperature, 0.2 Pa total working pressure, and - 250 V r.f. substrate bias. The microstructure of the deposited films was then examined in dependence of the methane flow rate. With increasing methane flow rate from 0 to approx. 2.0 sccm, the fraction of the cubic BN phase in the deposited films decreased gradually down to approx. 75 vol.%, whereas the film stress was reduced much more rapidly and almost linearly in relation to the methane flow rate. At 2.1 sccm methane, the stress became approx. 3 times reduced. Owing to the significantly decreased film stress, adherent, micrometer thick, cubic-phase dominant films can be allowed to form on silicon substrate. The microstructure of the films will be illustrated through FTIR and XRR.

  19. Aluminum Reduction and Nitridation of Bauxite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Zhikuan; ZHANG Dianwei; XU Enxia; HOU Xinmei; DONG Yanling

    2007-01-01

    The application of bauxite with low Al2O3 content has been studied in this paper and β-SiAlON has been obtained from two kinds of bauxites (Al203 content 68.08 mass% and 46.30 mass% respectively) by aluminum reduction and nitridation method.The sequence of reactions has been studied using thermal analysis (TG-DTA),X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with EDS.Compared with carbon thermal reduction and nitridation of aluminosilicates employed presently,the reaction in the system of bauxite-Al-N2 occurs at lower temperature.β-SiAlON appears as one of the main products from 1573K and exists' stably in the range of the present experimental temperature.The microstructure of β-SiAlON obtained at 1773 K is short column with 5-10μm observed by SEM.

  20. Sintering silicon nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Narottam P. (Inventor); Levine, Stanley R. (Inventor); Sanders, William A. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    Oxides having a composition of (Ba(1-x)Sr(x))O-Al2O3-2SiO2 are used as sintering aids for producing an improved silicon nitride ceramic material. The x must be greater than 0 to insure the formation of the stable monoclinic celsian glass phase.

  1. Contact damage of silicon nitride whisker-silicon nitride composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The influence of β-silicon nitride whiskers content on Hertzian contact damage in silicon nitride matrix prepared by tape casting and gas pressure sintering (GPS) is discussed. Hertzian indentations with different loads were applied to follow the evolution of damage in these whisker-reinforced composites. The morphology of contact damage was investigated by using optical microscopy, as well as electron microscopy. With increasing β-silicon nitride whiskers content in α-silicon nitride, the porosity of materials increased and the micro structure of matrix became finer. With decreasing grain size, the subsurface contact damage increased by increasing crack length. The samples with 2 mass % β-silicon nitride addition had showed shallow ring crack and quasi-plastic deformation. On the other hand, for sample with 10 mass % β-silicon nitride whisker added sample and coarse microstructures subsurface deformation was not observed. Copyright (2002) AD-TECH - International Foundation for the Advancement of Technology Ltd

  2. Characterization of nitrides in an AISI 1010 steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It was characterized the phase formation in the 1010 carbon steel nitrided in a plasma reactor nearby to eutectoid point. The microstructure and identification of these ones were evaluated by Optical microscopy (OM), Dilatometry and X-ray diffraction (XRD). (Author)

  3. Shock Syntheses of Novel Nitrides and Biomolecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekine, Toshimori

    2013-06-01

    High-pressure spinel nitride of Si3N4 was discovered more than 10 years ago. Since then there have been many studies on the spinel nitrides and related materials including oxynitrides. We have developed shock synthesis method to investigate their structural, mechanical, chemical, physical, and optical properties. At the same time we tried to synthesize carbon nitrides from the organic substances. And later we extended to shock synthesis of ammonia through the Haber-Bosch reaction under shock in order to apply geochemical subjects related to the origin of life. The simplest amino acid of glycine, as well as animes (up to propylamine) and carboxylic acids (up to pentanoic acid), has been synthesized successfully in aqueous solutions through meteoritic impact reactions. Recently we are trying to make more complex biomolecules for implications of biomolecule formation for the origin of life through meteorite impacts on early Earth's ocean. These results of shock syntheses may imply significant contributions to materials science and Earth and planetary sciences. This research is collaborated with National Institute for Materials Science and Tohoku University.

  4. "Reactive hard templating" : from carbon nitrides to metal nitrides

    OpenAIRE

    Fischer, Anna

    2008-01-01

    Nanostructured inorganic materials are routinely synthesized by the use of templates. Depending on the synthesis conditions of the product material, either “soft” or “hard” templates can be applied. For sol-gel processes, usually “soft” templating techniques are employed, while “hard” templates are used for high temperature synthesis pathways. In classical templating approaches, the template has the unique role of structure directing agent, in the sense that it is not participating to the che...

  5. Process of pressureless sintering to produce dense, high thermal conductivity aluminum nitride ceramic body

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The process comprises forming a mixture comprised of aluminum nitride powder and free carbon wherein the aluminum nitride has a predetermined oxygen content higher than about 0.8% by weight and wherein the amount of free carbon reacts with such oxygen content to produce a deoxidized powder or compact having an oxygen content ranging from greater than about 0.35% by weight to about 1.1% by weight and which is at least 20% by weight lower than the predetermined oxygen content, heating the mixture or a compact thereof to react the carbon and oxygen producing the deoxidized aluminum nitride, and sintering a compact of the deoxidized aluminum nitride producing a ceramic body having a density greater than 85% of theoretical and a thermal conductivity greater than 0.5 W/cm.K at 220 C

  6. Boron nitride nanomaterials for thermal management applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meziani, Mohammed J; Song, Wei-Li; Wang, Ping; Lu, Fushen; Hou, Zhiling; Anderson, Ankoma; Maimaiti, Halidan; Sun, Ya-Ping

    2015-05-18

    Hexagonal boron nitride nanosheets (BNNs) are analogous to their two-dimensional carbon counterparts in many materials properties, in particular, ultrahigh thermal conductivity, but also offer some unique attributes, including being electrically insulating, high thermal stability, chemical and oxidation resistance, low color, and high mechanical strength. Significant recent advances in the production of BNNs, understanding of their properties, and the development of polymeric nanocomposites with BNNs for thermally conductive yet electrically insulating materials and systems are highlighted herein. Major opportunities and challenges for further studies in this rapidly advancing field are also discussed. PMID:25652360

  7. Plasma-Activated Sintering of Aluminum Nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hensley, J. E.; Risbud, S. H.; Groza, J. R.; Yamazaki, K.

    1993-10-01

    The use of a new plasma- activated sintering (PAS) process to densify aluminum nitride (AIN) powders to nearly full theoretical density (97 to >99%) in 5 to 10 min was investigated. The process consists of a pulse activation step, followed by sintering at 1730 to 1800 °C using resistance heating in carbon dies. Submicron size (~0.44 μm) AIN powders of low oxygen content (submicron grain structure (~0.77 μm) with no apparent pores or intergranular phases. X- ray powder diffraction revealed no secondary crystalline phases.

  8. Hybrid photocatalysts using graphitic carbon nitride/cadmium sulfide/reduced graphene oxide (g-C3N4/CdS/RGO) for superior photodegradation of organic pollutants under UV and visible light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawar, Rajendra C; Khare, Varsha; Lee, Caroline Sunyong

    2014-09-01

    Graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3N4) was hybridized with CdS nanoparticles and reduced graphene oxide (RGO) sheets using a facile chemical method, for the application of catalytic photodegradation of Rhodamine B and Congo red dyes under irradiation with UV and visible light. Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS) analyses confirmed the formation of pure g-C3N4, as well as g-C3N4/CdS, g-C3N4/RGO, and g-C3N4/CdS/RGO composites. The large surface area of the g-C3N4/CdS/RGO composite (70.42 m(2) g(-1)) resulted in rapid dye adsorption onto the surface of the photocatalyst, leading to effective photodegradation of organic pollutants. The addition of CdS and RGO increased the photocatalytic activity of g-C3N4 by a factor of approximately twenty compared with that of the commercially available TiO2 catalyst under visible light, and the g-C3N4/CdS/RGO composite was found to significantly enhance the catalytic effect compared with pure g-C3N4 and with the g-C3N4/CdS and g-C3N4/RGO composites. The superior photocatalytic activity of the g-C3N4/CdS/RGO composite is attributed to enhanced separation of the photogenerated electron-hole pairs, as well as increased visible-light absorption. The improved transport of photoelectrons was consistent with the results of transient photocurrent measurements. Therefore, g-C3N4/CdS/RGO composites using a facile method are applicable to the development of high-efficiency photocatalytic devices for industrial applications. PMID:25001639

  9. Optical characterization of gallium nitride

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kirilyuk, Victoria

    2002-01-01

    Group III-nitrides have been considered a promising system for semiconductor devices since a few decades, first for blue- and UV-light emitting diodes, later also for high-frequency/high-power applications. Due to the lack of native substrates, heteroepitaxially grown III-nitride layers are usually

  10. Pressureless sintered silicon carbide tailored with aluminium nitride sintering agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study reports the influence of aluminium nitride on the pressureless sintering of cubic phase silicon carbide nanoparticles (β-SiC). Pressureless sintering was achieved at 2000 degrees C for 5 min with the additions of boron carbide together with carbon of 1 wt% and 6 wt%, respectively, and a content of aluminium nitride between 0 and 10 wt%. Sintered samples present relative densities higher than 92%. The sintered microstructure was found to be greatly modified by the introduction of aluminium nitride, which reflects the influence of nitrogen on the β-SiC to α-SiC transformation. The toughness of sintered sample was not modified by AlN incorporation and is relatively low (around 2.5 MPa m1/2). Materials exhibited transgranular fracture mode, indicating a strong bonding between SiC grains. (authors)

  11. Cytotoxic evaluation of silicon nitride-based ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silicon nitride-based ceramics are potential candidates as materials for orthopedic implants due to their chemical stability associated with suitable fracture toughness and propitious tribologic characteristics. Therefore, in this work, dense silicon nitride components are investigated considering their suitability as biomaterials. Initially, two different compositions of silicon nitride were considered, using ytterbium, yttrium and aluminum oxides as sintering aids. The materials were sintered in a carbon resistance furnace under nitrogen atmosphere and were analyzed by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) in order to characterize the microstructure. Indentation method was applied in order to obtain hardness and fracture toughness measurements, and in vitro test of cytotoxicity was performed for a preliminary biological evaluation. A microstructure composed of grains of beta-silicon nitride distributed in a secondary phase was observed. The samples achieved fracture toughness values of 5 MPa m1/2 and Vickers hardness values of 13 GPa. Since a nontoxic behavior has been observed during the cytotoxicity tests with the samples, this finding suggests that silicon nitride-based ceramic can be used as a material for clinical applications

  12. Glow-discharge nitriding of gears

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The method of glow-discharge nitriding of gear parts made of 30Kh2NMFA steel is introduced. The diffusion saturation is carried out in the atmosphere of dissociated ammonia at the temperature of 520-540 deg C and 200-800 Pa pressure for 16-40 h depending on the required thickness of the nitrided layer (0.2-0.5 mm). The structure of the nitrided metal is a layer of nitride compounds of the Fe4N type and diffusion zone enriched with nitrides. Glow-discharge nitrided parts with 600-650 HV strength retain certain wear resistance and fatigue strength as compared with gas nitriding

  13. Electrospun Gallium Nitride Nanofibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The high thermal conductivity and wide bandgap of gallium nitride (GaN) are desirable characteristics in optoelectronics and sensing applications. In comparison to thin films and powders, in the nanofiber morphology the sensitivity of GaN is expected to increase as the exposed area (proportional to the length) increases. In this work we present electrospinning as a novel technique in the fabrication of GaN nanofibers. Electrospinning, invented in the 1930s, is a simple, inexpensive, and rapid technique to produce microscopically long ultrafine fibers. GaN nanofibers are produced using gallium nitrate and dimethyl-acetamide as precursors. After electrospinning, thermal decomposition under an inert atmosphere is used to pyrolyze the polymer. To complete the preparation, the nanofibers are sintered in a tube furnace under a NH3 flow. Both scanning electron microscopy and profilometry show that the process produces continuous and uniform fibers with diameters ranging from 20 to a few hundred nanometers, and lengths of up to a few centimeters. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis shows the development of GaN nanofibers with hexagonal wurtzite structure. Future work includes additional characterization using transmission electron microscopy and XRD to understand the role of precursors and nitridation in nanofiber synthesis, and the use of single nanofibers for the construction of optical and gas sensing devices.

  14. Rapid Microwave Synthesis, Characterization and Reactivity of Lithium Nitride Hydride, Li4NH

    OpenAIRE

    Nuria Tapia-Ruiz; Natalie Sorbie; Nicolas Vaché; Hoang, Tuan K. A.; Gregory, Duncan H.

    2013-01-01

    Lithium nitride hydride, Li4NH, was synthesised from lithium nitride and lithium hydride over minute timescales, using microwave synthesis methods in the solid state for the first time. The structure of the microwave-synthesised powders was confirmed by powder X-ray diffraction [tetragonal space group I41/a; a = 4.8864(1) Å, c = 9.9183(2) Å] and the nitride hydride reacts with moist air under ambient conditions to produce lithium hydroxide and subsequently lithium carbonate. Li4NH undergoes n...

  15. Nitride fuel development in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nitride fuel for ADS has been developed by Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) under a double strata fuel cycle concept. In this case the nitride fuel contains MA elements as a principal component and is diluted by inert materials in place of U, which is totally different from the fuel for power reactors. So the fuel fabrication manner, fuel properties and irradiation behaviour have to be investigated in detail as well as the treatment of spent fuel. Through the experimental R&D, technical feasibility of nitride fuel cycle for the transmutation of MA will be demonstrated

  16. Nitriding iron at lower temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, W P; Tao, N R; Wang, Z B; Lu, J; Lu, K

    2003-01-31

    The microstructure in the surface layer of a pure iron plate was refined at the nanometer scale by means of a surface mechanical attrition treatment that generates repetitive severe plastic deformation of the surface layer. The subsequent nitriding kinetics of the treated iron with the nanostructured surface layer were greatly enhanced, so that the nitriding temperature could be as low as 300 degrees C, which is much lower than conventional nitriding temperatures (above 500 degrees C). This enhanced processing method demonstrates the technological significance of nanomaterials in improving traditional processing techniques and provides a new approach for selective surface reactions in solids. PMID:12560546

  17. Synthesis of Boron Nitride Nanotubes for Engineering Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurst, Janet; Hull, David; Gorican, Dan

    2005-01-01

    Boron Nitride nanotubes (BNNT) are of interest to the scientific and technical communities for many of the same reasons that carbon nanotubes (CNT) have attracted large amounts of attention. Both materials have potentially unique and significant properties which may have important structural and electronic applications in the future. However of even more interest than their similarities may be the differences between carbon and boron nanotubes. Whilt boron nitride nanotubes possess a very high modulus similaar to CNT, they are also more chemically and thermally inert. Additionally BNNT possess more uniform electronic properties, having a uniform band gap of approximately 5.5 eV while CNT vary from semi-conductin to conductor behavior. Boron Nitride nanotubes have been synthesized by a variety of methods such as chemical vapor deposition, arc discharge and reactive milling. Consistently producing a reliable product has proven difficult. Progress in synthesis of 1-2 gram sized batches of Boron Nitride nanotubes will be discussed as well as potential uses for this unique material.

  18. Preparation and Microstructure of Bauxite-Based Sialon by Reduction Nitridation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Haijun; LIU Zhanjie; ZHONG Xiangchong

    2004-01-01

    The phase compostition and microstructure of Sialon prepared from Chinese bauxite have been studied.The use of Si powder is more effective than that of activated carbon for reduction-nitridation.For bauxite specimens with 40~50% Si addition,more than 90% of Sialon may be obtained when nitrided at 1450~1500℃;the main crystalline phase is O'-Sialon(Z=0.2).

  19. Study of the Active Screen Plasma Nitriding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhao Cheng; C. X. Li; H. Dong; T. Bell

    2004-01-01

    Active screen plasma nitriding (ASPN) is a novel nitriding process, which overcomes many of the practical problems associated with the conventional DC plasma nitriding (DCPN). Experimental results showed that the metallurgical characteristics and hardening effect of 722M24 steel nitrided by ASPN at both floating potential and anodic (zero) potential were similar to those nitrided by DCPN. XRD and high-resolution SEM analysis indicated that iron nitride particles with sizes in sub-micron scale were deposited on the specimen surface in AS plasma nitriding. These indicate that the neutral iron nitride particles, which are sputtered from the active screen and transferred through plasma to specimen surface, are considered to be the dominant nitrogen carder in ASPN. The OES results show that NH could not be a critical species in plasma nitriding.

  20. Microstructure and conductivity of hydrogenated carbon nitride film%掺氮类金刚石薄膜的微观结构和电导特性

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张伟丽; 夏义本; 居建华; 王林军; 方志军

    2001-01-01

    Microstructures of nitrogen incorporated hydrogenated carbon (a-C:H:N) films deposited by radio frequency plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) method were characterized by Atomic Force Microscopes (AFM), Auger Electron Spectra (AES), Infrared (IR) and Micro- Raman spectra. Results indicate that there are some nanometer particles existed in the films. The con- tent of nitrogen in the films increases with the ratio of N2 to CH4 in the gas mixture. The large amount of nitrogen in the films takes the form of C-N and N-H, small amount of that takes the form of C≡ N. The influence of thermal annealing on the conductivity of a-C:H:N films was also investigated .%用射频等离子体化学气相沉积法(RFCVD)和CH4、N2与Ar组成的混合气体制备掺氮类 金刚石薄膜(a-C:H:N)。用原子力显微镜(AFM),俄歇电子能谱(AES),红外光谱(IR)以及显 微拉曼谱(Micro-Raman)对a-C:H:N薄膜的表面形貌、组分和微观结构进行了表征。实验结 果表明,薄膜中有纳米量级的颗粒存在,而且随反应气体中N2与CH4比值的增大,薄膜中氮元 素的含量也随之增大,并主要以C-N键和N-H键形式存在,少量以C≡N键形式存在。还研 究了热退火对a-C:H:N薄膜的电导率的影响。

  1. Reaction-bonded silicon nitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reaction-bonded silicon nitride (RBSN) has been characterized. The oxidation behaviour in air up to 15000C and 3000 h and the effects of static and cyclic oxidation on room-temperature strength have been studied. (orig./IHOE)

  2. Preparation of silicon nitride/carbon fibre/epoxy resin composites%氮化硅/碳纤维/环氧树脂复合材料的制备研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王明明; 张炜巍

    2013-01-01

    The silicon nitride (Si3N4) microparticles before and after modification were employed to prepare Si3N4/carbon fibre/epoxy resin (Si3N4/CF/EP) composite via high temperature molding press method.The effects of the mass fraction and surface modification of Si3N4 on the thermal conductivity,electrical properties and mechanical properties of the composite were investigated.The results showed that for the Si3N4/CF/EP composite its thermal conductivity increased with increasing the mass fraction of Si3N4,and the thermal conductivity was 1.02 W/mK when the mass fraction of Si3N4 was 40%.The electrical properties of the composite decrease linearly with increasing the mass fraction of Si3N4.The mechanical properties of the composite increased firstly and then decreased with adding of Si3N4.The thermal conductivity and mechanical properties of the composite were further improved after the modification of Si3N4.%采用高温模压成型法制备氮化硅/碳纤维/环氧树脂导热复合材料(Si3N4/CF/EP).研究了Si3N4用量和表面改性对Si3N4/CF/EP复合材料导热性能、导电性能和力学性能的影响.结果表明,复合材料的导热性能随Si3N4质量分数的增加而增大,当Si3N4质量分数为40%时,导热率为1.02 W/mK;而Si3N4/CF/EP复合材料的导电率随Si3N4质量分数的增加而呈线性降低;力学性能则随Si3N4质量分数的增加先增大后降低.表面改性有助于进一步提高Si3N4/CF/EP复合材料的导热性能和力学性能.

  3. Research progress in a new metal-free photocatalyst--graphitic carbon nitride%新型非金属光催化剂--石墨型氮化碳的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    范乾靖; 刘建军; 于迎春; 左胜利

    2014-01-01

    Polymeric graphitic carbon nitride , g-C3N4 , is a new organic photocatalyst with semiconductor property and proper band gap of 2.7eV,which possesses high thermal and chemical stability. In this paper,the structure,physicochemical properties and preparation methods of g-C3N4 are reviewed. As the photocatalytic activity of g-C3N4 is generally low,the methods to make it an effective photocatalyst are summarized,including texture modification,elements doping and constructing heterojunction with other materials,copolymerization and sulfur-mediated function. In addition,the applications of g-C3N4 for photocatalytic water splitting and degradation of organic water pollutants under visible light are discussed. At the end,it can be concluded that the developing tendency of g-C3N4 as a photocatalyst is exploring and further optimizing the preparation and modification methods to improve its photocatalytic activity.%石墨型氮化碳(g-C3N4)聚合物是一种具有合适禁带宽度(2.7eV)的新型非金属有机半导体光催化剂,它具有良好的热稳定性和化学稳定性。本文介绍了石墨型氮化碳的结构、理化性质和合成方法,重点阐述了进一步提高石墨型氮化碳光催化活性的方法,包括形貌调控、掺杂改性、共聚合改性和硫介质调控。并论述了石墨型氮化碳在可见光下催化分解水和降解有机污染物方面的应用现状。最后指出进一步探索和优化石墨型氮化碳的合成及改性方法,提高其光催化性能依然是g-C3N4在光催化领域应用的研究重点。

  4. Ab-initio computation of electronic, and transport properties of wurtzite aluminum nitride (W-AlN) and microwave absorption properties of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (outer diameter 20-30 nanometers)-epoxy composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nwigboji, Ifeanyi Humphrey

    In Section I, We report findings from several ab-initio, self-consistent calculations of electronic and transport properties of wurtzite aluminum nitride (w-AlN). Our calculations utilized a local density approximation (LDA) potential and the linear combination of Gaussian orbitals (LCGO). Unlike some other density functional theory (DFT) calculations, we employed the Bagayoko, Zhao, and Williams' method, enhanced by Ekuma and Franklin (BZW-EF). The BZW-EF method verifiably leads to the minima of the occupied energies; these minima, the low laying unoccupied energies, and related wave functions provide the most variationally and physically valid density functional theory (DFT) description of the ground states of materials under study. With multiple oxidation states of Al (Al3+ to Al) and the availability of N3- to N, the BZW-EF method required several sets of self-consistent calculations with different ionic species as input. The binding energy for (Al3+ & N3-) as input was 1.5 eV larger in magnitude than those for other input choices; the results discussed here are those from the calculation that led to the absolute minima of the occupied energies with this input. Our calculated, direct band gap for w-AlN, at the Gamma point, is 6.28 eV, in excellent agreement with the 6.28 eV experimental value at 5K. We discuss the bands, total and partial densities of states, and calculated, effective masses. In section II, multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs)-epoxy composites with MWCNTs of outer diameters (OD) of 20-30nm was fabricated. The MWCNT loadings in the composites were controlled from 1-10 wt. %. An Agilent PNA Network analyzer was utilized in the measurements of microwave absorption (MA) properties of these MWCNTs-epoxy composites over a wide frequency range of 1-26.5GHz.The measurement results showed that MA strongly depends on MWCNTs loadings in the composites. In addition, the microwave reflection, transmission, and dielectric permittivity of the MWCNTs

  5. Efficient boron nitride nanotube formation via combined laser-gas flow levitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitney, R. Roy; Jordan, Kevin; Smith, Michael

    2014-03-18

    A process for producing boron nitride nanotubes and/or boron-carbon-nitrogen nanotubes of the general formula B.sub.xC.sub.yN.sub.z. The process utilizes a combination of laser light and nitrogen gas flow to support a boron ball target during heating of the boron ball target and production of a boron vapor plume which reacts with nitrogen or nitrogen and carbon to produce boron nitride nanotubes and/or boron-carbon-nitrogen nanotubes of the general formula B.sub.xC.sub.yN.sub.z.

  6. Efficient Boron Nitride Nanotube Formation via Combined Laser-Gas Flow Levitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitney, R. Roy (Inventor); Jordan, Kevin (Inventor); Smith, Michael W. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A process for producing boron nitride nanotubes and/or boron-carbon-nitrogen nanotubes of the general formula B(sub x)C(sub y)N(sub z) The process utilizes a combination of laser light and nitrogen gas flow to support a boron ball target during heating of the boron ball target and production of a boron vapor plume which reacts with nitrogen or nitrogen and carbon to produce boron nitride nanotubes and/or boron-carbon-nitrogen nanotubes of the general formula B(sub x)C(sub y)N(sub z).

  7. Effect of boron nitride coating on fiber-matrix interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coatings can modify fiber-matrix reactions and consequently interfacial bond strengths. Commercially available mullite, silicon carbide, and carbon fibers were coated with boron nitride via low pressure chemical vapor deposition and incorporated into a mullite matrix by hot-pressing. The influence of fiber-matrix interactions for uncoated fibers on fracture morphologies was studied. These observations are related to the measured values of interfacial shear strengths

  8. Advances and directions of ion nitriding/carburizing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spalvins, Talivaldis

    1989-01-01

    Ion nitriding and carburizing are plasma activated thermodynamic processes for the production of case hardened surface layers not only for ferrous materials, but also for an increasing number of nonferrous metals. When the treatment variables are properly controlled, the use of nitrogenous or carbonaceous glow discharge medium offers great flexibility in tailoring surface/near-surface properties independently of the bulk properties. The ion nitriding process has reached a high level of maturity and has gained wide industrial acceptance, while the more recently introduced ion carburizing process is rapidly gaining industrial acceptance. The current status of plasma mass transfer mechanisms into the surface regarding the formation of compound and diffusion layers in ion nitriding and carbon build-up ion carburizing is reviewed. In addition, the recent developments in design and construction of advanced equipment for obtaining optimized and controlled case/core properties is summarized. Also, new developments and trends such as duplex plasma treatments and alternatives to dc diode nitriding are highlighted.

  9. Deposition of chromium nitrides, oxy-nitrides and titanium carbides on steel substrates by DC magnetron sputtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present paper deals with the deposition of chromium and titanium nitrides, oxynitrides, carbides and carbonitrides onto low carbon steel by reactive magnetron sputtering. The films were obtained by using different reactive gases (02, N2, CH4,). The process advancement and the corresponding film composition variations were investigated as a function of the specific reactivity of each gas. In addition, the cathode poisoning phenomena were studied. (author). 4 refs., 6 figs

  10. Cathodic Cage Plasma Nitriding: An Innovative Technique

    OpenAIRE

    de Sousa, R. R. M.; de Araújo, F. O.; da Costa, J. A. P.; A. de S. Brandim; de Brito, R. A.; Alves, C

    2012-01-01

    Cylindrical samples of AISI 1020, AISI 316, and AISI 420 steels, with different heights, were simultaneously treated by a new technique of ionic nitriding, entitled cathodic cage plasma nitriding (CCPN), in order to evaluate the efficiency of this technique to produce nitrided layers with better properties compared with those obtained using conventional ionic nitriding technique. This method is able to eliminate the edge effect in the samples, promoting a better uniformity of temperature, and...

  11. Microplasma Processed Ultrathin Boron Nitride Nanosheets for Polymer Nanocomposites with Enhanced Thermal Transport Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ri-Chao; Sun, Dan; Lu, Ai; Askari, Sadegh; Macias-Montero, Manuel; Joseph, Paul; Dixon, Dorian; Ostrikov, Kostya; Maguire, Paul; Mariotti, Davide

    2016-06-01

    This Research Article reports on the enhancement of the thermal transport properties of nanocomposite materials containing hexagonal boron nitride in poly(vinyl alcohol) through room-temperature atmospheric pressure direct-current microplasma processing. Results show that the microplasma treatment leads to exfoliation of the hexagonal boron nitride in isopropyl alcohol, reducing the number of stacks from >30 to a few or single layers. The thermal diffusivity of the resulting nanocomposites reaches 8.5 mm(2) s(-1), 50 times greater than blank poly(vinyl alcohol) and twice that of nanocomposites containing nonplasma treated boron nitride nanosheets. From TEM analysis, we observe much less aggregation of the nanosheets after plasma processing along with indications of an amorphous carbon interfacial layer, which may contribute to stable dispersion of boron nitride nanosheets in the resulting plasma treated colloids. PMID:27153343

  12. Humidity resistant hydrogenated carbon nitride films

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mikmeková, Eliška; Polčák, J.; Sobota, Jaroslav; Müllerová, Ilona; Peřina, Vratislav; Caha, O.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 275, 15 June (2013), s. 7-13. ISSN 0169-4332 R&D Projects: GA MŠk ED0017/01/01 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 ; RVO:61389005 Keywords : thin films * corrosion behanior * delamination * stress Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering; BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers (UJF-V) Impact factor: 2.538, year: 2013

  13. Corrosion of plasma nitrided austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The corrosion behaviour of plasma nitrided austenitic stainless steel grades AISI 304, 316 and 321 was studied at various temperatures. Certain plasma nitriding cycles included a post-oxidation treatment. The corrosion rates were measured using linear polarisation technique. Results showed that corrosion rate increased with the plasma nitriding temperature. Minimum deterioration occurred at 653K. (author). 2 tabs., 4 figs., 10 refs

  14. Ion nitridation - physical and technological aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ion nitridation, is a technique which allows the formation of a controlled thickness of nitrides in the surface of the material, using this material as the cathode in a low pressure glow discharge, which presents many advantages over the conventional method. A brief review of the ion nitriding technique, the physical fenomena involved, and we discuss technological aspects of this method, are presented. (Author)

  15. Mechanisms of Low-Temperature Nitridation Technology on a TaN Thin Film Resistor for Temperature Sensor Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Huey-Ru; Chen, Ying-Chung; Chang, Ting-Chang; Chang, Kuan-Chang; Tsai, Tsung-Ming; Chu, Tian-Jian; Shih, Chih-Cheng; Chuang, Nai-Chuan; Wang, Kao-Yuan

    2016-06-01

    In this letter, we propose a novel low-temperature nitridation technology on a tantalum nitride (TaN) thin film resistor (TFR) through supercritical carbon dioxide (SCCO2) treatment for temperature sensor applications. We also found that the sensitivity of temperature of the TaN TFR was improved about 10.2 %, which can be demonstrated from measurement of temperature coefficient of resistance (TCR). In order to understand the mechanism of SCCO2 nitridation on the TaN TFR, the carrier conduction mechanism of the device was analyzed through current fitting. The current conduction mechanism of the TaN TFR changes from hopping to a Schottky emission after the low-temperature SCCO2 nitridation treatment. A model of vacancy passivation in TaN grains with nitrogen and by SCCO2 nitridation treatment is eventually proposed to increase the isolation ability in TaN TFR, which causes the transfer of current conduction mechanisms.

  16. Mechanisms of Low-Temperature Nitridation Technology on a TaN Thin Film Resistor for Temperature Sensor Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Huey-Ru; Chen, Ying-Chung; Chang, Ting-Chang; Chang, Kuan-Chang; Tsai, Tsung-Ming; Chu, Tian-Jian; Shih, Chih-Cheng; Chuang, Nai-Chuan; Wang, Kao-Yuan

    2016-12-01

    In this letter, we propose a novel low-temperature nitridation technology on a tantalum nitride (TaN) thin film resistor (TFR) through supercritical carbon dioxide (SCCO2) treatment for temperature sensor applications. We also found that the sensitivity of temperature of the TaN TFR was improved about 10.2 %, which can be demonstrated from measurement of temperature coefficient of resistance (TCR). In order to understand the mechanism of SCCO2 nitridation on the TaN TFR, the carrier conduction mechanism of the device was analyzed through current fitting. The current conduction mechanism of the TaN TFR changes from hopping to a Schottky emission after the low-temperature SCCO2 nitridation treatment. A model of vacancy passivation in TaN grains with nitrogen and by SCCO2 nitridation treatment is eventually proposed to increase the isolation ability in TaN TFR, which causes the transfer of current conduction mechanisms. PMID:27251325

  17. Effect of aluminium nitride precipitation on recrystallisation kinetic in low carbon batch; Efecto de la precipitacion de nitruros de aluminio en la recristalizacion de aceros de bajo carbono recocidos convencionalmente

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monsalve, A.; Artigas, A.; Celentano, D.

    2005-07-01

    An important feature of aluminium killed steels is the strong influence that aluminium nitride precipitates produce in both the mechanical properties and the final micro-structural characteristics of the steel. This influence is related to the different stages of the fabrication process. This paper de las with a study of the effects of aluminium nitrides on the kinetics of recrystallisation. Different heat treatments were carried out, in one case to dissolve AIN, and in the other in order to precipitate AIN. These steels were subjected to cold rolling, followed by a batch annealing process. The recrystallised fraction was measured, thus obtaining the kinetic curves. The activation energy for recrystallisation was computed in each case. The results showed that AIN precipitation during recrystallisation produces a delay in recrystallisation kinetics through a change in the activation energy value. (Author) 29 refs.

  18. Quantum emission from hexagonal boron nitride monolayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Toan Trong; Bray, Kerem; Ford, Michael J; Toth, Milos; Aharonovich, Igor

    2016-01-01

    Artificial atomic systems in solids are widely considered the leading physical system for a variety of quantum technologies, including quantum communications, computing and metrology. To date, however, room-temperature quantum emitters have only been observed in wide-bandgap semiconductors such as diamond and silicon carbide, nanocrystal quantum dots, and most recently in carbon nanotubes. Single-photon emission from two-dimensional materials has been reported, but only at cryogenic temperatures. Here, we demonstrate room-temperature, polarized and ultrabright single-photon emission from a colour centre in two-dimensional hexagonal boron nitride. Density functional theory calculations indicate that vacancy-related defects are a probable source of the emission. Our results demonstrate the unprecedented potential of van der Waals crystals for large-scale nanophotonics and quantum information processing. PMID:26501751

  19. Quantum emission from hexagonal boron nitride monolayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Toan Trong; Bray, Kerem; Ford, Michael J.; Toth, Milos; Aharonovich, Igor

    2016-01-01

    Artificial atomic systems in solids are widely considered the leading physical system for a variety of quantum technologies, including quantum communications, computing and metrology. To date, however, room-temperature quantum emitters have only been observed in wide-bandgap semiconductors such as diamond and silicon carbide, nanocrystal quantum dots, and most recently in carbon nanotubes. Single-photon emission from two-dimensional materials has been reported, but only at cryogenic temperatures. Here, we demonstrate room-temperature, polarized and ultrabright single-photon emission from a colour centre in two-dimensional hexagonal boron nitride. Density functional theory calculations indicate that vacancy-related defects are a probable source of the emission. Our results demonstrate the unprecedented potential of van der Waals crystals for large-scale nanophotonics and quantum information processing.

  20. Pure and doped boron nitride nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Terrones

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available More than ten years ago, it was suggested theoretically that boron nitride (BN nanotubes could be produced. Soon after, various reports on their synthesis appeared and a new area of nanotube science was born. This review aims to cover the latest advances related to the synthesis of BN nanotubes. We show that these tubes can now be produced in larger amounts and, in particular, that the chemistry of BN tubes appears to be very important to the production of reinforced composites with insulating characteristics. From the theoretical standpoint, we also show that (BN-C heteronanotubes could have important implications for nanoelectronics. We believe that BN nanotubes (pure and doped could be used in the fabrication of novel devices in which pure carbon nanotubes do not perform very efficiently.

  1. Synthesis and characterization of boron nitrides nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents a new synthesis for the production of boron nitride nanotubes (BNNT) from boron powder, ammonium nitrate and hematite tube furnace CVD method. The samples were subjected to some characterization techniques as infrared spectroscopy, thermal analysis, X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy and transmission. By analyzing the results can explain the chemical reactions involved in the process and confirm the formation of BNNT with several layers and about 30 nanometers in diameter. Due to excellent mechanical properties and its chemical and thermal stability this material is promising for various applications. However, BNNT has received much less attention than carbon nanotubes, it is because of great difficulty to synthesize appreciable quantities from the techniques currently known, and this is one of the main reasons this work.(author)

  2. Thermal Conductivity of Uranium Nitride and Carbide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Szpunar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the electronic thermal conductivity of alternative fuels like uranium nitride and uranium carbide. We evaluate the electronic contribution to the thermal conductivity, by combining first-principles quantum-mechanical calculations with semiclassical correlations. The electronic structure of UN and UC was calculated using Quantum Espresso code. The spin polarized calculations were performed for a ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic ordering of magnetic moments on uranium lattice and magnetic moment in UC was lower than in UN due to stronger hybridization between 2p electrons of carbon and 5f electrons of uranium. The nonmagnetic electronic structure calculations were used as an input to BolzTrap code that was used to evaluate the electronic thermal conductivity. It is predicted that the thermal conductivity should increase with the temperature increase, but to get a quantitative agreement with the experiment at higher temperatures the interaction of electrons with phonons (and electron-electron scattering needs to be included.

  3. III-Nitride nanowire optoelectronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Songrui; Nguyen, Hieu P. T.; Kibria, Md. G.; Mi, Zetian

    2015-11-01

    Group-III nitride nanowire structures, including GaN, InN, AlN and their alloys, have been intensively studied in the past decade. Unique to this material system is that its energy bandgap can be tuned from the deep ultraviolet (~6.2 eV for AlN) to the near infrared (~0.65 eV for InN). In this article, we provide an overview on the recent progress made in III-nitride nanowire optoelectronic devices, including light emitting diodes, lasers, photodetectors, single photon sources, intraband devices, solar cells, and artificial photosynthesis. The present challenges and future prospects of III-nitride nanowire optoelectronic devices are also discussed.

  4. Mathematical Modelling of Nitride Layer Growth of Low Temperature Gas and Plasma Nitriding of AISI 316L

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Triwiyanto A.

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper present mathematical model which developed to predict the nitrided layer thickness (case depth of gas nitrided and plasma nitrided austenitic stainless steel according to Fick’s first law for pure iron by adapting and manipulating the Hosseini’s model to fit the diffusion mechanism where nitrided structure formed by nitrided AISI 316L austenitic stainless steel. The mathematical model later tested against various actual gas nitriding and plasma nitriding experimental results with varying nitriding temperature and nitriding duration to see whether the model managed to successfully predict the nitrided layer thickness. This model predicted the coexistence of ε-Fe2-3N and γ΄-Fe4N under the present nitriding process parameters. After the validation process, it is proven that the mathematical model managed to predict the nitrided layer growth of the gas nitrided and plasma nitrided of AISI 316L SS up to high degree of accuracy.

  5. Rapid fabrication of aluminum nitride with high thermal conductivity by millimeter-wave heating method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    other hand, the thermal conductivity of Y2O3-added aluminum nitride still remained to be about 180 W/m-K even when the aluminum nitride was sintered at nitrogen atmosphere for 3 hr in carbon heater furnace. Further, satisfactory thermal conductivity was not obtained from Yb2O3-added aluminum nitride because the aluminum nitride was not fully densified in the same sintering conditions. Because reducing condition (exactly oxygen potential) for N2-3%H2 mixed gas is not same to that for the conventional heating at nitrogen atmosphere with carbon heater, we can not simply compare the millimeter-wave sintering condition with that of the conventional sintering for the effect on the thermal conductivity of aluminum nitride. According to the previous papers, however, thermal conductivity of aluminum nitride higher than 200 W/m-K has been obtained at a sintering temperature higher than 1800 deg C and for a longer time than 10 hr. Accordingly, the thermal conductivity of conventionally-sintered aluminum nitride obtained in this study is judged to be reasonable. Therefore, it is concluded that millimeter-wave heating method enable to sinter aluminum nitride rapidly at a lower temperature than that in conventional method. Further, the selection of Yb2O3 as the sintering aid is quite important to obtain high thermal conductive aluminum nitride by the rapid fabricating process based on the millimeter-wave radiation. Details on these results are discussed in the presentation by connecting with microstructural results by SEM and XRD met

  6. Substrate-induced bandgap in graphene on hexagonal boron nitride

    OpenAIRE

    Giovannetti, Gianluca; Khomyakov, Petr A.; Brocks, Geert; Paul J. Kelly; Brink, Jeroen van den

    2007-01-01

    We determine the electronic structure of a graphene sheet on top of a lattice-matched hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) substrate using ab initio density functional calculations. The most stable configuration has one carbon atom on top of a boron atom, the other centered above a BN ring. The resulting inequivalence of the two carbon sites leads to the opening of a gap of 53 meV at the Dirac points of graphene and to finite masses for the Dirac fermions. Alternative orientations of the graphene s...

  7. Mathematical Modelling of Nitride Layer Growth of Low Temperature Gas and Plasma Nitriding of AISI 316L

    OpenAIRE

    Triwiyanto A.; Zainuddin A.; Abidin K.A.Z; Billah M.A; Hussain P.

    2014-01-01

    This paper present mathematical model which developed to predict the nitrided layer thickness (case depth) of gas nitrided and plasma nitrided austenitic stainless steel according to Fick’s first law for pure iron by adapting and manipulating the Hosseini’s model to fit the diffusion mechanism where nitrided structure formed by nitrided AISI 316L austenitic stainless steel. The mathematical model later tested against various actual gas nitriding and plasma nitriding experimental results with ...

  8. Hydrodenitrogenation of pyridine over transition metal nitrides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milad, I.K.; Smith, K.J. [British Columbia Univ., Vancouver, BC (Canada). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    1997-11-01

    The use of transition metal nitrides (TMN) as catalysts for hydrodenitrogenation (HDN) was discussed. A study was conducted in which a series of unsupported and supported Mo, Fe, W, Co, Nb, Cr, V and Ti nitrides were examined as catalysts for the HDN of pyridine at atmospheric pressure and 350 degrees C. The catalysts were prepared by temperature programmed nitridation of the metal oxide with NH{sub 3}. It was shown that a single nitride phase was present in each of the catalysts. The Mo nitride showed the greatest activity per gram of catalyst. Co and Fe nitrides showed the highest activities per surface area of the unsupported catalyst. Metal nitrides with lower heats of formation showed higher HDN activity. 1 tab.

  9. Homogeneous dispersion of gallium nitride nanoparticles in a boron nitride matrix by nitridation with urea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusunose, Takafumi; Sekino, Tohru; Ando, Yoichi

    2010-07-01

    A Gallium Nitride (GaN) dispersed boron nitride (BN) nanocomposite powder was synthesized by heating a mixture of gallium nitrate, boric acid, and urea in a hydrogen atmosphere. Before heat treatment, crystalline phases of urea, boric acid, and gallium nitrate were recognized, but an amorphous material was produced by heat treatment at 400 degrees C, and then was transformed into GaN and turbostratic BN (t-BN) by further heat treatment at 800 degrees C. TEM obsevations of this composite powder revealed that single nanosized GaN particles were homogeneously dispersed in a BN matrix. Homogeneous dispersion of GaN nanoparticles was thought to be attained by simultaneously nitriding gallium nitrate and boric acid to GaN and BN with urea. PMID:21128417

  10. 几种碳源对碳热还原氮化法制备Ti(C,N)粉末的影响%Influence of several carbon source on Ti(C,N)powders prepared by carbothermal reduction and nitridation method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    余鹏飞; 叶金文; 刘颖; 何旭; 王杰; 杨嘉

    2011-01-01

    以纳米TiO2和不同碳源为原料,采用碳热还原氮化法,制备了Ti(C,N)粉末.通过X射线衍射分析、热分析、扫描电镜、化学成分分析等手段研究了TiO2碳热还原氮化过程的反应机理和不同碳源对制备碳氮化钛粉末的影响.结果表明,在TiO2碳热还原氮化过程中,前期主要为TiO2/C固-固反应,后期CO参与的气-固反应变为主要反应;当碳黑为碳源时,比之活性碳和石墨,反应最为完全,而且粉末产物粒度较为细小均匀;同时随着碳黑比表面积的增大,碳氮比随之降低,游离碳和氧含量随之减小;当以比表面积为600m2/g的碳黑为碳源时,配碳量为28.8%的混合物在加热到1700℃,保温3h,氮气流量为1000mL/min的条件下,得到了游离碳含量<0.2%、氧含量<0.5%,总碳为11.42%的碳氮化钛粉末.%Ti(C,N)powders can be prepared by carbothermal reduction and nitridation method with the nanometer TiO2 and different carbon source as starting materials. X-ray diffractometer,TG/DSC thermal analyzer, SEM and chemical analysis are applied to investigate the reaction mechanism on carbothermal reduction-nitridation of TiO2 and the effects of different cardon source on preparation of titanium carbonitride powders. The results show that,in the reaction process,the predominant reaction mechanism is TiO2/C solid-solid reaction in the beginning and subsequent the gas-solid reaction in which CO participates. The reaction of mixtures with carbon black as the carbon source is more complete than those with active carbon and graphite, and the former is finer than the latter two in the grains of reaction products. At the same time,with the specific surface area of carbon black increasing,the carbon/nitrogen ratio declines, and the free carbon content and oxygen content decrease.Moreover,if the mixtures with carbon black specific surface of 600m2/g as the carbon source and a carbon content of 28. 8% were isothermal treated for 3h at 1700℃ in an

  11. One-Dimensional Vanadium Nitride Nanofibers Fabricated by Electrospinning for Supercapacitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vanadium nitride has been the hot material for supercapacitors due to its excellent electrical conductivity and high specific capacitance. However, vanadium nitride nanoparticle usually suffers a poor performance due to its aggregation and lack of effective contact. In this work, one-dimensional (1D) vanadium nitride nanofibers are prepared by a combination of electrostatic spinning and high-temperature calcination in ammonia. The cross-linked nanofibers composed of nanoparticles construct a facile transport path for charge and electrolyte ion. Moreover, vanadium nitride nanoparticles encapsulated into carbon prevent grain growth and aggregation, which provide more active sites for electrolyte ion. Owing to this unique structure, vanadium nitride nanofibers exhibit high specific capacitance of 291.5 F g−1 at 0.5 A g−1 and rate capability with a capacitance of 105.1 F g−1 at 6 A g−1. In addition, we find that annealing temperature has significant influence on the performance of vanadium nitride, which associates with fibrous structure and crystallinity, and a limited potential window can greatly improve the cycling stability (retains 50% of initial capacitance after 1000 cycles)

  12. Duplex treatment of 304 AISI stainless steel using rf plasma nitriding and carbonitriding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surface of 304 AISI austenitic stainless steel has been modified using duplex treatment technique of nitriding and carbonitriding. A thick modified nitrided layer, of approximately 20 μm, has been achieved when rf inductively coupled plasma was adjusted at 450 W for processing time of only 10 min. After performing the nitrided layer, the nitrided samples were carbonitrided using the same technique at different acetylene partial pressure ratios ranges from 10% to 70%, the balance was pure nitrogen. Different amount of nitrogen and carbon species are diffused underneath the surface through the nitrided layer during carbonitriding process and are found to be gas composition dependent. The treated samples were characterized by glow discharge optical spectroscopy, X-ray diffractometry, scanning electron microscopy and Vickers microhardness tester. The microstructure of the duplex treated layer indicates the formation of γ-Fe4N, Fe3C, CrN and nitrogen-expanded austenite (γN). The thickness of the duplex treated layer increases with increasing the acetylene partial pressure ratio. The surface microhardness of duplex treated samples has been found to be gas composition dependent and increased by 1.29 fold in comparison to the nitrided sample.

  13. Conductivity of materials made of aluminum nitride and silicon nitride mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorbatov, A. G.; Kamyshov, V. M.

    1978-01-01

    To establish the possible mechanism for conductivity in aluminum nitride a study was made of the electric conductivity of pure AlN and its mixtures with silicon nitride at different temperatures and partial pressures of nitrogen in the gas phase. The thermoelectromotive force was also measured. The experiments used polycrystalline samples of cylindrical shape 18 mm in diameter made of powders by hot pressing in graphite press molds at a temperature of 1973-2273 K and pressure 1,470,000 n/sqm. The items obtained by this method had porosity not over 5%. After pressing, the samples were machined to remove carbon from the surface, and were annealed in a stream of dry ammonia for 10 h at a temperature of 1273-1373 K. Electric conductivity was measured according to the bridge scheme on an alternating current of frequency 10 kHz. In order to guarantee close contact of the platinum electrodes with the surface of the samples, a thin layer of platinum was sprayed on them. Experiments were conducted in the temperature interval 1273-1573 K with a half hour delay at each assigned temperature with heating and cooling.

  14. New method for synthesis of metal carbides, nitrides and carbonitrides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koc, R.; Folmer, J.S.; Kodambaka, S.K. [Southern Illinois Univ., Carbondale, IL (United States)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    The purpose of this work is to develop a novel synthesis method using a carbothermic reduction reaction of carbon coated precursors for producing high purity, submicron, non-agglomerated powders of metal carbide, metal nitride and metal boride systems. The authors also want to demonstrate the advantages of the process and provide information on the applicability of the process for synthesizing related advanced ceramic powders (e.g. SiC, WC, TiN, TiB{sub 2}, Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}). During the FY96 of the project, steps are taken to investigate the reaction mechanisms and phase evolution during the formation of TiC from carbon coated titania precursors and to produce submicron TiC powders with desired stoichiometries. Depending on the carbon content in the coated titania precursor, TiC powder was produced with different stoichiometries (different amount of oxygen and free carbon).

  15. Internal nitride formation during gas-phase thermal nitridation of titanium

    OpenAIRE

    Ajikumar, PK; M. Kamruddin; Shankar, P; Gouda, Ramakrishna; Balamurugan, AK; Nithya, R.; Tyagi, AK; Jayaram, V; Biswas, SK; Raj, Baldev

    2009-01-01

    Titanium nitride surface layers were prepared by gas-phase thermal nitridation of pure titanium in an ammonia atmosphere at 1373 K for different times. In addition to the surface nitride layer, nitride/hydride formation was observed in the bulk of the specimen. The cross-section of the specimen was characterized by various techniques such as optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, secondary ion mass spectrometry and nanomechanical testing, ...

  16. PLASMA NITRIDING FOR IMPROVING WEAR RESISTANCE OF CABLE BOLT

    OpenAIRE

    SHAOQING NIU; SHUANGSUO YANG; YI LI

    2013-01-01

    In order to improve the wear resistance of the cable bolt and increase its life-time during operation, plasma nitriding was employed to obtain a protective nitriding layer on its surface. The microstructure, phase constitution, microhardness and wear resistance of the nitriding layer were investigated. It was shown that continuous and dense nitriding layers were formed on the surface of the samples. The microhardness of the nitrided sample was enhanced by the formation of nitriding layer, whi...

  17. Silicon nitride-fabrication, forming and properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article, which is a literature survey of the recent years, includes description of several methods for the formation of silicone nitride, and five methods of forming: Reaction-bonded silicon nitride, sintering, hot pressing, hot isostatic pressing and chemical vapour deposition. Herein are also included data about mechanical and physical properties of silicon nitride and the relationship between the forming method and the properties. (author)

  18. Characterization of nitrides in an AISI 1010 steel; Caracterizacion de nitruros en un acero AISI 1010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naquid G, C. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Gerencia de Ciencia de Materiales, A.P. 18-1027, 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    1998-07-01

    It was characterized the phase formation in the 1010 carbon steel nitrided in a plasma reactor nearby to eutectoid point. The microstructure and identification of these ones were evaluated by Optical microscopy (OM), Dilatometry and X-ray diffraction (XRD). (Author)

  19. Property database of TRU nitride fuel

    OpenAIRE

    西 剛史; 荒井 康夫; 高野 公秀; 倉田 正輝

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to prepare a property database of nitride fuel needed for the fuel design of accelerator-driven system (ADS) for transmutation of minor actinide (MA). Nitride fuel of ADS is characterized by high content of Pu and MA as principal components, and addition of a diluent material such as ZrN. Experimental data or evaluated values from the raw data on properties Pu and MA nitrides, and nitride solid solutions containing ZrN are collected and summarized, which cover the...

  20. Plasmonic titanium nitride nanostructures for perfect absorbers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guler, Urcan; Li, Wen-Wei; Kinsey, Nathaniel; Naik, Gururaj V.; Boltasseva, Alexandra; Guan, Jianguo; Kildishev, Alexander V.; Shalaev, Vladimir M.

    2013-01-01

    We propose a metamaterial based perfect absorber in the visible region, and investigate the performance of titanium nitride as an alternative plasmonic material. Numerical and experimental results reveal that titanium nitride performs better than gold as a plasmonic absorbing material.Renewable E......We propose a metamaterial based perfect absorber in the visible region, and investigate the performance of titanium nitride as an alternative plasmonic material. Numerical and experimental results reveal that titanium nitride performs better than gold as a plasmonic absorbing material...

  1. III-nitride blue microdisplays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prototype blue microdisplays have been fabricated from InGaN/GaN quantum wells. The device has a dimension of 0.5x0.5mm2 and consists of 10x10 pixels 12 μm in diameter. Emission properties such as electroluminescence spectra, output power versus forward current (L--I) characteristic, viewing angle, and uniformity have been measured. Due to the unique properties of III-nitride wide-band-gap semiconductors, microdisplays fabricated from III nitrides can potentially provide unsurpassed performance, including high-brightness/resolution/contrast, high-temperature/high-power operation, high shock resistance, wide viewing angles, full-color spectrum capability, long life, high speed, and low-power consumption, thus providing an enhancement and benefit to the present capabilities of miniature display systems

  2. Salt rejection and water transport through boron nitride nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilder, Tamsyn A; Gordon, Daniel; Chung, Shin-Ho

    2009-10-01

    Nanotube-based water-purification devices have the potential to transform the field of desalination and demineralization through their ability to remove salts and heavy metals without significantly affecting the fast flow of water molecules. Boron nitride nanotubes have shown superior water flow properties compared to carbon nanotubes, and are thus expected to provide a more efficient water purification device. Using molecular dynamics simulations it is shown that a (5, 5) boron nitride nanotube embedded in a silicon nitride membrane can, in principle, obtain 100% salt rejection at concentrations as high as 1 M owing to a high energy barrier while still allowing water molecules to flow at a rate as high as 10.7 water molecules per nanosecond (or 0.9268 L m(-2) h(-1)). Furthermore, ions continue to be rejected under the influence of high hydrostatic pressures up to 612 MPa. When the nanotube radius is increased to 4.14 A the tube becomes cation-selective, and at 5.52 A the tube becomes anion-selective. PMID:19582727

  3. Nucleation of iron nitrides during gaseous nitriding of iron; the effect of a preoxidation treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friehling, Peter B.; Poulsen, Finn Willy; Somers, Marcel A.J.

    2001-01-01

    grains. On prolonged nitriding, immediate nucleation at the surface of iron grains becomes possible. Calculated incubation times for the nucleation of gamma'-Fe4N1-x during nitriding are generally longer than those observed experimentally in the present work. The incubation time is reduced dramatically......The nucleation of iron nitrides during gaseous nitriding has been investigated using light microscopy and X-ray diffraction. Initially, the nucleation of gamma'-Fe4N1-x on a pure iron surface starts at grain boundaries meeting the surface, from where the nitride grains grow laterally into the iron...

  4. Deep levels of nitrogen vacancies complexes in graphite-like boron nitride

    CERN Document Server

    Grinyaev, S N; Lopatin, V V

    2002-01-01

    Paper presents results of theoretical studies using methods of model pseudopotential and of extended elementary cell of deep levels of nitrogen vacancies, small clusters from di- and trivacancies of nitrogen covering nearest defects in one layer of graphite-like boron nitride. On the basis of calculated spectra and intensities of oscillators one interpreted local bands of optical absorption, luminescence, photoconductivity in pyrolytic boron nitride prior to and subsequent to irradiation by fast neutrons, protons and ions of carbon (50-150 keV). One identified not deep levels of activation of thermally stimulated luminescence and conductivity prior to and subsequent to irradiation

  5. Three-dimensional tungsten nitride nanowires as high performance anode material for lithium ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Min; Qiu, Yongfu; Han, Yi; Guo, Yan; Cheng, Faliang

    2016-08-01

    Nanostructure materials often achieve low capacity when the active material mass loading is high. In this communication, high mass-loading tungsten nitride nanowires (WNNWs) were fabricated on a flexible carbon cloth by hydrothermal method and post annealing. The prepared electrode exhibited remarkable cyclic stability and attractive rate capability for lithium storage. It delivers at a current density of 200 mA g-1, a high capacity of 418 mAh g-1, which is higher than that of conventional graphite. This research opens more opportunity for the fabrication of three-dimensional metal nitrides as negative electrode material for flexible lithium ion batteries.

  6. Microstructure analysis of the iron nitride thin films nitrided on the surface of machinery component materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On this study the ion nitriding process of the machinery component materials, which consist of the piston pen and the piston rings, have been conducted. Ion nitriding of the machinery component materials was performed for some variation of nitriding temperature, nitriding time and pressure of nitrogen gas using DC glow discharge. The optimum hardness of the piston pen samples was obtained at the nitriding temperature of 100°C, the nitriding time of 3 hours and the nitrogen gas pressure of 1.6 mbar, and the hardness value increased approximately six times compared with the non nitrided samples; while the hardness value of the piston ring was increase approximately 2.6 time at the temperature nitriding of 100°C, the nitriding time of 3 hours and the nitrogen gas pressure of 1.2 mbar. To observe the micro-structure and elemental composition of iron nitride thin films formed on the surface of the samples was used SEM-EDAX, and the phase structure of iron nitride thin films was observed by using XRD. Based on the observations was known that a compound layer formed on the surface of samples containing different nitrogen and form the phase structure of γ-Fe4N, ε-Fe3N and ζ-Fe2N that have a very good mechanical properties. (author)

  7. Modelling structure and properties of amorphous silicon boron nitride ceramics

    OpenAIRE

    Johann Christian Schön; Alexander Hannemann; Guneet Sethi; Ilya Vladimirovich Pentin; Martin Jansen

    2011-01-01

    Silicon boron nitride is the parent compound of a new class of high-temperature stable amorphous ceramics constituted of silicon, boron, nitrogen, and carbon, featuring a set of properties that is without precedent, and represents a prototypical random network based on chemical bonds of predominantly covalent character. In contrast to many other amorphous materials of technological interest, a-Si3B3N7 is not produced via glass formation, i.e. by quenching from a melt, the reason being that th...

  8. High Kinetic Energy Penetrator Shielding and High Wear Resistance Materials Fabricated with Boron Nitride Nanotubes (BNNTS) and BNNT Polymer Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Jin Ho (Inventor); Park, Cheol (Inventor); Sauti, Godfrey (Inventor); Smith, Michael W. (Inventor); Jordan, Kevin C. (Inventor); Lowther, Sharon E. (Inventor); Bryant, Robert George (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    Boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs), boron nitride nanoparticles (BNNPs), carbon nanotubes (CNTs), graphites, or combinations, are incorporated into matrices of polymer, ceramic or metals. Fibers, yarns, and woven or nonwoven mats of BNNTs are used as toughening layers in penetration resistant materials to maximize energy absorption and/or high hardness layers to rebound or deform penetrators. They can be also used as reinforcing inclusions combining with other polymer matrices to create composite layers like typical reinforcing fibers such as Kevlar.RTM., Spectra.RTM., ceramics and metals. Enhanced wear resistance and usage time are achieved by adding boron nitride nanomaterials, increasing hardness and toughness. Such materials can be used in high temperature environments since the oxidation temperature of BNNTs exceeds 800.degree. C. in air. Boron nitride based composites are useful as strong structural materials for anti-micrometeorite layers for spacecraft and space suits, ultra strong tethers, protective gear, vehicles, helmets, shields and safety suits/helmets for industry.

  9. Corrosion surface protection by using titanium carbon nitride/titanium-niobium carbon nitride multilayered system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this work is the improvement of the electrochemical behavior of 4140 steel substrate using TiCN/TiNbCN multilayered system as a protective coating. We have grown [TiCN/TiNbCN]n multilayered via reactive r.f. magnetron sputtering technique in which was varied systematically the bilayer period (Λ), and the bilayer number (n), maintaining constant the total thickness of the coatings (∼ 3 μm). The coatings were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), optical microscopy, electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy assisted with selected area electron diffraction. The electrochemical properties were studied by Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy and Tafel curves. XRD results showed a preferential growth in the face-centered cubic (111) crystal structure for [TiCN/TiNbCN]n multilayered coatings [1]. In this work was obtained the maximum corrosion resistance for the coating with (Λ) equal to 15 nm, corresponding to n = 200 bilayered. The polarization resistance and corrosion rate were around 8.6 kOhm cm2 and 7.59 . 10-4 mm/year, these values were 8.6 and 0.001 times better than those showed by the uncoated 4140 steel substrate (1.0 kOhm and 0.57 mm/year), respectively. The improvement of the electrochemical behavior of the 4140 coated with this TiCN/TiNbCN multilayered system can be attributed to the presence of several interfaces that act as obstacles for the inward and outward diffusions of Cl- ion species, generating an increment in the energy or potential required for translating the corrosive ions across the coating/substrate interface. Moreover, the interface systems affect the means free path on the ions toward the metallic substrate, due to the decreasing of the defects presented in the multilayered coatings.

  10. Ion-beam nitriding of steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salik, Joshua (Inventor); Hubbell, Theodore E. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A surface of a steel substrate is nitrided without external heating by exposing it to a beam of nitrogen ions under low pressure, a pressure much lower than that employed for ion-nitriding. An ion source is used instead of a glow discharge. Both of these features reduce the introduction of impurities into the substrate surface.

  11. Synthesis of ternary nitrides by mechanochemical alloying

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, C.J.H.; Zhu, J.J.; Lindelov, H.; Jiang, Jianzhong

    2002-01-01

    nitrides by mechanochemical alloying of a binary transition metal nitride (MxN) with an elemental transition metal. In this way, we have been able to prepare Fe3Mo3N and Co3Mo3N by ball-milling of Mo2N with Fe and Co, respectively. The transformation sequence from the starting materials ( the binary...

  12. Blue-to-Orange Tunable Luminescence from Europium Doped Yt trium-Silicon-Oxide-Nitride Phosphors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Hu-Cheng; LI Cheng-Yu; PANG Ran; G. Lakshminarayana; ZHOU Shi-Feng; TENG Yu; QIU Jian-Rong

    2008-01-01

    Europium-doped yttrium-silicon-oxide-nitride phosphors are synthesized by carbothermal reduction and nitridation method. The crystal structure of the phosphors changed gradually from oxide Y2Si2 O7 to nitride YSi3N5state with increasing dosage of Si3N4 and carbon powder. The Y2Si2O7:Eu phosphor shows a blue emission at 465 nm with 300 nm excitation and a characteristic red emission of Eu3+ at 612 nm with 230 nm excitation. The YSi3N5 :Eu phosphor shows a broad emission band centred at 595 nm with some sharp peaks of Eu3+ with 325 nm excitation. The absorption of the studied phosphors increases from 450 to 700 nm with an increment in nitrogen content. Blue-to-orange tunable luminescence is observed with 390 nm excitation.

  13. High hardness of alloyed ferrite after nitriding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Detailed layer-by layer structure and phase analyses of the diffusion layer of nitrided binary alloys of iron with aluminium, chromium, vanadium and titanium have been carried out by means of a complex technique. Transition d-metals (chromium, vanadium and titanium) raise to a greater degree the solubility of nitrogen in the α solid solution, sharply increases the hardness of ferrite and decrease the depth of the layer. Nitrided binary alloys of iron with chromium, vanadium and titanium are strengthened through precipitation from the nitrogen-saturated α-solid solution of nitrides of alloying elements TiN, VN and CrN of a structure B1. A maximum hardness of ferrite alloyed by chromium, vanadium and titanium is observed after nitriding at 550 deg C when the precipitated special nitrides are fully coherent with the α matrix

  14. Cathodic Cage Plasma Nitriding: An Innovative Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. R. M. de Sousa

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cylindrical samples of AISI 1020, AISI 316, and AISI 420 steels, with different heights, were simultaneously treated by a new technique of ionic nitriding, entitled cathodic cage plasma nitriding (CCPN, in order to evaluate the efficiency of this technique to produce nitrided layers with better properties compared with those obtained using conventional ionic nitriding technique. This method is able to eliminate the edge effect in the samples, promoting a better uniformity of temperature, and consequently, a smaller variation of the thickness/height relation can be obtained. The compound layers were characterized by X-ray diffraction, optical microscopy, and microhardness test profile. The results were compared with the properties of samples obtained with the conventional nitriding, for the three steel types. It was verified that samples treated by CCPN process presented, at the same temperature, a better uniformity in the thickness and absence of the edge effect.

  15. Fully CMOS-compatible titanium nitride nanoantennas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CMOS-compatible fabrication of plasmonic materials and devices will accelerate the development of integrated nanophotonics for information processing applications. Using low-temperature plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition (PEALD), we develop a recipe for fully CMOS-compatible titanium nitride (TiN) that is plasmonic in the visible and near infrared. Films are grown on silicon, silicon dioxide, and epitaxially on magnesium oxide substrates. By optimizing the plasma exposure per growth cycle during PEALD, carbon and oxygen contamination are reduced, lowering undesirable loss. We use electron beam lithography to pattern TiN nanopillars with varying diameters on silicon in large-area arrays. In the first reported single-particle measurements on plasmonic TiN, we demonstrate size-tunable darkfield scattering spectroscopy in the visible and near infrared regimes. The optical properties of this CMOS-compatible material, combined with its high melting temperature and mechanical durability, comprise a step towards fully CMOS-integrated nanophotonic information processing

  16. Fully CMOS-compatible titanium nitride nanoantennas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Briggs, Justin A., E-mail: jabriggs@stanford.edu [Department of Applied Physics, Stanford University, 348 Via Pueblo Mall, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Stanford University, 496 Lomita Mall, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Naik, Gururaj V.; Baum, Brian K.; Dionne, Jennifer A. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Stanford University, 496 Lomita Mall, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Petach, Trevor A.; Goldhaber-Gordon, David [Department of Physics, Stanford University, 382 Via Pueblo Mall, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)

    2016-02-01

    CMOS-compatible fabrication of plasmonic materials and devices will accelerate the development of integrated nanophotonics for information processing applications. Using low-temperature plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition (PEALD), we develop a recipe for fully CMOS-compatible titanium nitride (TiN) that is plasmonic in the visible and near infrared. Films are grown on silicon, silicon dioxide, and epitaxially on magnesium oxide substrates. By optimizing the plasma exposure per growth cycle during PEALD, carbon and oxygen contamination are reduced, lowering undesirable loss. We use electron beam lithography to pattern TiN nanopillars with varying diameters on silicon in large-area arrays. In the first reported single-particle measurements on plasmonic TiN, we demonstrate size-tunable darkfield scattering spectroscopy in the visible and near infrared regimes. The optical properties of this CMOS-compatible material, combined with its high melting temperature and mechanical durability, comprise a step towards fully CMOS-integrated nanophotonic information processing.

  17. III-nitride semiconductor materials

    CERN Document Server

    Feng, Zhe Chuan

    2006-01-01

    III-Nitride semiconductor materials - (Al, In, Ga)N - are excellent wide band gap semiconductors very suitable for modern electronic and optoelectronic applications. Remarkable breakthroughs have been achieved recently, and current knowledge and data published have to be modified and upgraded. This book presents the new developments and achievements in the field. Written by renowned experts, the review chapters in this book cover the most important topics and achievements in recent years, discuss progress made by different groups, and suggest future directions. Each chapter also describes the

  18. Electron spectroscopy of dilute nitrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The application of electron spectroscopies in dilute nitride semiconductor research for both chemical analysis and the determination of electronic and lattice vibrational properties is described. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy of the nitrogen bonding configurations in dilute InNxSb1-x and InNxAs1-x alloys is presented. High resolution electron-energy-loss spectroscopy (HREELS) of the plasmon excitations in InNxSb1-x is shown to provide information on the electronic properties of the material, before and after annealing. HREELS is also used to investigate the GaN-like phonon modes in GaNxAs1-x alloys

  19. Surface analysis in steel nitrides by using Moessbauer spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The formation of iron nitride layer at low temperatures, 600-700 K, by Moessbauer spectroscopy is studied. These layers were obtained basically through two different processes: ion nitriding and ammonia gas nitriding. A preliminary study about post-discharge nitriding was made using discharge in hollow cathode as well as microwave excitation. The assembly of these chambers is also described. The analysis of the nitrided samples was done by CEMS and CXMS, aided by optical microscopy, and the CEMS and CXMS detectors were constructed by ourselves. We also made a brief study about these detectors, testing as acetone as the mixture 80% He+10% C H4 as detection gases for the use of CEMS. The surface analysis of the samples showed that in the ammonia gas process nitriding the nitrided layer starts by the superficial formation of an iron nitride rich nitrogen. By thermal evolution this nitride promotes the diffusion of nitrogen and the formation of other more stable nitrides. (author)

  20. Chemical Sharpening, Shortening, and Unzipping of Boron Nitride Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Yunlong; Chen, Zhongfang; Connell, John W.; Fay, Catharine C.; Park, Cheol; Kim, Jae-Woo; Lin, Yi

    2014-01-01

    Boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs), the one-dimensional member of the boron nitride nanostructure family, are generally accepted to be highly inert to oxidative treatments and can only be covalently modifi ed by highly reactive species. Conversely, it is discovered that the BNNTs can be chemically dispersed and their morphology modifi ed by a relatively mild method: simply sonicating the nanotubes in aqueous ammonia solution. The dispersed nanotubes are significantly corroded, with end-caps removed, tips sharpened, and walls thinned. The sonication treatment in aqueous ammonia solution also removes amorphous BN impurities and shortened BNNTs, resembling various oxidative treatments of carbon nanotubes. Importantly, the majority of BNNTs are at least partially longitudinally cut, or "unzipped". Entangled and freestanding BN nanoribbons (BNNRs), resulting from the unzipping, are found to be approximately 5-20 nm in width and up to a few hundred nanometers in length. This is the fi rst chemical method to obtain BNNRs from BNNT unzipping. This method is not derived from known carbon nanotube unzipping strategies, but is unique to BNNTs because the use of aqueous ammonia solutions specifi cally targets the B-N bond network. This study may pave the way for convenient processing of BNNTs, previously thought to be highly inert, toward controlling their dispersion, purity, lengths, and electronic properties.

  1. Electrospun Gallium Nitride Nanofibers (abstract)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meléndez, Anamaris; Morales, Kristle; Ramos, Idalia; Campo, Eva; Santiago, Jorge J.

    2009-04-01

    The high thermal conductivity and wide bandgap of gallium nitride (GaN) are desirable characteristics in optoelectronics and sensing applications. In comparison to thin films and powders, in the nanofiber morphology the sensitivity of GaN is expected to increase as the exposed area (proportional to the length) increases. In this work we present electrospinning as a novel technique in the fabrication of GaN nanofibers. Electrospinning, invented in the 1930s, is a simple, inexpensive, and rapid technique to produce microscopically long ultrafine fibers. GaN nanofibers are produced using gallium nitrate and dimethyl-acetamide as precursors. After electrospinning, thermal decomposition under an inert atmosphere is used to pyrolyze the polymer. To complete the preparation, the nanofibers are sintered in a tube furnace under a NH3 flow. Both scanning electron microscopy and profilometry show that the process produces continuous and uniform fibers with diameters ranging from 20 to a few hundred nanometers, and lengths of up to a few centimeters. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis shows the development of GaN nanofibers with hexagonal wurtzite structure. Future work includes additional characterization using transmission electron microscopy and XRD to understand the role of precursors and nitridation in nanofiber synthesis, and the use of single nanofibers for the construction of optical and gas sensing devices.

  2. Wear behaviour of plasma nitrided tool steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devi, M.U. [Tata Iron and Steel Co. Ltd., Jamshedpur (India). Research and Development Div.; Chakraborty, T.K. [Wire Rod Mill, Tata Iron and Steel Co. Ltd., Jamshedpur (India); Mohanty, O.N. [Research and Development Division, Tata Iron and Steel Co. Ltd., Jamshedpur (India)

    1999-09-01

    Plasma nitriding of three grades of tool steels, namely H13, D2 and a special purpose proprietary tool steel, referred to as L7', has been explored in an effort to enhance the working life of roll entry (RE) guides in wire rod rolling mill that are subjected to a complex wear mode including impact, sliding and rolling. In the case of H13 and D2 steels, plasma nitriding is found to improve the life of guide rolls by two to three times depending upon the type of tool steel. The working life of the guide rolls made from L7' steel, however, was observed to be lower after plasma nitriding due to softening of the substrate at plasma nitriding temperature. The cross-section normal to wear scar and the surface of worn-out rolls were characterised by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to understand the wear mechanisms. The SEM examination of worn-out surfaces revealed signatures for the adhesion, abrasion, delamination and tribochemical (oxidative) modes of wear. In the case of rolls without plasma nitriding, adhesion was one of the important causes of wear in all the tool steels. Delamination wear occurred in H13 steel and both delamination and microcutting modes of wear contributed to the overall damage in D2 steel rolls. L7' steel showed breaking of surface oxide film, indicating tribochemical wear. Plasma nitriding decreased the adhesive wear substantially. Delamination was found to be the primary mode of wear in nitrided H13 steel rolls. Abrasive wear contributed to damage in nitrided D2 steel rolls. Severe roll damage occurred in L7' steel, primarily by microcutting, due to softening during plasma nitriding. The working life of the rolls has been deliberated upon in the light of wear mechanisms observed in the different tool steels. (orig.)

  3. Friction Characteristics of Nitrided Layers on AISI 430 Ferritic Stainless Steel Obtained by Various Nitriding Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hakan AYDIN

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The influence of plasma, gas and salt-bath nitriding techniques on the friction coefficient of AISI 430 ferritic stainless steel was studied in this paper. Samples were plasma nitrided in 80 % N2 + 20 % H2 atmosphere at 450 °C and 520 °C for 8 h at a pressure of 2 mbar, gas nitrided in NH3 and CO2 atmosphere at 570 °C for 13 h and salt-bath nitrided in a cyanide-cyanate salt-bath at 570 °C for 1.5 h. Characterisation of nitrided layers on the ferritic stainless steel was carried out by means of microstructure, microhardness, surface roughness and friction coefficient measurements. Friction characteristics of the nitrided layers on the 430 steel were investigated using a ball-on-disc friction-wear tester with a WC-Co ball as the counter-body under dry sliding conditions. Analysis of wear tracks was carried out by scanning electron microscopy. Maximum hardness and maximum case depth were achieved on the plasma nitrided sample at 520 ºC for 8 h. The plasma and salt-bath nitriding techniques significantly decreased the average surface roughness of the 430 ferritic stainless steel. The friction test results showed that the salt-bath nitrided layer had better friction-reducing ability than the other nitrided layers under dry sliding conditions. Furthermore, the friction characteristic of the plasma nitrided layer at 520 ºC was better than that of the plasma nitrided layer at 450 °C.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.19.1.3819

  4. Low temperature anodic bonding to silicon nitride

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weichel, Steen; Reus, Roger De; Bouaidat, Salim;

    2000-01-01

    Low-temperature anodic bonding to stoichiometric silicon nitride surfaces has been performed in the temperature range from 3508C to 4008C. It is shown that the bonding is improved considerably if the nitride surfaces are either oxidized or exposed to an oxygen plasma prior to the bonding. Both bulk...... and thin-film glasses were used in the bonding experiments. Bond quality was evaluated using a tensile test on structured dies. The effect of oxygen-based pre-treatments of the nitride surface on the bond quality has been evaluated. Bond strengths up to 35 Nrmm2 and yields up to 100% were obtained....

  5. Atomic Resolution Microscopy of Nitrides in Steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danielsen, Hilmar Kjartansson

    2014-01-01

    MN and CrMN type nitride precipitates in 12%Cr steels have been investigated using atomic resolution microscopy. The MN type nitrides were observed to transform into CrMN both by composition and crystallography as Cr diffuses from the matrix into the MN precipitates. Thus a change from one precip...... layer between the crystalline nitride and ferrite matrix. Usually precipitates are described as having (semi) coherent or incoherent interfaces, but in this case it is more energetically favourable to create an amorphous layer instead of the incoherent interface....

  6. Plasma nitriding of AISI 52100 ball bearing steel and effect of heat treatment on nitrided layer

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ravindra Kumar; J Alphonsa; Ram Prakash; K S Boob; J Ghanshyam; P A Rayjada; P M Raole; S Mukherjee

    2011-02-01

    In this paper an effort has been made to plasma nitride the ball bearing steel AISI 52100. The difficulty with this specific steel is that its tempering temperature (∼170–200°C) is much lower than the standard processing temperature (∼460–580°C) needed for the plasma nitriding treatment. To understand the mechanism, effect of heat treatment on the nitrided layer steel is investigated. Experiments are performed on three different types of ball bearing races i.e. annealed, quenched and quench-tempered samples. Different gas compositions and process temperatures are maintained while nitriding these samples. In the quenched and quench-tempered samples, the surface hardness has decreased after plasma nitriding process. Plasma nitriding of annealed sample with argon and nitrogen gas mixture gives higher hardness in comparison to the hydrogen–nitrogen gas mixture. It is reported that the later heat treatment of the plasma nitrided annealed sample has shown improvement in the hardness of this steel. X-ray diffraction analysis shows that the dominant phases in the plasma nitrided annealed sample are (Fe2−3N) and (Fe4N), whereas in the plasma nitrided annealed sample with later heat treatment only -Fe peak occurs.

  7. Internal nitride formation during gas-phase thermal nitridation of titanium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Titanium nitride surface layers were prepared by gas-phase thermal nitridation of pure titanium in an ammonia atmosphere at 1373 K for different times. In addition to the surface nitride layer, nitride/hydride formation was observed in the bulk of the specimen. The cross-section of the specimen was characterized by various techniques such as optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, secondary ion mass spectrometry and nanomechanical testing, and the mechanism of formation of these phases is discussed.

  8. Nitriding of Aluminum Extrusion Die: Effect of Die Geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhtar, S. S.; Arif, A. F. M.; Yilbas, B. S.

    2010-04-01

    Nitriding of complex-shaped extrusion dies may result in non-uniform nitride layers and hence a required hardness may not be achieved in some regions of the bearing area. The present study is carried out to assess the effect of extrusion die profile on the characteristics and growth behavior of nitride layers so that the critical die design feature can be identified to enhance the uniformity of the nitride layer. For this purpose, AISI H13 steel samples have been manufactured with profiles similar to those of hot extrusion dies. The samples were then gas nitrided under controlled nitriding potential. The uniformity and depth of nitride layers have been investigated in terms of compound layer and total nitride case depth for selected die features. The results of this study indicated the need to include the effect of profile on the nitride layer for the optimal die design with improved service life.

  9. Method of nitriding refractory metal articles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiegs, Terry N.; Holcombe, Cressie E.; Dykes, Norman L.; Omatete, Ogbemi O.; Young, Albert C.

    1994-01-01

    A method of nitriding a refractory-nitride forming metal or metalloid articles and composite articles. A consolidated metal or metalloid article or composite is placed inside a microwave oven and nitrogen containing gas is introduced into the microwave oven. The metal or metalloid article or composite is heated to a temperature sufficient to react the metal or metalloid with the nitrogen by applying a microwave energy within the microwave oven. The metal or metalloid article or composite is maintained at that temperature for a period of time sufficient to convert the article of metal or metalloid or composite to an article or composite of refractory nitride. In addition, a method of applying a coating, such as a coating of an oxide, a carbide, or a carbo-nitride, to an article of metal or metalloid by microwave heating.

  10. ALUMINUM NITRIDE AS A HIGH TEMPERATURE TRANSDUCER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The high temperature capabilities of bulk single crystal aluminum nitride are investigated experimentally. Temperatures in excess of 1100 deg. Celsius are obtained and held for eight hours. Variation in the performance of single crystal samples is demonstrated.

  11. Titanium nitride nanoparticles for therapeutic applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guler, Urcan; Kildishev, Alexander V.; Boltasseva, Alexandra;

    2014-01-01

    Titanium nitride nanoparticles exhibit plasmonic resonances in the biological transparency window where high absorption efficiencies can be obtained with small dimensions. Both lithographic and colloidal samples are examined from the perspective of nanoparticle thermal therapy. © 2014 OSA....

  12. The Nitrogen-Nitride Anode.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delnick, Frank M.

    2014-10-01

    Nitrogen gas N 2 can be reduced to nitride N -3 in molten LiCl-KCl eutectic salt electrolyte. However, the direct oxidation of N -3 back to N 2 is kinetically slow and only occurs at high overvoltage. The overvoltage for N -3 oxidation can be eliminated by coordinating the N -3 with BN to form the dinitridoborate (BN 2 -3 ) anion which forms a 1-D conjugated linear inorganic polymer with -Li-N-B-N- repeating units. This polymer precipitates out of solution as Li 3 BN 2 which becomes a metallic conductor upon delithiation. Li 3 BN 2 is oxidized to Li + + N 2 + BN at about the N 2 /N -3 redox potential with very little overvoltage. In this report we evaluate the N 2 /N -3 redox couple as a battery anode for energy storage.

  13. Nitrogen-rich transition metal nitrides

    OpenAIRE

    Salamat, Ashkan; Hector, Andrew L.; Kroll, Peter; McMillan, Paul F.

    2013-01-01

    The solid state chemistry leading to the synthesis and characterization of metal nitrides with N:M ratios >1 is summarized. Studies of these compounds represent an emerging area of research. Most transition metal nitrides have much lower nitrogen contents, and they often form with non- or sub-stoichiometric compositions. These materials are typically metallic with often superconducting properties, and they provide highly refractory, high hardness materials with many technological applications...

  14. Progress in molecular uranium-nitride chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    King, David M.; Liddle, Stephen T

    2014-01-01

    The coordination, organometallic, and materials chemistry of uranium nitride has long been an important facet of actinide chemistry. Following matrix isolation experiments and computational characterisation, molecular, solution-based uranium chemistry has developed significantly in the last decade or so culminating most recently in the isolation of the first examples of long-sought terminal uranium nitride linkages. Herein, the field is reviewed with an emphasis on well-defined molecular spec...

  15. Surface modification of titanium by plasma nitriding

    OpenAIRE

    Myriam Pereira Kapczinski; Carlos Gil; Eder Julio Kinast; Carlos Alberto dos Santos

    2003-01-01

    A systematic investigation was undertaken on commercially pure titanium submitted to plasma nitriding. Thirteen different sets of operational parameters (nitriding time, sample temperature and plasma atmosphere) were used. Surface analyses were performed using X-ray diffraction, nuclear reaction and scanning electron microscopy. Wear tests were done with stainless steel Gracey scaler, sonic apparatus and pin-on-disc machine. The obtained results indicate that the tribological performance can ...

  16. Plasma nitriding of Al 99.5

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, H. -Y; Stock, H.-R.; Mayr, P.

    1993-01-01

    Aluminium nitride (AlN) is a very interesting ceramic because of its combination of properties such as high thermal stability, high hardness and an unusual combination of high thermal and low electrical conductivity. But it is very difficulty to obtain an AlN layer on the aluminium substrates by thermochemical nitriding process. Since a thin film of aluminium oxide existing on the surface of every aluminium substrate prevents the nitrogen atoms from diffusing into the aluminium lattice. Howev...

  17. Aluminum Nitride Sensors for Harsh Environments

    OpenAIRE

    Goericke, Fabian Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Harsh environment applications include high temperature, pressure and mechanical shock. Aluminum nitride is a strong ceramic material with very good high temperature survivability. It also has piezoelectric properties that can be used for sensing applications and it can be deposited with good control as thin polycrystalline film for the fabrication of micro-electromechanical systems. In this dissertation, optimized deposition parameters for aluminum nitride films and characterization techniqu...

  18. Innovative boron nitride-doped propellants

    OpenAIRE

    Thelma Manning; Richard Field; Kenneth Klingaman; Michael Fair; John Bolognini; Robin Crownover; Carlton P. Adam; Viral Panchal; Eugene Rozumov; Henry Grau; Paul Matter; Michael Beachy; Christopher Holt; Samuel Sopok

    2016-01-01

    The U.S. military has a need for more powerful propellants with balanced/stoichiometric amounts of fuel and oxidants. However, balanced and more powerful propellants lead to accelerated gun barrel erosion and markedly shortened useful barrel life. Boron nitride (BN) is an interesting potential additive for propellants that could reduce gun wear effects in advanced propellants (US patent pending 2015-026P). Hexagonal boron nitride is a good lubricant that can provide wear resistance and lower ...

  19. Nucleation of iron nitrides during gaseous nitriding of iron; the effect of a preoxidation treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friehling, Peter B.; Poulsen, Finn Willy; Somers, Marcel A.J.

    2001-01-01

    grains. On prolonged nitriding, immediate nucleation at the surface of iron grains becomes possible. Calculated incubation times for the nucleation of gamma'-Fe4N1-x during nitriding are generally longer than those observed experimentally in the present work. The incubation time is reduced dramatically...

  20. Microstructural characterization of an AISI-SAE 4140 steel without nitridation and nitrided

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It was micro structurally characterized an AISI-SAE 4140 steel before and after of nitridation through the nitridation process by plasma post-unloading microwaves through Optical microscopy (OM), Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) by means of secondary electrons and retrodispersed, X-ray diffraction (XRD), Energy dispersion spectra (EDS) and mapping of elements. (Author)

  1. Preparation and pattern recognition of O'-sialon by reduction-nitridation from coal gangue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The phase composition and microstructure of O'-sialon prepared from Chinese coal gangue have been studied. The use of Si powder is more effective than that of activated carbon or mainly carbon with a little silicon for reduction-nitridation. For specimens with 40% Si addition, more than 80% of O'-sialon may be obtained when nitrided at 1500 degree sign C. The formed O'-sialon was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscope (SEM). The parameters for O'-Sialon preparation are optimized by computer pattern recognition program based on principal component analysis, the target parameter optimum regions with higher relative content of O'-Sialon was indicated by this way

  2. Synthesis of Vanadium Nitride by a One Step Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sansan YU; Nianxin FU; Feng GAO; Zhitong SUI

    2007-01-01

    Vanadium nitrides were prepared via one step method of carbothermal reduction and nitridation of vanadium trioxide. Thermalgravimetric analysis (TGA) and X-ray diffraction were used to determine the reaction paths of vanadium carbide, namely the following sequential reaction: V2O3→V8C7 in higher temperature stage, the rule of vanadium nitride synthesized was established, and defined conditions of temperature for the production of the carbides and nitrides were determined. Vanadium oxycarbide may consist in the front process of carbothermal reduction of vanadium trioxide. In one step method for vanadium nitride by carbothermal reduction and nitridation of vanadium trioxide, the nitridation process is simultaneous with the carbothermal reduction. A one-step mechanism of the carbothermal reduction with simultaneous nitridation leaded to a lower terminal temperature in nitridation process for vanadium nitride produced, compared with that of carbothermal reduction process without nitridation. The grain size and shape of vanadium nitride were uniform, and had the shape of a cube. The one step method combined vacuum carborization and nitridation (namely two step method) into one process. It simplified the technological process and decreased the costs.

  3. Growth of epitaxial iron nitride ultrathin film on zinc-blende gallium nitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors report the growth of iron nitride on zinc-blende gallium nitride using molecular beam epitaxy. First, zinc-blende GaN is grown on a magnesium oxide substrate having (001) orientation; second, an ultrathin layer of FeN is grown on top of the GaN layer. In situ reflection high-energy electron diffraction is used to monitor the surface during growth, and a well-defined epitaxial relationship is observed. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy is used to reveal the epitaxial continuity at the gallium nitride-iron nitride interface. Surface morphology of the iron nitride, similar to yet different from that of the GaN substrate, can be described as plateau valley. The FeN chemical stoichiometry is probed using both bulk and surface sensitive methods, and the magnetic properties of the sample are revealed.

  4. Interaction between hydrogen and a nitrided layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Ćwiek

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: of this paper is to reveal the influence of nitrided layer on 34CrAlNi7-10 steel to its susceptibility to hydrogen degradation. Investigation was carried out with the use of slow strain tensile rate test (SSRT.Design/methodology/approach: Nitriding was done in the nitrogen-hydrogen (or argon gas atmospheres with various hydrogen content, i. e. 0%, 30%, and 70%, at the glow discharge at temperature 560°C for 6 hrs. In order to estimate the degree of hydrogen degradation SSRT test was conducted on round smooth specimens 4 mm in diameter. Tests were performed at ambient temperature either in dry air or in 0.005 M H2SO4 solution. The applied strain rate was 10-6 s-1. Tests in acid solution were conducted under cathodic polarization with constant current densities: 0.1; 1; 5 and 10 mA/cm2. Fracture surfaces after SSRT test were examined with scanning electron microscope (SEM to reveal a mode and mechanism of cracking.Findings: Plasma nitrided layers are effective barriers to hydrogen entry into structural steel which decreases susceptibility of steel to hydrogen degradation. Hydrogen is mainly accumulated in a compact nitrides zone. Evidences of no increase in brittleness of nitrided layers with absorbed hydrogen were observed.Research limitations/implications: There is no possibility to perform direct observations of exact mechanism of hydrogen-assisted cracking so far. Further research should be taken to reveal the exact mechanism of increased plasticity of nitrided layer with absorbed hydrogen.Practical implications: Plasma nitrided layers are effective barriers to hydrogen entry into structural steel utilized in aggressive environments, which could be potential sources of hydrogen charging of exploited steels.Originality/value: Plasma assisted nitriding provides the formation of thin compact nitride zone which protects high-strength steels against corrosion and hydrogen degradation. Evidences of no increase in brittleness of nitrided

  5. Transformation Mechanism From Sepiolite to Silicon Nitride (Si3N4)

    OpenAIRE

    KADİR, Selahattin

    1999-01-01

    Powder metallurgy production of Si3N4 materials has been used in different fields of production such as ceramic cutting tools, turbine components, automotive valves and ball-bearing components. This study was undertaken to determine the transformation mechanisms of sepiolite type magnesium hydrosilicate clay mineral to Si3N4 by carbothermal reduction and nitridation (CTRN). A sepiolite and carbon black powders mixture with a C/SiO2 molar ratio of 3 was used for the CTRN process. The...

  6. The precipitation and effect of nano nitrides in HSLC steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The existing forms of N and Al in HSLC (high strength low carbon) steel produced by TSCR (thin slab casting and rolling process), the precipitation thermodynamics and kinetics of AlN, and its effects on structure and mechanical property are studied. The experimental results show that only a small quantity of nitrogen is com- bined into AlN in HSLC steel produced by TSCR and most of the nitrogen in steel is still free nitrogen. Aluminum-nitride is mainly precipitated during the period of slow air cooling after coiling, but not during rolling and water cooling. The acid-soluble aluminum has no obvious effect on the grain size and mechanical property of HSLC steel produced by TSCR whose acid-soluble aluminum content is 0.005%―0.043%. The precipitation of AlN is not the main cause of grain refinement of HSLC steel produced by TSCR, nor is AlN the dominating precipitate that has precipitation strengthening effect. The nano nitrides are not pure AlN, but have complex compositions.

  7. Vertical transport in graphene-hexagonal boron nitride heterostructure devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruzzone, Samantha; Logoteta, Demetrio; Fiori, Gianluca; Iannaccone, Giuseppe

    2015-09-01

    Research in graphene-based electronics is recently focusing on devices based on vertical heterostructures of two-dimensional materials. Here we use density functional theory and multiscale simulations to investigate the tunneling properties of single- and double-barrier structures with graphene and few-layer hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) or hexagonal boron carbon nitride (h-BC2N). We find that tunneling through a single barrier exhibit a weak dependence on energy. We also show that in double barriers separated by a graphene layer we do not observe resonant tunneling, but a significant increase of the tunneling probability with respect to a single barrier of thickness equal to the sum of the two barriers. This is due to the fact that the graphene layer acts as an effective phase randomizer, suppressing resonant tunneling and effectively letting a double-barrier structure behave as two single-barriers in series. Finally, we use multiscale simulations to reproduce a current-voltage characteristics resembling that of a resonant tunneling diode, that has been experimentally observed in single barrier structure. The peak current is obtained when there is perfect matching between the densities of states of the cathode and anode graphene regions.

  8. New amorphous interface for precipitate nitrides in steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danielsen, Hilmar Kjartansson; Kadkhodazadeh, Shima; Grumsen, Flemming Bjerg; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2014-01-01

    According to classical theories precipitate interfaces are described by their degree of coherency with the matrix, which affects their strengthening contribution. Investigations of nitride precipitate interfaces in 12% Cr steels with transmission electron microscopy have shown the nitrides to be...

  9. Theory of thermal transport in multilayer hexagonal boron nitride and nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsay, L.; Broido, D. A.

    2012-01-01

    We present a theory for the lattice thermal conductivity κL of single-walled boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) and multilayer hexagonal boron nitride (MLBN), which is based on an exact numerical solution of the phonon Boltzmann equation. Coupling between layers in MLBN and nanotube curvature in BNNTs each break a phonon scattering selection rule found in single-layer hexagonal boron nitride (SLBN), which reduces κL in these systems. We show that out-of-plane flexural phonons in MLBN and out-of-tube phonons in BNNTs provide large contributions to κL, qualitatively similar to multilayer graphene (MLG) and single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). However, we find that the κL's in BNNTs and MLBN are considerably smaller compared to similar SWCNTs and MLG structures because of stronger anharmonic phonon scattering in the former. A large and strongly temperature-dependent isotope effect is found reflecting the interplay between anharmonic and isotope scattering phonons. Finally, we also demonstrate convergence of BNNTs into SLBN for large-diameter nanotubes and MLBN to bulk hexagonal boron nitride within a few layers.

  10. Rapid Microwave Synthesis, Characterization and Reactivity of Lithium Nitride Hydride, Li4NH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuria Tapia-Ruiz

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Lithium nitride hydride, Li4NH, was synthesised from lithium nitride and lithium hydride over minute timescales, using microwave synthesis methods in the solid state for the first time. The structure of the microwave-synthesised powders was confirmed by powder X-ray diffraction [tetragonal space group I41/a; a = 4.8864(1 Å, c = 9.9183(2 Å] and the nitride hydride reacts with moist air under ambient conditions to produce lithium hydroxide and subsequently lithium carbonate. Li4NH undergoes no dehydrogenation or decomposition [under Ar(g] below 773 K. A tetragonal–cubic phase transition, however, occurs for the compound at ca. 770 K. The new high temperature (HT phase adopts an anti-fluorite structure (space group Fm 3̅ m; a = 4.9462(3 Å with N3− and H− ions disordered on the 4a sites. Thermal treatment of Li4NH under nitrogen yields a stoichiometric mixture of lithium nitride and lithium imide (Li3N and Li2NH respectively.

  11. Compatibility/Stability Issues in the Use of Nitride Kernels in LWR TRISO Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armstrong, Beth L [ORNL; Besmann, Theodore M [ORNL

    2012-02-01

    The stability of the SiC layer in the presence of free nitrogen will be dependent upon the operating temperatures and resulting nitrogen pressures whether it is at High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) temperatures of 1000-1400 C (coolant design dependent) or LWR temperatures that range from 500-700 C. Although nitrogen released in fissioning will form fission product nitrides, there will remain an overpressure of nitrogen of some magnitude. The nitrogen can be speculated to transport through the inner pyrolytic carbon layer and contact the SiC layer. The SiC layer may be envisioned to fail due to resulting nitridation at the elevated temperatures. However, it is believed that these issues are particularly avoided in the LWR application. Lower temperatures will result in significantly lower nitrogen pressures. Lower temperatures will also substantially reduce nitrogen diffusion rates through the layers and nitriding kinetics. Kinetics calculations were performed using an expression for nitriding silicon. In order to further address these concerns, experiments were run with surrogate fuel particles under simulated operating conditions to determine the resulting phase formation at 700 and 1400 C.

  12. Synthesis and radiation response of BCON: a graphene oxide and hexagonal boron nitride hybrid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhimanapati, Ganesh R.; Wetherington, Maxwell; Mahabir, Shawn; Robinson, Joshua A.

    2016-06-01

    Since graphene, there has been a focus on several two-dimensional material systems (e.g. boron nitride, borocarbon nitride (BCN), transition-metal dichalcogenides) that provide an even wider array of unique chemistries and properties to explore future applications. Specifically, tailoring graphene/boron nitride heterostructures—which can theoretically retain the character of a single-atom thick sheet, withstand large physical strains, are easily functionalized, and have entirely different optical and mechanical properties compared to graphene—can provide the foundation for entirely new research avenues. In recent years, it has been shown that because of the similar crystal structure, carbon, boron, and nitrogen can co-exist as atomic sheets in a layered structure. We have developed a facile method of integrating boron nitride (hBN) and graphene oxide (GO) via chemical exfoliation which we refer to as BCON. The study of the stability of this material at different pH conditions indicates a stable and a uniform solution is achievable at pH 4–8. X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy helped to identify the new bonds which indicated the formation of BCON linkage. Further, an in situ XPS technique was used to understand the chemical changes while exposing it to ionization radiation specially focusing on the C/O ratio. It was observed that even with a very low energy source, this material is highly sensitive to ionizing radiation, such as neutron, alpha and beta particles.

  13. Effect of pulsed plasma nitriding on mechanical and tribological performance of Ck45 steel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rastkar, A R; Kiani, A; Alvand, F; Shokri, B; Amirzadeh, M

    2011-06-01

    We studied the mechanical properties and wear performance of AISI 1045 (Ck45) carbon steel under the influence of pulsed plasma nitriding. The treatments were performed at temperatures of 500 and 550 degrees C in N2:H2 gas ratios of 1:3 and 3:1 and the working pressure of 10 mbar for 1 to 4 hours. Samples were examined by X-ray diffraction, optical, electron and atomic force microscopy, microhardness tests, roughness measurements and wear tests. Nitride layers were mainly composed of epsilon-(Fe2-3N) or gamma'-(Fe4N) depending on the gas ratio and/or temperature and time. When the nitriding time is increased, the composition of the compound layer varies from monophase gamma'-(Fe4N) to the two phase of epsilon-(Fe2-3N) and gamma'-(Fe4N). The highest thickness and hardness of the layers were obtained at 550 degrees C in the N2:H2 gas ratios of 3:1 for 4 h. The topographical evolution and surface roughness of the samples showed that all the roughness parameters increase with increasing the temperature. The friction coefficient of all samples was higher than that of untreated material. Wear performance of all nitrided samples was significantly better than that of untreated material. PMID:21770190

  14. Investigation of light elements in nitrided steel using elastic backscattering analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work describes the ability of ion beam analysis techniques IBA to simultaneously determine the concentration and the possible depth profile of some light elements, such as carbon, oxygen and nitrogen, in matrices of high atomic number Z, such as stainless steel materials. In fact, the nitriding process of some materials has the potential to improve their tribological and mechanical properties and to offer various advantages as compared with other methods used in the modification of surfaces. Gas and Plasma nitriding were applied to certain types of steel, such as AISI-304 and H-13 which are commonly used in the industry, in order to improve their hardness and their surface corrosion resistance. The improvement was correlated with the depth profile of N and the consequent structure variations. More specifically, non-Rutherford elastic backscattering (alpha, alpha) at 5 MeV was performed on different samples, before and after nitriding, in order to determine the stoichiometry and the thickness of the newly formed surface nitrided layers.(authors)

  15. High-pressure high-temperature synthesis of novel binary and ternary nitride phases of group 4 and 14 elements

    OpenAIRE

    Dzivenko, D. A.; Horvath-Bordon, E.; Zerr, A.; Miehe, G.; Kroll, P.; Boehler, R.; McMillan, P.F.; Riedel, R.

    2008-01-01

    Our recent experiments on high-pressure high-temperature synthesis of novel ternary nitrides of group 4 and 14 elements are presented. Dense carbon nitride imide, C2N2(NH), was synthesized for the first time in a laser heated diamond anvil cell (LH-DAC) at pressures above 27 GPa and temperatures around 2000 K. Based on results of the electron diffraction-, EELS-and SIMS-measurements combined with theoretical calculations the structure of this new C-N-H phase was suggested to be of the defect-...

  16. Synthesis of TiN-Si3N4 composites from rutile and quartz by carbothermal reduction nitridation

    OpenAIRE

    Chen Kai; Huang Zhaohui; Fang Minghao; Liu Yan-Gai

    2012-01-01

    TiN-Si3N4 composite powders were prepared by carbothermal reduction nitridation using rutile and quartz as raw materials. The influence of temperature and carbon addition on the phase evolution and microstructure of the products were investigated. The equilibrium phase diagram of Si-C-N-O and Ti-C-N-O system at different temperatures under 0.2 MPa nitrogen pressure was drew. The results show that the optimum parameters for synthesizing TiN-Si3N4 by carbothermal reduction nitridation pro...

  17. Nitriding and Nitrocarburizing; Current Status and Future Challenges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Somers, Marcel A. J.

    This contribution addresses the current understanding of gaseous nitriding and nitrocarburizing. Aspects of thermodynamics, kinetics and microstructure development in iron and heat treatable steel will be explained. In these materials the nitrided/ nitrocarburized case can be subdivided in a...... compound layer consisting of iron (carbo-)nitrides and a diffusion zone, consisting of a dispersion of alloying element nitrides in ferrite. The compound layer provides beneficial tribological and corrosion performance, while the diffusion zone is responsible for improved fatigue performance. Furthermore...

  18. Nitriding and Nitrocarburizing; Current Status and Future Challenges

    OpenAIRE

    Somers, Marcel A.J.

    2013-01-01

    This contribution addresses the current understanding of gaseous nitriding and nitrocarburizing. Aspects of thermodynamics, kinetics and microstructure development in iron and heat treatable steel will be explained. In these materials the nitrided/ nitrocarburized case can be subdivided in a compound layer consisting of iron (carbo-)nitrides and a diffusion zone, consisting of a dispersion of alloying element nitrides in ferrite. The compound layer provides beneficial tribological and corrosi...

  19. Advancing liquid metal reactor technology with nitride fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A review of the use of nitride fuels in liquid metal fast reactors is presented. Past studies indicate that both uranium nitride and uranium/plutonium nitride possess characteristics that may offer enhanced performance, particularly in the area of passive safety. To further quantify these effects, the analysis of a mixed-nitride fuel system utilizing the geometry and power level of the US Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor as a reference is described. 18 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs

  20. Diffusion kinetics of nitrogen in tantalum during plasma-nitriding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张德元; 林勤; 曾卫军; 李放; 许兰萍; 付青峰

    2001-01-01

    The activation energies of nitrogen in tantalum on plasma nitriding conditions were calculated according to the experimental data of hardness of plasma-nitriding of tantalum vs time and temperature. The activation energy calculated is 148.873±0.390  kJ/mol. The depth increasing of nitriding layer with time follows square root relation. The nitriding process of tantalum is controlled by diffusion of nitrogen atoms in tantalum solid solution.

  1. Ion nitriding in 316=L stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ion nitriding is a glow discharge process that is used to induce surface modification in metals. It has been applied to 316-L austenitic stainless steel looking for similar benefits already obtained in other steels. An austenitic stainless steel was selected because is not hardenable by heat treatment and is not easy to nitride by gas nitriding. The samples were plastically deformed to 10, 20, 40, 50 AND 70% of their original thickness in order to obtain bulk hardening and to observe nitrogen penetration dependence on it. The results were: an increase of one to two rockwell hardness number (except in 70% deformed sample because of its thickness); an increase of even several hundreds per cent in microhardness knoop number in nitrided surface. The later surely modifies waste resistance which would be worth to quantify in further studies. Microhardness measured in an internal transversal face to nitrided surface had a gradual diminish in its value with depth. Auger microanalysis showed a higher relative concentration rate CN/CFe near the surface giving evidence of nitrogen presence till 250 microns deep. The color metallography etchant used, produced faster corrosion in nitrited regions. Therefore, corrosion studies have to be done before using ion nitrited 316-L under these chemicals. (Author)

  2. Innovative boron nitride-doped propellants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thelma Manning

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The U.S. military has a need for more powerful propellants with balanced/stoichiometric amounts of fuel and oxidants. However, balanced and more powerful propellants lead to accelerated gun barrel erosion and markedly shortened useful barrel life. Boron nitride (BN is an interesting potential additive for propellants that could reduce gun wear effects in advanced propellants (US patent pending 2015-026P. Hexagonal boron nitride is a good lubricant that can provide wear resistance and lower flame temperatures for gun barrels. Further, boron can dope steel, which drastically improves its strength and wear resistance, and can block the formation of softer carbides. A scalable synthesis method for producing boron nitride nano-particles that can be readily dispersed into propellants has been developed. Even dispersion of the nano-particles in a double-base propellant has been demonstrated using a solvent-based processing approach. Stability of a composite propellant with the BN additive was verified. In this paper, results from propellant testing of boron nitride nano-composite propellants are presented, including closed bomb and wear and erosion testing. Detailed characterization of the erosion tester substrates before and after firing was obtained by electron microscopy, inductively coupled plasma and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. This promising boron nitride additive shows the ability to improve gun wear and erosion resistance without any destabilizing effects to the propellant. Potential applications could include less erosive propellants in propellant ammunition for large, medium and small diameter fire arms.

  3. Transition Metal Nitrides: A First Principles Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, Ashish; Singh, A. K.

    2016-04-01

    The present work describes the structural stability and electronic and mechanical properties of transition metal nitrides (TmNs: B1 cubic structure (cF8, Fm ‾ overline 3 m)) using first principles density functional theory (DFT) within generalized gradient approximation (GGA). The lattice constant of TmNs increases with increasing the atomic radii of the transition metals. Stability of the TmNs decreases from IVB to VIB groups due to increase in formation energy/atom. The bonding characteristics of these nitrides have been explained based on electronic density of states and charge density. All the TmNs satisfy Born stability criteria in terms of elastic constants except CrN and MoN that do not exist in equilibrium binary phase diagrams. The groups IVB and V-VIB nitrides are associated with brittle and ductile behaviour based on G/B ratios, respectively. The estimated melting temperatures of these nitrides exhibit reasonably good agreement with calculated with B than those of the C11 for all nitrides.

  4. Innovative boron nitride-doped propellants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Thelma MANNING; Henry GRAU; Paul MATTER; Michael BEACHY; Christopher HOLT; Samuel SOPOK; Richard FIELD; Kenneth KLINGAMAN; Michael FAIR; John BOLOGNINI; Robin CROWNOVER; Carlton P. ADAM; Viral PANCHAL; Eugene ROZUMOV

    2016-01-01

    The U.S. military has a need for more powerful propellants with balanced/stoichiometric amounts of fuel and oxidants. However, balanced and more powerful propellants lead to accelerated gun barrel erosion and markedly shortened useful barrel life. Boron nitride (BN) is an interesting potential additive for propellants that could reduce gun wear effects in advanced propellants (US patent pending 2015-026P). Hexagonal boron nitride is a good lubricant that can provide wear resistance and lower flame temperatures for gun barrels. Further, boron can dope steel, which drastically improves its strength and wear resistance, and can block the formation of softer carbides. A scalable synthesis method for producing boron nitride nano-particles that can be readily dispersed into propellants has been developed. Even dispersion of the nano-particles in a double-base propellant has been demonstrated using a solvent-based processing approach. Stability of a composite propellant with the BN additive was verified. In this paper, results from propellant testing of boron nitride nano-composite propellants are presented, including closed bomb and wear and erosion testing. Detailed characterization of the erosion tester substrates before and after firing was obtained by electron microscopy, inductively coupled plasma and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. This promising boron nitride additive shows the ability to improve gun wear and erosion resistance without any destabilizing effects to the propellant. Potential applications could include less erosive propellants in propellant ammunition for large, medium and small diameter fire arms.

  5. Investigations on the Corrosion Behaviour and Structural Characteristics of Low Temperature Nitrided and Carburised Austenitic Stainless Steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    D. M(u)nter; H.-J. Spies; H. Biermann; Chr. Eckstein

    2004-01-01

    The wear resistance of austenitic stainless steels can be improved by thermo-chemical surface treatment with nitrogen and carbon. However, it is possible that the corrosion resistance will be impaired by the precipitation of chromiumnitrid or -carbide. The present contribution deals with investigations of the corrosion behaviour and structural characteristics of a low temperature nitrided and carburised austenitic stainless steel.The material investigated was AISI 316L (X2CrNiMo17-12-2) austenitic stainless steel. A commercial plasma-nitriding unit (pulsed dc) was used for the nitriding and carburising process. Additional samples were treated by the gasoxinitriding process for a comparison between plasma- and gasoxinitriding. The nitrided and carburised layer of austenltic stainless steel consists of the nitrogen or carbon S-phase (expanded austenite), respectively. X-ray diffraction investigations show the typical shift of the peaks to lower angles, indicating expansion of the fcc lattice. Also the X-ray diffraction technique was employed to study the residual stresses in the nitrogen and carbon S-phase. The corrosion behaviour of surface engineered samples was investigated with electrochemical methods. Anodic potentiodynamic polarisation curves were recorded for testing the resistance against general corrosion (in H2SO4) and pitting corrosion (in NaCl).

  6. Gas source molecular beam epitaxy of scandium nitride on silicon carbide and gallium nitride surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scandium nitride (ScN) is a group IIIB transition metal nitride semiconductor with numerous potential applications in electronic and optoelectronic devices due to close lattice matching with gallium nitride (GaN). However, prior investigations of ScN have focused primarily on heteroepitaxial growth on substrates with a high lattice mismatch of 7%–20%. In this study, the authors have investigated ammonia (NH3) gas source molecular beam epitaxy (NH3-GSMBE) of ScN on more closely lattice matched silicon carbide (SiC) and GaN surfaces (3-GSMBE conditions of 10−5–10−4 Torr NH3 and 800–1050 °C where selected for initial investigation. In-situ x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and ex-situ Rutherford backscattering measurements showed all ScN films grown using these conditions were stoichiometric. For ScN growth on 3C-SiC (111)-(√3 × √3)R30° carbon rich surfaces, the observed attenuation of the XPS Si 2p and C 1s substrate core levels with increasing ScN thickness indicated growth initiated in a layer-by-layer fashion. This was consistent with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images of 100–200 nm thick films that revealed featureless surfaces. In contrast, ScN films grown on 3C-SiC (111)-(3 × 3) and 3C-SiC (100)-(3 × 2) silicon rich surfaces were found to exhibit extremely rough surfaces in SEM. ScN films grown on both 3C-SiC (111)-(√3 × √3)R30° and 2H-GaN (0001)-(1 × 1) epilayer surfaces exhibited hexagonal (1 × 1) low energy electron diffraction patterns indicative of (111) oriented ScN. X-ray diffraction ω-2θ rocking curve scans for these same films showed a large full width half maximum of 0.29° (1047 arc sec) consistent with transmission electron microscopy images that revealed the films to be poly-crystalline with columnar grains oriented at ≈15° to the [0001] direction of the 6H-SiC (0001) substrate. In-situ reflection electron energy loss spectroscopy measurements determined the band-gap for

  7. Gas source molecular beam epitaxy of scandium nitride on silicon carbide and gallium nitride surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, Sean W., E-mail: sean.king@intel.com; Davis, Robert F. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695 (United States); Nemanich, Robert J. [Department of Physics, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695 (United States)

    2014-11-01

    Scandium nitride (ScN) is a group IIIB transition metal nitride semiconductor with numerous potential applications in electronic and optoelectronic devices due to close lattice matching with gallium nitride (GaN). However, prior investigations of ScN have focused primarily on heteroepitaxial growth on substrates with a high lattice mismatch of 7%–20%. In this study, the authors have investigated ammonia (NH{sub 3}) gas source molecular beam epitaxy (NH{sub 3}-GSMBE) of ScN on more closely lattice matched silicon carbide (SiC) and GaN surfaces (<3% mismatch). Based on a thermodynamic analysis of the ScN phase stability window, NH{sub 3}-GSMBE conditions of 10{sup −5}–10{sup −4} Torr NH{sub 3} and 800–1050 °C where selected for initial investigation. In-situ x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and ex-situ Rutherford backscattering measurements showed all ScN films grown using these conditions were stoichiometric. For ScN growth on 3C-SiC (111)-(√3 × √3)R30° carbon rich surfaces, the observed attenuation of the XPS Si 2p and C 1s substrate core levels with increasing ScN thickness indicated growth initiated in a layer-by-layer fashion. This was consistent with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images of 100–200 nm thick films that revealed featureless surfaces. In contrast, ScN films grown on 3C-SiC (111)-(3 × 3) and 3C-SiC (100)-(3 × 2) silicon rich surfaces were found to exhibit extremely rough surfaces in SEM. ScN films grown on both 3C-SiC (111)-(√3 × √3)R30° and 2H-GaN (0001)-(1 × 1) epilayer surfaces exhibited hexagonal (1 × 1) low energy electron diffraction patterns indicative of (111) oriented ScN. X-ray diffraction ω-2θ rocking curve scans for these same films showed a large full width half maximum of 0.29° (1047 arc sec) consistent with transmission electron microscopy images that revealed the films to be poly-crystalline with columnar grains oriented at ≈15° to the [0001] direction of the

  8. III-nitride based light emitting diodes and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Han, Jung; Amano, Hiroshi; Morkoç, Hadis

    2013-01-01

    Light emitting diodes (LEDs) are already used in traffic signals, signage lighting, and automotive applications. However, its ultimate goal is to replace traditional illumination through LED lamps since LED lighting significantly reduces energy consumption and cuts down on carbon-dioxide emission. Despite dramatic advances in LED technologies (e.g., growth, doping and processing technologies), however, there remain critical issues for further improvements yet to be achieved for the realization of solid-state lighting. This book aims to provide the readers with some contemporary LED issues, which have not been comprehensively discussed in the published books and, on which the performance of LEDs is seriously dependent. For example, most importantly, there must be a breakthrough in the growth of high-quality nitride semiconductor epitaxial layers with a low density of dislocations, in particular, in the growth of Al-rich and and In-rich GaN-based semiconductors. The materials quality is directly dependent on th...

  9. Hexagonal-boron nitride substrates for electroburnt graphene nanojunctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghi, Hatef; Sangtarash, Sara; Lambert, Colin

    2016-08-01

    We examine the effect of a hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) substrate on electron transport through graphene nanojunctions just before gap formation. Junctions in vacuum and on hBN are formed using classical molecular dynamics to create initial structures, followed by relaxation using density functional theory. We find that the hBN only slightly reduces the current through the junctions at low biases. Furthermore due to quantum interference at the last moments of breaking, the current though a single carbon filament spanning the gap is found to be higher than the current through two filaments spanning the gap in parallel. This feature is present both in the presence of absence of hBN.

  10. Ceramics based on titanium nitride and silicon nitride sintered by SPS-method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivkov, A. A.; Gerasimov, D. Yu; Evdokimov, A. A.

    2015-10-01

    The dependences of the microstructure and physical and mechanical properties of ceramic mixtures Si3N4/TiN in the full range of mass ratios of the components. Was also investigated directly, and the process of sintering occurring during a physical or chemical processes, in particular, has been obtained and the hardness of the material density on the ratio of the conductive titanium nitride phase and a silicon nitride insulating phase with values above and below the percolation threshold. Also obtained was pure ceramics based on titanium nitride with high physical-mechanical characteristics (H = 21.5 GPa).

  11. Microstructural characterization of nitrided Timetal 834.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moskalewicz, T; Grogger, W; Czyrska-Filemonowicz, A

    2006-09-01

    The microstructure of Timetal 834, in as-received condition and after nitriding under glow discharge has been examined by light microscopy and analytical transmission electorn microscopy (TEM) methods (SAED, EDS, EELS and EFTEM). The microstructure of the as-received alloy consists of the alpha phase and a small amount of the beta phase. Silicide precipitates (Zr5Si4) are present both inside the grains and at the grain boundaries. TEM investigations of cross-sectional thin foils allow for detailed analysis of the nitrided layer microstructure. It was found that the nitrided layer exhibits a graded character with continuously varying nitrogen content. The outermost sublayer consists of nanocrystals of delta-TiN. The following sublayers consist mainly of delta'-Ti2N and epsilon-Ti2N grains. The last sublayer, closest to the substrate, is identified as a nitrogen-rich alpha(N) solid solution containing up to 14 at% of nitrogen. PMID:17059528

  12. Thermodynamics, kinetics and process control of nitriding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mittemeijer, Eric J.; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    1997-01-01

    As a prerequisite for the predictability of properties obtained by a nitriding treatment of iron based workpieces, the relation between the process parameters and the composition and structure of the surface layer produced must be known. At present, even the description of thermodynamic equilibrium...... 10th Congress of the International Federation for Heat Treatment and Surface Engineering held in Brighton, UK on 1-5 September 1996. (C) 1997 The Institute of Materials....... for, the nitriding result is determined largely by kinetics. Nitriding kinetics are shown to be characterised by local near equilibria and stationary states at surfaces and interfaces, and the diffusion coefficient of nitrogen in the various phases, for which new data are presented. The necessary...

  13. Nitride Fuel Development at the INL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new method for fabricating nitride-based fuels for nuclear applications is under development at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). A primary objective of this research is the development of a process that could be operated as an automated or semi-automated technique reducing costs, worker doses, and eventually improving the final product form. To achieve these goals the fabrication process utilizes a new cryo-forming technique to produce microspheres formed from sub-micron oxide powder to improve material handling issues, yield rapid kinetics for conversion to nitrides, and reduced material impurity levels within the nitride compounds. The microspheres are converted to a nitride form within a high temperature particle fluidizing bed using a carbothermic process that utilizes a hydrocarbon-hydrogen-nitrogen gas mixture. A new monitor and control system using differential pressure changes in the fluidizing gas allows for real-time monitoring and control of the spouted bed reactor during conversion. This monitor and control system can provide real-time data that is used to control the gas flow rates, temperatures, and gas composition to optimize the fluidization of the particle bed. The small size (0.5 (micro)m) of the oxide powders in the microspheres dramatically increases the kinetics of the conversion process yielding reduced process times and temperatures. Initial studies using surrogate ZrO2 powder have yielded conversion efficiencies of 90-95% nitride formation with only small levels of oxide and carbide contaminants present. Further studies are being conducted to determine optimal gas mixture ratios, process time, and temperature range for providing complete conversion to a nitride form

  14. Nitride Fuel Development at the INL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    W.E. Windes

    2007-06-01

    A new method for fabricating nitride-based fuels for nuclear applications is under development at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). A primary objective of this research is the development of a process that could be operated as an automated or semi-automated technique reducing costs, worker doses, and eventually improving the final product form. To achieve these goals the fabrication process utilizes a new cryo-forming technique to produce microspheres formed from sub-micron oxide powder to improve material handling issues, yield rapid kinetics for conversion to nitrides, and reduced material impurity levels within the nitride compounds. The microspheres are converted to a nitride form within a high temperature particle fluidizing bed using a carbothermic process that utilizes a hydrocarbon – hydrogen - nitrogen gas mixture. A new monitor and control system using differential pressure changes in the fluidizing gas allows for real-time monitoring and control of the spouted bed reactor during conversion. This monitor and control system can provide real-time data that is used to control the gas flow rates, temperatures, and gas composition to optimize the fluidization of the particle bed. The small size (0.5 µm) of the oxide powders in the microspheres dramatically increases the kinetics of the conversion process yielding reduced process times and temperatures. Initial studies using surrogate ZrO2 powder have yielded conversion efficiencies of 90 -95 % nitride formation with only small levels of oxide and carbide contaminants present. Further studies are being conducted to determine optimal gas mixture ratios, process time, and temperature range for providing complete conversion to a nitride form.

  15. Precipitate-Accommodated Plasma Nitriding for Aluminum Alloys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Patama Visittipitukul; Tatsuhiko Aizawa; Hideyuki Kuwahara

    2004-01-01

    Reliable surface treatment has been explored to improve the strength and wear resistance of aluminum alloy parts in automotives. Long duration time as well as long pre-sputtering time are required for plasma nitriding of aluminum or its alloys only with the thickness of a few micrometers. New plasma inner nitriding is proposed to realize the fast-rate nitriding of aluminum alloys. Al-6Cu alloy is employed as a targeting material in order to demonstrate the effectiveness of this plasma nitriding. Mechanism of fast-rate nitriding process is discussed with consideration of the role of Al2Cu precipitates.

  16. The Moessbauer investigation in iron nitride/expanded graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We successfully prepared the composites possessed high magnetic properties and shielding effectiveness (SE) in RF band with the methods of loading iron nitride nanoparticles on expanded graphite (EG) by the gaseous reduction and nitridation. XRD measurement shows that the ferric phases changed in different nitridation temperature. The phase components of nanoparticles were analyzed in detail by the measurement of 57Fe Moessbauer spectra. The result shows that as the temperature increased, the Fe particles were gradually nitride until completely before 400℃ and the γ'-Fe4N was gradually converted to ε-FexN (2nitride after 400℃. (authors)

  17. Alkaline Capacitors Based on Nitride Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldissi, Matt

    2003-01-01

    High-energy-density alkaline electrochemical capacitors based on electrodes made of transition-metal nitride nanoparticles are undergoing development. Transition- metal nitrides (in particular, Fe3N and TiN) offer a desirable combination of high electrical conductivity and electrochemical stability in aqueous alkaline electrolytes like KOH. The high energy densities of these capacitors are attributable mainly to their high capacitance densities, which, in turn, are attributable mainly to the large specific surface areas of the electrode nanoparticles. Capacitors of this type could be useful as energy-storage components in such diverse equipment as digital communication systems, implanted medical devices, computers, portable consumer electronic devices, and electric vehicles.

  18. Local heating with titanium nitride nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guler, Urcan; Ndukaife, Justus C.; Naik, Gururaj V.;

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the feasibility of titanium nitride (TiN) nanoparticles as local heat sources in the near infrared region, focusing on biological window. Experiments and simulations provide promising results for TiN, which is known to be bio-compatible.......We investigate the feasibility of titanium nitride (TiN) nanoparticles as local heat sources in the near infrared region, focusing on biological window. Experiments and simulations provide promising results for TiN, which is known to be bio-compatible....

  19. Thermodynamics, kinetics and process control of nitriding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mittemeijer, Eric J.; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    1999-01-01

    As a prerequisite for predictability of properties obtained by a nitriding treatment of iron-based workpieces, the relation between the process parameters and the composition and structure of the surface layer produced must be known. At present (even) the description of thermodynamic equilibrium of...... pure iron-nitrogen phases has not been achieved fully. It has been shown that taking into account ordering of nitrogen in the epsilon and gamma' iron-nitride phases, leads to an improved understanding of the Fe-N phase diagram. Although thermodynamics indicate the state the system strives for, the...

  20. Four Terminal Gallium Nitride MOSFETs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veety, Matthew Thomas

    All reported gallium nitride (GaN) transistors to date have been three-terminal devices with source, drain, and gate electrodes. In the case of GaN MOSFETs, this leaves the bulk of the device at a floating potential which can impact device threshold voltage. In more traditional silicon-based MOSFET fabrication a bulk contact can be made on the back side of the silicon wafer. For GaN grown on sapphire substrates, however, this is not possible and an alternate, front-side bulk contact must be investigated. GaN is a III-V, wide band gap semiconductor that as promising material parameters for use in high frequency and high power applications. Possible applications are in the 1 to 10 GHz frequency band and power inverters for next generation grid solid state transformers and inverters. GaN has seen significant academic and commercial research for use in Heterojunction Field Effect Transistors (HFETs). These devices however are depletion-mode, meaning the device is considered "on" at zero gate bias. A MOSFET structure allows for enhancement mode operation, which is normally off. This mode is preferrable in high power applications as the device has lower off-state power consumption and is easier to implement in circuits. Proper surface passivation of seminconductor surface interface states is an important processing step for any device. Preliminary research on surface treatments using GaN wet etches and depletion-mode GaN devices utilizing this process are discussed. Devices pretreated with potassium pursulfate prior to gate dielectric deposition show significant device improvements. This process can be applied to any current GaN FET. Enhancement-mode GaN MOSFETs were fabricated on magnesium doped p-type Wurtzite gallium nitride grown by Metal Organic Chemical Vapor Deposition (MOCVD) on c-plane sapphire substrates. Devices utilized ion implant source and drain which was activated under NH3 overpressure in MOCVD. Also, devices were fabricated with a SiO2 gate dielectric

  1. Magnetron sputter deposited tantalum and tantalum nitride thin films: An analysis of phase, hardness and composition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tantalum (Ta) and tantalum nitride thin films are highly important as diffusion barriers and adhesion layers in microelectronics and hard coatings for cutting tools. In this study, the effect of the underlying substrate on the phase formation of Ta and the influence of a changing N2/Ar flow ratio on hardness, phase and composition of reactively formed tantalum nitride have been investigated. Ta is DC sputter deposited and forms β-Ta on amorphous diamond-like carbon and on the amorphous natural oxide layers of Ti and Si(100) while a 15 nm TaN seed layer results in the formation of α-Ta. The chemical composition of the topmost layers of a substrate influences the formation of α- and β-Ta. With increasing N2/Ar flow ratios a transition from amorphous Ta-rich tantalum nitride over face-centered cubic tantalum nitride (fcc-TaN) to (100) textured fcc-TaN at flow ratios above 45% is observed. The hardness of the tantalum nitride thin film reaches a maximum at a flow ratio of 45%, followed by a decrease in hardness for higher N2/Ar flow ratios. The increase in hardness is associated with a decrease in grain size and shows a stronger correlation for a Meyers and Ashworth relationship than for a Hall–Petch relationship. - Highlights: • Chemical composition of the substrate influences the phase of deposited Ta. • FCC-TaN seed layer leads to α-Ta on the natural oxide layers of Ti and Si(100). • Meyers and Ashworth relationship correlates stronger than Hall–Petch relationship

  2. Additive-assisted synthesis of boride, carbide, and nitride micro/nanocrystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    General and simple methods for the syntheses of borides, carbides and nitrides are highly desirable, since those materials have unique physical properties and promising applications. Here, a series of boride (TiB2, ZrB2, NbB2, CeB6, PrB6, SmB6, EuB6, LaB6), carbide (SiC, TiC, NbC, WC) and nitride (TiN, BN, AlN, MgSiN2, VN) micro/nanocrystals were prepared from related oxides and amorphous boron/active carbon/NaN3 with the assistance of metallic Na and elemental S. In-situ temperature monitoring showed that the reaction temperature could increase quickly to ∼850 °C, once the autoclave was heated to 100 °C. Such a rapid temperature increase was attributed to the intense exothermic reaction between Na and S, which assisted the formation of borides, carbides and nitrides. The as-obtained products were characterized by XRD, SEM, TEM, and HRTEM techniques. Results in this report will greatly benefit the future extension of this approach to other compounds. - Graphical abstract: An additive-assisted approach is successfully developed for the syntheses of borides, carbides and nitrides micro/nanocrystals with the assistance of the exothermic reaction between Na and S. Highlights: ► An additive-assisted synthesis strategy is developed for a number of borides, carbides and nitrides. ► The reaction mechanism is demonstrated by the case of SiC nanowires. ► The formation of SiC nanowires is initiated by the exothermic reaction of Na and S.

  3. Boron Nitride Nanotubes for Spintronics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamal B. Dhungana

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available With the end of Moore’s law in sight, researchers are in search of an alternative approach to manipulate information. Spintronics or spin-based electronics, which uses the spin state of electrons to store, process and communicate information, offers exciting opportunities to sustain the current growth in the information industry. For example, the discovery of the giant magneto resistance (GMR effect, which provides the foundation behind modern high density data storage devices, is an important success story of spintronics; GMR-based sensors have wide applications, ranging from automotive industry to biology. In recent years, with the tremendous progress in nanotechnology, spintronics has crossed the boundary of conventional, all metallic, solid state multi-layered structures to reach a new frontier, where nanostructures provide a pathway for the spin-carriers. Different materials such as organic and inorganic nanostructures are explored for possible applications in spintronics. In this short review, we focus on the boron nitride nanotube (BNNT, which has recently been explored for possible applications in spintronics. Unlike many organic materials, BNNTs offer higher thermal stability and higher resistance to oxidation. It has been reported that the metal-free fluorinated BNNT exhibits long range ferromagnetic spin ordering, which is stable at a temperature much higher than room temperature. Due to their large band gap, BNNTs are also explored as a tunnel magneto resistance device. In addition, the F-BNNT has recently been predicted as an ideal spin-filter. The purpose of this review is to highlight these recent progresses so that a concerted effort by both experimentalists and theorists can be carried out in the future to realize the true potential of BNNT-based spintronics.

  4. Silicon nitride for photovoltaic application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Lipiński

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: of this paper is to present the research results of silicon nitride SiNx films used for industrial silicon solar cells and for third generation solar cells.Design/methodology/approach: The SiNx films were deposited using RF- and LF-PECVD methods. The optical and structural properties were investigated by spectroscopic ellipsometry, XPS, FTIR spectroscopy and X-Ray reflectometry. The passivation properties were investigated by carriers lifetime measurements using a photoconductance decay (PCD technique. For the photovoltaics of third generation the multilayer structures of SiNx were deposited and annealed in order to obtain the silicon quantum superlattices. These structure were characterized by high-resolution TEM, GI-XRD, photoluminescence, Raman and SPV spectroscopy.Findings: It is shown that the layers deposited by LF PECVD have more profitable optical and electrical properties for industrial silicon solar cells than those deposited by RF PECVD. The other finding is that multi-layer structure of SiNx annealed at high temperature shows the properties of the new semiconductor with the gap energy broader then the gap of the silicon.Research limitations/implications: The maximal density of SiNx layers is equal to 2.6 g/cm3. It is too low to obtain high efficiency mc-Si cells. The deposition process should be further optimized. The other limitation is obtaining a regular structure of quantum superlattice composed of quantum dots with defined diameter and density which is a very difficult technological task. This work should be continued in the future.Practical implications: The results of SiNx investigation can be used to increase the efficiency of mc-Si solar cells. The results of multilayer SiNx investigations may be applied to a solar cells based on silicon QDs superlatice.

  5. Optimization of processing temperature in the nitridation process for the synthesis of iron nitride nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have demonstrated an effective strategy on the nitridation process to synthesize ε-Fe3N nanoparticles (NPs) from the zero valent iron NPs as a starting material. The transformation of iron into iron nitride phase was systematically studied by performing the nitridation process at different processing temperatures. The phase, crystal structure was analyzed by XRD. Morphology and size of the ZVINPs and ε-Fe3N NPs were analyzed by field emission scanning electron microscope. Further, their room temperature magnetic properties were studied by using vibrating sample magnetometer and it revealed that the magnetic property of ε-Fe3N is associated with ratio of Fe-N in the iron nitride system

  6. Study of the nitrides formation in the ionic nitriding process of zircaloy-2 zirconium alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zircaloy and Zr-Sn alloys are used in nuclear techniques because they show a very low effective absorption section for neutrons and a high corrosion resistance. This paper shows that by ionic nitriding of Zircaloy type alloys, a structure is obtained that enhances the wear resistance. From the study of the N2/H2 ratio on the nitride quantity formed by ion nitriding of Zircaloy-2 alloy, it can be concluded that the gaseous mixtures with high nitrogen and hydrogen content used in discharge are not favourable in the nitride forming process. The optimum ratio is 1/1. The ZrN superficial layer hardness was checked according to the exposure time and to the layer thickness. (J.S.). 6 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs

  7. Optimization of processing temperature in the nitridation process for the synthesis of iron nitride nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rohith Vinod, K.; Sakar, M.; Balakumar, S., E-mail: balasuga@yahoo.com [National Centre for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, University of Madras, Chennai-600025 (India); Saravanan, P. [Defence Metallurgical Research Laboratory, Hyderabad-500058 (India)

    2015-06-24

    We have demonstrated an effective strategy on the nitridation process to synthesize ε-Fe{sub 3}N nanoparticles (NPs) from the zero valent iron NPs as a starting material. The transformation of iron into iron nitride phase was systematically studied by performing the nitridation process at different processing temperatures. The phase, crystal structure was analyzed by XRD. Morphology and size of the ZVINPs and ε-Fe{sub 3}N NPs were analyzed by field emission scanning electron microscope. Further, their room temperature magnetic properties were studied by using vibrating sample magnetometer and it revealed that the magnetic property of ε-Fe{sub 3}N is associated with ratio of Fe-N in the iron nitride system.

  8. Characterization and properties of highly adhesive titanium nitride and tungsten nitride thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper presents results on the physical characteristics and mechanical properties of titanium nitride (TiN) and tungsten nitride (W2N) thin films grown by reactive DC magnetron sputtering. The films were deposited in a system with several magnetron modules of different sputtering materials suitable for deposition of single-layer metal nitride films and multilayer nitride coatings. The deposition conditions were optimized to obtain films with the highest adhesion to substrates of machine steel and sintered hard alloy. The adhesion of the films was measured in dependence on two principal process parameters: the nitrogen partial pressure in the magnetron discharge gas mixture of nitrogen and argon and the substrate temperature. The composition of the TiN films was determined by Auger electron spectroscopy. The microstructure and the crystallization trend of the films were studied by transmission electron microscopy and selected area electron diffraction. The hardness of the films was examined using standard measuring methods

  9. Materials processing and in-vivo animal studies of nitrided hydroxyapatite bioceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashid, Nancy Elizabeth

    2000-10-01

    Calcium phosphate bioceramics are currently being used in medicine and dentistry, for reconstruction or repair of diseased or injured bone, but with limited success. Incorporating nitrogen into phosphate glasses has resulted in improved properties, and it is proposed that similar benefits may be gained from nitriding calcium phosphate bioceramics for bone implants as well. This work focuses on processing of hydroxyapatite and tricalcium phosphate bioceramics nitrided by using solid, liquid, gas and ion sources. These materials were characterized by chemical, structural, mechanical, and biological methods to determine both the material structure and their suitability as implant materials. Calcium nitride and NaPON glass were unsatisfactory sources of nitrogen for hydroxyapatite (HA) and/or tricalcium phosphate (TCP) ceramics. Calcium nitride, Ca3N2, is reacts with water vapor in the air, releasing ammonia, and leaving behind crystals of calcium oxide, CaO. The calcium oxide byproduct decreases the chemical stability of hydroxyapatite and HA/TCP composites in simulated body fluid. Sodium phosphorus oxynitride (NaPON) glass, in the form of a liquid sintering aid for HA, produces an inhomogeneous, composite as well. Hydroxyapatite heated at 800C in an ammonia atmosphere produces a homogeneous material with up to 2 wt% N. Infrared spectroscopy indicates cyanamide ions, CN22-, are formed by the incorporated nitrogen and impurity carbon. The use of 15N-doped ammonia results in an 15N NMR peak at 83.2 ppm, indicating P--N bonding. Raman spectroscopy may also indicate P--N bonding, but it is inconclusive. In a limited study, nitrogen may decrease the hardness and fracture toughness of the phosphate ceramic, hydroxyapatite, contrary to results expected for nitrogen in phosphate glasses. Nitrogen ions are incorporated in hydroxyapatite by ion implantation, with lower energies producing higher nitrogen contents. The highest concentration achieved was 3.55 wt% N, as determined

  10. Molecular dynamics study of the torsional vibration characteristics of boron-nitride nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In recent years, synthesizing inorganic nanostructures such as boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) has led to extensive studies on their exceptional properties. In this study, the torsional vibration behavior of boron-nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) is explored on the basis of molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. The results show that the torsional frequency is sensitive to geometrical parameters such as length and boundary conditions. The axial vibration is found to be induced by torsional vibration of nanotubes which can cause instability in the nanostructure. It is also observed that the torsional frequency of BNNTs is higher than that of their carbon counterpart. Moreover, the shear modulus is predicted by incorporating MD simulation numerical results into torsional vibration frequency obtained through continuum-based model of tubes. Finally, it is seen that the torsional frequency of double-walled boron-nitride nanotubes (DWBNNTs) is between the frequencies of their constituent inner and outer tubes. - Highlights: • Molecular dynamics study of the torsional vibration behavior of BNNTs • Torsional vibration frequency are found to be dependent to geometrical parameters • The shear modulus of BNNTs are calculated through the continuum model • Torsional frequency of BNNTs are bigger than that of their carbon counterpart

  11. Molecular dynamics study of the torsional vibration characteristics of boron-nitride nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ansari, R.; Ajori, S., E-mail: Shahram_ajori1366@yahoo.com

    2014-08-01

    In recent years, synthesizing inorganic nanostructures such as boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) has led to extensive studies on their exceptional properties. In this study, the torsional vibration behavior of boron-nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) is explored on the basis of molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. The results show that the torsional frequency is sensitive to geometrical parameters such as length and boundary conditions. The axial vibration is found to be induced by torsional vibration of nanotubes which can cause instability in the nanostructure. It is also observed that the torsional frequency of BNNTs is higher than that of their carbon counterpart. Moreover, the shear modulus is predicted by incorporating MD simulation numerical results into torsional vibration frequency obtained through continuum-based model of tubes. Finally, it is seen that the torsional frequency of double-walled boron-nitride nanotubes (DWBNNTs) is between the frequencies of their constituent inner and outer tubes. - Highlights: • Molecular dynamics study of the torsional vibration behavior of BNNTs • Torsional vibration frequency are found to be dependent to geometrical parameters • The shear modulus of BNNTs are calculated through the continuum model • Torsional frequency of BNNTs are bigger than that of their carbon counterpart.

  12. 碳泡沫衬底上氮化铝纳米线的生长及其光致发光特性研究%Growth and photoluminescence character research of aluminum nitride nanowires upon carbon foam substrate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    程赛; 吕惠民; 石振海; 崔静雅

    2012-01-01

    To simplify preparation process of A1N/C composite foam, A1N nanomaterials are prepared via double decomposition reaction and then 800 °C annealing process to recrystallize hexagonal A1N (h-A1N) nanowires on carbon foam substrate. Fore the morphology characterization it follows that, h-A1N nanowires with straight cylindrical morphology grow along the [001]direction on carbon micro- spheres surface and are about 50 nm in diameter and several micrometers in length. Meanwhile, the growth mechanism of nanowire is interpreted as vapor-liquid-solid(VLS) process. The photoluminescence(PL) spectrum of as-prepared sample is also researched, and the results show that a sharp photoluminescence peak appears at 423 nm and shifts toward the red side with temperature increasing. The peak is attributed to the transition luminescence, owing to the substitution of C for N impurity energy level. The sample has good PL character in purple light band and is potential to be used in the photodetector field.%为了简化A1N/C复合泡沫材料的制备流程,本文采用复分解反应法制备A1N纳米材料,并通过800°C退火处理使其在碳泡沫衬底上重结晶为六方相A1N纳米线.通过形貌表征测试,纳米线为表面光滑的长直形圆柱体,直径约50nm,长度10μm以上,在碳微球表面沿[001]方向生长.同时,采用VLS生长机理对纳米线的生长进行了解释.对样品光致发光谱的研究表明。中心波长423nm处存在一尖锐发光峰且随温度升高发生明显的红移现象,系C替N杂质能级跃迁发光所致.样品在紫光波段具有良好的光致发光特性,有望应用于光探测器领域.

  13. Synthesis and characterization of transition metal nitrides and carbides for catalysis and electrochemistry application

    OpenAIRE

    Metzke, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    It was the goal of this work to explore two different synthesis pathways using green chemistry. The first part of this thesis is focusing on the use of the urea-glass route towards single phase manganese nitride and manganese nitride/oxide nano-composites embedded in carbon, while the second part of the thesis is focusing on the use of the “saccharide route” (namely cellulose, sucrose, glucose and lignin) towards metal (Ni0), metal alloy (Pd0.9Ni0.1, Pd0.5Ni0.5, Fe0.5Ni0.5, Cu0.5Ni0.5 and W0....

  14. Chemical reaction of hexagonal boron nitride and graphite nanoclusters in mechanical milling systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muramatsu, Y.; Grush, M.; Callcott, T.A. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    Synthesis of boron-carbon-nitride (BCN) hybrid alloys has been attempted extensively by many researchers because the BCN alloys are considered an extremely hard material called {open_quotes}super diamond,{close_quotes} and the industrial application for wear-resistant materials is promising. A mechanical alloying (MA) method of hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) with graphite has recently been studied to explore the industrial synthesis of the BCN alloys. To develop the MA method for the BCN alloy synthesis, it is necessary to confirm the chemical reaction processes in the mechanical milling systems and to identify the reaction products. Therefore, the authors have attempted to confirm the chemical reaction process of the h-BN and graphite in mechanical milling systems using x-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) methods.

  15. The electronic transport behavior of hybridized zigzag graphene and boron nitride nanoribbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this present work, we have investigated the electronic transport properties of the hybridized structure constructed by the zigzag graphene and boron-nitride (BN) nanoribbons (Z-BnNmCp, n + m + p = 16) through employing nonequilibrium Green's functions in combination with the density-functional theory. The results demonstrate that the electronic transport properties of the hybridized Z-BnNmCp nanoribbons are strongly dependent on the width of boron-nitride or graphene nanoribbons. When the numbers of n and m are not equal, the negative differential resistance behavior is observed, which can be modulated by varying the width of BN nanoribbons. The conductance of the hybridized Z-BnNmCp nanoribbons with odd numbers of zigzag carbon chains also increases by the width of BN nanoribbons

  16. Styrene Aziridination by Iron(IV) Nitrides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, Salvador B; Lee, Wei-Tsung; Dickie, Diane A; Scepaniak, Jeremiah J; Subedi, Deepak; Pink, Maren; Johnson, Michael D; Smith, Jeremy M

    2015-09-01

    Thermolysis of the iron(IV) nitride complex [PhB(tBuIm)3Fe≡N] with styrene leads to formation of the high-spin iron(II) aziridino complex [PhB(tBuIm)3Fe-N(CH2CHPh)]. Similar aziridination occurs with both electron-rich and electron-poor styrenes, while bulky styrenes hinder the reaction. The aziridino complex [PhB(tBuIm)3Fe-N(CH2CHPh)] acts as a nitride synthon, reacting with electron-poor styrenes to generate their corresponding aziridino complexes, that is, aziridine cross-metathesis. Reaction of [PhB(tBuIm)3Fe-N(CH2CHPh)] with Me3SiCl releases the N-functionalized aziridine Me3SiN(CH2CHPh) while simultaneously generating [PhB(tBuIm)3FeCl]. This closes a synthetic cycle for styrene azirdination by a nitride complex. While the less hindered iron(IV) nitride complex [PhB(MesIm)3Fe≡N] reacts with styrenes below room temperature, only bulky styrenes lead to tractable aziridino products. PMID:26179563

  17. Boron nitride nanosheets reinforced glass matrix composites

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Saggar, Richa; Porwal, H.; Tatarko, P.; Dlouhý, Ivo; Reece, M. J.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 114, SEP (2015), S26-S32. ISSN 1743-6753 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 7AMB14SK155 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 264526 Institutional support: RVO:68081723 Keywords : Boron nitride nanosheets * Borosilicate glass * Mechanical properties Subject RIV: JL - Materials Fatigue, Friction Mechanics Impact factor: 1.163, year: 2014

  18. Gallium nitride junction field-effect transistor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zolper, John C.; Shul, Randy J.

    1999-01-01

    An all-ion implanted gallium-nitride (GaN) junction field-effect transistor (JFET) and method of making the same. Also disclosed are various ion implants, both n- and p-type, together with or without phosphorous co-implantation, in selected III-V semiconductor materials.

  19. Gallium Nitride Crystals: Novel Supercapacitor Electrode Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shouzhi; Zhang, Lei; Sun, Changlong; Shao, Yongliang; Wu, Yongzhong; Lv, Jiaxin; Hao, Xiaopeng

    2016-05-01

    A type of single-crystal gallium nitride mesoporous membrane is fabricated and its supercapacitor properties are demonstrated for the first time. The supercapacitors exhibit high-rate capability, stable cycling life at high rates, and ultrahigh power density. This study may expand the range of crystals as high-performance electrode materials in the field of energy storage. PMID:27007502

  20. Residual Stress Induced by Nitriding and Nitrocarburizing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Somers, Marcel A.J.

    2005-01-01

    The present chapter is devoted to the various mechanisms involved in the buildup and relief of residual stress in nitrided and nitrocarburized cases. The work presented is an overview of model studies on iron and iron-based alloys. Subdivision is made between the compound (or white) layer...

  1. Novel mesoporous P-doped graphitic carbon nitride nanosheets coupled with ZnIn2S4 nanosheets as efficient visible light driven heterostructures with remarkably enhanced photo-reduction activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei; Liu, Tian-Yu; Huang, Ting; Liu, Xiao-Heng; Yang, Xu-Jie

    2016-02-01

    In this report, we rationally designed and fabricated P-C3N4/ZnIn2S4 nanocomposites by in situ immobilizing ZnIn2S4 nanosheets onto the surface of mesoporous P-doped graphite carbon nitrogen (P-C3N4) nanosheets in a mixed solvothermal environment; their application to the photoreduction of 4-nitroaniline was used to estimate the photocatalytic performance. Different to the template route, here the mesoporous P-C3N4 nanosheets were prepared with a template-free strategy. The as-fabricated P-C3N4/ZnIn2S4 nanocomposites were systematically characterized by analyzing the phase structure, chemical components, electronic and optical properties and separation of charge carrier pairs. More importantly, these P-C3N4/ZnIn2S4 heterostructures have been proven to be highly efficient visible light responsive photocatalysts for photo-reduction, and meanwhile exhibit excellent photo-stability during recycling runs. The sufficient evidence reveals that the significantly improved photocatalytic performance is mainly attributed to the more efficient charge carrier separation based on the construction of a close heterogeneous interface. This work may provide new insights into the utilization of P-C3N4/ZnIn2S4 nanocomposites as visible light driven photocatalysts for comprehensive organic transformations in the field of fine chemical engineering.In this report, we rationally designed and fabricated P-C3N4/ZnIn2S4 nanocomposites by in situ immobilizing ZnIn2S4 nanosheets onto the surface of mesoporous P-doped graphite carbon nitrogen (P-C3N4) nanosheets in a mixed solvothermal environment; their application to the photoreduction of 4-nitroaniline was used to estimate the photocatalytic performance. Different to the template route, here the mesoporous P-C3N4 nanosheets were prepared with a template-free strategy. The as-fabricated P-C3N4/ZnIn2S4 nanocomposites were systematically characterized by analyzing the phase structure, chemical components, electronic and optical properties and

  2. Ammonothermal Growth of Gallium Nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pimputkar, Siddha

    Bulk, single crystal Gallium Nitride (GaN) crystals are essential for enabling high performance electronic and optoelectronic devices by providing arbitrarily oriented, high quality, large, single crystal GaN substrates. Methods of producing single crystals of sufficient size and quality at a rate that would enable successful commercialization has been a major focus for research groups and companies worldwide. Recent advances have demonstrated remarkable improvements, though high cost and lack of high volume production remain key challenges. Major investments in bulk GaN growth were made at UCSB with particular focus on the ammonothermal method. The existing lab was upgraded and a new facility was designed and built with improved experimental setups for ammonothermal growth of GaN. The facilities can simultaneously operate up to 15 reactors of differing designs and capabilities with the ability to grow crystals up to 2 inches in diameter. A novel in-situ technique was devised to investigate the growth chemistry which occurs at typical operating conditions of 3,000 atm and 600 °C. Improvements in ammonothermal GaN include improved growth rates for c-plane by a factor of four to 344 μm/day with an overall record growth rate of 544 μm/day achieved for the (112¯2) plane. Crystal qualities comparable to that of the seed crystal were achieved. Impurity concentrations for transition metals were consistently reduced by a factor of 100 to concentrations below 1017 atoms/cm3. Optical transparency was improved by significantly reducing the yellow coloration typically seen for ammonothermal GaN. Single crystal GaN was successfully grown on large seeds and a 1 inch x ½ inch x ½ inch GaN crystal was demonstrated. To better understand the growth chemistry, models were created for the decomposition of ammonia under growth conditions, with initial experiments performed using the designed in-situ setup to verify the model's accuracy. To investigate the surface morphology and

  3. Metal surface nitriding by laser induced plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomann, A. L.; Boulmer-Leborgne, C.; Andreazza-Vignolle, C.; Andreazza, P.; Hermann, J.; Blondiaux, G.

    1996-10-01

    We study a nitriding technique of metals by means of laser induced plasma. The synthesized layers are composed of a nitrogen concentration gradient over several μm depth, and are expected to be useful for tribological applications with no adhesion problem. The nitriding method is tested on the synthesis of titanium nitride which is a well-known compound, obtained at present by many deposition and diffusion techniques. In the method of interest, a laser beam is focused on a titanium target in a nitrogen atmosphere, leading to the creation of a plasma over the metal surface. In order to understand the layer formation, it is necessary to characterize the plasma as well as the surface that it has been in contact with. Progressive nitrogen incorporation in the titanium lattice and TiN synthesis are studied by characterizing samples prepared with increasing laser shot number (100-4000). The role of the laser wavelength is also inspected by comparing layers obtained with two kinds of pulsed lasers: a transversal-excited-atmospheric-pressure-CO2 laser (λ=10.6 μm) and a XeCl excimer laser (λ=308 nm). Simulations of the target temperature rise under laser irradiation are performed, which evidence differences in the initial laser/material interaction (material heated thickness, heating time duration, etc.) depending on the laser features (wavelength and pulse time duration). Results from plasma characterization also point out that the plasma composition and propagation mode depend on the laser wavelength. Correlation of these results with those obtained from layer analyses shows at first the important role played by the plasma in the nitrogen incorporation. Its presence is necessary and allows N2 dissociation and a better energy coupling with the target. Second, it appears that the nitrogen diffusion governs the nitriding process. The study of the metal nitriding efficiency, depending on the laser used, allows us to explain the differences observed in the layer features

  4. Nitriding of Co–Cr–Mo alloy in nitrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Ning, E-mail: ningtang@imr.tohoku.ac.jp; Li, Yunping, E-mail: lyping@imr.tohoku.ac.jp; Koizumi, Yuichiro; Chiba, Akihiko, E-mail: a.chiba@imr.tohoku.ac.jp

    2014-06-01

    Using the results of a thermodynamic analysis, a Co–Cr–Mo alloy was successfully nitrided in nitrogen at temperatures of 1073–1473 K. The near-surface microstructure of the treated Co–Cr–Mo alloy was characterized using X-ray diffraction, field-emission scanning electron microscopy, electron probe micro-analyzer, and transmission electron microscopy equipped with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The results indicated that the highest nitriding efficiency was achieved at the treatment temperature of 1273 K, with the size and coverage of the nitride particles on sample's surface increasing with an increase in the treatment duration. After nitriding at 1273 K for 2 h, numerous nitride particles, consisting of an outer Cr{sub 2}N layer and an inner π phase layer, were formed on top of the nitrogen-containing γ phase, and some π phase also precipitated in the alloy matrix at the sub-surface level. - Highlights: • A Co–Cr–Mo alloy was successfully nitrided in nitrogen at 1073–1473 K. • The highest nitriding efficiency of the Co–Cr–Mo alloy was achieved at 1273 K. • Numerous nitride particles formed on sample's surface during nitriding at 1273 K. • The nitride particles consist of an outer Cr{sub 2}N layer and an inner π phase layer.

  5. Modelling structure and properties of amorphous silicon boron nitride ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johann Christian Schön

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Silicon boron nitride is the parent compound of a new class of high-temperature stable amorphous ceramics constituted of silicon, boron, nitrogen, and carbon, featuring a set of properties that is without precedent, and represents a prototypical random network based on chemical bonds of predominantly covalent character. In contrast to many other amorphous materials of technological interest, a-Si3B3N7 is not produced via glass formation, i.e. by quenching from a melt, the reason being that the binary components, BN and Si3N4, melt incongruently under standard conditions. Neither has it been possible to employ sintering of μm-size powders consisting of binary nitrides BN and Si3N4. Instead, one employs the so-called sol-gel route starting from single component precursors such as TADB ((SiCl3NH(BCl2. In order to determine the atomic structure of this material, it has proven necessary to simulate the actual synthesis route.Many of the exciting properties of these ceramics are closely connected to the details of their amorphous structure. To clarify this structure, it is necessary to employ not only experimental probes on many length scales (X-ray, neutron- and electron scattering; complex NMR experiments; IR- and Raman scattering, but also theoretical approaches. These address the actual synthesis route to a-Si3B3N7, the structural properties, the elastic and vibrational properties, aging and coarsening behaviour, thermal conductivity and the metastable phase diagram both for a-Si3B3N7 and possible silicon boron nitride phases with compositions different from Si3N4: BN = 1 : 3. Here, we present a short comprehensive overview over the insights gained using molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo simulations to explore the energy landscape of a-Si3B3N7, model the actual synthesis route and compute static and transport properties of a-Si3BN7.

  6. Hot isostatic pressing of silicon nitride with boron nitride, boron carbide, and carbon additions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mieskowski, Diane M.; Sanders, William A.

    1989-01-01

    Si3N4 test bars containing additions of BN, B4C, and C, were hot isostatically pressed in Ta cladding at 1900 and 2050 C to 98.9 percent to 99.5 percent theoretical density. Room-temperature strength data on specimens containing 2 wt pct BN and 0.5 wt pct C were comparable to data obtained for Si3N4 sintered with Y2O3, Y2O3 and Al2O3, or ZrO2. The 1370 C strengths were less than those obtained for additions of Y2O3 or ZrO2 but greater than those obtained from a combination of Y2O3 and Al2O3. SEM fractography indicated that, as with other types of Si3N4, room-temperature strength was controlled by processing flaws. The decrease in strength at 1370 C was typical of Si3N4 having an amorphous grain-boundary phase. The primary advantage of nonoxide additions appears to be in facilitating specimen removal from the Ta cladding.

  7. Hot isostatic pressing of silicon nitride with boron nitride, boron carbide, and carbon additions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports how Si3N4 test bars containing additions of BN, B4C, and C, were hot isostatically pressed in Ta cladding at 1900 degrees and 2050 degrees C to 98.9% to 99.5% theoretical density. Room-temperature strength data on specimens containing 2 wt% BN and 0.5 wt% C were comparable to data obtained for Si3N4 sintered with Y2O3, Y2O3 and Al2O3 or ZrO2. The 1370 degrees C strengths were less than those obtained for additions of Y2O3 or ZrO2 but greater than those obtained from a combination of Y2O3 and Al2O3. Scanning electron microscope fractography indicated that, as with other types of Si3N4, room-temperature strength was controlled by processing flaws. The decrease in strength at 1370 degrees C was typical of Si3N4 having an amorphous grain-boundary phase. The primary advantage of non-oxide additions appears to be in facilitating specimen removal from the Ta cladding

  8. Characteristics of the nitrided layer formed on AISI 304 austenitic stainless steel by high temperature nitriding assisted hollow cathode discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • AISI 304 austenite steel was nitrided at high temperatures in short time. • It could critically reduce time compared with low temperature nitriding. • The nitrided layer was mainly composed of nitrogen expanded austenite. • It could improve pitting corrosion resistance in NaCl solution. - Abstract: A series of experiments have been conducted on AISI 304 stainless steel using a hollow cathode discharge assisted plasma nitriding apparatus. Specimens were nitrided at high temperatures (520–560 °C) in order to produce nitrogen expanded austenite phase within a short time. The nitrided specimen was characterized by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, potentiodynamic polarization and microhardness tester. The corrosion properties of nitrided samples were evaluated using anodic polarization tests in 3.5% NaCl solution. The nitrided layer was shown to consist of nitrogen expanded austenite and possibly a small amount of CrN precipitates and iron nitrides. The results indicated that rapid nitriding assisted hollow cathode discharge not only increased the surface hardness but also improved the corrosion resistance of the untreated substrate

  9. Low-temperature nitridation of Fe nanoparticles precursor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, H; Lu, B; Lei, J P; Dong, X L

    2009-12-01

    Nitridation of Fe nanoparticle precursor was performed in a NH3 atmosphere at the temperatures of 473 K and 673 K for one hour. Fe nanoparticles precursor had a typical spherical shape with iron oxides shell and alpha-Fe core, which was obtained by an arc-discharge method. Up to date, the nitriding temperature of 473 K in present work was the lowest by thermal ammonolysis method because of the characteristics of the nano-sized particles. The resultant product after nitridation was a mixture of iron-nitrides (gamma'-Fe4N and epsilon-Fe3N) nanoparticles with homogeneous dispersion. The nitriding mechanism, oxidizing behaviors and magnetic properties of iron-nitride nanoparticles were measured and discussed. PMID:19908793

  10. An assessment of the thermodynamic properties of uranium nitride, plutonium nitride and uranium-plutonium mixed nitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thermodynamic properties such as vapour pressures, heat capacities and enthalpies of formation for UN(s), PuN(s) and (U, Pu)N(s) are critically evaluated. The equations of the vapour pressures and the heat capacities for the three nitrides are assessed. Thermal functions, and thermodynamic functions for the formation of UN(s), PuN(s) and (U, Pu)N(s), are calculated

  11. Fabrication and characterization of hexagonal boron nitride powder by spray drying and calcining-nitriding technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) powder was fabricated prepared by the spray drying and calcining-nitriding technology. The effects of nitrided temperature on the phases, morphology and particle size distribution of hBN powder, were investigated. The synthesized powders were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM), Fourier transformed infrared spectrum, ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) spectrum and photoluminescence (PL) spectrum. UV-vis spectrum revealed that the product had one obvious band gap (4.7 eV) and PL spectrum showed that it had a visible emission at 457 nm (λex=230 nm). FESEM image indicated that the particle size of the synthesized hBN was mainly in the range of 0.5-1.5 μm in diameter, and 50-150 nm in thickness. The high-energy ball-milling process following 900 deg. C calcining process was very helpful to obtain fully crystallized hBN at lower temperature. - Graphical abstract: hBN powder was fabricated prepared by spray drying and calcining-nitriding technology. The results indicated that spray drying and calcining-nitriding technology assisted with high-energy ball-milling process following calcined process was a hopeful way to manufacture hBN powder with high crystallinity in industrial scale

  12. Preparation and study of the nitrides and mixed carbide-nitrides of uranium and of plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A detailed description is given of a simple method for preparing uranium and plutonium nitrides by the direct action of nitrogen under pressure at moderate temperatures (about 400 C) on the partially hydrogenated bulk metal. It is shown that there is complete miscibility between the UN and PuN phases. The variations in the reticular parameters of the samples as a function of temperature and in the presence of oxide have been used to detect and evaluate the solubility of oxygen in the different phases. A study has been made of the sintering of these nitrides as a function of the preparation conditions with or without sintering additives. A favorable but non-reproducible, effect has been found for traces of oxide. The best results were obtained for pure UN at 1600 C (96 per cent theoretical density) on condition that a well defined powder, was used. The criterion used is the integral width of the X-ray diffraction lines. The compounds UN and PuN are completely miscible with the corresponding carbides. This makes it possible to prepare carbide-nitrides of the general formula (U,Pu) (C,N) by solid-phase diffusion, at around 1400 C. The sintering of these carbide-nitrides is similar to that of the carbides if the nitrogen content is low; in particular, nickel is an efficient sintering agent. For high contents, the sintering is similar to that of pure nitrides. (author)

  13. Nitride semiconductors studied by atom probe tomography and correlative techniques

    OpenAIRE

    Bennett, Samantha

    2011-01-01

    Optoelectronic devices fabricated from nitride semiconductors include blue and green light emitting diodes (LEDs) and laser diodes (LDs). To design efficient devices, the structure and composition of the constituent materials must be well-characterised. Traditional microscopy techniques used to examine nitride semiconductors include transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and atomic force microscopy (AFM). This thesis describes the study of nitride semiconductor materials using these tradi...

  14. Intragranular Chromium Nitride Precipitates in Duplex and Superduplex Stainless Steel

    OpenAIRE

    Iversen, Torunn Hjulstad

    2012-01-01

    Intragranular chromium nitrides is a phenomenon with detrimental effects on material properties in superduplex stainless steels which have not received much attention. Precipitation of nitrides occurs when the ferritic phase becomes supersaturated with nitrogen and there is insufficient time during cooling for diffusion of nitrogen into austenite. Heat treatment was carried out at between 1060◦C and 1160◦C to study the materials susceptibility to nitride precipitation with...

  15. Research and development of nitride fuel cycle for TRU burning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Susuki, Y.; Ogawa, T.; Osugi, T.; Arai, Y.; Mukaiyama, T. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1997-07-01

    The present status of the research and development of nitride fuel cycle for burning transuranium elements in actinide burner reactors and fast reactors at JAERI is described, especially focusing on the progress in the recent two years. The research and development cover fuel fabrication technology, property measurements such as thermal conductivity, basic irradiation tests at Japan Materials Testing Reactors(JMTR), electrorefining of actinide nitrides in fused salts, and the evaluation of mass balance in the reprocessing process of nitride fuel. (authors)

  16. Application Of Active Screen Method For Ion Nitriding Efficiency Improvement

    OpenAIRE

    Ogórek M.; Frączek T.; Skuza Z.

    2015-01-01

    Paper presents the research of austenitic steel AISI 304 after ion nitriding at 400°C and at t =4h, for the two different variants of samples distribution in the working plasma reactive chamber tube. In order to assess the effectiveness of ion nitriding variants emission spectroscopy – GDOES, surface hardness tests, microstructure research (LM) of nitrided layers were made. It has been found that the use of active screens increases the surface layer thickness and depth of nitrogen diffusion i...

  17. Plasma nitriding of AISI 304L and AISI 316L stainless steels: effect of time in the formation of S phase and the chromium nitrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plasma nitriding can improve hardness and wear resistance of austenitic stainless steels without losses in corrosion resistance. This fact relies on a nitrided layer constituted only by S phase, without chromium nitrides precipitation. In this work, the effect of nitriding time on phases formed on nitrided layer was investigated in two austenitic stainless steels: AISI 304L e AISI 316L. The samples were nitrided at 420 deg C, using a mixture of 60 % N2 and 40% H2, during 5, 7 and 9 hours. It was noted that chromium nitrides were formed on samples of AISI 304L, nitrided for 7 e 9 hours, while all nitrided samples of AISI 316L showed only formation of S phase. The nitrided layers were characterized using optical microscope and x-ray diffraction. (author)

  18. Synthesis of high purity gallium nitride powders and growth and characterization of aluminum nitride and gallium nitride bulk single crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balkas, Cengiz Mustafa

    Single crystalline platelets of aluminum nitride (AlN) ≤ 1 mm thick have been grown within the range 1950-2250sp°C on silicon carbide (SiC) substrates via sublimation-recondensation in a resistively heated graphite furnace. The source material was sintered AlN. A maximum growth rate of 500 mum/hr was achieved at 2150sp°C and a source-to-seed separation of 4 mm. Crystals grown at high temperatures ranged in color from blue to green due to the incorporation of Si and C from the SiC substrates; those grown at lower temperatures were colorless and transparent. Secondary-ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) results showed approximately a two order of magnitude decrease in the concentrations of these two impurities in the transparent crystals. X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Raman spectroscopy studies revealed low densities of line and planar defects and a strain free material. The synthesis of high purity, single phase GaN powders was accomplished in a hot wall tube furnace via (1) the reaction of Ga(l) with ammonia (NHsb3) and (2) the conversion of Gasb2Osb3(s). Polyhedra of various shapes were obtained from both processes; some rod-shaped crystals were also observed in the material derived from Gasb2Osb3. The GaN powders produced via the first route were characterized via XRD technique. The diffraction data revealed the material to be single phase with a = 3.1891 A, c = 5.1855 A, in space group P6sb3mc, Z = 2 and Dsb{x} = 6.0886 gr/cmsp3. Scanning electron microscopy revealed a particle size distribution in the ground material between 1 and 5 mum with most of the particles being {≈}1{mu}m. The data obtained in this study was chosen to be the new standard for the powder diffraction pattern for this material by the International Center for Diffraction Data. Single crystals of GaN up to 3 mm in length were grown by sublimation of pellets of this material under an NHsb3 flow. Typical green densities were 50 to 60% of theoretical density

  19. Investigation into some tribological properties of plasma nitrided hot-worked tool steel AISI H11

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yilbas, B.S.; Sahin, A.Z.; Said, S.A.M.; Nickel, J.; Coban, A. [King Fahd Univ. of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran (Saudi Arabia). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    1996-04-01

    Interest in the tribological properties of plasma nitriding has increased substantially over the past years because plasma nitriding provides a high nitride depth and improved hard facing. The present study examines the tribological properties of AISI H11 plasma nitrided, hot-worked steel. Different nitriding temperatures and durations were considered. Characterization of the composite structures was investigated with wear tests, x-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and microhardness tests. The depth profile of the nitrided zone was measured using the nuclear reaction analysis (NRA) technique. Plasma nitriding affected the microhardness, wear properties, and morphology considerably. Increase in process temperature increased the nitride zone depth.

  20. Ion nitriding of steel in plasma of non-selfsustained low-pressure arc discharge: phase transitions, faulted substructure and mechanical characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of the work is to find regularities of formation of phase composition, faulted substructure and mechanical characteristics of steels of martensite, ferrite-pearlite and austenite types exposed to low-temperature nitriding in plasma of non-self sustained low-pressure arc discharge with combined heated and hollow cathodes. The nitriding was made in pure nitrogen plasma with density ∼ 5 x 109 cm-3 by two temperature-time regimes. In the first case the temperature was 200oC and time was 2, 4, 6 and 8 hours. The temperature in this case was hold by following parameters of discharge: discharge current Idis = 10 A, discharge voltage Udis = 40 V and bias voltage Ubias = -200 V. In the second case the temperature was 530oC, time was 1, 2 and 5 hours and discharge parameters were discharge current Idis = 50 A, discharge voltage Udis = 40 V and bias voltage Ubias = -600 V. As the experimental materials the samples made from industrial steels 40H (0.4% C; 1.0% Cr), 12H2N4A (0.12% C, 2%Cr, 4%Ni), 12H18N10T (0.12%C, 18%Cr, 10%Ni, 1%Ti) after quenching and in initial state were used. Study of substructure and phase composition of nitrided surface of steel was made with light microscopy, scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Variation of mechanical characteristics was analyzed by micro- and nano-hardness, wear resistance and friction coefficient. The opportunity of low-temperature (∼ 200oC) nitriding of preliminary quenched and/or normalized steel is demonstrated. It is shown, that the volume of diffusion saturation of steel has multilayered structure and it consists of sub-layers differing by phase structure and a state of a faulted substructure. Formation on a nitriding surface a sublayer with nanocrystalline (∼ 10-30 nanometers) structure, containing crystallites of α-Fe, Fe2O3, nitride and carbon-nitride phases was found. It is found, that at nitriding steel with ferrite-pearlite structure (as against quenched) processes of a dynamic

  1. Heterostructure field effect transistors based on nitride interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A key property of the nitrides is the fact that they possess large spontaneous and piezoelectric polarization fields that allow a significant tailoring of the carrier dynamics and optical properties of nitride devices. In this paper, based on first-principles calculations of structural and electronic properties of bulk nitrides and their heterostructure, we investigate the potential of this novel material class for modern device applications by performing self-consistent Monte Carlo simulations. Our studies reveal that the nitride based electronic devices have characteristics that predispose them for high power and high frequency applications. We demonstrate also that transistor characteristics are favourably influenced by the internal polarization induced electric fields. (author)

  2. Heterostructure field effect transistors based on nitride interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majewski, J. A.; Zandler, G.; Vogl, P.

    2002-04-01

    A key property of the nitrides is the fact that they possess large spontaneous and piezoelectric polarization fields that allow a significant tailoring of the carrier dynamics and optical properties of nitride devices. In this paper, based on first-principles calculations of structural and electronic properties of bulk nitrides and their heterostructure, we investigate the potential of this novel material class for modern device applications by performing self-consistent Monte Carlo simulations. Our studies reveal that the nitride based electronic devices have characteristics that predispose them for high power and high frequency applications. We demonstrate also that transistor characteristics are favourably influenced by the internal polarization induced electric fields.

  3. Heterostructure field effect transistors based on nitride interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Majewski, J.A.; Zandler, G.; Vogl, P. [Physics Department and Walter Schottky Institute, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Garching (Germany)

    2002-05-03

    A key property of the nitrides is the fact that they possess large spontaneous and piezoelectric polarization fields that allow a significant tailoring of the carrier dynamics and optical properties of nitride devices. In this paper, based on first-principles calculations of structural and electronic properties of bulk nitrides and their heterostructure, we investigate the potential of this novel material class for modern device applications by performing self-consistent Monte Carlo simulations. Our studies reveal that the nitride based electronic devices have characteristics that predispose them for high power and high frequency applications. We demonstrate also that transistor characteristics are favourably influenced by the internal polarization induced electric fields. (author)

  4. Review of actinide nitride properties with focus on safety aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report provides a review of the potential advantages of using actinide nitrides as fuels and/or targets for nuclear waste transmutation. Then a summary of available properties of actinide nitrides is given. Results from irradiation experiments are reviewed and safety relevant aspects of nitride fuels are discussed, including design basis accidents (transients) and severe (core disruptive) accidents. Anyway, as rather few safety studies are currently available and as many basic physical data are still missing for some actinide nitrides, complementary studies are proposed. (author)

  5. Review of actinide nitride properties with focus on safety aspects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albiol, Thierry [CEA Cadarache, St Paul Lez Durance Cedex (France); Arai, Yasuo [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2001-12-01

    This report provides a review of the potential advantages of using actinide nitrides as fuels and/or targets for nuclear waste transmutation. Then a summary of available properties of actinide nitrides is given. Results from irradiation experiments are reviewed and safety relevant aspects of nitride fuels are discussed, including design basis accidents (transients) and severe (core disruptive) accidents. Anyway, as rather few safety studies are currently available and as many basic physical data are still missing for some actinide nitrides, complementary studies are proposed. (author)

  6. Quantum chemistry and atomistic simulations of solid nitrides

    OpenAIRE

    Eck, Bernhard

    2000-01-01

    The present thesis covers, at first, the binary nitrides of the the 3d transition metals. Based on their electronic band structures and bonding analyses for the sodium chloride as well as the zinc blend structure type it is then determined why the early nitrides crystallize in the NaCl structure while Fe- and Co-nitride adopt the ZnS structure. Thereafter all stoichiometrically well-defined iron nitrides are theoretically investigated, in particular with respect to the influence of the nitrog...

  7. Development of pseudocapacitive molybdenum oxide–nitride for electrochemical capacitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A thin film Mo oxide–nitride pseudocapacitive electrode was synthesized by electrodeposition of Mo oxide on Ti and a subsequent low-temperature (400 °C) thermal nitridation. Two nitridation environments, N2 and NH3, were used and the results were compared. Surface analyses of these nitrided films showed partial conversion of Mo oxide to nitrides, with a lower conversion percentage being the film produced in N2. However, the electrochemical analyses showed that the surface of the N2-treated film had better pseudocapacitive behaviors and outperformed that nitrided in NH3. Cycle life of the resultant N2-treated Mo oxide–nitride was also much improved over Mo oxide. A two-electrode cell using Mo oxide–nitride electrodes was demonstrated and showed high rate performance. - Highlights: • Mo(O,N)x was developed by electrodeposition and nitridation in N2 or NH3. • N2 treated Mo(O,N)x showed a capacitive performance superior to that treated by NH3. • The promising electrochemical performance was due to the formation of γ-Mo2N

  8. EXAFS investigation of low temperature nitrided stainless steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oddershede, Jette; Christiansen, Thomas; Ståhl, Kenny;

    2008-01-01

    Low temperature nitrided stainless steel AISI 316 flakes were investigated with EXAFS and X-ray diffraction analysis. The stainless steel flakes were transformed into a mixture of nitrogen expanded austenite and nitride phases. Two treatments were carried out yielding different overall nitrogen...... contents: (1) nitriding in pure NH3 and (2)nitriding in pure NH3 followed by reduction in H2. The majority of the Cr atoms in the stainless steel after treatment 1 and 2 was associated with a nitrogen–chromium bond distance comparable to that of the chemical compound CrN. The possibility of the occurrence...

  9. Investigation of surface properties of high temperature nitrided titanium alloys

    OpenAIRE

    Koyuncu, E.; F. Kahraman; Ö. Karadeniz

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of paper is to investigate surface properties of high temperature nitrided titanium alloys.Design/methodology/approach: In this study, surface modification of Ti6Al4V titanium alloy was made at various temperatures by plasma nitriding process. Plasma nitriding treatment was performed in 80% N2-20% H2 gas mixture, for treatment times of 2-15 h at the temperatures of 700-1000°C. Surface properties of plasma nitrided Ti6Al4V alloy were examined by metallographic inspection, ...

  10. Hydrogen permeability of nitrided stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The surface of a 316 stainless steel (316SS) specimen was nitrided by an electrochemical treatment in molten fluoride salt. Its hydrogen permeability was evaluated and compared with that of bare 316SS at temperature from 450degC to 650degC. When it was exposed to hydrogen pressure of 1.0 kPa from 450degC to 650degC, its permeability was 7.2×10-11 to 6.4×10-12 mol/sec.m.Pa1/2. The permeation flux was increased with temperature and the permeability is deviated from Sieverts' law around 450degC. It followed Sieverts' law and was similar to that of bare 316SS at elevated temperatures. This result suggested the surface nitriding increases solubility at low temperatures around 450degC. (author)

  11. Local residual stress measurements on nitride layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mansilla, C.; Ocelík, V.; De Hosson, J.Th.M., E-mail: j.t.m.de.hosson@rug.nl

    2015-06-11

    In this work, local stresses in different nitrided maraging steel samples of high practical interest for industrial applications were studied through the so-called micro-slit milling method using a focused ion beam. The nitrogen concentration profiles were acquired by glow discharge optical emission spectroscopy. The residual stress state was measured on the surface and also in cross-section, i.e. examining effects of the nitrogen concentration gradient. It is shown that an enhanced lateral resolution can be achieved when a novel multiple fitting approach is employed. The results presented show an overall agreement with stress profiles obtained by X-ray diffraction. Finite Element Modeling is used to explain the apparent discrepancies. A clear correlation between the residual stress and nitriding profiles has been found and the applicability of this method is shown in particular when stress gradients are present.

  12. Local residual stress measurements on nitride layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work, local stresses in different nitrided maraging steel samples of high practical interest for industrial applications were studied through the so-called micro-slit milling method using a focused ion beam. The nitrogen concentration profiles were acquired by glow discharge optical emission spectroscopy. The residual stress state was measured on the surface and also in cross-section, i.e. examining effects of the nitrogen concentration gradient. It is shown that an enhanced lateral resolution can be achieved when a novel multiple fitting approach is employed. The results presented show an overall agreement with stress profiles obtained by X-ray diffraction. Finite Element Modeling is used to explain the apparent discrepancies. A clear correlation between the residual stress and nitriding profiles has been found and the applicability of this method is shown in particular when stress gradients are present

  13. Atomic-layer deposition of silicon nitride

    CERN Document Server

    Yokoyama, S; Ooba, K

    1999-01-01

    Atomic-layer deposition (ALD) of silicon nitride has been investigated by means of plasma ALD in which a NH sub 3 plasma is used, catalytic ALD in which NH sub 3 is dissociated by thermal catalytic reaction on a W filament, and temperature-controlled ALD in which only a thermal reaction on the substrate is employed. The NH sub 3 and the silicon source gases (SiH sub 2 Cl sub 2 or SiCl sub 4) were alternately supplied. For all these methods, the film thickness per cycle was saturated at a certain value for a wide range of deposition conditions. In the catalytic ALD, the selective deposition of silicon nitride on hydrogen-terminated Si was achieved, but, it was limited to only a thin (2SiO (evaporative).

  14. Magnetron sputtering of thin nitride films

    OpenAIRE

    Kola, Prashanthi V

    1995-01-01

    The objective in this investigation was to design and commission a magnetron sputter deposition system and investigate the properties of hard coatings for mechanical and biomedical applications. The deposition of titanium (Ti) and titanium nitride (TiN) was undertaken as part of the commissioning tests and further work was conducted on the effect of the deposition parameters on the properties of TiN, specifically for biocompatible applications. A thorough understanding of the deposition proce...

  15. Boron Nitride Nanosheets for Metal Protection

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Lu Hua; Xing, Tan; Chen, Ying; Jones, Rob

    2015-01-01

    Although the high impermeability of graphene makes it an excellent barrier to inhibit metal oxidation and corrosion, graphene can form a galvanic cell with the underlying metal that promotes corrosion of the metal in the long term. Boron nitride (BN) nanosheets which have a similar impermeability could be a better choice as protective barrier, because they are more thermally and chemically stable than graphene and, more importantly, do not cause galvanic corrosion due to their electrical insu...

  16. Anomalous thermal conductivity of monolayer boron nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabarraei, Alireza; Wang, Xiaonan

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we use nonequilibrium molecular dynamics modeling to investigate the thermal properties of monolayer hexagonal boron nitride nanoribbons under uniaxial strain along their longitudinal axis. Our simulations predict that hexagonal boron nitride shows an anomalous thermal response to the applied uniaxial strain. Contrary to three dimensional materials, under uniaxial stretching, the thermal conductivity of boron nitride nanoribbons first increases rather than decreasing until it reaches its peak value and then starts decreasing. Under compressive strain, the thermal conductivity of monolayer boron nitride ribbons monolithically reduces rather than increasing. We use phonon spectrum and dispersion curves to investigate the mechanism responsible for the unexpected behavior. Our molecular dynamics modeling and density functional theory results show that application of longitudinal tensile strain leads to the reduction of the group velocities of longitudinal and transverse acoustic modes. Such a phonon softening mechanism acts to reduce the thermal conductivity of the nanoribbons. On the other hand, a significant increase in the group velocity (stiffening) of the flexural acoustic modes is observed, which counteracts the phonon softening effects of the longitudinal and transverse modes. The total thermal conductivity of the ribbons is a result of competition between these two mechanisms. At low tensile strain, the stiffening mechanism overcomes the softening mechanism which leads to an increase in the thermal conductivity. At higher tensile strain, the softening mechanism supersedes the stiffening and the thermal conductivity slightly reduces. Our simulations show that the decrease in the thermal conductivity under compressive strain is attributed to the formation of buckling defects which reduces the phonon mean free path.

  17. Sliding wear behaviour of surface nitrided zirconia

    OpenAIRE

    Valle Chiro, Jorge Antonio; Mestra Rodríguez, Álvaro Miguel; García Marro, Fernando; Anglada Gomila, Marcos Juan

    2011-01-01

    Tetragonal polycrystalline zirconia stabilised with 3% molar yttria (3Y-TZP) has found wide applications in orthopaedics and dentistry because of its excellent mechanical properties (flexural strength above 1000 MPa, fracture toughness about 5 MPa·m1/2, hardness above 12 GPa) and biocompatibility. However, 3Y-TZP has a strong drawback: poor resistance to hydrothermal ageing also referred to as low temperature degradation (LTD). Nitriding of 3Y-TZP can make the surface resistance to L...

  18. Formation and Structure of Boron Nitride Nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiang ZHANG; Zongquan LI; Jin XU

    2005-01-01

    Boron nitride (BN) nanotubes were simply synthesized by heating well-mixed boric acid, urea and iron nitrate powders at 1000℃. A small amount of BN nanowires was also obtained in the resultants. The morphological and structural characters of the BN nanostructures were studied using transmission electron microscopy. Other novel BN nanostructures, such as Y-junction nanotubes and bamboo-like nanotubes, were simultaneously observed. The growth mechanism of the BN nanotubes was discussed briefly.

  19. Thermal conductivity of nanostructured boron nitride materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Chengchun; Bando, Yoshio; Liu, Changhong; Fan, Shoushan; Zhang, Jun; Ding, Xiaoxia; Golberg, Dmitri

    2006-06-01

    We have measured the thermal conductivity of bulky pellets made of various boron nitride (BN)-based nanomaterials, including spherical nanoparticles, perfectly structured, bamboo-like nanotubes, and collapsed nanotubes. The thermal conductivity strongly depends on the morphology of the BN nanomaterials, especially on the surface structure. Spherical BN particles have the lowest thermal conductivity while the collapsed BN nanotubes possess the best thermoconductive properties. A model was proposed to explain the experimental observations based on the heat percolation passage considerations. PMID:16722739

  20. Nitride phosphors and solid-state lighting

    CERN Document Server

    Xie, Rong-Jun; Hirosaki, Naoto

    2011-01-01

    Introduction to Solid-State LightingBasics of Solid-State LightingBasics of White Light-Emitting Diodes (LEDs)Applications of Solid-State LightingIntroduction to LuminescenceClassification of Optical ProcessesFundamentals of LuminescenceLuminescent CentersMeasurement of LuminescenceTraditional Phosphors in White LEDsRequirements for Phosphors in White LEDsClassification of PhosphorsPhotoluminescent Properties of Traditional PhosphorsNitride Phosphors i

  1. Low temperature, fast deposition of metallic titanium nitride films using plasma activated reactive evaporation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Titanium and titanium nitride thin films were deposited on silica glass and W substrates at a high coating growth rate by plasma-activated reactive evaporation (ARE). The crystal structure, preferred orientation and grain size of the coatings were determined by x-ray diffraction (XRD) technique using Cu-Kα x rays. The analysis of the coating morphology was performed by field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM). The composition of the films was analyzed by Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) and electron-probe microanalysis (EPMA). The titanium and titanium nitride condensates were collected on a carbon-coated collodion film then characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) in order to study the structures of the deposits at very short deposition times. The resistivity of the films was measured by using the four-point-probe method. The titanium coatings were found to consist of very fine particles (40 nm in grain size) and to exhibit a strong (002) texture. The titanium nitride coatings were substoichiometric (TiNx,xx coatings obtained at low temperature and a high growth rate in this work exhibited a rather high electrical conductivity

  2. Quantifying the Solubility of Boron Nitride Nanotubes and Sheets with Static Light Scattering and Refractometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mutz, M [The University of Tennessee; Eastwood, Eric Allen [ORNL; Dadmun, Mark D [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    The dissolution of nanoparticles, particularly those containing boron, is an important area of interest for polymer nanocomposite formation and material development. In this work, the solubility of boron nitride nanotubes (BNNT), functionalized boron nitride nanotubes (FBNNT), and boron nitride sheets (BNZG) is quantified in toluene and THF with static light scattering, refractometry, UV vis spectroscopy, and physical observations. UV vis spectroscopy provides a method to determine the concentration and solubility limits of the solutions tested. Using light scattering, the second virial coefficient, A2, is determined and used to calculate , the solute solvent interaction parameter. The Hildebrand solubility parameter, , is then extracted from this data using the Hildebrand Scatchard Solution Theory. A list of potential good solvents based on the estimated value is provided for each nanoparticle. Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and prepolymers (EN4 and EN8) used to synthesize polyurethanes were also tested, because the published and molar attraction constants of these materials provided a selfconsistent check. The dn/dc of SWNTs and boron-containing particles was measured for the first time in this work. A solvent screen for BN-ZG provides additional information that supports the obtained and . Three systems were found to have values below 0.5 and were thermodynamically soluble: BNNT in THF, EN8 in THF, and EN8 in toluene.

  3. Plasma deposition of cubic boron nitride films from non-toxic material at low temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boron nitride has become the focus of a considerable amount of interest because of its properties which relate closely to those of carbon. In particular, the cubic nitride phase has extreme hardness and very high thermal conductivity similar to the properties of diamond. The conventional methods of synthesis use the highly toxic and inflammable gas diborane (B2H6) as the reactant material. A study has been made of the deposition of thin films of boron nitride (BN) using non-toxic material by the plasma-assisted chemical vapour deposition technique. The source material was borane-ammonia (BH3-NH3) which is a crystalline solid at room temperature with a high vapour pressure. The BH3-NH3 vapour was decomposed in a 13.56 MHz nitrogen plasma coupled either inductively or capacitively with the system. The composition of the films was assessed by measuring their IR absorption when deposited on silicon and KBr substrates. The hexagonal (graphitic) and cubic (diamond-like) allotropes can be distinguished by their characteristic absorption bands which occur at 1365 and 780 cm-1 (hexagonal) and 1070 cm-1 (cubic). We have deposited BN films consisting of a mixture of hexagonal and cubic phases; the relative content of the cubic phase was found to be directly dependent on r.f. power and substrate bias. (orig.)

  4. The mechanism for low temperature growth of vertically aligned boron nitride nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jiesheng; Xie, Ming; Khin Yap, Yoke

    2006-03-01

    Boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) are well recognized as the candidate that will complement the uses of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in nanotechnology. However, high growth temperatures (>1100 ^oC), low production yield, and impurities have prevented effective synthesis and applications of boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) in the past ten years. For the first time, we have succeeded on the growth of pure BNNTs on substrates [1, 2]. This has been realized based on our experiences of growing CNTs and boron nitride (BN) phases (cubic phase BN, hexagonal phase BN). According to our hypothetical model, energetic growth species play an important role on controlling the phases of BN solids. We have experimentally verified that BNNTs can be grown by energetic growth species by a plasma-enhanced pulsed laser deposition (PEPLD) technique. These BNNTs can be grown vertically aligned into arrays of regular patterns at 600 ^oC, and can be used for applications without purification. The growth mechanism of thee BNNTs will be discussed. [1]. Yap et al., Bull APS Vol 50, 1346-1347 (March 2005). [2]. Wang et al., nano Letters (2005) ASAP, DOI: 10.1021/nl051859n.

  5. Nitride inclusions in titanium-containing high-nitrogen steel after solid-phase nitriding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lysenkova, E. V.; Kadach, M. V.; Butskii, E. V.; Dorofievich, I. V.; Stomakhin, A. Ya.

    2015-09-01

    The principal possibility of production of sheet titanium-containing high-nitrogen steels without extreme harmful coarse nitride inclusions and their aggregates, which are characteristic of these compositions even at a relatively low (impurity) nitrogen content, is studied. To this end, the nitrogen content in the initial metal before its solidification is limited to the calculation level at which titanium nitrides are thermally unstable. Nitrogen is introduced in metal (08Cr18Ni12Ti steel) during its chemical thermal treatment in a nitrogen atmosphere at 1200°C. The nitrogen content in the finished metal is 0.4% (at 0.31% Ti). Studies in this direction are thought to be promising, since it is evident that the production of a metal of such a composition using the standard method of nitrogen introduction (in melt) is impossible. Scanning electron microscopy shows that titanium nitride particles in the finished metal are ≤0.5 μm in size.

  6. Wetting and infiltration of nitride bonded silicon nitride by liquid silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, V.; Reimann, C.; Friedrich, J.

    2016-04-01

    Nitride bonded silicon nitride (NBSN) is a promising crucible material for the repeated use in the directional solidification of multicrystalline (mc) silicon ingots for photovoltaic applications. Due to wetting and infiltration, however, silicon nitride in its initial state does not offer the desired reusability. In this work the sessile drop method is used to systematically study the wetting and infiltration behavior of NBSN after applying different oxidation procedures. It is found that the wetting of the NBSN crucible by liquid silicon can be prevented by the oxidation of the geometrical surface. The infiltration of liquid silicon into the porous crucible can be suppressed by oxygen enrichment within the volume of the NBSN, i.e. at the pore walls of the crucibles. The realized reusability of the NBSN is demonstrated by reusing a NBSN crucible six times for the directional solidification of undoped multicrystalline silicon ingots.

  7. Microscopic modeling of nitride intersubband absorbance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montano, Ines; Allerman, A. A.; Wierer, J. J.; Moseley, M.; Skogen, E. J.; Tauke-Pedretti, A.; Vawter, G. A.

    III-nitride intersubband structures have recently attracted much interest because of their potential for a wide variety of applications ranging from electro-optical modulators to terahertz quantum cascade lasers. To overcome present simulation limitations we have developed a microscopic absorbance simulator for nitride intersubband devices. Our simulator calculates the band structure of nitride intersubband systems using a fully coupled 8x8 k.p Hamiltonian and determines the material response of a single period in a density-matrix-formalism by solving the Heisenberg equation including many-body and dephasing contributions. After calculating the polarization due to intersubband transitions in a single period, the resulting absorbance of a superlattice structure including radiative coupling between the different periods is determined using a non-local Green's-function formalism. As a result our simulator allows us to predict intersubband absorbance of superlattice structures with microscopically determined lineshapes and linewidths accounting for both many-body and correlation contributions. This work is funded by Sandia National Laboratories Laboratory Directed Research and Development program. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin.

  8. Ion-nitriding of austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although ion-nitriding is an extensively industrialized process enabling steel surfaces to be hardened by nitrogen diffusion, with a resulting increase in wear, seizure and fatigue resistance, its direct application to stainless steels, while enhancing their mechanical properties, also causes a marked degradation in their oxidation resistance. However, by adaption of the nitriding process, it is possible to maintain the improved wear resistant properties while retaining the oxidation resistance of the stainless steel. The controlled diffusion permits the growth of a nitrogen supersaturated austenite layer on parts made of stainless steel (AISI 304L and 316L) without chromium nitride precipitation. The diffusion layer remains stable during post heat treatments up to 650 F for 5,000 hrs and maintains a hardness of 900 HV. A very low and stable friction coefficient is achieved which provides good wear resistance against stainless steels under diverse conditions. Electrochemical and chemical tests in various media confirm the preservation of the stainless steel characteristics. An example of the application of this process is the treatment of Reactor Control Rod Cluster Assemblies (RCCAs) for Pressurized Water Nuclear Reactors

  9. Fusion bonding of silicon nitride surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reck, Kasper; Østergaard, Christian; Thomsen, Erik Vilain;

    2011-01-01

    While silicon nitride surfaces are widely used in many micro electrical mechanical system devices, e.g. for chemical passivation, electrical isolation or environmental protection, studies on fusion bonding of two silicon nitride surfaces (Si3N4–Si3N4 bonding) are very few and highly application...... specific. Often fusion bonding of silicon nitride surfaces to silicon or silicon dioxide to silicon surfaces is preferred, though Si3N4–Si3N4 bonding is indeed possible and practical for many devices as will be shown in this paper. We present an overview of existing knowledge on Si3N4–Si3N4 bonding and new...... results on bonding of thin and thick Si3N4 layers. The new results include high temperature bonding without any pretreatment, along with improved bonding ability achieved by thermal oxidation and chemical pretreatment. The bonded wafers include both unprocessed and processed wafers with a total silicon...

  10. Heavy ion bombardment of silicates and nitrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several silicates, including α-quartz, zirconium silicate, thorium silicate, LiAlSiO4, a silicate glass and several nitrides, α and β Si3N4, AlN, ZrN as well as Si2N2O and ThO2, have been irradiated by 1019 to 1021 Krypton (3 MeV) ions/m2. The damaged powders of original particle size less than 5 μm, have been examined by x-ray diffraction and electron microscope methods. The silicates and Si2N2O become non-crystalline by 10 x 1019 ions/m2. The particles change shape, extending and bloating under prolonged irradiations of the order of 100 x 1019 ions/m2. Silicate glass also undergoes this irradiation creep process. The nitrides and ThO2 behave quite differently and even at fluences of 200 x 1019 x ions/m-2 the powders remain crystalline, retaining relatively sharp edges to the particles without exhibiting irradiation creep. This difference in behavior can be related to the nature of the framework crystal structures, flexible for the silicates with variable bond angles, rigid for the nitrides with fixed bond angles. This may explain the behavior of radioactive minerals not found in a metamict condition. (author)

  11. Development of compound layer of iron (carbo)nitrides during nitriding of steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ratajski, J.; Tacikowski, J.; Somers, Marcel A.J.

    2003-01-01

    The composition and phase constitution of a compound layer developing during gaseous nitriding was investigated at 853 K for three commercial steels (AISI 120, 4340 and 1090) and Armco iron. The compound layers were characterised by light optical microscopy, X-ray diffraction and electron probe...... microanalysis. The formation of the compound layer occurs along two distinct sequences: alpha-gamma prime-epsilon and/or alpha(theta)-epsilon2-gamma prime-epsilon1. The preferred sequence depends mainly on the chemical composition of steel and on the nitriding potential....

  12. Synthesis of carbo-nitride films using high-energy shock plasma deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent investigations shows that an enhanced nitrogen content of carbo-nitride films improves wear resistance, hardness, tribological and other properties of these films. The present work reports on the properties of nitrogen rich carbon films produced by an intense gas discharge between carbon electrodes in a nitrogen atmosphere. The energy of the discharge, initial nitrogen pressure, number of discharges and geometry are varied to establish their effect on the nitrogen content and the mechanical, structural and morphological characteristics of the deposited carbon-nitride films. The structural diagnostics include optical and scanning electron microscopy, as well as Auger and Raman Spectroscopes and Rutherford Backscattering. The C-N films formed fell into two categories, differing in morphology and mechanical properties. Type I are C-N films, containing up to 35 at. % nitrogen, and which have an amorphous structure. These films are formed at relatively low plasma shock pressure and exhibit relatively low microhardness, ∼ 2 GPa. In a relatively narrow range of the plasma shock pressure and temperature the second type of C-N deposition is observed consisting of high density, closely-packed crystal-like grains growing perpendicular to the substrate surface and displaying a cauliflower-like morphology. The microhardness of these films reaches 15 GPa, as measured by the Vickers method. 14 refs., 7 figs

  13. Silicon nitride nanoparticles for surface-assisted laser desorption/ionization of small molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conventional matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry is limited to analyses of higher molecular weight compounds due to high background noise generated by the matrix in the lower mass region. Surface-assisted laser desorption/ionization (SALDI) mass spectrometry is an alternative solution to this problem. Nanoparticles, structured silicon surfaces and carbon allotropes are commonly used as SALDI surfaces. Here, for the first time, we demonstrate the application of silicon nitride nanoparticles as a suitable medium for laser desorption/ionization of small drug molecules.

  14. Kinetics of commercial iron and steel 40Kh nitridation under electrolytic heating conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinetic regularities in saturation with nitrogen of commercial iron specimens sized 5x10x15 mm, and of steel 40 Kh, 20 mm in dia , 40 mm long, have been considered. The thickness of diffusion layers was measure with the use of metallographical analysis, the nitrogen content was determined using chemical and local X-ray spectral analyses. The results obtained permit to make a supposition, that kinetics of nitridation of commercial iron and medium-carbon steels, as well as the nature of phase formation, depend on specific conditions of ammonia transport during anodic process of electrolytic heating

  15. Thermogravimetry studies on ilmenite nitridation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay Kumar

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The present study is based on the possibility of beneficiation of Indian-ilmenite by carbonitrothermic process. The investigations were carried out in two parts. In the first part, thermogravimetric-differential thermogravimetric (TG-DTG experiments were conducted using cold pressed pellets of blended mixtures TiO2-C and FeTiO3-C. The TG experiments were carried out up to 1500 °C at the rate of 10 °C/min under flowing nitrogen gas. The formations of TiN in case of TiO2-C mixture and TiN along with Fe in case of FeTiO3-C mixture were observed. In the second part, the experiments were conducted using similar pellets, prepared under identical conditions, in a resistance heating furnace at 1500 °C. By simple operations of crushing and sieving, the products obtained from the ilmenite-carbon mixture were separated into a fraction enriched in titanium and a fraction depleted in titanium.

  16. Limitations to band gap tuning in nitride semiconductor alloys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gorczyca, I.; Suski, T.; Christensen, Niels Egede;

    2010-01-01

    Relations between the band gaps of nitride alloys and their lattice parameters are presented and limits to tuning of the fundamental gap in nitride semiconductors are set by combining a large number of experimental data with ab initio theoretical calculations. Large band gap bowings obtained...

  17. Nitriding of super alloys for enhancing physical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purohit, A.

    1984-06-25

    The invention teaches the improvement of certain super alloys by exposing the alloy to an atmosphere of elemental nitrogen at elevated temperatures in excess of 750/sup 0/C but less than 1150/sup 0/C for an extended duration, viz., by nitriding the surface of the alloy, to establish barrier nitrides of the order of 25 to 100 micrometers thickness. These barrier

  18. Hydrogen charging of plasma nitrided steel in acid solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Sobieszczyk

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Purpose of this paper is evaluation of susceptibility of plasma nitrided structural steel to hydrogen absorption.Design/methodology/approach: Structural steel, nitrided at glow discharge in the gas mixture of various N2, H2, Ar content was subjected to cathodic hydrogen charging in acid solution simulating the aged engine oil. The effect of the nitrided layers on the hydrogen transport and on the irreversible trapping was evaluated by the measurements of the hydrogen permeation rate and by the vacuum extraction, respectively.Findings: In the presence of the not defected compact nitride layer, no hydrogen permeation through the steel has been stated under the experimental conditions. Absorbed hydrogen was accumulated within this layer.Research limitations/implications: Further research should be taken to evaluate the influence of compact nitride zone on hydrogen degradation under tensile stress.Practical implications: Plasma nitriding treatment could improve the properties of the low-alloy high-strength structural steels exploited in aggressive environments, which is especially important in the case of possible hydrogen charging of exploited steel.Originality/value: Using the atmosphere of the higher nitrogen to hydrogen ratio at plasma assisted nitriding provides the formation of thin compact nitride zone, highly protective against corrosion and hydrogen degradation.

  19. Composition and microhardness of CAE boron nitride films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper deals with boron nitride produced by cathodic arc evaporation techniques.The films were applied on titanium and cemented carbide substrates. Their characterization was carried out using X-ray diffraction and Knoop microhardness tests. Demonstrated are the high properties of two-phase films, containing β (cubic) and γ (wurtzitic) modifications of boron nitride. (author). 7 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs

  20. Synthesis of metal-nitrides using high pressures and temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guillaume, C; Serghiou, G [University of Edinburgh, School of Engineering and Electronics, Kings Buildings, Mayfield Road, EH9 3JL UK (United Kingdom); Morniroli, J P [Laboratoire de Metallurgie Physique et Genie des Materiaux, UMR CNRS 8517, Universite des Sciences et Technologies de Lille et Ecole Nationale Superieure de Chimie de Lille, Cite Scientifique, 59655 Villeneuve d' Ascq Cedex (France); Frost, D J [Bayerisches Geoinstitut, Universitat Bayreuth, D-95440, Bayreuth (Germany)], E-mail: george.serghiou@ed.ac.uk

    2008-07-15

    Technologically, high density nitrides are showing promise for both ceramic and electronic applications. In a laser-heated diamond cell we prepare high density metal-nitrides by reaction of the nitrogen pressure medium with an elemental substrate. Two of our objectives are to develop criteria governing whether denser than ambient nitride phases will form, and to in particular establish the parameters required for synthesis in a multianvil press using elemental starting materials. We have already synthesized transition metal nitrides in a multianvil press using elemental starting materials, including hexagonal nickel nitride and alkali rhenium nitrides. Unlike previous metals, we also report that Cu does not form a nitride after heating with NaN{sub 3} at 2000 K and 20 GPa. Notably, Cu{sub 3}N is a semiconductor exhibiting weak directional bonds, whereas the immediately adjacent lower atomic number systems are metallic interstitial nitrides. We also briefly mention our work on processing high pressure and temperature recovered reaction products with focused ion beam methods for tailored characterization using electron microscopy.