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Sample records for carbon nitride film

  1. Formation of graphitic carbon nitride and boron carbon nitride film on sapphire substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosaka, Maito; Urakami, Noriyuki; Hashimoto, Yoshio

    2018-02-01

    As a novel production method of boron carbon nitride (BCN) films, in this paper, we present the incorporation of B into graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3N4). First, we investigated the formation of g-C3N4 films via chemical vapor deposition (CVD) using melamine powder as the precursor. The formation of g-C3N4 films on a c-plane sapphire substrate was confirmed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and Raman spectroscopy measurements. The deposition temperature of g-C3N4 films was found to be suitable between 550 and 600 °C since the degradation and desorption of hexagonal C–N bonds should be suppressed. As for BCN films, we prepared BCN films via two-zone extended CVD using ammonia borane as the B precursor. Several XPS signals from B, C, and N core levels were detected from B-incorporated g-C3N4 films. While the N composition was almost constant, the marked tendencies for increasing B composition and decreasing C composition were achieved with the increase in the B incorporation, indicating the incorporation of B atoms by the substitution for C atoms. Optical absorptions were shifted to the high-energy side by B incorporation, which indicates the successful formation of BCN films using melamine and ammonia borane powders as precursors.

  2. Evidence of nanodomes in carbon nitride thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chowdhury, S.; Laugier, M.T. [Material and Surface Science Institute (MSSI) and Department of Physics, University of Limerick, Limerick (Ireland)

    2004-01-01

    This article reports the synthesis of hard and conductive carbon nitride thin films with evidence of formation of nanodomes over a range of substrate temperature from 50 C to 550 C. The size of the nanodomes increases from 40-80 nm at room temperature to 200-400 nm at high temperature (550 C). Electrical characterization shows that these films have conductive behaviour with a resistivity depending on the size of the nanodomes. Resistivity values of 19 m{omega}cm were found for nanodomes of size 40-80 nm falling to 6 m{omega}cm for nanodomes of size 200-400 nm. Nanoindentation results show that the hardness and Young's modulus of these films are in the range from 9-22 GPa and 100-168 GPa respectively and these values decrease as the size of the nanodomes increases. GXRD results confirm that a crystalline graphitic carbon nitride structure has formed. (copyright 2004 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  3. Nanotribological performance of fullerene-like carbon nitride films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flores-Ruiz, Francisco Javier; Enriquez-Flores, Christian Ivan [Centro de Investigación y Estudios Avanzados (CINVESTAV) IPN, Unidad Querétaro, Lib. Norponiente 2000, Real de Juriquilla, C.P. 76230, Querétaro, Qro., México (Mexico); Chiñas-Castillo, Fernando, E-mail: fernandochinas@gmail.com [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Instituto Tecnológico de Oaxaca, Oaxaca, Oax. Calz. Tecnológico No. 125, CP. 68030, Oaxaca, Oax. (Mexico); Espinoza-Beltrán, Francisco Javier [Centro de Investigación y Estudios Avanzados (CINVESTAV) IPN, Unidad Querétaro, Lib. Norponiente 2000, Real de Juriquilla, C.P. 76230, Querétaro, Qro., México (Mexico)

    2014-09-30

    Highlights: • Fullerene-like CNx samples show an elastic recovery of 92.5% and 94.5% while amorphous CNx samples had only 75% elastic recovery. • Fullerene-like CNx films show an increment of 34.86% and 50.57% in fractions of C 1s and N 1s. • Fullerene-like CNx samples show a lower friction coefficient compared to amorphous CNx samples. • Friction reduction characteristics of fullerene-like CNx films are strongly related to the increase of sp{sup 3} CN bonds. - Abstract: Fullerene-like carbon nitride films exhibit high elastic modulus and low friction coefficient. In this study, thin CNx films were deposited on silicon substrate by DC magnetron sputtering and the tribological behavior at nanoscale was evaluated using an atomic force microscope. Results show that CNx films with fullerene-like structure have a friction coefficient (CoF ∼ 0.009–0.022) that is lower than amorphous CNx films (CoF ∼ 0.028–0.032). Analysis of specimens characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy shows that films with fullerene-like structure have a higher number of sp{sup 3} CN bonds and exhibit the best mechanical properties with high values of elastic modulus (E > 180 GPa) and hardness (H > 20 GPa). The elastic recovery determined on specimens with a fullerene-like CNx structure was of 95% while specimens of amorphous CNx structure had only 75% elastic recovery.

  4. Photoluminescence and Raman Spectroscopy Studies of Carbon Nitride Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Hernández-Torres

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Amorphous carbon nitride films with N/C ratios ranging from 2.24 to 3.26 were deposited by reactive sputtering at room temperature on corning glass, silicon, and quartz as substrates. The average chemical composition of the films was obtained from the semiquantitative energy dispersive spectroscopy analysis. Photoluminescence measurements were performed to determine the optical band gap of the films. The photoluminescence spectra displayed two peaks: one associated with the substrate and the other associated with CNx films located at ≈2.13±0.02 eV. Results show an increase in the optical band gap from 2.11 to 2.15 eV associated with the increase in the N/C ratio. Raman spectroscopy measurements showed a dominant D band. ID/IG ratio reaches a maximum value for N/C ≈ 3.03 when the optical band gap is 2.12 eV. Features observed by the photoluminescence and Raman studies have been associated with the increase in the carbon sp2/sp3 ratio due to presence of high nitrogen content.

  5. Study of Amorphous Carbon Nitride Films Aiming at White Light Emitting Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwano, Yuta; Kittaka, Toshiaki; Tabuchi, Hidekazu; Soukawa, Masaya; Kunitsugu, Shinsuke; Takarabe, Kenichi; Itoh, Kunio

    2008-10-01

    The possibility for white light emitting devices using carbon nitride (CNx) thin films has been studied. Microwave electron cyclotron resonance (ECR)-plasma chemical vapor deposition (CVD) and RF-sputtering apparatuses have been used for the formation of CNx thin films. In both cases, CH4 was used as the source or sub-source of carbon in order to investigate the effect of hydrogenated carbon nitride for luminescence. The cathodoluminescence (CL) measurement of the film grown by ECR-plasma CVD method showed three peaks of red, green, and blue (R/G/B). The photoluminescence (PL) measurement of the film grown by RF-sputtering also showed the red peak, which could not be observed in the film without hydrogen. Together with the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis data, we concluded that the red peak originates from the level relating to H atom and blue peak from C-N bonds.

  6. Facile fabrication of boron nitride nanosheets-amorphous carbon hybrid film for optoelectronic applications

    KAUST Repository

    Wan, Shanhong

    2015-01-01

    A novel boron nitride nanosheets (BNNSs)-amorphous carbon (a-C) hybrid film has been deposited successfully on silicon substrates by simultaneous electrochemical deposition, and showed a good integrity of this B-C-N composite film by the interfacial bonding. This synthesis can potentially provide the facile control of the B-C-N composite film for the potential optoelectronic devices. This journal is

  7. Improvement of orthodontic friction by coating archwire with carbon nitride film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei Songbo [State Key Laboratory of Tribology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Shao Tianmin, E-mail: shaotm@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Tribology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Ding Peng [Department of Orthodontics, Peking University School and Hospital of Stomatology, Beijing 100081 (China)

    2011-10-01

    In order to reduce frictional resistance between archwire and bracket during orthodontic tooth movement, carbon nitride (CNx) thin films were deposited on the surface of archwires with ion beam assisted deposition (IBAD). The energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometer (EDS) analysis showed that the CNx film was successfully deposited on the surface of the orthodontic wires. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis suggested that the deposited CNx film was sp{sup 2} carbon dominated structures, and diversiform bonds (N-C, N{identical_to}C, et al.) coexisted in the film. The friction tests indicated that the CNx film significantly reduced the wire-bracket friction both in ambient air and in artificial saliva. The sp{sup 2}C rich structure of the CNx film as well as its protection function for the archwire was responsible for the low friction of the wire-bracket sliding system.

  8. Structure and properties of carbon nitride thin films synthesized by nitrogen-ion-beam-assisted pulsed laser ablation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Z. Y.; Zhao, J. P.; Yano, T.; Shinozaki, T.; Ooie, T.

    2002-09-01

    Carbon nitride films were deposited by pulsed KrF excimer laser ablation of graphite with assistance of low energy nitrogen-ion-beam bombardment. The nitrogen to carbon ratio, bonding state, microstructure, and surface morphology of the deposited carbon nitride films were characterized by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, micro-Raman spectroscopy, and atomic force microscopy, respectively. The irradiation effect of the nitrogen ion beam with various ion currents on the synthesis of carbon nitride films was investigated. XPS and FTIR analyses indicate that the bonding state between carbon and nitrogen in the deposited films is influenced by nitrogen irradiation with different ion currents during deposition. The carbon-nitrogen bonding of C-N and CDouble_BondN is observed in the films. High nitrogen ion current is proposed to promote the desired N-sp3C bonds, i.e., the C3N4 phase. In addition, tribological properties of the carbon nitride films deposited on TiN coated stainless steel substrates were also studied in both dry and oil environments, which exhibits a low friction coefficient compared with hard TiN film. copyright 2002 American Vacuum Society.

  9. Surface morphology stabilization by chemical sputtering in carbon nitride film growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buijnsters, J G [Institute for Molecules and Materials (IMM), Radboud University Nijmegen, Toernooiveld 1, 6525 ED Nijmegen (Netherlands); Vazquez, L [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid (CSIC), C/Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz 3, 28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2008-01-07

    We have studied the influence of chemical sputtering effects on the morphology of carbon nitride films grown on silicon substrates by electron cyclotron resonance chemical vapour deposition. This study has been performed by comparing the evolution of their morphology with that of hydrogenated amorphous carbon films grown under similar conditions, where these effects are not present. When chemical sputtering effects operate we observe a film surface stabilization for length scales in the 60-750 nm range after a threshold roughness of about 3-4 nm has been developed. This stabilization is explained on the basis of the re-emission of nitrogen etching species, which is confirmed by growth experiments on microstructured substrates. (fast track communication)

  10. Effect of bias voltages on the synthesis of nanostructured carbon nitride films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, P. X.; Yang, P.; Shi, Y. C.

    2006-05-01

    XPS, Raman scattering and SEM were used to study effect of DC bias voltages (0-400 V) on the synthesis of high nitrogen content of carbon nitride (CN x) films. Maximal N/C ratio up to 0.81 was first obtained at the bias voltage of 250 V, and the maximal fraction of sp 3 CN bond inside the film was up to 40%. Either too high or too low bias voltages would result in decrease of nitrogen content inside the CN x films. Typical G and D bands were identified. Intensities of G and D bands showed periodic development following an increase of bias voltages. Several groups of nanoscale particles were observed at the pulsed bias voltage of 5 kV. Each group of particles appeared sunflower type of distribution where the biggest (85 nm) particle at the center was surrounded by many small sizes (35 nm) of CN particles.

  11. Correlation between bonding structure and mechanical properties of amorphous carbon nitride thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quiros, C.; Nunez, R.; Prieto, P. [Universidad Autonoma de Madrid (Spain). Dept. de Fisica Aplicada; Vergara, I.; Caceres, D. [Dpto. de Fisica, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, C/ Butarque 15, E-28915 Leganes, Madrid (Spain); Soriano, L.; Fuentes, G.G.; Elizalde, E.; Sanz, J.M. [Dpto. de Fisica Aplicada, C-XII, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, E-28049, Madrid (Spain)

    2000-03-01

    Amorphous carbon nitride thin films were prepared in a dual ion beam sputtering (DIBS) system. The N/C atomic concentration ratio ranged between 0.3 and 0.5 as determined by quantitative X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) of the surface. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), XPS and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) were used to obtain information about the different types of bonding present in the films. The hardness and the Young's modulus of the samples were determined by nanoindentation measurements. The hardness varied in the range 15-30 GPa with Young's modulus between 170 and 250 GPa. In order to explain the measured hardness, some of the films are considered as heterogeneous, in good agreement with the XPS, FT-IR and XAS data. (orig.)

  12. Interface study between nanostructured tantalum nitride films and carbon nanotubes grown by chemical vapour deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouchet-Fabre, B., E-mail: brigitte.bouchet-fabre@cea.fr [Nanosciences and Innovation, CEA/IRAMIS/NIMBE, CEA-Saclay, 91191 Gif sur Yvette Cedex (France); Pinault, M.; Foy, E. [Nanosciences and Innovation, CEA/IRAMIS/NIMBE, CEA-Saclay, 91191 Gif sur Yvette Cedex (France); Hugon, M.C.; Minéa, T. [Laboratoire de Physique des Gaz et des Plasmas (UMR 8578), Université Paris-Sud, Bat. 210, 91405 Orsay cedex (France); Mayne-L’Hermite, M. [Nanosciences and Innovation, CEA/IRAMIS/NIMBE, CEA-Saclay, 91191 Gif sur Yvette Cedex (France)

    2014-10-01

    Highlights: • Our paper deals with the understanding of the carbon nanotubes growth parameters following the use of specific thin nitride buffer films. • For a large choice of buffer, we use ultra thin films elaborated by the very new method: high power pulsed magnetron sputtering; it allows a larger nitrogen incorporation in the films and lead to out of equilibrium phase formation. • Then by a multiscale investigation, developing a structural, a chemical and a morphology approach, we lead to some conclusion on the correlation between the phase transition for the buffer and morphology transition for the CNTs. • That is a new and deep approach. - Abstract: We present the role of nitrogen content in tantalum nitride ultra-thin buffers, on the carbon nanotubes (CNTs) growth by chemical vapour deposition at 850 °C, assisted by ferrocene as catalyst source. Tantalum nitride (TaN{sub x}) films with a very large range of concentration x = [0, 1.8] and various nanostructures, from amorphous Ta(N) to Ta{sub 3}N{sub 5}, were deposited by Highly Pulsed Plasma Magnetron Sputtering. The buffer films are characterized after heat treatment at 850 °C, and after the CNT growth, by wide angle X-ray scattering in grazing incidence and scanning electron microscopy. The CNT diameter explored by transition electron microscopy shows an all-out value for under stoichiometric thin films (Ta{sub 1}-N{sub 1−δ}, Ta{sub 3}-N{sub 5−δ}) and a minimum value just above the stoichiometric phases (Ta{sub 1}-N{sub 1+δ}, Ta{sub 3}-N{sub 5+δ}). Firstly one shows that the buffer films under the heat treatment present surface modification highly dependent on their initial state, which influences the catalyst particles diffusion. Secondly at the stoichiometric TaN phase we show that a specific ternary phase FeTa{sub 2}O{sub 6} is formed at the interface CNT/buffer, not present in the other cases, leading to a special CNT growth condition.

  13. Structure and properties of pulsed-laser deposited carbon nitride thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riascos, H. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad Tecnologica de Pereira, A. A. 097 Pereira (Colombia) and Departamento de Fisica, Universidad del Valle Excellence Center for Novel Materials, A. A. 25360 Cali (Colombia)]. E-mail: hriascos@utp.edu.co; Neidhardt, J. [Thin Film Physics Division, Department of Physics, IFM, Linkoeping University, SE-581 83 Linkoeping (Sweden); Christian Doppler Laboratory for Advanced Hard Coatings, Department of Metallurgy and Materials Testing, University of Leoben, 8700 Leoben (Austria); Radnoczi, G.Z. [Thin Film Physics Division, Department of Physics, IFM, Linkoeping University, SE-581 83 Linkoeping (Sweden); Research Institute for Technical Physics and Materials Science, P.O. Box 49, H-1525 Budapest (Hungary); Emmerlich, J. [Thin Film Physics Division, Department of Physics, IFM, Linkoeping University, SE-581 83 Linkoeping (Sweden); Zambrano, G. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad del Valle Excellence Center for Novel Materials, A. A. 25360 Cali (Colombia); Hultman, L. [Thin Film Physics Division, Department of Physics, IFM, Linkoeping University, SE-581 83 Linkoeping (Sweden); Prieto, P. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad del Valle Excellence Center for Novel Materials, A. A. 25360 Cali, (Colombia)

    2006-02-21

    Carbon nitride (CN {sub x}) thin films were deposited on silicon (100) and (111) substrates at 300 deg. C by laser ablation of a graphite target using a pulsed Nd:YAG laser in a nitrogen atmosphere. The composition and structural properties of the films were investigated as functions of gas pressure and laser fluence. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) revealed a strong dependence of the amount of structurally incorporated nitrogen upon gas pressure. A maximum was observed at the highest laser fluence of 10 J/cm{sup 2} and at an intermediate pressure of 4 Pa. Further analyses of the XPS N 1s core level spectra of the CN {sub x} films, exhibiting the highest elasticity in nanoindentation experiments, revealed a typical double-peak arrangement; most pronounced for the highest laser fluence at low pressures. These two peak components indicate that the nitrogen bonded onto a graphitic structure dominates over the two-fold coordinated pyridine-like bonding configuration. This favors the growth of intersecting corrugated graphene structures that may be considered to have 'fullerene-like' microstructures. Additionally, Fourier Transformed Infrared Spectroscopy analyses of films deposited at different pressures show the presence of 2229 and 2273 cm{sup -1} stretching peaks associated with CN triple bonds (C{identical_to}N) of nitriles and isocyanides, 1640 cm{sup -1} and 1545 cm{sup -1} associated with the C=C and C=N and a peak at 1730 cm{sup -1}, which is connected to the C=O carbonyls groups. Films grown at 0.66 Pa revealed the strongest C{identical_to}N0011 pe.

  14. Nano-Particles and Films of Carbon Nitride Prepared by Using the Simple Plasma Sputtering Deposition Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, B. Q.; Li, H. Y.; Shi, Y. C.; Feng, P. X.

    Nanoscale particles and films of carbon nitride (CN) were synthesized on Si(100) substrates at room temperature by using simple plasma sputtering deposition techniques based on DC Glow Discharge with Hollow Cathode electrodes. The bonding structures of the films were investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy. G and D bands in Raman spectra of the samples were identified. Following an increase of the precursor nitrogen pressure, the intensity of the D band in Raman spectra of the sample became strong. Similar phenomenon was also observed with an increase of the bias voltage. Scanning electron microscope images of the samples indicated that smooth and uniform CNx films were obtained at low bias voltages. Whereas, setting a pulsed bias voltage up to 5 kV, several groups of nanoparticles were observed. Each group of nanoparticles showed "sunflower" type of distribution.

  15. Single-step synthesis of crystalline h-BN quantum- and nanodots embedded in boron carbon nitride films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsoso, Boitumelo J.; Ranganathan, Kamalakannan; Mutuma, Bridget K.; Lerotholi, Tsenolo; Jones, Glenn; Coville, Neil J.

    2017-03-01

    Herein we report on the synthesis and characterization of novel crystalline hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) quantum- and nanodots embedded in large-area boron carbon nitride (BCN) films. The films were grown on a Cu substrate by an atmospheric pressure chemical vapour deposition technique. Methane, ammonia, and boric acid were used as precursors for C, N and B to grow these few atomic layer thick uniform films. We observed that both the size of the h-BN quantum/nanodots and thickness of the BCN films were influenced by the vaporization temperature of boric acid as well as the H3BO3 (g) flux over the Cu substrate. These growth conditions were easily achieved by changing the position of the solid boric acid in the reactor with respect to the Cu substrate. Atomic force microscope (AFM) and TEM analyses show a variation in the h-BN dot size distribution, ranging from nanodots (˜224 nm) to quantum dots (˜11 nm) as the B-source is placed further away from the Cu foil. The distance between the B-source and the Cu foil gave an increase in the C atomic composition (42 at% C-65 at% C) and a decrease in both B and N contents (18 at% B and 14 at% N to 8 at% B and 7 at% N). UV-vis absorption spectra showed a higher band gap energy for the quantum dots (5.90 eV) in comparison with the nanodots (5.68 eV) due to a quantum confinement effect. The results indicated that the position of the B-source and its reaction with ammonia plays a significant role in controlling the nucleation of the h-BN quantum- and nanodots. The films are proposed to be used in solar cells. A mechanism to explain the growth of h-BN quantum/nanodots in BCN films is reported.

  16. Improvement in interfacial characteristics of low-voltage carbon nanotube thin-film transistors with solution-processed boron nitride thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeon, Jun-Young; Ha, Tae-Jun, E-mail: taejunha0604@gmail.com

    2017-08-15

    Highlights: • We demonstrate the potential of solution-processed boron nitride (BN) thin films for nanoelectronics. • Improved interfacial characteristics reduced the leakage current by three orders of magnitude. • The BN encapsulation improves all the device key metrics of low-voltage SWCNT-TFTs. • Such improvements were achieved by reduced interaction of interfacial localized states. - Abstract: In this article, we demonstrate the potential of solution-processed boron nitride (BN) thin films for high performance single-walled carbon nanotube thin-film transistors (SWCNT-TFTs) with low-voltage operation. The use of BN thin films between solution-processed high-k dielectric layers improved the interfacial characteristics of metal-insulator-metal devices, thereby reducing the current density by three orders of magnitude. We also investigated the origin of improved device performance in SWCNT-TFTs by employing solution-processed BN thin films as an encapsulation layer. The BN encapsulation layer improves the electrical characteristics of SWCNT-TFTs, which includes the device key metrics of linear field-effect mobility, sub-threshold swing, and threshold voltage as well as the long-term stability against the aging effect in air. Such improvements can be achieved by reduced interaction of interfacial localized states with charge carriers. We believe that this work can open up a promising route to demonstrate the potential of solution-processed BN thin films on nanoelectronics.

  17. Boron nitride converted carbon fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rousseas, Michael; Mickelson, William; Zettl, Alexander K.

    2016-04-05

    This disclosure provides systems, methods, and apparatus related to boron nitride converted carbon fiber. In one aspect, a method may include the operations of providing boron oxide and carbon fiber, heating the boron oxide to melt the boron oxide and heating the carbon fiber, mixing a nitrogen-containing gas with boron oxide vapor from molten boron oxide, and converting at least a portion of the carbon fiber to boron nitride.

  18. Deposit of thin films of nitrided amorphous carbon using the laser ablation technique; Deposito de peliculas delgadas de carbono amorfo nitrurado utilizando la tecnica de ablacion laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rebollo, P.B.; Escobar A, L.; Camps C, E. [Departamento de Fisica, Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, C.P. 52045 Salazar, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Haro P, E.; Camacho L, M.A. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana Iztapalapa (Mexico); Muhl S, S. [Instituto de Investigacion en Materiales, UNAM (Mexico)

    2000-07-01

    It is reported the synthesis and characterization of thin films of amorphous carbon (a-C) nitrided, deposited by laser ablation in a nitrogen atmosphere at pressures which are from 4.5 x 10 {sup -4} Torr until 7.5 x 10 {sup -2} Torr. The structural properties of the films are studied by Raman spectroscopy obtaining similar spectra at the reported for carbon films type diamond. The study of behavior of the energy gap and the ratio nitrogen/carbon (N/C) in the films, shows that the energy gap is reduced when the nitrogen incorporation is increased. It is showed that the refraction index of the thin films diminish as nitrogen pressure is increased, indicating the formation of graphitic material. (Author)

  19. Light emission in forward and reverse bias operation in OLED with amorphous silicon carbon nitride thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reyes, R [Facultad de Ingenieria Quimica y Textil, Universidad Nacional de Ingenieria, Av. Tupac Amaru SN, Lima (Peru); Cremona, M [Departamento de Fisica, PontifIcia Universidade Catolica de Rio de Janeiro, PUC-Rio, Cx. Postal 38071, Rio de Janeiro, RJ, CEP 22453-970 (Brazil); Achete, C A, E-mail: rreyes@uni.edu.pe [Departamento de Engenheria Metalurgica e de Materiais, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Cx. Postal 68505, Rio de Janeiro, RJ, CEP 21945-970 (Brazil)

    2011-01-01

    Amorphous silicon carbon nitride (a-SiC:N) thin films deposited by magnetron sputtering were used in the structure of an organic light emitting diode (OLED), obtaining an OLED operating in forward and reverse bias mode. The device consist of the heterojunction structure ITO/a-SiC:N/Hole Transport Layer (HTL)/ Electron Transport Layer (ETL)/a-SiC:N/Al. As hole transporting layer was used a thin film of 1-(3-methylphenyl)-1,2,3,4 tetrahydroquinoline - 6 - carboxyaldehyde - 1,1'- diphenylhydrazone (MTCD), while the tris(8-hydroxyquinoline aluminum) (Alq{sub 3}) is used as electron transport and emitting layer. A significant increase in the voltage operation compared to the conventional ITO/MTCD/Alq{sub 3}/Al structure was observed, so the onset of electroluminescence occurs at about 22 V in the forward and reverse bias mode of operation. The electroluminescence spectra is similar in both cases, only slightly shifted 0.14 eV to lower energies in relation to the conventional device.

  20. Improvement in interfacial characteristics of low-voltage carbon nanotube thin-film transistors with solution-processed boron nitride thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Jun-Young; Ha, Tae-Jun

    2017-08-01

    In this article, we demonstrate the potential of solution-processed boron nitride (BN) thin films for high performance single-walled carbon nanotube thin-film transistors (SWCNT-TFTs) with low-voltage operation. The use of BN thin films between solution-processed high-k dielectric layers improved the interfacial characteristics of metal-insulator-metal devices, thereby reducing the current density by three orders of magnitude. We also investigated the origin of improved device performance in SWCNT-TFTs by employing solution-processed BN thin films as an encapsulation layer. The BN encapsulation layer improves the electrical characteristics of SWCNT-TFTs, which includes the device key metrics of linear field-effect mobility, sub-threshold swing, and threshold voltage as well as the long-term stability against the aging effect in air. Such improvements can be achieved by reduced interaction of interfacial localized states with charge carriers. We believe that this work can open up a promising route to demonstrate the potential of solution-processed BN thin films on nanoelectronics.

  1. Synthesis and characterization of thin films of nitrided amorphous carbon deposited by laser ablation; Sintesis y caracterizacion de peliculas delgadas de carbono amorfo nitrurado, depositadas por ablacion laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rebollo P, B

    2001-07-01

    The objective of this work is the synthesis and characterization of thin films of amorphous carbon (a-C) and thin films of nitrided amorphous carbon (a-C-N) using the laser ablation technique for their deposit. For this purpose, the physical properties of the obtained films were studied as function of diverse parameters of deposit such as: nitrogen pressure, power density, substrate temperature and substrate-target distance. For the characterization of the properties of the deposited thin films the following techniques were used: a) Raman spectroscopy which has demonstrated being a sensitive technique to the sp{sup 2} and sp{sup 3} bonds content, b) Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy which allows to know semi-quantitatively way the presence of the elements which make up the deposited films, c) Spectrophotometry, for obtaining the absorption spectra and subsequently the optical energy gap of the deposited material, d) Ellipsometry for determining the refraction index, e) Scanning Electron Microscopy for studying the surface morphology of thin films and, f) Profilemetry, which allows the determination the thickness of the deposited thin films. (Author)

  2. Laser ablation of molecular carbon nitride compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, D., E-mail: d.fischer@fkf.mpg.de [Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research, Heisenbergstr. 1, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Schwinghammer, K. [Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research, Heisenbergstr. 1, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Department of Chemistry, University of Munich, LMU, Butenandtstr. 5-13, 81377 Munich (Germany); Nanosystems Initiative Munich (NIM) and Center for Nanoscience (CeNS), 80799 Munich (Germany); Sondermann, C. [Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research, Heisenbergstr. 1, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Department of Chemistry, University of Munich, LMU, Butenandtstr. 5-13, 81377 Munich (Germany); Lau, V.W.; Mannhart, J. [Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research, Heisenbergstr. 1, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Lotsch, B.V. [Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research, Heisenbergstr. 1, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Department of Chemistry, University of Munich, LMU, Butenandtstr. 5-13, 81377 Munich (Germany); Nanosystems Initiative Munich (NIM) and Center for Nanoscience (CeNS), 80799 Munich (Germany)

    2015-09-15

    We present a method for the preparation of thin films on sapphire substrates of the carbon nitride precursors dicyandiamide (C{sub 2}N{sub 4}H{sub 4}), melamine (C{sub 3}N{sub 6}H{sub 6}), and melem (C{sub 6}N{sub 10}H{sub 6}), using the femtosecond-pulsed laser deposition technique (femto-PLD) at different temperatures. The depositions were carried out under high vacuum with a femtosecond-pulsed laser. The focused laser beam is scanned on the surface of a rotating target consisting of the pelletized compounds. The resulting polycrystalline, opaque films were characterized by X-ray powder diffraction, infrared, Raman, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, photoluminescence, SEM, and MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry measurements. The crystal structures and optical/spectroscopic results of the obtained rough films largely match those of the bulk materials.

  3. Photocurrent generation in carbon nitride and carbon nitride/conjugated polymer composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byers, Joshua C; Billon, Florence; Debiemme-Chouvy, Catherine; Deslouis, Claude; Pailleret, Alain; Semenikhin, Oleg A

    2012-09-26

    The semiconductor and photovoltaic properties of carbon nitride (CNx) thin films prepared using a reactive magnetron cathodic sputtering technique were investigated both individually and as composites with an organic conjugated polymer, poly(2,2'-bithiophene) (PBT). The CNx films showed an increasing thickness as the deposition power and/or nitrogen content in the gas mixture increase. At low nitrogen content and low deposition power (25-50 W), the film structure was dominated by the abundance of the graphitic sp(2) regions, whereas at higher nitrogen contents and magnetron power CNx films started to demonstrate semiconductor properties, as evidenced by the occurrence of photoconductivity and the development of a space charge region. However, CNx films alone did not show any reproducible photovoltaic properties. The situation changed, however, when CNx was deposited onto conjugated PBT substrates. In this configuration, CNx was found to function as an acceptor material improving the photocurrent generation both in solution and in solid state photovoltaic devices, with the external quantum efficiencies reaching 1% at high nitrogen contents. The occurrence of the donor-acceptor charge transfer was further evidenced by suppression of the n-doping of the PBT polymer by CNx. Nanoscale atomic force microscopy (AFM) and current-sensing AFM data suggested that CNx may form a bulk heterojunction with PBT.

  4. Multifractal characteristics of titanium nitride thin films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ţălu Ştefan

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The study presents a multi-scale microstructural characterization of three-dimensional (3-D micro-textured surface of titanium nitride (TiN thin films prepared by reactive DC magnetron sputtering in correlation with substrate temperature variation. Topographical characterization of the surfaces, obtained by atomic force microscopy (AFM analysis, was realized by an innovative multifractal method which may be applied for AFM data. The surface micromorphology demonstrates that the multifractal geometry of TiN thin films can be characterized at nanometer scale by the generalized dimensions Dq and the singularity spectrum f(α. Furthermore, to improve the 3-D surface characterization according with ISO 25178-2:2012, the most relevant 3-D surface roughness parameters were calculated. To quantify the 3-D nanostructure surface of TiN thin films a multifractal approach was developed and validated, which can be used for the characterization of topographical changes due to the substrate temperature variation.

  5. Formation and control of stoichiometric hafnium nitride thin films by direct sputtering of hafnium nitride target

    CERN Document Server

    Gotoh, Y; Ishikawa, J; Liao, M Y

    2003-01-01

    Hafnium nitride thin films were prepared by radio-frequency sputter deposition with a hafnium nitride target. Deposition was performed with various rf powers, argon pressures, and substrate temperatures, in order to investigate the influences of these parameters on the film properties, particularly the nitrogen composition. It was found that stoichiometric hafnium nitride films were formed at an argon gas pressure of less than 2 Pa, irrespective of the other deposition parameters within the range investigated. Maintaining the nitrogen composition almost stoichiometric, orientation, stress, and electrical resistivity of the films could be controlled with deposition parameters. (author)

  6. Titanium nitride thin films for minimizing multipactoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, Kimo M.

    1979-01-01

    Applying a thin film coating to the surface of a workpiece, in particular, applying a coating of titanium nitride to a klystron window by means of a crossed-field diode sputtering array. The array is comprised of a cohesive group of numerous small hollow electrically conducting cylinders and is mounted so that the open ends of the cylinders on one side of the group are adjacent a titanium cathode plate. The workpiece is mounted so as to face the open ends of the other side of the group. A magnetic field is applied to the array so as to be coaxial with the cylinders and a potential is applied across the cylinders and the cathode plate, the cylinders as an anode being positive with respect to the cathode plate. The cylinders, the cathode plate and the workpiece are situated in an atmosphere of nitrogen which becomes ionized such as by field emission because of the electric field between the cylinders and cathode plate, thereby establishing an anode-cathode discharge that results in sputtering of the titanium plate. The sputtered titanium coats the workpiece and chemically combines with the nitrogen to form a titanium nitride coating on the workpiece. Gas pressure, gas mixtures, cathode material composition, voltages applied to the cathode and anode, the magnetic field, cathode, anode and workpiece spacing, and the aspect ratio (ratio of length to inner diameter) of the anode cylinders, all may be controlled to provide consistent optimum thin film coatings of various compositions and thicknesses. Another facet of the disclosure is the coating of microwave components per se with titanium nitride to reduce multipactoring under operating conditions of the components.

  7. Graphitic Carbon Nitride Supported Catalysts for Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Graphitic carbon nitrides are investigated for developing highly durable Pt electrocatalyst supports for polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs). Three different graphitic carbon nitride materials were synthesized with the aim to address the effect of crystallinity, porosity, and composition on the catalyst support properties: polymeric carbon nitride (gCNM), poly(triazine) imide carbon nitride (PTI/Li+Cl–), and boron-doped graphitic carbon nitride (B-gCNM). Following accelerated corrosion testing, all graphitic carbon nitride materials are found to be more electrochemically stable compared to conventional carbon black (Vulcan XC-72R) with B-gCNM support showing the best stability. For the supported catalysts, Pt/PTI-Li+Cl– catalyst exhibits better durability with only 19% electrochemical surface area (ECSA) loss versus 36% for Pt/Vulcan after 2000 scans. Superior methanol oxidation activity is observed for all graphitic carbon nitride supported Pt catalysts on the basis of the catalyst ECSA. PMID:24748912

  8. Amorphous Carbon-Boron Nitride Nanotube Hybrids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae Woo (Inventor); Siochi, Emilie J. (Inventor); Wise, Kristopher E. (Inventor); Lin, Yi (Inventor); Connell, John (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A method for joining or repairing boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs). In joining BNNTs, the nanotube structure is modified with amorphous carbon deposited by controlled electron beam irradiation to form well bonded hybrid a-C/BNNT structures. In repairing BNNTs, the damaged site of the nanotube structure is modified with amorphous carbon deposited by controlled electron beam irradiation to form well bonded hybrid a-C/BNNT structures at the damage site.

  9. Vertical III-nitride thin-film power diode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wierer, Jr., Jonathan; Fischer, Arthur J.; Allerman, Andrew A.

    2017-03-14

    A vertical III-nitride thin-film power diode can hold off high voltages (kV's) when operated under reverse bias. The III-nitride device layers can be grown on a wider bandgap template layer and growth substrate, which can be removed by laser lift-off of the epitaxial device layers grown thereon.

  10. Recent progress in the synthesis and characterization of amorphous and crystalline carbon nitride coatings

    CERN Document Server

    Widlow, I

    2000-01-01

    This review summarizes our most recent findings in the structure and properties of amorphous and crystalline carbon nitride coatings, synthesized by reactive magnetron sputtering. By careful control of the plasma conditions via proper choice of process parameters such as substrate bias, target power and gas pressure, one can precisely control film structure and properties. With this approach, we were able to produce amorphous carbon nitride films with controlled hardness and surface roughness. In particular, we can synthesize ultrathin (1 nm thick) amorphous carbon nitride films to be sufficiently dense and uniform that they provide adequate corrosion protection for hard disk applications. We demonstrated the strong correlation between ZrN (111) texture and hardness in CN sub x /ZrN superlattice coatings. Raman spectroscopy and near-edge X-ray absorption show the predominance of sp sup 3 -bonded carbon in these superlattice coatings.

  11. Investigations on the Role of N2:(N2 + CH4) Ratio on the Growth of Hydrophobic Nanostructured Hydrogenated Carbon Nitride Thin Films by Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition at Low Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanis, Noor Hamizah; Ritikos, Richard; Ahmad Kamal, Shafarina Azlinda; Abdul Rahman, Saadah

    2017-01-01

    Nanostructured hydrogenated carbon nitride (CNx:H) thin films were synthesized on a crystal silicon substrate at low deposition temperature by radio-frequency plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD). Methane and nitrogen were the precursor gases used in this deposition process. The effects of N2 to the total gas flow rate ratio on the formation of CNx:H nanostructures were investigated. Field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), Raman scattering, and Fourier transform of infrared spectroscopies (FTIR) were used to characterize the films. The atomic nitrogen to carbon ratio and sp2 bonds in the film structure showed a strong influence on its growth rate, and its overall structure is strongly influenced by even small changes in the N2:(N2 + CH4) ratio. The formation of fibrous CNx:H nanorod structures occurs at ratios of 0.7 and 0.75, which also shows improved surface hydrophobic characteristic. Analysis showed that significant presence of isonitrile bonds in a more ordered film structure were important criteria contributing to the formation of vertically-aligned nanorods. The hydrophobicity of the CNx:H surface improved with the enhancement in the vertical alignment and uniformity in the distribution of the fibrous nanorod structures. PMID:28772460

  12. Scratch-resistant transparent boron nitride films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dekempeneer, E.H.A.; Kuypers, S.; Vercammen, K.; Meneve, J.; Smeets, J. [Vlaamse Instelling voor Technologisch Onderzoek (VITO), Mol (Belgium); Gibson, P.N.; Gissler, W. [Joint Research Centre of the Commission of the European Communities, Institute for Advanced Materials, Ispra (Vatican City State, Holy See) (Italy)

    1998-03-01

    Transparent boron nitride (BN) coatings were deposited on glass and Si substrates in a conventional capacitively coupled RF PACVD system starting from diborane (diluted in helium) and nitrogen. By varying the plasma conditions (bias voltage, ion current density), coatings were prepared with hardness values ranging from 2 to 12 GPa (measured with a nano-indenter). Infrared absorption measurements indicated that the BN was of the hexagonal type. A combination of glancing-angle X-ray diffraction measurements and simulations shows that the coatings consist of hexagonal-type BN crystallites with different degrees of disorder (nanocrystalline or turbostratic material). High-resolution transmission electron microscopy analysis revealed the presence of an amorphous interface layer and on top of this interface layer a well-developed fringe pattern characteristic for the basal planes in h-BN. Depending on the plasma process conditions, these fringe patterns showed different degrees of disorder as well as different orientational relationships with respect to the substrate surface. These observations were correlated with the mechanical properties of the films. (orig.) 14 refs.

  13. Pyrolyzed thin film carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tai, Yu-Chong (Inventor); Liger, Matthieu (Inventor); Harder, Theodore (Inventor); Konishi, Satoshi (Inventor); Miserendino, Scott (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A method of making carbon thin films comprises depositing a catalyst on a substrate, depositing a hydrocarbon in contact with the catalyst and pyrolyzing the hydrocarbon. A method of controlling a carbon thin film density comprises etching a cavity into a substrate, depositing a hydrocarbon into the cavity, and pyrolyzing the hydrocarbon while in the cavity to form a carbon thin film. Controlling a carbon thin film density is achieved by changing the volume of the cavity. Methods of making carbon containing patterned structures are also provided. Carbon thin films and carbon containing patterned structures can be used in NEMS, MEMS, liquid chromatography, and sensor devices.

  14. Thermally grown thin nitride films as a gate dielectric

    CERN Document Server

    Shin, H C; Hwang, T K; Lee, K R

    1998-01-01

    High-quality very thin films ( <=6 nm) of silicon nitride were thermally grown in ammonia atmosphere with an IR (Infrared) gold image furnace. As-grown nitride film was analyzed using AES(Auger Emission Spectroscopy). Using MIS (Metal-Insulator-Semiconductor) devices, the growth rate was calculated using CV (Capacitance-Voltage) measurements and various electrical characteristics were obtained using CV, IV (Current-Voltage), trapping, time-dependent breakdown, high-field stress, constant current injection stress and dielectric breakdown techniques. These characteristics showed that very thin thermal silicon nitride films can be used as gate dielectrics for future highly scaled-down ULSI (Ultra Large Scale Integrated) devices, especially for EEPROM (Electrically Erasable and Programmable ROM)'s.

  15. Grafting titanium nitride surfaces with sodium styrene sulfonate thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zorn, Gilad; Migonney, Véronique; Castner, David G.

    2014-01-01

    The importance of titanium nitride lies in its high hardness and its remarkable resistance to wear and corrosion, which has led to its use as a coating for the heads of hip prostheses, dental implants and dental surgery tools. However, the usefulness of titanium nitride coatings for biomedical applications could be significantly enhanced by modifying their surface with a bioactive polymer film. The main focus of the present work was to graft a bioactive poly(sodium styrene sulfonate) (pNaSS) thin film from titanium nitride surfaces via a two-step procedure: first modifying the surface with 3-methacryloxypropyltrimethoxysilane (MPS) and then grafting the pNaSS film from the MPS modified titanium through free radical polymerization. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) were used after each step to characterize success and completeness of each reaction. The surface region of the titanium nitride prior to MPS functionalization and NaSS grafting contained a mixture of titanium nitride, oxy-nitride, oxide species as well as adventitious surface contaminants. After MPS functionalization, Si was detected by XPS, and characteristic MPS fragments were detected by ToF-SIMS. After NaSS grafting, Na and S were detected by XPS and characteristic NaSS fragments were detected by ToF-SIMS. The XPS determined thicknesses of the MPS and NaSS overlayers were ∼1.5 and ∼1.7 nm, respectively. The pNaSS film density was estimated by the toluidine blue colorimetric assay to be 260 ± 70 ng/cm2. PMID:25280842

  16. Protolytic carbon film technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Renschler, C.L.; White, C.A.

    1996-04-01

    This paper presents a technique for the deposition of polyacrylonitrile (PAN) on virtually any surface allowing carbon film formation with only the caveat that the substrate must withstand carbonization temperatures of at least 600 degrees centigrade. The influence of processing conditions upon the structure and properties of the carbonized film is discussed. Electrical conductivity, microstructure, and morphology control are also described.

  17. Room temperature synthesis of biodiesel using sulfonated graphitic carbon nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulfonation of graphitic carbon nitride (g-CN) affords a polar and strongly acidic catalyst, Sg-CN, which displays unprecedented reactivity and selectivity in biodiesel synthesis and esterification reactions at room temperature.

  18. Defect complexes in carbon and boron nitride nanotubes

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mashapa, MG

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The effect of defect complexes on the stability, structural and electronic properties of single-walled carbon nanotubes and boron nitride nanotubes is investigated using the ab initio pseudopotential density functional method implemented...

  19. Growth of gallium nitride and indium nitride nanowires on conductive and flexible carbon cloth substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yi; Ling, Yichuan; Wang, Gongming; Lu, Xihong; Tong, Yexiang; Li, Yat

    2013-03-07

    We report a general strategy for synthesis of gallium nitride (GaN) and indium nitride (InN) nanowires on conductive and flexible carbon cloth substrates. GaN and InN nanowires were prepared via a nanocluster-mediated growth method using a home built chemical vapor deposition (CVD) system with Ga and In metals as group III precursors and ammonia as a group V precursor. Electron microscopy studies reveal that the group III-nitride nanowires are single crystalline wurtzite structures. The morphology, density and growth mechanism of these nanowires are determined by the growth temperature. Importantly, a photoelectrode fabricated by contacting the GaN nanowires through a carbon cloth substrate shows pronounced photoactivity for photoelectrochemical water oxidation. The ability to synthesize group III-nitride nanowires on conductive and flexible substrates should open up new opportunities for nanoscale photonic, electronic and electrochemical devices.

  20. Synthesis of reduced carbon nitride at the reduction by hydroquinone of water-soluble carbon nitride oxide (g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4})O

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kharlamov, Alexey [Frantsevich Institute for Problems of Materials Science of NASU, Krzhyzhanovsky St. 3, 03680 Kiev (Ukraine); Bondarenko, Marina, E-mail: mebondarenko@ukr.net [Frantsevich Institute for Problems of Materials Science of NASU, Krzhyzhanovsky St. 3, 03680 Kiev (Ukraine); Kharlamova, Ganna [Taras Shevchenko National University of Kiev, Volodymyrs' ka St. 64, 01601 Kiev (Ukraine); Fomenko, Veniamin [Frantsevich Institute for Problems of Materials Science of NASU, Krzhyzhanovsky St. 3, 03680 Kiev (Ukraine)

    2016-09-15

    For the first time at the reduction by hydroquinone of water-soluble carbon nitride oxide (g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4})O reduced carbon nitride (or reduced multi-layer azagraphene) is obtained. It is differed from usually synthesized carbon nitride by a significantly large (on 0.09 nm) interplanar distance is. At the same time, the chemical bonds between atoms in a heteroatomic plane of reduced carbon nitride correspond to the bonds in a synthesized g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4}. The samples of water-soluble carbon nitride oxide were synthesized under the special reactionary conditions of a pyrolysis of melamine and urea. We believe that reduced carbon nitride consists of weakly connected carbon-nitrogen monosheets (azagraphene sheets) as well as reduced (from graphene oxide) graphene contains weakly connected graphene sheets. - Graphical abstract: XRD pattern and schematic atomic model of one layer of reduced carbon nitride, carbon nitride oxide and synthesized carbon nitride. For the first time at the reduction by hydroquinone of the water-soluble carbon nitride oxide (g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4})O is obtained the reduced carbon nitride (or reduced multi-layer azagraphene). Display Omitted - Highlights: • First the reduced carbon nitride (RCN) at the reduction of the carbon nitride oxide was obtained. • Water-soluble carbon nitride oxide was reduced by hydroquinone. • The chemical bonds in a heteroatomic plane of RCN correspond to the bonds in a synthesized g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4}. • Reduced carbon nitride consists of poorly connected heteroatomic azagraphene layers.

  1. Triazine-based graphitic carbon nitride: a two-dimensional semiconductor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Algara-Siller, Gerardo; Severin, Nikolai; Chong, Samantha Y; Björkman, Torbjörn; Palgrave, Robert G; Laybourn, Andrea; Antonietti, Markus; Khimyak, Yaroslav Z; Krasheninnikov, Arkady V; Rabe, Jürgen P; Kaiser, Ute; Cooper, Andrew I; Thomas, Arne; Bojdys, Michael J

    2014-07-14

    Graphitic carbon nitride has been predicted to be structurally analogous to carbon-only graphite, yet with an inherent bandgap. We have grown, for the first time, macroscopically large crystalline thin films of triazine-based, graphitic carbon nitride (TGCN) using an ionothermal, interfacial reaction starting with the abundant monomer dicyandiamide. The films consist of stacked, two-dimensional (2D) crystals between a few and several hundreds of atomic layers in thickness. Scanning force and transmission electron microscopy show long-range, in-plane order, while optical spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and density functional theory calculations corroborate a direct bandgap between 1.6 and 2.0 eV. Thus TGCN is of interest for electronic devices, such as field-effect transistors and light-emitting diodes. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Structure and Thermal Stability of Copper Nitride Thin Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangan Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Copper nitride (Cu3N thin films were deposited on glass via DC reactive magnetron sputtering at various N2 flow rates and partial pressures with 150°C substrate temperature. X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy were used to characterize the microstructure and morphology. The results show that the films are composed of Cu3N crystallites with anti-ReO3 structure. The microstructure and morphology of the Cu3N film strongly depend on the N2 flow rate and partial pressure. The cross-sectional micrograph of the film shows typical columnar, compact structure. The thermal stabilities of the films were investigated using vacuum annealing under different temperature. The results show that the introducing of argon in the sputtering process decreases the thermal stability of the films.

  3. Preparation of high-pressure phase boron nitride films by physical vapor deposition

    CERN Document Server

    Zhu, P W; Zhao, Y N; Li, D M; Liu, H W; Zou Guang Tian

    2002-01-01

    The high-pressure phases boron nitride films together with cubic, wurtzic, and explosive high-pressure phases, were successfully deposited on the metal alloy substrates by tuned substrate radio frequency magnetron sputtering. The percentage of cubic boron nitride phase in the film was about 50% as calculated by Fourier transform infrared measurements. Infrared peak position of cubic boron nitride at 1006.3 cm sup - sup 1 , which is close to the stressless state, indicates that the film has very low internal stress. Transition electron microscope micrograph shows that pure cubic boron nitride phase exits on the surface of the film. The growth mechanism of the BN films was also discussed.

  4. Pulsed laser deposition of thin refractory metal nitride films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Manuel; Bereznai, M.; Caricato, A. P.; D'Anna, Emilia; Juhasz, A.; Leggieri, Gilberto; Luches, Armando; Majni, Guiseppe; Martino, Maurizio; Mengucci, Paolo; Nagy, P. M.; Nanai, Laszlo; Toth, Zsolt

    2003-11-01

    We report on the deposition of thin transition metal nitride (TMN) films by ablating Mo, Ta, V and W targets in low-pressure (1, 10 and 100 Pa) nitrogen atmosphere by KrF excimer laser pulses, and on their characterization. The targets were foils of high purity (99.8%). 3" Si(111) wafers wre used as substrates. Film characteristics (composition, crystalline structure, hardness) were studied as a function of N2 pressure, KrF laser fluence (4.5-19 J/cm2), substrate temperature (20-750°C) and target to substrate distance (30-70 mm). Rutherford backscattering spectrometery (RBS) was used to calculate thickness of the films and identification of the composition. TMN films ar formed already at low N2 ambient pressures (1 Pa) and laser fluences (6 J/cm2) on substrates at room temperature. XRD investigations show that films deposited at elevated temperatures are mostly polycrystalline. While Mo, W and Ta nitrides show respectively a γ-Mo2N, β-W2N and δ-TaN phase in almost any deposition condition, vanadium nitride shows a prevalent phase of δ-VN at N2 pressures of 1-10 Pa, while at higher pressures (100 Pa) and at relatively high laser fluences (16-19 J/cm2) the dominant phase is β-V2N. Generally the crystallinity of the films improves by increasing the substrate temperature. Well-crystallinzed films are obtained on substrates heated at 500°C. Surface morphology, microhardness and electrical resistivity of the films are discussed as a function of both the nitrogen pressure and substrate temperature.

  5. Zinc nitride thin films: basic properties and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redondo-Cubero, A.; Gómez-Castaño, M.; García Núñez, C.; Domínguez, M.; Vázquez, L.; Pau, J. L.

    2017-02-01

    Zinc nitride films can be deposited by radio frequency magnetron sputtering using a Zn target at substrate temperatures lower than 250°C. This low deposition temperature makes the material compatible with flexible substrates. The asgrown layers present a black color, polycrystalline structures, large conductivities, and large visible light absorption. Different studies have reported about the severe oxidation of the layers in ambient conditions. Different compositional, structural and optical characterization techniques have shown that the films turn into ZnO polycrystalline layers, showing visible transparency and semi-insulating properties after total transformation. The oxidation rate is fairly constant as a function of time and depends on environmental parameters such as relative humidity or temperature. Taking advantage of those properties, potential applications of zinc nitride films in environmental sensing have been studied in the recent years. This work reviews the state-of-the-art of the zinc nitride technology and the development of several devices such as humidity indicators, thin film (photo)transistors and sweat monitoring sensors.

  6. Compositional analysis of silicon oxide/silicon nitride thin films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meziani Samir

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen, amorphous silicon nitride (SiNx:H abbreviated SiNx films were grown on multicrystalline silicon (mc-Si substrate by plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD in parallel configuration using NH3/SiH4 gas mixtures. The mc-Si wafers were taken from the same column of Si cast ingot. After the deposition process, the layers were oxidized (thermal oxidation in dry oxygen ambient environment at 950 °C to get oxide/nitride (ON structure. Secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS, Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS, Auger electron spectroscopy (AES and energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX were employed for analyzing quantitatively the chemical composition and stoichiometry in the oxide-nitride stacked films. The effect of annealing temperature on the chemical composition of ON structure has been investigated. Some species, O, N, Si were redistributed in this structure during the thermal oxidation of SiNx. Indeed, oxygen diffused to the nitride layer into Si2O2N during dry oxidation.

  7. Mesoporous carbon nitrides: synthesis, functionalization, and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakhi, Kripal S; Park, Dae-Hwan; Al-Bahily, Khalid; Cha, Wangsoo; Viswanathan, Balasubramanian; Choy, Jin-Ho; Vinu, Ajayan

    2017-01-03

    Mesoporous carbon nitrides (MCNs) with large surface areas and uniform pore diameters are unique semiconducting materials and exhibit highly versatile structural and excellent physicochemical properties, which promote their application in diverse fields such as metal free catalysis, photocatalytic water splitting, energy storage and conversion, gas adsorption, separation, and even sensing. These fascinating MCN materials can be obtained through the polymerization of different aromatic and/or aliphatic carbons and high nitrogen containing molecular precursors via hard and/or soft templating approaches. One of the unique characteristics of these materials is that they exhibit both semiconducting and basic properties, which make them excellent platforms for the photoelectrochemical conversion and sensing of molecules such as CO2, and the selective sensing of toxic organic acids. The semiconducting features of these materials are finely controlled by varying the nitrogen content or local electronic structure of the MCNs. The incorporation of different functionalities including metal nanoparticles or organic molecules is further achieved in various ways to develop new electronic, semiconducting, catalytic, and energy harvesting materials. Dual functionalities including acidic and basic groups are also introduced in the wall structure of MCNs through simple UV-light irradiation, which offers enzyme-like properties in a single MCN system. In this review article, we summarize and highlight the existing literature covering every aspect of MCNs including their templating synthesis, modification and functionalization, and potential applications of these MCN materials with an overview of the key and relevant results. A special emphasis is given on the catalytic applications of MCNs including hydrogenation, oxidation, photocatalysis, and CO2 activation.

  8. A Highly Selective Photoresist Ashing Process for Silicon Nitride Films by Addition of Trifluoromethane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Makoto; Eto, Hideo; Makino, Nobuaki; Omiya, Kayoko; Homma, Tetsuya; Nagatomo, Takao

    2001-09-01

    A highly selective photoresist ashing process was developed for the fabrication of thin-film transistor liquid-crystal displays (TFT-LCDs). This ashing process utilizes downflow plasma consisting of a carbon trifluoromethane/oxygen (CHF3/O2) gas mixture at a low temperature. The etching selectivity of photoresist films to silicon nitride (SiN) film increased when using the CHF3/O2 gas mixture plasma, as compared to that when using the carbon tetrafluoride/oxygen (CF4/O2) gas mixture plasma. At the CHF3 gas flow rate of 30 sccm, a high etching selectivity ratio of about 1080 for the photoresist films to the SiN films was achieved at room temperature. On the basis of surface analysis results for SiN films and plasma analysis results for the CHF3/O2 gas mixture, a mechanism for the high etching selectivity of the photoresist films was proposed. Reaction products that were formed on SiN films by the CHF3/O2 gas mixture plasma obstructed the etching of SiN films by fluorine (F) radicals, resulting in the high selectivity. It was found that the CHF3/O2 gas mixture plasma reacted with SiN, resulting in the formation of a protective reaction product that is considered to be an ammonium salt such as (NH4)2SiF6.

  9. Functional carbon nitride materials — design strategies for electrochemical devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessler, Fabian K.; Zheng, Yun; Schwarz, Dana; Merschjann, Christoph; Schnick, Wolfgang; Wang, Xinchen; Bojdys, Michael J.

    2017-06-01

    In the past decade, research in the field of artificial photosynthesis has shifted from simple, inorganic semiconductors to more abundant, polymeric materials. For example, polymeric carbon nitrides have emerged as promising materials for metal-free semiconductors and metal-free photocatalysts. Polymeric carbon nitride (melon) and related carbon nitride materials are desirable alternatives to industrially used catalysts because they are easily synthesized from abundant and inexpensive starting materials. Furthermore, these materials are chemically benign because they do not contain heavy metal ions, thereby facilitating handling and disposal. In this Review, we discuss the building blocks of carbon nitride materials and examine how strategies in synthesis, templating and post-processing translate from the molecular level to macroscopic properties, such as optical and electronic bandgap. Applications of carbon nitride materials in bulk heterojunctions, laser-patterned memory devices and energy storage devices indicate that photocatalytic overall water splitting on an industrial scale may be realized in the near future and reveal a new avenue of 'post-silicon electronics'.

  10. Excimer laser reactive deposition of vanadium nitride thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Anna, E.; Di Cristoforo, A.; Fernández, M.; Leggieri, G.; Luches, A.; Majni, G.; Mengucci, P.; Nanai, L.

    2002-01-01

    We report on the deposition of thin vanadium nitride films by ablating vanadium targets in low-pressure N 2 atmosphere, and on their characterization. The targets were vanadium foils (purity 99.8%). 3 in. Si(1 1 1) wafers were used as substrates. Film characteristics (composition and crystalline structure) were studied as a function of N 2 pressure (0.5-200 Pa), KrF laser fluence (4.5-19 J/cm 2), substrate temperature (20-750 °C) and target-to-substrate distance (30-70 mm). Vanadium nitride is already formed at low N 2 ambient pressures (1 Pa) and laser fluences (6 J/cm 2) on substrates at room temperature. At the N 2 pressures of 1-10 Pa, the prevalent phase is VN. At higher pressures (100 Pa) and at relatively high laser fluences (16-19 J/cm 2), the dominant phase is V 2N. The crystallinity of the films improves by increasing the substrate temperature. Well-crystallized films are obtained on substrates heated at 500 °C.

  11. Stress reduction of cubic boron nitride films by oxygen addition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ye, J. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, IMF I, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, D-76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany)], E-mail: Jian.Ye@imf.fzk.de; Ulrich, S.; Ziebert, C.; Stueber, M. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, IMF I, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, D-76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany)

    2008-12-01

    Cubic boron nitride (c-BN) films with significantly reduced residual stresses were successfully grown onto silicon substrates by means of controlled oxygen addition into the films. The deposition was based on radio-frequency magnetron sputtering of a hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) target, and was accomplished in a reactive mode using gas mixtures of argon, nitrogen, and oxygen at 0.3 Pa pressure, 400 deg. C growth temperature, and - 250 V substrate bias. Results of systematic investigations are shown in this article with respect to the critical influences of oxygen concentration during deposition upon the stress, cubic phase fraction, as well as nanohardness of the deposited films. Under the specified growth conditions, the formation of c-BN was generally completely hindered for oxygen concentrations above 1.5 vol.% in the gas mixture. At concentrations below approximately 1 vol.%, the added oxygen exhibits however marginal influences on the c-BN fraction, but on the other side a strong impact on the stress of the deposited films. Cubic-phase dominated films (containing 70-80 vol.% c-BN) with their compressive stress three times reduced were thus produced through careful control of oxygen fraction in the gas mixture, showing an excellent nanohardness of almost 60 GPa. For such films, a post-deposition thermal treatment at 900 deg. C led to an additional drastic stress reduction resulting in a final residual stress that is almost 10 times lower than that of as-deposited c-BN films without intentional oxygen addition.

  12. Triggering the atomic layers control of hexagonal boron nitride films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Yangxi [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Ceramic Fibers and Composites, College of Aerospace Science and Engineering, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha 410073 (China); Zhang, Changrui, E-mail: crzhang12@gmail.com [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Ceramic Fibers and Composites, College of Aerospace Science and Engineering, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha 410073 (China); Li, Bin [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Ceramic Fibers and Composites, College of Aerospace Science and Engineering, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha 410073 (China); Jiang, Da; Ding, Guqiao; Wang, Haomin [State Key Laboratory of Functional Materials for Informatics, Shanghai Institute of Microsystem and Information Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 865 Changning Road, Shanghai 200050 (China); Xie, Xiaoming, E-mail: xmxie@mail.sim.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Functional Materials for Informatics, Shanghai Institute of Microsystem and Information Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 865 Changning Road, Shanghai 200050 (China)

    2014-09-15

    Highlights: • Thickness of h-BN films can be controlled from double atomic layers to over ten atomic layers by adjusting the CVD parameters, quite different from the reported thickness control of up to tens of nanometers. (The interlayer distance of h-BN is 0.333 nm.) • Growth mechanisms of h-BN are discussed, especially for bilayer h-BN films. • Both epitaxial growth and diffusion-segregation process are involved in the synthesis of bilayer h-BN films. - Abstract: In this work, we report the successful synthesis of large scale hexagonal boron nitride films with controllable atomic layers. The films are grown on thin nickel foils via ambient pressure chemical vapor deposition with borazine as the precursor. The atomic layers of h-BN films can be controlled in a narrow range by adjusting growth time and the cooling rates. Transmission electron microscope results shows the h-BN films exhibit high uniformity and good crystalline. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy shows the B/N elemental ratio is about 1.01. The h-BN films exhibit a pronounced deep ultraviolet absorption at 203.0 nm with a large optical band gap of 6.02 ± 0.03 eV. The results suggest potential applications of h-BN films in deep ultraviolet and dielectric materials. Growth mechanisms of h-BN films with thickness control are discussed, especially when the synthesized h-BN films after a higher cooling rate show an in-plane rotation angle between bilayers. Both epitaxial growth and diffusion-segregation process are involved in the synthesis of bilayer h-BN films.

  13. Spectroscopic ellipsometry characterization of thin-film silicon nitride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jellison, G.E. Jr.; Modine, F.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Doshi, P.; Rohatgi, A. [Georiga Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    1997-05-01

    We have measured and analyzed the optical characteristics of a series of silicon nitride thin films prepared by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition on silicon substrates for photovoltaic applications. Spectroscopic ellipsometry measurements were made by using a two-channel spectroscopic polarization modulator ellipsometer that measures N, S, and C data simultaneously. The data were fit to a model consisting of air / roughness / SiN / crystalline silicon. The roughness was modeled using the Bruggeman effective medium approximation, assuming 50% SiN, 50% voids. The optical functions of the SiN film were parameterized using a model by Jellison and Modine. All the {Chi}{sup 2} are near 1, demonstrating that this model works extremely well for all SiN films. The measured dielectric functions were used to make optimized SiN antireflection coatings for crystalline silicon solar cells.

  14. Ultrahard carbon nanocomposite films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SIEGAL,MICHAEL P.; TALLANT,DAVID R.; PROVENCIO,PAULA P.; OVERMYER,DONALD L.; SIMPSON,REGINA L.; MARTINEZ-MIRANDA,L.J.

    2000-01-27

    Modest thermal annealing to 600 C of diamondlike amorphous-carbon (a-C) films grown at room temperature results in the formation of carbon nanocomposites with hardness similar to diamond. These nanocomposite films consist of nanometer-sized regions of high density a-C embedded in an a-C matrix with a reduced density of 5--10%. The authors report on the evolution of density and bonding topologies as a function of annealing temperature. Despite a decrease in density, film hardness actually increases {approximately} 15% due to the development of the nanocomposite structure.

  15. Thick film fabrication of aluminum nitride microcircuits. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perdieu, L.H.

    1994-03-01

    A new substrate material, aluminum nitride (AlN), and 11 new thick film inks were analyzed to determine their chemical compatibility, their electrical properties, their mechanical properties, and their overall suitability for use in the manufacturing of high-power microcircuits with efficient thermal properties. Because high-power chips emit a great deal of heat in a small surface area, a new substrate material was needed to dissipate that heat faster than the substrate material currently in use. Overall, the new materials were found to be acceptable for accomplishing this purpose.

  16. Vacancy complexes in carbon and boron nitride nanotubes

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mashapa, MG

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available -1 Journal of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Vol. 12, 7796-7806, 2012 Vacancy Complexes in Carbon and Boron Nitride Nanotubes M. G. Mashapa1,2, ? N. Chetty1 and S. Sinha Ray2,3 1 Physics Department, University of Pretoria, Pretoria, 0001, South Africa...

  17. Investigation of silicon carbon nitride nanocomposite films as a wear resistant layer in vitro and in vivo for joint replacement applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Y; Liu, D G; Bai, W Q; Tu, J P

    2017-05-01

    Silicon-contained CNx nanocomposite films were prepared using the ion beam assisted magnetron sputtering under different nitrogen gas pressure. With increase of the nitrogen pressure, silicon and nitrogen content of the CNx films drastically increase, and is saturated as the PN2 reach about 40%. Surface roughness and the contact angle are increase, while the friction coefficient decreased. The CNx film with 5.7at.% Si content possess the lowest friction coefficient of only 0.07, and exhibited the best tribological properties. The impact of CNx films with different silicon content on the growth and the activation of osteoblasts were compared to that of Ti6Al4V. The incorporation of silicon in the CNx film also showed an increase cell adhesion. Bonding structure and surface energy were determined to be the factors contributing to the improved biocompatibility. Macrophages attached to 5.7at.% Si contained CNx films down regulated their production of cytokines and chemokines. Moreover, employed with Si contained CNx coated joint replacements, which were implanted subcutaneously into Sprague-Dawley mice for up to 36days, the tissue reaction and capsule formation was significantly decreased compared to that of Ti6Al4V. A mouse implantation study demonstrated the excellent in vivo biocompatibility and functional reliability of wear resist layer for joint replacements with a Si doped a-CNx coating for 36days. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Pulsed laser deposition of niobium nitride thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farha, Ashraf Hassan, E-mail: ahass006@odu.edu; Elsayed-Ali, Hani E., E-mail: helsayed@odu.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Old Dominion University, Norfolk, VA 23529 (United States); Applied Research Center, Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA 23606 (United States); Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Ain Shams University, Cairo 11566 (Egypt); Ufuktepe, Yüksel, E-mail: ufuk@cu.edu.tr [Department of Physics, University of Cukurova, 01330 Adana (Turkey); Myneni, Ganapati, E-mail: rao@jlab.org [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, Virginia 23606 (United States)

    2015-12-04

    Niobium nitride (NbN{sub x}) films were grown on Nb and Si(100) substrates using pulsed laser deposition. NbN{sub x} films were deposited on Nb substrates using PLD with a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser (λ = 1064 nm, ∼40 ns pulse width, and 10 Hz repetition rate) at different laser fluences, nitrogen background pressures and deposition substrate temperatures. When all the fabrication parameters are fixed, except for the laser fluence, the surface roughness, nitrogen content, and grain size increase with increasing laser fluence. Increasing nitrogen background pressure leads to a change in the phase structure of the NbN{sub x} films from mixed β-Nb{sub 2}N and cubic δ-NbN phases to single hexagonal β-Nb{sub 2}N. The substrate temperature affects the preferred orientation of the crystal structure. The structural and electronic, properties of NbN{sub x} deposited on Si(100) were also investigated. The NbN{sub x} films exhibited a cubic δ-NbN with a strong (111) orientation. A correlation between surface morphology, electronic, and superconducting properties was found. The observations establish guidelines for adjusting the deposition parameters to achieve the desired NbN{sub x} film morphology and phase.

  19. Nanoscale hardness and microfriction of titanium nitride films deposited from the reaction of tetrakis (dimethylamino) titanium with ammonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Y. W.; Lee, W. Y.; Besmann, T. M.; Blau, P. J.

    1995-04-01

    Nanocrystalline titanium nitride films with very low carbon and oxygen content were deposited on single-crystal silicon substrates from the reaction of tetrakis (dimethylamino) titanium, Ti[(CH3)2N]4, with ammonia at 633 K and a pressure of 665 Pa. The film consisted of ˜10 nm grains. The hardness of the film, measured by nanoindentation, was 12.7±0.6 GPa. The average kinetic friction coefficient, against type 440C stainless steel, was determined using a friction microprobe to be 0.43.

  20. Low temperature aluminum nitride thin films for sensory applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yarar, E.; Zamponi, C.; Piorra, A.; Quandt, E., E-mail: eq@tf.uni-kiel.de [Institute for Materials Science, Chair for Inorganic Functional Materials, Kiel University, D-24143 Kiel (Germany); Hrkac, V.; Kienle, L. [Institute for Materials Science, Chair for Synthesis and Real Structure, Kiel University, D-24143 Kiel (Germany)

    2016-07-15

    A low-temperature sputter deposition process for the synthesis of aluminum nitride (AlN) thin films that is attractive for applications with a limited temperature budget is presented. Influence of the reactive gas concentration, plasma treatment of the nucleation surface and film thickness on the microstructural, piezoelectric and dielectric properties of AlN is investigated. An improved crystal quality with respect to the increased film thickness was observed; where full width at half maximum (FWHM) of the AlN films decreased from 2.88 ± 0.16° down to 1.25 ± 0.07° and the effective longitudinal piezoelectric coefficient (d{sub 33,f}) increased from 2.30 ± 0.32 pm/V up to 5.57 ± 0.34 pm/V for film thicknesses in the range of 30 nm to 2 μm. Dielectric loss angle (tan δ) decreased from 0.626% ± 0.005% to 0.025% ± 0.011% for the same thickness range. The average relative permittivity (ε{sub r}) was calculated as 10.4 ± 0.05. An almost constant transversal piezoelectric coefficient (|e{sub 31,f}|) of 1.39 ± 0.01 C/m{sup 2} was measured for samples in the range of 0.5 μm to 2 μm. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) investigations performed on thin (100 nm) and thick (1.6 μm) films revealed an (002) oriented AlN nucleation and growth starting directly from the AlN-Pt interface independent of the film thickness and exhibit comparable quality with the state-of-the-art AlN thin films sputtered at much higher substrate temperatures.

  1. Epitaxial ternary nitride thin films prepared by a chemical solution method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Hongmei [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Feldmann, David M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wang, Haiyan [TEXAS A& M; Bi, Zhenxing [TEXAS A& M

    2008-01-01

    It is indispensable to use thin films for many technological applications. This is the first report of epitaxial growth of ternary nitride AMN2 films. Epitaxial tetragonal SrTiN2 films have been successfully prepared by a chemical solution approach, polymer-assisted deposition. The structural, electrical, and optical properties of the films are also investigated.

  2. Synthesis of graphitic carbon nitride by reaction of melamine and uric acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dante, Roberto C., E-mail: rcdante@yahoo.com [Laboratorio de Tecnologias del Medio Ambiente, Departamento de Ingenieria Agricola y Forestal, Universidad de Valladolid, Avenida de Madrid 44, 34004 Palencia (Spain); Martin-Ramos, Pablo, E-mail: pablomartinramos@gmail.com [Laboratorio de Tecnologias del Medio Ambiente, Departamento de Ingenieria Agricola y Forestal, Universidad de Valladolid, Avenida de Madrid 44, 34004 Palencia (Spain); Correa-Guimaraes, Adriana, E-mail: acg@iaf.uva.es [Laboratorio de Tecnologias del Medio Ambiente, Departamento de Ingenieria Agricola y Forestal, Universidad de Valladolid, Avenida de Madrid 44, 34004 Palencia (Spain); Martin-Gil, Jesus, E-mail: jesusmartingil@gmail.com [Laboratorio de Tecnologias del Medio Ambiente, Departamento de Ingenieria Agricola y Forestal, Universidad de Valladolid, Avenida de Madrid 44, 34004 Palencia (Spain)

    2011-11-01

    Highlights: {yields} Graphitic carbon nitrides by CVD of melamine and uric acid on alumina. {yields} The building blocks of carbon nitrides are heptazine nuclei. {yields} Composite particles with alumina core and carbon nitride coating. - Abstract: Graphitic carbon nitrides were synthesized starting from melamine and uric acid. Uric acid was chosen because it thermally decomposes, and reacts with melamine by condensation at temperatures in the range of 400-600 deg. C. The reagents were mixed with alumina and subsequently the samples were treated in an oven under nitrogen flux. Alumina favored the deposition of the graphitic carbon nitrides layers on the exposed surface. This method can be assimilated to an in situ chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Infrared (IR) spectra, as well as X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns, are in accordance with the formation of a graphitic carbon nitride with a structure based on heptazine blocks. These carbon nitrides exhibit poor crystallinity and a nanometric texture, as shown by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis. The thermal degradation of the graphitic carbon nitride occurs through cyano group formation, and involves the bridging tertiary nitrogen and the bonded carbon, which belongs to the heptazine ring, causing the ring opening and the consequent network destruction as inferred by connecting the IR and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) results. This seems to be an easy and promising route to synthesize graphitic carbon nitrides. Our final material is a composite made of an alumina core covered by carbon nitride layers.

  3. Anti corrosion layer for stainless steel in molten carbonate fuel cell - comprises phase vapour deposition of titanium nitride, aluminium nitride or chromium nitride layer then oxidising layer in molten carbonate electrolyte

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2000-01-01

    Forming an anticorrosion protective layer on a stainless steel surface used in a molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) - comprises the phase vapour deposition (PVD) of a layer comprising at least one of titanium nitride, aluminium nitride or chromium nitride and then forming a protective layer in situ...

  4. Mechanical and electrochemical characterization of vanadium nitride (VN) thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caicedo, J.C., E-mail: Jcesarca@calima.univalle.edu.co [Grupo de Peliculas Delgadas, Departamento de Fisica, Universidad del Valle, Cali (Colombia); Zambrano, G. [Grupo de Peliculas Delgadas, Departamento de Fisica, Universidad del Valle, Cali (Colombia); Aperador, W. [Ingenieria Mecatronica, Universidad Militar Nueva Granada, Bogota (Colombia); Escobar-Alarcon, L.; Camps, E. [Departamento de Fisica, Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Apdo. Postal 18-1027, Mexico, DF 11801 (Mexico)

    2011-10-15

    Vanadium nitride (V-N) thin films were grown using a reactive d.c. magnetron sputtering process, from a vanadium target (99.999%) in an Ar/N{sub 2} gas mixture at different deposition bias voltage. Films were deposited onto silicon (1 0 0) and RUS-3 steel substrates at 400 deg. C. Structural, compositional, mechanical and electrochemical characterizations were performed by X-ray diffraction (XRD), elastic forward analysis (EFA), nanoindentation, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), and Tafel polarization curves, respectively. X-ray diffraction patterns show the presence of (1 1 1) and (2 0 0) crystallographic orientations associated to the V-N cubic phase. Nanoindentation measurements revealed that when the bias voltage increases from 0 V to -150 V the hardness and elastic modulus are increased from 11 GPa to 20 GPa and from 187 GPa to 221 GPa, respectively. EIS and Tafel curves showed that the corrosion rate of steel, coated with V-N single layer films deposited without bias voltage, diminishes 90% compared to the steel without this coating. On the other hand, when the V-N coating was deposited at the highest d.c. bias voltage (-150 V), the corrosion rate was greater than in the steel coated with zero-voltage (0 V) V-N films. This last result could be attributed to the formation of porosities produced by the ion bombardment during the deposition process.

  5. Mechanical and electrochemical characterization of vanadium nitride (VN) thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caicedo, J. C.; Zambrano, G.; Aperador, W.; Escobar-Alarcon, L.; Camps, E.

    2011-10-01

    Vanadium nitride (V-N) thin films were grown using a reactive d.c. magnetron sputtering process, from a vanadium target (99.999%) in an Ar/N 2 gas mixture at different deposition bias voltage. Films were deposited onto silicon (1 0 0) and RUS-3 steel substrates at 400 °C. Structural, compositional, mechanical and electrochemical characterizations were performed by X-ray diffraction (XRD), elastic forward analysis (EFA), nanoindentation, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), and Tafel polarization curves, respectively. X-ray diffraction patterns show the presence of (1 1 1) and (2 0 0) crystallographic orientations associated to the V-N cubic phase. Nanoindentation measurements revealed that when the bias voltage increases from 0 V to -150 V the hardness and elastic modulus are increased from 11 GPa to 20 GPa and from 187 GPa to 221 GPa, respectively. EIS and Tafel curves showed that the corrosion rate of steel, coated with V-N single layer films deposited without bias voltage, diminishes 90% compared to the steel without this coating. On the other hand, when the V-N coating was deposited at the highest d.c. bias voltage (-150 V), the corrosion rate was greater than in the steel coated with zero-voltage (0 V) V-N films. This last result could be attributed to the formation of porosities produced by the ion bombardment during the deposition process.

  6. Optimized transparent and heat reflecting oxide and nitride films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howson, R.P.; Ridge, M.I.; Suzuki, K.

    1984-11-01

    Films of indium oxide and indium oxide doped with tin have been produced by reactive planar magnetron sputtering of the pure metal and the alloy and from two metal sources simultaneously. In each case the oxygen partial pressure was controlled to give the higher sheet resistance in the oxide film which was deposited onto a plastic sheet transferred over a drum at ambient temperature. Films prepared under these conditions with the best properties for heat reflecting and visible transparent filters were found to be the oxide of the pure metal. A radio frequency discharge used in conjunction with the magnetron allowed the operating pressure to be considerably reduced, which allowed the preparation of titanium nitride films from a titanium metal target and the construction of simple metal and dielectric-metal-dielectric filters, which match theoretical predictions. A sandwich filter could be made from one titanium target by varying the active gas between oxygen and nitrogen to give a structure of: TiO/sub 2/-TiN-TiO/sub 2/. (A.V.)

  7. Electric Field Stiffening Effect in c-Oriented Aluminum Nitride Piezoelectric Thin Films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Cong; Shang, Zhengguo; Gong, Jia; Zhang, Feng; Zhou, Hong; Tang, Bin; Xu, Yi; Zhang, Chi; Yang, Ya; Mu, Xiaojing

    2018-01-17

    Aluminum nitride offers unique material advantages for the realization of ultrahigh-frequency acoustic devices attributed to its high ratio of stiffness to density, compatibility with harsh environments, and superior thermal properties. Although, to date, aluminum nitride thin films have been widely investigated regarding their electrical and mechanical characteristics under alternating small signal excitation, their ultrathin nature under large bias may also provide novel and useful properties. Here, we present a comprehensive investigation of electric field stiffening effect in c-oriented aluminum nitride piezoelectric thin films. By analyzing resonance characteristics in a 2.5 GHz aluminum nitride-based film bulk acoustic resonator, we demonstrate an up to 10% linear variation in the equivalent stiffness of aluminum nitride piezoelectric thin films when an electric field was applied from -150 to 150 MV/m along the c-axis. Moreover, for the first time, an atomic interaction mechanism is proposed to reveal the nature of electric field stiffening effect, suggesting that the nonlinear variation of the interatomic force induced by electric field modulation is the intrinsic reason for this phenomenon in aluminum nitride piezoelectric thin films. Our work provides vital experimental data and effective theoretical foundation for electric field stiffening effect in aluminum nitride piezoelectric thin films, indicating the huge potential in tunable ultrahigh-frequency microwave devices.

  8. Tuning the optical response in carbon doped boron nitride nanodots

    KAUST Repository

    Mokkath, Junais Habeeb

    2014-09-04

    Time dependent density functional theory and the hybrid B3LYP functional are used to investigate the structural and optical properties of pristine and carbon doped hexagonal boron nitride nanodots. In agreement with recent experiments, the embedded carbon atoms are found to favor nucleation. Our results demonstrate that carbon clusters of different shapes promote an early onset of absorption by generating in-gap states. The nanodots are interesting for opto-electronics due to their tunable optical response in a wide energy window. We identify cluster sizes and shapes with optimal conversion efficiency for solar radiation and a wide absorption range form infrared to ultraviolet. This journal is

  9. Superconducting niobium nitride films deposited by unbalanced magnetron sputtering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olaya, J.J. [Departamento de Ingenieria Mecanica y Mecatronica, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Ciudad Universitaria, Carrera 30 Numero 45-03, Bogota (Colombia); Huerta, L. [Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Circuito exterior s/n, CU Coyoacan, Mexico D.F. 04510 (Mexico); Rodil, S.E. [Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Circuito exterior s/n, CU Coyoacan, Mexico D.F. 04510 (Mexico)], E-mail: ser42@iim.unam.mx; Escamilla, R. [Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Circuito exterior s/n, CU Coyoacan, Mexico D.F. 04510 (Mexico)

    2008-10-01

    Niobium nitride (NbN) thin films were deposited under different configurations of the magnetic field using a magnetron sputtering system. The magnetic field configuration varied from balanced to unbalanced leading to different growth conditions and film properties. The aim of the paper was to identify correlations between deposition conditions, film properties and the electrical properties, specially the superconductive critical temperature (T{sub C}). The results suggested that there is a critical deposition condition, having an optimum ion-atom arrival ratio that promotes a well ordered and textured nanocrystalline structure (cubic phase) with the minimum residual stress and only under this condition a high critical temperature (16K) was obtained. Lower T{sub C} values around 12K were obtained for the NbN samples having a lower degree of structural perfection and texture, and a larger fraction of intergranular voids. On the other hand, analysis of valence-band spectra showed that the contribution of the Nb 4d states remained essentially constant while the higher T{sub C} was correlated to a higher contribution of the N 2p states.

  10. Thermal and quantum phase slips in niobium-nitride nanowires based on suspended carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masuda, Kohei; Takagi, Tasuku; Hashimoto, Takayuki [Department of Applied Physics and Physico-Informatics, Faculty of Science and Technology, Keio University, Hiyoshi, Yokohama 223-8522 (Japan); Moriyama, Satoshi, E-mail: MORIYAMA.Satoshi@nims.go.jp; Komatsu, Katsuyoshi [International Center for Materials Nanoarchitectonics (WPI-MANA), National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), Namiki, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044 (Japan); Morita, Yoshifumi, E-mail: morita@gunma-u.ac.jp [Faculty of Engineering, Gunma University, Kiryu, Gunma 376-8515 (Japan); Miki, Norihisa [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Science and Technology, Keio University, Hiyoshi, Yokohama 223-8522 (Japan); Tanabe, Takasumi [Department of Electronics and Electrical Engineering, Faculty of Science and Technology, Keio University, Hiyoshi, Yokohama 223-8522 (Japan); Maki, Hideyuki, E-mail: maki@appi.keio.ac.jp [Department of Applied Physics and Physico-Informatics, Faculty of Science and Technology, Keio University, Hiyoshi, Yokohama 223-8522 (Japan); JST-PRESTO, Honcho, Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan)

    2016-05-30

    Superconducting nanowires have attracted considerable attention due to their unique quantum-mechanical properties, as well as their potential as next-generation quantum nanodevices, such as single-photon detectors, phase-slip (PS) qubits, and other hybrid structures. In this study, we present the results of one-dimensional (1D) superconductivity in nanowires fabricated by coating suspended carbon nanotubes with a superconducting thin niobium nitride (NbN) film. In the resistance-temperature characteristic curves, hallmarks of 1D superconductivity with PS events are observed with unconventional negative magnetoresistance. We also confirm that a crossover occurs between thermal and quantum PSs as the temperature is lowered.

  11. Step flow versus mosaic film growth in hexagonal boron nitride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jiong; Yeo, Pei Shan Emmeline; Zheng, Yi; Xu, Hai; Gan, Chee Kwan; Sullivan, Michael B; Castro Neto, A H; Loh, Kian Ping

    2013-02-13

    Many emerging applications of hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) in graphene-based nanoelectronics require high-quality monolayers as the ultrathin dielectric. Here, the nucleation and growth of h-BN monolayer on Ru(0001) surface are investigated using scanning tunneling microscopy with a view toward understanding the process of defect formation on a strongly interacted interface. In contrast to homoelemental bonding in graphene, the heteroelemental nature of h-BN gives rise to growth fronts with elemental polarity. This can have consequences in the different stages of film growth, from the nucleation of h-BN magic clusters and their sintering to form compact triangular islands to the growth of patchwork mosaic monolayer with a high density of misfit boundaries. The parallel alignment of triangular islands on the same terrace produces translational fault lines when growth fronts merge, while antiparallel alignment of islands on adjacent terraces produces non-bonded fault lines between domains terminated by like atoms. With these insights into the generation of void defects and fault lines at grain boundaries, we demonstrate a strategy to obtain high-quality h-BN monolayer film based on step flow growth.

  12. Transparent, Conductive Carbon Nanotube Films

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zhuangchun Wu; Zhihong Chen; Xu Du; Jonathan M. Logan; Jennifer Sippel; Maria Nikolou; Katalin Kamaras; John R. Reynolds; David B. Tanner; Arthur F. Hebard; Andrew G. Rinzler

    2004-01-01

    We describe a simple process for the fabrication of ultrathin, transparent, optically homogeneous, electrically conducting films of pure single-walled carbon nanotubes and the transfer of those films...

  13. Fabrication of Microalloy Nitrided Layer on Low Carbon Steel by Nitriding Combined with Surface Nano-Alloying Pretreatment

    OpenAIRE

    Jian Sun; Quantong Yao

    2016-01-01

    Surface mechanical attrition treatment (SMAT) is an effective method to accelerate the nitriding process of metallic materials. In this work, a novel technique named surface nano-alloying (SNA) was developed on the basis of surface mechanical attrition treatment, which was employed as a pretreatment for the nitriding of low carbon steel materials. The microstructure and surface properties of treated samples were investigated by SEM, XRD, TEM and the Vickers hardness test. Experimental results...

  14. Preparation of carbon nanoparticles and carbon nitride from high nitrogen compound

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huynh, My Hang V [Los Alamos, NM; Hiskey, Michael A [Los Alamos, NM

    2009-09-01

    The high-nitrogen compound 3,6-di(azido)-1,2,4,5-tetrazine (DiAT) was synthesized by a relatively simple method and used as a precursor for the preparation of carbon nanospheres and nanopolygons, and nitrogen-rich carbon nitrides.

  15. Direct synthesis of nanoporous carbon nitride fibers using Al-based porous coordination polymers (Al-PCPs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Ming; Reboul, Julien; Furukawa, Shuhei; Radhakrishnan, Logudurai; Zhang, Yuanjian; Srinivasu, Pavuluri; Iwai, Hideo; Wang, Hongjing; Nemoto, Yoshihiro; Suzuki, Norihiro; Kitagawa, Susumu; Yamauchi, Yusuke

    2011-07-28

    We report a new synthetic route for preparation of nanoporous carbon nitride fibers with graphitic carbon nitride polymers, by calcination of Al-based porous coordination polymers (Al-PCPs) with dicyandiamide (DCDA) under a nitrogen atmosphere.

  16. Method for making carbon films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, M.X.

    1999-07-29

    A method for treating an organic polymer material, preferably a vinylidene chloride/vinyl chloride copolymer (Saran) to produce a flat sheet of carbon film material having a high surface area ([approx equal]1000 m[sup 2] /g) suitable as an electrode material for super capacitor applications. The method comprises heating a vinylidene chloride/vinyl chloride copolymer film disposed between two spaced apart graphite or ceramic plates to a first temperature of about 160 C for about 14 hours to form a stabilized vinylidene chloride/vinyl chloride polymer film, thereafter heating the stabilized film to a second temperature of about 750 C in an inert atmosphere for about one hour to form a carbon film; and finally activating the carbon film to increase the surface area by heating the carbon film in an oxidizing atmosphere to a temperature of at least 750--850 C for between 1--6 hours. 2 figs.

  17. Co-implantation of carbon and nitrogen into silicon dioxide for synthesis of carbon nitride materials

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, M B; Nuesca, G; Moore, R

    2002-01-01

    Materials synthesis of carbon nitride has been attempted with co-implantation of carbon and nitrogen into thermally grown SiO sub 2. Following implantation of C and N ions to doses of 10 sup 1 sup 7 cm sup - sup 2 , thermal annealing of the implanted SiO sub 2 sample was conducted at 1000 degree sign C in an N sub 2 ambient. As evidenced in Fourier transform infrared measurements and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, different bonding configurations between C and N, including C-N single bonds, C=N double bonds and C=N triple bonds, were found to develop in the SiO sub 2 film after annealing. Chemical composition profiles obtained with secondary ion mass spectroscopy were correlated with the depth information of the chemical shifts of N 1s core-level electrons, allowing us to examine the formation of C-N bonding for different atomic concentration ratios between N and C. X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy showed no sign of the formation of crystalline C sub 3 N sub 4 precipitates in the SiO ...

  18. Generation and Characteristics of IV-VI transition Metal Nitride and Carbide Nanoparticles using a Reactive Mesoporous Carbon Nitride

    KAUST Repository

    Alhajri, Nawal Saad

    2016-02-22

    Interstitial nitrides and carbides of early transition metals in groups IV–VI exhibit platinum-like electronic structures, which make them promising candidates to replace noble metals in various catalytic reactions. Herein, we present the preparation and characterization of nano-sized transition metal nitries and carbides of groups IV–VI (Ti, V, Nb, Ta, Cr, Mo, and W) using mesoporous graphitic carbon nitride (mpg-C3N4), which not only provides confined spaces for restricting primary particle size but also acts as a chemical source of nitrogen and carbon. We studied the reactivity of the metals with the template under N2 flow at 1023 K while keeping the weight ratio of metal to template constant at unity. The produced nanoparticles were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction, CHN elemental analysis, nitrogen sorption, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. The results show that Ti, V, Nb, Ta, and Cr form nitride phases with face centered cubic structure, whereas Mo and W forme carbides with hexagonal structures. The tendency to form nitride or carbide obeys the free formation energy of the transition metal nitrides and carbides. This method offers the potential to prepare the desired size, shape and phase of transition metal nitrides and carbides that are suitable for a specific reaction, which is the chief objective of materials chemistry.

  19. Magnetic graphitic carbon nitride: its application in the C–H activation of amines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnetic graphitic carbon nitride, Fe@g-C3N4, has been synthesized by adorning graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3N4) support with iron oxide via non-covalent interaction. The magnetically recyclable catalyst showed excellent reactivity for expeditious C-H activation and cyanation of ...

  20. Plasma-Chemical Synthesis of Nanosized Powders-Nitrides, Carbides, Oxides, Carbon Nanotubes and Fullerenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katerina, Zaharieva; Gheorghi, Vissokov; Janis, Grabis; Slavcho, Rakovsky

    2012-11-01

    In this article the plasma-chemical synthesis of nanosized powders (nitrides, carbides, oxides, carbon nanotubes and fullerenes) is reviewed. Nanosized powders - nitrides, carbides, oxides, carbon nanotubes and fullerenes have been successfully produced using different techniques, technological apparatuses and conditions for their plasma-chemical synthesis.

  1. Nanoporous Carbon Nitride: A High Efficient Filter for Seawater Desalination

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Weifeng; Zhou, Hongcai; Zhang, Xiaoming; Zhao, Mingwen

    2015-01-01

    The low efficiency of commercially-used reverse osmosis (RO) membranes has been the main obstacle in seawater desalination application. Here, we report the auspicious performance, through molecular dynamics simulations, of a seawater desalination filter based on the recently-synthesized graphene-like carbon nitride (g-C2N) [Nat. Commun., 2015, 6, 6486]. Taking advantage of the inherent nanopores and excellent mechanical properties of g-C2N filter, highly efficient seawater desalination can be achieved by modulating the nanopores under tensile strain. The water permeability can be improved by two orders of magnitude compared to RO membranes, which offers a promising approach to the global water shortage solution.

  2. Cavity induced fluorescence enhancement of graphitic carbon nitride submicron flakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veluthandath, Aneesh Vincent; Reddy Bongu, Sudhakara; Ramaprabhu, Sundara; Ballabh Bisht, Prem

    2017-01-01

    Graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3N4), which is structurally analogous to graphene, shows excellent fluorescent yield. Sharp ripple structure is observed in the fluorescence spectra of g-C3N4 flakes grafted on the surface of single polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) microspheres. The intensities and the number of modes of these structures nonlinearly vary with the size of micro-cavity and the coupled power. Theoretical simulations carried out with the help of Mie theory show that the ripple structure is due to modulation of the fluorescence by the whispering gallery modes (WGMs) of the spherical microcavity.

  3. Thin Film Deposition of Boron Nitride by Femtosecond Laser Pulses with Different Wavelengths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyake, Hidekazu; Luculescu, Catalin; Sato, Shunichi

    2002-12-01

    Thin film deposition of hexagonal boron nitride was carried out using fundamental and second harmonic waves of a femtosecond Ti:sapphire laser. Morphological investigation of the deposited thin films showed that the number of fragments and the ablation threshold were smaller in the case of second harmonic wave ablation than fundamental wave ablation.

  4. Visible-light photocatalytic activity of nitrided TiO{sub 2} thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camps, Enrique, E-mail: enrique.camps@inin.gob.mx [Departamento de Fisica, Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Apartado Postal 18-1027, Mexico DF 11801 (Mexico); Escobar-Alarcon, L. [Departamento de Fisica, Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Apartado Postal 18-1027, Mexico DF 11801 (Mexico); Camacho-Lopez, Marco Antonio [Laboratorio de Investigacion y Desarrollo de Materiales Avanzados, Facultad de Quimica, UAEM, km 14.5 Carretera Toluca-Atlacomulco (Mexico); Casados, Dora A. Solis [Centro de Investigacion en Quimica Sustentable, Facultad de Quimica, UAEM, km 14.5 Carretera Toluca-Atlacomulco (Mexico)

    2010-10-25

    TiO{sub 2} thin films have been applied in UV-light photocatalysis. Nevertheless visible-light photocatalytic activity would make this material more attractive for applications. In this work we present results on the modification of titanium oxide (anatase) sol-gel thin films, via a nitriding process using a microwave plasma source. After the treatment in the nitrogen plasma, the nitrogen content in the TiO{sub 2} films varied in the range from 14 up to 28 at%. The titanium oxide films and the nitrided ones were characterized by XPS, micro-Raman spectroscopy and UV-vis spectroscopy. Photocatalytic activity tests were done using a Methylene Blue dye solution, and as catalyst TiO{sub 2} and nitrided TiO{sub 2} films. The irradiation of films was carried out with a lamp with emission in the visible (without UV). The results showed that the nitrided TiO{sub 2} films had photocatalytic activity, while the unnitrided films did not.

  5. Growth and properties of subnanometer thin titanium nitride films

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kovalgin, Alexeij Y.; Van Hao, B.; Schmitz, Jurriaan; Wolters, Robertus A.M.

    2014-01-01

    This research brings new insights into the relation between properties of ultra-thin conductive metal nitrides made by atomic layer deposition (ALD) and their possible industrial applications. The advantage of conductive nitrides over pure metals is (i) better established ALD processes allowing

  6. Carbon nitride transparent counter electrode prepared by magnetron sputtering for a dye-sensitized solar cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaoyu Wu

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nitride (CNx films supported on fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO glass are prepared by radio frequency magnetron sputtering, in which the film thicknesses are 90–100 nm, and the element components in the CNx films are in the range of x = 0.15–0.25. The as-prepared CNx is for the first time used as counter electrode for dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs, and show a preparation-temperature dependent electrochemical performance. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS demonstrates that there is a higher proportion of sp2 CC and sp3 CN hybridized bonds in CNx-500 (the sample treated at 500 °C than in CNx-RT (the sample without a heat treatment. It is proposed that the sp2 CC and sp3 C–N hybridized bonds in the CNx films are helpful for improving the electrocatalytic activities in DSSCs. Meanwhile, Raman spectra also prove that CNx-500 has a relatively high graphitization level that means an increasing electrical conductivity. This further explains why the sample after the heat treatment has a higher electrochemical performance in DSSCs. In addition, the as-prepared CNx counter electrodes have a good light transmittance in the visible light region. The results are meaningful for developing low-cost metal-free transparent counter electrodes for DSSCs. Keywords: Solar cells, Counter electrodes, Carbon nitride, Electrocatalysis, Magnetron sputtering

  7. Intrinsic half-metallicity in fractal carbon nitride honeycomb lattices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Aizhu; Zhao, Mingwen

    2015-09-14

    Fractals are natural phenomena that exhibit a repeating pattern "exactly the same at every scale or nearly the same at different scales". Defect-free molecular fractals were assembled successfully in a recent work [Shang et al., Nature Chem., 2015, 7, 389-393]. Here, we adopted the feature of a repeating pattern in searching two-dimensional (2D) materials with intrinsic half-metallicity and high stability that are desirable for spintronics applications. Using first-principles calculations, we demonstrate that the electronic properties of fractal frameworks of carbon nitrides have stable ferromagnetism accompanied by half-metallicity, which are highly dependent on the fractal structure. The ferromagnetism increases gradually with the increase of fractal order. The Curie temperature of these metal-free systems estimated from Monte Carlo simulations is considerably higher than room temperature. The stable ferromagnetism, intrinsic half-metallicity, and fractal characteristics of spin distribution in the carbon nitride frameworks open an avenue for the design of metal-free magnetic materials with exotic properties.

  8. Oxidized Quasi-Carbon Nitride Quantum Dots Inhibit Ice Growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Guoying; Song, Zhiping; Geng, Hongya; Gao, Dong; Liu, Kai; Wu, Shuwang; Rao, Wei; Guo, Liangqia; Wang, Jianjun

    2017-07-01

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs), a type of high-efficiency but expensive and often unstable biological antifreeze, have stimulated substantial interest in the search for synthetic mimics. However, only a few reported AFP mimics display thermal hysteresis, and general criteria for the design of AFP mimics remain unknown. Herein, oxidized quasi-carbon nitride quantum dots (OQCNs) are synthesized through an up-scalable bottom-up approach. They exhibit thermal-hysteresis activity, an ice-crystal shaping effect, and activity on ice-recrystallization inhibition. In the cryopreservation of sheep red blood cells, OQCNs improve cell recovery to more than twice that obtained by using a commercial cryoprotectant (hydroxyethyl starch) without the addition of any organic solvents. It is shown experimentally that OQCNs preferably bind onto the ice-crystal surface, which leads to the inhibition of ice-crystal growth due to the Kelvin effect. Further analysis reveals that the match of the distance between two neighboring tertiary N atoms on OQCNs with the repeated spacing of O atoms along the c-axis on the primary prism plane of ice lattice is critical for OQCNs to bind preferentially on ice crystals. Here, the application of graphitic carbon nitride derivatives for cryopreservation is reported for the first time. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Nano Indentation Inspection of the Mechanical Properties of Gold Nitride Thin Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armen Verdyan

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available The morphology and the local mechanical properties of gold nitride thin films were studied by atomic force microscope (AFM. Gold nitride films were deposited for the first time on silicon substrate without any buffer layer at room temperature by reactive pulsed laser ablation deposition (RPLD. The films were fabricated on (100 Si wafers by RPLD technique in which KrF excimer laser was used to ablate a gold target in N2 atmosphere (0.1 GPa-100 Pa and ambient temperature. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM and atomic force microscopy inspections showed that the films were flat plane with rms roughness in the range of 35.1 nm-3.6 nm, depending on the deposition pressure. Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS and energy dispersion spectroscopy (EDS used to detect the nitrogen concentration in the films, have revealed a composition close to Au3N. The film

  10. Carbon growth from gas phase on various modifications of boron nitride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fedoseev, D.V.; Kochergina, A.A.; Bukhovets, V.L.; Vnukov, S.P. (AN SSSR, Moscow. Inst. Fizicheskoj Khimii)

    1983-05-01

    It is shown that at 450 deg C and 10 Torr the rate of carbon deposition on dense modifications of boron nitride-sphalerite- and wurtzite-like ones (analogues of diamond and lonsdaleite) by far surpasses the rate of growth on graphite-like boron nitride. Using the X-ray diffraction method and selective plasma etching of graphite a possibility of building-up thin diamond layers on the surface of dense modifications of boron nitride is shown.

  11. Chemical bonding and humidity sensing properties of amorphous carbon nitride (a-CNx) by acetylene gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aziz, Siti Aisyah Abd; Purhanudin, Noorain; Awang, Rozidawati

    2017-05-01

    Amorphous carbon nitride (a-CNx) thin films were deposited by radio frequency plasma enhance chemical vapor deposition (RF-PECVD) using a fixed mixture of acetylene (C2H2) at 20 sccm and nitrogen (N2) gases at 50 sccm. The films were deposited at different RF power of 60, 70, 80, 90 and 100 W. The deposition pressure, deposition time and substrate temperature were kept constant at 0.8 mbar, 30 minutes and 100°C, respectively. The chemical bonding of the a-CNx thin films was characterized using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and its sensing properties was determined using a home built humidity sensor system. The increase of RF powers leads to an increment of formation of double (C=N) and triple (C≡N) bonds as compared to a-CNx deposited using methane (CH4) or ethane (C2H6) gas. This is due to a higher ratio of C to H atoms in C2H2. The humidity sensing performance show the sensitivity of the films is the highest at low deposition power in changes of relative humidity (%RH). The a-CNx thin film show good repeatability and high sensitivity as a humidity sensing materials which prepared at low RF power.

  12. Group III-nitride thin films grown using MBE and bismuth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisielowski, Christian K.; Rubin, Michael

    2000-01-01

    The present invention comprises growing gallium nitride films in the presence of bismuth using MBE at temperatures of about 1000 K or less. The present invention further comprises the gallium nitride films fabricated using the inventive fabrication method. The inventive films may be doped with magnesium or other dopants. The gallium nitride films were grown on sapphire substrates using a hollow anode Constricted Glow Discharge nitrogen plasma source. When bismuth was used as a surfactant, two-dimensional gallium nitride crystal sizes ranging between 10 .mu.m and 20 .mu.m were observed. This is 20 to 40 times larger than crystal sizes observed when GaN films were grown under similar circumstances but without bismuth. It is thought that the observed increase in crystal size is due bismuth inducing an increased surface diffusion coefficient for gallium. The calculated value of 4.7.times.10.sup.-7 cm.sup.2 /sec. reveals a virtual substrate temperature of 1258 K which is 260 degrees higher than the actual one.

  13. Microstructure characterization of nitride thin films and heterostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Lin

    This dissertation has involved the microstructural characterization of epitaxial III-nitride thin films and heterostructures, and correlation with growth conditions and electronic properties. For AlGaN/GaN high-electron-mobility-transistor (HEMT) structures, when the AlN nucleation layer growth was in the N-rich growth regime, a sharp GaN/AlN interface was observed together with a high threading dislocation (TD) density in the GaN epilayer. When the Al/N flux ratio was increased, the AlN growth was in an intermediate growth regime, resulting in the initial formation of cubic-GaN but lower TD density in the subsequent GaN layer. The presence of c-GaN correlated with an abrupt change in isolation current from 0.089nA to 4.2nA, while the decrease of TD density was related to an increase in the Hall electron mobility. For InAlN/GaN HEMT structures, a vertical honeycomb structure within the InAlN layers was observed. The phase separation was two-dimensional in nature, occurring on the growth surface, and aligned perpendicular to and directions. Development of this honeycomb structure is likely to adversely affect the distribution of any two-dimensional electron gas at the InAlN/GaN interface and would thus be expected to degrade device conductivity. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observations of GaN QDs embedded in an AlN matrix showed that the truncated pyramid GaN QDs were dislocation-free. They tended to nucleate beside an edge component TD, with GaN wetting layer thickness of 2-2.5 ML in between. Observations of InN QDs and islands grown on Ga-polar GaN were consistent with a three-dimensional growth mode, with periodic arrays of misfit dislocations at the InN/GaN interface that provided strain relief for the relaxed QDs. The majority of the InN islands were associated with TDs in the GaN buffer layer having edge-type components. The density of TDs in GaN, particularly edge/mixed-type TDs, can be substantially reduced by overgrowth on a porous TiN network

  14. Photocatalytic CO₂ Reduction by Mesoporous Polymeric Carbon Nitride Photocatalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasbihi, Minoo; Acharjya, Amitava; Thomas, Arne; Reli, Martin; AmbroŽová, Nela; Kočcí, Kamila; Schomäcker, Reinhard

    2018-08-01

    In this paper, a sol-gel derived mesoporous polymeric carbon nitride has been investigated as a photocatalyst for CO2 photocatalytic reduction. Noble-metal Pt nanoparticles were deposited on carbon nitride (sg-CN) in order to investigate the performance of both Pt-sg-CN and sg-CN for photocatalytic CO2 reduction. Physicochemical properties of prepared nanocomposites were comprehensively characterized by using powder XRD, N2 physisorption, UV-Vis DRS, ICP-AES, FTIR, solid-state NMR, SEM, TEM and photoelectrochemical measurements. Compared with pure sg-CN, the resulting Pt-loaded sg-CN (Pt-sg-CN) exhibited significant improvement on the CO2 photocatalytic reduction to CH4 in the presence of water vapor at ambient condition under UV irradiation. 1.5 wt.% Pt-loaded sg-CN (Pt-sg-CN) photocatalyst formed the highest methane yield of 13.9 μmol/gcat. after 18 h of light irradiation, which was almost 2 times and 32 times improvement in comparison to pure sg-CN and commercial TiO2 Evonik P25, respectively. The substantial photocatalytic activity of Pt-sg-CN photocatalyst for the yield product of the CO2 photocatalytic reduction was attributed to the efficient interfacial transfer of photogenerated electrons from sg-CN to Pt due to the lower Fermi level of Pt in the Pt-sg-CN hybrid heterojunctions as also evidenced by photo-electrochemical measurements. This resulted in the reduction of electron-hole pairs recombination for effective spatial charge separation, consequently increasing the photocatalytic efficiency.

  15. Effect of contact metals on the piezoelectric properties of aluminum nitride thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harman, J.; Kabulski, A.; Pagán, V. R.; Famouri, P.; Kasarla, K. R.; Rodak, L. E.; Peter Hensel, J.; Korakakis, D.

    2008-01-01

    The converse piezoelectric response of aluminum nitride evaluated using standard metal insulator semiconductor structures has been found to exhibit a linear dependence on the work function of the metal used as the top electrode. The apparent d33 of the 150–1100 nm films also depends on the dc bias applied to the samples.

  16. Effect of contact metals on the piezoelectric properties of aluminum nitride thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harman, J.P.; Kabulski, A. (West Virginia U., Morgantown, WV); Pagan, V.R. (West Virginia U., Morgantown, WV); Famouri, K. (West Virginia U., Morgantown, WV); Kasarla, K.R.; Rodak, L.E. (West Virginia U., Morgantown, WV); Hensel, J.P.; Korakakis, D.

    2008-07-01

    The converse piezoelectric response of aluminum nitride evaluated using standard metal insulator semiconductor structures has been found to exhibit a linear dependence on the work function of the metal used as the top electrode. The apparent d33 of the 150–1100 nm films also depends on the dc bias applied to the samples.

  17. A mathematical model and simulation results of plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition of silicon nitride films

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Konakov, S.A.; Krzhizhanovskaya, V.V.

    2015-01-01

    We developed a mathematical model of Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition (PECVD) of silicon nitride thin films from SiH4-NH3-N2-Ar mixture, an important application in modern materials science. Our multiphysics model describes gas dynamics, chemical physics, plasma physics and electrodynamics.

  18. Quantitative Auger depth profiling of LPCVD and PECVD silicon nitride films

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keim, Enrico G.; Aïte, Kamal; Aïte, Kamal

    1989-01-01

    Thin silicon nitride films (100–210 nm) with refractive indices varying from 1.90 to 2.10 were deposited on silicon substrates by low pressure chemical vapour deposition (LPCVD) and plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD). Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS), ellipsometry,

  19. Nanostructures based in boro nitride thin films deposited by PLD onto Si/Si3N4/DLC substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Román, W. S.; Riascos, H.; Caicedo, J. C.; Ospina, R.; Tirado-Mejía, L.

    2009-05-01

    Diamond-like carbon and boron nitride were deposited like nanostructered bilayer on Si/Si3N4 substrate, both with (100) crystallographic orientation, these films were deposited through pulsed laser technique (Nd: YAG: 8 Jcm-2, 9ns). Graphite (99.99%) and boron nitride (99.99%) targets used to growth the films in argon atmosphere. The thicknesses of bilayer were determined with a perfilometer, active vibration modes were analyzed using infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), finding bands associated around 1400 cm-1 for B - N bonding and bands around 1700 cm-1 associated with C=C stretching vibrations of non-conjugated alkenes and azometinic groups, respectively. The crystallites of thin films were analyzed using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and determinated the h-BN (0002), α-Si3N4 (101) phases. The aim of this study is to relate the dependence on physical and chemical characteristics of the system Si/Si3N4/DLC/BN with gas pressure adjusted at the 1.33, 2.67 and 5.33 Pa values.

  20. Nickel Decorated on Phosphorous-Doped Carbon Nitride as an Efficient Photocatalyst for Reduction of Nitrobenzenes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Anurag Kumar; Pawan Kumar; Chetan Joshi; Manvi Manchanda; Rabah Boukherroub; Suman L Jain

    2016-01-01

      Nickel nanoparticle-decorated phosphorous-doped graphitic carbon nitride (Ni@g-PC3N4) was synthesized and used as an efficient photoactive catalyst for the reduction of various nitrobenzenes under visible light irradiation...

  1. Ion-induced stress relaxation during the growth of cubic boron nitride thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abendroth, B.E.

    2004-08-01

    in this thesis the deposition of cubic boron nitride films by magnetron sputtering is described. The deposition process is analyzed by Langmuir-probe measurement and energy resolved mass spectroscopy. the films are studied by stress measurement, spectroscopic ellipsometry, infrared spectroscopy, elastic recoil detection analysis, Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy, X-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and transmission electron microscopy. Discussed are the stress relaxation and the microstructure and bonding characteristics together with the effects of ion bombardement. (HSI)

  2. Electrical properties of titanium nitride films synthesized by reactive magnetron sputtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, W. M.; Gumarov, A. I.; Vakhitov, I. R.; Yanilkin, I. V.; Kiiamov, A. G.; Kharintsev, S. S.; Nikitin, S. I.; Tagirov, L. R.; Yusupov, R. V.

    2017-11-01

    Reactive dc magnetron sputtering was employed to produce thin films of titanium nitride using titanium metallic target, argon as the plasma gas and nitrogen as the reactive gas. A set of the films was studied deposited on the Si, fused silica and crystalline (001) MgO substrates with various deposition conditions. The films deposited on the Si and SiO2 substrates are polycrystalline while deposited at slow rate to the heated to 600°C MgO substrate are highly epitaxial according both to XRD and LEED data. Electrical resistivity of the films was measured by means of the four-probe van der Pauw method.

  3. Vibrational Spectroscopy of Chemical Species in Silicon and Silicon-Rich Nitride Thin Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirill O. Bugaev

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Vibrational properties of hydrogenated silicon-rich nitride (SiN:H of various stoichiometry (0.6≤≤1.3 and hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H films were studied using Raman spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Furnace annealing during 5 hours in Ar ambient at 1130∘C and pulse laser annealing were applied to modify the structure of films. Surprisingly, after annealing with such high-thermal budget, according to the FTIR data, the nearly stoichiometric silicon nitride film contains hydrogen in the form of Si–H bonds. From analysis of the FTIR data of the Si–N bond vibrations, one can conclude that silicon nitride is partly crystallized. According to the Raman data a-Si:H films with hydrogen concentration 15% and lower contain mainly Si–H chemical species, and films with hydrogen concentration 30–35% contain mainly Si–H2 chemical species. Nanosecond pulse laser treatments lead to crystallization of the films and its dehydrogenization.

  4. Selective and Regenerative Carbon Dioxide Capture by Highly Polarizing Porous Carbon Nitride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Youngtak; Le, Viet-Duc; Maiti, Uday Narayan; Hwang, Jin Ok; Park, Woo Jin; Lim, Joonwon; Lee, Kyung Eun; Bae, Youn-Sang; Kim, Yong-Hyun; Kim, Sang Ouk

    2015-09-22

    Energy-efficient CO2 capture is a stringent demand for green and sustainable energy supply. Strong adsorption is desirable for high capacity and selective capture at ambient conditions but unfavorable for regeneration of adsorbents by a simple pressure control process. Here we present highly regenerative and selective CO2 capture by carbon nitride functionalized porous reduced graphene oxide aerogel surface. The resultant structure demonstrates large CO2 adsorption capacity at ambient conditions (0.43 mmol·g(-1)) and high CO2 selectivity against N2 yet retains regenerability to desorb 98% CO2 by simple pressure swing. First-principles thermodynamics calculations revealed that microporous edges of graphitic carbon nitride offer the optimal CO2 adsorption by induced dipole interaction and allows excellent CO2 selectivity as well as facile regenerability. This work identifies a customized route to reversible gas capture using metal-free, two-dimensional carbonaceous materials, which can be extended to other useful applications.

  5. Effects of ambient conditions on the adhesion of cubic boron nitride films on silicon substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cardinale, G.F.; Howitt, D.G. [California Univ., Davis, CA (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Mirkarimi, P.B.; McCarty, K.F.; Klaus, E.J.; Medlin, D.L. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States)

    1994-08-01

    Effect of environmental conditions on cubic boron nitride (cBN) film adhesion to silicon substrates was studied. cBN films were deposited onto (100)-oriented silicon substrates by ion-assisted pulsed laser deposition. Irradiating ions were mixtures of nitrogen with argon, krypton, and xenon. Under room-ambient conditions, the films delaminated in the following time order: N/Xe, N/Kr, and N/Ar. cBN films deposited using N/Xe ion-assisted deposition were exposed to four environmental conditions for several weeks: a 1-mTorr vacuum, high humidity, dry oxygen, and dry nitrogen. Films exposed to the humid environment delaminated whereas those stored under vacuum or in dry gases did not. Films stored in dry nitrogen were removed after nearly two weeks and placed in the high-humidity chamber; these films subsequently delaminated within 14 hours.

  6. Hydrogen Storage in Boron Nitride and Carbon Nanomaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeo Oku

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Boron nitride (BN nanomaterials were synthesized from LaB6 and Pd/boron powder, and the hydrogen storage was investigated by differential thermogravimetric analysis, which showed possibility of hydrogen storage of 1–3 wt%. The hydrogen gas storage in BN and carbon (C clusters was also investigated by molecular orbital calculations, which indicated possible hydrogen storage of 6.5 and 4.9 wt%, respectively. Chemisorption calculation was also carried out for B24N24 cluster with changing endohedral elements in BN cluster to compare the bonding energy at nitrogen and boron, which showed that Li is a suitable element for hydrogenation to the BN cluster. The BN cluster materials would store H2 molecule easier than carbon fullerene materials, and its stability for high temperature would be good. Molecular dynamics calculations showed that a H2 molecule remains stable in a C60 cage at 298 K and 0.1 MPa, and that pressures over 5 MPa are needed to store H2 molecules in the C60 cage.

  7. Investigation on the structural and mechanical properties of anti-sticking sputtered tungsten chromium nitride films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Tai-Nan [Chemical Engineering Division, Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, Taiwan, ROC (China); Han, Sheng [Department of Leisure and Recreation Management, National Taichung University of Science and Technology, Taiwan, ROC (China); Weng, Ko-Wei, E-mail: kowei@nqu.edu.tw [Department of Electronic Engineering, National Quemoy University, Taiwan, ROC (China); Lee, Chin-Tan [Department of Electronic Engineering, National Quemoy University, Taiwan, ROC (China)

    2013-02-01

    Tungsten chromium nitride (WCrN) thin films are prepared by dual-gun co-sputter process. As the surface coatings on the molding die for glass forming, WCrN films show less deterioration at high temperature than the conventional CrN coating. WCrN thin films are deposited via the reactive co-sputtering of Cr/W targets. The working pressure is kept at 2.66 Pa and the argon/nitrogen ratio is 10. Applied power of chromium is fixed and the applied power of tungsten is varied. Experimental results indicate that the atomic ratio of tungsten in the films increases with the applied power of tungsten. The dominant crystalline phase is chromium nitride when the tungsten target power is below 100 W, while tungsten nitride dominates in the film structure when the tungsten target power is beyond 200 W. A dense structure with much finer particles is developed as the tungsten power is 200 W. As the power is increased to 300 W, the particles become coarser in size. The film roughness exhibits a decreasing trend at low tungsten power and then increases as the tungsten power increased up to 300 and 400 W, presumably due to the phase change from chromium nitrides to tungsten nitrides. Further annealing of the WCrN thin films is simulated as the glass molding condition to check the anti-sticking property which is a critical requirement in molding die surface coating application. The WCrN thin film coating shows good anti-sticking property at 400 °C annealing when the tungsten target power is 200 W. - Highlights: ► WCrN films are deposited by dual sputtering of pure Cr and W targets. ► The covalent bonding character of WCrN films explains the difference in hardness. ► WCrN (200 W W-target-power/400 °C-annealing) exhibits the best anti-sticking performance.

  8. Tribological behavior of DLC films deposited on nitrided and post-oxidized stainless steel by PACVD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalibon, E. L.; Brühl, S. P.; Heim, D.

    2012-06-01

    In this work, the tribological behavior and adhesion of DLC films deposited by PACVD on AISI 420 martensitic stainless steel was evaluated. Prior to DLC deposition, the samples were nitrided and some of them also post-oxidized. The films were characterized by Raman and EDS, microhardness was assessed with Vickers indenter and the microstructure was analyzed by OM, SEM, FIB. Fretting and linear reciprocating sliding tests were performed using a WC ball as counterpart, and the adhesion of the DLC films was characterized using the Scratch Test and Rockwell C indentation. Corrosion behavior was evaluated by the Salt Spray Fog Test. The film showed a hardness of only about 1500 HV but it was about 15-20 microns thick. The results of the mechanical tests showed that pre-treatments (nitriding and oxidizing) of the substrate did not have a big influence in the tribological behavior of the coating. However, the nitriding treatment before the DLC coating process reduced the interface stress and enhanced the adhesion. Additionally, all the films evidenced good corrosion resistance in a saline environment, better than the AISI 420 itself.

  9. Germanium nitride and oxynitride films for surface passivation of Ge radiation detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maggioni, G., E-mail: maggioni@lnl.infn.it [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia G. Galilei, Università di Padova, Via Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Viale dell’Universita’2, I-35020 Legnaro, Padova (Italy); Carturan, S. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia G. Galilei, Università di Padova, Via Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Viale dell’Universita’2, I-35020 Legnaro, Padova (Italy); Fiorese, L. [Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Viale dell’Universita’2, I-35020 Legnaro, Padova (Italy); Dipartimento di Ingegneria dei Materiali e delle Tecnologie Industriali, Università di Trento, Via Mesiano 77, I-38050 Povo, Trento (Italy); Pinto, N.; Caproli, F. [Scuola di Scienze e Tecnologie, Sezione di Fisica, Università di Camerino, Via Madonna delle Carceri 9, Camerino (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Perugia, Perugia (Italy); Napoli, D.R. [Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Viale dell’Universita’2, I-35020 Legnaro, Padova (Italy); Giarola, M.; Mariotto, G. [Dipartimento di Informatica—Università di Verona, Strada le Grazie 15, I-37134 Verona (Italy)

    2017-01-30

    Highlights: • A surface passivation method for HPGe radiation detectors is proposed. • Highly insulating GeNx- and GeOxNy-based layers are deposited at room temperature. • Deposition parameters affect composition and electrical properties of the layers. • The improved performance of a GeNx-coated HPGe diode is assessed. - Abstract: This work reports a detailed investigation of the properties of germanium nitride and oxynitride films to be applied as passivation layers to Ge radiation detectors. All the samples were deposited at room temperature by reactive RF magnetron sputtering. A strong correlation was found between the deposition parameters, such as deposition rate, substrate bias and atmosphere composition, and the oxygen and nitrogen content in the film matrix. We found that all the films were very poorly crystallized, consisting of very small Ge nitride and oxynitride nanocrystallites, and electrically insulating, with the resistivity changing from three to six orders of magnitude as a function of temperature. A preliminary test of these films as passivation layers was successfully performed by depositing a germanium nitride film on the intrinsic surface of a high-purity germanium (HPGe) diode and measuring the improved performance, in terms of leakage current, with respect to a reference passivated diode. All these interesting results allow us to envisage the application of this coating technology to the surface passivation of germanium-based radiation detectors.

  10. Bacterial adhesion studies on titanium, titanium nitride and modified hydroxyapatite thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeyachandran, Y.L. [Department of Physics, Bharathiar University, Coimbatore 641 046, Tamil Nadu (India); Venkatachalam, S. [Department of Physics, Bharathiar University, Coimbatore 641 046, Tamil Nadu (India); Karunagaran, B. [Department of Physics, Bharathiar University, Coimbatore 641 046, Tamil Nadu (India); Narayandass, Sa.K. [Department of Physics, Bharathiar University, Coimbatore 641 046, Tamil Nadu (India)]. E-mail: sakndass@yahoo.com; Mangalaraj, D. [Department of Physics, Bharathiar University, Coimbatore 641 046, Tamil Nadu (India); Bao, C.Y. [West China College of Stomatology, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041 (China); Zhang, C.L. [West China College of Stomatology, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041 (China)

    2007-01-15

    A qualitative study on adhesion of the oral bacteria Porphyromonas gingivalis on titanium (Ti), titanium nitride (TiN), fluorine modified hydroxyapatite (FHA) and zinc modified FHA (Zn-FHA) thin films is investigated. Ti and TiN thin films were deposited by DC magnetron sputtering and hydroxyapatite-based films were prepared by solgel method. The crystalline structure, optical characteristics, chemical composition and surface topography of the films were studied by XRD, optical transmission, XPS, EDAX and AFM measurements. The predominant crystallite orientation in the Ti and TiN films was along (002) and (111) of hcp and cubic structures, respectively. The Ti : O : N composition ratio in the surface of the Ti and TiN films was found to be 7 : 21 : 1 and 3 : 8 : 2, respectively. The atomic concentration ratio (Zn + Ca) / P in Zn-FHA film was found to be 1.74 whereby the Zn replaced 3.2% of Ca. The rough surface feature in modified HA films was clearly observed in the SEM images and the surface roughness (rms) of Ti and TiN films was 2.49 and 3.5 nm, respectively, as observed using AFM. The film samples were sterilized, treated in the bacteria culture medium, processed and analyzed using SEM. Surface roughness of the films was found to have least influence on the bacterial adhesion. More bacteria were observed on the TiN film with oxide nitride surface layer and less number of adhered bacteria was noticed on the Ti film with native surface oxide layer and on Zn-FHA film.

  11. Vanadium and vanadium nitride thin films grown by high power impulse magnetron sputtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajihoseini, H.; Gudmundsson, J. T.

    2017-12-01

    Thin vanadium and vanadium nitride films were grown on SiO2 by non-reactive and reactive high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS), respectively. The film properties were compared to films grown by conventional dc magnetron sputtering (dcMS) at similar conditions. We explored the influence of the stationary magnetic confinement field strength on the film properties and the process parameters. The deposition rate is much lower for non-reactive sputtering by HiPIMS than for dcMS. Furthermore, for both dcMS and HiPIMS the deposition rate is lower for strong magnetic confinement. Structural characterization was carried out using x-ray diffraction and reflection methods as well as atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscope. Both dcMS and HiPIMS grown vanadium films are polycrystalline with similar grain size regardless of magnetic field strength. For dcMS grown vanadium films the surface roughness is higher when a strong magnetic field is used. For both non-reactive growth of vanadium and reactive growth of vanadium nitride the HiPIMS process produces denser films with lower surface roughness than dcMS does. Lowering the magnetic field strength increases the deposition rate significantly for reactive HiPIMS while it increases only slightly in the reactive dcMS case. The films grown by HiPIMS with strong magnetic confinement exhibit higher density and lower roughness. We find that the operating pressure, growth temperature, discharge voltage and film thickness has influence on the properties of HiPIMS grown vanadium nitride films. The films are denser when grown at high temperature, high discharge voltage and low pressure. The density of those films is lower for thicker films and thicker films consist of larger grain size. For all the films explored, higher density coincides with lower surface roughness. Thus, the deposition method, magnetic field strength, growth temperature, discharge voltage, film thickness and growth pressure have a significant

  12. Study of magnetic iron nitride thin films deposited by high power impulse magnetron sputtering

    OpenAIRE

    Tayal, Akhil; Gupta, Mukul; Gupta, Ajay; Ganesan, V.; Behera, Layanta; Singh, Surendra; Basu, Saibal

    2014-01-01

    In this work, we studied phase formation, structural and magnetic properties of iron-nitride (Fe-N) thin films deposited using high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) and direct current magnetron sputtering (dc-MS). The nitrogen partial pressure during deposition was systematically varied both in HiPIMS and dc-MS. Resulting Fe-N films were characterized for their microstructure, magnetic properties and nitrogen concentration. We found that HiPIMS deposited Fe-N films show a globular ...

  13. Synthesis and structural characterization of boron nitride thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elena, M. (CMBM, 38050 Povo (Trento) (Italy)); Guzman, L. (CMBM, 38050 Povo (Trento) (Italy)); Calliari, L. (CMBM, 38050 Povo (Trento) (Italy)); Moro, L. (CMBM, 38050 Povo (Trento) (Italy)); Steiner, A. (Institute for Advanced Materials, Joint Research Centre, Commission of the European Communities, 21020 Ispra (Vatican City State, Holy See) (Italy)); Miotello, A. (Department of Physics, Trento Univ. (Italy)); Bonelli, M. (Department of Physics, Trento Univ. (Italy)); Capelletti, R. (Department of Physics, Parma Univ. (Italy)); Ossi, P.M. (Dipartimento di Ingegneria Nucleare del Politecnico, Milano (Italy))

    1994-12-15

    The purpose of this paper is to present first results of an investigation on the properties of boron-nitrogen thin films obtained by different deposition techniques. Films of different stoichiometries were produced on silicon substrates using r.f. magnetron sputtering and ion-beam-assisted deposition.In order to study the influence of the deposition process parameters on the film properties, the films were characterized by scanning electron microscopy. Auger electron spectroscopy, secondary neutral mass spectrometry, IR spectroscopy and nanoindentation.With the chosen experimental conditions, only hexagonal BN is formed. A considerable dependence of hardness of film microstructure has been evidenced. ((orig.))

  14. Photoelectrochemical characterization of p-type silicon electrodes covered with tunnelling nitride dielectric films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lana-Villarreal, T. [Laboratory of Electrocatalysis, UMR 6503, Universite de Poitiers, 40 Avenue du Recteur Pineau, 86022 Poitiers Cedex (France); Departament de Quimica Fisica and Institut Universitari d' Electroquimica, Universitat d' Alacant, Ap. 99, E-03080 Alacant (Spain); Straboni, A. [Laboratoire de Metallurgie Physique, UMR 6630, SP2MI, Universite de Poitiers, Boulevard Marie et Pierre Curie, Teleport 2, BP 30179, 86962 Futuroscope, Chasseneuil Cedex (France); Pichon, Luc [Laboratoire de Metallurgie Physique, UMR 6630, SP2MI, Universite de Poitiers, Boulevard Marie et Pierre Curie, Teleport 2, BP 30179, 86962 Futuroscope, Chasseneuil Cedex (France); Alonso-Vante, N. [Laboratory of Electrocatalysis, UMR 6503, Universite de Poitiers, 40 Avenue du Recteur Pineau, 86022 Poitiers Cedex (France)]. E-mail: nicolas.alonso.vante@univ-poitiers.fr

    2007-06-25

    The photoelectrochemical behaviour of p-Si(100) single crystal electrodes in aqueous solution, covered with a very thin nitride film, was studied. The silicon surface nitridation was achieved in a N{sub 2}-H{sub 2} plasma at floating potential. The as-grown insulating Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} layers, with thickness inferior to 3.1 nm, allow the electrons to tunnel in the presence of an electric field by the Fowler-Nordheim tunnelling mechanism. However, the p-Si(100)/Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}-electrolyte interface generated lower photocurrent densities than those generated by naked p-Si(100) electrodes. In contrast, the nitridated silicon surface displayed a significant stability improvement in aqueous electrolyte (neutral pH). An overvoltage higher than 0.6 V for water oxidation on a p-Si(100) covered with a 2.4 nm Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} layer was measured. The results show that silicon covered with a nitridated thin film may be useful to stabilize electrodes in photoelectrochemical applications.

  15. DFT Perspective on the Thermochemistry of Carbon Nitride Synthesis

    KAUST Repository

    Melissen, Sigismund T. A. G.

    2016-10-11

    Graphitic (g)-CxNyHz has become a popular family of photoharvesters in photocatalytic water splitting cells, as well as other applications in chemistry. In this Article, different g-CxNyHz structures were studied thermochemically using DFT. Following a benchmark study with different families of functionals, the B3LYP functional was shown to accurately capture the thermochemistry of carbon nitride synthesis. A triple-ζ polarized basis set, in combination with Civalleri’s modification to Grimme’s D2 formalism (with s6 = 0.5) for dispersion interactions, yielded accurate geometries. Grimme’s D3 formalism with Becke–Johnson damping was used to refine the energetic description of dispersion interactions. The stepwise cycloaddition of cyanamide to form melamine was shown to be exergonic, whereas the stepwise deamination of melamine to form g-C3N4 was shown to be endergonic. Of those structures respecting the [C6N9H3]n chemical formula, the structure commonly known as “melon” was found to be most stable, whereas the sp3-hybridized [C6N9H3]n elucidated by Horvath-Bordon et al. was found to be the least stable. Fully polymerized triazine-based g-C3N4 appeared slightly more stable than heptazine-based g-C3N4.

  16. Single Crystal, Luminescent Carbon Nitride Nanosheets Formed by Spontaneous Dissolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Thomas S; Suter, Theo M; Telford, Andrew M; Picco, Loren; Payton, Oliver D; Russell-Pavier, Freddie; Cullen, Patrick L; Sella, Andrea; Shaffer, Milo S P; Nelson, Jenny; Tileli, Vasiliki; McMillan, Paul F; Howard, Christopher A

    2017-10-11

    A primary method for the production of 2D nanosheets is liquid-phase delamination from their 3D layered bulk analogues. Most strategies currently achieve this objective by significant mechanical energy input or chemical modification but these processes are detrimental to the structure and properties of the resulting 2D nanomaterials. Bulk poly(triazine imide) (PTI)-based carbon nitrides are layered materials with a high degree of crystalline order. Here, we demonstrate that these semiconductors are spontaneously soluble in select polar aprotic solvents, that is, without any chemical or physical intervention. In contrast to more aggressive exfoliation strategies, this thermodynamically driven dissolution process perfectly maintains the crystallographic form of the starting material, yielding solutions of defect-free, hexagonal 2D nanosheets with a well-defined size distribution. This pristine nanosheet structure results in narrow, excitation-wavelength-independent photoluminescence emission spectra. Furthermore, by controlling the aggregation state of the nanosheets, we demonstrate that the emission wavelengths can be tuned from narrow UV to broad-band white. This has potential applicability to a range of optoelectronic devices.

  17. Two-dimensional graphitic carbon nitride nanosheets for biosensing applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Mengyi; Rong, Qiming; Meng, Hong-Min; Zhang, Xiao-Bing

    2017-03-15

    Two-dimensional graphitic carbon nitride nanosheets (CNNSs) with planar graphene-like structure have stimulated increasingly research interest in recent years due to their unique physicochemical properties. CNNSs possess superior stability, high fluorescence quantum yield, low-toxicity, excellent biocompatibility, unique electroluminescent and photoelectrochemical properties, which make them appropriate candidates for biosensing. In this review, we first introduce the preparation and unique properties of CNNSs, with emphasis on their superior properties for biosensing. Then, recent advances of CNNSs in photoelectrochemical biosensing, electrochemiluminescence biosensing and fluorescence biosensing are highlighted. An additional attention is paid to the marriage of CNNSs and nucleic acids, which exhibits great potentials in both biosensing and intracellular imaging. Finally, current challenges and opportunities of this 2D material are outlined. Inspired by the unique properties of CNNSs and their advantages in biological applications, we expect that more attention will be drawn to this promising 2D material and extensive applications can be found in bioanalysis and diseases diagnosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Preparation of flat carbon support films

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koning, RI; Oostergetel, GT; Brisson, A

    Wrinkling of carbon support films is known to limit the resolution of electron microscopy images of protein two-dimensional crystals. The origin of carbon wrinkling during preparation of the support films was investigated by reflected light microscopy. We observed that carbon films go through

  19. Nitride film growth morphology using remote plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wintrebert-Fouquet, M.; Butcher, K.S.A.; Chen, P.P.T. [Physics Department, Macquarie University, Sydney, NSW 2109 (Australia); Wuhrer, R. [Microstructural Analysis Unit, Faculty of Science, University of Technology, Sydney, Broadway, NSW 2007 (Australia)

    2007-06-15

    Gallium nitride and indium nitride films have been grown by remote plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (RPECVD) at temperatures between 570 and 650 C for GaN and between 350 and 570 C for InN on different substrates. For GaN vast improvements in film morphology and quality have resulted from reductions in background impurities when compared to previous reports. Epitaxial material can now be grown at 650 C under optimized growth conditions. Columnar growth still occurs for growth on some substrates, however film coalescence is observed when using appropriate buffer layers and epitaxial growth can also be observed. High resolution SEM images show examples of this. The root-mean-square surface roughness of epitaxial samples, as measured using atomic force microscopy, shows values of as little as 10 Angstroms. While X-ray diffraction shows that these surfaces are not amorphous but have a strong (0001) preferred axis with FWHM limited by instrumental effects to (2{theta}) 0.085 degrees. The improvement in film quality has allowed heavily doped n-type films to be grown with an electron mobility of 160 cm{sup 2}/V.s for a carrier concentration of {proportional_to}1 x 10{sup 19} cm{sup -3} at 650 C. Moss-Burstein shifted absorption data confirms the high doping level. For InN film growth by RPECVD, columnar growth is commonly observed in the temperature region of interest for films grown directly on sapphire, however film coalescence and epitaxial films are also observed for this material. X-ray diffraction indicates very sharp (0002) peaks with FWHM of (2{theta}) 0.07 degrees. High resolution SEM images show examples of film morphology at different growth temperatures. Electron backscattered diffraction images indicate a wurtzite structure even for InN films with strong deviations from the accepted lattice parameters. (copyright 2007 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  20. Conformational analysis and electronic structure of chiral carbon and carbon nitride nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiano Geraldo de Faria

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Geometry and electronic structure of chiral carbon and carbon nitride (CNx nanotubes were investigated through quantum chemical methods. Finite nanotubes with diameters ranging from 5 to 10 Å and containing up to 500 atoms were considered. CNx structures were built through random substitution of carbon atoms by nitrogen. The molecules were fully optimized by semi-empirical quantum chemical method (PM3. Our results show that the energy associated with nitrogen incorporation depends strongly upon the tube helicity and diameter. The doping of nanotubes with nitrogen contributes to reduce the stress caused by the small diameter of the studied systems. Density of States (DOS results for pure carbon and CNx nanostructures, obtained through DFT and Hartree-Fock calculations, were analyzed. The introduction of nitrogen in the tube produce states in the gap region which characterizes the metallic behavior, as expected for these systems after N-doping.

  1. Urea route to coat inorganic nanowires, carbon fibers and nanotubes by boron nitride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomathi, A.; Ramya Harika, M. [Chemistry and Physics of Materials Unit, DST Unit on Nanoscience and CSIR Centre of Excellence in Chemistry, Jawaharlal Nehru Centre for Advanced Scientific Research, Jakkur P.O., Bangalore 560064 (India); Rao, C.N.R. [Chemistry and Physics of Materials Unit, DST Unit on Nanoscience and CSIR Centre of Excellence in Chemistry, Jawaharlal Nehru Centre for Advanced Scientific Research, Jakkur P.O., Bangalore 560064 (India)], E-mail: cnrrao@jncasr.ac.in

    2008-03-15

    A simple route involving urea as the nitrogen source has been employed to carry out boron nitride coating on carbon fibers, multi-walled carbon nanotubes and inorganic nanowires. The process involves heating the carbon fibers and nanotubes or inorganic nanowires in a mixture of H{sub 3}BO{sub 3} and urea, followed by a heat treatment at 1000 deg. C in a N{sub 2} atmosphere. We have been able to characterize the BN coating by transmission electron microscopy as well as X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The urea decomposition route affords a simple method to coat boron nitride on one-dimensional nanostructures.

  2. Superconductor to weak-insulator transitions in disordered tantalum nitride films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breznay, Nicholas P.; Tendulkar, Mihir; Zhang, Li; Lee, Sang-Chul; Kapitulnik, Aharon

    2017-10-01

    We study the two-dimensional superconductor-insulator transition (SIT) in thin films of tantalum nitride. At zero magnetic field, films can be disorder-tuned across the SIT by adjusting thickness and film stoichiometry; insulating films exhibit classical hopping transport. Superconducting films exhibit a magnetic-field-tuned SIT, whose insulating ground state at high field appears to be a quantum-corrected metal. Scaling behavior at the field-tuned SIT shows classical percolation critical exponents z ν ≈1.3 , with a corresponding critical field Hc≪Hc 2 , the upper critical field. The Hall effect exhibits a crossing point near Hc, but with a nonuniversal critical value ρxy c comparable to the normal-state Hall resistivity. We propose that high-carrier-density metals will always exhibit this pattern of behavior at the boundary between superconducting and (trivially) insulating ground states.

  3. Thickness Influence on In Vitro Biocompatibility of Titanium Nitride Thin Films Synthesized by Pulsed Laser Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liviu Duta

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a study on the biocompatibility vs. thickness in the case of titanium nitride (TiN films synthesized on 410 medical grade stainless steel substrates by pulsed laser deposition. The films were grown in a nitrogen atmosphere, and their in vitro cytotoxicity was assessed according to ISO 10993-5 [1]. Extensive physical-chemical analyses have been carried out on the deposited structures with various thicknesses in order to explain the differences in biological behavior: profilometry, scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS, X-ray diffraction and surface energy measurements. XPS revealed the presence of titanium oxynitride beside TiN in amounts that vary with the film thickness. The cytocompatibility of films seems to be influenced by their TiN surface content. The thinner films seem to be more suitable for medical applications, due to the combined high values of bonding strength and superior cytocompatibility.

  4. Oxygen-assisted synthesis of hexagonal boron nitride films for graphene transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Pingping; Lin, Weiyi; Xu, Binbin; Cai, Weiwei

    2017-11-01

    We grow high-quality two-dimensional hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) films on copper pockets by chemical vapor deposition. A piece of sapphire embedded in the pocket serves as an oxygen supply during the growth process. To obtain clean h-BN films, source powders are placed in a U-shaped quartz tube and heated up in a water bath without the carrier-gas flow. These films are characterized by using SEM, Raman, XPS, and selected area electron diffraction analyses. As dielectric substrates, h-BN films significantly enhance the charge-carrier mobility of graphene transistors. This facile and robust method can be a scalable approach to synthesize large-area high-quality h-BN films for related electronic applications.

  5. Structure and optical characterization of silicon nitride films deposited by r.f. magnetron sputtering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jia, Xiaoyun; Xu, Zheng; Zhao, Suling [Beijing Jiaotong Univ. (China). Key Lab. of Luminescence and Optical Information, Ministry of Education; Tang, Yu; Zhou, Chunlan; Wang, Wenjing [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China). Inst. of Electrical Engineering

    2008-07-01

    Silicon nitride films were deposited by radio frequency (r.f.) magnetron sputtering in an Ar-N{sub 2} gas mixture at a low substrate temperature. Subsequently the samples were annealed in pure N{sub 2} ambience. Influences of the Ar/N{sub 2} gas flow ratio as well as annealing on the optical properties and structure were studied. The optical properties of the films before annealing were examined using transmittance spectra. The composition of the samples was investigated by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra. Microstructure of the films was investigated using atomic force microscope (AFM). The films after annealing compared to former present a more compact construct, which is very dependent on the hydrogen concentration in the film. (orig.)

  6. Nitrogen depletion of indium nitride films during Elastic Recoil Detection analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shrestha, Santosh K. [School of Physical, Environmental and Mathematical Sciences, University College, University of New South Wales at the Australian Defence Force Academy, Northcott Dr, Canberra, ACT 2600 (Australia)]. E-mail: s.shrestha@adfa.edu.au; Timmers, Heiko [School of Physical, Environmental and Mathematical Sciences, University College, University of New South Wales at the Australian Defence Force Academy, Northcott Dr, Canberra, ACT 2600 (Australia); Department of Nuclear Physics, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia); Butcher, K. Scott A. [Department of Physics, Macquarie University, Sydney, NSW 2109 (Australia); Wintrebert-Fouquet, Marie [Department of Physics, Macquarie University, Sydney, NSW 2109 (Australia); Chen, Patrick P.-T. [Department of Physics, Macquarie University, Sydney, NSW 2109 (Australia)

    2005-06-01

    Elastic Recoil Detection analysis of different types of indium nitride films has been performed using a 200 MeV Au beam. Recoil ions were detected with a gas ionisation detector featuring a large detection solid angle. Severe and non-linear nitrogen depletion has been observed, with films grown by RF-sputtering losing nitrogen more quickly than MBE-grown films. Assuming the formation of molecular nitrogen as the decisive step leading to nitrogen loss, the nitrogen depletion process has been modelled using the bulk molecular recombination model. The model allows accurate extrapolations of the original nitrogen content of the material. Since the other important elements can also be quantified, the stoichiometry of the film can thus reliably be obtained from Elastic Recoil Detection analysis. All the films analysed have been found to have excess nitrogen.

  7. Supramolecular intermediates in the synthesis of polymeric carbon nitride from melamine cyanurate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dante, Roberto C., E-mail: rcdante@yahoo.com [Facultad de Mecánica, Escuela Politécnica Nacional (EPN), Ladrón de Guevara E11-253, Quito (Ecuador); Sánchez-Arévalo, Francisco M. [Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de Mexico, Apdo. Postal 70-360, Cd. Universitaria, Mexico D.F. 04510 (Mexico); Chamorro-Posada, Pedro [Dpto. de Teoría de la Señal y Comunicaciones e IT, Universidad de Valladolid, ETSI Telecomunicación, Paseo Belén 15, 47011 Valladolid (Spain); Vázquez-Cabo, José [Dpto. de Teoría de la Señal y Comunicaciones, Universidad de Vigo, ETSI Telecomunicación, Lagoas Marcosende s/n, Vigo (Spain); Huerta, Lazaro [Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de Mexico, Apdo. Postal 70-360, Cd. Universitaria, Mexico D.F. 04510 (Mexico); Lartundo-Rojas, Luis [Centro de Nanociencias y Micro y Nanotecnologías—IPN, Luis Enrique Erro s/n, U. Prof. Adolfo López Mateos, 07738 Ciudad de Mexico, Distrito Federal (Mexico); Santoyo-Salazar, Jaime [Departamento de Física, Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados del Instituto Politécnico Nacional, CINVESTAV-IPN, Apdo. Postal 14-740, Mexico D.F. 07360 (Mexico); and others

    2015-03-15

    The adduct of melamine and cyanuric acid (MCA) was used in past research to produce polymeric carbon nitride and precursors. The reaction yield was considerably incremented by the addition of sulfuric acid. The polymeric carbon nitride formation occurs around 450 °C at temperatures above the sublimation of the adduct components, which occurs around 400 °C. In this report the effect of sulfuric acid on MCA was investigated. It was found that the MCA rosette supramolecular channel structures behave as a solid solvent able to host small molecules, such as sulfuric acid, inside these channels and interact with them. Therefore, the sulfuric acid effect was found to be close to that of a solute that causes a temperature increment of the “solvent sublimation” enough to allowing the formation of polymeric carbon nitride to occur. Sulfate ions are presumably hosted in the rosette channels of MCA as shown by simulations. - Graphical abstract: The blend of melamine cyanurate and sulfuric acid behaves like a solution so that melamine cyanurate decomposition is shifted to temperatures high enough to react and form polymeric carbon nitride. - Highlights: • The adduct of melamine and cyanuric acid behaves as a solid solvent. • The blend of sulfuric acid and melamine cyanurate behaves like a solution. • Melamine cyanurate decomposition is shifted to higher temperatures by sulfuric acid. • The formation of polymeric carbon nitride occurs for these higher temperatures.

  8. Probing carbon nanoparticles in C Nx thin films using Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Debdulal; Chhowalla, Manish; Hellgren, Niklas; Clyne, T. W.; Amaratunga, G. A. J.

    2004-07-01

    Carbon nitride films prepared by magnetron sputtering were studied by multiwavelength Raman spectroscopy. The low/intermediate wavenumber features observed near 400 and 700cm-1 are addressed, and the relaxation of the Raman selection rule due to curvature of the graphene planes in the nanoparticles (similar to carbon nanoonions) embedded in CNx thin films is invoked to explain the possible origin of the near 700cm-1 band. The shift in the G peak center and ID/IG ratio are correlated with the observed microstructural changes (published before) in order to understand the effect of nitrogenation and deposition temperature on the structure of the films.

  9. Hard template synthesis of porous carbon nitride materials with improved efficiency for photocatalytic CO{sub 2} utilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ovcharov, M. [L.V Pysarzhevsky Institute of Physical Chemistry, NAS of Ukraine, 31 pr. Nauky, 03028 Kyiv (Ukraine); Shcherban, N., E-mail: nataliyalisenko@ukr.net [L.V Pysarzhevsky Institute of Physical Chemistry, NAS of Ukraine, 31 pr. Nauky, 03028 Kyiv (Ukraine); Filonenko, S.; Mishura, A. [L.V Pysarzhevsky Institute of Physical Chemistry, NAS of Ukraine, 31 pr. Nauky, 03028 Kyiv (Ukraine); Skoryk, M. [NanoMedTech LLC, 68 Gorkogo str., Kyiv (Ukraine); Shvalagin, V.; Granchak, V. [L.V Pysarzhevsky Institute of Physical Chemistry, NAS of Ukraine, 31 pr. Nauky, 03028 Kyiv (Ukraine)

    2015-12-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Porous carbon nitrides were obtained via bulk and matrix pyrolysis of melamine. • Carbon nitride obtained in MCF has the highest bandgap and photocatalytic activity. • Acetaldehyde was the major product of the photoreduction reaction of CO2. - Abstract: Porous carbon nitrides of different morphology were obtained via bulk and hard template (SBA-15 and MCF) pyrolysis of melamine. Matrix method allowed obtaining ordered porous C{sub 3}N{sub 4} with higher bandgap (2.87 eV) in the contrary to the bulk sample (2.45 eV). Obtained carbon nitrides were found to be p-type semiconductors with catalytic activity towards photoreduction of carbon dioxide with water vapour. Carbon nitride obtained in MCF has the higher bandgap, developed surface, sponge-like morphology, spatially ordering and it's characterized by the highest photocatalytic activity.

  10. Pulsed DC magnetron sputtered piezoelectric thin film aluminum nitride – Technology and piezoelectric properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoeckel, C., E-mail: chris.stoeckel@zfm.tu-chemnitz.de; Kaufmann, C.; Hahn, R.; Schulze, R. [Center for Microtechnologies, Chemnitz University of Technology, Chemnitz 09126 (Germany); Billep, D. [Fraunhofer Institute for Electronic Nano Systems (ENAS), Chemnitz 09126 (Germany); Gessner, T. [Center for Microtechnologies, Chemnitz University of Technology, Chemnitz 09126 (Germany); Fraunhofer Institute for Electronic Nano Systems (ENAS), Chemnitz 09126 (Germany)

    2014-07-21

    Pulsed DC magnetron sputtered aluminum nitride (AlN) thin films are prepared on several seed layers and at different sputtering conditions. The piezoelectric c-axis (002) orientation of the AlN is analyzed with X-ray diffraction method. The transverse piezoelectric coefficient d{sub 31} is determined with a Laser-Doppler-Vibrometer at cantilevers and membranes by analytical calculations and finite element method. Additionally, thin film AlN on bulk silicon is used to characterize the longitudinal piezoelectric charge coefficient d{sub 33}.

  11. Pulsed DC magnetron sputtered piezoelectric thin film aluminum nitride - Technology and piezoelectric properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoeckel, C.; Kaufmann, C.; Hahn, R.; Schulze, R.; Billep, D.; Gessner, T.

    2014-07-01

    Pulsed DC magnetron sputtered aluminum nitride (AlN) thin films are prepared on several seed layers and at different sputtering conditions. The piezoelectric c-axis (002) orientation of the AlN is analyzed with X-ray diffraction method. The transverse piezoelectric coefficient d31 is determined with a Laser-Doppler-Vibrometer at cantilevers and membranes by analytical calculations and finite element method. Additionally, thin film AlN on bulk silicon is used to characterize the longitudinal piezoelectric charge coefficient d33.

  12. Magnetoelectric effect near spin reorientation transition in giant magnetostrictive-aluminum nitride thin film structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiercelin, Nicolas; Talbi, A.; Preobrazhensky, V.; Pernod, P.; Mortet, V.; Haenen, K.; Soltani, A.

    2008-10-01

    Hybrid giant magnetostrictive-piezoelectric film/film structures exhibiting magnetoelectric (ME) effect associated with a magnetic instability of the spin reorientation transition type are presented. We first present the theoretical study of a clamped beam actuator composed of a piezoelectric layer on a substrate actuated by a magnetostrictive layer. The actuator is a polished 50 μm thick 18×5 mm2 silicon substrate coated by an electrode, aluminum nitride, and magnetostrictive nanostructured layer. A ME coefficient of 30 V Oe-1 cm-1 at a 35 KHz longitudinal resonance was measured. Nonlinear excitation of this mode showed a "nonlinear" dynamic ME coefficient of 4 V Oe-1 cm-1.

  13. Corrosion, optical and magnetic properties of flexible iron nitride nano thin films deposited on polymer substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, W. Q.; Wang, Qun; Jin, Xin; Yasin, G.

    2017-11-01

    Iron nitride thin films of different compositions and thicknesses were deposited on flexible polymer substrate in Ar/N2 atmosphere by reactive magnetron sputtering under varying nitrogen flow rates. The nano structured films were characterized by X-ray diffraction, UV-visible spectrophotometer, electrochemical impedance (EIS), atomic force (AFM) and transmission electron microscopies. The dependence of their functional properties on coating and growth conditions was studied in detail. It was found that the thin films show a uniform permeability in the frequency range of 200 MHz to 1 Ghz and can be used in this range without appreciable changes. Decrease of nitrogen flow rate resulted in the smoother surfaces which in turn increase transmittance quality and corrosion resistance. Functional properties are dependent of nature, relative concentration of the iron nitride phases and film thickness. Surface integrity is excellent for180 nm thick sample because the films appear to be very dense and free from open pores. By keeping sputtering power stable at 110 W, nitrogen flow rate of 10 sccm was ideal to develop the ferromagnetic γʹFe4N phase at room temperature.

  14. Ferrocene-modified carbon nitride for direct oxidation of benzene to phenol with visible light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Xiangju; Cui, Yanjuan; Wang, Xinchen

    2014-03-01

    Ferrocene moieties were heterogenized onto carbon nitride polymers by a covalent -C=N- linkage bridging the two conjugation systems, enabling the merging of the redox function of ferrocene with carbon nitride photocatalysis to construct a heterogeneous Photo-Fenton system for green organocatalysis at neutral conditions. The synergistic donor-acceptor interaction between the carbon nitride matrix and ferrocene group, improved exciton splitting, and coupled photocatalytic performance allowed the direct synthesis of phenol from benzene in the presence of H2 O2 under visible light irradiation. This innovative modification method will offer an avenue to construct functionalized two-dimensional polymers useful also for other green synthesis processes using solar irradiation. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Erection of duct-like graphitic carbon nitride with enhanced photocatalytic activity for ACB photodegradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhmood, Tahir; Xia, Mingzhu; Lei, Wu; Wang, Fengyun

    2018-02-01

    Novel duct graphitic carbon nitride (DCN) was successfully prepared using the temperature control method in a quartz tube furnace from commercially available melamine and evaluated against the photo-degradation of latent organic pollutants, acarbose (ACB). These prepared materials were characterized by UV–Vis spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectra, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The characterization results indicated that the synthesized material was in the form of a duct-like structure and has greater adsorption capacity and photocatalytic ability as compared to traditionally synthesized graphitic carbon nitride materials. The DCN split theACB completely into many intermediates, which were depicted in the HPLC-MS spectrum for knowing the acarbose photo-degrdation pathway. The duct-like morphology of graphitic carbon nitride has improved properties, such as increasing the surface area and decelerating the e ‑/h + recombination, which increase the light absorbance ability with enhanced photoactivity.

  16. The effect of deposition parameters on the boron nitride films grown on Si(100) by PLD with nanosecond pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luculescu, C. R.; Sato, Shunichi; Fenic, Constantin G.

    2004-10-01

    The effects of several deposition parameters on the quality of deposited boron nitride (BN) films by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) with short laser pulses are studied. The laser fluence, nitrogen background pressure, Si(100) substrate temperature and laser wavelength were varied in order to find the maximum content of the cubic phase in our BN films. We found that laser fluence and wavelength are affecting strongly the structure of BN films while background pressure and substrate temperature are affecting slightly the film morphology.

  17. Deposition of aluminium nitride film by magnetron sputtering for diamond-based surface acoustic wave applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mortet, V.; Nesladek, M.; D' Haen, J.; Vanhoyland, G.; D' Olieslaeger, M. [IMO, Limburgs Universitair Centrum, Wetenschapspark 1, B-3590 Diepenbeek (Belgium); Elmazria, O.; Assouar, M.B.; Alnot, P. [LPMIA, Universite H. Poincare, Nancy I, F-54506 Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy Cedex (France)

    2002-10-16

    Diamond/piezoelectric material thin film layered structures are expected to be applied to high frequency surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices because of the high acoustic wave velocity of diamond. Aluminium nitride (AlN) has been chosen as piezoelectric material because of its both high phase velocity and high resistivity. AlN thin films have been deposited by DC pulsed magnetron sputtering on Si(100) substrates. Texture and structure of the films have been investigated by X-ray diffraction, cross-section and in-plane view scanning electronic microscopy observation, and atomic force microscopy. One-micron thick, smooth and (002) oriented AlN films have been successfully deposited on freestanding chemical vapour deposition (CVD) diamond layers. The surface acoustic wave characteristics of AlN/diamond structure were investigated. (Abstract Copyright [2002], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  18. High Temperature Annealing Studies on the Piezoelectric Properties of Thin Aluminum Nitride Films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. Farrell; V. R. Pagan; A. Kabulski; Sridhar Kuchibhatl; J. Harman; K. R. Kasarla; L. E. Rodak; P. Famouri; J. Peter Hensel; D. Korakakis

    2008-05-01

    A Rapid Thermal Annealing (RTA) system was used to anneal sputtered and MOVPE grown Aluminum Nitride (AlN) thin films at temperatures up to 1000°C in ambient and controlled environments. According to Energy Dispersive X-Ray Analysis (EDAX), the films annealed in an ambient environment rapidly oxidize after five minutes at 1000°C. Below 1000°C the films oxidized linearly as a function of annealing temperature which is consistent with what has been reported in literature [1]. Laser Doppler Vibrometry (LDV) was used to measure the piezoelectric coefficient, d33, of these films. Films annealed in an ambient environment had a weak piezoelectric response indicating that oxidation on the surface of the film reduces the value of d33. A high temperature furnace has been built that is capable of taking in-situ measurements of the piezoelectric response of AlN films. In-situ d33 measurements are recorded up to 300°C for both sputtered and MOVPE-grown AlN thin films. The measured piezoelectric response appears to increase with temperature up to 300°C possibly due to stress in the film.

  19. High Temperature Annealing Studies on the Piezoelectric Properties of Thin Aluminum Nitride Films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farrell, R.; Pagan, V.R.; Kabulski, A.; Kuchibhatla, S.; Harman, J.; Kasarla, K.R.; Rodak, L.E.; Hensel, J.P.; Famouri, P.; Korakakis, D.

    2008-01-01

    A Rapid Thermal Annealing (RTA) system was used to anneal sputtered and MOVPE-grown Aluminum Nitride (AlN) thin films at temperatures up to 1000°C in ambient and controlled environments. According to Energy Dispersive X-Ray Analysis (EDAX), the films annealed in an ambient environment rapidly oxidize after five minutes at 1000°C. Below 1000°C the films oxidized linearly as a function of annealing temperature which is consistent with what has been reported in literature [1]. Laser Doppler Vibrometry (LDV) was used to measure the piezoelectric coefficient, d33, of these films. Films annealed in an ambient environment had a weak piezoelectric response indicating that oxidation on the surface of the film reduces the value of d33. A high temperature furnace has been built that is capable of taking in-situ measurements of the piezoelectric response of AlN films. In-situ d33 measurements are recorded up to 300°C for both sputtered and MOVPE-grown AlN thin films. The measured piezoelectric response appears to increase with temperature up to 300°C possibly due to stress in the film.

  20. Structural and chemical analysis of annealed plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition aluminum nitride films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Broas, Mikael, E-mail: mikael.broas@aalto.fi; Vuorinen, Vesa [Department of Electrical Engineering and Automation, Aalto University, P.O. Box 13500, FIN-00076 Aalto, Espoo (Finland); Sippola, Perttu; Pyymaki Perros, Alexander; Lipsanen, Harri [Department of Micro- and Nanosciences, Aalto University, P.O. Box 13500, FIN-00076 Aalto, Espoo (Finland); Sajavaara, Timo [Department of Physics, University of Jyväskylä, P.O. Box 35, FIN-40014 Jyväskylä (Finland); Paulasto-Kröckel, Mervi [Department of Electrical Engineering and Automation, Aalto University. P.O. Box 13500, FIN-00076 Aalto, Espoo (Finland)

    2016-07-15

    Plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition was utilized to grow aluminum nitride (AlN) films on Si from trimethylaluminum and N{sub 2}:H{sub 2} plasma at 200 °C. Thermal treatments were then applied on the films which caused changes in their chemical composition and nanostructure. These changes were observed to manifest in the refractive indices and densities of the films. The AlN films were identified to contain light element impurities, namely, H, C, and excess N due to nonideal precursor reactions. Oxygen contamination was also identified in the films. Many of the embedded impurities became volatile in the elevated annealing temperatures. Most notably, high amounts of H were observed to desorb from the AlN films. Furthermore, dinitrogen triple bonds were identified with infrared spectroscopy in the films. The triple bonds broke after annealing at 1000 °C for 1 h which likely caused enhanced hydrolysis of the films. The nanostructure of the films was identified to be amorphous in the as-deposited state and to become nanocrystalline after 1 h of annealing at 1000 °C.

  1. Chemical Cleavage of Layered Carbon Nitride with Enhanced Photoluminescent Performances and Photoconduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhixin; Shen, Yanfei; Li, Ying; Liu, Anran; Liu, Songqin; Zhang, Yuanjian

    2015-12-22

    Graphene quantum dots (GQDs) and carbon dots (C-dots) have various alluring properties and potential applications, but they are often limited by unsatisfied optical performance such as low quantum yield, ambiguous fluorescence emission mechanism, and narrow emission wavelength. Herein, we report that bulk polymeric carbon nitride could be utilized as a layered precursor to prepare carbon nitride nanostructures such as nanorods, nanoleaves and quantum dots by chemical tailoring. As doped carbon materials, these carbon nitride nanostructures not only intrinsically emitted UV lights but also well inherited the explicit photoluminescence mechanism of the bulk pristine precursor, both of which were rarely reported for GQDs and C-dots. Especially, carbon nitride quantum dots (CNQDs) had a photoluminescence quantum yield (QY) up to 46%, among the highest QY for metal-free quantum dots so far. As examples, the CNQDs were utilized as a photoluminescence probe for rapid detection of Fe(3+) with a detection limit of 1 μM in 2 min and a photoconductor in an all-solid-state device. This work would open up an avenue for doped nanocarbon in developing photoelectrical devices and sensors.

  2. Remote PECVD silicon nitride films with improved electrical properties for GaAs P-HEMT passivation

    CERN Document Server

    Sohn, M K; Kim, K H; Yang, S G; Seo, K S

    1998-01-01

    In order to obtain thin silicon nitride films with excellent electrical and mechanical properties, we employed RPECVD (Remote Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition) process which produces less plasma-induced damage than the conventional PECVD. Through the optical and electrical measurements of the deposited films, we optimized the various RPECVD process parameters. The optimized silicon nitride films showed excellent characteristics such as small etch rate (approx 33 A/min by 7:1 BHF), high breakdown field (>9 MV/cm), and low compressive stress (approx 3.3x10 sup 9 dyne/cm sup 2). We successfully applied thin RPECVD silicon nitride films to the surface passivation of GaAs pseudomorphic high electron mobility transistors (P-HEMTs) with negligible degradations in DC and RF characteristics.

  3. Tunable removal rates of silicon dioxide, silicon nitride and polysilicon films during chemical mechanical polishing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dandu, Veera P. R.

    Achieving a high Si3N4 removal rate and a relatively low SiO2 removal rate, which is challenging but promising for emerging applications for sub-32 nm node devices, was investigated. This was thought to be impossible as the removal of Si3N4 usually follows a two-step mechanism in which silicon nitride is hydrolyzed first and then removed during CMP. Therefore, additives normally used to suppress the SiO 2 removal rate would tend to suppress the S3N4 removal rate as well. However, it was shown that by using a specific type of a cationic polymer in ceria-based dispersions, a low SiO2 removal rate (FinFET fabrication, where a polysilicon layer has to be selectively polished/protected with respect to silicon dioxide and/or silicon nitride layers. Several dispersions were identified which yield tunable removal rates of polysilicon (from <2 nm/min to ˜1 microm/min), silicon dioxide (<2 nm/min to ˜500 nm/min) and silicon nitride (<2 nm/min to ˜120 nm/min) films. This has been made possible by using several additives in ceria and silica based dispersions with and without surface functionalization at different pH values. A fundamental investigation of the interaction of the additive(s) with the abrasives, SiO2 Si3N4, and polysilicon films was also carried out in order to elucidate the removal mechanisms. Zeta potential measurements, UV-Vis Spectroscopy, adsorption isotherms and thermo gravimetric analysis were performed to understand the adsorption behavior of these additives on abrasives and polishing films at different pH values. It was observed that the Ce3+ on the surface of the ceria abrasives is reacting with the silicon dioxide and suboxide on the silicon nitride surfaces during polishing. Also, it appears that electrostatic interactions in conjunction with the reactivity of the active sites on the surface of abrasives play a vital role in determining the removal rates of silicon dioxide, silicon nitride and polysilicon films.

  4. Effects of twin boundaries in vanadium nitride films subjected to tensile/compressive deformations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Tao; Peng, Xianghe; Huang, Cheng; Zhao, Yinbo; Weng, Shayuan; Chen, Xiang; Hu, Ning

    2017-12-01

    Two kinds of atoms can serve as the twin boundary (TB) atoms in a transition metal nitride (TMN). In this work, we performed molecular dynamics (MD) simulations for the responses of vanadium nitride (VN) films with different kinds of TB atoms (V or N) subjected to uniaxial tensile/compressive deformations, to investigate their effects and the tensile-compressive asymmetry. In compressive deformation, the migration of TBs with V atoms to that with N atoms contributes to softening, while the pile-up of dislocations at TBs contributes to strengthening. During tension, fractures occur at the TBs without distinct nucleation of dislocations, the nature of the brittle fracture, which does not result in any improvement of fracture toughness and critical stress. Different frictional effects, cutoff radii, asymmetrical tensile and compressive nature of the interatomic potential and different deformation mechanisms are responsible for the tension-compression asymmetry in VN.

  5. Structural investigation of two carbon nitride solids produced by cathodic arc deposition and nitrogen implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merchant, A.R.; McCulloch, D.; McKenzie, D.R.; Yin, Y.; Gerstner, E.G. [New South Wales Univ., Kensington, NSW (Australia)

    1996-12-31

    Carbon nitride materials have been the focus of research efforts worldwide. Most materials studied have been amorphous, with only a few groups claiming to have found a crystalline material. In this paper, carbon nitride materials prepared by two different techniques are analysed, and found to be remarkably similar in bonding and structure. The materials appear to have a primarily sp{sup 2} bonded carbon structure with a lower bond length than found in an amorphous carbon. This is explained by nitrogen substituting into `rings` to a saturation level of about one nitrogen per three carbon atoms. No evidence was found for a crystalline structure of formula C{sub 3}N{sub 4}, or any amorphous derivative of it. 16 refs., 1 tab., 5 figs.

  6. Titanium nitride films for micro-supercapacitors: Effect of surface chemistry and film morphology on the capacitance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achour, Amine; Porto, Raul Lucio; Soussou, Mohamed-Akram; Islam, Mohammad; Boujtita, Mohammed; Aissa, Kaltouma Ait; Le Brizoual, Laurent; Djouadi, Abdou; Brousse, Thierry

    2015-12-01

    Electrochemical capacitors (EC) in the form of packed films can be integrated in various electronic devices as power source. A fabrication process of EC electrodes, which is compatible with micro-fabrication, should be addressed for practical applications. Here, we show that titanium nitride films with controlled porosity can be deposited on flat silicon substrates by reactive DC-sputtering for use as high performance micro-supercapacitor electrodes. A superior volumetric capacitance as high as 146.4 F cm-3, with an outstanding cycling stability over 20,000 cycles, was measured in mild neutral electrolyte of potassium sulfate. The specific capacitance of the films as well as their capacitance retentions were found to depend on thickness, porosity and surface chemistry of electrodes. The one step process used to fabricate these TiN electrodes and the wide use of this material in the field of semiconductor technology make it promising for miniaturized energy storage systems.

  7. Visible Light Neural Stimulation on graphitic-Carbon Nitride/Graphene Photocatalytic Fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Zhongyang; Xu, Ruodan; Wang, Zegao

    2017-01-01

    Light stimulation allows remote and spatiotemporally accurate operation that has been applied as effective, non-invasive means of therapeutic interventions. Here, visible light neural stimulation of graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3N4), an emerging photocatalyst with visible-light optoelectronic...

  8. Phenyl-Modified Carbon Nitride Quantum Dots with Distinct Photoluminescence Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Qianling; Xu, Jingsan; Wang, Xiaoyu; Li, Lidong; Antonietti, Markus; Shalom, Menny

    2016-03-07

    A novel type of quantum dot (Ph-CN) is manufactured from graphitic carbon nitride by "lining" the carbon nitride structure with phenyl groups through supramolecular preorganization. This approach requires no chemical etching or hydrothermal treatments like other competing nanoparticle syntheses and is easy and safe to use. The Ph-CN nanoparticles exhibit bright, tunable fluorescence, with a high quantum yield of 48.4 % in aqueous colloidal suspensions. Interestingly, the observed Stokes shift of approximately 200 nm is higher than the maximum values reported for carbon nitride based fluorophores. The high quantum yield and the large Stokes shift are related to the structural surface organization of the phenyl groups, which affects the π-electron delocalization in the conjugated carbon nitride networks and induces colloidal stability. The remarkable performance of the Ph-CN nanoparticles in imaging is demonstrated by a simple incubation study with HeLa cells. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Large scale boron carbon nitride nanosheets with enhanced lithium storage capabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Weiwei; Qin, Si; Liu, Dan; Portehault, David; Liu, Zongwen; Chen, Ying

    2013-01-14

    Few-layered boron carbon nitride nanosheets are synthesized by a simple and environmentally friendly process. The BCN nanosheets have 2-6 atomic layers with high surface area and show enhanced storage performance in lithium batteries, as well as a stable capacity of ~100 mA h g(-1) at 2 A g(-1) for 5000 cycles.

  10. Atomic Layer Deposition of Silicon Nitride Thin Films: A Review of Recent Progress, Challenges, and Outlooks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Meng

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available With the continued miniaturization of devices in the semiconductor industry, atomic layer deposition (ALD of silicon nitride thin films (SiNx has attracted great interest due to the inherent benefits of this process compared to other silicon nitride thin film deposition techniques. These benefits include not only high conformality and atomic-scale thickness control, but also low deposition temperatures. Over the past 20 years, recognition of the remarkable features of SiNx ALD, reinforced by experimental and theoretical investigations of the underlying surface reaction mechanism, has contributed to the development and widespread use of ALD SiNx thin films in both laboratory studies and industrial applications. Such recognition has spurred ever-increasing opportunities for the applications of the SiNx ALD technique in various arenas. Nevertheless, this technique still faces a number of challenges, which should be addressed through a collaborative effort between academia and industry. It is expected that the SiNx ALD will be further perceived as an indispensable technique for scaling next-generation ultra-large-scale integration (ULSI technology. In this review, the authors examine the current research progress, challenges and future prospects of the SiNx ALD technique.

  11. Optical reflectivity and hardness improvement of hafnium nitride films via tantalum alloying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Zhiqing; Huang, Haihua; Zhang, Sam; Wang, Xiaoyi; Gao, Jing; Zhao, Lei; Zheng, Weitao; Hu, Chaoquan

    2016-12-01

    It is found that incorporation of tantalum in a hafnium nitride film induces a tunable optical reflectivity and improves the hardness. The underlying mechanism can be illustrated by a combination of experiments and first-principles calculations. It is shown that the evolution of optical reflectivity and the increase in hardness arise from the formation of Hf1-xTaxN solid solutions and the resulting changes in the electronic structure. The increase in infrared reflectance originates from the increase in concentration of free electrons (n) because Ta (d3s2) has one more valence electron than Hf (d2s2). The sharp blue-shift in cutoff wavelength is attributed to the increase in n and the appearance of t2g → eg interband absorption. These results suggest that alloying of a second transition metal renders an effective avenue to improve simultaneously the optical and mechanical properties of transition metal nitride films. This opens up a door in preparing high-reflectance yet hard films.

  12. Mechanics of silicon nitride thin-film stressors on a transistor-like geometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Reboh

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available To understand the behavior of silicon nitride capping etch stopping layer stressors in nanoscale microelectronics devices, a simplified structure mimicking typical transistor geometries was studied. Elastic strains in the silicon substrate were mapped using dark-field electron holography. The results were interpreted with the aid of finite element method modeling. We show, in a counterintuitive sense, that the stresses developed by the film in the vertical sections around the transistor gate can reach much higher values than the full sheet reference. This is an important insight for advanced technology nodes where the vertical contribution of such liners is predominant over the horizontal part.

  13. Transition-metal-nitride-based thin films as novel energy harvesting materials

    OpenAIRE

    Eklund, Per; Kerdsongpanya, Sit; Alling, Björn

    2016-01-01

    The last few years have seen a rise in the interest in early transition-metal and rare-earth nitrides, primarily based on ScN and CrN, for energy harvesting by thermoelectricity and piezoelectricity. This is because of a number of important advances, among those the discoveries of exceptionally high piezoelectric coupling coefficient in (Sc,Al)N alloys and of high thermoelectric power factors of ScN-based and CrN-based thin films. These materials also constitute well-defined model systems for...

  14. Impact of annealing temperature on the mechanical and electrical properties of sputtered aluminum nitride thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gillinger, M.; Schneider, M.; Bittner, A.; Schmid, U. [Institute of Sensor and Actuator Systems, Vienna University of Technology, Vienna 1040 (Austria); Nicolay, P. [CTR Carinthian Tech Research AG, Villach 9524 (Austria)

    2015-02-14

    Aluminium nitride (AlN) is a promising material for challenging sensor applications such as process monitoring in harsh environments (e.g., turbine exhaust), due to its piezoelectric properties, its high temperature stability and good thermal match to silicon. Basically, the operational temperature of piezoelectric materials is limited by the increase of the leakage current as well as by enhanced diffusion effects in the material at elevated temperatures. This work focuses on the characterization of aluminum nitride thin films after post deposition annealings up to temperatures of 1000 °C in harsh environments. For this purpose, thin film samples were temperature loaded for 2 h in pure nitrogen and oxygen gas atmospheres and characterized with respect to the film stress and the leakage current behaviour. The X-ray diffraction results show that AlN thin films are chemically stable in oxygen atmospheres for 2 h at annealing temperatures of up to 900 °C. At 1000 °C, a 100 nm thick AlN layer oxidizes completely. For nitrogen, the layer is stable up to 1000 °C. The activation energy of the samples was determined from leakage current measurements at different sample temperatures, in the range between 25 and 300 °C. Up to an annealing temperature of 700 °C, the leakage current in the thin film is dominated by Poole-Frenkel behavior, while at higher annealing temperatures, a mixture of different leakage current mechanisms is observed.

  15. Leakage current characteristics of thick cubic boron nitride films deposited on titanium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamoto, S.; Nakakuma, T.; Teii, K.; Matsumoto, S.

    2017-12-01

    Thick cubic and sp2-bonded boron nitride (cBN and sp2BN) films are deposited on Ti substrates by plasma jet enhanced chemical vapor deposition using the chemistry of fluorine, and their direct current-voltage characteristics are studied for Ni-BN-Ti capacitor structures. The resistivity of the cBN film measured at room temperature is of the order of 108 Ωcm, which is three to four orders of magnitude lower than that of the sp2BN film. At high electric fields, Frenkel-Poole emission dominates the conduction of the sp2BN film, while thermionic emission is better able to describe the conduction of the cBN film at temperatures up to 473 K. A lower leakage current indicates lower densities of carriers and trap sites associated with defects, suggesting that a higher-quality cBN film with higher crystallinity and stoichiometry is potentially promising as an ultrahard dielectric material in high temperature condition.

  16. Influence of scandium concentration on power generation figure of merit of scandium aluminum nitride thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akiyama, Morito; Nagase, Toshimi [Measurement Solution Research Center, National Institute of Advanced Industrials Science and Technology, Tosu, Saga 841-0052 (Japan); Umeda, Keiichi; Honda, Atsushi [Murata Manufacturing Co., Ltd., Nagaokakyo, Kyoto 617-8555 (Japan)

    2013-01-14

    The authors have investigated the influence of scandium concentration on the power generation figure of merit (FOM) of scandium aluminum nitride (Sc{sub x}Al{sub 1-x}N) films prepared by cosputtering. The power generation FOM strongly depends on the scandium concentration. The FOM of Sc{sub 0.41}Al{sub 0.59}N film was 67 GPa, indicating that the FOM is five times larger than that of AlN. The FOM of Sc{sub 0.41}Al{sub 0.59}N film is higher than those of lead zirconate titanate and Pb(Mg{sub 1/3}Nb{sub 2/3})O{sub 3}-PbTiO{sub 3} films, which is the highest reported for any piezoelectric thin films. The high FOM of Sc{sub 0.41}Al{sub 0.59}N film is due to the high d{sub 31} and the low relative permittivity.

  17. Synthesis and characterization of hexagonal boron nitride film as a dielectric layer for graphene devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ki Kang; Hsu, Allen; Jia, Xiaoting; Kim, Soo Min; Shi, Yumeng; Dresselhaus, Mildred; Palacios, Tomas; Kong, Jing

    2012-10-23

    Hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) is a promising material as a dielectric layer or substrate for two-dimensional electronic devices. In this work, we report the synthesis of large-area h-BN film using atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition on a copper foil, followed by Cu etching and transfer to a target substrate. The growth rate of h-BN film at a constant temperature is strongly affected by the concentration of borazine as a precursor and the ambient gas condition such as the ratio of hydrogen and nitrogen. h-BN films with different thicknesses can be achieved by controlling the growth time or tuning the growth conditions. Transmission electron microscope characterization reveals that these h-BN films are polycrystalline, and the c-axis of the crystallites points to different directions. The stoichiometry ratio of boron and nitrogen is close to 1:1, obtained by electron energy loss spectroscopy. The dielectric constant of h-BN film obtained by parallel capacitance measurements (25 μm(2) large areas) is 2-4. These CVD-grown h-BN films were integrated as a dielectric layer in top-gated CVD graphene devices, and the mobility of the CVD graphene device (in the few thousands cm(2)/(V·s) range) remains the same before and after device integration.

  18. Effect of high carbon incorporation in Co substrates on the epitaxy of hexagonal boron nitride/graphene heterostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanaki, Alireza; Tian, Hao; Xu, Zhongguang; Zheng, Renjing; He, Yanwei; Cui, Zhenjun; Yang, Jingchuan; Liu, Jianlin

    2018-01-01

    We carried out a systematic study of hexagonal boron nitride/graphene (h-BN/G) heterostructure growth by introducing high incorporation of a carbon (C) source on a heated cobalt (Co) foil substrate followed by boron and nitrogen sources in a molecular beam epitaxy system. With the increase of C incorporation in Co, three distinct regions of h-BN/G heterostructures were observed from region (1) where the C saturation was not attained at the growth temperature (900 °C) and G was grown only by precipitation during the cooling process to form a ‘G network’ underneath the h-BN film; to region (2) where the Co substrate was just saturated by C atoms at the growth temperature and a part of G growth occurs isothermally to form G islands and another part by precipitation, resulting in a non-uniform h-BN/G film; and to region (3) where a continuous layered G structure was formed at the growth temperature and precipitated C atoms added additional G layers to the system, leading to a uniform h-BN/G film. It is also found that in all three h-BN/G heterostructure growth regions, a 3 h h-BN growth at 900 °C led to h-BN film with a thickness of 1–2 nm, regardless of the underneath G layers’ thickness or morphology. Growth time and growth temperature effects have been also studied.

  19. Direct Current Magnetron Glow Discharge Plasma Characteristics Study for Controlled Deposition of Titanium Nitride Thin Film

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sankar Moni Borah

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports on the study of direct current (DC magnetron glow discharge plasma characteristics in a cylindrical magnetron system in argon-nitrogen. Presence of nitrogen gas makes the plasma environment reactive, and it results in significant changes of the plasma properties—number density, electron temperature, floating potential, and sheath thickness. Applied magnetic field is a parameter which is closely related to proper deposition of thin film. Cylindrical Langmuir probe and Emissive probe are used as diagnostics for the estimation of various plasma parameters indicated earlier. Controlled titanium nitride (TiN thin film deposition on bell-metal at different argon-nitrogen gases ratio is another important study reported.

  20. Thin Film Formation of Gallium Nitride Using Plasma-Sputter Deposition Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Flauta

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available The formation of gallium nitride (GaN thin film using plasma-sputter deposition technique has beenconfirmed. The GaN film deposited on a glass substrate at an optimum plasma condition has shown x-raydiffraction (XRD peaks at angles corresponding to that of (002 and (101 reflections of GaN. The remainingmaterial on the sputtering target exhibited XRD reflections corresponding to that of bulk GaN powder. Toimprove the system’s base pressure, a new UHV compatible system is being developed to minimize theimpurities in residual gases during deposition. The sputtering target configuration was altered to allow themonitoring of target temperature using a molybdenum (Mo holder, which is more stable against Gaamalgam formation than stainless steel.

  1. Effective Third-Order Nonlinearities in Metallic Refractory Titanium Nitride Thin Films

    CERN Document Server

    Kinsey, Nathaniel; Courtwright, Devon; DeVault, Clayton; Bonner, Carl E; Gavrilenko, Vladimir I; Shalaev, Vladimir M; Hagan, David J; Van Stryland, Eric W; Boltasseva, Alexandra

    2015-01-01

    Nanophotonic devices offer an unprecedented ability to concentrate light into small volumes which can greatly increase nonlinear effects. However, traditional plasmonic materials suffer from low damage thresholds and are not compatible with standard semiconductor technology. Here we study the nonlinear optical properties in the novel refractory plasmonic material titanium nitride using the Z scan method at 1550 nm and 780 nm. We compare the extracted nonlinear parameters for TiN with previous works on noble metals and note a similarly large nonlinear optical response. However, TiN films have been shown to exhibit a damage threshold up to an order of magnitude higher than gold films of a similar thickness, while also being robust, cost-efficient, bio- and CMOS compatible. Together, these properties make TiN a promising material for metal-based nonlinear optics.

  2. Optical characterization of sputtered carbon films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ager, J.W. III

    1992-05-01

    Spattered carbon films are widely used as protective overcoats for thin film disk media. Raman spectroscopy is nondestructive and relatively rapid and is well suited for the characterization of carbon films. Specific features in the Raman spectra are empirically correlated with the rates of specific types of mechanical wear for both hydrogenated and unhydrogenated films. This observation is interpreted in terms of a random covalent network, in which the mechanical performance of the film is determined by the nature of the bonding that links sp{sup 2}-bonded domains.

  3. Growth and magnetic property of antiperovskite manganese nitride films doped with Cu by molecular beam epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Fengmei; Ren, Lizhu; Meng, Meng; Wang, Yunjia; Yang, Mei; Wu, Shuxiang; Li, Shuwei

    2014-04-01

    Manganese nitrides thin films on MgO (100) substrates with and without Cu-doping have been fabricated by plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy. Antiperovskite compounds Mn3.6Cu0.4N have been grown in the case of Cu-doping, and the pure Mn3N2 single crystal has been obtained without Cu-doping. The Mn3.6Cu0.4N exhibits ferrimagnetism, and the magnetization of Mn3.6Cu0.4N increases upon the temperature decreasing from 300 K to 5 K, similar to Mn4N. The exchange bias (EB) effects emerge in the Mn3.6Cu0.4N films. The EB behavior is originated from the interfaces between ferrimagnetic Mn3.6Cu0.4N and antiferromagnetic metal Mn, which is verified to be formed by the data of x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The present results not only provide a strategy for producing functional antiperovskite manganese nitrides, but also shed promising light on fabricating the exchange bias part of spintronic devices.

  4. Growth and magnetic property of antiperovskite manganese nitride films doped with Cu by molecular beam epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Fengmei, E-mail: yufengmei401@126.com [State Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Materials and Technologies, School of Physics and Engineering, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China); Automation College, Zhongkai University of Agriculture and Engineering, Guangzhou 510225 (China); Ren, Lizhu; Meng, Meng; Wang, Yunjia; Yang, Mei; Wu, Shuxiang; Li, Shuwei, E-mail: stslsw@mail.sysu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Materials and Technologies, School of Physics and Engineering, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China)

    2014-04-07

    Manganese nitrides thin films on MgO (100) substrates with and without Cu-doping have been fabricated by plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy. Antiperovskite compounds Mn{sub 3.6}Cu{sub 0.4}N have been grown in the case of Cu-doping, and the pure Mn{sub 3}N{sub 2} single crystal has been obtained without Cu-doping. The Mn{sub 3.6}Cu{sub 0.4}N exhibits ferrimagnetism, and the magnetization of Mn{sub 3.6}Cu{sub 0.4}N increases upon the temperature decreasing from 300 K to 5 K, similar to Mn{sub 4}N. The exchange bias (EB) effects emerge in the Mn{sub 3.6}Cu{sub 0.4}N films. The EB behavior is originated from the interfaces between ferrimagnetic Mn{sub 3.6}Cu{sub 0.4}N and antiferromagnetic metal Mn, which is verified to be formed by the data of x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The present results not only provide a strategy for producing functional antiperovskite manganese nitrides, but also shed promising light on fabricating the exchange bias part of spintronic devices.

  5. Nanotribological Behavior of Carbon Based Thin Films: Friction and Lubricity Mechanisms at the Nanoscale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Costas A. Charitidis

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The use of materials with very attractive friction and wear properties has raised much attention in research and industrial sectors. A wide range of tribological applications, including rolling and sliding bearings, machining, mechanical seals, biomedical implants and microelectromechanical systems (MEMS, require thin films with high mechanical strength, chemical inertness, broad optical transparency, high refractive index, wide bandgap excellent thermal conductivity and extremely low thermal expansion. Carbon based thin films like diamond, diamond-like carbon, carbon nitride and cubic boron nitride known as “super-hard” material have been studied thoroughly as the ideal candidate for tribological applications. In this study, the results of experimental and simulation works on the nanotribological behavior of carbon films and fundamental mechanisms of friction and lubricity at the nano-scale are reviewed. The study is focused on the nanomechanical properties and analysis of the nanoscratching processes at low loads to obtain quantitative analysis, the comparison obtain quantitative analysis, the comparison of their elastic/plastic deformation response, and nanotribological behavior of the a-C, ta-C, a-C:H, CNx, and a-C:M films. For ta-C and a-C:M films new data are presented and discussed.

  6. Investigation of mechanical properties of CVD grown titanium silicon nitride thin films under reduced atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guha, Spandan; Das, Soham; Bandyopadhyay, Asish; Das, Santanu; Swain, Bibhu P.

    2018-01-01

    Titanium silicon nitride (TiSiN) thin films were deposited by thermal chemical vapour deposition using TiO2 + Si3N4 powder with different H2 flow rates. Morphological, structural, and mechanical properties of deposited TiSiN films were characterized using different techniques by SEM, XRD, Raman, and nano-indentation. SEM images reveal that surface roughness of TiSiN thin films decreased with increasing of H2 flow rate. The Raman spectroscopy indicated that the intensity of acoustic phonon mode decreases, whereas intensity of optical phonon mode increases with increasing of H2 flow rate. The maximum hardness, Young's modulus, and yield strength of the TiSiN films are 18.23, 185.26, and 83.2 GPa, respectively. The crystallite size and lattice strain of TiSiN thin films vary 2.08-4.43 nm and 0.02-0.055, respectively, for different H2 flow rates. The quantitative and qualitative analyses of TiSiN thin were carried out using the Origin 9.0 software.

  7. Stoichiometry and thickness dependence of superconducting properties of niobium nitride thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beebe, Melissa R., E-mail: mrbeebe@email.wm.edu; Beringer, Douglas B.; Burton, Matthew C.; Yang, Kaida; Lukaszew, R. Alejandra [Department of Physics, The College of William & Mary, Small Hall, 300 Ukrop Way, Williamsburg, Virginia 23185 (United States)

    2016-03-15

    The current technology used in linear particle accelerators is based on superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities fabricated from bulk niobium (Nb), which have smaller surface resistance and therefore dissipate less energy than traditional nonsuperconducting copper cavities. Using bulk Nb for the cavities has several advantages, which are discussed elsewhere; however, such SRF cavities have a material-dependent accelerating gradient limit. In order to overcome this fundamental limit, a multilayered coating has been proposed using layers of insulating and superconducting material applied to the interior surface of the cavity. The key to this multilayered model is to use superconducting thin films to exploit the potential field enhancement when these films are thinner than their London penetration depth. Such field enhancement has been demonstrated in MgB{sub 2} thin films; here, the authors consider films of another type-II superconductor, niobium nitride (NbN). The authors present their work correlating stoichiometry and superconducting properties in NbN thin films and discuss the thickness dependence of their superconducting properties, which is important for their potential use in the proposed multilayer structure. While there are some previous studies on the relationship between stoichiometry and critical temperature T{sub C}, the authors are the first to report on the correlation between stoichiometry and the lower critical field H{sub C1}.

  8. Optical properties of aluminum nitride thin films grown by direct-current magnetron sputtering close to epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stolz, A. [Institut d' Electronique de Microélectronique et de Nanotechnologie (IEMN), UMR CNRS 8520, PRES Lille, Université Nord de France, Avenue Poincaré, 59652 Villeneuve d' Ascq Cedex (France); Soltani, A., E-mail: ali.soltani@iemn.univ-lille1.fr [Institut d' Electronique de Microélectronique et de Nanotechnologie (IEMN), UMR CNRS 8520, PRES Lille, Université Nord de France, Avenue Poincaré, 59652 Villeneuve d' Ascq Cedex (France); Abdallah, B. [Department of Materials Physics, Atomic Energy Commission of Syria, Damascus, P.O. Box 6091 (Syrian Arab Republic); Charrier, J. [Fonctions Optiques pour les Technologies de l' informatiON (FOTON), UMR CNRS 6082, 6, rue de Kerampont CS 80518, 22305 Lannion Cedex (France); Deresmes, D. [Institut d' Electronique de Microélectronique et de Nanotechnologie (IEMN), UMR CNRS 8520, PRES Lille, Université Nord de France, Avenue Poincaré, 59652 Villeneuve d' Ascq Cedex (France); Jouan, P.-Y.; Djouadi, M.A. [Institut des Matériaux Jean Rouxel – IMN, UMR CNRS 6502, 2, rue de la Houssinère BP 32229, 44322 Nantes (France); Dogheche, E.; De Jaeger, J.-C. [Institut d' Electronique de Microélectronique et de Nanotechnologie (IEMN), UMR CNRS 8520, PRES Lille, Université Nord de France, Avenue Poincaré, 59652 Villeneuve d' Ascq Cedex (France)

    2013-05-01

    Low-temperature Aluminum Nitride (AlN) thin films with a thickness of 3 μm were deposited by Direct-Current magnetron sputtering on sapphire substrate. They present optical properties similar to those of epitaxially grown films. Different characterization methods such as X-Ray Diffraction, Transmission Electron Microscopy and Atomic Force Microscopy were used to determine the structural properties of the films such as its roughness and crystallinity. Newton interferometer was used for stress measurement of the films. Non-destructive prism-coupling technique was used to determine refractive index and thickness homogeneity by a mapping on the whole sample area. Results show that AlN films grown on AlGaN layer have a high crystallinity close to epitaxial films, associated to a low intrinsic stress for low thickness. These results highlight that it is possible to grow thick sample with microstructure and optical properties close to epitaxy, even on a large surface. - Highlights: ► Aluminum Nitride sputtering technique with a low temperature growth process ► Epitaxial quality of two microns sputtered Aluminum Nitride film ► Optics as a non-destructive accurate tool for acoustic wave investigation.

  9. Preparation of high-content hexagonal boron nitride composite film and characterization of atomic oxygen erosion resistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yu; Li, Min; Gu, Yizhuo; Wang, Shaokai, E-mail: wsk@buaa.edu.cn; Zhang, Zuoguang

    2017-04-30

    Highlights: • Hexagonal boron nitride nanosheets can be well exfoliated with the help of nanofibrillated cellulose. • A carpet-like rough surface and distortion in crystal structure of h-BN are found in both h-BN film and h-BN/epoxy film after AO exposure. • H-BN/epoxy film exhibits a higher mass loss and erosion yield, different element content changes and chemical oxidations compared with h-BN film. - Abstract: Space aircrafts circling in low earth orbit are suffered from highly reactive atomic oxygen (AO). To shield AO, a flexible thin film with 80 wt.% hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) and h-BN/epoxy film were fabricated through vacuum filtration and adding nanofibrillated cellulose fibers. H-BN nanosheets were hydroxylated for enhancing interaction in the films. Mass loss and erosion yield at accumulated AO fluence about 3.04 × 10{sup 20} atoms/cm{sup 2} were adopted to evaluate the AO resistance properties of the films. A carpet-like rough surface, chemical oxidations and change in crystal structure of h-BN were found after AO treatment, and the degrading mechanism was proposed. The mass loss and erosion yield under AO attack were compared between h-BN film and h-BN/epoxy film, and the comparison was also done for various types of shielding AO materials. Excellent AO resistance property of h-BN film is shown, and the reasons are analyzed.

  10. Electrical properties of low pressure chemical vapor deposited silicon nitride thin films for temperatures up to 650 °C

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tiggelaar, Roald M.; Groenland, A.W.; Sanders, Remco G.P.; Gardeniers, Johannes G.E.

    2009-01-01

    The results of a study on electrical conduction in low pressure chemical vapor deposited silicon nitride thin films for temperatures up to 650 °C are described. Current density versus electrical field characteristics are measured as a function of temperature for 100 and 200 nm thick stoichiometric

  11. Increased charge storage capacity of titanium nitride electrodes by deposition of boron-doped nanocrystalline diamond films

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meijs, Suzan; McDonald, Matthew; Sørensen, Søren

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the feasibility of depositing a thin layer of boron-doped nanocrystalline diamond (B-NCD) on titanium nitride (TiN) coated electrodes and the effect this has on charge injection properties. The charge storage capacity increased by applying the B-NCD film...

  12. Study of the structure and electrical properties of the copper nitride thin films deposited by pulsed laser deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallardo-Vega, C. [Centro de Investigacion Cientifica y de Educacion Superior de Ensenada (CICESE), Km. 107 Carretera Tijuana-Ensenada, A. Postal 2732, 22860, Ensenada B.C. (Mexico)]. E-mail: gallardo@ccmc.unam.mx; Cruz, W. de la [Centro de Ciencias de la Materia Condensada, UNAM, Km. 107 Carretera Tijuana-Ensenada, A. Postal 2681, 22860, Ensenada B.C. (Mexico)

    2006-09-15

    Copper nitride thin films were prepared on glass and silicon substrates by ablating a copper target at different pressure of nitrogen. The films were characterized in situ by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) and ex situ by X-ray diffraction (XRD). The nitrogen content in the samples, x = [N]/[Cu], changed between 0 and 0.33 for a corresponding variation in nitrogen pressure of 9 x 10{sup -2} to 1.3 x 10{sup -1} Torr. Using this methodology, it is possible to achieve sub-, over- and stoichiometric films by controlling the nitrogen pressure. The XPS results show that is possible to obtain copper nitride with x = 0.33 (Cu{sub 3}N) and x = 0.25 (Cu{sub 4}N) when the nitrogen pressure is 1.3 x 10{sup -1} and 5 x 10{sup -2} Torr, respectively. The lattice constants obtained from XRD results for copper nitride with x = 0.25 is of 3.850 A and with x = 0.33 have values between 3.810 and 3.830 A. The electrical properties of the films were studied as a function of the lattice constant. These results show that the electrical resistivity increases when the lattice parameter is decreasing. The electrical resistivity of copper nitride with x = 0.25 was smaller than samples with x = 0.33.

  13. Nanostructures based in boro nitride thin films deposited by PLD onto Si/Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}/DLC substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roman, W S; Riascos, H [Grupo Plasma, Laser y Aplicaciones, Universidad Tecnologica de Pereira (Colombia); Caicedo, J C [Grupo de PelIculas Delgadas, Universidad del Valle, Cali (Colombia); Ospina, R [Laboratorio de Plasma, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, sede Manizales (Colombia); Tirado-MejIa, L, E-mail: hriascos@utp.edu.c [Laboratorio de Optoelectronica, Universidad del Quindio (Colombia)

    2009-05-01

    Diamond-like carbon and boron nitride were deposited like nanostructered bilayer on Si/Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} substrate, both with (100) crystallographic orientation, these films were deposited through pulsed laser technique (Nd: YAG: 8 Jcm{sup -2}, 9ns). Graphite (99.99%) and boron nitride (99.99%) targets used to growth the films in argon atmosphere. The thicknesses of bilayer were determined with a perfilometer, active vibration modes were analyzed using infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), finding bands associated around 1400 cm{sup -1} for B - N bonding and bands around 1700 cm{sup -1} associated with C=C stretching vibrations of non-conjugated alkenes and azometinic groups, respectively. The crystallites of thin films were analyzed using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and determinated the h-BN (0002), alpha-Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} (101) phases. The aim of this study is to relate the dependence on physical and chemical characteristics of the system Si/Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}/DLC/BN with gas pressure adjusted at the 1.33, 2.67 and 5.33 Pa values.

  14. TEM and AFM studies of aluminium nitride films synthesized by pulsed laser deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogarassy, Zs.; Petrik, P.; Duta, L.; Mihailescu, I. N.; Anastasescu, M.; Gartner, M.; Antonova, K.; Szekeres, A.

    2017-12-01

    Aluminium nitride (AlN) films were synthesized by pulsed laser ablation of poly-AlN target on Si(100) substrates using a KrF* excimer laser source ( λ = 248 nm, τ FWHM ≤ 25 ns), with incidence laser fluence of 3 J/cm2 and laser pulse repetition frequencies (LPF) of 3, 10 and 40 Hz, respectively. The depositions were performed in nitrogen pressure of 0.1 Pa and at substrate temperatures of 450 and 800 °C. The AlN structures were studied by transmission electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy (AFM), Fourier transform infrared reflectance (FTIR) spectroscopy and spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) measurements. The results show that at 450 °C and LPF of 3 Hz the AlN film is entirely amorphous, while at LPF of 10 and 40 Hz nanocrystallites with h-AlN phase appear in the grown films. At 800 °C, well-textured h-AlN nanocrystallites with columnar grains are formed. Growth of nanocrystallites in the 450 °C AlN films, similar to films grown at 800 °C, is possible when the films are deposited onto a high-temperature AlN "seed" layer, as they follow the columnar structure but with small-sized crystallites and a weaker texturing. AFM imaging reveals increasing surface roughness with the degree of crystallinity in the synthesized films. The structural changes are well correlated with the variation in the optical parameters registered by FTIR and SE.

  15. Optical and surface characterization of amorphous boron nitride thin films for use as blood compatible coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lousinian, S.; Kalfagiannis, N.; Logothetidis, S.

    2009-10-01

    The aim of this work is the investigation of the haemocompatibility properties of homogeneous and amorphous boron nitride (a-BN) thin films, through the adsorption of two basic blood plasma proteins, human serum albumin (HSA) and fibrinogen (Fib). The a-BN thin films were grown onto c-Si(100) substrates under different values of substrate bias voltage, employing the radio frequency (RF) magnetron sputtering technique. For the consideration of the optical, compositional and structural properties of the films, Spectroscopic Ellipsometry (SE) in the Vis-UV spectral region was used, while for the study of surface topography and surface charge distribution as well as of the wetting properties of the a-BN thin films, Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), Electric Force Microscopy (EFM) and Contact Angle measurements were additionally employed. The properties of the thin films were correlated with their haemocompatibility, through the estimation of the ratio of HSA/Fib surface concentration. The sp 3 content of the samples does not seem to correlate with the haemocompatibility of the a-BN thin films. However, the surface properties determine the thrombogenicity potential of the studied samples. More precisely, the a-BN films with a less negatively charged surface exhibit the smallest possibility of clot formation, possibly due to the interactions between the charged chains of the Fib molecules and the a-BN surface, while slight changes in the surface roughness do not affect their haemocompatibility properties. The wetting properties determine the thickness of the adsorbed Fib as well as the ratio of HSA/Fib surface concentration.

  16. Ab initio study of aspirin adsorption on single-walled carbon and carbon nitride nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yongju; Kwon, Dae-Gyeon; Kim, Gunn; Kwon, Young-Kyun

    We use ab intio density functional theory to investigate the adsorption properties of acetylsalicylic acid or aspirin on a (10, 0) carbon nanotube (CNT) and a (8, 0) triazine-based graphitic carbon nitride nanotube (CNNT). It is found that an aspirin molecule binds stronger to the CNNT with its adsorption energy of 0.67 eV than to the CNT with 0.51 eV. The stronger adsorption energy on the CNNT is ascribed to the high reactivity of its N atoms with high electron affinity. The CNNT exhibits local electric dipole moments, which cause strong charge redistribution in the aspirin molecule adsorbed on the CNNT than on the CNT. We also explore the influence of an external electric field on the adsorption properties of aspirin on these nanotubes by examining the modifications in their electronic band structures, partial densities of states, and charge distributions. It is found that an electric field applied along a particular direction induces aspirin molecular states in the in-gap region of the CNNT implying a potential application of aspirin detection.

  17. ECR plasma synthesis of silicon nitride films on GaAs and InSb

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbour, J.C.; Lovejoy, M.L.; Ashby, C.I.H.; Howard, A.J.; Custer, J.S.; Shul, R.J.

    1993-12-31

    Growth of high-quality dielectric films from Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) plasmas provides for low-temperature surface passivation of compound semiconductors. Silicon nitride (SiN{sub x}) films were grown at temperatures from 30 to 250 C on GaAs substrates. Stress in films was measured as a function of bias applied during growth (varied from 0 to 200 V), and of sample annealing treatments. Composition profiles of the samples were measured using ion beam analysis. The GaAs photoluminescence (PL) signal after SiN{sub x} growth without an applied bias (ion energy {congruent}30 eV) was twice as large as the PL signal from the cleaned GaAs substrate. The PL signal from samples biased at -50 and -100 V indicated that damage degraded the passivation quality, while atomic force microscopy of these samples showed a three fold increase in rms surface roughness relative to unbiased samples. The sample grown with a bias of -200 V showed the largest reduction in film stress but also the smallest PL signal.

  18. Direct growth of nanocrystalline hexagonal boron nitride films on dielectric substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tay, Roland Yingjie [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Temasek Laboratories@NTU, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Tsang, Siu Hon [Temasek Laboratories@NTU, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Loeblein, Manuela; Chow, Wai Leong [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); CNRS-International NTU Thales Research Alliance CINTRA UMI 3288, Research Techno Plaza, 50 Nanyang Drive, Singapore, Singapore 637553 (Singapore); Loh, Guan Chee [Institue of High Performance Computing, 1 Fusionopolis Way, #16-16 Connexis, Singapore 138632 (Singapore); Department of Physics, Michigan Technological University, Houghton, Michigan 49931 (United States); Toh, Joo Wah; Ang, Soon Loong [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Teo, Edwin Hang Tong, E-mail: htteo@ntu.edu.sg [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore, Singapore 639798 (Singapore)

    2015-03-09

    Atomically thin hexagonal-boron nitride (h-BN) films are primarily synthesized through chemical vapor deposition (CVD) on various catalytic transition metal substrates. In this work, a single-step metal-catalyst-free approach to obtain few- to multi-layer nanocrystalline h-BN (NCBN) directly on amorphous SiO{sub 2}/Si and quartz substrates is demonstrated. The as-grown thin films are continuous and smooth with no observable pinholes or wrinkles across the entire deposited substrate as inspected using optical and atomic force microscopy. The starting layers of NCBN orient itself parallel to the substrate, initiating the growth of the textured thin film. Formation of NCBN is due to the random and uncontrolled nucleation of h-BN on the dielectric substrate surface with no epitaxial relation, unlike on metal surfaces. The crystallite size is ∼25 nm as determined by Raman spectroscopy. Transmission electron microscopy shows that the NCBN formed sheets of multi-stacked layers with controllable thickness from ∼2 to 25 nm. The absence of transfer process in this technique avoids any additional degradation, such as wrinkles, tears or folding and residues on the film which are detrimental to device performance. This work provides a wider perspective of CVD-grown h-BN and presents a viable route towards large-scale manufacturing of h-BN substrates and for coating applications.

  19. Hydrogen production using zinc-doped carbon nitride catalyst irradiated with visible light

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bing Yue, Qiuye Li, Hideo Iwai, Tetsuya Kako and Jinhua Ye

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3N4 has been investigated as a photocatalyst for water splitting and organic dye degradation. In this study, we have developed a simple soft-chemical method of doping Zn into g-C3N4 to prepare a metal-containing carbon nitride. The doping was confirmed by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and diffusion reflectance spectra revealed a significant red shift in the absorption edge of Zn/g-C3N4. This hybrid material shows high photocatalytic activity and good stability for hydrogen evolution from an aqueous methanol solution under visible light irradiation (λ≥420 nm. The hydrogen evolution rate was more than 10 times higher for a 10%-Zn/g-C3N4 sample (59.5 μmol h−1 than for pure g-C3N4. The maximum quantum yield was 3.2% at 420 nm.

  20. Electrical behavior of multi-walled carbon nanotube network embedded in amorphous silicon nitride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buiculescu Raluca

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The electrical behavior of multi-walled carbon nanotube network embedded in amorphous silicon nitride is studied by measuring the voltage and temperature dependences of the current. The microstructure of the network is investigated by cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy. The multi-walled carbon nanotube network has an uniform spatial extension in the silicon nitride matrix. The current-voltage and resistance-temperature characteristics are both linear, proving the metallic behavior of the network. The I-V curves present oscillations that are further analyzed by computing the conductance-voltage characteristics. The conductance presents minima and maxima that appear at the same voltage for both bias polarities, at both 20 and 298 K, and that are not periodic. These oscillations are interpreted as due to percolation processes. The voltage percolation thresholds are identified with the conductance minima.

  1. Optimal indium-gallium-nitride Schottky-barrier thin-film solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Tom H.; Lakhtakia, Akhlesh; Monk, Peter B.

    2017-08-01

    A two-dimensional model was developed to simulate the optoelectronic characteristics of indium-gallium-nitride (InξGa1-ξN), thin-film, Schottky-barrier-junction solar cells. The solar cell comprises a window designed to reduce the reflection of incident light, Schottky-barrier and ohmic front electrodes, an n-doped InξGa1-ξN wafer, and a metallic periodically corrugated back-reflector (PCBR). The ratio of indium to gallium in the wafer varies periodically in the thickness direction, and thus the optical and electrical constitutive properties of the alloy also vary periodically. This material nonhomogeneity could be physically achieved by varying the fractional composition of indium and gallium during deposition. Empirical models for indium nitride and gallium nitride, combined with Vegard's law, were used to calculate the optical and electrical constitutive properties of the alloy. The periodic nonhomogeneity aids charge separation and, in conjunction with the PCBR, enables incident light to couple to multiple surface plasmon-polariton waves and waveguide modes. The profile of the resulting chargecarrier-generation rate when the solar cell is illuminated by the AM1.5G spectrum was calculated using the rigorous coupled-wave approach. The steady-state drift-diffusion equations were solved using COMSOL, which employs finite-element methods, to calculate the current density as a function of the voltage. Mid-band Shockley- Read-Hall, Auger, and radiative recombination rates were taken to be the dominant methods of recombination. The model was used to study the effects of the solar-cell geometry and the shape of the periodic material nonhomogeneity on efficiency. The solar-cell efficiency was optimized using the differential evolution algorithm.

  2. Predicted lattice-misfit stresses in a gallium-nitride (GaN) film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suhir, E.; Yi, S.

    2017-02-01

    Effective, easy-to-use and physically meaningful analytical predictive models are developed for the evaluation the lattice-misfit stresses (LMS) in a semiconductor film grown on a circular substrate (wafer). The two-dimensional (plane-stress) theory-of-elasticity approximation (TEA) is employed. First of all, the interfacial shearing stresses are evaluated. These stresses might lead to the occurrence and growth of dislocations, as well as to possible delaminations (adhesive strength of the assembly) and the elevated stress and strain in the buffering material, if any (cohesive strength of the assembly). Second of all, the normal radial and circumferential (tangential) stresses acting in the film cross-sections are determined. These stresses determine the short- and long-term strength (fracture toughness) of the film material. It is shown that while the normal stresses in the semiconductor film are independent of its thickness, the interfacial shearing stresses increase with an increase in the induced force (not stress!) acting in the film cross-sections, and that this force increases with an increase in the film thickness. This leads, for a thick enough film, to the occurrence, growth and propagation of dislocations. These start at the assembly ends and propagate, when the film thickness increases, inwards the structure. The TEA data are compared with the results obtained using a simplified strength-of-materials approach (SMA). This approach considers, instead of an actual circular assembly, an elongated bi-material rectangular strip of unit width and of finite length equal to the wafer diameter. The analysis, although applicable to any semiconductor crystal growth (SCG) technology is geared in this analysis to the Gallium-Nitride (GaN) technology. The numerical example is carried out for a GaN film grown on a Silicon Carbide (SiC) substrate. It is concluded that the SMA model is acceptable for understanding the physics of the state of stress and for the prediction

  3. 2D to 3D transition of polymeric carbon nitride nanosheets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chamorro-Posada, Pedro [Dpto. de Teoría de la Señal y Comunicaciones e IT, Universidad de Valladolid, ETSI Telecomunicación, Paseo Belén 15, 47011 Valladolid (Spain); Vázquez-Cabo, José [Dpto. de Teoría de la Señal y Comunicaciones, Universidad de Vigo, ETSI Telecomunicación, Lagoas Marcosende s/n, Vigo (Spain); Sánchez-Arévalo, Francisco M. [Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales (IIM), Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Apdo. Postal 70–360, Cd. Universitaria, México D.F. 04510 (Mexico); Martín-Ramos, Pablo [Dpto. de Teoría de la Señal y Comunicaciones e IT, Universidad de Valladolid, ETSI Telecomunicación, Paseo Belén 15, 47011 Valladolid (Spain); Laboratorio de Materiales Avanzados (Advanced Materials Laboratory) ETSIIAA, Universidad de Valladolid, Avenida de Madrid 44, 34004 Palencia (Spain); Martín-Gil, Jesús; Navas-Gracia, Luis M. [Laboratorio de Materiales Avanzados (Advanced Materials Laboratory) ETSIIAA, Universidad de Valladolid, Avenida de Madrid 44, 34004 Palencia (Spain); Dante, Roberto C., E-mail: rcdante@yahoo.com [Laboratorio de Materiales Avanzados (Advanced Materials Laboratory) ETSIIAA, Universidad de Valladolid, Avenida de Madrid 44, 34004 Palencia (Spain)

    2014-11-15

    The transition from a prevalent turbostratic arrangement with low planar interactions (2D) to an array of polymeric carbon nitride nanosheets with stronger interplanar interactions (3D), occurring for samples treated above 650 °C, was detected by terahertz-time domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS). The simulated 3D material made of stacks of shifted quasi planar sheets composed of zigzagged polymer ribbons, delivered a XRD simulated pattern in relatively good agreement with the experimental one. The 2D to 3D transition was also supported by the simulation of THz-TDS spectra obtained from quantum chemistry calculations, in which the same broad bands around 2 THz and 1.5 THz were found for 2D and 3D arrays, respectively. This transition was also in accordance with the tightening of the interplanar distance probably due to an interplanar π bond contribution, as evidenced also by a broad absorption around 2.6 eV in the UV–vis spectrum, which appeared in the sample treated at 650 °C, and increased in the sample treated at 700 °C. The band gap was calculated for 1D and 2D cases. The value of 3.374 eV for the 2D case is, within the model accuracy and precision, in a relative good agreement with the value of 3.055 eV obtained from the experimental results. - Graphical abstract: 2D lattice mode vibrations and structural changes correlated with the so called “2D to 3D transition”. - Highlights: • A 2D to 3D transition has been detected for polymeric carbon nitride. • THz-TDS allowed us to discover and detect the 2D to 3D transition of polymeric carbon nitride. • We propose a structure for polymeric carbon nitride confirming it with THz-TDS.

  4. Synthesis and photocatalytic properties of graphitic carbon nitride nanofibers using porous anodic alumina templates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suchitra, S. M.; Udayashankar, N. K.

    2017-12-01

    In the present study, we describe an effective method for the synthesis of Graphitic carbon nitride (GCN) nanostructures using porous anodic alumina (AAO) membrane as template by simple thermal condensation of cyanamide. Synthesized nanostructure was fully analysed by various techniques to detect its crystalline nature, morphology, luminescent properties followed by the evaluation of its photocatalytic activity in the degradation of Methylene blue dye. Structural analysis of synthesized GCNNF was systematically carried out using x-ray powder diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscope (SEM), and. The results confirmed the growth of GCN inside the nanochannels of anodic alumina templates. Luminescent properties of GCNNF were studied using photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy. PL analysis showed the presence of a strong emission peak in the wavelength range of 350–600 nm in blue region. GCNNF displays higher photocatalytic performance in the photodegradation of methylene blue compare to the bulk GCN. Highlights 1. In the present paper, we report the synthesis of graphitic carbon nitride nanofibers (GCNNF) using porous anodic aluminium oxide membranes as templates through thermal condensation of cyanamide at 500 °C. 2. The synthesis of Graphitic carbon nitride nanofibers using porous andic alumina template is the efficient approach for increasing crystallinity and surface area. 3. The high surface area of graphitic carbon nitride nanofibers has a good impact on novel optical and photocatalytic properties of the bulkGCN. 4. AAO templating of GCN is one of the versatile method to produce tailorable GCN nanostructures with higher surface area and less number of structural defects. 5. Towards photocatalytic degradation of dyes, the tuning of physical properties is very essential thing hence we are succeeded in achieving better catalytic performance of GCN nanostructures by making use of AAO templates.

  5. Cobalt-doped graphitic carbon nitride photocatalysts with high activity for hydrogen evolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Pei-Wen; Li, Kui; Yu, Yu-Xiang; Zhang, Wei-De, E-mail: zhangwd@scut.edu.cn

    2017-01-15

    Graphical abstract: Cobalt-doped graphitic carbon nitride (Co−CN) was synthesized by one-step thermal polycondensation using cobalt phthalocyanine and melamine as precursors. The obtained photocatalysts display high and stable activity for photocatalytic generation of hydrogen through water splitting. - Highlights: • Cobalt-doped g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} photocatalysts were prepared. • High and stable visible light photocatalytic activity for H{sub 2} evolution. • Efficient separation and transfer of photo-induced electron-hole pairs. - Abstract: Cobalt-doped graphitic carbon nitride (Co−CN) was synthesized by one-step thermal polycondensation using cobalt phthalocyanine (CoPc) and melamine as precursors. The π-π interaction between melamine and CoPc promotes cobalt doping into the framework of g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4}. The prepared samples were carefully characterized and the results demonstrated that Co-doped graphitic carbon nitride inhibited the crystal growth of graphitic carbon nitride (CN), leading to larger specific surface area (33.1 m{sup 2} g{sup −1}) and abundant Co-N{sub x} active sites, narrower band gap energy and more efficient separation of photogenerated electrons and holes. 0.46% Co−CN exhibited higher hydrogen evolution rate (28.0 μmol h{sup −1}) under visible light irradiation, which is about 3.0 times of that over the pure CN and about 2.2 times of that over cobalt-doped CN using CoCl{sub 2} ∙ 6H{sub 2}O as a cobalt source. This study provides a valuable strategy to modify CN with enhanced photocatalytic performance.

  6. Cu and Boron Doped Carbon Nitride for Highly Selective Oxidation of Toluene to Benzaldehyde.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Hongling; Ding, Guodong; Wu, Tianbin; Yang, Dexin; Jiang, Tao; Han, Buxing

    2015-07-13

    A novel Cu and boron doped graphitic carbon nitride catalyst (Cu-CNB) was synthesized using cheap precursors and systematically characterized. The selective oxidation of toluene proceeded very smoothly over the catalyst at 70 °C using tert-butyl hydroperoxide (TBHP) as the oxidant to exclusively afford benzaldehyde. The catalyst can be used for at least five cycles without decrease in activity and selectivity.

  7. Cu and Boron Doped Carbon Nitride for Highly Selective Oxidation of Toluene to Benzaldehyde

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongling Han

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available A novel Cu and boron doped graphitic carbon nitride catalyst (Cu-CNB was synthesized using cheap precursors and systematically characterized. The selective oxidation of toluene proceeded very smoothly over the catalyst at 70 °C using tert-butyl hydroperoxide (TBHP as the oxidant to exclusively afford benzaldehyde. The catalyst can be used for at least five cycles without decrease in activity and selectivity.

  8. Cu and Boron Doped Carbon Nitride for Highly Selective Oxidation of Toluene to Benzaldehyde

    OpenAIRE

    Han, Hongling; Ding, Guodong; Wu, Tianbin; Yang, Dexin; Jiang, Tao; Han, Buxing

    2015-01-01

    A novel Cu and boron doped graphitic carbon nitride catalyst (Cu-CNB) was synthesized using cheap precursors and systematically characterized. The selective oxidation of toluene proceeded very smoothly over the catalyst at 70 °C using tert-butyl hydroperoxide (TBHP) as the oxidant to exclusively afford benzaldehyde. The catalyst can be used for at least five cycles without decrease in activity and selectivity.

  9. Atomic layer deposition of tantalum nitride based thin films from cyclopentadienyl type precursor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anacleto, A. Correia, E-mail: anthony.correia@airliquide.co [Air Liquide, Centre de Recherche Claude Delorme, 1, chemin de la porte des loges - Les Loges en Josas - BP 126, 78354 Jouy en Josas Cedex (France); Zauner, A.; Cany-Canian, D. [Air Liquide, Centre de Recherche Claude Delorme, 1, chemin de la porte des loges - Les Loges en Josas - BP 126, 78354 Jouy en Josas Cedex (France); Gatineau, J. [Air Liquide, Air Liquide Laboratories, 28 Wadai, Tsukuba-shi, Ibaraki-Pref. 300-4247 (Japan); Hugon, M.-C. [Laboratoire de Physique des Gaz et Plasmas, UMR 8578, CNRS - Universite Paris Sud 11, 15, rue Georges Clemenceau, 91405 Orsay Cedex (France)

    2010-10-29

    Tantalum nitride based thin films have been deposited on p-Si (100) and SiO{sub 2}/Si by thermal Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) using either the Ta(= N{sup t}Bu)(NEt{sub 2}){sub 3} or a derivative, in which one dialkylamido ligand is substituted by a {eta}{sup 5}-cyclopentadienyl ({eta}{sup 5}-Cp), as metal organic precursors with ammonia as reducing agent. TaN{sub x}C{sub y} self-limiting temperature dependent ALD growth was achieved for the TaCp(= N{sup t}Bu)(NEt{sub 2}){sub 2}/NH{sub 3} process with a growth rate of 0.51-0.91 A cycle{sup -1} in the 400-425 {sup o}C temperature range while between 240 and 280 {sup o}C, the growth of TaN based films from the Ta(= N{sup t}Bu)(NEt{sub 2}){sub 3} was accompanied by a partial decomposition of the precursor. The {eta}{sup 5}-cyclopentadienyl type compound allows lower nitrogen content in the precursor and thereafter in the deposited film. Although N/Ta ratio is close to one at temperatures of 390 and 400 {sup o}C, as analyzed by Rutherford Back Scattering and Nuclear Reaction Analysis, films were amorphous independently of the deposition temperature. Since Ta-C bonds are present in the Cp derivative, the TaCp(= N{sup t}Bu)(NEt{sub 2}){sub 2} tends more likely to form tantalum carbide compared to Ta(= N{sup t}Bu)(NEt{sub 2}){sub 3}, which leads to lower thin film resistivity. For both precursors, employed in their respective ALD window, films were smooth with a root-mean-square roughness close to 1 nm.

  10. Comparative study of electron transport mechanisms in epitaxial and polycrystalline zinc nitride films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, Xiang; Yamaguchi, Yuuki; Ninomiya, Yoshihiko; Yamada, Naoomi, E-mail: n-yamada@isc.chubu.ac.jp [Department of Applied Chemistry, Chubu University, 1200 Matsumoto, Kasugai, Aichi 487–8501 (Japan)

    2016-01-14

    Zn{sub 3}N{sub 2} has been reported to have high electron mobility even in polycrystalline films. The high mobility in polycrystalline films is a striking feature as compared with group-III nitrides. However, the origins of the high mobility have not been elucidated to date. In this paper, we discuss the reason for high mobility in Zn{sub 3}N{sub 2}. We grew epitaxial and polycrystalline films of Zn{sub 3}N{sub 2}. Electron effective mass (m*) was determined optically and found to decrease with a decrease in electron density. Using a nonparabolic conduction band model, the m* at the bottom of the conduction band was derived to be (0.08 ± 0.03)m{sub 0} (m{sub 0} denotes the free electron mass), which is comparable to that in InN. Optically determined intra-grain mobility (μ{sub opt}) in the polycrystalline films was higher than 110 cm{sup 2} V{sup −1} s{sup −1}, resulting from the small m*. The Hall mobility (μ{sub H}) in the polycrystalline films was significantly smaller than μ{sub opt}, indicating that electron transport is impeded by scattering at the grain boundaries. Nevertheless, μ{sub H} higher than 70 cm{sup 2} V{sup −1} s{sup −1} was achievable owing to the beneficial effect of the high μ{sub opt}. As for the epitaxial films, we revealed that electron transport is hardly affected by grain boundary scattering and is governed solely by ionized impurity scattering. The findings in this study suggest that Zn{sub 3}N{sub 2} is a high-mobility semiconductor with small effective mass.

  11. Magnetic and structural properties of nitrided Fe and FeTi thin films

    CERN Document Server

    Bonder, M J

    2001-01-01

    presence of weak perpendicular anisotropy occurring as the bilayer thickness increased. As the bilayer thickness was increased there was an asymptotic approach of the magnetization to the level of the unexposed materials. The presence of the perpendicular anisotropy was maintained for a larger parameter space. In both series the anisotropy is attributed to stress induced by the substrate, Nitriding Fe and FeTi using the aforementioned technique provides a controlled and viable way to alter the magnetic and structural properties. This thesis investigates the magnetic and structural properties of Fe and Fe sub 8 sub 5 Ti sub 1 sub 5 thin films nitrided using a nitrogen atom source. In this novel technique, the atom source produces an atomic nitrogen beam for which multilayer samples with bilayers of the form Fe/FeN or FeTi/FeTiN were synthesized by varying the thickness of the Fe or FeTi exposed to the nitrogen beam. The samples studied here are all in the as-deposited state. X-Ray reflectivity confirms the pre...

  12. Charge Modulation in Graphitic Carbon Nitride as a Switchable Approach to High-Capacity Hydrogen Storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Xin; Kou, Liangzhi; Tahini, Hassan A; Smith, Sean C

    2015-11-01

    Electrical charging of graphitic carbon nitride nanosheets (g-C4 N3 and g-C3 N4 ) is proposed as a strategy for high-capacity and electrocatalytically switchable hydrogen storage. Using first-principle calculations, we found that the adsorption energy of H2 molecules on graphitic carbon nitride nanosheets is dramatically enhanced by injecting extra electrons into the adsorbent. At full hydrogen coverage, the negatively charged graphitic carbon nitride achieves storage capacities up to 6-7 wt %. In contrast to other hydrogen storage approaches, the storage/release occurs spontaneously once extra electrons are introduced or removed, and these processes can be simply controlled by switching on/off the charging voltage. Therefore, this approach promises both facile reversibility and tunable kinetics without the need of specific catalysts. Importantly, g-C4 N3 has good electrical conductivity and high electron mobility, which can be a very good candidate for electron injection/release. These predictions may prove to be instrumental in searching for a new class of high-capacity hydrogen storage materials. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Graphitic carbon nitride/graphene oxide/reduced graphene oxide nanocomposites for photoluminescence and photocatalysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aleksandrzak, Malgorzata, E-mail: malgorzata.aleksandrzak@o2.pl; Kukulka, Wojciech; Mijowska, Ewa

    2017-03-15

    Highlights: • Graphitic carbon nitride modified with graphene nanostructures. • Influence of graphene nanostructures size in photocatalytic properties of g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4}. • Improved photocatalysis resulted from up-converted photoluminescence. - Abstract: The study presents a modification of graphitic carbon nitride (g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4}) with graphene oxide (GO) and reduced graphene oxide (rGO) and investigation of photoluminescent and photocatalytic properties. The influence of GO and rGO lateral sizes used for the modification was investigated. The nanomaterials were characterized with atomic force microscopy (AFM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), diffuse reflectance UV–vis spectroscopy (DR-UV-vis) and photoluminescence spectroscopy (PL). PL revealed that pristine graphitic carbon nitride and its nanocomposites with GO and rGO emitted up-converted photoluminescence (UCPL) which could contribute to the improvement of photocatalytic activity of the materials. The photoactivity was evaluated in a process of phenol decomposition under visible light. A hybrid composed of rGO nanoparticles (rGONPs, 4–135 nm) exhibited the highest photoactivity compared to rGO with size of 150 nm–7.2 μm and graphene oxide with the corresponding sizes. The possible reason of the superior photocatalytic activity is the most enhanced UCPL of rGONPs, contributing to the emission of light with higher energy than the incident light, resulting in improved photogeneration of electron-hole pairs.

  14. Progress of Diamond-like Carbon Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CHEN Qing-yun

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Diamond-like carbon(DLC films had many unique and outstanding properties such as high thermal conductivity, high hardness, excellent chemical inertness, low friction coefficients and wear coefficients. The properties and combinations were very promising for heat sink, micro-electromechanical devices, radiation hardening, biomedical devices, automotive industry and other technical applications, more research and a lot of attention were attracted in recent years. The research progress of diamond-like films and the nucleation mechanism of film were summarized, and application prospect of DLC films were demonstrated. The aim of this paper is to provide insights on the research trend of DLC films and the industry applications.

  15. Optical emission spectroscopy of Aluminum Nitride thin films deposited by Pulsed Laser Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, J. A.; Vera, L. P.; Riascos, H.; Caicedo, J. C.

    2014-05-01

    In this work we study the Aluminium Nitride plasma produced by Nd:YAG pulsed laser, (λ = 1064 nm, 500 mJ, τ = 9 ns) with repletion rate of 10 Hz. The laser interaction on Al target (99.99%) under nitrogen gas atmosphere generate a plasma which is produced at room temperature; with variation in the pressure work from 0.53 Pa to 0.66 Pa matching with a applied laser fluence of 7 J/cm2.The films thickness measured by profilometer was 150 nm. The plasma generated was at different pressures was characterized by Optical Emission Spectroscopy (EOS). From emission spectra obtained ionic and atomic species were observed. The plume electronic temperature has been determined by assuming a local thermodynamic equilibrium of the emitting species. Finally the electronic temperature was calculated with Boltzmann plot from relative intensities of spectral lines.

  16. Imaging and identifying defects in nitride semiconductor thin films using a scanning electron microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naresh-Kumar, G.; Hourahine, B.; Trager-Cowan, C. [Department of Physics, SUPA, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow (United Kingdom); Vilalta-Clemente, A.; Ruterana, P. [CIMAP UMR 6252 CNRS-ENSICAEN-CEA-UCBN, 6, Caen (France); Gamarra, P.; Lacam, C.; Tordjman, M.; Di Forte-Poisson, M.A. [Thales Research and Technology, III-V Lab, Marcoussis (France); Parbrook, P.J. [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, University of Sheffield (United Kingdom); Day, A.P. [Aunt Daisy Scientific Ltd., Claremont House, High St, Lydney (United Kingdom); England, G. [K. E. Developments Ltd., Cambridge (United Kingdom)

    2012-03-15

    We describe the use of electron channelling contrast imaging (ECCI) - in a field emission scanning electron microscope (SEM) - to reveal and identify defects in nitride semiconductor thin films. In ECCI changes in crystallographic orientation, or changes in lattice constant due to local strain, are revealed by changes in grey scale in an image constructed by monitoring the intensity of backscattered electrons (BSEs) as an electron beam is scanned over a suitably oriented sample. Extremely small orientation changes are detectable, enabling small angle tilt and rotation boundaries and dislocations to be imaged. Images with a resolution of tens of nanometres are obtainable with ECCI. In this paper, we describe the use of ECCI with TEM to determine threading dislocation densities and types in InAlN/GaN heterostructures grown on SiC and sapphire substrates. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  17. Synthesis and Characterization of LPCVD Polysilicon and Silicon Nitride Thin Films for MEMS Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Sharma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Inherent residual stresses during material deposition can have profound effects on the functionality and reliability of fabricated MEMS devices. Residual stress often causes device failure due to curling, buckling, or fracture. Typically, the material properties of thin films used in surface micromachining are not very well controlled during deposition. The residual stress, for example, tends to vary significantly for different deposition conditions; experiments were carried out to study the polysilicon and silicon nitride deposited by Low Pressure Chemical Vapor Deposition (LPCVD method at wide range of process conditions. High temperature annealing effects on stress in case polysilicon are also reported. The reduced residual stress levels can significantly improve device performance, reliability, and yield as MEMS devices become smaller.

  18. Modeling the Growth of Aluminum Gallium Nitride ((Al)GaN) Films Grown on Aluminum Nitride (AlN) Substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-01

    cadmium zinc telluride ( CdZnTe or CZT) on Si using a superlattice (SL) in which the SL layers had different compositions (10). We found that the...Abbreviations, and Acronyms (Al)GaN aluminum gallium arsenide AlN aluminum nitride ARL U.S. Army Research Laboratory CdZnTe or CZT cadmium zinc

  19. Thermal stability of tungsten-boron-nitride thin film as diffusion barrier

    CERN Document Server

    Park, Y K; Kim, Y T; Lee, C W

    2000-01-01

    The electrical and the structural properties of tungsten boron nitride (W-B-N) thin films were studied to investigate the effects of boron and nitrogen in the 10000 A W-B-N diffusion barrier. The W-B-N thin films were deposited by using the RF magnetron sputtering method. The impurities provided a stuffing effect that was very effective for preventing interdiffusion between the interconnection metal and the silicon during the subsequent high-temperature annealing process. The resistivities of the W-B-N thin films were in the range of 140 - 406 mu OMEGA-cm, depending on the partial pressure ratio of the N sub 2 gas and the RF power density of the W sub 2 B sub 5 target. XRD and electrical property analyses showed that the W-B-N barrier did not react with Si during the annealing in N sub 2 gas ambient, even for annealing at 1000 .deg. C for 30 min.

  20. Mechanical, Corrosion and Biological Properties of Room-Temperature Sputtered Aluminum Nitride Films with Dissimilar Nanostructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besleaga, Cristina; Dumitru, Viorel; Trinca, Liliana Marinela; Popa, Adrian-Claudiu; Negrila, Constantin-Catalin; Kołodziejczyk, Łukasz; Luculescu, Catalin-Romeo; Ionescu, Gabriela-Cristina; Ripeanu, Razvan-George; Vladescu, Alina; Stan, George E

    2017-11-17

    Aluminum Nitride (AlN) has been long time being regarded as highly interesting material for developing sensing applications (including biosensors and implantable sensors). AlN, due to its appealing electronic properties, is envisaged lately to serve as a multi-functional biosensing platform. Although generally exploited for its intrinsic piezoelectricity, its surface morphology and mechanical performance (elastic modulus, hardness, wear, scratch and tensile resistance to delamination, adherence to the substrate), corrosion resistance and cytocompatibility are also essential features for high performance sustainable biosensor devices. However, information about AlN suitability for such applications is rather scarce or at best scattered and incomplete. Here, we aim to deliver a comprehensive evaluation of the morpho-structural, compositional, mechanical, electrochemical and biological properties of reactive radio-frequency magnetron sputtered AlN nanostructured thin films with various degrees of c -axis texturing, deposited at a low temperature (~50 °C) on Si (100) substrates. The inter-conditionality elicited between the base pressure level attained in the reactor chamber and crystalline quality of AlN films is highlighted. The potential suitability of nanostructured AlN (in form of thin films) for the realization of various type of sensors (with emphasis on bio-sensors) is thoroughly probed, thus unveiling its advantages and limitations, as well as suggesting paths to safely exploit the remarkable prospects of this type of materials.

  1. Mechanical, Corrosion and Biological Properties of Room-Temperature Sputtered Aluminum Nitride Films with Dissimilar Nanostructure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Besleaga

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Aluminum Nitride (AlN has been long time being regarded as highly interesting material for developing sensing applications (including biosensors and implantable sensors. AlN, due to its appealing electronic properties, is envisaged lately to serve as a multi-functional biosensing platform. Although generally exploited for its intrinsic piezoelectricity, its surface morphology and mechanical performance (elastic modulus, hardness, wear, scratch and tensile resistance to delamination, adherence to the substrate, corrosion resistance and cytocompatibility are also essential features for high performance sustainable biosensor devices. However, information about AlN suitability for such applications is rather scarce or at best scattered and incomplete. Here, we aim to deliver a comprehensive evaluation of the morpho-structural, compositional, mechanical, electrochemical and biological properties of reactive radio-frequency magnetron sputtered AlN nanostructured thin films with various degrees of c-axis texturing, deposited at a low temperature (~50 °C on Si (100 substrates. The inter-conditionality elicited between the base pressure level attained in the reactor chamber and crystalline quality of AlN films is highlighted. The potential suitability of nanostructured AlN (in form of thin films for the realization of various type of sensors (with emphasis on bio-sensors is thoroughly probed, thus unveiling its advantages and limitations, as well as suggesting paths to safely exploit the remarkable prospects of this type of materials.

  2. Effect of Cryogenic Cooling for Gallium Nitride Film Placed in Argon Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Daisuke; Nakano, Yoshitaka; Nakamura, Keiji

    2014-10-01

    There is no doubt for a gallium nitride (GaN) film to have plasma-induced damage (PID) when exposed in a plasma discharge. Our technique to make in-situ monitoring on a GaN film exposed in argon plasma is valuable toward to reveal the evolution of the damage. We evaluated the PID with photoluminescence (PL) that is excited with a ultra-violet light source. Our preliminary result showed that the PL intensity at the blue luminescence band (BL: 400--480 nm) increased while the intensity at yellow luminescence (YL: 480--700 nm) decreased as the plasma exposure time increased. Chen et al. previously found that PL spectrum changes due to both PID and substrate temperature. However, BL intensity is independent from the substrate temperature, while BL intensity is dependent on the degree of PID. In this experiment, we performed the plasma exposure to a GaN film under the situation when the substrate temperature was cooled with liquid nitrogen. The substrate temperature is set at -110 degC and exposed plasma in 15 minutes. In this condition, our BL stayed almost constant. This is an indication that we might be able to avoid the damage in the wavelength shorter than 480 nm. We will show more details from this results and further progresses in this presentation.

  3. APCVD hexagonal boron nitride thin films for passive near-junction thermal management of electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    KC, Pratik; Rai, Amit; Ashton, Taylor S.; Moore, Arden L.

    2017-12-01

    The ability of graphene to serve as an ultrathin heat spreader has been previously demonstrated with impressive results. However, graphene is electrically conductive, making its use in contact with electronic devices problematic from a reliability and integration perspective. As an alternative, hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) is a similarly structured material with large in-plane thermal conductivity but which possesses a wide band gap, thereby giving it potential to be utilized for directing contact, near-junction thermal management of electronics without shorting or the need for an insulating intermediate layer. In this work, the viability of using large area, continuous h-BN thin films as direct contact, near-junction heat spreaders for electronic devices is experimentally evaluated. Thin films of h-BN several square millimeters in size were synthesized via an atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition (APCVD) method that is both simple and scalable. These were subsequently transferred onto a microfabricated test device that simulated a multigate transistor while also allowing for measurements of the device temperature at various locations via precision resistance thermometry. Results showed that these large-area h-BN films with thicknesses of 77–125 nm are indeed capable of significantly lowering microdevice temperatures, with the best sample showing the presence of the h-BN thin film reduced the effective thermal resistance by 15.9% ± 4.6% compared to a bare microdevice at the same power density. Finally, finite element simulations of these experiments were utilized to estimate the thermal conductivity of the h-BN thin films and identify means by which further heat spreading performance gains could be attained.

  4. NITROANILINE FILM-HOLE MODIFIED GLASSY CARBON ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ABSTRACT. Herein, we report determination of dopamine (DA) at modified glassy carbon electrode (GCE) with a film produced by reduction of diazonium generated from p-nitroaniline (PNA). Pores were created purposely by stripping pre-deposited gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) in the modifier film. The modified electrodes.

  5. Non-destructive photon activation analysis of carbon and nitrogen in thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shikano, Koji; Katoh, Masaaki [Nippon Telegraph and Telephone Corp., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Opto-electronics Labs.; Masumoto, Kazuyoshi; Ohtsuki, Tsutomu

    1998-09-01

    Study was made on interference nuclear reactions with {sup 12}C({gamma},n){sup 11}C and {sup 14}N({gamma},n){sup 13}N reactions, interference radioactivity from the matrix, and prevention of contamination from the atmosphere. The following were made clear: Interference nuclear reactions can be neglected by controlling the radiation energy of bremsstrahlung below 30 MeV; radiation interference can be avoided by starting measurement 20-30 min after irradiation, though {sup 29}Al is formed from Si substrate; and contamination from the atmosphere can be controlled by He gas replacement. With graphite and boron nitride used as the reference standards, carbon in silicon carbide film and nitrogen in silicon nitride film were determined with the result that their concentrations in the films were 37.03{+-}1.28 {mu}g/cm{sup 2} and 52.97{+-}2.97 {mu}g/cm{sup 2}, respectively. The determination limits of this method were 0.3 {mu}g for carbon and 3 {mu}g for nitrogen. The measurement of film thickness distribution revealed that these film samples could be used as light element reference standards for charged particle activation analysis. (N.H.)

  6. Deposition and characterization of amorphous aluminum nitride thin films for a gate insulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oikawa, H.; Akiyama, R. [Institute of Materials Science, University of Tsukuba,1-1-1 Tennoudai, Tsukuba, 305-8573 (Japan); Tsukuba Nano-Tech Human Resource Development Program, Graduate School of Pure and Applied Sciences, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennoudai, Tsukuba, 305-8571 (Japan); Kanazawa, K. [Institute of Materials Science, University of Tsukuba,1-1-1 Tennoudai, Tsukuba, 305-8573 (Japan); Kuroda, S., E-mail: kuroda@ims.tsukuba.ac.jp [Institute of Materials Science, University of Tsukuba,1-1-1 Tennoudai, Tsukuba, 305-8573 (Japan); Tsukuba Nano-Tech Human Resource Development Program, Graduate School of Pure and Applied Sciences, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennoudai, Tsukuba, 305-8571 (Japan); Harayama, I. [Institute of Applied Physics, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennoudai, Tsukuba, 305-8573 (Japan); Tsukuba Nano-Tech Human Resource Development Program, Graduate School of Pure and Applied Sciences, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennoudai, Tsukuba, 305-8571 (Japan); Nagashima, K. [Institute of Applied Physics, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennoudai, Tsukuba, 305-8573 (Japan); Sekiba, D. [Institute of Applied Physics, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennoudai, Tsukuba, 305-8573 (Japan); Tandem Accelerator Complex, Research Facility Center for Science and Technology, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennoudai, Tsukuba, 305-8577 (Japan); Ashizawa, Y.; Tsukamoto, A.; Nakagawa, K. [College of Science and Technology, Nihon University, 7-24-1 Narashinodai, Funabashi, 274-8501 (Japan); Ota, N. [Tsukuba Nano-Tech Human Resource Development Program, Graduate School of Pure and Applied Sciences, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennoudai, Tsukuba, 305-8571 (Japan)

    2015-01-01

    Thin films of aluminum nitride (AlN) fabricated by reactive deposition were characterized in order to examine the electrical insulation properties suitable for a gate insulator. For a series of AlN films deposited with a variation of the amount of Al flux at a fixed N flux, compositional and chemical analyses were performed using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and elastic recoil detection analysis (ERDA). Combined with the result of current-voltage (I-V) measurement, it is found that the insulation properties are correlated with the compositional ratio between Al and N estimated by the ERDA measurement; a good electrical insulation with a minimal leak current of the order of 10{sup -9} A/cm{sup 2} at a high electric field 1 MV/cm is achieved in the film of nearly stoichiometric compositional ratio of Al/N, in which the dominance of the Al-N bonding state is confirmed in the XPS measurement. On the other hand, the incorporation of oxygen, probably caused by the surface oxidization due to the exposure to the air, has little effect on the electrical properties. - Highlights: • AlN thin films deposited by reactive deposition were characterized for gate insulator. • A good electrical insulation was achieved at nearly stoichiometric composition. • The effects of oxygen incorporation and Al-N bonding state were also investigated. • A minimum leak current density as low as 10{sup -9}A/cm{sup 2} at 1MV/cm was achieved.

  7. In situ preparation of calcium carbonate films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dahle, S. [Clausthaler Zentrum fuer Materialtechnik, Technische Universitaet Clausthal, Leibnizstrasse 4, 38678 Clausthal-Zellerfeld (Germany); Institut fuer Physik und Physikalische Technologien, Technische Universitaet Clausthal, Leibnizstrasse 4, 38678 Clausthal-Zellerfeld (Germany); Voigts, F. [Institut fuer Physik und Physikalische Technologien, Technische Universitaet Clausthal, Leibnizstrasse 4, 38678 Clausthal-Zellerfeld (Germany); Maus-Friedrichs, W., E-mail: w.maus-friedrichs@pe.tu-clausthal.de [Clausthaler Zentrum fuer Materialtechnik, Technische Universitaet Clausthal, Leibnizstrasse 4, 38678 Clausthal-Zellerfeld (Germany); Institut fuer Physik und Physikalische Technologien, Technische Universitaet Clausthal, Leibnizstrasse 4, 38678 Clausthal-Zellerfeld (Germany)

    2012-01-01

    The in situ preparation of calcium carbonate films in an ultra high vacuum (UHV) is inhibited by the decomposition of CO{sub 2} molecules at the surface and the absence of CO{sub 2} bulk diffusion. Therefore, it is not possible to prepare such films simply by CO{sub 2} exposure to a calcium layer. We investigated different approaches for the preparation of CaCO{sub 3} films in an UHV. Among these, only the simultaneous evaporation of Ca atoms in a mixed O{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} atmosphere is able to produce well defined stoichiometric calcium carbonate films. Metastable Induced Electron Spectroscopy, Ultraviolet Photoelectron Spectroscopy and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy are employed to verify quality and purity of the films.

  8. Sulfur-Doped Carbon Nitride Polymers for Photocatalytic Degradation of Organic Pollutant and Reduction of Cr(VI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yun; Yu, Zihao; Lin, Feng; Guo, Fangsong; Alamry, Khalid A; Taib, Layla A; Asiri, Abdullah M; Wang, Xinchen

    2017-04-01

    As a promising conjugated polymer, binary carbon nitride has attracted extensive attention as a metal-free and visible-light-responsive photocatalyst in the area of photon-involving purification of water and air. Herein, we report sulfur-doped polymeric carbon nitride microrods that are synthesized through thermal polymerization based on trithiocyanuric acid and melamine (TM) supramolecular aggregates. By tuning the polymerization temperature, a series of sulfur-doped carbon nitride microrods are prepared. The degradation of Rhodamine B (RhB) and the reduction of hexavalent chromium Cr(VI) are selected as probe reactions to evaluate the photocatalytic activities. Results show that increasing pyrolysis temperature leads to a large specific surface area, strong visible-light absorption, and accelerated electron-hole separation. Compared to bulk carbon nitride, the highly porous sulfur-doped carbon nitride microrods fabricated at 650 °C exhibit remarkably higher photocatalytic activity for degradation of RhB and reduction of Cr(VI). This work highlights the importance of self-assembly approach and temperature-control strategy in the synthesis of photoactive materials for environmental remediation.

  9. Superconducting energy scales and anomalous dissipative conductivity in thin films of molybdenum nitride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simmendinger, Julian; Pracht, Uwe S.; Daschke, Lena; Proslier, Thomas; Klug, Jeffrey A.; Dressel, Martin; Scheffler, Marc

    2016-08-01

    We report investigations of molybdenum nitride (MoN) thin films with different thickness and disorder and with superconducting transition temperature 9.89K >= T-c >= 2.78 K. Using terahertz frequency-domain spectroscopy we explore the normal and superconducting charge carrier dynamics for frequencies covering the range from 3 to 38 cm(-1) (0.1 to 1.1 THz). The superconducting energy scales, i.e., the critical temperature T-c, the pairing energy Delta, and the superfluid stiffness J, and the superfluid density n(s) can be well described within the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer theory for conventional superconductors. At the same time, we find an anomalously large dissipative conductivity, which cannot be explained by thermally excited quasiparticles, but rather by a temperature-dependent normal-conducting fraction, persisting deep into the superconducting state. Our results on this disordered system constrain the regime, where discernible effects stemming from the disorder-induced superconductor-insulator transition possibly become relevant, to MoN films with a transition temperature lower than at least 2.78 K.

  10. Mechanical and electrical properties of RF magnetron sputter deposited amorphous silicon-rich silicon nitride thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dergez, D.; Schneider, M., E-mail: michael.schneider@tuwien.ac.at; Bittner, A.; Pawlak, N.; Schmid, U.

    2016-05-01

    Amorphous silicon nitride thin films in a thickness range of 40 to 500 nm are deposited onto (100) silicon wafers using radio frequency magnetron sputter deposition. Analysis of variance techniques are used to determine which deposition parameter has a significant impact on the film properties. The biaxial stress of the layers is found to be compressive independent of the plasma chamber pressure levels and to increase with increasing plasma power. The chemical composition of the films is silicon-rich, resulting in an index of refraction (IOR) of 2.55 independent of deposition conditions. Both IOR and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements indicate a nitrogen to silicon ratio in the range of 0.71–0.85. The etch rates for HF wet chemical etching and for CF{sub 4}:O{sub 2} reactive ion etching are found to be much higher compared to direct current sputter deposited silicon nitride films with only a weak dependency on the deposition conditions. Temperature dependent leakage current measurements using Au/Cr/SiN{sub x}/Si structures between 25 and 300 °C show two dominating leakage current mechanisms: ohmic conduction dominates at low applied electric field values below 0.1 MV/cm and Poole–Frenkel type conduction above 0.3 MV/cm. The extracted electrical parameters such as the activation energy or the barrier height are found to be nearly unaffected by the deposition parameters. - Highlights: • RF reactive sputter deposited Si-rich silicon nitride thin films are investigated. • Deposition conditions show nearly no impact on film stress or chemical composition. • Wet and dry etch rates decrease with increasing process chamber pressure levels. • Electrical behaviour is dependent on film thickness, but not on deposition conditions.

  11. Galvanic corrosion of structural non-stoichiometric silicon nitride thin films and its implications on reliability of microelectromechanical devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Broas, M., E-mail: mikael.broas@aalto.fi; Mattila, T. T.; Paulasto-Kröckel, M. [Department of Electrical Engineering and Automation, Aalto University, Espoo, P.O. Box 13500, FIN-00076 Aalto (Finland); Liu, X.; Ge, Y. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Aalto University, Espoo, P.O. Box 16200, FIN-00076 Aalto (Finland)

    2015-06-28

    This paper describes a reliability assessment and failure analysis of a poly-Si/non-stoichiometric silicon nitride thin film composite structure. A set of poly-Si/SiN{sub x} thin film structures were exposed to a mixed flowing gas (MFG) environment, which simulates outdoor environments, for 90 days, and an elevated temperature and humidity (85 °C/95% R.H.) test for 140 days. The mechanical integrity of the thin films was observed to degrade during exposure to the chemically reactive atmospheres. The degree of degradation was analyzed with nanoindentation tests. Statistical analysis of the forces required to initiate a fracture in the thin films indicated degradation due to the exposure to the MFG environment in the SiN{sub x} part of the films. Scanning electron microscopy revealed a porous-like reaction layer on top of SiN{sub x}. The morphology of the reaction layer resembled that of galvanically corroded poly-Si. Transmission electron microscopy further clarified the microstructure of the reaction layer which had a complex multi-phase structure extending to depths of ∼100 nm. Furthermore, the layer was oxidized two times deeper in a 90 days MFG-tested sample compared to an untested reference. The formation of the layer is proposed to be caused by galvanic corrosion of elemental silicon in non-stoichiometric silicon nitride during hydrofluoric acid etching. The degradation is proposed to be due uncontrolled oxidation of the films during the stress tests.

  12. Thickness Influence onIn VitroBiocompatibility of Titanium Nitride Thin Films Synthesized by Pulsed Laser Deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duta, Liviu; Stan, George E; Popa, Adrian C; Husanu, Marius A; Moga, Sorin; Socol, Marcela; Zgura, Irina; Miculescu, Florin; Urzica, Iuliana; Popescu, Andrei C; Mihailescu, Ion N

    2016-01-13

    We report a study on the biocompatibility vs. thickness in the case of titanium nitride (TiN) films synthesized on 410 medical grade stainless steel substrates by pulsed laser deposition. The films were grown in a nitrogen atmosphere, and their in vitro cytotoxicity was assessed according to ISO 10993-5 [1]. Extensive physical-chemical analyses have been carried out on the deposited structures with various thicknesses in order to explain the differences in biological behavior: profilometry, scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), X-ray diffraction and surface energy measurements. XPS revealed the presence of titanium oxynitride beside TiN in amounts that vary with the film thickness. The cytocompatibility of films seems to be influenced by their TiN surface content. The thinner films seem to be more suitable for medical applications, due to the combined high values of bonding strength and superior cytocompatibility.

  13. Activated Carbon Supported Mo-Ti-N Binary Transition Metal Nitride as Catalyst for Acetylene Hydrochlorination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Dai

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Recently, many scientists have focused on the development of green industrial technology. However, the process of synthesizing vinyl chloride faces the problem of Hg pollution. Via a novel approach, we used two elements Mo and Ti to prepare an inexpensive and green binary transition metal nitride (BTMN as the active ingredient in a catalyst with nano-sized particles and an excellent degree of activation, which was supported on activated carbon. When the Mo/Ti mole ratio was 3:1, the conversion of acetylene reached 89% and the selectivity exceeded 98.5%. The doping of Ti in Mo-based catalysts reduced the capacity of adsorption for acetylene and also increased the adsorption of hydrogen chloride. Most importantly, the performance of the BTMN excelled those of the individual transition metal nitrides, due to the synergistic activity between Mo and Ti. This will expand the new epoch of the employment of transition metal nitrides as catalysts in the hydrochlorination of acetylene reaction.

  14. Coaxial carbon plasma gun deposition of amorphous carbon films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sater, D. M.; Gulino, D. A.; Rutledge, S. K.

    1984-01-01

    A unique plasma gun employing coaxial carbon electrodes was used in an attempt to deposit thin films of amorphous diamond-like carbon. A number of different structural, compositional, and electrical characterization techniques were used to characterize these films. These included scanning electron microscopy, scanning transmission electron microscopy, X ray diffraction and absorption, spectrographic analysis, energy dispersive spectroscopy, and selected area electron diffraction. Optical absorption and electrical resistivity measurements were also performed. The films were determined to be primarily amorphous, with poor adhesion to fused silica substrates. Many inclusions of particulates were found to be present as well. Analysis of these particulates revealed the presence of trace impurities, such as Fe and Cu, which were also found in the graphite electrode material. The electrodes were the source of these impurities. No evidence of diamond-like crystallite structure was found in any of the film samples. Details of the apparatus, experimental procedure, and film characteristics are presented.

  15. Voids padding induced further enhancement in photocatalytic performance of porous graphene-like carbon nitride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, Guohui [Hubei Key Laboratory of Accoutrement Technique in Fluid Machinery and Power Engineering, Wuhan university, Hubei 430072 (China); Laboratory of Environmental Sciences and Technology, Xinjiang Technical Institute of Physics & Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Urumqi 830011 (China); Chen, Dong [Hubei Key Laboratory of Accoutrement Technique in Fluid Machinery and Power Engineering, Wuhan university, Hubei 430072 (China); Luo, Jianmin [Laboratory of Environmental Sciences and Technology, Xinjiang Technical Institute of Physics & Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Urumqi 830011 (China); The Graduate School of Chinese Academy of Science, Beijing, 100049 (China); Zhu, Yunqing [Laboratory of Environmental Sciences and Technology, Xinjiang Technical Institute of Physics & Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Urumqi 830011 (China); Zeng, Yubin, E-mail: zengyubin@whu.edu.cn [Hubei Key Laboratory of Accoutrement Technique in Fluid Machinery and Power Engineering, Wuhan university, Hubei 430072 (China); Wang, Chuanyi, E-mail: cywang@ms.xjb.ac.cn [Hubei Key Laboratory of Accoutrement Technique in Fluid Machinery and Power Engineering, Wuhan university, Hubei 430072 (China); Laboratory of Environmental Sciences and Technology, Xinjiang Technical Institute of Physics & Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Urumqi 830011 (China)

    2017-08-05

    Highlights: • We synthesized an NH{sub 4}Cl padded C{sub 6}N{sub 9}H{sub 3} by calcining melamine hydrochloride in a vertical pit furnace. • The padded Cl{sup −} serves as a conjugate center to increase the conjugation fidelity of C{sub 6}N{sub 9}H{sub 3}. • Interface electric field can be constructed between Cl{sup −} and NH{sub 4}{sup +} to inhibit the surface recombination of carriers. • NH{sub 4}Cl padded C{sub 6}N{sub 9}H{sub 3} exhibits enhanced photocatalytic activity in terms of NO removal and water splitting. - Abstract: Design of 2-Dimensional nanostructured photocatalyst is an effective way to improve the photocatalytic activity of its bulk counterpart. However, the remaining (or newborn) drawbacks, such as enlarged band gap and the surface recombination of photogenerated charge carries, extremely limited the practical application of nanosheeted photocatalysts in solar energy conversion. In this study, we demonstrated that the voids padding with NH{sub 4}Cl can eliminate part of quantum size effect to reduce the band gap of nanosheeted carbon nitride. In addition, the padded NH{sub 4}Cl can create conjugate center and interface electric field in nanosheeted carbon nitride, and therefore to inhibit the surface recombination of photogenerated charge carries. This work not only provides a facile strategy to eliminate the drawbacks of nanosheeted carbon nitride, but also paves a new way to further improve the photocatalytic activity of other nano-sheeted materials.

  16. Activation of peroxymonosulfate by graphitic carbon nitride loaded on activated carbon for organic pollutants degradation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei, Mingyu; Gao, Long; Li, Jun [School of Environmental Engineering, Wuhan Textile University, Wuhan 430073 (China); Fang, Jia [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Wuhan Textile University, Wuhan 430073 (China); Cai, Wenxuan [School of Environmental Engineering, Wuhan Textile University, Wuhan 430073 (China); Li, Xiaoxia [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Wuhan Textile University, Wuhan 430073 (China); Xu, Aihua, E-mail: xahspinel@sina.com [School of Environmental Engineering, Wuhan Textile University, Wuhan 430073 (China); Engineering Research Center for Clean Production of Textile Dyeing and Printing, Ministry of Education, Wuhan 430073 (China)

    2016-10-05

    Highlights: • Supported g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} on AC catalysts with different loadings were prepared. • The metal free catalysts exhibited high efficiency for dyes degradation with PMS. • The catalyst presented a long-term stability for multiple runs. • The C=O groups played a key role in the oxidation process. - Abstract: Graphitic carbon nitride supported on activated carbon (g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4}/AC) was prepared through an in situ thermal approach and used as a metal free catalyst for pollutants degradation in the presence of peroxymonosulfate (PMS) without light irradiation. It was found that g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} was highly dispersed on the surface of AC with the increase of surface area and the exposition of more edges and defects. The much easier oxidation of C species in g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} to C=O was also observed from XPS spectra. Acid Orange 7 (AO7) and other organic pollutants could be completely degraded by the g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4}/AC catalyst within 20 min with PMS, while g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4}+PMS and AC+PMS showed no significant activity for the reaction. The performance of the catalyst was significantly influenced by the amount of g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} loaded on AC; but was nearly not affected by the initial solution pH and reaction temperature. In addition, the catalysts presented good stability. A nonradical mechanism accompanied by radical generation (HO· and SO{sub 4}·{sup −}) in AO7 oxidation was proposed in the system. The C=O groups play a key role in the process; while the exposure of more N-(C){sub 3} group can further increase its electron density and basicity. This study can contribute to the development of green materials for sustainable remediation of aqueous organic pollutants.

  17. Photocatalytic Hydrogen Production using Polymeric Carbon Nitride with a Hydrogenase and a Bioinspired Synthetic Ni Catalyst**

    OpenAIRE

    Caputo, Christine Amanda; Gross, Manuela A.; Lau, Vincent W; Cavazza, Christine; Lotsch, Bettina V.; Reisner, Erwin

    2014-01-01

    Solar-light-driven H2 production in water with a [NiFeSe]-hydrogenase (H2ase) and a bioinspired synthetic nickel catalyst (NiP) in combination with a heptazine carbon nitride polymer, melon (CNx), is reported. The semibiological and purely synthetic systems show catalytic activity during solar light irradiation with turnover numbers (TONs) of more than 50 000 mol H2 (mol H2ase)?1 and approximately 155 mol H2 (mol NiP)?1 in redox-mediator-free aqueous solution at pH 6 and 4.5, respectively. Bo...

  18. Activated Carbon Supported Mo-Ti-N Binary Transition Metal Nitride as Catalyst for Acetylene Hydrochlorination

    OpenAIRE

    Hui Dai; Mingyuan Zhu; Haiyang Zhang; Feng Yu; Chao Wang; Bin Dai

    2017-01-01

    Recently, many scientists have focused on the development of green industrial technology. However, the process of synthesizing vinyl chloride faces the problem of Hg pollution. Via a novel approach, we used two elements Mo and Ti to prepare an inexpensive and green binary transition metal nitride (BTMN) as the active ingredient in a catalyst with nano-sized particles and an excellent degree of activation, which was supported on activated carbon. When the Mo/Ti mole ratio was 3:1, the conversi...

  19. Electronic structure of carbon doped boron nitride nanotubes: a first-principles study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahaly, Mousumi Upadhyay; Waghmare, Umesh V

    2008-08-01

    We determine atomic and electronic structures of arm-chair and zigzag boron nitride nanotubes (BN-NTs) of different diameters using first-principles pseudopotential-based density functional theory calculations. We find that the structure of BN-NTs in bundled form is slightly different from that of the isolated BN-NTs, reflecting on the inter-tube interactions. Effects of carbon doping on the electronic structure of (5,5) and (5,0) BN-NTs are determined: carbon substitution either at B-site, being energetically very stable, or at N-site can yield magnetically polarized semiconducting state, whereas carbon substitution at neighbouring B and N sites yields a non-magnetic insulating structure.

  20. Films of Carbon Nanomaterials for Transparent Conductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Xinning; Wei, Jun

    2013-01-01

    The demand for transparent conductors is expected to grow rapidly as electronic devices, such as touch screens, displays, solid state lighting and photovoltaics become ubiquitous in our lives. Doped metal oxides, especially indium tin oxide, are the commonly used materials for transparent conductors. As there are some drawbacks to this class of materials, exploration of alternative materials has been conducted. There is an interest in films of carbon nanomaterials such as, carbon nanotubes and graphene as they exhibit outstanding properties. This article reviews the synthesis and assembly of these films and their post-treatment. These processes determine the film performance and understanding of this platform will be useful for future work to improve the film performance. PMID:28809267

  1. Films of Carbon Nanomaterials for Transparent Conductors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Wei

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The demand for transparent conductors is expected to grow rapidly as electronic devices, such as touch screens, displays, solid state lighting and photovoltaics become ubiquitous in our lives. Doped metal oxides, especially indium tin oxide, are the commonly used materials for transparent conductors. As there are some drawbacks to this class of materials, exploration of alternative materials has been conducted. There is an interest in films of carbon nanomaterials such as, carbon nanotubes and graphene as they exhibit outstanding properties. This article reviews the synthesis and assembly of these films and their post-treatment. These processes determine the film performance and understanding of this platform will be useful for future work to improve the film performance.

  2. Nanostructures of Indium Gallium Nitride Crystals Grown on Carbon Nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Ji-Yeon; Man Song, Keun; Min, Yo-Sep; Choi, Chel-Jong; Seok Kim, Yoon; Lee, Sung-Nam

    2015-11-16

    Nanostructure (NS) InGaN crystals were grown on carbon nanotubes (CNTs) using metalorganic chemical vapor deposition. The NS-InGaN crystals, grown on a ~5-μm-long CNT/Si template, were estimated to be ~100-270 nm in size. Transmission electron microscope examinations revealed that single-crystalline InGaN NSs were formed with different crystal facets. The observed green (~500 nm) cathodoluminescence (CL) emission was consistent with the surface image of the NS-InGaN crystallites, indicating excellent optical properties of the InGaN NSs on CNTs. Moreover, the CL spectrum of InGaN NSs showed a broad emission band from 490 to 600 nm. Based on these results, we believe that InGaN NSs grown on CNTs could aid in overcoming the green gap in LED technologies.

  3. Crystalline boron nitride aerogels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zettl, Alexander K.; Rousseas, Michael; Goldstein, Anna P.; Mickelson, William; Worsley, Marcus A.; Woo, Leta

    2017-12-12

    This disclosure provides methods and materials related to boron nitride aerogels. For example, one aspect relates to a method for making an aerogel comprising boron nitride, comprising: (a) providing boron oxide and an aerogel comprising carbon; (b) heating the boron oxide to melt the boron oxide and heating the aerogel; (c) mixing a nitrogen-containing gas with boron oxide vapor from molten boron oxide; and (d) converting at least a portion of the carbon to boron nitride to obtain the aerogel comprising boron nitride. Another aspect relates to a method for making an aerogel comprising boron nitride, comprising heating boron oxide and an aerogel comprising carbon under flow of a nitrogen-containing gas, wherein boron oxide vapor and the nitrogen-containing gas convert at least a portion of the carbon to boron nitride to obtain the aerogel comprising boron nitride.

  4. Correlation between photo response and nanostructures of silicon quantum dots in annealed Si-rich nitride films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Pei Ling [Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics and Center for Micro/Nano Science and Technology, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 70101, Taiwan, ROC (China); Gau, Chie, E-mail: gauc@mail.ncku.edu.tw [Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics and Center for Micro/Nano Science and Technology, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 70101, Taiwan, ROC (China); Liu, Chien Wei [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National Yunlin University of Science and Technology, Yunlin 64002, Taiwan, ROC (China)

    2013-02-01

    Synthesis and characterization of silicon quantum dots (Si QDs) materials are carried out. The Si QDs were prepared from a hydrogenated silicon rich nitride film that is deposited by the plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition process with a gas mixture of SiH{sub 4} and NH{sub 3} at flow ratios from 0.5 to 2. The Si QDs can be precipitated from the hydrogenated silicon rich nitride film by a high temperature annealing. The optimum density of the Si QDs precipitated amounts to 6.4 × 10{sup 12} cm{sup −2}, as calculated from transmission electron microscope images, for flow ratio of SiH{sub 4} versus NH{sub 3} at 2, and particle sizes less than 6 nm. The dots density within the film becomes concentrated when the flow ratio of SiH{sub 4} versus NH{sub 3} increases. The intensity of photo response increases drastically when the dots density becomes large. - Highlights: ► Silicon quantum dots (Si QDs) precipitated from deposited films were identified. ► All Si QDs obtained exhibit similar sizes but different densities. ► Correlation between photo response and amount of Si QDs was established. ► The photo response increases with increasing density of Si QDs in the film.

  5. Electromagnetic characteristics of carbon nanotube film materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Wei

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanotube (CNT possesses remarkable electrical conductivity, which shows great potential for the application as electromagnetic shielding material. This paper aims to characterize the electromagnetic parameters of a high CNT loading film by using waveguide method. The effects of layer number of CNT laminate, CNT alignment and resin impregnation on the electromagnetic characteristics were analyzed. It is shown that CNT film exhibits anisotropic electromagnetic characteristic. Pristine CNT film shows higher real part of complex permittivity, conductivity and shielding effectiveness when the polarized direction of incident wave is perpendicular to the winding direction of CNT film. For the CNT film laminates, complex permittivity increases with increasing layer number, and correspondingly, shielding effectiveness decreases. The five-layer CNT film shows extraordinary shielding performance with shielding effectiveness ranging from 67 dB to 78 dB in X-band. Stretching process induces the alignment of CNTs. When aligned direction of CNTs is parallel to the electric field, CNT film shows negative permittivity and higher conductivity. Moreover, resin impregnation into CNT film leads to the decrease of conductivity and shielding effectiveness. This research will contribute to the structural design for the application of CNT film as electromagnetic shielding materials.

  6. Carbon Coated Boron Nitride Nanosheets for Polymer Nanocomposites with Enhanced Dielectric Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Minhao; Zhao, Hang; He, Delong; Hu, Chaohe; Chen, Haowei; Bai, Jinbo

    2017-07-03

    Carbon coated boron nitride nanosheets (BNNSs@C) hybrids with different carbon contents were synthesized by a chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method. The content of carbon in as-obtained BNNSs@C hybrids could be precisely adjusted from 2.50% to 22.62% by controlling the carbon deposition time during the CVD procedure. Afterward, the BNNSs@C hybrids were subsequently incorporated into the polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) matrix to fabricate the BNNSs@C/PVDF nanocomposites through a combination of solution and melting blending methods. The dielectric properties of the as-obtained BNNSs@C/PVDF nanocomposites could be accurately tuned by adjusting the carbon content. The resultant nanocomposites could afford a high dielectric constant about 39 (10³ Hz) at BNNSs@C hybrids loading of 30 vol %, which is 4.8 times larger than that of pristine BNNSs-filled ones at the same filler loading, and 3.5 times higher than that of pure PVDF matrix. The largely enhanced dielectric performance could be ascribed to the improved interfacial polarizations of BNNSs/carbon and carbon/PVDF interfaces. The approach reported here offers an effective and alternative method to fabricate high-performance dielectric nanocomposites, which could be potentially applied to the embedded capacitors with high dielectric performance.

  7. Nitrogen-Doped Carbon Fiber Paper by Active Screen Plasma Nitriding and Its Microwave Heating Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Naishu; Ma, Shining; Sun, Xiaofeng

    2016-12-28

    In this paper, active screen plasma nitriding (ASPN) treatment was performed on polyacrylonitrile carbon fiber papers. Electric resistivity and microwave loss factor of carbon fiber were described to establish the relationship between processing parameters and fiber's ability to absorb microwaves. The surface processing effect of carbon fiber could be characterized by dynamic thermal mechanical analyzer testing on composites made of carbon fiber. When the process temperature was at 175 °C, it was conducive to obtaining good performance of dynamical mechanical properties. The treatment provided a way to change microwave heating properties of carbon fiber paper by performing different treatment conditions, such as temperature and time parameters. Atomic force microscope, scanning electron microscope, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis showed that, during the course of ASPN treatment on carbon fiber paper, nitrogen group was introduced and silicon group was removed. The treatment of nitrogen-doped carbon fiber paper represented an alternative promising candidate for microwave curing materials used in repairing and heating technology, furthermore, an efficient dielectric layer material for radar-absorbing structure composite in metamaterial technology.

  8. Passivation of textured crystalline silicon surfaces by catalytic CVD silicon nitride films and catalytic phosphorus doping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohdaira, Keisuke; Cham, Trinh Thi; Matsumura, Hideki

    2017-10-01

    Silicon nitride (SiN x ) films formed by catalytic chemical vapor deposition (Cat-CVD) and phosphorus (P)-doped layers formed by catalytic impurity doping (Cat-doping) are applied for the passivation of pyramid-shaped textured crystalline Si (c-Si) surfaces formed by anisotropic etching in alkaline solution. Lower surface recombination velocities (SRVs) tend to be obtained when smaller pyramids are formed on c-Si surfaces. P Cat-doping is effective for reducing the SRV of textured c-Si surfaces as in the case of flat c-Si surfaces. We realize SRVs of textured c-Si surfaces of ∼8.0 and ∼6.7 cm/s for only SiN x passivation and for the combination of SiN x and P Cat-doping, respectively. These structures also have high optical transparency and low Auger recombination loss, and are of great worth in application for the surface passivation of interdigitated back-contact c-Si solar cells.

  9. Photochemical functionalization of gallium nitride thin films with molecular and biomolecular layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Heesuk; Colavita, Paula E; Metz, Kevin M; Nichols, Beth M; Sun, Bin; Uhlrich, John; Wang, Xiaoyu; Kuech, Thomas F; Hamers, Robert J

    2006-09-12

    We demonstrate that photochemical functionalization can be used to functionalize and photopattern the surface of gallium nitride crystalline thin films with well-defined molecular and biomolecular layers. GaN(0001) surfaces exposed to a hydrogen plasma will react with organic molecules bearing an alkene (C=C) group when illuminated with 254 nm light. Using a bifunctional molecule with an alkene group at one end and a protected amine group at the other, this process can be used to link the alkene group to the surface, leaving the protected amine exposed. Using a simple contact mask, we demonstrate the ability to directly pattern the spatial distribution of these protected amine groups on the surface with a lateral resolution of <12 mum. After deprotection of the amines, single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides were linked to the surface using a bifunctional cross-linker. Measurements using fluorescently labeled complementary and noncomplementary sequences show that the DNA-modified GaN surfaces exhibit excellent selectivity, while repeated cycles of hybridization and denaturation in urea show good stability. These results demonstrate that photochemical functionalization can be used as an attractive starting point for interfacing molecular and biomolecular systems with GaN and other compound semiconductors.

  10. Insertion of nanocrystalline diamond film and the addition of hydrogen gas during deposition for adhesion improvement of cubic boron nitride thin film deposited by unbalanced magnetron sputtering method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ko, J.-S. [Electronic Materials Research Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, 39-1 Hawolgok-dong, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Korea University, 145, Anam-ro, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 136-701 (Korea, Republic of); Park, J.-K.; Lee, W.-S. [Electronic Materials Research Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, 39-1 Hawolgok-dong, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Huh, J.-Y. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Korea University, 145, Anam-ro, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 136-701 (Korea, Republic of); Baik, Y.-J., E-mail: yjbaik@kist.re.kr [Electronic Materials Research Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, 39-1 Hawolgok-dong, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-05-01

    Cubic boron nitride (c-BN) thick film growth was attempted by the addition of hydrogen for residual stress reduction and by using a nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) buffer layer for stabilizing the turbostratic boron nitride interfacial layer. The c-BN films were deposited by the unbalanced magnetron sputtering method. Thin (100 μm) Si strips (3 × 40 mm{sup 2}) were used as substrates. A boron nitride target was used, which was connected to a radio frequency power supply at 400 W. High frequency power connected to a substrate holder was used for self-biasing of − 40 V. The deposition pressure was 0.27 Pa with a flow of Ar (18 sccm)–N{sub 2} (2 sccm) mixed gas. Hydrogen gas of 2 sccm was added to the Ar–N{sub 2} mixed gas. The effect of the addition time of the hydrogen to the Ar–N{sub 2} gas during deposition was investigated and found to be critical to the occurrence of the delamination of the c-BN film on the NCD buffer layer. As the addition of the hydrogen was delayed, the delamination started later. C-BN film of 3 μm thickness adherent to the substrate was obtained. - Highlights: • A nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) buffer layer was applied to enhance the adhesion. • Hydrogen in the reaction gas caused delamination of the film at c-BN/NCD interface. • A delayed hydrogen addition was effective in inhibiting such delamination. • About 3 μm thick c-BN film could be grown.

  11. Recent advances in the growth, doping and characterization of III V nitride thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Robert F.; Ailey, K. S.; Bremser, M. D.; Carlson, E.; Kern, R. S.; Kester, D. J.; Perry, W. G.; Tanaka, S.; Weeks, T. W.

    Boron nitride thin films have been grown on the (100) surfaces of Si and diamond via ion beam assisted deposition (IBAD) using electron beam evaporation of B in tandem with N and Ar ion bombardment within the ranges of substrate temperature and ion flux of 200-700°C and 0.20-0.30 mA/cm2, respectively. Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) revealed a growth sequence of amorphous (a-BN), hexagonal (h-BN) and cubic (c-BN) layers under most conditions. This sequence is attributed primarily to increasing biaxial compressive stress with film thickness due to ion bombardment and some interstitial Ar incorporation. A minimum substrate temperature of 200-300° C is required for nucleation and growth of single phase c-BN by this technique. The initial stage of AlN film growth on α(6H)-SiC(0001) substrates by plasma-assisted, gas source molecular beam epitaxy has been investigated in terms of growth mode and interface defects. Essentially atomically flat AlN surfaces, indicative of two-dimensional growth, were obtained using on-axis substrates. Island-like features were observed on the vicinal surfaces. The coalescence of latter features gave rise to double positioning boundaries as a result of the misalignment of the Si/C bilayer steps with the Al/N bilayers in the growing films. The quality of the thicker AlN films was strongly influenced by the concentration of these boundaries. Monocrystalline GaN and AlxGa1-x N(0001) (0≤x≤1) films, void of oriented domain structures and associated low-angle grain boundaries and with smooth surface morphologies, have been grown via OMVPE on high-temperature monocrystalline AlN(0001) buffer layers, previously deposited on vicinal α(6H)-SiC(0001) wafers, using TEG, TEA and ammonia in a cold-wall, vertical, pancake-style reactor. Abrupt heterojunctions were demonstrated. The PL spectrum of the pure GaN showed strong near band-edge emissions with a FWHM value of 4 me

  12. High-surface-area nanoporous boron carbon nitrides for hydrogen storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Portehault, David; Giordano, Cristina; Antonietti, Markus [Max-Planck-Institute of Colloids and Interfaces, Department of Colloid Chemistry Research, Potsdam (Germany); Gervais, Christel; Sanchez, Clement [UPMC Univ Paris 06, CNRS, UMR 7574 Chimie de la Matiere Condensee de Paris, College de France, Paris (France); Senkovska, Irena; Kaskel, Stefan [Department of Inorganic Chemistry, University of Technology, Dresden (Germany)

    2010-06-09

    Nano- and mesoporous boron carbon nitrides with very high surface areas up to 1560 m{sup 2} g{sup -1} are obtained by pyrolysis of a graphitic carbon nitride mpg-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} infiltrated with a borane complex. This reactive hard-templating approach provides easy composition and texture tuning by temperature adjustment between 800 and 1400 C. The process yields B{sub x}C{sub y}N{sub z}O{sub v}H{sub w} materials as direct copies of the initial template with controlled compositions of 0.15{<=}x{<=}0.36, 0.10{<=}y{<=}0.12, 0.14{<=}z{<=}0.32, and 0.11{<=}v{<=}0.28. The nano and mesoporosities can also be tuned in order to provide hierarchical materials with specific surface areas ranging from 610 to 1560 m{sup 2} g{sup -1}. Such high values, coupled with resistance against air oxidation up to 700 C, suggest potential materials for gas storage and as catalyst supports. Indeed, it is demonstrated that these compounds exhibit high and tunable H{sub 2} uptakes from 0.55 to 1.07 wt.% at 77 K and 1 bar, thus guiding further search of materials for hydrogen storage. (Abstract Copyright [2010], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  13. Graphitic carbon nitride/graphene oxide/reduced graphene oxide nanocomposites for photoluminescence and photocatalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleksandrzak, Malgorzata; Kukulka, Wojciech; Mijowska, Ewa

    2017-03-01

    The study presents a modification of graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3N4) with graphene oxide (GO) and reduced graphene oxide (rGO) and investigation of photoluminescent and photocatalytic properties. The influence of GO and rGO lateral sizes used for the modification was investigated. The nanomaterials were characterized with atomic force microscopy (AFM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), diffuse reflectance UV-vis spectroscopy (DR-UV-vis) and photoluminescence spectroscopy (PL). PL revealed that pristine graphitic carbon nitride and its nanocomposites with GO and rGO emitted up-converted photoluminescence (UCPL) which could contribute to the improvement of photocatalytic activity of the materials. The photoactivity was evaluated in a process of phenol decomposition under visible light. A hybrid composed of rGO nanoparticles (rGONPs, 4-135 nm) exhibited the highest photoactivity compared to rGO with size of 150 nm-7.2 μm and graphene oxide with the corresponding sizes. The possible reason of the superior photocatalytic activity is the most enhanced UCPL of rGONPs, contributing to the emission of light with higher energy than the incident light, resulting in improved photogeneration of electron-hole pairs.

  14. Oxygen adsorption characteristics on hybrid carbon and boron-nitride nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Haining; Turner, C Heath

    2014-05-30

    In this work, first-principles density functional theory (DFT) is used to predict oxygen adsorption on two types of hybrid carbon and boron-nitride nanotubes (CBNNTs), zigzag (8,0), and armchair (6,6). Although the chemisorption of O2 on CBNNT(6,6) is calculated to be a thermodynamically unfavorable process, the binding of O2 on CBNNT(8,0) is found to be an exothermic process and can form both chemisorbed and physisorbed complexes. The CBNNT(8,0) has very different O2 adsorption properties compared with pristine carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and boron-nitride nanotube (BNNTs). For example, O2 chemisorption is significantly enhanced on CBNNTs, and O2 physisorption complexes also show stronger binding, as compared to pristine CNTs or BNNTs. Furthermore, it is found that the O2 adsorption is able to increase the conductivity of CBNNTs. Overall, these properties suggest that the CBNNT hybrid nanotubes may be useful as a gas sensor or as a catalyst for the oxygen reduction reaction. Copyright © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Cross-Linked Graphitic Carbon Nitride with Photonic Crystal Structure for Efficient Visible-Light-Driven Photocatalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Lu; Hong, Wei; Liu, Jing; Yang, Meijia; Lin, Wensheng; Chen, Guojian; Yu, Dingshan; Chen, Xudong

    2017-12-27

    Highly cross-linked graphitic carbon nitride has been prepared by a thermal copolymerization of dicyanodiamide with tetramethylammonium salts. The cross-linking can be evidenced by (i) increased C/N ratio without new carbon species, (ii) decreased specific surface area, and (iii) Tyndall effect after dissolution in concentrated sulfuric acid. The cross-linked graphitic carbon nitride with photonic crystal structure has highly efficient photocatalytic activity for water splitting under visible light due to the synergistic enhancement by the greatly suppressed photoluminescence, red-shifted absorption edges, strong inner reflections, and effective PCs stop band overlaps. It exhibits an enhanced photodegradation kinetic of methyl orange and a high visible-light-driven hydrogen-evolution rate of 166.9 μmol h-1 (25 times higher than that of the pristine graphitic carbon nitride counterpart). This work presents a facile method for designing and developing high-performance graphitic carbon nitride photocatalysts, providing a broad range of application prospects in the fields of electronics and energy conversion.

  16. High velocity SAW using aluminum nitride film on unpolished nucleation side of free-standing CVD diamond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmazria, Omar; Mortet, Vincent; El Hakiki, Mohamed; Nesladek, Milos; Alnot, Patrick

    2003-06-01

    High performances surface acoustic wave (SAW) filters based on aluminium nitride (AlN)/diamond layered structure have been fabricated. The C-axis oriented aluminum nitride films with various thicknesses were sputtered on unpolished nucleation side of free-standing polycrystalline chemical vapor deposition (CVD) diamond obtained by silicon substrate etching. Experimental results show that high order modes as well as Rayleigh waves are excited. Experimental results are in good agreement with the theoretical dispersion curves determined by software simulation with Green's function formalism. We demonstrate that high phase velocity first mode wave (so-called Sezawa wave) with high electromechanical coupling coefficient are obtained on AlN/diamond structure. This structure also has a low temperature coefficient of frequency (TCF), and preliminary results suggest that a zero TCF could be expected.

  17. In situ mechanical property measurements of amorphous carbon-boron nitride nanotube nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae-Woo; Carpena Núñez, Jennifer; Siochi, Emilie J.; Wise, Kristopher E.; Lin, Yi; Connell, John W.; Smith, Michael W.

    2012-01-01

    To understand the mechanical properties of amorphous carbon (a-C)/boron nitride nanotube (BNNT) nanostructures, in situ mechanical tests are conducted inside a transmission electron microscope equipped with an integrated atomic force microscope system. The nanotube structure is modified with amorphous carbon deposited by controlled electron beam irradiation. We demonstrate multiple in situ tensile, compressive, and lap shear tests with a-C/BNNT hybrid nanostructures. The tensile strength of the a-C/BNNT hybrid nanostructure is 5.29 GPa with about 90 vol% of a-C. The tensile strength and strain of the end-to-end joint structure with a-C welding is 0.8 GPa and 5.2% whereas the lap shear strength of the side-by-side joint structure with a-C is 0.25 GPa.

  18. In Situ Mechanical Property Measurements of Amorphous Carbon-Boron Nitride Nanotube Nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae-Woo; Lin, Yi; Nunez, Jennifer Carpena; Siochi, Emilie J.; Wise, Kristopher E.; Connell, John W.; Smith, Michael W.

    2011-01-01

    To understand the mechanical properties of amorphous carbon (a-C)/boron nitride nanotube (BNNT) nanostructures, in situ mechanical tests are conducted inside a transmission electron microscope equipped with an integrated atomic force microscope system. The nanotube structure is modified with amorphous carbon deposited by controlled electron beam irradiation. We demonstrate multiple in situ tensile, compressive, and lap shear tests with a-C/BNNT hybrid nanostructures. The tensile strength of the a-C/BNNT hybrid nanostructure is 5.29 GPa with about 90 vol% of a-C. The tensile strength and strain of the end-to-end joint structure with a-C welding is 0.8 GPa and 5.2% whereas the lap shear strength of the side-by-side joint structure with a-C is 0.25 GPa.

  19. Superior Current Carrying Capacity of Boron Nitride Encapsulated Carbon Nanotubes with Zero-Dimensional Contacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jhao-Wun; Pan, Cheng; Tran, Son; Cheng, Bin; Watanabe, Kenji; Taniguchi, Takashi; Lau, Chun Ning; Bockrath, Marc

    2015-10-14

    We report fabrication and characterization of hexagonal boron nitride (hBN)-encapsulated carbon nanotube (CNT) field effect transistors, which are coupled to electrical leads via zero-dimensional contacts. Device quality is attested by the ohmic contacts and observation of Coulomb blockade with a single periodicity in small bandgap semiconducing nanotubes. Surprisingly, hBN-encapsulated CNT devices demonstrate significantly enhanced current carrying capacity; a single-walled CNT can sustain >180 μA current or, equivalently, a current density of ∼2 × 10(10) A/cm(2), which is a factor of 6-7 higher than devices supported on SiO2 substrates. Such dramatic enhancement of current carrying capacity arises from the high thermal conductivity of hBN and lower hBN-CNT interfacial thermal resistance and has implications for carbon electronic applications.

  20. Structural morphology of amorphous conducting carbon film

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science; Volume 28; Issue 6. Structural ... Amorphous conducting carbon films deposited over quartz substrates were analysed using X-ray diffraction and AFM technique. X-ray diffraction data reveal disorder and roughness in the plane of graphene sheet as compared to that of graphite.

  1. Structural morphology of amorphous conducting carbon film

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Abstract. Amorphous conducting carbon films deposited over quartz substrates were analysed using X-ray diffraction and AFM technique. X-ray diffraction data reveal disorder and roughness in the plane of graphene sheet as compared to that of graphite. This roughness increases with decrease in preparation temperature.

  2. Characterization of amorphous hydrogenated carbon films ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Amorphous hydrogenated carbon films (-C:H) on -type (100) silicon wafers were prepared with a middle frequency pulsed unbalanced magnetron sputtering technique (MFPUMST) at different ratios of methane–argon gases. The band characteristics, mechanical properties as well as refractive index were measured by ...

  3. Facile Electrospinning Synthesis of Carbonized Polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP)/g-C3 N4 Hybrid Films for Photoelectrochemical Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan; Zhao, Xu; Tian, Yang; Wang, Yanbin; Jan, Abdul Khaliq; Chen, Yutong

    2017-01-05

    The film-forming ability and conductivity of graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3 N4 ) are still unsatisfying, despite much progress having been made in g-C3 N4 -related photocatalysts. New methods for synthesizing g-C3 N4 films coupled with excellent conductive materials are of significance. Herein, a facile method for synthesizing novel carbonized polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP)/g-C3 N4 (CPVP /g-C3 N4 ) films have been developed through an electrospinning technique. Nanocarbons are generated by in situ carbonization of PVP in the films, which could enhance the photoelectrochemical (PEC) performance of the films due to its good conductivity. The coverage of the CPVP /g-C3 N4 film is good and the films exhibit excellent PEC performance. Furthermore, the thickness of the films can be adjusted by varying the electrospinning time and substantially controlling the PEC performance, of which the photocurrent densities under visible-light irradiation are 3.55, 4.92, and 6.64 μA cm(-2) with spinning times of 40, 70, and 120 min, respectively. The photocurrent does not decrease until testing at 4000 s and the coverage is still good after the tests, which indicates the good stability of the films. The excellent PEC performance of the films and facile preparation method enables promising applications in energy and environmental remediation areas. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Three-dimensional kinetic Monte Carlo simulations of cubic transition metal nitride thin film growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nita, F.; Mastail, C.; Abadias, G.

    2016-02-01

    A three-dimensional kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) model has been developed and used to simulate the microstructure and growth morphology of cubic transition metal nitride (TMN) thin films deposited by reactive magnetron sputtering. Results are presented for the case of stoichiometric TiN, chosen as a representative TMN prototype. The model is based on a NaCl-type rigid lattice and includes deposition and diffusion events for both N and Ti species. It is capable of reproducing voids and overhangs, as well as surface faceting. Simulations were carried out assuming a uniform flux of incoming particles approaching the surface at normal incidence. The ballistic deposition model is parametrized with an interaction parameter r0 that mimics the capture distance at which incoming particles may stick on the surface, equivalently to a surface trapping mechanism. Two diffusion models are implemented, based on the different ways to compute the site-dependent activation energy for hopping atoms. The influence of temperature (300-500 K), deposition flux (0.1-100 monolayers/s), and interaction parameter r0 (1.5-6.0 Å) on the obtained growth morphology are presented. Microstructures ranging from highly porous, [001]-oriented straight columns with smooth top surface to rough columns emerging with different crystallographic facets are reproduced, depending on kinetic restrictions, deposited energy (seemingly captured by r0), and shadowing effect. The development of facets is a direct consequence of the diffusion model which includes an intrinsic (minimum energy-based) diffusion anisotropy, although no crystallographic diffusion anisotropy was explicitly taken into account at this stage. The time-dependent morphological evolution is analyzed quantitatively to extract the growth exponent β and roughness exponent α , as indicators of kinetic roughening behavior. For dense TiN films, values of α ≈0.7 and β =0.24 are obtained in good agreement with existing experimental data. At this

  5. Electron beam generation and structure of defects in carbon and boron nitride nano-tubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zobelli, A

    2007-10-15

    The nature and role of defects is of primary importance to understand the physical properties of C and BN (boron nitride) single walled nano-tubes (SWNTs). Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is a well known powerful tool to study the structure of defects in materials. However, in the case of SWNTs, the electron irradiation of the TEM may knock out atoms. This effect may alter the native structure of the tube, and has also been proposed as a potential tool for nano-engineering of nano-tubular structures. Here we develop a theoretical description of the irradiation mechanism. First, the anisotropy of the emission energy threshold is obtained via density functional based calculations. Then, we numerically derive the total Mott cross section for different emission sites of carbon and boron nitride nano-tubes with different chiralities. Using a dedicated STEM (Scanning Transmission Electron Microscope) microscope with experimental conditions optimised on the basis of derived cross-sections, we are able to control the generation of defects in nano-tubular systems. Either point or line defects can be obtained with a spatial resolution of a few nanometers. The structure, energetics and electronics of point and line defects in BN systems have been investigated. Stability of mono- and di- vacancy defects in hexagonal boron nitride layers is investigated, and their activation energies and reaction paths for diffusion have been derived using the nudged elastic band method (NEB) combined with density functional based techniques. We demonstrate that the appearance of extended linear defects under electron irradiation is more favorable than a random distribution of point defects and this is due to the existence of preferential sites for atom emission in the presence of pre-existing defects, rather than thermal vacancy nucleation and migration. (author)

  6. Single-Crystalline, Nanoporous Gallium Nitride Films With Fine Tuning of Pore Size for Stem Cell Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Lin; Zhou, Jing; Sun, Yubing; Zhang, Yu; Han, Jung; Fu, Jianping; Fan, Rong

    2014-11-01

    Single-crystalline nanoporous gallium nitride (GaN) thin films were fabricated with the pore size readily tunable in 20-100 nm. Uniform adhesion and spreading of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) seeded on these thin films peak on the surface with pore size of 30 nm. Substantial cell elongation emerges as pore size increases to ∼80 nm. The osteogenic differentiation of hMSCs occurs preferentially on the films with 30 nm sized nanopores, which is correlated with the optimum condition for cell spreading, which suggests that adhesion, spreading, and stem cell differentiation are interlinked and might be coregulated by nanotopography.

  7. Constructing a novel carbon nitride/polyaniline/ZnO ternary heterostructure with enhanced photocatalytic performance using exfoliated carbon nitride nanosheets as supports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandiselvi, Kannusamy; Fang, Huaifang; Huang, Xiubo; Wang, Jingyu; Xu, Xiaochan; Li, Tao

    2016-08-15

    Graphitic carbon nitride (CN) is an emerging photocatalyst with promising prospect, but presently it still falls short on photocatalytic efficiency and photoresponsive range. We herein constructed a novel ternary heterostructure by hybridization of conducting polymer and semiconductor with CN. The exfoliated two dimension CN nanosheets (CN-NSs) are superior to bulk CN as both catalysts and supporting materials. Most recently, there are few reports involving the construction of heterojunction photocatalysts using CN-NSs as supports. The improvement of charge separation efficiency, specific surface area and visible light harvesting is simultaneously achieved in such a novel ternary heterostructure due to the synergetic effect of polyaniline (PANI) and ZnO coupling. As a result, the CN-NS/PANI/ZnO photocatalyst possesses excellent visible photocatalytic performance for MB and 4-CP degradation with a rate constant of 0.026 and 0.0049min(-1), which is about 3.6 and 3.3 times of CN, respectively. The enhanced mechanism is proposed based on the confirmation of OH and h(+) as main oxidative species. Overall, this work can not only yield high-efficient visible photocatalysts but also provide deeper insight into the enhanced mechanisms of CN-NS-based ternary heterostructure. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Methods of forming boron nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trowbridge, Tammy L; Wertsching, Alan K; Pinhero, Patrick J; Crandall, David L

    2015-03-03

    A method of forming a boron nitride. The method comprises contacting a metal article with a monomeric boron-nitrogen compound and converting the monomeric boron-nitrogen compound to a boron nitride. The boron nitride is formed on the same or a different metal article. The monomeric boron-nitrogen compound is borazine, cycloborazane, trimethylcycloborazane, polyborazylene, B-vinylborazine, poly(B-vinylborazine), or combinations thereof. The monomeric boron-nitrogen compound is polymerized to form the boron nitride by exposure to a temperature greater than approximately 100.degree. C. The boron nitride is amorphous boron nitride, hexagonal boron nitride, rhombohedral boron nitride, turbostratic boron nitride, wurzite boron nitride, combinations thereof, or boron nitride and carbon. A method of conditioning a ballistic weapon and a metal article coated with the monomeric boron-nitrogen compound are also disclosed.

  9. Oxygen- and Lithium-Doped Hybrid Boron-Nitride/Carbon Networks for Hydrogen Storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shayeganfar, Farzaneh; Shahsavari, Rouzbeh

    2016-12-20

    Hydrogen storage capacities have been studied on newly designed three-dimensional pillared boron nitride (PBN) and pillared graphene boron nitride (PGBN). We propose these novel materials based on the covalent connection of BNNTs and graphene sheets, which enhance the surface and free volume for storage within the nanomaterial and increase the gravimetric and volumetric hydrogen uptake capacities. Density functional theory and molecular dynamics simulations show that these lithium- and oxygen-doped pillared structures have improved gravimetric and volumetric hydrogen capacities at room temperature, with values on the order of 9.1-11.6 wt % and 40-60 g/L. Our findings demonstrate that the gravimetric uptake of oxygen- and lithium-doped PBN and PGBN has significantly enhanced the hydrogen sorption and desorption. Calculations for O-doped PGBN yield gravimetric hydrogen uptake capacities greater than 11.6 wt % at room temperature. This increased value is attributed to the pillared morphology, which improves the mechanical properties and increases porosity, as well as the high binding energy between oxygen and GBN. Our results suggest that hybrid carbon/BNNT nanostructures are an excellent candidate for hydrogen storage, owing to the combination of the electron mobility of graphene and the polarized nature of BN at heterojunctions, which enhances the uptake capacity, providing ample opportunities to further tune this hybrid material for efficient hydrogen storage.

  10. Facile fabrication of ordered mesoporous graphitic carbon nitride for RhB photocatalytic degradation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Lei; Zhang, Anfeng [State Key Laboratory of Fine Chemicals, PSU-DUT Joint Center for Energy Research, School of Chemical Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Janik, Michael J. [EMS Energy Institute, PSU-DUT Joint Center for Energy Research and Department of Energy & Mineral Engineering, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Li, Keyan [State Key Laboratory of Fine Chemicals, PSU-DUT Joint Center for Energy Research, School of Chemical Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Song, Chunshan [State Key Laboratory of Fine Chemicals, PSU-DUT Joint Center for Energy Research, School of Chemical Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); EMS Energy Institute, PSU-DUT Joint Center for Energy Research and Department of Energy & Mineral Engineering, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Guo, Xinwen, E-mail: guoxw@dlut.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Fine Chemicals, PSU-DUT Joint Center for Energy Research, School of Chemical Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China)

    2017-02-28

    Highlights: • Ordered mesoporous graphitic carbon nitrides with S{sub BET} = 279.3 m{sup 2}/g were prepared. • Enhanced photocatalytic activity and reusability were presented. • Improved S{sub BET} and charge carrier separation efficiency contribute to the activity. - Abstract: Ordered mesoporous graphitic carbon nitrides were prepared by directly condensing the uniform mixtures of melamine and KIT-6. After removal of the KIT-6 sacrificial template, the carbon nitrides were characterized with TEM, N{sub 2} physical adsorption, XRD, FT-IR, XPS, UV–vis and PL spectrometries, and tested for their RhB photocatalytic degradation activity. Together, these characterizations confirmed the as-prepared tunable mesoporous materials with enhanced charge separation efficiency and superior photocatalytic performance. Compared with a conventional bulk g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4}, ordered mesoporous g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} exhibits a larger specific surface area of 279.3 m{sup 2}/g and a pore size distribution about 4.0 nm and 13.0 nm. Meanwhile, the reduced bandgap energy of 2.77 eV and lower photogenerated electron-hole pair recombination frequency were evidenced by UV–Vis and PL spectra. The RhB photocatalytic degradation activity maximizes with a mass ratio of KIT-6/melamine of 80% (KCN80), and the kinetic constant reaches 0.0760 min{sup −1} which is 16 times higher than that of the bulk sample. Reusability of KCN80 was demonstrated by a lack of evident deactivation after three consecutive reaction periods. The direct condensation of the KIT-6 and melamine mixture does not require pre-casting of the precursor into the pore system of the templates. Owing to its high product yield, improved S{sub BET}, reduced bandgap energy and limited charge recombination, the facile-prepared ordered mesoporous g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} is a practical candidate for further modification.

  11. Graphitic carbon nitride: Synthesis, characterization and photocatalytic decomposition of nitrous oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Praus, Petr, E-mail: petr.praus@vsb.cz [Institute of Environmental Technology, VŠB-Technical University of Ostrava, 17. Listopadu 15/2172, Ostrava 708 33 (Czech Republic); Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, VŠB-Technical University of Ostrava, 17. Listopadu 15/2172, Ostrava 708 33 (Czech Republic); Svoboda, Ladislav [Institute of Environmental Technology, VŠB-Technical University of Ostrava, 17. Listopadu 15/2172, Ostrava 708 33 (Czech Republic); Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, VŠB-Technical University of Ostrava, 17. Listopadu 15/2172, Ostrava 708 33 (Czech Republic); Ritz, Michal [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, VŠB-Technical University of Ostrava, 17. Listopadu 15/2172, Ostrava 708 33 (Czech Republic); Troppová, Ivana; Šihor, Marcel; Kočí, Kamila [Institute of Environmental Technology, VŠB-Technical University of Ostrava, 17. Listopadu 15/2172, Ostrava 708 33 (Czech Republic)

    2017-06-01

    Graphitic carbon nitride (g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4}) was synthetized by condensation of melamine at the temperatures of 400–700 °C in air for 2 h and resulting products were characterized and finally tested for the photocatalytic decomposition of nitrous oxide. The characterization methods were elemental analysis, UV–Vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS), photoluminescence (PL), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and Raman spectroscopy, measurement of specific surface area (SSA), X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), scanning (SEM) and transmission (TEM) electron microscopy. The XRD patterns, FTIR and Raman spectra proved the presence of g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} at above 550 °C but the optimal synthesis temperature of 600–650 °C was found. Under these conditions graphitic carbon nitride of the overall empirical composition of C{sub 6}N{sub 9}H{sub 2} was formed. At lower temperatures g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} with a higher content of hydrogen was formed but at higher temperatures g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} was decomposed. At the temperatures above 650 °C, its exfoliation was observed. The photocatalytic experiments showed that the activity of all the samples synthetized at 400–700 °C was very similar, that is, within the range of experimental error (5 %). The total conversion of N{sub 2}O reached about 43 % after 14 h. - Highlights: • Graphitic carbon nitride (g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4}) was thermally synthetized from melamine in the range of 400–700 °C. • The optimal temperature was determined at 600–650 °C. • All synthesis products were properly characterized by physico-chemical methods. • Exfoliation of g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} at above 600 °C was observed. • g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} was used for the photocatalytic decomposition of N{sub 2}O.

  12. Silicon nitride films fabricated by a plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition method for coatings of the laser interferometer gravitational wave detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Huang-Wei; Kuo, Ling-Chi; Huang, Shu-Yu; Wu, Meng-Yun; Juang, Yu-Hang; Lee, Chia-Wei; Chen, Hsin-Chieh; Wen, Ting Ting; Chao, Shiuh

    2018-01-01

    Silicon is a potential substrate material for the large-areal-size mirrors of the next-generation laser interferometer gravitational wave detector operated in cryogenics. Silicon nitride thin films uniformly deposited by a chemical vapor deposition method on large-size silicon wafers is a common practice in the silicon integrated circuit industry. We used plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition to deposit silicon nitride films on silicon and studied the physical properties of the films that are pertinent to application of mirror coatings for laser interferometer gravitational wave detectors. We measured and analyzed the structure, optical properties, stress, Young's modulus, and mechanical loss of the films, at both room and cryogenic temperatures. Optical extinction coefficients of the films were in the 10-5 range at 1550-nm wavelength. Room-temperature mechanical loss of the films varied in the range from low 10-4 to low 10-5 within the frequency range of interest. The existence of a cryogenic mechanical loss peak depended on the composition of the films. We measured the bond concentrations of N - H , Si - H , Si - N , and Si - Si bonds in the films and analyzed the correlations between bond concentrations and cryogenic mechanical losses. We proposed three possible two-level systems associated with the N - H , Si - H , and Si - N bonds in the film. We inferred that the dominant source of the cryogenic mechanical loss for the silicon nitride films is the two-level system of exchanging position between a H+ and electron lone pair associated with the N - H bond. Under our deposition conditions, superior properties in terms of high refractive index with a large adjustable range, low optical absorption, and low mechanical loss were achieved for films with lower nitrogen content and lower N - H bond concentration. Possible pairing of the silicon nitride films with other materials in the quarter-wave stack is discussed.

  13. Encapsulation of cisplatin as an anti-cancer drug into boron-nitride and carbon nanotubes: Molecular simulation and free energy calculation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roosta, Sara [Molecular Simulation Research Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, Iran University of Science & Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hashemianzadeh, Seyed Majid, E-mail: hashemianzadeh@iust.ac.ir [Molecular Simulation Research Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, Iran University of Science & Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ketabi, Sepideh, E-mail: sepidehketabi@yahoo.com [Department of Chemistry, East Tehran Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-10-01

    Encapsulation of cisplatin anticancer drug into the single walled (10, 0) carbon nanotube and (10, 0) boron-nitride nanotube was investigated by quantum mechanical calculations and Monte Carlo Simulation in aqueous solution. Solvation free energies and complexation free energies of the cisplatin@ carbon nanotube and cisplatin@ boron-nitride nanotube complexes was determined as well as radial distribution functions of entitled compounds. Solvation free energies of cisplatin@ carbon nanotube and cisplatin@ boron-nitride nanotube were − 4.128 kcal mol{sup −1} and − 2457.124 kcal mol{sup −1} respectively. The results showed that cisplatin@ boron-nitride nanotube was more soluble species in water. In addition electrostatic contribution of the interaction of boron- nitride nanotube complex and solvent was − 281.937 kcal mol{sup −1} which really more than Van der Waals and so the electrostatic interactions play a distinctive role in the solvation free energies of boron- nitride nanotube compounds. On the other hand electrostatic part of the interaction of carbon nanotube complex and solvent were almost the same as Van der Waals contribution. Complexation free energies were also computed to study the stability of related structures and the free energies were negative (− 374.082 and − 245.766 kcal mol{sup −1}) which confirmed encapsulation of drug into abovementioned nanotubes. However, boron-nitride nanotubes were more appropriate for encapsulation due to their larger solubility in aqueous solution. - Highlights: • Solubility of cisplatin@ boron-nitride nanotube is larger than cisplatin@ carbon nanotube. • Boron- nitride nanotube complexes have larger electrostatic contribution in solvation free energy. • Complexation free energies confirm encapsulation of drug into the nanotubes in aqueous solution. • Boron- nitride nanotubes are appropriate drug delivery systems compared with carbon nanotubes.

  14. Extraordinary optical transmission of periodic array of subwavelength holes within titanium nitride thin film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shabani, Alireza; Roknabadi, Mahmood Rezaee; Behdani, Mohammad; Nezhad, Mehdi Khazaei; Rahmani, Neda

    2017-07-01

    We focused on the optical properties of square array of subwavelength holes created within a titanium nitride (TiN) thin film. The TiN layer was placed on top of the dielectric layer as a surface plasmonic system originated from an intermetallic-dielectric arrangement. The finite-difference time-domain method was used via an Optiwave package to simulate periodic array of square and circular holes within the TiN layer. The effect of geometrical and material parameters such as periodic constant (a), size (S), shape of the holes, and the electric permittivity of the dielectric substrate has been investigated. An extraordinary optical transmission was observed in comparison with the nonhole system. It was shown that the wavelength of plasmonic modes, as a characteristic feature of the system, was affected by changing the periodic constant and electric permittivity. Meanwhile, changing the size as well as the shape of the holes did not affect the position of the peaks. These results are in agreement with the characteristic equation for plasmonic structure, which relates the surface plasmon wavelength (λsp) to the geometrical and material parameters of the system. The intensity of excited peaks was explained by distribution of the z-component of the electric field obtained from simulation, which illustrated the role of the surface plasmon polariton, localized surface plasmon resonance, and waveguide mode in tuning the optical behavior of the system. The results showed that TiN is a promising candidate for replacing metals in a plasmonic application with particular chemical and mechanical features.

  15. Molecular beam epitaxy of germanium nanoclusters and indium gallium nitride thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bing

    made by electron bean lithography and chlorine plasma etching. By minimizing the sizes of the patterns, laterally well-ordered arrays of Ge islands are achieved, and the mechanisms of the preferential nucleation of Ge islands at certain sites are examined. Next, another important issue of preserving the two-dimensional growth of Ge on silicon by intentionally introducing some impurities (surfactants) during growth to suppress the three-dimensional Ge island formation is investigated. In particular, arsenic as a surfactant is studied. The role of arsenic in MBE of Ge on Si(100) is proposed to be both associated with reduction of Ge adatom surface diffusion and chemically decorating the surface atomic steps to increase the reactivity of the steps with the Ge adatoms. Finally, I present studies of MBE of group III-nitride materials. The bulk strain of InGaN is first calculated using a simplified valence force field method. A phase diagram of InGaN is obtained for an overview of the thermodynamic properties of these materials. MBE experiments of GaN and InGaN thin films are then performed using both an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma and ammonia as the nitrogen sources. Thick GaN films of good crystal qualities and smooth surfaces are obtained by introducing a small amount of indium as a surfactant. InxGa1-xN films with different indium fraction x are also achieved by balancing the major growth parameters such as the substrate temperature and In/Ga flux ratio. The mechanisms of the film growth and evolution are discussed.

  16. Production of Metal-Free Composites Composed of Graphite Oxide and Oxidized Carbon Nitride Nanodots and Their Enhanced Photocatalytic Performances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seung Yeon; Oh, Junghoon; Park, Sunghee; Shim, Yeonjun; Park, Sungjin

    2016-04-04

    A novel metal-free composite (GN) composed of two types of carbon-based nanomaterials, graphite oxide (GO) and 2D oxidized carbon nitride (OCN) nanodots was produced. Chemical and morphological characterizations reveal that GN contains a main component of GO with well-dispersed 2D OCN nanodots. GN shows enhanced photocatalytic performance for degrading an organic pollutant, Rhodamine B, under visible light. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. A Facile Steam Reforming Strategy to Delaminate Layered Carbon Nitride Semiconductors for Photoredox Catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Pengju; Ou, Honghui; Fang, Yuanxing; Wang, Xinchen

    2017-03-27

    The delamination of layered crystals that produces single or few-layered nanosheets while enabling exotic physical and chemical properties, particularly for semiconductor functions in optoelectronic applications, remains a challenge. Here, we report a facile and green approach to prepare few-layered polymeric carbon nitride (PCN) semiconductors by a one-step carbon/nitrogen steam reforming reaction. Bulky PCN, obtained from typical precursors including urea, melamine, dicyandiamide, and thiourea, are exfoliated into few-layered nanosheets, while engineering its surface carbon vacancies. The unique sheet structures with strengthened surface properties endow PCNs with more active sites, and an increased charge separation efficiency with a prolonged charge lifetime, drastically promoting their photoredox performance. After an assay of a H2 evolution reaction, an apparent quantum yield of 11.3 % at 405 nm was recorded for the PCN nanosheets, which is much higher than those of PCN nanosheets. This delamination method is expandable to other carbon-based 2D materials for advanced applications. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Achieving a Collapsible, Strong, and Highly Thermally Conductive Film Based on Oriented Functionalized Boron Nitride Nanosheets and Cellulose Nanofiber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Kai; Fang, Jinchao; Ma, Jinrui; Huang, Rui; Chai, Songgang; Chen, Feng; Fu, Qiang

    2017-09-06

    Boron nitride nanosheet (BNNS) films receive wide attention in both academia and industry because of their high thermal conductivity (TC) and good electrical insulation capability. However, the brittleness and low strength of the BNNS film largely limit its application. Herein, functionalized BNNSs (f-BNNSs) with a well-maintained in-plane crystalline structure were first prepared utilizing urea in the aqueous solution via ball-milling for the purpose of improving their stability in water and enhancing the interaction with the polymer matrix. Then, a biodegradable and highly thermally conductive film with an orderly oriented structure based on cellulose nanofibers (CNFs) and f-BNNSs was prepared just by simple vacuum-assisted filtration. The modification of the BNNS and the introduction of the CNF result in a better orientation of the f-BNNS, sufficient connection between f-BNNS themselves, and strong interaction between f-BNNS and CNF, which not only make the prepared composite film strong and tough but also possess higher in-plane TC. An increase of 70% in-plane TC, 63.2% tensile strength, and 77.8% elongation could be achieved for CNF/f-BNNS films, compared with that for CNF/BNNS films at the filler content of 70%. Although at such a high f-BNNS content, this composite film can be bended and folded. It is even more interesting to find that the in-plane TC could be greatly enhanced with the decrease of the thickness of the film, and a value of 30.25 W/m K can be achieved at the thickness of ∼30 μm for the film containing 70 wt % f-BNNS. We believe that this highly thermally conductive film with good strength and toughness could have potential applications in next-generation highly powerful and collapsible electronic devices.

  19. Nickel Oxide and Nickel Co-doped Graphitic Carbon Nitride Nanocomposites and its Octylphenol Sensing Application

    KAUST Repository

    Gong, Wanyun

    2015-11-16

    Nickel oxide and nickel co-doped graphitic carbon nitride (NiO-Ni-GCN) nanocomposites were successfully prepared by thermal treatment of melamine and NiCl2 6H2O. NiO-Ni-GCN nanocomposites showed superior electrochemical catalytic activity for the oxidation of octylphenol to pure GCN. A detection method of octylphenol in environmental water samples was developed based at NiO-Ni-GCN nanocomposites modified electrode under infrared light irradiation. Differential pulse voltammetry was used as the analytic technique of octylphenol, exhibiting stable and specific concentration-dependent oxidation signal in the presence of octylphenol in the range of 10nM to 1μM and 1μM to 50μM, with a detection limit of 3.3nM (3S/N). © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Sulfur (VI) modified graphite carbon nitride nanosheets with chrysanthemum-like structure and enhanced photocatalytic activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Lili; Dai, Yunrong; Zhou, Yijing; Chang, Xin; Yin, Lifeng

    2018-02-01

    Chrysanthemum-like sulfur (VI) modified graphite carbon nitride (s/g-C3N4) was synthesized by sulfuring and sonicating bulk g-C3N4 at 800 kHz. The sulfuring relaxed the interlayer force of g-C3N4, and the sonication constructed its chrysanthemum-like structure which enhances the separation of photo-generated carriers and photochemical response. Density functional calculation and diffusion reflection spectra (DRS) verified that sulfur (VI) modification shifted down the valence band edge of g-C3N4 and improved the redox potentials of g-C3N4. The photocatalytic degradation efficiency of 4-nitrophenol (10 mg L-1) by s/g-C3N4 was 49.3 times higher than that by bulk g-C3N4 under visible light irradiation (>400 nm).

  1. Harvesting solar light with crystalline carbon nitrides for efficient photocatalytic hydrogen evolution

    KAUST Repository

    Bhunia, Manas Kumar

    2014-08-14

    Described herein is the photocatalytic hydrogen evolution using crystalline carbon nitrides (CNs) obtained by supramolecular aggregation followed by ionic melt polycondensation (IMP) using melamine and 2,4,6-triaminopyrimidine as a dopant. The solid state NMR spectrum of 15N-enriched CN confirms the triazine as a building unit. Controlling the amount and arrangements of dopants in the CN structure can dramatically enhance the photocatalytic performance for H2 evolution. The polytriazine imide (PTI) exhibits the apparent quantum efficiency (AQE) of 15% at 400 nm. This method successfully enables a substantial amount of visible light to be harvested for H2 evolution, and provides a promising route for the rational design of a variety of highly active crystalline CN photocatalysts. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Carbon nitride in energy conversion and storage: recent advances and future prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Yutong; Li, Mingming; Wang, Yong

    2015-03-01

    With the explosive growth of energy consumption, the exploration of highly efficient energy conversion and storage devices becomes increasingly important. Fuel cells, supercapacitors, and lithium-ion batteries are among the most promising options. The innovation of these devices mainly resides in the development of high-performance electrode materials and catalysts. Graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3 N4 ), due to structural and chemical properties such as semiconductor optical properties, rich nitrogen content, and tunable porous structure, has drawn considerable attention and shown great potential as an electrode material or catalyst in energy conversion and storage devices. This review covers recent progress in g-C3 N4 -containing systems for fuel cells, electrocatalytic water splitting devices, supercapacitors, and lithium-ion batteries. The corresponding catalytic mechanisms and future research directions in these areas are also discussed. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Visible Light Neural Stimulation on graphitic-Carbon Nitride/Graphene Photocatalytic Fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Zhongyang; Xu, Ruodan; Wang, Zegao

    2017-01-01

    Light stimulation allows remote and spatiotemporally accurate operation that has been applied as effective, non-invasive means of therapeutic interventions. Here, visible light neural stimulation of graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3N4), an emerging photocatalyst with visible-light optoelectronic...... conversion, was for the first time investigated. Specifically, g-C3N4 was combined with graphene oxide (GO) in a 3D manner on the surfaces of electrospun polycaprolactone/gelatin (PG) fibers and functioned as a biocompatible interface for visible-light stimulating neuronal differentiation. The enhanced...... was confirmed by the Lactate Dehydrogenase (LDH) assay, live dead staining and colorimetric cell viability assay CCK-8. Under a bidaily, monochromatic light stimulation at a wavelength of 450 nm at 10mW/cm2, a 18.5-fold increase of neurite outgrowth of PC12 was found on g-C3N4 coated fibers; while AA reduced GO...

  4. Challenges in calculating the bandgap of triazine-based carbon nitride structures

    KAUST Repository

    Steinmann, Stephan N.

    2017-02-08

    Graphitic carbon nitrides form a popular family of materials, particularly as photoharvesters in photocatalytic water splitting cells. Recently, relatively ordered g-C3N4 and g-C6N9H3 were characterized by X-ray diffraction and their ability to photogenerate excitons was subsequently estimated using density functional theory. In this study, the ability of triazine-based g-C3N4 and g-C6N9H3 to photogenerate excitons was studied using self-consistent GW computations followed by solving the Bethe–Salpeter Equation (BSE). In particular, monolayers, bilayers and 3D-periodic systems were characterized. The predicted optical band gaps are in the order of 1 eV higher than the experimentally measured ones, which is explained by a combination of shortcomings in the adopted model, small defects in the experimentally obtained structures and the particular nature of the experimental determination of the band gap.

  5. Highly efficient cobalt-doped carbon nitride polymers for solvent-free selective oxidation of cyclohexane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Fu

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Selective oxidation of saturated hydrocarbons with molecular oxygen has been of great interest in catalysis, and the development of highly efficient catalysts for this process is a crucial challenge. A new kind of heterogeneous catalyst, cobalt-doped carbon nitride polymer (g-C3N4, was harnessed for the selective oxidation of cyclohexane. X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectra and high resolution transmission electron microscope revealed that Co species were highly dispersed in g-C3N4 matrix and the characteristic structure of polymeric g-C3N4 can be retained after Co-doping, although Co-doping caused the incomplete polymerization to some extent. Ultraviolet–visible, Raman and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy further proved the successful Co doping in g-C3N4 matrix as the form of Co(IIN bonds. For the selective oxidation of cyclohexane, Co-doping can markedly promote the catalytic performance of g-C3N4 catalyst due to the synergistic effect of Co species and g-C3N4 hybrid. Furthermore, the content of Co largely affected the activity of Co-doped g-C3N4 catalysts, among which the catalyst with 9.0 wt% Co content exhibited the highest yield (9.0% of cyclohexanone and cyclohexanol, as well as a high stability. Meanwhile, the reaction mechanism over Co-doped g-C3N4 catalysts was elaborated. Keywords: Selective oxidation of cyclohexane, Oxygen oxidant, Carbon nitride, Co-doping

  6. Thin Polymer Films Containing Carbon Nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paszkiewicz, S.; Piesowicz, E.; Irska, I.; Roslaniec, Z.; Szymczyk, A.; Pawelec, I.

    2016-05-01

    Within the framework of the presented paper, the research experiments were conducted on the preparation and characterization of polymer thin films containing carbon nanotubes, graphene derivatives and hybrid systems of both CNTs/graphene derivatives, in which condensation polymers constituted the matrix. The use of in situ synthesis allowed to obtain nanocomposites with a high degree of homogeneity, which is a key issue for further industrial applications, while the analysis of the physical properties of the obtained materials showed effect of the addition of carbon nanotubes and graphene derivatives on their structure, barrier properties and thermal and electrical conductivity.

  7. Stepwise Synthesis of Mesoporous Carbon Nitride Functionalized by Melamine Based Dendrimer Amines for Adsorption of CO2 and CH4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansoor Anbia

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a novel solid dendrimer amine (hyperbranched polymers was prepared using mesoporous carbon nitride functionalized by melamine based dendrimer amines. This adsorbent was denoted MDA-MCN-1. The process was stepwise synthesis and hard-templating method using mesoporous silica SBA-15 as a template. Cyanuric chloride and N,N-diisopropylethylamine (DIPEA, Merck were used for functionalization of the MCN-1. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR, Nitrogen adsorption-desorption analysis, Small Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS, X-ray diffraction (XRD and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA were used for characterization of the adsorbent. This material was used for carbon dioxide gas (CO2 and methane gas (CH4 adsorption at high pressure (up to 20 bar and room temperature. The volumetric method was used for the tests of the gas adsorption. The CO2 adsorption capacity of modified mesoporous carbon nitrides was about 4 mmol CO2 per g adsorbent. The methane adsorption capacity of this material was less than that CO2. Modified Mesoporous Carbon Nitride adsorbed about 3.52 mmol CH4 /g adsorbent. The increment of melamine based dendrimer generation on mesoporous surface increased adsorption capacity of both carbon dioxide and methane gases. According to the results obtained, the solid dendrimer amines, (MDA-MCN-1, performs excellently for CO2 and CH4 capture from flow gases and CO2 and CH4 storage.

  8. p-type conduction in nitrogen-doped SnO{sub 2} films grown by thermal processing of tin nitride films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pan, S.S.; Wang, S.; Zhang, Y.X.; Luo, Y.Y.; Kong, F.Y.; Xu, S.C.; Xu, J.M.; Li, G.H. [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Key Laboratory of Materials Physics, Anhui Key Laboratory of Nanomaterials and Nanostructures, Institute of Solid State Physics, Hefei (China)

    2012-11-15

    p-type nitrogen-doped SnO{sub 2} (SnO{sub 2}:N) films were grown by thermal processing of amorphous tin nitride films at temperatures between 350 and 500 {sup circle} C in flowing O{sub 2}-Ar gas mixture. From high-resolution X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and X-ray diffraction patterns, it is deduced that the N atoms replace the O atoms in the SnO{sub 2} lattice. The N dopant is more tightly bound in SnO{sub 2}:N at higher thermal oxidation temperatures deduced from the XPS results. The hole concentration obtained at an oxidation temperature of 400 {sup circle} C is 1.87 x 10{sup 19} cm{sup -3}, which is dramatically enhanced compared to previous reports. Our results indicate that the high-temperature thermal oxidation of tin nitride is a facile and effective route to alleviate the self-compensation effect, reduce the content of {gamma}-N{sub 2} double donors, and reinforce the stability of N dopant in the SnO{sub 2}:N films. (orig.)

  9. Layer-structured hexagonal boron nitride carbon semiconductor alloys for deep UV photonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uddin, Md Rakib; Li, Jing; Lin, Jingyu; Jiang, Hongxing

    2015-03-01

    Hexagonal boron nitride carbon alloys, h - (BN)1-x(C2)x, are layer-structured semiconductor materials with a tunable bandgap energy from 0 eV (graphite) to 6.5 eV (h-BN). We report on synthesizing (BN)-rich h - (BN)1-x(C2)x semiconductor alloys using standard MOCVD growth technique on sapphire substrate. Bandgap energy variation with carbon concentration in the deep UV spectral range has been demonstrated through optical absorption measurements. Experimental results suggest that the critical carbon concentration (xc) to form the homogenous h - (BN)1-x(C2)x alloys is about 3.2% at a growth temperature of 1300 °C. It is expected that homogenous h - (BN)1-x(C2)x alloys with higher x can be achieved by increasing the growth temperature. This is a huge advantage over the InGaN alloy system in which higher growth temperatures cannot be utilized to close the miscibility gap. Together with our ability for producing high quality h-BN epilayers, h-(BN)C alloys and quantum wells open up new possibilities for realizing novel 2D optoelectronic devices with tunable physical properties. National Science Foundation.

  10. Ab initio studies of vacancies in (8,0) and (8,8) single-walled carbon and boron nitride nanotubes

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mashapa, MG

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available A systematic study of vacancies in single-walled carbon nanotubes and boron nitride nanotubes was carried out. First principles calculations within the framework of density functional theory using the CASTEP code are used to optimize fully...

  11. Homoepitaxial growth of gallium nitride films using seeded supersonic molecular beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGinnis, Arthur J.

    Homoepitaxial GaN thin films were grown on MOCVD GaN(0001)/A1N/6H-SiC substrates using NH3, elemental Ga and TEG. The GaN growth kinetics were probed using NH3-seeded and TEG-seeded supersonic molecular beams. A GaN surface kinetics model for growth using NH3 and elemental Ga was fitted with the data to find the zero-coverage NH3 sticking coefficient. Growth rates measured under NH3-limited conditions using hyperthermal NH3 beams with kinetic energies of 0.08--1.8 eV indicate decreasing nitrogen incorporation efficiency with increasing incident kinetic energy. The results indicate that NH3 chemisorption on GaN(0001) is unactivated and occurs via a precursor-mediated pathway. The surface morphology is controlled by the Ga surface diffusion length, which in turn, is controlled primarily by the GaN growth rate. Scaling analysis indicates surface diffusion as the dominant transport mechanism that competes with stochastic roughening. NH3 incident kinetic energies in the 0.4--1.8 eV range did not have a direct effect on surface morphology but an indirect influence via NH3 reactivity modulation. Two-dimensional GaN films were grown by chemical beam epitaxy using TEG-seeded supersonic molecular beams and NH3 from a leak valve. TEM analysis indicated that GaN films were homoepitaxially grown on GaN(0001) substrates but have a high density of planar defects. Substrate temperature was the primary variable in reducing carbon contamination in the films. The dissociative chemisorption pathway of triethylgallium on GaN(0001) also appears to be precursor-mediated.

  12. Self-supporting carbon glass films: a PAS standard sample?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coufal, H

    1982-01-01

    The preparation of self-supporting carbon glass films is described. Their spectral and photoacoustic parameters are presented indicating that these films are an optimum choice as standard samples for photoacoustic spectroscopy with gas-coupled microphones.

  13. Hydrogenated amorphous carbon films on steel balls and Si substrates: Nanostructural evolutions and their trigging tribological behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yongfu; Wang, Yan; Zhang, Xingkai; Shi, Jing; Gao, Kaixiong; Zhang, Bin; Zhang, Junyan

    2017-10-01

    In this study, we prepared hydrogenated amorphous carbon films on steel balls and Si substrates (steel ball- and Si substrate-films) with different deposition time, and discussed their carbon nanostructural evolutions and tribological behaviors. The steel ball-film structure started to be graphite-like structure and then gradually transformed into fullerene-like (FL) structure. The Si substrate-film structure began in FL structure and kept it through the thickness. The difference may be result from the competition between high starting substrate temperature after additional nitriding applied on the steel balls (its supply power is higher than that in the film deposition), and relaxation of compressive stress from energized ion bombardment in film deposition process. The FL structural film friction couples could achieve ultra-low friction in open air. In particular, the Si substrate-film with 3 h, against the steel ball-film with 2 h and 3 h, exhibited super-low friction (∼0.009) and superlong wear life (∼5.5 × 105 cycles). Our result could widen the superlubricity scope from previously high load and velocity, to middle load and velocity.

  14. Formation of thin graphite films upon carbon diffusion through nickel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shustin, E. G.; Isaev, N. V.; Luzanov, V. A.; Temiryazeva, M. P.

    2017-07-01

    Experimental results on the synthesis of thin graphite films with the aid of annealing of nickel films on carbon substrate are presented. Highly oriented pyrolitic graphite is used as the substrate to provide structural quality of the deposited nickel film. It is shown that the cyclic annealing of the structure with intermediate cooling leads to crystallization of primary amorphous carbon into a film consisting of flakes of vertical graphene. The process of graphite formation is discussed.

  15. Metal-functionalized single-walled graphitic carbon nitride nanotubes: a first-principles study on magnetic property

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shenoy Vivek

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The magnetic properties of metal-functionalized graphitic carbon nitride nanotubes were investigated based on first-principles calculations. The graphitic carbon nitride nanotube can be either ferromagnetic or antiferromagnetic by functionalizing with different metal atoms. The W- and Ti-functionalized nanotubes are ferromagnetic, which are attributed to carrier-mediated interactions because of the coupling between the spin-polarized d and p electrons and the formation of the impurity bands close to the band edges. However, Cr-, Mn-, Co-, and Ni-functionalized nanotubes are antiferromagnetic because of the anti-alignment of the magnetic moments between neighboring metal atoms. The functionalized nanotubes may be used in spintronics and hydrogen storage.

  16. Visible light photoreactivity from hybridization states between carbon nitride bandgap states and valence states in Nb and Ti oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hosik, E-mail: hosiklee@gmail.com [School of Mechanical and Advanced Materials Engineering, Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST), Unist-gil 100 Eonyang-eup, Ulsan 689-798 (Korea, Republic of); Ohno, Takahisa, E-mail: OHNO.Takahisa@nims.go.jp [Global Research Center for Environment and Energy based on Nanomaterials Science (GREEN), National Institute for Material Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba (Japan); Computational Materials Science Unit (CMSU), National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan)

    2013-03-29

    Highlights: ► Origin of bandgap reduction for visible photoreactivity is suggested. ► Carbon nitride adsorption in interlayer space can induce the bandgap reduction. ► The electronic structures are studied by density functional theory calculations. - Abstract: For better efficiency as photocatalysts, N-doping for visible light reactivity has been intensively studied in Lamellar niobic and titanic solid acids (HNb{sub 3}O{sub 8}, H{sub 2}Ti{sub 4}O{sub 9}), and its microscopic structures have been debated in this decade. We calculate the layered solid acids’ structures and bandgaps. Bandgap reduction by carbon nitride adsorption in interlayer space is observed computationally. It originates from localized nitrogen states which form delocalized top-valence states by hybridizing with the host oxygen states and can contribute to photo-current.

  17. Vanadium nitride quantum dot/nitrogen-doped microporous carbon nanofibers electrode for high-performance supercapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yage; Ran, Fen

    2017-03-01

    In this article, vanadium nitride quantum dot/nitrogen-doped microporous carbon nanofibers (VNQD/CNF) is developed by a method of combination of electrostatic spinning and high-temperature calcination under the atmosphere of NH3: N2 = 3: 2 for high performance supercapacitors. VNQD dispersing into CNF, enrichment of N atom doped in carbon bulk, and abundant porous structure not only prevent the growth and aggregation of VN nanoparticles, improve electrical conductivity, wettability, and stability of the electrode materials, but also enhance fast migration of electrolyte ions during the electrochemical process. Thus, VNQD/CNF exhibits a high specific capacitance of 406.5 F g-1 at 0.5 A g-1 and a good rate capability with a capacitance retention of 75.1% at 5.0 A g-1. Additionally, VNQD/CNF as a negative electrode are combined with Ni(OH)2 as a positive electrode to fabricate the hybrid supercapacitor of VNQD/CNF//Ni(OH)2. Remarkably, at a power density of 774.6 W kg-1, the supercapacitor device delivers an ultrahigh energy density of 31.2 Wh kg-1.

  18. Deposition and characterization of zirconium nitride (ZrN) thin films by reactive magnetron sputtering with linear gas ion source and bias voltage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kavitha, A.; Kannan, R. [Department of Physics, University College of Engineering, Anna University, Dindugal-624622 (India); Subramanian, N. Sankara [Department of Physics, Thiagarajar College of Engineering, Madurai -625015, Tamilnadu (India); Loganathan, S. [Ion Plating, Titan Industries Ltd., Hosur - 635126, Tamilnadu (India)

    2014-04-24

    Zirconium nitride thin films have been prepared on stainless steel substrate (304L grade) by reactive cylindrical magnetron sputtering method with Gas Ion Source (GIS) and bias voltage using optimized coating parameters. The structure and surface morphologies of the ZrN films were characterized using X-ray diffraction, atomic microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The adhesion property of ZrN thin film has been increased due to the GIS. The coating exhibits better adhesion strength up to 10 N whereas the ZrN thin film with bias voltage exhibits adhesion up to 500 mN.

  19. Detection of Carbon Monoxide Using Polymer-Carbon Composite Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homer, Margie L.; Ryan, Margaret A.; Lara, Liana M.

    2011-01-01

    A carbon monoxide (CO) sensor was developed that can be incorporated into an existing sensing array architecture. The CO sensor is a low-power chemiresistor that operates at room temperature, and the sensor fabrication techniques are compatible with ceramic substrates. Sensors made from four different polymers were tested: poly (4-vinylpryridine), ethylene-propylene-diene-terpolymer, polyepichlorohydrin, and polyethylene oxide (PEO). The carbon black used for the composite films was Black Pearls 2000, a furnace black made by the Cabot Corporation. Polymers and carbon black were used as received. In fact, only two of these sensors showed a good response to CO. The poly (4-vinylpryridine) sensor is noisy, but it does respond to the CO above 200 ppm. The polyepichlorohydrin sensor is less noisy and shows good response down to 100 ppm.

  20. Reactive magnetron cosputtering of hard and conductive ternary nitride thin films: Ti-Zr-N and Ti-Ta-N

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abadias, G.; Koutsokeras, L. E.; Dub, S. N.; Tolmachova, G. N.; Debelle, A.; Sauvage, T.; Villechaise, P. [Departement Physique et Mecanique des Materiaux, Institut Pprime, UPR 3346, CNRS, Universite de Poitiers, ENSMA, SP2MI--Teleport 2, Bd Marie et Pierre Curie, BP 30179, F86962 Futuroscope-Chasseneuil (France); Departement Physique et Mecanique des Materiaux, Institut Pprime, UPR 3346, CNRS, Universite de Poitiers, ENSMA, SP2MI--Teleport 2, Bd Marie et Pierre Curie, BP 30179, F86962 Futuroscope-Chasseneuil, France and Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Ioannina, Ioannina 45110 (Greece); Institute for Superhard Materials, NAS of Ukraine, Avtozavodskaya St. 2, 04074 Kiev (Ukraine); Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology, Akademicheskaya St., 61108 Kharkov (Ukraine); Universite Paris-Sud 11, CSNSM, Ba circumflex t 108, 91405 Orsay Cedex (France); CNRS-CEMHTI, Site Cyclotron, 3A, rue de la Ferollerie, 45071 Orleans Cedex 2 (France); Departement Physique et Mecanique des Materiaux, Institut Pprime, UPR 3346, CNRS, Universite de Poitiers, ENSMA, SP2MI--Teleport 2, Bd Marie et Pierre Curie, BP 30179, F86962 Futuroscope-Chasseneuil (France)

    2010-07-15

    Ternary transition metal nitride thin films, with thickness up to 300 nm, were deposited by dc reactive magnetron cosputtering in Ar-N{sub 2} plasma discharges at 300 deg. C on Si substrates. Two systems were comparatively studied, Ti-Zr-N and Ti-Ta-N, as representative of isostructural and nonisostructural prototypes, with the aim of characterizing their structural, mechanical, and electrical properties. While phase-separated TiN-ZrN and TiN-TaN are the bulk equilibrium states, Ti{sub 1-x}Zr{sub x}N and Ti{sub 1-y}Ta{sub y}N solid solutions with the Na-Cl (B1-type) structure could be stabilized in a large compositional range (up to x=1 and y=0.75, respectively). Substituting Ti atoms by either Zr or Ta atoms led to significant changes in film texture, microstructure, grain size, and surface morphology, as evidenced by x-ray diffraction, x-ray reflectivity, and scanning electron and atomic force microscopies. The ternary Ti{sub 1-y}Ta{sub y}N films exhibited superior mechanical properties to Ti{sub 1-x}Zr{sub x}N films as well as binary compounds, with hardness as high as 42 GPa for y=0.69. All films were metallic, the lowest electrical resistivity {rho}{approx}65 {mu}{Omega} cm being obtained for pure ZrN, while for Ti{sub 1-y}Ta{sub y}N films a minimum was observed at y{approx}0.3. The evolution of the different film properties is discussed based on microstructrural investigations.

  1. One-step electrochemical synthesis of ultrathin graphitic carbon nitride nanosheets and their application to the detection of uric acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Qiujun; Deng, Jianhui; Hou, Yuxin; Wang, Haiyan; Li, Haitao; Zhang, Youyu

    2015-08-07

    Ultrathin graphitic carbon nitride nanosheets (g-C3N4) with a thickness of about 2 nm were synthesized by a one-step electrochemical method for the first time. The possible mechanism of the electrochemical synthesis was discussed. This as-synthesized g-C3N4 showed intrinsic peroxidase-like activity and was successfully applied for the detection of uric acid.

  2. Improvement in nano-hardness and corrosion resistance of low carbon steel by plasma nitriding with negative DC bias voltage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alim, Mohamed Mounes; Saoula, Nadia; Tadjine, Rabah; Hadj-Larbi, Fayçal; Keffous, Aissa; Kechouane, Mohamed

    2016-10-01

    In this work, we study the effect of plasma nitriding on nano-hardness and corrosion resistance of low carbon steel samples. The plasma was generated through a radio-frequency inductively coupled plasma source. The substrate temperature increased (by the self-induced heating mechanism) with the treatment time for increasing negative bias voltages. X-rays diffraction analysis revealed the formation of nitride phases (ɛ-Fe2-3N and γ'-Fe4N) in the compound layer of the treated samples. A phase transition occurred from 3.5 kV to 4.0 kV and was accompanied by an increase in the volume fraction of the γ'-Fe4N phase and a decrease in that of the ɛ-Fe2-3N phase. Auger electron spectroscopy revealed a deep diffusion of the implanted nitrogen beyond 320 nm. The nano-hardness increased by ~400% for the nitrogen-implanted samples compared to the untreated state, the nitride phases are believed to participate to the hardening. Potentiodynamic polarization measurements revealed that the plasma nitriding has improved the corrosion resistance behavior of the material. When compared to the untreated state, the sample processed at 4.0 kV exhibits a shift of +500 mV and a reduction to 3% in its corrosion current. These results were obtained for relatively low bias voltages and short treatment time (2 h).

  3. Correlation of film density and wet etch rate in hydrofluoric acid of plasma enhanced atomic layer deposited silicon nitride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Provine, J., E-mail: jprovine@stanford.edu; Schindler, Peter; Kim, Yongmin; Walch, Steve P.; Kim, Hyo Jin [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Kim, Ki-Hyun [Manufacturing Technology Center, Samsung Electronics, Suwon, Gyeonggi-Do (Korea, Republic of); Prinz, Fritz B. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)

    2016-06-15

    The continued scaling in transistors and memory elements has necessitated the development of atomic layer deposition (ALD) of silicon nitride (SiN{sub x}), particularly for use a low k dielectric spacer. One of the key material properties needed for SiN{sub x} films is a low wet etch rate (WER) in hydrofluoric (HF) acid. In this work, we report on the evaluation of multiple precursors for plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition (PEALD) of SiN{sub x} and evaluate the film’s WER in 100:1 dilutions of HF in H{sub 2}O. The remote plasma capability available in PEALD, enabled controlling the density of the SiN{sub x} film. Namely, prolonged plasma exposure made films denser which corresponded to lower WER in a systematic fashion. We determined that there is a strong correlation between WER and the density of the film that extends across multiple precursors, PEALD reactors, and a variety of process conditions. Limiting all steps in the deposition to a maximum temperature of 350 °C, it was shown to be possible to achieve a WER in PEALD SiN{sub x} of 6.1 Å/min, which is similar to WER of SiN{sub x} from LPCVD reactions at 850 °C.

  4. Low hydrogen content silicon nitride films deposited at room temperature with a multipolar ECR plasma source

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Isai, I.G.; Holleman, J.; Wallinga, Hans; Woerlee, P.H.

    2004-01-01

    Silicon nitride layers with very low hydrogen content (less than 1 atomic percent) were deposited at near room temperature, from N2 and SiH4, with a multipolar electron cyclotron resonance plasma. The influences of pressure and nitrogen flow rate on physical and electrical properties were studied in

  5. Ultrafast deposition of silicon nitride and semiconductor silicon thin films by Hot Wire Chemical Vapor Deposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schropp, R.E.I.; van der Werf, C.H.M.; Verlaan, V.; Rath, J.K.; Li, H. B. T.

    2009-01-01

    The technology of Hot Wire Chemical Vapor Deposition (HWCVD) or Catalytic Chemical Vapor Deposition (Cat-CVD) has made great progress during the last couple of years. This review discusses examples of significant progress. Specifically, silicon nitride deposition by HWCVD (HW-SiNx) is highlighted,

  6. Highly Efficient Performance and Conversion Pathway of Photocatalytic NO Oxidation on SrO-Clusters@Amorphous Carbon Nitride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Wen; Li, Jieyuan; Dong, Fan; Sun, Yanjuan; Jiang, Guangming; Cen, Wanglai; Lee, S C; Wu, Zhongbiao

    2017-09-19

    This work demonstrates the first molecular-level conversion pathway of NO oxidation over a novel SrO-clusters@amorphous carbon nitride (SCO-ACN) photocatalyst, which is synthesized via copyrolysis of urea and SrCO 3 . The inclusion of SrCO 3 is crucial in the formation of the amorphous carbon nitride (ACN) and SrO clusters by attacking the intralayer hydrogen bonds at the edge sites of graphitic carbon nitride (CN). The amorphous nature of ACN can promote the transportation, migration, and transformation of charge carriers on SCO-ACN. And the SrO clusters are identified as the newly formed active centers to facilitate the activation of NO via the formation of Sr-NO δ(+) , which essentially promotes the conversion of NO to the final products. The combined effects of the amorphous structure and SrO clusters impart outstanding photocatalytic NO removal efficiency to the SCO-ACN under visible-light irradiation. To reveal the photocatalytic mechanism, the adsorption and photocatalytic oxidation of NO over CN and SCO-ACN are analyzed by in situ DRIFTS, and the intermediates and conversion pathways are elucidated and compared. This work presents a novel in situ DRIFTS-based strategy to explore the photocatalytic reaction pathway of NO oxidation, which is quite beneficial to understand the mechanism underlying the photocatalytic reaction and advance the development of photocatalytic technology for environmental remediation.

  7. Comparison and semiconductor properties of nitrogen doped carbon thin films grown by different techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alibart, F.; Drouhin, O. Durand [Laboratoire e Physique de la Matiere Condensee, 33 rue Saint Leu, 80000 Amiens (France); Benlahsen, M. [Laboratoire e Physique de la Matiere Condensee, 33 rue Saint Leu, 80000 Amiens (France)], E-mail: mohamed.benlahsen@sc.u-picardie.fr; Muhl, S.; Rodil, S. Elizabeth [Instituo de Investigationes en Materials, Universidad National Autonomia de Mexico, Mexico, D.F. 04510 (Mexico); Camps, E.; Escobar-Alarcon, L. [Instituo National de Investigationes Nucleares, Apdo. Postal 18-1027, Mexico, D.F. 11801 (Mexico)

    2008-06-30

    Amorphous carbon nitride (a-CN{sub x}) thin films have been synthesised by three different deposition techniques in an Ar/N{sub 2} gas mixture and have been deposited by varying the percentage of nitrogen gas in the mixture (i.e. the N{sub 2}/Ar + N{sub 2} ratio) from 0 to 10%. The variation of the electrical conductivity and the gap values of the deposited films versus the N{sub 2}/Ar + N{sub 2} ratio were investigated in relation with their local microstructure. Film composition was analysed using Raman spectroscopy and optical transmission experiments. The observed variation of electrical conductivity and optical properties are attributed to the changes in the atomic bonding structures, which were induced by N incorporation, increasing both the sp{sup 2} carbon content and their relative disorder. The low N content samples seem to be an interesting material to produce films with interesting properties for optoelectronic applications considering the facility to control the gas composition as a key parameter.

  8. Formation of Silicon/Carbon Core-Shell Nanowires Using Carbon Nitride Nanorods Template and Gold Catalyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilyani Putri Jamal

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this experiment, silicon/carbon (Si/C core-shell nanowires (NWs were synthesized using gold nanoparticles (Au NPs coated carbon nitride nanorods (CN NRs as a template. To begin with, the Au NPs coated CN NRs were prepared by using plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition assisted with hot-wire evaporation technique. Fourier transform infrared spectrum confirms the C–N bonding of the CN NRs, while X-ray diffraction pattern indicates the crystalline structure of the Au NPs and amorphous structure of the CN NRs. The Au NPs coated CN NRs were thermally annealed at temperature of 800°C in nitrogen ambient for one hour to induce the growth of Si/C core-shell NWs. The growth mechanism for the Si/C core-shell NWs is related to the nitrogen evolution and solid-liquid-solid growth process which is a result of the thermal annealing. The formation of Si/C core-shell NWs is confirmed by electron spectroscopic imaging analysis.

  9. Influence of laser pulse frequency on the microstructure of aluminum nitride thin films synthesized by pulsed laser deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonova, K.; Duta, L.; Szekeres, A.; Stan, G. E.; Mihailescu, I. N.; Anastasescu, M.; Stroescu, H.; Gartner, M.

    2017-02-01

    Aluminum Nitride (AlN) thin films were synthesized on Si (100) wafers at 450 °C by pulsed laser deposition. A polycrystalline AlN target was multipulsed irradiated in a nitrogen ambient, at different laser pulse repetition rate. Grazing Incidence X-Ray Diffraction and Atomic Force Microscopy analyses evidenced nanocrystallites with a hexagonal lattice in the amorphous AlN matrix. The thickness and optical constants of the layers were determined by infrared spectroscopic ellipsometry. The optical properties were studied by Fourier Transform Infrared reflectance spectroscopy in polarised oblique incidence radiation. Berreman effect was observed around the longitudinal phonon modes of the crystalline AlN component. Angular dependence of the A1LO mode frequency was analysed and connected to the orientation of the particles' optical axis to the substrate surface normal. The role of the laser pulse frequency on the layers' properties is discussed on this basis.

  10. Investigation of a Simplified Mechanism Model for Prediction of Gallium Nitride Thin Film Growth through Numerical Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Kai Hu

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available A numerical procedure was performed to simplify the complicated mechanism of an epitaxial thin-film growth process. In this study, three numerical mechanism models are presented for verifying the growth rate of the gallium nitride (GaN mechanism. The mechanism models were developed through rate of production analysis. All of the results can be compared in one schematic diagram, and the differences among these three mechanisms are pronounced at high temperatures. The simplified reaction mechanisms were then used as input for a two-dimensional computational fluid dynamics code FLUENT, enabling the accurate prediction of growth rates. Validation studies are presented for two types of laboratory-scale reactors (vertical and horizontal. A computational study including thermal and flow field was also performed to investigate the fluid dynamic in those reactors. For each study, the predictions agree acceptably well with the experimental data, indicating the reasonable accuracy of the reaction mechanisms.

  11. Chemical states and photoluminescence of Si0.3Ge0.7-nitride film formed by N2+ gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Y. M.; Jang, S. H.; Han, M.; Jung, M.-C.

    2011-09-01

    We investigated chemical states and photoluminescence of Si0.3Ge0.7-nitride film with a surface that was modified by N2+ ion implantation and rapid thermal annealing (RTA). By increasing the implantation time, the chemical bonding between Si and Ge was directly broken, and subnitrides were formed. We also observed the N2 vibration mode peak in the x-ray absorption spectra, but after RTA, this peak disappeared completely. SiNx was transformed to the stable Si3N4. However, GeNx with various chemical states, including Ge3N4 and nanocrystalline Ge, were formed. Photoluminescence observations at room temperature showed strong visible luminescence at wavelengths of 460 and 515 nm.

  12. Conductive Graphitic Carbon Nitride as an Ideal Material for Electrocatalytically Switchable CO2 Capture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Xin; Kou, Liangzhi; Tahini, Hassan A; Smith, Sean C

    2015-12-01

    Good electrical conductivity and high electron mobility of the sorbent materials are prerequisite for electrocatalytically switchable CO2 capture. However, no conductive and easily synthetic sorbent materials are available until now. Here, we examined the possibility of conductive graphitic carbon nitride (g-C4N3) nanosheets as sorbent materials for electrocatalytically switchable CO2 capture. Using first-principle calculations, we found that the adsorption energy of CO2 molecules on g-C4N3 nanosheets can be dramatically enhanced by injecting extra electrons into the adsorbent. At saturation CO2 capture coverage, the negatively charged g-C4N3 nanosheets achieve CO2 capture capacities up to 73.9 × 10(13) cm(-2) or 42.3 wt%. In contrast to other CO2 capture approaches, the process of CO2 capture/release occurs spontaneously without any energy barriers once extra electrons are introduced or removed, and these processes can be simply controlled and reversed by switching on/off the charging voltage. In addition, these negatively charged g-C4N3 nanosheets are highly selective for separating CO2 from mixtures with CH4, H2 and/or N2. These predictions may prove to be instrumental in searching for a new class of experimentally feasible high-capacity CO2 capture materials with ideal thermodynamics and reversibility.

  13. Adsorption of Paraquat Dichloride by Graphitic Carbon Nitride Synthesized from Melamine Scraps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watcharenwong, A.; Kaeokan, A.; Rammaroeng, R.; Upama, P.; Kajitvichyanukul, P.

    2017-07-01

    In this research, graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3N4) was synthesized from useless melamine scraps. Mixture of melamine powder and urea was directly burned in the muffle furnace at 550 °C. Later as-synthesized g-C3N4 was modified with hydrochloric acid. The g-C3N4 powder was characterized by several techniques including X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscope, and specific surface area analyser. Adsorption of the herbicide paraquat from an aqueous solution to suspended particles of g-C3N4 was investigated, taking into consideration several parameters such as initial concentration of paraquat, initial pH, and dosage of g-C3N4. The results showed that with the same amount of g-C3N4, the increase in the paraquat concentration caused the reduction in the removal efficiency and the higher the amount of g-C3N4, the less residual paraquat remained in the bulk solution. G-C3N4 showed better adsorption behaviour in the basic condition. Finally, Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption isotherms were also evaluated. Paraquat adsorption by g-C3N4 was in accordance with Langmuir more than Freundlich adsorption isotherm.

  14. Mode-locked Tm-doped fiber laser based on iron-doped carbon nitride nanosheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yongfeng; Zhou, Yan; Tang, Yulong; Xu, Jianqiu; Hu, Chenxia; Gao, Linfeng; Zhang, Haoli; Wang, Qiang

    2017-11-01

    Solution based nanosheets of iron-doped graphitic carbon nitrides (Fe-g-CN) have been prepared and their optical properties (both linear and nonlinear) are studied. These two-dimensional (2D) nanosheets show an absorption spectrum extending to over 2 µm, and in particular they possess strong nonlinear (saturable) absorption in the 2 µm spectral region. A saturable absorber (SA) manufactured from 2D Fe-g-CN nanosheets gives a modulation depth and saturation intensity of 12.9% and 8.9 MW cm‑2, respectively. This SA is further used to mode-lock thulium-doped fiber lasers, producing 2 µm laser pulses with a duration of 16.6 ps (dechirped to 2.2 ps), an average power of 96.4 mW, a pulse energy of 6.3 nJ, and a repetition rate of 15.3 MHz. As a new type of 2D nonlinear material with strong modulation capabilities, solution-based Fe-g-CN nanosheets can be potentially integrated into photonic and optoelectrionic devices, particuarly in the 2 µm spectral region.

  15. Photocatalytic hydrogen production using polymeric carbon nitride with a hydrogenase and a bioinspired synthetic Ni catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caputo, Christine A; Gross, Manuela A; Lau, Vincent W; Cavazza, Christine; Lotsch, Bettina V; Reisner, Erwin

    2014-10-20

    Solar-light-driven H2 production in water with a [NiFeSe]-hydrogenase (H2ase) and a bioinspired synthetic nickel catalyst (NiP) in combination with a heptazine carbon nitride polymer, melon (CN(x)), is reported. The semibiological and purely synthetic systems show catalytic activity during solar light irradiation with turnover numbers (TONs) of more than 50,000 mol H2(mol H2ase)(-1) and approximately 155 mol H2 (mol NiP)(-1) in redox-mediator-free aqueous solution at pH 6 and 4.5, respectively. Both systems maintained a reduced photoactivity under UV-free solar light irradiation (λ>420 nm). © 2014 The Authors. Published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

  16. Carbon nitride-TiO2 hybrid modified with hydrogenase for visible light driven hydrogen production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caputo, Christine A; Wang, Lidong; Beranek, Radim; Reisner, Erwin

    2015-10-01

    A system consisting of a [NiFeSe]-hydrogenase (H2ase) grafted on the surface of a TiO2 nanoparticle modified with polyheptazine carbon nitride polymer, melon (CN x ) is reported. This semi-biological assembly shows a turnover number (TON) of more than 5.8 × 105 mol H2 (mol H2ase)-1 after 72 h in a sacrificial electron donor solution at pH 6 during solar AM 1.5 G irradiation. An external quantum efficiency up to 4.8% for photon-to-hydrogen conversion was achieved under irradiation with monochromatic light. The CN x -TiO2-H2ase construct was also active under UV-free solar light irradiation (λ > 420 nm), where it showed a substantially higher activity than TiO2-H2ase and CN x -H2ase due, in part, to the formation of a CN x -TiO2 charge transfer complex and highly productive electron transfer to the H2ase. The CN x -TiO2-H2ase system sets a new benchmark for photocatalytic H2 production with a H2ase immobilised on a noble- and toxic-metal free light absorber in terms of visible light utilisation and stability.

  17. Multifunctional fiber reinforced polymer composites using carbon and boron nitride nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashrafi, Behnam; Jakubinek, Michael B.; Martinez-Rubi, Yadienka; Rahmat, Meysam; Djokic, Drazen; Laqua, Kurtis; Park, Daesun; Kim, Keun-Su; Simard, Benoit; Yousefpour, Ali

    2017-12-01

    Recent progress in nanotechnology has made several nano-based materials available with the potential to address limitations of conventional fiber reinforced polymer composites, particularly in reference to multifunctional structures. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are the most prevalent case and offer amazing properties at the individual nanotube level. There are already a few high-profile examples of the use of CNTs in space structures to provide added electrical conductivity for static dissipation and electromagnetic shielding. Boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs), which are structurally analogous to CNTs, also present a range of attractive properties. Like the more widely explored CNTs, individual BNNTs display remarkable mechanical properties and high thermal conductivity but with contrasting functional attributes including substantially higher thermal stability, high electrical insulation, polarizability, high neutron absorption and transparency to visible light. This presents the potential of employing either or both BNNTs and CNTs to achieve a range of lightweight, functional composites for space structures. Here we present the case for application of BNNTs, in addition to CNTs, in space structures and describe recent advances in BNNT production at the National Research Council Canada (NRC) that have, for the first time, provided sufficiently large quantities to enable commercialization of high-quality BNNTs and accelerate development of chemistry, composites and applications based on BNNTs. Early demonstrations showing the fabrication and limited structural testing of polymer matrix composites, including glass fiber-reinforced composite panels containing BNNTs will be discussed.

  18. Immobilizing photogenerated electrons from graphitic carbon nitride for an improved visible-light photocatalytic activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Han; Cao, Yue; Feng, Leiyu; Chen, Yinguang

    2016-01-01

    Reducing the recombination probability of photogenerated electrons and holes is pivotal in enhancing the photocatalytic ability of graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3N4). Speeding the departure of photogenerated electrons is the most commonly used method of achieving this. To the best of our knowledge, there is no report on suppressing the recombination of photogenerated electron–hole pairs by immobilizing the electrons with ester functional groups. Here, for the first time the mesoporous g-C3N4 (mpg-C3N4) was integrated with polymethyl methacrylate, a polymer abundant in ester groups, which showed a photocatalytic activity unexpectedly higher than that of the original mpg-C3N4 under visible-light irradiation. Experimental observations, along with theoretical calculations, clarified that the impressive photocatalytic ability of the as-modified mpg-C3N4 was mainly derived from the immobilization of photogenerated electrons via an electron-gripping effect imposed by the ester groups in the polymethyl methacrylate. This novel strategy might also be applied in improving the photocatalytic performance of other semiconductors. PMID:26948968

  19. Plasmon mediated enhancement and tuning of optical emission properties of two dimensional graphitic carbon nitride nanosheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayan, Sayan; Gogurla, Narendar; Midya, Anupam; Singha, Achintya; Ray, Samit K.

    2017-12-01

    We demonstrate surface plasmon induced enhancement and tunablilty in optical emission properties of two dimensional graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3N4) nanosheets through the attachment of gold (Au) nanoparticles. Raman spectroscopy has revealed surface enhanced Raman scattering that arises due to the combined effect of the charge transfer process and localized surface plasmon induced enhancement in electromagnetic field, both occurring at the nanoparticle–nanosheet interface. Photoluminescence studies suggest that at an optimal concentration of nanoparticles, the emission intensity can be enhanced, which is maximum within the 500–525 nm region. Further, the fabricated electroluminescent devices reveal that the emission feature can be tuned from bluish-green to red (∼160 nm shift) upon attaching Au nanoparticles. We propose that the π*→π transition in g-C3N4 can trigger surface plasmon oscillation in Au, which subsequently increases the excitation process in the nanosheets and results in enhanced emission in the green region of the photoluminescence spectrum. On the other hand, electroluminescence of g-C3N4 can induce plasmon oscillation more efficiently and thus can lead to red emission from Au nanoparticles through the radiative damping of particle plasmons. The influence of nanoparticle size and coverage on the emission properties of two dimensional g-C3N4, nanosheets has also been studied in detail.

  20. Plasma-enhanced growth, composition, and refractive index of silicon oxy-nitride films

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mattsson, Kent Erik

    1995-01-01

    -product. A model, that combine the chemical net reaction and the stoichiometric rules, is found to agree with measured deposition rates for given material compositions. Effects of annealing in a nitrogen atmosphere has been investigated for the 400 °C– 1100 °C temperature range. It is observed that PECVD oxy....... This relation suggest that the refractive index of oxy-nitride with a low nitrogen concentration is determined by the material density. It is suggested that the relative oxygen concentration in the gas flow is the major deposition characterization parameter, and that water vapor is the predominant reaction by...... nitrogen concentrations between 2 and 10 at. %. A simple atomic valence model is found to describe both the measured atomic concentrations and published material compositions for silicon oxy-nitride produced by PECVD. A relation between the Si–N bond concentration and the refractive index is found...

  1. Effect of oxygen on structural stability of nitrogen-doped germanium telluride films with and without silicon nitride layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ki-Hong [AE group, Corporate Technology Operations SAIT, Samsung Electronics Co. Ltd. Yongin, 446-712 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Sang-Jun, E-mail: sangjun5545.choi@samsung.com [System LSI, Samsung Electronics Co. Ltd., Yong-In, 446-712 (Korea, Republic of); Kyoung, Yong-Koo; Lee, Jun-Ho [AE group, Corporate Technology Operations SAIT, Samsung Electronics Co. Ltd. Yongin, 446-712 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-03-30

    Nitrogen-doped germanium telluride (N-GeTe) films with and without silicon nitride (SiN) layer were thermally annealed in an air atmosphere. The SiN layer prevented the oxidation of GeTe films despite the massive in-diffusion of oxygen atoms. The phase transition from cubic to rhombohedral phase occurred only in the air-annealed samples, not in the samples annealed at 2.0 mPa. The in-diffused oxygen is probably the leading cause of this phase transition. N-GeTe films without SiN layer showed an increase in sheet resistance after 1000 min of air annealing; this could be attributable to a phase transition from the cubic GeTe phase to the amorphous germanium oxide and metallic tellurium phases. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SiN layer prevented oxidation of GeTe despite the massive in-diffusion of oxygen. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The in-diffused oxygen have a critical role in the changes of crystal structure. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer N-GeTe exhibited phase transition into amorphous Ge oxide and metallic Te phase.

  2. Preparation of Electrically Conductive Polystyrene/Carbon Nanofiber Nanocomposite Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Luyi; O'Reilly, Jonathan Y.; Tien, Chi-Wei; Sue, Hung-Jue

    2008-01-01

    A simple and effective approach to prepare conductive polystyrene/carbon nanofiber (PS/CNF) nanocomposite films via a solution dispersion method is presented. Inexpensive CNF, which has a structure similar to multi-walled carbon nanotubes, is chosen as a nanofiller in this experiment to achieve conductivity in PS films. A good dispersion is…

  3. Growth of graphene films from non-gaseous carbon sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tour, James; Sun, Zhengzong; Yan, Zheng; Ruan, Gedeng; Peng, Zhiwei

    2015-08-04

    In various embodiments, the present disclosure provides methods of forming graphene films by: (1) depositing a non-gaseous carbon source onto a catalyst surface; (2) exposing the non-gaseous carbon source to at least one gas with a flow rate; and (3) initiating the conversion of the non-gaseous carbon source to the graphene film, where the thickness of the graphene film is controllable by the gas flow rate. Additional embodiments of the present disclosure pertain to graphene films made in accordance with the methods of the present disclosure.

  4. Low temperature CVD growth of ultrathin carbon films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chao; Wu, Peng; Gan, Wei; Habib, Muhammad; Xu, Weiyu; Fang, Qi; Song, Li

    2016-05-01

    We demonstrate the low temperature, large area growth of ultrathin carbon films by chemical vapor deposition under atmospheric pressure on various substrates. In particularly, uniform and continuous carbon films with the thickness of 2-5 nm were successfully grown at a temperature as low as 500 oC on copper foils, as well as glass substrates coated with a 100 nm thick copper layer. The characterizations revealed that the low-temperature-grown carbon films consist on few short, curved graphene layers and thin amorphous carbon films. Particularly, the low-temperature grown samples exhibited over 90% transmittance at a wavelength range of 400-750 nm and comparable sheet resistance in contrast with the 1000oC-grown one. This low-temperature growth method may offer a facile way to directly prepare visible ultrathin carbon films on various substrate surfaces that are compatible with temperatures (500-600oC) used in several device processing technologies.

  5. Aluminium nitride films deposition by reactive triode sputtering for surface acoustic wave device applications

    OpenAIRE

    MORTET, Vincent; Vasin, A; Jouan, PY; Elmazria, O; Djouadi, MA

    2003-01-01

    AlN thin films have been deposited by reactive triode sputtering. The effect of the nitrogen contents in the discharge on films stoichiometry and crystal orientation has been investigated. AlN films have been studied by means of Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy. Dense AlN layers with very high electrical resistivity, high index of refraction and large optical band gap were obtained at high deposition rates. Finally, the optimized films were app...

  6. Enhanced performance of dye-sensitized solar cells with layered structure graphitic carbon nitride and reduced graphene oxide modified TiO2 photoanodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Huiru; Hu, Haihua; Cui, Can; Lin, Ping; Wang, Peng; Wang, Hao; Xu, Lingbo; Pan, Jiaqi; Li, Chaorong

    2017-11-01

    TiO2/reduced graphene oxide (TiO2/rGO) composite has been widely exploited as the photoanode material for high efficient dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). However, the power conversion efficiency (PCE) is limited due to the charge recombination between the rGO and electrolyte. In this paper, we incorporate 5.5 wt% layered structure graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3N4) and 0.25 wt% rGO into TiO2 nanoparticle (NP) film to form a triple-component TiO2/rGO/g-C3N4 (TGC) photoanode for DSSCs. The TGC photoanode significantly increased the dye absorption and thus to improve the light harvesting efficiency. Furthermore, the electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) analysis of the DSSCs based on TGC photoanode demonstrates that the incorporation of the rGO and g-C3N4 into TiO2 effectively accelerates the electron transfer and reduces the charge recombination. As a result, the DSSCs based on TGC film show PCE of 5.83%, enhanced by 50.1% compared with that of pure TiO2 photoanodes. This result strongly suggests a facile strategy to improve the photovoltaic performance of DSSCs.

  7. Workshop on diamond and diamond-like-carbon films for the transportation industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nichols, F.A.; Moores, D.K. [eds.

    1993-01-01

    Applications exist in advanced transportation systems as well as in manufacturing processes that would benefit from superior tribological properties of diamond, diamond-like-carbon and cubic boron nitride coatings. Their superior hardness make them ideal candidates as protective coatings to reduce adhesive, abrasive and erosive wear in advanced diesel engines, gas turbines and spark-ignited engines and in machining and manufacturing tools as well. The high thermal conductivity of diamond also makes it desirable for thermal management not only in tribological applications but also in high-power electronic devices and possibly large braking systems. A workshop has been recently held at Argonne National Laboratory entitled ``Diamond and Diamond-Like-Carbon Films for Transportation Applications`` which was attended by 85 scientists and engineers including top people involved in the basic technology of these films and also representatives from many US industrial companies. A working group on applications endorsed 18 different applications for these films in the transportation area alone. Separate abstracts have been prepared.

  8. Self-organizing carbon nitride coatings on steel from molten lead–magnesium eutectic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.A. Orlova

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Based on the results of calculation and experimental studies zirconium saturated eutectic Pb–Mg alloy is recommended as liquid metal coolant in fuel elements loaded with nitride fuel. Test stand was developed and manufactured for carrying out studies of deposition of nitride and/or carbide protective coatings from molten eutectic Pb–Mg within narrow gap between coaxially arranged tubes. Pilot testing has been performed.

  9. Confined Synthesis of Carbon Nitride in a Layered Host Matrix with Unprecedented Solid-State Quantum Yield and Stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wendi; Xu, Simin; Guan, Shanyue; Liang, Ruizheng; Wei, Min; Evans, David G; Duan, Xue

    2018-01-01

    Fluorescent carbon nanomaterials have drawn tremendous attention for their intriguing optical performances, but their employment in solid-state luminescent devices is rather limited as a result of aggregation-induced photoluminescence quenching. Herein, ultrathin carbon nitride (CN) is synthesized within the 2D confined region of layered double hydroxide (LDH) via triggering the interlayer condensation reaction of citric acid and urea. The resulting CN/LDH phosphor emits strong cyan light under UV-light irradiation with an absolute solid-state quantum yield (SSQY) of 95.9 ± 2.2%, which is, to the best of our knowledge, the highest value of carbon-based fluorescent materials ever reported. Furthermore, it exhibits a strong luminescence stability toward temperature, environmental pH, and photocorrosion. Both experimental studies and theoretical calculations reveal that the host-guest interactions between the rigid LDH matrix and interlayer carbon nitride give the predominant contribution to the unprecedented SSQY and stability. In addition, prospective applications of the CN/LDH material are demonstrated in both white light-emitting diodes and upconversion fluorescence imaging of cancer cells. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Redeposition in plasma-assisted atomic layer deposition: Silicon nitride film quality ruled by the gas residence time

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knoops, Harm C. M., E-mail: h.c.m.knoops@tue.nl, E-mail: w.m.m.kessels@tue.nl [Department of Applied Physics, Eindhoven University of Technology, P.O. Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Oxford Instruments Plasma Technology, North End, Bristol BS49 4AP (United Kingdom); Peuter, K. de; Kessels, W. M. M., E-mail: h.c.m.knoops@tue.nl, E-mail: w.m.m.kessels@tue.nl [Department of Applied Physics, Eindhoven University of Technology, P.O. Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands)

    2015-07-06

    The requirements on the material properties and growth control of silicon nitride (SiN{sub x}) spacer films in transistors are becoming ever more stringent as scaling of transistor structures continues. One method to deposit high-quality films with excellent control is atomic layer deposition (ALD). However, depositing SiN{sub x} by ALD has turned out to be very challenging. In this work, it is shown that the plasma gas residence time τ is a key parameter for the deposition of SiN{sub x} by plasma-assisted ALD and that this parameter can be linked to a so-called “redeposition effect”. This previously ignored effect, which takes place during the plasma step, is the dissociation of reaction products in the plasma and the subsequent redeposition of reaction-product fragments on the surface. For SiN{sub x} ALD using SiH{sub 2}(NH{sup t}Bu){sub 2} as precursor and N{sub 2} plasma as reactant, the gas residence time τ was found to determine both SiN{sub x} film quality and the resulting growth per cycle. It is shown that redeposition can be minimized by using a short residence time resulting in high-quality films with a high wet-etch resistance (i.e., a wet-etch rate of 0.5 nm/min in buffered HF solution). Due to the fundamental nature of the redeposition effect, it is expected to play a role in many more plasma-assisted ALD processes.

  11. Scanning transmission electron microscopy analysis of Ge(O)/(graphitic carbon nitride) nanocomposite powder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawasaki, Masahiro [JEOL USA Inc., 11 Dearborn Road, Peabody, MA 01960 (United States); Sompetch, Kanganit [Department of Chemistry and Materials Science Research Center, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Sarakonsri, Thapanee, E-mail: tsarakonsri@gmail.com [Department of Chemistry and Materials Science Research Center, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Shiojiri, Makoto [Kyoto Institute of Technology, Kyoto 606-8585 (Japan); School of Science and Engineering, University of Toyama, Toyama 930-8555 (Japan)

    2015-12-15

    Analytical electron microscopy has revealed the structure of particles that were synthesized by chemical reaction of GeO{sub 2} with NaBH{sub 4} in the basic solution including graphitic carbon nitride (g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4}) powders. The g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} was arranged by recrystallization of melamine at 600 °C under N{sub 2} gas atmosphere. The samples were dried at 60 °C or 180 °C for 4 h. The g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} was observed as lamellae of several ten nm or less in size and had an amorphous-like structure with a distorted lattice in an area as small as a few hundred pm in size. The reaction product was Ge(O) particles as fine as several nm in size and composed of Ge and O atoms. Most of the particles must be of GeO{sub 2−x} with the amorphous-like structure that has also a distorted lattice in an area of a few hundred pm in size. In the sample dried at 60 °C, the particles were found to be dispersed in a wide area on the g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} lamella. It is hard to recognize those particles in TEM images. The particles in the sample dried at 180 °C became larger and were easily observed as isolated lumps. Hence, these powders can be regarded as GeO{sub 2}/g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} or Ge/GeO{sub 2}/g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} nanocomposites, and expected to be applicable to anode materials for high energy Li-ion batteries due to Ge catalysis effect, accordingly. - Graphical abstract: STEM analysis of Ge(O)/(graphitic carbon nitride) nanocomposite powder. - Highlights: • Graphitic (g)-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} powder was prepared at 600 °C by recrystallization of melamine. • Ge(O) was prepared by chemical reaction in a solution including the g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} powders. • The products can be regarded as GeO{sub 2}/g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} or Ge/GeO{sub 2}/g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} nanocomposites. • GeO{sub 2} was amorphous several-nm particles and g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} was amorphous lamella of several 10 nm in size. • We expect them to be applicable for high energy Li-ion battery anode

  12. Studies to Enhance Superconductivity in Thin Film Carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, Benjamin; Brunke, Lyle; Burke, Jack; Vier, David; Steckl, Andrew; Haugan, Timothy

    2012-02-01

    With research in the area of superconductivity growing, it is no surprise that new efforts are being made to induce superconductivity or increase transition temperatures (Tc) in carbon given its many allotropic forms. Promising results have been published for boron doping in diamond films, and phosphorus doping in highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) films show hints of superconductivity.. Following these examples in the literature, we have begun studies to explore superconductivity in thin film carbon samples doped with different elements. Carbon thin films are prepared by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) on amorphous SiO2/Si and single-crystal substrates. Doping is achieved by depositing from (C1-xMx) single-targets with M = B4C and BN, and also by ion implantation into pure-carbon films. Previous research had indicated that Boron in HOPG did not elicit superconducting properties, but we aim to explore that also in thin film carbon and see if there needs to be a higher doping in the sample if trends were able to be seen in diamond films. Higher onset temperatures, Tc , and current densities, Jc, are hoped to be achieved with doping of the thin film carbon with different elements.

  13. Influence of laser pulse frequency on the microstructure of aluminum nitride thin films synthesized by pulsed laser deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antonova, K., E-mail: krasa@issp.bas.bg [Institute of Solid State Physics, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Tzarigradsko Chaussee 72, Sofia 1784 (Bulgaria); Duta, L. [National Institute for Lasers, Plasma, and Radiation Physics, 409 Atomistilor Street, 077125 Magurele (Romania); Szekeres, A. [Institute of Solid State Physics, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Tzarigradsko Chaussee 72, Sofia 1784 (Bulgaria); Stan, G.E. [National Institute of Materials Physics, 105 bis Atomistilor Street, 077125 Magurele (Romania); Mihailescu, I.N. [National Institute for Lasers, Plasma, and Radiation Physics, 409 Atomistilor Street, 077125 Magurele (Romania); Anastasescu, M.; Stroescu, H.; Gartner, M. [Institute of Physical Chemistry, “Ilie Murgulescu”, Romanian Academy, 202 Splaiul Independentei, 060021 Bucharest (Romania)

    2017-02-01

    Highlights: • Study of pulsed laser deposited AlN films at different laser pulse frequencies. • Higher laser pulse frequency promotes nanocrystallites formation at temperature 450 °C. • AFM and GIXRD detect randomly oriented wurtzite AlN structures. • Characterization of the nanocrystallites’ orientation by FTIR reflectance spectra. • Berreman effect is registered in p-polarised radiation at large incidence angles. - Abstract: Aluminum Nitride (AlN) thin films were synthesized on Si (100) wafers at 450 °C by pulsed laser deposition. A polycrystalline AlN target was multipulsed irradiated in a nitrogen ambient, at different laser pulse repetition rate. Grazing Incidence X-Ray Diffraction and Atomic Force Microscopy analyses evidenced nanocrystallites with a hexagonal lattice in the amorphous AlN matrix. The thickness and optical constants of the layers were determined by infrared spectroscopic ellipsometry. The optical properties were studied by Fourier Transform Infrared reflectance spectroscopy in polarised oblique incidence radiation. Berreman effect was observed around the longitudinal phonon modes of the crystalline AlN component. Angular dependence of the A{sub 1}LO mode frequency was analysed and connected to the orientation of the particles’ optical axis to the substrate surface normal. The role of the laser pulse frequency on the layers’ properties is discussed on this basis.

  14. Improving the Microstructure and Electrical Properties of Aluminum Induced Polysilicon Thin Films Using Silicon Nitride Capping Layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min-Hang Weng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the capping layer effect of SiNx (silicon nitride on the microstructure, electrical, and optical properties of poly-Si (polycrystalline silicon prepared by aluminum induced crystallization (AIC. The primary multilayer structure comprised Al (30 nm/SiNx (20 nm/a-Si (amorphous silicon layer (100 nm/ITO coated glass and was then annealed in a low annealing temperature of 350°C with different annealing times, 15, 30, 45, and 60 min. The crystallization properties were analyzed and verified by X-ray diffraction (XRD and Raman spectra. The grain growth was analyzed via optical microscope (OM and scanning electron microscopy (SEM. The improved electrical properties such as Hall mobility, resistivity, and dark conductivity were investigated by using Hall and current-voltage (I-V measurements. The results show that the amorphous silicon film has been effectively induced even at a low temperature of 350°C and a short annealing time of 15 min and indicate that the SiNx capping layer can improve the grain growth and reduce the metal content in the induced poly-Si film. It is found that the large grain size is over 20 μm and the carrier mobility values are over 80 cm2/V-s.

  15. Structural and magnetic phase transitions in chromium nitride thin films grown by rf nitrogen plasma molecular beam epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Khan; Disseler, Steven M.; Ratcliff, William D.; Borchers, Julie A.; Ponce-Pérez, Rodrigo; Cocoletzi, Gregorio H.; Takeuchi, Noboru; Foley, Andrew; Richard, Andrea; Ingram, David C.; Smith, Arthur R.

    2017-09-01

    A magnetostructural phase transition is investigated in single-crystal chromium nitride (CrN) thin films grown by rf plasma molecular beam epitaxy on MgO(001) substrates. While still within the vacuum environment following molecular beam epitaxy growth, in situ low-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy, and in situ variable low-temperature reflection high-energy electron diffraction are applied, revealing an atomically smooth and metallic CrN(001) surface, and an in-plane structural transition from 1 ×1 (primitive CrN unit cell) to √{2 }×√{2 }-R 45∘ with a transition temperature of (278 ±3 ) K, respectively. Ex situ temperature-dependent measurements using neutron diffraction are also performed, looking at the structural peaks and likewise revealing a first-order structural transition along the [111] out-of-plane direction, with transition temperatures of (268 ± 3) K. Turning to the magnetic peaks, neutron diffraction confirms a clear magnetic transition from paramagnetic at room temperature to antiferromagnetic at low temperatures with a sharp, first-order phase transition and a Néel temperature of (270 ±2 ) K or (280 ±2 ) K for two different films. In addition to the experimental measurements of structural and magnetic ordering, we also discuss results from first-principles theoretical calculations which explore various possible magnetostructural models.

  16. Evidence for singlet-oxygen generation and biocidal activity in photoresponsive metallic nitride fullerene-polymer adhesive films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCluskey, D Michelle; Smith, Tiffany N; Madasu, Praveen K; Coumbe, Curtis E; Mackey, Mary A; Fulmer, Preston A; Wynne, James H; Stevenson, Steven; Phillips, J Paige

    2009-04-01

    The adhesive properties, as measured by bulk tack analysis, are found to decrease in blends of isomerically pure Sc3N@I(h)-C80 metallic nitride fullerene (MNF) and polystyrene-block-polyisoprene-block-polystyrene (SIS) copolymer pressure-sensitive adhesive under white light irradiation in air. The reduction of tack is attributed to the in situ generation of 1O2 and subsequent photooxidative cross-linking of the adhesive film. Comparisons are drawn to classical fullerenes C60 and C70 for this process. This work represents the first demonstration of 1O2 generating ability in the general class of MNFs (M3N@C80). Additional support is provided for the sensitizing ability of Sc3N@I(h)-C80 through the successful photooxygenation of 2-methyl-2-butene to its allylic hydroperoxides in benzene-d(6) under irradiation at 420 nm, a process that occurs at a rate comparable to that of C(60). Photooxygenation of 2-methyl-2-butene is found to be influenced by the fullerene sensitizer concentration and O2 flow rate. Molar extinction coefficients are reported for Sc3N@I(h)-C80 at 420 and 536 nm. Evaluation of the potential antimicrobial activity of films prepared in this study stemming from the in situ generation of 1O2 led to an observed 1 log kill for select Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria.

  17. The Multiple Effects of Precursors on the Properties of Polymeric Carbon Nitride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wendong Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Polymeric graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3N4 materials were prepared by direct pyrolysis of thiourea, dicyandiamide, melamine, and urea under the same conditions, respectively. In order to investigate the effects of precursors on the intrinsic physicochemical properties of g-C3N4, a variety of characterization tools were employed to analyze the samples. The photocatalytic activity of the samples was evaluated by the removal of NO in gas phase under visible light irradiation. The results showed that the as-prepared CN-T (from thiourea, CN-D (from dicyandiamide, CN-M (from melamine, and CN-U (from urea exhibited significantly different morphologies and microstructures. The band gaps of CN-T, CN-D, CN-M, and CN-U were 2.51, 2.58, 2.56, and 2.88 eV, respectively. Both thermal stability and yield are in the following order: CN-M > CN-D > CN-T > CN-U. The photoactivity of CN-U (31.9% is higher than that of CN-T (29.6%, CN-D (22.2%, and CN-M (26.8%. Considering the cost, toxicity, and yield of the precursors and the properties of g-C3N4, the best precursor for preparation of g-C3N4 was melamine. The present work could provide new insights into the selection of suitable precursor for g-C3N4 synthesis and in-depth understanding of the microstructure-dependent photocatalytic activity of g-C3N4.

  18. Enhanced visible-light-driven photocatalytic performance of porous graphitic carbon nitride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Fei, E-mail: feichang@usst.edu.cn [School of Environment and Architecture, University of Shanghai for Science and Technology, Shanghai 200093 (China); Li, Chenlu; Luo, Jieru; Xie, Yunchao; Deng, Baoqing [School of Environment and Architecture, University of Shanghai for Science and Technology, Shanghai 200093 (China); Hu, Xuefeng, E-mail: xfhu@yic.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Coastal Environmental Processes and Ecological Remediation, Yantai Institute of Coastal Zone Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Yantai, Shandong 264003 (China)

    2015-12-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Porous g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} samples were fabricated by a facile pyrolysis method. • As-prepared porous g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} samples showed remarkably enhanced photocatalytic performance. • Holes and radicals ·O{sub 2}{sup −} exerted dominant roles on the photocatalytic process. - Abstract: In this study, a series of porous graphitic carbon nitride (g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4}) materials were fabricated through a direct pyrolysis of protonated melamine by nitric acid solution. These as-prepared porous samples were characterized by a collection of analytical techniques. It was found that a proper concentration of nitric acid solution involved facilitated to generate samples in tube-like morphology with numerous pores, identified with X-ray diffraction patterns, FT-IR spectra, SEM, TEM, and BET measurements. These g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} samples were subjected to photocatalytic degradation of dye Rhodamine B (RhB) in aqueous under visible-light irradiation. Under identical conditions, those porous g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} samples showed significantly improved catalytic performance in comparison with the sample prepared without the introduction of nitric acid. In particularly, the best candidate, sample M1:1, showed an apparent reaction rate nearly 6.2 times that of the unmodified counterpart. The enhancement of photocatalytic performance could be attributed to the favorable porous structure with the enlarged specific surface area and the suitable electronic structure as well. In addition, ESR measurements were conducted for the sake of proposing a photocatalytic degradation mechanism.

  19. In situ synthesis of cylindrical spongy polypyrrole doped protonated graphitic carbon nitride for cholesterol sensing application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, Bishnu Kumar; Ahmad, Rafiq; Shrestha, Sita; Park, Chan Hee; Kim, Cheol Sang

    2017-08-15

    Herein, we demonstrate the exfoliation of bulk graphitic carbon nitrides (g-C 3 N 4 ) into ultra-thin (~3.4nm) two-dimensional (2D) nanosheets and their functionalization with proton (g-C 3 N 4 H + ). The layered semiconductor g-C 3 N 4 H + nanosheets were doped with cylindrical spongy shaped polypyrrole (CSPPy-g-C 3 N 4 H + ) using chemical polymerization method. The as-prepared nanohybrid composite was utilized to fabricate cholesterol biosensors after immobilization of cholesterol oxidase (ChOx) at physiological pH. Large specific surface area and positive charge nature of CSPPy-g-C 3 N 4 H + composite has tendency to generate strong electrostatic attraction with negatively charged ChOx, and as a result they formed stable bionanohybrid composite with high enzyme loading. A detailed electrochemical characterization of as-fabricated biosensor electrode (ChOx-CSPPy-g-C 3 N 4 H + /GCE) exhibited high-sensitivity (645.7 µAmM -1 cm -2 ) in wide-linear range of 0.02-5.0mM, low detection limit (8.0μM), fast response time (~3s), long-term stability, and good selectivity during cholesterol detection. To the best of our knowledge, this novel nanocomposite was utilized for the first time for cholesterol biosensor fabrication that resulted in high sensing performance. Hence, this approach opens a new prospective to utilize CSPPy-g-C 3 N 4 H + composite as cost-effective, biocompatible, eco-friendly, and superior electrocatalytic as well as electroconductive having great application potentials that could pave the ways to explore many other new sensors fabrication and biomedical applications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Resonance energy transfer based electrochemiluminescence and fluorescence sensing of riboflavin using graphitic carbon nitride quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Huan [Key Laboratory of Bioelectrochemistry & Environmental Analysis of Gansu Province, College of Chemistry & Chemical Engineering, Northwest Normal University, Lanzhou, Gansu 730070 (China); The Phytochemistry Key Laboratory of Tibetan Plateau of Qinghai Province, College of Pharmacy, Qinghai Nationalities University, Xining, Qinghai 810007 (China); Ma, Qin; Wang, Yanfeng; Wang, Caihe; Qin, Dongdong; Shan, Duoliang; Chen, Jing [Key Laboratory of Bioelectrochemistry & Environmental Analysis of Gansu Province, College of Chemistry & Chemical Engineering, Northwest Normal University, Lanzhou, Gansu 730070 (China); Lu, Xiaoquan, E-mail: luxq@nwnu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Bioelectrochemistry & Environmental Analysis of Gansu Province, College of Chemistry & Chemical Engineering, Northwest Normal University, Lanzhou, Gansu 730070 (China)

    2017-06-22

    Graphitic carbon nitride quantum dots (g-CNQDs) are rarely used in the field of electrochemiluminescence. In this paper, g-CNQDs have a strong and stable electrochemiluminescence (ECL) signal generated in the presence of co-reactant K{sub 2}S{sub 2}O{sub 8}. The ECL signal of g-CNQDs was quenched by the mechanism of resonance energy transfer (RET) between donor g-CNQDs and receptor riboflavin (RF) that is proved by UV-vis absorption spectroscopy, electrochemiluminescence and fluorescence emission spectroscopy analysis technology. Therefore, we achieved detection of the riboflavin content in the drug tablets of vitamin B{sub 2} using ECL and FL. The determination results of ECL showed that the riboflavin content of the drug vitamin B{sub 2} (VB{sub 2}) tablets was consistent with the fluorescence (FL) analysis, with wider linear range of 0.02–11 μM and lower minimum detection limit of 0.63 nM (S/N = 3) than FL. Hence, the riboflavin content in human serum was further detected using ECL. The relative standard deviation is less than 6.5%, with an acceptable recovery of 95.33%–104.22%, which means that this sensor has potential applications in the actual sample analysis. As a new ECL luminary, g-CNQDs have opened a new field for the development and application of ECL sensor. - Highlights: • G-CNQDs proposed as a new luminophore for ECL. • ECL signal was strong and stable in the presence of co-reactant K{sub 2}S{sub 2}O{sub 8}. • Based on the resonance energy transfer between g-CNQDs and riboflavin. • ECL has wider linear range and lower detection limit than FL.

  1. Self-floating graphitic carbon nitride/zinc phthalocyanine nanofibers for photocatalytic degradation of contaminants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Tiefeng; Ni, Dongjing; Chen, Xia; Wu, Fei; Ge, Pengfei; Lu, Wangyang, E-mail: luwy@zstu.edu.cn; Hu, Hongguang; Zhu, ZheXin; Chen, Wenxing, E-mail: wxchen@zstu.edu.cn

    2016-11-05

    Highlights: • A facile synthetic strategy to prepare visible-light responsive electrospun nanofibers. • Self-floating nanofiber photocatalyts for the effective utilization of solar. • Possible degradation pathway of RhB and CBZ under visible light and solar irradiation. • Present a method for removing highly hazardous contaminants. - Abstract: The effective elimination of micropollutants by an environmentally friendly method has received extensive attention recently. In this study, a photocatalyst based on polyacrylonitrile (PAN)-supported graphitic carbon nitride coupled with zinc phthalocyanine nanofibers (g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4}/ZnTcPc/PAN nanofibers) was successfully prepared, where g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4}/ZnTcPc was introduced as the catalytic entity and the PAN nanofibers were employed as support to overcome the defects of easy aggregation and difficult recycling. Herein, rhodamine B (RhB), 4-chlorophenol and carbamazepine (CBZ) were selected as the model pollutants. Compared with the typical hydroxyl radical-dominated catalytic system, g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4}/ZnTcPc/PAN nanofibers displayed the targeted adsorption and degradation of contaminants under visible light or solar irradiation in the presence of high additive concentrations. According to the results of the radical scavenging techniques and the electron paramagnetic resonance technology, the degradation of target substrates was achieved by the attack of active species, including photogenerated hole, singlet oxygen, superoxide radicals and hydroxyl radicals. Based on the results of ultra-performance liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry, the role of free radicals on the photocatalytic degradation intermediates was identified and the final photocatalytic degradation products of both RhB and CBZ were some biodegradable small molecules.

  2. Nanostructured Carbon Nitride Polymer-Reinforced Electrolyte To Enable Dendrite-Suppressed Lithium Metal Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jiulin; Tian, Jing; Li, Chilin

    2017-04-05

    Lithium metal batteries (LMBs) containing S, O2, and fluoride cathodes are attracting increasing attention owing to their much higher energy density than that of Li-ion batteries. However, current limitation for the progress of LMBs mainly comes from the uncontrolled formation and growth of Li dendrites at the anode side. In order to suppress dendrite growth, exploring novel nanostructured electrolyte of high modulus without degradation of Li-electrolyte interface appears to be a potential solution. Here we propose a lightweight polymer-reinforced electrolyte based on graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3N4) mesoporous microspheres as electrolyte filler [bis(trifluoromethanesulfonimide) lithium salt/di(ethylene glycol) dimethyl ether mixed with g-C3N4, denoted as LiTFSI-DGM-C3N4] for the first time. This nanostructured electrolyte can effectively suppress lithium dendrite growth during cycling, benefiting from the high mechanical strength and nanosheet-built hierarchical structure of g-C3N4. The Li/Li symmetrical cell based on this slurrylike electrolyte enables long-term cycling of at least 120 cycles with a high capacity of 6 mA·h/cm2 and small plating/stripping overpotential of ∼100 mV at a high current density of 2 mA/cm2. g-C3N4 filling also enables a separator(Celgard)-free Li/FeS2 cell with at least 400 cycles. The 3D geometry of g-C3N4 shows advantages on interfacial resistance and Li plating/stripping stability compared to its 2D geometry.

  3. Dependence of optical properties and hardness on carbon content in silicon carbonitride films deposited by plasma ion immersion processing technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Afanasyev-Charkin, I.V.; Nastasi, M. E-mail: nasty@lanl.gov

    2003-05-01

    Materials with Si-C-N composition are of great interest due to their remarkable properties such as high hardness and oxidation resistance. In this study amorphous silicon nitride and silicon carbonitride films were deposited on glass, fused silica, and carbon substrates by the plasma immersion ion processing technique. Gas pressure during the deposition was kept around 0.13 Pa (1 mTorr) and SiH{sub 4}, N{sub 2}, Ar and C{sub 2}H{sub 2} gas mixtures were used. Film hardness, composition and UV-visible optical absorption were characterized using nanoindentation, ion beam analysis techniques, and UV-visible spectroscopy, respectively. The films exhibit high transparency in the visible and near UV regions. Addition of the carbon to the films causes decrease in the density of the films, as well as decrease in hardness and transparency. These results suggest that in the low energy regime of PIIP the deposition of hard carbon composites with nitrogen and silicon does not take place.

  4. Novel band gap-tunable K–Na co-doped graphitic carbon nitride prepared by molten salt method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Jiannan [Institute of Eco-environmental Sciences, Liaoning Shihua University, Fushun 113001 (China); School of Environmental and Biological Engineering, Liaoning Shihua University, Fushun 113001 (China); Ma, Lin [School of Petrochemical Engineering, Liaoning Shihua University, Fushun 113001 (China); Wang, Haoying; Zhao, Yanfeng [School of Environmental and Biological Engineering, Liaoning Shihua University, Fushun 113001 (China); Zhang, Jian [School of Petrochemical Engineering, Liaoning Shihua University, Fushun 113001 (China); Hu, Shaozheng, E-mail: hushaozhenglnpu@163.com [Institute of Eco-environmental Sciences, Liaoning Shihua University, Fushun 113001 (China)

    2015-03-30

    Graphical abstract: K and Na ions co-doped into g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} crystal lattice can tune the position of CB and VB potentials, influence the structural and optical properties, and thus improve the photocatalytic degradation and mineralization ability. - Highlights: • K, Na co-doped g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} was prepared in KCl/NaCl molten salt system. • The structural and optical properties of g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} were greatly influenced by co-doping. • The position of VB and CB can be tuned by controlling the weight ratio of eutectic salts to melamine. • Co-doped g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} showed outstanding photodegradation ability, mineralization ability, and catalytic stability. - Abstract: Novel band gap-tunable K–Na co-doped graphitic carbon nitride was prepared by molten salt method using melamine, KCl, and NaCl as precursor. X-ray diffraction (XRD), N{sub 2} adsorption, Scanning electron microscope (SEM), UV–vis spectroscopy, Photoluminescence (PL), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were used to characterize the prepared catalysts. The CB and VB potentials of graphitic carbon nitride could be tuned from −1.09 and +1.55 eV to −0.29 and +2.25 eV by controlling the weight ratio of eutectic salts to melamine. Besides, ions doping inhibited the crystal growth of graphitic carbon nitride, enhanced the surface area, and increased the separation rate of photogenerated electrons and holes. The visible-light-driven Rhodamine B (RhB) photodegradation and mineralization performances were significantly improved after K–Na co-doping.

  5. Design and synthesis of palladium/graphitic carbon nitride/carbon black hybrids as high-performance catalysts for formic acid and methanol electrooxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Huayu; Huang, Huajie; Wang, Xin

    2015-02-01

    Here we report a facile two-step method to synthesize high-performance palladium/graphitic carbon nitride/carbon black (Pd/g-C3N4/carbon black) hybrids for electrooxidizing formic acid and methanol. The coating of g-C3N4 on carbon black surface is realized by a low-temperature heating treatment, followed by the uniform deposition of palladium nanoparticles (Pd NPs) via a wet chemistry route. Owning to the significant synergistic effects of the individual components, the preferred Pd/g-C3N4/carbon black electrocatalyst exhibits exceptional forward peak current densities as high as 2155 and 1720 mA mg-1Pd for formic acid oxidation in acid media and methanol oxidation in alkaline media, respectively, far outperforming the commercial Pd-C catalyst. The catalyst also shows reliable stability, demonstrating that the newly-designed hybrids have great promise in constructing high-performance portable fuel cell systems.

  6. Enhanced visible light photocatalytic degradation of Rhodamine B over phosphorus doped graphitic carbon nitride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chai, Bo, E-mail: willycb@163.com; Yan, Juntao; Wang, Chunlei; Ren, Zhandong; Zhu, Yuchan

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • The phosphorus doped g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} photocatalysts are synthesized by a co-pyrolysis procedure. • The crystal phase, morphology, and optical property of P doped g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} are characterized. • The P doped g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} photocatalysts show the improved photocatalytic activity. • The possible mechanism for enhanced photocatalytic activity is proposed. - Abstract: Phosphorus doped graphitic carbon nitride (g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4}) was easily synthesized using ammonium hexafluorophosphate (NH{sub 4}PF{sub 6}) as phosphorus source, and ammonium thiocyanate (NH{sub 4}SCN) as g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} precursor, through a direct thermal co-polycondensation procedure. The obtained phosphorus doped g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Fourier transform infrared spectra (FTIR), UV–vis diffuse reflectance absorption spectra (UV-DRS), photoelectrochemical measurement and photoluminescence spectra (PL). The photocatalytic activities of phosphorus doped g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} samples were evaluated by degradation of Rhodamine B (RhB) solution under visible light irradiation. The results showed that the phosphorus doped g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} had a superior photocatalytic activity than that of pristine g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4}, attributing to the phosphorus atoms substituting carbon atoms of g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} frameworks to result in light harvesting enhancement and delocalized π-conjugated system of this copolymer, beneficial for the increase of photocatalytic performance. The photoelectrochemical measurements also verified that the charge carrier separation efficiency was promoted by phosphorus doping g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4}. Moreover, the tests of radical scavengers demonstrated that the holes (h{sup +}) and superoxide radicals (·O{sub 2}{sup −}) were the main active species for the

  7. Chemical structural analysis of diamondlike carbon films: II. Raman analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takabayashi, Susumu; Ješko, Radek; Shinohara, Masanori; Hayashi, Hiroyuki; Sugimoto, Rintaro; Ogawa, Shuichi; Takakuwa, Yuji

    2018-02-01

    The chemical structure of diamondlike carbon (DLC) films, synthesized by photoemission-assisted glow discharge, has been analyzed by Raman spectroscopy. Raman analysis in conjunction with the sp2 cluster model clarified the film structure. The sp2 clusters in DLC films synthesized at low temperature preferred various aliphatic structures. Sufficient argon-ion assist allowed for formation of less strained DLC films containing large amounts of hydrogen. As the synthesis temperature was increased, thermal desorption of hydrogen left carbon dangling bonds with active unpaired electrons in the films, and the reactions that followed created strained films containing aromatic sp2 clusters. In parallel, the desorption of methane molecules from the growing surface by chemisorption of hydrogen radicals prevented the action of argon ions, promoting internal strain of the films. However, in synthesis at very high temperature, where sp2 clusters are sufficiently dominant, the strain was dissolved gradually. In contrast, the DLC films synthesized at low temperature were more stable than other films synthesized at the same temperature because of stable hydrogen-carbon bonds in the films.

  8. Heteroepitaxial growth and electric properties of (110)-oriented scandium nitride films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohgaki, Takeshi; Sakaguchi, Isao; Ohashi, Naoki; Haneda, Hajime

    2017-10-01

    ScN films were grown on MgO(110) substrates and α-Al2O3(10 1 bar 0) substrates by a molecular beam epitaxy method, and their crystalline orientation, crystallinity, and electric properties were examined. (110)-oriented ScN films were epitaxially grown on MgO(110) substrates with the same crystal orientations, and ScN films with an orientation relationship (110)ScN || (10 1 bar 0)α-Al2O3 and [001]ScN || [ 1 2 bar 10 ]α-Al2O3 were epitaxially grown on α-Al2O3(10 1 bar 0) substrates. Remarkably, electric-resistivity anisotropy was observed for ScN films grown on MgO(110) substrates, and the anisotropy depended on the growth temperature. The carrier concentration and Hall mobility of the ScN films grown on α-Al2O3(10 1 bar 0) substrates ranged from 1019-1021 cm-3 and 10-150 cm2 V-1 s-1, respectively. The crystallinity, crystalline-orientation anisotropy, and electric properties of the films were strongly affected by growth conditions. For the growth of ScN films with high mobility on α-Al2O3(10 1 bar 0) substrates, a high temperature and an appropriate ratio of source materials were necessary.

  9. Nanoindentation study of niobium nitride thin films on niobium fabricated by reactive pulsed laser deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mamun, Md Abdullah Al; Farha, Ashraf Hassan; Ufuktepe, Yüksel; Elsayed-Ali, Hani E.; Elmustafa, Abdelmageed A.

    2015-03-01

    Nanomechanical and structural properties of NbNx films deposited on single crystal Nb using pulsed laser deposition for different substrate temperature were previously investigated as a function of film/substrate crystal structure (Mamun et al. (2012) [30]). In this study we focus on the effect of laser fluences and background nitrogen pressure on the nanomechanical and structural properties of NbNx films. The crystal structure and surface morphology of the thin films were tested by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and atomic force microscopy. Using nanoindentation, the investigation of the nanomechanical properties revealed that the hardness of the NbNx films was directly influenced by the laser fluence for low background nitrogen pressure, whereas the nanomechanical hardness showed no apparent correlation with laser fluence at high background nitrogen pressure. The NbNx film hardness measured at 30% film thickness increased from 14.0 ± 1.3 to 18.9 ± 2.4 GPa when the laser fluence was increased from 15 to 25 J/cm2 at 10.7 Pa N2 pressure. X-ray diffraction showed NbNx films with peaks that correspond to δ-NbN cubic and β-Nb2N hexagonal phases in addition to the δ'-NbN hexagonal phase. Finally, increasing the laser fluence resulted in NbNx films with larger grain sizes.

  10. Conventional and pendeo-epitaxial growth of III-nitride thin films by molecular beam and metalorganic vapor phase techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linthicum, Kevin James

    Reactive gas-source molecular beam epitaxy was employed for the growth of monocrystalline GaN(0001) thin films. On-surface cracking of ammonia at 800°C was the method of choice for obtaining reactive nitrogen-containing species and growth rates of 2500A/hr were achieved. Pendeo-epitaxy, a general form of selective lateral growth, was developed for the organometallic vapor phase epitaxy growth of GaN and AlGaN thin films on GaN/AlN/6H-SiC(0001) substrates. In this technique, selective lateral growth was forced to initiate from the (1120) sidewalls of etched GaN seed forms by incorporating a silicon nitride seed mask atop the forms and employing the SiC substrate as a pseudo-mask. Coalescence over and between the seed forms was achieved. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that all vertically threading defects stemming from the GaN/AlN and AlN/SiC interfaces were contained within the seed forms and that a substantial reduction in the dislocation density of the laterally grown GaN was achieved. To achieve pendeo-epitaxial growth of monocrystalline GaN films on Si(111) substrates, a series of additional process steps was required, including the formation of a SiC chemical/reaction barrier. Single-crystal beta-SiC(111) thin films were obtained via carburization of the near-surface regions of vicinal Si(111). The thickness of the converted layers was approximately 5nm. Thick (500nm), epitaxial 3C-SiC layers grown via atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition were also used in tandem with the carburized silicon substrates. Monocrystalline AlN(0001) layers were grown on the SiC/Si substrates at 1100°C via MOVPE. Single-crystal wurtzitic GaN(0001) seed layers were grown on the AlN(0001) layers. The FWHM of the GaN(0002) x-ray diffraction and the photoluminescence band-edge emission peaks were 1443 arcsec and 19 meV, respectively. Pendeo-epitaxial growth of GaN on GaN/AlN/3C-SiC/Si(111) raised stripes was achieved. Crystallographic tilting of 0.2°(720 arcsec

  11. Synthesis and Characterization of LPCVD Polysilicon and Silicon Nitride Thin Films for MEMS Applications

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sharma, N; Hooda, M; Sharma, S. K

    2014-01-01

    .... Residual stress often causes device failure due to curling, buckling, or fracture. Typically, the material properties of thin films used in surface micromachining are not very well controlled during deposition...

  12. Nanoindentation study of niobium nitride thin films on niobium fabricated by reactive pulsed laser deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mamun, Md Abdullah Al [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Old Dominion University, Norfolk, VA 23529 (United States); Applied Research Center, Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA 23606 (United States); Farha, Ashraf Hassan [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Old Dominion University, Norfolk, VA 23529 (United States); Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Ain Shams University, Cairo 11566 (Egypt); Ufuktepe, Yüksel [Department of Physics, Cukurova University, Adana 01330 (Turkey); Elsayed-Ali, Hani E. [Applied Research Center, Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA 23606 (United States); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Old Dominion University, Norfolk, VA 23529 (United States); Elmustafa, Abdelmageed A., E-mail: aelmusta@odu.edu [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Old Dominion University, Norfolk, VA 23529 (United States); Applied Research Center, Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA 23606 (United States)

    2015-03-01

    Highlights: • NbN films were deposited on Nb by pulsed laser deposition in nitrogen background. • We studied structural/mechanical properties by XRD, SEM, AFM, and nanoindentation. • The hardness increased from 14.0 to 18.9 GPa for laser fluence 15–25 J/cm{sup 2} at 10.7 Pa. • The hardness showed no correlation with laser fluence at high background pressure. • Increasing the laser fluence resulted in NbN{sub x} films with larger grain sizes. - Abstract: Nanomechanical and structural properties of NbN{sub x} films deposited on single crystal Nb using pulsed laser deposition for different substrate temperature were previously investigated as a function of film/substrate crystal structure (Mamun et al. (2012) [30]). In this study we focus on the effect of laser fluences and background nitrogen pressure on the nanomechanical and structural properties of NbN{sub x} films. The crystal structure and surface morphology of the thin films were tested by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and atomic force microscopy. Using nanoindentation, the investigation of the nanomechanical properties revealed that the hardness of the NbN{sub x} films was directly influenced by the laser fluence for low background nitrogen pressure, whereas the nanomechanical hardness showed no apparent correlation with laser fluence at high background nitrogen pressure. The NbN{sub x} film hardness measured at 30% film thickness increased from 14.0 ± 1.3 to 18.9 ± 2.4 GPa when the laser fluence was increased from 15 to 25 J/cm{sup 2} at 10.7 Pa N{sub 2} pressure. X-ray diffraction showed NbN{sub x} films with peaks that correspond to δ-NbN cubic and β-Nb{sub 2}N hexagonal phases in addition to the δ′-NbN hexagonal phase. Increasing the laser fluence resulted in NbN{sub x} films with larger grain sizes.

  13. Thin film growth rate effects for primary ion beam deposited diamondlike carbon films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nir, D.; Mirtich, M.

    1986-01-01

    Diamondlike carbon (DLC) films were grown by primary ion beam deposition and the growth rates were measured for various beam energies, types of hydrocarbon gases and their ratio to Ar, and substrate materials. The growth rate had a linear dependence upon hydrocarbon content in the discharge chamber, and only small dependence on other parameters. For given deposition conditions a threshold in the atomic ratio of carbon to argon gas was identified below which films did not grow on fused silica substrate, but grew on Si substrate and on existing DLC films. Ion source deposition parameters and substrate material were found to affect the deposition threshold and film growth rates.

  14. A comparative study of transport properties in polycrystalline and epitaxial chromium nitride films

    KAUST Repository

    Duan, X. F.

    2013-01-08

    Polycrystalline CrNx films on Si(100) and glass substrates and epitaxial CrNx films on MgO(100) substrates were fabricated by reactive sputtering with different nitrogen gas flow rates (fN2). With the increase of fN2, a lattice phase transformation from metallic Cr2N to semiconducting CrN appears in both polycrystalline and epitaxial CrNx films. At fN2= 100 sccm, the low-temperature conductance mechanism is dominated by both Mott and Efros-Shklovskii variable-range hopping in either polycrystalline or epitaxial CrN films. In all of the polycrystalline and epitaxial films, only the polycrystalline CrNx films fabricated at fN2 = 30 and 50 sccm exhibit a discontinuity in ρ(T) curves at 260-280 K, indicating that both the N-vacancy concentration and grain boundaries play important roles in the metal-insulator transition. © 2013 American Institute of Physics.

  15. A Graphene-like Oxygenated Carbon Nitride Material for Improved Cycle-Life Lithium/Sulfur Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jinghai; Li, Wanfei; Duan, Limei; Li, Xin; Ji, Lei; Geng, Zhibin; Huang, Keke; Lu, Luhua; Zhou, Lisha; Liu, Zongrui; Chen, Wei; Liu, Liwei; Feng, Shouhua; Zhang, Yuegang

    2015-08-12

    Novel sulfur (S) anchoring materials and the corresponding mechanisms for suppressing capacity fading are urgently needed to advance the performance of Li/S batteries. Here, we designed and synthesized a graphene-like oxygenated carbon nitride (OCN) host material that contains tens of micrometer scaled two-dimensional (2D) rippled sheets, micromesopores, and oxygen heteroatoms. N content can reach as high as 20.49 wt %. A sustainable approach of one-step self-supporting solid-state pyrolysis (OSSP) was developed for the low-cost and large-scale production of OCN. The urea in solid sources not only provides self-supporting atmospheres but also produces graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3N4) working as 2D layered templates. The S/OCN cathode can deliver a high specific capacity of 1407.6 mA h g(-1) at C/20 rate with 84% S utilization and retain improved reversible capacity during long-term cycles at high current density. The increasing micropores, graphitic N, ether, and carboxylic O at the large sized OCN sheet favor S utilization and trapping for polysulfides.

  16. Improved tensile and buckling behavior of defected carbon nanotubes utilizing boron nitride coating – A molecular dynamic study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badjian, H.; Setoodeh, A.R., E-mail: setoodeh@sutech.ac.ir

    2017-02-15

    Synthesizing inorganic nanostructures such as boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) have led to immense studies due to their many interesting functional features such as piezoelectricity, high temperature resistance to oxygen, electrical insulation, high thermal conductivity and very long lengths as physical features. In order to utilize the superior properties of pristine and defected carbon nanotubes (CNTs), a hybrid nanotube is proposed in this study by forming BNNTs surface coating on the CNTs. The benefits of such coating on the tensile and buckling behavior of single-walled CNTs (SWCNTs) are illustrated through molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of the resulted nanostructures during the deformation. The AIREBO and Tersoff-Brenner potentials are employed to model the interatomic forces between the carbon and boron nitride atoms, respectively. The effects of chiral indices, aspect ratio, presence of mono-vacancy defects and coating dimension on coated/non-coated CNTs are examined. It is demonstrated that the coated defective CNTs exhibit remarkably enhanced ultimate strength, buckling load capacity and Young's modulus. The proposed coating not only enhances the mechanical properties of the resulted nanostructure, but also conceals it from few external factors impacting the behavior of the CNT such as humidity and high temperature.

  17. Measurement of Transient Tool Internal Temperature Fields by Novel Micro Thin Film Sensors Embedded in Polycrystalline Cubic Boron Nitride Cutting Inserts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werschmoeller, Dirk

    Monitoring and control of thermomechanical phenomena in tooling are imperative for advancing fundamental understanding, enhancing reliability, and improving workpiece quality in material removal processes. Polycrystalline cubic boron nitride (PCBN) tools are being used heavily in numerous machining processes, e.g., machining of hardened low carbon steel and superalloys. These processes are very sensitive to variations in local cutting conditions at, or close to, the tool-workpiece interface, but lack a thorough understanding of fundamental transient thermo-mechanical phenomena present. As a result, abrupt catastrophic tool failures and degraded machined surfaces frequently occur. Existing sensors are not suitable for process control and monitoring, as they are either destructively embedded and/or do not possess the necessary spatial and temporal resolution to provide relevant data during machining. This research presents a novel approach for obtaining thermomechanical data from the close vicinity (i.e., 10s of micrometers) of the tool-workpiece interface. Arrays of micro thin film thermocouples with junction size 5 x 5 mum were fabricated by standard microfabrication methods and have been successfully embedded into PCBN using diffusion bonding. Electron microscopy and X-ray spectroscopy were employed to examine material interactions at the bonding interface and to determine optimal bonding parameters. Static and dynamic sensor performances have been characterized. The sensors exhibit excellent linearity up to 1300 °C, fast rise time of 150 ns, and possess good sensitivity. The inserts instrumented with embedded thin film C-type thermocouples were successfully applied to measure internal tool temperatures as close as 70 mum to the cutting edge while machining aluminum and hardened steel workpieces at industrially relevant cutting parameters. Acquired temperature data follow theoretical trends very well. Correlations between temperature and cutting parameters have

  18. Tuning carbon nanotube assembly for flexible, strong and conductive films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yanjie; Li, Min; Gu, Yizhuo; Zhang, Xiaohua; Wang, Shaokai; Li, Qingwen; Zhang, Zuoguang

    2015-02-01

    Carbon nanotubes are ideal scaffolds for designing and architecting flexible graphite films with tunable mechanical, electrical and thermal properties. Herein, we demonstrate that the assembly of aligned carbon nanotubes with different aggregation density and morphology leads to different mechanical properties and anisotropic electrical conduction along the films. Using drying evaporation under tension treatment, the carbon nanotubes can be assembled into strong films with tensile strength and Young's modulus as high as 3.2 GPa and 124 GPa, respectively, leading to a remarkable toughness of 54.38 J g-1, greatly outperforming conventional graphite films, spider webs and even Kevlar fiber films. Different types of solvents may result in the assembly of CNTs with different aggregation morphology and therefore different modulus. In addition, we reveal that the high density assembly of aligned CNTs correlates with better electric conduction along the axial direction, enabling these flexible graphite films to be both strong and conductive.Carbon nanotubes are ideal scaffolds for designing and architecting flexible graphite films with tunable mechanical, electrical and thermal properties. Herein, we demonstrate that the assembly of aligned carbon nanotubes with different aggregation density and morphology leads to different mechanical properties and anisotropic electrical conduction along the films. Using drying evaporation under tension treatment, the carbon nanotubes can be assembled into strong films with tensile strength and Young's modulus as high as 3.2 GPa and 124 GPa, respectively, leading to a remarkable toughness of 54.38 J g-1, greatly outperforming conventional graphite films, spider webs and even Kevlar fiber films. Different types of solvents may result in the assembly of CNTs with different aggregation morphology and therefore different modulus. In addition, we reveal that the high density assembly of aligned CNTs correlates with better electric conduction

  19. Dendritic Tip-on Polytriazine-Based Carbon Nitride Photocatalyst with High Hydrogen Evolution Activity

    KAUST Repository

    Bhunia, Manas Kumar

    2015-11-23

    Developing stable, ubiquitous and efficient water-splitting photocatalyst material that has extensive absorption in the visible-light range is desired for a sustainable solar energy-conversion device. We herein report a triazine-based carbon nitride (CN) material with different C/N ratios achieved by varying the monomer composition ratio between melamine (Mel) and 2,4,6-triaminopyrimidine (TAP). The CN material with a different C/N ratio was obtained through a two-step synthesis protocol: starting with the solution state dispersion of the monomers via hydrogen-bonding supramolecular aggregate, followed by a salt-melt high temperature polycondensation. This protocol ensures the production of a highly crystalline polytriazine imide (PTI) structure con-sisting of a copolymerized Mel-TAP network. The observed bandgap narrowing with an increasing TAP/Mel ratio is well simulated by density functional theory (DFT) calculations, revealing a positive shift in the valence band upon substitution of N with CH in the aromatic rings. Increasing the TAP amount could not maintain the crystalline PTI structure, consistent with DFT calculation showing the repulsion associated with additional C-H introduced in the aromatic rings. Due to the high exciton binding energy calculated by DFT for the obtained CN, the cocatalyst must be close to any portion of the material to assist the separation of excit-ed charge carriers for an improved photocatalytic performance. The photocatalytic activity was improved by providing a dendritic tip-on-like shape grown on a porous fibrous silica KCC-1 spheres, and highly dispersed Pt nanoparticles (<5 nm) were photodepos-ited to introduce heterojunction. As a result, the Pt/CN/KCC-1 photocatalyst exhibited an apparent quantum efficiency (AQE) as high as 22.1 ± 3% at 400 nm and the silica was also beneficial for improving photocatalytic stability. The results obtained by time-resolved transient absorption spectroscopy measurements were consistent with

  20. Hetero-junctions of Boron Nitride and Carbon Nanotubes: Synthesis and Characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yap, Yoke Khin

    2013-03-14

    Hetero-junctions of boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are expected to have appealing new properties that are not available from pure BNNTs and CNTs. Theoretical studies indicate that BNNT/CNT junctions could be multifunctional and applicable as memory, spintronic, electronic, and photonics devices with tunable band structures. This will lead to energy and material efficient multifunctional devices that will be beneficial to the society. However, experimental realization of BNNT/CNT junctions was hindered by the absent of a common growth technique for BNNTs and CNTs. In fact, the synthesis of BNNTs was very challenging and may involve high temperatures (up to 3000 degree Celsius by laser ablation) and explosive chemicals. During the award period, we have successfully developed a simple chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technique to grow BNNTs at 1100-1200 degree Celsius without using dangerous chemicals. A series of common catalyst have then been identified for the synthesis of BNNTs and CNTs. Both of these breakthroughs have led to our preliminary success in growing two types of BNNT/CNT junctions and two additional new nanostructures: 1) branching BNNT/CNT junctions and 2) co-axial BNNT/CNT junctions, 3) quantum dots functionalized BNNTs (QDs-BNNTs), 4) BNNT/graphene junctions. We have started to understand their structural, compositional, and electronic properties. Latest results indicate that the branching BNNT/CNT junctions and QDs-BNNTs are functional as room-temperature tunneling devices. We have submitted the application of a renewal grant to continue the study of these new energy efficient materials. Finally, this project has also strengthened our collaborations with multiple Department of Energy's Nanoscale Science Research Centers (NSRCs), including the Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences (CNMS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and the Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies (CINTs) at Sandia National Laboratories and Los

  1. Structural characterization of thin films of titanium nitride deposited by laser ablation; Caracterizacion estructural de peliculas delgadas de nitruro de titanio depositadas por ablacion laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castro C, M.A.; Escobar A, L.; Camps C, E.; Mejia H, J.A. [ININ, 52045 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2004-07-01

    Thin films of titanium nitride were deposited using the technique of laser ablation. It was studied the effect of the density of laser energy used for ablation the target as well as of the pressure of the work gas about the structure and the hardness of the deposited thin films. Depending on the pressure of the work gas films was obtained with preferential orientation in the directions (200) and (111). At a pressure of 1 x 10{sup -2} Torr only the direction (200) was observed. On the other hand to the pressure of 5 x 10{sup -3} Torr the deposited material this formed by a mixture of the orientation (200) and (111), being the direction (111) the predominant one. Thin films of Ti N were obtained with hardness of up to 24.0 GPa that makes to these attractive materials for mechanical applications. The hardness showed an approximately linear dependence with the energy density. (Author)

  2. Formation of carbon nanotubes on an amorphous Ni{sub 25}Ta{sub 58}N{sub 17} alloy film by chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gromov, D. G.; Dubkov, S. V., E-mail: sv.dubkov@gmail.com [National Research University of Electronic Technology MIET (Russian Federation); Pavlov, A. A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Nanotechnologies of Microelectronics (Russian Federation); Skorik, S. N. [Technological Center Research and Production Complex (Russian Federation); Trifonov, A. Yu. [Lukin Scientific Research Institute of Physical Problems (Russian Federation); Kirilenko, E. P.; Shulyat’ev, A. S. [National Research University of Electronic Technology MIET (Russian Federation); Shaman, Yu. P. [Technological Center Research and Production Complex (Russian Federation); Rygalin, B. N. [National Research University of Electronic Technology MIET (Russian Federation)

    2016-12-15

    It is shown that it is possible to grow carbon nanotubes on the surface of an amorphous Ni–Ta–N metal alloy film with a low Ni content (~25 at %) by chemical deposition from acetylene at temperature 400–800°C. It is established that the addition of nitrogen into the Ni–Ta alloy composition is favorable for the formation of tantalum nitride and the expulsion of Ni clusters, which act as a catalyst of the growth of carbon nanotubes, onto the surface. From Raman spectroscopy studies, it is found that, as the temperature of synthesis is raised, the quality of nanotubes is improved.

  3. Measuring the dielectric and optical response of millimeter-scale amorphous and hexagonal boron nitride films grown on epitaxial graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigosi, Albert F.; Hill, Heather M.; Glavin, Nicholas R.; Pookpanratana, Sujitra J.; Yang, Yanfei; Boosalis, Alexander G.; Hu, Jiuning; Rice, Anthony; Allerman, Andrew A.; Nguyen, Nhan V.; Hacker, Christina A.; Elmquist, Randolph E.; Hight Walker, Angela R.; Newell, David B.

    2018-01-01

    Monolayer epitaxial graphene (EG), grown on the Si face of SiC, is an advantageous material for a variety of electronic and optical applications. EG forms as a single crystal over millimeter-scale areas and consequently, the large scale single crystal can be utilized as a template for growth of other materials. In this work, we present the use of EG as a template to form millimeter-scale amorphous and hexagonal boron nitride (a-BN and h-BN) films. The a-BN is formed with pulsed laser deposition and the h-BN is grown with triethylboron (TEB) and NH3 precursors, making it the first metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) process of this growth type performed on epitaxial graphene. A variety of optical and non-optical characterization methods are used to determine the optical absorption and dielectric functions of the EG, a-BN, and h-BN within the energy range of 1 eV–8.5 eV. Furthermore, we report the first ellipsometric observation of high-energy resonant excitons in EG from the 4H polytype of SiC and an analysis on the interactions within the EG and h-BN heterostructure.

  4. The Effect of Mesoporous Carbon Nitride Modification by Titanium Oxide Nanoparticles on Photocatalytic Degradation of 1,3-Dinitrobenzene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyyed Ershad Moradi

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, well ordered, mesoporous carbon nitride (MCN sorbent with uniform mesoporous wall, high surface area and pore volume has been fabricated using the simple polymerization reaction between ethylene diamine and carbon tetrachloride in mesoporous silica media, and then modified by TiO2 nanoparticles (Ti-MCN. The structural order and textural properties of the nanoporous materials were studied by XRD, elemental analysis, and nitrogen adsorption–desorption experiments. Photodegradation experiments for 1,3-dinitrobenzene were conducted in batch mode, the Ti-MCN catalysts were found to be more active compared to the free TiO2 nanoparticles for 1,3-dinitrobenzene degradation.

  5. Sub-picowatt resolution calorimetry with niobium nitride thin-film thermometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dechaumphai, Edward; Chen, Renkun

    2014-09-01

    High-resolution calorimetry has many important applications such as probing nanoscale thermal transport and studying the thermodynamics of biological and chemical systems. In this work, we demonstrated a calorimeter with an unprecedentedly high resolution at room temperature using a high-performance resistive thermometry material, niobium nitride (NbN(x)). Based on a theoretical analysis, we first showed that the heat flux resolution of a resistive-thermometry based calorimeter depends on the parasitic thermal conductance of the device and the temperature coefficient of resistance (TCR) of the thermometer, when the noise is limited by the Johnson noise. Based on this analysis, we then developed a calorimeter using NbNx as the thermometry material because it possesses both high TCR (~0.67%/K) and a low thermal conductivity (k ~ 1.1 W/m K). This calorimeter, when used with the modulated heating scheme, demonstrated an unprecedentedly high power resolution of 0.26 pW at room temperature. In addition, NbNx based resistive thermometry can also be extended to cryogenic temperature, where the TCR is shown to be significantly higher.

  6. Sub-picowatt resolution calorimetry with niobium nitride thin-film thermometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dechaumphai, Edward; Chen, Renkun, E-mail: rkchen@ucsd.edu [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States)

    2014-09-15

    High-resolution calorimetry has many important applications such as probing nanoscale thermal transport and studying the thermodynamics of biological and chemical systems. In this work, we demonstrated a calorimeter with an unprecedentedly high resolution at room temperature using a high-performance resistive thermometry material, niobium nitride (NbN{sub x}). Based on a theoretical analysis, we first showed that the heat flux resolution of a resistive-thermometry based calorimeter depends on the parasitic thermal conductance of the device and the temperature coefficient of resistance (TCR) of the thermometer, when the noise is limited by the Johnson noise. Based on this analysis, we then developed a calorimeter using NbN{sub x} as the thermometry material because it possesses both high TCR (∼0.67%/K) and a low thermal conductivity (k ∼ 1.1 W/m K). This calorimeter, when used with the modulated heating scheme, demonstrated an unprecedentedly high power resolution of 0.26 pW at room temperature. In addition, NbN{sub x} based resistive thermometry can also be extended to cryogenic temperature, where the TCR is shown to be significantly higher.

  7. Bonding of a Carbon Nanotube Film to a Au Film at Low Temperature and Contact Resistance of the Film under Micronewton Loads

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kinoshita, Hiroshi; Yoshitada, Isono; Ohmae, Nobuo

    2011-01-01

    A process for bonding a carbon nanotube (CNT) film to a Au film at low temperature was developed with a view to using the CNT films as electrical contact materials in radio-frequency microelectromechanical systems (RF MEMS) switches...

  8. Preparation of porous carbon films from polyacrylonitrile by proton irradiation and carbonization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hwa Su; Baek, Ga Young; Hwang, In-Tae; Jung, Chan-Hee; Choi, Jae-Hak

    2017-12-01

    Porous carbon films (PCFs) are widely used in various application fields, such as separation and water desalination as well as energy storage and conversion. In this study, PCFs were prepared from polyacrylonitrile (PAN) by proton irradiation and carbonization. Porous PAN films were prepared by a non-solvent-induced phase separation process. The porous PAN films were irradiated with proton ions, and then carbonized in a tube furnace at various fluences under an inert atmosphere. It was found that pore structures were well maintained during proton irradiation and high-temperature carbonization processes. The Raman and XRD results showed that pseudo-graphitic structures were formed by the carbonization of proton irradiated porous PAN films. The electrical conductivity of the prepared PCFs increased with an increasing carbonization temperature due to the formation of more graphitic structures at a higher temperature.

  9. Enhanced photocatalytic activity of graphitic carbon nitride/carbon nanotube/Bi2WO6 ternary Z-scheme heterojunction with carbon nanotube as efficient electron mediator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Deli; Ma, Wanxia; Xiao, Peng; Shao, Leqiang; Li, Di; Chen, Min

    2017-10-20

    All-solid-state Z-scheme heterojunction has attracted much attention in photocatalytic field because of its strong ability in charge separation and transfer. In the present study, all-solid-state ternary Z-scheme heterojunction constructed by graphitic carbon nitride (CN) nanosheet, carbon nanotube (CNT), and Bi2WO6 (BWO) nanosheet, in which CNT was employed as the electron mediator. The CN/CNT/BWO ternary Z-scheme heterojunction shows the enhanced photocatalytic activity towards the degradation of tetracycline hydrochloride (TC) as compared to the pristine g-C3N4, Bi2WO6, CNT/BWO, CNT/CN, and CN/BWO. The significantly improved photocatalytic activity can be mainly ascribed to the formed CNT-mediated Z-scheme heterojunction, which facilitates the separation and transfer of photogenerated electron-hole pairs. Our work provides a rational design of all-solid-state Z-scheme heterojunction with CNT as the electron mediator for highly efficient photocatalysis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Photoluminescence Study of Gallium Nitride Thin Films Obtained by Infrared Close Space Vapor Transport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis A. Hernández

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Photoluminescence (PL studies in GaN thin films grown by infrared close space vapor transport (CSVT-IR in vacuum are presented in this work. The growth of GaN thin films was done on a variety of substrates like silicon, sapphire and fused silica. Room temperature PL spectra of all the GaN films show near band-edge emission (NBE and a broad blue and green luminescence (BL, GL, which can be seen with the naked eye in a bright room. The sample grown by infrared CSVT on the silicon substrate shows several emission peaks from 2.4 to 3.22 eV with a pronounced red shift with respect to the band gap energy. The sample grown on sapphire shows strong and broad ultraviolet emission peaks (UVL centered at 3.19 eV and it exhibits a red shift of NBE. The PL spectrum of GaN films deposited on fused silica exhibited a unique and strong blue-green emission peak centered at 2.38 eV. The presence of yellow and green luminescence in all samples is related to native defects in the structure such as dislocations in GaN and/or the presence of amorphous phases. We analyze the material quality that can be obtained by CSVT-IR in vacuum, which is a high yield technique with simple equipment set-up, in terms of the PL results obtained in each case.

  11. Thin films and devices of diamond, silicon carbide and gallium nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Robert F.

    1993-04-01

    The extreme properties of diamond, SiC and GaN provide combinations of attributes for high-power, -temperature, -frequency and optoelectronic applications. The methods of deposition, the results of chemical, structural, microstructural and electrical characterization and device development are reviewed for thin films of these three materials. Problems and areas of future research are also noted.

  12. Nanoparticle-assisted Frenkel-Poole emission in two-terminal charging-controlled memory devices based on Si-rich silicon nitride thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhen; Wang, Xiao Lin; Wong, Jen It; Cen, Zhan Hong; Chen, T. P.; Zhang, Hai Yan

    2017-10-01

    Silicon nanoparticle (Si-NP)-embedded silicon nitride (Si3N4) thin films have been synthesized by implantation of Si ions into Si3N4 thin films followed by high-temperature thermal annealing. With different implant dosage of Si ions, the concentration of Si-NPs has been varied in the Si3N4 matrix. By forming an Al/Si-NP-embedded Si3N4/ p-Si structure, memory behavior was observed through charging-caused modulation in the device current. The current-voltage measurements were then conducted to study the carrier transport mechanism and thus to understand the origin of charging-induced variation in device resistance. It was found that the current exhibited a hopping-based conduction mechanism at low electric field. While at high electric field, a Frenkel-Poole (F-P) emission was found to dominate the current conduction. As a result, the charging-caused electron trapping under positive voltage in Si-NPs of the nitride film enhances the F-P emission, leading to a significant reduction in resistance. However, negative voltage-caused hole trapping suppresses the current conduction. The two-terminal devices based on such Si-NP-embedded Si3N4 thin films are promising to be used as charging-controlled memory devices.

  13. Nanostructured thin film coatings with different strengthening effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panfilov Yury

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A number of articles on strengthening thin film coatings were analyzed and a lot of unusual strengthening effects, such as super high hardness and plasticity simultaneously, ultra low friction coefficient, high wear-resistance, curve rigidity increasing of drills with small diameter, associated with process formation of nanostructured coatings by the different thin film deposition methods were detected. Vacuum coater with RF magnetron sputtering system and ion-beam source and arc evaporator for nanostructured thin film coating manufacture are represented. Diamond Like Carbon and MoS2 thin film coatings, Ti, Al, Nb, Cr, nitride, carbide, and carbo-nitride thin film materials are described as strengthening coatings.

  14. Response of Gallium Nitride Chemiresistors to Carbon Monoxide is Due to Oxygen Contamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Ravi Mohan; Lauterbach, Stefan; Kleebe, Hans-Joachim; Merdrignac-Conanec, Odile; Barsan, Nicolae; Weimar, Udo; Gurlo, Aleksander

    2017-06-23

    We report on the influence of oxygen impurities on the gas sensing properties of gallium nitride (GaN) chemiresistors. As shown by XRD, elemental analysis, and TEM characterization, surface oxidation of GaN-for example, upon contact to ambient air atmosphere-creates an oxidative amorphous layer which provides the sites for the sensing toward CO. Treating this powder under dry ammonia at 800 °C converts the oxide layer in nitride, and consequently the sensing performance toward CO is dramatically reduced for ammonia treated GaN gas sensors. Hence the response of GaN sensors to CO is caused by oxygen in the form of amorphous surface oxide or oxynitride.

  15. The effect of titanium nickel nitride decorated carbon nanotubes-reduced graphene oxide hybrid support for methanol oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Gen; Pan, Zhanchang; Li, Wuyi; Yu, Ke; Xia, Guowei; Zhao, Qixiang; Shi, Shikun; Hu, Guanghui; Xiao, Chumin; Wei, Zhigang

    2017-07-01

    Titanium nickel nitride (TiNiN) decorated three-dimensional (3D) carbon nanotubes-reduced graphene oxide (CNT-rGO), a fancy 3D platinum (Pt)-based catalyst hybrid support, is prepared by a solvothermal process followed by a nitriding process, which is tested as anodic catalyst support for the methanol oxidation reaction (MOR). The structure, morphology and composition of the synthesized TiNiN/CNT-rGO exhibits a uniform particle dispersion with high purity and interpenetrating 3D network structure. Notably, Pt/TiNiN/CNT-rGO catalyst exhibits significantly improved catalytic activity and durability for methanol oxidation in comparison with Pt/CNT-rGO and conventional Pt/C (JM). The outstanding electrochemical performance was attributed to structure and properties. That is, the 3D CNT-rGO provided a fast transport network for charge-transfer and mass-transfer as well as TiNiN NPs with good synergistic effect and the strong electronic coupling between different domains in TiNiN/CNT-rGO, thus the catalytic activity of the novel catalyst is greatly improved. These results evidences 3D TiNiN/CNT-rGO as a promising catalyst support for a wide range of applications in fuel cells.

  16. Ultraviolet photodetectors based on aluminum gallium nitride films grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Mira

    2000-10-01

    GaN-AlN alloys are an important class of materials for ultraviolet photodetectors. The focus of this work was to develop photoconducting and photovoltaic detectors based on AlxGa1-xN films, grown by molecular beam epitaxy. GaN photoconducting detectors were fabricated and characterized. Mobility-lifetime products of the films were determined from measurement of photoconductive gain. They varied from 10-2cm2/V to 10 -7cm2/V as resistivity changed from 10 2W-cm to 107W-cm. Spectral response showed a sharp transition at 365nm and three orders of magnitude visible light rejection. Semi-insulating films exhibited fast response time of 20ns. Dynamic range was linear over five orders of magnitude. Low frequency noise spectra were dominated by l/f noise in the 0--100Hz range and by generation-recombination noise in the 100Hz--10KHz range. A trap at DE = 0.32eV was identified from the temperature dependence of the noise spectrum. The noise equivalent power was determined to be 3 x 10-14W/Hz 1/2 at 10KHz for the semi-insulating detectors. Solar-blind UV photoconductive detectors were fabricated using Al xGa1-xN films with Al mole fraction x = 0--0.45. Detectors fabricated on films with Al mole fraction x = 0.45, corresponding to true solar-blind detection, exhibited mobility-lifetime products of 10 -5cm2/V, which is two orders of magnitude higher than that of GaN films of comparable resistivity. These films also exhibited the highest degree of long range atomic ordering. The enhanced photoconductive gain is accounted for by a model, which considers band offsets between the ordered and random domains in the partially ordered alloys, causing spatial separation of photo-carriers and consequently, long recombination lifetimes. Schottky barrier photovoltaic detectors (n-GaN/Ni-Pt), with a mesa-etched vertical geometry, were fabricated. These photodiodes exhibit a responsivity of 0.18A/W at 325nm and NEP of 1.3 x 10-9W/Hz 1/2 at 1KHz. Doping concentrations and barrier heights were

  17. Chemical etching behaviors of semipolar (11̄22) and nonpolar (11̄20) gallium nitride films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Younghun; Baik, Kwang Hyeon; Mastro, Michael A; Hite, Jennifer K; Eddy, Charles R; Kim, Jihyun

    2014-08-14

    Wet chemical etching using hot KOH and H3PO4 solutions was performed on semipolar (11̄22) and nonpolar (11̄20) GaN films grown on sapphire substrates. An alternating KOH/H3PO4/KOH etch process was developed to control the orientation of the facets on the thin-film surface. The initial etch step in KOH produced c- and m-plane facets on the surface of both semipolar (11̄22) and nonpolar (11̄20) GaN thin-films. A second etch step in H3PO4 solution additionally exposed a (̄1̄12̄2) plane, which is chemically stable in H3PO4 solution. By repeating the chemical etch with KOH solution, the m-plane facets as seen in the original KOH etch step were recovered. The etching methods developed in our work can be used to control the surface morphologies of nonpolar and semipolar GaN-based optoelectronic devices such as light-emitting diodes and solar cells.

  18. Enhanced c-axis orientation of aluminum nitride thin films by plasma-based pre-conditioning of sapphire substrates for SAW applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillinger, M.; Shaposhnikov, K.; Knobloch, T.; Stöger-Pollach, M.; Artner, W.; Hradil, K.; Schneider, M.; Kaltenbacher, M.; Schmid, U.

    2018-03-01

    Aluminum nitride (AlN) on sapphire has been investigated with two different pretreatments prior to sputter deposition of the AlN layer to improve the orientation and homogeneity of the thin film. An inverse sputter etching of the substrate in argon atmosphere results in an improvement of the uniformity of the alignment of the AlN grains and hence, in enhanced electro-mechanical AlN film properties. This effect is demonstrated in the raw measurements of SAW test devices. Additionally, the impulse response of several devices shows that a poor AlN thin film layer quality leads to a higher signal damping during the transduction of energy in the inter-digital transducers. As a result, the triple-transit signal cannot be detected at the receiver.

  19. Low temperature CVD growth of ultrathin carbon films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Yang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrate the low temperature, large area growth of ultrathin carbon films by chemical vapor deposition under atmospheric pressure on various substrates. In particularly, uniform and continuous carbon films with the thickness of 2-5 nm were successfully grown at a temperature as low as 500 oC on copper foils, as well as glass substrates coated with a 100 nm thick copper layer. The characterizations revealed that the low-temperature-grown carbon films consist on few short, curved graphene layers and thin amorphous carbon films. Particularly, the low-temperature grown samples exhibited over 90% transmittance at a wavelength range of 400-750 nm and comparable sheet resistance in contrast with the 1000oC-grown one. This low-temperature growth method may offer a facile way to directly prepare visible ultrathin carbon films on various substrate surfaces that are compatible with temperatures (500-600oC used in several device processing technologies.

  20. Hydrogen recycle and isotope exchange from dense carbon films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clausing, R.E.; Heatherly, L.

    1987-03-01

    Dense carbon films were prepared by deposition from hydrogen plasmas to which methane was added. The initial hydrogen recycle coefficient from the films ranges from more than two to less than one. The films contain large amounts of hydrogen (up to 50 at. %). They adjust themselves to provide recycling coefficients near unity. Isotope changeover times tend to be long. The reservoir of hydrogen instantly available to the plasma to maintain or stabilize the recycle coefficient and isotopic composition of the plasma is 10/sup 15/ cm/sup -2/ or greater depending on film preparation, temperature, and prior plasma exposure conditions. Simulator observations tend to support and improve the understanding of the observations in TEXTOR and JET; however, they also point out the need for control of film deposition and operating parameters to provide desirable and reproducible properties. The films and the hydrogen isotopes they contain can be removed easily by plasma processes. Since the hydrogen in these films is relatively immobile except in the zone reached by energetic particles, or at temperatures above 400/sup 0/C, dense carbon films may be useful in managing the tritium recovery from near-term fusion experiments.

  1. Dual ion beam deposition of carbon films with diamondlike properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirtich, M. J.; Swec, D. M.; Angus, J. C.

    1984-01-01

    A single and dual ion beam system was used to generate amorphous carbon films with diamond like properties. A methane/argon mixture at a molar ratio of 0.28 was ionized in the low pressure discharge chamber of a 30-cm-diameter ion source. A second ion source, 8 cm in diameter was used to direct a beam of 600 eV Argon ions on the substrates (fused silica or silicon) while the deposition from the 30-cm ion source was taking place. Nuclear reaction and combustion analysis indicate H/C ratios for the films to be 1.00. This high value of H/C, it is felt, allowed the films to have good transmittance. The films were impervious to reagents which dissolve graphitic and polymeric carbon structures. Although the measured density of the films was approximately 1.8 gm/cu cm, a value lower than diamond, the films exhibited other properties that were relatively close to diamond. These films were compared with diamondlike films generated by sputtering a graphite target.

  2. Effect of nitrogen doping on the structural, optical and electrical properties of indium tin oxide films prepared by magnetron sputtering for gallium nitride light emitting diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Lifei; Cheng, Guoan; Wang, Hougong; Wu, Yulong; Zheng, Ruiting; Ding, Peijun

    2017-01-01

    The indium tin oxide (ITO) films are prepared by the direct current magnetron sputtering technology with an ITO target in a mixture of argon and nitrogen gas at room temperature. The blue transmittance at 455 nm rises from 63% to 83% after nitrogen doping. The resistivity of the ITO film reduces from 4.6 × 10-3 (undoped film) to 5.7 × 10-4 Ω cm (N-doped film). The X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy data imply that the binding energy of the In3d5/2 peak is declined 0.05 eV after nitrogen doping. The high resolution transmission electron microscope images show that the nitrogen loss density of the GaN/ITO interface with N-doped ITO film is smaller than that of the GaN/ITO interface with undoped ITO film. The forward turn-on voltage of gallium nitride light emitting diode reduces by 0.5 V after nitrogen doping. The fabrication of the N-doped ITO film is conducive to modify the N component of the interface between GaN and ITO layer.

  3. Recent Advances of Graphitic Carbon Nitride-Based Structures and Applications in Catalyst, Sensing, Imaging, and LEDs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Aiwu; Wang, Chundong; Fu, Li; Wong-Ng, Winnie; Lan, Yucheng

    2017-10-01

    The graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3N4) which is a two-dimensional conjugated polymer has drawn broad interdisciplinary attention as a low-cost, metal-free, and visible-light-responsive photocatalyst in the area of environmental remediation. The g-C3N4-based materials have excellent electronic band structures, electron-rich properties, basic surface functionalities, high physicochemical stabilities and are "earth-abundant." This review summarizes the latest progress related to the design and construction of g-C3N4-based materials and their applications including catalysis, sensing, imaging, and white-light-emitting diodes. An outlook on possible further developments in g-C3N4-based research for emerging properties and applications is also included.

  4. From melamine sponge towards 3D sulfur-doping carbon nitride as metal-free electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jingjing; Li, Bin; Li, Songmei; Liu, Jianhua

    2017-07-01

    Development of new and efficient metal-free electrocatalysts for replacing Pt to improve the sluggish kinetics of oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) is of great importance to emerging renewable energy technologies such as metal-air batteries and polymer electrolyte fuel cells. Herein, 3D sulfur-doping carbon nitride (S-CN) as a novel metal-free ORR electrocatalyst was synthesized by exploiting commercial melamine sponge as raw material. The sulfur atoms were doping on CN networks uniformly through numerous S-C bonds which can provide additional active sites. And it was found that the S-CN exhibited high catalytic activity for ORR in term of more positive onset potential, higher electron transfer number and higher cathodic density. This work provides a novel choice of metal-free ORR electrocatalysts and highlights the importance of sulfur-doping CN in metal-free ORR electrocatalysts.

  5. A Monolithically Integrated Gallium Nitride Nanowire/Silicon Solar Cell Photocathode for Selective Carbon Dioxide Reduction to Methane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yichen; Fan, Shizhao; AlOtaibi, Bandar; Wang, Yongjie; Li, Lu; Mi, Zetian

    2016-06-20

    A gallium nitride nanowire/silicon solar cell photocathode for the photoreduction of carbon dioxide (CO2 ) is demonstrated. Such a monolithically integrated nanowire/solar cell photocathode offers several unique advantages, including the absorption of a large part of the solar spectrum and highly efficient carrier extraction. With the incorporation of copper as the co-catalyst, the devices exhibit a Faradaic efficiency of about 19 % for the 8e(-) photoreduction to CH4 at -1.4 V vs Ag/AgCl, a value that is more than thirty times higher than that for the 2e(-) reduced CO (ca. 0.6 %). © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Carbon nitride frameworks padded with graphene as efficient metal-free catalyst for HER in acidic and alkali electrolytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Shiming; Li, Bin; Li, Songmei; Yang, Shubin

    2017-05-01

    Although hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) is one of the most promising pathways to generate hydrogen in large-scale for future fuels, it is still lacking efficient and low-cost electrocatalysts. Here, carbon nitride frameworks padded with graphene (CNF-G) are explored as efficient metal-free catalysts with low-cost and good durability via a directly annealing commercial melamine sponge with graphene oxide. Owing to the high electrical conductivity of graphene, CNF-G exhibits outstanding catalytic activity during HER process in wide pH ranges. The overpotentials and Tafel slopes of CNF-G were 149 mV and 116 mV dec-1 in 0.5 M H2SO4, as well as 319 mV and 160 mV dec-1 in 1 M KOH, respectively. More importantly, CNF-G shows a high and stable catalytic activity demonstrated by a multiple cyclic voltammetry and long potentiostatic polarization.

  7. Visible-Light-Irradiated Graphitic Carbon Nitride Photocatalyzed Diels-Alder Reactions with Dioxygen as Sustainable Mediator for Photoinduced Electrons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yubao; Antonietti, Markus

    2017-08-01

    Photocatalytic Diels-Alder (D-A) reactions with electron rich olefins are realized by graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3 N4 ) under visible-light irradiation and aerobic conditions. This heterogeneous photoredox reaction system is highly efficient, and the apparent quantum yield reaches a remarkable value of 47 % for the model reaction. Dioxygen plays a critical role as electron mediator, which is distinct from the previous reports in the homogeneous RuII complex photoredox system. Moreover, the reaction intermediate vinylcyclobutane is captured and monitored during the reaction, serving as a direct evidence for the proposed reaction mechanism. The cycloaddition process is thereby determined to be the combination of direct [4+2] cycloaddition and [2+2] cycloaddition followed by photocatalytic rearrangement of the vinylcyclobutane intermediate. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Cubic and hexagonal boron-nitride (c-BN/h-BN) thin films deposited in situ by r.f. magnetron sputtering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caicedo, J.M.; Zambrano, G.; Baca, E.; Moran, O.; Prieto, P. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad del Valle, A.A. 25360 Cali (Colombia); Bejarano, G. [Laboratorio de Recubrimientos Duros, CDT-ASTIN SENA, Cali (Colombia)

    2005-07-01

    Cubic boron-nitride (c-BN)/hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) thin films were grown in situ on (100) oriented silicon substrates by r.f. (13.56 MHz) magnetron sputtering technique. In order to obtain the highest fraction of the c-BN phase, a negative d.c bias voltage, varying from 0 to -200 V was applied to the substrate during deposition. Another set of boron nitride thin films was deposited in situ on (100) oriented silicon substrates under r.f. bias voltage. The substrate holder was biased from 0 to -350 V by connecting such to an auxiliary r.f. generator (operated at 13.56 MHz). Films were characterized by Fourier Transformed Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) and Atomic Force Microscope (AFM). Well-defined peaks at 787 cm{sup -1}, 1100 cm{sup -1} and 1387 cm{sup -1}, corresponding to the 2{sub Au} (out-plane bending of B-N-B bond) h-BN vibration mode, the F2 (stretching) c-BN Transversal Optical (TO) mode and the E{sub 1u} (in-plane stretching of B-N bond) vibration mode of the h-BN, respectively, were observed in the FTIR spectra. A maximal fraction of the c-BN phase close to 85% was obtained under a bias voltage of -150 V at substrate temperature of 300 C and a total pressure of 4 x 10{sup -2} mbar. (copyright 2005 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  9. Influence of Nitrided Layer on The Properties of Carbon Coatings Produced on X105CrMo17 Steel Under DC Glow-Discharge Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz BOROWSKI

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In most cases, machine components, which come in contact with each other, are made of steel. Common steel types include 100Cr6 and X105CrMo17 are widely used in rolling bearings, which are subjected to high static loads. However, more and more sophisticated structural applications require increasingly better performance from steel. The most popular methods for improving the properties of steel is carburisation or nitriding. Unfortunately, when very high surface properties of steel are required, this treatment may be insufficient. Improvement of tribological properties can be achieved by increasing the hardness of the surface, reducing roughness or reducing the coefficient of friction. The formation of composite layers on steel, consisting of a hard nitride diffusion layer and an external carbon coating with a low coefficient of friction, seems to be a prospect with significant potential. The article describes composite layers produced on X105CrMo17 steel and defines their morphology, surface roughness and their functional properties such as: resistance to friction-induced wear, coefficient of friction and corrosion resistance. The layers have been formed at a temperature of 370°C in successive processes of: nitriding in low-temperature plasma followed by deposition of a carbon coating under DC glow-discharge conditions. An evaluation was also made of the impact of the nitrided layers on the properties and morphology of the carbon coatings formed by comparing them to coatings formed on non-nitrided X105CrMo17 steel substrates. A study of the surface topography, adhesion, resistance to friction-induced wear and corrosion shows the significant importance of the substrate type the carbon coatings are formed on.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.22.3.7532

  10. Ternary carbon composite films for supercapacitor applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Minh-Hai; Jeong, Hae Kyung

    2017-09-01

    A simple, binder-free, method of making supercapacitor electrodes is introduced, based on modification of activated carbon with graphite oxide and carbon nanotubes. The three carbon precursors of different morphologies support each other to provide outstanding electrochemical performance, such as high capacitance and high energy density. The ternary carbon composite shows six times higher specific capacitance compared to that of activated carbon itself with high retention. The excellent electrochemical properties of the ternary composite attribute to the high surface area of 1933 m2 g-1 and low equivalent series resistance of 2 Ω, demonstrating that it improve the electrochemical performance for supercapacitor applications.

  11. HVPE of aluminum nitride, film evaluation and multiscale modeling of the growth process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pons, M.; Su, J.; Chubarov, M.; Boichot, R.; Mercier, F.; Blanquet, E.; Giusti, G.; Pique, D.

    2017-06-01

    The different steps of the fabrication of epitaxial AlN films (0.5-20 μm) by high temperature chemical vapor deposition called also HVPE (Hydride Vapor Phase Epitaxy) are reviewed (i) by thermodynamic modeling to analyze reactions in the chlorination chamber, (ii) by multicomponent heat and mass transport for a better knowledge of actual supersaturation of gas species above the substrate, (iii) by simple mechanical modeling to analyze the different source of stress during growth and (iv) by level set methods to represent the interface evolution at the micrometric level on patterned substrates. The evaluation of thin films is discussed in the light of modeling results. The joint use of the different modeling approaches allowed the quantification, for a 2″ substrate, of (i) the optimum temperature for the chlorination chamber (500 °C) to avoid AlCl specie formation, (ii) the transport of the main species AlCl3 diluted in NH3 and H2 and (iii) the actual supersaturation at the growth interface on 2D surfaces or 3D patterned surfaces to promote lateral epitaxial overgrowth and improve crystalline quality. Finally, the upscaling from 2″ to 4″ substrates is computed and validated.

  12. Ultrahigh mobility and efficient charge injection in monolayer organic thin-film transistors on boron nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Daowei; Qiao, Jingsi; Zhang, Linglong; Wang, Junya; Lan, Tu; Qian, Jun; Li, Yun; Shi, Yi; Chai, Yang; Lan, Wei; Ono, Luis K.; Qi, Yabing; Xu, Jian-Bin; Ji, Wei; Wang, Xinran

    2017-01-01

    Organic thin-film transistors (OTFTs) with high mobility and low contact resistance have been actively pursued as building blocks for low-cost organic electronics. In conventional solution-processed or vacuum-deposited OTFTs, due to interfacial defects and traps, the organic film has to reach a certain thickness for efficient charge transport. Using an ultimate monolayer of 2,7-dioctyl[1]benzothieno[3,2-b][1]benzothiophene (C8-BTBT) molecules as an OTFT channel, we demonstrate remarkable electrical characteristics, including intrinsic hole mobility over 30 cm2/Vs, Ohmic contact with 100 Ω · cm resistance, and band-like transport down to 150 K. Compared to conventional OTFTs, the main advantage of a monolayer channel is the direct, nondisruptive contact between the charge transport layer and metal leads, a feature that is vital for achieving low contact resistance and current saturation voltage. On the other hand, bilayer and thicker C8-BTBT OTFTs exhibit strong Schottky contact and much higher contact resistance but can be improved by inserting a doped graphene buffer layer. Our results suggest that highly crystalline molecular monolayers are promising form factors to build high-performance OTFTs and investigate device physics. They also allow us to precisely model how the molecular packing changes the transport and contact properties. PMID:28913429

  13. Effect of Heat Treatment on the Nitrogen Content and Its Role on the Carbon Dioxide Adsorption Capacity of Highly Ordered Mesoporous Carbon Nitride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakhi, Kripal S; Park, Dae-Hwan; Joseph, Stalin; Talapaneni, Siddulu N; Ravon, Ugo; Al-Bahily, Khalid; Vinu, Ajayan

    2017-03-02

    Mesoporous carbon nitrides (MCNs) with rod-shaped morphology and tunable nitrogen contents have been synthesized through a calcination-free method by using ethanol-washed mesoporous SBA-15 as templates at different carbonization temperatures. Carbon tetrachloride and ethylenediamine were used as the sources of carbon and nitrogen, respectively. The resulting MCN materials were characterized with low- and high-angle powder XRD, nitrogen adsorption, high-resolution (HR) SEM, HR-TEM, elemental analysis, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and X-ray absorption near-edge structure techniques. The carbonization temperature plays a critical role in controlling not only the crystallinity, but also the nitrogen content and textural parameters of the samples, including specific surface area and specific pore volume. The nitrogen content of MCN decreases with a concomitant increase in specific surface area and specific pore volume, as well as the crystallinity of the samples, as the carbonization temperature is increased. The results also reveal that the structural order of the materials is retained, even after heat treatment at temperatures up to 900 °C with a significant reduction of the nitrogen content, but the structure is partially damaged at 1000 °C. The carbon dioxide adsorption capacity of these materials is not only dependent on the textural parameters, but also on the nitrogen content. The MCN prepared at 900 °C, which has an optimum BET surface area and nitrogen content, registers a carbon dioxide adsorption capacity of 20.1 mmol g(-1) at 273 K and 30 bar, which is much higher than that of mesoporous silica, MCN-1, activated carbon, and multiwalled carbon nanotubes. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Recyclable and electrically conducting carbon nanotube composite films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Guifu; Jain, Menka; Yang, Hao; Zhang, Yingying; Williams, Darrick; Jia, Quanxi

    2010-03-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) composite films possess unique electrical, mechanical and thermal properties. In particular, some research has shown that CNT-polymer composite films greatly enhance the performance of organic light-emitting diodes. Therefore, CNT composite films have been intensively fabricated and applied. However, recent research has shown that CNTs carry carcinogenic risks in vivo. Therefore, how to collect and treat damaged or trashed CNT composite films are considerable tasks for scientists working in this area. From the viewpoint of environmental protection and saving resources, recycling the CNT composite films is the most efficient way to solve these problems. Here, we employ a benign water-soluble polymer, polyethyleneimine (PEI), to disperse CNTs and a general spin-coating process to prepare the homogeneous CNT composite films. The prepared CNT composite films exhibit good water-soluble properties and recyclability, i.e. they can be formed and dissolved in water. In addition, the long CNTs and high loading in the PEI matrix facilitates good electric conductivity in these CNT composite films. A significant improvement in the conductivity of the composite films is observed as the concentration of CNTs in the PEI increases, reaching as high as 43.73 S cm-1 when the CNT concentration is equal to 3%.

  15. Interface and stability analysis of Tantalum- and Titanium nitride thin films onto Lithiumniobate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, U.; Oswald, S.; Eckert, J.

    2017-12-01

    Modern surface-acoustic-wave (SAW) devices are characterized by their trend to higher frequencies, power densities and new applications. For this, a shrinking of the dimensions is necessary resulting in an increased power density and temperature within the metallization. To reduce the emerging damaging effects (acustomigration, diffusion etc.) additional barrier layers between substrates and electrodes are necessary, especially for high temperature applications. In this context, we present results of detailed chemical interface analysis of sputtered TaN and TiN thin films as potential barrier layers onto SAW-substrate material (LiNbO3) with respect to their temporal (up to 8 h) and thermal stability up to 600 °C in vacuum. We report good stability of both systems. The main technique for analysis was non-destructive and surface sensitive angle-resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (AR-XPS).

  16. Growth kinetics and characterizations of gallium nitride thin films by remote PECVD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, S. W.; Bachmann, K. J.; Lucovsky, G.

    1993-01-01

    Thin films of GaN have been deposited at relatively low growth temperatures by remote plasma-enhanced chemical-vapor deposition (RPECVD), using a plasma excited NH3, and trimethylgallium (TMG), injected downstream from the plasma. The activation energy for GaN growth has been tentatively assigned to the dissociation of NH groups as the primary N-atom precursors in the surface reaction with adsorbed TMG, or TMG fragments. At high He flow rates, an abrupt increase in the growth rate is observed and corresponds to a change in the reaction mechanism attributed to the formation of atomic N. XRD reveals an increased tendency to ordered growth in the (0001) direction with increasing growth temperature, He flow rate, and RF plasma power. IR spectra show the fundamental lattice mode of GaN at 530 cm without evidence for vibrational modes of hydrocarbon groups.

  17. Infrared analysis of thin films amorphous, hydrogenated carbon on silicon

    CERN Document Server

    Jacob, W; Schwarz-Selinger, T

    2000-01-01

    The infrared analysis of thin films on a thick substrate is discussed using the example of plasma-deposited, amorphous, hydrogenated carbon layers (a-C:H) on silicon substrates. The framework for the optical analysis of thin films is presented. The main characteristic of thin film optics is the occurrence of interference effects due to the coherent superposition of light multiply reflected at the various internal and external interfaces of the optical system. These interference effects lead to a sinusoidal variation of the transmitted and reflected intensity. As a consequence, the Lambert-Beer law is not applicable for the determination of the absorption coefficient of thin films. Furthermore, observable changes of the transmission and reflection spectra occur in the vicinity of strong absorption bands due to the Kramers-Kronig relation. For a sound data evaluation these effects have to be included in the analysis. To be able to extract the full information contained in a measured optical thin film spectrum, ...

  18. Development and evaluation of gallium nitride-based thin films for x-ray dosimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofstetter, Markus; Howgate, John; Sharp, Ian D.; Stutzmann, Martin; Thalhammer, Stefan

    2011-06-01

    X-ray radiation plays an important role in medical procedures ranging from diagnostics to therapeutics. Due to the harm such ionizing radiation can cause, it has become common practice to closely monitor the dosages received by patients. To this end, precise online dosimeters have been developed with the dual objectives of monitoring radiation in the region of interest and improving therapeutic methods. In this work, we evaluate GaN thin film high electron mobility heterostructures with sub-mm2 detection areas as x-ray radiation detectors. Devices were tested using 40-300 kV Bremsstrahlung x-ray sources. We find that the photoconductive device response exhibits a large gain, is almost independent of the angle of irradiation, and is constant to within 2% of the signal throughout this medical diagnostic x-ray range, indicating that these sensors do not require recalibration for geometry or energy. Furthermore, the devices show a high sensitivity to x-ray intensity and can measure in the air kerma rate (free-in-air) range of 1 µGy s-1 to 10 mGy s-1 with a signal stability of ±1% and a linear total dose response over time. Medical conditions were simulated by measurements of device responses to irradiation through human torso phantoms. Direct x-ray imaging is demonstrated using the index finger and wrist sections of a human phantom. The results presented here indicate that GaN-based thin film devices exhibit a wide range of properties, which make them promising candidates for dosimetry applications. In addition, with potential detection volumes smaller than 10-6 cm3, they are well suited for high-resolution x-ray imaging. Moreover, with additional engineering steps, these devices can be adapted to potentially provide both in vivo biosensing and x-ray dosimetry.

  19. Development and evaluation of gallium nitride-based thin films for x-ray dosimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofstetter, Markus; Howgate, John; Sharp, Ian D; Stutzmann, Martin; Thalhammer, Stefan

    2011-06-07

    X-ray radiation plays an important role in medical procedures ranging from diagnostics to therapeutics. Due to the harm such ionizing radiation can cause, it has become common practice to closely monitor the dosages received by patients. To this end, precise online dosimeters have been developed with the dual objectives of monitoring radiation in the region of interest and improving therapeutic methods. In this work, we evaluate GaN thin film high electron mobility heterostructures with sub-mm(2) detection areas as x-ray radiation detectors. Devices were tested using 40-300 kV Bremsstrahlung x-ray sources. We find that the photoconductive device response exhibits a large gain, is almost independent of the angle of irradiation, and is constant to within 2% of the signal throughout this medical diagnostic x-ray range, indicating that these sensors do not require recalibration for geometry or energy. Furthermore, the devices show a high sensitivity to x-ray intensity and can measure in the air kerma rate (free-in-air) range of 1 µGy s(-1) to 10 mGy s(-1) with a signal stability of ±1% and a linear total dose response over time. Medical conditions were simulated by measurements of device responses to irradiation through human torso phantoms. Direct x-ray imaging is demonstrated using the index finger and wrist sections of a human phantom. The results presented here indicate that GaN-based thin film devices exhibit a wide range of properties, which make them promising candidates for dosimetry applications. In addition, with potential detection volumes smaller than 10(-6) cm(3), they are well suited for high-resolution x-ray imaging. Moreover, with additional engineering steps, these devices can be adapted to potentially provide both in vivo biosensing and x-ray dosimetry.

  20. Removal of Ozone by Carbon Nanotubes/Quartz Fiber Film.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shen; Nie, Jingqi; Wei, Fei; Yang, Xudong

    2016-09-06

    Ozone is recognized as a harmful gaseous pollutant, which can lead to severe human health problems. In this study, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were tested as a new approach for ozone removal. The CNTs/quartz fiber film was fabricated through growth of CNTs upon pure quartz fiber using chemical vapor deposition method. Ozone conversion efficiency of the CNTs/quartz fiber film was tested for 10 h and compared with that of quartz film, activated carbon (AC), and a potassium iodide (KI) solution under the same conditions. The pressure resistance of these materials under different airflow rates was also measured. The results showed that the CNTs/quartz fiber film had better ozone conversion efficiency but also higher pressure resistance than AC and the KI solution of the same weight. The ozone removal performance of the CNTs/quartz fiber film was comparable with AC at 20 times more weight. The CNTs played a dominant role in ozone removal by the CNTs/quartz fiber film. Its high ozone conversion efficiency, lightweight and free-standing properties make the CNTs/quartz fiber film applicable to ozone removal. Further investigation should be focused on reducing pressure resistance and studying the CNT mechanism for removing ozone.

  1. Field Emission from Nanostructure Carbon Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Sung Hoon; Kim, Hong Sik; Jang, Jin; Lee, Choong Hun

    We studied the field emission properties of carbon nanostructure, which comprised of high density carbon nanotips on Si. These carbon nanotips are grown on metal coated Si by a high density plasma chemical vapor deposition (HDPCVD) using an inductively coupled plasma. The emission current increases with increasing the growth temperature. They exhibited an emission current density of 1 mA/cm2 at a field of 1.95 V/μm when the growth temperature was 700°C. We developed high brightness field emission lamps using the carbon nanotips.

  2. Atomic Scale Interface Manipulation, Structural Engineering, and Their Impact on Ultrathin Carbon Films in Controlling Wear, Friction, and Corrosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwivedi, Neeraj; Yeo, Reuben J; Yak, Leonard J K; Satyanarayana, Nalam; Dhand, Chetna; Bhat, Thirumaleshwara N; Zhang, Zheng; Tripathy, Sudhiranjan; Bhatia, Charanjit S

    2016-07-13

    Reducing friction, wear, and corrosion of diverse materials/devices using manipulation to engineer and control the friction, wear, corrosion, and structural characteristics of 0.7-1.7 nm carbon-based films on CoCrPt:oxide-based magnetic media. We demonstrate that when an atomically thin (∼0.5 nm) chromium nitride (CrNx) layer is sandwiched between the magnetic media and an ultrathin carbon overlayer (1.2 nm), it modifies the film-substrate interface, creates various types of interfacial bonding, increases the interfacial adhesion, and tunes the structure of carbon in terms of its sp(3) bonding. These contribute to its remarkable functional properties, such as stable and lowest coefficient of friction (∼0.15-0.2), highest wear resistance and better corrosion resistance despite being only ∼1.7 nm thick, surpassing those of ∼2.7 nm thick current commercial carbon overcoat (COC) and other overcoats in this work. While this approach has direct implications for advancing current magnetic storage technology with its ultralow thickness, it can also be applied to advance the protective and barrier capabilities of other ultrathin materials for associated technologies.

  3. Graphene-analogue carbon nitride: novel exfoliation synthesis and its application in photocatalysis and photoelectrochemical selective detection of trace amount of Cu2+

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Hui; Yan, Jia; She, Xiaojie; Xu, Li; Xia, Jiexiang; Xu, Yuanguo; Song, Yanhua; Huang, Liying; Li, Huaming

    2014-01-01

    Graphene-analogue nanostructures defined as a new kind of promising materials with unique electronic, surface and optical properties have received much attention in the fields of catalysis, energy storage, sensing and electronic devices. Due to the distinctive structure characteristics of the graphene-analogue materials, they brought novel and amazing properties. Herein, graphene-analogue carbon nitride (GA-C3N4) was synthesized by high-yield, large-scale thermal exfoliation from the graphitic C3N4-based intercalation compound. Graphene-analogue carbon nitride exhibited 2D thin-layer structure with 6-9 atomic thickness, a high specific surface area of 30.1 m2 g-1, increased photocurrent responses and improved electron transport ability, which could give rise to enhancing the photocatalytic activity and stability. The graphene-analogue carbon nitride had a new features that could make it suitable as a sensor for Cu2+ determination. So GA-C3N4 is a new but promising candidate for heavy metal ions (Cu2+) determination in water environment. The photocatalytic mechanism and photoelectrochemical selective sensing of Cu2+ were also discussed.Graphene-analogue nanostructures defined as a new kind of promising materials with unique electronic, surface and optical properties have received much attention in the fields of catalysis, energy storage, sensing and electronic devices. Due to the distinctive structure characteristics of the graphene-analogue materials, they brought novel and amazing properties. Herein, graphene-analogue carbon nitride (GA-C3N4) was synthesized by high-yield, large-scale thermal exfoliation from the graphitic C3N4-based intercalation compound. Graphene-analogue carbon nitride exhibited 2D thin-layer structure with 6-9 atomic thickness, a high specific surface area of 30.1 m2 g-1, increased photocurrent responses and improved electron transport ability, which could give rise to enhancing the photocatalytic activity and stability. The graphene

  4. mwnts composite film modified glassy carbon electrode

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

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    ABSTRACT: A poly p-aminosalicylic acid (Poly(p-ASA)) and multiwall carbon nanotubes. (MWCNTs) composite modified glassy carbon (GC) electrode was constructed by casting the MWNTs on the GC electrode surface followed by electropolymerization of the p-ASA on the MWCNTs/GCE. The electrochemical behaviours ...

  5. Hafnium nitride films for thermoreflectance transducers at high temperatures: Potential based on heating from laser absorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rost, Christina M.; Braun, Jeffrey; Ferri, Kevin; Backman, Lavina; Giri, Ashutosh; Opila, Elizabeth J.; Maria, Jon-Paul; Hopkins, Patrick E.

    2017-10-01

    Time domain thermoreflectance (TDTR) and frequency domain thermoreflectance (FDTR) are common pump-probe techniques that are used to measure the thermal properties of materials. At elevated temperatures, transducers used in these techniques can become limited by melting or other phase transitions. In this work, time domain thermoreflectance is used to determine the viability of HfN thin film transducers grown on SiO2 through measurements of the SiO2 thermal conductivity up to approximately 1000 K. Further, the reliability of HfN as a transducer is determined by measuring the thermal conductivities of MgO, Al2O3, and diamond at room temperature. The thermoreflectance coefficient of HfN was found to be 1.4 × 10-4 K-1 at 800 nm, one of the highest thermoreflectance coefficients measured at this standard TDTR probe wavelength. Additionally, the high absorption of HfN at 400 nm is shown to enable reliable laser heating to elevate the sample temperature during a measurement, relative to other transducers.

  6. Visible light emission and energy transfer processes in Sm-doped nitride films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanatta, A. R.

    2012-06-01

    Even though the great interest in studying the near-infrared light emission due to Er3+ ions for telecommunication purposes, efficient visible radiation can be achieved from many different rare-earth (RE) ions. In fact, visible and/or near-infrared light emission takes place in RE-doped wide bandgap semiconductors following either photon or electron excitation, suggesting their technological potential in devices such as light-emitting diodes (LED's) and flat-panel displays, for example. Taking into consideration these aspects, the present contribution reports on the investigation of AlN, BeN, GeN, and SiN thin films doped with samarium. The samples were prepared by sputtering and as a result of the deposition method and conditions they present an amorphous structure and Sm concentrations in the low 0.5 at. %. After deposition, the samples were submitted to thermal annealing treatments and investigated by different spectroscopic techniques. A detailed examination of the experimental data allowed to identify optical transitions due to Sm3+ and Sm2+ ions as well as differences in their mechanisms of photon excitation and recombination. Moreover, it is shown that the Sm-related spectral features and emission intensity are susceptible, respectively, to the atomic environment the Sm3+/Sm2+ ions experience and to the presence of non-radiative recombination centers.

  7. NITROANILINE FILM-HOLE MODIFIED GLASSY CARBON ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Graphene modified GCE. DPV. 2.64. [43] p-Nitroaniline film-holes modified GCE. Amp. 0.611. This work. LSV – linear sweep voltammetry, DPV – differential pulse voltammetry, Amp – Amperometry. The proposed sensor is selective and sensitive for DA detection when compared with other techniques (Table 1) by excluding ...

  8. The effect of titanium nickel nitride decorated carbon nanotubes-reduced graphene oxide hybrid support for methanol oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Gen [School of Chemical Engineering and Light Industry, Guangdong University of Technology, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510006 (China); Pan, Zhanchang, E-mail: panzhanchang@163.com [School of Chemical Engineering and Light Industry, Guangdong University of Technology, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510006 (China); Li, Wuyi; Yu, Ke [School of Chemical Engineering and Light Industry, Guangdong University of Technology, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510006 (China); Xia, Guowei; Zhao, Qixiang; Shi, Shikun [Victory Giant Technology (Hui Zhou) Co., Ltd., Huizhou 516083 (China); Hu, Guanghui; Xiao, Chumin; Wei, Zhigang [School of Chemical Engineering and Light Industry, Guangdong University of Technology, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510006 (China)

    2017-07-15

    Highlights: • TiNiN/CNT-rGO support with an interactive three-dimensional structure and high surface area was synthesized. • Pt nanoparticles with small size were well dispersed on TiNiN/CNT-rGO support. • Pt/TiNiN/CNT-rGO shows remarkably enhanced methanol oxidation activity and durability. - Abstract: Titanium nickel nitride (TiNiN) decorated three-dimensional (3D) carbon nanotubes-reduced graphene oxide (CNT-rGO), a fancy 3D platinum (Pt)-based catalyst hybrid support, is prepared by a solvothermal process followed by a nitriding process, which is tested as anodic catalyst support for the methanol oxidation reaction (MOR). The structure, morphology and composition of the synthesized TiNiN/CNT-rGO exhibits a uniform particle dispersion with high purity and interpenetrating 3D network structure. Notably, Pt/TiNiN/CNT-rGO catalyst exhibits significantly improved catalytic activity and durability for methanol oxidation in comparison with Pt/CNT-rGO and conventional Pt/C (JM). The outstanding electrochemical performance was attributed to structure and properties. That is, the 3D CNT-rGO provided a fast transport network for charge-transfer and mass-transfer as well as TiNiN NPs with good synergistic effect and the strong electronic coupling between different domains in TiNiN/CNT-rGO, thus the catalytic activity of the novel catalyst is greatly improved. These results evidences 3D TiNiN/CNT-rGO as a promising catalyst support for a wide range of applications in fuel cells.

  9. Scattering of terahertz radiation from oriented carbon nanotube films

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eichhorn, Finn; Jepsen, Peter Uhd; Schroeder, Nicholas

    2009-01-01

    Session title: IThC-THz Interactions with Condensed Matter. We report on the use of terahertz time-domain spectroscopy to measure scattering from multi-walled carbon nanotubes aligned normal to the film plane. Measurements indicate scattering from the nanotubes is significantly stronger than...

  10. Fabrication and cytocompatibility of in situ crosslinked carbon nanomaterial films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Sunny C; Lalwani, Gaurav; Grover, Kartikey; Qin, Yi-Xian; Sitharaman, Balaji

    2015-05-28

    Assembly of carbon nanomaterials into two-dimensional (2D) coatings and films that harness their unique physiochemical properties may lead to high impact energy capture/storage, sensors, and biomedical applications. For potential biomedical applications, the suitability of current techniques such as chemical vapor deposition, spray and dip coating, and vacuum filtration, employed to fabricate macroscopic 2D all carbon coatings or films still requires thorough examination. Each of these methods presents challenges with regards to scalability, suitability for a large variety of substrates, mechanical stability of coatings or films, or biocompatibility. Herein we report a coating process that allow for rapid, in situ chemical crosslinking of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) into macroscopic all carbon coatings. The resultant coatings were found to be continuous, electrically conductive, significantly more robust, and cytocompatible to human adipose derived stem cells. The results lay groundwork for 3D layer-on-layer nanomaterial assemblies (including various forms of graphene) and also opens avenues to further explore the potential of MWCNT films as a novel class of nano-fibrous mats for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine.

  11. Fabrication and Cytocompatibility of In Situ Crosslinked Carbon Nanomaterial Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Sunny C.; Lalwani, Gaurav; Grover, Kartikey; Qin, Yi-Xian; Sitharaman, Balaji

    2015-01-01

    Assembly of carbon nanomaterials into two-dimensional (2D) coatings and films that harness their unique physiochemical properties may lead to high impact energy capture/storage, sensors, and biomedical applications. For potential biomedical applications, the suitability of current techniques such as chemical vapor deposition, spray and dip coating, and vacuum filtration, employed to fabricate macroscopic 2D all carbon coatings or films still requires thorough examination. Each of these methods presents challenges with regards to scalability, suitability for a large variety of substrates, mechanical stability of coatings or films, or biocompatibility. Herein we report a coating process that allow for rapid, in situ chemical crosslinking of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) into macroscopic all carbon coatings. The resultant coatings were found to be continuous, electrically conductive, significantly more robust, and cytocompatible to human adipose derived stem cells. The results lay groundwork for 3D layer-on-layer nanomaterial assemblies (including various forms of graphene) and also opens avenues to further explore the potential of MWCNT films as a novel class of nano-fibrous mats for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. PMID:26018775

  12. Fabrication and Cytocompatibility of In Situ Crosslinked Carbon Nanomaterial Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Sunny C.; Lalwani, Gaurav; Grover, Kartikey; Qin, Yi-Xian; Sitharaman, Balaji

    2015-05-01

    Assembly of carbon nanomaterials into two-dimensional (2D) coatings and films that harness their unique physiochemical properties may lead to high impact energy capture/storage, sensors, and biomedical applications. For potential biomedical applications, the suitability of current techniques such as chemical vapor deposition, spray and dip coating, and vacuum filtration, employed to fabricate macroscopic 2D all carbon coatings or films still requires thorough examination. Each of these methods presents challenges with regards to scalability, suitability for a large variety of substrates, mechanical stability of coatings or films, or biocompatibility. Herein we report a coating process that allow for rapid, in situ chemical crosslinking of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) into macroscopic all carbon coatings. The resultant coatings were found to be continuous, electrically conductive, significantly more robust, and cytocompatible to human adipose derived stem cells. The results lay groundwork for 3D layer-on-layer nanomaterial assemblies (including various forms of graphene) and also opens avenues to further explore the potential of MWCNT films as a novel class of nano-fibrous mats for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine.

  13. Pyrolytic carbon film deposit as an electrochemical interface.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Hadi

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available A pyrolytic carbon (PC film was grown on planar substrate (graphite rods by chemical vapor deposition from gaseous feed of methane using a vertical hot-wall deposition reactor. Scanning electron microscopy was used to study the surface structure. The PC film was also characterized by cyclic voltammetry technique to evaluate the background current, stability and the electrochemical response using ascorbic acid, Co(phen32+/3+ and Fe(CN6 3-/4- redox couplesand compared to glassy carbon (GC electrode. High degree of electrochemical activity and the enhanced signal to background (S/B ratio demonstrated that the PC film might be an attractive electrode material for electroanalytical measurements.

  14. Effect of argon flow on promoting boron doping for in-situ grown silicon nitride thin films containing silicon quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jia; Liu, Bin; Zhang, Xisheng; Guo, Xiaojia; (Frank Liu, Shengzhong

    2017-07-01

    Boron-doped silicon nitride thin films (SiNx) containing silicon quantum dots (Si QD) were prepared in situ by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition. With the aim of optimizing the performance of thin films, the mixed gas including argon and hydrogen was applied as dilution. The effects of Ar flow on the structural, electrical and optical properties of B-doped SiNx thin films were systemically studied through various characterizations. By tuning the Ar flow, the properties, such as QD size, crystallinity and optical band gap, can be effectively controlled. The B-doping efficiency in thin films was proved to be promoted by introducing moderate Ar flow. The maximum values of dark conductivity (1.52 S cm-1) and carrier concentration (2.41 × 1019 cm-3) were obtained for the B-doped SiNx thin films at the Ar flow of 200 sccm. Furthermore, the mechanism on the promotion in B-doping was illustrated in detail in this paper.

  15. Characterization of amorphous hydrogenated carbon films ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    sp3 fraction. References. Buijnsters J G, Camero M and Vazquez L 2006 Phys. Rev. B74. 155417. Chowdhury S, Laugier M T and Rahman I Z 2004 Thin Solid Films. 468 149. Clin M, Durand-Drouhin O, Zeinert A and Picot J C 1999 Dia. Relat. Mater. 8 527. Dai H Y, Wang L W, Jiang H and Huang N K 2007 Chin. Phys. Lett.

  16. Rapid synthesis of graphitic carbon nitride powders by metathesis reaction between CaCN{sub 2} and C{sub 2}Cl{sub 6}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pang Linlin [Key Laboratory of Liquid Structure and Heredity of Materials, Ministry of Education, Shandong University, Jinan, 250061 (China); Carbon Fiber Engineering Research Center of Shandong Province, Shandong University, Jinan 250061 (China); Bi Jianqiang [Key Laboratory of Liquid Structure and Heredity of Materials, Ministry of Education, Shandong University, Jinan, 250061 (China); Bai Yujun [Key Laboratory of Liquid Structure and Heredity of Materials, Ministry of Education, Shandong University, Jinan, 250061 (China) and Carbon Fiber Engineering Research Center of Shandong Province, Shandong University, Jinan 250061 (China)], E-mail: byj97@126.com; Qi Yongxin [Carbon Fiber Engineering Research Center of Shandong Province, Shandong University, Jinan 250061 (China); Zhu Huiling [Key Laboratory of Liquid Structure and Heredity of Materials, Ministry of Education, Shandong University, Jinan, 250061 (China); Carbon Fiber Engineering Research Center of Shandong Province, Shandong University, Jinan 250061 (China); Wang Chengguo; Wu Jiwei [Carbon Fiber Engineering Research Center of Shandong Province, Shandong University, Jinan 250061 (China); Lu Chengwei [Department of Equipment, Shandong University of Science and Technology, Jinan 250031 (China)

    2008-12-20

    Carbon nitride powders were rapidly synthesized at low temperature via the chemical metathesis reaction between CaCN{sub 2} and C{sub 2}Cl{sub 6}. X-ray diffraction results confirm the formation of crystalline graphitic carbon nitride. Besides the dominant morphology of nanoparticles, flakes, nanorods, hollow and solid spheres can be observed by transmission electron microscopy. The absorption peaks of C-N, C=N and s-triazine rings, as well as the absence of C{identical_to}N peak in the infrared spectra, further verify the formation of graphite-like sp{sup 2}-bonded structure with planar networks. Elemental analysis gives an atomic ratio of N/C around 0.3. X-ray photoelectron spectra exhibit the existence of chemical bonding between C and N.

  17. Modified carbon nanoparticle-chitosan film electrodes: Physisorption versus chemisorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rassaei, Liza; Sillanpaeae, Mika [Laboratory of Applied Environmental Chemistry, Department of Environmental Sciences, University of Kuopio, Patteristonkatu 1, 50101 Mikkeli (Finland); Marken, Frank [Department of Chemistry, University of Bath, Bath BA2 7AY (United Kingdom)

    2008-08-01

    Surface functionalised carbon nanoparticles of ca. 8 nm diameter co-assemble with chitosan into stable thin film electrodes at glassy carbon surfaces. Robust electrodes for application in sensing or electrocatalysis are obtained in a simple solvent evaporation process. The ratio of chitosan binder backbone to carbon nanoparticle conductor determines the properties of the resulting films. Chitosan (a poly-D-glucosamine) has a dual effect (i) as the binder for the mesoporous carbon composite structure and (ii) as binding site for redox active probes. Physisorption due to the positively charged ammonium group (pK{sub A} {approx} 6.5) occurs, for example, with anionic indigo carmine (a reversible 2e{sup -}-2H{sup +} reduction system in aqueous media). Chemisorption at the amine functionalities is demonstrated with 2-bromo-methyl-anthraquinone in acetonitrile (resulting in a reversible 2e{sup -}-2H{sup +} anthraquinone reduction system in aqueous media). Redox processes within the carbon nanoparticle-chitosan films are studied and at sufficiently high scan rates diffusion of protons (buffer concentration depended) is shown to be rate limiting. The chemisorption process provides a much more stable interfacial redox system with a characteristic and stable pH response over a pH 2-12 range. Chemisorption and physisorption can be employed simultaneously in a complementary binding process. (author)

  18. Alignment enhanced photoconductivity in single wall carbon nanotube films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ye; Lu, Shaoxin; Panchapakesan, Balaji

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we report, for the first time, the alignment enhanced photoconductivity of single wall carbon nanotube films upon laser illumination. The photoconductivity exhibited an increase, decrease or even 'negative' values when the laser spot was on different positions between contact electrodes, showing a 'position' dependent photoconductivity of partially aligned films of carbon nanotubes. Photon induced charge carrier generation in single wall carbon nanotubes and subsequent charge separation across the metal-carbon nanotube contacts is believed to cause the photoconductivity changes. A net photovoltage of ~4 mV and a photocurrent of ~10 µA were produced under the laser intensity of ~273 mW with a quantum efficiency of ~7.8% in vacuum. The photocurrent was observed to be in the direction of nanotube alignment. Finally, there was a strong dependence of the polarization of the incident light on the photocurrent and the orientation of the films influenced the dynamics of the rise and fall of the photocurrent. All of these phenomena clearly have significance in the area of design and fabrication of solar cells, micro-opto-mechanical systems and photodetectors based on carbon nanotubes.

  19. Toward High Performance 2D/2D Hybrid Photocatalyst by Electrostatic Assembly of Rationally Modified Carbon Nitride on Reduced Graphene Oxide

    OpenAIRE

    Jian Chen; Xiaochan Xu; Tao Li; Kannusamy Pandiselvi; Jingyu Wang

    2016-01-01

    Efficient metal-free visible photocatalysts with high stability are highly desired for sufficient utilization of solar energy. In this work, the popular carbon nitride (CN) photocatalyst is rationally modified by acid exfoliation of molecular grafted CN, achieving improved visible-light utilization and charge carriers mobility. Moreover, the modification process tuned the surface electrical property of CN, which enabled it to be readily coupled with the oppositely charged graphene oxide durin...

  20. MoS{sub 2}-coated microspheres of self-sensitized carbon nitride for efficient photocatalytic hydrogen generation under visible light irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gu, Quan [Key Laboratory of Applied Surface and Colloid Chemistry, Ministry of Education, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Shaanxi Normal University, Xi’an, 710062 (China); School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Sun, Huaming; Xie, Zunyuan; Gao, Ziwei [Key Laboratory of Applied Surface and Colloid Chemistry, Ministry of Education, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Shaanxi Normal University, Xi’an, 710062 (China); Xue, Can, E-mail: cxue@ntu.edu.sg [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 (Singapore)

    2017-02-28

    Highlights: • Successful coating of MoS{sub 2} onto self-sensitized carbon nitride microspheres. • The carbon nitride@MoS{sub 2} core-shell structure show enhanced H{sub 2} generation in visible light. • Synergistic effect of surface dyes and MoS{sub 2} coating enhances photocatalytic activities. - Abstract: We have successfully coated the self-sensitized carbon nitride (SSCN) microspheres with a layer of MoS{sub 2} through a facile one-pot hydrothermal method by using (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}MoS{sub 4} as the precursor. The resulted MoS{sub 2}-coated SSCN photocatalyst appears as a core-shell structure and exhibits enhanced visible-light activities for photocatalytic H{sub 2} generation as compared to the un-coated SSCN and the standard g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} reference with MoS{sub 2} coating. The photocatalytic test results suggest that the oligomeric s-triazine dyes on the SSCN surface can provide additional light-harvesting capability and photogenerated charge carriers, and the coated MoS{sub 2} layer can serve as active sites for proton reduction towards H{sub 2} evolution. This synergistic effect of surface triazine dyes and MoS{sub 2} coating greatly promotes the activity of carbon nitride microspheres for vishible-light-driven H{sub 2} generation. This work provides a new way of future development of low-cost noble-metal-free photocatalysts for efficient solar-driven hydrogen production.

  1. Self-assembly graphitic carbon nitride quantum dots anchored on TiO{sub 2} nanotube arrays: An efficient heterojunction for pollutants degradation under solar light

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su, Jingyang [Environmental Engineering Program, School of Engineering, The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China); Zhu, Lin [Fok Ying Tung Graduate School, The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China); Geng, Ping [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China); Chen, Guohua, E-mail: kechengh@ust.hk [Environmental Engineering Program, School of Engineering, The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China); Fok Ying Tung Graduate School, The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China); Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China)

    2016-10-05

    Highlights: • Carbon nitride quantum dots (CNQDs) were decorated onto TiO{sub 2} nanotube arrays (NTAs). • The CNQDs/TiO{sub 2} NTAs exhibits much improved photoelectrochemical activity. • The heterojunction displays efficient removal efficiencies for RhB and phenol. • Pollutants degradation mechanism over CNQDs/TiO{sub 2} NTAs was clarified. - Abstract: In this study, an efficient heterojunction was constructed by anchoring graphitic carbon nitride quantum dots onto TiO{sub 2} nanotube arrays through hydrothermal reaction strategy. The prepared graphitic carbon nitride quantum dots, which were prepared by solid-thermal reaction and sequential dialysis process, act as a sensitizer to enhance light absorption. Furthermore, it was demonstrated that the charge transfer and separation in the formed heterojunction were significantly improved compared with pristine TiO{sub 2}. The prepared heterojunction was used as a photoanode, exhibiting much improved photoelectrochemical capability and excellent photo-stability under solar light illumination. The photoelectrocatalytic activities of prepared heterojunction were demonstrated by degradation of RhB and phenol in aqueous solution. The kinetic constants of RhB and phenol degradation using prepared photoelectrode are 2.4 times and 4.9 times higher than those of pristine TiO{sub 2}, respectively. Moreover, hydroxyl radicals are demonstrated to be dominant active radicals during the pollutants degradation.

  2. Effets photothermoelectriques dans les films de nanotubes de carbone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardin St-Antoine, Benoit

    Carbon nanotube networks offer promising perspectives for a variety of technological applications, such as photovoltaic or light detection. Their potential in optoelectronic has been recently reconsidered after the recognition that thermal mechanisms (through a bolometric effect) were dominating the photoconductivity of free-standing nanotube films. This finding contrasted with previous reports for which the photoresponse stemmed from the dissociation of excitons due to an electric field. Moreover, it revealed that the effect of the radiative heating for such materials should not be neglected. This thesis aimed at exploring the significance of such heating and its interest in a thermoelectric perspective. This investigation deserved special attention because of the large Seebeck coefficients of semiconducting nanotubes (up to hundreds of microV/K). By studying the photo-thermoelectric effects arising in nanotube films, our work developed a better understanding of the interaction between a local illumination and the network, where the nanotube-nanotube junctions play a dominant role in transport. In our approach, a special attention was given to suspended films, a configuration that maximizes the radiative heating in order to assess the potential of carbon nanotubes in photo-thermoelectric applications. In the first part of the thesis, the thermal response of a material to a local illumination was modeled. In the absence of an electric current, photo-thermal effects should arise because of the non-uniform temperature profile, calculated using the Fourier equation. This equation was solved for the particular case of nanotube films suspended in vacuum between two massive electrodes. Under several assumptions, neglecting for instance the convection and radiation mechanisms, considering a thermal conductivity and an optical absorption independent of the doping level, and a relatively weak temperature rise (≤ 20 K), we found that a local illumination induces a

  3. Carbide-Derived Carbon Films for Integrated Electrochemical Energy Storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heon, Min

    Active RFID tags, which can communicate over tens or even hundreds of meters, MEMS devices of several microns in size, which are designed for the medical and pharmaceutical purposes, and sensors working in wireless monitoring systems, require microscale power sources that are able to provide enough energy and to satisfy the peak power demands in those applications. Supercapacitors have not been an attractive candidate for micro-scale energy storage, since most nanoporous carbon electrode materials are not compatible with micro-fabrication techniques and have failed to meet the requirements of high volumetric energy density and small form factor for power supplies for integrated circuits or microelectronic devices or sensors. However, supercapacitors can provide high power density, because of fast charging/discharging, which can enable self-sustaining micro-modules when combined with energy-harvesting devices, such as solar cell, piezoelectric or thermoelectric micro-generators. In this study, carbide-derived carbon (CDC) films were synthesized via vacuum decomposition of carbide substrates and gas etching of sputtered carbide thin films. This approach allowed manufacturing of porous carbon films on SiC and silicon substrates. CDC films were studied for micro-supercapacitor electrodes, and showed good double layer capacitance. Since the gas etching technique is compatible with conventional micro-device fabrication processes, it can be implemented to manufacture integrated on-chip supercapacitors on silicon wafers.

  4. The photosensitivity of carbon quantum dots/CuAlO2 films composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Jiaqi; Sheng, Yingzhuo; Zhang, Jingxiang; Wei, Jumeng; Huang, Peng; Zhang, Xin; Feng, Boxue

    2015-07-31

    Carbon quantum dots/CuAlO2 films were prepared by a simple route through which CuAlO2 films prepared by sol-gel on crystal quartz substrates were composited with carbon quantum dots on their surface. The characterization results indicated that CuAlO2 films were well combined with carbon quantum dots. The photoconductivity of carbon quantum dots/CuAlO2 films was investigated under illumination and darkness switching, and was demonstrated to be significantly enhanced compared with CuAlO2 films. Through analysis, this enhancement of photoconductivity was attributed to the carbon quantum dots with unique up-converted photoluminescence behavior.

  5. Epitaxial transformation of hcp–fcc Ti sublattices during nitriding processes of evaporated-Ti thin films due to nitrogen-implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Yu; Feng, Xiaoyi [Department of Metallurgy, Tohoku University, Aramaki-Aza-Aoba 02, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan); Kasukabe, Yoshitaka, E-mail: kasukabe@insc.tohoku.ac.jp [Department of Metallurgy, Tohoku University, Aramaki-Aza-Aoba 02, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan); Center for International Exchange, Tohoku University, 41 Kawauchi, Sendai 980-8576 (Japan); Yamamoto, Shunya; Yoshikawa, Masahito [Quantum Beam Science Directorate, JAEA, 1233 Watanuki, Takasaki 370-1292 (Japan); Fujino, Yutaka [Center for International Exchange, Tohoku University, 41 Kawauchi, Sendai 980-8576 (Japan)

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: ► Atomistic transformation processes of Ti films due to N-implantation have been clarified. ► The N{sub 2}{sup +} ions with 62 keV are implanted into as-deposited Ti film in the in-situ TEM. ► The hcp-fcc transformation is induced by the shear in the <0 1 · 0> direction on the (<0 0 · 1>) plane. ► The shear is promoted by the forming of covalent bonds and by the weakening of Ti–Ti bonds. -- Abstract: Atomistic transformation processes of Ti films due to N-implantation have been clarified through in-situ observations by using transmission electron microscope (TEM) along with molecular orbital calculations. The N{sub 2}{sup +} ions with 62 keV are implanted into as-deposited Ti films which consist of hcp-Ti and TiH{sub x} with preferred orientations, in the 400 kV analytic high resolution TEM combined with ion accelerators. Thus, titanium nitride (TiN{sub y}) films with preferred orientations are epitaxially formed by the inheritance of partial atomic arrangement of hcp-Ti or TiH{sub x} in as-deposited Ti films and by the occupation of octahedral sites by N atoms, which elucidates that epitaxial transformation of hcp–fcc Ti sublattices occurs. The analysis of electronic structure of Ti films during the implantation clarifies that octahedral sites of hcp-Ti with larger space have lower electron density, which leads to the invasion of N ions into octahedral sites. Thus, the hcp–fcc transformation is induced by the shear in the <0 1 · 0> direction on the (0 0 · 1) plane, promoted by the forming of covalent bonds mainly composed of hybridized orbitals due to combination of Ti3d and N2p orbitals, and by the weakening of Ti–Ti bonds.

  6. Growth of gallium nitride and aluminum gallium nitride thin films using conventional and pendeo-expitaxial growth processes on hydrogen(6)-silicon carbide(0001) and silicon(111) substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehrke, Thomas

    Pendeo-epitaxy (PE) of individual GaN and AlxGa1-x N films and single- and multi-layer heterostructures of these materials with low densities of dislocations and without coalescence boundaries have been achieved on striped GaN seed layers previously grown on AlN/6H-SiC (0001) substrates using metallorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). A reduction in the dislocation density of approximately five orders of magnitude was achieved in the laterally grown regions between the GaN stripes. The RMS roughness of the (112¯0) side wall of the uncoalesced areas of GaN was 0.099 nm. The application of a mask on the [11¯00] oriented GaN stripes hindered the vertical propagation of threading dislocations during regrowth; however, it also caused tilting in the moving fronts and associated crystallographic misregistry in the areas of coalescence over the stripes as well as the generation of dislocations propagating from the resulting boundaries. All of these problems were eliminated by the exclusion of the masks, as determined via X-ray diffraction and scanning and transmission electron microscopies. A comparative study of fully coalesced PE-AlxGa1-xN films with conventionally grown AlxGa1-xN films was conducted using scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), and high resolution scanning Auger microprobe analysis. An XRD FWHM of 794 arcsec was measured for PE-Al 10Ga90N films; this is comparable to conventionally grown films on these substrates. A variation of 1% in the atomic Al content of the Al10Ga90N films was determined to be related to the position in the microstructure. Films of PE-GaN and PE-AlxGa1-xN were also grown on Si(111) substrates via the use of an intermediate 3C-SiC transition layer capped by a high-temperature AlN(0001) buffer layer. The 3C-SiC transition layer eliminated chemical reactions between the Si and the NH3 and between the Si and Ga metal derived from the decomposition of triethylgallium. A similar reduction in the dislocation

  7. Structural and biological properties of carbon nanotube composite films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narayan, Roger J. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332-0245 (United States)]. E-mail: roger.narayan@mse.gatech.edu; Berry, C.J. [Environmental Biotechnology Section, Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States); Brigmon, R.L. [Environmental Biotechnology Section, Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)

    2005-11-20

    Carbon nanotube composite films have been developed that exhibit unusual structural and biological properties. These novel materials have been created by pulsed laser ablation of graphite and bombardment of nitrogen ions at temperatures between 600 and 700 deg. C. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy and radial distribution function analysis demonstrate that this material consists of sp{sup 2}-bonded concentric ribbons that are wrapped approximately 15 deg. normal to the silicon substrate. The interlayer order in this material extends to approximately 15-30 A. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy data suggest that this material is predominantly trigonally coordinated. The carbon nanotube composite structure results from the use of energetic ions, which allow for non-equilibrium growth of graphitic planes. In vitro testing has revealed significant antimicrobial activity of carbon nanotube composite films against Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus warneri colonization. Carbon nanotube composite films may be useful for inhibiting microorganism attachment and biofilm formation in hemodialysis catheters and other medical devices.

  8. Temporally and Spatially Resolved Plasma Spectroscopy in Pulsed Laser Deposition of Ultra-Thin Boron Nitride Films (Postprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-24

    substrate. The leading edge electron densities in laser ablated plasma can be as high as 1020 elec- trons/cm3, which can be greater than the density very...Walton, D. Leonhardt, R. F. Fernsler, D. D. Blackwell, and R. A. Meger, “Effect of plasma flux composition on the nitriding rate of stainless steel ,” J

  9. Superstable Ultrathin Water Film Confined in a Hydrophilized Carbon Nanotube.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomo, Yoko; Askounis, Alexandros; Ikuta, Tatsuya; Takata, Yasuyuki; Sefiane, Khellil; Takahashi, Koji

    2018-02-13

    Fluids confined in a nanoscale space behave differently than in the bulk due to strong interactions between fluid molecules and solid atoms. Here, we observed water confined inside "open" hydrophilized carbon nanotubes (CNT), with diameter of tens of nanometers, using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). A 1-7 nm water film adhering to most of the inner wall surface was observed and remained stable in the high vacuum (order of 10 -5 Pa) of the TEM. The superstability of this film was attributed to a combination of curvature, nanoroughness, and confinement resulting in a lower vapor pressure for water and hence inhibiting its vaporization. Occasional, suspended ultrathin water film with thickness of 3-20 nm were found and remained stable inside the CNT. This film thickness is 1 order of magnitude smaller than the critical film thickness (about 40 nm) reported by the Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek theory and previous experimental investigations. The stability of the suspended ultrathin water film is attributed to the additional molecular interactions due to the extended water meniscus, which balances the rest of the disjoining pressures.

  10. Organic/carbon nanotubes hybrid thin films for chemical detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banimuslem, Hikmat Adnan

    Metallophthalocyanines (MPcs) are classified as an important class of conjugated materials and they possess several advantages attributed to their unique chemical structure. Carbon nanotubes (CNT), on the other hand, are known to enhance the properties of nano-composites in the conjugated molecules, due to their one dimensional electronic skeleton, high surface area and high aspect ratio. In this thesis, work has been carried out on the investigation of different substituted metal-phthalocyanines with the aim of developing novel hybrid film structures which incorporates these phthalocyanines and single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) for chemical detection applications. Octa-substituted copper phthalocyanines (CuPcR[8]) have been characterised using UV-visible absorption spectroscopy. Obtained spectra have yielded an evidence of a thermally induced molecular reorganization in the films. Influence of the nature of substituents in the phthalocyanine molecule on the thin films conductivity was also investigated. Octa-substituted lead (II) phthalocyanines (PbPcR[8]) have also been characterized using UV-visible spectroscopy. Sandwich structures of ITO/PbPcR[8]/In were prepared to investigate the electronic conduction in PbPcR[8]. The variation in the J(V) behavior of the films as a result of heat treatment is expected to be caused by changes in the alignment inside the columnar stacking of the molecules of the films. Thin films of non-covalently hybridised SWCNT and tetra-substituted copper phthalocyanine (CuPcR[4]) molecules have been produced. FTIR, DC conductivity, SEM and AFM results have revealed the [mathematical equation]; interaction between SWCNTs and CuPCR[4] molecules and shown that films obtained from the acid-treated SWCNTs/CuPcR[4] hybrids demonstrated more homogenous surface. Thin films of pristine CuPCR[4] and CuPcR[4]/S WCNT were prepared by spin coating onto gold-coated glass slides and applied as active layers for the detection of benzo

  11. Polymeric Graphitic Carbon Nitride Doped with CuO Dispersed on Dealuminated Clinoptilolite (CuO/HCP: Synthesis and Characterisation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saheed Olalekan Sanni

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available CuO dispersed on dealuminated clinoptilolite (CuO/HCP and further doped with polymeric graphitic carbon nitride (CuO/HCP-g-C3N4 was synthesized through 2 facile routes: precipitation method for CuO/HCP and impregnation through ultrasonication method for the hybrid composite material. The hybrid composite material crystalline phase, surface morphology, and structural and thermal properties were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, energy-dispersive X-ray analysis (EDAX, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR, and thermal analysis. The formation of the hybrid composite material was confirmed by XRD showing crystalline phase of CuO and g-C3N4 present on the surface of dealuminated clinoptilolite (HCP. SEM images analysis depicts no aggregation of the mixed metal oxide semiconductor nanoparticles at the center of HCP. The hybrid composite material, CuO/HCP-g-C3N4, with a good homogeneously dispersed metal oxide conductor having excellent catalytic activities has been synthesized.

  12. A comparison between the mechanical and thermal properties of single-walled carbon nanotubes and boron nitride nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ting; Tang, Zhenan; Huang, Zhengxing; Yu, Jun

    2017-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are semimetallic while boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) are wide band gap insulators. Despite the discrepancy in their electrical properties, a comparison between the mechanical and thermal properties of CNTs and BNNTs has a significant research value for their potential applications. In this work, molecular dynamics simulations are performed to systematically investigate the mechanical and thermal properties of CNTs and BNNTs. The calculated Young's modulus is about 1.1 TPa for CNTs and 0.72 TPa for BNNTs under axial compressions. The critical bucking strain and maximum stress are inversely proportional to both diameter and length-diameter ratio and CNTs are identified axially stiffer than BNNTs. Thermal conductivities of (10, 0) CNTs and (10, 0) BNNTs follow similar trends with respect to length and temperature and are lower than that of their two-dimensional counterparts, graphene nanoribbons (GNRs) and BN nanoribbons (BNNRs), respectively. As the temperature falls below 200 K (130 K) the thermal conductivity of BNNTs (BNNRs) is larger than that of CNTs (GNRs), while at higher temperature it is lower than the latter. In addition, thermal conductivities of a (10, 0) CNT and a (10, 0) BNNT are further studied and analyzed under various axial compressive strains. Low-frequency phonons which mainly come from flexure modes are believed to make dominant contribution to the thermal conductivity of CNTs and BNNTs.

  13. Decorating CoP and Pt Nanoparticles on Graphitic Carbon Nitride Nanosheets to Promote Overall Water Splitting by Conjugated Polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Zhiming; Zheng, Yun; Guo, Fangsong; Niu, Pingping; Wang, Xinchen

    2017-01-10

    The splitting of water into H 2 and O 2 using solar energy is one of the key steps in artificial photosynthesis for the future production of renewable energy. Here, we show the first use of CoP and Pt nanoparticles as dual co-catalysts to modify graphitic carbon nitride (g-C 3 N 4 ) polymer to achieve overall water splitting under visible light irradiation. Our findings demonstrate that loading dual co-catalysts on delaminated g-C 3 N 4 imparts surface redox sites on the g-C 3 N 4 nanosheets that can not only promote catalytic kinetics but also promote charge separation and migration in the soft interface, thus improving the photocatalytic efficiency for overall water splitting. This robust, abundant, and stable photocatalyst based on covalent organic frameworks is demonstrated to hold great promise by forming heterojunctions with CoP and Pt for catalyzing the direct splitting of water into stoichiometric H 2 and O 2 using energy from photons. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. A simple fabrication for sulfur doped graphitic carbon nitride porous rods with excellent photocatalytic activity degrading RhB dye

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Qianjing; Liu, Jianjun; Yu, Yingchun; Zuo, Shengli; Li, Baoshan

    2017-01-01

    Constructing special nanostructures with large surface areas and tuning the band gap by element doping are efficient strategies to enhance the photocatalytic activity of semiconductor materials. Here we combined both strategies in one material to form sulfur-doped graphitic carbon nitride porous rods (S-pg-C3N4) in one pot by simply pyrolysis of the melamine-trithiocyanuric acid complex with different temperatures. The samples were characterized by XRD, FT-IR, and elemental analysis; nitrogen adsorption isotherms, SEM and TEM images; and UV-vis DRS and photoluminescence spectra. Characterizations showed that S-pg-C3N4 possessed porous rod structure with a larger surface area (20-52 m2/g) than that of bulk g-C3N4, and the surface area of the S-pg-C3N4 samples increased with the increase of heating temperature. Meanwhile, the trace sulfur remained in the framework of g-C3N4 formed sulfur doped g-C3N4, and the visible light absorption edge of the S-pg-C3N4 was extended, corresponding to a narrowed band gap. As a result, the S-pg-C3N4 samples exhibited an enhanced physical adsorption and photocatalytic activity in the degradation of Rhodamine B dye under visible light.

  15. Application of gallium nitride nanostructures and nitrogen doped carbon spheres as supports for the hydrogenation of cinnamaldehyde.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kente, Thobeka; Dube, Sibongile M A; Coville, Neil J; Mhlanga, Sabelo D

    2013-07-01

    This paper reports on the synthesis and use of nanostructures of gallium nitride (GaN NSs) and nitrogen doped carbon spheres (NCSs) as support materials for the hydrogenation of cinnamaldehyde. This study provides the first investigation of GaN as a catalyst support in hydrogenation reactions. The GaN NSs were synthesized via chemical vapour deposition (CVD) in a double stage furnace (750 degrees C) while NCSs were made by CVD in a single stage furnace (950 degrees C) respectively. TEM analysis revealed that the GaN NSs were rod-like with average diameters of 200 nm, while the NCSs were solid with smoother surfaces, and with diameters of 450 nm. Pd nanoparticles (1 and 3% loadings) were uniformly dispersed on acid functionalized GaN NSs and NCS. The Pd nanoparticles had average diameters that were influenced by the type of support material used. The GaN NSs and NCSs were tested for the selective hydrogenation of cinnamaldehyde in isopropanol at 40 and 60 degrees C under atmospheric pressure. A comparative study of the activity of the nanostructured materials revealed that the order of catalyst activity was 3% Pd/GaN > 3% Pd/NCSs > 1% Pd/NCSs > 1% Pd/GaN. However, 100% selectivity to hydrocinnamaldehyde (HCALD) was obtained with 1% Pd/GaN at reasonable conversion rates.

  16. Transition metal (Fe, Co and Ni) oxide nanoparticles grafted graphitic carbon nitrides as efficient optical limiters and recyclable photocatalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sridharan, Kishore; Kuriakose, Tintu; Philip, Reji; Park, Tae Joo

    2014-07-01

    A single-step pyrolysis assisted route towards the large scale fabrication of metal oxide nanoparticles (Fe2O3, Co3O4 and NiO) ingrained in graphitic carbon nitride (GCN) is demonstrated. Urea, an abundantly available precursor, plays a dual role during the synthesis: while it acts as a reducing agent, it also gets converted to GCN. The formation of GCN and the in-situ growth and embedment of oxide nanoparticles are discussed on the basis of the experimental results. The wide absorption of the samples in the visible light region makes them suitable for nonlinear transmission and photocatalytic activity studies. Visible light photocatalytic activities of the samples are studied by monitoring the degradation of Rhodamine B dye. Optical limiting properties of the prepared samples are studied through the open aperture z-scan technique using 5 ns laser pulses at a wavelength of 532 nm. The cost-efficient and time saving synthetic approach is complemented by the magnetic behaviour of the samples, which enables their use as recyclable photocatalyst and magnetically controllable optical limiters.

  17. Highly efficient hydrogen release from formic acid using a graphitic carbon nitride-supported AgPd nanoparticle catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Fang; Li, Xiao; Wan, Chao; Xu, Lixin; An, Yue; Ye, Mingfu; Lei, Zhao

    2017-12-01

    Bimetallic AgPd nanoparticles with various molar ratios immobilized on graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3N4) were successfully synthesized via a facile co-reduction approach. The powder XRD, XPS, TEM, EDX, ICP-AES and BET were employed to characterize the structure, size, composition and loading metal electronic states of the AgPd/g-C3N4 catalysts. The catalytic property of as-prepared catalysts for the dehydrogenation of formic acid (FA) with sodium formate (SF) as the additive was investigated. The performance of these catalysts, as indicated by the turnover frequency (TOF), depended on the composition of the prepared catalysts. Among all the AgPd/g-C3N4 catalysts tested, Ag9Pd91/g-C3N4 was found to be an exceedingly high activity for decomposing FA into H2 with TOF up to 480 h-1 at 323 K. The prepared catalyst is thus a potential candidate for triggering the widespread use of FA for H2 storage.

  18. Monoatomic-thick graphitic carbon nitride dots on graphene sheets as an efficient catalyst in the oxygen reduction reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaopeng; Wang, Lixia; Zhao, Fei; Hu, Chuangang; Zhao, Yang; Zhang, Zhipan; Chen, Shilu; Shi, Gaoquan; Qu, Liangti

    2015-02-21

    Atomically thick two-dimensional materials have been increasingly attracting research interest not only due to their promising applications in a range of functional devices but also to their theoretical value to unraveling the catalytic electron transfer process within a simplified scenario. In this work, the monoatomic-thick dot-sized graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3N4) has been synthesized and intimately contacted to the basal plane of the graphene sheet to form the monolayer g-C3N4 dots@graphene (MTCG). The electrocatalytic activity of the MTCG in the oxygen reduction reaction is found to rival that of the commercial Pt/C catalyst in terms of the catalytic current density and half-wave potential. The density functional theory calculations confirm the catalytic improvement of the MTCG originates from a higher efficiency for the reduction of OOH(-) than that of the g-C3N4 alone; therefore, the current work is expected to provide new insights in developing next-generation, highly efficient catalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction.

  19. Femtosecond laser ablation of diamond-like carbon films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dumitru, Gabriel; Romano, Valerio; Weber, Heinz P.; Pimenov, Sergei; Kononenko, Taras; Sentis, Marc; Hermann, Joerg; Bruneau, Sebastien

    2004-01-30

    Diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings were deposited on Si substrates using a hot filament diode discharge and they were irradiated with ultrashort laser pulses (800 nm, 150 fs, <4 J/cm{sup 2}). The laser-treated films were examined using optical microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, SEM, AFM and white-light interferometery. Damage threshold of 0.16 J/cm{sup 2} and ablation rates below 110 nm/pulse were determined. Changes in the structure of the laser-irradiated films were showed by means of Raman investigations. The laser-treated samples were etched and the depths of modified material layers were determined. Ablation experiments with longer laser pulses (1064 nm, 100 ns, <3 J/cm{sup 2}) were also performed and the irradiated DLC films were afterwards analyzed using the same procedures. Dissimilarities in the structure changes induced by fs-and ns-laser irradiation were observed and comments are given.

  20. Films, Buckypapers and Fibers from Clay, Chitosan and Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc in het Panhuis

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The mechanical and electrical characteristics of films, buckypapers and fiber materials from combinations of clay, carbon nanotubes (CNTs and chitosan are described. The rheological time-dependent characteristics of clay are maintained in clay–carbon nanotube–chitosan composite dispersions. It is demonstrated that the addition of chitosan improves their mechanical characteristics, but decreases electrical conductivity by three-orders of magnitude compared to clay–CNT materials. We show that the electrical response upon exposure to humid atmosphere is influenced by clay-chitosan interactions, i.e., the resistance of clay–CNT materials decreases, whereas that of clay–CNT–chitosan increases.

  1. Graphitic Carbon Nitride Nanosheets-Based Ratiometric Fluorescent Probe for Highly Sensitive Detection of H2O2 and Glucose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jin-Wen; Luo, Ying; Wang, Yu-Min; Duan, Lu-Ying; Jiang, Jian-Hui; Yu, Ru-Qin

    2016-12-14

    Graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3N4) nanosheets, an emerging graphene-like carbon-based nanomaterial with high fluorescence and large specific surface areas, hold great potential for biosensor applications. Current g-C3N4 nanosheets based fluorescent biosensors majorly rely on single fluorescent intensity reading through fluorescence quenching interactions between the nanosheets and metal ions. Here we report for the first time the development of a novel g-C3N4 nanosheets-based ratiometric fluorescence sensing strategy for highly sensitive detection of H2O2 and glucose. With o-phenylenediamine (OPD) oxidized by H2O2 in the presence of horseradish peroxidase (HRP), the oxidization product can assemble on the g-C3N4 nanosheets through hydrogen bonding and π-π stacking, which effectively quenches the fluorescence of g-C3N4 while delivering a new emission peak. The ratiometric signal variations enable robust and sensitive detection of H2O2. On the basis of the glucose converting into H2O2 through the catalysis of glucose oxidase, the g-C3N4-based ratiometric fluorescence sensing platform is also exploited for glucose assay. The developed strategy is demonstrated to give a detection limit of 50 nM for H2O2 and 0.4 μM for glucose, at the same time, it has been successfully used for glucose levels detection in human serum. This strategy may provide a cost-efficient, robust, and high-throughput platform for detecting various species involving H2O2-generation reactions for biomedical applications.

  2. Organic matters removal from landfill leachate by immobilized Phanerochaete chrysosporium loaded with graphitic carbon nitride under visible light irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Liang; Liu, Yutang; Zeng, Guangming; Chen, Guiqiu; Wan, Jia; Zeng, Yunxiong; Wang, Longlu; Wu, Haipeng; Xu, Piao; Zhang, Chen; Cheng, Min; Hu, Tianjue

    2017-10-01

    This study investigated the technical applicability of a combination of Phanerochaete chrysosporium (P. chrysosporium) with photocatalyst graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3N4) for organic matters removal from landfill leachate under visible light irradiation. Photocatalyst g-C3N4 was well immobilized on the hyphae surface of P. chrysosporium by calcium alginate. The typical absorption edge in visible light region for g-C3N4 was at about 460 nm, and the optical absorption bandgap of g-C3N4 was estimated to be 2.70 eV, demonstrating the great photoresponsive ability of g-C3N4. An optimized g-C3N4 content of 0.10 g in immobilized P. chrysosporium and an optimized immobilized P. chrysosporium dosage of 1.0 g were suitable for organic matters removal. The removal efficiency of total organic carbon (TOC) reached 74.99% in 72 h with the initial TOC concentration of 100 mg L-1. In addition, the gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (GC-MS) measurements showed that immobilized P. chrysosporium presented an outstanding removal performance for almost all organic compounds in landfill leachate, especially for the volatile fatty acids and long-chain hydrocarbons. The overall results indicate that the combination P. chrysosporium with photocatalyst g-C3N4 for organic matters removal from landfill leachate may provide a more comprehensive potential for the landfill leachate treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. An ultrasensitive electrochemiluminescent immunosensor based on graphene oxide coupled graphite-like carbon nitride and multiwalled carbon nanotubes-gold for the detection of diclofenac.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Liuyi; Zheng, Jing; Zhao, Kang; Deng, Anping; Li, Jianguo

    2018-03-15

    In this study, a novel competition-type electrochemiluminescent (ECL) immunosensor for detecting diclofenac (DCF) was fabricated with graphene oxide coupled graphite-like carbon nitride (GO-g-C3N4) as signal probe for the first time. The ECL intensity of carboxylated g-C3N4 was significantly enhanced after being combined with graphene oxide (GO) which exhibited excellent charge-transport property. The sensing platform was constructed by multiwalled carbon nanotubes and gold nanoparticles (MWCNTs-AuNPs), which not only provided an effective matrix for immobilizing a large amount of coating antigen but also facilitated the electronic transmission rate to enhance the ECL intensity. Based on the synergistic effect of GO-g-C3N4 and MWCNTs-AuNPs composite, the proposed sensor showed high sensitivity, good stability, and wide linearity for the detection of DCF in the range of 0.005-1000ngmL-1 with a detection limit of 1.7pgmL-1. Furthermore, the developed immunoassay has been applied to real samples with satisfactory results. Therefore, this work provided a promising method for the detection of DCF and other small molecular compounds in the future. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Fabrication of nitrogen-containing diamond-like carbon film by filtered arc deposition as conductive hard-coating film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iijima, Yushi; Harigai, Toru; Isono, Ryo; Imai, Takahiro; Suda, Yoshiyuki; Takikawa, Hirofumi; Kamiya, Masao; Taki, Makoto; Hasegawa, Yushi; Tsuji, Nobuhiro; Kaneko, Satoru; Kunitsugu, Shinsuke; Habuchi, Hitoe; Kiyohara, Shuji; Ito, Mikio; Yick, Sam; Bendavid, Avi; Martin, Phil

    2018-01-01

    Diamond-like carbon (DLC) films, which are amorphous carbon films, have been used as hard-coating films for protecting the surface of mechanical parts. Nitrogen-containing DLC (N-DLC) films are expected as conductive hard-coating materials. N-DLC films are expected in applications such as protective films for contact pins, which are used in the electrical check process of integrated circuit chips. In this study, N-DLC films are prepared using the T-shaped filtered arc deposition (T-FAD) method, and film properties are investigated. Film hardness and film density decreased when the N content increased in the films because the number of graphite structures in the DLC film increased as the N content increased. These trends are similar to the results of a previous study. The electrical resistivity of N-DLC films changed from 0.26 to 8.8 Ω cm with a change in the nanoindentation hardness from 17 to 27 GPa. The N-DLC films fabricated by the T-FAD method showed high mechanical hardness and low electrical resistivity.

  5. Ultrathin MoS{sub 2} sheets supported on N-rich carbon nitride nanospheres with enhanced lithium storage properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chenrayan, Senthil; Chandra, Kishore S.; Manickam, Sasidharan, E-mail: sasidharan.m@res.srmuniv.ac.in

    2017-07-15

    Graphical abstract: We report the construction of N-rich C{sub 3}N{sub 4}/MoS{sub 2} nanospheres from 2D layered materials that serve as potential anode materials for lithium-ion battery delivering a reversible capacity of 857 mAh g{sup −1} at 0.1 C rate and superior rate performance of 383 mAh g{sup −1} at 10 C rate. - Highlights: • 3D N-rich C{sub 3}N{sub 4}@MoS{sub 2} nanospheres scaffolds reported from 2D layered g–C{sub 3}N{sub 4}. • TEM confirmed N-rich spheres coated by MoS{sub 2} sheets forming an interconnected architecture. • N-rich C{sub 3}N{sub 4}@MoS{sub 2} scaffolds were explored as potential anode material for lithium ion batteries. • The electrode exhibited a high reversible discharge capacity of 857 mAh g{sup −1} after 50 repeated cycles. • At 10 C, the electrodes deliver capacity of 383 mAh {sup g−1}, which is superior to the pristine graphite anode. - Abstract: Deciphering the structural and volume changes occurring during electrode reactions in lithium-ion batteries is perhaps a boon for high energy density batteries. Here, we report the synthesis of 3D network of dichalcogenide molybdenum disulfide (MoS{sub 2}) encapsulated over nitrogen rich graphitic carbon nitride nanosphere (g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4}) forming an interconnected and uniform g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4}/MoS{sub 2} scaffolds. The crystallinity, phase purity, morphological features and elemental composition were evaluated through XRD, FESEM, TEM, HRTEM, BET and XPS analyses. The electrochemical properties of N-rich g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4}/MoS{sub 2} scaffolds were investigated as potential anode materials for lithium-ion batteries. Electrochemical testing of the g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4}/MoS{sub 2} constructured electrode delivered reversible capacity of 857 mAh g{sup −1}at 0.1 C rate after fifty cycles and exhibited a high rate performance with reversible capacity of 383 mAh g{sup −1} at 10 C rate (higher than theoretical capacity of graphite, 372 mAh g{sup −1}). The superior

  6. Plasma nitridation optimazation for sub-15 A gate dielectrics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cubaynes, F.N; Cubaynes, F.N.; Schmitz, Jurriaan; van der Marel, C.; Snijders, J.H.M.; Veloso, A.; Rothschild, A.; Olsen, C.; Date, L.

    2003-01-01

    The work investigates the impact of plasma nitridation process parameters upon the physical properties and upon the electrical performance of sub-15 A plasma nitrided gate dielectrics. The nitrogen distribution and chemical bonding of ultra-thin plasma nitrided films have been investigated using

  7. Flexible Carbon Nanotube Films for High Performance Strain Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olfa Kanoun

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Compared with traditional conductive fillers, carbon nanotubes (CNTs have unique advantages, i.e., excellent mechanical properties, high electrical conductivity and thermal stability. Nanocomposites as piezoresistive films provide an interesting approach for the realization of large area strain sensors with high sensitivity and low manufacturing costs. A polymer-based nanocomposite with carbon nanomaterials as conductive filler can be deposited on a flexible substrate of choice and this leads to mechanically flexible layers. Such sensors allow the strain measurement for both integral measurement on a certain surface and local measurement at a certain position depending on the sensor geometry. Strain sensors based on carbon nanostructures can overcome several limitations of conventional strain sensors, e.g., sensitivity, adjustable measurement range and integral measurement on big surfaces. The novel technology allows realizing strain sensors which can be easily integrated even as buried layers in material systems. In this review paper, we discuss the dependence of strain sensitivity on different experimental parameters such as composition of the carbon nanomaterial/polymer layer, type of polymer, fabrication process and processing parameters. The insights about the relationship between film parameters and electromechanical properties can be used to improve the design and fabrication of CNT strain sensors.

  8. Potential of P-doped carbon nanocone and Si-doped boron nitride ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    22

    greenhouse gases has important role in global warming which can damage environment; therefore, the ... Carbon monoxide (CO) produced by human activities and catalytic oxidation of CO to CO2, is a chief manner to make ... can be valuable to identify the useful catalyst to produce CO2 via N2O and CO as reacting gases.

  9. Preparation of self-supporting carbon thin films

    CERN Document Server

    Lommel, B; Kindler, B; Klemm, J; Steiner, J

    2002-01-01

    For heavy-ion beam experiments, self-supporting carbon thin films are needed as targets, stripper foils and as backings (Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A 334 (1993) 69) for materials which cannot be produced self-supporting. Using resistance evaporation under high vacuum, self-supporting carbon foils with a thickness of 5 mu g/cm sup 2 and a diameter of 10 mm, a thickness of 10 mu g/cm sup 2 and a diameter of 50 mm up to a thickness of 50 mu g/cm sup 2 and a diameter of 300 mm can be obtained. Due to the energy impact of the heavy-ion beam, the amorphous carbon is restructured into textured graphite, as was found already by Dollinger et al. (Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A 303 (1991) 79). The discuss the production process as well as the change of the layer structure caused by the energy deposit.

  10. PECVD silicon nitride diaphragms for condenser microphones

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheeper, P.R.; Scheeper, P.R.; Voorthuyzen, J.A.; Voorthuyzen, J.A.; Bergveld, Piet

    1991-01-01

    The application of plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposited (PECVD) silicon nitride as a diaphragm material for condenser microphones has been investigated. By means of adjusting the SiH4/NH3 gas-flow composition, silicon-rich silicon nitride films have been obtained with a relatively low tensile

  11. Nanocomposite fibers and film containing polyolefin and surface-modified carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu,Benjamin; Hsiao, Benjamin S.

    2010-01-26

    Methods for modifying carbon nanotubes with organic compounds are disclosed. The modified carbon nanotubes have enhanced compatibility with polyolefins. Nanocomposites of the organo-modified carbon nanotubes and polyolefins can be used to produce both fibers and films having enhanced mechanical and electrical properties, especially the elongation-to-break ratio and the toughness of the fibers and/or films.

  12. Stress reduction dependent on incident angles of carbon ions in ultrathin tetrahedral amorphous carbon films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Shipeng; Li, Xiaowei; Huang, Meidong; Ke, Peiling; Wang, Aiying

    2014-04-01

    We presented the combined experimental and simulation study on stress evolution as a function of incident angles of carbon ions for the ultrathin tetrahedral amorphous carbon films (ta-C). The residual stress was found about 3.6 ± 0.1 GPa for the incident angle of C ions with range of 0°-30°, while it decreased significantly to 2.8 GPa with the incident angle of 60°. Different with the previous reports, noted that in this case both the sp3 content and mechanical properties of film were not deteriorated. Taking molecular dynamics simulation, it was in particularly concluded that the critical relaxation of distorted C-sp3 bond lengths and bond angles played key role on the unusual stress reduction mechanism. The results provide a route to fabricate the ultrathin ta-C films with low stress and high hardness for the precision wear resistant applications.

  13. Synchronized metal-ion irradiation as a way to control growth of transition-metal nitride alloy films during hybrid HIPIMS/DCMS co-sputtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greczynski, Grzegorz

    2016-09-01

    High-power pulsed magnetron sputtering (HIPIMS) is particularly attractive for growth of transition metal (TM) nitride alloys for two reasons: (i) the high ionization degree of the sputtered metal flux, and (ii) the time separation of metal- and gas-ion fluxes incident at the substrate. The former implies that ion fluxes originating from elemental targets operated in HIPIMS are distinctly different from those that are obtained during dc magnetron sputtering (DCMS), which helps to separate the effects of HIPIMS and DCMS metal-ion fluxes on film properties. The latter feature allows one to minimize compressive stress due to gas-ion irradiation, by synchronizing the pulsed substrate bias with the metal-rich-plasma portion of the HIPIMS pulse. Here, we use pseudobinary TM nitride model systems TiAlN, TiSiN, TiTaN, and TiAlTaN to carry out experiments in a hybrid configuration with one target powered by HIPIMS, the other operated in DCMS mode. This allows us to probe the roles of intense and metal-ion fluxes (n = 1 , 2) from HIPIMS-powered targets on film growth kinetics, microstructure, and physical properties over a wide range of M1M2N alloy compositions. TiAlN and TiSiN mechanical properties are shown to be determined by the average metal-ion momentum transfer per deposited atom. Irradiation with lighter metal-ions (M1 =Al+ or Si+ during M1-HIPIMS/Ti-DCMS) yields fully-dense single-phase cubic Ti1-x (M1)x N films. In contrast, with higher-mass film constituent ions such as Ti+, easily exceeds the threshold for precipitation of second phase w-AlN or Si3N4. Based on the above results, a new PVD approach is proposed which relies on the hybrid concept to grow dense, hard, and stress-free thin films with no external heating. The primary targets, Ti and/or Al, operate in DCMS mode providing a continuous flux of sputter-ejected metal atoms to sustain a high deposition rate, while a high-mass target metal, Ta, is driven by HIPIMS to serve as a pulsed source of energetic

  14. Direct Growth of CuO Nanorods on Graphitic Carbon Nitride with Synergistic Effect on Thermal Decomposition of Ammonium Perchlorate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linghua Tan

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Novel graphitic carbon nitride/CuO (g-C3N4/CuO nanocomposite was synthesized through a facile precipitation method. Due to the strong ion-dipole interaction between copper ions and nitrogen atoms of g-C3N4, CuO nanorods (length 200–300 nm, diameter 5–10 nm were directly grown on g-C3N4, forming a g-C3N4/CuO nanocomposite, which was confirmed via X-ray diffraction (XRD, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS. Finally, thermal decomposition of ammonium perchlorate (AP in the absence and presence of the prepared g-C3N4/CuO nanocomposite was examined by differential thermal analysis (DTA, and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA. The g-C3N4/CuO nanocomposite showed promising catalytic effects for the thermal decomposition of AP. Upon addition of 2 wt % nanocomposite with the best catalytic performance (g-C3N4/20 wt % CuO, the decomposition temperature of AP was decreased by up to 105.5 °C and only one decomposition step was found instead of the two steps commonly reported in other examples, demonstrating the synergistic catalytic activity of the as-synthesized nanocomposite. This study demonstrated a successful example regarding the direct growth of metal oxide on g-C3N4 by ion-dipole interaction between metallic ions, and the lone pair electrons on nitrogen atoms, which could provide a novel strategy for the preparation of g-C3N4-based nanocomposite.

  15. Largely enhanced dielectric properties of carbon nanotubes/polyvinylidene fluoride binary nanocomposites by loading a few boron nitride nanosheets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Minhao; Zhao, Hang; He, Delong; Bai, Jinbo, E-mail: Jinbo.Bai@ecp.fr [Laboratoire de Mécanique des Sols, Structures et Matériaux, CNRS UMR 8579, Centrale-Supélec, Université Paris-Saclay, Grande Voie des Vignes, Châtenay-Malabry 92290 (France)

    2016-08-15

    The ternary nanocomposites of boron nitride nanosheets (BNNSs)/carbon nanotubes (CNTs)/polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) are fabricated via a combination of solution casting and extrusion-injection processes. The effects of BNNSs on the electrical conductivity, dielectric behavior, and microstructure changes of CNTs/PVDF binary nanocomposites are systematically investigated. A low percolation value (f{sub c}) for the CNTs/PVDF binary system is obtained due to the integration of solution and melting blending procedures. Two kinds of CNTs/PVDF binary systems with various CNTs contents (f{sub CNTs}) as the matrix are discussed. The results reveal that compared with CNTs/PVDF binary systems at the same f{sub CNTs}, the ternary BNNSs/CNTs/PVDF nanocomposites exhibit largely enhanced dielectric properties due to the improvement of the CNTs dispersion state and the conductive network. The dielectric constant of CNTs/PVDF binary nanocomposite with 6 vol. % CNTs (f{sub CNTs} < f{sub c}) shows a 79.59% enhancement from 49 to 88 after the incorporation of 3 vol. % BNNSs. For the other CNTs/PVDF system with 8 vol. % CNTs (f{sub CNTs} > f{sub c}), it displays a 43.32% improvement from 1325 to 1899 after the addition of 3 vol. % BNNSs. The presence of BNNSs facilitates the formation of the denser conductive network. Meanwhile, the ternary BNNSs/CNTs/PVDF systems exhibit a low dielectric loss. The adjustable dielectric properties could be obtained by employing the ternary systems due to the microstructure changes of nanocomposites.

  16. Novel mesoporous graphitic carbon nitride modified PbBiO2Br porous microspheres with enhanced photocatalytic performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bin; Di, Jun; Liu, Gaopeng; Yin, Sheng; Xia, Jiexiang; Zhang, Qi; Li, Huaming

    2017-12-01

    Sustainable mesoporous graphitic carbon nitride (mpg-C 3 N 4 ) modified PbBiO 2 Br porous microsphere (mpg-C 3 N 4 /PbBiO 2 Br) had been successfully synthesized via solvothermal process. Multiple techniques were applied to explore the structure, morphology, optical and electronic properties of the as-prepared photocatalysts. It could be found that the mpg-C 3 N 4 was uniformly distributed on the surface of the PbBiO 2 Br porous microsphere. Compared with the pure PbBiO 2 Br, the mpg-C 3 N 4 /PbBiO 2 Br exhibited superior photocatalytic activity for the degradation of organic pollutants under visible light irradiation. When the mass fraction of mpg-C 3 N 4 was 3%, the mpg-C 3 N 4 /PbBiO 2 Br composite materials exhibited the highest photocatalytic performance. The results indicated that the introduction of mpg-C 3 N 4 could effectively enhance the electron mobility to promote the catalytic activity. The enhanced photocatalytic activity of the mpg-C 3 N 4 /PbBiO 2 Br materials can be attributed to the stronger optical trapping capability and the more effective separation efficiency of photogenerated electron-hole pairs. During the process of photocatalysis, the main active species of the photocatalysts were determined to be the and hole under visible light irradiation. Based on the relative band positions of mpg-C 3 N 4 and PbBiO 2 Br, a possible photocatalytic mechanism of mpg-C 3 N 4 /PbBiO 2 Br composite catalyst was proposed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Peculiarities of the initial stages of carbonization processes in polyimide-based nanocomposite films containing carbon nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.V. Gofman

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Carbonization of the polyimide-based composite films containing carbon nanoparticles, namely nanofibers and nanocones/disks, in the temperature range 500–550°C was studied and the kinetics of the initial stage of carbonization and the effect of the filler on the mechanical properties of the carbonized films were evaluated. Two polyimides (PIs characterized by different macrochains’ rigidity and different degrees of ordering of the intermolecular structure were used. The character of the nanofiller’s action on the kinetics of the carbonization process depends on the heating rate. In this work, the intensity of the destruction of the PI matrix of the composite films was shown to be slightly higher than that of films of the same polymers with no filler. The introduction of the carbon nanoparticles into both PIs provokes the increase in the ultimate deformation values of the partially carbonized films, while the carbonization of the unfilled PI films yields the brittle materials. The Young’s modulus values of the materials based on the rigid-rod PI do not increase after carbonization, while those for compositions based on the PI with semi-rigid chains increase substantially. Carbon nanocones/disks are characterized by the best compatibility with matrix PIs in comparison with carbon nanofibers.

  18. A dense and strong bonding collagen film for carbon/carbon composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, Sheng; Li, Hejun, E-mail: lihejun@nwpu.edu.cn; Li, Kezhi; Lu, Jinhua; Zhang, Leilei

    2015-08-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Significantly enhancement of biocompatibility on C/C composites by preparing a collagen film. • The dense and continuous collagen film had a strong bonding strength with C/C composites after dehydrathermal treatment (DHT) crosslink. • Numerous oxygen-containing functional groups formed on the surface of C/C composites without matrix damage. - Abstract: A strong bonding collagen film was successfully prepared on carbon/carbon (C/C) composites. The surface conditions of the modified C/C composites were detected by contact angle measurements, scanning electron microscope (SEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Raman spectra. The roughness, optical morphology, bonding strength and biocompatibility of collagen films at different pH values were detected by confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM), universal test machine and cytology tests in vitro. After a 4-h modification in 30% H{sub 2}O{sub 2} solution at 100 °C, the contact angle on the surface of C/C composites was decreased from 92.3° to 65.3°. Large quantities of hydroxyl, carboxyl and carbonyl functional groups were formed on the surface of the modified C/C composites. Then a dense and continuous collagen film was prepared on the modified C/C substrate. Bonding strength between collagen film and C/C substrate was reached to 8 MPa level when the pH value of this collagen film was 2.5 after the preparing process. With 2-day dehydrathermal treatment (DHT) crosslinking at 105 °C, the bonding strength was increased to 12 MPa level. At last, the results of in vitro cytological test showed that this collagen film made a great improvement on the biocompatibility on C/C composites.

  19. Facile synthesis of nanorod-type graphitic carbon nitride/Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} composite with enhanced photocatalytic performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jiangpeng; Li, Changqing; Cong, Jingkun; Liu, Ziwei; Zhang, Hanzhuo; Liang, Mei [The Key laboratory of Advanced Textile Materials and Manufacturing Technology of Ministry of Education, National Engineering Lab for Textile Fiber Materials and Processing Technology (Zhejiang), College of Materials and Textiles, Zhejiang Sci-Tech University, Hangzhou 310018 (China); Gao, Junkuo, E-mail: jkgao@zstu.edu.cn [The Key laboratory of Advanced Textile Materials and Manufacturing Technology of Ministry of Education, National Engineering Lab for Textile Fiber Materials and Processing Technology (Zhejiang), College of Materials and Textiles, Zhejiang Sci-Tech University, Hangzhou 310018 (China); Wang, Shunli [Department of Physics, Center for Optoelectronic Materials and Devices, Zhejiang Sci-Tech University, Hangzhou 310018 (China); Yao, Juming, E-mail: yaoj@zstu.edu.cn [The Key laboratory of Advanced Textile Materials and Manufacturing Technology of Ministry of Education, National Engineering Lab for Textile Fiber Materials and Processing Technology (Zhejiang), College of Materials and Textiles, Zhejiang Sci-Tech University, Hangzhou 310018 (China)

    2016-06-15

    Here we report a facile synthesis of nanorod-type graphitic carbon nitride/Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} composite (Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}-g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4}) by using Fe-melamine supramolecular framework as precursor. The chemical and optical properties of the nanocomposites are well-characterized. The Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}-g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} nanocomposite demonstrated excellent photocatalytic activities under visible light due to the efficient utilization of sunlight and the construction of Z-scheme electron transfer pathway. The results indicated that it could be a promising approach for the preparation of efficient g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} nanocomposites photocatalysts by using metal-melamine supramolecular framework as precursors. - Graphical abstract: Nanorod-type graphitic carbon nitride/Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} composite (Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}-g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4}) was synthesized by using Fe-melamine supramolecular framework as precursor. The Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}-g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} nanocomposite demonstrated excellent photocatalytic activities under visible light. Display Omitted - Highlights: • Nanorod-type graphitic carbon nitride/Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} composite (Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}-g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4}) was synthesized. • Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}-g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} showed strong optical absorption in the visible-light region. • The Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}-g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} nanocomposite demonstrated excellent photocatalytic activities.

  20. Iron nanoparticles embedded in carbon films: structural and optical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashayekhi, Fatemeh; Shafiekhani, Azizollah; Sebt, Seyed Ali

    2016-06-01

    In the present work amorphous hydrogenated carbon films with sputtered iron nanoparticles (Fe NPs @ a-C:H) were deposited by co-deposition of RF-sputtering and RF-plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition methods using acetylene gas and iron target on quartz and silicon substrates. Samples were prepared in different initial pressures and during constant deposition time. The crystalline structure of Fe NPs @ a-C:H was studied using X-ray diffraction and selected area electron diffraction patterns. The X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis presents that increasing the initial pressure decreases the atomic ratio of Fe/C and the sp3-hybridized carbon content in prepared samples. The transmission electron microscope image shows the encapsulated Fe NPs in carbon films. The optical properties and localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) of samples were studied using UV-visible spectrophotometry, which is shown that increasing of Fe content decreases the intensity of LSPR peak and increases the optical band gap.

  1. Printable Thin Film Supercapacitors Using Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    KAUST Repository

    Kaempgen, Martti

    2009-05-13

    Thin film supercapacitors were fabricated using printable materials to make flexible devices on plastic. The active electrodes were made from sprayed networks of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) serving as both electrodes and charge collectors. Using a printable aqueous gel electrolyte as well as an organic liquid electrolyte, the performances of the devices show very high energy and power densities (6 W h/kg for both electrolytes and 23 and 70 kW/kg for aqueous gel electrolyte and organic electrolyte, respectively) which is comparable to performance in other SWCNT-based supercapacitor devices fabricated using different methods. The results underline the potential of printable thin film supercapacitors. The simplified architecture and the sole use of printable materials may lead to a new class of entirely printable charge storage devices allowing for full integration with the emerging field of printed electronics. © 2009 American Chemical Society.

  2. Adsorption of nucleic acid bases and amino acids on single-walled carbon and boron nitride nanotubes: a first-principles study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Jiaxin; Song, Wei; Wang, Lu; Lu, Jing; Luo, Guangfu; Zhou, Jing; Qin, Rui; Li, Hong; Gao, Zhengxiang; Lai, Lin; Li, Guangping; Mei, Wai Ning

    2009-11-01

    We study the adsorptions of nucleic acid bases adenine (A), cytosine (C), guanine (G), thymine (T), and uracil (U) and four amino acids phenylalanine, tyrosine, tryptophan, alanine on the single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and boron nitride nanotubes (SWBNNTs) by using density functional theory. We find that the aromatic content plays a critical role in the adsorption. The adsorptions of nucleic acid bases and amino acids on the (7, 7) SWBNNT are stronger than those on the (7, 7) SWCNT. Oxidative treatment of SWCNTs favors the adsorption of biomolecules on nanotubes.

  3. Pendeo-epitaxial growth and characterization of thin films of gallium nitride and related materials on SiC(0001) and Si(111) substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, R.F.; Zheleva, T.S. [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States); Gehrke, T. [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States); Nitronex Corp., Raleigh, NC (United States); Linthicum, K.J.; Rajagopal, P. [Nitronex Corp., Raleigh, NC (United States); Zorman, C.A.; Mehregany, M. [Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2001-02-01

    Monocrystalline GaN and Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}N films have been grown via the pendeo-epitaxy (PE) technique with and without Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} masks on GaN/AlN/6H-SiC(0001) and GaN(0001)/AlN(0001)/3C-SiC(111)/Si(111) substrates using organometallic vapor phase deposition. Scanning and transmission electron microscopies were used to evaluate the external microstructures and the distribution of dislocations, respectively. The dislocation densities in the PE grown films were reduced at least five orders of magnitude relative to the initial GaN seed layers. Tilting to 0.2 in the portion of the coalesced GaN epilayers grown over the silicon nitride masks was observed via X-ray diffraction. Neither tilting nor low angle boundaries were observed within areas of coalescence in the material grown on substrates without the masks. (orig.)

  4. Fabrication of periodical surface structures by picosecond laser irradiation of carbon thin films: transformation of amorphous carbon in nanographite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popescu, C.; Dorcioman, G. [National Institute for Lasers, Plasma and Radiation Physics, 409 Atomistilor Street, Magurele RO-077125 (Romania); Bita, B. [National Institute for Research and Development in Microtechnologies, 126A Erou Iancu Nicolae Street, Voluntari RO-077190 (Romania); Faculty of Physics, 405 Atomistilor Street, Magurele RO-077125 (Romania); Besleaga, C.; Zgura, I. [National Institute of Materials Physics, 105bis Atomistilor Street, Magurele RO-077125 (Romania); Himcinschi, C. [Institute of Theoretical Physics, TU Bergakademie Freiberg, Freiberg D-09596 (Germany); Popescu, A.C., E-mail: andrei.popescu@inflpr.ro [National Institute for Lasers, Plasma and Radiation Physics, 409 Atomistilor Street, Magurele RO-077125 (Romania)

    2016-12-30

    Highlights: • Ripples obtained on carbon films after irradiation with visible ps laser pulses. • Amorphous carbon was transformed in nanographite following irradiation. • Ripples had a complex morphology, being made of islands of smaller ripples. • Hydrophilic carbon films became hydrophobic after surface structuring. - Abstract: Thin films of carbon were synthesized by ns pulsed laser deposition in vacuum on silicon substrates, starting from graphite targets. Further on, the films were irradiated with a picosecond laser source emitting in visible at 532 nm. After tuning of laser parameters, we obtained a film surface covered by laser induced periodical surface structures (LIPSS). They were investigated by optical, scanning electron and atomic force microscopy. It was observed that changing the irradiation angle influences the LIPSS covered area. At high magnification it was revealed that the LIPSS pattern was quite complex, being composed of other small LIPSS islands, interconnected by bridges of nanoparticles. Raman spectra for the non-irradiated carbon films were typical for a-C type of diamond-like carbon, while the LIPSS spectra were characteristic to nano-graphite. The pristine carbon film was hydrophilic, while the LIPSS covered film surface was hydrophobic.

  5. Laser approaches for deposition of carbon nitride films - chemical vapour deposition and ablation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Popov, C.; Jelínek, Miroslav; Ivanov, B.; Tomov, R. I.; Kulisch, W.

    1999-01-01

    Roč. 8, - (1999), s. 577-581 ISSN 0925-9635 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/93/0464 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1010914 Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.924, year: 1999

  6. Boron carbon nitride nanostructures from salt melts: tunable water-soluble phosphors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Weiwei; Portehault, David; Dimova, Rumiana; Antonietti, Markus

    2011-05-11

    A simple, high yield, chemical process is developed to fabricate layered h-BN nanosheets and BCNO nanoparticles with a diameter of ca. 5 nm at 700 °C. The use of the eutectic LiCl/KCl salt melt medium enhances the kinetics of the reaction between sodium borohydride and urea or guanidine as well as the dispersion of the nanoparticles in water. The carbon content can be tuned from 0 to 50 mol % by adjusting the reactant ratio, thus providing precise control of the light emission of the particles in the range 440-528 nm while reaching a quantum yield of 26%. Because of their green synthesis, low toxicity, small size, and stability against aggregation in water, the as-obtained photoluminescent BCNO nanoparticles show promise for diagnostics and optoelectronics. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  7. Effect of gate-dielectrics on the electrical characteristics of solution-processed single-wall-carbon-nanotube thin-film transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Tae-Jun

    2017-07-01

    High performance of solution-processed, single-wall-carbon-nanotube (SWCNT) thin-film transistors (TFTs) is investigated through the use in the different gatedielectrics of silicon dioxide (SiO2), silicon nitride (SiNx), the bilayers of SiO2 and SiNx, and hexagonal boron-nitride (h-BN) thin films. The different interfacial characteristics affect the electrical characteristics of the SWCNT-TFTs including key device metrics. Significantly, the hysteresis window that is normally observed in drop-casted SWCNT-TFTs was majorly suppressed by the employment of a thin lower dielectric-constant material on a higher dielectricconstant material. Sub-2V operating SWCNT-TFTs with solution-processed h-BN gate dielectrics with good above- and sub-threshold characteristics are also investigated on the basis of interfacial characteristics underlying the device physics. Such performance can be realized by the suppressed interfacial impurity scattering through the chemically clean interface combined with optimized solution-process below 100 °C.[Figure not available: see fulltext.

  8. Structure and properties of ternary manganese nitride Mn{sub 3}CuN{sub y} thin films fabricated by facing target magnetron sputtering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Na, Yuanyuan [Center for Condensed Matter and Materials Physics, Key Laboratory of Micro-Naro Measurement, Manipulation and Physics, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China); Wang, Cong, E-mail: congwang@buaa.edu.cn [Center for Condensed Matter and Materials Physics, Key Laboratory of Micro-Naro Measurement, Manipulation and Physics, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China); Sun, Ying; Chu, Lihua; Nie, Man [Center for Condensed Matter and Materials Physics, Key Laboratory of Micro-Naro Measurement, Manipulation and Physics, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China); Ji, Nian; Wang, Jian-ping [The Center of Micromagnetic and Information Technology, Electrical and Computer Engineering Department, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis 55455 (United States)

    2011-07-15

    Graphical abstract: This figure reveals the dependence of the texture coefficient TC{sub (111)} and TC{sub (200)} of the Mn{sub 3}CuN{sub y} thin films on T{sub sub}. These results indicate that the preferred orientation of the Mn{sub 3}CuN{sub y} thin films dramatically changed from (1 1 1) to (2 0 0) with the increase of T{sub sub}. In one word, the orientation of Mn{sub 3}CuN{sub y} thin film can be tailored by adjusting the magnetron sputtering processing parameters and substrate. It is the first time to report the deposition of Mn{sub 3}CuN{sub y} thin films on single crystal Si (1 0 0) at various substrate temperatures (T{sub sub}) by facing target magnetron sputtering. The influences of substrate temperature on crystal structure and morphology are discussed. The temperature dependences of magnetization, lattice parameters and resistivity for the resulting film are systematically investigated, which shows several different physical properties from those of previous work. Highlights: {yields} Variation of the substrate temperatures adjusted the preferred orientation from (1 1 1) to (2 0 0) of the Mn{sub 3}CuN{sub y} thin films. {yields} There exists a magnetic ordering transition at 225 K from paramagnetic (PM) to ferrimagnetic (FI), which is different than previous results. {yields} It shows a positive thermal expansion behavior with average linear thermal expansion coefficient 2.49 x 10{sup -5} K{sup -1}. However there was no crystal phase transition occurred around the magnetic transition in the film. {yields} The temperature dependence of resistivity displayed a semiconductor-like behavior, which is quite different from the bulk sample. {yields} We believe that our findings may provide an important role to further utilize the potential of antiperovskite manganese nitride film. -- Abstract: Deposition of Mn{sub 3}CuN{sub y} thin films on single crystal Si (1 0 0) at various substrate temperatures (T{sub sub}) by facing target magnetron sputtering is

  9. Flexible diamond-like carbon films on rubber : On the origin of self-acting segmentation and film flexibility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pei, Y.T.; Bui, X.L.; Pal, J.P. van der; Martinez-Martinez, D.; Zhou, X.B.; Hosson, J.Th.M. De

    This paper reports an experimental approach to deposit flexible diamond-like carbon (DLC) films on hydrogenated nitrile butadiene rubber (HNBR) with plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition and an analytical model to describe the self-segmentation mechanism of the DLC films. By making use of the

  10. Aligned carbon nanotube thin films for DNA electrochemical sensing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berti, F. [Department of Chemistry, University of Florence, Via della Lastruccia 3, Sesto Fiorentino, Firenze 50019 (Italy); Lozzi, L. [Department of Physics, University of L' Aquila, Coppito, L' Aquila 67100 (Italy); Palchetti, I. [Department of Chemistry, University of Florence, Via della Lastruccia 3, Sesto Fiorentino, Firenze 50019 (Italy); Santucci, S. [Department of Physics, University of L' Aquila, Coppito, L' Aquila 67100 (Italy); Marrazza, G. [Department of Chemistry, University of Florence, Via della Lastruccia 3, Sesto Fiorentino, Firenze 50019 (Italy)], E-mail: giovanna.marrazza@unifi.it

    2009-09-01

    Carbon nanotubes are interesting materials for DNA electrochemical sensing due to their unique electric properties: high surface area, fast heterogeneous electron transfer, and electrochemical stability. In this work aligned Carbon NanoTube (CNT) thin films were designed and tested as candidate platforms for DNA immobilization and for the development of an electrochemical genosensor. The films were prepared by Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) using acetylene and ammonia as precursor gases and nickel particles as catalyst. A preliminary electrochemical characterization was performed using cyclic voltammetry since, so far, these films have been used only for gas sensing. The surfaces were then covalently functionalized with a DNA oligonucleotide probe, complementary to the sequence of the most common inserts in the GMOs: the Promoter 35S. The genosensor format involved the immobilization of the probe onto the sensor surface, the hybridization with the target-sequence and the electrochemical detection of the duplex formation. Careful attention was paid to the probe immobilization conditions in order to minimize the signal due to non-specifically adsorbed sequences. For the detection of the hybridization event both label-free and enzyme-labelled methods were investigated. In case of the enzyme-labelled method a target concentration at nanomolar level can be easily detected, with a linear response from 50 nM to 200 nM, whereas the label-free method showed a linear response between 0.5 {mu}M and 10 {mu}M. The reproducibility was 11% and 20% with the enzyme-labelled method and the label-free method, respectively. The batch-to-batch reproducibility of the different sensors was also evaluated.

  11. Carbon Nitride-Aromatic Diimide-Graphene Nanohybrids: Metal-Free Photocatalysts for Solar-to-Hydrogen Peroxide Energy Conversion with 0.2% Efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kofuji, Yusuke; Isobe, Yuki; Shiraishi, Yasuhiro; Sakamoto, Hirokatsu; Tanaka, Shunsuke; Ichikawa, Satoshi; Hirai, Takayuki

    2016-08-10

    Solar-to-chemical energy conversion is a challenging subject for renewable energy storage. In the past 40 years, overall water splitting into H2 and O2 by semiconductor photocatalysis has been studied extensively; however, they need noble metals and extreme care to avoid explosion of the mixed gases. Here we report that generating hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) from water and O2 by organic semiconductor photocatalysts could provide a new basis for clean energy storage without metal and explosion risk. We found that carbon nitride-aromatic diimide-graphene nanohybrids prepared by simple hydrothermal-calcination procedure produce H2O2 from pure water and O2 under visible light (λ > 420 nm). Photoexcitation of the semiconducting carbon nitride-aromatic diimide moiety transfers their conduction band electrons to graphene and enhances charge separation. The valence band holes on the semiconducting moiety oxidize water, while the electrons on the graphene moiety promote selective two-electron reduction of O2. This metal-free system produces H2O2 with solar-to-chemical energy conversion efficiency 0.20%, comparable to the highest levels achieved by powdered water-splitting photocatalysts.

  12. Ellipsometric study of silicon nitride on gallium arsenide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alterovitz, S. A.; Bu-Abbud, G. H.; Woollam, J. A.; Liu, D.; Chung, Y.; Langer, D.

    1982-01-01

    A method for optimizing the sensitivity of ellipsometric measurements for thin dielectric films on semiconductors is described in simple physical terms. The technique is demonstrated for the case of sputtered silicon nitride films on gallium arsenide.

  13. Large area lateral epitaxial overgrowth (LEO) of gallium nitride (GaN) thin films on silicon substrates and their characterization. Annual report, 1 March 1998--28 February 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, R.F.; Carlson, E.P.; Gehrke, T.; Linthicum, K.; Smith, T.P.

    1999-03-01

    Gallium nitride films have been grown on 6H-SiC substrates employing a new form of selective lateral epitaxy, namely pendeo-epitaxy. This technique forces regrowth to start exclusively on sidewalls of GaN seed structures. Both discrete pendeo-epitaxial microstructures and coalesced single crystal layers of GaN have been achieved. Analysis by SEM and TEM are used to evaluate the morphology of the resulting GaN films. Process routes leading to GaN pendeo- epitaxial growth using silicon substrates have also been achieved and the preliminary results are discussed.

  14. Charging of carbon thin films in scanning and phase-plate transmission electron microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hettler, Simon; Kano, Emi; Dries, Manuel

    2018-01-01

    A systematic study on charging of carbon thin films under intense electron-beam irradiation was performed in a transmission electron microscope to identify the underlying physics for the functionality of hole-free phase plates. Thin amorphous carbon films fabricated by different deposition techni...

  15. Nanowire-templated lateral epitaxial growth of non-polar group III nitrides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, George T [Albuquerque, NM; Li, Qiming [Albuquerque, NM; Creighton, J Randall [Albuquerque, NM

    2010-03-02

    A method for growing high quality, nonpolar Group III nitrides using lateral growth from Group III nitride nanowires. The method of nanowire-templated lateral epitaxial growth (NTLEG) employs crystallographically aligned, substantially vertical Group III nitride nanowire arrays grown by metal-catalyzed metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) as templates for the lateral growth and coalescence of virtually crack-free Group III nitride films. This method requires no patterning or separate nitride growth step.

  16. Elastic modulus of diamond-like carbon films prepared by pulsed vacuum arc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultrich, B.; Scheibe, H.-J.; Grandremy, G.; Schneider, D.; Siemroth, P.

    1994-12-01

    Amorphous carbon films have been prepared by special pulsed vacuum arc depositon methods allowing high currents up to 1 kA and more. The Young's modulus of these films has been determined with respect to various technological parameters. For these measurements a method based on the propagation of ultrasonic surface waves has been applied which has been specially designed for the investigation of thin films below one micrometer. Large changes of the elastic modulus, depending on the technology, have been observed, contrasting with the common understanding of invariability of the elastic behavior. Reflecting the large structural variations possible in amorphous carbon, the elastic modulus represents a suitable parameter for characterizing the carbon-carbon network. Furthermore, the elastic modulus of amorphous carbon films may be used for a first estimation of film hardness because of the strong correlation of these two quantities.

  17. Aligned carbon nanotube, graphene and graphite oxide thin films via substrate-directed rapid interfacial deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Arcy, Julio M; Tran, Henry D; Stieg, Adam Z; Gimzewski, James K; Kaner, Richard B

    2012-05-21

    A procedure for depositing thin films of carbon nanostructures is described that overcomes the limitations typically associated with solution based methods. Transparent and conductively continuous carbon coatings can be grown on virtually any type of substrate within seconds. Interfacial surface tension gradients result in directional fluid flow and film spreading at the water/oil interface. Transparent films of carbon nanostructures are produced including aligned ropes of single-walled carbon nanotubes and assemblies of single sheets of chemically converted graphene and graphite oxide. Process scale-up, layer-by-layer deposition, and a simple method for coating non-activated hydrophobic surfaces are demonstrated.

  18. Effect of ion bombardment and substrate orientation on structure and properties of titanium nitride films deposited by unbalanced magnetron sputtering

    CERN Document Server

    Guruvenket, S

    2002-01-01

    The effect of substrate orientation and ion bombardment during the growth on the structure and properties of TiN films deposited by reactive unbalanced magnetron sputtering has been reported. Films deposited at a nitrogen partial pressure of 5x10 sup - sup 5 mbar and a current density of 2.50 mA cm-2 were golden yellow in color, characteristic of stoichiometric TiN. The effect of Si(100) and Si(111) substrates on the TiN film along with the substrate bias has been investigated. With an increase in the substrate bias on Si(111) substrate, TiN(111) is the most preferred orientation. On a Si(100) substrate with an increase in the substrate bias, TiN(220) orientation has been observed. The influence of the substrate on the growth of TiN films has been explained in terms of surface energy. The variation of grain size, resistivity, and the internal stress of TiN films as the function of substrate bias have also been investigated.

  19. Effects of post-deposition annealing ambient on band alignment of RF magnetron-sputtered Y2O3 film on gallium nitride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quah, Hock Jin; Cheong, Kuan Yew

    2013-01-29

    The effects of different post-deposition annealing ambients (oxygen, argon, forming gas (95% N2 + 5% H2), and nitrogen) on radio frequency magnetron-sputtered yttrium oxide (Y2O3) films on n-type gallium nitride (GaN) substrate were studied in this work. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was utilized to extract the bandgap of Y2O3 and interfacial layer as well as establishing the energy band alignment of Y2O3/interfacial layer/GaN structure. Three different structures of energy band alignment were obtained, and the change of band alignment influenced leakage current density-electrical breakdown field characteristics of the samples subjected to different post-deposition annealing ambients. Of these investigated samples, ability of the sample annealed in O2 ambient to withstand the highest electric breakdown field (approximately 6.6 MV/cm) at 10-6 A/cm2 was related to the largest conduction band offset of interfacial layer/GaN (3.77 eV) and barrier height (3.72 eV).

  20. Transglutaminase-induced crosslinking of gelatin-calcium carbonate composite films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuemeng; Liu, Anjun; Ye, Ran; Wang, Wenhang; Li, Xin

    2015-01-01

    The effects of transglutaminase (TGase) on the rheological profiles and interactions of gelatin-calcium carbonate solutions were studied. In addition, mechanical properties, water vapour permeability and microstructures of gelatin-calcium carbonate films were also investigated and compared. Fluorescence data suggested that the interaction of TGase and gelation-calcium carbonate belonged to a static quenching mechanism, and merely one binding site between TGase and gelatin-calcium carbonate was identified. Moreover, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), the mechanical properties and the water vapour permeability studies revealed that TGase favoured the strong intramolecular polymerisation of the peptides in gelatin. The microstructures of the surfaces and cross sections in gelatin-calcium carbonate films were shown by scanning electron microscope (SEM) micrographs. The results of the fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) indicated that TGase caused conformational changes in the proteins films. Therefore, TGase successfully facilitated the formation of gelatin-calcium carbonate composite films. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Electrochemical and Antimicrobial Properties of Diamondlike Carbon-Metal Composite Films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MORRISON, M. L.; BUCHANAN, R. A.; LIAW, P. K.; BERRY, C. J.; BRIGMON, R.; RIESTER, L.; JIN, C.; NARAYAN, R. J.

    2005-05-11

    Implants containing antimicrobial metals may reduce morbidity, mortality, and healthcare costs associated with medical device-related infections. We have deposited diamondlike carbon-silver (DLC-Ag), diamondlike carbon-platinum (DLC-Pt), and diamondlike carbon-silver-platinum (DLC-AgPt) thin films using a multicomponent target pulsed laser deposition process. Transmission electron microscopy of the DLC-silver and DLC-platinum composite films revealed that the silver and platinum self-assemble into nanoparticle arrays within the diamondlike carbon matrix. The diamondlike carbon-silver film possesses hardness and Young's modulus values of 37 GPa and 331 GPa, respectively. The diamondlike carbon-metal composite films exhibited passive behavior at open-circuit potentials. Low corrosion rates were observed during testing in a phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) electrolyte. In addition, the diamondlike carbon-metal composite films were found to be immune to localized corrosion below 1000 mV (SCE). DLC-silver-platinum films demonstrated exceptional antimicrobial properties against Staphylococcus bacteria. It is believed that a galvanic couple forms between platinum and silver, which accelerates silver ion release and provides more robust antimicrobial activity. Diamondlike carbon-silver-platinum films may provide unique biological functionalities and improved lifetimes for cardiovascular, orthopaedic, biosensor, and implantable microelectromechanical systems.

  2. Exceptionally large migration length of carbon and topographically-facilitated self-limiting molecular beam epitaxial growth of graphene on hexagonal boron nitride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plaut, Annette S.; Wurstbauer, Ulrich; Wang, Sheng; Levy, Antonio L.; Fernandes dos Santos, Lara; Wang, Lei; Pfeiffer, Loren N.; Watanabe, Kenji; Taniguchi, Takashi; Dean, Cory R.; Hone, James; Pinczuk, Aron; Garcia, Jorge M.

    2017-04-01

    We demonstrate growth of single-layer graphene (SLG) on hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE), only limited in area by the finite size of the h-BN flakes. Using atomic force microscopy and micro-Raman spectroscopy, we show that for growth over a wide range of temperatures (500 °C – 1000 °C) the deposited carbon atoms spill off the edge of the h-BN flakes. We attribute this spillage to the very high mobility of the carbon atoms on the BN basal plane, consistent with van der Waals MBE. The h-BN flakes vary in size from 30 μm to 100 μm, thus demonstrating that the migration length of carbon atoms on h-BN is greater than 100 μm. When sufficient carbon is supplied to compensate for this loss, which is largely due to this fast migration of the carbon atoms to and off the edges of the h-BN flake, we find that the best growth temperature for MBE SLG on h-BN is ~950 °C. Self-limiting graphene growth appears to be facilitated by topographic h-BN surface features: We have thereby grown MBE self-limited SLG on an h-BN ridge. This opens up future avenues for precisely tailored fabrication of nano- and hetero-structures on pre-patterned h-BN surfaces for device applications.

  3. Carbon nanotube thin film transistors based on aerosol methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavodchikova, Marina Y; Kulmala, Tero; Nasibulin, Albert G; Ermolov, Vladimir; Franssila, Sami; Grigoras, Kestutis; Kauppinen, Esko I

    2009-02-25

    We demonstrate a fabrication method for high-performance field-effect transistors (FETs) based on dry-processed random single-walled carbon nanotube networks (CNTNs) deposited at room temperature. This method is an advantageous alternative to solution-processed and direct CVD grown CNTN FETs, which allows using various substrate materials, including heat-intolerant plastic substrates, and enables an efficient, density-controlled, scalable deposition of as-produced single-walled CNTNs on the substrate directly from the aerosol (floating catalyst) synthesis reactor. Two types of thin film transistor (TFT) structures were fabricated to evaluate the FET performance of dry-processed CNTNs: bottom-gate transistors on Si/SiO2 substrates and top-gate transistors on polymer substrates. Devices exhibited on/off ratios up to 10(5) and field-effect mobilities up to 4 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1). The suppression of hysteresis in the bottom-gate device transfer characteristics by means of thermal treatment in vacuum and passivation by an atomic layer deposited Al(2)O(3) film was investigated. A 32 nm thick Al(2)O(3) layer was found to be able to eliminate the hysteresis.

  4. Silicon and aluminum doping effects on the microstructure and properties of polymeric amorphous carbon films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Xiaoqiang, E-mail: lxq_suse@sina.com [Material Corrosion and Protection Key Laboratory of Sichuan province, Sichuan University of Science and Engineering, Zigong 643000 (China); Hao, Junying, E-mail: jyhao@licp.cas.cn [State Key Laboratory of Solid Lubrication, Lanzhou Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Xie, Yuntao [Material Corrosion and Protection Key Laboratory of Sichuan province, Sichuan University of Science and Engineering, Zigong 643000 (China)

    2016-08-30

    Highlights: • Evolution of nanostructure and properties of the polymeric amorphous carbon films were firstly studied. • Si doping enhanced polymerization of the hydrocarbon chains and Al doping resulted in increase in the ordered carbon clusters of polymeric amorphous carbon films. • Soft polymeric amorphous carbon films exhibited an unconventional frictional behaviors with a superior wear resistance. • The mechanical and vacuum tribological properties of the polymeric amorphous carbon films were significantly improved by Si and Al co-doping. - Abstract: Polymeric amorphous carbon films were prepared by radio frequency (R.F. 13.56 MHz) magnetron sputtering deposition. The microstructure evolution of the deposited polymeric films induced by silicon (Si) and aluminum(Al) doping were scrutinized through infrared spectroscopy, multi-wavelength Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). The comparative results show that Si doping can enhance polymerization and Al doping results in an increase in the ordered carbon clusters. Si and Al co-doping into polymeric films leads to the formation of an unusual dual nanostructure consisting of cross-linked polymer-like hydrocarbon chains and fullerene-like carbon clusters. The super-high elasticity and super-low friction coefficients (<0.002) under a high vacuum were obtained through Si and Al co-doping into the films. Unconventionally, the co-doped polymeric films exhibited a superior wear resistance even though they were very soft. The relationship between the microstructure and properties of the polymeric amorphous carbon films with different elements doping are also discussed in detail.

  5. Applications of thin carbon coatings and films in injection molding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrera, Eusebio Duarte

    In this research, the technical feasibility of two novel applications of thin carbon coatings is demonstrated. The first application consists of using thin carbon coatings on molds for molding ultra-thin plastic parts (nanoparticle thin films or nanopapers to create a conductive top layer. During this research, the technical feasibility of a new approach was proven which provides injection molding of ultra-thin parts at lower pressures, without the need of fast heating/fast cooling or other expensive mold modification. An in-house developed procedure by other members of our group, was employed for coating the mold surface using chemical vapor deposition (CVD) resulting in a graphene coating with carbide bonding to the mold surface. The coating resulted in a significant decrease of surface friction and consequently easiness of flow when compared to their uncoated counterparts. Thermoplastic polymers and their composites are a very attractive alternative but are hindered by the non-conductive nature of polymers. There are two general approaches used to date to achieve EMI shielding for plastic products. One is to spray a conductive metal coating onto the plastic surface forming a layer that must maintain its shielding effectiveness (SE), and its adhesion to the plastic throughout the expected life of the product. However, metal coatings add undesirable weight and tend to corrode over time. Furthermore, scratching the coating may create shielding failure; therefore, a protective topcoat may be required. The other approach is to use polymer composites filled with conductive fillers such as carbon black (CB), carbon nanofiber (CNF), and carbon nanotube (CNT). While conductive fillers may increase the electrical conductivity of polymer composites, the loading of such fillers often cannot reach a high level (nanoparticle thin films or nanopapers to create a conductive top layer. For many years, in-mold coating (IMC) has been commercially applied to Sheet Molding Compound

  6. Establishment of carbon atomic composition analysis by proton backscattering

    CERN Document Server

    Gotoh, Y; Fujii, R; Tsuji, H; Ishikawa, J

    2003-01-01

    Transition metal nitride and carbide thin films are expected to serve as a cathode material for cold cathodes. Since the atomic compositions of nitrogen and carbon will strongly affect the properties of the electron emission surface, quantification of these elements are necessary. In this report, we tried to quantify the carbon atomic compositions in the transition metal carbide thin films by resonant nuclear reaction of sup 1 sup 2 C(p, p) sup 1 sup 2 C.

  7. Superior piezoelectric composite films: taking advantage of carbon nanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saber, Nasser; Araby, Sherif; Meng, Qingshi; Hsu, Hung-Yao; Yan, Cheng; Azari, Sara; Lee, Sang-Heon; Xu, Yanan; Ma, Jun; Yu, Sirong

    2014-01-31

    Piezoelectric composites comprising an active phase of ferroelectric ceramic and a polymer matrix have recently found numerous sensory applications. However, it remains a major challenge to further improve their electromechanical response for advanced applications such as precision control and monitoring systems. We here investigated the incorporation of graphene platelets (GnPs) and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs), each with various weight fractions, into PZT (lead zirconate titanate)/epoxy composites to produce three-phase nanocomposites. The nanocomposite films show markedly improved piezoelectric coefficients and electromechanical responses (50%) besides an enhancement of ~200% in stiffness. The carbon nanomaterials strengthened the impact of electric field on the PZT particles by appropriately raising the electrical conductivity of the epoxy. GnPs have been proved to be far more promising in improving the poling behavior and dynamic response than MWNTs. The superior dynamic sensitivity of GnP-reinforced composite may be caused by the GnPs' high load transfer efficiency arising from their two-dimensional geometry and good compatibility with the matrix. The reduced acoustic impedance mismatch resulting from the improved thermal conductance may also contribute to the higher sensitivity of GnP-reinforced composite. This research pointed out the potential of employing GnPs to develop highly sensitive piezoelectric composites for sensing applications.

  8. Effect of source gas chemistry on tribological performance of diamond-like carbon films.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erdemir, A.; Eryilmaz, O. L.; Fenske, G. R.; Nilufer, I. B.

    1999-08-23

    In this study, we investigated the effects of various source gases (i. e., methane, ethane, ethylene, acetylene and methane + hydrogen) on friction and wear performance of diamond-like carbon (DLC) films. Specifically, we described the anomalous nature and fundamental friction and wear mechanisms of DLC films derived from gas discharge plasmas with very low to very high hydrogen content. The films were deposited on steel substrates by a plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition process at room temperature and the tribological tests were performed in dry nitrogen. The results of tribological tests revealed a close correlation between the friction and wear coefficients of the DLC films and the source gas chemistry. Specifically, films grown in source gases with higher hydrogen-to-carbon ratios had much lower friction coefficients and wear rates than the films derived from source gases with lower hydrogen-to-carbon ratios. The lowest friction coefficient (0.002) was achieved with a film derived from 25% methane--75% hydrogen while the films derived from acetylene had a coefficient of 0.15. Similar correlations were observed on wear rates. Specifically, the films derived from hydrogen rich plasmas had the least wear while the films derived from pure acetylene suffered the highest wear. We used a combination of scanning and transmission electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy to characterize the structural chemistry of the resultant DLC films.

  9. Highly stressed carbon film coatings on silicon potential applications

    CERN Multimedia

    Sharda, T

    2002-01-01

    The fabrication of highly stressed and strongly adhered nanocrystalline diamond films on Si substrates is presented. A microwave plasma CVD method with controlled and continuous bias current density was used to grow the films. The stress/curvature of the films can be varied and controlled by altering the BCD. Potential applications for these films include particle physics and x-ray optics.

  10. Surface properties of metal-nitride and metal-carbide films deposited on Nb for RF superconductivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garwin, E.L.; King, F.K.; Kirby, R.E.; Aita, O.

    1983-09-01

    Various effects occur which can prevent attainment of the high Q's and/or the high gradient fields necessary for the operation of rf superconducting cavities. One of these effects, multipactor, both causes the cavity to detune during filling due to resonant secondary electron emission at the cavity walls, and lowers the Q by dissipative processes. TiN deposited onto the high field regions of room temperature Al cavities has been used at SLAC to successfully reduce multipactor in the past. We have therefore studied TiN and its companion materials, NbN, NbC, and TiC, all on Nb substrates under several realistic conditions: (1) as deposited, (2) exposed to air, and (3) 1 keV electron-bombarded. The studied films (up to 14 nm thickness) were sputter deposited onto sputter-cleaned Nb substrates. Results indicate that the materials tested gave substantially the same results. The maximum secondary electron yields for as-deposited films was about 1.0 to 1.2. These yields rose to greater than 1.5 upon air-exposure and were reduced to nearly the pre-oxidized values after electron bombardment (about 3 x 10/sup 17/ electrons-cm/sup -2/ in the case of NbN and NbC). XPS analysis showed that the oxides (e.g. TiO/sub 2/ in the case of TiN films) formed during air exposure were only slightly reduced (converted to lower oxides) by the electron beam exposure. AES showed a slight reduction in the surface O concentration following beam exposure. The results indicate that any of these films would be poor choices if simply deposited and exposed to air, but, in fact, the in-situ electron bombardment which occurs in cavities serves to reduce the effective secondary electron yield and thereby causes a substantial reduction in multipacting.

  11. Potentiality of the composite fulleren based carbon films as the stripper foils for tandem accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Vasin, A V; Rusavsky, A V; Totsky, Y I; Vishnevski, I N

    2001-01-01

    The problem of the radiation resistance of the carbon stripper foils is considered. The short review of the experimental data available in literature and original experimental results of the are presented. In the paper discussed is the possibility of composite fulleren based carbon films to be used for preparation of the stripper foils. Some technological methods for preparation of composite fulleren based carbon films are proposed. Raman scattering and atom force microscopy were used for investigation of the fulleren and composite films deposited by evaporation of the C sub 6 sub 0 fulleren powder.

  12. Hybridizing Carbon Nitride Colloids with a Shell of Water-Soluble Conjugated Polymers for Tunable Full-Color Emission and Synergistic Cell Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Qianling; Xu, Jingsan; Shen, Guizhi; Zhang, Chao; Li, Lidong; Antonietti, Markus

    2017-12-20

    We present the preparation of a new multicolor emission system constructed from two complementary conjugated materials that are highly photoluminescent, that is, phenyl-modified carbon nitride (PhCN) colloids as the core and water-soluble conjugated polymers (WSCPs) adsorbed as the shell. The fluorescence bands of the PhCN and WSCPs effectively complement each other and the overall emission can be simply adjusted to fully cover the visible light spectrum with white light emission also accessible. Photophysical insights imply that the interactions between PhCN and WSCPs preserve the binary system from emission distortion and degradation, which is essential to delicately tune the overall fluorescence bands. Notably, the continuously tunable emission color is achieved under single-wavelength excitation (365 nm). This hybrid shows a synergistic permeation performance in cell imaging, that is, PhCN nanoparticles help the WSCP to enter the cells and therefore multicolor cellular imaging achieved.

  13. Tilting of carbon encapsulated metallic nanocolumns in carbon-nickel nanocomposite films by ion beam assisted deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krause, Matthias [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, PF-510119, 01314 Dresden (Germany); Technische Universitaet Dresden, D-01062 Dresden (Germany); Muecklich, Arndt; Zschornak, Matthias; Wintz, Sebastian; Gemming, Sibylle; Abrasonis, Gintautas [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, PF-510119, 01314 Dresden (Germany); Oates, Thomas W. H. [Leibniz-Institut fuer Analytische Wissenschaft, ISAS e.V., Albert-Einstein-Str. 9, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Luis Endrino, Jose [Surfaces and Coatings Department, Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, c/Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz 3, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Baehtz, Carsten; Shalimov, Artem [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, PF-510119, 01314 Dresden (Germany); Rossendorf Beamline, European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, F-38043 Grenoble (France)

    2012-07-30

    The influence of assisting low-energy ({approx}50-100 eV) ion irradiation effects on the morphology of C:Ni ({approx}15 at. %) nanocomposite films during ion beam assisted deposition (IBAD) is investigated. It is shown that IBAD promotes the columnar growth of carbon encapsulated metallic nanoparticles. The momentum transfer from assisting ions results in tilting of the columns in relation to the growing film surface. Complex secondary structures are obtained, in which a significant part of the columns grows under local epitaxy via the junction of sequentially deposited thin film fractions. The influence of such anisotropic film morphology on the optical properties is highlighted.

  14. Solar-Driven Reduction of Aqueous Protons Coupled to Selective Alcohol Oxidation with a Carbon Nitride-Molecular Ni Catalyst System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasap, Hatice; Caputo, Christine A; Martindale, Benjamin C M; Godin, Robert; Lau, Vincent Wing-Hei; Lotsch, Bettina V; Durrant, James R; Reisner, Erwin

    2016-07-27

    Solar water-splitting represents an important strategy toward production of the storable and renewable fuel hydrogen. The water oxidation half-reaction typically proceeds with poor efficiency and produces the unprofitable and often damaging product, O2. Herein, we demonstrate an alternative approach and couple solar H2 generation with value-added organic substrate oxidation. Solar irradiation of a cyanamide surface-functionalized melon-type carbon nitride ((NCN)CNx) and a molecular nickel(II) bis(diphosphine) H2-evolution catalyst (NiP) enabled the production of H2 with concomitant selective oxidation of benzylic alcohols to aldehydes in high yield under purely aqueous conditions, at room temperature and ambient pressure. This one-pot system maintained its activity over 24 h, generating products in 1:1 stoichiometry, separated in the gas and solution phases. The (NCN)CNx-NiP system showed an activity of 763 μmol (g CNx)(-1) h(-1) toward H2 and aldehyde production, a Ni-based turnover frequency of 76 h(-1), and an external quantum efficiency of 15% (λ = 360 ± 10 nm). This precious metal-free and nontoxic photocatalytic system displays better performance than an analogous system containing platinum instead of NiP. Transient absorption spectroscopy revealed that the photoactivity of (NCN)CNx is due to efficient substrate oxidation of the material, which outweighs possible charge recombination compared to the nonfunctionalized melon-type carbon nitride. Photoexcited (NCN)CNx in the presence of an organic substrate can accumulate ultralong-lived "trapped electrons", which allow for fuel generation in the dark. The artificial photosynthetic system thereby catalyzes a closed redox cycle showing 100% atom economy and generates two value-added products, a solar chemical, and solar fuel.

  15. Intercorrelated Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4} nanoparticles decorated with graphic carbon nitride: Enhanced stability and photocatalytic activities for water treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ren, Jia; Chai, Yuanyuan; Liu, Qianqian; Zhang, Lu; Dai, Wei-Lin, E-mail: wldai@fudan.edu.cn

    2017-05-01

    Highlights: • Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4} nanoparticles decorated with graphite-like carbon nitride material (g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4}). • Synthesized by a template-free in situ precipitation method. • Excellent (7 times higher) photooxidation ability. • Much more stable than pure Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4} in the photodegradation process. • Formation of heterojunction between Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4} and g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} contributed to the separation efficiency. - Abstract: The method of decorating Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4} nanoparticles with carbon nitride material (g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4}) is demonstrated as an efficient pathway to remarkably improve the stability and photocatalytic performance of Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4} nanoparticles which have been widely used in photocatalysis, but limited by the instability. The improved material herein results in the largely enhanced photocatalytic performance for water purification under visible light irradiation, which was nearly 7 times as high as that of pure Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4}. Meanwhile, the as-obtained materials show the unique stable property, mainly contributed by the protection effect of decorated g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} sheet. Additionally, the radical trapping experiments revealed that the introduction of g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} transformed the photocatalytic mechanism to some degree, where ·O{sub 2}{sup −} played a more important role. The tremendous enhancement in catalytic performance may be attributed to the larger surface area, controllable particle size and the synergistic effect between Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4} and g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4}, promoting the separation efficiency of the photogenerated electron-hole pairs. The decorating system can in principle be broadly put into use for unstable photocatalysts.

  16. Adherent diamond film deposited on Cu substrate by carbon transport from nanodiamond buried under Pt interlayer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Xuezhang [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Central South University, Changsha, 410083 (China); Wei Qiuping, E-mail: qiupwei@csu.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Central South University, Changsha, 410083 (China); State Key Laboratory of Powder Metallurgy, Central South University, Changsha, 410083 (China); Yu Zhiming, E-mail: zhiming@csu.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Central South University, Changsha, 410083 (China); State Key Laboratory of Powder Metallurgy, Central South University, Changsha, 410083 (China); Yang Taiming; Zhai Hao [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Central South University, Changsha, 410083 (China)

    2013-01-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Adherent polycrystalline diamond films were grown on copper substrate by carbon transport. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The nucleation density was increased to 10{sup 11} cm{sup -2}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Diamond films were a composite structure of nano-crystalline diamond layer and micro-crystalline diamond layer. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Diamond nucleation was based by carbon dissolving from UDDs to Pt interlayer and formation of sp{sup 3}-bonded diamond clusters at the Pt surface. - Abstract: Diamond film deposited on Cu suffered from poor adhesion mainly due to the large mismatch of thermal expansion coefficients and the lack of affinity between carbon and Cu. Enhancing diamond nucleation by carbon transport from buried nanodiamond through a Pt ultrathin interlayer, adherent diamond film was then deposited on Cu substrate without distinctly metallic interlayer. This novel nucleation mechanism increased diamond nucleation density to 10{sup 11} cm{sup -2}, and developed diamond film with a composite structure of nano-crystalline diamond (NCD) layer and micro-crystalline diamond layer. Diamond film was characterized by the scanning electron microscope (SEM) and Raman spectroscope, respectively. The composition of diamond film/Cu substrate interface was examined by electron probe microanalysis (EPMA). The adhesion of diamond film was evaluated by indentation test. Those results show that a Pt ultrathin interlayer provides stronger chemically bonded interfaces and improve film adhesion.

  17. Chemical structural analysis of diamondlike carbon films: I. Surface growth model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takabayashi, Susumu; Ješko, Radek; Shinohara, Masanori; Hayashi, Hiroyuki; Sugimoto, Rintaro; Ogawa, Shuichi; Takakuwa, Yuji

    2018-02-01

    The surface growth mechanisms of diamondlike carbon (DLC) films has been clarified. DLC films were synthesized in atmospheres with a fixed methane-to-argon ratio at different temperatures up to 700 °C by the photoemission-assisted glow discharge of photoemission-assisted plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition. The electrical resistivity of the films decreased logarithmically as the synthesis temperature was increased. Conversely, the dielectric constant of the films increased and became divergent at high temperature. However, the very high electrical resistivity of the film synthesized at 150 °C was retained even after post-annealing treatments at temperatures up to 500 °C, and divergence of the dielectric constant was not observed. Such films exhibited excellent thermal stability and retained large amounts of hydrogen, even after post-annealing treatments. These results suggest that numerous hydrogen atoms were incorporated into the DLC films during synthesis at low temperatures. Hydrogen atoms terminate carbon dangling bonds in the films to restrict π-conjugated growth. During synthesis at high temperature, hydrogen was desorbed from the interior of the growing films and π-conjugated conductive films were formed. Moreover, hydrogen radicals were chemisorbed by carbon atoms at the growing DLC surface, leading to removal of carbon atoms from the surface as methane gas. The methane molecules decomposed into hydrocarbons and hydrogen radicals through the attack of electrons above the surface. Hydrogen radicals contributed to the etching reaction cycle of the film; the hydrocarbon radicals were polymerized by reacting with other radicals and the methane source. The polymer radicals remained above the film, preventing the supply of the methane source and disrupting the action of argon ions. At high temperatures, the resultant DLC films were rough and thin.

  18. Synthesis of superlow friction carbon films from highly hydrogenated methane plasmas.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erdemir, A.; Eryilmaz, O. L.; Nilufer, I. B.; Fenske, G. R.

    2000-10-13

    In this study, we investigated the friction and wear performance of diamondlike carbon films (DLC) derived from increasingly hydrogenated methane plasmas. The films were deposited on steel substrates by a plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition process at room temperature and the tribological tests were performed in dry nitrogen. Tests results revealed a close correlation between the hydrogen in source gas plasma and the friction and wear coefficients of the DLC films. Specifically, films grown in plasmas with higher hydrogen-to-carbon ratios had much lower friction coefficients and wear rates than did films derived from source gases with lower hydrogen-to-carbon ratios. The lowest friction coefficient (0.003) was achieved with a film derived from 25% methane--75% hydrogen, while a coefficient of 0.015 was found for films derived from pure methane. Similar correlations were observed for wear rates. Films derived from hydrogen-rich plasmas had the least wear, while films derived from pure methane suffered the highest wear. We used a combination of surface analytical methods to characterize the structure and chemistry of the DLC films and worn surfaces.

  19. Enhanced current transport and injection in thin-film gallium-nitride light-emitting diodes by laser-based doping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Su Jin; Kim, Kyeong Heon; Chung, Ho Young; Shin, Hee Woong; Lee, Byeong Ryong; Jeong, Tak; Park, Hyung Jo; Kim, Tae Geun

    2014-10-08

    This paper reports improvements in the electrical and optical properties of blue-emission gallium nitride (GaN)-based thin-film light-emitting diodes (TFLEDs) after laser-based Si doping (LBSD) of a nitrogen-face n-GaN (denoted as hereafter n-GaN) layer. Experimental results show that the light-output powers of the flat- and rough-surface TFLEDs after LBSD are 52.1 and 11.35% higher than those before LBSD, respectively, at a current of 350 mA, while the corresponding operating voltages are decreased by 0.22 and 0.28 V for the flat- and rough-surface TFLEDs after LBSD, respectively. The reduced operating voltage after LBSD of the top n-GaN layer may result from the remarkably decreased specific contact resistance at the metal/n-GaN interface and the low series resistance of the TFLED device. The LBSD of n-GaN increases the number of nitrogen vacancies, and Si substitutes for Ga (SiGa) at the metal/n-GaN interface to produce highly Si-doped regions in n-GaN, leading to a decrease in the Schottky barrier height and width. As a result, the specific contact resistances are significantly decreased to 1.56 × 10(-5) and 2.86 × 10(-5) Ω cm(2) for the flat- and rough-surface samples after LBSD, respectively. On the other hand, the increased light-output power after LBSD can be explained by the uniform current spreading, efficient current injection, and enhanced light scattering resulting from the low contact resistivity, low lateral current resistance, and additional textured surface, respectively. Furthermore, LBSD did not degrade the electrical properties of the TFLEDs owing to low reverse leakage currents. The results indicate that our approach could potentially enable high-efficiency and high-power capabilities for optoelectronic devices.

  20. Electrical and optical properties of silicon-doped gallium nitride ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science; Volume 31; Issue 1. Electrical and optical properties of silicon-doped gallium nitride polycrystalline films. S R Bhattacharyya A K Pal. Thin Films Volume ... Electrical, optical and microstructural properties were studied for these films. It was observed that films deposited at room ...

  1. Silicon nitride and intrinsic amorphous silicon double antireflection coatings for thin-film solar cells on foreign substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Da; Kunz, Thomas [Bavarian Center for Applied Energy Research (ZAE Bayern), Division: Photovoltaics and Thermosensoric, Haberstr. 2a, 91058 Erlangen (Germany); Wolf, Nadine [Bavarian Center for Applied Energy Research (ZAE Bayern), Division: Energy Efficiency, Am Galgenberg 87, 97074 Wuerzburg (Germany); Liebig, Jan Philipp [Materials Science and Engineering, Institute I, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Martensstr. 5, 91058 Erlangen (Germany); Wittmann, Stephan; Ahmad, Taimoor; Hessmann, Maik T.; Auer, Richard [Bavarian Center for Applied Energy Research (ZAE Bayern), Division: Photovoltaics and Thermosensoric, Haberstr. 2a, 91058 Erlangen (Germany); Göken, Mathias [Materials Science and Engineering, Institute I, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Martensstr. 5, 91058 Erlangen (Germany); Brabec, Christoph J. [Bavarian Center for Applied Energy Research (ZAE Bayern), Division: Photovoltaics and Thermosensoric, Haberstr. 2a, 91058 Erlangen (Germany); Institute of Materials for Electronics and Energy Technology, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Martensstr. 7, 91058 Erlangen (Germany)

    2015-05-29

    Hydrogenated intrinsic amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) was investigated as a surface passivation method for crystalline silicon thin film solar cells on graphite substrates. The results of the experiments, including quantum efficiency and current density-voltage measurements, show improvements in cell performance. This improvement is due to surface passivation by an a-Si:H(i) layer, which increases the open circuit voltage and the fill factor. In comparison with our previous work, we have achieved an increase of 0.6% absolute cell efficiency for a 40 μm thick 4 cm{sup 2} aperture area on the graphite substrate. The optical properties of the SiN{sub x}/a-Si:H(i) stack were studied using spectroscopic ellipsometer techniques. Scanning transmission electron microscopy inside a scanning electron microscope was applied to characterize the cross section of the SiN{sub x}/a-Si:H(i) stack using focus ion beam preparation. - Highlights: • We report a 10.8% efficiency for thin-film silicon solar cell on graphite. • Hydrogenated intrinsic amorphous silicon was applied for surface passivation. • SiN{sub x}/a-Si:H(i) stacks were characterized by spectroscopic ellipsometer techniques. • Cross-section micrograph was obtained by scanning transmission electron microscopy. • Quantum efficiency and J-V measurements show improvements in the cell performance.

  2. Plasmonic Properties of Nanostructured Diamond Like Carbon/Silver Nanocomposite Films with Nanohole Arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šarūnas MEŠKINIS

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Plasmonic properties of the diamond like carbon nanocomposite films with embedded silver nanoparticles with patterned nanohole arrays were analyzed in this study. The films were deposited by unbalanced reactive magnetron sputtering of silver target. Nanopatterning of the films was performed by combining electron beam nanolithography and ion beam etching techniques. Modeling of plasmonic properties was done using the classical Maxwell-Garnett theory. Modeling data and experimental results were in good accordance. Formation of the nanohole pattern in diamond like carbon films doped with silver resulted in decreased intensity of the surface plasmon resonance absorbance peak. No new absorbance or transmittance peaks were observed after the nanopattering. It was explained by extraordinary transmission effect in nanostructured DLC : Ag film films due to plasmon polariton resonance inside of the nanoholes.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.22.4.13193

  3. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy investigation of multiwall carbon nanotube/nickel oxide nanocomposite thin films

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Roro, Kittessa T

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Owing to their unique electronic and optical properties, nanocomposite thin films are widely used for converting solar radiation therapy into other conventional energy forms, such as heat and electricity. Carbon nanotube-based composites which can...

  4. Microstructure and tribological performance of diamond-like carbon films deposited on hydrogenated rubber

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pal, J.P. van der; Martinez Martinez, Diego; Pei, Y.T.; Rudolf, P.; Hosson, J.Th.M. De

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, the microstructure and tribological performance of diamond-like carbon (DLC) films prepared by plasma chemical vapor deposition on hydrogenated nitrile butadiene rubbers (HNBR) are studied. Different negative variations of temperature during film growth were selected by proper changes

  5. Effect of Dielectric Constant and Dispersion of Particle on Hydrophobicity of Carbon Nanotube Based Electrocatalyst Film

    OpenAIRE

    YUDIANTI, Rike; Onggo, Holia; Syampurwadi, Anung

    2012-01-01

    Preparation Carbon Nanotube (CNT) based of electrocatalyst film using filtration methode is recently performed. Hydropobicity of electrocatalyst is prerequisite to eliminating PolyTetraFluoroEthylene (PTFE) treament as hydrophobic agent that commonly performed on the comercial electrocatalyst. The preparation was carried out using hydrophilic membrane to obtaining good electrocatalyst film. Technique of preparation and formulation of dispersed solution were optimized to improve hydrophobicity...

  6. Magnetism of carbon doped Mn 5 Si 3 and Mn 5 Ge 3 films

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The magnetic properties of Mn5Si3C and Mn5Ge3C films prepared by magnetron cosputtering or C+-ion implantation are studied. The carbon-doped films exhibit ferromagnetic properties with Curie temperatures C well above room temperature and metallic conductivity, making them possible candidates for future ...

  7. Macrophage-mediated erosion of gamma irradiated poly(trimethylene carbonate films

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bat, E.; van Kooten, Theo G.; Feijen, Jan; Grijpma, Dirk W.

    2009-01-01

    A macrophage culture model was used to investigate the erosion of gamma irradiated poly(trimethylene carbonate) (PTMC) films. When the PTMC films were incubated in the culture medium, but physically separated from the cells by a membrane, no erosion occurred. In contrast, when the J774A macrophages

  8. Multiwalled carbon nanotube films as small-sized temperature sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Bartolomeo, A.; Sarno, M.; Giubileo, F.; Altavilla, C.; Iemmo, L.; Piano, S.; Bobba, F.; Longobardi, M.; Scarfato, A.; Sannino, D.; Cucolo, A. M.; Ciambelli, P.

    2009-03-01

    We present the fabrication of thick and dense carbon nanotube networks in the form of freestanding films (CNTFs) and the study of their electric resistance as a function of the temperature, from 4 to 420 K. A nonmetallic behavior with a monotonic R(T ) and a temperature coefficient of resistance around -7×10-4 K-1 is generally observed. A behavioral accordance of the CNTF conductance with the temperature measured by a solid-state thermistor (ZnNO, Si, or Pt) is demonstrated, suggesting the possibility of using CNTFs as temperature small-sized (freely scalable) sensors, besides being confirmed by a wide range of sensitivity, fast response, and good stability and durability. Concerning electric behavior, we also underline that a transition from nonmetal to metal slightly below 273 K has been rarely observed. A model involving regions of highly anisotropic metallic conduction separated by tunneling barrier regions can explain the nonmetallic to metallic crossover based on the competing mechanisms of the metallic resistance rise and the barrier resistance lowering.

  9. Decomposition of ethylene carbonate on electrodeposited metal thin film anode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bridel, Jean-Sebastien; Grugeon, Sylvie; Laruelle, Stephane; Tarascon, Jean-Marie [Laboratoire de Reactivite et Chimie des Solides, Universite de Picardie Jules Verne CNRS (UMR-6007), Faculte des Sciences, 33 rue Saint-Leu 80039, Amiens Cedex (France); Hassoun, Jusef; Reale, Priscilla; Scrosati, Bruno [Chemistry Department, University of Rome ' ' La Sapienza' ' , 00185 Roma (Italy)

    2010-04-02

    Metals capable of forming alloys with Li are of great interest as an alternative to present carbon electrodes, hence the importance of knowing their interactions with electrolytes is necessary. Herein we report further on the high-voltage extra irreversibility of Sn electrodeposited thin films vs. Li in EC-DMC 1 M LiPF{sub 6} electrolytes. We show that this high-voltage irreversibility is strongly dependent upon the electrolyte composition as demonstrated by its disappearance in EC-free electrolytes. This finding coupled with IR spectroscopy measurements provides direct evidence for the tin-driven catalytic degradation of EC during the discharge of Sn/Li cells. From an electrochemical survey of various metals, capable of alloying with Li, we found that Bi and Pb behaved like Sn while Si and Sb did not act as catalysts towards EC degradation. A rationale for such behaviour is proposed, a procedure to bypass EC degradation with the addition of VC is presented, and an explanation for the non-observance of catalytic-driven EC degradation for Sn/C composites is provided. (author)

  10. Carbon and nitrogen co-doping self-assembled MoS2 multilayer films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoqin; Xu, Jiao; Chai, Liqiang; He, Tengfei; Yu, Fucheng; Wang, Peng

    2017-06-01

    Mo-S-C-N composite films were prepared using reactive magnetron sputtering of graphite and MoS2 targets in argon and nitrogen atmospheres. The effects of carbon/nitrogen co-doping and carbon concentration on the composition, microstructure, mechanical and