WorldWideScience

Sample records for carbon nanotubes synthesis

  1. Carbon Nanotubes Synthesis Through Gamma Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tirado, Pablo; Garcia, Rafael; Montes, Jorge; Melendrez, Rodrigo; Barboza, Marcelino; Contreras, Oscar

    2015-03-01

    Carbon nanotubes show a great potential of applications since there discovery by Iijima in 1991[1] due to their numerous physical-chemical properties such as their high weight to strength relationship, which make them ideal to use in high resistance compound materials, and in many other applications[2] In this work, a novel method for the synthesis of carbon nanotubes is presented, starting from an ultra-thin sheet of graphite synthesized by the chemical vapor decomposition technique (CVD), using ultra high purity methane and hydrogen at 1200°C in a horizontal quartz reactor. For the synthesis of carbon nanotubes, the graphite sheets were exposed to different doses of radiation, with the objective of breaking the graphite bonds and form carbon nanotubes; a Gammacell equipment model 220 Excel was used for the purpose, which counts with a radiation source of cobalt 60, and a current radiation rate of 0.9 Gy/seconds. The time of exposure to radiation was varied in each sample, according to the desired dose of radiation in each case, afterwards the samples were characterized using the Raman spectroscopy and TEM microscopy techniques with the objective of observing the kind of nanotubes formed, their morphology and their number of defects. Results will be shown during the poster session.

  2. Laser ablative synthesis of carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Michael W.; Jordan, Kevin; Park, Cheol

    2010-03-02

    An improved method for the production of single walled carbon nanotubes that utilizes an RF-induction heated side-pumped synthesis chamber for the production of such. Such a method, while capable of producing large volumes of carbon nanotubes, concurrently permits the use of a simplified apparatus that allows for greatly reduced heat up and cool down times and flexible flowpaths that can be readily modified for production efficiency optimization. The method of the present invention utilizes a free electron laser operating at high average and peak fluence to illuminate a rotating and translating graphite/catalyst target to obtain high yields of SWNTs without the use of a vacuum chamber.

  3. Chitosan-mediated synthesis of carbon nanotube-gold nanohybrids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GRAVEL; Edmond; FOILLARD; Stéphanie; DORIS; Eric

    2010-01-01

    Metal-nanotube nanohybrids were produced by in situ synthesis and stabilization of gold nanoparticles on chitosan-functionalized carbon nanotubes.The formation of gold nanoparticles from tetrachloroauric acid was observed after only a few minutes of contact with the functionalized nanotubes,at room temperature.These results suggest that adsorption of chitosan at the surface of carbon nanotubes permits smooth reduction of the metallic salt and efficient anchoring of gold nanoparticles to the nanotubes.

  4. Synthesis of Carbon Nanotube (CNT Composite Membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dusan Losic

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanotubes are attractive approach for designing of new membranes for advanced molecular separation because of their unique transport properties and ability to mimic biological protein channels. In this work the synthetic approach for fabrication of carbon nanotubes (CNTs composite membranes is presented. The method is based on growth of multi walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT using chemical vapour deposition (CVD on the template of nanoporous alumina (PA membranes. The influence of experimental conditions including carbon precursor, temperature, deposition time, and PA template on CNT growth process and quality of fabricated membranes was investigated. The synthesis of CNT/PA composites with controllable nanotube dimensions such as diameters (30–150 nm, and thickness (5–100 µm, was demonstrated. The chemical composition and morphological characteristics of fabricated CNT/PA composite membranes were investigated by various characterisation techniques including scanning electron microscopy (SEM, energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDXS, high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM and x-ray diffraction (XRD. Transport properties of prepared membranes were explored by diffusion of dye (Rose Bengal used as model of hydrophilic transport molecule.

  5. Synthesis and Application of Carbon Nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qun Zeng; Zhenhua Li; Yuhong Zhou

    2006-01-01

    Owing to the unique structure, the superior physical and chemical properties, the super strong mechanical performances, and so on, carbon nanotubes have attracted the attention of researchers all over the world. In this article, the basic properties and the main production processes of carbon nanotubes are introduced in brief, and the progress of applied research for carbon nanotubes is reviewed.

  6. Apparatus for the laser ablative synthesis of carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Michael W.; Jordan, Kevin

    2010-02-16

    An RF-induction heated side-pumped synthesis chamber for the production of carbon nanotubes. Such an apparatus, while capable of producing large volumes of carbon nanotubes, concurrently provides a simplified apparatus that allows for greatly reduced heat up and cool down times and flexible flowpaths that can be readily modified for production efficiency optimization.

  7. Carbon Nanotube Synthesis Using Coal Pyrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moothi, Kapil; Simate, Geoffrey S; Falcon, Rosemary; Iyuke, Sunny E; Meyyappan, M

    2015-09-01

    This study investigates carbon nanotube (CNT) production from coal pyrolysis wherein the output gases are used in a chemical vapor deposition reactor. The carbon products are similar to those using commercial coal gas as feedstock, but coal is a relatively cheaper feedstock compared to high purity source gases. A Gibbs minimization model has been developed to predict the volume percentages of product gases from coal pyrolysis. Methane and carbon monoxide were the largest carbon components of the product stream and thus formed the primary source for CNT synthesis. Both the model and the observations showed that increasing the furnace temperature led to a decrease in the absolute quantities of "useful" product gases, with the optimal temperature between 400 and 500 °C. Based on the experimental data, a kinetic rate law for CNT from coal pyrolysis was derived as d[CNT]/dt = K([CO][CH4])(1/2), where K is a function of several equilibrium constants representing various reactions in the CNT formation process.

  8. Carbon nanotubes from synthesis to in vivo biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajid, Muhammad Imran; Jamshaid, Usama; Jamshaid, Talha; Zafar, Nadiah; Fessi, H; Elaissari, Abdelhamid

    2016-03-30

    Owing to their unique and interesting properties, extensive research round the globe has been carried out on carbon nanotubes and carbon nanotubes based systems to investigate their practical usefulness in biomedical applications. The results from these studies demonstrate a great promise in their use in targeted drug delivery systems, diagnostic techniques and in bio-analytical applications. Although, carbon nanotubes possess quite interesting properties, which make them potential candidates in the biomedical science, but they also have some inherent properties which arise great concern regarding their biosafety. In this comprehensive review, we have discussed different aspects of carbon nanotubes and carbon nanotube based systems related to biomedical applications. In the beginning, a short historical account of these tiny yet powerful particles is given followed by discussion regarding their types, properties, methods of synthesis, large scale production method, purification techniques and characterization aspects of carbon nanotubes. In the second part of the review, the functionalization of carbon nanotubes is reviewed in detail, which is not only important to make them biocompatible and stable in biological systems but also render them a great property of loading various biomolecules, diagnostic and therapeutic moieties resulting in diversified applications. In the final part of the review, emphasis is given on the pharmacokinetic aspects of carbon nanotubes including administration routes, absorption mechanisms, distribution and elimination of carbon nanotubes based systems. Lastly, a comprehensive account about the potential biomedical applications has been given followed by insights into the future.

  9. Synthesis of Carbon Nanotubes by MWPCVD at Low Temperature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王升高; 汪建华; 王传新; 马志彬; 满卫东

    2002-01-01

    Growth of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) at low temperature is very important to the applications of nanotubes. In this paper, under the catalytic effect of cobalt nanoparticles supported by SiO2, CNTs were synthesized by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition (MWPCVD)below 500℃. It demonstrates that MWPCVD can be a very efficient process for the synthesis of CNTs at low temperature.

  10. Synthesis of carbon nanotubes with and without catalyst particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cuniberti Gianaurelio

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The initial development of carbon nanotube synthesis revolved heavily around the use of 3d valence transition metals such as Fe, Ni, and Co. More recently, noble metals (e.g. Au and poor metals (e.g. In, Pb have been shown to also yield carbon nanotubes. In addition, various ceramics and semiconductors can serve as catalytic particles suitable for tube formation and in some cases hybrid metal/metal oxide systems are possible. All-carbon systems for carbon nanotube growth without any catalytic particles have also been demonstrated. These different growth systems are briefly examined in this article and serve to highlight the breadth of avenues available for carbon nanotube synthesis.

  11. Synthesis, assembly, and applications of single-walled carbon nanotube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Koungmin

    This dissertation presents the synthesis and assembly of aligned carbon nanotubes, and their applications in both nano-electronics such as transistor and integrated circuits and macro-electronics in energy conversion devices as transparent conducting electrodes. Also, the high performance chemical sensor using metal oxide nanowire has been demonstrated. Chapter 1 presents a brief introduction of carbon nanotube, followed by discussion of a new synthesis technique using nanosphere lithography to grow highly aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes atop quartz and sapphire substrates. This method offers great potential to produce carbon nanotube arrays with simultaneous control over the nanotube orientation, position, density, diameter and even chirality. Chapter 3 introduces the wafer-scale integration and assembly of aligned carbon nanotubes, including full-wafer scale synthesis and transfer of massively aligned carbon nanotube arrays, and nanotube device fabrication on 4 inch Si/SiO2 wafer to yield submicron channel transistors with high on-current density ˜ 20 muA/mum and good on/off ratio and CMOS integrated circuits. In addition, various chemical doping methods for n-type nanotube transistors are studied to fabricate CMOS integrated nanotube circuits such as inverter, NAND and NOR logic devices. Furthermore, defect-tolerant circuit design for NAND and NOR is proposed and demonstrated to guarantee the correct operation of logic circuit, regardless of the presence of mis-aligned or mis-positioned nanotubes. Carbon nanotube flexible electronics and smart textiles for ubiquitous computing and sensing are demonstrated in chapter 4. A facile transfer printing technique has been introduced to transfer massively aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes from the original sapphire/quartz substrates to virtually any other substrates, including glass, silicon, polymer sheets, and even fabrics. The characterization of transferred nanotubes reveals that the transferred

  12. Synthesis, model and stability of helically coiled carbon nanotubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fejes, Dora; Raffai, Manuella; Hernadi, Klara;

    2013-01-01

    Structural model of helically coiled carbon nanotubes is proposed. It is constructed by means of topological coordinate method. Relaxation and cohesive energy calculation are performed by molecular mechanics, using second-generation bond order potential for hydrocarbons introduced by D. W. Brenner....... Our experiments focused on the production and development of catalysts for the synthesis of helically coiled CNTs (carbon nanotubes). The catalysts were tested in the decomposition of acetylene by CCVD (Catalytic Chemical Vapor Deposition) method. The carbon deposit was imaged by TEM (Transmission...

  13. Novel Ru - K/Carbon Nanotubes Catalyst for Ammonia Synthesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    A novel ammonia synthesis catalyst, potassium-promoted ruthenium supported on carbon nanotubes, was developed. It was found that the Ru-K/carbon nanotubes catalyst had higher activity for ammonia synthesis ( 20.85 ml NH 3 /h/g-cat ) than the Ru-K/fullerenes ( 13.3 ml NH 3 /h/g-cat ) at atmospheric ressure and 623 K. The catalyst had activity even at 473 K, and had the highest activity ( 23.46 ml NH 3 /h/g-cat ) at 643 K. It was suggested that the multi-walled structure favored the electron transfer, the hydrogen-storage and the hydrogen-spill which were favorable to ammonia synthesis.

  14. Improved synthesis of carbon nanotubes with junctions and of single-walled carbon nanotubes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    F L Deepak; A Govindaraj; C N R Rao

    2006-01-01

    Pyrolysis of thiophene over nickel nanoparticles dispersed on silica is shown to yield Yjunction carbon nanotubes with smaller diameters than those obtained by the pyrolysis of organometallicthiophene mixtures. In the presence of water vapour, the pyrolysis of organometallic-hydrocarbon mixtures yields single-walled nanotubes, as well as relatively narrow-diameter carbon nanotubes with Y-junctions. Pyrolysis of organometallic-hydrocarbon mixtures, in the absence of water vapour, only gives nanotubes with T- and Y-junctions.

  15. Natural Mineral-marine Manganese Nodule as a Novel Catalyst for the Synthesis of Carbon Nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes were fabricated by the pyrolysis of acetylene with naturally occurring marine manganese nodules as a novel catalyst at an elevated temperature.The nanotube product was examined by transmission electron microscopy.The method is expected to be the simplest one to synthesize carbon nanotubes due to unnecessary synthesis of catalyst.

  16. Improved synthesis of carbon nanotubes with junctions and of single-walled carbon nanotubes

    OpenAIRE

    Deepak, FL; Govindaraj, A.; Rao, CNR

    2006-01-01

    Pyrolysis of thiophene over nickel nanoparticles dispersed on silica is shown to yield Y-junction carbon nanotubes with smaller diameters than those obtained by the pyrolysis of organometallic-thiophene mixtures. In the presence of water vapour, the pyrolysis of organometallic-hydrocarbon mixtures yields single-walled nanotubes, as well as relatively narrow-diameter carbon nanotubes with Y-junctions. Pyrolysis-of organometallic-hydrocarbon mixtures, in the absence of water vapour, only gives ...

  17. Synthesis of nano-carbon (nanotubes, nanofibres, graphene) materials

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Kalpana Awasthi; Rajesh Kumar; Himanshu Raghubanshi; Seema Awasthi; Ratnesh Pandey; Devinder Singh; T P Yadav; O N Srivastava

    2011-07-01

    In the present study, we report the synthesis of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) using a new natural precursor: castor oil. The CNTs were synthesized by spray pyrolysis of castor oil–ferrocene solution at 850°C under an Ar atmosphere. We also report the synthesis of carbon nitrogen (C–N) nanotubes using castor oil–ferrocene–ammonia precursor. The as-grown CNTs and C–N nanotubes were characterized through scanning and transmission electron microscopic techniques. Graphitic nanofibres (GNFs) were synthesized by thermal decomposition of acetylene (C2H2) gas using Ni catalyst at 600°C. As-grown GNFs reveal both planar and helical morphology. We have investigated the structural and electrical properties of multi-walled CNTs (MWNTs)–polymer (polyacrylamide (PAM)) composites. The MWNTs–PAM composites were prepared using as purified, with ball milling and functionalized MWNTs by solution cast technique and characterized through SEM. A comparative study has been made on the electrical property of these MWNTs–PAM composites with different MWNTs loadings. It is shown that the ball milling and functionalization of MWNTs improves the dispersion of MWNTs into the polymer matrix. Enhanced electrical conductivity was observed for the MWNTs–PAM composites. Graphene samples were prepared by thermal exfoliation of graphite oxide. XRD analysis confirms the formation of graphene.

  18. Plasma-Chemical Synthesis of Nanosized Powders-Nitrides, Carbides, Oxides, Carbon Nanotubes and Fullerenes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Katerina ZAHARIEVA; Gheorghi VISSOKOV; Janis GRABIS; Slavcho RAKOVSKY

    2012-01-01

    In this article the plasma-chemical synthesis of nanosized powders (nitrides, car- bides, oxides, carbon nanotubes and fullerenes) is reviewed. Nanosized powders - nitrides, carbides, oxides, carbon nanotubes and fullerenes have been successfully produced using different techniques, technological apparatuses and conditions for their plasma-chemical synthesis.

  19. The synthesis and filling of single-walled carbon nanotubes

    CERN Document Server

    Friedrichs, S

    2002-01-01

    This thesis is concerned with the synthesis, properties and application of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). The two main objectives of the work were the development of a continuous-flow synthesis of SWNTs, using chemical vapour deposition (CVD) techniques, and the application of the hollow SWNTs as moulds for the study of the crystallisation behaviour of inorganic materials in the confined space of their inner cavity. The latter study was mainly performed by interpreting high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) images of the filled SWNTs. A so-called focal series restoration approach, which enhances the resolution of the images and thereby increases the information content, was employed where possible. Chapter I reviews the previous work in the field of SWNTs and introduces their basic structure, symmetry, physical and mechanical properties and the common methods of SWNT synthesis. The chapter ends with an overview of the techniques used in the present work for the characterisation of c...

  20. Carbon nanotubes on carbon fibers: Synthesis, structures and properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qiuhong

    The interface between carbon fibers (CFs) and the resin matrix in traditional high performance composites is characterized by a large discontinuity in mechanical, electrical, and thermal properties which can cause inefficient energy transfer. Due to the exceptional properties of carbon nanotubes (CNTs), their growth at the surface of carbon fibers is a promising approach to controlling interfacial interactions and achieving the enhanced bulk properties. However, the reactive conditions used to grow carbon nanotubes also have the potential to introduce defects that can degrade the mechanical properties of the carbon fiber (CF) substrate. In this study, using thermal chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method, high density multi-wall carbon nanotubes have been successfully synthesized directly on PAN-based CF surface without significantly compromising tensile properties. The influence of CVD growth conditions on the single CF tensile properties and carbon nanotube (CNT) morphology was investigated. The experimental results revealed that under high temperature growth conditions, the tensile strength of CF was greatly decreased at the beginning of CNT growth process with the largest decrease observed for sized CFs. However, the tensile strength of unsized CFs with CNT was approximately the same as the initial CF at lower growth temperature. The interfacial shear strength of CNT coated CF (CNT/CF) in epoxy was studied by means of the single-fiber fragmentation test. Results of the test indicate an improvement in interfacial shear strength with the addition of a CNT coating. This improvement can most likely be attributed to an increase in the interphase yield strength as well as an improvement in interfacial adhesion due to the presence of the nanotubes. CNT/CF also offers promise as stress and strain sensors in CF reinforced composite materials. This study investigates fundamental mechanical and electrical properties of CNT/CF using nanoindentation method by designed

  1. Synthesis of Carbon Nanotubes Using Sol Gel Route

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Fattah, Tarek

    2002-12-01

    Since 1990, carbon nanotubes were discovered and they have been the object of intense scientific study ever since. A carbon nanotube is a honeycomb lattice rolled into a cylinder. The diameter of a carbon nanotube is of nanometer size and the length is in the range of micrometer. Many of the extraordinary properties attributed to nanotubes, such as tensile strength and thermal stability, have inspired predictions of microscopic robots, dent-resistant car bodies and earthquake-resistant buildings. The first products to use nanotubes were electrical. Some General Motors cars already include plastic parts to which nanotubes were added; such plastic can be electrified during painting so that the paint will stick more readily. Two nanotube-based lighting and display products are well on their way to market. In the long term, perhaps the most valuable applications will take further advantage of nanotubes' unique electronic properties. Carbon nanotubes can in principle play the same role as silicon does in electronic circuits, but at a molecular scale where silicon and other standard semiconductors cease to work. There are several routes to synthesize carbon nanotubes; laser vaporization, carbon arc and vapor growth. We have applied a different route using sol gel chemistry to obtain carbon nanotubes. This work is patent-pending.

  2. Flame Synthesis Of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes And Nanofibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wal, Randy L. Vander; Berger, Gordon M.; Ticich, Thomas M.

    2003-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes are widely sought for a variety of applications including gas storage, intercalation media, catalyst support and composite reinforcing material [1]. Each of these applications will require large scale quantities of CNTs. A second consideration is that some of these applications may require redispersal of the collected CNTs and attachment to a support structure. If the CNTs could be synthesized directly upon the support to be used in the end application, a tremendous savings in post-synthesis processing could be realized. Therein we have pursued both aerosol and supported catalyst synthesis of CNTs. Given space limitations, only the aerosol portion of the work is outlined here though results from both thrusts will be presented during the talk. Aerosol methods of SWNT, MWNT or nanofiber synthesis hold promise of large-scale production to supply the tonnage quantities these applications will require. Aerosol methods may potentially permit control of the catalyst particle size, offer continuous processing, provide highest product purity and most importantly, are scaleable. Only via economy of scale will the cost of CNTs be sufficient to realize the large-scale structural and power applications on both earth and in space. Present aerosol methods for SWNT synthesis include laser ablation of composite metalgraphite targets or thermal decomposition/pyrolysis of a sublimed or vaporized organometallic [2]. Both approaches, conducted within a high temperature furnace, have produced single-walled nanotubes (SWNTs). The former method requires sophisticated hardware and is inherently limited by the energy deposition that can be realized using pulsed laser light. The latter method, using expensive organometallics is difficult to control for SWNT synthesis given a range of gasparticle mixing conditions along variable temperature gradients; multi-walled nanotubes (MWNTs) are a far more likely end products. Both approaches require large energy expenditures and

  3. Synthesis and characterization of carbon nanotube reinforced copper thin films

    OpenAIRE

    Otto, Cornelia

    2006-01-01

    Two model composites of copper and carbon nanotubes were fabricated by very different deposition methods. Copper electrodeposition in a plating bath containing nanotubes created a 3D matrix of randomly oriented CNTs within a thick, 20 micron Cu film. In contrast, sandwiching a layer of well-separated nanotubes between two sub-micron sputtered Cu layers produced a 2D-composite with nanotubes lying parallel to the substrate surface. These composites, which were mechanically tested using var...

  4. Synthesis of carbon nanotubes using natural carbon precursor: Castor oil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raziah, A. Z.; Junizah, A. R.; Saifuddin, N.

    2012-09-01

    Castor oil has long been an article of commerce due to its versatility as it is widely used as a starting material for many industrial chemical products because of its unique structure. In this study, carbon nanotubes has been synthesized by thermal decomposition of castor oil in nitrogen atmosphere at 300-400δC using custom-made microwave processing unit. The precursor material was catalyzed by iron clusters originating from the addition of ferrocene. The morphology and characterization of the CNTs were studied and discussed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM).

  5. On the Synthesis of Carbon Nanotubes from Waste Solid Hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuo, Chuanwei

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are allotropes of carbon with a cylindrical nanostructure. They consist of coaxial tubular graphene sheets, with diameters in the order of nanometers (1 x 10-9 m) and lengths in the order of micrometers (1 x 10-6 m). The latter can now be extended into the order of meters. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been studied for more than 20 years. CNTs possess superior electrical, mechanical, thermal, chemical, and structural properties, which make their potential applications nowadays overwhelmingly widespread. Now entering into the growth phase of product life cycle, increasing usage of CNTs in commercial products is part of the beginning of the nano-technological revolution. Expanding markets for CNTs' large volume applications place ever-increasing demands on lowering their production costs to the level acceptable by the end-user applications. It is estimated that the mass application of CNTs will be facilitated only when the price of CNTs approaches that of conductive carbon black. The synthesis of CNTs involves three elements: the carbonaceous feedstocks (raw materials), the catalysts, and the necessary process power consumption. Therefore, they jointly contribute to the major operation expenditures in CNT synthesis/production. Current technologies for large-scale production of CNTs (either chemical vapor deposition, CVD, or combustion synthesis) require intensive consumption of premium feedstocks and catalysts, and the CVD process requires high energy consumption. Therefore, there is a pressing need for resource-benign and energy-benign, cost-effective nano-manufacturing processes. In the search for sustainable alternatives, it would be prudent to explore renewable and/or replenishable low-cost feedstocks, such as those found in municipal, industrial, and agricultural recycling streams. In the search for low cost catalysts, stainless steels have been proposed as cost-effective dual purpose substrates and catalysts, as they contain transition

  6. Carbon Nanotubes Synthesis via Arc Discharge with a Yttria Catalyst

    OpenAIRE

    M. I. Mohammad; Ahmed A. Moosa; J.H. Potgieter; Mustafa K. Ismael

    2013-01-01

    A facile method is proposed to use a computer controlled Arc discharge gap between graphite electrodes together with an yttria-nickel catalyst to synthesize carbon nanotubes under an Ar-H2 gases mixture atmosphere by applying different DC currents and pressure. This produces carbon nanotubes with decreased diameters and increased length. XRD evidence indicated a shift toward higher crystallinity nanotubes. Yields of the CNTs after purification were also enhanced.

  7. Nitrogen doped carbon nanotubes : synthesis, characterization and catalysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dommele, S.

    2008-01-01

    Nitrogen containing Carbon Nanotubes (NCNT) have altered physical- and chemical properties with respect to polarity, conductivity and reactivity as compared to conventional carbon nanotubes (CNT) and have potential for use in electronic applications or catalysis. In this thesis the incorporation of

  8. Multiwalled carbon nanotube CVD synthesis, modification, and composite applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Dali

    Well-aligned carbon multiwall nanotube (MWNT) arrays have been continuously synthesized by a floating catalytic chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method involving the pyrolysis of xylene-ferrocene mixtures. The CVD parameters have been studied to selectively synthesize nanotubes with required dimensions. A mixed tip-root growth model has been proposed for the floating catalytic CVD synthesis. Coarsening of the catalyst particle at the root end promoted MWNT wall coarsening (addition of new concentric graphene shells), while the smaller catalyst particle at the tip contributed to MWNT elongation. A two-step process in which ferrocene was fed for only five minutes to nucleate the DTs was developed to understand if a continuous supply of catalyst was necessary for continued growth. The results show that the ferrocene was only necessary for initial nucleation. To simplify the CVD process further, another two-step synthesis method was developed in which the ferrocene was pre-decomposed so that the nanotube nucleation could be isolated from the growth, enabling quantification of growth mechanisms and kinetics. Mass spectra and hydrocarbon analyses of the CVD reactor tail gas were performed to understand the pyrolysis chemistry. Well-aligned N-doped and Ru-doped MWNT arrays have been produced by pyrolysis of pyridine ferrocene mixtures and xylene-ferrocene-ruthenocene mixtures, respectively. Various material characterization techniques were used to measure the dopant distributions and correlate the catalyst phase with the novel nanotube structures. High-temperature annealing has been shown to be a viable means to remove both the catalyst particles and certain microstructural defects within the CVD-derived DTs. The phase transformation of catalyst during annealing has also been studied. Homogeneous distribution of MWNTs in polystyrene matrices was achieved by an ultrasonic assisted solution-evaporation method. Addition of only 1 wt % DTs to polystyrene increased the polymer

  9. Synthesis of Aligned Carbon Nanotubes by Thermal Chemical Vapor Deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Gang; ZHOU Ming; MA Weiwei; CAI Lan

    2009-01-01

    Single crystal silicon was found to be very beneficial to the growth of aligned carbon nanotubes by chemical vapor deposition with C2H2 as carbon source. A thin film of Ni served as catalyst was deposited on the Si substrate by the K575X Peltier Cooled High Resolution Sputter Coater before growth. The growth properties of carbon nanotubes were studied as a function of the Ni catalyst layer thickness. The diameter, growth rate and areal density of the carbon nanotubes were controlled by the initial thickness of the catalyst layer. Steric hindrance between nanotubes forces them to grow in well-aligned manner at an initial stage of growth. Transmission electron microscope analysis revealed that nanotubes grew by a tip growth mechanism.

  10. Synthesis of anisotropic gold shell on carbon nanotube

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minati, L., E-mail: luminati@fbk.eu [CNR-IFN, CSMFO Lab. (Italy); Torrengo, S. [FBK (Italy); Ischia, G. [University of Trento, Department of Industrial Engineering (Italy); Speranza, G. [FBK (Italy)

    2013-11-15

    This paper reports a simple procedure to synthesize gold-coated carbon nanotubes. The method involves the reduction of gold precursor on oxidized carbon nanotubes. UV–Visible absorption spectroscopy and electron microscopy were used to study the gold precursor reduction on the carbon nanotubes. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy analysis showed the formation of an irregular gold layer around the CNT surface. The resulting nanoparticles show an anisotropic shape with dimensions between 100 and 200 nm. This hybrid material displays an intense absorption in the near infrared range with an absorption maximum at 840 nm.

  11. Synthesis of carbon nanotubes with Ni/CNTs catalyst

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI; Chunhua; (李春华); YAO; Kefu; (姚可夫); RUAN; Dianbo; (阮殿波); LIANG; Ji; (梁; 吉); XU; Cailu; (徐才录); WU; Dehai; (吴德海)

    2003-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs), owing to their large specific area, good chemical stability and modifiable surface properties after acidic or basic treatment, can be used as catalytic support materials. In this paper, the activities and selectivities of two catalysts, i. e. Ni catalyst supported by carbon nanotubes (Ni/CNTs) and that supported by diatomite (Ni/SiO2), are compared. It is found that the quality of the carbon nanotubes synthesized by the two catalysts is similar, but the yield of the former is 1.5 times higher than that of the latter. The excellent performance of the Ni/CNTs catalyst should be ascribed to the larger specific surface area and proper pore distribution and the structure of the carbon nanotube support.

  12. Catalytic CVD Synthesis of Carbon Nanotubes: Towards High Yield and Low Temperature Growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marijana Mionić

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The catalytic chemical vapor deposition (CCVD is currently the most flexible and economically attractive method for the growth of carbon nanotubes. Although its principle is simple, the precisely controlled growth of carbon nanotubes remains very complex because many different parameters influence the growth process. In this article, we review our recent results obtained on the synthesis of carbon nanotubes via CCVD. We discuss the role of the catalyst and the catalyst support. Our recent results obtained from the water assisted growth and the equimolar C2H2-CO2 reaction are also discussed. Both procedures lead to significantly enhanced carbon nanotube growth. In particular, the latter allows growing carbon nanotubes on diverse substrate materials at low temperatures.

  13. Ethanol flame synthesis of carbon nanotubes in deficient oxygen environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Wei-Chieh; Lin, Ta-Hui

    2016-04-01

    In this study, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were synthesized using ethanol diffusion flames in a stagnation-flow system composed of an upper oxidizer duct and a lower liquid pool. In the experiments, a gaseous mixture of oxygen and nitrogen flowed from the upper oxidizer duct, and then impinged onto the vertically aligned ethanol pool to generate a planar and steady diffusion flame in a deficient oxygen environment. A nascent nickel mesh was used as the catalytic metal substrate to collect deposited materials. The effect of low oxygen concentration on the formation of CNTs was explored. The oxygen concentration significantly influenced the flame environment and thus the synthesized carbon products. Lowering the oxygen concentration increased the yield, diameter, and uniformity of CNTs. The optimal operating conditions for CNT synthesis were an oxygen concentration in the range of 15%-19%, a flame temperature in the range of 460 °C-870 °C, and a sampling position of 0.5-1 mm below the upper edge of the blue flame front. It is noteworthy that the concentration gradient of C2 species and CO governed the CNT growth directly. CNTs were successfully fabricated in regions with uniform C2 species and CO distributions.

  14. The effect of alkaline doped catalysts on the CVD synthesis of carbon nanotubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nemeth, Krisztian; Nemeth, Zoltan; Fejes, Dora;

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this work was to develop new doped catalysts for chemical vapour deposition (CVD) synthesis in order to increase the quantity and quality of carbon nanotubes (CNTs). Doping compounds such as CsBr, CsCl, KBr and KCl were used to reach higher carbon deposit and carbon yield. The amount o...

  15. Carbon Nanotubes Advanced Topics in the Synthesis, Structure, Properties and Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Jorio, Ado; Dresselhaus, Mildred S

    2008-01-01

    The carbon nanotubes field has evolved substantially since the publication of the bestseller "Carbon Nanotubes: Synthesis, Structure, Properties and Applications". The present volume builds on the generic aspects of the aforementioned book, which emphasizes the fundamentals, with the new volume emphasizing areas that have grown rapidly since the first volume, guiding future directions where research is needed and highlighting applications. The volume also includes an emphasis on areas like graphene, other carbon-like and other tube-like materials because these fields are likely to affect and influence developments in nanotubes in the next 5 years.

  16. Synthesis and Integration of Nanostructured Carbon: Carbon Nanotube-Polymer Nanocomposites and Graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulotty, Richard Stephen

    Nanostructured carbon, in the form of tubes or sheets, exhibits exceptional thermal and electrical properties. Graphene, a single atomic sheet of hexagonal sp2 bonded carbon, posesses a thermal conductivity higher than diamond, with an extremely high electron mobility. Carbon nanotubes (CNT), which are tubes composed of one or more graphene sheets, also posess high thermal conductivity and electron mobility. One of the major problems facing the application of nanomaterials is integration into already existing material systems. A second challenge is controlled synthesis of nanomaterials. In this dissertation research novel methods were investigated for coupling carbon nanotubes to polymer matrices, as well as new approaches for controlling the synthesis of graphene and reduced graphene oxide like carbon (R-GOC) on copper (Cu) foils via chemical vapor deposition. It was determined that carboxylic functionalization of carbon nanotubes was effective in improving the coupling of CNTs to polymer matrices, affecting the thermal transport of the resulting CNT-polymer nanocomposites. From the CVD studies it was established that the cooling phase gases flowed after deposition influence the growth mechanics of graphene on Cu foil. Further CVD studies showed that methane may be decomposed directly onto quartz to form reduced graphene oxide like carbon thin films. The obtained thermal characterization results are important for development of CNTs as fillers for composite pastes with high thermal conductivity, and the results of the CVD studies are important for developing further understanding of growth mechanics of bilayer graphene and other nanostructured carbon. In addition to the fundamental study of CVD synthesis of graphene and R-GOC, this dissertation work includes engineering of graphene and R-GOC to various applications, including the development of the thinnest flexible transistor with active materials made from all-2D materials, as well as large-scale electron

  17. Synthesis and characterization of boron-doped carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ceragioli, H J; Peterlevitz, A C; Quispe, J C R; Pasquetto, M P; Sampaio, M A; Baranauskas, V [Faculdade de Engenharia Eletrica e Computacao, Departamento de Semicondutores, Instrumentos e Fotonica, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, UNICAMP, Av. Albert Einstein N.400, 13083-852 Campinas SP Brasil (Brazil); Larena, A [Department of Chemical Industrial Engineering and Environment, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, E.T.S. Ingenieros Industriales, C/ Jose Gutierrez Abascal, Madrid (Spain)], E-mail: vitor.baranauskas@gmail.com

    2008-03-15

    Boron-doped carbon nanotubes have been prepared by chemical vapour deposition of ethyl alcohol doped with B{sub 2}O{sub 3} using a hot-filament system. Multi-wall carbon nanotubes of diameters in the range of 30-100 nm have been observed by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM). Raman measurements indicated that the degree of C-C sp{sup 2} order decreased with boron doping. Lowest threshold fields achieved were 1.0 V/{mu}m and 2.1 V/{mu}m for undoped and boron-doped samples, respectively.

  18. Fabrication of spintronics device by direct synthesis of single-walled carbon nanotubes from ferromagnetic electrodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Ambri Mohamed, Nobuhito Inami, Eiji Shikoh, Yoshiyuki Yamamoto, Hidenobu Hori and Akihiko Fujiwara

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe an alternative method for realizing a carbon nanotube spin field-effect transistor device by the direct synthesis of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs on substrates by alcohol catalytic chemical vapor deposition. We observed hysteretic magnetoresistance (MR at low temperatures due to spin-dependent transport. In these devices, the maximum ratio in resistance variation of MR was found to be 1.8%.

  19. Synthesis, characterizations, and applications of carbon nanotubes and silicon nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Guangyong

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have received great attention because of their unique structure and promising applications in microelectronic devices such as field electron emitters. Silicon nanowires (SiNWs) are also very popular because Si is a well established electronic material. This thesis will present my effort on synthesis, characterizations, and applications of CNTs and SiNWs by thermal chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method. For CNTs growth, block copolymer micelles were used as a template to create large area arrays of metal nanoclusters as catalysts for patterned arrays, and Fe/Al/Fe sandwich film on single crystal magnesium oxide (MgO) substrate was used as the catalyst for growth of long length aligned CNTs by CVD. The factors that affect the structure and length of CNTs have been investigated. CNTs were also grown on etched Si substrate by PECVD method. Continuous dropwise condensation was achieved on a biomimetic two-tier texture with short CNTs deposited on micromachined pillars. Superhydrophobic condensation model was studied. For SiNWs growth, hydrogen gold tetrachloride was uniformly mixed into the salt and decomposed into gold nanoparticles at the growth temperature and acted as the catalyst particles to start the growth of Si nanowires. The as-grown Si nanowires are about 70--90 nm in diameter and up to 200 micrometers long. The salt was completely removed by water rinse after growth. Field emission of aligned CNTs grown on Si substrates and SiNWs on Si substrates and carbon clothes has been studied. A post growth annealing procedure has been found to drastically improve the field emission performance of these CNTs and SiNWs.

  20. Application of aromatization catalyst in synthesis of carbon nanotubes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Song Rongjun; Yang Yunpeng; Ji Qing; Li Bin

    2012-02-01

    In a typical chemical vapour deposition (CVD) process for synthesizing carbon nanotubes (CNTs), it was found that the aromatization catalysts could promote effectively the formation of CNT. The essence of this phenomenon was attributed to the fact that the aromatization catalyst can accelerate the dehydrogenation–cyclization and condensation reaction of carbon source, which belongs to a necessary step in the formation of CNTs. In this work, aromatization catalysts, H-beta zeolite, HZSM-5 zeolite and organically modified montmorillonite (OMMT) were chosen to investigate their effects on the formation of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) via pyrolysis method when polypropylene and 1-hexene as carbon source and Ni2O3 as the charring catalyst. The results demonstrated that the combination of those aromatization catalysts with nickel catalyst can effectively improve the formation of MWCNTs.

  1. Synthesis of bamboo-like carbon nanotubes by ethanol catalytic combustion technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENG Jin; ZOU Xiao-ping; LI Fei; ZHANG Hong-dan; REN Peng-fei

    2006-01-01

    Bamboo-like carbon nanotubes were synthesized by ethanol catalytic combustion (ECC) technique with combustion method. Copper plate was employed as substrate,ethanol as carbon source,and iron chloride as catalyst precursor. The as-grown black powder was characterized by means of scanning electron microscopy,transmission electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy. The results show that the thinner bamboo-like carbon nanotubes have a relatively good structure that the compartment layers are more regular,while the thicker carbon nanotubes have a relatively irregular bamboo-like structure:the proposed method is simple to synthesize bamboo-like carbon nanotubes and has some advantages,such as flexible synthesis conditions,simple setup,and environment-friendly.

  2. Single step process for the synthesis of carbon nanotubes and metal/alloy-filled multiwalled carbon nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaijumon MM

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstractA single-step approach for the synthesis of multi-walled nanotubes (MWNT filled with nanowires of Ni/ternary Zr based hydrogen storage alloy has been illustrated. We also demonstrate the generation of CO-free hydrogen by methane decomposition over alloy hydride catalyst. The present work also highlights the formation of single-walled nanotubes (SWNT and MWNTs at varying process conditions. These carbon nanostructures have been characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, high resolution TEM (HRTEM, Energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX and Raman spectroscopy. This new approach overcomes the existing multi-step process limitation, with possible impact on the development of future fuel cell, nano-battery and hydrogen sensor technologies.

  3. Carbon nanotube-ceramic nanocomposites: Synthesis and characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Michael David

    Ceramic materials are widely used in modern society for a variety of applications including fuel cell electrolytes, bio-medical implants, and jet turbines. However, ceramics are inherently brittle making them excellent candidates for mechanical reinforcement. In this work, the feasibility of dispersing multi-walled carbon nanotubes into a silicon carbide matrix for mechanical property enhancement is explored. Prior to dispersing, nanotubes were purified using an optimized, three step methodology that incorporates oxidative treatment, acid sonication, and thermal annealing rendering near-superhydrophobic behavior in synthesized thin films. Alkyl functionalized nanotube dispersability was characterized in various solvents. Dispersability was contingent on fostering polar interactions between the functionalized nanotubes and solvent despite the purely dispersive nature of the aliphatic chains. Interpretation of these results yielded values of 45.6 +/- 1.2, 0.78 +/- 0.04, and 2 4 +/- 0.9 mJ/m2 for the Lifshitz-van der Waals, electron acceptor and electron donor surface energy components respectively. Aqueous nanotube dispersions were prepared using a number of surfactants to examine surfactant concentration and pH effects on nanotube dispersability. Increasing surfactant concentrations resulted in a solubility plateau, which was independent of the surfactant's critical micelle concentration. Deviations from neutral pH demonstrated negligible influence on non-ionic surfactant adsorption while, ionic surfactants showed substantial pH dependent behavior. These results were explained in the context of nanotube surface ionization and Debye length variation. Successful MWNT dispersion into a silicon carbide based matrix is reported by in-situ ceramic formation using two routes; sol-gel chemistry and pre-ceramic polymeric precursor workup. For the former, nanotube dispersion was assisted by PluronicRTM surfactants. Pyrolytic treatment and consolidation of formed powders

  4. Synthesis of Carbon Nanotubes of Few Walls Using Aliphatic Alcohols as a Carbon Source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Espinosa-Magaña

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanotubes with single and few walls are highly appreciated for their technological applications, regardless of the limited availability due to their high production cost. In this paper we present an alternative process that can lead to lowering the manufacturing cost of CNTs of only few walls by means of the use of the spray pyrolysis technique. For this purpose, ferrocene is utilized as a catalyst and aliphatic alcohols (methanol, ethanol, propanol or butanol as the carbon source. The characterization of CNTs was performed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM and transmission electron microscopy (TEM. The study of the synthesized carbon nanotubes (CNTs show important differences in the number of layers that constitute the nanotubes, the diameter length, the quantity and the quality as a function of the number of carbons employed in the alcohol. The main interest of this study is to give the basis of an efficient synthesis process to produce CNTs of few walls for applications where small diameter is required.

  5. Synthesis and characterization of carbon nanotube from coconut shells activated carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melati, A.; Hidayati, E.

    2016-03-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been explored in almost every single cancer treatment modality, including drug delivery, lymphatic targeted chemotherapy, photodynamic therapy, and gene therapy. They are considered as one of the most promising nanomaterial with the capability of both detecting the cancerous cells and delivering drugs or small therapeutic molecules to the cells. CNTs have unique physical and chemical properties such as high aspect ratio, ultralight weight, high mechanical strength, high electrical conductivity, and high thermal conductivity. Coconut Shell was researched as active carbon source on 500 - 600°C. These activated carbon was synthesized becomes carbon nanotube and have been proposed as a promising tool for detecting the expression of indicative biological molecules at early stage of cancer. Clinically, biomarkers cancer can be detected by CNT Biosensor. We are using pyrolysis methods combined with CVD process or Wet Chemical Process on 600°C. Our team has successfully obtained high purity, and aligned MWCNT (Multi Wall Nanotube) bundles on synthesis CNT based on coconut shells raw materials. CNTs can be used to cross the mammalian cell membrane by endocytosis or other mechanisms. SEM characterization of these materials have 179 nm bundles on phase 83° and their materials compound known by using FTIR characterization.

  6. Synthesis, alignment, growth mechanism and functional properties of carbon nanotubes and their hybrid materials with inorganic and biomaterials

    OpenAIRE

    Joshi, Ravi

    2010-01-01

    The present work comprises a novel method for selective growth of carbon nanotubes, study of their growth mechanism as well as synthesis and application of their various hybrid materials. An experimental setup is established to grow carbon nanotubes using water assisted chemical vapor deposition method. Various growth parameters were scrutinized carefully and a growth mechanism is put forth for the same method. A new methodology to prepare different hybrid materials of aligned carbon nanotube...

  7. Laser ablation for the synthesis of carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holloway, Brian C. (Inventor); Eklund, Peter C. (Inventor); Smith, Michael W. (Inventor); Jordan, Kevin C. (Inventor); Shinn, Michelle (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    Single walled carbon nanotubes are produced in a novel apparatus by the laser-induced ablation of moving carbon target. The laser used is of high average power and ultra-fast pulsing. According to various preferred embodiments, the laser produces and output above about 50 watts/cm.sup.2 at a repetition rate above about 15 MHz and exhibits a pulse duration below about 10 picoseconds. The carbon, carbon/catalyst target and the laser beam are moved relative to one another and a focused flow of "side pumped", preheated inert gas is introduced near the point of ablation to minimize or eliminate interference by the ablated plume by removal of the plume and introduction of new target area for incidence with the laser beam. When the target is moved relative to the laser beam, rotational or translational movement may be imparted thereto, but rotation of the target is preferred.

  8. Laser ablation for the synthesis of carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holloway, Brian C; Eklund, Peter C; Smith, Michael W; Jordan, Kevin C; Shinn, Michelle

    2012-11-27

    Single walled carbon nanotubes are produced in a novel apparatus by the laser-induced ablation of moving carbon target. The laser used is of high average power and ultra-fast pulsing. According to various preferred embodiments, the laser produces and output above about 50 watts/cm.sup.2 at a repetition rate above about 15 MHz and exhibits a pulse duration below about 10 picoseconds. The carbon, carbon/catalyst target and the laser beam are moved relative to one another and a focused flow of "side pumped", preheated inert gas is introduced near the point of ablation to minimize or eliminate interference by the ablated plume by removal of the plume and introduction of new target area for incidence with the laser beam. When the target is moved relative to the laser beam, rotational or translational movement may be imparted thereto, but rotation of the target is preferred.

  9. Facile Instep Synthesis of Palladium Nanoparticle/Carbon@Carbon Nanotube Composites for Electrooxidation of Xylitol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kannan, Ramanujam; Kim, Ae Rhan; Nahm, Kee Suk; Yoo, Dong Jin

    2016-03-01

    The development of a facile, instep, and eco-friendly synthesis method of mono-dispersed low quantity palladium nanoparticle/carbon@functionllized carbon nanotube composite (Pd@C-f-CNT)electrocatalytic material was developed for use in the electrooxidation of xylitol. The prepared nanocatalyst was analyzed by powder X-ray diffraction analysis, Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The electrocatalytic studies were performed using voltammetric methods. Formation of Pd NPs was observed within 2 min. The microscopic analysis showed 5- to 10-nm-sized Pd NPs that uniformly covered the CNT. The instep-formed carbon helped to improve the electrocatalytic activity of the catalyst. Our proposed method provides new insight for the development of highly efficient metal NPs/CNT nanocatalyst for direct alcohol fuel cell applications. PMID:27455674

  10. Synthesis of Carbon Nanotube-Inorganic Hybrid Nanocomposites: An Instructional Experiment in Nanomaterials Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Dios, Miguel; Salgueirino, Veronica; Perez-Lorenzo, Moises; Correa-Duarte, Miguel A.

    2012-01-01

    An experiment is described to introduce advanced undergraduate students to an exciting area of nanotechnology that incorporates nanoparticles onto carbon nanotubes to produce systems that have valuable technological applications. The synthesis of such material has been easily achieved through a simple three-step procedure. Students explore…

  11. Controlled synthesis of high quality carbon nanotubes and their applications in transparent conductive films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dervishi, Enkeleda

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have exceptional electrical, mechanical and electronic properties which make them attractive for numerous applications. Catalytic chemical vapor deposition (cCVD) is one of the most promising methods for large-scale production of high-quality CNTs at a relatively low cost. Synthesis conditions such as catalyst composition, reaction temperature, hydrocarbon type and flow rate, have an enormous influence on the morphological properties of nanotubes. This research presents a thorough study of the parametric conditions affecting the growth properties of single-wall and multi-wall carbon nanotubes. High quality single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) were synthesized on different catalytic systems, using the inductive radio frequency cCVD method. The catalyst compositions, as well as, the reaction temperatures were varied and methane or acetylene was separately utilized as the hydrocarbon source. Noticeable differences when it comes to the size controllability of the catalyst active nano-particles and the nanotube morphology were observed at these different reaction conditions. High efficiency multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were synthesized from the pyrolytic decomposition of acetylene over Fe-Co/CaCO3. The catalyst stoichiometry was found to strongly influence the carbon deposition rate and the nanotube crystallinity characteristics. A comprehensive comparison was made between two different type of heating methods (resistive heating with external oven and inductive heating) with regards to gas utilization, the formation of amorphous carbon, nanotube morphology and growth efficiency. The structural and morphological properties of CNTs and of catalytic systems were analyzed by microscopy, X-ray diffraction, surface area analyzer, thermogravimetric analysis, Raman, and UV-Vis-NIR spectroscopy. MWCNTs synthesized by radio frequency cCVD have smaller outside diameters, larger inner diameters, fewer numbers of graphitic walls, less amorphous

  12. Synthesis of Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes by Plasma Arc: Role of Plasma Parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farhart, Samir; Scott, Carl D.

    2000-01-01

    Single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNT) are porous objects on the molecular scale and have a low density, which gives them potential applications as adsorbent for molecular hydrogen. Their H2 absorption capacity published in the literature varies from 4 to 10% by mass according to the purity of the materials and storage conditions. Optimization of production methods of SWNTs should permit improving these new materials for storage of hydrogen. In this article, we show the potential of using SWNTs in hydrogen storage. In particular, we pose problems associated with synthesis, purification, and opening up of the nanotubes. We present an electric arc process currently used at laboratory scale to produce single wall carbon nanotubes. We discuss, in particular, operating conditions that permit growth of nanotubes and some plasma parameters that assure control of the material. Analysis of the process is carried out with the aid of local measurements of temperature and scanning and transmission electron microscopy of the materials.

  13. Synthesis and Characterization of Carbon Nanotubes Decorated with Gold Nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In presented work we report results of simple and viable method for producing Au/CNT composites. Chemical composition and crystallographic structure of the Au/CNT composites was confirmed by X-ray diffraction measurements, while transmission and scanning electron microscopy were used to characterize the morphology of nanocrystals as well as the distribution of nanocrystals in the composite. The obtained particles with relatively small diameter (less than 9 nm) were found to be spatially well dispersed on the carbon nanotubes. The density of attached Au-nanoparticles is not sufficient, and cannot be improved by simple increasing gold loading. (authors)

  14. Gold Nanoparticles as the Catalyst of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Synthesis

    OpenAIRE

    Yoshikazu Homma

    2014-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles have been proven to act as efficient catalysts for chemical reactions, such as oxidation and hydrogen production. In this review we focus on a different aspect of the catalysis of gold nanoparticles; single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) synthesis. This is not a traditional meaning of catalytic reaction, but SWCNTs cannot be synthesized without nanoparticles. Previously, gold was considered as unsuitable metal species as the catalyst of SWCNT synthesis. However, gold nanopa...

  15. Synthesis and non-covalent functionalization of carbon nanotubes rings: new nanomaterials with lectin affinity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assali, Mohyeddin; Pernía Leal, Manuel; Fernández, Inmaculada; Khiar, Noureddine

    2013-03-01

    We present a mild and practical carbon nanotubes rings (CNRs) synthesis from non-covalent functionalized and water-soluble linear single-wall carbon nanotubes. The hemi-micellar-supramolecular self-organization of lactose-based glycolipid 1 on the ring surface, followed by photo-polymerization of the diacetylenic function triggered by UV light afforded the first water-soluble and biocompatible CNRs. The obtained donut-like nanoconstructs expose a high density of lactose moieties on their surface, and are able to engage specific interactions with Arachis hypogea lectin similar to glycoconjugates on the cell membrane.

  16. Synthesis and metrology of conducting carbon nanotube assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longson, Timothy Jay

    Since its discovery, the carbon nanotube (CNT) has been proposed as one of the ultimate materials for its electrical, thermal and mechanical properties due to its incredibly strong sp2 bonds, low defect density, and large aspect ratio. Many experimental results on individual CNTs have confirmed these outstanding theoretically predicted properties. However, scaling these properties to the macroscopic regime has proved to be challenging. This work focused on the synthesis and measurement of highly conducting, macroscopic, CNT assemblies. Scaling up the synthesis of vertically aligned multiwalled CNT (MWNT) forests was investigated through the development of a large, 100mm, wafer scale, cold wall chemical vapor deposition chamber. In addition to the synthesis, two distinct CNT assemblies have been investigated. A linear morphology where CNTs are strung in series for electrical transport (CNT wires) and a massively parallel 2D array of vertically aligned CNTs for Thermal Interface Material (TIM) applications. Poymer-CNT wire composites have been fabricated by developing a coaxial CNT core-polymer shell electrospinning technique. The core-shell interactions in this system have been studied by way of Hansen's solubility parameters. The most well defined CNT core was achieved using a core solvent that is semi-immiscible with the shell solution, yet still a solvent of the shell polymer. Electrical characterization of the resulting CNT core has shown a two orders of magnitude increase in conductivity over traditional, homogeneously mixed, electrospun CNT wires. A number of vertically aligned MWNT assemblies were studied for their thermal interface properties. Double-sided Silicon substrate (MWNT-Si-MWNT) TIM assemblies were characterized using a DC, 1D reference bar, thermal measurement technique. While attempts to control MWNT density via a micelle template technique produced only 'spaghetti like' CNTs, sputter deposited catalyst provided stark variations in array density

  17. Flame Synthesis of Single- and Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes and Nanofibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanderWal, R. L.; Ticich, Thomas M.

    2001-01-01

    Metal-catalyzed carbon nanotubes are highly sought for a diverse range of applications that include nanoelectronics, battery electrode material, catalysis, hydrogen storage media and reinforcing agents in polymer composites. These latter applications will require vast quantities of nanotubes at competitive prices to be economically feasible. Moreover, reinforcing applications may not require ultrahigh purity nanotubes. Indeed, functionalization of nanotubes to facilitate interfacial bonding within composites will naturally introduce defects into the tube walls, lessening their tensile strength. Current methods of aerosol synthesis of carbon nanotubes include laser ablation of composite targets of carbon and catalyst metal within high temperature furnaces and decomposition of a organometallics in hydrocarbons mixtures within a tube furnace. Common to each approach is the generation of particles in the presence of the reactive hydrocarbon species at elevated temperatures. In the laser-ablation approach, the situation is even more dynamic in that particles and nanotubes are borne during the transient cooling phase of the laser-induced plasma for which the temperature far exceeds that of the surrounding hot gases within the furnace process tube. A shared limitation is that more efficient methods of nanoparticle synthesis are not readily incorporated into these approaches. In contrast, combustion can quite naturally create nanomaterials such as carbon black. Flame synthesis is well known for its commercial scalability and energy efficiency. However, flames do present a complex chemical environment with steep gradients in temperature and species concentrations. Moreover, reaction times are limited within buoyant driven flows to tens of milliseconds. Therein microgravity can greatly lessen temperature and spatial gradients while allowing independent control of flame residence times. In preparation for defining the microgravity experiments, the work presented here focuses

  18. Synthesis and Hydrogen Storage in Single-walled Carbon Nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) were synthesized by a hydrogen arc discharge method. A high yield of gram quantity of SWNTs per hour was achieved. Tow kinds of SWNT products: web-like substance and thin films in large slices were obtained. Results of resonant Raman scattering measurements indicate that the SWNTs prepared have a wider diameter distribution and a larger mean diameter. Hydrogen uptake measurements of the two kinds of SWNT samples (both as prepared and pretreated) were carried out using a high pressure volumetric method,respectively. And a hydrogen storage capacity of 4 wt pct could be repeatedly achieved for the suitably pretreated SWNTs, which indicates that SWNTs may be a promising hydrogen storage material.

  19. Carbon nanotube template-assisted synthesis of zinc ferrite nanochains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We synthesized zinc ferrite nanochains, assembled from nanoparticles, using a carbon nanotubes (CNTs) template method. The resulting nanochains were systematically characterized with respect to crystal structure, morphology, elemental composition, magnetic properties and specific surface area by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometry, and the N2 adsorption method. The morphology results showed that the zinc ferrite particles with diameters of 10-20 nm were structurally linked to form nanochains. The magnetic property investigation indicated that the zinc ferrite nanochains exhibited ferromagnetic behavior and possessed a saturation magnetization of 45.4 emu g-1 at 300 K. We addressed the growth mechanism by analyzing the experimental conditions and characterization results. This method may be applicable to synthesizing other metal oxide nanochains as well.

  20. A self-assembled synthesis of carbon nanotubes for interconnects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zexiang; Cao, Guichuan; Lin, Zulun; Koehler, Irmgard; Bachmann, Peter K

    2006-02-28

    We report a novel approach to grow highly oriented, freestanding and structured carbon nanotubes (CNTs) between two substrates, using microwave plasma chemical vapour deposition. Sandwiched, multi-layered catalyst structures are employed to generate such structures. The as-grown CNTs adhere well to both the substrate and the top contact, and provide a low-resistance electric contact between the two. High-resolution scanning electron microscope (SEM) images show that the CNTs grow perpendicular to these surfaces. This presents a simple way to grow CNTs in different, predetermined directions in a single growth step. The overall resistance of a CNT bundle and two CNT-terminal contacts is measured to be about 14.7 k Ω. The corresponding conductance is close to the quantum limit conductance G(0). This illustrates that our new approach is promising for the direct assembly of CNT-based interconnects in integrated circuits (ICs) or other micro-electronic devices.

  1. Green Synthesis and Characterization of Carbon Nanotubes/Polyaniline Nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Van Hoa Nguyen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanotubes/polyaniline (CNT/PANI nanocomposites were synthesized by the interfacial polymerization of aniline in the presence of CNTs using two green solvents, water and an ionic liquid (1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate, [bmim][BF4], as the two phases. The formation and incorporation of PANI on the surface of the CNTs were confirmed by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The analyses showed that the surface of the CNTs was coated with different morphologies of thin PANI layers depending on whether a HCl or HNO3 solution was used. The thermal stability of the composites was much better than that of the bare CNTs and pure PANI. The as-prepared composites were also used to modify the nickel foam electrodes for characterization of the electrochemical properties.

  2. Gold Nanoparticles as the Catalyst of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshikazu Homma

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Gold nanoparticles have been proven to act as efficient catalysts for chemical reactions, such as oxidation and hydrogen production. In this review we focus on a different aspect of the catalysis of gold nanoparticles; single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT synthesis. This is not a traditional meaning of catalytic reaction, but SWCNTs cannot be synthesized without nanoparticles. Previously, gold was considered as unsuitable metal species as the catalyst of SWCNT synthesis. However, gold nanoparticles with diameters smaller than 5 nm were found to effectively produce SWCNTs. We discuss the catalysis of gold and related metals for SWCNT synthesis in comparison with conventional catalysts, such as iron, cobalt, and nickel.

  3. Synthesis of single-walled carbon nanotube networks using monodisperse metallic nanocatalysts encapsulated in reverse micelles

    OpenAIRE

    Gayduchenko Igor A.; Fedorov Georgy E.; Ibragimov Ramil A.; Stepanova Tatiana S.; Gazaliev Arsen S.; Vysochanskiy Nikolay A.; Bobrov Yuri A.; Malovichko Anton M.; Sosnin Ilya M.; Bobrinetskiy Ivan I.

    2016-01-01

    We report on a method of synthesis of single-walled carbon nanotubes percolated networks on silicon dioxide substrates using monodisperse Co and Ni catalyst. The catalytic nanoparticles were obtained by modified method of reverse micelles of bis-(2-ethylhexyl) sulfosuccinate sodium in isooctane solution that provides the nanoparticle size control in range of 1 to 5 nm. The metallic nanoparticles of Ni and Co were characterized using transmission electron mi...

  4. Synthesis of superconductor MgCNi3 with carbon nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xia Qing-Lin; Yi Jian-Hong; Peng Yuan-Dong; Luo Shu-Dong; Wang Hong-Zhong; Li Li-Ya

    2008-01-01

    MgCNia, an intermetallic compound superconductor with a cubic perovskite crystal structure, has been synthesized using fine Mg and Ni powders and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) as starting materials by the conventional powder metallurgy method. The composition, microstructure and superconductivity are characterized using x-ray diffraction (XRD), energy dispersive x-ray (EDX) analysis, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer. The results indicate that the phases of the synthesized samples are MgCNi3 (major phase) and traces of C and MgO. The MgCNi3 particle sizes range from several hundreds of nanometres to several micrometres.The onset superconducting transition temperature Tc of the MgCNi3 sample is about 7.2 K. The critical current density Jc is about 3.44 × 104 A/cm2 calculated according to the Bean model from the magnetization hysteresis loop of the slab MgCNi3 sample at 5 K and zero applied field.

  5. Controlled carbon nanotube synthesis for quantification of polymer-nanotube composite micromechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bult, Justin Bernard

    Conventional experimental approaches to the understanding of nanotube-polymer micro-mechanics have struggled to produce reproducible data due to the inherent difficulty in physically manipulating the nanotube in-situ. To avoid the problems scale represents in nanotube-polymer composites a novel approach of using Polarized Raman spectroscopy was developed. The Raman spectroscopic technique has the advantage of using non-invasive analysis to compute the composite micro mechanical properties of interfacial shear stress and critical length. Composites with nanotubes of defined length were needed in order to use the Raman technique. To satisfy this requirement a new thermal Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) tool capable of reproducibly growing aligned length uniformity with large mass yield was designed and built. The course of developing these furnace capabilities led to the investigation of nanotube growth mechanics. It is shown herein that a stable passivation barrier is required for nanotube growth. Using X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) depth profiling of metal substrate growth conclusively shows the presence of a stable catalyst layer on the outer surface of stable oxides of greater than 100 nm. By analyzing the diffusion profile represented in the XPS data it is shown that a critical thickness for the passivation oxide can be calculated as a function of time and temperature. For the growth parameters used in this study the critical thickness was found to be between 10 nm and 30 nm depending on the diffusivity value used for iron in chromia. This value agrees well with experimental observation. Uniformly grown carbon nanotubes with lengths of 4, 14, 17, 22, 43, 74, and 116 mum were incorporated into a polycarbonate matrix polymer via solvent-antisolvent processing. The nanotube composites of varied length were tested in tensile strain while Raman spectra were taken concurrently to deduce the load transfer to the nanotube due to composite strain. It is found

  6. Carbon nanotube ‒ inorganic hybrids: from synthesis to application

    OpenAIRE

    Cabana Jiménez, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Aquesta Tesi descriu la preparació de varis híbrids formats per nanotubs de carboni i material inorgànic per a diferents aplicacions, que van des de l’electrònica fins a la biomedicina. El propòsit d’aquesta recerca ha estat treballar en la funcionalització de nanotubs de carboni mitjançant la decoració externa i l’emplenat amb materials inorgànics per obtenir híbrids amb propietats funcionals. Com a pas previ a la funcionalització, els nanotubs de carboni s’han de purificar per a eliminar...

  7. New Rh-ZnO/Carbon Nanotubes Catalyst for Methanol Synthesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    A new catalyst for methanol synthesis, ZnO-promoted rhodium supported on carbon nanotubes, was developed. It was found that the Rh-ZnO/CNTs catalyst had high activity of 411.4 mg CH3OH/g/cat/h and selectivity of 96.7 % for methanol at 1 MPa and 523 K. The activity of this catalyst is much higher than that of NC 207 catalyst at the same reaction conditions. It was suggested that the multi-walled structure CNTs favored both the couple transfer of the proton and electron over the surface of the catalyst and the uptake of hydrogen which was favorable to methanol synthesis.

  8. Low-temperature facile synthesis of graphene and graphene-carbon nanotubes hybrid on dielectric surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Various carbon based nanostructures (graphene, graphene-CNTs hybrid and three-dimensional (3D) carbon network) have been grown separately on low-temperature (600 °C) substrates by using a chemical vapor deposition system with a two-heating reactor. The two-heating reactor is utilized to offer sufficient, well-proportioned floating C atoms and provide a simple method for low-temperature deposition. Morphology and electrical properties of the carbon based nanostructures can be controlled by the substrate surfaces. A relatively flat surface is beneficial for the synthesis of graphene and surfaces with nanodots are required to directly grow graphene-carbon nanotube hybrids. A chemical vapor deposition mechanism dependent on the temperature gradient is proposed, suggesting that the transfer-free carbon nanostructures can be deposited on different substrates. These results open an easy way for direct and high-efficiency deposition of various carbon nanostructures on the low-temperature dielectric substrates. (papers)

  9. Multiwalled Carbon Nanotube Synthesis Using Arc Discharge with Hydrocarbon as Feedstock

    OpenAIRE

    Chaudhary, K. T.; Z. H. Rizvi; Bhatti, K. A.; Ali, J; P. P. Yupapin

    2013-01-01

    Synthesis of multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) by arc discharge process is investigated with methane (CH4) as background and feedstock gas. The arc discharge is carried out between two graphite electrodes for ambient pressures 100, 300, and 500 torr and arc currents 50, 70, and 90 A. Plasma kinetics such as the density and temperature for arc discharge carbon plasma is determined to find out the contribution of physical parameters as arc current and ambient pressure on the plasma dynamics a...

  10. Carbon nanotube composite materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Bryan, Gregory; Skinner, Jack L; Vance, Andrew; Yang, Elaine Lai; Zifer, Thomas

    2015-03-24

    A material consisting essentially of a vinyl thermoplastic polymer, un-functionalized carbon nanotubes and hydroxylated carbon nanotubes dissolved in a solvent. Un-functionalized carbon nanotube concentrations up to 30 wt % and hydroxylated carbon nanotube concentrations up to 40 wt % can be used with even small concentrations of each (less than 2 wt %) useful in producing enhanced conductivity properties of formed thin films.

  11. Direct Synthesis and Spectrum Analysis of CeO2 Nanoparticles Deposited on Carbon Nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Zuwei; HU Chenguo; XIONG Yufeng; XIA Chuanhui; LI Feiyun; WANG Xue

    2009-01-01

    A novel method of direct synthesis of CeO2 nanoparticles onto multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) was developed with advantages of simplicity, ease of scale-up, and low costs.The size of CeO2 particles deposited on the MWNTs was less than 6 nm. SEM and TEM were em-ployed to analysis the CeO2 coated MWNTs, and the properties of FTIR spectrum and UV-vis ab-sorption spectrum were investigated. The functional groups on the MWNTs obtained by nitric acid treatment play an important role on the deposition of the CeO2 particles. The carbon nanotubes possess broadened UV absorption function after being coated with CeO2 nanopartilces.

  12. Method for synthesizing carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Hongyou

    2012-09-04

    A method for preparing a precursor solution for synthesis of carbon nanomaterials, where a polar solvent is added to at least one block copolymer and at least one carbohydrate compound, and the precursor solution is processed using a self-assembly process and subsequent heating to form nanoporous carbon films, porous carbon nanotubes, and porous carbon nanoparticles.

  13. Immobilised carbon nanotubes as carrier for Co-Fischer-Tropsch synthesis catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thiessen, J.; Rose, A.; Kiendl, I.; Jess, A. [Bayreuth Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Curulla-Ferre, D. [Total S.A., Gas and Power, Paris La Defense (France)

    2011-07-01

    A possibility to immobilise carbon nanotubes (CNT) to make them applicable in a technical scale fixed bed reactor is studied. The approach to fabricate millimetre scale composites containing CNT presented in this work is to confine the nano-carbon in macro porous ceramic particles. Thus CNT were grown on the inner surface of silica and alumina pellets and spheres, respectively. Cobalt nano particles were successfully deposited on the carbon surface inside the two types of ceramic carriers and the systems were tested in Fischer - Tropsch synthesis (FTS). The cobalt mass related activity of these novel catalysts is similar to a conventional system. The selectivities of the Co/CNT/ceramic composites were compared with non supported CNT and carbon nanofibres (CNF). (orig.)

  14. Unifying the templating effects of porous anodic alumina on metallic nanoparticles for carbon nanotube synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haase, Mark R., E-mail: Mark.R.Haase@gmail.com, E-mail: haasemr@mail.uc.edu; Alvarez, Noe T.; Malik, Rachit; Schulz, Mark; Shanov, Vesselin [580 Engineering Research Center, Department of Biomedical, Chemical and Environmental Engineering (United States)

    2015-09-15

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are a promising material for many applications, due to their extraordinary properties. Some of these properties vary in relation to the diameter of the nanotubes; thus, precise control of CNT diameter can be critical. Porous anodic alumina (PAA) membranes have been successfully used to template electrodeposited catalyst. However, the catalysts used in CNT synthesis are frequently deposited with more precise techniques, such as electron beam deposition. We test the efficacy of PAA as a template for electron beam-deposited catalyst by studying the diameter distribution of CNTs grown catalyst of various thicknesses supported by PAA. These are then compared by ANOVA to the diameter distributions of CNTs grown on metal catalyst supported by a conventional alumina film. These results also allow a unified description of two templating effects, the more common particles-in-pores model, and the recently described particles-between-pores.

  15. Progammed synthesis of magnetic mesoporous silica coated carbon nanotubes for organic pollutant adsorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Yue; Zhang, Min; Xia, Peixiong; Wang, Linlin; Zheng, Jing; Li, Weizhen; Xu, Jingli

    2016-05-01

    Magnetic mesoporous silica coated carbon nanotubes were produced from hydrophilic monodisperse magnetic nanoparticles decorated carbon nanotubes using well controlled programmed synthesis method and were characterized by TEM, XRD, FTIR, TGA, N2 adsorption-desorption and VSM. The well-designed mesoporous magnetic nanotubes had a large specific area, a highly open mesoporous structure and high magnetization. Firstly, SiO2-coated maghemite/CNTs nanoparticles (CNTs/Fe3O4@SiO2 composites) were synthesized by the combination of high temperature decomposition process and an sol-gel method, in which the iron acetylacetonate as well as TEOS acted as the precursor for maghemite and SiO2, respectively. The CNTs/Fe3O4@SiO2 composites revealed a core-shell structure, Then, CNTs/Fe3O4@mSiO2 was obtained by extracting cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) via an ion-exchange procedure. The resulting composites show not only a magnetic response to an externally applied magnetic field, but also can be a good adsorbent for the organic pollutant in the ambient temperature.

  16. A Review of Double-Walled and Triple-Walled Carbon Nanotube Synthesis and Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Kazunori Fujisawa; Hee Jou Kim; Su Hyeon Go; Hiroyuki Muramatsu; Takuya Hayashi; Morinobu Endo; Thomas Ch. Hirschmann; Dresselhaus, Mildred S.; Yoong Ahm Kim; Araujo, Paulo T.

    2016-01-01

    Double- and triple-walled carbon nanotubes (DWNTs and TWNTs) consist of coaxially-nested two and three single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). They act as the geometrical bridge between SWNTs and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs), providing an ideal model for studying the coupling interactions between different shells in MWNTs. Within this context, this article comprehensively reviews various synthetic routes of DWNTs’ and TWNTs’ production, such as arc discharge, catalytic chemical vapor...

  17. Synthesis of carbon nanotubes using the cobalt nanocatalyst by thermal chemical vapor deposition technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madani, S.S. [Department of Chemistry, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Zare, K. [Department of Chemistry, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Chemistry, Shahid Beheshti University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ghoranneviss, M. [Plasma Physics Research Center, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Salar Elahi, A., E-mail: Salari_phy@yahoo.com [Plasma Physics Research Center, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-11-05

    The three main synthesis methods of Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are the arc discharge, the laser ablation and the chemical vapour deposition (CVD) with a special regard to the latter one. CNTs were produced on a silicon wafer by Thermal Chemical Vapor Deposition (TCVD) using acetylene as a carbon source, cobalt as a catalyst and ammonia as a reactive gas. The DC-sputtering system was used to prepare cobalt thin films on Si substrates. A series of experiments was carried out to investigate the effects of reaction temperature and deposition time on the synthesis of the nanotubes. The deposition time was selected as 15 and 25 min for all growth temperatures. Energy Dispersive X-ray (EDX) measurements were used to investigate the elemental composition of the Co nanocatalyst deposited on Si substrates. Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) was used to characterize the surface topography of the Co nanocatalyst deposited on Si substrates. The as-grown CNTs were characterized under Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM) to study the morphological properties of CNTs. Also, the grown CNTs have been investigated by High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM) and Raman spectroscopy. The results demonstrated that increasing the temperature leads to increasing the diameter of CNTs. The ideal reaction temperature was 850 °C and the deposition time was 15 min. - Graphical abstract: FESEM images of CNTs grown on the cobalt catalyst at growth temperatures of (a) 850 °C, (b) 900 °C, (c) 950 °C and (d) 1000 °C during the deposition time of 15 min. - Highlights: • Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were produced on a silicon wafer by TCVD technique. • EDX and AFM were used to investigate the elemental composition and surface topography. • FESEM was used to study the morphological properties of CNTs. • The grown CNTs have been investigated by HRTEM and Raman spectroscopy.

  18. Carbon nanotube nanoelectrode arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Zhifeng; Lin, Yuehe; Yantasee, Wassana; Liu, Guodong; Lu, Fang; Tu, Yi

    2008-11-18

    The present invention relates to microelectode arrays (MEAs), and more particularly to carbon nanotube nanoelectrode arrays (CNT-NEAs) for chemical and biological sensing, and methods of use. A nanoelectrode array includes a carbon nanotube material comprising an array of substantially linear carbon nanotubes each having a proximal end and a distal end, the proximal end of the carbon nanotubes are attached to a catalyst substrate material so as to form the array with a pre-determined site density, wherein the carbon nanotubes are aligned with respect to one another within the array; an electrically insulating layer on the surface of the carbon nanotube material, whereby the distal end of the carbon nanotubes extend beyond the electrically insulating layer; a second adhesive electrically insulating layer on the surface of the electrically insulating layer, whereby the distal end of the carbon nanotubes extend beyond the second adhesive electrically insulating layer; and a metal wire attached to the catalyst substrate material.

  19. Using hydrocarbon as a carbon source for synthesis of carbon nanotube by electric field induced needle-pulsed plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work different hydrocarbons are used as the carbon source, in the production of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and nano onions. An electric field induced needle pulse arc-discharge reactor is used. The influence of starting carbon on the synthesis of CNTs is investigated. The production efficiency is compared for Acetone, Isopropanol and Naphthalene as simple hydrocarbons. The hydrocarbons are preheated and then pretreated by electric field before being exposed to plasma. The hydrocarbon vapor is injected into plasma through a graphite spout in the cathode assembly. The pulsed plasma takes place between two graphite rods while a strong electric field has been already established alongside the electrodes. The pulse width is 0.3 μs. Mechanism of precursor decomposition is discussed by describing three forms of energy that are utilized to disintegrate the precursor molecules: thermal energy, electric field and kinetic energy of plasma. Molecular polarity of a hydrocarbon is one of the reasons for choosing carbon raw material as a precursor in an electric field induced low power pulsed-plasma. The results show that in order to obtain high quality carbon nanotubes, Acetone is preferred to Isopropanol and Naphthalene. Scanning probe microscopy techniques are used to investigate the products. - Highlights: • We synthesized CNTs (carbon nano tubes) by needle pulsed plasma. • We use different hydrocarbons as carbon source in the production of CNTs. • We investigated the influence of starting carbon on the synthesis of CNTs. • Thermal energy, electric field and kinetic energy are used to break carbon bonds. • Polar hydrocarbon molecules are more efficient than nonpolar ones in production

  20. Carbon nanotube quantum dots

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sapmaz, S.

    2006-01-01

    Low temperature electron transport measurements on individual single wall carbon nanotubes are described in this thesis. Carbon nanotubes are small hollow cylinders made entirely out of carbon atoms. At low temperatures (below ~10 K) finite length nanotubes form quantum dots. Because of its small si

  1. Synthesis and Characterization of Multi Wall Carbon Nanotubes (MWCNT) Reinforced Sintered Magnesium Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijaya Bhaskar, S.; Rajmohan, T.; Palanikumar, K.; Bharath Ganesh Kumar, B.

    2016-04-01

    Metal matrix composites (MMCs) reinforced with ceramic nano particles (less than 100 nm), termed as metal matrix nano composites (MMNCs), can overcome those disadvantages associated with the conventional MMCs. MMCs containing carbon nanotubes are being developed and projected for diverse applications in various fields of engineering like automotive, avionic, electronic and bio-medical sectors. The present investigation deals with the synthesis and characterization of hybrid magnesium matrix reinforced with various different wt% (0-0.45) of multi wall carbon nano tubes (MWCNT) and micro SiC particles prepared through powder metallurgy route. Microstructure and mechanical properties such as micro hardness and density of the composites were examined. Microstructure of MMNCs have been investigated by scanning electron microscope, X-ray diffraction and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) for better observation of dispersion of reinforcement. The results indicated that the increase in wt% of MWCNT improves the mechanical properties of the composite.

  2. Spectroscopy of Individual Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes and their Synthesis via Chemical Vapor Deposition

    OpenAIRE

    Kiowski, Oliver

    2008-01-01

    A chemical vapor deposition (CVD) reactor was designed, built and used to grow vertically and horizontally aligned carbon nanotube arrays. The as-grown nanotubes were investigated on a single tube level using nearinfrared photoluminescence (PL) microscopy as well as Raman, atomic force and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). For photoluminescence excitation (PLE) spectroscopy of individual, semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs), a specialized PL set-up was constructed.

  3. Synthesis of single wall carbon nanotubes from a lamellar type aluminophosphate (AlPO4-L)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    N Venkatathri

    2008-08-01

    Single wall carbon nanotubes are synthesized from a lamellar type aluminophosphate, AlPO4-L. The lamellar aluminophosphate was synthesized from hexamethyleneimine template. The latter was calcined at argon atmosphere for 12 h at 600°C. The resulting carbonaceous material was treated with 1 N H2SO4 to remove the aluminophosphate skeleton. Characterization of the resulting carbon revealed to contain single walled nanotubes. These nanotubes are applicable to store more hydrogen.

  4. Synthesis and characterization of well-aligned carbon nitrogen nanotubes by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Well-aligned carbon nitrogen nanotube films have been synthesized successfully on mesoporous silica substrates by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition (MWPCVD) method. Studies on their morphology, structure, and composition by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), respectively, indicate that these nanotubes consist of linearly polymerized carbon nitrogen nanobells, and the nitrogen atoms have been doped into carbon netweork to form a new structure C1-xNx (x=0.16±0.01). X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) results of the samples further demonstrate that carbon bonds covalently with nitrogen in all the carbon nitrogen nanotube films.

  5. Space-Confined Synthesis of Three-Dimensional Boron/Nitrogen-Doped Carbon Nanotubes/Carbon Nanosheets Line-in-Wall Hybrids and Their Electrochemical Energy Storage Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Shan; Li, Jiajun; Li, Qingfeng;

    2016-01-01

    This research demonstrates a flexible one-pot strategy for fabricating three-dimensional (3D) boron/nitrogen-doped networks of carbon nanotubes(CNTs)/carbon nanosheets "Line-in-Wall" hybrids (LIWNB) based on the space-confined template method. In the synthesis, the high rate of freezing step and ...

  6. Pyrolytic Synthesis of Carbon Nanotubes on Ni, Co/MCM-41 Catalysts

    OpenAIRE

    Katok, K. V.; Tertykh, V. A.; Pavlenko, A. N.; Brichka, S. Ya.; Prikhod'ko, G. P.

    2004-01-01

    Process of vapor pyrolytic deposition of carbon on nickel and cobalt-containing ordered mesoporous MCM-41 matrices at decomposition of acetylene have been investigated. Formation of nanotubes, nanowires and amorphous carbon particles depending pyrolysis conditions is observed.

  7. Plumbing carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Chuanhong; Suenaga, Kazu; Iijima, Sumio

    2008-01-01

    Since their discovery, the possibility of connecting carbon nanotubes together like water pipes has been an intriguing prospect for these hollow nanostructures. The serial joining of carbon nanotubes in a controlled manner offers a promising approach for the bottom-up engineering of nanotube structures-from simply increasing their aspect ratio to making integrated carbon nanotube devices. To date, however, there have been few reports of the joining of two different carbon nanotubes. Here we demonstrate that a Joule heating process, and associated electro-migration effects, can be used to connect two carbon nanotubes that have the same (or similar) diameters. More generally, with the assistance of a tungsten metal particle, this technique can be used to seamlessly join any two carbon nanotubes-regardless of their diameters-to form new nanotube structures.

  8. Recent Trends in the Microwave-Assisted Synthesis of Metal Oxide Nanoparticles Supported on Carbon Nanotubes and Their Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah C. Motshekga

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The study of coating carbon nanotubes with metal/oxides nanoparticles is now becoming a promising and challenging area of research. To optimize the use of carbon nanotubes in various applications, it is necessary to attach functional groups or other nanostructures to their surface. The combination of the distinctive properties of carbon nanotubes and metal/oxides is expected to be applied in field emission displays, nanoelectronic devices, novel catalysts, and polymer or ceramic reinforcement. The synthesis of these composites is still largely based on conventional techniques, such as wet impregnation followed by chemical reduction of the metal nanoparticle precursors. These techniques based on thermal heating can be time consuming and often lack control of particle size and morphology. Hence, there is interest in microwave technology recently, where using microwaves represents an alternative way of power input into chemical reactions through dielectric heating. This paper covers the synthesis and applications of carbon-nanotube-coated metal/oxides nanoparticles prepared by a microwave-assisted method. The reviewed studies show that the microwave-assisted synthesis of the composites allows processes to be completed within a shorter reaction time with uniform and well-dispersed nanoparticle formation.

  9. Facile Synthesis of Highly Aligned Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes from Polymer Precursors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Y. Han

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a facile one-step approach which involves no flammable gas, no catalyst, and no in situ polymerization for the preparation of well-aligned carbon nanotube array. A polymer precursor is placed on top of an anodized aluminum oxide (AAO membrane containing regular nanopore arrays, and slow heating under Ar flow allows the molten polymer to wet the template through adhesive force. The polymer spread into the nanopores of the template to form polymer nanotubes. Upon carbonization the resulting multi-walled carbon nanotubes duplicate the nanopores morphology precisely. The process is demonstrated for 230, 50, and 20 nm pore membranes. The synthesized carbon nanotubes are characterized with scanning/transmission electron microscopies, Raman spectroscopy, and resistive measurements. Convenient functionalization of the nanotubes with this method is demonstrated through premixing CoPt nanoparticles in the polymer precursors.

  10. Phosphorylated multiwalled carbon nanotube-cyclodextrin polymer: synthesis, characterisation and potential application in water purification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamba, G; Mbianda, X Y; Govender, P P

    2013-10-15

    Multiwalled carbon nanotubes were synthesised by the nebulised spray pyrolysis method and purified to remove amorphous carbon and fullerenes. The purified multiwalled carbon nanotubes were oxidised using a 3:1 H2SO4/HNO3 mixture to introduce carboxylic groups and to a smaller extent hydroxyl groups on the walls of the carbon nanotubes. Subsequently, the oxidised carbon nanotubes were chlorinated using oxalyl chloride to generate acyl chloride groups through which phosphorylation took place. 4-Aminophenyl methylphosphonate was attached to the multiwalled carbon nanotubes via an amidation reaction. FT-IR and XPS confirmed the presence of PO, PO and PCP functional groups in the phosphorylated carbon nanotubes. Polymerisation of the phosphorylated carbon nanotubes with cyclodextrins was achieved using hexamethylene diisocyanate as a bifunctional linker. Surface morphology of the polymer was investigated by SEM while FT-IR was used to confirm the polymerisation reaction. Moreover, the thermal stability of the polymer was probed using TGA while BET was employed to determine the surface area and pore volume of the polymer. Furthermore, the polymer was tested for the removal of cobalt and 4-chlorophenol from synthetic aqueous solutions of the pollutants. The polymer displayed potential as an adsorbent for both cobalt and 4-chlorophenol.

  11. Investigation of water-assisted synthesis of high quality carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) were synthesized using a water-assisted method. High quality MWNTs having inner and outer diameter in the range of tens of nm and length in the range of hundreds of nm were obtained. The characterization results (SEM micrographs) clearly show that yield as well as nature (straight or twisted and curled) of produced carbon nanotubes varies directly with the diameter of initial carbon based precursor

  12. Synthesis of carbon nanotubes by laser ablation in graphite substrate of industrial arc electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero, A.; Puerta, J.; Gomez, F.; Blanco, F.

    2008-10-01

    In this work, an inexpensive and simple technique for the synthesis of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) by using graphite as the target for IR laser radiation is presented. This graphite material is obtained from the recycled graphite electrode core of an electric arc furnace. The experiment was carried out in a reaction chamber in an argon atmosphere at a low pressure. For laser ablation, a Lumonics TEA CO2 laser beam (7 J; 0.05-50 μs pulse length) was used in multimode operation. Products were collected on free mica sheets. The substrates were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and the products were characterized (collected as powder) by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). They showed significant amounts of high-quality dense filaments (CNTs) that were morphologically not aligned.

  13. Synthesis of carbon nanotubes by laser ablation in graphite substrate of industrial arc electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work, an inexpensive and simple technique for the synthesis of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) by using graphite as the target for IR laser radiation is presented. This graphite material is obtained from the recycled graphite electrode core of an electric arc furnace. The experiment was carried out in a reaction chamber in an argon atmosphere at a low pressure. For laser ablation, a Lumonics TEA CO2 laser beam (7 J; 0.05-50 μs pulse length) was used in multimode operation. Products were collected on free mica sheets. The substrates were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and the products were characterized (collected as powder) by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). They showed significant amounts of high-quality dense filaments (CNTs) that were morphologically not aligned.

  14. Particle size effects in Fischer-Tropsch synthesis by Co catalyst supported on carbon nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ali Nakhaei Pour; Elham Hosaini; Mohammad Izadyar; Mohammad Reza Housaindokht

    2015-01-01

    The effect of Co particle size on the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS) activity of carbon nanotube (CNT)-supported Co catalysts was investigated. Microemulsion (using water-to-surfactant molar ratios of 2 to12) and impregnation techniques were used to prepare catalysts with different Co particle sizes. Kinetic studies were performed to understand the effect of Co particle size on catalytic activity. Size-dependent kinetic parameters were developed using a thermodynamic method, to evaluate the structural sensitivity of the CNT-supported Co catalysts. The size-independent FTS reaction rate constant and size-independent adsorption parameter increased with increasing reac-tion temperature. The Polani parameter also depended on catalyst particle size, because of changes in the catalyst surface coverage.

  15. Development of niobium-promoted cobalt catalysts on carbon nanotubes for Fischer-Tropsch synthesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sardar Ali; Noor Asmawati Mohd Zabidi; Duvvuri Subbarao

    2011-01-01

    Cobalt-based catalysts were prepared by a wet impregnation method on carbon nanotubes (CNTs) support and promoted with niobium.Samples were characterized by nitrogen adsorption,TEM,XRD,TPR,TPO and H2-TPD.Addition of niobium increased the dispersion of cobalt but decreased the catalysts reducibility.Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS) was carried out in a fixed-bed microreactor at 543 K,1 atm and H2/CO =2 for 5 h.Addition of niobium enhanced the C5+ hydrocarbons selectivity by 39% and reduced methane selectivity by 59%.These effects were more pronounced for 0.04%Nb/Co/CNTs catalyst,compared with those observed for other niobium compositions.

  16. Synthesis and analytical applications of molecularly imprinted polymers on the surface of carbon nanotubes: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This review (with 142 references) summarize the state of the art in molecularly imprinting technology as applied to the surface of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) which result in so-called CNTs-MIPs. These nanomaterials offer a remedy to the flaws of traditional MIPs, such as poor site accessibility for templates, slow mass transfer and template leakage. They also are flexible in that different materials can be integrated with CNTs. Given the advantages of using CNT-MIPs, this technology has experienced rapid expansion, not the least because CNT-MIPs can be produced at low cost and by a variety of synthetic approaches. We summarize methods of, and recent advances in the synthesis of CNT-MIPs, and then highlight some representative applications. We also comment on their potential future developments and research directions. (author)

  17. Synthesis of carbon nanotube array using corona discharge plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    A corona discharge plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition with the features of atmospheric pressure and low temperature has been developed to synthesize the carbon nanotube array. The array was synthesized from methane and hydrogen mixture in anodic aluminum oxide template channels in that cobalt was electrodeposited at the bottom. The characterization results by the scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy indicate that the array consists of carbon nanotubes with the diameter of about 40 nm and the length of more than 4 -m, and the carbon nanotubes are mainly restrained within the channels of templates.

  18. Gas and pressure effects on the synthesis of amorphous carbon nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Tingkai; LIU Yongning; ZHU Jiewu

    2004-01-01

    The effects of gas, pressure and temperature on the production of amorphous carbon nanotubes were investigated using an arc discharging furnace at controlled temperature. Co/Ni alloy powder was used as catalyst.The discharge current was 80 A and voltage was 32 V. The optimal parameters were obtained: 600℃ temperature, hydrogen gas and 500 torr pressure. The productivity and purity of amorphous carbon nanotubes are 6.5 gram per hour and 80%, respectively. The diameter of the amorphous carbon nanotubes is about 7-20 nm.

  19. Synthesis of dark brown single-walled carbon nanotubes and their characterization by HSQC-NMR

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Rahebeh Amiri; Hamidreza Rafiee; Ashkan Golshani; Firoozeh Chalabian

    2013-03-01

    We report here a simple and effective approach to the covalent attachment of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and azo compounds. The functionalized SWCNTs prepared (through a radical mechanism) have been used for a diazonium coupling reaction. The results showed that the chemical method used has improved the processability and solubility of the carbon nanotubes. The dark brown SWCNTs obtained which can produce a yellow colour in organic solvents were characterized by different spectroscopic analyses. Heteronuclear single quantum coherence spectra (13C-1H HSQC) have been used to detect the carbon nanotube allylic protons. The morphology of the main product has been shown by scanning electron microscopy (SEM).

  20. Continuous polyethylene pyrolysis for hybrid flame/CVD synthesis of carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Nicholas Wilder

    2011-12-01

    A system was designed to integrate the continuous feeding of polyethylene for pyrolysis into the hybrid flame/CVD carbon nanotube (CNT) synthesis process previously developed in this laboratory. Following the completion of the stainless steel design and machining operations, the polyethylene dispenser, screw conveyor, pyrolysis chamber, venturi flame holder, particle filter, synthesis chamber and dual]zone heating system were successfully integrated for full operation. A water cooling unit was incorporated with the screw conveyor to ensure flawless delivery of polyethylene to the pyrolysis chamber, as well as a support system to suspend the CNT catalyst within the synthesis chamber. As with the previously developed process, the intended use of combustion effluent within the apparatus was to synthesize multi]walled CNTs using stainless steel wire mesh. This was facilitated by an extensive study of the effluent produced with this continuous feeding system at varying system settings and in comparison to the previous apparatus, followed by a determination of the system parameters, which result in conditions most favorable to multi walled CNT growth.

  1. Different Technical Applications of Carbon Nanotubes

    OpenAIRE

    Abdalla, S; Al-Marzouki, F.; Ahmed A. Al-Ghamdi; Abdel-Daiem, A.

    2015-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes have been of great interest because of their simplicity and ease of synthesis. The novel properties of nanostructured carbon nanotubes such as high surface area, good stiffness, and resilience have been explored in many engineering applications. Research on carbon nanotubes have shown the application in the field of energy storage, hydrogen storage, electrochemical supercapacitor, field-emitting devices, transistors, nanoprobes and sensors, composite material, templates, etc....

  2. MICROWAVE-ASSISTED SYNTHESIS OF CROSSLINKED POLY(VINYL ALCOHOL) NANOCOMPOSITES COMPRISING SINGLE-WALLED CARBON NANOTUBES, MULTI-WALLED CARBON NANOTUBES AND BUCKMINSTERFULLERENE

    Science.gov (United States)

    We report a facile method to accomplish cross-linking reaction of poly (vinyl alcohol) (PVA) with single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNT), multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWNT), and Buckminsterfullerene (C-60) using microwave (MW) irradiation. Nanocomposites of PVA cross-linked with SW...

  3. Synthesis of carbon nanotubes and porous carbons from printed circuit board waste pyrolysis oil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The possibility and feasibility of using pyrolysis oil from printed circuit board (PCB) waste as a precursor for advanced carbonaceous materials is presented. The PCB waste was first pyrolyzed in a laboratory scale fixed bed reactor at 600 deg. C to prepare pyrolysis oil. The analysis of pyrolysis oil by gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy indicated that it contained a very high proportion of phenol and phenol derivatives. It was then polymerized in formaldehyde solution to synthesize pyrolysis oil-based resin which was used as a precursor to prepare carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and porous carbons. Scanning electron microscopy and transmission microscopy investigation showed that the resulting CNTs had hollow cores with outer diameter of ∼338 nm and wall thickness of ∼86 nm and most of them were filled with metal nanoparticles or nanorods. X-ray diffraction reveals that CNTs have an amorphous structure. Nitrogen adsorption isotherm analysis indicated the prepared porous carbons had a Brunauer-Emmett-Teller surface area of 1214 m2/g. The mechanism of the formation of the CNTs and porous carbons was discussed.

  4. Fast Synthesis of Multilayer Carbon Nanotubes from Camphor Oil as an Energy Storage Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amin TermehYousefi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Among the wide range of renewable energy sources, the ever-increasing demand for electricity storage represents an emerging challenge. Utilizing carbon nanotubes (CNTs for energy storage is closely being scrutinized due to the promising performance on top of their extraordinary features. In this work, well-aligned multilayer carbon nanotubes were successfully synthesized on a porous silicon (PSi substrate in a fast process using renewable natural essential oil via chemical vapor deposition (CVD. Considering the influx of vaporized multilayer vertical carbon nanotubes (MVCNTs to the PSi, the diameter distribution increased as the flow rate decreased in the reactor. Raman spectroscopy results indicated that the crystalline quality of the carbon nanotubes structure exhibits no major variation despite changes in the flow rate. Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR spectra confirmed the hexagonal structure of the carbon nanotubes because of the presence of a peak corresponding to the carbon double bond. Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM images showed multilayer nanotubes, each with different diameters with long and straight multiwall tubes. Moreover, the temperature programmed desorption (TPD method has been used to analyze the hydrogen storage properties of MVCNTs, which indicates that hydrogen adsorption sites exist on the synthesized multilayer CNTs.

  5. Synthesis and Characterization of SiO2-Carbon Nanotube Hybrides Using a Sol-Gel Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Montakhab

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available This work is focused on synthesis of SiO2- CNT hybrides via sol-gel method. Homogeneous distribution of carbon nanotubes within silicon matrix was obtained by mixing the functionalized carbon nanotube (CNTCOOH with active silicic acid followed by titration to the solution of sodium silicate (Na2SiO3 under the average temperature condition of 80?C. Different ratios of multi-walled carbon nanotubes and various concentrations of colloidal silica were used for synthesis of SiO2-CNT. Powder X-Ray Diffraction (XRD and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM used for studying the structure and morphological characteristics of the synthesized SiO2-CNT hybrids. The results showed that the various morphologies of SiO2-CNTs are obtained with different ratio of precursors. The SEM images indicated the formation of uniform nanoparticles, nanowires and nanotube structures in various samples. In addition, the hydrogen storage capacity and thermal conductivity of SiO2-CNT hybrides were determined and presented in this article. Also total pore volume and BET surface area were calculated for these composites.

  6. Early evaluation of potential environmental impacts of carbon nanotube synthesis by chemical vapor deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plata, Desirée L; Hart, A John; Reddy, Christopher M; Gschwend, Philip M

    2009-11-01

    The carbon nanotube (CNT) industry is expanding rapidly, yet little is known about the potential environmental impacts of CNT manufacture. Here, we evaluate the effluent composition of a representative multiwalled CNT synthesis by catalytic chemical vapor deposition (CVD) in order to provide data needed to design strategies for mitigating any unacceptable emissions. During thermal pretreatment of the reactant gases (ethene and H(2)), we found over 45 side-products were formed, including methane, volatile organic compounds (VOCs), and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). This finding suggests several environmental concerns with the existing process, including potential discharges of the potent greenhouse gas, methane (up to 1.7%), and toxic compounds such as benzene and 1,3-butadiene (up to 36000 ppmv). Extrapolating these laboratory-scale data to future industrial CNT production, we estimate that (1) contributions of atmospheric methane will be negligible compared to other existing sources and (2) VOC and PAH emissions may become important on local scales but will be small when compared to national industrial sources. As a first step toward reducing such unwanted emissions, we used continuous in situ measures of CNT length during growth and sought to identify which thermally generated compounds correlated with CNT growth rate. The results suggested that, in future CNT production approaches, key reaction intermediates could be delivered to the catalyst without thermal treatment. This would eliminate the most energetically expensive component of CVD synthesis (heating reactant gases), while reducing the formation of unintended byproducts. PMID:19924971

  7. Predictive Synthesis of Freeform Carbon Nanotube Microarchitectures by Strain-Engineered Chemical Vapor Deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sei Jin; Zhao, Hangbo; Kim, Sanha; De Volder, Michael; John Hart, A

    2016-08-01

    High-throughput fabrication of microstructured surfaces with multi-directional, re-entrant, or otherwise curved features is becoming increasingly important for applications such as phase change heat transfer, adhesive gripping, and control of electromagnetic waves. Toward this goal, curved microstructures of aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs) can be fabricated by engineered variation of the CNT growth rate within each microstructure, for example by patterning of the CNT growth catalyst partially upon a layer which retards the CNT growth rate. This study develops a finite-element simulation framework for predictive synthesis of complex CNT microarchitectures by this strain-engineered growth process. The simulation is informed by parametric measurements of the CNT growth kinetics, and the anisotropic mechanical properties of the CNTs, and predicts the shape of CNT microstructures with impressive fidelity. Moreover, the simulation calculates the internal stress distribution that results from extreme deformation of the CNT structures during growth, and shows that delamination of the interface between the differentially growing segments occurs at a critical shear stress. Guided by these insights, experiments are performed to study the time- and geometry-depended stress development, and it is demonstrated that corrugating the interface between the segments of each microstructure mitigates the interface failure. This study presents a methodology for 3D microstructure design based on "pixels" that prescribe directionality to the resulting microstructure, and show that this framework enables the predictive synthesis of more complex architectures including twisted and truss-like forms.

  8. Synthesis and characterization of well-aligned carbon nitrogen nanotubes by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马旭村; 徐贵昌; 王恩哥

    2000-01-01

    Well-aligned carbon nitrogen nanotube films have been synthesized successfully on meso-porous silica substrates by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition (MWPCVD) method. Studies on their morphology, structure, and composition by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), respectively, indicate that these nanotubes consist of linearly polymerized carbon nitrogen nanobells, and the nitrogen atoms have been doped into carbon netweork to form a new structure C1-xNx( x = 0.16±0.01). X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) results of the samples further demonstrate that carbon bonds cova-lently with nitrogen in all the carbon nitrogen nanotube films.

  9. Ferric oxide nanoparticles decorated carbon nanotubes and carbon nanofibers: From synthesis to enhanced removal of phenol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamza A. Asmaly

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In this work, ferric oxide nanoparticle decorated carbon fibers and carbon nanotubes (CNF/Fe2O3 and CNT/Fe2O3 were synthesized and characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, X-ray diffraction (XRD, zeta potential and BET surface area analyzer. The prepared nanocomposites were evaluated or the removal of phenol ions from aqueous solution. The effects of experimental parameters, such as shaking speed, pH, contact time, adsorbent dosage and initial concentration, were evaluated for the phenol removal efficiency. The adsorption experimental data were represented by both the Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models. The Langmuir isotherm model best fitted the data on the adsorption of phenol, with a high correlation coefficient. The adsorption capacities, as determined by the Langmuir isotherm model were 0.842, 1.098, 1.684 and 2.778 mg/g for raw CNFs, raw CNTs, CNF–Fe2O3 and CNT–Fe2O3, respectively.

  10. Synthesis of carbon nanotubes by catalytic pyrolysis method with Feitknecht compound as precursor of NiZnAl catalyst

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan Xiaoqi; Liu Quanrun; Zhang Songlin; Zhang Kun; Chen Jiuling; Li Yongdan

    2004-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes are synthesized by catalytic pyrolysis method with a kind of new type catalyst--nickel-zinc-alumina catalyst prepared from Feitknecht compound. Tubular carbon nanotubes, bamboo-shaped carbon naotubes, herringbone carbon nanotubues and branched carbon nanotubes are all found formed at moderate temperature. It is important for the formation of quasi-liquid state of the metal nanoparticles at the tip of carbon naotubes during the growth of carbon nanotubes to lead to different kinds of carbon nanotubes. It is likely that the addition of zinc make the activity of nickel catalyst after calcinations and reduction changed strangely.

  11. Multiwalled Carbon Nanotube Synthesis Using Arc Discharge with Hydrocarbon as Feedstock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. T. Chaudhary

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Synthesis of multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWCNT by arc discharge process is investigated with methane (CH4 as background and feedstock gas. The arc discharge is carried out between two graphite electrodes for ambient pressures 100, 300, and 500 torr and arc currents 50, 70, and 90 A. Plasma kinetics such as the density and temperature for arc discharge carbon plasma is determined to find out the contribution of physical parameters as arc current and ambient pressure on the plasma dynamics and growth of MWCNT. With increase in applied arc current and ambient pressure, an increase in plasma temperature and density is observed. The synthesized samples of MWCNT at different experimental conditions are characterized by transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction. A decrease in the diameter and improvement in structure quality and growth of MWCNT are observed with increase in CH4 ambient pressure and arc current. For CH4 ambient pressure 500 torr and arc current 90 A, the well-aligned and straight MWCNT along with graphene stakes are detected.

  12. One-step synthesis of carbon nanotubes-copper composites for fabricating catalyst supports of methanol electrooxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Shaoyan; Fan Guoli; Zhang Chunfang [State Key Laboratory of Chemical Resource Engineering, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, P.O. Box 98, Beijing 100029 (China); Li Feng, E-mail: lifeng_70@163.com [State Key Laboratory of Chemical Resource Engineering, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, P.O. Box 98, Beijing 100029 (China)

    2012-07-16

    One-step synthesis of carbon nanotubes-copper composites was established by catalytic chemical vapor deposition (CCVD) of acetylene over Co-Cu-Al mixed metal oxides derived from layered double hydroxides (LDHs). Power X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM), transmission electron microscope (TEM), Raman spectra, thermogravimetric and differential thermal analysis (TG-DTA) and N{sub 2} adsorption-desorption measurements revealed that multi-walled carbon nanotubes were synthesized during cobalt-catalyzed CCVD, and copper nanoparticles were simultaneously in situ formed in CNTs matrix. Electrodes modified with platinum particles supported on as-fabricated CNTs-Cu composites showed much higher electrocatalytic activity for the oxidation of methanol than that modified with Pt particles supported on the commercial CNTs. The present study greatly enlarges the practical application of hybrid CNTs-based nanocomposites. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Carbon nanotubes-copper composites were prepared directly. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Copper nanoparticles were simultaneously in situ formed in carbon nanotubes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Electrodes were modified with platinum particles supported on such composites. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Electrodes showed excellent electrocatalytic activity for oxidation of methanol.

  13. Solution-phase synthesis of chromium-functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes

    KAUST Repository

    Kalinina, Irina V.

    2015-03-01

    The solution phase reactions of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) with Cr(CO)6 and benzene-Cr(CO)3 can lead to the formation of small chromium clusters. The cluster size can be varied from less than 1 nm to about 4 nm by increasing the reaction time. TEM images suggest that the clusters are deposited predominantly on the exterior walls of the nanotubes. TGA analysis was used to obtain the Cr content and carbon to chromium ratio in the Cr-complexed SWNTs. It is suggested that the carbon nanotube benzenoid structure templates the condensation of chromium atoms and facilitates the loss of carbon monoxide leading to well defined metal clusters.

  14. Spontaneous synthesis of carbon nanowalls, nanotubes and nanotips using high flux density plasmas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bystrov, K.; M. C. M. van de Sanden,; Arnas, C.; Marot, L.; Mathys, D.; Liu, F.; L.K. Xu,; X.B. Li,; A.V. Shalpegin,; De Temmerman, G.

    2014-01-01

    We have investigated the formation of various carbon nanostructures using extreme plasma fluxes up to four orders of magnitude larger than in conventional plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition processing. Carbon nanowalls, multi-wall nanotubes, spherical nanoparticles and nanotips are among the

  15. Synthesis and mechanical behavior of carbon nanotube-magnesium composites hybridized with nanoparticles of alumina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon nanotubes reinforced magnesium based composites were prepared with diligence and care using the powder metallurgy route coupled with rapid microwave sintering. Nanometer-sized particles of alumina were used to hybridize the carbon nanotubes reinforcement in the magnesium matrix so as to establish the intrinsic influence of hybridization on mechanical behavior of the resultant composite material. The yield strength, tensile strength and strain-to-failure of the carbon nanotubes-magnesium composites were found to increase with the addition of nanometer-sized alumina particles to the composite matrix. Scanning electron microscopy observations of the fracture surfaces of the samples deformed and failed in uniaxial tension revealed the presence of cleavage-like features on the fracture surface indicative of the occurrence of locally brittle fracture mechanism in the composite microstructure

  16. Microwave-assisted synthesis of carbon nanotubes from tannin, lignin, and derivatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viswanathan, Tito

    2014-06-17

    A method of synthesizing carbon nanotubes. In one embodiment, the method includes the steps of: (a) dissolving a first amount of a first transition-metal salt and a second amount of a second transition-metal salt in water to form a solution; (b) adding a third amount of tannin to the solution to form a mixture; (c) heating the mixture to a first temperature for a first duration of time to form a sample; and (d) subjecting the sample to a microwave radiation for a second duration of time effective to produce a plurality of carbon nanotubes.

  17. Synthesis and Characterization of Silver Nanoparticle-Multiwalled Carbon Nanotube Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dunieskys G. Larrude

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs grown by spray pyrolysis have been decorated with silver nanoparticles prepared via the silver mirror reaction. Good dispersion of silver nanostructures was obtained on the surface of MWCNTs, resulting in an efficient and simple wet chemistry method for increasing the reactivity of the carbon nanotubes surfaces. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy showed the orientations of the crystallography planes of the anchored silver nanoparticles and revealed their size distribution. Raman spectroscopy results confirm that the composite material preserves the integrity of the MWCNTs. Scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy were also employed for sample characterization.

  18. Effects of Citric Acid Concentration and Activation Temperature on the Synthesis of Carbon Nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fengyi Li; Minwei Wang; Rongbin Zhang; Renzhong Wei; Niancai Peng

    2004-01-01

    A series of Ni-La-Mg catalyst samples were prepared by citric acid complex method, and carbon nanotubes were synthesized by catalytic decomposition of CH4 on these catalysts. The effects of the citric acid concentration and the activation temperature on catalytic activity were investigated by CO adsorption,TEM and XRD techniques. The experimental results showed that the particle size of the catalysts prepared through gel auto-combustion varied with the concentration of citric acid. Therefore carbon nanotubes with different diameters were obtained correspondingly. The effect of activation temperature on the activity of catalyst was negligible from 500 to 700 ℃, but it became pronounced at lower or higher temperatures.

  19. Synthesis of zinc oxide nanoparticles on graphene-carbon nanotube hybrid for glucose biosensor applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwa, Kuo-Yuan; Subramani, Boopathi

    2014-12-15

    Synthesis of zinc oxide nanoparticles incorporated graphene-carbon nanotubes hybrid (GR-CNT-ZnO) through a simple, one-pot method is demonstrated. The as-synthesized GR-CNT-ZnO composite is applied to fabricate an enzyme based glucose biosensor. The GOx immobilized on GR-CNT-ZnO composite exhibits well-defined redox peaks with a peak potential separation (ΔEp) of about 26 mV with enhanced peak currents, indicating a fast electron transfer at the modified electrode surface. The cyclic voltammetry measurements revealed that the modified film has high electrocatalytic ability towards glucose detection in the presence of oxygen. The proposed sensor has a wide linear detection range from 10 μM to 6.5 mM of glucose with a limit of detection (LOD) of 4.5 (±0.08) μM. In addition, the sensor possessed appreciable repeatability, reproducibility and remarkable stability for the sensitive determination of glucose. The practicality of this sensor has been demonstrated in human serum samples, with results being in good agreement with those determined using a standard photometric method. PMID:24997365

  20. Synthesis of benzimidazole-grafted graphene oxide/multi-walled carbon nanotubes composite for supercapacitance application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srivastava, Rajesh Kr., E-mail: r05bhu@gmail.com [Division of Physics and Applied Physics, School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, 637371 Singapore (Singapore); Xingjue, Wang [Division of Physics and Applied Physics, School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, 637371 Singapore (Singapore); Kumar, Vinod [Department of Zoology, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi (India); Srivastava, Anchal [Department of Physics, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi (India); Singh, Vidya Nand [CSIR-National Physical Laboratory, New Delhi (India)

    2014-11-05

    Highlights: • We are reporting supercapacitance performance of BI-GO/MWCNTs composite. • The specific capacitance of BI-GO/MWCNTs is 275 and 460 F/g at 200 and 5 mV/s scan rate. • This composite has shown 224 F/g capacitance after 1300 cycles at 200 mV/s scan rate. - Abstract: We are reporting the fabrication, characterizations and supercapacitance performance of benzimidazole-grafted graphene oxide/multi-walled carbon nanotubes (BI-GO/MWCNTs) composite. The synthesis of BI-GO materials involves cyclization reaction of carboxylic groups on GO among the hydroxyl and amino groups on o-phenylenediamine. The BI-GO/MWCNTs composite has been fabricated via in situ reduction of BI-GO using hydrazine in presence of MWCNTs. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Raman spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) have been used to characterize its surface and elemental composition. The uniform dispersion of MWCNTs with BI-GO helps to improve the charge transfer reaction during electrochemical process. The specific capacitance of BI-GO/MWCNTs composite is 275 and 460 F/g at 200 and 5 mV/s scan rate in 1 mol/L aqueous solution of H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}. This BI-GO/MWCNTs composite has shown 224 F/g capacitance after 1300 cycles at 200 mV/s scan rate, which represents its good electrochemical stability.

  1. Synthesis of Vertically Aligned Carbon Nanotubes on Silicalite-1 Monolayer-Supported Substrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Zhao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Monodisperse magnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticles (NPs with the size of ca. 3.5 nm were prepared and used as the catalysts for the synthesis of vertically aligned carbon nanotube (VACNT arrays. A silicalite-1 microcrystal monolayer was used as the support layer between catalyst NPs and the silicon substrate. Compared to our previous report which used radio-frequency- (rf- sputtered Fe2O3 film as the catalyst, Fe3O4 NPs that were synthesized by wet chemical method showed an improved catalytic ability with less agglomeration. The silicalite-1 crystal monolayer acted as an effective “buffer” layer to prevent the catalyst NPs from agglomerating during the reaction process. It is believed that this is the first report that realizes the vertical alignment of CNTs over the zeolite monolayer, namely, silicalite-1 microcrystal monolayer, instead of using the intermediate anodic aluminum oxide (AAO scaffold to regulate the growth direction of CNT products.

  2. Hetero-junctions of Boron Nitride and Carbon Nanotubes: Synthesis and Characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yap, Yoke Khin

    2013-03-14

    Hetero-junctions of boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are expected to have appealing new properties that are not available from pure BNNTs and CNTs. Theoretical studies indicate that BNNT/CNT junctions could be multifunctional and applicable as memory, spintronic, electronic, and photonics devices with tunable band structures. This will lead to energy and material efficient multifunctional devices that will be beneficial to the society. However, experimental realization of BNNT/CNT junctions was hindered by the absent of a common growth technique for BNNTs and CNTs. In fact, the synthesis of BNNTs was very challenging and may involve high temperatures (up to 3000 degree Celsius by laser ablation) and explosive chemicals. During the award period, we have successfully developed a simple chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technique to grow BNNTs at 1100-1200 degree Celsius without using dangerous chemicals. A series of common catalyst have then been identified for the synthesis of BNNTs and CNTs. Both of these breakthroughs have led to our preliminary success in growing two types of BNNT/CNT junctions and two additional new nanostructures: 1) branching BNNT/CNT junctions and 2) co-axial BNNT/CNT junctions, 3) quantum dots functionalized BNNTs (QDs-BNNTs), 4) BNNT/graphene junctions. We have started to understand their structural, compositional, and electronic properties. Latest results indicate that the branching BNNT/CNT junctions and QDs-BNNTs are functional as room-temperature tunneling devices. We have submitted the application of a renewal grant to continue the study of these new energy efficient materials. Finally, this project has also strengthened our collaborations with multiple Department of Energy's Nanoscale Science Research Centers (NSRCs), including the Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences (CNMS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and the Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies (CINTs) at Sandia National Laboratories and Los

  3. Applications of Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajayan, Pulickel M.; Zhou, Otto Z.

    Carbon nanotubes have attracted the fancy of many scientists worldwide. The small dimensions, strength and the remarkable physical properties of these structures make them a very unique material with a whole range of promising applications. In this review we describe some of the important materials science applications of carbon nanotubes. Specifically we discuss the electronic and electrochemical applications of nanotubes, nanotubes as mechanical reinforcements in high performance composites, nanotube-based field emitters, and their use as nanoprobes in metrology and biological and chemical investigations, and as templates for the creation of other nanostructures. Electronic properties and device applications of nanotubes are treated elsewhere in the book. The challenges that ensue in realizing some of these applications are also discussed from the point of view of manufacturing, processing, and cost considerations.

  4. Synthesis of Stacked-Cup Carbon Nanotubes in a Metal Free Low Temperature System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Yuki; Nuth, Joseph A.; Johnson, Natasha M.; Farmer, Kevin D.; Roberts, Kenneth P.; Hussaini, Syed R.

    2011-01-01

    Stacked-cup carbon nanotubes were formed by either Fischer-Tropsch type or Haber Bosch type reactions in a metal free system. Graphite particles were used as the catalyst. The samples were heated at 600 C in a gas mixture of CO 75 Torr, N2 75 Torr and H2 550 Torr for three days. Trans mission electron microscope analysis of the catalyst surface at the completion of the experiment recognized the growth of nanotubes. They were 10-50 nm in diameter and approximately 1 micrometer in length. They had a hollow channel of 5-20 nm in the center. The nanotubes may have grown on graphite surfaces by the CO disproportionation reaction and the surface tension of the carbon nucleus may have determined the diameter. Although, generally, the diameter of a carbon nanotube depends on the size of the cataly1ic particles, the diameter of the nanotubes on graphite particles was independent of the particle size and significantly confined within a narrow range compared with that produced using catalytic amorphous iron-silicate nanoparticles. Therefore, they must have an unknown formation process that is different than the generally accepted mechanism.

  5. Synthesis and characterization of thermotropic liquid crystalline polyester/multi-walled carbon nanotube nanocomposites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thermotropic liquid crystalline polyester (TLCP) was synthesized via low-temperature solution polycondensation from 1,4-Bis(4-Hydroxybenzoyloxy)butane and terephthaloyl dichloride. Polymer nanocomposites based on a small quantity of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) were prepared by in situ polymerization method. The wide-angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD) results suggested that the addition of MWNTs to TLCP matrix did not significantly change the crystal structure of TLCP. The interactions between the molecules of the TLCP host phase and the carbon nanotubes were investigated through Raman spectroscopy investigations. We detected a distinct wave number shift of the radial breathing modes, confirming the carbon nanotubes interacted with the surrounding liquid crystal molecules, most likely through aromatic interactions (π-stacking). The interactions between liquid crystal host and nanotube guests were also evident from a polarizing microscopy (POM) study of the liquid crystal-isotropic phase transition in the proximity of nanotubes. The thermal properties and the morphological properties of the TLCP/MWNTs nanocomposites were investigated by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). TGA data demonstrated the addition of a small amount of MWNTs into TLCP matrix could improve the thermal stability of TLCP matrix. DSC results revealed that melt transition temperatures and isotropic transition temperatures of the hybrids were enhanced.

  6. Organic modification of carbon nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The organic modification of carbon nanotubes is a novel research field being developed recently. In this article, the history and newest progress of organic modification of carbon nanotubes are reviewed from two aspects:organic covalent modification and organic noncovalent modification of carbon nanotubes. The preparation and properties of organic modified carbon nanotubes are discussed in detail. In addition, the prospective development of organic modification of carbon nanotubes is suggested.

  7. Hydrothermal synthesis of manganese oxides/carbon nanotubes composites as anode materials for lithium ion batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Shou-Dong [School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, China University of Mining and Technology, Xuzhou, Jiangsu 221116 (China); Lithium-ion Batteries Laboratory, School of Materials Science and Engineering, China University of Mining and Technology, Xuzhou, Jiangsu 221116 (China); Zhu, Ya-Bo, E-mail: zhuyabo@163.com [School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, China University of Mining and Technology, Xuzhou, Jiangsu 221116 (China); Zhuang, Quan-Chao [Lithium-ion Batteries Laboratory, School of Materials Science and Engineering, China University of Mining and Technology, Xuzhou, Jiangsu 221116 (China); Wu, Chao [School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, China University of Mining and Technology, Xuzhou, Jiangsu 221116 (China); Lithium-ion Batteries Laboratory, School of Materials Science and Engineering, China University of Mining and Technology, Xuzhou, Jiangsu 221116 (China)

    2013-09-01

    Graphical abstract: Carbon nanotubes in the composites not only accommodate the volume change during charge/discharge processes, but also provide a good electron conducting network at high power rates, resulting in high reversible capacity of the electrodes. - Highlights: • MnO/CNTs composites are obtained by heating Mn{sub 3}O{sub 4}/CNTs at 500 °C for 3 h in flowing Ar/H{sub 2}. • MnO/CNTs electrode exhibits higher specific capacity at the current density of 100 mAh g{sup −1} and a better cycle performance. • Enhancement of cyclability of MnO/CNTs electrode can be attributed to the presence of CNTs in the composites. - Abstract: Mn{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles and Mn{sub 3}O{sub 4}/carbon nanotubes (CNTs) composites are prepared via a hydrothermal synthesis method. MnO and MnO/CNTs composites are obtained by heating Mn{sub 3}O{sub 4} and Mn{sub 3}O{sub 4}/CNTs at 500 for 3 h in flowing Ar/H{sub 2}. The phase structure, composition and morphology of the composites are characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM). The electrochemical properties of the composite electrodes are studied by performing cyclic voltammetry (CV), galvanostatic charge and discharge tests. The results reveal that the Mn{sub 3}O{sub 4}/CNTs and MnO/CNTs electrodes exhibit higher specific capacity at the current density of 100 mAh g{sup −1} and a better cycle performance than pure Mn{sub 3}O{sub 4} and MnO electrodes. The excellent electrochemical properties of Mn{sub 3}O{sub 4}/CNTs and MnO/CNTs electrodes can be attributed to the presence of CNTs in the composites offering an electron conducting network and suppressing the volume expansion of Mn{sub 3}O{sub 4} and MnO particles efficiently during the charge and discharge processes.

  8. Synthesis of multi-walled carbon nanotubes using CoMnMgO catalysts through catalytic chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wen; Feng, Yan-Yan; Jiang, Cheng-Fa; Chu, Wei

    2014-12-01

    The CoMgO and CoMnMgO catalysts are prepared by a co-precipitation method and used as the catalysts for the synthesis of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) through the catalytic chemical vapor deposition (CCVD). The effects of Mn addition on the carbon yield and structure are investigated. The catalysts are characterized by temperature programmed reduction (TPR) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) techniques, and the synthesized carbon materials are characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and thermo gravimetric analysis (TG). TEM measurement indicates that the catalyst CoMgO enclosed completely in the produced graphite layer results in the deactivation of the catalyst. TG results suggest that the CoMnMgO catalyst has a higher selectivity for CNTs than CoMgO. Meanwhile, different diameters of CNTs are synthesized by CoMnMgO catalysts with various amounts of Co content, and the results show that the addition of Mn avoids forming the enclosed catalyst, prevents the formation of amorphous carbon, subsequently promotes the growth of CNTs, and the catalyst with decreased Co content is favorable for the synthesis of CNTs with a narrow diameter distribution. The CoMnMgO catalyst with 40% Co content has superior catalytic activity for the growth of carbon nanotubes.

  9. Industrial Scale Synthesis of Carbon Nanotubes Via Fluidized Bed Chemical Vapor Deposition: A Senior Design Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, York R.; Fuchs, Alan; Meyyappan, M.

    2010-01-01

    Senior year chemical engineering students designed a process to produce 10 000 tonnes per annum of single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNT) and also conducted bench-top experiments to synthesize SWNTs via fluidized bed chemical vapor deposition techniques. This was an excellent pedagogical experience because it related to the type of real world design…

  10. Gears Based on Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffe, Richard; Han, Jie; Globus, Al; Deardorff, Glenn

    2005-01-01

    Gears based on carbon nanotubes (see figure) have been proposed as components of an emerging generation of molecular- scale machines and sensors. In comparison with previously proposed nanogears based on diamondoid and fullerene molecules, the nanotube-based gears would have simpler structures and are more likely to be realizable by practical fabrication processes. The impetus for the practical development of carbon-nanotube- based gears arises, in part, from rapid recent progress in the fabrication of carbon nanotubes with prescribed diameters, lengths, chiralities, and numbers of concentric shells. The shafts of the proposed gears would be made from multiwalled carbon nanotubes. The gear teeth would be rigid molecules (typically, benzyne molecules), bonded to the nanotube shafts at atomically precise positions. For fabrication, it may be possible to position the molecular teeth by use of scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) or other related techniques. The capability to position individual organic molecules at room temperature by use of an STM tip has already been demonstrated. Routes to the chemical synthesis of carbon-nanotube-based gears are also under investigation. Chemical and physical aspects of the synthesis of molecular scale gears based on carbon nanotubes and related molecules, and dynamical properties of nanotube- based gears, have been investigated by computational simulations using established methods of quantum chemistry and molecular dynamics. Several particularly interesting and useful conclusions have been drawn from the dynamical simulations performed thus far: The forces acting on the gears would be more sensitive to local molecular motions than to gross mechanical motions of the overall gears. Although no breakage of teeth or of chemical bonds is expected at temperatures up to at least 3,000 K, the gears would not work well at temperatures above a critical range from about 600 to about 1,000 K. Gear temperature could probably be controlled by

  11. Methods for preparation of carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rakov, Eduard G [D.I. Mendeleev Russian University of Chemical Technology, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2000-01-31

    The most important methods of synthesis and purification of carbon nanotubes, a new form of material, are described. The prospects for increasing the scale of preparation processes and for more extensive application of nanotubes are evaluated. The bibliography includes 282 references.

  12. Carbon nanotube macroelectronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jialu

    In this dissertation, I discuss the application of carbon nanotubes in macroelectronis. Due to the extraordinary electrical properties such as high intrinsic carrier mobility and current-carrying capacity, single wall carbon nanotubes are very desirable for thin-film transistor (TFT) applications such as flat panel display, transparent electronics, as well as flexible and stretchable electronics. Compared with other popular channel material for TFTs, namely amorphous silicon, polycrystalline silicon and organic materials, nanotube thin-films have the advantages of low-temperature processing compatibility, transparency, and flexibility, as well as high device performance. In order to demonstrate scalable, practical carbon nanotube macroelectroncis, I have developed a platform to fabricate high-density, uniform separated nanotube based thin-film transistors. In addition, many other essential analysis as well as technology components, such as nanotube film density control, purity and diameter dependent semiconducting nanotube electrical performance study, air-stable n-type transistor fabrication, and CMOS integration platform have also been demonstrated. On the basis of the above achievement, I have further demonstrated various kinds of applications including AMOLED display electronics, PMOS and CMOS logic circuits, flexible and transparent electronics. The dissertation is structured as follows. First, chapter 1 gives a brief introduction to the electronic properties of carbon nanotubes, which serves as the background knowledge for the following chapters. In chapter 2, I will present our approach of fabricating wafer-scale uniform semiconducting carbon nanotube thin-film transistors and demonstrate their application in display electronics and logic circuits. Following that, more detailed information about carbon nanotube thin-film transistor based active matrix organic light-emitting diode (AMOLED) displays is discussed in chapter 3. And in chapter 4, a technology to

  13. Synthesis and magnetic properties of multiwalled carbon nanotubes decorated with magnetite nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pistone, A., E-mail: pistone@unime.it [Department of Electronic Engineering, Chemistry and Industrial Engineering, University of Messina, Messina I-98166 (Italy); Iannazzo, D.; Fazio, M. [Department of Electronic Engineering, Chemistry and Industrial Engineering, University of Messina, Messina I-98166 (Italy); Celegato, F.; Barrera, G.; Tiberto, P. [INRIM Electromagnetism Division, Torino (Italy); Giordano, A.; Azzerboni, B.; Galvagno, S. [Department of Electronic Engineering, Chemistry and Industrial Engineering, University of Messina, Messina I-98166 (Italy)

    2014-02-15

    Magnetite particles with nanoscale sizes were deposited along multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) through a simple, effective and reproducible chemical route. The structure, morphology and magnetic properties of the hybrid materials were characterized by XRD, SEM, TEM, EDX, VSM. The characterization results show that the surface of nanotubes was loaded with iron oxides nanoclusters and each nanocluster is composed by several nanocrystals with a mean diameter of 10 nm. The experimental magnetic hysteretic behavior has been also studied by means of the Preisach model and a good agreement between experimental data and numerical computations was found.

  14. Conducting carbonized polyaniline nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mentus, Slavko; Ćirić-Marjanović, Gordana; Trchová, Miroslava; Stejskal, Jaroslav

    2009-06-01

    Conducting nitrogen-containing carbon nanotubes were synthesized by the carbonization of self-assembled polyaniline nanotubes protonated with sulfuric acid. Carbonization was carried out in a nitrogen atmosphere at a heating rate of 10 °C min-1 up to a maximum temperature of 800 °C. The carbonized polyaniline nanotubes which have a typical outer diameter of 100-260 nm, with an inner diameter of 20-170 nm and a length extending from 0.5 to 0.8 µm, accompanied with very thin nanotubes with outer diameters of 8-14 nm, inner diameters 3.0-4.5 nm and length extending from 0.3 to 1.0 µm, were observed by scanning and transmission electron microscopies. Elemental analysis showed 9 wt% of nitrogen in the carbonized product. Conductivity of the nanotubular PANI precursor, amounting to 0.04 S cm-1, increased to 0.7 S cm-1 upon carbonization. Molecular structure of carbonized polyaniline nanotubes has been analyzed by FTIR and Raman spectroscopies, and their paramagnetic characteristics were compared with the starting PANI nanotubes by EPR spectroscopy.

  15. Conducting carbonized polyaniline nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mentus, Slavko; Ciric-Marjanovic, Gordana [Faculty of Physical Chemistry, University of Belgrade, Studentski trg 12-16, 11158 Belgrade (Serbia); Trchova, Miroslava; Stejskal, Jaroslav [Institute of Macromolecular Chemistry, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Heyrovsky Square 2, 162 06 Prague 6 (Czech Republic)], E-mail: gordana@ffh.bg.ac.rs

    2009-06-17

    Conducting nitrogen-containing carbon nanotubes were synthesized by the carbonization of self-assembled polyaniline nanotubes protonated with sulfuric acid. Carbonization was carried out in a nitrogen atmosphere at a heating rate of 10 deg. C min{sup -1} up to a maximum temperature of 800 deg. C. The carbonized polyaniline nanotubes which have a typical outer diameter of 100-260 nm, with an inner diameter of 20-170 nm and a length extending from 0.5 to 0.8 {mu}m, accompanied with very thin nanotubes with outer diameters of 8-14 nm, inner diameters 3.0-4.5 nm and length extending from 0.3 to 1.0 {mu}m, were observed by scanning and transmission electron microscopies. Elemental analysis showed 9 wt% of nitrogen in the carbonized product. Conductivity of the nanotubular PANI precursor, amounting to 0.04 S cm{sup -1}, increased to 0.7 S cm{sup -1} upon carbonization. Molecular structure of carbonized polyaniline nanotubes has been analyzed by FTIR and Raman spectroscopies, and their paramagnetic characteristics were compared with the starting PANI nanotubes by EPR spectroscopy.

  16. FLUIDIZATION OF CARBON NANOTUBES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fei Wei; Cang Huang; Yao Wang

    2005-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) can be fluidized in the form of fluidlike agglomerates made of many three-dimensional sub-agglomerates, having a multi-stage agglomerate (MSA) structure and containing large amounts of twisting CNTs of micrometer magnitude.

  17. Carbon nanotubes: Fibrillar pharmacology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostarelos, Kostas

    2010-10-01

    The mechanisms by which chemically functionalized carbon nanotubes flow in blood and are excreted through the kidneys illustrate the unconventional behaviour of these fibrillar nanostructures, and the opportunities they offer as components for the design of advanced delivery vehicles.

  18. Optimal Synthesis of Horizontally Aligned Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes and Their Biofunctionalization for Biosensing Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dawoon Jung

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available As an influential candidate for highly sensitive biomolecule sensor, which can capture disease related biomolecules, carbon nanotube is useful material due to its unique properties. To adopt as a sensing platform, it is strongly needed to find optimal refined synthetic condition. In order to find the optimal synthetic conditions of horizontally aligned CNT, we performed quantity control of the mixed gases of H2 and CH4 injected. We successfully find that the formation of amorphous-like carbon was critically affected by some gas condition such as the flow rate of injected gases and ratios of gas mixture. Moreover, it should be noted that our horizontally aligned carbon nanotube array platform developed would offer another potential in developing nanoscale light source, where light emission results from electron-hole carrier recombination.

  19. Synthesis and characterization of CdS nanoparticle based multiwall carbon nanotube-maleic anhydride-1-octene nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malikov, E. Y.; Altay, M. C.; Muradov, M. B.; Akperov, O. H.; Eyvazova, G. M.; Puskás, R.; Madarász, D.; Kukovecz, Á.; Kónya, Z.

    2015-05-01

    CdS nanoparticles were synthesized by sonication from cadmium chloride and thiourea using a multiwall carbon nanotube (MWCNT)-maleic anhydride (MA)-1-octene system as the matrix. The matrix was obtained by the "grafting from" approach from oxidized carbon nanotubes and maleic anhydride-1-octene. Multiwall carbon nanotubes used for reinforcing the matrix were synthesized by Catalytic Chemical Vapor Deposition using Fe-Co/Al2O3 as the catalyst. The obtained nanostructures were characterized by FTIR, XRD, Raman spectroscopy, TEM, SEM and UV-vis spectroscopy. The average CdS particle diameter was 7.9 nm as confirmed independently by TEM and XRD. UV-vis spectroscopy revealed that the obtained nanostructure is an appropriate base material for making optical devices. The novelty of this work is the use of the MWCNT-MA-1-octene matrix obtained via the "grafting from" approach for the synthesis of uniformly dispersed CdS nanocrystals by ultrasonic cavitation to obtain a polymer nanocomposite.

  20. Nanotube composite carbon fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, R.; Jacques, D.; Rao, A. M.; Rantell, T.; Derbyshire, F.; Chen, Y.; Chen, J.; Haddon, R. C.

    1999-08-01

    Single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) were dispersed in isotropic petroleum pitch matrices to form nanotube composite carbon fibers with enhanced mechanical and electrical properties. We find that the tensile strength, modulus, and electrical conductivity of a pitch composite fiber with 5 wt % loading of purified SWNTs are enhanced by ˜90%, ˜150%, and 340% respectively, as compared to the corresponding values in unmodified isotropic pitch fibers. These results serve to highlight the potential that exits for developing a spectrum of material properties through the selection of the matrix, nanotube dispersion, alignment, and interfacial bonding.

  1. Carbon nanotube solar cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colin Klinger

    Full Text Available We present proof-of-concept all-carbon solar cells. They are made of a photoactive side of predominantly semiconducting nanotubes for photoconversion and a counter electrode made of a natural mixture of carbon nanotubes or graphite, connected by a liquid electrolyte through a redox reaction. The cells do not require rare source materials such as In or Pt, nor high-grade semiconductor processing equipment, do not rely on dye for photoconversion and therefore do not bleach, and are easy to fabricate using a spray-paint technique. We observe that cells with a lower concentration of carbon nanotubes on the active semiconducting electrode perform better than cells with a higher concentration of nanotubes. This effect is contrary to the expectation that a larger number of nanotubes would lead to more photoconversion and therefore more power generation. We attribute this to the presence of metallic nanotubes that provide a short for photo-excited electrons, bypassing the load. We demonstrate optimization strategies that improve cell efficiency by orders of magnitude. Once it is possible to make semiconducting-only carbon nanotube films, that may provide the greatest efficiency improvement.

  2. Facile synthesis of carbon nanotube/natural bentonite composites as a stable catalyst for styrene synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinaldi, Ali; Zhang, Jian; Mizera, Jan; Girgsdies, Frank; Wang, Ning; Hamid, Sharifah Bee Abd; Schlögl, Robert; Su, Dang Sheng

    2008-12-28

    Natural bentonite mineral, without any wet chemical treatment, was used directly to catalyze the growth of multi-wall CNTs and the produced CNTs/bentonite as an integrated composite stably catalyzed the oxidative dehydrogenation reaction over a long period of time; this concept provides a highly economical way for large-scale synthesis of nanocarbons and manufacture of styrene synthesis catalysts. PMID:19057768

  3. Direct synthesis of L1{sub 0} FePt nanoparticles within carbon nanotubes by wet chemical procedure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Capobianchi, A; Laureti, S; Fiorani, D [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche (CNR), Istituto di Struttura della Materia (ISM), Rome (Italy); Foglia, S [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche (CNR), Istituto di Fotonica e Nanotecnologie, Rome (Italy); Palange, E, E-mail: aldo.capobianchi@ism.cnr.i [Universita degli Studi dell' Aquila, Dipartimento di Ingegneria Elettrica e dell' Informazione, L' Aquila (Italy)

    2010-12-01

    This paper reports on the low temperature synthesis of L1{sub 0} iron-platinum (FePt) particles within multiwall carbon nanotubes using a novel wet chemical method that allows the filling of the nanotube cavity keeping clean its external wall. In the proposed procedure, nanotubes are filled with a precursor salt of hexaaquairon(II) hexachloroplatinate, ([Fe(H{sub 2}O){sub 6}][PtCl{sub 6}]) and nanoparticles of the magnetically hard phase are directly obtained by heating at 400 {sup 0}C in a reductive atmosphere. The advantage of such a precursor, allowing one to obtain at low temperature the L1{sub 0} phase without passing through the soft fcc phase, is due to its structure, where the Fe and Pt atoms are arranged in alternating planes, as in the fct FePt structure. Morphological, structural and magnetic properties of the filled nanotubes have been investigated by transmission electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction and magnetization measurements. The results show the coexistence of nanoparticles in the superparamagnetic and blocked state, depending on the temperature, due to the particle size distribution.

  4. Production of carbon nanotubes: Chemical vapor deposition synthesis from liquefied petroleum gas over Fe-Co-Mo tri-metallic catalyst supported on MgO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setyopratomo, P.; Wulan, Praswasti P. D. K.; Sudibandriyo, M.

    2016-06-01

    Carbon nanotubes were produced by chemical vapor deposition method to meet the specifications for hydrogen storage. So far, the various catalyst had been studied outlining their activities, performances, and efficiencies. In this work, tri-metallic catalyst consist of Fe-Co-Mo supported on MgO was used. The catalyst was prepared by wet-impregnation method. Liquefied Petroleum Gas (LPG) was used as carbon source. The synthesis was conducted in atmospheric fixed bed reactor at reaction temperature range 750 - 850 °C for 30 minutes. The impregnation method applied in this study successfully deposed metal component on the MgO support surface. It found that the deposited metal components might partially replace Mg(OH)2 or MgO molecules in their crystal lattice. Compare to the original MgO powder; it was significant increases in pore volume and surface area has occurred during catalyst preparation stages. The size of obtained carbon nanotubes is ranging from about 10.83 nm OD/4.09 nm ID up to 21.84 nm OD/6.51 nm ID, which means that multiwall carbon nanotubes were formed during the synthesis. Yield as much as 2.35 g.CNT/g.catalyst was obtained during 30 minutes synthesis and correspond to carbon nanotubes growth rate of 0.2 μm/min. The BET surface area of the obtained carbon nanotubes is 181.13 m2/g and around 50 % of which is contributed by mesopores. Micropore with half pore width less than 1 nm contribute about 10% volume of total micro and mesopores volume of the carbon nanotubes. The existence of these micropores is very important to increase the hydrogen storage capacity of the carbon nanotubes.

  5. Synthesis and electronic properties of ferrocene-filled double-walled carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Double-walled carbon nanotubes (DWNTs) are filled with ferrocene molecules by a vapour diffusion method for the first time. The as-synthesized ferrocene-filled DWNTs are characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), energy-dispersive x-ray spectrometry (EDX) and Raman spectroscopy. Electronic properties of double-walled carbon nanotubes (DWNTs) filled with ferrocene molecules are studied by fabricating them as the channels of field-effect transistor (FET) devices. Our results reveal that electronic properties of ferrocene-filled DWNTs are greatly modified due to the charge transfer between ferrocene molecules and DWNTs. In addition, after ferrocene molecules are decomposed inside DWNTs, electronic properties of DWNTs exhibit a further change due to Fe encapsulation, and unipolar n-type semiconducting DWNTs are consequently obtained

  6. Microwave-Assisted Functionalization of Carbon Nanotubes and Reactive Synthesis of Nanocomposites Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Offerers will build on their recent innovation of a microwave-induced route to the rapid functionalization, solubilization and reactive synthesis of carbon...

  7. Grafting of Chitosan and Chitosantrimethoxylsilylpropyl Methacrylate on Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes-Synthesis and Characterization

    OpenAIRE

    Carson, Laura; Kelly-Brown, Cordella; Stewart, Melisa; Oki, Aderemi; Regisford, Gloria; Stone, Julia; Traisawatwong, Pasakorn; Durand-Rougely, Clarissa; Luo, Zhiping

    2010-01-01

    Acid functionalized single walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were grafted to chitosan by first reacting the oxidized CNTs with thionyl chloride to form acyl-chlorinated CNTs. This product was subsequently dispersed in chitosan and covalently grafted to form CNT-chitosan. CNT-chitosan was further grafted onto 3-trimethoxysilylpropyl methacrylate by free radical polymerization conditions, to yield CNT-g-chitosan-g-3-trimethoxysilylpropyl methacrylate (TMSPM), hereafter referred to as CNT-chitosan-...

  8. Synthesis, Characterization and Utility of Carbon Nanotube Based Hybrid Sensors in Bioanalytical Applications

    OpenAIRE

    SUSHMEE BADHULIKA, FNU

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT OF THE DISSERTATIONSynthesis, characterization and utility of carbon nanotube based hybrid sensors in bioanalytical applicationsbySushmee BadhulikaDoctor of Philosophy, Department of Electrical EngineeringUniversity of California, Riverside, USAProf. Ashok Mulchandani, ChairpersonThe detection of gaseous analytes and biological molecules is of prime importance in the fields of environmental pollution control, food and water - safety and analysis, and medical diagnostics. This necess...

  9. Synthesis of sea urchin-like carbon nanotubes on nano-diamond powder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, E J; Lee, S K; Jeong, M G; Lee, Y B; Lim, D S

    2012-07-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have unique atomic structure and properties, such as a high aspect ratio and high mechanical, electrical and thermal properties. On the other hand, the agglomeration and entanglement of CNTs restrict their applications. Sea urchin-like multiwalled carbon nanotubes, which have a small aspect ratio, can minimize the problem of dispersion. The high hardness, thermal conductivity and chemical inertness of the nano-diamond powder make it suitable for a wide range of applications in the mechanical and electronic fields. CNTs were synthesized on nano-diamond powder by thermal CVD to fabricate a filler with suitable mechanical properties and chemical stability. This paper reports the growth of CNTs with a sea urchin-like structure on the surface of the nano-diamond powder. Nano-diamond powders were dispersed in an attritional milling system using zirconia beads in ethanol. After the milling process, 3-aminopropyltrimethoxysilane (APS) was added as a linker. Silanization was performed between the nano-diamond particles and the metal catalyst. Iron chloride was used as a catalyst for the fabrication of the CNTs. After drying, catalyst-attached nano-diamond powders could be achieved. The growth of the carbon nanotubes was carried out by CVD. The CNT morphology was examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The mean diameter and length of the CNTs were 201 nm and 3.25 microm, respectively. PMID:22966673

  10. Synthesis of chemically bonded graphene/carbon nanotube composites and their application in large volumetric capacitance supercapacitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Naeyoung; Kwon, Soongeun; Lee, Dongwook; Yoon, Dong-Myung; Park, Young Min; Benayad, Anass; Choi, Jae-Young; Park, Jong Se

    2013-12-17

    Chemically bonded graphene/carbon nanotube composites as flexible supercapacitor electrode materials are synthesized by amide bonding. Carbon nanotubes attached along the edges and onto the surface of graphene act as spacers to increase the electrolyte-accessible surface area. Our lamellar structure electrodes demonstrate the largest volumetric capacitance (165 F cm(-3) ) ever shown by carbon-based electrodes.

  11. Scalable synthesis of aligned carbon nanotubes bundles using green natural precursor: neem oil

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar, Rajesh; Tiwari, Radhey Shyam; Srivastava, Onkar Nath

    2011-01-01

    Practical application of aligned carbon nanotubes (ACNTs) would have to be determined by a matter of its economical and large-scale preparation. In this study, neem oil (also named Margoaa oil, extracted from the seeds of the neem--Azadirachta indica) was used as carbon source to fabricate the bundles of ACNTs. ACNTs have been synthesized by spray pyrolysis of neem oil and ferrocene mixture at 825°C. The major components of neem oil are hydrocarbon with less amount of oxygen, which provided t...

  12. Carbon nanotubes-supported palladium nanoparticles for the Suzuki reaction in supercritical carbon dioxide:A facile method for the synthesis of tetrasubstituted olefins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Lei; ZHANG WeiDe; JIANG HuanFeng

    2008-01-01

    A facile and efficient method for the synthesis of tetrasubstituted olefins in supercritical carbon dioxide was developed by using carbon nanotubes-supported palladium nanoparticles (Pd/CNTs) as the cata-lyst. Compared with common Pd/C, Pd/CNTs could more effectively catalyze the reaction of di-bromo-substituted olefins with boronic acids, affording the corresponding tetrasubstituted olefins with moderate to good yields. This environmentally benign route with an easy-to-handle catalyst provides an appealing alternative to the currently available methods.

  13. Carbon nanotubes-supported palladium nanoparticles for the Suzuki reaction in supercritical carbon dioxide: A facile method for the synthesis of tetrasubstituted olefins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    A facile and efficient method for the synthesis of tetrasubstituted olefins in supercritical carbon dioxide was developed by using carbon nanotubes-supported palladium nanoparticles (Pd/CNTs) as the catalyst. Compared with common Pd/C, Pd/CNTs could more effectively catalyze the reaction of dibromo-substituted olefins with boronic acids, affording the corresponding tetrasubstituted olefins with moderate to good yields. This environmentally benign route with an easy-to-handle catalyst provides an appealing alternative to the currently available methods.

  14. Templated Growth of Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siochik Emilie J. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A method of growing carbon nanotubes uses a synthesized mesoporous si lica template with approximately cylindrical pores being formed there in. The surfaces of the pores are coated with a carbon nanotube precu rsor, and the template with the surfaces of the pores so-coated is th en heated until the carbon nanotube precursor in each pore is convert ed to a carbon nanotube.

  15. Boron-doped few-walled carbon nanotubes: novel synthesis and properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preston, Colin; Song, Da; Taillon, Josh; Cumings, John; Hu, Liangbing

    2016-11-01

    Few-walled carbon nanotubes offer a unique marriage of graphitic quality and robustness to ink-processing; however, doping procedures that may alter the band structure of these few-walled nanotubes are still lacking. This report introduces a novel solution-injected chemical vapor deposition growth process to fabricate the first boron-doped few-walled carbon nanotubes (B-FWNTs) reported in literature, which may have extensive applications in battery devices. A comprehensive characterization of the as-grown B-FWNTs confirms successful boron substitution in the graphitic lattice, and reveals varying growth parameters impact the structural properties of B-FWNT yield. An investigation into the optimal growth purification parameters and ink-making procedures was also conducted. This study introduces the first process technique to successfully grow intrinsically p-doped FWNTs, and provides the first investigation into the impact factors of the growth parameters, purification steps, and ink-making processes on the structural properties of the B-FWNTs and the electrical properties of the resulting spray-coated thin-film electrodes.

  16. Carbon nanotube synthesis from propane decomposition on a pre-treated Ni overlayer

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    J Sengupta; S K Panda; C Jacob

    2009-04-01

    Growth of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) was performed by atmospheric pressure chemical vapour deposition (APCVD) of propane on Si(111) with a pre-treated Ni overlayer acting as a catalyst. Prior to the growth of CNTs, a thin film of Ni was deposited on Si(111) substrate by evaporation and heat treated at 900°C. The growth of nanotubes was carried out at 850°C using propane as a source of carbon. Distribution of the catalyst particles over the Si substrate was analysed before and after heat treatment by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The X-ray diffraction (XRD) pattern of the grown material revealed that they are graphitic in nature. Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) was used to investigate the growth process and it was found that a catalytic particle was always situated at the tip of the tube thus implying a tip growth mechanism. Evidence for the presence of radial breathing mode from multi-wall nanotubes (MWNTs) in the grown sample was obtained from micro-Raman analysis. Finally, high-resolution transmission electron microscopic (HRTEM) analysis confirmed that the graphene layers of the CNTs are well ordered with typical 0.34 nm spacing.

  17. Carbon nanotube junctions and devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Postma, H.W.Ch.

    2001-01-01

    In this thesis Postma presents transport experiments performed on individual single-wall carbon nanotubes. Carbon nanotubes are molecules entirely made of carbon atoms. The electronic properties are determined by the exact symmetry of the nanotube lattice, resulting in either metallic or semiconduct

  18. Chirality specific and spatially uniform synthesis of single-walled carbon nanotubes from a sputtered Co-W bimetallic catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Hua; Kumamoto, Akihito; Takezaki, Hiroki; Ohyama, Shinnosuke; Qian, Yang; Inoue, Taiki; Ikuhara, Yuichi; Chiashi, Shohei; Xiang, Rong; Maruyama, Shigeo

    2016-08-14

    Synthesis of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) with well-defined atomic arrangements has been widely recognized in the past few decades as the biggest challenge in the SWNT community, and has become a bottleneck for the application of SWNTs in nano-electronics. Here, we report a selective synthesis of (12, 6) SWNTs with an enrichment of 50%-70% by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) using sputtered Co-W as a catalyst. This is achieved under much milder reduction and growth conditions than those in the previous report using transition-metal molecule clusters as catalyst precursors (Nature, 2014, 510, 522). Meanwhile, in-plane transmission electron microscopy unambiguously identified an intermediate structure of Co6W6C, which is strongly associated with selective growth. However, most of the W atoms disappear after a 5 min CVD growth, which implies that anchoring W may be important in this puzzling Co-W system. PMID:27412697

  19. Quantitative study of catalytic activity and catalytic deactivation of Fe–Co/Al2O3 catalysts for multi-walled carbon nanotube synthesis by the CCVD process

    OpenAIRE

    Pirard, Sophie; Heyen, Georges; Pirard, Jean-Paul

    2010-01-01

    The catalytic deactivation during multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWNT) synthesis by the CCVD process and the influence of hydrogen on it were quantified. Initial specific reaction rate, relative specific productivity and catalytic deactivation were studied. Carbon source was ethylene, and a bimetallic iron–cobalt catalyst supported on alumina was used. The catalytic deactivation was modeled by a decreasing hyperbolic law, reflecting the progressive accumulation of amorphous carbon on active si...

  20. CVD-grown horizontally aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes: synthesis routes and growth mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Imad; Bachmatiuk, Alicja; Warner, Jamie H; Büchner, Bernd; Cuniberti, Gianaurelio; Rümmeli, Mark H

    2012-07-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) have attractive electrical and physical properties, which make them very promising for use in various applications. For some applications however, in particular those involving electronics, SWCNTs need to be synthesized with a high degree of control with respect to yield, length, alignment, diameter, and chirality. With this in mind, a great deal of effort is being directed to the precision control of vertically and horizontally aligned nanotubes. In this review the focus is on the latter, horizontally aligned tubes grown by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). The reader is provided with an in-depth review of the established vapor deposition orientation techniques. Detailed discussions on the characterization routes, growth parameters, and growth mechanisms are also provided. PMID:22619167

  1. Synthesis of carbon nanotube arrays using ethanol in porous anodic aluminum oxide template

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Guojun; WANG Sen; GONG Jinlong; ZHU Dezhang; HE Suixia; LI Yulan; ZHU Zhiyuan

    2005-01-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) arrays confined by porous anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) template were synthesized using ethanol as reactant carbon source at low pressure. Images by scanning electron microscope (SEM) and low magnification transmission electron microscopy (TEM) show that these CNTs have highly uniform outer diameter and length, absolutely controlled by the diameter and depth of nano-channel arrays of the AAO. High resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) imaging indicates that the graphitization of the CNT walls is better than the results reported on this kind of template-based CNT arrays, although it is not so good as that of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) synthesized by catalysis. CNTs synthesized using acetylene as reactant gas show much less graphitization than those prepared using ethanol by comparing the results of HRTEM and Raman spectroscopy. The etching effects of decomposed OH radicals on the amorphous carbon and the roughness of AAO nano-channel arrays on the CNTs growth were employed to explain the graphitization and growth of the CNTs.

  2. Robust synthesis and continuous manufacturing of carbon nanotube forests and graphene films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polsen, Erik S.

    Successful translation of the outstanding properties of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and graphene to commercial applications requires highly consistent methods of synthesis, using scalable and cost-effective machines. This thesis presents robust process conditions and a series of process operations that will enable integrated roll-to-roll (R2R) CNT and graphene growth on flexible substrates. First, a comprehensive study was undertaken to establish the sources of variation in laboratory CVD growth of CNT forests. Statistical analysis identified factors that contribute to variation in forest height and density including ambient humidity, sample position in the reactor, and barometric pressure. Implementation of system modifications and user procedures reduced the variation in height and density by 50% and 54% respectively. With improved growth, two new methods for continuous deposition and patterning of catalyst nanoparticles for CNT forest growth were developed, enabling the diameter, density and pattern geometry to be tailored through the control of process parameters. Convective assembly of catalyst nanoparticles in solution enables growth of CNT forests with density 3-fold higher than using sputtered catalyst films with the same growth parameters. Additionally, laser printing of magnetic ink character recognition toner provides a large scale patterning method, with digital control of the pattern density and tunable CNT density via laser intensity. A concentric tube CVD reactor was conceptualized, designed and built for R2R growth of CNT forests and graphene on flexible substrates helically fed through the annular gap. The design enables downstream injection of the hydrocarbon source, and gas consumption is reduced 90% compared to a standard tube furnace. Multi-wall CNT forests are grown continuously on metallic and ceramic fiber substrates at 33 mm/min. High quality, uniform bi- and multi-layer graphene is grown on Cu and Ni foils at 25 - 495 mm/min. A second machine

  3. Gas phase synthesis of non-bundled, small diameter single-walled carbon nanotubes with near-armchair chiralities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mustonen, K.; Laiho, P.; Kaskela, A.; Zhu, Z.; Reynaud, O.; Houbenov, N.; Tian, Y.; Jiang, H.; Kauppinen, E. I., E-mail: esko.kauppinen@aalto.fi [Department of Applied Physics, Aalto University School of Science, P.O. Box 15100, FI-00076 Aalto (Finland); Susi, T. [Faculty of Physics, University of Vienna, Boltzmanngasse 5, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Nasibulin, A. G. [Department of Applied Physics, Aalto University School of Science, P.O. Box 15100, FI-00076 Aalto (Finland); Skolkovo Institute of Science and Technology, Nobel str. 3, 143026 (Russian Federation); Saint-Petersburg State Polytechnical University, 29 Polytechniheskaya st., St. Petersburg, 195251 (Russian Federation)

    2015-07-06

    We present a floating catalyst synthesis route for individual, i.e., non-bundled, small diameter single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) with a narrow chiral angle distribution peaking at high chiralities near the armchair species. An ex situ spark discharge generator was used to form iron particles with geometric number mean diameters of 3–4 nm and fed into a laminar flow chemical vapour deposition reactor for the continuous synthesis of long and high-quality SWCNTs from ambient pressure carbon monoxide. The intensity ratio of G/D peaks in Raman spectra up to 48 and mean tube lengths up to 4 μm were observed. The chiral distributions, as directly determined by electron diffraction in the transmission electron microscope, clustered around the (n,m) indices (7,6), (8,6), (8,7), and (9,6), with up to 70% of tubes having chiral angles over 20°. The mean diameter of SWCNTs was reduced from 1.10 to 1.04 nm by decreasing the growth temperature from 880 to 750 °C, which simultaneously increased the fraction of semiconducting tubes from 67% to 80%. Limiting the nanotube gas phase number concentration to ∼10{sup 5 }cm{sup −3} prevented nanotube bundle formation that is due to collisions induced by Brownian diffusion. Up to 80% of 500 as-deposited tubes observed by atomic force and transmission electron microscopy were individual. Transparent conducting films deposited from these SWCNTs exhibited record low sheet resistances of 63 Ω/□ at 90% transparency for 550 nm light.

  4. Carbon Nanotubes and Related Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kingsuk Mukhopadhyay

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanotubes have attracted the fancy of many scientists world wide. The small dimensions,strength, and the remarkable physical properties of these structures make them a unique material with a whole range of promising applications. In this review, the structural aspects, the advantages and disadvantages of different for their procedures synthesis, the qualitative and quantitative estimation of carbon nanotubes by different analytical techniques, the present status on their applications as well as the current challenges faced in the application field, national, in particular DRDO, DMSRDE status, and interest in this field, have been discussed.Defence Science Journal, 2008, 58(4, pp.437-450, DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.14429/dsj.58.1666

  5. Synthesis of High-quality Single- and Double-walled Carbon Nanotubes on Fe/MgO Catalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehran B. Kashi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, Fe/MgO catalysts with three different iron contents (5, 10, and 15 wt.% were prepared by three catalyst preparation methods: impregnation, solution combustion synthesis, and co-calcination of metal ni‐ trates. The resulting catalysts were subjected to methane at 900°C in order to grow carbon nanotubes (CNTs. The powders and products were then studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD, differential thermal analysis (DTA, scanning and transmission electron microscopy (SEM and TEM, and Raman spectroscopy. Formation of MgFe2O4 upon heating the catalysts to 900°C was confirmed by XRD. After the growth step, corresponding peaks of MgFe2O4 disappeared and metallic iron peaks appeared, indicating that MgFe2O4 is the responsible phase for production of iron nanoparticles. HRTEM images showed that the product on the 5 wt.% catalysts was mostly SWNTs and DWNTs with no evidence of carbon nanofi‐ bres or multi-walled carbon nanotubes on the co-calcina‐ tion catalyst. Furthermore, ID/IG ratios obtained from Raman spectra were all below 0.1, except for one sample, showing the good quality of the products.

  6. Horizontal carbon nanotube alignment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Matthew T; Cientanni, Vito; Milne, William I

    2016-09-21

    The production of horizontally aligned carbon nanotubes offers a rapid means of realizing a myriad of self-assembled near-atom-scale technologies - from novel photonic crystals to nanoscale transistors. The ability to reproducibly align anisotropic nanostructures has huge technological value. Here we review the present state-of-the-art in horizontal carbon nanotube alignment. For both in and ex situ approaches, we quantitatively assess the reported linear packing densities alongside the degree of alignment possible for each of these core methodologies. PMID:27546174

  7. Carbon Nanotube Solar Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Klinger, Colin; Patel, Yogeshwari; Postma, Henk W. Ch.

    2012-01-01

    We present proof-of-concept all-carbon solar cells. They are made of a photoactive side of predominantly semiconducting nanotubes for photoconversion and a counter electrode made of a natural mixture of carbon nanotubes or graphite, connected by a liquid electrolyte through a redox reaction. The cells do not require rare source materials such as In or Pt, nor high-grade semiconductor processing equipment, do not rely on dye for photoconversion and therefore do not bleach, and are easy to fabr...

  8. Synthesis of Nickel-Encapsulated Carbon Nanocapsules and Cup-Stacked-Type Carbon Nanotubes via Nickel-Doped Fullerene Nanowhiskers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tokushi Kizuka

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Nickel- (Ni doped C60 nanowhiskers (NWs were synthesized by a liquid-liquid interfacial precipitation method using a C60-saturated toluene solution and isopropanol with Ni nitrate hexahydrate Ni(NO32·6H2O. By varying the heating temperature of Ni-doped C60 NWs, two types of one-dimensional carbon nanostructures were produced. By heating the NWs at 973 and 1173 K, carbon nanocapsules (CNCs that encapsulated Ni nanoparticles were produced. The Ni-encapsulated CNCs joined one dimensionally to form chain structures. Upon heating the NWs to 1373 K, cup-stacked-type carbon nanotubes were synthesized.

  9. Free Fall Plasma-Arc Reactor for Synthesis of Carbon Nanotubes in Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alford, J. M.; Mason, G. R.; Feinkema, D. A.

    2006-01-01

    High temperatures inside the plasma of a carbon arc generate strong buoyancy driven convection which has an effect on the growth and morphology of the single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). To study the effect of buoyancy on the arc process, a miniature carbon arc apparatus was designed and developed to synthesize SWNTs in a microgravity environment substantially free from buoyant convective flows. An arc reactor was operated in the 2.2- and 5.18-second drop towers at the NASA Glenn Research Center. The apparatus employed a 4 mm diameter anode and was powered by a portable battery pack capable of providing in excess of 300 amps at 30 volts to the arc for the duration of a 5-second drop. However, the principal result is that no dramatic difference in sample yield or composition was noted between normal gravity, 2.2-and 5-second long microgravity runs.

  10. Synthesis of carbon nanotubes by CCVD of natural gas using hydrotreating catalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed E. Awadallah

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanotubes have been successfully synthesized using the catalytic chemical vapor deposition (CCVD technique over typical refining hydrotreating catalysts (hydrodesulfurization and hydrodenitrogenation containing Ni–Mo and Co–Mo supported on Al2O3 catalysts at 700°C in a fixed bed horizontal reactor using natural gas as a carbon source. The catalysts and the as-grown CNTs were characterized by transmission electron microscopy, HRTEM, X-ray diffraction patterns, EDX and TGA–DTG. The obtained data clarified that the Ni–Mo catalyst gives higher yield, higher purity and selectivity for CNTs compared to Co–Mo catalyst. XRD, TEM and TGA reveal also that the Ni–Mo catalyst produces mostly CNTs with different diameters whereas the Co–Mo catalyst produces largely amorphous carbon.

  11. Effects of bimetallic catalysts on synthesis of nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes as nanoscale energetic materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hao Liu; Yong Zhang; Ruying Li; Xueliang Sun; Hakima Abou-Rachid

    2011-01-01

    Well aligned nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes (CNx-NTs),as energetic materials,are synthesized on a silicon substrate by aerosol-assisted chemical vapor deposition.Tungsten (W) and molybdenum (Mo) metals are respectively introduced to combine with iron (Fe) to act as a bimetallic co-catalyst layer.Correlations between the composition and shape of the co-catalyst and morphology,size,growth rate and nitrogen doping amount of the synthesized CNx-NTs are investigated by secondary and backscattered electron imaging in a field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectrometer (XPS).Compared to pure iron catalyst.W-Fe co-catalyst can result in lower growth rate,larger diameter and wider size distribution of the CNx-NTs; while incorporation of molybdenum into the iron catalyst layer can reduce the diameter and size distribution of the nanotubes.Compared to the sole iron catalyst,Fe-W catalyst impedes nitrogen doping while Fe-Mo catalyst promotes the incorporation of nitrogen into the nanotubes.The present work indicates that CNx-NTs with modulated size,growth rate and nitrogen doping concentration are expected to be synthesized by tuning the size and composition of co-catalysts,which may find great potential in producing CNx-NTs with controlled structure and properties.

  12. Synthesis of single-walled carbon nanotubes by the vertical floating catalyst method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The vertical floating catalyst method is first used to produce single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs)continuously on a large scale by a newly developed technique and pyrolysis of n-hexane. Diameter distributions, microstructure and purity of the SWNTs film, rope and web are measured by Raman spectroscopy and electron microscope.The results show that SWNTs product has a high degree of orientation, a wide distribution of diameters (0.7-2.0 nm)and high purity of > 80%.``

  13. Effect of Varying Inert Gas and Acetylene Concentration on the Synthesis of Carbon Nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afrin, Rahat; Abbas, Syed Mustansar; Shah, Nazar Abbas; Mustafa, Muhammad Farooq; Ali, Zulfiqar; Ahmad, Nisar

    2016-03-01

    The multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) with small diameter and high purity were achieved by chemical vapor deposition technique using silicon substrate. The introduction of specific concentration of inert gas with hydrocarbon played a key role in controlling morphology and diameter of MWCNTs. Nickel mixed ferrite nanoparticles were used as a catalyst for the growth of MWCNTs. Growth parameters like concentration of hydrocarbon source and inert gas flow, composition of catalyst particles and growth temperature were studied. In this work smaller diameter and twisted MWCNTs were formed by dilution of acetylene with argon gas. Electrical properties suggest a semimetallic behavior of synthesized MWCNTs.

  14. Synthesis of Large Quantity Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes by Arc Discharge

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李振华; 王淼; 王新庆; 朱海滨; 卢焕明; 安藤义则

    2002-01-01

    We report on a new method to prepare large quantity single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) with high purity.Using a Y-Ni powder composite graphite rod as an anode, at a given angle with the high-purity graphite cathode rod, a cloth-like deposit can be obtained by dc arc discharge in helium at high temperature, which contains about 60% SWCNTs. In this way, we can obtain a deposit of more than one gram in ten minutes. Transmission electron microscopy and Raman scattering have been used to observe the structure and morphology of the SWCNTs.

  15. Synthesis and investigation of PMMA films with homogeneously dispersed multiwalled carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pantoja-Castro, M.A., E-mail: m_pantojaq@yahoo.com.mx [Facultad de Ingeniería Química, Universidad Michoacana de San Nicolás de Hidalgo, Av. J. Múgica S/N Col., Villa Universidad, CP 58040 Morelia, Michoacán (Mexico); Pérez-Robles, J.F. [Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados del IPN, Unidad Querétaro, Libramiento Norponiente #2000, Fracc. Real de Juriquilla, CP 76230 Querétaro (Mexico); González-Rodríguez, H. [Facultad de Ingeniería Química, Universidad Michoacana de San Nicolás de Hidalgo, Av. J. Múgica S/N Col., Villa Universidad, CP 58040 Morelia, Michoacán (Mexico); Vorobiev-Vasilievitch, Y. [Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados del IPN, Unidad Querétaro, Libramiento Norponiente #2000, Fracc. Real de Juriquilla, CP 76230 Querétaro (Mexico); Martínez-Tejada, H.V. [Instituto de Energía, Materiales y Medio Ambiente, Universidad Pontificia Bolivariana, Circular 1 No. 70-01, Bloque 22, Medellín (Colombia); Velasco-Santos, C. [Centro de Física Aplicada y Tecnología Avanzada, Universidad Autónoma de México, Av. Boulevard Juriquilla, No. 3001 Juriquilla, CP 76230 Querétaro (Mexico)

    2013-07-15

    Multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNT) modified by 2.2′-azoiso-butyronitrile (AIBN) were incorporated into methyl methacrylate (MMA) by sonochemistry method, resulting in homogenous dispersion of MWNT, which makes possible to obtain flexible conductive polymer-matrix nanocomposites films of PMMA, with MWNT concentrations ranging from 0 to 0.5 wt%. Modified MWNT (AIBN-MWNT) were studied by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR), Raman spectroscopy, X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) and through visual observations in order to compare the dispersion in 2-propanone and toluene with that of pristine MWNT. Synthesized PMMA-AIBN-MWNT films were studied by FT-IR and Raman spectroscopy. Using FT-IR for the AIBN-MWNT it was not possible to identify any group or groups attached to the nanotubes. Raman spectroscopy shows a small modification in the Lorentzian peaks ratio I{sub D/G} of AIBN-MWNT, meanwhile XPS showed that atomic compositions does not change for AIBN-MWNT compared to the pristine nanotubes. Also by impedance it was analyzed the conductivity of PMMA-MWNT films and the results showed a threshold percolation at 0.5 wt%. FT-IR and Raman analyses for PMMA-AIBN-MWNT composite indicate a covalent bonding between PMMA and MWNT due to the opening of π-bonds of the nanotubes, which is related with a possible proposed reaction scheme. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • We used sonochemistry-in situ polymerization to disperse MWNT very soon in PMMA. • A high and homogenous dispersion of MWNT in PMMA was achieved. • The modification of MWNT by AIBN was analyzed using Raman. • A covalent bonding between PMMA and MWNT was analyzed by FT-IR and Raman. • According to the results of PMMA-MWNT it was proposed a scheme reaction.

  16. Purity-enhanced bulk synthesis of thin single-wall carbon nanotubes using iron-copper catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, H E; Miyata, Y; Nakayama, T; Chen, S; Kitaura, R; Shinohara, H, E-mail: noris@nagoya-u.jp [Department of Chemistry and Institute for Advanced Research, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan)

    2011-09-30

    We report high purity and high yield synthesis of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) of narrow diameter from iron-copper bimetal catalysts. The SWCNTs with diameter of 0.8-1.2 nm are synthesized using the zeolite-supported alcohol chemical vapour deposition method. Single metal and bimetal catalysts are systematically investigated to achieve both the enhancement of SWCNT yield and the suppression of the undesired formation of graphitic impurities. The relative yield and purity of SWCNTs are quantified using optical absorption spectroscopy with an ultracentrifuge-based purification technique. For the single metal catalyst, iron shows the highest catalytic activity compared with the other metals such as cobalt, nickel, molybdenum, copper, and platinum. It has been found that the addition of copper to iron results in the suppression of carbonaceous impurity formation without decreasing the SWCNT yield. The purity-enhanced SWCNT shows fairly low sheet resistance due to the improvement of inter-nanotube contacts. This scalable design of SWCNT synthesis with enhanced purity is therefore a promising tool for shaping future high performance devices.

  17. Synthesis and utilization of a novel carbon nanotubes supported nanocables for the adsorption of dyes from aqueous solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Wei; Jiang, Xinyu [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China); Chen, Xiaoqing, E-mail: xqchen@csu.edu.cn [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center of Resource-conserving & Environment-friendly Society and Ecological Civilization (China)

    2015-09-15

    Using multiwalled carbon nanotubes(MWCNTs) as mechanical support and glucose as carbon resource, a hydrothermal carbonization route was designed for the synthesis of MWCNTs@carbon nanocables with tunable diameter and length. MWCNTs are firstly used as templates for the formation of carbon-rich composite nanocables, and the diameter of the nanocables could be tailored through adjusting the hydrothermal time or the ratio of MWCNTs and glucose. Owing to abundant superficial oxygen-containing functional groups, porous surface and remarkable reactivity, the as-synthesized nanocables are capable of efficiently adsorbing cationic dye methylene blue (MB) and crystal violet (CV). Furthermore, the optimum adsorption conditions, kinetics, adsorption isotherms and adsorption thermodynamics of dyes were studied systematically. Additionally, the maximum adsorption capacities calculated from data analysis (298.5 mg/g for MB and 228.3 mg/g for CV) are significant higher than those of raw MWCNTs and some other adsorbents reported previously, which provides strong evidence for using MWCNTs@carbon nanocables as adsorbent to remove dyes from aqueous solutions. - Graphical abstract: MWCNTs@carbon nanocables has been successfully fabricated by a hydrothermal carbonization method. The as-synthesized novel samples were used as adsorbents and exhibited high adsorption capacity on MB and CV. - Highlights: • A simple, cost-effective and “green” method for the synthesis of the material. • The diameter and length of the material are relatively easy to control. • The surface has large oxygen-containing groups and preferable chemical reactivity. • Compared with raw MWCNTs and some other adsorbents, the adsorption capacity is much high.

  18. Synthesis and utilization of a novel carbon nanotubes supported nanocables for the adsorption of dyes from aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using multiwalled carbon nanotubes(MWCNTs) as mechanical support and glucose as carbon resource, a hydrothermal carbonization route was designed for the synthesis of MWCNTs@carbon nanocables with tunable diameter and length. MWCNTs are firstly used as templates for the formation of carbon-rich composite nanocables, and the diameter of the nanocables could be tailored through adjusting the hydrothermal time or the ratio of MWCNTs and glucose. Owing to abundant superficial oxygen-containing functional groups, porous surface and remarkable reactivity, the as-synthesized nanocables are capable of efficiently adsorbing cationic dye methylene blue (MB) and crystal violet (CV). Furthermore, the optimum adsorption conditions, kinetics, adsorption isotherms and adsorption thermodynamics of dyes were studied systematically. Additionally, the maximum adsorption capacities calculated from data analysis (298.5 mg/g for MB and 228.3 mg/g for CV) are significant higher than those of raw MWCNTs and some other adsorbents reported previously, which provides strong evidence for using MWCNTs@carbon nanocables as adsorbent to remove dyes from aqueous solutions. - Graphical abstract: MWCNTs@carbon nanocables has been successfully fabricated by a hydrothermal carbonization method. The as-synthesized novel samples were used as adsorbents and exhibited high adsorption capacity on MB and CV. - Highlights: • A simple, cost-effective and “green” method for the synthesis of the material. • The diameter and length of the material are relatively easy to control. • The surface has large oxygen-containing groups and preferable chemical reactivity. • Compared with raw MWCNTs and some other adsorbents, the adsorption capacity is much high

  19. Synthesis and utilization of a novel carbon nanotubes supported nanocables for the adsorption of dyes from aqueous solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei; Jiang, Xinyu; Chen, Xiaoqing

    2015-09-01

    Using multiwalled carbon nanotubes(MWCNTs) as mechanical support and glucose as carbon resource, a hydrothermal carbonization route was designed for the synthesis of MWCNTs@carbon nanocables with tunable diameter and length. MWCNTs are firstly used as templates for the formation of carbon-rich composite nanocables, and the diameter of the nanocables could be tailored through adjusting the hydrothermal time or the ratio of MWCNTs and glucose. Owing to abundant superficial oxygen-containing functional groups, porous surface and remarkable reactivity, the as-synthesized nanocables are capable of efficiently adsorbing cationic dye methylene blue (MB) and crystal violet (CV). Furthermore, the optimum adsorption conditions, kinetics, adsorption isotherms and adsorption thermodynamics of dyes were studied systematically. Additionally, the maximum adsorption capacities calculated from data analysis (298.5 mg/g for MB and 228.3 mg/g for CV) are significant higher than those of raw MWCNTs and some other adsorbents reported previously, which provides strong evidence for using MWCNTs@carbon nanocables as adsorbent to remove dyes from aqueous solutions.

  20. Synthesis, pharmacokinetics, and biological use of lysine-modified single-walled carbon nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mulvey JJ

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available J Justin Mulvey,1,2 Evan N Feinberg,1,3 Simone Alidori,1 Michael R McDevitt,4,5 Daniel A Heller,1,6 David A Scheinberg1,5,6 1Molecular Pharmacology and Chemistry Program, Sloan Kettering Institute, New York, NY, USA; 2Tri-Institutional MD-PhD Program, New York, NY, USA; 3Department of Applied Physics, Yale University, New Haven, CT USA; 4Department of Radiology and 5Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY, USA; 6Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY, USA Abstract: We aimed to create a more robust and more accessible standard for amine-modifying single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs. A 1,3-cycloaddition was developed using an azomethine ylide, generated by reacting paraformaldehyde and a side-chain-Boc (tert-Butyloxycarbonyl-protected, lysine-derived alpha-amino acid, H-Lys(Boc-OH, with purified SWCNT or C60. This cycloaddition and its lysine adduct provides the benefits of dense, covalent modification, ease of purification, commercial availability of reagents, and pH-dependent solubility of the product. Subsequently, SWCNTs functionalized with lysine amine handles were covalently conjugated to a radiometalated chelator, 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA. The 111In-labeled construct showed rapid renal clearance in a murine model and a favorable biodistribution, permitting utility in biomedical applications. Functionalized SWCNTs strongly wrapped small interfering RNA (siRNA. In the first disclosed deployment of thermophoresis with carbon nanotubes, the lysine-modified tubes showed a desirable, weak SWCNT-albumin binding constant. Thus, lysine-modified nanotubes are a favorable candidate for medicinal work. Keywords: fullerene, cycloaddition, azomethine, DOTA, thermophoresis, 111In

  1. Scalable synthesis of aligned carbon nanotubes bundles using green natural precursor: neem oil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Rajesh; Tiwari, Radhey Shyam; Srivastava, Onkar Nath

    2011-12-01

    Practical application of aligned carbon nanotubes (ACNTs) would have to be determined by a matter of its economical and large-scale preparation. In this study, neem oil (also named Margoaa oil, extracted from the seeds of the neem-- Azadirachta indica) was used as carbon source to fabricate the bundles of ACNTs. ACNTs have been synthesized by spray pyrolysis of neem oil and ferrocene mixture at 825°C. The major components of neem oil are hydrocarbon with less amount of oxygen, which provided the precursor species in spray pyrolysis growth of CNTs. The bundles of ACNTs have been grown directly inside the quartz tube. The as-grown ACNTs have been characterized through Raman spectroscopy, scanning and transmission electron microscopic (SEM/TEM) techniques. SEM images reveal that the bundles of ACNTs are densely packed and are of several microns in length. High-resolution TEM analysis reveals these nanotubes to be multi-walled CNTs. These multi-walled CNTs were found to have inner diameter between 15 and 30 nm. It was found that present technique gives high yield with high density of bundles of ACNTs.

  2. Low-temperature synthesis of carbon nanotubes on indium tin oxide electrodes for organic solar cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Capasso

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The electrical performance of indium tin oxide (ITO coated glass was improved by including a controlled layer of carbon nanotubes directly on top of the ITO film. Multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs were synthesized by chemical vapor deposition, using ultrathin Fe layers as catalyst. The process parameters (temperature, gas flow and duration were carefully refined to obtain the appropriate size and density of MWCNTs with a minimum decrease of the light harvesting in the cell. When used as anodes for organic solar cells based on poly(3-hexylthiophene (P3HT and phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM, the MWCNT-enhanced electrodes are found to improve the charge-carrier extraction from the photoactive blend, thanks to the additional percolation paths provided by the CNTs. The work function of as-modified ITO surfaces was measured by the Kelvin probe method to be 4.95 eV, resulting in an improved matching to the highest occupied molecular orbital level of the P3HT. This is in turn expected to increase the hole transport and collection at the anode, contributing to the significant increase of current density and open-circuit voltage observed in test cells created with such MWCNT-enhanced electrodes.

  3. Scalable synthesis of aligned carbon nanotubes bundles using green natural precursor: neem oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar Rajesh

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Practical application of aligned carbon nanotubes (ACNTs would have to be determined by a matter of its economical and large-scale preparation. In this study, neem oil (also named Margoaa oil, extracted from the seeds of the neem--Azadirachta indica was used as carbon source to fabricate the bundles of ACNTs. ACNTs have been synthesized by spray pyrolysis of neem oil and ferrocene mixture at 825°C. The major components of neem oil are hydrocarbon with less amount of oxygen, which provided the precursor species in spray pyrolysis growth of CNTs. The bundles of ACNTs have been grown directly inside the quartz tube. The as-grown ACNTs have been characterized through Raman spectroscopy, scanning and transmission electron microscopic (SEM/TEM techniques. SEM images reveal that the bundles of ACNTs are densely packed and are of several microns in length. High-resolution TEM analysis reveals these nanotubes to be multi-walled CNTs. These multi-walled CNTs were found to have inner diameter between 15 and 30 nm. It was found that present technique gives high yield with high density of bundles of ACNTs.

  4. Dusty plasma synthesis of nanostructured Zn/ZnO-carbon nanotube composites by aerosol flow condensation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lennox, Martin, E-mail: martin.lennox@mcgill.ca; Coulombe, Sylvain, E-mail: sylvain.coulombe@mcgill.ca [McGill University, Plasma Processing Laboratory, Department of Chemical Engineering (Canada)

    2012-11-15

    A new, dusty plasma process for depositing nanoparticles generated by aerosol flow condensation and treated using a 13.56 MHz capacitively-coupled non-thermal glow discharge is described. The use of organometallic compounds as nanoparticle precursors is avoided, thereby allowing for a processing plasma free of contaminating degradation products. Nanostructured composites of zinc and zinc oxide were deposited on carbon nanotubes with complete coverage, and the influences of the argon quench and sheath gas flow rates, and the presence of 0.5 vol.% ethane in the processing plasma on the synthesized composites was investigated by electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction (XRD). In the absence of plasma, {approx}1 {mu}m Zn microparticles composed of agglomerated nanoparticles were formed on the carbon nanotube surface. Plasma processing produced coatings of nanoparticles with lognormal size distributions and median diameters of {approx}5 nm. At maximum argon flow rates, the distribution was monodisperse, whereas lower flow rates produced bimodal size distributions with the second mode having median values of {approx}70 nm.

  5. Synthesis and Properties of Magnetic Composites of Carbon Nanotubes/Fe Nanoparticle

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Mei-Hua; QI Xiao-Si; ZHONG Wei; YE Xiao-Juan; DENG Yu; AU Chak-tong; JIN Chang-Qing; YANG Zai-Xing

    2009-01-01

    Magnetic composites of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are synthesized by the in situ catalytic decomposition of benzene at temperatures as low as 400℃ over Fe nanoparticles (mean grain size = 26 nm) produced by sol-gel fabrication and hydrogen reduction. The yield of CNT composite is up to about 3025% in a run of 6 h. FE-SEM and HRTEM investigations reveal that one-dimensional carbon species are produced in a large quantity. A relatively high value of magnetization is observed for the composite due to the encapsulation of ferromagnetic Fe3C and/or α-Fe. The method is suitable for the mass-production of CNT composites that contain magnetic nanoparticles.

  6. CARBON NANOTUBES: PROPERTIES AND APPLICATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, John, E.

    2009-07-24

    Carbon nanotubes were discovered in 1991 as a minority byproduct of fullerene synthesis. Remarkable progress has been made in the ensuing years, including the discovery of two basic types of nanotubes (single-wall and multi-wall), great strides in synthesis and purification, elucidation of many fundamental physical properties, and important steps towards practical applications. Both the underlying science and technological potential of SWNT can profitably be studied at the scale of individual tubes and on macroscopic assemblies such as fibers. Experiments on single tubes directly reveal many of the predicted quantum confinement and mechanical properties. Semiconductor nanowires have many features in common with nanotubes, and many of the same fundamental and practical issues are in play – quantum confinement and its effect on properties; possible device structures and circuit architectures; thermal management; optimal synthesis, defect morphology and control, etc. In 2000 we began a small effort in this direction, conducted entirely by undergraduates with minimal consumables support from this grant. With DOE-BES approval, this grew into a project in parallel with the carbon nanotube work, in which we studied of inorganic semiconductor nanowire growth, characterization and novel strategies for electronic and electromechanical device fabrication. From the beginnings of research on carbon nanotubes, one of the major applications envisioned was hydrogen storage for fuel-cell powered cars and trucks. Subsequent theoretical models gave mixed results, the most pessimistic indicating that the fundamental H2-SWNT interaction was similar to flat graphite (physisorption) with only modest binding energies implying cryogenic operation at best. New material families with encouraging measured properties have emerged, and materials modeling has gained enormously in predictive power, sophistication, and the ability to treat a realistically representative number of atoms. One of

  7. Different Technical Applications of Carbon Nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdalla, S; Al-Marzouki, F; Al-Ghamdi, Ahmed A; Abdel-Daiem, A

    2015-12-01

    Carbon nanotubes have been of great interest because of their simplicity and ease of synthesis. The novel properties of nanostructured carbon nanotubes such as high surface area, good stiffness, and resilience have been explored in many engineering applications. Research on carbon nanotubes have shown the application in the field of energy storage, hydrogen storage, electrochemical supercapacitor, field-emitting devices, transistors, nanoprobes and sensors, composite material, templates, etc. For commercial applications, large quantities and high purity of carbon nanotubes are needed. Different types of carbon nanotubes can be synthesized in various ways. The most common techniques currently practiced are arc discharge, laser ablation, and chemical vapor deposition and flame synthesis. The purification of CNTs is carried out using various techniques mainly oxidation, acid treatment, annealing, sonication, filtering chemical functionalization, etc. However, high-purity purification techniques still have to be developed. Real applications are still under development. This paper addresses the current research on the challenges that are associated with synthesis methods, purification methods, and dispersion and toxicity of CNTs within the scope of different engineering applications, energy, and environmental impact.

  8. Synthesis of single-walled carbon nanotubes using induction thermal plasma technology with different catalysts: thermodynamic and experimental studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of the type and quantity of three catalyst mixtures (i.e. Ni-Y2O3, Ni-Co-Y2O3, and Ni-Mo-Y2O3) on single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) synthesis by induction thermal plasma process have been examined in order to evaluate their individual influences on SWCNT production. Thermodynamic calculations, in gas and particularly in liquid solution phases, have also been performed to better understand the effects of the catalysts on the production of SWCNT. Characterization of the synthesized SWCNT by different techniques including Raman spectroscopy, high resolution scanning electron microscopy (HRSEM) imaging and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) clearly indicated that the best quality of SWCNT was achieved using Ni-Co-Y2O3 catalyst mixture in the feedstock.

  9. Using Converter Dust to Produce Low Cost Cementitious Composites by in situ Carbon Nanotube and Nanofiber Synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Péter Ludvig

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanotubes (CNTs and nanofibers (CNFs were synthesized on clinker and silica fume particles in order to create a low cost cementitious nanostructured material. The synthesis was carried out by an in situ chemical vapor deposition (CVD process using converter dust, an industrial byproduct, as iron precursor. The use of these materials reduces the cost, with the objective of application in large-scale nanostructured cement production. The resulting products were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM, transmission electron microscopy (TEM and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA and were found to be polydisperse in size and to have defective microstructure. Some enhancement in the mechanical behavior of cement mortars was observed due to the addition of these nano-size materials. The contribution of these CNTs/CNFs to the mechanical strength of mortar specimens is similar to that of high quality CNTs incorporated in mortars by physical mixture.

  10. Synthesis and characterization of water-soluble carbon nanotubes from mustard soot

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Prashant Dubey; Devarajan Muthukumaran; Subhashis Dash; Rupa Mukhopadhyay; Sabyasachi Sarkar

    2005-10-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNT) has been synthesized by pyrolysing mustard oil using an oil lamp. It was made water-soluble (wsCNT) through oxidative treatment by dilute nitric acid and was characterized by SEM, AFM, XRD, Raman and FTIR spectroscopy. The synthesized wsCNT showed the presence of several junctions and defects in it. The presence of curved graphene structure (sp2) with frequent sp3 hybridized carbon is found to be responsible for the observed defects. These defects along with the presence of di- and tri-podal junctions showed interesting magnetic properties of carbon radicals formed by spin frustration. This trapped carbon radical showed ESR signal in aqueous solution and was very stable even under drastic treatment by strong oxidizing or reducing agents. Oxidative acid treatment of CNT introduced several carboxylic acid group functionalities in wsCNT along with the nicking of the CNT at different lengths with varied molecular weight. To evaluate molecular weights of these wsCNTs, an innovative method like gel electrophoresis using high molecular weight DNA as marker was introduced.

  11. Synthesis of carbon nanotubes by CVD method using iron and molybdenum-based catalysts supported on ceramic matrices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molybdenum is known for its synergistic effect in the synthesis of carbon nanotubes (CNs) by chemical vapor deposition (CVD method). When added to typical catalysts like iron, nickel, and cobalt, even in small quantities, it is increases the yield of these nanostructures. The presence of Mo also has an influence on the type and number of CN walls formed. Although this effect is widely documented in the literature, there is not yet a consensus about the mechanism of action of molybdenum in catalytic systems. The objective of the present work is to study the influence of molybdenum on the catalytic activity of iron nanoparticle-based catalysts supported on magnesium oxide (Fe/MgO system) in the synthesis of carbon nanotubes by the CVD method. The Mo concentration was systematically varied from null to molar ratio values four times greater than the quantity of Fe, and the obtained material (catalysts and carbon nanotubes) were broadly characterized by different techniques. In order to also study the influence of the preparation method on the final composition of the catalytic system phases, the catalytic systems (Fe/MgO e FeMox/MgO) were synthesized by two different methods: co-precipitation and impregnation. The greatest CN yields were observed for the catalysts prepared by coprecipitation. The difference was attributed to better dispersion of the Fe and Mo phases in the catalyst ceramic matrix. In the precipitation stage, it was observed the formation of layered double hydroxides whose concentration increased with the Mo content up to the ratio of Mo/Fe equal to 0.2. This phase is related to a better distribution of Fe and Mo in this concentration range. Another important characteristic observed is that the ceramic matrix is not inert. It can react both with Fe and Mo and form the iron solid solution in the magnesium oxide and the phases magnesium-ferrite (MgFe204) and magnesium molybdate (MgMo04). The MgFe204 phase is observed in all catalytic systems, while the Mg

  12. Synthesis and characterization of alumina-coated carbon nanotubes and their application for lead removal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, Vinod K., E-mail: vinodfcy@gmail.com [Chemistry Department, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia); Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology Roorkee, Roorkee 247667 (India); Agarwal, Shilpi [Chemistry Department, Jiwaji University, Gwalior, MP (India); Saleh, Tawfik A. [Chemistry Department, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia)

    2011-01-15

    Graphical abstract: Cylindrical bonds representative diagram of alumina-coated MWCNTs. Research highlights: {yields} Comparing with uncoated-MWCNTs, alumina-coated MWCNTs has higher adsorption capacity toward lead. {yields} In the fixed bed mode, the percentage of lead removal increases by decreasing the flow rate. {yields} The lead removal increases when the bed thickness increases. - Abstract: Alumina-coated multi-wall carbon nanotubes were synthesized and characterized by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and FTIR. They were used as an adsorbent for the removal of lead ions from aqueous solutions in two modes, batch and fixed bed. In the batch mode, experiments were carried out to investigate the effect of contact time, agitation speed, adsorbent dosage and solution pH on the removal of lead. The coated nanotubes exhibit better removal ability over uncoated. For fixed-bed columns, thickness of the layer and flow rate were investigated. Increasing the thickness and decreasing the flow rate enhanced the removal of lead. The prepared adsorbent displayed the main advantage of separation convenience when a fixed-bed column was used compared to the batch adsorption treatment.

  13. Synthesis and characterization of polyaniline and polyaniline - Carbon nanotubes nanostructures for electrochemical supercapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bavio, Marcela A.; Acosta, Gerardo G.; Kessler, Teresita

    2014-01-01

    Nanostructures of polyaniline (PANI) and PANI with embedded carbon nanotubes (CNT) were synthesized through a chemical method of self-organization. An oxidative polymerization process was performed in the monomer acid solution with the presence of a surfactant and the addition of multi-walled CNT. The CNT were added with and without pretreatment, CNTf and CNTnf, respectively. Furthermore, ammonium persulfate and sodium dodecyl sulfate were incorporated to the reaction solution as dispersant and oxidizing agents, respectively. Different nanostructures such as nanoparticles or nanotubes were obtained depending on the CNT added, and characterized by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, UV-vis spectroscopy, infrared spectroscopy and electrochemical techniques. Spectroscopy results showed variations in the observed bands of the synthetized nanostructures attributed to changes in the molecular structures, to the state of doped PANI reached during polymerization and to the stabilization of these links by hydrogen bridge interactions. PANI and PANI-CNT composites were evaluated by electrochemical techniques to test their behavior in relation to supercapacitors properties. PANI-CNTf nanocomposites displayed improved capacitive properties in H2SO4 solutions, namely 1744 F g-1at 2 A g-1. Also, the specific capacitance was strongly influenced by the developed morphologies. These characteristics point to their feasible application as supercapacitors materials.

  14. Carbon Nanotube Purification and Functionalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebron, Marisabel; Mintz, Eric; Smalley, Richard E.; Meador, Michael A.

    2003-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes have the potential to significantly enhance the mechanical, thermal, and electrical properties of polymers. However, dispersion of carbon nanotubes in a polymer matrix is hindered by the electrostatic forces that cause them to agglomerate. Chemical modification of the nanotubes is necessary to minimize these electrostatic forces and promote adhesion between the nanotubes and the polymer matrix. In a collaborative research program between Clark Atlanta University, Rice University, and NASA Glenn Research Center several approaches are being explored to chemically modify carbon nanotubes. The results of this research will be presented.

  15. Varied morphology carbon nanotubes and method for their manufacture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenzhi; Wen, Jian Guo; Ren, Zhi Feng

    2007-01-02

    The present invention describes the preparation of carbon nanotubes of varied morphology, catalyst materials for their synthesis. The present invention also describes reactor apparatus and methods of optimizing and controlling process parameters for the manufacture carbon nanotubes with pre-determined morphologies in relatively high purity and in high yields. In particular, the present invention provides methods for the preparation of non-aligned carbon nanotubes with controllable morphologies, catalyst materials and methods for their manufacture.

  16. Synthesis and Characterization of Multi-walled Carbon Nanotube Doped Silica Aerogels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Baomin; SONG Kai; HAN Yu; ZHANG Tingting

    2012-01-01

    Mulri-walled carbon nanotube doped silica aerogels(MWCNT-SAs) were synthesized from a wet gel of well-dispersed MWCNT by one-step solvent exchange/surface modification and ambient pressure drying(APD).Waterglass was employed as a precursor to prepare wet gel.The content of MWCNT varied from 0 to 15% volume by wet gel.The surface group,thermal stability and microstructure of pure silica aerogel and MWCNT-SAs were investigated by FTIR,DTA,and TEM.Experimental results show that MWCNT-SAs are hydrophobic when the temperature is below 400 ℃,MWCN T -SAs exhibit a mesoporous network structure,and they achieve the largest scale with least shrinkage and lowest density when doped with 5 vol% MWCNT.

  17. Synthesis and Characterizations of Poly(3-hexylthiophene and Modified Carbon Nanotube Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Rezaul Karim

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Poly(3-hexylthiophene and modified (functionalized and silanized multiwall carbon nanotube (MWNT nanocomposites have been prepared through in situ polymerization process in chloroform medium with FeCl3 oxidant at room temperature. The composites are characterized through Fourier transfer infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR, Raman, and X-ray diffraction (XRD measurements to probe the nature of interaction between the moieties. Optical properties of the composites are measured from ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis and photoluminescence (PL spectroscopy. Conductivity of the composites is followed by four probe techniques to understand the conduction mechanism. The change (if any in C=C symmetric and antisymmetric stretching frequencies in FT-IR, the shift in G band frequencies in Raman, any alterations in λmax of UV-Vis, and PL spectroscopic measurements are monitored with modified MWNT loading in the polymer matrix.

  18. Room-temperature synthesis and electrocatalysis of carbon nanotubes supported palladium–iron alloy nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) supported palladium–iron bimetallic nanoparticles (Pd–Fe/CNTs) catalyst is synthesized using palladium hexacyanoferrate (PdHCF) as reaction precursor. In this method, the negatively charged PdHCF nanoparticles self-assemble on the positively charged polydiallyldimethylammonium chloride (PDDA) functionalized CNTs through electrostatic interaction, and then are reduced to Pd–Fe alloy nanoparticles by sodium borohydride. The physicochemical properties of Pd–Fe/CNTs are investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). These structural analyses reveal that the Pd–Fe/CNTs catalyst possesses the high alloying degree and the small particle size. Electrochemical measurements show that the eletrocatalytic activity of the Pd–Fe/MWCNTs catalyst for the methanol oxidation is better than that of the Pd/CNTs catalyst, which originates from the synergistic effect between Pd atom and Fe atom

  19. Facile synthesis of stable superhydrophobic nanocomposite based on multi-walled carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokarian, Zahra; Rasuli, Reza; Abedini, Yousefali

    2016-04-01

    A facile approach to fabricate a stable superhydrophobic composite comprising multi-walled carbon nanotubes and silicone rubber has been reported. Contact angle of de-ionized water droplets on the prepared surface was measured with the value of near 159°; while water droplets easily rolled off and bounced on it. Surface free energy of the superhydrophobic coating was examined by three methods about 26 mJ/m2. The prepared film shows good stability under high stress conditions such as ultraviolet exposure, heating, pencil hardness test, attacking with different pH value and ionic-strength solutions. In addition, remarkable stability of the coating was observed after soaking in condensed hydrochloric acid, 5 wt.% NaCl aqueous solution, boiling water and tape test.

  20. A novel method for fabrication of Fe catalyst used for the synthesis of carbon nanotubes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    E Z Karimi; J Vahdati-Khaki; S M Zebarjad; I A Bataev; A G Bannov

    2014-08-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been grown by decomposition of propane over a nanocamposite catalyst by chemical vapour deposition (CVD). The catalyst was prepared from an aluminum/iron oxide/graphite mixture milled in a high-energy ball-milling equipment. Scanning and transmission electron microscopies, Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction measurements have been carried out in order to investigate the catalyst and synthesized CNTs. The results show that iron nanoparticles are produced in an alumina and ball-milled graphite matrix. This produced nanocomposite is used as a catalyst to synthesize CNTs via CVD successfully. The yield of CNTs formation was greatly influenced by the milling time and deposition temperature.

  1. Synthesis of MnO{sub 2}/short multi-walled carbon nanotube nanocomposite for supercapacitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Jinhui; Wang, Yanhui; Zang, Jianbing, E-mail: diamondzjb@163.com; Xin, Guoxiang; Ji, Huiying; Yuan, Yungang

    2014-01-15

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) were selectively etched in molten nitrate to produce short MWNTs (s-MWNTs). MnO{sub 2}/s-MWNT nanocomposite was synthesized by a reduction of potassium permanganate under microwave irradiation. For comparative purpose, MnO{sub 2}/MWNT nanocomposite was also synthesized and investigated for its physical and electrochemical performance. Uniform and conformal MnO{sub 2} coatings were more easily formed on the surfaces of individual s-MWNTs. MnO{sub 2}/s-MWNT nanocomposite estimated by cyclic voltammetry (CV) in 0.5 M Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} aqueous solution had the specific capacitance as high as 392.1 F g{sup −1} at 2 mV s{sup −1}. This value was more than 48.9% larger than MnO{sub 2}/s-MWNT nanocomposite. In addition, MnO{sub 2}/s-MWNT nanocomposite was also examined by repeating the CV test at a scan rate of 50 mV s{sup −1}, exhibiting an excellent cycling stability along with 99.2% specific capacitance retained after 1000 cycles. Therefore, MnO{sub 2}/s-MWNT nanocomposite is a promising electrode material in the supercapacitors. - Highlights: • Multi-walled carbon nanotubes are etched in molten nitrate to produce short MWNTs. • S-MWNTs can form more stable suspensions than did the pristine MWNTs. • Nano-scaled MnO{sub 2} is more effectively dispersed on the surface of the s-MWNTs. • This microstructure promotes the electrical conductivity of the electrode. • The electrode exhibits high specific capacitance and a cycle stability.

  2. Templated Synthesis of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes with Specific Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Feng; Wang, Xiao; Li, Meihui; Liu, Xiyan; Zhao, Xiulan; Zhang, Daqi; Zhang, Yan; Yang, Juan; Li, Yan

    2016-04-19

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) have shown great potential in various applications attributed to their unique structure-dependent properties. Therefore, the controlled preparation of chemically and structurally pristine SWNTs is a crucial issue for their advanced applications (e.g., nanoelectronics) and has been a great challenge for two decades. Epitaxial growth from well-defined seeds has been shown to be a promising strategy to control the structure of SWNTs. Segments of carbon nanotubes, including short pipes from cutting of preformed nanotubes and caps from opening of fullerenes or cyclodehydrogenation of polycyclic hydrocarbon precursors, have been used as the seeds to grow SWNTs. Single-chirality SWNTs were obtained with both presorted chirality-pure SWNT segments and end caps obtained from polycyclic hydrocarbon molecules with designed structure. The main challenges of nanocarbon-segment-seeded processes are the stability of the seeds, yield, and efficiency. Catalyst-mediated SWNT growth is believed to be more efficient. The composition and morphology of the catalyst nanoparticles have been widely reported to affect the chirality distribution of SWNTs. However, chirality-specific SWNT growth is hard to achieve by alternating catalysts. The specificity of enzyme-catalyzed reactions brings us an awareness of the essentiality of a unique catalyst structure for the chirality-selective growth of SWNTs. Only catalysts with the desired atomic arrangements in their crystal planes can act as structural templates for chirality-specific growth of SWNTs. We have developed a new family of catalysts, tungsten-based intermetallic compounds, which have high melting points and very special crystal structures, to facilitate the growth of SWNTs with designed chirality. By the use of W6Co7 catalysts, (12,6) SWNTs were directly grown with purity higher than 92%. Both high-resolution transmission electron microscopy measurements and density functional theory simulations

  3. Templated Synthesis of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes with Specific Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Feng; Wang, Xiao; Li, Meihui; Liu, Xiyan; Zhao, Xiulan; Zhang, Daqi; Zhang, Yan; Yang, Juan; Li, Yan

    2016-04-19

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) have shown great potential in various applications attributed to their unique structure-dependent properties. Therefore, the controlled preparation of chemically and structurally pristine SWNTs is a crucial issue for their advanced applications (e.g., nanoelectronics) and has been a great challenge for two decades. Epitaxial growth from well-defined seeds has been shown to be a promising strategy to control the structure of SWNTs. Segments of carbon nanotubes, including short pipes from cutting of preformed nanotubes and caps from opening of fullerenes or cyclodehydrogenation of polycyclic hydrocarbon precursors, have been used as the seeds to grow SWNTs. Single-chirality SWNTs were obtained with both presorted chirality-pure SWNT segments and end caps obtained from polycyclic hydrocarbon molecules with designed structure. The main challenges of nanocarbon-segment-seeded processes are the stability of the seeds, yield, and efficiency. Catalyst-mediated SWNT growth is believed to be more efficient. The composition and morphology of the catalyst nanoparticles have been widely reported to affect the chirality distribution of SWNTs. However, chirality-specific SWNT growth is hard to achieve by alternating catalysts. The specificity of enzyme-catalyzed reactions brings us an awareness of the essentiality of a unique catalyst structure for the chirality-selective growth of SWNTs. Only catalysts with the desired atomic arrangements in their crystal planes can act as structural templates for chirality-specific growth of SWNTs. We have developed a new family of catalysts, tungsten-based intermetallic compounds, which have high melting points and very special crystal structures, to facilitate the growth of SWNTs with designed chirality. By the use of W6Co7 catalysts, (12,6) SWNTs were directly grown with purity higher than 92%. Both high-resolution transmission electron microscopy measurements and density functional theory simulations

  4. Chirality specific and spatially uniform synthesis of single-walled carbon nanotubes from a sputtered Co-W bimetallic catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Hua; Kumamoto, Akihito; Takezaki, Hiroki; Ohyama, Shinnosuke; Qian, Yang; Inoue, Taiki; Ikuhara, Yuichi; Chiashi, Shohei; Xiang, Rong; Maruyama, Shigeo

    2016-07-01

    Synthesis of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) with well-defined atomic arrangements has been widely recognized in the past few decades as the biggest challenge in the SWNT community, and has become a bottleneck for the application of SWNTs in nano-electronics. Here, we report a selective synthesis of (12, 6) SWNTs with an enrichment of 50%-70% by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) using sputtered Co-W as a catalyst. This is achieved under much milder reduction and growth conditions than those in the previous report using transition-metal molecule clusters as catalyst precursors (Nature, 2014, 510, 522). Meanwhile, in-plane transmission electron microscopy unambiguously identified an intermediate structure of Co6W6C, which is strongly associated with selective growth. However, most of the W atoms disappear after a 5 min CVD growth, which implies that anchoring W may be important in this puzzling Co-W system.Synthesis of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) with well-defined atomic arrangements has been widely recognized in the past few decades as the biggest challenge in the SWNT community, and has become a bottleneck for the application of SWNTs in nano-electronics. Here, we report a selective synthesis of (12, 6) SWNTs with an enrichment of 50%-70% by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) using sputtered Co-W as a catalyst. This is achieved under much milder reduction and growth conditions than those in the previous report using transition-metal molecule clusters as catalyst precursors (Nature, 2014, 510, 522). Meanwhile, in-plane transmission electron microscopy unambiguously identified an intermediate structure of Co6W6C, which is strongly associated with selective growth. However, most of the W atoms disappear after a 5 min CVD growth, which implies that anchoring W may be important in this puzzling Co-W system. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Raman spectroscopy (G-band) of SWNTs grown from Co and Co-W catalyst; Kataura plot for chirality

  5. Synthesis of Nanoscale Heterostructures Comprised of Metal Nanowires, Carbon Nanotubes, and Metal Nanoparticles: Investigation of Their Structure and Electrochemical Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nitin Chopra

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available One-dimensional nanoscale heterostructures comprised of multisegment gold-nickel nanowires, carbon nanotube, and nickel nanoparticles were fabricated in a unique approach combining top-down and bottom-up assembly methods. Porous alumina template was utilized for sequential electrodeposition of gold and nickel nanowire segments. This was followed by chemical vapor deposition growth of carbon nanotubes on multisegment gold-nickel nanowires, where nickel segment also acted as a carbon nanotube growth catalyst. The aligned arrays of these gold-nickel-carbon nanotube heterostructures were released from porous alumina template and then subjected to wet-chemical process to be decorated with nickel/nickel oxide core/shell nanoparticles. X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and Raman spectroscopy were utilized for morphology, interface, defect, and structure characterization. The electrochemical performance of these heterostructures was studied using cyclic voltammetry method and the specific capacitance of various heterostructures was estimated and compared.

  6. Carbon nanotube network varactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Generalov, A. A.; Anoshkin, I. V.; Erdmanis, M.; Lioubtchenko, D. V.; Ovchinnikov, V.; Nasibulin, A. G.; Räisänen, A. V.

    2015-01-01

    Microelectromechanical system (MEMS) varactors based on a freestanding layer of single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) films were designed, fabricated and tested. The freestanding SWCNT film was employed as a movable upper patch in the parallel plate capacitor of the MEMS. The measurements of the SWCNT varactors show very high tunability, nearly 100%, of the capacitance with a low actuation voltage of 10 V. The functionality of the varactor is improved by implementing a flexible nanocellulose aerogel filling.

  7. Carbon nanotube IR detectors (SV)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leonard, F. L.

    2012-03-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia) and Lockheed Martin Corporation (LMC) collaborated to (1) evaluate the potential of carbon nanotubes as channels in infrared (IR) photodetectors; (2) assemble and characterize carbon nanotube electronic devices and measure the photocurrent generated when exposed to infrared light;(3) compare the performance of the carbon nanotube devices with that of traditional devices; and (4) develop and numerically implement models of electronic transport and opto-electronic behavior of carbon nanotube infrared detectors. This work established a new paradigm for photodetectors.

  8. From Carbon Nanotube Crystals to Carbon Nanotube Flowers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Zhengjun; ZHAO Ye; ZHOU Ya

    2005-01-01

    We have investigated the very initial deposition stages of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) with ferrocene (Fe(C5H5)2) and xylene (C8H10) for growing carbon nanotubes, and made clear that the mechanism for the self-organization behaviors of nanotubes at different growth stages by this approach. For instance, the organization of nanotubes into flower-like structures at prolonged deposition is developed from the crystal-like structures formed at early growth stages, both of which are closely related to and determined by the very initial deposition stages of this CVD approach. Based on this approach, ways have been established to build up different architectures of carbon nanotubes, by controlling the initial deposition stages of the CVD process, with which we have realized the selective growth of self-organized carbon nanotube structures. This study provides a new idea for growing carbon nanotube architectures by CVD.

  9. Selective synthesis of double helices of carbon nanotube bundles grown on treated metallic substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cervantes-Sodi, Felipe; Iniguez-Rabago, Agustin; Rosas-Melendez, Samuel; Ballesteros-Villarreal, Monica [Departamento de Fisica y Matematicas, Universidad Iberoamericana, Prolongacion Paseo de la Reforma 880, Lomas de Santa Fe (Mexico); Vilatela, Juan J. [IMDEA Materials Institute, E.T.S. de Ingenieros de Caminos, Madrid (Spain); Reyes-Gutierrez, Lucio G.; Jimenez-Rodriguez, Jose A. [Ingenieria Industrial, Grupo JUMEX, Ecatepec de Morelos, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Palacios, Eduardo [Lab. de Microscopia Electronica de Ultra Alta Resolucion, Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo, San Bartolo Atepehuacan (Mexico); Terrones, Mauricio [Department of Physics, Department of Materials Science and Engineering and Materials Research Institute, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA (United States); Research Center for Exotic Nanocarbons (JST), Shinshu University, Nagano (Japan)

    2012-12-15

    Double-helix microstructures consisting of two parallel strands of hundreds of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) have been synthesized by chemical vapour deposition of ferrocene/toluene vapours on metal substrates. Growth of coiled carbon nanostructures with site selectivity is achieved by varying the duration of thermochemical pretreatment to deposit a layer of SiO{sub x} on the metallic substrate. Production of multibranched structures of MWCNTs converging in SiO{sub x} microstructure is also reported. In the abstract figure, panel (a) shows a coloured micrograph of a typical double-helix coiled microstructure of MWCNTs grown on SiO{sub x} covered steel substrate. Green and blue show each of the two individual strands of MWCNTs. Panel (b) is an amplification of a SiO{sub x} microparticle (white) on the tip of the double-stranded coil (green and blue). The microparticle guides the collective growth of hundreds of MWCNTs to form the coiled structure. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  10. Green synthesis of polymer monoliths incorporated with carbon nanotubes in room temperature ionic liquid and deep eutectic solvents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li-Shun; Gao, Shu-Ping; Huang, Yan-Ping; Liu, Zhao-Sheng

    2016-07-01

    In this work, an efficient method to prepare polymer monoliths with incorporated carbon nanotubes in a mixture of room temperature ionic liquid and deep eutectic solvents was developed. With assistance of the binary green solvent, 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate and choline chloride/ethylene glycol, single-walled carbon nanotubes were dispersed successfully in pre-polymerization mixture without need of oxidative cutting of carbon nanotubes, which may allow depletion of the emission of volatile organic compounds into environment. The novel single-walled carbon nanotubes monolith was evaluated by capillary electrochromatography. Compared with the monolith made without single-walled carbon nanotubes, the monolith with the incorporation of single-walled carbon nanotubes exhibited high column efficiency (251,000plates/m) in the chromatographic separation. The morphology of the monolith can be tuned by the composition of mixture of ionic liquids and deep eutectic solvents to afford good column permeability and excellent separation ability for small molecules of alkyl phenones and alkyl benzenes. The results demonstrated that the method is a green strategy for the fabrication of multifunctional polymer monoliths. PMID:27154683

  11. Carbon nanotube core graphitic shell hybrid fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahm, Myung Gwan; Lee, Jae-Hwang; Hart, Amelia H C; Song, Sung Moo; Nam, Jaewook; Jung, Hyun Young; Hashim, Daniel Paul; Li, Bo; Narayanan, Tharangattu N; Park, Chi-Dong; Zhao, Yao; Vajtai, Robert; Kim, Yoong Ahm; Hayashi, Takuya; Ku, Bon-Cheol; Endo, Morinobu; Barrera, Enrique; Jung, Yung Joon; Thomas, Edwin L; Ajayan, Pulickel M

    2013-12-23

    A carbon nanotube yarn core graphitic shell hybrid fiber was fabricated via facile heat treatment of epoxy-based negative photoresist (SU-8) on carbon nanotube yarn. The effective encapsulation of carbon nanotube yarn in carbon fiber and a glassy carbon outer shell determines their physical properties. The higher electrical conductivity (than carbon fiber) of the carbon nanotube yarn overcomes the drawbacks of carbon fiber/glassy carbon, and the better properties (than carbon nanotubes) of the carbon fiber/glassy carbon make up for the lower thermal and mechanical properties of the carbon nanotube yarn via synergistic hybridization without any chemical doping and additional processes. PMID:24224730

  12. Synthesis of Millimeter-Scale Carbon Nanotube Arrays and Their Applications on Electrochemical Supercapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Xinwei

    This research is aimed at synthesizing millimeter-scale carbon nanotube arrays (CNTA) by conventional chemical vapor deposition (CCVD) and water-assisted chemical vapor deposition (WACVD) methods, and exploring their application as catalyst supports for electrochemical supercapacitors. The growth mechanism and growth kinetics of CNTA under different conditions were systematically investigated to understand the relationship among physical characteristics of catalyst particles, growth parameters, and carbon nanotube (CNT) structures within CNTAs. Multiwalled CNT (MWCNT) array growth demonstrates lengthening and thickening stages in CCVD and WACVD. In CCVD, the lengthening and thickening were found to be competitive. By investigating catalyst particles after different pretreatment conditions, it has been found that inter-particle spacing plays a significant role in influencing CNTA height, CNT diameter and wall number. In WACVD, a long linear lengthening stage has been found. CNT wall number remains constant and catalysts preserve the activity in this stage, while MWCNTs thicken substantially and catalysts deactivate following the previously proposed radioactive decay model in the thickening stage of WACVD. Water was also shown to preserve the catalyst activity by significantly inhibiting catalyst-induced and gas phase-induced thickening processes in WACVD. Mn3O4 nanoparticles were successfully deposited and uniformly distributed within millimeter-long CNTAs by dip-casting method from non-aqueous solutions. After modification with Mn3O4 nanoparticles, CNTAs have been changed from hydrophobic to hydrophilic without their alignment and integrity being destroyed. The hydrophilic Mn 3O4/CNTA composite electrodes present ideal capacitive behavior with high reversibility. This opens up a new route of utilizing ultra-long CNTAs, based on which a scalable and cost-effective method was developed to fabricate composite electrodes using millimeter-long CNTAs. To improve the

  13. Synthesis of carbon nanotubes using screen-printing catalyst and its application for a field emission device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiang, Wang-Ta; Su, Shui-Hsiang; Wu, Cheng-Yu; Yokoyama, Meiso [Department of Electronic Engineering, I-Shou University, No. 1, Sec. 1, Syuecheng Rd., Dashu Township, Kaohsiung County 840 (China)

    2010-04-15

    Iron nitrate (Fe(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}.9H{sub 2}O) catalyst is screen-printed over silicon substrates and efficiently utilized to catalyze the synthesis of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) by thermal chemical vapor deposition (CVD). The concentration of iron nitrate influences the particle size distribution of the Fe catalyst, which determines the morphology of the obtained CNT arrays. H{sub 2} is introduced in varying concentrations in a CH{sub 4}/N{sub 2} mixed gas during the synthesis of the CNTs, from which CNTs with uniform diameter distribution are grown. A field emission device that employs CNTs as emitters exhibits a current density of 9 mA/cm{sup 2} at an electrical field of 1.2 V/{mu}m. This work demonstrates the potential to synthesize CNTs using a screen-printed catalyst, which is a requirement for field emitter application at a large size. (copyright 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  14. Synthesis of silver nanoparticle decorated multiwalled carbon nanotubes-graphene mixture and its heat transfer studies in nanofluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tessy Theres Baby

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study describes a novel synthesis procedure for a hybrid nanostructure consisting of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNT, hydrogen exfoliated graphene (HEG and silver nanoparticles. Moreover, synthesis of nanofluids using the above hybrid material and their heat transfer properties are discussed. The hybrid structure of MWNT and HEG (MWNT-HEG has been synthesized by a simple mixing of MWNT and graphite oxide (GO followed by exfoliation of this mixture in hydrogen atmosphere. The sample has been characterized with different experimental techniques. After surface functionalization, this hybrid material is decorated with silver nanoparticles (Ag/(MWNT-HEG and dispersed in ethylene glycol (EG without any surfactant. The thermal conductivity and convective heat transfer properties are measured for different volume fractions. An enhancement of ∼8% in thermal conductivity is obtained for a volume fraction of 0.04% at 25°C. The convective heat transfer coefficient of these nanofluids is determined using an in-house fabricated setup. The enhancement in heat transfer coefficient is about 570% for 0.005% volume fraction at the entrance of the pipe for Re = 250.

  15. Synthesis of Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes-Titania Nanomaterial for Desulfurization of Model Fuel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tawfik A. Saleh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This work reported on the development of novel nanomaterials of multiwalled carbon nanotubes doped with titania (CNT/TiO2 for the adsorptive desulfurization of model fuel oils. Various analytical techniques such as field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR were used for the characterization of the nanomaterials. The initial results indicated the effectiveness of the prepared CNT/TiO2 nanomaterials in removing sulfur compounds from model fuel oil. The adsorption of DBT, BT, and thiophene from model fuel onto the derived sorbents was performed using batch mode system. These CNT/TiO2 nanomaterials initially afforded approximately 45% removal of DBT, 55% BT, and more than 65% thiophene compounds from model fuels. The CNT/TiO2 nanomaterials provided an excellent activity towards interaction with organosulfur compounds. More experiments are underway to optimize the parameters for the adsorptive desulfurization processes. We believe that these nanomaterials as adsorbents will find useful applications in petroleum industry because of their operational simplicity, high efficiency, and high capacity.

  16. Synthesis and characterization of magnetic carbon nanotubes/silsesquioxane nanocomposite thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osorio, Alice Gonçalves; Machado, Geraldo Beyer; Pereira, Marcelo Barbalho; Benvenutti, Edilson Valmir; Pereira, Luis Gustavo; Bergmann, Carlos Perez; Oliveira, Artur Harres de; Costa, Tania Maria Haas

    2016-05-01

    In the present study, magnetic carbon nanotubes (CNTs)/silsesquioxane nanocomposites were produced by sol-gel method and deposited as thin film by dip-coating process. Blank films and films with CNTs were characterized in order to evaluate their chemical composition and morphology. Profilometry technique showed the formation of films with 305 ± 22 nm of thickness for blank samples (without CNTs) and 173 ± 05 nm thickness for samples with CNTs. Microscopy techniques indicated the presence of CNTs well dispersed in the films and, with the aid of Raman and Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy, chemical composition of silsesquioxane matrix was evidenced and the presence of CNTs was confirmed in the films. Finally, the magnetic response of the deposited films was analyzed by Alternating Gradient-Field Magnetometer and results indicated that films reinforced with CNTs showed a hysteresis loop that indicates a coercivity of 103 Oe and the blank film did not show any significant response to the field applied. Hence, the authors suggest that this hybrid organic-inorganic material has potential to be applied as a new material for magnetic storage.

  17. High-yield Synthesis of Nanohybrid Shish-kebab Polyethylene-carbon Nanotube Structure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CUI Chaojie; QIAN Weizhong; ZHAO Mengqiang; XU Guanghui; NIE Jingqi; JIA Xilai; WEI Fei

    2013-01-01

    We report a novel method to prepare nanohybrid shish-kebab (NHSK) structure of polyethylene (PE) and carbon nanotube (CNT),Pristine CNTs without surface modification with high concentration was effectively dispersed in xylene solution by a simple shearing method,which induces the quick crystallization of PE in xylene to form a novel NHSK structure with more dense and smaller PE kebab on CNT axis.The flocculated NHSK product was transferred quickly from the xylene solution to the ethanol solution,in order to shorten the preparation time.The freeze-drying method was used in vacuum instead of high-temperature drying to avoid the aggregation of NHSK product.These improvements allow the formation of NHSK with an absolute yield of 200 mg·h-1,which is 2000 folds of that reported previously.It is favorable to apply this structured material in high performance nanocomposite,by improving the compatibility of CNTs in polymer and the interracial force between CNTs and polymer.

  18. Advanced materials from natural materials: synthesis of aligned carbon nanotubes on wollastonites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Meng-Qiang; Zhang, Qiang; Huang, Jia-Qi; Nie, Jing-Qi; Wei, Fei

    2010-04-26

    The growth of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) on natural materials is a low-cost, environmentally benign, and materials-saving method for the large-scale production of CNTs. Directly building 3D CNT architectures on natural materials is a key issue for obtaining advanced materials with high added value. We report the fabrication of aligned CNT arrays on fibrous natural wollastonite. Strongly dispersed iron particles with small sizes were produced on a planar surface of soaked fibrous wollastonite by a reduction process. These particles then catalyzed the decomposition of ethylene, leading to the synchronous growth of CNTs to form leaf- and brush-like wollastonite/CNT hybrids. The as-obtained hybrids could be further transformed into porous SiO(2)/CNT hybrids by reaction with hydrochloric acid. Further treatment with hydrofluoric acid resulted in aligned CNT arrays, with purities as high as 98.7 %. The presented work is very promising for the fabrication of advanced materials with unique structures and properties that can be used as fillers, catalyst supports, or energy-absorbing materials. PMID:20183856

  19. Process Parameters for Successful Synthesis of Carbon Nanotubes by Chemical Vapor Deposition: Implications for Chemical Mechanisms and Life-cycle Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Ke

    Manufacturing of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) via chemical vapor deposition (CVD) calls for thermal treatment associated with gas-phase rearrangement and catalyst deposition to achieve high cost efficiency and limited influence on environmental impact. Taking advantage of higher degree of structure control and economical efficiency, catalytic chemical vapor deposition (CCVD) has currently become the most prevailing synthesis approach for the synthesis of large-scale pure CNTs in past years. Because the synthesis process of CNTs dominates the potential ecotoxic impacts, materials consumption, energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions should be further limited to efficiently reduce life cycle ecotoxicity of carbon naotubes. However, efforts to reduce energy and material requirements in synthesis of CNTs by CCVD are hindered by a lack of mechanistic understanding. In this thesis, the effect of operating parameters, especially the temperature, carbon source concentration, and residence time on the synthesis were studied to improve the production efficiency in a different angle. Thus, implications on the choice of operating parameters could be provided to help the synthesis of carbon nanotubes. Here, we investigated the typical operating parameters in conditions that have yielded successful CNT production in the published academic literature of over seventy articles. The data were filtered by quality of the resultant product and deemed either "successful" or "unsuccessful" according to the authors. Furthermore, growth rate data were tabulated and used as performance metric for the process whenever possible. The data provided us an opportunity to prompt possible and common methods for practioners in the synthesis of CNTs and motivate routes to achieve energy and material minimization. The statistical analysis revealed that methane and ethylene often rely on thermal conversion process to form direct carbon precursor; further, methane and ethylene could not be the direct

  20. Scalable synthesis of hierarchically structured carbon nanotube-graphene fibres for capacitive energy storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Dingshan; Goh, Kunli; Wang, Hong; Wei, Li; Jiang, Wenchao; Zhang, Qiang; Dai, Liming; Chen, Yuan

    2014-07-01

    Micro-supercapacitors are promising energy storage devices that can complement or even replace batteries in miniaturized portable electronics and microelectromechanical systems. Their main limitation, however, is the low volumetric energy density when compared with batteries. Here, we describe a hierarchically structured carbon microfibre made of an interconnected network of aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes with interposed nitrogen-doped reduced graphene oxide sheets. The nanomaterials form mesoporous structures of large specific surface area (396 m(2) g(-1)) and high electrical conductivity (102 S cm(-1)). We develop a scalable method to continuously produce the fibres using a silica capillary column functioning as a hydrothermal microreactor. The resultant fibres show a specific volumetric capacity as high as 305 F cm(-3) in sulphuric acid (measured at 73.5 mA cm(-3) in a three-electrode cell) or 300 F cm(-3) in polyvinyl alcohol (PVA)/H(3)PO(4) electrolyte (measured at 26.7 mA cm(-3) in a two-electrode cell). A full micro-supercapacitor with PVA/H(3)PO(4) gel electrolyte, free from binder, current collector and separator, has a volumetric energy density of ∼6.3 mWh cm(-3) (a value comparable to that of 4 V-500 µAh thin-film lithium batteries) while maintaining a power density more than two orders of magnitude higher than that of batteries, as well as a long cycle life. To demonstrate that our fibre-based, all-solid-state micro-supercapacitors can be easily integrated into miniaturized flexible devices, we use them to power an ultraviolet photodetector and a light-emitting diode.

  1. Controlling Structural Characteristics of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes (SWNT) by Tailoring Catalyst Composition and Synthesis Conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report shows the extensive research on the mechanism responsible for the formation of single walled carbon nanotubes in order to get control over their structural parameters (diameter and chirality). Catalyst formulations, pre-treatment conditions, and reaction conditions are described in detail as well as mechanisms to produce nanotubes structures of specific arrays (vertical forest, nanotube pillars). Applications of SWNT in different fields are also described in this report. In relation to this project five students have graduated (3 PhD and 2 MS) and 35 papers have been published.

  2. Teslaphoresis of Carbon Nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bornhoeft, Lindsey R; Castillo, Aida C; Smalley, Preston R; Kittrell, Carter; James, Dustin K; Brinson, Bruce E; Rybolt, Thomas R; Johnson, Bruce R; Cherukuri, Tonya K; Cherukuri, Paul

    2016-04-26

    This paper introduces Teslaphoresis, the directed motion and self-assembly of matter by a Tesla coil, and studies this electrokinetic phenomenon using single-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs). Conventional directed self-assembly of matter using electric fields has been restricted to small scale structures, but with Teslaphoresis, we exceed this limitation by using the Tesla coil's antenna to create a gradient high-voltage force field that projects into free space. CNTs placed within the Teslaphoretic (TEP) field polarize and self-assemble into wires that span from the nanoscale to the macroscale, the longest thus far being 15 cm. We show that the TEP field not only directs the self-assembly of long nanotube wires at remote distances (>30 cm) but can also wirelessly power nanotube-based LED circuits. Furthermore, individualized CNTs self-organize to form long parallel arrays with high fidelity alignment to the TEP field. Thus, Teslaphoresis is effective for directed self-assembly from the bottom-up to the macroscale. PMID:27074626

  3. Studies of Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caneba, Gerard T.

    2005-01-01

    The fellowship experience for this summer for 2004 pertains to carbon nanotube coatings for various space-related applications. They involve the following projects: (a) EMI protection films from HiPco-polymers, and (b) Thermal protection nanosilica materials. EMI protection films are targeted to be eventually applied onto casings of laptop computers. These coatings are composites of electrically-conductive SWNTs and compatible polymers. The substrate polymer will be polycarbonate, since computer housings are typically made of carbon composites of this type of polymer. A new experimental copolymer was used last year to generate electrically-conductive and thermal films with HiPco at 50/50 wt/wt composition. This will be one of the possible formulations. Reference films will be base polycarbonate and neat HiPco onto polycarbonate films. Other coating materials that will be tried will be based on HiPco composites with commercial enamels (polyurethane, acrylic, polyester), which could be compatible with the polycarbonate substrate. Nanosilica fibers are planned for possible use as thermal protection tiles on the shuttle orbiter. Right now, microscale silica is used. Going to the nanoscale will increase the surface-volume-per-unit-area of radiative heat dissipation. Nanoscale carbon fibers/nanotubes can be used as templates for the generation of nanosilica. A sol-gel operation is employed for this purpose.

  4. Luminescence of carbon nanotube bulbs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI ChuanGang; WU DeHai; WANG KunLin; WEI JinQuan; WEI BingQing; ZHU HongWei; WANG ZhiCheng; LUO JianBin; LIU WenJin; ZHENG MingXin

    2007-01-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) bulbs made of decimeter-scale double-walled carbon nanotube (DWCNT) strands and films were fabricated and their luminescence properties, including the lighting efficiency, voltage-current relation and thermal stability were investigated. The results show that the DWCNT bulb has a comparable spectrum of visible light with tungsten bulb and its average efficiency is 40% higher than that of a tungsten filament at the same temperature (1400-2300 K). The nanotube filaments show both resistance and thermal stability over a large temperature region. No obvious damage was found for a nanotube bulb illuminating at 2300 K for more than 24 hours in vacuum.

  5. Carbon nanotube-templated polyaniline nanofibers: synthesis, flash welding and ultrafiltration membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Yaozu; Yu, Deng-Guang; Wang, Xia; Chain, Wei; Li, Xin-Gui; Hoek, Eric M. V.; Kaner, Richard B.

    2013-04-01

    Electro-active switchable ultrafiltration membranes are of great interest due to the possibility of external control over permeability, selectivity, anti-fouling and cleaning. Here, we report on hybrid single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT)-polyaniline (PANi) nanofibers synthesized by in situ polymerization of aniline in the presence of oxidized SWCNTs. The composite nanofibers exhibit unique morphology of core-shell (SWCNT-PANi) structures with average total diameters of 60 nm with 10 to 30 nm thick PANi coatings. The composite nanofibers are easily dispersed in polar aprotic solvents and cast into asymmetric membranes via a nonsolvent induced phase separation. The hybrid SWCNT-PANi membranes are electrically conductive at neutral pH and exhibit ultrafiltration-like permeability and selectivity when filtering aqueous suspensions of 6 nm diameter bovine serum albumin and 48 nm diameter silica particles. A novel flash welding technique is utilized to tune the morphology, porosity, conductivity, permeability and nanoparticle rejection of the SWCNT-PANi composite ultrafiltration membranes. Upon flash welding, both conductivity and pure water permeability of the membranes improves by nearly a factor of 10, while maintaining silica nanoparticle rejection levels above 90%. Flash welding of SWCNT-PANi composite membranes holds promise for formation of electrochemically tunable membranes.Electro-active switchable ultrafiltration membranes are of great interest due to the possibility of external control over permeability, selectivity, anti-fouling and cleaning. Here, we report on hybrid single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT)-polyaniline (PANi) nanofibers synthesized by in situ polymerization of aniline in the presence of oxidized SWCNTs. The composite nanofibers exhibit unique morphology of core-shell (SWCNT-PANi) structures with average total diameters of 60 nm with 10 to 30 nm thick PANi coatings. The composite nanofibers are easily dispersed in polar aprotic solvents and

  6. Synthesis and characterization of poly lactic acid and multiwall carbon nano-tubes mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar LG, Santhosh; del A. Cardona, Rocío; Berríos-Soto, Melvin; Santiago-Avilés, Jorge J.

    2011-10-01

    The motivation for this study is to reproduce processing conditions which lead to the formation of photo or photoinduced thermal actuation, combined with inexpensive, environmentally friendly (easily degradable) materials. Commercially available polymer, poly lactic acid (PLA), was used in our studies. PLA is a well know biodegradable polymer naturally obtained from corn. PLA was received as a solid resin in pellet form and dissolved in 1:3 acetone/chloroform solutions, to achieve the proper electrospinning kinematic viscosity. Once in the liquid phase, the material was mixed with commercially available multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) at varying concentrations and dispersed by severe sonication. The mixtures was electrospun at room temperature using a home built electrospinning apparatus capable of depositing randomly oriented fiber mats or oriented fibers onto different substrates, ranging from oxidized silicon wafers, alumina squares or glass microscope slides. The fibers diameters and lengths are statistically distributed following a log-normal distribution and the mean and dispersion are controlled by spinning parameters. Once the fibers were electrospun, they were compositionally, morphologically and structurally characterized by thermal and gravimetric analysis (TGA/DTA), rheology, imaging using a focused Ion Beam Scanning Electron Microscope (IBSEM), and IR /Raman methodologies. These studies can be used to explore PLA-MWCNTs mixtures suitability in applications such as super-capacitor technology, which would enable us to pursue further research in this field, while focusing on improving the electro spinning conditions so as to be able to better anticipate fiber morphology to generate a consistent regime of fibers.

  7. Nitrogen in highly crystalline carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ducati, C; Koziol, K; Stavrinadis, A; Friedrichs, S; Windle, A H; Midgley, P A [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, University of Cambridge, Pembroke Street, Cambridge CB2 3QZ (United Kingdom)

    2006-02-22

    Multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) with an unprecedented degree of internal order were synthesised by chemical vapour deposition (CVD) adding a nitrogen-containing compound to the hydrocarbon feedstock. Ferrocene was used as the metal catalyst precursor. The remarkable crystallinity of these nanotubes lies both in the isochirality and in the crystallographic register of their walls, as demonstrated by electron diffraction and high resolution electron microscopy experiments. High resolution transmission electron microscopy analysis shows that the walls of the nanotubes consist of truncated stacked cones, instead of perfect cylinders, with a range of apex angles that appears to be related to the nitrogen concentration in the synthesis process. The structure of armchair, zigzag and chiral nanotubes is modelled and discussed in terms of density of topological defects, providing an interesting comparison with our microscopy experiments. A growth mechanism based on the interplay of base- and tip-growth is proposed to account for our experimental observations.

  8. Synthesis, Optimization, and Performance Demonstration of Electrospun Carbon Nanofiber-Carbon Nanotube Composite Sorbents for Point-of-Use Water Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter, Katherine T; Vargo, John D; Rupasinghe, Thilini P; De Jesus, Aribet; Tivanski, Alexei V; Sander, Edward A; Myung, Nosang V; Cwiertny, David M

    2016-05-11

    We developed an electrospun carbon nanofiber-carbon nanotube (CNF-CNT) composite with optimal sorption capacity and material strength for point-of-use (POU) water treatment. Synthesis variables including integration of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and macroporosity (via sublimation of phthalic acid), relative humidity (20 and 40%), and stabilization temperature (250 and 280 °C) were used to control nanofiber diameter and surface area (from electron microscopy and BET isotherms, respectively), surface composition (from XPS), and strength (from AFM nanoindentation and tensile strength tests). Composites were then evaluated using kinetic, isotherm, and pH-edge sorption experiments with sulfamethoxazole (log Kow = 0.89) and atrazine (log Kow = 2.61), representative micropollutants chosen for their different polarities. Although CNFs alone were poor sorbents, integration of CNTs and macroporosity achieved uptake comparable to granular activated carbon. Through reactivity comparisons with CNT dispersions, we propose that increasing macroporosity exposes the embedded CNTs, thereby enabling their role as the primary sorbent in nanofiber composites. Because the highest capacity sorbents lacked sufficient strength, our optimal formulation (polyacrylonitrile 8 wt %, CNT 2 wt %, phthalic acid 2.4 wt %; 40% relative humidity; 280 °C stabilization) represents a compromise between strength and performance. This optimized sorbent was tested with a mixture of ten organic micropollutants at environmentally relevant concentrations in a gravity-fed, flow-through filtration system, where removal trends suggest that both hydrophobic and specific binding interactions contribute to micropollutant uptake. Collectively, this work highlights the promise of CNF-CNT filters (e.g., mechanical strength, ability to harness CNT sorption capacity), while also prioritizing areas for future research and development (e.g., improved removal of highly polar micropollutants, sensitivity to

  9. Yarn spun from carbon nanotube forests: Production, structure, properties and applications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Menghe Miao

    2013-01-01

    The discovery ofdrawable carbon nanotube forests opened up the possibility of constructing a wide range of pure carbon nanotube macrostructures and sparked interests in developing applications from these structures,especially pure carbon nanotube yarns.This review examines the various facets of the drawable carbon nanotube forests,synthesis and drawability,and their resulting yarns,structure,production,properties and applications.The structure,formation and properties of carbon nanotube yarns are compared with those of conventional textile yarns in order to obtain a better understanding of the science,structural mechanics and processing technology involved in carbon nanotube yarns.

  10. Carbon Nanotube Biosensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen-Mihaela eTilmaciu

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Nanomaterials possess unique features which make them particularly attractive for biosensing applications. In particular Carbon Nanotubes (CNTs can serve as scaffolds for immobilization of biomolecules at their surface, and combine several exceptional physical, chemical, electrical and optical characteristics properties which make them one of the best suited materials for the transduction of signals associated with the recognition of analytes, metabolites or disease biomarkers. Here we provide a comprehensive review on these carbon nanostructures, in which we will describe their structural and physical properties, discuss functionalization and cellular uptake, biocompatibility and toxicity issues. We further review historical developments in the field of biosensors, and describe the different types of biosensors which have been developed over time, with specific focus on CNT-conjugates engineered for biosensing applications, and in particular detection of cancer biomarkers.

  11. CCVD synthesis of carbon nanotubes from (Mg,Co,Mo)O catalysts: influence of the proportions of cobalt and molybdenum

    OpenAIRE

    Flahaut, Emmanuel; Peigney, Alain; Bacsa, Wolfgang; Bacsa, Revathi; Laurent, Christophe

    2004-01-01

    International audience Carbon nanotubes have been synthesised by catalytic chemical vapour deposition of a H2-CH4 mixture (18 mol% CH4) over (Mg,Co,Mo)O catalysts. The total amount of cobalt and molybdenum has been kept constant at 1 cat% and the proportion of molybdenum with respect to cobalt has been varied from x(Mo) = 0.25-1.0. This variation has important effects on both the yield and the nature (number of walls, straight walls or bamboo-like structures) of the carbon nanotubes. It al...

  12. Synthesis and characterization of SnO-carbon nanotube composite as anode material for lithium-ion batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SnO-carbon nanotube composite was synthesized by a sol-gel method. The electrochemical behavior of the composite using an anode active material in lithium-ion batteries was investigated. It was found that the composite showed enhanced anode performance compared with the unsupported SnO or carbon nanotube (CNT). The capacity fade of the composite electrode was reduced over unsupported SnO or CNT. We attribute the results to the conductivity and ductility of the CNT matrix, and the high dispersion of SnO

  13. Amorphous carbon contamination monitoring and process optimization for single-walled carbon nanotube integration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We detail the monitoring of amorphous carbon deposition during thermal chemical vapour deposition of carbon nanotubes and propose a contamination-less process to integrate high-quality single-walled carbon nanotubes into micro-electromechanical systems. The amorphous content is evaluated by confocal micro-Raman spectroscopy and by scanning/transmission electron microscopy. We show how properly chosen process parameters can lead to successful integration of single-walled nanotubes, enabling nano-electromechanical system synthesis

  14. Bond dissociation mechanism of ethanol during carbon nanotube synthesis via alcohol catalytic CVD technique: Ab initio molecular dynamics simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oguri, Tomoya; Shimamura, Kohei; Shibuta, Yasushi; Shimojo, Fuyuki; Yamaguchi, Shu

    2014-03-01

    Dissociation of ethanol on a nickel cluster is investigated by ab initio molecular dynamics simulation to reveal the bond dissociation mechanism of carbon source molecules during carbon nanotube synthesis. C-C bonds in only CHxCO fragments are dissociated on the nickel cluster, whereas there is no preferential structure among the fragments for C-O bond dissociation. The dissociation preference is uncorrelated with the bond dissociation energy of corresponding bonds in freestanding molecules but is correlated with the energy difference between fragment molecules before and after dissociation on the nickel surface. Moreover, carbon-chain formation occurs after C-C bond dissociation in a continuous simulation. What determines the chirality of CNTs? What happens at the dissociation stage of carbon source molecules? Regarding the former question, many researchers have pointed out the good epitaxial relationship between a graphite network and a close-packed facet (i.e., fcc(1 1 1) or hcp(0 0 0 1)) of transition metals [17-19]. Therefore, the correlation between the chirality of CNTs and the angle of the step edge on metal (or metal carbide) surfaces has been closely investigated [20-22]. In association with this geometric matching, the epitaxial growth of graphene on Cu(1 1 1) and Ni(1 1 1) surfaces has recently been achieved via CCVD technique [23-25], which is a promising technique for the synthesis of large-area and monolayer graphene.Regarding the latter question, it is empirically known that the yield and quality of CNT products strongly depend on the choice of carbon source molecules and additives. For example, it is well known that the use of ethanol as carbon source molecules yields a large amount of SWNTs without amorphous carbons (called the alcohol CCVD (ACCVD) technique) compared with the CCVD process using hydrocarbons [4]. Moreover, the addition of a small amount of water dramatically enhances the activity and lifetime of the catalytic metal (called the

  15. A new one-step synthesis method for coating multi-walled carbon nanotubes with iron oxide nanorods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song Haojie, E-mail: songhj@ujs.edu.cn; Qian Jing [Jiangsu University, School of Material Science and Engineering (China); Jia Xiaohua [Jiangsu University, School of the Environment (China); Yang Xiaofei; Tang Hua; Min Chunying [Jiangsu University, School of Material Science and Engineering (China)

    2012-01-15

    A facile solution-chemical method has been developed to be capable of covering a multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWNTs) with iron oxide nanorods without using any bridging species. MWNTs in this composite were decorated randomly by {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanorods with diameters in the range of 3-5 nm and lengths of 15-30 nm. The formation route to anchor {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanorods onto MWNTs was proposed as the intercalation and adsorption of iron ions onto the wall of MWNTs, followed by the nucleation and growth of {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanorods. {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}/MWNTs nanocomposites show specific high Brunauer-Emmett-Teller surface areas. The photocatalytic activity experiment indicated that the prepared {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}/MWNTs nanocomposites exhibited a higher photocatalytic activity for the photocatalytic decolorization of rhodamine B aqueous solution under the visible-light illumination than the single phase {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} samples. This methodology made the synthesis of MWNTs-nanorods composites possible and may be further extended to prepare more complicated nanocomposites based on MWNTs for technological applications.

  16. Synthesis of Fe3O4/Pt Nanoparticles Decorated Carbon Nanotubes and Their Use as Magnetically Recyclable Catalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongkun He

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a facile approach to prepare Fe3O4/Pt nanoparticles decorated carbon nanotubes (CNTs. The superparamagnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticles with average size of 4∼5 nm were loaded on the surfaces of carboxyl groups functionalized CNTs via a high-temperature solution-phase hydrolysis method from the raw material of FeCl3. The synthesis process of magnetic CNTs is green and readily scalable. The loading amounts of Fe3O4 nanopartilces and the magnetizations of the resulting magnetic CNTs show good tunability. The Pt nanopaticles with average size of 2.5 nm were deposited on the magnetic CNTs through a solution-based method. It is demonstrated that the Fe3O4/Pt nanoparticles decorated CNTs have high catalytic activity in the reduction reaction of 4-nitrophenol and can be readily recycled by a magnet and reused in the next reactions with high efficiencies for at least fifteen successive cycles. The novel CNTs-supported magnetically recyclable catalysts are promising in heterogeneous catalysis applications.

  17. Synthesis of few-walled carbon nanotube-Rh nanoparticles by arc discharge: Effect of selective oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Yanfeng, E-mail: zyfshu@gmail.com

    2012-06-15

    Highly crystalline rhodium (Rh) nanoparticles supported on carbon nanotubes were prepared by selective oxidation method. Carbon nanotubes and FeRh nanoparticles were simultaneously generated in hydrogen arc plasma. The as-grown nanomaterials can be purified by heat treatment in open air and by soaking in HCl. X-ray diffraction and selected area electron diffraction results reveal that as-grown FeRh nanoparticles have a typical chemical CsCl-type structure which can be transformed into a face-centered cubic structure by thermal annealing in the purification process. The purification process is selective toward the removal of the amorphous carbon coating the nanoparticles, and transforms Fe to Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}. Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} can be easily dissolved in hydrochloric acid, leaving carbon nanotubes-Rh nanoparticles. Rh nanoparticles with diameters of 2-60 nm are deposited uniformly on the surface of the carbon nanotube bundles. This simple and selective chemistry offers a new process for synthesizing and controlling Fe content in carbon nanotube-FeRh nanoparticles. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer High-crystallinity CNTs and FeRh nanoparticles were simultaneously generated in arc plasma. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The diameter distribution of CNTs depends on different gases. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Heat treatment in open air and soaking in HCl can convert CNTs-FeRh to CNTs-Rh. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The selective oxidation mechanisms of metal nanoparticles and carbon materials differ.

  18. Facile synthesis of poly(-phenylenediamine)/MWCNT nanocomposites and characterization for investigation of structural effects of carbon nanotubes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Quang Long Pham; Yuvaraj Haldorai; Van Hoa Nguyen; Dirk Tuma; Jae-Jin Shim

    2011-02-01

    Poly(-phenylenediamine) (PPD)/carboxylic acid-functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotubes (-MWCNTs) nanocomposites were prepared by chemical oxidative polymerization using potassium persulfate (K2S2O8) as an oxidant. Field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE–SEM) and field-emission transmission electron microscopy (FE–TEM) showed that a tubular layer of PPD was coated on the surface of carbon nanotubes with a thickness of 10–20 nm. FT–IR analysis provided an evidence for the formation of nanocomposites. The thermal stability of nanocomposites was improved by addition of -MWCNTs as confirmed by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). XRD spectra showed that the crystalline nature of PPD was not affected much by the addition of -MWCNTs. As the content of -MWCNTs was increased, the electrical conductivity of the nanocomposites increased due to the interaction between polymer and nanotubes that enhances electron delocalization.

  19. Synthesis, characterization of core-shell carbon-coated CaSnO3 nanotubes and their performance as anode of lithium ion battery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xiaoyan; Xiao, Ting; Huang, Wei; Tao, Wei; Heng, Bojun; Chen, Xinqi; Tang, Yiwen

    2012-06-01

    In this paper, we design a strategy to obtain core-shell carbon-coated CaSnO3 nanotubes (hereafter C-CTO NTs) directly via a facile subsequent solvothermal synthesis using CaSn(OH)6 nanotubes as precursor in a mixed ethanol and water solvent. The mixed solvent not only facilitates the phase transformation of CaSnO3 from CaSn(OH)6 to take place quickly, but also retains the tube-shaped morphology. The uniform decoration of C shell on the surface of CaSnO3 nanotubes (hereafter CTO NTs) was confirmed by EELS (electron energy loss spectroscopy). Moreover we found that the uniform carbon-coating layer on the surface of CTO NTs played roles of a good conductor and a structure buffer to alleviate the strains from the volume variation of CTO NTs cores. So the core-shell structure possesses both the electroactivity of C and the advantages of nanotube structure. When used as an anode for Li ion battery, it shows enhanced cycling performance in term of cycling stability over bare CTO NT electrode and CaSnO3 nanocube (hereafter CTO NC) electrode. To our best knowledge, this is the first attempt to use C-CTO NTs as an anode in Li ion battery.

  20. Synthesis and characterization of carbon nanotubes on clay minerals and its application to a hydrogen peroxide biosensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsu, H.-L. [Department of Chemical Engineering, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung 402, Taiwan (China); Jehng, J.-M. [Department of Chemical Engineering, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung 402, Taiwan (China)], E-mail: jmjehng@dragon.nchu.edu.tw

    2009-01-01

    In this study, we demonstrate the synthesis of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) on clay minerals, and the development of biosensors based on Nafion-CNT/Clay-Au and Nafion-CNT/Clay-Au-Glucose oxidase (GOD) composite films for the detection of hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) and glucose, respectively. The CNTs are synthesized on nickel cation exchanged clay mineral platelets. From field-emission scanning electron microscope images, X-ray diffraction, Fourier transfer infrared and thermogravimetric analysis results, the clay layers are exfoliated and delaminated after the growth of CNTs on them. The mixed hybrid film of Nafion, CNT/Clay, Au particles and GOD is coated on the glassy carbon (GC) electrode to detect H{sub 2}O{sub 2} or glucose. This film exhibits a detection limit of 5.0 x 10{sup -5} M for H{sub 2}O{sub 2} with a sensitivity of 280 nA mM{sup -1}. In addition, the amperometric response for glucose containing 2.0 mg mL{sup -1} GOD in the Nafion-CNT/Clay-Au-GOD modified GC electrode exhibits a sensitivity of 620 nA mM{sup -1} with a linear range up to 1850 {mu}M. A higher sensitivity and shorter response time are observed with increasing GOD content in the composite matrix film. Besides, the highest sensitivity of 2032 nA mM{sup -1} is obtained with the addition of the 10.0 mg mL{sup -1} GOD in the composite film. Consequently, the CNT/Clay/Nafion medium can probably be a useful electrode for the development of sensors due to its high sensitivity and applicability.

  1. Carbon Nanotube Electron Gun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Cattien V. (Inventor); Ribaya, Bryan P. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    An electron gun, an electron source for an electron gun, an extractor for an electron gun, and a respective method for producing the electron gun, the electron source and the extractor are disclosed. Embodiments provide an electron source utilizing a carbon nanotube (CNT) bonded to a substrate for increased stability, reliability, and durability. An extractor with an aperture in a conductive material is used to extract electrons from the electron source, where the aperture may substantially align with the CNT of the electron source when the extractor and electron source are mated to form the electron gun. The electron source and extractor may have alignment features for aligning the electron source and the extractor, thereby bringing the aperture and CNT into substantial alignment when assembled. The alignment features may provide and maintain this alignment during operation to improve the field emission characteristics and overall system stability of the electron gun.

  2. Carbon nanotube biconvex microcavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butt, Haider; Yetisen, Ali K.; Ahmed, Rajib; Yun, Seok Hyun; Dai, Qing

    2015-03-01

    Developing highly efficient microcavities with predictive narrow-band resonance frequencies using the least amount of material will allow the applications in nonlinear photonic devices. We have developed a microcavity array that comprised multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) organized in a biconvex pattern. The finite element model allowed designing microcavity arrays with predictive transmission properties and assessing the effects of the microarray geometry. The microcavity array demonstrated negative index and produced high Q factors. 2-3 μm tall MWCNTs were patterned as biconvex microcavities, which were separated by 10 μm in an array. The microcavity was iridescent and had optical control over the diffracted elliptical patterns with a far-field pattern, whose properties were predicted by the model. It is anticipated that the MWCNT biconvex microcavities will have implications for the development of highly efficient lenses, metamaterial antennas, and photonic circuits.

  3. Carbon nanotube optical mirrors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Peter C.; Rabin, Douglas

    2015-01-01

    We report the fabrication of imaging quality optical mirrors with smooth surfaces using carbon nanotubes (CNT) embedded in an epoxy matrix. CNT/epoxy is a multifunctional composite material that has sensing capabilities and can be made to incorporate self-actuation. Moreover, as the precursor is a low density liquid, large and lightweight mirrors can be fabricated by processes such as replication, spincasting, and three-dimensional printing. Therefore, the technology holds promise for the development of a new generation of lightweight, compact "smart" telescope mirrors with figure sensing and active or adaptive figure control. We report on measurements made of optical and mechanical characteristics, active optics experiments, and numerical modeling. We discuss possible paths for future development.

  4. Functionalization of Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khare, Bishun N. (Inventor); Meyyappan, Meyya (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    Method and system for functionalizing a collection of carbon nanotubes (CNTs). A selected precursor gas (e.g., H2 or F2 or CnHm) is irradiated to provide a cold plasma of selected target species particles, such as atomic H or F, in a first chamber. The target species particles are d irected toward an array of CNTs located in a second chamber while suppressing transport of ultraviolet radiation to the second chamber. A CNT array is functionalized with the target species particles, at or below room temperature, to a point of saturation, in an exposure time interval no longer than about 30 sec. *Discrimination against non-target species is provided by (i) use of a target species having a lifetime that is much greater than a lifetime of a non-target species and/or (2) use of an applied magnetic field to discriminate between charged particle trajectories for target species and for non-target species.

  5. Carbon nanotube biconvex microcavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butt, Haider, E-mail: h.butt@bham.ac.uk; Ahmed, Rajib [Nanotechnology Laboratory, School of Mechanical Engineering, University of Birmingham, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Yetisen, Ali K.; Yun, Seok Hyun [Harvard Medical School and Wellman Center for Photomedicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, 50 Blossom Street, Boston, Massachusetts 02114 (United States); Dai, Qing [National Center for Nanoscience and Technology, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2015-03-23

    Developing highly efficient microcavities with predictive narrow-band resonance frequencies using the least amount of material will allow the applications in nonlinear photonic devices. We have developed a microcavity array that comprised multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) organized in a biconvex pattern. The finite element model allowed designing microcavity arrays with predictive transmission properties and assessing the effects of the microarray geometry. The microcavity array demonstrated negative index and produced high Q factors. 2–3 μm tall MWCNTs were patterned as biconvex microcavities, which were separated by 10 μm in an array. The microcavity was iridescent and had optical control over the diffracted elliptical patterns with a far-field pattern, whose properties were predicted by the model. It is anticipated that the MWCNT biconvex microcavities will have implications for the development of highly efficient lenses, metamaterial antennas, and photonic circuits.

  6. Enhanced Carbon Nanotube Ultracapacitors Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed innovation utilizes carbon nanotubes (CNTs) coated with pseudo-capacitive MnO2 material as nano-composite electrode and ionic electrolyte for the...

  7. Molybdenum Disulfide Sheathed Carbon Nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu Chun SONG; Zhu De XU; Yi Fan ZHENG; Gui HAN; Bo LIU; Wei Xiang CHEN

    2004-01-01

    Single and double layered MoS2-coated multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNs) were successfully prepared by pyrolyzing (NH4)2MoS4-coated multiwalled carbon nanotubes in an H2 atmosphere at 900℃. MoS2-coated MWCNs would be expected to have different tribological and mechanical properties compared to MoS2, so it may have potential applications in many fields.

  8. Carbon nanotubes for coherent spintronics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Kuemmeth

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanotubes bridge the molecular and crystalline quantum worlds, and their extraordinary electronic, mechanical and optical properties have attracted enormous attention from a broad scientific community. We review the basic principles of fabricating spin-electronic devices based on individual, electrically-gated carbon nanotubes, and present experimental efforts to understand their electronic and nuclear spin degrees of freedom, which in the future may enable quantum applications.

  9. Selective functionalization of carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strano, Michael S. (Inventor); Usrey, Monica (Inventor); Barone, Paul (Inventor); Dyke, Christopher A. (Inventor); Tour, James M. (Inventor); Kittrell, W. Carter (Inventor); Hauge, Robert H. (Inventor); Smalley, Richard E. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    The present invention is directed toward methods of selectively functionalizing carbon nanotubes of a specific type or range of types, based on their electronic properties, using diazonium chemistry. The present invention is also directed toward methods of separating carbon nanotubes into populations of specific types or range(s) of types via selective functionalization and electrophoresis, and also to the novel compositions generated by such separations.

  10. Carbon nanotubes for coherent spintronics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuemmeth, Ferdinand; Churchill, H O H; Herring, P K;

    2010-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes bridge the molecular and crystalline quantum worlds, and their extraordinary electronic, mechanical and optical properties have attracted enormous attention from a broad scientific community. We review the basic principles of fabricating spin-electronic devices based on individual......, electrically-gated carbon nanotubes, and present experimental efforts to understand their electronic and nuclear spin degrees of freedom, which in the future may enable quantum applications....

  11. Synthesis and characterization of carbon modified TiO{sub 2} nanotube and photocatalytic activity on methylene blue under sunlight

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yinchang [Faculty of Material Science and Chemistry, China University of Geoscience, Wuhan 430074 (China); Wang, Yongqian, E-mail: cugwyq@126.com [Faculty of Material Science and Chemistry, China University of Geoscience, Wuhan 430074 (China); Zhejiang Research Institute, China University of Geosciences, Hanzhou 311305 (China); Kong, Junhan; Jia, Hanxiang; Wang, Zhengshu [Faculty of Material Science and Chemistry, China University of Geoscience, Wuhan 430074 (China)

    2015-07-30

    Graphical abstract: Tentative photo-degradation mechanism diagram of the MB on the surface of carbon modified TNT. When the TiO{sub 2} was under ultraviolet light irradiation, the electrons were excited and transferred from the valence band (VB) to the conduction band (CB), leaving the holes on VB. The electrons were trapped by O{sub 2} and formed superoxide anion (O{sub 2}{sup −}). H{sub 2}O around the TiO{sub 2} was oxidized by the holes leaved on VB to hydroxyl radicals (OH·). When the TiO{sub 2} was modified by carbon, the same is that the electrons of C{sup 4+} would be excited from ground state to 2P orbital under visible light irradiation. The electrons and holes can also lead to the generation of the O{sub 2}{sup −} and OH·. The oxidability of O{sub 2}{sup −} and OH· created around the carbon modified TNT is strong, and could oxidize the MB to CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O. - Highlights: • The TNT was successfully modified by carbon, its amount is about 4.95%. • The carbon modified TNT has a great enhancement of visible light absorption. • The photocatalytic ability of carbon modified TNT is higher than pristine TNT. • A tentative photo-degradation mechanism of carbon modified TNT is proposed. - Abstract: Carbon modified TiO{sub 2} nanotube was successfully synthesized via anodic oxidation method and its photocatalytic activity was evaluated by photodegrading methylene blue. The full width at half maximum of carbon modified TiO{sub 2} nanotube is smaller than that of pristine TiO{sub 2} nanotube, indicating the fact that carbon modifying leads to the increase of TiO{sub 2} crystallinity. TiO{sub 2} nanotube modified by carbon has a great enhancement on visible light absorption while contrasting with the pristine TiO{sub 2} nanotube. A tentative mechanism for the enhancement of sunlight absorption is proposed.

  12. Carbon nanotube computer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shulaker, Max M; Hills, Gage; Patil, Nishant; Wei, Hai; Chen, Hong-Yu; Wong, H-S Philip; Mitra, Subhasish

    2013-09-26

    The miniaturization of electronic devices has been the principal driving force behind the semiconductor industry, and has brought about major improvements in computational power and energy efficiency. Although advances with silicon-based electronics continue to be made, alternative technologies are being explored. Digital circuits based on transistors fabricated from carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have the potential to outperform silicon by improving the energy-delay product, a metric of energy efficiency, by more than an order of magnitude. Hence, CNTs are an exciting complement to existing semiconductor technologies. Owing to substantial fundamental imperfections inherent in CNTs, however, only very basic circuit blocks have been demonstrated. Here we show how these imperfections can be overcome, and demonstrate the first computer built entirely using CNT-based transistors. The CNT computer runs an operating system that is capable of multitasking: as a demonstration, we perform counting and integer-sorting simultaneously. In addition, we implement 20 different instructions from the commercial MIPS instruction set to demonstrate the generality of our CNT computer. This experimental demonstration is the most complex carbon-based electronic system yet realized. It is a considerable advance because CNTs are prominent among a variety of emerging technologies that are being considered for the next generation of highly energy-efficient electronic systems.

  13. Carbon Nanotube Purification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delzeit, Lance D. (Inventor); Delzeit, Clement J. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    A method for cleaning or otherwise removing amorphous carbon and other residues that arise in growth of a carbon nanotube (CNT) array. The CNT array is exposed to a plurality of hydroxyls or hydrogen, produced from a selected vapor or liquid source such as H2O or H2O2. and the hydroxyls or hydrogen (neutral or electrically charged) react with the residues to produce partly or fully dissolved or hydrogenated or hydroxylizated products that can be removed or separated from the CNT array. The hydroxyls or hydrogen can be produced by heating the CNT array, residue and selected vapor or liquid source or by application of an electromagnetic excitation signal with a selected frequency or range of frequencies to dissociate the selected vapor or liquid. The excitation frequency can be chirped to cover a selected range of frequencies corresponding to dissociation of the selected vapor or liquid. Sonication may be uscd to supplement dissociation of the H2O and/or H2O2.

  14. Selective synthesis of large diameter, highly conductive and high density single-walled carbon nanotubes by a thiophene-assisted chemical vapor deposition method on transparent substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jinghua; Otsuka, Keigo; Zhang, Xiao; Maruyama, Shigeo; Liu, Jie

    2016-07-01

    Selective synthesis of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) with controlled properties is an important research topic for SWNT studies. Here we report a thiophene-assisted chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method to directly grow highly conductive SWNT thin films on substrates, including transparent ones. By adding low concentration thiophene into the carbon feedstock (ethanol), the as-prepared carbon nanotubes demonstrate an obvious up-shift in the diameter distribution while the single-walled structure is still retained. In the proposed mechanism, the change in the diameter is sourced from the increase in the carbon yield induced by the sulfur-containing compound. Such SWNTs are found to possess high conductivity with 95% SWNTs demonstrating on/off ratios lower than 100 in transistors. More importantly, it is further demonstrated that this method can be used to directly synthesize dense SWNT networks on transparent substrates which can be utilized as transparent conductive films (TCFs) with very high transparency. Such TCFs can be applied to fabricate a light modulating window as a proof-of-concept. The present work provides important insights into the growth mechanism of SWNTs and great potential for the preparation of TCFs with high scalability, easy operation and low cost.Selective synthesis of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) with controlled properties is an important research topic for SWNT studies. Here we report a thiophene-assisted chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method to directly grow highly conductive SWNT thin films on substrates, including transparent ones. By adding low concentration thiophene into the carbon feedstock (ethanol), the as-prepared carbon nanotubes demonstrate an obvious up-shift in the diameter distribution while the single-walled structure is still retained. In the proposed mechanism, the change in the diameter is sourced from the increase in the carbon yield induced by the sulfur-containing compound. Such SWNTs are found to

  15. Ruthenium-bipyridine complexes bearing fullerene or carbon nanotubes: synthesis and impact of different carbon-based ligands on the resulting products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhen-yi; Huang, Rong-bin; Xie, Su-yuan; Zheng, Lan-sun

    2011-09-01

    This paper discusses the synthesis of two carbon-based pyridine ligands of fullerene pyrrolidine pyridine (C(60)-py) and multi-walled carbon nanotube pyrrolidine pyridine (MWCNT-py) via 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition. The two complexes, C(60)-Ru and MWCNT-Ru, were synthesized by ligand substitution in the presence of NH(4)PF(6), and Ru(II)(bpy)(2)Cl(2) was used as a reaction precursor. Both complexes were characterized by mass spectroscopy (MS), elemental analysis, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, infrared spectroscopy (IR), ultraviolet/visible spectroscopy (UV-VIS) spectrometry, Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and cyclic voltammetry (CV). The results showed that the substitution way of C(60)-py is different from that of MWCNT-py. The C(60)-py and a NH(3) replaced a Cl(-) and a bipyridine in Ru(II)(bpy)(2)Cl(2) to produce a five-coordinate complex of [Ru(bpy)(NH(3))(C(60)-py)Cl]PF(6), whereas MWCNT-py replaced a Cl(-) to generate a six-coordinate complex of [Ru(bpy)(2)(MWCNT-py)Cl]PF(6). The cyclic voltammetry study showed that the electron-withdrawing ability was different for C(60) and MWCNT. The C(60) showed a relatively stronger electron-withdrawing effect with respect to MWCNT. PMID:21769337

  16. Multi-walled carbon nanotubes as catalyst promoter for dimethyl ether synthesis from CO{sub 2} hydrogenation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zha, Fei, E-mail: zhafei@nwnu.edu.cn [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Northwest Normal University, Lanzhou 730070 (China); Tian, Haifeng; Yan, Jun [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Northwest Normal University, Lanzhou 730070 (China); Chang, Yue [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Northwest Normal University, Lanzhou 730070 (China); Key Laboratory of Polymer Material of Gansu Province, Lanzhou 730070 (China)

    2013-11-15

    The mixed acid of H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}/HNO{sub 3}-pretreated multi-walled carbon nanotubes was employed as supports and ultrasound-assisted co-precipitation method was designed to prepare multi-walled carbon nanotubes supported CuO–ZnO–Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/HZSM-5 catalyst. The catalyst was characterized by means of X-ray diffraction spectrum (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), thermal analysis (TG) and Brunauer–Emmett–Teller (BET). The catalyst activity for the preparation of dimethyl ether from hydrogenation of CO{sub 2} was investigated in a fixed-bed reactor, which showed that multi-walled carbon nanotubes could promote the catalyst activity of CuO–ZnO–Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/HZSM-5. Under the reaction conditions of temperature at 262 °C, pressure at 3.0 MPa, H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} = 3 (volume ratio) and space velocity (SV) = 1800 mL g{sub cat}{sup −1} h{sup −1}, the conversion per pass of carbon dioxide was 46.2%, with the dimethyl ether yield and selectivity of 20.9% and 45.2%.

  17. Graphene nanoribbons production from flat carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melo, W. S.; Guerini, S.; Diniz, E. M., E-mail: eduardo.diniz@ufma.br [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal do Maranhão, São Luís - MA 65080-805 (Brazil)

    2015-11-14

    Graphene nanoribbons are of great interest for pure and applied sciences due to their unique properties which depend on the nanoribbon edges, as, for example, energy gap and antiferromagnetic coupling. Nevertheless, the synthesis of nanoribbons with well-defined edges remains a challenge. To collaborate with this subject, here we propose a new route for the production of graphene nanoribbons from flat carbon nanotubes filled with a one-dimensional chain of Fe atoms by first principles calculations based on density functional theory. Our results show that Fe-filled flat carbon nanotubes are energetically more stable than non flattened geometries. Also we find that by hydrogenation or oxygenation of the most curved region of the Fe-filled flat armchair carbon nanotube, it occurred a spontaneous production of zigzag graphene nanoribbons which have metallic or semiconducting behavior depending on the edge and size of the graphene nanoribbon. Such findings can be used to create a new method of synthesis of regular-edge carbon nanoribbons.

  18. Graphene nanoribbons production from flat carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphene nanoribbons are of great interest for pure and applied sciences due to their unique properties which depend on the nanoribbon edges, as, for example, energy gap and antiferromagnetic coupling. Nevertheless, the synthesis of nanoribbons with well-defined edges remains a challenge. To collaborate with this subject, here we propose a new route for the production of graphene nanoribbons from flat carbon nanotubes filled with a one-dimensional chain of Fe atoms by first principles calculations based on density functional theory. Our results show that Fe-filled flat carbon nanotubes are energetically more stable than non flattened geometries. Also we find that by hydrogenation or oxygenation of the most curved region of the Fe-filled flat armchair carbon nanotube, it occurred a spontaneous production of zigzag graphene nanoribbons which have metallic or semiconducting behavior depending on the edge and size of the graphene nanoribbon. Such findings can be used to create a new method of synthesis of regular-edge carbon nanoribbons

  19. Small Diameter Few- Walled Carbon Nanotubes: An Alternative for Single Walled nanotubes in Bulk Applications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jie Liu

    2005-01-01

    @@ 1Introduction Although Single walled carbon nanotubes have shown tremendous potential in many applications due to their unique electrical and mechanical properties, the lack of a large scale synthesis method at low cost is still the main limiting factor for the realization of the full potential of this unique materials. On the other hand, multiwalled carbon nanotubes are being made in tons per year quantity and found their application in conducting plastic and other bulk applications.

  20. Carbon nanotube-polymer composites manufacture, properties, and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Grady, Brian P

    2011-01-01

    The accessible compendium of polymers in carbon nanotubes (CNTs) Carbon nanotubes (CNTs)-extremely thin tubes only a few nanometers in diameter but able to attain lengths thousands of times greater-are prime candidates for use in the development of polymer composite materials. Bringing together thousands of disparate research works, Carbon Nanotube-Polymer Composites: Manufacture, Properties, and Applications covers CNT-polymers from synthesis to potential applications, presenting the basic science and engineering of this dynamic and complex area in an accessible, readable way. Desi

  1. Carbon nanotube materials from hydrogen storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dillon, A.C.; Bekkedahl, T.A.; Cahill, A.F. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO (United States)

    1995-09-01

    The lack of convenient and cost-effective hydrogen storage is a major impediment to wide scale use of hydrogen in the United States energy economy. Improvements in the energy densities of hydrogen storage systems, reductions in cost, and increased compatibility with available and forecasted systems are required before viable hydrogen energy use pathways can be established. Carbon-based hydrogen adsorption materials hold particular promise for meeting and exceeding the U.S. Department of Energy hydrogen storage energy density targets for transportation if concurrent increases in hydrogen storage capacity and carbon density can be achieved. These two goals are normally in conflict for conventional porous materials, but may be reconciled by the design and synthesis of new adsorbent materials with tailored pore size distributions and minimal macroporosity. Carbon nanotubes offer the possibility to explore new designs for adsorbents because they can be fabricated with small size distributions, and naturally tend to self-assemble by van der Waals forces. This year we report heats of adsorption for hydrogen on nanotube materials that are 2 and 3 times greater than for hydrogen on activated carbon. The hydrogen which is most strongly bound to these materials remains on the carbon surface to temperatures greater than 285 K. These results suggest that nanocapillary forces are active in stabilizing hydrogen on the surfaces of carbon nanotubes, and that optimization of the adsorbent will lead to effective storage at higher temperatures. In this paper we will also report on our activities which are targeted at understanding and optimizing the nucleation and growth of single wall nanotubes. These experiments were made possible by the development of a unique feedback control circuit which stabilized the plasma-arc during a synthesis run.

  2. Synthesis of Multishell Carbon Nanotube Composites via Template Method%模板法合成多壁碳纳米管复合材料

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李文博; 翟东媛; 潘力佳; 濮林; 许建斌; 施毅

    2011-01-01

    Multishell nanotubes of polyaniline and carbon were synthesized via a template approach. A thin layer of MnO2 coated on carbon nanotubes, acts as a reactive template for the consequent formation of the polyaniline coating. The polyaniline-carbon nanotubes show enhanced dispersibility in water and can be possibly used as a functional material of electrochemical capacitors with improved performance. The general method operates by coating carbon nanotubes on functional materials such as poly (3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene), polypyrrole, silica, and carbon.

  3. Carbon nanotubes: controlled growth and application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang Liu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Notable progress has been made on the synthesis, properties and uses of carbon nanotubes (CNTs in the past two decades. However, the controlled growth of single-wall CNTs (SWCNTs with predefined and uniform structures remains a big challenge, and making full use of CNTs in applications still requires great effort. In this article, our strategies and recent progress on the controlled synthesis of SWCNTs by chemical vapor deposition are reviewed, and the applications of CNTs in lithium-ion batteries, transparent conductive films, and as connectors of metal atomic chains are discussed. Finally, future prospects for CNTs are considered.

  4. Probing Photosensitization by Functionalized Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) photosensitize the production of reactive oxygen species that can damage organisms by biomembrane oxidation or mediate CNTs' environmental transformations. The photosensitized nature of derivatized carbon nanotubes from various synthetic methods, and thus ...

  5. On the stability of carbon nanotube and titania nanowire based catalyst materials:from synthesis to applications

    OpenAIRE

    Rautio, A.-R. (Anne-Riikka)

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Degradation of the support and sintering of catalyst nanoparticles inherently leads to a loss of functionality of catalyst materials in converters and sensors. Malfunction in such devices may lead to serious economic and environmental damage. The quest for novel and sustainable catalyst materials with better durability is thus ongoing. In this thesis, one-dimensional nanomaterials such as carbon nanotubes and titanium dioxide nanowires are studied and compared to their convention...

  6. Synthesis and Physicochemical Behaviour of Polyurethane-Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes Nanocomposites Based on Renewable Castor Oil Polyols

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Polyurethanes (PUs) are high performance materials, with vast industrial and engineering applications. In this research, effects of Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes (MWCNTs) on physicochemical properties of Castor Oil based Polyurethanes (COPUs) were studied. MWCNTs were added in different weight percentages (0% to 1% wt) in a castor oil based polyurethane (COPUs-MWCNTs) nanocomposites. The composition, structure, and morphology of polyurethanes were characterized by Fourier transform infrared sp...

  7. One-pot synthesis of molecular bottle-brush functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes with superior dispersibility in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Yong; Hu, Qin; Yuan, Qiulin; Wu, Yan; Ling, Ying; Tang, Haoyu

    2014-01-01

    Molecular bottle-brush functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) with superior dispersibility in water are prepared by a one-pot synthetic methodology. Elongating the main-chain and side-chain length of molecular bottle-brushes can further increase SWCNT dispersibility. They show significant enhancement of SWCNT dispersibility up to four times higher than those of linear molecular functionalized SWCNTs. PMID:24307218

  8. Kondo physics in carbon nanotubes

    OpenAIRE

    Nygard, Jesper; Cobden, David Henry; Lindelof, Poul Erik

    2000-01-01

    The connection of electrical leads to wire-like molecules is a logical step in the development of molecular electronics, but also allows studies of fundamental physics. For example, metallic carbon nanotubes are quantum wires that have been found to act as one-dimensional quantum dots, Luttinger-liquids, proximity-induced superconductors and ballistic and diffusive one-dimensional metals. Here we report that electrically-contacted single-wall nanotubes can serve as powerful probes of Kondo ph...

  9. Cytotoxicity of carbon nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    With large-scale production and application at large scale, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) may cause ad-verse response to the environment and human health. Thus, study on bio-effects and safety of CNTs has attracted great attention from scientists and governments worldwide. This report briefly summa-rizes the main results from the in vitro toxicity study of CNTs. The emphasis is placed on the descrip-tion of a variety of factors affecting CNTs cytotoxicity, including species of CNTs, impurities contained, lengths of CNTs, aspect ratios, chemical modification, and assaying methods of cytotoxicity. However, experimental information obtained thus far on CNTs’ cytotoxicity is lacking in comparability, and some-times there is controversy about it. In order to assess more accurately the potential risks of CNTs to human health, we suggest that care should be taken for issues such as chemical modification and quantitative characterization of CNTs in cytotoxicity assessment. More importantly, studies on physical and chemical mechanisms of CNTs’ cytotoxicity should be strengthened; assaying methods and evaluating criteria characterized by nanotoxicology should be gradually established.

  10. Cytotoxicity of carbon nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Ying; LI WenXin

    2008-01-01

    With large-scale production and application at large scale, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) may cause ad-verse response to the environment and human health. Thus, study on bio-effects and safety of CNTs has attracted great attention from scientists and governments worldwide. This report briefly summa-rizes the main results from the in vitro toxicity study of CNTs. The emphasis is placed on the descrip-tion of a variety of factors affecting CNTs cytotoxicity, including species of CNTs, impurities contained,lengths of CNTs, aspect ratios, chemical modification, and assaying methods of cytotoxicity. However,experimental information obtained thus far on CNTs' cytotoxicity is lacking in comparability, and some-times there is controversy about it. In order to assess more accurately the potential risks of CNTs to human health, we suggest that care should be taken for issues such as chemical modification and quantitative characterization of CNTa in cytotoxicity assessment. More importantly, studies on physical and chemical mechanisms of CNTs' cytotoxicity should be strengthened; assaying methods and evaluating criteria characterized by nanotoxicology should be gradually established.

  11. Synthesis and application of highly active dithiooxamide fictionalised multi-walled carbon nanotubes toward mercury removal from aqueous solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highly sensitive and accurate method has been applied for removal of toxic mercury(II) ions in aqueous solution, using synthesized nanosorbent. Determination of mercury(II) was carried out by flame atomic absorption spectrometer. A nanosorbent MWCNT was synthesized by the reaction of dithiooxamide with functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes. Initially, the surface of the multi-walled carbon nanotubes was oxidized by a mixture of nitric and sulfuric acids and then was functionalized using thionyl chloride. The ligand has been attached to the multi-walled carbon nanotubes in a somewhat shorter time and lower temperature than previous reported methods. The sorbent was characterized by Fourier transmission infrared and scanning electron microscopy. In this research, the effect of different parameters in removal of mercury(II) ions by nanosorbent, such as, pH, amount of nanosorbent, time and concentration of Hg(II), was investigated. Experiments show that the new MWCNT with loading amount of 1.02 mmol g-1 is a powerful sorbent for removing the Hg(II) ions from water. (author)

  12. Modified Sol-Gel Synthesis of Carbon Nanotubes Supported Titania Composites with Enhanced Visible Light Induced Photocatalytic Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quanjie Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWCNT enhanced MWCNT/TiO2 nanocomposites were synthesized by surface coating of carbon nanotube with mixed phase of anatase and rutile TiO2 through a modified sol-gel approach using tetrabutyl titanate as raw material. The morphological structures and physicochemical properties of the nanocomposites were characterized by FT-IR, XRD, DTA-TG, TEM, and UV-Vis spectra. The results show that TiO2 nanoparticles with size of around 15 nm are closely attached on the sidewall of MWCNT. The nanocomposites possess good absorption properties not only in the ultraviolet but also in the visible light region. Under irradiation of ultraviolet lamp, the prepared composites have the highest photodegradation efficiency of 83% within 4 hours towards the degradation of Methyl Orange (MO aqueous solution. The results indicate that the carbon nanotubes supported TiO2 nanocomposites exhibit high photocatalytic activity and stability, showing great potentials in the treatment of wastewater.

  13. Hybrid Composite of Polyaniline Containing Carbon Nanotube

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Carbon nanotube-polyaniline hybrid material was synthesized by emulsion polymerization in-situ. The morphology of hybrid material was studied by TEM and X-ray diffraction. The conductivity of nanocomposite increases with the increasing of carbon nanotube content because of the new conductivity passageways formed by carbon nanotubes.

  14. Dispersions of Carbon nanotubes in Polymer Matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wise, Kristopher Eric (Inventor); Park, Cheol (Inventor); Siochi, Emilie J. (Inventor); Harrison, Joycelyn S. (Inventor); Lillehei, Peter T. (Inventor); Lowther, Sharon E. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    Dispersions of carbon nanotubes exhibiting long term stability are based on a polymer matrix having moieties therein which are capable of a donor-acceptor complexation with carbon nanotubes. The carbon nanotubes are introduced into the polymer matrix and separated therein by standard means. Nanocomposites produced from these dispersions are useful in the fabrication of structures, e.g., lightweight aerospace structures.

  15. Gaseous product mixture from Fischer-Tropsch synthesis as an efficient carbon feedstock for low temperature CVD growth of carbon nanotube carpets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almkhelfe, Haider; Carpena-Núñez, Jennifer; Back, Tyson C; Amama, Placidus B

    2016-07-21

    Low-temperature chemical vapor deposition (CVD) growth of carbon nanotube (CNT) carpets from Fe and Fe-Cu catalysts using a gaseous product mixture from Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS-GP) as a superior carbon feedstock is demonstrated. This growth approach addresses a persistent issue of obtaining thick CNT carpets on temperature-sensitive substrates at low temperatures using a non-plasma CVD approach without catalyst pretreatment and/or preheating of the carbon feedstock. The efficiency of the process is evidenced by the highly dense, vertically aligned CNT structures from both Fe and Fe-Cu catalysts even at temperatures as low as 400 °C - a record low growth temperature for CNT carpets obtained via conventional thermal CVD. The grown CNTs exhibit a straight morphology with hollow interior and parallel graphitic planes along the tube walls. The apparent activation energies for CNT carpet growth on Fe and Fe-Cu catalysts are 0.71 and 0.54 eV, respectively. The synergistic effect of Fe and Cu show a strong dependence on the growth temperature, with Cu being more influential at temperatures higher than 450 °C. The low activation energies and long catalyst lifetimes observed are rationalized based on the unique composition of FTS-GP and Gibbs free energies for the decomposition reactions of the hydrocarbon components. The use of FTS-GP facilitates low-temperature growth of CNT carpets on traditional (alumina film) and nontraditional substrates (aluminum foil) and has the potential of enhancing CNT quality, catalyst lifetime, and scalability. PMID:27353432

  16. Synthesis and characterization of boron nitrides nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents a new synthesis for the production of boron nitride nanotubes (BNNT) from boron powder, ammonium nitrate and hematite tube furnace CVD method. The samples were subjected to some characterization techniques as infrared spectroscopy, thermal analysis, X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy and transmission. By analyzing the results can explain the chemical reactions involved in the process and confirm the formation of BNNT with several layers and about 30 nanometers in diameter. Due to excellent mechanical properties and its chemical and thermal stability this material is promising for various applications. However, BNNT has received much less attention than carbon nanotubes, it is because of great difficulty to synthesize appreciable quantities from the techniques currently known, and this is one of the main reasons this work.(author)

  17. Adsorption on the carbon nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DING Yi; YANG Xiao-bao; NI Jun

    2006-01-01

    Adsorption on single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) is a subject of growing experimental and theoretical interest.The possible adsorbed patterns of atoms and molecules on the single-walled carbon nanotubes vary with the diameters and chirality of the tubes due to the confinement.The curvature of the carbon nanotube surface enlarges the distance of the adsorbate atoms and thus enhances the stability of high coverage structures of adsorbate.There exist two novel high-coverage stable structures of potassium adsorbed on SWCNTs,which are not stable on graphite.The electronic properties of SWCNTs can be modified by adsorbate atoms and metal-semiconductor and semiconductor-semi-conductor transitions can be achieved by the doping of alkali atoms.

  18. Synthesis, characterization, and stability of Fe-MCM-41 for production of carbon nanotubes by acetylene pyrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amama, Placidus B; Lim, Sangyun; Ciuparu, Dragos; Yang, Yanhui; Pfefferle, Lisa; Haller, Gary L

    2005-02-24

    Fe-substituted MCM-41 molecular sieves with ca. 1, 2, and 3 wt % Fe were synthesized hydrothermally using different sources of colloidal silica (HiSil and Cab-O-Sil) and characterized by ICP, XRD, N2 physisorption, UV-vis, EPR, TPR, and X-ray absorption. Catalysts synthesized from Cab-O-Sil showed higher structural order and stability than those from HiSil. The local environment of Fe in the mesoporous material as studied by UV-vis reveals the dominance of framework Fe in all the as-synthesized Fe-MCM-41 samples. Dislodgement of some Fe species to extraframework location occurs upon calcination, and this effect is more severe for Fe-MCM-41 (2 wt %) and Fe-MCM-41 (3 wt %), as confirmed by EPR and X-ray absorption. These materials have been used as catalytic templates for the production of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) by acetylene pyrolysis at atmospheric pressure. A relationship between the Fe loading in MCM-41 and the carbon species produced during this reaction has been established. Using our optimized conditions for this system, Fe-MCM-41 with ca. 2 wt % Fe showed the best results with particularly high selectivity for single-wall carbon nanotube (SWNT) production. This catalyst was selective for carbon nanotubes with a low amount of amorphous carbon for a narrow range of temperatures from 1073 to 1123 K. To account for the different selectivity of these catalysts for CNTs production, the local environment and chemical state of Fe in the used catalyst was further probed by X-band EPR. PMID:16851270

  19. Carbon nanotube-polymer composite actuators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gennett, Thomas; Raffaelle, Ryne P.; Landi, Brian J.; Heben, Michael J.

    2008-04-22

    The present invention discloses a carbon nanotube (SWNT)-polymer composite actuator and method to make such actuator. A series of uniform composites was prepared by dispersing purified single wall nanotubes with varying weight percents into a polymer matrix, followed by solution casting. The resulting nanotube-polymer composite was then successfully used to form a nanotube polymer actuator.

  20. CVD synthesis of carbon nanotubes using a finely dispersed cobalt catalyst and their use in double layer electrochemical capacitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon nanotubes (CNT) were obtained by chemical vapour deposition (CVD), decomposing turpentine oil over finely dispersed Co metal as a catalyst at 675 deg. C. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM) images reveal that the nanotubes are densely packed and of 10-50 nm in diameter. The XRD pattern of purified CNT shows that they are graphitic in nature. Resistivity measurements of these CNT indicate that they are highly conducting. Hall measurements of CNT reveal that electrons are the majority carriers with a carrier concentration of 1.35x1020 cm-3. Cyclic voltammetry (CV) and constant current charging/discharging was used to characterise the behaviour of electrochemical double layer capacitors of purified CNT with H2SO4. For CNT/2 M H2SO4/CNT, a capacitance of 12 F g-1 (based on the weight of the active material) was obtained

  1. Quantum transport in carbon nanotubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laird, Edward A.; Kuemmeth, Ferdinand; Steele, Gary A.;

    2015-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes are a versatile material in which many aspects of condensed matter physics come together. Recent discoveries, enabled by sophisticated fabrication, have uncovered new phenomena that completely change our understanding of transport in these devices, especially the role of the spin...... and valley degrees of freedom. This review describes the modern understanding of transport through nanotube devices. Unlike conventional semiconductors, electrons in nanotubes have two angular momentum quantum numbers, arising from spin and from valley freedom. We focus on the interplay between the two....... In single quantum dots defined in short lengths of nanotube, the energy levels associated with each degree of freedom, and the spin-orbit coupling between them, are revealed by Coulomb blockade spectroscopy. In double quantum dots, the combination of quantum numbers modifies the selection rules of Pauli...

  2. CMOS Integrated Carbon Nanotube Sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been gaining their importance as sensors for gases, temperature and chemicals. Advances in fabrication processes simplify the formation of CNT sensor on silicon substrate. We have integrated single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) with complementary metal oxide semiconductor process (CMOS) to produce a chip sensor system. The sensor prototype was designed and fabricated using a 0.30 um CMOS process. The main advantage is that the device has a voltage amplifier so the electrical measure can be taken and amplified inside the sensor. When the conductance of the SWCNTs varies in response to media changes, this is observed as a variation in the output tension accordingly.

  3. Carbon nanotube materials for hydrogen storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dillon, A.C.; Parilla, P.A.; Jones, K.M.; Riker, G.; Heben, M.J. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)

    1998-08-01

    Carbon single-wall nanotubes (SWNTs) are essentially elongated pores of molecular dimensions and are capable of adsorbing hydrogen at relatively high temperatures and low pressures. This behavior is unique to these materials and indicates that SWNTs are the ideal building block for constructing safe, efficient, and high energy density adsorbents for hydrogen storage applications. In past work the authors developed methods for preparing and opening SWNTs, discovered the unique adsorption properties of these new materials, confirmed that hydrogen is stabilized by physical rather than chemical interactions, measured the strength of interaction to be {approximately} 5 times higher than for adsorption on planar graphite, and performed infrared absorption spectroscopy to determine the chemical nature of the surface terminations before, during, and after oxidation. This year the authors have made significant advances in synthesis and characterization of SWNT materials so that they can now prepare gram quantities of high-purity SWNT samples and measure and control the diameter distribution of the tubes by varying key parameters during synthesis. They have also developed methods which purify nanotubes and cut nanotubes into shorter segments. These capabilities provide a means for opening the tubes which were unreactive to the oxidation methods that successfully opened tubes, and offer a path towards organizing nanotube segments to enable high volumetric hydrogen storage densities. They also performed temperature programmed desorption spectroscopy on high purity carbon nanotube material obtained from collaborator Prof. Patrick Bernier and finished construction of a high precision Seivert`s apparatus which will allow the hydrogen pressure-temperature-composition phase diagrams to be evaluated for SWNT materials.

  4. Modified carbon nanotubes and methods of forming carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heintz, Amy M.; Risser, Steven; Elhard, Joel D.; Moore, Bryon P.; Liu, Tao; Vijayendran, Bhima R.

    2016-06-14

    In this invention, processes which can be used to achieve stable doped carbon nanotubes are disclosed. Preferred CNT structures and morphologies for achieving maximum doping effects are also described. Dopant formulations and methods for achieving doping of a broad distribution of tube types are also described.

  5. Synthesis of coaxial nanotubes of MoS2 and carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The di chalcogenides WS2 and MoS2 by their tubular properties were combined. It was synthesized coaxial structures of MoS2 with C with the purpose to studying the possible structural changes of the MoS2 nano tubes at was submitted to a propylene gas flux as carbon precursor in a thermal treatment. Studies of structural characterization by Transmission Electron Microscopy (Tem) were realized. The theoretical simulation of the structure was realized using an algorithm type multilayer. The possibility of the nano tubes are applied to gas storage as can be the hydrogen arouse interest by the energy production. (Author)

  6. Catalytic synthesis of nitrogen-doped multi-walled carbon nanotubes using layered double hydroxides as catalyst precursors

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Yong Cao; Yun Zhao; Qingxia Li; Qingze Jiao

    2009-03-01

    The nitrogen (N)-doped carbon (CN) nanotubes were synthesized by pyrolysis of ethylenediamine with Ni1.07Mg1.01AlO3.58, Ni1.99Mg0.29AlO3.78, and Ni2.31Mg0.08AlO3.89 mixed oxides as catalysts at 650°C. Those mixed oxides were obtained by calcination of corresponding layered double hydroxide precursors (LDHs). Structure and composition of LDHs and mixed oxides were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Inductively coupled plasma spectrum. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and transmission electron microscope were used to characterize the N content, proportion of pyridine-like N structure and morphology of CN nanotubes. The results showed that the tubes grown with Ni2.31Mg0.08AlO3.89 as catalysts had more obvious bamboo-like structure, larger diameter than those grown with Ni1.07Mg1.01AlO3.58 and Ni1.99Mg0.29AlO3.78. The N content and proportion of graphitic-like N structures increased with the content of Ni2+ increasing in LDH precursors. The morphology, N content and pyridine-like N structures for CN nanotubes can be controlled to a certain extent by varying the content of Ni2+ in LDH precursors.

  7. Synthesis of carbon nanotubes by catalytic vapor decomposition (CVD) method: Optimization of various parameters for the maximum yield

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Kanchan M Samant; Santosh K Haram; Sudhir Kapoor

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes an effect of flow rate, carrier gas (H2, N2 and Ar) composition, and amount of benzene on the quality and the yield of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) formed by catalytical vapour decomposition (CVD) method. The flow and mass control of gases and precursor vapors respectively were found to be interdependent and therefore crucial in deciding the quality and yield of CNTs. We have achieved this by modified soap bubble flowmeter, which controlled the flow rates of two gases, simultaneously. With the help of this set-up, CNTs could be prepared in any common laboratory. Raman spectroscopy indicated the possibilities of formation of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). From scanning electron microscopy (SEM) measurements, an average diameter of the tube/bundle was estimated to be about 70 nm. The elemental analysis using energy dispersion spectrum (EDS) suggested 96 at.wt.% carbon along with ca. 4 at.wt. % iron in the as-prepared sample. Maximum yield and best quality CNTs were obtained using H2 as the carrier gas.

  8. Synthesis of anatase titania-carbon nanotubes nanocomposites with enhanced photocatalytic activity through a nanocoating-hydrothermal process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anatase TiO2 nanoparticles were covalently anchored onto acid-treated multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) through a nanocoating-hydrothermal process to obtain TiO2-MWNTs nanocomposites. The composition and structural properties of the nanocomposites were characterized by XRD, BET, TG, TEM, HRTEM, EDX, XPS, and FTIR, and the formation of ester-bond linkage between TiO2 nanoparticles and MWNTs was demonstrated. The enhanced photocatalytic activity of TiO2-MWNTs nanocomposites was probed by photodegradation reaction of methylene blue under visible-light irradiation

  9. Synthesis of anatase titania-carbon nanotubes nanocomposites with enhanced photocatalytic activity through a nanocoating-hydrothermal process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Qun; Yang Dong; Chen Daimei; Wang Yabo; Jiang Zhongyi [Tianjin University, Key Laboratory for Green Chemical Technology, School of Chemical Engineering and Technology (China)], E-mail: zhyjiang@tju.edu.cn

    2007-12-15

    Anatase TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles were covalently anchored onto acid-treated multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) through a nanocoating-hydrothermal process to obtain TiO{sub 2}-MWNTs nanocomposites. The composition and structural properties of the nanocomposites were characterized by XRD, BET, TG, TEM, HRTEM, EDX, XPS, and FTIR, and the formation of ester-bond linkage between TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles and MWNTs was demonstrated. The enhanced photocatalytic activity of TiO{sub 2}-MWNTs nanocomposites was probed by photodegradation reaction of methylene blue under visible-light irradiation.

  10. CARBON NANOTUBES AND PHARMACEUTICAL APPLICATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ram Pavani

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanotubes (CNTs are often described as a graphene sheet rolled up into the shape of a cylinder. These have fascinated scientists with their extraordinary properties. These compounds have become increasingly popular in various fields simply because of their small size and amazing optical, electric and magnetic properties when used alone or with additions of metals. Carbon nanotubes have potential therapeutic applications in the field of drug delivery, diagnostics, and biosensing. Functionalized carbon nanotubes can also act as vaccine delivery systems.Carbon nanotubes (CNTs are considered to be one of the innovative resources in nanotechnology with possible use in wide range of biomedical applications viz. cancer treatment, bioengineering, cardiac autonomic regulation, platelet activation and tissue regeneration. The effect of CNTs on cells and tissues are extremely important for their use in various complex biological systems. With the increasing interest shown by the nanotechnology research community in this field, it is expected that plenty of applications of CNTs will be explored in future.

  11. Quantum transport in carbon nanotubes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laird, E.A.; Kuemmeth, F.; Steele, G.A.; Grove-Rasmussen, K.; Nygard, J.; Flensberg, K.; Kouwenhoven, L.P.

    2015-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes are a versatile material in which many aspects of condensed matter physics come together. Recent discoveries have uncovered new phenomena that completely change our understanding of transport in these devices, especially the role of the spin and valley degrees of freedom. This revie

  12. [Synthesis of Fe/nitrogen-doped Carbon Nanotube/Nanoparticle Composite and Its Catalytic Performance in Oxygen Reduction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ting-ting; Zhu, Neng-wu; Lu, Yu; Wu, Ping-xiao

    2016-01-15

    The cathode catalyst plays an important role in the electricity generation of microbial fuel cells (MFCs). In order to achieve the large-scale application of MFCs, cathode catalyst with low cost and high oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) has great sense to substitute the precious catalyst of Pt/C. Here chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method was utilized accompanied with melamine as a nitrogen and carbon precursor, oxidized carbon powder (Black Pearls 2000 or Acetylene Black) as carbon precursor and iron acetate as an iron precursor so as to synthesize two kinds of Fe and nitrogen doped carbon nanotube/nanoparticle composites (FeNCB and FeNCC) as MFCs cathode catalysts. The cyclic voltammetry and rotating ring-disk electrode were applied to analyze the ORR activity discrepancies of FeNCB, FeNCC, and Pt/C (20%), which was confirmed by MFC operation. The results showed that the ORR performance of FeNCB was slightly better than Pt/C and dramatically better than FeNCC. Moreover, the catalysis of ORR by FeNCB was through a four-electron transfer pathway. Besides, the performance of MFC-FeNCB was higher than MFC-Pt/C and observably higher than MFC-FeNCC which was a contribute to promote the scale of MFC. MFC-FeNCB achieved the maximum power output density of 1212.8 mW x m(-2), an open circuit potential of 0.875 V, and a stabilized voltage of (0.500 +/- 0.025) V. Further analysis via X-ray diffraction, X ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and Raman exhibited that the diameter of carbon nanotube, the types of N and Fe as well as the concentration of nitrogen, iron and oxygen was the reason for the discrepancies of ORR characteristics for the prepared catalysts. PMID:27078977

  13. Attachment of Gold Nanoparticles to Carbon Nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xi Cheng MA; Ning LUN; Shu Lin WEN

    2005-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes were initially chemically modified with an H2SO4-HNO3 treatment,and subsequently activated with Pd-Sn catalytic nuclei via a one-step activation approach. These activated nanotubes were used as precursors for obtaining gold nanoparticles-attached nanotubes via simple electroless plating. This approach provides an efficient method for attachment of metal nanostructures to carbon nanotubes. Such novel hybrid nanostructures are attractive for many applications.

  14. Facile synthesis of titania nanoparticles coated carbon nanotubes for selective enrichment of phosphopeptides for mass spectrometry analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Yinghua; Lu, Jin; Deng, Chunhui; Zhang, Xiangmin

    2013-03-30

    In this work, titania nanoparticles coated carbon nanotubes (denoted as CNTs/TiO2 composites) were synthesized through a facile but effective solvothermal reaction using titanium isopropoxide as the titania source, isopropyl alcohol as the solvent and as the basic catalyst in the presence of hydrophilic carbon nanotubes. Characterizations using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) indicate that the CNTs/TiO2 composites consist of CNT core and a rough outer layer formed by titania nanoparticles (5-10nm). Measurements using wide angle X-ray diffraction (WAXRD), zeta potential and N2 sorption reveal that the titania shell is formed by anatase titania nanoparticles, and the composites have a high specific surface area of about 104 m(2)/g. By using their high surface area and affinity to phosphopeptides, the CNTs/TiO2 composites were applied to selectively enrich phosphopeptides for mass spectrometry analysis. The high selectivity and capacity of the CNTs/TiO2 composites have been demonstrated by effective enrichment of phosphopeptides from digests of phosphoprotein, protein mixtures of β-casein and bovine serum albumin, human serum and rat brain samples. These results foresee a promising application of the novel CNTs/TiO2 composites in the selective enrichment of phosphopeptides.

  15. Krypton Gas for High Quality Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes Synthesis by KrF Excimer Laser Ablation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasim Al-Zanganawee

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We report for the first time the production of single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs by KrF excimer laser ablation method under the krypton gas atmosphere. For the ablation experiment 450 mJ energy and 30 Hz repetition rate KrF excimer laser was used, and the target was prepared with the following composition: 0.6% Ni, 0.6% Co, and 98.8% C (atomic percentage. The ablation product was characterized by confocal Raman microspectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA. The SWCNTs obtained are a mixture of semiconducting and metallic types with narrow diameters distribution of 1.26 to 1.49 nm, are micrometers long, and contain low amount of graphite and amorphous carbon.

  16. Synthesis of carbon nanotubes/Si nanowires core-sheath structure arrays and their field emission properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, M.; Li, M.K.; Zhang, Z.J.; Li, H.L

    2003-09-30

    A new composite structure of carbon nanotubes (CNTs)/Si nanowires (SiNWs) arrays have been synthesized by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) within the pores of microporous alumina template. The results of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microcopy (TEM) reveal that the obtained well-aligned composite structure has a core-sheath structure and the deposited material in the carbon sheath is polycrystalline silicon. Field emission from these CNTs-sheathed SiNWs exhibits significant enhancement compared to the pure SiNWs in turn-on field, total emission current and stability. The field emission characteristics of the composite structure are analyzed based on Fowler-Nordheim theory. The electron field emission increased with decreasing diameter of such structure. The well-aligned core-sheath structure provides an important means to fabricate emitter devices with chemically inert surface as well as with superior performance of field emission properties.

  17. Synthesis of carbon nanotubes/Si nanowires core-sheath structure arrays and their field emission properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, M.; Li, M. K.; Zhang, Z. J.; Li, H. L.

    2003-09-01

    A new composite structure of carbon nanotubes (CNTs)/Si nanowires (SiNWs) arrays have been synthesized by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) within the pores of microporous alumina template. The results of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microcopy (TEM) reveal that the obtained well-aligned composite structure has a core-sheath structure and the deposited material in the carbon sheath is polycrystalline silicon. Field emission from these CNTs-sheathed SiNWs exhibits significant enhancement compared to the pure SiNWs in turn-on field, total emission current and stability. The field emission characteristics of the composite structure are analyzed based on Fowler-Nordheim theory. The electron field emission increased with decreasing diameter of such structure. The well-aligned core-sheath structure provides an important means to fabricate emitter devices with chemically inert surface as well as with superior performance of field emission properties.

  18. Investigation of the Solution Electrical Conductivity Effect upon the Synthesis of Carbon Nanotubes by Arc Discharge Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asieh Dehghani Kiadehi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Some techniques have been developed to produce carbon nanotubes (CNTs in sizeable quantities, including arc discharge, laser ablation and chemical vapor deposition (CVD. Arc discharge in liquid environment is a new, simple and cheap method of synthesizing CNTs. CNTs in this study were fabricated by arc discharge in liquid. The present work was undertaken to study the effect of electrical conductivity of liquid on CNTs production and was fabricated using arc discharge between two graphite electrodes submerged in different aqueous solutions of NaCl, KCl and LiCl. For comparative study, CNTs were synthesized under different electrical conductivity conditions and the results were analyzed, compared and discussed. The scanning electron microscopy (SEM, transmission electron microscopy (TEM and Raman spectroscopy were employed to study the morphology of these carbon nanostructures. Based on LiCl 0.25 N, high-crystalline and a longed multi MWCNTs, SWCNTs were synthesized by using this technique.

  19. From carbon nanotubes to carbon atomic chains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casillas García, Gilberto; Zhang, Weijia; José-Yacamán, Miguel

    2010-10-01

    Carbyne is a linear allotrope of carbon. It is formed by a linear arrangement of carbon atoms with sp-hybridization. We present a reliable and reproducible experiment to obtain these carbon atomic chains using few-layer-graphene (FLG) sheets and a HRTEM. First the FLG sheets were synthesized from worm-like exfoliated graphite and then drop-casted on a lacey-carbon copper grid. Once in the TEM, two holes are opened near each other in a FLG sheet by focusing the electron beam into a small spot. Due to the radiation, the carbon atoms rearrange themselves between the two holes and form carbon fibers. The beam is concentrated on the carbon fibers in order excite the atoms and induce a tension until multi wall carbon nanotube (MWCNT) is formed. As the radiation continues the MWCNT breaks down until there is only a single wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT). Then, when the SWCNT breaks, an atomic carbon chain is formed, lasts for several seconds under the radiation and finally breaks. This demonstrates the stability of this carbon structure.

  20. Carbon Nanotubes Filled with Ferromagnetic Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albrecht Leonhardt

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanotubes (CNT filled with ferromagnetic metals like iron, cobalt or nickel are new and very interesting nanostructured materials with a number of unique properties. In this paper we give an overview about different chemical vapor deposition (CVD methods for their synthesis and discuss the influence of selected growth parameters. In addition we evaluate possible growth mechanisms involved in their formation. Moreover we show their identified structural and magnetic properties. On the basis of these properties we present different application possibilities. Some selected examples reveal the high potential of these materials in the field of medicine and nanotechnology.

  1. Bloch oscillations in carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jódar, Esther; Pérez-Garrido, Antonio; Rojas, Fernando

    2009-05-27

    Bloch oscillations arise when electrons are in a one-dimensional linear chain of atoms under a constant electric field. In this paper we show numerically that electrons in different types of carbon nanotubes show oscillations with a Bloch frequency proportional to the constant electric field applied along the nanotube axis. We show these oscillations, calculating the quadratic displacement as a function of the electric field. Because of the double periodicity of the nanotubes' geometry (the lattice constant and the lines of atoms) two frequencies appear, one twice the value of the other. These frequencies coincide perfectly with those predicted for a linear chain of atoms, taking into account the periodicity considered in each case.

  2. Roping and wrapping carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ausman, Kevin D.; O'Connell, Michael J.; Boul, Peter; Ericson, Lars M.; Casavant, Michael J.; Walters, Deron A.; Huffman, Chad; Saini, Rajesh; Wang, Yuhuang; Haroz, Erik; Billups, Edward W.; Smalley, Richard E.

    2001-11-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes can be dispersed into solvents by ultrasonication to the point that primarily individual tubes, cut to a few hundred nanometers in length, are present. However, when such dispersions are filtered to a thick mat, or paper, only tangles of uniform, seemingly endless ropes are observed. The factors contributing to this "roping" phenomenon, akin to aggregation or crystallization, will be discussed. We have developed methods for generating "super-ropes" more than twenty times the diameter of those formed by filtration, involving the extraction of nanotube material from an oleum dispersion. Nanotubes have been solubilized in water, largely individually, by non-covalently wrapping them with linear polymers. The general thermodynamic drive for this wrapping involves the polymer disrupting both the hydrophobic interface with water and the smooth tube-tube interaction in aggregates. The nanotubes can be recovered from their polymeric wrapping by changing their solvent system. This solubilization process opens the door to solution chemistry on pristine nanotubes, as well as their introduction into biologically relevant systems.

  3. Carbon nanotube and conducting polymer composites for supercapacitors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chuang Peng; Shengwen Zhang; Daniel Jewell; George Z. Chen

    2008-01-01

    Composites of carbon nanotubes and conducting polymers can be prepared via chemical synthesis, electrochemical deposition on pre-formed carbon nanotube electrodes, or by electrochemical co-deposition. The composites combine the large pseudocapacitance of the conducting polymers with the fast charging/discharging double-layer capacitance and excellent mechanical properties of the carbon nanotubes. The electrochemically co-deposited composites are the most homogeneous and show an unusual interaction between thepolymer and nanotubes, giving rise to a strengthened electron delocalisation and conjugation along the polymer chains. As a result they exhibit excellent electrochemical charge storage properties and fast charge/discharge switching, making them promising electrode mate-rials for high power supercapacitors.

  4. Electroluminescent Polymers and Carbon Nanotubes for Flat Panel Displays

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liming Dai; Limin Dong; Mei Gao; Shaoming Huang; Oddvar Johansen; Albert W.H.Mau,Zoran Vasic; Berthold Winkler; Yongyuang Yang

    2000-01-01

    polymeric light-emitting diodes(LEDs) with sufficient brightness. efficiencies, low driving voltages, and various interesting features have been reported. The relatively short device lifetime, however, still remains as a major problem to be solved before any commercial applications will be realized. In this regard,carbon nanotubes have recently been proposed as more robust electron field emitters for flat panel displays. We have synthesised large arrays of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes, from which micropatterns of the aligned nanotubes suitable for flat panel displays were fabricated on various substrates. In this paper, we summarise our work on the synthesis and microfabrication of electroluminescent polymers and carbon nanotubes for flat panel displays with reference to other complementary work as appropriate.

  5. Covalently immobilized lipase on aminoalkyl-, carboxy- and hydroxy-multi-wall carbon nanotubes in the enantioselective synthesis of Solketal esters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zniszczoł, Aurelia; Herman, Artur P; Szymańska, Katarzyna; Mrowiec-Białoń, Julita; Walczak, Krzysztof Z; Jarzębski, Andrzej; Boncel, Sławomir

    2016-06-01

    Aiming at the preparation of efficient, stable on storage and recyclable nanobiocatalysts for enantioselective transesterification, alkaline lipase from Pseudomonas fluorescens was covalently immobilized (up to 8.5wt.%) on functionalized multi-wall carbon nanotubes (f-MWCNTs). f-MWCNTs were synthesized via: (a) (2+1)-cycloaddition of a nitrene to the C-sp(2) nanotube walls (3.2mmolg(-1), a novel synthetic approach) and, (b) oxidative treatments, i.e. Fenton reagent (3.5mmolg(-1)) and nitrating mixture (2.5mmolg(-1)), yielding aminoalkyl-, hydroxyl- and carboxyl-MWCNTs, respectively. Amino- and epoxy- functionalized mesoporous silica (f-SBA-15) were used as the reference supports. Transesterification of vinyl n-butyrate by racemic Solketal with a chromatographically (GC) traced kinetics was selected as the model reaction. The studies revealed that different chemical functionalization of morphologically identical nanotube supports led to various enzyme loadings, catalytic activities and enantioselectivities. MWCNT-NH2-based nanobiocatalyst was found to be the most active composite among all of the tested systems (yield 20%, t=0.5h, 1321Ug(-1)), i.e. 12 times more active than the native enzyme. In turn, lipase immobilized on MWCNT-COOH emerged as the most enantioselective system (ex aequo with SBA-NH2) (eeR=74%, t=0.5h at yield of 3-5%). The activity of the MWCNT-NH2-based nanobiocatalyst after 8 cycles of transesterification dropped to 60% of its initial value, whereas for SBA-NH2-based composite remained unchanged. Importantly, stability on storage was fully maintained for all MWCNT-based nanobiocatalysts or even 'extra-enhanced' for MWCNT-OH. PMID:27178796

  6. Synthesis of carbon nanotubes over 3D cubical Co-KIT-6 and nickel decorated graphene by Hummer's method, its application as counter electrode in dye sensitive solar cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramanian, Sunu; Pandurangan, Arumugam

    2016-04-01

    The challenges on carbon nanotubes and graphene are still the subject of many research works due to its unique properties. There are three main methods to synthesis carbon nanotubes in which chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method can use for large scale production. The principle of CVD is the decomposition of various hydrocarbons over transition metal supported catalyst. KIT-6 molecular sieve was used as a support to prepare cobalt catalyst for CVD method using metal impregnation method to produce cobalt loadings of 2, 4 and 6 wt%. The catalysts were characterized by XRD, FTIR &TEM. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) synthesized on Co-KIT-6 was also characterized by XRD, TGA, SEM & Raman spectra. Graphene was synthesized by Hummers method, which is the most common method for preparing graphene oxide. Graphene oxide was prepared by oxidation of graphite using some oxidizing agents like sulphuric acid, sodium nitrate and potassium permanganate. This graphene oxide is further treated with hydrazine solution to convert it into chemically converted graphene and also decorated with nickel metal and characterized. Hummer's method is important for large scale production of graphene. Both Graphene and carbon nanotubes are used in different fields due to its unique properties. Both Graphene and carbon nanotubes are fabricated in counter electrode of Dye sensitized solar cells (DSSC). By cyclic voltammetry study, it confirms that both materials are good and efficient to replace platinum in the DSSC.

  7. Carbon Nanotubes - Polymer Composites with Enhanced Conductivity using Functionalized Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramasubramaniam, Rajagopal; Chen, Jian; Gupta, Rishi

    2003-03-01

    Individual carbon nanotubes show superior electrical, mechanical and thermal properties [1]. Composite materials using carbon nanotubes as fillers are predicted to show similar superior properties. However, realization of such composites has been plagued by poor dispersion of carbon nanotubes in solvents and in polymer matrices. We have developed a method to homogenously disperse carbon nanotubes in polymer matrices using functionalized nanotubes [2]. Thin films of functionalized single walled nanotubes (SWNT) - polystyrene composites and functionalized SWNT - polycarbonate composites were prepared using solution evaporation and spin coating. Both of the composites show several orders of magnitude increase in conductivity for less than 1 wt thresholds of the composites are less than 0.2 wt nanotubes. We attribute the enhanced conduction to the superior dispersion of the functionalized nanotubes in the polymer matrix and to the reduced nanotube waviness resulting from the rigid backbone of the conjugated polymer. References: [1]. R. H. Baughman, A. A. Zakhidov and W. A. de Heer, Science v297, p787 (2002); [2]. J. Chen, H. Liu, W. A. Weimer, M. D. Halls, D. H. Waldeck and G. C. Walker, J. Am. Chem. Soc. v124, p9034 (2002).

  8. Assembly and Applications of Carbon Nanotube Thin Films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hongwei ZHU; Bingqing WEI

    2008-01-01

    The ultimate goal of current research on carbon nanotubes (CNTs) is to make breakthroughs that advance nanotechnological applications of bulk CNT materials. Especially, there has been growing interest in CNT thin films because of their unique and usually enhanced properties and tremendous potential as components for use in nano-electronic and nano-mechanical device applications or as structural elements in various devices. If a synthetic or a post processing method can produce high yield of nanotube thin films, these structures will provide tremendous potential for fundamental research on these devices. This review will address the synthesis, the post processing and the device applications of self-assembled nanotube thin films.

  9. Synthesis of subnanometer-diameter vertically aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes with copper-anchored cobalt catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Kehang; Kumamoto, Akihito; Xiang, Rong; An, Hua; Wang, Benjamin; Inoue, Taiki; Chiashi, Shohei; Ikuhara, Yuichi; Maruyama, Shigeo

    2016-01-21

    We synthesize vertically aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes (VA-SWNTs) with subnanometer diameters on quartz (and SiO2/Si) substrates by alcohol CVD using Cu-anchored Co catalysts. The uniform VA-SWNTs with a nanotube diameter of 1 nm are synthesized at a CVD temperature of 800 °C and have a thickness of several tens of μm. The diameter of SWNTs was reduced to 0.75 nm at 650 °C with the G/D ratio maintained above 24. Scanning transmission electron microscopy energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS-STEM) and high angle annular dark field (HAADF-STEM) imaging of the Co/Cu bimetallic catalyst system showed that Co catalysts were captured and anchored by adjacent Cu nanoparticles, and thus were prevented from coalescing into a larger size, which contributed to the small diameter of SWNTs. The correlation between the catalyst size and the SWNT diameter was experimentally clarified. The subnanometer-diameter and high-quality SWNTs are expected to pave the way to replace silicon for next-generation optoelectronic and photovoltaic devices. PMID:26690843

  10. Ballistic Fracturing of Carbon Nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozden, Sehmus; Machado, Leonardo D; Tiwary, ChandraSekhar; Autreto, Pedro A S; Vajtai, Robert; Barrera, Enrique V; Galvao, Douglas S; Ajayan, Pulickel M

    2016-09-21

    Advanced materials with multifunctional capabilities and high resistance to hypervelocity impact are of great interest to the designers of aerospace structures. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with their lightweight and high strength properties are alternative to metals and/or metallic alloys conventionally used in aerospace applications. Here we report a detailed study on the ballistic fracturing of CNTs for different velocity ranges. Our results show that the highly energetic impacts cause bond breakage and carbon atom rehybridizations, and sometimes extensive structural reconstructions were also observed. Experimental observations show the formation of nanoribbons, nanodiamonds, and covalently interconnected nanostructures, depending on impact conditions. Fully atomistic reactive molecular dynamics simulations were also carried out in order to gain further insights into the mechanism behind the transformation of CNTs. The simulations show that the velocity and relative orientation of the multiple colliding nanotubes are critical to determine the impact outcome.

  11. PEG-assisted Synthesis of Homogeneous Carbon Nanotubes-MoS2-Carbon as a Counter Electrode for Dye-sensitized Solar Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: We developed a polyethylene glycol-assisted strategy to improve the coating of ultra-thin MoS2 on carbon nanotubes (CNTs). The composite was used as counter electrodes (CEs) for dye-sensitized solar cells to give a higher photo-to-electron efficiency than that of Pt CEs. - Highlights: • A polyethylene glycol-assisted strategy was developed. • The homogeneous composite of CNTs-MoS2-carbon was prepared. • The composite was used as counter electrodes (CEs) for dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). • The CNTs-MoS2-carbon CEs possess low Rct of 1.73 Ω cm2. • DSSCs based on CNTs-MoS2-carbon CEs achieve a power conversion efficiency of 7.23%. - Abstract: Carbon nanotubes-MoS2-carbon (CNTs-MoS2-carbon) was synthesized via a method of wet impregnation and calcination with the assistance of surface-active polyethylene glycol 400 (PEG400). Characterizations of TEM, Raman spectra, XRD, XPS, BET and TG-DSC revealed that CNTs were homogenously coated with ultra-thin layers of MoS2. It was demonstrated that the unique structure is attributed to the wetting and emulsification capacity of PEG400. The CNTs-MoS2-carbon was used as counter electrodes (CEs) for dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). Analyses of electrochemistry indicate that the CEs modified by CNTs-MoS2-carbon have high activity and stability in the electro-reduction from I3− to I− due to the low charge transfer resistance. DSSCs based on CNTs-MoS2-carbon CEs were demonstrated to have a power conversion efficiency of 7.23%, which is higher than Pt CEs (6.19%)

  12. Synthesis and Evaluation on Performance of Hydrogen Storage of Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes Decorated with Platinum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MU Shi-chung; TANG Hao-lin; PAN Mu; YUAN Run-zhang

    2003-01-01

    By means of chemical reduction,nanoparticles of platinum were deposited on the surface of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs).The performance of hydrogen storage of as-prepared MWCNTs decorated with platinum was investigated.The results indicate that:(1) Hydrogen uptake is more quick and intense for decorated MWCNTs than that for not decorated ones at 10.931MPa and room temperature.The saturation of hydrogen uptake of the former only lasts about 30min,while the latter needs about 150 min;(2) The amount of hydrogen uptake of decorated MWCNTs is about 1.13wt%, which is larger than that of not decorated ones(about 0.54wt%);(3) However,more than 37% hydrogen absorbed by decorated MWCNTs is chemisorbed.

  13. Synthesis of highly dispersed platinum particles on carbon nanotubes by an in situ vapor-phase method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mercado-Zúñiga, C. [Depto. Ing. Metalurgia y Materiales, Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Mexico 07300 D.F. (Mexico); Vargas-García, J.R., E-mail: rvargasga@ipn.mx [Depto. Ing. Metalurgia y Materiales, Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Mexico 07300 D.F. (Mexico); Hernández-Pérez, M.A. [Depto. Ing. Metalurgia y Materiales, Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Mexico 07300 D.F. (Mexico); Figueroa-Torres, M.Z. [Depto. Eco-Materiales y Energia, Univ. Autonoma de Nuevo Leon, Nuevo Leon 66450 (Mexico); Cervantes-Sodi, F. [Depto. Fisica y Matematicas, Univ. Iberoamericana, Mexico 01209 D.F. (Mexico); Torres-Martínez, L.M. [Depto. Eco-Materiales y Energia, Univ. Autonoma de Nuevo Leon, Nuevo Leon 66450 (Mexico)

    2014-12-05

    Highlights: • Highly dispersed Pt nanoparticles were prepared on functionalized carbon nanotubes. • A simple and competitive vapor-phase method was employed. • Carbonyl groups were assumed to be responsible for assisted decomposition of Pt-acac. • Pt particles were highly dispersed because carbonyl groups served as reaction sites. • Particles of 2.3 nm in size were highly dispersed even the high loading (27 wt%Pt). - Abstract: Highly dispersed Pt nanoparticles were prepared on functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (f-MWCNTs) using a simple in situ vapor-phase method. The method consisted in two-step procedure in which an initial mixture of Pt precursor (Pt-acac) and f-MWCNTs was heated in a quartz tube reactor, first at 180 °C and then at 400 °C. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR–ATR), thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) were used to follow the chemical and structural transformations of mixture components during heating steps. The functionalization of MWCNTs with HNO{sub 3}/H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} solution resulted in formation of surface carbonyl groups. The FTIR–ATR and XRD results indicated that individual Pt-acac withstood heating at 180 °C, whereas it was dissociated when heated in contact with f-MWCNTs at the same temperature. Thus, the functional carbonyl groups were found to be responsible for assisted decomposition of Pt-acac at 180 °C. Since carbonyl groups served as reaction sites for decomposition of Pt-acac, the resulting particles were highly and homogeneously dispersed on the surface of MWCNTs even the relatively high metallic loading of 27 wt%. TEM observations revealed that crystalline Pt particles exhibit narrow size distribution with a mean size of 2.3 nm.

  14. Photoluminescence Study of Carbon Nanotubes

    OpenAIRE

    Han, H. X.; Li, G. H.; Ge, W. K.; Wang, Z. P.; Xu, Z. Y.; Xie, S. S.; Chang, B H; Sun, L. F.; Wang, B S; G. Xu; Su, Z.B.

    2000-01-01

    ultiwalled carbon nanotubes, prepared by both electric arc discharge and chemical vapor deposition methods, show a strong visible light emission in photoluminescence experiments. All the samples employed in the experiments exhibit nearly same super-linear intensity dependence of the emission bands on the excitation intensity, and negligible temperature dependence of the central position and the line shapes of the emission bands. Based upon theoretical analysis of the electronic band structure...

  15. Photonics based on carbon nanotubes

    OpenAIRE

    Gu, Qingyuan; Gicquel-Guézo, Maud; Loualiche, Slimane; Pouliquen, Julie Le; Batte, Thomas; Folliot, Hervé; Dehaese, Olivier; Grillot, Frederic; Battie, Yann; Loiseau, Annick; Liang, Baolai; Huffaker, Diana

    2013-01-01

    Among direct-bandgap semiconducting nanomaterials, single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) exhibit strong quasi-one-dimensional excitonic optical properties, which confer them a great potential for their integration in future photonics devices as an alternative solution to conventional inorganic semiconductors. In this paper, we will highlight SWCNT optical properties for passive as well as active applications in future optical networking. For passive applications, we directly compare the effi...

  16. OPPORTUNITIES OF BIOMEDICAL USE OF CARBON NANOTUBES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. V. Mitrofanova

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Nanomaterials  –  materials,  whouse  structure  elements  has  proportions  doesn’t  exceed  100  nm.  In superdispersed state matter acquire new properties. In the last decade, carbon nanotubes become the most popular nanomaterials, that cause attention of representatives of various scientific field. The сarbon nanotubes offer new opportunities for biological and medical applications: imaging at the molecular, cellular and tissue levels, biosensors and electrodes based on carbon nanotubes, target delivery of various substances, radiation and photothermal therapy. The most promising of carbon nanotubes in the context of biomedical applications is their ability to penetrate the various tissues of the body and carry large doses of agents, providing diagnostic and therapeutic effects. Functionalized nanotubes are biodegradable. Other current direction of using carbon nanotubes in medicine and biology is to visualize objects on the molecular, cellular and tissue level. Associated with carbon nanotubes contrasting substances improve the visualization of cells and tissues, which can detected new patterns of development of the pathological process. Due to the vagueness of the question of biocompatibility and cytotoxicity of carbon nanotubes possibility of their practical application is hampered. Before the introduction of carbon nanotubes into practical health care is necessary to provide all the possible consequences of using nanotubes. High rates of properties and development of new nanostructures based on carbon nanotubes in the near future will lead to new advances related to the application and development of new parameters that will determine their properties and effects. In these review attention is paid to the structure, physico-chemical properties of nanotubes, their functionalization, pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics and all aspects of using of carbon nanotubes.

  17. An efficient synthesis of graphenated carbon nanotubes over the tailored mesoporous molecular sieves by chemical vapor deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Tailored 3D cubic Ni/KIT-6 with large pores was synthesized successfully. ► The new hybrid g-CNTs in large scale were synthesized using Ni/KIT-6 by CVD method. ► The use of mesoporous material by CVD method would be an ideal choice to prepare g-CNTs at reasonable cost. ► This type of g-CNTs might be a new avenue for nano-electronic applications. - Abstract: The new hybrid of graphenated carbon nanotubes (g-CNTs) was superior to either CNTs or graphene. Mesoporous 3D cubic Ni/KIT-6 were synthesized hydrothermally through organic template route and then were used as catalytic template for the production of g-CNTs using acetylene as a carbon precursor by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method. The deposited new hybrid carbon materials were purified and analyzed by various physico-chemical techniques such as XRD, TGA, SEM, TEM and Raman spectroscopy techniques. The graphitization of CNTs was confirmed by TGA and HRTEM studies. Thermal stability, surface morphology, and structural morphology of these materials were revealed by TGA, SEM and TEM analysis, respectively. Moreover, the tailored mesoporous Ni/KIT-6 molecular sieves were found to possess better quality and massive quantity of g-CNTs produced compared to other catalytic template route

  18. An efficient synthesis of graphenated carbon nanotubes over the tailored mesoporous molecular sieves by chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atchudan, R. [Department of Applied Chemistry, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 702-701 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Chemistry, CEG Campus, Anna University, Chennai 600025 (India); Joo, Jin., E-mail: joojin@knu.ac.kr [Department of Applied Chemistry, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 702-701 (Korea, Republic of); Pandurangan, A., E-mail: pandurangan_a@yahoo.com [Department of Chemistry, CEG Campus, Anna University, Chennai 600025 (India)

    2013-06-01

    Highlights: ► Tailored 3D cubic Ni/KIT-6 with large pores was synthesized successfully. ► The new hybrid g-CNTs in large scale were synthesized using Ni/KIT-6 by CVD method. ► The use of mesoporous material by CVD method would be an ideal choice to prepare g-CNTs at reasonable cost. ► This type of g-CNTs might be a new avenue for nano-electronic applications. - Abstract: The new hybrid of graphenated carbon nanotubes (g-CNTs) was superior to either CNTs or graphene. Mesoporous 3D cubic Ni/KIT-6 were synthesized hydrothermally through organic template route and then were used as catalytic template for the production of g-CNTs using acetylene as a carbon precursor by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method. The deposited new hybrid carbon materials were purified and analyzed by various physico-chemical techniques such as XRD, TGA, SEM, TEM and Raman spectroscopy techniques. The graphitization of CNTs was confirmed by TGA and HRTEM studies. Thermal stability, surface morphology, and structural morphology of these materials were revealed by TGA, SEM and TEM analysis, respectively. Moreover, the tailored mesoporous Ni/KIT-6 molecular sieves were found to possess better quality and massive quantity of g-CNTs produced compared to other catalytic template route.

  19. 一种适于碳纳米管制备的绿色前驱体%A green precursor for carbon nanotube synthesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    S.Paul; S.K.Samdarshi

    2011-01-01

    The present work aims to explore a natural renewable precursor for the synthesis of multiwalled carbon nanotubes ( MWCNTs), conforming to the principles of green chemistry. MWCNTs were synthesized by chemical vapor deposition using a natural renewable precursor ( coconut oil). Nitrogen gas was used as an inert atmosphere as well as a carrier for the evaporated precursor (flow rate: 100mL/min). The synthesized MWCNTs are characterized by scanning and transmission electron microscopy, electron dispersive X-ray analysis, and Raman spectroscopy. The diameters of the synthesized nanotubes are in the range of 80 nm to 90 nm under optimum conditions.%根据绿色化学原理尝试探索一种合成多壁碳纳米管的天然可再生前驱体.应用化学气相沉积(CVD)法,采用一种天然可再生前躯体(椰仁油),通过系列步骤合成了MWCNTs.氮气既作为气化前驱体载气(气体流速:100mL/min)又维持合成在惰性氛围中进行.合成的MWCNTs使用SEM、EDX、TEM和Raman表征,最佳条件下得到的碳纳米管直径为80nm~90nm.

  20. LDRD final report on carbon nanotube composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cahill, P.A.; Rand, P.B.

    1997-04-01

    Carbon nanotubes and their composites were examined using computational and experimental techniques in order to modify the mechanical and electrical properties of resins. Single walled nanotubes were the focus of the first year effort; however, sufficient quantities of high purity single walled nanotubes could not be obtained for mechanical property investigations. The unusually high electrical conductivity of composites loaded with <1% of multiwalled nanotubes is useful, and is the focus of continuing, externally funded, research.

  1. Engineering carbon nanotubes and nanotube circuits using electrical breakdown.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, P G; Arnold, M S; Avouris, P

    2001-04-27

    Carbon nanotubes display either metallic or semiconducting properties. Both large, multiwalled nanotubes (MWNTs), with many concentric carbon shells, and bundles or "ropes" of aligned single-walled nanotubes (SWNTs), are complex composite conductors that incorporate many weakly coupled nanotubes that each have a different electronic structure. Here we demonstrate a simple and reliable method for selectively removing single carbon shells from MWNTs and SWNT ropes to tailor the properties of these composite nanotubes. We can remove shells of MWNTs stepwise and individually characterize the different shells. By choosing among the shells, we can convert a MWNT into either a metallic or a semiconducting conductor, as well as directly address the issue of multiple-shell transport. With SWNT ropes, similar selectivity allows us to generate entire arrays of nanoscale field-effect transistors based solely on the fraction of semiconducting SWNTs.

  2. Preparation of carbon nanotubes by MPECVD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Microwave plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (MPECVD) method has been regarded as one of the most promising candidates for the synthesis of CNTs due to the vertical alignment, the large area growth, the lower growth temperature, uniform heat distribution and the good control of the different growth parameters. In this work we present our results about the preparation of carbon nanotube with different morphologies by using microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition MPECVD. Well aligned, curly and coiled carbon nanotubes have been prepared. We have investigated the effect of the different growth condition parameters such as type of the catalyst, pressure and the hydrogen to methane flow rate ratio on the morphology of the carbon nanotubes. The results were showed that there is a great dependence of the morphology of carbon nanotubes on these parameters. There is a linear relation between the growth rate and the methane to hydrogen ratio. We found that the growth rate has a great dependence on the amount of methane. For example the growth rate varied from the value 1,34 μm/min when the methane flow rate was 10 sccm to more than 14 μm/min when the methane flow rate was raised to 50 sccm. This growth rate is greater than that reported in the literature. The effect of the gas pressure on the CNTs was also studied. The Raman spectra (excitation wavelength 473 nm) of all samples show D-band peak at around 1300 cm-1 and G-band peak at around 1580 cm-1, which indicate that our CNTs are multi wall CNTs (MWCNTs). The D-band and the G-band correspond to sp2 and sp3 carbon stretching modes relatively, and their intensity ratio is a measure of the amount of disorder in the CNTs. The D-band is known to be attributed to the carbonaceous particles, defects in the curved graphitic sheet and tube ends. It has been suggested that lower Ig/Id ratios and narrower first and second order D and G bands are suggestive of well-aligned NNTs. The photoluminescence PL

  3. Catalysts for Efficient Production of Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Ted X.; Dong, Yi

    2009-01-01

    Several metal alloys have shown promise as improved catalysts for catalytic thermal decomposition of hydrocarbon gases to produce carbon nanotubes (CNTs). Heretofore almost every experiment on the production of carbon nanotubes by this method has involved the use of iron, nickel, or cobalt as the catalyst. However, the catalytic-conversion efficiencies of these metals have been observed to be limited. The identification of better catalysts is part of a continuing program to develop means of mass production of high-quality carbon nanotubes at costs lower than those achieved thus far (as much as $100/g for purified multi-wall CNTs or $1,000/g for single-wall CNTs in year 2002). The main effort thus far in this program has been the design and implementation of a process tailored specifically for high-throughput screening of alloys for catalyzing the growth of CNTs. The process includes an integral combination of (1) formulation of libraries of catalysts, (2) synthesis of CNTs from decomposition of ethylene on powders of the alloys in a pyrolytic chemical-vapor-decomposition reactor, and (3) scanning- electron-microscope screening of the CNTs thus synthesized to evaluate the catalytic efficiencies of the alloys. Information gained in this process is put into a database and analyzed to identify promising alloy compositions, which are to be subjected to further evaluation in a subsequent round of testing. Some of these alloys have been found to catalyze the formation of carbon nano tubes from ethylene at temperatures as low as 350 to 400 C. In contrast, the temperatures typically required for prior catalysts range from 550 to 750 C.

  4. Facile Synthesis of Ternary Boron Carbonitride Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luo Lijie

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In this study, a novel and facile approach for the synthesis of ternary boron carbonitride (B–C–N nanotubes was reported. Growth occurred by heating simple starting materials of boron powder, zinc oxide powder, and ethanol absolute at 1150 °C under a mixture gas flow of nitrogen and hydrogen. As substrate, commercial stainless steel foil with a typical thickness of 0.05 mm played an additional role of catalyst during the growth of nanotubes. The nanotubes were characterized by SEM, TEM, EDX, and EELS. The results indicate that the synthesized B–C–N nanotubes exhibit a bamboo-like morphology and B, C, and N elements are homogeneously distributed in the nanotubes. A catalyzed vapor–liquid–solid (VLS mechanism was proposed for the growth of the nanotubes.

  5. Dielectrophoretic assembly of carbon nanotube devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dimaki, Maria

    The purpose of this project has been to assemble single-walled carbon nanotubes on electrodes at the tip of a biocompatible cantilever and use these for chemical species sensing in air and liquid, for example in order to measure the local activity from ion channels in the cell membrane....... The electrical resistance of carbon nanotubes has been shown to be extremely sensitive to gas molecules. Dielectrophoresis is a method capable of quickly attracting nanotubes on microelectrodes by using an electric field, thus enabling nanotube integration in microsystems. Dielectrophoresis offers also...... the potential of distinguishing between nanotubes of different electrical properties, which is very important for the optimisation of the properties of the carbon nanotube sensors. Various cantilever and planar structures were designed, fabricated and tested both with multi-walled and single-walled carbon...

  6. Spontaneous Synthesis and Electrochemical Characterization of Nanostructured MnO2 on Nitrogen-Incorporated Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying-Chu Chen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigated the layered manganese dioxide with hydrate (MnO2⋅xH2O deposits onto nitrogen-containing carbon nanotube (CNxNTs as a hierarchical electrode for an energy-storage device. The dense and entangled CNxNTs were directly grown by microwave plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (MPECVD on a carbon cloth (CC, and subsequently used as a current collector. By controlling the pH value of KMnO4 precursor solution, and incorporating nitrogen into CNTs as a reducing agent, the MnO2 thin layer was uniformly fabricated on the CNxNTs at room temperature by using a spontaneous reduction method. The role of incorporation nitrogen is not only capable of creating active sites on the CNT surface, but can also donate electrons to reduce MnO4- to MnO2 spontaneously. From the measurements of cyclic voltammograms and galvanostatic charge/discharge, MnO2/CNxNTs/CC composite electrodes illustrated excellent specific capacitance of 589.1 Fg-1. The key factor for high performance could be attributed to the thin-layered MnO2 nanostructure, which resulted in the full utilization of MnO2 deposits. Hence, the hierarchically porous MnO2/CNxNTs/CC electrodes exhibited excellent capacitive behavior for electrochemical capacitor application.

  7. Designed synthesis of tunable amorphous carbon nanotubes (a-CNTs) by a novel route and their oxidation resistance properties

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Longlong Xu; Yifu Zhang; Xiongzhi Zhang; Yu Huang; Xiaoyu Tan; Chi Huang; Xiao Mei; Fei Niu; Changgong Meng; Gongzhen Cheng

    2014-10-01

    Tunable amorphous carbon nanotubes (a-CNTs) were successfully synthesized using V3O7.H2O and glucose solution as the starting materials by a novel route for the first time. The as-obtained samples were separately characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), energy-dispersive spectrometer (EDS), elemental analysis (EA), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT–IR) and Raman spectrum. The results showed that the as-obtained a-CNTs had uniform diameters with outer diameter ranging from 140 to 250 nm and inner diameter about 28 nm on an average, and their length was up to several micrometres. No VO residues remaining in a-CNTs showed the as-obtained a-CNTs with high purity. The as-prepared a-CNTs were a kind of hydrogenated a-CNTs containing both the 3- and 2-type carbons. Furthermore, the thermal stability of the as-obtained a-CNTs in the air atmosphere were investigated by thermo-gravimetric/differential thermal analyser (TG-DTA), revealing that the as-obtained a-CNTs had good thermal stability and oxidation resistance below 300 °C in air.

  8. Study of Carbon Nanotube-Substrate Interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaqueline S. Soares

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Environmental effects are very important in nanoscience and nanotechnology. This work reviews the importance of the substrate in single-wall carbon nanotube properties. Contact with a substrate can modify the nanotube properties, and such interactions have been broadly studied as either a negative aspect or a solution for developing carbon nanotube-based nanotechnologies. This paper discusses both theoretical and experimental studies where the interaction between the carbon nanotubes and the substrate affects the structural, electronic, and vibrational properties of the tubes.

  9. A Tunable Carbon Nanotube Oscillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sazonova, Vera

    2005-03-01

    Nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS) hold promise for a number of scientific and technological applications. Carbon nanotubes (NT) are perhaps the ultimate material for realizing a NEMS device as they are the stiffest material known, have low density, ultrasmall cross sections and can be defect-free. Equally important, a nanotube can act as a transistor and thus is able to sense its own motion. Here, we report the electrical actuation and detection of the guitar-string oscillation modes of doubly-clamped NT oscillators. We observed resonance frequencies in the 5MHz to 150MHz range with quality factors in the 50 to 100 range. We showed that the resonance frequencies can be widely tuned by a gate voltage. We also report on the temperature dependence of the quality factor and present a discussion of possible loss mechanisms.

  10. Mechanics of filled carbon nanotubes

    KAUST Repository

    Monteiro, A.O.

    2014-04-01

    The benefits of filling carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with assorted molecular and crystalline substances have been investigated for the past two decades. Amongst the study of new structural phases, defects, chemical reactions and varied types of host-guest interactions, there is one fundamental characterisation aspect of these systems that continues to be overlooked: the mechanical behaviour of filled CNTs. In contrast to their empty counterparts, the mechanics of filled CNTs is a subject where reports appear far and apart, this despite being key to the application of these materials in technological devices. In the following paragraphs, we review the work that has been carried out up to the present on the mechanics of filled CNTs. The studies discussed range from experimental resonant frequency essays performed within electron microscopes to modelling, via molecular dynamics, of three-point bending of nanotubes filled with gases. (C) 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Amorphous Carbon-Boron Nitride Nanotube Hybrids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae Woo (Inventor); Siochi, Emilie J. (Inventor); Wise, Kristopher E. (Inventor); Lin, Yi (Inventor); Connell, John (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A method for joining or repairing boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs). In joining BNNTs, the nanotube structure is modified with amorphous carbon deposited by controlled electron beam irradiation to form well bonded hybrid a-C/BNNT structures. In repairing BNNTs, the damaged site of the nanotube structure is modified with amorphous carbon deposited by controlled electron beam irradiation to form well bonded hybrid a-C/BNNT structures at the damage site.

  12. Functional Materials based on Carbon Nanotubes

    OpenAIRE

    Jung, Adrian Thomas

    2007-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes, no matter if they are single-walled or multi-walled, are an integral component in the vastly growing field of nanotechnology. Since their discovery by TEM and the invention of numerous large-scale production techniques, nanotubes are close to making their way into industrial products. Although many properties and modification processes are still under intensive research, the first real-market applications for carbon nanotubes have already been presented. However, if function...

  13. Glucose oxidase immobilization onto carbon nanotube networking

    CERN Document Server

    Karachevtsev, V A; Zarudnev, E S; Karachevtsev, M V; Leontiev, V S; Linnik, A S; Lytvyn, O S; Plokhotnichenko, A M; Stepanian, S G

    2012-01-01

    When elaborating the biosensor based on single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs), it is necessary to solve such an important problem as the immobilization of a target biomolecule on the nanotube surface. In this work, the enzyme (glucose oxidase (GOX)) was immobilized on the surface of a nanotube network, which was created by the deposition of nanotubes from their solution in 1,2-dichlorobenzene by the spray method. 1-Pyrenebutanoic acid succinimide ester (PSE) was used to form the molecular interface, the bifunctional molecule of which provides the covalent binding with the enzyme shell, and its other part (pyrene) is adsorbed onto the nanotube surface. First, the usage of such a molecular interface leaves out the direct adsorption of the enzyme (in this case, its activity decreases) onto the nanotube surface, and, second, it ensures the enzyme localization near the nanotube. The comparison of the resonance Raman (RR) spectrum of pristine nanotubes with their spectrum in the PSE environment evidences the creat...

  14. Polymer Self-assembly on Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giulianini, Michele; Motta, Nunzio

    This chapter analyses the poly(3-hexylthiophene) self-assembly on carbon nanotubes and the interaction between the two materials forming a new hybrid nanostructure. The chapter starts with a review of the several studies investigating polymers and biomolecules self-assembled on nanotubes. Then conducting polymers and polythiophenes are briefly introduced. Accordingly, carbon nanotube structure and properties are reported in Sect. 3. The experimental section starts with the bulk characterisation of polymer thin films with the inclusion of uniformly distributed carbon nanotubes. By using volume film analysis techniques (AFM, TEM, UV-Vis and Raman), we show how the polymer's higher degree of order is a direct consequence of interaction with carbon nanotubes. Nevertheless, it is through the use of nanoscale analysis and molecular dynamic simulations that the self-assembly of the polymer on the nanotube surface can be clearly evidenced and characterised. In Sect. 6, the effect of the carbon templating structure on the P3HT organisation on the surface is investigated, showing the chirality-driven polymer assembly on the carbon nanotube surface. The interaction between P3HT and CNTs brings also to charge transfer, with the modification of physical properties for both species. In particular, the alteration of the polymer electronic properties and the modification of the nanotube mechanical structure are a direct consequence of the P3HT π-π stacking on the nanotube surface. Finally, some considerations based on molecular dynamics studies are reported in order to confirm and support the experimental results discussed.

  15. Suspended carbon nanotubes coupled to superconducting circuits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schneider, B.H.

    2014-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes are unique candidates to study quantum mechanical properties of a nanomechanical resonator. However to access this quantum regime, present detectors are not yet sensitive enough. In this thesis we couple a carbon nanotube CNT mechanical resonator to a superconducting circuit which i

  16. Synthesis of coal-derived single-walled carbon nanotube from coal by varying the ratio of Zr/Ni as bimetallic catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Rajesh, E-mail: rajeshbhu1@gmail.com [Banaras Hindu University, Nanoscience and Nanotechnology Unit, Department of Physics (India); Singh, Rajesh Kumar, E-mail: rksbhu@gmail.com [Indian Institute of Technology (Banaras Hindu University), Department of Applied Physics (India); Ghosh, A. K.; Sen, Raja; Srivastava, S. K. [Central Institute of Mining and Fuel Research (India); Tiwari, R. S.; Srivastava, O. N. [Banaras Hindu University, Nanoscience and Nanotechnology Unit, Department of Physics (India)

    2013-01-15

    In this paper coal, source has been used in place of graphite for synthesis of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) with new Zr/Ni bimetallic catalyst. Using coal as starting material to produce the high-value-added SWCNTs is an economically competent route. SWCNTs have been synthesized by the electric arc discharge method using the so-called heterogeneous annealed coal anode filled with Zr and Ni catalyst. SWCNTs have been synthesized using annealed coal rod. The SWCNTs bundles synthesized generally have diameters of 4-10 nm. Most of those produced with Zr/Ni as the catalyst has a diameter ranging from 2.0 to 1.0 nm. The as-synthesized SWCNTs have been characterized employing XRD, HRTEM, EDX, Raman spectroscopy, and FTIR. It has been found that the change of the ratio of Zr and Ni concentration (wt%) in the catalyst affects the yield of SWCNTs. However, the purity of SWCNTs is very sensitive to the concentration of Zr. An optimal range of Zr/Ni compositions for synthesis of SWCNTs with relatively high purity and yield is obtained at specific concentration of 3:1.

  17. Light Emission in Silicon from Carbon Nanotubes

    CERN Document Server

    Gaufrès, Etienne; Noury, Adrien; Roux, Xavier Le; Rasigade, Gilles; Beck, Alexandre; Vivien, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    The use of optics in microelectronic circuits to overcome the limitation of metallic interconnects is more and more considered as a viable solution. Among future silicon compatible materials, carbon nanotubes are promising candidates thanks to their ability to emit, modulate and detect light in the wavelength range of silicon transparency. We report the first integration of carbon nanotubes with silicon waveguides, successfully coupling their emission and absorption properties. A complete study of this coupling between carbon nanotubes and silicon waveguides was carried out, which led to the demonstration of the temperature-independent emission from carbon nanotubes in silicon at a wavelength of 1.3 {\\mu}m. This represents the first milestone in the development of photonics based on carbon nanotubes on silicon.

  18. Development of supercapacitors based on carbon nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Block-type electrodes made of carbon nanotubes were fabricated by different processes. The volumetric specific capacitance based on such electrodes reached 107 F/cm3, which proves carbon nanotubes to be ideal candidate materials for supercapacitors. The composite electrodes consisting of carbon nanotubes and RuO2.xH2O were developed by the deposition of RuO2 on the surface of carbon nanotubes. Supercapacitors based on the composite electrodes show much higher specific capacitance than those based on pure carbon nanotube ones. A specific capacitance of 600 F/g can be achieved when the weight percent of RuO2.xH2O in the composite electrodes reaches 75%. In addition, supercapacitors based on the composite electrodes show both high energy density and high power density characteristics.

  19. Development of supercapacitors based on carbon nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马仁志; 魏秉庆; 徐才录; 梁吉; 吴德海

    2000-01-01

    Block-type electrodes made of carbon nanotubes were fabricated by different processes. The volumetric specific capacitance based on such electrodes reached 107 F/cm3, which proves carbon nanotubes to be ideal candidate materials for supercapacitors. The composite electrodes consisting of carbon nanotubes and RuO2 ·xH2O were developed by the deposition of RuO2 on the surface of carbon nanotubes. Supercapacitors based on the composite electrodes show much higher specific capacitance than those based on pure carbon nanotube ones. A specific capacitance of 600 F/g can be achieved when the weight percent of RuO2· xH2O in the composite electrodes reaches 75% . In addition , supercapacitors based on the composite electrodes show both high energy density and high power density characteristics.

  20. Computational Aspects of Carbon and Boron Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Manuel

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Carbon hexagonal nanotubes, boron triangular nanotubes and boron a-nanotubes are a few popular nano structures. Computational researchers look at these structures as graphs where each atom is a node and an atomic bond is an edge. While researchers are discussing the differences among the three nanotubes, we identify the topological and structural similarities among them. We show that the three nanotubes have the same maximum independent set and their matching ratios are independent of the number of columns. In addition, we illustrate that they also have similar underlying broadcasting spanning tree and identical communication behavior.

  1. Liquid surface model for carbon nanotube energetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solov'yov, Ilia; Mathew, Maneesh; Solov'yov, Andrey V.;

    2008-01-01

    In the present paper we developed a model for calculating the energy of single-wall carbon nanotubes of arbitrary chirality. This model, which we call as the liquid surface model, predicts the energy of a nanotube with relative error less than 1% once its chirality and the total number of atoms...... an important insight in the energetics and stability of nanotubes of different chirality and might be important for the understanding of nanotube growth process. For the computations we use empirical Brenner and Tersoff potentials and discuss their applicability to the study of carbon nanotubes. From...... the calculated energies we determine the elastic properties of the single-wall carbon nanotubes (Young modulus, curvature constant) and perform a comparison with available experimental measurements and earlier theoretical predictions....

  2. Synthesis of Boron Nitride Nanotubes for Engineering Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurst, Janet; Hull, David; Gorican, Dan

    2005-01-01

    Boron Nitride nanotubes (BNNT) are of interest to the scientific and technical communities for many of the same reasons that carbon nanotubes (CNT) have attracted large amounts of attention. Both materials have potentially unique and significant properties which may have important structural and electronic applications in the future. However of even more interest than their similarities may be the differences between carbon and boron nanotubes. Whilt boron nitride nanotubes possess a very high modulus similaar to CNT, they are also more chemically and thermally inert. Additionally BNNT possess more uniform electronic properties, having a uniform band gap of approximately 5.5 eV while CNT vary from semi-conductin to conductor behavior. Boron Nitride nanotubes have been synthesized by a variety of methods such as chemical vapor deposition, arc discharge and reactive milling. Consistently producing a reliable product has proven difficult. Progress in synthesis of 1-2 gram sized batches of Boron Nitride nanotubes will be discussed as well as potential uses for this unique material.

  3. Growing carbon nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshinori Ando

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available The discovery of ‘fullerenes’ added a new dimension to the knowledge of carbon science1; and the subsequent discovery of ‘carbon nanotubes’ (CNTs, the elongated fullerene added a new dimension to the knowledge of technology2;. Today, ‘nanotechnology’ is a hot topic attracting scientists, industrialists, journalists, governments, and even the general public. Nanotechnology is the creation of functional materials, devices, and systems through control of matter on the nanometer scale and the exploitation of novel phenomena and properties of matter (physical, chemical, biological, electrical, etc. at that length scale. CNTs are supposed to be a key component of nanotechnology. Almost every week a new potential application of CNTs is identified, stimulating scientists to peep into this tiny tube with ever increasing curiosity.

  4. Synthesis and Physicochemical Behaviour of Polyurethane-Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes Nanocomposites Based on Renewable Castor Oil Polyols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alaa Ali

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Polyurethanes (PUs are high performance materials, with vast industrial and engineering applications. In this research, effects of Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes (MWCNTs on physicochemical properties of Castor Oil based Polyurethanes (COPUs were studied. MWCNTs were added in different weight percentages (0% to 1% wt in a castor oil based polyurethane (COPUs-MWCNTs nanocomposites. The composition, structure, and morphology of polyurethanes were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR, X-ray diffraction (XRD, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM, and element detection by energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDX analysis, respectively. Thermal stability was studied by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA. Barrier properties and surface area studies were investigated by nitrogen permeability machine and BET technique. Mechanical properties were calculated by tensile universal testing machine. Results showed well dispersed MWCNTs in polyurethane matrix at different weight percentages. The best results were obtained with 0.3 wt% of MWCNTs in the composite. Surface area studies revealed presence of very few pores which is in a good agreement with barrier permeability, reduced up to ~68% in 1 wt% and ~70% in 0.5 wt% of MWCNTs in polymer matrix, with respect to pure COPUs samples.

  5. Synthesis of silver nanoparticles on surface-functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes by ultraviolet initiated photo-reduction method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lei, Yanhua, E-mail: yhualei@gmail.com [Institute of Materials Science and Engineering, Ocean University of China, No. 238, SongLing Road Qingdao, Qingdao 266100 (China); Gao, Guanhui [Shenzhen University Town, Institute of Biomedicine and Biotechnology, Shenzhen Institutes of Advanced Technology, No. 1068, Xueyuan Avenue, Shenzhen (China); Liu, Wechao [Institute of Materials Science and Engineering, Ocean University of China, No. 238, SongLing Road Qingdao, Qingdao 266100 (China); Liu, Tao; Yin, Yansheng [Institute of Marine Materials Science and Engineering, Shanghai Maritime University, No. 1550, LingGangXingChengHai Road Shanghai, Shanghai 201306 (China)

    2014-10-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • MWNTs decorated with Ag nanoparticle were synthesized by UV method. • No protecting or reducing agents were required. • Highly dispersed, fcc nano-Ag with diameter of 5–10 nm was formed on MWNTs. - Abstract: In this article, we described a new, facile method on fabrication of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) with silver nanoparticles by an ultraviolet initiated method. MWNTs were functionalized with acrylic acid to introduce carboxylic acid groups, and then the Ag nanoparticles were synthesized on the functionalized MWNTs by using of ultraviolet irradiation without adding of any protective or reductive agent. The obtained MWNTs/Ag composites were analyzed with Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FT-IR) spectroscopy, transmission electron microscope (TEM), X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). It was confirmed that Ag nanoparticles with diameters in a region of 5–10 nm were anchored on the surface of MWNTs by an interaction of Ag and oxygen in the carboxyl group.

  6. Facile Low-Temperature Synthesis of Carbon Nanotube/ Nanohybrids with Enhanced Visible-Light-Driven Photocatalytic Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunlong Xie

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrate a facile and novel chemical precipitation strategy for the accurate coating of TiO2 nanoparticles on the surface of carbon nanotubes (CNTs to form CNT/TiO2 nanohybrids, which only requires titanium sulfate and CNTs as starting materials and reacts in the alkaline solution at 60°C for 6 h. Using this process, the as-prepared hybrid structures preserved the good dispersity and uniformity of initial CNTs. Furthermore, the CNT/TiO2 nanohybrids show a broad blue luminescence at 469 nm and exhibit significantly enhanced photocatalytic activity for the degradation of rhodamine B (RhB under visible-light irradiation, which is about 1.5 times greater than that of commercial Degussa P25 TiO2 nanoparticles. It is believed that this facile chemical precipitation strategy is scalable and its application can be extended to synthesize other CNT/oxide nanohybrids for various applications.

  7. Synthesis of Multiwalled Carbon Nanotube-Reinforced Polyborosiloxane Nanocomposites with Mechanically Adaptive and Self-Healing Capabilities for Flexible Conductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Tongfei; Chen, Biqiong

    2016-09-14

    Intrinsic self-healing polyborosiloxane (PBS) and its multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWCNT)-reinforced nanocomposites were synthesized from hydroxyl terminated poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) and boric acid at room temperature. The formation of Si-O-B moiety in PBS was confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. PBS and its MWCNT-reinforced nanocomposites were found possessing water- or methanol-activated mechanically adaptive behaviors; the compressive modulus decreased substantially when exposed to water or methanol vapor and recovered their high value after the stimulus was removed. The compressive modulus was reduced by 76%, 86%, 90%, and 83% for neat PBS and its nanocomposites containing 3.0, 6.2, and 13.3 wt % MWCNTs, respectively, in water vapor, and the modulus reduction activated by methanol vapor was greater than by water vapor. MWCNTs at higher contents acted as a continuous electrical channel in PBS offering electrical conductivity, which was up to 1.21 S/cm for the nanocomposite containing 13.3 wt % MWCNTs. The MWCNT-reinforced PBS nanocomposites also showed excellent mechanically and electrically self-healing properties, moldability, and adhesion to PDMS elastomer substrate. These properties enabled a straightforward fabrication of self-repairing MWCNT/PBS electronic circuits on PDMS elastomer substrates.

  8. Microwave-assisted synthesis and characterization of bimetallic PtRu alloy nanoparticles supported on carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahsepar, Mansour, E-mail: rahsepar@shirazu.ac.ir [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, School of Engineering, Shiraz University, Zand Boulevard, Shiraz, 7134851154 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Kim, Hasuck, E-mail: hasuckim@snu.ac.kr [Department of Chemistry, Seoul National University, 599 Gwanak-ro, Gwanak-gu, Seoul, 151-747 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Energy Systems Engineering, Daegu Gyeongbuk Institute of Science & Technology, Daegu, 711-873 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-11-15

    Multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) supported PtRu nanoparticles were synthesized by using a microwave-assisted improved impregnation technique. X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and X-ray photo electron spectroscopy were used to characterize the prepared PtRu/MWCNT nanoparticles. The PtRu nanoparticles with a satisfactory dispersion were formed on the external surface of MWCNTs. The CO stripping experiment was performed to evaluate the poisoning resistance of the prepared PtRu/MWCNT nanoparticles. Results of electrochemical measurements indicate that the prepared PtRu/MWCNTs shows an enhanced performance toward CO poisoning. The results of characterization revealed that microwave-assisted improved impregnation technique have a high yield of alloy phase formation and could be effectively used as a simple, quick and efficient technique for preparation of bimetallic PtRu/MWCNT nanoparticles. - Highlights: • Highly dispersed PtRu/MWCNTs were formed without use of any stabilizing agent. • Microwave irradiation enhances the uniform dispersion of the PtRu nanoparticles. • Microwave-assisted improved impregnation have a high yield of alloy phase formation. • The prepared PtRu/MWCNTs shows an enhanced performance toward CO poisoning.

  9. Design of a Prussian Blue Analogue/Carbon Nanotube Thin-Film Nanocomposite: Tailored Precursor Preparation, Synthesis, Characterization, and Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husmann, Samantha; Zarbin, Aldo J G

    2016-05-01

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) filled with different species of cobalt (metallic cobalt, cobalt oxide) were synthesized by a chemical vapor deposition method through cobaltocene pyrolysis. A systematic study was performed to correlate different experimental conditions with the structure and characteristics of the obtained material. Thin films of Co-filled CNTs were deposited over conductive substrates through a liquid-liquid interfacial method and were used for cobalt hexacyanoferrate (CoHCFe) electrodeposition by an innovative route in which the Co species encapsulated in the CNTs were employed as reactants. The CNT/CoHCFe films were characterized by different spectroscopic, microscopic, and electrochemical techniques and presented high electrochemical stability in different media. The nanocomposites were applied as both an electrochemical sensor to H2 O2 and a cathode for ion batteries and showed limits of detection at approximately 3.7 nmol L(-1) and a capacity of 130 mAh g(-1) at a current density of 5 A g(-1) . PMID:27010671

  10. Biomimetic synthesis of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid/multi-walled carbon nanotubes/apatite composite membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. L. Zhang

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Bioactive guided tissue regeneration (GTR membrane has had some success for periodontal therapy. In this study, poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA/multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs composite membranes were incubated in three supersaturated calcification solutions (SCS of different pH values for 21 days to prepare a PLGA/MWNTs/apatite composite. Scanning electron microscope (SEM, X-ray diffraction (XRD, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR, energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS, water contact angle measurement and mechanical testing were used for characterization. It was found that after 21 days incubation, apatite with low crystallite size and crystallinity was formed on the PLGA/MWNTs composite membranes. The Ca-poor carbapatite was similar in morphology and composition to that of natural bone. The size and shape of the apatite crystals immersed in three SCS were different from each other. The hydrophilicity and mechanical properties of the PLGA/MWNTs composite membranes were significantly enhanced after mineralization. This indicated that biomimetic mineralization may be an effective method to improve the biocompatibility and bone inductivity of certain materials. The PLGA/MWNTs/apatite composites may be potentially useful in GTR applications, particularly as GTR membranes for periodontal tissue regeneration.

  11. Synthesis and electrochemical performance of multi-walled carbon nanotube/polyaniline/MnO 2 ternary coaxial nanostructures for supercapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qiang; Liu, Jianhua; Zou, Jianhua; Chunder, Anindarupa; Chen, Yiqing; Zhai, Lei

    Multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT)/polyaniline (PANI)/MnO 2 (MPM) ternary coaxial structures are fabricated as supercapacitor electrodes via a simple wet chemical method. The electrostatic interaction between negative poly(4-styrenesulfonic acid) (PSS) molecules and positive Mn 2+ ions causes the generation of MnO 2 nanostructures on MWCNT surfaces while the introduction of PANI layers with appropriate thickness on MWCNT surfaces facilitates the formation of MWCNT/PANI/MnO 2 ternary coaxial structures. The thickness of PANI coatings is controlled by tuning the aniline/MWCNT ratio. The effect of PANI thickness on the subsequent MnO 2 nanoflakes attachment onto MWCNTs, and the MPM structures is investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM). The results suggest that appropriate thickness of PANI layers is important for building MPM ternary coaxial structures without the agglomeration of MnO 2 nanoflakes. The MPM ternary coaxial structures provide large interaction area between the MnO 2 nanoflakes and electrolyte, and improve the electrochemical utilization of the hydrous MnO 2, and decrease the contact resistance between MnO 2 and PANI layer coated MWCNTs, leading to intriguing electrochemical properties for the applications in supercapacitors such as a specific capacitance of 330 Fg -1 and good cycle stability.

  12. Carbon nanotube surface modification with polyelectrolyte brushes endowed with quantum dots and metal oxide nanoparticles through in situ synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Llarena, Irantzu; Romero, Gabriela; Moya, Sergio E [CIC biomaGUNE Paseo Miramon, 182 Edificio Empresarial C, E-20009 San Sebastian, Gipuzkoa (Spain); Ziolo, Ronald F, E-mail: smoya@cicbiomagune.es [Centro de Investigacion en Quimica Aplicada, Blv. Enrique Reyna No. 140, Saltillo, Coahuila 25253 (Mexico)

    2010-02-05

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been successfully coated with a covalently bonded polymer brush of negatively charged poly(3-sulfopropylamino methacrylate) (PSPM) by in situ polymerization employing atomic transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) from initiating silanes attached to the CNTs before the polymerization. The CNT-bonded brush forms a polymer layer or shell-like structure around the CNTs and provides colloidal stabilization for the CNTs in aqueous media. In situ syntheses of nanocrystalline CdS and magnetic iron oxide in the polymer brushes lead to the formation of hybrid nanocomposites consisting of nanoparticle-containing PSPM-coated CNTs that remain readily dispersible and stable in aqueous media. The hybrid nanostructures are synthesized by ion exchange with the cations of the sulfonate groups of the PSPM followed by precipitation and were followed by stepwise zeta potential measurements and TEM. Such structures could have applications in the design of more complex structures and devices. The general synthetic scheme can be extended to include other nanoparticles as brush cargo to broaden the utility or functionality of the CNTs. TEM data shows nanocrystalline CdS in the range of 5-8 nm embedded in the PSPM brush and nanocrystalline iron oxide with a size between 2 and 4 nm, with the former consistent with UV-vis spectroscopy and fluorescence measurements.

  13. Synthesis of Multiwalled Carbon Nanotube-Reinforced Polyborosiloxane Nanocomposites with Mechanically Adaptive and Self-Healing Capabilities for Flexible Conductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Tongfei; Chen, Biqiong

    2016-09-14

    Intrinsic self-healing polyborosiloxane (PBS) and its multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWCNT)-reinforced nanocomposites were synthesized from hydroxyl terminated poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) and boric acid at room temperature. The formation of Si-O-B moiety in PBS was confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. PBS and its MWCNT-reinforced nanocomposites were found possessing water- or methanol-activated mechanically adaptive behaviors; the compressive modulus decreased substantially when exposed to water or methanol vapor and recovered their high value after the stimulus was removed. The compressive modulus was reduced by 76%, 86%, 90%, and 83% for neat PBS and its nanocomposites containing 3.0, 6.2, and 13.3 wt % MWCNTs, respectively, in water vapor, and the modulus reduction activated by methanol vapor was greater than by water vapor. MWCNTs at higher contents acted as a continuous electrical channel in PBS offering electrical conductivity, which was up to 1.21 S/cm for the nanocomposite containing 13.3 wt % MWCNTs. The MWCNT-reinforced PBS nanocomposites also showed excellent mechanically and electrically self-healing properties, moldability, and adhesion to PDMS elastomer substrate. These properties enabled a straightforward fabrication of self-repairing MWCNT/PBS electronic circuits on PDMS elastomer substrates. PMID:27530233

  14. Carbon nanotube surface modification with polyelectrolyte brushes endowed with quantum dots and metal oxide nanoparticles through in situ synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llarena, Irantzu; Romero, Gabriela; Ziolo, Ronald F; Moya, Sergio E

    2010-02-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been successfully coated with a covalently bonded polymer brush of negatively charged poly(3-sulfopropylamino methacrylate) (PSPM) by in situ polymerization employing atomic transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) from initiating silanes attached to the CNTs before the polymerization. The CNT-bonded brush forms a polymer layer or shell-like structure around the CNTs and provides colloidal stabilization for the CNTs in aqueous media. In situ syntheses of nanocrystalline CdS and magnetic iron oxide in the polymer brushes lead to the formation of hybrid nanocomposites consisting of nanoparticle-containing PSPM-coated CNTs that remain readily dispersible and stable in aqueous media. The hybrid nanostructures are synthesized by ion exchange with the cations of the sulfonate groups of the PSPM followed by precipitation and were followed by stepwise zeta potential measurements and TEM. Such structures could have applications in the design of more complex structures and devices. The general synthetic scheme can be extended to include other nanoparticles as brush cargo to broaden the utility or functionality of the CNTs. TEM data shows nanocrystalline CdS in the range of 5-8 nm embedded in the PSPM brush and nanocrystalline iron oxide with a size between 2 and 4 nm, with the former consistent with UV-vis spectroscopy and fluorescence measurements. PMID:20032551

  15. Synthesis of carbon nanotube-nickel nanocomposites using atomic layer deposition for high-performance non-enzymatic glucose sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Taejin; Kim, Soo Hyeon; Lee, Chang Wan; Kim, Hangil; Choi, Sang-Kyung; Kim, Soo-Hyun; Kim, Eunkyoung; Park, Jusang; Kim, Hyungjun

    2015-01-15

    A useful strategy has been developed to fabricate carbon-nanotube-nickel (CNT-Ni) nanocomposites through atomic layer deposition (ALD) of Ni and chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of functionalized CNTs. Various techniques, including scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), were used to characterize the morphology and the structure of as-prepared samples. It was confirmed that the products possess uniform Ni nanoparticles that are constructed by finely controlled deposition of Ni onto oxygen or bromine functionalized CNT surface. Electrochemical studies indicate that the CNT-Ni nanocomposites exhibit high electrocatalytic activity for glucose oxidation in alkaline solutions, which enables the products to be used in enzyme-free electrochemical sensors for glucose determination. It was demonstrated that the CNT-Ni nanocomposite-based glucose biosensor offers a variety of merits, such as a wide linear response window for glucose concentrations of 5 μM-2 mM, short response time (3 s), a low detection limit (2 μM), high sensitivity (1384.1 μA mM(-1) cm(-2)), and good selectivity and repeatability.

  16. Carbon nanotube growth density control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delzeit, Lance D. (Inventor); Schipper, John F. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    Method and system for combined coarse scale control and fine scale control of growth density of a carbon nanotube (CNT) array on a substrate, using a selected electrical field adjacent to a substrate surface for coarse scale density control (by one or more orders of magnitude) and a selected CNT growth temperature range for fine scale density control (by multiplicative factors of less than an order of magnitude) of CNT growth density. Two spaced apart regions on a substrate may have different CNT growth densities and/or may use different feed gases for CNT growth.

  17. Coated carbon nanotube array electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Zhifeng; Wen, Jian; Chen, Jinghua; Huang, Zhongping; Wang, Dezhi

    2008-10-28

    The present invention provides conductive carbon nanotube (CNT) electrode materials comprising aligned CNT substrates coated with an electrically conducting polymer, and the fabrication of electrodes for use in high performance electrical energy storage devices. In particular, the present invention provides conductive CNTs electrode material whose electrical properties render them especially suitable for use in high efficiency rechargeable batteries. The present invention also provides methods for obtaining surface modified conductive CNT electrode materials comprising an array of individual linear, aligned CNTs having a uniform surface coating of an electrically conductive polymer such as polypyrrole, and their use in electrical energy storage devices.

  18. Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapour Deposition of Horizontally Aligned Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew T. Cole

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available A plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition reactor has been developed to synthesis horizontally aligned carbon nanotubes. The width of the aligning sheath was modelled based on a collisionless, quasi-neutral, Child’s law ion sheath where these estimates were empirically validated by direct Langmuir probe measurements, thereby confirming the proposed reactors ability to extend the existing sheath fields by up to 7 mm. A 7 mbar growth atmosphere combined with a 25 W plasma permitted the concurrent growth and alignment of carbon nanotubes with electric fields of the order of 0.04 V μm−1 with linear packing densities of up to ~5 × 104 cm−1. These results open up the potential for multi-directional in situ alignment of carbon nanotubes providing one viable route to the fabrication of many novel optoelectronic devices.

  19. Purification of carbon nanotube by wet oxidation; Shisshiki sanka ni yoru carbon nanotube no seisei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morishita, K.; Takarada, T. [Gunma University, Gunma (Japan)

    1997-07-10

    In order to efficiently recover carbon nanotubes, the purification method by wet oxidation with orthoperiodic acid and perchloric acid is investigated. The reactivity of the carbonaceous material toward the acids depends on the type of carbon. Carbon nanotubes are selectively recovered under the mild oxidation conditions. The degree of purification depends on the concentration of orthoperiodic acid. It is suggested that wet oxidation is an effective method for purification of carbon nanotubes. 17 refs., 6 figs.

  20. Synthesis of single-walled carbon nanotubes by the pyrolysis of a compression activated iron(II) phthalocyanine/phthalocyanine metal-free derivative/ferric acetate mixture

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Tawanda Mugadza; Edith Antunes; Tebello Nyokong

    2015-07-01

    This paper reports on the synthesis of single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) from an activated mixture of iron (II) phthalocyanine, its metal-free derivative and ferric acetate. The powdered mixture was activated by compression into a tablet by applying a force of 300 kN, followed by re-grinding into powder and heating it to high temperatures (1000°C). The activation by compression resulted in more than 50% debundling of SWCNTs as judged by transition electron microscopy. Acid functionalization of the SWCNTs was confirmed by the increase in the D:G ratio from 0.56 to 0.87 in the Raman spectra and the observation of an average of one carboxylic acid group per 13 carbon atoms from thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). TGA also showed that the initial decomposition temperatures for the activated and non-activated mixtures to be 205°C and 245°C, respectively. Hence, activation leads to the lowering of the pyrolysis temperature of the phthalocyanines. X-ray diffraction, electronic absorption and Fourier transform infrared spectra were also employed to characterize the SWCNT.

  1. Synthesis of Ni/Mg/Al Layered Double Hydroxides and Their Use as Catalyst Precursors in the Preparation of Carbon Nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Yun; JIAO Qing-ze; LIANG Ji; LI Chun-hua

    2005-01-01

    Ni/Mg/Al layered double hydroxides(LDHs) with different n(Ni):n(Mg):n(Al) ratio values were prepared via a coprecipitation reaction. Then Ni/Mg/Al mixed oxides were obtained by calcination of these LDHs precursors. Carbon nanotubes were produced in the catalytic decomposition of propane over the Ni/Mg/Al mixed oxide catalysts. The quality of as-made nanotubes was investigated by SEM and TEM. The nanotubes were multiwall with a high length-diameter ratio and appeared to be flexible. The catalytic activities of these mixed oxides increased with increasing the Ni content. The Ni/Mg/Al mixed oxide with the highest Ni content [n(Ni)/n(Mg)/n(Al)=1/1/1] showed the highest activity and the carbon nanotubes grown on its surface had the best quality.

  2. Synthesis of single- and double-walled carbon nanotubes using the calcined MgO supported commercial metal oxide as catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simple, low-cost and environment-friendly catalysts for synthesizing carbon nanotubes were prepared by simply calcining the mixture of commercial transition metal oxide powders and porous or crystalline MgO at 950 °C. The commercial metal oxide powders, including Fe2O3, Co2O3, Ni2O3, Fe3O4 and Co3O4, were directly used without any pretreatment. Calcination of the MgO supported Fe2O3 catalysts results in the formation of MgFe2O4/MgO solid solution or the dissolution of metal into MgO lattices. High quality single- and double-walled carbon nanotubes were synthesized by thermal decomposition of methane, and were characterized by field emission scanning electron microscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, and Raman spectroscopy. The results bring forward an effective way to prepare the catalyst for synthesizing single- and double-walled carbon nanotubes. - Highlights: ► MgO supported catalysts for synthesizing carbon nanotubes were prepared. ► Commercial metal oxides were chosen as catalyst precursors. ► Single- and double-walled carbon nanotubes were synthesized.

  3. Synthesis of single- and double-walled carbon nanotubes using the calcined MgO supported commercial metal oxide as catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wan, Mao-Lin; Jia, Yong, E-mail: yjiaahedu@163.com; Fang, Fang; Zhou, Shuang-Sheng; Wu, Pei-Yun; Peng, Dai-Yin

    2012-12-15

    Simple, low-cost and environment-friendly catalysts for synthesizing carbon nanotubes were prepared by simply calcining the mixture of commercial transition metal oxide powders and porous or crystalline MgO at 950 Degree-Sign C. The commercial metal oxide powders, including Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Co{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Ni{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} and Co{sub 3}O{sub 4,} were directly used without any pretreatment. Calcination of the MgO supported Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts results in the formation of MgFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}/MgO solid solution or the dissolution of metal into MgO lattices. High quality single- and double-walled carbon nanotubes were synthesized by thermal decomposition of methane, and were characterized by field emission scanning electron microscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, and Raman spectroscopy. The results bring forward an effective way to prepare the catalyst for synthesizing single- and double-walled carbon nanotubes. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MgO supported catalysts for synthesizing carbon nanotubes were prepared. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Commercial metal oxides were chosen as catalyst precursors. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Single- and double-walled carbon nanotubes were synthesized.

  4. Síntese de nanotubos de carbono a partir do bagaço da cana-de-açúcar Synthesis of carbon nanotubes from sugarcane bagasse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joner Oliveira Alves

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available A tradicional produção de açúcar, associada à crescente produção de etanol, faz da indústria sucroalcooleira um dos principais segmentos da economia brasileira. As indústrias brasileiras de açúcar e álcool processaram cerca de 630 milhões de toneladas de cana em 2009, gerando, aproximadamente, 142 milhões de toneladas de bagaço. Este trabalho apresenta uma possibilidade de destinação para o bagaço da cana através da queima controlada associada à síntese de nanotubos de carbono (CNTs, materiais que possuem inúmeras possibilidades de aplicações tecnológicas devido as suas excepcionais propriedades. Foi utilizado o processo de pirólise a 1000ºC associado a um sistema catalisador, visando à recuperação dos gases gerados como matéria-prima para a síntese dos CNTs. As emissões gasosas foram analisadas por cromatografia e os materiais produzidos foram caracterizados com o emprego de MEV, MET, TGA e espectroscopia Raman. Os resultados mostraram que o uso do catalisador resultou na diminuição das emissões gasosas. Nanotubos de carbono com comprimentos de 10 a 40 µm e diâmetros entre 20 e 50 nm foram produzidos.The traditional sugar production associated with the growing ethanol production makes the sugarcane industry one of the main segments of the Brazilian economy; together the Brazilian industries of sugar and ethanol processed about 630 million tons of sugarcane in 2009, which generated approximately 142 million tons of bagasse. This work presents an economically and environmentally viable solution for the bagasse disposal through the controlled burn associated with the synthesis of carbon nanotubes (CNTs, materials that have a wide range of potential technological applications due to its exceptional properties. The pyrolysis process at 1000°C associated with a catalyst system were used to recover the generated gases as raw material for the synthesis of CNTs. Gaseous emissions were analyzed by chromatography and

  5. Functionalized carbon nanotubes: biomedical applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vardharajula S

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Sandhya Vardharajula,1 Sk Z Ali,2 Pooja M Tiwari,1 Erdal Eroğlu,1 Komal Vig,1 Vida A Dennis,1 Shree R Singh11Center for NanoBiotechnology and Life Sciences Research, Alabama State University, Montgomery, AL, USA; 2Department of Microbiology, Osmania University, Hyderabad, IndiaAbstract: Carbon nanotubes (CNTs are emerging as novel nanomaterials for various biomedical applications. CNTs can be used to deliver a variety of therapeutic agents, including biomolecules, to the target disease sites. In addition, their unparalleled optical and electrical properties make them excellent candidates for bioimaging and other biomedical applications. However, the high cytotoxicity of CNTs limits their use in humans and many biological systems. The biocompatibility and low cytotoxicity of CNTs are attributed to size, dose, duration, testing systems, and surface functionalization. The functionalization of CNTs improves their solubility and biocompatibility and alters their cellular interaction pathways, resulting in much-reduced cytotoxic effects. Functionalized CNTs are promising novel materials for a variety of biomedical applications. These potential applications are particularly enhanced by their ability to penetrate biological membranes with relatively low cytotoxicity. This review is directed towards the overview of CNTs and their functionalization for biomedical applications with minimal cytotoxicity.Keywords: carbon nanotubes, cytotoxicity, functionalization, biomedical applications

  6. Carbon nanotubes as heat dissipaters in microelectronics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pérez Paz, Alejandro; García-Lastra, Juan María; Markussen, Troels;

    2013-01-01

    We review our recent modelling work of carbon nanotubes as potential candidates for heat dissipation in microelectronics cooling. In the first part, we analyze the impact of nanotube defects on their thermal transport properties. In the second part, we investigate the loss of thermal properties...... of nanotubes in presence of an interface with various substances, including air and water. Comparison with previous works is established whenever is possible....

  7. Fabrication of 3D carbon nanotube networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laera, Anna Maria; Mirenghi, Luciana; Schioppa, Monica; Nobile, Concetta; Capodieci, Laura; Grazia Scalone, Anna; Di Benedetto, Francesca; Tapfer, Leander

    2016-08-01

    We report on the synthesis and characterization of a hyperbranched polymer englobing single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). This new material was obtained by using SWCNTs functionalized with carboxylic groups as starting reagent. The acid groups were firstly converted in acyl chloride moieties and afterwards were bound to hexamethylenediamine (HMDA) via formation of amide functionality. The acquired spectra of attenuated total reflectance and the analysis performed through x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy confirmed the amide bond formation. The hyperbranched polymer characterization was completed by using scanning and transmission electron microscopy, thermo-gravimetric analysis and Raman spectroscopy. The electron microscopy analyses showed the formation of an amorphous polymeric material englobing a dense network of SWCNTs without phase segregation, demonstrating that the reaction with HMDA allows a reorganization of SWCNTs in a complex three-dimensional network.

  8. Hydrothermal synthesis of sodium titanate nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    From suspension of nanoparticles TiO2 in concentrated water solution of NaOH were prepared by hydrothermal synthesis sodium titanates particles with different shapes. Influence of synthesis duration under temperature 180 grad C on the change of particles shapes was observed. The result of experiment showed that one day synthesis resulted to obtained product with high content of nanotubes, but the extension of this period led to the transformation of product's shape into stripes. From the results of experiment follows that as a precursor for TiO2 nanotubes preparation may be used only products of hydrothermal synthesis, which duration of pressure synthesis was not longer than 24 hours. (authors)

  9. Center for Applications of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Resasco, Daniel E

    2008-02-21

    This report describes the activities conducted under a Congressional Direction project whose goal was to develop applications for Single-walled carbon nanotubes, under the Carbon Nanotube Technology Center (CANTEC), a multi-investigator program that capitalizes on OU’s advantageous position of having available high quality carbon nanotubes. During the first phase of CANTEC, 11 faculty members and their students from the College of Engineering developed applications for carbon nanotubes by applying their expertise in a number of areas: Catalysis, Reaction Engineering, Nanotube synthesis, Surfactants, Colloid Chemistry, Polymer Chemistry, Spectroscopy, Tissue Engineering, Biosensors, Biochemical Engineering, Cell Biology, Thermal Transport, Composite Materials, Protein synthesis and purification, Molecular Modeling, Computational Simulations. In particular, during this phase, the different research groups involved in CANTEC made advances in the tailoring of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes (SWNT) of controlled diameter and chirality by Modifying Reaction Conditions and the Nature of the catalyst; developed kinetic models that quantitatively describe the SWNT growth, created vertically oriented forests of SWNT by varying the density of metal nanoparticles catalyst particles, and developed novel nanostructured SWNT towers that exhibit superhydrophobic behavior. They also developed molecular simulations of the growth of Metal Nanoparticles on the surface of SWNT, which may have applications in the field of fuell cells. In the area of biomedical applications, CANTEC researchers fabricated SWNT Biosensors by a novel electrostatic layer-by-layer (LBL) deposition method, which may have an impact in the control of diabetes. They also functionalized SWNT with proteins that retained the protein’s biological activity and also retained the near-infrared light absorbance, which finds applications in the treatment of cancer.

  10. Carbon Nanotube Paper-Based Electroanalytical Devices

    OpenAIRE

    Youngmi Koo; Vesselin N. Shanov; Yeoheung Yun

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report on carbon nanotube paper-based electroanalytical devices. A highly aligned-carbon nanotube (HA-CNT) array, grown using chemical vapor deposition (CVD), was processed to form bi-layered paper with an integrated cellulose-based Origami-chip as the electroanalytical device. We used an inverse-ordered fabrication method from a thick carbon nanotube (CNT) sheet to a thin CNT sheet. A 200-layered HA-CNT sheet and a 100-layered HA-CNT sheet are explored as a working electrode. The de...

  11. Ordered phases of cesium in carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Jeong Won; Hwang, Ho Jung; Song, Ki Oh; Choi, Won Young; Byun, Ki Ryang [Chung-Ang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Oh Keun [Semyung University, Jecheon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jun Ha [Sangmyung University, Chonan (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Won Woo [Juseong College, Cheongwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-10-15

    We investigate the structural phases of Cs in carbon nanotubes by using a structural optimization process applied to an atomistic simulation method. As the radius of the carbon nanotubes is increased, the structures are found in various phases from an atomic strand to multishell packs composed of coaxial cylindrical shells. Both helical structures and layered structures are found. The numbers of helical atom rows composed of coaxial tubes and the orthogonal vectors of the circular rolling of a triangular network can explain the structural phases of Cs in carbon nanotubes.

  12. Carbon nanotube fiber spun from wetted ribbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yuntian T; Arendt, Paul; Zhang, Xiefei; Li, Qingwen; Fu, Lei; Zheng, Lianxi

    2014-04-29

    A fiber of carbon nanotubes was prepared by a wet-spinning method involving drawing carbon nanotubes away from a substantially aligned, supported array of carbon nanotubes to form a ribbon, wetting the ribbon with a liquid, and spinning a fiber from the wetted ribbon. The liquid can be a polymer solution and after forming the fiber, the polymer can be cured. The resulting fiber has a higher tensile strength and higher conductivity compared to dry-spun fibers and to wet-spun fibers prepared by other methods.

  13. Methods for producing reinforced carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Zhifen; Wen, Jian Guo; Lao, Jing Y.; Li, Wenzhi

    2008-10-28

    Methods for producing reinforced carbon nanotubes having a plurality of microparticulate carbide or oxide materials formed substantially on the surface of such reinforced carbon nanotubes composite materials are disclosed. In particular, the present invention provides reinforced carbon nanotubes (CNTs) having a plurality of boron carbide nanolumps formed substantially on a surface of the reinforced CNTs that provide a reinforcing effect on CNTs, enabling their use as effective reinforcing fillers for matrix materials to give high-strength composites. The present invention also provides methods for producing such carbide reinforced CNTs.

  14. Microcapsule carbon nanotube devices for therapeutic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulamarva, Arun; Raja, Pavan M. V.; Bhathena, Jasmine; Chen, Hongmei; Talapatra, Saikat; Ajayan, Pulickel M.; Nalamasu, Omkaram; Prakash, Satya

    2009-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes are a new class of nanomaterials that have immense potential in the field of biomedicine. Their ability to carry large quantities of therapeutic molecules makes them prime candidates for providing targeted delivery of therapeutics for use in various diseases. However, their utility is limited due to the problems faced during their delivery to target sites. This article for the first time describes the design of a novel microcapsule carbon nanotube targeted delivery device. This device has potential in the targeted delivery of carbon nanotubes in suitable membranes along with their cargo, safely and effectively to the target loci.

  15. Defect-Free Carbon Nanotube Coils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shadmi, Nitzan; Kremen, Anna; Frenkel, Yiftach; Lapin, Zachary J; Machado, Leonardo D; Legoas, Sergio B; Bitton, Ora; Rechav, Katya; Popovitz-Biro, Ronit; Galvão, Douglas S; Jorio, Ado; Novotny, Lukas; Kalisky, Beena; Joselevich, Ernesto

    2016-04-13

    Carbon nanotubes are promising building blocks for various nanoelectronic components. A highly desirable geometry for such applications is a coil. However, coiled nanotube structures reported so far were inherently defective or had no free ends accessible for contacting. Here we demonstrate the spontaneous self-coiling of single-wall carbon nanotubes into defect-free coils of up to more than 70 turns with identical diameter and chirality, and free ends. We characterize the structure, formation mechanism, and electrical properties of these coils by different microscopies, molecular dynamics simulations, Raman spectroscopy, and electrical and magnetic measurements. The coils are highly conductive, as expected for defect-free carbon nanotubes, but adjacent nanotube segments in the coil are more highly coupled than in regular bundles of single-wall carbon nanotubes, owing to their perfect crystal momentum matching, which enables tunneling between the turns. Although this behavior does not yet enable the performance of these nanotube coils as inductive devices, it does point a clear path for their realization. Hence, this study represents a major step toward the production of many different nanotube coil devices, including inductors, electromagnets, transformers, and dynamos. PMID:26708150

  16. Charge Screening Effect in Metallic Carbon Nanotubes

    OpenAIRE

    Sasaki, K

    2001-01-01

    Charge screening effect in metallic carbon nanotubes is investigated in a model including the one-dimensional long-range Coulomb interaction. It is pointed out that an external charge which is being fixed spatially is screened by internal electrons so that the resulting object becomes electrically neutral. We found that the screening length is given by about the diameter of a nanotube.

  17. Carbon Nanotubes for Human Space Flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Carl D.; Files, Brad; Yowell, Leonard

    2003-01-01

    Single-wall carbon nanotubes offer the promise of a new class of revolutionary materials for space applications. The Carbon Nanotube Project at NASA Johnson Space Center has been actively researching this new technology by investigating nanotube production methods (arc, laser, and HiPCO) and gaining a comprehensive understanding of raw and purified material using a wide range of characterization techniques. After production and purification, single wall carbon nanotubes are processed into composites for the enhancement of mechanical, electrical, and thermal properties. This "cradle-to-grave" approach to nanotube composites has given our team unique insights into the impact of post-production processing and dispersion on the resulting material properties. We are applying our experience and lessons-learned to developing new approaches toward nanotube material characterization, structural composite fabrication, and are also making advances in developing thermal management materials and electrically conductive materials in various polymer-nanotube systems. Some initial work has also been conducted with the goal of using carbon nanotubes in the creation of new ceramic materials for high temperature applications in thermal protection systems. Human space flight applications such as advanced life support and fuel cell technologies are also being investigated. This discussion will focus on the variety of applications under investigation.

  18. The electrical conduction variation in stained carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Shih-Jye; Wei Fan, Jun; Lin, Chung-Yi

    2012-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes become stained from coupling with foreign molecules, especially from adsorbing gas molecules. The charge exchange, which is due to the orbital hybridization, occurred in the stained carbon nanotube induces electrical dipoles that consequently vary the electrical conduction of the nanotube. We propose a microscopic model to evaluate the electrical current variation produced by the induced electrical dipoles in a stained zigzag carbon nanotube. It is found that stronger orbital hybridization strengths and larger orbital energy differences between the carbon nanotube and the gas molecules help increasing the induced electrical dipole moment. Compared with the stain-free carbon nanotube, the induced electrical dipoles suppress the current in the nanotube. In the carbon nanotubes with induced dipoles the current increases as a result of increasing orbital energy dispersion via stronger hybridization couplings. In particular, at a fixed hybridization coupling, the current increases with the bond length for the donor-carbon nanotube but reversely for the acceptor-carbon nanotube.

  19. Synthesis and characterization of niobium-promoted cobalt/iron catalysts supported on carbon nanotubes for the hydrogenation of carbon monoxide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zahra Gholami; Noor Asmawati Mohd Zabidi; Fatemeh Gholami; Mohammadtaghi Vakili

    2016-01-01

    Bimetallic Co/Fe catalysts supported on carbon nanotubes ( CNTs) were prepared, and niobium ( Nb) was added as promoter to the 70Co:30Fe/CNT catalyst. The physicochemical properties of the catalysts were characterized, and the catalytic performances were analyzed at the same operation conditions (H2:CO (volume ratio)= 2:1, p = 1 MPa, and t = 260℃) in a tubular fixed-bed microreactor system. The addition of Nb to the bimetallic catalyst decreases the average size of the oxide nanoparticles and improves the reducibility of the bimetallic catalyst. Evaluation of the catalyst performance in a Fischer-Tropsch reaction shows that the catalyst results in high selectivity to methane, and the selectivity to C5+ increased slightly in the bimetallic catalyst unlike that in the monometallic catalysts. The addition of 1% Nb to the bimetallic catalyst increases CO conversion and selectivity to C5+. Meanwhile, a decrease in methane selectivity is observed.

  20. Covalent enzyme immobilization onto carbon nanotubes using a membrane reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voicu, Stefan Ioan; Nechifor, Aurelia Cristina; Gales, Ovidiu; Nechifor, Gheorghe

    2011-05-01

    Composite porous polysulfone-carbon nanotubes membranes were prepared by dispersing carbon nanotubes into a polysulfone solution followed by the membrane formation by phase inversion-immersion precipitation technique. The carbon nanotubes with amino groups on surface were functionalized with different enzymes (carbonic anhydrase, invertase, diastase) using cyanuric chloride as linker between enzyme and carbon nanotube. The composite membrane was used as a membrane reactor for a better dispersion of carbon nanotubes and access to reaction centers. The membrane also facilitates the transport of enzymes to active carbon nanotubes centers for functionalization (amino groups). The functionalized carbon nanotubes are isolated by dissolving the membranes after the end of reaction. Carbon nanotubes with covalent immobilized enzymes are used for biosensors fabrications. The obtained membranes were characterized by Scanning Electron Microscopy, Thermal analysis, FT-IR Spectroscopy, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance, and functionalized carbon nanotubes were characterized by FT-IR spectroscopy.

  1. Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes Decorated with Cobalt Oxide Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. G. Larrude

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs synthesized by spray pyrolysis were decorated with cobalt oxide nanoparticles using a simple synthesis route. This wet chemistry method yielded nanoparticles randomly anchored to the surface of the nanotubes by decomposition of cobalt nitrate hexahydrate diluted in acetone. Electron microscopy analysis indicated that dispersed particles were formed on the MWCNTs walls. The average size increased with the increasing concentration of cobalt nitrate in acetone in the precursor mixture. TEM images indicated that nanoparticles were strongly attached to the tube walls. The Raman spectroscopy results suggested that the MWCNT structure was slightly damaged after the nanoparticle growth.

  2. Coulomb drag in multiwall armchair carbon nanotubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lunde, A.M.; Jauho, Antti-Pekka

    2004-01-01

    We calculate the transresistivity rho(21) between two concentric armchair nanotubes in a diffusive multiwall carbon nanotube as a function of temperature T and Fermi level epsilon(F). We approximate the tight-binding band structure by two crossing bands with a linear dispersion near the Fermi...... surface. The cylindrical geometry of the nanotubes and the different parities of the Bloch states are accounted for in the evaluation of the effective Coulomb interaction between charges in the concentric nanotubes. We find a broad peak in rho(21) as a function of temperature at roughly T similar to 0.4T...

  3. Synthesis, characterization and catalytic activity of sulphonated multi-walled carbon nanotubes as heterogeneous, robust and reusable catalysts for the synthesis of bisphenolic antioxidants under solvent-free conditions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Reza Fareghi-Alamdari; Mohsen Golestanzadeh; Farima Agend; Negar Zekri

    2013-09-01

    In this study, a simple and green method has been developed for the synthesis of bisphenolic antioxidants by the reaction of 2-tert-butyl-4-methylphenol and aldehydes in the presence of sulphonated multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs-SO3H) as heterogeneous, robust and reusable catalysts under solventfree conditions. MWCNTs-SO3H was prepared and characterized by some microscopic and spectroscopic techniques including scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, FT-IR spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy. Acidity of the catalyst was measured by acid-base titration. The catalyst was reused several times without efficient loss of its activity for the preparation of bisphenolic antioxidants. In addition, high yields of the products, relatively short reaction times, being solvent-free and non-toxicity of the catalyst are other worthwhile advantages of the present method.

  4. Designed synthesis of multi-walled carbon nanotubes@Cu@MoS2 hybrid as advanced electrocatalyst for highly efficient hydrogen evolution reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Feng; Li, Jing; Lin, Xiaoqing; Li, Xinzhe; Fang, Yiyun; Jiao, Lixin; An, Xincai; Fu, Yan; Jin, Jun; Li, Rong

    2015-12-01

    Design and synthesis of non-precious-metal catalyst for efficient electrochemical transformation of water to molecular hydrogen in acid environments is of paramount importance in reducing energy losses during the water splitting process. Here, the hybrid material of MoS2-coated Cu loaded on the multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs@Cu@MoS2) was synthesized using chemical process and hydrothermal method. It was found that the participation of MWCNTs and Cu nanoparticles not only improved the electrical conductivity of the catalyst, but also further enhanced the catalytic activity by synergistic effect with edge-exposed MoS2-coating. Electrochemical experiments demonstrated that the catalyst exhibited excellent hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) activity with large cathode currents (small overpotential of 184 mV for 10 mA cm-2 current density) and a Tafel slope as small as 62 mV per decade. Furthermore, it was discovered that the current density of this composite catalyst had a little decrease after the continual 1000 cycling, which showed the catalyst had a high stability in the recycling process. These findings confirmed that this catalyst was a useful and earth-abundant material for water splitting.

  5. Facile one-step synthesis of nanocomposite based on carbon nanotubes and Nickel-Aluminum layered double hydroxides with high cycling stability for supercapacitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Caihui; Sun, Shiguo; Xu, Yongqian; Yu, Ruijin; Li, Hongjuan

    2016-10-15

    Nickel-Aluminum Layered Double Hydroxide (NiAl-LDH) and nanocomposite of Carbon Nanotubes (CNTs) and NiAl-LDH (CNTs/NiAl-LDH) were prepared by using a facile one-step homogeneous precipitation approach. The morphology, structure and electrochemical properties of the as-prepared CNTs/NiAl-LDH nanocomposite were then systematically studied. According to the galvanostatic charge-discharge curves, the CNTs/NiAl-LDH nanocomposite exhibited a high specific capacitance of 694Fg(-1) at the 1Ag(-1). Furthermore, the specific capacitance of the CNTs/NiAl-LDH nanocomposite still retained 87% when the current density was increased from 1 to 10Ag(-1). These results indicated that the CNTs/NiAl-LDH nanocomposite displayed a higher specific capacitance and rate capability than pure NiAl-LDH. And the participation of CNTs in the NiAl-LDH composite improved the electrochemical properties. Additionally, the capacitance of the CNTs/NiAl-LDH nanocomposite kept at least 92% after 3000cycles at 20Ag(-1), suggesting that the nanocomposite exhibited excellent cycling durability. This strategy provided a facile and effective approach for the synthesis of nanocomposite based on CNTs and NiAl-LDH with enhanced supercapacitor behaviors, which can be potentially applied in energy storage conversion devices. PMID:27405071

  6. Microfabricated electroactive carbon nanotube actuators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahluwalia, Arti; Baughman, Ray H.; De Rossi, Danilo; Mazzoldi, Alberto; Tesconi, Mario; Tognetti, Alessandro; Vozzi, Giovanni

    2001-07-01

    A variety of microfabrication techniques have been developed at the University of Pisa. They are based either on pressure or piston actuated microsyringes or modified ink-jet printers. This work present the results of a study aimed at fabricating carbon nanotube (NT) actuators using micro-syringes. In order to prevent the nanotubes from aggregating into clumps, they were enclosed in a partially cross-linked polyvinylalcohol - polyallylamine matrix. After sonication the solution remained homogenously dispersed for about 40 minutes, which was sufficient time for deposition. Small strips of NT, about 5 mm across and 15 mm long were deposited. Following deposition, the films were baked at 80 degree(s)C and their thickness, impedance and mechanical resistance measured. The results indicate that 50 minutes of baking time is sufficient to give a constant resistivity of 1.12 x 10-2 (Omega) m per layer similar to a typical semiconductor, and each layer has a thickness of about 6 micrometers .

  7. Synthesis of the Carbon Nanomaterials Based on Renewable Bioresources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.A. Chan

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The effectiveness and feasibility of producing nanoscale carbon materials from renewable bioresources were shown as an example marsh mass. The mechanisms of synthesis of amorphous organic carbon from sphagnum moss species modified by a liquid peat phase of humic nature are discussed. A fundamentally new way of producing carbon nanotubes by mechanical activation of amorphous organic carbon is described.

  8. Covalently bonded three-dimensional carbon nanotube solids via boron induced nanojunctions

    OpenAIRE

    Hashim, Daniel P.; Narayanan, Narayanan T.; Romo-Herrera, Jose M.; Cullen, David A.; Myung Gwan Hahm; Peter Lezzi; Suttle, Joseph R.; Doug Kelkhoff; E. Muñoz-Sandoval; Sabyasachi Ganguli; Roy, Ajit K.; Smith, David J.; Robert Vajtai; Sumpter, Bobby G.; Vincent Meunier

    2012-01-01

    The establishment of covalent junctions between carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and the modification of their straight tubular morphology are two strategies needed to successfully synthesize nanotube-based three-dimensional (3D) frameworks exhibiting superior material properties. Engineering such 3D structures in scalable synthetic processes still remains a challenge. This work pioneers the bulk synthesis of 3D macroscale nanotube elastic solids directly via a boron-doping strategy during chemical va...

  9. Synthesis, Characterization and Application of Poly (Styrene-4- Vinyl Pyridine) Membranes Assembled With Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes

    KAUST Repository

    He, Haoze

    2011-06-01

    Poly(styrene‐4‐vinylpyridine) (PS‐P4VP) isoporous membranes were prepared and their properties were evaluated in this research. The solution was prepared by dissolving PS‐P4VP polymer with necessary additives into a 1:1:1 1,4‐dioxane – N,N‐dimethyl formamide – tetrahydrofuran (DOX‐DMF‐THF, DDT) solvent. Then 0.5‐1.0 mL of the primary solution was cast onto the non‐woven substrate membrane on a glass slide, evaporated for 15‐20 sec and immersed into de‐ionized water for more than 30 min for the solidification of isoporous structure and for the formation of the primary films, which could be post‐processed in different ways for different tests. The membrane surface presents a well‐ordered, hexagonal self‐assembly structure, which is fit for aqueous and gaseous filtration. The pore size of the isoporous surface is 30~40 nm. The pore size is also sensitive to [H+] in the solution and a typical pair of S‐shape pH‐correlation curves with significant hysteresis was found. Four techniques were tried to improve the properties of the membranes in this research: 1) 1,4‐diiodobutane was introduced to chemically change the structure as a cross‐linking agent. 2) single‐wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) was linked to the membranes in order to strengthen the stability and rigidity and to reduce the hysteresis. 3) Homo‐poly(4‐vinylpyridine) (homo‐P4VP) was added and inserted into the PS‐P4VP micelles to affect the pore size and surface structure. 4) Copper acetate (Cu(Ac)2) was used as substitute of dioxane to prepare the Cu(Ac)2‐DMF‐THF (CDT) mixed solvent, for a better SWCNT dispersion. All the possible improvements were judged by the atomic force microscopy (AFM) images, water and gas flux tests and pH‐correlation curves. The introduction of SWCNT was the most important innovation in this research and is promising in future applications.

  10. Purification of Carbon Nanotubes: Alternative Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Files, Bradley; Scott, Carl; Gorelik, Olga; Nikolaev, Pasha; Hulse, Lou; Arepalli, Sivaram

    2000-01-01

    Traditional carbon nanotube purification process involves nitric acid refluxing and cross flow filtration using surfactant TritonX. This is believed to result in damage to nanotubes and surfactant residue on nanotube surface. Alternative purification procedures involving solvent extraction, thermal zone refining and nitric acid refiuxing are used in the current study. The effect of duration and type of solvent to dissolve impurities including fullerenes and P ACs (polyaromatic compounds) are monitored by nuclear magnetic reasonance, high performance liquid chromatography, and thermogravimetric analysis. Thermal zone refining yielded sample areas rich in nanotubes as seen by scanning electric microscopy. Refluxing in boiling nitric acid seem to improve the nanotube content. Different procedural steps are needed to purify samples produced by laser process compared to arc process. These alternative methods of nanotube purification will be presented along with results from supporting analytical techniques.

  11. Carbon Nanotube Composites: Strongest Engineering Material Ever?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayeaux, Brian; Nikolaev, Pavel; Proft, William; Nicholson, Leonard S. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    The primary goal of the carbon nanotube project at Johnson Space Center (JSC) is to fabricate structural materials with a much higher strength-to-weight ratio than any engineered material today, Single-wall nanotubes present extraordinary mechanical properties along with new challenges for materials processing. Our project includes nanotube production, characterization, purification, and incorporation into applications studies. Now is the time to move from studying individual nanotubes to applications work. Current research at JSC focuses on structural polymeric materials to attempt to lower the weight of spacecraft necessary for interplanetary missions. These nanoscale fibers present unique new challenges to composites engineers. Preliminary studies show good nanotube dispersion and wetting by the epoxy materials. Results of tensile strength tests will also be reported. Other applications of nanotubes are also of interest for energy storage, gas storage, nanoelectronics, field emission, and biomedical uses.

  12. Deconvoluting hepatic processing of carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alidori, Simone; Bowman, Robert L.; Yarilin, Dmitry; Romin, Yevgeniy; Barlas, Afsar; Mulvey, J. Justin; Fujisawa, Sho; Xu, Ke; Ruggiero, Alessandro; Riabov, Vladimir; Thorek, Daniel L. J.; Ulmert, Hans David S.; Brea, Elliott J.; Behling, Katja; Kzhyshkowska, Julia; Manova-Todorova, Katia; Scheinberg, David A.; McDevitt, Michael R.

    2016-07-01

    Single-wall carbon nanotubes present unique opportunities for drug delivery, but have not advanced into the clinic. Differential nanotube accretion and clearance from critical organs have been observed, but the mechanism not fully elucidated. The liver has a complex cellular composition that regulates a range of metabolic functions and coincidently accumulates most particulate drugs. Here we provide the unexpected details of hepatic processing of covalently functionalized nanotubes including receptor-mediated endocytosis, cellular trafficking and biliary elimination. Ammonium-functionalized fibrillar nanocarbon is found to preferentially localize in the fenestrated sinusoidal endothelium of the liver but not resident macrophages. Stabilin receptors mediate the endocytic clearance of nanotubes. Biocompatibility is evidenced by the absence of cell death and no immune cell infiltration. Towards clinical application of this platform, nanotubes were evaluated for the first time in non-human primates. The pharmacologic profile in cynomolgus monkeys is equivalent to what was reported in mice and suggests that nanotubes should behave similarly in humans.

  13. Carbon nanotubes – becoming clean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole Grobert

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanotubes (CNTs are now well into their teenage years. Early on, theoretical predictions and experimental data showed that CNTs possess chemical and mechanical properties that exceed those of many other materials. This has triggered intense research into CNTs. A variety of production methods for CNTs have been developed; chemical modification, functionalization, filling, and doping have been achieved; and manipulation, separation, and characterization of individual CNTs is now possible. Today, products containing CNTs range from tennis rackets and golf clubs to vehicle fenders, X-ray tubes, and Li ion batteries. Breakthroughs for CNT-based technologies are anticipated in the areas of nanoelectronics, biotechnology, and materials science. In this article, I review the current situation in CNT production and highlight the importance of clean CNT material for the success of future applications.

  14. Piezoresistive Sensors Based on Carbon Nanotube Films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    L(U) Jian-wei; WANG Wan-lu; LIAO Ke-jun; WANG Yong-tian; LIU CHang-lin; Zeng Qing-gao

    2005-01-01

    Piezoresistive effect of carbon nanotube films was investigated by a three-point bending test.Carbon nanotubes were synthesized by hot filament chemical vapor deposition.The experimental results showed that the carbon nanotubes have a striking piezoresistive effect.The relative resistance was changed from 0 to 10.5×10-2 and 3.25×10-2 for doped and undoped films respectively at room temperature when the microstrain under stress from 0 to 500. The gauge factors for doped and undoped carbon nanotube films under 500 microstrain were about 220 and 67 at room temperature, respectively, exceeding that of polycrystalline silicon (30) at 35℃.The origin of the resistance changes in the films may be attributed to a strain-induced change in the band gap for the doped tubes and the defects for the undoped tubes.

  15. Self Assembled Carbon Nanotube Enhanced Ultracapacitors Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The objective of this NASA STTR program is to develop single wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) based ultracapacitors for energy storage devices (ESD) application, using...

  16. A Thermal Model for Carbon Nanotube Interconnects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clay Mayberry

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we have studied Joule heating in carbon nanotube based very large scale integration (VLSI interconnects and incorporated Joule heating influenced scattering in our previously developed current transport model. The theoretical model explains breakdown in carbon nanotube resistance which limits the current density. We have also studied scattering parameters of carbon nanotube (CNT interconnects and compared with the earlier work. For 1 µm length single-wall carbon nanotube, 3 dB frequency in S12 parameter reduces to ~120 GHz from 1 THz considering Joule heating. It has been found that bias voltage has little effect on scattering parameters, while length has very strong effect on scattering parameters.

  17. Carbon nanotube polymer composition and devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Gao; Johnson, Stephen; Kerr, John B.; Minor, Andrew M.; Mao, Samuel S.

    2011-06-14

    A thin film device and compound having an anode, a cathode, and at least one light emitting layer between the anode and cathode, the at least one light emitting layer having at least one carbon nanotube and a conductive polymer.

  18. Carbon nanotube heat-exchange systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendricks, Terry Joseph; Heben, Michael J.

    2008-11-11

    A carbon nanotube heat-exchange system (10) and method for producing the same. One embodiment of the carbon nanotube heat-exchange system (10) comprises a microchannel structure (24) having an inlet end (30) and an outlet end (32), the inlet end (30) providing a cooling fluid into the microchannel structure (24) and the outlet end (32) discharging the cooling fluid from the microchannel structure (24). At least one flow path (28) is defined in the microchannel structure (24), fluidically connecting the inlet end (30) to the outlet end (32) of the microchannel structure (24). A carbon nanotube structure (26) is provided in thermal contact with the microchannel structure (24), the carbon nanotube structure (26) receiving heat from the cooling fluid in the microchannel structure (24) and dissipating the heat into an external medium (19).

  19. Carbon nanotube temperature and pressure sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Ilia N; Geohegan, David Bruce

    2013-10-29

    The present invention, in one embodiment, provides a method of measuring pressure or temperature using a sensor including a sensor element composed of a plurality of carbon nanotubes. In one example, the resistance of the plurality of carbon nanotubes is measured in response to the application of temperature or pressure. The changes in resistance are then recorded and correlated to temperature or pressure. In one embodiment, the present invention provides for independent measurement of pressure or temperature using the sensors disclosed herein.

  20. Carbon nanotube temperature and pressure sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivanov, Ilia N.; Geohegan, David B.

    2016-10-25

    The present invention, in one embodiment, provides a method of measuring pressure or temperature using a sensor including a sensor element composed of a plurality of carbon nanotubes. In one example, the resistance of the plurality of carbon nanotubes is measured in response to the application of temperature or pressure. The changes in resistance are then recorded and correlated to temperature or pressure. In one embodiment, the present invention provides for independent measurement of pressure or temperature using the sensors disclosed herein.

  1. Controlled Deposition and Alignment of Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smits, Jan M. (Inventor); Wincheski, Russell A. (Inventor); Patry, JoAnne L. (Inventor); Watkins, Anthony Neal (Inventor); Jordan, Jeffrey D. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A carbon nanotube (CNT) attraction material is deposited on a substrate in the gap region between two electrodes on the substrate. An electric potential is applied to the two electrodes. The CNT attraction material is wetted with a solution defined by a carrier liquid having carbon nanotubes (CNTs) suspended therein. A portion of the CNTs align with the electric field and adhere to the CNT attraction material. The carrier liquid and any CNTs not adhered to the CNT attraction material are then removed.

  2. ALUMINUM FOIL REINFORCED BY CARBON NANOTUBES

    OpenAIRE

    A. V. Alekseev; PREDTECHENSKIY M.R.

    2016-01-01

    In our research, the method of manufacturing an Al-carbon nanotube (CNT) composite by hot pressing and cold rolling was attempted. The addition of one percent of multi-walled carbon nanotubes synthesized by OCSiAl provides a significant increase in the ultimate tensile strength of aluminum. The tensile strength of the obtained composite material is at the tensile strength level of medium-strength aluminum alloys.

  3. Analysis of Carbon Nanotube Field-Effect-Transistors (FETs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Toshishige

    1999-01-01

    This five page presentation is grouped into 11 numbered viewgraphs, most of which contain one or more diagrams. Some of the diagrams are accompanied by captions, including: 2) Nanotube FET by Delft, IBM; 3) Nanotube FET/Standard MOSFET; 5) Saturation with carrier-carrier; 7) Electronic properties of carbon nanotube; 8) Theoretical nanotube FET characteristics; 11) Summary: Delft and IBM nanotube FET analysis.

  4. ON THE CONTINUUM MODELING OF CARBON NANOTUBES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张鹏; 黄永刚; Philippe H.Geubelle; 黄克智

    2002-01-01

    We have recently proposed a nanoscale continuum theory for carbonnanotubes. The theory links continuum analysis with atomistic modeling by incor-porating interatomic potentials and atomic structures of carbon nanotubes directlyinto the constitutive law. Here we address two main issues involved in setting upthe nanoscale continuum theory for carbon nanotubes, namely the multi-body in-teratomic potentials and the lack of centrosymmetry in the nanotube structure. Weexplain the key ideas behind these issues in establishing a nanoscale continuum theoryin terms of interatomic potentials and atomic structures.

  5. Facile synthesis of β-lactoglobulin-functionalized multi-wall carbon nanotubes and gold nanoparticles on glassy carbon electrode for electrochemical sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Xin; Miao, Zhiying; Zhang, Di; Fang, Yuxin; Ma, Min; Chen, Qiang

    2014-12-15

    A facile approach was developed for the preparation of nanocomposite based on β-lactoglobulin (BLG)-functionalized multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and gold nanoparticles (GNPs) for the first time. Owing to the amphipathic nature, BLG can be adopted onto the surface of MWCNTs to form BLG-MWCNTs with uniform dispersion in water. Taking advantage of sulfhydryl groups on BLG-MWCNTs, GNPs were decorated on the BLG-MWCNTs-modified glassy carbon electrode (GCE) by electrodeposition. The nanocomposite was characterized by transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and X-ray spectroscopy analysis. Cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometric method were used to evaluate the electrocatalytic ability of the nanocomposite. Furthermore, a glucose biosensor was developed based on the immobilization of glucose oxidase with cross-linking in the matrix of bovine serum albumin (BSA) on the nanocomposite modified GCE. The resulting biosensor exhibited high sensitivity (3.98 μA mM(-1)), wider linear range (0.025-5.5 mM), low detection limit (1.1 μM at the signal-to-noise ratio of 3) and fast response time (within 7s) for glucose detection. PMID:24984286

  6. Method for nano-pumping using carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Insepov, Zeke; Hassanein, Ahmed

    2009-12-15

    The present invention relates generally to the field of nanotechnology, carbon nanotubes and, more specifically, to a method and system for nano-pumping media through carbon nanotubes. One preferred embodiment of the invention generally comprises: method for nano-pumping, comprising the following steps: providing one or more media; providing one or more carbon nanotubes, the one or more nanotubes having a first end and a second end, wherein said first end of one or more nanotubes is in contact with the media; and creating surface waves on the carbon nanotubes, wherein at least a portion of the media is pumped through the nanotube.

  7. Fast readout of carbon nanotube mechanical resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meerwaldt, Harold; Singh, Vibhor; Schneider, Ben; Schouten, Raymond; van der Zant, Herre; Steele, Gary

    2013-03-01

    We perform fast readout measurements of carbon nanotube mechanical resonators. Using an electronic mixing scheme, we can detect the amplitude of the mechanical motion with an intermediate frequency (IF) of 46 MHz and a timeconstant of 1 us, up to 5 orders of magnitude faster than before. Previous measurements suffered from a low bandwidth due to the combination of the high resistance of the carbon nanotube and a large stray capacitance. We have increased the bandwidth significantly by using a high-impedance, close-proximity HEMT amplifier. The increased bandwidth should allow us to observe the nanotube's thermal motion and its transient response, approaching the regime of real-time detection of the carbon nanotube's mechanical motion.

  8. Manipulation and cutting of carbon nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Nanomanipulation plays an important role in nanofabrication, it is also a technology necessary in exploring the secrets of nanoworld, and it thus beco mesa start point to research future nanomachine. In this study, manipulation and cutting of carbon nanotubes have been conducted in order to examine whether we can move a nanocomponent from one site to another by using the tip of atomic fo rce microscope (AFM). The technique may also be valuable for providing the const ructive materials of nanofabrication. While exploring the method for manipulatin g and cutting of nanotubes, some new phenomena have been observed during the process. Results show that carbon nanotubes present a feature of deformation combin ing bending and distortion when subjected to large mechanical forces exerted by the tip of AFM. In special cases, long carbon nanotubes can be cut into two part s, by which we can remove the part where crystal lattice is flawed, and therefor e a perfect nanocomponent can be obtained.

  9. Fabrication of nylon-6/carbon nanotube composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, C.; Jia, Z.; Wu, D.; Han, Q.; Meek, T.

    2006-05-01

    A new technique to fabricate nylon-6/carbon nanotube (PA6/CNT) composites is presented. The method involves a pretreatment of carbon nanotubes synthesized by catalytic pyrolysis of hydrocarbon and an improved in-situ process for mixing nanotubes with the nylon 6 matrix. A good bond between carbon nanotubes and the nylon-6 matrix is obtained. Mechanical property measurements indicate that the tensile strength of PA6/CNT composites is improved significantly while the toughness and elongation are somewhat compromised. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis of the fractured tensile specimens reveals cracking initiated at the wrapping of the CNTs PA6 layer/PA6 matrix interface rather than at the PA6/CNT interface.

  10. Polymerization initated at sidewalls of carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tour, James M. (Inventor); Hudson, Jared L. (Inventor); Krishnamoorti, Ramanan (Inventor); Yurekli, Koray (Inventor); Mitchell, Cynthia A. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    The present invention is directed to aryl halide (such as aryl bromide) functionalized carbon nanotubes that can be utilized in anionic polymerization processes to form polymer-carbon nanotube materials with improved dispersion ability in polymer matrices. In this process the aryl halide is reacted with an alkyllithium species or is reacted with a metal to replace the aryl-bromine bond with an aryl-lithium or aryl-metal bond, respectively. It has further been discovered that other functionalized carbon nanotubes, after deprotonation with a deprotonation agent, can similarly be utilized in anionic polymerization processes to form polymer-carbon nanotube materials. Additionally or alternatively, a ring opening polymerization process can be performed. The resultant materials can be used by themselves due to their enhanced strength and reinforcement ability when compared to their unbound polymer analogs. Additionally, these materials can also be blended with pre-formed polymers to establish compatibility and enhanced dispersion of nanotubes in otherwise hard to disperse matrices resulting in significantly improved material properties. The resultant polymer-carbon nanotube materials can also be used in drug delivery processes due to their improved dispersion ability and biodegradability, and can also be used for scaffolding to promote cellular growth of tissue.

  11. New Method Developed To Purify Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes for Aerospace Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebron, Marisabel; Meador, Michael A.

    2003-01-01

    Single wall carbon nanotubes have attracted considerable attention because of their remarkable mechanical properties and electrical and thermal conductivities. Use of these materials as primary or secondary reinforcements in polymers or ceramics could lead to new materials with significantly enhanced mechanical strength and electrical and thermal conductivity. Use of carbon-nanotube-reinforced materials in aerospace components will enable substantial reductions in component weight and improvements in durability and safety. Potential applications for single wall carbon nanotubes include lightweight components for vehicle structures and propulsion systems, fuel cell components (bipolar plates and electrodes) and battery electrodes, and ultra-lightweight materials for use in solar sails. A major barrier to the successful use of carbon nanotubes in these components is the need for methods to economically produce pure carbon nanotubes in large enough quantities to not only evaluate their suitability for certain applications but also produce actual components. Most carbon nanotube synthesis methods, including the HiPCO (high pressure carbon monoxide) method developed by Smalley and others, employ metal catalysts that remain trapped in the final product. These catalyst impurities can affect nanotube properties and accelerate their decomposition. The development of techniques to remove most, if not all, of these impurities is essential to their successful use in practical applications. A new method has been developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center to purify gram-scale quantities of single wall carbon nanotubes. This method, a modification of a gas phase purification technique previously reported by Smalley and others, uses a combination of high-temperature oxidations and repeated extractions with nitric and hydrochloric acid. This improved procedure significantly reduces the amount of impurities (catalyst and nonnanotube forms of carbon) within the nanotubes, increasing

  12. Modeling of carbon nanotubes and carbon nanotube-polymer composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, G.; Kumar, S.

    2016-01-01

    In order to meet stringent environmental, safety and performance requirements from respective regulatory bodies, various technology-based industries are promoting the use of advanced carbon nanotube (CNT) reinforced lightweight and high strength polymer nanocomposites (PNCs) as a substitute to conventional materials both in structural and non-structural applications. The superior mechanical properties of PNCs made up of CNTs or bundles of CNTs can be attributed to the interfacial interaction between the CNTs and matrix, CNT's morphologies and to their uniform dispersion in the matrix. In PNCs, CNTs physically bond with polymeric matrix at a level where the assumption of continuum level interactions is not applicable. Modeling and prediction of mechanical response and failure behavior of CNTs and their composites becomes a complex task and is dealt with the help of up-scale modeling strategies involving multiple spatial and temporal scales in hierarchical or concurrent manner. Firstly, the article offers an insight into various modeling techniques in studying the mechanical response of CNTs; namely, equivalent continuum approach, quasi-continuum approach and molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. In the subsequent steps, these approaches are combined with analytical and numerical micromechanics models in a multiscale framework to predict the average macroscopic response of PNCs. The review also discusses the implementation aspects of these computational approaches, their current status and associated challenges with a future outlook.

  13. Hybrid carbon fiber/carbon nanotube composites for structural damping applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were grown on the surface of carbon fibers utilizing a relatively low temperature synthesis technique; graphitic structures by design (GSD). To probe the effects of the synthesis protocols on the mechanical properties, other samples with surface grown CNTs were prepared using catalytic chemical vapor deposition (CCVD). The woven graphite fabrics were thermally shielded with a thin film of SiO2 and CNTs were grown on top of this film. Raman spectroscopy and electron microscopy revealed the grown species to be multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). The damping performance of the hybrid CNT–carbon fiber-reinforced epoxy composite was examined using dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA). Mechanical testing confirmed that the degradations in the strength and stiffness as a result of the GSD process are far less than those encountered through using the CCVD technique and yet are negligible compared to the reference samples. The DMA results indicated that, despite the minimal degradation in the storage modulus, the loss tangent (damping) for the hybrid composites utilizing GSD-grown MWCNTs improved by 56% compared to the reference samples (based on raw carbon fibers with no surface treatment or surface grown carbon nanotubes) over the frequency range 1–60 Hz. These results indicated that the energy dissipation in the GSD-grown MWCNTs composite can be primarily attributed to the frictional sliding at the nanotube/epoxy interface and to a lesser extent to the stiff thermal shielding SiO2 film on the fiber/matrix interface. (paper)

  14. Carbon Nanotube and Graphene Nanoelectromechanical Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleman, Benjamin Jose

    One-dimensional and two-dimensional forms of carbon are composed of sp 2-hybridized carbon atoms arranged in a regular hexagonal, honeycomb lattice. The two-dimensional form, called graphene, is a single atomic layer of hexagonally-bonded carbon atoms. The one-dimensional form, known as a carbon nanotube, can be conceptualized as a rectangular piece of graphene wrapped into a seamless, high-aspect-ratio cylinder or tube. This dissertation addresses the physics and applied physics of these one and two-dimensional carbon allotropes in nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS). First, we give a theoretical background on the electrodynamics and mechanics of carbon nanotube NEMS. We then describe basic experimental techniques, such as electron and scanning probe microscopy, that we then use to probe static and dynamic mechanical and electronic behavior of the carbon nanotube NEMS. For example, we observe and control non-linear beam bending and single-electron quantum tunneling effects in carbon nanotube resonators. We then describe parametric amplification, self-oscillation behavior, and dynamic, non-linear effects in carbon nanotube mechanical resonators. We also report a novel approach to fabricate carbon nanotube atomic force microscopy (AFM) probes, and show that they can lead to exceptional lateral resolution enhancement in AFM when imaging both hard and soft (biological) materials. Finally, we describe novel fabrication techniques for large-area, suspended graphene membranes, and utilize these membranes as TEM-transparent, AFM-compatible, NEMS resonators. Laser-driven mechanical vibrations of the graphene resonators are detected by optical interferometry and several vibration harmonics are observed. A degeneracy splitting is observed in the vibrational modes of square-geometry resonators. We then attribute the observed degeneracy splitting to local mass inhomogeneities and membrane defects, and find good overall agreement with the developed theoretical model.

  15. Synthesis of superparamagnetic carbon nanotubes immobilized Pt and Pd pincer complexes: highly active and selective catalysts towards cyclohexane oxidation with dioxygen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Kelly; Mishra, Jaya; Suzuki, Shinzo; Mishra, Gopal S

    2014-12-14

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) with Ni/Co have been prepared using an arc discharge technique and Ni/Co-carbon composite rods in an inert atmosphere and were surface modified using 3-aminophenyl trimethoxysilane. These NH2-functionalized magnetic carbon nanotubes have been used as a novel support for Pd((II)) and Pt((II)) pincer complexes immobilized as magnetic nano-catalysts. The morphology of the support and the catalysts have been characterized by IR, EPR, SEM, TGA, TEM, XRD, AAS and EDS analysis. These magnetic nano-catalysts have been tested on the industrially important cyclohexane (Cy-hx) oxidation with O2 and significantly high TONs of 1678 to 1946 were achieved under solvent free and relatively mild conditions. The SWNTs/Pd catalyst provided the best conversion, 22.7%, but the SWNTs/Pt system also provided a good conversion of 20.7%. PMID:25340475

  16. Synthesis and Characterization Of Fe-modified Imogolite Nanotubes

    OpenAIRE

    Shafia, Ehsan

    2015-01-01

    During the past decades, and after introducing the most famous carbon nanotubes, the main role in these fields has been playing by the single- and multi-wall carbon nanotubes which have received tremendous research interest due to their superior mechanical, chemical, electrical and thermal properties. However, several problems in carbon nanotube technology, such as high-temperature process with low yield product, imprecise control over nanotube dimensions and chirality, limitations of chemica...

  17. Carbon nanotube ecotoxicity in amphibians: assessment of multiwalled carbon nanotubes and comparison with double-walled carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouchet, Florence; Landois, Perine; Puech, Pascal; Pinelli, Eric; Flahaut, Emmanuel; Gauthier, Laury

    2010-08-01

    The potential impact of industrial multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) was investigated under normalized laboratory conditions according to the International Standard micronucleus assay ISO 21427-1 for 12 days of half-static exposure to 0.1, 1, 10 and 50 mg/l of MWNTs in water. Three different end points were carried out for 12 days of exposure: mortality, growth inhibition and micronuclei induction in erythrocytes of the circulating blood of larvae. Raman spectroscopy analysis was used to study the presence of carbon nanotubes in the biological samples. Considering the high diversity of carbon nanotubes according to their different characteristics, MWNTs were analyzed in Xenopus larvae, comparatively to double-walled carbon nanotubes used in a previous study in similar conditions. Growth inhibition in larvae exposed to 50 mg/l of MWNTs was evidenced; however, no genetoxicity (micronucleus assay) was noticed, at any concentration. Carbon nanotube localization in the larvae leads to different possible hypothesis of mechanisms explaining toxicity in Xenopus.

  18. Carbon Nanotube-Based Synthetic Gecko Tapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhinojwala, Ali

    2008-03-01

    Wall-climbing geckos have unique ability to attach to different surfaces without the use of any viscoelastic glues. On coming in contact with any surface, the micron-size gecko foot-hairs deform, enabling molecular contact over large areas, thus translating weak van der Waals (vdW) interactions into enormous shear forces. We will present our recent results on the development of synthetic gecko tape using aligned carbon nanotubes to mimic the keratin hairs found on gecko feet. The patterned carbon nanotube-based gecko tape can support a shear stress (36 N/cm^2) nearly four times higher than the gecko foot and sticks to a variety of surfaces, including Teflon. Both the micron-size setae (replicated by nanotube bundles) and nanometer-size spatulas (individual nanotubes) are necessary to achieve macroscopic shear adhesion and to translate the weak vdW interactions into high shear forces. The carbon nanotube based tape offers an excellent synthetic option as a dry conductive reversible adhesive in microelectronics, robotics and space applications. The mechanism behind these large shear forces and self-cleaning properties of these carbon nanotube based synthetic gecko tapes will be discussed. This work was performed in collaboration with graduate students Liehui Ge, and Sunny Sethi, and collaborators from RPI; Lijie Ci and Professor Pulickel Ajayan.

  19. Boron Nitride Nanotube: Synthesis and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiano, Amanda L.; Park, Cheol; Lee, Joseph W.; Luong, Hoa H.; Gibbons, Luke J.; Chu, Sang-Hyon; Applin, Samantha I.; Gnoffo, Peter; Lowther, Sharon; Kim, Hyun Jung; Danehy, Paul M.; Inman, Jennifer A.; Jones, Stephen B.; Kang, Jin Ho; Sauti, Godfrey; Thibeault, Sheila A.; Yamakov, Vesselin; Wise, Kristopher E.; Su, Ji; Fay, Catharine C.

    2014-01-01

    Scientists have predicted that carbon's immediate neighbors on the periodic chart, boron and nitrogen, may also form perfect nanotubes, since the advent of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in 1991. First proposed then synthesized by researchers at UC Berkeley in the mid 1990's, the boron nitride nanotube (BNNT) has proven very difficult to make until now. Herein we provide an update on a catalyst-free method for synthesizing highly crystalline, small diameter BNNTs with a high aspect ratio using a high power laser under a high pressure and high temperature environment first discovered jointly by NASA/NIA JSA. Progress in purification methods, dispersion studies, BNNT mat and composite formation, and modeling and diagnostics will also be presented. The white BNNTs offer extraordinary properties including neutron radiation shielding, piezoelectricity, thermal oxidative stability (> 800 C in air), mechanical strength, and toughness. The characteristics of the novel BNNTs and BNNT polymer composites and their potential applications are discussed.

  20. Growth of straight carbon nanotubes by simple thermal chemical vapor deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZOU Xiao-ping; H. ABE; T. SHIMIZU; A. ANDO; H. TOKUMOTO; ZHU Shen-ming; ZHOU Hao-shen

    2006-01-01

    Straight carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were achieved by simple thermal chemical vapor deposition(STCVD) catalyzed by Mo-Fe alloy catalyst on silica supporting substrate at 700 ℃. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy images show that the straight CNTs are well graphitized with no attached amorphous carbon. Mo-Fe alloy catalyst particles play a very crucial role in the growth of straight CNTs. The straight carbon nanotubes contain much less defects than the curved nanotubes and might have potential applications for nanoelectrical devices in the future. The simple synthesis of straight CNTs may have benefit for large-scale productions.

  1. Processing and Characterization of Carbon Nanotube Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Can, Roberto J.; Grimsley, Brian W.; Czabaj, Michael W.; Siochi, Emilie J.; Hull, Brandon

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in the synthesis of large-scale quantities of carbon nanotubes (CNT) have provided the opportunity to study the mechanical properties of polymer matrix composites using these novel materials as reinforcement. Nanocomp Technologies, Inc. currently supplies large sheets with dimensions up to 122 cm x 244 cm containing both single-wall and few-wall CNTs. The tubes are approximately 1 mm in length with diameters ranging from 8 to 12 nm. In the present study being conducted at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC), single and multiple layers of CNT sheets were infused or coated with various polymer solutions that included commercial toughened-epoxies and bismaleimides, as well as a LaRC developed polyimide. The resulting CNT composites were tested in tension using a modified version of ASTM D882-12 to determine their strength and modulus values. The effects of solvent treatment and mechanical elongation/alignment of the CNT sheets on the tensile performance of the composite were determined. Thin composites (around 50 wt% CNT) fabricated from acetone condensed and elongated CNT sheets with either a BMI or polyimide resin solution exhibited specific tensile moduli approaching that of toughened epoxy/ IM7 carbon fiber unidirectional composites.

  2. Release characteristics of selected carbon nanotube polymer composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) are commonly used in polymer formulations to improve strength, conductivity, and other attributes. A developing concern is the potential for carbon nanotube polymer nanocomposites to release nanoparticles into the environment as the polymer ...

  3. Methods for Gas Sensing with Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaul, Anupama B. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    Methods for gas sensing with single-walled carbon nanotubes are described. The methods comprise biasing at least one carbon nanotube and exposing to a gas environment to detect variation in temperature as an electrical response.

  4. A Review: Carbon Nanotube-Based Piezoresistive Strain Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waris Obitayo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of carbon nanotubes for piezoresistive strain sensors has acquired significant attention due to its unique electromechanical properties. In this comprehensive review paper, we discussed some important aspects of carbon nanotubes for strain sensing at both the nanoscale and macroscale. Carbon nanotubes undergo changes in their band structures when subjected to mechanical deformations. This phenomenon makes them applicable for strain sensing applications. This paper signifies the type of carbon nanotubes best suitable for piezoresistive strain sensors. The electrical resistivities of carbon nanotube thin film increase linearly with strain, making it an ideal material for a piezoresistive strain sensor. Carbon nanotube composite films, which are usually fabricated by mixing small amounts of single-walled or multiwalled carbon nanotubes with selected polymers, have shown promising characteristics of piezoresistive strain sensors. Studies also show that carbon nanotubes display a stable and predictable voltage response as a function of temperature.

  5. Carbon Nanotube-Based Permeable Membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holt, J K; Park, H G; Bakajin, O; Noy, A; Huser, T; Eaglesham, D

    2004-04-06

    A membrane of multiwalled carbon nanotubes embedded in a silicon nitride matrix was fabricated for use in studying fluid mechanics on the nanometer scale. Characterization by fluorescent tracer diffusion and scanning electron microscopy suggests that the membrane is void-free near the silicon substrate on which it rests, implying that the hollow core of the nanotube is the only conduction path for molecular transport. Assuming Knudsen diffusion through this nanotube membrane, a maximum helium transport rate (for a pressure drop of 1 atm) of 0.25 cc/sec is predicted. Helium flow measurements of a nanoporous silicon nitride membrane, fabricated by sacrificial removal of carbon, give a flow rate greater than 1x10{sup -6} cc/sec. For viscous, laminar flow conditions, water is estimated to flow across the nanotube membrane (under a 1 atm pressure drop) at up to 2.8x10{sup -5} cc/sec (1.7 {micro}L/min).

  6. Carbon Nanotube Tower-Based Supercapacitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyyappan, Meyya (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A supercapacitor system, including (i) first and second, spaced apart planar collectors, (ii) first and second arrays of multi-wall carbon nanotube (MWCNT) towers or single wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) towers, serving as electrodes, that extend between the first and second collectors where the nanotube towers are grown directly on the collector surfaces without deposition of a catalyst and without deposition of a binder material on the collector surfaces, and (iii) a porous separator module having a transverse area that is substantially the same as the transverse area of at least one electrode, where (iv) at least one nanotube tower is functionalized to permit or encourage the tower to behave as a hydrophilic structure, with increased surface wettability.

  7. A critical review of glucose biosensors based on carbon nanomaterials: carbon nanotubes and graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Zhigang; Garcia-Gancedo, Luis; Flewitt, Andrew J; Xie, Huaqing; Moussy, Francis; Milne, William I

    2012-01-01

    There has been an explosion of research into the physical and chemical properties of carbon-based nanomaterials, since the discovery of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) by Iijima in 1991. Carbon nanomaterials offer unique advantages in several areas, like high surface-volume ratio, high electrical conductivity, chemical stability and strong mechanical strength, and are thus frequently being incorporated into sensing elements. Carbon nanomaterial-based sensors generally have higher sensitivities and a lower detection limit than conventional ones. In this review, a brief history of glucose biosensors is firstly presented. The carbon nanotube and grapheme-based biosensors, are introduced in Sections 3 and 4, respectively, which cover synthesis methods, up-to-date sensing approaches and nonenzymatic hybrid sensors. Finally, we briefly outline the current status and future direction for carbon nanomaterials to be used in the sensing area. PMID:22778628

  8. A Critical Review of Glucose Biosensors Based on Carbon Nanomaterials: Carbon Nanotubes and Graphene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William I. Milne

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available There has been an explosion of research into the physical and chemical properties of carbon-based nanomaterials, since the discovery of carbon nanotubes (CNTs by Iijima in 1991. Carbon nanomaterials offer unique advantages in several areas, like high surface-volume ratio, high electrical conductivity, chemical stability and strong mechanical strength, and are thus frequently being incorporated into sensing elements. Carbon nanomaterial-based sensors generally have higher sensitivities and a lower detection limit than conventional ones. In this review, a brief history of glucose biosensors is firstly presented. The carbon nanotube and grapheme-based biosensors, are introduced in Sections 3 and 4, respectively, which cover synthesis methods, up-to-date sensing approaches and nonenzymatic hybrid sensors. Finally, we briefly outline the current status and future direction for carbon nanomaterials to be used in the sensing area.

  9. Carbon Nanotubes and Chronic Granulomatous Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara P. Barna

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Use of nanomaterials in manufactured consumer products is a rapidly expanding industry and potential toxicities are just beginning to be explored. Combustion-generated multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNT or nanoparticles are ubiquitous in non-manufacturing environments and detectable in vapors from diesel fuel, methane, propane, and natural gas. In experimental animal models, carbon nanotubes have been shown to induce granulomas or other inflammatory changes. Evidence suggesting potential involvement of carbon nanomaterials in human granulomatous disease, has been gathered from analyses of dusts generated in the World Trade Center disaster combined with epidemiological data showing a subsequent increase in granulomatous disease of first responders. In this review we will discuss evidence for similarities in the pathophysiology of carbon nanotube-induced pulmonary disease in experimental animals with that of the human granulomatous disease, sarcoidosis.

  10. Optical trapping of carbon nanotubes and graphene

    OpenAIRE

    Vasi, S.; M. A. Monaca; Donato, M. G.; Bonaccorso, F.; Privitera, G; Trushkevych, O.; G. Calogero; Fazio, B.; Irrera, A.; M.A. Iati'; Saija, R.; Denti, P.; F. Borghese; Jones, P H; Ferrari, A. C.

    2011-01-01

    We study optical trapping of nanotubes and graphene. We extract the distribution of both centre-of-mass and angular fuctuations from three-dimensional tracking of these optically trapped carbon nanostructures. The optical force and torque constants are measured from auto and cross-correlation of the tracking signals. We demonstrate that nanotubes enable nanometer spatial, and femto-Newton force resolution in photonic force microscopy by accurately measuring the radiation pressure in a double ...

  11. Efficiently Dispersing Carbon Nanotubes in Polyphenylene Sulfide

    OpenAIRE

    Sommer, Kevin M; Pipes, R. Byron

    2013-01-01

    Thermal plastics are replacing conventional metals in the aerospace, sporting, electronics, and other industries. Thermal plastics are able to withstand relatively high temperatures, have good fatigue properties, and are lighter than metals. Unfortunately, they are not very electrically conductive. However, adding carbon nanotubes to thermal plastics such as polyphenylene sulfide (PPS) can drastically increase the plastic's conductivity at a low weight percent of nanotubes called the percolat...

  12. Carbon nanotube based biomedical agents for heating, temperature sensoring and drug delivery

    CERN Document Server

    Klingeler, Ruediger; Buechner, Bernd

    2009-01-01

    Due to their extraordinary physical and chemical properties carbon nanotubes reveal a promising potential as biomedical agents for heating, temperature sensoring and drug delivery on the cellular level. Filling carbon nanotubes with tailored materials realises nanoscaled containers in which the active content is encapsulated by a protecting carbon shell. We describe different synthesis routes and show the structural and magnetic properties of carbon nanotubes. In particular, the filling with magnetic materials offers the potential for hyperthermia applications while the insertion of NMR active substances allows the usage as markers and sensors. The potential of carbon nanotubes for biomedical applications is highlighted by hyperthermia studies which prove their applicability for local in-situ heating. In addition we have shown that a non-invasive temperature control by virtue of a carbon-wrapped nanoscaled thermometer and filling with anti-cancer drugs is possible.

  13. Synthesis of 1D-glyconanomaterials by a hybrid noncovalent-covalent functionalization of single wall carbon nanotubes: a study of their selective interactions with lectins and with live cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pernía Leal, M.; Assali, M.; Cid, J. J.; Valdivia, V.; Franco, J. M.; Fernández, I.; Pozo, D.; Khiar, N.

    2015-11-01

    the dynamic hybrids obtained by non-covalent functionalizations. In the present work, we examined the molecular basis of an original strategy that combines the advantages of both functionalizations without their main drawbacks. The hierarchical self-assembly of diacetylenic-based neoglycolipids into highly organized and compacted rings around the nanotubes, followed by photopolymerization leads to the formation of nanotubes covered with glyconanorings with a shish kebab-type topology exposing the carbohydrate ligands to the water phase in a multivalent fashion. The glyconanotubes obtained are fully functional, and able to establish specific interactions with their cognate receptors. In fact, by taking advantage of this selective binding, an easy method to sense lectins as a working model of toxin detection was developed based on a simple analysis of TEM images. Remarkably, different experimental settings to assess cell membrane integrity, cell growth kinetics and cell cycle demonstrated the cellular biocompatibility of the sugar-coated carbon nanotubes compared to pristine single-walled carbon nanotubes. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental procedures for the synthesis of compounds 12-10, 12-15, 17-20, 22-25, 27-30, NMR spectra, and additional TEM images. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr05956a

  14. Thermal Transport in Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christman, Jeremy; Moore, Andrew; Khatun, Mahfuza

    2011-10-01

    Recent advances in nanostructure technology have made it possible to create small devices at the nanoscale. Carbon nanotubes (CNT's) are among the most exciting building blocks of nanotechnology. Their versatility and extremely desirable properties for electronic and other devices have driven intense research and development efforts in recent years. A review of electrical and thermal conduction of the structures will be presented. The theoretical investigation is mainly based on molecular dynamics. Green Kubo relation is used for the study of thermal conductivity. Results include kinetic energy, potential energy, heat flux autocorrelation function, and heat conduction of various CNT structures. Most of the computation and simulation has been conducted on the Beowulf cluster at Ball State University. Various software packages and tools such as Visual Molecular Dynamics (VMD), Large-scale Atomic/Molecular Massively Parallel Simulator (LAMMPS), and NanoHUB, the open online resource at Purdue University have been used for the research. The work has been supported by the Indiana Academy of Science Research Fund, 2010-2011.

  15. Does water dope carbon nanotubes?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bell, Robert A.; Payne, Michael C. [Theory of Condensed Matter Group, Cavendish Laboratory, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Mostofi, Arash A. [Department of Materials and Department of Physics, and the Thomas Young Centre for Theory and Simulation of Materials, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

    2014-10-28

    We calculate the long-range perturbation to the electronic charge density of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) as a result of the physisorption of a water molecule. We find that the dominant effect is a charge redistribution in the CNT due to polarisation caused by the dipole moment of the water molecule. The charge redistribution is found to occur over a length-scale greater than 30 Å, highlighting the need for large-scale simulations. By comparing our fully first-principles calculations to ones in which the perturbation due to a water molecule is treated using a classical electrostatic model, we estimate that the charge transfer between CNT and water is negligible (no more than 10{sup −4} e per water molecule). We therefore conclude that water does not significantly dope CNTs, a conclusion that is consistent with the poor alignment of the relevant energy levels of the water molecule and CNT. Previous calculations that suggest water n-dopes CNTs are likely due to the misinterpretation of Mulliken charge partitioning in small supercells.

  16. Elastomer Reinforced with Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, Jared L.; Krishnamoorti, Ramanan

    2009-01-01

    Elastomers are reinforced with functionalized, single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) giving them high-breaking strain levels and low densities. Cross-linked elastomers are prepared using amine-terminated, poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS), with an average molecular weight of 5,000 daltons, and a functionalized SWNT. Cross-link densities, estimated on the basis of swelling data in toluene (a dispersing solvent) indicated that the polymer underwent cross-linking at the ends of the chains. This thermally initiated cross-linking was found to occur only in the presence of the aryl alcohol functionalized SWNTs. The cross-link could have been via a hydrogen-bonding mechanism between the amine and the free hydroxyl group, or via attack of the amine on the ester linage to form an amide. Tensile properties examined at room temperature indicate a three-fold increase in the tensile modulus of the elastomer, with rupture and failure of the elastomer occurring at a strain of 6.5.

  17. Facile template-directed synthesis of carbon-coated SnO{sub 2} nanotubes with enhanced Li-storage capabilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Xiaoshu; Zhu, Jingyi; Yao, Yinan; Zhou, Yiming; Tang, Yawen; Wu, Ping, E-mail: zjuwuping@njnu.edu.cn

    2015-08-01

    Herein, a novel type of carbon-coated SnO{sub 2} nanotubes has been designed and synthesized through a facile two-step hydrothermal approach by using ZnO nanorods as templates. During the synthetic route, SnO{sub 2} nanocrystals and carbon layer have been uniformly deposited on the rod-like templates in sequence, meanwhile ZnO nanorods could be in situ dissolved owing to the generated alkaline and acidic environments during hydrothermal coating of SnO{sub 2} nanocrystals and hydrothermal carbonization of glucose, respectively. When utilized as an anode material in lithium-ion batteries, the carbon-coated SnO{sub 2} nanotubes manifests markedly enhanced Li-storage capabilities in terms of specific capacity and cycling stability in comparison with bare SnO{sub 2} nanocrystals. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • C-coated SnO{sub 2} nanotubes prepared via facile ZnO-nanorod-templated hydrothermal route. • Unique morphological and structural features toward lithium storage. • Enhanced Li-storage performance in terms of specific capacity and cycling stability.

  18. 水性碳纳米管接枝改性环氧树脂的合成%Synthesis of water-solubility carbon nanotube graftmodified epoxy resin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    沈有斌; 刘晓国

    2012-01-01

    用酸氧化法对多壁碳纳米管(MWNTs)进行羧化处理后引入酰氯基团,利用酰氯基团与环氧酯聚合物中的羟基进行缩聚反应将MWNTs接枝到环氧树脂结构中,合成得到碳纳米管接枝改性的环氧酯聚合物。该聚合物与丙烯酸单体进行自由基聚合,在聚合物中引入羧基,利用羧基与有机胺中和成盐,制得水性碳纳米管接枝改性环氧酯聚合物。对聚合物进行红外光谱和透射电镜分析表明,碳纳米管与环氧酯聚合物进行了接枝反应。%The multi-walled carbon nanotubes(MWNTs)was treated by acid oxidation,and then processed by acyl chlorination.The carbonyl chlorides groups reaction with epoxy acrylic acid resin was applied to get carbon nanotubes grafted epoxy resin,and then free radical polymerization is conducted with acrylic acid.Consequently,the waterborne epoxy acrylate resin grafted with carbon nanotubes is obtained.The resin as main film-former is used to prepare waterborne carbon nanotubes grafted epoxy acrylic resin coating.The structure of the resin is analyzed by IR.Results show that carbon nanotubes can be grafted with epoxy resin by introducing carbonyl chlorides groups.

  19. Characterization and synthesis of carbon aggregates in high temperature environment

    OpenAIRE

    Russo, Carmela

    2013-01-01

    Carbon materials in all its forms, from the natural carbon solid materials, as coal and graphite, to the synthesized carbon materials, as carbon black, pitch fibers, fullerenes, carbon nanotubes, etc,. have been object of many studies regarding their characteristics and behaviour due to their importance in the energy and industrial sectors. Recently, most of the research efforts have been focused on the synthesis of new carbon materials and in particular on their physico-chemical propertie...

  20. Edge effects in finite elongated carbon nanotubes

    CERN Document Server

    Hod, O; Scuseria, G E; Hod, Oded; Peralta, Juan E.; Scuseria, Gustavo E.

    2006-01-01

    The importance of finite-size effects for the electronic structure of long zigzag and armchair carbon nanotubes is studied. We analyze the electronic structure of capped (6,6), (8,0), and (9,0) single walled carbon nanotubes as a function of their length up to 60 nm, using a divide and conquer density functional theory approach. For the metallic nanotubes studied, most of the physical features appearing in the density of states of an infinite carbon nanotube are recovered at a length of 40 nm. The (8,0) semi-conducting nanotube studied exhibits pronounced edge effects within the energy gap that scale as the inverse of the length of the nanotube. As a result, the energy gap reduces from the value of ~1 eV calculated for the periodic system to a value of ~0.25 eV calculated for a capped 62 nm long CNT. These edge effects are expected to become negligible only at tube lengths exceeding 6 micrometers. Our results indicate that careful tailoring of the nature of the system and its capping units should be applied w...

  1. Synthesis of Boron Nanowires, Nanotubes, and Nanosheets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajen B. Patel

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The synthesis of boron nanowires, nanotubes, and nanosheets using a thermal vapor deposition process is reported. This work confirms previous research and provides a new method capable of synthesizing boron nanomaterials. The materials were made by using various combinations of MgB2, Mg(BH42, MCM-41, NiB, and Fe wire. Unlike previously reported methods, a nanoparticle catalyst and a silicate substrate are not required for synthesis. Two types of boron nanowires, boron nanotubes, and boron nanosheets were made. Their morphology and chemical composition were determined through the use of scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and electron energy loss spectroscopy. These boron-based materials have potential for electronic and hydrogen storage applications.

  2. Transport Properties of Carbon-Nanotube/Cement Composites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Han, B.; Yang, Z.; Shi, X.; Yu, X.

    2012-01-01

    This paper preliminarily investigates the general transport properties (i.e., water sorptivity, water permeability, and gas permeability) of carbon-nanotube/cement composites. Carboxyl multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) are dispersed into cement mortar to fabricate the carbon nanotubes (CNTs) rei

  3. Deposition of the platinum crystals on the carbon nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    A new technique and the affecting factors for depositing platinum on the carbon nanotubes were investigated. The results show that the deposited platinum crystals in the atmosphere of hydrogen or nitrogen have a small size and a homogeneous distribution on the surface of the carbon nanotubes. The pretreatment would decrease the platinum particles on the carbon nanotubes significantly.

  4. Decoration of activated carbon nanotubes by assembling nano-silver

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen-sha Li; Bin-song Wang; Ying-jie Qiao; Wei-zhe Lu; Ji Liang

    2009-01-01

    A facile solution processed strategy of synthesizing nano silver assembled on carbon nanotubes (CNTs) at room tempera-ture was put forward. Activated carbon nanotubes were used as precursors for preparing silver-decorated nanotubes. The nature of the decorated nanotubes was studied using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and en-ergy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). The inert surfaces of carbon nanotubes were activated by introducing catalytic nuclei via an oxidation-sensitization-activation approach. Activated carbon nanotubes catalyzed the metal deposition specifically onto their surfaces upon immersion in electroless plating baths. The method produced nanotubes decorated with silver. The extent of silver decoration was found to be dependent on fabrication conditions. Dense nano silver assembled on nanotube surfaces could be ob-tained by keeping a low reaction rate in the solution phase. The results here show that this method is an efficient and simple means of achieving carbon nanotubes being assembled by nano metal.

  5. Covellite CuS nanocrystals: realizing rapid microwave-assisted synthesis in air and unravelling the disappearance of their plasmon resonance after coupling with carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Mee Rahn; Hafez, Hassan A; Chai, Xin; Besteiro, Lucas V; Tan, Long; Ozaki, Tsuneyuki; Govorov, Alexander O; Izquierdo, Ricardo; Ma, Dongling

    2016-07-14

    Semiconductor nanocrystals that show plasmonic resonance represent an emerging class of highly promising plasmonic materials with potential applications in diverse fields, such as sensing and optical and optoelectronic devices. We report a new approach to synthesizing homogeneous covellite CuS nanoplatelets in air and the almost complete disappearance of their plasmonic resonance once coupled with multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). These nanoplatelets were rapidly synthesized by a simple microwave-assisted approach at a relatively low reaction temperature in air, instead of under N2 as reported previously. These less severe synthesis conditions were enabled by appropriately selecting a Cu precursor and preparing a precursor sulfur solution (instead of using solid sulfur) and by using microwave radiation as the heat source. The advantages of utilizing microwave irradiation, including uniform and rapid heating, became clear after comparing the results of the synthesis with those achieved using a conventional oil-bath method under N2. The CuS nanoplatelets prepared in this way showed very strong plasmon resonance at c. 1160 nm as a result of their free charge carriers at the calculated density of nh = 1.5 × 10(22) cm(-3) based on the Drude model. With the aim of exploring their potential for near-infrared responsive optoelectronic devices, they were hybridized with functionalized MWCNTs. Their strong plasmon resonance almost completely disappeared on hybridization. Detailed investigations excluded the effect of possible structural changes in the CuS nanoplatelets during the hybridization process and a possible effect on the plasmon resonance arising from the chemical bonding of surface ligands. Charge transfer was considered to be the main reason for the almost complete disappearance of the plasmon resonance, which was further confirmed by terahertz (THz) time-domain spectrometry and THz time-resolved spectrometry measurements performed on the Cu

  6. Synthesis and evaluation of single-wall carbon nanotube-paclitaxel-folic acid conjugate as an anti-cancer targeting agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavakolifard, Sara; Biazar, Esmaeil; Pourshamsian, Khalil; Moslemin, Mohammad H

    2016-08-01

    Single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) represent a novel nanomaterial applied in various nanotechnology fields because of their surface chemistry properties and high drug cargo capacity. In this study, SWCNT are pre-functionalized covalently with paclitaxel (PTX) - an anticancer drug, and folic acid (FA), as a targeting agent for many tumors. The samples are investigated and evaluated by different analyses such as Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA), absorption spectroscopic measurements (UV-Visible), elemental analysis, and cell analyses with cancer cell line cultures. The results show good conjugation of the targeting molecule and the anticancer drug on the surface of the carbon nanotubes (CNT). This work demonstrates that the SWCNT-PTX-FA system is a potentially useful system for the targeted delivery of anticancer drugs. PMID:25783856

  7. Carbon nanotube suspensions, dispersions, & composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Trevor John

    Carbon Nanotubes (CNTs) are amazing structures that hold the potential to revolutionize many areas of scientific research. CNTs can be behave both as semiconductors and metals, can be grown in highly ordered arrays and patterns or in random orientation, and can be comprised of one graphene cylinder (single wall nanotube, SWNT) or several concentric graphene cylinders (multi-wall nanotube, MWNT). Although these structures are usually only a few nanometers wide, they can be grown up to centimeter lengths, and in massive quantities. CNTs can be produced in a variety of processes ranging from repeated combustion of organic material such as dried grass, arc-discharge with graphite electrodes, laser ablation of a graphitic target, to sophisticated chemical vapor deposition (CVD) techniques. CNTs are stronger than steel but lighter than aluminum, and can be more conductive than copper or semiconducting like silicon. This variety of properties has been matched by the wide variety of applications that have been developed for CNTs. Many of these applications have been limited by the inability of researchers to tame these structures, and incorporating CNTs into existing technologies can be exceedingly difficult and prohibitively expensive. It is therefore the aim of the current study to develop strategies for the solution processing and deposition of CNTs and CNT-composites, which will enable the use of CNTs in existing and emerging technologies. CNTs are not easily suspended in polar solvents and are extremely hydrophobic materials, which has limited much of the solution processing to organic solvents, which also cannot afford high quality dispersions of CNTs. The current study has developed a variety of aqueous CNT solutions that employ surfactants, water-soluble polymers, or both to create suspensions of CNTs. These CNT 'ink' solutions were deposited with a variety of techniques that have afforded many interesting structures, both randomly oriented as well as highly

  8. Graphene-carbon nanotube hybrid materials and use as electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tour, James M.; Zhu, Yu; Li, Lei; Yan, Zheng; Lin, Jian

    2016-09-27

    Provided are methods of making graphene-carbon nanotube hybrid materials. Such methods generally include: (1) associating a graphene film with a substrate; (2) applying a catalyst and a carbon source to the graphene film; and (3) growing carbon nanotubes on the graphene film. The grown carbon nanotubes become covalently linked to the graphene film through carbon-carbon bonds that are located at one or more junctions between the carbon nanotubes and the graphene film. In addition, the grown carbon nanotubes are in ohmic contact with the graphene film through the carbon-carbon bonds at the one or more junctions. The one or more junctions may include seven-membered carbon rings. Also provided are the formed graphene-carbon nanotube hybrid materials.

  9. Facile synthesis of 3D silicon/carbon nanotube capsule composites as anodes for high-performance lithium-ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Xinyang; Sun, Wang; Zhang, Jing; Wang, Fang; Sun, Kening

    2016-10-01

    Carbon nanotubes have attracted widespread attention as ideal materials for Lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) due to their excellent conductivity, mechanical flexibility, chemical stability and extremely large surface area. Here, three-dimensional (3D) silicon/carbon nanotube capsule composites (Si/CNCs) are firstly prepared via water-in-oil (W/O) emulsion technique with more than 75 wt% loading amount of silicon. CNCs with unique hollow sphere structure act as a 3D interconnected conductive network skeleton, and the cross-linked carbon nanotubes (CNTs) of CNCs can effectively enhance the strength, flexibility and conductivity of the electrode. This Si/CNCs can not only alleviate the volume expansion, but also effectively improve the electrochemical performance of the LIBs. Such Si/CNCs electrode with the unique structure achieves a high initial discharge specific capacity of 2950 mAh g-1 and retains 1226 mAh g-1 after 100 cycles at 0.5 A g-1, as well as outstanding rate performance of 547 mAh g-1 at 10 A g-1.

  10. Geometric and electronic structure of carbon nanotube networks: 'super'-carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coluci, V. R.; Galvão, D. S.; Jorio, A.

    2006-02-01

    Structures of the so-called super-carbon nanotubes are proposed. These structures are built from single walled carbon nanotubes connected by Y-like junctions forming a 'super'-sheet that is then rolled into a seamless cylinder. Such a procedure can be repeated several times, generating a fractal structure. This procedure is not limited to carbon nanotubes, and can be easily modified for application to other systems. Tight binding total energy and density of states calculations showed that the 'super'-sheets and tubes are stable and predicted to present metallic and semiconducting behaviour.

  11. Nanocrystalline cobalt oxides for carbon nanotube growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Kun; Jayatissa, Ahalapitiya H.; Jayasuriya, Ambalangodage C.

    2007-09-01

    Thin Films of nanocrystalline cobalt oxide were formed by sol-gel method. Structure, optical properties and surface properties of these films were investigated by numerous characterization techniques. These films were successfully fabricated on glass substrates below 500°C. . Micropatterns of cobalt oxide thin films were also fabricated on glass and silicon substrates by employing a lift-off method. Crystal size of these nanocrystalline cobalt films could be successfully controllable by varying the amount of cobalt precursors and number of layers. These films were used as the seeding layers for carbon nanotube growth in a CVD process By changing the concentration of monomer precursors in the solgel coating solutions, different size nanoclusters hence different size carbon nanotubes could be synthesized in CVD process. This method can be used for controlled growth of carbon nanotubes for many different applications. In this paper, detail of these experimental results will be presented.

  12. Boron-Filled Hybrid Carbon Nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Rajen B; Chou, Tsengming; Kanwal, Alokik; Apigo, David J; Lefebvre, Joseph; Owens, Frank; Iqbal, Zafar

    2016-01-01

    A unique nanoheterostructure, a boron-filled hybrid carbon nanotube (BHCNT), has been synthesized using a one-step chemical vapor deposition process. The BHCNTs can be considered to be a novel form of boron carbide consisting of boron doped, distorted multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) encapsulating boron nanowires. These MWCNTs were found to be insulating in spite of their graphitic layered outer structures. While conventional MWCNTs have great axial strength, they have weak radial compressive strength, and do not bond well to one another or to other materials. In contrast, BHCNTs are shown to be up to 31% stiffer and 233% stronger than conventional MWCNTs in radial compression and have excellent mechanical properties at elevated temperatures. The corrugated surface of BHCNTs enables them to bond easily to themselves and other materials, in contrast to carbon nanotubes (CNTs). BHCNTs can, therefore, be used to make nanocomposites, nanopaper sheets, and bundles that are stronger than those made with CNTs. PMID:27460526

  13. Boron-Filled Hybrid Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Rajen B.; Chou, Tsengming; Kanwal, Alokik; Apigo, David J.; Lefebvre, Joseph; Owens, Frank; Iqbal, Zafar

    2016-07-01

    A unique nanoheterostructure, a boron-filled hybrid carbon nanotube (BHCNT), has been synthesized using a one-step chemical vapor deposition process. The BHCNTs can be considered to be a novel form of boron carbide consisting of boron doped, distorted multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) encapsulating boron nanowires. These MWCNTs were found to be insulating in spite of their graphitic layered outer structures. While conventional MWCNTs have great axial strength, they have weak radial compressive strength, and do not bond well to one another or to other materials. In contrast, BHCNTs are shown to be up to 31% stiffer and 233% stronger than conventional MWCNTs in radial compression and have excellent mechanical properties at elevated temperatures. The corrugated surface of BHCNTs enables them to bond easily to themselves and other materials, in contrast to carbon nanotubes (CNTs). BHCNTs can, therefore, be used to make nanocomposites, nanopaper sheets, and bundles that are stronger than those made with CNTs.

  14. Modelling Carbon Nanotubes-Based Mediatorless Biosensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julija Razumiene

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a mathematical model of carbon nanotubes-based mediatorless biosensor. The developed model is based on nonlinear non-stationary reaction-diffusion equations. The model involves four layers (compartments: a layer of enzyme solution entrapped on a terylene membrane, a layer of the single walled carbon nanotubes deposited on a perforated membrane, and an outer diffusion layer. The biosensor response and sensitivity are investigated by changing the model parameters with a special emphasis on the mediatorless transfer of the electrons in the layer of the enzyme-loaded carbon nanotubes. The numerical simulation at transient and steady state conditions was carried out using the finite difference technique. The mathematical model and the numerical solution were validated by experimental data. The obtained agreement between the simulation results and the experimental data was admissible at different concentrations of the substrate.

  15. Modelling carbon nanotubes-based mediatorless biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baronas, Romas; Kulys, Juozas; Petrauskas, Karolis; Razumiene, Julija

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a mathematical model of carbon nanotubes-based mediatorless biosensor. The developed model is based on nonlinear non-stationary reaction-diffusion equations. The model involves four layers (compartments): a layer of enzyme solution entrapped on a terylene membrane, a layer of the single walled carbon nanotubes deposited on a perforated membrane, and an outer diffusion layer. The biosensor response and sensitivity are investigated by changing the model parameters with a special emphasis on the mediatorless transfer of the electrons in the layer of the enzyme-loaded carbon nanotubes. The numerical simulation at transient and steady state conditions was carried out using the finite difference technique. The mathematical model and the numerical solution were validated by experimental data. The obtained agreement between the simulation results and the experimental data was admissible at different concentrations of the substrate. PMID:23012537

  16. Detection of gas atoms with carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arash, B.; Wang, Q.

    2013-05-01

    Owning to their unparalleled sensitivity resolution, nanomechanical resonators have excellent capabilities in design of nano-sensors for gas detection. The current challenge is to develop new designs of the resonators for differentiating distinct gas atoms with a recognizably high sensitivity. In this work, the characteristics of impulse wave propagation in carbon nanotube-based sensors are investigated using molecular dynamics simulations to provide a new method for detection of noble gases. A sensitivity index based on wave velocity shifts in a single-walled carbon nanotube, induced by surrounding gas atoms, is defined to explore the efficiency of the nano-sensor. The simulation results indicate that the nano-sensor is able to differentiate distinct noble gases at the same environmental temperature and pressure. The inertia and the strengthening effects by the gases on wave characteristics of carbon nanotubes are particularly discussed, and a continuum mechanics shell model is developed to interpret the effects.

  17. High frequency conductivity in carbon nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. S. Abukari

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available We report on theoretical analysis of high frequency conductivity in carbon nanotubes. Using the kinetic equation with constant relaxation time, an analytical expression for the complex conductivity is obtained. The real part of the complex conductivity is initially negative at zero frequency and become more negative with increasing frequency, until it reaches a resonance minimum at ω ∼ ωB for metallic zigzag CNs and ω < ωB for armchair CNs. This resonance enhancement is indicative for terahertz gain without the formation of current instabilities induced by negative dc conductivity. We noted that due to the high density of states of conduction electrons in metallic zigzag carbon nanotubes and the specific dispersion law inherent in hexagonal crystalline structure result in a uniquely high frequency conductivity than the corresponding values for metallic armchair carbon nanotubes. We suggest that this phenomenon can be used to suppress current instabilities that are normally associated with a negative dc differential conductivity.

  18. Boron-Filled Hybrid Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Rajen B.; Chou, Tsengming; Kanwal, Alokik; Apigo, David J.; Lefebvre, Joseph; Owens, Frank; Iqbal, Zafar

    2016-01-01

    A unique nanoheterostructure, a boron-filled hybrid carbon nanotube (BHCNT), has been synthesized using a one-step chemical vapor deposition process. The BHCNTs can be considered to be a novel form of boron carbide consisting of boron doped, distorted multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) encapsulating boron nanowires. These MWCNTs were found to be insulating in spite of their graphitic layered outer structures. While conventional MWCNTs have great axial strength, they have weak radial compressive strength, and do not bond well to one another or to other materials. In contrast, BHCNTs are shown to be up to 31% stiffer and 233% stronger than conventional MWCNTs in radial compression and have excellent mechanical properties at elevated temperatures. The corrugated surface of BHCNTs enables them to bond easily to themselves and other materials, in contrast to carbon nanotubes (CNTs). BHCNTs can, therefore, be used to make nanocomposites, nanopaper sheets, and bundles that are stronger than those made with CNTs. PMID:27460526

  19. Investigating the effect of carbon nanotube diameter and wall number in carbon nanotube/silicon heterojunction solar cells

    OpenAIRE

    Tom Grace; LePing Yu; Christopher Gibson; Daniel Tune; Huda Alturaif; Zeid Al Othman; Joseph Shapter

    2016-01-01

    Suspensions of single-walled, double-walled and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were generated in the same solvent at similar concentrations. Films were fabricated from these suspensions and used in carbon nanotube/silicon heterojunction solar cells and their properties were compared with reference to the number of walls in the nanotube samples. It was found that single-walled nanotubes generally produced more favorable results; however, the double and multi-walled nanotube films used in...

  20. Molecular Dynamics Modeling of Carbon Nanotubes and Their Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Lars R.; Pyrz, Ryszard

    2004-06-01

    The tensile modulus of individual nanotubes and nanotube-polypropylene composites has been determined using molecular dynamics simulations. Simulations of individual single-walled carbon nanotubes showed that their tensile modulus was dependent on the tube structure and the diameter if the diameter was below 1,6 nm. The tensile modulus was determined for an infinite single-walled carbon nanotube embedded in an amorphous polypropylene matrix and for a finite and capped single-walled carbon nanotube embedded in a polypropylene matrix. For the infinite nanotube-polypropylene system the modulus was found to correspond to the one given by the Voigt approximation. For the finite nanotube-polypropylene system the reinforcing effect of the nanotube was not very pronounced. A pull out simulation showed that the length of the nanotube in the simulation was much smaller than the critical length and hence no load transfer between the nanotube and the matrix existed.

  1. Advanced materials based on carbon nanotube arrays, yarns and papers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradford, Phlip David

    Carbon nanotubes have hundreds of potential applications but require innovative processing techniques to manipulate the microscopic carbon dust into useful devices and products. This thesis describes efforts to process carbon nanotubes (CNTs) using novel methods with the goals of: (1) improving the properties of energy absorbing and composite carbon nanotube materials and (2) increasing understanding of fundamental structure-property relationships within these materials. Millimeter long CNTs, in the form of arrays, yarns and papers, were used to produce energy absorbing foams and high volume fraction CNT composites. Vertically aligned CNT arrays were grown on silicon substrates using chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of ethylene gas over iron nano-particles. The low density, millimeter thick arrays were tested under compression as energy absorbing foams. With additional CVD processing steps, it was possible to tune the compressive properties of the arrays. After the longest treatment, the compressive strength of the arrays was increased by a factor of 35 with a density increase of only six fold, while also imparting recovery from compression to the array. Microscopy revealed that the post-synthesis CVD treatment increased the number of CNT walls through an epitaxial type radial growth on the surface of the as-grown tubes. The increase in tube radius and mutual support between nanotubes explained the increases in compressive strength while an increase in nanotube roughness was proposed as the morphological change responsible for recovery in the array. Carbon nanotube yarns were used as the raw material for macroscopic textile preforms with a multi-level hierarchical carbon nanotube (CNT) structure: nanotubes, bundles, spun single yarns, plied yarns and 3-D braids. In prior tensile tests, composites produced from the 3-D braids exhibited unusual mechanical behavior effects. The proposed physical hypotheses explained those effects by molecular level interactions and

  2. A carbon nanotube optical rectenna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Asha; Singh, Virendra; Bougher, Thomas L.; Cola, Baratunde A.

    2015-12-01

    An optical rectenna—a device that directly converts free-propagating electromagnetic waves at optical frequencies to direct current—was first proposed over 40 years ago, yet this concept has not been demonstrated experimentally due to fabrication challenges at the nanoscale. Realizing an optical rectenna requires that an antenna be coupled to a diode that operates on the order of 1 PHz (switching speed on the order of 1 fs). Diodes operating at these frequencies are feasible if their capacitance is on the order of a few attofarads, but they remain extremely difficult to fabricate and to reliably couple to a nanoscale antenna. Here we demonstrate an optical rectenna by engineering metal-insulator-metal tunnel diodes, with a junction capacitance of ˜2 aF, at the tip of vertically aligned multiwalled carbon nanotubes (˜10 nm in diameter), which act as the antenna. Upon irradiation with visible and infrared light, we measure a d.c. open-circuit voltage and a short-circuit current that appear to be due to a rectification process (we account for a very small but quantifiable contribution from thermal effects). In contrast to recent reports of photodetection based on hot electron decay in a plasmonic nanoscale antenna, a coherent optical antenna field appears to be rectified directly in our devices, consistent with rectenna theory. Finally, power rectification is observed under simulated solar illumination, and there is no detectable change in diode performance after numerous current-voltage scans between 5 and 77 °C, indicating a potential for robust operation.

  3. Micromechanics of carbon nanotube turfs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torabi, Hamid

    Complex structures consisting of intertwined, nominally vertical carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are called turfs. Unique electrical, thermal, optical, and permeability properties of these turfs have attracted growing attention during the past decade, and have rendered them as appropriate candidates for applications such as contact thermal switches. These properties are controlled by the details of the turf microstructures. Due to the application of the turfs in different fields, they are subjected to different loading conditions. Deformation changes the microstructure of a CNT turf, which results in change of effective properties. Many researchers have recently studied the collective mechanical behavior of CNT turfs to compression loading, as this behavior determines their performance. However, their complex and intertwined structure must be investigated in more details to find the relation between their deformation and their underlying morphology. Under uniform compression experiments, CNT turfs exhibit irreversible collective buckling of a layer preceded by reorientation of CNT segments. Experimentally observed independence of the buckling stress and the buckling wavelength on the turf width suggests the existence of an intrinsic material length. To investigate the relationship the macroscopic material properties and the statistical parameters describing the nano-scale geometry of the turf (tortuosity, density and connectivity) we develop a nano-scale computational model, based on the representation of CNT segments as elastica finite elements with van der Waals interactions. The virtual turfs are generated by means of a constrained random walk algorithm and subsequent relaxation. The resulting computational model is robust and is capable of modeling the collective behavior of CNTs. We first establish the dependence of statistical parameters on the computational parameters used for turf generation, then establish relationships between post-buckling stress, initial

  4. A tunable carbon nanotube electromechanical oscillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sazonova, Vera; Yaish, Yuval; Üstünel, Hande; Roundy, David; Arias, Tomás A.; McEuen, Paul L.

    2004-09-01

    Nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS) hold promise for a number of scientific and technological applications. In particular, NEMS oscillators have been proposed for use in ultrasensitive mass detection, radio-frequency signal processing, and as a model system for exploring quantum phenomena in macroscopic systems. Perhaps the ultimate material for these applications is a carbon nanotube. They are the stiffest material known, have low density, ultrasmall cross-sections and can be defect-free. Equally important, a nanotube can act as a transistor and thus may be able to sense its own motion. In spite of this great promise, a room-temperature, self-detecting nanotube oscillator has not been realized, although some progress has been made. Here we report the electrical actuation and detection of the guitar-string-like oscillation modes of doubly clamped nanotube oscillators. We show that the resonance frequency can be widely tuned and that the devices can be used to transduce very small forces.

  5. Magnetoresistance of Multiwalled Carbon Nanotube Yarns

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHENG Lei-Mei; GAO Wei; CAO Shi-Xun; ZHANG Jin-Cang

    2008-01-01

    We measure zero-field resistivity and magnetoresistance of multiwalled carbon nanotube yarns (CNTYs). The CNTYs are drawn from superaligned multiwalled carbon nanotube arrays synthesized by the low-pressure chemical vapour deposition method. The zero-field resistivity shows a logarithmic decrease from 2 K to 300 K. In the presence of a magnetic field applied perpendicular to the yarn axis, a pronounced negative magnetoresistance is observed. A magnetoresistance ratio of 22% is obtained. These behaviours can be explained by the weak localization effect.

  6. A carbon nanotube-based sensing element

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Xing; ZHOU Zhao-ying; WU Ying; ZHANG Jin; ZHANG Ying-ying

    2007-01-01

    A carbon nanotube-based(CNT) sensing element is presented, which consists of substrate, insulating layer, electrodes,carbon nanotube and measuring circuit. The sensing components are a single or array of CNTs, which are located on the two electrodes. The CNT-based sensing element is fabricated by CVD (chemical vapor deposition)-direct-growth on microelectrodes. The sensing model and measurement method of electromechanical property are also presented. Finally, the voltage-current characteristics are measured, which show that the CNT-based sensing element has good electrical properties.

  7. Carbon nanotubes for in vivo cancer nanotechnology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The latest progress of using carbon nanotubes(CNTs) for in vivo cancer nanotechnology is reviewed.CNTs can be functionalized by either covalent or non-covalent chemistry to produce functional bioconjugates for many in vivo applications.In vivo behaviors and toxicology studies of CNTs are summarized,suggesting no significant toxicity of well functionalized CNTs to the treated mice.Owing to their unique chemical and physical properties,CNTs,especially single-walled carbon nanotubes(SWNTs),have been widely used for various modalities of in vivo cancer treatment and imaging.Future development of CNT-based nanomedicine may bring novel opportunities to cancer diagnosis and therapy.

  8. Piezoresistive effect in carbon nanotube films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    The piezoresistive effect of the pristine carbon nanotube (CNT) films has been studied. Carbon nanotubes were synthesized by hot filament chemical vapor deposition. The piezoresistive effect in the pristine CNT films was studied by a three-point bending test. The gauge factor for the pristine CNT films under 500 microstrains was found to be at least 65 at room temperature, and increased with temperature, exceeding that of polycrystalline silicon (30) at 35℃. The origin of the piezoresistivity in CNT films may be ascribed to a pressure-induced change in the band gap and the defects.

  9. Covellite CuS nanocrystals: realizing rapid microwave-assisted synthesis in air and unravelling the disappearance of their plasmon resonance after coupling with carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Mee Rahn; Hafez, Hassan A.; Chai, Xin; Besteiro, Lucas V.; Tan, Long; Ozaki, Tsuneyuki; Govorov, Alexander O.; Izquierdo, Ricardo; Ma, Dongling

    2016-06-01

    Semiconductor nanocrystals that show plasmonic resonance represent an emerging class of highly promising plasmonic materials with potential applications in diverse fields, such as sensing and optical and optoelectronic devices. We report a new approach to synthesizing homogeneous covellite CuS nanoplatelets in air and the almost complete disappearance of their plasmonic resonance once coupled with multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). These nanoplatelets were rapidly synthesized by a simple microwave-assisted approach at a relatively low reaction temperature in air, instead of under N2 as reported previously. These less severe synthesis conditions were enabled by appropriately selecting a Cu precursor and preparing a precursor sulfur solution (instead of using solid sulfur) and by using microwave radiation as the heat source. The advantages of utilizing microwave irradiation, including uniform and rapid heating, became clear after comparing the results of the synthesis with those achieved using a conventional oil-bath method under N2. The CuS nanoplatelets prepared in this way showed very strong plasmon resonance at c. 1160 nm as a result of their free charge carriers at the calculated density of nh = 1.5 × 1022 cm-3 based on the Drude model. With the aim of exploring their potential for near-infrared responsive optoelectronic devices, they were hybridized with functionalized MWCNTs. Their strong plasmon resonance almost completely disappeared on hybridization. Detailed investigations excluded the effect of possible structural changes in the CuS nanoplatelets during the hybridization process and a possible effect on the plasmon resonance arising from the chemical bonding of surface ligands. Charge transfer was considered to be the main reason for the almost complete disappearance of the plasmon resonance, which was further confirmed by terahertz (THz) time-domain spectrometry and THz time-resolved spectrometry measurements performed on the CuS-MWCNT nanohybrids

  10. Computational Nanomechanics of Carbon Nanotubes and Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Deepak; Wei, Chenyu; Cho, Kyeongjae; Biegel, Bryan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Nanomechanics of individual carbon and boron-nitride nanotubes and their application as reinforcing fibers in polymer composites has been reviewed with interplay of theoretical modeling, computer simulations and experimental observations. The emphasis in this work is on elucidating the multi-length scales of the problems involved, and of different simulation techniques that are needed to address specific characteristics of individual nanotubes and nanotube polymer-matrix interfaces. Classical molecular dynamics simulations are shown to be sufficient to describe the generic behavior such as strength and stiffness modulus but are inadequate to describe elastic limit and nature of plastic buckling at large strength. Quantum molecular dynamics simulations are shown to bring out explicit atomic nature dependent behavior of these nanoscale materials objects that are not accessible either via continuum mechanics based descriptions or through classical molecular dynamics based simulations. As examples, we discus local plastic collapse of carbon nanotubes under axial compression and anisotropic plastic buckling of boron-nitride nanotubes. Dependence of the yield strain on the strain rate is addressed through temperature dependent simulations, a transition-state-theory based model of the strain as a function of strain rate and simulation temperature is presented, and in all cases extensive comparisons are made with experimental observations. Mechanical properties of nanotube-polymer composite materials are simulated with diverse nanotube-polymer interface structures (with van der Waals interaction). The atomistic mechanisms of the interface toughening for optimal load transfer through recycling, high-thermal expansion and diffusion coefficient composite formation above glass transition temperature, and enhancement of Young's modulus on addition of nanotubes to polymer are discussed and compared with experimental observations.

  11. Carbon nanotubes as tips for atomic force microscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    国立秋; 徐宗伟; 赵铁强; 赵清亮; 张飞虎; 董申

    2004-01-01

    Ordinary AFM probes' characters prevent the AFM' s application in various scopes. Carbon nanotubes represent ideal AFM probe materials for their higher aspect ratio, larger Young' s modulus, unique chemical structure, and well-defined electronic property. Carbon nanotube AFM probes are obtained by using a new method of attaching carbon nanotubes to the end of ordinary AFM probes, and are then used for doing AFM experiments. These experiments indicated that carbon nanotube probes have higher elastic deformation, higher resolution and higher durability. And it was also found that carbon nanotube probes can accurately reflect the morphology of deep narrow gaps, while ordinary probes can not reflect.

  12. Recent advances in molecular electronics based on carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourgoin, Jean-Philippe; Campidelli, Stéphane; Chenevier, Pascale; Derycke, Vincent; Filoramo, Arianna; Goffman, Marcelo F

    2010-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have exceptional physical properties that make them one of the most promising building blocks for future nanotechnologies. They may in particular play an important role in the development of innovative electronic devices in the fields of flexible electronics, ultra-high sensitivity sensors, high frequency electronics, opto-electronics, energy sources and nano-electromechanical systems (NEMS). Proofs of concept of several high performance devices already exist, usually at the single device level, but there remain many serious scientific issues to be solved before the viability of such routes can be evaluated. In particular, the main concern regards the controlled synthesis and positioning of nanotubes. In our opinion, truly innovative use of these nano-objects will come from: (i) the combination of some of their complementary physical properties, such as combining their electrical and mechanical properties, (ii) the combination of their properties with additional benefits coming from other molecules grafted on the nanotubes, and (iii) the use of chemically- or bio-directed self-assembly processes to allow the efficient combination of several devices into functional arrays or circuits. In this article, we outline the main issues concerning the development of carbon nanotubes based electronics applications and review our recent results in the field.

  13. Improved Method of Purifying Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delzeit, Lance D.

    2004-01-01

    An improved method of removing the residues of fabrication from carbon nanotubes has been invented. These residues comprise amorphous carbon and metal particles that are produced during the growth process. Prior methods of removing the residues include a variety of processes that involved the use of halogens, oxygen, or air in both thermal and plasma processes. Each of the prior methods entails one or more disadvantages, including non-selectivity (removal or damage of nanotubes in addition to removal of the residues), the need to dispose of toxic wastes, and/or processing times as long as 24 hours or more. In contrast, the process described here does not include the use of toxic chemicals, the generation of toxic wastes, causes little or no damage to the carbon nanotubes, and involves processing times of less than 1 hour. In the improved method, purification is accomplished by flowing water vapor through the reaction chamber at elevated temperatures and ambient pressures. The impurities are converted to gaseous waste products by the selective hydrogenation and hydroxylation by the water in a reaction chamber. This process could be performed either immediately after growth or in a post-growth purification process. The water used needs to be substantially free of oxygen and can be obtained by a repeated freeze-pump-thaw process. The presence of oxygen will non-selectively attach the carbon nanotubes in addition to the amorphous carbon.

  14. Synthesis and characterizations of CoPt nanoparticles supported on poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)/poly(styrenesulfonate) functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes with superior activity for NaBH4 hydrolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Simple strategy for the synthesis of CoPt-PEDOT:PSS/MWCNTs. • PEDOT:PSS as a modifier of MWCNTs can improve the particles dispersion. • Superior catalytic activities for the NaBH4 hydrolysis reaction. - Abstract: We present here a facile strategy for synthesis of CoPt nanoparticles supported on poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)/poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). The as-prepared CoPt-PEDOT:PSS/MWCNT catalyst was characterized with UV–vis spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and X-ray photoelectron. The well-supported and low-Pt-content nanostructure catalyst exhibits superior catalytic activity for the NaBH4 hydrolysis reaction with a 47.3 kJ mol−1 of activation energy. The maximum hydrogen generation rate is 6900 mL min−1 g−1 at 298 K

  15. Carbon Nanotube Membranes: Carbon Nanotube Membranes for Energy-Efficient Carbon Sequestration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2010-03-01

    Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: Porifera is developing carbon nanotube membranes that allow more efficient removal of CO2 from coal plant exhaust. Most of today’s carbon capture methods use chemical solvents, but capture methods that use membranes to draw CO2 out of exhaust gas are potentially more efficient and cost effective. Traditionally, membranes are limited by the rate at which they allow gas to flow through them and the amount of CO2 they can attract from the gas. Smooth support pores and the unique structure of Porifera’s carbon nanotube membranes allows them to be more permeable than other polymeric membranes, yet still selective enough for CO2 removal. This approach could overcome the barriers facing membrane-based approaches for capturing CO2 from coal plant exhausts.

  16. Carbon nanotube stationary phases for microchip electrochromatography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Klaus Bo; Bøggild, Peter; Kutter, Jörg Peter

    nanotubes are very interesting for integration in especially microfluidic devices, because they can readily be grown on planar substrates by means of chemical vapour deposition. In this way the cumbersome process of packing of the stationary phase in the finished microfluidic channels is avoided and the CNT...... surface can furthermore be used directly as a stationary phase in reverse-phase separations, thereby avoiding subsequent functionalization of the nanostructures. This significantly reduces the fabrication time and possibly also increases the reproducibility of the column performance. In this presentation......, microfluidic devices with microfabricated carbon nanotube columns for electrochromatographic separations will be presented. The electrically conductive carbon nanotube layer has been patterned into hexoganol micropillars in order to support electroosmotic flow without forming gas bubbles from electrolysis...

  17. Controllable synthesis of Co3O4/polyethyleneimine-carbon nanotubes nanocomposites for CO and NH3 gas sensing at room temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: Co3O4/polyethyleneimine-carbon nanotubes composites (CoPCNTs) have been successfully controllable synthesized via hydrothermal method at different temperature. The CoPCNTs sensors exhibited the highest response to CO and NH3 gases with response time of 4 s and 4.3 s, low detection limit of 5 ppm and 1 ppm at room temperature, respectively. The enhanced gas sensing could be ascribed to the synergistic effect between the tiny size of Co3O4 and good conductivity of carbon nanotubes functionalized by polyethyleneimine. - Highlights: • The CNTs functionalized by polyethyleneimine provided a new functional structural. • The novel 1D structure could capture and migrate electrons quickly. • The Co3O4 nanoparticles liked a snake winding around CNTs. • The gas sensor could work at room temperatures, which suit to practical application. - Abstract: A novel 1D Co3O4/polyethyleneimine-carbon nanotubes composites (CoPCNTs) have been successfully synthesized via hydrothermal method at different temperature. The CNTs functionalized by polyethyleneimine (PCNTs) provided a new material with new structural and functional properties. The PCNTs was used as loading guider and electron transfer path. The Co3O4 nanoparticles (NPs) loaded on the PCNTs surface liked a snake winding around CNTs, and the size was about 5–10 nm. The gas sensing characteristics of the CoPCNTs sensors to carbon monoxide (CO) and ammonia (NH3) were evaluated with different gas concentration. The CoPCNTs sensors grown at 160 °C exhibited the highest response to CO and NH3 gases with response time of 4 s and 4.3 s at room temperature (RT), respectively. Hence, the approach developed in this work would be important for the low-cost and large-scale production of the CoPCNTs materials with highly promising applications in gas sensors

  18. Controlled synthesis and tunable properties of ultrathin silica nanotubes through spontaneous polycondensation on polyamine fibrils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian-Jun Yuan

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a facile approach to a biomimetic rapid fabrication of ultrathin silica nanotubes with a highly uniform diameter of 10 nm and inner hollow of around 3 nm. The synthesis is carried out through a spontaneous polycondensation of alkoxysilane on polyamine crystalline fibrils that were conveniently produced from the neutralization of a solution of protonated linear polyethyleneimine (LPEI–H+ by alkali compounds. A simple mixing the fibrils with alkoxysilane in aqueous solution allowed for the rapid formation of silica to produce LPEI@silica hybrid nanotubes. These 10-nm nanotubes were hierarchically organized in a mat-like morphology with a typical size of 1–2 micrometers. The subsequent removal of organic LPEI via calcination resulted in silica nanotubes that keep this morphology. The morphology, the structure, the pore properties and the formation mechanism of the silica nanotubes were carefully investigated with scanning electron microscopy (SEM, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, Brunauer–Emmett–Teller measurements (BET, and X-ray diffraction (XRD. Detailed studies demonstrated that the formation of the nanotubes depends on the molar ratio of [OH]/[CH2CH2NH] during the neutralization as well as on the basicity of the alkali compound and on the concentration of the silica source. The synthesis of silica nanotubes established here could be easily applied to a fabrication on the kilogram scale. Silica nanotubes that were obtained from the calcination of hybrid nanotubes of LPEI@silica in an N2 atmosphere showed a distinct photoluminescence centered at 540 nm with a maximum excitation wavelength of 320 nm. Furthermore, LPEI@silica hybrid nanotubes were applied to create silica–carbon composite nanotubes by alternative adsorption of ionic polymers and subsequent carbonization.

  19. Structure Stability of Ⅰ-Type Carbon Nanotube Junctions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    夏丹; 袁喆; 李家明

    2002-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes with junctions may play an important role in future ‘nanoelectronics' and future ‘nano devices'.In particular, junctions constructed with metal and semiconducting nanotubes have potential applications. Basedon the orthogonal tight-binding molecular dynamics method, we present our study of the structure stability ofI-type carbon nanotube junctions.

  20. Deconvoluting hepatic processing of carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alidori, Simone; Bowman, Robert L; Yarilin, Dmitry; Romin, Yevgeniy; Barlas, Afsar; Mulvey, J Justin; Fujisawa, Sho; Xu, Ke; Ruggiero, Alessandro; Riabov, Vladimir; Thorek, Daniel L J; Ulmert, Hans David S; Brea, Elliott J; Behling, Katja; Kzhyshkowska, Julia; Manova-Todorova, Katia; Scheinberg, David A; McDevitt, Michael R

    2016-01-01

    Single-wall carbon nanotubes present unique opportunities for drug delivery, but have not advanced into the clinic. Differential nanotube accretion and clearance from critical organs have been observed, but the mechanism not fully elucidated. The liver has a complex cellular composition that regulates a range of metabolic functions and coincidently accumulates most particulate drugs. Here we provide the unexpected details of hepatic processing of covalently functionalized nanotubes including receptor-mediated endocytosis, cellular trafficking and biliary elimination. Ammonium-functionalized fibrillar nanocarbon is found to preferentially localize in the fenestrated sinusoidal endothelium of the liver but not resident macrophages. Stabilin receptors mediate the endocytic clearance of nanotubes. Biocompatibility is evidenced by the absence of cell death and no immune cell infiltration. Towards clinical application of this platform, nanotubes were evaluated for the first time in non-human primates. The pharmacologic profile in cynomolgus monkeys is equivalent to what was reported in mice and suggests that nanotubes should behave similarly in humans. PMID:27468684

  1. Making junctions between carbon nanotubes using an ion beam

    CERN Document Server

    Krasheninnikov, A V; Keinonen, J; Banhart, F

    2003-01-01

    Making use of empirical potential molecular dynamics, we study ion bombardment of crossed single-walled carbon nanotubes as a tool to join the nanotubes. We demonstrate that ion irradiation should result in welding of crossed nanotubes, both suspended and deposited on substrates. We further predict optimum ion doses and energies for ion-mediated nanotube welding which may potentially be used for developing complicated networks of joined nanotubes.

  2. Computational and experimental studies of the interaction between single-walled carbon nanotubes and folic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, John J.; Rozo, Ciro E.; Castillo-León, Jaime; Rindzevicius, Tomas; Svendsen, Winnie E.; Rozlosnik, Noemi; Boisen, Anja; Martínez, Fernando

    2013-03-01

    This Letter involved the preparation of a conjugate between single-walled carbon nanotubes and folic acid that was obtained without covalent chemical functionalization using a simple 'one pot' synthesis method. Subsequently, the conjugate was investigated by a computational hybrid method: our own N-layered Integrated Molecular Orbital and Molecular Mechanics (B3LYP(6-31G(d):UFF)). The results confirmed that the interaction occurred via hydrogen bonding between protons of the glutamic moiety from folic acid and π electrons from the carbon nanotubes. The single-walled carbon nanotube-folic acid conjugate presented herein is believed to lead the way to new potential applications as carbon nanotube-based drug delivery systems.

  3. CVD fabrication of carbon nanotubes on electrodeposited flower-like Fe nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zanganeh, Saeid, E-mail: SAZ@engr.uconn.ed [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Connecticut, 371 Fairfield Way, U-2157 Storrs, CT 06269-2157 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Center of Excellence for Production of Advanced Materials, Sharif University of Technology, P.O. Box 11365-9466, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Torabi, Morteza [Department of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, Iran University of Science and Technology, P.O. Box 16845-161, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Center of Excellence for Production of Advanced Materials, Sharif University of Technology, P.O. Box 11365-9466, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Kajbafvala, Amir [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, North Carolina State University, 911 Partner' s Way, Raleigh, NC 27695-7907 (United States); Zanganeh, Navid [Chemical Engineering Department, Amirkabir University of Technology, P.O. Box 15875-4413, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Bayati, M.R.; Molaei, Roya; Zargar, H.R. [Department of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, Iran University of Science and Technology, P.O. Box 16845-161, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sadrnezhaad, S.K. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Center of Excellence for Production of Advanced Materials, Sharif University of Technology, P.O. Box 11365-9466, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2010-10-08

    Research highlights: {yields} The latest results obtained about production of flower-like nanostructured Fe catalysts deposited electrochemically on platinum electrodes (as a suitable catalyst for synthesis of carbon nanotubes) are presented in this paper. {yields} CVD is used as a convenient way of deposition of CNTs on the flower-like Fe catalyst substrate. - Abstract: Galvanostatic method was used to electrodeposit Fe nanostructures on platinum electrodes as catalysts. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) revealed flower-like Fe deposits with high surface area. Carbon nanotubes were grown on flower-like Fe nanostructures by chemical vapor deposition. The structure of the synthesized carbon nanotubes was investigated by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. According to X-ray diffraction patterns, Fe was the only detected constituent of the deposited coating. The carbon nanotubes had small wall-thickness and wide hollow core.

  4. A new mechanism for carbon nanotube evolution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    @@ Key discoveries on the growth mechanism of carbon nanotubes(CNTs) have recently been achieved by CAS researcher ZHU Zhenping and his research group at the State Key Laboratory of Coal Conversion,the Institute of Coal Chemistry of CAS, funded by the National Natural Science Foundation of China and the CAS Bairen Program.

  5. Chiral Anomaly in Toroidal Carbon Nanotubes

    OpenAIRE

    Sasaki, K.

    2001-01-01

    It is pointed out that the chiral anomaly in 1+1 dimensions should be observed in toroidal carbon nanotubes on a planar geometry with varying magnetic field. We show that the chiral anomaly is closely connected with the persistent current in a one-dimensional metallic ring.

  6. Single electron-ics with carbon nanotubes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Götz, G.T.J.

    2010-01-01

    We experimentally investigate Quantum Dots, formed in Carbon Nanotubes. The first part of this thesis deals with charge sensing on such quantum dots. The charge sensor is a metallic Single-electron-transistor, sensitive to the charge of a single electron on the quantum dot. We use this technique for

  7. Spatially resolved spectroscopy on carbon nanotubes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, J.W.

    2001-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes are small cylindrical molecules with a typical diameter of 1 nm and lengths of up to micrometers. These intriguing molecules exhibit, depending on the exact atomic structure, either semiconducting or metallic behavior. This makes them ideal candidates for possible future molecular e

  8. Effective models for excitons in carbon nanotubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cornean, Horia; Duclos, Pierre; Ricaud, Benjamin

    We analyse the low lying spectrum of a model of excitons in carbon nanotubes. Consider two particles with a Coulomb self-interaction, placed on an infinitely long cylinder. If the cylinder radius becomes small, the low lying spectrum is well described by a one-dimensional effective Hamiltonian...

  9. Effective models for excitons in carbon nanotubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cornean, Horia; Duclos, Pierre; Ricaud, Benjamin

    2007-01-01

    We analyse the low lying spectrum of a model of excitons in carbon nanotubes. Consider two particles with opposite charges and a Coulomb self-interaction, placed on an infinitely long cylinder. If the cylinder radius becomes small, the low lying spectrum of their relative motion is well described...

  10. A New Resistance Formulation for Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji-Huan He

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A new resistance formulation for carbon nanotubes is suggested using fractal approach. The new formulation is also valid for other nonmetal conductors including nerve fibers, conductive polymers, and molecular wires. Our theoretical prediction agrees well with experimental observation.

  11. Bioaccumulation and ecotoxicity of carbon nanotubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jackson, Petra; Jacobsen, Nicklas Raun; Baun, Anders;

    2013-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNT) have numerous industrial applications and may be released to the environment. In the aquatic environment, pristine or functionalized CNT have different dispersion behavior, potentially leading to different risks of exposure along the water column. Data included in this review...

  12. In-line manufacture of carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brambilla, Nicol Michele; Signorelli, Riccardo; Martini, Fabrizio; Corripio Luna, Oscar Enrique

    2015-04-28

    Mass production of carbon nanotubes (CNT) are facilitated by methods and apparatus disclosed herein. Advantageously, the methods and apparatus make use of a single production unit, and therefore provide for uninterrupted progress in a fabrication process. Embodiments of control systems for a variety of CNT production apparatus are included.

  13. Heat Transport in Liquid Polyester Resin with Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vales-Pinzón, C.; Quiñones-Weiss, G.; Alvarado-Gil, J. J.; Medina-Esquivel, R. A.

    2015-11-01

    Carbon nanotubes represent one of the most important materials in nanoscience and nanotechnology, due to their outstanding structural, mechanical, electrical, and thermal properties. It has been shown that when incorporated in a polymeric matrix, carbon nanotubes can improve its physical properties. In this work, thermal-diffusivity measurements of composite materials, prepared by mixing carbon nanotubes in liquid polyester resin, were performed by means of the thermal-wave resonant cavity. The results show an increase of the thermal diffusivity when the volume fraction of carbon nanotubes grows. It is also shown that this increase depends strongly on the diameter of the nanotubes.

  14. Degradation of multiwall carbon nanotubes by bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Understanding the environmental transformation of multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) is important to their life cycle assessment and potential environmental impacts. We report that a bacterial community is capable of degrading 14C-labeled MWCNTs into 14CO2 in the presence of an external carbon source via co-metabolism. Multiple intermediate products were detected, and genotypic characterization revealed three possible microbial degraders: Burkholderia kururiensis, Delftia acidovorans, and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia. This result suggests that microbe/MWCNTs interaction may impact the long-term fate of MWCNTs. Highlights: •Mineralization of MWCNTs by a bacterial community was observed. •The mineralization required an external carbon source. •Multiple intermediate products were identified in the MWCNT degrading culture. •Three bacterial species were found likely responsible for MWCNT degradation. -- The 14C-labeled multiwall carbon nanotubes can be degraded to 14CO2 and other byproducts by a bacteria community under natural conditions

  15. Carbon nanotubes for stem cell control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David A. Stout

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available In the past decade, two major advancements have transformed the world of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine—stem cells and carbon nano-dimensional materials. In the past, stem cell therapy seemed like it may present a cure for all medical ailments, but problems arose (i.e., immune system clearance, control of differentiation in the body, etc. that have hindered progress. But, with the synergy of carbon nano-dimensional materials, researchers have been able to overcome these tissue engineering and regenerative medicine obstacles and have begun developing treatments for strokes, bone failure, cardiovascular disease, and many other conditions. Here, we briefly review research involving carbon nanotubes which are relevant to the tissue engineering and regenerative medicine field with a special emphasis on carbon nanotube applications for stem cell delivery, drug delivery applications, and their use as improved medical devices.

  16. A Temperature Window for the Synthesis of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes by Catalytic Chemical Vapor Deposition of CH4over Mo2-Fe10/MgO Catalyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Ouyang

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A temperature window for the synthesis of single-walled carbon nanotubes by catalytic chemical vapor deposition of CH4over Mo2-Fe10/MgO catalyst has been studied by Raman spectroscopy. The results showed that when the temperature is lower than 750 °C, there were few SWCNTs formed, and when the temperature is higher than 950 °C, mass amorphous carbons were formed in the SWCNTs bundles due to the self-decomposition of CH4. The temperature window of SWCNTs efficient growth is between 800 and 950 °C, and the optimum growth temperature is about 900 °C. These results were supported by transmission electron microscope images of samples formed under different temperatures. The temperature window is important for large-scale production of SWCNTs by catalytic chemical vapor deposition method.

  17. Inexpensive sol-gel synthesis of multiwalled carbon nanotube-TiO2 hybrids for high performance antibacterial materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas, Nadir; Shao, Godlisten N; Haider, M Salman; Imran, Syed Muhammad; Park, Sung Soo; Jeon, Sun-Jeong; Kim, Hee Taik

    2016-11-01

    This study reports an inexpensive sol-gel method to synthesize TiO2-CNT hybrid materials. Synthesized TiO2-CNT materials show strong antibacterial activity in the absence of light. Cheap TiO2 source TiOCl2 is used during synthesis in the absence of high temperatures, high pressures and organic solvents. TiO2-CNT materials with 0, 2, 5, 10, 15 and 20wt% of CNT were synthesized and compared for antibacterial activity, surface area, porosity, crystalline structure, chemical state, and HaCaT cell proliferation. The antibacterial strength of hybrid materials increased significantly with the increase in CNT loading amount, and the TiO2-CNT samples with a CNT loading of 10wt% or more nearly removed all of the E.coli bacteria. HaCaT cell proliferation studies of synthesized hybrid materials illustrated that prepared TiO2-CNT systems exhibit minimum cytotoxicity. The characteristics of prepared materials were analyzed by means of XRD, FTIR, Raman spectroscopy, XPS, TEM, and nitrogen gas physisorption studies, compared and discussed. PMID:27524080

  18. Inexpensive sol-gel synthesis of multiwalled carbon nanotube-TiO2 hybrids for high performance antibacterial materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas, Nadir; Shao, Godlisten N; Haider, M Salman; Imran, Syed Muhammad; Park, Sung Soo; Jeon, Sun-Jeong; Kim, Hee Taik

    2016-11-01

    This study reports an inexpensive sol-gel method to synthesize TiO2-CNT hybrid materials. Synthesized TiO2-CNT materials show strong antibacterial activity in the absence of light. Cheap TiO2 source TiOCl2 is used during synthesis in the absence of high temperatures, high pressures and organic solvents. TiO2-CNT materials with 0, 2, 5, 10, 15 and 20wt% of CNT were synthesized and compared for antibacterial activity, surface area, porosity, crystalline structure, chemical state, and HaCaT cell proliferation. The antibacterial strength of hybrid materials increased significantly with the increase in CNT loading amount, and the TiO2-CNT samples with a CNT loading of 10wt% or more nearly removed all of the E.coli bacteria. HaCaT cell proliferation studies of synthesized hybrid materials illustrated that prepared TiO2-CNT systems exhibit minimum cytotoxicity. The characteristics of prepared materials were analyzed by means of XRD, FTIR, Raman spectroscopy, XPS, TEM, and nitrogen gas physisorption studies, compared and discussed.

  19. Preparation of double-walled carbon nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Bin; WEI Jinquan; CI Lijie; WU Dehai

    2004-01-01

    Double-walled carbon nanotubes were prepared using the floating chemical vapor deposition with methane as carbon source and adding small amount of sulfur into the ferrocene catalyst. The optimized technological parameters are: the reaction temperature is 1200℃; the catalyst vapor temperature is 80℃; the flow rate of argon is 2000 SCCM; the flow rate of methane is 5 SCCM. The purified DWNTs under these optimized technological parameters have high purity above 90 wt%.

  20. Exploring the Immunotoxicity of Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yanmei; Zhang, Qiu; Mu, Qingxin; Zhang, Bin; Yan, Bing

    2008-08-01

    Mass production of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and their applications in nanomedicine lead to the increased exposure risk of nanomaterials to human beings. Although reports on toxicity of nanomaterials are rapidly growing, there is still a lack of knowledge on the potential toxicity of such materials to immune systems. This article reviews some existing studies assessing carbon nanotubes’ toxicity to immune system and provides the potential mechanistic explanation.