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Sample records for carbon nanotubes prepared

  1. Methods for preparation of carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rakov, Eduard G [D.I. Mendeleev Russian University of Chemical Technology, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2000-01-31

    The most important methods of synthesis and purification of carbon nanotubes, a new form of material, are described. The prospects for increasing the scale of preparation processes and for more extensive application of nanotubes are evaluated. The bibliography includes 282 references.

  2. Preparation of double-walled carbon nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Bin; WEI Jinquan; CI Lijie; WU Dehai

    2004-01-01

    Double-walled carbon nanotubes were prepared using the floating chemical vapor deposition with methane as carbon source and adding small amount of sulfur into the ferrocene catalyst. The optimized technological parameters are: the reaction temperature is 1200℃; the catalyst vapor temperature is 80℃; the flow rate of argon is 2000 SCCM; the flow rate of methane is 5 SCCM. The purified DWNTs under these optimized technological parameters have high purity above 90 wt%.

  3. A new method of preparing single-walled carbon nanotubes

    OpenAIRE

    Vivekchang, SRC; Govindaraj, A.

    2003-01-01

    A novel method of purification for single-walled carbon nanotubes, prepared by an arc-discharge method, is described. The method involves a combination of acid washing followed by high temperature hydrogen treatment to remove the metal nanoparticles and amorphous carbon present in the as-synthesized single-walled carbon nanotubes. The purified single-walled carbon nanotubes have been characterised by low-angle X-ray diffraction, electron microscopy, thermo-gravimetric analysis and Raman spect...

  4. A new method of preparing single-walled carbon nanotubes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S R C Vivekchand; A Govindaraj

    2003-10-01

    A novel method of purification for single-walled carbon nanotubes, prepared by an arc-discharge method, is described. The method involves a combination of acid washing followed by high temperature hydrogen treatment to remove the metal nanoparticles and amorphous carbon present in the as-synthesized singlewalled carbon nanotubes. The purified single-walled carbon nanotubes have been characterised by low-angle X-ray diffraction, electron microscopy, thermo-gravimetric analysis and Raman spectroscopy.

  5. Preparation of array of long carbon nanotubes and fibers therefrom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arendt, Paul N.; DePaula, Ramond F.; Zhu, Yuntian T.; Usov, Igor O.

    2015-11-19

    An array of carbon nanotubes is prepared by exposing a catalyst structure to a carbon nanotube precursor. Embodiment catalyst structures include one or more trenches, channels, or a combination of trenches and channels. A system for preparing the array includes a heated surface for heating the catalyst structure and a cooling portion that cools gas above the catalyst structure. The system heats the catalyst structure so that the interaction between the precursor and the catalyst structure results in the formation of an array of carbon nanotubes on the catalyst structure, and cools the gas near the catalyst structure and also cools any carbon nanotubes that form on the catalyst structure to prevent or at least minimize the formation of amorphous carbon. Arrays thus formed may be used for spinning fibers of carbon nanotubes.

  6. Preparation of very long and open aligned carbon nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    潘正伟; 常保和; 孙连峰; 钱露茜; 刘祖琴; 唐东升; 王刚; 解思深

    2000-01-01

    Very long and open aligned carbon nanotubes that reach about 2 mm long, an order of magnitude longer than previously reached, have been prepared by chemical vapor deposition over silica dioxide substrates on the surface, where iron/silica nano-composite particles are evenly positioned. The nanotubes are naturally opened at the bottom ends. The growth mechanism of the very long and open-ended nanotubes is also discussed.

  7. Preparation of arrays of long carbon nanotubes using catalyst structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Yuntian T.; Arendt, Paul; Li, Qingwen; Zhang, Xiefie

    2016-03-22

    A structure for preparing an substantially aligned array of carbon nanotubes include a substrate having a first side and a second side, a buffer layer on the first side of the substrate, a catalyst on the buffer layer, and a plurality of channels through the structure for allowing a gaseous carbon source to enter the substrate at the second side and flow through the structure to the catalyst. After preparing the array, a fiber of carbon nanotubes may be spun from the array. Prior to spinning, the array can be immersed in a polymer solution. After spinning, the polymer can be cured.

  8. Preparation of supported electrocatalyst comprising multiwalled carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Gang; Zelenay, Piotr

    2013-08-27

    A process for preparing a durable non-precious metal oxygen reduction electrocatalyst involves heat treatment of a ball-milled mixture of polyaniline and multiwalled carbon nanotubes in the presence of a Fe species. The catalyst is more durable than catalysts that use carbon black supports. Performance degradation was minimal or absent after 500 hours of operation at constant cell voltage of 0.40 V.

  9. Direct Preparation of Carbon Nanotube Intramolecular Junctions on Structured Substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Jianing; Zhan, Zhaoyao; Sun, Gengzhi; Mohan, Hari Krishna Salila Vijayalal; Zhou, Jinyuan; Kim, Young-Jin; Zheng, Lianxi

    2016-12-01

    Leveraging the unique properties of single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) intramolecular junctions (IMJs) in innovative nanodevices and next-generation nanoelectronics requires controllable, repeatable, and large-scale preparation, together with rapid identification and comprehensive characterization of such structures. Here we demonstrate SWNT IMJs through directly growing ultralong SWNTs on trenched substrates. It is found that the trench configurations introduce axial strain in partially suspended nanotubes, and promote bending deformation in the vicinity of the trench edges. As a result, the lattice and electronic structure of the nanotubes can be locally modified, to form IMJs in the deformation regions. The trench patterns also enable pre-defining the formation locations of SWNT IMJs, facilitating the rapid identification. Elaborate Raman characterization has verified the formation of SWNT IMJs and identified their types. Rectifying behavior has been observed by electrical measurements on the as-prepared semiconducting-semiconducting (S-S) junction.

  10. Preparation of carbon nanotube composite material with metal matrix by electroplating

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    AN Bai-gang; LI Li-xiang; Li Hong-xi

    2005-01-01

    It is demonstrated that the nickel can be deposited directly on the surface of carbon nanotubes without pre-sensitization by Sn2+ and Pd2+ in a watt bath containing suspended nanotubes by electroplating. The nickel is deposited as spherical nanoparticle on the nanotubes. By increasing reaction time, the carbon nanotube is fully coated with nickel. A probable model, which represents the formation process of carbon nanotube-nickel composites by electroplating, is presented. The results show that this method is efficient and simple for preparing carbon nanotube-metal composite.

  11. Preparation of Nickel-Copper Bilayers Coated on Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhong Zheng

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to oxidizability of copper coating on carbon nanotubes, the interfacial bond strength between copper coating and its matrix is weak, which leads to the reduction of the macroscopic properties of copper matrix composite. The electroless coating technics was applied to prepare nickel-copper bilayers coated on single-walled carbon nanotubes. The coated single-walled carbon nanotubes were characterized through transmission electron microscope spectroscopy, field-emission electron microscope spectroscopy, X-ray diffractometry, and thermogravimetric analysis. The results demonstrated that the nickel-copper bilayers coated on single-walled carbon nanotubes possessed higher purity of unoxidized copper fine-grains than copper monolayers.

  12. Preparation and separation of DNA-wrapped carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ao, Geyou; Zheng, Ming

    2015-01-01

    Purification of single-chirality single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) from their synthetic mixture is a prerequisite for many applications. DNA-controlled carbon nanotube (CNT) purification has evolved over a decade along with other separation techniques utilizing different types of dispersing agents such as surfactants and polymers. The size of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) libraries affords practically unlimited ways of coating SWCNTs. Recent developments in separating surfactant-dispersed SWCNTs by polymer aqueous two-phase (ATP) extraction has enabled rapid and efficient SWCNT separation on a larger volume scale. Applying the ATP separation method to DNA-SWCNT hybrids opens a new route for effective sorting of nanotubes into each and every single-chirality species. Here, we report protocols for purifying as many as 15 single-chirality nanotube species from a synthetic mixture based on the separation of DNA-SWCNTs by the aqueous two-phase (ATP) method.

  13. Catalyst deposition for the preparation of carbon nanotubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    Disclosed is a method of depositing islands of catalyst with a predetermined density, wherein in said method comprises the steps of: obtaining a diffusion barrier covered nano patterned surface comprising a plurality of plateaus, having a density of plateaus dependent on the predetermined density...... patterned surface is configured to ensure that no more than a single island of catalyst is formed on each plateau, so that a sub sequent growth of carbon nanotubes from the deposited islands result in that no more than a single carbon nanotube is grown from each plateau....

  14. Preparation and CO conversion activity of ceria nanotubes by carbon nanotubes templating method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FANG Jianhui; CAO Zhiyuan; ZHANG Dengsong; SHEN Xia; DING Weizhong; SHI Liyi

    2008-01-01

    Ceria nanotubes with high CO conversion activity by means of carbon nanotubes as removable templates in the simple liquid phase process were fabricated under moderate conditions. The pristine CNTs were first pretreated by refluxing in a 30% nitric acid solution at 140 °C for 24 h, then dispersed in an ethanolic Ce(NO3)3·6H2O solution with ultrasonic radiation at room temperature for 1 h. Under vigorous stirring, NaOH solution was added drop by drop into the above ethanolic solution until the pH value was 10. The product was collected and repeatedly washed with ethanol and on drying at 60 °C, the CeO2/CNT composites were obtained. Then, the as-prepared composites were heated at 450 °C in an air atmosphere for 30 min to remove CNTs. The ceria nanotubes were characterized by X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), and X-Ray Photoelectron Spectrum (XPS). The results showed that the ceria nanotubes were polycrystalline face-centered cubic phase and were composed of lots of dense ceria nanoparticles. The diameter of ceria nanotubes was about 40-50 nm. Catalytic activity of the product for CO oxidation was carried out at the region of 30-300 °C in a U-shaped quartz reactor with feeding about 0.15 g of the catalyst, which was loaded on Al2O3 carrier. The inlet gas composition was 1.0% CO and 28% O2 with N2 as balance, and the rate of flow was kept at 40 ml/min. The catalytic products were analyzed by gas chromatography. The as-prepared CeO2 nanotubes showed higher CO oxidation activity, which indicated that the morphology of ceria products affected the catalytic performance. The ceria nanotubes supported on Al2O3 demonstrated that conversion temperature for CO oxidation to CO2 was lower than that for bulk catalysts.

  15. Preparation and Characterization of Polycarbonate Modified Multiple-walled Carbon Nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Jin-Gang; HUANG Ke-Long; LIU Su-Qin; TANG Jin-Chun

    2008-01-01

    To prepare polymer/carbon nanotube composites, polycarbonate was chosen to modify multiple-walled carbon nanotubes. Poly[(propylene oxide)-(carbon dioxide)-(ε-caprolactone)], poly(butylene-co-ε-caprolactone carbonate),and poly[(propylene oxide)-co-(carbon dioxide)-co-(maleic anhydride)] were the polycarbonates which were used to modify multiple-walled carbon nanotubes, but only soluble poly[(propylene oxide)-(carbon dioxide)-(ε-caprolactone)] modified multiple-walled carbon nanotubes could be obtained. Thermogravimetric analysis clearly indicated that more polycarbonates were attached to soluble poly[(propylene oxide)-(carbon dioxide)-(ε-caprolactone)] modified multiple-walled carbon nanotubes. The formation of surface functional groups and changes of nanotube structures and morphology were monitored by infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy, respectively. Because of their solubility and bioactive moieties,poly[(propylene oxide)-(carbon dioxide)-(ε-caprolactone)] modified multiple-walled carbon nanotubes may find their potential use in drug delivery.

  16. Preparation of Carbon Nanotubes from Methane on Ni/Cu/A1 Catalyst

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Renzhong Wei; Fengyi Li; Yan Ju

    2005-01-01

    A series of Ni/Cu/Al catalyst samples were prepared by the co-precipitation method. Carbon nanotubes with large inner diameters are successfully synthesized from methane on Ni/Cu/Al catalyst by adding sodium carbonate. The effects of the copper content and amounts of sodium carbonate on the morphology and microstructures of carbon nanotubes were investigated by CO adsorption and TEM technique. The experimental results showed that copper can influence both the catalytic activity and catalyst life. Best result was obtained when the copper content was 15%. Addition of sodium carbonate favors the formation of carbon nanotubes with large inner diameters. The growth mechanism of carbon nanotubes with large inner diameter is discussed.

  17. Preparation and characterization of aligned carbon nanotubes coated with titania nanoparticles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Hongtao; ZHAO Huimin; QUAN Xie; CHEN Shuo

    2006-01-01

    Well-aligned carbon nanotubes coated with titania (TiO2) were prepared by atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition (APCVD), and the sequential experiments including carbon nanotubes preparation, air-oxidation purification and titania nanoparticles coating were performed at different temperatures in the same reactor. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscope (TEM), X-ray diffraction patterns (XRD), and energy- dispersive X-ray spectra (EDX) demonstrated the well-aligned nanotubes and TiO2 nanoparticles in close proximity and the average diameter of TiO2 nanoparticles was 11.5 nm.

  18. Chemical Properties of Carbon Nanotubes Prepared Using Camphoric Carbon by Thermal-CVD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azira, A. A.; Rusop, M.

    2010-03-01

    Chemical properties and surface study on the influence of starting carbon materials by using thermal chemical vapor deposition (Thermal-CVD) to produced carbon nanotubes (CNTs) is investigated. The CNTs derived from camphor were synthesized as the precursor material due to low sublimation temperature. The major parameters are also evaluated in order to obtain high-yield and high-quality CNTs. The prepared CNTs are examined using field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) to determine the microstructure of nanocarbons. The FESEM investigation of the CNTs formed on the support catalysts provides evidence that camphor is suitable as a precursor material for nanotubes formation. The chemical properties of the CNTs were conducted using FTIR spectroscopy and PXRD analysis. The high-temperature graphitization process induced by the Thermal-CVD enables the hydrocarbons to act as carbon sources and changes the aromatic species into the layered graphite structure of CNTs.

  19. Preparation of carbon nanotubes with different morphology by microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duraia, El-Shazly M. [Suez Canal University, Faculty of Science, Physics Department, Ismailia (Egypt); Al-Farabi Kazakh National University, 71 Al-Farabi av., 050038 Almaty (Kazakhstan); Institute of Physics and Technology, Ibragimov Street 11, 050032 Almaty (Kazakhstan); Mansurov, Zulkhair [Al-Farabi Kazakh National University, 71 Al-Farabi av., 050038 Almaty (Kazakhstan); Tokmoldin, S.Zh. [Institute of Physics and Technology, Ibragimov Street 11, 050032 Almaty (Kazakhstan)

    2010-04-15

    In this work we present a part of our results about the preparation of carbon nanotube with different morphologies by using microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition MPECVD. Well aligned, curly, carbon nanosheets, coiled carbon sheets and carbon microcoils have been prepared. We have investigated the effect of the different growth condition parameters such as the growth temperature, pressure and the hydrogen to methane flow rate ratio on the morphology of the carbon nanotubes. The results showed that there is a great dependence of the morphology of carbon nanotubes on these parameters. The yield of the carbon microcoils was high when the growth temperature was 700 C. There is a linear relation between the growth rate and the methane to hydrogen ratio. The effect of the gas pressure on the CNTs was also studied. Our samples were investigated by scanning electron microscope and Raman spectroscopy (copyright 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  20. Preparation polystyrene/multiwalled carbon nanotubes nanocomposites by copolymerization of styrene and styryl-functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hua, Jing, E-mail: huajing72@qust.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Rubber-Plastics Ministry of Education, Qingdao University of Science and Technology, Qingdao (China); Wang, Zhongguang; Xu, Ling; Wang, Xin; Zhao, Jian; Li, Feifei [Key Laboratory of Rubber-Plastics Ministry of Education, Qingdao University of Science and Technology, Qingdao (China)

    2013-01-15

    Styryl-functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotubes (p-MWNTs) were prepared by esterification based on the carboxylate salt of carbon nanotubes and p-chloromethylstyrene in toluene. Then in situ radical copolymerization of p-MWNTs and styrene initiated by 2,2 Prime -azobis(isobutyronitrile) (AIBN) was applied to synthesize composites of styryl-functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotubes and polystyrene (PS) (p-MWNTs/PS). Characterizations carried out by FT-IR, {sup 1}H NMR, UV-vis show that styryl group covalently bond to the surface of MWNTs. The results of UV showed that the solutions of p-MWNTs/PS in chloroform have the hyperchromic effect. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images of p-MWNTs/PS composites and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images of fracture surface of p-MWNTs/PS composites showed the functionalized nanotubes had a better dispersion than that of the unfunctionalized MWNTs in the matrix. The results of thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) suggested that the thermal stability of p-MWNTs/PS composites improved in the presence of MWNTs. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A facile and simple way to successfully prepare the polystyrene/MWNTs nanocomposites. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Characterizations show that styryl group covalently bond to the surface of MWNTs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The solutions of p-MWNTs/PS in chloroform have the hyperchromic effect. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Thermal stability of p-tpas composites improved in the presence of MWNTs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The performance of polymer prepared by this method have great potential for exploitation.

  1. Organic modification of carbon nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The organic modification of carbon nanotubes is a novel research field being developed recently. In this article, the history and newest progress of organic modification of carbon nanotubes are reviewed from two aspects:organic covalent modification and organic noncovalent modification of carbon nanotubes. The preparation and properties of organic modified carbon nanotubes are discussed in detail. In addition, the prospective development of organic modification of carbon nanotubes is suggested.

  2. The preparation of functionalized single walled carbon nanotubes as high efficiency DNA carriers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The positively charged single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs+) were prepared by conjugating with -CONH-C6H12-NH3+.The double strand DNA (dsDNA) chains were loaded onto SWNTs+ via the electrostatic interactions. SWNTs+ shows improved loading efficiency (353.5 μg/mg) toward dsDNA compared with that of charged free single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs)(82.9 μg/mg).

  3. Preparation of silver-carbon nanotubes composites with plasma electrochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoefft, Oliver; Lohmann, Lara; Olschewski, Mark; Endres, Frank

    2016-09-01

    Plasma electrochemistry is a powerful tool to generate free nanoparticles in aqueous solutions and especially in ionic liquids (ILs). Due to their very low vapour pressure, ionic liquids can be employed under vacuum conditions as fluid substrates or solvents. Thus, ionic liquids are well suitable electrolytes for plasma electrochemical processes delivering stable and homogeneous plasmas. We have shown that free copper and germanium nanoparticles can be obtained in ILs by applying a plasma as a mechanically contact-free electrode. Here we present our results using an argon plasma for the electrochemical synthesis of silver on pure and pre-treated multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) in 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium dicyanamide. For the pre-treatment of the MWCNTS we have used a dielectric barrier discharge plasma (DBD) at atmospheric pressure. For the untreated MWCNTs we have found a formation of free silver nanoparticles between, on and in the vicinity of the carbon nanotubes. In case of the plasma treated MWCNTs a silver-carbon nanotubes composite is formed. Thus, the treatment of the MWCNTs obviously has a great influence on the deposit. Therefore we additionally have investigated the influence of the DBD on the chemical composition of the MWCNTs surface with X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy.

  4. High efficient preparation of carbon nanotube-grafted carbon fibers with the improved tensile strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Wenxin; Wang, Yanxiang; Wang, Chengguo; Chen, Jiqiang; Wang, Qifen; Yuan, Yan; Niu, Fangxu

    2016-02-01

    An innovative technique has been developed to obtain the uniform catalyst coating on continuously moving carbon fibers. Carbon nanotube (CNT)-grafted carbon fibers with significantly improved tensile strength have been succeeded to produce by using chemical vapor deposition (CVD) when compared to the tensile strength of untreated carbon fibers. The critical requirements for preparation of CNT-grafted carbon fibers with high tensile strength have been found, mainly including (i) the obtainment of uniform coating of catalyst particles with small particle size, (ii) the low catalyst-induced and mechano-chemical degradation of carbon fibers, and (iii) the high catalyst activity which could facilitate the healing and strengthening of carbon fibers during the growth of CNTs. The optimum growth temperature was found to be about 500 °C, and the optimum catalyst is Ni due to its highest activity, there is a pronounced increase of 10% in tensile strength of carbon fibers after CNT growth at 500 °C by using Ni catalyst. Based on the observation from HRTEM images, a healing and crosslink model of neighboring carbon crystals by CNTs has been formulated to reveal the main reason that causes an increase in tensile strength of carbon fibers after the growth of CNTs. Such results have provided the theoretical and experimental foundation for the large-scale preparation of CNT-grafted carbon fibers with the improved tensile strength, significantly promoting the development of CNT-grafted carbon fiber reinforced polymer composites.

  5. Carbon nanotube prepared from carbon monoxide by CVD method and its application as electrode materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    AN Yuliang; YUAN Xia; CHENG Shinan; GEN Xin

    2006-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes with larger inner diameter were synthesized by the chemical vapor deposition of carbon monoxide (CO) on iron catalyst using H2S as promoting agent.It is found that the structure and morphology of carbon nanotubes can be tailored, to some degree, by varying the experimental conditions such as precursor components and process parameters.The results show that the presence of H2S may play key role for growing Y-branched carbon nanotubes.The products were characterized by SEM, TEM, and Raman spectroscopy, respectively.Furthermore, the obtained carbon nanotubes were explored as electrode materials for supercapacitor.

  6. Homogeneous Carbon Nanotube/Carbon Composites Prepared by Catalyzed Carbonization Approach at Low Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongjiang Li

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We synthesize carbon nanotube (CNT/carbon composite using catalyzed carbonization of CNT/Epoxy Resin composite at a fairly low temperature of about 400∘C. The microstructure of the composite is characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM, transmission electron microscope (TEM, and X-ray diffraction (XRD. The results indicate that CNTs and pyrolytic carbon blend well with each other. Pyrolytic carbon mainly stays in an amorphous state, with some of it forming crystalline structures. The catalyst has the effect of eliminating the interstices in the composites. Remarkable increases in thermal and electrical conductivity are also reported.

  7. Inkjet Printing of Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan P. Tortorich

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available In an attempt to give a brief introduction to carbon nanotube inkjet printing, this review paper discusses the issues that come along with preparing and printing carbon nanotube ink. Carbon nanotube inkjet printing is relatively new, but it has great potential for broad applications in flexible and printable electronics, transparent electrodes, electronic sensors, and so on due to its low cost and the extraordinary properties of carbon nanotubes. In addition to the formulation of carbon nanotube ink and its printing technologies, recent progress and achievements of carbon nanotube inkjet printing are reviewed in detail with brief discussion on the future outlook of the technology.

  8. Isotactic polypropylene/carbon nanotube composites prepared by latex technology: electrical conductivity study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grossiord, N.; Wouters, M.E.L.; Miltner, H.E.; Lu, K.; Loos, J.; Mele, B.V.; Koning, C.E.

    2010-01-01

    Several series of nanocomposites were prepared using a latex-based process, the main step of which consisted of mixing an aqueous suspension of exfoliated carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and a polymer latex. In the present work, a systematic study on the electrical properties of fully amorphous (polystyrene

  9. Nonlinear optical properties measurement of polypyrrole -carbon nanotubes prepared by an electrochemical polymerization method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahriari

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the optical properties dependence of Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes (MWNT on concentration was discussed. MWNT samples were prepared in polypyrrole by an electrochemical polymerization of monomers, in the presence of different concentrations of MWNTs, using Sodium Dodecyl-Benzen-Sulfonate (SDBS as surfactant at room temperature. The nonlinear refractive and nonlinear absorbtion indices were measured using a low power CW laser beam operated at 532 nm using z-scan method. The results show that nonlinear refractive and nonlinear absorbtion indices tend to be increased with increasing the concentration of carbon nanotubes. Optical properties of  carbone nanotubes indicate that they are good candidates for nonlinear optical devices

  10. Preparation and properties of Cu matrix composite reinforced by carbon nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Xiao-hua; LI Wen-hua; CHEN Chuan-sheng; XU Long-shan; YANG Zhi; HU Jing

    2005-01-01

    Cu matrix composites reinforced by carbon nanotubes(CNTs) were prepared. The effect of carbon nanotubes on mechanical and tribological properties of the Cu matrix composites were investigated. The chemical method for coating CNTs was reported. The morphology of the fracture surfaces and worn surface were examined by SEM.The results show that Cu/coated-CNTs composites have higher hardness, much better wear resistance and antifriction properties than those of the reference Cu alloy (Cu-10Sn) and Cu/uncoated-CNTs composite sintered under the same conditions. The optimal mechanical properties of the composites occurred at 2. 25% (mass fraction) of CNTs. The excellent wear resistance and anti-friction properties are attributed to the fiber strengthening effect of CNTs and the effect of the spherical wear debris containing carbon nanotubes on the tribo-surface.

  11. CARBON NANOTUBES: A REVIEW ON PREPARATION TECHNIQUES AND APPLICATIONS IN VARIOUS FIELDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SaiSowjanya Palla

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanotubes (CNTs are allotropes of carbon with a nanostructure that can have a length-to-diameter ratio greater than 1,000,000. Different types of carbon nanotubes can be produced by different methods: Arc discharge, laser ablation, chemical vapour deposition and flame synthesis. Purification of the tubes can be divided into a couple of main techniques: oxidation, acid treatment, annealing, sonication, filtering and functionalisation techniques. Economically feasible large-scale production and purification techniques still have to be developed. Fundamental and practical nanotube researches have shown possible applications in the fields of energy storage, molecular electronics, nanomechanic devices, composite materials and immobilization of enzymes. Various immobilization methods have been developed, and in particular, specific attachment of enzymes on carbon nanotubes has been an important focus of attention. With the growing attention paid to cascade enzymatic reaction, it is possible that multi enzyme co-immobilization would be one of the next goals in the future. In this paper, we focus on preparation techniques, various applications of CNTs and enzyme immobilization on carbon nanotubes.

  12. Preparation of Multiwall Carbon Nanotubes-supported High Loading Platinum for Vehicular PEMFC Application

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bing ZHANG; Li Juan CHEN; Kai Yong GE; Yan Chuan GUO; Bi Xian PENG

    2005-01-01

    Multiwall carbon nanotube-supported Pt (Pt/MWNTs) catalysts with high dispersion and high loading of Pt were prepared by chemical reduction method and the loading of Pt got to 40wt%. The average diameter of Pt nanoparticles on MWNTs was about 3.5 nm. When the hydrogen and air were used as reactant gases for PEMFC, Pt/MWNTs catalysts showed significantly higher performance than the Pt/XC-72 (carbon black) catalysts.

  13. Study on Carbon Nanotubes Prepared from Catalytic Decomposition of CH4 over Lanthanum Containing Ni-Base Catalysts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Minwei; Li Fengyi

    2004-01-01

    A series of lanthanum containing Ni-base catalysts were prepared by citric acid complex method.Carbon nanotubes (CNT) were synthesized bY catalytic decomposing CH4 over these catalysts and characterized by XRD, TEM and TGA.It is found that the addition of lanthanum can not increase the yield of carbon nanotube, but can make the diameter of carbon nanotube thinner and even.The more the lanthanum addsr, the thinner the diameter of CNTs becomes.With the CNTs prepared on Ni-Mg catalyst, the CNTs prepared on Ni-La-Mg catalyst has better crystallinity and thermal stability.

  14. Catalytic self-assembly preparation and characterization of carbon nitride nanotubes by a solvothermal method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Fuling; CAO Chuanbao; ZHU Hesun

    2005-01-01

    A solvothermal reaction of anhydrous C3N3Cl3 and sodium using cyclohexane as solvent and NiCl2 as catalyst precursor has been carried out to prepare carbon nitride nanotubes successfully at 230℃ and 1.8 MPa. The carbon nitride nanotubes were characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), electron diffraction (ED), electron energy loss spectrum (EELS) and Raman spectrum. SEM and TEM results indicated that the tubes have a length of 20-30 μm, a uniform outer diameter of about 50-60 nm, an inner diameter of 30-40 nm and are highly ordered assembled as bundles. The EELS measurement indicated that the ratio of N/C was about 1.00. The ED and XRD analyses revealed that the tube may have a new CN crystalline structure. The growth mechanism of nanotubes was discussed.

  15. Preparation of palladium loaded carbon nanotubes and activated carbons for hydrogen sorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anson, A. [Instituto de Carboquimica, CSIC, Miguel Luesma Castan, 4, 50018 Zaragoza (Spain)]. E-mail: aanson@ualberta.ca; Lafuente, E. [Instituto de Carboquimica, CSIC, Miguel Luesma Castan, 4, 50018 Zaragoza (Spain); Urriolabeitia, E. [Departamento de Quimica Inorganica, Universidad de Zaragoza, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Navarro, R. [Departamento de Quimica Inorganica, Universidad de Zaragoza, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Benito, A.M. [Instituto de Carboquimica, CSIC, Miguel Luesma Castan, 4, 50018 Zaragoza (Spain); Maser, W.K. [Instituto de Carboquimica, CSIC, Miguel Luesma Castan, 4, 50018 Zaragoza (Spain); Martinez, M.T. [Instituto de Carboquimica, CSIC, Miguel Luesma Castan, 4, 50018 Zaragoza (Spain)

    2007-06-14

    Single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and MAXSORB activated carbon have been used as the support of palladium nanoparticles. The preparation of the palladium loaded carbon materials has been done by direct reaction between the support and a Pd (0) compound, either Pd{sub 2}(dba){sub 3}.CHCl{sub 3} or Pd(PPh{sub 3}){sub 4}. The efficiency of the loading reaction has been much better when Pd{sub 2}(dba){sub 3}.CHCl{sub 3} has been chosen as the Pd source, reaching high palladium loadings (up to ca. 45 wt.%) with relatively small particle size (5-10 nm for SWNTs and 30-40 nm for MAXSORB). The hydrogen isotherms of the palladium loaded materials present a steep increase at very low pressures. The H/Pd atomic ratio of the samples has been found to be dependent on the Pd precursor, being higher in the case of Pd{sub 2}(dba){sub 3}.CHCl{sub 3}. Several samples have achieved H/Pd ratios higher than the value for bulk Pd (H/Pd {approx} 0.6-0.7). Maximum hydrogen sorption at room temperature in the palladium loaded samples has been found to be of 0.5 wt.% at atmospheric pressure. Oxidative treatments on the substrate before the palladium loading have diminished the efficiency of the loading reaction, the hydrogen adsorption, and the H/Pd atomic ratio.

  16. Preparation of double-walled carbon nanotubes using lanthanum as promoter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    安玉良; 候青怡; 王俊; 郑朝晖; 赵晖; 张罡

    2010-01-01

    Double-walled carbon nanotubes (DWNTs) were prepared from graphite by arc discharge technique with La as promoter. The DWNTs products were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy. The results demonstrated that La was a suitable promoter reagent for making high purity DWNTs with narrow diameter distribution by arc discharge method. The role of La in the growth of the DWNTs was briefly discussed in terms of the...

  17. Preparation of magnetic carbon nanotubes (Mag-CNTs) for biomedical and biotechnological applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masotti, Andrea; Caporali, Andrea

    2013-12-18

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been widely studied for their potential applications in many fields from nanotechnology to biomedicine. The preparation of magnetic CNTs (Mag-CNTs) opens new avenues in nanobiotechnology and biomedical applications as a consequence of their multiple properties embedded within the same moiety. Several preparation techniques have been developed during the last few years to obtain magnetic CNTs: grafting or filling nanotubes with magnetic ferrofluids or attachment of magnetic nanoparticles to CNTs or their polymeric coating. These strategies allow the generation of novel versatile systems that can be employed in many biotechnological or biomedical fields. Here, we review and discuss the most recent papers dealing with the preparation of magnetic CNTs and their application in biomedical and biotechnological fields.

  18. Preparation of Carbon Nanotubes by the Catalysis of Polymer Metal Complex on Porous Al203 Matrix

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI YanLi; ZHANG XiaoGang; LI HuLin

    2001-01-01

    @@ At present, synthesis of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) is normally conducted on a vapor-to-solid interface at ca. 500-3500℃ via various vapor phase methods, such as are discharge, laser ablation, catalytic pyrolysis and chemical vapor deposition, etc.1-2 Recently, channel materials (such as channels of alumina and of AlPO4-5 zeolite) 3 have been utilized as solid-state templates to grow CNTs inside the channel. Here we described a novel method to prepare the carbon nanotubes based on the decomposition of C2H2 gas on the Co-Ni catalyst anchored by polymer complex on the porous A12O3 matrix. The degree of graphitization of synthesized CNTs and catalysts are of great interest.

  19. Preparation of Carbon Nanotubes by the Catalysis of Polymer Metal Complex on Porous Al203 Matrix

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI; YanLi

    2001-01-01

    At present, synthesis of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) is normally conducted on a vapor-to-solid interface at ca. 500-3500℃ via various vapor phase methods, such as are discharge, laser ablation, catalytic pyrolysis and chemical vapor deposition, etc.1-2 Recently, channel materials (such as channels of alumina and of AlPO4-5 zeolite) 3 have been utilized as solid-state templates to grow CNTs inside the channel. Here we described a novel method to prepare the carbon nanotubes based on the decomposition of C2H2 gas on the Co-Ni catalyst anchored by polymer complex on the porous A12O3 matrix. The degree of graphitization of synthesized CNTs and catalysts are of great interest.  ……

  20. Intercalated carbon nanotubes as a template for the preparation of supported heteroatomic nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schouler, Marie-Claude; Chamssedine, Fadel; Claves, Daniel

    2011-03-01

    Chemistry in confined conditions is explored at the level of the interlayer space of multiwall carbon nanotubes. Starting from preliminary intercalated tubes, a ligand exchange reaction has been successfully conducted within the former Van der Waals gap, resulting in a final dispersion of heteroatomic particles, around 2 nm large and nearly homogeneous in size, on the outer surface of the tubes. Intercalated tubular carbon architectures thus prove to be interesting templates for a bottom-up preparation of chemically complex supported nanoparticles, with potential activities for versatile applications.

  1. Sheet resistances of composite films prepared from chemically-reduced graphite oxides and multiwalled carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Weontae; Kim, Daehan; Jeong, Euh Duck; Bae, Jong-Seong

    2013-12-01

    Graphite oxides (GOs) were spray-coated on a glass substrate to prepare the GO film, and the film was soaked in a HI aqueous solution to make a chemically-reduced GO (rGO) film. The rGOs were successfully prepared by using a chemical reduction of as-made GOs, but their surfaces were seriously damaged during the chemical treatments. The Sheet resistances of rGO and rGO/multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWNT) films were characterized as functions of the film's thickness and the number of MWNTs added to the rGO films.

  2. Effect of catalyst preparation on the yield of carbon nanotube growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Escobar, Mariano, E-mail: mescobar@df.uba.a [Dep. Quimica Inorganica, Analitica y Quimica Fisica, FCEyN, UBA, Ciudad Universitaria (1428), Bs As (Argentina); LP and MC, Dep. Fisica, FCEyN, UBA (Argentina); Rubiolo, Gerardo [Unidad de Actividad Materiales, CNEA, Av Gral Paz 1499, San Martin (1650), Bs As (Argentina); Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas (CONICET) (Argentina); Candal, Roberto [Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas (CONICET) (Argentina); Instituto de Fisico-quimica de Materiales, Ambiente y Energia (INQUIMAE), CONICET - UBA (Argentina); Goyanes, Silvia [LP and MC, Dep. Fisica, FCEyN, UBA (Argentina); Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas (CONICET) (Argentina)

    2009-10-01

    Multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were synthesized by catalytic chemical vapor deposition (CVD) on catalytic iron nanoparticles dispersed in a silica matrix, prepared by sol gel method. In this contribution, variation of gelation condition on catalyst structure and its influence on the yield of carbon nanotubes growth was studied. The precursor utilized were tetraethyl-orthosilicate and iron nitrate. The sols were dried at two different temperatures in air (25 or 80 deg. C) and then treated at 450 deg. C for 10 h. The xerogels were introduced into the chamber and reduced in a hydrogen/nitrogen (10%v/v) atmosphere at 600 deg. C. MWCNTs were formed by deposition of carbon atoms from decomposition of acetylene at 700 deg. C. The system gelled at RT shows a yield of 100% respect to initial catalyst mass whereas the yield of that gelled at 80 deg. C was lower than 10%. Different crystalline phases are observed for both catalysts in each step of the process. Moreover, TPR analysis shows that iron oxide can be efficiently reduced to metallic iron only in the system gelled at room temperature. Carbon nanotubes display a diameter of about 25-40 nm and several micron lengths. The growth mechanism of MWCNTs is base growth mode for both catalysts.

  3. Carbon nanotube composite materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Bryan, Gregory; Skinner, Jack L; Vance, Andrew; Yang, Elaine Lai; Zifer, Thomas

    2015-03-24

    A material consisting essentially of a vinyl thermoplastic polymer, un-functionalized carbon nanotubes and hydroxylated carbon nanotubes dissolved in a solvent. Un-functionalized carbon nanotube concentrations up to 30 wt % and hydroxylated carbon nanotube concentrations up to 40 wt % can be used with even small concentrations of each (less than 2 wt %) useful in producing enhanced conductivity properties of formed thin films.

  4. Preparation and Crystallization of Carbon Nanotube/maleic Anhydride-grafted Polypropylene Composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaohua CHEN; Jing HU; Lingping ZHOU; Wenhua LI; Zi YANG; Yanguo WANG

    2008-01-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT)/maleic acid anhydride (MAH)-grafted polypropylene (PP) composites were prepared by in situ grafting method. Infrared spectroscopy showed that the CNTs were linked to PP by MAH grafting. The microstructures and calorimetry analysis indicated that the crystallization behaviors of the filled and unfilled PP were quite different. The addition of CNTs dramatically reduced the spherulite size, increased crystallization rate and improved the thermal stability of PP. These results confirmed the expected nucleant effect of CNT on the crystallization of PP. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy showed that the CNTs were dispersed homogeneously, indicating that the original CNT bundles were separated into individual tubes by the grafting.

  5. Preparation of anionically polymerized butadiene-co-styrene copolymer-multiwalled carbon nanotubes nanocomposites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhong Guang; Wang, Jing Hua; Ling Xu

    2012-01-01

    Poly(butadiene-co-styrene) copolymer/multi-walled carbon nanotubes (SB-MWNTs) nanocomposites are prepared via terminating anionically synthesized living poly(butadiene-styryl)lithium with acyl chlorides on the MWNTs,which obtained from the carboxylation and acylation of the MWNTs.Results from the characterization of the SB-MWNTs nanocomposites,including its soluble in solvent,UV-vis and TEM of the dissolved samples,TGA and SEM of nanocomposites are presented and discussed respectively.MWNTs treated by SB can be easily distributed in the SBR (styrene-butadiene rubber) matrix.

  6. Thrombogenicity and blood coagulation of a microcatheter prepared from carbon nanotube-nylon-based composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endo, Morinobu; Koyama, Shozo; Matsuda, Yoshikazu; Hayashi, Takuya; Kim, Yoong-Ahm

    2005-01-01

    Here we describe the fabrication of nanocomposite-based microcatheter through-melt extrusion utilizing high-purity carbon nanotubes as filler and nylon as matrix. Homogeneous dispersion of carbon nanotubes in nylon can provide novel microcatheters with enhanced mechanical properties (easier to handle) and extremely reduced thrombogenicity or antithrombotic property. The present microcatheter with high performance is highly promising for medical applications.

  7. Continuous Preparation of Copper/Carbon Nanotube Composite Films and Application in Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Xiao Gang; Le Wu, Min; Wang, Xiao Xia; Zhong, Xin Hua; Zhao, Ke; Wang, Jian Nong

    2016-02-08

    Realizing the continuous and large scale preparation of particle/carbon nanotube (CNT) composites with enhanced functionalities, and broad applications in energy conversion, harvesting, and storage systems, remains as a big challenge. Here, we report a scalable strategy to continuously prepare particle/CNT composite films in which particles are confined by CNT films. This is achieved by the continuous condensation and deposition of a cylindrical assembly of CNTs on a paper strip and the in situ incorporation of particles during the layer-by-layer deposition process. A Cu/CNT composite film is prepared as an example; such a film exhibits very high power conversion efficiency when it is used as a counter electrode in a solar cell, compared with previous materials under otherwise identical conditions. The proposed method can be extended to other CNT-based composite films with excellent functionalities for wide applications.

  8. Organic/hybrid nanoparticles and single-walled carbon nanotubes: preparation methods and chiral applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhassen, Haysem; Antony, Vijy; Ghanem, Ashraf; Yajadda, Mir Massoud Aghili; Han, Zhao Jun; Ostrikov, Kostya Ken

    2014-11-01

    Nanoparticles are molecular-sized solids with at least one dimension measuring between 1-100 nm or 10-1000 nm depending on the individual discipline's perspective. They are aggregates of anywhere from a few hundreds to tens of thousands of atoms which render them larger than molecules but smaller than bulk solids. Consequently, they frequently exhibit physical and chemical properties somewhere between. On the other hand, nanocrystals are a special class of nanoparticles which have started gaining attention recently owing to their unique crystalline structures which provide a larger surface area and promising applications including chiral separations. Hybrid nanoparticles are supported by the growing interest of chemists, physicists, and biologists, who are researching to fully exploit them. These materials can be defined as molecular or nano-composites with mixed (organic or bio) and inorganic components, where at least one of the component domain has a dimension ranging from a few Å to several nanometers. Similarly, and due to their extraordinary physical, chemical, and electrical properties, single-walled carbon nanotubes have been the subject of intense research. In this short review, the focus is mainly on the current well-established simple preparation techniques of chiral organic and hybrid nanoparticles as well as single-walled carbon nanotubes and their applications in separation science. Of particular interest, cinchonidine, chitosan, and β-CD-modified gold nanoparticles (GNPs) are discussed as model examples for organic and hybrid nanoparticles. Likewise, the chemical vapor deposition method, used in the preparation of single-walled carbon nanotubes, is discussed. The enantioseparation applications of these model nanomaterials is also presented.

  9. Fabrication And Properties Of Silver Based Multiwall Carbon Nanotube Composite Prepared By Spark Plasma Sintering Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lis M.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents results of investigations of the obtained nanocomposite materials based on silver with addition of multiwall carbon nanotubes. The powder of carbon nanotubes content from 0.1 to 3 wt. % was produced by application of powder metallurgy methods, through mixing and high-energetic milling, and also chemical methods. Modification of carbon nanotubes included electroless deposition of silver particles on the carbon nanotube active surfaces and chemical reduction with strong reducing agent – sodium borohydride (NaBH4. The obtained powder mixtures were consolidated by SPS – Spark Plasma Sintering method. The formed composites were subjected to tests of relative density, electrical conductivity and electro-erosion properties. Detailed examinations of the structure with application of X-ray microanalysis, with consideration of carbon nanotubes distribution, were also carried out. The effect of manufacturing methods on properties of the obtained composites was observed.

  10. PEGylation of carbon nanotubes via mussel inspired chemistry: Preparation, characterization and biocompatibility evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Xiaoyong; Zeng, Guangjian; Tian, Jianwen; Wan, Qing; Huang, Qiang [Department of Chemistry, Nanchang University, 999 Xuefu Avenue, Nanchang 330031 (China); Wang, Ke; Zhang, Qingsong [Department of Chemistry and the Tsinghua Center for Frontier Polymer Research, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Liu, Meiying; Deng, Fengjie [Department of Chemistry, Nanchang University, 999 Xuefu Avenue, Nanchang 330031 (China); Wei, Yen, E-mail: xiaoyongzhang1980@gmail.com [Department of Chemistry and the Tsinghua Center for Frontier Polymer Research, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2015-10-01

    Graphical abstract: Water dispersible and biocompatible PEGylated carbon nanotubes were prepared via a novel mussel inspired strategy for the first time. - Highlights: • Surface modification of CNTs via bioinspired chemistry. • CNTs with high water dispersibility and excellent biocompatibility. • PEGytion of CNTs via Michael addition reaction. • Preparation of aminated PEG molecules via chain transfer polymerization. - Abstract: A novel strategy for surface modification of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) was developed via combination of mussel inspired chemistry and Michael addition reaction. In this procedure, pristine MWCNT were first coated with polydopamine (PDA) through self polymerization of dopamine. The PDA functionalized CNT (CNT-PDA) were further functionalized with amino-terminated polymers (polyPEGMA), which were synthesized via free radical polymerization using cysteamine hydrochloride as the chain transfer agent and poly(ethylene glycol) monomethyl ether methacylate as the monomer. The successful modification of CNT was ascertained by a series of characterization techniques including transmission electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, thermal gravimetric analysis and X-ray photoelectron spectrometry. The polymer modified CNT showed enhanced dispersibility in aqueous and organic solution. Cytotoxicity evaluation of polymers modified CNT showed that these modified CNT are biocompatible with cells. Finally, due to the universal adhesive of PDA and chain transfer free radical polymerization, this strategy developed in this work can also be extended for surface modification of many other nanomaterials with different functional polymers.

  11. Surface Study of Carbon Nanotubes Prepared by Thermal-CVD of Camphor Precursor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azira, A. A.; Rusop, M.

    2010-03-01

    Surface morphology study on the influence of starting carbon materials by using thermal chemical vapor deposition (Thermal-CVD) to produced carbon nanotubes (CNTs) is investigated. The CNTs derived from camphor were synthesized as the precursor material due to low sublimation temperature, which indirectly maybe cost effective. The major parameters are also evaluated in order to obtain high-yield and high-quality CNTs. The prepared CNTs are examined using field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and high resolution transmission electron microscope (HR-TEM) to determine the microstructure of nanocarbons. The FESEM investigation of the CNTs formed on the support catalysts provides evidence that camphor is suitable as a precursor material for nanotubes formation. The high-temperature graphitization process induced by the Thermal-CVD enables the hydrocarbons to act as carbon sources and changes the aromatic species into the layered graphite structure of CNTs. The camphoric hydrocarbons not only found acts as the precursors but also enhances the production rate and the quality of CNTs.

  12. Optically active substituted polyacetylene@carbon nanotube hybrids: Preparation, characterization and infrared emissivity property study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bu, Xiaohai; Zhou, Yuming, E-mail: ymzhou@seu.edu.cn; Zhang, Tao; Wang, Yongjuan; Zhang, Zewu; He, Man

    2014-08-15

    Optically active substituted polyacetylene@multiwalled carbon nanotubes (SPA@MWCNTs) nanohybrids were fabricated by wrapping helical SPA copolymers onto the surface of modified nanotubes through ester bonding linkage. SPA copolymer based on chiral phenylalanine and serine was pre-polymerized by a rhodium zwitterion catalyst in THF, and evidently proved to possess strong optical activity and adopt a predominately one-handed helical conformation. Various characterizations including Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) demonstrated that the SPA had been covalently grafted onto the nanotubes without destroying their original graphite structure. The wrapped SPA was found to exhibit an enhancement in thermal stability and still maintained considerable optical activity after grafting. The infrared emissivity property of the nanohybrids at 8–14 μm was investigated in addition. The results indicated that the SPA@MWCNTs hybrid matrix could possess a much lower infrared emissivity value (ε=0.707) than raw MWCNTs, which might be due to synergistic effect of the unique helical conformation of optically active SPA and strengthened interfacial interaction between the organic polymers and inorganic nanoparticles. - Graphical abstract: Optically active SPA@MWCNTs nanohybrids with low infrared emissivity. - Highlights: • Synthesis of optically active SPA copolymer derived from serine and phenylalanine. • Preparation and characterization of optically active SPA@MWCNTs nanohybrids. • Application study of the SPA@MWCNTs nanohybrids (ε=0.707) in lowering the infrared emissivity.

  13. Morphology of carbon nanotubes prepared via chemical vapour deposition technique using acetylene: A small angle neutron scattering investigation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    D Sen; K Dasgupta; J Bahadur; S Mazumder; D Sathiyamoorthy

    2008-11-01

    Small angle neutron scattering (SANS) has been utilized to study the morphology of the multi-walled carbon nanotubes prepared by chemical vapour deposition of acetylene. The effects of various synthesis parameters like temperature, catalyst concentration and catalyst support on the size distribution of the nanotubes are investigated. Distribution of nanotube radii in two length scales has been observed. The number density of the smaller diameter tubes was found more in number compared to the bigger one for all the cases studied. No prominent scaling of the structure factor was observed for the different synthesis conditions.

  14. Recent trends in preparation and application of carbon nanotube-graphene hybrid thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thanh Dang, Van; Dung Nguyen, Duc; Thanh Cao, Thi; Le, Phuoc Huu; Tran, Dai Lam; Phan, Ngoc Minh; Chuc Nguyen, Van

    2016-09-01

    The combination of one-dimensional (1D) carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and two-dimensional (2D) graphene materials to generate three-dimensional (3D) carbon nanotube-graphene hybrid thin films (CNGHTFs) has attracted great attention owing to their intriguing properties via the synergistic effects of these two materials on their electrical, optical, and electrochemical properties in comparison with their individual components. This review aims to provide a brief introduction of recent trends in preparation methodologies and some outstanding applications of CNGHTFs. It contains two main scientific subjects. The first of these is the research on preparation techniques of CNGHTFs, including reduction agent-assisted mechanical blending of reduced graphene oxide (rGO) and CNTs, hybridization methods for layer-by-layer (LBL) assembly of CNTs and rGO sheets, multi-step methods using combinations of a solution and chemical vapor deposition (CVD) processing, one-step growth of CNGHTFs by the CVD method, and modified CVD methods via thermal deposition of carbon source on catalyst surfaces. The advantages and disadvantages of the preparation methods of CNGHTFs are presented and discussed in detail. The second scientific subject of the review is the research on some outstanding applications of CNGHTFs in various research fields, including transparent conductors, electron field emitters, field-effect transistors, biosensors and supercapacitors. In most cases, the CNGHTFs showed superior performances than those of the pristine GO/graphene or CNT materials. Therefore, the CNGHTFs exhibit as high-potential materials for various practical applications. Opportunites and challenges in the fields are also presented.

  15. Preparation and Photocatalytic Properties of SnO2 Coated on Nitrogen-Doped Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lingling Wang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available SnO2 nanoparticles coated on nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes were prepared successfully via a simple wet-chemical route. The as-obtained SnO2/CNx composites were characterized using X-ray powder diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. The photocatalytic activity of as-prepared SnO2/CNx for degradation Rhodamine B under UV light irradiation was investigated. The results show that SnO2/CNx nanocomposites have a higher photocatalytic activity than pure SnO2 and SnO2/CNTs nanocomposites. This enhanced photoresponse indicates that the photoinduced electrons in the SnO2 prefer separately transferring to the CNx, which has a high degree of defects. As a consequence, the radiative recombination of the electron-hole pairs is hampered and the photocatalytic activity is significantly enhanced for the SnO2/CNx photocatalysts.

  16. Continuous Preparation of Carbon Nanotube Film and Its Applications in Fuel and Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Xiao Gang; Huang, Xin Xin; Wang, Xiao Xia; Zhong, Xin Hua; Meng, Xin Xin; Wang, Jian Nong

    2016-03-01

    So far, simultaneously realizing the continuous, controllable, and scalable preparation of carbon nanotube (CNT) film has remained a big challenge. Here, we report a scalable approach to continuously prepare CNT film with good control of film size and thickness. This is achieved through the layer-by-layer condensation and deposition of a cylindrical CNT assembly that is continuously produced from a floating catalyst CVD reactor on a paper strip. The promising applications of such a film are demonstrated by directly using it as an effective protecting layer for the Pt/C catalyst in proton exchange membrane fuel cells and as an efficient counter electrode material in quantum-dot-sensitized solar cells.

  17. Method for synthesizing carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Hongyou

    2012-09-04

    A method for preparing a precursor solution for synthesis of carbon nanomaterials, where a polar solvent is added to at least one block copolymer and at least one carbohydrate compound, and the precursor solution is processed using a self-assembly process and subsequent heating to form nanoporous carbon films, porous carbon nanotubes, and porous carbon nanoparticles.

  18. Carbon nanotube nanoelectrode arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Zhifeng; Lin, Yuehe; Yantasee, Wassana; Liu, Guodong; Lu, Fang; Tu, Yi

    2008-11-18

    The present invention relates to microelectode arrays (MEAs), and more particularly to carbon nanotube nanoelectrode arrays (CNT-NEAs) for chemical and biological sensing, and methods of use. A nanoelectrode array includes a carbon nanotube material comprising an array of substantially linear carbon nanotubes each having a proximal end and a distal end, the proximal end of the carbon nanotubes are attached to a catalyst substrate material so as to form the array with a pre-determined site density, wherein the carbon nanotubes are aligned with respect to one another within the array; an electrically insulating layer on the surface of the carbon nanotube material, whereby the distal end of the carbon nanotubes extend beyond the electrically insulating layer; a second adhesive electrically insulating layer on the surface of the electrically insulating layer, whereby the distal end of the carbon nanotubes extend beyond the second adhesive electrically insulating layer; and a metal wire attached to the catalyst substrate material.

  19. Preparation and characterization of rubbery epoxy/multiwall carbon nanotubes composites using amino acid salt assisted dispersion technique

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Epoxy/multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) composites were prepared using sodium salt of 6-aminohexanoic acid (SAHA) modified MWCNT and its effect properties of related composites were investigated. The composite prepared using a polar solvent, tetrahydrofuran exhibits better mechanical properties compared to those prepared using less polar solvent and without using solvent. The tensile properties and dynamic storage modulus was found to be increased as a result of modification of MWCNT with SA...

  20. Carbon nanotube quantum dots

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sapmaz, S.

    2006-01-01

    Low temperature electron transport measurements on individual single wall carbon nanotubes are described in this thesis. Carbon nanotubes are small hollow cylinders made entirely out of carbon atoms. At low temperatures (below ~10 K) finite length nanotubes form quantum dots. Because of its small si

  1. Preparation and Application of Conductive Textile Coatings Filled with Honeycomb Structured Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filip Govaert

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Electrical conductive textile coatings with variable amounts of carbon nanotubes (CNTs are presented. Formulations of textile coatings were prepared with up to 15 wt % of CNT, based on the solid weight of the binder. The binders are water based polyacrylate dispersions. The CNTs were mixed into the binder dispersion starting from a commercially available aqueous CNT dispersion that is compatible with the binder dispersion. Coating formulations with variable CNT concentrations were applied on polyester and cotton woven and knitted fabrics by different textile coating techniques: direct coating, transfer coating, and screen printing. The coatings showed increasing electrical conductivity with increasing CNT concentration. The coatings can be regarded to be electrically conductive (sheet resistivity<103 Ohm/sq starting at 3 wt% CNT. The degree of dispersion of the carbon nanotubes particles inside the coating was visualized by scanning electron microscopy. The CNT particles form honeycomb structured networks in the coatings, proving a high degree of dispersion. This honeycomb structure of CNT particles is forming a conductive network in the coating leading to low resistivity values.

  2. Synthesis of carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awasthi, Kalpana; Srivastava, Anchal; Srivastava, O N

    2005-10-01

    Carbon nanotubes play a fundamental role in the rapidly developing field of nanoscience and nanotechnology because of their unique properties and high potential for applications. In this article, the different synthesis methods of carbon nanotubes (both multi-walled and single-walled) are reviewed. From the industrial point of view, the chemical vapor deposition method has shown advantages over laser vaporization and electric arc discharge methods. This article also presents recent work in the controlled synthesis of carbon nanotubes with ordered architectures. Special carbon nanotube configurations, such as nanocoils, nanohorns, bamboo-shaped and carbon cylinder made up from carbon nanotubes are also discussed.

  3. Carbon nanotube-polymer composite actuators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gennett, Thomas; Raffaelle, Ryne P.; Landi, Brian J.; Heben, Michael J.

    2008-04-22

    The present invention discloses a carbon nanotube (SWNT)-polymer composite actuator and method to make such actuator. A series of uniform composites was prepared by dispersing purified single wall nanotubes with varying weight percents into a polymer matrix, followed by solution casting. The resulting nanotube-polymer composite was then successfully used to form a nanotube polymer actuator.

  4. Preparation and characterization of grafted collagen-multiwalled carbon nanotubes composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Y; Zhou, Y M; Shan, Y; Ju, H X; Xue, X J

    2007-02-01

    This paper describes a new class of composite materials designed by combining multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and grafted collagen matrix. These materials show high mechanical capabilities by taking advantage of the favorable mechanical characteristics of MWCNTs. Furthermore, doping carbon nanotubes into grafted collagen matrix results in a substantial improvement of thermal stability and infrared emissivity. Thus these materials possess potential applications in some fields such as biomedicine and infrared camouflage.

  5. Electrochemical Intercalation of Lithium into Raw and Mild Oxide-treated Carbon Nanotubes Prepared by CVD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIN Ke-zhi; XU Yan-hui; WANG Xiao-lin; LUO Guo-hua

    2004-01-01

    The raw carbon nanotubes (CNTs) prepared by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) were used in electrochemical lithiation. To remove the impurity the mild oxidation was done on the samples. The electrochemical characteristics of the two samples are investigated by the galvanostatic charge-discharge measurements and cyclic voltammetry. The structural and interfacial changes of the CNTs electrode were analyzed by XRD and FT-IR. The samples show a reversibility of lithium intercalation and de-intercalation. The reversible capacities of the first five cycles are larger than 300 mAh/g and the irreversible capacity of the first cycle was much larger than that mentioned in literatures. There is no identical change in the structure during the charge and discharge. The reactions at the interface between electrode and the electrolyte are similar to those of other carbonaceous materials.

  6. Electrically Conductive, Optically Transparent Polymer/Carbon Nanotube Composites and Process for Preparation Thereof

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connell, John W. (Inventor); Smith, Joseph G. (Inventor); Harrison, Joycelyn S. (Inventor); Park, Cheol (Inventor); Watson, Kent A. (Inventor); Ounaies, Zoubeida (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    The present invention is directed to the effective dispersion of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) into polymer matrices. The nanocomposites are prepared using polymer matrices and exhibit a unique combination of properties, most notably, high retention of optical transparency in the visible range (i.e., 400-800 nm), electrical conductivity, and high thermal stability. By appropriate selection of the matrix resin, additional properties such as vacuum ultraviolet radiation resistance, atomic oxygen resistance, high glass transition (T.sub.g) temperatures, and excellent toughness can be attained. The resulting nanocomposites can be used to fabricate or formulate a variety of articles such as coatings on a variety of substrates, films, foams, fibers, threads, adhesives and fiber coated prepreg. The properties of the nanocomposites can be adjusted by selection of the polymer matrix and CNT to fabricate articles that possess high optical transparency and antistatic behavior.

  7. Preparation and characterization of aligned carbon nanotubes/polylactic acid composite fibers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kong Yuxia; Yuan Jie [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tongji University, Shanghai 201804 (China); Qiu Jun, E-mail: qiujun@tongji.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tongji University, Shanghai 201804 (China); Key Laboratory of Advanced Civil Engineering Materials of Education of Ministry, Shanghai 201804 (China)

    2012-07-01

    Aligned functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotubes/polylactic acid (MWNTs-PCL/PLA) composite fibers were successfully prepared by electrospinning processing. The MWNTs bonded with the polycaprolactone chains exhibited excellent uniform dispersion in PLA solution by comparing with the acid-functionalized MWNTs and amino-functionalized MWNTs. Optical microscopy was used to study the aligned degree of the fibers and to investigate the influences of the electrodes distance on the alignment and structure of the fibers, and results showed that the best quality of aligned fibers with dense structure and high aligned degree were obtained at an electrodes distance of 3 cm. Moreover, the MWNTs embedded inside the MWNTs-PCL/PLA fibers displayed well orientation along the axes of the fibers, which was demonstrated by field emission scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy.

  8. Preparation and Characterization of Highly Aligned Carbon Nanotubes/Polyacrylonitrile Composite Nanofibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanhua Song

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In the electrospinning process, a modified parallel electrode method (MPEM, conducted by placing a positively charged ring between the needle and the parallel electrode collector, was used to fabricate highly aligned carbon nanotubes/polyacrylonitrile (CNTs/PAN composite nanofibers. Characterizations of the samples—such as morphology, the degree of alignment, and mechanical and conductive properties—were investigated by a combination of scanning electron microscopy (SEM, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, universal testing machine, high-resistance meter, and other methods. The results showed the MPEM could improve the alignment and uniformity of electrospun CNTs/PAN composite nanofibers, and enhance their mechanical and conductive properties. This meant the successful preparation of highly aligned CNT-reinforced PAN nanofibers with enhanced physical properties, suggesting their potential application in appliances and communication areas.

  9. Preparation of Isolated Single-walled Carbon Nanotubes with High Hydrogen Storage Capacity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张艾飞; 刘吉平; 吕广庶; 刘华

    2006-01-01

    Isolated single-walled carbon nanotubes with high proportion of opening tips were synthesized by using alcohol as carbon source. The mechanism of cutting action of oxygen was proposed to explain its growth. Compared with carbon nanotubes synthesized with benzene as carbon source, their specific surface area was heightened by approximately 2.2 times (from 200.5 to 648 m2/g) and the hydrogen storage capacity was increased by approximately 6.5 times (from 0.95 to 7.17%, ω)which had exceeded DOE energy standard of vehicular hydrogen storage.

  10. CVD Method for Carbon Nanotubes Preparation Based on Orthogonal Experiment Using C3H6

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SU Xunwen; JIANG Fang

    2015-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have potential applications in many fields, chemical vapor deposition (CVD) is an effective method for CNTs preparation. By CVD, the catalytic pyrolysis temperature, pyrolysis time and the size of the raw gas lfow have a great inlfuence on yield rate of CNTs and their form. In this paper, the orthogonal experiment analysis method is used for studying the inlfuence factors of yield rate of CNTs. Research results show that, in the suitable temperature range of preparing CNTs, there is relatively more CNTs with excellent morphology, otherwise, if the temperature is too low, the growth of CNTs will not be sufifcient; if the temperature is too high, then CNTs will be generated with excessive defects; with longer growth time of suitable pyrolysis of CNTs, higher yield of CNTs will be obtained; CNTs morphology with reaction time is not proportional; too low or too high raw gas lfow rate is not conducive to the growth of CNTs. We have found the optimum conditions for the CNTs preparation: pyrolysis temperature 680℃, pyrolysis time 35 min, propylene lfow rate of 180 mL/min. The results have a reference value for the preparation of CNTS and their composites.

  11. PREPARATION OF MULTI-WALLED CARBON NANOTUBES USING NiO CATALYST SYNTHESIZED BY HYDROTHERMAL METHOD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Y.J. Zhu; Y.L. Chen; X.M. Xue; Y.M. Chen; C.Y. Wu; T.C. Kuang; S.H. Li; H. Y. Zhang

    2003-01-01

    The Ni(OH)2/SiO2 binary colloid was prepared using Ni(NO3)2.6H2O and (C2H5 O)4SiO4 as starting materials and was used to form NiO/SiO2 composite powder by hydrothermal method and desiccant method in open air respectively. Multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were synthesized respectively by chemical vapor deposition using the NiO/SiO2 catalyst prepared by different methods. The phase and morphology of the catalysts and the morphology, output yield and purity of MWCNTs were compared by XRD, TEM and SEM. The results show that the catalyst powder prepared by hydrothermal method, compared with that by desiccant method, is smaller, better dispersion and has stronger catalytic activity. Pure MWCNTs with smaller tube diameter and narrow range could be obtained at a high yield using that NiO/SiO.2 powder prepared by hydrothermal method as catalyst.

  12. A general strategy for the preparation of carbon nanotubes and graphene oxide decorated with PdO nanoparticles in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Hongkun; Gao, Chao

    2010-07-02

    The preparation of carbon nanotube (CNT)/PdO nanoparticles and graphene oxide (GO)/PdO nanoparticle hybrids via a general aqueous solution strategy is reported. The PdO nanoparticles are generated in situ on the CNTs and GO by a one-step "green" synthetic approach in aqueous Pd(NO(3))(2) solution under ambient conditions without adding any additional chemicals. The production of PdO is confirmed by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and thermal gravimetric analysis. The morphologies of the resulting CNT/PdO and GO/PdO nanohybrids are characterized by transmission and/or scanning transmission electron microscopy. PdO nanoparticles with an average size of 2-3 nm in diameter are decorated evenly along the surfaces of CNTs and GO. This synthesis strategy is demonstrated to be compatible for 1) CNTs with different modifications, including pristine, oxidized, and polymer-functionalized CNTs; 2) different types of CNTs, including single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), double-walled carbon nanotubes (DWCNTs), and multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs); and 3) different shapes of carbon materials, including tubular CNTs and planar GO. The as-prepared CNT/PdO and GO/PdO nanohybrids can be transformed into CNT/Pd and GO/Pd nanohybrids by reduction with NaBH(4), and can then be used as a heterogeneous catalyst in the catalytic reduction of 4-nitrophenol.

  13. Preparation and Characterization of Electrospun Fibers of Poly(methyl methacrylate - Single walled carbon nano-tube Nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bibekananda Sundaray, Ph.D.

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Electrospinning is a versatile method of preparing polymer nanocmposite fibers. Electrospun nanocomposite fibers of poly(methyl methacrylate and single walled carbon nanotubes were prepared. The fibers were characterized by SEM, TEM, TGA and Raman spectroscopy. These fibers show dramatic improvement in the electrical conductivity compared to the polymer. The temperature dependent electrical resistance measurements show a one dimensional variable range hopping model (1-D VRH type of conduction mechanism operating in these types of systems.

  14. Molybdenum Disulfide Sheathed Carbon Nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu Chun SONG; Zhu De XU; Yi Fan ZHENG; Gui HAN; Bo LIU; Wei Xiang CHEN

    2004-01-01

    Single and double layered MoS2-coated multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNs) were successfully prepared by pyrolyzing (NH4)2MoS4-coated multiwalled carbon nanotubes in an H2 atmosphere at 900℃. MoS2-coated MWCNs would be expected to have different tribological and mechanical properties compared to MoS2, so it may have potential applications in many fields.

  15. Preparation and modification of carbon nanotubes electrodes by cold plasmas processes toward the preparation of amperometric biosensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luais, E. [CEISAM, Universite de Nantes, CNRS, 2 rue de la Houssiniere, 44322 Nantes cedex 3 (France); IMN, Universite de Nantes, CNRS, 2 rue de la Houssiniere, 44322 Nantes cedex 3 (France); PCI, Universite du Maine, CNRS, rue Aristote, 72085 Le Mans cedex 9 (France); Thobie-Gautier, C. [CEISAM, Universite de Nantes, CNRS, 2 rue de la Houssiniere, 44322 Nantes cedex 3 (France); Tailleur, A.; Djouadi, M.-A.; Granier, A.; Tessier, P.Y. [IMN, Universite de Nantes, CNRS, 2 rue de la Houssiniere, 44322 Nantes cedex 3 (France); Debarnot, D.; Poncin-Epaillard, F. [PCI, Universite du Maine, CNRS, rue Aristote, 72085 Le Mans cedex 9 (France); Boujtita, M., E-mail: mohammed.boujtita@univ-nantes.f [CEISAM, Universite de Nantes, CNRS, 2 rue de la Houssiniere, 44322 Nantes cedex 3 (France)

    2010-11-30

    An electrochemical transducer based on vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (CNT) was prepared as a platform for biosensor development. Prior to enzyme immobilization, the CNT were treated using a microwave plasma system (CO{sub 2} and N{sub 2}/H{sub 2}) in order to functionalize the CNT surface with oxygenated and aminated groups. The morphological aspect of the electrode surface was examined by SEM and its chemical structure was also elucidated by XPS analysis. It was found out that microwave plasma system (CO{sub 2} and N{sub 2}/H{sub 2}) not only functionalizes the CNT but also permits to avoid the collapse phenomena retaining thus the alignment structure of the electrode surface. The electrochemical properties of the resulting new material based on CNT were carried out by cyclic voltammetry and were found suitable to develop high sensitive enzyme (HRP) biosensors operating on direct electron transfer process.

  16. Preparation and Characterization of Carbon Nanotubes-Coated Cordierite for Catalyst Supports

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jianmei Wang; Rong Wang; Xiujin Yu; Jianxin Lin; Feng Xie; Kemei Wei

    2006-01-01

    The carbon nanotubes-coated cordierite (CNTs-cordierite) was fabricated by pyrolysis of ethine on cordierite with iron catalyst, which was penetrated into the cordierite substrate by vacuum impregnation. The cordierite substrate, carbon naontubes, and CNTs-cordierite were characterized by SEM, TEM/HREM, BET, and TGA. The results show that the carbon nanotubes were distributed uniformly on the surface of cordierite. A significant increase in BET surface area and pore volume was observed, and a suitable pore-size distribution was obtained. On the CNTs-cordierite, carbon nanotubes penetrated into the cordierite substrate, which led to a remarkable stability of the CNTs against ultrasound maltreatment. Growth time is an important factor for thermostability and texture of the sample. The mass increased but the purity decreased with the growth time, which caused the exothermic peak shift to low temperature, and the corresponding full width half maximum (FWHM) of the peak in DTG increased.

  17. Preparation of Pt–Ru bimetallic catalyst supported on carbon nanotubes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    B Rajesh; K Ravindranathan Thampi; J -M Bonard; B Viswanathan

    2000-10-01

    The template carbonization of polyphenyl acetylene yields hollow, uniform cylindrical carbon nanotubes with outer diameter almost equal to pore diameter of the template used. High resolution transmission electron microscopic investigation reveals that Pt–Ru nanoparticles are highly dispersed inside the tube with an average particle size of 1.7 nm.

  18. Field Emission Lamps Prepared with Dip-Coated and Nickel Electroless Plated Carbon Nanotube Cathodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, N W; Youh, M J; Chung, K J; Liu, Y M; Ger, M D

    2015-07-01

    Fabrication and efficiency enhancement of tubal field emission lamps (FELs) using multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) as the cathode field emitters were studied. The cathode filaments were prepared by eletrolessly plating a nickel (Ni) film on the cathode made of a 304 stainless steel wire dip-coated with MWNTs. The 304 wire was dip-coated with MWNTs and nano-sized Pd catalyst in a solution, and then eletrolessly plated with Ni to form an MWNT-embedded composite film. The MWNTs embedded in Ni not only had better adhesion but also exhibited a higher FE threshold voltage, which is beneficial to our FEL system and can increase the luminous efficiency of the anode phosphor. Our results show that the FE cathode prepared by dipping three times in a solution containing 400 ppm Pd nano-catalysts and 0.2 wt.% MWNTs and then eletrolessly plating a Ni film at a deposition temperature of 60 °C, pH value of 5, and deposition time of 7 min has the best FE uniformity and efficiency. Its emission current can stay as low as 2.5 mA at a high applied voltage of 7 kV, which conforms to the high-voltage-and-low-current requirement of the P22 phosphor and can therefore maximize the luminous efficiency of our FEL. We found that the MWNT cathodes prepared by this approach are suitable for making high-efficiency FELs.

  19. New catalyst supports prepared by surface modification of graphene- and carbon nanotube structures with nitrogen containing carbon coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Eun-Jin; Hempelmann, Rolf; Nica, Valentin; Radev, Ivan; Natter, Harald

    2017-02-01

    We present a new and facile method for preparation of nitrogen containing carbon coatings (NCC) on the surface of graphene- and carbon nanotubes (CNT), which has an increased electronic conductivity. The modified carbon system can be used as catalyst support for electrocatalytic applications, especially for polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFC). The surface modification is performed by impregnating carbon structures with a nitrogen containing ionic liquid (IL) with a defined C:N ratio, followed by a thermal treatment under ambient conditions. We investigate the influence of the main experimental parameters (IL amount, temperature, substrate morphology) on the formation of the NCC. Additionally, the structure and the chemical composition of the resulting products are analyzed by electron microscopic techniques (SEM, TEM), energy disperse X-ray analysis (EDX), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and hot extraction analysis. The modified surface has a nitrogen content of 29 wt% which decreases strongly at temperatures above 600 °C. The new catalyst supports are used for the preparation of PEMFC anodes which are characterized by polarization measurements and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Compared to unmodified graphene and CNT samples the electronic conductivity of the modified systems is increased by a factor of 2 and shows improved mass transport properties.

  20. In situ preparation of composite from conjugated polyschiff bases and multiwalled carbon nanotube: Synthesis, electrochromic, acidochromic properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma Lina; Cai Jiwei [Key Laboratory of Functional Inorganic Material Chemistry (Heilongjiang University), Ministry of Education, Department of Polymer Materials and Engineering, Harbin 150086 (China); Zhao Ping [Key Laboratory for Advanced Materials and Institute of Fine Chemicals, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China); Niu Haijun, E-mail: haijunniu@hotmail.com [Key Laboratory of Functional Inorganic Material Chemistry (Heilongjiang University), Ministry of Education, Department of Polymer Materials and Engineering, Harbin 150086 (China); Wang Cheng; Bai Xuduo [Key Laboratory of Functional Inorganic Material Chemistry (Heilongjiang University), Ministry of Education, Department of Polymer Materials and Engineering, Harbin 150086 (China); Wang Wen [School of Material Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150080 (China)

    2012-03-15

    Graphical abstract: The introduction of carbon nanotubes greatly improves the photochromic property of the composites. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MWNTs/PSB composite was prepared by in situ polymerization with a new type of PSB. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The introduction of carbon nanotubes greatly improves the photochromic property of the composites. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The composites exhibited excellent thermal stability and reversible electrochemical behavior. - Abstract: Polyschiff base (PSB) which has the structure of C=N double bond is well known as conducting material with high thermal resistance, chemical and electrical properties. Recently, it was used as hole transporting material in organic light emitting diode (OLED), chemical sensor and electrochromic materials. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with excellent properties such as unique electrical, mechanical, optical and chemical properties are promising reinforcing materials for polymer composites which improve the comprehensive properties of polymers. In this paper, conjugated PSB-grafted multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) composite was prepared by in situ polymerization. The resultant composites were characterized by thermogravimetric (TGA), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), UV-vis absorption, photoluminescence (PL), cyclic voltammograms (CV), infrared spectroscopy (IR) and Raman spectroscopy. The composites exhibited high thermal stability and excellent reversibilities of electrochromic, photochromic, acidochromic characteristics, with the color change from the light yellow to blue.

  1. PARAMETRIC STUDY FOR THE PREPARATION OF ALIGNED SINGLE-WALLED CARBON NANOTUBES BY ANODE-ARC DISCHARGE METHOD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    J.F. Dai; Q. Wang; W.X. Li; Z.Q. Wei; G.J. Xu

    2005-01-01

    Well aligned quasi-straight single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and straight SWCNTs bundle have been prepared in large scale by anode-arc vaporization of graphite with metallic catalysts. Various parameters such as the catalyst preparation, the kinds and pressure of the buffer gases, the quantity of anode-arc current intensity, and the method of purification have been examined. The influence of these parameters on the deposited carbon yield is reported, together with observations of the produced material. Improvement in synthetic techniques has resulted in the optimal conditions for the production of large quantities of high quality SWCNTs in our semi-continuous synthesis method. The formation of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) was studied briefly in this paper. Owing to the magnetic pinching effect of arc current, the CNTs arrange in parallel lines along the arc current direction.

  2. Densification of in situ prepared mesocarbon microbead/carbon nanotube composites by hot-press sintering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Bin; GONG Qian-ming; WU Jian-jun; SONG Huai-he; LIANG Ji

    2009-01-01

    In situ prepared mesocarbon microbead/carbon nanotube(MCMB/CNT) composites are potential precursors of high density carbon materials for various applications. Integrated MCMB/CNT composites were successfully fabricated by hot-press sintering at 550 ℃ under 30 MPa. After further calcination at 900 ℃, the hot-press sintering fabricated MCMB block has an apparent density of 1.77 g/cm3 and the open porosity 5.1%. With the addition of 5%(mass fraction) CNTs, the density of the composite block is elevated to 1.84 g/cm3, and its open porosity is reduced to 3.5%. The flexural strength of composite block with 5% CNTs is elevated to 116 MPa. Through the hot-press sintering, pores of 10-50 nm in the calcinated bulks are remarkably eliminated. The interstice between microbeads in the composite blocks is filled up by CNTs together with β-resin and quinoline-insoluble spheres, which can further contribute to the densification.

  3. Multi-Directional Growth of Aligned Carbon Nanotubes Over Catalyst Film Prepared by Atomic Layer Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Kai

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The structure of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs severely depends on the properties of pre-prepared catalyst films. Aiming for the preparation of precisely controlled catalyst film, atomic layer deposition (ALD was employed to deposit uniform Fe2O3 film for the growth of CNT arrays on planar substrate surfaces as well as the curved ones. Iron acetylacetonate and ozone were introduced into the reactor alternately as precursors to realize the formation of catalyst films. By varying the deposition cycles, uniform and smooth Fe2O3 catalyst films with different thicknesses were obtained on Si/SiO2 substrate, which supported the growth of highly oriented few-walled CNT arrays. Utilizing the advantage of ALD process in coating non-planar surfaces, uniform catalyst films can also be successfully deposited onto quartz fibers. Aligned few-walled CNTs can be grafted on the quartz fibers, and they self-organized into a leaf-shaped structure due to the curved surface morphology. The growth of aligned CNTs on non-planar surfaces holds promise in constructing hierarchical CNT architectures in future.

  4. Metallic/semiconducting ratio of carbon nanotubes in a bundle prepared using CVD technique

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Khurshed Ahmad Shah; S S Islam; H S Mavi; A K Shukla; Harsh

    2006-08-01

    We present an investigation of the nature of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) in a bundle by resonant Raman spectroscopy. The calculation has been done for the three peak positions in radial breathing mode (RBM) spectra obtained by using a laser excitation wavelength () of 633 nm from He–Ne laser on SWNT bundle sample prepared by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technique using iron catalyst at 800° C. The detailed analysis in the present study is focused on peak positions 162 cm-1, 186 cm-1, and 216 cm-1. The first step of the analysis is to construct a list of possible (, ) pairs from the diameters calculated from the RBM peak positions. The parameters of SWNTs studied gives in-depth understanding of many symmetry, resonance and characteristic properties of SWNT bundles. Our results indicate that the contribution of metallic SWNTs in the bundle is small at RBM peak positions 162 cm-1, 186 cm-1 and in agreement with pervious results at peak position 216 cm-1.

  5. A General Strategy for the Preparation of Carbon Nanotubes and Graphene Oxide Decorated with PdO Nanoparticles in Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongkun He

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The preparation of carbon nanotube (CNT/PdO nanoparticles and graphene oxide (GO/PdO nanoparticle hybrids via a general aqueous solution strategy is reported. The PdO nanoparticles are generated in situ on the CNTs and GO by a one-step “green” synthetic approach in aqueous Pd(NO32 solution under ambient conditions without adding any additional chemicals. The production of PdO is confirmed by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and thermal gravimetric analysis. The morphologies of the resulting CNT/PdO and GO/PdO nanohybrids are characterized by transmission and/or scanning transmission electron microscopy. PdO nanoparticles with an average size of 2–3 nm in diameter are decorated evenly along the surfaces of CNTs and GO. This synthesis strategy is demonstrated to be compatible for 1 CNTs with different modifications, including pristine, oxidized, and polymer-functionalized CNTs; 2 different types of CNTs, including single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs, double-walled carbon nanotubes (DWCNTs, and multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs; and 3 different shapes of carbon materials, including tubular CNTs and planar GO. The as-prepared CNT/PdO and GO/PdO nanohybrids can be transformed into CNT/Pd and GO/Pd nanohybrids by reduction with NaBH4, and can then be used as a heterogeneous catalyst in the catalytic reduction of 4-nitrophenol.

  6. Preparation and properties of in-situ growth of carbon nanotubes reinforced hydroxyapatite coating for carbon/carbon composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shoujie; Li, Hejun; Su, Yangyang; Guo, Qian; Zhang, Leilei

    2017-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) possess excellent mechanical properties for their role playing in reinforcement as imparting strength to brittle hydroxyapatite (HA) bioceramic coating. However, there are few reports relating to the in-situ grown carbon nanotubes reinforced hydroxyapatite (CNTs-HA) coating. Here we demonstrate the potential application in reinforcing biomaterials by an attempt to use in-situ grown of CNTs strengthen HA coating, using a combined method composited of injection chemical vapor deposition (ICVD) and pulsed electrodeposition. The microstructure, phases and chemical compositions of CNTs-HA coatings were characterized by various advanced methods. The scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images indicated that CNTs-HA coatings avoided the inhomogeneous dispersion of CNTs inside HA coating. The result show that the interfacial shear strength between CNTs-HA coating and the C/C composite matrix reaches to 12.86±1.43MPa. Potenitodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) studies show that the content of CNTs affects the corrosion resistance of CNTs-HA coating. Cell culturing and simulated body fluid test elicit the biocompatibility with living cells and bioactivity of CNTs-HA coatings, respectively.

  7. Nanomechanics of carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kis, Andras; Zettl, Alex

    2008-05-13

    Some of the most important potential applications of carbon nanotubes are related to their mechanical properties. Stiff sp2 bonds result in a Young's modulus close to that of diamond, while the relatively weak van der Waals interaction between the graphitic shells acts as a form of lubrication. Previous characterization of the mechanical properties of nanotubes includes a rich variety of experiments involving mechanical deformation of nanotubes using scanning probe microscopes. These results have led to promising prototypes of nanoelectromechanical devices such as high-performance nanomotors, switches and oscillators based on carbon nanotubes.

  8. Coatings of Different Carbon Nanotubes on Platinum Electrodes for Neuronal Devices: Preparation, Cytocompatibility and Interaction with Spiral Ganglion Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niklas Burblies

    Full Text Available Cochlear and deep brain implants are prominent examples for neuronal prostheses with clinical relevance. Current research focuses on the improvement of the long-term functionality and the size reduction of neural interface electrodes. A promising approach is the application of carbon nanotubes (CNTs, either as pure electrodes but especially as coating material for electrodes. The interaction of CNTs with neuronal cells has shown promising results in various studies, but these appear to depend on the specific type of neurons as well as on the kind of nanotubes. To evaluate a potential application of carbon nanotube coatings for cochlear electrodes, it is necessary to investigate the cytocompatibility of carbon nanotube coatings on platinum for the specific type of neuron in the inner ear, namely spiral ganglion neurons. In this study we have combined the chemical processing of as-delivered CNTs, the fabrication of coatings on platinum, and the characterization of the electrical properties of the coatings as well as a general cytocompatibility testing and the first cell culture investigations of CNTs with spiral ganglion neurons. By applying a modification process to three different as-received CNTs via a reflux treatment with nitric acid, long-term stable aqueous CNT dispersions free of dispersing agents were obtained. These were used to coat platinum substrates by an automated spray-coating process. These coatings enhance the electrical properties of platinum electrodes, decreasing the impedance values and raising the capacitances. Cell culture investigations of the different CNT coatings on platinum with NIH3T3 fibroblasts attest an overall good cytocompatibility of these coatings. For spiral ganglion neurons, this can also be observed but a desired positive effect of the CNTs on the neurons is absent. Furthermore, we found that the well-established DAPI staining assay does not function on the coatings prepared from single-wall nanotubes.

  9. Carbon nanotube solar cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colin Klinger

    Full Text Available We present proof-of-concept all-carbon solar cells. They are made of a photoactive side of predominantly semiconducting nanotubes for photoconversion and a counter electrode made of a natural mixture of carbon nanotubes or graphite, connected by a liquid electrolyte through a redox reaction. The cells do not require rare source materials such as In or Pt, nor high-grade semiconductor processing equipment, do not rely on dye for photoconversion and therefore do not bleach, and are easy to fabricate using a spray-paint technique. We observe that cells with a lower concentration of carbon nanotubes on the active semiconducting electrode perform better than cells with a higher concentration of nanotubes. This effect is contrary to the expectation that a larger number of nanotubes would lead to more photoconversion and therefore more power generation. We attribute this to the presence of metallic nanotubes that provide a short for photo-excited electrons, bypassing the load. We demonstrate optimization strategies that improve cell efficiency by orders of magnitude. Once it is possible to make semiconducting-only carbon nanotube films, that may provide the greatest efficiency improvement.

  10. Electrochemical preparation and electrochemical behavior of polypyrrole/carbon nanotube composite films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xue-tong ZHANG; Wen-hui SONG

    2009-01-01

    Polypyirole/multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWNT) composite fihns were electrochemically depos-ited in the presence of an ionic surfactant, sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), acting as both supporting electrolyte and dispersant. The effects of the surfactant and the MWNT concentrations on the structure at the resulting composite films were investigated. The electrochemical behavior of the resulting polypyrrole/MWNT composite film was investigated aS well bv cyclic voltammogram. The effect of the additional alternating electric field applied during the constant direct potential electrochemical deposition on the morphology and electrochemical behavior of the resulting composite film was also investigated in this study.

  11. Acid yellow 9 as a dispersing agent for carbon nanotubes: preparation of redox polymer-carbon nanotube composite film and its sensing application towards ascorbic acid and dopamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, S Ashok; Wang, Sea-Fue; Yang, Thomas C-K; Yeh, Chun-Ting

    2010-08-15

    In this study, we show that acid yellow 9 (4-amino-1-1'-azobenzene-3,4'-disulfonicacid, AY) is a good stabilizing agent for multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). MWCNTs dispersed in AY solution was remained stable about three months and even remained stable after centrifugation at 10,000 rpm for 30 min. Using MWCNTs/AY dispersion, thin-films were prepared on indium tin oxide coated glass electrode and glassy carbon electrodes. Further, dried films of MWCNTs/AY were subjected to electropolymerization in 0.1M H(2)SO(4) solution. Adsorbed AY molecules on MWCNTs get polymerized and they yield a polymer-MWCNTs nanocomposite film on electrode surface which is found to be electrochemically active in wide pH range (1-11). Characterization studies were performed using cyclic voltammetry and SEM. These studies are supported that hybrid material PAY/MWCNTs was obtained. Moreover, newly synthesized PAY-MWCNTs composite film showed excellent electrocatalytic activity towards oxidation of dopamine (DA) and ascorbic acid (AA) with high sensitivity in physiological pH. Linear sweep voltammetry was employed to the determination of DA in the presence of AA in the range of 2x10(-7) to 1.4x10(-6) M. Amperometry was employed to determination of AA at 0.0 V in the range from 1x10(-6) to 5.6x10(-5) M, and DA, uric acid are not interfered on the steady-state current of AA. In addition, real samples such as dopamine injection and AA spiked into human urine were analyzed using PAY/MWCNTs composite modified electrode and satisfactory results were obtained.

  12. Preparation, loading, and cytotoxicity analysis of polymer nanotubes from an ethylene glycol dimethacrylate homopolymer in comparison to multi‐walled carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Laurent; Zheng, Yu; Steinhart, Martin; Werner, Carsten; Wang, Wenxin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Despite concerns over toxicity, carbon nanotubes have been extensively investigated for potential applications in nanomedicine because of their small size, unique properties, and ability to carry cargo such as small molecules and nucleic acids. Herein, we show that polymer nanotubes can be synthesized quickly and easily from a homopolymer of ethylene glycol dimethacrylate (EGDMA). The nanotubes formed via photo‐initiated polymerization of the highly functional prepolymer, inside an anodized aluminium oxide template, have a regular structure and large internal pore and can be loaded with a fluorescent dye within minutes representing a simple alternative to multi‐walled carbon nanotubes for biomedical applications. PMID:27512602

  13. Preparation of carbon nanotubes by ethanol catalytic combustion technique using nickel salt as catalyst precursor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Fei; ZOU Xiao-ping; CHENG Jin; ZHANG Hong-dan; REN Peng-fei

    2006-01-01

    A simple growth technique of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) by combustion of ethanol was developed. In the experiment,copper plate was employed as substrate,nickel nitrate (Ni(NO3)2) and nickel chloride (NiCl2) as catalyst precursor,and ethanol as carbon source. The cleaned copper substrate was dipped into catalyst precursor solution for mounting catalyst precursor particles. The dip-coated substrate was then placed into ethanol flame for about 10 min after drying. The black wool-like production grown on copper plate was obtained. This route is called an ethanol catalytic combustion(ECC) process. The black powders were characterized by means of scanning electron microscopy(SEM),transmission electron microscopy(TEM),energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer(EDS) and Raman spectroscopy. The results show that the techique is much simpler and more economical to meet the future broader applications.

  14. Carbon nanotube fiber spun from wetted ribbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yuntian T; Arendt, Paul; Zhang, Xiefei; Li, Qingwen; Fu, Lei; Zheng, Lianxi

    2014-04-29

    A fiber of carbon nanotubes was prepared by a wet-spinning method involving drawing carbon nanotubes away from a substantially aligned, supported array of carbon nanotubes to form a ribbon, wetting the ribbon with a liquid, and spinning a fiber from the wetted ribbon. The liquid can be a polymer solution and after forming the fiber, the polymer can be cured. The resulting fiber has a higher tensile strength and higher conductivity compared to dry-spun fibers and to wet-spun fibers prepared by other methods.

  15. Preparation, characterization of a ceria loaded carbon nanotubes nanocomposites photocatalyst and degradation of azo dye Acid Orange 7

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen Tao

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available A ceria loaded carbon nanotubes (CeO2/CNTs nanocomposites photocatalyst was prepared by chemical precipitation, and the preparation conditions were optimized using an orthogonal experiment method. HR-TEM, XRD, UV-Vis/DRS, TGA and XPS were used to characterize the photocatalyst. Nitrogen adsorption-desorption was employed to determine the BET specific surface area. The results indicated that the photocatalyst has no obvious impurities. CeO2 was dispersed on the carbon nanotubes with a good loading effect and high loading efficiency without agglomeration. The catalyst exhibits a strong ability to absorb light in the ultraviolet region and some ability to absorb light in the visible light region. The CeO2/CNTs nanocomposites photocatalyst was used to degrade azo dye Acid Orange 7 (40 mg/L. The optical decolorization rate was 66.58% after xenon lamp irradiation for 4 h, which is better than that of commercial CeO2 (43.13%. The results suggested that CeO2 loading on CNTs not only enhanced the optical decolorization rate but also accelerated the separation of CeO2/CNTs and water.

  16. Templated Growth of Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siochik Emilie J. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A method of growing carbon nanotubes uses a synthesized mesoporous si lica template with approximately cylindrical pores being formed there in. The surfaces of the pores are coated with a carbon nanotube precu rsor, and the template with the surfaces of the pores so-coated is th en heated until the carbon nanotube precursor in each pore is convert ed to a carbon nanotube.

  17. Carbon nanotube junctions and devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Postma, H.W.Ch.

    2001-01-01

    In this thesis Postma presents transport experiments performed on individual single-wall carbon nanotubes. Carbon nanotubes are molecules entirely made of carbon atoms. The electronic properties are determined by the exact symmetry of the nanotube lattice, resulting in either metallic or semiconduct

  18. Continuous preparation of carbon-nanotube-supported platinum catalysts in a flow reactor directly heated by electric current

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alicja Schlange

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available In this contribution we present for the first time a continuous process for the production of highly active Pt catalysts supported by carbon nanotubes by use of an electrically heated tubular reactor. The synthesized catalysts show a high degree of dispersion and narrow distributions of cluster sizes. In comparison to catalysts synthesized by the conventional oil-bath method a significantly higher electrocatalytic activity was reached, which can be attributed to the higher metal loading and smaller and more uniformly distributed Pt particles on the carbon support. Our approach introduces a simple, time-saving and cost-efficient method for fuel cell catalyst preparation in a flow reactor which could be used at a large scale.

  19. Graded Composites of Polyamide/Carbon Nanotubes Prepared by Laser Sintering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmoria, G. V.; Paggi, R. A.; Beal, V. E.

    2017-02-01

    In this study, the mechanical and electrical properties of graded composition material (GM) were investigated in order to evaluate the effects of the addition of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) to a polyamide 12 (PA12) matrix in different proportions. A graded component of PA12/MWCNTs was designed and manufactured by selective laser sintering (SLS) and variations in the morphology as well as in the mechanical and electrical properties were observed. The effect of different proportions of MWCNTs in the PA12 was investigated by microscopy, flexural test and resistivity measurements. The addition of 0.5 and 1.0 wt% of MWCNTs promoted an increase in the composite strength and flexural modulus. A significant reduction in the resistivity was verified with the addition of 3.0% of MWCNTs in the polyamide matrix. The mechanical and electrical behavior presented by the PA12/MWCNT composites suggests that the percolation concentration is around 3 wt%, when an effective inter-nanotube contact seems to be reached, improving the electrical conductivity but reducing the mechanical strength. A GM component with an MWCNT concentration gradient along the vertical axis was designed and manufactured by SLS. A gradual controlled variation in the composition of GM component leads to variations in the microstructure as well as in the mechanical and electrical properties.

  20. Processing and Characterization of Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes Containing Alumina-Carbon Refractories Prepared by Nanocomposite Powder Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Feng; Li, Nan; Liu, Baikuan; He, Zhongyang

    2016-06-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have often been used as additives to improve the properties of refractories containing carbon. However, it is very difficult to evenly distribute CNTs in the matrix. In order to solve this difficulty, an alumina/multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) (AM) composite powder in which MWCNTs had grown on the surfaces of Al2O3 particles was developed and used in alumina-carbon (Al2O3-C) refractories. The effects of the AM composite powders on the microstructure and properties of the Al2O3-C refractories were studied and compared with the commercial MWCNTs. The nanocomposite powders significantly improved the distribution uniformity of MWCNTs in the Al2O3-C matrix. The densification, fracture properties, thermal shock resistance, and slag corrosion resistance were enhanced due to the well-dispersed MWCNTs. On the contrary, no improvement of the densification, fracture properties, and thermal shock resistance of the refractories was achieved by addition of commercial MWCNTs due to the agglomeration of MWCNTs.

  1. Carbon nanotubes for supercapacitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Hui; Li, Jianyi; Feng, Yuanping

    2010-01-05

    As an electrical energy storage device, supercapacitor finds attractive applications in consumer electronic products and alternative power source due to its higher energy density, fast discharge/charge time, low level of heating, safety, long-term operation stability, and no disposable parts. This work reviews the recent development of supercapacitor based on carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and their composites. The purpose is to give a comprehensive understanding of the advantages and disadvantages of carbon nanotubes-related supercapacitor materials and to find ways for the improvement in the performance of supercapacitor. We first discussed the effects of physical and chemical properties of pure carbon nanotubes, including size, purity, defect, shape, functionalization, and annealing, on the supercapacitance. The composites, including CNTs/oxide and CNTs/polymer, were further discussed to enhance the supercapacitance and keep the stability of the supercapacitor by optimally engineering the composition, particle size, and coverage.

  2. Carbon Nanotubes for Supercapacitor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Jianyi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract As an electrical energy storage device, supercapacitor finds attractive applications in consumer electronic products and alternative power source due to its higher energy density, fast discharge/charge time, low level of heating, safety, long-term operation stability, and no disposable parts. This work reviews the recent development of supercapacitor based on carbon nanotubes (CNTs and their composites. The purpose is to give a comprehensive understanding of the advantages and disadvantages of carbon nanotubes-related supercapacitor materials and to find ways for the improvement in the performance of supercapacitor. We first discussed the effects of physical and chemical properties of pure carbon nanotubes, including size, purity, defect, shape, functionalization, and annealing, on the supercapacitance. The composites, including CNTs/oxide and CNTs/polymer, were further discussed to enhance the supercapacitance and keep the stability of the supercapacitor by optimally engineering the composition, particle size, and coverage.

  3. Preparation of Conductive Coating Solutions by Blending Waterborne Acrylic Polyurethane Dispersion with Carbon Nanotube

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huh, Woo Young; Yun, Dong Gu; Song, Ki Chang [Konyang University, Nonsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-02-15

    Waterborne polyurethane dispersion (WPUD) was synthesized from polycarbonate diol (PCD), isophorone diisocyanate (IPDI) and dimethylol propionic acid (DMPA) as starting materials. Then, waterborne acrylic polyurethane dispersion (AUD) was synthesized by reacting the WPUD with an acrylate monomer, methyl methacrylate (MMA). Subsequently, the AUD was mixed with multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) to yield a conductive coating solution, and the mixture was coated on the polycarbonate substrate. With increasing the amount of MMA in the AUD, the pencil hardness, abrasion resistance and chemical resistance of the coating films were improved, but the electrical conductivity of the coating films was decreased. On the other hand, the pencil hardness, abrasion resistance and chemical resistance of coating films were decreased, but the electrical conductivity was enhanced with increasing the amount of MWCNT in the conductive coating solutions.

  4. Hierarchical composite structures prepared by electrophoretic deposition of carbon nanotubes onto glass fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Qi; Rider, Andrew N; Thostenson, Erik T

    2013-03-01

    Carbon nanotube/glass fiber hierarchical composite structures have been produced using an electrophoretic deposition (EPD) approach for integrating the carbon nanotubes (CNTs) into unidirectional E-glass fabric, followed by infusion of an epoxy polymer matrix. The resulting composites show a hierarchical structure, where the structural glass fibers, which have diameters in micrometer range, are coated with CNTs having diameters around 10-20 nm. The stable aqueous dispersions of CNTs were produced using a novel ozonolysis and ultrasonication technique that results in dispersion and functionalization in a single step. Ozone-oxidized CNTs were then chemically reacted with a polyethyleneimine (PEI) dendrimer to enable cathodic EPD and promote adhesion between the CNTs and the glass-fiber substrate. Deposition onto the fabric was accomplished by placing the fabric in front of the cathode and applying a direct current (DC) field. Microscopic characterization shows the integration of CNTs throughout the thickness of the glass fabric, where individual fibers are coated with CNTs and a thin film of CNTs also forms on the fabric surfaces. Within the composite, networks of CNTs span between adjacent fibers, and the resulting composites exhibit good electrical conductivity and considerable increases in the interlaminar shear strength, relative to fiber composites without integrated CNTs. Mechanical, chemical and morphological characterization of the coated fiber surfaces reveal interface/interphase modification resulting from the coating is responsible for the improved mechanical and electrical properties. The CNT-coated glass-fiber laminates also exhibited clear changes in electrical resistance as a function of applied shear strain and enables self-sensing of the transition between elastic and plastic load regions.

  5. Synthesis of Ni/Mg/Al Layered Double Hydroxides and Their Use as Catalyst Precursors in the Preparation of Carbon Nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Yun; JIAO Qing-ze; LIANG Ji; LI Chun-hua

    2005-01-01

    Ni/Mg/Al layered double hydroxides(LDHs) with different n(Ni):n(Mg):n(Al) ratio values were prepared via a coprecipitation reaction. Then Ni/Mg/Al mixed oxides were obtained by calcination of these LDHs precursors. Carbon nanotubes were produced in the catalytic decomposition of propane over the Ni/Mg/Al mixed oxide catalysts. The quality of as-made nanotubes was investigated by SEM and TEM. The nanotubes were multiwall with a high length-diameter ratio and appeared to be flexible. The catalytic activities of these mixed oxides increased with increasing the Ni content. The Ni/Mg/Al mixed oxide with the highest Ni content [n(Ni)/n(Mg)/n(Al)=1/1/1] showed the highest activity and the carbon nanotubes grown on its surface had the best quality.

  6. Carbon nanotube filters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, A.; Srivastava, O. N.; Talapatra, S.; Vajtai, R.; Ajayan, P. M.

    2004-09-01

    Over the past decade of nanotube research, a variety of organized nanotube architectures have been fabricated using chemical vapour deposition. The idea of using nanotube structures in separation technology has been proposed, but building macroscopic structures that have controlled geometric shapes, density and dimensions for specific applications still remains a challenge. Here we report the fabrication of freestanding monolithic uniform macroscopic hollow cylinders having radially aligned carbon nanotube walls, with diameters and lengths up to several centimetres. These cylindrical membranes are used as filters to demonstrate their utility in two important settings: the elimination of multiple components of heavy hydrocarbons from petroleum-a crucial step in post-distillation of crude oil-with a single-step filtering process, and the filtration of bacterial contaminants such as Escherichia coli or the nanometre-sized poliovirus (~25 nm) from water. These macro filters can be cleaned for repeated filtration through ultrasonication and autoclaving. The exceptional thermal and mechanical stability of nanotubes, and the high surface area, ease and cost-effective fabrication of the nanotube membranes may allow them to compete with ceramic- and polymer-based separation membranes used commercially.

  7. Carbon nanotubes for microelectronics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Andrew P; Duesberg, Georg S; Seidel, Robert V; Liebau, Maik; Unger, Eugen; Pamler, Werner; Kreupl, Franz; Hoenlein, Wolfgang

    2005-04-01

    Despite all prophecies of its end, silicon-based microelectronics still follows Moore's Law and continues to develop rapidly. However, the inherent physical limits will eventually be reached. Carbon nanotubes offer the potential for further miniaturization as long as it is possible to selectively deposit them with defined properties.

  8. Nitrogen doping in carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewels, C P; Glerup, M

    2005-09-01

    Nitrogen doping of single and multi-walled carbon nanotubes is of great interest both fundamentally, to explore the effect of dopants on quasi-1D electrical conductors, and for applications such as field emission tips, lithium storage, composites and nanoelectronic devices. We present an extensive review of the current state of the art in nitrogen doping of carbon nanotubes, including synthesis techniques, and comparison with nitrogen doped carbon thin films and azofullerenes. Nitrogen doping significantly alters nanotube morphology, leading to compartmentalised 'bamboo' nanotube structures. We review spectroscopic studies of nitrogen dopants using techniques such as X-ray photoemission spectroscopy, electron energy loss spectroscopy and Raman studies, and associated theoretical models. We discuss the role of nanotube curvature and chirality (notably whether the nanotubes are metallic or semiconducting), and the effect of doping on nanotube surface chemistry. Finally we review the effect of nitrogen on the transport properties of carbon nanotubes, notably its ability to induce negative differential resistance in semiconducting tubes.

  9. Carbon nanotubes film preparation on 3D structured silicon substrates by spray coating technique for application in solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Y.; Li, M.; Lin, C.; Liu, P.; Zhang, J.

    2014-11-01

    This paper firstly reports the preparation of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) film on silicon substrate of three-dimensional (3D) inverted pyramid structure (IPS) by spray coating. The effect of different substrate temperatures, spraying times and opening sizes on CNTs sidewall covering properties were investigated. The results show that the CNTs covering ratio of sidewall is much lower than that of flat surface and gradually decrease with depth. 40μm×40μm opening obtained the best sidewall covering by CNTs suspension of 40μg/ml at 120°C after 30min spraying so that the CNTs can reach the bottom of IPS and cover about 68.9% sidewall area. At last, it is demonstrated that the output power of the CNTs film-Si solar cell can be enhanced 5.7 times by this method compared to that of the plane structure.

  10. Evolution of carbon nanotube dispersion in preparation of epoxy-based composites: From a masterbatch to a nanocomposite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Aravand

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The state of carbon nanotube (CNT dispersion in epoxy is likely to change in the process of composite production. In the present work CNT dispersion is characterized at different stages of nanocomposite preparation: in the original masterbatch with high CNT concentration, after masterbatch dilution, in the process of curing and in the final nanocomposite. The evaluation techniques included dynamic rheological analysis of the liquid phases, optical, environmental and charge contrast scanning electron microscopy, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and dynamic mechanical analysis. The evolution of the CNT dispersion was assessed for two CNT/epoxy systems with distinctly different dispersion states induced by different storage time. Strong interactions between CNT clusters were revealed in the masterbatch with a longer storage time. Upon curing CNT clusters in this material formed a network-like structure. This network enhanced the elastic behaviour and specific conductivity of the resulting nanocomposite, leading to a partial electrical percolation after curing.

  11. Preparation and properties of multi-wall carbon nanotube/SiC composites by aqueous tape casting

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    L(U) ZhiHui; JIANG DongLiang; ZHANG JingXian; LIN QingLing

    2009-01-01

    MWCNTS/SiC composites were fabricated by aqueous tape casting. High solid content (50 vol%) SiC slurries with sintering additives and multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) as reinforcements were prepared using Tetramethylammonium hydroxide as the dispersant. The stability of MWCNTs/SiC slur-ries was studied and characterized in terms of zeta potential and rheology measurements. The relative density of the composite was about 98% after hot-pressing at 1850℃ (at 25 MPa in Ar for 30 min). The hardness of the composites decreased with the increase in MWCNTs content, The flexural strength and was 0,25 wt%. Further increase in MWCNTs content to 0.50 wt% did not lead to the increase in me-chanical properties. Most of MWCNTs were found to be located at SiC grain boundaries and the pull out of the MWCNTs was observed.

  12. Shear Flow Induced Alignment of Carbon Nanotubes in Natural Rubber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan He

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A new procedure for the fabrication of natural rubber composite with aligned carbon nanotubes is provided in this study. The two-step approach is based on (i the preparation of mixture latex of natural rubber, multiwalled carbon nanotubes, and other components and (ii the orientation of carbon nanotubes by a flow field. Rubber composite sheets filled with variable volume fraction of aligned carbon nanotubes were fabricated and then confirmed by transmission electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy studies. An obvious increase in thermal conductivity has been obtained after the alignment of carbon nanotubes. The dynamic mechanical analysis was carried out in a tear mode for the composite.

  13. The Toxicology of Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donaldson, Ken; Poland, Craig; Duffin, Rodger; Bonner, James

    2012-06-01

    1. Carbon nanotube structure, synthesis and applications C. Singh and W. Song; 2. The aerodynamic behaviour and pulmonary deposition of carbon nanotubes A. Buckley, R. Smith and R Maynard; 3. Utilising the concept of the biologically effective dose to define the particle and fibre hazards of carbon nanotubes K. Donaldson, R. Duffin, F. Murphy and C. Poland; 4. CNT, biopersistence and the fibre paradigm D. Warheit and M. DeLorme; 5. Length-dependent retention of fibres in the pleural space C. Poland, F. Murphy and K. Donaldson; 6. Experimental carcinogenicity of carbon nanotubes in the context of other fibres K. Unfried; 7. Fate and effects of carbon nanotubes following inhalation J. Ryman-Rasmussen, M. Andersen and J. Bonner; 8. Responses to pulmonary exposure to carbon nanotubes V. Castranova and R. Mercer; 9. Genotoxicity of carbon nanotubes R. Schins, C. Albrecht, K. Gerloff and D. van Berlo; 10. Carbon nanotube-cellular interactions; macrophages, epithelial and mesothelial cells V. Stone, M. Boyles, A. Kermanizadeh, J. Varet and H. Johnston; 11. Systemic health effects of carbon nanotubes following inhalation J. McDonald; 12. Dosimetry and metrology of carbon nanotubes L. Tran, L. MacCalman and R. Aitken; Index.

  14. Preparation of 3D electrode microarrays of multi-walled carbon nanotubes/nafion nanocomposites for microfluidic biofuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jin Ho; Kim, Young Ho; Choi, Sung Deuk; Kim, Gyu Man

    2014-12-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) electrode microarrays with multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) reinforced Nafion nanocomposites were prepared for microfluidic biofuel cells. The oxidized MWCNTs (ox-MWCNTs) were prepared using chemical reactions with 60% nitric acid solution with pristine MWCNTs at 120 degrees C for 12 hrs with a nitrogen gas flow environment. Ox-MWCNTs in the range of 1 to 20 wt.% based on the Nafion polymer weight were reinforced to Nafion nanocomposites by solution casting. The micro-porous structure of the ox-MWCNTs reinforced Nafion nanocomposites was prepared by plasma etching for 5 to 20 min. The 10 wt.% ox-MWCNTs reinforced Nafion nanocomposite produced stable micro-porous structures of 3D electrodes by 10 min plasma etching. Micro-scale 3D structures of MWCNTs reinforced Nafion nanocomposites in a diameter range of 47 to 300 μm were prepared by the micro-stencil assisted casting. To characterize the 3D electrode microarrays, the physical geometry and the reinforced MWCNT dispersion in the nanocomposite structure were examined using a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and an optical microscope. Thermal property measurements of the ox-MWCNTs reinforced Nafion nanocomposites with 10 min of plasma etching, and without plasma etching were made. Both showed stable thermal properties over 300 degrees C. The proposed 3D electrode microarray of MWCNT/Nafion nanocomposites with micro-porous structures can be applied to miniaturized fuel cell devices.

  15. Preparation and toxicological assessment of functionalized carbon nanotube-polymer hybrids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikos D Koromilas

    Full Text Available Novel Carbon Nanotube-Polymer Hybrids were synthesized as potential materials for the development of membranes for water treatment applications in the field of Membrane Bioreactors (MBRs. Due to the toxicological concerns regarding the use of nanomaterials in water treatment as well as the rising demand for safe drinking water to protect public health, we studied the functionalization of MWCNTs and Thin-MWCNTs as to control their properties and increase their ability of embedment into porous anisotropic polymeric membranes. Following the growth of the hydrophilic monomer on the surface of the properly functionalized CNTs, that act as initiator for the controlled radical polymerization (ATRP of sodium styrene sulfonate (SSNa, the antimicrobial quaternized phosphonium and ammonium salts were attached on CNTs-g-PSSNa through non-covalent bonding. In another approach the covalent attachment of quaternized ammonium polymeric moieties of acrylic acid-vinyl benzyl chloride copolymers with N,N-dimethylhexadecylamine (P(AA12-co-VBCHAM on functionalized CNTs has also been attempted. Finally, the toxicological assessment in terms of cell viability and cell morphological changes revealed that surface characteristics play a major role in the biological response of functionalized CNTs.

  16. One-step bulk preparation of calcium carbonate nanotubes and its application in anticancer drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jing; Sun, Dong-Mei; Qian, Wen-Yu; Zhu, Rong-Rong; Sun, Xiao-Yu; Wang, Wen-Rui; Li, Kun; Wang, Shi-Long

    2012-06-01

    Bulk fabrication of ordered hollow structural particles (HSPs) with large surface area and high biocompatibility simultaneously is critical for the practical application of HSPs in biosensing and drug delivery. In this article, we describe a smart approach for batch synthesis of calcium carbonate nanotubes (CCNTs) based on supported liquid membrane (SLM) with large surface area, excellent structural stability, prominent biocompatibility, and acid degradability. The products were characterized by transmission electron micrograph, X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectra, UV-vis spectroscopy, zeta potential, and particle size distribution. The results showed that the tube-like structure facilitated podophyllotoxin (PPT) diffusion into the cavity of hollow structure, and the drug loading and encapsulation efficiency of CCNTs for PPT are as high as 38.5 and 64.4 wt.%, respectively. In vitro drug release study showed that PPT was released from the CCNTs in a pH-controlled and time-dependent manner. The treatment of HEK 293T and SGC 7901 cells demonstrated that PPT-loaded CCNTs were less toxic to normal cells and more effective in antitumor potency compared with free drugs. In addition, PPT-loaded CCNTs also enhanced the apoptotic process on tumor cells compared with the free drugs. This study not only provides a new kind of biocompatible and pH-sensitive nanomaterial as the feasible drug container and carrier but more importantly establishes a facile approach to synthesize novel hollow structural particles on a large scale based on SLM technology.

  17. Preparation and properties of natural rubber reinforced with polydopamine-coating modified carbon nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y-L. Lu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs were functionalized by polydopamine (PDA-coating and mixed with natural rubber (NR via latex compounding. Compared with pristine MWCNTs, the surface of MWCNT-PDA was covered by an amorphous and nanometer-scale PDA layer which had a large amount of oxygenic and nitric functional groups. So the MWCNT-PDA showed a perfect dispersion in NR matrix. The tensile strength of NR/MWCNT-PDA (5 phr composites is 28.6 MPa, compared with the pure NR, which increased by 42%. For the electrical properties, when the content of MWCNTPDA or MWCNTs is 2 phr, the volume resistivity of NR/MWCNT-PDA composites falls to about 2.7·109 Ω·cm, compared with 3.3·1013 Ω·cm of NR/MWCNT composites. The thermal conductivity of NR composites increased only by 28.2% when 5 phr MWCNT-PDA was added. A model proposed by Nan was used to calculate the thermal conductivity of NR/MWCNT composites, and the calculated values were compared with the experimental values, the results showed that the interface thermal resistance is the main reason why MWCNTs could not significantly increase the thermal conductivity of natural rubber.

  18. Preparation, electromagnetic and enhanced microwave absorption properties of Fe nanoparticles encapsulated in carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qi, Xiaosi, E-mail: sci.xsqi@gzu.edu.cn [Physics Department, Guizhou University, Guiyang 550025 (China); Nanjing National Laboratory of Microstructures and Jiangsu Provincial Laboratory for NanoTechnology, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Xu, Jianle; Hu, Q. [Physics Department, Guizhou University, Guiyang 550025 (China); Zhong, Wei, E-mail: wzhong@nju.edu.cn [Nanjing National Laboratory of Microstructures and Jiangsu Provincial Laboratory for NanoTechnology, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Du, Youwei [Nanjing National Laboratory of Microstructures and Jiangsu Provincial Laboratory for NanoTechnology, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)

    2015-08-15

    Graphical abstract: In the article, core/shell structured Fe/CNT hybrid have been synthesized over the hollow Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles. Compared with those representative Fe/CNTs, the obtained Fe/CNT hybrid exhibits enhanced microwave-absorbing ability and can be used as light-weight microwave absorber. - Highlights: • The paper reports the synthesis of Fe/CNT hybrid directly over Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} particles. • The RL value below −20 dB can be obtained in the 1.0–18 GHz frequency range. • The obtained Fe/CNT hybrid exhibits enhanced microwave absorption property. - Abstract: Using hollow Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} particles as the catalyst, the core/shell structured Fe/carbon nanotube (CNT) hybrid could be synthesized by a chemical vapor deposition method without the hydrogen reduction process. Based on the obtained results, a possible growth mechanism of the Fe/CNT hybrid was discussed. And the investigations of electromagnetic and microwave absorption performances indicate that a minimum reflection loss (RL) value of the obtained sample is ca. −40.15 dB at 17.15 GHz with a matching thickness of 1.5 mm, and the RL value below −20 dB can be obtained in the whole frequency range (1.0–18 GHz) with the sample thickness varies from 1.3 to 10.0 mm. The results demonstrate that a simple and environment-friendly route has been proposed for the production of core/shell structured carbon nanohybrid. The obtained Fe/CNT hybrid exhibits excellent microwave absorption properties and has potential applications in thin thickness and light-weight microwave absorbers.

  19. Enhancement of the thermo-mechanical properties and efficacy of mixing technique in the preparation of graphene/PVC nanocomposites compared to carbon nanotubes/PVC

    OpenAIRE

    Mudassir Hasan; Moonyong Lee

    2014-01-01

    Thin films of poly vinyl chloride (PVC)/multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) and PVC/graphene (GN) nanocomposites were prepared by mixing in the presence of different quantities of nanoparticles. Film casting was performed using tetrahydrofuran as a solvent. The as-prepared PVC/MWCNT and PVC/GN nanocomposites were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, thermogravimetric analysis, differential scanning calorimetry, dynamic mechanical analysis, and...

  20. Carbon Nanotube Purification and Functionalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebron, Marisabel; Mintz, Eric; Smalley, Richard E.; Meador, Michael A.

    2003-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes have the potential to significantly enhance the mechanical, thermal, and electrical properties of polymers. However, dispersion of carbon nanotubes in a polymer matrix is hindered by the electrostatic forces that cause them to agglomerate. Chemical modification of the nanotubes is necessary to minimize these electrostatic forces and promote adhesion between the nanotubes and the polymer matrix. In a collaborative research program between Clark Atlanta University, Rice University, and NASA Glenn Research Center several approaches are being explored to chemically modify carbon nanotubes. The results of this research will be presented.

  1. Varied morphology carbon nanotubes and method for their manufacture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenzhi; Wen, Jian Guo; Ren, Zhi Feng

    2007-01-02

    The present invention describes the preparation of carbon nanotubes of varied morphology, catalyst materials for their synthesis. The present invention also describes reactor apparatus and methods of optimizing and controlling process parameters for the manufacture carbon nanotubes with pre-determined morphologies in relatively high purity and in high yields. In particular, the present invention provides methods for the preparation of non-aligned carbon nanotubes with controllable morphologies, catalyst materials and methods for their manufacture.

  2. CO2 Removal from Biogas Using Carbon Nanotubes Mixed Matrix Membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tutuk Djoko Kusworo

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available A new type of mixed matrix membrane consisting of polyethersulfone (PES and carbon nanotubes (CNTs is prepared for biogas purification application. PES mixed matrix membrane with and without modification of carbon nanotubes were prepared by a dry/wet phase inversion technique using a pneumatically membrane casting machine system. The modified carbon nanotubes were prepared by treating the carbon nanotubes with chemical modification using acid treatment to allow PES chains to be grafted on carbon nanotubes surface. The results from the FESEM, DSC and FTIR analysis confirmed that chemical modification on carbon nanotubes surface had taken place. Meanwhile, the nanogaps in the interface of polymer and carbon nanotubes were appeared in the PES mixed matrix membrane with unmodified of carbon nanotubes. The modified carbon nanotubes mixed matrix membrane increases the mechanical properties and the permeability of all gases. For PES-modified carbon nanotubes mixed matrix membrane the maximum selectivity achieved for CO2/CH4 is 23.54

  3. Production of carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Journet, C.; Bernier, P.

    Carbon nanostructures such as single-walled and multi-walled nanotubes (SWNTs and MWNTs) or graphitic polyhedral nanoparticles can be produced using various methods. Most of them are based on the sublimation of carbon under an inert atmosphere, such as the electric arc discharge process, the laser ablation method, or the solar technique. But chemical methods can also be used to synthesize these kinds of carbon materials: the catalytic decomposition of hydrocarbons, the production by electrolysis, the heat treatment of a polymer, the low temperature solid pyrolysis, or the in situ catalysis.

  4. Preparation and characterization of poly[Ni(salen)(crown receptor)]/multi-walled carbon nanotube composite films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tedim, J.; Hillman, A.R. [Department of Chemistry, University of Leicester, Leicester LE1 7 RH (United Kingdom); Goncalves, F.; Pereira, M.F.R.; Figueiredo, J.L. [Laboratorio de Catalise e Materiais, Departamento de Engenharia Quimica, Faculdade de Engenharia, Universidade do Porto, 4200-465 Porto (Portugal); Moura, C. [CIQ, Departamento de Quimica, Faculdade de Ciencias, Universidade do Porto, 4169-007 Porto (Portugal); Freire, C. [REQUIMTE, Departamento de Quimica, Faculdade de Ciencias, Universidade do Porto, 4169-007 Porto (Portugal)

    2008-10-01

    Nanocomposite films comprising multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) embedded within poly[Ni(3-Mesalophen-b15-c5)] were deposited on Pt and ITO electrode surfaces by the potentiodynamic polymerisation of [Ni(3-Mesalophen-b15-c5)] from solutions containing dispersed MWCNTs. Composites incorporating carbon nanotubes subject to a range of oxidising pre-treatments were compared with those incorporating untreated carbon nanotubes and with the pure polymer. In both cases, the use of CH{sub 3}CN and CH{sub 2}Cl{sub 2} as fabrication and characterization media were explored. Films were characterized by voltammetry, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and scanning electron microscope (SEM). The coating of the carbon nanotubes with polymer varied significantly with pre-treatment and solvent medium; this influenced the final composite morphology and electrical properties. Performance enhancement of the polymer component by the presence of the carbon nanotubes was manifested through the ability to store charge and the ease with which this could be accomplished; these were parameterized via increased redox capacitance and decreased charge-transfer resistance, respectively. Correlation of impedance parameters with SEM images provided a morphological rationale for composite electrical properties. (author)

  5. Preparation of metal wire supported solid-phase microextraction fiber coated with multi-walled carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Juanjuan; Sun, Min; Xu, Lili; Li, Jubai; Liu, Xia; Jiang, Shengxiang

    2011-09-01

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes-coated solid-phase microextraction fiber was prepared by a novel protocol involving mussel-adhesive-protein-inspired polydopamine film. The polydopamine was used as binding agent to immobilize amine-functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes onto the surface of the stainless steel wire via Michael addition or Schiff base reaction. Surface properties of the fiber were characterized by field emission scanning electron microscope and X-ray photoelectron spectroscope. Six phenols in aqueous solution were used as model compounds to investigate the extraction performance of the fiber and satisfactory results were obtained. Limit of detection was 0.10 μg/L for 2-methylphenol (2-MP) and 4-methylphenol (4-MP), and 0.02 μg/L for 2-ethylphenol (2-EP), 4-ethylphenol (4-EP), 2-tert-butylphenol (2-t-BuP), and 4-tert-butylphenol (4-t-BuP), which were much lower than commercial fiber and fibers made in laboratory. RSDs for one unique fiber are in the range of 1.92-7.00%. Fiber-to-fiber (n=3) reproducibility ranges from 4.44 to 8.41%. It also showed very high stability and durability to acid, alkali, organic solvent, and high temperature. Real water sample from Yellow river was applied to test the reliability of the established solid-phase microextraction (SPME)-GC method and recoveries with addition level at 5 and 100 μg/L were in the range from 81.5 to 110.0%.

  6. Carbon Nanotubes Hybrid Hydrogels in Drug Delivery: A Perspective Review

    OpenAIRE

    Giuseppe Cirillo; Silke Hampel; Umile Gianfranco Spizzirri; Ortensia Ilaria Parisi; Nevio Picci; Francesca Iemma

    2014-01-01

    The use of biologics, polymers, silicon materials, carbon materials, and metals has been proposed for the preparation of innovative drug delivery devices. One of the most promising materials in this field are the carbon-nanotubes composites and hybrid materials coupling the advantages of polymers (biocompatibility and biodegradability) with those of carbon nanotubes (cellular uptake, stability, electromagnatic, and magnetic behavior). The applicability of polymer-carbon nanotubes composites i...

  7. Preparation of glass carbon electrode modified with nanocrystalline nickel-decorated carbon nanotubes and electrocatalytic oxidation of methanol in alkaline solution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Nanocrystalline nickel with an average diameter of about 16 nm and a face-centered cubic (fcc)structure was uniformly attached to the surface of carbon nanotubes (CNT) by wet chemistry.The sample was characterized by X-ray powder diffraction and transmission electron microscopy (TEM).A glass carbon electrode modified with nickel-modified multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs-Ni/GCE) was prepared.The electrochemical behavior of the MWCNTs-Ni/GCE and the electrocatalytic oxidation of methanol at the MWCNTsNi/GCE were investigated by cyclic voltammetry in 1.0 mol/L NaOH solution.The cyclic voltammograms showed that the electron transfer between β-Ni(OH)2 and β-NiOOH is mainly a diffusion-controlled quasireversible process,and that the electrode has high catalytic activity for the electrooxidation of methanol in alkaline medium,revealing its potential application in alkaline rechargeable batteries and fuel cells.

  8. Carbon nanotube network varactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Generalov, A. A.; Anoshkin, I. V.; Erdmanis, M.; Lioubtchenko, D. V.; Ovchinnikov, V.; Nasibulin, A. G.; Räisänen, A. V.

    2015-01-01

    Microelectromechanical system (MEMS) varactors based on a freestanding layer of single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) films were designed, fabricated and tested. The freestanding SWCNT film was employed as a movable upper patch in the parallel plate capacitor of the MEMS. The measurements of the SWCNT varactors show very high tunability, nearly 100%, of the capacitance with a low actuation voltage of 10 V. The functionality of the varactor is improved by implementing a flexible nanocellulose aerogel filling.

  9. Carbon Nanotube Thermoelectric Coolers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-02-06

    conductance. Inside thecentral section of the carbon nanotube, we obtained an impressive Peltier cooling 57 K down from the liquid nitrogentemperature. 15... trapped charges or dipoles) that occur either at the interface between the CNT and the gate dielectric (interface defects) or at some position within... liquid nitrogen temperature 77T  K up to hot 134 8T  K, or decreases from 77T  K down to about cold 20 6T  K, thus evidencing a strong

  10. Carbon nanotube biosensors

    OpenAIRE

    Tîlmaciu, Carmen-Mihaela; Morris, May C

    2015-01-01

    Nanomaterials possess unique features which make them particularly attractive for biosensing applications. In particular, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) can serve as scaffolds for immobilization of biomolecules at their surface, and combine several exceptional physical, chemical, electrical, and optical characteristics properties which make them one of the best suited materials for the transduction of signals associated with the recognition of analytes, metabolites, or disease biomarkers. Here we pr...

  11. From Carbon Nanotube Crystals to Carbon Nanotube Flowers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Zhengjun; ZHAO Ye; ZHOU Ya

    2005-01-01

    We have investigated the very initial deposition stages of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) with ferrocene (Fe(C5H5)2) and xylene (C8H10) for growing carbon nanotubes, and made clear that the mechanism for the self-organization behaviors of nanotubes at different growth stages by this approach. For instance, the organization of nanotubes into flower-like structures at prolonged deposition is developed from the crystal-like structures formed at early growth stages, both of which are closely related to and determined by the very initial deposition stages of this CVD approach. Based on this approach, ways have been established to build up different architectures of carbon nanotubes, by controlling the initial deposition stages of the CVD process, with which we have realized the selective growth of self-organized carbon nanotube structures. This study provides a new idea for growing carbon nanotube architectures by CVD.

  12. Carbon Nanotubes Based Quantum Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jian-Ping

    1999-01-01

    This document represents the final report for the NASA cooperative agreement which studied the application of carbon nanotubes. The accomplishments are reviewed: (1) Wrote a review article on carbon nanotubes and its potentials for applications in nanoscale quantum devices. (2) Extensive studies on the effects of structure deformation on nanotube electronic structure and energy band gaps. (3) Calculated the vibrational spectrum of nanotube rope and the effect of pressure. and (4) Investigate the properties of Li intercalated nanotube ropes and explore their potential for energy storage materials and battery applications. These studies have lead to four publications and seven abstracts in international conferences.

  13. ELECTRICAL RESISTIVITY, CRYSTALLIZATION AND MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF POLYPROPYLENE/MULTI-WALLED CARBON NANOTUBE/CALCIUM CARBONATE COMPOSITES PREPARED BY MELT MIXING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ha-da Bao; Zhao-xia Guo; Jian Yu

    2009-01-01

    Polypropylene (PP)/multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT)/calcium carbonate (CaCO3) composites are prepared by melt mixing using two types of CaCO3 of different sizes. The electrical resistivities of the composites with the two types of CaCO3 are all lower than those of the corresponding PP/MWCNT composites at various MWCNT loadings (1 wt%-5 wt%). The morphology of the composites is investigated by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM). The crystallization behavior of PP in the composites is characterized by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The storage modulus, as measured by dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA), increases significantly by the presence of CaCO3.

  14. Self-healing guar gum and guar gum-multiwalled carbon nanotubes nanocomposite gels prepared in an ionic liquid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Mukesh; Mondal, Dibyendu; Mukesh, Chandrakant; Prasad, Kamalesh

    2013-10-15

    Guar gum is a galactomannan extracted from the seed of the leguminous shrub Cyamopsis tetragonoloba. It was found to form a soft viscoelastic gel in 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride, an ionic liquid at an optimized concentration of 10%w/v. A nanocomposite gel of the gum with enhanced strength could be prepared with 0.2%w/v of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) in the ionic liquid. When the gels thus prepared were subjected to surface fractures or bisected completely, they found to self-heal at room temperature without any external interventions. The self-healing process could be repeated several times. These viscoelastic gel systems showed thixotropic nature and recovery of the storage modulus with time for several cycles was observed upon rheological investigations. The interaction took place between ionic liquid, guar gum and MWCNT was studied by SEM, TEM, FT-IR, powder XRD and rheometry. The results suggested that, upon standing at room temperature development of electrostatic interactions and the van der Waals interactions among the ionic liquid molecules facilitated the formation of reversible noncovalent bonds and eventually activated the self-healing in the gel systems through appropriate chain entanglements.

  15. Preparation and properties of functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotubes/polypropylene nanocomposite bipolar plates for polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Shu-Hang; Weng, Cheng-Chih; Yen, Chuan-Yu; Hsiao, Min-Chien; Ma, Chen-Chi M.; Tsai, Ming-Chi; Su, Ay; Yen, Ming-Yu; Lin, Yu-Feng; Liu, Po-Lan

    Multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) are covalently modified with different molecular weights 400 and 2000 poly(oxyalkylene)-amine bearing the diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A (DGEBA) epoxy (POA400-DGEBA and POA2000-DGEBA) oligomers. The oxidized MWCNTs (MWCNTs-COOH) are converted to the acid chloride-functionalized MWCNTs, followed by the reaction with POA-DGEBAs to prepare the MWCNTs/POA400-DGEBA and MWCNTs/POA2000-DGEBA. FTIR, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and high resolution X-ray photoelectron spectra (XPS) reveal that the POA-DGEBAs are covalently attached to the surface of MWCNTs. The morphology of MWCNTs/POA-DGEBA is observed by TEM. The POA400-DGEBA coated on the MWCNTs is thicker and more uniform. However, the coating of POA2000-DGEBA on the MWCNTs shows a worm-like bulk substance and the MWCNT surface is bare. In addition, the flexural strength and the bulk electrical conductivity of the MWCNTs/polypropylene nanocomposite bipolar plates are measured 59% and 505% higher than those of the original composite bipolar plates by adding 8 phr of MWCNTs/POA400-DGEBA. The maximum current density and power density of the single cell test for the nanocomposite bipolar plate with 4 phr MWCNTs/POA400-DGEBA are 1.32 A cm -2 and 0.533 W cm -2, respectively. The overall performance confirms the functionalized MWCNTs/polypropylene nanocomposite bipolar plates prepared in this study are suitable for PEMFC application.

  16. Preparation and properties of functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotubes/polypropylene nanocomposite bipolar plates for polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liao, Shu-Hang; Weng, Cheng-Chih; Yen, Chuan-Yu.; Hsiao, Min-Chien; Ma, Chen-Chi M.; Yen, Ming-Yu.; Liu, Po-Lan [Department of Chemical Engineering, National Tsing Hua University, Hsin-Chu 30043 (China); Tsai, Ming-Chi [Department of Engineering and System Science, National Tsing Hua University, Hsin-Chu 30043 (China); Su, Ay [Fuel Cell Center, Yuan Ze University, Tao-Yuan 32003 (China); Lin, Yu-Feng [Plastics Industry Development Center, Tai-Chung 40768 (China)

    2010-01-01

    Multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) are covalently modified with different molecular weights 400 and 2000 poly(oxyalkylene)-amine bearing the diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A (DGEBA) epoxy (POA400-DGEBA and POA2000-DGEBA) oligomers. The oxidized MWCNTs (MWCNTs-COOH) are converted to the acid chloride-functionalized MWCNTs, followed by the reaction with POA-DGEBAs to prepare the MWCNTs/POA400-DGEBA and MWCNTs/POA2000-DGEBA. FTIR, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and high resolution X-ray photoelectron spectra (XPS) reveal that the POA-DGEBAs are covalently attached to the surface of MWCNTs. The morphology of MWCNTs/POA-DGEBA is observed by TEM. The POA400-DGEBA coated on the MWCNTs is thicker and more uniform. However, the coating of POA2000-DGEBA on the MWCNTs shows a worm-like bulk substance and the MWCNT surface is bare. In addition, the flexural strength and the bulk electrical conductivity of the MWCNTs/polypropylene nanocomposite bipolar plates are measured 59% and 505% higher than those of the original composite bipolar plates by adding 8 phr of MWCNTs/POA400-DGEBA. The maximum current density and power density of the single cell test for the nanocomposite bipolar plate with 4 phr MWCNTs/POA400-DGEBA are 1.32 A cm{sup -2} and 0.533 W cm{sup -2}, respectively. The overall performance confirms the functionalized MWCNTs/polypropylene nanocomposite bipolar plates prepared in this study are suitable for PEMFC application. (author)

  17. Crystallization and mechanical properties of functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes/polyvinylidene fluoride composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ma, Jing; Iftekharul Haque, Rubaiyet; Larsen, Mikael

    2012-01-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes were purified and functionalized by nitric acid and octadecylamine. Raman and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy were used to characterize the functionalization of the single-walled carbon nanotubes. Polyvinylidene flouride nanocomposites containing 1 wt......% purified or functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes were prepared by solution blending and injection molding. The dispersion of different carbon nanotubes in dimethylformamide and in polyvinylidene flouride has been investigated. Mechanical properties show that adding single-walled carbon nanotubes...

  18. Lithium interaction with carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nalimova, V.A. [Moskovskij Gosudarstvennyj Univ., Moscow (Russian Federation). Khimicheskij Fakul`tet; Sklovsky, D.E. [Moskovskij Gosudarstvennyj Univ., Moscow (Russian Federation). Khimicheskij Fakul`tet; Bondarenko, G.N. [Topcheiv Institute of Petrochemical Synthesis, Leninsky Prospekt, 29, Moscow (Russian Federation); Alvergnat-Gaucher, H. [CRMD, CNRS, Universite d`Orleans, 1B rue de la Ferollerie, 45071, Orleans Cedex 02 (France); Bonnamy, S. [CRMD, CNRS, Universite d`Orleans, 1B rue de la Ferollerie, 45071, Orleans Cedex 02 (France); Beguin, F. [CRMD, CNRS, Universite d`Orleans, 1B rue de la Ferollerie, 45071, Orleans Cedex 02 (France)

    1997-05-01

    Lithium interaction with catalytic carbon nanotubes under high-pressure conditions was studied. A large amount of Li (2Li/C) reacted with the carbon nanotubes forming an intercalation compound (I{sub c}{proportional_to}4.1 A) which follows from X-ray diffraction and IR spectroscopy data. We cannot exclude also the possibility of insertion of a part of Li into the channel of the nanotubes. (orig.)

  19. Carbon nanotube Archimedes screws.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oroszlány, László; Zólyomi, Viktor; Lambert, Colin J

    2010-12-28

    Recently, nanomechanical devices composed of a long stationary inner carbon nanotube and a shorter, slowly rotating outer tube have been fabricated. In this paper, we study the possibility of using such devices as nanoscale transducers of motion into electricity. When the outer tube is chiral, we show that such devices act like quantum Archimedes screws, which utilize mechanical energy to pump electrons between reservoirs. We calculate the pumped charge from one end of the inner tube to the other, driven by the rotation of a chiral outer nanotube. We show that the pumped charge can be greater than one electron per 360° rotation, and consequently, such a device operating with a rotational frequency of 10 MHz, for example, would deliver a current of ≈1 pAmp.

  20. Carbon nanotube based transparent conductive thin films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, X; Rajamani, R; Stelson, K A; Cui, T

    2006-07-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) based optically transparent and electrically conductive thin films are fabricated on plastic substrates in this study. Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are chemically treated with a mixture of concentrated sulfuric acid and nitric acid before being dispersed in aqueous surfactant-contained solutions. SWNT thin films are prepared from the stable SWNT solutions using wet coating techniques. The 100 nm thick SWNT thin film exhibits a surface resistivity of 6 kohms/square nanometer with an average transmittance of 88% on the visible light range, which is three times better than the films prepared from the high purity as-received SWNTs.

  1. Preparation of {sup 14}C-Labeled Multi-walled Carbon Nano-tubes for Biodistribution Investigations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Georgin, D.; Czarny, B.; Botquin, M.; Mayne-L' Hermite, M.; Pinault, M.; Bouchet-Fabre, B.; Carriere, M.; Poncy, J.L.; Chau, Q.; Maximilien, R.; Dive, V.; Taran, F. [CEA, IBITECS, SCBM, 91191 Gif sur Yvette (France); CEA, IBITECS, SIMOPRO, 91191 Gif sur Yvette (FR); CEA, IRAMIS, SPAM, 91191 Gif sur Yvette (FR); CEA, IRAMIS, SCM, 91191 Gif sur Yvette (FR); CEA, IRCM, SREIT, 91680 Bruyeres le Chatel (FR)

    2009-07-01

    A new method allowing the {sup 14}C-labeling of carboxylic acid functions of carbon nano-tubes is described. The key step of the labeling process is a de-carbonylation reaction that has been developed and optimized with the help of a screening method. The optimized process has been successfully applied to multi-walled carbon nano-tubes (MWNTs), and the corresponding {sup 14}C-labeled nano-tubes were used to investigate their in vivo behavior. Preliminary results obtained after i.v. contamination of rats revealed liver as the main target organ. Radiolabeling of NTs with a long-life radioactive nucleus like {sup 14}C, coupled to a highly sensitive autoradiographic method, that provides a unique detection threshold, will make it possible to determine for a long time period whether or not NTs remain in any organs after animal exposure. (authors)

  2. CO2 Removal from Biogas Using Carbon Nanotubes Mixed Matrix Membranes

    OpenAIRE

    Tutuk Djoko Kusworo; Ahmad Fauzi Ismail; Budiyono; I Nyoman Widiasa; Seno Johari; Sunarso

    2010-01-01

    A new type of mixed matrix membrane consisting of polyethersulfone (PES) and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) is prepared for biogas purification application. PES mixed matrix membrane with and without modification of carbon nanotubes were prepared by a dry/wet phase inversion technique using a pneumatically membrane casting machine system. The modified carbon nanotubes were prepared by treating the carbon nanotubes with chemical modification using acid treatment to allow PES chains to be grafted on c...

  3. A statistical mechanics model of carbon nanotube macro-films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    Carbon nanotube macro-films are two-dimensional films with micrometer thickness and centimeter by centimeter in-plane dimension.These carbon nanotube macroscopic assemblies have attracted significant attention from the material and mechanics communities recently because they can be easily handled and tailored to meet specific engineering needs.This paper reports the experimental methods on the preparation and characterization of single-walled carbon nanotube macro-films,and a statistical mechanics model on ...

  4. Carbon nanotube/biocompatible bola-amphiphile supramolecular biohybrid materials: preparation and their application in bacterial cell agglutination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Guocan; Li, Jinying; Yu, Wei; Han, Chengyou; Mao, Zhengwei; Gao, Changyou; Huang, Feihe

    2013-11-26

    Supramolecular biohybrid materials were successfully constructed driven by non-covalent interactions between three biocompatible bolaform amphiphiles and single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). The existence of galactoses in these supramolecular systems endowed the hybrid materials with interesting bio-function. By introducing the SWNTs as semi-flexible platforms, these supramolecular biohybrid materials display excellent agglutination ability for E. coli.

  5. Carbon Nanotubes and Modern Nanoagriculture

    KAUST Repository

    Bayoumi, Maged Fouad

    2015-01-27

    Since their discovery, carbon nanotubes have been prominent members of the nanomaterial family. Owing to their extraordinary physical, chemical, and mechanical properties, carbon nanotubes have been proven to be a useful tool in the field of plant science. They were frequently perceived to bring about valuable biotechnological and agricultural applications that still remain beyond experimental realization. An increasing number of studies have demonstrated the ability of carbon nanotubes to traverse different plant cell barriers. These studies, also, assessed the toxicity and environmental impacts of these nanomaterials. The knowledge provided by these studies is of practical and fundamental importance for diverse applications including intracellular labeling and imaging, genetic transformation, and for enhancing our knowledge of plant cell biology. Although different types of nanoparticles have been found to activate physiological processes in plants, carbon nanotubes received particular interest. Following addition to germination medium, carbon nanotubes enhanced root growth and elongation of some plants such as onion, cucumber and rye-grass. They, also, modulated the expression of some genes that are essential for cell division and plant development. In addition, multi-walled carbon nanotubes were evidenced to penetrate thick seed coats, stimulate germination, and to enhance growth of young tomato seedlings. Multi-walled carbon nanotubes can penetrate deeply into the root system and further distribute into the leaves and the fruits. In recent studies, carbon nanotubes were reported to be chemically entrapped into the structure of plant tracheary elements. This should activate studies in the fields of plant defense and wood engineering. Although, all of these effects on plant physiology and plant developmental biology have not been fully understood, the valuable findings promises more research activity in the near future toward complete scientific understanding of

  6. Studies of Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caneba, Gerard T.

    2005-01-01

    The fellowship experience for this summer for 2004 pertains to carbon nanotube coatings for various space-related applications. They involve the following projects: (a) EMI protection films from HiPco-polymers, and (b) Thermal protection nanosilica materials. EMI protection films are targeted to be eventually applied onto casings of laptop computers. These coatings are composites of electrically-conductive SWNTs and compatible polymers. The substrate polymer will be polycarbonate, since computer housings are typically made of carbon composites of this type of polymer. A new experimental copolymer was used last year to generate electrically-conductive and thermal films with HiPco at 50/50 wt/wt composition. This will be one of the possible formulations. Reference films will be base polycarbonate and neat HiPco onto polycarbonate films. Other coating materials that will be tried will be based on HiPco composites with commercial enamels (polyurethane, acrylic, polyester), which could be compatible with the polycarbonate substrate. Nanosilica fibers are planned for possible use as thermal protection tiles on the shuttle orbiter. Right now, microscale silica is used. Going to the nanoscale will increase the surface-volume-per-unit-area of radiative heat dissipation. Nanoscale carbon fibers/nanotubes can be used as templates for the generation of nanosilica. A sol-gel operation is employed for this purpose.

  7. Synthesis, characterisation and applications of coiled carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanus, Monica J; Harris, Andrew T

    2010-04-01

    Coiled carbon nanotubes are helical carbon structures formed when heptagonal and pentagonal rings are inserted into the hexagonal backbone of a 'straight' nanotube. Coiled carbon nanotubes have been reported with both regular and irregular helical structures. In this work the structure, growth mechanism(s), synthesis, properties and potential applications of coiled carbon nanotubes are reviewed. Published data suggests that coiled carbon nanotube synthesis occurs due to nonuniform extrusion of carbon from a catalyst surface. To date, coiled carbon nanotubes have been synthesised using catalyst modification techniques including: (i) the addition of S or P containing compounds during synthesis; (ii) the use of binary or ternary metal catalysts; (iii) the use of microwaves to create a local temperature gradient around individual catalyst particles and; (iv) the use of pH control during catalyst preparation. In most instances coiled carbon nanotubes are produced as a by-product; high yield and/or large-scale synthesis of coiled carbon nanotubes remains problematic. The qualitative analysis of coiled carbon nanotubes is currently hindered by the absence of specific characterisation data in the literature, e.g., oxidation profiles measured by thermogravimetric analysis and Raman spectra of pure coiled carbon nanotube samples.

  8. Carbon Nanotubes for Space Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyyappan, Meyya

    2000-01-01

    The potential of nanotube technology for NASA missions is significant and is properly recognized by NASA management. Ames has done much pioneering research in the last five years on carbon nanotube growth, characterization, atomic force microscopy, sensor development and computational nanotechnology. NASA Johnson Space Center has focused on laser ablation production of nanotubes and composites development. These in-house efforts, along with strategic collaboration with academia and industry, are geared towards meeting the agency's mission requirements. This viewgraph presentation (including an explanation for each slide) outlines the research focus for Ames nanotechnology, including details on carbon nanotubes' properties, applications, and synthesis.

  9. Luminescence of carbon nanotube bulbs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI ChuanGang; WU DeHai; WANG KunLin; WEI JinQuan; WEI BingQing; ZHU HongWei; WANG ZhiCheng; LUO JianBin; LIU WenJin; ZHENG MingXin

    2007-01-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) bulbs made of decimeter-scale double-walled carbon nanotube (DWCNT) strands and films were fabricated and their luminescence properties, including the lighting efficiency, voltage-current relation and thermal stability were investigated. The results show that the DWCNT bulb has a comparable spectrum of visible light with tungsten bulb and its average efficiency is 40% higher than that of a tungsten filament at the same temperature (1400-2300 K). The nanotube filaments show both resistance and thermal stability over a large temperature region. No obvious damage was found for a nanotube bulb illuminating at 2300 K for more than 24 hours in vacuum.

  10. Highly oriented carbon nanotube papers made of aligned carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Ding; Song Pengcheng; Liu Changhong; Wu Wei; Fan Shoushan [Tsinghua-Foxconn Nanotechnology Research Center and Department of Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)], E-mail: chliu@tsinghua.edu.cn

    2008-02-20

    Paper-like carbon nanotube (CNT) materials have many important applications such as in catalysts, in filtration, actuators, capacitor or battery electrodes, and so on. Up to now, the most popular way of preparing buckypapers has involved the procedures of dispersion and filtration of a suspension of CNTs. In this work, we present a simple and effective macroscopic manipulation of aligned CNT arrays called 'domino pushing' in the preparation of the aligned thick buckypapers with large areas. This simple method can efficiently ensure that most of the CNTs are well aligned tightly in the buckypaper. The initial measurements indicate that these buckypapers have better performance on thermal and electrical conductance. These buckypapers with controllable structure also have many potential applications, including supercapacitor electrodes.

  11. A facile and scalable method to prepare carbon nanotube-grafted-graphene for high performance Li-S battery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Q. Q.; Huang, J. B.; Li, G. R.; Lin, Z.; Liu, B. H.; Li, Z. P.

    2017-01-01

    A carbon nanotube-grafted-graphene (CNT-g-Gr) is developed for enhancements of electrical conduction and polysulfide (PS) absorption to improve rate performance and cycleability of lithium-sulfur battery. The CNT-g-Gr is prepared through CNT growth on Ni-deposited graphene sheet which is fabricated via pyrolysis of glucose in a molten salt. The obtained CNT-g-Gr shows much higher specific surface area and PS adsorption capability than graphene. The in-situ formed Ni nanoparticles on graphene sheet not only serve as the catalytic sites for CNT growth, but also function as the anchor-sites for polar PS absorption. The CNT-g-Gr contributes a superb PS adsorption capability arising from graphene and CNT absorbing weakly-polar PS species, and Ni nanoparticles absorbing the species with stronger polarity. The resultant Li-S battery with the CNT-g-Gr shows excellent cycleability and rate performance. A stable discharge capacity of 900 mAh g-1 (with low capacity degradation rate) and a rate capacity of 260 mAh g-1 at 30 C discharge rate have been achieved.

  12. Preparation of Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes/Hydroxyl-Terminated Silicone Oil Fiber and Its Application to Analysis of Crude Oils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shukui Zhu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A simple and efficient method to analyze the volatile and semivolatile organic compounds in crude oils has been developed based on direct immersion solid-phase microextraction coupled to comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography/time-of-flight mass spectrometry (DI-SPME-GC × GC/TOFMS. A novel fiber, multiwalled carbon nanotubes/hydroxyl-terminated silicone oil (MWNTs-TSO-OH, was prepared by sol-gel technology. Using standard solutions, the extraction conditions were optimized such as extraction mode, extraction temperature, extraction time, and salts effect. With the optimized conditions, a real crude oil sample was extracted and then analyzed in detail. It shows that the proposed method is very effective in simultaneously analyzing the normal and branched alkanes, cycloalkanes, aromatic hydrocarbons, and biomarkers of crude oil such as steranes and terpanes. Furthermore, the method showed good linearity (r > 0.999, precision (RSD < 8%, and detection limits ranging from 0.2 to 1.6 ng/L.

  13. Preparation and properties of multi-wall carbon nanotube/SiC composites by aqueous tape casting

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    MWCNTS/SiC composites were fabricated by aqueous tape casting. High solid content (50 vol%) SiC slurries with sintering additives and multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) as reinforcements were prepared using Tetramethylammonium hydroxide as the dispersant. The stability of MWCNTs/SiC slur-ries was studied and characterized in terms of zeta potential and rheology measurements. The relative density of the composite was about 98% after hot-pressing at 1850℃ (at 25 MPa in Ar for 30 min). The hardness of the composites decreased with the increase in MWCNTs content. The flexural strength and the fracture toughness were 742.17 MPa and 4.63 MPa·m1/2, respectively when the MWCNTs content was 0.25 wt%. Further increase in MWCNTs content to 0.50 wt% did not lead to the increase in mechanical properties. Most of MWCNTs were found to be located at SiC grain boundaries and the pull out of the MWCNTs was observed.

  14. Morphology, structure and Raman scattering of carbon nanotubes produced by using mesoporous materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    解思深; 李文治; 王超英; 徐丽雯; 张昊; 张云; 钱露茜

    1997-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes were prepared by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of hydrocarbon gas on various substrates.The effect of substrates on the growth,morphology and structure of carbon nanotubes were investigated.Aligned carbon nanotubes with high density and purity were achieved by CVD on mesoporous silica substrate.The Raman scattering of aligned carbon nanotubes was carried out,and the dependence of the phonon properties on the mi-crostructure of the nanotubes has been discussed.

  15. Raman Spectroscopic Study of Carbon Nanotubes Prepared Using Fe/ZnO-Palm Olein-Chemical Vapour Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syazwan Afif Mohd Zobir

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs were synthesized using Fe/ZnO catalyst by a dual-furnace thermal chemical vapor deposition (CVD method at 800–1000°C using nitrogen gas with a constant flow rate of 150 sccm/min as a gas carrier. Palm olein (PO, ferrocene in the presence of 0.05 M zinc nitrate, and a p-type silicon wafer were used as carbon source, catalyst precursor, and sample target, respectively. D, G, and G′ bands were observed at 1336–1364, 1559–1680, and 2667–2682 cm-1, respectively. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs with the highest degree of crystallinity were obtained at around 8000°C, and the smallest diameter of about 2 nm was deposited on the silicon substrate at 1000°C.

  16. Carbon Nanotube Biosensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen-Mihaela eTilmaciu

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Nanomaterials possess unique features which make them particularly attractive for biosensing applications. In particular Carbon Nanotubes (CNTs can serve as scaffolds for immobilization of biomolecules at their surface, and combine several exceptional physical, chemical, electrical and optical characteristics properties which make them one of the best suited materials for the transduction of signals associated with the recognition of analytes, metabolites or disease biomarkers. Here we provide a comprehensive review on these carbon nanostructures, in which we will describe their structural and physical properties, discuss functionalization and cellular uptake, biocompatibility and toxicity issues. We further review historical developments in the field of biosensors, and describe the different types of biosensors which have been developed over time, with specific focus on CNT-conjugates engineered for biosensing applications, and in particular detection of cancer biomarkers.

  17. Carbon nanotube biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tîlmaciu, Carmen-Mihaela; Morris, May C.

    2015-01-01

    Nanomaterials possess unique features which make them particularly attractive for biosensing applications. In particular, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) can serve as scaffolds for immobilization of biomolecules at their surface, and combine several exceptional physical, chemical, electrical, and optical characteristics properties which make them one of the best suited materials for the transduction of signals associated with the recognition of analytes, metabolites, or disease biomarkers. Here we provide a comprehensive review on these carbon nanostructures, in which we describe their structural and physical properties, functionalization and cellular uptake, biocompatibility, and toxicity issues. We further review historical developments in the field of biosensors, and describe the different types of biosensors which have been developed over time, with specific focus on CNT-conjugates engineered for biosensing applications, and in particular detection of cancer biomarkers. PMID:26579509

  18. Role of carbon nanotubes in electroanalytical chemistry: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agüí, Lourdes; Yáñez-Sedeño, Paloma; Pingarrón, José M

    2008-08-01

    This review covers recent advances in the development of new designs of electrochemical sensors and biosensors that make use of electrode surfaces modification with carbon nanotubes. Applications based on carbon nanotubes-driven electrocatalytic effects, and the construction and analytical usefulness of new hybrid materials with polymers or other nanomaterials will be treated. Moreover, electrochemical detection using carbon nanotubes-modified electrodes as detecting systems in separation techniques such as high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) or capillary electrophoresis (CE) will be also considered. Finally, the preparation of electrochemical biosensors, including enzyme electrodes, immunosensors and DNA biosensors, in which carbon nanotubes play a significant role in their sensing performance will be separately considered.

  19. Atomic transportation via carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Quan

    2009-01-01

    The transportation of helium atoms in a single-walled carbon nanotube is reported via molecular dynamics simulations. The efficiency of the atomic transportation is found to be dependent on the type of the applied loading and the loading rate as well as the temperature in the process. Simulations show the transportation is a result of the van der Waals force between the nanotube and the helium atoms through a kink propagation initiated in the nanotube.

  20. Preparation and characterization of functionalized single walled carbon nanotubes (fSWCNT)/ Hydroxyapatite (HAp)-Nylon hybridized composite biomaterial to study the mechanical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanal, Suraj; Leventouri, Theodora; Mahfuz, Hassan; Rondinone, Adam

    2014-03-01

    Synthetic hydroxyapatite (HAp) bears poor mechanical properties that limit its applicability in orthopedics. We study the possibility of overcoming such limitations by incorporating functionalized single walled carbon nanotubes (fSWCNT) in a biocompatible/bioactive nano-composite. We present results from synthesis and characterization of samples prepared under different processing parameters. Ultra sonication method was to disperse functionalized single walled carbon nanotubes (fSWCNT) in HAp followed by a simple hot assorting method to incorporate with polymerized ɛ-caprolactam. The fracture toughness of the composite materials was tested in compliance with the ASTM D-5045 standard. We have found that while the fracture toughness strongly depends on the processing parameters, a value comparable to the one for cortical bone is achieved. Mechanical properties, electron microscopy and crystal structure properties of the composite materials will be discussed.

  1. Preparation of electrochemically reduced graphene oxide/multi-wall carbon nanotubes hybrid film modified electrode, and its application to amperometric sensing of rutin

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Uling Yang; Gang Li; Meifang Hu; Lingbo Qu

    2014-07-01

    Through a facile electrochemical method, we prepared an electrochemically reduced graphene oxide (ERGO)/multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) hybrid film modified glassy carbon electrode (GCE), and characterized it by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and x-ray diffraction (XRD) The experimental results demonstrated that ERGO-MWNTs/GCE exhibited excellent electrocatalytic activity toward rutin as evidenced by the significant enhancement of redox peak currents in comparison with a bare GCE, ERGO/GCE and MWNTs/GCE. This method has been applied for the direct determination of rutin in real samples with satisfactory results.

  2. Catalytic systems of cumene oxidation based on multiwalled carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobotaeva, N. S.; Skorokhodova, T. S.; Ryabova, N. V.

    2015-03-01

    Catalytic systems for cumene oxidation were prepared on the basis of silver-activated carbon nanotubes. Silver lies on the surface of the carbon nanotubes in the nanocrystalline state and has a size of 15-20 nm. The use of the obtained catalytic systems in cumene oxidation with molecular oxygen allowed a considerable decrease in the oxidation temperature and an increase in selectivity.

  3. Carbon nanotubes: engineering biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez-Gualdrón, Diego A; Burgos, Juan C; Yu, Jiamei; Balbuena, Perla B

    2011-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are cylinder-shaped allotropic forms of carbon, most widely produced under chemical vapor deposition. They possess astounding chemical, electronic, mechanical, and optical properties. Being among the most promising materials in nanotechnology, they are also likely to revolutionize medicine. Among other biomedical applications, after proper functionalization carbon nanotubes can be transformed into sophisticated biosensing and biocompatible drug-delivery systems, for specific targeting and elimination of tumor cells. This chapter provides an introduction to the chemical and electronic structure and properties of single-walled carbon nanotubes, followed by a description of the main synthesis and post-synthesis methods. These sections allow the reader to become familiar with the specific characteristics of these materials and the manner in which these properties may be dependent on the specific synthesis and post-synthesis processes. The chapter ends with a review of the current biomedical applications of carbon nanotubes, highlighting successes and challenges.

  4. Storage of hydrogen in floating catalytic carbon nanotubes after graphitizing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱宏伟; 李雪松; 慈立杰; 徐才录; 毛宗强; 梁吉; 吴德海

    2002-01-01

    Hydrogen storage under moderate pressure (~10 Mpa) and ambient temperature (~25℃) in multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) prepared by the floating catalyst method is investigated. The capacity of hydrogen adsorption is evaluated based on both the nanotubes diameter and morphology. Indirect evidence indicates that hydrogen adsorption not only occurs on tube surface and interiors, but also in tube interlayers. The results show that the floating catalytic carbon nanotubes might be a candidate hydrogen storage material for fuel cell electric vehicles.

  5. Preparation, Characterization, and In Vitro and Vivo Antitumor Activity of Oridonin-Conjugated Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes Functionalized with Carboxylic Group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuanjin Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanotubes have shown great potential in tumor therapy. Oridonin (ORI is a poorly water-soluble diterpenoid compound (C20H28O6 used in the treatment of esophageal and hepatic carcinoma for decades. For the purpose of enhancing the antitumor potency and reducing cytotoxicity of ORI, multiwalled carbon nanotubes functionalized with carboxylic group (MWCNTs-COOH were used as ORI carrier. ORI was noncovalently encapsulated into (or onto the functionalized carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs-ORI. The obtained MWCNTs-ORI has been characterized. The ORI loading efficiency in MWCNTs-COOH carrier was studied to be about 82.6% (w/w. In vitro cytotoxicity assay on MWCNTs-ORI gave IC50 of 7.29±0.5 μg/mL and ORI-F gave IC50 of 14.5±1.4 μg/mL. The antitumor effect studies in vivo showed that MWCNTs-ORI improved antitumor activity of ORI in comparison with ORI-F. The tumor inhibition ratio for MWCNTs-ORI (1.68×10-2 g·Kg−1·d−1 was 86.4%, higher than that of ORI-F (1.68×10-2 g·Kg−1·d−1 which was 39.2%. This can greatly improve the pharmaceutical efficiency and reduce potential side effects.

  6. Functionalization of Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khare, Bishun N. (Inventor); Meyyappan, Meyya (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    Method and system for functionalizing a collection of carbon nanotubes (CNTs). A selected precursor gas (e.g., H2 or F2 or CnHm) is irradiated to provide a cold plasma of selected target species particles, such as atomic H or F, in a first chamber. The target species particles are d irected toward an array of CNTs located in a second chamber while suppressing transport of ultraviolet radiation to the second chamber. A CNT array is functionalized with the target species particles, at or below room temperature, to a point of saturation, in an exposure time interval no longer than about 30 sec. *Discrimination against non-target species is provided by (i) use of a target species having a lifetime that is much greater than a lifetime of a non-target species and/or (2) use of an applied magnetic field to discriminate between charged particle trajectories for target species and for non-target species.

  7. Carbon Nanotube Electron Gun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Cattien V. (Inventor); Ribaya, Bryan P. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    An electron gun, an electron source for an electron gun, an extractor for an electron gun, and a respective method for producing the electron gun, the electron source and the extractor are disclosed. Embodiments provide an electron source utilizing a carbon nanotube (CNT) bonded to a substrate for increased stability, reliability, and durability. An extractor with an aperture in a conductive material is used to extract electrons from the electron source, where the aperture may substantially align with the CNT of the electron source when the extractor and electron source are mated to form the electron gun. The electron source and extractor may have alignment features for aligning the electron source and the extractor, thereby bringing the aperture and CNT into substantial alignment when assembled. The alignment features may provide and maintain this alignment during operation to improve the field emission characteristics and overall system stability of the electron gun.

  8. Carbon nanotube biconvex microcavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butt, Haider; Yetisen, Ali K.; Ahmed, Rajib; Yun, Seok Hyun; Dai, Qing

    2015-03-01

    Developing highly efficient microcavities with predictive narrow-band resonance frequencies using the least amount of material will allow the applications in nonlinear photonic devices. We have developed a microcavity array that comprised multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) organized in a biconvex pattern. The finite element model allowed designing microcavity arrays with predictive transmission properties and assessing the effects of the microarray geometry. The microcavity array demonstrated negative index and produced high Q factors. 2-3 μm tall MWCNTs were patterned as biconvex microcavities, which were separated by 10 μm in an array. The microcavity was iridescent and had optical control over the diffracted elliptical patterns with a far-field pattern, whose properties were predicted by the model. It is anticipated that the MWCNT biconvex microcavities will have implications for the development of highly efficient lenses, metamaterial antennas, and photonic circuits.

  9. Enhanced Carbon Nanotube Ultracapacitors Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed innovation utilizes carbon nanotubes (CNTs) coated with pseudo-capacitive MnO2 material as nano-composite electrode and ionic electrolyte for the...

  10. Carbon nanotubes for coherent spintronics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuemmeth, Ferdinand; Churchill, H O H; Herring, P K;

    2010-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes bridge the molecular and crystalline quantum worlds, and their extraordinary electronic, mechanical and optical properties have attracted enormous attention from a broad scientific community. We review the basic principles of fabricating spin-electronic devices based on individua...

  11. Selective functionalization of carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strano, Michael S. (Inventor); Usrey, Monica (Inventor); Barone, Paul (Inventor); Dyke, Christopher A. (Inventor); Tour, James M. (Inventor); Kittrell, W. Carter (Inventor); Hauge, Robert H. (Inventor); Smalley, Richard E. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    The present invention is directed toward methods of selectively functionalizing carbon nanotubes of a specific type or range of types, based on their electronic properties, using diazonium chemistry. The present invention is also directed toward methods of separating carbon nanotubes into populations of specific types or range(s) of types via selective functionalization and electrophoresis, and also to the novel compositions generated by such separations.

  12. Carbon nanotubes for coherent spintronics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuemmeth, Ferdinand; Churchill, H O H; Herring, P K

    2010-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes bridge the molecular and crystalline quantum worlds, and their extraordinary electronic, mechanical and optical properties have attracted enormous attention from a broad scientific community. We review the basic principles of fabricating spin-electronic devices based on individual......, electrically-gated carbon nanotubes, and present experimental efforts to understand their electronic and nuclear spin degrees of freedom, which in the future may enable quantum applications....

  13. Controlling growth of aligned carbon nanotubes from porous silicon templates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Fabricating well-aligned carbon nanotubes, especially, on a silicon substrate is very important for their applications. In this paper, an aligned carbon nanotube array has been prepared by pyrolysis of hydrocarbons catalyzed by nickel nanoparticles embedded in porous silicon (PS) templates. High-magnification transmission electron microscopy images confirm that the nanotubes are well graphitized. The PS substrates with pore sizes between 10 and 100 nm play a control role on the growth of carbon nanotubes and the diameters of the tubes increase with the enlargement of the pores of the substrates. However, such a control role cannot be found in the macro-PS substrates.

  14. The effect of carbon nanotubes on chiral chemical reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rance, Graham A.; Miners, Scott A.; Chamberlain, Thomas W.; Khlobystov, Andrei N.

    2013-02-01

    The intrinsic helicity of carbon nanotubes influences the formation of chiral molecules in chemical reactions. A racemic mixture of P and M enantiomers of nanotubes affects the enantiomeric excess of the products of the autocatalytic Soai reaction proportional to the amount of nanotubes added in the reaction mixture. An intermediate complex formed between the nanotube and the organometallic reagent is essential and explains the observed correlation between the enantiomeric distribution of products and the curvature of the carbon nanostructure. This Letter establishes a key mechanism for harnessing the helicity of nanoscale carbon surfaces for preparative organic reactions.

  15. Growth of Carbon Nanotubes over Ni Nano-particles Prepared in Situ by Reduction of La2NiO4 Oxides

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    A novel catalyst precursor, La2NiO4, was investigated to synthesize carbon nanotubes, obtained from catalytic disproportionation of CO. The morphology of carbon nanotubes has been examined by TEM (transmission electron micrograph) and SEM (scaning electron micrograph). It was observed that the Ni nano-particle size formed at different reducing temperatures was a key factor to the yield and diameter of carbon nanotubes.

  16. Enhanced Growth and Redox Characteristics of Some Conducting Polymers on Carbon Nanotube Modified Electrodes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    R.Saraswathi

    2007-01-01

    1 Results Recent studies on the electrochemistry of a number of active compounds at carbon nanotube electrodes have proved beyond doubt their excellent electrocatalytic properties.Particularly,the advancements accomplished towards the functionalization of carbon nanotubes resulting in their enhanced solubilization in aqueous solutions have helped in the preparation of stable carbon nanotube electrodes.Glassy carbon has been invariably the preferred substrate for casting carbon nanotube electrodes.Such c...

  17. Preparation of Hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin Cross-linked Multi-walled Carbon Nanotubes and Their Application in Enantioseparation of Clenbuterol

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Jingang; Huang Dushu; Huang Kelong; Hong Yong

    2011-01-01

    A method of cross-linking multi-walled carbon nanotubes by a nucleophilic substitution of brominated multi-walled carbon nanotubes using hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin anions was studied. The modified multi-walled carbon nanotube samples were characterized using thermogravimetric analysis, energy-dispersive X-ray spectros-copy, transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The hydroxypropyi-β-cyclodextrin modified multi-walled carbon nanotubes were used as a chiral stationary phase additive for thin-layer chromatography to separate clenbuterol enantiomers, and the chiral separation factor was increased.

  18. Preparation, Electromechanical, and Structural Study of Carbon Nanotube/Gelatin Nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-15

    composite [22]. Gelatin is a high molecular weight polypeptide obtained by controlled hydrolysis of collagen [23]. It is a good film and particle... CNTs ) are a new form of carbon, consisting of concentric cylinders of graphite layers rolled into graphene cylinders. The combination of their shape...shows the incorporation of the MWNT into the gelatin fibrils and a possible cross-linked MWNT /gelatin composite. The interaction between CNT and SDS

  19. Properties of Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masood, Samina; Bullmore, Daniel; Duran, Michael; Jacobs, Michael

    2012-10-01

    Different synthesizing methods are used to create various nanostructures of carbon; we are mainly interested in single and multi-wall carbon nanotubes, (SWCNTs) and (MWCNTs) respectively. The properties of these tubes are related to their synthetic methods, chirality, and diameter. The extremely sturdy structure of CNTs, with their distinct thermal and electromagnetic properties, suggests a tremendous use of these tubes in electronics and medicines. Here, we analyze various physical properties of SWCNTs with a special emphasis on electromagnetic and chemical properties. By examining their electrical properties, we demonstrate the viability of discrete CNT based components. After considering the advantages of using CNTs over microstructures, we make a case for the advancement and development of nanostructures based electronics. As for current CNT applications, it's hard to overlook their use and functionality in the development of cancer treatment. Whether the tubes are involved in chemotherapeutic drug delivery, molecular imaging and targeting, or photodynamic therapy, we show that the remarkable properties of SWCNTs can be used in advantageous ways by many different industries.

  20. Carbon nanotube computer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shulaker, Max M; Hills, Gage; Patil, Nishant; Wei, Hai; Chen, Hong-Yu; Wong, H-S Philip; Mitra, Subhasish

    2013-09-26

    The miniaturization of electronic devices has been the principal driving force behind the semiconductor industry, and has brought about major improvements in computational power and energy efficiency. Although advances with silicon-based electronics continue to be made, alternative technologies are being explored. Digital circuits based on transistors fabricated from carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have the potential to outperform silicon by improving the energy-delay product, a metric of energy efficiency, by more than an order of magnitude. Hence, CNTs are an exciting complement to existing semiconductor technologies. Owing to substantial fundamental imperfections inherent in CNTs, however, only very basic circuit blocks have been demonstrated. Here we show how these imperfections can be overcome, and demonstrate the first computer built entirely using CNT-based transistors. The CNT computer runs an operating system that is capable of multitasking: as a demonstration, we perform counting and integer-sorting simultaneously. In addition, we implement 20 different instructions from the commercial MIPS instruction set to demonstrate the generality of our CNT computer. This experimental demonstration is the most complex carbon-based electronic system yet realized. It is a considerable advance because CNTs are prominent among a variety of emerging technologies that are being considered for the next generation of highly energy-efficient electronic systems.

  1. Carbon Nanotube Purification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delzeit, Lance D. (Inventor); Delzeit, Clement J. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    A method for cleaning or otherwise removing amorphous carbon and other residues that arise in growth of a carbon nanotube (CNT) array. The CNT array is exposed to a plurality of hydroxyls or hydrogen, produced from a selected vapor or liquid source such as H2O or H2O2. and the hydroxyls or hydrogen (neutral or electrically charged) react with the residues to produce partly or fully dissolved or hydrogenated or hydroxylizated products that can be removed or separated from the CNT array. The hydroxyls or hydrogen can be produced by heating the CNT array, residue and selected vapor or liquid source or by application of an electromagnetic excitation signal with a selected frequency or range of frequencies to dissociate the selected vapor or liquid. The excitation frequency can be chirped to cover a selected range of frequencies corresponding to dissociation of the selected vapor or liquid. Sonication may be uscd to supplement dissociation of the H2O and/or H2O2.

  2. Probing Photosensitization by Functionalized Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) photosensitize the production of reactive oxygen species that can damage organisms by biomembrane oxidation or mediate CNTs' environmental transformations. The photosensitized nature of derivatized carbon nanotubes from various synthetic methods, and thus ...

  3. Carbon Nanotube Based Molecular Electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Deepak; Saini, Subhash; Menon, Madhu

    1998-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes and the nanotube heterojunctions have recently emerged as excellent candidates for nanoscale molecular electronic device components. Experimental measurements on the conductivity, rectifying behavior and conductivity-chirality correlation have also been made. While quasi-one dimensional simple heterojunctions between nanotubes with different electronic behavior can be generated by introduction of a pair of heptagon-pentagon defects in an otherwise all hexagon graphene sheet. Other complex 3- and 4-point junctions may require other mechanisms. Structural stability as well as local electronic density of states of various nanotube junctions are investigated using a generalized tight-binding molecular dynamics (GDBMD) scheme that incorporates non-orthogonality of the orbitals. The junctions investigated include straight and small angle heterojunctions of various chiralities and diameters; as well as more complex 'T' and 'Y' junctions which do not always obey the usual pentagon-heptagon pair rule. The study of local density of states (LDOS) reveal many interesting features, most prominent among them being the defect-induced states in the gap. The proposed three and four pointjunctions are one of the smallest possible tunnel junctions made entirely of carbon atoms. Furthermore the electronic behavior of the nanotube based device components can be taylored by doping with group III-V elements such as B and N, and BN nanotubes as a wide band gap semiconductor has also been realized in experiments. Structural properties of heteroatomic nanotubes comprising C, B and N will be discussed.

  4. Cytotoxicity of carbon nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Ying; LI WenXin

    2008-01-01

    With large-scale production and application at large scale, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) may cause ad-verse response to the environment and human health. Thus, study on bio-effects and safety of CNTs has attracted great attention from scientists and governments worldwide. This report briefly summa-rizes the main results from the in vitro toxicity study of CNTs. The emphasis is placed on the descrip-tion of a variety of factors affecting CNTs cytotoxicity, including species of CNTs, impurities contained,lengths of CNTs, aspect ratios, chemical modification, and assaying methods of cytotoxicity. However,experimental information obtained thus far on CNTs' cytotoxicity is lacking in comparability, and some-times there is controversy about it. In order to assess more accurately the potential risks of CNTs to human health, we suggest that care should be taken for issues such as chemical modification and quantitative characterization of CNTa in cytotoxicity assessment. More importantly, studies on physical and chemical mechanisms of CNTs' cytotoxicity should be strengthened; assaying methods and evaluating criteria characterized by nanotoxicology should be gradually established.

  5. Cytotoxicity of carbon nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    With large-scale production and application at large scale, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) may cause ad-verse response to the environment and human health. Thus, study on bio-effects and safety of CNTs has attracted great attention from scientists and governments worldwide. This report briefly summa-rizes the main results from the in vitro toxicity study of CNTs. The emphasis is placed on the descrip-tion of a variety of factors affecting CNTs cytotoxicity, including species of CNTs, impurities contained, lengths of CNTs, aspect ratios, chemical modification, and assaying methods of cytotoxicity. However, experimental information obtained thus far on CNTs’ cytotoxicity is lacking in comparability, and some-times there is controversy about it. In order to assess more accurately the potential risks of CNTs to human health, we suggest that care should be taken for issues such as chemical modification and quantitative characterization of CNTs in cytotoxicity assessment. More importantly, studies on physical and chemical mechanisms of CNTs’ cytotoxicity should be strengthened; assaying methods and evaluating criteria characterized by nanotoxicology should be gradually established.

  6. Carbon Nanotubes Hybrid Hydrogels in Drug Delivery: A Perspective Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Cirillo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of biologics, polymers, silicon materials, carbon materials, and metals has been proposed for the preparation of innovative drug delivery devices. One of the most promising materials in this field are the carbon-nanotubes composites and hybrid materials coupling the advantages of polymers (biocompatibility and biodegradability with those of carbon nanotubes (cellular uptake, stability, electromagnatic, and magnetic behavior. The applicability of polymer-carbon nanotubes composites in drug delivery, with particular attention to the controlled release by composites hydrogel, is being extensively investigated in the present review.

  7. Carbon nanotubes hybrid hydrogels in drug delivery: a perspective review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cirillo, Giuseppe; Hampel, Silke; Spizzirri, Umile Gianfranco; Parisi, Ortensia Ilaria; Picci, Nevio; Iemma, Francesca

    2014-01-01

    The use of biologics, polymers, silicon materials, carbon materials, and metals has been proposed for the preparation of innovative drug delivery devices. One of the most promising materials in this field are the carbon-nanotubes composites and hybrid materials coupling the advantages of polymers (biocompatibility and biodegradability) with those of carbon nanotubes (cellular uptake, stability, electromagnatic, and magnetic behavior). The applicability of polymer-carbon nanotubes composites in drug delivery, with particular attention to the controlled release by composites hydrogel, is being extensively investigated in the present review.

  8. Silver decorated multiwalled carbon nanotubes and their characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gahlot, Swati; Kulshrestha, Vaibhav; Shahi, V. K.

    2014-04-01

    Deposition of silver nanoparticles on functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotubes is done in the present study. To decorate silver nanoparticles on CNT walls silver nitrate (AgNO3) was used as precursor. Finally prepared nanotubes (Ag-CNT) were analyzed by TEM, XRD and FTIR for the structural and chemical characterization.

  9. Preparation and photovoltaic properties of layered TiO2/carbon nanotube/TiO2 photoanodes for dye-sensitized solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barberio, M.; Grosso, D. R.; Imbrogno, A.; Xu, F.

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we report on the realization of photoanodes for dye sensitized solar cells based on composites of carbon nanotubes and titanium dioxide nanoparticles. Our results show the best photovoltaics performance for carbon nanotubes weight percentages between 0.2% and 0.4%. Photoanodes realized in three-layer configuration, TiO2/carbon nanotube/TiO2, show a cell efficiency of 10.5% and a fill factor of 70%, values 2.4 times greater with respect to that of classical TiO2 anode. The presence of carbon nanotubes enhances the charge transport, strongly reducing the electron/hole recombination in the anode bulk, while the double layer of TiO2 increases the dye adsorption limiting the reduction caused by the presence of carbon nanotubes.

  10. Hybrid Composite of Polyaniline Containing Carbon Nanotube

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Carbon nanotube-polyaniline hybrid material was synthesized by emulsion polymerization in-situ. The morphology of hybrid material was studied by TEM and X-ray diffraction. The conductivity of nanocomposite increases with the increasing of carbon nanotube content because of the new conductivity passageways formed by carbon nanotubes.

  11. Synthesis and Application of Carbon Nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qun Zeng; Zhenhua Li; Yuhong Zhou

    2006-01-01

    Owing to the unique structure, the superior physical and chemical properties, the super strong mechanical performances, and so on, carbon nanotubes have attracted the attention of researchers all over the world. In this article, the basic properties and the main production processes of carbon nanotubes are introduced in brief, and the progress of applied research for carbon nanotubes is reviewed.

  12. Catalytic growth of carbon nanotubes with large inner diameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WEI REN ZHONG

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanotubes (2.4 g/g catalyst, with large inner diameters were successfully synthesized through pyrolysis of methane on a Ni–Cu–Al catalyst by adding sodium carbonate into the carbon nanotubes growth system. The inner diameter of the carbon nanotubes prepared by this method is about 20–60 nm, while their outer diameter is about 40–80 nm. Transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction were employed to investigate the morphology and microstructures of the carbon nanotubes. The analyses showed that these carbon nanotubes have large inner diameters and good graphitization. The addition of sodium carbonate into the reaction system brings about a slight decrease in the methane conversion and the yield of carbon. The experimental results showed that sodium carbonate is a mildly toxic material which influenced the catalytic activity of the Ni–Cu–Al catalyst and resulted in the formation of carbon nanotubes with large inner diameters. The growth mechanism of the carbon nanotubes with large inner diameters is discussed in this paper.

  13. Investigating the Inter-Tube Conduction Mechanism in Polycarbonate Nanocomposites Prepared with Conductive Polymer-Coated Carbon Nanotubes

    KAUST Repository

    Ventura, Isaac Aguilar

    2015-12-16

    A well-known strategy to improve the electrical conductivity of polymers is to dope them with high-aspect-ratio and conductive nanoparticles such as carbon nanotubes (CNTs). However, these nanocomposites also exhibit undesirable properties such as damage-sensitive and history-dependent conductivity because their macroscopic electrical conductivity is largely determined by the tunneling effect at the tube/tube interface. To reduce these issues, new nanocomposites have been developed with CNTs that have been coated with a conductive layer of poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT/PSS). It has been posited that the insulating region between the CNTs is replaced by a conductive polymer bridge; this has not been proven up to now. We propose here to investigate in-depth how the macroscopic conductivity of these materials is changing when (1) varying the frequency of the electrical loading (impedance spectroscopy), (2) varying the mechanical hydrostatic pressure, and (3) varying the voltage of the electrical loading. The response is systematically compared to the one of conventional carbon nanotube/polycarbonate (CNT/PC) nanocomposites so we can clarify how efficiently the tunneling effect is suppressed from these composites. The objective is to elucidate further the mechanism for conduction in such material formulations.

  14. Investigating the Inter-Tube Conduction Mechanism in Polycarbonate Nanocomposites Prepared with Conductive Polymer-Coated Carbon Nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventura, Isaac Aguilar; Zhou, Jian; Lubineau, Gilles

    2015-12-01

    A well-known strategy to improve the electrical conductivity of polymers is to dope them with high-aspect-ratio and conductive nanoparticles such as carbon nanotubes (CNTs). However, these nanocomposites also exhibit undesirable properties such as damage-sensitive and history-dependent conductivity because their macroscopic electrical conductivity is largely determined by the tunneling effect at the tube/tube interface. To reduce these issues, new nanocomposites have been developed with CNTs that have been coated with a conductive layer of poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT/PSS). It has been posited that the insulating region between the CNTs is replaced by a conductive polymer bridge; this has not been proven up to now. We propose here to investigate in-depth how the macroscopic conductivity of these materials is changing when (1) varying the frequency of the electrical loading (impedance spectroscopy), (2) varying the mechanical hydrostatic pressure, and (3) varying the voltage of the electrical loading. The response is systematically compared to the one of conventional carbon nanotube/polycarbonate (CNT/PC) nanocomposites so we can clarify how efficiently the tunneling effect is suppressed from these composites. The objective is to elucidate further the mechanism for conduction in such material formulations.

  15. The Effect of Functionalization Carbon Nanotubes (CNTs) on the Performance of PES-CNTs Mixed Matrix Membrane

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmad Mustafa; Tutuk Djoko Kusworo; Abdullah Busairi; Ahmad Fauzi Ismail

    2010-01-01

    A new type of mixed matrix membrane consisting of functionalized carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and polyethersulfone (PES) is prepared for biogas purification. PES mixed matrix membrane with and without modification of carbon nanotubes were prepared by a dry/wet phase inversion technique using a pneumatically flat sheet membrane casting machine system. The modified carbon nanotubes were prepared by treating the carbon nanotubes with chemical modification using Dynasylan Ameo (DA) silane agent to all...

  16. Synthesis of Carbon Nanotube (CNT Composite Membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dusan Losic

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanotubes are attractive approach for designing of new membranes for advanced molecular separation because of their unique transport properties and ability to mimic biological protein channels. In this work the synthetic approach for fabrication of carbon nanotubes (CNTs composite membranes is presented. The method is based on growth of multi walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT using chemical vapour deposition (CVD on the template of nanoporous alumina (PA membranes. The influence of experimental conditions including carbon precursor, temperature, deposition time, and PA template on CNT growth process and quality of fabricated membranes was investigated. The synthesis of CNT/PA composites with controllable nanotube dimensions such as diameters (30–150 nm, and thickness (5–100 µm, was demonstrated. The chemical composition and morphological characteristics of fabricated CNT/PA composite membranes were investigated by various characterisation techniques including scanning electron microscopy (SEM, energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDXS, high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM and x-ray diffraction (XRD. Transport properties of prepared membranes were explored by diffusion of dye (Rose Bengal used as model of hydrophilic transport molecule.

  17. Hydrodynamic properties of carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walther, J H; Werder, T; Jaffe, R L; Koumoutsakos, P

    2004-06-01

    We study water flowing past an array of single walled carbon nanotubes using nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. For carbon nanotubes mounted with a tube spacing of 16.4 x 16.4 nm and diameters of 1.25 and 2.50 nm, respectively, we find drag coefficients in reasonable agreement with the macroscopic, Stokes-Oseen solution. The slip length is -0.11 nm for the 1.25 nm carbon nanotube, and 0.49 for the 2.50 nm tube for a flow speed of 50 m/s, respectively, and 0.28 nm for the 2.50 nm tube at 200 m/s. A slanted flow configuration with a stream- and spanwise velocity component of 100 ms(-1) recovers the two-dimensional results, but exhibits a significant 88 nm slip along the axis of the tube. These results indicate that slip depends on the particular flow configuration.

  18. Adsorption on the carbon nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DING Yi; YANG Xiao-bao; NI Jun

    2006-01-01

    Adsorption on single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) is a subject of growing experimental and theoretical interest.The possible adsorbed patterns of atoms and molecules on the single-walled carbon nanotubes vary with the diameters and chirality of the tubes due to the confinement.The curvature of the carbon nanotube surface enlarges the distance of the adsorbate atoms and thus enhances the stability of high coverage structures of adsorbate.There exist two novel high-coverage stable structures of potassium adsorbed on SWCNTs,which are not stable on graphite.The electronic properties of SWCNTs can be modified by adsorbate atoms and metal-semiconductor and semiconductor-semi-conductor transitions can be achieved by the doping of alkali atoms.

  19. Preparation of a sol-gel-derived carbon nanotube ceramic electrode by microwave irradiation and its application for the determination of adenine and guanine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbaspour, Abdolkarim, E-mail: abbaspour@chem.susc.ac.i [Department of Chemistry, College of Sciences, Shiraz University, Shiraz, Fars 71456-85464 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ghaffarinejad, Ali [Department of Chemistry, College of Sciences, Shiraz University, Shiraz, Fars 71456-85464 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2010-01-01

    In this study, microwave irradiation was used for the fast preparation (min) of a sol-gel-derived carbon nanotube ceramic electrode (MW-CNCE). For confirmation of the preparation of the ceramic by MW irradiation, Fourier transform infrared, X-ray diffraction spectra and scanning electron microscopy images of the produced ceramic were compared with those of conventional ceramic (which is produced by drying the ceramic in air for 48 h). The electrochemical behavior of MW-CNCE in nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, L-cysteine, adenine and guanine was compared with that of a conventional sol-gel-derived carbon nanotube ceramic electrode (CNCE). In all systems, similar peak potentials and lower background currents were obtained with respect to CNCE. Finally, the MW-CNCE was used for the simultaneous determination of adenine and guanine using differential pulse voltammetry. The linear ranges of 0.1-10 and 0.1-20 muM were obtained for adenine and guanine, respectively. These results are comparable with some modified electrodes that have recently been reported for the determination of adenine and guanine, with the advantage that the proposed electrode did not contain modifier. In addition, the proposed electrode was successfully used for the oxidation of adenine and guanine in DNA, and the detection limit for this measurement was 0.05 mug mL{sup -1} DNA.

  20. Modified carbon nanotubes and methods of forming carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heintz, Amy M.; Risser, Steven; Elhard, Joel D.; Moore, Bryon P.; Liu, Tao; Vijayendran, Bhima R.

    2016-06-14

    In this invention, processes which can be used to achieve stable doped carbon nanotubes are disclosed. Preferred CNT structures and morphologies for achieving maximum doping effects are also described. Dopant formulations and methods for achieving doping of a broad distribution of tube types are also described.

  1. The Microstructure of Ni Layer on Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes Prepared by an Electroless Coating Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weixue Li

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs, diameter: 2~3 nm, which were obtained in the suspension of purification solution, with Ni-P coating layers were obtained by an electroless deposition process. The SWNTs before and after coating were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM and energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS. An Ni-P layer on individual nanotube with thickness of 20 nm can be obtained after the deposition process. The X-ray diffraction (XRD and selected area electron diffraction (SAED analysis of Ni-P SWNTs before and after heat treatment show that the heat treatment caused the transformation of the amorphous Ni-P layer to the nanocrystalline Ni-P (crystalline Ni and Ni3P intermetallic compound layer. The XRD pattern of SWNTs with Ni-P layers after heat treatment revealed that the crystal structures of Ni in plating layer contained: hexagonal close-packed (hcp structure and face-centered cubic (fcc structure. The lattice parameters of Ni (fcc and Ni3P are larger than the bulk's, indicting that the lattice expansion has taken place. However, the lattice parameter of Ni (hcp has no difference from the bulk's.

  2. Preparation and properties of a composite SiC with addition of multi-walled carbon nanotubes synthesized in the plasma jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shavelkina, M. B.; Amirov, R. Kh; Kelina, I. Yu; Golubeva, N. A.

    2016-11-01

    Ceramic composite reinforced with plaits of carbon nanotubes have been fabricated by the reaction bonded silicon carbide method. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are produced using a 35 kW dc plasma torch and C2H2 as carbon precursor. Effective methods of CNTs adding and dispersing in the preform volume have been found. The optimal content and operational technological parameters have been determined for ceramic matrix. Physico-mechanical properties of the reinforcing ceramic matrices with nanomaterials have been investigated.

  3. Enhancement of the thermo-mechanical properties and efficacy of mixing technique in the preparation of graphene/PVC nanocomposites compared to carbon nanotubes/PVC

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mudassir Hasan; Moonyong Lee

    2014-01-01

    Thin films of poly vinyl chloride (PVC)/multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) and PVC/graphene (GN) nanocomposites were prepared by mixing in the presence of different quantities of nanoparticles. Film casting was performed using tetrahydrofuran as a solvent. The as-prepared PVC/MWCNT and PVC/GN nanocomposites were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, thermogravimetric analysis, differential scanning calorimetry, dynamic mechanical analysis, and diffused reflectance spectroscopy. Only the PVC/GN nanocomposite films were evaluated further for detailed mechanical analysis because of the poor dispersion of MWCNTs in PVC. The PVC/GN nanocomposite films were thermo-mechanically more stable than the PVC films. These nanocomposites have potential as a replacement material for PVC and PVC/MWCNT owing to their better dispersion and high stability.

  4. Enhancement of the thermo-mechanical properties and efficacy of mixing technique in the preparation of graphene/PVC nanocomposites compared to carbon nanotubes/PVC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mudassir Hasan

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Thin films of poly vinyl chloride (PVC/multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT and PVC/graphene (GN nanocomposites were prepared by mixing in the presence of different quantities of nanoparticles. Film casting was performed using tetrahydrofuran as a solvent. The as-prepared PVC/MWCNT and PVC/GN nanocomposites were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, thermogravimetric analysis, differential scanning calorimetry, dynamic mechanical analysis, and diffused reflectance spectroscopy. Only the PVC/GN nanocomposite films were evaluated further for detailed mechanical analysis because of the poor dispersion of MWCNTs in PVC. The PVC/GN nanocomposite films were thermo-mechanically more stable than the PVC films. These nanocomposites have potential as a replacement material for PVC and PVC/MWCNT owing to their better dispersion and high stability.

  5. Preparation and characterization of silver nanoparticles immobilized on multi-walled carbon nanotubes by poly(dopamine) functionalization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang Yi; Lu Yonglai; Zhang Liqun; Liu Li; Dai Yajie; Wang Wencai, E-mail: wangw@mail.buct.edu.cn [Beijing University of Chemical Technology, State Key Laboratory of Organic-Inorganic Composites and Key Laboratory of Beijing City on Preparation and Processing of Novel Polymer Materials (China)

    2012-06-15

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) functionalized with poly(dopamine) (PDA) were found to cause the immobilization of silver nanoparticles on the surface. The PDA functional layer not only improved the dispersion of MWNTs in aqueous solution, but also was used as a platform for subsequent silver nanoparticle immobilization. The surface morphology of the functionalized MWNTs was observed by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The results showed that PDA layers with controlled thickness on the nanometer scale were formed on MWNT surfaces by in situ spontaneous oxidative polymerization of dopamine, and that high-density of homogeneously dispersed spherical silver nanoparticles with sizes of 3-4 nm were immobilized on their outer surface. The space between spherical silver nanoparticles is less than 10 nm. Both X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction results showed that the Ag nanoparticles on the surface of hybrids exist in the zero valent state.

  6. Preparation and characterization of silver nanoparticles immobilized on multi-walled carbon nanotubes by poly(dopamine) functionalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yi; Lu, Yonglai; Zhang, Liqun; Liu, Li; Dai, Yajie; Wang, Wencai

    2012-06-01

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) functionalized with poly(dopamine) (PDA) were found to cause the immobilization of silver nanoparticles on the surface. The PDA functional layer not only improved the dispersion of MWNTs in aqueous solution, but also was used as a platform for subsequent silver nanoparticle immobilization. The surface morphology of the functionalized MWNTs was observed by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The results showed that PDA layers with controlled thickness on the nanometer scale were formed on MWNT surfaces by in situ spontaneous oxidative polymerization of dopamine, and that high-density of homogeneously dispersed spherical silver nanoparticles with sizes of 3-4 nm were immobilized on their outer surface. The space between spherical silver nanoparticles is less than 10 nm. Both X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction results showed that the Ag nanoparticles on the surface of hybrids exist in the zero valent state.

  7. Cellulose aerogels decorated with multi-walled carbon nanotubes: preparation, characterization, and application for electromagnetic interference shielding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian LI,Caichao WAN

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Electromagnetic wave pollution has attracted extensive attention because of its ability to affect the operation of electronic machinery and endanger human health. In this work, the environmentally-friendly hybrid aerogels consisting of cellulose and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs were fabricated. The aerogels have a low bulk density of 58.17 mg·cm-3. The incorporation of MWCNTs leads to an improvement in the thermal stability. In addition, the aerogels show a high electromagnetic interference (EMI SEtotal value of 19.4 dB. Meanwhile, the absorption-dominant shielding mechanism helps a lot to reduce secondary radiation, which is beneficial to develop novel eco-friendly EMI shielding materials.

  8. Quantum transport in carbon nanotubes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laird, E.A.; Kuemmeth, F.; Steele, G.A.; Grove-Rasmussen, K.; Nygard, J.; Flensberg, K.; Kouwenhoven, L.P.

    2015-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes are a versatile material in which many aspects of condensed matter physics come together. Recent discoveries have uncovered new phenomena that completely change our understanding of transport in these devices, especially the role of the spin and valley degrees of freedom. This revie

  9. Electrochemical Performance of a Carbon Nanotube/La-Doped TiO2 Nanocomposite and its Use for Preparation of an Electrochemical Nicotinic Acid Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanxing Liu

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available A carbon nanotube/La-doped TiO2 (La-TiO2 nanocomposite (CLTN was prepared by a procedure similar to a complex/adsorption process. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM images show that the La-TiO2 distributes on the carbon nanotube walls. The CLTN was mixed with paraffin to form a CLTN paste for the CLTN paste electrode (CLTNPE. The electrochemical characteristics of CLTNPE were compared with that of conventional carbon electrodes such as the carbon paste electrode (CPE and glass carbon electrode (GC. The CLTNPE exhibits electrochemical activity and was used to investigate the electrochemistry of nicotinic acid (NA. The modified electrode has a strong electrocatalytic effect on the redox of NA. The cyclic voltammetry (CV redox potential of NA at the CLTNPE is 320 mV. The oxidation process of NA on the CLTNPE is pH dependent. A sensitive chronoamperometric response for NA was obtained covering a linear range from 1.0×10-6 mol·L-1 to 1.2×10-4 mol·L-1, with a detection limit of 2.7×10-7 mol·L-1. The NA sensor displays a remarkable sensitivity and stability. The mean recovery of NA in the human urine is 101.8%, with a mean variation coefficient (RSD of 2.6%.

  10. Preparation and characterization of multi-walled carbon nanotubes/chitosan nanocomposite and its application for the removal of heavy metals from aqueous solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salam, Mohamed Abdel, E-mail: masalam16@hotmail.com [Chemistry Department, Faculty of Science, King Abdulaziz University, P.O. Box 80200, Jeddah 21589 (Saudi Arabia); Makki, Mohamad S.I.; Abdelaal, Magdy Y.A. [Chemistry Department, Faculty of Science, King Abdulaziz University, P.O. Box 80200, Jeddah 21589 (Saudi Arabia)

    2011-02-03

    Research highlights: > Nanocomposite made of multi-walled carbon nanotubes and chitosan was prepared and characterized. > The characterization confirmed the homogenous and well distribution of the MWCNTs within the chitosan matrix. > MWCNTs/chitosan nanocomposite was used for the removal of copper, zinc, cadmium and nickel ions from aqueous solution. > The results showed that nanocomposite could remove successfully most of the metal ions from solution with high efficiency. - Abstract: Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were modified with chitosan, and a homogenous nanocomposite was obtained. The morphological properties of the MWCNTs/chitosan nanocomposite were studied with scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA). The morphological results indicate the successful modification and the formation of MWCNTs/chitosan nanocomposites. The MWCNTs/chitosan nanocomposite was packed inside a glass column and used for the removal of copper, zinc, cadmium, and nickel ions from aqueous solution. The MWCNTs/chitosan nanocomposite showed a great efficiency for the removal of the target metal ions from the aqueous solution. The results suggested that this novel MWCNTs/chitosan nanocomposite could be used for different environmental applications.

  11. Controllable method for fabricating single-wall carbon nanotube tips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Y.; Iijima, S.

    2000-08-01

    Single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) were abruptly cut with a niobium substrate after a heating process in an ultrahigh vacuum transmission electron microscope. The cutting was attributed to a break of weakly bonded interface between carbon nanotubes and niobium carbide that formed as a product of a solid-phase reaction. This effect provided a controllable method for preparing well-defined SWCNT tips in future field-emission applications.

  12. Peel test of spinnable carbon nanotube webs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khandoker, Noman; Hawkins, Stephen C.; Ibrahim, Raafat; Huynh, Chi P.

    2014-06-01

    This paper presents results of peel tests with spinnable carbon nanotube webs. Peel tests were performed to study the effect of orientation angles on interface energies between nanotubes. In absence of any binding agent the interface energy represents the Van Der Waals energies between the interacting nanotubes. Therefore, the effect of the orientations on Van Der Waals energies between carbon nanotubes is obtained through the peel test. It is shown that the energy for crossed nanotubes at 90° angle is lower than the energy for parallel nanotubes at 0° angle. This experimental observation was validated by hypothetical theoretical calculations.

  13. From carbon nanotubes to carbon atomic chains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casillas García, Gilberto; Zhang, Weijia; José-Yacamán, Miguel

    2010-10-01

    Carbyne is a linear allotrope of carbon. It is formed by a linear arrangement of carbon atoms with sp-hybridization. We present a reliable and reproducible experiment to obtain these carbon atomic chains using few-layer-graphene (FLG) sheets and a HRTEM. First the FLG sheets were synthesized from worm-like exfoliated graphite and then drop-casted on a lacey-carbon copper grid. Once in the TEM, two holes are opened near each other in a FLG sheet by focusing the electron beam into a small spot. Due to the radiation, the carbon atoms rearrange themselves between the two holes and form carbon fibers. The beam is concentrated on the carbon fibers in order excite the atoms and induce a tension until multi wall carbon nanotube (MWCNT) is formed. As the radiation continues the MWCNT breaks down until there is only a single wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT). Then, when the SWCNT breaks, an atomic carbon chain is formed, lasts for several seconds under the radiation and finally breaks. This demonstrates the stability of this carbon structure.

  14. Attachment of Gold Nanoparticles to Carbon Nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xi Cheng MA; Ning LUN; Shu Lin WEN

    2005-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes were initially chemically modified with an H2SO4-HNO3 treatment,and subsequently activated with Pd-Sn catalytic nuclei via a one-step activation approach. These activated nanotubes were used as precursors for obtaining gold nanoparticles-attached nanotubes via simple electroless plating. This approach provides an efficient method for attachment of metal nanostructures to carbon nanotubes. Such novel hybrid nanostructures are attractive for many applications.

  15. Elastomer Reinforced with Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, Jared L.; Krishnamoorti, Ramanan

    2009-01-01

    Elastomers are reinforced with functionalized, single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) giving them high-breaking strain levels and low densities. Cross-linked elastomers are prepared using amine-terminated, poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS), with an average molecular weight of 5,000 daltons, and a functionalized SWNT. Cross-link densities, estimated on the basis of swelling data in toluene (a dispersing solvent) indicated that the polymer underwent cross-linking at the ends of the chains. This thermally initiated cross-linking was found to occur only in the presence of the aryl alcohol functionalized SWNTs. The cross-link could have been via a hydrogen-bonding mechanism between the amine and the free hydroxyl group, or via attack of the amine on the ester linage to form an amide. Tensile properties examined at room temperature indicate a three-fold increase in the tensile modulus of the elastomer, with rupture and failure of the elastomer occurring at a strain of 6.5.

  16. Preparation, electrochemical behavior and electrocatalytic activity of chlorogenic acid multi-wall carbon nanotubes as a hydroxylamine sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zare, Hamid R., E-mail: hrzare@yazduni.ac.ir; Nasirizadeh, Navid; Ajamain, Hamideh; Sahragard, Ali

    2011-07-20

    Electrochemical characteristics of an electrodeposited chlorogenic acid film on multi-wall carbon nanotubes glassy carbon electrode (CGA-MWCNT-GCE) and its role as a sensor for electrocatalytic oxidation of hydroxylamine are described. Cyclic voltammograms of the CGA-MWCNT-GCE indicate a pair of well-defined and nearly reversible redox couple with the surface confined characteristics at a wide pH range of 2.0-12.0. The charge transfer coefficient, {alpha}, and the charge transfer rate constant, k{sub s}, of CGA adsorbed on MWCNT were calculated 0.48 and 44 {+-} 2 s{sup -1} respectively. The CGA-MWCNT-GCE shows a dramatic increase in the peak current and/or a decrease in the overvoltage of hydroxylamine electrooxidation in comparison with that seen at a CGA modified GCE, MWCNT modified GCE and activated GCE. The kinetic parameters of electron transfer coefficient, {alpha}, the heterogeneous electron transfer rate constant, k', and exchange current, i{sub 0}, for oxidation of hydroxylamine at the modified electrode surface were determined using cyclic voltammetry. Four linear calibration ranges and high repeatability with relative standard deviation of 4.6%, for a series of four successive measurements in 17.7 {mu}M hydroxylamine, are obtained at the CGA-MWCNT-GCE using an amperometric method. Finally, the modified electrode was successfully used for determination of spiked hydroxylamine in two water samples.

  17. Improvement of toughness and electrical properties of epoxy composites with carbon nanotubes prepared by industrially relevant processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollertz, R.; Chatterjee, S.; Gutmann, H.; Geiger, T.; Nüesch, F. A.; Chu, B. T. T.

    2011-03-01

    The addition of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) to polymeric matrices or master batches has the potential to provide composites with novel properties. However, composites with a uniform dispersion of CNTs have proved to be difficult to manufacture, especially at an industrial scale. This paper reports on processing methods that overcome problems related to the control and reproducibility of dispersions. By using a high pressure homogenizer and a three-roll calendaring mill in combination, CNT reinforced epoxies were fabricated by mould casting with a well dispersed nanofiller content from 0.1 to 2 wt%. The influence of the nano-carbon reinforcements on toughness and electrical properties of the CNT/epoxies was studied. A substantial increase of all mechanical properties already appeared at the lowest CNT content of 0.1 wt%, but further raising the nanofiller concentration only led to moderate further changes. The most significant enhancement was obtained for fracture toughness, reaching up to 82%. The low percolation thresholds were confirmed by electrical conductivity measurements on the same composites yielding a threshold value of only about 0.01 wt%. As corroborated by a thorough microscopic analysis of the composites, mechanical and electrical enhancement points to the formation of an interconnected network of agglomerated CNTs.

  18. Improvement of toughness and electrical properties of epoxy composites with carbon nanotubes prepared by industrially relevant processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hollertz, R; Chatterjee, S; Geiger, T; Nueesch, F A; Chu, B T T [EMPA, Laboratory for Functional Polymers, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology (Switzerland); Gutmann, H, E-mail: bryan.chu@empa.ch [Rohner Chem AG, Gempenstrasse 6, 4133 Pratteln (Switzerland)

    2011-03-25

    The addition of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) to polymeric matrices or master batches has the potential to provide composites with novel properties. However, composites with a uniform dispersion of CNTs have proved to be difficult to manufacture, especially at an industrial scale. This paper reports on processing methods that overcome problems related to the control and reproducibility of dispersions. By using a high pressure homogenizer and a three-roll calendaring mill in combination, CNT reinforced epoxies were fabricated by mould casting with a well dispersed nanofiller content from 0.1 to 2 wt%. The influence of the nano-carbon reinforcements on toughness and electrical properties of the CNT/epoxies was studied. A substantial increase of all mechanical properties already appeared at the lowest CNT content of 0.1 wt%, but further raising the nanofiller concentration only led to moderate further changes. The most significant enhancement was obtained for fracture toughness, reaching up to 82%. The low percolation thresholds were confirmed by electrical conductivity measurements on the same composites yielding a threshold value of only about 0.01 wt%. As corroborated by a thorough microscopic analysis of the composites, mechanical and electrical enhancement points to the formation of an interconnected network of agglomerated CNTs.

  19. Spectroscopy of Optical Excitations in Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yingzhong

    2006-03-01

    Understanding the optical spectra and electronic excited state dynamics of carbon naotubes is important both for fundamental research and a wide variety of potential applications. In this presentation, we will report the results of a systematic study on semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) obtained by utilizing complementary femtosecond spectroscopic techniques, including fluorescence up-conversion, frequency-resolved transient absorption, and three-pulse photon echo peakshift (3PEPS) spectroscopy. Our efforts have focused on optically selective detection of the spectra and dynamics associated with structurally distinct semiconducting SWNT species. Using individual nanotube enriched micelle-dispersed SWNT preparations, in combination with resonant excitation and detection, has enabled us to independently access selected species, such as the (8,3), (6,5), (7,5), (11,0), (7,6) and (9,5) nanotubes. We will discuss the following topics: (1) the excitonic nature of the elementary excitation and its unambiguous identification from direct determination of the exciton binding energy for a selected semiconducting nanotube, the (8,3) tube; (2) the spectroscopic and dynamical signatures of exciton-exciton annihilation and its predominant role in governing ultrafast excited state relaxation; (3) the annihilation-concomitant exciton dissociation and the spectroscopic and dynamic features of the resulting electron-hole continuum; (4) timescales characterizing the ultrafast thermalization processes. In addition, we will demonstrate the power of 3PEPS spectroscopy to elucidate the spectral properties and dynamics of SWNTs. This work was supported by the NSF.

  20. Pulsed laser deposition of carbon nanotube and polystyrene-carbon nanotube composite thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stramel, A. A.; Gupta, M. C.; Lee, H. R.; Yu, J.; Edwards, W. C.

    2010-12-01

    In this work, we report on the fabrication of carbon nanotube thin films via pulsed laser deposition using a pulsed, diode pumped, Tm:Ho:LuLF laser with 2 μm wavelength. The thin films were deposited on silicon substrates using pure carbon nanotube targets and polystyrene-carbon nanotube composite targets. Raman spectra, scanning electron micrographs, and transmission electron micrographs show that carbon nanotubes are present in the deposited thin films, and that the pulsed laser deposition process causes minimal degradation to the quality of the nanotubes when using pure carbon nanotube targets.

  1. Carbon nanotube materials for hydrogen storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dillon, A.C.; Parilla, P.A.; Jones, K.M.; Riker, G.; Heben, M.J. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)

    1998-08-01

    Carbon single-wall nanotubes (SWNTs) are essentially elongated pores of molecular dimensions and are capable of adsorbing hydrogen at relatively high temperatures and low pressures. This behavior is unique to these materials and indicates that SWNTs are the ideal building block for constructing safe, efficient, and high energy density adsorbents for hydrogen storage applications. In past work the authors developed methods for preparing and opening SWNTs, discovered the unique adsorption properties of these new materials, confirmed that hydrogen is stabilized by physical rather than chemical interactions, measured the strength of interaction to be {approximately} 5 times higher than for adsorption on planar graphite, and performed infrared absorption spectroscopy to determine the chemical nature of the surface terminations before, during, and after oxidation. This year the authors have made significant advances in synthesis and characterization of SWNT materials so that they can now prepare gram quantities of high-purity SWNT samples and measure and control the diameter distribution of the tubes by varying key parameters during synthesis. They have also developed methods which purify nanotubes and cut nanotubes into shorter segments. These capabilities provide a means for opening the tubes which were unreactive to the oxidation methods that successfully opened tubes, and offer a path towards organizing nanotube segments to enable high volumetric hydrogen storage densities. They also performed temperature programmed desorption spectroscopy on high purity carbon nanotube material obtained from collaborator Prof. Patrick Bernier and finished construction of a high precision Seivert`s apparatus which will allow the hydrogen pressure-temperature-composition phase diagrams to be evaluated for SWNT materials.

  2. Bloch oscillations in carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jódar, Esther; Pérez-Garrido, Antonio; Rojas, Fernando

    2009-05-27

    Bloch oscillations arise when electrons are in a one-dimensional linear chain of atoms under a constant electric field. In this paper we show numerically that electrons in different types of carbon nanotubes show oscillations with a Bloch frequency proportional to the constant electric field applied along the nanotube axis. We show these oscillations, calculating the quadratic displacement as a function of the electric field. Because of the double periodicity of the nanotubes' geometry (the lattice constant and the lines of atoms) two frequencies appear, one twice the value of the other. These frequencies coincide perfectly with those predicted for a linear chain of atoms, taking into account the periodicity considered in each case.

  3. Bloch oscillations in carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jodar, Esther; Perez-Garrido, Antonio [Departamento Fisica Aplicada, Antiguo Hospital de Marina Campus Muralla del Mar, UPCT, Cartagena 30202 Murcia (Spain); Rojas, Fernando [Centro de Nanociencias y Nanotecnologia-UNAM, Apartado Postal 356, Ensenada, Baja California 22800 (Mexico)], E-mail: ejodar@upct.es

    2009-05-27

    Bloch oscillations arise when electrons are in a one-dimensional linear chain of atoms under a constant electric field. In this paper we show numerically that electrons in different types of carbon nanotubes show oscillations with a Bloch frequency proportional to the constant electric field applied along the nanotube axis. We show these oscillations, calculating the quadratic displacement as a function of the electric field. Because of the double periodicity of the nanotubes' geometry (the lattice constant and the lines of atoms) two frequencies appear, one twice the value of the other. These frequencies coincide perfectly with those predicted for a linear chain of atoms, taking into account the periodicity considered in each case. (fast track communication)

  4. Preparation and property of conductive rubber co-filled by carbon nanotubes and carbon black%碳纳米管/炭黑并用导电橡胶的制备与性能研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张玉刚; 黄英; 廉超; 葛运建

    2011-01-01

    文章基于溶液共混法,制成了一种新型的碳纳米管/炭黑/硅胶多相复合材料.实验利用TEM、压阻测试平台等手段表征和分析了碳纳米管的功能化、添加比例对复合材料性能的影响.实验结果表明:功能化可以有效改善碳纳米管的表面特性,进而改善其在聚合物中的分散性;不同维度纳米材料(碳纳米管/炭黑)的并用会在橡胶体系中形成“葡萄串”结构,远程导电网络和近程导电网络相互补充,有助于增强导电网络的稳定性,提高复合材料的电学和热学稳定性.功能化碳纳米管与炭黑的体积比为4∶21时制备的复合材料具有良好的电学和温度稳定性,压阻线性较好,可以满足柔性触觉传感器的制作需要.%Based on the method of solution blending, the carbon nanotubes/carbon black co-filled conductive rubber were prepared. The samples were characterized by TEM and piezoresistive tester, and the effects of the functionalization and filler proportion of carbon nanotubes on the properties of the composite material were investigated. The experimental results show that the functionalized carbon nanotubes have better dispersivity in polymers due to their improved surface properties. The synergy of carbon nanotubes and carbon black particles forms a grape-like structure in the rubber system and the long-distance and short-distance conductive networks can complement each other, consequently enhancing the stability of the conductive network and the electrical and thermal stability of the composite material. When the filler proportion of functionalized carbon nanotubes and carbon black is 4 ! 21, the optimal electrical and temperature stability and piezoresistive linearity of the composite material can be obtained, which satisfies the manufacturing requirements of the flexible tactile sensor.

  5. Preparation of carbon nanotubes as the conductive coating layer on flexible thermal-resistant substrate by permeating method and its residual stress analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Wen-Kai; Huang, Szu-Chun; Yu, Hsin Her

    2014-03-01

    A polyarylate (PAR) substrate was first prepared by hot pressing and then carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were coated on its surface by a low-temperature spraying method. In order to eliminate the residual stress and enhance the adhesive ability between the substrate and the coated CNT layer, an optimal thermo-permeating process is proposed. The relationship between the thickness of the permeating layer and the residual stress of coating layers was investigated. Triple-layer structure models were provided to evaluate the residual stress of coating layers. The experimental results show that if the sample was treated by the optimal thermo-permeating process, its residual stress was dramatically reduced from 1.7×103 MPa to 0.45 Pa; meanwhile, its adhesive ability was intensively enhanced from 1B to 5B according to ASTM D3359 adhesion classifications.

  6. Fluoride and lead adsorption on carbon nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Shuguang; LI Yanhui

    2004-01-01

    The properties and applications of CNT have been studied extensively since Iijima discovered them in 1991[1,2]. They have exceptional mechanical properties and unique electrical property, highly chemical stability and large specific surface area. Thus far, they have widely potential applications in many fields. They can be used as reinforcing materials in composites[3], field emissions[4], hydrogen storage[5], nanoelectronic components[6], catalyst supports[7], adsorption material and so on. However, the study on the potential application of CNT, environmental protection field in particular, was hardly begun.Long[8] et al. reported that CNT had a significantly higher dioxin removal efficiency than that of activated carbon. The Langmuir adsorption constant is 2.7 × 1052, 1.3 × 1018 respectively. The results indicated that CNT is potential candidate for the removal of micro-organic pollutants. However, the reports on the CNT used as fluoride and heavy metal adsorbent are seldom.In this paper, A novel material, alumina supported on carbon nanotubes (Al2O3/CNT), was prepared from carbon nanotubes and Al(NO3)3. X-ray diffraction (XRD) spectra demonstrate that alumina is amorphous, and scanning electron microscope (SEM) images show that CNT and alumina are homogeneously mixed. Furthermore, the fluoride adsorption behavior on the surface of Al2O3/CNT has been investigated and compared with other adsorbents. The results indicate that Al2O3/CNT has a high adsorption capacity, with a saturation adsorption capacity of 39.4 mg/g. It is also found that the adsorption capacity of Al2O3/CNT is 3.0~4.5 times that of γ-Al2O3while almost equal to that of IRA-410 polymeric resin at 25 ℃. The adsorption isotherms of fluoride on Al2O3/CNT is fit the Freundlich equation well, optimal pH ranging from 5.0 to 9.0.Also in this paper, a novel material, modified carbon nanotubes (CNT), was prepared from carbon nanotubes and HNO3 under boiling condition. Infrared spectroscopy (IR

  7. Facile preparation of disposable immunosensor for Shigella flexneri based on multi-wall carbon nanotubes/chitosan composite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao Guangying, E-mail: zhaogy-user@163.co [Food Safety Key Lab of Zhejiang Province, Department of Food Quality and Safety, Zhejiang Gongshang University, 149, Jiaogong Road, Hangzhou 310035, Zhejiang Province (China); Zhan Xuejia [Food Safety Key Lab of Zhejiang Province, Department of Food Quality and Safety, Zhejiang Gongshang University, 149, Jiaogong Road, Hangzhou 310035, Zhejiang Province (China)

    2010-02-28

    Based on multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNT)/chitosan/horseradish peroxidase labeled antibodies to Shigella flexneri (HRP-anti-S. flexneri) biocomposite film on a screen-printed electrode (SPE) surface, a disposable immunosensor has been developed for the rapid detection of S. flexneri. The HRP-anti-S. flexneri can be entrapped into MWCNT/chitosan composite matrix without other cross-linking agent. Thionine and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} were used as the mediator and substrate, respectively. The surface morphologies of modified films were characterized by atomic force microscope (AFM). Cyclic voltammery (CV) was carried out to characterize the electrochemical properties of the immobilization of materials on the electrode surface and quantified S. flexneri. Due to the strong electrocatalytic properties of MWCNT and HRP toward H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, the response signal was significantly amplified. S. flexneri could be detected by the decrease of the reduction peak current before and after immunoreaction. Under optimal conditions, S. flexneri could be detected in the range of 10{sup 4} to 10{sup 10} cfu mL{sup -1}, with a detection limit of 2.3 x 10{sup 3} cfu mL{sup -1} (S/N = 3). Furthermore, the proposed immunosensor exhibited a satisfactory specificity, reproducibility, stability and accuracy, indicating that the proposed immunosensor has potential application for a facile, rapid and harmless immunoassay.

  8. Pressure-Induced Interlinking of Carbon Nanotubes

    OpenAIRE

    Yildirim, T.; Gulseren, O.; Kilic, C.; Ciraci, S.

    2000-01-01

    We predict new forms of carbon consisting of one and two dimensional networks of interlinked single wall carbon nanotubes, some of which are energetically more stable than van der Waals packing of the nanotubes on a hexagonal lattice. These interlinked nanotubes are further transformed with higher applied external pressures to more dense and complicated stable structures, in which curvature-induced carbon sp$^{3}$ re-hybridizations are formed. We also discuss the energetics of the bond format...

  9. Different Technical Applications of Carbon Nanotubes

    OpenAIRE

    Abdalla, S; Al-Marzouki, F.; Ahmed A. Al-Ghamdi; Abdel-Daiem, A.

    2015-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes have been of great interest because of their simplicity and ease of synthesis. The novel properties of nanostructured carbon nanotubes such as high surface area, good stiffness, and resilience have been explored in many engineering applications. Research on carbon nanotubes have shown the application in the field of energy storage, hydrogen storage, electrochemical supercapacitor, field-emitting devices, transistors, nanoprobes and sensors, composite material, templates, etc....

  10. Faster and Smaller with Carbon Nanotubes?

    OpenAIRE

    Seidel, Robert V.; Graham, Andrew P.; Duesberg, Georg S.; Liebau, Maik; Unger, Eugen; Kreupl, Franz; Hoenlein, Wolfgang

    2004-01-01

    Carbon Nanotubes seem to be one of the most promising candidates for nanoelectronic devices beyond presumable scaling limits of silicon and compound semiconductors and independent from lithographic limitations. Discovered only about a decade ago, there has been a tremendous advance in the field of carbon nanotubes. Their exciting properties, especially with respect to electronic applications, and their fabrication methods will be discussed. A variety of Carbon Nanotube...

  11. Carbon nanoparticle-modified multi-wall carbon nanotubes with fast adsorption kinetics for water treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guan; Ren, Wei; Tan, Hui Ru; Liu, Ye

    2017-02-01

    Carbon nanoparticle-modified multi-wall carbon nanotubes were prepared using a dehydration of carbohydrate compound method. The structural change was characterized by transmission electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and Brunauer, Emmett and Teller measurement. Fast adsorption kinetics was observed for multi-wall carbon nanotubes with modification, as demonstrated by the adsorption of the model compound methylene blue. This work provides a novel facile engineering strategy to equip multi-wall carbon nanotubes with fast adsorption kinetics, which is promising for efficient water purification.

  12. Carbon Nanotubes and Related Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kingsuk Mukhopadhyay

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanotubes have attracted the fancy of many scientists world wide. The small dimensions,strength, and the remarkable physical properties of these structures make them a unique material with a whole range of promising applications. In this review, the structural aspects, the advantages and disadvantages of different for their procedures synthesis, the qualitative and quantitative estimation of carbon nanotubes by different analytical techniques, the present status on their applications as well as the current challenges faced in the application field, national, in particular DRDO, DMSRDE status, and interest in this field, have been discussed.Defence Science Journal, 2008, 58(4, pp.437-450, DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.14429/dsj.58.1666

  13. Ballistic Fracturing of Carbon Nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozden, Sehmus; Machado, Leonardo D; Tiwary, ChandraSekhar; Autreto, Pedro A S; Vajtai, Robert; Barrera, Enrique V; Galvao, Douglas S; Ajayan, Pulickel M

    2016-09-21

    Advanced materials with multifunctional capabilities and high resistance to hypervelocity impact are of great interest to the designers of aerospace structures. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with their lightweight and high strength properties are alternative to metals and/or metallic alloys conventionally used in aerospace applications. Here we report a detailed study on the ballistic fracturing of CNTs for different velocity ranges. Our results show that the highly energetic impacts cause bond breakage and carbon atom rehybridizations, and sometimes extensive structural reconstructions were also observed. Experimental observations show the formation of nanoribbons, nanodiamonds, and covalently interconnected nanostructures, depending on impact conditions. Fully atomistic reactive molecular dynamics simulations were also carried out in order to gain further insights into the mechanism behind the transformation of CNTs. The simulations show that the velocity and relative orientation of the multiple colliding nanotubes are critical to determine the impact outcome.

  14. Carbon Nanotubes: Molecular Electronic Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Deepak; Saini, Subhash; Menon, Madhu

    1997-01-01

    The carbon Nanotube junctions have recently emerged as excellent candidates for use as the building blocks in the formation of nanoscale molecular electronic networks. While the simple joint of two dissimilar tubes can be generated by the introduction of a pair of heptagon-pentagon defects in an otherwise perfect hexagonal graphene sheet, more complex joints require other mechanisms. In this work we explore structural characteristics of complex 3-point junctions of carbon nanotubes using a generalized tight-binding molecular-dynamics scheme. The study of pi-electron local densities of states (LDOS) of these junctions reveal many interesting features, most prominent among them being the defect-induced states in the gap.

  15. Torsional Carbon Nanotube Artificial Muscles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foroughi, Javad; Spinks, Geoffrey M.; Wallace, Gordon G.; Oh, Jiyoung; Kozlov, Mikhail E.; Fang, Shaoli; Mirfakhrai, Tissaphern; Madden, John D. W.; Shin, Min Kyoon; Kim, Seon Jeong; Baughman, Ray H.

    2011-10-01

    Rotary motors of conventional design can be rather complex and are therefore difficult to miniaturize; previous carbon nanotube artificial muscles provide contraction and bending, but not rotation. We show that an electrolyte-filled twist-spun carbon nanotube yarn, much thinner than a human hair, functions as a torsional artificial muscle in a simple three-electrode electrochemical system, providing a reversible 15,000° rotation and 590 revolutions per minute. A hydrostatic actuation mechanism, as seen in muscular hydrostats in nature, explains the simultaneous occurrence of lengthwise contraction and torsional rotation during the yarn volume increase caused by electrochemical double-layer charge injection. The use of a torsional yarn muscle as a mixer for a fluidic chip is demonstrated.

  16. Carbon nanotubes in tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosi, Susanna; Ballerini, Laura; Prato, Maurizio

    2014-01-01

    As a result of their peculiar features, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are emerging in many areas of nanotechnology applications. CNT-based technology has been increasingly proposed for biomedical applications, to develop biomolecule nanocarriers, bionanosensors and smart material for tissue engineering purposes. In the following chapter this latter application will be explored, describing why CNTs can be considered an ideal material able to support and boost the growth and the proliferation of many kinds of tissues.

  17. A Thermal Model for Carbon Nanotube Interconnects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohsin, Kaji Muhammad; Srivastava, Ashok; Sharma, Ashwani K.; Mayberry, Clay

    2013-01-01

    In this work, we have studied Joule heating in carbon nanotube based very large scale integration (VLSI) interconnects and incorporated Joule heating influenced scattering in our previously developed current transport model. The theoretical model explains breakdown in carbon nanotube resistance which limits the current density. We have also studied scattering parameters of carbon nanotube (CNT) interconnects and compared with the earlier work. For 1 µm length single-wall carbon nanotube, 3 dB frequency in S12 parameter reduces to ~120 GHz from 1 THz considering Joule heating. It has been found that bias voltage has little effect on scattering parameters, while length has very strong effect on scattering parameters.

  18. OPPORTUNITIES OF BIOMEDICAL USE OF CARBON NANOTUBES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. V. Mitrofanova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanomaterials  –  materials,  whouse  structure  elements  has  proportions  doesn’t  exceed  100  nm.  In superdispersed state matter acquire new properties. In the last decade, carbon nanotubes become the most popular nanomaterials, that cause attention of representatives of various scientific field. The сarbon nanotubes offer new opportunities for biological and medical applications: imaging at the molecular, cellular and tissue levels, biosensors and electrodes based on carbon nanotubes, target delivery of various substances, radiation and photothermal therapy. The most promising of carbon nanotubes in the context of biomedical applications is their ability to penetrate the various tissues of the body and carry large doses of agents, providing diagnostic and therapeutic effects. Functionalized nanotubes are biodegradable. Other current direction of using carbon nanotubes in medicine and biology is to visualize objects on the molecular, cellular and tissue level. Associated with carbon nanotubes contrasting substances improve the visualization of cells and tissues, which can detected new patterns of development of the pathological process. Due to the vagueness of the question of biocompatibility and cytotoxicity of carbon nanotubes possibility of their practical application is hampered. Before the introduction of carbon nanotubes into practical health care is necessary to provide all the possible consequences of using nanotubes. High rates of properties and development of new nanostructures based on carbon nanotubes in the near future will lead to new advances related to the application and development of new parameters that will determine their properties and effects. In these review attention is paid to the structure, physico-chemical properties of nanotubes, their functionalization, pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics and all aspects of using of carbon nanotubes.

  19. Liquid surface model for carbon nanotube energetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solov'yov, Ilia; Mathew, Maneesh; Solov'yov, Andrey V.;

    2008-01-01

    an important insight in the energetics and stability of nanotubes of different chirality and might be important for the understanding of nanotube growth process. For the computations we use empirical Brenner and Tersoff potentials and discuss their applicability to the study of carbon nanotubes. From......In the present paper we developed a model for calculating the energy of single-wall carbon nanotubes of arbitrary chirality. This model, which we call as the liquid surface model, predicts the energy of a nanotube with relative error less than 1% once its chirality and the total number of atoms...... are known. The parameters of the liquid surface model and its potential applications are discussed. The model has been suggested for open end and capped nanotubes. The influence of the catalytic nanoparticle, atop which nanotubes grow, on the nanotube stability is also discussed. The suggested model gives...

  20. Use of alkali metal salts to prepare high purity single-walled carbon nanotube solutions and thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashour, Rakan F.

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) display interesting electronic and optical properties desired for many advanced thin film applications, such as transparent conductive electrodes or thin-film transistors. Large-scale production of SWCNTs generally results in polydispersed mixtures of nanotube structures. Since SWCNT electronic character (conducting or semiconducting nature) depends on the nanotube structure, application performance is being held back by this inability to discretely control SWCNT synthesis. Although a number of post-production techniques are able to separate SWCNTs based on electronic character, diameter, or chirality, most still suffer from the disadvantage of high costs of materials, equipment, or labor intensity to be relevant for large-scale production. On the other hand, chromatographic separation has emerged as a method that is compatible with large scale separation of metallic and semiconducting SWCNTs. In this work, SWCNTs, in an aqueous surfactant suspension of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), are separated by their electronic character using a gel chromatography process. Metallic SWCNTs (m-SWCNTs) are collected as initial fractions since they show minimum interaction with the gel medium, whereas, semiconducting SWCNTs (sc- SWCNTs) remain adsorbed to the gel. The process of sc-SWCNT retention in the gel is found to be driven by the packing density of SDS around the SWCNTs. Through a series of separation experiments, it is shown that sc-SWCNTs can be eluted from the gel simply by disturbing the configuration of the SDS/SWCNT micellar structure. This is achieved by either introducing a solution containing a co-surfactant, such as sodium cholate (SC), or solutions of alkali metal ionic salts. Analysis of SWCNT suspensions by optical absorption provides insights into the effect of changing the metal ion (M+ = Li+, Na+, and K+) in the eluting solution. Salts with smaller metal ions (e.g. Li+) require higher concentrations to achieve

  1. One-step preparation of carbon nanotubes doped mesoporous birnessite K2Mn4O9 achieving 77% of theoretical capacitance by a facile redox reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Litao; Li, Peiyang; Tao, Keyu; Wang, Xiaomin; Liang, Wei; Gao, Yanfeng

    2016-01-01

    A facile, scalable and cost-efficient redox reaction is developed to prepare micro-powders of a quasi-crystallised, mesoporous birnessite-type manganese oxide, K2Mn4O9. In 1 M KOH electrolyte, the K2Mn4O9 powder shows a high specific capacitance of 754 F g-1 at 1 A g-1 (calculated with the net weight of K2Mn4O9 micro-powder only). Meanwhile, the electrode retains 91% of its initial capacitance after 5000 cycles at a high current density of 5 A g-1. By simply adding carbon nanotubes (CNTs) into the reaction system, the specific capacitances of as-prepared K2Mn4O9/CNTs composites are further increased to 929 and 1055 F g-1 at 1 A g-1 in 1 and 6 M KOH electrolyte (corresponding to 69 and 77% of the theoretical capacitance of MnO2), or 600 and 674 F g-1 at 5 A g-1, respectively. Significantly, a maximum energy density of 62 Wh kg-1 at a power density of 852 W kg-1 could be achieved based on a K2Mn4O9/CNTs//activated carbon asymmetric supercapacitor (ASC). At the same time, the ASC device exhibits a decent long cycle life with 85% specific capacitance retained after 1000 cycles, suggesting its wide application potential in low-cost high energy density storage systems.

  2. Synthesis of carbon nanotubes by catalytic pyrolysis method with Feitknecht compound as precursor of NiZnAl catalyst

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan Xiaoqi; Liu Quanrun; Zhang Songlin; Zhang Kun; Chen Jiuling; Li Yongdan

    2004-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes are synthesized by catalytic pyrolysis method with a kind of new type catalyst--nickel-zinc-alumina catalyst prepared from Feitknecht compound. Tubular carbon nanotubes, bamboo-shaped carbon naotubes, herringbone carbon nanotubues and branched carbon nanotubes are all found formed at moderate temperature. It is important for the formation of quasi-liquid state of the metal nanoparticles at the tip of carbon naotubes during the growth of carbon nanotubes to lead to different kinds of carbon nanotubes. It is likely that the addition of zinc make the activity of nickel catalyst after calcinations and reduction changed strangely.

  3. Poly(ethylene-co-butylene) functionalized multi walled carbon nanotubes applied in polypropylene nanocomposites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Daugaard, Anders Egede; Jankova Atanasova, Katja; Marín, Jose Manuel Roman;

    2012-01-01

    A novel functionalized multi walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) was prepared through grafting with α-azido-poly(ethylene-co-butylene) (PEB-N3). The PEB-N3 was prepared through a two step procedure and grafted onto an industrial grade multi walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) through a highly efficient nit...

  4. LDRD final report on carbon nanotube composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cahill, P.A.; Rand, P.B.

    1997-04-01

    Carbon nanotubes and their composites were examined using computational and experimental techniques in order to modify the mechanical and electrical properties of resins. Single walled nanotubes were the focus of the first year effort; however, sufficient quantities of high purity single walled nanotubes could not be obtained for mechanical property investigations. The unusually high electrical conductivity of composites loaded with <1% of multiwalled nanotubes is useful, and is the focus of continuing, externally funded, research.

  5. Carbon nanotube growth by PECVD: a review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyyappan, M; Delzeit, Lance; Cassell, Alan; Hash, David [NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States)

    2003-05-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs), due to their unique electronic and extraordinary mechanical properties, have been receiving much attention for a wide variety of applications. Recently, plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD) has emerged as a key growth technique to produce vertically-aligned nanotubes. This paper reviews various plasma sources currently used in CNT growth, catalyst preparation and growth results. Since the technology is in its early stages, there is a general lack of understanding of growth mechanisms, the role of the plasma itself, and the identity of key species responsible for growth. This review is aimed at the low temperature plasma research community that has successfully addressed such issues, through plasma and surface diagnostics and modelling, in semiconductor processing and diamond thin film growth.

  6. Engineering carbon nanotubes and nanotube circuits using electrical breakdown.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, P G; Arnold, M S; Avouris, P

    2001-04-27

    Carbon nanotubes display either metallic or semiconducting properties. Both large, multiwalled nanotubes (MWNTs), with many concentric carbon shells, and bundles or "ropes" of aligned single-walled nanotubes (SWNTs), are complex composite conductors that incorporate many weakly coupled nanotubes that each have a different electronic structure. Here we demonstrate a simple and reliable method for selectively removing single carbon shells from MWNTs and SWNT ropes to tailor the properties of these composite nanotubes. We can remove shells of MWNTs stepwise and individually characterize the different shells. By choosing among the shells, we can convert a MWNT into either a metallic or a semiconducting conductor, as well as directly address the issue of multiple-shell transport. With SWNT ropes, similar selectivity allows us to generate entire arrays of nanoscale field-effect transistors based solely on the fraction of semiconducting SWNTs.

  7. Preparation of solid-phase microextraction fiber coated with single-walled carbon nanotubes by electrophoretic deposition and its application in extracting phenols from aqueous samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Quanlong; Wang, Xuefeng; Yuan, Dongxing

    2009-02-27

    A novel solid-phase microextraction (SPME) Pt fiber coated with single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) was prepared by electrophoretic deposition (EPD) and applied to the determination of phenols in aqueous samples by direct immersion (DI)-SPME-HPLC-UV. The results revealed that EPD was a simple and reproducible technique for the preparation of SPME fibers coated with SWCNTs without the use of adhesive. The obtained SWCNT coating did not swell in organic solvents nor strip off from substrate, and possessed high mechanical strength due to the strong Van der Waals attractions between the surfaces of the SWCNTs. The prepared SPME fiber was conductive since both SWCNT coating and Pt wire were conductive. Using Pt wire as substrate, the fiber was unbreakable. Owing to the presence of oxygenated groups on SWCNTs and the high surface area of SWCNTs, the SWCNT fiber was similar to or superior to commercial PA fiber in extracting the studied phenols from aqueous sample. A durability of more than 80 analyses was achieved for one unique fiber. Under optimized conditions, the detection limits for the phenols varied between 0.9 and 3.8 ng/mL, the precisions were in the range of 0.7-3.2% (n=3), and linear ranges were within 10 and 300 ng/mL. The method was successfully applied to the analysis of spiked seawater and tap water samples with the recoveries from 87.5 to 102.0%.

  8. High pressure organic colloid method for the preparation of high performance carbon nanotube-supported Pt and PtRu catalysts for fuel cell applications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG; KateNing; Viola; BIRSS

    2010-01-01

    Highly dispersed,high performance Pt and PtRu catalysts,supported on multiwalled carbon nanotubes(CNTs),were prepared by a high pressure organic colloid method.The particle sizes of the active components were as small as 1.2 nm for Pt and 1.1 nm for PtRu,and the active Pt surface areas were 295 and 395 m2/g,respectively.The catalysts showed very high activities toward the anodic oxidation of methanol,evaluated by cyclic voltammetry,being up to 4 times higher than that of commercial Johnson Matthey Hispec 2000 Pt/XC-72R and 5 times better than Hispec 5000 PtRu/XC-72R catalysts.In a full air/hydrogen fuel cell,a membrane-electrode assembly prepared using our Pt/CNT and PtRu/CNT catalysts showed 50% and 100% higher performances than those prepared with commercial Johnson Matthey Pt/XC-72R and PtRu/XC-72R catalysts for the same Pt loading and operating conditions.

  9. 碳纳米管/磺化聚苯胺复合材料的制备%Preparation of Carbon Nanotube/Sulphonated Polyaniline Composite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李嘉博; 胡晓东; 李光磊; 张辉

    2011-01-01

    采用原位聚合法制备了碳纳米管/聚苯胺复合材料,然后通过氯磺化及水解处理得到碳纳米管/磺化聚苯胺复合材料,产物在水中具有较好的分散稳定性,为两者的应用开辟了新领域.采用红外光谱(FT-IR),扫描电镜(SEM)对产物进行分析,结果表明,碳纳米管和苯胺质量比为4:1时,聚苯胺在碳纳米管表面的包覆效果最好.碳纳米管与聚苯胺及磺化聚苯胺之间存在一定的界面作用.%The multi-walled carbon nanotubes /polyaniline (MWNT/PANI) composite were prepared by in situ polymerization of aniline. Then the multi-walled carbon nanotube/sulphonated polyaniline (MWNT/SPAN) were gained by sulfonation of MWNT/PANI with chlorosulfonic acid in an inert solvent and by hydrolysis in water.Fourier transfer spectrum (FTIR) and scanning electronic microscopy (SEM) were used to characterize morphology and chemical structure of the gained product. The results show that when the mass ratio of CNTs and aniline reaches to 4: 1, the best polyaniline-coated product can be gained. Furthermore, it is found that there is some interaction between PANI or SPAN and MWNTs.

  10. Plasticity and Kinky Chemistry of Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Deepak; Dzegilenko, Fedor

    2000-01-01

    Since their discovery in 1991, carbon nanotubes have been the subject of intense research interest based on early predictions of their unique mechanical, electronic, and chemical properties. Materials with the predicted unique properties of carbon nanotubes are of great interest for use in future generations of aerospace vehicles. For their structural properties, carbon nanotubes could be used as reinforcing fibers in ultralight multifunctional composites. For their electronic properties, carbon nanotubes offer the potential of very high-speed, low-power computing elements, high-density data storage, and unique sensors. In a continuing effort to model and predict the properties of carbon nanotubes, Ames accomplished three significant results during FY99. First, accurate values of the nanomechanics and plasticity of carbon nanotubes based on quantum molecular dynamics simulations were computed. Second, the concept of mechanical deformation catalyzed-kinky-chemistry as a means to control local chemistry of nanotubes was discovered. Third, the ease of nano-indentation of silicon surfaces with carbon nanotubes was established. The elastic response and plastic failure mechanisms of single-wall nanotubes were investigated by means of quantum molecular dynamics simulations.

  11. Dielectrophoretic assembly of carbon nanotube devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dimaki, Maria

    The purpose of this project has been to assemble single-walled carbon nanotubes on electrodes at the tip of a biocompatible cantilever and use these for chemical species sensing in air and liquid, for example in order to measure the local activity from ion channels in the cell membrane....... The electrical resistance of carbon nanotubes has been shown to be extremely sensitive to gas molecules. Dielectrophoresis is a method capable of quickly attracting nanotubes on microelectrodes by using an electric field, thus enabling nanotube integration in microsystems. Dielectrophoresis offers also...... the potential of distinguishing between nanotubes of different electrical properties, which is very important for the optimisation of the properties of the carbon nanotube sensors. Various cantilever and planar structures were designed, fabricated and tested both with multi-walled and single-walled carbon...

  12. Sorting carbon nanotubes for electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martel, Richard

    2008-11-25

    Because of their unique structure and composition, single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are at the interface between molecules and crystalline solids. They also present properties that are ideal for making lightweight, inexpensive, and flexible electronics. The raw material is composed of a heterogeneous mixture of SWNTs that differ in helicity and diameter and, therefore, requires purification and separation. In a series of groundbreaking experiments, a robust process serving this purpose was developed based on SWNTs encapsulated in surfactants and water. Ultracentrifugation in a density gradient combined with surfactant mixtures provided buoyant density differences, enabling enrichment for both diameter and electronic properties. A new paper in this issue explores further the process through the hydrodynamic properties of SWNT-surfactant complexes. The study reveals that we have just begun to uncover the dynamics and properties of nanotube-surfactant interactions and highlights the potential that could be gained from a better understanding of their chemistry. The time scale of integration of carbon nanotubes into electronics applications remains unclear, but the recent developments in sorting out SWNTs paves the way for improving on the properties of network-based SWNTs.

  13. Carbon nanotube and conducting polymer composites for supercapacitors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chuang Peng; Shengwen Zhang; Daniel Jewell; George Z. Chen

    2008-01-01

    Composites of carbon nanotubes and conducting polymers can be prepared via chemical synthesis, electrochemical deposition on pre-formed carbon nanotube electrodes, or by electrochemical co-deposition. The composites combine the large pseudocapacitance of the conducting polymers with the fast charging/discharging double-layer capacitance and excellent mechanical properties of the carbon nanotubes. The electrochemically co-deposited composites are the most homogeneous and show an unusual interaction between thepolymer and nanotubes, giving rise to a strengthened electron delocalisation and conjugation along the polymer chains. As a result they exhibit excellent electrochemical charge storage properties and fast charge/discharge switching, making them promising electrode mate-rials for high power supercapacitors.

  14. Study of Carbon Nanotube-Substrate Interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaqueline S. Soares

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Environmental effects are very important in nanoscience and nanotechnology. This work reviews the importance of the substrate in single-wall carbon nanotube properties. Contact with a substrate can modify the nanotube properties, and such interactions have been broadly studied as either a negative aspect or a solution for developing carbon nanotube-based nanotechnologies. This paper discusses both theoretical and experimental studies where the interaction between the carbon nanotubes and the substrate affects the structural, electronic, and vibrational properties of the tubes.

  15. CARBON NANOTUBES: PROPERTIES AND APPLICATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, John, E.

    2009-07-24

    Carbon nanotubes were discovered in 1991 as a minority byproduct of fullerene synthesis. Remarkable progress has been made in the ensuing years, including the discovery of two basic types of nanotubes (single-wall and multi-wall), great strides in synthesis and purification, elucidation of many fundamental physical properties, and important steps towards practical applications. Both the underlying science and technological potential of SWNT can profitably be studied at the scale of individual tubes and on macroscopic assemblies such as fibers. Experiments on single tubes directly reveal many of the predicted quantum confinement and mechanical properties. Semiconductor nanowires have many features in common with nanotubes, and many of the same fundamental and practical issues are in play – quantum confinement and its effect on properties; possible device structures and circuit architectures; thermal management; optimal synthesis, defect morphology and control, etc. In 2000 we began a small effort in this direction, conducted entirely by undergraduates with minimal consumables support from this grant. With DOE-BES approval, this grew into a project in parallel with the carbon nanotube work, in which we studied of inorganic semiconductor nanowire growth, characterization and novel strategies for electronic and electromechanical device fabrication. From the beginnings of research on carbon nanotubes, one of the major applications envisioned was hydrogen storage for fuel-cell powered cars and trucks. Subsequent theoretical models gave mixed results, the most pessimistic indicating that the fundamental H2-SWNT interaction was similar to flat graphite (physisorption) with only modest binding energies implying cryogenic operation at best. New material families with encouraging measured properties have emerged, and materials modeling has gained enormously in predictive power, sophistication, and the ability to treat a realistically representative number of atoms. One of

  16. Amorphous Carbon-Boron Nitride Nanotube Hybrids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae Woo (Inventor); Siochi, Emilie J. (Inventor); Wise, Kristopher E. (Inventor); Lin, Yi (Inventor); Connell, John (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A method for joining or repairing boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs). In joining BNNTs, the nanotube structure is modified with amorphous carbon deposited by controlled electron beam irradiation to form well bonded hybrid a-C/BNNT structures. In repairing BNNTs, the damaged site of the nanotube structure is modified with amorphous carbon deposited by controlled electron beam irradiation to form well bonded hybrid a-C/BNNT structures at the damage site.

  17. A Tunable Carbon Nanotube Oscillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sazonova, Vera

    2005-03-01

    Nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS) hold promise for a number of scientific and technological applications. Carbon nanotubes (NT) are perhaps the ultimate material for realizing a NEMS device as they are the stiffest material known, have low density, ultrasmall cross sections and can be defect-free. Equally important, a nanotube can act as a transistor and thus is able to sense its own motion. Here, we report the electrical actuation and detection of the guitar-string oscillation modes of doubly-clamped NT oscillators. We observed resonance frequencies in the 5MHz to 150MHz range with quality factors in the 50 to 100 range. We showed that the resonance frequencies can be widely tuned by a gate voltage. We also report on the temperature dependence of the quality factor and present a discussion of possible loss mechanisms.

  18. Mechanics of filled carbon nanotubes

    KAUST Repository

    Monteiro, A.O.

    2014-04-01

    The benefits of filling carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with assorted molecular and crystalline substances have been investigated for the past two decades. Amongst the study of new structural phases, defects, chemical reactions and varied types of host-guest interactions, there is one fundamental characterisation aspect of these systems that continues to be overlooked: the mechanical behaviour of filled CNTs. In contrast to their empty counterparts, the mechanics of filled CNTs is a subject where reports appear far and apart, this despite being key to the application of these materials in technological devices. In the following paragraphs, we review the work that has been carried out up to the present on the mechanics of filled CNTs. The studies discussed range from experimental resonant frequency essays performed within electron microscopes to modelling, via molecular dynamics, of three-point bending of nanotubes filled with gases. (C) 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Improved Composites Using Crosslinked, Surface-Modified Carbon Nanotube Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, James Stewart

    2014-01-01

    Individual carbon nanotubes (CNTs) exhibit exceptional tensile strength and stiffness; however, these properties have not translated well to the macroscopic scale. Premature failure of bulk CNT materials under tensile loading occurs due to the relatively weak frictional forces between adjacent CNTs, leading to poor load transfer through the material. When used in polymer matrix composites (PMCs), the weak nanotube-matrix interaction leads to the CNTs providing less than optimal reinforcement.Our group is examining the use of covalent crosslinking and surface modification as a means to improve the tensile properties of PMCs containing carbon nanotubes. Sheet material comprised of unaligned multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) was used as a drop-in replacement for carbon fiber in the composites. A variety of post-processing methods have been examined for covalently crosslinking the CNTs to overcome the weak inter-nanotube shear interactions, resulting in improved tensile strength and modulus for the bulk sheet material. Residual functional groups from the crosslinking chemistry may have the added benefit of improving the nanotube-matrix interaction. Composites prepared using these crosslinked, surface-modified nanotube sheet materials exhibit superior tensile properties to composites using the as received CNT sheet material.

  20. Hydrogen Storage in Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Joseph; Gilbert, Matthew; Naab, Fabian; Savage, Lauren; Holland, Wayne; Duggan, Jerome; McDaniel, Floyd

    2004-10-01

    Hydrogen as a fuel source is an attractive, relatively clean alternative to fossil fuels. However, a major limitation in its use for the application of automobiles has been the requirement for an efficient hydrogen storage medium. Current hydrogen storage systems are: physical storage in high pressure tanks, metal hydride, and gas-on-solid absorption. However, these methods do not fulfill the Department of Energy's targeted requirements for a usable hydrogen storage capacity of 6.5 wt.%, operation near ambient temperature and pressure, quick extraction and refueling, reliability and reusability.Reports showing high capacity hydrogen storage in single-walled carbon nanotubes originally prompted great excitement in the field, but further research has shown conflicting results. Results for carbon nanostructures have ranged from less than 1 wt.% to 70 wt.%. The wide range of adsorption found in previous experiments results from the difficulty in measuring hydrogen in objects just nanometers in size. Most previous experiments relied on weight analysis and residual gas analysis to determine the amount of hydrogen being adsorbed by the CNTs. These differing results encouraged us to perform our own analysis on single-walled (SWNTs), double-walled (DWNTs), and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs), as well as carbon fiber. We chose to utilize direct measurement of hydrogen in the materials using elastic recoil detection analysis (ERDA). This work was supported by the National Science Foundation's Research Experience for Undergraduates and the University of North Texas.

  1. Glucose oxidase immobilization onto carbon nanotube networking

    CERN Document Server

    Karachevtsev, V A; Zarudnev, E S; Karachevtsev, M V; Leontiev, V S; Linnik, A S; Lytvyn, O S; Plokhotnichenko, A M; Stepanian, S G

    2012-01-01

    When elaborating the biosensor based on single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs), it is necessary to solve such an important problem as the immobilization of a target biomolecule on the nanotube surface. In this work, the enzyme (glucose oxidase (GOX)) was immobilized on the surface of a nanotube network, which was created by the deposition of nanotubes from their solution in 1,2-dichlorobenzene by the spray method. 1-Pyrenebutanoic acid succinimide ester (PSE) was used to form the molecular interface, the bifunctional molecule of which provides the covalent binding with the enzyme shell, and its other part (pyrene) is adsorbed onto the nanotube surface. First, the usage of such a molecular interface leaves out the direct adsorption of the enzyme (in this case, its activity decreases) onto the nanotube surface, and, second, it ensures the enzyme localization near the nanotube. The comparison of the resonance Raman (RR) spectrum of pristine nanotubes with their spectrum in the PSE environment evidences the creat...

  2. Polymer Self-assembly on Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giulianini, Michele; Motta, Nunzio

    This chapter analyses the poly(3-hexylthiophene) self-assembly on carbon nanotubes and the interaction between the two materials forming a new hybrid nanostructure. The chapter starts with a review of the several studies investigating polymers and biomolecules self-assembled on nanotubes. Then conducting polymers and polythiophenes are briefly introduced. Accordingly, carbon nanotube structure and properties are reported in Sect. 3. The experimental section starts with the bulk characterisation of polymer thin films with the inclusion of uniformly distributed carbon nanotubes. By using volume film analysis techniques (AFM, TEM, UV-Vis and Raman), we show how the polymer's higher degree of order is a direct consequence of interaction with carbon nanotubes. Nevertheless, it is through the use of nanoscale analysis and molecular dynamic simulations that the self-assembly of the polymer on the nanotube surface can be clearly evidenced and characterised. In Sect. 6, the effect of the carbon templating structure on the P3HT organisation on the surface is investigated, showing the chirality-driven polymer assembly on the carbon nanotube surface. The interaction between P3HT and CNTs brings also to charge transfer, with the modification of physical properties for both species. In particular, the alteration of the polymer electronic properties and the modification of the nanotube mechanical structure are a direct consequence of the P3HT π-π stacking on the nanotube surface. Finally, some considerations based on molecular dynamics studies are reported in order to confirm and support the experimental results discussed.

  3. Suspended carbon nanotubes coupled to superconducting circuits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schneider, B.H.

    2014-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes are unique candidates to study quantum mechanical properties of a nanomechanical resonator. However to access this quantum regime, present detectors are not yet sensitive enough. In this thesis we couple a carbon nanotube CNT mechanical resonator to a superconducting circuit which i

  4. Carbon Nanotubes – Interactions with Biological Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Reis, Joana; Capela-Silva, Fernando; Potes, José; Fonseca, Alexandra; Oliveira, Mónica; Kanagaraj, Subramani; Marques, António Torres

    2011-01-01

    his book chapter discusses the prospective biomedical applications of carbon nanotubes based materials, the impact of carbon nanotubes properties in the interaction with biological systems. Protein adsorption, impact on cell viability and cytokine production are explored. Potential respiratory and dermal toxicity are reviewed, as the difficulties on studying the biological response. In face of recent studies, special attention is drawn upon promising orthopaedic use.

  5. Multiscale Simulations of Carbon Nanotubes and Liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koumoutsakos, Petros

    2005-11-01

    We present molecular dynamics and hybrid continuum/atomistic simulations of carbon nanotubes in liquid environments with an emphasis on aqueous solutions. We emphasize computational issues such as interaction potentials and coupling techniques and their influence on the simulated physics. We present results from simulations of water flows inside and outside doped and pure carbon nanotubes and discuss their implications for experimental studies.

  6. A Study on the Effects of Carrier Gases on the Structure and Morphology of Carbon Nanotubes Prepared by Pyrolysis of Ferrocene and C2H2 Mixture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wanliang Mi; Jerry Yuesheng Lin; Qian Mao; Yongdan Li; Baoquan Zhang

    2005-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were prepared using different carrier gases,with ferrocene as the catalyst precusor and acetylene as the carbon source. The effects of ammonia and nitrogen as carrier gases on the structure and morphology of CNTs were investigated. Transmission electron microscope (TEM),high-resolution electron microscope (HRTEM),scanning electron microscope (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) were employed to characterize the products and the catalyst. Experiment results show that the CNTs grown in N2 gas exhibited cylindrical and tubular structure,while a bamboo-like structure was observed for the CNTs grown in NH3 gas. Moreover,vertically aligned CNTs were obtained on an Al2O3 disk when NH3 was used as the carrier gas. The carrier gas also exerted influence on the shape of the catalyst. Based on the theory of active centers of catalysis and combined with the particle shape of the catalyst,a growth model for the vertically aligned CNTs on the substrate is given.

  7. Preparation and characterization of multi-walled carbon nanotube/hydroxyapatite nanocomposite film dip coated on Ti–6Al–4V by sol–gel method for biomedical applications: An in vitro study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abrishamchian, Alireza [Department of Dental Biomaterials, School of Dentistry/Research Center for Science and Technology in Medicine, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hooshmand, Tabassom, E-mail: hoshmand@sina.tums.ac.ir [Department of Dental Biomaterials, School of Dentistry/Research Center for Science and Technology in Medicine, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mohammadi, Mohammadreza [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Sharif University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Najafi, Farhood [Department of Resin and Additives, Institute for Color Science and Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-05-01

    In the present research, the introduction of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) into the hydroxyapatite (HA) matrix and dip coating of nanocomposite on titanium alloy (Ti–6Al–4V) plate was conducted in order to improve the performance of the HA-coated implant via the sol–gel method. The structural characterization and electron microscopy results confirmed well crystallized HA–MWCNT coating and homogenous dispersion of carbon nanotubes in the ceramic matrix at temperatures as low as 500 °C. The evaluation of the mechanical properties of HA and HA/MWCNT composite coatings with different weight percentages of MWCNTs showed that the addition of low concentrations of MWCNTs (0.5 and 1 wt.%) had improved effect on the mechanical properties of nanocomposite coatings. Moreover, this in vitro study ascertained the biocompatibility of the prepared sol–gel-derived HA/MWCNT composite coatings. - Highlights: ► Carbon nanotube/hydroxyapatite composite was successfully dip-coated on Ti by sol–gel. ► Well-crystallized HA–MWCNT and homogenous dispersion of nanotubes were obtained. ► Low concentration of CNTs improved the mechanical properties of composite coating. ► Biocompatibility of the prepared sol–gel-derived HA/MWCNT films was ascertained.

  8. Development of supercapacitors based on carbon nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Block-type electrodes made of carbon nanotubes were fabricated by different processes. The volumetric specific capacitance based on such electrodes reached 107 F/cm3, which proves carbon nanotubes to be ideal candidate materials for supercapacitors. The composite electrodes consisting of carbon nanotubes and RuO2.xH2O were developed by the deposition of RuO2 on the surface of carbon nanotubes. Supercapacitors based on the composite electrodes show much higher specific capacitance than those based on pure carbon nanotube ones. A specific capacitance of 600 F/g can be achieved when the weight percent of RuO2.xH2O in the composite electrodes reaches 75%. In addition, supercapacitors based on the composite electrodes show both high energy density and high power density characteristics.

  9. Development of supercapacitors based on carbon nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马仁志; 魏秉庆; 徐才录; 梁吉; 吴德海

    2000-01-01

    Block-type electrodes made of carbon nanotubes were fabricated by different processes. The volumetric specific capacitance based on such electrodes reached 107 F/cm3, which proves carbon nanotubes to be ideal candidate materials for supercapacitors. The composite electrodes consisting of carbon nanotubes and RuO2 ·xH2O were developed by the deposition of RuO2 on the surface of carbon nanotubes. Supercapacitors based on the composite electrodes show much higher specific capacitance than those based on pure carbon nanotube ones. A specific capacitance of 600 F/g can be achieved when the weight percent of RuO2· xH2O in the composite electrodes reaches 75% . In addition , supercapacitors based on the composite electrodes show both high energy density and high power density characteristics.

  10. Preparation of well-aligned carbon nanotubes/silicon nanowires core-sheath composite structure arrays in porous anodic aluminum oxide templates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李梦轲; 陆梅; 王成伟; 力虎林

    2002-01-01

    The well-aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs) arrays with opened ends were prepared in ordered pores of anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) template by the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method. After then, silicon nanowires (SiNWs) were deposited in the hollow cavities of CNTs. By using this method, CNTs/SiNWs core-sheath composite structure arrays were synthesized successfully. Growing structures and physical properties of the CNTs/SiNWs composite structure arrays were analyzed and researched by the scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray diffraction spectrum (XRD), respectively. The field emission (FE) behavior of the CNTs/SiNWs composite structure arrays was studied based on Fowler- Nordheim tunneling mechanism and current-voltage (I -V) curve. And the photoluminescence (PL) was also characterized. Significantly, the CNTs/SiNWs core-sheath composite structure nanowire fabricated by AAO template method is characteristic of a metal/semiconductor (M/S) behavior and can be utilized to synthesize nanoscale PN junction or Schottky diode device. This process also could be useful for the fabrication of SiNWs and other nanoscale core-sheath composite structure nanowires with chemically inert interfaces for nanoscale electronic and device applications where surface oxidation is undesirable. The diameters and lengths of nanoscale composite structure arrays can be dominated easily, and the experimental result shows that the curling and twisting structures are fewer than those prepared by other synthesized methods.

  11. Kinetics and thermodynamics of adsorption of ionizable aromatic compounds from aqueous solutions by as-prepared and oxidized multiwalled carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, G D; Shao, D D; Ren, X M; Wang, X Q; Li, J X; Chen, Y X; Wang, X K

    2010-06-15

    The adsorption of 1-naphthylamine, 1-naphthol and phenol on as-prepared and oxidized multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) has been investigated. The results illustrated that both as-prepared and oxidized MWCNTs showed high adsorption capacity for the three ionizable aromatic compounds (IACs) studied. Oxidation of MWCNTs increased the surface area and the pore volume, and introduced oxygen-containing functional groups to the surfaces of MWCNTs, which depressed the adsorption of IACs on MWCNTs. Both Langmuir and Freundlich models described the adsorption isotherms very well and the adsorption thermodynamic parameters (DeltaG degrees, DeltaH degrees and DeltaS degrees) were measured. The adsorption for 1-naphthylamine, 1-naphthol and phenol is general spontaneous and thermodynamically favorable. The adsorption of phenol is an exothermic process, whereas the adsorption of 1-naphthylamine and 1-naphthol is an endothermic process. Results of this work are of great significance for the environmental application of MWCNTs for the removal of IACs from large volume of aqueous solutions.

  12. Control of multiple excited image states around segmented carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knörzer, J., E-mail: johannes.knoerzer@physnet.uni-hamburg.de; Fey, C., E-mail: christian.fey@physnet.uni-hamburg.de [Zentrum für Optische Quantentechnologien, Universität Hamburg, Luruper Chaussee 149, Hamburg 22761 (Germany); Sadeghpour, H. R. [ITAMP, Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States); Schmelcher, P. [Zentrum für Optische Quantentechnologien, Universität Hamburg, Luruper Chaussee 149, Hamburg 22761 (Germany); The Hamburg Centre for Ultrafast Imaging, Luruper Chaussee 149, Hamburg 22761 (Germany)

    2015-11-28

    Electronic image states around segmented carbon nanotubes can be confined and shaped along the nanotube axis by engineering the image potential. We show how several such image states can be prepared simultaneously along the same nanotube. The inter-electronic distance can be controlled a priori by engineering tubes of specific geometries. High sensitivity to external electric and magnetic fields can be exploited to manipulate these states and their mutual long-range interactions. These building blocks provide access to a new kind of tailored interacting quantum systems.

  13. Epitaxial Approaches to Carbon Nanotube Organization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismach, Ariel

    Carbon nanotubes have unique electronic, mechanical, optical and thermal properties, which make them ideal candidates as building blocks in nano-electronic and electromechanical systems. However, their organization into well-defined geometries and arrays on surfaces remains a critical challenge for their integration into functional nanosystems. In my PhD, we developed a new approach for the organization of carbon nanotubes directed by crystal surfaces. The principle relies on the guided growth of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) by atomic features presented on anisotropic substrates. We identified three different modes of surface-directed growth (or 'nanotube epitaxy'), in which the growth of carbon nanotubes is directed by crystal substrates: We first observed the nanotube unidirectional growth along atomic steps ('ledge-directed epitaxy') and nanofacets ('graphoepitaxy') on the surface of miscut C-plane sapphire and quartz. The orientation along crystallographic directions ('lattice-directed epitaxy') was subsequently observed by other groups on different crystals. We have proposed a "wake growth" mechanism for the nanotube alignment along atomic steps and nanofacets. In this mechanism, the catalyst nanoparticle slides along the step or facet, leaving the nanotube behind as a wake. In addition, we showed that the combination of surface-directed growth with external forces, such as electric-field and gas flow, can lead to the simultaneous formation of complex nanotube structures, such as grids and serpentines. The "wake growth" model, which explained the growth of aligned nanotubes, could not explain the formation of nanotube serpentines. For the latter, we proposed a "falling spaghetti" mechanism, in which the nanotube first grows by a free-standing process, aligned in the direction of the gas flow, then followed by absorption on the stepped surface in an oscillatory manner, due to the competition between the drag force caused by the gas flow on the suspended

  14. Growing carbon nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshinori Ando

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available The discovery of ‘fullerenes’ added a new dimension to the knowledge of carbon science1; and the subsequent discovery of ‘carbon nanotubes’ (CNTs, the elongated fullerene added a new dimension to the knowledge of technology2;. Today, ‘nanotechnology’ is a hot topic attracting scientists, industrialists, journalists, governments, and even the general public. Nanotechnology is the creation of functional materials, devices, and systems through control of matter on the nanometer scale and the exploitation of novel phenomena and properties of matter (physical, chemical, biological, electrical, etc. at that length scale. CNTs are supposed to be a key component of nanotechnology. Almost every week a new potential application of CNTs is identified, stimulating scientists to peep into this tiny tube with ever increasing curiosity.

  15. Improved synthesis of carbon nanotubes with junctions and of single-walled carbon nanotubes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    F L Deepak; A Govindaraj; C N R Rao

    2006-01-01

    Pyrolysis of thiophene over nickel nanoparticles dispersed on silica is shown to yield Yjunction carbon nanotubes with smaller diameters than those obtained by the pyrolysis of organometallicthiophene mixtures. In the presence of water vapour, the pyrolysis of organometallic-hydrocarbon mixtures yields single-walled nanotubes, as well as relatively narrow-diameter carbon nanotubes with Y-junctions. Pyrolysis of organometallic-hydrocarbon mixtures, in the absence of water vapour, only gives nanotubes with T- and Y-junctions.

  16. Coated carbon nanotube array electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Zhifeng; Wen, Jian; Chen, Jinghua; Huang, Zhongping; Wang, Dezhi

    2008-10-28

    The present invention provides conductive carbon nanotube (CNT) electrode materials comprising aligned CNT substrates coated with an electrically conducting polymer, and the fabrication of electrodes for use in high performance electrical energy storage devices. In particular, the present invention provides conductive CNTs electrode material whose electrical properties render them especially suitable for use in high efficiency rechargeable batteries. The present invention also provides methods for obtaining surface modified conductive CNT electrode materials comprising an array of individual linear, aligned CNTs having a uniform surface coating of an electrically conductive polymer such as polypyrrole, and their use in electrical energy storage devices.

  17. Carbon nanotube growth density control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delzeit, Lance D. (Inventor); Schipper, John F. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    Method and system for combined coarse scale control and fine scale control of growth density of a carbon nanotube (CNT) array on a substrate, using a selected electrical field adjacent to a substrate surface for coarse scale density control (by one or more orders of magnitude) and a selected CNT growth temperature range for fine scale density control (by multiplicative factors of less than an order of magnitude) of CNT growth density. Two spaced apart regions on a substrate may have different CNT growth densities and/or may use different feed gases for CNT growth.

  18. Purification of carbon nanotube by wet oxidation; Shisshiki sanka ni yoru carbon nanotube no seisei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morishita, K.; Takarada, T. [Gunma University, Gunma (Japan)

    1997-07-10

    In order to efficiently recover carbon nanotubes, the purification method by wet oxidation with orthoperiodic acid and perchloric acid is investigated. The reactivity of the carbonaceous material toward the acids depends on the type of carbon. Carbon nanotubes are selectively recovered under the mild oxidation conditions. The degree of purification depends on the concentration of orthoperiodic acid. It is suggested that wet oxidation is an effective method for purification of carbon nanotubes. 17 refs., 6 figs.

  19. In situ, controlled and reproducible attachment of carbon nanotubes onto conductive AFM tips

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Jianxun [International Center for Materials Nanoarchitectonics (MANA), National Institute for Materials Science, 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044 (Japan); Chinese Academy of Science Key Laboratory for Biomedical Effects of Nanomaterials and Nanosafty, National Center for Nanoscience and Technology of China, No. 11, Bei yi tiao, Zhong Guan Cun, Beijing 100190 (China); Shingaya, Yoshitaka [International Center for Materials Nanoarchitectonics (MANA), National Institute for Materials Science, 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044 (Japan); Zhao, Yuliang [Chinese Academy of Science Key Laboratory for Biomedical Effects of Nanomaterials and Nanosafty, National Center for Nanoscience and Technology of China, No. 11, Bei yi tiao, Zhong Guan Cun, Beijing 100190 (China); Nakayama, Tomonobu, E-mail: NAKAYAMA.Tomonobu@nims.go.jp [International Center for Materials Nanoarchitectonics (MANA), National Institute for Materials Science, 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044 (Japan)

    2015-04-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • An effective and controllable method was developed to fabricate CNT AFM probes in-situ. • Individual carbon nanotube was assembled. • The alignment angle and protruding length of as-produced CNT probes are excellent. - Abstract: Owing to the small diameter, wear resistance, high aspect ratio of their cylindrical structure and outstanding young's modulus, carbon nanotubes are regarded as excellent probes for atomic force microscope (AFM) imaging and various applications. To take the best out of carbon nanotubes’ potentials as AFM probes, we present a facile and reliable method to attach a single carbon nanotube onto an AFM probe covered with conductive Au layer. The method involves the following steps: positioning the AFM probe exactly onto a designated multiple-walled carbon nanotube growing vertically on a conductive substrate, establishing physical contact of the probe apex to the carbon nanotube with an appropriate force, and finally flowing a DC current of typically 100 μA from the AFM probe to the substrate through the carbon nanotube. The current flow results in the fracture and attachment of the carbon nanotube onto the AFM probe. Our method is similar to that reported in previous studies to cut and assemble carbon nanotubes by flowing current under SEM, but by our method we succeed to achieve superior control of protruding length and reproducible attachment angle of the carbon nanotube in one step. Moreover, it is now possible to reliably prepare carbon nanotube probes in-situ during AFM experiments.

  20. Preference of multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) to single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) and activated carbon for preparing silica nanohybrid pickering emulsion for chemical enhanced oil recovery (C-EOR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    AfzaliTabar, M.; Alaei, M.; Ranjineh Khojasteh, R.; Motiee, F.; Rashidi, A. M.

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this research was to determine the best nano hybrid that can be used as a Pickering emulsion Chemical Enhanced Oil Recovery (C-EOR). Therefore, we have prepared different carbon structures nano hybrids with SiO2 nano particles with different weight percent using sol-gel method. The as-prepared nano materials were characterized with X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FE-SEM) and Thermal Gravimetric Analysis (TGA). Pickering emulsions of these nanohybrids were prepared at pH=7 in ambient temperature and with distilled water. Stability of the mentioned Pickering emulsions was controlled for one month. Emulsion phase morphology was investigated using optical microscopic imaging. Evaluation results demonstrated that the best sample is the 70% MWCNT/SiO2 nanohybrid. Stability of the selected nanohybrid (70% MWCNT/SiO2 nanohybrid) was investigated by alteration of salinity, pH and temperature. Results showed that the mentioned Pickering emulsion has very good stability at 0.1%, 1% salinity, moderate and high temperature (25 °C and 90 °C) and neutral and alkaline pH (7, 10) that is suitable for the oil reservoirs conditions. The effect of the related nano fluid on the wettability of carbonate rock was investigated by measuring the contact angle and interfacial tension. Results show that the nanofluid could significantly change the wettability of the carbonate rock from oil wet to water wet and can decrease the interfacial tension. Therefore, the 70% MWCNT/SiO2 nanohybrid Pickering emulsion can be used for Chemical Enhanced Oil Recovery (C-EOR).

  1. Homogeneous CdTe quantum dots-carbon nanotubes heterostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vieira, Kayo Oliveira [Grupo de Pesquisa em Química de Materiais – (GPQM), Departamento de Ciências Naturais, Universidade Federal de São João del-Rei, Campus Dom Bosco, Praça Dom Helvécio, 74, CEP 36301-160, São João del-Rei, MG (Brazil); Bettini, Jefferson [Laboratório Nacional de Nanotecnologia, Centro Nacional de Pesquisa em Energia e Materiais, CEP 13083-970, Campinas, SP (Brazil); Ferrari, Jefferson Luis [Grupo de Pesquisa em Química de Materiais – (GPQM), Departamento de Ciências Naturais, Universidade Federal de São João del-Rei, Campus Dom Bosco, Praça Dom Helvécio, 74, CEP 36301-160, São João del-Rei, MG (Brazil); Schiavon, Marco Antonio, E-mail: schiavon@ufsj.edu.br [Grupo de Pesquisa em Química de Materiais – (GPQM), Departamento de Ciências Naturais, Universidade Federal de São João del-Rei, Campus Dom Bosco, Praça Dom Helvécio, 74, CEP 36301-160, São João del-Rei, MG (Brazil)

    2015-01-15

    The development of homogeneous CdTe quantum dots-carbon nanotubes heterostructures based on electrostatic interactions has been investigated. We report a simple and reproducible non-covalent functionalization route that can be accomplished at room temperature, to prepare colloidal composites consisting of CdTe nanocrystals deposited onto multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) functionalized with a thin layer of polyelectrolytes by layer-by-layer technique. Specifically, physical adsorption of polyelectrolytes such as poly (4-styrene sulfonate) and poly (diallyldimethylammonium chloride) was used to deagglomerate and disperse MWCNTs, onto which we deposited CdTe quantum dots coated with mercaptopropionic acid (MPA), as surface ligand, via electrostatic interactions. Confirmation of the CdTe quantum dots/carbon nanotubes heterostructures was done by transmission and scanning electron microscopies (TEM and SEM), dynamic-light scattering (DLS) together with absorption, emission, Raman and infrared spectroscopies (UV–vis, PL, Raman and FT-IR). Almost complete quenching of the PL band of the CdTe quantum dots was observed after adsorption on the MWCNTs, presumably through efficient energy transfer process from photoexcited CdTe to MWCNTs. - Highlights: • Highly homogeneous CdTe-carbon nanotubes heterostructures were prepared. • Simple and reproducible non-covalent functionalization route. • CdTe nanocrystals homogeneously deposited onto multi-walled carbon nanotubes. • Efficient energy transfer process from photoexcited CdTe to MWCNTs.

  2. Study on Diameter Controlled Growth of Carbon Nanotubes by LaAl1-xFexO3 Catalysts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PENG Feng; WANG Hong-juan

    2005-01-01

    A series of LaAl1-xFexO3 catalysts prepared with lanthanum nitrate, aluminium nitrate and iron nitrate was investigated in catalytical syntheses of carbon nanotubes with high yields and purity. The properties of carbon nanotubes prepared by the method of CVD(chemical vapor deposition) with n-hexane as the carbon resource were studied and it was shown that the diameter of carbon nanotubes can be controlled by the molar ratio of iron to aluminum in the catalysts and that the diameter of carbon nanotubes changes a little with the decrease of the iron content in the catalysts. From the TEM pictures of carbon nanotubes, it can be found that the LaAl1-xFexO3 catalysts have a significant influence on the wall thickness of the carbon nanotubes, whereas they have little influence on the inner diameter of the carbon nanotubes.

  3. Smart Polymer/Carbon Nanotube Nanocomposites and Their Electrorheological Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ke Zhang

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This review article summarizes the preparation of polymer/carbon nanotube (CNT nanocomposites and their applications as electrorheological (ER fluids. These ER fluids exhibited a controllable electro-response under an applied electric field due to the presence of well-dispersed CNTs. The background, morphology, preparations, and characteristics of these materials are discussed, specifically focusing on the various approaches in the preparation of polymer/CNT nanocomposites, morphology, and their effects on the ER characteristics.

  4. Functionalized carbon nanotubes: biomedical applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vardharajula S

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Sandhya Vardharajula,1 Sk Z Ali,2 Pooja M Tiwari,1 Erdal Eroğlu,1 Komal Vig,1 Vida A Dennis,1 Shree R Singh11Center for NanoBiotechnology and Life Sciences Research, Alabama State University, Montgomery, AL, USA; 2Department of Microbiology, Osmania University, Hyderabad, IndiaAbstract: Carbon nanotubes (CNTs are emerging as novel nanomaterials for various biomedical applications. CNTs can be used to deliver a variety of therapeutic agents, including biomolecules, to the target disease sites. In addition, their unparalleled optical and electrical properties make them excellent candidates for bioimaging and other biomedical applications. However, the high cytotoxicity of CNTs limits their use in humans and many biological systems. The biocompatibility and low cytotoxicity of CNTs are attributed to size, dose, duration, testing systems, and surface functionalization. The functionalization of CNTs improves their solubility and biocompatibility and alters their cellular interaction pathways, resulting in much-reduced cytotoxic effects. Functionalized CNTs are promising novel materials for a variety of biomedical applications. These potential applications are particularly enhanced by their ability to penetrate biological membranes with relatively low cytotoxicity. This review is directed towards the overview of CNTs and their functionalization for biomedical applications with minimal cytotoxicity.Keywords: carbon nanotubes, cytotoxicity, functionalization, biomedical applications

  5. Selective intercalation of polymers in carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazilevsky, Alexander V; Sun, Kexia; Yarin, Alexander L; Megaridis, Constantine M

    2007-07-03

    A room-temperature, open-air method is devised to selectively intercalate relatively low-molecular-weight polymers (approximately 10-100 kDa) from dilute, volatile solutions into open-end, as-grown, wettable carbon nanotubes with 50-100 nm diameters. The method relies on a novel self-sustained diffusion mechanism driving polymers from dilute volatile solutions into carbon nanotubes and concentrating them there. Relatively low-molecular-weight polymers, such as poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO, 600 kDa) and poly(caprolactone) (PCL, 80 kDa), were encapsulated in graphitic nanotubes as confirmed by transmission electron microscopy, which revealed morphologies characteristic of mixtures in nanoconfinements affected by intermolecular forces. Whereas relatively small, flexible polymer molecules can conform to enter these nanotubes, larger macromolecules (approximately 1000 kDa) remain outside. The selective nature of this process is useful for filling nanotubes with polymers and could also be valuable in capping nanotubes.

  6. SYNTHESIS OF CARBON NANOTUBES FOR ACETYLENE DETECTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.Y. FAIZAH

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available A gas sensor, utilizing carbon nanotubes (CNTs in a pellet form for acetylene detection has been developed. This research was carried out to investigate the absorption effect of acetylene (C2H2 towards the change of resistance of carbon nanotubes pellet as sensor signal. Source Measurement Unit (SMU was used to study the gas sensing behaviour of resistance based sensors employing carbon nanotubes pellet as the active sensing element. Studies revealed that the absorption of acetylene into the carbon nanotubes pellet resulting in increase in pellet resistance. The changes are attributed to p-type conductivity in semiconducting carbon nanotubes. Carbon nanotubes used in this research was synthesized by means of Floating Catalyst Chemical Vapor Deposition (FC-CVD method. Benzene was used as a hydrocarbon source while ferrocene as a source of catalyst with Hydrogen and Argon as carrier and purge gas respectively. From the research, it was shown that carbon nanotubes show high sensitivity towards acetylene. The highest sensitivity recorded was 1.21, 1.16 and 17.86 for S1, S2 and S3 respectively. It is expected that many applications of CNT-based sensors will be explored in future as the interest of the nanotechnology research in this field increases.

  7. Preparation and characterization of nanocomposites based on COOH functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes and on poly(trimethylene terephthalate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Poly(trimethylene terephthalate nanocomposites containing COOH functionalized multi-walled nanotubes were synthesized with in situ polymerization method. The microstructure of the nanocomposites was studied by SEM, in terms of the dispersion state of the nanotubes and the polymer–nanotube interface. The thermal behaviour, mechanical properties and conductivity of these resultant PTT/MWCNTs nanocomposites were studied. The effect of the presence of MWCNTs on cold crystallization of PTT was monitored by dielectric spectroscopy. From thermal analysis study, it is found that the melting temperature and glass transition temperature are not significantly affected by the addition of MWCNTs. The crystallization temperature of PTT matrix is affected by the presence of CNTs. Nanocomposites have slightly higher degree of crystallinity than neat PTT and their thermo-oxidative stability is not significantly affected by the addition of MWCNTs. The study of the isothermal cold crystallization of amorphous PTT and its nanocomposites monitored by dielectric spectroscopy reveals that the presence of MWCNTs have influence on crystallization rate, especially at higher concentration (0.3 wt%. In comparison with neat PTT, the MWCNTs reinforced nanocomposites posses higher tensile strength and Young’s modulus at low MWCNTs loading (0.05–0.3 wt%. In addition, all nanocomposites show reduction of brittleness as compared to the neat PTT. The electrical percolation threshold was found between 0.3 and 0.4 wt% loading of MWCNTs.

  8. A Tester for Carbon Nanotube Mode Lockers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yong-Won; Yamashita, Shinji

    2007-05-01

    We propose and demonstrate a tester for laser pulsating operation of carbon nanotubes employing a circulator with the extra degree of freedom of the second port to access diversified nanotube samples. The nanotubes are deposited onto the end facet of a dummy optical fiber by spray method that guarantees simple sample loading along with the minimized perturbation of optimized laser cavity condition. Resultant optical spectra, autocorrelation traces and pulse train of the laser outputs with qualified samples are presented.

  9. Can amino-functionalized carbon nanotubes carry functional nerve growth factor?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wen Chen; Qing Xiong; Quanxia Ren; Yake Guo; Gao Li

    2014-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes can carry protein into cells to induce biological effects. Amino-functionalized carbon nanotubes are soluble and biocompatible, have high reactivity and low toxicity, and can help promote nerve cell growth. In this study, amino-functionalized ethylenediamine-treated multi-walled carbon nanotubes were used to prepare carbon nanotubes-nerve growth factor complexes by non-covalent grafting. The physicochemical properties, cytotoxicity to PC12 and chick embryo dorsal root ganglion, and biological activity of the carbon nanotubes-nerve growth factor complexes were investigated. The results showed that amino functionalization improved carbon nanotubes-nerve growth factor complex dispersibility, reduced their toxicity to PC12 cells, and promoted PC12 cell differentiation and chick embryo dorsal root ganglion.

  10. Preparation of well-aligned carbon nanotubes/silicon nanowires core-sheath composite structure arrays in porous anodic aluminum oxide templates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李梦轲; 力虎林; 陆梅; 王成伟

    2002-01-01

    The well-aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs) arrays with opened ends were prepared in ordered pores of anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) template by the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method. After then, silicon nanowires (SiNWs) were deposited in the hollow cavities of CNTs. By using this method, CNTs/SiNWs core-sheath composite structure arrays were synthesized successfully. Growing structures and physical properties of the CNTs/SiNWs composite structure arrays were analyzed and researched by the scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray diffraction spectrum (XRD), respectively. The field emission (FE) behavior of the CNTs/SiNWs composite structure arrays was studied based on Fowler-Nordheim tunneling mechanism and current-voltage (/-V) curve. And the photoluminescence (PL) was also characterized. Significantly, the CNTs/SiNWs core-sheath composite structure nanowire fabricated by AAO template method is characteristic of a metal/semiconductor (M/S) behavior and can be

  11. Preparation, characterization and adsorption properties of chitosan modified magnetic graphitized multi-walled carbon nanotubes for highly effective removal of a carcinogenic dye from aqueous solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, HuaYue; Fu, YongQian; Jiang, Ru; Yao, Jun; Liu, Li; Chen, YanWen; Xiao, Ling; Zeng, GuangMing

    2013-11-01

    Novel chitosan-modified magnetic graphitized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (CS-m-GMCNTs) were synthesized via a suspension cross-linking method. Composition, morphology and magnetic properties of as-prepared CS-m-GMCNTs were characterized by XRD, SEM-EDS, BET and VSM. The large saturation magnetization (12.27 emu g-1) allows fast separation of CS-m-GMCNTs from treated aqueous solution. The adsorption of congo red (CR) on CS-m-GMCNTs was strongly dependent on pH, temperature of the aqueous phase and adsorbent dosage. Up to 100 and 94.58% color removal could be achieved in 100 min contact time with 10 and 50 mg L-1 of initial concentrations, respectively. The adsorption capacity of CR onto CS-m-GMCNTs could reach 262.9 mg g-1. The pseudo-second-order kinetic model with high correlation coefficients (R2 > 0.999) was suitable to describe the process of CR adsorption onto CS-m-GMCNTs. The Langmuir model fitted the adsorption isotherm data better than the Freundlich model. Values of thermodynamic parameters (ΔG°, ΔH° and ΔS°) indicated that the adsorption process was strongly dependent on temperature of the aqueous phase, and spontaneous and endothermic process in nature. Therefore, CS-m-GMCNTs adsorbent displays main advantages of excellent dispersion, convenience separation and high adsorption capacity, which implies their potential application in the environmental cleanup.

  12. Dispersion of single-walled carbon nanotubes in dimethylacetamide and a dimethylacetamide-cholic acid mixture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyshin, A. A.; Eliseeva, O. V.; Bondarenko, G. V.; Kolker, A. M.; Kiselev, M. G.

    2016-12-01

    A way of dispersing single-walled carbon nanotubes in preparing stable suspensions with high concentrations of individual nanotubes in amide solvents is described. The obtained suspensions are studied via Raman spectroscopy. The dependence of the degree of single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) dispersion in individual and mixed amide solvents on the type of solvent, the mass of nanotubes, and the concentration of cholic acid is established. A technique for processing spectral data to estimate the diameters and chiralities of individual nanotubes in suspension is described in detail.

  13. Copper-decorated carbon nanotubes-based composite electrodes for nonenzymatic detection of glucose

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pop, A.; Manea, F.; Orha, C.; Motoc, S.; Llinoiu, E.; Vaszilcsin, N.; Schoonman, J.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to prepare three types of multiwall carbon nanotubes (CNT)-based composite electrodes and to modify their surface by copper electrodeposition for nonenzymatic oxidation and determination of glucose from aqueous solution. Copper-decorated multiwall carbon nanotubes composite

  14. Enzymatic degradation of multiwalled carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yong; Allen, Brett L; Star, Alexander

    2011-09-01

    Because of their unique properties, carbon nanotubes and, in particular, multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) have been used for the development of advanced composite and catalyst materials. Despite their growing commercial applications and increased production, the potential environmental and toxicological impacts of MWNTs are not fully understood; however, many reports suggest that they may be toxic. Therefore, a need exists to develop protocols for effective and safe degradation of MWNTs. In this article, we investigated the effect of chemical functionalization of MWNTs on their enzymatic degradation with horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)). We investigated HRP/H(2)O(2) degradation of purified, oxidized, and nitrogen-doped MWNTs and proposed a layer-by-layer degradation mechanism of nanotubes facilitated by side wall defects. These results provide a better understanding of the interaction between HRP and carbon nanotubes and suggest an eco-friendly way of mitigating the environmental impact of nanotubes.

  15. Methods for producing reinforced carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Zhifen; Wen, Jian Guo; Lao, Jing Y.; Li, Wenzhi

    2008-10-28

    Methods for producing reinforced carbon nanotubes having a plurality of microparticulate carbide or oxide materials formed substantially on the surface of such reinforced carbon nanotubes composite materials are disclosed. In particular, the present invention provides reinforced carbon nanotubes (CNTs) having a plurality of boron carbide nanolumps formed substantially on a surface of the reinforced CNTs that provide a reinforcing effect on CNTs, enabling their use as effective reinforcing fillers for matrix materials to give high-strength composites. The present invention also provides methods for producing such carbide reinforced CNTs.

  16. Ordered phases of cesium in carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Jeong Won; Hwang, Ho Jung; Song, Ki Oh; Choi, Won Young; Byun, Ki Ryang [Chung-Ang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Oh Keun [Semyung University, Jecheon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jun Ha [Sangmyung University, Chonan (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Won Woo [Juseong College, Cheongwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-10-15

    We investigate the structural phases of Cs in carbon nanotubes by using a structural optimization process applied to an atomistic simulation method. As the radius of the carbon nanotubes is increased, the structures are found in various phases from an atomic strand to multishell packs composed of coaxial cylindrical shells. Both helical structures and layered structures are found. The numbers of helical atom rows composed of coaxial tubes and the orthogonal vectors of the circular rolling of a triangular network can explain the structural phases of Cs in carbon nanotubes.

  17. Microcapsule carbon nanotube devices for therapeutic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulamarva, Arun; Raja, Pavan M. V.; Bhathena, Jasmine; Chen, Hongmei; Talapatra, Saikat; Ajayan, Pulickel M.; Nalamasu, Omkaram; Prakash, Satya

    2009-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes are a new class of nanomaterials that have immense potential in the field of biomedicine. Their ability to carry large quantities of therapeutic molecules makes them prime candidates for providing targeted delivery of therapeutics for use in various diseases. However, their utility is limited due to the problems faced during their delivery to target sites. This article for the first time describes the design of a novel microcapsule carbon nanotube targeted delivery device. This device has potential in the targeted delivery of carbon nanotubes in suitable membranes along with their cargo, safely and effectively to the target loci.

  18. Biochips Containing Arrays of Carbon-Nanotube Electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jun; Meyyappan, M.; Koehne, Jessica; Cassell, Alan; Chen, Hua

    2008-01-01

    Biochips containing arrays of nanoelectrodes based on multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) are being developed as means of ultrasensitive electrochemical detection of specific deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) and messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) biomarkers for purposes of medical diagnosis and bioenvironmental monitoring. In mass production, these biochips could be relatively inexpensive (hence, disposable). These biochips would be integrated with computer-controlled microfluidic and microelectronic devices in automated hand-held and bench-top instruments that could be used to perform rapid in vitro genetic analyses with simplified preparation of samples. Carbon nanotubes are attractive for use as nanoelectrodes for detection of biomolecules because of their nanoscale dimensions and their chemical properties.

  19. Synthesis and characterization of boron-doped carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ceragioli, H J; Peterlevitz, A C; Quispe, J C R; Pasquetto, M P; Sampaio, M A; Baranauskas, V [Faculdade de Engenharia Eletrica e Computacao, Departamento de Semicondutores, Instrumentos e Fotonica, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, UNICAMP, Av. Albert Einstein N.400, 13083-852 Campinas SP Brasil (Brazil); Larena, A [Department of Chemical Industrial Engineering and Environment, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, E.T.S. Ingenieros Industriales, C/ Jose Gutierrez Abascal, Madrid (Spain)], E-mail: vitor.baranauskas@gmail.com

    2008-03-15

    Boron-doped carbon nanotubes have been prepared by chemical vapour deposition of ethyl alcohol doped with B{sub 2}O{sub 3} using a hot-filament system. Multi-wall carbon nanotubes of diameters in the range of 30-100 nm have been observed by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM). Raman measurements indicated that the degree of C-C sp{sup 2} order decreased with boron doping. Lowest threshold fields achieved were 1.0 V/{mu}m and 2.1 V/{mu}m for undoped and boron-doped samples, respectively.

  20. Nickel Oxide/Carbon Nanotubes Nanocomposite for Electrochemical Capacitance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kui LIANG; Kayhyeok AN; Younghee LEE

    2005-01-01

    A nanocomposite of nickel oxide/carbon nanotubes was prepared through a simple chemical precipitation followed by thermal annealing. The electrochemical capacitance of this electrode material was studied. When the mass fraction of CNTs (carbon nanotubes) in NiO/CNT composites increases, the electrical resistivity of nanocomposites decreases and becomes similar to that of pure CNTs when it reaches 30%. The specific surface area of composites increases with increasing CNT mass fraction and the specific capacitance reaches 160 F/g under 10 mA/g discharge current density at CNT mass fraction of 10%.

  1. The electrical conduction variation in stained carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Shih-Jye; Wei Fan, Jun; Lin, Chung-Yi

    2012-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes become stained from coupling with foreign molecules, especially from adsorbing gas molecules. The charge exchange, which is due to the orbital hybridization, occurred in the stained carbon nanotube induces electrical dipoles that consequently vary the electrical conduction of the nanotube. We propose a microscopic model to evaluate the electrical current variation produced by the induced electrical dipoles in a stained zigzag carbon nanotube. It is found that stronger orbital hybridization strengths and larger orbital energy differences between the carbon nanotube and the gas molecules help increasing the induced electrical dipole moment. Compared with the stain-free carbon nanotube, the induced electrical dipoles suppress the current in the nanotube. In the carbon nanotubes with induced dipoles the current increases as a result of increasing orbital energy dispersion via stronger hybridization couplings. In particular, at a fixed hybridization coupling, the current increases with the bond length for the donor-carbon nanotube but reversely for the acceptor-carbon nanotube.

  2. Carbon nanotubes for RF and microwaves

    OpenAIRE

    Burke, P. J.; Yu, Z; Rutherglen, C.

    2005-01-01

    In this invited overview paper we provide a brief up-to-date summary of the potential applications of carbon nanotubes for RF and microwave devices and systems. We focus in particular on the use of nanotubes as ultra-high speed interconnects in integrated circuits.

  3. Carbon nanotubes as heat dissipaters in microelectronics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pérez Paz, Alejandro; García-Lastra, Juan María; Markussen, Troels

    2013-01-01

    We review our recent modelling work of carbon nanotubes as potential candidates for heat dissipation in microelectronics cooling. In the first part, we analyze the impact of nanotube defects on their thermal transport properties. In the second part, we investigate the loss of thermal properties...

  4. Carbon Nanotubes for Human Space Flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Carl D.; Files, Brad; Yowell, Leonard

    2003-01-01

    Single-wall carbon nanotubes offer the promise of a new class of revolutionary materials for space applications. The Carbon Nanotube Project at NASA Johnson Space Center has been actively researching this new technology by investigating nanotube production methods (arc, laser, and HiPCO) and gaining a comprehensive understanding of raw and purified material using a wide range of characterization techniques. After production and purification, single wall carbon nanotubes are processed into composites for the enhancement of mechanical, electrical, and thermal properties. This "cradle-to-grave" approach to nanotube composites has given our team unique insights into the impact of post-production processing and dispersion on the resulting material properties. We are applying our experience and lessons-learned to developing new approaches toward nanotube material characterization, structural composite fabrication, and are also making advances in developing thermal management materials and electrically conductive materials in various polymer-nanotube systems. Some initial work has also been conducted with the goal of using carbon nanotubes in the creation of new ceramic materials for high temperature applications in thermal protection systems. Human space flight applications such as advanced life support and fuel cell technologies are also being investigated. This discussion will focus on the variety of applications under investigation.

  5. Fermentation based carbon nanotube multifunctional bionic composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentini, Luca; Bon, Silvia Bittolo; Signetti, Stefano; Tripathi, Manoj; Iacob, Erica; Pugno, Nicola M.

    2016-06-01

    The exploitation of the processes used by microorganisms to digest nutrients for their growth can be a viable method for the formation of a wide range of so called biogenic materials that have unique properties that are not produced by abiotic processes. Here we produced living hybrid materials by giving to unicellular organisms the nutrient to grow. Based on bread fermentation, a bionic composite made of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and a single-cell fungi, the Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast extract, was prepared by fermentation of such microorganisms at room temperature. Scanning electron microscopy analysis suggests that the CNTs were internalized by the cell after fermentation bridging the cells. Tensile tests on dried composite films have been rationalized in terms of a CNT cell bridging mechanism where the strongly enhanced strength of the composite is governed by the adhesion energy between the bridging carbon nanotubes and the matrix. The addition of CNTs also significantly improved the electrical conductivity along with a higher photoconductive activity. The proposed process could lead to the development of more complex and interactive structures programmed to self-assemble into specific patterns, such as those on strain or light sensors that could sense damage or convert light stimulus in an electrical signal.

  6. Coulomb drag in multiwall armchair carbon nanotubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lunde, A.M.; Jauho, Antti-Pekka

    2004-01-01

    We calculate the transresistivity rho(21) between two concentric armchair nanotubes in a diffusive multiwall carbon nanotube as a function of temperature T and Fermi level epsilon(F). We approximate the tight-binding band structure by two crossing bands with a linear dispersion near the Fermi...... surface. The cylindrical geometry of the nanotubes and the different parities of the Bloch states are accounted for in the evaluation of the effective Coulomb interaction between charges in the concentric nanotubes. We find a broad peak in rho(21) as a function of temperature at roughly T similar to 0.4T...

  7. Carbon nanotubes/laser ablation gold nanoparticles composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lascialfari, Luisa [Department of Chemistry, Università di Firenze, Via della Lastruccia 3-13, Sesto Fiorentino, Firenze 50019 (Italy); Istituto dei Sistemi Complessi, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, via Madonna del Piano 10, Sesto Fiorentino, Firenze 50019 (Italy); Consorzio Interuniversitario Nazionale per la Scienza e Tecnologia dei Materiali (INSTM), Via Giusti 9, Firenze 50123 (Italy); Marsili, Paolo [Istituto dei Sistemi Complessi, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, via Madonna del Piano 10, Sesto Fiorentino, Firenze 50019 (Italy); Caporali, Stefano [Department of Chemistry, Università di Firenze, Via della Lastruccia 3-13, Sesto Fiorentino, Firenze 50019 (Italy); Consorzio Interuniversitario Nazionale per la Scienza e Tecnologia dei Materiali (INSTM), Via Giusti 9, Firenze 50123 (Italy); Muniz-Miranda, Maurizio [Department of Chemistry, Università di Firenze, Via della Lastruccia 3-13, Sesto Fiorentino, Firenze 50019 (Italy); Margheri, Giancarlo [Istituto dei Sistemi Complessi, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, via Madonna del Piano 10, Sesto Fiorentino, Firenze 50019 (Italy); Serafini, Andrea; Brandi, Alberto [Department of Chemistry, Università di Firenze, Via della Lastruccia 3-13, Sesto Fiorentino, Firenze 50019 (Italy); Giorgetti, Emilia, E-mail: emilia.giorgetti@fi.isc.cnr.it [Istituto dei Sistemi Complessi, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, via Madonna del Piano 10, Sesto Fiorentino, Firenze 50019 (Italy); Cicchi, Stefano, E-mail: stefano.cicchi@unifi.it [Department of Chemistry, Università di Firenze, Via della Lastruccia 3-13, Sesto Fiorentino, Firenze 50019 (Italy); Consorzio Interuniversitario Nazionale per la Scienza e Tecnologia dei Materiali (INSTM), Via Giusti 9, Firenze 50123 (Italy)

    2014-10-31

    The production of nanohybrids formed by oxidized multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and nanoparticles, produced by pulsed laser ablation in liquids process, is described. The use of linkers, obtained by transformation of pyrene-1-butanol, is mandatory to generate an efficient and stable interaction between the two components. Transmission electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis showed the obtainment of the efficient coverage of the MWCNTs by nanoparticles composed by metal gold and, partially, by oxides. - Highlights: • Laser ablation is a used for the production of gold nanoparticle colloids • An efficient decoration of carbon nanotubes with nanoparticles is obtained through the use of a linker • This method allows an efficient and tunable preparation of carbon nanotube hybrids.

  8. Terahertz Science and Technology of Macroscopically Aligned Carbon Nanotube Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kono, Junichiro

    One of the outstanding challenges in nanotechnology is how to assemble individual nano-objects into macroscopic architectures while preserving their extraordinary properties. For example, the one-dimensional character of electrons in individual carbon nanotubes leads to extremely anisotropic transport, optical, and magnetic phenomena, but their macroscopic manifestations have been limited. Here, we describe methods for preparing macroscopic films, sheets, and fibers of highly aligned carbon nanotubes and their applications to basic and applied terahertz studies. Sufficiently thick films act as ideal terahertz polarizers, and appropriately doped films operate as polarization-sensitive, flexible, powerless, and ultra-broadband detectors. Together with recently developed chirality enrichment methods, these developments will ultimately allow us to study dynamic conductivities of interacting one-dimensional electrons in macroscopic single crystals of single-chirality single-wall carbon nanotubes.

  9. Microfabricated electroactive carbon nanotube actuators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahluwalia, Arti; Baughman, Ray H.; De Rossi, Danilo; Mazzoldi, Alberto; Tesconi, Mario; Tognetti, Alessandro; Vozzi, Giovanni

    2001-07-01

    A variety of microfabrication techniques have been developed at the University of Pisa. They are based either on pressure or piston actuated microsyringes or modified ink-jet printers. This work present the results of a study aimed at fabricating carbon nanotube (NT) actuators using micro-syringes. In order to prevent the nanotubes from aggregating into clumps, they were enclosed in a partially cross-linked polyvinylalcohol - polyallylamine matrix. After sonication the solution remained homogenously dispersed for about 40 minutes, which was sufficient time for deposition. Small strips of NT, about 5 mm across and 15 mm long were deposited. Following deposition, the films were baked at 80 degree(s)C and their thickness, impedance and mechanical resistance measured. The results indicate that 50 minutes of baking time is sufficient to give a constant resistivity of 1.12 x 10-2 (Omega) m per layer similar to a typical semiconductor, and each layer has a thickness of about 6 micrometers .

  10. Flightweight Carbon Nanotube Magnet Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, J. N.; Schmidt, H. J.; Ruoff, R. S.; Chandrasekhar, V.; Dikin, D. A.; Litchford, R. J.

    2003-01-01

    Virtually all plasma-based systems for advanced airborne/spaceborne propulsion and power depend upon the future availability of flightweight magnet technology. Unfortunately, current technology for resistive and superconducting magnets yields system weights that tend to counteract the performance advantages normally associated with advanced plasma-based concepts. The ongoing nanotechnology revolution and the continuing development of carbon nanotubes (CNT), however, may ultimately relieve this limitation in the near future. Projections based on recent research indicate that CNTs may achieve current densities at least three orders of magnitude larger than known superconductors and mechanical strength two orders of magnitude larger than steel. In fact, some published work suggests that CNTs are superconductors. Such attributes imply a dramatic increase in magnet performance-to-weight ratio and offer real hope for the construction of true flightweight magnets. This Technical Publication reviews the technology status of CNTs with respect to potential magnet applications and discusses potential techniques for using CNT wires and ropes as a winding material and as an integral component of the containment structure. The technology shortfalls are identified and a research and technology strategy is described that addresses the following major issues: (1) Investigation and verification of mechanical and electrical properties, (2) development of tools for manipulation and fabrication on the nanoscale, (3) continuum/molecular dynamics analysis of nanotube behavior when exposed to practical bending and twisting loads, and (4) exploration of innovative magnet fabrication techniques that exploit the natural attributes of CNTs.

  11. Preparation of Solid Phase Microextraction (SPME) Probes through Polyaniline Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes (PANI/MWCNTs) Coating for the Extraction of Palmitic Acid and Oleic Acid in Organic Solvents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khajeamiri, Alireza

    2012-01-01

    A fiber coating from polyaniline (PANI) was electrochemically prepared and employed for Solid phase micreoextraction (SPME). The PANI film was directly electrodeposited on the platinum wire surface using cyclic voltametry (CV) technique. The same method was applied for the preparation of SPME fiber coated by polyaniline multiwalled carbon nanotubes (PANI/MWCNTs) composite. The concentration of sulfuric acid for electropolymerization was 0.1 M in the presence of 0.045 M aniline in aqueous solution. For the electrodeposition of PANI/MWCNT composite, 4 μg/mL of MWCNTs was dispersed into the solution. Film coating was carried out on the platinum wire by repetitive cycling of potentials between 0 and 1.0 V at the scan rate of 0.05 V/s. The applicability of these coatings were assessed through employing a laboratory-made SPME injecting device and gas chromatography with mass spectrometry (GC-MS) for the extraction of palmitic acid and oleic acid from chloroform. The developed method proved to be simple and easy, offering high reproducibility. Both PANI coated and PANI/CNT coated probes had the ability to concentrate palmitic acid and oleic acid on their coating and produced strong signals in GC-MS chromatograms. In the meantime, PANI/CNT coated SPME probes produced signals which were stronger than those produced by PANI coated SPME probes. The amount of extracted palmitic acid and oleic acid from chloroform by the PANI/MWCNTs coating was about 6 and 12 times higher than the amount extracted by plane PANI SPME fibers respectively. It could be suggested that the composite material with CNTs has both an increased surface area and an elevated absorptive capacity which leads to this overall increase in extracted palmitic acid and oleic acid.

  12. 碳纳米管薄膜的制备及其超疏水性研究%The Preparation of Carbon Nanotubes Films and Its Superhydrophobicity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李刚

    2012-01-01

    采用化学气相沉积法在平面硅基体上制备碳纳米管薄膜,并通过扫描电子显微镜、透射电子显微镜和接触角测量仪对样品进行形貌结构和浸润性质的表征.结果表明:碳纳米管的定向性主要由基体上催化剂粒子的分布控制,并遵循顶部生长生长机制;2种碳纳米管薄膜都具有较大的接触角,获得的定向碳纳米管表面具有微纳米复合结构是产生超疏水的主要原因.%Carbon nanotubes( CNTs) films were prepared on planar silicon substrates by chemical vapor deposition meth od. Scanning electron microscope( SEM) .transmission electron microscope(TEM) ,contact angle goniometer and rheometer were employed to characterize the morphologies,structures,wettabilities and rheological properties of as-prepared CNTs. It reveals that the distribution of catalyst particles determines the orientation of CNTs. The CNTs have a bamboo shaped mul tiwalled structure and grow by a tip growth mechanism. Whether CNTs arrange regularly or not,they will take on large con tact angles. The special surface structure with micro-papillae and nanoscale lotus-like papillae may be the main reason con tributing to the superhydrophobic surfaces of aligned CNTs.

  13. Morphology, mechanical, cross-linking, thermal, and tribological properties of nitrile and hydrogenated nitrile rubber/multi-walled carbon nanotubes composites prepared by melt compounding: The effect of acrylonitrile content and hydrogenation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Likozar, Blaz, E-mail: blaz.likozar@fkkt.uni-lj.si [Polymer Competence Center Leoben GmbH, Montanuniversitaet Leoben, Roseggerstrasse 12, A-8700 Leoben (Austria); Major, Zoltan, E-mail: zoltan.major@jku.at [Polymer Competence Center Leoben GmbH, Montanuniversitaet Leoben, Roseggerstrasse 12, A-8700 Leoben (Austria)

    2010-11-01

    The purpose of this work was to prepare nanocomposites by mixing multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) with nitrile and hydrogenated nitrile elastomers (NBR and HNBR). Utilization of transmission electronic microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and small- and wide-angle X-ray scattering techniques (SAXS and WAXS) for advanced morphology observation of conducting filler-reinforced nitrile and hydrogenated nitrile rubber composites is reported. Principal results were increases in hardness (maximally 97 Shore, type A), elastic modulus (maximally 981 MPa), tensile strength (maximally 27.7 MPa), elongation at break (maximally 216%), cross-link density (maximally 7.94 x 10{sup 28} m{sup -3}), density (maximally 1.16 g cm{sup -3}), and tear strength (11.2 kN m{sup -1}), which were clearly visible at particular acrylonitrile contents both for unhydrogenated and hydrogenated polymers due to enhanced distribution of carbon nanotubes (CNT) and their aggregated particles in the applied rubber matrix. Conclusion was that multi-walled carbon nanotubes improved the performance of nitrile and hydrogenated nitrile rubber nanocomposites prepared by melt compounding.

  14. Morphology, mechanical, cross-linking, thermal, and tribological properties of nitrile and hydrogenated nitrile rubber/multi-walled carbon nanotubes composites prepared by melt compounding: The effect of acrylonitrile content and hydrogenation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Likozar, Blaž; Major, Zoltan

    2010-11-01

    The purpose of this work was to prepare nanocomposites by mixing multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) with nitrile and hydrogenated nitrile elastomers (NBR and HNBR). Utilization of transmission electronic microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and small- and wide-angle X-ray scattering techniques (SAXS and WAXS) for advanced morphology observation of conducting filler-reinforced nitrile and hydrogenated nitrile rubber composites is reported. Principal results were increases in hardness (maximally 97 Shore, type A), elastic modulus (maximally 981 MPa), tensile strength (maximally 27.7 MPa), elongation at break (maximally 216%), cross-link density (maximally 7.94 × 1028 m-3), density (maximally 1.16 g cm-3), and tear strength (11.2 kN m-1), which were clearly visible at particular acrylonitrile contents both for unhydrogenated and hydrogenated polymers due to enhanced distribution of carbon nanotubes (CNT) and their aggregated particles in the applied rubber matrix. Conclusion was that multi-walled carbon nanotubes improved the performance of nitrile and hydrogenated nitrile rubber nanocomposites prepared by melt compounding.

  15. Modification of carbon nanotubes and synthesis of polymeric composites involving the nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badamshina, E R; Gafurova, M P; Estrin, Yakov I [Institute of Problems of Chemical Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Chernogolovka, Moscow Region (Russian Federation)

    2010-12-29

    The results of studies, mainly published in recent years, on modification of carbon nanotubes and design of composites with these nanotubes for the manufacture of new-generation materials are generalized and analyzed. The methods of modification of the nanotubes by low- and high-molecular compounds and methods of polymer modification by carbon nanotubes are considered. Data on the properties of modified nanotubes are presented. The current and potential applications of materials based on the nanotubes are indicated.

  16. Purification of Carbon Nanotubes: Alternative Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Files, Bradley; Scott, Carl; Gorelik, Olga; Nikolaev, Pasha; Hulse, Lou; Arepalli, Sivaram

    2000-01-01

    Traditional carbon nanotube purification process involves nitric acid refluxing and cross flow filtration using surfactant TritonX. This is believed to result in damage to nanotubes and surfactant residue on nanotube surface. Alternative purification procedures involving solvent extraction, thermal zone refining and nitric acid refiuxing are used in the current study. The effect of duration and type of solvent to dissolve impurities including fullerenes and P ACs (polyaromatic compounds) are monitored by nuclear magnetic reasonance, high performance liquid chromatography, and thermogravimetric analysis. Thermal zone refining yielded sample areas rich in nanotubes as seen by scanning electric microscopy. Refluxing in boiling nitric acid seem to improve the nanotube content. Different procedural steps are needed to purify samples produced by laser process compared to arc process. These alternative methods of nanotube purification will be presented along with results from supporting analytical techniques.

  17. Deconvoluting hepatic processing of carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alidori, Simone; Bowman, Robert L.; Yarilin, Dmitry; Romin, Yevgeniy; Barlas, Afsar; Mulvey, J. Justin; Fujisawa, Sho; Xu, Ke; Ruggiero, Alessandro; Riabov, Vladimir; Thorek, Daniel L. J.; Ulmert, Hans David S.; Brea, Elliott J.; Behling, Katja; Kzhyshkowska, Julia; Manova-Todorova, Katia; Scheinberg, David A.; McDevitt, Michael R.

    2016-07-01

    Single-wall carbon nanotubes present unique opportunities for drug delivery, but have not advanced into the clinic. Differential nanotube accretion and clearance from critical organs have been observed, but the mechanism not fully elucidated. The liver has a complex cellular composition that regulates a range of metabolic functions and coincidently accumulates most particulate drugs. Here we provide the unexpected details of hepatic processing of covalently functionalized nanotubes including receptor-mediated endocytosis, cellular trafficking and biliary elimination. Ammonium-functionalized fibrillar nanocarbon is found to preferentially localize in the fenestrated sinusoidal endothelium of the liver but not resident macrophages. Stabilin receptors mediate the endocytic clearance of nanotubes. Biocompatibility is evidenced by the absence of cell death and no immune cell infiltration. Towards clinical application of this platform, nanotubes were evaluated for the first time in non-human primates. The pharmacologic profile in cynomolgus monkeys is equivalent to what was reported in mice and suggests that nanotubes should behave similarly in humans.

  18. Carbon Nanotube Composites: Strongest Engineering Material Ever?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayeaux, Brian; Nikolaev, Pavel; Proft, William; Nicholson, Leonard S. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    The primary goal of the carbon nanotube project at Johnson Space Center (JSC) is to fabricate structural materials with a much higher strength-to-weight ratio than any engineered material today, Single-wall nanotubes present extraordinary mechanical properties along with new challenges for materials processing. Our project includes nanotube production, characterization, purification, and incorporation into applications studies. Now is the time to move from studying individual nanotubes to applications work. Current research at JSC focuses on structural polymeric materials to attempt to lower the weight of spacecraft necessary for interplanetary missions. These nanoscale fibers present unique new challenges to composites engineers. Preliminary studies show good nanotube dispersion and wetting by the epoxy materials. Results of tensile strength tests will also be reported. Other applications of nanotubes are also of interest for energy storage, gas storage, nanoelectronics, field emission, and biomedical uses.

  19. Functionalized carbon nanotubes: biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vardharajula, Sandhya; Ali, Sk Z; Tiwari, Pooja M; Eroğlu, Erdal; Vig, Komal; Dennis, Vida A; Singh, Shree R

    2012-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are emerging as novel nanomaterials for various biomedical applications. CNTs can be used to deliver a variety of therapeutic agents, including biomolecules, to the target disease sites. In addition, their unparalleled optical and electrical properties make them excellent candidates for bioimaging and other biomedical applications. However, the high cytotoxicity of CNTs limits their use in humans and many biological systems. The biocompatibility and low cytotoxicity of CNTs are attributed to size, dose, duration, testing systems, and surface functionalization. The functionalization of CNTs improves their solubility and biocompatibility and alters their cellular interaction pathways, resulting in much-reduced cytotoxic effects. Functionalized CNTs are promising novel materials for a variety of biomedical applications. These potential applications are particularly enhanced by their ability to penetrate biological membranes with relatively low cytotoxicity. This review is directed towards the overview of CNTs and their functionalization for biomedical applications with minimal cytotoxicity.

  20. Carbon Nanotube Tape Vibrating Gyroscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Dennis Stephen (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A vibrating gyroscope includes a piezoelectric strip having length and width dimensions. The piezoelectric strip includes a piezoelectric material and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) substantially aligned and polled along the strip's length dimension. A spindle having an axis of rotation is coupled to the piezoelectric strip. The axis of rotation is parallel to the strip's width dimension. A first capacitance sensor is mechanically coupled to the spindle for rotation therewith. The first capacitance sensor is positioned at one of the strip's opposing ends and is spaced apart from one of the strip's opposing faces. A second capacitance sensor is mechanically coupled to the spindle for rotation therewith. The second capacitance sensor is positioned at another of the strip's opposing ends and is spaced apart from another of the strip's opposing faces. A voltage source applies an AC voltage to the piezoelectric strip.

  1. Aligned carbon nanotubes for nanoelectronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Won Bong; Bae, Eunju; Kang, Donghun; Chae, Soodoo; Cheong, Byung-ho; Ko, Ju-hye; Lee, Eungmin; Park, Wanjun

    2004-10-01

    We discuss the central issues to be addressed for realizing carbon nanotube (CNT) nanoelectronics. We focus on selective growth, electron energy bandgap engineering and device integration. We have introduced a nanotemplate to control the selective growth, length and diameter of CNTs. Vertically aligned CNTs are synthesized for developing a vertical CNT-field effect transistor (FET). The ohmic contact of the CNT/metal interface is formed by rapid thermal annealing. Diameter control, synthesis of Y-shaped CNTs and surface modification of CNTs open up the possibility for energy bandgap modulation. The concepts of an ultra-high density transistor based on the vertical-CNT array and a nonvolatile memory based on the top gate structure with an oxide-nitride-oxide charge trap are also presented. We suggest that the deposited memory film can be used for the quantum dot storage due to the localized electric field created by a nano scale CNT-electron channel.

  2. Carbon nanotubes – becoming clean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole Grobert

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanotubes (CNTs are now well into their teenage years. Early on, theoretical predictions and experimental data showed that CNTs possess chemical and mechanical properties that exceed those of many other materials. This has triggered intense research into CNTs. A variety of production methods for CNTs have been developed; chemical modification, functionalization, filling, and doping have been achieved; and manipulation, separation, and characterization of individual CNTs is now possible. Today, products containing CNTs range from tennis rackets and golf clubs to vehicle fenders, X-ray tubes, and Li ion batteries. Breakthroughs for CNT-based technologies are anticipated in the areas of nanoelectronics, biotechnology, and materials science. In this article, I review the current situation in CNT production and highlight the importance of clean CNT material for the success of future applications.

  3. Carbon nanotube polymer composition and devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Gao; Johnson, Stephen; Kerr, John B.; Minor, Andrew M.; Mao, Samuel S.

    2011-06-14

    A thin film device and compound having an anode, a cathode, and at least one light emitting layer between the anode and cathode, the at least one light emitting layer having at least one carbon nanotube and a conductive polymer.

  4. Carbon nanotube heat-exchange systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendricks, Terry Joseph; Heben, Michael J.

    2008-11-11

    A carbon nanotube heat-exchange system (10) and method for producing the same. One embodiment of the carbon nanotube heat-exchange system (10) comprises a microchannel structure (24) having an inlet end (30) and an outlet end (32), the inlet end (30) providing a cooling fluid into the microchannel structure (24) and the outlet end (32) discharging the cooling fluid from the microchannel structure (24). At least one flow path (28) is defined in the microchannel structure (24), fluidically connecting the inlet end (30) to the outlet end (32) of the microchannel structure (24). A carbon nanotube structure (26) is provided in thermal contact with the microchannel structure (24), the carbon nanotube structure (26) receiving heat from the cooling fluid in the microchannel structure (24) and dissipating the heat into an external medium (19).

  5. A Thermal Model for Carbon Nanotube Interconnects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clay Mayberry

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we have studied Joule heating in carbon nanotube based very large scale integration (VLSI interconnects and incorporated Joule heating influenced scattering in our previously developed current transport model. The theoretical model explains breakdown in carbon nanotube resistance which limits the current density. We have also studied scattering parameters of carbon nanotube (CNT interconnects and compared with the earlier work. For 1 µm length single-wall carbon nanotube, 3 dB frequency in S12 parameter reduces to ~120 GHz from 1 THz considering Joule heating. It has been found that bias voltage has little effect on scattering parameters, while length has very strong effect on scattering parameters.

  6. Fabrication of porous carbon nanotube network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Jun-Wei; Fu, Shu-Juan; Gwo, Shangjr; Lin, Kuan-Jiuh; Lin, Kuna-Jiuh

    2008-11-21

    We used the spin-coating method combined with ultrasonic atomization as a continuous, one-step process to generate a two-dimensional honeycomb network that was constructed from pure multi-walled carbon nanotubes.

  7. Self Assembled Carbon Nanotube Enhanced Ultracapacitors Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The objective of this NASA STTR program is to develop single wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) based ultracapacitors for energy storage devices (ESD) application, using...

  8. Piezoresistive Sensors Based on Carbon Nanotube Films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    L(U) Jian-wei; WANG Wan-lu; LIAO Ke-jun; WANG Yong-tian; LIU CHang-lin; Zeng Qing-gao

    2005-01-01

    Piezoresistive effect of carbon nanotube films was investigated by a three-point bending test.Carbon nanotubes were synthesized by hot filament chemical vapor deposition.The experimental results showed that the carbon nanotubes have a striking piezoresistive effect.The relative resistance was changed from 0 to 10.5×10-2 and 3.25×10-2 for doped and undoped films respectively at room temperature when the microstrain under stress from 0 to 500. The gauge factors for doped and undoped carbon nanotube films under 500 microstrain were about 220 and 67 at room temperature, respectively, exceeding that of polycrystalline silicon (30) at 35℃.The origin of the resistance changes in the films may be attributed to a strain-induced change in the band gap for the doped tubes and the defects for the undoped tubes.

  9. Controlled Deposition and Alignment of Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smits, Jan M. (Inventor); Wincheski, Russell A. (Inventor); Patry, JoAnne L. (Inventor); Watkins, Anthony Neal (Inventor); Jordan, Jeffrey D. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A carbon nanotube (CNT) attraction material is deposited on a substrate in the gap region between two electrodes on the substrate. An electric potential is applied to the two electrodes. The CNT attraction material is wetted with a solution defined by a carrier liquid having carbon nanotubes (CNTs) suspended therein. A portion of the CNTs align with the electric field and adhere to the CNT attraction material. The carrier liquid and any CNTs not adhered to the CNT attraction material are then removed.

  10. Carbon nanotube temperature and pressure sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivanov, Ilia N.; Geohegan, David B.

    2016-12-13

    The present invention, in one embodiment, provides a method of measuring pressure or temperature using a sensor including a sensor element composed of a plurality of carbon nanotubes. In one example, the resistance of the plurality of carbon nanotubes is measured in response to the application of temperature or pressure. The changes in resistance are then recorded and correlated to temperature or pressure. In one embodiment, the present invention provides for independent measurement of pressure or temperature using the sensors disclosed herein.

  11. Carbon nanotube temperature and pressure sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivanov, Ilia N.; Geohegan, David B.

    2016-11-15

    The present invention, in one embodiment, provides a method of measuring pressure or temperature using a sensor including a sensor element composed of a plurality of carbon nanotubes. In one example, the resistance of the plurality of carbon nanotubes is measured in response to the application of temperature or pressure. The changes in resistance are then recorded and correlated to temperature or pressure. In one embodiment, the present invention provides for independent measurement of pressure or temperature using the sensors disclosed herein.

  12. Carbon nanotube temperature and pressure sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivanov, Ilia N.; Geohegan, David B.

    2016-10-25

    The present invention, in one embodiment, provides a method of measuring pressure or temperature using a sensor including a sensor element composed of a plurality of carbon nanotubes. In one example, the resistance of the plurality of carbon nanotubes is measured in response to the application of temperature or pressure. The changes in resistance are then recorded and correlated to temperature or pressure. In one embodiment, the present invention provides for independent measurement of pressure or temperature using the sensors disclosed herein.

  13. [Hygienic evaluation of multilayer carbon nanotubes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haliullin, T O; Zalyalov, R R; Shvedova, A A; Tkachov, A G

    2015-01-01

    The authors demonstrate that traditional methods evaluating work conditions on contemporary innovative enterprises producing nanomaterials assess these conditions as harmless and safe. At the same time, special investigation methods enable to reveal new hazards for workers' health: the study results prove that workers engaged into multilayer carbon nanotubes production are exposed to multilayer carbon nanotubes aerosols in concentrations exceeding internationally acceptable levels of 1 μg/ml (NIOSH)--that can harm the workers' health.

  14. Carbon nanotube temperature and pressure sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Ilia N; Geohegan, David Bruce

    2013-10-29

    The present invention, in one embodiment, provides a method of measuring pressure or temperature using a sensor including a sensor element composed of a plurality of carbon nanotubes. In one example, the resistance of the plurality of carbon nanotubes is measured in response to the application of temperature or pressure. The changes in resistance are then recorded and correlated to temperature or pressure. In one embodiment, the present invention provides for independent measurement of pressure or temperature using the sensors disclosed herein.

  15. Carbon nanotubes field effect transistors biosensors

    OpenAIRE

    Martínez, M.T.; Tseng, Y. C.; Ormategui, N.; Loinaz, I.; Eritja Casadellà, Ramón; Salvador, Juan Pablo; Marco, María Pilar; Bokor, J.

    2012-01-01

    [EN] Carbon nanotube transistor arrays (CNTFETs) were used as biosensors to detect NA hybridization and to recognize two anabolic steroids, stanozolol (Stz) and methylboldenone (MB). Single strand DNA and antibodies specific for STz and MB were immobilized on the carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in situ in the device using two different approaches: direct noncovalent bonding of antibodies to the devices and covalently trough a polymer previously attached to the CNTFETs. A new approach to ensure specif...

  16. Filling of carbon nanotubes and nanofibres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reece D. Gately

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The reliable production of carbon nanotubes and nanofibres is a relatively new development, and due to their unique structure, there has been much interest in filling their hollow interiors. In this review, we provide an overview of the most common approaches for filling these carbon nanostructures. We highlight that filled carbon nanostructures are an emerging material for biomedical applications.

  17. ON THE CONTINUUM MODELING OF CARBON NANOTUBES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张鹏; 黄永刚; Philippe H.Geubelle; 黄克智

    2002-01-01

    We have recently proposed a nanoscale continuum theory for carbonnanotubes. The theory links continuum analysis with atomistic modeling by incor-porating interatomic potentials and atomic structures of carbon nanotubes directlyinto the constitutive law. Here we address two main issues involved in setting upthe nanoscale continuum theory for carbon nanotubes, namely the multi-body in-teratomic potentials and the lack of centrosymmetry in the nanotube structure. Weexplain the key ideas behind these issues in establishing a nanoscale continuum theoryin terms of interatomic potentials and atomic structures.

  18. Preparation of novel curcumin-imprinted polymers based on magnetic multi-walled carbon nanotubes for the rapid extraction of curcumin from ginger powder and kiwi fruit root.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhaohui; Chen, Xing; Rao, Wei; Long, Fang; Yan, Liang; Yin, Yuli

    2015-01-01

    A novel molecularly imprinted polymer based on magnetic phenyl-modified multi-walled carbon nanotubes was synthesized using curcumin as the template molecule, methacrylic acid as the functional monomer and ethylene glycol dimethacrylate as the cross-linker. The phenyl groups contained in the magnetic imprinted polymers acted as the assisting functional monomer. The magnetic imprinted polymers were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy and vibrating sample magnetometry. Adsorption studies demonstrated that the magnetic imprinted polymers possessed excellent selectivity toward curcumin with a maximum capacity of 16.80 mg/g. Combining magnetic extraction and high-performance liquid chromatography technology, the magnetic imprinted polymer based on magnetic phenyl-modified multi-walled carbon nanotubes was applied for the rapid separation and enrichment of curcumin from ginger powder and kiwi fruit root successfully.

  19. Hydrogen isotherms in palladium loaded carbon nanotubes and activated carbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez, M. T.; Anson, A.; Lafuente, E.; Urriolabeitia, E.; Navarro, R.; Benito, A. M.; Maser, W. K.

    2005-07-01

    Session 5a In order to increase the hydrogen sorption capacity of carbon materials, a sample of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and the activated carbon MAXSORB have been loaded with palladium nanoparticles. While carbon materials adsorb hydrogen due to physical interactions, palladium can capture hydrogen into the bulk structure or chemically react to form hydrides. Experiental SWNTs have been synthesized in an electric arc reactor, using Ni and Y as catalysts in a 660 mbar He atmosphere. MAXSORB is a commercial activated carbon obtained from petroleum coke through a chemical treatment with KOH. Palladium has been deposited over the carbon support by means of a reflux method in a solution of an organometallic complex. Different samples have been prepared depending on the weight ratio (Carbon material / Pd) in the original reactants. The effectiveness of the deposition method has been examined by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD), induction coupled plasma spectrometry (ICPS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The volumetric system Autosorb-1 from Quantachrome Instruments has been used to obtain the nitrogen adsorption isotherms at 77 K for all the materials. The hydrogen isotherms at 77 K and room temperature and up to 800 torr have also been obtained in the Autosorb-1. The BET specific surface area and the micropore volume have been calculated from the nitrogen adsorption data. High pressure hydrogen isotherms up to 90 bar have been carried out at room temperature in a VTI system provided with a Rubotherm microbalance. (Author)

  20. Method for nano-pumping using carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Insepov, Zeke; Hassanein, Ahmed

    2009-12-15

    The present invention relates generally to the field of nanotechnology, carbon nanotubes and, more specifically, to a method and system for nano-pumping media through carbon nanotubes. One preferred embodiment of the invention generally comprises: method for nano-pumping, comprising the following steps: providing one or more media; providing one or more carbon nanotubes, the one or more nanotubes having a first end and a second end, wherein said first end of one or more nanotubes is in contact with the media; and creating surface waves on the carbon nanotubes, wherein at least a portion of the media is pumped through the nanotube.

  1. Electrochemical detection of nanomolar dopamine in the presence of neurophysiological concentration of ascorbic acid and uric acid using charge-coated carbon nanotubes via facile and green preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Jeong-Wook; Yoon, Yeo Woon; Heo, Jihye; Yu, Joonhee; Kim, Hasuck; Kim, Tae Hyun

    2016-01-15

    Negatively charged multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were prepared using simple sonication technique with non-toxic citric acid (CA) for the electrochemical detection of dopamine (DA). CA/MWCNTs were placed on glassy carbon (GC) electrodes by drop-casting method and then electrochemical determinations of DA were performed in the presence of highly concentrated ascorbic acid (AA). For the comparison of the charge effect on MWCNTs surface, positively charged polyethyleneimine (PEI)/MWCNT/GC electrode and pristine MWCNT/GC electrode were also prepared. Contrary to conventional GC electrode, all three types of MWCNT modified electrodes (CA/MWCNT/GC, PEI/MWCNT/GC, and pristine MWCNT/GC) can discriminate ~μM of DA from 1mM AA using cyclic voltammetry (CV) and differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) due to the inherent electrocatalytic effect of MWCNTs. Compared to positively charged PEI/MWCNT/GC and pristine MWCNT/GC electrodes, negatively charged CA/MWCNT/GC electrode remarkably enhanced the electrochemical sensitivity and selectivity of DA, showing the linear relationship between DPV signal and DA concentration in the range of 10-1000nM even in the presence of ~10(5) times concentrated AA, which is attributed to the synergistic effect of the electrostatic interaction between cationic DA molecules and negatively charged MWCNTs and the inherent electrocatalytic property of MWCNT. As a result, the limit of detection (LOD) of DA for CA/MWCNT/GC electrode was 4.2nM, which is 5.2 and 16.5 times better than those for MWCNT/GC electrode and PEI/MWCNT/GC electrode even in the presence of 1mM AA. This LOD value for DA at CA/MWCNT/GC electrode is one of the lowest values compared to the previous reports and is low enough for the early diagnosis of neurological disorder in the presence of physiological AA concentration (~0.5mM). In addition, the high selectivity and sensitivity of DA at CA/MWCNT/GC electrode were well kept even in the presence of both 1mM AA and 10μM uric acid

  2. Fast readout of carbon nanotube mechanical resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meerwaldt, Harold; Singh, Vibhor; Schneider, Ben; Schouten, Raymond; van der Zant, Herre; Steele, Gary

    2013-03-01

    We perform fast readout measurements of carbon nanotube mechanical resonators. Using an electronic mixing scheme, we can detect the amplitude of the mechanical motion with an intermediate frequency (IF) of 46 MHz and a timeconstant of 1 us, up to 5 orders of magnitude faster than before. Previous measurements suffered from a low bandwidth due to the combination of the high resistance of the carbon nanotube and a large stray capacitance. We have increased the bandwidth significantly by using a high-impedance, close-proximity HEMT amplifier. The increased bandwidth should allow us to observe the nanotube's thermal motion and its transient response, approaching the regime of real-time detection of the carbon nanotube's mechanical motion.

  3. Manipulation and cutting of carbon nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Nanomanipulation plays an important role in nanofabrication, it is also a technology necessary in exploring the secrets of nanoworld, and it thus beco mesa start point to research future nanomachine. In this study, manipulation and cutting of carbon nanotubes have been conducted in order to examine whether we can move a nanocomponent from one site to another by using the tip of atomic fo rce microscope (AFM). The technique may also be valuable for providing the const ructive materials of nanofabrication. While exploring the method for manipulatin g and cutting of nanotubes, some new phenomena have been observed during the process. Results show that carbon nanotubes present a feature of deformation combin ing bending and distortion when subjected to large mechanical forces exerted by the tip of AFM. In special cases, long carbon nanotubes can be cut into two part s, by which we can remove the part where crystal lattice is flawed, and therefor e a perfect nanocomponent can be obtained.

  4. Carbon nanotubes and graphene towards soft electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chae, Sang Hoon; Lee, Young Hee

    2014-04-01

    Although silicon technology has been the main driving force for miniaturizing device dimensions to improve cost and performance, the current application of Si to soft electronics (flexible and stretchable electronics) is limited due to material rigidity. As a result, various prospective materials have been proposed to overcome the rigidity of conventional Si technology. In particular, nano-carbon materials such as carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and graphene are promising due to outstanding elastic properties as well as an excellent combination of electronic, optoelectronic, and thermal properties compared to conventional rigid silicon. The uniqueness of these nano-carbon materials has opened new possibilities for soft electronics, which is another technological trend in the market. This review covers the recent progress of soft electronics research based on CNTs and graphene. We discuss the strategies for soft electronics with nano-carbon materials and their preparation methods (growth and transfer techniques) to devices as well as the electrical characteristics of transparent conducting films (transparency and sheet resistance) and device performances in field effect transistor (FET) (structure, carrier type, on/off ratio, and mobility). In addition to discussing state of the art performance metrics, we also attempt to clarify trade-off issues and methods to control the trade-off on/off versus mobility). We further demonstrate accomplishments of the CNT network in flexible integrated circuits on plastic substrates that have attractive characteristics. A future research direction is also proposed to overcome current technological obstacles necessary to realize commercially feasible soft electronics.

  5. Static and dynamic wetting measurements of single carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, Asa H; Cohen, Sidney R; Wagner, H Daniel

    2004-05-07

    Individual carbon nanotubes were immersed and removed from various organic liquids using atomic force microscopy. The carbon nanotube-liquid interactions could be monitored in situ, and accurate measurements of the contact angle between liquids and the nanotube surface were made. These wetting data were used to produce Owens and Wendt plots giving the dispersive and polar components of the nanotube surface.

  6. Low-temperature selective catalytic reduction of NO with NH3 over nanoflaky MnOx on carbon nanotubes in situ prepared via a chemical bath deposition route

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Cheng; Zhang, Dengsong; Cai, Sixiang; Zhang, Lei; Huang, Lei; Li, Hongrui; Maitarad, Phornphimon; Shi, Liyi; Gao, Ruihua; Zhang, Jianping

    2013-09-01

    Nanoflaky MnOx on carbon nanotubes (nf-MnOx@CNTs) was in situ synthesized by a facile chemical bath deposition route for low-temperature selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NO with NH3. This catalyst was mainly characterized by the techniques of X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), N2 adsorption-desorption analysis, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), H2 temperature-programmed reduction (H2-TPR) and NH3 temperature-programmed desorption (NH3-TPD). The SEM, TEM, XRD results and N2 adsorption-desorption analysis indicated that the CNTs were surrounded by nanoflaky MnOx and the obtained catalyst exhibited a large surface area as well. Compared with the MnOx/CNT and MnOx/TiO2 catalysts prepared by an impregnation method, the nf-MnOx@CNTs presented better NH3-SCR activity at low temperature and a more extensive operating temperature window. The XPS results showed that a higher atomic concentration of Mn4+ and more chemisorbed oxygen species existed on the surface of CNTs for nf-MnOx@CNTs. The H2-TPR and NH3-TPD results demonstrated that the nf-MnOx@CNTs possessed stronger reducing ability, more acid sites and stronger acid strength than the other two catalysts. Based on the above mentioned favourable properties, the nf-MnOx@CNT catalyst has an excellent performance in the low-temperature SCR of NO to N2 with NH3. In addition, the nf-MnOx@CNT catalyst also presented favourable stability and H2O resistance.Nanoflaky MnOx on carbon nanotubes (nf-MnOx@CNTs) was in situ synthesized by a facile chemical bath deposition route for low-temperature selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NO with NH3. This catalyst was mainly characterized by the techniques of X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), N2 adsorption-desorption analysis, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), H2 temperature-programmed reduction (H2-TPR) and NH3 temperature

  7. Polymerization initated at sidewalls of carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tour, James M. (Inventor); Hudson, Jared L. (Inventor); Krishnamoorti, Ramanan (Inventor); Yurekli, Koray (Inventor); Mitchell, Cynthia A. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    The present invention is directed to aryl halide (such as aryl bromide) functionalized carbon nanotubes that can be utilized in anionic polymerization processes to form polymer-carbon nanotube materials with improved dispersion ability in polymer matrices. In this process the aryl halide is reacted with an alkyllithium species or is reacted with a metal to replace the aryl-bromine bond with an aryl-lithium or aryl-metal bond, respectively. It has further been discovered that other functionalized carbon nanotubes, after deprotonation with a deprotonation agent, can similarly be utilized in anionic polymerization processes to form polymer-carbon nanotube materials. Additionally or alternatively, a ring opening polymerization process can be performed. The resultant materials can be used by themselves due to their enhanced strength and reinforcement ability when compared to their unbound polymer analogs. Additionally, these materials can also be blended with pre-formed polymers to establish compatibility and enhanced dispersion of nanotubes in otherwise hard to disperse matrices resulting in significantly improved material properties. The resultant polymer-carbon nanotube materials can also be used in drug delivery processes due to their improved dispersion ability and biodegradability, and can also be used for scaffolding to promote cellular growth of tissue.

  8. Preparation of molecularly imprinted polymers on the surface of magnetic carbon nanotubes with a pseudo template for rapid simultaneous extraction of four fluoroquinolones in egg samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Deli; Dramou, Pierre; Xiong, Nanqian; He, Hua; Yuan, Danhua; Dai, Hao; Li, Hui; He, Xiaomei; Peng, Jun; Li, Nan

    2013-06-07

    Fluoroquinolones (FQs) have emerged as one of the most important class of antibiotics. Due to their low concentration in bio-matrix samples which contain a lot of interfering substances, the efficient solid phase extraction and accurate determination of FQs remain a challenge. In this paper, a new strategy for the isolation and enrichment of FQs from egg samples was obtained by molecularly imprinted polymers on the surface of magnetic carbon nanotubes (MCNTs@MIP), which not only can be collected and separated rapidly by an external magnetic field, but also have a high specific surface area, outstanding mechanical properties and specific recognition for FQs. MCNTs@MIP were prepared using ofloxacin as a pseudo template, methacrylic acid as a functional monomer, and ethylene glycol dimethacrylate as a cross-linker. The characteristics of the MCNTs@MIP were assessed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), multipoint Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) analysis, vibrating sample magnetometry (VSM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. The results of the adsorption experiments not only demonstrated rapid dynamic adsorption but also showed a high selectivity toward FQs. An extraction method using MCNTs@MIP coupled with high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) was developed for the determination of four FQs in egg samples. The recovery of four FQs ranged from 95.2% ± 3.2% to 100.7% ± 3.1% and the detection limits ranged from 0.25-0.40 ng g(-1). The results demonstrate that the proposed method based on pseudo template MCNTs@MIP is a promising approach for the preconcentration, purification, and simultaneous analysis of four FQs in bio-matrix samples.

  9. Low-temperature selective catalytic reduction of NO with NH₃ over nanoflaky MnOx on carbon nanotubes in situ prepared via a chemical bath deposition route.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Cheng; Zhang, Dengsong; Cai, Sixiang; Zhang, Lei; Huang, Lei; Li, Hongrui; Maitarad, Phornphimon; Shi, Liyi; Gao, Ruihua; Zhang, Jianping

    2013-10-07

    Nanoflaky MnO(x) on carbon nanotubes (nf-MnO(x)@CNTs) was in situ synthesized by a facile chemical bath deposition route for low-temperature selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NO with NH₃. This catalyst was mainly characterized by the techniques of X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), N₂ adsorption-desorption analysis, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), H₂ temperature-programmed reduction (H₂-TPR) and NH₃ temperature-programmed desorption (NH₃-TPD). The SEM, TEM, XRD results and N₂ adsorption-desorption analysis indicated that the CNTs were surrounded by nanoflaky MnO(x) and the obtained catalyst exhibited a large surface area as well. Compared with the MnO(x)/CNT and MnO(x)/TiO₂ catalysts prepared by an impregnation method, the nf-MnO(x)@CNTs presented better NH₃-SCR activity at low temperature and a more extensive operating temperature window. The XPS results showed that a higher atomic concentration of Mn(4+) and more chemisorbed oxygen species existed on the surface of CNTs for nf-MnO(x)@CNTs. The H₂-TPR and NH₃-TPD results demonstrated that the nf-MnO(x)@CNTs possessed stronger reducing ability, more acid sites and stronger acid strength than the other two catalysts. Based on the above mentioned favourable properties, the nf-MnO(x)@CNT catalyst has an excellent performance in the low-temperature SCR of NO to N₂ with NH₃. In addition, the nf-MnO(x)@CNT catalyst also presented favourable stability and H₂O resistance.

  10. The Effect of Functionalization Carbon Nanotubes (CNTs on the Performance of PES-CNTs Mixed Matrix Membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Mustafa

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available A new type of mixed matrix membrane consisting of functionalized carbon nanotubes (CNTs and polyethersulfone (PES is prepared for biogas purification. PES mixed matrix membrane with and without modification of carbon nanotubes were prepared by a dry/wet phase inversion technique using a pneumatically flat sheet membrane casting machine system. The modified carbon nanotubes were prepared by treating the carbon nanotubes with chemical modification using Dynasylan Ameo (DA silane agent to allow PES chains to be grafted on carbon nanotubes surface. The results from the FESEM, DSC and FTIR analysis confirmed that chemical modification on carbon nanotubes surface had taken place. Meanwhile, the nanogaps in the interface of polymer and carbon nanotubes were appeared in the PES mixed matrix membrane with unmodified of carbon nanotubes. The modified carbon nanotubes mixed matrix membrane increases the mechanical properties, the productivity and purity of biogas. For PES-modified carbon nanotubes mixed matrix membrane the maximum selectivity achieved for CO2/CH4 is 36.78

  11. Oscillatory characteristics of carbon nanotubes inside carbon nanotube bundles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, R.; Alipour, A.; Sadeghi, F.

    2012-12-01

    This article presents a comprehensive study on the mechanics of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) oscillating in CNT bundles. Using the continuum approximation along with Lennard-Jones (LJ) potential function, new semi-analytical expressions in terms of double integrals are presented to evaluate van der Waals (vdW) potential energy and interaction force upon which the equation of motion is directly solved. The obtained potential expression enables one to arrive at a new semi-analytical formula for the exact evaluation of oscillation frequency. Also, an algebraic frequency formula is extracted on the basis of the simplifying assumption of constant vdW force. Based on the present expressions, a thorough study on various aspects of operating frequencies under different system parameters is given, which permits fresh insight into the problem. The strong dependence of oscillation frequency on system parameters, such as the extrusion distance and initial velocity of the core as initial conditions for the motion is indicated. Interestingly, a specific initial velocity is found at which the oscillation frequency is independent of the core length. In addition, a relation between this specific initial velocity and the escape velocity is disclosed.

  12. Carbon nanotube electrodes for hot-wire electrochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gründler, Peter; Frank, Otakar; Kavan, Ladislav; Dunsch, Lothar

    2009-02-23

    The use and preparation of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) at thin metallic wire electrodes for hot-wire electrochemical studies is described. The nanotubes were deposited on metal substrates such as gold by electrophoresis from a dispersion containing sodium dodecyl sulphate as an anionic surfactant. The formation of a layer of pure SWCNTs is achieved by thermal treatment at 350 degrees C. When heated in situ by a strong ac current, the electrodes can be used for electrochemical studies of nanotubes at increased temperatures. The state and functionality of the electrodes were characterized by Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and cyclic voltammetry with both anionic and cationic redox systems (dopamine, ferrocene carboxylic acid). First time experiments at the heated SWCNT electrodes demonstrated an excellent suitability of these as-prepared electrodes for thermoelectrochemical studies.

  13. Effect of aligned carbon nanotubes on electrical conductivity behaviour in polycarbonate matrix

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M M Larijani; E J Khamse; Z Asadollahi; M Asadi

    2012-06-01

    This article reports effects of alignment of embedded carbon nanotubes in a polycarbonate polymer matrix under magnetic, direct and alternating current electric fields on the electrical properties of the resulting nanocomposites. Composites consisting of different quantities of carbon nanotubes in a polycarbonate matrix have been prepared using a solution casting technique. The effects of field strength and nanotube concentration on the resulted network structure and conductivity of the composites were studied by in situ optical microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and four-point probe technique. The results showed that the composites prepared in the presence of field had better conductivity than those of as-prepared composites. It was also concluded that the application of alternating current electric field and magnetic field in this system led to the formation of relatively continuing networks while direct current electric field only prevented agglomeration of the carbon nanotubes in the polycarbonate matrix and created relatively uniform distribution of nanotubes in the matrix.

  14. FIB-SEM imaging of carbon nanotubes in mouse lung tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Købler, Carsten; Saber, Anne Thoustrup; Jacobsen, Nicklas Raun

    2014-01-01

    Ultrastructural characterisation is important for understanding carbon nanotube (CNT) toxicity and how the CNTs interact with cells and tissues. The standard method for this involves using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). However, in particular, the sample preparation, using a microtome...

  15. Preparation of Carbon-nanotube Reinforced Mg Based Bulk Metallic Glass Composites and Its Mechanical Properties%碳纳米管—镁基非晶复合材料的制备及力学性能

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵平; 李双寿; 彭浩; 刘金海

    2011-01-01

    Carbon-nanotube reinforced Mg-based bulk metallic glass composites were prepared successfully with copper mold by differential pressure casting. Moreover, the microstructure, compressive behavior, fracture strength as well as fracture morphology of the composites were investigated. The results show that there exists desirable bonding between carbon-nanotube particle and the Mg-based bulk metallic glass, and the glass forming ability and thermal stability of the Mg-based bulk metallic glass can not be apparently changed by the induction of carbon-nanotube particle. Compared with the matrix a-morphous alloy, the composites exhibit obvious advantages in the maximum compressive strength and fracture displacement. Carbon-nanotube is uniformly distributed into the matrix amorphous alloy in the absence of large-area colony, meanwhile, amounts of dimple structure in the fracture morphology of the composites can be observed.%采用铜模差压压铸的方法成功制备了碳纳米管颗粒增强镁基非晶复合材料,并对其微观结构、压缩性能、断裂强度及断口形貌进行了研究.结果表明,碳纳米管颗粒与非晶基体结合良好,其引入没有明显改变基体非晶合金的玻璃形成能力和热稳定性能;与非晶合金相比,复合材料的最大压缩强度及断裂位移有明显提高.碳纳米管在基体中复合的比较均匀,没有出现大面积团聚,并形成很多韧窝结构.

  16. 75 FR 56880 - Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes and Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes; Significant New Use Rules

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-17

    ... structural characteristics entitled ``Material Characterization of Carbon Nanotubes for Molecular Identity... AGENCY 40 CFR Parts 9 and 721 RIN 2070-AB27 Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes and Single-Walled Carbon...). The two chemical substances are identified generically as multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) (PMN...

  17. Carbon nanotube ecotoxicity in amphibians: assessment of multiwalled carbon nanotubes and comparison with double-walled carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouchet, Florence; Landois, Perine; Puech, Pascal; Pinelli, Eric; Flahaut, Emmanuel; Gauthier, Laury

    2010-08-01

    The potential impact of industrial multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) was investigated under normalized laboratory conditions according to the International Standard micronucleus assay ISO 21427-1 for 12 days of half-static exposure to 0.1, 1, 10 and 50 mg/l of MWNTs in water. Three different end points were carried out for 12 days of exposure: mortality, growth inhibition and micronuclei induction in erythrocytes of the circulating blood of larvae. Raman spectroscopy analysis was used to study the presence of carbon nanotubes in the biological samples. Considering the high diversity of carbon nanotubes according to their different characteristics, MWNTs were analyzed in Xenopus larvae, comparatively to double-walled carbon nanotubes used in a previous study in similar conditions. Growth inhibition in larvae exposed to 50 mg/l of MWNTs was evidenced; however, no genetoxicity (micronucleus assay) was noticed, at any concentration. Carbon nanotube localization in the larvae leads to different possible hypothesis of mechanisms explaining toxicity in Xenopus.

  18. Carbon Nanotube-Based Synthetic Gecko Tapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhinojwala, Ali

    2008-03-01

    Wall-climbing geckos have unique ability to attach to different surfaces without the use of any viscoelastic glues. On coming in contact with any surface, the micron-size gecko foot-hairs deform, enabling molecular contact over large areas, thus translating weak van der Waals (vdW) interactions into enormous shear forces. We will present our recent results on the development of synthetic gecko tape using aligned carbon nanotubes to mimic the keratin hairs found on gecko feet. The patterned carbon nanotube-based gecko tape can support a shear stress (36 N/cm^2) nearly four times higher than the gecko foot and sticks to a variety of surfaces, including Teflon. Both the micron-size setae (replicated by nanotube bundles) and nanometer-size spatulas (individual nanotubes) are necessary to achieve macroscopic shear adhesion and to translate the weak vdW interactions into high shear forces. The carbon nanotube based tape offers an excellent synthetic option as a dry conductive reversible adhesive in microelectronics, robotics and space applications. The mechanism behind these large shear forces and self-cleaning properties of these carbon nanotube based synthetic gecko tapes will be discussed. This work was performed in collaboration with graduate students Liehui Ge, and Sunny Sethi, and collaborators from RPI; Lijie Ci and Professor Pulickel Ajayan.

  19. Novel method to prepare multiwalled carbon nanotube/poly(dimethyl siloxane) (MWCNT/PDMS) non-conducting composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goswami, Kaustav; Daugaard, Anders Egede; Skov, Anne Ladegaard

    due to a localized distribution of CNT. Ultrasonicated and dispersed multiwalled CNTs were mixed with short chain ,- vinyl terminated PDMS. When the whole mixture containing dispersed CNT and short chain PDMS was irradiated with UV radiation in presence of deficient amount of hexa functional thiol...... PDMS crosslinker and a photoinitiator, hyperbranced PDMS layer was formed over the CNTs. The prepared hyperbranched CNTs were mixed in different weight ratios (0.33%, 0.66%, 1%) with long chain ,- vinyl terminated PDMS and crosslinked subsequently with the same hexa functional thiol PDMS via UV...... photoinitiated thiol-ene chemistry to obtain the networks. Rheology of the prepared networks showed a gradual decrease in storage modulus (G’) in the entire frequency range as the amount of CNT was increased due to a reduction in crosslinking density imposed by the CNT was increased due to a reduction...

  20. A carbon nanotube wall membrane for water treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Byeongho; Baek, Youngbin; Lee, Minwoo; Jeong, Dae Hong; Lee, Hong H; Yoon, Jeyong; Kim, Yong Hyup

    2015-05-14

    Various forms of carbon nanotubes have been utilized in water treatment applications. The unique characteristics of carbon nanotubes, however, have not been fully exploited for such applications. Here we exploit the characteristics and corresponding attributes of carbon nanotubes to develop a millimetre-thick ultrafiltration membrane that can provide a water permeability that approaches 30,000 l m(-2) h(-1) bar(-1), compared with the best water permeability of 2,400 l m(-2) h(-1) bar(-1) reported for carbon nanotube membranes. The developed membrane consists only of vertically aligned carbon nanotube walls that provide 6-nm-wide inner pores and 7-nm-wide outer pores that form between the walls of the carbon nanotubes when the carbon nanotube forest is densified. The experimental results reveal that the permeance increases as the pore size decreases. The carbon nanotube walls of the membrane are observed to impede bacterial adhesion and resist biofilm formation.

  1. A Review: Carbon Nanotube-Based Piezoresistive Strain Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waris Obitayo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of carbon nanotubes for piezoresistive strain sensors has acquired significant attention due to its unique electromechanical properties. In this comprehensive review paper, we discussed some important aspects of carbon nanotubes for strain sensing at both the nanoscale and macroscale. Carbon nanotubes undergo changes in their band structures when subjected to mechanical deformations. This phenomenon makes them applicable for strain sensing applications. This paper signifies the type of carbon nanotubes best suitable for piezoresistive strain sensors. The electrical resistivities of carbon nanotube thin film increase linearly with strain, making it an ideal material for a piezoresistive strain sensor. Carbon nanotube composite films, which are usually fabricated by mixing small amounts of single-walled or multiwalled carbon nanotubes with selected polymers, have shown promising characteristics of piezoresistive strain sensors. Studies also show that carbon nanotubes display a stable and predictable voltage response as a function of temperature.

  2. Methods for Gas Sensing with Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaul, Anupama B. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    Methods for gas sensing with single-walled carbon nanotubes are described. The methods comprise biasing at least one carbon nanotube and exposing to a gas environment to detect variation in temperature as an electrical response.

  3. Release characteristics of selected carbon nanotube polymer composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) are commonly used in polymer formulations to improve strength, conductivity, and other attributes. A developing concern is the potential for carbon nanotube polymer nanocomposites to release nanoparticles into the environment as the polymer ...

  4. Carbon Nanotube Reinforced Polymers for Radiation Shielding Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thibeault, S. (Technical Monitor); Vaidyanathan, Ranji

    2004-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation provides information on the use of Extrusion Freeform Fabrication (EEF) for the fabrication of carbon nanotubes. The presentation addresses TGA analysis, Raman spectroscopy, radiation tests, and mechanical properties of the carbon nanotubes.

  5. Physical Removal of Metallic Carbon Nanotubes from Nanotube Network Devices Using a Thermal and Fluidic Process

    OpenAIRE

    Ford, Alexandra C.; Shaughnessy, Michael; Wong, Bryan M.; Kane, Alexander A.; Kuznetsov, Oleksandr V.; Krafcik, Karen L.; Billups, W. E.; Hauge, Robert H.; Léonard, François

    2013-01-01

    Electronic and optoelectronic devices based on thin films of carbon nanotubes are currently limited by the presence of metallic nanotubes. Here we present a novel approach based on nanotube alkyl functionalization to physically remove the metallic nanotubes from such network devices. The process relies on preferential thermal desorption of the alkyls from the semiconducting nanotubes and the subsequent dissolution and selective removal of the metallic nanotubes in chloroform. The approach is ...

  6. Carbon Nanotube Tower-Based Supercapacitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyyappan, Meyya (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A supercapacitor system, including (i) first and second, spaced apart planar collectors, (ii) first and second arrays of multi-wall carbon nanotube (MWCNT) towers or single wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) towers, serving as electrodes, that extend between the first and second collectors where the nanotube towers are grown directly on the collector surfaces without deposition of a catalyst and without deposition of a binder material on the collector surfaces, and (iii) a porous separator module having a transverse area that is substantially the same as the transverse area of at least one electrode, where (iv) at least one nanotube tower is functionalized to permit or encourage the tower to behave as a hydrophilic structure, with increased surface wettability.

  7. Carbon Nanotube-Based Permeable Membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holt, J K; Park, H G; Bakajin, O; Noy, A; Huser, T; Eaglesham, D

    2004-04-06

    A membrane of multiwalled carbon nanotubes embedded in a silicon nitride matrix was fabricated for use in studying fluid mechanics on the nanometer scale. Characterization by fluorescent tracer diffusion and scanning electron microscopy suggests that the membrane is void-free near the silicon substrate on which it rests, implying that the hollow core of the nanotube is the only conduction path for molecular transport. Assuming Knudsen diffusion through this nanotube membrane, a maximum helium transport rate (for a pressure drop of 1 atm) of 0.25 cc/sec is predicted. Helium flow measurements of a nanoporous silicon nitride membrane, fabricated by sacrificial removal of carbon, give a flow rate greater than 1x10{sup -6} cc/sec. For viscous, laminar flow conditions, water is estimated to flow across the nanotube membrane (under a 1 atm pressure drop) at up to 2.8x10{sup -5} cc/sec (1.7 {micro}L/min).

  8. Functionalized carbon nanotubes for potential medicinal applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yi; Bai, Yuhong; Yan, Bing

    2010-06-01

    Functionalized carbon nanotubes display unique properties that enable a variety of medicinal applications, including the diagnosis and treatment of cancer, infectious diseases and central nervous system disorders, and applications in tissue engineering. These potential applications are particularly encouraged by their ability to penetrate biological membranes and relatively low toxicity. High aspect ratio, unique optical property and the likeness as small molecule make carbon nanotubes an unusual allotrope of element carbon. After functionalization, carbon nanotubes display potentials for a variety of medicinal applications, including the diagnosis and treatment of cancer, infectious diseases and central nervous system disorders, and applications in tissue engineering. These potential applications are particularly encouraged by their ability to penetrate biological membranes and relatively low toxicity.

  9. Carbon Nanotubes and Chronic Granulomatous Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara P. Barna

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Use of nanomaterials in manufactured consumer products is a rapidly expanding industry and potential toxicities are just beginning to be explored. Combustion-generated multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNT or nanoparticles are ubiquitous in non-manufacturing environments and detectable in vapors from diesel fuel, methane, propane, and natural gas. In experimental animal models, carbon nanotubes have been shown to induce granulomas or other inflammatory changes. Evidence suggesting potential involvement of carbon nanomaterials in human granulomatous disease, has been gathered from analyses of dusts generated in the World Trade Center disaster combined with epidemiological data showing a subsequent increase in granulomatous disease of first responders. In this review we will discuss evidence for similarities in the pathophysiology of carbon nanotube-induced pulmonary disease in experimental animals with that of the human granulomatous disease, sarcoidosis.

  10. A single carbon fiber microelectrode with branching carbon nanotubes for bioelectrochemical processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xueyan; Lu, Xin; Tze, William T Y; Wang, Ping

    2010-06-15

    Carbon fiber electrodes are greatly promising for microelectronic applications including high performance biosensors, miniaturized transmitters, and energy storage and generation devices. For biosensor applications, one drawback of using carbon fiber microelectrodes, especially single fiber electrodes, is the weak electronic signals, a consequence of low surface area of fibers, which ultimately limit the sensitivity of the sensors. In this paper, we report a novel single fiber microelectrode with branched carbon nanotubes for enhanced sensing performance. The fiber microelectrode was prepared from carbonization of cellulose fibers. Upon introduction of carbon nanotubes, the carbon fibers exhibited a significant increase in the specific surface area from carbon nanotubes enhanced the redox reactions on surfaces of the electrode by reducing the oxidation potential of NAD(H) from 0.8 to 0.55 V. The single carbon fiber with branched nanotubes was also examined for the detection of glycerol, and the results showed linear responding signals in a concentration range of 40-250 microM. These results are comparable to the properties of fossil-based carbon materials, and thus our cellulose-based carbon electrodes provide a potentially sustainable alternative in bioelectrochemical applications.

  11. Preparation of water-soluble multi-walled carbon nanotubes by Ce(Ⅳ)-induced redox radical polymerization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dong Yang; Xiaohong Zhang; Changchun Wang; Yuechao Tang; Junjun Li; Jianhua Hu

    2009-01-01

    Poly(acrylic acid), poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) and polyacrylamide functionalized MWNTs were prepared by Ce(IV)-induced redox radical polymerization. The reaction can be conducted in aqueous media at room temperature, and the polymer graft ratio increased with the increase of monomer feed ratio. MWNTs anchored with PAA on the surface are pH sensitive and exhibit a reversible assembly-deas-sembly response in aqueous solution, whereas those coated with PNIPAM are thermally sensitive. All the polymer-functionalized MWNTs are highly soluble in water to give robust stable black solutions. Such water-soluble MWNTs are promising for biological and biomedical applications.

  12. Localized Excitons in Carbon Nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamska, Lyudmyla; Doorn, Stephen K.; Tretiak, Sergei

    2015-03-01

    It has been historically known that unintentional defects in carbon nanotubes (CNTs) may fully quench the fluorescence. However, some dopants may enhance the fluorescence by one order of magnitude thus turning the CNTs, which are excellent light absorbers, in good emitters. We have correlated the experimentally observed photoluminescence spectra to the electronic structure simulations. Our experiment reveals multiple sharp asymmetric emission peaks at energies 50-300 meV red-shifted from that of the lowest bright exciton peak. Our simulations suggest an association of these peaks with deep trap states tied to different specific chemical adducts. While the wave functions of excitons in undoped CNTs are delocalized, those of the deep-trap states are strongly localized and pinned to the dopants. These findings are consistent with the experimental observation of asymmetric broadening of the deep trap emission peaks, which can result from scattering of acoustic phonons on localized excitons. Our work lays the foundation to utilize doping as a generalized route for wave function engineering and direct control of carrier dynamics in SWCNTs toward enhanced light emission properties for photonic applications.

  13. Thermal Transport in Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christman, Jeremy; Moore, Andrew; Khatun, Mahfuza

    2011-10-01

    Recent advances in nanostructure technology have made it possible to create small devices at the nanoscale. Carbon nanotubes (CNT's) are among the most exciting building blocks of nanotechnology. Their versatility and extremely desirable properties for electronic and other devices have driven intense research and development efforts in recent years. A review of electrical and thermal conduction of the structures will be presented. The theoretical investigation is mainly based on molecular dynamics. Green Kubo relation is used for the study of thermal conductivity. Results include kinetic energy, potential energy, heat flux autocorrelation function, and heat conduction of various CNT structures. Most of the computation and simulation has been conducted on the Beowulf cluster at Ball State University. Various software packages and tools such as Visual Molecular Dynamics (VMD), Large-scale Atomic/Molecular Massively Parallel Simulator (LAMMPS), and NanoHUB, the open online resource at Purdue University have been used for the research. The work has been supported by the Indiana Academy of Science Research Fund, 2010-2011.

  14. Pristine carbon nanotubes based resistive temperature sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Md Bayazeed; Saini, Sudhir Kumar; Sharma, Daya Shankar; Agarwal, Pankaj B.

    2016-04-01

    A good sensor must be highly sensitive, faster in response, of low cost cum easily producible, and highly reliable. Incorporation of nano-dimensional particles/ wires makes conventional sensors more effective in terms of fulfilling the above requirements. For example, Carbon Nanotubes (CNTs) are promising sensing element because of its large aspect ratio, unique electronic and thermal properties. In addition to their use for widely reported chemical sensing, it has also been explored for temperature sensing. This paper presents the fabrication of CNTs based temperature sensor, prepared on silicon substrate using low cost spray coating method, which is reliable and reproducible method to prepare uniform CNTs thin films on any substrate. Besides this, simple and inexpensive method of preparation of dispersion of single walled CNTs (SWNTs) in 1,2 dichlorobenzene by using probe type ultrasonicator for debundling the CNTs for improving sensor response were used. The electrical contacts over the dispersed SWNTs were taken using silver paste electrodes. Fabricated sensors clearly show immediate change in resistance as a response to change in temperature of SWNTs. The measured sensitivity (change in resistance with temperature) of the sensor was found ˜ 0.29%/°C in the 25°C to 60°C temperature range.

  15. Field emission properties of the graphenated carbon nanotube electrode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zanin, H., E-mail: hudson.zanin@bristol.ac.uk [School of Chemistry, University of Bristol, Bristol BS8 1TS (United Kingdom); Faculdade de Engenharia Elétrica e Computação, Departamento de Semicondutores, Instrumentos e Fotônica, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, UNICAMP, Av. Albert Einstein N. 400, CEP 13 083-852 Campinas, São Paulo (Brazil); Ceragioli, H.J.; Peterlevitz, A.C.; Baranauskas, Vitor [Faculdade de Engenharia Elétrica e Computação, Departamento de Semicondutores, Instrumentos e Fotônica, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, UNICAMP, Av. Albert Einstein N. 400, CEP 13 083-852 Campinas, São Paulo (Brazil); Marciano, F.R.; Lobo, A.O. [Laboratory of Biomedical Nanotechnology/Institute of Research and Development at UNIVAP, Av. Shishima Hifumi, 2911, CEP 12244-000 Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil)

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Facile method to prepare graphenated carbon nanotubes (g-CNTs). • The electric field emission behaviour of g-CNTs was studied. • g-CNTs show better emission current stability than non-graphenated CNTs. - Abstract: Reduced graphene oxide-coated carbon nanotubes (RGO-CNT) electrodes have been prepared by hot filament chemical vapour deposition system in one-step growth process. We studied RGO-CNT electrodes behaviour as cold cathode in field emission test. Our results show that RGO-CNT retain the low threshold voltage typical of CNTs, but with greatly improved emission current stability. The field emission enhancement value is significantly higher than that expected being caused by geometric effect (height divided by the radius of nanotube). This suggested that the field emission of this hybrid structure is not only from a single tip, but eventually it is from several tips with contribution of graphene nanosheets at CNT's walls. This phenomenon explains why the graphenated carbon nanotubes do not burn out as quickly as CNT does until emission ceases completely. These preliminaries results make nanocarbon materials good candidates for applications as electron sources for several devices.

  16. Different Technical Applications of Carbon Nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdalla, S; Al-Marzouki, F; Al-Ghamdi, Ahmed A; Abdel-Daiem, A

    2015-12-01

    Carbon nanotubes have been of great interest because of their simplicity and ease of synthesis. The novel properties of nanostructured carbon nanotubes such as high surface area, good stiffness, and resilience have been explored in many engineering applications. Research on carbon nanotubes have shown the application in the field of energy storage, hydrogen storage, electrochemical supercapacitor, field-emitting devices, transistors, nanoprobes and sensors, composite material, templates, etc. For commercial applications, large quantities and high purity of carbon nanotubes are needed. Different types of carbon nanotubes can be synthesized in various ways. The most common techniques currently practiced are arc discharge, laser ablation, and chemical vapor deposition and flame synthesis. The purification of CNTs is carried out using various techniques mainly oxidation, acid treatment, annealing, sonication, filtering chemical functionalization, etc. However, high-purity purification techniques still have to be developed. Real applications are still under development. This paper addresses the current research on the challenges that are associated with synthesis methods, purification methods, and dispersion and toxicity of CNTs within the scope of different engineering applications, energy, and environmental impact.

  17. Chemical reactions confined within carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miners, Scott A; Rance, Graham A; Khlobystov, Andrei N

    2016-08-22

    In this critical review, we survey the wide range of chemical reactions that have been confined within carbon nanotubes, particularly emphasising how the pairwise interactions between the catalysts, reactants, transition states and products of a particular molecular transformation with the host nanotube can be used to control the yields and distributions of products of chemical reactions. We demonstrate that nanoscale confinement within carbon nanotubes enables the control of catalyst activity, morphology and stability, influences the local concentration of reactants and products thus affecting equilibria, rates and selectivity, pre-arranges the reactants for desired reactions and alters the relative stability of isomeric products. We critically evaluate the relative advantages and disadvantages of the confinement of chemical reactions inside carbon nanotubes from a chemical perspective and describe how further developments in the controlled synthesis of carbon nanotubes and the incorporation of multifunctionality are essential for the development of this ever-expanding field, ultimately leading to the effective control of the pathways of chemical reactions through the rational design of multi-functional carbon nanoreactors.

  18. Different Technical Applications of Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdalla, S.; Al-Marzouki, F.; Al-Ghamdi, Ahmed A.; Abdel-Daiem, A.

    2015-09-01

    Carbon nanotubes have been of great interest because of their simplicity and ease of synthesis. The novel properties of nanostructured carbon nanotubes such as high surface area, good stiffness, and resilience have been explored in many engineering applications. Research on carbon nanotubes have shown the application in the field of energy storage, hydrogen storage, electrochemical supercapacitor, field-emitting devices, transistors, nanoprobes and sensors, composite material, templates, etc. For commercial applications, large quantities and high purity of carbon nanotubes are needed. Different types of carbon nanotubes can be synthesized in various ways. The most common techniques currently practiced are arc discharge, laser ablation, and chemical vapor deposition and flame synthesis. The purification of CNTs is carried out using various techniques mainly oxidation, acid treatment, annealing, sonication, filtering chemical functionalization, etc. However, high-purity purification techniques still have to be developed. Real applications are still under development. This paper addresses the current research on the challenges that are associated with synthesis methods, purification methods, and dispersion and toxicity of CNTs within the scope of different engineering applications, energy, and environmental impact.

  19. Mechanical properties of Cu-based composites reinforced by carbon nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    Cu-based composites reinforced by 0 % ~25 % (volume fraction) carbon nanotubes were prepared. The fracture behaviors and the rolling properties of the composites and the effects of the volume fraction of the carbon nanotubes were studied. The experimental results show that the fracture toughness of the composites is related to the pulling-out and bridging of the carbon nanotubes in the fracture process. With the volume fraction of the carbon nanotubes increasing, the Vicker' s hardness and the compactness of the composites increase first and then decrease. The peaks of the hardness and the compactness occur at 12 % ~15 % of volume fraction of carbon nanotubes. Some proper ratio of rolling reduction benefits to the comprehensive mechanical properties of the composites.

  20. Improvements in Production of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balzano, Leandro; Resasco, Daniel E.

    2009-01-01

    A continuing program of research and development has been directed toward improvement of a prior batch process in which single-walled carbon nanotubes are formed by catalytic disproportionation of carbon monoxide in a fluidized-bed reactor. The overall effect of the improvements has been to make progress toward converting the process from a batch mode to a continuous mode and to scaling of production to larger quantities. Efforts have also been made to optimize associated purification and dispersion post processes to make them effective at large scales and to investigate means of incorporating the purified products into composite materials. The ultimate purpose of the program is to enable the production of high-quality single-walled carbon nanotubes in quantities large enough and at costs low enough to foster the further development of practical applications. The fluidized bed used in this process contains mixed-metal catalyst particles. The choice of the catalyst and the operating conditions is such that the yield of single-walled carbon nanotubes, relative to all forms of carbon (including carbon fibers, multi-walled carbon nanotubes, and graphite) produced in the disproportionation reaction is more than 90 weight percent. After the reaction, the nanotubes are dispersed in various solvents in preparation for end use, which typically involves blending into a plastic, ceramic, or other matrix to form a composite material. Notwithstanding the batch nature of the unmodified prior fluidized-bed process, the fluidized-bed reactor operates in a continuous mode during the process. The operation is almost entirely automated, utilizing mass flow controllers, a control computer running software specific to the process, and other equipment. Moreover, an important inherent advantage of fluidized- bed reactors in general is that solid particles can be added to and removed from fluidized beds during operation. For these reasons, the process and equipment were amenable to

  1. Edge effects in finite elongated carbon nanotubes

    CERN Document Server

    Hod, O; Scuseria, G E; Hod, Oded; Peralta, Juan E.; Scuseria, Gustavo E.

    2006-01-01

    The importance of finite-size effects for the electronic structure of long zigzag and armchair carbon nanotubes is studied. We analyze the electronic structure of capped (6,6), (8,0), and (9,0) single walled carbon nanotubes as a function of their length up to 60 nm, using a divide and conquer density functional theory approach. For the metallic nanotubes studied, most of the physical features appearing in the density of states of an infinite carbon nanotube are recovered at a length of 40 nm. The (8,0) semi-conducting nanotube studied exhibits pronounced edge effects within the energy gap that scale as the inverse of the length of the nanotube. As a result, the energy gap reduces from the value of ~1 eV calculated for the periodic system to a value of ~0.25 eV calculated for a capped 62 nm long CNT. These edge effects are expected to become negligible only at tube lengths exceeding 6 micrometers. Our results indicate that careful tailoring of the nature of the system and its capping units should be applied w...

  2. Dispersion of single-walled carbon nanotubes in alcohol-cholic acid mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyshin, A. A.; Eliseeva, O. V.; Bondarenko, G. V.; Kolker, A. M.; Zakharov, A. G.; Fedorov, M. V.; Kiselev, M. G.

    2013-12-01

    A procedure for dispersing single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) for the preparation of suspensions with high concentrations of individual nanotubes in various solvents was described. The most stable suspensions were obtained from a mixture of ethanol with cholic acid at an acid concentration of 0.018 mol/kg.

  3. The Preparation of Carbon Nanotube/MnO2 Composite Fiber and Its Application to Flexible Micro-Supercapacitor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Li

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, flexible electronic devices pursued for potential applications. The design and the fabrication of a novel flexible nanoarchitecture by coating electrical conductive MWCNT fiber with ultrathin films of MnO2 to achieve high specific capacitance, for micro-supercapacitors electrode applications, are demonstrated here. The MWCNT/MnO2 composite fiber electrode was prepared by the electrochemical deposition which was carried out through using two different methods: cyclic voltammetry and potentiostatic methods. The cyclic voltammetry method can get “crumpled paper ball” morphology MnO2 which has bigger specific capacitances than that achieved by potentiostatic method. The flexible micro-supercapacitor was fabricated by twisting two aligned MWCNT fibers and showed an area specific capacitance of 2.43 mF/cm2. The flexible micro-supercapacitors also enable promising applications in various fields.

  4. Bulk Cutting of Carbon Nanotubes Using Electron Beam Irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegler, Kirk J. (Inventor); Rauwald, Urs (Inventor); Hauge, Robert H. (Inventor); Schmidt, Howard K. (Inventor); Smalley, Richard E. (Inventor); Kittrell, W. Carter (Inventor); Gu, Zhenning (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    According to some embodiments, the present invention provides a method for attaining short carbon nanotubes utilizing electron beam irradiation, for example, of a carbon nanotube sample. The sample may be pretreated, for example by oxonation. The pretreatment may introduce defects to the sidewalls of the nanotubes. The method is shown to produces nanotubes with a distribution of lengths, with the majority of lengths shorter than 100 tun. Further, the median length of the nanotubes is between about 20 nm and about 100 nm.

  5. Chitosan-mediated synthesis of carbon nanotube-gold nanohybrids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GRAVEL; Edmond; FOILLARD; Stéphanie; DORIS; Eric

    2010-01-01

    Metal-nanotube nanohybrids were produced by in situ synthesis and stabilization of gold nanoparticles on chitosan-functionalized carbon nanotubes.The formation of gold nanoparticles from tetrachloroauric acid was observed after only a few minutes of contact with the functionalized nanotubes,at room temperature.These results suggest that adsorption of chitosan at the surface of carbon nanotubes permits smooth reduction of the metallic salt and efficient anchoring of gold nanoparticles to the nanotubes.

  6. Effects of single-walled carbon nanotubes on lysozyme gelation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tardani, Franco; La Mesa, Camillo

    2014-09-01

    The possibility to disperse carbon nanotubes in biocompatible matrices has got substantial interest from the scientific community. Along this research line, the inclusion of single walled carbon nanotubes in lysozyme-based hydrogels was investigated. Experiments were performed at different nanotube/lysozyme weight ratios. Carbon nanotubes were dispersed in protein solutions, in conditions suitable for thermal gelation. The state of the dispersions was determined before and after thermal treatment. Rheology, dynamic light scattering and different microscopies investigated the effect that carbon nanotubes exert on gelation. The gelation kinetics and changes in gelation temperature were determined. The effect of carbon and lysozyme content on the gel properties was, therefore, determined. At fixed lysozyme content, moderate amounts of carbon nanotubes do not disturb the properties of hydrogel composites. At moderately high volume fractions in carbon nanotubes, the gels become continuous in both lysozyme and nanotubes. This is because percolating networks are presumably formed. Support to the above statements comes by rheology.

  7. Deposition of the platinum crystals on the carbon nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    A new technique and the affecting factors for depositing platinum on the carbon nanotubes were investigated. The results show that the deposited platinum crystals in the atmosphere of hydrogen or nitrogen have a small size and a homogeneous distribution on the surface of the carbon nanotubes. The pretreatment would decrease the platinum particles on the carbon nanotubes significantly.

  8. Transport Properties of Carbon-Nanotube/Cement Composites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Han, B.; Yang, Z.; Shi, X.; Yu, X.

    2012-01-01

    This paper preliminarily investigates the general transport properties (i.e., water sorptivity, water permeability, and gas permeability) of carbon-nanotube/cement composites. Carboxyl multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) are dispersed into cement mortar to fabricate the carbon nanotubes (CNTs) rei

  9. Interaction of pristine and functionalized carbon nanotubes with lipid membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baoukina, Svetlana; Monticelli, Luca; Tieleman, D Peter

    2013-10-10

    Carbon nanotubes are widely used in a growing number of applications. Their interactions with biological materials, cell membranes in particular, is of interest in applications including drug delivery and for understanding the toxicity of carbon nanotubes. We use extensive molecular dynamics simulations with the MARTINI model to study the interactions of model nanotubes of different thickness, length, and patterns of chemical modification with model membranes. In addition, we characterize the interactions of small bundles of carbon nanotubes with membrane models. Short pristine carbon nanotubes readily insert into membranes and adopt an orientation parallel to the plane of the membrane in the center of the membrane. Larger aggregates and functionalized nanotubes exhibit a range of possible interactions. The distribution and orientation of carbon nanotubes can be controlled by functionalizing the nanotubes. Free energy calculations provide thermodynamic insight into the preferred orientations of different nanotubes and quantify structural defects in the lipid matrix.

  10. Graphene-carbon nanotube hybrid materials and use as electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tour, James M.; Zhu, Yu; Li, Lei; Yan, Zheng; Lin, Jian

    2016-09-27

    Provided are methods of making graphene-carbon nanotube hybrid materials. Such methods generally include: (1) associating a graphene film with a substrate; (2) applying a catalyst and a carbon source to the graphene film; and (3) growing carbon nanotubes on the graphene film. The grown carbon nanotubes become covalently linked to the graphene film through carbon-carbon bonds that are located at one or more junctions between the carbon nanotubes and the graphene film. In addition, the grown carbon nanotubes are in ohmic contact with the graphene film through the carbon-carbon bonds at the one or more junctions. The one or more junctions may include seven-membered carbon rings. Also provided are the formed graphene-carbon nanotube hybrid materials.

  11. Carbon nanotube suspensions, dispersions, & composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Trevor John

    Carbon Nanotubes (CNTs) are amazing structures that hold the potential to revolutionize many areas of scientific research. CNTs can be behave both as semiconductors and metals, can be grown in highly ordered arrays and patterns or in random orientation, and can be comprised of one graphene cylinder (single wall nanotube, SWNT) or several concentric graphene cylinders (multi-wall nanotube, MWNT). Although these structures are usually only a few nanometers wide, they can be grown up to centimeter lengths, and in massive quantities. CNTs can be produced in a variety of processes ranging from repeated combustion of organic material such as dried grass, arc-discharge with graphite electrodes, laser ablation of a graphitic target, to sophisticated chemical vapor deposition (CVD) techniques. CNTs are stronger than steel but lighter than aluminum, and can be more conductive than copper or semiconducting like silicon. This variety of properties has been matched by the wide variety of applications that have been developed for CNTs. Many of these applications have been limited by the inability of researchers to tame these structures, and incorporating CNTs into existing technologies can be exceedingly difficult and prohibitively expensive. It is therefore the aim of the current study to develop strategies for the solution processing and deposition of CNTs and CNT-composites, which will enable the use of CNTs in existing and emerging technologies. CNTs are not easily suspended in polar solvents and are extremely hydrophobic materials, which has limited much of the solution processing to organic solvents, which also cannot afford high quality dispersions of CNTs. The current study has developed a variety of aqueous CNT solutions that employ surfactants, water-soluble polymers, or both to create suspensions of CNTs. These CNT 'ink' solutions were deposited with a variety of techniques that have afforded many interesting structures, both randomly oriented as well as highly

  12. Ultrafast Nanocrystalline-TiO2 (B)/Carbon Nanotube Hyperdispersion Prepared via Combined Ultracentrifugation and Hydrothermal Treatments for Hybrid Supercapacitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naoi, Katsuhiko; Kurita, Takayuki; Abe, Masayuki; Furuhashi, Takumi; Abe, Yuta; Okazaki, Keita; Miyamoto, Junichi; Iwama, Etsuro; Aoyagi, Shintaro; Naoi, Wako; Simon, Patrice

    2016-08-01

    Anisotropically grown (b-axis short) single-nano TiO2 (B), uniformly hyper-dispersed on the surface of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT), was successfully synthesized via an in situ ultracentrifugation (UC) process coupled with a follow-up hydrothermal treatment. The uc-TiO2 (B)/MWCNT composite materials enable ultrafast Li(+) intercalation especially along the b-axis, resulting in a capacity of 235 mA h g(-1) per TiO2 (B) even at 300C (1C = 335 mA g(-1) ).

  13. Adsorption Behavior of Ferromagnetic Carbon Nanotubes for Methyl Orange from Aqueous Solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liping; Zhang, Mingyu; Zhao, Chenxi; Yang, Shan

    2016-03-01

    The ferromagnetic carbon nanotubes which can be easily separated from aqueous solution were prepared and characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Batch experiments were carried out to investigate the adsorption behavior of ferromagnetic carbon nanotubes for removing methyl orange (MO). The results showed that these ferromagnetic carbon nanotubes were richer in surface function groups than the carbon nanotubes did, furthermore, both γ-Fe2O3 and Fe with ferromagnetism were found on the surface of carbon nanotubes. The results also demonstrated that ferromagnetic carbon nanotubes possessed stronger adsorption ability for MO than carbon nanotubes did. The adsorption isotherms followed Langmuir isotherm equation and the adsorption kinetics could be well described with the pseudo second-order kinetic model. The adsorption process involved an intraparticle diffusion, while it was not the only rate-controlling step. The values of AG were negative and the value of ΔH is -12.37 kJ/mol, proving that the adsorption of MO onto ferromagnetic carbon nanotubes was a spontaneous and exothermic process.

  14. High frequency conductivity in carbon nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. S. Abukari

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available We report on theoretical analysis of high frequency conductivity in carbon nanotubes. Using the kinetic equation with constant relaxation time, an analytical expression for the complex conductivity is obtained. The real part of the complex conductivity is initially negative at zero frequency and become more negative with increasing frequency, until it reaches a resonance minimum at ω ∼ ωB for metallic zigzag CNs and ω < ωB for armchair CNs. This resonance enhancement is indicative for terahertz gain without the formation of current instabilities induced by negative dc conductivity. We noted that due to the high density of states of conduction electrons in metallic zigzag carbon nanotubes and the specific dispersion law inherent in hexagonal crystalline structure result in a uniquely high frequency conductivity than the corresponding values for metallic armchair carbon nanotubes. We suggest that this phenomenon can be used to suppress current instabilities that are normally associated with a negative dc differential conductivity.

  15. Carbon nanotubes in neuroregeneration and repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabbro, Alessandra; Prato, Maurizio; Ballerini, Laura

    2013-12-01

    In the last decade, we have experienced an increasing interest and an improved understanding of the application of nanotechnology to the nervous system. The aim of such studies is that of developing future strategies for tissue repair to promote functional recovery after brain damage. In this framework, carbon nanotube based technologies are emerging as particularly innovative tools due to the outstanding physical properties of these nanomaterials together with their recently documented ability to interface neuronal circuits, synapses and membranes. This review will discuss the state of the art in carbon nanotube technology applied to the development of devices able to drive nerve tissue repair; we will highlight the most exciting findings addressing the impact of carbon nanotubes in nerve tissue engineering, focusing in particular on neuronal differentiation, growth and network reconstruction.

  16. Boron-Filled Hybrid Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Rajen B.; Chou, Tsengming; Kanwal, Alokik; Apigo, David J.; Lefebvre, Joseph; Owens, Frank; Iqbal, Zafar

    2016-07-01

    A unique nanoheterostructure, a boron-filled hybrid carbon nanotube (BHCNT), has been synthesized using a one-step chemical vapor deposition process. The BHCNTs can be considered to be a novel form of boron carbide consisting of boron doped, distorted multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) encapsulating boron nanowires. These MWCNTs were found to be insulating in spite of their graphitic layered outer structures. While conventional MWCNTs have great axial strength, they have weak radial compressive strength, and do not bond well to one another or to other materials. In contrast, BHCNTs are shown to be up to 31% stiffer and 233% stronger than conventional MWCNTs in radial compression and have excellent mechanical properties at elevated temperatures. The corrugated surface of BHCNTs enables them to bond easily to themselves and other materials, in contrast to carbon nanotubes (CNTs). BHCNTs can, therefore, be used to make nanocomposites, nanopaper sheets, and bundles that are stronger than those made with CNTs.

  17. A review on protein functionalized carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaraju, Kathyayini; Reddy, Roopa; Reddy, Narendra

    2015-12-18

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been widely recognized and used for controlled drug delivery and in various other fields due to their unique properties and distinct advantages. Both single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and multiwalled (MWCNTs) carbon nanotubes are used and/or studied for potential applications in medical, energy, textile, composite, and other areas. Since CNTs are chemically inert and are insoluble in water or other organic solvents, they are functionalized or modified to carry payloads or interact with biological molecules. CNTs have been preferably functionalized with proteins because CNTs are predominantly used for medical applications such as delivery of drugs, DNA and genes, and also for biosensing. Extensive studies have been conducted to understand the interactions, cytotoxicity, and potential applications of protein functionalized CNTs but contradicting results have been published on the cytotoxicity of the functionalized CNTs. This paper provides a brief review of CNTs functionalized with proteins, methods used to functionalize the CNTs, and their potential applications.

  18. Boron-Filled Hybrid Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Rajen B.; Chou, Tsengming; Kanwal, Alokik; Apigo, David J.; Lefebvre, Joseph; Owens, Frank; Iqbal, Zafar

    2016-01-01

    A unique nanoheterostructure, a boron-filled hybrid carbon nanotube (BHCNT), has been synthesized using a one-step chemical vapor deposition process. The BHCNTs can be considered to be a novel form of boron carbide consisting of boron doped, distorted multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) encapsulating boron nanowires. These MWCNTs were found to be insulating in spite of their graphitic layered outer structures. While conventional MWCNTs have great axial strength, they have weak radial compressive strength, and do not bond well to one another or to other materials. In contrast, BHCNTs are shown to be up to 31% stiffer and 233% stronger than conventional MWCNTs in radial compression and have excellent mechanical properties at elevated temperatures. The corrugated surface of BHCNTs enables them to bond easily to themselves and other materials, in contrast to carbon nanotubes (CNTs). BHCNTs can, therefore, be used to make nanocomposites, nanopaper sheets, and bundles that are stronger than those made with CNTs. PMID:27460526

  19. Carbon Nanotube Bolometer for Absolute FTIR Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Solomon; Neira, Jorge; Tomlin, Nathan; Lehman, John

    We have developed and calibrated planar electrical-substitution bolometers which employ absorbers made from vertically-aligned carbon nanotube arrays. The nearly complete absorption of light by the carbon nanotubes from the visible range to the far-infrared can be exploited to enable a device with read-out in native units equivalent to optical power. Operated at cryogenic temperatures near 4 K, these infrared detectors are designed to have time constant near 10 ms and a noise floor of about 10 pW. Built upon a micro-machined silicon platform, each device has an integrated heater and thermometer, either a carbon nanotube thermistor or superconducting transition edge sensor, for temperature control. We are optimizing temperature-controlled measurement techniques to enable high resolution spectral calibrations using these devices with a Fourier-transform spectrometer.

  20. Carbon Nanotubes Synthesis Through Gamma Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tirado, Pablo; Garcia, Rafael; Montes, Jorge; Melendrez, Rodrigo; Barboza, Marcelino; Contreras, Oscar

    2015-03-01

    Carbon nanotubes show a great potential of applications since there discovery by Iijima in 1991[1] due to their numerous physical-chemical properties such as their high weight to strength relationship, which make them ideal to use in high resistance compound materials, and in many other applications[2] In this work, a novel method for the synthesis of carbon nanotubes is presented, starting from an ultra-thin sheet of graphite synthesized by the chemical vapor decomposition technique (CVD), using ultra high purity methane and hydrogen at 1200°C in a horizontal quartz reactor. For the synthesis of carbon nanotubes, the graphite sheets were exposed to different doses of radiation, with the objective of breaking the graphite bonds and form carbon nanotubes; a Gammacell equipment model 220 Excel was used for the purpose, which counts with a radiation source of cobalt 60, and a current radiation rate of 0.9 Gy/seconds. The time of exposure to radiation was varied in each sample, according to the desired dose of radiation in each case, afterwards the samples were characterized using the Raman spectroscopy and TEM microscopy techniques with the objective of observing the kind of nanotubes formed, their morphology and their number of defects. Results will be shown during the poster session.

  1. Preparation and properties of carbon nanotube/polypropylene nanocomposite bipolar plates for polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Shu-Hang; Yen, Chuan-Yu; Weng, Cheng-Chih; Lin, Yu-Feng; Ma, Chen-Chi M.; Yang, Ching-Hung; Tsai, Ming-Chi; Yen, Ming-Yu; Hsiao, Min-Chien; Lee, Shuo-Jen; Xie, Xiao-Feng; Hsiao, Yi-Hsiu

    This study aims at the fabrication of lightweight and high performance nanocomposite bipolar plates for the application in polymer electrode membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs). The thin nanocomposite bipolar plates (the thickness polypropylene (PP) with different crystallinities including high crystallinity PP (HC-PP), medium crystallinity PP (MC-PP), low crystallinity PP (LC-PP) were prepared to investigate the influence of crystallinity on the dispersion of MWCNTs in PP matrix. The optimum composition of original composite bipolar plates was determined at 80 wt.% graphite content and 20 wt.% PP content based on the measurements of electrical and mechanical properties with various graphite contents. Results also indicate that MWCNTs was dispersed better in LC-PP than other PP owing to enough dispersed regions in nanocomposite bipolar plates. This good MWCNT dispersion of LC-PP would cause better bulk electrical conductivity, mechanical properties and thermal stability of MWCNTs/PP nanocomposite bipolar plates. In the MWCNTs/LC-PP system, the bulk electrical conductivities with various MWCNT contents all exceed 100 S cm -1. The flexural strength of the MWCNTs/LC-PP nanocomposite bipolar plate with 8 phr of MWCNTs was approximately 37% higher than that of the original nanocomposite bipolar plate and the unnotched Izod impact strength of MWCNTs/LC-PP nanocomposite bipolar plates was also increased from 68.32 J m -1 (0 phr) to 81.40 J m -1 (8 phr), increasing 19%. In addition, the coefficient of thermal expansion of MWCNTs/LC-PP nanocomposite bipolar plate was decreased from 32.91 μm m -1 °C -1 (0 phr) to 25.79 μm m -1 °C -1 (8 phr) with the increasing of MWCNT content. The polarization curve of MWCNTs/LC-PP nanocomposite bipolar plate compared with graphite bipolar plate was also evaluated. These results confirm that the addition of MWCNTs in LC-PP leads to a significant improvement on the cell performance of the nanocomposite bipolar plate.

  2. A carbon nanotube optical rectenna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Asha; Singh, Virendra; Bougher, Thomas L.; Cola, Baratunde A.

    2015-12-01

    An optical rectenna—a device that directly converts free-propagating electromagnetic waves at optical frequencies to direct current—was first proposed over 40 years ago, yet this concept has not been demonstrated experimentally due to fabrication challenges at the nanoscale. Realizing an optical rectenna requires that an antenna be coupled to a diode that operates on the order of 1 PHz (switching speed on the order of 1 fs). Diodes operating at these frequencies are feasible if their capacitance is on the order of a few attofarads, but they remain extremely difficult to fabricate and to reliably couple to a nanoscale antenna. Here we demonstrate an optical rectenna by engineering metal-insulator-metal tunnel diodes, with a junction capacitance of ˜2 aF, at the tip of vertically aligned multiwalled carbon nanotubes (˜10 nm in diameter), which act as the antenna. Upon irradiation with visible and infrared light, we measure a d.c. open-circuit voltage and a short-circuit current that appear to be due to a rectification process (we account for a very small but quantifiable contribution from thermal effects). In contrast to recent reports of photodetection based on hot electron decay in a plasmonic nanoscale antenna, a coherent optical antenna field appears to be rectified directly in our devices, consistent with rectenna theory. Finally, power rectification is observed under simulated solar illumination, and there is no detectable change in diode performance after numerous current-voltage scans between 5 and 77 °C, indicating a potential for robust operation.

  3. Micromechanics of carbon nanotube turfs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torabi, Hamid

    Complex structures consisting of intertwined, nominally vertical carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are called turfs. Unique electrical, thermal, optical, and permeability properties of these turfs have attracted growing attention during the past decade, and have rendered them as appropriate candidates for applications such as contact thermal switches. These properties are controlled by the details of the turf microstructures. Due to the application of the turfs in different fields, they are subjected to different loading conditions. Deformation changes the microstructure of a CNT turf, which results in change of effective properties. Many researchers have recently studied the collective mechanical behavior of CNT turfs to compression loading, as this behavior determines their performance. However, their complex and intertwined structure must be investigated in more details to find the relation between their deformation and their underlying morphology. Under uniform compression experiments, CNT turfs exhibit irreversible collective buckling of a layer preceded by reorientation of CNT segments. Experimentally observed independence of the buckling stress and the buckling wavelength on the turf width suggests the existence of an intrinsic material length. To investigate the relationship the macroscopic material properties and the statistical parameters describing the nano-scale geometry of the turf (tortuosity, density and connectivity) we develop a nano-scale computational model, based on the representation of CNT segments as elastica finite elements with van der Waals interactions. The virtual turfs are generated by means of a constrained random walk algorithm and subsequent relaxation. The resulting computational model is robust and is capable of modeling the collective behavior of CNTs. We first establish the dependence of statistical parameters on the computational parameters used for turf generation, then establish relationships between post-buckling stress, initial

  4. Laser ablative synthesis of carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Michael W.; Jordan, Kevin; Park, Cheol

    2010-03-02

    An improved method for the production of single walled carbon nanotubes that utilizes an RF-induction heated side-pumped synthesis chamber for the production of such. Such a method, while capable of producing large volumes of carbon nanotubes, concurrently permits the use of a simplified apparatus that allows for greatly reduced heat up and cool down times and flexible flowpaths that can be readily modified for production efficiency optimization. The method of the present invention utilizes a free electron laser operating at high average and peak fluence to illuminate a rotating and translating graphite/catalyst target to obtain high yields of SWNTs without the use of a vacuum chamber.

  5. Carbon nanotubes for in vivo cancer nanotechnology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The latest progress of using carbon nanotubes(CNTs) for in vivo cancer nanotechnology is reviewed.CNTs can be functionalized by either covalent or non-covalent chemistry to produce functional bioconjugates for many in vivo applications.In vivo behaviors and toxicology studies of CNTs are summarized,suggesting no significant toxicity of well functionalized CNTs to the treated mice.Owing to their unique chemical and physical properties,CNTs,especially single-walled carbon nanotubes(SWNTs),have been widely used for various modalities of in vivo cancer treatment and imaging.Future development of CNT-based nanomedicine may bring novel opportunities to cancer diagnosis and therapy.

  6. Piezoresistive effect in carbon nanotube films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    The piezoresistive effect of the pristine carbon nanotube (CNT) films has been studied. Carbon nanotubes were synthesized by hot filament chemical vapor deposition. The piezoresistive effect in the pristine CNT films was studied by a three-point bending test. The gauge factor for the pristine CNT films under 500 microstrains was found to be at least 65 at room temperature, and increased with temperature, exceeding that of polycrystalline silicon (30) at 35℃. The origin of the piezoresistivity in CNT films may be ascribed to a pressure-induced change in the band gap and the defects.

  7. Nanoscale atomic waveguides with suspended carbon nanotubes

    CERN Document Server

    Peano, V; Kasper, A; Egger, R

    2005-01-01

    We propose an experimentally viable setup for the realization of one-dimensional ultracold atom gases in a nanoscale magnetic waveguide formed by single doubly-clamped suspended carbon nanotubes. We show that all common decoherence and atom loss mechanisms are small guaranteeing a stable operation of the trap. Since the extremely large current densities in carbon nanotubes are spatially homogeneous, our proposed architecture allows to overcome the problem of fragmentation of the atom cloud. Adding a second nanowire allows to create a double-well potential with a moderate tunneling barrier which is desired for tunneling and interference experiments with the advantage of tunneling distances being in the nanometer regime.

  8. A Study of Surface Modifications of Carbon Nanotubes on the Properties of Polyamide 66/Multiwalled Carbon Nanotube Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Qiu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of surface modification of carbon nanotube on the properties of polyamide 66/multiwalled carbon nanotube composites have been investigated. Polyamide 66 (PA66 and multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWCNT composites were prepared by melt mixing. The surfaces of MWCNTs were modified with acid- and amine-groups. Field emission scanning electron microscopy analyses revealed that amine-MWCNTs (D-MWCNTs dispersed better in the PA66 matrix than pristine- and acid-MWCNTs. However, an introduction of D-MWCNTs into PA66 matrix induced heterogeneous nucleation and affected the crystal growth process during the crystallization of PA66/MWCNT composites. Both nanoindentation and friction analyses were carried out in a study of the effect of the introduction of modified MWCNTs on both mechanical and friction properties of the composites. With the introduction of D-MWCNTs, both nanohardness and elastic modulus of the composites were significantly improved, but it was observed that the maximum depth, nanohardness, and elastic modulus of the composites showed no distinct change before and after a friction test. It is evident that PA66/D-MWCNT composites have the least friction coefficient of the PA66/MWCNT composites of all the approaches of carbon nanotube surface modification.

  9. Quantum transport in carbon nanotubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laird, Edward A.; Kuemmeth, Ferdinand; Steele, Gary A.;

    2015-01-01

    by recent advances in theory. As well as the well-understood overall picture, we also state clearly open questions for the field. These advances position nanotubes as a leading system for the study of spin and valley physics in one dimension where electronic disorder and hyperfine interaction can both...... and valley degrees of freedom. This review describes the modern understanding of transport through nanotube devices. Unlike conventional semiconductors, electrons in nanotubes have two angular momentum quantum numbers, arising from spin and from valley freedom. We focus on the interplay between the two....... In single quantum dots defined in short lengths of nanotube, the energy levels associated with each degree of freedom, and the spin-orbit coupling between them, are revealed by Coulomb blockade spectroscopy. In double quantum dots, the combination of quantum numbers modifies the selection rules of Pauli...

  10. A tunable carbon nanotube electromechanical oscillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sazonova, Vera; Yaish, Yuval; Üstünel, Hande; Roundy, David; Arias, Tomás A.; McEuen, Paul L.

    2004-09-01

    Nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS) hold promise for a number of scientific and technological applications. In particular, NEMS oscillators have been proposed for use in ultrasensitive mass detection, radio-frequency signal processing, and as a model system for exploring quantum phenomena in macroscopic systems. Perhaps the ultimate material for these applications is a carbon nanotube. They are the stiffest material known, have low density, ultrasmall cross-sections and can be defect-free. Equally important, a nanotube can act as a transistor and thus may be able to sense its own motion. In spite of this great promise, a room-temperature, self-detecting nanotube oscillator has not been realized, although some progress has been made. Here we report the electrical actuation and detection of the guitar-string-like oscillation modes of doubly clamped nanotube oscillators. We show that the resonance frequency can be widely tuned and that the devices can be used to transduce very small forces.

  11. Carbon nanotubes as tips for atomic force microscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    国立秋; 徐宗伟; 赵铁强; 赵清亮; 张飞虎; 董申

    2004-01-01

    Ordinary AFM probes' characters prevent the AFM' s application in various scopes. Carbon nanotubes represent ideal AFM probe materials for their higher aspect ratio, larger Young' s modulus, unique chemical structure, and well-defined electronic property. Carbon nanotube AFM probes are obtained by using a new method of attaching carbon nanotubes to the end of ordinary AFM probes, and are then used for doing AFM experiments. These experiments indicated that carbon nanotube probes have higher elastic deformation, higher resolution and higher durability. And it was also found that carbon nanotube probes can accurately reflect the morphology of deep narrow gaps, while ordinary probes can not reflect.

  12. A Review of the Properties and CVD Synthesis of Coiled Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dóra Fejes

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The CVD route for carbon nanotube production has become a popular method to make large amounts of multiwall carbon nanotubes. The structure, morphology and size of carbon materials depend critically on the catalyst preparation and deposition conditions. According to current knowledge, CVD method is the only process which can produce carbon nanocoils. These nanocoils are perfect candidates for nanotechnology applications. One might indeed hope that these coils would have the extraordinary stiffness displayed by straight nanotubes. Based on theoretical studies, regular coiled nanotubes exhibit exceptional mechanical, electrical, and magnetic properties due to the combination of their peculiar helical morphology and the fascinating properties of nanotubes. In spite of its technological interest, relatively low attention has been paid to this special field. In this paper we attempt to summarize results obtained until now.

  13. Computational Nanomechanics of Carbon Nanotubes and Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Deepak; Wei, Chenyu; Cho, Kyeongjae; Biegel, Bryan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Nanomechanics of individual carbon and boron-nitride nanotubes and their application as reinforcing fibers in polymer composites has been reviewed with interplay of theoretical modeling, computer simulations and experimental observations. The emphasis in this work is on elucidating the multi-length scales of the problems involved, and of different simulation techniques that are needed to address specific characteristics of individual nanotubes and nanotube polymer-matrix interfaces. Classical molecular dynamics simulations are shown to be sufficient to describe the generic behavior such as strength and stiffness modulus but are inadequate to describe elastic limit and nature of plastic buckling at large strength. Quantum molecular dynamics simulations are shown to bring out explicit atomic nature dependent behavior of these nanoscale materials objects that are not accessible either via continuum mechanics based descriptions or through classical molecular dynamics based simulations. As examples, we discus local plastic collapse of carbon nanotubes under axial compression and anisotropic plastic buckling of boron-nitride nanotubes. Dependence of the yield strain on the strain rate is addressed through temperature dependent simulations, a transition-state-theory based model of the strain as a function of strain rate and simulation temperature is presented, and in all cases extensive comparisons are made with experimental observations. Mechanical properties of nanotube-polymer composite materials are simulated with diverse nanotube-polymer interface structures (with van der Waals interaction). The atomistic mechanisms of the interface toughening for optimal load transfer through recycling, high-thermal expansion and diffusion coefficient composite formation above glass transition temperature, and enhancement of Young's modulus on addition of nanotubes to polymer are discussed and compared with experimental observations.

  14. Nickel oxide nanotube synthesis using multiwalled carbon nanotubes as sacrificial templates for supercapacitor application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdalla, Ahmed M.; Sahu, Rakesh P.; Wallar, Cameron J.; Chen, Ri; Zhitomirsky, Igor; Puri, Ishwar K.

    2017-02-01

    A novel approach for the fabrication of nickel oxide nanotubes based on multiwalled carbon nanotubes as a sacrificial template is described. Electroless deposition is employed to deposit nickel onto carbon nanotubes. The subsequent annealing of the product in the presence of air oxidizes nickel to nickel oxide, and carbon is released as gaseous carbon dioxide, leaving behind nickel oxide nanotubes. Electron microscopy and elemental mapping confirm the formation of nickel oxide nanotubes. New chelating polyelectrolytes are used as dispersing agents to achieve high colloidal stability for both the nickel-coated carbon nanotubes and the nickel oxide nanotubes. A gravimetric specific capacitance of 245.3 F g-1 and an areal capacitance of 3.28 F cm-2 at a scan rate of 2 mV s-1 is achieved, with an electrode fabricated using nickel oxide nanotubes as the active element with a mass loading of 24.1 mg cm-2.

  15. Flexible microdevices based on carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Ashante'; Cannon, Andrew; Lee, Jungchul; King, William P.; Graham, Samuel

    2006-12-01

    This work reports the fabrication and testing of flexible carbon nanotube microdevices made using hot embossing material transfer. Both micro-plasma and photodetector devices were made using as-grown unpurified multi-wall carbon nanotubes printed on PMMA substrates. Optical detectors were fabricated by attaching metal wires and monitoring the resistance as a function of light exposure. The electrical resistance of the nanotubes showed a strong sensitivity to light exposure which was also enhanced by heating the devices. While such processes in MWCNTs are not fully understood, the addition of thermal energy is believed to generate additional free charge carriers in the nanotubes. The plasma-generating microdevices consisted of a thin layer of thermoplastic polymer having the CNT electrode on one side and a metal electrode on the reverse side. The devices were electrically tested under atmospheric conditions with 0.01-1 kV ac and at 2.5 kHz, with the plasma igniting near 0.7 kV. The fabrication of these flexible organic devices demonstrates the ability to pattern useful carbon nanotube microdevices in low-cost thermoplastic polymers.

  16. Carbon nanotubes as optical biomedical sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruss, Sebastian; Hilmer, Andrew J; Zhang, Jingqing; Reuel, Nigel F; Mu, Bin; Strano, Michael S

    2013-12-01

    Biosensors are important tools in biomedical research. Moreover, they are becoming an essential part of modern healthcare. In the future, biosensor development will become even more crucial due to the demand for personalized-medicine, point-of care devices and cheaper diagnostic tools. Substantial advances in sensor technology are often fueled by the advent of new materials. Therefore, nanomaterials have motivated a large body of research and such materials have been implemented into biosensor devices. Among these new materials carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are especially promising building blocks for biosensors due to their unique electronic and optical properties. Carbon nanotubes are rolled-up cylinders of carbon monolayers (graphene). They can be chemically modified in such a way that biologically relevant molecules can be detected with high sensitivity and selectivity. In this review article we will discuss how carbon nanotubes can be used to create biosensors. We review the latest advancements of optical carbon nanotube based biosensors with a special focus on near-infrared (NIR)-fluorescence, Raman-scattering and fluorescence quenching.

  17. Improved Method of Purifying Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delzeit, Lance D.

    2004-01-01

    An improved method of removing the residues of fabrication from carbon nanotubes has been invented. These residues comprise amorphous carbon and metal particles that are produced during the growth process. Prior methods of removing the residues include a variety of processes that involved the use of halogens, oxygen, or air in both thermal and plasma processes. Each of the prior methods entails one or more disadvantages, including non-selectivity (removal or damage of nanotubes in addition to removal of the residues), the need to dispose of toxic wastes, and/or processing times as long as 24 hours or more. In contrast, the process described here does not include the use of toxic chemicals, the generation of toxic wastes, causes little or no damage to the carbon nanotubes, and involves processing times of less than 1 hour. In the improved method, purification is accomplished by flowing water vapor through the reaction chamber at elevated temperatures and ambient pressures. The impurities are converted to gaseous waste products by the selective hydrogenation and hydroxylation by the water in a reaction chamber. This process could be performed either immediately after growth or in a post-growth purification process. The water used needs to be substantially free of oxygen and can be obtained by a repeated freeze-pump-thaw process. The presence of oxygen will non-selectively attach the carbon nanotubes in addition to the amorphous carbon.

  18. Carbon Nanotube Membranes: Carbon Nanotube Membranes for Energy-Efficient Carbon Sequestration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2010-03-01

    Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: Porifera is developing carbon nanotube membranes that allow more efficient removal of CO2 from coal plant exhaust. Most of today’s carbon capture methods use chemical solvents, but capture methods that use membranes to draw CO2 out of exhaust gas are potentially more efficient and cost effective. Traditionally, membranes are limited by the rate at which they allow gas to flow through them and the amount of CO2 they can attract from the gas. Smooth support pores and the unique structure of Porifera’s carbon nanotube membranes allows them to be more permeable than other polymeric membranes, yet still selective enough for CO2 removal. This approach could overcome the barriers facing membrane-based approaches for capturing CO2 from coal plant exhausts.

  19. Carbon nanotubes for thermal interface materials in microelectronic packaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Wei

    , an in situ functionalization process has for the first time been demonstrated. The in situ functionalization renders the vertically aligned carbon nanotubes a proper chemical reactivity for forming chemical bonding with other substrate materials such as gold and silicon. 2. An ultrafast microwave annealing process has been developed to reduce the defect density in vertically aligned carbon nanotubes. Raman and thermogravimetric analyses have shown a distinct defect reduction in the CNTs annealed in microwave for 3 min. Fibers spun from the as-annealed CNTs, in comparison with those from the pristine CNTs, show increases of ˜35% and ˜65%, respectively, in tensile strength (˜0.8 GPa) and modulus (˜90 GPa) during tensile testing; an ˜20% improvement in electrical conductivity (˜80000 S m-1) was also reported. The mechanism of the microwave response of CNTs was discussed. Such a microwave annealing process has been extended to the preparation of reduced graphene oxide. 3. Based on the fundamental understanding of interfacial thermal transport and surface chemistry of metals and carbon nanotubes, two major transfer/assembling processes have been developed: molecular bonding and metal bonding. Effective improvement of the interfacial thermal transport has been achieved by the interfacial bonding. 4. The thermal diffusivity of vertically aligned carbon nanotube (VACNT, multi-walled) films was measured by a laser flash technique, and shown to be ˜30 mm2 s-1 along the tube-alignment direction. The calculated thermal conductivities of the VACNT film and the individual CNTs are ˜27 and ˜540 W m-1 K-1, respectively. The technique was verified to be reliable although a proper sampling procedure is critical. A systematic parametric study of the effects of defects, buckling, tip-to-tip contacts, packing density, and tube-tube interaction on the thermal diffusivity was carried out. Defects and buckling decreased the thermal diffusivity dramatically. An increased packing

  20. Purity Evaluation of Bulk Single Wall Carbon Nanotube Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dettlaff-Weglikowska, U.; Wang, J.; Liang, J.; Hornbostel, B.; Cech, J.; Roth, S.

    2005-09-01

    We report on our experience using a preliminary protocol for quality control of bulk single wall carbon nanotube (SWNT) materials produced by the electric arc-discharge and laser ablation method. The first step in the characterization of the bulk material is mechanical homogenization. Quantitative evaluation of purity has been performed using a previously reported procedure based on solution phase near-infrared spectroscopy. Our results confirm that this method is reliable in determining the nanotube content in the arc-discharge sample containing carbonaceous impurities (amorphous carbon and graphitic particles). However, the application of this method to laser ablation samples gives a relative purity value over 100 %. The possible reason for that might be different extinction coefficient meaning different oscillator strength of the laser ablation tubes. At the present time, a 100 % pure reference sample of laser ablation SWNT is not available, so we chose to adopt the sample showing the highest purity as a new reference sample for a quantitative purity evaluation of laser ablation materials. The graphitic part of the carbonaceous impurities has been estimated using X-ray diffraction of 1:1 mixture of nanotube material and C60 as an internal reference. To evaluate the metallic impurities in the as prepared and homogenized carbon nanotube soot inductive coupled plasma (ICP) has been used.

  1. Platinum nanoparticles on carbon-nanotube support prepared by room-temperature reduction with H2 in ethylene glycol/water mixed solvent as catalysts for polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yuying; Dou, Zhengjie; Fang, Yanxiong; Li, Muwu; Wu, Xin; Zeng, Jianhuang; Hou, Zhaohui; Liao, Shijun

    2016-02-01

    Polyol approach is commonly used in synthesizing Pt nanoparticles in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells. However, the application of this process consumes a great deal of time and energy, as the reduction of precursors requires elevated temperatures and several hours. Moreover, the ethylene glycol and its oxidizing products bound to Pt are difficult to remove. In this work, we utilize the advantages of ethylene glycol and prepare Pt nanoparticles through a room-temperature hydrogen gas reduction in an ethylene glycol/water mixed solvent, which is followed by subsequent harvesting by carbon nanotubes as electrocatalysts. This method is simple, facile, and time-efficient, as the entire room-temperature reduction process is completed in a few minutes. As the solvent changes from water to an ethylene glycol/water mix, the size of Pt nanoparticles varies from 10 to 3 nm and their shape transitions from polyhedral to spherical. Pt nanoparticles prepared in a 1:1 volume ratio mixture of ethylene glycol/water are uniformly dispersed with an average size of ∼3 nm. The optimized carbon nanotube-supported Pt electrocatalyst exhibits excellent methanol oxidation and oxygen reduction activities. This work demonstrates the potential use of mixed solvents as an approach in materials synthesis.

  2. Synthesis of dark brown single-walled carbon nanotubes and their characterization by HSQC-NMR

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Rahebeh Amiri; Hamidreza Rafiee; Ashkan Golshani; Firoozeh Chalabian

    2013-03-01

    We report here a simple and effective approach to the covalent attachment of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and azo compounds. The functionalized SWCNTs prepared (through a radical mechanism) have been used for a diazonium coupling reaction. The results showed that the chemical method used has improved the processability and solubility of the carbon nanotubes. The dark brown SWCNTs obtained which can produce a yellow colour in organic solvents were characterized by different spectroscopic analyses. Heteronuclear single quantum coherence spectra (13C-1H HSQC) have been used to detect the carbon nanotube allylic protons. The morphology of the main product has been shown by scanning electron microscopy (SEM).

  3. Electrochemical production of Sn-filled carbon nanotubes in molten salts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄辉; 张文魁; 李美超; 甘永平; 马淳安; 张孝彬

    2004-01-01

    Sn-filled carbon nanotubes(CNTs) were prepared in situ by electrolysis of graphite in molten LiCl/SnCl2mixtures. Transmission electron microscopy(TEM) investigation shows that the as-made products contain abundance of carbon nanotubes and most of them are filled with metal nanoparticles or nanorods. Some nanotubes are even inserted with long continuous nanowires more than several micrometers in length. Selected area electron diffraction(SAED) patterns and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy(EDS) of the filled nanotubes confirm the presence ofSn inside the nanotubes. The encapsulated Sn was further identified asβ-Sn with tetragonal structure. Based on theexperimental results, a possible growth mechanism of the Sn-filled nanotubes was also discussed.

  4. Chitin and carbon nanotube composites as biocompatible scaffolds for neuron growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Nandita; Chen, Jinhu; Koziol, Krzysztof K.; Hallam, Keith R.; Janas, Dawid; Patil, Avinash J.; Strachan, Ally; G. Hanley, Jonathan; Rahatekar, Sameer S.

    2016-04-01

    The design of biocompatible implants for neuron repair/regeneration ideally requires high cell adhesion as well as good electrical conductivity. Here, we have shown that plasma-treated chitin carbon nanotube composite scaffolds show very good neuron adhesion as well as support of synaptic function of neurons. The addition of carbon nanotubes to a chitin biopolymer improved the electrical conductivity and the assisted oxygen plasma treatment introduced more oxygen species onto the chitin nanotube scaffold surface. Neuron viability experiments showed excellent neuron attachment onto plasma-treated chitin nanotube composite scaffolds. The support of synaptic function was evident on chitin/nanotube composites, as confirmed by PSD-95 staining. The biocompatible and electrically-conducting chitin nanotube composite scaffold prepared in this study can be used for in vitro tissue engineering of neurons and, potentially, as an implantable electrode for stimulation and repair of neurons.

  5. Carbon nanotubes buckypapers for potential transdermal drug delivery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwengber, Alex [PINMATE-Departamento de Industrias, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Ciudad Universitaria, C1428EGA Buenos Aires (Argentina); Prado, Héctor J. [PINMATE-Departamento de Industrias, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Ciudad Universitaria, C1428EGA Buenos Aires (Argentina); Cátedra de Tecnología Farmacéutica II, Departamento de Tecnología Farmacéutica, Facultad de Farmacia y Bioquímica, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Junín 956, C1113AAD Buenos Aires (Argentina); Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas (CONICET), Av. Rivadavia 1917, C1033AAJ Buenos Aires (Argentina); Zilli, Darío A. [PINMATE-Departamento de Industrias, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Ciudad Universitaria, C1428EGA Buenos Aires (Argentina); Bonelli, Pablo R. [PINMATE-Departamento de Industrias, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Ciudad Universitaria, C1428EGA Buenos Aires (Argentina); Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas (CONICET), Av. Rivadavia 1917, C1033AAJ Buenos Aires (Argentina); and others

    2015-12-01

    Drug loaded buckypapers based on different types of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were prepared and characterized in order to evaluate their potentialities for the design of novel transdermal drug delivery systems. Lab-synthesized CNTs as well as commercial samples were employed. Clonidine hydrochloride was used as model drug, and the influence of composition of the drug loaded buckypapers and processing variables on in vitro release profiles was investigated. To examine the influence of the drug nature the evaluation was further extended to buckypapers prepared with flurbiprofen and one type of CNTs, their selection being based on the results obtained with the former drug. Scanning electronic microscopy images indicated that the model drugs were finely dispersed on the CNTs. Differential scanning calorimetry, and X-ray diffraction pointed to an amorphous state of both drugs in the buckypapers. A higher degree of CNT–drug superficial interactions resulted in a slower release of the drug. These interactions were in turn affected by the type of CNTs employed (single wall or multiwall CNTs), their functionalization with hydroxyl or carboxyl groups, the chemical structure of the drug, and the CNT:drug mass ratio. Furthermore, the application of a second layer of drug free CNTs on the loaded buckypaper, led to decelerate the drug release and to reduce the burst effect. - Highlights: • Drug loaded buckypapers from carbon nanotubes were prepared and characterized. • Their potentialities for transdermal drug delivery applications were evaluated. • Characteristics of carbon nanotubes and the structure of the drug affected release • A higher carbon nanotube:drug mass ratio decelerated release • Up to one week controlled release profiles were obtained for the drug flurbiprofen.

  6. A multi-walled carbon nanotube-modified glassy carbon electrode as a new sensor for the sensitive simultaneous determination of paracetamol and tramadol in pharmaceutical preparations and biological fluids

    OpenAIRE

    Babaei, Ali; Taheri,Ali Reza; Afrasiabi,Mohammad

    2011-01-01

    A chemically modified electrode was constructed based on a multi-walled carbon nanotube-modified glassy carbon electrode (MWCNTs/GCE). It was demonstrated that this sensor can be used for the simultaneous determination of the pharmaceutically important compounds paracetamol (PAR) and tramadol (TRA). The measurements were carried out by the application of differential pulse voltammetry (DPV), cyclic voltammetry (CV) and chronoamperometry (CA) methods. Application of the DPV method demonstrated...

  7. Structure Stability of Ⅰ-Type Carbon Nanotube Junctions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    夏丹; 袁喆; 李家明

    2002-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes with junctions may play an important role in future ‘nanoelectronics' and future ‘nano devices'.In particular, junctions constructed with metal and semiconducting nanotubes have potential applications. Basedon the orthogonal tight-binding molecular dynamics method, we present our study of the structure stability ofI-type carbon nanotube junctions.

  8. Bioaccumulation and ecotoxicity of carbon nanotubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jackson, Petra; Jacobsen, Nicklas Raun; Baun, Anders;

    2013-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNT) have numerous industrial applications and may be released to the environment. In the aquatic environment, pristine or functionalized CNT have different dispersion behavior, potentially leading to different risks of exposure along the water column. Data included in this review...

  9. Effective models for excitons in carbon nanotubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cornean, Horia; Duclos, Pierre; Ricaud, Benjamin

    2007-01-01

    We analyse the low lying spectrum of a model of excitons in carbon nanotubes. Consider two particles with opposite charges and a Coulomb self-interaction, placed on an infinitely long cylinder. If the cylinder radius becomes small, the low lying spectrum of their relative motion is well described...

  10. Effective models for excitons in carbon nanotubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cornean, Horia; Duclos, Pierre; Ricaud, Benjamin

    We analyse the low lying spectrum of a model of excitons in carbon nanotubes. Consider two particles with a Coulomb self-interaction, placed on an infinitely long cylinder. If the cylinder radius becomes small, the low lying spectrum is well described by a one-dimensional effective Hamiltonian...

  11. In-line manufacture of carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brambilla, Nicol Michele; Signorelli, Riccardo; Martini, Fabrizio; Corripio Luna, Oscar Enrique

    2015-04-28

    Mass production of carbon nanotubes (CNT) are facilitated by methods and apparatus disclosed herein. Advantageously, the methods and apparatus make use of a single production unit, and therefore provide for uninterrupted progress in a fabrication process. Embodiments of control systems for a variety of CNT production apparatus are included.

  12. Biodistribution of Carbon Nanotubes in Animal Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Nicklas Raun; Møller, Peter; Clausen, Per Axel

    2016-01-01

    The many physical and chemical properties of carbon nanotubes (CNT) make it one of the most commercially attractive materials in the era of nanotechnology. Here, we review the recent publications on in vivo biodistribution of pristine and functionalized forms of single-walled and multi-walled CNT...

  13. Conductance of AFM Deformed Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svizhenko, Alexei; Maiti, Amitesh; Anatram, M. P.; Biegel, Bryan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation provides information on the electrical conductivity of carbon nanotubes upon deformation by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The density of states and conductance were computed using four orbital tight-binding method with various parameterizations. Different chiralities develop bandgap that varies with chirality.

  14. Multiwall carbon nanotubes reinforced epoxy nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei

    The emergence of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) has led to myriad possibilities for structural polymer composites with superior specific modulus, strength, and toughness. While the research activities in carbon nanotube reinforced polymer composites (NRPs) have made enormous progress towards fabricating next-generation advanced structural materials with added thermal, optical, and electrical advantages, questions concerning the filler dispersion, interface, and CNT alignment in these composites remain partially addressed. In this dissertation, the key technical challenges related to the synthesis, processing, and reinforcing mechanics governing the effective mechanical properties of NRPs were introduced and reviewed in the first two chapters. Subsequently, issues on the dispersion, interface control, hierarchical structure, and multi-functionality of NRPs were addressed based on functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotube reinforced DGEBA epoxy systems (NREs). In chapter 3, NREs with enhanced flexural properties were discussed in the context of improved dispersion and in-situ formation of covalent bonds at the interface. In chapter 4, NREs with controlled interface and tailored thermomechanical properties were demonstrated through the judicious choice of surface functionality and resin chemistry. In chapter 5, processing-condition-induced CNT organization in hierarchical epoxy nanocomposites was analyzed. In Chapter 6, possibilities were explored for multi-functional NREs for underwater acoustic structural applications. Finally, the findings of this dissertation were concluded and future research was proposed for ordered carbon nanotube array reinforced nanocomposites in the last chapter. Four journal publications resulted from this work are listed in Appendix.

  15. Spatially resolved spectroscopy on carbon nanotubes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, J.W.

    2001-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes are small cylindrical molecules with a typical diameter of 1 nm and lengths of up to micrometers. These intriguing molecules exhibit, depending on the exact atomic structure, either semiconducting or metallic behavior. This makes them ideal candidates for possible future molecular e

  16. Chemistry of Carbon Nanotubes for Everyone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu-Dutt, Sharmistha; Minus, Marilyn L.; Jain, Rahul; Nepal, Dhriti; Kumar, Satish

    2012-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have the extraordinary potential to change our lives by improving existing products and enabling new ones. Current and future research and industrial workforce professionals are very likely to encounter some aspects of nanotechnology including CNT science and technology in their education or profession. The simple structure…

  17. Single electron-ics with carbon nanotubes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Götz, G.T.J.

    2010-01-01

    We experimentally investigate Quantum Dots, formed in Carbon Nanotubes. The first part of this thesis deals with charge sensing on such quantum dots. The charge sensor is a metallic Single-electron-transistor, sensitive to the charge of a single electron on the quantum dot. We use this technique for

  18. Photothermal effects of immunologically modified carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griswold, Ryan T.; Henderson, Brock; Goddard, Jessica; Tan, Yongqiang; Hode, Tomas; Liu, Hong; Nordquist, Robert E.; Chen, Wei R.

    2013-02-01

    Carbon nanotubes have a great potential in the biomedical applications. To use carbon nanotubes in the treatment of cancer, we synthesized an immunologically modified single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) using a novel immunomodifier, glycated chitosan (GC), as an effective surfactant for SWNT. This new composition SWNT-GC was stable due to the strong non-covalent binding between SWNT and GC. The structure of SWNT-GC is presented in this report. The photothermal effect of SWNT-GC was investigated under irradiation of a near-infrared laser. SWNT-GC retained the optical properties of SWNT and the immunological properties of GC. Specifically, the SWNT-GC could selectively absorb a 980-nm light and induce desirable thermal effects in tissue culture and in animals. It could also induce tumor cell destruction, controlled by the laser settings and the doses of SWNT and GC. Laser+SWNT-GC treatment could also induce strong expression of heat shock proteins on the surface of tumor cells. This immunologically modified carbon nanotube could be used for selective photothermal interactions in noninvasive tumor treatment.

  19. A New Resistance Formulation for Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji-Huan He

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A new resistance formulation for carbon nanotubes is suggested using fractal approach. The new formulation is also valid for other nonmetal conductors including nerve fibers, conductive polymers, and molecular wires. Our theoretical prediction agrees well with experimental observation.

  20. A new mechanism for carbon nanotube evolution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    @@ Key discoveries on the growth mechanism of carbon nanotubes(CNTs) have recently been achieved by CAS researcher ZHU Zhenping and his research group at the State Key Laboratory of Coal Conversion,the Institute of Coal Chemistry of CAS, funded by the National Natural Science Foundation of China and the CAS Bairen Program.

  1. Quantum transport in carbon nanotubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laird, Edward A.; Kuemmeth, Ferdinand; Steele, Gary A.

    2015-01-01

    modifies their transport behaviour. Interaction between electrons inside and outside a quantum dot is manifested in SU(4) Kondo behavior and level renormalization. Interaction within a dot leads to Wigner molecules and more complex correlated states. This review takes an experimental perspective informed...... and valley degrees of freedom. This review describes the modern understanding of transport through nanotube devices. Unlike conventional semiconductors, electrons in nanotubes have two angular momentum quantum numbers, arising from spin and from valley freedom. We focus on the interplay between the two....... In single quantum dots defined in short lengths of nanotube, the energy levels associated with each degree of freedom, and the spin-orbit coupling between them, are revealed by Coulomb blockade spectroscopy. In double quantum dots, the combination of quantum numbers modifies the selection rules of Pauli...

  2. Making junctions between carbon nanotubes using an ion beam

    CERN Document Server

    Krasheninnikov, A V; Keinonen, J; Banhart, F

    2003-01-01

    Making use of empirical potential molecular dynamics, we study ion bombardment of crossed single-walled carbon nanotubes as a tool to join the nanotubes. We demonstrate that ion irradiation should result in welding of crossed nanotubes, both suspended and deposited on substrates. We further predict optimum ion doses and energies for ion-mediated nanotube welding which may potentially be used for developing complicated networks of joined nanotubes.

  3. Carbon nanotubes for stem cell control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David A. Stout

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available In the past decade, two major advancements have transformed the world of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine—stem cells and carbon nano-dimensional materials. In the past, stem cell therapy seemed like it may present a cure for all medical ailments, but problems arose (i.e., immune system clearance, control of differentiation in the body, etc. that have hindered progress. But, with the synergy of carbon nano-dimensional materials, researchers have been able to overcome these tissue engineering and regenerative medicine obstacles and have begun developing treatments for strokes, bone failure, cardiovascular disease, and many other conditions. Here, we briefly review research involving carbon nanotubes which are relevant to the tissue engineering and regenerative medicine field with a special emphasis on carbon nanotube applications for stem cell delivery, drug delivery applications, and their use as improved medical devices.

  4. An electrochemical sensor prepared by sonochemical one-pot synthesis of multi-walled carbon nanotube-supported cobalt nanoparticles for the simultaneous determination of paracetamol and dopamine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kutluay, Aysegul; Aslanoglu, Mehmet, E-mail: maslanoglu@harran.edu.tr

    2014-08-11

    Highlights: • A GCE was modified with carbon nanotubes and cobalt nanoparticles. • The composite material was obtained using an ultrasonic chemical deposition method. • The CoNPs/MWCNT/GCE was applied for the simultaneous determination of PAR and DA. • The presence of AA and UA did not affect the responses of PAR and DA. • Lower detection limits were obtained using the CoNPs/MWCNT/GCE. - Abstract: Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) functionalized by cobalt nanoparticles were obtained using a single step chemical deposition method in an ultrasonic bath. The composite material was characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX). The electroactivity of the cobalt-functionalized MWCNTs was assessed in respect to the electrooxidation of paracetamol (PAR) and dopamine (DA). It was found that the carbon nanotube supported cobalt nanoparticles have significantly higher catalytic properties. The proposed electrode has been applied for the simultaneous determination of PAR and DA. The modified electrode could resolve the overlapped voltammetric waves of PAR and DA into two well-defined voltammetric peaks with peak to peak separation of about 203 mV. On the other hand, the presence of potential drug interfering compounds AA and UA did not affect the voltammetric responses of PAR and DA. The current of oxidation peaks showed a linear dependent on the concentrations of PAR and DA in the range of 5.2 × 10{sup −9}–4.5 × 10{sup −7} M (R{sup 2} = 0.9987) and 5.0 × 10{sup −8}–3.0 × 10{sup −6} M (R{sup 2} = 0.9999), respectively. The detection limits of 1.0 × 10{sup −9} M and 1.5 × 10{sup −8} M were obtained for PAR and DA, respectively. The proposed electrode showed good stability (peak current change: 4.9% with and RSD of 2.6% for PAR; 5.5% with and RSD of 3.0% for DA over 3 weeks), reproducibility (RSD 2.3% for PAR and RSD 1.5% for DA), repeatability (RSD 2.25% for PAR and RSD 2.50% for DA) and

  5. Pure carbon nanoscale devices: Nanotube heterojunctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chico, L.; Crespi, V.H.; Benedict, L.X.; Louie, S.G.; Cohen, M.L. [Department of Physics, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)]|[Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    1996-02-01

    Introduction of pentagon-heptagon pair defects into the hexagonal network of a single carbon nanotube can change the helicity of the tube and alter its electronic structure. Using a tight-binding method to calculate the electronic structure of such systems we show that they behave as nanoscale metal/semiconductor or semiconductor/semiconductor junctions. These junctions could be the building blocks of nanoscale electronic devices made entirely of carbon. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  6. Exploring the Immunotoxicity of Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Yanmei

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Mass production of carbon nanotubes (CNTs and their applications in nanomedicine lead to the increased exposure risk of nanomaterials to human beings. Although reports on toxicity of nanomaterials are rapidly growing, there is still a lack of knowledge on the potential toxicity of such materials to immune systems. This article reviews some existing studies assessing carbon nanotubes’ toxicity to immune system and provides the potential mechanistic explanation.

  7. A flexible multifunctional sensor based on carbon nanotube/polyurethane composite

    OpenAIRE

    Slobodian, Petr; Říha, Pavel; Benlikaya, Ruhan; Svoboda, Petr; Petráš, David

    2013-01-01

    A sensor was made of a polymer composite composed of electrically-conductive carbon nanotubes embedded in elastic polyurethane. The composite was prepared by using a polyurethane filter membrane, enmeshing it and melding together with carbon nanotubes. Testing has shown that the composite can be elongated as much as 400 % during which the electrical resistance is increased 270 times. The composite is also sensitive to compression and to organic solvent vapors. These properties indicat...

  8. Preparation of Electrically Conductive Polystyrene/Carbon Nanofiber Nanocomposite Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Luyi; O'Reilly, Jonathan Y.; Tien, Chi-Wei; Sue, Hung-Jue

    2008-01-01

    A simple and effective approach to prepare conductive polystyrene/carbon nanofiber (PS/CNF) nanocomposite films via a solution dispersion method is presented. Inexpensive CNF, which has a structure similar to multi-walled carbon nanotubes, is chosen as a nanofiller in this experiment to achieve conductivity in PS films. A good dispersion is…

  9. Carbon nanoparticles trapped in vivo-similar to carbon nanotubes in time-dependent biodistribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jia-Hui; Yang, Sheng-Tao; Wang, Xin; Wang, Haifang; Liu, Yamin; Luo, Pengju G; Liu, Yuanfang; Sun, Ya-Ping

    2014-08-27

    Carbon nanoparticles are in all of the carbon nanomaterials that are presently widely pursued for potential bioapplications, but their in vivo biodistribution-related properties are largely unknown. In this work, highly (13)C-enriched carbon nanoparticles were prepared to allow their quantification in biological samples by using isotope-ratio mass spectroscopy. The in vivo biodistribution results are presented and discussed, and also compared with those of the aqueous suspended carbon nanotubes reported previously. The distribution profile and time dependencies are largely similar between the nanoparticles and nanotubes, with results on both suggesting meaningful accumulation in some major organs over an extended period of time. Therefore, the surface modification of carbon nanoparticles, preferably the chemical functionalization of the nanoparticles with biocompatible molecules or species, is desirable or necessary in the pursuit of these nanomaterials for various bioapplications.

  10. Carbon nanotube oscillators for applications as nanothermometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmat, Fainida; Thamwattana, Ngamta; Hill, James M.

    2010-10-01

    Nanostructures such as carbon nanotubes have a broad range of potential applications such as nanomotors, nano-oscillators and electromechanical nanothermometers, and a proper understanding of the molecular interaction between nanostructures is fundamentally important for these applications. In this paper, we determine the molecular interaction potential of interacting carbon nanotubes for two configurations. The first is a shuttle configuration involving a short outer tube sliding on a fixed inner tube, and the second involves a telescopic configuration for which an inner tube moves both in the region between two outer tubes and through the tubes themselves. For the first configuration we examine two cases of semi-infinite and finite inner carbon nanotubes. We employ the continuum approximation and the 6-12 Lennard-Jones potential for non-bonded molecules to determine the molecular interaction potential and the resulting van der Waals force, and we evaluate the resulting surface integrals numerically. We also investigate the acceptance condition and suction energy for the first configuration. Our results show that for the shuttle configuration with a semi-infinite inner tube, the suction energy is maximum when the difference between the outer and inner tubes radii is approximately 3.4 Å, which is the ideal inter-wall spacing between graphene sheets. For the finite inner tube, the potential energy is dependent on both the inner and outer tube lengths as well as on the inter-wall spacing. In terms of the oscillating frequency, the critical issue is the length of the moving outer tube, and the shorter the length, the higher the frequency. Further, for the telescopic configuration with two semi-infinite outer nanotubes of different radii, we find that the interaction energy also depends on the difference of the tube radii. For two outer nanotubes of equal radii we observe that the shorter the distance between the two outer nanotubes, the higher the magnitude of the

  11. Single wall carbon nanotubes and their electrical properties

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    薛增泉; 刘惟敏; 侯士敏; 施祖进; 顾镇南; 刘虹雯; 赵兴钰; 张兆祥; 吴绵雷; 彭练矛; 吴全德

    2000-01-01

    Single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) were synthesized and purified. A water colloid of SWCNTs was prepared and used to assemble SWCNTs onto a gold film surface. Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) images showed that short SWCNTs stood on gold film surfaces. Using STM tips made of SWCNTs, a crystal grain image of a gold thin film and an atomic resolution image of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite were successfully obtained. The electrical properties of short SWCNTs, which stood on the surface of gold film, were measured using STM. That SWCNTs stand on gold thin films is a promising technique for studying structures and properties of carbon nanotubes, as well as assembling and fabricating high-intensity coherent electron sources, field emission flat panel display, tips for scanning probe microscopes, new nanoelectronic devices, etc.

  12. Decorating multiwalled carbon nanotubes with zinc oxide nano-crystallines through hydrothermal growth process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI ChenSha; QIAO YingJie; LI YuMing

    2012-01-01

    Multiwalled-carbon nanotubes coated with nano-crystalline zinc oxide (ZnO) was prepared by in situ growth of nano zinc oxide on the surfaces of carbon nanotubes through hydrothermal method.X-ray diffraction,transmission electron microscopy and scanning electron microscopy analysis techniques were used to characterize the samples.It was observed that a layer of nano-crystalline ZnO with the wurtzite hexagonal crystal structure was uniformly coated on the nanotube surfaces with good adhesion,which resulted in the formation of a novel ZnO-nanotube nano composite.In this work,the carbon nanotubes decorated by metal oxide nanoparticles were synthesized by a simple chemical-solution route which is suitable for the large-scale production with low cost.

  13. Field-effect transistors assembled from functionalized carbon nanotubes

    OpenAIRE

    Klinke, Christian; Hannon, James B.; Afzali, Ali; Avouris, Phaedon

    2006-01-01

    We have fabricated field effect transistors from carbon nanotubes using a novel selective placement scheme. We use carbon nanotubes that are covalently bound to molecules containing hydroxamic acid functionality. The functionalized nanotubes bind strongly to basic metal oxide surfaces, but not to silicon dioxide. Upon annealing, the functionalization is removed, restoring the electronic properties of the nanotubes. The devices we have fabricated show excellent electrical characteristics.

  14. Porous carbon nanotubes: Molecular absorption, transport, and separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yzeiri, Irena; Patra, Niladri; Král, Petr

    2014-03-01

    We use classical molecular dynamics simulations to study nanofluidic properties of porous carbon nanotubes. We show that saturated water vapor condenses on the porous nanotubes, can be absorbed by them and transported in their interior. When these nanotubes are charged and placed in ionic solutions, they can selectively absorb ions in their interior and transport them. Porous carbon nanotubes can also be used as selective molecular sieves, as illustrated on a room temperature separation of benzene and ethanol.

  15. Carbon Nanotubes Blended Hydroxyapatite Ethanol Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anjum, S. R.; Khairnar, R. S.

    2016-12-01

    Nano crystals of Hydroxyapatite (HAp) were synthesized by a wet chemical precipitation method. The nano composite materials were developed by doping various weight concentrations of carbon nanotubes in HAp, followed by characterization using scanning electron microscopy, and X-ray diffraction. Thick films of these materials were prepared by using screen printing technique. The ethanol sensing properties of these nano crystals and nano composite films were investigated by two probe electrical method. The gas sensing features such as operating temperature, response and recovery time, maximum gas detection limit, etc. were studied, since these parameters are of prime importance for sensor. The results revealed that at room temperature, the composite materials exhibited improved sensing performance towards 100 ppm ethanol with fast response times. It also showed shorter recovery time with higher vapor uptake capacity. The ethanol adsorption processes on doped and undoped substrates can be explained by surface chemical reactions as well as providing the possible adsorption models. The novelty of this work lies in developing reusable sensor substrates for room temperature sensing.

  16. Carbon nanotubes on a spider silk scaffold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steven, Eden; Saleh, Wasan R.; Lebedev, Victor; Acquah, Steve F. A.; Laukhin, Vladimir; Alamo, Rufina G.; Brooks, James S.

    2013-09-01

    Understanding the compatibility between spider silk and conducting materials is essential to advance the use of spider silk in electronic applications. Spider silk is tough, but becomes soft when exposed to water. Here we report a strong affinity of amine-functionalised multi-walled carbon nanotubes for spider silk, with coating assisted by a water and mechanical shear method. The nanotubes adhere uniformly and bond to the silk fibre surface to produce tough, custom-shaped, flexible and electrically conducting fibres after drying and contraction. The conductivity of coated silk fibres is reversibly sensitive to strain and humidity, leading to proof-of-concept sensor and actuator demonstrations.

  17. Localization in single-walled carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuhrer, M.S.; Cohen, M.L.; Zettl, A.; Crespi, V.H.

    1998-08-15

    We demonstrate that in low temperature semiconductor-like regions the electrical resistance of single-walled carbon nanotube mats is highly nonlinear with a temperature-dependent threshold field for the onset of nonohmic conduction. The modest applied electric field completely suppresses the upturn in resistance and recovers metallic behavior over the entire temperature range 2.2K < T < 300K. The transport data indicate low-temperature localization of charge carriers arise from disorder on the nanotube bundles themselves and not from granularity caused by weak interbundle connections. The temperature-independent localization radius a is determined to be approximately 330 nm.

  18. A Multiwall Carbon Nanotube-chitosan Modified Electrode for Selective Detection of Dopamine in the Presence of Ascorbic Acid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ling Yan JIANG; Chuan Yin LIU; Li Ping JIANG; Guang Han LU

    2005-01-01

    A novel multiwall carbon nanotube-chitosan modified electrode has been prepared.The modified electrode resolves the overlapping voltammetric response of dopamine and ascorbic acid into two well-defined peak by 212 mY. The mechanism of discrimination of dopamine from ascorbic acid is discussed. Dopamine can be determined selectively with the carbon nanotube-chitosan modified electrode. The electrode shows good sensitivity, selectivity and stability.keywords: Nanotube-chitosan modified electrode, dopamine, ascorbic acid.

  19. Thin Coatings of Polymeric Carbon and Carbon Nanotubes for Corrosion Protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-02-01

    Carbon Nanotube Functionalization /Doping Polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) A) p-Doping C) Polymer Wrapping Model B) n-Doping Polyethyleneimine ( PEI ) SWCNT Paint...fluorine-containing) groups functions as the barrier layer Multilayer Smart Carbon Nanotube Coating Insoluble polymer layer top coating -PMMA Substrate...Thin Coatings of Polymeric Carbon and Carbon Nanotubes for Corrosion Protection Zafar Iqbal Department of Chemistry and Environmental Science New

  20. Functionalization of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eloise Van Hooijdonk

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available This review focuses and summarizes recent studies on the functionalization of carbon nanotubes oriented perpendicularly to their substrate, so-called vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (VA-CNTs. The intrinsic properties of individual nanotubes make the VA-CNTs ideal candidates for integration in a wide range of devices, and many potential applications have been envisaged. These applications can benefit from the unidirectional alignment of the nanotubes, the large surface area, the high carbon purity, the outstanding electrical conductivity, and the uniformly long length. However, practical uses of VA-CNTs are limited by their surface characteristics, which must be often modified in order to meet the specificity of each particular application. The proposed approaches are based on the chemical modifications of the surface by functionalization (grafting of functional chemical groups, decoration with metal particles or wrapping of polymers to bring new properties or to improve the interactions between the VA-CNTs and their environment while maintaining the alignment of CNTs.

  1. Wear Behaviour of Carbon Nanotubes Reinforced Nanocrystalline AA 4032 Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senthil Saravanari, M. S.; Kumaresh Babu, S. P.; Sivaprasad, K.

    2016-09-01

    The present paper emphasizes the friction and wear properties of Carbon Nanotubes reinforced AA 4032 nanocomposites prepared by powder metallurgy technique. CNTs are multi-wall in nature and prepared by electric arc discharge method. Multi-walled CNTs are blended with AA 4032 elemental powders and compaction followed by sintering to get bulk nanocomposites. The strength of the composites has been evaluated by microhardness and the surface contact between the nanocomposites and EN 32 steel has been evaluated by Pin on disk tester. The results are proven that reinforcement of CNTs play a major role in the enhancement of hardness and wear.

  2. Pharmacokinetics Evaluation of Carbon Nanotubes Using FTIR Analysis and Histological Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gherman, Claudia; Tudor, Matea Cristian; Constantin, Bele; Flaviu, Tabaran; Stefan, Razvan; Maria, Bindea; Chira, Sergiu; Braicu, Cornelia; Pop, Laura; Petric, Roxana Cojocneanu; Berindan-Neagoe, Ioana

    2015-04-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are biologically non-toxic and long-circulating nanostructures that have special physical properties. This study was focused on developing alternative methods that track carbon nanotubes, like FR-IR to classical tissue histological procedure. FT-IR absorption spectra were used to confirm the carboxylation of carbon nanotubes and to evaluate the presence of carbon nanotubes from bulk spleen samples and histologically prepared samples (control spleen and spleen with SWCNT-COOH). FT-IR spectrum of spleen sample from animals injected with CNTs shows major spectral differences consisting in infrared bands located at ~1173 cm(-1), ~ 1410 cm(-1); ~1658 cm(-1), ~1737 cm(-1) and around 1720 cm(-1) respectively. In terms of localization of carbon nanotubes, selective accumulation of marginal zone macrophages and splenic red pulp is observed for all treated groups, indicating the presence of carbon nanotubes even at 3, 4 and 7 days after treatment. In summary, we believe that histological evaluation and FT-IR can provide more characteristic information about the pharmacokinetcis and the clearance of carbon nanotubes.

  3. Carbon nanotubes degraded by neutrophil myeloperoxidase induce less pulmonary inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagan, Valerian E.; Konduru, Nagarjun V.; Feng, Weihong; Allen, Brett L.; Conroy, Jennifer; Volkov, Yuri; Vlasova, Irina I.; Belikova, Natalia A.; Yanamala, Naveena; Kapralov, Alexander; Tyurina, Yulia Y.; Shi, Jingwen; Kisin, Elena R.; Murray, Ashley R.; Franks, Jonathan; Stolz, Donna; Gou, Pingping; Klein-Seetharaman, Judith; Fadeel, Bengt; Star, Alexander; Shvedova, Anna A.

    2010-05-01

    We have shown previously that single-walled carbon nanotubes can be catalytically biodegraded over several weeks by the plant-derived enzyme, horseradish peroxidase. However, whether peroxidase intermediates generated inside human cells or biofluids are involved in the biodegradation of carbon nanotubes has not been explored. Here, we show that hypochlorite and reactive radical intermediates of the human neutrophil enzyme myeloperoxidase catalyse the biodegradation of single-walled carbon nanotubes in vitro, in neutrophils and to a lesser degree in macrophages. Molecular modelling suggests that interactions of basic amino acids of the enzyme with the carboxyls on the carbon nanotubes position the nanotubes near the catalytic site. Importantly, the biodegraded nanotubes do not generate an inflammatory response when aspirated into the lungs of mice. Our findings suggest that the extent to which carbon nanotubes are biodegraded may be a major determinant of the scale and severity of the associated inflammatory responses in exposed individuals.

  4. Adsorption of Gases on Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mbaye, Mamadou Thiao

    2014-01-01

    This research focus in studying the interaction between various classical and quantum gases with novel carbon nanostructures, mainly carbon nanotubes (CNTs). Since their discovery by the Japanese physicist Sumio Iijima [1] carbon nanotubes have, experimentally and theoretically, been subjected to many scientific investigation. Studies of adsorption on CNTs are particularly directed toward their better usage in gas storage, gas separation, catalyst, drug delivery, and water purification. We explore the adsorption of different gases entrapped in a single, double, or multi-bundles of CNTs using computer simulations. The first system we investigate consists of Ar and Kr films adsorbed on zigzag or armchair nanotubes. Our simulations revealed that Kr atoms on intermediate size zigzag NTs undergo two phase transitions: A liquid-vapor (L→V), and liquid-commensurate (L→CS) with a fractional coverage of one Kr atoms adsorbed for every four carbon atoms. For Ar on zigzag and armchair NTs, the only transition observed is a L→V. In the second problem, we explore the adsorption of CO2 molecules in a nanotube bundle and calculate the isosteric heat of adsorption of the entrapped molecules within the groove. We observed that the lower the temperature, the higher the isosteric of adsorption. Last, we investigate the adsorption of hydrogen, Helium, and Neon gases on the groove site of two parallel nanotubes. At low temperature, the transverse motion on the plane perpendicular to the tubes' axis is frozen out and as a consequence, the heat capacity is reduced to 1/2. At high temperature, the atoms gain more degree of freedom and as a consequence the heat capacity is 5/2.

  5. Purification of Carbon Nanotubes by Proton Irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Euikwoun; Lee, Jeonggil; Lee, Younman; Jeon, Jaekyun; Kim, Jae-Yong; Kim, Jeongha; Shin, Kwanwoo; Youn, Sang-Pil; Kim, Kyeryung

    2007-10-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) exhibit variety of superior physical properties including well-defined nanodimensional structure, high electrical and thermal conductivity, and good mechanical stability against external irradiations. Further, a large specific surface area per unit weight suggests that carbon nanotubes could be excellent candidates for gas storage, purification, and separation. However, the practical application of CNTs is limited mainly due to the metallic impurities that were used as a catalyst during the fabrication process. Here, we irradiated CNTs by using high energy proton beams (35.7 MeV at the Bragg Peak). Interestingly, metallic impurities such as Fe, Ni, Co and chunk of amorphous carbon that were attached on the surface of CNTs were completely removed after the irradiation. The mechanism of such the purification process is not understood. The possible speculation will be demonstrated combined with the changes of physical properties including the appearance of the magnetism after the irradiation.

  6. Mechanical properties of functionalized carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Z Q; Liu, B; Chen, Y L; Hwang, K C [FML, Department of Engineering Mechanics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Jiang, H [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287 (United States); Huang, Y [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States)], E-mail: liubin@tsinghua.edu.cn, E-mail: y-huang@northwestern.edu

    2008-10-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) used to reinforce polymer matrix composites are functionalized to form covalent bonds with the polymer in order to enhance the CNT/polymer interfaces. These bonds destroy the perfect atomic structures of a CNT and degrade its mechanical properties. We use atomistic simulations to study the effect of hydrogenization on the mechanical properties of single-wall carbon nanotubes. The elastic modulus of CNTs gradually decreases with the increasing functionalization (percentage of C-H bonds). However, both the strength and ductility drop sharply at a small percentage of functionalization, reflecting their sensitivity to C-H bonds. The cluster C-H bonds forming two rings leads to a significant reduction in the strength and ductility. The effect of carbonization has essentially the same effect as hydrogenization.

  7. On the Nanoindentation of the Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petre P. Teodorescu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A new inverse approach is proposed in this paper, which combines elements of nonlocal theory and molecular mechanics, based on the experimental results available in the nanoindentation literature. The effect of the inlayer van der Waals atomistic interactions for carbon nanotubes with multiple walls (MWCNT is included by means of the Brenner-Tersoff potential and experimental results. The neighboring walls of MWCNT are coupled through van der Waals interactions, and the shell buckling would initiate in the outermost shell, when nanotubes are short. The nanoindentation technique is simulated for the axially compressed of individual nanotubes, in order to evaluate the load-unloaded-displacement, the curve critical buckling and the appropriate values for local Lamé constants.

  8. Carbon nanotube-ceramic nanocomposites: Synthesis and characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Michael David

    Ceramic materials are widely used in modern society for a variety of applications including fuel cell electrolytes, bio-medical implants, and jet turbines. However, ceramics are inherently brittle making them excellent candidates for mechanical reinforcement. In this work, the feasibility of dispersing multi-walled carbon nanotubes into a silicon carbide matrix for mechanical property enhancement is explored. Prior to dispersing, nanotubes were purified using an optimized, three step methodology that incorporates oxidative treatment, acid sonication, and thermal annealing rendering near-superhydrophobic behavior in synthesized thin films. Alkyl functionalized nanotube dispersability was characterized in various solvents. Dispersability was contingent on fostering polar interactions between the functionalized nanotubes and solvent despite the purely dispersive nature of the aliphatic chains. Interpretation of these results yielded values of 45.6 +/- 1.2, 0.78 +/- 0.04, and 2 4 +/- 0.9 mJ/m2 for the Lifshitz-van der Waals, electron acceptor and electron donor surface energy components respectively. Aqueous nanotube dispersions were prepared using a number of surfactants to examine surfactant concentration and pH effects on nanotube dispersability. Increasing surfactant concentrations resulted in a solubility plateau, which was independent of the surfactant's critical micelle concentration. Deviations from neutral pH demonstrated negligible influence on non-ionic surfactant adsorption while, ionic surfactants showed substantial pH dependent behavior. These results were explained in the context of nanotube surface ionization and Debye length variation. Successful MWNT dispersion into a silicon carbide based matrix is reported by in-situ ceramic formation using two routes; sol-gel chemistry and pre-ceramic polymeric precursor workup. For the former, nanotube dispersion was assisted by PluronicRTM surfactants. Pyrolytic treatment and consolidation of formed powders

  9. Modification of single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNT) for hydrogen storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rashidi, A.M.; Nouralishahi, A.; Karimi, A.; Kashefi, K. [Nanotechnology Research Center, Research Institute of petroleum industry (RIPI), Tehran (Iran); Khodadadi, A.A.; Mortazavi, Y. [Chemical engineering Department, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran)

    2010-09-15

    Due to unique structural, mechanical and electrical properties of single wall carbon nanotubes, SWNTs, they have been proposed as promising hydrogen storage materials especially in automotive industries. This research deals with investing of CNT's and some activated carbons hydrogen storage capacity. The CNT's were prepared through natural gas decomposition at a temperature of 900 C over cobalt-molybdenum nanoparticles supported by nanoporous magnesium oxide (Co-Mo/MgO) during a chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process. The effects of purity of CNT (80-95%wt.) on hydrogen storage were investigated here. The results showed an improvement in the hydrogen adsorption capacity with increasing the purity of CNT's. Maximum adsorption capacity was 0.8%wt. in case of CNT's with 95% purity and it may be raised up with some purification to 1%wt. which was far less than the target specified by DOE (6.5%wt.). Also some activated carbons were manufactured and the results compared to CNTs. There were no considerable H{sub 2}-storage for carbon nanotubes and activated carbons at room-temperature due to insufficient binding between H{sub 2} molecules carbon nanostructures. Therefore, hydrogen must be adsorbed via interaction of atomic hydrogen with the storage environment in order to achieve DOE target, because the H atoms have a very stronger interaction with carbon nanostructures. (author)

  10. Carbon nanotube materials from hydrogen storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dillon, A.C.; Bekkedahl, T.A.; Cahill, A.F. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO (United States)

    1995-09-01

    The lack of convenient and cost-effective hydrogen storage is a major impediment to wide scale use of hydrogen in the United States energy economy. Improvements in the energy densities of hydrogen storage systems, reductions in cost, and increased compatibility with available and forecasted systems are required before viable hydrogen energy use pathways can be established. Carbon-based hydrogen adsorption materials hold particular promise for meeting and exceeding the U.S. Department of Energy hydrogen storage energy density targets for transportation if concurrent increases in hydrogen storage capacity and carbon density can be achieved. These two goals are normally in conflict for conventional porous materials, but may be reconciled by the design and synthesis of new adsorbent materials with tailored pore size distributions and minimal macroporosity. Carbon nanotubes offer the possibility to explore new designs for adsorbents because they can be fabricated with small size distributions, and naturally tend to self-assemble by van der Waals forces. This year we report heats of adsorption for hydrogen on nanotube materials that are 2 and 3 times greater than for hydrogen on activated carbon. The hydrogen which is most strongly bound to these materials remains on the carbon surface to temperatures greater than 285 K. These results suggest that nanocapillary forces are active in stabilizing hydrogen on the surfaces of carbon nanotubes, and that optimization of the adsorbent will lead to effective storage at higher temperatures. In this paper we will also report on our activities which are targeted at understanding and optimizing the nucleation and growth of single wall nanotubes. These experiments were made possible by the development of a unique feedback control circuit which stabilized the plasma-arc during a synthesis run.

  11. Carbon Nanotubes for Space Photovoltaic Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efstathiadis, Harry; Haldar, Pradeep; Landi, Brian J.; Denno, Patrick L.; DiLeo, Roberta A.; VanDerveer, William; Raffaelle, Ryne P.

    2007-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) can be envisioned as an individual graphene sheet rolled into a seamless cylinder (single-walled, SWNT), or concentric sheets as in the case of a multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWNT) (1). The role-up vector will determine the hexagonal arrangement and "chirality" of the graphene sheet, which will establish the nanotube to be metallic or semiconducting. The optoelectronic properties will depend directly on this chiral angle and the diameter of the SWNT, with semiconductor types exhibiting a band gap energy (2). Characteristic of MWNTs are the concentric graphene layers spaced 0.34 nm apart, with diameters from 10-200 nm and lengths up to hundreds of microns (2). In the case of SWNTs, the diameters range from 0.4 - 2 nm and lengths have been reported up to 1.5 cm (3). SWNTs have the distinguishable property of "bundling" together due to van der Waal's attractions to form "ropes." A comparison of these different structural types is shown in Figure 1. The use of SWNTS in space photovoltaic (PV) applications is attractive for a variety of reasons. Carbon nanotubes as a class of materials exhibit unprecedented optical, electrical, mechanical properties, with the added benefit of being nanoscale in size which fosters ideal interaction in nanomaterial-based devices like polymeric solar cells. The optical bandgap of semiconducting SWNTs can be varied from approx. 0.4 - 1.5 eV, with this property being inversely proportional to the nanotube diameter. Recent work at GE Global Research has shown where a single nanotube device can behave as an "ideal" pn diode (5). The SWNT was bridged over a SiO2 channel between Mo contacts and exhibited an ideality factor of 1, based on a fit of the current-voltage data using the diode equation. The measured PV efficiency under a 0.8 eV monochromatic illumination showed a power conversion efficiency of 0.2 %. However, the projected efficiency of these junctions is estimated to be > 5 %, especially when one considers the

  12. Preparation and Electrochemical Properties of Selenium Nanoparticles/Multiwall Carbon Nanotubes Composite Materials%纳米硒/多壁碳纳米管复合材料的制备及其电化学性能

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    荣凤霞; 周俊; 刘薇; 王锐; 白燕

    2011-01-01

    The multiwall carbon nanotubes(MWCNTs) were treated by concentrated H2SO4/HNO3 mixtures. The selenium nanoparticles/multiwall carbon nanotubes composite materials (nano-Se0/MWCNTs for short 1) was prepared by MWCNTs loaded nano-Se0. The structure and mopography of 1 were characterized by IR, TEM and SEM. The electrochemical properties of 1 were investigated by cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectra.%经混酸纯化处理的多壁碳纳米管(MWCNTs)负载纳米硒(Nano-Se0)制备纳米硒/多壁碳纳米管复合材料(Nano-Se0/MWCNTs,简称1),其结构经IR,TEM和SEM表征.以Fe(CN)4-/3-6 为探针离子,采用循环伏安法和电化学阻抗法考察了1的电化学性能.

  13. Carbon Micronymphaea: Graphene on Vertically Aligned Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong Won Choi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the morphology of carbon nanomaterials such as carbon nanotube (CNT, graphene, and their hybrid structure under various operating conditions during a one-step synthesis via plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD. We focus on the synthetic aspects of carbon hybrid material composed of heteroepitaxially grown graphene on top of a vertical array of carbon nanotubes, called carbon micronymphaea. We characterize the structural features of this unique nanocomposite by uses of electron microscopy and micro-Raman spectroscopy. We observe carbon nanofibers, poorly aligned and well-aligned vertical arrays of CNT sequentially as the growth temperature increases, while we always discover the carbon hybrids, called carbon micronymphaea, at specific cooling rate of 15°C/s, which is optimal for the carbon precipitation from the Ni nanoparticles in this study. We expect one-pot synthesized graphene-on-nanotube hybrid structure poses great potential for applications that demand ultrahigh surface-to-volume ratios with intact graphitic nature and directional electronic and thermal transports.

  14. Multifunctional Carbon Nanotube Fiber Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    coagulant. The second process (patent pending) is novel in that it directly results polymer-free nanotube fibers without using a super acid spinning...chemical and electrochemical stability, hydrophobicity and viscosity . The generic structure, chemical name and abbreviations for the most common ions...modification procedure involved the electrochemical infiltration of small amounts of the polypyrrole/p-toluene sulphonate (PPy/PTS) conducting polymer

  15. Preparation and properties of magnetic iron oxide nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Baoliang Lv; Yao Xu; Dong Wu; Yuhan Sun

    2008-01-01

    Magnetite (Fe3O4) nanotubes were prepared by reducing synthesized hematite (α-Fe2O3) nanotubes in 5% H2+95% Ar atmosphere,and then maghemite (γ-Fe2O3) nanotubes were obtained by re-oxidizing the Fe3O4 nanotubes.The nanotube structure was kept from collapsing or sintering throughout the high temperature reducing and re-oxidizing processes.The coercivities of the Fe3O4 and γ-Fe2O3 nanotubes synthesized were found to be 340.22 Oe and 342.23 Oe,respectively,both higher than other nanostructures with the same phase and of similar size.Both adsorbed phosphate and the nanotube structure are considered responsible for this high coercivity.

  16. Use of Functionalized Carbon Nanotubes for Covalent Attachment of Nanotubes to Silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tour, James M.; Dyke, Christopher A.; Maya, Francisco; Stewart, Michael P.; Chen, Bo; Flatt, Austen K.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the invention is to covalently attach functionalized carbon nanotubes to silicon. This step allows for the introduction of carbon nanotubes onto all manner of silicon surfaces, and thereby introduction of carbon nano - tubes covalently into silicon-based devices, onto silicon particles, and onto silicon surfaces. Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) dispersed as individuals in surfactant were functionalized. The nano - tube was first treated with 4-t-butylbenzenediazonium tetrafluoroborate to give increased solubility to the carbon nanotube; the second group attached to the sidewall of the nanotube has a silyl-protected terminal alkyne that is de-protected in situ. This gives a soluble carbon nanotube that has functional groups appended to the sidewall that can be attached covalently to silicon. This reaction was monitored by UV/vis/NJR to assure direct covalent functionalization.

  17. Metal-enhanced fluorescence of carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Guosong; Tabakman, Scott M; Welsher, Kevin; Wang, Hailiang; Wang, Xinran; Dai, Hongjie

    2010-11-17

    The photoluminescence (PL) quantum yield of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) is relatively low, with various quenching effects by metallic species reported in the literature. Here, we report the first case of metal enhanced fluorescence (MEF) of surfactant-coated carbon nanotubes on nanostructured gold substrates. The photoluminescence quantum yield of SWNTs is observed to be enhanced more than 10-fold. The dependence of fluorescence enhancement on metal-nanotube distance and on the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) of the gold substrate for various SWNT chiralities is measured to reveal the mechanism of enhancement. Surfactant-coated SWNTs in direct contact with metal exhibit strong MEF without quenching, suggesting a small quenching distance for SWNTs on the order of the van der Waals distance, beyond which the intrinsically fast nonradiative decay rate in nanotubes is little enhanced by metal. The metal enhanced fluorescence of SWNTs is attributed to radiative lifetime shortening through resonance coupling of SWNT emission to the reradiating dipolar plasmonic modes in the metal.

  18. Developing Carbon Nanotube Standards at NASA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolaev, Pasha; Arepalli, Sivaram; Sosa, Edward; Gorelik, Olga; Yowell, Leonard

    2007-01-01

    Single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) are currently being produced and processed by several methods. Many researchers are continuously modifying existing methods and developing new methods to incorporate carbon nanotubes into other materials and utilize the phenomenal properties of SWCNTs. These applications require availability of SWCNTs with known properties and there is a need to characterize these materials in a consistent manner. In order to monitor such progress, it is critical to establish a means by which to define the quality of SWCNT material and develop characterization standards to evaluate of nanotube quality across the board. Such characterization standards should be applicable to as-produced materials as well as processed SWCNT materials. In order to address this issue, NASA Johnson Space Center has developed a protocol for purity and dispersion characterization of SWCNTs. The NASA JSC group is currently working with NIST, ANSI and ISO to establish purity and dispersion standards for SWCNT material. A practice guide for nanotube characterization is being developed in cooperation with NIST. Furthermore, work is in progress to incorporate additional characterization methods for electrical, mechanical, thermal, optical and other properties of SWCNTs.

  19. Remote Joule heating by a carbon nanotube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baloch, Kamal H.; Voskanian, Norvik; Bronsgeest, Merijntje; Cumings, John

    2012-05-01

    Minimizing Joule heating remains an important goal in the design of electronic devices. The prevailing model of Joule heating relies on a simple semiclassical picture in which electrons collide with the atoms of a conductor, generating heat locally and only in regions of non-zero current density, and this model has been supported by most experiments. Recently, however, it has been predicted that electric currents in graphene and carbon nanotubes can couple to the vibrational modes of a neighbouring material, heating it remotely. Here, we use in situ electron thermal microscopy to detect the remote Joule heating of a silicon nitride substrate by a single multiwalled carbon nanotube. At least 84% of the electrical power supplied to the nanotube is dissipated directly into the substrate, rather than in the nanotube itself. Although it has different physical origins, this phenomenon is reminiscent of induction heating or microwave dielectric heating. Such an ability to dissipate waste energy remotely could lead to improved thermal management in electronic devices.

  20. Graphene nanoribbons production from flat carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melo, W. S.; Guerini, S.; Diniz, E. M., E-mail: eduardo.diniz@ufma.br [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal do Maranhão, São Luís - MA 65080-805 (Brazil)

    2015-11-14

    Graphene nanoribbons are of great interest for pure and applied sciences due to their unique properties which depend on the nanoribbon edges, as, for example, energy gap and antiferromagnetic coupling. Nevertheless, the synthesis of nanoribbons with well-defined edges remains a challenge. To collaborate with this subject, here we propose a new route for the production of graphene nanoribbons from flat carbon nanotubes filled with a one-dimensional chain of Fe atoms by first principles calculations based on density functional theory. Our results show that Fe-filled flat carbon nanotubes are energetically more stable than non flattened geometries. Also we find that by hydrogenation or oxygenation of the most curved region of the Fe-filled flat armchair carbon nanotube, it occurred a spontaneous production of zigzag graphene nanoribbons which have metallic or semiconducting behavior depending on the edge and size of the graphene nanoribbon. Such findings can be used to create a new method of synthesis of regular-edge carbon nanoribbons.

  1. Synthesis of nano-carbon (nanotubes, nanofibres, graphene) materials

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Kalpana Awasthi; Rajesh Kumar; Himanshu Raghubanshi; Seema Awasthi; Ratnesh Pandey; Devinder Singh; T P Yadav; O N Srivastava

    2011-07-01

    In the present study, we report the synthesis of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) using a new natural precursor: castor oil. The CNTs were synthesized by spray pyrolysis of castor oil–ferrocene solution at 850°C under an Ar atmosphere. We also report the synthesis of carbon nitrogen (C–N) nanotubes using castor oil–ferrocene–ammonia precursor. The as-grown CNTs and C–N nanotubes were characterized through scanning and transmission electron microscopic techniques. Graphitic nanofibres (GNFs) were synthesized by thermal decomposition of acetylene (C2H2) gas using Ni catalyst at 600°C. As-grown GNFs reveal both planar and helical morphology. We have investigated the structural and electrical properties of multi-walled CNTs (MWNTs)–polymer (polyacrylamide (PAM)) composites. The MWNTs–PAM composites were prepared using as purified, with ball milling and functionalized MWNTs by solution cast technique and characterized through SEM. A comparative study has been made on the electrical property of these MWNTs–PAM composites with different MWNTs loadings. It is shown that the ball milling and functionalization of MWNTs improves the dispersion of MWNTs into the polymer matrix. Enhanced electrical conductivity was observed for the MWNTs–PAM composites. Graphene samples were prepared by thermal exfoliation of graphite oxide. XRD analysis confirms the formation of graphene.

  2. Carbon nanotube catalysts: recent advances in synthesis, characterization and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Yibo; Miao, Jianwei; Yang, Zhihong; Xiao, Fang-Xing; Yang, Hong Bin; Liu, Bin; Yang, Yanhui

    2015-05-21

    Carbon nanotubes are promising materials for various applications. In recent years, progress in manufacturing and functionalizing carbon nanotubes has been made to achieve the control of bulk and surface properties including the wettability, acid-base properties, adsorption, electric conductivity and capacitance. In order to gain the optimal benefit of carbon nanotubes, comprehensive understanding on manufacturing and functionalizing carbon nanotubes ought to be systematically developed. This review summarizes methodologies of manufacturing carbon nanotubes via arc discharge, laser ablation and chemical vapor deposition and functionalizing carbon nanotubes through surface oxidation and activation, doping of heteroatoms, halogenation, sulfonation, grafting, polymer coating, noncovalent functionalization and nanoparticle attachment. The characterization techniques detecting the bulk nature and surface properties as well as the effects of various functionalization approaches on modifying the surface properties for specific applications in catalysis including heterogeneous catalysis, photocatalysis, photoelectrocatalysis and electrocatalysis are highlighted.

  3. CARBON NANOTUBES: AN APPROACH TO NOVEL DRUG DELIVERY SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. H. Alai et al.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanotubes are cylindrical carbon molecules have novel properties, making them potentially useful in many applications in nanotechnology, electronics, optics, and other fields of material science as well as potential uses in architectural fields. They have unique electronic, mechanical, optical and chemical properties that make them good candidates for a wide variety of applications, including drug transporters, new therapeutics, delivery systems and diagnostics. Their unique surface area, stiffness, strength and resilience have led to much excitement in the field of pharmacy. Nanotubes are categorized as single-walled nanotubes, multiple walled nanotubes. Various techniques have been developed to produce nanotubes in sizeable quantities, including arc discharge, laser ablation, chemical vapor deposition. They can pass through membranes, carrying therapeutic drugs, vaccines and nucleic acids deep into the cell to targets previously unreachable. Purification of the tubes can be divided into a couple of main techniques: oxidation, acid treatment, annealing, sonication, filtering and functionalization techniques. The main problem of insolubility in aqueous media has been solved by developing a synthetic protocol that allows highly water-soluble carbon NTs to be obtained. The modifications are done to improve efficiency of carbon nanotubes by formulating luminescent carbon nanotubes, ultrathin carbon nanoneedles, magnetically guided nanotubes. The application of carbon nanotube in tissue engineering, drug carrier release system, wound healing, in cancer treatment and as biosensor. Researchers have recently developed a new approach to Boron Neutron Capture Therapy in the treatment of cancer using substituted Carborane-Appended Water-Soluble single-wall carbon nanotubes.

  4. 功能化多壁碳纳米管海绵状微球制备%Preparation of spongy microspheres consisting of functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dhiraj Dutta; Rama Dubey; Jitendra Yadav; T.C.Shami; K.U.Bhasker Rao

    2011-01-01

    Multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were synthesized by catalytic chemical vapor deposition and functionalized by oxidation with potassium permanganate at room temperature using a phase transfer catalyst, methyl trioctyl ammonium chloride as a dispersion agent. The functionalized nanotubes were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and thermogravimetry. Sonication was used to assist their dispersion in dichloromethane and the resulting suspension was added dropwise to a stirred polyvinyl alcohol aqueous solution and spongy microspheres were formed. SEM showed that the microspheres consisted of loosely entangled MWCNTs that had diameters in the range 50-150 μm. The microspheres may be useful for lightweight energy absorbing coatings, catalyst and electronics applications.%通过催化化学气相沉积法合成了多壁碳纳米管(MWCNTs).在相转移催化剂甲基三辛基氯化铵存在下,以高锰酸钾(KMnO4)为氧化剂在室温下对MWCNTs进行功能化处理.采用傅立叶变化红外光谱、热失重分析分析法对功能化MWCNTs进行表征.借助超声波降解法将功能化MWCNTs分散在二氯甲烷中形成悬浮液,然后将其悬浮液逐滴加至搅拌的聚乙烯醇溶液中形成海绵状微球.扫描电子显微镜(SEM)显示:形成的海绵状微球由松散缠结的MWCNTs构成,直径为50μm~150μm.该微球可望应用于轻型吸能涂料,催化剂以及电子学领域.

  5. Preparation of modified multiwalled carbon nanotubes/chitosan composites and their antifouling properties%改性碳纳米管/壳聚糖复合材料的制备及防污性能

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈守刚; 刘丹; 王洪芬

    2015-01-01

    By controlling the pH of the solution, single-layer dopamine modified multiwalled carbon nanotubes (micaDA-MWCNTs) were prepared under acid condition. Multiwalled carbon nanotubes/chitosan (CS/micaDA-MWCNTs) composites were prepared by covalent grafting method with glutaraldehyde as a bridge material between chitosan and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). The structure and nature of CS/micaDA-MWCNTs composites were characterized by transmission electron microscope (TEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA). The results showed that about 6 nm membrane layer of chitosan was well-distributively coated on the surface and the end of MWCNTs. The effective biocompatible strategy of dopamine monolayer film coated carbon nanotubes can not only achieve the purpose of modification with less damage of carbon nanotube structure, but also increase significant amounts of surface active groups of MWCNTs, thereby increasing the content of grafted chitosan. Thermogravimetry analysis (TGA) data showed the chitosan graft was approximately 71.78%. CS/micaDA-MWCNTs had the advantages of both CS and MWCNTs in bacteriostasis, sustained-release effect and diatom growth inhibition. Antifouling experiments indicated that the composites had an efficient broad-spectrum of antibacterial activity againstE.coli, S.aureus,Vibrio anguillarum,Navicula parva andNavicula rows.%通过控制溶液的pH,在酸性条件下制备了单层多巴胺改性的多壁碳纳米管,然后以戊二醛作为反应中间桥梁,共价接枝制备得到碳纳米管/壳聚糖复合材料。通过透射电子显微镜(TEM)、红外光谱(FTIR)和热重分析法(TGA)对复合材料的结构和性能进行表征,结果表明碳纳米管的管壁外面和管端都被均匀包覆起来,包覆层厚度在6 nm左右;采用多巴胺单层膜包覆碳纳米管,达到了减小对碳纳米管结构造成破坏同时增加表面活性基团数量的

  6. Computational and experimental studies of the interaction between single-walled carbon nanotubes and folic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, John J.; Rozo, Ciro E.; Castillo-León, Jaime; Rindzevicius, Tomas; Svendsen, Winnie E.; Rozlosnik, Noemi; Boisen, Anja; Martínez, Fernando

    2013-03-01

    This Letter involved the preparation of a conjugate between single-walled carbon nanotubes and folic acid that was obtained without covalent chemical functionalization using a simple 'one pot' synthesis method. Subsequently, the conjugate was investigated by a computational hybrid method: our own N-layered Integrated Molecular Orbital and Molecular Mechanics (B3LYP(6-31G(d):UFF)). The results confirmed that the interaction occurred via hydrogen bonding between protons of the glutamic moiety from folic acid and π electrons from the carbon nanotubes. The single-walled carbon nanotube-folic acid conjugate presented herein is believed to lead the way to new potential applications as carbon nanotube-based drug delivery systems.

  7. Van der Waals interaction between two crossed carbon nanotubes

    OpenAIRE

    Zhbanov, Alexander I.; Pogorelov, Evgeny G.; Chang, Yia-Chung

    2008-01-01

    The analytical expressions for the van der Waals potential energy and force between two crossed carbon nanotubes are presented. The Lennard-Jones potential for two carbon atoms and the method of the smeared out approximation suggested by L.A. Girifalco were used. The exact formula is expressed in terms of rational and elliptical functions. The potential and force for carbon nanotubes were calculated. The uniform potential curves for single- and multi- wall nanotubes were plotted. The equilibr...

  8. Raman spectroscopy on carbon nanotubes at high pressure

    OpenAIRE

    Loa, I.

    2003-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy has been the most extensively employed method to study carbon nanotubes at high pressures. This review covers reversible pressure-induced changes of the lattice dynamics and structure of single- and multi-wall carbon nanotubes as well as irreversible transformations induced by high pressures. The interplay of covalent and van-der-Waals bonding in single-wall nanotube bundles and a structural distortion near 2 GPa are discussed in detail. Attempts of transforming carbon nano...

  9. Thermogravimetric Analysis of Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arepalli, Sivram; Nikolaev, Pavel; Gorelik, Olga

    2010-01-01

    An improved protocol for thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) of samples of single-wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) material has been developed to increase the degree of consistency among results so that meaningful comparisons can be made among different samples. This improved TGA protocol is suitable for incorporation into the protocol for characterization of carbon nanotube material. In most cases, TGA of carbon nanotube materials is performed in gas mixtures that contain oxygen at various concentrations. The improved protocol is summarized.

  10. Simulations of Electrophoretic RNA Transport Through Transmembrane Carbon Nanotubes

    OpenAIRE

    Zimmerli, Urs; Koumoutsakos, Petros

    2008-01-01

    The study of interactions between carbon nanotubes and cellular components, such as membranes and biomolecules, is fundamental for the rational design of nanodevices interfacing with biological systems. In this work, we use molecular dynamics simulations to study the electrophoretic transport of RNA through carbon nanotubes embedded in membranes. Decorated and naked carbon nanotubes are inserted into a dodecane membrane and a dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine lipid bilayer, and the system is sub...

  11. Continuous Growth of Vertically Aligned Carbon Nanotubes Forests

    OpenAIRE

    Guzman de Villoria, Roberto; Wardle, Brian L.

    2011-01-01

    Vertically aligned carbon nanotubes are one of the most promising materials due their numerous applications in flexible electronic devices, biosensors and multifunctional aircraft materials, among others. However, the costly production of aligned carbon nanotubes, generally in a batch process, prevents their commercial use. For the first time, a controlled process to grow aligned carbon nanotubes in a continuous manner is presented. Uniform growth is achieved using 2D and 3D substrates. A sig...

  12. Nanoscale Continuum Modelling of Carbon Nanotubes by Polyhedral Finite Elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Logah Perumal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available As the geometry of a cell of carbon nanotube is hexagonal, a new approach is presented in modelling of single-walled carbon nanotubes using polyhedral finite elements. Effect of varying length, diameter, and thickness of carbon nanotubes on Young’s modulus is studied. Both armchair and zigzag configurations are modelled and simulated in Mathematica. Results from current approach found good agreement with the other published data.

  13. Investigation of bioresistant dry building mixes modified by carbon nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Korolev Evgeniy Valer'evich

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Dry construction mixes are today a product of high technologies. Depending on the purpose and requirements to the properties it is easy to produce dry construction mixes with different compositions and operating indicators in plant conditions using the necessary modifying additives. Cement, gypsum and other mineral binders are used in the construction mixes. Different types of cement are more heavily used in dry construction mixes. Such dry mixes are believed to be more effective materials comparing to traditional cement-sandy solutions of centralized preparation. The authors present the results of the investigations on obtaining biocidal cement-sand compositions. It was established, that introduction of sodium sulfate into the composition provides obtaining the materials with funginert and fungicide properties. The strength properties of the mixes modified by carbon nanotubes and biocide additive were investigated by mathematical planning methods. The results of the investigations showed that the modification of cement stone structure by carbon nanotubes positively influences their strength and technological properties. Nanomodifying of construction composites by introducing carbon nanotubes may be effectively used at different stages of structure formation of a construction material.

  14. Influence of carbon nanotube length on toxicity to zebrafish embryos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng J

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Jinping Cheng,1,2 Shuk Han Cheng11Department of Biology and Chemistry, City University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong; 2State Key Laboratory of Estuarine and Coastal Research, East China Normal University, Shanghai, ChinaAbstract: There is currently a large difference of opinion in nanotoxicology studies of nanomaterials. There is concern about why some studies have indicated that there is strong toxicity, while others have not. In this study, the length of carbon nanotubes greatly affected their toxicity in zebrafish embryos. Multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs were sonicated in a nitric acid solution for 24 hours and 48 hours. The modified MWCNTs were tested in early developing zebrafish embryo. MWCNTs prepared with the longer sonication time resulted in severe developmental toxicity; however, the shorter sonication time did not induce any obvious toxicity in the tested developing zebrafish embryos. The cellular and molecular changes of the affected zebrafish embryos were studied and the observed phenotypes scored. This study suggests that length plays an important role in the in vivo toxicity of functionalized CNTs. This study will help in furthering the understanding on current differences in toxicity studies of nanomaterials.Keywords: length, carbon nanotubes, sonication, developmental toxicity, zebrafish

  15. A Carbon Nanotube Cable for a Space Elevator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bochnícek, Zdenek

    2013-01-01

    In this paper the mechanical properties of carbon nanotubes are discussed in connection with the possibility to use them for the construction of a space elevator. From the fundamental information about the structure of a carbon nanotube and the chemical bond between carbon atoms, Young's modulus and the ultimate tensile strength are…

  16. Carbon nanotube based stationary phases for microchip chromatography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Klaus Bo; Kutter, Jörg Peter

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this article is to provide an overview and critical evaluation of the use of carbon nanotubes and related carbon-based nanomaterials for microchip chromatography. The unique properties of carbon nanotubes, such as a very high surface area and intriguing adsorptive behaviour, have...

  17. Electrostatic sensing and electrochemistry with single carbon nanotubes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heller, I.

    2009-01-01

    This thesis describes the experimental study of devices based on single carbon nanotubes in the context of (bio)sensing in aqueous solutions. Carbon nanotubes are cylindrical molecules of sp2- carbon, about one nanometer in diameter and typically several micrometers long, which have semiconducting o

  18. Carbon Nanotube Flexible and Stretchable Electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Le; Wang, Chuan

    2015-08-01

    The low-cost and large-area manufacturing of flexible and stretchable electronics using printing processes could radically change people's perspectives on electronics and substantially expand the spectrum of potential applications. Examples range from personalized wearable electronics to large-area smart wallpapers and from interactive bio-inspired robots to implantable health/medical apparatus. Owing to its one-dimensional structure and superior electrical property, carbon nanotube is one of the most promising material platforms for flexible and stretchable electronics. Here in this paper, we review the recent progress in this field. Applications of single-wall carbon nanotube networks as channel semiconductor in flexible thin-film transistors and integrated circuits, as stretchable conductors in various sensors, and as channel material in stretchable transistors will be discussed. Lastly, state-of-the-art advancement on printing process, which is ideal for large-scale fabrication of flexible and stretchable electronics, will also be reviewed in detail.

  19. Carbon Nanotube Flexible and Stretchable Electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Le; Wang, Chuan

    2015-12-01

    The low-cost and large-area manufacturing of flexible and stretchable electronics using printing processes could radically change people's perspectives on electronics and substantially expand the spectrum of potential applications. Examples range from personalized wearable electronics to large-area smart wallpapers and from interactive bio-inspired robots to implantable health/medical apparatus. Owing to its one-dimensional structure and superior electrical property, carbon nanotube is one of the most promising material platforms for flexible and stretchable electronics. Here in this paper, we review the recent progress in this field. Applications of single-wall carbon nanotube networks as channel semiconductor in flexible thin-film transistors and integrated circuits, as stretchable conductors in various sensors, and as channel material in stretchable transistors will be discussed. Lastly, state-of-the-art advancement on printing process, which is ideal for large-scale fabrication of flexible and stretchable electronics, will also be reviewed in detail.

  20. Printed Carbon Nanotube Electronics and Sensor Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kevin; Gao, Wei; Emaminejad, Sam; Kiriya, Daisuke; Ota, Hiroki; Nyein, Hnin Yin Yin; Takei, Kuniharu; Javey, Ali

    2016-06-01

    Printing technologies offer large-area, high-throughput production capabilities for electronics and sensors on mechanically flexible substrates that can conformally cover different surfaces. These capabilities enable a wide range of new applications such as low-cost disposable electronics for health monitoring and wearables, extremely large format electronic displays, interactive wallpapers, and sensing arrays. Solution-processed carbon nanotubes have been shown to be a promising candidate for such printing processes, offering stable devices with high performance. Here, recent progress made in printed carbon nanotube electronics is discussed in terms of materials, processing, devices, and applications. Research challenges and opportunities moving forward from processing and system-level integration points of view are also discussed for enabling practical applications.