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Sample records for carbon nanotubes mwcnts

  1. Plasma Treated Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes (MWCNTs for Epoxy Nanocomposites

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    Jie Lian

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Plasma nanocoating of allylamine were deposited on the surfaces of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs to provide desirable functionalities and thus to tailor the surface characteristics of MWCNTs for improved dispersion and interfacial adhesion in epoxy matrices. Plasma nanocoated MWCNTs were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM, surface contact angle, and pH change measurements. Mechanical testing results showed that epoxy reinforced with 1.0 wt % plasma coated MWCNTs increased the tensile strength by 54% as compared with the pure epoxy control, while epoxy reinforced with untreated MWCNTs have lower tensile strength than the pure epoxy control. Optical and electron microscopic images show enhanced dispersion of plasma coated MWCNTs in epoxy compared to untreated MWCNTs. Plasma nanocoatings from allylamine on MWCNTs could significantly enhance their dispersion and interfacial adhesion in epoxy matrices. Simulation results based on the shear-lag model derived from micromechanics also confirmed that plasma nanocoating on MWCNTs significantly improved the epoxy/fillers interface bonding and as a result the increased composite strength.

  2. The functionalization and characterization of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs)

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    Abdullah, Mohd Pauzi [School of Chemical Sciences and Food Technology, Faculty Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600, Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia); Center of Water Analysis and Research (ALIR), Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600, Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia); Zulkepli, Siti Aminah [School of Chemical Sciences and Food Technology, Faculty Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600, Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2015-09-25

    Functionalization is the process of introducing chemical functional groups on the surface of the material. In this study, a multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNTs) was functionalized by oxidation treatment using concentrated nitric acid. The functionalized and pristine MWCNTs were analyzed by using Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-IR) and X-Ray Diffraction (XRD). The XRD patterns exhibit the graphitic properties for all samples. Besides, the XRD results also demonstrate that the percent of crystallinity of MWCNTs increases as the duration of acid treatment increases. The percent of crystallinity increases from 66% to 80% when the pristine MWCNT treated for 12 hours with additional 12 hours reflux process with nitric acid. The IR spectrum for the 12 hours-treated MWCNTs shows the formation of carboxyl functional group. Additional 12 hours reflux process with nitric acid on the 12 hours-treated MWCNTs have shown the loss of existing carboxyl group and only hydroxyl group formed.

  3. Potentiometric urea biosensor based on multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs)/silica composite material

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    Ahuja, Tarushee [National Physical Laboratory (Council of Scientific and Industrial Research), Dr. K.S. Krishnan Road, New Delhi-110012 (India); Department of Applied Chemistry, Delhi College of Engineering, University of Delhi, Bawana Road, Delhi-110042 (India); Kumar, D. [Department of Applied Chemistry, Delhi College of Engineering, University of Delhi, Bawana Road, Delhi-110042 (India); Singh, Nahar; Biradar, A.M. [National Physical Laboratory (Council of Scientific and Industrial Research), Dr. K.S. Krishnan Road, New Delhi-110012 (India); Rajesh, E-mail: rajesh_csir@yahoo.com [National Physical Laboratory (Council of Scientific and Industrial Research), Dr. K.S. Krishnan Road, New Delhi-110012 (India)

    2011-03-12

    A novel potentiometric urea biosensor has been fabricated with urease (Urs) immobilized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) embedded in silica matrix deposited on the surface of indium tin oxide (ITO) coated glass plate. The enzyme Urs was covalently linked with the exposed free -COOH groups of functionalized MWCNTs (F-MWCNTs), which are subsequently incorporated within the silica matrix by sol-gel method. The Urs/MWCNTs/SiO{sub 2}/ITO composite modified electrode was characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) and UV-visible spectroscopy. The morphologies and electrochemical performance of the modified Urs/MWCNTs/SiO{sub 2}/ITO electrode have been investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and potentiometric method, respectively. The synergistic effect of silica matrix, F-MWCNTs and biocompatibility of Urs/MWCNTs/SiO{sub 2} made the biosensor to have the excellent electro catalytic activity and high stability. The resulting biosensor exhibits a good response performance to urea detection with a wide linear range from 2.18 x 10{sup -5} to 1.07 x 10{sup -3} M urea. The biosensor shows a short response time of 10-25 s and a high sensitivity of 23 mV/decade/cm{sup 2}.

  4. New practical method of homogeneous dispersion of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) into Mg matrix composites

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    Zhang, Teng; Du, Shuangming; Sun, Wanchang; Zhang, Jumei; Niu, Libin; Hua, Xiaohu

    2017-03-01

    It is difficult to disperse multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) into Mg matrix composites homogeneously due to the high specific surface energy between MWCNTs. This would affect the mechanical properties of magnesium matrix composites reinforced by MWCNTs tremendously. The key is to overcome MWCNTs aggregate together, and gain the homogeneous dispersion of MWCNTs. Moreover, the density difference of Mg matrix and MWCNTs is another problem which prevents MWCNTs from dispersing homogeneously into Mg matrix composites. In order to solve these problems, a new practical method of homogeneous dispersion of carbon nanotubes into Mg matrix composites was presented basing on combination the tow step ball milling and ultrasonication dispersion methods. First, a certain amount of MWCNTs was ball-milled in ethanol solution contain 5 wt.% sodium stearate at various rotation speeds (100 rpm-300 rpm) and ball-milled times (0.5 H-2 H) to break MWCNTs hard aggregation. Second, MWCNTs which were subjected to the ball-milling were dispersed further in ethanol solution containing (SDS, DBS) using ultrasonication method. Third, the Mg powers were mixed with good dispersion of carbon nanotubes solution and ball-milled for 1 H to make MWCNTs coated uniformly on the surface of the magnesium substrate. The results were mainly examined by field emission scanning electron microscopy (SEM). It was found that MWCNTs were dispersed well and some of these MWCNTs had directional arrangement. Furthermore, MWCNTs were homogeneously dispersed into Mg matrix composites. These results suggest that this method has good application for magnesium matrix composites reinforced by carbon nanotubes.

  5. Fatigue life of stainless steel 304 enhancement by addition of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs)

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    Syed, Rizwanulhaque; Jiang, Wei; Wang, Cunshan [Dalian University of Technology, Dalian (China); Sabir, M. Iqbal [Xiao Zhang County, Tianjin (China)

    2015-01-15

    Stainless steel is among the most widely used industrial materials. In particular, stainless steel 304 (304SS) is the most used material grade. To increase the utilization of any industrial material, its fatigue life should be optimized. In this work, the fatigue life of 304SS was enhanced by the addition of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). Moreover, the incorporation of a small amount of MWCNTs increased the fatigue life of 304SS. Scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction (XRD) results showed that the suppression of fatigue crack growth rate was caused by CNT deposition at the crack tip. CNTs were entangled with each other, thereby resulting in finer grain size. The XRD diffractograms of the 304SS treated area peak showed that the microstructure consisted of austenite and carbon.

  6. The cellular response of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs

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    Chantelle L. Phillips

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Nanoparticles (NPs especially those of carbon nanotubes (CNTs have remarkable properties that are very desirable in various biological and biomedical applications. This has necessitated the rapid study of CNT toxicities, to augment their safe use, particularly, in yeast cells. The yeast cell; Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a widely used industrial and biological organism with very limited data regarding their cellular behaviour in NPs. The current study examines the cellular response of S. cerevisiae to MWCNTs. The CNTs were produced by the swirled floating catalytic chemical vapour deposition (SFCCVD method and covalently functionalised using 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition. The CNT properties such as size, surface area, quality and surface vibrations were characterized using TEM, SEM, BET, TGA and Raman spectroscopy, respectively. The cellular uptake was confirmed with a FITC functionalised MWCNTs using 1H NMR, SEM and TEM. The CNT concentrations of 2–40 μg/ml were used to determine the cellular response through cell growth phases and cell viability characteristics. The TEM and SEM analyses showed the production of MWCNTs with an average diameter of 53 ± 12 nm and a length of 2.5 ± 0.5 μm. The cellular uptake of FITC-MWCNTs showed 100% internalisation in the yeast cells. The growth curve responses to the MWCNT doses showed no significant differences at P > 0.05 on the growth rate and viability of the S. cerevisiae cells.

  7. Mechanical Properties of Carbon Nanotube/Polyurethane Nanocomposites via PPG Dispersion with MWCNTs

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    Kim, Dae Won; Kim, Jong Seok [Chonbuk National University, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    In order to improve the dispersity of nanofiller, polyurethane (PU) nanocomposites were manufactured via poly(propylene gylcol) (PPG) dispersion with MWCNTs prepared by using a ball mill shaker. MWCNTs could be functionalized by treating with the hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}). Tensile strengths and elongations at break of PU/H{sub 2}O{sub 2} treated MWCNTs nanocomposites were enhanced compared to those of the PU/pristine MWCNTs nanocomposites. The good dispersion of MWCNTs shown in SEM images was obtained by the functionalization of MWCNTs surface. PU/carbon black (CB) composites showed no significant change in the tensile properties. The tensile properties of PU nanocomposites containing pristine MWCNTs or H{sub 2}O{sub 2} treated MWCNTs were enhanced with increasing dispersion time. As a result, it was certified that the enhanced dispersity of nanofiller brought the improvement of the tensile properties of the MWCNTs based PU nanocomposites.

  8. Predicting pulmonary fibrosis in humans after exposure to multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs).

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    Sharma, Monita; Nikota, Jake; Halappanavar, Sabina; Castranova, Vincent; Rothen-Rutishauser, Barbara; Clippinger, Amy J

    2016-07-01

    The increased production and use of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) in a diverse array of consumer, medical, and industrial applications have raised concerns about potential human exposure to these materials in the workplace and ambient environments. Inhalation is a primary route of exposure to MWCNTs, and the existing data indicate that they are potentially hazardous to human health. While a 90-day rodent inhalation test (e.g., OECD Test No. 413: subchronic inhalation toxicity: 90-day study or EPA Health Effects Test Guidelines OPPTS 870.3465 90-day inhalation toxicity) is recommended by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Office of Pollution Prevention and Toxics for MWCNTs (and other CNTs) if they are to be commercially produced (Godwin et al. in ACS Nano 9:3409-3417, 2015), this test is time and cost-intensive and subject to scientific and ethical concerns. As a result, there has been much interest in transitioning away from studies on animals and moving toward human-based in vitro and in silico models. However, given the multiple mechanisms of toxicity associated with subchronic exposure to inhaled MWCNTs, a battery of non-animal tests will likely be needed to evaluate the key endpoints assessed by the 90-day rodent study. Pulmonary fibrosis is an important adverse outcome related to inhalation exposure to MWCNTs and one that the non-animal approach should be able to assess. This review summarizes the state-of-the-science regarding in vivo and in vitro toxicological methods for predicting MWCNT-induced pulmonary fibrosis.

  9. Rapid synthesis of CNTs@MIL-101(Cr) using multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) as crystal growth accelerator☆

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qing Wang; Shengqiang Wang; Hongbing Yu

    2016-01-01

    In this work, hybrid material CNTs@MIL-101(Cr) was synthesized in 2 h using multi-wal ed carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) as the crystal growth accelerator with hydrothermal method. The characteristic differences between the crystals of CNTs@MIL-101(Cr) and MIL-101 were investigated by N2 adsorption–desorption isotherms, X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM) and thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA). The results showed that MWCNTs embedding in the hybrid material provide more mesoporous volumes than that of MIL-101. Moreover, the fast synthesized crystals of CNTs@MIL-101(Cr) still preserve the octahedral shape like MIL-101 and have a larger size ranging from 1.5 to 2.0μm which were approximately three times larger than that of MIL-101. In the proposed mechanism, the roles of MWCNTs played in the crystal ization were discussed where MWCNTs can be seen as coaxial cylindrical tubes composed of multi-layer graphenes and the place where nucleation and crystal growth processes occur at the tubes' out surface. Then, a crystal seeding layer bonding with the MWCNTs may be easily formed which accelerates the growth rate of MIL-101 crystals. Thus, larger crystals of CNTs@MIL-101(Cr) were formed due to the faster crystal growth rate of MIL-101.

  10. Biomarker analysis of liver cells exposed to surfactant-wrapped and oxidized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs)

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    Henderson, W. Matthew, E-mail: Henderson.Matt@epa.gov [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Research and Development, National Exposure Research Laboratory, 960 College Station Road, Athens 30605, GA (United States); Bouchard, Dermont [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Research and Development, National Exposure Research Laboratory, 960 College Station Road, Athens 30605, GA (United States); Chang, Xiaojun [Grantee to U.S. Environmental Protection Agency via National Research Council Cooperative Agreement, Athens 30605, GA (United States); Al-Abed, Souhail R. [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Research and Development, National Risk Management Research Laboratory, 26 Martin Luther King Dr. W, Cincinnati, OH 45268 (United States); Teng, Quincy [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Research and Development, National Exposure Research Laboratory, 960 College Station Road, Athens 30605, GA (United States)

    2016-09-15

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have great potential in industrial, consumer, and mechanical applications, based partly on their unique structural, optical and electronic properties. CNTs are commonly oxidized or treated with surfactants to facilitate aqueous solution processing, and these CNT surface modifications also increase possible human and ecological exposures to nanoparticle-contaminated waters. To determine the exposure outcomes of oxidized and surfactant-wrapped multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) on biochemical processes, metabolomics-based profiling of human liver cells (C3A) was utilized. Cells were exposed to 0, 10, or 100 ng/mL of MWCNTs for 24 and 48 h; MWCNT particle size distribution, charge, and aggregation were monitored concurrently during exposures. Following MWCNT exposure, cellular metabolites were extracted, lyophilized, and buffered for {sup 1}H NMR analysis. Acquired spectra were subjected to both multivariate and univariate analysis to determine the consequences of nanotube exposure on the metabolite profile of C3A cells. Resulting scores plots illustrated temporal and dose-dependent metabolite responses to all MWCNTs tested. Loadings plots coupled with t-test filtered spectra identified metabolites of interest. XPS analysis revealed the presence of hydroxyl and carboxyl functionalities on both MWCNTs surfaces. Metal content analysis by ICP-AES indicated that the total mass concentration of the potentially toxic impurities in the exposure experiments were extremely low (i.e. [Ni] ≤ 2 × 10{sup −10} g/mL). Preliminary data suggested that MWCNT exposure causes perturbations in biochemical processes involved in cellular oxidation as well as fluxes in amino acid metabolism and fatty acid synthesis. Dose-response trajectories were apparent and spectral peaks related to both dose and MWCNT dispersion methodologies were determined. Correlations of the significant changes in metabolites will help to identify potential biomarkers associated with

  11. Ultrasonically treated multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) as PtRu catalyst supports for methanol electrooxidation

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    Yang, Chunwei; Hu, Xinguo; Wang, Dianlong; Dai, Changsong [Department of Applied Chemistry, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Zhang, Liang; Jin, Haibo [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 (China); Agathopoulos, Simeon [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Ioannina, GR-451 10 Ioannina (Greece)

    2006-09-29

    In the quest of fabricating supported catalysts, experimental results of transmission electron microscopy, Raman and infrared spectroscopy indicate that ultrasonic treatment effectively functionalizes multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), endowing them with groups that can act as nucleation sites which can favor well-dispersed depositions of PtRu clusters on their surface. Ultrasonic treatment seems to be superior than functionalization via regular refluxing. This is confirmed by the determination of the electrochemistry active surface area (ECA) and the CO-tolerance performance of the PtRu catalysts, measured by adsorbed CO-stripping voltammetry in 0.5M sulfuric acid solution, and the real surface area of the PtRu catalysts, evaluated by Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) measurements. Finally, the effectiveness for methanol oxidation is assessed by cyclic voltammetry (CV) in a sulfuric acid and methanol electrolyte. (author)

  12. The physiological effects of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) on conidia and the development of the entomopathogenic fungus, Metarhizium anisopliae (Metsch.) Sorok.

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    Gorczyca, Anna; Kasprowicz, Marek J; Lemek, Tadeusz

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study was an in vitro evaluation of the effect of MWCNTs on the conidia of two strains of entomopathogenic fungus, Metarhizium anisopliae. The study made use of water suspensions of MWCNTs (concentration ∼ 3 mg·mL(-1)) made from commercial nanotubes and centrifuged. The conidia were placed in contact with nanotubes for 240 h. An assessment of MWCNT influence on conidia was performed after 1, 24, 72 and 240 h and focused on the linear growth of vegetative mycelium derived from these conidia, mycelium sporulation in subcultures and pathogenicity. Using TEM imaging, it was demonstrated that carbon nanotubes are able to damage cell membranes of the examined fungi conidia. However, the absence was noted of a significantly fungistatic effect of both MWCNT suspensions on the examined strains with respect to the physiological features in question. The increase in vegetative mycelium effected by spores after contact with MWCNTs was characterized by a slight modification in relation to the control. There was no strong trend (inhibition - stimulation), in relation to the effect of the tested suspension of carbon nanotubes, on the development of the vegetative mycelium in in vitro culture. Sporulation of the mycelium after completion of the culture only occurred in one case (strain Ma73F and culture of spores after 24-h contact with MWCNTs) significantly more intensely than in the controls. With respect to pathogenicity for test insects compared to the control strain, Ma73F spores grown from the longest contact with nanotubes suspensions performed significantly better. On the basis of the calculated of mycelium index growth rates and the time of death of the test insects (LT50), it was found that the adverse effects of water suspension MWCNTs on the spores of M. anisopliae were applied after a short contact with biological material. This indicates unfavorable physical rather than chemical effects on the tested cell. Over time, nanotube aggregation in water

  13. Biomarker analysis of liver cells exposed to surfactant-wrapped and oxidized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs)

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    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have great potential in industrial, consumer, and mechanical applications, based partly on their unique structural, optical and electronic...

  14. Solar photocatalytic degradation of 2,6-dinitro-p-cresol (DNPC) using multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs)-TiO(2) composite photocatalysts.

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    Wang, Hui; Wang, Hui-Long; Jiang, Wen-Feng

    2009-05-01

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs)-TiO(2) composite photocatalysts with excellent activity were prepared by sol-gel method in order to investigate its photocatalytic activity under solar irradiation for the degradation of 2,6-dinitro-p-cresol (DNPC) in aqueous solution. The prepared composite were analyzed by XRD, FTIR, SEM, TEM, TG-DTA and UV-vis absorption spectra techniques. The results showed that the composite can cause an obvious red shift of UV-vis spectra compared with pure TiO(2). The degradation of DNPC by MWCNTs-TiO(2) composite photocatalysts under solar irradiation was systematically studied by varying the experimental parameters such as pH value, irradiation time, the initial substrate concentration, reaction temperature, catalyst concentration, etc. The optimal conditions were a DNPC concentration of 33.4 mgL(-1) at pH 6.0 with MWCNTs-TiO(2) concentration of 6.0gL(-1) under solar irradiation for the illumination of 150 min. The presence of MWCNTs can enhance the photoefficiency of TiO(2). The highest efficiency on photodegradation of DNPC can be achieved with an optimal MWCNTs/TiO(2) mass ratio of 0.05%. The photocatalytic degradation of DNPC obeys a pseudo-first-order behavior according to the Langmuir-Hinshelwood model, and possible decomposing mechanisms are also discussed. The photocatalyst was used for five cycles with photocatalytic degradation efficiency still higher than 96%. The results of the study showed the feasible and potential use of MWCNTs-TiO(2) composite in degradation of toxic organic pollutants.

  15. Determination of Lead Ion by a Modified Carbon Paste Electrode Based on Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes (MWCNTs and Ligand (N-(4-Hydroxyphenyl Ethanamide

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    Marzieh Bagheri

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The preparation of a new modified carbon paste electrode (CPE to measure lead ion has been reported in this study. Lead is a highly toxic element which can have a negative impact on the environment. Therefore, measurement of lead in aquatic environments is very important. Although several methods have been developed for determination of lead ion in aquatic environments, there is no a cheap, simple, accurate and rapid method to measure this ion. Aim of this study is to develop a new method to measure the lead based on using multi walls carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs and Paracetamol as an ionophore for modification of a CPE. The optimum composition of modified CPE was determined as 64% of graphite powder, 20% of paraffin oil, 12% of nanotube and 4% of ionophore. This optimum composition was shown high selectivity, with appropriate Nernestian slope (-29.73 mV/decade, linear range (from 1.0×10-1to 1.0×10-8M, low lead concentration detection limit (7.5×10-9M and good response time (equal of 25 sec.The results of this study to introduce a cheap, accurate and simple method for determination of lead ion in aquatic environments.

  16. Determination of Lead Ion by a Modified Carbon Paste Electrode Based on Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes (MWCNTs andLigand (N-(4-Hydroxyphenyl Ethanamide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marzieh Bagheri

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The preparation of a new modified carbon paste electrode (CPEto measure lead ion has been reported in this study. Lead is a highly toxic element which can have a negative impact on the environment. Therefore, measurement of lead in aquatic environments is very important. Although several methods have been developed for determination of lead ion in aquatic environments, there is no a cheap, simple, accurate and rapid method to measure this ion. Aim of this study is to develop a new method to measure the lead based on using multi walls carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs and Paracetamol as an ionophore for modificationof a CPE.The optimum composition of modified CPE was determined as 64% of graphite powder, 20% of paraffin oil, 12% of nanotube and 4% of ionophore.This optimum composition was shown high selectivity, with appropriate Nernestian slope (-29.73 mV/decade, linear range (from 1.0×10-1to 1.0×10-8M, low lead concentration detection limit (7.5×10-9M and good response time (equal of 25 sec.The results of this study to introduce a cheap, accurate and simple method for determination of lead ion in aquatic environments.

  17. Biomarker analysis of liver cells exposed to surfactant-wrapped and oxidized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have great potential in industrial, consumer, and mechanical applications, based partly on their unique structural, optical and electronic properties. CNTs are commonly oxidized or treated with surfactants to facilitate aqueous solution processing, and the...

  18. Preparation of Solid Phase Microextraction (SPME) Probes through Polyaniline Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes (PANI/MWCNTs) Coating for the Extraction of Palmitic Acid and Oleic Acid in Organic Solvents.

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    Khajeamiri, Alireza

    2012-01-01

    A fiber coating from polyaniline (PANI) was electrochemically prepared and employed for Solid phase micreoextraction (SPME). The PANI film was directly electrodeposited on the platinum wire surface using cyclic voltametry (CV) technique. The same method was applied for the preparation of SPME fiber coated by polyaniline multiwalled carbon nanotubes (PANI/MWCNTs) composite. The concentration of sulfuric acid for electropolymerization was 0.1 M in the presence of 0.045 M aniline in aqueous solution. For the electrodeposition of PANI/MWCNT composite, 4 μg/mL of MWCNTs was dispersed into the solution. Film coating was carried out on the platinum wire by repetitive cycling of potentials between 0 and 1.0 V at the scan rate of 0.05 V/s. The applicability of these coatings were assessed through employing a laboratory-made SPME injecting device and gas chromatography with mass spectrometry (GC-MS) for the extraction of palmitic acid and oleic acid from chloroform. The developed method proved to be simple and easy, offering high reproducibility. Both PANI coated and PANI/CNT coated probes had the ability to concentrate palmitic acid and oleic acid on their coating and produced strong signals in GC-MS chromatograms. In the meantime, PANI/CNT coated SPME probes produced signals which were stronger than those produced by PANI coated SPME probes. The amount of extracted palmitic acid and oleic acid from chloroform by the PANI/MWCNTs coating was about 6 and 12 times higher than the amount extracted by plane PANI SPME fibers respectively. It could be suggested that the composite material with CNTs has both an increased surface area and an elevated absorptive capacity which leads to this overall increase in extracted palmitic acid and oleic acid.

  19. Effect of Spark-Plasma-Sintering Conditions on Tensile Properties of Aluminum Matrix Composites Reinforced with Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes (MWCNTs)

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    Chen, B.; Imai, H.; Umeda, J.; Takahashi, M.; Kondoh, K.

    2017-02-01

    In this study, aluminum (Al) matrix composites containing 2 wt.% multiwalled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were fabricated by powder metallurgy using high-energy ball milling (HEBM), spark plasma sintering (SPS), and subsequent hot extrusion. The effect of SPS conditions on the tensile properties of CNT/Al composites was investigated. The results showed that composites with well-dispersed CNTs and nearly full-density CNT/Al can be obtained. During HEBM, CNTs were shortened, inserted into welded Al powder particles, bonded to Al, and still stable without CNT-Al reaction. After consolidation, Al4C3 phases formed in composites under different sintering conditions. With the increase of sintering temperature and holding time, the strength decreased. Conversely, the ductility and toughness noticeably increased. As a result, a good balance between strength (367 MPa in ultimate tensile strength) and ductility (13% in elongation) was achieved in the as-extruded CNT/Al composite sintered at 630°C with a holding time of 300 min.

  20. Fabrication and characterisation of low density polyethylene (LDPE/multi walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs nano-composites

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    Meenakshi Goyal

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanotubes (CNT have shown extraordinary electrical, mechanical properties as well as many other physical properties. The aim of this study is to explore the scope of CNT/LDPE nano-composites for engineering applications. Nano-composites of LDPE and MWCNT are generally prepared by using the melt blending method but in the present investigation these have been prepared by using solvent mixing method. Xylene has been used as a solvent which can dissolve low density polyethylene (LDPE at about 125 °C. The solution of LDPE in xylene has been ultrasonicated with various percentages of MWCNT (0, 1, 2, 5, 10 wt% of MWCNT composite to form thin film after drying. MWCNT used in this study have been synthesised by electric arc discharge method. Characteristics of these composites have been determined by Raman spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM. Raman spectroscopy revealed variation in intensity of CNT's peak with variation in concentration of CNT. The results indicated that intensity of CNT's peak was found to increase with the increase in concentration of CNT which indicated the type of interaction between polymer and CNT. SEM analysis reveals CNT-polymer interfacial adhesion and shows agglomeration of CNT's at some locations and presence of individual tubes at other locations. These investigations show that LDPE/MWCNT composites can be fabricated using simple solvent mixing method. Further investigation on the effect of MWCNT on mechanical, electrical and thermal properties of LDPE based composites are in progress.

  1. Optimization of carbon nanotube volume percentage for enhancement of high frequency magnetic properties of SrFe{sub 8}MgCoTi{sub 2}O{sub 19}/MWCNTs

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    Gordani, Gholam Reza, E-mail: gordani@gmail.com [Department of Materials science and Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Materials Engineering Department, Malek Ashtar University of Technology, Shahin Shahr (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ghasemi, Ali [Materials Engineering Department, Malek Ashtar University of Technology, Shahin Shahr (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Saidi, Ali [Department of Materials science and Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-08-01

    A novel magnetic nanocomposite of multiwalled carbon nanotubes decorated with SrFe{sub 8}MgCoTi{sub 2}O{sub 19} nanoparticles have been prepared by a chemical co-precipitation method. The structural, magnetic and electromagnetic properties of samples were studied as a function of volume percentage of MWCNTs by X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, vibrating sample magnetometer and vector network analysis. The XRD and FTIR results showed that the nanocomposites were synthesized successfully. Field emission scanning electron microscopy micrographs demonstrated that homogeneous and high level of dispersion of MWCNTs and Sr-hexaferrite nanoparticles in nanocomposite samples were obtained. The saturation magnetization of the nanocomposite samples was found to decrease by an increase in volume percentage of MWCNTs up to 5 vol%. The vector network analysis results show that the highest value of reflection loss of nanocomposite was −42.43 dB at 11.13 GHz with an absorption bandwidth of more than of 4 GHz. The results indicate that, these novel types of nanocomposites with appropriate amount of MWCNTs hold great promise for microwave device applications. - Highlights: • We investigate the high frequency properties of Sr-hexaferrite/MWCNTs composite. • Saturation magnetization of nanocomposites is decreased with presence of MWCNTs. • The ferrite/CNTs nanocomposite sample covers whole X-band frequencies (8–12 GHz). • The ferrite/CNTs nanocomposite can be used as a potential magnetic loss material. • Nanocomposite contain 5 vol% of CNTs have shown greater than 99% of reflection loss.

  2. Release characteristics of selected carbon nanotube polymer composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) are commonly used in polymer formulations to improve strength, conductivity, and other attributes. A developing concern is the potential for carbon nanotube polymer nanocomposites to release nanoparticles into the environment as the polymer ...

  3. Improved Strength and Toughness of Carbon Woven Fabric Composites with Functionalized MWCNTs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eslam Soliman

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This investigation examines the role of carboxyl functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (COOH-MWCNTs in the on- and off-axis flexure and the shear responses of thin carbon woven fabric composite plates. The chemically functionalized COOH-MWCNTs were used to fabricate epoxy nanocomposites and, subsequently, carbon woven fabric plates to be tested on flexure and shear. In addition to the neat epoxy, three loadings of COOH-MWCNTs were examined: 0.5 wt%, 1.0 wt% and 1.5 wt% of epoxy. While no significant statistical difference in the flexure response of the on-axis specimens was observed, significant increases in the flexure strength, modulus and toughness of the off-axis specimens were observed. The average increase in flexure strength and flexure modulus with the addition of 1.5 wt% COOH-MWCNTs improved by 28% and 19%, respectively. Finite element modeling is used to demonstrate fiber domination in on-axis flexure behavior and matrix domination in off-axis flexure behavior. Furthermore, the 1.5 wt% COOH-MWCNTs increased the toughness of carbon woven composites tested on shear by 33%. Microstructural investigation using Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR proves the existence of chemical bonds between the COOH-MWCNTs and the epoxy matrix.

  4. Comparative Characterization of Multiscale Carbon Fiber Composite with Long and Short MWCNTs at Higher Weight Fractions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Zimmer

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available There are documented advantages to using carbon nanotubes (CNTs in composites for various property enhancements. However, to date, only limited studies have been conducted on using of longer CNTs over 1 mm in length. This study used long multiwalled carbon nanotubes (LMWCNTs and their longer extended networks to test multiple properties in thermal conductivity, electrical conductivity, mechanical strength, and modulus and then compared these properties to those of shorter multi-walled carbon nanotubes (SMWCNTs. For carbon fiber-reinforced composites, the longer graphite paths from LMWCNTs in the matrix were expected to improve all properties. The longer networks were expected to allow for more undisturbed phonon transportation to improve thermal conductivity. This in turn relates to improved electrical conductivity and better mechanical properties. However, results have shown that the LMWCNTs do not improve or decrease thermal conductivity, whereas the shorter MWCNTs provide mixed results. LMWCNTs did show improvements in electrical, mechanical, and physical properties, but compared to shorter MWCNTs, the results in other certain properties varied. This perplexing outcome resides in the functioning of the networks made by both the LMWCNTs and shorter MWCNTs.

  5. Boron-Filled Hybrid Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Rajen B.; Chou, Tsengming; Kanwal, Alokik; Apigo, David J.; Lefebvre, Joseph; Owens, Frank; Iqbal, Zafar

    2016-07-01

    A unique nanoheterostructure, a boron-filled hybrid carbon nanotube (BHCNT), has been synthesized using a one-step chemical vapor deposition process. The BHCNTs can be considered to be a novel form of boron carbide consisting of boron doped, distorted multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) encapsulating boron nanowires. These MWCNTs were found to be insulating in spite of their graphitic layered outer structures. While conventional MWCNTs have great axial strength, they have weak radial compressive strength, and do not bond well to one another or to other materials. In contrast, BHCNTs are shown to be up to 31% stiffer and 233% stronger than conventional MWCNTs in radial compression and have excellent mechanical properties at elevated temperatures. The corrugated surface of BHCNTs enables them to bond easily to themselves and other materials, in contrast to carbon nanotubes (CNTs). BHCNTs can, therefore, be used to make nanocomposites, nanopaper sheets, and bundles that are stronger than those made with CNTs.

  6. Boron-Filled Hybrid Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Rajen B.; Chou, Tsengming; Kanwal, Alokik; Apigo, David J.; Lefebvre, Joseph; Owens, Frank; Iqbal, Zafar

    2016-01-01

    A unique nanoheterostructure, a boron-filled hybrid carbon nanotube (BHCNT), has been synthesized using a one-step chemical vapor deposition process. The BHCNTs can be considered to be a novel form of boron carbide consisting of boron doped, distorted multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) encapsulating boron nanowires. These MWCNTs were found to be insulating in spite of their graphitic layered outer structures. While conventional MWCNTs have great axial strength, they have weak radial compressive strength, and do not bond well to one another or to other materials. In contrast, BHCNTs are shown to be up to 31% stiffer and 233% stronger than conventional MWCNTs in radial compression and have excellent mechanical properties at elevated temperatures. The corrugated surface of BHCNTs enables them to bond easily to themselves and other materials, in contrast to carbon nanotubes (CNTs). BHCNTs can, therefore, be used to make nanocomposites, nanopaper sheets, and bundles that are stronger than those made with CNTs. PMID:27460526

  7. Effect of functionalization on drug delivery potential of carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Sonam; Mehra, Neelesh Kumar; Jain, Keerti; Jain, Narendra Kumar

    2016-12-01

    The main aim of the present investigation was to explore the effect of functionalization on drug delivery potential of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and to compare the in vitro and in vivo cancer targeting potential of doxorubicin HCL (DOX)-loaded ox-/multi-walled CNTs (MWCNTs), DOX-loaded PEG-MWCNTs and DOX-loaded FA-PEG-MWCNTs. The DOX/PEG-FA-MWCNTs showed enhanced cytotoxicity and were most preferentially taken up by the cancerous cells. The obtained results also support the extended resistance time and sustained release profile of drug-loaded surface-engineered MWCNTs. Overall, we concluded that the developed MWCNTs nanoformulations have higher cancer targeting potential.

  8. Exchange of Surfactant by Natural Organic Matter on the Surfaces of Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    The increasing production and applications of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) have elicited concerns regarding their release and potential adverse effects in the environment. To form stable aqueous MWCNTs suspensions, surfactants are often employed to facilitate dispersion...

  9. Calorimetric Characterizacion of PLLA-MWCNTs and PLLA-MWCNTsf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albano, C.; Gonzalez, G.; Karam, A.; Covis, M.

    2010-06-01

    In the present work the thermal characterization of composites of polylactide (PLLA) with pristine or functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) prepared by the method solution mixing. The effect of % MWCNTs added on the thermal transitions was evaluated.

  10. A role of nanotube dangling pyrrole and oxygen functions in the electrochemical synthesis of polypyrrole/MWCNTs hybrid materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krukiewicz, Katarzyna, E-mail: katarzyna.krukiewicz@polsl.pl [Department of Physical Chemistry and Technology of Polymers, Silesian University of Technology, Strzody 9, 44-100 Gliwice (Poland); Herman, Artur P., E-mail: artur.herman@polsl.pl [Department of Organic Chemistry, Bioorganic Chemistry and Biotechnology, Silesian University of Technology, Krzywoustego 4, Gliwice 44-100 (Poland); Turczyn, Roman, E-mail: roman.turczyn@polsl.pl [Department of Physical Chemistry and Technology of Polymers, Silesian University of Technology, Strzody 9, 44-100 Gliwice (Poland); Szymańska, Katarzyna, E-mail: katarzyna.szymanska@polsl.pl [Department of Chemical and Process Engineering, Silesian University of Technology, Strzody 7, 44-100 Gliwice (Poland); Koziol, Krzysztof K.K., E-mail: kk292@cam.ac.uk [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, University of Cambridge, 27 Charles Babbage Road, Cambridge CB3 0FS (United Kingdom); Boncel, Sławomir, E-mail: slawomir.boncel@polsl.pl [Department of Organic Chemistry, Bioorganic Chemistry and Biotechnology, Silesian University of Technology, Krzywoustego 4, Gliwice 44-100 (Poland); Zak, Jerzy K., E-mail: jerzy.zak@polsl.pl [Department of Physical Chemistry and Technology of Polymers, Silesian University of Technology, Strzody 9, 44-100 Gliwice (Poland)

    2014-10-30

    Highlights: • The effect of MWCNT functionalization on properties of PPy composites was explained. • The behavior of pristine, pyrrole-modified and oxidized MWCNT was explained. • Functionalization of MWCNT improved their dispersibility and processability. • Different mechanisms of (f-)MWCNT incorporation into PPy composites were explained. • Orientation of growing PPy chains was tailored through the addition of (f-)MWCNT. - Abstract: The effect of the functionalization of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) on the process of electrochemical co-deposition of MWCNTs and polypyrrole (PPy), as well as the morphology of obtained composites have been demonstrated. As the nanotube components of the hybrids, three types of MWCNT were used, namely c-CVD derived (pristine) MWCNTs, their oxidized counterparts MWCNT-Ox and pyrrole-modified MWCNT-Py. The stability of pristine and functionalized MWCNTs (f-MWCNT) dispersions in tetrahydrofuran and water was studied together with the description of the process of formation PPy/(f-)MWCNT hybrid materials via electrochemical co-deposition. The structural and morphological properties of the hybrids were characterized by Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy revealing substantial differences among hybrid materials in their surface morphology and the influence of MWCNT functionalization on the orientation of growing PPy chains.

  11. MWCNTs/SnO2复合材料的制备及室温NO气敏性研究%Preparation of Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes-SnO2 composite and its gas sensor properties for NO detection at room temperature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    史克英; 陈垒; 李丽; 马喜强

    2011-01-01

    为开发室温NO气敏传感器,采用SnCl2溶液法合成了MWCNTs/SnO2复合材料,并对复合材料进行了XRD,Raman,SEM,TEM,TG - DSC及XPS表征.结果表明:在MWCNTs/SnO2复合材料中,尺寸为5 nm左右的SnO2颗粒均匀地负载在MWCNTs表面,MWCNTs与SnO2的质量之比基本恒为3∶1,不随所加羧基化MWCNTs量的不同(30~100 mg)而变化.利用静态注气法考察的MWCNTs/SnO2复合材料室温NO气敏响应特性表明,MWCNTs/SnO2复合材料对NO的气敏响应有了较大的提高,对100 × 10-6 NO的响应值大约是MWCNTs的4倍.将纳米SnO2负载在MWCNTs的表面之所以能够明显提高MWCNTs的室温NO响应值,是由于复合材料吸附NO分子时电子由p型半导体MWCNTs向SnO2转移的结果.%In order to develop NO gas sensor working at room temperature, Multi - Walled Carbon Nanotubes ( MWCNTs) and SnO2 composite was synthesized by SnCl2 solution method, and the composite was characterized by XRD, Raman, SEM, TEM, TG - DSC and XPS methods. It was observed that SnO2 nanoparticles of only 5 nm were deposited uniformly on the surface of MWCNTs in the MWCNTs/SnO2 composite. The weight ratio of MWCNTs to SnO2 in the composite was kept 3:1 though different amount of carboxylated MWCNTs (30 ~ 100 mg) was used in the synthesis process. The NO response property of MWCNTs/SnO2 composite was investigated at room temperature by static testing. It was shown that the MWCNTs/SnO2 sensor's response has increased by a factor of four in comparison with that of MWCNTs toward 100 x 10-6 NO. Therefore, modification of SnO2 nanoparticles on the surface of MWCNTs could improve significantly the response of MWCNTs toward NO at room temperature. This was because the electrons transferred from p - type MWCNTs to SnO2 when NO molecules were adsorbed on the MWC-NTs/SnO2 composite.

  12. Multiwalled carbon nanotubes-sulfur composites with enhanced electrochemical performance for lithium/sulfur batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Xin Zhou; Jin, Bo, E-mail: jinbo@jlu.edu.cn; Xin, Pei Ming; Wang, Huan Huan

    2014-07-01

    Multiwalled carbon nanotubes-sulfur (MWCNTs-S) composites were synthesized by chemical activation of MWCNTs and capillarity between sulfur and MWCNTs. The MWCNTs activated by potassium hydroxide (denoted as K-MWCNTs) were used as conductive additive. The as-prepared K-MWCNTs-S composites can display excellent cycle stability and rate capability with the initial discharge capacity of 741 mAh g⁻¹ and capacity retention of 80% after 50 cycles compared to pure S. The improvement in the electrochemical performance for K-MWCNTs-S composites is attributed to the interstitial structure of the MWCNTs resulted from the strong chemical etching, which can facilitate the insertion and extraction of Li ions and more better percolation of the electrolyte, and also ascribed to enhanced electronic conductivity of K-MWCNTs-S composites. It is indicated that the K-MWCNTs-S composites can be used as the cathode materials for lithium–sulfur batteries.

  13. Carbon nanotube biconvex microcavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butt, Haider; Yetisen, Ali K.; Ahmed, Rajib; Yun, Seok Hyun; Dai, Qing

    2015-03-01

    Developing highly efficient microcavities with predictive narrow-band resonance frequencies using the least amount of material will allow the applications in nonlinear photonic devices. We have developed a microcavity array that comprised multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) organized in a biconvex pattern. The finite element model allowed designing microcavity arrays with predictive transmission properties and assessing the effects of the microarray geometry. The microcavity array demonstrated negative index and produced high Q factors. 2-3 μm tall MWCNTs were patterned as biconvex microcavities, which were separated by 10 μm in an array. The microcavity was iridescent and had optical control over the diffracted elliptical patterns with a far-field pattern, whose properties were predicted by the model. It is anticipated that the MWCNT biconvex microcavities will have implications for the development of highly efficient lenses, metamaterial antennas, and photonic circuits.

  14. Impact of multi-walled carbon nanotubes on aquatic species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asharani, P V; Serina, N G B; Nurmawati, M H; Wu, Y L; Gong, Z; Valiyaveettil, S

    2008-07-01

    To understand the environmental impacts of carbon nanotubes (CNTs), the toxicity study was carried out with water-soluble multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) using zebrafish (Danio rerio) as a model system. Zebrafish embryos were treated with different concentrations of MWCNTs. Teratogenic effects were evaluated through changes in embryonic development after 24 hours post-fertilization (hpf), 48 hpf and 72 hpf. No observable effect concentration (NOEC) was at 40 microg/mL. Lowest effect concentration (LOEC) of MWCNTs which caused significant phenotypic defects in zebrafish embryo was 60 microg/mL. At concentration above 60 microg/mL, slimy mucus like coating was observed around the embryo. At high concentrations, MWCNTs was found to be involved in the apoptosis, delayed hatching and formation of abnormal spinal chords. Thus, the toxicity of multi-walled carbon nanotubes is concentration dependent.

  15. Deposition of Silver Nanoparticles on Dendrimer Functionalized Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes: Synthesis, Characterization and Antimicrobial Activity

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    The nanohybrids composed of silver nanoparticles and aromatic polyamide functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) is successfully synthesized and tested for their antibacterial activity against different pathogens. Prior to deposition of silver nanoparticles, acid treated MWCNTs (MWCNTs-COOH) were successively reacted with p-phenylenediamine and methylmethacrylate to form series of NH2-terminated aromatic polyamide dendrimers on the surface of MWCNTs through Michael addition and am...

  16. A Study of Surface Modifications of Carbon Nanotubes on the Properties of Polyamide 66/Multiwalled Carbon Nanotube Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Qiu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of surface modification of carbon nanotube on the properties of polyamide 66/multiwalled carbon nanotube composites have been investigated. Polyamide 66 (PA66 and multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWCNT composites were prepared by melt mixing. The surfaces of MWCNTs were modified with acid- and amine-groups. Field emission scanning electron microscopy analyses revealed that amine-MWCNTs (D-MWCNTs dispersed better in the PA66 matrix than pristine- and acid-MWCNTs. However, an introduction of D-MWCNTs into PA66 matrix induced heterogeneous nucleation and affected the crystal growth process during the crystallization of PA66/MWCNT composites. Both nanoindentation and friction analyses were carried out in a study of the effect of the introduction of modified MWCNTs on both mechanical and friction properties of the composites. With the introduction of D-MWCNTs, both nanohardness and elastic modulus of the composites were significantly improved, but it was observed that the maximum depth, nanohardness, and elastic modulus of the composites showed no distinct change before and after a friction test. It is evident that PA66/D-MWCNT composites have the least friction coefficient of the PA66/MWCNT composites of all the approaches of carbon nanotube surface modification.

  17. Long-term hepatotoxicity of polyethylene-glycol functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Danying; Ji Zongfei; Shen Xizhong; Dong Ling; Gu Taoying [Department of Gastroenterology, Zhongshan Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China); Deng Xiaoyong; Wu Minghong; Liu Yuanfang, E-mail: dltalk@tom.com, E-mail: mhwu@staff.shu.edu.cn [Institute of Nanochemistry and Nanobiology, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200444 (China)

    2010-04-30

    The toxicity of polyethylene-glycol functionalized (PEGylated) multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and non-PEGylated MWCNTs in vivo was evaluated and compared. Mice were exposed to MWCNTs by intravenous injection. The activity level of glutathione, superoxide dismutase and gene expression in liver, as well as some biochemical parameters and the tumor necrosis factor alpha level in blood were measured over 2 months. The pathological and electron micrographic observations of liver evidently indicate that the damage caused by non-PEGylated MWCNTs is slightly more severe than that of PEGylated MWCNTs, which means that PEGylation can partly, but not substantially, improve the in vivo biocompatibility of MWCNTs.

  18. Facile route to multi-walled carbon nanotubes under ambient conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ha, Hyunchul; Jeong, Soo-Hwan [Kyungpook National University, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-02-15

    A facile and practical route is demonstrated to prepare multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) by a sonochemical method. By applying ultrasonic irradiation to the mixture of ferrocene and xylene with small amount of water, crystalline MWCNTs were selectively synthesized under ambient conditions, allowing MWCNTs with diameter of 25-40 nm to be obtained. A control experiment revealed that a small amount of water was essential for producing MWCNTs. The analysis of Raman spectra of MWCNTs showed that the intensity of the D-band relative to the G-band was 0.98, indicating relatively good crystallinity of these MWCNTs. This result was consistent with that of TEM observation.

  19. Carbon nanotube composite materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Bryan, Gregory; Skinner, Jack L; Vance, Andrew; Yang, Elaine Lai; Zifer, Thomas

    2015-03-24

    A material consisting essentially of a vinyl thermoplastic polymer, un-functionalized carbon nanotubes and hydroxylated carbon nanotubes dissolved in a solvent. Un-functionalized carbon nanotube concentrations up to 30 wt % and hydroxylated carbon nanotube concentrations up to 40 wt % can be used with even small concentrations of each (less than 2 wt %) useful in producing enhanced conductivity properties of formed thin films.

  20. Melt dispersion and electrospinning of non-functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotubes in thermoplastic polyurethane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunley, Matthew T; Pötschke, Petra; Long, Timothy E

    2009-12-16

    Nanoscale fibers with embedded, aligned, and percolated non-functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were fabricated through electrospinning dispersions based on melt-compounded thermoplastic polyurethane/MWCNT nanocomposite, with up to 10 wt.-% MWCNTs. Transmission electron microscopy indicated that the nanotubes were highly oriented and percolated throughout the fibers, even at high MWCNT concentrations. The coupling of efficient melt compounding with electrospinning eliminated the need for intensive surface functionalization or sonication of the MWCNTs, and the high aspect ratio as well as the electrical and mechanical properties of the nanotubes were retained. This method provides a more efficient technique to generate one-dimensional nanofibers with aligned MWCNTs.

  1. Electrical conductance of carbon nanotubes with misaligned ends

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pantano, Antonio, E-mail: antonio.pantano@unipa.it; Muratore, Giuseppe; Montinaro, Nicola [Universita degli Studi di Palermo, Dipartimento di Ingegneria Chimica, Gestionale, Informatica e Meccanica (Italy)

    2013-09-15

    During a manufacturing process, when a straight carbon nanotube is placed on a substrate, e.g., production of transistors, its two ends are often misaligned. In this study, we investigate the effects of multiwall carbon nanotubes' (MWCNTs) outer diameter and chirality on the change in conductance due to misalignment of the two ends. The length of the studied MWCNTs was 120 nm, while the diameters ranged between 4 and 7 nm. A mixed finite element-tight-binding approach was carefully designed to realize reduction in computational time by orders of magnitude in calculating the deformation-induced changes in the electrical transport properties of the nanotubes. Numerical results suggest that armchair MWCNTs of small diameter should work better if used as conductors, while zigzag MWCNTs of large diameter are more suitable for building sensors.Graphical Abstract.

  2. Enhanced encapsulation of metoprolol tartrate with carbon nanotubes as adsorbent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garala, Kevin; Patel, Jaydeep; Patel, Anjali; Dharamsi, Abhay

    2011-12-01

    A highly water-soluble antihypertensive drug, metoprolol tartrate (MT), was selected as a model drug for preparation of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs)-impregnated ethyl cellulose (EC) microspheres. The present investigation was aimed to increase encapsulation efficiency of MT with excellent adsorbent properties of MWCNTs. The unique surface area, stiffness, strength and resilience of MWCNTs have drawn much anticipation as carrier for highly water-soluble drugs. Carbon nanotubes drug adsorbate (MWCNTs:MT)-loaded EC microspheres were further optimized by the central composite design of the experiment. The effects of independent variables (MWCNTs:MT and EC:adsorbate) were evaluated on responses like entrapment efficiency (EE) and t 50 (time required for 50% drug release). The optimized batch was compared with drug alone EC microspheres. The results revealed high degree of improvement in encapsulation efficiency for MWCNTs:MT-loaded EC microspheres. In vitro drug release study exhibited complete release form drug alone microspheres within 15 h, while by the same time only 50-60% drug was released for MWCNTs-impregnated EC microspheres. The optimized batch was further characterized by various instrumental analyses such as scanning electron microscopy, powder X-ray diffraction and differential scanning calorimetry. The results endorse encapsulation of MWCNTs:MT adsorbate inside the matrix of EC microspheres, which might have resulted in enhanced encapsulation and sustained effect of MT. Hence, MWCNTs can be utilized as novel carriers for extended drug release and enhanced encapsulation of highly water-soluble drug, MT.

  3. Influence of Carbon Nanotubes on Thermal Stability of Water-Dispersible Nanofibrillar Polyaniline/Nanotube Composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-Bin Zhang

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Significant influence on the thermal stability of polyaniline (PANI in the presence of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs is reported. By means of in-situ rapid mixing approach, water-dispersible nanofibrillar PANI and composites, consisting of MWCNTs uniformly coated with PANI in the state of emeraldine salt, with a well-defined core-shell heterogeneous structure, were prepared. The de-protonation process in PANI occurs at a lower temperature under the presence of MWCNTs on the polyaniline composite upon thermal treatment. However, it is found that the presence of MWCNTs significantly enhances the thermal stability of PANI’s backbone upon exposure to laser irradiation, which can be ascribed to the core-shell heterogeneous structure of the composite of MWCNTs and PANI, and the high thermal conductivity of MWCNTs.

  4. Mechanical characterization and morphology of polylactic acid /liquid natural rubber filled with multi walled carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Adilah Mat; Ahmad, Sahrim Hj.

    2013-11-01

    In this paper the polymer nanocomposite of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) nanoparticles was incorporated with polylactic acid (PLA) and liquid natural rubber (LNR) as compatibilizer were prepared via melt blending method. The effect of MWCNTs loading on the tensile and impact properties of nanocomposites was investigated. The result has shown that the sample with 3.5 wt % of MWCNTs exhibited higher tensile strength, Young's modulus and impact strength. The elongation at break decreased with increasing percentage of MWCNTs. The SEM micrographs confirmed the effect of good dispersion of MWCNTs and their interfacial bonding in PLA/LNR composites. The improved dispersion of MWCNTs can be obtained due to altered interparticle interactions, MWCNTs-MWCNTs and MWCNTs-matrix networks are well combined to generate the synergistic effect of the system as shown by SEM micrographs which is improved the properties significantly.

  5. Purification and dispersibility of multi-walled carbon nanotubes in aqueous solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yuanzhao; Li, Zhenxia; Zhao, Yang

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, the pristine multi-walled carbon nanotubes (P-MWCNTs) were purified either by the high temperature treatment (HT-MWCNTs) or by concentrated acid treatment (CA-MWCNTs). The HT-MWCNTs were prepared by heating at 500°C, while the CA-MWCNTs were treated by the mixture of concentrated nitric and sulfuric acids taken in a volume ratio of 3: 1. Ultrasonic processing and surfactants were utilized to achieve homogenous MWCNTs suspensions. The HT-MWCNTs and CA-MWCNTs were characterized by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). Among these three MWCNTs, the prepared homogeneously dispersed MWCNTs suspensions were characterized by UV-Vis absorbency and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Finally, the dispersion mechanism was discussed. The results showed that both high temperature treatment and concentrated acid treatment can be used for purification of the P-MWCNTs, removing the amorphous carbon and other impurities. In these suspensions, the purified MWCNTs showed a better dispersibility in aqueous solution. The high temperature treatment was a kind of physical purification treatment method and it just burned the amorphous carbon away and strengthened the structure of MWCNTs, while the concentrated acid treatment was a chemical purification treatment method and this chemical treatment method grafted more effective groups to improve the dispersibility of MWCNTs.

  6. Homogeneous CdTe quantum dots-carbon nanotubes heterostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vieira, Kayo Oliveira [Grupo de Pesquisa em Química de Materiais – (GPQM), Departamento de Ciências Naturais, Universidade Federal de São João del-Rei, Campus Dom Bosco, Praça Dom Helvécio, 74, CEP 36301-160, São João del-Rei, MG (Brazil); Bettini, Jefferson [Laboratório Nacional de Nanotecnologia, Centro Nacional de Pesquisa em Energia e Materiais, CEP 13083-970, Campinas, SP (Brazil); Ferrari, Jefferson Luis [Grupo de Pesquisa em Química de Materiais – (GPQM), Departamento de Ciências Naturais, Universidade Federal de São João del-Rei, Campus Dom Bosco, Praça Dom Helvécio, 74, CEP 36301-160, São João del-Rei, MG (Brazil); Schiavon, Marco Antonio, E-mail: schiavon@ufsj.edu.br [Grupo de Pesquisa em Química de Materiais – (GPQM), Departamento de Ciências Naturais, Universidade Federal de São João del-Rei, Campus Dom Bosco, Praça Dom Helvécio, 74, CEP 36301-160, São João del-Rei, MG (Brazil)

    2015-01-15

    The development of homogeneous CdTe quantum dots-carbon nanotubes heterostructures based on electrostatic interactions has been investigated. We report a simple and reproducible non-covalent functionalization route that can be accomplished at room temperature, to prepare colloidal composites consisting of CdTe nanocrystals deposited onto multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) functionalized with a thin layer of polyelectrolytes by layer-by-layer technique. Specifically, physical adsorption of polyelectrolytes such as poly (4-styrene sulfonate) and poly (diallyldimethylammonium chloride) was used to deagglomerate and disperse MWCNTs, onto which we deposited CdTe quantum dots coated with mercaptopropionic acid (MPA), as surface ligand, via electrostatic interactions. Confirmation of the CdTe quantum dots/carbon nanotubes heterostructures was done by transmission and scanning electron microscopies (TEM and SEM), dynamic-light scattering (DLS) together with absorption, emission, Raman and infrared spectroscopies (UV–vis, PL, Raman and FT-IR). Almost complete quenching of the PL band of the CdTe quantum dots was observed after adsorption on the MWCNTs, presumably through efficient energy transfer process from photoexcited CdTe to MWCNTs. - Highlights: • Highly homogeneous CdTe-carbon nanotubes heterostructures were prepared. • Simple and reproducible non-covalent functionalization route. • CdTe nanocrystals homogeneously deposited onto multi-walled carbon nanotubes. • Efficient energy transfer process from photoexcited CdTe to MWCNTs.

  7. Laponite assisted dispersion of carbon nanotubes in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loginov, Maksym; Lebovka, Nikolai; Vorobiev, Eugene

    2012-01-01

    The ability of Laponite to stabilize aqueous suspensions of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) was investigated with the help of analytical centrifugation, microscopic image analysis, and measurements of electrical conductivity of hybrid Laponite+MWCNT suspensions. The impact of nanotube concentration C(n) (0.0025-0.5 wt%) and Laponite/MWCNTs ratio X (varied within 0-1 wt/wt) on the properties of Laponite+MWCNT hybrid suspensions was discussed. It was observed that sonication of MWCNTs at critical minimal concentration of Laponite X(c)≈0.25±0.05 resulted in efficient dispersion and formation of stabilized suspensions of individual nanotubes. The stabilization of nanotubes in the presence of Laponite was explained by adsorption of Laponite particles and formation of a hydrophilic charged shell on the surface of nanotubes. Increase of MWCNT concentration above the critical value resulted in percolation and formation of spatially extended electrically conductive networks of particles.

  8. Interactions between the glass fiber coating and oxidized carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ku-Herrera, J.J., E-mail: jesuskuh@live.com.mx [Centro de Investigación Científica de Yucatán A.C., Unidad de Materiales, Calle 43 No.130, Col. Chuburná de Hidalgo. C.P., 97200 Mérida, Yucatán (Mexico); Avilés, F., E-mail: faviles@cicy.mx [Centro de Investigación Científica de Yucatán A.C., Unidad de Materiales, Calle 43 No.130, Col. Chuburná de Hidalgo. C.P., 97200 Mérida, Yucatán (Mexico); Nistal, A. [Instituto de Cerámica y Vidrio (ICV-CSIC), Kelsen 5, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Cauich-Rodríguez, J.V. [Centro de Investigación Científica de Yucatán A.C., Unidad de Materiales, Calle 43 No.130, Col. Chuburná de Hidalgo. C.P., 97200 Mérida, Yucatán (Mexico); Rubio, F.; Rubio, J. [Instituto de Cerámica y Vidrio (ICV-CSIC), Kelsen 5, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Bartolo-Pérez, P. [Departamento de Física Aplicada, Cinvestav, Unidad Mérida, C.P., 97310 Mérida, Yucatán (Mexico)

    2015-03-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Oxidized multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were deposited onto E-glass fibers. • The role of the fiber coating on the deposition of MWCNTs on the fibers is studied. • A rather homogeneous deposition of MWCNTs is achieved if the coating is maintained. • Multiple oxygen-containing groups were found in the analysis of the fiber coating. • Evidence of chemical interaction between MWCNTs and the fiber coating was found. - Abstract: Chemically oxidized multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were deposited onto commercial E-glass fibers using a dipping procedure assisted by ultrasonic dispersion. In order to investigate the role of the fiber coating (known as “sizing”), MWCNTs were deposited on the surface of as-received E-glass fibers preserving the proprietary coating as well as onto glass fibers which had the coating deliberately removed. Scanning electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy were used to assess the distribution of MWCNTs onto the fibers. A rather homogeneous coverage with high density of MWCNTs onto the glass fibers is achieved when the fiber coating is maintained. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analyses of the chemical composition of the glass fiber coating suggest that such coating is a complex mixture with multiple oxygen-containing functional groups such as hydroxyl, carbonyl and epoxy. FTIR and XPS of MWCNTs over the glass fibers and of a mixture of MWCNTs and fiber coating provided evidence that the hydroxyl and carboxyl groups of the oxidized MWCNTs react with the oxygen-containing functional groups of the glass fiber coating, forming hydrogen bonding and through epoxy ring opening. Hydrogen bonding and ester formation between the functional groups of the MWCNTs and the silane contained in the coating are also possible.

  9. Interlaminar Shear Property of Modified Glass Fiber reinforced Polymer with Different MWCNTs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sun Lili; Zhao Yan; Duan Yuexin; Zhang Zuoguang

    2008-01-01

    The intcrlaminar shear property of composites remains a serious concern in application. In this article, five different multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) are tried to improve the interlaminar shear property of composites, including two MWCNTs (MWCNTs-A and MWCNTs-B) different with diameters and lengths, an orientated MWCNTs (MWCNTs-C), a film-shaped MWCNTs-A (MWCNTs-D), and a surface-treated MWCNTs-B (MWCNTs-E). The interlaminar shear strength (ILSS) of the composites, filled with one of the above-mentioned materials as a constituent is investigated. The best ILSS increases by 8.16% from 24.5 MPa to 26.5 MPa with MWCNTs-E. In addition, the dispersion of MWCNTs in a glass fiber-reinforced polymer (GFRP) is researched by a scanning electron microscopy (SEM) in association with the ILSS results.

  10. Comparison Of The MWCNTs-Rh And MWCNTs-Re Carbon-Metal Nanocomposites Obtained In High-Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dobrzańska-Danikiewicz A.D.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Carbon-metal nanocomposites consisting of multiwalled carbon nanotubes coated with rhodium or rhenium nanoparticles by the high-temperature method were fabricated during the research undertaken. Multiwalled carbon nanotubes fabricated by Catalytic-Chemical Vapour Deposition (CCVD were used in the investigations. Multiwalled carbon nanotubes functionalisation in acid or in a mixture of acids was applied to deposit rhodium or rhenium nanoparticles onto the surface of carbon nanotubes, and then the material was placed in a solution being a precursor of metallic nanoparticles. The material prepared was next subjected to high-temperature reduction in the atmosphere of argon and/or hydrogen to deposit rhodium or rhenium nanoparticles onto the surface of multiwalled carbon nanotubes. The investigations performed include, respectively: fabrication of a CNT-NPs (Carbon NanoTube-NanoParticles nanocomposite material; the characterisation of the material produced including examination of the structure and morphology, and the assessment of rhodium and/or rhenium nanoparticles distribution on the surface of carbon nanotubes. Micro- and spectroscopy techniques were employed to characterise the structure of the nanocomposites obtained.

  11. Novel fabrication of silica nanotubes using multi-walled carbon nanotubes as template

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Zhi-Hua Yin; Xiang Liu; Zhong-Xing Su

    2010-08-01

    Silica nanotubes were synthesized using multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) as template. The as-obtained samples were characterized by infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), field emission scanning electron microscope (FE–SEM) and photoluminescent (PL) spectroscopy. The results indicate that the thickness of the outer walls is about 10 nm and the inner diameter is completely dependent on the size of MWCNTs. The as-fabricated silica nanotubes emit a strong violet light under excitation of 250 nm.

  12. Adsorption and adhesion of blood proteins and fibroblasts on multi-wall carbon nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Dedun; YUAN Li; YANG Ying; DENG XiangYun; Lü XiaoYing; HUANG Yan; CAO Zheng; LIU Hao; SUN XueLiang

    2009-01-01

    This article concerns the investigation of blood protein adsorption on carbon paper and multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). Mouse fibroblast cell adhesion and growth on MWCNTs was also studied. The results showed that fibrinogen adsorption on carbon paper was much lower than that on MWCNTs, which means that platelets readily aggregate on the surface of MWCNTs. Mouse fibroblast cells im-planted on MWCNTs tended to grow more prolifically than those implanted on carbon paper. The cell concentration observed on MWCNTs increased from 1.2×105/mL for a single day culture to 2×105/mL for a 7-day culture. No toxicity reaction was observed during the culturing period. These results indi-cated that MWCNTs possessed excellent tissue compatibility.

  13. Adsorption and adhesion of blood proteins and fibroblasts on multi-wall carbon nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    This article concerns the investigation of blood protein adsorption on carbon paper and multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). Mouse fibroblast cell adhesion and growth on MWCNTs was also studied. The results showed that fibrinogen adsorption on carbon paper was much lower than that on MWCNTs, which means that platelets readily aggregate on the surface of MWCNTs. Mouse fibroblast cells implanted on MWCNTs tended to grow more prolifically than those implanted on carbon paper. The cell concentration observed on MWCNTs increased from 1.2×105/mL for a single day culture to 2×105/mL for a 7-day culture. No toxicity reaction was observed during the culturing period. These results indicated that MWCNTs possessed excellent tissue compatibility.

  14. Properties of Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masood, Samina; Bullmore, Daniel; Duran, Michael; Jacobs, Michael

    2012-10-01

    Different synthesizing methods are used to create various nanostructures of carbon; we are mainly interested in single and multi-wall carbon nanotubes, (SWCNTs) and (MWCNTs) respectively. The properties of these tubes are related to their synthetic methods, chirality, and diameter. The extremely sturdy structure of CNTs, with their distinct thermal and electromagnetic properties, suggests a tremendous use of these tubes in electronics and medicines. Here, we analyze various physical properties of SWCNTs with a special emphasis on electromagnetic and chemical properties. By examining their electrical properties, we demonstrate the viability of discrete CNT based components. After considering the advantages of using CNTs over microstructures, we make a case for the advancement and development of nanostructures based electronics. As for current CNT applications, it's hard to overlook their use and functionality in the development of cancer treatment. Whether the tubes are involved in chemotherapeutic drug delivery, molecular imaging and targeting, or photodynamic therapy, we show that the remarkable properties of SWCNTs can be used in advantageous ways by many different industries.

  15. Unusually high dispersion of nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes in DNA solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jin Hee; Kataoka, Masakazu; Fujisawa, Kazunori; Tojo, Tomohiro; Muramatsu, Hiroyuki; Vega-Díaz, Sofía M; Tristán-López, F; Hayashi, Takuya; Kim, Yoong Ahm; Endo, Morinobu; Terrones, Mauricio; Dresselhaus, Mildred S

    2011-12-08

    The dispersibility in a DNA solution of bundled multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), having different chemical functional groups on the CNT sidewall, was investigated by optical spectroscopy. We observed that the dispersibility of nitrogen (N)-doped MWCNTs was significantly higher than that of pure MWCNTs and MWCNTs synthesized in the presence of ethanol. This result is supported by the larger amount of adsorbed DNA on N-doped MWCNTs, as well as by the higher binding energy established between nucleobases and the N-doped CNTs. Pure MWCNTs are dispersed in DNA solution via van der Waals and hydrophobic interactions; in contrast, the nitrogenated sites within N-doped MWCNTs provided additional sites for interactions that are important to disperse nanotubes in DNA solutions.

  16. Progress in Research on Carbon Nanotubes Reinforced Cementitious Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qinghua Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available As one-dimensional (1D nanofiber, carbon nanotubes (CNTs have been widely used to improve the performance of nanocomposites due to their high strength, small dimensions, and remarkable physical properties. Progress in the field of CNTs presents a potential opportunity to enhance cementitious composites at the nanoscale. In this review, current research activities and key advances on multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs reinforced cementitious composites are summarized, including the effect of MWCNTs on modulus of elasticity, porosity, fracture, and mechanical and microstructure properties of cement-based composites. The issues about the improvement mechanisms, MWCNTs dispersion methods, and the major factors affecting the mechanical properties of composites are discussed. In addition, large-scale production methods of MWCNTs and the effects of CNTs on environment and health are also summarized.

  17. Mechanical Reinforcement of Diopside Bone Scaffolds with Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cijun Shuai

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanotubes are ideal candidates for the mechanical reinforcement of ceramic due to their excellent mechanical properties, high aspect ratio and nanometer scale diameter. In this study, the effects of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs on the mechanical properties of diopside (Di scaffolds fabricated by selective laser sintering were investigated. Results showed that compressive strength and fracture toughness improved significantly with increasing MWCNTs from 0.5 to 2 wt %, and then declined with increasing MWCNTs to 5 wt %. Compressive strength and fracture toughness were enhanced by 106% and 21%, respectively. The reinforcing mechanisms were identified as crack deflection, MWCNTs crack bridging and pull-out. Further, the scaffolds exhibited good apatite-formation ability and supported adhesion and proliferation of cells in vitro.

  18. Carbon nanotube nanoelectrode arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Zhifeng; Lin, Yuehe; Yantasee, Wassana; Liu, Guodong; Lu, Fang; Tu, Yi

    2008-11-18

    The present invention relates to microelectode arrays (MEAs), and more particularly to carbon nanotube nanoelectrode arrays (CNT-NEAs) for chemical and biological sensing, and methods of use. A nanoelectrode array includes a carbon nanotube material comprising an array of substantially linear carbon nanotubes each having a proximal end and a distal end, the proximal end of the carbon nanotubes are attached to a catalyst substrate material so as to form the array with a pre-determined site density, wherein the carbon nanotubes are aligned with respect to one another within the array; an electrically insulating layer on the surface of the carbon nanotube material, whereby the distal end of the carbon nanotubes extend beyond the electrically insulating layer; a second adhesive electrically insulating layer on the surface of the electrically insulating layer, whereby the distal end of the carbon nanotubes extend beyond the second adhesive electrically insulating layer; and a metal wire attached to the catalyst substrate material.

  19. Effect of Varying Inert Gas and Acetylene Concentration on the Synthesis of Carbon Nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afrin, Rahat; Abbas, Syed Mustansar; Shah, Nazar Abbas; Mustafa, Muhammad Farooq; Ali, Zulfiqar; Ahmad, Nisar

    2016-03-01

    The multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) with small diameter and high purity were achieved by chemical vapor deposition technique using silicon substrate. The introduction of specific concentration of inert gas with hydrocarbon played a key role in controlling morphology and diameter of MWCNTs. Nickel mixed ferrite nanoparticles were used as a catalyst for the growth of MWCNTs. Growth parameters like concentration of hydrocarbon source and inert gas flow, composition of catalyst particles and growth temperature were studied. In this work smaller diameter and twisted MWCNTs were formed by dilution of acetylene with argon gas. Electrical properties suggest a semimetallic behavior of synthesized MWCNTs.

  20. Carbon nanotube quantum dots

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sapmaz, S.

    2006-01-01

    Low temperature electron transport measurements on individual single wall carbon nanotubes are described in this thesis. Carbon nanotubes are small hollow cylinders made entirely out of carbon atoms. At low temperatures (below ~10 K) finite length nanotubes form quantum dots. Because of its small si

  1. Dysprosium Acetylacetonato Single-Molecule Magnet Encapsulated in Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryo Nakanishi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Dy single-molecule magnets (SMMs, which have several potential uses in a variety of applications, such as quantum computing, were encapsulated in multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs by using a capillary method. Encapsulation was confirmed by using transmission electron microscopy (TEM. In alternating current magnetic measurements, the magnetic susceptibilities of the Dy acetylacetonato complexes showed clear frequency dependence even inside the MWCNTs, meaning that this hybrid can be used as magnetic materials in devices.

  2. Ozone Sensing Based on Palladium Decorated Carbon Nanotubes

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were easily and efficiently decorated with Pd nanoparticles through a vapor-phase impregnation-decomposition method starting from palladium acetylacetonates. The sensor device consisted on a film of sensitive material (MWCNTs-Pd) deposited by drop coating on platinum interdigitated electrodes on a SiO2 substrate. The sensor exhibited a resistance change to ozone (O3) with a response time of 60 s at different temperatures and the capability of detecting conc...

  3. Synthesis of carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awasthi, Kalpana; Srivastava, Anchal; Srivastava, O N

    2005-10-01

    Carbon nanotubes play a fundamental role in the rapidly developing field of nanoscience and nanotechnology because of their unique properties and high potential for applications. In this article, the different synthesis methods of carbon nanotubes (both multi-walled and single-walled) are reviewed. From the industrial point of view, the chemical vapor deposition method has shown advantages over laser vaporization and electric arc discharge methods. This article also presents recent work in the controlled synthesis of carbon nanotubes with ordered architectures. Special carbon nanotube configurations, such as nanocoils, nanohorns, bamboo-shaped and carbon cylinder made up from carbon nanotubes are also discussed.

  4. Preparation of silver-carbon nanotubes composites with plasma electrochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoefft, Oliver; Lohmann, Lara; Olschewski, Mark; Endres, Frank

    2016-09-01

    Plasma electrochemistry is a powerful tool to generate free nanoparticles in aqueous solutions and especially in ionic liquids (ILs). Due to their very low vapour pressure, ionic liquids can be employed under vacuum conditions as fluid substrates or solvents. Thus, ionic liquids are well suitable electrolytes for plasma electrochemical processes delivering stable and homogeneous plasmas. We have shown that free copper and germanium nanoparticles can be obtained in ILs by applying a plasma as a mechanically contact-free electrode. Here we present our results using an argon plasma for the electrochemical synthesis of silver on pure and pre-treated multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) in 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium dicyanamide. For the pre-treatment of the MWCNTS we have used a dielectric barrier discharge plasma (DBD) at atmospheric pressure. For the untreated MWCNTs we have found a formation of free silver nanoparticles between, on and in the vicinity of the carbon nanotubes. In case of the plasma treated MWCNTs a silver-carbon nanotubes composite is formed. Thus, the treatment of the MWCNTs obviously has a great influence on the deposit. Therefore we additionally have investigated the influence of the DBD on the chemical composition of the MWCNTs surface with X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy.

  5. Growth of Ag nanocrystals on multiwalled carbon nanotubes and Ag-carbon nanotube interaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    The experimental investigations on the interaction between Ag-nanocrystal particles (Ag-NCPs) and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in Ag-nanocrystal particles/carbon nanotubes (Ag-NCPs/CNTs) hybrid structures were reported. The growth of Ag-NCPs on multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) was carried out by thermal evaporation deposition. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction analyses revealed that Ag-NCPs had the crystal lattice feature of face-centered cube (fcc). The growth of Ag-NCPs on MWCNTs induced the cross-section deformation of MWCNT. The experimental results also showed that the synthesized Ag-NCPs/CNTs hybrid structure appeared as quasi-one dimensional nanowires containing the Ag-NCP/CNT hetero-junction. There was local cross-section deformation on MWCNTs at the interface of hetero-junction. These results involve the important topic about fundamental and practical studies for structure of MNCPs on CNTs and also find clues to further research of Ag nanocrystal growing on MWCNTs and related Ag-CNT interaction.

  6. Unzipped Nanotube Sheet Films Converted from Spun Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes by O2 Plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jangr, Hoon-Sik; Jeon, Sang Koo; Shim, Dae Seob; Lee, Nam Hee; Nahm, Seung Hoon

    2015-11-01

    Large-scale graphene or carbon nanotube (CNT) films are good candidates for transparent flexible electrodes, and the strong interest in graphene and CNT films has motivated the scalable production of a good-conductivity and an optically transmitting film. Unzipping techniques for converting CNTs to graphene are especially worthy of notice. Here, we performed nanotube unzipping of the spun multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) to produce networked graphene nanoribbon (GNR) sheet films using an 02 plasma etching method, after which we produced the spun MWCNT film by continually pulling MWCNTs down from the vertical well aligned MWCNTs on the substrate. The electrical resistance was slightly decreased and the optical transmittance was significantly increased when the spun MWCNT films were etched for 20 min by O2 plasma of 100 mA. Plasma etching for the optimized time, which does not change the thickness of the spun MWCNT films, improved the electrical resistance and the optical transmittance.

  7. New strategy for chemically attachment of Schiff base complexes on Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila Moradi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Chemically attachment of Schiff base complexes on multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs surfaces through a convenient and simple method was studied. In the first step of this method, we present a new method for preparation of aminated MWCNTs in order to attachment of (new chlorinated salen Schiff bases. Amination of multiwalled carbon nanotubes performed under microwave (MW irradiation through a one pot two step reaction. The chemically attachment of salen Schiff bases on functionalized MWCNTs (salen@MWCNTs performed under a facile simple nucleophilic substitution reaction and complexation of attached salen Schiff bases (salen complex@MWCNTs in last step, have been occurred with reaction of transition metal salts and salen@MWCNTs. The obtained products were characterized in detail, using FTIR, XRD, UV-Vis absorption, SEM and EDX methods.

  8. Carbon Nanotubes Act as Contaminant Carriers and Translocate within Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guosheng; Qiu, Junlang; Liu, Yan; Jiang, Ruifen; Cai, Siying; Liu, Yuan; Zhu, Fang; Zeng, Feng; Luan, Tiangang; Ouyang, Gangfeng

    2015-10-01

    Nanotechnology permits broad advances in agriculture. However, as it is still at a relatively early stage of development, the potential risks remain unclear. Herein, for the first time, we reveal the following: 1) the impact of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) on the accumulation/depuration behaviors of contaminants in crop, mustard (Brassica juncea), and 2) the permeability and transportability of MWCNTs in intact mature mustard plants. Using an in vivo sampling technique, the kinetic accumulation/depuration processes of several contaminants in mustard plans exposed to MWCNTs were traced, and an enhancement of contaminant accumulation in living plants was observed. Meanwhile, we observed that the MWCNTs permeated into the roots of intact living plants (three months old) and were then transported to the upper organs under the force of transpiration steam. This study demonstrated that MWCNTs can act as contaminant carriers and be transported to the edible parts of crops.

  9. Covering vertically aligned carbon nanotubes with a multiferroic compound

    KAUST Repository

    Mahajan, Amit

    2014-10-30

    This work highlights the possible use of vertically-aligned multiwall carbon nanotubes (VA-MWCNTs) as bottom electrodes for microelectronics, for example for memory applications. As a proof of concept BiFeO3 (BFO) films were fabricated in-situ deposited on the surface of VA-MWCNTs by RF (radio frequency) magnetron sputtering. For in situ deposition temperature of 400 °C and deposition time up to 2 h, BFO films cover the MWCNTs and no damage occurs either in the film or MWCNTs. In spite of the macroscopic lossy polarization behaviour, the ferroelectric nature, domain structure and switching of these conformal BFO films was verified by piezo force microscopy. G type antiferromagnetic ordering with weak ferromagnetic ordering loop was proved for BFO films on VA-MWCNTs having a coercive field of 700 Oe.

  10. Preparation and characterization of grafted collagen-multiwalled carbon nanotubes composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Y; Zhou, Y M; Shan, Y; Ju, H X; Xue, X J

    2007-02-01

    This paper describes a new class of composite materials designed by combining multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and grafted collagen matrix. These materials show high mechanical capabilities by taking advantage of the favorable mechanical characteristics of MWCNTs. Furthermore, doping carbon nanotubes into grafted collagen matrix results in a substantial improvement of thermal stability and infrared emissivity. Thus these materials possess potential applications in some fields such as biomedicine and infrared camouflage.

  11. Systemic and immunotoxicity of pristine and PEGylated multi-walled carbon nanotubes in an intravenous 28 days repeated dose toxicity study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ting; Tang, Meng; Zhang, Shanshan; Hu, Yuanyuan; Li, Han; Zhang, Tao; Xue, Yuying; Pu, Yuepu

    2017-01-01

    The numerous increasing use of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) derived from nanotechnology has raised concerns about their biosafety and potential toxicity. CNTs cause immunologic dysfunction and limit the application of CNTs in biomedicine. The immunological responses induced by pristine multi-walled carbon nanotubes (p-MWCNTs) and PEGylated multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs-PEG) on BALB/c mice via an intravenous administration were investigated. The results reflect that the p-MWCNTs induced significant increases in spleen, thymus, and lung weight. Mice treated with p-MWCNTs showed altered lymphocyte populations (CD3+, CD4+, CD8+, and CD19+) in peripheral blood and increased serum IgM and IgG levels, and splenic macrophage ultrastructure indicated mitochondria swelling. p-MWCNTs inhibited humoral and cellular immunity function and were associated with decreased immune responses against sheep erythrocytes and serum hemolysis level. Natural killer (NK) activity was not modified by two types of MWCNTs. In comparison with two types of MWCNTs, for a same dose, p-MWCNTs caused higher levels of inflammation and immunosuppression than MWCNTs-PEG. The results of immunological function suggested that after intravenous administration with p-MWCNTs caused more damage to systemic immunity than MWCNTs-PEG. Here, we demonstrated that a surface functional modification on MWCNTs reduces their immune perturbations in vivo. The chemistry-modified MWCNTs change their preferred immune response in vivo and reduce the immunotoxicity of p-MWCNTs. PMID:28280324

  12. Thermal stability of catalytically grown multi-walled carbon nanotubes observed in transmission electron microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Cheng-Yu; Liu, Chuan-Pu; Boothroyd, Chris

    2009-01-01

    The thermal stability of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) was assessed in situ by transmission electron microscopy. Upon heating, Ni catalysts in MWC-NTs containing bamboo structures shrank from the tail due to evaporation, leading to additional bamboo formation and tube elongation at 800...

  13. MIPs-graphene nanoplatelets-MWCNTs modified glassy carbon electrode for the determination of cardiac troponin I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Ya; Shen, Xiao-Lei; Wang, Hai-Shui; Tao, Jia; Huang, Jian-Zhi; Zeng, Qiang; Wang, Li-Shi

    2017-03-01

    An electrochemical sensor with high selectivity in addition to sensitivity was developed for the determination of cardiac troponin I (cTnI), based on the modification of cTnI imprinted polymer film on a glassy carbon electrode (GCE). The sensor was fabricated by layer-by-layer assembled graphene nanoplatelets (GS), multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), chitosan (CS), glutaraldehyde (GA) composites, which can increase the electronic transfer rate and the active surface area to capture a larger number of antigenic proteins. MWCNTs/GS based imprinted polymers (MIPs/MWCNTs/GS) were synthesized by means of methacrylic acid (MAA) as the monomer, ethylene glycol dimethacrylate (EGDMA) as the cross linker α,α'-azobisisobutyronitrile (AIBN) as the initiator and cTnI as the template. In comparison with conventional methods, the proposed electrochemical sensor is highly sensitive for cTnI, providing a better linear response range from 0.005 to 60 ng cm(-3) and a lower limit of detection (LOD) of 0.0008 ng cm(-3) under optimal experimental conditions. In addition, the electrochemical sensor exhibited good specificity, acceptable reproducibility and stability. Moreover, satisfactory results were obtained in real human serum samples, indicating that the developed method has the potential to find application in clinical detection of cTnI as an alternative approach.

  14. A facile and novel approach towards carboxylic acid functionalization of multiwalled carbon nanotubes and efficient water dispersion

    KAUST Repository

    Rehman, Ata Ur

    2013-10-01

    A convenient, cheap and mild covalent functionalization route for multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) have been developed for the first time. The MWCNTs were treated with wet chemical oxidants (NaNO2/HCl, HNO3/H2O2) in order to modify MWCNTs with carboxyl groups. Surface functionality groups and morphology of MWCNTs were analyzed by FTIR, TGA, SEM and TEM. The results consistently confirmed the formation of carboxyl functionalities on MWCNTs, while the structure of MWCNTs has remained relatively intact. Functionalized MWCNTs showed good dispersion in aqueous media than untreated MWCNTs. Results show that NaNO2/HCl treatment is best suited for the chemical functionalization, giving optimum surface carboxyl groups and minimum length shortening of MWCNTs. © 2013 Elsevier B.V.

  15. Effects of a carbon nanotube-collagen coating on a titanium surface on osteoblast growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jung Eun; Park, Il-Song; Neupane, Madhav Prasad; Bae, Tae-Sung; Lee, Min-Ho

    2014-02-01

    This study was performed to evaluate the effect of collagen-multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) composite coating deposited on titanium on osteoblast growth. Titanium samples coated with only collagen and MWCNTs were used as controls. Pure titanium was coated with collagen-MWCNTs composite coating with 5, 10 and 20 μg cm-2 MWCNTs by dip coating method. Scanning probe microscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy were used to ascertain the root mean squared roughness, structural and morphological features and, the interaction between the collagen and the MWCNTs, respectively. The biocompatibility of the collagen-MWCNTs composite coated Ti was assessed by MTT and ALP activity assays after culturing the cells for 2 and 5 days. The study reveals that root mean squared surface roughness of collagen-MWCNTs composite coated titanium is relatively higher than those of collagen and MWCNTs coated Ti. There is a strong interaction between the MWCNTs and the collagen, which is supported by the inferences made in FE-SEM and TEM studies and further confirmed by FT-IR spectra. Among all the specimens tested, cell proliferation is relatively higher on collagen-MWCNTs composite coated Ti specimen incorporated with 20 μg cm-2 of MWCNTs (p collagen-MWCNTs composite coated Ti specimens is considered responsible for the relatively higher extent of cell proliferation. The MWCNTs incorporated in the composite could have also contributed to the cell viability and growth.

  16. Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes Decorated with Cobalt Oxide Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. G. Larrude

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs synthesized by spray pyrolysis were decorated with cobalt oxide nanoparticles using a simple synthesis route. This wet chemistry method yielded nanoparticles randomly anchored to the surface of the nanotubes by decomposition of cobalt nitrate hexahydrate diluted in acetone. Electron microscopy analysis indicated that dispersed particles were formed on the MWCNTs walls. The average size increased with the increasing concentration of cobalt nitrate in acetone in the precursor mixture. TEM images indicated that nanoparticles were strongly attached to the tube walls. The Raman spectroscopy results suggested that the MWCNT structure was slightly damaged after the nanoparticle growth.

  17. A review on protein functionalized carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaraju, Kathyayini; Reddy, Roopa; Reddy, Narendra

    2015-12-18

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been widely recognized and used for controlled drug delivery and in various other fields due to their unique properties and distinct advantages. Both single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and multiwalled (MWCNTs) carbon nanotubes are used and/or studied for potential applications in medical, energy, textile, composite, and other areas. Since CNTs are chemically inert and are insoluble in water or other organic solvents, they are functionalized or modified to carry payloads or interact with biological molecules. CNTs have been preferably functionalized with proteins because CNTs are predominantly used for medical applications such as delivery of drugs, DNA and genes, and also for biosensing. Extensive studies have been conducted to understand the interactions, cytotoxicity, and potential applications of protein functionalized CNTs but contradicting results have been published on the cytotoxicity of the functionalized CNTs. This paper provides a brief review of CNTs functionalized with proteins, methods used to functionalize the CNTs, and their potential applications.

  18. Morphology and Cure Behavior of Multi-walled Carbon Nanotubes-based Thermally Conductive Adhesive

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Junxia; YAN Shilin; HE Yunban; YAN Fei; XIE Beiping

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated the cure behavior of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) based thermally conductive adhesive by comprehensively thermal analysis, which presented extremely complicated variability of conversion ratioαas a function of temperature with synergistic action of positive effect and negative volume-blocking effect of MWCNTs and cross-linked network of cured polymer molecules. Due to the decomposition of MWCNTs and degradation of polymer, the mass drop is dramatically obvious over the temperature range of 330-370℃. Binary resins filled with acid-treated MWCNTs present similar reaction interval as neat epoxy and matrix resins, which is distinct from the material filled with raw MWCNTs. The alteration of the crystalline temperature and cure temperature of resins is attributed to heterogeneous nucleation of MWCNTs in matrix resins. The-COOH group of acid-treated MWCNTs reacts with epoxy groups and thus generates cross-linking, accelerates the reaction rate and reduces the cure temperature.

  19. Structure, electronic properties, and aggregation behavior of hydroxylated carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    López-Oyama, A. B.; Silva-Molina, R. A.; Ruíz-García, J.; Guirado-López, R. A., E-mail: guirado@ifisica.uaslp.mx [Instituto de Física “Manuel Sandoval Vallarta,” Universidad Autónoma de San Luis Potosí, Álvaro Obregón 64, 78000 San Luis Potosí, San Luis Potosí (Mexico); Gámez-Corrales, R. [Departamento de Física, Universidad de Sonora, Apartado Postal 5-088, 83190, Hermosillo, Sonora (Mexico)

    2014-11-07

    We present a combined experimental and theoretical study to analyze the structure, electronic properties, and aggregation behavior of hydroxylated multiwalled carbon nanotubes (OH–MWCNT). Our MWCNTs have average diameters of ∼2 nm, lengths of approximately 100–300 nm, and a hydroxyl surface coverage θ∼0.1. When deposited on the air/water interface the OH–MWCNTs are partially soluble and the floating units interact and link with each other forming extended foam-like carbon networks. Surface pressure-area isotherms of the nanotube films are performed using the Langmuir balance method at different equilibration times. The films are transferred into a mica substrate and atomic force microscopy images show that the foam like structure is preserved and reveals fine details of their microstructure. Density functional theory calculations performed on model hydroxylated carbon nanotubes show that low energy atomic configurations are found when the OH groups form molecular islands on the nanotube's surface. This patchy behavior for the OH species is expected to produce nanotubes having reduced wettabilities, in line with experimental observations. OH doping yields nanotubes having small HOMO–LUMO energy gaps and generates a nanotube → OH direction for the charge transfer leading to the existence of more hole carriers in the structures. Our synthesized OH–MWCNTs might have promising applications.

  20. An experimental investigation of using carbon foam-PCM-MWCNTs composite materials for thermal management of electronic devices under pulsed power modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alshaer, W. G.; Rady, M. A.; Nada, S. A.; Palomo Del Barrio, Elena; Sommier, Alain

    2017-02-01

    The present article reports on a detailed experimental investigation of using carbon foam-PCM-MWCNTs composite materials for thermal management (TM) of electronic devices subjected to pulsed power. The TM module was fabricated by infiltrating paraffin wax (RT65) as a phase change material (PCM) and multi walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) as a thermal conductivity enhancer in a carbon foam as a base structure. Two carbon foam materials of low and high values of thermal conductivities, CF20 and KL1-250 (3.1 and 40 W/m K), were tested as a base structure for the TM modules. Tests were conducted at different power intensities and power cycling/loading modes. Results showed that for all power varying modes and all carbon foams, the infiltration of RT65 into carbon foam reduces the temperature of TM module and results in damping the temperature spikes height. Infiltration of MWCNTS into RT65 further improves the effectiveness of TM module. Temperature damping was more pronounced in stand-alone pulsed power cycles as compared to pulsed power spikes modes. The effectiveness of inclusion of RT65 and RT65/MWCNTs in damping the temperature spikes height is remarkable in TM modules based on KL1-250 as compared to CF-20.

  1. An experimental investigation of using carbon foam-PCM-MWCNTs composite materials for thermal management of electronic devices under pulsed power modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alshaer, W. G.; Rady, M. A.; Nada, S. A.; Palomo Del Barrio, Elena; Sommier, Alain

    2016-05-01

    The present article reports on a detailed experimental investigation of using carbon foam-PCM-MWCNTs composite materials for thermal management (TM) of electronic devices subjected to pulsed power. The TM module was fabricated by infiltrating paraffin wax (RT65) as a phase change material (PCM) and multi walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) as a thermal conductivity enhancer in a carbon foam as a base structure. Two carbon foam materials of low and high values of thermal conductivities, CF20 and KL1-250 (3.1 and 40 W/m K), were tested as a base structure for the TM modules. Tests were conducted at different power intensities and power cycling/loading modes. Results showed that for all power varying modes and all carbon foams, the infiltration of RT65 into carbon foam reduces the temperature of TM module and results in damping the temperature spikes height. Infiltration of MWCNTS into RT65 further improves the effectiveness of TM module. Temperature damping was more pronounced in stand-alone pulsed power cycles as compared to pulsed power spikes modes. The effectiveness of inclusion of RT65 and RT65/MWCNTs in damping the temperature spikes height is remarkable in TM modules based on KL1-250 as compared to CF-20.

  2. Layer-by-layer assembled carbon nanotube films with molecule recognition function and lower capacitive background current.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Bo; Zeng, Jinxiang; Luo, Guangming; Luo, Shenglian; Wei, Wanzhi; Li, Jun

    2009-02-01

    Multilayer films of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) with molecule recognition function were assembled on glassy carbon (GC) electrode with lower capacitive background current by two steps: first, MWCNTs interacted with beta-cyclodextrin (beta-CD) with the aid of sonication to form beta-CD-MWCNTs nanocomposite, then the beta-CD-MWCNTs nanocomposite was assembled on GC electrode using layer-by-layer (LBL) method based on electrostatic interaction of positively charged biopolymer chitosan and negatively charged MWCNTs. The assembled beta-CD-MWCNTs multilayer films were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and cyclic voltammetry. The SEM indicated that the MWCNTs multilayer films with beta-CD were somewhat more compact than that of the MWCNTs multilayer films without beta-CD. The cyclic voltammetric results indicated that the assembled MWCNTs with beta-CD on GC electrode exhibited lower capacitive background current than the assembled MWCNTs without beta-CD. The MWCNTs multilayer films with beta-CD were studied with respect to the electrocatalytic activity toward dopamine (DA). Compared with the MWCNTs multilayer films without beta-CD, the MWCNTs multilayer films with beta-CD possesses a much lower capacitive background current and higher electrocatalytic activity in phosphate buffer, which was ascribed to the relatively compact three-dimensional structure of the MWCNTs multilayer films with beta-CD and the excellent molecule recognition function of beta-CD.

  3. Synthesis and Characterization of Silver Nanoparticle-Multiwalled Carbon Nanotube Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dunieskys G. Larrude

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs grown by spray pyrolysis have been decorated with silver nanoparticles prepared via the silver mirror reaction. Good dispersion of silver nanostructures was obtained on the surface of MWCNTs, resulting in an efficient and simple wet chemistry method for increasing the reactivity of the carbon nanotubes surfaces. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy showed the orientations of the crystallography planes of the anchored silver nanoparticles and revealed their size distribution. Raman spectroscopy results confirm that the composite material preserves the integrity of the MWCNTs. Scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy were also employed for sample characterization.

  4. Spectroscopic investigations on oxidized multi-walled carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anandhi, C. M. S.; Premkumar, S.; Asath, R. Mohamed; Mathavan, T.; Benial, A. Milton Franklin

    2016-05-01

    The pristine multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were oxidized by the ultrasonication process. The oxidized MWCNTs were characterized by the X-ray diffraction (XRD), ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) and Fourier transform -Raman (FT-Raman) spectroscopic techniques. The XRD analysis confirms that the oxidized MWCNTs exist in a hexagonal structure and the sharp XRD peak corresponds to the (002) Bragg's reflection plane, which indicates that the MWCNTs have higher crystalline nature. The UV-Vis analysis confirms that the MWCNTs functionalized with the carboxylic acid. The red shift was observed corresponds to the D band in the Raman spectrum, which reveals that the reduced disordered graphitic structure of oxidized MWCNTs. The strong Raman peak was observed at 2563 cm-1 corresponds to the overtone of the D band, which is the characteristic vibrational mode of oxidized MWCNTs. The carboxylic acid functionalization of MWCNTs enhances the dispersibility, which paves the way for potential applications in the field of biosensors and targeted drug delivery.

  5. Modulation of apoptotic pathways of macrophages by surface-functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuanqin Jiang

    Full Text Available Biomedical applications of carbon nanotubes (CNTs often involve improving their hydrophilicity and dispersion in biological media by modifying them through noncovalent or covalent functionalization. However, the potential adverse effects of surface-functionalized CNTs have not been well characterized. In this study, we functionalized multi-walled CNTs (MWCNTs via carboxylation, to produce MWCNTs-COOH, and via poly (ethylene glycol linking, to produce MWCNTs-PEG. We used these functionalized MWCNTs to study the effect of surface functionalization on MWCNTs-induced toxicity to macrophages, and elucidate the underlying mechanisms of action. Our results revealed that MWCNTs-PEG were less cytotoxic and were associated with less apoptotic cell death of macrophages than MWCNTs-COOH. Additionally, MWCNTs-PEG induced less generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS involving less activation of NADPH oxidase compared with MWCNTs-COOH, as evidenced by membrane translocation of p47(phox and p67(phox in macrophages. The less cytotoxic and apoptotic effect of MWCNTs-PEG compared with MWCNTs-COOH resulted from the lower cellular uptake of MWCNTs-PEG, which resulted in less activation of oxidative stress-responsive pathways, such as p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK and nuclear factor (NF-κB. These results demonstrate that surface functionalization of CNTs may alter ROS-mediated cytotoxic and apoptotic response by modulating apoptotic signaling pathways. Our study thus provides new insights into the molecular basis for the surface properties affecting CNTs toxicity.

  6. New generation fiber reinforced polymer composites incorporating carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soliman, Eslam

    The last five decades observed an increasing use of fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) composites as alternative construction materials for aerospace and infrastructure. The high specific strength of FRP attracted its use as non-corrosive reinforcement. However, FRP materials were characterized with a relatively low ductility and low shear strength compared with steel reinforcement. On the other hand, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been introduced in the last decade as a material with minimal defect that is capable of increasing the mechanical properties of polymer matrices. This dissertation reports experimental investigations on the use of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) to produce a new generation of FRP composites. The experiments showed significant improvements in the flexure properties of the nanocomposite when functionalized MWCNTs were used. In addition, MWCNTs were used to produce FRP composites in order to examine static, dynamic, and creep behavior. The MWCNTs improved the off-axis tension, off-axis flexure, FRP lap shear joint responses. In addition, they reduced the creep of FRP-concrete interface, enhanced the fracture toughness, and altered the impact resistance significantly. In general, the MWCNTs are found to affect the behaviour of the FRP composites when matrix failure dominates the behaviour. The improvement in the mechanical response with the addition of low contents of MWCNTs would benefit many industrial and military applications such as strengthening structures using FRP composites, composite pipelines, aircrafts, and armoured vehicles.

  7. Electrochemical Reduction of Oxygen on Anthraquinone/Carbon Nanotubes Nanohybrid Modified Glassy Carbon Electrode in Neutral Medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Gong

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The electrochemical behaviors of monohydroxy-anthraquinone/multiwall carbon nanotubes (MHAQ/MWCNTs nanohybrid modified glassy carbon (MHAQ/MWCNTs/GC electrodes in neutral medium were investigated; also reported was their application in the electrocatalysis of oxygen reduction reaction (ORR. The resulting MHAQ/MWCNTs nanohybrid was characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM and transmission electron microscope (TEM. It was found that the ORR at the MHAQ/MWCNTs/GC electrode occurs irreversibly at a potential about 214 mV less negative than at a bare GC electrode in pH 7.0 buffer solution. Cyclic voltammetric and rotating disk electrode (RDE techniques indicated that the MHAQ/MWCNTs nanohybrid has high electrocatalytic activity for the two-electron reduction of oxygen in the studied potential range. The kinetic parameters of ORR at the MHAQ/MWCNTs nanohybrid modified GC electrode were also determined by RDE and EIS techniques.

  8. Fabrication and mechanical properties of multiwalled carbon nanotube/nanonickel reinforced epoxy resin composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiwen; Zhao, Dongyu; Luan, Dongxue; Bi, Changlong

    2016-12-01

    Nanonickel is supported on the surface of the multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), forming the multiwalled carbon nanotubes/nanonickel composites (MWCNTs/Ni). By using the emulsifying machine dispersing MWCNTs/Ni evenly among epoxy resin, which is prepared into epoxy resin/multiwalled carbon nanotubes/nanonickel (EP/MWCNTs/Ni) composite materials. Additionally, the observed strong interfacial interaction between MWCNTs and the epoxy resin matrix is responsible for the enhanced mechanical properties based on the analysis from scanning electron microscope. Experimental results based on the analysis from dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) indicate a significant improvement in the glass transition temperature (Tg) by around 20 °C upon the addition of 1.5 wt% MWCNTs/Ni to the epoxy matrix. The tensile strength and the impact strength of the composites can improve around 64.8 and 176.7% compared with that of cured pure epoxy and improve with increasing MWCNTs/Ni content up to 1.3 wt%. Finally, the excellent mechanics capability of EP/MWCNTs/Ni nanocomposites will provide enormous opportunities for aerospace applications where conductive adhesive or high-performance polymer materials are necessary.

  9. Preparation and properties of functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotubes/polypropylene nanocomposite bipolar plates for polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Shu-Hang; Weng, Cheng-Chih; Yen, Chuan-Yu; Hsiao, Min-Chien; Ma, Chen-Chi M.; Tsai, Ming-Chi; Su, Ay; Yen, Ming-Yu; Lin, Yu-Feng; Liu, Po-Lan

    Multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) are covalently modified with different molecular weights 400 and 2000 poly(oxyalkylene)-amine bearing the diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A (DGEBA) epoxy (POA400-DGEBA and POA2000-DGEBA) oligomers. The oxidized MWCNTs (MWCNTs-COOH) are converted to the acid chloride-functionalized MWCNTs, followed by the reaction with POA-DGEBAs to prepare the MWCNTs/POA400-DGEBA and MWCNTs/POA2000-DGEBA. FTIR, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and high resolution X-ray photoelectron spectra (XPS) reveal that the POA-DGEBAs are covalently attached to the surface of MWCNTs. The morphology of MWCNTs/POA-DGEBA is observed by TEM. The POA400-DGEBA coated on the MWCNTs is thicker and more uniform. However, the coating of POA2000-DGEBA on the MWCNTs shows a worm-like bulk substance and the MWCNT surface is bare. In addition, the flexural strength and the bulk electrical conductivity of the MWCNTs/polypropylene nanocomposite bipolar plates are measured 59% and 505% higher than those of the original composite bipolar plates by adding 8 phr of MWCNTs/POA400-DGEBA. The maximum current density and power density of the single cell test for the nanocomposite bipolar plate with 4 phr MWCNTs/POA400-DGEBA are 1.32 A cm -2 and 0.533 W cm -2, respectively. The overall performance confirms the functionalized MWCNTs/polypropylene nanocomposite bipolar plates prepared in this study are suitable for PEMFC application.

  10. Preparation and properties of functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotubes/polypropylene nanocomposite bipolar plates for polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liao, Shu-Hang; Weng, Cheng-Chih; Yen, Chuan-Yu.; Hsiao, Min-Chien; Ma, Chen-Chi M.; Yen, Ming-Yu.; Liu, Po-Lan [Department of Chemical Engineering, National Tsing Hua University, Hsin-Chu 30043 (China); Tsai, Ming-Chi [Department of Engineering and System Science, National Tsing Hua University, Hsin-Chu 30043 (China); Su, Ay [Fuel Cell Center, Yuan Ze University, Tao-Yuan 32003 (China); Lin, Yu-Feng [Plastics Industry Development Center, Tai-Chung 40768 (China)

    2010-01-01

    Multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) are covalently modified with different molecular weights 400 and 2000 poly(oxyalkylene)-amine bearing the diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A (DGEBA) epoxy (POA400-DGEBA and POA2000-DGEBA) oligomers. The oxidized MWCNTs (MWCNTs-COOH) are converted to the acid chloride-functionalized MWCNTs, followed by the reaction with POA-DGEBAs to prepare the MWCNTs/POA400-DGEBA and MWCNTs/POA2000-DGEBA. FTIR, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and high resolution X-ray photoelectron spectra (XPS) reveal that the POA-DGEBAs are covalently attached to the surface of MWCNTs. The morphology of MWCNTs/POA-DGEBA is observed by TEM. The POA400-DGEBA coated on the MWCNTs is thicker and more uniform. However, the coating of POA2000-DGEBA on the MWCNTs shows a worm-like bulk substance and the MWCNT surface is bare. In addition, the flexural strength and the bulk electrical conductivity of the MWCNTs/polypropylene nanocomposite bipolar plates are measured 59% and 505% higher than those of the original composite bipolar plates by adding 8 phr of MWCNTs/POA400-DGEBA. The maximum current density and power density of the single cell test for the nanocomposite bipolar plate with 4 phr MWCNTs/POA400-DGEBA are 1.32 A cm{sup -2} and 0.533 W cm{sup -2}, respectively. The overall performance confirms the functionalized MWCNTs/polypropylene nanocomposite bipolar plates prepared in this study are suitable for PEMFC application. (author)

  11. Time-resolved laser-induced incandescence from multiwalled carbon nanotubes in air

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitrani, J. M. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08540, USA; Shneider, M. N. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544, USA

    2015-01-26

    We observed temporal laser-induced incandescence (LII) signals from multiwalled carbon nanotubes(MWCNTs) suspended in ambient air. Unlike previous LII experiments with soot particles, which showed that primary particles with larger diameters cool at slower timescales relative to smaller particles, we observed that thicker MWCNTs with larger outer diameters (ODs) cool at faster timescales relative to thinner MWCNTs with smaller ODs. We suggested a simple explanation of this effect, based on the solution of one-dimensional nonstationary heat conduction equation for the initial non-uniform heating of MWCNTs with ODs greater than the skin depth.

  12. Enhanced reflection loss and permittivity of self assembled Mg-Co-Zr substituted barium ferrite dot array on carbon nanotube

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghasemi, Ali, E-mail: ali13912001@yahoo.com [Materials Engineering Department, Malek Ashtar University of Technology, Shahin Shahr (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2012-03-15

    In this research work, magnetic multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNTs) nanocomposites have been created by the assembly of Mg-Co-Zr substituted barium ferrite film onto the surface of MWCNTs. Microwave absorption of the MWCNTs/doped barium ferrite nanocomposites is evidently enhanced compared to that of pure MWCNTs and substituted ferrites. The maximum reflection loss increased significantly with an increase in volume percentage of MWCNTs. Reflection loss evaluations indicated that nanocomposites display a great potential application as thinner and lighter wide-band electromagnetic wave absorbers. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ferrite dot array was formed on carbon nanotube by sol-gel method. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It was found that the volume percentage of carbon nanotube has remarkable influence on reflection loss characteristics. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Microwave measurements indicate that the synthesized nanocomposites could be employed as wide-band electromagnetic wave absorbers.

  13. Carbon nanotubes/laser ablation gold nanoparticles composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lascialfari, Luisa [Department of Chemistry, Università di Firenze, Via della Lastruccia 3-13, Sesto Fiorentino, Firenze 50019 (Italy); Istituto dei Sistemi Complessi, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, via Madonna del Piano 10, Sesto Fiorentino, Firenze 50019 (Italy); Consorzio Interuniversitario Nazionale per la Scienza e Tecnologia dei Materiali (INSTM), Via Giusti 9, Firenze 50123 (Italy); Marsili, Paolo [Istituto dei Sistemi Complessi, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, via Madonna del Piano 10, Sesto Fiorentino, Firenze 50019 (Italy); Caporali, Stefano [Department of Chemistry, Università di Firenze, Via della Lastruccia 3-13, Sesto Fiorentino, Firenze 50019 (Italy); Consorzio Interuniversitario Nazionale per la Scienza e Tecnologia dei Materiali (INSTM), Via Giusti 9, Firenze 50123 (Italy); Muniz-Miranda, Maurizio [Department of Chemistry, Università di Firenze, Via della Lastruccia 3-13, Sesto Fiorentino, Firenze 50019 (Italy); Margheri, Giancarlo [Istituto dei Sistemi Complessi, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, via Madonna del Piano 10, Sesto Fiorentino, Firenze 50019 (Italy); Serafini, Andrea; Brandi, Alberto [Department of Chemistry, Università di Firenze, Via della Lastruccia 3-13, Sesto Fiorentino, Firenze 50019 (Italy); Giorgetti, Emilia, E-mail: emilia.giorgetti@fi.isc.cnr.it [Istituto dei Sistemi Complessi, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, via Madonna del Piano 10, Sesto Fiorentino, Firenze 50019 (Italy); Cicchi, Stefano, E-mail: stefano.cicchi@unifi.it [Department of Chemistry, Università di Firenze, Via della Lastruccia 3-13, Sesto Fiorentino, Firenze 50019 (Italy); Consorzio Interuniversitario Nazionale per la Scienza e Tecnologia dei Materiali (INSTM), Via Giusti 9, Firenze 50123 (Italy)

    2014-10-31

    The production of nanohybrids formed by oxidized multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and nanoparticles, produced by pulsed laser ablation in liquids process, is described. The use of linkers, obtained by transformation of pyrene-1-butanol, is mandatory to generate an efficient and stable interaction between the two components. Transmission electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis showed the obtainment of the efficient coverage of the MWCNTs by nanoparticles composed by metal gold and, partially, by oxides. - Highlights: • Laser ablation is a used for the production of gold nanoparticle colloids • An efficient decoration of carbon nanotubes with nanoparticles is obtained through the use of a linker • This method allows an efficient and tunable preparation of carbon nanotube hybrids.

  14. Creep of thermoplastic polyurethane reinforced with ozone functionalized carbon nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Zhang

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This work focused on the mechanical behavior, especially creep resistance, of thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU filled with ozone-treated multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs. It was found that the ozone functionalization of MWCNTs could improve their dispersion and interfacial adhesion to the TPU matrix as proved by scanning electron microscope and Raman spectrometer. It finally contributed to the enhancement of Young’s modulus and yield strength of TPU/MWCNT composites. Moreover, the creep resistance and recovery of MWCNT/TPU composites revealed a significant improvement by incorporating ozone functionalized MWCNTs. The strong interaction between the modified MWCNTs and TPU matrix would enhance the interfacial bonding and facilitate the load transfer, resulting in low creep strain and unrecovered strain.

  15. Nanomechanics of carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kis, Andras; Zettl, Alex

    2008-05-13

    Some of the most important potential applications of carbon nanotubes are related to their mechanical properties. Stiff sp2 bonds result in a Young's modulus close to that of diamond, while the relatively weak van der Waals interaction between the graphitic shells acts as a form of lubrication. Previous characterization of the mechanical properties of nanotubes includes a rich variety of experiments involving mechanical deformation of nanotubes using scanning probe microscopes. These results have led to promising prototypes of nanoelectromechanical devices such as high-performance nanomotors, switches and oscillators based on carbon nanotubes.

  16. Occupational Exposure to Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes During Commercial Production Synthesis and Handling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuijpers, Eelco; Bekker, Cindy; Fransman, Wouter; Brouwer, Derk; Tromp, Peter; Vlaanderen, Jelle; Godderis, Lode; Hoet, Peter; Lan, Qing; Silverman, Debra; Vermeulen, Roel; Pronk, Anjoeka

    2016-04-01

    The world-wide production of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) has increased substantially in the last decade, leading to occupational exposures. There is a paucity of exposure data of workers involved in the commercial production of CNTs. The goals of this study were to assess personal exposure to multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) during the synthesis and handling of MWCNTs in a commercial production facility and to link these exposure levels to specific activities. Personal full-shift filter-based samples were collected, during commercial production and handling of MWCNTs, R&D activities, and office work. The concentrations of MWCNT were evaluated on the basis of EC concentrations. Associations were studied between observed MWCNT exposure levels and location and activities. SEM analyses showed MWCNTs, present as agglomerates ranging between 200 nm and 100 µm. Exposure levels of MWCNTs observed in the production area during the full scale synthesis of MWCNTs (N = 23) were comparable to levels observed during further handling of MWCNTs (N = 19): (GM (95% lower confidence limit-95% upper confidence limit)) 41 μg m(-3) (20-88) versus 43 μg m(-3) (22-86), respectively. In the R&D area (N = 11) and the office (N = 5), exposure levels of MWCNTs were significantly (P production area, whereas increased exposure levels in the R&D area were related to handling of MWCNTs powder.

  17. Organic modification of carbon nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The organic modification of carbon nanotubes is a novel research field being developed recently. In this article, the history and newest progress of organic modification of carbon nanotubes are reviewed from two aspects:organic covalent modification and organic noncovalent modification of carbon nanotubes. The preparation and properties of organic modified carbon nanotubes are discussed in detail. In addition, the prospective development of organic modification of carbon nanotubes is suggested.

  18. Single-walled and multi-walled carbon nanotubes based drug delivery system: Cancer therapy: A review

    OpenAIRE

    Dineshkumar, B.; Krishnakumar, K; A R Bhatt; D Paul; Cherian, J; John, A.; S. Suresh

    2015-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are advanced nano-carrier for delivery of drugs especially anti-cancer drugs. In the field of CNT-based drug delivery system, both single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and multi-walled nanotubes (MWCNTs) can be used for targeting anticancer drugs in tissues and organs, where the high therapeutic effect is necessary. Benefits of the carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in drug delivery systems are; avoiding solvent usage and reducing the side effects. Therefore, the present revie...

  19. Single-walled and multi-walled carbon nanotubes based drug delivery system: Cancer therapy: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Dineshkumar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanotubes (CNTs are advanced nano-carrier for delivery of drugs especially anti-cancer drugs. In the field of CNT-based drug delivery system, both single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs and multi-walled nanotubes (MWCNTs can be used for targeting anticancer drugs in tissues and organs, where the high therapeutic effect is necessary. Benefits of the carbon nanotubes (CNTs in drug delivery systems are; avoiding solvent usage and reducing the side effects. Therefore, the present review article described about achievement of SWCNTs and MWCNTs to deliver the anticancer drugs with different cancerous cell lines.

  20. Single-walled and multi-walled carbon nanotubes based drug delivery system: Cancer therapy: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dineshkumar, B; Krishnakumar, K; Bhatt, A R; Paul, D; Cherian, J; John, A; Suresh, S

    2015-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are advanced nano-carrier for delivery of drugs especially anti-cancer drugs. In the field of CNT-based drug delivery system, both single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and multi-walled nanotubes (MWCNTs) can be used for targeting anticancer drugs in tissues and organs, where the high therapeutic effect is necessary. Benefits of the carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in drug delivery systems are; avoiding solvent usage and reducing the side effects. Therefore, the present review article described about achievement of SWCNTs and MWCNTs to deliver the anticancer drugs with different cancerous cell lines.

  1. An efficient and mild carboxylation of multiwall carbon nanotubes using H2O2 in the presence of heteropolyacid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M.Z. Kassaee; H. Zandi; J. Akbari; E. Motamedi

    2012-01-01

    A clean,fast,and facile oxidation of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) by H2O2/heteropolyacid (H3PW12O40) gave highly carboxylated MWCNTs under mild conditions,at a conveniently accessible temperature.After an easy workup,the product was characterized by SEM,XRD,and FY-IR.

  2. Nanorobotic Manipulation Setup for Pick-and-Place Handling and non-destructive Characterization of Carbon Nanotubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eicchorn, V.; Carlson, Kenneth; Andersen, Karin Nordström

    2007-01-01

    . The pick-and-place task is carried out by using an electrothermal actuated microgripper, designed for controlled manipulation of nanotubes. The nanotube is picked up from an array of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and transferred to the tip of an atomic force microscope (AFM) probe in order...

  3. Effects of a carbon nanotube-collagen coating on a titanium surface on osteoblast growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jung Eun, E-mail: pje312@naver.com; Park, Il-Song, E-mail: ilsong@jbnu.ac.kr; Neupane, Madhav Prasad; Bae, Tae-Sung; Lee, Min-Ho, E-mail: lmh@jbnu.ac.kr

    2014-02-15

    This study was performed to evaluate the effect of collagen-multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) composite coating deposited on titanium on osteoblast growth. Titanium samples coated with only collagen and MWCNTs were used as controls. Pure titanium was coated with collagen-MWCNTs composite coating with 5, 10 and 20 μg cm{sup −2} MWCNTs by dip coating method. Scanning probe microscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy were used to ascertain the root mean squared roughness, structural and morphological features and, the interaction between the collagen and the MWCNTs, respectively. The biocompatibility of the collagen-MWCNTs composite coated Ti was assessed by MTT and ALP activity assays after culturing the cells for 2 and 5 days. The study reveals that root mean squared surface roughness of collagen-MWCNTs composite coated titanium is relatively higher than those of collagen and MWCNTs coated Ti. There is a strong interaction between the MWCNTs and the collagen, which is supported by the inferences made in FE-SEM and TEM studies and further confirmed by FT-IR spectra. Among all the specimens tested, cell proliferation is relatively higher on collagen-MWCNTs composite coated Ti specimen incorporated with 20 μg cm{sup −2} of MWCNTs (p < 0.05) after 5 days of cell culture. Cell proliferation studies confirm the existence of a strong dependence of the extent of cell proliferation on the amount of MWCNTs incorporated in the composite; the higher the amount of MWCNTs, the greater the extent of cell proliferation. The higher surface roughness of collagen-MWCNTs composite coated Ti specimens is considered responsible for the relatively higher extent of cell proliferation. The MWCNTs incorporated in the composite could have also contributed to the cell viability and growth.

  4. Effect of silane treatment of carboxylic-functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes on the thermal properties of epoxy nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The effect of silane treatment of carboxylic-functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (COOH-MWCNTs on the thermal properties of COOH-MWCNTs/epoxy nanocomposites was studied by comparing the research results on differential scanning calorimetry and thermogravimetric analysis data of silane treated COOH-MWCNTs/epoxy system with those of as-received COOH-MWCNTs/epoxy system. At the initial curing stage, silane treatment of COOH-MWCNTs does not change the autocatalytic cure reaction mechanism of COOH-MWCNTs/diglycidyl ether of bisphenol-A glycidol ether epoxy resin/2-ethyl-4-methylimidazole (COOH-MWCNTs/DGEBA/EMI-2,4 system, however, silane treatment of COOH-MWCNTs has catalytic effect on the curing process, which could help to shorten pre-cure time or lower pre-temperature. Then, at the later curing stage, silane treatment of COOH-MWCNTs promotes vitrification, which would help to shorten post-cure time or lower post-temperature. Therefore, overall, silane treatment of COOH-MWCNTs could bring positive effect on the processing of epoxy nanocomposites. Furthermore, it was also found that silane treatment of COOH-MWCNTs does not affect the thermal degradation pattern of COOH-MWCNTs/DGEBA/EMI-2,4 system, however, decreases the thermal stability of COOH-MWCNTs/DGEBA/EMI-2,4 nanocomposites.

  5. Synthesis of Silica Decorated MWCNTs for Field Emission Property

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈正瀚; 彭毓航; 林鸿明; 罗吉宗

    2006-01-01

    A novel route to nanocomposites containing surface modified multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) by silica thin film is reported. The effect of chemical oxidation on the surface of MWCNTs by using different acid-treatments is studied.The acidic processes are characterized by Raman spectroscopy, thermogravimetry analysis, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. MWCNTs can be coated homogeneously with silica film by using tetraethoxysilane (TEOS)as a precursor in a sol-gel process. Varying the shell thickness of amorphous silica coating layers on MWCNTs exhibits excellent thermal stability, reliability, and lifetime of field emission properties, especially down to less than 10 nm.

  6. Surface-initiated graft polymerization on multiwalled carbon nanotubes pretreated by corona discharge at atmospheric pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lihua; Fang, Zhengping; Song, Ping'an; Peng, Mao

    2010-03-01

    Surface-initiated graft polymerization on multi-walled carbon nanotubes pretreated with a corona discharge at atmospheric pressure was explored. The mechanism of the corona-discharge-induced graft polymerization is discussed. The results indicate that MWCNTs were encapsulated by poly(glycidyl methacrylate) (PGMA), demonstrating the formation of PGMA-grafted MWCNTs (PGMA-g-MWCNTs), with a grafting ratio of about 22 wt%. The solubility of PGMA-g-MWCNTs in ethanol was dramatically improved compared to pristine MWCNTs, which could contribute to fabricating high-performance polymer/MWCNTs nanocomposites in the future. Compared with most plasma processes, which operate at low pressures, corona discharge has the merit of working at atmospheric pressure.

  7. Elimination and Recycling of Imatinib by Ethoxylated Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes from aqueous solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Pakzad Masouleh

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available An adsorbent and carrier based on ethoxylated functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (f-MWCNTs were prepared with diethylene glycol (2EG followed by esterification process. Resultant dietylene glycolated MWCNTs (MWCNTs-2EG used for elimination of Imatinib mesylate (Ima from water. Maximum Ima adsorption per 3 mg of adsorbent and 9 mg of initial Ima was 8.76 mg. maximum recycling at two pH values 7.4 and 5.3 was determined about 6.15 mg (70% and 7.42 mg (85% respectively. Ima elimination and recycling process is greatly enhanced by the creation of functional groups on the MWCNTs-2EG in compare with carboxylated MWCNTs (MWCNTs-COOH.

  8. Application of aromatization catalyst in synthesis of carbon nanotubes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Song Rongjun; Yang Yunpeng; Ji Qing; Li Bin

    2012-02-01

    In a typical chemical vapour deposition (CVD) process for synthesizing carbon nanotubes (CNTs), it was found that the aromatization catalysts could promote effectively the formation of CNT. The essence of this phenomenon was attributed to the fact that the aromatization catalyst can accelerate the dehydrogenation–cyclization and condensation reaction of carbon source, which belongs to a necessary step in the formation of CNTs. In this work, aromatization catalysts, H-beta zeolite, HZSM-5 zeolite and organically modified montmorillonite (OMMT) were chosen to investigate their effects on the formation of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) via pyrolysis method when polypropylene and 1-hexene as carbon source and Ni2O3 as the charring catalyst. The results demonstrated that the combination of those aromatization catalysts with nickel catalyst can effectively improve the formation of MWCNTs.

  9. Heat dissipation for microprocessor using multiwalled carbon nanotubes based liquid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung Thang, Bui; Trinh, Pham Van; Chuc, Nguyen Van; Khoi, Phan Hong; Minh, Phan Ngoc

    2013-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are one of the most valuable materials with high thermal conductivity (2000 W/m · K compared with thermal conductivity of Ag 419 W/m · K). This suggested an approach in applying the CNTs in thermal dissipation system for high power electronic devices, such as computer processor and high brightness light emitting diode (HB-LED). In this work, multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) based liquid was made by COOH functionalized MWCNTs dispersed in distilled water with concentration in the range between 0.2 and 1.2 gram/liter. MWCNT based liquid was used in liquid cooling system to enhance thermal dissipation for computer processor. By using distilled water in liquid cooling system, CPU's temperature decreases by about 10°C compared with using fan cooling system. By using MWCNT liquid with concentration of 1 gram/liter MWCNTs, the CPU's temperature decreases by 7°C compared with using distilled water in cooling system. Theoretically, we also showed that the presence of MWCNTs reduced thermal resistance and increased the thermal conductivity of liquid cooling system. The results have confirmed the advantages of the MWCNTs for thermal dissipation systems for the μ -processor and other high power electronic devices.

  10. Heat Dissipation for Microprocessor Using Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes Based Liquid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bui Hung Thang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanotubes (CNTs are one of the most valuable materials with high thermal conductivity (2000 W/m·K compared with thermal conductivity of Ag 419 W/m·K. This suggested an approach in applying the CNTs in thermal dissipation system for high power electronic devices, such as computer processor and high brightness light emitting diode (HB-LED. In this work, multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs based liquid was made by COOH functionalized MWCNTs dispersed in distilled water with concentration in the range between 0.2 and 1.2 gram/liter. MWCNT based liquid was used in liquid cooling system to enhance thermal dissipation for computer processor. By using distilled water in liquid cooling system, CPU’s temperature decreases by about 10°C compared with using fan cooling system. By using MWCNT liquid with concentration of 1 gram/liter MWCNTs, the CPU’s temperature decreases by 7°C compared with using distilled water in cooling system. Theoretically, we also showed that the presence of MWCNTs reduced thermal resistance and increased the thermal conductivity of liquid cooling system. The results have confirmed the advantages of the MWCNTs for thermal dissipation systems for the μ-processor and other high power electronic devices.

  11. Interlaminar Fracture Toughness of CFRP Laminates Incorporating Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Borowski

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP laminates exhibit limited fracture toughness due to characteristic interlaminar fiber-matrix cracking and delamination. In this article, we demonstrate that the fracture toughness of CFRP laminates can be improved by the addition of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs. Experimental investigations and numerical modeling were performed to determine the effects of using MWCNTs in CFRP laminates. The CFRP specimens were produced using an epoxy nanocomposite matrix reinforced with carboxyl functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (COOH–MWCNTs. Four MWCNTs contents of 0.0%, 0.5%, 1.0%, and 1.5% per weight of the epoxy resin/hardener mixture were examined. Double cantilever beam (DCB tests were performed to determine the mode I interlaminar fracture toughness of the unidirectional CFRP composites. This composite material property was quantified using the critical energy release rate, GIC. The experimental results show a 25%, 20%, and 17% increase in the maximum interlaminar fracture toughness of the CFRP composites with the addition of 0.5, 1.0, and 1.5 wt% MWCNTs, respectively. Microstructural investigations using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS verify that chemical reactions took place between the COOH–MWCNTs and the epoxy resin, supporting the improvements experimentally observed in the interlaminar fracture toughness of the CFRP specimens containing MWCNTs. Finite element (FE simulations show good agreement with the experimental results and confirm the significant effect of MWCNTs on the interlaminar fracture toughness of CFRP.

  12. Immune responses of BALB/c mice to subcutaneously injected multi-walled carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Jie; Yang, Man; Jia, Fumin; Xu, Zhen; Kong, Hua; Xu, Haiyan

    2011-12-01

    Carbon nanotubes have been shown to have the ability to transport therapeutic and detective reagents into cells. However, the rapid advances in new carbon nanotube-based materials and technologies have raised concerns about their safety. Such concerns require a fundamental understanding of the toxicological properties of carbon nanotubes. In particular, the use of carbon nanotubes as drug or probe delivery platforms may depend on the prevention of stimulatory side-effects to the immune system. In this study, we investigated the immunological properties of oxidized water dispersible multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) in healthy BALB/c mice. We injected the MWCNTs subcutaneously, and the immune responses of the mice were monitored over time. We show that the MWCNTs induce complement activation and the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines early after injection of the mice, and that the levels of complement and cytokines return to normal levels over time. With the exception of the lymph nodes, there was no obvious accumulation of MWCNTs observed in the liver, spleen, kidney, or heart. In addition, we did not observe injury in the organs or lymph nodes. Our results indicate that local, subcutaneous administration of MWCNTs induces obvious short-term immunological reactions, which can be eliminated over time.

  13. Flexible microdevices based on carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Ashante'; Cannon, Andrew; Lee, Jungchul; King, William P.; Graham, Samuel

    2006-12-01

    This work reports the fabrication and testing of flexible carbon nanotube microdevices made using hot embossing material transfer. Both micro-plasma and photodetector devices were made using as-grown unpurified multi-wall carbon nanotubes printed on PMMA substrates. Optical detectors were fabricated by attaching metal wires and monitoring the resistance as a function of light exposure. The electrical resistance of the nanotubes showed a strong sensitivity to light exposure which was also enhanced by heating the devices. While such processes in MWCNTs are not fully understood, the addition of thermal energy is believed to generate additional free charge carriers in the nanotubes. The plasma-generating microdevices consisted of a thin layer of thermoplastic polymer having the CNT electrode on one side and a metal electrode on the reverse side. The devices were electrically tested under atmospheric conditions with 0.01-1 kV ac and at 2.5 kHz, with the plasma igniting near 0.7 kV. The fabrication of these flexible organic devices demonstrates the ability to pattern useful carbon nanotube microdevices in low-cost thermoplastic polymers.

  14. Measuring inside damage of individual multi-walled carbon nanotubes using scanning transmission X-ray microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Jinyin; Bai, Lili; Zhao, Guanqi; Sun, Xuhui, E-mail: xhsun@suda.edu.cn, E-mail: jzhong@suda.edu.cn; Zhong, Jun, E-mail: xhsun@suda.edu.cn, E-mail: jzhong@suda.edu.cn [Soochow University-Western University Centre for Synchrotron Radiation Research, Institute of Functional Nano and Soft Materials (FUNSOM) and Collaborative Innovation Center of Suzhou Nano Science and Technology, Soochow University, Suzhou 215123 (China); Wang, Jian [Canadian Light Source, Inc., University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan S7N 0X4 (Canada)

    2014-06-16

    The electronic structure of individual multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) has been probed using scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM). Although transmission electron microscope (TEM) images show that the exterior of the MWCNTs are clean and straight; the inside structure of some of the MWCNTs is much less well ordered, as revealed by STXM. The amorphization of the interior tubes can be introduced in the growth or modification processes. Moreover, TEM measurement with high dose may also lead to the inside damage. Our results reveal that the structure of individual MWCNTs can be complex and suggest that electronic structure measurements are an important tool for characterizing carbon nanomaterials.

  15. Measuring inside damage of individual multi-walled carbon nanotubes using scanning transmission X-ray microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jinyin; Bai, Lili; Wang, Jian; Zhao, Guanqi; Sun, Xuhui; Zhong, Jun

    2014-06-01

    The electronic structure of individual multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) has been probed using scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM). Although transmission electron microscope (TEM) images show that the exterior of the MWCNTs are clean and straight; the inside structure of some of the MWCNTs is much less well ordered, as revealed by STXM. The amorphization of the interior tubes can be introduced in the growth or modification processes. Moreover, TEM measurement with high dose may also lead to the inside damage. Our results reveal that the structure of individual MWCNTs can be complex and suggest that electronic structure measurements are an important tool for characterizing carbon nanomaterials.

  16. Melting heat transfer in stagnation point flow of carbon nanotubes towards variable thickness surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Hayat

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This work concentrates on the mathematical modeling for stagnation point flow of nanofluids over an impermeable stretching sheet with variable thickness. Carbon nanotubes [single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs and multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs] as the nanoparticles are utilized. Water and kerosene oil are taken as the base fluids. Heat transfer through melting effect is discussed. Transformation procedure is adapted to obtain the non-linear ordinary differential equations from the fundamental laws of mass, linear momentum and energy. The optimal values of convergence control parameters and corresponding individual and total residual errors for SWCNTs and MWCNTs are computed by means of homotopy analysis method (HAM based BVPh 2.0. Characteristics of different involved parameters on the velocity, temperature, skin friction coefficient and Nusselt number are discussed. Higher velocity profile is observed for wall thickness parameter in case of water carbon nanotubes when compared with the kerosene oil carbon nanotubes.

  17. Comparison of impedimetric detection of DNA hybridization on the various biosensors based on modified glassy carbon electrodes with PANHS and nanomaterials of RGO and MWCNTs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benvidi, Ali; Tezerjani, Marzieh Dehghan; Jahanbani, Shahriar; Mazloum Ardakani, Mohammad; Moshtaghioun, Seyed Mohammad

    2016-01-15

    In this research, we have developed lable free DNA biosensors based on modified glassy carbon electrodes (GCE) with reduced graphene oxide (RGO) and carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) for detection of DNA sequences. This paper compares the detection of BRCA1 5382insC mutation using independent glassy carbon electrodes (GCE) modified with RGO and MWCNTs. A probe (BRCA1 5382insC mutation detection (ssDNA)) was then immobilized on the modified electrodes for a specific time. The immobilization of the probe and its hybridization with the target DNA (Complementary DNA) were performed under optimum conditions using different electrochemical techniques such as cyclic voltammetry (CV) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The proposed biosensors were used for determination of complementary DNA sequences. The non-modified DNA biosensor (1-pyrenebutyric acid-N- hydroxysuccinimide ester (PANHS)/GCE), revealed a linear relationship between ∆Rct and logarithm of the complementary target DNA concentration ranging from 1.0×10(-16)molL(-1) to 1.0×10(-10)mol L(-1) with a correlation coefficient of 0.992, for DNA biosensors modified with multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and reduced graphene oxide (RGO) wider linear range and lower detection limit were obtained. For ssDNA/PANHS/MWCNTs/GCE a linear range 1.0×10(-17)mol L(-1)-1.0×10(-10)mol L(-1) with a correlation coefficient of 0.993 and for ssDNA/PANHS/RGO/GCE a linear range from 1.0×10(-18)mol L(-1) to 1.0×10(-10)mol L(-1) with a correlation coefficient of 0.985 were obtained. In addition, the mentioned biosensors were satisfactorily applied for discriminating of complementary sequences from noncomplementary sequences, so the mentioned biosensors can be used for the detection of BRCA1-associated breast cancer.

  18. Purification of Carbon Nanotubes Synthesized by Catalytic Decomposition of Methane using Bimetallic Fe-Co Catalysts Supported on MgO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guan, Beh Hoe; Ramli, Irmawati [Advanced Materials and Nanotechnology Laboratory, Institute of Advanced Technology, Universiti Putra Malaysia 43400 UPM Serdang, Selangor (Malaysia); Yahya, Noorhana [Fundamental and Applied Science Department Universiti Teknologi Petronas, Bandar Seri Iskandar, 31750 Tronoh, Perak (Malaysia); Pah, Lim Kean, E-mail: irmawati@science.upm.edu.my [Physics department, Faculty of Science, Universiti Putra Malaysia 43400 UPM Serdang, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2011-02-15

    This work reports the synthesis of carbon nanotubes by catalytic decomposition of methane using bimetallic Fe-Co catalysts supported on MgO. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) results show the as-prepared carbon nanotubes are multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) with diameter in the range of 15nm to 45nm. Purification of as-prepared MWCNTs was carried out by acid and heat treatment method. EDX results show the Fe, Co and MgO catalysts were successfully removed by refluxing the as-prepared MWCNTs in 3M H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}.

  19. Purification of Carbon Nanotubes Synthesized by Catalytic Decomposition of Methane using Bimetallic Fe-Co Catalysts Supported on MgO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Beh Hoe; Ramli, Irmawati; Yahya, Noorhana; Kean Pah, Lim

    2011-02-01

    This work reports the synthesis of carbon nanotubes by catalytic decomposition of methane using bimetallic Fe-Co catalysts supported on MgO. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) results show the as-prepared carbon nanotubes are multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) with diameter in the range of 15nm to 45nm. Purification of as-prepared MWCNTs was carried out by acid and heat treatment method. EDX results show the Fe, Co and MgO catalysts were successfully removed by refluxing the as-prepared MWCNTs in 3M H2SO4.

  20. Carbon nanotube solar cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colin Klinger

    Full Text Available We present proof-of-concept all-carbon solar cells. They are made of a photoactive side of predominantly semiconducting nanotubes for photoconversion and a counter electrode made of a natural mixture of carbon nanotubes or graphite, connected by a liquid electrolyte through a redox reaction. The cells do not require rare source materials such as In or Pt, nor high-grade semiconductor processing equipment, do not rely on dye for photoconversion and therefore do not bleach, and are easy to fabricate using a spray-paint technique. We observe that cells with a lower concentration of carbon nanotubes on the active semiconducting electrode perform better than cells with a higher concentration of nanotubes. This effect is contrary to the expectation that a larger number of nanotubes would lead to more photoconversion and therefore more power generation. We attribute this to the presence of metallic nanotubes that provide a short for photo-excited electrons, bypassing the load. We demonstrate optimization strategies that improve cell efficiency by orders of magnitude. Once it is possible to make semiconducting-only carbon nanotube films, that may provide the greatest efficiency improvement.

  1. Ozone sensing based on palladium decorated carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colindres, Selene Capula; Aguir, Khalifa; Cervantes Sodi, Felipe; Vargas, Luis Villa; Salazar, José Moncayo; Febles, Vicente Garibay

    2014-04-14

    Multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were easily and efficiently decorated with Pd nanoparticles through a vapor-phase impregnation-decomposition method starting from palladium acetylacetonates. The sensor device consisted on a film of sensitive material (MWCNTs-Pd) deposited by drop coating on platinum interdigitated electrodes on a SiO₂ substrate. The sensor exhibited a resistance change to ozone (O₃) with a response time of 60 s at different temperatures and the capability of detecting concentrations up to 20 ppb. The sensor shows the best response when exposed to O3 at 120 °C. The device shows a very reproducible sensor performance, with high repeatability, full recovery and efficient response.

  2. Palladium-nanoparticle-coated carbon nanotube gas sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Maeum; Jung, Daewoong; Lee, Gil S.

    2014-08-01

    Flexible hydrogen gas sensors were fabricated using multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) decorated with Pd nanoparticles for the detection of H2 gas at room temperature. A comparative gas-sensing study was carried out on both the Pd-nanoparticles-decorated and undecorated MWCNT sheets in order to examine the effect of Pd nanoparticles on the gas-sensing performances at room temperature. Experimental results showed that the MWCNTs/Pd sensor exhibited fast response and recovery as well as high sensitivity compared with the pure MWCNT sensor. The improved sensing properties of this sensor were attributed to the spillover effect of Pd nanoparticles and the highly conductive MWCNT sheet.

  3. Amine-functionalized low-cost industrial grade multi-walled carbon nanotubes for the capture of carbon dioxide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qing; Liu; Yao; Shi; Shudong; Zheng; Liqi; Ning; Qing; Ye; Mengna; Tao; Yi; He

    2014-01-01

    Industrial grade multi-walled carbon nanotubes(IG-MWCNTs) are a low-cost substitute for commercially purified multi-walled carbon nanotubes(P-MWCNTs). In this work, IG-MWCNTs were functionalized with tetraethylenepentamine(TEPA) for CO2capture. The TEPA impregnated IG-MWCNTs were characterized with various experimental methods including N2adsorption/desorption isotherms, elemental analysis, X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and thermogravimetric analysis. Both the adsorption isotherms of IGMWCNTs-n and the isosteric heats of different adsorption capacities were obtained from experiments. TEPA impregnated IG-MWCNTs were also shown to have high CO2adsorption capacity comparable to that of TEPA impregnated P-MWCNTs. The adsorption capacity of IG-MWCNTs based adsorbents was in the range of 2.145 to 3.088 mmol/g, depending on adsorption temperatures. Having the advantages of low-cost and high adsorption capacity, TEPA impregnated IG-MWCNTs seem to be a promising adsorbent for CO2capture from flue gas.

  4. Inkjet Printing of Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan P. Tortorich

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available In an attempt to give a brief introduction to carbon nanotube inkjet printing, this review paper discusses the issues that come along with preparing and printing carbon nanotube ink. Carbon nanotube inkjet printing is relatively new, but it has great potential for broad applications in flexible and printable electronics, transparent electrodes, electronic sensors, and so on due to its low cost and the extraordinary properties of carbon nanotubes. In addition to the formulation of carbon nanotube ink and its printing technologies, recent progress and achievements of carbon nanotube inkjet printing are reviewed in detail with brief discussion on the future outlook of the technology.

  5. Pharmacia and biological functionalities of nutrient broth dispersed multi-walled carbon nanotubes:A novel drug delivery system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    A new drug delivery system was developed using the interaction of nutrient broth treated multi-walled carbon nanotubes(NBT-MWCNTs) and cefotaxime sodium(CTX) as a model.Investigated factors of the drug delivery system include dispersion effect,biocompatibility of NBT-MWCNTs,pharmacodynamic effect and delivery efficiency in vitro.It was found that MWCNTs can be well dispersed in the nutrient broth and stable at least for one week at 4 °C.The formed NBT-MWCNTs suspension scarcely exhibits toxicity to E.coli at concentrations lower than 10.24 μg/mL,but displays enhanced pharmacodynamic effect of CTX via its bridge effect and targeted transport.Compared with general acid treated MWCNTs(AT-MWCNTs),our present NBT-MWCNTs show good biocompatibility,enhanced pharmacodynamic effect,and high delivery efficiency.

  6. Preparation and properties of multi-wall carbon nanotube/SiC composites by aqueous tape casting

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    L(U) ZhiHui; JIANG DongLiang; ZHANG JingXian; LIN QingLing

    2009-01-01

    MWCNTS/SiC composites were fabricated by aqueous tape casting. High solid content (50 vol%) SiC slurries with sintering additives and multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) as reinforcements were prepared using Tetramethylammonium hydroxide as the dispersant. The stability of MWCNTs/SiC slur-ries was studied and characterized in terms of zeta potential and rheology measurements. The relative density of the composite was about 98% after hot-pressing at 1850℃ (at 25 MPa in Ar for 30 min). The hardness of the composites decreased with the increase in MWCNTs content, The flexural strength and was 0,25 wt%. Further increase in MWCNTs content to 0.50 wt% did not lead to the increase in me-chanical properties. Most of MWCNTs were found to be located at SiC grain boundaries and the pull out of the MWCNTs was observed.

  7. Sorption of peat humic acids to multi-walled carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xilong; Shu, Liang; Wang, Yanqi; Xu, Bingbing; Bai, Yingchen; Tao, Shu; Xing, Baoshan

    2011-11-01

    Sorption of humic acids (HAs) from a peat soil by multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) was examined in this work. Sorption rate of HAs to MWCNTs was dominantly controlled by their diffusion from liquid-MWCNT boundary to MWCNT surfaces. Size exclusion chromatography analysis did not detect preferential sorption of HA fractions to MWCNTs at equilibrium, whereas the components with lower molecular weight in some HA fractions (e.g., HA1) would more preferentially be sorbed to MWCNTs at the initial sorption stage. Equilibrium sorption intensity of HAs by MWCNTs was dependent on their surface area and a sum of meso- and macropore volume. The surface area and sum of meso- and macroporosity-normalized sorption coefficient (K(d)) values of a given HA by MWCNTs increased with increasing outer diameter of MWCNTs, because MWCNTs with larger outer diameter were more strongly dispersed by HAs thereby making more sorption sites exposed for HA sorption. Van der Waals interaction between the alkyl components rather than the aromatic ones of HAs with MWCNTs was likely the key driving force for their sorption. This study highlights the sorption rate-controlling step of HAs from a same source to MWCNTs and the major factors affecting their sorption intensity at equilibrium.

  8. Spectroscopic studies on sidewall carboxylic acid functionalization of multi-walled carbon nanotubes with valine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deborah, M.; Jawahar, A.; Mathavan, T.; Dhas, M. Kumara; Benial, A. Milton Franklin

    2015-03-01

    The valine functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTS) were prepared and characterized by using XRD, UV-Vis, FT-IR, EPR, SEM, and EDX, spectroscopic techniques. The enhanced XRD peak (0 0 2) intensity was observed for valine functionalized MWCNTs compared with oxidized MWCNTs, which is likely due to sample purification by acid washing. UV-Vis study shows the formation of valine functionalized MWCNTs. FT-IR study confirms the presence of functional groups of oxidized MWCNTs and valine functionalized MWCNTs. The ESR line shape analysis indicates that the observed EPR line shape is a Gaussian line shape. The g-values indicate that the systems are isotropic in nature. The morphology study was carried out for oxidized MWCNTs and valine functionalized MWCNTs by using SEM. The EDX spectra revealed that the high purity of oxidized MWCNTs and valine functionalized MWCNTs. The functionalization has been chosen because, functionalization of CNTs with amino acids makes them soluble and biocompatible. Thus, they have potential applications in the field of biosensors and targeted drug delivery.

  9. Spectroscopic studies on sidewall carboxylic acid functionalization of multi-walled carbon nanotubes with valine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deborah, M; Jawahar, A; Mathavan, T; Dhas, M Kumara; Benial, A Milton Franklin

    2015-03-15

    The valine functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTS) were prepared and characterized by using XRD, UV-Vis, FT-IR, EPR, SEM, and EDX, spectroscopic techniques. The enhanced XRD peak (002) intensity was observed for valine functionalized MWCNTs compared with oxidized MWCNTs, which is likely due to sample purification by acid washing. UV-Vis study shows the formation of valine functionalized MWCNTs. FT-IR study confirms the presence of functional groups of oxidized MWCNTs and valine functionalized MWCNTs. The ESR line shape analysis indicates that the observed EPR line shape is a Gaussian line shape. The g-values indicate that the systems are isotropic in nature. The morphology study was carried out for oxidized MWCNTs and valine functionalized MWCNTs by using SEM. The EDX spectra revealed that the high purity of oxidized MWCNTs and valine functionalized MWCNTs. The functionalization has been chosen because, functionalization of CNTs with amino acids makes them soluble and biocompatible. Thus, they have potential applications in the field of biosensors and targeted drug delivery.

  10. Structure and Properties of Self-assembled Narural Rubber/Multi-walled Carbon Nanotube Composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PENG Zheng; FENG Chunfang; LUO Yongyue; YI Zhifeng; KONG Lingxue

    2011-01-01

    Natural rubber (NR)/multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNTs) composites were prepared by combining self-assembly and latex compounding techniques.The acid-treated MWCNTs (H2SO4∶HNO3=3∶1,volume ratio) were self-assembled with poly (diallyldimethylammonium chloride) (PDDA) through electrostatic adhesion.In the second assembling,NR/MWCNTs composites were developed by mixing MWCNTs/PDDA solution with NR latex.The results show that MWCNTs are homogenously distributed throughout the NR matrix as single tube and present a great interfacial adhesion with NR phase when MWCNTs contents are less than 3 wt%.Moreover,the addition of the MWCNTs brings about the remarkable enhancement in tensile strength and crosslink density compared with the NR host,and the data peak at 2 wt% MWCNTs loadings.When more MWCNTs are loaded,aggregations of MWCNTs are gradually generated,and the tensile strength and crosslink both decrease to a certain extent.

  11. Incorporation of Functionalized Multiwall Carbon Nanotubes into a Polyurethane Matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Michálek

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Functionalized and raw multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs were investigated colloid-chemically in order to study the role of polar versus nonpolar interaction with a polyurethane (PU matrix. Both kinds of MWCNTs were dispersed by ultrasonication in the presence of a surfactant (sodium dodecyl sulphate in aqueous solution. Functional groups on the nanotube surface were characterized by infrared spectroscopy and by the ζ-potential in aqueous suspension. Such suspensions were added to waterborne PU dispersions, drop-cast on glass substrates and cured. The percolation threshold for electrical conductivity with polar (functionalized MWCNTs was reached at 0.24 wt.%, whereas at concentrations as high as 2 wt.%, PU films with nonpolar MWCNTs stayed below the percolation threshold. With an addition of 0.4 wt.% polar MWCNTs, the electrical conductivity increased to >10−6 S/cm in the cured coating layer. These results are interpreted with respect to the chemical nature of the PU matrix.

  12. An approach to a multi walled carbon nanotube based mass sensor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mateiu, Ramona Valentina; Davis, Zachary James; Madsen, Dorte Nørgaard;

    2004-01-01

    We propose an approach to a nanoscale mass sensor based on a gold electrode structure, on which a multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) bridge can be placed and soldered. The structure is comprised of three electrodes with a width of 2 or 4 mum. Two outer electrodes with a length of 10 or 15 mum...... the bridging nanotube. The free standing MWCNTs were fabricated by chemical vapour deposition of Fe(H) phthalocyanine. A nanomanipulator with an x - y - z translation stage was used for placing the MWCNTs across the source-drain electrodes. The nanotubes were soldered onto the substrate by electron beam...

  13. Effect of oxide nanoparticles on structural properties of multiwalled carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhall, Shivani; Jaggi, Neena

    2016-03-01

    A simple chemical precipitation route is reported to partially decorate mutliwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) with oxide nanoparticles in the present study. X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy and Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) are used to investigate the structural properties of MWCNTs composite with nickel, cuprous, zinc and tin oxides nanoparticles. Raman analysis confirms that, ZnO nanoparticles attached nanotubes show more ordering of graphene layers as compared to the others because of uniform dispersion of nanoparticles. It is investigated that, adopted route proved helpful to improve the structural properties of the nanotubes.

  14. Enhanced Photovoltaic Performance with Carbon Nanotubes Incorporating into Hole Transport Materials for Perovskite Solar Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Junxia; Li, Jingling; Xu, Xueqing; Xu, Gang; Shen, Honglie

    2016-10-01

    In an attempt to further enhance the photovoltaic performance of perovskite solar cells (PSCs) fabricated by spray deposition under ambient conditions, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are introduced for incorporation into hole transport materials (HTM). The effect of CNT category and length on the efficiency of the perovskite solar cell for incorporation into HTM is investigated. The enhanced photovoltaic performance is achieved in multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) with the shortest length. The efficiency of acid-treated MWCNT-based cells is improved compared to that of purified MWCNTs due to the better dispersibility and the π-π interaction between the -COOH group and spiro-OMeTAD. As the volume ratio of the spiro-OMeTAD and spiro/MWCNTs mixture is 2:2 or 3:1, the highest power conversion efficiency (PCE) of PSCs containing MWCNTs reaches 8.7% with the enhanced short-circuit current density ( J sc) and open-circuit voltage ( V oc).

  15. Occupational nanosafety considerations for carbon nanotubes and carbon nanofibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castranova, Vincent; Schulte, Paul A; Zumwalde, Ralph D

    2013-03-19

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are carbon atoms arranged in a crystalline graphene lattice with a tubular morphology. CNTs exhibit high tensile strength, possess unique electrical properties, are durable, and can be functionalized. These properties allow applications as structural materials, in electronics, as heating elements, in batteries, in the production of stain-resistant fabric, for bone grafting and dental implants, and for targeted drug delivery. Carbon nanofibers (CNFs) are strong, flexible fibers that are currently used to produce composite materials. Agitation can lead to aerosolized CNTs and CNFs, and peak airborne particulate concentrations are associated with workplace activities such as weighing, transferring, mixing, blending, or sonication. Most airborne CNTs or CNFs found in workplaces are loose agglomerates of micrometer diameter. However, due to their low density, they linger in workplace air for a considerable time, and a large fraction of these structures are respirable. In rat and mouse models, pulmonary exposure to single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), or CNFs causes the following pulmonary reactions: acute pulmonary inflammation and injury, rapid and persistent formation of granulomatous lesions at deposition sites of large CNT agglomerates, and rapid and progressive alveolar interstitial fibrosis at deposition sites of more dispersed CNT or CNF structures. Pulmonary exposure to SWCNTs can induce oxidant stress in aortic tissue and increases plaque formation in an atherosclerotic mouse model. Pulmonary exposure to MWCNTs depresses the ability of coronary arterioles to respond to dilators. These cardiovascular effects may result from neurogenic signals from sensory irritant receptors in the lung. Pulmonary exposure to MWCNTs also upregulates mRNA for inflammatory mediators in selected brain regions, and pulmonary exposure to SWCNTs upregulates the baroreceptor reflex. In addition, pulmonary exposure to

  16. Improvement in structural and electrical properties of cuprous oxide-coated multiwalled carbon nanotubes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Shivani Dhall; Neena Jaggi

    2014-10-01

    In the present work, cuprous oxide (Cu2O) nanoparticles are coated on multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) using Fehling’s reaction. The coating of Cu2O nanoparticles on the nanotubes was confirmed by SEM and X-ray diffraction (XRD) spectra. The calculated D/G ratio of Cu2O (using 3% CuSO4 by wt)-coated MWCNTs by Raman spectra is found to decrease to 0.94 as compared to 1.14 for pristine MWCNTs. It shows that the presence of Cu2O nanoparticles on nanotubes decreases the inherent defects present in the form of some pentagons/heptagons in the honeycomb hexagonal carbon atoms in the structure of graphene sheets of MWCNTs and increases the crystalline nature of MWCNTs, which is also confirmed by the XRD peaks. Whereas the value of D/G ratio increases to 1.39 for sample 2 (using 5% CuSO4 by wt), which represents the structural deformation. Moreover, the electrical conductivity of MWCNTs was increased by 3 times after coating the nanotubes with Cu2O (using 3% CuSO4 by wt).

  17. Significant decrease in thermal conductivity of multi-walled carbon nanotube induced by inter-wall van der Waals interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xue; Zhou, Wu-Xing; Chen, Xue-Kun; Liu, Yue-Yang; Chen, Ke-Qiu

    2016-05-01

    The thermal transport properties of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were investigated by using non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulation. The results show that the thermal conductivity of MWCNTs decreases significantly comparing to that of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) due to the inter-wall van der Waals interactions. The more interesting is a fact that the thermal conductance of MWCNTs is significantly greater than the thermal conductance summation of each SWCNTs. This is because the thermal conductance of a carbon nanotube protected by an outer tube is much larger than that of one that is not protected. Moreover, we also studied the thermal flux distribution of MWCNTs, and found that the outer tube plays a dominant role in heat energy transfer.

  18. Templated Growth of Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siochik Emilie J. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A method of growing carbon nanotubes uses a synthesized mesoporous si lica template with approximately cylindrical pores being formed there in. The surfaces of the pores are coated with a carbon nanotube precu rsor, and the template with the surfaces of the pores so-coated is th en heated until the carbon nanotube precursor in each pore is convert ed to a carbon nanotube.

  19. Carbon nanotube junctions and devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Postma, H.W.Ch.

    2001-01-01

    In this thesis Postma presents transport experiments performed on individual single-wall carbon nanotubes. Carbon nanotubes are molecules entirely made of carbon atoms. The electronic properties are determined by the exact symmetry of the nanotube lattice, resulting in either metallic or semiconduct

  20. Effective coarse-grained simulations of super-thick multi-walled carbon nanotubes under torsion

    OpenAIRE

    Jian, Zou; Huang, Xu; Arroyo Balaguer, Marino; Zhang, Sulin

    2009-01-01

    Under torsion and beyond the buckling point, multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) develop a periodic wave-like rippling morphology. Here, we show that torsional rippling deformations can be accurately described by a simple sinusoidal shape function. Combining this observation with the geometry optimization, we develop an effective coarse-grained model that reproduces the complex nonlinear mechanical responses of thick MWCNTs under torsion predicted by large-scale atomistic simulations. Furt...

  1. Complexes of carbon nanotubes with oligonucleotides in thin Langmuir-Blodgett films to detect electrochemically hybridization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egorov, A. S.; Egorova, V. P.; Krylova, H. V.; Lipnevich, I. V.; Orekhovskaya, T. I.; Veligura, A. A.; Govorov, M. I.; Shulitsky, B. G.

    2014-10-01

    Self-assembled complexes consisting of thin multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and DNA-oligonucleotides which are able to a cooperative binding to complementary oligonucleotides have been investigated. It was establised a high-performance charge transport in nanostructured Langmuir-Blodgett complexes thin MWCNTs/DNA. A method to electrochemically detect DNA hybridization on the self-organized structures has been proposed.

  2. Biochips Containing Arrays of Carbon-Nanotube Electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jun; Meyyappan, M.; Koehne, Jessica; Cassell, Alan; Chen, Hua

    2008-01-01

    Biochips containing arrays of nanoelectrodes based on multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) are being developed as means of ultrasensitive electrochemical detection of specific deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) and messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) biomarkers for purposes of medical diagnosis and bioenvironmental monitoring. In mass production, these biochips could be relatively inexpensive (hence, disposable). These biochips would be integrated with computer-controlled microfluidic and microelectronic devices in automated hand-held and bench-top instruments that could be used to perform rapid in vitro genetic analyses with simplified preparation of samples. Carbon nanotubes are attractive for use as nanoelectrodes for detection of biomolecules because of their nanoscale dimensions and their chemical properties.

  3. Mechanisms of Multi-walled Carbon Nanotubes-Induced Oxidative Stress and Genotoxicity in Mouse Fibroblast Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alarifi, Saud; Ali, Daoud

    2015-01-01

    The extensive production and wide application of carbon nanotubes have made investigations of its toxic potentials necessary. In the present study, we explored the underlying mechanism through which multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) induce toxicity in mouse fibroblast cells (L929). 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide and neutral red uptake viability assays were used to examine mechanisms of cytotoxicity. Dose and time-dependent cytotoxicity was observed in L929 cells. The MWCNTs significantly increased the generation of reactive oxygen species, lipid peroxidation, superoxide dismutase, and decreased glutathione. It was observed that the MWCNTs induced caspase 3 activity. The highest DNA strand breakage was detected by comet assay at 300 µg/mL of MWCNTs. Thus, the data indicate that MWCNTs induced cytotoxicity and apoptosis in L929 cells via oxidative stress.

  4. Nanoscratch technique for aligning multiwalled carbon nanotubes synthesized by the arc discharge method in open air

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A Joseph Berkmans; M Jagannatham; Prathap Haridoss

    2015-08-01

    Horizontally aligned and densely packed multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were synthesized in an open air, without the need for a controlled atmosphere, using a rotating cathode arc discharge method with the help of a metal scraper. The physical force exerted by the scraper results in in-situ alignment of MWCNTs along the direction of scrape marks. This strategy, which enables the alignment of nanotubes in a controlled fashion to any length and direction of interest, was examined to determine the force required to align a nanotube. A model is developed to understand the alignment process. Using the nanoscratch technique to mimic this strategy, and incorporating the data obtained from the nanoscratch technique into the model developed, the minimum force required to align a MWCNT, as well as the energy required to align a gram of nanotubes, has been estimated. The method demonstrated represents an economical approach for large-scale synthesis of aligned MWCNTs at low costs.

  5. Influence of the electronic distribution of polymers in the spatial conformation of polymer grafted carbon nanotube composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garate, H. [Universidad de Buenos Aires, FCEyN, Depto. de Fisica IFIBA-CONICET LPyMC, Pabellon I, Buenos Aires 1428 (Argentina); Universidad de Buenos Aires, FCEyN, Depto. de Quimica Organica, (CIHIDECAR-CONICET) Buenos Aires 1428 (Argentina); De Falco, A. [Universidad de Buenos Aires, FCEyN, Depto. de Fisica IFIBA-CONICET LPyMC, Pabellon I, Buenos Aires 1428 (Argentina); Moreno, M.S. [Centro Atomico Bariloche, 8400 S.C. de Bariloche (Argentina); Fascio, M.L. [Universidad de Buenos Aires, FCEyN, Depto. de Quimica Organica, (CIHIDECAR-CONICET) Buenos Aires 1428 (Argentina); Goyanes, S. [Universidad de Buenos Aires, FCEyN, Depto. de Fisica IFIBA-CONICET LPyMC, Pabellon I, Buenos Aires 1428 (Argentina); Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas (CONICET) (Argentina); D' Accorso, N.B., E-mail: norma@qo.fcen.uba.ar [Universidad de Buenos Aires, FCEyN, Depto. de Quimica Organica, (CIHIDECAR-CONICET) Buenos Aires 1428 (Argentina); Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas (CONICET) (Argentina)

    2012-08-15

    In this work we report the covalent functionalization of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) with polyacrylonitrile (PAN) and polyvinylpyridine (PVP) by the graft from method. Differences in the electronic distribution of both polymers resulted in different interaction between polymers and the nanotubes. It was found that PVP chains wrapped the nanotubes while nanotubes functionalized with PAN presented PAN chains forming amorphous entanglements on the nanoscale linked to the MWCNTs. Differences in the conformation between both polymers and the MWCNTs can be attributed to interactions between the aromatic groups in PVP and the MWCNTs through {pi}-{pi} stacking. The absence of aromatic groups in the case of the PAN chains favours the interaction between them. The functionalization efficiency was characterized using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and UV-vis spectroscopy, while morphological changes were characterized by high resolution transmission electron microscopy.

  6. Electrical properties of carbon nanotubes in flowing vapor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIAO Peng; WANG Xin-qiang; ZHANG Yun-huai

    2006-01-01

    Electric potentials were generated from carbon nanotubes immersed in flowing vapors.The nanomaterials used in this study were multiwall carbon nanotubes(MWCNTs) and silver nanopowders.These nanomaterials were dispersed and densely packed on a substrate and immersed in flowing vapors generated from solution such as water,ethanol and KCl.The potentials generated from these samples were measured by a voltmeter.Experimental results showed that the electric potentials were produced at the surface of the MWCNT samlpes,and strongly dependent on the pretreatment of MWCNT and properties of the flowing vapors.The mechanism of vapor-flow induced potentials may be ascribed to ions in the flowing vapors.This property of MWCNTs can advantage their application to nanoscale sensors,detectors and power cells.

  7. Carbon nanotubes for supercapacitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Hui; Li, Jianyi; Feng, Yuanping

    2010-01-05

    As an electrical energy storage device, supercapacitor finds attractive applications in consumer electronic products and alternative power source due to its higher energy density, fast discharge/charge time, low level of heating, safety, long-term operation stability, and no disposable parts. This work reviews the recent development of supercapacitor based on carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and their composites. The purpose is to give a comprehensive understanding of the advantages and disadvantages of carbon nanotubes-related supercapacitor materials and to find ways for the improvement in the performance of supercapacitor. We first discussed the effects of physical and chemical properties of pure carbon nanotubes, including size, purity, defect, shape, functionalization, and annealing, on the supercapacitance. The composites, including CNTs/oxide and CNTs/polymer, were further discussed to enhance the supercapacitance and keep the stability of the supercapacitor by optimally engineering the composition, particle size, and coverage.

  8. Carbon Nanotubes for Supercapacitor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Jianyi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract As an electrical energy storage device, supercapacitor finds attractive applications in consumer electronic products and alternative power source due to its higher energy density, fast discharge/charge time, low level of heating, safety, long-term operation stability, and no disposable parts. This work reviews the recent development of supercapacitor based on carbon nanotubes (CNTs and their composites. The purpose is to give a comprehensive understanding of the advantages and disadvantages of carbon nanotubes-related supercapacitor materials and to find ways for the improvement in the performance of supercapacitor. We first discussed the effects of physical and chemical properties of pure carbon nanotubes, including size, purity, defect, shape, functionalization, and annealing, on the supercapacitance. The composites, including CNTs/oxide and CNTs/polymer, were further discussed to enhance the supercapacitance and keep the stability of the supercapacitor by optimally engineering the composition, particle size, and coverage.

  9. Photothermal effects of multi-walled carbon nanotubes on the viability of BT-474 cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chou, Hung-Tao [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Tsing Hua University, No. 101, Sec. 2 Kuang-Fu Rd., Hsin-chu 30013, Taiwan (China); Wang, Tsung-Pao [Department of Medical Science, National Tsing Hua University, No. 101, Sec. 2 Kuang-Fu Rd., Hsin-chu 30013, Taiwan (China); Lee, Chi-Young [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Tsing Hua University, No. 101, Sec. 2 Kuang-Fu Rd., Hsin-chu 30013, Taiwan (China); Tai, Nyan-Hwa, E-mail: nhtai@mx.nthu.edu.tw [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Tsing Hua University, No. 101, Sec. 2 Kuang-Fu Rd., Hsin-chu 30013, Taiwan (China); Chang, Hwan-You, E-mail: hychang@mx.nthu.edu.tw [Department of Medical Science, National Tsing Hua University, No. 101, Sec. 2 Kuang-Fu Rd., Hsin-chu 30013, Taiwan (China)

    2013-03-01

    Functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (f-MWCNTs) were conjugated to an antibody of BT-474 cancer cells (f-MWCNTs-ab), and the photothermal effect of the f-MWCNTs-ab for BT-474 cancer cell destruction was demonstrated. After near-infrared irradiation, the f-MWCNTs-ab were more capable of killing cancer cells and possessed higher cell specificity than f-MWCNTs. Quantitative results showed that the viability of the cancer cells was affected by the concentration of the f-MWCNTs-ab solution, irradiation time, and settling time after irradiation. The membrane impermeable fluorescence dye ethidium bromide was used to detect cell viability after near-infrared irradiation, and the results agreed with those obtained from the Alamar Blue cell viability assay. The EtBr fluorescence results suggest that the cell membrane, attached to f-MWCNTs-ab, was damaged after irradiation, which led to cell death and necrosis. Using confocal microscopy, a few f-MWCNTs-ab were detected in the cell, indicating the endocytosis effect. The results not only explain the improved efficiency of thermotherapy but also indicate that necrosis may result from protein denaturation attributing to the heated f-MWCNTs-ab in the cell. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer f-MWCNTs conjugated with anti-HER2 antibody by chemical method. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Kill breast cancer cells by using low dose f-MWCNTs-ab due to photothermal effect. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Use EtBr fluorescent to prove that the cell membrane was broken by heated f-MWCNTs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Few f-MWCNTs-ab were detected in the cell indicating the endocytosis effect. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Necrosis may result from protein denaturation due to contact with the heated CNTs.

  10. The hepatotoxicity of multi-walled carbon nanotubes in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ji Zongfei; Zhang Danying; Shen Xizhong; Dong Ling [Department of Gastroenterology, Zhongshan Hospital, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China); Li Ling; Deng Xiaoyong; Wu Minhong; Liu Yuanfang, E-mail: xydeng@shu.edu.c, E-mail: dltalk@tom.co [Institute of Nanochemistry and Nanobiology, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200444 (China)

    2009-11-04

    The hepatotoxicity of two types of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), acid-oxidized MWCNTs (O-MWCNTs) and Tween-80-dispersed MWCNTs (T-MWCNTs), were investigated with Kunming mice exposed to 10 and 60 mg kg{sup -1} by intravenous injection for 15 and 60 d. Compared with the PBS group, the body-weight gain of the mice decreased and the level of total bilirubin and aspartate aminotransferase increased in the MWCNT-exposed group with a significant dose-effect relationship, while tumor necrosis factor alpha level did not show significant statistical change within 60 d. Spotty necrosis, inflammatory cell infiltration in portal region, hepatocyte mitochondria swelling and lysis were observed with a significant dose-effect relationship in the MWCNT groups. Liver damage of the T-MWCNT group was more severe than that of the O-MWCNT group according to the Roenigk classification system. Furthermore, T-MWCNTs induce slight liver oxidative damage in mice at 15 d, which was recovered at 60 d. Part of the gene expressions of mouse liver in the MWCNT groups changed compared to the PBS group, including GPCRs (G protein-coupled receptors), cholesterol biosynthesis, metabolism by cytochrome P450, natural-killer-cell-mediated cytotoxicity, TNF- {alpha}, NF-{kappa}B signaling pathway, etc. In the P450 pathway, the gene expressions of Gsta2 (down-regulated), Cyp2B19 (up-regulated) and Cyp2C50 (down-regulated) had significant changes in the MWCNT groups. These results show that a high dose of T-MWCNTs can induce hepatic toxicity in mice while O-MWCNTs seem to have less toxicity.

  11. The hepatotoxicity of multi-walled carbon nanotubes in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Zongfei; Zhang, Danying; Li, Ling; Shen, Xizhong; Deng, Xiaoyong; Dong, Ling; Wu, Minhong; Liu, Yuanfang

    2009-11-01

    The hepatotoxicity of two types of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), acid-oxidized MWCNTs (O-MWCNTs) and Tween-80-dispersed MWCNTs (T-MWCNTs), were investigated with Kunming mice exposed to 10 and 60 mg kg-1 by intravenous injection for 15 and 60 d. Compared with the PBS group, the body-weight gain of the mice decreased and the level of total bilirubin and aspartate aminotransferase increased in the MWCNT-exposed group with a significant dose-effect relationship, while tumor necrosis factor alpha level did not show significant statistical change within 60 d. Spotty necrosis, inflammatory cell infiltration in portal region, hepatocyte mitochondria swelling and lysis were observed with a significant dose-effect relationship in the MWCNT groups. Liver damage of the T-MWCNT group was more severe than that of the O-MWCNT group according to the Roenigk classification system. Furthermore, T-MWCNTs induce slight liver oxidative damage in mice at 15 d, which was recovered at 60 d. Part of the gene expressions of mouse liver in the MWCNT groups changed compared to the PBS group, including GPCRs (G protein-coupled receptors), cholesterol biosynthesis, metabolism by cytochrome P450, natural-killer-cell-mediated cytotoxicity, TNF- α, NF-κB signaling pathway, etc. In the P450 pathway, the gene expressions of Gsta2 (down-regulated), Cyp2B19 (up-regulated) and Cyp2C50 (down-regulated) had significant changes in the MWCNT groups. These results show that a high dose of T-MWCNTs can induce hepatic toxicity in mice while O-MWCNTs seem to have less toxicity.

  12. Electrical measurement on individual multi-walled carbon nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZOU Xiao-ping; H. ABE; T. SHIMIZU; A. ANDO; H. OKUMOTO; ZHU Shen-ming; ZHOU Hao-shen

    2006-01-01

    The characterization of electrical property of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) on a nanometer scale is essential for their potential application in nano-electronic devices. The MWCNTs were synthesized on Fe2O3/SiO2/Si substrate and Pt plate substrate by simple thermal chemical vapor deposition (STCVD) technique and the electrical measurements of individual MWCNT grown on silicon substrate and Pt plate substrate were performed by home-made 'nano-manipulator',respectively. According to current-voltage curves obtained in the experiments the current density that the MWCNTs can carry is calculated to be about 107 A/cm2,which is much larger than that of normal metals.

  13. Thermal Stability of Zirconia-coated Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Manivannan

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Sol-gel method has been used to coat multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs with zirconia at room temperature and the coated tubes were sintered at high temperature. The samples were characterised by Raman spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction, environmental scanning electron microscope, transmission electron microscopy, and energy-dispersive x-ray analyses. The performance of the coated-MWCNTs was investigated as a function of temperature. The TGA studies indicated that sintering of coated-MWCNTs has improved its oxidation resistance and this improvement is related to the proper selection of sintering temperature.Defence Science Journal, 2010, 60(3, pp.337-342, DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.14429/dsj.60.362

  14. Influence of Plasma Jet Temperature Profiles in Arc Discharge Methods of Carbon Nanotubes Synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grzegorz Raniszewski

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available One of the most common methods of carbon nanotubes (CNTs synthesis is application of an electric-arc plasma. However, the final product in the form of cathode deposit is composed of carbon nanotubes and a variety of carbon impurities. An assay of carbon nanotubes produced in arc discharge systems available on the market shows that commercial cathode deposits contain about 10% CNTs. Given that the quality of the final product depends on carbon–plasma jet parameters, it is possible to increase the yield of the synthesis by plasma jet control. Most of the carbon nanotubes are multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs. It was observed that the addition of catalysts significantly changes the plasma composition, effective ionization potential, the arc channel conductance, and in effect temperature of the arc and carbon elements flux. This paper focuses on the influence of metal components on plasma-jet forming containing carbon nanotubes cathode deposit. The plasma jet temperature control system is presented.

  15. Effective CO2 adsorption on pristine and chemically functionalized MWCNTs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukrullah, Shazia; Mohamed, Norani Muti; Shaharun, Maizatul Shima; Ullah, Sami; Naz, Muhammad Yasin

    2016-11-01

    Carbon dioxide is one of the major greenhouse gases, which directly links to global warming. In this study, the laboratory produced multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were amine-functionalized and tested for their potential as a CO2 adsorbent material. The CVD grown MWCNTs were treated with H2SO4/HNO3 and functionalized with 30% of 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTS). Both the pristine and functionalized MWCNTs were characterized for their surface morphology, chemical composition and functional groups by using FESEM, EDX and FTIR techniques. The acidic and APTS treatment to MWCNTs resulted in unbundling and loosening of the nanotubes from their bundled, agglomerated and entangled forms. Furthermore, oxidation and functionalization also significantly influenced the CO2 adsorption capacity of MWCNTs. The breakthrough curves (adsorption isotherms) revealed that the modified MWCNTs exhibit higher capacity for CO2 adsorption as compared to the pristine MWCNTs. Overall, CO2 uptake by the pristine and modified MWCNTs was found about 0.00025 mol/g and 0.00038 mol/g, respectively.

  16. Facile synthesis of poly(-phenylenediamine)/MWCNT nanocomposites and characterization for investigation of structural effects of carbon nanotubes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Quang Long Pham; Yuvaraj Haldorai; Van Hoa Nguyen; Dirk Tuma; Jae-Jin Shim

    2011-02-01

    Poly(-phenylenediamine) (PPD)/carboxylic acid-functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotubes (-MWCNTs) nanocomposites were prepared by chemical oxidative polymerization using potassium persulfate (K2S2O8) as an oxidant. Field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE–SEM) and field-emission transmission electron microscopy (FE–TEM) showed that a tubular layer of PPD was coated on the surface of carbon nanotubes with a thickness of 10–20 nm. FT–IR analysis provided an evidence for the formation of nanocomposites. The thermal stability of nanocomposites was improved by addition of -MWCNTs as confirmed by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). XRD spectra showed that the crystalline nature of PPD was not affected much by the addition of -MWCNTs. As the content of -MWCNTs was increased, the electrical conductivity of the nanocomposites increased due to the interaction between polymer and nanotubes that enhances electron delocalization.

  17. Dispersion of Multiwall Carbon Nanotubes in Organic Solvents through Hydrothermal Supercritical Condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishnegowda Jagadish

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiwall carbon nanotube (MWCNT composite materials require careful formulation of processing methods to ultimately realize the desired properties. Until now, controlled dispersion of MWCNT remains a challenge, due to strong van der Waals binding energies associated with the MWCNT aggregates. In the present study, an effort has been made to disperse MWCNTs in organic solvents like dichloromethane, ethanol, isopropyl alcohol, and hexane through hydrothermal reaction. Dichloromethane is considered the best solvent for the dispersion of MWCNTs. The characterizations were carried out to find the dispersion design, particle size, and stabilization, which clearly indicate that the desired properties of MWCNTs have been achieved.

  18. Improved thermal conductivity of Ag decorated carbon nanotubes water based nanofluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farbod, Mansoor; Ahangarpour, Ameneh

    2016-12-01

    The effect of Ag decoration of carbon nanotubes on thermal conductivity enhancement of Ag decorated MWCNTs water based nanofluids has been investigated. The pristine and functionalized MWCNTs were decorated with Ag nanoparticles by mass ratios of 1%, 2% and 4% and used to prepare water based nanofluids with 0.1 vol.%. An enhancement of 1-20.4 percent in thermal conductivity was observed. It was found that the decoration of functionalized MWCNTs can increase the thermal conductivity about 0.16-8.02 percent compared to the undecorated ones. The maximum enhancement of 20.4% was measured for the sample containing 4 wt.% Ag at 40 °C.

  19. Evidence for reduced charge recombination in carbon nanotube/perovskite-based active layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bag, Monojit; Renna, Lawrence A.; Jeong, Seung Pyo; Han, Xu; Cutting, Christie L.; Maroudas, Dimitrios; Venkataraman, D.

    2016-10-01

    Using impedance spectroscopy and computation, we show that incorporation of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) in the bulk of the active layer of perovskite-based solar cells reduces charge recombination and increases the open circuit voltage. An ∼87% reduction in recombination was achieved when MWCNTs were introduced in the planar-heterostructure perovskite solar cell containing mixed counterions. The open circuit voltage (Voc) of perovskite/MWCNTs devices was increased by 70 mV, while the short circuit current density (Jsc) and fill factor (FF) remained unchanged.

  20. Magnetic properties of electroless nickel-phosphorus coated multi-walled carbon nanotubes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bridget Ingham

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Nickel-phosphorus (EN deposited multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs were prepared using an electroless platingtechnique. The D.C and A.C magnetic behavior of the composites showed that pre-acid treatment of the MWCNTs prior toelectroless deposition greatly enhanced the magnetic susceptibility at 5 K producing a composite with antiferromagneticcorrelations and a superparamagnetic transition at 65.5 K. Raman scattering analysis suggests that there is no directinteraction of the nickel-phosphorus deposit and the MWCNTs.

  1. Comparison of fetal toxicity of various multi-wall carbon nanotubes in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoko Fujitani

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The fetal toxicities of multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs with various sizes were compared in CD1(ICR mice. MWCNTs were suspended in 2% sodium carboxymethyl cellulose solution in phosphate-buffered saline. On day 9 of gestation, dams were administered a single intraperitoneal dose of MWCNTs (4 mg/kg body weight, while dams in the control group were administered vehicle (10 mL/kg body weight. The rectal temperatures of the dams were monitored 2 h after administaration to asses statuses of the dams. The dams and fetuses were examined on day 18 of gestation. The number of live fetus per dam decreased in some MWCNTs-administered groups. The mean percentages of live fetuses in total implantations in the MWCNTs-administered groups markedly varied from 0% to 95%, and the highest mean percentage of live fetuses in the MWCNTs-administered group was equivalent to that of the control group. The decrease in live fetuses depended on an increased number of early dead fetuses. In the groups with markedly lowered rectal temperature after administration, the fetal loss were evident. The blood levels of interleukin-6 and/or monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 in dam 2 h after administration of MWCNTs markedlyr increased, especially in the goups with significant decrease in live fetuses. These results indicated a relationship between inflammation in the dam, which probabely depended on the particular length of the MWCNTs, and the fetal toxicioty of MWCNTs in mice.

  2. Influence of carbon nanotube length on toxicity to zebrafish embryos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng J

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Jinping Cheng,1,2 Shuk Han Cheng11Department of Biology and Chemistry, City University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong; 2State Key Laboratory of Estuarine and Coastal Research, East China Normal University, Shanghai, ChinaAbstract: There is currently a large difference of opinion in nanotoxicology studies of nanomaterials. There is concern about why some studies have indicated that there is strong toxicity, while others have not. In this study, the length of carbon nanotubes greatly affected their toxicity in zebrafish embryos. Multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs were sonicated in a nitric acid solution for 24 hours and 48 hours. The modified MWCNTs were tested in early developing zebrafish embryo. MWCNTs prepared with the longer sonication time resulted in severe developmental toxicity; however, the shorter sonication time did not induce any obvious toxicity in the tested developing zebrafish embryos. The cellular and molecular changes of the affected zebrafish embryos were studied and the observed phenotypes scored. This study suggests that length plays an important role in the in vivo toxicity of functionalized CNTs. This study will help in furthering the understanding on current differences in toxicity studies of nanomaterials.Keywords: length, carbon nanotubes, sonication, developmental toxicity, zebrafish

  3. An analytical solution for dynamic behavior of multiwall carbon nanotubes subjected to mechanical shock loading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tahani, M.; Abolbashari, M. H. [Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, Mashhad (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Minaei, Gh. Mohajeri [Technical and Vocational University, Neyshabur (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Talebian, S. T. [Islamic Azad University, Neyshabur (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-09-15

    Dynamic behavior and frequency analysis of multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) with finite length are investigated using an analytical method. By applying multiple elastic shells and a linearized model of van der Waals forces, a comprehensive continuum dynamic model of MWCNTs is developed. Also, by utilizing Laplace transform, time histories of MWCNTs subjected to shock lading are obtained. Then by using the fast Fourier transform (FFT), the time responses are transferred to the frequency domain and natural frequencies are found. The accuracy of results is verified by comparing the results of sudden loading with those obtained by numerical methods. Furthermore, an abrupt unloading after ramp loading is simulated, and the dependency of diameter and length on the axial and radial natural frequencies of MWCNTs is examined. Also, by characterizing the longitudinal displacement, the wave propagation velocities are obtained and an explicit expression is found for the axial natural frequencies of MWCNTs subjected to shock loading.

  4. Superior Performance Nanocomposites from Uniformly Dispersed Octadecylamine Functionalized Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Ye

    2015-12-08

    Polyetherimide (PEI) is a widely applied as engineering plastic in the electronics, aerospace, and automotive industries but the disadvantages of extremely low conductivity, atmospheric moisture absorption, and poor fluidity at high temperature limits its application. Herein, commercial multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were modified with a long alkyl chain molecule, octadecylamine (ODA), to produce a uniform dispersion in commercial PEI matrices. Both covalent and noncovalent modification of MWCNTs with ODA, were prepared and compared. Modified MWCNTs were incorporated in PEI matrices to fabricate nanocomposite membranes by a simple casting method. Investigating mechanical properties, thermal stability, and conductivity of the polyetherimide (PEI)/MWCNT composites showed a unique combination of properties, such as high electrical conductivity, high mechanical properties, and high thermal stability at a low content of 1.0 wt % loading of ODA modified MWCNTs. Moreover, electrical resistivity decreased around 10 orders of magnitude with only 0.5 wt % of modified MWCNTs.

  5. MODIFICATION OF MULTI-WALLED CARBON NANOTUBES WITH POLY(NITRILOETHYLENENITRILOVINYLENE) "GRAFTING TO" THE SURFACE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kun Yuan; Xiao-feng Wang; Xiang-jun Zhou; Wei-chao Ma; Yuan-cheng Zhu; Xin-wen Liu; Jun-yan Zhang

    2009-01-01

    A mild and facile way was used to prepare poly(nitriloethylenenitrilovinylene)-grafted multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs-g-PNENV) nanocomposites via the "grafting to" method. The MWCNTs-g-PNENV nanocomposites are well dispersible in polar solvents such as water, tetrahydrofuran and ethanol. Chemical structure of the resulting product was characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA). FTIR showed that the "grafting to" process belonged to covalent attachment mechanisms. TEM observations indicated that the MWCNTs were coated with a uniform PNENV layer, and the MWCNTs existed as a hard backbone. TGA data also showed that the PNENV shell was successfully grafted to the side wall of MWCNTs.

  6. Rheological and mechanical study of regenerated cellulose/multi-walled carbon nanotube composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Wei; Wang, Shuxia; Liu, Hui; Wu, Jimin; Huang, Min; Ma, Wenjing; Huang, Chaobo

    2016-09-01

    Regenerated cellulose (RC)-based composites reinforced with multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were prepared by a facile casting method. The morphology and microstructure of the fabricated composites were characterized using transmission electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and Raman spectroscopy. Thermogravimetry and derivative thermogravimetric analysis were conducted to investigate the effect of MWCNTs on the thermal behaviors of the RC. The results showed that the introduction of MWCNTs enhanced the thermal stability of the RC. Moreover, the effect of the dispersion state of MWCNTs in microcrystalline cellulose/ZnCl2 solutions with varying MWCNT loadings was studied by rheological tests. The mechanical properties of composite films were remarkably improved compared to those of pure RC film. Specifically, the composite film containing 3 wt% of MWCNTs exhibits a 123% enhancement in tensile strength and a 163% enhancement in the Young’s modulus compared with the pure RC film.

  7. Catalytic effect of carbon nanotubes on polymerization of cyanate ester resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Kinetic peculiarities of polycyclotrimerization process of dicyanate ester of bisphenol A (DCBA in the presence of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs have been investigated using Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR spectroscopy technique. It has been found that even very small amounts of MWCNTs (0.01–0.1 wt% catalyze the reaction of polycyclotrimerization of DCBA leading to formation of polycyanurate network (PCN/MWCNTs nanocomposite. However, some decrease in final degree of conversion for nanocomposites compared to the neat PCN within the temperature/time schedule used was observed. The kinetic rate constants increased with addition of MWCNTs and energies of activation were found to be significantly decreased even at low contents of MWCNTs.

  8. Improvement in characteristics of natural rubber nanocomposite by surface modification of multi-walled carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Kenji; Noguchi, Toru; Ueki, Hiroyuki; Niihara, Ken-ichi; Sugiura, Tomoyoshi; Inukai, Shigeki; Fujishige, Masatsugu

    2015-05-01

    We aim to develop high-level applications of NR through the innovative use of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) to improve reinforcing performance and thermal resistance. In this study, we examined the structures and characteristics of composite materials in which NR was the matrix and MWCNTs were the fillers. We studied the properties of composites containing surface-activated MWCNTs with three different diameters. The results show that the reinforcing performance improves as MWCNT diameter decreases, while thermal resistance improves as we decrease the heat-treatment temperature. The latter occurs because adherence between MWCNTs and NR becomes stronger at lower heat-treatment temperatures. We also found that for practical applications, we need to control active sites on MWCNTs to balance adhesion against thermal resistance.

  9. Poly(vinyl chloride-grafted multi-walled carbon nanotubes via Friedel-Crafts alkylation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available A novel approach was developed for the surface modification of the multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs with high percentage of grafting (PG% by the grafting of polymer via the Friedel-Crafts alkylation. The graft reaction conditions, such as the amount of catalyst added, the reaction temperature, and the reaction time were optimized for the Friedel-Crafts alkylation of the MWCNTs with poly(vinyl chloride (PVC with anhydrous aluminum chloride (AlCl3 as catalyst in chloroform (CHCl3. The Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR, Raman, and thermogravimetric (TGA analysis showed that PVC had been successfully grafted onto MWCNTs both at the ends and on the sidewalls by the proposed Friedel-Crafts alkylation. The PVC grafted MWCNTs (PVC-MWCNTs could be dispersed well in organic solvent and the dispersion was more stable.

  10. Simultaneous detection of ascorbic acid, dopamine, uric acid and tryptophan with Azure A-interlinked multi-walled carbon nanotube/gold nanoparticles composite modified electrode

    OpenAIRE

    Hayati Filik; Asiye Aslıhan Avan; Sevda Aydar

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, multi-walled carbon nanotube/Azure A/gold nanoparticle composites (Nafion/AuNPs/AzA/MWCNTs) were prepared by binding gold nanoparticles to the surfaces of Azure A-coated carbon nanotubes. Nafion/AuNPs/AzA/MWCNTs based electrochemical sensor was fabricated for the simultaneous determination of ascorbic acid, dopamine, uric acid, and tryptophan. Cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy were used to characterize the electrochemical properties of the modified e...

  11. Carbon nanotube filters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, A.; Srivastava, O. N.; Talapatra, S.; Vajtai, R.; Ajayan, P. M.

    2004-09-01

    Over the past decade of nanotube research, a variety of organized nanotube architectures have been fabricated using chemical vapour deposition. The idea of using nanotube structures in separation technology has been proposed, but building macroscopic structures that have controlled geometric shapes, density and dimensions for specific applications still remains a challenge. Here we report the fabrication of freestanding monolithic uniform macroscopic hollow cylinders having radially aligned carbon nanotube walls, with diameters and lengths up to several centimetres. These cylindrical membranes are used as filters to demonstrate their utility in two important settings: the elimination of multiple components of heavy hydrocarbons from petroleum-a crucial step in post-distillation of crude oil-with a single-step filtering process, and the filtration of bacterial contaminants such as Escherichia coli or the nanometre-sized poliovirus (~25 nm) from water. These macro filters can be cleaned for repeated filtration through ultrasonication and autoclaving. The exceptional thermal and mechanical stability of nanotubes, and the high surface area, ease and cost-effective fabrication of the nanotube membranes may allow them to compete with ceramic- and polymer-based separation membranes used commercially.

  12. Carbon nanotubes for microelectronics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Andrew P; Duesberg, Georg S; Seidel, Robert V; Liebau, Maik; Unger, Eugen; Pamler, Werner; Kreupl, Franz; Hoenlein, Wolfgang

    2005-04-01

    Despite all prophecies of its end, silicon-based microelectronics still follows Moore's Law and continues to develop rapidly. However, the inherent physical limits will eventually be reached. Carbon nanotubes offer the potential for further miniaturization as long as it is possible to selectively deposit them with defined properties.

  13. Processing and Characterization of Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes Containing Alumina-Carbon Refractories Prepared by Nanocomposite Powder Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Feng; Li, Nan; Liu, Baikuan; He, Zhongyang

    2016-06-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have often been used as additives to improve the properties of refractories containing carbon. However, it is very difficult to evenly distribute CNTs in the matrix. In order to solve this difficulty, an alumina/multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) (AM) composite powder in which MWCNTs had grown on the surfaces of Al2O3 particles was developed and used in alumina-carbon (Al2O3-C) refractories. The effects of the AM composite powders on the microstructure and properties of the Al2O3-C refractories were studied and compared with the commercial MWCNTs. The nanocomposite powders significantly improved the distribution uniformity of MWCNTs in the Al2O3-C matrix. The densification, fracture properties, thermal shock resistance, and slag corrosion resistance were enhanced due to the well-dispersed MWCNTs. On the contrary, no improvement of the densification, fracture properties, and thermal shock resistance of the refractories was achieved by addition of commercial MWCNTs due to the agglomeration of MWCNTs.

  14. NanoRelease: Pilot interlaboratory comparison of a weathering protocol applied to resilient and labile polymers with and without embedded carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    A major use of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) is as functional fillers embedded in a solid matrix, such as plastics or coatings. Weathering and abrasion of the solid matrix during use can lead to environmental releases of the MWCNTs. Here we focus on a protocol to identif...

  15. Nanomaterial Case Study: A Comparison of Multiwalled Carbon Nanotube and Decabromodiphenyl Ether Flame-Retardant Coatings Applied to Upholstery Textiles (Independent Peer Review Draft)

    Science.gov (United States)

    This Independent Peer Review Draft document presents a case study of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs); it focuses on the specific example of MWCNTs as used in flame-retardant coatings applied to upholstery textiles. This case study is organized around the comprehensive envir...

  16. Structural and surface modifications of carbon nanotubes when submitted to high temperature annealing treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castillejos, E. [Instituto de Catalisis y Petroleoquimica, ICP-CSIC, Campus de Cantoblanco, 28046 Madrid (Spain); Bachiller-Baeza, B. [Instituto de Catalisis y Petroleoquimica, ICP-CSIC, Campus de Cantoblanco, 28046 Madrid (Spain); Unidad Asociada UNED/ICP-CSIC Group for Molecular Design of Heterogeneous Catalysts, Madrid (Spain); Perez-Cadenas, M.; Gallegos-Suarez, E. [Dpto. de Quimica Inorganica y Tecnica, UNED, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Rodriguez-Ramos, I. [Instituto de Catalisis y Petroleoquimica, ICP-CSIC, Campus de Cantoblanco, 28046 Madrid (Spain); Unidad Asociada UNED/ICP-CSIC Group for Molecular Design of Heterogeneous Catalysts, Madrid (Spain); Guerrero-Ruiz, A. [Unidad Asociada UNED/ICP-CSIC Group for Molecular Design of Heterogeneous Catalysts, Madrid (Spain); Dpto. de Quimica Inorganica y Tecnica, UNED, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Tamargo-Martinez, K., E-mail: katia@incar.csic.es [Instituto Nacional del Carbon, INCAR-CSIC, Apartado 73, 33080 Oviedo (Spain); Martinez-Alonso, A.; Tascon, J.M.D. [Instituto Nacional del Carbon, INCAR-CSIC, Apartado 73, 33080 Oviedo (Spain)

    2012-09-25

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), pristine and heat-treated at 2873 K, were comparatively characterized using HRTEM, SEM, nitrogen adsorption, Raman spectroscopy and immersion calorimetry. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Annealing at 2873 K produced removal of amorphous phases, ordering of graphene layers and structural changes inside the cylindrical mesopores. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Immersion enthalpies in organic liquids indicated the existence of specific {pi}-{pi} electronic interactions between aromatic molecules and the surface of heat-treated MWCNTs. - Abstract: Multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were synthesized using a chemical vapour deposition procedure using acetylene as source of carbon, iron pentacarbonyl as catalyst and an inert carrier gas. An aliquot of these MWCNTs was heat-treated at 2873 K under inert atmosphere (Ar). The two carbon nanotube samples where characterized using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), scanning electron microscopy, nitrogen adsorption at 77 K, Raman spectroscopy, and immersion calorimetry in toluene, methanol and methylcyclohexane. HRTEM images confirmed that high-temperature treatment removed amorphous carbon, the graphene layers being better graphitized, and also some structural changes inside the cylindrical mesopores took place. Immersion enthalpies in toluene, in which molecules are present as aromatic functions, indicated the existence of specific {pi}-{pi} electronic interactions between such molecules and the surface of heat-treated MWCNTs.

  17. Nitrogen doping in carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewels, C P; Glerup, M

    2005-09-01

    Nitrogen doping of single and multi-walled carbon nanotubes is of great interest both fundamentally, to explore the effect of dopants on quasi-1D electrical conductors, and for applications such as field emission tips, lithium storage, composites and nanoelectronic devices. We present an extensive review of the current state of the art in nitrogen doping of carbon nanotubes, including synthesis techniques, and comparison with nitrogen doped carbon thin films and azofullerenes. Nitrogen doping significantly alters nanotube morphology, leading to compartmentalised 'bamboo' nanotube structures. We review spectroscopic studies of nitrogen dopants using techniques such as X-ray photoemission spectroscopy, electron energy loss spectroscopy and Raman studies, and associated theoretical models. We discuss the role of nanotube curvature and chirality (notably whether the nanotubes are metallic or semiconducting), and the effect of doping on nanotube surface chemistry. Finally we review the effect of nitrogen on the transport properties of carbon nanotubes, notably its ability to induce negative differential resistance in semiconducting tubes.

  18. Effects of Carbon Nanotube Environmental Dispersion on an Aquatic Invertebrate, Hirudo medicinalis

    OpenAIRE

    Rossana Girardello; Stefano Tasselli; Nicolò Baranzini; Roberto Valvassori; Magda de Eguileor; Annalisa Grimaldi

    2015-01-01

    The recent widespread applications of nanomaterials, because of their properties, opens new scenarios that affect their dispersal in the environment. In particular multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), despite their qualities, seem to be harmful for animals and humans. To evaluate possible toxic effects caused by carbon nanotube environmental dispersion, with regard to aquatic compartment, we proposed as experimental model a freshwater invertebrate: Hirudo medicinalis. In the present study we ...

  19. The Surface Charge and Cellular Processing of Covalently Functionalized Multiwall Carbon Nanotubes Determine Pulmonary Toxicity

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Ruibin; Wang,Xiang; Ji, Zhaoxia; Sun, Bingbing; Zhang, Haiyuan; Chang, Chong Hyun; Lin, Sijie; Meng, Huan; Liao, Yu-Pei; Wang, Meiying; Li, Zongxi; Hwang, Angela; Song, Tze-Bin; Xu, Run; Yang, Yang

    2013-01-01

    Functionalized carbon nanotubes (f-CNTs) are being produced in increased volume because of the ease of dispersion and maintenance of the pristine material physicochemical properties when used in composite materials as well as for other commercial applications. However, the potential adverse effects of f-CNTs have not been quantitatively or systematically explored, and in this study we used a library of covalently functionalized multiwall carbon nanotubes (f-MWCNTs), established from the same ...

  20. Improvement of the LiBH{sub 4} hydrogen desorption by confinement in modified carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Y.T.; Wan, C.B.; Meng, X.H.; Ju, X., E-mail: jux@ustb.edu.cn

    2015-10-05

    Highlights: • The desorption kinetics for LiBH{sub 4} greatly promoted using melt infiltration method. • The LiBH{sub 4} confined in modified MWCNTs shows the best desorption kinetics. • The crystal structure of MWCNTs and SWCNTs is unchanged after ball milling. • Ball milling introduces a great amount of structural defects in the CNTs. • Nano-confinement is dominant on improving the hydrogen desorption of LiBH{sub 4}. - Abstract: The dehydrogenation kinetics of LiBH{sub 4} incorporated within various carbon nanotubes has been studied. It is demonstrated that the desorption kinetics of LiBH{sub 4} could be greatly promoted using a simple melt infiltration method and LiBH{sub 4} confined in modified multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) shows the best desorption kinetics. The structural properties of carbon nanotubes and confined samples are demonstrated by means of transmission electron microscopy, powder X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy. The crystal structure of MWCNTs and single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) are almost unchanged after ball milling. But high energy ball milling leads to a decrease in the average nanotube length and introduces a great amount of local disorder and structural defects in the CNTs, which may provide a considerable kinetic improvement.

  1. Hydroxyapatite reinforced with multi-walled carbon nanotubes and bovine serum albumin for bone substitute applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gholami, Fatemeh; Noor, Ahmad-Fauzi Mohd

    2016-12-01

    The similarity of the chemical composition of HA to the mineral phase of bone and its excellent biocompatibility meets the requirement of materials designed for bone substitute purpose. The application of HA in load bearing devices is limited by its poor mechanical properties. CNTs with outstanding stiffness, strength, combined with their small size and large interfacial area, suggest that they may have great potential as a reinforcing agent for HA. This work aims to develop the Hydroxyapatite/Multi-walled Carbon Nanotubes/Bovine Serum Albumin (HA/MWCNTs/BSA) composites with different types of MWCNTs including hydroxylated and carboxylated MWCNTs (MWCNTs-OH, MWCNTs-COOH), and evaluation of mechanical strength and in vitro cellular response of developed composites. HA powder was mixed with de-ionized water, 15 wt.% BSA, and 0.5 wt.% of different MWCNTs* (> 95%), MWCNTs (> 99.9%), MWCNTs-OH (> 99.9%), MWCNTs-COOH (> 99.9%) to produce composites. Among all developed composites, the HA/MWCNTs-COOH/BSA shows the highest compressive strength (29.57 MPa). The cytotoxic effect of HA/MWCNTs-COOH/BSA with different concentrations (6.25 to 200 µg/ml) was evaluated by MTT assay against normal human colon fibroblast (CCD-18Co cell line). At low concentration, all developed composites were found to be non-cytotoxic when treated to the human fibroblast cells and did not elicit cytotoxic effects on cell proliferation and the highest values of cell viability (283%) for the HA/MWCNTs-COOH/BSA composites obtained; whereas when the concentration was increased, the reduction in cell viability was observed. The novel composites showed favorable cytocompatibility with improved compressive strength which make it applicable to use in range of trabecular bone.

  2. Hydrophilic Modification of Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotube for Building Photonic Crystals with Enhanced Color Visibility and Mechanical Strength

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feihu Li

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Low color visibility and poor mechanical strength of polystyrene (PS photonic crystal films have been the main shortcomings for the potential applications in paints or displays. This paper presents a simple method to fabricate PS/MWCNTs (multi-walled carbon nanotubes composite photonic crystal films with enhanced color visibility and mechanical strength. First, MWCNTs was modified through radical addition reaction by aniline 2,5-double sulfonic acid diazonium salt to generate hydrophilic surface and good water dispersity. Then the MWCNTs dispersion was blended with PS emulsion to form homogeneous PS/MWCNTs emulsion mixtures and fabricate composite films through thermal-assisted method. The obtained films exhibit high color visibility under natural light and improved mechanical strength owing to the light-adsorption property and crosslinking effect of MWCNTs. The utilization of MWCNTs in improving the properties of photonic crystals is significant for various applications, such as in paints and displays.

  3. Effects of polyethyleneimine-mediated functionalization of multi-walled carbon nanotubes on earthworm bioaccumulation and sorption by soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Elijah J; Pinto, Roger A; Zhang, Liwen; Huang, Qingguo; Landrum, Peter F; Weber, Walter J

    2011-04-15

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are often modified for different intended potential applications to enhance their aqueous stability or change properties such as surface charge. Such changes may also profoundly impact their environmental behaviors. Herein, we report the effects of modifying (14)C-labeled multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) with polyetheyleneimine (PEI) surface coatings to render them more stable in solution and to give them positive, negative, or neutral surface charges. These carbon nanotubes were used to test their sorption by soils and uptake and elimination behaviors by earthworms. Sorption results indicate nearly linear sorption isotherms for regular MWCNTs and nonlinear isotherms for modified MWCNTs, indicating that the PEI coatings influenced MWCNT interactions with soils. Nevertheless, there were minimal differences in the sorption results among the different soils for each type of nanotube despite differences in the soil organic carbon and cation exchange capacities. Differences in uptake behaviors by earthworms were not apparent among different types of PEI-MWCNTs and MWCNTs with limited absorption into organism tissues consistently observed. Elimination patterns were well fit with an exponential decay model suggesting that the worms can readily eliminate any accumulated MWCNTs.

  4. Comparisons of adsorbent cost for the removal of zinc (II) from aqueous solution by carbon nanotubes and activated carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Chungsying; Chiu, Huantsung; Bai, Hsunling

    2007-01-01

    The reversibility of Zn2+ sorption onto single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and powdered activated carbon (PAC) was investigated to evaluate their repeated availability performance in water treatment. Under the same conditions, the Zn2+ sorption capacity of SWCNTs and MWCNTs was more than that of PAC and could be maintained after several cycles of water treatment and regeneration. A statistical analysis on the replacement cost of these adsorbents based on the best-fit regression of the measured equilibrium capacity of each water treatment cycle was also conducted. The results revealed that the SWCNTs and MWCNTs could be reused through a large number of water treatment cycles and thus appear cost-effective in spite of their high unit cost at the present time.

  5. The Toxicology of Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donaldson, Ken; Poland, Craig; Duffin, Rodger; Bonner, James

    2012-06-01

    1. Carbon nanotube structure, synthesis and applications C. Singh and W. Song; 2. The aerodynamic behaviour and pulmonary deposition of carbon nanotubes A. Buckley, R. Smith and R Maynard; 3. Utilising the concept of the biologically effective dose to define the particle and fibre hazards of carbon nanotubes K. Donaldson, R. Duffin, F. Murphy and C. Poland; 4. CNT, biopersistence and the fibre paradigm D. Warheit and M. DeLorme; 5. Length-dependent retention of fibres in the pleural space C. Poland, F. Murphy and K. Donaldson; 6. Experimental carcinogenicity of carbon nanotubes in the context of other fibres K. Unfried; 7. Fate and effects of carbon nanotubes following inhalation J. Ryman-Rasmussen, M. Andersen and J. Bonner; 8. Responses to pulmonary exposure to carbon nanotubes V. Castranova and R. Mercer; 9. Genotoxicity of carbon nanotubes R. Schins, C. Albrecht, K. Gerloff and D. van Berlo; 10. Carbon nanotube-cellular interactions; macrophages, epithelial and mesothelial cells V. Stone, M. Boyles, A. Kermanizadeh, J. Varet and H. Johnston; 11. Systemic health effects of carbon nanotubes following inhalation J. McDonald; 12. Dosimetry and metrology of carbon nanotubes L. Tran, L. MacCalman and R. Aitken; Index.

  6. Growth, modification and integration of carbon nanotubes into molecular electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moscatello, Jason P.

    Molecules are the smallest possible elements for electronic devices, with active elements for such devices typically a few Angstroms in footprint area. Owing to the possibility of producing ultra-high density devices, tremendous effort has been invested in producing electronic junctions by using various types of molecules. The major issues for molecular electronics include (1) developing an effective scheme to connect molecules with the present micro- and nano-technology, (2) increasing the lifetime and stabilities of the devices, and (3) increasing their performance in comparison to the state-of-the-art devices. In this work, we attempt to use carbon nanotubes (CNTs) as the interconnecting nanoelectrodes between molecules and microelectrodes. The ultimate goal is to use two individual CNTs to sandwich molecules in a cross-bar configuration while having these CNTs connected with microelectrodes such that the junction displays the electronic character of the molecule chosen. We have successfully developed an effective scheme to connect molecules with CNTs, which is scalable to arrays of molecular electronic devices. To realize this far reaching goal, the following technical topics have been investigated. (1) Synthesis of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) by thermal chemical vapor deposition (T-CVD) and plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) techniques (Chapter 3). We have evaluated the potential use of tubular and bamboo-like MWCNTs grown by T-CVD and PE-CVD in terms of their structural properties. (2) Horizontal dispersion of MWCNTs with and without surfactants, and the integration of MWCNTs to microelectrodes using deposition by dielectrophoresis (DEP) (Chapter 4). We have systematically studied the use of surfactant molecules to disperse and horizontally align MWCNTs on substrates. In addition, DEP is shown to produce impurityfree placement of MWCNTs, forming connections between microelectrodes. We demonstrate the deposition density is tunable by

  7. Preparation, Characterization, and In Vitro and Vivo Antitumor Activity of Oridonin-Conjugated Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes Functionalized with Carboxylic Group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuanjin Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanotubes have shown great potential in tumor therapy. Oridonin (ORI is a poorly water-soluble diterpenoid compound (C20H28O6 used in the treatment of esophageal and hepatic carcinoma for decades. For the purpose of enhancing the antitumor potency and reducing cytotoxicity of ORI, multiwalled carbon nanotubes functionalized with carboxylic group (MWCNTs-COOH were used as ORI carrier. ORI was noncovalently encapsulated into (or onto the functionalized carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs-ORI. The obtained MWCNTs-ORI has been characterized. The ORI loading efficiency in MWCNTs-COOH carrier was studied to be about 82.6% (w/w. In vitro cytotoxicity assay on MWCNTs-ORI gave IC50 of 7.29±0.5 μg/mL and ORI-F gave IC50 of 14.5±1.4 μg/mL. The antitumor effect studies in vivo showed that MWCNTs-ORI improved antitumor activity of ORI in comparison with ORI-F. The tumor inhibition ratio for MWCNTs-ORI (1.68×10-2 g·Kg−1·d−1 was 86.4%, higher than that of ORI-F (1.68×10-2 g·Kg−1·d−1 which was 39.2%. This can greatly improve the pharmaceutical efficiency and reduce potential side effects.

  8. Carbon Nanotube Purification and Functionalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebron, Marisabel; Mintz, Eric; Smalley, Richard E.; Meador, Michael A.

    2003-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes have the potential to significantly enhance the mechanical, thermal, and electrical properties of polymers. However, dispersion of carbon nanotubes in a polymer matrix is hindered by the electrostatic forces that cause them to agglomerate. Chemical modification of the nanotubes is necessary to minimize these electrostatic forces and promote adhesion between the nanotubes and the polymer matrix. In a collaborative research program between Clark Atlanta University, Rice University, and NASA Glenn Research Center several approaches are being explored to chemically modify carbon nanotubes. The results of this research will be presented.

  9. Effects of Adding Multiwall Carbon Nanotubes on Performance of Polyvinyl Acetate and Urea-Formaldehyde Adhesives in Tropical Timber Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Róger Moya

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs functionalized with hydroxyl groups (MWCNTs-OH have been incorporated into polyvinyl acetate (PVAc and urea-formaldehyde (UF adhesives utilized in tropical wood gluing. The Raman spectroscopy, the atomic force microscopy (AFM, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM were used to describe the MWCNTs-OH. The adhesives were evaluated in three concentrations of MWCNTs-OH: 0% (control, 0.05%, and 0.1%. The evaluation included color, the distribution of MWCNTs-OH by TEM and AFM, thermal stability and viscosity of the adhesives, and shear strength (SS of the glue line for nine tropical woods. AFM and TEM confirmed interaction of MWCNTs-OH with adhesives. The viscosity of the PVAc adhesive increases with added MWCNTs-OH. The incorporation of MWCNTs-OH in PVAc and UF resin produces wood adhesives with less brightness, less yellowness, and increased redness. The nanotubes in the adhesive improved the thermal stability of the composites and increased the entropy factor and energy of activation in the kinetic decomposition of the resin. In relation to SS, MWCNTs-OH in any of the two concentrations had no significant effect on SS in dry condition in half of the species studied glued with PVAc adhesive, whereas, for UF-adhesive, the SS and percentage of wood failure improved in most of the 9 species studied.

  10. Production of carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Journet, C.; Bernier, P.

    Carbon nanostructures such as single-walled and multi-walled nanotubes (SWNTs and MWNTs) or graphitic polyhedral nanoparticles can be produced using various methods. Most of them are based on the sublimation of carbon under an inert atmosphere, such as the electric arc discharge process, the laser ablation method, or the solar technique. But chemical methods can also be used to synthesize these kinds of carbon materials: the catalytic decomposition of hydrocarbons, the production by electrolysis, the heat treatment of a polymer, the low temperature solid pyrolysis, or the in situ catalysis.

  11. Electromechanical properties of multi-walled carbon nano-tubes; Proprietes electromecaniques des nanotubes de carbone multiparois

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lefevre, R.

    2005-12-15

    In this PhD thesis, we tackled theoretically and experimentally the problem of designing nano-electromechanical systems (NEMS) based on multi-walled carbon nano-tubes (MWCNTs). Furthermore, we applied our know-how to perform components like switches. We developed a theoretical model to describe the deflection of a suspended MWCNT stressed by an attractive electrostatic force. Our model highlights a scaling law linking up the electrostatic deflection, geometrical, electrical and physical parameters of MWCNTs based NEMS. This result constitutes a practical designing tool because it predicts their electromechanical behaviour on a 'large' range of operational parameters. At the same time, we developed several processes to fabricate nano-structures incorporating a suspended MWCNT electrostatically actuated. Among these different structures, the simplest was used to develop a method for probing electromechanical properties of MWCNTs. Our method is based on atomic force microscopy measurements on a doubly clamped suspended MWCNT electrostatically deflected by a drive voltage. These measurements show clearly for different MWCNTs (different diameter and length) the existence of such scaling law in agreement with the continuum model prediction. From these results, we extracted the Young's modulus of MWCNTs. For diameters smaller than 30 nm it is constant and its average value equals 400 GPa. Above, we observed a strong decrease that could be explained by the entry in a non-linear regime of deformation. Finally, we show the realization of an electromechanical switch based on a suspended MWCNT which presents good switching behaviour. (author)

  12. Simple Method to Synthesize Functionalized Carbon Nanotubes Employing Cobalt Nitrate and Acetone by Using Spray Pyrolysis Deposition Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge A. Gómez

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently alcohols and ketones have been employed to sensitize CNT by CVD. A study has shown the importance of the chemical nature of those carbon precursors on the characteristics of the CNT (carbon nanotubes obtained. In the present work we show the influence of the catalyst employed on the synthesis of functionalized multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs utilizing acetone as carbon source and cobalt nitrate Co(NO32 as catalyst.

  13. Preparation and Characterization of MWCNTs/E44

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan GAO; Zhenjia WANG; Rui WANG; Ji LIANG; Luke WANG

    2006-01-01

    Epoxy resin was modified by multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) with an in situ method. The composite was observed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD), and its abrasive wear resistance and tensile properties were tested. The results show that the function groups found on the surface of MWCNTs helped to improve the resin's crack resistance, and the cracks were found notably reduced in the composite. Although the resin and MWCNTs were bonded physically, the tensile properties and wear resistance of the composite were improved notably when an optimum amount of MWCNTs were filled in Epikote-44 (E44). When 5 wt pct acidified MWCNTs were filled in E44, the elastic modulus, breaking strength and wear resistance of the composite increase to 226.7%, 303.3% and 272.55% (153.29%), respectively.

  14. Optically active substituted polyacetylene@carbon nanotube hybrids: Preparation, characterization and infrared emissivity property study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bu, Xiaohai; Zhou, Yuming, E-mail: ymzhou@seu.edu.cn; Zhang, Tao; Wang, Yongjuan; Zhang, Zewu; He, Man

    2014-08-15

    Optically active substituted polyacetylene@multiwalled carbon nanotubes (SPA@MWCNTs) nanohybrids were fabricated by wrapping helical SPA copolymers onto the surface of modified nanotubes through ester bonding linkage. SPA copolymer based on chiral phenylalanine and serine was pre-polymerized by a rhodium zwitterion catalyst in THF, and evidently proved to possess strong optical activity and adopt a predominately one-handed helical conformation. Various characterizations including Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) demonstrated that the SPA had been covalently grafted onto the nanotubes without destroying their original graphite structure. The wrapped SPA was found to exhibit an enhancement in thermal stability and still maintained considerable optical activity after grafting. The infrared emissivity property of the nanohybrids at 8–14 μm was investigated in addition. The results indicated that the SPA@MWCNTs hybrid matrix could possess a much lower infrared emissivity value (ε=0.707) than raw MWCNTs, which might be due to synergistic effect of the unique helical conformation of optically active SPA and strengthened interfacial interaction between the organic polymers and inorganic nanoparticles. - Graphical abstract: Optically active SPA@MWCNTs nanohybrids with low infrared emissivity. - Highlights: • Synthesis of optically active SPA copolymer derived from serine and phenylalanine. • Preparation and characterization of optically active SPA@MWCNTs nanohybrids. • Application study of the SPA@MWCNTs nanohybrids (ε=0.707) in lowering the infrared emissivity.

  15. Improvement of interaction between pre-dispersed multi-walled carbon nanotubes and unsaturated polyester resin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beg, M. D. H., E-mail: dhbeg@yahoo.com; Moshiul Alam, A. K. M., E-mail: akmmalam@gmail.com; Yunus, R. M. [Universiti Malaysia Pahang, Faculty of Chemical and Natural Resources Engineering (Malaysia); Mina, M. F. [Bangladesh University of Engineering and Technology, Department of Physics (Bangladesh)

    2015-01-15

    Efforts are being given to the development of well-dispersed nanoparticle-reinforced polymer nanocomposites in order to tailor the material properties. In this perspective, well dispersion of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) in unsaturated polyester resin (UPR) was prepared using pre-dispersed MWCNTs in tetrahydrofuran solvent with ultrasonication method. Then the well-dispersed MWCNTs reinforced UPR nanocomposites were fabricated through solvent evaporation. Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy indicates a good interaction between matrix and MWCNTs. This along with homogeneous dispersion of nanotubes in matrix has been confirmed by the field emission scanning electron microscopy. At low shear rate, the value of viscosity of UPR is 8,593 mPa s and that of pre-dispersed MWCNT–UPR suspension is 43,491 mPa s, showing implicitly a good dispersion of nanotubes. A notable improvement in the crystallinity of UPR from 14 to 21 % after MWCNTs inclusion was observed by X-ray diffractometry. The mechanical properties, such as tensile strength, tensile modulus, impact strength, and elongation-at-break, of nanocomposite were found to be increased to 22, 20, 28, and 87 %, respectively. The estimated melting enthalpy per gram for composites as analyzed by differential scanning calorimetry is higher than that of UPR. The onset temperature of thermal decomposition in the nanocomposites as monitored by thermogravimetric analysis is found higher than that of UPR. Correlations among MWCNTs dispersion, nucleation, fracture morphology, and various properties were measured and reported.

  16. Amino acid-functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes for improving compatibility with chiral poly(amide-ester-imide) containing L-phenylalanine and L-tyrosine linkages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdolmaleki, Amir, E-mail: abdolmaleki@cc.iut.ac.ir [Organic Polymer Chemistry Research Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan, 84156-83111, Islamic Republic of Iran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Nanotechnology and Advanced Materials Institute, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan, 84156-83111, Islamic Republic of Iran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mallakpour, Shadpour, E-mail: mallakpour84@alumni.ufl.edu [Organic Polymer Chemistry Research Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan, 84156-83111, Islamic Republic of Iran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Nanotechnology and Advanced Materials Institute, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan, 84156-83111, Islamic Republic of Iran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Borandeh, Sedigheh [Organic Polymer Chemistry Research Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan, 84156-83111, Islamic Republic of Iran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-12-15

    Amino acid functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (f-MWCNTs)/poly(amide-ester-imide) (PAEI) composites were fabricated by solution mixing method. Proper functionalization and mixing strategy of MWCNTs provides the best opportunity for better distribution and bonding of nanoparticles to the polymer matrix. MWCNTs have been chemically modified with L-phenylalanine to improve their compatibility with L-phenylalanine based PAEI. Field emission scanning electron microscopy micrographs of composite revealed that f-MWCNTs made a good interaction with polymer chains by wrapping the polymer around them, and transmission electron microscopy results confirmed well dispersion with nano size of f-MWCNTs in the polymer matrix. In addition, thermal analysis showed good enhancement in thermal properties of composites compared to pure polymer. Thermal stability of the composites containing f-MWCNTs was enhanced due to their good dispersion and improved interfacial interaction between the amino acid based PAEI matrix and f-MWCNTs.

  17. Amino acid-functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes for improving compatibility with chiral poly(amide-ester-imide) containing L-phenylalanine and L-tyrosine linkages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdolmaleki, Amir; Mallakpour, Shadpour; Borandeh, Sedigheh

    2013-12-01

    Amino acid functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (f-MWCNTs)/poly(amide-ester-imide) (PAEI) composites were fabricated by solution mixing method. Proper functionalization and mixing strategy of MWCNTs provides the best opportunity for better distribution and bonding of nanoparticles to the polymer matrix. MWCNTs have been chemically modified with L-phenylalanine to improve their compatibility with L-phenylalanine based PAEI. Field emission scanning electron microscopy micrographs of composite revealed that f-MWCNTs made a good interaction with polymer chains by wrapping the polymer around them, and transmission electron microscopy results confirmed well dispersion with nano size of f-MWCNTs in the polymer matrix. In addition, thermal analysis showed good enhancement in thermal properties of composites compared to pure polymer. Thermal stability of the composites containing f-MWCNTs was enhanced due to their good dispersion and improved interfacial interaction between the amino acid based PAEI matrix and f-MWCNTs.

  18. Carbon nanotube network varactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Generalov, A. A.; Anoshkin, I. V.; Erdmanis, M.; Lioubtchenko, D. V.; Ovchinnikov, V.; Nasibulin, A. G.; Räisänen, A. V.

    2015-01-01

    Microelectromechanical system (MEMS) varactors based on a freestanding layer of single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) films were designed, fabricated and tested. The freestanding SWCNT film was employed as a movable upper patch in the parallel plate capacitor of the MEMS. The measurements of the SWCNT varactors show very high tunability, nearly 100%, of the capacitance with a low actuation voltage of 10 V. The functionality of the varactor is improved by implementing a flexible nanocellulose aerogel filling.

  19. Carbon Nanotube Thermoelectric Coolers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-02-06

    conductance. Inside thecentral section of the carbon nanotube, we obtained an impressive Peltier cooling 57 K down from the liquid nitrogentemperature. 15... trapped charges or dipoles) that occur either at the interface between the CNT and the gate dielectric (interface defects) or at some position within... liquid nitrogen temperature 77T  K up to hot 134 8T  K, or decreases from 77T  K down to about cold 20 6T  K, thus evidencing a strong

  20. Carbon nanotube biosensors

    OpenAIRE

    Tîlmaciu, Carmen-Mihaela; Morris, May C

    2015-01-01

    Nanomaterials possess unique features which make them particularly attractive for biosensing applications. In particular, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) can serve as scaffolds for immobilization of biomolecules at their surface, and combine several exceptional physical, chemical, electrical, and optical characteristics properties which make them one of the best suited materials for the transduction of signals associated with the recognition of analytes, metabolites, or disease biomarkers. Here we pr...

  1. Synthesis of benzimidazole-grafted graphene oxide/multi-walled carbon nanotubes composite for supercapacitance application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srivastava, Rajesh Kr., E-mail: r05bhu@gmail.com [Division of Physics and Applied Physics, School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, 637371 Singapore (Singapore); Xingjue, Wang [Division of Physics and Applied Physics, School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, 637371 Singapore (Singapore); Kumar, Vinod [Department of Zoology, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi (India); Srivastava, Anchal [Department of Physics, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi (India); Singh, Vidya Nand [CSIR-National Physical Laboratory, New Delhi (India)

    2014-11-05

    Highlights: • We are reporting supercapacitance performance of BI-GO/MWCNTs composite. • The specific capacitance of BI-GO/MWCNTs is 275 and 460 F/g at 200 and 5 mV/s scan rate. • This composite has shown 224 F/g capacitance after 1300 cycles at 200 mV/s scan rate. - Abstract: We are reporting the fabrication, characterizations and supercapacitance performance of benzimidazole-grafted graphene oxide/multi-walled carbon nanotubes (BI-GO/MWCNTs) composite. The synthesis of BI-GO materials involves cyclization reaction of carboxylic groups on GO among the hydroxyl and amino groups on o-phenylenediamine. The BI-GO/MWCNTs composite has been fabricated via in situ reduction of BI-GO using hydrazine in presence of MWCNTs. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Raman spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) have been used to characterize its surface and elemental composition. The uniform dispersion of MWCNTs with BI-GO helps to improve the charge transfer reaction during electrochemical process. The specific capacitance of BI-GO/MWCNTs composite is 275 and 460 F/g at 200 and 5 mV/s scan rate in 1 mol/L aqueous solution of H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}. This BI-GO/MWCNTs composite has shown 224 F/g capacitance after 1300 cycles at 200 mV/s scan rate, which represents its good electrochemical stability.

  2. Decoration of Silver Nanoparticles on Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes: Antibacterial Mechanism and Ultrastructural Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ngo Xuan Dinh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, development of carbon nanocomposites composed of carbon nanostructures and metal nanoparticles has attracted much interests because of their large potential for technological applications such as catalyst, sensor, biomedicine, and disinfection. In this work, we established a simple chemistry method to synthesize multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs decorated with silver nanoparticles (Ag-NPs using a modified photochemical reaction (Tollens process. The formation and interaction of Ag-NPs with functionalized groups on the surface of MWCNTs were analyzed by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy. The average size of Ag-NPs on the MWCNTs was approximately ~7 nm with nearly uniform size distribution. Antibacterial effect of Ag-MWCNTs nanocomposites was evaluated against two pathogenic bacteria including Gram-negative Escherichia Coli and Gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus bacteria. Interaction and bactericidal mechanism of Ag-MWCNTs with tested bacteria was studied by adapting the electron microscopy. Analysis on ultrastructural changes of bacterial cells indicates that antibacterial action mechanism of Ag-MWCNTs is physical interaction with cell membrane, the large formation of cell-Ag-MWCNTs aggregates, and faster destructibility of cell membrane and disruption of membrane function, hence resulting in cells death.

  3. Elucidating How Surface Functionalization of Multiwalled Carbon Nanotube Affects Nanostructured MWCNT/Titania Hybrid Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Fu Yang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The new class of multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWCNT/titania nanocomposites was prepared using a sol-gel technique. The addition of titania to MWCNTs has the potential to provide new capability for the development of electrical devices by taking advantage of the favorable electric characteristics of MWCNTs. MWCNTs were first functionalized with carboxyl, acyl chloride, amine, and hydroxyl groups and were then dispersed in a tetraisopropyl titanate (TIPT solution via ultrasonic processing. After gelation, well-dispersed titania in the MWCNT/titania nanocomposites was obtained. Functionalized MWCNTs with varied functional groups were proved by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR. For the nanocomposites, the degree of the sol-gel process were proved by Raman spectroscopy and wide-angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD. Furthermore, the morphology of the MWCNT/titania nanocomposites was observed using transmission electron microscopy (TEM. In the sol-gel process, the functionalized MWCNTs with carboxyl, acyl chloride, amine, and hydroxyl groups have resulted in the carbon nanotube-graft-titania nanocomposites with a network structure of titania between the carbon nanotubes.

  4. From Carbon Nanotube Crystals to Carbon Nanotube Flowers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Zhengjun; ZHAO Ye; ZHOU Ya

    2005-01-01

    We have investigated the very initial deposition stages of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) with ferrocene (Fe(C5H5)2) and xylene (C8H10) for growing carbon nanotubes, and made clear that the mechanism for the self-organization behaviors of nanotubes at different growth stages by this approach. For instance, the organization of nanotubes into flower-like structures at prolonged deposition is developed from the crystal-like structures formed at early growth stages, both of which are closely related to and determined by the very initial deposition stages of this CVD approach. Based on this approach, ways have been established to build up different architectures of carbon nanotubes, by controlling the initial deposition stages of the CVD process, with which we have realized the selective growth of self-organized carbon nanotube structures. This study provides a new idea for growing carbon nanotube architectures by CVD.

  5. Influence of carbon nanotubes on the properties of epoxy based composites reinforced with a semicrystalline thermoplastic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díez-Pascual, A.; Shuttleworth, P.; Gónzalez-Castillo, E.; Marco, C.; Gómez-Fatou, M.; Ellis, G.

    2014-08-01

    Novel ternary nanocomposites based on a thermoset (TS) system composed of triglycidyl p-aminophenol (TGAP) epoxy resin and 4,4'-diaminodiphenylsulfone (DDS) curing agent incorporating 5 wt% of a semicrystalline thermoplastic (TP), an ethylene/1-octene copolymer, and 0.5 or 1.0 wt% multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) have been prepared via physical blending and curing. The influence of the TP and the MWCNTs on the curing process, morphology, thermal and mechanical properties of the hybrid nanocomposites has been analyzed. Different morphologies evolved depending on the CNT content: the material with 0.5 wt% MWCNTs showed a matrix-dispersed droplet-like morphology with well-dispersed nanofiller that selectively located at the TS/TP interphase, while that with 1.0 wt% MWCNTs exhibited coarse dendritic TP areas containing agglomerated MWCNTs. Although the cure reaction was accelerated in its early stage by the nanofillers, curing occurred at a lower rate since these obstructed chain crosslinking. The nanocomposite with lower nanotube content displayed two crystallization peaks at lower temperature than that of pure TP, while a single peak appearing at similar temperature to that of TP was observed for the blend with higher nanotube loading. The highest thermal stability was found for TS/TP (5.0 wt%)/MWCNTs (0.5 wt%), due to a synergistic barrier effect of both TP and the nanofiller. Moreover, this nanocomposite displayed the best mechanical properties, with an optimal combination of stiffness, strength and toughness. However, poorer performance was found for TS/TP (5.0 wt%)/MWCNTs (1.0 wt%) due to the less effective reinforcement of the agglomerated nanotubes and the coalescence of the TP particles into large areas. Therefore, finely tuned morphologies and properties can be obtained by adjusting the nanotube content in the TS/TP blends, leading to high-performance hybrid nanocomposites suitable for structural and high-temperature applications.

  6. Carbon Nanotubes Based Quantum Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jian-Ping

    1999-01-01

    This document represents the final report for the NASA cooperative agreement which studied the application of carbon nanotubes. The accomplishments are reviewed: (1) Wrote a review article on carbon nanotubes and its potentials for applications in nanoscale quantum devices. (2) Extensive studies on the effects of structure deformation on nanotube electronic structure and energy band gaps. (3) Calculated the vibrational spectrum of nanotube rope and the effect of pressure. and (4) Investigate the properties of Li intercalated nanotube ropes and explore their potential for energy storage materials and battery applications. These studies have lead to four publications and seven abstracts in international conferences.

  7. Vascular effects of multiwalled carbon nanotubes in dyslipidemic ApoE-/- mice and cultured endothelial cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cao, Yi; Jacobsen, Nicklas Raun; Danielsen, Pernille Høgh;

    2014-01-01

    Accumulating evidences indicate that pulmonary exposure to carbon nanotubes (CNTs) is associated with increased risk of lung diseases, whereas the effect on the vascular system is less studied. We investigated vascular effects of 2 types of multiwalled CNTs (MWCNTs) in apolipoprotein E(-/-) mice,...

  8. MWCNTs/Resin Nanocomposites: Structural, Thermal, Mechanical and Dielectric Investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. D. Alexopoulos

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs were manufactured, characterized and added to a typical aeronautical resin matrix at different concentrations as nano-reinforcement. The carbon content of produced MWCNTs was determined to be around 98.5% while they consisted of 13-20 wall-layers and their external diameter had an average size in between 20 and 50 nm. MWCNTs were dispersed in an epoxy resin system and tensile specimens for different MWCNTs concentrations were prepared in an open mould. Electrical wiring was attached to the specimens’ surface and surface electrical resistance change was in-situ monitored during monotonic tension till fracture. Performed tensile tests showed that the MWCNTs addition increased both modulus of elasticity and ultimate tensile strength on the nano-composites with a simultaneously dramatic ductility decrease. The MWCNTs addition enhanced the investigated resin matrix with monitoring ability; electrical resistance change of the investigated tensile tests was correlated in the elastic regime with axial nominal strain and the gauge factor of the different MWCNTs concentration specimens were calculated. It was found that lowest MWCNTs concentration gave the best results in terms of piezo-resistivity and simultaneously the least enhancement in the mechanical properties.

  9. Synthesis of Metal Nanoparticle-decorated Carbon Nanotubes under Ambient Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yi; Watson, Kent A.; Ghose, Sayata; Smith, Joseph G.; Connell, John W.

    2008-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the production of Metal Nanoparticle-decorated carbon Nanotubes. Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were efficiently decorated with metal nanoparticles (e.g. Ag, Pt, etc.) using the corresponding metal acetate in a simple mixing process without the need of chemical reagents or further processing. The conversion of acetate compounds to the corresponding metal reached over 90%, forming nanoparticles with average diameters less than 10 nm under certain conditions. The process was readily scalable allowing for the convenient preparation of multi-gram quantities of metal nanoparticle-decorated MWCNTs in a matter of a few minutes. These materials are under evaluation for a variety of electrical and catalytic applications. The preparation and characterization of these materials will be presented. The microscopic views of the processed MWCNTs are shown

  10. Origin of mechanical modifications in poly (ether ether ketone)/carbon nanotube composite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pavlenko, Ekaterina; Puech, Pascal; Bacsa, Wolfgang, E-mail: wolfgang.bacsa@cemes.fr [CEMES-CNRS and University of Toulouse, 29 Jeanne Marvig, 31055 Toulouse (France); Boyer, François; Olivier, Philippe [Université de Toulouse, Institut Clément Ader, I.U.T. Université Paul Sabatier - 133C Avenue de Rangueil - B.P. 67701, 31077 Toulouse CEDEX 4 (France); Sapelkin, Andrei [School of Physics and Astronomy, Queen Mary, University of London, Mile End Road, E1 4NS London (United Kingdom); King, Stephen; Heenan, Richard [ISIS Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, OX11 0QX Didcot (United Kingdom); Pons, François; Gauthier, Bénédicte; Cadaux, Pierre-Henri [AIRBUS FRANCE (B.E. M and P Toulouse), 316 Route de Bayonne, 31060 Toulouse (France)

    2014-06-21

    Variations in the hardness of a poly (ether ether ketone) beam electrically modified with multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT, 0.5%-3%) are investigated. It is shown that both rupture and hardness variations correlate with the changes in carbon nanotube concentration when using micro indentation and extended Raman imaging. Statistical analysis of the relative spectral intensities in the Raman image is used to estimate local tube concentration and polymer crystallinity. We show that the histogram of the Raman D band across the image provides information about the amount of MWCNTs and the dispersion of MWCNTs in the composite. We speculate that we have observed a local modification of the ordering between pure and modified polymer. This is partially supported by small angle neutron scattering measurements, which indicate that the agglomeration state of the MWCNTs is the same at the concentrations studied.

  11. Multiple functionalization of multi-walled carbon nanotubes with carboxyl and amino groups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Zhiyuan [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China); Yang, Zhanhong, E-mail: zhongnan320@gmail.com [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China); Key Laboratory of Resource Chemistry of Nonferrous Metals, Ministry of Education, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China); Hu, Youwang; Li, Jianping [College of Mechanical and Electrical Engineering, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China); Fan, Xinming [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China)

    2013-07-01

    In this paper, carboxyl and amino groups have been introduced onto the surface of the multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) by the mixed acid treatment and the diazonium reaction, respectively. The presence of multifunctionality groups on the MWCNTs has been characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, thermogravimetric (TGA) analysis, Raman spectra, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectrum (EDS). The multifunctionalized carbon nanotubes were further utilized to react with acetyl chloride and ethylenediamine (EDA). The formation of the amide bond in the grafting reaction has been confirmed by FT-IR spectroscopy. The result indicates that the further grafting is successful. The multifunctionalized MWCNTs can be a new versatile platform for many interesting applications.

  12. Studies of Fe-binding sites within multiwall carbon nanotubes using Moessbauer spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luberda-Durnas, Katarzyna; Nieznalska, Magdalena; Matlak, Krzysztof; Korecki, Jozef; Burda, Kvetoslava [Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Science, AGH - University of Science and Technology, Krakow (Poland); Mazurkiewicz, Marta; Malolepszy, Artur [Faculty of Material Science and Engineering, Warsaw University of Technology, Warsaw (Poland); Khachataryan, Gohar; Khachataryan, Karen; Tomasik, Piotr; Michalski, Oskar [Department of Chemistry, Agricultural University, Krakow (Poland); Stobinski, Leszek [Faculty of Material Science and Engineering, Warsaw University of Technology, Warsaw (Poland); Institute of Physical Chemistry, Polish Academy of Sciences, Warsaw (Poland)

    2011-08-15

    The potential applications of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are strongly related to their physical and chemical properties. In this work, results of different methods for the oxidation of crude CNTs are reported. These methods changed Fe binding sites within multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). Moessbauer spectroscopy was used to detect the chemical properties of the Fe-phases in MWCNTs. Signals from the iron carbide Fe{sub 3}C were the main components in the Moessbauer spectra of unmodified MWCNTs revealing magnetic ordering even at 300 K. In oxidized MWCNTs, the amount of Fe{sub 3}C decreased and {gamma}-Fe and {alpha}-Fe, ferrihydrates of iron oxides and different forms of goethite appeared. In MWCNTs oxidized with HClO{sub 4}, a significant fraction ({proportional_to}24%) of magnetically ordered Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} particles was detected. This study showed that traces of iron catalyst embedded in MWCNTs could be used as a sensitive probe to monitor various MWCNT modifications. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  13. Acid yellow 9 as a dispersing agent for carbon nanotubes: preparation of redox polymer-carbon nanotube composite film and its sensing application towards ascorbic acid and dopamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, S Ashok; Wang, Sea-Fue; Yang, Thomas C-K; Yeh, Chun-Ting

    2010-08-15

    In this study, we show that acid yellow 9 (4-amino-1-1'-azobenzene-3,4'-disulfonicacid, AY) is a good stabilizing agent for multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). MWCNTs dispersed in AY solution was remained stable about three months and even remained stable after centrifugation at 10,000 rpm for 30 min. Using MWCNTs/AY dispersion, thin-films were prepared on indium tin oxide coated glass electrode and glassy carbon electrodes. Further, dried films of MWCNTs/AY were subjected to electropolymerization in 0.1M H(2)SO(4) solution. Adsorbed AY molecules on MWCNTs get polymerized and they yield a polymer-MWCNTs nanocomposite film on electrode surface which is found to be electrochemically active in wide pH range (1-11). Characterization studies were performed using cyclic voltammetry and SEM. These studies are supported that hybrid material PAY/MWCNTs was obtained. Moreover, newly synthesized PAY-MWCNTs composite film showed excellent electrocatalytic activity towards oxidation of dopamine (DA) and ascorbic acid (AA) with high sensitivity in physiological pH. Linear sweep voltammetry was employed to the determination of DA in the presence of AA in the range of 2x10(-7) to 1.4x10(-6) M. Amperometry was employed to determination of AA at 0.0 V in the range from 1x10(-6) to 5.6x10(-5) M, and DA, uric acid are not interfered on the steady-state current of AA. In addition, real samples such as dopamine injection and AA spiked into human urine were analyzed using PAY/MWCNTs composite modified electrode and satisfactory results were obtained.

  14. Genotoxicity and carcinogenicity risk of carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyokuni, Shinya

    2013-12-01

    Novel materials are often commercialized without a complete assessment of the risks they pose to human health because such assessments are costly and time-consuming; additionally, sometimes the methodology needed for such an assessment does not exist. Carbon nanotubes have the potential for widespread application in engineering, materials science and medicine. However, due to the needle-like shape and high durability of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), concerns have been raised that they may induce asbestos-like pathogenicity when inhaled. Indeed, experiments in rodents supported this hypothesis. Notably, the genetic alterations in MWCNT-induced rat malignant mesothelioma were similar to those induced by asbestos. Single-walled CNTs (SWCNTs) cause mitotic disturbances in cultured cells, but thus far, there has been no report that SWCNTs are carcinogenic. This review summarizes the recent noteworthy publications on the genotoxicity and carcinogenicity of CNTs and explains the possible molecular mechanisms responsible for this carcinogenicity. The nanoscale size and needle-like rigid structure of CNTs appear to be associated with their pathogenicity in mammalian cells, where carbon atoms are major components in the backbone of many biomolecules. Publishing adverse events associated with novel materials is critically important for alerting people exposed to such materials. CNTs still have a bright future with superb economic and medical merits. However, appropriate regulation of the production, distribution and secondary manufacturing processes is required, at least to protect the workers.

  15. Lithium interaction with carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nalimova, V.A. [Moskovskij Gosudarstvennyj Univ., Moscow (Russian Federation). Khimicheskij Fakul`tet; Sklovsky, D.E. [Moskovskij Gosudarstvennyj Univ., Moscow (Russian Federation). Khimicheskij Fakul`tet; Bondarenko, G.N. [Topcheiv Institute of Petrochemical Synthesis, Leninsky Prospekt, 29, Moscow (Russian Federation); Alvergnat-Gaucher, H. [CRMD, CNRS, Universite d`Orleans, 1B rue de la Ferollerie, 45071, Orleans Cedex 02 (France); Bonnamy, S. [CRMD, CNRS, Universite d`Orleans, 1B rue de la Ferollerie, 45071, Orleans Cedex 02 (France); Beguin, F. [CRMD, CNRS, Universite d`Orleans, 1B rue de la Ferollerie, 45071, Orleans Cedex 02 (France)

    1997-05-01

    Lithium interaction with catalytic carbon nanotubes under high-pressure conditions was studied. A large amount of Li (2Li/C) reacted with the carbon nanotubes forming an intercalation compound (I{sub c}{proportional_to}4.1 A) which follows from X-ray diffraction and IR spectroscopy data. We cannot exclude also the possibility of insertion of a part of Li into the channel of the nanotubes. (orig.)

  16. Carbon nanotube Archimedes screws.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oroszlány, László; Zólyomi, Viktor; Lambert, Colin J

    2010-12-28

    Recently, nanomechanical devices composed of a long stationary inner carbon nanotube and a shorter, slowly rotating outer tube have been fabricated. In this paper, we study the possibility of using such devices as nanoscale transducers of motion into electricity. When the outer tube is chiral, we show that such devices act like quantum Archimedes screws, which utilize mechanical energy to pump electrons between reservoirs. We calculate the pumped charge from one end of the inner tube to the other, driven by the rotation of a chiral outer nanotube. We show that the pumped charge can be greater than one electron per 360° rotation, and consequently, such a device operating with a rotational frequency of 10 MHz, for example, would deliver a current of ≈1 pAmp.

  17. Microstructure and activation characteristics of Mg-Ni alloy modified by multi-walled carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aminorroaya, Sima; Liu, Hua Kun [Institute for Superconducting and Electronic Materials, University of Wollongong, Fairy Meadow, NSW 2522 (Australia); CSIRO National Hydrogen Materials Alliance, CSIRO Energy Centre, 10 Murray Dwyer Circuit, Steel River Estate, Mayfield West, NSW 2304 (Australia); Cho, Younghee; Dahle, Arne [CSIRO National Hydrogen Materials Alliance, CSIRO Energy Centre, 10 Murray Dwyer Circuit, Steel River Estate, Mayfield West, NSW 2304 (Australia); Materials Engineering, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD 4072 (Australia)

    2010-05-15

    An Mg-6 wt% Ni alloy was fabricated by a casting technique and the drilled chips ball-milled by high energy ball milling to be examined for their hydrogenation modified with multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). The activation characteristics of ball-milled alloy are compared with those of the materials obtained by ball milling with 5 wt% MWCNTs for 0.5, 1, 2, 5 and 10 h. MWCNTs enhanced the absorption kinetics considerably in all cases. The hydrogen content of the modified powder with MWCNTs reached maximum hydrogen capacity within 2 min of exposure to hydrogen at 370 C and 2 MPa pressure. X-ray diffraction analysis provided evidence that no carbon-containing phase was formed during milling. However, milling with MWCNTs reduced the crystallite size, even if the milling was carried out for only an hour. The rate-controlling steps of the hydriding reactions at different milling times were determined by fitting the respective kinetic equations. Evidence is provided that nucleation and growth of hydrides are accelerated drastically by a homogenous distribution of MWCNTs on the surface of the ball-milled powders. We show that MWCNTs are very effective at promoting the hydriding/dehydriding kinetics, as well as in increasing the hydrogen capacity of the magnesium alloy. (author)

  18. Polyvinylidenefluoride/carbon nanotubes mixed matrix membranes with tailored properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontananova, Enrica; Grosso, Valentina; Aljlil, Saad A.; Bahattab, Mohammed A.; Vuono, Danilo; Di Profio, Gianluca; Drioli, Enrico

    2016-05-01

    Membrane operations are promising tools for efficient and environmentally friendly separations. However, the development of advanced membranes with tailored properties is a key issue to be addressed in order to better exploit the potentialities of membrane-based separations. An important approach toward this aim is the development of mixed matrix membranes in which an organic and an inorganic phase coexist in order to have synergic effects on membrane properties. The peculiar properties of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) such as high electrical and thermal conductivity, high strength and unique transport properties, has motivated a considerable effort to produce CNT-polymer composites in order to engineer membrane properties. In this work the roughness, wettability, morphology, crystalline phase and pore size of polyvinylidenefluoride (PVDF) membranes were tailored working on the membrane preparation conditions, as well as, by blending the polymer with multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). A study on the effect of concentration of the polymer, use of pore forming additives, type and concentration of MWCNTs (pristine and functionalized), was carried out. The results highlighted interesting relationships between membrane microstructure and composition, as well as, MWCNTs distribution, on transport and wettability properties, in the perspectives of a more efficient application of PVDF membranes in liquid phase separations.

  19. Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes at the Interface of Pickering Emulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, Nicholas M; Weston, Javen S; Li, Brian; Venkataramani, Deepika; Aichele, Clint P; Harwell, Jeffrey H; Crossley, Steven P

    2015-12-01

    Carbon nanotubes exhibit very unique properties in biphasic systems. Their interparticle attraction leads to reduced droplet coalescence rates and corresponding improvements in emulsion stability. Here we use covalent and noncovalent techniques to modify the hydrophilicity of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and study their resulting behavior at an oil-water interface. By using both paraffin wax/water and dodecane/water systems, the thickness of the layer of MWNTs at the interface and resulting emulsion stability are shown to vary significantly with the approach used to modify the MWNTs. Increased hydrophilicity of the MWNTs shifts the emulsions from water-in-oil to oil-in-water. The stability of the emulsion is found to correlate with the thickness of nanotubes populating the oil-water interface and relative strength of the carbon nanotube network. The addition of a surfactant decreases the thickness of nanotubes at the interface and enhances the overall interfacial area stabilized at the expense of increased droplet coalescence rates. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time the interfacial thickness of modified carbon nanotubes has been quantified and correlated to emulsion stability.

  20. Carbon nanotubes and carbon onions for modification of styrene-acrylate copolymer based nanocomposites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merijs-Meri, Remo; Zicans, Janis; Ivanova, Tatjana; Bitenieks, Juris [Institute of Polymer Materials, Riga Technical University, Azenes street 14/24, LV-1048, Riga (Latvia); Kuzhir, Polina; Maksimenko, Sergey [Institute of Nuclear Problems, Belarus State University, Bobruiskaya str. 11, 220030, Minsk (Belarus); Kuznetsov, Vladimir; Moseenkov, Sergey [Boreskov Institute of Catalyst Siberian branch of RAS, pr. Lavrentieva 5, 630090, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    2014-05-15

    Styrene acrylate polymer (SAC) nanocomposites with various carbon nanofillers (multiwalled carbon nanotubes MWCNTs and onion like carbon OLC) are manufactured by means of latex based routes. Concentration of the carbon nanofillers is changed in a broad interval starting from 0.01 up to 10 wt. %. Elastic, dielectric and electromagnetic properties of SAC nanocomposites are investigated. Elastic modulus, electrical conductivity and electromagnetic radiation absorption of the investigated SAC nanocomposites increase along with rising nanofiller content. The effect of the addition of anisometric MWCNTs on the elastic properties of the composite is higher than in the case of the addition of OLC. Higher electrical conductivity of the OLC containing nanocomposites is explained with the fact that reasonable agglomeration of the nanofiller can promote the development of electrically conductive network. Efficiency of the absorption of electromagnetic radiation depends on the development of conductive network within the SAC matrix.

  1. Carbon Nanotubes and Modern Nanoagriculture

    KAUST Repository

    Bayoumi, Maged Fouad

    2015-01-27

    Since their discovery, carbon nanotubes have been prominent members of the nanomaterial family. Owing to their extraordinary physical, chemical, and mechanical properties, carbon nanotubes have been proven to be a useful tool in the field of plant science. They were frequently perceived to bring about valuable biotechnological and agricultural applications that still remain beyond experimental realization. An increasing number of studies have demonstrated the ability of carbon nanotubes to traverse different plant cell barriers. These studies, also, assessed the toxicity and environmental impacts of these nanomaterials. The knowledge provided by these studies is of practical and fundamental importance for diverse applications including intracellular labeling and imaging, genetic transformation, and for enhancing our knowledge of plant cell biology. Although different types of nanoparticles have been found to activate physiological processes in plants, carbon nanotubes received particular interest. Following addition to germination medium, carbon nanotubes enhanced root growth and elongation of some plants such as onion, cucumber and rye-grass. They, also, modulated the expression of some genes that are essential for cell division and plant development. In addition, multi-walled carbon nanotubes were evidenced to penetrate thick seed coats, stimulate germination, and to enhance growth of young tomato seedlings. Multi-walled carbon nanotubes can penetrate deeply into the root system and further distribute into the leaves and the fruits. In recent studies, carbon nanotubes were reported to be chemically entrapped into the structure of plant tracheary elements. This should activate studies in the fields of plant defense and wood engineering. Although, all of these effects on plant physiology and plant developmental biology have not been fully understood, the valuable findings promises more research activity in the near future toward complete scientific understanding of

  2. Studies of Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caneba, Gerard T.

    2005-01-01

    The fellowship experience for this summer for 2004 pertains to carbon nanotube coatings for various space-related applications. They involve the following projects: (a) EMI protection films from HiPco-polymers, and (b) Thermal protection nanosilica materials. EMI protection films are targeted to be eventually applied onto casings of laptop computers. These coatings are composites of electrically-conductive SWNTs and compatible polymers. The substrate polymer will be polycarbonate, since computer housings are typically made of carbon composites of this type of polymer. A new experimental copolymer was used last year to generate electrically-conductive and thermal films with HiPco at 50/50 wt/wt composition. This will be one of the possible formulations. Reference films will be base polycarbonate and neat HiPco onto polycarbonate films. Other coating materials that will be tried will be based on HiPco composites with commercial enamels (polyurethane, acrylic, polyester), which could be compatible with the polycarbonate substrate. Nanosilica fibers are planned for possible use as thermal protection tiles on the shuttle orbiter. Right now, microscale silica is used. Going to the nanoscale will increase the surface-volume-per-unit-area of radiative heat dissipation. Nanoscale carbon fibers/nanotubes can be used as templates for the generation of nanosilica. A sol-gel operation is employed for this purpose.

  3. Radial Corrugations of Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes Driven by Inter-Wall Nonbonding Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xu; Liang, Wentao; Zhang, Sulin

    2011-12-01

    We perform large-scale quasi-continuum simulations to determine the stable cross-sectional configurations of free-standing multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). We show that at an inter-wall spacing larger than the equilibrium distance set by the inter-wall van der Waals (vdW) interactions, the initial circular cross-sections of the MWCNTs are transformed into symmetric polygonal shapes or asymmetric water-drop-like shapes. Our simulations also show that removing several innermost walls causes even more drastic cross-sectional polygonization of the MWCNTs. The predicted cross-sectional configurations agree with prior experimental observations. We attribute the radial corrugations to the compressive stresses induced by the excessive inter-wall vdW energy release of the MWCNTs. The stable cross-sectional configurations provide fundamental guidance to the design of single MWCNT-based devices and shed lights on the mechanical control of electrical properties.

  4. Radial Corrugations of Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes Driven by Inter-Wall Nonbonding Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Xu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We perform large-scale quasi-continuum simulations to determine the stable cross-sectional configurations of free-standing multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs. We show that at an inter-wall spacing larger than the equilibrium distance set by the inter-wall van der Waals (vdW interactions, the initial circular cross-sections of the MWCNTs are transformed into symmetric polygonal shapes or asymmetric water-drop-like shapes. Our simulations also show that removing several innermost walls causes even more drastic cross-sectional polygonization of the MWCNTs. The predicted cross-sectional configurations agree with prior experimental observations. We attribute the radial corrugations to the compressive stresses induced by the excessive inter-wall vdW energy release of the MWCNTs. The stable cross-sectional configurations provide fundamental guidance to the design of single MWCNT-based devices and shed lights on the mechanical control of electrical properties.

  5. Development of multi-walled carbon nanotubes reinforced monetite bionanocomposite cements for orthopedic applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boroujeni, Nariman Mansoori; Zhou, Huan; Luchini, Timothy J F; Bhaduri, Sarit B

    2013-10-01

    In this study, we present results of our research on biodegradable monetite (DCPA, CaHPO4) cement with surface-modified multi-walled carbon nanotubes (mMWCNTs) as potential bone defect repair material. The cement pastes showed desirable handling properties and possessed a suitable setting time for use in surgical setting. The incorporation of mMWCNTs shortened the setting time of DCPA and increased the compressive strength of DCPA cement from 11.09±1.85 MPa to 21.56±2.47 MPa. The cytocompatibility of the materials was investigated in vitro using the preosteoblast cell line MC3T3-E1. An increase of cell numbers was observed on both DCPA and DCPA-mMWCNTs. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) results also revealed an obvious cell growth on the surface of the cements. Based on these results, DCPA-mMWCNTs composite cements can be considered as potential bone defect repair materials.

  6. Fast functionalization of multi-walled carbon nanotubes by an atmospheric pressure plasma jet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolacyak, Daniel; Ihde, Jörg; Merten, Christian; Hartwig, Andreas; Lommatzsch, Uwe

    2011-07-01

    The afterglow of an atmospheric pressure plasma has been used for the fast oxidative functionalization of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). Scanning electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy demonstrate that the MWCNT morphology is mostly preserved when the MWCNTs are dispersed in a solvent and injected as a spray into the plasma. Contact angle measurements show that this approach enhances the wettability of MWCNTs and reduces their sedimentation in an aqueous dispersion. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, IR spectroscopy, and electrokinetic measurements show that oxygen plasma incorporates about 6.6 at.% of oxygen and creates mainly hydroxyl and carboxyl functional groups on the MWCNT surface. The typical effective treatment time is estimated to be in the range of milliseconds. The approach is ideally suited for combination with the industrial gas phase CVD synthesis of MWCNTs.

  7. The effects of functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotube on mechanical properties of multi-walled carbon nanotube/epoxy composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Ardjmand

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The mechanical properties of the multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT/epoxy composites affected by carboxyl and amino functionalized MWCNT are investigated. Tensile tests of the specimens were carried out to obtain mechanical properties of MWCNT/epoxy composites for various weight-percents (wt % of MWCNTs. In order to properly predict the mechanical properties of MWCNT reinforced epoxy composites, the effect of MWCNTs de bonding is considered through applying a correction factor to a Halpin-Tsai equation. Applicability of the modified model was endorsed by the experimental results.

  8. Carbon Nanotubes for Space Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyyappan, Meyya

    2000-01-01

    The potential of nanotube technology for NASA missions is significant and is properly recognized by NASA management. Ames has done much pioneering research in the last five years on carbon nanotube growth, characterization, atomic force microscopy, sensor development and computational nanotechnology. NASA Johnson Space Center has focused on laser ablation production of nanotubes and composites development. These in-house efforts, along with strategic collaboration with academia and industry, are geared towards meeting the agency's mission requirements. This viewgraph presentation (including an explanation for each slide) outlines the research focus for Ames nanotechnology, including details on carbon nanotubes' properties, applications, and synthesis.

  9. Luminescence of carbon nanotube bulbs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI ChuanGang; WU DeHai; WANG KunLin; WEI JinQuan; WEI BingQing; ZHU HongWei; WANG ZhiCheng; LUO JianBin; LIU WenJin; ZHENG MingXin

    2007-01-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) bulbs made of decimeter-scale double-walled carbon nanotube (DWCNT) strands and films were fabricated and their luminescence properties, including the lighting efficiency, voltage-current relation and thermal stability were investigated. The results show that the DWCNT bulb has a comparable spectrum of visible light with tungsten bulb and its average efficiency is 40% higher than that of a tungsten filament at the same temperature (1400-2300 K). The nanotube filaments show both resistance and thermal stability over a large temperature region. No obvious damage was found for a nanotube bulb illuminating at 2300 K for more than 24 hours in vacuum.

  10. Antibacterial activity and cytotoxicity of multi-walled carbon nanotubes decorated with silver nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Youngmin; Hwang, Jangsun; Kim, Jieun; Jeong, Yoon; Hwang, Mintai P; Choi, Jonghoon

    2014-01-01

    Recently, various nanoscale materials, including silver (Ag) nanoparticles, have been actively studied for their capacity to effectively prevent bacterial growth. A critical challenge is to enhance the antibacterial properties of nanomaterials while maintaining their biocompatibility. The conjugation of multiple nanomaterials with different dimensions, such as spherical nanoparticles and high-aspect-ratio nanotubes, may increase the target-specific antibacterial capacity of the consequent nanostructure while retaining an optimal biocompatibility. In this study, multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were treated with a mixture of acids and decorated with Ag nanoparticles via a chemical reduction of Ag cations by ethanol solution. The synthesized Ag-MWCNT complexes were characterized by transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffractometry, and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The antibacterial function of Ag-MWCNTs was evaluated against Methylobacterium spp. and Sphingomonas spp. In addition, the biocompatibility of Ag-MWCNTs was evaluated using both mouse liver hepatocytes (AML 12) and human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Finally, we determined the minimum amount of Ag-MWCNTs required for a biocompatible yet effective antibacterial treatment modality. We report that 30 μg/mL of Ag-MWCNTs confers antibacterial functionality while maintaining minimal cytotoxicity toward both human and animal cells. The results reported herein would be beneficial for researchers interested in the efficient preparation of hybrid nanostructures and in determining the minimum amount of Ag-MWCNTs necessary to effectively hinder the growth of bacteria.

  11. Multi-walled carbon nanotubes in aqueous phytic acid for enhancing biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xiaoyu; Miao, Yun; Ye, Pingping; Wen, Ying; Yang, Haifeng

    2014-04-01

    The poor dispersion of carbon based nanomaterials without strong acid pretreatment in aqueous solution is a fundamental problem, limiting its applications in biology-related fields. A good dispersion of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) in water was realized by 50 wt.% phytic acid (PA) solution. As an application case, the PA-MWCNTs dispersion in aqueous solution was used for the immobilization of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and its direct electrochemistry was realized. The constructed biosensor has a sound limit of detection, wide linear range, and high affinity for hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) as well as being free from interference of co-existing electro-active species.

  12. A novel processing of carbon nanotubes grown on molecular sieve coated porous ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazumder, Sangram; Sarkar, Naboneeta; Park, Jung Gyu; Zhao, Wei; Kim, Sukyoung; Kim, Ik Jin

    2015-08-01

    The present study focuses on the growth of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) on Fe-containing zeolites coated porous ceramics by implementing three different and independent techniques, successively. Direct foaming-derived porous ceramics were subjected to hydrothermal reaction for on-site growth of NaA zeolites within it. The porous ceramics-zeolite composite was subjected to ion-exchange reaction to obtain the catalyst for CNT synthesis. Multi-walled CNTs (MWCNTs) were grown by catalytic chemical vapour deposition (CCVD) process using acetylene as carbon source. Microstructural, thermogravimetric and spectroscopic analyses showed distinctive differences in terms of hollow structural feature, yield and crystallinity of the MWCNTs with different reaction temperatures.

  13. Common Wet Chemical Agents for Purifying Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasel Das

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purification and functionalization of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs are challenging but vital for their effective applications in various fields including water purification technologies, optoelectronics, biosensors, fuel cells, and electrode arrays. The currently available purification techniques, often complicated and time consuming, yielded shortened and curled MWCNTs that are not suitable for applications in certain fields such as membrane technologies, hybrid catalysis, optoelectronics, and sensor developments. Here we described the H2O2 synergy on the actions of HCl and KOH in purifying and functionalizing pristine MWCNTs. The method (HCl/H2O2 showed 100% purification yield as compared to HCl and KOH/H2O2 with purification yields 93.46 and 3.92%, respectively. We probed the findings using transmission electron microscope, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscope, attenuated total reflectance infrared spectroscope, Raman spectroscope, thermal gravimetric analysis, and X-ray powder diffraction. The study is a new avenue for simple, rapid, low cost, and scalable purification of pristine MWCNTs for application in versatile fields.

  14. Mechanoresponses of human primary osteoblasts grown on carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroustalli, A; Kotsikoris, V; Karamitri, A; Topouzis, S; Deligianni, D

    2015-03-01

    Bone mechanotransduction is strongly influenced by the biomaterial properties. A good understanding of these mechanosensory mechanisms in bone has the potential to provide new strategies in the highly evolving field of bone tissue engineering. The aim of the present investigation was to study the interactive effects of local mechanical stimuli on multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs)/osteoblast interface, using an in vitro model that allows the study of cell growth, attachment and differentiation. Strain was applied at physiological levels [strain magnitudes 500 microstrain (μɛ), at frequency of load application 0.5 Hz]. The effect of mechanical strain and substrate was thus studied by measuring the messenger RNA expression of alkaline phosphatase, vinculin, collagen 1A, and integrins β1, β3, α4, and αv, using real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The osteoblasts grown on MWCNTs displayed quick adaptation to the new environment by modulating the expression of key adhesion integrins. Furthermore, the addition of mechanical strain interplayed with the extracellular matrix and was efficiently transduced by cells grown on MWCNTs, providing stronger adhesion and survival. MWCNTs are therefore a material perfectly compatible with osteoblast differentiation, adhesion, and growth, and should be further evaluated, to derive new-generation biomaterial scaffolds for the treatment of skeletal defects which require bone reconstruction.

  15. Synthesis of carbon nanotube-TiO(2) nanotubular material for reversible hydrogen storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Amrita; Banerjee, Subarna; Mohapatra, Susanta K; Graeve, Olivia A; Misra, Mano

    2008-11-05

    A material consisting of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and larger titania (TiO(2)) nanotube arrays has been produced and found to be efficient for reversible hydrogen (H(2)) storage. The TiO(2) nanotube arrays (diameter ∼60 nm and length ∼2-3 µm) are grown on a Ti substrate, and MWCNTs a few µm in length and ∼30-60 nm in diameter are grown inside these TiO(2) nanotubes using chemical vapor deposition with cobalt as a catalyst. The resulting material has been used in H(2) storage experiments based on a volumetric method using the pressure, composition, and temperature relationship of the storage media. This material can store up to 2.5 wt% of H(2) at 77 K under 25 bar with more than 90% reversibility.

  16. BisGMA-polyvinylpyrrolidone blend based nanocomposites reinforced with chitosan grafted f-multiwalled carbon nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Praharaj

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, initially a non-destroyable surface grafting of acid functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotubes (f-MWCNTs with biopolymer chitosan (CS was carried out using glutaraldehyde as a cross-linking agent via the controlled covalent deposition method which was characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR and scanning electron microscopy (SEM. Then, BisGMA (bisphenol-A glycidyldimethacrylate-polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP blend was prepared (50:50 wt% by a simple sonication method. The CS grafted f-MWCNTs (CS/f-MWCNTs were finally dispersed in BisGMA-PVP blend (BGP50 system in different compositions i.e. 0, 2, 5 and 7 wt% and pressed into molds for the fabrication of reinforced nanocomposites which were characterized by SEM. Nanocomposites reinforced with 2 wt% raw MWCNTs and acid f-MWCNTs were also fabricated and their properties were studied in detail. The results of comparative study report lower values of the investigated properties in nanocomposites with 2 wt% raw and f-MWCNTs than the one with 2 wt% CS/f-MWCNTs proving it to be a better reinforcing nanofiller. Further, the mechanical behavior of the nanocomposites with various CS/f-MWCNTs content showed a dramatic increase in Young’s Modulus, tensile strength, impact strength and hardness along with improved dynamic mechanical, thermal and electrical properties at 5 wt% content of CS/f-MWCNTs. The addition of CS/f-MWCNTs also resulted in reduced corrosion and swelling properties. Thus, the fabricated nanocomposites with optimum nanofiller content could serve as low cost and light weight structural, thermal and electrical materials compatible in various corrosive and solvent based environments.

  17. Preparation of 3D electrode microarrays of multi-walled carbon nanotubes/nafion nanocomposites for microfluidic biofuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jin Ho; Kim, Young Ho; Choi, Sung Deuk; Kim, Gyu Man

    2014-12-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) electrode microarrays with multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) reinforced Nafion nanocomposites were prepared for microfluidic biofuel cells. The oxidized MWCNTs (ox-MWCNTs) were prepared using chemical reactions with 60% nitric acid solution with pristine MWCNTs at 120 degrees C for 12 hrs with a nitrogen gas flow environment. Ox-MWCNTs in the range of 1 to 20 wt.% based on the Nafion polymer weight were reinforced to Nafion nanocomposites by solution casting. The micro-porous structure of the ox-MWCNTs reinforced Nafion nanocomposites was prepared by plasma etching for 5 to 20 min. The 10 wt.% ox-MWCNTs reinforced Nafion nanocomposite produced stable micro-porous structures of 3D electrodes by 10 min plasma etching. Micro-scale 3D structures of MWCNTs reinforced Nafion nanocomposites in a diameter range of 47 to 300 μm were prepared by the micro-stencil assisted casting. To characterize the 3D electrode microarrays, the physical geometry and the reinforced MWCNT dispersion in the nanocomposite structure were examined using a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and an optical microscope. Thermal property measurements of the ox-MWCNTs reinforced Nafion nanocomposites with 10 min of plasma etching, and without plasma etching were made. Both showed stable thermal properties over 300 degrees C. The proposed 3D electrode microarray of MWCNT/Nafion nanocomposites with micro-porous structures can be applied to miniaturized fuel cell devices.

  18. Role of iron oxide impurities in electrocatalysis by multiwall carbon nanotubes: An investigation using a novel magnetically modified ITO electrodes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Kanchan M Samant; Vrushali S Joshi; Kashinath R Patil; Santosh K Haram

    2014-04-01

    The role of iron oxide impurities in the electrocatalytic properties of multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) prepared by catalytic chemical vapour decomposition method (CCVD) is studied in detail. A novel magnetically modified electrodes have been developed by which MWCNTs were immobilized on indium-tin oxide (ITO) electrodes, without any chemical binders. The electro-catalytic oxidation of dopamine, and reduction of hydrogen peroxide have been studied by cyclic voltammetry on magnetically modified electrodes with (i) MWCNTs with occluded iron oxide impurities (Fe-MWCNTs), (ii) MWCNTs grown on iron oxide nanoparticle particulate films (Io-MWCNTs) and (iii) pristine iron oxide nanoparticle particulate film (Io-NPs). A shift towards less positive potentials for the oxidation of dopamine was observed which is in the order of Fe-MWCNTs < Io-MWCNTs < Io-NPs. Similarly, trend towards less negative potentials for the reduction of hydrogen peroxide was observed. Thus, the electrocatalytic activities displayed by MWCNTs have been attributed to the iron oxide impurities associated with it. The systematic variation was related to the nature of interaction of iron oxide nanoparticles with MWCNT surface.

  19. Non-covalent bonding interaction of surfactants with functionalized carbon nanotubes in proton exchange membranes for fuel cell applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayeed, M Abu; Kim, Young Ho; Park, Younjin; Gopalan, A I; Lee, Kwang-Pill; Choi, Sang-June

    2013-11-01

    Dispersion of functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) in proton exchange membranes (PEMs) was conducted via non-covalent bonding between benzene rings of various surfactants and functionalized MWCNTs. In the solution casting method, dispersion of functionalized MWCNTs in PEMs such as Nafion membranes is a critical issue. In this study, 1 wt.% pristine MWCNTs (p-MWCNTs) and oxidized MWCNTs (ox-MWCNTs) were reinforced in Nafion membranes by adding 0.1-0.5 wt.% of a surfactant such as benzalkonium chloride (BKC) as a cationic surfactant with a benzene ring, Tween-80 as a nonanionic surfactant without a benzene ring, sodium dodecylsulfonate (SDS) as an anionic surfactant without a benzene ring, or sodium dodecylben-zenesulfonate (SDBS) as an anionic surfactant with a benzene ring and their effects on the dispersion of nanocomposites were then observed. Among these surfactants, those with benzene rings such as BKC and SDBS produced enhanced dispersion via non-covalent bonding interaction between CNTs and surfactants. Specifically, the surfactants were adsorbed onto the surface of functionalized MWCNTs, where they prevented re-aggregation of MWCNTs in the nanocomposites. Furthermore, the prepared CNTs reinforced nanocomposite membranes showed reduced methanol uptake values while the ion exchange capacity values were maintained. The enhanced properties, including thermal property of the CNTs reinforced PEMs with surfactants, could be applicable to fuel cell applications.

  20. Synergistic Enhancement of Antitumor Efficacy by PEGylated Multi-walled Carbon Nanotubes Modified with Cell-Penetrating Peptide TAT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Shanshan; Wang, Tong; Pei, Xibo; Cai, He; Chen, Junyu; Zhang, Xin; Wan, Qianbing; Wang, Jian

    2016-10-01

    In the present study, a cell-penetrating peptide, the transactivating transcriptional factor (TAT) domain from HIV, was linked to PEGylated multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) to develop a highly effective antitumor drug delivery system. FITC was conjugated on MWCNTs-polyethylene glycol (PEG) and MWCNTs-PEG-TAT to provide fluorescence signal for tracing the cellular uptake of the nanocarrier. After loaded with an anticancer agent, doxorubicin (DOX) via π - π stacking interaction, the physicochemical characteristics, release profile and biological evaluation of the obtained nano-sized drug carrier were investigated. The DOX loaded MWCNTs-PEG and MWCNTs-PEG-TAT drug carriers both displayed appropriate particle size, excellent stability, high drug loading, and pH-dependent drug release profile. Nevertheless, compared with DOX-MWCNTs-PEG, DOX-MWCNTs-PEG-TAT showed improved cell internalization, intracellular distribution and potentiated anticancer efficacy due to the TAT-mediated membrane translocation, endosomal escape and nuclear targeting. Furthermore, the therapeutic efficacy of DOX was not compromised after being conjugated with MWCNTs-PEG-TAT and the proposed nanocarrier was also confirmed to have a good biocompatibility. In conclusion, our results suggested that the unique combination of TAT and MWCNTs as a multifunctional drug delivery system might be a powerful tool for improved anticancer drug development.

  1. Significant decrease in thermal conductivity of multi-walled carbon nanotube induced by inter-wall van der Waals interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Xue; Zhou, Wu-Xing, E-mail: wuxingzhou@hnu.edu.cn; Chen, Xue-Kun; Liu, Yue-Yang; Chen, Ke-Qiu, E-mail: keqiuchen@hnu.edu.cn

    2016-05-06

    The thermal transport properties of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were investigated by using non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulation. The results show that the thermal conductivity of MWCNTs decreases significantly comparing to that of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) due to the inter-wall van der Waals interactions. The more interesting is a fact that the thermal conductance of MWCNTs is significantly greater than the thermal conductance summation of each SWCNTs. This is because the thermal conductance of a carbon nanotube protected by an outer tube is much larger than that of one that is not protected. Moreover, we also studied the thermal flux distribution of MWCNTs, and found that the outer tube plays a dominant role in heat energy transfer. - Highlights: • Significant decrease in thermal conductivity of multi-walled carbon nanotube induced by inter-wall interactions. • The thermal conductivity of the inner tube is increased significantly due to protected by outer tube. • The outer tube plays a dominant role in heat energy transfer in multi-walled carbon nanotube.

  2. Mechanical properties of PET composites using multi-walled carbon nanotubes functionalized by inorganic and itaconic acids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. May-Pat

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs were oxidized by two different acid treatments and further functionalized with itaconic acid (IA. The functionalized MWCNTs were used to fabricate Poly(ethylene terephthalate (PET composites by melt mixing. The presence of functional groups on the surface of the treated MWCNTs was confirmed by infrared spectroscopy and thermogravimetric analysis. The MWCNTs oxidized with a concentrated mixture of HNO3 and H2SO4 exhibited more oxygen containing functional groups (OH, COOH but also suffer larger structural degradation than those oxidized by a mild treatment based on diluted HNO3 followed by H2O2. PET composites were fabricated using the oxidized-only and oxidized followed by functionalization with IA MWCNTs. PET composites fabricated with MWCNT oxidized by mild conditions showed improved tensile strength and failure strain, while harsh MWCNT oxidation render them overly brittle.

  3. Synthesis and Evaluation on Performance of Hydrogen Storage of Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes Decorated with Platinum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MU Shi-chung; TANG Hao-lin; PAN Mu; YUAN Run-zhang

    2003-01-01

    By means of chemical reduction,nanoparticles of platinum were deposited on the surface of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs).The performance of hydrogen storage of as-prepared MWCNTs decorated with platinum was investigated.The results indicate that:(1) Hydrogen uptake is more quick and intense for decorated MWCNTs than that for not decorated ones at 10.931MPa and room temperature.The saturation of hydrogen uptake of the former only lasts about 30min,while the latter needs about 150 min;(2) The amount of hydrogen uptake of decorated MWCNTs is about 1.13wt%, which is larger than that of not decorated ones(about 0.54wt%);(3) However,more than 37% hydrogen absorbed by decorated MWCNTs is chemisorbed.

  4. Kinetic response study in chemiresistive gas sensor based on carbon nanotube surface functionalized with substituted phthalocyanines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Anshul Kumar; Kumar, Pankaj; Saini, Rajan; Bedi, R. K.; Mahajan, Aman

    2016-05-01

    A kind of hybrid material is prepared by functionalizing multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs-COOH) with substituted copper phthalocyanine and the formation of CuPcOC8/MWCNTs-COOH hybrid is confirmed by scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The results indicated that on the surface of nanotubes substituted CuPcOC8 derivatives has been successfully anchored through π-π stacking interaction. The gas sensing application of the fabricated hybrid material is tested upon exposure to different hazardous species, specifically NO2, NO, Cl2 and NH3 at operating temperature of 150˚C. It has been demonstrated that for Cl2 minimum detection limit of CuPcOC8/MWCNTs-COOH hybrid is 100 ppb. The response of hybrid sensor is found to be increased with increase in the concentration of Cl2.

  5. Carbon Nanotube Biosensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen-Mihaela eTilmaciu

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Nanomaterials possess unique features which make them particularly attractive for biosensing applications. In particular Carbon Nanotubes (CNTs can serve as scaffolds for immobilization of biomolecules at their surface, and combine several exceptional physical, chemical, electrical and optical characteristics properties which make them one of the best suited materials for the transduction of signals associated with the recognition of analytes, metabolites or disease biomarkers. Here we provide a comprehensive review on these carbon nanostructures, in which we will describe their structural and physical properties, discuss functionalization and cellular uptake, biocompatibility and toxicity issues. We further review historical developments in the field of biosensors, and describe the different types of biosensors which have been developed over time, with specific focus on CNT-conjugates engineered for biosensing applications, and in particular detection of cancer biomarkers.

  6. Carbon nanotube biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tîlmaciu, Carmen-Mihaela; Morris, May C.

    2015-01-01

    Nanomaterials possess unique features which make them particularly attractive for biosensing applications. In particular, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) can serve as scaffolds for immobilization of biomolecules at their surface, and combine several exceptional physical, chemical, electrical, and optical characteristics properties which make them one of the best suited materials for the transduction of signals associated with the recognition of analytes, metabolites, or disease biomarkers. Here we provide a comprehensive review on these carbon nanostructures, in which we describe their structural and physical properties, functionalization and cellular uptake, biocompatibility, and toxicity issues. We further review historical developments in the field of biosensors, and describe the different types of biosensors which have been developed over time, with specific focus on CNT-conjugates engineered for biosensing applications, and in particular detection of cancer biomarkers. PMID:26579509

  7. Hybrid carbon fiber/carbon nanotube composites for structural damping applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tehrani, M; Safdari, M; Boroujeni, A Y; Razavi, Z; Case, S W; Dahmen, K; Garmestani, H; Al-Haik, M S

    2013-04-19

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were grown on the surface of carbon fibers utilizing a relatively low temperature synthesis technique; graphitic structures by design (GSD). To probe the effects of the synthesis protocols on the mechanical properties, other samples with surface grown CNTs were prepared using catalytic chemical vapor deposition (CCVD). The woven graphite fabrics were thermally shielded with a thin film of SiO2 and CNTs were grown on top of this film. Raman spectroscopy and electron microscopy revealed the grown species to be multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). The damping performance of the hybrid CNT-carbon fiber-reinforced epoxy composite was examined using dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA). Mechanical testing confirmed that the degradations in the strength and stiffness as a result of the GSD process are far less than those encountered through using the CCVD technique and yet are negligible compared to the reference samples. The DMA results indicated that, despite the minimal degradation in the storage modulus, the loss tangent (damping) for the hybrid composites utilizing GSD-grown MWCNTs improved by 56% compared to the reference samples (based on raw carbon fibers with no surface treatment or surface grown carbon nanotubes) over the frequency range 1-60 Hz. These results indicated that the energy dissipation in the GSD-grown MWCNTs composite can be primarily attributed to the frictional sliding at the nanotube/epoxy interface and to a lesser extent to the stiff thermal shielding SiO2 film on the fiber/matrix interface.

  8. The Influence of Carbon Nanotube and Roll Bonding Parameters on the Bond Strength of Al Sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samadzadeh, Mahmoud; Toroghinejad, Mohammad Reza

    2014-05-01

    This study investigates the bond strength of aluminum sheets subjected to the roll bonding process in the presence of multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). The effects of MWCNTs dispersion, thickness reduction, weight fraction of MWCNTs at the interface, and rolling temperature on the bond strength of the commercial pure aluminum sheets are studied. The peeling test is used to evaluate the bond strength of aluminum sheets. Optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy are also used to evaluate the surface conditions of the peeled surfaces. Results indicate that, compared to the spread method, using the solution dispersion method to disperse MWCNTs reduces aluminum sheet's bond strength. Also, the presence of MWCNTs reduces the sheet's bond strength compared to aluminum sheets at a constant thickness reduction. However, bond strength is increased with higher thickness reductions in the presence or absence of MWCNTs. It is also shown that increasing the entry temperature improves bond strength, but that bond strength enhancement is lower in aluminum-MWCNTs sheets than in aluminum-aluminum sheets.

  9. Comparison of Electronic Structure and Magnetic Properties of Few Layer Graphene and Multiwall Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sekhar Chandra Ray

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A comparative study has been made for the non-catalyst based few layer graphene (FLG and Fe-catalyst based multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs. Magnetic and electronic properties of FLG and MWCNTs were studied using magnetic M-H hysteresis loops and synchrotron radiation based X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy measurements. Structural defects and electronic and bonding properties of FLG/MWCNTs have been studied using Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS, and ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS. The work functions of FLG and MWCNTs are 4.01 eV and 3.79 eV, respectively, obtained from UPS (He-I spectra. UPS (He-II results suggest that the density of states (DOS of MWCNTs is higher than FLG and is consistent with Raman spectroscopy result that shows the defect of MWCNTs is higher than FLG. The magnetic coercivity (Hc of the MWCNTs (~750 Oe is higher than FLG (~85 Oe which could be used for various technological magnetic applications.

  10. Adsorption of roxarsone from aqueous solution by multi-walled carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jianglin; Tong, Zilin; Hu, Zhenhu; Chen, Guowei; Chen, Tianhu

    2012-07-01

    Roxarsone, an organoarsenic compound serving as a common feeding additive in poultry industry, brings about potential risk of the toxic inorganic arsenate contamination in ambient environment. Current understanding in the dynamics of roxarsone removal and the determining environmental processes remains unclear, thus restricts the progress in roxarsone-contaminated wastewater treatment. In this study, the adsorption of roxarsone on multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) was investigated. The adsorption of roxarsone on MWCNTs decreased dramatically with increasing pH from 2.0 to 11.7 and decreased significantly with increasing ionic strength from 0 to 1.0 mol/L KCl. It was found that the sorption isotherms of roxarsone on MWCNTs were nonlinear, which can be well described according to the Freundlich and Polanyi-Manes models. Thermodynamic analysis indicates that the adsorption of roxarsone on MWCNTs is an exothermic and spontaneous process. Sorption site energy analysis reveals a distribution of sorption energy and the heterogeneous adsorption sites of roxarsone on MWCNTs. The dynamic adsorption with column shows the potential of the practical application for the roxarsone-contaminated wastewater treatment by MWCNTs. The FTIR analysis indicates that EDA interaction and electrostatic repulsion might be the dominant mechanisms for the adsorption of roxarsone on MWCNTs.

  11. Development of multi-walled carbon nanotubes reinforced monetite bionanocomposite cements for orthopedic applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boroujeni, Nariman Mansoori [Department of Mechanical, Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering, The University of Toledo, Toledo, OH (United States); Zhou, Huan, E-mail: Huan.Zhou@Rockets.utoledo.edu [Department of Mechanical, Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering, The University of Toledo, Toledo, OH (United States); Luchini, Timothy J.F. [Department of Mechanical, Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering, The University of Toledo, Toledo, OH (United States); Bhaduri, Sarit B. [Department of Mechanical, Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering, The University of Toledo, Toledo, OH (United States); Division of Dentistry, The University of Toledo, Toledo, OH (United States)

    2013-10-15

    In this study, we present results of our research on biodegradable monetite (DCPA, CaHPO{sub 4}) cement with surface-modified multi-walled carbon nanotubes (mMWCNTs) as potential bone defect repair material. The cement pastes showed desirable handling properties and possessed a suitable setting time for use in surgical setting. The incorporation of mMWCNTs shortened the setting time of DCPA and increased the compressive strength of DCPA cement from 11.09 ± 1.85 MPa to 21.56 ± 2.47 MPa. The cytocompatibility of the materials was investigated in vitro using the preosteoblast cell line MC3T3-E1. An increase of cell numbers was observed on both DCPA and DCPA-mMWCNTs. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) results also revealed an obvious cell growth on the surface of the cements. Based on these results, DCPA-mMWCNTs composite cements can be considered as potential bone defect repair materials. - Highlights: • A monetite bone cement for orthopedic applications is reported. • Incorporation of MWCNTs into monetite bone cement is discussed. • Surface functionalized MWCNTs can improve the mechanical strength of monetite cement. • MWCNTs have no impacts on the cytocompatibility of monetite cements.

  12. Scalable fabrication of immunosensors based on carbon nanotube polymer composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendoza, Ernest; Gonzalez-Guerrero, Ana B [Institut Catala de Nanotecnologia, Campus Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Orozco, Jahir; Jimenez-Jorquera, Cecilia; Fernandez-Sanchez, Cesar [Instituto de Microelectronica de Barcelona, CNM-IMB (CSIC), Campus Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Calle, Ana; Lechuga, Laura M [Instituto de Microelectronica de Madrid, CNM-IMM (CSIC), Isaac Newton 8, 28760 Tres Cantos, Madrid (Spain)], E-mail: Ernest.Mendoza.icn@uab.es

    2008-02-20

    In this work we present the fabrication and characterization of immunosensors based on polystyrene (PS)-multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) composites. The electrochemical properties of the sensors have been investigated and show that the surface area is increased upon addition of the MWCNT-PS layer. Furthermore, a plasma activation process is used to partially remove the PS and expose the MWCNTs. This results in a huge increase in the electrochemical area and opens up the possibility of binding biomolecules to the MWCNT wall. The MWCNTs have been functionalized covalently with a model antibody (rabbit IgG). The biosensors have been tested using amperometric techniques and show detection limits comparable to standard techniques such as ELISA.

  13. Rheological properties of carbon nanotubes-reinforced magnetorheological elastomer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aziz, S. A. A.; Mazlan, SA; Nik Ismail, N. I.; Ubaidillah; Khairi, MHA; Yunus, NA

    2017-01-01

    Magnetorheological elastomer (MRE) based on the natural rubber with different types of multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) as additives were synthesized. MRE with pristine MWCNTs was prepared as a control and the carboxylated (MWCNT-COOH), as well as hydroxylated (MWCNT-OH) were introduced as new additives in MRE. Their rheological properties under different magnetic field were evaluated by using the rheometer (MCR 302, AntonPaar, Austria) equipped with the electromagnetic device. The dependency of MREs towards excitation frequencies under different magnetic field was investigated. It is shown that the storage modulus and loss factor of MRE with functionalized MWCNTs exhibited noticeable increment in MR performance compared to control parallel with the frequencies increment.

  14. Ozone Sensing Based on Palladium Decorated Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selene Capula Colindres

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs were easily and efficiently decorated with Pd nanoparticles through a vapor-phase impregnation-decomposition method starting from palladium acetylacetonates. The sensor device consisted on a film of sensitive material (MWCNTs-Pd deposited by drop coating on platinum interdigitated electrodes on a SiO2 substrate. The sensor exhibited a resistance change to ozone (O3 with a response time of 60 s at different temperatures and the capability of detecting concentrations up to 20 ppb. The sensor shows the best response when exposed to O3 at 120 °C. The device shows a very reproducible sensor performance, with high repeatability, full recovery and efficient response.

  15. Freestanding Aligned Multi-walled Carbon Nanotubes for Supercapacitor Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, João Vitor Silva; Corat, Evaldo José; May, Paul William; Cardoso, Lays Dias Ribeiro; Lelis, Pedro Almeida; Zanin, Hudson

    2016-11-01

    We report on the synthesis and electrochemical properties of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) for supercapacitor devices. Freestanding vertically-aligned MWCNTs and MWCNT powder were grown concomitantly in a one-step chemical vapour deposition process. Samples were characterized by scanning and transmission electron microscopies and Fourier transform infrared and Raman spectroscopies. At similar film thicknesses and surface areas, the freestanding MWCNT electrodes showed higher electrochemical capacitance and gravimetric specific energy and power than the randomly-packed nanoparticle-based electrodes. This suggests that more ordered electrode film architectures facilitate faster electron and ion transport during the charge-discharge processes. Energy storage and supply or supercapacitor devices made from these materials could bridge the gap between rechargeable batteries and conventional high-power electrostatic capacitors.

  16. Transactivator of transcription (TAT) peptide- chitosan functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotubes as a potential drug delivery vehicle for cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Xia; Liu, Lanxia; Zhu, Dunwan; Zhang, Hailing; Leng, Xigang

    2015-01-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT)-based drug delivery vehicles might find great potential in cancer therapy via the combination of chemotherapy with photothermal therapy due to the strong optical absorbance of CNTs in the near-infrared region. However, the application of CNTs in cancer therapy was considerably constrained by their lack of solubility in aqueous medium, as well as the cytotoxicity caused by their hydrophobic surface. Intracellular delivery efficiency is another factor determining the application potential of CNTs in cancer therapy. In the present study, low-molecular-weight chitosan conjugated with transactivator of transcription (TAT) peptide was used for noncovalent functionalization of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), aiming at providing a more efficient drug delivery vehicle for cancer therapy. The TAT-chitosan-conjugated MWCNTs (MWCNTs-TC) were further investigated for their water solubility, cytotoxicity, cell-penetrating capability, and accumulation in tumor. It was found that MWCNTs-TC were essentially nontoxic with satisfying water solubility, and they were more efficient in terms of cancer-targeted intracellular transport both in vitro and in vivo as compared with chitosan-modified MWCNTs (MWCNTs-CS), suggesting the great application potential of MWCNTs-TC in cancer therapy.

  17. Effect of anti-biofouling potential of multi-walled carbon nanotubes-filled polydimethylsiloxane composites on pioneer microbial colonization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yuan; Lang, Yanhe; Sun, Qian; Liang, Shuang; Liu, Yongkang; Zhang, Zhizhou

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, two carbon nanotube (CNT) nanofillers, namely the multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and the carboxyl-modified MWCNTs (cMWCNTs), were introduced into the polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) matrix respectively, in order to produce the PDMS composites with reinforced anti-biofouling properties. The anti-biofouling capacity of the silicone-based coatings, including the unfilled PDMS (P0), the MWCNTs-filled PDMS (PM) and the cMWCNTs-filled PDMS (PC), was examined via the field assays conducted in Weihai, China. The effect of different silicone-based coatings on the dynamic variations of the pioneer microbial-community diversity was analyzed using the single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) technique. The PM and PC surfaces have exhibited excellent anti-biofouling properties in contrast to that of the PDMS surface, with extremely low attachment of the early colonizers, such as juvenile invertebrates, seaweeds and algae sporelings. The PM and PC surfaces can effectively prevent biofouling for more than 12 weeks. These combined results suggest that the incorporation of MWCNTs or cMWCNTs into the PDMS matrix can dramatically reinforce its anti-biofouling properties. The SSCP analysis reveals that compared with the PDMS surfaces, the PM and PC surfaces have strong modulating effect on the pioneer prokaryotic and eukaryotic communities, particularly on the colonization of pioneer eukaryotic microbes. The significantly reduced pioneer eukaryotic-community diversity may contribute to the weakening of the subsequent colonization of macrofoulers.

  18. Carboxylated multi-walled carbon nanotubes aggravated biochemical and subcellular damages in leaves of broad bean (Vicia faba L.) seedlings under combined stress of lead and cadmium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Chengrun, E-mail: chengrunwang@163.com [School of Life Science, Huainan Normal University, Huainan 232001 (China); Liu, Haitao; Chen, Jinyun [School of Life Science, Huainan Normal University, Huainan 232001 (China); Tian, Yuan [Department of Plant, Soil and Microbial Sciences, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Shi, Jian; Li, Dongdong; Guo, Chen; Ma, Qingping [School of Life Science, Huainan Normal University, Huainan 232001 (China)

    2014-06-01

    Highlights: • MWCNTs-COOH disturb mineral elements and cause oxidative damages in the leaves. • Cd and Pb combination result in reduction of mineral elements and enrichment of Na, involving in toxicity mechanisms. • MWCNTs-COOH facilitate Cd and Pb uptake, and aggravate biochemical and subcellular damages. - Abstract: Increasing industrialization of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) would inevitably lead to their release into the environment and combination with heavy metals. However, studies concerning the combined effects of MWCNTs and heavy metals on agricultural crops are limited. Herein, effects and mechanisms of carboxylated MWCNTs (MWCNTs-COOH) (2.5, 5 and 10 mg/L) and their combination with 20 μM Pb and 5 μM Cd (shortened as Pb + Cd) on Vicia faba L. seedlings were investigated. The results showed that the MWCNTs-COOH disturbed the imbalance of nutrient elements, and caused oxidative stress and damages in the leaves. Additionally, the combination of MWCNTs-COOH with Pb + Cd resulted in enrichment of Pb and Cd, and deterioration of oxidative damages compared with the treatments of MWCNTs-COOH or Pb + Cd alone in the leaves. As the results, the concentrations of MWCNTs-COOH not only caused oxidative stress, but also exacerbated the biochemical and subcellular damages due to the treatment of Pb + Cd in the leaves. It also suggests that persistent release of MWCNTs-COOH into the environment may cause phytotoxicity and aggravate ecological risks due to combination of heavy metals.

  19. Atomic transportation via carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Quan

    2009-01-01

    The transportation of helium atoms in a single-walled carbon nanotube is reported via molecular dynamics simulations. The efficiency of the atomic transportation is found to be dependent on the type of the applied loading and the loading rate as well as the temperature in the process. Simulations show the transportation is a result of the van der Waals force between the nanotube and the helium atoms through a kink propagation initiated in the nanotube.

  20. Pre-treatment of multi-walled carbon nanotubes for polyetherimide mixed matrix hollow fiber membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goh, P S; Ng, B C; Ismail, A F; Aziz, M; Hayashi, Y

    2012-11-15

    Mixed matrix hollow fibers composed of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and polyetherimide (PEI) were fabricated. Pre-treatment of MWCNTs was carried out prior to the incorporation into the polymer matrix using a simple and feasible two stages approach that involved dry air oxidation and surfactant dispersion. The characterizations of the surface treated MWCNTs using TEM and Raman spectroscopy have evidenced the effectiveness of dry air oxidation in eliminating undesired amorphous carbon and metal catalyst while surfactant dispersion using Triton X100 has suppressed the agglomeration of MWCNTs. The resultant mixed matrix hollow fibers were applied for O(2)/N(2) pure gas separation. Interestingly, it was found that removal of disordered amorphous carbons and metal particles has allowed the hollow structures to be more accessible for the fast and smooth transport of gas molecules, hence resulted in noticeable improvement in the gas separation properties. The composite hollow fibers embedded with the surface modified MWCNTs showed increase in permeability as much as 60% while maintaining the selectivity of the O(2)/N(2) gas pair. This study highlights the necessity to establish an appropriate pre-treatment approach for MWCNTs in order to fully utilize the beneficial transport properties of this material in mixed matrix polymer nanocomposite for gas separation.

  1. Method for synthesizing carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Hongyou

    2012-09-04

    A method for preparing a precursor solution for synthesis of carbon nanomaterials, where a polar solvent is added to at least one block copolymer and at least one carbohydrate compound, and the precursor solution is processed using a self-assembly process and subsequent heating to form nanoporous carbon films, porous carbon nanotubes, and porous carbon nanoparticles.

  2. Development of scalable methods for the utilization of multi-walled carbon nanotubes in polymer and metal matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vennerberg, Danny Curtis

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) have received considerable attention as reinforcement for composites due to their high tensile strength, stiffness, electrical conductivity and thermal conductivity as well as their low coefficient of thermal expansion. However, despite the availability of huge quantities of low-cost, commercially synthesized nanotubes, the utilization of MWCNTs in engineering composites is extremely limited due to difficulties in achieving uniform dispersion and strong interfacial bonding with the matrix. A proven method of enhancing the nanotube-polymer interface and degree of MWCNT dispersion involves functionalizing the MWCNTs through oxidation with strong acids. While effective at laboratory scales, this technique is not well-suited for large-scale operations due to long processing times, poor yield, safety hazards, and environmental concerns. This work aims to find scalable solutions to several of the challenges associated with the fabrication of MWCNT-reinforced composites. For polymer matrix composite applications, a rapid, dry, and cost-effective method of oxidizing MWCNTs with O3 in a fluidized bed was developed as an alternative to acid oxidation. Oxidized MWCNTs were further functionalized with silane coupling agents using water and supercritical carbon dioxide as solvents in order to endow the MWCNTs with matrix-specific functionalities. The effect of silanization on the cure kinetics, rheological behavior, and thermo-mechanical properties of model epoxy nanocomposites were investigated. Small additions of functionalized MWCNTs were found to increase the glass transition temperature, strength, and toughness of the epoxy. In order to achieve composite properties approaching those of individual nanotubes, new approaches are needed to allow for high loadings of MWCNTs. One strategy involves making macroscopic mats of nanotubes called buckypaper (BP) and subsequently infiltrating the mats with resin in processes familiar to

  3. Carbon nanotubes: engineering biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez-Gualdrón, Diego A; Burgos, Juan C; Yu, Jiamei; Balbuena, Perla B

    2011-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are cylinder-shaped allotropic forms of carbon, most widely produced under chemical vapor deposition. They possess astounding chemical, electronic, mechanical, and optical properties. Being among the most promising materials in nanotechnology, they are also likely to revolutionize medicine. Among other biomedical applications, after proper functionalization carbon nanotubes can be transformed into sophisticated biosensing and biocompatible drug-delivery systems, for specific targeting and elimination of tumor cells. This chapter provides an introduction to the chemical and electronic structure and properties of single-walled carbon nanotubes, followed by a description of the main synthesis and post-synthesis methods. These sections allow the reader to become familiar with the specific characteristics of these materials and the manner in which these properties may be dependent on the specific synthesis and post-synthesis processes. The chapter ends with a review of the current biomedical applications of carbon nanotubes, highlighting successes and challenges.

  4. Cure Kinetics of Epoxy Nanocomposites Affected by MWCNTs Functionalization: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reza Saeb

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The current paper provides an overview to emphasize the role of functionalization of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs in manipulating cure kinetics of epoxy nanocomposites, which itself determines ultimate properties of the resulting compound. In this regard, the most commonly used functionalization schemes, that is, carboxylation and amidation, are thoroughly surveyed to highlight the role of functionalized nanotubes in controlling the rate of autocatalytic and vitrification kinetics. The current literature elucidates that the mechanism of curing in epoxy/MWCNTs nanocomposites remains almost unaffected by the functionalization of carbon nanotubes. On the other hand, early stage facilitation of autocatalytic reactions in the presence of MWCNTs bearing amine groups has been addressed by several researchers. When carboxylated nanotubes were used to modify MWCNTs, the rate of such reactions diminished as a consequence of heterogeneous dispersion within the epoxy matrix. At later stages of curing, however, the prolonged vitrification was seen to be dominant. Thus, the type of functional groups covalently located on the surface of MWCNTs directly affects the degree of polymer-nanotube interaction followed by enhancement of curing reaction. Our survey demonstrated that most widespread efforts ever made to represent multifarious surface-treated MWCNTs have not been directed towards preparation of epoxy nanocomposites, but they could result in property synergism.

  5. p-Phosphonic acid calix[8]arene assisted dispersion and stabilisation of pea-pod C60@multi-walled carbon nanotubes in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xianjue; Gibson, Christopher T; Britton, Joshua; Eggers, Paul K; Wahid, M Haniff; Raston, Colin L

    2015-02-11

    A facile approach has been developed for non-covalently stabilising pristine C60 and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) in water in the presence of p-phosphonic acid calix[8]arene, along with the formation of a 'pea-pod' encapsulation of the fullerene inside the MWCNTs. Aqueous dispersions of the different carbon nano-materials are readily decorated with palladium nanoparticles.

  6. Detection of methane using multi-walled carbon nanotubes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    J Kathirvelan; R Vijayaraghavan

    2015-08-01

    A sensor for detecting and estimating methane using multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) as the sensing element has been developed for the first time. Silver electrodes have been ink-jet printed on glass substrate over which MWCNT is brush coated to fabricate the sensor element which is of chemoresistive type. The sensitivity of the sensor (increase in the resistance of the sensor on exposure to analyte) increases linearly with concentration of methane and a maximum sensitivity of about 20% has been observed for 160 ppm of methane. A prototype device has been fabricated with this sensor and tested for its performance. It could be used to detect methane on site.

  7. Drug-loading capacity and nuclear targeting of multiwalled carbon nanotubes grafted with anionic amphiphilic copolymers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsai HC

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Hsieh-Chih Tsai,1,* Jeng-Yee Lin,2,* Faiza Maryani,1 Chun-Chiang Huang,1 Toyoko Imae1,31Graduate Institute of Applied Science and Technology, 2Division of Plastic Surgery, Department of Surgery, Taipei Medical University Hospital, Taipei Medical University, 3Department of Chemical Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taipei, Taiwan *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: In this study, three types of hybrid nanotubes (NTs, ie, oxidized multiwalled carbon NTs (COOH MWCNTs, heparin (Hep-conjugated MWCNTs (Hep MWCNTs, and diblock copolymer polyglycolic acid (PGA-co-heparin conjugated to MWCNTs (PGA MWCNTs, were synthesized with improved biocompatibility and drug-loading capacity. Hydrophilic Hep substituents on MWCNTs improved biocompatibility and acted as nucleus-sensitive segments on the CNT carrier, whereas the addition of PGA enhanced drug-loading capacity. In the PGA MWCNT system, the amphiphilic copolymer (PGA-Hep formed micelles on the side walls of CNTs, as confirmed by electron microscopy. The PGA system encapsulated the hydrophobic drug with high efficiency compared to the COOH MWCNT and Hep MWCNT systems. This is because the drug was loaded onto the PGA MWCNTs through hydrophobic forces and onto the CNTs by ∏–∏ stacking interactions. Additionally, most of the current drug-carrier designs that target cancer cells release the drug in the lysosome or cytoplasm. However, nuclear-targeted drug release is expected to kill cancer cells more directly and efficiently. In our study, PGA MWCNT carriers effectively delivered the active anticancer drug doxorubicin into targeted nuclei. This study may provide an effective strategy for the development of carbon-based drug carriers for nuclear-targeted drug delivery. Keywords: carbon nanotube, amphiphilic copolymer, drug loading, nucleus targeting, cancer therapy

  8. Separation of Bacteria, Protozoa and Carbon Nanotubes by Density Gradient Centrifugation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Mortimer

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Sustainable production and use of carbon nanotube (CNT-enabled materials require efficient assessment of CNT environmental hazards, including the potential for CNT bioaccumulation and biomagnification in environmental receptors. Microbes, as abundant organisms responsible for nutrient cycling in soil and water, are important ecological receptors for studying the effects of CNTs. Quantification of CNT association with microbial cells requires efficient separation of CNT-associated cells from individually dispersed CNTs and CNT agglomerates. Here, we designed, optimized, and demonstrated procedures for separating bacteria (Pseudomonas aeruginosa from unbound multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs and MWCNT agglomerates using sucrose density gradient centrifugation. We demonstrate separation of protozoa (Tetrahymena thermophila from MWCNTs, bacterial agglomerates, and protozoan fecal pellets by centrifugation in an iodixanol solution. The presence of MWCNTs in the density gradients after centrifugation was determined by quantification of 14C-labeled MWCNTs; the recovery of microbes from the density gradient media was confirmed by optical microscopy. Protozoan intracellular contents of MWCNTs and of bacteria were also unaffected by the designed separation process. The optimized methods contribute to improved efficiency and accuracy in quantifying MWCNT association with bacteria and MWCNT accumulation in protozoan cells, thus supporting improved assessment of CNT bioaccumulation.

  9. Separation of Bacteria, Protozoa and Carbon Nanotubes by Density Gradient Centrifugation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortimer, Monika; Petersen, Elijah J.; Buchholz, Bruce A.; Holden, Patricia A.

    2016-01-01

    Sustainable production and use of carbon nanotube (CNT)-enabled materials require efficient assessment of CNT environmental hazards, including the potential for CNT bioaccumulation and biomagnification in environmental receptors. Microbes, as abundant organisms responsible for nutrient cycling in soil and water, are important ecological receptors for studying the effects of CNTs. Quantification of CNT association with microbial cells requires efficient separation of CNT-associated cells from individually dispersed CNTs and CNT agglomerates. Here, we designed, optimized, and demonstrated procedures for separating bacteria (Pseudomonas aeruginosa) from unbound multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and MWCNT agglomerates using sucrose density gradient centrifugation. We demonstrate separation of protozoa (Tetrahymena thermophila) from MWCNTs, bacterial agglomerates, and protozoan fecal pellets by centrifugation in an iodixanol solution. The presence of MWCNTs in the density gradients after centrifugation was determined by quantification of 14C-labeled MWCNTs; the recovery of microbes from the density gradient media was confirmed by optical microscopy. Protozoan intracellular contents of MWCNTs and of bacteria were also unaffected by the designed separation process. The optimized methods contribute to improved efficiency and accuracy in quantifying MWCNT association with bacteria and MWCNT accumulation in protozoan cells, thus supporting improved assessment of CNT bioaccumulation. PMID:27917301

  10. Enhancement of thermal stability of multiwalled carbon nanotubes via different silanization routes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scheibe, B., E-mail: bscheibe@zut.edu.p [Centre of Knowledge Based Nanomaterials and Technologies, Institute of Chemical and Enviroment Engineering, West Pomeranian University of Technology, Szczecin (Poland); Borowiak-Palen, E.; Kalenczuk, R.J. [Centre of Knowledge Based Nanomaterials and Technologies, Institute of Chemical and Enviroment Engineering, West Pomeranian University of Technology, Szczecin (Poland)

    2010-06-18

    This work presents an effect of two different silanization procedures on thermal and structural properties of oxidized and oxidized followed by sodium borohydrate (NaBH{sub 4}) reduction of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). Purified sample was oxidized in a mixture of nitric and sulfuric acids in a reflux. An oxidized material was divided into two batches. The first batch underwent a silanization procedure directly, while the second batch was reduced by NaBH{sub 4} treatment prior to the silanization. The silanization experiments were performed: (A) with {gamma}-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES) at room temperature in acetone (pH {approx}7) and (B) with condensated {gamma}-aminopropyltriethoxysilane at 40 {sup o}C in water (pH 4). The extent of the functionalization of the samples after each procedure was examined by Raman spectroscopy. The vibrational properties of the materials were studied via Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Boehms titration technique was applied to quantify the amount of the functional groups on MWCNTs. The morphology of the pristine and functionalized carbon nanotubes was exposed to high-resolution transmission electron microscopy analysis. The energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis was used to characterize the elemental composition of each sample. The effect of the silanization process on the thermal properties of MWCNTs was investigated by thermogravimetry analysis. Interestingly, the significant increase of the thermal stability of silanized MWCNTs samples in respect to the pristine MWCNTs was observed.

  11. High-yield Synthesis of Multiwalled Carbon Nanotube by Mechanothermal Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manafi SA

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This study reports on the mechanothermal synthesis of multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWCNTs from elemental graphite powder. Initially, high ultra-active graphite powder can be obtained by mechanical milling under argon atmosphere. Finally, the mechanical activation product is heat-treated at 1350°C for 2–4 h under argon gas flow. After heat-treatment, active graphite powders were successfully changed into MWCNTs with high purity. The XRD analyses showed that in the duration 150 h of milling, all the raw materials were changed to the desired materials. From the broadening of the diffraction lines in the XRD patterns, it was concluded that the graphite crystallites were nanosized, and raising the milling duration resulted in the fineness of the particles and the increase of the strain. The structure and morphology of MWCNTs were investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM. The yield of MWCNTs was estimated through SEM and TEM observations of the as-prepared samples was to be about 90%. Indeed, mechanothermal method is of interest for fundamental understanding and improvement of commercial synthesis of carbon nanotubes (CNTs. As a matter of fact, the method of mechanothermal guarantees the production of MWCNTs suitable for different applications.

  12. Transactivator of transcription (TAT peptide–chitosan functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotubes as a potential drug delivery vehicle for cancer therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong X

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Xia Dong, Lanxia Liu, Dunwan Zhu, Hailing Zhang, Xigang Leng Laboratory of Bioengineering, Institute of Biomedical Engineering, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Tianjin Key Laboratory of Biomedical Materials, Tianjin, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Carbon nanotube (CNT-based drug delivery vehicles might find great potential in cancer therapy via the combination of chemotherapy with photothermal therapy due to the strong optical absorbance of CNTs in the near-infrared region. However, the application of CNTs in cancer therapy was considerably constrained by their lack of solubility in aqueous medium, as well as the cytotoxicity caused by their hydrophobic surface. Intracellular delivery efficiency is another factor determining the application potential of CNTs in cancer therapy. In the present study, low-molecular-weight chitosan conjugated with transactivator of transcription (TAT peptide was used for noncovalent functionalization of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs, aiming at providing a more efficient drug delivery vehicle for cancer therapy. The TAT–chitosan-conjugated MWCNTs (MWCNTs-TC were further investigated for their water solubility, cytotoxicity, cell-penetrating capability, and accumulation in tumor. It was found that MWCNTs-TC were essentially nontoxic with satisfying water solubility, and they were more efficient in terms of cancer-targeted intracellular transport both in vitro and in vivo as compared with chitosan-modified MWCNTs (MWCNTs-CS, suggesting the great application potential of MWCNTs-TC in cancer therapy. Keywords: carbon nanotube, TAT, chitosan, drug delivery

  13. Functionalization of Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khare, Bishun N. (Inventor); Meyyappan, Meyya (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    Method and system for functionalizing a collection of carbon nanotubes (CNTs). A selected precursor gas (e.g., H2 or F2 or CnHm) is irradiated to provide a cold plasma of selected target species particles, such as atomic H or F, in a first chamber. The target species particles are d irected toward an array of CNTs located in a second chamber while suppressing transport of ultraviolet radiation to the second chamber. A CNT array is functionalized with the target species particles, at or below room temperature, to a point of saturation, in an exposure time interval no longer than about 30 sec. *Discrimination against non-target species is provided by (i) use of a target species having a lifetime that is much greater than a lifetime of a non-target species and/or (2) use of an applied magnetic field to discriminate between charged particle trajectories for target species and for non-target species.

  14. Carbon Nanotube Electron Gun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Cattien V. (Inventor); Ribaya, Bryan P. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    An electron gun, an electron source for an electron gun, an extractor for an electron gun, and a respective method for producing the electron gun, the electron source and the extractor are disclosed. Embodiments provide an electron source utilizing a carbon nanotube (CNT) bonded to a substrate for increased stability, reliability, and durability. An extractor with an aperture in a conductive material is used to extract electrons from the electron source, where the aperture may substantially align with the CNT of the electron source when the extractor and electron source are mated to form the electron gun. The electron source and extractor may have alignment features for aligning the electron source and the extractor, thereby bringing the aperture and CNT into substantial alignment when assembled. The alignment features may provide and maintain this alignment during operation to improve the field emission characteristics and overall system stability of the electron gun.

  15. Enhanced Carbon Nanotube Ultracapacitors Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed innovation utilizes carbon nanotubes (CNTs) coated with pseudo-capacitive MnO2 material as nano-composite electrode and ionic electrolyte for the...

  16. Carbon nanotubes for coherent spintronics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuemmeth, Ferdinand; Churchill, H O H; Herring, P K;

    2010-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes bridge the molecular and crystalline quantum worlds, and their extraordinary electronic, mechanical and optical properties have attracted enormous attention from a broad scientific community. We review the basic principles of fabricating spin-electronic devices based on individua...

  17. Ultra-stiff large-area carpets of carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meysami, Seyyed Shayan; Dallas, Panagiotis; Britton, Jude; Lozano, Juan G.; Murdock, Adrian T.; Ferraro, Claudio; Gutierrez, Eduardo Saiz; Rijnveld, Niek; Holdway, Philip; Porfyrakis, Kyriakos; Grobert, Nicole

    2016-06-01

    Herewith, we report the influence of post-synthesis heat treatment (aerosol-assisted chemical vapour deposition (AACVD) setup. Electron and X-ray diffraction showed that the heat treatment at 2350 °C under inert atmosphere purifies, removes residual catalyst particles, and partially aligns adjacent single crystals (crystallites) in polycrystalline MWCNTs. The purification and improvement in the crystallites alignment within the MWCNTs resulted in reduced dispersibility of the VA-MWCNTs in liquid media. High-resolution microscopy revealed that the crystallinity is improved in scales of few tens of nanometres while the point defects remain largely unaffected. The heat treatment also had a marked benefit on the mechanical properties of the carpets. For the first time, we report compression moduli as high as 120 MPa for VA-MWCNT carpets, i.e. an order of magnitude higher than previously reported figures. The application of higher temperatures (arc-discharge plasma, >=4000 °C) resulted in the formation of a novel graphite-matrix composite reinforced with CVD and arc-discharge-like carbon nanotubes.Herewith, we report the influence of post-synthesis heat treatment (aerosol-assisted chemical vapour deposition (AACVD) setup. Electron and X-ray diffraction showed that the heat treatment at 2350 °C under inert atmosphere purifies, removes residual catalyst particles, and partially aligns adjacent single crystals (crystallites) in polycrystalline MWCNTs. The purification and improvement in the crystallites alignment within the MWCNTs resulted in reduced dispersibility of the VA-MWCNTs in liquid media. High-resolution microscopy revealed that the crystallinity is improved in scales of few tens of nanometres while the point defects remain largely unaffected. The heat treatment also had a marked benefit on the mechanical properties of the carpets. For the first time, we report compression moduli as high as 120 MPa for VA-MWCNT carpets, i.e. an order of magnitude higher than

  18. Surface Modification of Multiwall Carbon Nanotubes with Cationic Conjugated Polyelectrolytes: Fundamental Interactions and Intercalation into Conductive Poly(methyl-methacrylate) Composites

    KAUST Repository

    Ezzeddine, Alaa

    2015-05-22

    This research investigates the modification and dispersion and of pristine multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) through a simple solution mixing technique based on noncovalent interactions between poly(phenylene ethynylene) based conjugated polyelectrolytes functionalized with cationic imidazolium solubilizing groups (PIM-2 and PIM-4) and MWCNTs. Spectroscopic studies demonstrated the ability of PIMs to strongly interact with and efficiently disperse MWCNTs in different solvents mainly due to π-interactions between the PIMs and MWCNTs. Transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy revealed the coating of the polyelectrolytes on the walls of the nanotubes. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) studies confirm the homogenous dispersion of PIM modified MWCNTs in poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) matrix. The addition of 1 wt% PIM modified MWCNTs to the matrix has led to a significant decrease in DC resistivity of the composite (13 orders of magnitude). The increase in electrical conductivity and the improvement in thermal and mechanical properties of the membranes containing the PIM modified MWCNTs is ascribed to the formation of MWCNTs networks and cross-linking sites that provided channels for the electrons to move in throughout the matrix and reinforced the interface between MWCNTs and PMMA.

  19. Efficient surface modification of MWCNTs with vitamin B1 and production of poly(ester-imide)/MWCNTs nanocomposites containing L-phenylalanine moiety: Thermal and microscopic study

    OpenAIRE

    S. Mallakpour; S Soltanian

    2016-01-01

    A simple and efficient method was presented for chemical functionalization of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) with vitamin B1. Poly(ester-imide) (PEI) based nanocomposites were prepared by the incorporation of different amounts of modified MWCNTs (5, 10, 15 wt%) into a chiral and biodegradable PEI by solution blending and ultrasonic dispersion methods. The chiral PEI was produced by a step-growth polymerization of chiral diacid with 4,4'-thiobis(2-tertbutyl-5-methylphenol). Spectroscop...

  20. Molybdenum Disulfide Sheathed Carbon Nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu Chun SONG; Zhu De XU; Yi Fan ZHENG; Gui HAN; Bo LIU; Wei Xiang CHEN

    2004-01-01

    Single and double layered MoS2-coated multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNs) were successfully prepared by pyrolyzing (NH4)2MoS4-coated multiwalled carbon nanotubes in an H2 atmosphere at 900℃. MoS2-coated MWCNs would be expected to have different tribological and mechanical properties compared to MoS2, so it may have potential applications in many fields.

  1. Selective functionalization of carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strano, Michael S. (Inventor); Usrey, Monica (Inventor); Barone, Paul (Inventor); Dyke, Christopher A. (Inventor); Tour, James M. (Inventor); Kittrell, W. Carter (Inventor); Hauge, Robert H. (Inventor); Smalley, Richard E. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    The present invention is directed toward methods of selectively functionalizing carbon nanotubes of a specific type or range of types, based on their electronic properties, using diazonium chemistry. The present invention is also directed toward methods of separating carbon nanotubes into populations of specific types or range(s) of types via selective functionalization and electrophoresis, and also to the novel compositions generated by such separations.

  2. Carbon nanotubes for coherent spintronics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuemmeth, Ferdinand; Churchill, H O H; Herring, P K

    2010-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes bridge the molecular and crystalline quantum worlds, and their extraordinary electronic, mechanical and optical properties have attracted enormous attention from a broad scientific community. We review the basic principles of fabricating spin-electronic devices based on individual......, electrically-gated carbon nanotubes, and present experimental efforts to understand their electronic and nuclear spin degrees of freedom, which in the future may enable quantum applications....

  3. MWCNTs/SiO2 Composite System: Carrier Transmission, Twin-Percolation and Dielectric Properties

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAO Wen-Qiang; LU Ming-Ming; WEN Bo; CHEN Yuan-Lu; LI Hong-Bo; YUAN Jie; CAO Mao-Sheng

    2011-01-01

    We synthesize composite systems of multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs)/SiO2 by using the sol-gel method.The dielectric properties of the systems with different-concentration MWCNTs are studied.In our MWCNTs/SiO2 inorganic systems,the twin-percolation phenomenon exists when the concentrations of MWCNTs are 5-10% and 15-20%.The permittivity and conductivity have jumping changes.The twin-percolation phenomenon is attributed to the special transfer mechanism of MWCNTs in the system,determined by hopping and migrating electrons.Variations of dielectric properties and conductance of the M WCNTs/SiO2 systems are conformed to the percolation theory.The special percolation phenomenon and electric properties of MWCNTs/SiO2 can help us comprehend the conductivity mechanism of the MWCNTs/SiO2 systems effectively,and promote the development of a high performance function composite system.In recent years,one-dimensional (1D) nanomaterials,and especially 1D carbon nanomaterials,have attracted extensive interests due to their unique properties in various fields,such as physics,[1-4] chemistry,[5-8] and materials.[9,10] Carbon nanotubes (CNTs)[11-14] with unique one-dimensional nanostructures are widely used in field emission devices,hydrogen storage and microwave absorption,making them a good candidate for practical applications.%We synthesize composite systems of multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs)/SiO2 by using the sol-gel method. The dielectric properties of the systems with different-concentration MWCNTs are studied. In our MWCNTs/SiO2 inorganic systems, the twin-percolation phenomenon exists when the concentrations of MWCNTs are 5-10% and 15 20%. The permittivity and conductivity have jumping changes. The twin-percolation phenomenon is attributed to the special transfer mechanism of MWCNTs in the system, determined by hopping and migrating electrons. Variations of dielectric properties and conductance of the MWCNTs/SiO2 systems are conformed to the percolation theory

  4. Differentiation of chemical reaction activity of various carbon nanotubes using redox potential: Classification by physical and chemical structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuruoka, Shuji; Matsumoto, Hidetoshi; Castranova, Vincent; Porter, Dale W; Yanagisawa, Takashi; Saito, Naoto; Kobayashi, Shinsuke; Endo, Morinobu

    2015-12-01

    The present study systematically examined the kinetics of a hydroxyl radical scavenging reaction of various carbon nanotubes (CNTs) including double-walled and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (DWCNTs and MWCNTs), and carbon nano peapods (AuCl3@DWCNT). The theoretical model that we recently proposed based on the redox potential of CNTs was used to analyze the experimental results. The reaction kinetics for DWCNTs and thin MWCNTs agreed well with the theoretical model and was consistent with each other. On the other hand, thin and thick MWCNTs behaved differently, which was consistent with the theory. Additionally, surface morphology of CNTs substantially influenced the reaction kinetics, while the doped particles in the center hollow parts of CNTs (AuCl3@DWCNT) shifted the redox potential in a different direction. These findings make it possible to predict the chemical and biological reactivity of CNTs based on the structural and chemical nature and their influence on the redox potential.

  5. Flexible carbon nanotube nanocomposite sensor for multiple physiological parameter monitoring

    KAUST Repository

    Nag, Anindya

    2016-10-16

    The paper presents the design, development, and fabrication of a flexible and wearable sensor based on carbon nanotube nanocomposite for monitoring specific physiological parameters. Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) was used as the substrate with a thin layer of a nanocomposite comprising functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and PDMS as electrodes. The sensor patch functionalized on strain-sensitive capacitive sensing from interdigitated electrodes which were patterned with a laser on the nanocomposite layer. The thickness of the electrode layer was optimized regarding strain and conductivity. The sensor patch was connected to a monitoring device from one end and attached to the body on the other for examining purposes. Experimental results show the capability of the sensor patch used to detect respiration and limb movements. This work is a stepping stone of the sensing system to be developed for multiple physiological parameters.

  6. Interactions between carbon nanotubes and bioactives: a drug delivery perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehra, Neelesh Kumar; Palakurthi, Srinath

    2016-04-01

    Applications of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in the biomedical arena have gained increased attention over the past decade. Surface engineering of CNTs by covalent and noncovalent modifications enables site-specific drug delivery and targeting. CNTs are available as single-, double-, triple-, and multiwalled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs, DWCNTs, TWCNTs, and MWCNTs, respectively) and have unique physicochemical properties, including a high surface area, high loading efficiency, good biocompatibility, low toxicity, ultra lightweight, rich surface chemistry, non-immunogenicity, and photoluminescence. In this review, we highlight current understanding of the different types of physical and chemical interaction that occur between therapeutics and CNTs, and the potential application of the latter in drug delivery and imaging. Such understanding will aid exploration of the utility of multifunctional CNTs as pharmaceutical nanocarriers, and potential safety and toxicity issues.

  7. Carbon nanotube reinforced metal binder for diamond cutting tools

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sidorenko, Daria; Mishnaevsky, Leon; Levashov, Evgeny;

    2015-01-01

    The potential of carbon nanotube reinforcement of metallic binders for the improvement of quality and efficiency of diamond cutting wheels is studied. The effect of multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) reinforcement on the mechanical properties i.e. hardness, Young modulus, strength and deformation...... behavior of copper and iron based binder for diamond cutting wheels is investigated experimentally and numerically. Computational micromechanical studies were carried out to clarify the mechanisms of the MWCNT material strengthening. It is demonstrated that the adding of MWCNTs leads to the decrease...... of grain size of the structural constituents of the binder, what in turn leads to the improved simultaneously hardness, Young modulus, plastic extension, bending strength and performances of the metallic binders. Comparing service properties of diamond end-cutting drill bits with and without MWCNT one...

  8. Using carbon nanotubes to induce micronuclei and double strand breaks of the DNA in human cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cveticanin, Jelena; Joksic, Gordana; Leskovac, Andreja; Petrovic, Sandra; Sobot, Ana Valenta; Neskovic, Olivera, E-mail: oliveran@vinca.rs [Vinca Institute of Nuclear Sciences, PO Box 522, Belgrade (Serbia)

    2010-01-08

    Carbon nanotubes are unique one-dimensional macromolecules with promising applications in biology and medicine. Since their toxicity is still under debate, here we present a study investigating the genotoxic properties of purified single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), and amide functionalized purified SWCNTs on cultured human lymphocytes employing cytokinesis block micronucleus assay and enumeration of {gamma}H2AX foci as a measure of double strand breaks (DSBs) of the DNA in normal human fibroblasts. SWCNTs induce micronuclei (MN) formation in lymphocytes and decrease the proliferation potential (CBPI) of cells. In a fibroblast cell line the same dose of SWCNTs induces {gamma}H2AX foci 2.7-fold higher than in a control. Amide functionalized purified SWCNTs behave differently: they do not disturb the cell proliferation potential of harvested lymphocytes, but induce micronuclei to a higher extent than SWCNTs. When applied on fibroblasts, amide functionalized SWCNTs also induce {gamma}H2AX foci, 3.18-fold higher than the control. The cellular effects of MWCNTs display the broad spectrum of clastogenic properties seen as the highest incidence of induced lymphocyte micronuclei and anaphase bridges among nuclei in binucleated cells. Surprisingly, the incidence of induced {gamma}H2AX foci was not as high as was expected by the micronucleus test, which indicates that MWCNTs act as clastogen and aneugen agents simultaneously. Biological endpoints investigated in this study indicate a close relationship between the electrochemical properties of carbon nanotubes and observed genotoxicity.

  9. Thermal Conductivity of Diamond Packed Electrospun PAN-Based Carbon Fibers Incorporated with Multi Wall Carbon Nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Qi; Lu, Chunyuan; Tulugan, Kelimu; Jin, Chunzi; Yoon, Soo Jong; Park, Yeong Min; Kim, Tae Gyu

    2016-02-01

    Multi wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and diamond are renowned as superlative material due to their relatively high thermal conductivity and hardness while comparing with any bulk materials. In this research, polyacrylonitrile (PAN) solution incorporated with MWCNTs at an alteration of mass fractions (0 wt%, 0.6 wt%, 1 wt%, 2 wt%) were fabricated via electrospinning under optimized parameters. Dried composite nanofibers were stabilized and carbonized, after which water base polytrafluorethylene (PTFE) mixed with nano diamond powder solution was spin coated on them. Scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, X-ray scattering and Laserflash thermal conductivity were used to characterize the composite nanofiber sheets. The result shows that the thermal conductivity increased to 4.825 W/m K from 2.061 W/mK. The improvement of thermal conductivities is suggesting the incorporation of MWCNTs.

  10. Adsorption of Molecular Gases on Silver/Carbon Nanotube Composites at Low Temperatures and Low Pressures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Barberio

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We present an experimental study adsorption of molecular gases (N2, H2, O2, CH4, C2H4, and C2H6 on multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs and MWCNT doped with Ag at low temperatures (35 K and pressures (10−6 Torr using the temperature programmed desorption technique. Our results show that the desorption kinetics is of the first order; furthermore comparative measurements indicate that Ag/MWCNTs have an adsorption capacity higher than that of a pure sample suggesting that these composites are good candidates as gas cryosorbers for applications in cryopumps or sensor of latest generation.

  11. Liquid crystal behavior induced assembling fabrication of conductive chiral MWCNTs@NCC nanopaper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ren, Yumei; Wang, Tianjiao; Chen, Zhimin; Li, Jing; Tian, Qiuge; Yang, Hongxia; Xu, Qun, E-mail: qunxu@zzu.edu.cn

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • In this study conductive chiral MWCNTs@NCC nanopapers were prepared. • The introduction of the MWCNTs has a pronounced effect on the chiral structure of the as-prepared nanopaper. • The multiple weak molecular interactions existing between MWCNTs and NCC are responsible for the effective dispersion and stabilization of MWCNTs. • The resulting nanopaper has an increased conductivity. - Abstract: The conductive chiral MWCNTs@NCC nanopapers obtained by the assembly of nanocrystalline cellulose liquid crystals (NCC LCs) host matrix along with one-dimensional (1-D) multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) have been studied in this work. Circular dichroism (CD) studies show strong signals stemming from the chiral nematic structure. Notably, the introduction of the MWCNTs has a pronounced effect on the chiral structure of the as-prepared nanopaper. Our experimental results indicate the multiple weak molecular interactions existing between MWCNTs and NCC are responsible for the effective dispersion and stabilization of MWCNTs. Moreover it also confirms the resulting nanopaper has an increased conductivity of 4.2 S/m at 1.96 wt% MWCNTs. So the co-assembly of the nanocomposite herein opens a gateway for preparing functional materials combining the photonic properties of the NCC LCs matrix with other building blocks that can supply other advantageous functions.

  12. Effect of high-temperature heat treatment duration on the purity and microstructure of MWCNTs

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    I Srikanth; N Padmavathi; P S R Prasad; P Ghosal; R K Jain; Ch Subrahmanyam

    2016-02-01

    The effect of high-temperature heat treatment on purity and structural changes of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were studied by subjecting the raw MWCNTs (pristine MWCNTs) to 2600°C for 60 and 120 min. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were used to study the effect of heat-treatment duration on the purity and structural changes of MWCNTs. Results show that high-temperature heat treatment can be used to purify MWCNTs with proper optimization of treatment time. It was observed that 60 min heat treatment of raw MWCNTs imparts high purity and structural perfection to MWCNTs, while 120 min heat treatment imparts structural degradation to MWCNTs with collapse of the innermost shells. The present study indicates that metal impurities act as moderators in controlling the degradation of MWCNTs up to certain duration, and once the metal impurities escape completely, further heat treatment degrades the structure of MWCNTs.

  13. Improving Fatigue Performance of GFRP Composite Using Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moneeb Genedy

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Glass fiber reinforced polymers (GFRP have become a preferable material for reinforcing or strengthening reinforced concrete structures due to their corrosion resistance, high strength to weight ratio, and relatively low cost compared with carbon fiber reinforced polymers (CFRP. However, the limited fatigue life of GFRP hinders their use in infrastructure applications. For instance, the low fatigue life of GFRP caused design codes to impose stringent stress limits on GFRP that rendered their use non-economic under significant cyclic loads in bridges. In this paper, we demonstrate that the fatigue life of GFRP can be significantly improved by an order of magnitude by incorporating Multi-Wall Carbon Nanotubes (MWCNTs during GFRP fabrication. GFRP coupons were fabricated and tested under static tension and cyclic tension with mean fatigue stress equal to 40% of the GFRP tensile strength. Microstructural investigations using scanning electron microscopy (SEM and Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR spectroscopy were used for further investigation of the effect of MWCNTs on the GFRP composite. The experimental results show the 0.5 wt% and the 1.0 wt% MWCNTs were able to improve the fatigue life of GFRP by 1143% and 986%, respectively, compared with neat GFRP.

  14. Nicotinamide-functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotubes increase insulin production in pancreatic beta cells via MIF pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilie, Ioana; Ilie, Razvan; Mocan, Teodora; Tabaran, Flaviu; Iancu, Cornel; Mocan, Lucian

    2013-01-01

    Recent data in the literature support the role of nicotinamide (NA) as a pharmacologic agent that stimulates pancreatic beta-cells to produce insulin in vitro. There are data showing that carbon nanotubes may be useful in initiating and maintaining cellular metabolic responses. This study shows that administration of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) functionalized with nicotinamide (NA-MWCNTs) leads to significant insulin production compared with individual administration of NA, MWCNTs, and a control solution. Treatment of 1.4E7 cells for 30 minutes with NA-MWCNTs at concentrations ranging from 1 mg/L to 20 mg/L resulted in significantly increased insulin release (0.18 ± 0.026 ng/mL for 1 mg/L, 0.21 ± 0.024 ng/mL for 5 mg/L, and 0.27 ± 0.028 ng/mL for 20 mg/L). Thus, compared with cells treated with NA only (0.1 ± 0.01 ng/mL for 1 mg/L, 0.12 ± 0.017 ng/mL for 5 mg/L, and 0.17 ± 0.01 ng/mL for 20 mg/L) we observed a significant positive effect on insulin release in cells treated with NA-MWCNTs. The results were confirmed using flow cytometry, epifluorescence microscopy combined with immunochemistry staining, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay techniques. In addition, using immunofluorescence microscopy techniques, we were able to demonstrate that MWCNTs enhance insulin production via the macrophage migration inhibitory factor pathway. The application and potential of NA combined with MWCNTs as an antidiabetic agent may represent the beginning of a new chapter in the nanomediated treatment of diabetes mellitus.

  15. Electronic structure of fluorinated multiwalled carbon nanotubes studied using x-ray absorption and photoelectron spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brzhezinskaya, M. M.; Muradyan, V. E.; Vinogradov, N. A.; Preobrajenski, A. B.; Gudat, W.; Vinogradov, A. S.

    2009-04-01

    This paper presents the results of combined investigation of the chemical bond formation in fluorinated multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) with different fluorine contents (10-55wt%) and reference compounds (highly oriented pyrolytic graphite crystals and “white” graphite fluoride) using x-ray absorption and photoelectron spectroscopy at C1s and F1s thresholds. Measurements were performed at BESSY II (Berlin, Germany) and MAX-laboratory (Lund, Sweden). The analysis of the soft x-ray absorption and photoelectron spectra points to the formation of covalent chemical bonding between fluorine and carbon atoms in the fluorinated nanotubes. It was established that within the probing depth (˜15nm) of carbon nanotubes, the process of fluorination runs uniformly and does not depend on the fluorine concentration. In this case, fluorine atoms interact with MWCNTs through the covalent attachment of fluorine atoms to graphene layers of the graphite skeleton (phase 1) and this bonding is accompanied by a change in the hybridization of the 2s and 2p valence electron states of the carbon atom from the trigonal (sp2) to tetrahedral (sp3) hybridization and by a large electron transfer between carbon an fluorine atoms. In the MWCNT near-surface region the second fluorine-carbon phase with weak electron transfer is formed; it is located mainly within two or three upper graphene monolayers, and its contribution becomes much poorer as the probing depth of fluorinated multiwalled carbon nanotubes (F-MWCNTs) increases. The defluorination process of F-MWCNTs on thermal annealing has been investigated. The conclusion has been made that F-MWCNT defluorination without destruction of graphene layers is possible.

  16. Carbon nanotube computer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shulaker, Max M; Hills, Gage; Patil, Nishant; Wei, Hai; Chen, Hong-Yu; Wong, H-S Philip; Mitra, Subhasish

    2013-09-26

    The miniaturization of electronic devices has been the principal driving force behind the semiconductor industry, and has brought about major improvements in computational power and energy efficiency. Although advances with silicon-based electronics continue to be made, alternative technologies are being explored. Digital circuits based on transistors fabricated from carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have the potential to outperform silicon by improving the energy-delay product, a metric of energy efficiency, by more than an order of magnitude. Hence, CNTs are an exciting complement to existing semiconductor technologies. Owing to substantial fundamental imperfections inherent in CNTs, however, only very basic circuit blocks have been demonstrated. Here we show how these imperfections can be overcome, and demonstrate the first computer built entirely using CNT-based transistors. The CNT computer runs an operating system that is capable of multitasking: as a demonstration, we perform counting and integer-sorting simultaneously. In addition, we implement 20 different instructions from the commercial MIPS instruction set to demonstrate the generality of our CNT computer. This experimental demonstration is the most complex carbon-based electronic system yet realized. It is a considerable advance because CNTs are prominent among a variety of emerging technologies that are being considered for the next generation of highly energy-efficient electronic systems.

  17. Carbon Nanotube Purification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delzeit, Lance D. (Inventor); Delzeit, Clement J. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    A method for cleaning or otherwise removing amorphous carbon and other residues that arise in growth of a carbon nanotube (CNT) array. The CNT array is exposed to a plurality of hydroxyls or hydrogen, produced from a selected vapor or liquid source such as H2O or H2O2. and the hydroxyls or hydrogen (neutral or electrically charged) react with the residues to produce partly or fully dissolved or hydrogenated or hydroxylizated products that can be removed or separated from the CNT array. The hydroxyls or hydrogen can be produced by heating the CNT array, residue and selected vapor or liquid source or by application of an electromagnetic excitation signal with a selected frequency or range of frequencies to dissociate the selected vapor or liquid. The excitation frequency can be chirped to cover a selected range of frequencies corresponding to dissociation of the selected vapor or liquid. Sonication may be uscd to supplement dissociation of the H2O and/or H2O2.

  18. Networks of connected Pt nanoparticles supported on carbon nanotubes as superior catalysts for methanol electrooxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Meihua; Zhang, Jianshuo; Wu, Chuxin; Guan, Lunhui

    2017-02-01

    The high cost and short lifetime of the Pt-based anode catalyst for methanol oxidation reaction (MOR) hamper the widespread commercialization of direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC). Therefore, improving the activity of Pt-based catalysts is necessary for their practical application. For the first time, we prepared networks of connected Pt nanoparticles supported on multi-walled carbon nanotubes with loading ratio as high as 91 wt% (Pt/MWCNTs). Thanks for the unique connected structure, the Pt mass activity of Pt/MWCNTs for methanol oxidation reaction is 4.4 times as active as that of the commercial Pt/C (20 wt%). When carbon support is considered, the total mass activity of Pt/MWCNTs is 20 times as active as that of the commercial Pt/C. The durability and anti-poisoning ability are also improved greatly.

  19. Electrocatalytic response of poly(cobalt tetraaminophthalocyanine)/multi-walled carbon nanotubes-Nafion modified electrode toward sulfadiazine in urine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-ping HONG; Yah ZHU; Yan-zhen ZHANG

    2012-01-01

    A highly sensitive amperometric sulfadiazine sensor fabricated by electrochemical deposition of poly(cobalt tetraaminophthalocyanine) (poly(CoⅡTAPc)) on the surface of a multi-walled carbon nanotubes-Nafion (MWCNTs-Nafion) modified electrode is described.This electrode showed a very attractive performance by combining the advantages of Co11TAPc,MWCNTs,and Nafion.Compared with the bare glassy carbon electrode (GCE) and the MWCNTs-Nafion modified electrode,the electrocatalytic activity of poly(CoⅡTAPc)-coated MWCNTs-Nafion GCE generated greatly improved electrochemical detections toward sulfadiazine including low oxidation potential,high current responses,and good anti-fouling performance.The oxidation peak currents of sulfadiazine obtained on the new modified electrode increased linearly while increasing the concentration of sulfadiazine from 0.5 to 43.5 μmol/L with the detection limit of 0.17 μmol/L.

  20. Candida rugosa Lipase Immobilized onto Acid-Functionalized Multi-walled Carbon Nanotubes for Sustainable Production of Methyl Oleate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Che Marzuki, Nur Haziqah; Mahat, Naji Arafat; Huyop, Fahrul; Buang, Nor Aziah; Wahab, Roswanira Abdul

    2015-10-01

    The chemical production of methyl oleate using chemically synthesized fatty acid alcohols and other toxic chemicals may lead to significant environmental hazards to mankind. Being a highly valuable fatty acid replacement raw material in oleochemical industry, the mass production of methyl oleate via environmentally favorable processes is of concern. In this context, an alternative technique utilizing Candida rugosa lipase (CRL) physically adsorbed on multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) has been suggested. In this study, the acid-functionalized MWCNTs prepared using a mixture of HNO3 and H2SO4 (1:3 v/v) was used as support for immobilizing CRL onto MWCNTs (CRL-MWCNTs) as biocatalysts. Enzymatic esterification was performed and the efficiency of CRL-MWCNTs was evaluated against the free CRL under varying conditions, viz. temperature, molar ratio of acid/alcohol, solvent log P, and enzyme loading. The CRL-MWCNTs resulted in 30-110 % improvement in the production of methyl oleate over the free CRL. The CRL-MWCNTs attained its highest yield (84.17 %) at 50 °C, molar ratio of acid/alcohol of 1:3, 3 mg/mL of enzyme loading, and iso-octane (log P 4.5) as solvent. Consequently, physical adsorption of CRL onto acid-functionalized MWCNTs has improved the activity and stability of CRL and hence provides an environmentally friendly means for the production of methyl oleate.

  1. Effects of Multiwalled Carbon Nanotube Surface Modification and Purification on Bovine Serum Albumin Binding and Biological Responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Bai

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Carboxylation of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs has been used to improve solubility in aqueous systems and for further functionalization with biologically active moieties for biomedical uses. An important consideration is that oxidation debris is generated during the process of carboxylation, which can be removed by base washing. We hypothesized that surface modification as well as purification by debris removal may alter physicochemical properties of MWCNTs and their ability to bind proteins. We utilized pristine MWCNT, carboxylated MWCNTs (F-MWCNTs, and base-washed carboxylated MWCNTs (BW-F-MWCNTs to examine formation of a bovine serum albumin (BSA protein corona and impact on biological responses. We found that carboxylation increased the capability of F-MWCNTs to bind BSA, and base washing further increased this binding. Functionalization increased cellular uptake by rat aortic endothelial cells (RAEC and mouse macrophages (RAW264.7, while base washing showed results similar to the functionalized analog. Interestingly, BSA binding downregulated mRNA levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6 and heme oxygenase 1 (Hmox1 in RAEC cells but upregulated the expression of IL-6 and Hmox1 in RAW264.7 cells. Overall, our study demonstrated that surface modification as well as further purification impacted the interaction of MWCNTs with proteins and subsequent cellular responses.

  2. Preparation and properties of multi-wall carbon nanotube/SiC composites by aqueous tape casting

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    MWCNTS/SiC composites were fabricated by aqueous tape casting. High solid content (50 vol%) SiC slurries with sintering additives and multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) as reinforcements were prepared using Tetramethylammonium hydroxide as the dispersant. The stability of MWCNTs/SiC slur-ries was studied and characterized in terms of zeta potential and rheology measurements. The relative density of the composite was about 98% after hot-pressing at 1850℃ (at 25 MPa in Ar for 30 min). The hardness of the composites decreased with the increase in MWCNTs content. The flexural strength and the fracture toughness were 742.17 MPa and 4.63 MPa·m1/2, respectively when the MWCNTs content was 0.25 wt%. Further increase in MWCNTs content to 0.50 wt% did not lead to the increase in mechanical properties. Most of MWCNTs were found to be located at SiC grain boundaries and the pull out of the MWCNTs was observed.

  3. Carbon nanotube filled with magnetic iron oxide and modified with polyamidoamine dendrimers for immobilizing lipase toward application in biodiesel production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Yanli; Su, Feng; Li, Kai; Ke, Caixia; Yan, Yunjun

    2017-01-01

    Superparamagnetic multi-walled carbon nanotubes (mMWCNTs) were prepared by filling multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) with iron oxide, and further modified by linking polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimers (mMWCNTs-PAMAM) on the surface. Then, mMWCNTs-PAMAM was employed as the carrier and successfully immobilized Burkholderia cepacia lipase (BCL) via a covalent method (BCL-mMWCNTs-G3). The maximum activity recovery of the immobilized lipase was 1,716% and the specific activity increased to 77,460 U/g-protein, 17-fold higher than that of the free enzyme. The immobilized lipase displayed significantly enhanced thermostability and pH-resistance, and could efficiently catalyze transesterification to produce biodiesel at a conversion rate of 92.8%. Moreover, it possessed better recycling performance. After 20 cycles of repeated used, it still retained ca. 90% of its original activity, since the carbon nanotube−enzyme conjugates could be easily separated from the reaction mixture by using a magnet. This study provides a new perspective for biotechnological applications by adding a magnetic property to the unique intrinsic properties of nanotubes. PMID:28358395

  4. Preparation and characterization of multi-walled carbon nanotubes/chitosan nanocomposite and its application for the removal of heavy metals from aqueous solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salam, Mohamed Abdel, E-mail: masalam16@hotmail.com [Chemistry Department, Faculty of Science, King Abdulaziz University, P.O. Box 80200, Jeddah 21589 (Saudi Arabia); Makki, Mohamad S.I.; Abdelaal, Magdy Y.A. [Chemistry Department, Faculty of Science, King Abdulaziz University, P.O. Box 80200, Jeddah 21589 (Saudi Arabia)

    2011-02-03

    Research highlights: > Nanocomposite made of multi-walled carbon nanotubes and chitosan was prepared and characterized. > The characterization confirmed the homogenous and well distribution of the MWCNTs within the chitosan matrix. > MWCNTs/chitosan nanocomposite was used for the removal of copper, zinc, cadmium and nickel ions from aqueous solution. > The results showed that nanocomposite could remove successfully most of the metal ions from solution with high efficiency. - Abstract: Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were modified with chitosan, and a homogenous nanocomposite was obtained. The morphological properties of the MWCNTs/chitosan nanocomposite were studied with scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA). The morphological results indicate the successful modification and the formation of MWCNTs/chitosan nanocomposites. The MWCNTs/chitosan nanocomposite was packed inside a glass column and used for the removal of copper, zinc, cadmium, and nickel ions from aqueous solution. The MWCNTs/chitosan nanocomposite showed a great efficiency for the removal of the target metal ions from the aqueous solution. The results suggested that this novel MWCNTs/chitosan nanocomposite could be used for different environmental applications.

  5. Gas Composition Sensing Using Carbon Nanotube Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing; Meyyappan, Meyya

    2012-01-01

    This innovation is a lightweight, small sensor for inert gases that consumes a relatively small amount of power and provides measurements that are as accurate as conventional approaches. The sensing approach is based on generating an electrical discharge and measuring the specific gas breakdown voltage associated with each gas present in a sample. An array of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in a substrate is connected to a variable-pulse voltage source. The CNT tips are spaced appropriately from the second electrode maintained at a constant voltage. A sequence of voltage pulses is applied and a pulse discharge breakdown threshold voltage is estimated for one or more gas components, from an analysis of the current-voltage characteristics. Each estimated pulse discharge breakdown threshold voltage is compared with known threshold voltages for candidate gas components to estimate whether at least one candidate gas component is present in the gas. The procedure can be repeated at higher pulse voltages to estimate a pulse discharge breakdown threshold voltage for a second component present in the gas. The CNTs in the gas sensor have a sharp (low radius of curvature) tip; they are preferably multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) or carbon nanofibers (CNFs), to generate high-strength electrical fields adjacent to the tips for breakdown of the gas components with lower voltage application and generation of high current. The sensor system can provide a high-sensitivity, low-power-consumption tool that is very specific for identification of one or more gas components. The sensor can be multiplexed to measure current from multiple CNT arrays for simultaneous detection of several gas components.

  6. Sorption of organophosphate esters by carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Wei; Yan, Li [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100085 (China); Duan, Jinming [School of Environmental and Municipal Engineering, Xi’an University of Architecture and Technology, Xi’an 710055 (China); Jing, Chuanyong, E-mail: cyjing@rcees.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100085 (China)

    2014-05-01

    Graphical abstract: The interfacial interactions between the OPE molecules and CNTs. - Highlights: • Oxygen-containing groups on CNTs change the sorption property for OPEs. • Molecular configuration of OPEs has insignificant impact on their sorption. • Hydrophobic, π–π EDA and Brønsted acid–base interaction occurred between the CNTs and OPEs. - Abstract: Insights from the molecular-level mechanism of sorption of organophosphate esters (OPEs) on carbon nanotubes (CNTs) can further our understanding of the fate and transport of OPEs in the environment. The motivation for our study was to explore the sorption process of OPEs on multi-walled CNTs (MWCNTs), single-walled CNTs (SWCNTs) and their oxidized counterparts (O-MWCNTs and O-SWCNTs), and its molecular mechanism over a wide concentration range. The sorption isotherm results revealed that the hydrophobicity of OPEs dominated their affinities on a given CNT and the π–π electron donor–acceptor (EDA) interaction also played an important role in the sorption of aromatic OPEs. This π–π EDA interaction, verified with Raman and FT-IR spectroscopy, could restrict the radial vibration of SWCNTs and affect the deformation vibration γ(CH) bands of OPE molecules. The OPE surface coverage on CNTs, estimated using the nonlinear Dubinin–Ashtakhov model, indicated that the oxygen-containing functional groups on CNTs could interact with water molecules by H-bonding, resulting in a decrease in effective sorption sites. In addition, FTIR analysis also confirmed the occurrence of Brønsted acid–base interactions between OPEs and surface OH groups of SWCNTs. Our results should provide mechanistic insights into the sorption mechanism of OPE contaminants on CNTs.

  7. Hybrid Carbon Fibers/Carbon Nanotubes Structures for Next Generation Polymeric Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Al-Haik

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Pitch-based carbon fibers are commonly used to produce polymeric carbon fiber structural composites. Several investigations have reported different methods for dispersing and subsequently aligning carbon nanotubes (CNTs as a filler to reinforce polymer matrix. The significant difficulty in dispersing CNTs suggested the controlled-growth of CNTs on surfaces where they are needed. Here we compare between two techniques for depositing the catalyst iron used toward growing CNTs on pitch-based carbon fiber surfaces. Electrochemical deposition of iron using pulse voltametry is compared to DC magnetron iron sputtering. Carbon nanostructures growth was performed using a thermal CVD system. Characterization for comparison between both techniques was compared via SEM, TEM, and Raman spectroscopy analysis. It is shown that while both techniques were successful to grow CNTs on the carbon fiber surfaces, iron sputtering technique was capable of producing more uniform distribution of iron catalyst and thus multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs compared to MWCNTs grown using the electrochemical deposition of iron.

  8. ZnO Functionalization of Multi-walled Carbon Nanotubes for Methane Sensing at Single Parts Per Million Concentration Levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    This paper presents a novel atomic layer deposition (ALD) based ZnO functionalization of surface pre-treated multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) for highly sensitive methane chemoresistive sensors. The temperature optimization of the ALD process leads to enhanced ZnO nanopart...

  9. Co-transport of chlordecone and sulfadiazine in the presence of functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes in soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batch and saturated soil column experiments were conducted to investigate sorption and mobility of two 14C-labeled contaminants, the hydrophobic chlordecone (CLD) and the readily water-soluble sulfadiazine (SDZ), in the absence or presence of functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). Th...

  10. Electrochemical Determination of Pentachlorophenol in Water on a Multi-Wall Carbon Nanotubes-Epoxy Composite Electrode

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Remes, A.; Pop, A.; Manea, F.; Baciu, A.; Picken, S.J.; Schoonman, J.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was the preparation, characterization, and application of a multi-wall carbon nanotubes-epoxy composite electrode (MWCNT-EP) with 25%, wt. MWCNTs loading for the voltammetric/amperometric determination of pentachlorophenol (PCP) in aqueous solutions. The structural and morpholo

  11. Multibiomarker response in the earthworm Eisenia fetida as tool for assessing multi-walled carbon nanotube ecotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calisi, A; Grimaldi, A; Leomanni, A; Lionetto, M G; Dondero, F; Schettino, T

    2016-05-01

    Carbon nanotubes have received a great attention in the last years thanks to their remarkable structural, electrical, and chemical properties. Nowadays carbon nanotubes are increasingly found in terrestrial and aquatic environment and potential harmful impacts of these nanoparticles on humans and wildlife are attracting increasing research and public attention. The effects of carbon nanotubes on aquatic organisms have been explored by several authors, but comparatively the information available on the impact of these particles on soil organisms is much less. Earthworms have traditionally been considered to be convenient indicators of land use impact and soil fertility. The aim of this work was to study the integrated response of a suite of biomarkers covering molecular to whole organism endpoints for the assessment of multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNTs) effects on earthworms (Eisenia fetida) exposed to spiked soil. Results showed that cellular and biochemical responses, such as immune cells morphometric alterations and lysosomal membrane destabilization, acetylcholinesterase inhibition and metallothionein tissue concentration changes, showed high sensitivity to MWCNTs exposure. They can improve our understanding and ability to predict chronic toxicity outcomes of MWCNTs exposure such as reproductive alterations. In this context although more investigation is needed to understand the mechanistic pathway relating the biochemical and cellular biomarker analyzed to reproductive alterations, the obtained results give an early contribution to the future development of an adverse outcomes pathways for MWCNTs exposure.

  12. Cardiovascular health effects of oral and pulmonary exposure to multi-walled carbon nanotubes in ApoE-deficient mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christophersen, Daniel V.; Jacobsen, Nicklas R.; Andersen, Maria H. G.

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to high aspect ratio nanomaterials, such as multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) may be associated with increased risk of atherosclerosis, pulmonary disease, and cancer. In the present study, we investigated the cardiovascular and pulmonary health effects of 10 weeks of repeated oral...

  13. Graded Composites of Polyamide/Carbon Nanotubes Prepared by Laser Sintering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmoria, G. V.; Paggi, R. A.; Beal, V. E.

    2017-02-01

    In this study, the mechanical and electrical properties of graded composition material (GM) were investigated in order to evaluate the effects of the addition of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) to a polyamide 12 (PA12) matrix in different proportions. A graded component of PA12/MWCNTs was designed and manufactured by selective laser sintering (SLS) and variations in the morphology as well as in the mechanical and electrical properties were observed. The effect of different proportions of MWCNTs in the PA12 was investigated by microscopy, flexural test and resistivity measurements. The addition of 0.5 and 1.0 wt% of MWCNTs promoted an increase in the composite strength and flexural modulus. A significant reduction in the resistivity was verified with the addition of 3.0% of MWCNTs in the polyamide matrix. The mechanical and electrical behavior presented by the PA12/MWCNT composites suggests that the percolation concentration is around 3 wt%, when an effective inter-nanotube contact seems to be reached, improving the electrical conductivity but reducing the mechanical strength. A GM component with an MWCNT concentration gradient along the vertical axis was designed and manufactured by SLS. A gradual controlled variation in the composition of GM component leads to variations in the microstructure as well as in the mechanical and electrical properties.

  14. Effects of long and short carboxylated or aminated multiwalled carbon nanotubes on blood coagulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Meng

    Full Text Available In this work the effects of four different multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs, including long carboxylated (L-COOH, short carboxylated (S-COOH, long aminated (L-NH(2 and short aminated (S-NH(2 ones, on the integrity of red blood cells, coagulation kinetics and activation of platelets were investigated with human whole blood. We found that the four MWCNTs induced different degrees of red blood cell damage as well as a mild level of platelet activation (10-25%. L-COOH and L-NH(2 induced a higher level of platelet activation than S-COOH and S-NH(2 respectively; meanwhile L-NH(2 caused marked reductions in platelet viability. The presence of the four MWCNTs led to earlier fibrin formation, L-NH(2 increased the clots hardness significantly, while L-COOH and S-NH(2 made the clots become softer. It was concluded that the four MWCNTs affected blood coagulation process and the clots mechanical properties; they also altered the integrity of the red blood cells and the viability of the platelets, as well as induced platelets activation. The effects of MWCNTs depended on the size and chemistry of the nanotubes and the type of cells they contacted.

  15. Growth of Aligned Multiwall Carbon Nanotubes and the Effect of Adsorbates on the Field Emission Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milne, W. I.; Teo, K. B. K.; Lansley, S. B.; Chhowalla, M.; Amaratunga, G. A. J.; Semet, V.; Binh, Vu Thien; Pirio, G.; Legagneux, P.

    2003-10-01

    In attempt to decipher the field emission characteristics of multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), we have developed a fabrication method based on plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD) to provide utmost control of the nanotube structure such as their alignment, individual position, diameter, length and morphology. We investigated the field emission properties of these nanotubes to elucidate the effect of adsorbates on the nanotubes. Our results show that although the adsorbates cause an apparent lowering of the required turn on voltage/field of the nanotubes, the adsorbates undesirably cause a saturation of the current, large temporal fluctuations in the current, and also a deviation of the emission characteristics from Fowler-Nordheim like emission. The adsorbates are easily removed by extracting an emission current of 1 uA per nanotube or using a high applied electric field (˜25V/um).

  16. Large scale load of phosphotungstic acid on multiwalled carbon nanotubes with a grafted poly(4-vinylpyridine) linker

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuan Junhua, E-mail: jhyuan@zjnu.cn [College of Chemistry and Life Sciences, Zhejiang Normal University, Jinhua 321004 (China); Jin Xiaoli; Li Na; Chen Jianrong; Miao Jigen [College of Chemistry and Life Sciences, Zhejiang Normal University, Jinhua 321004 (China); Zhang Qixian [State Key Laboratory of Electroanalytical Chemistry, Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun 130022 (China); Niu Li, E-mail: lniu@ciac.jl.cn [State Key Laboratory of Electroanalytical Chemistry, Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun 130022 (China); Song Jixia [Jilin City Institute of Testing on Product Quality, Jilin 132013 (China)

    2011-11-30

    Highlights: > Carbon nanotubes was grafted with poly(4-vinylpyridine). > Phosphotungstic acid was deposited onto carbon nanotubes with this polymer linker. > This deposition is highly uniform and large scale. > These phosphotungstic acid/carbon nanotubes hybrids can be used as nitrite sensor. > Its linear concentration is 1.2 to 17.5 {mu}M with a detection limit of 0.2 {mu}M. - Abstract: Multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were grafted with poly(4-vinylpyridine) (PV4P) in aqueous solution by in situ free radical polymerization of 4-vinylpyridine. The as-prepared PV4P-g-MWCNTs hybrids can load phosphotungstic acid (PW) on a large scale by electrostatic interaction, which was characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The as-prepared PWs/PV4P-g-MWCNTs hybrids were modified onto a carbon glassy electrode. Cyclic voltammograms (CVs) show that the electrochemical behavior of the modified electrode follows a four-one-electron surface-confined process of Keggin-type PWs. The modified electrode can be used as a nitrite sensor. The comparison of CVs shows that the response current of nitrite reduction at the electrode modified with PWs/PV4P-g-MWCNTs hybrids is 15 times higher than that of PWs/MWCNTs hybrids in a control experiment at 0.65 V (vs. AgCl). The amperometric i-t curve for the electrode modified with PWs/PV4P-g-MWCNTs hybrids exhibits a linear concentration of NO{sub 2}{sup -} ranged from 1.2 to 17.5 {mu}M with a detection limit of 0.2 {mu}M.

  17. Impacts of multiwalled carbon nanotubes on nutrient removal from wastewater and bacterial community structure in activated sludge.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reti Hai

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The increasing use of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs will inevitably lead to the exposure of wastewater treatment facilities. However, knowledge of the impacts of MWCNTs on wastewater nutrient removal and bacterial community structure in the activated sludge process is sparse. AIMS: To investigate the effects of MWCNTs on wastewater nutrient removal, and bacterial community structure in activated sludge. METHODS: Three triplicate sequencing batch reactors (SBR were exposed to wastewater which contained 0, 1, and 20 mg/L MWCNTs. MiSeq sequencing was used to investigate the bacterial community structures in activated sludge samples which were exposed to different concentrations of MWCNTs. RESULTS: Exposure to 1 and 20 mg/L MWCNTs had no acute (1 day impact on nutrient removal from wastewater. After long-term (180 days exposure to 1 mg/L MWCNTs, the average total nitrogen (TN removal efficiency was not significantly affected. TN removal efficiency decreased from 84.0% to 71.9% after long-term effects of 20 mg/L MWCNTs. After long-term exposure to 1 and 20 mg/L MWCNTs, the total phosphorus removal efficiencies decreased from 96.8% to 52.3% and from 98.2% to 34.0% respectively. Further study revealed that long-term exposure to 20 mg/L MWCNTs inhibited activities of ammonia monooxygenase and nitrite oxidoreductase. Long-term exposure to 1 and 20 mg/L MWCNTs both inhibited activities of exopolyphosphatase and polyphosphate kinase. MiSeq sequencing data indicated that 20 mg/L MWCNTs significantly decreased the diversity of bacterial community in activated sludge. Long-term exposure to 1 and 20 mg/L MWCNTs differentially decreased the abundance of nitrifying bacteria, especially ammonia-oxidizing bacteria. The abundance of PAOs was decreased after long-term exposure to 20 mg/L MWCNTs. The abundance of glycogen accumulating organisms (GAOs was increased after long-term exposure to 1 mg/L MWCNTs. CONCLUSION: MWCNTs have adverse effects on

  18. Voltammetric Determination of Codeine on Glassy Carbon Electrode Modified with Nafion/MWCNTs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Piech

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A glassy carbon electrode modified with a Nafion/MWCNTs composite is shown to enable the determination of codeine using differential pulse voltammetry in phosphate buffer of pH 3.0. At a preconcentration time of 15 s, the calibration graph is linear in the 0.5 µM (0.15 mg·L−1 to 15 µM (4.5 mg·L−1 concentration range with a correlation coefficient of 0.998. The detection limit at a preconcentration time of 120 s is as low as 4.5 μg·L−1. The repeatability of the method at a 0.6 μg·L−1 concentration level, expressed as the RSD, is 3.7% (for n=5. The method was successfully applied and validated by analyzing codeine in drug, human plasma, and urine samples.

  19. Properties and Applications of Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullmore, Daniel; Duran, Michael; Jacobs, Michael; Masood, Samina

    2012-10-01

    Different synthesizing methods are used to create various nanostructures of carbon; we are mainly interested in single and multi-wall carbon nanotubes, (SWCNTs) and (MWCNTs) respectively. The properties of these tubes are related to their synthetic methods, chirality, and diameter. The extremely sturdy structure of CNTs, with their distinct thermal and electromagnetic properties, suggests a tremendous use of these tubes in electronics and medicines. Here, we analyze various physical properties of SWCNTs with a special emphasis on electromagnetic and chemical properties. By examining their electrical properties, we demonstrate the viability of discrete CNT based components. After considering the advantages of using CNTs over microstructures, we make a case for the advancement and development of nanostructures based electronics. As for current CNT applications, its hard to overlook their use and functionality in the development of cancer treatment. Whether the tubes are involved in chemotherapeutic drug delivery, molecular imaging and targeting, or photodynamic therapy, we show that the remarkable properties of SWCNTs can be used in advantageous ways by many different industries.

  20. Bioaccumulation of Multiwall Carbon Nanotubes in Tetrahymena thermophila by Direct Feeding or Trophic Transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortimer, Monika; Petersen, Elijah J; Buchholz, Bruce A; Orias, Eduardo; Holden, Patricia A

    2016-08-16

    Consumer goods contain multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) that could be released during product life cycles into the environment, where their effects are uncertain. Here, we assessed MWCNT bioaccumulation in the protozoan Tetrahymena thermophila via trophic transfer from bacterial prey (Pseudomonas aeruginosa) versus direct uptake from growth media. The experiments were conducted using (14)C-labeled MWCNT ((14)C-MWCNT) doses at or below 1 mg/L, which proved subtoxic since there were no adverse effects on the growth of the test organisms. A novel contribution of this study was the demonstration of the ability to quantify MWCNT bioaccumulation at low (sub μg/kg) concentrations accomplished by employing accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). After the treatments with MWCNTs at nominal concentrations of 0.01 mg/L and 1 mg/L, P. aeruginosa adsorbed considerable amounts of MWCNTs: (0.18 ± 0.04) μg/mg and (21.9 ± 4.2) μg/mg bacterial dry mass, respectively. At the administered MWCNT dose of 0.3 mg/L, T. thermophila accumulated up to (0.86 ± 0.3) μg/mg and (3.4 ± 1.1) μg/mg dry mass by trophic transfer and direct uptake, respectively. Although MWCNTs did not biomagnify in the microbial food chain, MWCNTs bioaccumulated in the protozoan populations regardless of the feeding regime, which could make MWCNTs bioavailable for organisms at higher trophic levels.

  1. Compositing polyetherimide with polyfluorene wrapped carbon nanotubes for enhanced interfacial interaction and conductivity

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Ye

    2014-06-25

    A novel approach to chemically functionalize multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) for making superior polyetherimide (PEI) nanocomposites with polyfluorene polymer is presented. In this approach, MWCNTs are non-covalently functionalized with poly(9,9-dioctyfluorenyl-2,7-diyl) (PFO) through π-π stacking as confirmed by UV-vis, fluorescence, and Raman spectra. Atomic force microscopy as well as scanning and transmission electron microscopy shows the PFO coated MWCNTs, which provides excellent dispersion of the latter in both solvent and PEI matrix. The strong interaction of PFO with PEI chains, as evidenced from fluorescence spectra, supports the good adhesion of dispersed MWCNTs to PEI leading to stronger interfacial interactions. As a result, the addition of as little as 0.25 wt % of modified MWCNTs to PEI matrix can strongly improve the mechanical properties of the composite (increase of 46% in storage modulus). Increasing the amount of MWCNTs to 2.0 wt % (0.5 wt % PFO loading) affords a great increase of 119% in storage modulus. Furthermore, a sharp decrease of 12 orders of magnitude in volume resistivity of PEI composite is obtained with only 0.5 wt % of PFO modified MWCNT. © 2014 American Chemical Society.

  2. Responses of testis, epididymis, and sperm of pubertal rats exposed to functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farombi, Ebenezer O; Adedara, Isaac A; Forcados, Gilead E; Anao, Osemudiamen O; Agbowo, Agatha; Patlolla, Anita K

    2016-05-01

    The present study investigated the response of testes, epididymides and sperm in pubertal Wistar rats following exposure to 0, 0.25, 0.5, 0.75, and 1.0 mg kg(-1) functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (f-MWCNTs) for 5 days. The results showed that administration of (f-MWCNTs) significantly increased the activities of superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase in a dose-dependent manner in both testes and sperm compared with control group. Moreover, the significant decrease in the activity of glutathione-S-transferase and glutathione level was accompanied with significant elevation in the levels of hydrogen peroxide and malondialdehyde in both testes and sperm of (f-MWCNTs)-treated rats. The spermiogram of (f-MWCNTs)-treated rats indicated significant decrease in epididymal sperm number, sperm progressive motility, testicular sperm number and daily sperm production with elevated sperm abnormalities when compared with the control. Exposure to (f-MWCNTs) decreased plasma testosterone level and produced marked morphological changes including decreased geminal epithelium, edema, congestion, reduced spermatogenic cells and focal areas of tubular degeneration in the testes. The lumen of the epididymides contained reduced sperm cells and there was mild to severe hyperplasia epithelial cells lining the duct of the epididymis. Collectively, pubertal exposure of male rats to (f-MWCNTs) elicited oxidative stress response resulting in marked testicular and epididymides dysfunction.

  3. Multi-walled carbon nanotube instillation impairs pulmonary function in C57BL/6 mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walters Dianne M

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs are widely used in many disciplines due to their unique physical and chemical properties. Therefore, some concerns about the possible human health and environmental impacts of manufactured MWCNTs are rising. We hypothesized that instillation of MWCNTs impairs pulmonary function in C57BL/6 mice due to development of lung inflammation and fibrosis. Methods MWCNTs were administered to C57BL/6 mice by oropharyngeal aspiration (1, 2, and 4 mg/kg and we assessed lung inflammation and fibrosis by inflammatory cell infiltration, collagen content, and histological assessment. Pulmonary function was assessed using a FlexiVent system and levels of Ccl3, Ccl11, Mmp13 and IL-33 were measured by RT-PCR and ELISA. Results Mice administered MWCNTs exhibited increased inflammatory cell infiltration, collagen deposition and granuloma formation in lung tissue, which correlated with impaired pulmonary function as assessed by increased resistance, tissue damping, and decreased lung compliance. Pulmonary exposure to MWCNTs induced an inflammatory signature marked by cytokine (IL-33, chemokine (Ccl3 and Ccl11, and protease production (Mmp13 that promoted the inflammatory and fibrotic changes observed within the lung. Conclusions These results further highlight the potential adverse health effects that may occur following MWCNT exposure and therefore we suggest these materials may pose a significant risk leading to impaired lung function following environmental and occupational exposures.

  4. A glance on the effects of temperature on axisymmetric dynamic behavior of multiwall carbon nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    S.T.Talebian; M.Tahani; M.H.Abolbashari; S.M.Hosseini

    2012-01-01

    In this paper the effects of temperature on the radial breathing modes (RBMs) and radial wave propagation in multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) are investigated using a continuum model of multiple elastic isotropic shells.The van der Waals forces between tubes are simulated as a nonlinear function of interlayer spacing of MWCNTs.The governing equations are solved using a finite element method.A wide range of innermost radius-to-thickness ratio of MWCNTs is considered to enhance the investigation.The presented solution is verified by comparing the results with those reported in the literature.The effects of temperature on the van der Waals interaction coefficient between layers of MWCNTs are examined.It is found that the variation of the van der Waals interaction coefficient at high temperature is sensible.Subsequently,variations of RBM frequencies and radial wave propagation in MWCNTs with temperatures up to 1 600 K are illustrated.It is shown that the thick MWCNTs are more sensible to temperature than the thin ones.

  5. Characterization and Hydrogen Storage of Surface-Modified Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes for Fuel Cell Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuen-Song Lin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The synthesis, identification, and H2 storage of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs have been investigated in the present work. MWCNTs were produced from the catalytic-assembly solvent (benzene-thermal (solvothermal route. Reduction of C6Cl6 with metallic potassium was carried out in the presence of Co/Ni catalyst precursors at 503–623 K for 12 h. XRD patterns indicated that the abstraction of Cl from hexachlorobenzene and the formation of KCl precipitates were involved in the early stage of the synthesis process of MWCNTs. This result offers further explanation for the formation of MWCNT structure and yield using the solvothermal route depending on the Co/Ni catalyst precursors. The diameter of MWCNTs ranged between 30 and 100 nm and the H2 storage capacity of MWCNTs improved when 2.7–3.8 wt% Pd or NaAlH4 were doped. The XANES/EXAFS spectra revealed that the Co/Ni catalyst precursors of the MWCNT synthesis were in metallic form and Pd atoms possessed a Pd–Pd bond distance of 2.78 Å with a coordination number of 9.08. Ti-NaAlH4 or Pd nanoparticles were dispersed on MWCNTs and facilitated to improve the H2 storage capacity significantly with the surface modification process.

  6. Hydroxyapatite growth on multiwall carbon nanotubes grown on titanium fibers from a titanium sheet

    KAUST Repository

    Chetibi, Loubna

    2013-09-27

    Nano-hydroxyapatite (HA) was grown on functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) deposited on TiO2 nanofibers (NFs) that were hydrothermally grown on Ti metal sheets. The HA was electrochemically grown on the MWCNTs/TiO2 porous layer. It was found that the HA grows on the MWCNTs/TiO2 NFs in the form of dense coating with nanorice grain-shaped. The incorporation of MWCNTs between HA and TiO2 NFs has led to higher adhesion strength as measured by micro-scratching test indicating the benefit of MWCNTs on the improving the bonding strength of HA layer. The obtained coatings exhibit excellent corrosion resistance in simulated body fluid. It is expected that this simple route for preparing the new HA/MWCNTs/TiO2/Ti-layered structure might be used not only in the biomedical field, but also in catalysis and biological sensing among others. © 2013 Springer Science+Business Media New York.

  7. Superparamagnetic properties of carbon nanotubes filled with NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stojak Repa, K.; Israel, D.; Phan, M. H., E-mail: phanm@usf.edu, E-mail: sharihar@usf.edu; Srikanth, H., E-mail: phanm@usf.edu, E-mail: sharihar@usf.edu [Department of Physics, University of South Florida, Tampa, Florida 33620 (United States); Alonso, J. [Department of Physics, University of South Florida, Tampa, Florida 33620 (United States); BCMaterials Edificio No. 500, Parque Tecnológico de Vizcaya, 48160 Derio (Spain); Palmero, E. M.; Vazquez, M. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, CSIC, 28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2015-05-07

    Multi walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were successfully synthesized using custom-made 80 nm pore-size alumina templates, and were uniformly filled with nickel ferrite (NFO) nanoparticles of 7.4 ± 1.7 nm diameter using a novel magnetically assisted capillary action method. X-ray diffraction confirmed the inverse spinel phase for the synthesized NFO. Transmission electron microscopy confirms spherical NFO nanoparticles with an average diameter of 7.4 nm inside MWCNTs. Magnetometry indicates that both NFO and NFO-filled MWCNTs present a blocking temperature around 52 K, with similar superparamagnetic-like behavior, and weak dipolar interactions, giving rise to a super-spin-glass-like behavior at low temperatures. These properties along with the uniformity of sub-100 nm structures and the possibility of tunable magnetic response in variable diameter carbon nanotubes make them ideal for advanced biomedical and microwave applications.

  8. Fast Degradation for High Activity: Oxygen- and Nitrogen-Functionalised Carbon Nanotubes in Solid-Acid Fuel-Cell Electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naumov, Olga; Naumov, Sergej; Flyunt, Roman; Abel, Bernd; Varga, Aron

    2016-12-08

    Similar to polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells, the widespread application of solid acid fuel cells (SAFCs) has been hindered partly by the necessity of the use of the precious-metal catalyst Pt in the electrodes. Here we investigate multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) for their potential catalytic activity by using symmetric cell measurements of solid-acid-based electrochemical cells in a cathodic environment. For all measurements, the carbon nanotubes were Pt free and subject to either nitrogen or oxygen plasma treatment. AC impedance spectroscopy of the electrochemical cells, with and without a DC bias, was performed and showed significantly lower initial impedances for oxygen-plasma-treated MWCNTs compared to those treated with a nitrogen plasma. In symmetric cell measurements with a DC bias, the current declines quickly for oxygen-plasma-treated MWCNTs and more slowly, over 12 days, for nitrogen-plasma-treated MWCNTs. To elucidate the degradation mechanisms of the oxygen-plasma-treated MWCNTs under SAFC operating conditions, theoretical calculations were performed using DFT. The results indicate that several degradation mechanisms are likely to occur in parallel through the reduction of the surface oxygen groups that were introduced by the plasma treatment. This finally leads to an inert MWCNT surface and a very low electrode performance. Nitrogen-plasma-treated MWCNTs appear to have a higher stability and may be worthwhile for future investigations.

  9. Probing Photosensitization by Functionalized Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) photosensitize the production of reactive oxygen species that can damage organisms by biomembrane oxidation or mediate CNTs' environmental transformations. The photosensitized nature of derivatized carbon nanotubes from various synthetic methods, and thus ...

  10. Magnetic studies of polystyrene/iron-filled multi-wall carbon nanotube composite films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarova, T. L.; Zakharchuk, I.; Geydt, P.; Lahderanta, E.; Komlev, A. A.; Zyrianova, A. A.; Kanygin, M. A.; Sedelnikova, O. V.; Suslyaev, V. I.; Bulusheva, L. G.; Okotrub, A. V.

    2016-10-01

    Polystyrene/iron-filled multi-wall carbon nanotube composite films were prepared by solution processing, forge-rolling and stretching methods. Elongated iron carbide nanoparticles formed because of catalytic growth are situated inside the hollow cavity of the nanotubes. Magnetic susceptibility measurements as well as records of isothermal hysteresis loops performed in three perpendicular directions of magnetic field confirmed that the nanotubes have a preferential alignment in the matrix. Strong diamagnetic anisotropy in the composites emerges not only from the MWCNTs but also from the polystyrene matrix. The polymer sticks to the honeycomb lattice through the interaction of the π-orbitals of the phenyl ring and those of the carbon nanotube, contributing to anisotropic diamagnetic response. The contribution of iron nanoparticles to overall magnetic response strongly depends on nanotube concentration in the composite as well as on matrix-filler non-covalent stacking, which influences magnetic interparticle interactions.

  11. Influence of Addition of Carboxyl Functionalized MWCNTs on Performance of Neat and Carbon Fiber Reinforced EPON 862

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-01

    compared the effect of pristine and functionalized MWCNTs on the rheology and cure properties of carbon fiber reinforced epoxy resin (EPON 828 and...conversion that is, α =0.80 can be considered as the gel point of DGEBF/DETA system as shown by Qui et al. [38] for TGDDM/DDS system. 50...Polymer Science, DOI: 10.1002/app.37990 [71] M. Hosur, B. Rajib, S. Zainuddin, A. Kumar, J. Trovillion, and S. Jeelani. 2012. Rheology , Flexure and

  12. Synthesis and utilization of a novel carbon nanotubes supported nanocables for the adsorption of dyes from aqueous solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Wei; Jiang, Xinyu [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China); Chen, Xiaoqing, E-mail: xqchen@csu.edu.cn [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center of Resource-conserving & Environment-friendly Society and Ecological Civilization (China)

    2015-09-15

    Using multiwalled carbon nanotubes(MWCNTs) as mechanical support and glucose as carbon resource, a hydrothermal carbonization route was designed for the synthesis of MWCNTs@carbon nanocables with tunable diameter and length. MWCNTs are firstly used as templates for the formation of carbon-rich composite nanocables, and the diameter of the nanocables could be tailored through adjusting the hydrothermal time or the ratio of MWCNTs and glucose. Owing to abundant superficial oxygen-containing functional groups, porous surface and remarkable reactivity, the as-synthesized nanocables are capable of efficiently adsorbing cationic dye methylene blue (MB) and crystal violet (CV). Furthermore, the optimum adsorption conditions, kinetics, adsorption isotherms and adsorption thermodynamics of dyes were studied systematically. Additionally, the maximum adsorption capacities calculated from data analysis (298.5 mg/g for MB and 228.3 mg/g for CV) are significant higher than those of raw MWCNTs and some other adsorbents reported previously, which provides strong evidence for using MWCNTs@carbon nanocables as adsorbent to remove dyes from aqueous solutions. - Graphical abstract: MWCNTs@carbon nanocables has been successfully fabricated by a hydrothermal carbonization method. The as-synthesized novel samples were used as adsorbents and exhibited high adsorption capacity on MB and CV. - Highlights: • A simple, cost-effective and “green” method for the synthesis of the material. • The diameter and length of the material are relatively easy to control. • The surface has large oxygen-containing groups and preferable chemical reactivity. • Compared with raw MWCNTs and some other adsorbents, the adsorption capacity is much high.

  13. Carbon Nanotube Based Molecular Electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Deepak; Saini, Subhash; Menon, Madhu

    1998-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes and the nanotube heterojunctions have recently emerged as excellent candidates for nanoscale molecular electronic device components. Experimental measurements on the conductivity, rectifying behavior and conductivity-chirality correlation have also been made. While quasi-one dimensional simple heterojunctions between nanotubes with different electronic behavior can be generated by introduction of a pair of heptagon-pentagon defects in an otherwise all hexagon graphene sheet. Other complex 3- and 4-point junctions may require other mechanisms. Structural stability as well as local electronic density of states of various nanotube junctions are investigated using a generalized tight-binding molecular dynamics (GDBMD) scheme that incorporates non-orthogonality of the orbitals. The junctions investigated include straight and small angle heterojunctions of various chiralities and diameters; as well as more complex 'T' and 'Y' junctions which do not always obey the usual pentagon-heptagon pair rule. The study of local density of states (LDOS) reveal many interesting features, most prominent among them being the defect-induced states in the gap. The proposed three and four pointjunctions are one of the smallest possible tunnel junctions made entirely of carbon atoms. Furthermore the electronic behavior of the nanotube based device components can be taylored by doping with group III-V elements such as B and N, and BN nanotubes as a wide band gap semiconductor has also been realized in experiments. Structural properties of heteroatomic nanotubes comprising C, B and N will be discussed.

  14. Cytotoxicity of carbon nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Ying; LI WenXin

    2008-01-01

    With large-scale production and application at large scale, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) may cause ad-verse response to the environment and human health. Thus, study on bio-effects and safety of CNTs has attracted great attention from scientists and governments worldwide. This report briefly summa-rizes the main results from the in vitro toxicity study of CNTs. The emphasis is placed on the descrip-tion of a variety of factors affecting CNTs cytotoxicity, including species of CNTs, impurities contained,lengths of CNTs, aspect ratios, chemical modification, and assaying methods of cytotoxicity. However,experimental information obtained thus far on CNTs' cytotoxicity is lacking in comparability, and some-times there is controversy about it. In order to assess more accurately the potential risks of CNTs to human health, we suggest that care should be taken for issues such as chemical modification and quantitative characterization of CNTa in cytotoxicity assessment. More importantly, studies on physical and chemical mechanisms of CNTs' cytotoxicity should be strengthened; assaying methods and evaluating criteria characterized by nanotoxicology should be gradually established.

  15. Cytotoxicity of carbon nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    With large-scale production and application at large scale, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) may cause ad-verse response to the environment and human health. Thus, study on bio-effects and safety of CNTs has attracted great attention from scientists and governments worldwide. This report briefly summa-rizes the main results from the in vitro toxicity study of CNTs. The emphasis is placed on the descrip-tion of a variety of factors affecting CNTs cytotoxicity, including species of CNTs, impurities contained, lengths of CNTs, aspect ratios, chemical modification, and assaying methods of cytotoxicity. However, experimental information obtained thus far on CNTs’ cytotoxicity is lacking in comparability, and some-times there is controversy about it. In order to assess more accurately the potential risks of CNTs to human health, we suggest that care should be taken for issues such as chemical modification and quantitative characterization of CNTs in cytotoxicity assessment. More importantly, studies on physical and chemical mechanisms of CNTs’ cytotoxicity should be strengthened; assaying methods and evaluating criteria characterized by nanotoxicology should be gradually established.

  16. Polyaniline–multi-wall-carbon nanotube nanocomposites as a dopamine sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    REZA EMAMALI SABZI

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available A composite of polyaniline with multi-wall-carbon nanotubes (PANi/ /MWCNTs was synthesized by an in situ chemical oxidative polymerization method. The PANi nanoparticles were synthesized chemically using aniline as the monomer and ammonium peroxydisulfate as the oxidant. The nanocomposites were prepared as a carbon paste using functionalized MWCNTs and PANi nanoparticles. The PANi–MWCNTs were characterized physically using scanning electron microscopy (SEM and the electrochemical behavior of the composites in acidic solution (HCl was investigated using cyclic voltammetry. The PANi/MWCNT composite electrode was used for studying dopamine (DA as an electroactive material. The cyclic voltammetric results indicated that multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs significantly enhanced the electrocatalytic activity in favor of the oxidation of DA. The kinetics of the catalytic reaction was investigated using the chronoamperometry technique whereby the average va¬lue of the diffusion coefficient (D and the catalytic rate constant (k for DA were determined to be (7.98±0.8×10-7 cm2 s-1 and (8.33±0.072×104 dm3 mol-1 s-1, respectively.

  17. Cement Pastes and Mortars Containing Nitrogen-Doped and Oxygen-Functionalized Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauricio Martínez-Alanis

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cement pastes and mortars based on ordinary Portland cement containing nitrogen-doped multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT-Nx or oxygen-functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT-Ox are investigated. To incorporate MWCNTs into the cementitious matrix, the as-produced carpets are dispersed over periods of 1 and 2 hours in distilled water at pH levels of 1 and 7. The cement pastes are prepared by adding 0.1 wt% of MWCNTs to cement powder, followed by characterization with SEM and X-ray diffraction (XRD at an early age (first hours of hydration. The mortars are mechanically characterized during the hydration process for a period of 28 days. SEM characterization of cement pastes revealed that the carbon nanotubes are well incorporated in the cementitious matrix, with the hydrated cement grains interconnected by long carbon nanotubes. XRD characterizations demonstrated that, during the hydration of cement pastes, different peaks emerged that were associated with ettringite, hydrated calcium silicate, and calcium hydroxide, among other structures. Results of the compressive strength measurements for mortars simultaneously mixed with MWCNT-Nx and MWCNT-Ox reached an increment of approximately 30% in compressive strength. In addition, density functional theory calculations were performed in nitrogen-doped and oxygen-functionalized carbon nanotubes interacting with a cement grain.

  18. Multi-walled carbon nanotubes: biodegradation by gastric agents in vitro and effect on murine intestinal system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masyutin, A.; Erokhina, M.; Sychevskaya, K.; Gusev, A.; Vasyukova, I.; Smirnova, E.; Onishchenko, G.

    2015-11-01

    One of the main questions limiting application of fibrous carbon nanomaterials (CNM) in medicine and food industry concerns presumptive degradation of CNM in living organisms. In this study, we have investigated biodegradation of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) by gastric agents in vitro and influence of ingested MWCNTs on murine intestine. Using scanning, conventional transmission and analytical electron microscopy, we demonstrated that industrial MWCNTs treated in vitro by 0.1 M hydrochloric acid (pH=1) and gastric juice (pH=2-3) isolated from murine stomach, are subjected to incomplete degradation. After 30 days of oral administration to experimental mice, we did find MWCNTs in the cells of small intestine, and it may indicate that agglomerates of MWCNTs do not penetrate into colon epithelia and do not accumulate in enterocytes. However, we observed local areas of necrotic damages of intestinal villi. It seems likely, therefore, that MWCNTs end up leaving gastrointestinal tract by excretion with the feces. Our results suggest that MWCNTs do not undergo complete degradation in gastrointestinal tract of mice, and passing through non-degraded particles may negatively affect intestinal system.

  19. Ultraviolet and infrared studies of the single-walled and multi-walled carbon nanotube films with different thickness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abouelsayed, A., E-mail: a_sobhi77@yahoo.com [Spectroscopy Department, Physics Division, National Research Centre, 33 El Bohouth st. (Former El Tahrir st.), Dokki, Giza P.O. 12622 (Egypt); Eisa, Wael H. [Spectroscopy Department, Physics Division, National Research Centre, 33 El Bohouth st. (Former El Tahrir st.), Dokki, Giza P.O. 12622 (Egypt); Dawy, M. [Physical Chemistry Department, Inorganic Chemical Industries and Mineral Resources Division National Research Centre, 33 El Bohouth st. (former El Tahrir st.), Dokki, Giza P.O. 12622 (Egypt); Shabaka, A. [Spectroscopy Department, Physics Division, National Research Centre, 33 El Bohouth st. (Former El Tahrir st.), Dokki, Giza P.O. 12622 (Egypt)

    2016-02-15

    Ultraviolet and infrared transmission measurements on an unoriented single-wall (SWCNTs) and multi-wall (MWCNTs) carbon nanotubes films were performed over a frequency range 190–2500 nm for the four different films. A clear change in the fine structure of the infrared spectrum for different films. The higher-energy optical absorption bands, which correspond to transitions across the Van Hove singularities, are not observed in the measured frequency range in the case of MWCNTs films. The broad excitation in the low-energy range below 0.025 eV (Drude peak (E{sub M0})) are attributed to the contributions from metallic carriers localized in a finite length. This Drude peak (E{sub M0}) at low-energies is decreased in in case of MWCNTs, which suggests a progressive transition of metallic tubes to insulating state. The unoriented MWCNTs films have an average thickness of about 200–400 nm. The scanning electron microscope pictures of the SWCNTs and the MWCNTs films illustrate the morphological differences between the four studied samples. The volume fraction of the carbon nanotubes in all films appears to be the same, although there is a difference for particles other than nanotubes in the films.

  20. Hybrid Composite of Polyaniline Containing Carbon Nanotube

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Carbon nanotube-polyaniline hybrid material was synthesized by emulsion polymerization in-situ. The morphology of hybrid material was studied by TEM and X-ray diffraction. The conductivity of nanocomposite increases with the increasing of carbon nanotube content because of the new conductivity passageways formed by carbon nanotubes.

  1. Synthesis and Application of Carbon Nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qun Zeng; Zhenhua Li; Yuhong Zhou

    2006-01-01

    Owing to the unique structure, the superior physical and chemical properties, the super strong mechanical performances, and so on, carbon nanotubes have attracted the attention of researchers all over the world. In this article, the basic properties and the main production processes of carbon nanotubes are introduced in brief, and the progress of applied research for carbon nanotubes is reviewed.

  2. Integration and characterization of aligned carbon nanotubes on metal/silicon substrates and effects of water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Yong; Li Ruying; Liu Hao [Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, University of Western Ontario, London, ON. N6A 5B9 (Canada); Sun Xueliang, E-mail: xsun@eng.uwo.ca [Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, University of Western Ontario, London, ON. N6A 5B9 (Canada); Merel, Philippe; Desilets, Sylvain [Defence Research and Development Canada- Valcartier, 2459 Boulevard Pie-XI nord, Quebec, QC G3J 1X5 (Canada)

    2009-02-15

    We report here a facile way to grow aligned multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) on various metal (e.g. gold, tungsten, vanadium and copper)/silicon electrically conductive substrates by aerosol-assisted chemical vapor deposition (AACVD). Without using any buffer layers, integration of high quality MWCNTs to the conductive substrates has been achieved by introducing appropriate amount of water vapor into the growth system. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) determination indicate tidy morphology and narrow diameter distribution of the nanotubes as well as promising growth rate suitable for industrial applications. Raman spectra analysis illustrates that the structural order and purity of the nanotubes are significantly improved in the presence of water vapor. The growth mechanism of the nanotubes has been discussed. It is believed that water vapor plays a key role in the catalyst-substrate interaction and nucleation of the carbon nanotubes on the conductive substrates. This synthesis approach is expected to be extended to other catalyst-conductive substrate systems and provide some new insight in the direct integration of carbon nanotubes onto conductive substrates, which promises great potential for applications in electrical interconnects, contacts for field emitters, and other electronic nanodevices.

  3. [PLANT GENETIC TRANSFORMATION USING CARBON NANOTUBES FOR DNA DELIVERY].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burlaka, O M; Pirko, Ya V; Yemets, A I; Blume, Ya B

    2015-01-01

    The possibility of exploiting carbon nanotubes (CNTs)-based nanocarriers to deliver genes into protoplasts, callus and mesophyll explants of plants was examined. Using single-walled CNTs (SWCNTs) at the concentration of 20 μg/ml and multi-walled CNTs (MWCNTs) at the concentration of 15 μg/ml genetic transformation of Nicotiana tabacum L. mesophyll protoplasts with plasmid pGreen 0029 was carried out and transient expression of reporter yfp gene in the protoplasts was observed. Using SWCNTs at the concentration of 40 μg/ml and MWCNTs at the concentration of 30 μg/ml genetic transformation of N. tabacum callus and leaf explants with nptII gene as a part of plasmid pGreen 0029 was carried out. As a result plant regeneration on selective medium containing 50 mg/lkanamycin was shown. SWCNTs-based nanocarriers de-onstrated their appli-ability to transform protoplasts as well as walled plant cells. Whereas, MWCNTs-based nano-arriers were suitable only for transformation of proto-lasts due to the limiting role of cellulose walls in cell penetration.

  4. Carbon Nanotube Degradation in Macrophages: Live Nanoscale Monitoring and Understanding of Biological Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elgrabli, Dan; Dachraoui, Walid; Ménard-Moyon, Cécilia; Liu, Xiao Jie; Bégin, Dominique; Bégin-Colin, Sylvie; Bianco, Alberto; Gazeau, Florence; Alloyeau, Damien

    2015-10-27

    Despite numerous applications, the cellular-clearance mechanism of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) has not been clearly established yet. Previous in vitro studies showed the ability of oxidative enzymes to induce nanotube degradation. Interestingly, these enzymes have the common capacity to produce reactive oxygen species (ROS). Here, we combined material and life science approaches for revealing an intracellular way taken by macrophages to degrade carbon nanotubes. We report the in situ monitoring of ROS-mediated MWCNT degradation by liquid-cell transmission electron microscopy. Two degradation mechanisms induced by hydroxyl radicals were extracted from these unseen dynamic nanoscale investigations: a non-site-specific thinning process of the walls and a site-specific transversal drilling process on pre-existing defects of nanotubes. Remarkably, similar ROS-induced structural injuries were observed on MWCNTs after aging into macrophages from 1 to 7 days. Beside unraveling oxidative transformations of MWCNT structure, we elucidated an important, albeit not exclusive, biological pathway for MWCNT degradation in macrophages, involving NOX2 complex activation, superoxide production, and hydroxyl radical attack, which highlights the critical role of oxidative stress in cellular processing of MWCNTs.

  5. Effect of catalyst preparation on the yield of carbon nanotube growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Escobar, Mariano, E-mail: mescobar@df.uba.a [Dep. Quimica Inorganica, Analitica y Quimica Fisica, FCEyN, UBA, Ciudad Universitaria (1428), Bs As (Argentina); LP and MC, Dep. Fisica, FCEyN, UBA (Argentina); Rubiolo, Gerardo [Unidad de Actividad Materiales, CNEA, Av Gral Paz 1499, San Martin (1650), Bs As (Argentina); Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas (CONICET) (Argentina); Candal, Roberto [Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas (CONICET) (Argentina); Instituto de Fisico-quimica de Materiales, Ambiente y Energia (INQUIMAE), CONICET - UBA (Argentina); Goyanes, Silvia [LP and MC, Dep. Fisica, FCEyN, UBA (Argentina); Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas (CONICET) (Argentina)

    2009-10-01

    Multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were synthesized by catalytic chemical vapor deposition (CVD) on catalytic iron nanoparticles dispersed in a silica matrix, prepared by sol gel method. In this contribution, variation of gelation condition on catalyst structure and its influence on the yield of carbon nanotubes growth was studied. The precursor utilized were tetraethyl-orthosilicate and iron nitrate. The sols were dried at two different temperatures in air (25 or 80 deg. C) and then treated at 450 deg. C for 10 h. The xerogels were introduced into the chamber and reduced in a hydrogen/nitrogen (10%v/v) atmosphere at 600 deg. C. MWCNTs were formed by deposition of carbon atoms from decomposition of acetylene at 700 deg. C. The system gelled at RT shows a yield of 100% respect to initial catalyst mass whereas the yield of that gelled at 80 deg. C was lower than 10%. Different crystalline phases are observed for both catalysts in each step of the process. Moreover, TPR analysis shows that iron oxide can be efficiently reduced to metallic iron only in the system gelled at room temperature. Carbon nanotubes display a diameter of about 25-40 nm and several micron lengths. The growth mechanism of MWCNTs is base growth mode for both catalysts.

  6. Enhanced sensing based MWCNTS on interdigitated electrode (IDEs) biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farehanim, M. A.; Hashim, U.; Azizah, N.; Fatin, M. F.; Azman, A. H.

    2017-03-01

    Multi Walled Carbon Nanotubes (MWCNTs) is one of an excellent nanomaterial that can enhance the sensing of DNA detection. The simple and generic protocol for label free detection of DNA hybridization was demonstrated with random sequence oligonucleotide. Interdigitated electrode was used due to easy fabrication using basic conventional lithography process. DNA hybridization was performed on Interdigitated electrode that was modified with MWNCTs to act as surface active area, electrical conductance change due to the effect of MWCNTs-DNA binding on DNA functionalization were measured.

  7. Synthesis of carbon nanotubes by pyrolysis of solid Ni(dmg){sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kordatos, K. [School of Chemical Engineering, National Technical University of Athens, 9 Heroon Polytechniou Street, 15780 Zografou (Greece)], E-mail: kordatos@central.ntua.gr; Vlasopoulos, A.D.; Strikos, S.; Ntziouni, A.; Gavela, S. [School of Chemical Engineering, National Technical University of Athens, 9 Heroon Polytechniou Street, 15780 Zografou (Greece); Trasobares, S. [Departamento de Ciencia de los Materiales e Ingenieria Metalurgica y Quimica Inorganica, Universidad de Cadiz, 11510 Puerto Real (Spain); Kasselouri-Rigopoulou, V. [School of Chemical Engineering, National Technical University of Athens, 9 Heroon Polytechniou Street, 15780 Zografou (Greece)

    2009-03-30

    We describe the high yield synthesis of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and the determination of the optimum production conditions. The method involves the catalytic pyrolysis of solid Ni(dmg){sub 2} under an Ar atmosphere. The obtained materials were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis, high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy and thermogravimetry analysis (TGA). The data revealed the formation of MWCNTs surrounded by a varying quantity of byproducts such as amorphous carbon and metallic particles, depending mainly on the reaction temperature. Pyrolysis of Ni(dmg){sub 2} at 900 deg. C results in the production of nanotube material with the highest degree of crystallinity.

  8. Hydrodynamic properties of carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walther, J H; Werder, T; Jaffe, R L; Koumoutsakos, P

    2004-06-01

    We study water flowing past an array of single walled carbon nanotubes using nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. For carbon nanotubes mounted with a tube spacing of 16.4 x 16.4 nm and diameters of 1.25 and 2.50 nm, respectively, we find drag coefficients in reasonable agreement with the macroscopic, Stokes-Oseen solution. The slip length is -0.11 nm for the 1.25 nm carbon nanotube, and 0.49 for the 2.50 nm tube for a flow speed of 50 m/s, respectively, and 0.28 nm for the 2.50 nm tube at 200 m/s. A slanted flow configuration with a stream- and spanwise velocity component of 100 ms(-1) recovers the two-dimensional results, but exhibits a significant 88 nm slip along the axis of the tube. These results indicate that slip depends on the particular flow configuration.

  9. Adsorption on the carbon nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DING Yi; YANG Xiao-bao; NI Jun

    2006-01-01

    Adsorption on single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) is a subject of growing experimental and theoretical interest.The possible adsorbed patterns of atoms and molecules on the single-walled carbon nanotubes vary with the diameters and chirality of the tubes due to the confinement.The curvature of the carbon nanotube surface enlarges the distance of the adsorbate atoms and thus enhances the stability of high coverage structures of adsorbate.There exist two novel high-coverage stable structures of potassium adsorbed on SWCNTs,which are not stable on graphite.The electronic properties of SWCNTs can be modified by adsorbate atoms and metal-semiconductor and semiconductor-semi-conductor transitions can be achieved by the doping of alkali atoms.

  10. Comparative Study of Adsorption Isotherms of Vitamin C on Multi wall and single wall Carbon Nanotube

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azin Dehmolaei

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available We have studied the interaction of Vitamin C solution on multi-wall and single-wall carbon nanotubeAfter investigated comparative study and assigned to Vitamin C adsorption isotherm. The adsorption equilibrium isotherms were fitted by Freundlich, Langmuir, and Temkin models. It was found that the Langmuirmodel described the adsorption process better than other two isotherm models. The amount of Antioxidant drug(Vitamin C adsorbed on Multi wallcarbon nanotube surface increased with the increase of the initial Antioxidant concentration. Based on the results, under similar conditions the efficiency of adsorption of Vitamin C by Multi-wall carbon nanotube(MWCNTs was more thansingle-wall carbon nanotube.

  11. Ultraviolet pulsed laser irradiation of multi-walled carbon nanotubes in nitrogen atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pérez del Pino, Ángel, E-mail: aperez@icmab.es; Cabana, Laura; Tobias, Gerard [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Barcelona, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas (ICMAB-CSIC), Campus UAB, 08193 Bellaterra (Spain); György, Enikö [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Barcelona, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas (ICMAB-CSIC), Campus UAB, 08193 Bellaterra (Spain); National Institute for Lasers, Plasma and Radiation Physics, P. O. Box MG 36, 76900 Bucharest V (Romania); Ballesteros, Belén [ICN2—Institut Catala de Nanociencia i Nanotecnologia, Campus UAB, 08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona (Spain)

    2014-03-07

    Laser irradiation of randomly oriented multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) networks has been carried out using a pulsed Nd:YAG UV laser in nitrogen gas environment. The evolution of the MWCNT morphology and structure as a function of laser fluence and number of accumulated laser pulses has been studied using electron microscopies and Raman spectroscopy. The observed changes are discussed and correlated with thermal simulations. The obtained results indicate that laser irradiation induces very fast, high temperature thermal cycles in MWCNTs which produce the formation of different nanocarbon forms, such as nanodiamonds. Premelting processes have been observed in localized sites by irradiation at low number of laser pulses and low fluence values. The accumulation of laser pulses and the increase in the fluence cause the full melting and amorphization of MWCNTs. The observed structural changes differ from that of conventional high temperature annealing treatments of MWCNTs.

  12. Electrical conductivity and electromagnetic interference shielding characteristics of multiwalled carbon nanotube filled polyurethane composite films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son Hoang, Anh

    2011-06-01

    Multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were homogeneously dispersed in a pure polyurethane resin by grinding in a planetary ball mill. The structure and surface morphology of the MWCNTs and MWCNT/polyurethane composites were studied by filed emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) methods. The electrical conductivity at room temperature and electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding effectiveness (SE) of the composite films with different MWCNT loadings were investigated and the measurement of EMI SE was carried out in a frequency range of 8-12 GHz (X-band). The experimental results show that with a low MWCNT concentration the composite films could achieve a high conductivity and their EMI SE has a strong dependence on MWCNT content. For the composite films with 22 wt% of MWCNTs, the EMI SE attained an average value of 20 dB, so that the shielding effect reduced the penetrating power to 1%.

  13. Ultraviolet pulsed laser irradiation of multi-walled carbon nanotubes in nitrogen atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez del Pino, Ángel; György, Enikö; Cabana, Laura; Ballesteros, Belén; Tobias, Gerard

    2014-03-01

    Laser irradiation of randomly oriented multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) networks has been carried out using a pulsed Nd:YAG UV laser in nitrogen gas environment. The evolution of the MWCNT morphology and structure as a function of laser fluence and number of accumulated laser pulses has been studied using electron microscopies and Raman spectroscopy. The observed changes are discussed and correlated with thermal simulations. The obtained results indicate that laser irradiation induces very fast, high temperature thermal cycles in MWCNTs which produce the formation of different nanocarbon forms, such as nanodiamonds. Premelting processes have been observed in localized sites by irradiation at low number of laser pulses and low fluence values. The accumulation of laser pulses and the increase in the fluence cause the full melting and amorphization of MWCNTs. The observed structural changes differ from that of conventional high temperature annealing treatments of MWCNTs.

  14. A resistive-type sensor based on flexible multi-walled carbon nanotubes and polyacrylic acid composite films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jeongah; Cho, Daehwan; Jeong, Youngjin

    2013-09-01

    A humidity sensor film was fabricated by loading high numbers of multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) in a poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) polymer matrix containing poly(4-styrenesulfonic acid) (PSS) to enhance the MWCNT dispersion. Cross-section images demonstrate that the MWCNTs distribute evenly throughout the matrix. The fabrication processes and sensing mechanisms of the film are explained to investigate the flexible properties and humidity-sensing characteristics of the film. The film loaded with 33 wt% MWCNTs is much more flexible than an overhead projector (OHP) film and shows similar electrical resistance to pure CNT Bucky paper. The sensor film composed of 1:2 MWCNTs:PAA is highly sensitive to humidity (0.069/%RH) and displays good linearity (0.99).

  15. Carbon nanotube-polymer composite actuators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gennett, Thomas; Raffaelle, Ryne P.; Landi, Brian J.; Heben, Michael J.

    2008-04-22

    The present invention discloses a carbon nanotube (SWNT)-polymer composite actuator and method to make such actuator. A series of uniform composites was prepared by dispersing purified single wall nanotubes with varying weight percents into a polymer matrix, followed by solution casting. The resulting nanotube-polymer composite was then successfully used to form a nanotube polymer actuator.

  16. Pyrolytic deposition of nanostructured titanium carbide coatings on the surface of multiwalled carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kremlev, K. V.; Ob"edkov, A. M.; Ketkov, S. Yu.; Kaverin, B. S.; Semenov, N. M.; Gusev, S. A.; Tatarskii, D. A.; Yunin, P. A.

    2016-05-01

    Nanostructured titanium carbide coatings have been deposited on the surface of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) by the MOCVD method with bis(cyclopentadienyl)titanium dichloride precursor. The obtained TiC/MWCNT hybrid materials were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. It is established that a TiC coating deposits onto the MWCNT surface with the formation of a core-shell (MWSNT-TiC) type structure.

  17. Multiwalled carbon nanotube-reinforced ceramic matrix composites as a promising structural material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Estili, Mehdi, E-mail: mehdiestili@gmail.co [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Department of Materials Processing, Graduate School of Engineering, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan); Kwon, Hansang; Kawasaki, Akira; Cho, Seungchan; Takagi, Kenta; Kikuchi, Keiko [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Kawai, Masayoshi [Institute of Materials Structure Science, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan)

    2010-03-15

    In this paper, we introduce fully dense, multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWCNT)-reinforced ceramic matrix composites recently processed by a novel powder technology in our laboratory to be considered as a promising potential structural materials for employment in severe working conditions. A strategy is also offered to investigate the effect of working condition on the mechanical properties of MWCNTs embedded in the ceramic matrix for a reliable material selection for the working conditions needed.

  18. Multiwalled carbon nanotubes coating accelerates osteoconductivity of anodized titanium [an abstract of entire text

    OpenAIRE

    井上, 沙織

    2014-01-01

    Because of their excellent mechanical, electrical and biocompatible properties, multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) are employed for tissue engineering. Recent studies have also revealed that CNTs provide a preferable surface for cell adhesion and growth. Osteoblast-like cells adhere well and grow on the MWCNT-coated collagen sponge better than on the non-coated sponge. On the other hand, ti tanium is commonly used as a biomaterial for dental implants because of its excellent mechanical and...

  19. Development of Pd and Pd-Co catalysts supported on multi-walled carbon nanotubes for formic acid oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morales-Acosta, D.; Godinez, Luis A.; Rodriguez, H.G.; Arriaga, L.G. [Centro de Investigacion y Desarrollo Tecnologico en Electroquimica, Parque Tecnologico Queretaro, Sanfandila, Pedro Escobedo, C.P. 76703 Queretaro (Mexico); Ledesma-Garcia, J. [Division de Investigacion y Posgrado, Facultad de Ingenieria, Universidad Autonoma de Queretaro, Cerro de las Campanas S/N, C.P. 76010, Queretaro, Qro. (Mexico); Alvarez-Contreras, L. [Centro de Investigacion en Materiales Avanzados S. C., Complejo Industrial Chihuahua, C.P. 31109, Chihuahua, Chih. (Mexico)

    2010-01-15

    Pd-Co and Pd catalysts were prepared by the impregnation synthesis method at low temperature on multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). The nanotubes were synthesized by spray pyrolysis technique. Both catalysts were obtained with high homogeneous distribution and particle size around 4 nm. The morphology, composition and electrocatalytic properties were investigated by transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive X-ray analysis, X-ray diffraction and electrochemical measurements, respectively. The electrocatalytic activity of Pd and PdCo/MWCNTs catalysts was investigated in terms of formic acid electrooxidation at low concentration in H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} aqueous solution. The results obtained from voltamperometric studies showed that the current density achieved with the PdCo/MWCNTs catalyst is 3 times higher than that reached with the Pd/MWCNTs catalyst. The onset potential for formic acid electrooxidation on PdCo/MWCNTs electrocatalyst showed a negative shift ca. 50 mV compared with Pd/MWCNTs. (author)

  20. Oxidation and silanization of MWCNTs for MWCNT/vinyl ester composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Chemical functionalization of multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs is conducted by means of acid oxidation, direct silanization of the as-received MWCNTs and a sequential treatment based on oxidation and silanization. Polymer composites made from the functionalized MWCNTs and a vinyl ester resin are fabricated and tested in compression. It is found that although silanization could be achieved without the assistance of a previous oxidative treatment, oxidizing the MWCNTs by HNO3/H2O2 prior to silanization yields significantly better attachment of the silane molecules to the CNT surface and hence, better mechanical performance of the resulting composite. The limited improvements in mechanical properties found are discussed in light of the reduction of the nanotube length after MWCNT oxidation and composite processing.

  1. Modified carbon nanotubes and methods of forming carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heintz, Amy M.; Risser, Steven; Elhard, Joel D.; Moore, Bryon P.; Liu, Tao; Vijayendran, Bhima R.

    2016-06-14

    In this invention, processes which can be used to achieve stable doped carbon nanotubes are disclosed. Preferred CNT structures and morphologies for achieving maximum doping effects are also described. Dopant formulations and methods for achieving doping of a broad distribution of tube types are also described.

  2. Selective synthesis of double helices of carbon nanotube bundles grown on treated metallic substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cervantes-Sodi, Felipe; Iniguez-Rabago, Agustin; Rosas-Melendez, Samuel; Ballesteros-Villarreal, Monica [Departamento de Fisica y Matematicas, Universidad Iberoamericana, Prolongacion Paseo de la Reforma 880, Lomas de Santa Fe (Mexico); Vilatela, Juan J. [IMDEA Materials Institute, E.T.S. de Ingenieros de Caminos, Madrid (Spain); Reyes-Gutierrez, Lucio G.; Jimenez-Rodriguez, Jose A. [Ingenieria Industrial, Grupo JUMEX, Ecatepec de Morelos, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Palacios, Eduardo [Lab. de Microscopia Electronica de Ultra Alta Resolucion, Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo, San Bartolo Atepehuacan (Mexico); Terrones, Mauricio [Department of Physics, Department of Materials Science and Engineering and Materials Research Institute, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA (United States); Research Center for Exotic Nanocarbons (JST), Shinshu University, Nagano (Japan)

    2012-12-15

    Double-helix microstructures consisting of two parallel strands of hundreds of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) have been synthesized by chemical vapour deposition of ferrocene/toluene vapours on metal substrates. Growth of coiled carbon nanostructures with site selectivity is achieved by varying the duration of thermochemical pretreatment to deposit a layer of SiO{sub x} on the metallic substrate. Production of multibranched structures of MWCNTs converging in SiO{sub x} microstructure is also reported. In the abstract figure, panel (a) shows a coloured micrograph of a typical double-helix coiled microstructure of MWCNTs grown on SiO{sub x} covered steel substrate. Green and blue show each of the two individual strands of MWCNTs. Panel (b) is an amplification of a SiO{sub x} microparticle (white) on the tip of the double-stranded coil (green and blue). The microparticle guides the collective growth of hundreds of MWCNTs to form the coiled structure. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  3. Polymer-derived ceramic composite fibers with aligned pristine multiwalled carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Sourangsu; Zou, Jianhua; Liu, Jianhua; Xu, Chengying; An, Linan; Zhai, Lei

    2010-04-01

    Polymer-derived ceramic fibers with aligned multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) are fabricated through the electrospinning of polyaluminasilazane solutions with well-dispersed MWCNTs followed by pyrolysis. Poly(3-hexylthiophene)-b-poly (poly (ethylene glycol) methyl ether acrylate) (P3HT-b-PPEGA), a conjugated block copolymer compatible with polyaluminasilazane, is used to functionalize MWCNT surfaces with PPEGA, providing a noninvasive approach to disperse carbon nanotubes in polyaluminasilazane chloroform solutions. The electrospinning of the MWCNT/polyaluminasilazane solutions generates polymer fibers with aligned MWCNTs where MWCNTs are oriented along the electrospun jet by a sink flow. The subsequent pyrolysis of the obtained composite fibers produces ceramic fibers with aligned MWCNTs. The study of the effect of polymer and CNT concentration on the fiber structures shows that the fiber size increases with the increment of polymer concentration, whereas higher CNT content in the polymer solutions leads to thinner fibers attributable to the increased conductivity. Both the SEM and TEM characterization of the polymer and ceramic fibers demonstrates the uniform orientation of CNTs along the fibers, suggesting excellent dispersion of CNTs and efficient CNT alignment via the electrospinning. The electrical conductivity of a ceramic fibers with 1.2% aligned MWCNTs is measured to be 1.58 x 10(-6) S/cm, which is more than 500 times higher than that of bulk ceramic (3.43 x 10(-9) S/cm). Such an approach provides a versatile method to disperse CNTs in preceramic polymer solutions and offers a new approach to integrate aligned CNTs in ceramics.

  4. The thermal properties of a carbon nanotube-enriched epoxy: Thermal conductivity, curing, and degradation kinetics

    KAUST Repository

    Ventura, Isaac Aguilar

    2013-05-31

    Multiwalled carbon nanotube-enriched epoxy polymers were prepared by solvent evaporation based on a commercially available epoxy system and functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotubes (COOH-MWCNTs). Three weight ratio configurations (0.05, 0.5, and 1.0 wt %) of COOH-MWCNTs were considered and compared with neat epoxy and ethanol-treated epoxy to investigate the effects of nano enrichment and processing. Here, the thermal properties of the epoxy polymers, including curing kinetics, thermal conductivity, and degradation kinetics were studied. Introducing the MWCNTs increased the curing activation energy as revealed by differential scanning calorimetry. The final thermal conductivity of the 0.5 and 1.0 wt % MWCNT-enriched epoxy samples measured by laser flash technique increased by up to 15% compared with the neat material. The activation energy of the degradation process, investigated by thermogravimetric analysis, was found to increase with increasing CNT content, suggesting that the addition of MWCNTs improved the thermal stability of the epoxy polymers. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Towards highly stable aqueous dispersions of multi-walled carbon nanotubes: the effect of oxygen plasma functionalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garzia Trulli, Marta; Sardella, Eloisa; Palumbo, Fabio; Palazzo, Gerardo; Giannossa, Lorena Carla; Mangone, Annarosa; Comparelli, Roberto; Musso, Simone; Favia, Pietro

    2017-04-01

    In order to improve the dispersion of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) in aqueous media, their surface functionalization was carried out in O2-fed low-pressure plasmas. Differently from what can be found in the literature of this field, homogeneous functionalization was achieved by generating the plasma inside vials containing the nanotube powders properly stirred. Experimental parameters, such as input power, treatment time and pressure, were varied to investigate their influence on the process efficiency. A detailed characterization of the plasma treated nanotubes, dry and in aqueous suspension, was carried out with a multi-diagnostic analytical approach, to evaluate their surface chemical properties, morphology, structural integrity and stability in the colloidal state. The plasma grafting of polar ionizable (e.g. acid) groups has been proved to successfully limit the agglomeration of MWCNTs and to produce nanotubes suspensions that are stable for one month and more in water.

  6. Nanostructuring effect of multi-walled carbon nanotubes on electrochemical properties of carbon foam as constructive electrode for lead acid battery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Rajeev; Kumari, Saroj; Mathur, Rakesh B.; Dhakate, Sanjay R.

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, nanostructuring effect of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) on electrochemical properties of coal tar pitch (CTP) based carbon foam (CFoam) was investigated. The different weight fractions of MWCNTs were mixed with CTP and foam was developed from the mixture of CTP and MWCNTs by sacrificial template technique and heat treated at 1,400 and 2,500 °C in inert atmosphere. These foams were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and potentiostat PARSTAT for cyclic voltammetry. It was observed that, bulk density of CFoam increases with increasing MWCNTs content and decreases after certain amount. The MWCNTs influence the morphology of CFoam and increase the width of ligaments as well as surface area. During the heat treatment, stresses exerting at MWCNTs/carbon interface accelerate ordering of the graphene layer which have positive effect on the electrochemical properties of CFoam. The current density increases from 475 to 675 mA/cm2 of 1,400 °C heat treated and 95 to 210 mA/cm2 of 2,500 °C heat-treated CFoam with 1 wt% MWCNTs. The specific capacitance was decreases with increasing the scan rate from 100 to 1,000 mV/s. In case of 1 % MWCNTs content CFoam the specific capacitance at the scan rate 100 mV/s was increased from 850 to 1,250 μF/cm2 and 48 to 340 μF/cm2 of CFoam heat treated at 1,400 °C and 2,500 °C respectively. Thus, the higher value surface area and current density of MWCNTs-incorporated CFoam heat treated to 1,400 °C can be suitable for lead acid battery electrode with improved charging capability.

  7. Supercritical-assistant liquid crystal template approach to synthesize mesoporous titania/multiwalled carbon nanotube composites with high visible-light driven photocatalytic performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Chen; Li, Youji, E-mail: bcclyj@163.com; Xu, Peng; Li, Ming; Huo, Pingxiang

    2014-12-15

    Graphical abstract: We investigate the influence of mesoporous titania content upon the visible-light driven photocatalytic performance of MPT/MWCNTs in phenol degradation. - Highlights: • MPT/MWCNTs were fabricated by liquid-crystal template in supercritical CO{sub 2}. • MPT/MWCNTs show high visible-light driven photoactivity for phenol degradation. • MPT/MWCNTs also show high reusable photoactivity under visible irradiation. • MPT content can control visible-light driven photoactivity of MPT/MWCNTs. • MPT is not easily broken away from from MPT/MWCNT composites. - Abstract: Mesoporous titania (MPT) was deposited onto multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) by deposition of titanium sol containing liquid-crystal template with assistant of supercritical CO{sub 2}. The products were characterized with various analytical techniques to determine their structural, morphological, optical absorption and photocatalytic properties. The results indicate that in photocatalytic degradation of phenol under visible light, the mixtures or composites of MPT and MWCNT show the high efficiency because of synergies between absorbing visible light, releasing electrons and facilitating transfer of charge carriers of MWCNTs and providing activated centers of MPT. Because of the mutual constraint between MPT and MWCNTs on the photocatalytic efficiency, the optimal loading of MPT in MPT/MWCNT-3 for phenol degradation is 48%. Because the intimate contact between MWCNTs and MPT is more beneficial to electron transformation, photoactivity of mixture is lower than that of composites with high reusable performance. The optimum conditions of phenol degradation were obtained.

  8. Supramolecular modification of multi-walled carbon nanotubes with β-cyclodextrin for better dispersibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yi; Xu, Zhonghao; Yang, Qiangbin; Wu, Feng; Liang, Lv

    2015-01-01

    A novel hybrid material based on multi-walled carbon nanotubes was synthesized using organic synthesis, and the structures of multi-walled carbon nanotube derivatives were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, thermogravimetric analysis, 1H NMR spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and scanning electron microscope. The analytical results indicated that β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) was anchored to the surface of Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs, OD: 10-20 nm, length: 10-30 μm) and dispersion experiments exhibited that the introduction of β-CD onto the MWCNTs would dramatically enhance the dispersion of MWCNTs in both ethanol and water media; the suspensions were found to be very stable for 2 months, and the results of this technique confirmed the experimental results. This novel technique would provide a new, simple, and facile route to prepare the modified nanomaterials based on silane-coupling agent and β-CD, and the obtained modified nanomaterials have great potential practical significance and theoretical value to develop the novel organic-inorganic hybrid material, which was very useful for water treatment and biological medicine.

  9. Self-assembly of nano-hydroxyapatite on multi-walled carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Susan; Xu, Guofu; Wang, Wei; Watari, Fumio; Cui, Fuzhai; Ramakrishna, Seeram; Chan, Casey K

    2007-09-01

    Inspired by self-assembly of nano-hydroxyapatite (nHA) on collagen associated with the 67nm periodic microstructure of collagen, we used multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) with approximately 40nm bamboo periodic microstructure as a template for nHA deposition to form a nHA-MWCNT composite. The assembled apatite was analyzed by transmission electron microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Defects that were analogous to edge dislocations along the carbon nanotubes' multi-walled surfaces were the nucleation sites for nHA after these defects had been functionalized principally into carboxylic groups. Spindle-shaped units consisting of an assembly of near parallel, fibril-like nHA polycrystals were formed and oriented at a certain angle to the long axis of the carbon nanotubes, unlike nHA-collagen in which the nHA is oriented along the longitudinal axis of the collagen molecule. One possible explanation for this difference is that there are more bonds for calcium chelation (-COOH, >CO) on the collagen fibril surface than on the surface of MWCNTs. Spindle-shaped units that are detached from the MWCNT template are able to maintain the ordered parallel structure of the nHA polycrystal fibril. We have thus created a self-assembled hydroxyapatite on MWCNTs.

  10. Improved covalent functionalization of multi-walled carbon nanotubes using ascorbic acid for poly(amide–imide) composites having dopamine linkages

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    SHADPOUR MALLAKPOUR; AMIN ZADEHNAZARI

    2017-02-01

    Ascorbic acid has been covalently linked to multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). The structures of the functionalized MWCNTs were characterized with Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy. Thermogravimetric analysis results also demonstrated the presence of organic portions of the functionalized MWCNTs. Polymer composites based on a nanostructured poly(amide–imide) (PAI) were fabricated by an ex situ technique with 5, 10 and 15% loading by weight. Composite films were made by the solvent casting method. The thermal stabilityof the composites increased with even a small amount of modified MWCNT added. Tensile tests were conducted and depicted an increase in the elastic modulus with increasing MWCNTs content. X-ray diffraction study of thecomposites also indicated that the composites incorporated MWCNTs in the polymer chain.

  11. Biosafety of non-surface modified carbon nanocapsules as a potential alternative to carbon nanotubes for drug delivery purposes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan C L Tang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Carbon nanotubes (CNTs have found wide success in circuitry, photovoltaics, and other applications. In contrast, several hurdles exist in using CNTs towards applications in drug delivery. Raw, non-modified CNTs are widely known for their toxicity. As such, many have attempted to reduce CNT toxicity for intravenous drug delivery purposes by post-process surface modification. Alternatively, a novel sphere-like carbon nanocapsule (CNC developed by the arc-discharge method holds similar electric and thermal conductivities, as well as high strength. This study investigated the systemic toxicity and biocompatibility of different non-surface modified carbon nanomaterials in mice, including multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs, single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs, carbon nanocapsules (CNCs, and C ₆₀ fullerene (C ₆₀. The retention of the nanomaterials and systemic effects after intravenous injections were studied. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: MWCNTs, SWCNTs, CNCs, and C ₆₀ were injected intravenously into FVB mice and then sacrificed for tissue section examination. Inflammatory cytokine levels were evaluated with ELISA. Mice receiving injection of MWCNTs or SWCNTs at 50 µg/g b.w. died while C ₆₀ injected group survived at a 50% rate. Surprisingly, mortality rate of mice injected with CNCs was only at 10%. Tissue sections revealed that most carbon nanomaterials retained in the lung. Furthermore, serum and lung-tissue cytokine levels did not reveal any inflammatory response compared to those in mice receiving normal saline injection. CONCLUSION: Carbon nanocapsules are more biocompatible than other carbon nanomaterials and are more suitable for intravenous drug delivery. These results indicate potential biomedical use of non-surface modified carbon allotrope. Additionally, functionalization of the carbon nanocapsules could further enhance dispersion and biocompatibility for intravenous injection.

  12. Characterization and In Vitro Sustained Release of Silibinin from pH Responsive Carbon Nanotube-Based Drug Delivery System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia M. Tan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study was to develop and characterize an in vitro sustained release formulation of silibinin (SB using commercially available carboxylated multiwalled carbon nanotubes (COOH-MWCNTs and to investigate cytotoxicity action of the synthesized nanohybrid (SB-MWCNTs. The resulting nanohybrid was characterized with Fourier transform infrared (FTIR, Raman spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA, ultraviolet-visible spectrophotometry (UV-Vis, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM. FTIR, Raman spectroscopy, and TGA analysis confirmed the adsorption of SB molecules to the COOH-MWCNTs. The release of SB from the COOH-MWCNTs nanocarrier was found to be sustained and pH-dependent. The maximum percentage release of SB from the nanocarrier reached approximately 96.6% and 43.1% within 1000 minutes when exposed to pH 7.4 and pH 4.8 solutions, respectively. It was observed that the release of kinetic behaviour of SB from the MWCNTs nanocarrier conformed well to pseudo-second order kinetic model. The obtained MTT result showed that the SB-MWCNTs exhibited enhanced cytotoxicity to human cancer cell lines in comparison with free SB at lower concentrations. These results suggest that SB-MWCNTs nanohybrid may be a promising nanodrug delivery system with sustained release property for the treatment of cancers.

  13. Cerium oxide nanoparticles/multi-wall carbon nanotubes composites: Facile synthesis and electrochemical performances as supercapacitor electrode materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Dongyang; Chen, Nan; Li, Yuxiu; Xing, Xinxin; Liu, Xu; Xiao, Xuechun; Wang, Yude

    2017-02-01

    Cerium oxide nanoparticles/multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) composites are synthesized by a facile hydrothermal method without any surfactant or template. The morphology and microstructure of samples are examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transition electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectrum and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Electrochemical properties of the MWCNTs, the pure CeO2, and the CeO2/MWCNTs nanocomposites electrodes are investigated by cyclic voltammetry (CV), galvanostatic charge/discharge (GDC) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements. The CeO2/MWCNTs nanocomposite (at the mole ratio of 1:1) electrode exhibits much larger specific capacitance compared with both the MWCNTs electrode and the pure CeO2 electrode and significantly improves cycling stability compared to the pure CeO2 electrode. The CeO2/MWCNTs nanocomposite (at the mole ratio of 1:1) achieves a specific capacitance of 455.6 F g-1 at the current density of 1 A g-1. Therefore, the as prepared CeO2/MWCNTs nanocomposite is a promising electrode material for high-performance supercapacitors.

  14. The adsorption of biomolecules to multi-walled carbon nanotubes is influenced by both pulmonary surfactant lipids and surface chemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Bing

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background During production and processing of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs, they may be inhaled and may enter the pulmonary circulation. It is essential that interactions with involved body fluids like the pulmonary surfactant, the blood and others are investigated, particularly as these interactions could lead to coating of the tubes and may affect their chemical and physical characteristics. The aim of this study was to characterize the possible coatings of different functionalized MWCNTs in a cell free environment. Results To simulate the first contact in the lung, the tubes were coated with pulmonary surfactant and subsequently bound lipids were characterized. The further coating in the blood circulation was simulated by incubating the tubes in blood plasma. MWCNTs were amino (NH2- and carboxyl (-COOH-modified, in order to investigate the influence on the bound lipid and protein patterns. It was shown that surfactant lipids bind unspecifically to different functionalized MWCNTs, in contrast to the blood plasma proteins which showed characteristic binding patterns. Patterns of bound surfactant lipids were altered after a subsequent incubation in blood plasma. In addition, it was found that bound plasma protein patterns were altered when MWCNTs were previously coated with pulmonary surfactant. Conclusions A pulmonary surfactant coating and the functionalization of MWCNTs have both the potential to alter the MWCNTs blood plasma protein coating and to determine their properties and behaviour in biological systems.

  15. [Biochemical effects of chronic peroral administration of carbon nanotubes and activated charcoal in drinking water in rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khripach, L V; Rakhmanin, Iu A; Mikhajlova, R I; Knyazeva, T D; Koganova, Z I; Zhelezniak, E V; Savostikova, O N; Alekseeva, A V; Kameneckaya, D V; Ryzhova, I N; Kruglova, E V; Revazova, T L

    2014-01-01

    Chronic 6-month experiment was carried out in rats, which received drinking water with multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), diameter of 15-40 nm, length ≥ 2 mkm) or activated charcoal (AC, diameter of 10-100 mkm), blood samples of the animals were used for assessment of biochemical markers. Both coal compounds induced the appearance of signs of oxidative stress 2 weeks after the beginning of the experiment and alteration of serum markers of liver and renal damage, as well as changes of cortisol and protein serum concentrations later Thus, despite of known high (asbest-like) inhalation toxicity of carbon nanotubes in comparison with other carbon allotrops (fullerenes and black carbon), we have found similar effects of MWCNTs and carbon microparticles in orally treated rats.

  16. Hydroxylation of multi-walled carbon nanotubes: Enhanced biocompatibility through reduction of oxidative stress initiated cell membrane damage, cell cycle arrestment and extrinsic apoptotic pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhenbao; Liu, Yanfei; Peng, Dongming

    2016-10-01

    Modification of CNTs with hydroxyl group promotes their applications in biomedical area. However, the impact of hydroxylation on their biocompatibility is far from being completely understood. In this study, we carried out a comprehensive evaluation of hydroxylated multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs-OH) on the human normal liver L02 cell line, and compared it with that of pristine multi-walled carbon nanotubes (p-MWCNTs). Results demonstrated that compared with p-MWCNTs, MWCNTs-OH induced significantly lower oxidative stress as indicated by the level of intracellular antioxidant glutathione (GSH), subsequently lead to less cell membrane damage as demonstrated by lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) leakage assay, and showed slightly decreased arrestment of cell cycle distribution at G0/G1. More interestingly, MWCNTs-OH exhibited significantly lower tendency to activate caspase-8, a key molecule involved in the extrinsic apoptotic pathway. All these in vitro results demonstrated that hydroxylation of MWCNTs enhanced their biocompatibility compare with p-MWCNTs.

  17. Evaluation of uptake, cytotoxicity and inflammatory effects in respiratory cells exposed to pristine and -OH and -COOH functionalized multi-wall carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ursini, Cinzia Lucia; Maiello, Raffaele; Ciervo, Aureliano; Fresegna, Anna Maria; Buresti, Giuliana; Superti, Fabiana; Marchetti, Magda; Iavicoli, Sergio; Cavallo, Delia

    2016-03-01

    Toxic effects were reported for pristine-multi-wall carbon nanotubes (p-MWCNTs) while the role of the functionalization on MWCNT-induced toxicity is not yet well defined. We evaluated on human alveolar (A549) epithelial cells and normal bronchial (BEAS-2B) cells exposed to p-MWCNTs, MWCNTs-OH and MWCNTs-COOH: uptake by TEM, cell viability by different assays, membrane damage by the LDH assay and cytokine release by ELISA. The aims of the present study were to: (i) confirm MWCNT cytotoxicity mechanisms hypothesized in our previous studies; (ii) identify the most reliable viability assay to screen MWCNT toxicity; and (iii) to test our model to clarify the role of functionalization on MWCNT-induced toxicity. In A549 cells, p-MWCNTs and MWCNTs-OH were localized free in the cytoplasm and inside vacuoles whereas MWCNTs-COOH were confined inside filled cytoplasmic vesicles. WST-1 and Trypan blue assays showed in A549 cells a similar slight viability reduction for all MWCNTs whereas in BEAS-2B cells WST1 showed a high viability reduction at the highest concentrations, particularly for MWCNTs-COOH. The MTT assay showed a false cytotoxicity as a result of MWCNTs-interference. Pristine and MWCNTs-COOH induced membrane damage, particularly in BEAS-2B cells. MWCNTs-COOH induced interleukin-6 (IL-6) and IL-8 release in A549 cells whereas p-MWCNTs induced IL-8 release in BEAS-2B cells. MWCNTs intracellular localization in A549 cells confirms the toxicity mechanisms previously hypothesized, with p-MWCNTs disrupting the membrane and vesicle-confined MWCNTs-COOH inducing inflammation. WST-1 was more reliable than MTT to test MWCNT-toxicity. BEAS-2B cells were more susceptible then A549 cells, particularly to MWCNT-COOH cytotoxicity. Our results confirm the toxicity of p-MWCNTs and demonstrate, also for the two kinds of tested functionalized MWCNTs toxic effects with a different mechanism of action.

  18. Direct electrochemistry and electrochemical catalysis of myoglobin-TiO2 coated multiwalled carbon nanotubes modified electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lei; Tian, Dan-Bi; Zhu, Jun-Jie

    2008-11-01

    TiO(2) nanoparticles were homogeneously coated on multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) by hydrothermal deposition, and this nanocomposite might be a promising material for myoglobin (Mb) immobilization in view of its high biocompatibility and large surface. The glassy carbon (GC) electrode modified with Mb-TiO(2)/MWCNTs films exhibited a pair of well-defined, stable and nearly reversible cycle voltammetric peaks. The formal potential of Mb in TiO(2)/MWCNTs film was linearly varied in the range of pH 3-10 with a slope of 48.65 mV/pH, indicating that the electron transfer was accompanied by single proton transportation. The electron transfer between Mb and electrode surface, k(s) of 3.08 s(-1), was greatly facilitated in the TiO(2)/MWCNTs film. The electrocatalytic reductions of hydrogen peroxide were also studied, and the apparent Michaelis-Menten constant is calculated to be 83.10 microM, which shows a large catalytic activity of Mb in the TiO(2)/MWCNTs film to H(2)O(2). The modified GC electrode shows good analytical performance for amperometric determination of hydrogen peroxide. The resultant Mb-TiO(2)/MWCNTs modified glassy carbon electrode exhibited fast amperometric response to hydrogen peroxide reduction, long term life and excellent stability. Finally the activity of the sensor for nitric oxide reduction was also investigated.

  19. A novel method of supporting gold nanoparticles on MWCNTs: Synchrotron X-ray reduction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kuan-Nan Lin; Tsung-Yeh Yang; Hong-Ming Lin; Yeu-Kuang Hwu; She-Huang Wu; Chung-Kwei Lin

    2007-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles decorating the surface of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) are prepared by photochemical reduction. The gold clusters form different interesting geometrical faceted shapes in accordance to time duration of synchrotron X-ray irradiation. The shape of nanogold could be spherical, rod-like, or triangular. Carbon nanotubes serve as optimal templates for the heterogeneous nucleation of gold nanocrystals. These nanocrystal structures are characterized by transmission electron microscope (TEM) and element analysis by energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS).

  20. Quantum transport in carbon nanotubes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laird, E.A.; Kuemmeth, F.; Steele, G.A.; Grove-Rasmussen, K.; Nygard, J.; Flensberg, K.; Kouwenhoven, L.P.

    2015-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes are a versatile material in which many aspects of condensed matter physics come together. Recent discoveries have uncovered new phenomena that completely change our understanding of transport in these devices, especially the role of the spin and valley degrees of freedom. This revie

  1. DJ-1 as a potential biomarker for the development of biocompatible multiwalled carbon nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haniu H

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Hisao Haniu1, Tamotsu Tsukahara2, Yoshikazu Matsuda3, Yuki Usui4, Kaoru Aoki5, Masayuki Shimizu5, Nobuhide Ogihara5, Kazuo Hara5, Seiji Takanashi5, Masanori Okamoto5, Norio Ishigaki5, Koichi Nakamura5, Hiroyuki Kato5, Naoto Saito6 1Institute of Carbon Science and Technology, 2Department of Integrative Physiology and Bio-System Control, Shinshu University, Matsumoto, Nagano, 3Clinical Pharmacology Educational Center, Nihon Pharmaceutical University, Ina-machi, Saitama, 4Research Center for Exotic Nanocarbons, 5Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, 6Department of Applied Physical Therapy, Shinshu University School of Health Sciences, Shinshu University, Matsumoto, Nagano, Japan Background: In the present study, we investigated whether DJ-1 could serve as a biomarker for assessing the biocompatibility of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs, using the highly purified carbon nanotube, HTT2800. Methods: Using Western blot analysis, we determined DJ-1 protein levels in two different types of cells (one capable and the other incapable of HTT2800 endocytosis. Using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, we also investigated the ability of purified nanotubes to alter DJ-1 mRNA levels. Results: We demonstrated that the DJ-1 protein concentration was reduced, regardless of the cytotoxic activity of intracellular HTT2800. Furthermore, HTT2800 decreased the DJ-1 mRNA levels in a dose-dependent manner. This decrease in DJ-1 mRNA levels was not observed in the case of Sumi black or cup-stacked carbon nanotubes. Conclusion: These data indicate that modification of DJ-1 expression is caused by the cell response to MWCNTs. We conclude that DJ-1 is a promising candidate biomarker for the development of biocompatible MWCNTs. Keywords: multiwalled carbon nanotubes, DJ-1 protein, Western blot, quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction

  2. Electron irradiation-induced change of structure and damage mechanisms in multi-walled carbon nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨剑群; 李兴冀; 刘超铭; 马国亮; 高峰

    2015-01-01

    Owing to their unique structure and excellent electrical property, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) as an ideal candidate for making future electronic components have great application potentiality. In order to meet the requirements for space appli-cation in electronic components, it is necessary to study structural changes and damage mechanisms of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), caused by the irradiations of 70 and 110 keV electrons. In the paper, the changes of structure and damage mechanisms in the irradiated MWCNTs, induced by the irradiations of 70 and 110 keV electrons, are investigated. The changes in surface morphology and structure of the irradiated MWCNT film are characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Raman spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction analysis (XRD), and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. It is found that the MWCNTs show different behaviors in structural changes after 70 and 110 keV electron irradiation due to different damage mechanisms. SEM results reveal that the irra-diation of 70 keV electrons does not change surface morphology of the MWCNT film, while the irradiation of 110 keV electrons with a high fluence of 5 × 1015 cm−2 leads to evident morphological changes, such as the formation of a rough surface, the entanglement of nanotubes and the shrinkage of nanotubes. Based on Raman spectroscopy, XPS, and XRD analyses, it is confirmed that the irradiation of 70 keV electrons increases the interlayer spacing of the MWCNTs and disorders their structure through electronic excitations and ionization effects, while the irradiation of 110 keV electrons obviously reduces the interlayer spacing of the MWCNTs and improves their graphitic order through knock-on atom dis-placements. The improvement of the irradiated MWCNTs by 110 keV electrons is attributed to the restructuring of defect sites induced by knock-on atom displacements. EPR spectroscopic analyses reveal that the MWCNTs

  3. Electrospinning of polyvinylidene difluoride with carbon nanotubes: synergistic effects of extensional force and interfacial interaction on crystalline structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shu; Yee, Wu Aik; Tjiu, Wuiwui Chauhari; Liu, Ye; Kotaki, Masaya; Boey, Yin Chiang Freddy; Ma, Jan; Liu, Tianxi; Lu, Xuehong

    2008-12-02

    Polyvinylidene difluoride (PVDF) solutions containing a very low concentration of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) of similar surface chemistry, respectively, were electrospun, and the nanofibers formed were collected using a modified rotating disk collector. The polymorphic behavior and crystal orientation of the nanofibers were studied using wide-angle X-ray diffraction and infrared spectroscopy, while the nanotube alignment and interfacial interactions in the nanofibers were probed by transmission electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy. It is shown that the interfacial interaction between the SWCNTs and PVDF and the extensional force experienced by the nanofibers in the electrospinning and collection processes can work synergistically to induce highly oriented beta-form crystallites extensively. In contrast, the MWCNTs could not be well aligned along the nanofiber axis, which leads to a lower degree of crystal orientation.

  4. Peel test of spinnable carbon nanotube webs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khandoker, Noman; Hawkins, Stephen C.; Ibrahim, Raafat; Huynh, Chi P.

    2014-06-01

    This paper presents results of peel tests with spinnable carbon nanotube webs. Peel tests were performed to study the effect of orientation angles on interface energies between nanotubes. In absence of any binding agent the interface energy represents the Van Der Waals energies between the interacting nanotubes. Therefore, the effect of the orientations on Van Der Waals energies between carbon nanotubes is obtained through the peel test. It is shown that the energy for crossed nanotubes at 90° angle is lower than the energy for parallel nanotubes at 0° angle. This experimental observation was validated by hypothetical theoretical calculations.

  5. From carbon nanotubes to carbon atomic chains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casillas García, Gilberto; Zhang, Weijia; José-Yacamán, Miguel

    2010-10-01

    Carbyne is a linear allotrope of carbon. It is formed by a linear arrangement of carbon atoms with sp-hybridization. We present a reliable and reproducible experiment to obtain these carbon atomic chains using few-layer-graphene (FLG) sheets and a HRTEM. First the FLG sheets were synthesized from worm-like exfoliated graphite and then drop-casted on a lacey-carbon copper grid. Once in the TEM, two holes are opened near each other in a FLG sheet by focusing the electron beam into a small spot. Due to the radiation, the carbon atoms rearrange themselves between the two holes and form carbon fibers. The beam is concentrated on the carbon fibers in order excite the atoms and induce a tension until multi wall carbon nanotube (MWCNT) is formed. As the radiation continues the MWCNT breaks down until there is only a single wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT). Then, when the SWCNT breaks, an atomic carbon chain is formed, lasts for several seconds under the radiation and finally breaks. This demonstrates the stability of this carbon structure.

  6. Attachment of Gold Nanoparticles to Carbon Nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xi Cheng MA; Ning LUN; Shu Lin WEN

    2005-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes were initially chemically modified with an H2SO4-HNO3 treatment,and subsequently activated with Pd-Sn catalytic nuclei via a one-step activation approach. These activated nanotubes were used as precursors for obtaining gold nanoparticles-attached nanotubes via simple electroless plating. This approach provides an efficient method for attachment of metal nanostructures to carbon nanotubes. Such novel hybrid nanostructures are attractive for many applications.

  7. Comparison of 4-Chloro-2-Nitrophenol Adsorption on Single-Walled and Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karim Zare

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The adsorption characteristics of 4-chloro-2-nitrophenol (4C2NP onto single-walled and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs and MWCNTs from aqueous solution were investigated with respect to the changes in the contact time, pH of solution, carbon nanotubes dosage and initial 4C2NP concentration. Experimental results showed that the adsorption efficiency of 4C2NP by carbon nanotubes (both of SWCNTs and MWCNTs increased with increasing the initial 4C2NP concentration. The maximum adsorption took place in the pH range of 2–6. The linear correlation coefficients of different isotherm models were obtained. Results revealed that the Langmuir isotherm fitted the experimental data better than the others and based on the Langmuir model equation,maximum adsorption capacity of 4C2NP onto SWCNTs and MWCNTs were 1.44 and 4.42 mg/g, respectively. Theobserved changes in the standard Gibbs free energy, standard enthalpy and standard entropy showed that the adsorption of 4C2NP onto SWCNTs and MWCNTs is spontaneous and exothermic in the temperature range of 298–328 K.

  8. Comparison of 4-chloro-2-nitrophenol adsorption on single-walled and multi-walled carbon nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehrizad Ali

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The adsorption characteristics of 4-chloro-2-nitrophenol (4C2NP onto single-walled and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs and MWCNTs from aqueous solution were investigated with respect to the changes in the contact time, pH of solution, carbon nanotubes dosage and initial 4C2NP concentration. Experimental results showed that the adsorption efficiency of 4C2NP by carbon nanotubes (both of SWCNTs and MWCNTs increased with increasing the initial 4C2NP concentration. The maximum adsorption took place in the pH range of 2–6. The linear correlation coefficients of different isotherm models were obtained. Results revealed that the Langmuir isotherm fitted the experimental data better than the others and based on the Langmuir model equation, maximum adsorption capacity of 4C2NP onto SWCNTs and MWCNTs were 1.44 and 4.42 mg/g, respectively. The observed changes in the standard Gibbs free energy, standard enthalpy and standard entropy showed that the adsorption of 4C2NP onto SWCNTs and MWCNTs is spontaneous and exothermic in the temperature range of 298–328 K.

  9. LSER model for organic compounds adsorption by single-walled carbon nanotubes: Comparison with multi-walled carbon nanotubes and activated carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xiangquan; Sun, Weiling; Ni, Jinren

    2015-11-01

    LSER models for organic compounds adsorption by single and multi-walled carbon nanotubes and activated carbon were successfully developed. The cavity formation and dispersion interactions (vV), hydrogen bond acidity interactions (bB) and π-/n-electron interactions (eE) are the most influential adsorption mechanisms. SWCNTs is more polarizable, less polar, more hydrophobic, and has weaker hydrogen bond accepting and donating abilities than MWCNTs and AC. Compared with SWCNTs and MWCNTs, AC has much less hydrophobic and less hydrophilic adsorption sites. The regression coefficients (e, s, a, b, v) vary in different ways with increasing chemical saturation. Nonspecific interactions (represented by eE and vV) have great positive contribution to organic compounds adsorption, and follow the order of SWCNTs > MWCNTs > AC, while hydrogen bond interactions (represented by aA and bB) demonstrate negative contribution. These models will be valuable for understanding adsorption mechanisms, comparing adsorbent characteristics, and selecting the proper adsorbents for certain organic compounds.

  10. Ultra-sensitive and wide-dynamic-range sensors based on dense arrays of carbon nanotube tips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Gengzhi; Huang, Yinxi; Zheng, Lianxi; Zhan, Zhaoyao; Zhang, Yani; Pang, John H. L.; Wu, Tom; Chen, Peng

    2011-11-01

    Electrochemical electrodes based on dense and vertically aligned arrays of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were produced. The open tips of individual hollow nanotubes are exposed as active sites while the entangled nanotube stems encapsulated in epoxy collectively provide multiplexed and highly conductive pathways for charge transport. This unique structure together with the extraordinary electrical and electrochemical properties of MWCNTs offers a high signal-to-noise ratio (thus high sensitivity) and a large detection range, compared with other carbon-based electrodes. Our electrodes can detect K3FeCN6 and dopamine at concentrations as low as 5 nM and 10 nM, respectively, and are responsive in a large dynamic range that spans almost 5 orders of magnitude.Electrochemical electrodes based on dense and vertically aligned arrays of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were produced. The open tips of individual hollow nanotubes are exposed as active sites while the entangled nanotube stems encapsulated in epoxy collectively provide multiplexed and highly conductive pathways for charge transport. This unique structure together with the extraordinary electrical and electrochemical properties of MWCNTs offers a high signal-to-noise ratio (thus high sensitivity) and a large detection range, compared with other carbon-based electrodes. Our electrodes can detect K3FeCN6 and dopamine at concentrations as low as 5 nM and 10 nM, respectively, and are responsive in a large dynamic range that spans almost 5 orders of magnitude. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c1nr10899a

  11. Pulsed laser deposition of carbon nanotube and polystyrene-carbon nanotube composite thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stramel, A. A.; Gupta, M. C.; Lee, H. R.; Yu, J.; Edwards, W. C.

    2010-12-01

    In this work, we report on the fabrication of carbon nanotube thin films via pulsed laser deposition using a pulsed, diode pumped, Tm:Ho:LuLF laser with 2 μm wavelength. The thin films were deposited on silicon substrates using pure carbon nanotube targets and polystyrene-carbon nanotube composite targets. Raman spectra, scanning electron micrographs, and transmission electron micrographs show that carbon nanotubes are present in the deposited thin films, and that the pulsed laser deposition process causes minimal degradation to the quality of the nanotubes when using pure carbon nanotube targets.

  12. Removal of Pb(II) from aqueous solution by oxidized multiwalled carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Di; Tan, Xiaoli; Chen, Changlun; Wang, Xiangke

    2008-06-15

    Oxidized multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were employed as sorbent to study the sorption characteristic of Pb(II) from aqueous solution as a function of contact time, pH, ionic strength, foreign ions, and oxidized MWCNTs' contents under ambient conditions using batch technique. The results indicate that sorption of Pb(II) on oxidized MWCNTs is strongly dependent on pH values, and independent of ionic strength and the type of foreign ions. The removal of Pb(II) to oxidized MWCNTs is rather quickly and the kinetic sorption can be described by a pseudo-second-order model very well. Sorption of Pb(II) is mainly dominated by surface complexation rather than ion exchange. The efficient removal of Pb(II) from aqueous solution is limited at pH 7-10. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) is performed to study the sorption mechanism at a molecular level and thereby to identify the species of the sorption processes. The 3-D relationship of pH, Ceq and q indicates that all the data of Ceq-q lie in a straight line with slope -V/m and intercept C0V/m for the same initial concentration of Pb(II) and same content of oxidized MWCNTs of each experimental data.

  13. Palladium-doped-ZrO2-multiwalled carbon nanotubes nanocomposite: an advanced photocatalyst for water treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anku, William Wilson; Oppong, Samuel Osei-Bonsu; Shukla, Sudheesh Kumar; Agorku, Eric Selorm; Govender, Poomani Penny

    2016-06-01

    The photocatalytic degradation of organic pollutants from water using palladium-doped-zirconium oxide-multiwalled carbon nanotubes (Pd-ZrO2-MWCNTs) nanocomposites is presented. A series of Pd doped-ZrO2-MWCNTs nanocomposites with varying percentage compositions of Pd were prepared by the homogenous co-precipitation method. The photocatalytic applicability of the materials was investigated by the degradation of acid blue 40 dye in water under simulated solar light. The optical, morphological and structural properties of the nanocomposites were evaluated using X-ray powder diffraction, Fourier transformer infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, BET surface area analysis and (UV-Vis) spectroscopy. The Pd-ZrO2-MWCNTs nanocomposites showed enhanced photocatalytic activity toward the degradation of the acid blue 40 dye under visible light compared with bare ZrO2 and ZrO2-MWCNTs alone. The remarkable photocatalytic activity of Pd-ZrO2-MWCNTs nanocomposites in the visible light makes it an ideal photocatalyst for the removal of organic pollutants in water. The 0.5 % Pd-ZrO2-MWCNT was the most efficient photocatalyst with 98 % degradation after 3 h with corresponding K a and band gap values of 16.8 × 10-3 m-1 and 2.79 eV, respectively.

  14. Specifically Grafting Hematin on MPTS-Coated Carbon Nanotubes for Catalyzing the Oxidation of Aniline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kunkun Zheng

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Catalysts supported on nanomaterials have been widely investigated for the treatment of hazardous materials. This work has developed a novel method for grafting hematin on nanomaterials for catalyzing the oxidation of aniline in order to remove aniline from wastewater. Magnetic multi-walled carbon nanotubes (M-MWCNTs were coated with a layer formed through the hydrolysis and condensation of 3-mercaptopropyltriethoxysilane (MPTS. Hematin was specifically grafted on the MPTS-coated M-MWCNTs through thiol-alkene reaction. Hematin-MPTS-M-MWCNTs were used to catalyze the oxidation of aniline, and a high efficiency has been obtained. Consecutive use of the conjugate of hematin-MPTS-M-MWCNTs has been investigated, and the activity has been retained to a significant extent after five reaction/cleaning cycles. The result demonstrates that hematin-MPTS-M-MWCNTs are efficient for catalyzing the oxidation of aniline. The methodology for the specific grafting of hematin is of general utility, it is an easy-to-operate method and can be extended to other supports. Potentially, hematin-MPTS-based conjugates have a widespread application in catalyzing the removal of aniline from wastewater.

  15. Effects of multiwall carbon nanotubes on viscoelastic properties of magnetorheological elastomers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aziz, Siti Aishah Abdul; Amri Mazlan, Saiful; Intan Nik Ismail, Nik; Ubaidillah, U.; Choi, Seung-Bok; Khairi, Muntaz Hana Ahmad; Azhani Yunus, Nurul

    2016-07-01

    The effect of different types of multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) on the morphological, magnetic and viscoelastic properties of magnetorheological elastomers (MREs) are studied in this work. A series of natural rubber MRE are prepared by adding MWCNTs as a new additive in MRE. Effects of functionalized MWCNT namely carboxylated MWCNT (COOH-MWCNT) and hydroxylated MWCNT (OH-MWCNT) on the rheological properties of MREs are investigated and the pristine MWCNTs is referred as a control. Epoxidised palm oil (EPO) is used as a medium to disperse carbonyl iron particle (CIP) and sonicate the MWCNTs. Morphological and magnetic properties of MREs are characterized by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM), respectively. Rheological properties under different magnetic field are evaluated by using parallel plate rheometer. From the results obtained, FESEM images indicate that COOH-MWCNT and CIP have better compatibility which leads to the formation of interconnected network in the matrix. In addition, by adding functionalized COOH-MWCNT, it is shown that the saturation magnetization is 5% higher than the pristine MWCNTs. It is also found that with the addition of COOH-MWCNT, the magnetic properties are improved parallel with enhancement of MR effect particularly at low strain amplitude. It is finally shown that the use of EPO also can contribute to the enhancement of MR performance.

  16. Development of biofuel cells based on gold nanoparticle decorated multi-walled carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naruse, Junichi; Hoa, Le Quynh; Sugano, Yasuhito; Ikeuchi, Tomohiko; Yoshikawa, Hiroyuki; Saito, Masato; Tamiya, Eiichi

    2011-12-15

    This study focused on developing the synthesis of Au nanoparticle-decorated functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (Au-NPs/f-MWCNTs) for monosaccharide (bio-fuel) oxidation reactions and practical application in air-biofuel cells. We developed a scalable and straightforward method to synthesize Au-NPs/f-MWCNTs which allow us to control the loading and size of the Au-NPs. The Au-NPs/f-MWCNTs exhibited better catalytic activities and stability than the Au sheet and subsequently resulted in a threefold increase in the power density of the air-glucose fuel cell with an exceptionally high open circuit voltage (~1.3 V). The catalytic efficiency was confirmed by high performance liquid chromatography with the superior of the Au-NPs/f-MWCNTs over a bare gold electrode. In addition, the application of this advanced catalyst to other monosaccharide oxidation reactions figured out that the configuration of -OH groups at C(2) and C(3) of the reactants plays an important role in the initial adsorption process, and thus, affects the required activation energy for further oxidation. The different monosaccharides lead to significantly different fuel cell performances in terms of power density, which coherently corresponds to the difference in the configuration of C(2) and C(3). Because two small air-glucose fuel cells using Au-NPs/f-MWCNTs can run a LED lamp, further applications of other monosaccharides as fuel in biofuel cells for equivalent required power devices may be possible.

  17. Biosafety of multiwalled carbon nanotube in mice: a behavioral toxicological approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivani, Saeed; Karimi, Isaac; Tabatabaei, Seyed Reza Fatemi

    2012-01-01

    Multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) with unique chemical and electromechanical properties are ideal candidates for the development of drug delivery platforms. The scarce knowledge for the effects of exposure to MWCNTs during pregnancy on postnatal outcomes motivated us to investigate whether intraperitoneal injections (i.p.) of MWCNTs during mating and early pregnancy affect on reproductive and neurobehavioral endpoints and psychobiological status of pups. Thirty virgin female mice were divided to three groups (n = 10 for each); two treated groups injected i.p. with 1 and 10 mg of MWCNTs suspended in 1 ml of phosphate buffered saline solution (PBS) in both mating day and gestation day 3, respectively. The control group was injected i.p. with an equal volume of PBS as a vehicle. MWCNT-treated dams did not exhibit considerable changes in their reproductive performance in gestation and lactation periods. MWCNT-treated pups exhibited similar ontogenetic expressions of neurobehavioral and physical endpoints as compared with control group. Most notably, exposure to MWCNTs was increased depressive and anxious behaviors of treated pups in parallel to adverse effect on their internal organ weights. The absolute thymus weight was declined in MWCNT-treated groups while absolute weights of liver and spleen decreased in group treated by 1 mg of MWCNT as compared to control group. Relative organ weights in MWCNT-treated groups were almost similar to control group.

  18. Molecular-dynamic studies of carbon-water-carbon composite nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Jian; Ji, Baohua; Feng, Xi-Qiao; Gao, Huajian

    2006-11-01

    We recently reported the discovery via molecular-dynamic simulations that single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) with different diameters, lengths, and chiralities can coaxially self-assemble into multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) in water via the spontaneous insertion of smaller tubes into larger ones. Here, we extend that study to investigate the various water structures formed between two selected SWCNTs after such coaxial assembly. Depending on the tube geometry, typical water structures, besides the bulk phase, include a one-dimensional (1D) ordered water chain inside the smaller tube, a uniform or nonuniform water shell between the two tubes, and a "boundary layer" of water near the exterior wall of the larger tube. It was found that a concentric water shell consisting of up to three layers of water molecules can form between the two SWCNTs, which leads to a class of carbon-water-carbon composite nanotubes. Analysis of the potential energy of the SWCNT-water system indicated that the composite nanotubes are stabilized by both the tube-tube and tube-water van der Waals interactions. Geometrically confined between the two SWCNTs, water mono- and bilayers are found to be stable, highly condensed, and ordered, although the average number of hydrogen bonds per water molecule is reduced. In contrast, a water trilayer between the two CNTs can be easily disrupted by thermal fluctuations.

  19. Comparison of cellular toxicity between multi-walled carbon nanotubes and onion-like shell-shaped carbon nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Seunghyon [Seoul National University, School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Ji-Eun [Korea Research Institute of Standard and Science, Center for NanoSafety Metrology, Division of Convergence Technology (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Daegyu [LG Electronics (Korea, Republic of); Woo, Chang Gyu [Korea Institute of Machinery and Materials, Environmental and Energy Systems Research Division (Korea, Republic of); Pikhitsa, Peter V. [Seoul National University, School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Myung-Haing, E-mail: mchotox@snu.ac.kr [Seoul National University, Laboratory of Toxicology, College of Veterinary Medicine (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Mansoo, E-mail: mchoi@snu.ac.kr [Seoul National University, School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-09-15

    The cellular toxicity of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and onion-like shell-shaped carbon nanoparticles (SCNPs) was investigated by analyzing the comparative cell viability. For the reasonable comparison, physicochemical characteristics were controlled thoroughly such as crystallinity, carbon bonding characteristic, hydrodynamic diameter, and metal contents of the particles. To understand relation between cellular toxicity of the particles and generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), we measured unpaired singlet electrons of the particles and intracellular ROS, and analyzed cellular toxicity with/without the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC). Regardless of the presence of NAC, the cellular toxicity of SCNPs was found to be lower than that of MWCNTs. Since both particles show similar crystallinity, hydrodynamic size, and Raman signal with negligible contribution of remnant metal particles, the difference in cell viability would be ascribed to the difference in morphology, i.e., spherical shape (aspect ratio of one) for SCNP and elongated shape (high aspect ratio) for MWCNT.

  20. Bloch oscillations in carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jódar, Esther; Pérez-Garrido, Antonio; Rojas, Fernando

    2009-05-27

    Bloch oscillations arise when electrons are in a one-dimensional linear chain of atoms under a constant electric field. In this paper we show numerically that electrons in different types of carbon nanotubes show oscillations with a Bloch frequency proportional to the constant electric field applied along the nanotube axis. We show these oscillations, calculating the quadratic displacement as a function of the electric field. Because of the double periodicity of the nanotubes' geometry (the lattice constant and the lines of atoms) two frequencies appear, one twice the value of the other. These frequencies coincide perfectly with those predicted for a linear chain of atoms, taking into account the periodicity considered in each case.

  1. Bloch oscillations in carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jodar, Esther; Perez-Garrido, Antonio [Departamento Fisica Aplicada, Antiguo Hospital de Marina Campus Muralla del Mar, UPCT, Cartagena 30202 Murcia (Spain); Rojas, Fernando [Centro de Nanociencias y Nanotecnologia-UNAM, Apartado Postal 356, Ensenada, Baja California 22800 (Mexico)], E-mail: ejodar@upct.es

    2009-05-27

    Bloch oscillations arise when electrons are in a one-dimensional linear chain of atoms under a constant electric field. In this paper we show numerically that electrons in different types of carbon nanotubes show oscillations with a Bloch frequency proportional to the constant electric field applied along the nanotube axis. We show these oscillations, calculating the quadratic displacement as a function of the electric field. Because of the double periodicity of the nanotubes' geometry (the lattice constant and the lines of atoms) two frequencies appear, one twice the value of the other. These frequencies coincide perfectly with those predicted for a linear chain of atoms, taking into account the periodicity considered in each case. (fast track communication)

  2. Nicotinamide-functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotubes increase insulin production in pancreatic beta cells via MIF pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilie I

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Ioana Ilie,1 Razvan Ilie,2 Teodora Mocan,3 Flaviu Tabaran,4 Cornel Iancu,4 Lucian Mocan4 1Department of Endocrinology, 2Department of Microbiology, 3Department of Physiology, 4Third Surgery Clinic, Department of Nanomedicine, Iuliu Hatieganu University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Cluj-Napoca, Romania Abstract: Recent data in the literature support the role of nicotinamide (NA as a pharmacologic agent that stimulates pancreatic beta-cells to produce insulin in vitro. There are data showing that carbon nanotubes may be useful in initiating and maintaining cellular metabolic responses. This study shows that administration of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs functionalized with nicotinamide (NA-MWCNTs leads to significant insulin production compared with individual administration of NA, MWCNTs, and a control solution. Treatment of 1.4E7 cells for 30 minutes with NA-MWCNTs at concentrations ranging from 1 mg/L to 20 mg/L resulted in significantly increased insulin release (0.18 ± 0.026 ng/mL for 1 mg/L, 0.21 ± 0.024 ng/mL for 5 mg/L, and 0.27 ± 0.028 ng/mL for 20 mg/L. Thus, compared with cells treated with NA only (0.1 ± 0.01 ng/mL for 1 mg/L, 0.12 ± 0.017 ng/mL for 5 mg/L, and 0.17 ± 0.01 ng/mL for 20 mg/L we observed a significant positive effect on insulin release in cells treated with NA-MWCNTs. The results were confirmed using flow cytometry, epifluorescence microscopy combined with immunochemistry staining, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay techniques. In addition, using immunofluorescence microscopy techniques, we were able to demonstrate that MWCNTs enhance insulin production via the macrophage migration inhibitory factor pathway. The application and potential of NA combined with MWCNTs as an antidiabetic agent may represent the beginning of a new chapter in the nanomediated treatment of diabetes mellitus. Keywords: carbon nanotubes, NA, insulin-producing cells, insulin, macrophage migration inhibitory factor, diabetes mellitus

  3. SnO2-decorated multiwalled carbon nanotubes and Vulcan carbon through a sonochemical approach for supercapacitor applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinoth, Victor; Wu, Jerry J; Asiri, Abdullah M; Lana-Villarreal, Teresa; Bonete, Pedro; Anandan, Sambandam

    2016-03-01

    Multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and Vulcan carbon (VC) decorated with SnO2 nanoparticles were synthesized using a facile and versatile sonochemical procedure. The as-prepared nanocomposites were characterized by means of transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and Fourier transform infra red spectroscopy. It was evidenced that SnO2 nanoparticles were uniformly distributed on both carbon surfaces, tightly decorating the MWCNTs and VC. The electrochemical performance of the nanocomposites was evaluated by cyclic voltammetry and galvanostatic charge/discharge cycling. The as-synthesized SnO2/MWCNTs nanocomposites show a higher capacity than the SnO2/VC nanocomposites. Concretely, the SnO2/MWCNTs electrodes exhibit a specific capacitance of 133.33 F g(-1), whereas SnO2/VC electrodes exhibit a specific capacitance of 112.14 F g(-1) measured at 0.5 mA cm(-2) in 1 M Na2SO4.

  4. Transient oxidative stress and inflammation after intraperitoneal administration of multiwalled carbon nanotubes functionalized with single strand DNA in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clichici, Simona, E-mail: simonaclichici@yahoo.com [Department of Physiology, University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Biris, Alexandru Radu [National R and D Institute of Isotopic and Molecular Technologies, Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Tabaran, Flaviu [University of Agricultural Sciences and Veterinary Medicine, Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Filip, Adriana [Department of Physiology, University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Cluj-Napoca (Romania)

    2012-03-15

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) are widely used for nanotechnology. Their impact on living organisms is, however, not entirely clarified. Oxidative stress and inflammation seem to be the key mechanisms involved in MWCNTs' cytotoxicity. Until present, pulmonary and skin models were the main tested experimental designs to assess carbon nanotubes' toxicity. The systemic administration of MWCNTs is essential, with respect for future medical applications. Our research is performed on Wistar rats and is focused on the dynamics of oxidative stress parameters in blood and liver and pro-inflammatory cytokines in liver, after single dose (270 mg l{sup −1}) ip administration of MWCNTs (exterior diameter 15–25 nm, interior diameter 10–15 nm, surface 88 m{sup 2} g{sup −1}) functionalized with single strand DNA (ss-DNA). The presence of MWCNTs in blood was assessed by Raman spectroscopy, while in liver histological examination and confocal microscopy were used. It was found that ss-DNA-MWCNTs induce oxidative stress in plasma and liver, with the return of the tested parameters to normal values, 6 h after ip injection of nanotubes, with the exception of reduced glutathione in plasma. The inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β) had a similar pattern of evolution. We also assessed the level of ERK1/2 and the phosphorylation of p65 subunit of NF-kB in liver that had a transient increase and returned to normal at the end of the tested period. Our results demonstrate that ss-DNA-MWCNTs produce oxidative stress and inflammation, but with a transient pattern. Given the fact that antioxidants modify the profile not only for oxidative stress, but also of inflammation, the dynamics of these alterations may be of practical importance for future protective strategies. -- Highlights: ► ss-DNA-MWCNTs ip administration induce oxidative stress in plasma and liver. ► ss-DNA-MWCNTs ip administration determine liver inflammation. ► ERK1/2 and p65 phosphorylated NF

  5. Nano-Welding of Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes on Silicon and Silica Surface by Laser Irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanping Yuan

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a continuous fiber laser (1064 nm wavelength, 30 W/cm2 is used to irradiate multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs on different substrate surfaces. Effects of substrates on nano-welding of MWCNTs are investigated by scanning electron microscope (SEM. For MWCNTs on silica, after 3 s irradiation, nanoscale welding with good quality can be achieved due to breaking C–C bonds and formation of new graphene layers. While welding junctions can be formed until 10 s for the MWCNTs on silicon, the difference of irradiation time to achieve welding is attributed to the difference of thermal conductivity for silica and silicon. As the irradiation time is prolonged up to 12.5 s, most of the MWCNTs are welded to a silicon substrate, which leads to their frameworks of tube walls on the silicon surface. This is because the accumulation of absorbed energy makes the temperature rise. Then chemical reactions among silicon, carbon and nitrogen occur. New chemical bonds of Si–N and Si–C achieve the welding between the MWCNTs and silicon. Vibration modes of Si3N4 appear at peaks of 363 cm−1 and 663 cm−1. There are vibration modes of SiC at peaks of 618 cm−1, 779 cm−1 and 973 cm−1. The experimental observation proves chemical reactions and the formation of Si3N4 and SiC by laser irradiation.

  6. Azobenzene-based supramolecular polymers for processing MWCNTs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maggini, Laura; Marangoni, Tomas; Georges, Benoit; Malicka, Joanna M.; Yoosaf, K.; Minoia, Andrea; Lazzaroni, Roberto; Armaroli, Nicola; Bonifazi, Davide

    2012-12-01

    Photothermally responsive supramolecular polymers containing azobenzene units have been synthesised and employed as dispersants for multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) in organic solvents. Upon triggering the trans-cis isomerisation of the supramolecular polymer intermolecular interactions between MWCNTs and the polymer are established, reversibly affecting the suspensions of the MWCNTs, either favouring it (by heating, i.e. cis --> trans isomerisation) or inducing the CNTs' precipitation (upon irradiation, trans --> cis isomerisation). Taking advantage of the chromophoric properties of the molecular subunits, the solubilisation/precipitation processes have been monitored by UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy. The structural properties of the resulting MWCNT-polymer hybrid materials have been thoroughly investigated via thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) and modelled with molecular dynamics simulations.Photothermally responsive supramolecular polymers containing azobenzene units have been synthesised and employed as dispersants for multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) in organic solvents. Upon triggering the trans-cis isomerisation of the supramolecular polymer intermolecular interactions between MWCNTs and the polymer are established, reversibly affecting the suspensions of the MWCNTs, either favouring it (by heating, i.e. cis --> trans isomerisation) or inducing the CNTs' precipitation (upon irradiation, trans --> cis isomerisation). Taking advantage of the chromophoric properties of the molecular subunits, the solubilisation/precipitation processes have been monitored by UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy. The structural properties of the resulting MWCNT-polymer hybrid materials have been thoroughly investigated via thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and atomic force microscopy

  7. Biochar, activated carbon, and carbon nanotubes have different effects on fate of 14C-catechol and microbial community in soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Jun; Ji, Rong; Yu, Yongjie; Xie, Zubin; Yan, Xiaoyuan

    2015-10-01

    This study investigated the effects of biochar, activated carbon (AC)-, and single-walled and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs and MWCNTs) in various concentrations (0, 0.2, 20, and 2,000 mg/kg dry soil) on the fate of 14C-catechol and microbial community in soil. The results showed that biochar had no effect on the mineralization of 14C-catechol, whereas AC at all amendment rates and SWCNTs at 2,000 mg/kg significantly reduced mineralization. Particularly, MWCNTs at 0.2 mg/kg significantly stimulated mineralization compared with the control soil. The inhibitory effects of AC and SWCNTs on the mineralization were attributed to the inhibited soil microbial activities and the shifts in microbial communities, as suggested by the reduced microbial biomass C and the separated phylogenetic distance. In contrast, the stimulatory effects of MWCNTs on the mineralization were attributed to the selective stimulation of specific catechol-degraders by MWCNTs at 0.2 mg/kg. Only MWCNTs amendments and AC at 2,000 mg/kg significantly changed the distribution of 14C residues within the fractions of humic substances. Our findings suggest biochar, AC, SWCNTs and MWCNTs have different effects on the fate of 14C-catechol and microbial community in soil.

  8. Biochar, activated carbon, and carbon nanotubes have different effects on fate of (14)C-catechol and microbial community in soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Jun; Ji, Rong; Yu, Yongjie; Xie, Zubin; Yan, Xiaoyuan

    2015-10-30

    This study investigated the effects of biochar, activated carbon (AC)-, and single-walled and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs and MWCNTs) in various concentrations (0, 0.2, 20, and 2,000 mg/kg dry soil) on the fate of (14)C-catechol and microbial community in soil. The results showed that biochar had no effect on the mineralization of (14)C-catechol, whereas AC at all amendment rates and SWCNTs at 2,000 mg/kg significantly reduced mineralization. Particularly, MWCNTs at 0.2 mg/kg significantly stimulated mineralization compared with the control soil. The inhibitory effects of AC and SWCNTs on the mineralization were attributed to the inhibited soil microbial activities and the shifts in microbial communities, as suggested by the reduced microbial biomass C and the separated phylogenetic distance. In contrast, the stimulatory effects of MWCNTs on the mineralization were attributed to the selective stimulation of specific catechol-degraders by MWCNTs at 0.2 mg/kg. Only MWCNTs amendments and AC at 2,000 mg/kg significantly changed the distribution of (14)C residues within the fractions of humic substances. Our findings suggest biochar, AC, SWCNTs and MWCNTs have different effects on the fate of (14)C-catechol and microbial community in soil.

  9. Supercritical Fluid Synthesis and Characterization of Catalytic Metal Nanoparticles on Carbon Nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ye, Xiangrong; Lin, Yuehe; Wang, Chong M.; Engelhard, Mark H.; Wang, Yong; Wai, Chien M.

    2004-02-27

    A rapid, convenient and environmentally benign method has been developed for the fabrication of metal nanoparticle/multiwall carbon nanotube (MWCNT) composites. Nanoparticles of palladium, rhodium and ruthenium are deposited onto functionalized MWCNTs through a simple hydrogen reduction of metal-?-diketone precursors in supercritical carbon dioxide, and are characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analyses. These highly dispersed nanoparticles, with a narrow range of size distribution and good adhesion on MWCNT surfaces, are expected to exhibit promising catalytic properties for a variety of chemical reactions. Preliminary experiments demonstrate that Pd nanoparticles supported on MWCNTs are effective catalysts for hydrogenation of olefins in carbon dioxide. The Pd nanoparticle?MWCNT composite also shows a high electrocatalytic activity in oxygen reduction for potential fuel cell application.

  10. Carbon nanotubes polymer nanoparticles inks for healthcare textile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Pratyush; Lee, Jungmin; Mathur, Gyanesh N.; Varadan, Vijay K.

    2012-10-01

    Healthcare textiles are ambient health monitoring systems that can contribute towards medical aid as well as general fitness of the populace. These are textile based products that have sensor systems mounted on them or are electrically functionalized to act as sensors. While embedded sensor chipsets and connection wires have been shown as working prototypes of this concept, there is a need for seamless integration of sensor technologies without hindering the inherent properties of the textile. Screen printing or stamping with electrically conductive inks have been demonstrated as technologies for fabricating electronics on flexible substrates. They are applicable to textile manufacturing as well. Printing technology allows for fabrication of nanocomposite based electronics elements in a bottom-up fashion. This has advantages such as low material consumption, high speed fabrication and low temperature processing. In this research, Multi-Wall Carbon Nanotubes (MWCNTs) and polyaniline nanoparticles (PANP) core shell based nanocomposites were synthesized and formulated into colloidal ink. Printed MWCNTs-PANP traces were electrically characterized and compared with traces made with those made by other composites such as Silver, and Carbon Black. The nanocomposite based inks are compared for proposed applications as sensor systems and conductive tracks on smart textile for pervasive wireless healthcare system that can be mass produced using low cost printing processes.

  11. Application of Response Surface Methodology for Optimization of Urea Grafted Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes in Enhancing Nitrogen Use Efficiency and Nitrogen Uptake by Paddy Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norazlina Mohamad Yatim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Efficient use of urea fertilizer (UF as important nitrogen (N source in the world’s rice production has been a concern. Carbon-based materials developed to improve UF performance still represent a great challenge to be formulated for plant nutrition. Advanced N nanocarrier is developed based on functionalized multiwall carbon nanotubes (f-MWCNTs grafted with UF to produce urea-multiwall carbon nanotubes (UF-MWCNTs for enhancing the nitrogen uptake (NU and use efficiency (NUE. The grafted N can be absorbed and utilized by rice efficiently to overcome the N loss from soil-plant systems. The individual and interaction effect between the specified factors of f-MWCNTs amount (0.10–0.60 wt% and functionalization reflux time (12–24 hrs with the corresponding responses (NUE, NU were structured via the Response Surface Methodology (RSM based on five-level CCD. The UF-MWCNTs with optimized 0.5 wt% f-MWCNTs treated at 21 hrs reflux time achieve tremendous NUE up to 96% and NU at 1180 mg/pot. Significant model terms (p value < 0.05 for NUE and NU responses were confirmed by the ANOVA. Homogeneous dispersion of UF-MWCNTs was observed via FESEM and TEM. The chemical changes were monitored by FT-IR and Raman spectroscopy. Hence, this UF-MWCNTs’ approach provides a promising strategy in enhancing plant nutrition for rice.

  12. Adsorption of mercury from water by modified multi-walled carbon nanotubes: adsorption behaviour and interference resistance by coexisting anions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Paris Honglay; Hsu, Cheng-Feng; Tsai, David Dah-wei; Lu, Yen-Ming; Huang, Winn-Jung

    2014-08-01

    This investigation reports the use of modified multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) with various functional groups for adsorbing inorganic divalent mercury (Hg(II)) from water samples. To elucidate the behaviours and mechanisms of Hg(II) adsorption by modified MWCNTs, their adsorption capacity was studied by considering adsorption isotherms and kinetics. Particular attention was paid to interference of coexisting inorganic ions with Hg(II) adsorption. The results reveal that functionalization with oxygen-containing groups improved the Hg(II) adsorption capacity of the MWCNTs. Kinetic analysis demonstrated that the adsorption of Hg(II) by MWCNTs was closely described by the pseudo-second-order and Elovich models, suggesting that the adsorption of Hg(II) by MWCNTs was significantly affected by chemical adsorption. The kinetic results were also analysed using the intraparticle diffusion model, which revealed that intraparticle diffusion was not the only rate-controlling mechanism. The adsorption of Hg(II) on MWCNTs fell drastically as the ionic strength increased from 0 to 1.0mol/L chloride ions, and declined significantly as the pH increased from 2.2 to 10.5. The elemental maps obtained by energy-dispersive spectrometer (EDS) revealed the formation of surface complexes of chloride ions with functional groups on MWCNTs, which reduced the number of available sites for the adsorption of Hg(II) and strengthened the repulsive forces between Hg(II) and MWCNTs. The EDS results suggest that chloride ions are important in controlling Hg(II) speciation and adsorption on the surfaces of MWCNTs.

  13. Crucial role of the biological barrier at the primary targeted organs in controlling the translocation and toxicity of multi-walled carbon nanotubes in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qiuli; Li, Yinxia; Li, Yiping; Zhao, Yunli; Ge, Ling; Wang, Haifang; Wang, Dayong

    2013-10-01

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) can be translocated into the targeted organs of organisms. We employed a model organism of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans to investigate the role of a biological barrier at the primary targeted organs in regulating the translocation and toxicity formation of MWCNTs. A prolonged exposure to MWCNTs at predicted environmental relevant concentrations caused adverse effects associated with both the primary and secondary targeted organs on nematodes. The function of PEGylated modification in reducing MWCNTs toxicity might be mainly due to the suppression of their translocation into secondary targeted organs through the primary targeted organs. A biological barrier at the primary targeted organs contributed greatly to the control of MWCNTs translocation into secondary targeted organs, as indicated by functions of Mn-SODs required for prevention of oxidative stress in the primary targeted organs. Over-expression of Mn-SODs in primary targeted organs effectively suppressed the translocation and toxicity of MWCNTs. Our work highlights the crucial role of the biological barrier at the primary targeted organs in regulating the translocation and toxicity formation of MWCNTs. Our data also shed light on the future development of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) with improved biocompatibility and design of prevention strategies against ENMs toxicity.Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) can be translocated into the targeted organs of organisms. We employed a model organism of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans to investigate the role of a biological barrier at the primary targeted organs in regulating the translocation and toxicity formation of MWCNTs. A prolonged exposure to MWCNTs at predicted environmental relevant concentrations caused adverse effects associated with both the primary and secondary targeted organs on nematodes. The function of PEGylated modification in reducing MWCNTs toxicity might be mainly due to the suppression

  14. Hierarchical MWCNTs/Fe₃O₄/PANI magnetic composite as adsorbent for methyl orange removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ying; Chen, Hongli; Li, Jie; Chen, Changlun

    2015-07-15

    Multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) decorated with Fe3O4 nanoparticles (MWCNTs/Fe3O4) were modified by polyaniline (PANI). The adsorption kinetics of methyl orange (MO) on MWCNTs/Fe3O4/PANI could be fitted well by the pseudo-second-order model. The adsorption of MO on MWCNTs/Fe3O4/PANI was strongly dependent on pH values. The Langmuir isotherm model fitted MO adsorption isotherm better than the Freundlich model. The hierarchical MWCNTs/Fe3O4/PANI showed high adsorption capacity toward ionic dyes (446.25 mg g(-1) for MO and 417.38 mg g(-1) for Congo red (CR)). The nitrogen-containing functional groups of PANI decorated on MWCNTs/Fe3O4/PANI contributed to many effective adsorption sites and thus increased the adsorption capacity toward MO and CR. Moreover, PANI prevented Fe3O4 nanoparticles from dissolution, and hence improved the stability of MWCNTs/Fe3O4/PANI in solution. The experimental results showed that the MWCNTs/Fe3O4/PANI composite was a promising magnetic material for the preconcentration and separation of ionic dye pollutants from aqueous solutions in environmental pollution cleanup.

  15. Effect of CVD Process Temperature on Activation Energy and Structural Growth of MWCNTs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukrullah, S.; Mohamed, N. M.; Shaharun, M. S.; Saheed, M. S. M.; Irshad, M. I.

    2016-03-01

    This study investigated the effect of process temperature and activation energy on chemical vapor deposition growth of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). A vertically fluidized bed reactor was used to grow MWCNTs by catalytic decomposition of ethylene over Fe2O3/Al2O3 at the cost of very low activation energy of 19.516 kJ/mole. FESEM, TEM, and Raman spectroscopy were used to characterize the growth parameters of MWCNTs in the temperature range of 873.15 K to 1273.15 K (600 °C to 1000 °C). SAED patterns were taken to investigate the crystallinity of the grown structures. The experimental results revealed that MWCNTs grown at the optimum process temperature of 1073.15 K (800 °C) exhibited hexagonal crystal structures, narrow diameter distribution and shorter inter-layer spacing. However, the inner and outer walls of most of MWCNTs grown at the temperatures above and below the optimum were non-uniform and defective. The higher process temperatures promoted the agglomeration of the catalyst particles and decomposition of the carbon precursor, which in return increased the tube diameter, surface defects and amorphous carbon content in the product. The intensity ratio plots also predicted low crystallinity in MWCNTs grown at unoptimized process temperatures. The highest I G/ I D ratio of 1.43 was determined at 1073.15 K (800 °C), which reflects high pct yield, purity and crystalline growth of MWCNTs.

  16. Efficient surface modification of MWCNTs with vitamin B1 and production of poly(ester-imide/MWCNTs nanocomposites containing L-phenylalanine moiety: Thermal and microscopic study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Mallakpour

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A simple and efficient method was presented for chemical functionalization of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs with vitamin B1. Poly(ester-imide (PEI based nanocomposites were prepared by the incorporation of different amounts of modified MWCNTs (5, 10, 15 wt% into a chiral and biodegradable PEI by solution blending and ultrasonic dispersion methods. The chiral PEI was produced by a step-growth polymerization of chiral diacid with 4,4'-thiobis(2-tertbutyl-5-methylphenol. Spectroscopic and microscopic techniques were used to examine the chemical structure, morphology and thermal stability of the functionalized MWCNTs and the obtained nanocomposites. The microstructure study revealed the homogeneous dispersion of modified MWCNTs throughout the PEI matrix. Thermogravimetric analysis results confirmed that the heat stability of the prepared composites was improved compared to the pure PEI.

  17. Pressure-Induced Interlinking of Carbon Nanotubes

    OpenAIRE

    Yildirim, T.; Gulseren, O.; Kilic, C.; Ciraci, S.

    2000-01-01

    We predict new forms of carbon consisting of one and two dimensional networks of interlinked single wall carbon nanotubes, some of which are energetically more stable than van der Waals packing of the nanotubes on a hexagonal lattice. These interlinked nanotubes are further transformed with higher applied external pressures to more dense and complicated stable structures, in which curvature-induced carbon sp$^{3}$ re-hybridizations are formed. We also discuss the energetics of the bond format...

  18. Different Technical Applications of Carbon Nanotubes

    OpenAIRE

    Abdalla, S; Al-Marzouki, F.; Ahmed A. Al-Ghamdi; Abdel-Daiem, A.

    2015-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes have been of great interest because of their simplicity and ease of synthesis. The novel properties of nanostructured carbon nanotubes such as high surface area, good stiffness, and resilience have been explored in many engineering applications. Research on carbon nanotubes have shown the application in the field of energy storage, hydrogen storage, electrochemical supercapacitor, field-emitting devices, transistors, nanoprobes and sensors, composite material, templates, etc....

  19. Faster and Smaller with Carbon Nanotubes?

    OpenAIRE

    Seidel, Robert V.; Graham, Andrew P.; Duesberg, Georg S.; Liebau, Maik; Unger, Eugen; Kreupl, Franz; Hoenlein, Wolfgang

    2004-01-01

    Carbon Nanotubes seem to be one of the most promising candidates for nanoelectronic devices beyond presumable scaling limits of silicon and compound semiconductors and independent from lithographic limitations. Discovered only about a decade ago, there has been a tremendous advance in the field of carbon nanotubes. Their exciting properties, especially with respect to electronic applications, and their fabrication methods will be discussed. A variety of Carbon Nanotube...

  20. Magnetic multiwall carbon nanotubes modified with dual hydroxy functional ionic liquid for the solid-phase extraction of protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jing; Wang, Yuzhi; Huang, Yanhua; Xu, Kaijia; Li, Na; Wen, Qian; Zhou, Yigang

    2015-05-21

    A novel adsorbent based on silica-coated magnetic multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) surface modified by dual hydroxy functional ionic liquid (FIL) ([OH]-FIL-m-MWCNTs@SiO2) has been designed and used for the purification of lysozyme (Lys) by magnetic solid-phase extraction (MSPE). Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), a vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) were employed to characterize [OH]-FIL-m-MWCNTs@SiO2. After extraction, the concentration of Lys was determined by a UV-Vis spectrophotometer at 278 nm. A series of single-factor experiments were carried out to identify the optimal conditions of the extraction and the extraction amount could reach up to 94.6 mg g(-1). The RSD of the precision, the repeatability and the stability experiments were 0.37% (n = 3), 0.47% (n = 3) and 0.52% (n = 3), respectively. Comparison of [OH]-FIL-m-MWCNTs@SiO2 with silica-coated magnetic Fe3O4 (Fe3O4@SiO2), silica-coated magnetic multiwall carbon nanotubes (m-MWCNTs@SiO2) and alkyl quaternary ammonium ionic liquid-modified on m-MWCNTs@SiO2 was carried out by extracting Lys. The extraction of bovine serum albumin (BSA), trypsin (Try) and ovalbumin (OVA) was also done by the proposed method. Desorption of Lys was carried out by 0.005 mol L(-1) Na2HPO4-1 mol L(-1) NaCl as the eluent solution and the desorption ratio reached 91.6%. Nearly 97.8% of the [OH]-FIL-m-MWCNTs@SiO2 could be recovered from each run, and the extraction amount decreased less after five runs. The circular dichroism spectral experiment analysis indicated that the secondary structure of Lys was unchanged after extraction.

  1. Carbon Nanotubes and Related Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kingsuk Mukhopadhyay

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanotubes have attracted the fancy of many scientists world wide. The small dimensions,strength, and the remarkable physical properties of these structures make them a unique material with a whole range of promising applications. In this review, the structural aspects, the advantages and disadvantages of different for their procedures synthesis, the qualitative and quantitative estimation of carbon nanotubes by different analytical techniques, the present status on their applications as well as the current challenges faced in the application field, national, in particular DRDO, DMSRDE status, and interest in this field, have been discussed.Defence Science Journal, 2008, 58(4, pp.437-450, DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.14429/dsj.58.1666

  2. Ballistic Fracturing of Carbon Nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozden, Sehmus; Machado, Leonardo D; Tiwary, ChandraSekhar; Autreto, Pedro A S; Vajtai, Robert; Barrera, Enrique V; Galvao, Douglas S; Ajayan, Pulickel M

    2016-09-21

    Advanced materials with multifunctional capabilities and high resistance to hypervelocity impact are of great interest to the designers of aerospace structures. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with their lightweight and high strength properties are alternative to metals and/or metallic alloys conventionally used in aerospace applications. Here we report a detailed study on the ballistic fracturing of CNTs for different velocity ranges. Our results show that the highly energetic impacts cause bond breakage and carbon atom rehybridizations, and sometimes extensive structural reconstructions were also observed. Experimental observations show the formation of nanoribbons, nanodiamonds, and covalently interconnected nanostructures, depending on impact conditions. Fully atomistic reactive molecular dynamics simulations were also carried out in order to gain further insights into the mechanism behind the transformation of CNTs. The simulations show that the velocity and relative orientation of the multiple colliding nanotubes are critical to determine the impact outcome.

  3. Carbon Nanotubes: Molecular Electronic Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Deepak; Saini, Subhash; Menon, Madhu

    1997-01-01

    The carbon Nanotube junctions have recently emerged as excellent candidates for use as the building blocks in the formation of nanoscale molecular electronic networks. While the simple joint of two dissimilar tubes can be generated by the introduction of a pair of heptagon-pentagon defects in an otherwise perfect hexagonal graphene sheet, more complex joints require other mechanisms. In this work we explore structural characteristics of complex 3-point junctions of carbon nanotubes using a generalized tight-binding molecular-dynamics scheme. The study of pi-electron local densities of states (LDOS) of these junctions reveal many interesting features, most prominent among them being the defect-induced states in the gap.

  4. Torsional Carbon Nanotube Artificial Muscles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foroughi, Javad; Spinks, Geoffrey M.; Wallace, Gordon G.; Oh, Jiyoung; Kozlov, Mikhail E.; Fang, Shaoli; Mirfakhrai, Tissaphern; Madden, John D. W.; Shin, Min Kyoon; Kim, Seon Jeong; Baughman, Ray H.

    2011-10-01

    Rotary motors of conventional design can be rather complex and are therefore difficult to miniaturize; previous carbon nanotube artificial muscles provide contraction and bending, but not rotation. We show that an electrolyte-filled twist-spun carbon nanotube yarn, much thinner than a human hair, functions as a torsional artificial muscle in a simple three-electrode electrochemical system, providing a reversible 15,000° rotation and 590 revolutions per minute. A hydrostatic actuation mechanism, as seen in muscular hydrostats in nature, explains the simultaneous occurrence of lengthwise contraction and torsional rotation during the yarn volume increase caused by electrochemical double-layer charge injection. The use of a torsional yarn muscle as a mixer for a fluidic chip is demonstrated.

  5. Morphological and compositional engineering of Ni/carbon nanotube composite film via a novel cyclic voltammetric route

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Yu Jun Yang

    2012-08-01

    Ni/multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) composite films were deposited on the glassy carbon electrode (GCE) by a Ni plating bath containing homogeneously dispersed MWCNTs using polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) as dispersion additive. Incorporation of MWCNTs into Ni matrix was greatly enhanced by the application of cyclic voltammetric (CV) deposition technique. The structure and nature of the Ni/MWCNT were characterized by field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The results show that the content of MWCNT and the morphology of the deposited Ni/MWCNT composite film can be controlled by selecting the appropriate electroplating conditions. Further study indicates that the obtained Ni/MWCNT showed excellent electro-catalytic activity for the oxidation of ethanol in alkaline solution.

  6. Carbon nanotubes in tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosi, Susanna; Ballerini, Laura; Prato, Maurizio

    2014-01-01

    As a result of their peculiar features, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are emerging in many areas of nanotechnology applications. CNT-based technology has been increasingly proposed for biomedical applications, to develop biomolecule nanocarriers, bionanosensors and smart material for tissue engineering purposes. In the following chapter this latter application will be explored, describing why CNTs can be considered an ideal material able to support and boost the growth and the proliferation of many kinds of tissues.

  7. A Thermal Model for Carbon Nanotube Interconnects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohsin, Kaji Muhammad; Srivastava, Ashok; Sharma, Ashwani K.; Mayberry, Clay

    2013-01-01

    In this work, we have studied Joule heating in carbon nanotube based very large scale integration (VLSI) interconnects and incorporated Joule heating influenced scattering in our previously developed current transport model. The theoretical model explains breakdown in carbon nanotube resistance which limits the current density. We have also studied scattering parameters of carbon nanotube (CNT) interconnects and compared with the earlier work. For 1 µm length single-wall carbon nanotube, 3 dB frequency in S12 parameter reduces to ~120 GHz from 1 THz considering Joule heating. It has been found that bias voltage has little effect on scattering parameters, while length has very strong effect on scattering parameters.

  8. Removal of Pb(II) and methylene blue from aqueous solution by magnetic hydroxyapatite-immobilized oxidized multi-walled carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yaoguang; Hu, Lihua; Zhang, Guangya; Yan, Tao; Yan, Liangguo; Wei, Qin; Du, Bin

    2017-05-15

    Magnetic hydroxyapatite-immobilized oxidized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (mHAP-oMWCNTs), an excellent adsorbent for Pb(II) and methylene blue (MB) removal, was synthesized in the present work. It was characterized by SEM, XRD, FTIR, BET, TGA and zeta potential analysis. mHAP-oMWCNTs displayed better adsorption performance than mHAP, mMWCNTs and HAP-oMWCNTs. The adsorption of Pb(II) and MB mainly depend on the ion-exchange property of HAP and the abundant oxygenic functional groups on oMWCNTs surface. Besides, good magnetic performance of mHAP-oMWCNTs makes it easy to achieve the solid-liquid separation. The adsorption kinetic data described well with the pseudo-second-order model and the equilibrium data fitted well with Frendlich and Langmuir isotherms for Pb(II) and MB, respectively. The maximum adsorption capacity was 698.4mgg(-1) for Pb(II) and 328.4mgg(-1) for MB from Langmuir isotherm. Thermodynamic studies (ΔG0, ΔS>0) implied the both adsorption was endothermic and spontaneous process. Furthermore, the excellent reusability of mHAP-oMWCNTs was confirmed by the desorption experiments. All the results showed mHAP-oMWCNTs has a promising application in water treatment.

  9. OPPORTUNITIES OF BIOMEDICAL USE OF CARBON NANOTUBES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. V. Mitrofanova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanomaterials  –  materials,  whouse  structure  elements  has  proportions  doesn’t  exceed  100  nm.  In superdispersed state matter acquire new properties. In the last decade, carbon nanotubes become the most popular nanomaterials, that cause attention of representatives of various scientific field. The сarbon nanotubes offer new opportunities for biological and medical applications: imaging at the molecular, cellular and tissue levels, biosensors and electrodes based on carbon nanotubes, target delivery of various substances, radiation and photothermal therapy. The most promising of carbon nanotubes in the context of biomedical applications is their ability to penetrate the various tissues of the body and carry large doses of agents, providing diagnostic and therapeutic effects. Functionalized nanotubes are biodegradable. Other current direction of using carbon nanotubes in medicine and biology is to visualize objects on the molecular, cellular and tissue level. Associated with carbon nanotubes contrasting substances improve the visualization of cells and tissues, which can detected new patterns of development of the pathological process. Due to the vagueness of the question of biocompatibility and cytotoxicity of carbon nanotubes possibility of their practical application is hampered. Before the introduction of carbon nanotubes into practical health care is necessary to provide all the possible consequences of using nanotubes. High rates of properties and development of new nanostructures based on carbon nanotubes in the near future will lead to new advances related to the application and development of new parameters that will determine their properties and effects. In these review attention is paid to the structure, physico-chemical properties of nanotubes, their functionalization, pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics and all aspects of using of carbon nanotubes.

  10. Liquid surface model for carbon nanotube energetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solov'yov, Ilia; Mathew, Maneesh; Solov'yov, Andrey V.;

    2008-01-01

    an important insight in the energetics and stability of nanotubes of different chirality and might be important for the understanding of nanotube growth process. For the computations we use empirical Brenner and Tersoff potentials and discuss their applicability to the study of carbon nanotubes. From......In the present paper we developed a model for calculating the energy of single-wall carbon nanotubes of arbitrary chirality. This model, which we call as the liquid surface model, predicts the energy of a nanotube with relative error less than 1% once its chirality and the total number of atoms...... are known. The parameters of the liquid surface model and its potential applications are discussed. The model has been suggested for open end and capped nanotubes. The influence of the catalytic nanoparticle, atop which nanotubes grow, on the nanotube stability is also discussed. The suggested model gives...

  11. Dry-Transfer of Aligned Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes for Flexible Transparent Thin Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Cole

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Herein we present an inexpensive facile wet-chemistry-free approach to the transfer of chemical vapour-deposited multiwalled carbon nanotubes to flexible transparent polymer substrates in a single-step process. By controlling the nanotube length, we demonstrate accurate control over the electrical conductivity and optical transparency of the transferred thin films. Uniaxial strains of up to 140% induced only minor reductions in sample conductivity, opening up a number of applications in stretchable electronics. Nanotube alignment offers enhanced functionality for applications such as polarisation selective electrodes and flexible supercapacitor substrates. A capacitance of 17 F/g was determined for supercapacitors fabricated from the reported dry-transferred MWCNTs with the corresponding cyclic voltagrams showing a clear dependence on nanotube length.

  12. Decomposition and particle release of a carbon nanotube/epoxy nanocomposite at elevated temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlagenhauf, Lukas [Empa - Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Laboratory for Functional Polymers (Switzerland); Kuo, Yu-Ying; Bahk, Yeon Kyoung [Empa - Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Laboratory for Advanced Analytical Technologies (Switzerland); Nüesch, Frank [Empa - Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Laboratory for Functional Polymers (Switzerland); Wang, Jing, E-mail: Jing.Wang@ifu.baug.ethz.ch [Empa - Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Laboratory for Advanced Analytical Technologies (Switzerland)

    2015-11-15

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) as fillers in nanocomposites have attracted significant attention, and one of the applications is to use the CNTs as flame retardants. For such nanocomposites, possible release of CNTs at elevated temperatures after decomposition of the polymer matrix poses potential health threats. We investigated the airborne particle release from a decomposing multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT)/epoxy nanocomposite in order to measure a possible release of MWCNTs. An experimental set-up was established that allows decomposing the samples in a furnace by exposure to increasing temperatures at a constant heating rate and under ambient air or nitrogen atmosphere. The particle analysis was performed by aerosol measurement devices and by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of collected particles. Further, by the application of a thermal denuder, it was also possible to measure non-volatile particles only. Characterization of the tested samples and the decomposition kinetics were determined by the usage of thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The particle release of different samples was investigated, of a neat epoxy, nanocomposites with 0.1 and 1 wt% MWCNTs, and nanocomposites with functionalized MWCNTs. The results showed that the added MWCNTs had little effect on the decomposition kinetics of the investigated samples, but the weight of the remaining residues after decomposition was influenced significantly. The measurements with decomposition in different atmospheres showed a release of a higher number of particles at temperatures below 300 °C when air was used. Analysis of collected particles by TEM revealed that no detectable amount of MWCNTs was released, but micrometer-sized fibrous particles were collected.

  13. The MWCNTs-Rh Nanocomposite Obtained By The New High-Temperature Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dobrzańska-Danikiewicz A.D.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available A nanocomposite was fabricated during the research undertaken, consisting of multiwalled carbon nanotubes coated with rhodium nanoparticles by the new high-temperature method being the subject of the patent claim. High quality multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs with the length of 100÷500 nm and the diameter of 8÷20 nm obtained in advance with Catalytic Chemical Vapour Deposition (CVD were employed in the investigations. The nanotubes manufactured under the own research contain small amounts of metallic impurities and amorphous carbon deposits. Multiwalled carbon nanotubes functionalisation in acids was applied to deposit rhodium nanoparticles onto the surface of carbon nanotubes, and then the material was placed in a solution being a precursor of rhodium nanoparticles. The material prepared was next placed in a quartz vessel and subjected to high-temperature reduction in the atmosphere of argon to deposit rhodium nanoparticles onto the surface of multiwalled carbon nanotubes. The following examinations were performed, respectively: MWCNTs fabrication, fabrication of a CNT-NPs (Carbon NanoTube-NanoParticles nanocomposite material; the characterisation of the materials produced including examination of the structure and morphology, and the assessment of rhodium nanoparticles distribution on the surface of carbon nanotubes. Micro- and spectroscopy techniques were employed to characterise the structure of the nanocomposites obtained.

  14. LDRD final report on carbon nanotube composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cahill, P.A.; Rand, P.B.

    1997-04-01

    Carbon nanotubes and their composites were examined using computational and experimental techniques in order to modify the mechanical and electrical properties of resins. Single walled nanotubes were the focus of the first year effort; however, sufficient quantities of high purity single walled nanotubes could not be obtained for mechanical property investigations. The unusually high electrical conductivity of composites loaded with <1% of multiwalled nanotubes is useful, and is the focus of continuing, externally funded, research.

  15. NOVEL ZINC OXIDE FUNCTIONALIZED CARBON NANOTUBE CHEMIRESISTOR SENSOR ENHANCED WITH SURFACE O2 PLASMA INDUCED DEFECTS FOR METHANEDETECTION AT SINGLE PPM LEVEL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novelty/Progress ClaimsThis paper presents a novel functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) based chemiresistor sensor which can detect methane at 2 ppm concentration level at room temperature with relative resistance change (RRC) of 2%. This is the highest reported ...

  16. Engineering carbon nanotubes and nanotube circuits using electrical breakdown.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, P G; Arnold, M S; Avouris, P

    2001-04-27

    Carbon nanotubes display either metallic or semiconducting properties. Both large, multiwalled nanotubes (MWNTs), with many concentric carbon shells, and bundles or "ropes" of aligned single-walled nanotubes (SWNTs), are complex composite conductors that incorporate many weakly coupled nanotubes that each have a different electronic structure. Here we demonstrate a simple and reliable method for selectively removing single carbon shells from MWNTs and SWNT ropes to tailor the properties of these composite nanotubes. We can remove shells of MWNTs stepwise and individually characterize the different shells. By choosing among the shells, we can convert a MWNT into either a metallic or a semiconducting conductor, as well as directly address the issue of multiple-shell transport. With SWNT ropes, similar selectivity allows us to generate entire arrays of nanoscale field-effect transistors based solely on the fraction of semiconducting SWNTs.

  17. Synthesis and Physicochemical Behaviour of Polyurethane-Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes Nanocomposites Based on Renewable Castor Oil Polyols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alaa Ali

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Polyurethanes (PUs are high performance materials, with vast industrial and engineering applications. In this research, effects of Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes (MWCNTs on physicochemical properties of Castor Oil based Polyurethanes (COPUs were studied. MWCNTs were added in different weight percentages (0% to 1% wt in a castor oil based polyurethane (COPUs-MWCNTs nanocomposites. The composition, structure, and morphology of polyurethanes were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR, X-ray diffraction (XRD, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM, and element detection by energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDX analysis, respectively. Thermal stability was studied by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA. Barrier properties and surface area studies were investigated by nitrogen permeability machine and BET technique. Mechanical properties were calculated by tensile universal testing machine. Results showed well dispersed MWCNTs in polyurethane matrix at different weight percentages. The best results were obtained with 0.3 wt% of MWCNTs in the composite. Surface area studies revealed presence of very few pores which is in a good agreement with barrier permeability, reduced up to ~68% in 1 wt% and ~70% in 0.5 wt% of MWCNTs in polymer matrix, with respect to pure COPUs samples.

  18. Graphite coated with manganese oxide/multiwall carbon nanotubes composites as anodes in marine benthic microbial fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu, Yubin, E-mail: ffyybb@ouc.edu.cn; Yu, Jian; Zhang, Yelong; Meng, Yao

    2014-10-30

    Highlights: • MnO{sub 2}/MWCNTs composites anode exhibits faster reaction kinetics. • The surfaces of MnO{sub 2}/MWCNTs composites anode exhibits better wettability. • A BMFC using the modified anode have excellent power output. - Abstract: Improving anode performance is of great significance to scale up benthic microbial fuel cells (BMFCs) for its marine application to drive oceanography instruments. In this study, manganese oxide (MnO{sub 2})/multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) composites are prepared to be as novel anodes in the BMFCs via a direct redox reaction between permanganate ions (MnO{sub 4}{sup −}) and MWCNTs. The results indicate that the MnO{sub 2}/MWCNTs anode has a better wettability, greater kinetic activity and higher power density than that of the plain graphite (PG) anode. It is noted that the MnO{sub 2} (50% weight percent)/MWCNTs anode shows the highest electrochemical performance among them and will be a promising material for improving bioelectricity production of the BMFCs. Finally, a synergistic mechanism of electron transfer shuttle of Mn ions and their redox reactions in the interface between modified anode and bacteria biofilm are proposed to explain its excellent electrochemical performance.

  19. Electrocatalytic oxidation and determination of insulin at nickel oxide nanoparticles-multiwalled carbon nanotube modified screen printed electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafiee, Banafsheh; Fakhari, Ali Reza

    2013-08-15

    Nickel oxide nanoparticles modified nafion-multiwalled carbon nanotubes screen printed electrode (NiONPs/Nafion-MWCNTs/SPE) were prepared using pulsed electrodeposition of NiONPs on the MWCNTs/SPE surface. The size, distribution and structure of the NiONPs/Nafion-MWCNTs were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and x-ray diffraction (XRD) and also the results show that NiO nanoparticles were homogeneously electrodeposited on the surfaces of MWCNTs. Also, the electrochemical behavior of NiONPs/Nafion-MWCNTs composites in aqueous alkaline solutions of insulin was studied by cyclic voltammetry, chronoamperometry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). It was found that the prepared nanoparticles have excellent electrocatalytic activity towards insulin oxidation due to special properties of NiO nanoparticles. Cyclic voltammetric studies showed that the NiONPs/Nafion-MWCNTs film modified SPE, lowers the overpotentials and improves electrochemical behavior of insulin oxidation, as compared to the bare SPE. Amperometry was also used to evaluate the analytical performance of modified electrode in the quantitation of insulin. Excellent analytical features, including high sensitivity (1.83 μA/μM), low detection limit (6.1 nM) and satisfactory dynamic range (20.0-260.0 nM), were achieved under optimized conditions. Moreover, these sensors show good repeatability and a high stability after a while or successive potential cycling.

  20. Effect of processing parameter and filler content on tensile properties of multi-walled carbon nanotubes reinforced polylactic acid nanocomposite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Adilah Mat; Ahmad, Sahrim Hj.

    2013-05-01

    Polymer nanocomposite of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) nanoparticles incorporated with polylactic acid (PLA) and liquid natural rubber (LNR) as compatibilizer were prepared via melt blending method using the Haake Rheomix internal mixer. In order to obtain the optimal processing parameter, the nanocomposite with 89 wt % of PLA was blended with 10 wt % of LNR and 1 wt % of MWCNTs were mixed with various mixing parameter condition; mixing temperature, mixing speed and mixing time. The optimum processing parameter of the composites was obtained at temperature of 190°C, rotation speed of 90 rpm and mixing time of 14 min. Next, the effect of MWCNTs loading on the tensile properties of nanocomposites was investigated. The nanocomposites were melt blended using the optimal processing parameter with MWCNTs loading of 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, 2.5, 3.0, 3.5 and 4 wt %. The result showed that the sample with 3.5 wt % of MWCNTs gave higher tensile strength and Young's modulus. The SEM micrographs confirmed the effect of good dispersion of MWCNTs and their interfacial bonding in PLA nanocomposites. However, the elongation at break decreased with increasing the percentage of MWCNTs.

  1. Conductive Polymeric Composites Based on Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes and Linseed Oil Functionalized and Cross-Linked with Diacetylenes from Propargyl Alcohol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Ramírez-Jiménez

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Diacetylene-functionalized epoxidized linseed oil (DAELO matrix was synthesized in order to improve the dispersion of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs without the necessity of some chemical or physical modification of them. That fact was evidenced by the low critical concentration of DAELO-based composites in comparison (1.0 wt% MWCNTs with the epoxidized linseed oil- (ELO- based composites (5 wt% MWCNTs. For this, both series of composites were prepared by the ultrasonic dispersion method using the same conditions of solvent, dilution, and sonication time. It was shown that, tailoring the polymer matrix with groups rich in nonpolar electric density, as diacetylene, and capable of interacting by van der Waals forces, it is possible to improve the dispersion of carbon nanotubes (CNTs without necessity of some modification knowing that those treatments usually affect lowering their electrical properties.

  2. Up-regulation of T lymphocyte and antibody production by inflammatory cytokines released by macrophage exposure to multi-walled carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grecco, Ana Carolina P; Paula, Rosemeire F O; Mizutani, Erica; Sartorelli, Juliana C; Milani, Ana M; Longhini, Ana Leda F; Oliveira, Elaine C; Pradella, Fernando; Silva, Vania D R; Moraes, Adriel S; Peterlevitz, Alfredo C; Farias, Alessandro S; Ceragioli, Helder J; Santos, Leonilda M B; Baranauskas, Vitor

    2011-07-01

    Our data demonstrate that multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) are internalized by macrophages, subsequently activating them to produce interleukin (IL)-12 (IL-12). This cytokine induced the proliferative response of T lymphocytes to a nonspecific mitogen and to ovalbumin (OVA). This increase in the proliferative response was accompanied by an increase in the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as interferon-gamma (IFNγ), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFα) and IL-6, in mice inoculated with MWCNTs, whether or not they had been immunized with OVA. A decrease in the expression of transforming growth factor-beta (TGFβ) was observed in the mice treated with MWCNTs, whereas the suppression of the expression of both TGFβ and IL-10 was observed in mice that had been both treated and immunized. The activation of the T lymphocyte response by the pro-inflammatory cytokines leads to an increase in antibody production to OVA, suggesting the important immunostimulatory effect of carbon nanotubes.

  3. Up-regulation of T lymphocyte and antibody production by inflammatory cytokines released by macrophage exposure to multi-walled carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grecco, Ana Carolina P.; Paula, Rosemeire F. O.; Mizutani, Erica; Sartorelli, Juliana C.; Milani, Ana M.; Longhini, Ana Leda F.; Oliveira, Elaine C.; Pradella, Fernando; Silva, Vania D. R.; Moraes, Adriel S.; Peterlevitz, Alfredo C.; Farias, Alessandro S.; Ceragioli, Helder J.; Santos, Leonilda M. B.; Baranauskas, Vitor

    2011-07-01

    Our data demonstrate that multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) are internalized by macrophages, subsequently activating them to produce interleukin (IL)-12 (IL-12). This cytokine induced the proliferative response of T lymphocytes to a nonspecific mitogen and to ovalbumin (OVA). This increase in the proliferative response was accompanied by an increase in the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as interferon-gamma (IFNγ), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFα) and IL-6, in mice inoculated with MWCNTs, whether or not they had been immunized with OVA. A decrease in the expression of transforming growth factor-beta (TGFβ) was observed in the mice treated with MWCNTs, whereas the suppression of the expression of both TGFβ and IL-10 was observed in mice that had been both treated and immunized. The activation of the T lymphocyte response by the pro-inflammatory cytokines leads to an increase in antibody production to OVA, suggesting the important immunostimulatory effect of carbon nanotubes.

  4. Mechanism of field electron emission from carbon nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Zhi-bing; DENG Shao-zhi; XU Ning-sheng

    2006-01-01

    Field electron emission (FE) is a quantum tunneling process in which electrons are injected from materials (usually metals) into a vacuum under the influence of an applied electric field.In order to obtain usable electron current,the conventional way is to increase the local field at the surface of an emitter.For a plane metal emitter with a typical work function of 5 eV,an applied field of over 1000V/μm is needed to obtain a significant current.The high working field (and/or the voltage between the electrodes)has been the bottleneck for many applications of the FE technique.Since the 1960s,enormous effort has been devoted to reduce the working macroscopic field (voltage).A widely adopted idea is to sharpen the emitters to get a large surface field enhancement.The materials of emitters should have good electronic conductivity,high melting points,good chemical inertness,and high mechanical stiffness.Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are built with such needed properties.As a quasi-one-dimensional material,the CNT is expected to have a large surface field enhancement factor.The experiments have proved the excellent FE performance of CNTs.The turn-on field (the macroscopic field for obtaining a density of 10 μA/cm2 ) of CNT based emitters can be as low as 1 V/μm.However,this turn-on field is too good to be explained by conventional theory.There are other observations,such as the non-linear Fowler-Nordheim plot and multi-peaks field emission energy distribution spectra,indicating that the field enhancement is not the only story in the FE of CNTs.Since the discovery of CNTs,people have employed more serious quantum mechanical methods,including the electronic band theory,tight-binding theory,scattering theory and density function theory,to investigate FE of CNTs.A few theoretical models have been developed at the same time.The multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs)should be assembled with a sharp metal needle of nano-scale radius,for which the FE mechanism is more or less clear

  5. Influence of the different oxidation treatment on the performance of multi-walled carbon nanotubes in the catalytic wet air oxidation of phenol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shaoxia; Wang, Xingang; Yang, Hongwei; Sun, Yu; Liu, Yunxia

    2012-09-30

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) functionalized by different oxidants (HNO(3)/H(2)SO(4), H(2)O(2), O(3) and air) have been used as catalysts for the wet air oxidation of phenol. To investigate the effect of the oxidation conditions on the structure of the functionalized MWCNTs, various characterization techniques, e.g., scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Raman spectroscopy, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) have been used. The MWCNTs treated with O(3) and H(2)O(2) show higher amounts of oxygen-containing functional groups and carboxylic acid groups, and a weaker acidic nature, in comparison with those treated with other oxidizing agents. All the functionalized MWCNTs exhibit good activity in the catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO) of phenol. However, the MWCNTs treated with O(3) show the highest activity with desirable stability in comparison with other functionalized MWCNTs, indicating that the functionalization of carbon nanotubes with O(3) is a very promising strategy in synthesizing efficient catalysts for CWAO.

  6. Multiwalled carbon nanotube hybrids as MRI contrast agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikodem Kuźnik

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI is one of the most commonly used tomography techniques in medical diagnosis due to the non-invasive character, the high spatial resolution and the possibility of soft tissue imaging. Contrast agents, such as gadolinium complexes and superparamagnetic iron oxides, are administered to spotlight certain organs and their pathologies. Many new models have been proposed that reduce side effects and required doses of these already clinically approved contrast agents. These new candidates often possess additional functionalities, e.g., the possibility of bioactivation upon action of particular stimuli, thus serving as smart molecular probes, or the coupling with therapeutic agents and therefore combining both a diagnostic and therapeutic role. Nanomaterials have been found to be an excellent scaffold for contrast agents, among which carbon nanotubes offer vast possibilities. The morphology of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs, their magnetic and electronic properties, the possibility of different functionalization and the potential to penetrate cell membranes result in a unique and very attractive candidate for a new MRI contrast agent. In this review we describe the different issues connected with MWCNT hybrids designed for MRI contrast agents, i.e., their synthesis and magnetic and dispersion properties, as well as both in vitro and in vivo behavior, which is important for diagnostic purposes. An introduction to MRI contrast agent theory is elaborated here in order to point to the specific expectations regarding nanomaterials. Finally, we propose a promising, general model of MWCNTs as MRI contrast agent candidates based on the studies presented here and supported by appropriate theories.

  7. Graphene and carbon nanotube nanocomposite for gene transfection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hollanda, L.M. [Laboratory of Biotechnology, Department of Biochemistry, Institute of Biology at UNICAMP, Rua Monteiro Lobato 255, Campinas, SP CEP 13083-862 (Brazil); Lobo, A.O. [Laboratory of Biomedical Nanotechnology, Institute of Research and Development at the UNIVAP, Av. Shishima Hifumi, 2911, CEP: 12244-000 Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil); Lancellotti, M. [Laboratory of Biotechnology, Department of Biochemistry, Institute of Biology at UNICAMP, Rua Monteiro Lobato 255, Campinas, SP CEP 13083-862 (Brazil); Berni, E. [Biological Chemistry Laboratory, Department of Physical Chemistry, Institute of Chemistry at UNICAMP, R. José de Castro, Campinas, SP CEP 13083-970 (Brazil); Corat, E.J. [Associated Laboratory of Sensors and Materials of the INPE, Av. dos Astronautas 1758, Sao Jose dos Campos CEP: 12227-010 SP (Brazil); Zanin, H., E-mail: hudsonzanin@gmail.com [Associated Laboratory of Sensors and Materials of the INPE, Av. dos Astronautas 1758, Sao Jose dos Campos CEP: 12227-010 SP (Brazil)

    2014-06-01

    Graphene and carbon nanotube nanocomposite (GCN) was synthesised and applied in gene transfection of pIRES plasmid conjugated with green fluorescent protein (GFP) in NIH-3T3 and NG97 cell lines. The tips of the multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were exfoliated by oxygen plasma etching, which is also known to attach oxygen content groups on the MWCNT surfaces, changing their hydrophobicity. The nanocomposite was characterised by high resolution scanning electron microscopy; energy-dispersive X-ray, Fourier transform infrared and Raman spectroscopies, as well as zeta potential and particle size analyses using dynamic light scattering. BET adsorption isotherms showed the GCN to have an effective surface area of 38.5 m{sup 2}/g. The GCN and pIRES plasmid conjugated with the GFP gene, forming π-stacking when dispersed in water by magnetic stirring, resulting in a helical wrap. The measured zeta potential confirmed that the plasmid was connected to the nanocomposite. The NIH-3T3 and NG97 cell lines could phagocytize this wrap. The gene transfection was characterised by fluorescent protein produced in the cells and pictured by fluorescent microscopy. Before application, we studied GCN cell viability in NIH-3T3 and NG97 line cells using both MTT and Neutral Red uptake assays. Our results suggest that GCN has moderate stability behaviour as colloid solution and has great potential as a gene carrier agent in non-viral based therapy, with low cytotoxicity and good transfection efficiency. - Highlights: • Facile water dispersible GCN was prepared exfoliating MWCNTs by oxygen plasma etching. • Oxygen content groups were attached on the GCN surfaces changing its hydrophobicity. • Low concentrations of GCN showed low cytotoxicity for NIH-3T3 and NG97 line cells. • The GCN and pIRES plasmid conjugated with the GFP gene. • Gene transfection was studied using this new material.

  8. Phytotoxicity of carbon nanotubes in soybean as determined by interactions with micronutrients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaytseva, Olga; Wang, Zhengrui; Neumann, Günter

    2017-02-01

    Carbon nanomaterials released into the environment exert extremely variable effects on living organisms. In this study, we used soybean ( Glycine max) to investigate early responses to seed exposure to multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs, outer diameter 20-70 nm, inner diameter 5-10 nm, length of >2 μm). Soybean seeds were imbibed with deionised water (control) or MWCNT suspension (1000 mg L-1) and were analysed for MWCNT contamination using light microscopy. The seedlings vitality status was evaluated by staining with triphenyltetrazolium chloride and measurement of oxidative stress indicators in the root tissue. Micronutrient (Zn, Mn, Cu) availability in different seedling organs was assessed and the effects of antioxidants, and micronutrient supplementation was investigated. Oxidative stress induction by MWCNTs was detectable in radicle tips, coincided with MWCNTs accumulation and was reverted by external application of proline as antioxidant and micronutrients (Zn, Cu, Mn) as cofactors for various enzymes involved in oxidative stress defence. Accordingly, SOD activity increased after Zn supplementation. During germination, the MWCNT treatments reduced Zn translocation from the cotyledons to the seedling and MWCNTs exhibited adsorption potential for Zn and Cu, which may be involved in internal micronutrients immobilisation. This study demonstrates for the first time that MWCNT phytotoxicity is linked with oxidative stress-related disturbances of micronutrient homeostasis.

  9. Structural, electronic and photovoltaic characterization of multiwalled carbon nanotubes grown directly on stainless steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Camilli

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available We have taken advantage of the native surface roughness and the iron content of AISI-316 stainless steel to grow multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs by chemical vapour deposition without the addition of an external catalyst. The structural and electronic properties of the synthesized carbon nanostructures have been investigated by a range of electron microscopy and spectroscopy techniques. The results show the good quality and the high graphitization degree of the synthesized MWCNTs. Through energy-loss spectroscopy we found that the electronic properties of these nanostructures are markedly different from those of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG. Notably, a broadening of the π-plasmon peak in the case of MWCNTs is evident. In addition, a photocurrent was measured when MWCNTs were airbrushed onto a silicon substrate. External quantum efficiency (EQE and photocurrent values were reported both in planar and in top-down geometry of the device. Marked differences in the line shapes and intensities were found for the two configurations, suggesting that two different mechanisms of photocurrent generation and charge collection are in operation. From this comparison, we are able to conclude that the silicon substrate plays an important role in the production of electron–hole pairs.

  10. Hydrogen Peroxide Sensor Based on Carbon Nanotubes/β-Ni(OH)2 Nanocomposites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张小俊; 黄燕; 顾爱侠; 王广凤; 方宾; 吴华强

    2012-01-01

    Ni(OH)2 nanoflowers were synthesized by a simple and energy-efficient wet chemistry method. The product was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray powder diffraction (XRD). Then Ni(OH)2 nanoflowers attached multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) modified glassy carbon electrodes (GCE) were proposed (MWCNTs/Ni(OH)2/GCE) to use as electrochemical sensor to detect hydrogen peroxide. The results showed that the synergistic effect was obtained on the MWCNTs/Ni(OH)2/GCE whose sensitivity was better than that of Ni(OH)2/GCE. The linear range is from 0.2 to 22 mmol/L, the detection limit is 0.066 mmol/L, and the re- sponse time is 〈5 s. Satisfyingly, the MWCNTs/Ni(OH)2/GCE was not only successfully employed to eliminate the interferences from uric acid (UA), acid ascorbic (AA), dopamine (DA), glucose (GO) but also NO2 during the detection. The MWCNTs/Ni(OH)z/GCE allows highly sensitive, excellently selective and fast amperometric sensing of hydrogen peroxide and thus is promising for the future development of hydrogen peroxide sensors.

  11. Photopolymerization of Diacetylene on Aligned Multiwall Carbon Nanotube Microfibers for High-Performance Energy Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulaganathan, Mani; Hansen, Reinack Varghese; Drayton, Nateisha; Hingorani, Hardik; Kutty, R Govindan; Joshi, Hrishikesh; Sreejith, Sivaramapanicker; Liu, Zheng; Yang, Jinglei; Zhao, Yanli

    2016-12-07

    Linear two-dimensional materials have recently attracted an intense interest for supercapacitors because of their potential uses as electrodes in next-generation wearable electronics. However, enhancing the electrochemical properties of these materials without complicated structural modifications remains a challenge. Herein, we present the preparation of a hybrid electrode system via polydiacetylene (PDA) cloaking on the surface of aligned multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) through self-assembly based in situ photopolymerization. This strategy eliminates the need for initiators and binders that hinder electrochemical performance in conventional conducting polymer based composite electrodes. As noncovalent PDA cloaking did not alter the chemical structure of MWCNTs, high inherent conductivity from sp(2) hybridized carbon was preserved. The resulting hybrid microfiber (MWCNT@PDA) exhibited a significant increase in specific capacitance (1111 F g(-1)) when compared to bare MWCNTs (500 F g(-1)) and PDA (666.7 F g(-1)) in a voltage window of 0-1.2 V at a current density of 3 A g(-1) in 0.5 M K2SO4 electrolyte. The specific capacitance was retained (ca. 95%) after 7000 charge/discharge cycles. The present results suggest that aligned MWCNTs cloaked with conjugated polymers could meet the demands for future flexible electronics.

  12. Enriched surface acidity for surfactant-free suspensions of carboxylated carbon nanotubes purified by centrifugation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth I. Braun

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available It is well known that surfactant-suspended carbon nanotube (CNT samples can be purified by centrifugation to decrease agglomerates and increase individually-dispersed CNTs. However, centrifugation is not always part of protocols to prepare CNT samples used in biomedical applications. Herein, using carboxylated multi-walled CNTs (cMWCNTs suspended in water without a surfactant, we developed a Boehm titrimetric method for the analysis of centrifuged cMWCNT suspensions and used it to show that the surface acidity of oxidized carbon materials in aqueous cMWCNT suspensions was enriched by ∼40% by a single low-speed centrifugation step. This significant difference in surface acidity between un-centrifuged and centrifuged cMWCNT suspensions has not been previously appreciated and is important because the degree of surface acidity is known to affect the interactions of cMWCNTs with biological systems.

  13. Plasticity and Kinky Chemistry of Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Deepak; Dzegilenko, Fedor

    2000-01-01

    Since their discovery in 1991, carbon nanotubes have been the subject of intense research interest based on early predictions of their unique mechanical, electronic, and chemical properties. Materials with the predicted unique properties of carbon nanotubes are of great interest for use in future generations of aerospace vehicles. For their structural properties, carbon nanotubes could be used as reinforcing fibers in ultralight multifunctional composites. For their electronic properties, carbon nanotubes offer the potential of very high-speed, low-power computing elements, high-density data storage, and unique sensors. In a continuing effort to model and predict the properties of carbon nanotubes, Ames accomplished three significant results during FY99. First, accurate values of the nanomechanics and plasticity of carbon nanotubes based on quantum molecular dynamics simulations were computed. Second, the concept of mechanical deformation catalyzed-kinky-chemistry as a means to control local chemistry of nanotubes was discovered. Third, the ease of nano-indentation of silicon surfaces with carbon nanotubes was established. The elastic response and plastic failure mechanisms of single-wall nanotubes were investigated by means of quantum molecular dynamics simulations.

  14. Dielectrophoretic assembly of carbon nanotube devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dimaki, Maria

    The purpose of this project has been to assemble single-walled carbon nanotubes on electrodes at the tip of a biocompatible cantilever and use these for chemical species sensing in air and liquid, for example in order to measure the local activity from ion channels in the cell membrane....... The electrical resistance of carbon nanotubes has been shown to be extremely sensitive to gas molecules. Dielectrophoresis is a method capable of quickly attracting nanotubes on microelectrodes by using an electric field, thus enabling nanotube integration in microsystems. Dielectrophoresis offers also...... the potential of distinguishing between nanotubes of different electrical properties, which is very important for the optimisation of the properties of the carbon nanotube sensors. Various cantilever and planar structures were designed, fabricated and tested both with multi-walled and single-walled carbon...

  15. Sorting carbon nanotubes for electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martel, Richard

    2008-11-25

    Because of their unique structure and composition, single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are at the interface between molecules and crystalline solids. They also present properties that are ideal for making lightweight, inexpensive, and flexible electronics. The raw material is composed of a heterogeneous mixture of SWNTs that differ in helicity and diameter and, therefore, requires purification and separation. In a series of groundbreaking experiments, a robust process serving this purpose was developed based on SWNTs encapsulated in surfactants and water. Ultracentrifugation in a density gradient combined with surfactant mixtures provided buoyant density differences, enabling enrichment for both diameter and electronic properties. A new paper in this issue explores further the process through the hydrodynamic properties of SWNT-surfactant complexes. The study reveals that we have just begun to uncover the dynamics and properties of nanotube-surfactant interactions and highlights the potential that could be gained from a better understanding of their chemistry. The time scale of integration of carbon nanotubes into electronics applications remains unclear, but the recent developments in sorting out SWNTs paves the way for improving on the properties of network-based SWNTs.

  16. Study of Carbon Nanotube-Substrate Interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaqueline S. Soares

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Environmental effects are very important in nanoscience and nanotechnology. This work reviews the importance of the substrate in single-wall carbon nanotube properties. Contact with a substrate can modify the nanotube properties, and such interactions have been broadly studied as either a negative aspect or a solution for developing carbon nanotube-based nanotechnologies. This paper discusses both theoretical and experimental studies where the interaction between the carbon nanotubes and the substrate affects the structural, electronic, and vibrational properties of the tubes.

  17. CARBON NANOTUBES: PROPERTIES AND APPLICATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, John, E.

    2009-07-24

    Carbon nanotubes were discovered in 1991 as a minority byproduct of fullerene synthesis. Remarkable progress has been made in the ensuing years, including the discovery of two basic types of nanotubes (single-wall and multi-wall), great strides in synthesis and purification, elucidation of many fundamental physical properties, and important steps towards practical applications. Both the underlying science and technological potential of SWNT can profitably be studied at the scale of individual tubes and on macroscopic assemblies such as fibers. Experiments on single tubes directly reveal many of the predicted quantum confinement and mechanical properties. Semiconductor nanowires have many features in common with nanotubes, and many of the same fundamental and practical issues are in play – quantum confinement and its effect on properties; possible device structures and circuit architectures; thermal management; optimal synthesis, defect morphology and control, etc. In 2000 we began a small effort in this direction, conducted entirely by undergraduates with minimal consumables support from this grant. With DOE-BES approval, this grew into a project in parallel with the carbon nanotube work, in which we studied of inorganic semiconductor nanowire growth, characterization and novel strategies for electronic and electromechanical device fabrication. From the beginnings of research on carbon nanotubes, one of the major applications envisioned was hydrogen storage for fuel-cell powered cars and trucks. Subsequent theoretical models gave mixed results, the most pessimistic indicating that the fundamental H2-SWNT interaction was similar to flat graphite (physisorption) with only modest binding energies implying cryogenic operation at best. New material families with encouraging measured properties have emerged, and materials modeling has gained enormously in predictive power, sophistication, and the ability to treat a realistically representative number of atoms. One of

  18. Wetting behavior of multi-walled carbon nanotube nanofluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karthikeyan, A.; Coulombe, S.; Kietzig, A. M.

    2017-03-01

    Nanofluids—engineered colloidal suspensions in base liquids—have captivated the interest of researchers over the last two decades for various existing as well as emerging technological applications. The main impetus for the synthesis of such novel nanocomposite liquids is the potential to alter properties of the base liquid, such as its viscosity, thermal conductivity, and surface tension, and to introduce specific optical and magnetic properties. Numerous studies suggest trends and explanations for the effects associated with the addition of nanoparticles, and that deviation from the base liquid properties are dependent on nanoparticle concentration. However, there remains a certain ambiguity in the available literature. The wetting behavior and surface tension of nanofluids are particular examples where highly conflicting results exist. In this study, we used multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) functionalized by plasma treatment and dispersed in reverse osmosis water and 99% anhydrous ethanol. Our observations reveal that the surface tension and wetting behavior of the stable aqueous and ethanol-based nanofluids containing plasma functionalized MWCNTs are unaffected by the MWCNT loading up to 120 (0.012) and ∼210 (0.021) ppm (vol%), respectively. The ethanol-based MWCNT nanofluids allowed us to extend the study to higher loadings, and a linear increase of the surface tension past ∼200 ppm was observed. Conversely, nanofluids containing non-functionalized or surfactant-stabilized MWCNTs show drastically different contact angle values when compared to the base liquids even at very low concentrations (less than 100 ppm). We demonstrate that the stability of nanofluid and method of stabilization are crucial parameters in determining the wetting behavior of nanofluids.

  19. Wetting behavior of multi-walled carbon nanotube nanofluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karthikeyan, A; Coulombe, S; Kietzig, A M

    2017-03-10

    Nanofluids-engineered colloidal suspensions in base liquids-have captivated the interest of researchers over the last two decades for various existing as well as emerging technological applications. The main impetus for the synthesis of such novel nanocomposite liquids is the potential to alter properties of the base liquid, such as its viscosity, thermal conductivity, and surface tension, and to introduce specific optical and magnetic properties. Numerous studies suggest trends and explanations for the effects associated with the addition of nanoparticles, and that deviation from the base liquid properties are dependent on nanoparticle concentration. However, there remains a certain ambiguity in the available literature. The wetting behavior and surface tension of nanofluids are particular examples where highly conflicting results exist. In this study, we used multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) functionalized by plasma treatment and dispersed in reverse osmosis water and 99% anhydrous ethanol. Our observations reveal that the surface tension and wetting behavior of the stable aqueous and ethanol-based nanofluids containing plasma functionalized MWCNTs are unaffected by the MWCNT loading up to 120 (0.012) and ∼210 (0.021) ppm (vol%), respectively. The ethanol-based MWCNT nanofluids allowed us to extend the study to higher loadings, and a linear increase of the surface tension past ∼200 ppm was observed. Conversely, nanofluids containing non-functionalized or surfactant-stabilized MWCNTs show drastically different contact angle values when compared to the base liquids even at very low concentrations (less than 100 ppm). We demonstrate that the stability of nanofluid and method of stabilization are crucial parameters in determining the wetting behavior of nanofluids.

  20. Composite yarns of multiwalled carbon nanotubes with metallic electrical conductivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randeniya, Lakshman K; Bendavid, Avi; Martin, Philip J; Tran, Canh-Dung

    2010-08-16

    Unique macrostructures known as spun carbon-nanotube fibers (CNT yarns) can be manufactured from vertically aligned forests of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). These yarns behave as semiconductors with room-temperature conductivities of about 5 x 10(2) S cm(-1). Their potential use as, for example, microelectrodes in medical implants, wires in microelectronics, or lightweight conductors in the aviation industry has hitherto been hampered by their insufficient electrical conductivity. In this Full Paper, the synthesis of metal-CNT composite yarns, which combine the unique properties of CNT yarns and nanocrystalline metals to obtain a new class of materials with enhanced electrical conductivity, is presented. The synthesis is achieved using a new technique, self-fuelled electrodeposition (SFED), which combines a metal reducing agent and an external circuit for transfer of electrons to the CNT surface, where the deposition of metal nanoparticles takes place. In particular, the Cu-CNT and Au-CNT composite yarns prepared by this method have metal-like electrical conductivities (2-3 x 10(5) S cm(-1)) and are mechanically robust against stringent tape tests. However, the tensile strengths of the composite yarns are 30-50% smaller than that of the unmodified CNT yarn. The SFED technique described here can also be used as a convenient means for the deposition of metal nanoparticles on solid electrode supports, such as conducting glass or carbon black, for catalytic applications.

  1. Multi-walled carbon nanotube-based RF antennas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elwi, Taha A; Al-Rizzo, Hussain M; Rucker, Daniel G; Dervishi, Enkeleda; Li, Zhongrui; Biris, Alexandru S

    2010-01-29

    A novel application that utilizes conductive patches composed of purified multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) embedded in a sodium cholate composite thin film to create microstrip antennas operating in the microwave frequency regime is proposed. The MWCNTs are suspended in an adhesive solvent to form a conductive ink that is printed on flexible polymer substrates. The DC conductivity of the printed patches was measured by the four probe technique and the complex relative permittivity was measured by an Agilent E5071B probe. The commercial software package, CST Microwave Studio (MWS), was used to simulate the proposed antennas based on the measured constitutive parameters. An excellent agreement of less than 0.2% difference in resonant frequency is shown. Simulated and measured results were also compared against identical microstrip antennas that utilize copper conducting patches. The proposed MWCNT-based antennas demonstrate a 5.6% to 2.2% increase in bandwidth, with respect to their corresponding copper-based prototypes, without significant degradation in gain and/or far-field radiation patterns.

  2. A Nicotinamide Adenine Dinucleotide Dispersed Multi-walled Carbon Nanotubes Electrode for Direct and Selective Electrochemical Detection of Uric Acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yan; Li, Yiwei; Ma, Yaohong; Meng, Qingjun; Yan, Yan; Shi, Jianguo

    2015-01-01

    A nanocomposite platform built with multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) via a noncovalent interaction between the large π systems in NAD(+) molecules and MWCNTs on a glassy carbon substrate was successfully developed for the sensitive and selective detection of uric acid (UA) in the presence of ascorbic acid (AA), dopamine (DA). NAD(+) has an adenine subunit and a nicotinamide subunit, which enabled interaction with the purine subunit of UA through a strong π-π interaction to enhance the specificity of UA. Compared with a bare glassy carbon electrode (GCE) and MWCNTs/GCE, the MWCNTs-NAD(+)/GCE showed a low background current and a remarkable enhancement of the oxidation peak current of UA. Using differential pulse voltammetry (DPV), a high sensitivity for the determination of UA was explored for the MWCNTs-NAD(+) modified electrode. A linear relationship between the DPV peak current of UA and its concentration could be obtained in the range of 0.05 - 10 μM with the detection limit as low as 10 nM (S/N = 3). This present strategy provides a novel and promising platform for the detection of UA in human urine and serum samples.

  3. Amorphous Carbon-Boron Nitride Nanotube Hybrids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae Woo (Inventor); Siochi, Emilie J. (Inventor); Wise, Kristopher E. (Inventor); Lin, Yi (Inventor); Connell, John (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A method for joining or repairing boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs). In joining BNNTs, the nanotube structure is modified with amorphous carbon deposited by controlled electron beam irradiation to form well bonded hybrid a-C/BNNT structures. In repairing BNNTs, the damaged site of the nanotube structure is modified with amorphous carbon deposited by controlled electron beam irradiation to form well bonded hybrid a-C/BNNT structures at the damage site.

  4. A Tunable Carbon Nanotube Oscillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sazonova, Vera

    2005-03-01

    Nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS) hold promise for a number of scientific and technological applications. Carbon nanotubes (NT) are perhaps the ultimate material for realizing a NEMS device as they are the stiffest material known, have low density, ultrasmall cross sections and can be defect-free. Equally important, a nanotube can act as a transistor and thus is able to sense its own motion. Here, we report the electrical actuation and detection of the guitar-string oscillation modes of doubly-clamped NT oscillators. We observed resonance frequencies in the 5MHz to 150MHz range with quality factors in the 50 to 100 range. We showed that the resonance frequencies can be widely tuned by a gate voltage. We also report on the temperature dependence of the quality factor and present a discussion of possible loss mechanisms.

  5. Mechanics of filled carbon nanotubes

    KAUST Repository

    Monteiro, A.O.

    2014-04-01

    The benefits of filling carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with assorted molecular and crystalline substances have been investigated for the past two decades. Amongst the study of new structural phases, defects, chemical reactions and varied types of host-guest interactions, there is one fundamental characterisation aspect of these systems that continues to be overlooked: the mechanical behaviour of filled CNTs. In contrast to their empty counterparts, the mechanics of filled CNTs is a subject where reports appear far and apart, this despite being key to the application of these materials in technological devices. In the following paragraphs, we review the work that has been carried out up to the present on the mechanics of filled CNTs. The studies discussed range from experimental resonant frequency essays performed within electron microscopes to modelling, via molecular dynamics, of three-point bending of nanotubes filled with gases. (C) 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Hydroxyapitite-multiwalled carbon nanotubes nanocomposite for adhesion and electrochemical study of human osteoblast-like cells (MG-63)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jia Xueen; Zhou Yaping; Tan Liang [Key Laboratory of Chemical Biology and Traditional Chinese Medicine Research (Ministry of Education of China), College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Hunan Normal University, Changsha 410081 (China); Xie Qingji [Key Laboratory of Chemical Biology and Traditional Chinese Medicine Research (Ministry of Education of China), College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Hunan Normal University, Changsha 410081 (China)], E-mail: xieqj@hunnu.edu.cn; Tang Hao; Ma Ming; Yao Shouzhuo [Key Laboratory of Chemical Biology and Traditional Chinese Medicine Research (Ministry of Education of China), College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Hunan Normal University, Changsha 410081 (China)

    2009-05-01

    A new biocompatible interface made up of hydroxyapitite-multiwalled carbon nanotubes (HA-MWCNTs) nanocomposite was developed for adhesion and electrochemical detection of human osteoblast-like cells (MG-63). The HA-MWCNTs nanocomposite was synthesized by self-assembling nano-hydroxyapitite onto multiwalled carbon nanotubes in solution, which was characterized by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The adhesion of the MG-63 on the nanocomposite film was studied by quartz crystal microbalance and cyclic voltammetry. The nanocomposites interface showed improved immobilization capacity for cells and good biocompatibility for preserving the activity of immobilized living cells. The living cells immobilized on an HA-MWCNTs modified glassy carbon electrode exhibited an irreversible anodic peak response being positively associated with the density and viability of cells, which was used to describe the cells growth and evaluate the effectiveness of antitumor drug 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) on the cells. The obtained 5-FU cytotoxicity results agreed well with those from conventional MTT assays. The highly biocompatible HA-MWCNTs nanocomposite is also expected to be an appropriate matrix for the electrochemical investigation of adhesion, proliferation, and apoptosis of many other relevant mammalian cells00.

  7. NADPH Oxidase-Dependent NLRP3 Inflammasome Activation and its Important Role in Lung Fibrosis by Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Bingbing; Wang, Xiang; Ji, Zhaoxia; Wang, Meiying; Liao, Yu-Pei; Chang, Chong Hyun; Li, Ruibin; Zhang, Haiyuan; Nel, André E; Xia, Tian

    2015-05-06

    The purpose of this paper is to elucidate the key role of NADPH oxidase in NLRP3 inflammasome activation and generation of pulmonary fibrosis by multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). Although it is known that oxidative stress plays a role in pulmonary fibrosis by single-walled CNTs, the role of specific sources of reactive oxygen species, including NADPH oxidase, in inflammasome activation remains to be clarified. In this study, three long aspect ratio (LAR) materials (MWCNTs, single-walled carbon nanotubes, and silver nanowires) are used to compare with spherical carbon black and silver nanoparticles for their ability to trigger oxygen burst activity and NLRP3 assembly. All LAR materials but not spherical nanoparticles induce robust NADPH oxidase activation and respiratory burst activity in THP-1 cells, which are blunted in p22(phox) -deficient cells. The NADPH oxidase is directly involved in lysosomal damage by LAR materials, as demonstrated by decreased cathepsin B release and IL-1β production in p22(phox) -deficient cells. Reduced respiratory burst activity and inflammasome activation are also observed in bone marrow-derived macrophages from p47(phox) -deficient mice. Moreover, p47(phox) -deficient mice have reduced IL-1β production and lung collagen deposition in response to MWCNTs. Lung fibrosis is also suppressed by N-acetyl-cysteine in wild-type animals exposed to MWCNTs.

  8. Preparation and characterization of poly[Ni(salen)(crown receptor)]/multi-walled carbon nanotube composite films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tedim, J.; Hillman, A.R. [Department of Chemistry, University of Leicester, Leicester LE1 7 RH (United Kingdom); Goncalves, F.; Pereira, M.F.R.; Figueiredo, J.L. [Laboratorio de Catalise e Materiais, Departamento de Engenharia Quimica, Faculdade de Engenharia, Universidade do Porto, 4200-465 Porto (Portugal); Moura, C. [CIQ, Departamento de Quimica, Faculdade de Ciencias, Universidade do Porto, 4169-007 Porto (Portugal); Freire, C. [REQUIMTE, Departamento de Quimica, Faculdade de Ciencias, Universidade do Porto, 4169-007 Porto (Portugal)

    2008-10-01

    Nanocomposite films comprising multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) embedded within poly[Ni(3-Mesalophen-b15-c5)] were deposited on Pt and ITO electrode surfaces by the potentiodynamic polymerisation of [Ni(3-Mesalophen-b15-c5)] from solutions containing dispersed MWCNTs. Composites incorporating carbon nanotubes subject to a range of oxidising pre-treatments were compared with those incorporating untreated carbon nanotubes and with the pure polymer. In both cases, the use of CH{sub 3}CN and CH{sub 2}Cl{sub 2} as fabrication and characterization media were explored. Films were characterized by voltammetry, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and scanning electron microscope (SEM). The coating of the carbon nanotubes with polymer varied significantly with pre-treatment and solvent medium; this influenced the final composite morphology and electrical properties. Performance enhancement of the polymer component by the presence of the carbon nanotubes was manifested through the ability to store charge and the ease with which this could be accomplished; these were parameterized via increased redox capacitance and decreased charge-transfer resistance, respectively. Correlation of impedance parameters with SEM images provided a morphological rationale for composite electrical properties. (author)

  9. Synthesis of Pt and Pt-Fe nanoparticles supported on MWCNTs used as electrocatalysts in the methanol oxidation reaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    J.R.Rodriguez; R.M.F´elix; E.A.Reynoso; Y.Gochi-Ponce; Y.Verde Gómez; S.Fuentes Moyado; G.Alonso-N ´uñez

    2014-01-01

    This work reports a feasible synthesis of highly-dispersed Pt and Pt-Fe nanoparticles supported on multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) without Fe and multiwall carbon nanotubes with iron (MWCNTs-Fe) which applied as electrocatalysts for methanol electrooxidation. A Pt coordination complex salt was synthesized in an aqueous solution and it was used as precursor to prepare Pt/MWCNTs, Pt/MWCNTs-Fe, and Pt-Fe/MWCNTs using FeCl2·4H2O as iron source which were named S1, S2 and S3, respectively. The coordination complex of platinum (TOA)2PtCl6 was obtained by the chemical reaction between (NH4)2PtCl6 with tetraoctylammonium bromide (TOAB) and it was characterized by FT-IR and TGA. The materials were characterized by Raman spectroscopy, SEM, EDS, XRD, TEM and TGA. The electrocatalytic activity of Pt-based supported on MWCNTs in the methanol oxidation was investigated by cyclic voltammetry (CV) and chronoamperometry (CA). Pt-Fe/MWCNTs electrocatalysts showed the highest electrocatalytic activity and stability among the tested electrocatalysts due to that the addition of”Fe”promotes the OH species adsorption on the electrocatalyst surface at low potentials, thus, enhancing the activity toward the methanol oxidation reaction (MOR).

  10. Microstructure and mechanical properties of in situ casting TiC/Ti6Al4V composites through adding multi-walled carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ya, Bin; Zhou, Bingwen; Yang, Hongshuo; Huang, Bingkun; Jia, Fei; Zhang, Xingguo, E-mail: zxgwj@dlut.edu.cn

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • Adding MWCNTs in situ casting fabricating TiC/Ti6Al4V composites is first reported. • The solidification process of in situ casting TiC/Ti6Al4V composites is discussed. • Microstructure shows remarkable correlations with adding MWCNTS. • Strength and plasticity show remarkable correlations with adding MWCNTs. - Abstract: In this study, multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were added as carbon sources to fabricate in situ casting TiC/Ti6Al4V (TC4) composites. The effects of MWCNTs on the microstructure and mechanical properties are studied. The composites are analyzed by X-ray diffraction, field-emission scanning electron microscope and electron probe microanalysis. The fracture behavior of TiC/TC4 composites are also studied. Smaller size of TiC particles and grain compared with TC4-graphite composites can be observed. The tensile strength of TC4-MWCNTs composites is about 1110.1 MPa, which is higher than that of TC4-graphite composites, about 1003.6 MPa. Fracture behavior also was changed by adding MWCNTs in situ casting TiC/TC4 composites.

  11. Hydrogen Storage in Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Joseph; Gilbert, Matthew; Naab, Fabian; Savage, Lauren; Holland, Wayne; Duggan, Jerome; McDaniel, Floyd

    2004-10-01

    Hydrogen as a fuel source is an attractive, relatively clean alternative to fossil fuels. However, a major limitation in its use for the application of automobiles has been the requirement for an efficient hydrogen storage medium. Current hydrogen storage systems are: physical storage in high pressure tanks, metal hydride, and gas-on-solid absorption. However, these methods do not fulfill the Department of Energy's targeted requirements for a usable hydrogen storage capacity of 6.5 wt.%, operation near ambient temperature and pressure, quick extraction and refueling, reliability and reusability.Reports showing high capacity hydrogen storage in single-walled carbon nanotubes originally prompted great excitement in the field, but further research has shown conflicting results. Results for carbon nanostructures have ranged from less than 1 wt.% to 70 wt.%. The wide range of adsorption found in previous experiments results from the difficulty in measuring hydrogen in objects just nanometers in size. Most previous experiments relied on weight analysis and residual gas analysis to determine the amount of hydrogen being adsorbed by the CNTs. These differing results encouraged us to perform our own analysis on single-walled (SWNTs), double-walled (DWNTs), and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs), as well as carbon fiber. We chose to utilize direct measurement of hydrogen in the materials using elastic recoil detection analysis (ERDA). This work was supported by the National Science Foundation's Research Experience for Undergraduates and the University of North Texas.

  12. Improving the affinity of silicon surface for biosensor application: The interaction between multiwall carbon nanotube (MWCNT) and chitosan (CS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayakumaran, Thivina; Hashim, U.; Ruslinda, A. Rahim; Arshad, M. K.; Veeradasan, P.; Nordin, N. K. S.

    2017-03-01

    Previous study show the preparation, characterization and physical properties of carbon nanotube (CNT) and chitosan (CS). Multi-Wall CNT (MWCNT) and chitosan is utilized on the silicon surface in this studies. Functionalized of Multi Wall Carbon Nanotubes (MWCNTs) were demonstrated using the nitric acid (HNO3) oxidation technique to remove impurities. In this studies, the interaction between CS-MWCNT was investigated and explained according to the UV-VIS result. The range of the wavelength obtained from the UV-Vis data is 200-700nm. The hybrid form of CS-MWCNT proves to be more promising as a surface for biosensing application.

  13. Quantitative stability analyses of multiwall carbon nanotube nanofluids following water/ice phase change cycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivall, Jason; Langlois-Rahme, Gabriel; Coulombe, Sylvain; Servio, Phillip

    2017-02-01

    Multiwall carbon nanotube nanofluids are regularly investigated for phase change enhancement between liquid and solid states owing to their improved heat transfer properties. The potential applications are numerous, the most notable being latent heat thermal energy storage, but the success of all nanofluid-assisted technologies hinges greatly on the ability of nanoparticles to remain stably dispersed after repeated phase change cycles. In this report, the stability of aqueous nanofluids made from oxygen-functionalized multiwall carbon nanotubes (f-MWCNTs) was profiled over the course of 20 freeze/thaw cycles. Sonication was used after each cycle to re-disperse clusters formed from the crystallization process. This study offers a quantitative evaluation of f-MWCNT-nanofluid stability as a result of phase change through optical characterization of concentration and particle size. It also provides insight into the integrity of the surface functionalities through zeta potential and XPS analyses. Concentration and particle size measurements showed moderate and consistent recoverability of f-MWCNT dispersion following ultrasonication. XPS measurements of solid-state MWCNTs exposed to freeze/thaw cycling in water, and zeta potential analyses of the nanofluids indicate that the surface oxygen content is preserved throughout phase change and over repeated cycles. These results suggest a resilience of oxygen-functionalized MWCNTs to the freezing and thawing of water, which is ideal for their utilization as phase change enhancers.

  14. Effects of Carbon Nanotube Environmental Dispersion on an Aquatic Invertebrate, Hirudo medicinalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girardello, Rossana; Tasselli, Stefano; Baranzini, Nicolò; Valvassori, Roberto; de Eguileor, Magda; Grimaldi, Annalisa

    2015-01-01

    The recent widespread applications of nanomaterials, because of their properties, opens new scenarios that affect their dispersal in the environment. In particular multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), despite their qualities, seem to be harmful for animals and humans. To evaluate possible toxic effects caused by carbon nanotube environmental dispersion, with regard to aquatic compartment, we proposed as experimental model a freshwater invertebrate: Hirudo medicinalis. In the present study we analyse acute and chronic immune responses over a short (1, 3, 6 and 12 hours) and long time (from 1 to 5 weeks) exposure to MWCNTs by optical, electron and immunohistochemical approaches. In the exposed leeches angiogenesis and fibroplasia accompanied by massive cellular migration occur. Immunocytochemical characterization using specific markers shows that in these inflammatory processes the monocyte-macrophages (CD45+, CD68+) are the most involved cells. These immunocompetent cells are characterized by sequence of events starting from the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines (in particular IL-18), and amyloidogenensis. Our combined experimental approaches, basing on high sensitive inflammatory response can highlight adverse effects of nanomaterials on aquatic organisms and could be useful to assess the MWCNTs impact on aquatic, terrestrial animal and human health.

  15. Effects of Carbon Nanotube Environmental Dispersion on an Aquatic Invertebrate, Hirudo medicinalis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rossana Girardello

    Full Text Available The recent widespread applications of nanomaterials, because of their properties, opens new scenarios that affect their dispersal in the environment. In particular multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs, despite their qualities, seem to be harmful for animals and humans. To evaluate possible toxic effects caused by carbon nanotube environmental dispersion, with regard to aquatic compartment, we proposed as experimental model a freshwater invertebrate: Hirudo medicinalis. In the present study we analyse acute and chronic immune responses over a short (1, 3, 6 and 12 hours and long time (from 1 to 5 weeks exposure to MWCNTs by optical, electron and immunohistochemical approaches. In the exposed leeches angiogenesis and fibroplasia accompanied by massive cellular migration occur. Immunocytochemical characterization using specific markers shows that in these inflammatory processes the monocyte-macrophages (CD45+, CD68+ are the most involved cells. These immunocompetent cells are characterized by sequence of events starting from the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines (in particular IL-18, and amyloidogenensis. Our combined experimental approaches, basing on high sensitive inflammatory response can highlight adverse effects of nanomaterials on aquatic organisms and could be useful to assess the MWCNTs impact on aquatic, terrestrial animal and human health.

  16. Characterization and nanomechanical properties of novel dental implant coatings containing copper decorated-carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasani, N; Vahdati Khaki, J; Mojtaba Zebarjad, S

    2014-09-01

    Fluorapatite-titania coated Ti-based implants are promising for using in dental surgery for restoring teeth. One of the challenges in implantology is to achieve a bioactive coating with appropriate mechanical properties. In this research, simple sol-gel method was developed for synthesis of fluorapatite-titania-carbon nanotube decorated with antibacterial agent. Triethyl phosphate [PO4(C2H5)3], calcium nitrate [Ca(NO3)2] and ammonium fluoride (NH4F) were used as precursors under an ethanol-water based solution for fluorapatite (FA) production. Titanium isopropoxide and isopropanol were used as starting materials for making TiO2 sol-gels. Also, Copper acetate [Cu(C2H3O2)2·H2O] was used as precursor for decoration of multi walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) with wet chemical method. The decorated MWCNTs (CNT(Cu)) were evaluated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The phase identification of the FA-TiO2-CNT(Cu) coating was carried out by XRD analysis. Morphology of coated samples was investigated by SEM observations. The surface elastic modulus and hardness of coatings were studied using nanoindentation technique. The results indicate that novel dental implant coating containing FA, TiO2 and copper decorated MWCNTs have proper morphological features. The results of nanoindentation test show that incorporation of CNT(Cu) in FA-TiO2 matrix can improve the nanomechanical properties of composite coating.

  17. Thermal Spectroscopy and Kinetic Studies of PEO/PVDF Loaded by Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laila Hussein Gaabour

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanocomposites of polyethylene oxide (PEO and polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF without and with low content of single and multiwalled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs-MWCNTs were prepared and studied by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA using different heating rate. TGA results indicate that the thermal stability of neat PEO/PVDF blend was improved with both heating rate and incorporation of carbon nanotubes (CNTs. The degradation temperature for neat blend was lower than those of the nanocomposites after adding both SWCNTs and MWCNTs. As increase of heating rate, the onset of decomposition is irregularly moved to higher temperatures. This indicates that the thermal stability of the polymeric matrices has been improved after addition of CNTs. The residual weight of the samples left increased steadily with adding of both SWCNTs and MWCNTs. Kinetic thermodynamic parameters such as activation energy, enthalpy, entropy, and Gibbs free energy are evaluated from TGA data using Coats-Redfern model. The values of all parameters irregularly decrease with increasing of heating rate due to increasing of heating rate temperature, the random scission of macromolecule chain in the polymeric matrices predominates and the activation energy has a lower value.

  18. Glucose oxidase immobilization onto carbon nanotube networking

    CERN Document Server

    Karachevtsev, V A; Zarudnev, E S; Karachevtsev, M V; Leontiev, V S; Linnik, A S; Lytvyn, O S; Plokhotnichenko, A M; Stepanian, S G

    2012-01-01

    When elaborating the biosensor based on single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs), it is necessary to solve such an important problem as the immobilization of a target biomolecule on the nanotube surface. In this work, the enzyme (glucose oxidase (GOX)) was immobilized on the surface of a nanotube network, which was created by the deposition of nanotubes from their solution in 1,2-dichlorobenzene by the spray method. 1-Pyrenebutanoic acid succinimide ester (PSE) was used to form the molecular interface, the bifunctional molecule of which provides the covalent binding with the enzyme shell, and its other part (pyrene) is adsorbed onto the nanotube surface. First, the usage of such a molecular interface leaves out the direct adsorption of the enzyme (in this case, its activity decreases) onto the nanotube surface, and, second, it ensures the enzyme localization near the nanotube. The comparison of the resonance Raman (RR) spectrum of pristine nanotubes with their spectrum in the PSE environment evidences the creat...

  19. Polymer Self-assembly on Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giulianini, Michele; Motta, Nunzio

    This chapter analyses the poly(3-hexylthiophene) self-assembly on carbon nanotubes and the interaction between the two materials forming a new hybrid nanostructure. The chapter starts with a review of the several studies investigating polymers and biomolecules self-assembled on nanotubes. Then conducting polymers and polythiophenes are briefly introduced. Accordingly, carbon nanotube structure and properties are reported in Sect. 3. The experimental section starts with the bulk characterisation of polymer thin films with the inclusion of uniformly distributed carbon nanotubes. By using volume film analysis techniques (AFM, TEM, UV-Vis and Raman), we show how the polymer's higher degree of order is a direct consequence of interaction with carbon nanotubes. Nevertheless, it is through the use of nanoscale analysis and molecular dynamic simulations that the self-assembly of the polymer on the nanotube surface can be clearly evidenced and characterised. In Sect. 6, the effect of the carbon templating structure on the P3HT organisation on the surface is investigated, showing the chirality-driven polymer assembly on the carbon nanotube surface. The interaction between P3HT and CNTs brings also to charge transfer, with the modification of physical properties for both species. In particular, the alteration of the polymer electronic properties and the modification of the nanotube mechanical structure are a direct consequence of the P3HT π-π stacking on the nanotube surface. Finally, some considerations based on molecular dynamics studies are reported in order to confirm and support the experimental results discussed.

  20. Suspended carbon nanotubes coupled to superconducting circuits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schneider, B.H.

    2014-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes are unique candidates to study quantum mechanical properties of a nanomechanical resonator. However to access this quantum regime, present detectors are not yet sensitive enough. In this thesis we couple a carbon nanotube CNT mechanical resonator to a superconducting circuit which i

  1. Carbon Nanotubes – Interactions with Biological Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Reis, Joana; Capela-Silva, Fernando; Potes, José; Fonseca, Alexandra; Oliveira, Mónica; Kanagaraj, Subramani; Marques, António Torres

    2011-01-01

    his book chapter discusses the prospective biomedical applications of carbon nanotubes based materials, the impact of carbon nanotubes properties in the interaction with biological systems. Protein adsorption, impact on cell viability and cytokine production are explored. Potential respiratory and dermal toxicity are reviewed, as the difficulties on studying the biological response. In face of recent studies, special attention is drawn upon promising orthopaedic use.

  2. Multiscale Simulations of Carbon Nanotubes and Liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koumoutsakos, Petros

    2005-11-01

    We present molecular dynamics and hybrid continuum/atomistic simulations of carbon nanotubes in liquid environments with an emphasis on aqueous solutions. We emphasize computational issues such as interaction potentials and coupling techniques and their influence on the simulated physics. We present results from simulations of water flows inside and outside doped and pure carbon nanotubes and discuss their implications for experimental studies.