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Sample records for carbon nanotubes effects

  1. Edge effects in finite elongated carbon nanotubes

    OpenAIRE

    Hod, Oded; Peralta, Juan E.; Scuseria, Gustavo E.

    2006-01-01

    The importance of finite-size effects for the electronic structure of long zigzag and armchair carbon nanotubes is studied. We analyze the electronic structure of capped (6,6), (8,0), and (9,0) single walled carbon nanotubes as a function of their length up to 60 nm, using a divide and conquer density functional theory approach. For the metallic nanotubes studied, most of the physical features appearing in the density of states of an infinite carbon nanotube are recovered at a length of 40 nm...

  2. Effective models for excitons in carbon nanotubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cornean, Horia; Duclos, Pierre; Ricaud, Benjamin

    We analyse the low lying spectrum of a model of excitons in carbon nanotubes. Consider two particles with a Coulomb self-interaction, placed on an infinitely long cylinder. If the cylinder radius becomes small, the low lying spectrum is well described by a one-dimensional effective Hamiltonian...

  3. Effective models for excitons in carbon nanotubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cornean, Horia; Duclos, Pierre; Ricaud, Benjamin

    2007-01-01

    We analyse the low lying spectrum of a model of excitons in carbon nanotubes. Consider two particles with opposite charges and a Coulomb self-interaction, placed on an infinitely long cylinder. If the cylinder radius becomes small, the low lying spectrum of their relative motion is well described...

  4. Correlation and dimensional effects of trions in carbon nanotubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rønnow, Troels Frimodt; Pedersen, Thomas Garm; Cornean, Horia

    2010-01-01

    We study the binding energies of singlet trions, i.e., charged excitons, in carbon nanotubes. The problem is modeled, through the effective-mass model, as a three-particle complex on the surface of a cylinder, which we investigate using both one- and two-dimensional expansions of the wave function...... are used to compute physical binding energies for a wide selection of carbon nanotubes. In addition, the dependence on dielectric screening is examined. Our findings indicate that trions are detectable at room temperature in carbon nanotubes with radius below 8 Å....

  5. Integrating carbon nanotubes into silicon by means of vertical carbon nanotube field-effect transistors

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Jingqi

    2014-01-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes have been integrated into silicon for use in vertical carbon nanotube field-effect transistors (CNTFETs). A unique feature of these devices is that a silicon substrate and a metal contact are used as the source and drain for the vertical transistors, respectively. These CNTFETs show very different characteristics from those fabricated with two metal contacts. Surprisingly, the transfer characteristics of the vertical CNTFETs can be either ambipolar or unipolar (p-type or n-type) depending on the sign of the drain voltage. Furthermore, the p-type/n-type character of the devices is defined by the doping type of the silicon substrate used in the fabrication process. A semiclassical model is used to simulate the performance of these CNTFETs by taking the conductance change of the Si contact under the gate voltage into consideration. The calculation results are consistent with the experimental observations. This journal is © the Partner Organisations 2014.

  6. Integrating carbon nanotubes into silicon by means of vertical carbon nanotube field-effect transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jingqi; Wang, Qingxiao; Yue, Weisheng; Guo, Zaibing; Li, Liang; Zhao, Chao; Wang, Xianbin; Abutaha, Anas I; Alshareef, H N; Zhang, Yafei; Zhang, X X

    2014-08-07

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes have been integrated into silicon for use in vertical carbon nanotube field-effect transistors (CNTFETs). A unique feature of these devices is that a silicon substrate and a metal contact are used as the source and drain for the vertical transistors, respectively. These CNTFETs show very different characteristics from those fabricated with two metal contacts. Surprisingly, the transfer characteristics of the vertical CNTFETs can be either ambipolar or unipolar (p-type or n-type) depending on the sign of the drain voltage. Furthermore, the p-type/n-type character of the devices is defined by the doping type of the silicon substrate used in the fabrication process. A semiclassical model is used to simulate the performance of these CNTFETs by taking the conductance change of the Si contact under the gate voltage into consideration. The calculation results are consistent with the experimental observations.

  7. Vertically aligned carbon nanotube field-effect transistors

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Jingqi

    2012-10-01

    Vertically aligned carbon nanotube field-effect transistors (CNTFETs) have been developed using pure semiconducting carbon nanotubes. The source and drain were vertically stacked, separated by a dielectric, and the carbon nanotubes were placed on the sidewall of the stack to bridge the source and drain. Both the effective gate dielectric and gate electrode were normal to the substrate surface. The channel length is determined by the dielectric thickness between source and drain electrodes, making it easier to fabricate sub-micrometer transistors without using time-consuming electron beam lithography. The transistor area is much smaller than the planar CNTFET due to the vertical arrangement of source and drain and the reduced channel area. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Carbon nanotubes

    OpenAIRE

    SLOBODAN N. MARINKOVIC

    2008-01-01

    Nanotubes, the last in the focus of scientists in a series of “all carbon” materials discovered over the last several decades are the most interesting and have the greatest potential. This review aims at presenting in a concise manner the considerable amount of knowledge accumulated since the discovery of this amazing form of solid carbon, particularly during the last 15 years. The topics include methods of synthesis, mathematical description, characterization by Raman spectroscopy, most impo...

  9. Investigating the effect of some parameters of the channel on the characteristics of tunneling carbon nanotube field-effect transistor

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Valed Karimi, Najmeh; Pourasad, Yaghoub

    2016-01-01

    This paper studies p-i-n tunneling carbon nanotube field-effect transistor to investigate the effect of various parameters of the channel on the characteristics of tunneling carbon nanotube field-effect transistor...

  10. Thermoelectric effects in electron chiral tunneling in metallic carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parafilo, A. V.; Ilinskaya, O. A.; Krive, I. V.; Park, Y. W.

    2015-12-01

    Thermoelectric effects in a metallic single-wall carbon nanotube in the presence of long-range electrostatic and pseudomagnetic potentials (produced by strain) are considered. It is shown that for strong scattering potentials (chiral tunneling) a pronounced energy "gap" appears in the energy dependence of electron transmission coefficient. This results in strong violation of Wiedemann-Franz law and in a peak-like behavior of thermopower as a function of chemical potential. The electronic figure-of-merit (ZT) is calculated and shown to be sensitive at low temperatures to nanotube chirality. By tuning chemical potential, ZT can reach high values (ZT≃5) that makes specially engineered nanotube-based thermocouple to be a promising nano-device with a high thermoelectric performance.

  11. Carbon nanotube composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Bryan, Gregory; Skinner, Jack L; Vance, Andrew; Yang, Elaine Lai; Zifer, Thomas

    2015-03-24

    A material consisting essentially of a vinyl thermoplastic polymer, un-functionalized carbon nanotubes and hydroxylated carbon nanotubes dissolved in a solvent. Un-functionalized carbon nanotube concentrations up to 30 wt % and hydroxylated carbon nanotube concentrations up to 40 wt % can be used with even small concentrations of each (less than 2 wt %) useful in producing enhanced conductivity properties of formed thin films.

  12. Activity of catalase adsorbed to carbon nanotubes: effects of carbon nanotube surface properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chengdong; Luo, Shuiming; Chen, Wei

    2013-09-15

    Nanomaterials have been studied widely as the supporting materials for enzyme immobilization. However, the interactions between enzymes and carbon nanotubes (CNT) with different morphologies and surface functionalities may vary, hence influencing activities of the immobilized enzyme. To date how the adsorption mechanisms affect the activities of immobilized enzyme is not well understood. In this study the adsorption of catalase (CAT) on pristine single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT), oxidized single-walled carbon nanotubes (O-SWNT), and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNT) was investigated. The adsorbed enzyme activities decreased in the order of O-SWNT>SWNT>MWNT. Fourier transforms infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and circular dichrois (CD) analyses reveal more significant loss of α-helix and β-sheet of MWNT-adsorbed than SWNT-adsorbed CAT. The difference in enzyme activities between MWNT-adsorbed and SWNT-adsorbed CAT indicates that the curvature of surface plays an important role in the activity of immobilized enzyme. Interestingly, an increase of β-sheet content was observed for CAT adsorbed to O-SWNT. This is likely because as opposed to SWNT and MWNT, O-SWNT binds CAT largely via hydrogen bonding and such interaction allows the CAT molecule to maintain the rigidity of enzyme structure and thus the biological function. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. SU(4) Kondo effect in carbon nanotube quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguado, Ramon; Choi, Mahn-Soo; Lopez, Rosa

    2005-03-01

    We investigate theoretically the non-equilibrium transport properties of carbon nanotube quantum dots. Owing to the two-dimensional band structure of graphene, a double orbital degeneracy plays the role of a pseudo-spin, which is entangled with the spin. Quantum fluctuations between these four degrees of freedom result in an SU(4) Kondo effect at low temperatures. This exotic Kondo effect manifests as a four-peak splitting in the non-linear conductance when an axial magnetic field is applied [1]. Recent transport experiments in carbon nanotube quantum dots [2] clearly support our theoretical findings. [1] M. S. Choi, R. Lopez and R. Aguado, cond-mat/0411665 (2004). [2] P. Jarillo-Herrero, J. Kong, H. S. J. van der Zant, C. Dekker, L. P. Kouwenhoven and S. De Franceschi, to be published (2004).

  14. Current instability of carbon nanotube field effect transistors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng Ning [Microelectronics Center, School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 639798 (Singapore); Zhang Qing [Microelectronics Center, School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 639798 (Singapore); Yuan Shaoning [Microelectronics Center, School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 639798 (Singapore); Li Hong [Microelectronics Center, School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 639798 (Singapore); Tian Jingze [Chartered Semiconductor Manufacturing, 60 Woodlands Industrial Park D, 738406 (Singapore); Chan Lap [Chartered Semiconductor Manufacturing, 60 Woodlands Industrial Park D, 738406 (Singapore)

    2007-10-24

    The current instability of carbon nanotube field effect transistors (CNTFETs) is systematically studied under the influence of applied voltages, surfactants and temperatures. The devices were fabricated from carbon nanotubes and sodium dodecyl benzene sulfonate (SDBS) suspension using an ac dielectrophoresis (DEP) technique. The source and drain current for as-prepared p-type CNTFETs show an increase with time for the on-state, but a decrease for the off-state. Comparisons between constant and intermittent biasing conditions reveal that mobile ions could be the origin of the current instability. After removal of adsorbed SDBS, opposite transient behaviors of the current were observed, which can be attributed to the charge trapping induced screening effect.

  15. Current instability of carbon nanotube field effect transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Ning; Zhang, Qing; Yuan, Shaoning; Li, Hong; Tian, Jingze; Chan, Lap

    2007-10-01

    The current instability of carbon nanotube field effect transistors (CNTFETs) is systematically studied under the influence of applied voltages, surfactants and temperatures. The devices were fabricated from carbon nanotubes and sodium dodecyl benzene sulfonate (SDBS) suspension using an ac dielectrophoresis (DEP) technique. The source and drain current for as-prepared p-type CNTFETs show an increase with time for the on-state, but a decrease for the off-state. Comparisons between constant and intermittent biasing conditions reveal that mobile ions could be the origin of the current instability. After removal of adsorbed SDBS, opposite transient behaviors of the current were observed, which can be attributed to the charge trapping induced screening effect.

  16. Electrical conductivity of metal–carbon nanotube structures: Effect of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The electrical properties of asymmetric metal–carbon nanotube (CNT) structures have been studied using density functional theory and non-equilibrium Green's function method with Atomistix tool kit. The models with asymmetric metal contacts and carbon nanotube bear resemblance to experimental set-ups. The study ...

  17. Carbon nanotube solar cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colin Klinger

    Full Text Available We present proof-of-concept all-carbon solar cells. They are made of a photoactive side of predominantly semiconducting nanotubes for photoconversion and a counter electrode made of a natural mixture of carbon nanotubes or graphite, connected by a liquid electrolyte through a redox reaction. The cells do not require rare source materials such as In or Pt, nor high-grade semiconductor processing equipment, do not rely on dye for photoconversion and therefore do not bleach, and are easy to fabricate using a spray-paint technique. We observe that cells with a lower concentration of carbon nanotubes on the active semiconducting electrode perform better than cells with a higher concentration of nanotubes. This effect is contrary to the expectation that a larger number of nanotubes would lead to more photoconversion and therefore more power generation. We attribute this to the presence of metallic nanotubes that provide a short for photo-excited electrons, bypassing the load. We demonstrate optimization strategies that improve cell efficiency by orders of magnitude. Once it is possible to make semiconducting-only carbon nanotube films, that may provide the greatest efficiency improvement.

  18. Effect of different carbon nanotubes on cell viability and proliferation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Nicola, Milena [Dipartimento di Biologia, Universita di Roma Tor Vergata (Italy); Gattia, Daniele Mirabile [Divisione nuovi materiali ENEA Casaccia (Italy); Bellucci, Stefano [INFN Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati (Italy); De Bellis, Giovanni [INFN Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati (Italy); Micciulla, Federico [INFN Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati (Italy); Pastore, Roberto [INFN Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati (Italy); Tiberia, Alessandra [INFN Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati (Italy); Cerella, Claudia [Dipartimento di Biologia, Universita di Roma Tor Vergata (Italy); D' Alessio, Maria [Dipartimento di Biologia, Universita di Roma Tor Vergata (Italy); Antisari, Marco Vittori [Divisione nuovi materiali ENEA Casaccia (Italy); Marazzi, Renzo [Divisione nuovi materiali ENEA Casaccia (Italy); Traversa, Enrico [Dipartimento di Chimica, Universita di Roma Tor Vergata (Italy); Magrini, Andrea [Cattedra Medicina del Lavoro, Universita di Roma Tor Vergata (Italy); Bergamaschi, Antonio [Cattedra di Medicina del Lavoro, Universita Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Rome (Italy); Ghibelli, Lina [Dipartimento di Biologia, Universita di Roma Tor Vergata (Italy)

    2007-10-03

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are a focus of intense research for their potential applications in multiple diverse applications, including innovative biomedical applications. Due to their very recent discovery, little information is available about the biocompatibility and toxicity of this new class of nanoparticle, and a systematic study on biological interference is lacking. Thus, we decided to explore the toxicity of three different types of carbon nanotube, differing in preparation (arc discharge versus catalysed chemical vapour deposition); size (10-50 versus 100-150 nm wide x 1-10 {mu}m long); contaminants (amorphous C, graphite, fullerenes or iron) and morphological type (multi-walled, MW, or single-walled, SW) on human leukemic U937 cells. We found that these carbon nanotubes exert a strong effect on the proliferation of the reporter U937 monocytic cell. However, these CNTs did not significantly affect the cell viability. These results show that CNTs, though not directly exerting a direct cytotoxic effect, are nonetheless able to deeply alter cell behaviour, and thus we recommend thorough analyses to limit health risk due to uncontrolled exposure.

  19. The Toxicology of Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donaldson, Ken; Poland, Craig; Duffin, Rodger; Bonner, James

    2012-06-01

    1. Carbon nanotube structure, synthesis and applications C. Singh and W. Song; 2. The aerodynamic behaviour and pulmonary deposition of carbon nanotubes A. Buckley, R. Smith and R Maynard; 3. Utilising the concept of the biologically effective dose to define the particle and fibre hazards of carbon nanotubes K. Donaldson, R. Duffin, F. Murphy and C. Poland; 4. CNT, biopersistence and the fibre paradigm D. Warheit and M. DeLorme; 5. Length-dependent retention of fibres in the pleural space C. Poland, F. Murphy and K. Donaldson; 6. Experimental carcinogenicity of carbon nanotubes in the context of other fibres K. Unfried; 7. Fate and effects of carbon nanotubes following inhalation J. Ryman-Rasmussen, M. Andersen and J. Bonner; 8. Responses to pulmonary exposure to carbon nanotubes V. Castranova and R. Mercer; 9. Genotoxicity of carbon nanotubes R. Schins, C. Albrecht, K. Gerloff and D. van Berlo; 10. Carbon nanotube-cellular interactions; macrophages, epithelial and mesothelial cells V. Stone, M. Boyles, A. Kermanizadeh, J. Varet and H. Johnston; 11. Systemic health effects of carbon nanotubes following inhalation J. McDonald; 12. Dosimetry and metrology of carbon nanotubes L. Tran, L. MacCalman and R. Aitken; Index.

  20. Light Emission from Carbon Nanotube Field Effect Transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misewich, James

    2004-03-01

    Since their discovery in 1991, research in carbon nanotubes has grown rapidly. Part of this interest is driven by the remarkable electrical and mechanical properties demonstrated by carbon nanotubes which could have significant technological impact (1,2). Recent progress has included demonstrations of interesting opto-electronic properties of carbon nanotubes. In one experiment we have shown that single carbon nanotubes can be a source of infrared optical emission (3). We have also shown how a single carbon nanotube can be used as a photoconductive detector (4). In this talk, we will examine the opto-electronic properties of individual single wall carbon nanotubes. (1) M.S. Dresselhaus, G. Dresselhaus, and Ph. Avouris (eds.), "Carbon Nanotubes", Topics Appl. Phys. 80, (2001). (2) Ph. Avouris, Acct. Chem. Res. 35, 1026 (2002). (3) J.A. Misewich, R. Martel, Ph. Avouris, J. Tsang, S. Heinze, and J. Tersoff, Science 300, 783 (2003). (4) M. Freitag, Y. Martin, J.A. Misewich, R. Martel, and Ph. Avouris, Nanoletters 3, 1067 (2003).

  1. Toxicological effects of multi-wall carbon nanotubes in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Aihong; Sun Kangning, E-mail: Sunkangning@sdu.edu.cn; Yang, Jiafeng [Engineering Ceramics Key Laboratory of Shandong Province, Material Science and Engineering Institute, Shandong University, Key Laboratory of Liquid Structure and Heredity of Materials ministry of Education (China); Zhao Dongmei [The Second Hospital of Shandong University (China)

    2008-12-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the lung toxicity of multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). The present work exposed MWCNTs into the rats in intratracheal instillation administration modes. We systematically studied the distribution of nanoparticles in vivo, target organs and time-effects of nanotoxicity, dose-effects of nanotoxicity, etc. These results indicate that under the conditions of this test, pulmonary exposures to MWCNTs in rats by intratracheal instillation produced a series of multiple lesions in a dose-dependent and time-dependent manner, evidence of a foreign tissue body reaction.

  2. Carbon nanotube nanoelectrode arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Zhifeng; Lin, Yuehe; Yantasee, Wassana; Liu, Guodong; Lu, Fang; Tu, Yi

    2008-11-18

    The present invention relates to microelectode arrays (MEAs), and more particularly to carbon nanotube nanoelectrode arrays (CNT-NEAs) for chemical and biological sensing, and methods of use. A nanoelectrode array includes a carbon nanotube material comprising an array of substantially linear carbon nanotubes each having a proximal end and a distal end, the proximal end of the carbon nanotubes are attached to a catalyst substrate material so as to form the array with a pre-determined site density, wherein the carbon nanotubes are aligned with respect to one another within the array; an electrically insulating layer on the surface of the carbon nanotube material, whereby the distal end of the carbon nanotubes extend beyond the electrically insulating layer; a second adhesive electrically insulating layer on the surface of the electrically insulating layer, whereby the distal end of the carbon nanotubes extend beyond the second adhesive electrically insulating layer; and a metal wire attached to the catalyst substrate material.

  3. Carbon Nanotube Network Ambipolar Field-Effect Transistors with 108 On/Off Ratio

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Derenskyi, Vladimir; Gomulya, Widianta; Salazar Rios, Jorge Mario; Fritsch, Martin; Fröhlich, Nils; Jung, Stefan; Allard, Sybille; Bisri, Satria Zulkarnaen; Gordiichuk, Pavlo; Herrmann, Andreas; Scherf, Ullrich; Loi, Maria Antonietta

    2017-01-01

    Polymer wrapping is a highly effective method of selecting semiconducting carbon nanotubes and dispersing them in solution. Semi-aligned semiconducting carbon nanotube networks are obtained by blade coating, an effective and scalable process. The field-effect transistor (FET) performance can be

  4. Geometry of carbon nanotubes and mechanisms of phagocytosis and toxic effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harik, Vasyl Michael

    2017-05-05

    A review of in vivo and in vitro toxicological studies of the potential toxic effects of carbon nanotubes is presented along with the analysis of experimental data and a hypothesis about the nanotube-asbestos similarity. Developments of the structure-activity paradigm have been reviewed along with the size effects and the classification of carbon nanotubes into eleven distinct classes (e.g., the high aspect ratio nanotubes, thick multi-wall nanotubes and short nanotubes). Scaling analysis of similarities between different classes of carbon nanotubes and asbestos fibers in the context of their potential toxicity and the efficiency of phagocytosis has been reviewed. The potential toxic effects of carbon nanotubes have been characterized by their normalized length, their aspect ratio and other parameters related to their inhalability, engulfment by macrophages and the effectiveness of phagocytosis. Geometric scaling parameters and the classification of carbon nanotubes are used to develop an updated parametric map for the extrapolation of the potential toxic effects resulting from the inhalation of long and short carbon nanotubes. An updated parametric map has been applied to the evaluation of the efficiency of phagocytosis involving distinct classes of carbon nanotubes. A critical value of an important nondimensional parameter characterizing the efficiency of phagocytosis for different nanotubes is presented along with its macrophage-based normalization. The present evaluation of the potential toxicological effects of the high aspect ratio carbon nanotubes is found to be in the agreement with other available studies and earlier scaling analyses. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Modeling of external electric field effect on the carbon and silicon carbide nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sorokina, Veronika, E-mail: ansonika@mail.ru [Saint Petersburg State University, 7/9 Universitetskaya nab., St. Petersburg, 199034 (Russian Federation); Nikiforov, Konstantin, E-mail: knikiforov@cc.spbu.ru [Saint Petersburg Electrotechnical University “LETI”, 5 Prof. Popova, St. Petersburg, 197376 (Russian Federation)

    2016-06-17

    Studying emission characteristics of nanotubes is extremely important for development of electronics. Compared to other electron sources nanotube-based field emitters allow obtaining significant emission currents at relatively low values of the applied field. It is possible due to their unique structure. This article is devoted to theoretical investigation how external electric field effects several samples of open single-wall nanotubes from carbon and silicon carbide. Total energies, dipole moments and band gaps for five types of nanotubes were calculated from the first principles. The numerical experiment results indicate the adequacy of modeling. It was concluded that considered configurations of achiral carbon nanotubes should be semiconductors.

  6. Piezoelectric effect in non-uniform strained carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilina, M. V.; Blinov, Yu F.; Ilin, O. I.; Rudyk, N. N.; Ageev, O. A.

    2017-10-01

    The piezoelectric effect in non-uniform strained carbon nanotubes (CNTs) has been studied. It is shown that the magnitude of strained CNTs surface potential depends on a strain value. It is established that the resistance of CNT also depends on the strain and internal electric field, which leads to the hysteresis in the current-voltage characteristics. Analysis of experimental studies of the non-uniform strained CNT with a diameter of 92 nm and a height of 2.1 μm allowed us to estimate the piezoelectric coefficient 0.107 ± 0.032 C/m2.

  7. Carbon nanotube quantum dots

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sapmaz, S.

    2006-01-01

    Low temperature electron transport measurements on individual single wall carbon nanotubes are described in this thesis. Carbon nanotubes are small hollow cylinders made entirely out of carbon atoms. At low temperatures (below ~10 K) finite length nanotubes form quantum dots. Because of its small

  8. Carbon Nanotubes for Supercapacitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    As an electrical energy storage device, supercapacitor finds attractive applications in consumer electronic products and alternative power source due to its higher energy density, fast discharge/charge time, low level of heating, safety, long-term operation stability, and no disposable parts. This work reviews the recent development of supercapacitor based on carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and their composites. The purpose is to give a comprehensive understanding of the advantages and disadvantages of carbon nanotubes-related supercapacitor materials and to find ways for the improvement in the performance of supercapacitor. We first discussed the effects of physical and chemical properties of pure carbon nanotubes, including size, purity, defect, shape, functionalization, and annealing, on the supercapacitance. The composites, including CNTs/oxide and CNTs/polymer, were further discussed to enhance the supercapacitance and keep the stability of the supercapacitor by optimally engineering the composition, particle size, and coverage. PMID:20672061

  9. Carbon Nanotubes for Supercapacitor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Jianyi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract As an electrical energy storage device, supercapacitor finds attractive applications in consumer electronic products and alternative power source due to its higher energy density, fast discharge/charge time, low level of heating, safety, long-term operation stability, and no disposable parts. This work reviews the recent development of supercapacitor based on carbon nanotubes (CNTs and their composites. The purpose is to give a comprehensive understanding of the advantages and disadvantages of carbon nanotubes-related supercapacitor materials and to find ways for the improvement in the performance of supercapacitor. We first discussed the effects of physical and chemical properties of pure carbon nanotubes, including size, purity, defect, shape, functionalization, and annealing, on the supercapacitance. The composites, including CNTs/oxide and CNTs/polymer, were further discussed to enhance the supercapacitance and keep the stability of the supercapacitor by optimally engineering the composition, particle size, and coverage.

  10. Carbon nanotubes for supercapacitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Hui; Li, Jianyi; Feng, Yuanping

    2010-01-05

    As an electrical energy storage device, supercapacitor finds attractive applications in consumer electronic products and alternative power source due to its higher energy density, fast discharge/charge time, low level of heating, safety, long-term operation stability, and no disposable parts. This work reviews the recent development of supercapacitor based on carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and their composites. The purpose is to give a comprehensive understanding of the advantages and disadvantages of carbon nanotubes-related supercapacitor materials and to find ways for the improvement in the performance of supercapacitor. We first discussed the effects of physical and chemical properties of pure carbon nanotubes, including size, purity, defect, shape, functionalization, and annealing, on the supercapacitance. The composites, including CNTs/oxide and CNTs/polymer, were further discussed to enhance the supercapacitance and keep the stability of the supercapacitor by optimally engineering the composition, particle size, and coverage.

  11. Effects of Two Purification Pretreatments on Electroless Copper Coating over Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhong Zheng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available To achieve the reinforcement of copper matrix composite by single-walled carbon nanotubes, a three-step-refluxing purification of carbon nanotubes sample with HNO3-NaOH-HCl was proposed and demonstrated. A previously reported purification process using an electromagnetic stirring with H2O2/HCl mixture was also repeated. Then, the purified carbon nanotubes were coated with copper by the same electroless plating process. At the end, the effects of the method on carbon nanotubes themselves and on copper coating were determined by transmission electron microscope spectroscopy, scanning electron microscope spectroscopy, X-ray diffractometry, thermogravimetric analysis, Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy, and energy dispersive spectrometry. It was clearly confirmed that both of the two processes could remove most of iron catalyst particles and carbonaceous impurities without significant damage to carbon nanotubes. The thermal stability of the sample purified by H2O2/HCl treatment was slightly higher than that purified by HNO3-NaOH-HCl treatment. Nevertheless, the purification by HNO3-NaOH-HCl treatment was more effective for carboxyl functionalization on nanotubes than that by H2O2/HCl treatment. The Cu-coating on carbon nanotubes purified by both purification processes was complete, homogenous, and continuous. However, the Cu-coating on carbon nanotubes purified by H2O2/HCl was oxidized more seriously than those on carbon nanotubes purified by HNO3-NaOH-HCl treatment.

  12. Directed Assembly of Single Wall Carbon Nanotube Field Effect Transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penzo, Erika; Palma, Matteo; Chenet, Daniel A; Ao, Geyou; Zheng, Ming; Hone, James C; Wind, Shalom J

    2016-02-23

    The outstanding electronic properties of single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) have made them prime candidates for future nanoelectronics technologies. One of the main obstacles to the implementation of advanced SWCNT electronics to date is the inability to arrange them in a manner suitable for complex circuits. Directed assembly of SWCNT segments onto lithographically patterned and chemically functionalized substrates is a promising way to organize SWCNTs in topologies that are amenable to integration for advanced applications, but the placement and orientational control required have not yet been demonstrated. We have developed a technique for assembling length sorted and chirality monodisperse DNA-wrapped SWCNT segments on hydrophilic lines patterned on a passivated oxidized silicon substrate. Placement of individual SWCNT segments at predetermined locations was achieved with nanometer accuracy. Three terminal electronic devices, consisting of a single SWCNT segment placed either beneath or on top of metallic source/drain electrodes were fabricated. Devices made with semiconducting nanotubes behaved as typical p-type field effect transistors (FETs), whereas devices made with metallic nanotubes had a finite resistance with little or no gate modulation. This scalable, high resolution approach represents an important step forward toward the potential implementation of complex SWCNT devices and circuits.

  13. Potential of carbon nanotube field effect transistors for analogue circuits

    KAUST Repository

    Hayat, Khizar

    2013-05-11

    This Letter presents a detailed comparison of carbon nanotube field effect transistors (CNFETs) and metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistors (MOSFETs) with special focus on carbon nanotube FET\\'s potential for implementing analogue circuits in the mm-wave and sub-terahertz range. The latest CNFET lithographic dimensions place it at-par with complementary metal oxide semiconductor in terms of current handling capability, whereas the forecasted improvement in the lithography enables the CNFETs to handle more than twice the current of MOSFETs. The comparison of RF parameters shows superior performance of CNFETs with a g m , f T and f max of 2.7, 2.6 and 4.5 times higher, respectively. MOSFET- and CNFET-based inverter, three-stage ring oscillator and LC oscillator have been designed and compared as well. The CNFET-based inverters are found to be ten times faster, the ring oscillator demonstrates three times higher oscillation frequency and CNFET-based LC oscillator also shows improved performance than its MOSFET counterpart.

  14. Effect of multiwalled carbon nanotube loading on the properties of Nafion(R) membranes

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Cele, NP

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The dispersion of carbon nanotubes is one of the problems in the application of polymer nanocomposites. In this study, the effect of chemical functionalization of the carbon nanotube surface on the dispersion of the tubes within a polymer...

  15. Effect of Carbon Nanotube Size on Compressive Strengths of Nanotube Reinforced Cementitious Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanvir Manzur

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Application of nanoscale science to construction material has already begun. In recent times, various nanofibers have raised the interest of researchers due to their exceptional mechanical properties and high potential to be used as reinforcement within cement matrix. Carbon nanotube (CNT is one of the most important areas of research in the field of nanotechnology. The size and exceptional mechanical properties of CNT show their high potential to be used to produce high performance next generation cementitious composites. In this study, an attempt has been made to investigate the effect of size of CNTs on compressive strengths of CNT reinforced cement composites. Seven different sizes of multiwalled nanotubes (MWNTs were used to produce MWNT-cement composites. A trend was observed regarding the effect of nanotube size on compressive strength of composites in most cases. MWNT with outside diameter (OD of 20 nm or less exhibited relatively better performance. Smaller MWNT can be distributed at much finer scale and consequently filling the nanopore space within the cement matrix more efficiently. This in turn resulted in stronger composites.

  16. Comparison of Mechanical Properties and Effects in Micro- and Nanocomposites with Carbon Fillers (Carbon Microfibers, Graphite Microwhiskers, and Carbon Nanotubes)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guz', I. A.; Rushchitskii, Ya. Ya.

    2004-05-01

    The mechanical properties and effects in fibrous composite materials are compared. The materials are based on the same matrix (EPON-828 epoxy resin) and differ in the type of fibers: Thornel-300 carbon microfibers, graphite microwhiskers, carbon zigzag nanotubes, and carbon chiral nanotubes. Two material models are considered: a model of elastic medium (macrolevel model) and a model of elastic mixture (micro-nanolevel model). Mechanical constants of 40 materials (4 types + 10 modifications) are calculated and compared. The theoretical ultimate compression strength along the fibers is discussed. The effects accompanying the propagation of longitudinal waves in the fiber direction are investigated.

  17. Synergistic Effect of Carbon Nanotubes and Graphene on Diopside Scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tingting; Wu, Ping; Gao, Chengde; Feng, Pei; Xiao, Tao; Deng, Youwen; Shuai, Cijun; Peng, Shuping

    2016-01-01

    A synergetic effect between carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and graphene on diopside (Di) scaffolds was demonstrated. 3D network architecture in the matrix was formed through the 1D CNTs inlaid among the 2D graphene platelets (GNPs). The mechanical properties of the CNTs/GNPs/Di scaffolds were significantly improved compared with the CNTs/Di scaffolds and GNPs/Di scaffolds. In addition, the scaffolds exhibited excellent apatite-forming ability, a modest degradation rate, and stable mechanical properties in simulated body fluid (SBF). Moreover, cell culturing tests indicated that the scaffolds supported the cells attachment and proliferation. Taken together, the CNTs/GNPs/Di scaffolds offered great potential for bone tissue engineering.

  18. Enthalpy and entropy effects in hydrogen adsorption on carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efremenko, Irena; Sheintuch, Moshe

    2005-07-05

    Interaction energies and entropies associated with hydrogen adsorption on the inner and outer surfaces of zigzag single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) of various diameters are analyzed by means of molecular mechanics, density functional theory, and ab initio calculations. For a single molecule the strongest interaction, which is 3.5 greater than that with the planar graphite sheet, is found inside a (8,0) nanotube. Adsorption on the outer surfaces is weaker than that on graphite. Due to the steric considerations, both processes are accompanied by an extremely strong decline in entropy. Absence of specific adsorption sites and weak attractive interaction between hydrogen molecules within carbon nanotubes results in their close packing at low temperatures. Using the calculated geometric and thermodynamic parameters in Langmuir isotherms we predict the adsorption capacity of SWCNTs at room temperature to be smaller than 1 wt % even at 100 bar.

  19. Carbon nanotubes decorating methods

    OpenAIRE

    A.D. Dobrzańska-Danikiewicz; Łukowiec, D.; D. Cichock; W. Wolany

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The work is to present and characterise various methods of depositing carbon nanotubes with nanoparticles of precious metals, and also to present the results of own works concerning carbon nanotubes coated with platinum nanoparticles.Design/methodology/approach: Electron transmission and scanning microscopy has been used for imaging the structure and morphology of the nanocomposites obtained and the distribution of nanoparticles on the surface of carbon nanotubes.Findings: The studie...

  20. Carbon Nanotubes and Modern Nanoagriculture

    KAUST Repository

    Serag, Maged F.

    2015-01-27

    Since their discovery, carbon nanotubes have been prominent members of the nanomaterial family. Owing to their extraordinary physical, chemical, and mechanical properties, carbon nanotubes have been proven to be a useful tool in the field of plant science. They were frequently perceived to bring about valuable biotechnological and agricultural applications that still remain beyond experimental realization. An increasing number of studies have demonstrated the ability of carbon nanotubes to traverse different plant cell barriers. These studies, also, assessed the toxicity and environmental impacts of these nanomaterials. The knowledge provided by these studies is of practical and fundamental importance for diverse applications including intracellular labeling and imaging, genetic transformation, and for enhancing our knowledge of plant cell biology. Although different types of nanoparticles have been found to activate physiological processes in plants, carbon nanotubes received particular interest. Following addition to germination medium, carbon nanotubes enhanced root growth and elongation of some plants such as onion, cucumber and rye-grass. They, also, modulated the expression of some genes that are essential for cell division and plant development. In addition, multi-walled carbon nanotubes were evidenced to penetrate thick seed coats, stimulate germination, and to enhance growth of young tomato seedlings. Multi-walled carbon nanotubes can penetrate deeply into the root system and further distribute into the leaves and the fruits. In recent studies, carbon nanotubes were reported to be chemically entrapped into the structure of plant tracheary elements. This should activate studies in the fields of plant defense and wood engineering. Although, all of these effects on plant physiology and plant developmental biology have not been fully understood, the valuable findings promises more research activity in the near future toward complete scientific understanding of

  1. Mechanisms of Radiation Induced Effects in Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    understanding the fundamental radiation response of nanocarbon materials (CNTs and graphene ) and the nanoscale electronic devices comprising them. The...earmarked to replace conventional semiconductor devices in the near future. At the onset of the current program, carbon nanotube technology was...research agenda was highly impactful on understanding the fundamental radiation response of nanocarbon materials (CNTs and graphene ) and the nanoscale

  2. Electrical conductivity of metal–carbon nanotube structures: Effect of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    studied using density functional theory and non-equilibrium Green's function method with Atomistix tool kit. The models with asymmetric metal ... Density functional theory; non-equilibrium green function; carbon nanotube; silicon; conduc- tance. 1. Introduction ..... devices and novel solar cells. However, there is a further.

  3. Ambient effects on the electrical conductivity of carbon nanotubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roch, Aljoscha; Greifzu, Moritz; Roch Talens, Esther

    2015-01-01

    We show that the electrical conductivity of single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) networks is affected by oxygen and air humidity under ambient conditions by more than a magnitude. Later, we intentionally modified the electrical conductivity by functionalization with iodine and investigated...

  4. Emerging Carbon Nanotube Electronic Circuits, Modeling, and Performance

    OpenAIRE

    Yao Xu; Ashok Srivastava; Sharma, Ashwani K.

    2010-01-01

    Current transport and dynamic models of carbon nanotube field-effect transistors are presented. A model of single-walled carbon nanotube as interconnect is also presented and extended in modeling of single-walled carbon nanotube bundles. These models are applied in studying the performances of circuits such as the complementary carbon nanotube inverter pair and carbon nanotube as interconnect. Cadence/Spectre simulations show that carbon nanotube field-effect transistor circuits can operate a...

  5. Carbon fiber/carbon nanotube reinforced hierarchical composites: Effect of CNT distribution on shearing strength

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, H. W.; Mishnaevsky, Leon; Yi, H. Y.

    2016-01-01

    The strength and fracture behavior of carbon fiber reinforced polymer composites with carbon nanotube (CNT) secondary reinforcement are investigated experimentally and numerically. Short Beam Shearing tests have been carried out, with SEM observations of the damage evolution in the composites. 3D...... multiscale computational (FE) models of the carbon/polymer composite with varied CNT distributions have been developed and employed to study the effect of the secondary CNT reinforcement, its distribution and content on the strength and fracture behavior of the composites. It is shown that adding secondary...

  6. Synergistic effect of plasma-modified halloysite nanotubes and carbon black in natural rubber-butadiene rubber blend

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poikelispaa, Minna; Das, Amit; Dierkes, Wilma K.; Vuorinen, Jyrki

    2013-01-01

    Halloysite nanotubes (HNTs) were investigated concerning their suitability for rubber reinforcement. As they have geometrical similarity with carbon nanotubes, they were expected to impart a significant reinforcement effect on the rubber compounds but the dispersion of the nanofillers is difficult.

  7. Effects of carbon nanotube functionalization for active layer incorporation in organic bulk heterojunction solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adikaari, A.A.D.T.; Nismy, N.A.; Henley, S.J.; Shkunov, M.; Silva, S.R.P. [Surrey Univ., Guildford (United Kingdom). Nanoelectronics Centre

    2010-07-01

    We report the effects of carbon nanotube (CNT) functionalisation for active layer incorporation in polythiophene/fullerene derivative bulk heterojunction solar cells. Design of organic photovoltaic devices is limited by the low exciton diffusion lengths of organic photoactive materials and carbon nanotubes are investigated here for possible enhancement of charge dissociation/transport within the active layer. For reasonable distribution of carbon nanotubes in the active layer, they need to be well dispersed in aromatic solvents such as 1, 2 dicholorobenzene, which yield best results for polythiophene/fullerene derivative bulk heterojunction solar cells. However, pristine nanotubes are difficult to be dispersed in aromatic solvents, therefore functionalisation is utilised to achieve better dispersions. Acid functionalised multiwall carbon nanotubes in active layers of bulk heterojunction systems perform better compared to pristine nanotubes. However, the devices show decreased shunt resistances and lower the open circuit voltages compared to reference devices, manly due to the active layer thicknesses of a few multiples of the diameter of individual nanotubes. Acid functionalised multiwall carbon nanotubes yield best efficiencies reported so far for such systems at 2.3% compared to pristine multiwall carbon nanotube incorporated devices (1.3%). Further, Octadecylamine functionalised single walled carbon nanotubes result in excellent stable dispersions resulting in 1.8% efficient polythiophene/fullerene derivative devices. With good dispersions, optimisation of the physical properties such as length and diameter paves the way for possible harnessing of excellent charge transport properties of CNTs in organic photovoltaic systems and breaking the current limitations associated with exciton diffusion lengths and low charge mobility of organic materials. (orig.)

  8. Electronic structures and three-dimensional effects of boron-doped carbon nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Koretsune and Susumu Saito

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available We study boron-doped carbon nanotubes by first-principles methods based on the density functional theory. To discuss the possibility of superconductivity, we calculate the electronic band structure and the density of states (DOS of boron-doped (10,0 nanotubes by changing the boron density. It is found that the Fermi level density of states D(epsilonF increases upon lowering the boron density. This can be understood in terms of the rigid band picture where the one-dimensional van Hove singularity lies at the edge of the valence band in the DOS of the pristine nanotube. The effect of three-dimensionality is also considered by performing the calculations for bundled (10,0 nanotubes and boron-doped double-walled carbon nanotubes (10,0@(19,0. From the calculation of the bundled nanotubes, it is found that interwall dispersion is sufficiently large to broaden the peaks of the van Hove singularity in the DOS. Thus, to achieve the high D(epsilonF using the bundle of nanotubes with single chirality, we should take into account the distance from each nanotube. In the case of double-walled carbon nanotubes, we find that the holes introduced to the inner tube by boron doping spread also on the outer tube, while the band structure of each tube remains almost unchanged.

  9. Effective permittivity of single-walled carbon nanotube composites: Two-fluid model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moradi, Afshin, E-mail: a.moradi@kut.ac.ir [Department of Engineering Physics, Kermanshah University of Technology, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Nano Sciences, Institute for Studies in Theoretical Physics and Mathematics (IPM), Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Zangeneh, Hamid Reza; Moghadam, Firoozeh Karimi [Department of Photonics, Faculty of Physics, University of Kashan, Kashan (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    We develop an effective medium theory to obtain effective permittivity of a composite of two-dimensional (2D) aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes. Electronic excitations on each nanotube surface are modeled by an infinitesimally thin layer of a 2D electron gas represented by two interacting fluids, which takes into account different nature of the σ and π electrons. Calculations of both real and imaginary parts of the effective dielectric function of the system are presented, for different values of the filling factor and radius of carbon nanotubes.

  10. Carbon nanotubes cement composites

    OpenAIRE

    Simone Musso; Jean-Marc Tulliani; Giuseppe Ferro

    2011-01-01

    The present paper reviews the current state of the art of carbon nanotubes cement-based composites and the possible applications. The influence of carbon nanotubes additions onto cement paste mechanical and electrical properties are discussed in detail. Though promising, several challenges have still to be solved before the introduction of these new materials into the public sphere through civil infrastructures.

  11. Effect of Catalytic Layer Thickness on Diameter of Vertically Aligned Individual Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyun Kyung Jung

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of catalytic thin film thickness on the diameter control of individual carbon nanotubes grown by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition was investigated. Individual carbon nanotubes were grown on catalytic nanodot arrays, which were fabricated by e-beam lithography and e-beam evaporation. During e-beam evaporation of the nanodot pattern, more catalytic metal was deposited at the edge of the nanodots than the desired catalyst thickness. Because of this phenomenon, carbon atoms diffused faster near the center of the dots than at the edge of the dots. The carbon atoms, which were gathered at the interface between the catalytic nanodot and the diffusion barrier, accumulated near the center of the dot and lifted the catalyst off. From the experiments, an individual carbon nanotube with the same diameter as that of the catalytic nanodot was obtained from a 5 nm thick catalytic nanodot; however, an individual carbon nanotube with a smaller diameter (~40% reduction was obtained from a 50 nm thick nanodot. We found that the thicker the catalytic layer, the greater the reduction in diameter of the carbon nanotubes. The diameter-controlled carbon nanotubes could have applications in bio- and nanomaterial scanning and as a contrast medium for magnetic resonance imaging.

  12. Purification of carbon nanotubes via selective heating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogers, John A.; Wilson, William L.; Jin, Sung Hun; Dunham, Simon N.; Xie, Xu; Islam, Ahmad; Du, Frank; Huang, Yonggang; Song, Jizhou

    2017-11-21

    The present invention provides methods for purifying a layer of carbon nanotubes comprising providing a precursor layer of substantially aligned carbon nanotubes supported by a substrate, wherein the precursor layer comprises a mixture of first carbon nanotubes and second carbon nanotubes; selectively heating the first carbon nanotubes; and separating the first carbon nanotubes from the second carbon nanotubes, thereby generating a purified layer of carbon nanotubes. Devices benefiting from enhanced electrical properties enabled by the purified layer of carbon nanotubes are also described.

  13. Effect of uniaxial strain on the current of (6,6 finite armchair carbon nanotube

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SE Faizabadi

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available   In this paper, the uniaxial strain effect on the electronic properties of (6,6 finite armchair carbon nanotube was investigated by using the Green function technique and Landure-Buttiker formula. It was found that, in (6,6 finite carbon nanotube with 3q and 3q+1 length, where q is a certain integer, the current was induced by the application of a suitable tensile strain and compressive strain in low voltage, respectively. The current of (6,6 finite carbon nanotube with 3q-1 length was decreased by loading the uniaxial strain. According to the results semiconductor-metal transition in (6,6 finite carbon nanotube and vice versa is observed by applying uniaxial strain.

  14. Effect of Fiber Length on Carbon Nanotube-Induced Fibrogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amruta Manke

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Given their extremely small size and light weight, carbon nanotubes (CNTs can be readily inhaled by human lungs resulting in increased rates of pulmonary disorders, particularly fibrosis. Although the fibrogenic potential of CNTs is well established, there is a lack of consensus regarding the contribution of physicochemical attributes of CNTs on the underlying fibrotic outcome. We designed an experimentally validated in vitro fibroblast culture model aimed at investigating the effect of fiber length on single-walled CNT (SWCNT-induced pulmonary fibrosis. The fibrogenic response to short and long SWCNTs was assessed via oxidative stress generation, collagen expression and transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β production as potential fibrosis biomarkers. Long SWCNTs were significantly more potent than short SWCNTs in terms of reactive oxygen species (ROS response, collagen production and TGF-β release. Furthermore, our finding on the length-dependent in vitro fibrogenic response was validated by the in vivo lung fibrosis outcome, thus supporting the predictive value of the in vitro model. Our results also demonstrated the key role of ROS in SWCNT-induced collagen expression and TGF-β activation, indicating the potential mechanisms of length-dependent SWCNT-induced fibrosis. Together, our study provides new evidence for the role of fiber length in SWCNT-induced lung fibrosis and offers a rapid cell-based assay for fibrogenicity testing of nanomaterials with the ability to predict pulmonary fibrogenic response in vivo.

  15. Carbon nanotube conditioning: ab initio simulations of the effect of defects and doping on the electronic properties of carbon nanotube systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto, Matias; Barrera, Enrique

    Using carbon nanotubes for electrical conduction applications at the macroscale has proven to be a difficult task, mainly, due to defects and impurities present, and lack of uniform electronic properties in synthesized carbon nanotube bundles. Some researchers have suggested that growing only metallic armchair nanotubes and arranging them with an ideal contact length could lead to the ultimate electrical conductivity; however, such recipe presents too high of a cost to pay. A different route and the topic of this work is to learn to manage the defects, impurities, and the electronic properties of carbon nanotubes present, so that the electrical conduction of a bundle or even wire may be enhanced. We used density functional theory calculations to study the effect of defects and doping on the electronic structure of metallic, semi-metal and semiconducting carbon nanotubes in order to gain a clear picture of their properties. Additionally, using dopants to increase the conductance across a junction between two carbon nanotubes was studied for different configurations. Finally, interaction potentials obtained via first-principles calculations were generalized by developing mathematical models for the purpose of running simulations at a larger length scale using molecular dynamics. Partial funding was received from CONACyT Scholarship 314419.

  16. Functionalization of single-walled carbon nanotubes regulates their effect on hemostasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sokolov, A V; Aseychev, A V; Kostevich, V A; Gusev, A A; Gusev, S A; Vlasova, I I, E-mail: irina.vlasova@yahoo.com [Research Institute for Physico-Chemical Medicine, FMBA, M. Pirogovskaya Str. 1a, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2011-04-01

    Applications of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) in medical field imply the use of drug-coupled carbon nanotubes as well as carbon nanotubes functionalized with different chemical groups that change nanotube surface properties and interactions between nanotubes and cells. Covalent attachment of polyethylene glycol (PEG) to carboxylated single-walled carbon nanotubes (c-SWNT) is known to prevent the nanotubes from interaction with macrophages. Here we characterized nanotube's ability to stimulate coagulation processes in platelet-poor plasma (PPP), and evaluated the effect of SWNTs on platelet aggregation in platelet-rich plasma (PRP). Our study showed that PEG-SWNT did not affect the rate of clotting in PPP, while c-SWNT shortened the clot formation time five times compared to the control PPP. Since c-SWNT failed to accelerate coagulation in plasma lacking coagulation factor XI, it may be suggested that c-SWNT affects the contact activation pathway. In PRP, platelets responded to both SWNT types with irreversible aggregation, as evidenced by changes in the aggregate mean radius. However, the rate of aggregation induced by c-SWNT was two times higher than it was with PEG-SWNT. Cytological analysis also showed that c-SWNT was two times more efficient when compared to PEG-SWNT in aggregating platelets in PRP. Taken together, our results show that functionalization of nanoparticles can diminish their negative influence on blood cells. As seen from our data, modification of c-SWNT with PEG, when only a one percent of carbon atoms is bound to polymer (70 wt %), decreased the nanotube-induced coagulation in PRP and repelled the accelerating effect on the coagulation in PPP. Thus, when functionalized SWNTs are used for administration into bloodstream of laboratory animals, their possible pro-coagulant and pro-aggregating properties must be taken into account.

  17. Functionalization of single-walled carbon nanotubes regulates their effect on hemostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolov, A. V.; Aseychev, A. V.; Kostevich, V. A.; Gusev, A. A.; Gusev, S. A.; Vlasova, I. I.

    2011-04-01

    Applications of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) in medical field imply the use of drug-coupled carbon nanotubes as well as carbon nanotubes functionalized with different chemical groups that change nanotube surface properties and interactions between nanotubes and cells. Covalent attachment of polyethylene glycol (PEG) to carboxylated single-walled carbon nanotubes (c-SWNT) is known to prevent the nanotubes from interaction with macrophages. Here we characterized nanotube's ability to stimulate coagulation processes in platelet-poor plasma (PPP), and evaluated the effect of SWNTs on platelet aggregation in platelet-rich plasma (PRP). Our study showed that PEG-SWNT did not affect the rate of clotting in PPP, while c-SWNT shortened the clot formation time five times compared to the control PPP. Since c-SWNT failed to accelerate coagulation in plasma lacking coagulation factor XI, it may be suggested that c-SWNT affects the contact activation pathway. In PRP, platelets responded to both SWNT types with irreversible aggregation, as evidenced by changes in the aggregate mean radius. However, the rate of aggregation induced by c-SWNT was two times higher than it was with PEG-SWNT. Cytological analysis also showed that c-SWNT was two times more efficient when compared to PEG-SWNT in aggregating platelets in PRP. Taken together, our results show that functionalization of nanoparticles can diminish their negative influence on blood cells. As seen from our data, modification of c-SWNT with PEG, when only a one percent of carbon atoms is bound to polymer (70 wt %), decreased the nanotube-induced coagulation in PRP and repelled the accelerating effect on the coagulation in PPP. Thus, when functionalized SWNTs are used for administration into bloodstream of laboratory animals, their possible pro-coagulant and pro-aggregating properties must be taken into account.

  18. Carbon nanotube macroelectronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jialu

    In this dissertation, I discuss the application of carbon nanotubes in macroelectronis. Due to the extraordinary electrical properties such as high intrinsic carrier mobility and current-carrying capacity, single wall carbon nanotubes are very desirable for thin-film transistor (TFT) applications such as flat panel display, transparent electronics, as well as flexible and stretchable electronics. Compared with other popular channel material for TFTs, namely amorphous silicon, polycrystalline silicon and organic materials, nanotube thin-films have the advantages of low-temperature processing compatibility, transparency, and flexibility, as well as high device performance. In order to demonstrate scalable, practical carbon nanotube macroelectroncis, I have developed a platform to fabricate high-density, uniform separated nanotube based thin-film transistors. In addition, many other essential analysis as well as technology components, such as nanotube film density control, purity and diameter dependent semiconducting nanotube electrical performance study, air-stable n-type transistor fabrication, and CMOS integration platform have also been demonstrated. On the basis of the above achievement, I have further demonstrated various kinds of applications including AMOLED display electronics, PMOS and CMOS logic circuits, flexible and transparent electronics. The dissertation is structured as follows. First, chapter 1 gives a brief introduction to the electronic properties of carbon nanotubes, which serves as the background knowledge for the following chapters. In chapter 2, I will present our approach of fabricating wafer-scale uniform semiconducting carbon nanotube thin-film transistors and demonstrate their application in display electronics and logic circuits. Following that, more detailed information about carbon nanotube thin-film transistor based active matrix organic light-emitting diode (AMOLED) displays is discussed in chapter 3. And in chapter 4, a technology to

  19. Electric field effect in the growth of carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plaza, E., E-mail: ericvpp@gmail.com; Briceño-Fuenmayor, H. [Instituto Venezolano de Investigaciones Científicas (IVIC), Laboratorio de Física de Fluidos y Plasma (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of); Arévalo, J. [Instituto Zuliano de Investigaciones Tecnológicas (INZIT), Unidad de Caracterización y Estructura de Materiales (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of); Atencio, R. [Instituto Venezolano de Investigaciones Científicas (IVIC), Centro de Investigación y Tecnología de Materiales (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of); Corredor, L. [Instituto Zuliano de Investigaciones Tecnológicas (INZIT), Unidad de Caracterización y Estructura de Materiales (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    The growth of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) under a controlled electric field in a chemical vapor deposition system is investigated. We evaluate the influence of this external field on the morphological and structural characteristics of CNTs. Scanning electron microscopy results display a large presence of carbonaceous material in the positive plate, which appear to be a consequence of the attraction of electric forces over the electronically unbalanced cracked carbon molecules in the heating zone. We also observe a growth behavior for CNTs, in which catalyst particles are localized either at the bottom or the upper part of the nanotube, depending on the intensity and direction of the electric field. A Raman analysis from all obtained carbon materials shows the presence of two peaks, corresponding to the D ∼ 1340 cm{sup −1} and G ∼ 1590 cm{sup −1} bands attributed to multiwall CNTs. The average diameter of the CNTs is in the range between 90 and 40 nm. These results provide experimental evidence for the dependence of the catalyst and subtract interaction on the growing mechanism, in which weak chemical or electronic interactions could stimulate a top-growing as the strongest base-growing process.

  20. Nano-engineered composites: interlayer carbon nanotubes effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carley, Glaucio, E-mail: carleyone@hotmail.com [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Geraldo, Viviany; Oliveira, Sergio de [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Dept. de Fisica; Avila, Antonio Ferreira [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Dept. de Fisica

    2013-11-01

    The concept of carbon nanotube interlayer was successfully introduced to carbon fiber/epoxy composites. This new hybrid laminated composites was characterized by Raman spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and tensile tests. An increase on peak stress close to 85% was witnessed when CNTs interlayer with 206.30 mg was placed to carbon fiber/epoxy laminates. The failure mechanisms are associated to CNTs distribution between and around carbon fibers. These CNTs are also responsible for crack bridging formation and the increase on peak stress. Initial stiffness is strongly affected by the CNT interlayer, however, changes on stiffness is associated to changes on nano/micro-structure due to damage. Three different behaviors can be described, i.e. for interlayers with Almost-Equal-To 60 mg of CNT the failure mode is based on cracks between and around carbon fibers, while for interlayers with CNT contents between 136 mg and 185 mg cracks were spotted on fibers and inside the CNT/matrix mix. Finally, the third failure mechanism is based on carbon fiber breakage, as a strong interface between CNT/matrix mix and carbon fibers is observed. (author)

  1. Transport in Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, S.; Xue, Yong-Qinag; Anantram, M. P.; Saini, Subhash (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    This presentation discusses coupling between carbon nanotubes (CNT), simple metals (FEG) and a graphene sheet. The graphene sheet did not couple well with FEG, but the combination of a graphene strip and CNT did couple well with most simple metals.

  2. Carbon nanotubes for supercapacitor

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pan, Hui; Li, Jianyi; Feng, Yuanping

    2010-01-01

    .... The purpose is to give a comprehensive understanding of the advantages and disadvantages of carbon nanotubes-related supercapacitor materials and to find ways for the improvement in the performance of supercapacitor...

  3. Carbon nanotube biosensors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tîlmaciu, Carmen-Mihaela; Morris, May C

    2015-01-01

    .... In particular, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) can serve as scaffolds for immobilization of biomolecules at their surface, and combine several exceptional physical, chemical, electrical, and optical characteristics properties which make them one...

  4. Theoretical properties of carbon nanotubes

    CERN Document Server

    Palser, A H

    2000-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes are invariably terminated with hemi-fullerene caps. In order to investigate the effect of these caps on the electronic structure, a method is developed to enumerate every hemi-fullerene cap which is commensurate with a given nanotube body. This algorithm is then applied to nanotubes for which I + m <= 25. The results of this algorithm are then used to study the effects of caps with different symmetries on the electronic structure of metallic and semi-conducting nanotubes within the Hueckel model. It is found that caps can cause localised and resonance states, although the likelihood of localised states occurring in capped metallic nanotubes is shown to be small. In addition, caps induce a non-uniform charge distribution, in which negative charge tends to accumulate on pentagon vertices. The thesis ends by describing two new density matrix methods for performing linear-scaling electronic-structure calculations within the independent electron approximation. Example calculations demonstrate t...

  5. Morphing Carbon Nanotube Microstructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-02-20

    muscle inspired by spider dragline silk. Nat. Commun. 5, 3322 (2014). 13. Hart, A. J. & Slocum , A. H. Rapid Growth and Flow-Mediated Nucleation of...Phys. Lett. 87, 123110 (2005). 15. A. J. Hart, A. H. Slocum . Rapid growth and flow-mediated nucleation of millimeter-scale aligned carbon nanotube... Slocum , B. L. Wardle. High-yield growth and morphology control of aligned carbon nanotubes on ceramic fibers for multifunctional enhancement of

  6. Carbon Nanotubes in Neuroscience

    OpenAIRE

    Malarkey, Erik B.; Parpura, Vladimir

    2010-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes have electrical, mechanical and chemical properties that make them one of the most promising materials for applications in neuroscience. Single-walled and multi-walled carbon nanotubes have been increasingly used as scaffolds for neuronal growth and more recently for neural stem cell growth and differentiation. They are also used in interfaces with neurons, where they can detect neuronal electrical activity and also deliver electrical stimulation to these cells. The emerging ...

  7. Distinguishing Field Effects from Charge Effects in the Optoelectronic Properties of Carbon Nanotube Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Joshua Kennedy

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We have used charge-induced absorption to quantify the influence of injected charges on electroabsorption measurements in single-wall carbon nanotube films. The interpretations of experimental measurements of χ3 processes in nanotubes are simplified by taking into account the change in electron-electron interactions upon charge injection. Electroabsorption spectra that are properly corrected for charge-induced effects show remarkable agreement with a simple Stark shift of the exciton transitions with no notable second-derivative contributions. Thus, distinguishing electric field effects from carrier density effects allows for a more rigorous calculation of exciton polarizability from electroabsorption measurements, even in heterogeneous films. PACS: 78.67.Ch Nanotubes: optical properties of low-dimensional, mesoscopic, and nanoscale materials and structures.

  8. Effects of Atomic-Scale Structure on the Fracture Properties of Amorphous Carbon - Carbon Nanotube Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Benjamin D.; Wise, Kristopher E.; Odegard, Gregory M.

    2015-01-01

    The fracture of carbon materials is a complex process, the understanding of which is critical to the development of next generation high performance materials. While quantum mechanical (QM) calculations are the most accurate way to model fracture, the fracture behavior of many carbon-based composite engineering materials, such as carbon nanotube (CNT) composites, is a multi-scale process that occurs on time and length scales beyond the practical limitations of QM methods. The Reax Force Field (ReaxFF) is capable of predicting mechanical properties involving strong deformation, bond breaking and bond formation in the classical molecular dynamics framework. This has been achieved by adding to the potential energy function a bond-order term that varies continuously with distance. The use of an empirical bond order potential, such as ReaxFF, enables the simulation of failure in molecular systems that are several orders of magnitude larger than would be possible in QM techniques. In this work, the fracture behavior of an amorphous carbon (AC) matrix reinforced with CNTs was modeled using molecular dynamics with the ReaxFF reactive forcefield. Care was taken to select the appropriate simulation parameters, which can be different from those required when using traditional fixed-bond force fields. The effect of CNT arrangement was investigated with three systems: a single-wall nanotube (SWNT) array, a multi-wall nanotube (MWNT) array, and a SWNT bundle system. For each arrangement, covalent bonds are added between the CNTs and AC, with crosslink fractions ranging from 0-25% of the interfacial CNT atoms. The SWNT and MWNT array systems represent ideal cases with evenly spaced CNTs; the SWNT bundle system represents a more realistic case because, in practice, van der Waals interactions lead to the agglomeration of CNTs into bundles. The simulation results will serve as guidance in setting experimental processing conditions to optimize the mechanical properties of CNT

  9. Carbon nanotube synthesis via the catalytic CVD method: a review on the effect of reaction parameters

    OpenAIRE

    Öncel, Çınar; Oncel, Cinar; Yürüm, Yuda; Yurum, Yuda

    2006-01-01

    This review covers the results obtained in carbon nanotube synthesis by chemical vapor deposition. Parameters such as catalysts, supports, carbon precursors, reaction time, temperature and gas flow rates that are used in the production of carbon nanotubes are discussed throughout the text. Purification of the synthesized carbon nanotubes and methods utilized for cost reduction were also explored.

  10. Interaction between Carbon Nanotubes and Aromatic Hydrocarbon-degrading Microbes and its Effect on Carbon Nanotubes Transformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Y.; Wang, L.; Poulson, S.; Wang, X.; Xing, B.; Yang, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Due to their unique electrical, optical and mechanical properties, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been substantially produced and widely applied during the past decades, leading to their increased probability of entering the environment. Some estimation suggests that CNTs are accumulated in agricultural systems with their soil concentration increasing by 0.4-157 ng/kg/year. This has raised concerns about environmental impacts of these emerging contaminants including their ecotoxicity. Meanwhile, transformation of CNTs in the environment can significantly affect their transport, bioavailability and thereby ecotoxicity. So far, environmental biodegradation of CNTs remains obscure. Given the high diversity of soil microorganisms and their metabolic potentials, it is important to investigate microbial biodegradation of CNTs under various environmental conditions. This study focuses on an aromatic hydrocarbon-degrading bacterium, Mycobacterium vanbaalenii PYR-1, as a model microorganism capable of ring cleavage. We hypothesize that bacterial activities could transform CNTs to more hydrophilic forms, increasing their aqueous stability and environmental reactivity. We incubated M. vanbaalenii PYR-1 with 13C-labeded multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) for 30 days, monitored δ13C in the system, characterized MWCNTs before and after the reaction, and compared the results with culture-negative controls. To investigate effects of various environmental conditions, including the presence of extracellular oxidative enzymes from white-rot fungi, additional experiments will be conducted and results compared will be compared among different setups. Moreover, we will measure adverse impacts of CNTs on the metabolic activities of M. vanbaalenii PYR-1, particularly its biodegradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

  11. Effect of agglomeration of carbon nanotubes on gas permeability of PVTMS/CNT mixed matrix membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grekhov, A. M.; Eremin, Yu S.; Bakhtin, D.; Volkov, V. V.

    2016-09-01

    Mixed matrix membranes (MMMs) with unique transport characteristics can be prepared by the addition of the minor amounts of carbon nanotubes. Qualitative (critical, effective, marked) changes in the membrane performance are shown to be provided by the formation of a percolation cluster composed of nanotubes. For MMMs based on poly(trimethylvinylsilane) (PVTMS) containing carbon nanotubes (CNT), due to the formation of the CNT percolation cluster, gas permeability increases by a factor of 5-15. When the CNT content in the MMMs is higher than the percolation threshold, gas permeability remains on the same level or even decreases. Numerical simulation proves that the above negative changes are provided by the agglomeration of nanotubes and subsequent deterioration of the percolation structure in the membranes.

  12. The geometrical effect of single walled carbon nanotube network transistors on low frequency noise characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Un Jeong; Kil, Joon Pyo; Park, Wanjun

    2011-07-01

    The noise characteristics of randomly networked single walled carbon nanotubes grown directly by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition with field effect transistor. Geometrical complexity due to the large number of tube-tube junctions in the nanotube network is expected to be one of the key factors for the noise power of 1/f dependence. We investigated low frequency noise as a function of channel length (2-10 microm) and found that increased with longer channel length. Percolational behaviors of nanotube network that differs from ordinary semiconducting and metallic materials can be characterized by a geometrical picture with electrical homo- and hetero-junctions. Fixed nanotube density provides a test conditions to evaluate the contributions of junctions as a noise center. Hooge's empirical law is applied to investigate the low frequency noise characteristics of single walled carbon nanotube random network transistors. The noise power shows the dependence of the transistor channel length. It is understood that nanotube/nanotube junctions act as a noise center. However, the differences induced by channel length in the noise power are observed as not so significant. We conclude that tolerance of low frequency noise is important property for SWNT networks as an electronic device application.

  13. [Carbon nanotubes - Characteristic of the substance, biological effects and occupational exposure levels].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Świdwińska-Gajewska, Anna Maria; Czerczak, Sławomir

    2017-03-24

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are a diverse group of nano-objects in terms of structure, size (length, diameter), shape and characteristics. The growing interest in these structures is due to the increasing number of people working in exposure to CNTs. Occupational exposure to carbon nanotubes may occur in research laboratories, as well as in plants producing CNTs and their nanocomposites. Carbon nanotubes concentration at the emission source may reach 107 particles/cm3. These values, however, are considerably reduced after the application of adequate ventilation. Animal studies suggest that the main route of exposure is inhalation. Carbon nanotubes administered orally are largely excreted in the feces. In animals exposed by inhalation, CNTs caused mainly inflammation, as a result of oxidative stress, leading above all to changes in the lungs. The main effect of animal dermal exposure is oxidative stress causing local inflammation. In animals exposed by ingestion the mild or no toxicity was observed. Carbon nanotubes did not induce mutations in the bacterial tests, but they were genotoxic in a series of tests on cells in vitro, as well as in exposed mice in vivo. Embryotoxicity of nanotubes depends mainly on their modifications and carcinogenicity - primarily on the CNT size and its rigidity. Occupational exposure limits for CNTs proposed by world experts fall within the range of 1-80 μg/m3. The different effects of various kinds of CNT, leads to the conclusion that each type of nanotube should be treated as a separate substance with individual estimation of hygienic normative. Med Pr 2017;68(2):259-276. This work is available in Open Access model and licensed under a CC BY-NC 3.0 PL license.

  14. Carbon nanotubes – Characteristic of the substance, biological effects and occupational exposure levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Maria Świdwińska-Gajewska

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanotubes (CNTs are a diverse group of nano-objects in terms of structure, size (length, diameter, shape and characteristics. The growing interest in these structures is due to the increasing number of people working in exposure to CNTs. Occupational exposure to carbon nanotubes may occur in research laboratories, as well as in plants producing CNTs and their nanocomposites. Carbon nanotubes concentration at the emission source may reach 107 particles/cm3. These values, however, are considerably reduced after the application of adequate ventilation. Animal studies suggest that the main route of exposure is inhalation. Carbon nanotubes administered orally are largely excreted in the feces. In animals exposed by inhalation, CNTs caused mainly inflammation, as a result of oxidative stress, leading above all to changes in the lungs. The main effect of animal dermal exposure is oxidative stress causing local inflammation. In animals exposed by ingestion the mild or no toxicity was observed. Carbon nanotubes did not induce mutations in the bacterial tests, but they were genotoxic in a series of tests on cells in vitro, as well as in exposed mice in vivo. Embryotoxicity of nanotubes depends mainly on their modifications and carcinogenicity – primarily on the CNT size and its rigidity. Occupational exposure limits for CNTs proposed by world experts fall within the range of 1–80 μg/m3. The different effects of various kinds of CNT, leads to the conclusion that each type of nanotube should be treated as a separate substance with individual estimation of hygienic normative. Med Pr 2017;68(2:259–276

  15. Nuclear Quantum Effects in the Layering and Diffusion of Hydrogen Isotopes in Carbon Nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalczyk, Piotr; Terzyk, Artur P; Gauden, Piotr A; Furmaniak, Sylwester; Kaneko, Katsumi; Miller, Thomas F

    2015-09-03

    Although recent experimental studies have demonstrated that H2 and D2 molecules wet the inner surface of supergrowth carbon nanotubes at low temperatures, characterization of the structural and dynamical properties in this regime is challenging. This Letter presents a theoretical study of self-diffusion in pure and binary H2, D2, and T2 contact monolayer films formed on the inner surface of a carbon nanotube. Our results show that monolayer formation and self-diffusion both in pure hydrogen isotopes and in H2/T2 and H2/D2 isotope mixtures is impacted by nuclear quantum effects, suggesting potential applications of carbon nanotubes for the separation of hydrogen isotopes.

  16. The effect of metal-contacts on carbon nanotube for high frequency interconnects and devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Chimowa

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available High frequency characterisation of platinum and tungsten contacts on individual multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNT is performed from 10 MHz to 50 GHz. By measuring the scattering parameters of aligned individual MWNTs, we show that metal contacts enhance an inductive response due to the improved MWNT-electrode coupling reducing the capacitive effect. This behaviour is pronounced in the frequency below 10 GHz and strong for tungsten contacts. We explain the inductive response as a result of the interaction of stimulus current with the localized (or defects states present at the contact region resulting in the current lagging behind the voltage. The results are further supported by direct current measurements that show tungsten to significantly increase carbon nanotube-electrode coupling. The immediate consequence is the reduction of the contact resistance, implying a reduction of electron tunnelling barrier from the electrode to the carbon nanotube.

  17. Carbon nanotube junctions and devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Postma, H.W.Ch.

    2001-01-01

    In this thesis Postma presents transport experiments performed on individual single-wall carbon nanotubes. Carbon nanotubes are molecules entirely made of carbon atoms. The electronic properties are determined by the exact symmetry of the nanotube lattice, resulting in either metallic or

  18. Vascular effects of multiwalled carbon nanotubes in dyslipidemic ApoE-/- mice and cultured endothelial cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cao, Yi; Jacobsen, Nicklas Raun; Danielsen, Pernille Høgh

    2014-01-01

    Accumulating evidences indicate that pulmonary exposure to carbon nanotubes (CNTs) is associated with increased risk of lung diseases, whereas the effect on the vascular system is less studied. We investigated vascular effects of 2 types of multiwalled CNTs (MWCNTs) in apolipoprotein E(-/-) mice,...

  19. Field Effect Transistor Using Carbon Nanotubes and DNA as Electrical Gate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdalla, S.; Al-Marzouki, F. M.; Al-Ghamdi, Ahmed A.

    2017-02-01

    We present an electronic sensor in the molecular scale, which is very sensitive for detection and sensing of DNA characteristics and DNA activities in particular activities between DNA duplex and any protein. Here, the device shows that DNA is electronically inserted to be on the same time as an electrical device transducer and as a biological target in a carbon nanotube-DNA-carbon nanotube electronic sensor. We have performed a DNA binding through an amide group by the electron transfer through amide group. The presented device has shown an efficient and rapid procedure to bind the electrical vulnerability of DNA with the detection of enzymatic effectiveness leading to high efficient biosensor.

  20. Twisting Effects on Carbon Nanotubes: A First-Principles Study with Helical Symmetry Operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kato, Koichiro; Koretsune, Takashi; Saito, Susumu, E-mail: kato@stat.phys.titech.ac.jp [Department of Physics, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 Oh-okayama, Meguro-Ku, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan)

    2011-07-20

    We report the energetics and the electronic properties of twisted carbon nanotubes (CNTs). We use a real-space density functional theory with helical-symmetry operation, and apply it for several CNTs with the diameters of around 0.8 nm including the experimentally abundant (6,5) nanotube. By using this computational code, one can now obtain the total energies with enough accuracies to optimize the CNT geometries including quasi-continuous twisting levels for any type of nanotube in principle. As a result, it is found that chiral nanotubes possess twisted geometries at their ground states. The electronic structures of CNTs depend sensitively on twisting levels in this diameter region, and the twisting effects on their fundamental gap values can be judged by the value of mod(n - m, 3), where n and m are the chiral indices.

  1. Channeling potential in single-walled carbon nanotubes: The effect of radial deformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abu-Assy, M.K. [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Suez-Canal University, Ismailia 41522 (Egypt); Soliman, M.S., E-mail: Mahmoud_einstien2@yahoo.com [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Suez-Canal University, El-Arish (Egypt)

    2016-10-01

    We study the effect of radial deformation in single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), due to one external factor, on the channeling potential. The calculations covered the channeling potential for positrons of 100 MeV move along the z-axis, which is the axis of the radially deformed SWCNTs (6, 0), (8, 0) under external mechanical stress at different values for the induced strain and also for radially deformed SWCNT (5, 5) under external transverse electric field of 1.8 and 2.6 V/Å. The calculations executed according to the continuum model approximation given by Lindhard for the case of an axial channeling in single crystals. The results of the calculations in this work agreed well with previous calculations depending on the equilibrium electron density in perfect carbon nanotubes. It has been found that, for perfect nanotubes, the channeling potential, i.e., the potential at any point (x, y) in a plane normal to the nanotube axis (xy-plane), is a function of the distance from the nanotube center whatever the (x, y) coordinate and hence, it could be expressed in terms of one independent variable. On the other hand, in radially deformed SWCNTs, the channeling potential was found to be a function of two independent variables (x, y) and could be given here by a general formula in terms of fitting parameters for each nanotube with chiral index (n, m). The obtained formula has been used in plotting the contour plot for the channeling potential.

  2. Modified carbon nanotubes and methods of forming carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heintz, Amy M.; Risser, Steven; Elhard, Joel D.; Moore, Bryon P.; Liu, Tao; Vijayendran, Bhima R.

    2016-06-14

    In this invention, processes which can be used to achieve stable doped carbon nanotubes are disclosed. Preferred CNT structures and morphologies for achieving maximum doping effects are also described. Dopant formulations and methods for achieving doping of a broad distribution of tube types are also described.

  3. High Performance Ambipolar Field-Effect Transistor of Random Network Carbon Nanotubes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bisri, Satria Zulkarnaen; Gao, Jia; Derenskyi, Vladimir; Gomulya, Widianta; Iezhokin, Igor; Gordiichuk, Pavlo; Herrmann, Andreas; Loi, Maria Antonietta

    2012-01-01

    Ambipolar field-effect transistors of random network carbon nanotubes are fabricated from an enriched dispersion utilizing a conjugated polymer as the selective purifying medium. The devices exhibit high mobility values for both holes and electrons (3 cm(2)/V.s) with a high on/off ratio (10(6)). The

  4. Multiscale computational modeling of size effects in carbon nanotube-polymer composites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Malagu, M.

    2017-01-01

    The development of carbon nanotube(CNT)-polymer composites advocates for a better understanding of their physical and mechanical properties that depend on the diameter of the embedded CNTs. Given that the experimental assessment of size effects is extremely difficult, the use of numerical models can

  5. Effects of functionalization on thermal properties of single-wall and multi-wall carbon nanotube-polymer nanocomposites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulotty, Richard; Castellino, Micaela; Jagdale, Pravin; Tagliaferro, Alberto; Balandin, Alexander A

    2013-06-25

    Carboxylic functionalization (-COOH groups) of carbon nanotubes is known to improve their dispersion properties and increase the electrical conductivity of carbon-nanotube-polymer nanocomposites. We have studied experimentally the effects of this type of functionalization on the thermal conductivity of the nanocomposites. It was found that while even small quantities of carbon nanotubes (~1 wt %) can increase the electrical conductivity, a larger loading fraction (~3 wt %) is required to enhance the thermal conductivity of nanocomposites. Functionalized multi-wall carbon nanotubes performed the best as filler material leading to a simultaneous improvement of the electrical and thermal properties of the composites. Functionalization of the single-wall carbon nanotubes reduced the thermal conductivity enhancement. The observed trends were explained by the fact that while surface functionalization increases the coupling between carbon nanotube and polymer matrix, it also leads to formation of defects, which impede the acoustic phonon transport in the single-wall carbon nanotubes. The obtained results are important for applications of carbon nanotubes and graphene flakes as fillers for improving thermal, electrical and mechanical properties of composites.

  6. Analytic and computational micromechanics of clustering and interphase effects in carbon nanotube composites.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seidel, Gary D.; Hammerand, Daniel Carl; Lagoudas, Dimitris C. (Texas A& M University, College Station, TX)

    2006-01-01

    Effective elastic properties for carbon nanotube reinforced composites are obtained through a variety of micromechanics techniques. Using the in-plane elastic properties of graphene, the effective properties of carbon nanotubes are calculated utilizing a composite cylinders micromechanics technique as a first step in a two-step process. These effective properties are then used in the self-consistent and Mori-Tanaka methods to obtain effective elastic properties of composites consisting of aligned single or multi-walled carbon nanotubes embedded in a polymer matrix. Effective composite properties from these averaging methods are compared to a direct composite cylinders approach extended from the work of Hashin and Rosen (1964) and Christensen and Lo (1979). Comparisons with finite element simulations are also performed. The effects of an interphase layer between the nanotubes and the polymer matrix as result of functionalization is also investigated using a multi-layer composite cylinders approach. Finally, the modeling of the clustering of nanotubes into bundles due to interatomic forces is accomplished herein using a tessellation method in conjunction with a multi-phase Mori-Tanaka technique. In addition to aligned nanotube composites, modeling of the effective elastic properties of randomly dispersed nanotubes into a matrix is performed using the Mori-Tanaka method, and comparisons with experimental data are made. Computational micromechanical analysis of high-stiffness hollow fiber nanocomposites is performed using the finite element method. The high-stiffness hollow fibers are modeled either directly as isotropic hollow tubes or equivalent transversely isotropic effective solid cylinders with properties computed using a micromechanics based composite cylinders method. Using a representative volume element for clustered high-stiffness hollow fibers embedded in a compliant matrix with the appropriate periodic boundary conditions, the effective elastic properties

  7. Study of Carbon Nanotube-Substrate Interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaqueline S. Soares

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Environmental effects are very important in nanoscience and nanotechnology. This work reviews the importance of the substrate in single-wall carbon nanotube properties. Contact with a substrate can modify the nanotube properties, and such interactions have been broadly studied as either a negative aspect or a solution for developing carbon nanotube-based nanotechnologies. This paper discusses both theoretical and experimental studies where the interaction between the carbon nanotubes and the substrate affects the structural, electronic, and vibrational properties of the tubes.

  8. Effect of dentin surface modification using carbon nanotubes on dental bonding and antibacterial ability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suo, Lai; Li, Zhongjie; Luo, Feng; Chen, Junyu; Jia, Lingling; Wang, Tong; Pei, Xibo; Wan, Qianbing

    2017-11-03

    This study developed carbon nanotube coatings for the dentin surface and investigated the bonding strength and the in vitro antibacterial properties of carbon nanotube-coated dentin. Single-walled carbon nanotubes and multi-walled carbon nanotubes were first modified and then characterized using Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscope, and transmission electron microscopy. Second, dentin samples were coated using either single-walled carbon nanotubes or multi-walled carbon nanotubes and observed under a scanning electron microscope. Then, the shear bonding strength and antibacterial properties of the dentin samples were tested. The results showed that both modified single-walled carbon nanotubes and multi-walled carbon nanotubes formed a stable coating on the dentin surface without affecting the shear bonding strength. Moreover, the antibacterial properties of the single-walled carbon nanotube-coated samples was obviously superior to those of the multi-walled carbon nanotubecoated samples. Consequently, single-walled carbon nanotube coating may be an antibacterial agent for potential application in the dental bonding field.

  9. Hydrogen storage in carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirscher, M; Becher, M

    2003-01-01

    The article gives a comprehensive overview of hydrogen storage in carbon nanostructures, including experimental results and theoretical calculations. Soon after the discovery of carbon nanotubes in 1991, different research groups succeeded in filling carbon nanotubes with some elements, and, therefore, the question arose of filling carbon nanotubes with hydrogen by possibly using new effects such as nano-capillarity. Subsequently, very promising experiments claiming high hydrogen storage capacities in different carbon nanostructures initiated enormous research activity. Hydrogen storage capacities have been reported that exceed the benchmark for automotive application of 6.5 wt% set by the U.S. Department of Energy. However, the experimental data obtained with different methods for various carbon nanostructures show an extreme scatter. Classical calculations based on physisorption of hydrogen molecules could not explain the high storage capacities measured at ambient temperature, and, assuming chemisorption of hydrogen atoms, hydrogen release requires temperatures too high for technical applications. Up to now, only a few calculations and experiments indicate the possibility of an intermediate binding energy. Recently, serious doubt has arisen in relation to several key experiments, causing considerable controversy. Furthermore, high hydrogen storage capacities measured for carbon nanofibers did not survive cross-checking in different laboratories. Therefore, in light of today's knowledge, it is becoming less likely that at moderate pressures around room temperature carbon nanostructures can store the amount of hydrogen required for automotive applications.

  10. The donut and dynamic polarization effects in proton channeling through carbon nanotubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borka, D.; Mowbray, Duncan; Miskovic, Z.L.

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the angular and spatial distributions of protons with an energy of 0.223 MeV after channeling them through an (11, 9) single-wall carbon nanotube of 0.2 mu m length. The proton incident angle is varied between 0 and 10 mrad, being close to the critical angle for channeling. We show...... that, as the proton incident angle increases and approaches the critical angle for channeling, a ring-like structure is developed in the angular distribution-the donut effect. We demonstrate that it is the rainbow effect. If the proton incident angle is between zero and half of the critical angle...... demonstrate that an increase of the proton incident angle can lead to a significant rearrangement of the propagating protons within the nanotube. This effect may be used to locate atomic impurities in nanotubes as well as for creating nanosized proton beams to be used in materials science, biology...

  11. Effect of magnetic field on carbon nanotubes and graphene structure synthesized at low pressure via arc discharge process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roslan, M. S.; Chaudary, K. T.; Haider, Z.; Zin, A. F. M.; Ali, J.

    2017-03-01

    Carbon nanomaterials have attracted vast attention due to the rising demand for various nanotechnology applications. The possibility of preparing multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) and graphene on large scale are demonstrated using direct current arc discharge with transverse magnetic field effect at low ambient pressure. In this work, we study, the effect of external transverse magnetic effect on structural perfection of graphene and multi-walled carbon nanotube. High quality carbon-nanotube were synthesized by arc discharge plasma in Hydrogen ambient at pressure 1 mbar in presence of external transverse magnetic field. The synthesized nanomaterials were characterized by electron microscopy, XRD and Raman Spectroscopy. A significant increase in the quantity and quality of carbon nanotube and graphene in the presence of transverse magnetic field during arc discharge process.

  12. Enrichment of semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes by carbothermic reaction for use in all-nanotube field effect transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shisheng; Liu, Chang; Hou, Peng-Xiang; Sun, Dong-Ming; Cheng, Hui-Ming

    2012-11-27

    Selective removal of metallic single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and consequent enrichment of semiconducting SWCNTs were achieved through an efficient carbothermic reaction with a NiO thin film at a relatively low temperature of 350 °C. All-SWCNT field effect transistors (FETs) were fabricated with the aid of a patterned NiO mask, in which the as-grown SWCNTs behaving as source/drain electrodes and the remaining semiconducting SWCNTs that survive in the carbothermic reaction as a channel material. The all-SWCNT FETs demonstrate improved current ON/OFF ratios of ∼10(3).

  13. Effect of surface treatment of carbon nanotubes on mechanical properties of cement composite

    OpenAIRE

    KONDAKOV Alexander Igorevich; MIKHALEVA Zoya Alekseevna; TKACHEV Alexey Grigorievich; POPOV Andrey Ivanovich; GORSKI Sergey Yurevich

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the paper is to explore the influence of the carbon nanotubes functionalized by oxygen groups on the physical and mechanical properties of cement composites. Advantages and disadvantages of the main methods for the homogeneous distribution of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in solution are discussed. A method for covalent functionalization of CNTs is described. An acid-base titration and dispersion analysis of solutions containing functionalized carbon nanotubes (f-CNTs) was performed. The...

  14. Effect of interfaces on the thermal, mechanical and chemical characteristics of carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Guo An

    The primary focus of this work is to explore the effect of interface on thermal, mechanical, and chemical properties of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and the methods to modify the interface between CNTs and CNTs based composites. CNTs are potentially promising fibers for ultra-high-strength composites. The load transfer between the inner and outer tubes in multiwall nanotubes (MWNTs) has to be clearly understood to realize the potential of MWNTs in composites and other applications such as nano-springs, and nano-bearings. This dissertation studies the load transfer between the walls of MWNTs in both tension and compression using molecular dynamics simulations. It is found that only the minimal load is transferred to the inner nanotube in tension. The load transfer of capped nanotubes in compression is much higher than in tension. In the case of uncapped nanotubes, the inner nanotube is deformed in bending only after the outer nanotube is extensively deformed by buckling. The presence of a few interstitial atoms between the walls of MWNTs can significantly improve the stiffness and enhance the load transfer to the inner nanotubes in both tension and compression. The modification of the interface of CNTs is a key factor for effectively using CNTs in many applications. Many potential applications of CNTs, including high strength composites, nano-sensors, and molecular electronics, can be created by chemical surface modification. The use of molecular statics and dynamics helps exploring ion irradiation as a method for functionalization of CNTs. It is found that ion bombardment of single and Multiwall carbon nanotubes creates vacancies and defects, which can act as high-energy sites for further chemical reactions; furthermore, ion irradiation of CNTs embedded in polymer matrix creates chemical attachments between CNTs and polymer matrix, enhancing the compositing process. Mechanical property simulations based on tension and pullout tests indicate that the chemical links

  15. Growth of carbon nanotubes on surfaces: the effects of catalyst and substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murcia, Angel Berenguer; Geng, Junfeng

    2013-08-01

    We report a study of synthesising air-stable, nearly monodispersed bimetallic colloids of Co/Pd and Fe/Mo of varying compositions as active catalysts for the growth of carbon nanotubes. Using these catalysts we have investigated the effects of catalyst and substrate on the carbon nanostructures formed in a plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD) process. We will show how it is possible to assess the influence of both the catalyst and the support on the controlled growth of carbon nanotube and nanofiber arrays. The importance of the composition of the catalytic nuclei will be put into perspective with other results from the literature. Furthermore, the influence of other synthetic parameters such as the nature of the nanoparticle catalysts will also be analysed and discussed in detail.

  16. Carbon Nanotubes for Supercapacitor

    OpenAIRE

    Li Jianyi; Pan Hui; Feng YuanPing

    2010-01-01

    Abstract As an electrical energy storage device, supercapacitor finds attractive applications in consumer electronic products and alternative power source due to its higher energy density, fast discharge/charge time, low level of heating, safety, long-term operation stability, and no disposable parts. This work reviews the recent development of supercapacitor based on carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and their composites. The purpose is to give a comprehensive understanding of the advantages and disad...

  17. 148. Carbon Nanotubes

    OpenAIRE

    Hedmer, Maria; Kåredal, Monica; Gustavsson, Per; Rissler, Jenny

    2013-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) can be seen as graphene sheets rolled to form cylinders. CNTs may be categorised as single- (SWCNT) or multi-walled (MWCNT). Due to the small size, the number of particles as well as the surface area per mass unit is extremely high. CNTs are highly diverse, differing with respect to e.g., diameter, length, chiral angles, chemical functionalisation, purity, stiffness and bulk density. Today, CNTs are utilised primarily for the reinforcement of composite polymers, but th...

  18. Carbon nanotube IR detectors (SV)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leonard, F. L.

    2012-03-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia) and Lockheed Martin Corporation (LMC) collaborated to (1) evaluate the potential of carbon nanotubes as channels in infrared (IR) photodetectors; (2) assemble and characterize carbon nanotube electronic devices and measure the photocurrent generated when exposed to infrared light;(3) compare the performance of the carbon nanotube devices with that of traditional devices; and (4) develop and numerically implement models of electronic transport and opto-electronic behavior of carbon nanotube infrared detectors. This work established a new paradigm for photodetectors.

  19. Methods for producing reinforced carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Zhifen [Newton, MA; Wen, Jian Guo [Newton, MA; Lao, Jing Y [Chestnut Hill, MA; Li, Wenzhi [Brookline, MA

    2008-10-28

    Methods for producing reinforced carbon nanotubes having a plurality of microparticulate carbide or oxide materials formed substantially on the surface of such reinforced carbon nanotubes composite materials are disclosed. In particular, the present invention provides reinforced carbon nanotubes (CNTs) having a plurality of boron carbide nanolumps formed substantially on a surface of the reinforced CNTs that provide a reinforcing effect on CNTs, enabling their use as effective reinforcing fillers for matrix materials to give high-strength composites. The present invention also provides methods for producing such carbide reinforced CNTs.

  20. The Effects of Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes on the Shear Piezoelectricity of Biopolymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovell, Conrad; Fitz-Gerald, James M.; Harrison, Joycelyn S.; Park, Cheol

    2008-01-01

    Shear piezoelectricity was investigated in a series of composites consisting of increased loadings of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) in poly (gamma-benzyl-L-glutamate), or PBLG. The effects of the SWCNTs on this material property in PBLG will be discussed. Their influence on the morphology of the polymer (degree of orientation and crystallinity), and electrical and dielectric properties of the composite will be reported

  1. Porous-carbon-nanotube decorated carbon nanofibers with effective microwave absorption properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tao; Xiao, Bo; Zhou, Pengyu; Xia, Long; Wen, Guangwu; Zhang, Haibin

    2017-09-01

    Carbon nanofibers decorated with porous carbon nanotubes were prepared by electrospinning and annealing methods. The microwave reflection loss of the products was investigated in the frequency range of 2-18 GHz. The bandwidth with a reflection loss less than -10 dB covers a wide frequency, ranging from 7.0 to 14.1 GHz with thickness of 3.0-5.5 mm, and the minimum reflection loss is -44.5 dB at 10.7 GHz with thickness of 2.0 mm. The large reflection loss and wide reflection band reveal that the products could be a promising candidate for microwave absorption.

  2. Enzymatic degradation of multiwalled carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yong; Allen, Brett L; Star, Alexander

    2011-09-01

    Because of their unique properties, carbon nanotubes and, in particular, multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) have been used for the development of advanced composite and catalyst materials. Despite their growing commercial applications and increased production, the potential environmental and toxicological impacts of MWNTs are not fully understood; however, many reports suggest that they may be toxic. Therefore, a need exists to develop protocols for effective and safe degradation of MWNTs. In this article, we investigated the effect of chemical functionalization of MWNTs on their enzymatic degradation with horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)). We investigated HRP/H(2)O(2) degradation of purified, oxidized, and nitrogen-doped MWNTs and proposed a layer-by-layer degradation mechanism of nanotubes facilitated by side wall defects. These results provide a better understanding of the interaction between HRP and carbon nanotubes and suggest an eco-friendly way of mitigating the environmental impact of nanotubes. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  3. Carbon nanotubes as plant growth regulators: effects on tomato growth, reproductive system, and soil microbial community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khodakovskaya, Mariya V; Kim, Bong-Soo; Kim, Jong Nam; Alimohammadi, Mohammad; Dervishi, Enkeleda; Mustafa, Thikra; Cernigla, Carl E

    2013-01-14

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) can affect plant phenotype and the composition of soil microbiota. Tomato plants grown in soil supplemented with CNTs produce two times more flowers and fruit compared to plants grown in control soil. The effect of carbon nanotubes on microbial community of CNT-treated soil is determined by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and pyrosequencing analysis. Phylogenetic analysis indicates that Proteobacteria and Bacteroidetes are the most dominant groups in the microbial community of soil. The relative abundances of Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes are found to increase, whereas Proteobacteria and Verrucomicorbia decrease with increasing concentration of CNTs. The results of comparing diversity indices and species level phylotypes (OTUs) between samples showed that there is not a significant affect on bacterial diversity. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Beneficial effect of multi-wall carbon nanotubes on the graphitization of polyacrylonitrile (PAN coating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mária Darányi

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Polyacrylonitrile (PAN solutions were deposited on quartz plates by spin coating to yield 2–3 µm thick PAN films. The films were decomposed at 1000°C in N2 atmosphere into electrically conducting carbonaceous coatings. When the precursor solution contained cobalt (0.2 g Co-acetate per 1 g PAN and/or multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs, 2 mg MWCNT per 1 g PAN the specific electrical resistance of the product film dropped from the original 492 Ω·cm-1 value down to 46 Ω·cm-1. By excluding all other possibilities we came to the conclusion that the beneficial effect of carbon nanotubes is related to their catalytic action in the final graphitization of condensed nitrogen-containing rings into graphitic nanocrystallites.

  5. The effect of surfactant on stability and thermal conductivity of carbon nanotube based nanofluids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leong Kin Yuen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The addition of highly conductive substance such as carbon nanotubes into a traditional heat transfer fluid will enhance the fluids’ thermal conductivity. However, dispersion process of carbon nanotubes into base fluids is not an easy task due to hydrophobic characteristic of its surface. This study attempts to investigate the stability and thermal conductivity of carbon nanotube based ethylene glycol/water nanofluids with and without surfactants. Stability investigation was conducted through observation and zeta potential measurement methods. As for the thermal conductivity, the samples were measured based on transient line heat source. The results showed that 0.01 wt.% of carbon nanotube based nanofluid, containing 0.01wt.% hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide possess highest zeta potential value compared to the other tested samples. 0.5 wt. % of carbon nanotube based nanofluids with gum arabic exhibit 25.7% thermal conductivity enhancement.

  6. Effect of chirality and curvature of single-walled carbon nanotubes on the adsorption of uracil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajarajeswari, M.; Iyakutti, K. [School of Physics, Madurai Kamaraj University, Madurai, Tamil Nadu 625 021 (India); Kawazoe, Y. [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan)

    2011-06-15

    Adsorption of uracil on single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) (5,2) and (5,5) in the presence of water molecules has been investigated using first-principles technique. Uracil is adsorbed on the nanotube noncovalently through {pi}-{pi} stacking interaction. The binding strength of uracil varies with the chirality of the carbon nanotubes. Addition of water molecules inside and outside the nanotube altered the interaction of the uracil with the nanotube and modifies the binding strength. Orientation of the water molecule and the charge transfer through the C-H bonds are the important factors in the interaction of the water molecule with the carbon nanotube. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  7. Effects of feed gas composition and catalyst thickness on carbon nanotube and nanofiber synthesis by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, R K; Kim, S S; Hash, D B; Gore, J P; Fisher, T S

    2008-06-01

    Many engineering applications require carbon nanotubes with specific characteristics such as wall structure, chirality and alignment. However, precise control of nanotube properties grown to application specifications remains a significant challenge. Plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) offers a variety of advantages in the synthesis of carbon nanotubes in that several important synthesis parameters can be controlled independently. This paper reports an experimental study of the effects of reacting gas composition (percentage methane in hydrogen) and catalyst film thickness on carbon nanotube (CNT) growth and a computational study of gas-phase composition for the inlet conditions of experimentally observed carbon nanotube growth using different chemical reaction mechanisms. The simulations seek to explain the observed effects of reacting gas composition and to identify the precursors for CNT formation. The experimental results indicate that gas-phase composition significantly affects the synthesized material, which is shown to be randomly aligned nanotube and nanofiber mats for relatively methane-rich inlet gas mixtures and non-tubular carbon for methane-lean incoming mixtures. The simulation results suggest that inlet methane-hydrogen mixture coverts to an acetylene-methane-hydrogen mixture with minor amounts of ethylene, hydrogen atom, and methyl radical. Acetylene appears to be the indicator species for solid carbon formation. The simulations also show that inlet methane-hydrogen mixture does not produce enough gas-phase precursors needed to form quality CNTs below 5% CH4 concentrations in the inlet stream.

  8. Numerical Study of Operating Pressure Effect on Carbon Nanotube Growth Rate and Length Uniformity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Zahed

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD is one of the most popular methods for producing Carbon Nanotubes (CNTs. The growth rate of CNTs based on CVD technique is investigated by using a numerical model based on finite volume method. Inlet gas mixture, including xylene as carbon source and mixture of argon and hydrogen as carrier gas enters into a horizontal CVD reactor at atmospheric pressure. In this article the operating pressure variations are studied as the effective parameter on CNT growth rate and length uniformity.

  9. Carbon Nanotubes as an Effective Opportunity for Cancer Diagnosis and Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanginario, Alessandro; Miccoli, Beatrice; Demarchi, Danilo

    2017-02-15

    Despite the current progresses of modern medicine, the resistance of malignant tumors to present medical treatments points to the necessity of developing new therapeutic approaches. In recent years, numerous studies have focused their attention on the promising use of nanomaterials, like iron oxide nanowires, zinc oxide or mesoporous silica nanoparticles, for cancer and metastasis treatment with the advantage of operating directly at the bio-molecular scale. Among them, carbon nanotubes emerged as valid candidates not only for drug delivery, but also as a valuable tool in cancer imaging and physical ablation. Nevertheless, deep investigations about carbon nanotubes' potential bio-compatibility and cytotoxicity limits should be also critically addressed. In the present review, after introducing carbon nanotubes and their promising advantages and drawbacks for fighting cancer, we want to focus on the numerous and different ways in which they can assist to reach this goal. Specifically, we report on how they can be used not only for drug delivery purposes, but also as a powerful ally to develop effective contrast agents for tumors' medical or photodynamic imaging, to perform direct physical ablation of metastasis, as well as gene therapy.

  10. Effect of surface treatment of carbon nanotubes on mechanical properties of cement composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KONDAKOV Alexander Igorevich

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the paper is to explore the influence of the carbon nanotubes functionalized by oxygen groups on the physical and mechanical properties of cement composites. Advantages and disadvantages of the main methods for the homogeneous distribution of carbon nanotubes (CNTs in solution are discussed. A method for covalent functionalization of CNTs is described. An acid-base titration and dispersion analysis of solutions containing functionalized carbon nanotubes (f-CNTs was performed. The research data made it possible to propose new technology of preparation of modified concrete. The results of the work can be used for designing of the additives commonly used in the construction industry, as well as for further studies of the effects of CNTs on the physical and mechanical and structural properties of building materials. Efficient modification of cement composite with f-CNTs was achieved at the concentration of f-CNTs ranging from 0.0004% to 0.0008% by weight of the binder. The observed increase of the concrete mechanical properties is explained by the fact that the CNTs act as nucleation centers for the cement hydration products.

  11. Coulomb drag in multiwall armchair carbon nanotubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lunde, A.M.; Jauho, Antti-Pekka

    2004-01-01

    We calculate the transresistivity rho(21) between two concentric armchair nanotubes in a diffusive multiwall carbon nanotube as a function of temperature T and Fermi level epsilon(F). We approximate the tight-binding band structure by two crossing bands with a linear dispersion near the Fermi...... surface. The cylindrical geometry of the nanotubes and the different parities of the Bloch states are accounted for in the evaluation of the effective Coulomb interaction between charges in the concentric nanotubes. We find a broad peak in rho(21) as a function of temperature at roughly T similar to 0.4T...

  12. Experimental and theoretical studies of agglomeration effects in multi-walled carbon nanotube-polycarbonate melts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study we report on morphological and rheological characterization of multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWNT-polycarbonate composites produced by injection molding. The main focus is to carry out nonlinear viscoelastic experiments that allow following the structural rearrangements of carbon nanotubes in the polycarbonate melt. Small angle X-ray scattering reveals only a slight orientation of MWNTs in the as-received samples, i.e. after application of extremely high shear rates. Thus, the main structural effect observed during the stress growth experiment is the breakage of MWNT agglomerates. To study this effect in detail a flocculation experiment, in which the sample undergoes oscillatory deformation first at a small strain amplitude in the linear regime succeeded by higher amplitudes in the nonlinear regime, has been carried out. The agglomeration process manifests itself in an increase of the storage and loss moduli in the linear regime, whereas the deagglomeration process does vice versa. The corresponding effects can be described in the frame of a superposition approach that takes into account the stress contribution of the polycarbonate matrix, the hydrodynamic reinforcement due to embedded nanotubes and the viscoelastic stress due to the presence of a MWNT-network.

  13. Rainbow effect in channeling of high energy protons through single-wall carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrovic, S. [Laboratory of Physics (010), Vinca Institute of Nuclear Sciences, P.O. Box 522, 11001 Belgrade (Serbia and Montenegro)]. E-mail: petrovs@vin.bg.ac.yu; Borka, D. [Laboratory of Physics (010), Vinca Institute of Nuclear Sciences, P.O. Box 522, 11001 Belgrade (Serbia and Montenegro); Neskovic, N. [Laboratory of Physics (010), Vinca Institute of Nuclear Sciences, P.O. Box 522, 11001 Belgrade (Serbia and Montenegro)

    2005-05-01

    We studied theoretically the angular distributions and the rainbows in the case of 1 GeV protons channeled in the ropes of (10, 10) single-wall carbon nanotubes. It was assumed that the transverse cross section of a rope could be described via a (two-dimensional) hexagonal superlattice with one nanotube per lattice point. The rope length was varied between 2.4 and 7.2 {mu}m, corresponding to the reduced rope lengths associated with the transverse proton motion close to the centers of the regions in between three neighboring nanotubes, {lambda} {sub b}, between 0.17 and 0.50, respectively. The angular distributions of channeled protons were generated by the computer simulation method using the numerical solution of the proton equations of motion in the transverse plane. We used the Moliere's expression for the interaction potential of the proton and a carbon atom. The rainbow lines were determined numerically too. We showed that they ensured the full explanation of the angular distributions. The effect of zero-degree focusing of channeled ions for the reduced rope length {lambda} {sub b} = 0.50 was also observed, indicating the existence of the rainbow cycles in the evolution of the angular distribution. We noted a strong influence of the rainbow effect on the effect of zero-degree focusing.

  14. The effect of graphitic target density on carbon nanotube synthesis by pulsed laser ablation method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazeimzadeh, Fatemeh; Malekfar, Rasoul; Houshiar, Mahboubeh

    2018-01-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) was synthesized by pulsed laser ablation (PLA) of a graphitic target in vacuum chamber filled by argon gas. The effect of different condition of target preparation on the amount and quality of carbon nanotube generation was investigated. The graphite powder with 2 at% micrometer nickel (Ni) powder was mixed and packed in to a mold using a hydraulic press device at a pressure of 1000 kg/cm3. The obtained pellet which contained the mixture powder provided the carbon source for CNTs formation in PLA method. Two pellets with the pressure time of 15 and 200 min was prepared. It has been shown that the time which graphitic target is under pressure is an effective parameter that can increase the amount of produced CNTs. Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) images show that if the density of graphitic target is increased by raising up the pressure time, CNTs can grow even under the condition in which usually no nanotube can be formed. It can be due to the elimination of the distances between the graphite and catalyst grains that causes the catalysis performance improvement. The experiment was performed for nanometer cobalt ferrite (CoFe2O4) together with Ni catalyst particles too. The diameter of synthesized CNPs was larger in the case of pure nickel that is related to the size of catalysts. Moreover, it was also observed that the production rate of the nanotubes increased for high density targets. This shows that the results are independent of the type of catalyst.

  15. A Thermal Model for Carbon Nanotube Interconnects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clay Mayberry

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we have studied Joule heating in carbon nanotube based very large scale integration (VLSI interconnects and incorporated Joule heating influenced scattering in our previously developed current transport model. The theoretical model explains breakdown in carbon nanotube resistance which limits the current density. We have also studied scattering parameters of carbon nanotube (CNT interconnects and compared with the earlier work. For 1 µm length single-wall carbon nanotube, 3 dB frequency in S12 parameter reduces to ~120 GHz from 1 THz considering Joule heating. It has been found that bias voltage has little effect on scattering parameters, while length has very strong effect on scattering parameters.

  16. Electron configuration of carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stojkovic, S.M.; Setrajcic, J.P. [Novi Sad Univ. (Yugoslavia). Inst. of Physics; Vragovic, I.D. [Technical Faculty M. Pupin, Zrenjanin (Yugoslavia)

    2000-07-01

    In the paper the analysis of electron band structure of infinite carbon nanotubes was performed using Green's function method. The electron dispersion law was found in harmonic and nearest neighbor approximation. One can see that carbon nanotubes of infinite length can be divided into two classes: metallic and semiconducting. Additional spatial confinement of the system along the nanotube axes leads to the opening of the forbidden gap even in nanotubes that are metallic for infinite length. The value of the forbidden gap decreases by increasing the tube length. The dependence of the forbidden gap on the tube length is not monotonic; it has oscillatory character for short tubes. (orig.)

  17. Carbon Nanotubes for Space Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyyappan, Meyya

    2000-01-01

    The potential of nanotube technology for NASA missions is significant and is properly recognized by NASA management. Ames has done much pioneering research in the last five years on carbon nanotube growth, characterization, atomic force microscopy, sensor development and computational nanotechnology. NASA Johnson Space Center has focused on laser ablation production of nanotubes and composites development. These in-house efforts, along with strategic collaboration with academia and industry, are geared towards meeting the agency's mission requirements. This viewgraph presentation (including an explanation for each slide) outlines the research focus for Ames nanotechnology, including details on carbon nanotubes' properties, applications, and synthesis.

  18. Effect of doping with Al/B on the sensitivity of a metallic carbon nanotube to CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merlano, Aura; Garay, Andrés; Pérez, F. R.; Salazar, Ángel

    2017-06-01

    In this work the effect of doping with aluminum (Al) and boron (B) an armchair (6,6) carbon nanotube on its sensibility to carbon dioxide (CO2) for possible application in sensors of this gas was studied. Using first-principles calculations within the framework of the density functional theory (DFT), adsorption energies were obtained in the cases when the molecule is initially perpendicular to the surface of the nanotube, near the dopant atom, and located above a carbon atom of the nanotube, above a C-C bond, or directly above the center of a hexagon. It was found that doping with Al does not improve the adsorption of the molecule compared to the pristine nanotube. However, doping with B slightly favors the adsorption for some of the considered positions. The results suggest that B doping might be an acceptable option in the design and construction of nano devices for CO2 detection.

  19. Effect of nitrogen doping on the electromagnetic properties of carbon nanotube-based composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanygin, M. A.; Sedelnikova, O. V.; Asanov, I. P.; Bulusheva, L. G.; Okotrub, A. V.; Kuzhir, P. P.; Plyushch, A. O.; Maksimenko, S. A.; Lapko, K. N.; Sokol, A. A.; Ivashkevich, O. A.; Lambin, Ph.

    2013-04-01

    Nitrogen-doped and pure carbon nanotube (CNT) based composites were fabricated for investigating their dielectric properties in static regime as well as electromagnetic response properties in microwave frequency range (Ka-band). Two classes of host matrix—polystyrene and phosphate unfired ceramics—have been used for composites fabrication. The study reveals miscellaneous effect of nitrogen doping on the dielectric permittivity, dc conductivity and electromagnetic interference shielding efficiency of CNT-based composites, produced with both polymer and ceramic matrices. The high-frequency polarizability, estimated for different-length CNTs, and static polarizability, calculated for nitrogen-containing CNT models using a quantum-chemical approach, show that this effect results from a decrease of the nanotube defect-free-length and deterioration of the polarizability with incorporation of nitrogen in pyridinic form.

  20. Effect of the carbon nanotube surface characteristics on the conductivity and dielectric constant of carbon nanotube/poly(vinylidene fluoride) composites

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Carabineiro, Sónia AC; Pereira, Manuel FR; Pereira, João N; Caparros, Cristina; Sencadas, Vitor; Lanceros-Mendez, Senentxu

    2011-01-01

    Commercial multi-walled carbon nanotubes (CNT) were functionalized by oxidation with HNO3, to introduce oxygen-containing surface groups, and by thermal treatments at different temperatures for their selective removal...

  1. Synthesis of highly aligned carbon nanotubes by one-step liquid-phase process: Effects of carbon sources on morphology of carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamagiwa, Kiyofumi; Kuwano, Jun

    2017-06-01

    This paper describes a unique and innovative synthesis technique for carbon nanotubes (CNTs) by a one-step liquid-phase process under ambient pressure. Vertically aligned multi-walled CNT arrays with a maximum height of 100 µm are prepared on stainless steel substrates, which are submerged and electrically heated in straight-chain primary alcohols with n C = 1-4 (n C: number of C atoms in the molecule) containing an appropriate amount of cobalt-based organometallic complex as a catalyst precursor. Structural isomers of butanol were also used for the synthesis to examine the effects of structural factors on the morphology of the deposited products. Notably, 2-methyl-2-propanol, which is a tertiary alcohol, produced only a small amount of low-crystallinity carbonaceous deposits, whereas vertically aligned CNTs were grown from the other isomers of butanol. These results suggest that the presence or absence of β-hydrogen in the molecular structure is a key factor for understanding the dissociation behavior of the carbon source molecules on the catalyst.

  2. Advanced carbon nanotubes functionalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setaro, A.

    2017-10-01

    Similar to graphene, carbon nanotubes are materials made of pure carbon in its sp2 form. Their extended conjugated π-network provides them with remarkable quantum optoelectronic properties. Frustratingly, it also brings drawbacks. The π-π stacking interaction makes as-produced tubes bundle together, blurring all their quantum properties. Functionalization aims at modifying and protecting the tubes while hindering π-π stacking. Several functionalization strategies have been developed to circumvent this limitation in order for nanotubes applications to thrive. In this review, we summarize the different approaches established so far, emphasizing the balance between functionalization efficacy and the preservation of the tubes’ properties. Much attention will be given to a functionalization strategy overcoming the covalent-noncovalent dichotomy and to the implementation of two advanced functionalization schemes: (a) conjugation with molecular switches, to yield hybrid nanosystems with chemo-physical properties that can be tuned in a controlled and reversible way, and; (b) plasmonic nanosystems, whose ability to concentrate and enhance the electromagnetic fields can be taken advantage of to enhance the optical response of the tubes.

  3. Flow-driven voltage generation in carbon nanotubes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The flow of various liquids and gases over single-walled carbon nanotube bundles induces an electrical signal (voltage/current) in the sample along the ... to the nanotubes, the gas flow effect can be seen for a variety of solids ranging from single and multi-walled carbon nanotubes, graphite and doped semiconductors.

  4. Carbon nanotube biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tîlmaciu, Carmen-Mihaela; Morris, May C.

    2015-01-01

    Nanomaterials possess unique features which make them particularly attractive for biosensing applications. In particular, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) can serve as scaffolds for immobilization of biomolecules at their surface, and combine several exceptional physical, chemical, electrical, and optical characteristics properties which make them one of the best suited materials for the transduction of signals associated with the recognition of analytes, metabolites, or disease biomarkers. Here we provide a comprehensive review on these carbon nanostructures, in which we describe their structural and physical properties, functionalization and cellular uptake, biocompatibility, and toxicity issues. We further review historical developments in the field of biosensors, and describe the different types of biosensors which have been developed over time, with specific focus on CNT-conjugates engineered for biosensing applications, and in particular detection of cancer biomarkers. PMID:26579509

  5. Carbon Nanotube Biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilmaciu, Carmen-Mihaela; Morris, May

    2015-10-01

    Nanomaterials possess unique features which make them particularly attractive for biosensing applications. In particular Carbon Nanotubes (CNTs) can serve as scaffolds for immobilization of biomolecules at their surface, and combine several exceptional physical, chemical, electrical and optical characteristics properties which make them one of the best suited materials for the transduction of signals associated with the recognition of analytes, metabolites or disease biomarkers. Here we provide a comprehensive review on these carbon nanostructures, in which we will describe their structural and physical properties, discuss functionalization and cellular uptake, biocompatibility and toxicity issues. We further review historical developments in the field of biosensors, and describe the different types of biosensors which have been developed over time, with specific focus on CNT-conjugates engineered for biosensing applications, and in particular detection of cancer biomarkers.

  6. Carbon Nanotube Biosensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen-Mihaela eTilmaciu

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Nanomaterials possess unique features which make them particularly attractive for biosensing applications. In particular Carbon Nanotubes (CNTs can serve as scaffolds for immobilization of biomolecules at their surface, and combine several exceptional physical, chemical, electrical and optical characteristics properties which make them one of the best suited materials for the transduction of signals associated with the recognition of analytes, metabolites or disease biomarkers. Here we provide a comprehensive review on these carbon nanostructures, in which we will describe their structural and physical properties, discuss functionalization and cellular uptake, biocompatibility and toxicity issues. We further review historical developments in the field of biosensors, and describe the different types of biosensors which have been developed over time, with specific focus on CNT-conjugates engineered for biosensing applications, and in particular detection of cancer biomarkers.

  7. Defect complexes in carbon and boron nitride nanotubes

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mashapa, MG

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The effect of defect complexes on the stability, structural and electronic properties of single-walled carbon nanotubes and boron nitride nanotubes is investigated using the ab initio pseudopotential density functional method implemented...

  8. Carboxylated Capped Carbon Nanotubes Interacting with Nimesulide Molecules: Applied Electric Fields Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivian Machado de Menezes

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Interactions of carboxylated capped carbon nanotubes with nimesulide molecules under electric fields were investigated by ab initio simulations. Repulsive forces between the nimesulide molecules and the carboxyl group of the carbon nanotubes, except for the nimesulide radical configuration, were observed. To keep the original molecule in the pristine form, electric fields with different intensities were applied, where changes in the behavior of the interactions between the molecules were noticed. It was shown that the intensity of the interaction between the nimesulide and the hydrophilic carboxylated capped carbon nanotube can be modulated by the action of the external electric fields making promising systems for drug delivery applications.

  9. Effect of swift heavy ion irradiation on single- and multiwalled carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olejniczak, Andrzej, E-mail: aolejnic@chem.uni.torun.pl [Flerov Laboratory of Nuclear Reactions, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna 141980 (Russian Federation); Faculty of Chemistry, Nicolaus Copernicus University, ul. Gagarina 7, 87-100 Toruń (Poland); Skuratov, Vladimir A. [Flerov Laboratory of Nuclear Reactions, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna 141980 (Russian Federation)

    2014-05-01

    The effect of irradiation with swift heavy ions on the structure and properties of carbon nanotubes was investigated by Raman spectroscopy. It was found that disordering of the system occurred mainly at the surface. No ordering phenomena have been observed over a whole range of both fluences and electronic stopping powers studied. The disorder parameter (i.e., the ratio of the D and G band intensities (I{sub D}/I{sub G})) increases non-linearly with the irradiation dose, showing a tendency to saturate at high fluences. The increase in the disorder parameter upon irradiation was proportional to the square root of the ion fluence. The radiation stability of the few-walled nanotubes was ca. 1.6 higher than that of the single-walled ones. The irradiation with both the Xe and Kr ions leads to essentially the same increase in the I{sub D}/I{sub G} ratio with respect to the deposited electronic energy density. In the case of the Ar ion irradiation, the observed increase in the I{sub D}/I{sub G} ratio is much lower, suggesting that the electronic stopping power threshold for defects creation in carbon nanotubes is lower than that for graphite.

  10. Effect of filament aspect ratio on the dielectric response of multiwalled carbon nanotube composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, C. J.; Huang, Y. Y.; Marshall, J. E.; Terentjev, E. M.

    2011-05-01

    Subpercolated composites consisting of highly polar fillers in an insulating matrix have long been predicted to exhibit a large dielectric constant. In this study, we examine the feasibility of experimentally reproducing such an effect based on a multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs)-polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) composite system. MWNTs of different diameters were subjected to high-power ultrasound. The sonication-induced scission of nanotubes shows saturation at a final length dependent on the tube diameter, in agreement with a theoretical model. Sonication allows us to produce MWNTs with a prescribed mean aspect ratio between 10 and 55. Composites were formed from these MWNTs with PDMS elastomer at a fixed 1 wt% doping level, using a common solution-processing method. Results from AC impedance spectroscopy indicate that the tube length minimally affects the dielectric response of these composites when the doping level is below the percolation threshold.

  11. Carbon nanotube functionalized with dodecylamine for the effective dispersion in solvents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, Filipe Vargas, E-mail: filipevargasf@gmail.com [Instituto Tecnológico de Aeronáutica (ITA), Divisão de Ciências Fundamentais, São José dos Campos, SP (Brazil); Francisco, Wesley; Menezes, Beatriz Rossi Canuto de; Cividanes, Luciana De Simone [Instituto Tecnológico de Aeronáutica (ITA), Divisão de Ciências Fundamentais, São José dos Campos, SP (Brazil); Coutinho, Aparecido dos Reis [Universidade Metodista de Piracicaba (UNIMEP), Laboratório de Materiais Carbonosos, Santa Bárbara d' Oeste, SP (Brazil); Thim, Gilmar Patrocínio [Instituto Tecnológico de Aeronáutica (ITA), Divisão de Ciências Fundamentais, São José dos Campos, SP (Brazil)

    2015-12-01

    Highlights: • The functionalized carbon nanotubes exhibit the formation of a shell structure with nanotubes in the center. • Graphitic structures (sp{sup 2}) reduce simultaneously with the change of textures on the surface of carbon nanotubes. • The nonpolar chain of dodecylamine improves the carbon nanotube interaction with the nonpolar solvent. - Abstract: In this work, it was performed a dispersion study of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) functionalized with carboxylic and alkane groups in various solvents. CNT was functionalized using H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}/HNO{sub 3} and subsequently functionalized by dodecylamine (DDA). Fourier transform infrared, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis and transmission electron microscopy were used to characterize the CNTs at each step of the surface modification. The dispersion state of CNTs in the solvents was evaluated by Optical microscopy and visual observations. The evaluation of the solvent influence itself was also made. Results confirmed the presence of oxygen-containing and alkane groups on CNTs surfaces. The dispersion stability was strongly dependent on the solvent and carbon nanotubes surface interactions, which can vary with the chemical nature of the solvent. The study of the surface modifications and the degree of carbon nanotubes dispersion is relevant to enhance the full understanding of its applications.

  12. Effect of amino acid-functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In a single-step, rapid microwave-assisted process, multi-walled carbon nanotubes were functionalized by -valine amino acid. Formation of amino acid on nanotube surface was confirmed by Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, X-ray diffraction, field emission scanning and transmission ...

  13. Method for synthesizing carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Hongyou

    2012-09-04

    A method for preparing a precursor solution for synthesis of carbon nanomaterials, where a polar solvent is added to at least one block copolymer and at least one carbohydrate compound, and the precursor solution is processed using a self-assembly process and subsequent heating to form nanoporous carbon films, porous carbon nanotubes, and porous carbon nanoparticles.

  14. Carbon nanotubes toxicology and effects on metabolism and immunological modification in vitro and in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiaretti, M.; Mazzanti, G.; Bosco, S.; Bellucci, S.; Cucina, A.; LeFoche, F.; Carru, G. A.; Mastrangelo, S.; Di Sotto, A.; Masciangelo, R.; Chiaretti, A. M.; Balasubramanian, C.; DeBellis, G.; Micciulla, F.; Porta, N.; Deriu, G.; Tiberia, A.

    2008-11-01

    The aim of this research is focused on the biological effects of multi wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) on three different human cell types, laboratory animals in vivo, and immunological effects. Large numbers of researchers are directly involved in the handling of nanostructured materials such as MWCNTs and nanoparticles. It is important to assess the potential health risks related to their daily exposure to carbon nanotubes. The administration of sterilized nanosamples has been performed on laboratory animals, in both acute and chronic administration, and the pathological effects on the parenchymal tissues have been investigated. We studied the serum immunological modifications after intraperitoneal administration of the MWCNTs. We did not observe any antigenic reaction; the screening of ANA, anti-ENA, anti-cardiolipin, C-ANCA and P-ANCA was negative. No quantitative modification of immunoglobulins was observed, hence no modification of humoral immunity was documented. We also studied the effects of MWCNTs on the proliferation of three different cell types. MCF-7 showed a significant inhibition of proliferation for all conditions studied, whereas hSMCs demonstrated a reduction of cell growth only for the highest MWCNTs concentrations after 72 h. Also, no growth modification was observed in the Caco-2 cell line. We observed that a low quantity of MWCNTs does not provoke any inflammatory reaction. However, for future medical applications, it is important to realize prosthesis based on MWCNTs, through studying the corresponding implantation effects. Moreover, it has to be emphasized that this investigation does not address, at the moment, the carcinogenicity of MWCNTs, which requires a detailed follow-up investigation on the specific topic. In view of the subsequent and more extensive use of MWCNTs, especially in applications where carbon nanotubes are injected into the human body for drug delivery, as a contrast agent carrying entities for MRI, or as the basic

  15. The effect of growth parameters on the height and density of carbon nanotube forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Call, Robert W.

    Carbon nanotube forests (CNTFs) are grown using an injection chemical vapor deposition method. Images of CNTFs are taken using a scanning electron microscope and are used to measure their height and density. Growth parameters are systematically varied to determine their effect on the height and density of CNTFs. Investigations of CNTF density as a function of distance from the growth substrate reveal that diffusion can be a limiting factor on CNTF growth. Our findings indicate that height and density are related and that each growth parameter has multi-dimensional effects.

  16. Carbon nanotubes: engineering biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez-Gualdrón, Diego A; Burgos, Juan C; Yu, Jiamei; Balbuena, Perla B

    2011-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are cylinder-shaped allotropic forms of carbon, most widely produced under chemical vapor deposition. They possess astounding chemical, electronic, mechanical, and optical properties. Being among the most promising materials in nanotechnology, they are also likely to revolutionize medicine. Among other biomedical applications, after proper functionalization carbon nanotubes can be transformed into sophisticated biosensing and biocompatible drug-delivery systems, for specific targeting and elimination of tumor cells. This chapter provides an introduction to the chemical and electronic structure and properties of single-walled carbon nanotubes, followed by a description of the main synthesis and post-synthesis methods. These sections allow the reader to become familiar with the specific characteristics of these materials and the manner in which these properties may be dependent on the specific synthesis and post-synthesis processes. The chapter ends with a review of the current biomedical applications of carbon nanotubes, highlighting successes and challenges. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Single carbon nanotube photovoltaic device

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barkelid, K.M.; Zwiller, V.G.

    2013-01-01

    Here we present photocurrent measurements on a single suspended carbon nanotube p-n junction. The p-n junction was induced by electrostatic doping by local gates, and the E11 and E22 resonances in the nanotube could be probed using photocurrent spectroscopy. Current-voltage characteristics were

  18. Effective in vitro gene delivery to murine cancerous brain cells using carbon nanotube-polyethylenimine conjugates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azadeh Hashem Nia

    2015-04-01

    Conclusion: Conjugation of PEI with carbon nanotube les to new vectors with lowered cytotoxicity and higher transfection efficiency. The highest transfection efficiency was obtained with the lowest molecular weight PEI.

  19. Effect of carbon nanotubes upon emissions from cutting and sanding carbon fiber-epoxy composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heitbrink, William A. [LMK OSH Consulting LLC (United States); Lo, Li-Ming, E-mail: LLo@cdc.gov [Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Division of Applied Research and Technology, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) (United States)

    2015-08-15

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are being incorporated into structural composites to enhance material strength. During fabrication or repair activities, machining nanocomposites may release CNTs into the workplace air. An experimental study was conducted to evaluate the emissions generated by cutting and sanding on three types of epoxy-composite panels: Panel A containing graphite fibers, Panel B containing graphite fibers and carbon-based mat, and Panel C containing graphite fibers, carbon-based mat, and multi-walled CNTs. Aerosol sampling was conducted with direct-reading instruments, and filter samples were collected for measuring elemental carbon (EC) and fiber concentrations. Our study results showed that cutting Panel C with a band saw did not generate detectable emissions of fibers inspected by transmission electron microscopy but did increase the particle mass, number, and EC emission concentrations by 20–80 % compared to Panels A and B. Sanding operation performed on two Panel C resulted in fiber emission rates of 1.9 × 10{sup 8} and 2.8 × 10{sup 6} fibers per second (f/s), while no free aerosol fibers were detected from sanding Panels A and B containing no CNTs. These free CNT fibers may be a health concern. However, the analysis of particle and EC concentrations from these same samples cannot clearly indicate the presence of CNTs, because extraneous aerosol generation from machining the composite epoxy material increased the mass concentrations of the EC.

  20. Effect of Carbon Nanotubes Upon Emissions From Cutting and Sanding Carbon Fiber-Epoxy Composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heitbrink, William A; Lo, Li-Ming

    2015-08-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are being incorporated into structural composites to enhance material strength. During fabrication or repair activities, machining nanocomposites may release CNTs into the workplace air. An experimental study was conducted to evaluate the emissions generated by cutting and sanding on three types of epoxy-composite panels: Panel A containing graphite fibers, Panel B containing graphite fibers and carbon-based mat, and Panel C containing graphite fibers, carbon-based mat, and multi-walled CNTs. Aerosol sampling was conducted with direct-reading instruments, and filter samples were collected for measuring elemental carbon (EC) and fiber concentrations. Our study results showed that cutting Panel C with a band saw did not generate detectable emissions of fibers inspected by transmission electron microscopy but did increase the particle mass, number, and EC emission concentrations by 20% to 80% compared to Panels A and B. Sanding operation performed on two Panel C resulted in fiber emission rates of 1.9×10(8) and 2.8×10(6) fibers per second (f/s), while no free aerosol fibers were detected from sanding Panels A and B containing no CNTs. These free CNT fibers may be a health concern. However, the analysis of particle and EC concentrations from these same samples cannot clearly indicate the presence of CNTs, because extraneous aerosol generation from machining the composite epoxy material increased the mass concentrations of the EC.

  1. Local Synthesis of Carbon Nanotubes in Silicon Microsystems: The Effect of Temperature Distribution on Growth Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ta, Bao Q.; Haugen, Tormod B.; Hoivik, Nils; Halvorsen, Einar; Aasmundtveit, Knut E.

    2013-01-01

    Local synthesis and direct integration of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) into microsystems is a promising method for producing CNT-based devices in a single step, low-cost, and wafer-level, CMOS/MEMS-compatible process. In this report, the structure of the locally grown CNTs are studied by transmission imaging in scanning electron microscopy—S(T)EM. The characterization is performed directly on the microsystem, without any post-synthesis processing required. The results show an effect of temperature on the structure of CNTs: high temperature favors thin and regular structures, whereas low temperature favors “bamboo-like" structures. PMID:28811428

  2. Local Synthesis of Carbon Nanotubes in Silicon Microsystems: The Effect of Temperature Distribution on Growth Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Knut E. Aasmundtveit

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Local synthesis and direct integration of carbon nanotubes (CNTs into microsystems is a promising method for producing CNT-based devices in a single step, low-cost, and wafer-level, CMOS/MEMS-compatible process. In this report, the structure of the locally grown CNTs are studied by transmission imaging in scanning electron microscopy—S(TEM. The characterization is performed directly on the microsystem, without any post-synthesis processing required. The results show an effect of temperature on the structure of CNTs: high temperature favors thin and regular structures, whereas low temperature favors “bamboo-like” structures.

  3. Effect of Topological Defects on Buckling Behavior of Single-walled Carbon Nanotube

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Guoxiu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Molecular dynamic simulation method has been employed to consider the critical buckling force, pressure, and strain of pristine and defected single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT under axial compression. Effects of length, radius, chirality, Stone–Wales (SW defect, and single vacancy (SV defect on buckling behavior of SWCNTs have been studied. Obtained results indicate that axial stability of SWCNT reduces significantly due to topological defects. Critical buckling strain is more susceptible to defects than critical buckling force. Both SW and SV defects decrease the buckling mode of SWCNT. Comparative approach of this study leads to more reliable design of nanostructures.

  4. Effects of lung exposure to carbon nanotubes on female fertility and pregnancy. A study in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hougaard, Karin S.; Jackson, Petra; Kyjovska, Zdenka O.

    2013-01-01

    We studied the effects of preconceptional exposure to multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs): mature, female C57BL/6J mice were intratracheally instilled with 67μg NM-400 MWCNT, and the following day co-housed with mature males, in breeding pairs. Time to delivery of the first litter, litter...... parameters, maternal inflammation and histopathology of lung and liver were recorded. In male offspring, locomotor activity, startle response, and daily sperm production (DSP) were assessed. In the dams, lung and liver bore evidence of MWCNT exposure when assessed 6 weeks and 4 months after exposure. A short...

  5. Carbon Nanotube Electron Gun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Cattien V. (Inventor); Ribaya, Bryan P. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    An electron gun, an electron source for an electron gun, an extractor for an electron gun, and a respective method for producing the electron gun, the electron source and the extractor are disclosed. Embodiments provide an electron source utilizing a carbon nanotube (CNT) bonded to a substrate for increased stability, reliability, and durability. An extractor with an aperture in a conductive material is used to extract electrons from the electron source, where the aperture may substantially align with the CNT of the electron source when the extractor and electron source are mated to form the electron gun. The electron source and extractor may have alignment features for aligning the electron source and the extractor, thereby bringing the aperture and CNT into substantial alignment when assembled. The alignment features may provide and maintain this alignment during operation to improve the field emission characteristics and overall system stability of the electron gun.

  6. Enhanced Carbon Nanotube Ultracapacitors Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed innovation utilizes carbon nanotubes (CNTs) coated with pseudo-capacitive MnO2 material as nano-composite electrode and ionic electrolyte for the...

  7. Transparent, Conductive Carbon Nanotube Films

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zhuangchun Wu; Zhihong Chen; Xu Du; Jonathan M. Logan; Jennifer Sippel; Maria Nikolou; Katalin Kamaras; John R. Reynolds; David B. Tanner; Arthur F. Hebard; Andrew G. Rinzler

    2004-01-01

    We describe a simple process for the fabrication of ultrathin, transparent, optically homogeneous, electrically conducting films of pure single-walled carbon nanotubes and the transfer of those films...

  8. Carbon Nanotubes and Related Structures

    OpenAIRE

    Kingsuk Mukhopadhyay; Kanik Ram; K.U. Bhasker Rao

    2008-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes have attracted the fancy of many scientists world wide. The small dimensions,strength, and the remarkable physical properties of these structures make them a unique material with a whole range of promising applications. In this review, the structural aspects, the advantages and disadvantages of different for their procedures synthesis, the qualitative and quantitative estimation of carbon nanotubes by different analytical techniques, the present status on their applications a...

  9. Carbon nanotubes for coherent spintronics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuemmeth, Ferdinand; Churchill, H O H; Herring, P K

    2010-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes bridge the molecular and crystalline quantum worlds, and their extraordinary electronic, mechanical and optical properties have attracted enormous attention from a broad scientific community. We review the basic principles of fabricating spin-electronic devices based on individual......, electrically-gated carbon nanotubes, and present experimental efforts to understand their electronic and nuclear spin degrees of freedom, which in the future may enable quantum applications....

  10. Selective functionalization of carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strano, Michael S. (Inventor); Usrey, Monica (Inventor); Barone, Paul (Inventor); Dyke, Christopher A. (Inventor); Tour, James M. (Inventor); Kittrell, W. Carter (Inventor); Hauge, Robert H. (Inventor); Smalley, Richard E. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    The present invention is directed toward methods of selectively functionalizing carbon nanotubes of a specific type or range of types, based on their electronic properties, using diazonium chemistry. The present invention is also directed toward methods of separating carbon nanotubes into populations of specific types or range(s) of types via selective functionalization and electrophoresis, and also to the novel compositions generated by such separations.

  11. Carbon Nanotubes as an Effective Opportunity for Cancer Diagnosis and Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Sanginario

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Despite the current progresses of modern medicine, the resistance of malignant tumors to present medical treatments points to the necessity of developing new therapeutic approaches. In recent years, numerous studies have focused their attention on the promising use of nanomaterials, like iron oxide nanowires, zinc oxide or mesoporous silica nanoparticles, for cancer and metastasis treatment with the advantage of operating directly at the bio-molecular scale. Among them, carbon nanotubes emerged as valid candidates not only for drug delivery, but also as a valuable tool in cancer imaging and physical ablation. Nevertheless, deep investigations about carbon nanotubes’ potential bio-compatibility and cytotoxicity limits should be also critically addressed. In the present review, after introducing carbon nanotubes and their promising advantages and drawbacks for fighting cancer, we want to focus on the numerous and different ways in which they can assist to reach this goal. Specifically, we report on how they can be used not only for drug delivery purposes, but also as a powerful ally to develop effective contrast agents for tumors’ medical or photodynamic imaging, to perform direct physical ablation of metastasis, as well as gene therapy.

  12. Influence of contact height on the performance of vertically aligned carbon nanotube field-effect transistors

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Jingqi

    2013-01-01

    Vertically aligned carbon nanotube field-effect transistors (CNTFETs) have been experimentally demonstrated (J. Li et al., Carbon, 2012, 50, 4628-4632). The source and drain contact heights in vertical CNTFETs could be much higher than in flat CNTFETs if the fabrication process is not optimized. To understand the impact of contact height on transistor performance, we use a semi-classical method to calculate the characteristics of CNTFETs with different contact heights. The results show that the drain current decreases with increasing contact height and saturates at a value governed by the thickness of the oxide. The current reduction caused by the increased contact height becomes more significant when the gate oxide is thicker. The higher the drain voltage, the larger the current reduction. It becomes even worse when the band gap of the carbon nanotube is larger. The current can differ by a factor of more than five between the CNTEFTs with low and high contact heights when the oxide thickness is 50 nm. In addition, the influence of the contact height is limited by the channel length. The contact height plays a minor role when the channel length is less than 100 nm. © 2013 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  13. Carbon Nanotubes as an Effective Opportunity for Cancer Diagnosis and Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanginario, Alessandro; Miccoli, Beatrice; Demarchi, Danilo

    2017-01-01

    Despite the current progresses of modern medicine, the resistance of malignant tumors to present medical treatments points to the necessity of developing new therapeutic approaches. In recent years, numerous studies have focused their attention on the promising use of nanomaterials, like iron oxide nanowires, zinc oxide or mesoporous silica nanoparticles, for cancer and metastasis treatment with the advantage of operating directly at the bio-molecular scale. Among them, carbon nanotubes emerged as valid candidates not only for drug delivery, but also as a valuable tool in cancer imaging and physical ablation. Nevertheless, deep investigations about carbon nanotubes’ potential bio-compatibility and cytotoxicity limits should be also critically addressed. In the present review, after introducing carbon nanotubes and their promising advantages and drawbacks for fighting cancer, we want to focus on the numerous and different ways in which they can assist to reach this goal. Specifically, we report on how they can be used not only for drug delivery purposes, but also as a powerful ally to develop effective contrast agents for tumors’ medical or photodynamic imaging, to perform direct physical ablation of metastasis, as well as gene therapy. PMID:28212271

  14. Excitonic effects in third-harmonic generation: The case of carbon nanotubes and nanoribbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attaccalite, C.; Cannuccia, E.; Grüning, M.

    2017-03-01

    Linear and nonlinear optical properties of low-dimensional nanostructures have attracted great interest from the scientific community as tools to probe the strong confinement of electrons and for possible applications in optoelectronic devices. In particular it has been shown that the linear optical response of carbon nanotubes [F. Wang et al., Science 308, 838 (2005), 10.1126/science.1110265] and graphene nanoribbons [Nat. Commun. 5 4253 (2014), 10.1038/ncomms5253] is dominated by bounded electron-hole pairs, excitons. The role of excitons in linear response has been widely studied, but still, little is known about their effect on nonlinear susceptibilities. Using a recently developed methodology [Phys. Rev. B 88, 235113 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevB.88.235113] based on well-established ab initio many-body perturbation theory approaches, we find that quasiparticle shifts and excitonic effects significantly modify the third-harmonic generation in carbon nanotubes and graphene nanoribbons. For both systems the net effect of many-body effects is to reduce the intensity of the main peak in the independent-particle spectrum and redistribute the spectral weight among several excitonic resonances.

  15. Carbon nanotube conditioning part 1—effect of interwall interaction on the electronic band gap of double-walled carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto, M.; Vajtai, R.; Ajayan, P. M.; Barrera, E. V.

    2018-01-01

    Ab initio density functional theory simulations were used to calculate the electronic structure and the total energy of double-walled carbon nanotubes (DWCNTs). The relaxed configurations studied were uncapped, infinitely-long zigzag@zigzag double-walled carbon nanotubes. The lowest energy configuration was found to correspond to an interwall distance of 0.35 nm, except for the configurations with inner tube chiral indices (5,0), (6,0) and (7,0). The largest binding energies were found to correspond to a 0.35 nm interwall distance for all the DWCNT configurations studied, and increasing with DWCNT average diameter. In terms of the effect of the interwall interaction on the electronic band gap of DWCNTs, four regions of band gap were obtained which were termed: zero band gap, narrow band gap, small band gap, and medium band gap regions. These regions offer the possibility to first tune the electronic band gap to a region with a desired range, and further tune that choice within the region itself by varying the interwall distance. It was also found that zigzag@zigzag DWCNTs with outer tube leading chiral index n = 3k + 1 or n = 3k + 2 (k being an integer) follow, as a general trend, an inversely proportional relation of the electronic band gap with respect to the average diameter.

  16. Phthalimide containing donor-acceptor polymers for effective dispersion of single-walled carbon nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baris Yilmaz

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Single-walled carbon nanotubes have been dispersed by novel phthalimide containing donor-acceptor type copolymers in organic media. Brominated phthalimide comonomer has been copolymerized with several electron rich structures using Suzuki and Stille coupling reactions. Carbon nanotube dispersion capability of the resultant polymers has been assessed by exploiting the non-covalent interaction of nanotube surface with the pi-system of conjugated backbone of polymers. Four polymers have been found to be good candidates for individually dispersing nanotubes in solution. In order to identify the dispersed nanotube species, 2D excitation-emission map and Raman spectroscopy have been performed. Molecular dynamics modelling has been utilized to reveal the binding energies of dispersants with the nanotube surface and the simulation results have been compared with the experimental findings. Both experimental and theoretical results imply the presence of a complex mechanism that governs the extent of dispersion capacity and selectivity of each conjugated polymeric dispersant in solubilizing carbon nanotubes.

  17. Carbon-Nanotubes-Supported Pd Nanoparticles for Alcohol Oxidations in Fuel Cells: Effect of Number of Nanotube Walls on Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jin; Lu, Shanfu; Xiang, Yan; Shen, Pei Kang; Liu, Jian; Jiang, San Ping

    2015-09-07

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are well known electrocatalyst supports due to their high electrical conductivity, structural stability, and high surface area. Here, we demonstrate that the number of inner tubes or walls of CNTs also have a significant promotion effect on the activity of supported Pd nanoparticles (NPs) for alcohol oxidation reactions of direct alcohol fuel cells (DAFCs). Pd NPs with similar particle size (2.1-2.8 nm) were uniformly assembled on CNTs with different number of walls. The results indicate that Pd NPs supported on triple-walled CNTs (TWNTs) have the highest mass activity and stability for methanol, ethanol, and ethylene glycol oxidation reactions, as compared to Pd NPs supported on single-walled and multi-walled CNTs. Such a specific promotion effect of TWNTs on the electrocatalytic activity of Pd NPs is not related to the contribution of metal impurities in CNTs, oxygen-functional groups of CNTs or surface area of CNTs and Pd NPs. A facile charge transfer mechanism via electron tunneling between the outer wall and inner tubes of CNTs under electrochemical driving force is proposed for the significant promotion effect of TWNTs for the alcohol oxidation reactions in alkaline solutions. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Carbon nanotube computer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shulaker, Max M; Hills, Gage; Patil, Nishant; Wei, Hai; Chen, Hong-Yu; Wong, H-S Philip; Mitra, Subhasish

    2013-09-26

    The miniaturization of electronic devices has been the principal driving force behind the semiconductor industry, and has brought about major improvements in computational power and energy efficiency. Although advances with silicon-based electronics continue to be made, alternative technologies are being explored. Digital circuits based on transistors fabricated from carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have the potential to outperform silicon by improving the energy-delay product, a metric of energy efficiency, by more than an order of magnitude. Hence, CNTs are an exciting complement to existing semiconductor technologies. Owing to substantial fundamental imperfections inherent in CNTs, however, only very basic circuit blocks have been demonstrated. Here we show how these imperfections can be overcome, and demonstrate the first computer built entirely using CNT-based transistors. The CNT computer runs an operating system that is capable of multitasking: as a demonstration, we perform counting and integer-sorting simultaneously. In addition, we implement 20 different instructions from the commercial MIPS instruction set to demonstrate the generality of our CNT computer. This experimental demonstration is the most complex carbon-based electronic system yet realized. It is a considerable advance because CNTs are prominent among a variety of emerging technologies that are being considered for the next generation of highly energy-efficient electronic systems.

  19. Effect of Peierls transition in armchair carbon nanotube on dynamical behaviour of encapsulated fullerene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hieu Nguyen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The changes of dynamical behaviour of a single fullerene molecule inside an armchair carbon nanotube caused by the structural Peierls transition in the nanotube are considered. The structures of the smallest C20 and Fe@C20 fullerenes are computed using the spin-polarized density functional theory. Significant changes of the barriers for motion along the nanotube axis and rotation of these fullerenes inside the (8,8 nanotube are found at the Peierls transition. It is shown that the coefficients of translational and rotational diffusions of these fullerenes inside the nanotube change by several orders of magnitude. The possibility of inverse orientational melting, i.e. with a decrease of temperature, for the systems under consideration is predicted.

  20. Commercial single-walled carbon nanotubes effects in fibrinolysis of human umbilical vein endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Yáñez, Yury; Bahena-Uribe, Daniel; Chávez-Munguía, Bibiana; López-Marure, Rebeca; González-Monroy, Stuart; Cisneros, Bulmaro; Albores, Arnulfo

    2015-08-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that carbon nanotubes (CNTs) induce platelet aggregation, endothelial dysfunction and vascular thrombosis. However, there is little information on the effects of CNTs on fibrinolysis. We investigated the role of pristine-commercial single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) with fibrinolysis and their contribution to the induction of pro-thrombotic processes in human vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). SWCNTs alone produced concentration-dependent oxidation, as measured by a dithiothreitol oxidation assay. Internalized SWCNTs were located in HUVEC treated with 25 μg/ml using transmission electron microscopy, whereas treatment with 50 μg/ml compromised cell viability, and oxidative stress increased significantly at 5 μg/ml. The study showed that in HUVEC treated with 25 μg SWCNT/ml, fibrinolysis-related gene expression and protein levels had increased by 3-12 h after treatment (serpine-1: 13-fold; PLAT: 11-fold and PLAU: 2-fold), but only the PAI-1 protein was increased (1.5-fold), whereas tissue and urokinase plasminogen activator proteins (tPA and uPA, respectively) tended to decrease. In summary, pristine SWCNTs treatment resulted in evident HUVEC damage caused by cell fiber contact, internalization, and oxidative stress due to contaminant metals. The generation of endothelial dysfunction, as shown by the altered expression of genes and proteins involved in fibrinolysis, suggest that SWCNTs display pro-thrombotic effects. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  1. Effect of different carrier gases and their flow rates on the growth of carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tewari, Aarti; Sharma, Suresh C.

    2015-04-01

    The present paper examines the effect of different carrier gases and their flow rates on the growth of carbon nanotubes (CNTs). A theoretical model is developed incorporating the charging rate of the carbon nanotube, kinetics of all the plasma species, and the growth rate of the CNTs because of diffusion and accretion of ions on the catalyst nanoparticle. The three different carrier gases, i.e., argon (Ar), ammonia, and nitrogen, are considered in the present investigation, and flow rates of all the three carrier gases are varied individually (keeping the flow rates of hydrocarbon and hydrogen gas constant) to investigate the variations in the number densities of hydrocarbon and hydrogen ions in the plasma and their consequent effects on the height and radius of CNT. Based on the results obtained, it is concluded that Ar favors the formation of CNTs with larger height and radius whereas ammonia contributes to better height of CNT but decreases the radius of CNT, and nitrogen impedes both the height and radius of CNT. The present work can serve to the better understanding of process parameters during growth of CNTs by a plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition process.

  2. The effect of protein corona composition on the interaction of carbon nanotubes with human blood platelets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Paoli, Silvia H; Diduch, Lukas L; Tegegn, Tseday Z; Orecna, Martina; Strader, Michael B; Karnaukhova, Elena; Bonevich, John E; Holada, Karel; Simak, Jan

    2014-08-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNT) are one of the most promising nanomaterials for use in medicine. The blood biocompatibility of CNT is a critical safety issue. In the bloodstream, proteins bind to CNT through non-covalent interactions to form a protein corona, thereby largely defining the biological properties of the CNT. Here, we characterize the interactions of carboxylated-multiwalled carbon nanotubes (CNTCOOH) with common human proteins and investigate the effect of the different protein coronas on the interaction of CNTCOOH with human blood platelets (PLT). Molecular modeling and different photophysical techniques were employed to characterize the binding of albumin (HSA), fibrinogen (FBG), γ-globulins (IgG) and histone H1 (H1) on CNTCOOH. We found that the identity of protein forming the corona greatly affects the outcome of CNTCOOH's interaction with blood PLT. Bare CNTCOOH-induced PLT aggregation and the release of platelet membrane microparticles (PMP). HSA corona attenuated the PLT aggregating activity of CNTCOOH, while FBG caused the agglomeration of CNTCOOH nanomaterial, thereby diminishing the effect of CNTCOOH on PLT. In contrast, the IgG corona caused PLT fragmentation, and the H1 corona induced a strong PLT aggregation, thus potentiating the release of PMP. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. Effect of electrode gap on the sensing properties of multiwalled carbon nanotubes based gas sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saheed, Mohamed Shuaib Mohamed; Mohamed, Norani Muti; Burhanudin, Zainal Arif

    2016-11-01

    Vertically aligned multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) were grown on Si substrate coated with alumina and iron using chemical vapor deposition. Electrode gap of 10, 25 and 50 µm were adopted to determine the effect of varying gap spacing on the sensing properties such as voltage breakdown, sensitivity and selectivity for three gases namely argon, carbon dioxide and ammonia. Argon has the lowest voltage breakdown for every electrode gap. The fabricated MWCNT based gas sensor drastically reduced the voltage breakdown by 89.5% when the electrode spacing is reduced from 50 µm to 10 µm. The reduction is attributed to the high non-uniform electric field between the electrodes caused by the protrusion of nanotips. The sensor shows good sensitivity and selectivity with the ability to detect the gas in the mixture with air provided that the concentration is ≥ 20% where the voltage breakdown will be close to the pure gas.

  4. Effect of oxide nanoparticles on structural properties of multiwalled carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhall, Shivani; Jaggi, Neena

    2016-03-01

    A simple chemical precipitation route is reported to partially decorate mutliwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) with oxide nanoparticles in the present study. X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy and Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) are used to investigate the structural properties of MWCNTs composite with nickel, cuprous, zinc and tin oxides nanoparticles. Raman analysis confirms that, ZnO nanoparticles attached nanotubes show more ordering of graphene layers as compared to the others because of uniform dispersion of nanoparticles. It is investigated that, adopted route proved helpful to improve the structural properties of the nanotubes.

  5. Effect of conducting polypyrrole on the transport properties of carbon nanotube yarn

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foroughi, Javad, E-mail: foroughi@uow.edu.au [ARC Centre of Excellence for Electromaterials Science, Intelligent Polymer Research Institute, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW 2519 (Australia); Information and communication Technology Research Institute, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW 2519 (Australia); Kimiaghalam, Bahram [Information and communication Technology Research Institute, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW 2519 (Australia); Ghorbani, Shaban Reza [Department of Physics, Hakim Sabzevari University, P.O. Box 397, Sabzevar (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Safaei, Farzad [Information and communication Technology Research Institute, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW 2519 (Australia); Abolhasan, Mehran [Faculty of Engineering and IT University of Technology Sydney, Sydney, NSW Australia (Australia)

    2012-10-01

    Experiments were conducted to measure the electrical conductivity in three types of pristine and carbon nanotube-polypyrrole (CNT-PPy) composite yarns and its dependence on over a wide temperature range. The experimental results fit well with the analytical models developed. The effective energy separation between localized states of the pristine CNT yarn is larger than that for both the electrochemically and chemically prepared CNT-PPy yarns. It was found that all samples are in the critical regime in the insulator-metal transition, or close to the metallic regime at low temperature. The electrical conductivity results are in good agreement with a Three Dimensional Variable Range Hopping model at low temperatures, which provides a strong indication that electron hopping is the main means of current transfer in CNT yarns at T < 100 K. We found that the two shell model accurately describes the electronic properties of CNT and CNT-PPy composite yarns in the temperature range of 5-350 K. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We developed hybrid carbon nanotube conducting polypyrrole composite yarns. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The main current transfer scheme in yarn is via three dimensional electrons hopping. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Two shell model describes well electronic properties of yarns in range of 5-350 K.

  6. Effect of single walled carbon nanotubes on the threshold voltage of dye based photovoltaic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, S.; Manik, N. B.

    2016-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes are being widely used in organic photovoltaic (OPV) devices as their usage has been reported to enhance the device efficiency along with other related parameters. In this work we have studied the energy (Ec) effect of single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) on the threshold voltage (Vth) and also on the trap states of dye based photovoltaic devices. SWCNT is added in a series of dyes such as Rose Bengal (RB), Methyl Red (MR), Malachite Green (MG) and Crystal Violet (CV). By analysing the steady state dark current-voltage (I-V) characteristics Vth and Ec is estimated for the different devices with and without addition of SWCNT. It is observed that on an average for all the dyes Vth is reduced by about 30% in presence of SWCNT. The trap energy Ec also reduces in case of all the dyes. The relation between Vth, Ec and total trap density is discussed. From the photovoltaic measurements it is seen that the different photovoltaic parameters change with addition of SWCNT to the dye based devices. Both the short circuit current density and fill factor are found to increase for all the dye based devices in presence of SWCNT.

  7. Unique Characteristics of Vertical Carbon Nanotube Field-effect Transistors on Silicon

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Jingqi

    2014-07-01

    A vertical carbon nanotube field-effect transistor (CNTFET) based on silicon (Si) substrate has been proposed and simulated using a semi-classical theory. A single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) and an n-type Si nanowire in series construct the channel of the transistor. The CNTFET presents ambipolar characteristics at positive drain voltage (Vd) and n-type characteristics at negative Vd. The current is significantly influenced by the doping level of n-Si and the SWNT band gap. The n-branch current of the ambipolar characteristics increases with increasing doping level of the n-Si while the p-branch current decreases. The SWNT band gap has the same influence on the p-branch current at a positive Vd and n-type characteristics at negative Vd. The lower the SWNT band gap, the higher the current. However, it has no impact on the n-branch current in the ambipolar characteristics. Thick oxide is found to significantly degrade the current and the subthreshold slope of the CNTFETs.

  8. Effect of oxygen plasma treatment on carbon nanotube-based sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ham, Seung Woo; Hong, Hyun Pyo; Kim, Joon Hyub; Min, Sung Jun; Min, Nam Ki

    2014-11-01

    We present the research results of the use of plasma modification for the fabrication of carbon nanotube-based devices for chemical and biological sensing. The oxygen plasma treatment of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) effectively grafts oxygen atoms onto the CNT surface. For investigating the impact of plasma modification on the MWCNT-based sensor performance, three different sensors are fabricated: NH3 gas sensors, humidity sensors, and immunosensors. The plasma-modified MWCNTs (p-MWCNTs) exhibit a sensitivity to NH3 that is approximately twice that of the corresponding untreated sensor. The humidity sensor with a p-MWCNT top electrode exhibits a much faster response time compared with the untreated MWCNT electrodes. The p-MWCNT immunosensor exhibits a detection limit almost 1000 times lower than that of the standard ELISA assay, while the untreated MWCNTs exhibit no detectable signal. These results imply that the oxygen-containing functional groups on the CNT surface significantly affect the performance of the CNT-based chemical and biological sensors.

  9. Synergistic Effects in the Gas Sensitivity of Polypyrrole/Single Wall Carbon Nanotube Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nguyen Duc Thien

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Polypyrrole/single wall carbon nanotube composites were synthesized by in-situ chemical polymerization using pyrrole (PPy as precursor and single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs as additive component. Electron microscope images reveal that SWNTs component acts as nucleation sites for PPy growth in the form of spherical and cylindrical core-shell structures. The SWNTs/PPy core-shell results in thin n-p junctions which modify the PPy bandgap and reduce the work function of electrons. As a result of the strong coupling, Raman and IR spectra show that the PPy undergoes a transition from polaron to bipolaron state, i.e., indicating an increase in the conductivity. In the UV-Vis spectra, the 340 nm adsorption band (π*-π transition exhibits a red shift, while the 460 nm adsorption band (bipolaron transition experiences a blue shift indicating a change in electronic structure and a relocation of polaron levels in the band gap of PPy. The modification in PPy electronic structure brings in a synergistic effect in sensing feature. Upon exposure to oxygen (an oxidizing agent and NH3 gas (a reducing agent, the PPy/SWNTs nanocomposite shows an enhancement in sensitivity exceeding ten folds in comparison with those of PPy or SWNTs.

  10. Effect of interwall interaction on the electronic structure of double-walled carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto, M; Boyer, T A; Biradar, S; Ge, L; Vajtai, R; Elías-Zúñiga, A; Ajayan, P M; Barrera, E V

    2015-04-24

    Through this study, the results of density functional theory calculations within the local density approximation of the electronic structure of zigzag-zigzag double-walled carbon nanotubes (DWCNTs), with chiral indices (n, 0)@(m, 0) for n = 7-15, and m = 15-26, has been presented and the effects of interwall interaction and orbital hybridization on the electronic structure of these systems has been discussed. It was observed that the electronic band gap of the aforementioned DWCNTs depends on the interwall distance only for metallic-semiconductor configurations and on the intrinsic properties of the constituent tubes in all other combinations. It was also observed that the calculated band gap for most of the metallic-metallic DWCNTs was smaller than semiconductor-metallic, metallic-semiconductor, and semiconductor-semiconductor configurations. Metallic-semiconductor DWCNTs were found to be desirable for band gap tuning applications because of their dependence on interwall distance, opening up the possibility of using such systems in electronic device applications, such as transistors. Other applications include the use of DWCNTs in macroscopic carbon nanotube conducting wires, for which metallic-metallic and semiconducting-metallic zigzag-zigzag DWCNTs were found to be the most desirable configurations due to their small band gaps.

  11. Frequency, delay and velocity analysis for intrinsic channel region of carbon nanotube field effect transistors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Geetha

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Gate wrap around field effect transistor is preferred for its good channel control. To study the high frequency behaviour of the device, parameters like cut-off frequency, transit or delay time, velocity are calculated and plotted. Double-walled and array of channels are considered in this work for enhanced output and impedance matching of the device with the measuring equipment terminal respectively. The perfomance of double-walledcarbon nanotube is compared with single-walled carbon nanotube and found that the device with double-wall shows appreciable improvement in its characteristics. Analysis of these parameters are done with various values of source/drain length, gate length, tube diameters and channel densities. The maximum cut-off frequency is found to be 72.3 THz with corresponding velocity as 5x106 m/s for channel density as 3 and gate length as 11nm. The number of channel is varied from 3 to 21 and found that the perfromance of the device containing double-walled carbon nano tube is better for channel number lesser than or equal to 12. The proposed modelling can be used for designing devices to handle high speed applications of future generation.

  12. Effect of Thermal Treatment on the Structure of Multi-walled Carbon Nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behler, K.; Osswald, S.; Ye, H.; Dimovski, S.; Gogotsi, Y. [Drexel University, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, and A.J. Drexel Nanotechnology Institute (United States)], E-mail: yg36@drexel.edu

    2006-10-15

    The effects of vacuum annealing and oxidation in air on the structure of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) produced by a large-scale catalytic chemical vapor deposition (CCVD) process are studied using Raman spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). A detailed Raman spectroscopic study of as-produced nanotubes has also been conducted. While oxidation in air up to 400 deg. C removes disordered carbon, defects in tube walls are produced at higher temperatures. TEM reveals that MWCNTs annealed at 1,800 deg. C and above become more ordered than as-received tubes, while the tubes annealed at 2,000 deg. C exhibit polygonalization, mass transfer and over growth. The change in structure is observable by the separation of the Raman G and D' peaks, a lower R-value (I{sub D}/I{sub G} ratio), and an increase in the intensity of the second order peaks. Using wavelengths from the deep ultraviolet (UV) range (5.08 eV) extending into the visible near infrared (IR) (1.59 eV), the Raman spectra of MWCNTs reveal a dependence of the D-band position proportional to the excitation energy of the incident laser energies.

  13. Device and circuit-level performance of carbon nanotube field-effect transistor with benchmarking against a nano-MOSFET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Michael Loong Peng; Lentaris, Georgios; Amaratunga Aj, Gehan

    2012-08-19

    The performance of a semiconducting carbon nanotube (CNT) is assessed and tabulated for parameters against those of a metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET). Both CNT and MOSFET models considered agree well with the trends in the available experimental data. The results obtained show that nanotubes can significantly reduce the drain-induced barrier lowering effect and subthreshold swing in silicon channel replacement while sustaining smaller channel area at higher current density. Performance metrics of both devices such as current drive strength, current on-off ratio (Ion/Ioff), energy-delay product, and power-delay product for logic gates, namely NAND and NOR, are presented. Design rules used for carbon nanotube field-effect transistors (CNTFETs) are compatible with the 45-nm MOSFET technology. The parasitics associated with interconnects are also incorporated in the model. Interconnects can affect the propagation delay in a CNTFET. Smaller length interconnects result in higher cutoff frequency.

  14. Effect of cleaning procedures on the electrical properties of carbon nanotube transistors—A statistical study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tittmann-Otto, J., E-mail: jana.tittmann-otto@zfm.tu-chemnitz.de; Hermann, S.; Hartmann, M.; Toader, M. [Center for Microtechnologies (ZfM), Technische Universität Chemnitz, Chemnitz D-09107 (Germany); Center for Advancing Electronics Dresden (cfaed), Technische Universität Chemnitz, Chemnitz D-09107 (Germany); Kalbacova, J.; Rodriguez, R. D.; Zahn, D. R. T. [Center for Advancing Electronics Dresden (cfaed), Technische Universität Chemnitz, Chemnitz D-09107 (Germany); Semiconductor Physics, Technische Universität Chemnitz, Chemnitz D-09107 (Germany); Schulz, S. E.; Gessner, T. [Center for Microtechnologies (ZfM), Technische Universität Chemnitz, Chemnitz D-09107 (Germany); Center for Advancing Electronics Dresden (cfaed), Technische Universität Chemnitz, Chemnitz D-09107 (Germany); Fraunhofer Institute for Electronic Nano Systems (ENAS), Chemnitz D-09126 (Germany)

    2016-03-28

    The interface between a carbon nanotube (CNT) and its environment can dramatically affect the electrical properties of CNT-based field-effect transistors (FETs). For such devices, the channel environment plays a significant role inducing doping or charge traps giving rise to hysteresis in the transistor characteristics. Thereby the fabrication process strongly determines the extent of those effects and the final device performance. In CNT-based devices obtained from dispersions, a proper individualization of the nanotubes is mandatory. This is generally realized by an ultrasonic treatment combined with surfactant molecules, which enwrap nanotubes forming micelle aggregates. To minimize impact on device performance, it is of vital importance to consider post-deposition treatments for removal of surfactant molecules and other impurities. In this context, we investigated the effect of several wet chemical cleaning and thermal post treatments on the electrical characteristics as well as physical properties of more than 600 devices fabricated only by wafer-level compatible technologies. We observed that nitric acid and water treatments improved the maximum-current of devices. Additionally, we found that the ethanol treatment successfully lowered hysteresis in the transfer characteristics. The effect of the chemical cleaning procedures was found to be more significant on CNT-metal contacts than for the FET channels. Moreover, we investigated the effect of an additional thermal cleaning step under vacuum after the chemical cleaning, which had an exceptional impact on the hysteresis behavior including hysteresis reversal. The presence of surfactant molecules on CNT was evidenced by X-ray photoelectron and Raman spectroscopies. By identifying the role of surfactant molecules and assessing the enhancement of device performance as a direct consequence of several cleaning procedures, these results are important for the development of CNT-based electronics at the wafer-level.

  15. Effect of cleaning procedures on the electrical properties of carbon nanotube transistors—A statistical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tittmann-Otto, J.; Hermann, S.; Kalbacova, J.; Hartmann, M.; Toader, M.; Rodriguez, R. D.; Schulz, S. E.; Zahn, D. R. T.; Gessner, T.

    2016-03-01

    The interface between a carbon nanotube (CNT) and its environment can dramatically affect the electrical properties of CNT-based field-effect transistors (FETs). For such devices, the channel environment plays a significant role inducing doping or charge traps giving rise to hysteresis in the transistor characteristics. Thereby the fabrication process strongly determines the extent of those effects and the final device performance. In CNT-based devices obtained from dispersions, a proper individualization of the nanotubes is mandatory. This is generally realized by an ultrasonic treatment combined with surfactant molecules, which enwrap nanotubes forming micelle aggregates. To minimize impact on device performance, it is of vital importance to consider post-deposition treatments for removal of surfactant molecules and other impurities. In this context, we investigated the effect of several wet chemical cleaning and thermal post treatments on the electrical characteristics as well as physical properties of more than 600 devices fabricated only by wafer-level compatible technologies. We observed that nitric acid and water treatments improved the maximum-current of devices. Additionally, we found that the ethanol treatment successfully lowered hysteresis in the transfer characteristics. The effect of the chemical cleaning procedures was found to be more significant on CNT-metal contacts than for the FET channels. Moreover, we investigated the effect of an additional thermal cleaning step under vacuum after the chemical cleaning, which had an exceptional impact on the hysteresis behavior including hysteresis reversal. The presence of surfactant molecules on CNT was evidenced by X-ray photoelectron and Raman spectroscopies. By identifying the role of surfactant molecules and assessing the enhancement of device performance as a direct consequence of several cleaning procedures, these results are important for the development of CNT-based electronics at the wafer-level.

  16. Probing Photosensitization by Functionalized Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) photosensitize the production of reactive oxygen species that can damage organisms by biomembrane oxidation or mediate CNTs' environmental transformations. The photosensitized nature of derivatized carbon nanotubes from various synthetic methods, and thus ...

  17. Quantum dot attachment and morphology control by carbon nanotubes

    OpenAIRE

    Juarez, Beatriz H.; Klinke, Christian; Kornowski, Andreas; Weller, Horst

    2008-01-01

    Novel applications in nanotechnology rely on the design of tailored nano-architectures. For this purpose, carbon nanotubes and nanoparticles are intensively investigated. In this work we study the influence of non-functionalized carbon nanotubes on the synthesis of CdSe nanoparticles by means of organometallic colloidal routes. This new synthesis methodology does not only provide an effective path to attach nanoparticles non-covalently to carbon nanotubes but represents also a new way to cont...

  18. Quantum Dot Attachment and Morphology Control by Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juárez, Beatriz H.; Klinke, Christian; Kornowski, Andreas; Weller, Horst

    2007-12-01

    Novel applications in nanotechnology rely on the design of tailored nano-architectures. For this purpose, carbon nanotubes and nanoparticles are intensively investigated. In this work we study the influence of non-functionalized carbon nanotubes on the synthesis of CdSe nanoparticles by means of organometallic colloidal routes. This new synthesis methodology does not only provide an effective path to attach nanoparticles non-covalently to carbon nanotubes but represents also a new way to control the shape of nanoparticles.

  19. Au nanoparticles attached carbon nanotubes as a high performance active element in field effect transistor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Myeongsoon; Kim, Don, E-mail: donkim@pknu.ac.kr

    2016-08-15

    The Au nanoparticles attached carbon nanotubes (Au-CNTs), diameter ranged from 40 to 250 nm, were prepared and discussed their chemical and electrical properties. The shape and crystallinity of the carbon nanotubes (CNTs) phase depended main2ly on the diameter of CNTs (r{sub Au-CNT}). Highly crystalline, straight CNTs were observed when the r{sub Au-CNT} exceeded 80 nm, and less crystalline noodle-shaped CNTs were observed when the r{sub Au-CNT} was smaller than 80 nm. The crystallinity of the CNT phase was confirmed by analyzing the G and D bands in their Raman spectra and the electrical conductivities of the Au-CNTs. The electrical conductivity of the highly crystalline carbon phase of Au-CNTs (r{sub Au-CNT} = 250 nm) was ∼10{sup 4} S/cm. The back-gated field effect transistors (FETs) based on the Au-CNTs, which were assembled on a SiO{sub 2}/Si wafer using the dielectrophoresis technique, showed that the Au-CNTs would be a good functional electronic material for future electronic and sensing applications. The transconductance and hole mobility of the FETs, which were assembled with the highly crystalline Au-CNTs (r{sub Au-CNT} = 250 nm), reached to 3.6 × 10{sup −4} A/V and 3.1 × 10{sup 4} cm{sup 2}/V s, respectively. These values are in the middle of those of reported for single walled carbon nanotubes and graphene. However, we could not find any field effect in a CNTFET, which assembled without Au nanoparticles, through the same process. - Highlights: • The shape and crystallinity of the CNTs depended mainly on the diameter of CNTs. • The electrical conductivity of the highly crystalline Au-CNTs was ∼10{sup 4} S/cm. • The Au-CNT FET shows typical p-channel gate effect with the on/off ratio of ∼10{sup 4}. • The Au-CNT FET shows very high transconductance (g{sub m}) and carrier mobility (μ{sub h}).

  20. Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Network Field Effect Transistor as a Humidity Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasantha R. Mudimela

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Single-walled carbon nanotube network field effect transistors were fabricated and studied as humidity sensors. Sensing responses were altered by changing the gate voltage. At the open channel state (negative gate voltage, humidity pulse resulted in the decrease of the source-drain current, and, vice versa, the increase in the source-drain current was observed at the positive gate voltage. This effect was explained by the electron-donating nature of water molecules. The operation speed and signal intensity was found to be dependent on the gate voltage polarity. The positive or negative change in current with humidity pulse at zero-gate voltage was found to depend on the previous state of the gate electrode (positive or negative voltage, respectively. Those characteristics were explained by the charge traps in the gate dielectric altering the effective gate voltage, which influenced the operation of field effect transistor.

  1. Carbon nanotube woven textile photodetector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubair, Ahmed; Wang, Xuan; Mirri, Francesca; Tsentalovich, Dmitri E.; Fujimura, Naoki; Suzuki, Daichi; Soundarapandian, Karuppasamy P.; Kawano, Yukio; Pasquali, Matteo; Kono, Junichiro

    2018-01-01

    The increasing interest in mobile and wearable technology demands the enhancement of functionality of clothing through incorporation of sophisticated architectures of multifunctional materials. Flexible electronic and photonic devices based on organic materials have made impressive progress over the past decade, but higher performance, simpler fabrication, and most importantly, compatibility with woven technology are desired. Here we report on the development of a weaved, substrateless, and polarization-sensitive photodetector based on doping-engineered fibers of highly aligned carbon nanotubes. This room-temperature-operating, self-powered detector responds to radiation in an ultrabroad spectral range, from the ultraviolet to the terahertz, through the photothermoelectric effect, with a low noise-equivalent power (a few nW/Hz 1 /2) throughout the range and with a Z T -factor value that is twice as large as that of previously reported carbon nanotube-based photothermoelectric photodetectors. Particularly, we fabricated a ˜1 -m-long device consisting of tens of p+-p- junctions and weaved it into a shirt. This device demonstrated a collective photoresponse of the series-connected junctions under global illumination. The performance of the device did not show any sign of deterioration through 200 bending tests with a bending radius smaller than 100 μ m as well as standard washing and ironing cycles. This unconventional photodetector will find applications in wearable technology that require detection of electromagnetic radiation.

  2. Universally dispersible carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prevoteau, Alexandre; Soulié-Ziakovic, Corinne; Leibler, Ludwik

    2012-12-12

    We show that supramolecular chemistry provides a convenient tool to prepare carbone nanotubes (CNTs) that can be dispersed in solvents of any chemical nature, easily recovered and redispersed. Thymine-modified CNTs (CNT-Thy) can be dispersed in solution in the presence of diaminotriazine (DAT) end-functionalized polymers, through supramolecular Thy/DAT association. DAT-polymer chains are selected according to the solvent chemical nature: polystyrene (PS) for hydrophobic/low polarity solvents and a propylene oxide/ethylene oxide copolymer (predominantly propylene oxide based, PPO/PEO) for polar solvents or water. Long-term stable supramolecular CNT dispersions are reversibly aggregated by adding a few droplets of a selective dissociating agent of the Thy/DAT association (DMSO). CNT-Thy, simply recycled by centrifugation or filtration, can be redispersed in another solvent in presence of a suitable soluble DAT-polymer. Dispersion and aggregation can also be switched on and off by choosing a polymer for which a given solvent is close to Θ-conditions, e.g., PS in cyclohexane or PPO/PEO in water.

  3. Chemical reactions confined within carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miners, Scott A; Rance, Graham A; Khlobystov, Andrei N

    2016-08-22

    In this critical review, we survey the wide range of chemical reactions that have been confined within carbon nanotubes, particularly emphasising how the pairwise interactions between the catalysts, reactants, transition states and products of a particular molecular transformation with the host nanotube can be used to control the yields and distributions of products of chemical reactions. We demonstrate that nanoscale confinement within carbon nanotubes enables the control of catalyst activity, morphology and stability, influences the local concentration of reactants and products thus affecting equilibria, rates and selectivity, pre-arranges the reactants for desired reactions and alters the relative stability of isomeric products. We critically evaluate the relative advantages and disadvantages of the confinement of chemical reactions inside carbon nanotubes from a chemical perspective and describe how further developments in the controlled synthesis of carbon nanotubes and the incorporation of multifunctionality are essential for the development of this ever-expanding field, ultimately leading to the effective control of the pathways of chemical reactions through the rational design of multi-functional carbon nanoreactors.

  4. Detection of gas atoms with carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arash, B.; Wang, Q.

    2013-01-01

    Owning to their unparalleled sensitivity resolution, nanomechanical resonators have excellent capabilities in design of nano-sensors for gas detection. The current challenge is to develop new designs of the resonators for differentiating distinct gas atoms with a recognizably high sensitivity. In this work, the characteristics of impulse wave propagation in carbon nanotube-based sensors are investigated using molecular dynamics simulations to provide a new method for detection of noble gases. A sensitivity index based on wave velocity shifts in a single-walled carbon nanotube, induced by surrounding gas atoms, is defined to explore the efficiency of the nano-sensor. The simulation results indicate that the nano-sensor is able to differentiate distinct noble gases at the same environmental temperature and pressure. The inertia and the strengthening effects by the gases on wave characteristics of carbon nanotubes are particularly discussed, and a continuum mechanics shell model is developed to interpret the effects.

  5. Effect of the carbon nanotube surface characteristics on the conductivity and dielectric constant of carbon nanotube/poly(vinylidene fluoride composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pereira João

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Commercial multi-walled carbon nanotubes (CNT were functionalized by oxidation with HNO3, to introduce oxygen-containing surface groups, and by thermal treatments at different temperatures for their selective removal. The obtained samples were characterized by adsorption of N2 at -196°C, temperature-programmed desorption and determination of pH at the point of zero charge. CNT/poly(vinylidene fluoride composites were prepared using the above CNT samples, with different filler fractions up to 1 wt%. It was found that oxidation reduced composite conductivity for a given concentration, shifted the percolation threshold to higher concentrations, and had no significant effect in the dielectric response.

  6. Carbon nanotubes: Synthesis, characterization, and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deck, Christian Peter

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) possess exceptional material properties, making them desirable for use in a variety of applications. In this work, CNTs were grown using two distinct catalytic chemical vapor deposition (CVD) procedures, floating catalyst CVD and thermal CVD, which differed in the method of catalyst introduction. Reaction conditions were optimized to synthesize nanotubes with desired characteristics, and the effects of varying growth parameters were studied. These parameters included gas composition, temperature, reaction duration, and catalyst and substrate material. The CNT products were then examined using several approaches. For each CVD method, nanotube growth rates were determined and the formation and termination mechanisms were investigated. The effects of reaction parameters on nanotube diameters and morphology were also explored to identify means of controlling these important properties. In addition to investigating the effects of different growth parameters, the material properties of nanotubes were also studied. The floating catalyst CVD method produced thick mats of nanotubes, and the mechanical response of these samples was examined using in-situ compression and tension testing. These results indicated that mat structure is composed of discontinuous nanotubes, and a time-dependent response was also observed. In addition, the electrical resistance of bulk CNT samples was found to increase for tubes grown with higher catalyst concentrations and with bamboo morphologies. The properties of nanotubes synthesized using thermal CVD were also examined. Mechanical testing was performed using the same in-situ compression approach developed for floating catalyst CVD samples. A second characterization method was devised, where an optical approach was used to measure the deflection of patterned nanotubes exposed to an applied fluid flow. This response was also simulated, and comparisons with the experimental data were used to determine the flexural

  7. Model for two-channel Kondo effect in carbon nanotube quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzmenko, Igor; Kuzmenko, Tetyana; Avishai, Yshai

    2014-11-01

    The overscreened Kondo effect is shown to be feasible in a carbon nanotube quantum dot junction hosting a spin-1/2 atom with a single s -wave valence electron (e.g., Au). The idea is to use the two valleys ξ =K ,K' (located on two inequivalent corners of the first Brillouin zone) as two symmetry protected flavor quantum numbers. Exchange interaction between the itinerant electrons and the host atom is computed and shown to be antiferromagnetic, and it does not couple different flavors. Perturbative renormalization group analysis exposes a finite weak-coupling two-channel fixed point, where the Kondo temperature is estimated to be around 0.5 -5 K. Remarkably, occurrence of two different scaling regimes implies a nonmonotonic dependence of the conductance as a function of temperature. Consequently, in this system (unlike the "standard" two-channel Kondo effect), the physics of the overscreened Kondo effect is exposed already in the weak coupling regime.

  8. Defect Screening Effects of Fluoropolymer Capping in Single Walled Carbon Nanotube Transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Seonpil; Kim, Bongjun; Geier, Michael; Hersam, Mark; Dodabalapur, Ananth

    2015-03-01

    One of the most promising uses of single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) is as active channel semiconductor materials in field-effect transistors (FETs). Recent advances in the availability of highly sorted semiconducting SWCNT source material and in printing such nanotubes to realize high-performance thin-film transistors make them very promising candidates for printed electronics. In this presentation, we report on the substantial improvements in the characteristics of SWCNT FET devices and circuits comprised of these devices by the use of coatings of the fluoropolymer containing copolymer, PVDF-TrFE. The origins of these improvements may be attributed to the polar nature of C-F bonds and the local organization of the fluoropolymer at the interfaces with the SWCNTs so as to partially neutralize charged defects. This hypothesis was tested by the experiments using a number of vapor phase polar molecules which produce similar effects on the FET characteristics. The polar vapor experiments show that dipoles can partially neutralize residual charges arising from defects/impurities. The dipole present in polar molecules adopts an orientation that tends to cancel the effects of the charged defect/impurity from the perspective of mobile charges in the SWCNTs.

  9. Effect of mixture ratios and nitrogen carrier gas flow rates on the morphology of carbon nanotube structures grown by CVD

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Malgas, GF

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports on the growth of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) by thermal Chemical Vapour Deposition (CVD) and investigates the effects of nitrogen carrier gas flow rates and mixture ratios on the morphology of CNTs on a silicon substrate by vaporizing...

  10. Selective detection of SO2 at room temperature based on organoplatinum functionalized single-walled carbon nanotube field effect transistors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cid, C.C.; Jimenez-Cadena, G.; Riu, J.; Maroto, A.; Rius, F.X.; Batema, G.D.; van Koten, G.

    2009-01-01

    We report a field effect transistor (FET) based on a network of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) that for the first time can selectively detect a single gaseous molecule in air by chemically functionalizing the SWCNTs with a selective molecular receptor. As a target model we used SO2. The

  11. Excellent catalytic effects of multi-walled carbon nanotube supported titania on hydrogen storage of a Mg-Ni alloy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Yajun; Zhu, Yunfeng; Li, Liquan

    2015-02-11

    Superior catalytic effects of multi-walled carbon nanotube supported titania synthesized by the sol-gel method on hydrogen storage of a Mg-Ni alloy were investigated. The excellent hydrogen storage properties were obtained: absorbed 5.60 wt% H2 within 60 s at 373 K and released 6.08 wt% H2 within 600 s at 553 K.

  12. Effect of temperature on the selection of semiconducting single walled carbon nanotubes using Poly(3-dodecylthiophene-2,5-diyl)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gomulya, Widianta; Salazar Rios, Jorge; Derenskyi, Vladimir; Bisri, Satria Zulkarnaen; Jung, Stefan; Fritsch, Martin; Allard, Sybille; Scherf, Ullrich; dos Santos, Maria Cristina; Loi, Maria Antonietta

    We report on the investigation of the temperature effect on the selective dispersion of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) by Poly(3-dodecylthiophene-2,5-diy1) wrapping. The interaction mechanism between polymer chains and SWNTs is studied by controlling the polymer aggregation via variation of

  13. EDITORIAL: Focus on Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-09-01

    The study of carbon nanotubes, since their discovery by Iijima in 1991, has become a full research field with significant contributions from all areas of research in solid-state and molecular physics and also from chemistry. This Focus Issue in New Journal of Physics reflects this active research, and presents articles detailing significant advances in the production of carbon nanotubes, the study of their mechanical and vibrational properties, electronic properties and optical transitions, and electrical and transport properties. Fundamental research, both theoretical and experimental, represents part of this progress. The potential applications of nanotubes will rely on the progress made in understanding their fundamental physics and chemistry, as presented here. We believe this Focus Issue will be an excellent guide for both beginners and experts in the research field of carbon nanotubes. It has been a great pleasure to edit the many excellent contributions from Europe, Japan, and the US, as well from a number of other countries, and to witness the remarkable effort put into the manuscripts by the contributors. We thank all the authors and referees involved in the process. In particular, we would like to express our gratitude to Alexander Bradshaw, who invited us put together this Focus Issue, and to Tim Smith and the New Journal of Physics staff for their extremely efficient handling of the manuscripts. Focus on Carbon Nanotubes Contents Transport theory of carbon nanotube Y junctions R Egger, B Trauzettel, S Chen and F Siano The tubular conical helix of graphitic boron nitride F F Xu, Y Bando and D Golberg Formation pathways for single-wall carbon nanotube multiterminal junctions Inna Ponomareva, Leonid A Chernozatonskii, Antonis N Andriotis and Madhu Menon Synthesis and manipulation of carbon nanotubes J W Seo, E Couteau, P Umek, K Hernadi, P Marcoux, B Lukic, Cs Mikó, M Milas, R Gaál and L Forró Transitional behaviour in the transformation from active end

  14. Dispersions of Carbon nanotubes in Polymer Matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wise, Kristopher Eric (Inventor); Park, Cheol (Inventor); Siochi, Emilie J. (Inventor); Harrison, Joycelyn S. (Inventor); Lillehei, Peter T. (Inventor); Lowther, Sharon E. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    Dispersions of carbon nanotubes exhibiting long term stability are based on a polymer matrix having moieties therein which are capable of a donor-acceptor complexation with carbon nanotubes. The carbon nanotubes are introduced into the polymer matrix and separated therein by standard means. Nanocomposites produced from these dispersions are useful in the fabrication of structures, e.g., lightweight aerospace structures.

  15. Microwave Irradiation Induced Effects to Single-walled Carbon Nanotube Thin Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lu; Xiong, Yao; Wu, Ziran; Chen, Liwei; Xin, Hao

    2009-03-01

    Carbon nanotubes have been considered as potential building blocks for nano-scale circuits in virtue of their unique mechanical and electrical properties. However, one of the biggest obstacles for massive production of nanotube circuits is the difficulty of separating semiconducting tubes from metallic tubes or vice versa. In this work, a convenient method which may be potentially employed to selectively remove metallic tubes using microwave induced breakdown is proposed and investigated. Carbon nanotube thin films deposited on glass and quartz substrates are placed in a commercial microwave oven and heated for up to several minutes. The radial breathing mode in Raman spectra on the nanotube samples before and after the microwave irradiation suggests that the metallic-to-semiconducting ratios are reduced by around 20%. Meanwhile, because in the thin film samples most of the nanotubes are entangled, smaller diameter nanotubes (both metallic and semiconducting) tend to be affected more. THz transmission measurements of these thin films are also performed before and after microwave irradiation. The significant increase of transmission after the microwave irradiation process confirms the loss of metallic tubes.

  16. Effect on Growth, Photosynthesis, and Oxidative Stress of Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes Exposure to Marine Alga Dunaliella tertiolecta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megha Thakkar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Single walled carbon nanotubes were carboxylated by microwave assisted acid oxidation (f-SWCNTs and examined for their ecotoxicity on marine alga chlorophyte Dunaliella tertiolecta. Toxicity was evaluated based on growth, photosynthetic activities, oxidative stress, and intracellular glutathione in the concentration range of 0.1–20 mg/L f-SWCNT. Physical interactions between the f-SWCNT and alga were examined using light microscopy and scanning electron microscope. Increasing the nanotube concentration increased the toxic effects where growth inhibition was as high as 30%, photosynthetic yield decreased by as much as 18%, and intracellular glutathione reduction reached 95%. The results from f-SWCNTs were somewhat different when compared to our previous study using the same algae and functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotubes, where exposure led to longer lag phase and higher growth rate inhibition.

  17. Effect on Growth, Photosynthesis, and Oxidative Stress of Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes Exposure to Marine Alga Dunaliella tertiolecta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakkar, Megha; Mitra, Somenath; Wei, Liping

    2016-01-01

    Single walled carbon nanotubes were carboxylated by microwave assisted acid oxidation (f-SWCNTs) and examined for their ecotoxicity on marine alga chlorophyte Dunaliella tertiolecta. Toxicity was evaluated based on growth, photosynthetic activities, oxidative stress, and intracellular glutathione in the concentration range of 0.1-20 mg/L f-SWCNT. Physical interactions between the f-SWCNT and alga were examined using light microscopy and scanning electron microscope. Increasing the nanotube concentration increased the toxic effects where growth inhibition was as high as 30%, photosynthetic yield decreased by as much as 18%, and intracellular glutathione reduction reached 95%. The results from f-SWCNTs were somewhat different when compared to our previous study using the same algae and functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotubes, where exposure led to longer lag phase and higher growth rate inhibition.

  18. Cost-effective single-step carbon nanotube synthesis using microwave oven

    Science.gov (United States)

    Algadri, Natheer A.; Ibrahim, K.; Hassan, Z.; Bououdina, M.

    2017-08-01

    This paper reports the characterization of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) synthesised using a conventional microwave oven method, offering several advantages including fast, simple, low cost, and solvent free growth process. The procedure involves flattening of graphite/ferrocene mixture catalyst inside the microwave oven under ambient conditions for a very short duration of 5 s, which inhibits the loss factor of graphite and ferrocene. The effect of graphite/ferrocene mixture ratio for the synthesis of CNTs is investigated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), x-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy and UV-NIR-Vis measurements. The samples produced using the different ratios contain nanotubes with an average diameter in the range 44-79 nm. The highest yield of CNTs is attained with graphite/ferrocene mixture ratio of 70:30. The lowest I D/I G ratio intensity as identified by Raman spectroscopy for 70:30 ratio indicates the improved crystallinity of CNTs. Due to the capillary effect of CNTs, Fe nanoparticles are found to be encapsulated inside the tubes at different positions along the tube length. The obtained results showed that the smaller the diameter of graphite and ferrocene favors the synthesis of graphene oxide upon microwave radiation.

  19. Effects of long and short carboxylated or aminated multiwalled carbon nanotubes on blood coagulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Meng

    Full Text Available In this work the effects of four different multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs, including long carboxylated (L-COOH, short carboxylated (S-COOH, long aminated (L-NH(2 and short aminated (S-NH(2 ones, on the integrity of red blood cells, coagulation kinetics and activation of platelets were investigated with human whole blood. We found that the four MWCNTs induced different degrees of red blood cell damage as well as a mild level of platelet activation (10-25%. L-COOH and L-NH(2 induced a higher level of platelet activation than S-COOH and S-NH(2 respectively; meanwhile L-NH(2 caused marked reductions in platelet viability. The presence of the four MWCNTs led to earlier fibrin formation, L-NH(2 increased the clots hardness significantly, while L-COOH and S-NH(2 made the clots become softer. It was concluded that the four MWCNTs affected blood coagulation process and the clots mechanical properties; they also altered the integrity of the red blood cells and the viability of the platelets, as well as induced platelets activation. The effects of MWCNTs depended on the size and chemistry of the nanotubes and the type of cells they contacted.

  20. Effects of carbon nanotubes and metal catalysts on hydrogen storage in magnesium nanocomposites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, X; Wu, C Z; Wang, H; Cheng, H M; Lu, G Q

    2006-02-01

    This paper reports a study on nanostructured magnesium composites with carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and catalytic transition metals with high H2 adsorption capacity and fast adsorption kinetics at reduced hydrogenation temperatures. Nanostructures in such a composite are shown to be responsible for improvements in both adsorption capacity and kinetics. It is found that the carbon nanotubes significantly increase the hydrogen storage capacity, and the catalytic transition metals (Fe and Ti) greatly improve the kinetics. This could be understood from the enhancement of diffusion by CNTs and decrease in energy barrier of hydrogen dissociation at the magnesium surface.

  1. Electrochemical detection of amaranth in food based on the enhancement effect of carbon nanotube film.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Peng; Hu, Xiaozhong; Cheng, Qin; Zhao, Xiaoya; Fu, Xiaofang; Wu, Kangbing

    2010-12-08

    Amaranth is widely added to food and can cause many adverse health effects when it is excessively consumed. Therefore, the monitoring of amaranth is quite important. Herein, an electrochemical sensor for the sensitive and rapid detection of amaranth was reported using multiwall carbon nanotube (MWNT) as the sensing film. Due to the large surface area and high accumulation efficiency, the MWNT sensor showed a strong enhancement effect on the oxidation of amaranth, and greatly increased the current signal. The detection conditions such as pH value, amount of MWNT, accumulation potential and time were optimized. The linear range is from 40 nM to 0.8 μM, and the limit of detection is 35 nM. Finally, the new sensor was successfully employed to detect amaranth in soft drinks, and the results were tested by high-performance liquid chromatography.

  2. Carbon nanotube field-effect devices with asymmetric electrode configuration by contact geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yotprayoonsak, P.; Talukdar, D.; Ahlskog, M.

    2014-06-01

    We have studied experimentally the conductive properties of single walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) based field-effect type devices, with different contact geometries at the connecting electrode. The device designs are asymmetric with one end of the SWNT having the metal electrode deposited on top and immersing it, while at the other end, the SWNT is on top of the electrode. The devices were made with either gold or palladium as electrode materials, of which the latter resulted in different behavior of the different contact types. This is argued to be caused by the existence of a thin insulating layer of surface adsorbents on the palladium, possibly Pd5O4, the effect of which is enhanced by the 1D nature of the contact area in the configuration with SWNT on top of electrode.

  3. Effect of Electron Beam Irradiation on the Tensile Properties of Carbon Nanotubes Sheets and Yarns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Tiffany S.; Miller, Sandi G.; Baker, James S.; McCorkle, Linda S.; Meador, Michael A.

    2013-01-01

    Carbon nanotube sheets and yarns were irradiated using electron beam (e-beam) energy to determine the effect of irradiation dose on the tensile properties. Results showed that a slight change in tensile strength occurred after irradiating as-received CNT sheets for 20 minutes, and a slight decrease in tensile strength as the irradiation time approached 90 minutes. On the other hand, the addition of small molecules to the CNT sheet surface had a greater effect on the tensile properties of e-beam irradiated CNT sheets. Some functionalized CNT sheets displayed up to a 57% increase in tensile strength following 90 minutes of e-beam exposure. In addition, as-received CNT yarns showed a significant increase in tensile strength as the irradiation time increased.

  4. Bulk properties of crystalline single wall carbon nanotubes: Purification, pressure effects and transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, J. E.; Lee, R. S.; Kim, H. J.; Rinzler, A. G.; Smalley, R. E.; Yaguzhinski, S. L.; Bozhko, A. D.; Sklovsky, D. E.; Nalimova, V. A.

    1998-08-01

    Pulsed laser ablation (PLA) has been scaled up to yield several grams/day of single-walled nanotubes. Annealed, purified material is highly crystalline, essentially free of amorphous carbon, fullerenes and catalyst residues, and about 3 times denser than the highly porous, as-grown product. In principle the interactions between tubes in a rope, and/or between rope crystallites, may be "tuned" by 3 different approaches—chemical doping, hydrostatic pressure, or purification/annealing, all of which have a dramatic effect on the temperature dependence of resistivity. In particular, we suggest that the crossover from positive to negative dR/dT at low temperature is a 3D effect and not an intrinsic property of isolated neutral SWNT.

  5. Aggregated single-walled carbon nanotubes attenuate the behavioural and neurochemical effects of methamphetamine in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Xue; Yang, Jing-Yu; He, Yi; Wang, Li-Rong; Liu, Ping; Yu, Li-Sha; Bi, Guo-Hua; Zhu, Ming-Ming; Liu, Yue-Yang; Xiang, Rong-Wu; Yang, Xiao-Ting; Fan, Xin-Yu; Wang, Xiao-Min; Qi, Jia; Zhang, Hong-Jie; Wei, Tuo; Cui, Wei; Ge, Guang-Lu; Xi, Zheng-Xiong; Wu, Chun-Fu; Liang, Xing-Jie

    2016-07-01

    Methamphetamine (METH) abuse is a serious social and health problem worldwide. At present, there are no effective medications to treat METH addiction. Here, we report that aggregated single-walled carbon nanotubes (aSWNTs) significantly inhibited METH self-administration, METH-induced conditioned place preference and METH- or cue-induced relapse to drug-seeking behaviour in mice. The use of aSWNTs alone did not significantly alter the mesolimbic dopamine system, whereas pretreatment with aSWNTs attenuated METH-induced increases in extracellular dopamine in the ventral striatum. Electrochemical assays suggest that aSWNTs facilitated dopamine oxidation. In addition, aSWNTs attenuated METH-induced increases in tyrosine hydroxylase or synaptic protein expression. These findings suggest that aSWNTs may have therapeutic effects for treatment of METH addiction by oxidation of METH-enhanced extracellular dopamine in the striatum.

  6. Photothermal, photoconductive and nonlinear optical effects induced by nanosecond pulse irradiation in multi-wall carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    García-Merino, J.A.; Martínez-González, C.L.; Miguel, C.R. Torres-San [Sección de Estudios de Posgrado e Investigación, Escuela Superior de Ingeniería Mecánica y Eléctrica Unidad Zacatenco, Instituto Politécnico Nacional, 07738 México Distrito Federal (Mexico); Trejo-Valdez, M. [Escuela Superior de Ingeniería Química e Industrias Extractivas, Instituto Politécnico Nacional, 07738 México Distrito Federal (Mexico); Martínez-Gutiérrez, H. [Centro de Nanociencia y MicroNanotecnología del Instituto Politécnico Nacional, 07738 México Distrito Federal (Mexico); Torres-Torres, C., E-mail: crstorres@yahoo.com.mx [Sección de Estudios de Posgrado e Investigación, Escuela Superior de Ingeniería Mecánica y Eléctrica Unidad Zacatenco, Instituto Politécnico Nacional, 07738 México Distrito Federal (Mexico)

    2015-04-15

    Highlights: • Carbon nanotubes were prepared by an aerosol pyrolysis method. • Thermal phenomena were induced by nanosecond irradiation. • Photoconductive and nonlinear optical properties were evaluated. • A monostable multivibrator function in carbon nanotubes was analyzed. - Abstract: The influence of the optical absorption exhibited by multi-wall carbon nanotubes on their photothermal, photoconductive and nonlinear optical properties was evaluated. The experiments were performed by using a Nd:YAG laser system at 532 nm wavelength and 1 ns pulse duration. The observations were carried out in thin film samples conformed by carbon nanotubes prepared by an aerosol pyrolysis method; Raman spectroscopy studies confirmed their multi-wall nature. Theoretical and numerical calculations based on the heat equation allow us to predict the temporal response of the induced effects associated to the optical energy transference. A two-wave mixing method was employed to explore the third order nonlinear optical response exhibited by the sample. A dominant thermal process was identified as the main physical mechanism responsible for the optical Kerr effect. Potential applications for developing a monostable multivibrator exhibiting different time-resolved characteristics were analyzed.

  7. Carbon nanotube-polymer composite actuators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gennett, Thomas [Denver, CO; Raffaelle, Ryne P [Honeoye Falls, NY; Landi, Brian J [Rochester, NY; Heben, Michael J [Denver, CO

    2008-04-22

    The present invention discloses a carbon nanotube (SWNT)-polymer composite actuator and method to make such actuator. A series of uniform composites was prepared by dispersing purified single wall nanotubes with varying weight percents into a polymer matrix, followed by solution casting. The resulting nanotube-polymer composite was then successfully used to form a nanotube polymer actuator.

  8. Orientational Growth of Carbon Nanotube for Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Shen; Su, Ching-Hua; Cochrane, J. C.; Lehoczky, S.; Cui, Y.; Burger, A.; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Since the superior properties of multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) could improve numerous devices such as electronics and sensors, many efforts have been made in investigating the growth mechanism of MWCNT to synthesize high quality MWCNT. Most applications require uniform aligned CNT. In this presentation, a directional growth of CNT will be reported. Carbon nanotubes are synthesized using thermal chemical vapor deposition. Temperature and pressure are two important growth parameters for fabricating carbon nanotubes. It is found that the nanotube diameter distribution mainly depends on the growth-temperature. With the substrate surface normal either along or against the gravity vector, different growth orientations of MWCNT are observed by scanning electron microscopy although the Raman spectra are similar for samples synthesized at different locations. The sizes of these carbon nanotubes in each sample are quite uniform and the length of the tube is up to several tens of micrometers. These results suggest the gravitation effects in the growth of long and small diameter CNT.

  9. Effects of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT under Neisseria meningitidis transformation process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mattos Ives B

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study aimed at verifying the action of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT under the naturally transformable Neisseria meningitidis against two different DNA obtained from isogenic mutants of this microorganism, an important pathogen implicated in the genetic horizontal transfer of DNA, causing the escape of the principal vaccination measured worldwide by the capsular switching process. Materials and methods The bacterium receptor strain C2135 was cultivated and had its mutant DNA donor M2 and M6, which received a receptor strain and MWCNT at three different concentrations. The inhibition effect of DNAse on the DNA in contact with nanoparticles was evaluated. Results The results indicated an in increase in the transformation capacity of N. meninigtidis in different concentrations of MWCNT when compared with negative control without nanotubes. A final analysis of the interaction between DNA and MWCNT was carried out using Raman Spectroscopy. Conclusion These increases in the transformation capacity mediated by MWCNT, in meningococci, indicate the interaction of these particles with the virulence acquisition of these bacteria, as well as with the increase in the vaccination escape process.

  10. Pretreatment of carbon nanotubes: Effects on its properties and catalytic performances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulong, Tuan Syahylah Tuan; Zabidi, Noor Asmawati Mohd; Shaharun, Maizatul Shima

    2016-11-01

    The effects of pretreatment via acid and thermal treatment on the properties of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) are studied using FTIR, TGA, Raman spectroscopy and TEM. Meanwhile, catalytic performances of Cu/ZnO catalysts supported on raw and treated CNTs are evaluated by CO2 hydrogenation into methanol using a fixed-bed microactivity reactor. Pretreatment of CNTs have removed caps, created defects on CNTs wall and also introduced some functional groups as confirmed by FTIR, TGA, Raman spectroscopy and TEM. However, deposition of metals into the support via incipient wetness impregnation method results in agglomeration of metal particles outside CNTs. Methanol synthesis studies (523 K, 22.5 bar) were performed and activity study revealed that catalysts supported on treated CNTs achieved CO2 conversion of 19 %.

  11. Detection of influenza A virus using carbon nanotubes field effect transistor based DNA sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Thi Luyen; Nguyen, Thi Thuy; Huyen Tran, Thi Thu; Chu, Van Tuan; Thinh Tran, Quang; Tuan Mai, Anh

    2017-09-01

    The carbon nanotubes field effect transistor (CNTFET) based DNA sensor was developed, in this paper, for detection of influenza A virus DNA. Number of factors that influence the output signal and analytical results were investigated. The initial probe DNA, decides the available DNA strands on CNTs, was 10 μM. The hybridization time for defined single helix was 120 min. The hybridization temperature was set at 30 °C to get a net change in drain current of the DNA sensor without altering properties of any biological compounds. The response time of the DNA sensor was less than one minute with a high reproducibility. In addition, the DNA sensor has a wide linear detection range from 1 pM to 10 nM, and a very low detection limit of 1 pM. Finally, after 7-month storage in 7.4 pH buffer, the output signal of DNA sensor recovered 97%.

  12. Effects of interfaces on nano-friction of vertically aligned multi-walled carbon nanotube arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lou, J. [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science, Rice University, Houston, TX 77005 (United States)], E-mail: jlou@rice.edu; Kim, K.-S. [Division of Engineering, Brown University, Providence, RI 02912 (United States)

    2008-06-15

    Sliding friction properties of vertically aligned multi-walled carbon nanotube (VAMWNT) arrays have been investigated in current study in a quantitative manner. The VAMWNT arrays have been fabricated on an anodic aluminum oxide template by chemical vapor deposition at 650 deg. C. Friction force was measured in air by a modified atomic force microscopy (AFM) cantilever-bead assembly with 15 {mu}m diameter borosilicate sphere attached to the end of the regular AFM cantilever. Quantitative measurements were achieved by using a novel in situ calibration methods recently developed based on diamagnetic levitation [Q. Li, K.-S. Kim, A. Rydberg, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 77 (2006) 065105-1-13]. The effects of different interfaces were studied using both cantilever-bead assembly coated with and without Al thin layer coatings. A reverse stick-slip behavior was observed in the current system as compared to the normal stick-slip behavior found in the literature.

  13. Effect of multiwalled carbon nanotubes on the thermoelectric properties of Mn-Zn ferrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shupin; Li, Aimin; Sun, Kangning; Sun, Xiaoning; Wang, Yaping; Wang, Song

    2017-10-01

    In this study, Mn-Zn ferrites with three different multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) concentration, 1,2,3 wt%, were used to compare the effect of MWNTs on thermoelectric properties of the composites. The dimensionless figure of merit (ZT) of the composites at the low contents (1 and 2 wt%) of MWNTs have shown significantly increased values compared to those of composites at the high contents (3 wt%) in the temperature range of 323-973 K. The maximum ZT of 0.038 was obtained at 2 wt%. It is considered that the improved thermoelectric performance of the composite mainly originated from electrical conductivity that is attributed to the increased carrier concentration or carrier mobility.

  14. Time-Dependent Subcellular Distribution and Effects of Carbon Nanotubes in Lungs of Mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Købler, Carsten; Poulsen, Sarah S.; Saber, Anne T.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Methods Pulmonary deposited carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are cleared very slowly from the lung, but there is limited information on how CNTs interact with the lung tissue over time. To address this, three different multiwalled CNTs were intratracheally instilled into female C57BL/6 mice......: one short (850 nm) and tangled, and two longer (4 mu m and 5.7 mu m) and thicker. We assessed the cellular interaction with these CNTs using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) 1, 3 and 28 days after instillation. Results TEM analysis revealed that the three CNTs followed the same overall...... of cellular interactions in lung tissue, with the longer and thicker CNTs resulting inmore severe effects in terms of eosinophil influx and incidence of eosinophilic crystalline pneumonia (ECP)....

  15. Origins and characteristics of the threshold voltage variability of quasiballistic single-walled carbon nanotube field-effect transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Qing; Han, Shu-jen; Penumatcha, Ashish V; Frank, Martin M; Tulevski, George S; Tersoff, Jerry; Haensch, Wilfried E

    2015-02-24

    Ultrascaled transistors based on single-walled carbon nanotubes are identified as one of the top candidates for future microprocessor chips as they provide significantly better device performance and scaling properties than conventional silicon technologies. From the perspective of the chip performance, the device variability is as important as the device performance for practical applications. This paper presents a systematic investigation on the origins and characteristics of the threshold voltage (VT) variability of scaled quasiballistic nanotube transistors. Analysis of experimental results from variable-temperature measurement as well as gate oxide thickness scaling studies shows that the random variation from fixed charges present on the oxide surface close to nanotubes dominates the VT variability of nanotube transistors. The VT variability of single-tube transistors has a figure of merit that is quantitatively comparable with that of current silicon devices; and it could be reduced with the adoption of improved device passivation schemes, which might be necessary for practical devices incorporating multiple nanotubes, whose area normalized VT variability becomes worse due to the synergic effects from the limited surface coverage of nanotubes and the nonlinearity of the device off-state leakage current, as predicted by the Monte Carlo simulation.

  16. Carbon nanotubes: synthesis, structure, functionalization, and characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamolo, Valeria Anna; Vazquez, Ester; Prato, Maurizio

    2014-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes have generated great expectations in the scientific arena, mainly due to their spectacular properties, which include a high aspect ratio, high strain resistance, and high strength, along with high conductivities. Nowadays, carbon nanotubes are produced by a variety of methods, each of them with advantages and disadvantages. Once produced, carbon nanotubes can be chemically modified, using a wide range of chemical reactions. Functionalization makes these long wires much easier to manipulate and dispersible in several solvents. In addition, the properties of carbon nanotubes can be combined with those of organic appendages. Finally, carbon nanotubes need to be carefully characterized, either as pristine or modified materials.

  17. Biomedical applications of carbon-nanotube composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meredith, Jay Russell; Jin, Chunming; Narayan, Roger J; Aggarwal, Ravi

    2013-01-01

    The unique physical, chemical and mechanical properties of carbon nanotubes make them attractive for a variety of biomedical applications. Carbon nanotubes have been used to modify conventional biomedical materials to enhance mechanical properties, biocompatibility, or to impart other functionalities. New multifunctional composite materials using carbon nanotubes have been developed by combining them with inorganic, polymeric or biological materials. The biomedical applications for which novel carbon nanotube composites have been investigated include antimicrobial coatings, neural implants, tissue engineering scaffolds and electrochemical biosensors. In this paper, research on development and application of carbon nanotube composites for biomedical applications has been reviewed.

  18. Carbon nanotubes and methods of making carbon nanotubes

    KAUST Repository

    Basset, Jean-Marie

    2017-04-27

    Embodiments of the present disclosure provide for methods that can be used to produce carbon nanotubes (hereinafter CNT) having an inner diameter about 5-55 nm, methods of tuning the inner diameter of CNTs (e.g., by adjusting reaction pressure), CNTs having an inner diameter of greater than 20 nm or more, and the like.

  19. Phase Behavior of Carbon Nanotube Suspensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulin, Philippe

    2006-03-01

    We study the phase behavior of nanotube suspensions stabilized by surfactants or amphiphilic polymers. The control of the composition of the solutions allows the interaction potential between the nanotubes to be finely tuned. As a consequence, it is possible to quantitatively analyze important phenomena such as percolation or liquid crystalline phase transitions. In particular, we describe how the percolation of rod-like particles is quantitatively decreased in the presence of attractive interactions (1). We show that rod-like particles respond much more strongly than spheres to attractive interactions; strengthening thereby the technological interest of carbon nanotubes to achieve low percolation thresholds for electrostatic dissipation or electromagnetic shielding. By contrast, carbon nanotubes which experience repulsive interactions can spontaneously order and form liquid crystalline solutions (2). Aligning and packing nanotubes is a major challenge to obtain macroscopic materials with improved properties. We will briefly discuss at the end of the presentation, our latest results concerning the fabrication of fibers aligned nanotubes (3). In particular, we will present new treatments of these fibers which lead to unusual mechanical properties and shape memory effects with giant stress recovery (4). *B. Vigolo, C. Coulon, M. Maugey, C. Zakri, P. Poulin, Science 2005. *S. Badaire, C. Zakri, M. Maugey, A. Derr'e, J. Barisci, G. Wallace, P. Poulin, Adv. Mat. 2005. *P. Miaudet, M. Maugey, A. Derr'e, V. Pichot, P. Launois, P. Poulin, C. Zakri, Nanoletters 2005. *P. Miaudet, A. Derr'e, M. Maugey, C. Zakri, P. Poulin, in preparation.

  20. Effect of tetrahedral amorphous carbon coating on the resistivity and wear of single-walled carbon nanotube network

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iyer, Ajai, E-mail: ajai.iyer@aalto.fi; Etula, Jarkko; Liu, Xuwen; Koskinen, Jari [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, School of Chemical Technology, Aalto University, P.O. Box 16200, 00076 Espoo (Finland); Kaskela, Antti; Kauppinen, Esko I. [NanoMaterials Group, Department of Applied Physics, School of Science, Aalto University, P.O. Box 15100, 00076 Espoo (Finland); Novikov, Serguei [Department of Micro and Nanosciences, Aalto University, P.O. Box 13500, 00076 Aalto (Finland)

    2016-05-14

    Single walled carbon nanotube networks (SWCNTNs) were coated by tetrahedral amorphous carbon (ta-C) to improve the mechanical wear properties of the composite film. The ta-C deposition was performed by using pulsed filtered cathodic vacuum arc method resulting in the generation of C+ ions in the energy range of 40–60 eV which coalesce to form a ta-C film. The primary disadvantage of this process is a significant increase in the electrical resistance of the SWCNTN post coating. The increase in the SWCNTN resistance is attributed primarily to the intrinsic stress of the ta-C coating which affects the inter-bundle junction resistance between the SWCNTN bundles. E-beam evaporated carbon was deposited on the SWCNTNs prior to the ta-C deposition in order to protect the SWCNTN from the intrinsic stress of the ta-C film. The causes of changes in electrical resistance and the effect of evaporated carbon thickness on the changes in electrical resistance and mechanical wear properties have been studied.

  1. Effects of serum albumin on the degradation and cytotoxicity of single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yun; Tian, Rong; Yang, Zhen; Chen, Jianfa; Lu, Naihao

    2017-03-01

    Neutrophil myeloperoxidase (MPO) and peroxynitrite (ONOO-) can oxidatively biodegrade carboxylated single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). The protein-SWCNTs interactions will play an important role in the degradation and cytotoxicity of nanotubes. Here, we investigated the binding of bovine serum albumin (BSA, a common and well-characterized model blood serum protein) to SWCNTs, and found that the hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions might be crucial factors in stabilizing the binding of SWCNTs with BSA. The binding of BSA could impair SWCNTs biodegradation in vitro through the competitive adsorption to nanotube. Both SWCNTs and BSA-SWCNTs were significantly degraded in zymosan-stimulated macrophages, and the degradation degree was more for BSA-SWCNTs. The mechanism for SWCNTs degradation in activated macrophages was further investigated to demonstrate the dominant participation of MPO and ONOO--driven pathways. Moreover, binding of BSA to SWCNTs reduced cytotoxicity and degraded nanotubes induced less cytotoxicity than non-degraded nanotubes. The binding of BSA may be an important determinant for the biodegradation and cytotoxicity of SWCNTs in inflammatory cells, and therefore, provide a new route to mitigate the potential toxicity of nanotubes in future biomedical applications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Effects of multi-wall carbon nanotubes on structural and mechanical ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2017-09-22

    Sep 22, 2017 ... Abstract. Poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) (PHB)/chitosan electrospun scaffold was recently prepared for cartilage tissue engineering purpose. The drawback of this scaffold was its low mechanical properties. This study was carried out to see if addition of multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) to PHB/chitosan ...

  3. Effect of Dielectric Constant and Dispersion of Particle on Hydrophobicity of Carbon Nanotube Based Electrocatalyst Film

    OpenAIRE

    YUDIANTI, Rike; Onggo, Holia; Syampurwadi, Anung

    2012-01-01

    Preparation Carbon Nanotube (CNT) based of electrocatalyst film using filtration methode is recently performed. Hydropobicity of electrocatalyst is prerequisite to eliminating PolyTetraFluoroEthylene (PTFE) treament as hydrophobic agent that commonly performed on the comercial electrocatalyst. The preparation was carried out using hydrophilic membrane to obtaining good electrocatalyst film. Technique of preparation and formulation of dispersed solution were optimized to improve hydrophobicity...

  4. Effectiveness of sorting single-walled carbon nanotubes by diameter using polyfluorene derivatives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gao, J.; Kwak, M.; Wildeman, J.; Hermann, A.; Loi, M. A.; Herrmann, A.

    Semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) sorted by conjugated polymers are of great interest for electronic and optoelectronic applications Here we demonstrate by optical methods that the selectivity of conjugated polymers for semiconducting SWCNTs is influenced by the structure of

  5. Effects of multi-wall carbon nanotubes on structural and mechanical ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) (PHB)/chitosan electrospun scaffold was recently prepared for cartilage tissue engineering purpose. The drawback of this scaffold was its low mechanical properties. This study was carried out to see if addition of multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) to PHB/chitosan polymeric blend can show ...

  6. Adverse effects of industrial multiwalled carbon nanotubes on human pulmonary cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabet, Lyes; Bussy, Cyrill; Amara, Nadia; Setyan, Ari; Grodet, Alain; Rossi, Michel J.; Pairon, Jean-Claude; Boczkowski, Jorge; Lanone, Sophie

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate adverse effects of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) produced for industrial purposes, on the human epithelial cell line A549. MWCNT were dispersed in dipalmitoyl lecithin (DPL), a component of pulmonary surfactant, and the effects of dispersion in DPL were compared to those in 2 other media: ethanol (EtOH) and phosphate buffer saline (PBS). Effects of MWCNT were also compared to those of 2 asbestos fibers (chrysotile and crocidolite) and carbon black (CB) nanoparticles, not only in A549 cells, but also on mesothelial cells (MeT5A human cell line), used as an asbestos-sensitive cell type. MWCNT formed agglomerates on top of both cell lines (surface area 15–35 μm2), that were significantly larger and more numerous in PBS than in EtOH and DPL. Whatever the dispersion media, incubation with 100 μg/ml MWCNT induced a similar decrease in metabolic activity without changing cell membrane permeability or apoptosis. Neither MWCNT cellular internalization nor oxidative stress were observed. In contrast, asbestos fibers penetrated into the cells, decreased metabolic activity but not cell membrane permeability and increased apoptosis, without decreasing cell number. CB was internalized without any adverse effects. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that MWCNT produced for industrial purposes exert adverse effects without being internalized by human epithelial and mesothelial pulmonary cell lines. PMID:19034795

  7. Functionalized carbon nanotubes: biomedical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vardharajula, Sandhya; Ali, Sk Z; Tiwari, Pooja M; Eroğlu, Erdal; Vig, Komal; Dennis, Vida A; Singh, Shree R

    2012-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are emerging as novel nanomaterials for various biomedical applications. CNTs can be used to deliver a variety of therapeutic agents, including biomolecules, to the target disease sites. In addition, their unparalleled optical and electrical properties make them excellent candidates for bioimaging and other biomedical applications. However, the high cytotoxicity of CNTs limits their use in humans and many biological systems. The biocompatibility and low cytotoxicity of CNTs are attributed to size, dose, duration, testing systems, and surface functionalization. The functionalization of CNTs improves their solubility and biocompatibility and alters their cellular interaction pathways, resulting in much-reduced cytotoxic effects. Functionalized CNTs are promising novel materials for a variety of biomedical applications. These potential applications are particularly enhanced by their ability to penetrate biological membranes with relatively low cytotoxicity. This review is directed towards the overview of CNTs and their functionalization for biomedical applications with minimal cytotoxicity. PMID:23091380

  8. Functionalized carbon nanotubes: biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vardharajula, Sandhya; Ali, Sk Z; Tiwari, Pooja M; Eroğlu, Erdal; Vig, Komal; Dennis, Vida A; Singh, Shree R

    2012-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are emerging as novel nanomaterials for various biomedical applications. CNTs can be used to deliver a variety of therapeutic agents, including biomolecules, to the target disease sites. In addition, their unparalleled optical and electrical properties make them excellent candidates for bioimaging and other biomedical applications. However, the high cytotoxicity of CNTs limits their use in humans and many biological systems. The biocompatibility and low cytotoxicity of CNTs are attributed to size, dose, duration, testing systems, and surface functionalization. The functionalization of CNTs improves their solubility and biocompatibility and alters their cellular interaction pathways, resulting in much-reduced cytotoxic effects. Functionalized CNTs are promising novel materials for a variety of biomedical applications. These potential applications are particularly enhanced by their ability to penetrate biological membranes with relatively low cytotoxicity. This review is directed towards the overview of CNTs and their functionalization for biomedical applications with minimal cytotoxicity.

  9. Carbon nanotube embedded PVDF membranes: Effect of solvent composition on the structural morphology for membrane distillation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mapunda, Edgar C.; Mamba, Bhekie B.; Msagati, Titus A. M.

    2017-08-01

    Rapid population increase, growth in industrial and agricultural sectors and global climate change have added significant pressure on conventional freshwater resources. Tapping freshwater from non-conventional water sources such as desalination and wastewater recycling is considered as sustainable alternative to the fundamental challenges of water scarcity. However, affordable and sustainable technologies need to be applied for the communities to benefit from the treatment of non-conventional water source. Membrane distillation is a potential desalination technology which can be used sustainably for this purpose. In this work multi-walled carbon nanotube embedded polyvinylidene fluoride membranes for application in membrane distillation desalination were prepared via non-solvent induced phase separation method. The casting solution was prepared using mixed solvents (N, N-dimethylacetamide and triethyl phosphate) at varying ratios to study the effect of solvent composition on membrane morphological structures. Membrane morphological features were studied using a number of techniques including scanning electron microscope, atomic force microscope, SAXSpace tensile strength analysis, membrane thickness, porosity and contact angle measurements. It was revealed that membrane hydrophobicity, thickness, tensile strength and surface roughness were increasing as the composition of N, N-dimethylacetamide in the solvent was increasing with maximum values obtained between 40 and 60% N, N-dimethylacetamide. Internal morphological structures were changing from cellular structures to short finger-like and sponge-like pores and finally to large macro void type of pores when the amount of N, N-dimethylacetamide in the solvent was changed from low to high respectively. Multi-walled carbon nanotube embedded polyvinylidene fluoride membranes of desired morphological structures and physical properties can be synthesized by regulating the composition of solvents used to prepare the

  10. Conductivity of single-walled carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gets, A. V.; Krainov, V. P., E-mail: vpkrainov@mail.ru [Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (Russian Federation)

    2016-12-15

    The conductivity of single-walled carbon nanotubes at low temperatures is calculated. It is shown that it is much higher than the well-known conductivity of a model 1D Fermi system. This is a purely quantum-mechanical effect.

  11. Long-Term Effects of Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes and Graphene on Microbial Communities in Dry Soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Yuan; Priester, John H; Mortimer, Monika; Chang, Chong Hyun; Ji, Zhaoxia; Schimel, Joshua P; Holden, Patricia A

    2016-04-05

    Little is known about the long-term effects of engineered carbonaceous nanomaterials (ECNMs) on soil microbial communities, especially when compared to possible effects of natural or industrial carbonaceous materials. To address these issues, we exposed dry grassland soil for 1 year to 1 mg g(-1) of either natural nanostructured material (biochar), industrial carbon black, three types of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), or graphene. Soil microbial biomass was assessed by substrate induced respiration and by extractable DNA. Bacterial and fungal communities were examined by terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP). Microbial activity was assessed by soil basal respiration. At day 0, there was no treatment effect on soil DNA or T-RFLP profiles, indicating negligible interference between the amended materials and the methods for DNA extraction, quantification, and community analysis. After a 1-year exposure, compared to the no amendment control, some treatments reduced soil DNA (e.g., biochar, all three MWCNT types, and graphene; P graphene); however, there were no significant differences across the amended treatments. These findings suggest that ECNMs may moderately affect dry soil microbial communities but that the effects are similar to those from natural and industrial carbonaceous materials, even after 1-year exposure.

  12. The effect of alkaline doped catalysts on the CVD synthesis of carbon nanotubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nemeth, Krisztian; Nemeth, Zoltan; Fejes, Dora

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this work was to develop new doped catalysts for chemical vapour deposition (CVD) synthesis in order to increase the quantity and quality of carbon nanotubes (CNTs). Doping compounds such as CsBr, CsCl, KBr and KCl were used to reach higher carbon deposit and carbon yield. The amount o...... of the dopant alkali compounds varied from 1 to 5%. As prepared CNTs were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X‐ray diffraction (XRD) and Raman microscopy. Results revealed that both carbon yield and deposit could be increased over doped catalysts....

  13. Modelling Heat Transfer of Carbon Nanotubes

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Xin-She

    2010-01-01

    Modelling heat transfer of carbon nanotubes is important for the thermal management of nanotube-based composites and nanoelectronic device. By using a finite element method for three-dimensional anisotropic heat transfer, we have simulated the heat conduction and temperature variations of a single nanotube, a nanotube array and a part of nanotube-based composite surface with heat generation. The thermal conductivity used is obtained from the upscaled value from the molecular simulations or ex...

  14. Quantum transport in carbon nanotubes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laird, E.A.; Kuemmeth, F.; Steele, G.A.; Grove-Rasmussen, K.; Nygard, J.; Flensberg, K.; Kouwenhoven, L.P.

    2015-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes are a versatile material in which many aspects of condensed matter physics come together. Recent discoveries have uncovered new phenomena that completely change our understanding of transport in these devices, especially the role of the spin and valley degrees of freedom. This

  15. Nonlinear optical response of multiwalled carbon-nanotube dispersions

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Flaherty, Sean M.; Hold, Stephanie V.; Brennan, Margaret E.; Cadek, Martin; Drury, Anna; Coleman, Jonathan N.; Blau, Werner J.

    2003-01-01

    Experimental measurements of nonlinear optical extinction of nanosecond laser pulses by a set of conjugated copolymer/multiwalled carbon-nanotube composites dispersed in solution are reported here. The polymer poly(para-phenylenevinylene-co-2,5-dioctyloxy-meta-phenylenevinylene) and multiwalled carbon-nanotube composites were varied according to nanotube mass content. The experiments were performed with an open-aperture Z scan with 6-ns Gaussian pulses at 532 nm from a frequency-doubled, Q-switched Nd:YAG laser. The nonlinear optical extinction of the incident pulses displays enhanced dissipation of the incident light for lower incident intensities relative to increasing multiwalled carbon-nanotube content. Either the multiwalled carbon nanotubes or the polymer dominates the nonlinear response of the composite depending on the relative mass of polymer to nanotube. Effective optical coefficients with a nonlinear absorption based model are calculated, and their intensity dependence is investigated. Mechanistic implications of the optical dissipation are also discussed.

  16. Titania carbon nanotube composites for enhanced photocatalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyrgiotakis, Georgios

    Photocatalytic composites have been used for the past few decades in a wide range of applications. The most common application is the purification of air and water by removing toxic compounds. There is limited use however towards biocidal applications. Despite their high efficiency, photocatalytic materials are not comparable to the effectiveness of conventional biocidal compounds such as chlorine and alcoholic disinfectants. On the other hand, nearly a decade ago with the discovery of the carbon nanotubes a new vibrant scientific field emerged. Nanotubes are unique structures of carbon that posse amazing electrical, mechanical and thermal properties. In this research carbon nanotubes are used as photocatalytic enhancers. They were coated with anatase titania to form a composite material. Two different types of nanotubes (metallic versus non-metallic) were used and the photocatalytic activity was measured. The metallic tubes demonstrated exceptional photocatalytic properties, while non-metallic tubes had low photocatalytic efficiency. The reason for that difference was investigated and was the major focus of this research. The research concluded that the reasons for the high efficiency of the carbon nanotubes were (i) the metallic nature of the tubes and (ii) the possible bond between the titania coating and the underlying graphite layers (C-O-Ti). Since both composites had the same indications regarding the C-O-Ti bond, the metallic nature of the carbon nanotubes is believed to be the most dominant factor contributing to the enhancement of the photocatalysis. The composite material may have other potential applications such as for sensing and photovoltaic uses.

  17. Upshot of binary chemical reaction and activation energy on carbon nanotubes with Cattaneo-Christov heat flux and buoyancy effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Dianchen; Ramzan, M.; Ahmad, Shafiq; Chung, Jae Dong; Farooq, Umer

    2017-12-01

    A mathematical model is framed to discuss the flow of carbon nanotube-suspended nanofluids with Cattaneo-Christov heat flux and binary chemical reaction. The flow analysis is performed in attendance of heat generation/absorption, energy activation, and buoyancy effects past a nonlinear stretched surface embedded in a non-Darcy permeable medium. A combination of varied nanotubes with base fluids is also taken into account. The Runge-Kutta fifth-order Fehlberg technique is engaged to find the numerical solution of a highly nonlinear problem. The impact of sundry parameters on involved distributions is illustrated graphically with requisite discussion keeping in view their physical aspects. Different tables that comprise numerically calculated values of numerous sundry parameters highlighting their physical significance are also erected. It is witnessed that velocity and temperature profiles are enhanced for mounting values of nanoparticle volume fraction parameters. Further, it is seen that for enhancing the value of the Prandtl number, the temperature profile decreases rapidly for single-walled carbon nanotubes than multi-walled carbon nanotubes.

  18. Elastic properties of noncarbon nanotubes as compared to carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochaev, Aleksey

    2017-10-01

    A comparative study of stability, structural, and elastic properties of single-wall noncarbon nanotubes, including BN, AlN, GaN, AlP, GaP, and B nanotubes using ab initio simulation is presented. The proposed nanotubes can be found in nature, which is confirmed by calculation of their binding energy. The values of Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio for (0,n ) and (n ,n ) proposed nanotubes with n =3 ⋯20 are obtained. The conception of two-dimensional (2D) Young's modulus of planar and tubular materials was developed. The calculations show that stable forms of boron nitride nanotubes have the 2D Young's modulus almost similar to carbon nanotubes. At the same time, it is stated that boron nanotubes have a higher 2D Young's modulus than any other known carbon and noncarbon nanostructures.

  19. Liquid-induced damping of mechanical feedback effects in single electron tunneling through a suspended carbon nanotube

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmid, D. R.; Stiller, P. L.; Strunk, Ch.; Hüttel, A. K., E-mail: andreas.huettel@ur.de [Institute for Experimental and Applied Physics, University of Regensburg, Universitätsstr. 31, 93053 Regensburg (Germany)

    2015-09-21

    In single electron tunneling through clean, suspended carbon nanotube devices at low temperature, distinct switching phenomena have regularly been observed. These can be explained via strong interaction of single electron tunneling and vibrational motion of the nanotube. We present measurements on a highly stable nanotube device, subsequently recorded in the vacuum chamber of a dilution refrigerator and immersed in the {sup 3}He/ {sup 4}He mixture of a second dilution refrigerator. The switching phenomena are absent when the sample is kept in the viscous liquid, additionally supporting the interpretation of dc-driven vibration. Transport measurements in liquid helium can thus be used for finite bias spectroscopy where otherwise the mechanical effects would dominate the current.

  20. Analysis of effects of oxidized multiwalled carbon nanotubes on electro-optic polymer/liquid crystal thin film gratings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shriyan, Sameet K; Fontecchio, Adam K

    2010-11-22

    This work focuses on experimentally demonstrating the modification in diffusion kinetics, formation of holographic polymer dispersed liquid crystal gratings and an improvement in its electro optic response by doping them with multi-walled carbon nanotubes. Results indicate a faster rise and fall times which is attributed to the reduction in size of the liquid crystal droplets formed and a reduction in switching voltage due to change in dielectric properties of the medium as manifested by a rise in capacitance. Real time diffraction efficiency measurements reveal a time delay in the appearance of the diffracted order due to non-participation of the nanotube in the polymerization induced phase separation process. An analysis of this effect is presented based on the Stoke-Einstein's diffusion equation incorporating shape anisotropy of the nanotubes.

  1. Effect of TiO2 nanoparticles on the thermal properties of decorated multiwall carbon nanotubes: A Raman investigation

    OpenAIRE

    de Zevallos-Marquez, AMO; Brasil, MJSP; Iikawa, F.; Abbaspourrad, A; Verissimo, C; Moshkalev, SA; Alves, OL

    2010-01-01

    We have investigated multiwalled carbon nanotubes decorated with TiO2 nanoparticles. Scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy measurements revealed that the TiO2 incorporates on the nanotubes forming large cauliflowerlike aggregates and/or small crystalline particles attached to the nanotube wall, depending on the growth conditions. A detailed Raman study was performed in pristine and a series of decorated nanotubes, where we analyzed both the Raman signal from the na...

  2. Multi-walled carbon nanotube-graphene-polyaniline multiphase nanocomposite with superior electromagnetic shielding effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Tejendra K.; Singh, Bhanu Pratap; Mathur, Rakesh B.; Dhakate, Sanjay R.

    2013-12-01

    The multiphase approach was adapted to enhance the electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding effectiveness (SE) of polyaniline (PANI) based nanocomposites. The natural graphite flakes (NGF) incorporated modified PANI was used for the development of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) based nanocomposites. In PANINGF-MWCNTs composites, multilayer graphene was synthesized in situ by ball milling. The resultant PANINGF-MWCNTs nanocomposites were characterized by different techniques. It was revealed from the transmission electron microscope (TEM) observation that in situ derived multilayer graphene acts as a bridge between PANI and MWCNTs, and plays a significant role for improving the properties of multiphase nanocomposites. It was observed that EMI-SE increases with increasing the MWCNTs content from 1 to 10 wt% in the multiphase nanocomposites. The maximum value of total EMI-SE was -98 dB of nanocomposite with 10 wt% of MWCNTs content. The high value of EMI-SE is dominated by the absorption phenomenon which is due to the collective effect of increase in space charge polarization and decrease in carrier mobility. The decrease in carrier mobility has a positive effect on the shore hardness value due to the strong interaction between the reinforcing constituent in multiphase nanocomposites. As a consequence, shore hardness increases from 56 to 91 at 10 wt% of MWCNTs.The multiphase approach was adapted to enhance the electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding effectiveness (SE) of polyaniline (PANI) based nanocomposites. The natural graphite flakes (NGF) incorporated modified PANI was used for the development of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) based nanocomposites. In PANINGF-MWCNTs composites, multilayer graphene was synthesized in situ by ball milling. The resultant PANINGF-MWCNTs nanocomposites were characterized by different techniques. It was revealed from the transmission electron microscope (TEM) observation that in situ derived multilayer

  3. Effects of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes on shear performance of laminated nanocomposite bonded joints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davood Askari and Mehrdad N Ghasemi-Nejhad

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The main objective is to improve the most commonly addressed weakness of the laminated composites (i.e. delamination due to poor interlaminar strength using carbon nanotubes (CNTs as reinforcement between the laminae and in the transverse direction. In this work, a chemical vapor deposition technique has been used to grow dense vertically aligned arrays of CNTs over the surface of chemically treated two-dimensionally woven cloth and fiber tows. The nanoforest-like fabrics can be used to fabricate three-dimensionally reinforced laminated nanocomposites. The presence of CNTs aligned normal to the layers and in-between the layers of laminated composites is expected to considerably enhance the properties of the laminates. To demonstrate the effectiveness of our approach, composite single lap-joint specimens were fabricated for interlaminar shear strength testing. It was observed that the single lap-joints with through-the-thickness CNT reinforcement can carry considerably higher shear stresses and strains. Close examination of the test specimens showed that the failure of samples with CNT nanoforests was completely cohesive, while the samples without CNT reinforcement failed adhesively. This concludes that the adhesion of adjacent carbon fabric layers can be considerably improved owing to the presence of vertically aligned arrays of CNT nanoforests.

  4. Effects of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes on shear performance of laminated nanocomposite bonded joints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Askari, Davood; Ghasemi-Nejhad, Mehrdad N

    2012-08-01

    The main objective is to improve the most commonly addressed weakness of the laminated composites (i.e. delamination due to poor interlaminar strength) using carbon nanotubes (CNTs) as reinforcement between the laminae and in the transverse direction. In this work, a chemical vapor deposition technique has been used to grow dense vertically aligned arrays of CNTs over the surface of chemically treated two-dimensionally woven cloth and fiber tows. The nanoforest-like fabrics can be used to fabricate three-dimensionally reinforced laminated nanocomposites. The presence of CNTs aligned normal to the layers and in-between the layers of laminated composites is expected to considerably enhance the properties of the laminates. To demonstrate the effectiveness of our approach, composite single lap-joint specimens were fabricated for interlaminar shear strength testing. It was observed that the single lap-joints with through-the-thickness CNT reinforcement can carry considerably higher shear stresses and strains. Close examination of the test specimens showed that the failure of samples with CNT nanoforests was completely cohesive, while the samples without CNT reinforcement failed adhesively. This concludes that the adhesion of adjacent carbon fabric layers can be considerably improved owing to the presence of vertically aligned arrays of CNT nanoforests.

  5. Effects of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes on shear performance of laminated nanocomposite bonded joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Askari, Davood; Ghasemi-Nejhad, Mehrdad N.

    2012-08-01

    The main objective is to improve the most commonly addressed weakness of the laminated composites (i.e. delamination due to poor interlaminar strength) using carbon nanotubes (CNTs) as reinforcement between the laminae and in the transverse direction. In this work, a chemical vapor deposition technique has been used to grow dense vertically aligned arrays of CNTs over the surface of chemically treated two-dimensionally woven cloth and fiber tows. The nanoforest-like fabrics can be used to fabricate three-dimensionally reinforced laminated nanocomposites. The presence of CNTs aligned normal to the layers and in-between the layers of laminated composites is expected to considerably enhance the properties of the laminates. To demonstrate the effectiveness of our approach, composite single lap-joint specimens were fabricated for interlaminar shear strength testing. It was observed that the single lap-joints with through-the-thickness CNT reinforcement can carry considerably higher shear stresses and strains. Close examination of the test specimens showed that the failure of samples with CNT nanoforests was completely cohesive, while the samples without CNT reinforcement failed adhesively. This concludes that the adhesion of adjacent carbon fabric layers can be considerably improved owing to the presence of vertically aligned arrays of CNT nanoforests.

  6. DFT investigations of the piezoresistive effect of carbon nanotubes for sensor application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, Christian [Center for Microtechnologies, Chemnitz University of Technology, 09126 Chemnitz (Germany); Schuster, Joerg [Fraunhofer Institute for Electronic Nanosystems (ENAS), Technologie-Campus 3, 09126 Chemnitz (Germany); Gessner, Thomas [Center for Microtechnologies, Chemnitz University of Technology, 09126 Chemnitz (Germany); Fraunhofer Institute for Electronic Nanosystems (ENAS), Technologie-Campus 3, 09126 Chemnitz (Germany)

    2012-12-15

    We investigate the piezoresistive effect of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) within density functional theory (DFT) aiming at application-relevant CNTs. CNTs are excellent candidates for the usage in nano-electromechanical sensors (NEMSs) due to their small band gap at zero strain leading to a finite resistivity at room temperature. The application of strain induces a band gap-opening leading to a tremendous change in the resistivity. DFT with the LDA approximation yields reasonable results for pure carbon systems like CNTs and is applied to calculate the electronic structure of experimentally relevant CNTs. For the transport part, a simple ballistic transport model based on the band gap is used. We compare our DFT results for the band gaps of strained CNTs to results of tight binding (TB) models. By introducing a scaling factor of {radical}2, an excellent agreement of the DFT data with TB model, published by Yang and Han [Phys. Rev. Lett. 85, 154 (2000)], is obtained. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  7. Influence of carbon nanotubes and graphene nanosheets on photothermal effect of hydroxyapatite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neelgund, Gururaj M; Oki, Aderemi R

    2016-12-15

    Herein we present a successful strategy for enhancement of photothermal efficiency of hydroxyapatite (HAP) by its conjugation with carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and graphene nanosheets (GR). Owing to excellent biocompatibility with human body and its non-toxicity, implementation of HAP based nanomaterials in photothermal therapy (PTT) provides non-replaceable benefits over PTE agents. Therefore, in this report, it has been experimentally exploited that the photothermal effect (PTE) of HAP has significantly improved by its assembly with CNTs and GR. It is found that the type of carbon nanomaterial used to conjugate with HAP has influence on its PTE in such a way that the photothermal efficiency of GR-HAP was higher than CNTs-COOH-HAP under exposure to 980nm near-infrared (NIR) laser. The temperature attained by aqueous dispersions of both CNTs-COOH-HAP and GR-HAP after illuminating to NIR radiations for 7min was found to be above 50°C, which is beyond the temperature tolerance of cancer cells. So that the rise in temperature shown by both CNTs-COOH-HAP and GR-HAP is enough to induce the death of tumoral or cancerous cells. Overall, this approach in modality of HAP with CNTs and GR provide a great potential for development of future nontoxic PTE agents. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. The Effect of Atom Vacancy Defect on the Vibrational Behavior of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes: A Structural Mechanics Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. K. Georgantzinos

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available An atomistic structural mechanics method, which is based on the exclusive use of spring elements, is developed in order to study the effect of imperfections due to atom vacancy on the vibrational characteristics of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs. The developed elements simulate the relative translations and rotations between atoms as well as the mass of the atoms. In this way, molecular mechanics theory can be applied directly because the atomic bonds are modeled by using exclusively physical variables such as bond stretching. The method is validated for its predictability comparing with vibration results found in the open literature for pristine nanotubes. Then, it is used for the vibration analysis of defective nanotubes. Imperfections such as one-atom vacancy, two-atom vacancy, and one carbon hexagonal cell vacancy are investigated. Their effect on vibrational behavior is explored for different defect positions, nanotube diameters, and support conditions. According to the obtained results, the fundamental frequency is decreased as the size of imperfection increases, and the percentage reduction in fundamental frequency due to the atomic vacancy defect is more affected for a single-clamped SWCNT than for a double-clamped one.

  9. Effect of catalyst preparation on the yield of carbon nanotube growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Escobar, Mariano, E-mail: mescobar@df.uba.a [Dep. Quimica Inorganica, Analitica y Quimica Fisica, FCEyN, UBA, Ciudad Universitaria (1428), Bs As (Argentina); LP and MC, Dep. Fisica, FCEyN, UBA (Argentina); Rubiolo, Gerardo [Unidad de Actividad Materiales, CNEA, Av Gral Paz 1499, San Martin (1650), Bs As (Argentina); Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas (CONICET) (Argentina); Candal, Roberto [Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas (CONICET) (Argentina); Instituto de Fisico-quimica de Materiales, Ambiente y Energia (INQUIMAE), CONICET - UBA (Argentina); Goyanes, Silvia [LP and MC, Dep. Fisica, FCEyN, UBA (Argentina); Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas (CONICET) (Argentina)

    2009-10-01

    Multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were synthesized by catalytic chemical vapor deposition (CVD) on catalytic iron nanoparticles dispersed in a silica matrix, prepared by sol gel method. In this contribution, variation of gelation condition on catalyst structure and its influence on the yield of carbon nanotubes growth was studied. The precursor utilized were tetraethyl-orthosilicate and iron nitrate. The sols were dried at two different temperatures in air (25 or 80 deg. C) and then treated at 450 deg. C for 10 h. The xerogels were introduced into the chamber and reduced in a hydrogen/nitrogen (10%v/v) atmosphere at 600 deg. C. MWCNTs were formed by deposition of carbon atoms from decomposition of acetylene at 700 deg. C. The system gelled at RT shows a yield of 100% respect to initial catalyst mass whereas the yield of that gelled at 80 deg. C was lower than 10%. Different crystalline phases are observed for both catalysts in each step of the process. Moreover, TPR analysis shows that iron oxide can be efficiently reduced to metallic iron only in the system gelled at room temperature. Carbon nanotubes display a diameter of about 25-40 nm and several micron lengths. The growth mechanism of MWCNTs is base growth mode for both catalysts.

  10. Applications of carbon nanotubes in neurobiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malarkey, Erik B; Parpura, Vladimir

    2007-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes are one of the most promising materials for the electronics, computer and aerospace industries. There are numerous properties of carbon nanotubes that make them attractive for applications in neurobiology: small size, flexibility, strength, inertness, electrical conductivity and ease of modification with biological compounds. Here, we discuss the current applications of carbon nanotubes in neuroscience. Carbon nanotubes and their derivatives can be used as substrates/scaffolds for neural cell growth. The chemical properties of carbon nanotubes can be systematically varied by attaching different functional groups; manipulation of the charge carried by functionalized carbon nanotubes can be used to control the outgrowth and branching pattern of neuronal processes. The ease with which carbon nanotubes can be patterned makes them attractive for studying the organization of neural networks and the electrical conductivity of nanotubes can provide a mechanism to monitor or stimulate neurons through the substrate itself. However, it is important to recognize that carbon nanotubes themselves can affect neuronal function, most likely by interaction with ion channels. The use of carbon nanotubes in neurobiology is a promising application that has the potential to develop new methods and techniques to advance the study of neuroscience.

  11. Carbon nanotube coatings as chemical absorbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tillotson, Thomas M.; Andresen, Brian D.; Alcaraz, Armando

    2004-06-15

    Airborne or aqueous organic compound collection using carbon nanotubes. Exposure of carbon nanotube-coated disks to controlled atmospheres of chemical warefare (CW)-related compounds provide superior extraction and retention efficiencies compared to commercially available airborne organic compound collectors. For example, the carbon nanotube-coated collectors were four (4) times more efficient toward concentrating dimethylmethyl-phosphonate (DMMP), a CW surrogate, than Carboxen, the optimized carbonized polymer for CW-related vapor collections. In addition to DMMP, the carbon nanotube-coated material possesses high collection efficiencies for the CW-related compounds diisopropylaminoethanol (DIEA), and diisopropylmethylphosphonate (DIMP).

  12. Peeling off effects in vertically aligned Fe3C filled carbon nanotubes films grown by pyrolysis of ferrocene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boi, Filippo S.; Medranda, Daniel; Ivaturi, Sameera; Wang, Jiayu; Guo, Jian; Lan, Mu; Wen, Jiqiu; Wang, Shanling; He, Yi; Mountjoy, Gavin; Willis, Maureen A. C.; Xiang, Gang

    2017-06-01

    We report the observation of an unusual self-peeling effect which allows the synthesis of free standing vertically aligned carbon nanotube films filled with large quantities of Fe3C and small quantities of γ-Fe crystals. We demonstrate that this effect depends on the interplay of three main factors: (1) the physical interactions between the chosen substrate surface and grown carbon nanotubes (CNTs), which is fixed by the composition of the used substrate (111 SiO2/Si or quartz), (2) the CNT-CNT Van der Waals interactions, and (3) the differential thermal contraction between the grown CNT film and the used substrate, which is fixed by the cooling rate differences between the grown film and the used quartz or Si/SiO2 substrates. The width and stability of these films are then further increased to cm-scale by addition of small quantities of toluene to the ferrocene precursor.

  13. The formation mechanism of chiral carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jing; Liu, Liren; Lu, Junzhe; Zhu, Hengjiang

    2018-02-01

    The nuclei and the formation mechanism of chiral carbon nanotubes, namely, single-, double-, and triple-walled carbon nanotubes are simulated by the first principle density functional theory. The formation mechanism from nuclei to corresponding infinitely long carbon nanotubes occurs spirally and via absorbing carbon atoms layer by layer. Carbon atoms at the open end are metastable state compared with ones in the tube wall or the closed end, which indicate the growth point of chiral carbon nanotubes is located at the open end. Growth of outer layer tubular clusters takes precedence over the inner layer in the process of forming multi-walled nuclear structures. Because of the ratio of carbon atoms at the open end to all carbon atoms decreases, the stability of the tubular clusters increases with their length. The infinitely long carbon nanotubes are obtained by executing periodic boundary conditions depend on corresponding nuclear structures.

  14. Effect of acid treated carbon nanotubes on mechanical, rheological and thermal properties of polystyrene nanocomposites

    KAUST Repository

    Amr, Issam Thaher

    2011-09-01

    In this work, multiwall carbon nanotubes (CNT) were functionalized by acid treatment and characterized using Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). Polystyrene/CNT composites of both the untreated and acid treated carbon nanotubes were prepared by thermal bulk polymerization without any initiator at different loadings of CNT. The tensile tests showed that the addition of 0.5 wt.% of acid treated CNT results in 22% increase in Young\\'s modulus. The DSC measurements showed a decrease in glass transition temperature (Tg) of PS in the composites. The rheological studies at 190 °C showed that the addition of untreated CNT increases the viscoelastic behavior of the PS matrix, while the acid treated CNT acts as plasticizer. Thermogravimetric analysis indicated that the incorporation of CNT into PS enhanced the thermal properties of the matrix polymer. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Dynamic characteristics of multi-walled carbon nanotubes under a ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    walled carbon nanotubes; transverse magnetic field; van der Waals force. 1. Introduction. Since the discovery of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) (Iijima. 1991), extensive research related to the carbon nanotubes in the fields of chemistry, physics, ...

  16. Investigation Effects of Magnetetic Impurity Doping on Average Magnetization of Semiconducting Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeedeh Ghafourian

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNT extensively are attractive from both theoretical and experimental point of view, due to its technological applications such as nano electronics devises. SWCNT are created by rolling a graphen sheet into a cyclindrical form. We have investigated the possibility of making a ferromagnetic semiconductor zigzag SWCNT by doping magnetic impurities. We found by increasing magnetic impurities doping on a zigzag SWCNT, average magnetization is increased and one can make a ferromagnetic semiconductor

  17. Flame Retardancy Effects of Graphene Nanoplatelet/Carbon Nanotube Hybrid Membranes on Carbon Fiber Reinforced Epoxy Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongxian Zhuo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanotube/graphene nanoplatelet (MWCNT/GNP hybrid membranes with lower liquid permeability and better barrier effect compared to MWCNT membranes were successfully synthesized by vacuum filtering. Their morphologies, water permeability, and pore structures were characterized by a scanning electron microscope (SEM and nitrogen adsorption isotherms. Furthermore, MWCNT/GNP membranes were used to improve the flame retardancy of carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP composites, and the influence of weight percentage of GNPs on the permeability and flame retardancy of MWCNT/GNP membranes was systematically investigated. Results show that incorporation of MWCNT/GNP membranes on CFRP composite plates can remarkably improve the flame retardancy of CFRP composites. Specifically, the incorporation of hierarchical MWCNT/GNP membrane with 7.5 wt% of GNP displays a 35% reduction in the peak heat release rate (PHRR for a CFRP composite plate with the epoxy as matrix and a 11% reduction in PHRR compared with the incorporation of MWCNT membrane only. A synergistic flame retarding mechanism is suggested to be attributed to these results, which includes controlling the pore size and penetrative network structure.

  18. Are carbon nanotube effects on green algae caused by shading and agglomeration?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwab, Fabienne; Bucheli, Thomas D; Lukhele, Lungile P; Magrez, Arnaud; Nowack, Bernd; Sigg, Laura; Knauer, Katja

    2011-07-15

    Due to growing production, carbon nanotubes (CNT) may soon be found in a broad range of products and thus in the environment. In this work, an algal growth test was developed to determine effects of pristine and oxidized CNT on the green algae Chlorella vulgaris and Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata. CNT suspensions were prepared in algal test medium and characterized taking into account the suspension age, the reduced light transmittance of nanoparticle suspensions defined as shading of CNT and quantified by UV/vis spectroscopy, and the agglomeration of the CNT and of the algal cells. Growth inhibition and photosynthetic activity were investigated as end points. Growth of C. vulgaris was inhibited with effect concentrations of 50% (EC(50)) values of 1.8 mg CNT/L and of 24 mg CNT/L in well dispersed and in agglomerated suspensions, respectively, and 20 mg CNT/L and 36 mg CNT/L for P. subcapitata, respectively. However, the photosynthetic activity was not affected. Growth inhibition was highly correlated with the shading of CNT and the agglomeration of algal cells. This suggests that the reduced algal growth might be caused mainly by indirect effects, i.e. by reduced availability of light and different growth conditions caused by the locally elevated algal concentration inside of CNT agglomerates.

  19. Temperature Dependence of Electrical Characteristics of Carbon Nanotube Field-Effect Transistors: A Quantum Simulation Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Naderi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available By developing a two-dimensional (2D full quantum simulation, the attributes of carbon nanotube field-effect transistors (CNTFETs in different temperatures have been comprehensively investigated. Simulations have been performed by employing the self-consistent solution of 2D Poisson-Schrödinger equations within the nonequilibrium Green's function (NEGF formalism. Principal characteristics of CNTFETs such as current capability, drain conductance, transconductance, and subthreshold swing (SS have been investigated. Simulation results present that as temperature raises from 250 to 500 K, the drain conductance and on-current of the CNTFET improved; meanwhile the on-/off-current ratio deteriorated due to faster growth in off-current. Also the effects of temperature on short channel effects (SCEs such as drain-induced barrier lowering (DIBL and threshold voltage roll-off have been studied. Results show that the subthreshold swing and DIBL parameters are almost linearly correlated, so the degradation of these parameters has the same origin and can be perfectly influenced by the temperature.

  20. Numerical Results for SU(4) and SU(2) Kondo Effect in Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, George; Busser, Carlos

    2006-03-01

    New numerical results are presented for the Kondo effect in Carbon Nanotube (CNT) quantum dots (QDs). As recently reported by P. Jarillo-Herrero et al. (Nature 434, 484 (2005)), the Kondo effect in CNTs presents an SU(4) symmetry, which arises from the entanglement of orbital and spin degrees of freedom. As the number of co-tunneling processes increases, thanks to the extra (orbital) degree of freedom, the Kondo temperature reaches a high value of TK=7.7K. Interesting considerations can be drawn regarding the change from SU(4) to SU(2) symmetries depending on the hopping matrix elements between the leads and the CNT QD. Our results will analyze the transition between the SU(4) and the so-called two-level SU(2) (2LSU(2)) Kondo regimes induced by the variation of the coupling of the QD to the leads. The effect of an external magnetic field along the tube direction will also be analyzed. Our results will be compared with available Numerical Renormalization Group (NRG) results by M-S Choi et al. (Phys. Rev. Lett. 95, 067204 (2005)). A comparison with the experimental results will be made to gauge the adequacy of the model and approximations made.

  1. Effect of Multi-walled Carbon Nanotubes on Metabolism and Morphology of Filamentous Green Microalgae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munk, Michele; Brandão, Humberto M; Yéprémian, Claude; Couté, Alain; Ladeira, Luiz O; Raposo, Nádia R B; Brayner, Roberta

    2017-11-01

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) have potential applications in the industrial, agricultural, pharmaceutical, medical, and environmental remediation fields. However, many uncertainties exist regarding the environmental implications of engineered nanomaterials. This study examined the effect of the MWCNTs on metabolic status and morphology of filamentous green microalgae Klebsormidium flaccidum. Appropriate concentrations of MWCNT (1, 50, and 100 μg mL-1) were added to a microalgal culture in the exponential growth phase and incubated for 24, 48, 72, and 96 h. Exposure to MWCNT led to reductions in algal growth after 48 h and decreased on cell viability for all experimental endpoints except for 1 µg mL-1 at 24 h and 100 µg mL-1 after 72 h. At 100 µg mL-1, MWCNTs induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and had an effect on intracellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) content depending on concentration and time. No photosynthetic activity variation was observed. Observations by scanning transmission electron microscopy showed cell damage. In conclusion, we have demonstrated that exposure to MWCNTs affects cell metabolism and microalgal cell morphology. To our best knowledge, this is the first case in which MWCNTs exhibit adverse effects on filamentous green microalgae K. flaccidum. These results contribute to elucidate the mechanism of MWCNT nanotoxicity in the bioindicator organism of terrestrial and freshwater habitats.

  2. Torsional wave propagation in multiwalled carbon nanotubes using nonlocal elasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arda, Mustafa; Aydogdu, Metin

    2016-03-01

    Torsional wave propagation in multiwalled carbon nanotubes is studied in the present work. Governing equation of motion of multiwalled carbon nanotube is obtained using Eringen's nonlocal elasticity theory. The effect of van der Waals interaction coefficient is considered between inner and outer nanotubes. Dispersion relations are obtained and discussed in detail. Effect of nonlocal parameter and van der Waals interaction to the torsional wave propagation behavior of multiwalled carbon nanotubes is investigated. It is obtained that torsional van der Waals interaction between adjacent tubes can change the rotational direction of multiwalled carbon nanotube as in-phase or anti-phase. The group and escape velocity of the waves converge to a limit value in the nonlocal elasticity approach.

  3. Simultaneous effects of single wall carbon nanotube and effective variable viscosity for peristaltic flow through annulus having permeable walls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iqra Shahzadi

    Full Text Available The current article deals with the combine effects of single wall carbon nanotubes and effective viscosity for the peristaltic flow of nanofluid through annulus. The nature of the walls is assumed to be permeable. The present theoretical model can be considered as mathematical representation to the motion of conductive physiological fluids in the existence of the endoscope tube which has many biomedical applications such as drug delivery system. The outer tube has a wave of sinusoidal nature that is travelling along its walls while the inner tube is rigid and uniform. Lubrication approach is used for the considered analysis. An empirical relation for the effective variable viscosity of nanofluid is proposed here interestingly. The viscosity of nanofluid is the function of radial distance and the concentration of nanoparticles. Exact solution for the resulting system of equations is displayed for various quantities of interest. The outcomes show that the maximum velocity of SWCNT-blood nanofluid enhances for larger values of viscosity parameter. The pressure gradient in the more extensive part of the annulus is likewise found to increase as a function of variable viscosity parameter. The size of the trapped bolus is also influenced by variable viscosity parameter. The present examination also revealed that the carbon nanotubes have many applications related to biomedicine. Keywords: Variable nanofluid viscosity, SWCNT, Annulus, Permeable walls, Exact solution

  4. Carbon Nanotube Thermoelectric Coolers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-02-06

    fitting the sharp features with the Gauss bell curves as was suggested earlier in Ref. (Yang, Fedorov et al. 2012). Comparing the  eG V curves...Yang, Fedorov et al. 2012). Our experimental results suggest that the electric current along the nanotube induces an impressive change of local...fermions, Eur. Phys. J. B (2014) 87: 99 DOI: 10.1140/epjb/e2014-40794-0. 2. Y. Yang, G. Fedorov , J. Zhang, A. Tselev, S. Shafraniuk and P. Barbara

  5. Effect of Novel Quercetin Titanium Dioxide-Decorated Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes Nanocomposite on Bacillus subtilis Biofilm Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raie, Diana S; Mhatre, Eisha; El-Desouki, Doaa S

    2018-01-01

    The present work was targeted to design a surface against cell seeding and adhering of bacteria, Bacillus subtilis. A multi-walled carbon nanotube/titanium dioxide nano-power was produced via simple mixing of carbon nanotube and titanium dioxide nanoparticles during the sol-gel process followed...

  6. Method of making carbon nanotube composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Bryan, Gregory; Skinner, Jack L; Vance, Andrew; Yang, Elaine Lai; Zifer, Thomas

    2014-05-20

    The present invention is a method of making a composite polymeric material by dissolving a vinyl thermoplastic polymer, un-functionalized carbon nanotubes and hydroxylated carbon nanotubes and optionally additives in a solvent to make a solution and removing at least a portion of the solvent after casting onto a substrate to make thin films. The material has enhanced conductivity properties due to the blending of the un-functionalized and hydroxylated carbon nanotubes.

  7. Investigation of chemical and physical properties of carbon nanotubes and their effects on cell biomechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Chenbo

    Cerasela Zoica Dinu, Effects of acid treatment on structure, properties and biocompatibility of carbon nanotubes, Applied Surface Science, 2013, 268, 261-268.) Chapter two shows how exposure to CNTs changes the biomechanical properties of fixed human lung epithelial cells (BEAS-2B cells). Specifically, by using Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) nanoindentation technology, we demonstrated that cellular exposure to multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) for 24h induces significant changes in cellular biomechanics leading to increased cellular stiffness. The MWCNTs incubation also seemed to alter the surface area of the cells. Consequently, measures of the mechanical properties of the exposed cell could be used as indicators of its biological state and could offer valuable insights into the mechanisms associated with CNTs-induced genetic instability. (Publication: Chenbo Dong, Linda Sargent, Michael L Kashon, David Lowry, Jonathan S. Dordick, Steven H. Reynolds, Yon Rojanasakul and Cerasela Zoica Dinu, Expose to carbon nanotubes leads to change in cellular biomechanics, Advanced Healthcare Materials, 2013, 7, 945-951.) Chapter three links together the MWCNTs exposure duration, internalization and induced biomechanical changes in fixed cells. Our findings indicated that changes in biomechanical properties of the fixed cells are a function of the uptake and internalization of the MWCNTs as well as their uptake time. Specifically, short exposure time did not seem to lead to considerable changes in the elastic properties in the cellular system. However, longer cellular exposure to CNTs leads to a higher uptake and internalization of the nanotubes and a larger effect on the cell mechanics. Such changes could be related to CNTs interactions with cellular elements and could bring information on the CNT intrinsic toxicity. Chapter four talks about the potential of purified forms of CNTs with increased hydrophilicity to affect live human lung epithelial cells when used at occupational

  8. [Cultivation of continuous cell lines on the substrate of carbon nanotubes and the effect of electric stimulation on cell proliferation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podcherniaeva, R Ia; Suetina, I A; Mikhaĭlova, G R; Lopatina, O A; Bobrinetskiĭ, I I; Morozov, R A; Seleznev, A S

    2012-01-01

    It was demonstrated that the three studied samples of carbon nanotubes of domestic production fixed on the substrate surface did not have toxic effect and could be used for cell cultivation. A biocompatible conductive coating based on carbon nanotubes and bovine serum albumin was developed. The efficacy of the coating for growing in vitro cell cultures was tested. A device was developed for electric stimulation of the cells. Local electric potential was applied to the cells using nanoscale electrodes. The results of human embryonic fibroblast cultivation in a pulsed electric field on conductive nanocomposite substrates were presented. An 26% increase in the proliferative activity of cells was observed at potentials up to 100 mV.

  9. Effect of pH on enhancement of hydrogen storage capacity in carbon nanotubes on a copper substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varshoy, Sh.; Khoshnevisan, B.; Mohammadi, M.; Behpour, M.

    2017-12-01

    Electrochemical storage of hydrogen in Cu-CNTs (copper and carbon nanotubes) electrodes was studied by Chronopotentiometry technique. In this project effective absorption factors in atomic hydrogenation by CNTs such as charge/discharge (C&D) cyclic number, current and also different pHs were studied. Acidic method was used for purifying and functionalizing the CNTs, and the outputs were characterized using XRD spectroscopy. The CNTs were deposited on copper foam with nano metric porosity by electrophoretic method (EPD). By comparing the results of different experiments in different charge and discharge cycles, it was observed that multi-wall carbon nanotubes in the current of 3 mA with pH=5.4 have a maximum discharge capacity ‎about 10,000 mA h/g.

  10. Carbon Nanotubes: Molecular Electronic Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Deepak; Saini, Subhash; Menon, Madhu

    1997-01-01

    The carbon Nanotube junctions have recently emerged as excellent candidates for use as the building blocks in the formation of nanoscale molecular electronic networks. While the simple joint of two dissimilar tubes can be generated by the introduction of a pair of heptagon-pentagon defects in an otherwise perfect hexagonal graphene sheet, more complex joints require other mechanisms. In this work we explore structural characteristics of complex 3-point junctions of carbon nanotubes using a generalized tight-binding molecular-dynamics scheme. The study of pi-electron local densities of states (LDOS) of these junctions reveal many interesting features, most prominent among them being the defect-induced states in the gap.

  11. Carbon nanotubes as excitonic insulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varsano, Daniele; Sorella, Sandro; Sangalli, Davide; Barborini, Matteo; Corni, Stefano; Molinari, Elisa; Rontani, Massimo

    2017-11-13

    Fifty years ago Walter Kohn speculated that a zero-gap semiconductor might be unstable against the spontaneous generation of excitons-electron-hole pairs bound together by Coulomb attraction. The reconstructed ground state would then open a gap breaking the symmetry of the underlying lattice, a genuine consequence of electronic correlations. Here we show that this excitonic insulator is realized in zero-gap carbon nanotubes by performing first-principles calculations through many-body perturbation theory as well as quantum Monte Carlo. The excitonic order modulates the charge between the two carbon sublattices opening an experimentally observable gap, which scales as the inverse of the tube radius and weakly depends on the axial magnetic field. Our findings call into question the Luttinger liquid paradigm for nanotubes and provide tests to experimentally discriminate between excitonic and Mott insulators.

  12. The Vibration of a Linear Carbon Chain in Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongqing Ding

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available An explicit solution for the vibration of a carbon chain inside carbon nanotubes (CNTs was obtained using continuum modeling of the van der Waals (vdW interactions between them. The effect of the initial tensile force and the amplitude of the carbon chain as well as the radii of the CNTs on the vibration frequency were analyzed in detail, respectively. Our analytical results show that the vibration frequency of the carbon chain in a (5,5 CNT could be around two orders of magnitude higher than that of an independent carbon chain without initial tensile force. For a given CNT radius, the vibration frequency nonlinearly increases with increasing amplitude and initial tensile force. The obtained analytical cohesive energy and vibration frequency are reasonable by comparison of present molecular dynamics (MD simulations. These findings will be a great help towards understanding the vibration property of a nanowire in nanotubes, and designing nanoelectromechanical devices.

  13. Multifunctional Carbon Nanotube Fiber Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-12-26

    First, both sides of the membrane were sputter-coated with a thin layer of platinum. On one side, a thin film of CNT was next deposited by filtration...absorption spectra of thin films or solutions containing predominantly aggregated SWNTs are dominated by inhomogeneously broadened optical transitions...electrochemical actuation. This objective was attained by welding carbon nanotube structures with polymer derived ceramic (PDC), silicon carbonitride (SiCN

  14. Toxic effects of single-walled carbon nanotubes in the development of E. coli biofilm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Debora F; Elimelech, Menachem

    2010-06-15

    The impact of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) on the different developmental stages of biofilms has been investigated using E. coli K12 as a model organism. Specifically, we investigated (i) the impact of SWNT concentration on cell growth and biofilm formation, (ii) toxic effects of SWNTs on mature biofilms, and (iii) formation of biofilm on SWNT-coated surfaces. The results show that at the initial stage of biofilm formation, SWNTs come into contact with bacterial cells prior to biofilm maturation and inhibit their growth. Furthermore, the results suggest that bacteria in mature biofilms are less sensitive to the presence of SWNTs than cells in other biofilm stages, similar to previous observations of biofilm resistance to antimicrobials. In mature biofilms, the soluble exopolymeric substances (EPS) secreted by the biofilm play an important role in mitigating the toxic effects of SWNTs. Upon exposure to SWNTs, biofilms without soluble EPS in the supernatant had a much more significant loss of biomass because of cell detachment from the biofilm than biofilms containing soluble EPS. To observe similar cell loss, biofilms with soluble EPS needed SWNT concentrations that were 10 times higher compared to biofilms without soluble EPS. Finally, SWNTs deposited onto surfaces affected significantly the subsequent biofilm development. Analysis of the total biomass and the area occupied by cells indicates that a SWNT-coated substratum has 10 times less biofilm colonization and biomass production than a control substratum without SWNTs.

  15. The effect of carbon nanotube chirality on the spiral flow of copper atoms in their cores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, M.C.G., E-mail: M070041@e.ntu.edu.sg [Nanyang Technological University, School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Zhong, Z.W. [Nanyang Technological University, School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 (Singapore)

    2012-12-14

    The effect of carbon nanotube (CNT) chirality on the flow of copper atoms along its core has been investigated using molecular dynamics simulations. The investigation is conducted using CNTs of different chirality, and different flow conditions such as temperatures, bias voltages and the initial positions of the copper atoms. The results show that the atoms flow in a spiral fashion along the CNT channels. The effect is most evident in the CNT channel with zigzag CNTs. The movement of the copper atoms is more erratic when the temperature is increased at a low biased voltage, regardless of the types of channel used. The initial positions of the copper atoms affect the way they converge as they move downstream along the channel. A bias voltage of 4 V favours the initiation of a spiral flow, especially when the position of the copper atoms is far from the central axis of the channel. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We model the transportation of copper atoms in armchair and zigzag CNT channels. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The spiral flow of copper atoms occurs in a semiconductor-semiconductor CNT. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The compact copper mass is predicted to occur at 673 K with a 4 V bias voltage.

  16. Interactions and effects of BSA-functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes on different cell lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muzi, Laura; Tardani, Franco; La Mesa, Camillo; Bonincontro, Adalberto; Bianco, Alberto; Risuleo, Gianfranco

    2016-04-01

    Functionalized carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have shown great promise in several biomedical contexts, spanning from drug delivery to tissue regeneration. Thanks to their unique size-related properties, single-walled CNTs (SWCNTs) are particularly interesting in these fields. However, their use in nanomedicine requires a clear demonstration of their safety in terms of tissue damage, toxicity and pro-inflammatory response. Thus, a better understanding of the cytotoxicity mechanisms, the cellular interactions and the effects that these materials have on cell survival and on biological membranes is an important first step for an appropriate assessment of their biocompatibility. In this study we show how bovine serum albumin (BSA) is able to generate homogeneous and stable dispersions of SWCNTs (BSA-CNTs), suggesting their possible use in the biomedical field. On the other hand, this study wishes to shed more light on the impact and the interactions of protein-stabilized SWCNTs with two different cell types exploiting multidisciplinary techniques. We show that BSA-CNTs are efficiently taken up by cells. We also attempt to describe the effect that the interaction with cells has on the dielectric characteristics of the plasma membrane and ion flux using electrorotation. We then focus on the BSA-CNTs’ acute toxicity using different cellular models. The novel aspect of this work is the evaluation of the membrane alterations that have been poorly investigated to date.

  17. Effects of aspect ratio of multi-walled carbon nanotubes on coal washery waste water treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aliyu, Ahmed; Kariim, Ishaq; Abdulkareem, Saka Ambali

    2017-11-01

    The dependency of adsorption behaviour on the aspect ratio of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) has been explored. In this study, effect of growth temperature on yield and aspect ratio of MWCNTs by catalytic chemical vapour deposition (CCVD) method is reported. The result revealed that yield and aspect ratio of synthesised MWCNTs strongly depend on the growth temperature during CCVD operation. The resulting MWCNTs were characterized by High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscope (HRTEM), Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) techniques to determine it diameter, hydrodynamic diameter and crystallinity respectively. Aspect ratio and length of the grown MWCNTs were determined from the HRTEM images with the hydrodynamic diameter using the modified Navier-Stokes and Stokes-Einstein equations. The effect of the prepared MWCNTs dosage were investigated on the Turbidity, Iron (Fe) and Lead (Pb) removal efficiency of coal washery effluent. The MWCNTs with higher length (58.17 μm) and diameter (71 nm) tend to show high turbidity and Fe removal, while MWCNTs with lower length (38.87 μm) and diameter (45 nm) tend to show high removal of Pb. Hence, the growth temperature during CCVD operation shows a great effluence on the aspect ratio of MWCNTs which determines it area of applications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Effect of Saline Solution on the Electrical Response of Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes-Epoxy Nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hammad Younes

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of saline solution on the electrical resistance of single wall carbon nanotubes-epoxy nanocomposites have been investigated experimentally. Ultrasonic assisted fabricated 1.0% and 0.5 W/W% SWCNTs epoxy nanocomposites are integrated into a Kelvin structure by smear cast the nanocomposites on a glass wafer. Four metal pads are deposited on the nanocomposites using the beam evaporator and wires are tethered using soldering. The effect of saline solution on the electrical resistance of the nanocomposites is studied by adding drop of saline solution to the surface of the fabricated nanocomposites and measuring electrical resistance. Moreover, the nanocomposites are soaked completely into 3 wt.% saline solution and real-time measurement of the electrical resistance is conducted. It is found that a drop of saline solution on the surface of the nanocomposites film increases the resistance by 50%. Furthermore, the real-time measurement reveals a 40% increase in the resistance of the nanocomposites film. More importantly, the nanocomposites are successfully reset by soaking in DI water for four hours. This study may open the door for using SWCNTs epoxy nanocomposites as scale sensors in oil and gas industry.

  19. Molecular Mechanics of the Moisture Effect on Epoxy/Carbon Nanotube Nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lik-ho Tam

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The strong structural integrity of polymer nanocomposite is influenced in the moist environment; but the fundamental mechanism is unclear, including the basis for the interactions between the absorbed water molecules and the structure, which prevents us from predicting the durability of its applications across multiple scales. In this research, a molecular dynamics model of the epoxy/single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT nanocomposite is constructed to explore the mechanism of the moisture effect, and an analysis of the molecular interactions is provided by focusing on the hydrogen bond (H-bond network inside the nanocomposite structure. The simulations show that at low moisture concentration, the water molecules affect the molecular interactions by favorably forming the water-nanocomposite H-bonds and the small cluster, while at high concentration the water molecules predominantly form the water-water H-bonds and the large cluster. The water molecules in the epoxy matrix and the epoxy-SWCNT interface disrupt the molecular interactions and deteriorate the mechanical properties. Through identifying the link between the water molecules and the nanocomposite structure and properties, it is shown that the free volume in the nanocomposite is crucial for its structural integrity, which facilitates the moisture accumulation and the distinct material deteriorations. This study provides insights into the moisture-affected structure and properties of the nanocomposite from the nanoscale perspective, which contributes to the understanding of the nanocomposite long-term performance under the moisture effect.

  20. Concentration effect of carbon nanotube based saturable absorber on stabilizing and shortening mode-locked pulse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Jin-Chen; Lan, Yi-Fen; Chang, Chia-Ming; Chen, Xi-Zong; Yeh, Chao-Yung; Lee, Chao-Kuei; Lin, Gong-Ru; Lin, Jiang-Jen; Cheng, Wood-Hi

    2010-02-15

    We comprehensively investigated the concentration effect of dispersed single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) in polymer films for being a saturable absorber (SA) to stabilize the mode locking performance of the erbium-doped fiber laser (EDFL) pulse through the diagnosis of its nonlinear properties of SA. The measured modulation depth was from 1 to 4.5% as the thickness increased 18 to 265 microm. The full-width half-maximum (FWHM) of the stable mode-locked EDFL (MLEDFL) pulse decreased from 3.43 to 2.02 ps as the concentrations of SWCNTs SA increased 0.125 to 0.5 wt%. At constant concentration of 0.125 wt%, the similar pulse shortening effect of the MLEDFL was also observed when the FWHM decreased from 3.43 to 1.85 ps as the thickness of SWCNTs SA increased 8 to 100 microm. With an erbium-doped fiber length of 80 cm, the shortest pulse width of 1.85 ps were achieved at 1.56 microm with a repetition rate of 11.1 MHz and 0.2 mW of the output power under an output coupling ratio of 5%. An in-depth study on the stable mode-locked pulse formation employing SWCNTs SA, it is possible to fabricate the SWCNT films for use in high performance MLEDFL and utilization of many other low-cost nanodevices.

  1. Effect of multi-walled carbon nanotubes on phytotoxicity of sediments contaminated by phenanthrene and cadmium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Biao; Zeng, Guangming; Gong, Jilai; Zhang, Peng; Deng, Jiaqin; Deng, Canhui; Yan, Jin; Xu, Piao; Lai, Cui; Zhang, Chen; Cheng, Min

    2017-04-01

    To implement effective control and abatement programs for contaminants accumulating in sediments, strategies are needed for evaluating the quality of amended sediments. In this study, phytotoxicity of the sediments contaminated by cadmium and phenanthrene was evaluated after in situ remediation with multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) as adsorbents. Adsorption experiments and measurement of aqueous concentrations of the contaminants in overlying water were used to investigate the remediation effectiveness from physical and chemical aspects. The results indicated that MWCNTs showed a much better adsorption performance towards phenanthrene and Cd(II) compared with the sediments. The in situ remediation with MWCNTs could distinctly decrease the aqueous concentrations of phenanthrene and Cd(II) released from the sediments, reducing environmental risk towards overlying water. Influences of MWCNTs dose, MWCNTs diameter, and contact time on phtotoxicity of the contaminated sediments were studied. No significant inhibition of the amended sediments on germination of the test species was observed in the experiments, while the root growth was more sensitive than biomass production to the changes of contaminant concentrations. The analysis of Pearson correlation coefficients between evaluation indicators and associated remediation parameters suggested that phytotoxicity of sediments might inaccurately indicate the changes of pollutant content, but it was significant in reflecting the ecotoxicity of sediments after remediation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Photothermal effects of multi-walled carbon nanotubes on the viability of BT-474 cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Hung-Tao; Wang, Tsung-Pao; Lee, Chi-Young; Tai, Nyan-Hwa; Chang, Hwan-You

    2013-03-01

    Functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (f-MWCNTs) were conjugated to an antibody of BT-474 cancer cells (f-MWCNTs-ab), and the photothermal effect of the f-MWCNTs-ab for BT-474 cancer cell destruction was demonstrated. After near-infrared irradiation, the f-MWCNTs-ab were more capable of killing cancer cells and possessed higher cell specificity than f-MWCNTs. Quantitative results showed that the viability of the cancer cells was affected by the concentration of the f-MWCNTs-ab solution, irradiation time, and settling time after irradiation. The membrane impermeable fluorescence dye ethidium bromide was used to detect cell viability after near-infrared irradiation, and the results agreed with those obtained from the Alamar Blue cell viability assay. The EtBr fluorescence results suggest that the cell membrane, attached to f-MWCNTs-ab, was damaged after irradiation, which led to cell death and necrosis. Using confocal microscopy, a few f-MWCNTs-ab were detected in the cell, indicating the endocytosis effect. The results not only explain the improved efficiency of thermotherapy but also indicate that necrosis may result from protein denaturation attributing to the heated f-MWCNTs-ab in the cell. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Carbon Nanotubes: Measuring Dispersion and Length

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fagan, Jeffrey A.; Bauer, Barry J.; Hobbie, Erik K.; Becker, Matthew L.; Hight-Walker, Angela; Simpson, Jeffrey R.; Chun, Jaehun; Obrzut, Jan; Bajpai, Vardhan; Phelan, Fred R.; Simien, Daneesh; Yeon Huh, Ji; Migler, Kalman B.

    2011-03-01

    Advanced technological uses of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) rely on the production of single length and chirality populations that are currently only available through liquid phase post processing. The foundation of all of these processing steps is the attainment of individualized nanotube dispersion in solution; an understanding of the collodial properties of the dispersed SWCNTs can then be used to designed appropriate conditions for separations. In many instances nanotube size, particularly length, is especially active in determining the achievable properties from a given population, and thus there is a critical need for measurement technologies for both length distribution and effective separation techniques. In this Progress Report, we document the current state of the art for measuring dispersion and length populations, including separations, and use examples to demonstrate the desirability of addressing these parameters.

  4. On the Nanoindentation of the Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petre P. Teodorescu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A new inverse approach is proposed in this paper, which combines elements of nonlocal theory and molecular mechanics, based on the experimental results available in the nanoindentation literature. The effect of the inlayer van der Waals atomistic interactions for carbon nanotubes with multiple walls (MWCNT is included by means of the Brenner-Tersoff potential and experimental results. The neighboring walls of MWCNT are coupled through van der Waals interactions, and the shell buckling would initiate in the outermost shell, when nanotubes are short. The nanoindentation technique is simulated for the axially compressed of individual nanotubes, in order to evaluate the load-unloaded-displacement, the curve critical buckling and the appropriate values for local Lamé constants.

  5. Effect of Novel Quercetin Titanium Dioxide-Decorated Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes Nanocomposite on Bacillus subtilis Biofilm Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana S. Raie

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The present work was targeted to design a surface against cell seeding and adhering of bacteria, Bacillus subtilis. A multi-walled carbon nanotube/titanium dioxide nano-power was produced via simple mixing of carbon nanotube and titanium dioxide nanoparticles during the sol-gel process followed by heat treatment. Successfully, quercetin was immobilized on the nanocomposite via physical adsorption to form a quercetin/multi-walled carbon nanotube/titanium dioxide nanocomposite. The adhesion of bacteria on the coated-slides was verified after 24 h using confocal laser-scanning microscopy. Results indicated that the quercetin/multi-walled carbon nanotube/titanium dioxide nanocomposite had more negativity and higher recovery by glass surfaces than its counterpart. Moreover, coating surfaces with the quercetin-modified nanocomposite lowered both hydrophilicity and surface-attached bacteria compared to surfaces coated with the multi-walled carbon nanotubes/titanium dioxide nanocomposite.

  6. Simulation of diode characteristics of carbon nanotube field-effect transistors with symmetric source and drain contacts

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Jingqi

    2011-09-01

    The diode characteristics of carbon nanotube field-effect transistors (CNTFETs) with symmetric source and drain contacts have been experimentally found at zero gate voltage (Li J. et al., Appl. Phys. Lett., 92 (2008) 133111). We calculate this characteristic using a semiclassical method based on Schottky barrier transistor mechanism. The influences of metal work function, the diameter of the carbon nanotubes and the dielectric thickness on the rectification behavior have been studied. The calculation results show that the metal with a higher work function results in a better diode characteristics for a p-type CNTFET. For single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) with different band gaps, both forward current and reverse current increase with decreasing band gap, but the ratio of forward current to reverse current decreases with decreasing band gap. This result is well consistent with the experimental observations reported previously. The simulation of the dielectric thickness effect indicates that the thinner the dielectric layer, the better the rectification behavior. The CNTFETs without a bottom gate could not show the diode characteristics, which is consistent with the reported experimental observation. © 2011 Europhysics Letters Association.

  7. Inhibitory effects of multiwall carbon nanotubes with high iron impurity on viability and neuronal differentiation in cultured PC12 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Li; Jiang, Aihua; Chen, Rui; Li, Chen-zhong; Wang, Liming; Qu, Ying; Wang, Peng; Zhao, Yuliang; Chen, Chunying

    2013-11-08

    The increasing use of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in biomedical applications has garnered a great concern on their potential negative effects to human health. CNTs have been reported to potentially disrupt normal neuronal function and they were speculated to accumulate and cause brain damage, although a lot of distinct and exceptional properties and potential wide applications have been associated with this material in neurobiology. Fe impurities strapped inside the CNTs may be partially responsible for neurotoxicity generation. In the present study, we selected rat pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells to investigate and compare the effects of two kinds of multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) with different concentrations of Fe impurities which usually come from the massive production of CNTs by chemical vapor deposition. Exposure to Fe-high MWCNTs can reduce cell viability and increase cytoskeletal disruption of undifferentiated PC12 cells, diminish the ability to form mature neurites, and then adversely influence the neuronal dopaminergic phenotype in NGF-treated PC-12 cells. The present results highlight the critical role of iron residue in the adverse response to MWCNTs exposure in neural cells. These findings provide useful information for understanding the toxicity and safe application of carbon nanotubes. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Effects of carbon nanotube addition on superconductivity in Y-Ba-Cu-O bulk superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, K.; Miyake, Y.; Miryala, M.; Murakami, M.

    2017-07-01

    Bulk Y-Ba-Cu-O superconductors have significant potential for engineering applications due to high critical current density, which is attributed to the presence of pinning centers such as Y2BaCuO5. The introduction of nano-sized secondary phase is known to act as more effective pinning center than those in micron sizes. The diameter of carbon nanotube (CNT) is close to that of the coherence length of high-temperature superconductors, which is expected to improve the flux pinning performance. We have investigated the effects of CNT addition on the microstructure, superconducting transition temperature (T c), and critical current density (J c) of YBa2Cu3O x (Y123) based bulk superconductors. SEM observation showed the distribution of needle-like particles around 100 nm in length in the Y123 matrix for the CNT added samples. The highly porous texture was also observed for the excess addition of CNT. T c was enhanced from 90.5 K to 91.8 K with increasing CNT addition. It is probable that carbon originated from CNT suppressed oxidation and carrier doping. Jc exhibited the highest value for 0.25 wt% CNT added sample. This suggests that nano-sized needle-like particles act as effective pinning centers. However, a further increase of CNT led to the decline of J c, which suggests that there is an optimum amount of CNT for the improvement of J c. The secondary peak was observed for the sample with 1 wt% CNT addition, where CO3 substitutions with Cu site at the Cu-O chain might induce oxygen vacancies leading to the field induced pinning.

  9. Carbon nanotube and conducting polymer composites for supercapacitors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chuang Peng Shengwen Zhang Daniel Jewell George Z. Chen

    2008-01-01

    Composites of carbon nanotubes and conducting polymers can be prepared via chemical synthesis, electrochemical deposition on preformed carbon nanotube electrodes, or by electrochemical co-deposition...

  10. Effects of multiwalled carbon nanotubes and triclocarban on several eukaryotic cell lines: elucidating cytotoxicity, endocrine disruption, and reactive oxygen species generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Anne; Maletz, Sibylle X; Hollert, Henner; Schäffer, Andreas; Maes, Hanna M

    2014-01-01

    To date, only a few reports about studies on toxic effects of carbon nanotubes (CNT) are available, and their results are often controversial. Three different cell lines (rainbow trout liver cells (RTL-W1), human adrenocortical carcinoma cells (T47Dluc), and human adrenocarcinoma cells (H295R)) were exposed to multiwalled carbon nanotubes, the antimicrobial agent triclocarban (TCC) as well as the mixture of both substances in a concentration range of 3.13 to 50 mg CNT/L, 31.25 to 500 μg TCC/L, and 3.13 to 50 mg CNT/L + 1% TCC (percentage relative to carbon nanotubes concentration), respectively. Triclocarban is a high-production volume chemical that is widely used as an antimicrobial compound and is known for its toxicity, hydrophobicity, endocrine disruption, bioaccumulation potential, and environmental persistence. Carbon nanotubes are known to interact with hydrophobic organic compounds. Therefore, triclocarban was selected as a model substance to examine mixture toxicity in this study. The influence of multiwalled carbon nanotubes and triclocarban on various toxicological endpoints was specified: neither cytotoxicity nor endocrine disruption could be observed after exposure of the three cell lines to carbon nanotubes, but the nanomaterial caused intracellular generation of reactive oxygen species in all cell types. For TCC on the other hand, cell vitality of 80% could be observed at a concentration of 2.1 mg/L for treated RTL-W1 cells. A decrease of luciferase activity in the ER Calux assay at a triclocarban concentration of 125 μg/L and higher was observed. This effect was less pronounced when multiwalled carbon nanotubes were present in the medium. Taken together, these results demonstrate that multiwalled carbon nanotubes induce the production of reactive oxygen species in RTL-W1, T47Dluc, and H295R cells, reveal no cytotoxicity, and reduce the bioavailability and toxicity of the biocide triclocarban.

  11. Carbon nanotube materials from hydrogen storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dillon, A.C.; Bekkedahl, T.A.; Cahill, A.F. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO (United States)

    1995-09-01

    The lack of convenient and cost-effective hydrogen storage is a major impediment to wide scale use of hydrogen in the United States energy economy. Improvements in the energy densities of hydrogen storage systems, reductions in cost, and increased compatibility with available and forecasted systems are required before viable hydrogen energy use pathways can be established. Carbon-based hydrogen adsorption materials hold particular promise for meeting and exceeding the U.S. Department of Energy hydrogen storage energy density targets for transportation if concurrent increases in hydrogen storage capacity and carbon density can be achieved. These two goals are normally in conflict for conventional porous materials, but may be reconciled by the design and synthesis of new adsorbent materials with tailored pore size distributions and minimal macroporosity. Carbon nanotubes offer the possibility to explore new designs for adsorbents because they can be fabricated with small size distributions, and naturally tend to self-assemble by van der Waals forces. This year we report heats of adsorption for hydrogen on nanotube materials that are 2 and 3 times greater than for hydrogen on activated carbon. The hydrogen which is most strongly bound to these materials remains on the carbon surface to temperatures greater than 285 K. These results suggest that nanocapillary forces are active in stabilizing hydrogen on the surfaces of carbon nanotubes, and that optimization of the adsorbent will lead to effective storage at higher temperatures. In this paper we will also report on our activities which are targeted at understanding and optimizing the nucleation and growth of single wall nanotubes. These experiments were made possible by the development of a unique feedback control circuit which stabilized the plasma-arc during a synthesis run.

  12. High-Throughput Peptide Epitope Mapping Using Carbon Nanotube Field-Effect Transistors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steingrimur Stefansson

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Label-free and real-time detection technologies can dramatically reduce the time and cost of pharmaceutical testing and development. However, to reach their full promise, these technologies need to be adaptable to high-throughput automation. To demonstrate the potential of single-walled carbon nanotube field-effect transistors (SWCNT-FETs for high-throughput peptide-based assays, we have designed circuits arranged in an 8 × 12 (96-well format that are accessible to standard multichannel pipettors. We performed epitope mapping of two HIV-1 gp160 antibodies using an overlapping gp160 15-mer peptide library coated onto nonfunctionalized SWCNTs. The 15-mer peptides did not require a linker to adhere to the non-functionalized SWCNTs, and binding data was obtained in real time for all 96 circuits. Despite some sequence differences in the HIV strains used to generate these antibodies and the overlapping peptide library, respectively, our results using these antibodies are in good agreement with known data, indicating that peptides immobilized onto SWCNT are accessible and that linear epitope mapping can be performed in minutes using SWCNT-FET.

  13. Synergistic effect of carbon nanotube and clay for improving the flame retardancy of ABS resin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma Haiyun [Institute of Polymer Composites, Key Laboratory of Macromolecular Synthesis and Functionalization, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Tong Lifang [Institute of Polymer Composites, Key Laboratory of Macromolecular Synthesis and Functionalization, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Xu Zhongbin [Institute of Polymer Composites, Key Laboratory of Macromolecular Synthesis and Functionalization, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Fang Zhengping [Institute of Polymer Composites, Key Laboratory of Macromolecular Synthesis and Functionalization, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China)

    2007-09-19

    Synergistic effect between multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) and clay on improving the flame retardancy of acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene (ABS) resin was studied. Flammability properties measured by a cone calorimeter revealed that incorporation of clay and MWNTs into ABS resin significantly reduced the peak heat release rate (PHRR) and slowed down the whole combustion process compared to the individually filled system based on clay or MWNTs. The flame retardancy of the ABS/clay/MWNTs nanocomposites was strongly affected by the formation of a network structure. Linear viscoelastic properties of the ABS nanocomposites showed that the coexistence of clay and MWNTs can enhance the network structure which can hinder the movement of polymer chains and improve flame retardancy. From transmission electron microscope analysis, MWNTs were shortened after combustion and there was no significant change in their diameters. For chars of ABS/clay/MWNTs nanocomposites, some MWNTs ran across between clay layers, indicating a strong interaction existed between clay and MWNTs. The existence of clay enhanced the graphitization degree of MWNTs during combustion. Clay can assist the elimination of dislocations and defects and the rearrangement of crystallites. Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, one of the components of clay, acts as the catalyst of graphitization.

  14. Highly Uniform Carbon Nanotube Field-Effect Transistors and Medium Scale Integrated Circuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bingyan; Zhang, Panpan; Ding, Li; Han, Jie; Qiu, Song; Li, Qingwen; Zhang, Zhiyong; Peng, Lian-Mao

    2016-08-10

    Top-gated p-type field-effect transistors (FETs) have been fabricated in batch based on carbon nanotube (CNT) network thin films prepared from CNT solution and present high yield and highly uniform performance with small threshold voltage distribution with standard deviation of 34 mV. According to the property of FETs, various logical and arithmetical gates, shifters, and d-latch circuits were designed and demonstrated with rail-to-rail output. In particular, a 4-bit adder consisting of 140 p-type CNT FETs was demonstrated with higher packing density and lower supply voltage than other published integrated circuits based on CNT films, which indicates that CNT based integrated circuits can reach to medium scale. In addition, a 2-bit multiplier has been realized for the first time. Benefitted from the high uniformity and suitable threshold voltage of CNT FETs, all of the fabricated circuits based on CNT FETs can be driven by a single voltage as small as 2 V.

  15. Effect of hybrid carbon nanotubes-bimetallic composite particles on the performance of polymer solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Sun-Young [Department of Material Processing, Korea Institute of Materials Science, Changwon 641-831 (Korea); Division of Applied Chemical Engineering, Department of Polymer Engineering, Pukyong National University, Busan 608-739 (Korea); Kim, Whi-Dong; Kim, Soo H. [Department of Nanosystem and Nanoprocess Engineering, Pusan National University, 30 Jangjeon-dong, Geumjeong-gu, Busan 609-735 (Korea); Kim, Do-Geun; Kim, Jong-Kuk; Jeong, Yong-Soo; Kang, Jae-Wook [Department of Material Processing, Korea Institute of Materials Science, Changwon 641-831 (Korea); Kim, Joo Hyun [Division of Applied Chemical Engineering, Department of Polymer Engineering, Pukyong National University, Busan 608-739 (Korea); Lee, Jae Keun [School of Mechanical Engineering, Pusan National University, 30 Jangjeon-dong, Geumjeong-gu, Busan 609-735 (Korea)

    2010-05-15

    Hybrid carbon nanotubes-bimetallic composite nanoparticles with sea urchin-like structures (SU-CNTs) were introduced to bulk heterojunction polymer-fullerene solar cells to improve their performance. The SU-CNTs were composed of multi-walled CNTs, which were grown radially over the entire surface of the bimetallic nanoparticles composed of Ni and Al. SU-CNTs with a precisely controlled length of {proportional_to}200{+-}40 nm were dispersed homogenously in a polymer active layer. Compared with a pristine device (i.e., without SU-CNTs), the SU-CNTs-doped organic photovoltaic (OPV) cells showed an improved short-circuit current density and power conversion efficiency from 7.5 to 9.5 mA/cm{sup 2} and 2.1{+-}0.1% to 2.2{+-}0.2% (max. 2.5%), respectively. The specially designed SU-CNTs have strong potential as an effective exciton dissociation medium in the polymer active layer to enhance the performance of organic solar cells. (author)

  16. Adsorption and desorption of dissolved organic matter by carbon nanotubes: Effects of solution chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, Maya; Chefetz, Benny

    2016-06-01

    Increasing use of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) has led to their introduction into the environment where they can interact with dissolved organic matter (DOM). This study focuses on solution chemistry effects on DOM adsorption/desorption processes by single-walled CNTs (SWCNTs). Our data show that DOM adsorption is controlled by the attachment of DOM molecules to the SWCNTs, and that the initial adsorption rate is dependent on solution parameters. Adsorbed amount of DOM at high ionic strength was limited, possibly due to alterations in SWCNT bundling. Desorption of DOM performed at low pH resulted in additional DOM adsorption, whereas at high pH, adsorbed DOM amount decreased. The extent of desorption conducted at increased ionic strength was dependent on pre-adsorbed DOM concentration: low DOM loading stimulated additional adsorption of DOM, whereas high DOM loading facilitated release of adsorbed DOM. Elevated ionic strength and increased adsorbed amount of DOM reduced the oxidation temperature of the SWCNTs, suggesting that changes in the assembly of the SWCNTs had occurred. Moreover, DOM-coated SWCNTs at increased ionic strength provided fewer sites for atrazine adsorption. This study enhances our understanding of DOM-SWCNT interactions in aqueous systems influenced by rapid changes in salinity, and facilitates potential use of SWCNTs in water-purification technologies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Variability and Reliability of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Field Effect Transistors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Ehteshamul Islam

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Excellent electrical performance and extreme sensitivity to chemical species in semiconducting Single-Walled Carbon NanoTubes (s-SWCNTs motivated the study of using them to replace silicon as a next generation field effect transistor (FET for electronic, optoelectronic, and biological applications. In addition, use of SWCNTs in the recently studied flexible electronics appears more promising because of SWCNTs’ inherent flexibility and superior electrical performance over silicon-based materials. All these applications require SWCNT-FETs to have a wafer-scale uniform and reliable performance over time to a level that is at least comparable with the currently used silicon-based nanoscale FETs. Due to similarity in device configuration and its operation, SWCNT-FET inherits most of the variability and reliability concerns of silicon-based FETs, namely the ones originating from line edge roughness, metal work-function variation, oxide defects, etc. Additional challenges arise from the lack of chirality control in as-grown and post-processed SWCNTs and also from the presence of unstable hydroxyl (–OH groups near the interface of SWCNT and dielectric. In this review article, we discuss these variability and reliability origins in SWCNT-FETs. Proposed solutions for mitigating each of these sources are presented and a future perspective is provided in general, which are required for commercial use of SWCNT-FETs in future nanoelectronic applications.

  18. Temperature effects on the nitric acid oxidation of industrial grade multiwalled carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrade, Nadia F., E-mail: nadia@fisica.ufc.br [Universidade Federal do Ceara, Departamento de Fisica (Brazil); Martinez, Diego Stefani T., E-mail: diegostefani.br@gmail.com; Paula, Amauri J., E-mail: amaurijp@gmail.com [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), Laboratorio de Quimica do Estado Solido (LQES), Instituto de Quimica (Brazil); Silveira, Jose V. [Universidade Federal do Ceara, Departamento de Fisica (Brazil); Alves, Oswaldo L., E-mail: oalves@iqm.unicamp.br [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), Laboratorio de Quimica do Estado Solido (LQES), Instituto de Quimica (Brazil); Souza Filho, Antonio G., E-mail: agsf@fisica.ufc.br [Universidade Federal do Ceara, Departamento de Fisica (Brazil)

    2013-07-15

    In this study, we report an oxidative treatment of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) by using nitric acid at different temperatures (25-175 Degree-Sign C). The analyzed materials have diameters varying from 10 to 40 nm and majority lengths between 3 and 6 {mu}m. The characterization results obtained by different techniques (e.g., field emission scanning electron microscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy, Braunauer, Emmet and Teller method, {zeta}-potential and confocal Raman spectroscopy) allowed us to access the effects of temperature treatment on the relevant physico-chemical properties of the MWCNTs samples studied in view of an integrated perspective to use these samples in a bio-toxicological context. Analytical microbalance measurements were used to access the purity of samples (metallic residue) after thermogravimetric analysis. Confocal Raman spectroscopy measurements were used to evaluate the density of structural defects created on the surface of the tubes due to the oxidation process by using 2D Raman image. Finally, we have demonstrated that temperature is an important parameter in the generation of oxidation debris (a byproduct which has not been properly taken into account in the literature) in the industrial grade MWCNTs studied after nitric acid purification and functionalization.

  19. Damaging Effects of Multi-walled Carbon Nanotubes on Pregnant Mice with Different Pregnancy Times

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Wei; Bi, Juanjuan; Zhang, Xiaoyong; Wang, Jing; Wang, Jianjun; Liu, Peng; Li, Zhan; Wu, Wangsuo

    2014-03-01

    The mechanism by which nanoparticles cross the placental barrier was studied by using isotopic tracers. The abortion rates and other related data were counted and analysed in pregnant mice with different pregnancy times. Results showed that oxidised multi-walled carbon nanotubes (oMWCNTs) crossed the placental barrier and entered the foetus body. The abortion rates in the pregnant mice depended on pregnancy times. The abortion rates in the first-time, second-time and fourth-time pregnant mice were 70%, 40% and 50%, respectively. The maternal body weight gain was inhibited until gestational ages of 13, 10 and 11 d. oMWCNTs decreased the serum progesterone level and increased the serum oestradiol level in a dose- and time-dependent manner. However, this effect decreased with gestational age. The histology and vascular endothelial growth factor/reactive oxygen species content in the placenta showed that oMWCNTs narrowed the blood vessel and decreased the number of blood vessels in the placenta.

  20. The Effects of Carbon Nanotubes on the Mechanical and Wear Properties of AZ31 Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingyang Zhou

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanotube (CNT-reinforced AZ31 matrix nanocomposites were successfully fabricated using a powder metallurgy method followed by hot extrusion. The influence of CNTs on microstructures, mechanical properties, and wear properties were systematically investigated by optical microscope (OM, scanning electron microscope (SEM, X-ray diffraction (XRD, hardness test, tensile test, and wear test. The results revealed that the nanocomposites showed a slightly smaller grain size compared with the matrix and uniform distribution that CNTs could achieve at proper content. As a result, the addition of CNTs could weaken basal plane texture. However, the yield strength and ultimate tensile strength of the composites were enhanced as the amount of CNTs increased up to 2.0 wt. %, reaching maximum values of 241 MPa (+28.2% and 297 MPa (+6.1%, respectively. The load transfer mechanism, Orowan mechanism, and thermal mismatch mechanism played important roles in the enhancement of the yield strength, and several classical models were employed to predict the theoretical values. The effect of CNT content on the friction coefficient and weight loss of the nanocomposites was also studied. The relationships between the amount of CNTs, the friction coefficient, and weight loss could be described by the exponential decay model and the Boltzmann model, respectively.

  1. When carbon nanotubes encounter the immune system: desirable and undesirable effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumortier, Hélène

    2013-12-01

    The role of our immune system is to bring efficient protection against invasion by foreign elements, not only pathogens but also any material it may be in contact with. Nanoparticles may enter the body and encounter the immune system either intentionally (e.g. administration for biomedical application) or not (e.g. respiratory occupational exposure). Therefore, it is of fundamental importance to get a thorough knowledge of the way they interact with immune cells and all related consequences. Among nanomaterials, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are of special interest because of their tremendous field of applications. Consequently, their increasing production, processing and eventual incorporation into new types of composites and/or into biological systems have raised fundamental issues regarding their potential impact on health. This review aims at giving an overview of the known desirable and undesirable effects of CNTs on the immune system, i.e. beneficial modulation of immune cells by CNTs engineered for biomedical applications versus toxicity, inflammation and unwanted immune reactions triggered by CNTs themselves. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Synergistic effect of ionic liquid intercalation and multiwalled carbon nanotube spacers with improved supercapacitor performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiangyang; Guo, Jianhui; Chen, Jianping; Zhang, Jiwei; Zhang, Jingwei

    2017-09-01

    The restacking of reduced graphene oxide (RGO) with undesirable energy density and power density is still a thorny issue. In our work, we proposed a simple strategy from incorporating ionic liquid (IL) and multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) in turn to impede the RGO sheets aggragation. With synergistic effect of IL ions intercalation and MWCNTs spacers, a uniformly dispersed hierarchical pore structure was obtained. For RGO-IL-MWCNTs, a very high specific surface area (588.7 m2 g-1) with enhanced fraction of mesopores and macropores can provide more accessible areas and pathways for charge accommodation and IL diffusion. This optimized hierarchical pore structure possesses a high specific capacity of 269.3 F g-1 (at 2 mV s-1) and a very high energy density of 131.8 Wh kg-1 (at a power density of 892.6 W kg-1) in pure IL electrolyte at room temperature. Interestingly, this simple method probably offers excellent potential for large-scale production of dispersed two-dimensional layered materials with superior performance.

  3. Effect of rubber polarity on selective wetting of carbon nanotubes in ternary blends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. H. Le

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Based on atomic force microscopy (AFM and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR analysis of the rubber-filler gel (wetting concept the kinetics of selective wetting of carbon nanotubes (CNTs in ternary styrene butadiene rubber (SBR/butadiene rubber (BR/natural rubber (NR blends was qualitatively and quantitatively characterized. Almost all CNTs are found to be wetted by the non-polar NR but not by the other non-polar rubber like BR or weakly polar SBR. It was proposed that phospholipids, which are linked to the α-terminal of NR can interact with the CNT surface through cation-π interactions forming strong bonding between NR and CNTs. Using the corrected surface tension value of NR, which involves the effect of phospholipids found in our previous work the selective wetting of CNTs in ternary rubber blends can be well predicted using the Z-model for a thermodynamic equilibrium state. By replacing the non-polar BR by a polar rubber like nitrile butadiene rubber (NBR as a blend component CNTs are wetted by NBR slightly more than by NR thanks to the strong interaction between CNTs and nitrile groups of NBR. SBR remains unbound to CNTs in both blends.

  4. Time-dependent subcellular distribution and effects of carbon nanotubes in lungs of mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carsten Købler

    Full Text Available Pulmonary deposited carbon nanotubes (CNTs are cleared very slowly from the lung, but there is limited information on how CNTs interact with the lung tissue over time. To address this, three different multiwalled CNTs were intratracheally instilled into female C57BL/6 mice: one short (850 nm and tangled, and two longer (4 μm and 5.7 μm and thicker. We assessed the cellular interaction with these CNTs using transmission electron microscopy (TEM 1, 3 and 28 days after instillation.TEM analysis revealed that the three CNTs followed the same overall progression pattern over time. Initially, CNTs were taken up either by a diffusion mechanism or via endocytosis. Then CNTs were agglomerated in vesicles in macrophages. Lastly, at 28 days post-exposure, evidence suggesting CNT escape from vesicle enclosures were found. The longer and thicker CNTs more often perturbed and escaped vesicular enclosures in macrophages compared to the smaller CNTs. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL showed that the CNT exposure induced both an eosinophil influx and also eosinophilic crystalline pneumonia.Two very different types of multiwalled CNTs had very similar pattern of cellular interactions in lung tissue, with the longer and thicker CNTs resulting in more severe effects in terms of eosinophil influx and incidence of eosinophilic crystalline pneumonia (ECP.

  5. Cytotoxicity of Carbon Nanotubes on J774 Macrophages Is a Purification-Dependent Effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Lorena Montes-Fonseca

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The cytotoxicity of the carbon nanotubes (CNTs is an important factor for the manufacture of nanovaccines. The aim of this work was to evaluate the relationship of the purification method of CNTs in cellular toxicity using macrophages (MOs from the J774 cell line. Viability test was performed with MTT assays at 24 h of exposure at concentrations of 0.06, 0.6, and 6 mg/L of unpurified (UP-CNTs or purified (P-CNTs CNTs by two different methods: (1 reflux with 3M HNO3 and (2 sonication in H2SO4/HNO3. Characterization and COOH content of CNTs was performed using scanning electron microscopy, raman spectroscopy, and titration with NaHCO3. P-CNTs1 had lengths >100 μm and 2.76% COOH content, while P-CNTs2 had lengths >1 μm and 7% COOH content. This last particle showed a lower toxic effect. The results suggest that the lenght and COOH content are important factors in the toxicity of the CNTs.

  6. High performance dendrimer functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes field effect transistor biosensor for protein detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajesh, Sharma, Vikash; Puri, Nitin K.; Mulchandani, Ashok; Kotnala, Ravinder K.

    2016-12-01

    We report a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) field-effect transistor (FET) functionalized with Polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimer with 128 carboxyl groups as anchors for site specific biomolecular immobilization of protein antibody for C-reactive protein (CRP) detection. The FET device was characterized by scanning electron microscopy and current-gate voltage (I-Vg) characteristic studies. A concentration-dependent decrease in the source-drain current was observed in the regime of clinical significance, with a detection limit of ˜85 pM and a high sensitivity of 20% change in current (ΔI/I) per decade CRP concentration, showing SWNT being locally gated by the binding of CRP to antibody (anti-CRP) on the FET device. The low value of the dissociation constant (Kd = 0.31 ± 0.13 μg ml-1) indicated a high affinity of the device towards CRP analyte arising due to high anti-CRP loading with a better probe orientation on the 3-dimensional PAMAM structure.

  7. Targeting Antibodies to Carbon Nanotube Field Effect Transistors by Pyrene Hydrazide Modification of Heavy Chain Carbohydrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steingrimur Stefansson

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Many carbon nanotube field-effect transistor (CNT-FET studies have used immobilized antibodies as the ligand binding moiety. However, antibodies are not optimal for CNT-FET detection due to their large size and charge. Their size can prevent ligands from reaching within the Debye length of the CNTs and a layer of charged antibodies on the circuits can drown out any ligand signal. In an attempt to minimize the antibody footprint on CNT-FETs, we examined whether pyrene hydrazide modification of antibody carbohydrates could reduce the concentration required to functionalize CNT circuits. The carbohydrates are almost exclusively on the antibody Fc region and this site-specific modification could mediate uniform antibody orientation on the CNTs. We compared the hydrazide modification of anti-E. coli O157:H7 polyclonal antibodies to pyrenebutanoic acid succinimidyl ester-coated CNTs and carbodiimide-mediated antibody CNT attachment. Our results show that the pyrene hydrazide modification was superior to those methods with respect to bacteria detection and less than 1 nM labeled antibody was required to functionalize the circuits.

  8. Carrier polarity engineering in carbon nanotube field-effect transistors by induced charges in polymer insulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aikawa, Shinya; Kim, Sungjin; Thurakitseree, Theerapol; Einarsson, Erik; Inoue, Taiki; Chiashi, Shohei; Tsukagoshi, Kazuhito; Maruyama, Shigeo

    2018-01-01

    We present that the electrical conduction type in carbon nanotube field-effect transistors (CNT-FETs) can be converted by induced charges in a polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) insulator. When the CNT channels are covered with pure PVA, the FET characteristics clearly change from unipolar p-type to ambipolar. The addition of ammonium ions (NH4+) in the PVA leads to further conversion to unipolar n-type conduction. The capacitance - voltage characteristics indicate that a high density of positive charges is induced at the PVA/SiO2 interface and within the bulk PVA. Electrons are electrostatically accumulated in the CNT channels due to the presence of the positive charges, and thus, stable n-type conduction of PVA-coated CNT-FETs is observed, even under ambient conditions. The mechanism for conversion of the conduction type is considered to be electrostatic doping due to the large amount of positive charges in the PVA. A blue-shift of the Raman G-band peak was observed for CNTs coated with NH4+-doped PVA, which corresponds to unipolar n-type CNT-FET behavior. These results confirm that carrier polarity engineering in CNT-FETs can be achieved with a charged PVA passivation layer.

  9. Single-Wall Carbon Nanotube Field Effect Transistors with Non-Volatile Memory Operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakurai, Tatsuya; Yoshimura, Takeshi; Akita, Seiji; Fujimura, Norifumi; Nakayama, Yoshikazu

    2006-10-01

    We describe the fabrication and electrical characteristics of single-wall carbon-nanotubes field-effect transistors (CNT-FETs) with a non-volatile memory function using ferroelectric thin films as gate insulators. The ferroelectric-gate CNT-FETs were fabricated using single-wall CNTs synthesized from alcohol by catalytic chemical vapor deposition and sol-gel derived PbZr0.5Ti0.5O3 thin films. The ferroelectric-gate CNT-FETs showed modulation of the drain current with the gate voltage and the threshold voltage shift (memory window) on the drain current-gate voltage characteristics. Moreover, the memory window was saturated around 1.1 V as the gate voltage sweeping range increased. These results indicate that carriers in CNTs are controlled by spontaneous polarization of the ferroelectric films. Because ferroelectrics exhibit complex couplings between their electrical, structural, mechanical, thermal, and optical properties, and because CNTs have unique mechanical and electrical properties, ferroelectric-gate CNT-FETs offer promise as potentially useful nanoelectronics devices not only for non-volatile memory elements but also for high-sensitivity sensors.

  10. Dephasing and hyperfine interaction in carbon nanotubes double quantum dots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reynoso, Andres Alejandro; Flensberg, Karsten

    2012-01-01

    We study theoretically the return probability experiment, which is used to measure the dephasing time T-2*, in a double quantum dot (DQD) in semiconducting carbon nanotubes with spin-orbit coupling and disorder-induced valley mixing. Dephasing is due to hyperfine interaction with the spins of the C...... with these for DQDs in clean nanotubes, whereas the disorder effect is always relevant when the magnetic field is perpendicular to the nanotube axis....

  11. The Effect of Wettability on the Dynamical Behaviors of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Yan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The dynamical behaviors of single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT with the internal and external wettability are studied based on a multiple flexible shell model in the paper. The SWCNT-water system comprises five constituent parts, that is, the SWCNT, the absorbed inner and outer layers of water molecules, the water in the center of the SWCNT, and the water surrounding the absorbed outer water layer. Here we consider the absorbed water layers as infinitesimally thin shells, which interact with the nanotube via a continuum Lennard-Jones potential, and the water in the center of the SWCNT and the counterpart surrounding the absorbed outer water layer as the potential flow. It is found that the interactions of SWCNT and the water layer are responsible for an upshift in the frequency of the SWCNT and the total upshift is approximately the sum of the two corresponding upshifts. The vdW interactions also cause the increase of the frequency of internal and external water shells. We hope that the paper can offer a new modeling approach to determine whether carbon nanotubes have adsorbed fluids inside their pores and could be used for detecting changes in their filling state.

  12. Raman spectroscopic characterization of multiwall carbon nanotubes and of composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Bokobza

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available In this work Raman spectroscopy was used for extensive characterization of multiwall carbon nanotube (MWNTs and of MWCNTs/rubber composites. We have measured the Raman spectra of bundled and dispersed multiwall carbon nanotubes. All the Raman bands of the carbon nanotubes are seen to shift to higher wavenumbers upon debundling on account of less intertube interactions. Effects of laser irradiation were also investigated. Strong effects are observed by changing the wavelength of the laser excitation. On the other hand, at a given excitation wavelength, changes on the Raman bands are observed by changing the laser power density due to sample heating during the measurement procedure.

  13. Effects of Chemical Environment on the Optical Properties of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Wei-Chun

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) dispersed in sodium dodecyl sulfate (SOS) suspensions exhibit diameter-dependent oxidative quenching of their E11 fluorescence. This behavior can be substantially changed to become a near diameter independent quenching phenomenon in the presence of electron-withdrawing nitroaromatic compounds. This change is measured as a function of pH and concentration of oxidizing agents for SWNTs suspended either in SDS or in Nafion. Benzene, toluene, phenol, and nitromethane do not show such change. This suggests the possibility of forming an electron donor-acceptor (EDA) complex, where the SWNT is the electron donor and nitroaromatic compounds are the acceptor, and the resulting supramolecular complex exhibits different redox behavior than the uncomplexed SWNT. Next, the dispersion of SWNTs in Nafion aqueous system is sustainable in ethanol and in salt solutions for observing well-resolved NIR fluorescence peaks of SWNTs. The optical property of the SWNT/Nafion suspension is studied by means of reversible oxidative quenching behavior with different oxidants including H2O2 and I2. Additionally, a simple and rapid one-step method for encapsulating SWNT/Nafion suspension into silica for fluorescence studies is also described. The redox reactions of fluorescent SWNT/silica composite with H2O2 and I2, either in water or in air, are studied with respect to time. Under this condition, the fluorescence of SWNT/silica composite shows the exponential decay and the dependence on the thickness of the silica composite. Furthermore, solvent effect on the fluorescence properties of the surfactant-dispersed SWNT in the aqueous solution is investigated by addition of DMSO, DMF, and THF, respectively. By mixing with certain amount of water soluble organic solvents, the fluorescence intensity of Nafion-dispersed SWNTs shows significant enhancement because the conformational change of fluorinated backbone of Nafion can improve the dispersion of SWNTs in the

  14. Cytotoxicity Assessment of Some Carbon Nanotubes and Related Carbon Nanoparticle Aggregates and the Implications for Anthropogenic Carbon Nanotube Aggregates in the Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Venzor

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Nanotechnology and nanomaterials have become the new frontier world-wide over the past few years and prospects for the production and novel uses of large quantities of carbon nanotubes in particular are becoming an increasing reality. Correspondingly, the potential health risks for these and other nanoparticulate materials have been of considerable concern. Toxicological studies, while sparse, have been concerned with virtually uncharacterized, single wall carbon nanotubes, and the conclusions have been conflicting and uncertain. In this research we performed viability assays on a murine lung macrophage cell line to assess the comparative cytotoxicity of commercial, single wall carbon nanotubes (ropes and two different multiwall carbon nanotube samples; utilizing chrysotile asbestos nanotubes and black carbon nanoaggregates as toxicity standards. These nanotube materials were completely characterized by transmission electron microscopy and observed to be aggregates ranging from 1 to 2 μm in mean diameter, with closed ends. The cytotoxicity data indicated a strong concentration relationship and toxicity for all the carbon nanotube materials relative to the asbestos nanotubes and black carbon. A commercial multiwall carbon nanotube aggregate exhibiting this significant cell response was observed to be identical in structure to multiwall carbon nanotube aggregates demonstrated to be ubiquitous in the environment, and especially in indoor environments, where natural gas or propane cooking stoves exist. Correspondingly, preliminary epidemiological data, although sparse, indicate a correlation between asthma incidence or classification, and exposure to gas stoves. These results suggest a number of novel epidemiological and etiological avenues for asthma triggers and related respiratory or other environmental health effects, especially since indoor number concentrations for multiwall carbon nanotube aggregates is at least 10 times the outdoor

  15. Plasticity and Kinky Chemistry of Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Deepak; Dzegilenko, Fedor

    2000-01-01

    Since their discovery in 1991, carbon nanotubes have been the subject of intense research interest based on early predictions of their unique mechanical, electronic, and chemical properties. Materials with the predicted unique properties of carbon nanotubes are of great interest for use in future generations of aerospace vehicles. For their structural properties, carbon nanotubes could be used as reinforcing fibers in ultralight multifunctional composites. For their electronic properties, carbon nanotubes offer the potential of very high-speed, low-power computing elements, high-density data storage, and unique sensors. In a continuing effort to model and predict the properties of carbon nanotubes, Ames accomplished three significant results during FY99. First, accurate values of the nanomechanics and plasticity of carbon nanotubes based on quantum molecular dynamics simulations were computed. Second, the concept of mechanical deformation catalyzed-kinky-chemistry as a means to control local chemistry of nanotubes was discovered. Third, the ease of nano-indentation of silicon surfaces with carbon nanotubes was established. The elastic response and plastic failure mechanisms of single-wall nanotubes were investigated by means of quantum molecular dynamics simulations.

  16. Dielectrophoretic assembly of carbon nanotube devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dimaki, Maria

    The purpose of this project has been to assemble single-walled carbon nanotubes on electrodes at the tip of a biocompatible cantilever and use these for chemical species sensing in air and liquid, for example in order to measure the local activity from ion channels in the cell membrane....... The electrical resistance of carbon nanotubes has been shown to be extremely sensitive to gas molecules. Dielectrophoresis is a method capable of quickly attracting nanotubes on microelectrodes by using an electric field, thus enabling nanotube integration in microsystems. Dielectrophoresis offers also...... the potential of distinguishing between nanotubes of different electrical properties, which is very important for the optimisation of the properties of the carbon nanotube sensors. Various cantilever and planar structures were designed, fabricated and tested both with multi-walled and single-walled carbon...

  17. Comparing the photothermal effects of gold nanorods and single-walled carbon nanotubes in cancer models

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Connor L.; Hasanjee, Aamr M.; Young, Blake; Wolf, Roman; Silk, Kegan; Ingalls, Rianna; Zhou, Feifan; Chen, Wei R.

    2017-02-01

    Laser Immunotherapy (LIT) is an innovative cancer treatment modality that is specifically targeted towards treating late-stage, metastatic cancer. This treatment modality utilizes laser irradiation in combination with active immune system stimulation to induce a systemic anti-tumor immune response against metastatic cancer. Nanoparticles have recently been utilized to support and increase the photothermal effect of the laser irradiation by absorbing the light energy produced from the laser and converting that energy into thermal energy. In the past, single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) have been the main choice in nanotechnology, however, recent studies have shown that gold nanorods (AuNRs) are a prospective alternative that may produce photothermal effects similar to SWNTs. Due to the precedence of gold biomaterials currently having approval for use in various treatments for humans, AuNRs are regarded to be a safer option than SWNTs. The goal of this study is to precisely compare any differences in photothermal effects between AuNRs and SWNTs. Both types of nanoparticles were irradiated with the same wavelength of near-infrared light to ascertain the photothermal effects in gel phantom tumor models, aqueous solutions, and metastatic cancer cell cultures. We discerned from the results that the AuNRs could be equally or more effective than SWNTs in absorbing the light energy from the laser and converting it into thermal energy. In both solution and gel studies, AuNRs were shown to be more efficient than SWNTs in creating thermal energy, while in cell studies, no definitive differences between AuNRs and SWNTs were observed. The cytotoxicity of both nanoparticles needs further assessment in future studies. Given these results, AuNRs are comparable to SWNTs, even superior in certain aspects. This advances the opportunity to use AuNRs as replacements for SWNTs in LIT treatments. The results from this study will contribute to any subsequent studies in the development

  18. Growing carbon nanotubes

    OpenAIRE

    Ando, Yoshinori; Zhao, Xinluo; Sugai, Toshiki; Kumar, Mukul

    2004-01-01

    The discovery of ‘fullerenes’ added a new dimension to the knowledge of carbon science1; and the subsequent discovery of ‘carbon nanotubes’ (CNTs, the elongated fullerene) added a new dimension to the knowledge of technology2;. Today, ‘nanotechnology’ is a hot topic attracting scientists, industrialists, journalists, governments, and even the general public. Nanotechnology is the creation of functional materials, devices, and systems through control of matter on the nanometer scale and the ex...

  19. Effect of laser radiation on multi-wall carbon nanotubes: study of shell structure and immobilization process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gyoergy, Enikoe, E-mail: egyorgy@icmab.es; Perez del Pino, Angel [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Barcelona, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas (ICMAB-CSIC) (Spain); Roqueta, Jaume; Ballesteros, Belen [Centro de Investigaciones en Nanociencia y Nanotecnologia, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas (CIN2-CSIC) (Spain); Cabana, Laura; Tobias, Gerard [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Barcelona, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas (ICMAB-CSIC) (Spain)

    2013-08-15

    Multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) with diameters between 10 and 15 nm were transferred and immobilized onto SiO{sub 2} glass substrates by ultraviolet matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation (UV-MAPLE). Toluene was chosen as solvent material for the preparation of the composite MAPLE targets. An UV KrF* ({lambda} = 248 nm, {tau}{sub FWHM} {approx_equal} 25 ns, {nu} = 10 Hz) excimer laser source was used for the irradiation experiments. The effects of incident laser fluence on the structure of the laser transferred MWCNTs was investigated by high resolution transmission electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy. The surface morphology of the laser processed MWCNTs was investigated by field emission scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy in acoustic (dynamic) configuration. Network-like structures constituted by individual nanotubes and nanotube bundles were created onto solid substrates. Changes in the nanotubes' shell structure can be induced through the tuning of the laser fluence value incident onto the composite MAPLE targets.

  20. Effect of boron concentration on physicochemical properties of boron-doped carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keru, Godfrey; Ndungu, Patrick G.; Nyamori, Vincent O., E-mail: nyamori@ukzn.ac.za

    2015-03-01

    Boron-doped carbon nanotubes (B-CNTs) were synthesized using chemical vapour deposition (CVD) floating catalyst method. Toluene was used as the carbon source, triphenylborane as boron as well as the carbon source while ferrocene was used as the catalyst. The amount of triphenylborane used was varied in a solution of toluene and ferrocene. Ferrocene was kept constant at 2.5 wt.%. while a maximum temperature of 900 °C was used for the synthesis of the shaped carbon nanomaterial (SCNMs). SCNMs obtained were characterized by the use of transmission electron microscope (TEM), scanning electron microscope (SEM), high resolution-electron microscope, electron dispersive X-ay spectroscopy (EDX), Raman spectroscopy, inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES), vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM), nitrogen adsorption at 77 K, and inverse gas chromatography. TEM and SEM analysis confirmed SCNMs obtained were a mixture of B-CNTs and carbon nanofibres (B-CNF). EDX and ICP-OES results showed that boron was successively incorporated into the carbon hexagonal network of CNTs and its concentration was dependent on the amount of triphenylborane used. From the VSM results, the boron doping within the CNTs introduced ferromagnetic properties, and as the percentage of boron increased the magnetic coactivity and squareness changed. In addition, boron doping changed the conductivity and the surface energy among other physicochemical properties of B-CNTs. - Highlights: • Boron-doping of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) changes their physiochemical properties. • Amount of boron-doping was dependent on the wt.% of boron precursor used. • Boron-doping changed CNTs surfaces and the distribution of dispersive energy sites. • Boron-doping affected the conductivity and ferromagnetic properties. • Increased boron-doping results in a more favourable interaction with polar probes.

  1. Carbon nanotubes enhanced the lead toxicity on the freshwater fish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, D. S. T.; Alves, O. L.; Barbieri, E.

    2013-04-01

    Carbon nanotubes are promising nanostructures for many applications in materials industry and biotechnology. However, it is mandatory to evaluate their toxicity and environmental implications. We evaluated nitric acid treated multiwalled carbon nanotubes (HNO3-MWCNT) toxicity in Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) and also the lead (Pb) toxicity modulation after the nanotube interaction. Industrial grade multiwalled carbon nanotubes [Ctube 100, CNT Co. Ltd] were treated with 9M HNO3 for 12h at 150°C to generate oxygenated groups on the nanotube surface, to improve water dispersion and heavy metal interaction. The HNO3-treated multiwalled carbon nanotubes were physico-chemically characterized by several techniques [e.g. TEM, FE-SEM, TGA, ζ-potential and Raman spectroscopy]. HNO3-MWCNT did not show toxicity on Nile tilapia when the concentration ranged from 0.1 to 3.0 mg/L, and the maximum exposure time was 96h. After 24, 48, 72 and 96h the LC50 values of Pb were 1.65, 1.32, 1.10 and 0.99 mg/L, respectively. To evaluate the Pb-nanotube interaction influence on the ecotoxicity, we submitted the Nile tilapia to different concentrations of Pb mixed with a non-toxic concentration of HNO3-MWCNT (1.0 mg/L). After 24, 48, 72, 96 h the LC50 values of Pb plus nanotubes were: 0.32, 0.25, 0.20, 0.18 mg/L, respectively. These values showed a synergistic effect after Pb-nanotube interaction since Pb toxicity increased over five times. X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) was used to confirm lead adsorption on the carbon nanotube oxidized surface. The exposure of Nile tilapia to Pb plus HNO3-MWCNT caused both oxygen consumption and ammonium excretion decrease, when compared to the control. Finally, our results show that carbon nanotubes interact with classical pollutants drawing attention to the environmental implications.

  2. Mechanics of filled carbon nanotubes

    KAUST Repository

    Monteiro, A.O.

    2014-04-01

    The benefits of filling carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with assorted molecular and crystalline substances have been investigated for the past two decades. Amongst the study of new structural phases, defects, chemical reactions and varied types of host-guest interactions, there is one fundamental characterisation aspect of these systems that continues to be overlooked: the mechanical behaviour of filled CNTs. In contrast to their empty counterparts, the mechanics of filled CNTs is a subject where reports appear far and apart, this despite being key to the application of these materials in technological devices. In the following paragraphs, we review the work that has been carried out up to the present on the mechanics of filled CNTs. The studies discussed range from experimental resonant frequency essays performed within electron microscopes to modelling, via molecular dynamics, of three-point bending of nanotubes filled with gases. (C) 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Cytotoxicity effects of water dispersible oxidized multiwalled carbon nanotubes on marine alga, Dunaliella tertiolecta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei Liping, E-mail: liping.wei@njit.edu [Department of Chemistry and Environmental Science, New Jersey Institute of Technology, 151 Tiernan Hall, Newark, NJ 07102 (United States); Thakkar, Megha; Chen Yuhong; Ntim, Susana Addo; Mitra, Somenath [Department of Chemistry and Environmental Science, New Jersey Institute of Technology, 151 Tiernan Hall, Newark, NJ 07102 (United States); Zhang Xueyan [Otto York Center, New Jersey Institute of Technology, Newark, NJ 07102 (United States)

    2010-10-15

    The multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) are novel materials with many potential applications. The ecotoxicity of these materials is not well studied, but it is essential for environmental impact assessments. In this study a commercially available MWNT material was carboxylated by microwave assisted acid oxidation. This functionalized MWNT (f-MWNT) material was examined for toxicity effects using unicellular marine green alga Dunaliella tertiolecta. D. tertiolecta was exposed to f-MWNT which had been pre-equilibrated with culture media for 24 h. Substantial growth lag phase was observed at 5 and 10 mg L{sup -1} f-MWNT, and the resulting 50% effective concentration (EC50) on 96-h growth was 0.82 {+-} 0.08 mg L{sup -1}. During mid-exponential growth phase cytotoxicity was evidenced at 10 mg L{sup -1} f-MWNT in 36% reduction in exponential growth rate, 88 mV more positive glutathione redox potential (indicative of oxidative stress), 5% and 22% reduction in photosystem II (PSII) quantum yield and functional cross section respectively, all relative to the control cultures. However, when the large f-MWNT aggregates in the media with 10 mg L{sup -1} f-MWNT were removed by 0.2 {mu}m filtration, D. tertiolecta did not show significant cytotoxicity effects in any of the above parameters. This suggests that the cytotoxicity effects originated predominately from the large f-MWNT aggregates. Analysis of the f-MWNT aggregation dynamics suggests active interaction between f-MWNT and algal cells or cell metabolites that promoted f-MWNT aggregation formation. The f-MWNT particles were also found absorbed on algal cell surface. The direct contact between f-MWNT and cell surface was likely responsible for reduced PSII functional cross section and oxidative stress during exponential growth.

  4. Photothermal effects of multi-walled carbon nanotubes on the viability of BT-474 cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chou, Hung-Tao [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Tsing Hua University, No. 101, Sec. 2 Kuang-Fu Rd., Hsin-chu 30013, Taiwan (China); Wang, Tsung-Pao [Department of Medical Science, National Tsing Hua University, No. 101, Sec. 2 Kuang-Fu Rd., Hsin-chu 30013, Taiwan (China); Lee, Chi-Young [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Tsing Hua University, No. 101, Sec. 2 Kuang-Fu Rd., Hsin-chu 30013, Taiwan (China); Tai, Nyan-Hwa, E-mail: nhtai@mx.nthu.edu.tw [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Tsing Hua University, No. 101, Sec. 2 Kuang-Fu Rd., Hsin-chu 30013, Taiwan (China); Chang, Hwan-You, E-mail: hychang@mx.nthu.edu.tw [Department of Medical Science, National Tsing Hua University, No. 101, Sec. 2 Kuang-Fu Rd., Hsin-chu 30013, Taiwan (China)

    2013-03-01

    Functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (f-MWCNTs) were conjugated to an antibody of BT-474 cancer cells (f-MWCNTs-ab), and the photothermal effect of the f-MWCNTs-ab for BT-474 cancer cell destruction was demonstrated. After near-infrared irradiation, the f-MWCNTs-ab were more capable of killing cancer cells and possessed higher cell specificity than f-MWCNTs. Quantitative results showed that the viability of the cancer cells was affected by the concentration of the f-MWCNTs-ab solution, irradiation time, and settling time after irradiation. The membrane impermeable fluorescence dye ethidium bromide was used to detect cell viability after near-infrared irradiation, and the results agreed with those obtained from the Alamar Blue cell viability assay. The EtBr fluorescence results suggest that the cell membrane, attached to f-MWCNTs-ab, was damaged after irradiation, which led to cell death and necrosis. Using confocal microscopy, a few f-MWCNTs-ab were detected in the cell, indicating the endocytosis effect. The results not only explain the improved efficiency of thermotherapy but also indicate that necrosis may result from protein denaturation attributing to the heated f-MWCNTs-ab in the cell. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer f-MWCNTs conjugated with anti-HER2 antibody by chemical method. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Kill breast cancer cells by using low dose f-MWCNTs-ab due to photothermal effect. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Use EtBr fluorescent to prove that the cell membrane was broken by heated f-MWCNTs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Few f-MWCNTs-ab were detected in the cell indicating the endocytosis effect. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Necrosis may result from protein denaturation due to contact with the heated CNTs.

  5. Effect of solution conductivity and electrode shape on the deposition of carbon nanotubes from solution using dielectrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naieni, A Kashefian; Nojeh, A

    2012-12-14

    Dielectrophoresis (DEP) is a popular technique for fabricating carbon nanotube (CNT) devices. The electric current passing through the solution during DEP creates a temperature gradient, which results in electrothermal fluid flow because of the presence of the electric field. CNT solutions prepared with various methods can have different conductivities and the motion of the solution because of the electrothermal phenomenon can affect the DEP deposition differently in each case. We investigated the effect of this movement in solutions with various levels of conductivity through experiments as well as numerical modeling. Our results show that electrothermal motion in the solution can alter the deposition pattern of the nanotubes drastically for high conductivity solutions, while DEP remains the dominant force when a low conductivity (surfactant-free) solution is used. The extent of effectiveness of each force is discussed in the various cases and the fluid movement model is investigated using two- and three-dimensional finite element simulations.

  6. Amorphous Carbon-Boron Nitride Nanotube Hybrids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae Woo (Inventor); Siochi, Emilie J. (Inventor); Wise, Kristopher E. (Inventor); Lin, Yi (Inventor); Connell, John (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A method for joining or repairing boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs). In joining BNNTs, the nanotube structure is modified with amorphous carbon deposited by controlled electron beam irradiation to form well bonded hybrid a-C/BNNT structures. In repairing BNNTs, the damaged site of the nanotube structure is modified with amorphous carbon deposited by controlled electron beam irradiation to form well bonded hybrid a-C/BNNT structures at the damage site.

  7. Transport Properties of Carbon-Nanotube/Cement Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Baoguo; Yang, Zhengxian; Shi, Xianming; Yu, Xun

    2013-01-01

    This paper preliminarily investigates the general transport properties (i.e., water sorptivity, water permeability, and gas permeability) of carbon-nanotube/cement composites. Carboxyl multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) are dispersed into cement mortar to fabricate the carbon nanotubes (CNTs) reinforced cement-based composites by applying ultrasonic energy in combination with the use of surfactants (sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate and sodium dodecyl sulfate). Experimental results indicate that even at a very small dosage the addition of MWNTs can help decrease water sorptivity coefficient, water permeability coefficient, and gas permeability coefficient of cement mortar, which suggests that CNTs can effectively improve the durability properties of cement-based composites.

  8. Glucose oxidase immobilization onto carbon nanotube networking

    CERN Document Server

    Karachevtsev, V A; Zarudnev, E S; Karachevtsev, M V; Leontiev, V S; Linnik, A S; Lytvyn, O S; Plokhotnichenko, A M; Stepanian, S G

    2012-01-01

    When elaborating the biosensor based on single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs), it is necessary to solve such an important problem as the immobilization of a target biomolecule on the nanotube surface. In this work, the enzyme (glucose oxidase (GOX)) was immobilized on the surface of a nanotube network, which was created by the deposition of nanotubes from their solution in 1,2-dichlorobenzene by the spray method. 1-Pyrenebutanoic acid succinimide ester (PSE) was used to form the molecular interface, the bifunctional molecule of which provides the covalent binding with the enzyme shell, and its other part (pyrene) is adsorbed onto the nanotube surface. First, the usage of such a molecular interface leaves out the direct adsorption of the enzyme (in this case, its activity decreases) onto the nanotube surface, and, second, it ensures the enzyme localization near the nanotube. The comparison of the resonance Raman (RR) spectrum of pristine nanotubes with their spectrum in the PSE environment evidences the creat...

  9. Effects of transferrin conjugated multi-walled carbon nanotubes in lung cancer delivery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Rahul Pratap [Department of Pharmacology, Institute of Medical Sciences, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi 221005 (India); Sharma, Gunjan [Genotoxicology and Cancer Biology Lab, Department of Zoology, Institute of Science, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi 221005 (India); Sonali [Department of Pharmacology, Institute of Medical Sciences, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi 221005 (India); Singh, Sanjay [Department of Pharmaceutics, Indian Institute of Technology (BHU), Varanasi 221005 (India); Patne, Shashikant C.U. [Department of Pathology, Institute of Medical Sciences, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi 221005 (India); Pandey, Bajarangprasad L. [Department of Pharmacology, Institute of Medical Sciences, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi 221005 (India); Koch, Biplob, E-mail: kochbiplob@gmail.com [Genotoxicology and Cancer Biology Lab, Department of Zoology, Institute of Science, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi 221005 (India); Muthu, Madaswamy S., E-mail: muthubits@rediffmail.com [Department of Pharmaceutics, Indian Institute of Technology (BHU), Varanasi 221005 (India); Department of Pharmacology, Institute of Medical Sciences, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi 221005 (India)

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to develop multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) which were covalently conjugated with transferrin by carbodiimide chemistry and loaded with docetaxel as a model drug for effective treatment of lung cancer in comparison with the commercial docetaxel injection (Docel™). D-Alpha-tocopheryl polyethylene glycol 1000 succinate (TPGS) was used as amphiphilic surfactant to improve the aqueous dispersity and biocompatibility of MWCNT. Human lung cancer cells (A549 cells) were employed as an in-vitro model to access cellular uptake, cytotoxicity, cellular apoptosis, cell cycle analysis, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) of the docetaxel/coumarin-6 loaded MWCNT. The cellular uptake results of transferrin conjugated MWCNT showed higher efficiency in comparison with free C6. The IC{sub 50} values demonstrated that the transferrin conjugated MWCNT could be 136-fold more efficient than Docel™ after 24 h treatment with the A549 cells. Flow cytometry analysis confirmed that cancerous cells appeared significantly (P < 0.05) in the sub-G1 phase for transferrin conjugated MWCNT in comparison with Docel™. Results of transferrin conjugated MWCNT have showed better efficacy with safety than Docel™. - Highlights: • It shows the development of transferrin conjugated MWCNT formulation of DTX for the effective treatment of lung cancer. • Evaluated the cellular uptake, cytotoxicity, cellular apoptosis, cell cycle, and ROS level of the DTX/C6 loaded MWCNT. • The IC{sub 50} values demonstrated that the transferrin conjugated MWCNT could be 136-fold more effective than Docel™. • Safety of the DTX formulations were studied by the measurements of ALP, LDH and total protein count levels in BAL fluid. • Results of transferrin conjugated MWCNT have showed better efficacy with safety than Docel™ in lung cancer delivery.

  10. Ophthalmologial Applications of Carbon Nanotube Nanotechology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loftus, David; Girten, Beverly (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The development of an implantable device consisting of an array of carbon nanotubes on a silicon chip for restoration of vision in patients with macular degeneration and other retinal disorders is presented. The use of carbon nanotube bucky paper for retinal cell transplantation is proposed. This paper is in viewgraph form.

  11. Carbon Nanotubes – Interactions with Biological Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Reis, Joana; Capela-Silva, Fernando; Potes, José; Fonseca, Alexandra; Oliveira, Mónica; Kanagaraj, Subramani; Marques, António Torres

    2011-01-01

    his book chapter discusses the prospective biomedical applications of carbon nanotubes based materials, the impact of carbon nanotubes properties in the interaction with biological systems. Protein adsorption, impact on cell viability and cytokine production are explored. Potential respiratory and dermal toxicity are reviewed, as the difficulties on studying the biological response. In face of recent studies, special attention is drawn upon promising orthopaedic use.

  12. Effect of Microwave Cure on the Thermo-Mechanical Properties of Tung Oil-Based/Carbon Nanotube Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madeline Smith

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Tung oil is uniquely reactive among plant-based natural oils due to the series ofconjugated carbon-carbon double bonds in its fatty acid chains. These conjugatedcarbon-carbon double bonds impart a high reactivity towards cationic polymerization in thepresence of other reactive co-monomers, such as divinylbenzene and styrene. An impressivedecrease in the cure time of tung oil-based thermosets has been achieved when the resinsinvestigated were microwaved in the presence of carbon nanotubes (CNTs. However, thefast cure compromised the overall thermo-mechanical properties of the materialsinvestigated. Microwave power, exposure time, and CNT loading effects have been assessedby means of dielectric analysis (DEA, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA, differentialscanning calorimetry (DSC, dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA, and proton nuclearmagnetic resonance (1H NMR spectroscopy of extracts obtained by Soxhlet extraction.Possible reasons were proposed to explain the overall inferior properties observed wheneverfaster cure rates were achieved.

  13. Epoxy-based carbon nanotubes reinforced composites

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Kesavan Pillai, Sreejarani

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available developed strategy offering promising results is to reinforce epoxy matrices with nano-sized organic and inorganic particles such as carbon nanotubes (CNTs), carbon nanofibres (CNFs), nanoclays, metal oxide nanoparticles, etc. and make new materials...

  14. Effect of Varying Inert Gas and Acetylene Concentration on the Synthesis of Carbon Nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afrin, Rahat; Abbas, Syed Mustansar; Shah, Nazar Abbas; Mustafa, Muhammad Farooq; Ali, Zulfiqar; Ahmad, Nisar

    2016-03-01

    The multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) with small diameter and high purity were achieved by chemical vapor deposition technique using silicon substrate. The introduction of specific concentration of inert gas with hydrocarbon played a key role in controlling morphology and diameter of MWCNTs. Nickel mixed ferrite nanoparticles were used as a catalyst for the growth of MWCNTs. Growth parameters like concentration of hydrocarbon source and inert gas flow, composition of catalyst particles and growth temperature were studied. In this work smaller diameter and twisted MWCNTs were formed by dilution of acetylene with argon gas. Electrical properties suggest a semimetallic behavior of synthesized MWCNTs.

  15. Effect of degassing on the aggregation of carbon nanotubes dispersed in water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, C.-J.; Huang, J.-R.; Hwang, I.-S.; Choi, H. J.; Lai, P.-Y.; Chan, C. K.

    2017-10-01

    Dynamic light scattering (DLS) along with centrifugation and shaking tests reveal that dissolved gases can significantly affect the aggregation behavior of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) dispersed in water. The CNTs in non-degassed samples form loose, stable networks having the DLS result reminiscent of semidilute polymer solutions, whereas the CNTs in degassed samples aggregate to form Brownian colloids that sediment quickly. Interestingly, the CNTs dispersed in acetone, with or without degassing, also behave like semidilute polymers in DLS experiments. We propose a surface nanobubble-assisted mechanism to explain the observed aggregation behaviors. Our work signifies that dissolved gases may play an important role in determining hydrophobicity and biomolecular functions in aqueous environments.

  16. Effects of phonon dimensionality in the specific heat of multiwall carbon nanotubes at low temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jorge, Guillermo A; Bekeris, V; Acha, C [Laboratorio de Bajas Temperaturas, Departamento de Fisica, FCEyN-UBA, Pab. 1, Ciudad Universitaria (1428), Buenos Aires (Argentina); Escobar, M M; Goyanes, S [Laboratorio de Polimeros y Materiales Compuestos, Departamento de Fisica, FCEyN-UBA, Pab. 1, Ciudad Universitaria (1428), Buenos Aires (Argentina); Zilli, D; Cukierman, A L [PINMATE, Departamento de Industrias, FCEyN-UBA, Pab. Industrias, Ciudad Universitaria (1428), Buenos Aires (Argentina); Candal, R J, E-mail: gjorge@df.uba.a [Instituto de Fisicoquimica de Materiales, Ambiente y EnergIa, CONICET-UBA, Ciudad Universitaria (1428) Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2009-05-01

    We have measured the specific heat at constant pressure, C{sub p}, of three different samples of multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWNT). For all samples, C{sub p} departs from a graphitic behavior at T < 120 K. C{sub p} measurements show a temperature threshold from a linear regime for intermediate temperature to a higher-order power law for low temperatures. Moreover, it was found that this crossover only depends on the internal structure of the individual MWNT and not on the spatial order of the MWNT within a bundle.

  17. Effect of Surface Modification on the Hansen Solubility Parameters of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ma, Jing; Larsen, Mikael

    2013-01-01

    In this work, seven types of surface-modified single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) were studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Raman spectroscopy to investigate the functional groups and extent of functionalization. Hansen solubility parameters were determined based on observations...... of the sedimentation and swollen states of the SWNTs in solvents after ultrasonication, and the results were compared with the hydrodynamic sizes of the SWNTs evaluated by the dynamic light scattering method. We found that the solubility of SWNTs is related to their functional groups and degree of functionalization...

  18. Poisson effect enhances compression force sensing with oxidized carbon nanotube network/polyurethane sensor

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Slobodian, P.; Říha, Pavel; Olejník, R.; Matyáš, J.; Kovář, M.

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 271 (2018), s. 76-82 ISSN 0924-4247 R&D Projects: GA MŠk ED2.1.00/19.0409 Grant - others:Ministerstvo školství, mládeže a tělovýchovy (MŠMT)(CZ) LO1504; TBU in Zlin(CZ) IGA/CPS/ 2015 /001 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20600510 Keywords : compression force sensor * carbon nanotubes * polyurethane * polymer composite * nanocracks Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics Impact factor: 2.499, year: 2016

  19. Transition of single-walled carbon nanotubes from metallic to semiconducting in field-effect transistors by hydrogen plasma treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Gang; Li, Qunqing; Jiang, Kaili; Zhang, Xiaobo; Chen, Jia; Ren, Zheng; Fan, Shoushan

    2007-06-01

    We report hydrogen plasma treatment results on converting the metallic single-walled carbon nanotubes to semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes. We found that the as-grown single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) can be sorted as three groups which behave as metallic, as-metallic, and semiconducting SWNTs. These three groups have different changes under hydrogen plasma treatment and successive annealing process. The SWNTs can be easily hydrogenated in the hydrogen plasma environment and the as-metallic SWNTs can be transformed to semiconducting SWNTs. The successive annealing process can break the C-H bond, so the conversion is reversible.

  20. One dimensional models of excitons in carbon nanotubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cornean, Horia Decebal; Duclos, P.; Pedersen, Thomas Garm

    Excitons in carbon nanotubes may be modeled by two oppositely charged particles living on the surface of a cylinder. We derive three one dimensional effective Hamiltonians which become exact as the radius of the cylinder vanishes. Two of them are solvable.......Excitons in carbon nanotubes may be modeled by two oppositely charged particles living on the surface of a cylinder. We derive three one dimensional effective Hamiltonians which become exact as the radius of the cylinder vanishes. Two of them are solvable....

  1. Molecular dynamics study of effects of nickel coating on torsional behavior of single-walled carbon nanotube

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song Haiyang, E-mail: gsfshy@sohu.co [School of Science, Xi' an University of Posts and Telecommunications, Xi' an 710121 (China); Zha Xinwei [School of Science, Xi' an University of Posts and Telecommunications, Xi' an 710121 (China)

    2011-02-15

    The effects of nickel coating on the torsional behaviors of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) subject to torsion motion are investigated using the molecular dynamics (MD) simulation method. The simulation results show that regardless of chirality, defect or radius, nickel coating can considerably enhance the critical torque of SWCNTs. However, by comparing the critical torsion angle between nickel-coated SWCNTs and corresponding pristine SWCNTs, it is found that nickel coating in small-radius nanotubes does induce a reduction in the critical torsion angle. The results also show that the structural failure of nickel coated imperfect (9,0) SWCNT occurs at an obviously higher critical torque in comparison with uncoated (9,0) SWCNT with a vacancy defect. Furthermore, we also find that the critical torque of a short nickel coated SWCNT is bigger than that of a long one, while the critical torsion angle for a short tube is smaller than that for a long one.

  2. In Vivo Toxicity Assessment of Occupational Components of the Carbon Nanotube Life Cycle To Provide Context to Potential Health Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Lindsey; Cena, Lorenzo; Orandle, Marlene; Yanamala, Naveena; Dahm, Matthew M; Birch, M Eileen; Evans, Douglas E; Kodali, Vamsi K; Eye, Tracy; Battelli, Lori; Zeidler-Erdely, Patti C; Casuccio, Gary; Bunker, Kristin; Lupoi, Jason S; Lersch, Traci L; Stefaniak, Aleksandr B; Sager, Tina; Afshari, Aliakbar; Schwegler-Berry, Diane; Friend, Sherri; Kang, Jonathan; Siegrist, Katelyn J; Mitchell, Constance A; Lowry, David T; Kashon, Michael L; Mercer, Robert R; Geraci, Charles L; Schubauer-Berigan, Mary K; Sargent, Linda M; Erdely, Aaron

    2017-09-26

    Pulmonary toxicity studies on carbon nanotubes focus primarily on as-produced materials and rarely are guided by a life cycle perspective or integration with exposure assessment. Understanding toxicity beyond the as-produced, or pure native material, is critical, due to modifications needed to overcome barriers to commercialization of applications. In the first series of studies, the toxicity of as-produced carbon nanotubes and their polymer-coated counterparts was evaluated in reference to exposure assessment, material characterization, and stability of the polymer coating in biological fluids. The second series of studies examined the toxicity of aerosols generated from sanding polymer-coated carbon-nanotube-embedded or neat composites. Postproduction modification by polymer coating did not enhance pulmonary injury, inflammation, and pathology or in vitro genotoxicity of as-produced carbon nanotubes, and for a particular coating, toxicity was significantly attenuated. The aerosols generated from sanding composites embedded with polymer-coated carbon nanotubes contained no evidence of free nanotubes. The percent weight incorporation of polymer-coated carbon nanotubes, 0.15% or 3% by mass, and composite matrix utilized altered the particle size distribution and, in certain circumstances, influenced acute in vivo toxicity. Our study provides perspective that, while the number of workers and consumers increases along the life cycle, toxicity and/or potential for exposure to the as-produced material may greatly diminish.

  3. Liquid surface model for carbon nanotube energetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solov'yov, Ilia; Mathew, Maneesh; Solov'yov, Andrey V.

    2008-01-01

    In the present paper we developed a model for calculating the energy of single-wall carbon nanotubes of arbitrary chirality. This model, which we call as the liquid surface model, predicts the energy of a nanotube with relative error less than 1% once its chirality and the total number of atoms...... an important insight in the energetics and stability of nanotubes of different chirality and might be important for the understanding of nanotube growth process. For the computations we use empirical Brenner and Tersoff potentials and discuss their applicability to the study of carbon nanotubes. From...... the calculated energies we determine the elastic properties of the single-wall carbon nanotubes (Young modulus, curvature constant) and perform a comparison with available experimental measurements and earlier theoretical predictions....

  4. The effects of polymer morphology and single-wall carbon nanotubes on biopolymer shear piezoelectricity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovell, Conrad

    Discovered over fifty years ago, the shear piezoelectric effect occurs in biopolymers that possess chirality due to asymmetric backbone carbon atoms. This dissertation focuses on the mechanisms responsible for shear piezoelectricity, as well as methods to improve the multifunctionality of these materials without degrading their shear piezoelectricity. Previous research has determined that shear piezoelectricity is a function of polymer crystallinity and orientation. At the present time, investigations concerning the effects of these parameters are incomplete since previous studies have relied exclusively on using orientation to alter crystallinity. In this research, polylactic acid (PLA) samples were fabricated by a twofold drawing/annealing process to investigate further the relationship between crystallinity, orientation, and shear piezoelectricity. The results of this study reveal that the product of crystallinity and orientation determines shear piezoelectricity regardless of either parameter's individual magnitude. Methods to prepare these typically weak biopolymers for potential applications were also examined. Single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) have previously been incorporated into polymers to introduce multifunctionality, but their effects on shear piezoelectricity are unknown. In order to achieve thorough dispersion in these materials, the copolypeptide poly (leucine-ran-phenylalanine) (polyLF) was engineered to exhibit favorable interactions with SWCNTs. The enthalpic and entropic penalties of mixing between these molecules were reduced due to the copolypeptide's aromatic sidechains and their similar size/shape, respectively. This study is the first to demonstrate the dual enthalpic/entropic approach in mixtures of SWCNTs and a high molecular weight polypeptide. The enhanced interactions result in a well-dispersed SWCNT/polyLF nanocomposite with improved multifunctionality. A third polymer, poly (gamma-benzyl-L-glutamate) (PBLG), which exhibits

  5. Carbon nanotube--poly(3-octylthiophene) composite photovoltaic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, David L; Czerw, Richard; Harrison, Benjamin

    2006-07-01

    The effects of varying nanotube loading/concentration in carbon nanotube-poly(3-octylthiophene) blends used as thin film photovoltaic cells, have been studied. The network of single walled nanotubes clearly aids in exciton separation and modifies carrier mobility within the active layer as suggested by a bulk heterojunction model. Further, modifications to the metal-polymer interface occur with the addition of nanotubes leading to variations in the observed VOC of the photovoltaic cells. Finally, the "nanocomposite" devices exhibit significant enhancements to external power conversion efficiencies, with the overall efficiency strongly dependent on device design parameters such as the addition of buffer layers.

  6. Locally addressable tunnel barriers within a carbon nanotube

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biercuk, M.; Mason, N.; Chow, J.

    2003-01-01

    We report the realization and characterization of independently controllable tunnel barriers within a carbon nanotube. The nanotubes are mechanically bent or kinked using an atomic force microscope, and top gates are subsequently placed near each kink. Transport measurements indicate that the kinks...... form gate-controlled tunnel barriers, and that gates placed away from the kinks have little or no effect on conductance. The overall conductance of the nanotube can be controlled by tuning the transmissions of either the kinks or the metal-nanotube contacts....

  7. Analytical, numerical, and experimental investigations on effective mechanical properties and performances of carbon nanotubes and nanotube based nanocomposites with novel three dimensional nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Askari, Davood

    The theoretical objectives and accomplishment of this work are the analytical and numerical investigation of material properties and mechanical behavior of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and nanotube nanocomposites when they are subjected to various loading conditions. First, the finite element method is employed to investigate numerically the effective Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio of a single-walled CNT. Next, the effects of chirality on the effective Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio are investigated and then variations of their effective coefficient of thermal expansions and effective thermal conductivities are studied for CNTs with different structural configurations. To study the influence of small vacancy defects on mechanical properties of CNTs, finite element analyses are performed and the behavior of CNTs with various structural configurations having different types of vacancy defects is studied. It is frequently reported that nano-materials are excellent candidates as reinforcements in nanocomposites to change or enhance material properties of polymers and their nanocomposites. Second, the inclusion of nano-materials can considerably improve electrical, thermal, and mechanical properties of the bonding agent, i.e., resin. Note that, materials atomic and molecular level do not usually show isotropic behaviour, rather they have orthotropic properties. Therefore, two-phase and three-phase cylindrically orthotropic composite models consisting of different constituents with orthotropic properties are developed and introduced in this work to analytically predict the effective mechanical properties and mechanical behavior of such structures when they are subjected to various external loading conditions. To verify the analytically obtained exact solutions, finite element analyses of identical cylindrical structures are also performed and then results are compared with those obtained analytically, and excellent agreement is achieved. The third part of this

  8. Some Observations on Carbon Nanotubes Susceptibility to Cell Phagocytosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aneta Fraczek-Szczypta

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to assess the influence of different types of carbon nanotubes (CNTs on cell phagocytosis. Three kinds of carbon nanotubes: single-walled carbon nanohorns (SWCNHs, multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs, and ultra-long single-walled carbon nanotubes (ULSWCNTs before and after additional chemical functionalization were seeded with macrophage cell culture. Prior to biological testing, the CNTs were subjected to dispersion process with the use of phosphate buffered solution (PBS and PBS containing surfactant (Tween 20 or dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO. The results indicate that the cells interaction with an individual nanotube is entirely different as compared to CNTs in the form of aggregate. The presence of the surfactant favors the CNTs dispersion in culture media and facilitates phagocytosis process, while it has disadvantageous influence on cells morphology. The cells phagocytosis is a more effective for MWCNTs and SWCNHs after their chemical functionalization. Moreover, these nanotubes were well dispersed in culture media without using DMSO or surfactant. The functionalized carbon nanotubes were easily dispersed in pure PBS and seeded with cells.

  9. Raman spectroscopy study of the doping effect of the encapsulated terbium halogenides on single-walled carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kharlamova, M.V.; Kramberger, C.; Mittelberger, A. [University of Vienna, Faculty of Physics, Vienna (Austria)

    2017-04-15

    In the present work, the doping effect of terbium chloride, terbium bromide, and terbium iodide on single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) was compared by Raman spectroscopy. A precise investigation of the doping-induced alterations of the Raman modes of the filled SWCNTs was conducted. The shifts of the components of the Raman modes and modification of their profiles allowed concluding that the inserted terbium halogenides have acceptor doping effect on the SWCNTs, and the doping efficiency increases in the line with terbium iodide, terbium bromide, and terbium chloride. (orig.)

  10. Large-scale assembly of 'type-switchable' field effect transistors based on carbon nanotubes and nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myung, Sung; Woo, Sungjong; Im, Jiwoon; Lee, Hyungwoo; Min, Yo-Sep; Kwon, Young-Kyun; Hong, Seunghun

    2010-08-27

    We report the large-scale assembly of type-switchable field effect transistors (FETs) based on carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and nanoparticles (NPs). In this device, the charges stored in NPs adjacent to ambipolar CNT channels were adjusted to control the carrier type and density in the channels. We demonstrated the real-time reconfiguration of individual FET types and logic circuit functionality. Theoretical simulation of a model system was provided to explain this doping effect. This work takes advantage of the ambipolar properties of CNTs and opens up the possibility to build new types of devices with reconfigurable functionalities.

  11. Thin single-walled carbon nanotubes with narrow chirality distribution: constructive interplay of plasma and Gibbs-Thomson effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostrikov, Kostya Ken; Mehdipour, Hamid

    2011-10-25

    Multiscale, multiphase numerical modeling is used to explain the mechanisms of effective control of chirality distributions of single-walled carbon nanotubes in direct plasma growth and suggest effective approaches to further improvement. The model includes an unprecedented combination of the plasma sheath, ion/radical transport, species creation/loss, plasma-surface interaction, heat transfer, surface/bulk diffusion, graphene layer nucleation, and bending/lift-off modules. It is shown that the constructive interplay between the plasma and the Gibbs-Thomson effect can lead to the effective nucleation and lift-off of small graphene layers on small metal catalyst nanoparticles. As a result, much thinner nanotubes with narrower chirality distributions can nucleate at much lower process temperatures and pressures compared to thermal CVD. This approach is validated by a host of experimental results, substantially reduces the amounts of energy and atomic matter required for the nanotube growth, and can be extended to other nanoscale structures and materials systems, thereby nearing the ultimate goal of energy- and matter-efficient nanotechnology.

  12. Effect of carbon nanotubes on the transport and retention of bacteria in saturated porous media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Haiyan; Tong, Meiping; Kim, Hyunjung

    2013-10-15

    This study investigated the influence of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) on the transport and retention behaviors of bacteria (E. coli) in packed porous media at both low and high ionic strength in NaCl and CaCl2 solutions. At low ionic strengths (5 mM NaCl and 0.3 mM CaCl2), both breakthrough curves and retained profiles of bacteria with CNTs (both 5 and 10 mg L(-1)) were equivalent to those without CNTs, indicating the presence of CNTs did not affect the transport and retention of E. coli at low ionic strengths. The results were supported by those from cell characterization tests (i.e., viability, surface properties, sizes), which showed no significant difference between with and without CNTs. In contrast, breakthrough curves of bacteria with CNTs were lower than those without CNTs at high ionic strengths (25 mM NaCl and 1.2 mM CaCl2), suggesting that the presence of CNTs decreased cell transport at high ionic strengths. The enhanced bacterial deposition in the presence of CNTs was mainly observed at segments near the column inlet, leading to much steeper retained profiles relative to those without CNTs. Additional transport experiments conducted with sand columns predeposited with CNTs revealed that the codeposition of bacteria with CNTs, as well as the deposition of the cell-CNTs cluster formed in cell suspension due to cell bridging effect, largely contributed to the increased deposition of bacteria at high ionic strengths in porous media.

  13. Effects of single wall carbon nanotubes and its functionalization with sodium hyaluronate on bone repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes, Renato M; Silva, Gerluza A B; Caliari, Marcelo V; Silva, Edelma E; Ladeira, Luiz Orlando; Ferreira, Anderson J

    2010-08-14

    Sodium hyaluronate (HY) accelerates the repair of bone defects. However, the weak stability of HY formulations in aqueous environments has hindered its wide utilization. The functionalization of carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) with HY (HY-SWCNT) results in a reinforced hydrogel with an increased stability. Nevertheless, the biological effects of HY-SWCNT have not been explored. Thus, our objective was to evaluate whether this biomaterial preserves the bioactivity of the HY. Wistar rats were subjected to molar extraction and the sockets were treated with SWCNT (50-400 microg/mL), 1% HY, HY-SWCNT (50-400 microg/mL) or carbopol (vehicle). After seven days of surgery, histological and morphometric analyses were performed to evaluate the trabecular bone formation and the number of cell nuclei in the sockets. Expression of collagen types I and III was determined by immunohistochemistry. Treatment with SWCNT did not alter the bone deposition, as well as the cell nuclei counting. Additionally, no significant evidence of toxicity was observed in SWCNT-treated sockets. Contrastingly, both HY and HY-SWCNT induced a marked increase in the bone formation (HY: 10.10+/-1.99%; HY-SWCNT 100 microg/mL: 10.90+/-1.13%; control: 3.69+/-1.17%) and decreased the cell nuclei amount in the sockets. Moreover, collagen type I expression was more pronounced in HY- and HY-SWCNT-treated sockets. No significant differences were viewed in the expression of collagen type III. Our results indicate that SWCNT is a feasible material to deliver HY to bone defects. Importantly, the functionalization of SWCNT with HY preserved the beneficial biological properties of HY in the healing process, thereby suggesting that HY-SWCNT scaffolds are potentially useful biomaterials for the restoration of bone defects. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Effect of fiber length of carbon nanotubes on the absorption of erythropoietin from rat small intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Yukako; Venkatesan, Natarajan; Hirako, Noriko; Sugioka, Nobuyuki; Takada, Kanji

    2007-06-07

    Erythropoietin (EPO) loaded carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with surfactant as an absorption enhancer were prepared for the oral delivery of EPO using two types of CNTs, long and short fiber length CNTs, and the effect of CNT fiber length on the absorption efficiency of EPO was studied. After Labrasol, PEG-8 caprylic/capric glycerides, as absorption enhancer was adsorbed into long fiber CNTs of which mean fiber length was 20-80 microm, as a carrier, EPO and casein as protease inhibitor and Explotab (sodium starch glycolate) as a disintegrating agent, were mixed. The resulting solid preparation was administered into the rat jejunum and serum EPO levels were measured by ELISA. The dose of EPO, CNTs, casein and Explotab were 100 IU/kg, 5mg/kg, 25mg/kg and 2.5mg/kg, respectively. Serum EPO level reached to C(max), 69.0+/-3.9 mIU/ml, at 3.5+/-0.1h and AUC was 175.7+/-13.8 mIU h/ml. These values were approximately half of that obtained with short fiber length CNTs of which C(max) was 143.1+/-15.2 mIU/ml and AUC was 256.3+/-9.7 mIU h/ml. When amphoteric surfactant, Lipomin LA, sodium beta-alkylaminopropionic acid, was used to accelerate the disaggregation of long fiber length CNTs, C(max) was 36.0+/-4.9 and AUC was 96.9+/-11.9, which showed less bioavailability (BA) of EPO. These results suggest that the short fiber length CNTs deliver more both EPO and absorption enhancer to the absorptive cells of the rat small intestine and the aggregation of CNTs is not the critical factor for the oral delivery of EPO.

  15. Investigation of growth dynamics of carbon nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianna V. Kharlamova

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The synthesis of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs with defined properties is required for both fundamental investigations and practical applications. The revealing and thorough understanding of the growth mechanism of SWCNTs is the key to the synthesis of nanotubes with required properties. This paper reviews the current status of the research on the investigation of growth dynamics of carbon nanotubes. The review starts with the consideration of the peculiarities of the growth mechanism of carbon nanotubes. The physical and chemical states of the catalyst during the nanotube growth are discussed. The chirality selective growth of nanotubes is described. The main part of the review is dedicated to the analysis and systematization of the reported results on the investigation of growth dynamics of nanotubes. The studies on the revealing of the dependence of the growth rate of nanotubes on the synthesis parameters are reviewed. The correlation between the lifetime of catalyst and growth rate of nanotubes is discussed. The reports on the calculation of the activation energy of the nanotube growth are summarized. Finally, the growth properties of inner tubes inside SWCNTs are considered.

  16. Investigation of growth dynamics of carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    The synthesis of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) with defined properties is required for both fundamental investigations and practical applications. The revealing and thorough understanding of the growth mechanism of SWCNTs is the key to the synthesis of nanotubes with required properties. This paper reviews the current status of the research on the investigation of growth dynamics of carbon nanotubes. The review starts with the consideration of the peculiarities of the growth mechanism of carbon nanotubes. The physical and chemical states of the catalyst during the nanotube growth are discussed. The chirality selective growth of nanotubes is described. The main part of the review is dedicated to the analysis and systematization of the reported results on the investigation of growth dynamics of nanotubes. The studies on the revealing of the dependence of the growth rate of nanotubes on the synthesis parameters are reviewed. The correlation between the lifetime of catalyst and growth rate of nanotubes is discussed. The reports on the calculation of the activation energy of the nanotube growth are summarized. Finally, the growth properties of inner tubes inside SWCNTs are considered. PMID:28503394

  17. Graphene and Carbon Nanotubes Synergistically Improved the Thermal Conductivity of Phenolic Resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Han

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available People discover the synergistic effect of graphene and carbon nanotubes on heat conduction in graphene carbon nanotubes / epoxy resin hybrid composites. In this article we added them into the phenolic resin and test the thermal conductivity. We found the thermal conductivity was increased by 6.5% in the phenolic resin by adding 0.45wt% graphene and 0.15wt% single wall carbon nanotubes (maintain the mass ratio 3:1. So if graphene and carbon nanotubes are added in proportion, thermal conductivity of phenolic resin will be improved significantly which is better than only carbon nanotubes or graphene.

  18. Cationic Carbon Nanotubes for Nucleic Acids Delivery

    OpenAIRE

    Battigelli, Alessia

    2012-01-01

    2010/2011 Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are a new form of carbon discovered in the ’50/’60, but described at the atomic level only in 1991 by Iijima. CNTs are constituted by one or more rolled up graphene sheets and they can be classified in single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) or multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). The peculiar properties of CNTs, characterized by their physical, chemical and mechanical properties, by their thermic conductivity and their large aspect ratio, rendered this...

  19. Atomic Structure and Energy Distribution of Collapsed Carbon Nanotubes of Different Chiralities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia A. Baimova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available For carbon nanotubes of sufficiently large diameter at sufficiently low temperature, due to the action of the van der Waals forces, the ground state is a bilayer graphene with closed edges, the so-called collapsed configuration. Molecular dynamics simulation of collapsed carbon nanotubes is performed. The effect of length, diameter, and chirality of the nanotubes on their properties is investigated. It is shown that collapsed nanotubes after relaxation have rippled structure which is strongly dependent on the nanotube chirality. The structural properties are studied by calculating the radial distribution function and energy distribution along various regions in the collapsed carbon nanotubes.

  20. Effect of the rheological properties of carbon nanotube dispersions on the processing and properties of transparent conductive electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maillaud, Laurent; Poulin, Philippe; Pasquali, Matteo; Zakri, Cécile

    2015-06-02

    Transparent conductive films are made from aqueous surfactant stabilized dispersions of carbon nanotubes using an up-scalable rod coating method. The processability of the films is governed by the amount of surfactant which is shown to alter strongly the wetting and viscosity of the ink. The increase of viscosity results from surfactant mediated attractive interactions between the carbon nanotubes. Links between the formulation, ink rheological properties, and electro-optical properties of the films are determined. The provided guidelines are generalized and used to fabricate optimized electrodes using conductive polymers and carbon nanotubes. In these electrodes, the carbon nanotubes act as highly efficient viscosifiers that allow the optimized ink to be homogeneously spread using the rod coating method. From a general point of view and in contrast to previous studies, the CNTs are optimally used in the present approach as conductive additives for viscosity enhancements of electronic inks.

  1. Parallel carbon nanotube quantum dots and their interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Goss K.; Leijnse M.; Smerat S.; Wegewijs M.R.; Schneider C.M.; Meyer C

    2012-01-01

    We present quantum transport measurements of interacting parallel quantum dots formed in the strands of a carbon nanotube rope. In this molecular quantum dot system, transport is dominated by one quantum dot, while additional resonances from parallel side dots appear, which exhibit a weak gate coupling. This differential gating effect provides a tunability of the quantum dot system with only one gate electrode and provides control over the carbon nanotube strand that carries the current. By t...

  2. A carbon nanotube optical rectenna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Asha; Singh, Virendra; Bougher, Thomas L.; Cola, Baratunde A.

    2015-12-01

    An optical rectenna—a device that directly converts free-propagating electromagnetic waves at optical frequencies to direct current—was first proposed over 40 years ago, yet this concept has not been demonstrated experimentally due to fabrication challenges at the nanoscale. Realizing an optical rectenna requires that an antenna be coupled to a diode that operates on the order of 1 PHz (switching speed on the order of 1 fs). Diodes operating at these frequencies are feasible if their capacitance is on the order of a few attofarads, but they remain extremely difficult to fabricate and to reliably couple to a nanoscale antenna. Here we demonstrate an optical rectenna by engineering metal-insulator-metal tunnel diodes, with a junction capacitance of ˜2 aF, at the tip of vertically aligned multiwalled carbon nanotubes (˜10 nm in diameter), which act as the antenna. Upon irradiation with visible and infrared light, we measure a d.c. open-circuit voltage and a short-circuit current that appear to be due to a rectification process (we account for a very small but quantifiable contribution from thermal effects). In contrast to recent reports of photodetection based on hot electron decay in a plasmonic nanoscale antenna, a coherent optical antenna field appears to be rectified directly in our devices, consistent with rectenna theory. Finally, power rectification is observed under simulated solar illumination, and there is no detectable change in diode performance after numerous current-voltage scans between 5 and 77 °C, indicating a potential for robust operation.

  3. Carbon nanotube materials for hydrogen storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dillon, A.C.; Jones, K.M.; Heben, M.J. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)

    1996-10-01

    Hydrogen burns pollution-free and may be produced from renewable energy resources. It is therefore an ideal candidate to replace fossil fuels as an energy carrier. However, the lack of a convenient and cost-effective hydrogen storage system greatly impedes the wide-scale use of hydrogen in both domestic and international markets. Although several hydrogen storage options exist, no approach satisfies all of the efficiency, size, weight, cost and safety requirements for transportation or utility use. A material consisting exclusively of micropores with molecular dimensions could simultaneously meet all of the requirements for transportation use if the interaction energy for hydrogen was sufficiently strong to cause hydrogen adsorption at ambient temperatures. Small diameter ({approx}1 mm) carbon single-wall nanotubes (SWNTs) are elongated micropores of molecular dimensions, and materials composed predominantly of SWNTs may prove to be the ideal adsorbent for ambient temperature storage of hydrogen. Last year the authors reported that hydrogen could be adsorbed on arc-generated soots containing 12{Angstrom} diameter nanotubes at temperatures in excess of 285K. In this past year they have learned that such adsorption does not occur on activated carbon materials, and that the cobalt nanoparticles present in their arc-generated soots are not responsible for the hydrogen which is stable at 285 K. These results indicate that enhanced adsorption forces within the internal cavities of the SWNTs are active in stabilizing hydrogen at elevated temperatures. This enhanced stability could lead to effective hydrogen storage under ambient temperature conditions. In the past year the authors have also demonstrated that single-wall carbon nanotubes in arc-generated soots may be selectively opened by oxidation in H{sub 2}O resulting in improved hydrogen adsorption, and they have estimated experimentally that the amount of hydrogen stored is {approximately}10% of the nanotube weight.

  4. Effects of multi-walled carbon nanotubes on the electrogenerated chemiluminescence and fluorescence of CdTe quantum dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wusimanjiang, Yiliyasi; Meyer, Alexander; Lu, Liping; Miao, Wujian

    2016-10-01

    Effects of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) that were immobilized on glassy carbon electrode (GCE) on the electrogenerated chemiluminescence (ECL) of CdTe quantum dots (QDs) using tri-n-propylamine (TPrA) and 2-(dibutylamino)ethanol (DBAE) as the anodic coreactant are reported. Depending on the solution concentration of coreactant and QDs, the surface-confined CNTs could either quench or enhance the ECL intensity. Lowering the solution concentration of QDs was found to be beneficial for enhancing ECL. A V-shaped profile of ECL intensity ratio (at CNTs over bare GCE) versus coreactant concentration suggested that either low or high concentrations of coreactant were needed for effective ECL generation. The ECL quenching by CNTs was believed to follow the typical dynamic quenching mechanism, which was confirmed by fluorescent data that provided a Stern-Volmer and an estimated quenching constant of 11.7 g/L and 1.2 × 10(9) L/g•s, respectively, for the excited state CdTe* quenching by CNTs in solution. Furthermore, the ECL performance at CNTs was also affected by the type of the coreactant used, where up to 30 times enhancement in ECL was observed from the CdTe/DBAE system under the given experimental conditions. Graphical Abstract Illustration of anodic quantum dots ECL enhancement and quenching by multi-walled carbon nanotubes.

  5. ACID FUNCTIONALIZED SINGLE-WALLED CARBON NANOTUBES ENHANCE CARDIAC ISCHEMIC/REPERFUSIOIN INJURY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engineered carbon nanotubes are being intensively developed for wide applications. Because of their unique light properties, nanotubes can impose some potentially toxic effects, particularly if they have been modified to express functionally reactive chemical groups on their sur...

  6. Aging and Humidity Effects of Hydrocarbon Gas Sensor Based on Carbon Nanotubes Functionalized with Metal Oxide Nanocrystals

    OpenAIRE

    Xiang, Jiaxi

    2017-01-01

    With the enhanced greenhouse effect and the increasing pollutants in the air, gas sensors applied in door or outdoors are in great demand. A hetero-structure gas sensors based on Multi-walled Carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) functionalized with metal oxide (MOX) nanoparticles are fabricated, which can be operated at room temperature with low power consumption. ZnO and TiO2 nanoparticles were deposited on MWCNT by Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) at different temperatures from 17 ℃ to 220 ℃/225 ℃. The ch...

  7. Cardiovascular health effects of oral and pulmonary exposure to multi-walled carbon nanotubes in ApoE-deficient mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christophersen, Daniel V.; Jacobsen, Nicklas R.; Andersen, Maria H. G.

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to high aspect ratio nanomaterials, such as multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) may be associated with increased risk of atherosclerosis, pulmonary disease, and cancer. In the present study, we investigated the cardiovascular and pulmonary health effects of 10 weeks of repeated oral...... or pulmonary exposures to MWCNTs (4 or 40μg each week) in Apolipoprotein E-deficient (ApoE-/-) mice fed a Western-type diet. Intratracheal instillation of MWCNTs was associated with oxidative damage to DNA in lung tissue and elevated levels of lipid peroxidation products in plasma, whereas the exposure only...

  8. Magnetic field effect on Poiseuille flow and heat transfer of carbon nanotubes along a vertical channel filled with Casson fluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sidra Aman

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Applications of carbon nanotubes, single walls carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs and multiple walls carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs in thermal engineering have recently attracted significant attention. However, most of the studies on CNTs are either experimental or numerical and the lack of analytical studies limits further developments in CNTs research particularly in channel flows. In this work, an analytical investigation is performed on heat transfer analysis of SWCNTs and MWCNTs for mixed convection Poiseuille flow of a Casson fluid along a vertical channel. These CNTs are suspended in three different types of base fluids (Water, Kerosene and engine Oil. Xue [Phys. B Condens. Matter 368, 302–307 (2005] model has been used for effective thermal conductivity of CNTs. A uniform magnetic field is applied in a transverse direction to the flow as magnetic field induces enhancement in the thermal conductivity of nanofluid. The problem is modelled by using the constitutive equations of Casson fluid in order to characterize the non-Newtonian fluid behavior. Using appropriate non-dimensional variables, the governing equations are transformed into the non-dimensional form, and the perturbation method is utilized to solve the governing equations with some physical conditions. Velocity and temperature solutions are obtained and discussed graphically. Expressions for skin friction and Nusselt number are also evaluated in tabular form. Effects of different parameters such as Casson parameter, radiation parameter and volume fraction are observed on the velocity and temperature profiles. It is found that velocity is reduced under influence of the exterior magnetic field. The temperature of single wall CNTs is found greater than MWCNTs for all the three base fluids. Increase in volume fraction leads to a decrease in velocity of the fluid as the nanofluid become more viscous by adding CNTs.

  9. Magnetic field effect on Poiseuille flow and heat transfer of carbon nanotubes along a vertical channel filled with Casson fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aman, Sidra; Khan, Ilyas; Ismail, Zulkhibri; Salleh, Mohd Zuki; Alshomrani, Ali Saleh; Alghamdi, Metib Said

    2017-01-01

    Applications of carbon nanotubes, single walls carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and multiple walls carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) in thermal engineering have recently attracted significant attention. However, most of the studies on CNTs are either experimental or numerical and the lack of analytical studies limits further developments in CNTs research particularly in channel flows. In this work, an analytical investigation is performed on heat transfer analysis of SWCNTs and MWCNTs for mixed convection Poiseuille flow of a Casson fluid along a vertical channel. These CNTs are suspended in three different types of base fluids (Water, Kerosene and engine Oil). Xue [Phys. B Condens. Matter 368, 302-307 (2005)] model has been used for effective thermal conductivity of CNTs. A uniform magnetic field is applied in a transverse direction to the flow as magnetic field induces enhancement in the thermal conductivity of nanofluid. The problem is modelled by using the constitutive equations of Casson fluid in order to characterize the non-Newtonian fluid behavior. Using appropriate non-dimensional variables, the governing equations are transformed into the non-dimensional form, and the perturbation method is utilized to solve the governing equations with some physical conditions. Velocity and temperature solutions are obtained and discussed graphically. Expressions for skin friction and Nusselt number are also evaluated in tabular form. Effects of different parameters such as Casson parameter, radiation parameter and volume fraction are observed on the velocity and temperature profiles. It is found that velocity is reduced under influence of the exterior magnetic field. The temperature of single wall CNTs is found greater than MWCNTs for all the three base fluids. Increase in volume fraction leads to a decrease in velocity of the fluid as the nanofluid become more viscous by adding CNTs.

  10. Application of carbon nanotubes flexible strain sensor in smart textiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiong CHENG

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Smart textiles have not only the necessary functions of daily wear, but also the intelligence. The focus of the current textile materials research is the selection of flexible material. For flexible materials, carbon material is one of the ideal materials for preparing flexible strain gauges. The application of flexible strain sensor prepared by carbon nanotubes as a flexible material in smart textiles is the research content. The research status of carbon nanotubes flexible strain sensor is introduced from the aspects of the structure, properties and application. The characteristics and functions of flexible strain gages prepared with carbon nanotube fibers and carbon nanotube films as flexible materials are discussed in terms of selection, preparation method, performance test and application. At the same time, the advantages and disadvantages of the flexible strain sensor of carbon nanotubes are reviewed from the aspects of preparation difficulty, production cost and practical application effect. High sensitivity with high strain will be a key research direction for carbon nanotube flexible strain sensors.

  11. Separation of Metallic and Semiconducting Carbon Nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tambraparni, Madhava B; Wang, Shiren

    2010-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes are currently the focus of intense interest due to their extraordinary properties. However, as-grown nanotubes exist as bundles of metallic and semiconducting. This hinders their widespread applications. Much progress has been made to overcome this limitation. Many separation methods have been investigated, including combination of physical, chemical, or biochemical methods. These methods have demonstrated their own advantages and limitations. This paper reviews recent patents progress made for the separation of metallic and semiconducting nanotubes.

  12. Carbon nanotubes as heat dissipaters in microelectronics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pérez Paz, Alejandro; García-Lastra, Juan María; Markussen, Troels

    2013-01-01

    We review our recent modelling work of carbon nanotubes as potential candidates for heat dissipation in microelectronics cooling. In the first part, we analyze the impact of nanotube defects on their thermal transport properties. In the second part, we investigate the loss of thermal properties...... of nanotubes in presence of an interface with various substances, including air and water. Comparison with previous works is established whenever is possible....

  13. Carbon nanotube-based synthetic gecko tapes

    OpenAIRE

    Ge, Liehui; Sethi, Sunny; Ci, Lijie; Ajayan, Pulickel M.; Dhinojwala, Ali

    2007-01-01

    We have developed a synthetic gecko tape by transferring micropatterned carbon nanotube arrays onto flexible polymer tape based on the hierarchical structure found on the foot of a gecko lizard. The gecko tape can support a shear stress (36 N/cm2) nearly four times higher than the gecko foot and sticks to a variety of surfaces, including Teflon. Both the micrometer-size setae (replicated by nanotube bundles) and nanometer-size spatulas (individual nanotubes) are necessary to achieve macroscop...

  14. Carbon nanotubes: Sensor properties. A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Zaporotskova, Irina V.; Natalia P. Boroznina; Parkhomenko, Yuri N.; Kozhitov, Lev V.

    2017-01-01

    Recent publications dealing with dealing with the fabrication of gas and electrochemical biosensors based on carbon nanotubes have been reviewed. Experimental and theoretical data on the working principles of nanotubes have been presented. The main regularities of the structure, energy parameters and sensor properties of modified semiconducting systems on the basis of cabon nanotubes have been studied by analyzing the mechanisms of nanotubule interaction with functional groups (including carb...

  15. Influence of Plasma Jet Temperature Profiles in Arc Discharge Methods of Carbon Nanotubes Synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raniszewski, Grzegorz; Wiak, Slawomir; Pietrzak, Lukasz; Szymanski, Lukasz; Kolacinski, Zbigniew

    2017-02-23

    One of the most common methods of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) synthesis is application of an electric-arc plasma. However, the final product in the form of cathode deposit is composed of carbon nanotubes and a variety of carbon impurities. An assay of carbon nanotubes produced in arc discharge systems available on the market shows that commercial cathode deposits contain about 10% CNTs. Given that the quality of the final product depends on carbon-plasma jet parameters, it is possible to increase the yield of the synthesis by plasma jet control. Most of the carbon nanotubes are multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). It was observed that the addition of catalysts significantly changes the plasma composition, effective ionization potential, the arc channel conductance, and in effect temperature of the arc and carbon elements flux. This paper focuses on the influence of metal components on plasma-jet forming containing carbon nanotubes cathode deposit. The plasma jet temperature control system is presented.

  16. Exposure to Carbon Nanotube Material: Assessment of Nanotube Cytotoxicity Using Human Keratinocyte Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shvedova, Anna A.; Castranova, Vincent; Kisin, Elena R.; Schwegler-Berry, Diane; Murray, Ashley R.; Gandelsman, Vadim Z.; Maynard, Andrew; Baron, Paul

    2003-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes are new members of carbon allotropes similar to fullerenes and graphite. Because of their unique electrical, mechanical, and thermal properties, carbon nanotubes are important for novel applications in the electronics, aerospace, and computer industries. Exposure to graphite and carbon materials has been associated with increased incidence of skin diseases, such as carbon fiber dermatitis, hyperkeratosis, and naevi. We investigated adverse effects of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) using a cell culture of immortalized human epidermal keratinocytes (HaCaT). After 18 h of exposure of HaCaT to SWCNT, oxidative stress and cellular toxicity were indicated by formation of free radicals, accumulation of peroxidative products, antioxidant depletion, and loss of cell viability. Exposure to SWCNT also resulted in ultrastructural and morphological changes in cultured skin cells. These data indicate that dermal exposure to unrefined SWCNT may lead to dermal toxicity due to accelerated oxidative stress in the skin of exposed workers.

  17. Biological effects of carbon nanotubes generated in forest wildfire ecosystems rich in resinous trees on native plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Lara-Romero

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanotubes (CNTs have a broad range of applications and are generally considered human-engineered nanomaterials. However, carbon nanostructures have been found in ice cores and oil wells, suggesting that nature may provide appropriate conditions for CNT synthesis. During forest wildfires, materials such as turpentine and conifer tissues containing iron under high temperatures may create chemical conditions favorable for CNT generation, similar to those in synthetic methods. Here, we show evidence of naturally occurring multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs produced from Pinus oocarpa and Pinus pseudostrobus, following a forest wildfire. The MWCNTs showed an average of 10 walls, with internal diameters of ∼2.5 nm and outer diameters of ∼14.5 nm. To verify whether MWCNT generation during forest wildfires has a biological effect on some characteristic plant species of these ecosystems, germination and development of seedlings were conducted. Results show that the utilization of comparable synthetic MWCNTs increased seed germination rates and the development of Lupinus elegans and Eysenhardtia polystachya, two plants species found in the burned forest ecosystem. The finding provides evidence that supports the generation and possible ecological functions of MWCNTs in nature.

  18. Biological effects of carbon nanotubes generated in forest wildfire ecosystems rich in resinous trees on native plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lara-Romero, Javier; Campos-García, Jesús; Dasgupta-Schubert, Nabanita; Borjas-García, Salomón; Tiwari, D K; Paraguay-Delgado, Francisco; Jiménez-Sandoval, Sergio; Alonso-Nuñez, Gabriel; Gómez-Romero, Mariela; Lindig-Cisneros, Roberto; Reyes De la Cruz, Homero; Villegas, Javier A

    2017-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have a broad range of applications and are generally considered human-engineered nanomaterials. However, carbon nanostructures have been found in ice cores and oil wells, suggesting that nature may provide appropriate conditions for CNT synthesis. During forest wildfires, materials such as turpentine and conifer tissues containing iron under high temperatures may create chemical conditions favorable for CNT generation, similar to those in synthetic methods. Here, we show evidence of naturally occurring multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) produced from Pinus oocarpa and Pinus pseudostrobus, following a forest wildfire. The MWCNTs showed an average of 10 walls, with internal diameters of ∼2.5 nm and outer diameters of ∼14.5 nm. To verify whether MWCNT generation during forest wildfires has a biological effect on some characteristic plant species of these ecosystems, germination and development of seedlings were conducted. Results show that the utilization of comparable synthetic MWCNTs increased seed germination rates and the development of Lupinus elegans and Eysenhardtia polystachya, two plants species found in the burned forest ecosystem. The finding provides evidence that supports the generation and possible ecological functions of MWCNTs in nature.

  19. Effect of Substrate Morphology on Growth and Field Emission Properties of Carbon Nanotube Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar Vikram

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstractCarbon nanotube (CNT films were grown by microwave plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition process on four types of Si substrates: (i mirror polished, (ii catalyst patterned, (iii mechanically polished having pits of varying size and shape, and (iv electrochemically etched. Iron thin film was used as catalytic material and acetylene and ammonia as the precursors. Morphological and structural characteristics of the films were investigated by scanning and transmission electron microscopes, respectively. CNT films of different morphology such as vertically aligned, randomly oriented flowers, or honey-comb like, depending on the morphology of the Si substrates, were obtained. CNTs had sharp tip and bamboo-like internal structure irrespective of growth morphology of the films. Comparative field emission measurements showed that patterned CNT films and that with randomly oriented morphology had superior emission characteristics with threshold field as low as ~2.0 V/μm. The defective (bamboo-structure structures of CNTs have been suggested for the enhanced emission performance of randomly oriented nanotube samples.

  20. Carbon nanotube fiber spun from wetted ribbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Yuntian T; Arendt, Paul; Zhang, Xiefei; Li, Qingwen; Fu, Lei; Zheng, Lianxi

    2014-04-29

    A fiber of carbon nanotubes was prepared by a wet-spinning method involving drawing carbon nanotubes away from a substantially aligned, supported array of carbon nanotubes to form a ribbon, wetting the ribbon with a liquid, and spinning a fiber from the wetted ribbon. The liquid can be a polymer solution and after forming the fiber, the polymer can be cured. The resulting fiber has a higher tensile strength and higher conductivity compared to dry-spun fibers and to wet-spun fibers prepared by other methods.

  1. Ion irradiation of electronic-type-separated single wall carbon nanotubes: A model for radiation effects in nanostructured carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rossi, Jamie E. [NanoPower Research Laboratory, Rochester Institute of Technology, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Cress, Cory D.; Messenger, Scott R.; Weaver, Brad D. [Electronics Science and Technology Division, United States Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, D.C. 20375 (United States); Helenic, Alysha R.; Landi, Brian J. [NanoPower Research Laboratory, Rochester Institute of Technology, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Department of Chemical and Biomedical Engineering, Rochester Institute of Technology, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Schauerman, Chris M. [NanoPower Research Laboratory, Rochester Institute of Technology, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Golisano Institute of Sustainability, Rochester Institute of Technology, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); DiLeo, Roberta A.; Cox, Nathanael D. [NanoPower Research Laboratory, Rochester Institute of Technology, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Department of Microsystems Engineering, Rochester Institute of Technology, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Hubbard, Seth M. [NanoPower Research Laboratory, Rochester Institute of Technology, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Department of Microsystems Engineering, Rochester Institute of Technology, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Department of Physics, Rochester Institute of Technology, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States)

    2012-08-01

    The structural and electrical properties of electronic-type-separated (metallic and semiconducting) single wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) thin-films have been investigated after irradiation with 150 keV {sup 11}B{sup +} and 150 keV {sup 31}P{sup +} with fluences ranging from 10{sup 12} to 10{sup 15} ions/cm{sup 2}. Raman spectroscopy results indicate that the ratio of the Raman D to G Prime band peak intensities (D/G Prime ) is a more sensitive indicator of SWCNT structural modification induced by ion irradiation by one order of magnitude compared to the ratio of the Raman D to G band peak intensities (D/G). The increase in sheet resistance (R{sub s}) of the thin-films follows a similar trend as the D/G Prime ratio, suggesting that the radiation induced variation in bulk electrical transport for both electronic-types is equal and related to localized defect generation. The characterization results for the various samples are compared based on the displacement damage dose (DDD) imparted to the sample, which is material and damage source independent. Therefore, it is possible to extend the analysis to include data from irradiation of transferred CVD-graphene films on SiO{sub 2}/Si substrates using 35 keV C{sup +} ions, and compare the observed changes at equivalent levels of ion irradiation-induced damage to that observed in the SWCNT thin-film samples. Ultimately, a model is developed for the prediction of the radiation response of nanostructured carbon materials based on the DDD for any incident ion with low-energy recoil spectra. The model is also related to the defect concentration, and subsequently the effective defect-to-defect length, and yields a maximum defect concentration (minimum defect-to-defect length) above which the bulk electrical transport properties in SWCNT thin-films and large graphene-based electronic devices rapidly degrade when exposed to harsh environments.

  2. Confinement in single walled carbon nanotubes investigated by spectroscopic ellipsometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Battie, Y., E-mail: yann.battie@univ-lorraine.fr [LCP-A2MC, Institut Jean Barriol, Université de Lorraine, 1 Bd Arago, 57070 Metz (France); Jamon, D. [Université de Lyon, Université Jean Monnet, EA 3523, Laboratoire Télécom Claude Chappe, 25 rue du Dr Rémy Annino, 42000 Saint Etienne (France); Lauret, J.S. [Laboratoire Aimé Cotton, UPR 3321, ENS Cachan, 94245 Cachan (France); Gu, Q.; Gicquel-Guézo, M. [FOTON, UMR 6082, INSA, Avenue des Buttes de Coësmes, 35043 Rennes (France); En Naciri, A. [LCP-A2MC, Institut Jean Barriol, Université de Lorraine, 1 Bd Arago, 57070 Metz (France); Loiseau, A. [Laboratoire d' étude des microstructures, ONERA-CNRS UMR 104, 29 Av. de la Division Leclerc, 92322 Chatillon (France)

    2014-11-28

    Thick films of single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) with different diameter and chirality distributions are characterized by combining transmission electron microscopy and spectroscopic ellipsometry. The dependence of the dielectric function with the increase of the SWCNT diameter occurs with a drastic redshift of the S{sub 11}, S{sub 22} and M{sub 11} transition energies. The transfer integral parameter γ{sub 0} of SWCNT is also evaluated and analyzed. We demonstrate that parts of the optical properties of SWCNTs are attributed to a one dimensional confinement effect. - Highlights: • Ellipsometric measurements are performed on carbon nanotube thick films. • The complex dielectric functions of conventional carbon nanotubes are given. • Confinement effects explain the variations of dielectric function of nanotubes.

  3. Nanocomposite scaffold for chondrocyte growth and cartilage tissue engineering: effects of carbon nanotube surface functionalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chahine, Nadeen O; Collette, Nicole M; Thomas, Cynthia B; Genetos, Damian C; Loots, Gabriela G

    2014-09-01

    The goal of this study was to assess the long-term biocompatibility of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) for tissue engineering of articular cartilage. We hypothesized that SWNT nanocomposite scaffolds in cartilage tissue engineering can provide an improved molecular-sized substrate for stimulation of chondrocyte growth, as well as structural reinforcement of the scaffold's mechanical properties. The effect of SWNT surface functionalization (-COOH or -PEG) on chondrocyte viability and biochemical matrix deposition was examined in two-dimensional cultures, in three-dimensional (3D) pellet cultures, and in a 3D nanocomposite scaffold consisting of hydrogels+SWNTs. Outcome measures included cell viability, histological and SEM evaluation, GAG biochemical content, compressive and tensile biomechanical properties, and gene expression quantification, including extracellular matrix (ECM) markers aggrecan (Agc), collagen-1 (Col1a1), collagen-2 (Col2a1), collagen-10 (Col10a1), surface adhesion proteins fibronectin (Fn), CD44 antigen (CD44), and tumor marker (Tp53). Our findings indicate that chondrocytes tolerate functionalized SWNTs well, with minimal toxicity of cells in 3D culture systems (pellet and nanocomposite constructs). Both SWNT-PEG and SWNT-COOH groups increased the GAG content in nanocomposites relative to control. The compressive biomechanical properties of cell-laden SWNT-COOH nanocomposites were significantly elevated relative to control. Increases in the tensile modulus and ultimate stress were observed, indicative of a tensile reinforcement of the nanocomposite scaffolds. Surface coating of SWNTs with -COOH also resulted in increased Col2a1 and Fn gene expression throughout the culture in nanocomposite constructs, indicative of increased chondrocyte metabolic activity. In contrast, surface coating of SWNTs with a neutral -PEG moiety had no significant effect on Col2a1 or Fn gene expression, suggesting that the charged nature of the -COOH surface

  4. Inkjet printing of flexible high-performance carbon nanotube transparent conductive films by ``coffee ring effect''

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimoni, Allon; Azoubel, Suzanna; Magdassi, Shlomo

    2014-09-01

    Transparent and flexible conductors are a major component in many modern optoelectronic devices, such as touch screens for smart phones, displays, and solar cells. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) offer a good alternative to commonly used conductive materials, such as metal oxides (e.g. ITO) for flexible electronics. The production of transparent conductive patterns, and arrays composed of connected CNT ``coffee rings'' on a flexible substrate poly(ethylene terephthalate), has been reported. Direct patterning is achieved by inkjet printing of an aqueous dispersion of CNTs, which self-assemble at the rim of evaporating droplets. After post-printing treatment with hot nitric acid, the obtained TCFs are characterized by a sheet resistance of 156 Ω sq-1 and transparency of 81% (at 600 nm), which are the best reported values obtained by inkjet printing of conductive CNTs. This makes such films very promising as transparent conductors for various electronic devices, as demonstrated by using an electroluminescent device.

  5. Effect of periodic potential on exciton states in semiconductor carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roslyak, Oleksiy, E-mail: oroslyak@fordham.edu [Department of Physics and Engineering Physics, Fordham University, Bronx, NY 10458 (United States); Piryatinski, Andrei, E-mail: apiryat@lanl.gov [Theoretical Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2016-12-20

    We develop a theoretical background to treat exciton states in semiconductor single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) in the presence of a periodic potential induced by a surface acoustic wave (SAW) propagating along SWCNT. The formalism accounts for the electronic band splitting into the Floquet sub-bands induced by the Bragg scattering on the SAW potential. Optical transitions between the Floquet states and correlated electron–hole pairs (excitons) are numerically examined. Formation of new van Hove singularities within the edges of Floquet sub-bands and associated transfer of the exciton oscillator strengths resulting in the photoluminescence quenching are predicted. The simulations demonstrate the exciton energy red Stark shift and reduction in the exciton binding energy. Comparison of our results with reported theoretical and experimental studies is provided.

  6. Catalytic effect of carbon nanotubes on polymerization of cyanate ester resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Kinetic peculiarities of polycyclotrimerization process of dicyanate ester of bisphenol A (DCBA in the presence of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs have been investigated using Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR spectroscopy technique. It has been found that even very small amounts of MWCNTs (0.01–0.1 wt% catalyze the reaction of polycyclotrimerization of DCBA leading to formation of polycyanurate network (PCN/MWCNTs nanocomposite. However, some decrease in final degree of conversion for nanocomposites compared to the neat PCN within the temperature/time schedule used was observed. The kinetic rate constants increased with addition of MWCNTs and energies of activation were found to be significantly decreased even at low contents of MWCNTs.

  7. Mechanical properties of carbon nanotube/polymer composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arash, B.; Wang, Q.; Varadan, V. K.

    2014-01-01

    The remarkable mechanical properties of carbon nanotubes, such as high elastic modulus and tensile strength, make them the most ideal and promising reinforcements in substantially enhancing the mechanical properties of resulting polymer/carbon nanotube composites. It is acknowledged that the mechanical properties of the composites are significantly influenced by interfacial interactions between nanotubes and polymer matrices. The current challenge of the application of nanotubes in the composites is hence to determine the mechanical properties of the interfacial region, which is critical for improving and manufacturing the nanocomposites. In this work, a new method for evaluating the elastic properties of the interfacial region is developed by examining the fracture behavior of carbon nanotube reinforced poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) matrix composites under tension using molecular dynamics simulations. The effects of the aspect ratio of carbon nanotube reinforcements on the elastic properties, i.e. Young's modulus and yield strength, of the interfacial region and the nanotube/polymer composites are investigated. The feasibility of a three-phase micromechanical model in predicting the elastic properties of the nanocomposites is also developed based on the understanding of the interfacial region. PMID:25270167

  8. Covalent enzyme immobilization onto carbon nanotubes using a membrane reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voicu, Stefan Ioan; Nechifor, Aurelia Cristina; Gales, Ovidiu; Nechifor, Gheorghe

    2011-05-01

    Composite porous polysulfone-carbon nanotubes membranes were prepared by dispersing carbon nanotubes into a polysulfone solution followed by the membrane formation by phase inversion-immersion precipitation technique. The carbon nanotubes with amino groups on surface were functionalized with different enzymes (carbonic anhydrase, invertase, diastase) using cyanuric chloride as linker between enzyme and carbon nanotube. The composite membrane was used as a membrane reactor for a better dispersion of carbon nanotubes and access to reaction centers. The membrane also facilitates the transport of enzymes to active carbon nanotubes centers for functionalization (amino groups). The functionalized carbon nanotubes are isolated by dissolving the membranes after the end of reaction. Carbon nanotubes with covalent immobilized enzymes are used for biosensors fabrications. The obtained membranes were characterized by Scanning Electron Microscopy, Thermal analysis, FT-IR Spectroscopy, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance, and functionalized carbon nanotubes were characterized by FT-IR spectroscopy.

  9. Effects of carbon nanotubes on phosphorus adsorption behaviors on aquatic sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Jin; Li, Kun; Wang, Peifang; Wang, Chao; Shen, Mengmeng; Liu, Jingjing; Tian, Xin; Lu, Bianhe

    2017-08-01

    Aquatic sediments are believed to be an important sink for carbon nanotubes (CNTs). With novel properties, CNTs can potentially disturb the fate and mobility of the co-existing contaminants in the sediments. Only toxic pollutants have been investigated previously, and to the best of our knowledge, no data has been published on how CNTs influence phosphorus (P) adsorption on aquatic sediments. In this study, multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were selected as model CNTs. Experimental results indicated that compared to pseudo-first order and intraparticle diffusion models, the pseudo-second-order model is better for describing the adsorption kinetics of sediments and MWCNT-contaminated sediments. Adsorption isotherm studies suggested that the Langmuir model fits the isotherm data well. With the increase in the MWCNT-to-sediment ratio from 0.0% to 5.0%, the theoretical maximum monolayer adsorption capacity (Q max ) for P increased from 0.664 to 0.996mg/g. However, the Langmuir isotherm coefficient (K L ) significantly decreased from 4.231L/mg to 2.874L/mg, indicating the decrease in the adsorption free energy of P adsorbed on the sediments after MWCNT contamination. It was suggested that P was released more easily to the overlying water after the re-suspension of sediments. Moreover, the adsorption of sediments and sediment-MWCNT mixture was endothermic and physical in nature. Results obtained herein suggested that the change in the specific surface area and zeta potential of sediments is related to MWCNT contamination, and the large adsorption capacity of MWCNTs is probably the main factor responsible for the variation in the adsorption of P on aquatic sediments. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Strongly correlated electron behavior in carbon nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hone James

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available One dimensional systems offer a fascinating platform for investigating and understanding the collective and many-body behavior of interacting electron systems. We report low-temperature transport experiments on carbon nanotubes, which are archetypal one-dimensional systems that have either semiconducting or metallic band structure depending on their radius and chirality. Semiconducting nanotubes at low densities exhibit Wigner crystal behavior, while nominally metallic nanotubes are observed to have an energy gap at half filling, consistent with theories of a Mott insulating state in nanotubes. Our results demonstrate nanotubes’ promise for studying a variety of tunable correlated electron phenomena in one dimension.

  11. Influence of Plasma Jet Temperature Profiles in Arc Discharge Methods of Carbon Nanotubes Synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grzegorz Raniszewski

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available One of the most common methods of carbon nanotubes (CNTs synthesis is application of an electric-arc plasma. However, the final product in the form of cathode deposit is composed of carbon nanotubes and a variety of carbon impurities. An assay of carbon nanotubes produced in arc discharge systems available on the market shows that commercial cathode deposits contain about 10% CNTs. Given that the quality of the final product depends on carbon–plasma jet parameters, it is possible to increase the yield of the synthesis by plasma jet control. Most of the carbon nanotubes are multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs. It was observed that the addition of catalysts significantly changes the plasma composition, effective ionization potential, the arc channel conductance, and in effect temperature of the arc and carbon elements flux. This paper focuses on the influence of metal components on plasma-jet forming containing carbon nanotubes cathode deposit. The plasma jet temperature control system is presented.

  12. Channeling of protons through carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borka, D; Petrovic, S; Neskovic, N [Laboratory of Physics (010), Vinca Institute of Nuclear Sciences, P. O. Box 522, 11001 Belgrade (Serbia); Mowbray, D J; Miskovic, Z L [Department of Applied Mathematics, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario, N2L3G1 (Canada)], E-mail: dusborka@vin.bg.ac.yu

    2008-10-01

    We investigate how dynamic polarization of carbon valence electrons influences both the angular and spatial distributions of protons channeled in a (11, 9) single-wall carbon nanotube placed in vacuum and in different dielectric media. Proton speeds between 3 and 10 a.u., corresponding to energies of 0.223 and 2.49 MeV, are chosen with the nanotube length varied between 0.1 and 1 {mu}m. In all performed calculations we describe the interaction between proton and carbon atoms on the nanotube wall using the Doyle-Turner potential. The image force on a proton is calculated using a two-dimensional hydrodynamic model for the dynamic response of the nanotube valence electrons and the dielectric media surrounding the nanotube. The angular distributions of channeled protons are generated using a computer simulation method which solves the proton equations of motion in the transverse plane numerically. The best level of ordering and straightening of carbon nanotube arrays is often achieved when they are grown in a dielectric matrix. Consequently, we investigate here how the dynamic polarization of carbon valence electrons in the presence of various surrounding dielectric media affects the angular distributions of protons channeled through (11, 9) single-wall carbon nanotubes. Our analysis shows that the inclusion of the image interaction, gives rise to a number of rainbow maxima in the corresponding angular and spatial distribution. Our analysis shows that the presence of dielectric media surrounding the nanotube influences the positions and appearance of rainbows in the corresponding angular and spatial distributions. In addition, we analyze the possibility of production of nano-sized beams by carbon nanotubes.

  13. Effective dispersion of multi-walled carbon nanotubes in aqueous solution using an ionic-gemini dispersant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Jiangtao; Du, Wenbo; Meng, Fanjing; Zhao, Chenchen; Du, Xian

    2018-02-15

    A promising ionic-gemini molecule, 4, 4'-di (n-tetradecyl) diphenylmethane disulfate salt (DSDM), is reported for effective dispersion of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) in aqueous medium in the present investigation. The dispersibility and stability of the DSDM-modified MWCNTs were characterized by UV-vis spectrophotometer, Raman spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy and zeta potential measurements. The hydrophobic interaction between alky chains and carbon nanotubes as well as the π-π-stacking interaction between benzene rings and carboatomic rings in MWCNTs enables a successful modification of DSDM onto the MWCNT surface. The dispersed MWCNTs individually existed in dispersion with no structural damage, indicating a much better performance than the MWCNTs dispersed by the sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate (SDBS), a frequently reported single-chain ionic dispersant. Surface potential measurements showed that the DSDM-modified MWCNTs were negatively charged, giving rise to electrostatic repulsion between the MWCNTs in aqueous solution. A better MWCNT dispersion effect was observed with the increase in MWCNT surface potential, and the dispersion with high MWCNT surface potential presents high dispersion stability with no agglomeration appeared for more than 5 months. The magnesium (Mg) matrix composite fabricated based on the DSDM-dispersed MWCNTs demonstrated excellent mechanical properties compared to pure Mg. Our research may provide an alternative way to improve the mechanical properties of composites. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Carbon Nanotube Composites: Strongest Engineering Material Ever?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayeaux, Brian; Nikolaev, Pavel; Proft, William; Nicholson, Leonard S. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    The primary goal of the carbon nanotube project at Johnson Space Center (JSC) is to fabricate structural materials with a much higher strength-to-weight ratio than any engineered material today, Single-wall nanotubes present extraordinary mechanical properties along with new challenges for materials processing. Our project includes nanotube production, characterization, purification, and incorporation into applications studies. Now is the time to move from studying individual nanotubes to applications work. Current research at JSC focuses on structural polymeric materials to attempt to lower the weight of spacecraft necessary for interplanetary missions. These nanoscale fibers present unique new challenges to composites engineers. Preliminary studies show good nanotube dispersion and wetting by the epoxy materials. Results of tensile strength tests will also be reported. Other applications of nanotubes are also of interest for energy storage, gas storage, nanoelectronics, field emission, and biomedical uses.

  15. Deconvoluting hepatic processing of carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alidori, Simone; Bowman, Robert L.; Yarilin, Dmitry; Romin, Yevgeniy; Barlas, Afsar; Mulvey, J. Justin; Fujisawa, Sho; Xu, Ke; Ruggiero, Alessandro; Riabov, Vladimir; Thorek, Daniel L. J.; Ulmert, Hans David S.; Brea, Elliott J.; Behling, Katja; Kzhyshkowska, Julia; Manova-Todorova, Katia; Scheinberg, David A.; McDevitt, Michael R.

    2016-07-01

    Single-wall carbon nanotubes present unique opportunities for drug delivery, but have not advanced into the clinic. Differential nanotube accretion and clearance from critical organs have been observed, but the mechanism not fully elucidated. The liver has a complex cellular composition that regulates a range of metabolic functions and coincidently accumulates most particulate drugs. Here we provide the unexpected details of hepatic processing of covalently functionalized nanotubes including receptor-mediated endocytosis, cellular trafficking and biliary elimination. Ammonium-functionalized fibrillar nanocarbon is found to preferentially localize in the fenestrated sinusoidal endothelium of the liver but not resident macrophages. Stabilin receptors mediate the endocytic clearance of nanotubes. Biocompatibility is evidenced by the absence of cell death and no immune cell infiltration. Towards clinical application of this platform, nanotubes were evaluated for the first time in non-human primates. The pharmacologic profile in cynomolgus monkeys is equivalent to what was reported in mice and suggests that nanotubes should behave similarly in humans.

  16. Carbon Nanotube Tape Vibrating Gyroscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Dennis Stephen (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A vibrating gyroscope includes a piezoelectric strip having length and width dimensions. The piezoelectric strip includes a piezoelectric material and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) substantially aligned and polled along the strip's length dimension. A spindle having an axis of rotation is coupled to the piezoelectric strip. The axis of rotation is parallel to the strip's width dimension. A first capacitance sensor is mechanically coupled to the spindle for rotation therewith. The first capacitance sensor is positioned at one of the strip's opposing ends and is spaced apart from one of the strip's opposing faces. A second capacitance sensor is mechanically coupled to the spindle for rotation therewith. The second capacitance sensor is positioned at another of the strip's opposing ends and is spaced apart from another of the strip's opposing faces. A voltage source applies an AC voltage to the piezoelectric strip.

  17. Photonics based on carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Qingyuan; Gicquel-Guézo, Maud; Loualiche, Slimane; Pouliquen, Julie Le; Batte, Thomas; Folliot, Hervé; Dehaese, Olivier; Grillot, Frederic; Battie, Yann; Loiseau, Annick; Liang, Baolai; Huffaker, Diana

    2013-06-26

    Among direct-bandgap semiconducting nanomaterials, single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) exhibit strong quasi-one-dimensional excitonic optical properties, which confer them a great potential for their integration in future photonics devices as an alternative solution to conventional inorganic semiconductors. In this paper, we will highlight SWCNT optical properties for passive as well as active applications in future optical networking. For passive applications, we directly compare the efficiency and power consumption of saturable absorbers (SAs) based on SWCNT with SA based on conventional multiple quantum wells. For active applications, exceptional photoluminescence properties of SWCNT, such as excellent light-emission stabilities with temperature and excitation power, hold these nanometer-scale materials as prime candidates for future active photonics devices with superior performances.

  18. Carbon nanotubes based vacuum gauge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudyk, N. N.; Il’in, O. I.; Il’ina, M. V.; Fedotov, A. A.; Klimin, V. S.; Ageev, O. A.

    2017-11-01

    We have created an ionization type Vacuum gauge with sensor element based on an array of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes. Obtained asymmetrical current-voltage characteristics at different voltage polarity on the electrode with the CNTs. It was found that when applying a negative potential on an electrode with the CNTs, the current in the gap is higher than at a positive potential. In the pressure range of 1 ÷ 103 Torr vacuum gauge sensitivity was 6 mV/Torr (at a current of 4.5·10-5 A) and in the range of 10-5 ÷ 1 Torr was 10 mV/Torr (at a current of 1.3·10-5 A). It is shown that the energy efficiency of vacuum gauge can be increased in the case where electrode with CNT operates as an emitter of electrons.

  19. Occupational Exposure to Carbon Nanotubes and Nanofibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... metal oxides, nanotubes, nanowires, quantum dots, and carbon fullerenes (buckyballs), among others. Early scientific studies have indicated ... to minimize worker exposure. This NIOSH CIB, (1) reviews the animal and other toxicological data relevant to ...

  20. Carbon nanotubes dispersed polymer nanocomposites: mechanical ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    CNT composite showed that the rough ... data storage, sensors, and biomedical applications [9]. The polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and ... that undergoes big distortions without deteriorations [15,16]. The carbon nanotubes (CNTs) consist of ...

  1. Fermentation based carbon nanotube multifunctional bionic composites

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Valentini, Luca; Bon, Silvia Bittolo; Signetti, Stefano; Tripathi, Manoj; Iacob, Erica; Pugno, Nicola M

    2016-01-01

    .... Based on bread fermentation, a bionic composite made of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and a single-cell fungi, the Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast extract, was prepared by fermentation of such microorganisms at room temperature...

  2. Carbon nanotube polymer composition and devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Gao [Oakland, CA; Johnson, Stephen [Richmond, CA; Kerr, John B [Oakland, CA; Minor, Andrew M [El Cerrito, CA; Mao, Samuel S [Castro Valley, CA

    2011-06-14

    A thin film device and compound having an anode, a cathode, and at least one light emitting layer between the anode and cathode, the at least one light emitting layer having at least one carbon nanotube and a conductive polymer.

  3. Carbon nanotube heat-exchange systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendricks, Terry Joseph; Heben, Michael J.

    2008-11-11

    A carbon nanotube heat-exchange system (10) and method for producing the same. One embodiment of the carbon nanotube heat-exchange system (10) comprises a microchannel structure (24) having an inlet end (30) and an outlet end (32), the inlet end (30) providing a cooling fluid into the microchannel structure (24) and the outlet end (32) discharging the cooling fluid from the microchannel structure (24). At least one flow path (28) is defined in the microchannel structure (24), fluidically connecting the inlet end (30) to the outlet end (32) of the microchannel structure (24). A carbon nanotube structure (26) is provided in thermal contact with the microchannel structure (24), the carbon nanotube structure (26) receiving heat from the cooling fluid in the microchannel structure (24) and dissipating the heat into an external medium (19).

  4. Self Assembled Carbon Nanotube Enhanced Ultracapacitors Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The objective of this NASA STTR program is to develop single wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) based ultracapacitors for energy storage devices (ESD) application, using...

  5. The bactericidal effect of carbon nanotube/agar composites irradiated with near-infrared light on Streptococcus mutans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akasaka, Tsukasa, E-mail: akasaka@den.hokudai.ac.jp [Graduate School of Dental Medicine, Hokkaido University, Kita13 Nishi7, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-8586 (Japan); Matsuoka, Makoto [Graduate School of Dental Medicine, Hokkaido University, Kita13 Nishi7, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-8586 (Japan); Hashimoto, Takeshi [Meijo Nano Carbon Co. Ltd., Otsubashi bldg. 4F, 3-4-10 Marunouchi, Naka-ku, Nagoya 460-0002 (Japan); Abe, Shigeaki; Uo, Motohiro; Watari, Fumio [Graduate School of Dental Medicine, Hokkaido University, Kita13 Nishi7, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-8586 (Japan)

    2010-10-15

    Dental caries are mainly associated with oral pathogens, and Streptococcus mutans is a primary cariogenic organism. Many methods have been established to eliminate S. mutans from the oral cavity. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of carbon nanotube (CNT)/agar composites irradiated with near-infrared (NIR) light on S. mutans, as a potential photothermal antimicrobial nanotherapy. A colony-forming unit assay clearly showed that CNT/agar composites attain bactericidal activity after NIR light irradiation; this bactericidal activity is higher than that of graphite (GP)/agar and activated carbon (AC)/agar composites. Furthermore, it was observed that longer irradiation times immobilized S. mutans in the CNT/agar composite.

  6. Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes Reinforced Polypropylene Composite Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Li

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Polypropylene (PP composites reinforced with multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs were prepared by using twin screw extruder. The experimental results showed that with the increasing amount of MWNTs the elongation at break decreased whereas the tensile strength, bending strength, and impact strength increased. By using scanning electron microscope (SEM, we find that the hydroxyl-modified carbon nanotube has better dispersion performance in PP and better mechanical properties.

  7. Carbon nanotube temperature and pressure sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivanov, Ilia N.; Geohegan, David B.

    2017-09-12

    The present invention, in one embodiment, provides a method of measuring pressure or temperature using a sensor including a sensor element composed of a plurality of carbon nanotubes. In one example, the resistance of the plurality of carbon nanotubes is measured in response to the application of temperature or pressure. The changes in resistance are then recorded and correlated to temperature or pressure. In one embodiment, the present invention provides for independent measurement of pressure or temperature using the sensors disclosed herein.

  8. Carbon nanotube temperature and pressure sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Ilia N.; Geohegan, David B.

    2016-12-13

    The present invention, in one embodiment, provides a method of measuring pressure or temperature using a sensor including a sensor element composed of a plurality of carbon nanotubes. In one example, the resistance of the plurality of carbon nanotubes is measured in response to the application of temperature or pressure. The changes in resistance are then recorded and correlated to temperature or pressure. In one embodiment, the present invention provides for independent measurement of pressure or temperature using the sensors disclosed herein.

  9. Carbon nanotubes as near infrared laser susceptors

    OpenAIRE

    Bahrami, Amir

    2011-01-01

    The coupling efficiency of carbon nanotubes with near infrared laser radiation at 940nm wavelength was investigated. Nanotubes treated with different post processing methods were irradiated at different laser power intensities as dry samples and suspensions in water or ethanol. The interaction with the laser beam was measured and quantified based on the temperature increase in the samples as well as the amount of energy transmitted through them. Parallel experiments using carbon black reveale...

  10. Controlled Deposition and Alignment of Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smits, Jan M. (Inventor); Wincheski, Russell A. (Inventor); Patry, JoAnne L. (Inventor); Watkins, Anthony Neal (Inventor); Jordan, Jeffrey D. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A carbon nanotube (CNT) attraction material is deposited on a substrate in the gap region between two electrodes on the substrate. An electric potential is applied to the two electrodes. The CNT attraction material is wetted with a solution defined by a carrier liquid having carbon nanotubes (CNTs) suspended therein. A portion of the CNTs align with the electric field and adhere to the CNT attraction material. The carrier liquid and any CNTs not adhered to the CNT attraction material are then removed.

  11. Single electron-ics with carbon nanotubes

    OpenAIRE

    Götz, G.T.J.

    2010-01-01

    We experimentally investigate Quantum Dots, formed in Carbon Nanotubes. The first part of this thesis deals with charge sensing on such quantum dots. The charge sensor is a metallic Single-electron-transistor, sensitive to the charge of a single electron on the quantum dot. We use this technique for real-time charge readout and precise tuning of the tunnel barriers of the quantum dot. The second part of this thesis describes the realization of exceptionally clean Carbon Nanotube quantum dots....

  12. Carbon nanotube temperature and pressure sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivanov, Ilia N.; Geohegan, David B.

    2016-11-15

    The present invention, in one embodiment, provides a method of measuring pressure or temperature using a sensor including a sensor element composed of a plurality of carbon nanotubes. In one example, the resistance of the plurality of carbon nanotubes is measured in response to the application of temperature or pressure. The changes in resistance are then recorded and correlated to temperature or pressure. In one embodiment, the present invention provides for independent measurement of pressure or temperature using the sensors disclosed herein.

  13. Carbon nanotube temperature and pressure sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivanov, Ilia N.; Geohegan, David B.

    2016-10-25

    The present invention, in one embodiment, provides a method of measuring pressure or temperature using a sensor including a sensor element composed of a plurality of carbon nanotubes. In one example, the resistance of the plurality of carbon nanotubes is measured in response to the application of temperature or pressure. The changes in resistance are then recorded and correlated to temperature or pressure. In one embodiment, the present invention provides for independent measurement of pressure or temperature using the sensors disclosed herein.

  14. Carbon nanotube temperature and pressure sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Ilia N; Geohegan, David Bruce

    2013-10-29

    The present invention, in one embodiment, provides a method of measuring pressure or temperature using a sensor including a sensor element composed of a plurality of carbon nanotubes. In one example, the resistance of the plurality of carbon nanotubes is measured in response to the application of temperature or pressure. The changes in resistance are then recorded and correlated to temperature or pressure. In one embodiment, the present invention provides for independent measurement of pressure or temperature using the sensors disclosed herein.

  15. Carbon Nanotube Integration with a CMOS Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Maximiliano S.; Lerner, Betiana; Resasco, Daniel E.; Pareja Obregon, Pablo D.; Julian, Pedro M.; Mandolesi, Pablo S.; Buffa, Fabian A.; Boselli, Alfredo; Lamagna, Alberto

    2010-01-01

    This work shows the integration of a sensor based on carbon nanotubes using CMOS technology. A chip sensor (CS) was designed and manufactured using a 0.30 μm CMOS process, leaving a free window on the passivation layer that allowed the deposition of SWCNTs over the electrodes. We successfully investigated with the CS the effect of humidity and temperature on the electrical transport properties of SWCNTs. The possibility of a large scale integration of SWCNTs with CMOS process opens a new route in the design of more efficient, low cost sensors with high reproducibility in their manufacture. PMID:22319330

  16. An electrothermal carbon nanotube gas sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawano, Takeshi; Chiamori, Heather C; Suter, Marcel; Zhou, Qin; Sosnowchik, Brian D; Lin, Liwei

    2007-12-01

    We show both gas pressure and species sensing capabilities based on the electrothermal effect of a multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWCNT). Upon exposure to gaseous environments, the resistance of a heated MWCNT is found to change following the conductive heat-transfer variances of gas molecules. To realize this mechanism, a suspended MWCNT is constructed by synthesis and assembly in localized chemical vapor deposition that is accomplished within seconds via real-time electrical feedback control. Vacuum pressure sensitivity and gas species differentiability are observed and analyzed. Such MWCNT electrothermal sensors are compact, fast and reversible in responses, and fully integratable with microelectronics.

  17. Carbon nanotube radio-frequency electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Donglai; Zhang, Zhiyong; Peng, Lian-Mao

    2017-05-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) is considered a promising material for radio-frequency (RF) applications, owing to its high carrier mobility and saturated drift velocity, as well as ultra-small intrinsic gate capacitance. Here, we review progress on CNT-based devices and integrated circuits for RF applications, including theoretical projection of RF performance of CNT-based devices, preparation of CNT materials, fabrication, optimization of RF field-effect transistors (FETs) structures, and ambipolar FET-based RF applications, and we outline challenges and prospects of CNT-based RF applications.

  18. Superconductivity in single wall carbon nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Yavari

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available   By using Greens function method we first show that the effective interaction between two electrons mediated by plasmon exchange can become attractive which in turn can lead to superconductivity at a high critical temperature in a singl wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNT. The superconducting transition temperature Tc for the SWCNT (3,3 obtained by this mechanism agrees with the recent experimental result. We also show as the radius of SWCNT increases, plasmon frequency becomes lower and leads to lower Tc.

  19. Carbon hybrid fillers composed of carbon nanotubes directly grown on graphene nanoplatelets for effective thermal conductivity in epoxy composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Lan; Park, Ji Sun; Lim, Yun-Soo; Lee, Churl Seung; Shin, Kwonwoo; Moon, Ho Jun; Yang, Cheol-Min; Lee, Young Sil; Han, Jong Hun

    2013-03-26

    Carbon nanomaterials are generally used to promote the thermal conductivity of polymer composites. However, individual graphene nanoplatelets (GNPs) or carbon nanotubes (CNTs) limit the realization of the desirable thermal conductivity of the composite in both through- and in-plane directions. In this work, we present the thermal conductivity enhancement of the epoxy composite with carbon hybrid fillers composed of CNTs directly grown on the GNP support. The composite with 20 wt% hybrid filler loading showed 300% and 50% through-plane thermal conductivity improvements in comparison with the individual CNTs and GNPs, respectively. Moreover, it showed an enhanced thermal conductivity of up to 12% higher than that of the simply mixed GNP and CNT fillers. In more detail, hybrid fillers, whose CNTs were synthesized on the GNP support (Support C, Fe/Mo-MgO:GNP=1:0.456) for 60 min via chemical vapor deposition process, presented the highest through-plane thermal conductivity of 2.41 W m(-1) K(-1) in an epoxy composite.

  20. Filling of carbon nanotubes and nanofibres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reece D. Gately

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The reliable production of carbon nanotubes and nanofibres is a relatively new development, and due to their unique structure, there has been much interest in filling their hollow interiors. In this review, we provide an overview of the most common approaches for filling these carbon nanostructures. We highlight that filled carbon nanostructures are an emerging material for biomedical applications.

  1. Adsorption removal of antiviral drug oseltamivir and its metabolite oseltamivir carboxylate by carbon nanotubes: Effects of carbon nanotube properties and media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wen-Long; Wu, Qian-Yuan; Wang, Zheng-Ming; Niu, Li-Xia; Wang, Chao; Sun, Ming-Chao; Hu, Hong-Ying

    2015-10-01

    This investigation evaluated the adsorption behavior of the antiviral drugs of oseltamivir (OE) and its metabolites (i.e., oseltamivir carboxylate (OC)) on three types of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) including single-walled CNT (SWCNT), multi-walled CNT (MWCNT), and carboxylated SWCNT (SWCNT-COOH). CNTs can efficiently remove more than 90% of the OE and OC from aqueous solution when the initial concentration was lower than 10(-4) mmol/L. The Polanyi-Manes model depicted the adsorption isotherms of OE and OC on CNTs better than the Langmuir and Freundlich models. The properties of OE/OC and the characteristics of CNTs, particularly the oxygen functional groups (e.g., SWCNT-COOH) played important roles during the adsorption processes. OE showed a higher adsorption affinity than OC. By comparing the different adsorbates adsorption on each CNT and each adsorbate adsorption on different CNTs, the adsorption mechanisms of hydrophobic interaction, electrostatic interaction, van der Waals force, and H-bonding were proposed as the contributing factors for OE and OC adsorption on CNTs. Particularly, for verifying the contribution of electrostatic interaction, the changes of adsorption partition efficiency (Kd) of OE and OC on CNTs were evaluated by varying pH from 2 to 11 and the importance of isoelectric point (pHIEP) of CNTs on OE and OC adsorption was addressed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Synergic effect of multi-walled carbon nanotubes and gold nanoparticles towards immunosensing of ricin with carbon nanotube-gold nanoparticles-chitosan modified screen printed electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suresh, Srinivasan; Gupta, Manish; Kumar, Gupta Ajay; Rao, Vepa Kameswara; Kumar, Om; Ghosal, Partha

    2012-09-07

    An amperometric immunosensor for the specific detection of Ricinus communis is reported. Screen printed electrodes (SPEs) were modified with gold nanoparticles (GNPs) loaded multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs)-chitosan (Ch) film. The ratio of MWCNT and GNP was optimised to get best electrochemically active electrode. Sandwich immunoassay format was used for the immunosensing of ricin. The revealing antibodies tagged with the enzyme alkaline phosphatase (ALP) converts the substrate 1-naphthyl phosphate into 1-naphthol that was determined with the amperometric technique. The amperometric current obtained was correlated with the concentration of ricin. The prepared GNP-MWCNT-Ch-SPE showed high stability due to the Ch film, short response time with good reproducibility and increased shelf life of the electrodes immobilised with antibodies. The electrochemical activity of the electrode improved because of optimization of composition of CNTs and gold nanoparticles. Under the optimal conditions, the modified electrode showed a wide linear response to the concentration of ricin in the range of 2.5-25 ng mL(-1) with a limit of detection of 2.1 ng mL(-1) and with a relative standard deviation of 5.1% and storage life of 32 days.

  3. Synergistic photothermal ablative effects of functionalizing carbon nanotubes with a POSS-PCU nanocomposite polymer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tan Aaron

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The application of nanotechnology in biology and medicine represents a significant paradigm shift in the approach to the treatment of cancer. Evidence suggests that when exposed to near-infrared radiation (NIR, carbon nanotubes (CNTs dissipate a substantial amount of heat energy. We have developed a novel nanocomposite polymer, polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane poly (carbonate-urea urethane (POSS-PCU. POSS-PCU displays excellent biocompatibility and has been used in making artificial organs as well as protective coatings for medical devices. Results Functionalizing (or “coating” CNTs with POSS-PCU confers biocompatibility and increase the amount of heat energy generated, by enhancing dispersion. Here we demonstrate that POSS-PCU-functionalized multi-walled CNTs (MWNTs act synergistically together when exposed to NIR to thermally ablate cancer cells. Conclusion Given that POSS-PCU has already been used in human in first-in-man studies as trachea, lacrimal duct, bypass graft and other organs, our long-term goal is to take POSS-PCU coated CNTs to clinical studies to address the treatment of cancer by optimizing its therapeutic index and increasing its specificity via antibody conjugation.

  4. Method for manufacturing high quality carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benavides, Jeanette M. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A non-catalytic process for the production of carbon nanotubes includes supplying an electric current to a carbon anode and a carbon cathode which have been securely positioned in the open atmosphere with a gap between them. The electric current creates an electric arc between the carbon anode and the carbon cathode, which causes carbon to be vaporized from the carbon anode and a carbonaceous residue to be deposited on the carbon cathode. Inert gas is pumped into the gap to flush out oxygen, thereby preventing interference with the vaporization of carbon from the anode and preventing oxidation of the carbonaceous residue being deposited on the cathode. The anode and cathode are cooled while electric current is being supplied thereto. When the supply of electric current is terminated, the carbonaceous residue is removed from the cathode and is purified to yield carbon nanotubes.

  5. Method for nano-pumping using carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Insepov, Zeke [Darien, IL; Hassanein, Ahmed [Bolingbrook, IL

    2009-12-15

    The present invention relates generally to the field of nanotechnology, carbon nanotubes and, more specifically, to a method and system for nano-pumping media through carbon nanotubes. One preferred embodiment of the invention generally comprises: method for nano-pumping, comprising the following steps: providing one or more media; providing one or more carbon nanotubes, the one or more nanotubes having a first end and a second end, wherein said first end of one or more nanotubes is in contact with the media; and creating surface waves on the carbon nanotubes, wherein at least a portion of the media is pumped through the nanotube.

  6. Quantum conductance of a helically coiled carbon nanotube

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wengang Lu

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Using a π-orbital tight-binding model, we investigate the transport properties of a coiled carbon nanotube (also called carbon nanotube spring, which we construct by connecting carbon nanotubes periodically in three-dimensional (3D space. The conductance is quantized due to the translational symmetry in the coiled direction. However, the conductance behaviors differ greatly from those of pristine metallic carbon nanotubes but similar to those of carbon nanotube superlattices. We explain that conductance behaviors of the coiled carbon nanotube.

  7. Large-scale carbon nanotube synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacKenzie, Kiern J; Dunens, Oscar M; See, Chee H; Harris, Andrew T

    2008-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are a form of crystalline carbon with extraordinary chemical, physical, electrical and mechanical properties, making them potentially valuable in a broad range of applications. These properties have resulted in an unprecedented level of interest in the development of techniques to manufacture CNTs, and consequently a raft of competing patents have been issued, with universities and commercial entities alike looking to obtain patent protection for their inventions. In this paper we review relevant aspects of international patent law, summarize CNT definitions and discuss patent irregularities, and discuss the implications of the widening gap between nanotechnology practice and the underlying patent law. This is followed by a review of the chemical vapour deposition technique of CNT synthesis, in particular using a fluidised bed, identified as the most promising method to date for the large-scale, low cost production of CNTs. We further examine the carbon nanotube patent space, focusing primarily on patents for CNTs produced via CVD and FBCVD techniques. This patent space is both convoluted and uncertain, and it appears likely that some form of litigation will ensue in future to ultimately determine intellectual property ownership in various regions. We also discuss the likely effect of this 'patent thicket' on the commercialisation of large-scale CNT synthesis processes.

  8. The Synthesis of Nitrogen-Doped Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    NICO

    TEM analysis revealed that the nanotubes exhibit bam- boo-like structures with rough ... The XPS and CN elemental analysis revealed that nitrogen atoms were successfully doped into the carbon walls. The amount of nitrogen .... might be due to effects related to the catalyst particle shape, the bulk diffusion of carbon and ...

  9. Sucrose Treated Carbon Nanotube and Graphene Yarns and Sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauti, Godfrey (Inventor); Kim, Jae-Woo (Inventor); Siochi, Emilie J. (Inventor); Wise, Kristopher E. (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    Consolidated carbon nanotube or graphene yarns and woven sheets are consolidated through the formation of a carbon binder formed from the dehydration of sucrose. The resulting materials, on a macro-scale are lightweight and of a high specific modulus and/or strength. Sucrose is relatively inexpensive and readily available, and the process is therefore cost-effective.

  10. Application of multi-walled carbon nanotubes to enhance anodic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) modification of anodes and the optimisation of relevant parameters thereof for application in an Enterobacter cloacae microbial fuel cell were examined. The H – type microbial fuel cells were used for the fundamental studies, with a carbon sheet as a control anode and ...

  11. Carbon nanotube stationary phases for microchip electrochromatography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Klaus Bo; Bøggild, Peter; Kutter, Jörg Peter

    The use of nanomaterials in separation science has increased rapidly in the last decade. The reason for this is to take advantage of the unique properties of these materials, such as a very high surface-to-volume ratio and favourable sorbent behaviour. Carbon nanostructures, such as carbon......, microfluidic devices with microfabricated carbon nanotube columns for electrochromatographic separations will be presented. The electrically conductive carbon nanotube layer has been patterned into hexoganol micropillars in order to support electroosmotic flow without forming gas bubbles from electrolysis...

  12. Synthesis of single wall carbon nanotubes from a lamellar type ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Wintec

    walled nanotubes. These nanotubes are applicable to store more hydrogen. Keywords. AlPO4-L; single wall carbon nanotubes. 1. Introduction. Carbon nanotubes (Iijima 1991) are nano-scale structures formed by self assembly. They possess excellent chemical and physical properties (Rodney and Donald 1995; Chen.

  13. Polymerization initated at sidewalls of carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tour, James M. (Inventor); Hudson, Jared L. (Inventor); Krishnamoorti, Ramanan (Inventor); Yurekli, Koray (Inventor); Mitchell, Cynthia A. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    The present invention is directed to aryl halide (such as aryl bromide) functionalized carbon nanotubes that can be utilized in anionic polymerization processes to form polymer-carbon nanotube materials with improved dispersion ability in polymer matrices. In this process the aryl halide is reacted with an alkyllithium species or is reacted with a metal to replace the aryl-bromine bond with an aryl-lithium or aryl-metal bond, respectively. It has further been discovered that other functionalized carbon nanotubes, after deprotonation with a deprotonation agent, can similarly be utilized in anionic polymerization processes to form polymer-carbon nanotube materials. Additionally or alternatively, a ring opening polymerization process can be performed. The resultant materials can be used by themselves due to their enhanced strength and reinforcement ability when compared to their unbound polymer analogs. Additionally, these materials can also be blended with pre-formed polymers to establish compatibility and enhanced dispersion of nanotubes in otherwise hard to disperse matrices resulting in significantly improved material properties. The resultant polymer-carbon nanotube materials can also be used in drug delivery processes due to their improved dispersion ability and biodegradability, and can also be used for scaffolding to promote cellular growth of tissue.

  14. The Effect of DNA and Sodium Cholate Dispersed Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes on the Green Algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan M. Williams

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Increasing use of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs will lead to their increased release into the environment. Previous work has shown negative effects of SWCNT on growth and survival of model organisms. The aim of the current study was to determine the effect of SWCNT well-dispersed by either DNA or sodium cholate (SC on the unicellular green algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii in stagnant water conditions. Growth measurements were taken up to ten days for algae treated with varied levels of DNA:SWCNT or SC:SWCNT or controls, and chlorophyll content after 10 days was determined. Results show no effect on either growth or chlorophyll content of algae at any concentration or duration. This is in contradiction to prior work showing toxicity of SWCNT to environmental model organisms.

  15. Significant promotion effect of carbon nanotubes on the electrocatalytic activity of supported Pd NPs for ethanol oxidation reaction of fuel cells: the role of inner tubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jin; Cheng, Yi; Lu, Shanfu; Jia, Lichao; Shen, Pei Kang; Jiang, San Ping

    2014-11-18

    The inner tubes of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have a significant promotion effect on the electrocatalytic activity of Pd nanoparticles (NPs) for the ethanol oxidation of direct alcohol fuel cells (DAFCs) and Pd NPs supported on CNTs with 3-7 walls show a much higher activity as compared to that supported on typical single-walled and multi-walled CNTs.

  16. Formation of carbon nanotubes on iron/cobalt oxides supported on zeolite-Y : Effect of zeolite textural properties and particle morphology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Triantafyllidis, K. S.; Karakoulia, S. A.; Gournis, D.; Delimitis, A.; Nalbandian, L.; Maccallini, E.; Rudolf, P.

    2008-01-01

    The effect of the textural properties and morphology of zeolite Y, used as support of iron (Fe) or cobalt (Co) oxides, on the quantity and quality of the multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) synthesized by catalytic chemical vapour deposition (CCVD) of acetylene was studied. The parent zeolite Y was

  17. The alignment of carbon nanotubes: an effective route to extend their excellent properties to macroscopic scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xuemei; Chen, Tao; Yang, Zhibin; Peng, Huisheng

    2013-02-19

    To improve the practical application of carbon nanotubes, it is critically important to extend their physical properties from the nanoscale to the macroscopic scale. Recently, chemists aligned continuous multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) sheets and fibers to produce materials with high mechanical strength and electrical conductivity. This provided an important clue to the use of MWCNTs at macroscopic scale. Researchers have made multiple efforts to optimize this aligned structure and improve the properties of MWCNT sheets and fibers. In this Account, we briefly highlight the new synthetic methods and promising applications of aligned MWCNTs for organic optoelectronic materials and devices. We describe several general methods to prepare both horizontally and perpendicularly aligned MWCNT/polymer composite films, through an easy solution or melting process. The composite films exhibit the combined properties of being flexible, transparent, and electrically conductive. These advances may pave the way to new flexible substrates for organic solar cells, sensing devices, and other related applications. Similarly, we discuss the synthesis of aligned MWCNT/polymer composite fibers with interesting mechanical and electrical properties. Through these methods, we can incorporate a wide variety of soluble or fusible polymers for such composite films and fibers. In addition, we can later introduce functional polymers with conjugated backbones or side chains to improve the properties of these composite materials. In particular, cooperative interactions between aligned MWCNTs and polymers can produce novel properties that do not occur individually. Common examples of this are two types of responsive polymers, photodeformable azobenzene-containing liquid crystalline polymer and chromatic polydiacetylene. Aligning the structure of MWCNTs induces the orientation of azobenzene-containing mesogens, and produces photodeformable polymer elastomers. This strategy also solves the long

  18. Acrylonitrile, an advantageous precursor to synthesize nitrogen doped carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar-Elguézabal, A.; Román-Aguirre, M.; De la Torre, L.; Zaragoza, E. A.

    2017-05-01

    The nitrogen doped carbon nanotubes present specific characteristics that offer better performance than pure carbon nanotubes for application like biomedicine, hydrogen adsorption and electrocataytic devices. This work present a simple method to obtain well-aligned nitrogen doped multi wall carbon nanotubes, which present open channels with diameter around 50 nm. These carbon nanotubes are obtained using acrylonitrile as carbon and nitrogen source, which offers some advantages on the use of other precursors like ammonia, pyridine, benzylamine, acetonitrile or melamine.

  19. Diagnosis and Treatment of Neurological and Ischemic Disorders Employing Carbon Nanotube Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick P. Komane

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Extensive research on carbon nanotubes has been conducted due to their excellent physicochemical properties. Based on their outstanding physicochemical properties, carbon nanotubes have the potential to be employed as theranostic tools for neurological pathologies such as Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease including ischemic stroke diagnosis and treatment. Stroke is currently regarded as the third root cause of death and the leading source of immobility around the globe. The development and improvement of efficient and effective procedures for central nervous system disease diagnosis and treatment is necessitated. The main aim of this review is to discuss the application of nanotechnology, specifically carbon nanotubes, to the diagnosis and treatment of neurological disorders with an emphasis on ischemic stroke. Areas covered include the conventional current diagnosis and treatment of neurological disorders, as well as a critical review of the application of carbon nanotubes in the diagnosis and treatment of ischemic stroke, covering areas such as functionalization of carbon nanotubes and carbon nanotube-based biosensors. A broad perspective on carbon nanotube stimuli-responsiveness, carbon nanotube toxicity, and commercially available carbon nanotubes is provided. Potential future studies employing carbon nanotubes have been discussed, evaluating their extent of advancement in the diagnosis and treatment of neurological and ischemic disorders.

  20. Preparation and electrocatalytic property of WC/carbon nanotube composite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Guohua [State Key Laboratory Breeding Base of Green Chemistry-Synthesis Technology, Hangzhou 310014 (China) and Research Center of Nano Science and Technology, Zhejiang University of Technology, Hangzhou 310014 (China) and School of Chemical Engineering and Material Science, Zhejiang University of Technology, Hangzhou 310014 (China)]. E-mail: nanozjut@zjut.edu.cn; Ma Chunan [State Key Laboratory Breeding Base of Green Chemistry-Synthesis Technology, Hangzhou 310014 (China); Research Center of Nano Science and Technology, Zhejiang University of Technology, Hangzhou 310014 (China); School of Chemical Engineering and Material Science, Zhejiang University of Technology, Hangzhou 310014 (China); Tang Junyan [State Key Laboratory Breeding Base of Green Chemistry-Synthesis Technology, Hangzhou 310014 (China); School of Chemical Engineering and Material Science, Zhejiang University of Technology, Hangzhou 310014 (China); Sheng Jiangfeng [State Key Laboratory Breeding Base of Green Chemistry-Synthesis Technology, Hangzhou 310014 (China); School of Chemical Engineering and Material Science, Zhejiang University of Technology, Hangzhou 310014 (China)

    2007-01-01

    Tungsten carbide/carbon nanotube composite was prepared by surface decoration and in situ reduction-carbonization. The samples were characterized by XRD, SEM, EDS, TEM, HRTEM and BET, respectively. The XRD results show that the sample is composed of carbon nanotube, tungsten carbide and tungsten oxide. The EDS results show that the distribution of tungsten oxide is consistent with that of tungsten carbide. SEM, TEM and HRTEM results show that the tungsten carbide nanoparticle with irregular granule grows on the outside surface of carbon nanotube homogenously. The electrocatalytic activity of the sample for p-nitrophenol reduction was tested by a powder microelectrode in a basic solution. The results show that the electrocatalytic activity of the sample is higher than that of granular tungsten carbide, hollow globe tungsten carbide with mesoporosity and carbon nanotube purified. The improvement of the electrocatalytic activity of the sample can be attributed to its components and composite structure. These results indicate that tungsten carbide/carbon nanotube composite is one of the effective ways to improve the electrocatalytic activity of tungsten carbide.

  1. Wrapping and dispersion of multiwalled carbon nanotubes improves electrical conductivity of protein-nanotube composite biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voge, Christopher M; Johns, Jeremy; Raghavan, Mekhala; Morris, Michael D; Stegemann, Jan P

    2013-01-01

    Composites of extracellular matrix proteins reinforced with carbon nanotubes have the potential to be used as conductive biopolymers in a variety of biomaterial applications. In this study, the effect of functionalization and polymer wrapping on the dispersion of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) in aqueous media was examined. Carboxylated MWCNT were wrapped in either Pluronic(®) F127 or gelatin. Raman spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy showed that covalent functionalization of the pristine nanotubes disrupted the carbon lattice and added carboxyl groups. Polymer and gelatin wrapping resulted in increased surface adsorbed oxygen and nitrogen, respectively. Wrapping also markedly increased the stability of MWCNT suspensions in water as measured by settling time and zeta potential, with Pluronic(®)-wrapped nanotubes showing the greatest effect. Treated MWCNT were used to make 3D collagen-fibrin-MWCNT composite materials. Carboxylated MWCNT resulted in a decrease in construct impedance by an order of magnitude, and wrapping with Pluronic(®) resulted in a further order of magnitude decrease. Functionalization and wrapping also were associated with maintenance of fibroblast function within protein-MWCNT materials. These data show that increased dispersion of nanotubes in protein-MWCNT composites leads to higher conductivity and improved cytocompatibility. Understanding how nanotubes interact with biological systems is important in enabling the development of new biomedical technologies. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Combination of Polymer Technology and Carbon Nanotube Array for the Development of an Effective Drug Delivery System at Cellular Level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riggio Cristina

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In this article, a carbon nanotube (CNT array-based system combined with a polymer thin film is proposed as an effective drug release device directly at cellular level. The polymeric film embedded in the CNT array is described and characterized in terms of release kinetics, while in vitro assays on PC12 cell line have been performed in order to assess the efficiency and functionality of the entrapped agent (neural growth factor, NGF. PC12 cell differentiation, following incubation on the CNT array embedding the alginate delivery film, demonstrated the effectiveness of the proposed solution. The achieved results indicate that polymeric technology could be efficiently embedded in CNT array acting as drug delivery system at cellular level. The implication of this study opens several perspectives in particular in the field of neurointerfaces, combining several functions into a single platform.

  3. The effect of gate voltage on the electrical transport properties in the contacts of C60 to carbon nanotube leads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AA Shokri

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available  In this paper, we examined the effect of gate voltage, bias voltage, contact geometries and the different bond lengths on the electrical transport properties in a nanostructure consisting of C60 molecule attached to two semi-infinite leads made of single wall carbon nanotubes in the coherent regime. Our calculation was based on the Green’s function method within nearest-neighbour tight-binding approximation. After the calculation was of transmission, the electrical current was obtained by the Landauer-Buttiker formula. Next, the effect of the mentioned factors was investigated in the nanostructure. The application of the present results may be useful in designing devices based on molecular electronics in nanoscale.

  4. Effect of magnetic field on thermal conductivity and viscosity of a magnetic nanofluid loaded with carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shahsavar, Amin [Kermanshah University of Technology, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Salimpour, Mohammad Reza; Saghafian, Mohsen [Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shafii, M. B. [Sharif University of Technology, Tehran(Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-02-15

    The present work examines experimentally the effect of magnetic field on the viscosity and thermal conductivity of a hybrid nanofluid containing tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH) coated Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles and Gum arabic (GA) coated carbon nanotubes (CNTs). The hybrid nanofluid was prepared by using ultrasonic dispersion method. Magnetic field was created by a pair of spaced apart magnet plates. The effect of temperature on the time variation of thermal conductivity under applied magnetic field was also investigated. According to the results of this study, viscosity of the hybrid nanofluid increases with the strength of magnetic field, while it decreases with the increase of temperature. Additionally, it is found that the hybrid nanofluid behaves as a shear thinning fluid at low shear rates while it exhibits Newtonian behavior at high shear rates. Furthermore, results show that when an external magnetic field is applied to the studied magnetic nanofluids, the thermal conductivity experiences a peak.

  5. Effect of Longitudinal Magnetic Field on Vibration Characteristics of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes in a Viscoelastic Medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, D. P.; Lei, Y.; Shen, Z. B.

    2017-09-01

    The effect of longitudinal magnetic field on vibration response of a sing-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) embedded in viscoelastic medium is investigated. Based on nonlocal Euler-Bernoulli beam theory, Maxwell's relations, and Kelvin viscoelastic foundation model, the governing equations of motion for vibration analysis are established. The complex natural frequencies and corresponding mode shapes in closed form for the embedded SWCNT with arbitrary boundary conditions are obtained using transfer function method (TFM). The new analytical expressions for the complex natural frequencies are also derived for certain typical boundary conditions and Kelvin-Voigt model. Numerical results from the model are presented to show the effects of nonlocal parameter, viscoelastic parameter, boundary conditions, aspect ratio, and strength of the magnetic field on vibration characteristics for the embedded SWCNT in longitudinal magnetic field. The results demonstrate the efficiency of the proposed methods for vibration analysis of embedded SWCNTs under magnetic field.

  6. Effect of Longitudinal Magnetic Field on Vibration Characteristics of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes in a Viscoelastic Medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, D. P.; Lei, Y.; Shen, Z. B.

    2017-12-01

    The effect of longitudinal magnetic field on vibration response of a sing-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) embedded in viscoelastic medium is investigated. Based on nonlocal Euler-Bernoulli beam theory, Maxwell's relations, and Kelvin viscoelastic foundation model, the governing equations of motion for vibration analysis are established. The complex natural frequencies and corresponding mode shapes in closed form for the embedded SWCNT with arbitrary boundary conditions are obtained using transfer function method (TFM). The new analytical expressions for the complex natural frequencies are also derived for certain typical boundary conditions and Kelvin-Voigt model. Numerical results from the model are presented to show the effects of nonlocal parameter, viscoelastic parameter, boundary conditions, aspect ratio, and strength of the magnetic field on vibration characteristics for the embedded SWCNT in longitudinal magnetic field. The results demonstrate the efficiency of the proposed methods for vibration analysis of embedded SWCNTs under magnetic field.

  7. Fully printed flexible carbon nanotube photodetectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Suoming; Cai, Le; Wang, Tongyu; Miao, Jinshui; Sepúlveda, Nelson; Wang, Chuan

    2017-03-01

    Here, we report fully printed flexible photodetectors based on single-wall carbon nanotubes and the study of their electrical characteristics under laser illumination. Due to the photothermal effect and the use of high purity semiconducting carbon nanotubes, the devices exhibit gate-voltage-dependent photoresponse with the positive photocurrent or semiconductor-like behavior (conductivity increases at elevated temperatures) under positive gate biases and the negative photocurrent or metal-like behavior (conductivity decreases at elevated temperatures) under negative gate biases. Mechanism for such photoresponse is attributed to the different temperature dependencies of carrier concentration and carrier mobility, which are two competing factors that ultimately determine the photothermal effect-based photoresponse. The photodetectors built on the polyimide substrate also exhibit superior mechanical compliance and stable photoresponse after thousands of bending cycles down to a curvature radius as small as 3 mm. Furthermore, due to the low thermal conductivity of the plastic substrate, the devices show up to 6.5 fold improvement in responsivity compared to the devices built on the silicon substrate. The results presented here provide a viable path to low cost and high performance flexible photodetectors fabricated entirely by the printing process.

  8. Electrochemical hydrogen storage in single-walled carbon nanotube paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Z P; Ng, S H; Wang, J Z; Huang, Z G; Liu, H K; Too, C O; Wallace, G G

    2006-03-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) papers were successfully prepared by dispersing SWNTs in Triton X-100 solution, then filtered by PVDF membrane (0.22 microm pore size). The electrochemical behavior and the reversible hydrogen storage capacity of single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) papers have been investigated in alkaline electrolytic solutions (6 N KOH) by cyclic voltammetry, linear micropolarization, and constant current charge/discharge measurements. The effect of thickness and the addition of carbon black on hydrogen adsorption/desorption were also investigated. It was found that the electrochemical charge-discharge mechanism occurring in SWNT paper electrodes is somewhere between that of carbon nanotubes (physical process) and that of metal hydride electrodes (chemical process), and consists of a charge-transfer reaction (Reduction/Oxidation) and a diffusion step (Diffusion).

  9. Carbon nanotube ecotoxicity in amphibians: assessment of multiwalled carbon nanotubes and comparison with double-walled carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouchet, Florence; Landois, Perine; Puech, Pascal; Pinelli, Eric; Flahaut, Emmanuel; Gauthier, Laury

    2010-08-01

    The potential impact of industrial multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) was investigated under normalized laboratory conditions according to the International Standard micronucleus assay ISO 21427-1 for 12 days of half-static exposure to 0.1, 1, 10 and 50 mg/l of MWNTs in water. Three different end points were carried out for 12 days of exposure: mortality, growth inhibition and micronuclei induction in erythrocytes of the circulating blood of larvae. Raman spectroscopy analysis was used to study the presence of carbon nanotubes in the biological samples. Considering the high diversity of carbon nanotubes according to their different characteristics, MWNTs were analyzed in Xenopus larvae, comparatively to double-walled carbon nanotubes used in a previous study in similar conditions. Growth inhibition in larvae exposed to 50 mg/l of MWNTs was evidenced; however, no genetoxicity (micronucleus assay) was noticed, at any concentration. Carbon nanotube localization in the larvae leads to different possible hypothesis of mechanisms explaining toxicity in Xenopus.

  10. Carbon Nanotube-Based Synthetic Gecko Tapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhinojwala, Ali

    2008-03-01

    Wall-climbing geckos have unique ability to attach to different surfaces without the use of any viscoelastic glues. On coming in contact with any surface, the micron-size gecko foot-hairs deform, enabling molecular contact over large areas, thus translating weak van der Waals (vdW) interactions into enormous shear forces. We will present our recent results on the development of synthetic gecko tape using aligned carbon nanotubes to mimic the keratin hairs found on gecko feet. The patterned carbon nanotube-based gecko tape can support a shear stress (36 N/cm^2) nearly four times higher than the gecko foot and sticks to a variety of surfaces, including Teflon. Both the micron-size setae (replicated by nanotube bundles) and nanometer-size spatulas (individual nanotubes) are necessary to achieve macroscopic shear adhesion and to translate the weak vdW interactions into high shear forces. The carbon nanotube based tape offers an excellent synthetic option as a dry conductive reversible adhesive in microelectronics, robotics and space applications. The mechanism behind these large shear forces and self-cleaning properties of these carbon nanotube based synthetic gecko tapes will be discussed. This work was performed in collaboration with graduate students Liehui Ge, and Sunny Sethi, and collaborators from RPI; Lijie Ci and Professor Pulickel Ajayan.

  11. Effect of Modified and Nonmodified Carbon Nanotubes on the Rheological Behavior of High Density Polyethylene Nanocomposite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adewunmi A. Ahmad

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports the results of studies on the rheological behavior of nanocomposites of high density polyethylene (HDPE with pristine multiwall carbon nanotubes (CNT as well as phenol and 1-octadecanol (C18 functionalized CNT at 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and 7 wt% loading. The viscosity reduction at 1 wt% CNT follows the order, pristine CNT < phenol functionalized CNT < C18 functionalized CNT. As the filler loading increases from 1 to 2, 3, and 4 wt%, neat HDPE and filled HDPE systems show similar moduli and viscosity, particularly in the low frequency region. As the filler loading increases further to 5 and 7 wt%, the viscosity and moduli become greater than the neat HDPE. The storage modulus, tan, and the Cole-Cole plots show that CNT network formation occurs at higher CNT loading. The critical CNT loading or the rheological percolation threshold, where network formation occurs is found to be strongly dependant on the functionalization of CNT. For pristine CNT, the rheological percolation threshold is around 4 wt%, but for functionalized CNT it is around 7 wt%. The surface morphologies of CNT and functionalized CNT at 1 wt% loading showed good dispersion while at 7 wt% loading, dispersion was also achieved, but there are few regions with agglomeration of CNT.

  12. Solvent effects on polymer sorting of carbon nanotubes with applications in printed electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huiliang; Hsieh, Bing; Jiménez-Osés, Gonzalo; Liu, Peng; Tassone, Christopher J; Diao, Ying; Lei, Ting; Houk, Kendall N; Bao, Zhenan

    2015-01-07

    Regioregular poly(3-alkylthiophene) (P3AT) polymers have been previously reported for the selective, high-yield dispersion of semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) in toluene. Here, five alternative solvents are investigated, namely, tetrahydrofuran, decalin, tetralin, m-xylene, and o-xylene, for the dispersion of SWCNTs by poly(3-dodecylthiophene) P3DDT. The dispersion yield could be increased to over 40% using decalin or o-xylene as the solvents while maintaining high selectivity towards semiconducting SWCNTs. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations in explicit solvents are used to explain the improved sorting yield. In addition, a general mechanism is proposed to explain the selective dispersion of semiconducting SWCNTs by conjugated polymers. The possibility to perform selective sorting of semiconducting SWCNTs using various solvents provides a greater diversity of semiconducting SWCNT ink properties, such as boiling point, viscosity, and surface tension as well as toxicity. The efficacy of these new semiconducting SWCNT inks is demonstrated by using the high boiling point and high viscosity solvent tetralin for inkjet-printed transistors, where solvent properties are more compatible with the inkjet printing head and improved droplet formation. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Effect of improved contact on reliability of sub-60 nm carbon nanotube vias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyas, Anshul A; Zhou, Changjian; Chai, Yang; Wang, Phillip; Yang, Cary Y

    2016-09-16

    Advances in semiconductor technology due to the aggressive downward scaling of on-chip feature sizes have led to rapid rises in the resistivity and current density of interconnect conductors. As a result, current interconnect materials, Cu and W, are subject to performance and reliability constraints approaching or exceeding their physical limits. Therefore, alternative materials are being actively considered as potential replacements to meet such constraints. The carbon nanotube (CNT) is among the leading replacement candidates for on-chip interconnect vias due to its high aspect-ratio nanostructure and superior current-carrying capacity to Cu and W, as well as other potential candidates. Based on the results for 40 nm and 60 nm top-contact metallized CNT vias, we demonstrate that not only are their current-carrying capacities two orders of magnitude higher than their Cu and W counterparts, they are enhanced by reduced via resistance due to contact engineering facilitated by the first reported contact resistance extraction scheme for a 40 nm linewidth.

  14. Size effect on brittle and ductile fracture of two-dimensional interlinked carbon nanotube network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Yuhang; Aluru, N. R.

    2017-09-01

    The mechanical properties of two-dimensional (2D) interlinked carbon nanotube (CNT) network are investigated using ab initio calculation and molecular dynamics simulations (MD) with Reaxff force field. The simulation results show that bulk 2D interlinked CNT network has good mechanical properties along the axial direction which can be comparable to that of single-walled CNT and graphene, but has better ductility along the radial direction than single-walled CNT and graphene. In addition, the mechanical properties of 2D interlinked CNT network ribbon along the radial direction depend strongly on the size of the ribbon. The Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio decrease as the size increases while the fracture strain increases with the size increasing. By analyzing the atomic structural (both bond length and atomic von Mises stress) evolution of the ribbons, the mechanism of a brittle-to-ductile transition is revealed. The exploration of the mechanical properties of the 2D interlinked CNT network paves the way for application of the relevant devices that can benefit from the high Young's modulus, high tensile strength, and good ductility.

  15. Reinforcing Effects of Poly(D-Lactide)-g-Multiwall Carbon Nanotubes on Polylactide Nanocomposites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jeong Hee; Lee, Jae Yun; Chin, In-Joo

    2015-10-01

    Polylactide (PLA) nanocomposites with multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) grafted with poly(L-lactide) or poly(D-lactide) were prepared by solution casting, and their thermal and mechanical properties were evaluated. MWNTs containing hydroxyl groups were treated by ring-opening polymerization of either L-lactide or D-lactide. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy confirmed that the MWNT surfaces had been modified by the PLLA or PDLA chains. The thermal properties were measured by differential scanning calorimetry and thermogravimetric analysis. The mechanical properties were examined using a universal testing machine. The morphology of the fractured surfaces of the PLA nanocomposites was observed by scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. PDLA-g-MWNTs were dispersed more uniformly compared to PLLA-g-MWNTs in the PLA matrix. The incorporation of PDLA-g-MWNTs greatly improved the tensile strength of the nanocomposites regardless of the contents. Thermal analysis revealed different characteristics at specific composites depending on the type of modification.

  16. Conformational-induced doping effect of sodium dodecyl benzene sulfonate on single walled carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jin-Hyon; Yoon, Seon-Mi; Park, Sam-Jin; Cha, In-Sung; Shin, Hyeon-Jin; Choi, Jae-Young; Kim, Jong Min; Paik, Ungyu

    2012-02-01

    The doping behavior of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) was investigated with an emphasis on the control of the conformation of sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate (NaDDBS) with sulfonate groups acting as an electro-withdrawing group. The conformation of adsorbed NaDDBS on SWCNTs was controlled as a function of the amount of NaDDBS. The doping behavior of SWCNTs was significantly affected by the dosing amount of NaDDBS due to the conformational change of NaDDBS adsorbed on the SWCNT surface, which affected the spatial distance between the SWCNT surface and the sulfonate groups in NaDDBS. At a higher concentration, the spatial distance between the sulfonate group in NaDDBS and SWCNT was not sufficiently close enough to dope SWCNT due to the repulsive forces between the sulfonate groups in NaDDBS. Alternatively, at a lower concentration, NaDDBS acted as a p-type dopant for SWCNTs. To this end, this paper demonstrates a new tendency of doping that is related to the adsorbed behavior of a dispersant.

  17. The effect of DNA-dispersed single-walled carbon nanotubes on the polymerase chain reaction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan M Williams

    Full Text Available The unique properties of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNT make them useful in many new technologies and applications. The interaction of DNA and SWCNT is of interest for many uses, including molecular sensors. This study determined polymerase chain reaction (PCR efficiency in amplifying a 76 base pair DNA sequence in the presence of SWCNT, of heterogeneous "Mix" and (6,5-enriched chiralities, associated with three DNA sequences. The dependence of PCR efficiency on the concentration of DNA:SWCNT preparations was measured, as well as their age and level of dispersion (less than one month or between four and ten months. Additionally, the ability to directly amplify the DNA sequence associated with the SWCNT scaffold was investigated. In PCRs with DNA:SWCNT preparations less than one month old, concentrations greater than or equal to 0.1 mg/mL inhibited the PCR reaction. In PCRs with older preparations, no inhibition was seen at 0.01 or 0.1 mg/mL, with amplification at 1 mg/mL in some samples. Additionally, our studies showed that the DNA directly associated with the SWCNT can be amplified using PCR. This work provides an inhibitory concentration of DNA-dispersed SWCNT in PCR reactions for different preparations as well as a basis for future DNA:SWCNT studies that require PCR amplification. This will be useful for future studies focused on the use of SWCNT in molecular sensing technologies.

  18. Experimental investigation on effect of multi-walled carbon nanotubes concentration on flexural properties and microstructure of cement mortar composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousefi, Ali; Bunnori, Norazura Muhamad; Khavarian, Mehrnoush; Hassanshahi, Omid; Majid, Taksiah A.

    2017-10-01

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) with extraordinary properties have shown a promising role toward enhancing the flexural performance of cement composites. This paper investigates the effect of concentrations of MWCNTs on major flexural properties of cement mortar composites, including flexural strength, strain capacity, modulus of toughness, and modulus of elasticity. For this purpose, cement mortar reinforced with various concentrations of MWCNTs (0.02, 0.05, and 0.1 wt.% by weight of cement). Dispersion of MWCNTs was carried out using ultrasonic energy and concrete superplasticizer as surfactant agent. Prismatic beams of sizes 100 mm×100 mm×500 mm were fabricated and four-point bending tests were performed on the beam specimens at the age of 28 days. The results from bending tests indicated substantial improvements in the flexural strength, strain capacity and modulus of toughness of MWCNT-cement mortar, while the modules of elasticity remained constant. It was observed that specimens reinforced with 0.05 wt.% of MWCNTs exhibited higher flexural properties enhancement. Besides, it was noticed that with the increase of MWCNTs content, the flexural properties of MWCNT-cement mortar increased. The microstructure observation of MWCNT-cement mortar demonstrated well dispersion of nanotubes with concentration of 0.05 wt.% but large agglomerates and bundles of MWCNTs depicted within the sample with higher loading of MWCNTs (0.1 wt.%). It was concluded that the properties enhancement of MWCNT-cement composites highly depends on the concentration of MWCNTs and the level of dispersion of nanotubes in the cement matrix.

  19. Inhibitory effects of carbon nanotubes on the degradation of 14C-2,4-dichlorophenol in soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Wenqiang; Shan, Jun; Jiang, Bingqi; Wang, Lianhong; Feng, Jianfang; Guo, Hongyan; Ji, Rong

    2013-01-01

    Concerns on the potential risks of engineered nanoparticles to the environment are increasing; however, little is known about the effects of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) on the environmental fate of hydrophobic organic pollutants in soil. We incubated radioactive labeled 2,4-dichlorophenol ((14)C-2,4-DCP) in a soil in the presence of various concentrations (0, 2, 20, and 2000 mg kg(-1) dry soil) of single-walled (SWCNTs) and multi-walled (MWCNTs) carbon nanotubes, and determined the mineralization, degradation, and residue distribution of 2,4-DCP in the soil. CNTs were added to the soil either after the spiking of (14)C-2,4-DCP or together with (14)C-2,4-DCP as a mixture. CNTs at the concentration of 2000 mg kg(-1) significantly (Psoil after 90 d of incubation. Pre-adsorption of (14)C-2,4-DCP on CNTs showed stronger inhibitory effects on the degradation of (14)C-2,4-DCP, already significant with CNTs at 20 mg kg(-1). In general, SWCNTs had a higher effect on the degradation and residue distribution of 2,4-DCP in the soil than MWCNTs. The inhibitory effects are supposed to be owing to limited activities of soil endogenous microorganisms, potential toxicities of CNTs to the microorganisms, and reduced bioavailability of 2,4-DCP in the presence of CNTs, even though a desorption hysteresis of 2,4-DCP on CNTs was not observed. Our results indicate that CNTs have more significant impacts on the environmental fate of the hydrophobic pollutants entering soil together with CNTs via strong sorption than the pollutants already present in soil. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Single-walled carbon nanotubes dispersed in aqueous media via non-covalent functionalization: effect of dispersant on the stability, cytotoxicity, and epigenetic toxicity of nanotube suspensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alpatova, Alla L; Shan, Wenqian; Babica, Pavel; Upham, Brad L; Rogensues, Adam R; Masten, Susan J; Drown, Edward; Mohanty, Amar K; Alocilja, Evangelyn C; Tarabara, Volodymyr V

    2010-01-01

    As the range of applications for carbon nanotubes (CNTs) rapidly expands, understanding the effect of CNTs on prokaryotic and eukaryotic cell systems has become an important research priority, especially in light of recent reports of the facile dispersion of CNTs in a variety of aqueous systems including natural water. In this study, single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) were dispersed in water using a range of natural (gum arabic, amylose, Suwannee River natural organic matter) and synthetic (polyvinyl pyrrolidone, Triton X-100) dispersing agents (dispersants) that attach to the CNT surface non-covalently via different physiosorption mechanisms. The charge and the average effective hydrodynamic diameter of suspended SWCNTs as well as the concentration of exfoliated SWCNTs in the dispersion were found to remain relatively stable over a period of 4 weeks. The cytotoxicity of suspended SWCNTs was assessed as a function of dispersant type and exposure time (up to 48 h) using general viability bioassay with Escherichia coli and using neutral red dye uptake (NDU) bioassay with WB-F344 rat liver epithelia cells. In the E. coli viability bioassays, three types of growth media with different organic loadings and salt contents were evaluated. When the dispersant itself was non-toxic, no losses of E. coli and WB-F344 viability were observed. The cell viability was affected only by SWCNTs dispersed using Triton X-100, which was cytotoxic in SWCNT-free (control) solution. The epigenetic toxicity of dispersed CNTs was evaluated using gap junction intercellular communication (GJIC) bioassay applied to WB-F344 rat liver epithelial cells. With all SWCNT suspensions except those where SWCNTs were dispersed using Triton X-100 (wherein GJIC could not be measured because the sample was cytotoxic), no inhibition of GJIC in the presence of SWCNTs was observed. These results suggest a strong dependence of the toxicity of SWCNT suspensions on the toxicity of the dispersant and point to

  1. Selective Functionalization of Carbon Nanotubes: Part II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyyappan, Meyya; Khare, Bishun

    2010-01-01

    An alternative method of low-temperature plasma functionalization of carbon nanotubes provides for the simultaneous attachment of molecular groups of multiple (typically two or three) different species or different mixtures of species to carbon nanotubes at different locations within the same apparatus. This method is based on similar principles, and involves the use of mostly the same basic apparatus, as those of the methods described in "Low-Temperature Plasma Functionalization of Carbon Nanotubes" (ARC-14661-1), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 28, No. 5 (May 2004), page 45. The figure schematically depicts the basic apparatus used in the aforementioned method, with emphasis on features that distinguish the present alternative method from the other. In this method, one exploits the fact that the composition of the deposition plasma changes as the plasma flows from its source in the precursor chamber toward the nanotubes in the target chamber. As a result, carbon nanotubes mounted in the target chamber at different flow distances (d1, d2, d3 . . .) from the precursor chamber become functionalized with different species or different mixtures of species. In one series of experiments to demonstrate this method, N2 was used as the precursor gas. After the functionalization process, the carbon nanotubes from three different positions in the target chamber were examined by Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy to identify the molecular groups that had become attached. On carbon nanotubes from d1 = 1 cm, the attached molecular groups were found to be predominantly C-N and C=N. On carbon nanotubes from d2 = 2.5 cm, the attached molecular groups were found to be predominantly C-(NH)2 and/or C=NH2. (The H2 was believed to originate as residual hydrogen present in the nanotubes.) On carbon nanotubes from d3 = 7 cm no functionalization could be detected - perhaps, it was conjectured, because this distance is downstream of the plasma source, all of the free ions and free radicals of

  2. Tough ceramic coatings: Carbon nanotube reinforced silica sol-gel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez, A.J., E-mail: antoniojulio.lopez@urjc.es [Dept. de Ciencia e Ingenieria de Materiales, ESCET, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, C/Tulipan s/n, Mostoles 28933, Madrid (Spain); Rico, A.; Rodriguez, J.; Rams, J. [Dept. de Ciencia e Ingenieria de Materiales, ESCET, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, C/Tulipan s/n, Mostoles 28933, Madrid (Spain)

    2010-08-15

    Silica coatings reinforced with carbon nanotubes were produced via sol-gel route using two mixing techniques of the sol-gel precursors, mechanical and ultrasonic mixing, and dip-coating as deposition process on magnesium alloy substrates. Effective incorporation and distribution of 0.1 wt.% of carbon nanotubes in the amorphous silica matrix of the coatings were achieved using both techniques. Fabrication procedure determines the morphological aspects of the coating. Only mechanical mixing process produced coatings dense and free of defects. Nanoindentation technique was used to examine the influence of the fabrication process in the mechanical features of the final coatings, i.e. indentation fracture toughness, Young's modulus and hardness. A maximum toughening effect of about 24% was achieved in silica coatings reinforced with carbon nanotubes produced by the mechanical mixing route. Scanning electron microscopy investigation revealed that the toughening of these reinforced coatings was mainly due to bridging effect of the reinforcement.

  3. A Review: Carbon Nanotube-Based Piezoresistive Strain Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waris Obitayo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of carbon nanotubes for piezoresistive strain sensors has acquired significant attention due to its unique electromechanical properties. In this comprehensive review paper, we discussed some important aspects of carbon nanotubes for strain sensing at both the nanoscale and macroscale. Carbon nanotubes undergo changes in their band structures when subjected to mechanical deformations. This phenomenon makes them applicable for strain sensing applications. This paper signifies the type of carbon nanotubes best suitable for piezoresistive strain sensors. The electrical resistivities of carbon nanotube thin film increase linearly with strain, making it an ideal material for a piezoresistive strain sensor. Carbon nanotube composite films, which are usually fabricated by mixing small amounts of single-walled or multiwalled carbon nanotubes with selected polymers, have shown promising characteristics of piezoresistive strain sensors. Studies also show that carbon nanotubes display a stable and predictable voltage response as a function of temperature.

  4. Co-TPP functionalized carbon nanotube composites for detection of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Keywords. Electrical properties; nanostructure materials; porphyrin functionalized carbon nanotubes; sensor for chlorobenzene and nitrobenzene vapour. Abstract. We report preparation of nanocomposites by non-covalent functionalization of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with metal-tetraphenylporphyrins (M-TPP). Fourier ...

  5. Methods for Gas Sensing with Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaul, Anupama B. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    Methods for gas sensing with single-walled carbon nanotubes are described. The methods comprise biasing at least one carbon nanotube and exposing to a gas environment to detect variation in temperature as an electrical response.

  6. Carbon Nanotube Reinforced Polymers for Radiation Shielding Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thibeault, S. (Technical Monitor); Vaidyanathan, Ranji

    2004-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation provides information on the use of Extrusion Freeform Fabrication (EEF) for the fabrication of carbon nanotubes. The presentation addresses TGA analysis, Raman spectroscopy, radiation tests, and mechanical properties of the carbon nanotubes.

  7. A carbon nanotube wall membrane for water treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Byeongho; Baek, Youngbin; Lee, Minwoo; Jeong, Dae Hong; Lee, Hong H; Yoon, Jeyong; Kim, Yong Hyup

    2015-05-14

    Various forms of carbon nanotubes have been utilized in water treatment applications. The unique characteristics of carbon nanotubes, however, have not been fully exploited for such applications. Here we exploit the characteristics and corresponding attributes of carbon nanotubes to develop a millimetre-thick ultrafiltration membrane that can provide a water permeability that approaches 30,000 l m(-2) h(-1) bar(-1), compared with the best water permeability of 2,400 l m(-2) h(-1) bar(-1) reported for carbon nanotube membranes. The developed membrane consists only of vertically aligned carbon nanotube walls that provide 6-nm-wide inner pores and 7-nm-wide outer pores that form between the walls of the carbon nanotubes when the carbon nanotube forest is densified. The experimental results reveal that the permeance increases as the pore size decreases. The carbon nanotube walls of the membrane are observed to impede bacterial adhesion and resist biofilm formation.

  8. Release characteristics of selected carbon nanotube polymer composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) are commonly used in polymer formulations to improve strength, conductivity, and other attributes. A developing concern is the potential for carbon nanotube polymer nanocomposites to release nanoparticles into the environment as the polymer ...

  9. Carbon Nanotube Tower-Based Supercapacitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyyappan, Meyya (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A supercapacitor system, including (i) first and second, spaced apart planar collectors, (ii) first and second arrays of multi-wall carbon nanotube (MWCNT) towers or single wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) towers, serving as electrodes, that extend between the first and second collectors where the nanotube towers are grown directly on the collector surfaces without deposition of a catalyst and without deposition of a binder material on the collector surfaces, and (iii) a porous separator module having a transverse area that is substantially the same as the transverse area of at least one electrode, where (iv) at least one nanotube tower is functionalized to permit or encourage the tower to behave as a hydrophilic structure, with increased surface wettability.

  10. Liquid crystalline order of carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiev, Georgi; Ahlawat, Aditya; Mulkern, Brian; Doyle, Robert; Mongeau, Jennifer; Ogilvie, Alex

    2007-03-01

    Topological defects formed during phase transitions in liquid crystals provide a direct proof of the standard Cosmological model and are direct links to the Early Universe. On the other hand in Nanotechnology, carbon nanotubes can be manipulated and oriented directly by changing the liquid crystalline state of the nanotubes, in combination with organic liquid crystals. Currently there are no nano-assemblers, which makes the liquid crystal state of the nanotubes, one of the few ways of controlling them. We show the design of a fast and efficient polarized light ellipsometric system (a new modification of previous optical systems) that can provide fast quantitative real time measurements in two dimensions of the formation of topological defects in liquid crystals during phase transitions in lab settings. Our aim is to provide fundamental information about the formation of optically anisotropic structures in liquid crystals and the orientation of carbon nanotubes in electric field.

  11. Effects of Adding Multiwall Carbon Nanotubes on Performance of Polyvinyl Acetate and Urea-Formaldehyde Adhesives in Tropical Timber Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Róger Moya

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs functionalized with hydroxyl groups (MWCNTs-OH have been incorporated into polyvinyl acetate (PVAc and urea-formaldehyde (UF adhesives utilized in tropical wood gluing. The Raman spectroscopy, the atomic force microscopy (AFM, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM were used to describe the MWCNTs-OH. The adhesives were evaluated in three concentrations of MWCNTs-OH: 0% (control, 0.05%, and 0.1%. The evaluation included color, the distribution of MWCNTs-OH by TEM and AFM, thermal stability and viscosity of the adhesives, and shear strength (SS of the glue line for nine tropical woods. AFM and TEM confirmed interaction of MWCNTs-OH with adhesives. The viscosity of the PVAc adhesive increases with added MWCNTs-OH. The incorporation of MWCNTs-OH in PVAc and UF resin produces wood adhesives with less brightness, less yellowness, and increased redness. The nanotubes in the adhesive improved the thermal stability of the composites and increased the entropy factor and energy of activation in the kinetic decomposition of the resin. In relation to SS, MWCNTs-OH in any of the two concentrations had no significant effect on SS in dry condition in half of the species studied glued with PVAc adhesive, whereas, for UF-adhesive, the SS and percentage of wood failure improved in most of the 9 species studied.

  12. Orientation and density control of bispecific anti-HER2 antibody on functionalized carbon nanotubes for amplifying effective binding reactivity to cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hye-In; Hwang, Dobeen; Jeon, Su-Ji; Lee, Sangyeop; Park, Jung Hyun; Yim, Dabin; Yang, Jin-Kyoung; Kang, Homan; Choo, Jaebum; Lee, Yoon-Sik; Chung, Junho; Kim, Jong-Ho

    2015-03-01

    Nanomaterial bioconjugates have gained unabated interest in the field of sensing, imaging and therapy. As a conjugation process significantly affects the biological functions of proteins, it is crucial to attach them to nanomaterials with control over their orientation and the nanomaterial-to-protein ratio in order to amplify the binding efficiency of nanomaterial bioconjugates to targets. Here, we describe a targeting nanomaterial platform utilizing carbon nanotubes functionalized with a cotinine-modified dextran polymer and a bispecific anti-HER2 × cotinine tandem antibody. This new approach provides an effective control over antibody orientation and density on the surface of carbon nanotubes through site-specific binding between the anti-cotinine domain of the bispecific tandem antibody and the cotinine group of the functionalized carbon nanotubes. The developed synthetic carbon nanotube/bispecific tandem antibody conjugates (denoted as SNAs) show an effective binding affinity against HER2 that is three orders of magnitude higher than that of the carbon nanotubes bearing a randomly conjugated tandem antibody prepared by carbodiimide chemistry. As the density of a tandem antibody on SNAs increases, their effective binding affinity to HER2 increases as well. SNAs exhibit strong resonance Raman signals for signal transduction, and are successfully applied to the selective detection of HER2-overexpressing cancer cells.Nanomaterial bioconjugates have gained unabated interest in the field of sensing, imaging and therapy. As a conjugation process significantly affects the biological functions of proteins, it is crucial to attach them to nanomaterials with control over their orientation and the nanomaterial-to-protein ratio in order to amplify the binding efficiency of nanomaterial bioconjugates to targets. Here, we describe a targeting nanomaterial platform utilizing carbon nanotubes functionalized with a cotinine-modified dextran polymer and a bispecific anti-HER2

  13. Photoreactivity of hydroxylated multi-walled carbon nanotubes and its effects on the photodegradation of atenolol in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ya; Zhou, Lei; Zeng, Chao; Wang, Qi; Wang, Zunyao; Gao, Shixiang; Ji, Yuefei; Yang, Xi

    2013-11-01

    In spite of the increasing concerns about the fate of pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) and the nanomaterial pollution in aquatic ecosystem, the effects of carbon nanotubes on the photochemical transformation of PPCPs are less considered. In this study, the photochemical production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) were examined in colloidal dispersions of hydroxylated multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNT-OH) under simulated solar irradiation using a Xenon lamp. Two kinds of ROS, (1)O2 and OH, were confirmed by their molecular probes, furfuryl alcohol (FFA) and p-chlorobenzoic acid (PCBA). The steady-state concentrations of (1)O2 and OH were calculated as 1.30×10(-14) M and 5.02×10(-16) M, respectively. The effects of MWNT-OH on photodegradation of atenolol (ATL) were investigated in the presence of natural water components, i.e., dissolved organic matters (DOMs), nitrate (NO3(-)) and ferric ions (Fe(3+)). Photoproducts of atenolol were identified by solid phase extraction-liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (SPE-LC-MS) analysis techniques. Three potential photochemical pathways of atenolol, including the hydroxylation on aromatic ring, the loss of amide group and the cleavage of ether oxygen bond as well as di-polymerization of reaction intermediates were tentatively proposed. Using the radical quenching method, reaction with OH was determined as the major photolysis pathway of atenolol in irradiated MWNT-OH suspensions. These findings of the production of ROS and their effects on the photodegradation of organic contaminants provided useful information for assessing environmental risk of MWNT-OH. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Functionalized carbon nanotubes for potential medicinal applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yi; Bai, Yuhong; Yan, Bing

    2010-06-01

    Functionalized carbon nanotubes display unique properties that enable a variety of medicinal applications, including the diagnosis and treatment of cancer, infectious diseases and central nervous system disorders, and applications in tissue engineering. These potential applications are particularly encouraged by their ability to penetrate biological membranes and relatively low toxicity. High aspect ratio, unique optical property and the likeness as small molecule make carbon nanotubes an unusual allotrope of element carbon. After functionalization, carbon nanotubes display potentials for a variety of medicinal applications, including the diagnosis and treatment of cancer, infectious diseases and central nervous system disorders, and applications in tissue engineering. These potential applications are particularly encouraged by their ability to penetrate biological membranes and relatively low toxicity. (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Agglomeration defects on irradiated carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steini Moura, Cassio [Faculty of Physics, Pontificia Universidade Catolica do Rio Grande do Sul, 90619-900, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Balzaretti, Naira Maria; Amaral, Livio [Institute of Physics, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, C.P.: 15051, 91501-070, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Gribel Lacerda, Rodrigo; Pimenta, Marcos A. [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, C.P.: 702, 31270-901, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2012-03-15

    Aligned carbon nanotubes (CNT) were irradiated in the longitudinal and perpendicular directions, with low energy carbon and helium ions in order to observe the formation of defects in the atomic structure. Analysis through Raman spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy indicated bundle rupture and ion track formation on nanotube bundles. Aligned CNT presented a kind of defect comprising ravine formation and tube agglomeration on top of the substrate. The latter structure is possibly caused by static charge accumulation induced by the incoming ions. Fluence plays a role on the short range order. Higher fluence irradiation transforms CNT into amorphous carbon nanowires.

  16. Agglomeration defects on irradiated carbon nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cássio Stein Moura

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Aligned carbon nanotubes (CNT were irradiated in the longitudinal and perpendicular directions, with low energy carbon and helium ions in order to observe the formation of defects in the atomic structure. Analysis through Raman spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy indicated bundle rupture and ion track formation on nanotube bundles. Aligned CNT presented a kind of defect comprising ravine formation and tube agglomeration on top of the substrate. The latter structure is possibly caused by static charge accumulation induced by the incoming ions. Fluence plays a role on the short range order. Higher fluence irradiation transforms CNT into amorphous carbon nanowires.

  17. Immobilization of enzymes onto carbon nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prlainović Nevena Ž.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The discovery of carbon nanotubes (CNTs has opened a new door in nanotechnology. With their high surface area, unique electronic, thermal and mechanical properties, CNTs have been widely used as carriers for protein immobilization. In fact, carbon nanotubes present ideal support system without diffusional limitations, and also have the possibility of surface covalent functionalization. It is usually the oxidation process that introduces carboxylic acid groups. Enzymes and other proteins could be adsorbed or covalently attached onto carbon nanotubes. Adsorption of enzyme is a very simple and inexpensive immobilization method and there are no chemical changes of the protein. It has also been found that this technique does not alter structure and unique properties of nanotubes. However, a major problem in process designing is relatively low stability of immobilized protein and desorption from the carrier. On the other hand, while covalent immobilization provides durable attachment the oxidation process can reduce mechanical and electronic properties of carbon nanotubes. It can also affect the active site of enzyme and cause the loss of enzyme activity. Bioimmobilization studies have showed that there are strong interactions between carbon nanotubes surface and protein. The retention of enzyme structure and activity is critical for their application and it is of fundamental interest to understand the nature of these interactions. Atomic force microscopy (AFM, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, scanning electron microscopy (SEM and circular dichroism (CD spectroscopy provide an insight into the structural changes that occur during the immobilization. The aim of this paper is to summarize progress of protein immobilization onto carbon nanotubes.

  18. Carbon nanotube fiber terahertz polarizer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubair, Ahmed; Tsentalovich, Dmitri E.; Young, Colin C.; Heimbeck, Martin S.; Everitt, Henry O.; Pasquali, Matteo; Kono, Junichiro

    2016-04-01

    Conventional, commercially available terahertz (THz) polarizers are made of uniformly and precisely spaced metallic wires. They are fragile and expensive, with performance characteristics highly reliant on wire diameters and spacings. Here, we report a simple and highly error-tolerant method for fabricating a freestanding THz polarizer with nearly ideal performance, reliant on the intrinsically one-dimensional character of conduction electrons in well-aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs). The polarizer was constructed on a mechanical frame over which we manually wound acid-doped CNT fibers with ultrahigh electrical conductivity. We demonstrated that the polarizer has an extinction ratio of ˜-30 dB with a low insertion loss (fiber polarizer and found comparable attenuation to a commercial metallic wire-grid polarizer. Furthermore, based on the classical theory of light transmission through an array of metallic wires, we demonstrated the most striking difference between the CNT-fiber and metallic wire-grid polarizers: the latter fails to work in the zero-spacing limit, where it acts as a simple mirror, while the former continues to work as an excellent polarizer even in that limit due to the one-dimensional conductivity of individual CNTs.

  19. Elastomer Reinforced with Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, Jared L.; Krishnamoorti, Ramanan

    2009-01-01

    Elastomers are reinforced with functionalized, single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) giving them high-breaking strain levels and low densities. Cross-linked elastomers are prepared using amine-terminated, poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS), with an average molecular weight of 5,000 daltons, and a functionalized SWNT. Cross-link densities, estimated on the basis of swelling data in toluene (a dispersing solvent) indicated that the polymer underwent cross-linking at the ends of the chains. This thermally initiated cross-linking was found to occur only in the presence of the aryl alcohol functionalized SWNTs. The cross-link could have been via a hydrogen-bonding mechanism between the amine and the free hydroxyl group, or via attack of the amine on the ester linage to form an amide. Tensile properties examined at room temperature indicate a three-fold increase in the tensile modulus of the elastomer, with rupture and failure of the elastomer occurring at a strain of 6.5.

  20. Carbon nanotube fiber terahertz polarizer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zubair, Ahmed [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Rice University, Houston, Texas 77005 (United States); Tsentalovich, Dmitri E.; Young, Colin C. [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Rice University, Houston, Texas 77005 (United States); Heimbeck, Martin S. [Charles M. Bowden Laboratory, Aviation & Missile Research, Development, and Engineering Center (AMRDEC), Redstone Arsenal, Alabama 35898 (United States); Everitt, Henry O. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Rice University, Houston, Texas 77005 (United States); Charles M. Bowden Laboratory, Aviation & Missile Research, Development, and Engineering Center (AMRDEC), Redstone Arsenal, Alabama 35898 (United States); Pasquali, Matteo [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Rice University, Houston, Texas 77005 (United States); Department of Chemistry, Rice University, Houston, Texas 77005 (United States); Department of Materials Science and NanoEngineering, Rice University, Houston, Texas 77005 (United States); Kono, Junichiro, E-mail: kono@rice.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Rice University, Houston, Texas 77005 (United States); Department of Materials Science and NanoEngineering, Rice University, Houston, Texas 77005 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rice University, Houston, Texas 77005 (United States)

    2016-04-04

    Conventional, commercially available terahertz (THz) polarizers are made of uniformly and precisely spaced metallic wires. They are fragile and expensive, with performance characteristics highly reliant on wire diameters and spacings. Here, we report a simple and highly error-tolerant method for fabricating a freestanding THz polarizer with nearly ideal performance, reliant on the intrinsically one-dimensional character of conduction electrons in well-aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs). The polarizer was constructed on a mechanical frame over which we manually wound acid-doped CNT fibers with ultrahigh electrical conductivity. We demonstrated that the polarizer has an extinction ratio of ∼−30 dB with a low insertion loss (<0.5 dB) throughout a frequency range of 0.2–1.1 THz. In addition, we used a THz ellipsometer to measure the Müller matrix of the CNT-fiber polarizer and found comparable attenuation to a commercial metallic wire-grid polarizer. Furthermore, based on the classical theory of light transmission through an array of metallic wires, we demonstrated the most striking difference between the CNT-fiber and metallic wire-grid polarizers: the latter fails to work in the zero-spacing limit, where it acts as a simple mirror, while the former continues to work as an excellent polarizer even in that limit due to the one-dimensional conductivity of individual CNTs.

  1. Superconductivity in the Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ieong, Chao

    This is an experimental study of the superconductivity of the carbon nanotubes (CNTs)--more specifically the CNTs studied is 0.4 nm diameter single-wall CNTs existing inside the channels of the AFI zeolite crystal, abbreviated as CNT AFI--by probing the magnetization property of this CNT AFI system. These human engineered 4-Angstrom CNTs, which is a nanoscale and low-dimensional material, are approaching the limit set by nature, and superconductivity in the CNTs in general is theoretically (microscopic or first-principles) both interesting and challenging. Hence, empirical studies are important in providing useful guiding information. The magnetization and specific-heat studies could provide convincing evidences supporting or critiquing the electrical transport results of the CNT AFI system. But probing the superconductivity in this system, as the superconducting signal is very small in a large background, is another challenge. Therefore the high-resolution calorimetry and magnetometry techniques detailedin this thesis are invaluable. With improved method of fabrication to increase the CNTs content inside the channels of the AFI crystallites, the empirical results [Nanoscale 4, 21-41 (2012)]were markedly different from those published in 2001 [Science 292, 2462 (2001)]. The magnetization results of this thesis largely agree with the results from the electrical transport study [Phys. Rev. B 81, 174530 (2010)], but there is some result that raises doubt in the critical current interpretation there. Lastly, there is still some electrical transport result of this system that has not been explained convincingly and is of interest.

  2. Determinants of carbon nanotube toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanone, Sophie; Andujar, Pascal; Kermanizadeh, Ali; Boczkowski, Jorge

    2013-12-01

    In the last few years questions have been raised regarding the potential toxicity of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) to humans and environment. It is believed that the physico-chemical characteristics of these materials are key determinants of CNT interaction with living organisms, and hence determine their toxicity. As for other nanomaterials, the most important of these characteristics are the length, diameter, surface area, tendency to agglomerate, bio-durability, presence and nature of catalyst residues as well as chemical functionalization of the CNT. This review highlights the recent advancements in the understanding of the CNT properties which are essential in determining CNT toxicity. Hence the focus is on CNT dimensions, surface properties, bio-durability and corona formation as these fields have evolved greatly in recent years. A deeper understanding of these events and their underlying mechanisms could provide a molecular explanation of the biological and physiological responses following CNT administration and therefore help in the development of safe by design materials. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Contaminant Interactions and Biological Effects of Single-walled Carbon Nanotubes in a Benthic Estuarine System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parks, Ashley Nicole

    The fate, bioavailability, bioaccumulation and toxicity of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT) have not been extensively studied to date. Pristine SWNT are highly hydrophobic and have been shown to strongly associate with natural particulate matter in aquatic environments. In light of this, I have focused my research to examine the influence of sediment and food exposure routes on bioavailability, bioaccumulation, and toxicity of structurally diverse SWNT in several ecologically-important marine invertebrate species. No significant mortality was observed in any organism at concentrations up to 1000 mg/kg. Evidence of biouptake after ingestion was observed for pristine semiconducting SWNT using NIRF spectroscopy and for oxidized 14C-SWNT using liquid scintillation counting. After a 24 hour depuration period, the pristine semiconducting SWNT were eliminated from organisms to below the method detection limit (5 microg/mL), and the 14C-SWNT body burden was decreased by an order of magnitude to a bioaccumulation factor (BAF) of toxicity or bioaccumulation in benthic invertebrates. Overall, the SWNT were not bioavailable and appear to associate with the sediment. In addition to investigating the toxicity and bioaccumulation of SWNT as an independent toxicant, it is important to consider how they will interact with other contaminants in the environment (i.e., increase or decrease toxicity and bioaccumulation of co-contaminants, alter the environmental transport of co-contaminants, induce degradation of co-contaminants, etc.). I wanted to investigate the effects of SWNT on a complex mixture of contaminants already present in a natural system. New Bedford Harbor (NBH) sediment, which is contaminated with polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), was amended with pristine SWNT to determine if the presence of SWNT would mitigate the toxicity and bioaccumulation of the PCBs in deposit-feeding invertebrates. A dilution series of the NBH sediment was created using uncontaminated Long

  4. Effect of Continuous Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes on Thermal and Mechanical Properties of Flexible Composite Film

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Eun Cha

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available To investigate the effect of continuous multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs on the thermal and mechanical properties of composites, we propose a fabrication method for a buckypaper-filled flexible composite film prepared by a two-step process involving buckypaper fabrication using vacuum filtration of MWCNTs, and composite film fabrication using the dipping method. The thermal conductivity and tensile strength of the composite film filled with the buckypaper exhibited improved results, respectively 76% and 275% greater than those of the individual MWCNT-filled composite film. It was confirmed that forming continuous MWCNT fillers is an important factor which determines the physical characteristics of the composite film. In light of the study findings, composite films using buckypaper as a filler and polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS as a flexible matrix have sufficient potential to be applied as a heat-dissipating material, and as a flexible film with high thermal conductivity and excellent mechanical properties.

  5. Flexible, Low-Cost Sensor Based on Electrolyte Gated Carbon Nanotube Field Effect Transistor for Organo-Phosphate Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatt, Vijay Deep; Joshi, Saumya; Becherer, Markus; Lugli, Paolo

    2017-05-18

    A flexible enzymatic acetylcholinesterase biosensor based on an electrolyte-gated carbon nanotube field effect transistor is demonstrated. The enzyme immobilization is done on a planar gold gate electrode using 3-mercapto propionic acid as the linker molecule. The sensor showed good sensing capability as a sensor for the neurotransmitter acetylcholine, with a sensitivity of 5.7 μA/decade, and demonstrated excellent specificity when tested against interfering analytes present in the body. As the flexible sensor is supposed to suffer mechanical deformations, the endurance of the sensor was measured by putting it under extensive mechanical stress. The enzymatic activity was inhibited by more than 70% when the phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) buffer was spiked with 5 mg/mL malathion (an organophosphate) solution. The biosensor was successfully challenged with tap water and strawberry juice, demonstrating its usefulness as an analytical tool for organophosphate detection.

  6. The effect of the catalyst metals on the thermal-oxidative stability of single-walled carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chuxin; Xu, Jiaoxing; Li, Jiaxin; Dong, Guofa; Guan, Lunhui

    2009-08-01

    In this work, we analyzed the effect of the catalyst metals with various forms on the thermal-oxidative stability of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) by using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and electronic dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). The results indicate that the catalyst metal nanoparticles encapsulated inside multi-shelled graphite particles play a main role on destabilizing SWCNTs during their air oxidation. We also compared the thermal stability of SWCNTs in the cloth-like soot and the cotton-like soot produced by arc-discharge. The SWCNTs in the cotton-like soot are of higher thermal-oxidation stability than that in the cloth-like soot due to fewer multi-shelled graphite nanoparticles encapsulating metal nanoparticles.

  7. Effect of different substitution position on the switching behavior in single-molecule device with carbon nanotube electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jingjuan; Han, Xiaoxiao; Yuan, Peipei; Bian, Baoan; Wang, Yixiang

    2018-01-01

    We investigate the electronic transport properties of dihydroazulene (DHA) and vinylheptafulvene (VHF) molecule sandwiched between two carbon nanotubes using density functional theory and non-equilibrium Green's function. The device displays significantly switching behavior between DHA and VHF isomerizations. It is found the different substitution position of F in the molecule influences the switching ratio of device, which is analyzed by transmission spectra and molecular projected self-consistent Hamiltonian. The observed negative differential resistance effect is explained by transmission spectra and transmission eigenstates of transmission peak in the bias window. The observed reverse of current in VHF form in which two H atoms on the right side of the benzene ring of the molecule are replaced by F is explained by transmission spectra and molecule-electrode coupling with the varied bias. The results suggest that the reasonable substitution position of molecule may improve the switching ratio, displaying a potential application in future molecular circuit.

  8. Avalanche breakdown and self-stabilization effects in electrically driven transition of carbon nanotube covered VO2 film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yuliang; Chen, Shi; Liu, Qianghu; Ren, Hui; Zheng, Xusheng; Wang, Liangxin; Lu, Yuan; Song, Li; Zhang, Guobin; Zou, Chongwen

    2017-06-01

    Electrical-driven metal-insulator transition (MIT) is quite vital and widespread for both applications and MIT mechanism of VO2. In this report, we discussed the avalanche breakdown and self-stabilization effects behind the electrically driven phase transition in macro-scale carbon nanotube covered VO2 film to further understand the phase transition behaviors as well as explore promising electrical-driven VO2 devices. It was found that the Joule heat was the main source to trigger the phase transition of VO2 film. However, the time-dependent triggering routes were quite different, since the avalanche behavior was observed under the voltage-driven mode, while the gradual self-stabilization existed in the current-driven mode. The simulation results based on the proposed thermodynamics models were in good agreement with the experimental phenomena, which were basically originated from the intrinsic first-order phase transition properties of VO2 film.

  9. Effects of reducing temperatures on the hydrogen storage capacity of double-walled carbon nanotubes with Pd loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Qu; Wu, Huimin; Wexler, David; Liu, Huakun

    2014-06-01

    The effects of different temperatures on the hydrogen sorption characteristics of double-walled carbon nanotubes (DWCNTs) with palladium loading have been investigated. When we use different temperatures, the particle sizes and specific surface areas of the samples are different, which affects the hydrogen storage capacity of the DWCNTs. In this work, the amount of hydrogen storage capacity was determined (by AMC Gas Reactor Controller) to be 1.70, 1.85, 2.00, and 1.93 wt% for pristine DWCNTS and for 2%Pd/DWCNTs-300 degrees C, 2%Pd/DWCNTs-400 degrees C, and 2%Pd/DWCNTs-500 degrees C, respectively. We found that the hydrogen storage capacity can be enhanced by loading with 2% Pd nanoparticles and selecting a suitable temperature. Furthermore, the sorption can be attributed to the chemical reaction between atomic hydrogen and the dangling bonds of the DWCNTs.

  10. The effect of surface treatments on the field emission characteristics of patterned carbon nanotubes on KOVAR substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Keunsoo; Lee, Yang Doo; Kang, Byung Hyun; Dong, Ki-Young; Baek, Jinho; Fai, Vincent Lau Chun [Korea University, Display and Nanosystem Laboratory, College of Engineering (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Won-Seok [Electronic Materials Research Group, Hyosung Corporation, R and D Business Laboratory (Korea, Republic of); Yang, Cheol-Min [Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Institute of Advanced Composite Materials (Korea, Republic of); Ju, Byeong-Kwon, E-mail: bkju@korea.ac.kr [Korea University, Display and Nanosystem Laboratory, College of Engineering (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-07-15

    The field emission characteristics of patterned carbon nanotubes (CNTs) the average diameter of which is 16 nm cathodes on substrates with different surface treatments were investigated. The surface treatments of the substrate were performed by nickel electroless plating and palladium coating, which is an activation procedure of electroless plating. CNTs were patterned on the surface-treated substrate with radius of 200 {mu}m through conventional photolithography process. Two deposition methods, electrophoresis deposition and spray deposition, were used to investigate the effects of deposition methods on field emission characteristics of the cathodes. It was revealed that the two deposition methods showed similar turn-on field trends, which means that the different surface morphologies of the substrates have more influence on the field emission characteristics than the different deposition methods performed in this study. Through the surface treatments, the roughness of the surface increased and cathodes with a high roughness factor showed better field emission characteristics compared to non-treated ones.

  11. A Review of the Application and Performance of Carbon Nanotubes in Fuel Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chong Luo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The fuel cell has the nature of high energy conversion efficiency and low pollutant emission. Carbon nanotubes used for fuel cells can decrease the needs of noble metals which are used for catalyst and improve the performance of fuel cells. The application of carbon nanotubes in fuel cells is summarized and discussed. The following aspects are described in this paper: the method used to reduce the platinum, the effect of carbon nanotubes on the fuel cell, improving the performance of fuel cell catalysts, the interaction between catalyst and carbon nanotube support, and the synthetic conditions of carbon nanotube supported catalyst. We summarize some of the results of previous studies and raise expectations for the microscopic state study of carbon nanotubes in the future.

  12. Different Technical Applications of Carbon Nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdalla, S; Al-Marzouki, F; Al-Ghamdi, Ahmed A; Abdel-Daiem, A

    2015-12-01

    Carbon nanotubes have been of great interest because of their simplicity and ease of synthesis. The novel properties of nanostructured carbon nanotubes such as high surface area, good stiffness, and resilience have been explored in many engineering applications. Research on carbon nanotubes have shown the application in the field of energy storage, hydrogen storage, electrochemical supercapacitor, field-emitting devices, transistors, nanoprobes and sensors, composite material, templates, etc. For commercial applications, large quantities and high purity of carbon nanotubes are needed. Different types of carbon nanotubes can be synthesized in various ways. The most common techniques currently practiced are arc discharge, laser ablation, and chemical vapor deposition and flame synthesis. The purification of CNTs is carried out using various techniques mainly oxidation, acid treatment, annealing, sonication, filtering chemical functionalization, etc. However, high-purity purification techniques still have to be developed. Real applications are still under development. This paper addresses the current research on the challenges that are associated with synthesis methods, purification methods, and dispersion and toxicity of CNTs within the scope of different engineering applications, energy, and environmental impact.

  13. Kelvin probe force microscopy studies of the charge effects upon adsorption of carbon nanotubes and C60 fullerenes on hydrogen-terminated diamond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kölsch, S.; Fritz, F.; Fenner, M. A.; Kurch, S.; Wöhrl, N.; Mayne, A. J.; Dujardin, G.; Meyer, C.

    2018-01-01

    Hydrogen-terminated diamond is known for its unusually high surface conductivity that is ascribed to its negative electron affinity. In the presence of acceptor molecules, electrons are expected to transfer from the surface to the acceptor, resulting in p-type surface conductivity. Here, we present Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) measurements on carbon nanotubes and C60 adsorbed onto a hydrogen-terminated diamond(001) surface. A clear reduction in the Kelvin signal is observed at the position of the carbon nanotubes and C60 molecules as compared with the bare, air-exposed surface. This result can be explained by the high positive electron affinity of carbon nanotubes and C60, resulting in electron transfer from the surface to the adsorbates. When an oxygen-terminated diamond(001) is used instead, no reduction in the Kelvin signal is obtained. While the presence of a charged adsorbate or a difference in work function could induce a change in the KPFM signal, a charge transfer effect of the hydrogen-terminated diamond surface, by the adsorption of the carbon nanotubes and the C60 fullerenes, is consistent with previous theoretical studies.

  14. The Effect of Alumina and Magnesia Supported Germanium Nanoparticles on the Growth of Carbon Nanotubes in the Chemical Vapor Deposition Method

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    Ghazaleh Allaedini

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of alumina and magnesia supported germanium (Ge nanoparticles on the synthesis of carbon nanotubes (CNTs using the chemical vapor deposition (CVD method in atmospheric pressure was investigated. The TEM micrographs confirmed the formation of carbon nanotubes, and the field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM analysis suggested a tip-growth mechanism for the grown carbon nanotubes. The X-ray diffraction (XRD pattern indicated a graphitic nature of the carbon nanotubes. The obtained CNTs using Ge nanoparticles supported by MgO resulted in a higher degree of graphitization than the CNTs obtained using Ge nanoparticles supported by Al2O3. Raman spectroscopy analysis of the CNTs confirmed the presence of radial breathing modes (RBM, which verified the formation of CNTs. High frequency Raman analysis demonstrated that the degree of graphitization of the synthesized CNTs using magnesia supported Ge nanoparticles is higher than that of the alumina supported Ge nanoparticles with the values of (ID/IG ratios equal to 0.45 and 0.73, respectively.

  15. Skeletal myotube formation enhanced by electrospun polyurethane carbon nanotube scaffolds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirivisoot, Sirinrath; Harrison, Benjamin S

    2011-01-01

    Background This study examined the effects of electrically conductive materials made from electrospun single- or multiwalled carbon nanotubes with polyurethane to promote myoblast differentiation into myotubes in the presence and absence of electrical stimulation. Methods and results After electrical stimulation, the number of multinucleated myotubes on the electrospun polyurethane carbon nanotube scaffolds was significantly larger than that on nonconductive electrospun polyurethane scaffolds (5% and 10% w/v polyurethane). In the absence of electrical stimulation, myoblasts also differentiated on the electrospun polyurethane carbon nanotube scaffolds, as evidenced by expression of Myf-5 and myosin heavy chains. The myotube number and length were significantly greater on the electrospun carbon nanotubes with 10% w/v polyurethane than on those with 5% w/v polyurethane. The results suggest that, in the absence of electrical stimulation, skeletal myotube formation is dependent on the morphology of the electrospun scaffolds, while with electrical stimulation it is dependent on the electrical conductivity of the scaffolds. Conclusion This study indicates that electrospun polyurethane carbon nanotubes can be used to modulate skeletal myotube formation with or without application of electrical stimulation. PMID:22072883

  16. Catalytic Chemical Vapor Deposition of Methane to Carbon Nanotubes: Copper Promoted Effect of Ni/MgO Catalysts

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    Wen Yang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The Ni/MgO and Ni-Cu/MgO catalysts were prepared by sol-gel method and used as the catalysts for synthesis of carbon nanotubes by thermal chemical vapor deposition. The effect of Cu on the carbon yield and structure was investigated, and the effects of calcination temperature and reaction temperature were also investigated. The catalysts and synthesized carbon materials were characterized by temperature programmed reduction (TPR, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM. Results showed that the addition of Cu promoted the reduction of nickel species, subsequently improving the growth and yield of CNTs. Meanwhile, CNTs were synthesized by the Ni/MgO and Ni-Cu/MgO catalysts with various calcination temperatures and reaction temperatures, and results suggested that the obtained CNTs on Ni-Cu/MgO catalyst with the calcination temperature of 500°C and the reaction temperature of 650°C were of the greatest yield and quantity of 927%.

  17. Effect of solution chemistry on multi-walled carbon nanotube deposition and mobilization in clean porous media.

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    Tian, Yuan; Gao, Bin; Wu, Lei; Muñoz-Carpena, Rafael; Huang, Qingguo

    2012-09-15

    There are increasing concerns over the environmental impact and health risks of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) because they may be released into soil and groundwater systems. The present work systematically investigated the transport, deposition, and mobilization behaviors of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) in saturated columns packed with acid-cleaned glass beads and quartz sand of two different grain sizes. Combined effects of pH (5.6 and 10) and ionic strength (IS: DI water, 1mM, and 10mM) on the fate and transport of the MWNTs in the columns were examined. MWNTs were relatively mobile in all the tested conditions with DI water as the experimental solution. Their deposition in the saturated porous media, however, was very sensitive to solution chemistry, particularly IS. Slight increase in solution IS (1 mM) caused strong deposition of MWNTs in both quartz sand (>44%) and glass beads (>39%). Mobilization experimental results indicated that most of the MWNT attachment (>73%) to the porous media was irreversible and reduction in solution IS only caused a small portion of re-entrainment (deposited MWNT for all the tested conditions. This indicates that more MWNTs are trapped in the primary minimum, although the deposition of MWNTs in saturated porous media occurs in both primary and secondary minimum. It is suggested that, under unfavorable conditions, weak associated MWNTs in the secondary minimum may be transferred into the primary minimum due to the effect of hydrodynamic force and/or local favorable sites associated with surface heterogeneity. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Theory of Carbon Nanotube (CNT)-Based Electron Field Emitters

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    Bocharov, Grigory S.; Eletskii, Alexander V.

    2013-01-01

    Theoretical problems arising in connection with development and operation of electron field emitters on the basis of carbon nanotubes are reviewed. The physical aspects of electron field emission that underlie the unique emission properties of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are considered. Physical effects and phenomena affecting the emission characteristics of CNT cathodes are analyzed. Effects given particular attention include: the electric field amplification near a CNT tip with taking into account the shape of the tip, the deviation from the vertical orientation of nanotubes and electrical field-induced alignment of those; electric field screening by neighboring nanotubes; statistical spread of the parameters of the individual CNTs comprising the cathode; the thermal effects resulting in degradation of nanotubes during emission. Simultaneous consideration of the above-listed effects permitted the development of the optimization procedure for CNT array in terms of the maximum reachable emission current density. In accordance with this procedure, the optimum inter-tube distance in the array depends on the region of the external voltage applied. The phenomenon of self-misalignment of nanotubes in an array has been predicted and analyzed in terms of the recent experiments performed. A mechanism of degradation of CNT-based electron field emitters has been analyzed consisting of the bombardment of the emitters by ions formed as a result of electron impact ionization of the residual gas molecules. PMID:28348342

  19. Theory of Carbon Nanotube (CNT-Based Electron Field Emitters

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    Alexander V. Eletskii

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Theoretical problems arising in connection with development and operation of electron field emitters on the basis of carbon nanotubes are reviewed. The physical aspects of electron field emission that underlie the unique emission properties of carbon nanotubes (CNTs are considered. Physical effects and phenomena affecting the emission characteristics of CNT cathodes are analyzed. Effects given particular attention include: the electric field amplification near a CNT tip with taking into account the shape of the tip, the deviation from the vertical orientation of nanotubes and electrical field-induced alignment of those; electric field screening by neighboring nanotubes; statistical spread of the parameters of the individual CNTs comprising the cathode; the thermal effects resulting in degradation of nanotubes during emission. Simultaneous consideration of the above-listed effects permitted the development of the optimization procedure for CNT array in terms of the maximum reachable emission current density. In accordance with this procedure, the optimum inter-tube distance in the array depends on the region of the external voltage applied. The phenomenon of self-misalignment of nanotubes in an array has been predicted and analyzed in terms of the recent experiments performed. A mechanism of degradation of CNT-based electron field emitters has been analyzed consisting of the bombardment of the emitters by ions formed as a result of electron impact ionization of the residual gas molecules.

  20. Bulk Cutting of Carbon Nanotubes Using Electron Beam Irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegler, Kirk J. (Inventor); Rauwald, Urs (Inventor); Hauge, Robert H. (Inventor); Schmidt, Howard K. (Inventor); Smalley, Richard E. (Inventor); Kittrell, W. Carter (Inventor); Gu, Zhenning (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    According to some embodiments, the present invention provides a method for attaining short carbon nanotubes utilizing electron beam irradiation, for example, of a carbon nanotube sample. The sample may be pretreated, for example by oxonation. The pretreatment may introduce defects to the sidewalls of the nanotubes. The method is shown to produces nanotubes with a distribution of lengths, with the majority of lengths shorter than 100 tun. Further, the median length of the nanotubes is between about 20 nm and about 100 nm.