WorldWideScience

Sample records for carbon nanotube-polymer composites

  1. Carbon nanotube-polymer composite actuators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gennett, Thomas; Raffaelle, Ryne P.; Landi, Brian J.; Heben, Michael J.

    2008-04-22

    The present invention discloses a carbon nanotube (SWNT)-polymer composite actuator and method to make such actuator. A series of uniform composites was prepared by dispersing purified single wall nanotubes with varying weight percents into a polymer matrix, followed by solution casting. The resulting nanotube-polymer composite was then successfully used to form a nanotube polymer actuator.

  2. Carbon nanotube-polymer composites manufacture, properties, and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Grady, Brian P

    2011-01-01

    The accessible compendium of polymers in carbon nanotubes (CNTs) Carbon nanotubes (CNTs)-extremely thin tubes only a few nanometers in diameter but able to attain lengths thousands of times greater-are prime candidates for use in the development of polymer composite materials. Bringing together thousands of disparate research works, Carbon Nanotube-Polymer Composites: Manufacture, Properties, and Applications covers CNT-polymers from synthesis to potential applications, presenting the basic science and engineering of this dynamic and complex area in an accessible, readable way. Desi

  3. Release characteristics of selected carbon nanotube polymer composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) are commonly used in polymer formulations to improve strength, conductivity, and other attributes. A developing concern is the potential for carbon nanotube polymer nanocomposites to release nanoparticles into the environment as the polymer ...

  4. Mechanical properties of carbon nanotube/polymer composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arash, B.; Wang, Q.; Varadan, V. K.

    2014-10-01

    The remarkable mechanical properties of carbon nanotubes, such as high elastic modulus and tensile strength, make them the most ideal and promising reinforcements in substantially enhancing the mechanical properties of resulting polymer/carbon nanotube composites. It is acknowledged that the mechanical properties of the composites are significantly influenced by interfacial interactions between nanotubes and polymer matrices. The current challenge of the application of nanotubes in the composites is hence to determine the mechanical properties of the interfacial region, which is critical for improving and manufacturing the nanocomposites. In this work, a new method for evaluating the elastic properties of the interfacial region is developed by examining the fracture behavior of carbon nanotube reinforced poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) matrix composites under tension using molecular dynamics simulations. The effects of the aspect ratio of carbon nanotube reinforcements on the elastic properties, i.e. Young's modulus and yield strength, of the interfacial region and the nanotube/polymer composites are investigated. The feasibility of a three-phase micromechanical model in predicting the elastic properties of the nanocomposites is also developed based on the understanding of the interfacial region.

  5. High Power Q-Switched Thulium Doped Fibre Laser using Carbon Nanotube Polymer Composite Saturable Absorber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernysheva, Maria; Mou, Chengbo; Arif, Raz; AlAraimi, Mohammed; Rümmeli, Mark; Turitsyn, Sergei; Rozhin, Aleksey

    2016-01-01

    We have proposed and demonstrated a Q-switched Thulium doped fibre laser (TDFL) with a 'Yin-Yang' all-fibre cavity scheme based on a combination of nonlinear optical loop mirror (NOLM) and nonlinear amplified loop mirror (NALM). Unidirectional lasing operation has been achieved without any intracavity isolator. By using a carbon nanotube polymer composite based saturable absorber (SA), we demonstrated the laser output power of ~197 mW and pulse energy of 1.7 μJ. To the best of our knowledge, this is the highest output power from a nanotube polymer composite SA based Q-switched Thulium doped fibre laser. PMID:27063511

  6. High Power Q-Switched Thulium Doped Fibre Laser using Carbon Nanotube Polymer Composite Saturable Absorber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernysheva, Maria; Mou, Chengbo; Arif, Raz; Alaraimi, Mohammed; Rümmeli, Mark; Turitsyn, Sergei; Rozhin, Aleksey

    2016-04-01

    We have proposed and demonstrated a Q-switched Thulium doped fibre laser (TDFL) with a ‘Yin-Yang’ all-fibre cavity scheme based on a combination of nonlinear optical loop mirror (NOLM) and nonlinear amplified loop mirror (NALM). Unidirectional lasing operation has been achieved without any intracavity isolator. By using a carbon nanotube polymer composite based saturable absorber (SA), we demonstrated the laser output power of ~197 mW and pulse energy of 1.7 μJ. To the best of our knowledge, this is the highest output power from a nanotube polymer composite SA based Q-switched Thulium doped fibre laser.

  7. Modeling of carbon nanotubes and carbon nanotube-polymer composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, G.; Kumar, S.

    2016-01-01

    In order to meet stringent environmental, safety and performance requirements from respective regulatory bodies, various technology-based industries are promoting the use of advanced carbon nanotube (CNT) reinforced lightweight and high strength polymer nanocomposites (PNCs) as a substitute to conventional materials both in structural and non-structural applications. The superior mechanical properties of PNCs made up of CNTs or bundles of CNTs can be attributed to the interfacial interaction between the CNTs and matrix, CNT's morphologies and to their uniform dispersion in the matrix. In PNCs, CNTs physically bond with polymeric matrix at a level where the assumption of continuum level interactions is not applicable. Modeling and prediction of mechanical response and failure behavior of CNTs and their composites becomes a complex task and is dealt with the help of up-scale modeling strategies involving multiple spatial and temporal scales in hierarchical or concurrent manner. Firstly, the article offers an insight into various modeling techniques in studying the mechanical response of CNTs; namely, equivalent continuum approach, quasi-continuum approach and molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. In the subsequent steps, these approaches are combined with analytical and numerical micromechanics models in a multiscale framework to predict the average macroscopic response of PNCs. The review also discusses the implementation aspects of these computational approaches, their current status and associated challenges with a future outlook.

  8. Mechanical properties of carbon nanotube/polymer composites

    OpenAIRE

    B. Arash; Wang, Q.(The University of Kansas, Lawrence, USA); Varadan, V. K.

    2014-01-01

    The remarkable mechanical properties of carbon nanotubes, such as high elastic modulus and tensile strength, make them the most ideal and promising reinforcements in substantially enhancing the mechanical properties of resulting polymer/carbon nanotube composites. It is acknowledged that the mechanical properties of the composites are significantly influenced by interfacial interactions between nanotubes and polymer matrices. The current challenge of the application of nanotubes in the compos...

  9. Carbon Nanotubes - Polymer Composites with Enhanced Conductivity using Functionalized Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramasubramaniam, Rajagopal; Chen, Jian; Gupta, Rishi

    2003-03-01

    Individual carbon nanotubes show superior electrical, mechanical and thermal properties [1]. Composite materials using carbon nanotubes as fillers are predicted to show similar superior properties. However, realization of such composites has been plagued by poor dispersion of carbon nanotubes in solvents and in polymer matrices. We have developed a method to homogenously disperse carbon nanotubes in polymer matrices using functionalized nanotubes [2]. Thin films of functionalized single walled nanotubes (SWNT) - polystyrene composites and functionalized SWNT - polycarbonate composites were prepared using solution evaporation and spin coating. Both of the composites show several orders of magnitude increase in conductivity for less than 1 wt thresholds of the composites are less than 0.2 wt nanotubes. We attribute the enhanced conduction to the superior dispersion of the functionalized nanotubes in the polymer matrix and to the reduced nanotube waviness resulting from the rigid backbone of the conjugated polymer. References: [1]. R. H. Baughman, A. A. Zakhidov and W. A. de Heer, Science v297, p787 (2002); [2]. J. Chen, H. Liu, W. A. Weimer, M. D. Halls, D. H. Waldeck and G. C. Walker, J. Am. Chem. Soc. v124, p9034 (2002).

  10. Functionalized Carbon Nanotube-Polymer Composites and Interactions with Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrera, Enrique V. (Inventor); Wilkins, Richard (Inventor); Shofner, Meisha (Inventor); Pulikkathara, Merlyn X. (Inventor); Vaidyanathan, Ranjii (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    The present invention involves the interaction of radiation with functionalized carbon nanotubes that have been incorporated into various host materials, particularly polymeric ones. The present invention is directed to chemistries, methods, and apparatuses which exploit this type of radiation interaction, and to the materials which result from such interactions. The present invention is also directed toward the time dependent behavior of functionalized carbon nanotubes in such composite systems.

  11. Recent advances in research on carbon nanotube-polymer composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Michele T; Gun'ko, Yurii K

    2010-04-18

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) demonstrate remarkable electrical, thermal, and mechanical properties, which allow a number of exciting potential applications. In this article, we review the most recent progress in research on the development of CNT-polymer composites, with particular attention to their mechanical and electrical (conductive) properties. Various functionalization and fabrication approaches and their role in the preparation of CNT-polymer composites with improved mechanical and electrical properties are discussed. We tabulate the most recent values of Young's modulus and electrical conductivities for various CNT-polymer composites and compare the effectiveness of different processing techniques. Finally, we give a future outlook for the development of CNT-polymer composites as potential alternative materials for various applications, including flexible electrodes in displays, electronic paper, antistatic coatings, bullet-proof vests, protective clothing, and high-performance composites for aircraft and automotive industries. PMID:20496401

  12. An exceptional bimorph effect and a low quality factor from carbon nanotube-polymer composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Microcantilever actuators made from carbon nanotube polymer are driven at very low pull-in voltages and the thermal bimorph effect reaches 325 μm at 26-110 deg. C, much greater than the values for existing devices

  13. Electro-mechanical modeling of the piezoresistive response of carbon nanotube polymer composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, S.; Rezvanian, O.; Zikry, M. A.

    2013-05-01

    A coupled electro-mechanical FE approach was developed to investigate the piezoresistive response of carbon nanotube polymer composites. Gauge factors (GFs) and resistance variations of CNT-polymer composite systems were obtained by coupling Maxwell equations to mechanical loads and deformations through initial piezoresistive coefficients of the CNTs, the epoxy, and the tunnel regions, for different arrangements, percolated paths, tunnel distances, and tensile, compressive, and bending loading conditions. A scaling relation between GFs and applied strains was obtained to understand how variations in loading conditions and CNT arrangements affect sensing capabilities and piezoresistive carbon nanotube polymer composite behavior. These variations in GFs were then used to understand how the coupled strains, stresses and current densities vary for aligned and percolated paths for the different loading conditions, CNT arrangements, and tunnel distances. For the percolated path under tensile loading conditions, elastic strains as high as 16% and electrical conductivities that were four orders in magnitude greater than the initial matrix conductivity were obtained. Results for the three loading conditions clearly demonstrate that electrical conductivity and sensing capabilities can be optimized as a function of percolation paths, tunneling distance, orientation, and loading conditions for piezoresistive applications with large elastic strains and conductivities.

  14. Electro-mechanical modeling of the piezoresistive response of carbon nanotube polymer composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A coupled electro-mechanical FE approach was developed to investigate the piezoresistive response of carbon nanotube polymer composites. Gauge factors (GFs) and resistance variations of CNT–polymer composite systems were obtained by coupling Maxwell equations to mechanical loads and deformations through initial piezoresistive coefficients of the CNTs, the epoxy, and the tunnel regions, for different arrangements, percolated paths, tunnel distances, and tensile, compressive, and bending loading conditions. A scaling relation between GFs and applied strains was obtained to understand how variations in loading conditions and CNT arrangements affect sensing capabilities and piezoresistive carbon nanotube polymer composite behavior. These variations in GFs were then used to understand how the coupled strains, stresses and current densities vary for aligned and percolated paths for the different loading conditions, CNT arrangements, and tunnel distances. For the percolated path under tensile loading conditions, elastic strains as high as 16% and electrical conductivities that were four orders in magnitude greater than the initial matrix conductivity were obtained. Results for the three loading conditions clearly demonstrate that electrical conductivity and sensing capabilities can be optimized as a function of percolation paths, tunneling distance, orientation, and loading conditions for piezoresistive applications with large elastic strains and conductivities. (paper)

  15. Analysis of DC Electrical Conductivity Models of Carbon Nanotube-Polymer Composites with Potential Application to Nanometric Electronic Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Vargas-Bernal

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The design of nanometric electronic devices requires novel materials for improving their electrical performance from stages of design until their fabrication. Until now, several DC electrical conductivity models for composite materials have been proposed. However, these models must be valued to identify main design parameters that more efficiently control the electrical properties of the materials to be developed. In this paper, four different models used for modeling DC electrical conductivity of carbon nanotube-polymer composites are studied with the aim of obtaining a complete list of design parameters that allow guarantying to the designer an increase in electrical properties of the composite by means of carbon nanotubes.

  16. Computational modeling of elastic properties of carbon nanotube/polymer composites with interphase regions. Part II: Mechanical modeling

    KAUST Repository

    Han, Fei

    2014-01-01

    We present two modeling approaches for predicting the macroscopic elastic properties of carbon nanotubes/polymer composites with thick interphase regions at the nanotube/matrix frontier. The first model is based on local continuum mechanics; the second one is based on hybrid local/non-local continuum mechanics. The key computational issues, including the peculiar homogenization technique and treatment of periodical boundary conditions in the non-local continuum model, are clarified. Both models are implemented through a three-dimensional geometric representation of the carbon nanotubes network, which has been detailed in Part I. Numerical results are shown and compared for both models in order to test convergence and sensitivity toward input parameters. It is found that both approaches provide similar results in terms of homogenized quantities but locally can lead to very different microscopic fields. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Thermal Expansion and Diffusion Coefficients of Carbon Nanotube-Polymer Composites

    OpenAIRE

    Wei, Chenyu; Srivastava, Deepak; Cho, Kyeongjae

    2002-01-01

    Classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations employing Brenner potential for intra-nanotube interactions and Van der Waals forces for polymer-nanotube interfaces are used to invetigate the thermal expansion and diffusion characteristics of carbon nanotube-polyethylene composites. Additions of carbon nanotubes to polymer matrix are found to increase the glass transition temperature Tg, and thermal expansion and diffusion coefficients in the composite above Tg. These findings could have implic...

  18. Method of Making an Electroactive Sensing/Actuating Material for Carbon Nanotube Polymer Composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ounaies, Zoubeida (Inventor); Park, Cheol (Inventor); Harrison, Joycelyn S. (Inventor); Holloway, Nancy M. (Inventor); Draughon, Gregory K. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    An electroactive sensing or actuating material comprises a composite made from a polymer with polarizable moieties and an effective amount of carbon nanotubes incorporated in the polymer for a predetermined electromechanical operation of the composite when such composite is affected by an external stimulus. In another embodiment, the composite comprises a, third component of micro -sized to nano-sized particles of an electroactive ceramic that is also incorporated in the polymer matrix. The method for making the three-phase composite comprises either incorporating the carbon nanotubes in the polymer matrix before incorporation of the particles of ceramic or mixing the carbon nanotubes and particles of ceramic together in a solution before incorporation in the polymer matrix.

  19. Sensing/actuating materials made from carbon nanotube polymer composites and methods for making same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ounaies, Zoubeida (Inventor); Park, Cheol (Inventor); Harrison, Joycelyn S. (Inventor); Holloway, Nancy M. (Inventor); Draughon, Gregory K. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    An electroactive sensing or actuating material comprises a composite made from a polymer with polarizable moieties and an effective amount of carbon nanotubes incorporated in the polymer for a predetermined electromechanical operation of the composite when such composite is affected by an external stimulus. In another embodiment, the composite comprises a third component of micro-sized to nano-sized particles of an electroactive ceramic that is also incorporated in the polymer matrix. The method for making the three-phase composite comprises either incorporating the carbon nanotubes in the polymer matrix before incorporation of the particles of ceramic or mixing the carbon nanotubes and particles of ceramic together in a solution before incorporation in the polymer matrix.

  20. Thermal Expansion and Diffusion Coefficients of Carbon Nanotube-Polymer Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Chengyu; Srivastava, Deepak; Cho, Kyeongjae; Biegel, Bryan (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations employing Brenner potential for intra-nanotube interactions and van der Waals forces for polymer-nanotube interface have been used to investigate thermal expansion and diffusion characteristics of carbon nanotube-polyethylene composites. Addition of carbon nanotubes to polymer matrix is found to significantly increase the glass transition temperature Tg, and thermal expansion and diffusion coefficients in the composite above Tg. The increase has been attributed to the temperature dependent increase of the excluded volume for the polymer chains, and the findings could have implications in the composite processing, coating and painting applications.

  1. The effect of molecular mobility on electronic transport in carbon nanotube-polymer composites and networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A multiscale modeling approach to the prediction of electrical conductivity in carbon nanotube (CNT)–polymer composite materials is developed, which takes into account thermally activated molecular mobility of the matrix and the CNTs. On molecular level, a tight-binding density functional theory and non-equilibrium Green's function method are used to calculate the static electron transmission function in the contact between two metallic carbon nanotubes that corresponds to electron transport at 0 K. For higher temperatures, the statistical distribution of effective contact resistances is considered that originates from thermal fluctuations of intermolecular distances caused by molecular mobility of carbon nanotube and the polymer matrix. Based on this distribution and using effective medium theory, the temperature dependence of macroscopic electrical resistivity for CNT-polymer composites and CNT mats is calculated. The predicted data indicate that the electrical conductivity of the CNT-polymer composites increases linearly with temperature above 50 K, which is in a quantitative agreement with the experiments. Our model predicts a slight nonlinearity in temperature dependence of electric conductivity at low temperatures for percolated composites with small CNT loading. The model also explains the effect of glass transition and other molecular relaxation processes in the polymer matrix on the composite electrical conductivity. The developed multiscale approach integrates the atomistic charge transport mechanisms in percolated CNT-polymer composites with the macroscopic response and thus enables direct comparison of the prediction with the measurements of macroscopic material properties

  2. Multi-walled carbon nanotubes/polymer composites in absence and presence of acrylic elastomer (ACM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, S; Rath, T; Mahaling, R N; Mukherjee, M; Khatua, B B; Das, C K

    2009-05-01

    Polyetherimide/Multiwall carbon nanotube (MWNTs) nanocomposites containing as-received and modified (COOH-MWNT) carbon nanotubes were prepared through melt process in extruder and then compression molded. Thermal properties of the composites were characterized by thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA). Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) images showed that the MWNTs were well dispersed and formed an intimate contact with the polymer matrix without any agglomeration. However the incorporation of modified carbon nanotubes formed fascinating, highly crosslinked, and compact network structure throughout the polymer matrix. This showed the increased adhesion of PEI with modified MWNTs. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) also showed high degree of dispersion of modified MWNTs along with broken ends. Dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) results showed a marginal increase in storage modulus (E') and glass transition temperature (T(g)) with the addition of MWNTs. Increase in tensile strength and impact strength of composites confirmed the use the MWNTs as possible reinforcement agent. Both thermal and electrical conductivity of composites increased, but effect is more pronounced on modification due to formation of network of carbon nanotubes. Addition of acrylic elastomer to developed PEI/MWNTs (modified) nanocomposites resulted in the further increase in thermal and electrical properties due to the formation of additional bond between MWNTs and acrylic elastomers at the interface. All the results presented are well corroborated by SEM and FESEM studies. PMID:19452959

  3. Microcontact printing for patterning carbon nanotube/polymer composite films with electrical conductivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogihara, Hitoshi; Kibayashi, Hiro; Saji, Tetsuo

    2012-09-26

    Patterned carbon nanotube (CNT)/acrylic resin composite films were prepared using microcontact printing (μCP). To prepare ink for μCP, CNTs were dispersed into propylene glycol monomethyl ether acetate (PGMEA) solution in which acrylic resin and a commercially available dispersant (Disperbyk-2001) dissolved. The resulting ink were spin-coated onto poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) stamps. By drying solvent components from the ink, CNT/polymer composite films were prepared over PDMS stamps. Contact between the stamps and glass substrates provided CNT/polymer composite patternings on the substrates. The transfer behavior of the CNT/polymer composite films depended on the thermal-treatment temperature during μCP; thermal treatment at temperatures near the glass-transition temperature (T(g)) of the acrylic resin was effective to form uniform patternings on substrates. Moreover, contact area between polymer and substrates also affect the transfer behavior. The CNT/polymer composite films showed high electrical conductivity, despite the nonconductivity of polymer components, because CNTs in the films were interconnected. The electrical conductivity of the composite films increased as CNT content in the film became higher; as a result, the composite patternings showed almost as high electrical conductivity as previously reported CNT/polymer bulk composites. PMID:22900673

  4. Molecular dynamics simulation of diffusion of gases in a carbon-nanotube-polymer composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Extensive molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were carried out to compute the solubilities and self-diffusivities of CO2 and CH4 in amorphous polyetherimide (PEI) and mixed-matrix PEI generated by inserting single-walled carbon nanotubes into the polymer. Atomistic models of PEI and its composites were generated using energy minimizations, MD simulations, and the polymer-consistent force field. Two types of polymer composite were generated by inserting (7,0) and (12,0) zigzag carbon nanotubes into the PEI structure. The morphologies of PEI and its composites were characterized by their densities, radial distribution functions, and the accessible free volumes, which were computed with probe molecules of different sizes. The distributions of the cavity volumes were computed using the Voronoi tessellation method. The computed self-diffusivities of the gases in the polymer composites are much larger than those in pure PEI. We find, however, that the increase is not due to diffusion of the gases through the nanotubes which have smooth energy surfaces and, therefore, provide fast transport paths. Instead, the MD simulations indicate a squeezing effect of the nanotubes on the polymer matrix that changes the composite polymers' free-volume distributions and makes them more sharply peaked. The presence of nanotubes also creates several cavities with large volumes that give rise to larger diffusivities in the polymer composites. This effect is due to the repulsive interactions between the polymer and the nanotubes. The solubilities of the gases in the polymer composites are also larger than those in pure PEI, hence indicating larger gas permeabilities for mixed-matrix PEI than PEI itself

  5. High-Performance Carbon Nanotube/Polymer Composite Fiber from Layer-by-Layer Deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Min Le; Chen, Yun; Zhang, Liang; Zhan, Hang; Qiang, Lei; Wang, Jian Nong

    2016-03-30

    So far, preparation of high-performance carbon nanotube (CNT)/polymer composites still faces big challenges mainly due to the limited control of CNT dispersion, fraction, and alignment in polymers. Here, a new "layer-by-layer deposition" method is put forward for preparing CNT/polymer composite fibers using poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) as an exemplary polymer. This is based on the continuous production of a hollow cylindrical CNT assembly from a high temperature reactor and its shrinking by a PVA-containing solution and deposition on a removable substrate wire. The in situ mixing of the two composite components at the molecular level allows CNTs to disperse and PVA to infiltrate into the fiber efficiently. As a result, remarkable effects of the CNT reinforcement on the PVA matrix are observed, including a strength improvement from ∼50 to 1255 MPa and electrical conductivity from ∼0 to 1948 S cm(-1). The new method offers good controllability of CNT dispersion and fraction in the polymer matrix, variability for making composite fibers using different polymers, and suitability for scaled up production. This study thus provides a new research direction for preparing CNT-reinforced composites and future performance maximization. PMID:26959406

  6. Full factorial design analysis of carbon nanotube polymer-cement composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fábio de Paiva Cota

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The work described in this paper is related to the effect of adding carbon nanotubes (CNT on the mechanical properties of polymer-cement composites. A full factorial design has been performed on 160 samples to identify the contribution provided by the following factors: polymeric phase addition, CNT weight addition and water/cement ratio. The response parameters of the full factorial design were the bulk density, apparent porosity, compressive strength and elastic modulus of the polymer-cement-based nanocomposites. All the factors considered in this analysis affected significantly the bulk density and apparent porosity of the composites. The compressive strength and elastic modulus were affected primarily by the cross-interactions between polymeric phase and CNT additions, and the water/cement ratio with polymeric phase factors.

  7. Aligned Single Wall Carbon Nanotube Polymer Composites Using an Electric Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Cheol; Wiklinson, John; Banda, Sumanth; Ounaies, Zoubeida; Wise, Kristopher E.; Sauti, Godfrey; Lillehei, Peter T.; Harrison, Joycelyn S.

    2005-01-01

    While high shear alignment has been shown to improve the mechanical properties of single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNT)-polymer composites, it is difficult to control and often results in degradation of the electrical and dielectric properties of the composite. Here, we report a novel method to actively align SWNTs in a polymer matrix, which allows for control over the degree of alignment of SWNTs without the side effects of shear alignment. In this process, SWNTs are aligned via field-induced dipolar interactions among the nanotubes under an AC electric field in a liquid matrix followed by immobilization by photopolymerization while maintaining the electric field. Alignment of SWNTs was controlled as a function of magnitude, frequency, and application time of the applied electric field. The degree of SWNT alignment was assessed using optical microscopy and polarized Raman spectroscopy and the morphology of the aligned nanocomposites was investigated by high resolution scanning electron microscopy. The structure of the field induced aligned SWNTs is intrinsically different from that of shear aligned SWNTs. In the present work, SWNTs are not only aligned along the field, but also migrate laterally to form thick, aligned SWNT percolative columns between the electrodes. The actively aligned SWNTs amplify the electrical and dielectric properties in addition to improving the mechanical properties of the composite. All of these properties of the aligned nanocomposites exhibited anisotropic characteristics, which were controllable by tuning the applied field conditions.

  8. Effective mobility and photocurrent in carbon nanotube-polymer composite photovoltaic cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We examine the dark and the illuminated current-voltage (J-V) characteristics of poly(3-octylthiophene) (P3OT)/single-wall carbon nanotube (SWNT) composite photovoltaic cells as a function of SWNT concentration. Using an exponential band tail model, the influence of SWNT concentration on the J-V characteristics of the cells is analysed in terms of corresponding parameters such as effective hole mobility, short-circuit current, and open-circuit voltage. For the device with optimum 1% SWNT concentration, the increased photoresponse (∼500 times) as compared to the pristine P3OT cell can be attributed partly to the increase (∼50 times) in effective hole mobility, due to the reduction of localized states of the pristine P3OT matrix, and partly to the enhanced exciton extraction at the polymer/nanotube junctions

  9. Radar absorbing properties of carbon nanotubes/polymer composites in the V-band

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    E A ZAKHARYCHEV; E N RAZOV; YU D SEMCHIKOV; N S ZAKHARYCHEVA; M A KABINA; L I BAKINA; V L ZEFIROV

    2016-04-01

    This research is devoted to the study of radar absorbing properties of the composites, based on the epoxy binder and carbon nanotubes (CNT) in the frequency range of 52–73 GHz. Three species of unmodified multi-walledCNT differing in length and diameter were investigated as fillers. The reflection coefficients (Krefl) at the radar absorbing material (RAM)–air interface and the electro-magnetic radiation (EMR) absorption coefficients (Kabs) in the materials with the different content of nanotubes were measured (Krefl and Kabs were calculated using the highest (the worst) value of the voltage standing-wave ratio (VSWR) in the frequency range of 52–73 GHz). It was established that the increase in nanotubes aspect ratio (a ratio of CNT length to its diameter) leads to Kabs rising for polymer composites. Also, CNT diameter decrease leads to Krefl reduction. CNT of 8–15 nm in diameter and more than 2 $\\mu$m in length are the most effective from all investigated fillers. The reflection loss values were calculated and CNT optimal concentrations were obtained at different thickness of RAMs.

  10. Scalable fabrication of multifunctional freestanding carbon nanotube/polymer composite thin films for energy conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaokai; Gittleson, Forrest; Carmo, Marcelo; Sekol, Ryan C; Taylor, André D

    2012-02-28

    Translating the unique properties of individual single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) to the macroscale while simultaneously incorporating additional functionalities into composites has been stymied by inadequate assembly methods. Here we describe a technique for developing multifunctional SWNT/polymer composite thin films that provides a fundamental engineering basis to bridge the gap between their nano- and macroscale properties. Selected polymers are infiltrated into a Mayer rod coated conductive SWNT network to fabricate solar cell transparent conductive electrodes (TCEs), fuel cell membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs), and lithium ion battery electrodes. Our TCEs have an outstanding optoelectronic figure of merit σ(dc)/σ(ac) of 19.4 and roughness of 3.8 nm yet are also mechanically robust enough to withstand delamination, a step toward scratch resistance necessary for flexible electronics. Our MEAs show platinum utilization as high as 1550 mW/mg(Pt), demonstrating our technique's ability to integrate ionic conductivity of the polymer with electrical conductivity of the SWNTs at the Pt surface. Our battery anodes, which show reversible capacity of ∼850 mAh/g after 15 cycles, demonstrate the integration of electrode and separator to simplify device architecture and decrease overall weight. Each of these applications demonstrates our technique's ability to maintain the conductivity of SWNT networks and their dispersion within a polymer matrix while concurrently optimizing key complementary properties of the composite. Here, we lay the foundation for the assembly of nanotubes and nanostructured components (rods, wires, particles, etc.) into macroscopic multifunctional materials using a low-cost and scalable solution-based processing technique. PMID:22236330

  11. Carbon nanotube/polymer composite electrodes for flexible, attachable electrochemical DNA sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jianfeng; Lee, Eun-Cheol

    2015-09-15

    All-solution-processed, easily-made, flexible multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT)/polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS)-based electrodes were fabricated and used for electrochemical DNA sensors. These electrodes could serve as a recognition layer for DNA, without any surface modification, through π-π interactions between the MWCNTs and DNA, greatly simplifying the fabrication process for DNA sensors. The electrodes were directly connected to an electrochemical analyzer in the differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) and cyclic voltammetry (CV) measurements, where methylene blue was used as a redox indicator. Since neither functional groups nor probe DNA were immobilized on the surfaces of the electrodes, the sensor can be easily regenerated by washing these electrodes with water. The limit of detection was found to be 1.3 × 10(2)pM (S/N=3), with good DNA sequence differentiation ability. Fast fabrication of a DNA sensor was also achieved by cutting and attaching the MWCNT-PDMS composite electrodes at an analyte solution-containable region. Our results pave the way for developing user-fabricated easily attached DNA sensors at low costs. PMID:25950937

  12. Inkjet printing of multi-walled carbon nanotube/polymer composite thin film for interconnection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lok, Boon Keng; Ng, You Min; Liang, Yen Nan; Hu, Xiao

    2010-07-01

    In this paper, multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) ink was selectively patterned by inkjet printing on substrates to form conductive traces and electrodes for interconnection application. MWCNT was firstly functionalized using concentrated acid and dispersed in deionized water to form a colloidal solution. Various concentrations of MWCNT were formulated to test the stability of the solution. The printability of the MWCNT ink was examined against printing temperature, ink concentration and ink droplet pitch. Rheological properties of the ink were determined by rheometer and sessile drop method. The electrical conductivity of the MWCNT pattern was measured against multiple printing of MWCNT on the same pattern (up to 10 layers). While single layer printing pattern exhibited highest resistance, the CNT entangled together and formed a random network with more printed layers has higher conductivity. The electrical properties of the printed film was compared to a composite ink of CNT and conducting polymer (CNT ink was mixed with conductive polymer solution, Poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)-Poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS)). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to observe the surface structure and atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to study the morphology of the printed film under different conditions. PMID:21128484

  13. Development of a Taste Sensor Based on a Carbon Nanotube-Polymer Composite Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirata, Takamichi; Takagi, Keisuke; Akiya, Masahiro

    2007-04-01

    A taste sensor consisting of a back-gate type field effect transistor (FET) chip based on carbon nanotube compound materials [poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG)-grafted single-walled carbon nanotubes (PEG-SWNTs)] was developed. The results of impedance measurements for five tastes (sourness, saltiness, bitterness, sweetness, and umami), are shown much difference for specific tastes which are difficult to identify by using Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) film. Moreover, the sensor is able to distinguish most of the experimental taste materials with a short response time (˜60 s).

  14. Real time macrophage migration analysis and associated pro-inflammatory cytokine release on transparent carbon nanotube/polymer composite nano-film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khang, Dongwoo

    2015-08-01

    Surface chemistry and nanoscale surface morphology are both influential factors for cell adhesion, growth, and differentiation. In particular, cell migration is one of the major markers of initial immune response activation to implanted biomaterials. Despite their indication, it has been difficult to directly examine macrophages on nanoscale materials, because most nanomaterials possess greater thicknesses than nanoscale. This study developed transparent films comprising a carbon nanotube and polymer composite with controlled surface stiffness and nanoscale roughness. As nanoscale surface topography can incite immune cell activation, analysis of the real-time cell migration (including velocity) of macrophages due to changes in nanoscale surface topography of a biopolymer can support the direct relationship between initial macrophage dynamics and corresponding pro-inflammatory responses. Through real-time analysis, we have identified that surface chemistry and surface nanoscale topography are both independent factors mediating macrophage interactions, and, thus, immune cell behavior can be further controlled by the systematic variation of nanoscale surface topography for a given surface chemistry. Considering that the initial immune response can determine the fate and lifetime of implanted biomaterials, this study presents the direct relationship between initial macrophage dynamics and subsequent inflammatory cytokine release on transparent carbon nanotube polymer composites.

  15. Nano-structural characteristics of carbon nanotube-polymer composite films for high-amplitude optoacoustic generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baac, Hyoung Won; Ok, Jong G.; Lee, Taehwa; Jay Guo, L.

    2015-08-01

    We demonstrate nano-structural characteristics of carbon nanotube (CNT)-polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) composite films that can be used as highly efficient and robust ultrasound transmitters for diagnostic and therapeutic applications. An inherent architecture of the nano-composite provides unique thermal, optical, and mechanical properties that are accommodated not just for efficient energy conversion but also for extraordinary robustness against pulsed laser ablation. First, we explain a thermoacoustic transfer mechanism within the nano-composite. CNT morphologies are examined to determine a suitable arrangement for heat transfer to the surrounding PDMS. Next, we introduce an approach to enhance optical extinction of the composite films, which uses shadowed deposition of a thin Au layer through an as-grown CNT network. Finally, the transmitter robustness is quantified in terms of laser-induced damage threshold. This reveals that the CNT-PDMS films can withstand an order-of-magnitude higher optical fluence (and extinction) than a Cr film used as a reference. Such robustness is crucial to increase the maximum-available optical energy for optoacoustic excitation and pressure generation. All of these structure-originated characteristics manifest the CNT-PDMS composite films as excellent optoacoustic transmitters for high-amplitude and high-frequency ultrasound generation.

  16. Development of a flexible three-axis tactile sensor based on screen-printed carbon nanotube-polymer composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A flexible, three-axis carbon nanotube (CNT)–polymer composite-based tactile sensor is presented. The proposed sensor consists of a flexible substrate, four sensing cells, and a bump structure. A CNT–polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) composite is produced by a solvent evaporation method, and thus, the CNTs are well-dispersed within the PDMS matrix. The composite is directly patterned onto a flexible substrate using a screen printing technique to fabricate a sensor with four sensing cells. When a force is applied on the bump, the magnitude and direction of force could be detected by comparing the changes in electrical resistance of each sensing cell caused by the piezoresistive effect of the composite. The experimentally verified sensing characteristics of the fabricated sensor exhibit a linear relationship between the resistance change and the applied force, and the measured sensitivities of the sensor for the normal and shear forces are 6.67 and 86.7%/N for forces up to 2.0 and 0.5 N, respectively. Experiments to verify the load-sensing repeatability show a maximum 2.00% deviation of the resistance change within the tested force range. (paper)

  17. Carbon nanotube-polymer nanocomposite infrared sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradhan, Basudev; Setyowati, Kristina; Liu, Haiying; Waldeck, David H; Chen, Jian

    2008-04-01

    The infrared photoresponse in the electrical conductivity of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) is dramatically enhanced by embedding SWNTs in an electrically and thermally insulating polymer matrix. The conductivity change in a 5 wt % SWNT-polycarbonate nanocomposite is significant (4.26%) and sharp upon infrared illumination in the air at room temperature. While the thermal effect predominates in the infrared photoresponse of a pure SWNT film, the photoeffect predominates in the infrared photoresponse of SWNT-polycarbonate nanocomposites. PMID:18333623

  18. Molecular level computational studies of polyethylene and polyacrylonitrile composites containing single walled carbon nanotubes: effect of carboxylic acid functionalization on nanotube-polymer interfacial properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haghighatpanah, Shayesteh; Bohlén, Martin; Bolton, Kim

    2014-01-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) and molecular mechanics (MM) methods have been used to investigate additive-polymer interfacial properties in single walled carbon nanotube (SWNT)—polyethylene and SWNT—polyacrylonitrile composites. Properties such as the interfacial shear stress and bonding energy are similar for the two composites. In contrast, functionalizing the SWNT with carboxylic acid groups leads to an increase in these properties, with a larger increase for the polar polyacrylonitrile composite. Increasing the percentage of carbon atoms that were functionalized from 1 to 5% also leads to an increase in the interfacial properties. In addition, the interfacial properties depend on the location of the functional groups on the SWNT wall. PMID:25229056

  19. Computational modeling of elastic properties of carbon nanotube/polymer composites with interphase regions. Part I: Micro-structural characterization and geometric modeling

    KAUST Repository

    Han, Fei

    2014-01-01

    A computational strategy to predict the elastic properties of carbon nanotube-reinforced polymer composites is proposed in this two-part paper. In Part I, the micro-structural characteristics of these nano-composites are discerned. These characteristics include networks/agglomerations of carbon nanotubes and thick polymer interphase regions between the nanotubes and the surrounding matrix. An algorithm is presented to construct three-dimensional geometric models with large amounts of randomly dispersed and aggregated nanotubes. The effects of the distribution of the nanotubes and the thickness of the interphase regions on the concentration of the interphase regions are demonstrated with numerical results. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Study on Preparation and Resistivity-strain Dependence of Carbon Nanotube/polymer Composite Thin Films%碳纳米管/聚合物复合材料薄膜制备及其压阻特性研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋晓辉; 岳鹏飞; 王孟平; 赵兰普

    2012-01-01

    A carbon nanotube/polymer conductive composite material has been fabricated by vacuum filtration and flexible transfer methods. The vacuum filtration method was utilized to obtain carbon nanotube networks with controllable density and thickness, and then the networks were transferred to polymer to form composite layers. Resistivity-strain dependence of these thin films with different initial volume of dilute suspension filtered through the membrane was measured. The results show that the thin films with thinner CNTs networks exhibit weaker resistance-strain sensitivity under the same stain and the strain sensing material shows resistance-strain sensitivity depending only on the initial CNTs suspension volume. While as the initial volume decrease to a value, the sensitivity will increase dramatically. It is indicated that the resistivity-strain sensitivity of the CNT/PDMS composite thin film is controllable, which can be used for strain sensing and conductive layers.%基于真空过滤方法获得均匀的不同厚度碳纳米管薄膜,通过与聚合物基体的润湿固化转移碳纳米管薄膜制备压阻敏感度可控的复合材料薄膜.并研究了该薄膜的压阻特性.结果表明薄膜的压阻敏感度随着初始碳纳米管悬浮液体积的减小而降低,当体积减小到一定程度时,薄膜压阻敏感度反而增加,但是线性范围减小.碳纳米管/聚合物复合材料的这种压阻特性,一方面了说明了碳纳米管与聚合物复合材料薄膜压阻效应的可控性;另一方面,也表明了通过调节压阻敏感度,该复合材料既可用作应变传感,又可以用作对变形不敏感的导电薄膜.

  1. Strain Sensors Based on Carbon Nanotube - Polymer Coatings

    OpenAIRE

    Grabowski, Krzysztof; Zbyrad, Paulina; Wilmański, Alan; Uhl, Tadeusz

    2014-01-01

    In this work there have been investigated the potential usage of the CNT's as strain sensors for the structural health monitoring based on the spray coatings. Experimental work was performed on the metal and glass-reinforced composites. Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes (MWCNTs) were mixed with different matrix materials (acrylic and epoxy) and then applied to the test material with the use of two techniques (screen printing and spray coating). Futhermore, sensors were investigated using SEM. Resp...

  2. Synthesis of Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotube/Polymer Composite Latex%多壁碳纳米管/聚合物复合乳液的合成

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许民; 周春华; 丰瑛

    2012-01-01

    Multi-walled carbon nanotube/poly(styrene-butyl acrylate-acrylic acid) ( MWCNTs/P (St-BA-AA)) composite latex was synthesized using in-situ emulsion polymerization,and the best conditions of in-situ emulsion polymerization were found out with orthogonal texts. According to the analytic detection of Fourier transform infrared spectra, Raman spectra and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) ,it is shown that the surfaces of MWCNTs are grafted assuredly with P( St-BA-AA) chains by covalent bonds. SEM photos show that MWCNTs are coated with a layer of polymer and dispersed well in the emulsion of P( St-BA-AA). Dynamically mechanical analyzer (DMA) and mechanical property tests show that,compared with pure polymer films,the tanδ,the tensile strength, the elongation at break and the elastic modulus of the nanocomposite with 1.0 w% MWCNTs are increased by 51.7% ,52. 8% ,66.7% ,and 82.6% .respectively, and the tanδ still exceeds 0.5 in the high-temperature range.%采用原位乳液聚合法合成多壁碳纳米管/聚(苯乙烯-丙烯酸丁醋-丙烯酸)( MWCNTs/P( St - BA - AA))复合乳液,通过正交实验确定原位乳液聚合的最佳条件.经红外光谱、拉曼光谱和热重分析(TGA)测试,结果表明:通过共价键在MWCNTs表面成功引入P(St - BA - AA)共聚物长链.扫描电镜(SEM)观察显示MWCNTs的表面包覆有一层聚合物,并在复合乳液中均匀分散.动态力学分析仪(DMA)和力学性能测试结果表明当MWCNTs的加入质量分数为1.0%时,复合薄膜与纯聚合物薄膜相比,内耗、拉伸强度、断裂伸长率及弹性模量分别提高了51.7%、52.8%、66.7%及82.6%,在高温区tanδ仍大于0.5.

  3. Single Wall Carbon Nanotube-polymer Solar Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Sheila G.; Castro, Stephanie L.; Landi, Brian J.; Gennett, Thomas; Raffaelle, Ryne P.

    2005-01-01

    Investigation of single wall carbon nanotube (SWNT)-polymer solar cells has been conducted towards developing alternative lightweight, flexible devices for space power applications. Photovoltaic devices were constructed with regioregular poly(3-octylthiophene)-(P3OT) and purified, >95% w/w, laser-generated SWNTs. The P3OT composites were deposited on ITO-coated polyethylene terapthalate (PET) and I-V characterization was performed under simulated AM0 illumination. Fabricated devices for the 1.0% w/w SWNT-P3OT composites showed a photoresponse with an open-circuit voltage (V(sub oc)) of 0.98 V and a short-circuit current density (I(sub sc)) of 0.12 mA/sq cm. Optimization of carrier transport within these novel photovoltaic systems is proposed, specifically development of nanostructure-SWNT complexes to enhance exciton dissociation.

  4. Carbon nanotubes polymer nanoparticles inks for healthcare textile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Pratyush; Lee, Jungmin; Mathur, Gyanesh N.; Varadan, Vijay K.

    2012-10-01

    Healthcare textiles are ambient health monitoring systems that can contribute towards medical aid as well as general fitness of the populace. These are textile based products that have sensor systems mounted on them or are electrically functionalized to act as sensors. While embedded sensor chipsets and connection wires have been shown as working prototypes of this concept, there is a need for seamless integration of sensor technologies without hindering the inherent properties of the textile. Screen printing or stamping with electrically conductive inks have been demonstrated as technologies for fabricating electronics on flexible substrates. They are applicable to textile manufacturing as well. Printing technology allows for fabrication of nanocomposite based electronics elements in a bottom-up fashion. This has advantages such as low material consumption, high speed fabrication and low temperature processing. In this research, Multi-Wall Carbon Nanotubes (MWCNTs) and polyaniline nanoparticles (PANP) core shell based nanocomposites were synthesized and formulated into colloidal ink. Printed MWCNTs-PANP traces were electrically characterized and compared with traces made with those made by other composites such as Silver, and Carbon Black. The nanocomposite based inks are compared for proposed applications as sensor systems and conductive tracks on smart textile for pervasive wireless healthcare system that can be mass produced using low cost printing processes.

  5. Scalable fabrication of carbon nanotube/polymer nanocomposite membranes for high flux gas transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sangil; Jinschek, Joerg R; Chen, Haibin; Sholl, David S; Marand, Eva

    2007-09-01

    We present a simple, fast, and practical route to vertically align carbon nanotubes on a porous support using a combination of self-assembly and filtration methods. The advantage of this approach is that it can be easily scaled up to large surface areas, allowing the fabrication of membranes for practical gas separation applications. The gas transport properties of thus constructed nanotube/polymer nanocomposite membranes are analogous to those of carbon nanotube membranes grown by chemical vapor deposition. This paper shows the first data for transport of gas mixtures through carbon nanotube membranes. The permeation of gas mixtures through the membranes exhibits different properties than those observed using single-gas experiments, confirming that non-Knudsen transport occurs. PMID:17685662

  6. High performance carbon nanotube - polymer nanofiber hybrid fabrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildiz, Ozkan; Stano, Kelly; Faraji, Shaghayegh; Stone, Corinne; Willis, Colin; Zhang, Xiangwu; Jur, Jesse S.; Bradford, Philip D.

    2015-10-01

    Stable nanoscale hybrid fabrics containing both polymer nanofibers and separate and distinct carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are highly desirable but very challenging to produce. Here, we report the first instance of such a hybrid fabric, which can be easily tailored to contain 0-100% millimeter long CNTs. The novel CNT - polymer hybrid nonwoven fabrics were created by simultaneously electrospinning nanofibers onto aligned CNT sheets which were drawn and collected on a grounded, rotating mandrel. Due to the unique properties of the CNTs, the hybrids show very high tensile strength, very small pore size, high specific surface area and electrical conductivity. In order to further examine the hybrid fabric properties, they were consolidated under pressure, and also calendered at 70 °C. After calendering, the fabric's strength increased by an order of magnitude due to increased interactions and intermingling with the CNTs. The hybrids are highly efficient as aerosol filters; consolidated hybrid fabrics with a thickness of 20 microns and areal density of only 8 g m-2 exhibited ultra low particulate (ULPA) filter performance. The flexibility of this nanofabrication method allows for the use of many different polymer systems which provides the opportunity for engineering a wide range of nanoscale hybrid materials with desired functionalities.Stable nanoscale hybrid fabrics containing both polymer nanofibers and separate and distinct carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are highly desirable but very challenging to produce. Here, we report the first instance of such a hybrid fabric, which can be easily tailored to contain 0-100% millimeter long CNTs. The novel CNT - polymer hybrid nonwoven fabrics were created by simultaneously electrospinning nanofibers onto aligned CNT sheets which were drawn and collected on a grounded, rotating mandrel. Due to the unique properties of the CNTs, the hybrids show very high tensile strength, very small pore size, high specific surface area and electrical

  7. Carbon Nanotube/Polymer Nanocomposites Flexible Stress and Strain Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Jin Ho; Sauti, Godfrey; Park, Cheol; Scholl, Jonathan A.; Lowther, Sharon E.; Harrison, Joycelyn S.

    2008-01-01

    Conformable stress and strain sensors are required for monitoring the integrity of airframe structures as well as for sensing the mechanical stimuli in prosthetic arms. For this purpose, we have developed a series of piezoresistive single-wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT)/polymer nanocomposites. The electromechanical coupling of pressure with resistance changes in these nanocomposites is exceptionally greater than that of metallic piezoresistive materials. In fact, the piezoresistive stress coefficient (pi) of a SWCNT/polymer nanocomposite is approximately two orders of magnitude higher than that of a typical metallic piezoresistive. The piezoresistive stress coefficient is a function of the nanotube concentration wherein the maximum value occurs at a concentration just above the percolation threshold concentration (phi approx. 0.05 %). This response appears to originate from a change in intrinsic resistivity under compression/tension. A systematic study of the effect of the modulus of the polymer matrix on piezoresistivity allowed us to make flexible and conformable sensors for biomedical applications. The prototype haptic sensors using these nanocomposites are demonstrated. The piezocapacitive properties of SWCNT/polymer are also characterized by monitoring the capacitance change under pressure.

  8. Preparation and toxicological assessment of functionalized carbon nanotube-polymer hybrids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikos D Koromilas

    Full Text Available Novel Carbon Nanotube-Polymer Hybrids were synthesized as potential materials for the development of membranes for water treatment applications in the field of Membrane Bioreactors (MBRs. Due to the toxicological concerns regarding the use of nanomaterials in water treatment as well as the rising demand for safe drinking water to protect public health, we studied the functionalization of MWCNTs and Thin-MWCNTs as to control their properties and increase their ability of embedment into porous anisotropic polymeric membranes. Following the growth of the hydrophilic monomer on the surface of the properly functionalized CNTs, that act as initiator for the controlled radical polymerization (ATRP of sodium styrene sulfonate (SSNa, the antimicrobial quaternized phosphonium and ammonium salts were attached on CNTs-g-PSSNa through non-covalent bonding. In another approach the covalent attachment of quaternized ammonium polymeric moieties of acrylic acid-vinyl benzyl chloride copolymers with N,N-dimethylhexadecylamine (P(AA12-co-VBCHAM on functionalized CNTs has also been attempted. Finally, the toxicological assessment in terms of cell viability and cell morphological changes revealed that surface characteristics play a major role in the biological response of functionalized CNTs.

  9. Synthesis and Integration of Nanostructured Carbon: Carbon Nanotube-Polymer Nanocomposites and Graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulotty, Richard Stephen

    Nanostructured carbon, in the form of tubes or sheets, exhibits exceptional thermal and electrical properties. Graphene, a single atomic sheet of hexagonal sp2 bonded carbon, posesses a thermal conductivity higher than diamond, with an extremely high electron mobility. Carbon nanotubes (CNT), which are tubes composed of one or more graphene sheets, also posess high thermal conductivity and electron mobility. One of the major problems facing the application of nanomaterials is integration into already existing material systems. A second challenge is controlled synthesis of nanomaterials. In this dissertation research novel methods were investigated for coupling carbon nanotubes to polymer matrices, as well as new approaches for controlling the synthesis of graphene and reduced graphene oxide like carbon (R-GOC) on copper (Cu) foils via chemical vapor deposition. It was determined that carboxylic functionalization of carbon nanotubes was effective in improving the coupling of CNTs to polymer matrices, affecting the thermal transport of the resulting CNT-polymer nanocomposites. From the CVD studies it was established that the cooling phase gases flowed after deposition influence the growth mechanics of graphene on Cu foil. Further CVD studies showed that methane may be decomposed directly onto quartz to form reduced graphene oxide like carbon thin films. The obtained thermal characterization results are important for development of CNTs as fillers for composite pastes with high thermal conductivity, and the results of the CVD studies are important for developing further understanding of growth mechanics of bilayer graphene and other nanostructured carbon. In addition to the fundamental study of CVD synthesis of graphene and R-GOC, this dissertation work includes engineering of graphene and R-GOC to various applications, including the development of the thinnest flexible transistor with active materials made from all-2D materials, as well as large-scale electron

  10. Preparation and Application of Aligned Carbon Nanotube/Polymer Composite Material%取向碳纳米管/高分子新型复合材料的制备及应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    丘龙斌; 孙雪梅; 仰志斌; 郭文瀚; 彭慧胜

    2012-01-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT)/polymer composite materials have been widely studied for two decades. However, there remains a common and critical challenge, i.e., random dispersion of CNTs in polymer matrices, which has largely lowered their properties and limited their applications. Herein, we have developed a general method to prepare highly aligned CNT/polymer composite materials in formats of array, film, and fiber. The key procedure is to synthesize spinnable CNT arrays with high quality by a chemical vapor deposition process. Fe/A1203 was used as catalyst, ethylene was used as carbon source, a mixture gas of argon and hydrogen was used as carrying gas. The optimal growth conditions were summarized as below: thickness of 1.2 nm for Fe, thickness of 3 nm for A1203, flow rate of 400 standard cm3/min for argon, flow rate of 90 standard cm3/min for ethylene, flow rate of 30 standard cm3/min for hydrogen, growth temperature of 740 ~C, and growth time of 10 rain. Here the catalyst system was coated on silicon substrate by electron beam evaporation with rates of 0.5 and 2 A/s for Fe and A1203, respectively. To prepare CNT sheets or fibers, the spinnable array was first stabilized in a stage. A blade was then used to draw a ribbon out of the array. A CNT sheet would be obtained if the ribbon was directly pulled out without rotation, while a fiber should be produced if a rotary spinning was used. The spinning speed was about 15 cm/min. Mono- mer/polymer solutions or melts were directly coated onto the aligned CNT sheet or fiber to produce the aligned CNT/polymer film or fiber. Due to the high alignment of CNTs in polymer matrices, the resulting composite materials exhibited remarkable physical properties, e.g., the mechanical strength and electrical conductivity can be improved for one and three orders com- pared with the conventional solution blending method, respectively. These novel composite materials are promising for a wide variety of applications. The use of them

  11. Electrical, electromagnetic and structural characteristics of carbon nanotube-polymer nanocomposites

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Sung-Hoon

    2009-01-01

    We report on a new type of carbon nanotube (CNT)-polymer nanocomposite with enhanced electrical, electromagnetic and mechanical properties. Such composites were synthesized through a new methodology for integrating CNTs with polymers, where functional groups on CNTs were made to interact with select polymer groups, e.g., epoxy linkages, enabling uniform dispersion over a very wide range of CNT loading. Such composites, e.g., single-walled CNT- RET (reactive ethylene terpolymer), incorporate g...

  12. A cohesive law for carbon nanotube/polymer interfaces based on the van der Waals force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, L. Y.; Huang, Y.; Jiang, H.; Ravichandran, G.; Gao, H.; Hwang, K. C.; Liu, B.

    2006-11-01

    We have established the cohesive law for interfaces between a carbon nanotube (CNT) and polymer that are not well bonded and are characterized by the van der Waals force. The tensile cohesive strength and cohesive energy are given in terms of the area density of carbon nanotube and volume density of polymer, as well as the parameters in the van der Waals force. For a CNT in an infinite polymer, the shear cohesive stress vanishes, and the tensile cohesive stress depends only on the opening displacement. For a CNT in a finite polymer matrix, the tensile cohesive stress remains the same, but the shear cohesive stress depends on both opening and sliding displacements, i.e., the tension/shear coupling. The simple, analytical expressions of the cohesive law are useful to study the interaction between CNT and polymer, such as in CNT-reinforced composites. The effect of polymer surface roughness on the cohesive law is also studied.

  13. Effect of Molecular Weight on Load Transfer in Nanotube / Polymer Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Minfang; Du, Fangming; Haggenmueller, Reto; Winey, Karen

    2006-03-01

    The tensile moduli of nanocomposite fibers are being investigated with attention to the molecular weight of the polymer. Nanocomposites composed of single wall carbon nanotube (SWNT) and poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) were prepared by our coagulation method and processed into composite fibers using melt fiber spinning. SWNT in the fibers are aligned and the nanotube - nanotube interactions are diminished, so that, the mechanical load on SWNT is mainly from polymer - SWNT interactions. The tensile moduli along the direction parallel to the SWNT were characterized at 1.0 mm / sec with the fiber length of 25.4 mm. At a weight-average molecular weight (Mw) 25 kDa, the tensile moduli of PMMA are the same with the composites. However, when the Mw is increased to 100kDa, the tensile moduli are improved greatly by adding SWNT. This indicates that the load in the composites is transferred to the SWNT more efficiently at 100 kDa molecular weight. A micromechanics model was used to relate the elastic shear stress on the polymer - SWNT interface to the polymer chain length. It showed that with increasing polymer chain length, the interfacial shear stress was enhanced. This study demonstrates the importance of the molecular weight of the polymer matrix to the load transfer in nanocomposites.

  14. Transparent and Electrically Conductive Carbon Nanotube-Polymer Nanocomposite Materials for Electrostatic Charge Dissipation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dervishi, E.; Biris, A. S.; Biris, A. R.; Lupu, D.; Trigwell, S.; Miller, D. W.; Schmitt, T.; Buzatu, D. A.; Wilkes, J. G.

    2006-01-01

    In recent years, nanocomposite materials have been extensively studied because of their superior electrical, magnetic, and optical properties and large number of possible applications that range from nano-electronics, specialty coatings, electromagnetic shielding, and drug delivery. The aim of the present work is to study the electrical and optical properties of carbon nanotube(CNT)-polymer nanocomposite materials for electrostatic charge dissipation. Single and multi-wall carbon nanotubes were grown by catalytic chemical vapor deposition (CCVD) on metal/metal oxide catalytic systems using acetylene or other hydrocarbon feedstocks. After the purification process, in which amorphous carbon and non-carbon impurities were removed, the nanotubes were functionalized with carboxylic acid groups in order to achieve a good dispersion in water and various other solvents. The carbon nanostructures were analyzed, both before and after functionalization by several analytical techniques, including microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and X-Ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Solvent dispersed nanotubes were mixed (1 to 7 wt %) into acrylic polymers by sonication and allowed to dry into 25 micron thick films. The electrical and optical properties of the films were analyzed as a function of the nanotubes' concentration. A reduction in electrical resistivity, up to six orders of magnitude, was measured as the nanotubes' concentration in the polymeric films increased, while optical transparency remained 85 % or higher relative to acrylic films without nanotubes.

  15. Fabrication of micro pillars using multiwall carbon nanotubes/polymer nanocomposites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This research presents a new approach to fabricate polymer/carbon nanotubes (CNT) nanocomposites. Multiwall carbon nanotubes with 6–9 nm diameter and 1.5 µm length are used. Polydimethysolixane (PDMS), acetone and polyethylene oxide (PEO) are used as polymer matrix, solvent and dispersant, respectively. The research work is divided into two stages: dispersion of CNT and preparation of PDMS/CNT nanocomposite. A new method is used to disperse the carbon nanotubes into acetone with the help of PEO dispersant. The optimum dispersant to the CNT weight ratio and sonication time for obtaining well-dispersed CNT are obtained and found to be 1.0 and 4.5 h, respectively. Micro pillars made of nanocomposites containing different CNT in the PDMS matrix are produced. The surface roughness and the fracture of nanocomposite are also investigated. (paper)

  16. Mechanics of aligned carbon nanotube polymer matrix nanocomposites simulated via stochastic three-dimensional morphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Itai Y.; Wardle, Brian L.

    2016-01-01

    The promise of enhanced and tailored properties motivates the study of one-dimensional nanomaterials, especially aligned carbon nanotubes (A-CNTs), for the reinforcement of polymeric materials. While CNTs have remarkable theoretical properties, previous work on aligned CNT polymer matrix nanocomposites (A-PNCs) reported mechanical properties that are orders of magnitude lower than those predicted by rule of mixtures. This large difference primarily originates from the morphology of the CNTs, because the CNTs that comprise the A-PNCs have significant local curvature commonly referred to as waviness. Here we present a simulation framework capable of analyzing 105 wavy CNTs with realistic three-dimensional morphologies to quantify the impact of waviness on the effective elastic modulus contribution of wavy CNTs. The simulation results show that due to the low shear modulus of the reinforcing CNT ‘fibers’, and large (\\gt 50%) compliance contribution of the shear deformation mode, waviness reduces the effective stiffness contribution of the A-CNTs by two to three orders of magnitude. Also, the mechanical property predictions resulting from the simulation framework outperform those previously reported using finite element analysis since representative descriptions of the morphology are required to accurately predict properties of the A-PNCs. Further work to quantify the morphology of A-PNCs in three-dimensions, simulate their full non-isotropic constitutive relations, and predict their failure mechanisms is planned.

  17. Effects of Nitrogen Doping on X-band Dielectric Properties of Carbon Nanotube/Polymer Nanocomposites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arjmand, Mohammad; Sundararaj, Uttandaraman

    2015-08-19

    Nitrogen-doped and undoped carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were synthesized by selective passing of source and carrier gases (ethane, ammonia, hydrogen, and argon) over an alumina-supported iron catalyst in a quartz tubular reactor at 650 °C. Synthesized CNTs were mixed with polyvinylidene fluoride with an Alberta polymer asymmetric minimixer (APAM) mixer at 240 °C and 235 rpm, and the resulting nanocomposites were compression molded. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Raman spectroscopy, and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) techniques revealed that introducing nitrogen into the crystalline structure of CNTs resulted in higher crystalline defects. Dielectric measurements showed that nitrogen doping significantly increased dielectric permittivity for a known dielectric loss. This was ascribed to the role of the crystalline defects and nitrogen atoms, which acted as polarizing centers, blocked the nomadic charges, polarized them, and prevented them from moving along CNTs. The obtained results introduce nitrogen doping as a regulative tool to control the dielectric properties of CNT/polymer nanocomposites. PMID:26218098

  18. Computational Nanomechanics of Carbon Nanotubes and Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Deepak; Wei, Chenyu; Cho, Kyeongjae; Biegel, Bryan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Nanomechanics of individual carbon and boron-nitride nanotubes and their application as reinforcing fibers in polymer composites has been reviewed with interplay of theoretical modeling, computer simulations and experimental observations. The emphasis in this work is on elucidating the multi-length scales of the problems involved, and of different simulation techniques that are needed to address specific characteristics of individual nanotubes and nanotube polymer-matrix interfaces. Classical molecular dynamics simulations are shown to be sufficient to describe the generic behavior such as strength and stiffness modulus but are inadequate to describe elastic limit and nature of plastic buckling at large strength. Quantum molecular dynamics simulations are shown to bring out explicit atomic nature dependent behavior of these nanoscale materials objects that are not accessible either via continuum mechanics based descriptions or through classical molecular dynamics based simulations. As examples, we discus local plastic collapse of carbon nanotubes under axial compression and anisotropic plastic buckling of boron-nitride nanotubes. Dependence of the yield strain on the strain rate is addressed through temperature dependent simulations, a transition-state-theory based model of the strain as a function of strain rate and simulation temperature is presented, and in all cases extensive comparisons are made with experimental observations. Mechanical properties of nanotube-polymer composite materials are simulated with diverse nanotube-polymer interface structures (with van der Waals interaction). The atomistic mechanisms of the interface toughening for optimal load transfer through recycling, high-thermal expansion and diffusion coefficient composite formation above glass transition temperature, and enhancement of Young's modulus on addition of nanotubes to polymer are discussed and compared with experimental observations.

  19. Computational micromechanics analysis of electron hopping and interfacial damage induced piezoresistive response in carbon nanotube-polymer nanocomposites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon nanotube (CNT)-polymer nanocomposites have been observed to exhibit an effective macroscale piezoresistive response, i.e., change in macroscale resistivity when subjected to applied deformation. The macroscale piezoresistive response of CNT-polymer nanocomposites leads to deformation/strain sensing capabilities. It is believed that the nanoscale phenomenon of electron hopping is the major driving force behind the observed macroscale piezoresistivity of such nanocomposites. Additionally, CNT-polymer nanocomposites provide damage sensing capabilities because of local changes in electron hopping pathways at the nanoscale because of initiation/evolution of damage. The primary focus of the current work is to explore the effect of interfacial separation and damage at the nanoscale CNT-polymer interface on the effective macroscale piezoresistive response. Interfacial separation and damage are allowed to evolve at the CNT-polymer interface through coupled electromechanical cohesive zones, within a finite element based computational micromechanics framework, resulting in electron hopping based current density across the separated CNT-polymer interface. The macroscale effective material properties and gauge factors are evaluated using micromechanics techniques based on electrostatic energy equivalence. The impact of the electron hopping mechanism, nanoscale interface separation and damage evolution on the effective nanocomposite electrostatic and piezoresistive response is studied in comparison with the perfectly bonded interface. The effective electrostatic/piezoresistive response for the perfectly bonded interface is obtained based on a computational micromechanics model developed in the authors’ earlier work. It is observed that the macroscale effective gauge factors are highly sensitive to strain induced formation/disruption of electron hopping pathways, interface separation and the initiation/evolution of interfacial damage. (paper)

  20. Femtosecond Dynamics in Single Wall Carbon Nanotube/Poly(3-Hexylthiophene Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandrou Ioannis

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstractFemtosecond transient absorption measurements on single wall carbon nanotube/poly(3-hexylthiophene composites are used to investigate the relaxation dynamics of this blended material. The influence of the addition of nanotubes in polymer matrix on the ultrashort relaxation dynamics is examined in detail. The introduction of nanotube/polymer heterojunctions enhances the exciton dissociation and quenches the radiative recombination of composites. The relaxation dynamics of these composites are compared with the fullerene derivative-polymer composites with the same matrix. These results provide explanation to the observed photovoltaic performance of two types of composites.

  1. Carbon Carbon Composites: An Overview .

    OpenAIRE

    G. Rohini Devi; K. Rama Rao

    1993-01-01

    Carbon carbon composites are a new class of engineering materials that are ceramic in nature but exhibit brittle to pseudoplastic behaviour. Carbon-carbon is a unique all-carbon composite with carbon fibre embeded in carbon matrix and is known as an inverse composite. Due to their excellent thermo-structural properties, carbon-carbon composites are used in specialised application like re-entry nose-tips, leading edges, rocket nozzles, and aircraft brake discs apart from several indust...

  2. Comparative Study on Dispersion and Interfacial Properties of Single Walled Carbon Nanotube/Polymer Composites Using Hansen Solubility Parameters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ma, Jing; Larsen, Mikael

    2013-01-01

    fabricated by solution blending 1 wt % SWNTs with various modification (nonmodified, nitric acid functionalized, and amine functionalized SWNTs) and three kinds of polymeric materials (polycarbonate, polyvinylidene fluoride, and epoxy). Chemical compatibilities between SWNTs and solvents or polymers are...

  3. Development of Polymethylmethacrylate Based Composite for Gas Sensing Application

    OpenAIRE

    Devikala, S.; P. Kamaraj

    2011-01-01

    Gas detection instruments are increasingly needed for industrial health and safety, environmental monitoring and process control. Conductive polymer composites have various industrial applications. The composite prepared by mixing carbon black with polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) has very good gas sensing applications. The gas sensors based on carbon nanotube/polymer, ceramic and metal oxide composites such as epoxy, polyimide, PMMA / Barium titanate and tin oxide have also been developed. In t...

  4. Composite carbon foam electrode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, S.T.; Pekala, R.W.; Kaschmitter, J.L.

    1997-05-06

    Carbon aerogels used as a binder for granulated materials, including other forms of carbon and metal additives, are cast onto carbon or metal fiber substrates to form composite carbon thin film sheets. The thin film sheets are utilized in electrochemical energy storage applications, such as electrochemical double layer capacitors (aerocapacitors), lithium based battery insertion electrodes, fuel cell electrodes, and electrocapacitive deionization electrodes. The composite carbon foam may be formed by prior known processes, but with the solid particles being added during the liquid phase of the process, i.e. prior to gelation. The other forms of carbon may include carbon microspheres, carbon powder, carbon aerogel powder or particles, graphite carbons. Metal and/or carbon fibers may be added for increased conductivity. The choice of materials and fibers will depend on the electrolyte used and the relative trade off of system resistivity and power to system energy. 1 fig.

  5. Pitch carbon microsphere composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, H. L.; Nelson, J. B.

    1977-01-01

    Petroleum pitch carbon microspheres were prepared by flash heating emulsified pitch and carbonizing the resulting microspheres in an inert atmosphere. Microsphere composites were obtained from a mixture of microspheres and tetraester precursor pyrrone powder. Scanning electron micrographs of the composite showed that it was an aggregate of microspheres bonded together by the pyrrone at the sphere contact points, with voids in and among the microspheres. Physical, thermal, and sorption properties of the composite are described. Composite applications could include use as a honeycomb filler in elevated-temperature load-bearing sandwich boards or in patient-treatment tables for radiation treatment of tumors.

  6. Nanotube composite carbon fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, R.; Jacques, D.; Rao, A. M.; Rantell, T.; Derbyshire, F.; Chen, Y.; Chen, J.; Haddon, R. C.

    1999-08-01

    Single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) were dispersed in isotropic petroleum pitch matrices to form nanotube composite carbon fibers with enhanced mechanical and electrical properties. We find that the tensile strength, modulus, and electrical conductivity of a pitch composite fiber with 5 wt % loading of purified SWNTs are enhanced by ˜90%, ˜150%, and 340% respectively, as compared to the corresponding values in unmodified isotropic pitch fibers. These results serve to highlight the potential that exits for developing a spectrum of material properties through the selection of the matrix, nanotube dispersion, alignment, and interfacial bonding.

  7. Carbon Fiber Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    HyComp(R), Inc. development a line of high temperature carbon fiber composite products to solve wear problems in the harsh environment of steel and aluminum mills. WearComp(R), self-lubricating composite wear liners and bushings, combines carbon graphite fibers with a polyimide binder. The binder, in conjunction with the fibers, provides the slippery surface, one that demands no lubrication, yet wears at a very slow rate. WearComp(R) typically lasts six to ten times longer than aluminum bronze. Unlike bronze, WearComp polishes the same surface and imparts a self-lube film for years of service. It is designed for continuous operation at temperatures of 550 degrees Fahrenheit and can operate under high compressive loads.

  8. Free-standing carbon nanotube composite sensing skin for distributed strain sensing in structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, Andrew R.; Minegishi, Kaede; Kurata, Masahiro; Lynch, Jerome P.

    2014-04-01

    The technical challenges of managing the health of critical infrastructure systems necessitate greater structural sensing capabilities. Among these needs is the ability for quantitative, spatial damage detection on critical structural components. Advances in material science have now opened the door for novel and cost-effective spatial sensing solutions specially tailored for damage detection in structures. However, challenges remain before spatial damage detection can be realized. Some of the technical challenges include sensor installations and extensive signal processing requirements. This work addresses these challenges by developing a patterned carbon nanotube composite thin film sensor whose pattern has been optimized for measuring the spatial distribution of strain. The carbon nanotube-polymer nanocomposite sensing material is fabricated on a flexible polyimide substrate using a layer-by-layer deposition process. The thin film sensors are then patterned into sensing elements using optical lithography processes common to microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) technologies. The sensor array is designed as a series of sensing elements with varying width to provide insight on the limitations of such patterning and implications of pattern geometry on sensing signals. Once fabrication is complete, the substrate and attached sensor are epoxy bonded to a poly vinyl composite (PVC) bar that is then tested with a uniaxial, cyclic load pattern and mechanical response is characterized. The fabrication processes are then utilized on a larger-scale to develop and instrument a component-specific sensing skin in order to observe the strain distribution on the web of a steel beam. The instrumented beam is part of a larger steel beam-column connection with a concrete slab in composite action. The beam-column subassembly is laterally loaded and strain trends in the web are observed using the carbon nanotube composite sensing skin. The results are discussed in the context of

  9. Carbon nanotubes filled polymer composites: A comprehensive study on improving dispersion, network formation and electrical conductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakravarthi, Divya Kannan

    In this dissertation, we determine how the dispersion, network formation and alignment of carbon nanotubes in polymer nanocomposites affect the electrical properties of two different polymer composite systems: high temperature bismaleimide (BMI) and polyethylene. The knowledge gained from this study will facilitate optimization of the above mentioned parameters, which would further enhance the electrical properties of polymer nanocomposites. BMI carbon fiber composites filled with nickel-coated single walled carbon nanotubes (Ni-SWNTs) were processed using high temperature vacuum assisted resin transfer molding (VARTM) to study the effect of lightning strike mitigation. Coating the SWNTs with nickel resulted in enhanced dispersions confirmed by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and dynamic light scattering (DLS). An improved interface between the carbon fiber and Ni-SWNTs resulted in better surface coverage on the carbon plies. These hybrid composites were tested for Zone 2A lightning strike mitigation. The electrical resistivity of the composite system was reduced by ten orders of magnitude with the addition of 4 weight percent Ni-SWNTs (calculated with respect to the weight of a single carbon ply). The Ni-SWNTs - filled composites showed a reduced amount of damage to simulated lightning strike compared to their unfilled counterparts indicated by the minimal carbon fiber pull out. Methods to reduce the electrical resistivity of 10 weight percent SWNTs --- medium density polyethylene (MDPE) composites were studied. The composites processed by hot coagulation method were subjected to low DC electric fields (10 V) at polymer melt temperatures to study the effect of viscosity, nanotube welding, dispersion and, resultant changes in electrical resistivity. The electrical resistivity of the composites was reduced by two orders of magnitude compared to 10 wt% CNT-MDPE baseline. For effective alignment of SWNTs, a new process called Electric field Vacuum Spray was devised to

  10. High performance carbon-carbon composites

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Lalit M Manocha

    2003-02-01

    Carbon-carbon composites rank first among ceramic composite materials with a spectrum of properties and applications in various sectors. These composites are made of fibres in various directions and carbonaceous polymers and hydrocarbons as matrix precursors. Their density and properties depend on the type and volume fraction of reinforcement, matrix precursor used and end heat treatment temperature. Composites made with thermosetting resins as matrix precursors possess low densities (1.55–1.75 g/cm3) and well-distributed microporosity whereas those made with pitch as the matrix precursor, after densification exhibit densities of 1.8–2.0 g/cm3 with some mesopores, and those made by the CVD technique with hydrocarbon gases, possess intermediate densities and matrices with close porosities. The former (resin-based) composites exhibit high flexural strength, low toughness and low thermal conductivity, whereas the latter (pitch- and CVD-based) can be made with very high thermal conductivity (400–700 W/MK) in the fibre direction. Carbon-carbon composites are used in a variety of sectors requiring high mechanical properties at elevated temperatures, good frictional properties for brake pads in high speed vehicles or high thermal conductivity for thermal management applications. However, for extended life applications, these composites need to be protected against oxidation either through matrix modification with Si, Zr, Hf etc. or by multilayer oxidation protection coatings consisting of SiC, silica, zircon etc.

  11. Development of carbon composites cured by radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    -Developments of the new process in the manufacture of composites - Developments of a necessary technics for the manufacture of an export embargo components - Developments of the green process in the manufacture of composites - Developments and applications of the radiation curing technics in the manufacture of various composites - Developments of the manufacturing process for carbon/carbon(carbon/silicon carbide) composites

  12. Carbon nanotube-chalcogenide composite

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Stehlík, Š.; Orava, J.; Kohoutek, T.; Wágner, T.; Frumar, M.; Zima, Vítězslav; Hara, T.; Matsui, Y.; Ueda, K.; Pumera, M.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 183, č. 1 (2010), s. 144-149. ISSN 0022-4596 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/08/0208 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : carbon nanotubes * chalcogenide glasses * composites Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry Impact factor: 2.261, year: 2010

  13. Controlled carbon nanotube synthesis for quantification of polymer-nanotube composite micromechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bult, Justin Bernard

    Conventional experimental approaches to the understanding of nanotube-polymer micro-mechanics have struggled to produce reproducible data due to the inherent difficulty in physically manipulating the nanotube in-situ. To avoid the problems scale represents in nanotube-polymer composites a novel approach of using Polarized Raman spectroscopy was developed. The Raman spectroscopic technique has the advantage of using non-invasive analysis to compute the composite micro mechanical properties of interfacial shear stress and critical length. Composites with nanotubes of defined length were needed in order to use the Raman technique. To satisfy this requirement a new thermal Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) tool capable of reproducibly growing aligned length uniformity with large mass yield was designed and built. The course of developing these furnace capabilities led to the investigation of nanotube growth mechanics. It is shown herein that a stable passivation barrier is required for nanotube growth. Using X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) depth profiling of metal substrate growth conclusively shows the presence of a stable catalyst layer on the outer surface of stable oxides of greater than 100 nm. By analyzing the diffusion profile represented in the XPS data it is shown that a critical thickness for the passivation oxide can be calculated as a function of time and temperature. For the growth parameters used in this study the critical thickness was found to be between 10 nm and 30 nm depending on the diffusivity value used for iron in chromia. This value agrees well with experimental observation. Uniformly grown carbon nanotubes with lengths of 4, 14, 17, 22, 43, 74, and 116 mum were incorporated into a polycarbonate matrix polymer via solvent-antisolvent processing. The nanotube composites of varied length were tested in tensile strain while Raman spectra were taken concurrently to deduce the load transfer to the nanotube due to composite strain. It is found

  14. A method of fabricating highly transparent and conductive interpenetrated carbon nanotube-parylene networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report a method of fabrication of free standing and ultra-thin carbon nanotube-parylene-C interpenetrating networks. The network is highly transparent, highly flexible, and more conductive than transparent nanotube/polymer composites. Scanning electron microscope imaging reveals that the interpenetrated networks are dense and pinhole free compared to bare nanotube networks. We found that parylene-C coats along carbon nanotubes and links them together, increasing both the mechanical robustness of the film, and the electrical stability under UV radiation. This method is universal for fabricating interpenetrating networks of other nanoscale materials such as nanowires and nanofibers.

  15. Hybrid Composites Based on Carbon Fiber/Carbon Nanofilament Reinforcement

    OpenAIRE

    Mehran Tehrani; Ayoub Yari Boroujeni; Claudia Luhrs; Jonathan Phillips; Al-Haik, Marwan S.

    2014-01-01

    Carbon nanofilament and nanotubes (CNTs) have shown promise for enhancing the mechanical properties of fiber-reinforced composites (FRPs) and imparting multi-functionalities to them. While direct mixing of carbon nanofilaments with the polymer matrix in FRPs has several drawbacks, a high volume of uniform nanofilaments can be directly grown on fiber surfaces prior to composite fabrication. This study demonstrates the ability to create carbon nanofilaments on the surface of carbon fibers emplo...

  16. Method for fabricating composite carbon foam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayer, Steven T. (San Leandro, CA); Pekala, Richard W. (Pleasant Hill, CA); Kaschmitter, James L. (Pleasanton, CA)

    2001-01-01

    Carbon aerogels used as a binder for granularized materials, including other forms of carbon and metal additives, are cast onto carbon or metal fiber substrates to form composite carbon thin film sheets. The thin film sheets are utilized in electrochemical energy storage applications, such as electrochemical double layer capacitors (aerocapacitors), lithium based battery insertion electrodes, fuel cell electrodes, and electrocapacitive deionization electrodes. The composite carbon foam may be formed by prior known processes, but with the solid particles being added during the liquid phase of the process, i.e. prior to gelation. The other forms of carbon may include carbon microspheres, carbon powder, carbon aerogel powder or particles, graphite carbons. Metal and/or carbon fibers may be added for increased conductivity. The choice of materials and fibers will depend on the electrolyte used and the relative trade off of system resistivity and power to system energy.

  17. Capacitor with a composite carbon foam electrode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayer, S.T.; Pekala, R.W.; Kaschmitter, J.L.

    1999-04-27

    Carbon aerogels used as a binder for granularized materials, including other forms of carbon and metal additives, are cast onto carbon or metal fiber substrates to form composite carbon thin film sheets. The thin film sheets are utilized in electrochemical energy storage applications, such as electrochemical double layer capacitors (aerocapacitors), lithium based battery insertion electrodes, fuel cell electrodes, and electrocapacitive deionization electrodes. The composite carbon foam may be formed by prior known processes, but with the solid particles being added during the liquid phase of the process, i.e. prior to gelation. The other forms of carbon may include carbon microspheres, carbon powder, carbon aerogel powder or particles, graphite carbons. Metal and/or carbon fibers may be added for increased conductivity. The choice of materials and fibers will depend on the electrolyte used and the relative trade off of system resistivity and power to system energy. 1 fig.

  18. Capacitor with a composite carbon foam electrode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayer, Steven T. (San Leandro, CA); Pekala, Richard W. (Pleasant Hill, CA); Kaschmitter, James L. (Pleasanton, CA)

    1999-01-01

    Carbon aerogels used as a binder for granularized materials, including other forms of carbon and metal additives, are cast onto carbon or metal fiber substrates to form composite carbon thin film sheets. The thin film sheets are utilized in electrochemical energy storage applications, such as electrochemical double layer capacitors (aerocapacitors), lithium based battery insertion electrodes, fuel cell electrodes, and electrocapacitive deionization electrodes. The composite carbon foam may be formed by prior known processes, but with the solid partides being added during the liquid phase of the process, i.e. prior to gelation. The other forms of carbon may include carbon microspheres, carbon powder, carbon aerogel powder or particles, graphite carbons. Metal and/or carbon fibers may be added for increased conductivity. The choice of materials and fibers will depend on the electrolyte used and the relative trade off of system resistivity and power to system energy.

  19. Carbon nanostructure composite for electromagnetic interference shielding

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Anupama Joshi; Suwarna Datar

    2015-06-01

    This communication reviews current developments in carbon nanostructure-based composite materials for electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding. With more and more electronic gadgets being used at different frequencies, there is a need for shielding them from one another to avoid interference. Conventionally, metal-based shielding materials have been used. But due to the requirement of light weight, corrosion resistive materials, lot of work is being done on composite materials. In this research the forerunner is the nanocarbon-based composite material whose different forms add different characteristics to the composite. The article focusses on composites based on graphene, graphene oxide, carbon nanotubes, and several other novel forms of carbon.

  20. Development of scalable methods for the utilization of multi-walled carbon nanotubes in polymer and metal matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vennerberg, Danny Curtis

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) have received considerable attention as reinforcement for composites due to their high tensile strength, stiffness, electrical conductivity and thermal conductivity as well as their low coefficient of thermal expansion. However, despite the availability of huge quantities of low-cost, commercially synthesized nanotubes, the utilization of MWCNTs in engineering composites is extremely limited due to difficulties in achieving uniform dispersion and strong interfacial bonding with the matrix. A proven method of enhancing the nanotube-polymer interface and degree of MWCNT dispersion involves functionalizing the MWCNTs through oxidation with strong acids. While effective at laboratory scales, this technique is not well-suited for large-scale operations due to long processing times, poor yield, safety hazards, and environmental concerns. This work aims to find scalable solutions to several of the challenges associated with the fabrication of MWCNT-reinforced composites. For polymer matrix composite applications, a rapid, dry, and cost-effective method of oxidizing MWCNTs with O3 in a fluidized bed was developed as an alternative to acid oxidation. Oxidized MWCNTs were further functionalized with silane coupling agents using water and supercritical carbon dioxide as solvents in order to endow the MWCNTs with matrix-specific functionalities. The effect of silanization on the cure kinetics, rheological behavior, and thermo-mechanical properties of model epoxy nanocomposites were investigated. Small additions of functionalized MWCNTs were found to increase the glass transition temperature, strength, and toughness of the epoxy. In order to achieve composite properties approaching those of individual nanotubes, new approaches are needed to allow for high loadings of MWCNTs. One strategy involves making macroscopic mats of nanotubes called buckypaper (BP) and subsequently infiltrating the mats with resin in processes familiar to

  1. Carbon Nanotubes Reinforced Composites for Biomedical Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Wei Wang(College of William and Mary); Yuhe Zhu; Susan Liao; Jiajia Li

    2014-01-01

    This review paper reported carbon nanotubes reinforced composites for biomedical applications. Several studies have found enhancement in the mechanical properties of CNTs-based reinforced composites by the addition of CNTs. CNTs reinforced composites have been intensively investigated for many aspects of life, especially being made for biomedical applications. The review introduced fabrication of CNTs reinforced composites (CNTs reinforced metal matrix composites, CNTs reinforced polymer matr...

  2. Silicon Whisker and Carbon Nanofiber Composite Anode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Junqing (Inventor); Newman, Aron (Inventor); Lennhoff, John (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A carbon nanofiber can have a surface and include at least one crystalline whisker extending from the surface of the carbon nanofiber. A battery anode composition can be formed from a plurality of carbon nanofibers each including a plurality of crystalline whiskers.

  3. Intermediate Temperature Carbon - Carbon Composite Structures. CRADA Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lara-Curzio, Edgar [ORNL

    2007-06-01

    The objective of this Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between UT-Battelle, LLC (the "Contractor") and Synterials, Inc. (the "Participant") was to demonstrate promising processing methods, which can lead to producing Carbon-Carbon Composites (CCC), with tensile and interlaminar properties comparable to those of organic matrix composites and environmental stability at 1200 F for long periods of time. The participant synthesized carbon-carbon composites with two different fiber coatings and three different matrices. Both parties evaluated the tensile and interlaminar properties of these materials and characterized the microstructure of the matrices and interfaces. It was found that fiber coatings of carbon and boron carbide provided the best environmental protection and resulted in composites with high tensile strength.

  4. Prospects for using carbon-carbon composites for EMI shielding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaier, James R.

    1990-01-01

    Since pyrolyzed carbon has a higher electrical conductivity than most polymers, carbon-carbon composites would be expected to have higher electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding ability than polymeric resin composites. A rule of mixtures model of composite conductivity was used to calculate the effect on EMI shielding of substituting a pyrolyzed carbon matrix for a polymeric matrix. It was found that the improvements were small, no more than about 2 percent for the lowest conductivity fibers (ex-rayon) and less than 0.2 percent for the highest conductivity fibers (vapor grown carbon fibers). The structure of the rule of mixtures is such that the matrix conductivity would only be important in those cases where it is much higher than the fiber conductivity, as in metal matrix composites.

  5. Carbon fiber composite molecular sieves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burchell, T.D.; Rogers, M.R.; Williams, A.M.

    1996-06-01

    The removal of CO{sub 2} is of significance in several energy applications. The combustion of fossil fuels, such as coal or natural gas, releases large volumes of CO{sub 2} to the environment. Several options exist to reduce CO{sub 2} emissions, including substitution of nuclear power for fossil fuels, increasing the efficiency of fossil plants and capturing the CO{sub 2} prior to emission to the environment. All of these techniques have the attractive feature of limiting the amount of CO{sub 2} emitted to the atmosphere, but each has economic, technical, or societal limitations. In the production of natural gas, the feed stream from the well frequently contains contaminants and diluents which must be removed before the gas can enter the pipeline distribution system. Notable amongst these diluent gasses is CO{sub 2}, which has no calorific value. Currently, the pipeline specification calls for <2 mol % CO{sub 2} in the gas. Gas separation is thus a relevant technology in the field of energy production. A novel separation system based on a parametric swing process has been developed that utilizes the unique combination of properties exhibited by our carbon fiber composite molecular sieve (CFCMS).

  6. Carbon nanotube suspensions, dispersions, & composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Trevor John

    Carbon Nanotubes (CNTs) are amazing structures that hold the potential to revolutionize many areas of scientific research. CNTs can be behave both as semiconductors and metals, can be grown in highly ordered arrays and patterns or in random orientation, and can be comprised of one graphene cylinder (single wall nanotube, SWNT) or several concentric graphene cylinders (multi-wall nanotube, MWNT). Although these structures are usually only a few nanometers wide, they can be grown up to centimeter lengths, and in massive quantities. CNTs can be produced in a variety of processes ranging from repeated combustion of organic material such as dried grass, arc-discharge with graphite electrodes, laser ablation of a graphitic target, to sophisticated chemical vapor deposition (CVD) techniques. CNTs are stronger than steel but lighter than aluminum, and can be more conductive than copper or semiconducting like silicon. This variety of properties has been matched by the wide variety of applications that have been developed for CNTs. Many of these applications have been limited by the inability of researchers to tame these structures, and incorporating CNTs into existing technologies can be exceedingly difficult and prohibitively expensive. It is therefore the aim of the current study to develop strategies for the solution processing and deposition of CNTs and CNT-composites, which will enable the use of CNTs in existing and emerging technologies. CNTs are not easily suspended in polar solvents and are extremely hydrophobic materials, which has limited much of the solution processing to organic solvents, which also cannot afford high quality dispersions of CNTs. The current study has developed a variety of aqueous CNT solutions that employ surfactants, water-soluble polymers, or both to create suspensions of CNTs. These CNT 'ink' solutions were deposited with a variety of techniques that have afforded many interesting structures, both randomly oriented as well as highly

  7. Simulations of carbon fiber composite delamination tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kay, G

    2007-10-25

    Simulations of mode I interlaminar fracture toughness tests of a carbon-reinforced composite material (BMS 8-212) were conducted with LSDYNA. The fracture toughness tests were performed by U.C. Berkeley. The simulations were performed to investigate the validity and practicality of employing decohesive elements to represent interlaminar bond failures that are prevalent in carbon-fiber composite structure penetration events. The simulations employed a decohesive element formulation that was verified on a simple two element model before being employed to perform the full model simulations. Care was required during the simulations to ensure that the explicit time integration of LSDYNA duplicate the near steady-state testing conditions. In general, this study validated the use of employing decohesive elements to represent the interlaminar bond failures seen in carbon-fiber composite structures, but the practicality of employing the elements to represent the bond failures seen in carbon-fiber composite structures during penetration events was not established.

  8. Cages based on carbon-carbon composite

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sochor, M.; Balík, Karel; Tichý, P.; Šídlo, P.; Španiel, M.; Vtípil, J.; Beneš, J.

    Dublin : Dublin Royal Academy of Medicine in Ireland , 2000 - (Prendergast, P.; Lee, T.; Carr, A.), s. 373 ISBN 0-9538809-0-7. [Conference of the European Society of Biomaterials /12./. Dublin (IE), 28.08.2000-30.08.2000] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA106/00/1407 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z3046908 Keywords : C-C composite * mechanical testing * biocompatibility Subject RIV: JH - Ceramics, Fire-Resistant Materials and Glass

  9. Epoxide composite materials with carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Methods of formation and physical properties of epoxide composite materials reinforced with carbon nanotubes are considered. An analogy is made between the relaxation properties of carbon nanotubes and macromolecules. The concentration dependences of the electrical conductivity of the epoxy polymers filled with single-walled and multi-walled carbon nanotubes are discussed. Modern views on the mechanism of reinforcement of polymers with nanotubes are outlined. The bibliography includes 143 references.

  10. Application of carbon fiber reinforced carbon composite to nuclear engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon fiber reinforced carbon matrix composite (C/C composite) is thought to be one of promising structural materials with high temperature resistivity in the nuclear engineering field. In the high temperature gas-cooled reactors with gas outlet temperature maximum around 1000degC, high performance core internal structures, such as control rod sheath, core restraint mechanism, will be expected to achieve by the C/C composite application. Moreover, in the fusion reactors, plasma facing structures having high temperature with high neutron irradiation and particle collision will be expected to achieve by the C/C composite application. In this paper, current research and development studies of the C/C composite application on both reactors are reviewed and vista of the future on the C/C composite application is mentioned. (author)

  11. Carbon fiber content measurement in composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qiushi

    Carbon fiber reinforced polymers (CFRPs) have been widely used in various structural applications in industries such as aerospace and automotive because of their high specific stiffness and specific strength. Their mechanical properties are strongly influenced by the carbon fiber content in the composites. Measurement of the carbon fiber content in CFRPs is essential for product quality control and process optimization. In this work, a novel carbonization-in-nitrogen method (CIN) is developed to characterize the fiber content in carbon fiber reinforced thermoset and thermoplastic composites. In this method, a carbon fiber composite sample is carbonized in a nitrogen environment at elevated temperatures, alongside a neat resin sample. The carbon fibers are protected from oxidization while the resin (the neat resin and the resin matrix in the composite sample) is carbonized under the nitrogen environment. The residue of the carbonized neat resin sample is used to calibrate the resin carbonization rate and calculate the amount of the resin matrix in the composite sample. The new method has been validated on several thermoset and thermoplastic resin systems and found to yield an accurate measurement of fiber content in carbon fiber polymer composites. In order to further understand the thermal degradation behavior of the high temperature thermoplastic polymer during the carbonization process, the mechanism and the kinetic model of thermal degradation behavior of carbon fiber reinforced poly (phenylene sulfide) (CPPS) are studied using thermogravimetry analysis (TGA). The CPPS is subjected to TGA in an air and nitrogen atmosphere at heating rates from 5 to 40°C min--1. The TGA curves obtained in air are different from those in nitrogen. This demonstrates that weight loss occurs in a single stage in nitrogen but in two stages in air. To elucidate this difference, thermal decomposition kinetics is analyzed by applying the Kissinger, Flynn-Wall-Ozawa, Coat-Redfern and

  12. Ablation properties of carbon/carbon composites with tungsten carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ablation properties and morphologies of carbon/carbon (C/C) composites with tungsten carbide (WC) filaments were investigated by ablation test on an arc heater and scanning electron microscopy. And the results were compared with those without tungsten carbide (WC) filaments tested under the same conditions. It shows that there is a big difference between C/C composites with and without WC filaments on both macroscopic and microscopic ablation morphologies and the ablation rates of the former are higher than the latter. It is found that the ablation process of C/C composites with WC filaments includes oxidation of carbon fibers, carbon matrices and WC, melting of WC and WO3, and denudation of WC, WO3 and C/C composites. Oxidation and melting of WC leads to the formation of holes in z directional carbon fiber bundles, which increases the coarseness of the ablation surfaces of the composites, speeds up ablation and leads to the higher ablation rate. Moreover, it is further found that the molten WC and WO3 cannot form a continuous film on the ablation surface to prevent further ablation of C/C composites.

  13. Neutron scattering investigation of carbon/carbon composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Carbon/Carbon (C/C) composites, built up from bi-directionally woven fabrics from PAN based carbon fibers, pre-impregnated with phenolic resin followed by pressure curing and carbonization at 1000oC and a final heat treatment at either 1800oC or 2400oC, were investigated by means of small-angle as well as wideangle elastic neutron scattering. Sample orientations arranging the carbon fibers parallel and perpendicular to the incoming beam were examined. Structural features of the composites, i.e. of the fibers as well as the inherently existing pores, are presented and the influence of the heat treatment on the structural properties is discussed. (author)

  14. Carbon foam/hydroxyapatite coating for carbon/carbon composites: Microstructure and biocompatibility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To improve the surface biocompatibility of carbon/carbon composites, a carbon foam/hydroxyapatite coating was applied using a combination method of slurry procedure and ultrasound-assisted electrochemical deposition procedure. The morphology, microstructure and chemical composition of the coating were investigated by scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. The biocompatibility of the carbon foam/hydroxyapatite coating was investigated by osteoblast-like MG63 cell culture tests. The results showed that the carbon foam could provide a large number of pores on the surface of carbon/carbon composites. The hydroxyapatite crystals could infiltrate into the pores and form the carbon foam/hydroxyapatite coating. The coating covered the carbon/carbon composites fully and uniformly with slice morphology. The cell response tests showed that the MG63 cells on carbon foam/hydroxyapatite coating had a better cell adhesion and cell proliferation than those on uncoated carbon/carbon composites. The carbon foam/hydroxyapatite coatings were cytocompatible and were beneficial to improve the biocompatibility. The approach presented here may be exploited for fabrication of carbon/carbon composite implant surfaces.

  15. Multifunctional Hybrid Carbon Nanotube/Carbon Fiber Polymer Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Jin Ho; Cano, Roberto J.; Ratcliffe, James G.; Luong, Hoa; Grimsley, Brian W.; Siochi, Emilie J.

    2016-01-01

    For aircraft primary structures, carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) composites possess many advantages over conventional aluminum alloys due to their light weight, higher strengthand stiffness-to-weight ratio, and low life-cycle maintenance costs. However, the relatively low electrical and thermal conductivities of CFRP composites fail to provide structural safety in certain operational conditions such as lightning strikes. Despite several attempts to solve these issues with the addition of carbon nanotubes (CNT) into polymer matrices, and/or by interleaving CNT sheets between conventional carbon fiber (CF) composite layers, there are still interfacial problems that exist between CNTs (or CF) and the resin. In this study, hybrid CNT/CF polymer composites were fabricated by interleaving layers of CNT sheets with Hexcel® IM7/8852 prepreg. Resin concentrations from 1 wt% to 50 wt% were used to infuse the CNT sheets prior to composite fabrication. The interlaminar properties of the resulting hybrid composites were characterized by mode I and II fracture toughness testing (double cantilever beam and end-notched flexure test). Fractographical analysis was performed to study the effect of resin concentration. In addition, multi-directional physical properties like thermal conductivity of the orthotropic hybrid polymer composite were evaluated. Interleaving CNT sheets significantly improved the in-plane (axial and perpendicular direction of CF alignment) thermal conductivity of the hybrid composite laminates by 50 - 400%.

  16. Carbon-carbon composite and copper-composite bond damages for high flux component controlled fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plasma facing components constitute the first wall in contact with plasma in fusion machines such as Tore Supra and ITER. These components have to sustain high heat flux and consequently elevated temperatures. They are made up of an armour material, the carbon-carbon composite, a heat sink structure material, the copper chromium zirconium, and a material, the OFHC copper, which is used as a compliant layer between the carbon-carbon composite and the copper chromium zirconium. Using different materials leads to the apparition of strong residual stresses during manufacturing, because of the thermal expansion mismatch between the materials, and compromises the lasting operation of fusion machines as damage which appeared during manufacturing may propagate. The objective of this study is to understand the damage mechanisms of the carbon-carbon composite and the composite-copper bond under solicitations that plasma facing components may suffer during their life. The mechanical behaviours of carbon-carbon composite and composite-copper bond were studied in order to define the most suitable models to describe these behaviours. With these models, thermomechanical calculations were performed on plasma facing components with the finite element code Cast3M. The manufacturing of the components induces high stresses which damage the carbon-carbon composite and the composite-copper bond. The damage propagates during the cooling down to room temperature and not under heat flux. Alternative geometries for the plasma facing components were studied to reduce damage. The relation between the damage of the carbon-carbon composite and its thermal conductivity was also demonstrated. (author)

  17. Epoxy based photoresist/carbon nanoparticle composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lillemose, Michael; Gammelgaard, Lauge; Richter, Jacob;

    2008-01-01

    We have fabricated composites of SU-8 polymer and three different types of carbon nanoparticles (NPs) using ultrasonic mixing. Structures of composite thin films have been patterned on a characterization chip with standard UV photolithography. Using a four-point bending probe, a well defined stress...... is applied to the composite thin film and we have demonstrated that the composites are piezoresistive. Stable gauge factors of 5-9 have been measured, but we have also observed piezoresistive responses with gauge factors as high as 50. As SU-8 is much softer than silicon and the gauge factor of the...... composite material is relatively high, carbon nanoparticle doped SU-8 is a valid candidate for the piezoresistive readout in polymer based cantilever sensors, with potentially higher sensitivity than silicon based cantilevers....

  18. Irradiation behavior of carbon-based composite materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Consideration is given to the data on radiation changes of sizes and some properties of different carbon-based composite materials (carbon-graphite and graphite-graphite compositions; carbon-carbon composite materials with carbon reinforcing fibers; carbon-silicon compositions), irradiated by neutrons at 320-1700 k. It is shown that change of sizes is dictated by the type and the ratio of components, forming (or not forming) the reinforcing uniform frame. 22 refs.; 10 figs

  19. Evaluation of carbon fiber composites modified by in situ incorporation of carbon nanofibers

    OpenAIRE

    André Navarro de Miranda; Luiz Claudio Pardini; Carlos Alberto Moreira dos Santos; Ricardo Vieira

    2011-01-01

    Nano-carbon materials, such as carbon nanotubes and carbon nanofibers, are being thought to be used as multifunctional reinforcement in composites. The growing of carbon nanofiber at the carbon fiber/epoxy interface results in composites having better electrical properties than conventional carbon fiber/epoxy composites. In this work, carbon nanofibers were grown in situ over the surface of a carbon fiber fabric by chemical vapor deposition. Specimens of carbon fiber/nanofiber/epoxy (CF/CNF/e...

  20. Multiwalled Carbon nanotube - Strength to polymer composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pravin, Jagdale; Khan, Aamer. A.; Massimo, Rovere; Carlo, Rosso; Alberto, Tagliaferro

    2016-02-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs), a rather fascinating material, are among the pillars of nanotechnology. CNTs exhibit unique electrical, mechanical, adsorption, and thermal properties with high aspect ratio, exceptional stiffness, excellent strength, and low density, which can be exploited in the manufacturing of revolutionary smart nano composite materials. The demand for lighter and stronger polymer composite material in various applications is increasing every day. Among all the possibilities to research and exploit the exceptional properties of CNTs in polymer composites we focused on the reinforcement of epoxy resin with different types of multiwalled carbon nano tubes (MWCNTs). We studied mechanical properties such as stress, strain, ultimate tensile strength, yield point, modulus and fracture toughness, and Young's modulus by plotting and calculating by means of the off-set method. The mechanical strength of epoxy composite is increased intensely with 1 and 3 wt.% of filler.

  1. Vibrations of carbon nanotube-reinforced composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Formica, Giovanni; Lacarbonara, Walter; Alessi, Roberto

    2010-05-01

    This work deals with a study of the vibrational properties of carbon nanotube-reinforced composites by employing an equivalent continuum model based on the Eshelby-Mori-Tanaka approach. The theory allows the calculation of the effective constitutive law of the elastic isotropic medium (matrix) with dispersed elastic inhomogeneities (carbon nanotubes). The devised computational approach is shown to yield predictions in good agreement with the experimentally obtained elastic moduli of composites reinforced with uniformly aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs). The primary contribution of the present work deals with the global elastic modal properties of nano-structured composite plates. The investigated composite plates are made of a purely isotropic elastic hosting matrix of three different types (epoxy, rubber, and concrete) with embedded single-walled CNTs. The computations are carried out via a finite element (FE) discretization of the composite plates. The effects of the CNT alignment and volume fraction are studied in depth to assess how the modal properties are influenced both globally and locally. As a major outcome, the lowest natural frequencies of CNT-reinforced rubber composites are shown to increase up to 500 percent.

  2. Carbon-carbon composites based on a polyimide matrix ITA

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Yudin, V. E.; Goikhman, M. Y.; Gribanov, A. V.; Gubanova, G. N.; Kudryavtsev, V. V.; Balík, Karel; Glogar, Petr

    Singapore : World Scientific, 1996 - (Palmer, K.; Marx , D.; Wright, M.), s. 187-197 ISBN 981-02-2801-5. [Carbon and Carbonaceous Composite Materials: Structure-Property Relationships. Malenovice (CZ), 10.10.1995-13.10.1995] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA104/94/1789

  3. Pores and Cracks Analysis of Carbon-Carbon Composites

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Weishauptová, Zuzana; Balík, Karel; Medek, Jiří

    Illinois : World Scientific Publishing Go.Pte.Ltd., 1996 - (Palmer, K.; Marx , D.; Wright, M.), s. 364-370 ISBN 981-02-2801-5. [International Conference on Carbon and Carbonaceous Composite Materials. Malenovice (CZ), 10.10.1995-13.10.1995] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA104/94/1789

  4. Synthesis of Carbon Nanotube (CNT Composite Membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dusan Losic

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanotubes are attractive approach for designing of new membranes for advanced molecular separation because of their unique transport properties and ability to mimic biological protein channels. In this work the synthetic approach for fabrication of carbon nanotubes (CNTs composite membranes is presented. The method is based on growth of multi walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT using chemical vapour deposition (CVD on the template of nanoporous alumina (PA membranes. The influence of experimental conditions including carbon precursor, temperature, deposition time, and PA template on CNT growth process and quality of fabricated membranes was investigated. The synthesis of CNT/PA composites with controllable nanotube dimensions such as diameters (30–150 nm, and thickness (5–100 µm, was demonstrated. The chemical composition and morphological characteristics of fabricated CNT/PA composite membranes were investigated by various characterisation techniques including scanning electron microscopy (SEM, energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDXS, high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM and x-ray diffraction (XRD. Transport properties of prepared membranes were explored by diffusion of dye (Rose Bengal used as model of hydrophilic transport molecule.

  5. Fabrication of nylon-6/carbon nanotube composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, C.; Jia, Z.; Wu, D.; Han, Q.; Meek, T.

    2006-05-01

    A new technique to fabricate nylon-6/carbon nanotube (PA6/CNT) composites is presented. The method involves a pretreatment of carbon nanotubes synthesized by catalytic pyrolysis of hydrocarbon and an improved in-situ process for mixing nanotubes with the nylon 6 matrix. A good bond between carbon nanotubes and the nylon-6 matrix is obtained. Mechanical property measurements indicate that the tensile strength of PA6/CNT composites is improved significantly while the toughness and elongation are somewhat compromised. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis of the fractured tensile specimens reveals cracking initiated at the wrapping of the CNTs PA6 layer/PA6 matrix interface rather than at the PA6/CNT interface.

  6. CARBON FIBER COMPOSITES IN HIGH VOLUME

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warren, Charles David [ORNL; Das, Sujit [ORNL; Jeon, Dr. Saeil [Volvo Trucks North America

    2014-01-01

    Vehicle lightweighting represents one of several design approaches that automotive and heavy truck manufacturers are currently evaluating to improve fuel economy, lower emissions, and improve freight efficiency (tons-miles per gallon of fuel). With changes in fuel efficiency and environmental regulations in the area of transportation, the next decade will likely see considerable vehicle lightweighting throughout the ground transportation industry. Greater use of carbon fiber composites and light metals is a key component of that strategy. This paper examines the competition between candidate materials for lightweighting of heavy vehicles and passenger cars. A 53-component, 25 % mass reduction, body-in-white cost analysis is presented for each material class, highlighting the potential cost penalty for each kilogram of mass reduction and then comparing the various material options. Lastly, as the cost of carbon fiber is a major component of the elevated cost of carbon fiber composites, a brief look at the factors that influence that cost is presented.

  7. Preparation of composite electroheat carbon film

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIA Jin-tong; TU Chuan-jun; LI Yan; HU Li-min; DENG Jiu-hua

    2005-01-01

    A kind of conductive and heating unit, which can reach a high surface electroheat temperature at a low voltage, was developed in view of the traditional electroheat coating which has a low surface electroheat temperature and an insufficient heat resistance of its binder. The coating molded electroheat carbon film(CMECF) was prepared by carbonizing the coating which was prepared by adding modified resin into flake graphite and carbon fiber, coating molded onto the surface of the heat resisting matrix after dried, while the hot pressing molded electroheat thick carbon film(HPMETCF) was prepared by carbonizing the bodies whose powders were hot pressing molded directly.The surface and inner microstructure of the carbon film was characterized and analyzed by SEM and DSC/TG, while electroheat property was tested by voltage-current volume resistivity tester and electrical parameter tester. The results show that, close-packed carbon network configuration is formed within the composite electroheat carbon film film after anti-oxidizable treatment reaches a higher surface electroheat temperature than that of the existing electroheat coatings at a low voltage, and has excellent electroheat property, high thermal efficiency as well as stable physicochemical property. It is found that, at room temperature(19± 2 ℃) and 22 V for 5 min, the surface electroheat temperature of the self-produced CMECF (mfiller/mresin = 1. 8/1) reaches 112 ℃ while HPMETCF (mfiller/mresin = 3. 6/1) reaches 265 ℃.

  8. Low density bismaleimide-carbon microballoon composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kourtides, D. A.; Parker, J. A. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    A process is described for the preparation of composite laminate.structures of glass cloth preimpregnated with polybismaleimide resin and adhered to a polybismaleimide glass or aromatic polyamide paper honeycomb cell structure that is filled or partially filled with a syntactic foam consisting of a mixture of bismaleimide resin and carbon microballoons. The carbon microballoons are prepared by pyrolyzing phenolic microballoons and subsequently bonded using a 2% bismaleimide solution. The laminate structures are cured for two hours at 477 deg K and are adhered to the honeycomb bismaleimide adhesive using a pressure of 700 KN/sq m pressure at 450 deg K. The laminate composite is then post-cured for two hours at 527 deg K to produce a composite laminate having a density in the range from about 95 kilograms per cubic meter to 130 kilograms per cubic meter.

  9. Failure behaviour of carbon/carbon composite under compression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tushtev, K.; Grathwohl, G. [Universitaet Bremen, Advanced Ceramics, Bremen (Germany); Koch, D. [Deutsches Zentrum fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt, Institut fuer Bauweisen- und Konstruktionsforschung, Keramische Verbundstrukturen, Stuttgart (Germany); Horvath, J.

    2012-11-15

    In this work the properties of Carbon/Carbon-material are investigated under quasi-static compression and model-like characterized. The investigated material was produced by pyrolysis of a Carbon/Carbon - composite of bidirectionally reinforced fabric layers. For the compression tests, a device to prevent additional bending stress was made. The stress-strain behaviour of this material has been reproduced in various publications. This will be discussed on the fracture behaviour and compared the experimental results from the compression tests with the characteristics of tensile and shear tests. The different compression and tensile properties of stiffness, poisson and strength were assessed. Differences between the tensile and compression behaviour resulting from on-axis tests by micro buckling and crack closure and off-axis experiments by superimposed pressure normal stresses that lead to increased shear friction. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  10. Carbon Fiber Foam Composites and Methods for Making the Same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leseman, Zayd Chad (Inventor); Atwater, Mark Andrew (Inventor); Phillips, Jonathan (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Exemplary embodiments provide methods and apparatus of forming fibrous carbon foams (FCFs). In one embodiment, FCFs can be formed by flowing a fuel rich gas mixture over a catalytic material and components to be encapsulated in a mold to form composite carbon fibers, each composite carbon fiber having a carbon phase grown to encapsulate the component in situ. The composite carbon fibers can be intertwined with one another to form FCFs having a geometry according to the mold.

  11. Processing and Characterization of Carbon Nanotube Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Can, Roberto J.; Grimsley, Brian W.; Czabaj, Michael W.; Siochi, Emilie J.; Hull, Brandon

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in the synthesis of large-scale quantities of carbon nanotubes (CNT) have provided the opportunity to study the mechanical properties of polymer matrix composites using these novel materials as reinforcement. Nanocomp Technologies, Inc. currently supplies large sheets with dimensions up to 122 cm x 244 cm containing both single-wall and few-wall CNTs. The tubes are approximately 1 mm in length with diameters ranging from 8 to 12 nm. In the present study being conducted at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC), single and multiple layers of CNT sheets were infused or coated with various polymer solutions that included commercial toughened-epoxies and bismaleimides, as well as a LaRC developed polyimide. The resulting CNT composites were tested in tension using a modified version of ASTM D882-12 to determine their strength and modulus values. The effects of solvent treatment and mechanical elongation/alignment of the CNT sheets on the tensile performance of the composite were determined. Thin composites (around 50 wt% CNT) fabricated from acetone condensed and elongated CNT sheets with either a BMI or polyimide resin solution exhibited specific tensile moduli approaching that of toughened epoxy/ IM7 carbon fiber unidirectional composites.

  12. Ultrastrong, Stiff and Multifunctional Carbon Nanotube Composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Xin [North Carolina State University; Yong, Zhenzhong [Suzhou Institute of Nano-Tech and Nano-Bionics; Li, Qingwen [Suzhou Institute of Nano-Tech and Nano-Bionics; Bradford, Philip D. [North Carolina State University; Liu, Wei [Donghua University, Shanghai, China; Tucker, Dennis S. [Tucker Technical Solutions; Cai, Wei [ORNL; Wang, Hsin [ORNL; Yuan, Fuh-Gwo [North Carolina State University; Zhu, Yuntian [North Carolina State University

    2012-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are an order of magnitude stronger than any current engineering fiber. However, for the past two decades it has been a challenge to utilize their reinforcement potential in composites. Here we report CNT composites with unprecedented multifunctionalities, including record high strength (3.8 GPa), Young s modulus (293 GPa), electrical conductivity (1230 S cm-1) and thermal conductivity (41 W m-1 K-1). These superior properties are derived from the long length, high volume fraction, good alignment and reduced waviness of the CNTs, which were produced by a novel processing approach that can be easily scaled up for industrial production.

  13. CARBON-CONTAINING COMPOSITES BASED ON METALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VAGANOV V. E.

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement Among the developed technologies metal-composites production,a special place takes powder metallurgy, having fundamental differences from conventionally used foundry technologies. The main advantages of this technology are: the possibility of sensitive control, the structure and phase composition of the starting components, and ultimately the possibility of obtaining of bulk material in nanostructured state with a minimum of processing steps. The potential reinforcers metals include micro and nano-sized oxides, carbides, nitrides, whiskers. The special position is occupied with carbon nanostructures (CNS: С60 fullerenes, single-layer and multi-layer nanotubes, onions (spherical "bulbs", nano-diamonds and graphite,their properties are being intensively studied in recent years. These objects have a high thermal and electrical conductivity values, superelasticity, and have a strength approximate to the theoretical value, which can provide an obtaining composite nanomaterial with a unique set of physical and mechanical properties. In creation of a metal matrix composite nanomaterials (CM, reinforced by various CNS, a special attention should be given to mechanical activation processes (MA already at the stage of preparation of the starting components affecting the structure, phase composition and properties of aluminum-matrix composites. Purpose. To investigate the influence of mechanical activation on the structure and phase composition of aluminum-matrix composites. Conclusion. The results of the study of the structure and phase composition of the initial and mechanically activated powders and bulk-modified metal-composites are shown, depending on the type and concentration of modifying varieties CNS, regimes of MA and parameters of compaction. The study is conducted of tribological properties of Al-CNS OF nanostructured materials.

  14. Detection of Carbon Monoxide Using Polymer-Carbon Composite Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homer, Margie L.; Ryan, Margaret A.; Lara, Liana M.

    2011-01-01

    A carbon monoxide (CO) sensor was developed that can be incorporated into an existing sensing array architecture. The CO sensor is a low-power chemiresistor that operates at room temperature, and the sensor fabrication techniques are compatible with ceramic substrates. Sensors made from four different polymers were tested: poly (4-vinylpryridine), ethylene-propylene-diene-terpolymer, polyepichlorohydrin, and polyethylene oxide (PEO). The carbon black used for the composite films was Black Pearls 2000, a furnace black made by the Cabot Corporation. Polymers and carbon black were used as received. In fact, only two of these sensors showed a good response to CO. The poly (4-vinylpryridine) sensor is noisy, but it does respond to the CO above 200 ppm. The polyepichlorohydrin sensor is less noisy and shows good response down to 100 ppm.

  15. Fermentation based carbon nanotube multifunctional bionic composites

    OpenAIRE

    Luca Valentini; Silvia Bittolo Bon; Stefano Signetti; Manoj Tripathi; Erica Iacob; Pugno, Nicola M.

    2016-01-01

    The exploitation of the processes used by microorganisms to digest nutrients for their growth can be a viable method for the formation of a wide range of so called biogenic materials that have unique properties that are not produced by abiotic processes. Here we produced living hybrid materials by giving to unicellular organisms the nutrient to grow. Based on bread fermentation, a bionic composite made of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and a single-cell fungi, the Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast extr...

  16. Fermentation based carbon nanotube bionic functional composites

    OpenAIRE

    Valentini, Luca; Bon, Silvia Bittolo; Signetti, Stefano; Tripathi, Manoj; Iacob, Erica; Pugno, Nicola M.

    2016-01-01

    The exploitation of the processes used by microorganisms to digest nutrients for their growth can be a viable method for the formation of a wide range of so called biogenic materials that have unique mechanical and physical properties that are not produced by abiotic processes. Based on grape must and bread fermentation, a bionic composite made of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and single-cell fungi, the Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast extract, was prepared by fermentation of such microorganisms at r...

  17. Composites with polymer-grafted carbon nanotubes

    OpenAIRE

    Paiva, M. C.; Novais, R. M.; Covas, J. A.

    2014-01-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT)/polymer composites exhibit the processability advantages of plastics, while conveying electrical conductivity characteristics suitable for electric transport, or for sensing functionalities. The success of their application depends on the ability to homogeneously disperse the CNT in the polymer matrices to form a stable conductive network. The structural strength of the nanocomposite is also desirable, and may be a requirement. The chemical functionalization of the CNT i...

  18. Advanced thermoplastic carbon fibre reinforced pultruded composites

    OpenAIRE

    Novo, P. J.; Silva, J F; Nunes, J. P.; MARQUES, A. T.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this work is to optimize the production of new continuous carbon fibers reinforced thermoplastic matrix pre-impregnated materials (towpregs) continuously processed by dry deposition of polymer powders in a new equipment developed by the Institute for Polymers and Composites (IPC). The processing of the produced towpregs by pultrusion, in a developed prototype equipment existing in the Engineering School of the Polytechnic Institute of Porto (ISEP), was also optimized. Two differ...

  19. Amperometric biosensors based on carbon composite transducers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Fang

    1998-12-01

    Much current work in analytical chemistry is devoted to design of biosensors. One particular area in this field is the development of enzyme-based amperometric biosensors for the quantitative determination of a series of substrates in clinical, environmental, industrial and agricultural significance. This dissertation focuses on the design of improved amperometric biosensors based on carbon composite transducers. The use of metallized carbons as transducer materials results in remarkably selective amperometric biosensors. Such enzyme-based transducers eliminate major electroactive interferences, and hence circumvent the need for mediators or membrane barriers. The remarkable selectivity of metal-dispersed carbons is attributed to their strong, preferential, electrocatalytic capacity towards the reductive detection of biologically-generated hydrogen peroxide. Such electrocatalytic activity allows metal-dispersed biosensors to be operated at the optimal potential region between +0.1 and -0.2 V, where the unwanted reactions are neglected resulting in the lowest noise level. Several new materials (e.g., ruthenium on carbon, rhodium on carbon, etc.) and constructions (e.g., carbon fiber, electrochemical co-deposition transducer, etc.) were applied in the development of novel enzyme-based transducers in order to improve the selectivity and applicability of amperometric biosensors. The susceptibility of first-generation oxidase amperometric biosensing to oxygen fluctuations can be improved by using oxygen-rich fluorocarbons as the pasting binders in carbon paste enzyme transducers. Such binders provide an internal supply of oxygen resulting in efficient detection in oxygen-deficit conditions. In particular, the use of poly-chlorotrifluorethylene (Kel-F) oil as carbon paste binder results in a well-defined response and an identical signal up to 40 mM glucose in both the presence and absence of oxygen. Comparing with mediated or wired enzyme-based transducers, such internal

  20. Radiation resistance of carbon composites (carbon-carbon type)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Active (in-channel) and passive (post-irradiation) methods have been used to study how the dimensions and electrical resistance of the composites KUP-VM, Termar-TD, and carboxylar change at temperatures up to 2100-2300 K and a fluence of up to 3·1021 n/cm2. The change in the size and resistivity, determined by both methods, are almost the same, i.e., there are no dynamic effects. The dimensions of the samples depend in an involved way on the irradiation temperature, neutron fluence, and structure of the material. The samples retained their integrity under the irradiation conditions of the tests. 8 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  1. Preparation of PAN/phenolic-based carbon/carbon composites with flexible towpreg carbon fiber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon/carbon composites made with flexible towpreg carbon fiber as reinforcement and phenolic resins as matrix precursor were impregnated with pitch during re-carbonization process. The structural characteristics of the composites were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), three-point bending tests, Archimedes' method and water adsorption. Results showed that the density of the carbon/carbon composites increases from 1.45 to 1.54 g/cm3 with the cycles of pitch impregnated and re-carbonization. Open porosity measurement indicated that the increase of porosity resulted from the decomposition of phenolic resin matrix, and the open porosity of the composite gradually decreased after the impregnation and re-carbonization process. These composites also exhibited an improvement in flexural strength with increasing number of densification cycles. From SEM morphological observation, it was concluded that few cracks appeared in the surfaces and a few smaller pores with a diameter <1 μm could be observed

  2. Carbon storage potential in natural fiber composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The environmental performance of hemp based natural fiber mat thermoplastic (NMT) has been evaluated in this study by quantifying carbon storage potential and CO2 emissions and comparing the results with commercially available glass fiber composites. Non-woven mats of hemp fiber and polypropylene matrix were used to make NMT samples by film-stacking method without using any binder aid. The results showed that hemp based NMT have compatible or even better strength properties as compared to conventional flax based thermoplastics. A value of 63 MPa for flexural strength is achieved at 64% fiber content by weight. Similarly, impact energy values (84-154 J/m) are also promising. The carbon sequestration and storage by hemp crop through photosynthesis is estimated by quantifying dry biomass of fibers based on one metric ton of NMT. A value of 325 kg carbon per metric ton of hemp based composite is estimated which can be stored by the product during its useful life. An extra 22% carbon storage can be achieved by increasing the compression ratio by 13% while maintaining same flexural strength. Further, net carbon sequestration by industrial hemp crop is estimated as 0.67 ton/h/year, which is compatible to all USA urban trees and very close to naturally, regenerated forests. A comparative life cycle analysis focused on non-renewable energy consumption of natural and glass fiber composites shows that a net saving of 50 000 MJ (3 ton CO2 emissions) per ton of thermoplastic can be achieved by replacing 30% glass fiber reinforcement with 65% hemp fiber. It is further estimated that 3.07 million ton CO2 emissions (4.3% of total USA industrial emissions) and 1.19 million m3 crude oil (1.0% of total Canadian oil consumption) can be saved by substituting 50% fiber glass plastics with natural fiber composites in North American auto applications. However, to compete with glass fiber effectively, further research is needed to improve natural fiber processing, interfacial bonding and

  3. Novel apparatus for joining of carbon-carbon composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Jeremiah D. E.; Mukasyan, Alexander S.; La Forest, Mark L.; Simpson, Allen H.

    2007-01-01

    A novel apparatus for joining carbon-carbon (C-C) composites is presented. This device was designed and built based on the concept of self-sustained oxygen-free high-temperature reactions. A layer of reactive mixture is contained between two disks of C-C composite that are to be joined. The stack is held in place between two electrodes, which are connected to a dc power supply. dc current is used to uniformly initiate the reaction in the reactive layer. The electrodes are also part of the pneumatic system, which applies a load to the stack. The designed hydraulic system is effective, lending to low cost and simplified, rapid, accurate operation. It provides a very short response time (˜10ms), which is important for the considered applications. All operational parameters such as initial and final loads, applied current, delay time between ignition and final load application, duration of Joule heating, and safety interlocks are controlled by a programable logic controller system. These features make it an efficient, user-friendly and safe machine to join refractory materials. The entire joining process takes place on the order of seconds, rather than hours as required for solid-state joining methods. The mechanical properties of the obtained joints are higher than those for the C-C composites.

  4. Radiation curing of carbon fibre composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Epoxy/carbon fibre reinforced composites were produced by means of e-beam irradiation through a pulsed 10 MeV electron beam accelerator. The matrix consisted of a difunctional epoxy monomer (DGEBA) and an initiator of cationic polymerisation, while the reinforcement was a unidirectional high modulus carbon fibre fabric. Dynamic mechanical thermal analysis was carried out in order to determine the cross-linking degree. The analysis pointed out a nonuniformity in the cross-linking degree of the e-beam cured panels, with the formation of clusters at low Tg (glass transition temperature) and clusters at high Tg. An out-of-mould post irradiation thermal treatment on e-beam cured samples provides a higher uniformity in the network although some slight degradation effects. Mode I delamination fracture toughness and Interlaminar Shear Strength (ISS) were also investigated by means of Double Cantilever Beam (DCB) and Short Beam Shear tests, respectively. Results from this mechanical characterisation allowed to correlate fracture toughness of the bulk matrix resin, cross-linking density and fibre/matrix interaction to the delamination fracture behaviour of the fibre reinforced material. - Highligths: • Epoxy/carbon fibre composites were produced by means of e-beam irradiation. • DMTA analysis pointed out a nonuniformity in the cross-linking degree of the material. • An out-of-mould post irradiation thermal treatment allows a higher uniformity. • Mechanical tests were interpreted on the basis of the cross-linking density and fibre/matrix interaction

  5. Hysteresis phenomenon of the field emission from carbon nanotube/polymer nanocomposite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filippov, S. V.; Popov, E. O.; Kolosko, A. G.; Romanov, P. A.

    2015-11-01

    Using the high voltage scanning method and the technique of multichannel recording and processing of field emission (FE) characteristics in real time mode we found out some subtle effects on current voltage characteristics (IVC) of the multi-tip field emitters. We observed the direct and reverse hysteresis simultaneously in the same field emission experiment. Dependence of the form of IVC hysteresis on time of high voltage scanning was observed.

  6. Functionalized Single Walled Carbon Nanotube/Polymer Nanocomposite Membranes for Gas Separation and Desalination

    OpenAIRE

    Surapathi, Anil Kumar

    2012-01-01

    Polymeric membranes for gas separation are limited in their performance by a trade-off between permeability and selectivity. New methods of design are necessary in making membranes, which can show both high permeability and selectivity. A mixed matrix membrane is one such particular design, which brings in the superior gas separation performance of inorganic membranes together with the easy processability and price of the polymers. In a mixed matrix membrane, the inorganic phase is dispersed ...

  7. Transmission Electron Microscopy of Single Wall Carbon Nanotube/Polymer Nanocomposites: A First-Principles Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sola, Francisco; Xia, Zhenhai; Lebrion-Colon, Marisabel; Meador, Michael A.

    2012-01-01

    The physics of HRTEM image formation and electron diffraction of SWCNT in a polymer matrix were investigated theoretically on the basis of the multislice method, and the optics of a FEG Super TWIN Philips CM 200 TEM operated at 80 kV. The effect of nanocomposite thickness on both image contrast and typical electron diffraction reflections of nanofillers were explored. The implications of the results on the experimental applicability to study dispersion, chirality and diameter of nanofillers are discussed.

  8. Fermentation based carbon nanotube multifunctional bionic composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentini, Luca; Bon, Silvia Bittolo; Signetti, Stefano; Tripathi, Manoj; Iacob, Erica; Pugno, Nicola M.

    2016-06-01

    The exploitation of the processes used by microorganisms to digest nutrients for their growth can be a viable method for the formation of a wide range of so called biogenic materials that have unique properties that are not produced by abiotic processes. Here we produced living hybrid materials by giving to unicellular organisms the nutrient to grow. Based on bread fermentation, a bionic composite made of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and a single-cell fungi, the Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast extract, was prepared by fermentation of such microorganisms at room temperature. Scanning electron microscopy analysis suggests that the CNTs were internalized by the cell after fermentation bridging the cells. Tensile tests on dried composite films have been rationalized in terms of a CNT cell bridging mechanism where the strongly enhanced strength of the composite is governed by the adhesion energy between the bridging carbon nanotubes and the matrix. The addition of CNTs also significantly improved the electrical conductivity along with a higher photoconductive activity. The proposed process could lead to the development of more complex and interactive structures programmed to self-assemble into specific patterns, such as those on strain or light sensors that could sense damage or convert light stimulus in an electrical signal.

  9. Fermentation based carbon nanotube multifunctional bionic composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentini, Luca; Bon, Silvia Bittolo; Signetti, Stefano; Tripathi, Manoj; Iacob, Erica; Pugno, Nicola M.

    2016-01-01

    The exploitation of the processes used by microorganisms to digest nutrients for their growth can be a viable method for the formation of a wide range of so called biogenic materials that have unique properties that are not produced by abiotic processes. Here we produced living hybrid materials by giving to unicellular organisms the nutrient to grow. Based on bread fermentation, a bionic composite made of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and a single-cell fungi, the Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast extract, was prepared by fermentation of such microorganisms at room temperature. Scanning electron microscopy analysis suggests that the CNTs were internalized by the cell after fermentation bridging the cells. Tensile tests on dried composite films have been rationalized in terms of a CNT cell bridging mechanism where the strongly enhanced strength of the composite is governed by the adhesion energy between the bridging carbon nanotubes and the matrix. The addition of CNTs also significantly improved the electrical conductivity along with a higher photoconductive activity. The proposed process could lead to the development of more complex and interactive structures programmed to self-assemble into specific patterns, such as those on strain or light sensors that could sense damage or convert light stimulus in an electrical signal. PMID:27279425

  10. Thermomechanical response of inhibited carbon-carbon composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Analytical models to capture the additional inhomogeneities such as boron carbide particulates added to enhance the oxidation resistance of carbon-carbon composites are developed. In parallel, the test results of laminates subjected to static and fatigue loading at ambient and high temperature (900 C) are monitored so that an interactive numerical simulation and observation procedure can be developed. The material system studied is HITCO 2D CC137EH, highly inhibited, eight harness satin weave, RT42 CVD SiC coated, carbon-carbon laminate. The static testing to date focuses on generating the upper bound loads to be used in the thermomechanical fatigue tests. The stress-strain response obtained from the static tension tests reveal a region of nonlinearity which is attributed to the presence of the porosity, the microcracking and the inhibitors. The significant number of oxidation tests of coated as well as partially uncoated specimens clearly indicate the preferential oxidation along the fiber bundles perpendicular to the exposed edges

  11. Fibrous composites comprising carbon nanotubes and silica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Huisheng; Zhu, Yuntian Theodore; Peterson, Dean E.; Jia, Quanxi

    2011-10-11

    Fibrous composite comprising a plurality of carbon nanotubes; and a silica-containing moiety having one of the structures: (SiO).sub.3Si--(CH.sub.2).sub.n--NR.sub.1R.sub.2) or (SiO).sub.3Si--(CH.sub.2).sub.n--NCO; where n is from 1 to 6, and R.sub.1 and R.sub.2 are each independently H, CH.sub.3, or C.sub.2H.sub.5.

  12. Quasi-Carbon Fibers and the Composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    @@The aim of this report is to study the properties of quasi-carbon fibers (QCF) prepared from the PAN fiber precursor by pyrolysis at a temperature between 400℃ and 1200℃. The resistivity of QCF with different heat-treated temperature (HTT) was investigated by a Hall-35 testing system,and the flexural properties of the result composites (QCFC) are also discussed. In addition, the scanning electronic microscope (SEM) was utilized to observe the surface morphology of QCF and the fracture section of QCFC obtained from flexural testing.

  13. Flexural Properties of Activated Carbon Filled Epoxy Nano composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Activated carbon (AC) filled epoxy nano composites obtained by mixing the desired amount of nano AC viz., bamboo stem, oil palm empty fruit bunch, and coconut shell from agricultural biomass with the epoxy resin. Flexural properties of activated carbons filled epoxy nano composites with 1 %, and 5 % filler loading were measured. In terms of flexural strength and modulus, a significant increment was observed with addition of 1 % vol and 5 % vol nano-activated carbon as compared to neat epoxy. The effect of activated carbon treated by two chemical agents (potassium hydroxide and phosphoric acid) on the flexural properties of epoxy nano composites were also investigated. Flexural strength of activated carbon-bamboo stem, activated carbon-oil palm, and activated carbon-coconut shell reinforced epoxy nano composites showed almost same value in case of 5 % potassium hydroxide activated carbon. Flexural strength of potassium hydroxide activated carbon-based epoxy nano composites was higher than phosphoric acid activated carbon. The flexural toughness of both the potassium hydroxide and phosphoric acid activated carbon reinforced composites range between 0.79 - 0.92 J. It attributed that developed activated carbon filled epoxy nano composites can be used in different applications. (author)

  14. Carbon Nanotube Composites for Electronic Packaging Applications: A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Lavanya Aryasomayajula; Klaus-Juergen Wolter

    2013-01-01

    Composite engineering comprises of metal matrix composites. They have high strength-weight ratio, better stiffness, economical production, and ease of availability of raw materials. The discovery of carbon nanotubes has opened new possibilities to face challenges better. Carbon Nanotubes are known for their high mechanical strength, excellent thermal and electrical properties. Recent research has made progress in fabricating carbon nanotube metal matrix and polymer-based composites. The metho...

  15. Polymer composite material structures comprising carbon based conductive loads

    OpenAIRE

    Jérôme, Robert; Pagnoulle, Christophe; Detrembleur, Christophe; Thomassin, Jean-Michel; Huynen, Isabelle; Bailly, Christian; Bednarz, Luikasz; Daussin, Raphaël; Saib, Aimad; Baudouin, Anne-Christine; Laloyaux, Xavier

    2007-01-01

    The present invention provides a polymer composite material structure comprising at least one layer of a foamed polymer composite material comprising a foamed polymer matrix and 0.1 wt % to 6 wt % carbon based conductive loads, such as e.g. carbon nanotubes, dispersed in the foamed polymer matrix. The polymer composite material structure according to embodiments of the present invention shows good shielding and absorbing properties notwithstanding the low amount of carbon based conductive loa...

  16. Polymer composite material structures comprising carbon based conductive loads

    OpenAIRE

    Jérôme, Robert; Pagnoulle, Christophe; Detrembleur, Christophe; Thomassin, Jean-Michel; Huynen, Isabelle; Bailly, Christian; Bednarz, Lucasz; Daussin, Raphaël; Saib, Aimad

    2006-01-01

    The present invention provides a polymer composite material structure comprising at least one layer of a foamed polymer composite material comprising a foamed polymer matrix and 0.1 to 6 wt% carbon based conductive loads, such as e.g. carbon nanotubes, dispersed in the foamed polymer matrix. The polymer composite material structure according to embodiments of the present invention shows good shielding and absorbing properties notwithstanding the low amount of carbon based conductive loads. Th...

  17. Manufacturing of Nanocomposite Carbon Fibers and Composite Cylinders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Seng; Zhou, Jian-guo

    2013-01-01

    Pitch-based nanocomposite carbon fibers were prepared with various percentages of carbon nanofibers (CNFs), and the fibers were used for manufacturing composite structures. Experimental results show that these nanocomposite carbon fibers exhibit improved structural and electrical conductivity properties as compared to unreinforced carbon fibers. Composite panels fabricated from these nanocomposite carbon fibers and an epoxy system also show the same properties transformed from the fibers. Single-fiber testing per ASTM C1557 standard indicates that the nanocomposite carbon fiber has a tensile modulus of 110% higher, and a tensile strength 17.7% times higher, than the conventional carbon fiber manufactured from pitch. Also, the electrical resistance of the carbon fiber carbonized at 900 C was reduced from 4.8 to 2.2 ohm/cm. The manufacturing of the nanocomposite carbon fiber was based on an extrusion, non-solvent process. The precursor fibers were then carbonized and graphitized. The resultant fibers are continuous.

  18. Dynamic damage in carbon-fibre composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourne, N K; Parry, S; Townsend, D; Withers, P J; Soutis, C; Frias, C

    2016-07-13

    The Taylor test is used to determine damage evolution in carbon-fibre composites across a range of strain rates. The hierarchy of damage across the scales is key in determining the suite of operating mechanisms and high-speed diagnostics are used to determine states during dynamic loading. Experiments record the test response as a function of the orientation of the cylinder cut from the engineered multi-ply composite with high-speed photography and post-mortem target examination. The ensuing damage occurs during the shock compression phase but three other tensile loading modes operate during the test and these are explored. Experiment has shown that ply orientations respond to two components of release; longitudinal and radial as well as the hoop stresses generated in inelastic flow at the impact surface. The test is a discriminant not only of damage thresholds but of local failure modes and their kinetics. This article is part of the themed issue 'Multiscale modelling of the structural integrity of composite materials'. PMID:27242311

  19. Nano-engineered composites: interlayer carbon nanotubes effect

    OpenAIRE

    Glaucio Carley; Viviany Geraldo; Sergio Oliveira; Antonio Ferreira Avila

    2013-01-01

    The concept of carbon nanotube interlayer was successfully introduced to carbon fiber/epoxy composites. This new hybrid laminated composites was characterized by Raman spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and tensile tests. An increase on peak stress close to 85% was witnessed when CNTs interlayer with 206.30 mg was placed to carbon fiber/epoxy laminates. The failure mechanisms are associated to CNTs distribution between and around carbon fibers. These CNTs are also r...

  20. The dynamic response of carbon fiber-filled polymer composites

    OpenAIRE

    Patterson B.; Orler E.B.; Furmanski J.; Rigg P.A.; Scharff R.J.; Stahl D.B.; Sheffield S.A.; Gustavsen R.L.; Dattelbaum D.M.; Coe J.D.

    2012-01-01

    The dynamic (shock) responses of two carbon fiber-filled polymer composites have been quantified using gas gun-driven plate impact experimentation. The first composite is a filament-wound, highly unidirectional carbon fiber-filled epoxy with a high degree of porosity. The second composite is a chopped carbon fiber- and graphite-filled phenolic resin with little-to-no porosity. Hugoniot data are presented for the carbon fiber-epoxy (CE) composite to 18.6 GPa in the through-thickness direction,...

  1. Radiation processing for PTFE composite reinforced with carbon fiber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present work is an attempt to evaluate the performance of crosslinked PTFE as a polymer matrix for carbon fiber-reinforced composite materials. The carbon fiber-reinforced PTFE pre-composite, which is laminated with PTFE fine powder, is crosslinked by electron beam irradiation. Mechanical and frictional properties of the crosslinked PTFE composite obtained are higher than those of PTFE resin. The crosslinked PTFE composite with high mechanical and radiation resistant performance is obtained by radiation crosslinking process

  2. Carbon composition with hierarchical porosity, and methods of preparation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayes, Richard T; Dai, Sheng

    2014-10-21

    A method for fabricating a porous carbon material possessing a hierarchical porosity, the method comprising subjecting a precursor composition to a curing step followed by a carbonization step, the precursor composition comprising: (i) a templating component comprised of a block copolymer, (ii) a phenolic component, (iii) a dione component in which carbonyl groups are adjacent, and (iv) an acidic component, wherein said carbonization step comprises heating the precursor composition at a carbonizing temperature for sufficient time to convert the precursor composition to a carbon material possessing a hierarchical porosity comprised of mesopores and macropores. Also described are the resulting hierarchical porous carbon material, a capacitive deionization device in which the porous carbon material is incorporated, as well as methods for desalinating water by use of said capacitive deionization device.

  3. Irradiation-induced structure and property changes in tokamak plasma-facing, carbon-carbon composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon-carbon composites are an attractive choice for fusion reactor plasma-facing components because of their low atomic number, superior thermal shock resistance, and low neutron activation. Next generation plasma fusion reactors, such as the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), will require advanced carbon-carbon composite materials possessing high thermal conductivity to manage the anticipated severe heat loads. Moreover, ignition machines such as ITER will produce large neutron fluxes. Consequently, the influence of neutron damage on the structure and properties of carbon-carbon composite materials must be evaluated. Data from two irradiation experiments are reported and discussed here. Carbon-carbon composite materials were irradiated in target capsules in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). A peak damage dose of 4.7 displacements per atom (dpa) at 600 degree C was attained. The carbon materials irradiated included uni-directional, two-directional, and three-directional carbon-carbon composites. Dimensional changes are reported for the composite materials and are related to single crystal dimensional changes through fiber and composite structural models. Moreover, the irradiation-induced dimensional changes are reported and discussed in terms of their architecture, fiber type, and graphitization temperature. The effect of neutron irradiation on thermal conductivity of two three-directional, carbon-carbon composites is reported and the recovery of thermal conductivity due to thermal annealing is discussed

  4. Multiparameter structural optimization of single-walled carbon nanotube composites: toward record strength, stiffness, and toughness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Bong Sup; Zhu, Jian; Jan, Edward; Critchley, Kevin; Ho, Szushen; Podsiadlo, Paul; Sun, Kai; Kotov, Nicholas A

    2009-07-28

    Efficient coupling of mechanical properties of SWNTs with the matrix leading to the transfer of unique mechanical properties of SWNTs to the macroscopic composites is a tremendous challenge of today's materials science. The typical mechanical properties of known SWNT composites, such as strength, stiffness, and toughness, are assessed in an introductory survey where we focused on concrete numerical parameters characterizing mechanical properties. Obtaining ideal stress transfer will require fine optimization of nanotube-polymer interface. SWNT nanocomposites were made here by layer-by-layer (LBL) assembly with poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA), and the first example of optimization in respect to key parameters determining the connectivity at the graphene-polymer interface, namely, degree of SWNT oxidation and cross-linking chemistry, was demonstrated. The resulting SWNT-PVA composites demonstrated tensile strength (σ(ult)) = 504.5 ± 67.3 MPa, stiffness (E) = 15.6 ± 3.8 GPa, and toughness (K) = 121.2 ± 19.2 J/g with maximum values recorded at σ(ult) = 600.1 MPa, E = 20.6 GPa, and K = 152.1 J/g. This represents the strongest and stiffest nonfibrous SWNT composites made to date outperforming other bulk composites by 2-10 times. Its high performance is attributed to both high nanotube content and efficient stress transfer. The resulting LBL composite is also one of the toughest in this category of materials and exceeding the toughness of Kevlar by 3-fold. Our observation suggests that the strengthening and toughening mechanism originates from the synergistic combination of high degree of SWNT exfoliation, efficient SWNT-PVA binding, crack surface roughening, and fairly efficient distribution of local stress over the SWNT network. The need for a multiscale approach in designing SWNT composites is advocated. PMID:19591447

  5. Bonding between Carbon Fiver/Carbon composite and copper alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to develop material for Divertor of Nuclear Fusion Reactor, we investigated bonding method between C-C material (Carbon Fiber/Carbon composite) and three kinds of heat sink materials, the microstructure of the bonding layer, shearing strength, thermal shock resistance temperature and analysis of thermal stress. C-C material was manufactured with carbon fiber oriented in one direction. Thermal conductivity of C-C is 570 W/m·k along this orientation. For heat sink material, three kinds of material, Cu, Cr-Cu alloy and W-Cu alloy were used. Results are summarized below; (1) As a brazing filler metal for bonding between C-C and copper alloy, ten kinds of brazing filler metals were investigated. As a result 2Ti-AgCu paste filler metal was selected. The brazing filler metal is excellent in wettability and as high shearing strength as a bonding layer. (2) Shearing strengths of the C-C/copper and copper alloy joints with 2Ti-AgCu paste brazing filler metal decrease in the order of C-C/Cu, C-C/Cr-Cu, C-C/W-Cu. Hardness of the bonding layer decrease in the order of C-C/W-Cu, C-C/Cr-Cu and C-C/Cu. Therefore, the shearing strength of the bonding layer increase with decreasing hardness. (3) By using a copper plate of 2-5 mm in thickness as a bonding layer between of C-C/Cr-Cu and C-C/W-Cu joints, shearing strength and thermal shock resistance temperature are improved to those of the C-C/Cu joint. Through thermal stress analysis, the thermal stress relief of the copper plate was confirmed. (author)

  6. Carbon Fiber Reinforced Carbon Composite Valve for an Internal Combustion Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivers, H. Kevin (Inventor); Ransone, Philip O. (Inventor); Northam, G. Burton (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A carbon fiber reinforced carbon composite valve for internal combustion engines and the like formed of continuous carbon fibers throughout the valve's stem and head is disclosed. The valve includes braided carbon fiber material over axially aligned unidirectional carbon fibers forming a valve stem; the braided and unidirectional carbon fibers being broomed out at one end of the valve stem forming the shape of the valve head; the valve-shaped structure being densified and rigidized with a matrix of carbon containing discontinuous carbon fibers: and the finished valve being treated to resist oxidation. Also disclosed is a carbon matrix plug containing continuous and discontinuous carbon fibers and forming a net-shape valve head acting as a mandrel over which the unidirectional and braided carbon fibers are formed according to textile processes. Also disclosed are various preform valves and processes for making finished and preform carbon fiber reinforced carbon composite valves.

  7. Activated Carbon Composites for Air Separation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, Frederick S [ORNL; Contescu, Cristian I [ORNL; Tsouris, Costas [ORNL; Burchell, Timothy D [ORNL

    2011-09-01

    Coal-derived synthesis gas is a potential major source of hydrogen for fuel cells. Oxygen-blown coal gasification is an efficient approach to achieving the goal of producing hydrogen from coal, but a cost-effective means of enriching O2 concentration in air is required. A key objective of this project is to assess the utility of a system that exploits porous carbon materials and electrical swing adsorption to produce an O2-enriched air stream for coal gasification. As a complement to O2 and N2 adsorption measurements, CO2 was used as a more sensitive probe molecule for the characterization of molecular sieving effects. To further enhance the potential of activated carbon composite materials for air separation, work was implemented on incorporating a novel twist into the system; namely the addition of a magnetic field to influence O2 adsorption, which is accompanied by a transition between the paramagnetic and diamagnetic states. The preliminary findings in this respect are discussed.

  8. Low percolation transitions in carbon nanotube networks dispersed in a polymer matrix: dielectric properties, simulations and experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The low concentration behaviour and the increase of the dielectric constant in carbon nanotubes/polymer nanocomposites near the percolation threshold are still not well understood. In this work, a numerical model has been developed which focuses on the effect of the inclusion of conductive fillers in a dielectric polymer matrix on the dielectric constant and the dielectric strength. Experiments have been carried out in carbon nanotubes/poly(vinylidene fluoride) nanocomposites in order to compare to the simulation results. This work shows how the critical concentration is related to the formation of capacitor networks and that these networks give rise to high variations in the electrical properties of the composites. Based on numerical studies, the dependence of the percolation transition on the preparation of the nanocomposite is discussed. Finally, based on numerical and experimental results, both ours and from other authors, the causes of anomalous percolation behaviour of the dielectric constant are identified.

  9. Silver-functionalized carbon nanofiber composite electrodes for ibuprofen detection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Manea, F.; Motoc, S.; Pop, A.; Remes, A.; Schoonman, J.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study is to prepare and characterize two types of silver-functionalized carbon nanofiber (CNF) composite electrodes, i.e., silver-decorated CNF-epoxy and silver-modified natural zeolite-CNF-epoxy composite electrodes suitable for ibuprofen detection in aqueous solution. Ag carbon nan

  10. Transport Properties of Carbon-Nanotube/Cement Composites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Han, B.; Yang, Z.; Shi, X.; Yu, X.

    2012-01-01

    This paper preliminarily investigates the general transport properties (i.e., water sorptivity, water permeability, and gas permeability) of carbon-nanotube/cement composites. Carboxyl multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) are dispersed into cement mortar to fabricate the carbon nanotubes (CNTs) rei

  11. CARBONIZED STARCH MICROCELLULAR FOAM-CELLULOSE FIBER COMPOSITE STRUCTURES

    OpenAIRE

    Andrew R. Rutledge; Richard A. Venditti; Joel J. Pawlak; Sameer Patel; Janderson L. Cibils

    2008-01-01

    The production of microporous carbon foams from renewable starch microcellular foam-fiber (SMCF-Fiber) composites is described. Carbon foams are used in applications such as thermal insulation, battery electrodes, filters, fuel cells, and medical devices. SMCF-Fiber compos-ites were created from an aquagel. The water in the aquagel was exchanged with ethanol and then dried and carbonized. Higher amylose content starches and fiber contents of up to 4% improved the processability of the foam. ...

  12. Preparation and characterization of carbon nanotube-hybridized carbon fiber to reinforce epoxy composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → CNTs were uniformly grown onto the carbon fibers. → No obvious mechanical properties of carbon fiber were observed after CNT growth. → The IFSS of multiscale epoxy composite was measured by single fiber pull-out tests. → Observing fractography of composite, the fracture modes of CNTs were discussed. -- Abstract: The multiscale carbon nanotube-hybridized carbon fiber was prepared by a newly developed aerosol-assisted chemical vapour deposition. Scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscope were carried out to characterize this multiscale material. Compared with the original carbon fibers, the fabrication of this hybrid fiber resulted in an almost threefold increase of BET surface area to reach 2.22 m2/g. Meanwhile, there was a slight degradation of fiber tensile strength within 10%, while the fiber modulus was not significantly affected. The interfacial shearing strength of a carbon fiber-reinforced polymer composite with carbon nanotube-hybridized carbon fiber and an epoxy matrix was determined from the single fiber pull-out tests of microdroplet composite. Due to an efficient increase of load transfer at the fiber/matrix interfaces, the interracial shear strength of composite reinforced by carbon nanotube-hybridized carbon fiber is almost 94% higher than that of one reinforced by the original carbon fiber. Based on the fractured morphologies of the composites, the interfacial reinforcing mechanisms were discussed through proposing different types of carbon nanotube fracture modes along with fiber pulling out from epoxy composites.

  13. Silver-functionalized carbon nanofiber composite electrodes for ibuprofen detection

    OpenAIRE

    Manea, F.; Motoc, S.; Pop, A.(National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Bucharest, Romania); Remes, A.; Schoonman, J.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study is to prepare and characterize two types of silver-functionalized carbon nanofiber (CNF) composite electrodes, i.e., silver-decorated CNF-epoxy and silver-modified natural zeolite-CNF-epoxy composite electrodes suitable for ibuprofen detection in aqueous solution. Ag carbon nanotube composite electrode exhibited the best electroanalytical parameters through applying preconcentration/differential-pulsed voltammetry scheme.

  14. Microwave absorbing properties of activated carbon fibre polymer composites

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Tianchun Zou; Naiqin Zhao; Chunsheng Shi; Jiajun Li

    2011-02-01

    Microwave absorption of composites containing activated carbon fibres (ACFs) was investigated. The results show that the absorptivity greatly depends on increasing ACF content in the absorbing layer, first increasing and then decreasing. When the content is 0.76 wt.%, the bandwidth below −10dB is 12.2 GHz. Comparing the absorption characteristics of the ACF composite with one containing unactivated fibres, it is found that carbon fibre activation increases the absorption of the composite.

  15. Adhesive bonding of discontinuous carbon fibre composites: an experimental investigation

    OpenAIRE

    Nicholls, Tristan Kit

    2013-01-01

    The excellent specific stiffness and strength of carbon fibre reinforced polymer composites means that the automotive sector has been investigating methods of implementing these materials into structurally demanding applications. The work detailed within this thesis supports ongoing research at the University of Nottingham into the automated manufacture of discontinuous carbon fibre reinforced polymer composite materials. Advances in the automation of composites manufacturing has meant that m...

  16. Fiber Length and Orientation in Long Carbon Fiber Thermoplastic Composites

    OpenAIRE

    Hanhan, Imad; Sullivan, Connor; Sharma, Bhisham; Sangid, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Carbon fiber composites have become popular in aerospace applications because of their lightweight yet strong material properties. The injection molding process can be used to produce discontinuous fiber composites using less time and resources than traditional methods, thereby broadening carbon fiber composites’ applications in different industries. Utilization of longer fibers offers more load carrying capability and superior strength properties for injected molded composites. Since the fib...

  17. Formation of carbon nanotubes from a silicon carbide/carbon composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Ravi; Engstler, Jörg; Haridoss, Prathap; Schneider, Jörg J.

    2009-02-01

    The reaction of a SiC/C composite powder in an arcing plasma forms carbon nanotubes in good yield. Besides carbon nanotubes, a Si/C composite composed of β SiC covered with a shell of graphite is formed. The graphitic carbon surface layers of the carbon shell of this composite reacts further to form carbon nanotubes when heated to 600 °C. This process seems highly effective since only a small overall low weight loss, indicative for a complete carbon shell oxidation is observed by thermal analysis. The formation of the carbon nanotubes from SiC is unlikely since no SiO 2 has been found when heating the SiC/C core shell composite to its reaction temperature of 600 °C under O 2. The CNTs formed are of good quality with 3 to 6 concentric walls and high aspect ratio. Occasionally even single walled carbon naotubes have been observed.

  18. Mechanical properties of carbon fiber composites for environmental applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrews, R.; Grulke, E. [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States)

    1996-10-01

    Activated carbon fiber composites show great promise as fixed-bed catalytic reactors for use in environmental applications such as flue gas clean-up and ground water decontamination. A novel manufacturing process produces low density composites from chopped carbon fibers and binders. These composites have high permeability, can be activated to have high surface area, and have many potential environmental applications. This paper reports the mechanical and flow properties of these low density composites. Three point flexural strength tests were used to measure composite yield strength and flexural moduli. Composites containing over 10 pph binder had an adequate yield strength of about 200 psi at activations up to 40% weight loss. The composites were anisotropic, having along-fiber to cross-fiber yield strength ratios between 1.2 and 2.0. The friction factor for flow through the composites can be correlated using the fiber Reynolds number, and is affected by the composite bulk density.

  19. Highly thermal conductive carbon fiber/boron carbide composite material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a composite member for use in walls of a thermonuclear reactor, if carbon fibers and boron carbide are mixed, since they are brought into contact with each other directly, boron is reacted with the carbon fibers to form boron carbide to lower thermal conductivity of the carbon fibers. Then, in the present invention, graphite or amorphous carbon is filled between the carbon fibers to provide a fiber bundle of not less than 500 carbon fibers. Further, the surface of the fiber bundle is coated with graphite or amorphous carbon to suppress diffusion or solid solubilization of boron to carbon fibers or reaction of them. Then, lowering of thermal conductivity of the carbon fibers is prevented, as well as the mixing amount of the carbon fiber bundles with boron carbide, a sintering temperature and orientation of carbon fiber bundles are optimized to provide a highly thermal conductive carbon fiber/boron carbide composite material. In addition, carbide or boride type short fibers, spherical graphite, and amorphous carbon are mixed in the boron carbide to prevent development of cracks. Diffusion or solid solubilization of boron to carbon fibers is reduced or reaction of them if the carbon fibers are bundled. (N.H.)

  20. NARloy-Z-Carbon Nanotube Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhat, Biliyar N.

    2012-01-01

    Motivation: (1) NARloy-Z (Cu-3%Ag-0.5%Zr) is the state of the art, high thermal conductivity structural alloy used for making liquid rocket engine main combustion chamber liner. It has a Thermal conductivity approx 80% of pure copper. (2) Improving the thermal conductivity of NARloy-Z will help to improve the heat transfer efficiency of combustion chamber. (3)Will also help to reduce the propulsion system mass and increase performance. It will also increases thrust to weight ratio. (4) Improving heat transfer helps to design and build better thermal management systems for nuclear propulsion and other applications. Can Carbon nanotubes (CNT) help to improve the thermal conductivity (TC)of NARloy-Z? (1)CNT's have TC of approx 20X that of copper (2) 5vol% CNT could potentially double the TC of NARloy-Z if properly aligned (3) Improvement will be less if CNT s are randomly distributed, provided there is a good thermal bond between CNT and matrix. Prior research has shown poor results (1) No TC improvement in the copper-CNT composite reported (2)Reported values are typically lower (3) Attributed to high contact thermal resistance between CNT and Cu matrix (4)Results suggest that a bonding material between CNT and copper matrix is required to lower the contact thermal resistance It is hypothesized that Zr in NARloy-Z could act as a bonding agent to lower the contact thermal resistance between CNT and matrix.

  1. Hansen solubility parameters for a carbon fiber/epoxy composite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Launay, Helene; Hansen, Charles M.; Almdal, Kristoffer

    2007-01-01

    In this study, the physical affinity between an epoxy matrix and oxidized, unsized carbon fibers has been evaluated using Hansen solubility (cohesion) parameters (HSP). A strong physical compatibility has been shown, since their respective HSP are close. The use of a glassy carbon substrate as a...... model for unsized carbon fiber has been demonstrated as appropriate for the study of interactions between the materials in composite carbon fiber-epoxy systems. The HSP of glassy carbon are similar to those of carbon fibers and epoxy matrix. (C) 2007 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved....

  2. Mechanical properties of carbon fiber composites for environmental applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrews, R.; Grulke, E.; Kimber, G. [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States)

    1996-12-31

    Activated carbon fiber composites show great promise as fixed-bed catalytic reactors for use in environmental applications such as flue gas clean-up and ground water decontamination. A novel manufacturing process produces low density composites from chopped carbon fibers and binders. These composites have high permeability, can be activated to have high surface area, and have many potential environmental applications. This paper reports the mechanical and flow properties of these low density composites. Three point flexural strength tests were used to measure composite yield strength and flexural moduli. Composites containing over 10 pph binder had an adequate yield strength of about 200 psi at activations up to 40% weight loss. The composites were anisotropic, having along-fiber to cross-fiber yield strength ratios between 1.2 and 2.0. The pressure drop of air through the composites correlated with the gas velocity, and showed a dependence on sample density.

  3. Tribological Characteristics of Chromium-active Carbon Electroplated Composite Coatings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUKa-fi; HUAMeng; Yi-min

    2004-01-01

    A process of chromium electroplating using a standard bath with additives and active carbon particles was reported, and the tribological behaviors of the composite coatings using the pin-on-disk tester and the table wear tester were i nvestig(aed. Experimental results indicate that the electroplated chromium-active carbon composite coatings exhibited the low friction coefficient anti excellent anti-wear properties whets coffered with the normal chromium electroplated ones. The formation of active carbon particles within the chromium matrices can be explained by SEM analysis and the mechanis of wear resistance of the composite coatings were studied.

  4. Carbon and Oxygen isotopic composition in paleoenvironmental determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work reports that the carbon and oxygen isotopic composition separate the mollusks from marine environment of the mollusks from continental environment in two groups isotopically different, making the biological control outdone by environment control, in the isotopic fragmentation mechanisms. The patterns from the continental environment are more rich in O16 than the patterns from marine environments. The C12 is also more frequent in the mollusks from continental environments. The carbon isotopic composition in paterns from continental environments is situated betwen - 10.31 and - 4,05% and the oxygen isotopic composition is situated between - 6,95 and - 2,41%. To the marine environment patterns the carbon isotopic composition is between - 2,08 and + 2,65% and the oxigen isotopic composition is between - 2,08 and + 0,45%. Was also analysed fossil marine mollusks shells and their isotopic composition permit the formulation of hypothesis about the environment which they lived. (C.D.G.)

  5. Effect of carbon nanofibers on the infiltration and thermal conductivity of carbon/carbon composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → The CNFs improve the infiltration rate and thermal properties of carbon/carbon composites. → The densification rate increases with the CNF content increasing at the beginning of infiltration. → The values of the thermal conductivity of the composite obtain their maximum values at 5 wt.%. -- Abstract: Preforms containing 0, 5, 10, 15 and 20 wt.% carbon nanofibers (CNFs) were fabricated by spreading layers of carbon cloth, and infiltrated using the electrified preform heating chemical vapor infiltration method (ECVI) under atmospheric pressure. Initial thermal gradients were determined. Resistivity and density evolutions with infiltration time have been recorded. Scanning electron microscopy, polarized light micrograph and X-ray diffraction technique were used to analyze the experiment results. The results showed that the infiltration rate increased with the rising of CNF content, and after 120 h of infiltration, the density was the highest when the CNF content was 5 wt.%, but the composite could not be densified efficiently as the CNF content ranged from 10 wt.% to 20 wt.%. CNF-reinforced C/C composites have enhanced thermal conductivity, the values at 5 wt.% were increased by nearly 5.5-24.1% in the X-Y direction and 153.8-251.3% in the Z direction compared to those with no CNFs. When the additive content was increased to 20 wt.%, due to the holes and cavities in the CNF web and between carbon cloth and matrix, the thermal conductivities in the X-Y and Z directions decreased from their maximum values at 5 wt.%.

  6. Titanium dioxide, single-walled carbon nanotube composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yao, Yuan; Li, Gonghu; Gray, Kimberly; Lueptow, Richard M.

    2015-07-14

    The present invention provides titanium dioxide/single-walled carbon nanotube composites (TiO.sub.2/SWCNTs), articles of manufacture, and methods of making and using such composites. In certain embodiments, the present invention provides membrane filters and ceramic articles that are coated with TiO.sub.2/SWCNT composite material. In other embodiments, the present invention provides methods of using TiO.sub.2/SWCNT composite material to purify a sample, such as a water or air sample.

  7. Hybrid Composite of Polyaniline Containing Carbon Nanotube

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Carbon nanotube-polyaniline hybrid material was synthesized by emulsion polymerization in-situ. The morphology of hybrid material was studied by TEM and X-ray diffraction. The conductivity of nanocomposite increases with the increasing of carbon nanotube content because of the new conductivity passageways formed by carbon nanotubes.

  8. The effect of neutron irradiation on the structure and properties of carbon-carbon composite materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon-based materials are an attractive choice for fusion reactor plasma facing components (PFCs) because of their low atomic number, superior thermal shock resistance, and low neutron activation. Next generation plasma fusion reactors, such as the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), will require advanced carbon-carbon composite materials possessing extremely high thermal conductivity to manage the anticipated severe heat loads. Moreover, ignition machines such as ITER will produce high neutron fluxes. Consequently, the influence of neutron damage on the structure and properties of carbon-carbon composite materials must be evaluated. Data from an irradiation experiment are reported and discussed here. Fusion relevant graphite and carbon-carbon composites were irradiated in a target capsule in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). A peak damage dose of 1.59 dpa at 600 degrees C was attained. The carbon materials irradiated included nuclear graphite grade H-451 and one-, two-, and three-directional carbon-carbon composite materials. Dimensional changes, thermal conductivity and strength are reported for the materials examined. The influence of fiber type, architecture, and heat treatment temperature on properties and irradiation behavior are reported. Carbon-Carbon composite dimensional changes are interpreted in terms of simple microstructural models

  9. Carbon fiber reinforced thermoplastic composites for future automotive applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedrich, K.

    2016-05-01

    After a brief introduction to polymer composite properties and markets, the state of the art activities in the field of manufacturing of advanced composites for automotive applications are elucidated. These include (a) long fiber reinforced thermoplastics (LFT) for secondary automotive components, and (b) continuous carbon fiber reinforced thermosetting composites for car body applications. It is followed by future possibilities of carbon fiber reinforced thermoplastic composites for e.g. (i) crash elements, (ii) racing car seats, and (iii) production and recycling of automotive fenders.

  10. Single-walled carbon nanotube incorporated novel three phase carbon/epoxy composite with enhanced properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rana, Sohel; Alagirusamy, Ramasamy; Joshi, Mangala

    2011-08-01

    In the present work, single-walled carbon nanotubes were dispersed within the matrix of carbon fabric reinforced epoxy composites in order to develop novel three phase carbon/epoxy/single-walled carbon nanotube composites. A combination of ultrasonication and high speed mechanical stirring at 2000 rpm was used to uniformly disperse carbon nanotubes in the epoxy resin. The state of carbon nanotube dispersion in the epoxy resin and within the nanocomposites was characterized with the help of optical microscopy and atomic force microscopy. Pure carbon/epoxy and three phase composites were characterized for mechanical properties (tensile and compressive) as well as for thermal and electrical conductivity. Fracture surfaces of composites after tensile test were also studied in order to investigate the effect of dispersed carbon nanotubes on the failure behavior of composites. Dispersion of only 0.1 wt% nanotubes in the matrix led to improvements of 95% in Young's modulus, 31% in tensile strength, 76% in compressive modulus and 41% in compressive strength of carbon/epoxy composites. In addition to that, electrical and thermal conductivity also improved significantly with addition of carbon nanotubes. PMID:22103118

  11. A carbon-carbon composite materials development program for fusion energy applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon-carbon composites increasingly are being used for plasma-facing component (PFC) applications in magnetic-confinement plasma-fusion devices. They offer substantial advantages such as enhanced physical and mechanical properties and superior thermal shock resistance compared to the previously favored bulk graphite. Next-generation plasma-fusion reactors, such as the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) and the Burning Plasma Experiment (BPX), will require advanced carbon-carbon composites possessing extremely high thermal conductivity to manage the anticipated extreme thermal heat loads. This report outlines a program that will facilitate the development of advanced carbon-carbon composites specifically tailored to meet the requirements of ITER and BPX. A strategy for developing the necessary associated design data base is described. Materials property needs, i.e., high thermal conductivity, radiation stability, tritium retention, etc., are assessed and prioritized through a systems analysis of the functional, operational, and component requirements for plasma-facing applications. The current Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Fusion Energy Program on carbon-carbon composites is summarized. Realistic property goals are set based upon our current understanding. The architectures of candidate PFC carbon-carbon composite materials are outlined, and architectural features considered desirable for maximum irradiation stability are described. The European and Japanese carbon-carbon composite development and irradiation programs are described. The Working Group conclusions and recommendations are listed. It is recommended that developmental carbon-carbon composite materials from the commercial sector be procured via request for proposal/request for quotation (RFP/RFQ) as soon as possible

  12. Silicon Whisker and Carbon Nanofiber Composite Anode Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Physical Sciences Inc. (PSI) has successfully developed a silicon whisker and carbon nanofiber composite anode for lithium ion batteries on a Phase I program. PSI...

  13. Silicon Whisker and Carbon Nanofiber Composite Anode Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Physical Sciences Inc. (PSI) proposes to develop a silicon whisker and carbon nanofiber composite anode for lithium ion batteries on a Phase I program. This anode...

  14. Carbon-fiber composite molecular sieves for gas separation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jagtoyen, M.; Derbyshire, F.; Kimber, G.; Fei, Y.Q. [Univ. of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research, Lexington, KY (United States)

    1995-08-01

    The progress of research in the development of novel, rigid, monolithic adsorbent carbon fiber composites is described. Carbon fiber composites are produced at ORNL and activated at the CAER using steam or CO{sub 2} under different conditions, with the aims of producing a uniform degree of activation through the material, and of closely controlling pore structure and adsorptive properties The principal focus of the work to date has been to produce materials with narrow porosity for use in gas separations.

  15. Controlled synthesis of high quality carbon nanotubes and their applications in transparent conductive films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dervishi, Enkeleda

    carbon formation, and higher crystallinity compared with the ones grown by the external furnace cCVD method. Lastly, this research presents the development and characterization of carbon nanotube polymer composites and conductive transparent nanotube thin film coatings. Electrostatic charge dissipation presents a major problem for applications ranging from electronics to space exploration. Nanotube polymer composites with new and improved bulk and surface properties were found to have the highest charge dissipation rates with decay times of seconds. Moreover, a comparative study of conductive transparent thin coatings on glass substrates using different types of CNTs is also discussed. The optoelectronic performance of the carbon nanotube films was found to strongly depend on many effects; including the ratio of metallic-to-semiconducting tubes, dispersion, length, diameter, wall number, and defects.

  16. Electromagnetic interference shielding characteristics of carbon nanofiber-polymer composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yonglai; Guptal, Mool C; Dudley, Kenneth L; Lawrence, Roland W

    2007-02-01

    Electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding characteristics of carbon nanofiber-polystyrene composites were investigated in the frequency range of 12.4-18 GHz (Ku-band). It was observed that the shielding effectiveness of such composites was frequency independent, and increased with increasing carbon nanofiber loading within Ku-band. The experimental data exhibited that the shielding effectiveness of the polymer composite containing 20 wt% carbon nanofibers could reach more than 36 dB in the measured frequency region, indicating such composites can be applied to the potential EMI shielding materials. In addition, the results showed that the contribution of reflection to the EMI shielding effectiveness was much larger than that of absorption, implying the primary EMI shielding mechanism of such composites was reflection of electromagnetic radiation within Ku-band. PMID:17450793

  17. Carbon Fiber Reinforced, Zero CME Composites Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Technical Abstract: This project proposes to develop moisture insensitive, high performance, carbon fiber laminates for future missions. Current space-qualified...

  18. Carbon fiber/carbon nanotube reinforced hierarchical composites: Effect of CNT distribution on shearing strength

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, H. W.; Mishnaevsky, Leon; Yi, H. Y.;

    2016-01-01

    The strength and fracture behavior of carbon fiber reinforced polymer composites with carbon nanotube (CNT) secondary reinforcement are investigated experimentally and numerically. Short Beam Shearing tests have been carried out, with SEM observations of the damage evolution in the composites. 3D...... multiscale computational (FE) models of the carbon/polymer composite with varied CNT distributions have been developed and employed to study the effect of the secondary CNT reinforcement, its distribution and content on the strength and fracture behavior of the composites. It is shown that adding secondary...... CNT nanoreinforcement into the matrix and/or the sizing of carbon fiber/reinforced composites ensures strong increase of the composite strength. The effect of secondary CNTs reinforcement is strongest when some small addition of CNTs in the polymer matrix is complemented by the fiber sizing with high...

  19. Fabrication and properties of carbon network reinforced composite fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zirconium dioxide composites reinforced with 3D glassy carbon foam was fabricated using Spark Plasma Sintering (SPS) with a heating rate of 100degC/min and a uniaxial pressure of 50 MPa at 1500degC, 1600degC, and 1700degC, respectively. The effect of carbon foam on the thermal properties of the ZrO2 composites was investigated. In addition, the effect of the sintering temperature on the densification of the composites was also investigated and the optimized sintering temperature was identified. The microstructures of 3D carbon foam reinforced ZrO2 composites showed that the 3D shape of carbon foam was retained after the sintering process, and the ZrO2 was homogeneously distributed within the 3D carbon foam. At the interfaces between the 3D carbon foam and ZrO2, neither a chemical reaction nor a new phase formation was detected by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and X-ray Diffractometry (XRD). The thermal diffusivity of carbon foam reinforced ZrO2 composites measured at 1100degC was increased by 47% and reached to 0.66 mm2s-1 and the thermal conductivity was increased by 50% and reached to 2.428 W/m-K. (author)

  20. Mechanical characterization of epoxy composite with multiscale reinforcements: Carbon nanotubes and short carbon fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Multiscale composite was prepared by incorporation of carbon nanotubes and fibers. • Carbon nanotubes were also grown on short carbon fibers to enhance stress transfer. • Significant improvements were achieved in mechanical properties of composites. • Synergic effect of carbon nanotubes and fibers was demonstrated. - Abstract: Carbon nanotubes (CNT) and short carbon fibers were incorporated into an epoxy matrix to fabricate a high performance multiscale composite. To improve the stress transfer between epoxy and carbon fibers, CNT were also grown on fibers through chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method to produce CNT grown short carbon fibers (CSCF). Mechanical characterization of composites was performed to investigate the synergy effects of CNT and CSCF in the epoxy matrix. The multiscale composites revealed significant improvement in elastic and storage modulus, strength as well as impact resistance in comparison to CNT–epoxy or CSCF–epoxy composites. An optimum content of CNT was found which provided the maximum stiffness and strength. The synergic reinforcing effects of combined fillers were analyzed on the fracture surface of composites through optical and scanning electron microscopy (SEM)

  1. Molybdenum isotopic composition of modern and Carboniferous carbonates

    OpenAIRE

    Voegelin, Andrea R.; Nägler, Thomas F.; Samankassou, Elias; Villa, Igor M.

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the redox-sensitive isotope system of molybdenum (Mo) in marine carbonates to evaluate their potential as archive of the Mo isotopic composition of coeval seawater. We present Mo isotope data (δ98/95Mo) of modern skeletal and non-skeletal carbonates as well as a variety of precipitates from the mid and late Carboniferous. The external reproducibility is determined by repeated analyses of two commercially available carbonate standards. The resulting uncertainty of the low concen...

  2. Microwave plasma CVD of NANO structured tin/carbon composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcinek, Marek; Kostecki, Robert

    2012-07-17

    A method for forming a graphitic tin-carbon composite at low temperatures is described. The method involves using microwave radiation to produce a neutral gas plasma in a reactor cell. At least one organo tin precursor material in the reactor cell forms a tin-carbon film on a supporting substrate disposed in the cell under influence of the plasma. The three dimensional carbon matrix material with embedded tin nanoparticles can be used as an electrode in lithium-ion batteries.

  3. Characterization of Carbon Mat Thermoplastic Composites: Flow and Mechanical Properties

    OpenAIRE

    Caba, Aaron C.

    2005-01-01

    Carbon mat thermoplastics (CMT) consisting of 12.7 mm or 25.4 mm long, 7.2 micrometer diameter, chopped carbon fibers in a polypropylene (PP) or poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) thermoplastic matrix were manufactured using the wetlay technique. This produces a porous mat with the carbon fibers well dispersed and randomly oriented in a plane. CMT composites offer substantial cost and weight savings over typical steel construction in new automotive applications. In production vehicles, aut...

  4. Carbon nanotubes composites for microwave applications

    OpenAIRE

    Herrero Fernández, Diego

    2015-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes have become a focus of study due to the great applications you can have and its excellent properties. In this thesis the compounds formed by a host and a percentage of carbon nanotubes are modelled. The models used are the Debye model, the Maxwell Garnett model and McLachlan model. These models have been implemented in ...

  5. Aerogel and xerogel composites for use as carbon anodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, John F.; Tillotson, Thomas M.; Hrubesh, Lawrence W.

    2008-08-12

    Disclosed herein are aerogel and xerogel composite materials suitable for use as anodes in fuel cells and batteries. Precursors to the aerogel and xerogel compounds are infused with inorganic polymeric materials or carbon particles and then gelled. The gels are then pyrolyzed to form composites with internal structural support.

  6. Temperature effects on polymer-carbon composite sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, J. R.; Homer, M. L.; Manatt, K.; Kisor, A.; Lara, L.; Jewell, A. D.; Shevade, A.; Ryan, M. A.

    2003-01-01

    At JPL we have investigated the effects of temperature on polymer-carbon black composite sensors. While the electrical properties of polymer composites have been studied, with mechanisms of conductivity described by connectivity and tunneling, it is not fully understood how these properties affect sensor characteristics and responses.

  7. Mechanically stiff, electrically conductive composites of polymers and carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Worsley, Marcus A.; Kucheyev, Sergei O.; Baumann, Theodore F.; Kuntz, Joshua D.; Satcher, Jr., Joe H.; Hamza, Alex V.

    2015-07-21

    Using SWNT-CA as scaffolds to fabricate stiff, highly conductive polymer (PDMS) composites. The SWNT-CA is immersing in a polymer resin to produce a SWNT-CA infiltrated with a polymer resin. The SWNT-CA infiltrated with a polymer resin is cured to produce the stiff and electrically conductive composite of carbon nanotube aerogel and polymer.

  8. Multifunctional Carbon Fibre Flat Tape for Composites

    OpenAIRE

    Koncherry, Vivek

    2014-01-01

    Recently, there has been a significant growth in the use of composites in sectors such as automotive, aerospace and wind energy. Composites are traditionally designed for mechanical performance in terms of strength, stiffness and impact energy absorption; however multifunctionality has become the focus of researchers and designers in recent years. Multifunctional design of composites involve adding functionality such as thermal management, radiation shielding, stealth, structural health monit...

  9. Three-Phase Carbon Fiber Amine Functionalized Carbon Nanotubes Epoxy Composite: Processing, Characterisation, and Multiscale Modeling

    OpenAIRE

    Kamal Sharma; Mukul Shukla

    2014-01-01

    The present paper discusses the key issues of carbon nanotube (CNT) dispersion and effect of functionalisation on the mechanical properties of multiscale carbon epoxy composites. In this study, CNTs were added in epoxy matrix and further reinforced with carbon fibres. Predetermined amounts of optimally amine functionalised CNTs were dispersed in epoxy matrix, and unidirectional carbon fiber laminates were produced. The effect of the presence of CNTs (1.0 wt%) in the resin was reflected by pro...

  10. Oxidation behaviour of ribbon shape carbon fibers and their composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon fibers, though important constituent as reinforcements for high performance carbon/carbon composites, are shadowed by their oxidation in air at temperatures beginning 450 deg. C. Owing to tailorable properties of carbon fibers, efforts are underway to explore structural modification possibilities to improve the oxidation resistance of the fibers and their composites. The pitch based ribbon shape carbon fibers are found to have highly preferential oriented graphitic structure resulting in high mechanical properties and thermal conductivity. In the present work oxidation behaviour of ribbon shape carbon fibers and their composites heat treated to 1000-2700 deg. C has been studied. SEM examination of these composites exhibits development of graphitic texture and ordering within the fibers with increase in heat treatment temperature. Oxidation studies made by thermogravimetric analysis in air show that matrix has faster rate of oxidation and in the initial stages the matrix gets oxidized at faster rate with slower rate of oxidation of the fibers depending on processing conditions of fibers and composites

  11. Thermal and electrical conductivities of carbon fibers and carbon nanotubes incorporated polyurethanes composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Single filler polyurethane composites with carbon fibers (CFs) and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) were prepared by melt mixing methods and its thermal as well as electrical resistivity characteristics were investigated. The influences of fillers and mixing methods on thermal and electrical conductivity of CF/- and MWNT/polyurethane composites were investigated and the result shows that the addition of carbon fillers improved the thermal conductivity of the polyurethane composites. Higher filler concentration results in better thermal conductivity because better formation of thermally conductive networks along polymer matrix to ensure the thermal was conducted through the matrix and the network along the polymer composites. The presence of carbon additives improves the electrical resistivity of the materials as well. The present study revealed the potential of carbon as agent for better thermal and electrical conductivities and their properties depend strongly on the dispersion and distribution of the fillers in the polymer matrix. (author)

  12. Modeling the carbon isotope composition of bivalve shells (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanek, C.

    2010-12-01

    The stable carbon isotope composition of bivalve shells is a valuable archive of paleobiological and paleoenvironmental information. Previous work has shown that the carbon isotope composition of the shell is related to the carbon isotope composition of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) in the ambient water in which a bivalve lives, as well as metabolic carbon derived from bivalve respiration. The contribution of metabolic carbon varies among organisms, but it is generally thought to be relatively low (e.g., 90%) in the shells from terrestrial organisms. Because metabolic carbon contains significantly more C-12 than DIC, negative excursions from the expected environmental (DIC) signal are interpreted to reflect an increased contribution of metabolic carbon in the shell. This observation contrasts sharply with modeled carbon isotope compositions for shell layers deposited from the inner extrapallial fluid (EPF). Previous studies have shown that growth lines within the inner shell layer of bivalves are produced during periods of anaerobiosis when acidic metabolic byproducts (e.g., succinic acid) are neutralized (or buffered) by shell dissolution. This requires the pH of EPF to decrease below ambient levels (~7.5) until a state of undersaturation is achieved that promotes shell dissolution. This condition may occur when aquatic bivalves are subjected to external stressors originating from ecological (predation) or environmental (exposure to atm; low dissolved oxygen; contaminant release) pressures; normal physiological processes will restore the pH of EPF when the pressure is removed. As a consequence of this process, a temporal window should also exist in EPF at relatively low pH where shell carbonate is deposited at a reduced saturation state and precipitation rate. For example, EPF chemistry should remain slightly supersaturated with respect to aragonite given a drop of one pH unit (6.5), but under closed conditions, equilibrium carbon isotope fractionation

  13. Puncture-Healing Thermoplastic Resin Carbon-Fiber-Reinforced Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Keith L. (Inventor); Siochi, Emilie J. (Inventor); Grimsley, Brian W. (Inventor); Cano, Roberto J. (Inventor); Czabaj, Michael W. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A composite comprising a combination of a self-healing polymer matrix and a carbon fiber reinforcement is described. In one embodiment, the matrix is a polybutadiene graft copolymer matrix, such as polybutadiene graft copolymer comprising poly(butadiene)-graft-poly(methyl acrylate-co-acrylonitrile). A method of fabricating the composite is also described, comprising the steps of manufacturing a pre-impregnated unidirectional carbon fiber preform by wetting a plurality of carbon fibers with a solution, the solution comprising a self-healing polymer and a solvent, and curing the preform. A method of repairing a structure made from the composite of the invention is described. A novel prepreg material used to manufacture the composite of the invention is described.

  14. Conductive Behaviors of Carbon Nanofibers Reinforced Epoxy Composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MEI Qilin; WANG Jihui; WANG Fuling; HUANG Zhixiong; YANG Xiaolin; WEI Tao

    2008-01-01

    By means of ultrasonic dispersion,carbon nanofibers reinforced epoxy resin composite was prepared in the lab,the electrical conductivity of composite with different carbon nanofibers loadings were studied,also the voltage-current relationship,resistance-temperature properties and mechano-electric effect were investigated.Results show that the resistivity of composite decreases in geometric progression with the increasing of carbon nanofibers,and the threshold ranges between 0.1 wt%-0.2 wt%.The voltage-current relationship is in good conformity with the Ohm's law,both positive temperature coefficient and negative temperature coefficient can be found at elevated temperature.In the course of stretching,the electrical resistance of the composites increases with the stress steadily and changes sharply near the breaking point,which is of importance for the safety monitor and structure health diagnosis.

  15. High Volume Fraction Carbon Nanotube Composites for Aerospace Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siochi, E. J.; Kim, J.-W.; Sauti, G.; Cano, R. J.; Wincheski, R. A.; Ratcliffe, J. G.; Czabaj, M.

    2016-01-01

    Reported mechanical properties of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) at the nanoscale suggest their potential to enable significantly lighter structures of interest for space applications. However, their utility depends on the retention of these properties in bulk material formats that permit practical fabrication of large structures. This presentation summarizes recent progress made to produce carbon nanotube composites with specific tensile properties that begin to rival those of carbon fiber reinforced polymer composites. CNT content in these nanocomposites was greater than 70% by weight. Tested nanocomposite specimens were fabricated from kilometers or tens of square meters of CNT, depending on the starting material format. Processing methods to yield these results, and characterization and testing to evaluate the performance of these composites will be discussed. The final objective is the demonstration of a CNT composite overwrapped pressure vessel to be flight tested in the Fall of 2016.

  16. Carbon Cryogel Silicon Composite Anode Materials for Lithium Ion Batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodworth James; Baldwin, Richard; Bennett, William

    2010-01-01

    A variety of materials are under investigation for use as anode materials in lithium-ion batteries, of which, the most promising are those containing silicon. 10 One such material is a composite formed via the dispersion of silicon in a resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF) gel followed by pyrolysis. Two silicon-carbon composite materials, carbon microspheres and nanofoams produced from nano-phase silicon impregnated RF gel precursors have been synthesized and investigated. Carbon microspheres are produced by forming the silicon-containing RF gel into microspheres whereas carbon nano-foams are produced by impregnating carbon fiber paper with the silicon containing RF gel to create a free standing electrode. 1-4,9 Both materials have demonstrated their ability to function as anodes and utilize the silicon present in the material. Stable reversible capacities above 400 mAh/g for the bulk material and above 1000 mAh/g of Si have been observed.

  17. Carbon Nanotube Composites for Electronic Packaging Applications: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lavanya Aryasomayajula

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Composite engineering comprises of metal matrix composites. They have high strength-weight ratio, better stiffness, economical production, and ease of availability of raw materials. The discovery of carbon nanotubes has opened new possibilities to face challenges better. Carbon Nanotubes are known for their high mechanical strength, excellent thermal and electrical properties. Recent research has made progress in fabricating carbon nanotube metal matrix and polymer-based composites. The methods of fabrication of these composites, their properties and possible applications restricted to the field of electronic packaging have been discussed in this paper. Experimental and theoretical calculations have shown improved mechanical and physical properties like tensile stress, toughness, and improved electrical and thermal properties. They have also demonstrated the ease of production of the composites and their adaptability as one can tailor their properties as per the requirement. This paper reviews work reported on fabricating and characterizing carbon- nanotube-based metal matrix and polymer composites. The focus of this paper is mainly to review the importance of these composites in the field of electronics packaging.

  18. Isotopic composition of carbon monoxide in St. Louis, Missouri area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The concentration and isotropic composition of carbon monoxide were determined for air samples taken in the vicinity of St. Louis, Missouri, to provide information as to the movement of the pollutant plume from the city. Urban air was detected as far as 48 miles downwind of St. Louis; however, movement of the pollutant plume was not detected. The effect of engine carbon monoxide produced along a highway in a rural area was found to be minimal three miles downwind of the highway. Diurnal studies demonstrated an inverse relationship between carbon monoxide concentration and oxygen and carbon isotopic ratios during the night. A parallel relation prevailed during the day

  19. Hybrid Matrices Layer of Carbon Fiber Composites

    OpenAIRE

    J. Dhanraj Pamar; Dr. B. Balu Naik

    2013-01-01

    Polymeric composites have gone through a level of maturity beyond the laboratory stage with the development of all composite aircraft structures. Yet the basic understanding of the material used in its primary structure has not been extensively investigated. Although this may be attributed in part to the proprietary nature of the system, we believe that it is because of lack of specific tools required for its analysis. Specifically, micromechanical models always as...

  20. Composite Materials with Magnetically Aligned Carbon Nanoparticles Having Enhanced Electrical Properties and Methods of Preparation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Haiping (Inventor); Peterson, G.P. (Bud) (Inventor); Salem, David R. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Magnetically aligned carbon nanoparticle composites have enhanced electrical properties. The composites comprise carbon nanoparticles, a host material, magnetically sensitive nanoparticles and a surfactant. In addition to enhanced electrical properties, the composites can have enhanced mechanical and thermal properties.

  1. Preparation of carbon/carbon composite by pyrolysis of ethanol and methane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • The mixture of ethanol and methane was used as the precursor of pyrolytic carbon. • C/C composites with high textured pyrolytic carbon and high density were obtained. • At the same condition, the high textured carbon cannot be obtained using methane. • The mixture precursor is a promising candidate for C/C composites in CVI. - Abstract: A high textured carbon/carbon (C/C) composite was prepared using the mixture gas of ethanol and methane as the precursor by isothermal chemical vapor infiltration. The preform was infiltrated at 1180 °C with the gas pressure from 2 to 10 kPa. For 85 h infiltration, the average bulk density is up to 1.8 ± 0.02 g cm−3. The texture of the infiltrated carbon was studied by polarized-light microscopy and characterized with the aid of the extinction angle. Texture and fracture morphology of the pyrolytic carbon matrix were observed using scanning electronic microscope. C/C composites with high textured pyrolytic carbon matrix and high density were obtained by pyrolysis of ethanol and methane. This indicates the mixture of ethanol and methane is a promising candidate of the precursors for the preparation of C/C composites

  2. Carbon materials as fillers for polymer matrix composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Stabik

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Paper presents different types of carbon materials used as modifiers for polymer matrix composites. The article contains summary description of the available varieties of carbon materials from brown and hard coal to the carbon nanotubes and fullerenes.Design/methodology/approach: The aim of the publication is to present different forms of carbon materials, their origins and ways of creation. Paper summarizes also basic properties and possible applications of carbon materials as components of engineering polymeric composites.Findings: Paper especially focuses on types of hard coal (mine coal as potential fillers for polymers. These materials and their properties and applications were studied in detail by the authors in previous researches.Research limitations/implications: Analysis of the literature and authors’ own research results indicate that carbon materials as fillers can essentially improve many different properties of polymer matrix composites but still have to be extensively searched to fully evaluate their characteristics and possible applications.Practical implications: Particular attention should be directed to the use of mined coal as a properties modifier of polymers because of its interesting properties, low prize and availability in Poland.Originality/value: New types of carbon materials as polymer fillers, their properties and application possibilities are presented.

  3. Multilayer Electroactive Polymer Composite Material Comprising Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ounaies, Zoubeida (Inventor); Park, Cheol (Inventor); Harrison, Joycelyn S. (Inventor); Holloway, Nancy M. (Inventor); Draughon, Gregory K. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    An electroactive material comprises multiple layers of electroactive composite with each layer having unique dielectric, electrical and mechanical properties that define an electromechanical operation thereof when affected by an external stimulus. For example, each layer can be (i) a 2-phase composite made from a polymer with polarizable moieties and an effective amount of carbon nanotubes incorporated in the polymer for a predetermined electromechanical operation, or (ii) a 3-phase composite having the elements of the 2-phase composite and further including a third component of micro-sized to nano-sized particles of an electroactive ceramic incorporated in the polymer matrix.

  4. Effectiveness of Electromagnetic-Wave Shielding by Composites of Carbon Nanotubes and Carbon Microcoils in Polyurethane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Gi-Hwan; Kim, Sung-Hoon; Yun, Wan Soo

    2015-11-01

    Carbon microcoils (CMCs) were deposited on Al2O3 substrates using C2H2 and H2 as source gases and SF6 as an additive gas in a thermal chemical vapor deposition system. Composites of carbon nanotubes in polyurethane (CNT@PU), carbon microcoils in polyurethane (CMC@PU), and carbon nanotubes plus carbon microcoils in polyurethane (CNT + CMC@PU) were fabricated. The electromagnetic-wave-shielding properties of the CNT + CMC@PU composites were examined and compared with those of CNT@PU and CMC@PU in the measurement-frequency range of 0.25-3.5 GHz. By the incorporation of CNTs, the CNT + CMC@PU composite had the reduced volume resistivity compared with that of CMC@PU composite. Consequently it gives rise to the enhanced shielding effectiveness through the reflection-based EMI-shielding mechanism. Meanwhile, the CNT + CMC@PU composite showed increasing shielding effectiveness with increasing measuring frequency in the range of 2.0-3.5 GHz. In addition, the CNT+CMC@PU composite's SE increased with increasing coated-layer thickness. These results indicate the role of the absorption as an EMI-shielding mechanism in CNT + CMC@PU composite. Based on these results, we suggest that the CNT + CMC@PU composite is a promising EMI-shielding material that can be applicable in a wide frequency range through the reflection and absorption shielding mechanism. PMID:26726656

  5. Hybrid Matrices Layer of Carbon Fiber Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. B. Balu Naik

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Polymeric composites have gone through a level of maturity beyond the laboratory stage with the development of all composite aircraft structures. Yet the basic understanding of the material used in its primary structure has not been extensively investigated. Although this may be attributed in part to the proprietary nature of the system, we believe that it is because of lack of specific tools required for its analysis.Specifically, micromechanical models always assume an evenly distributed homogeneous matrix while lamination theory assumes constant stress through the laminate thickness. Specifically, this work focuses on the development of model systems that can be studied without concerns of proprietary and/or export control requirements. Consequently, the amount of toughness improvement must be balanced between interlaminar and intralaminar fracture toughness. Finally, this work has demonstrated that even though the multilayer structured laminates provide Mode II interlaminar fracture toughness improvements, their mechanical testing behavior is extremely different than conventional composite structures.

  6. Analysis of composition and microstructural uniformity of hybrid glass/carbon fibre composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beauson, Justine; Markussen, Christen Malte; Madsen, Bo

    2013-01-01

    level are investigated. The different levels of compositions in the composites are defined and experimentally determined. The composite volume fractions are determined using an image analysis based procedure. The global fibre volume fractions are determined using a gravimetrical based method. The local......In hybrid fibre composites, the intermixing of the two types of fibres imposes challenges to obtain materials with a well-defined and uniform microstructure. In the present paper, the composition and the microstructural uniformity of hybrid glass/carbon fibre composites mixed at the fibre bundle...... fibre volume fractions are determined using volumetric calculations. A model is presented to predict the interrelation of volume fractions in hybrid fibre composites. The microstructural uniformity of the composites is analysed by the determined variation in composite volume fractions. Two analytical...

  7. Tough carbon fiber composites by hybridization with self-reinforced composites

    OpenAIRE

    Swolfs, Yentl; Gorbatikh, Larissa; Hine, Peter; Ward, Ian; Verpoest, Ignace

    2014-01-01

    While the interest in carbon fiber composites for automotive applications is rapidly increasing, their high cost and low failure strain or toughness continue to impede their widespread use. Both factors can be improved by hybridizing carbon fibers with a material that offers both ductility and reduced cost. In this work, the hybridization with highly oriented polypropylene tapes was investigated. Hybrid co-woven cloths of carbon fiber/polypropylene (PP) prepregs and oriented PP tapes were use...

  8. Electroadsorption Desalination with Carbon Nanotube/PAN-Based Carbon Fiber Felt Composites as Electrodes

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    The chemical vapor deposition method is used to prepare CNT (carbon nanotube)/PCF (PAN-based carbon fiber felt) composite electrodes in this paper, with the surface morphology of CNT/PCF composites and electroadsorption desalination performance being studied. Results show such electrode materials with three-dimensional network nanostructures having a larger specific surface area and narrower micropore distribution, with a huge number of reactive groups covering the surface. Compared with PCF ...

  9. Carbon Fiber Reinforced Carbon Composites Rotary Valves for Internal Combustion Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northam, G. Burton (Inventor); Ransone, Philip O. (Inventor); Rivers, H. Kevin (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    Carbon fiber reinforced carbon composite rotary, sleeve, and disc valves for internal combustion engines and the like are disclosed. The valves are formed from knitted or braided or warp-locked carbon fiber shapes. Also disclosed are valves fabricated from woven carbon fibers and from molded carbon matrix material. The valves of the present invention with their very low coefficient of thermal expansion and excellent thermal and self-lubrication properties, do not present the sealing and lubrication problems that have prevented rotary, sleeve, and disc valves from operating efficiently and reliably in the past. Also disclosed are a sealing tang to further improve sealing capabilities and anti-oxidation treatments.

  10. Carbon Fiber Reinforced Carbon Composite Rotary Valve for an Internal Combustion Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northam, G.Burton (Inventor); Ransone, Philip O. (Inventor); Rivers, H. Kevin (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    Carbon fiber reinforced carbon composite rotary sleeve, and disc valves for internal combustion engines and the like are disclosed. The valves are formed from knitted or braided or wrap-locked carbon fiber shapes. Also disclosed are valves fabricated from woven carbon fibers and from molded carbon matrix material. The valves of the present invention with their very low coefficient of thermal expansion and excellent thermal and self-lubrication properties do not present the sealing and lubrication problems that have prevented rotary sleeve and disc valves from operating efficiently and reliably in the past. Also disclosed are a sealing tang to further improve sealing capabilities and anti-oxidation treatments.

  11. Mechanics of soft composites of rods in elastic gels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Moumita; MacKintosh, F C

    2011-12-01

    We report detailed theoretical investigations of the micromechanics and bulk elastic properties of composites consisting of randomly distributed stiff fibers embedded in an elastic matrix in two and three dimensions. Recent experiments [V. Pelletier, N. Gal, P. Fournier, and M. L. Kilfoil, Phys. Rev. Lett. 102, 188303 (2009)] have suggested that the inclusion of stiff microtubules in a softer, nearly incompressible biopolymer matrix can lead to emergent compressibility. This can be understood in terms of the enhancement of the compressibility of the composite relative to its shear compliance as a result of the addition of stiff rodlike inclusions. We show that the Poisson's ratio ν of such a composite evolves with increasing rod density toward a particular value, or fixed point, independent of the material properties of the matrix, as long as it has a finite initial compressibility. This fixed point is ν = 1/4 in three dimensions and ν = 1/3 in two dimensions. Our results suggest an important role for stiff filaments such as microtubules and stress fibers in cell mechanics. At the same time, our work has a wider elasticity context, with potential applications to composite elastic media with a wide separation of scales in stiffness of its constituents such as carbon nanotube-polymer composites, which have been shown to have highly tunable mechanics. PMID:22304115

  12. Sulfur/carbon composites prepared with ordered porous carbon for Li-S battery cathode

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xin Zhuang; Yingjia Liu; Jian Chen; Hao Chen; Baolian Yi

    2014-01-01

    Ordered porous cabon with a 2-D hexagonal structure, high specific surface area and large pore volume was synthesized through a two-step heating method using tri-block copolymer as template and phenolic resin as carbon precursor. The results indicated the electrochemical performance of the sulfur/carbon composites prepared with the ordered porous carbon was significantly affected by the pore structure of the carbon. Both the specific capacity and cycling stability of the sulfur/carbon composites were improved using the bimodal micro/meso-porous carbon frameworks with high surface area. Its initial discharge capacity can be as high as 1200 mAh·g-1 at a current density of 167.5 mA·g-1. The improved capacity retention was obtained during the cell cycling as well.

  13. Raman Spectroscopic Studies of Carbon Nanotube Composite Fibres

    OpenAIRE

    Deng, Libo

    2011-01-01

    The project has been concerned with structure/property relationships in a series of different carbon nanotube (CNT) composite fibres. Raman spectroscopy has been proved to be a powerful technique to characterise the CNT-containing fibres. Electrospinning has been used to prepare poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) nanofibres containing single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). The effect of the processing conditions including the polymer concentration, electric voltage, tip-to-collector distance, nanotube ...

  14. Improvement in char formability of phenolic resin for development of Carbon/Carbon composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the processing of carbon/carbon composites using polymer resin as the matrix precursor, it is inevitable that a porous structure was formed after carbonization. As a result, densification by liquid phase impregnation followed by recarbonization is required to obtain a densified composite. Consequently, the char formability of resin is an important factor in reducing the number of densification cycles and hence the processing cost. In this study, a novel approach is adopted to improve the densification of carbon/carbon composites by using a new phenolic resin modified by pitch. For this purpose, soluble part of pitch was extracted and dispersed in resol type phenolic resin. The polymerization reaction was performed in presence of para-formaldehyde and a resol-pitch compound was obtained. The second compound was prepared by mixing novolac-furfural in 55:45 weight ratio containing 9% by weight hexamethylene tetramine. This compound was added to resol-pitch compound in 10,20,50 and 80 w %. The microstructure of carbonized resin was investigated by X-ray diffraction and char yield, and the linear and volumetric shrinkage were obtained. Results show that in 80:20 ratio of resol-pitch to novolac-furfural , the char yield would be maximized by 71% and volumetric shrinkage would be minimized at 16.4%. At the same time, XRD results indicate that the resin has a strong ability to graphitize carbon/carbon composites matrix as a necessary step for its processing

  15. Plasma exposure tests of a carbon fiber/epoxy composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An experiment was conducted to test the exposure of a vacuum chamber made of a carbon fiber/epoxy composite to a plasma environment. In previous tests this material(CE 339, made by Ferro Corp.) has shown good vacuum properties and has also demonstrated the capability to withstand high energy electron beams in tests at the Naval Research Laboratory. Based on these promising results, the Torsatron Group at Auburn University conducted plasma exposure tests on a section of carbon fiber/epoxy composite pipe furnished by Oak Ridge National Laboratory. 1 ref, 2 figs

  16. Highly strong and conductive carbon nanotube/cellulose composite paper

    OpenAIRE

    Imai, Masanori; Akiyama, Kousuke; Tanaka, Tomo; Sano, Eiichi

    2010-01-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT)/cellulose composite materials were fabricated in a paper making process optimized for a CNT network to form on the cellulose fibers. The measured electric conductivity was from 0.05-671 S/m for 0.5-16.7-wt% CNT content, higher than that for other polymer composites. The real permittivities were the highest in the microwave region. The unique CNT network structure is thought to be the reason for these high conductivity and permittivity values. Compared to other carbon mat...

  17. Damage detection in composite interfaces through carbon nanotube reinforcement

    OpenAIRE

    Bily, Mollie A.; Young W. Kwon; Pollak, Randall D.

    2010-01-01

    Use of carbon nanotubes along composite interfaces was studied to both improve fracture strength and monitor interfacial damage progression. Both carbon fiber and E-glass fiber composites were manufactured with vinyl ester resin using vacuum-assisted resin transfer molding. First, the effects of single-step curing (i.e., co-curing) versus two-step curing (i.e., curing a new section to a previously cured section) was studied using Mode II fracture testing. The results showed the two-step cured...

  18. Progress in Research on Carbon Nanotubes Reinforced Cementitious Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qinghua Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available As one-dimensional (1D nanofiber, carbon nanotubes (CNTs have been widely used to improve the performance of nanocomposites due to their high strength, small dimensions, and remarkable physical properties. Progress in the field of CNTs presents a potential opportunity to enhance cementitious composites at the nanoscale. In this review, current research activities and key advances on multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs reinforced cementitious composites are summarized, including the effect of MWCNTs on modulus of elasticity, porosity, fracture, and mechanical and microstructure properties of cement-based composites. The issues about the improvement mechanisms, MWCNTs dispersion methods, and the major factors affecting the mechanical properties of composites are discussed. In addition, large-scale production methods of MWCNTs and the effects of CNTs on environment and health are also summarized.

  19. Field emission from hybrid diamond-like carbon and carbon nanotube composite structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanin, H; May, P W; Hamanaka, M H M O; Corat, E J

    2013-12-11

    A thin diamond-like carbon (DLC) film was deposited onto a densely packed "forest" of vertically aligned multiwalled carbon nanotubes (VACNT). DLC deposition caused the tips of the CNTs to clump together to form a microstructured surface. Field-emission tests of this new composite material show the typical low threshold voltages for carbon nanotube structures (2 V μm(-1)) but with greatly increased emission current, better stability, and longer lifetime. PMID:24224845

  20. Electrical conductivity improvement of aeronautical carbon fiber reinforced polyepoxy composites by insertion of carbon nanotubes

    OpenAIRE

    Lonjon, Antoine; Demont, Philippe; Dantras, Eric; Lacabanne, Colette

    2012-01-01

    An increase and homogenization of electrical conductivity is essential in epoxy carbon fiber laminar aeronautical composites. Dynamic conductivity measurements have shown a very poor transversal conductivity. Double wall carbon nanotubes have been introduced into the epoxy matrix to increase the electrical conductivity. The conductivity and the degree of dispersion of carbon nanotubes in epoxy matrix were evaluated. The epoxy matrix was filled with 0.4 wt.% of CNTs to establish the percolatio...

  1. Hybrid Carbon Fibers/Carbon Nanotubes Structures for Next Generation Polymeric Composites

    OpenAIRE

    Doorn, S.; Dai, L.; Phillips, J.; A. K. Roy; M. M. Reda Taha; C. C. Luhrs; Al-Haik, M.

    2010-01-01

    Pitch-based carbon fibers are commonly used to produce polymeric carbon fiber structural composites. Several investigations have reported different methods for dispersing and subsequently aligning carbon nanotubes (CNTs) as a filler to reinforce polymer matrix. The significant difficulty in dispersing CNTs suggested the controlled-growth of CNTs on surfaces where they are needed. Here we compare between two techniques for depositing the catalyst iron used toward growing CNTs on pitch-based ca...

  2. Trial manufacturing of copper-carbon steel composite overpack

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports the results of design analysis and trial manufacturing of copper-carbon steel composite overpacks. The overpack is one of the key components of the engineered barrier system, hence, it is necessary to confirm the applicability of current technique in their manufacture. The copper-carbon steel composite overpack consists of a double container, an outer vessel made of oxygen-free, high-purity copper as the corrosion allowance material, and an inner vessel made of carbon steel as the pressure-resistant material. The trial manufacturing in this time, only the copper outer vessel has been fabricated. Both oxygen-free copper and oxygen-free phosphorus copper were used as materials for the outer vessel. For the shell and bottom portion, these materials were formed integrally by a backward extrusion method. For sealing the top cover plate to the main body, an electron-beam welding method was applied. After manufacturing, mechanical testing of specimens from the copper vessels were carried out. It was confirmed that current technique has sufficient feasibility to manufacture outer vessel. In addition, potential for irradiation embrittlement of the inner carbon-steel vessel by irradiation from vitrified waste over the life time of the overpack has been analyzed. It was shown that the small degree of irradiation embrittlement gives no significant impact on the pressure resistance of the carbon-steel vessel. Future research and development items regarding copper-carbon steel composite overpacks are also discussed. (author)

  3. Preparation and electrocatalytic property of WC/carbon nanotube composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tungsten carbide/carbon nanotube composite was prepared by surface decoration and in situ reduction-carbonization. The samples were characterized by XRD, SEM, EDS, TEM, HRTEM and BET, respectively. The XRD results show that the sample is composed of carbon nanotube, tungsten carbide and tungsten oxide. The EDS results show that the distribution of tungsten oxide is consistent with that of tungsten carbide. SEM, TEM and HRTEM results show that the tungsten carbide nanoparticle with irregular granule grows on the outside surface of carbon nanotube homogenously. The electrocatalytic activity of the sample for p-nitrophenol reduction was tested by a powder microelectrode in a basic solution. The results show that the electrocatalytic activity of the sample is higher than that of granular tungsten carbide, hollow globe tungsten carbide with mesoporosity and carbon nanotube purified. The improvement of the electrocatalytic activity of the sample can be attributed to its components and composite structure. These results indicate that tungsten carbide/carbon nanotube composite is one of the effective ways to improve the electrocatalytic activity of tungsten carbide

  4. Polyacrylonitrile/carbon nanotube composite fibers: Reinforcement efficiency and carbonization studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chae, Han Gi

    Polyacrylonitrile (PAN)/carbon nanotube (CNT) composite fibers were made using various processing methods such as conventional solution spinning, gel spinning, and bi-component gel spinning. The detailed characterization exhibited that the smaller and longer CNT will reinforce polymer matrix mostly in tensile strength and modulus, respectively. Gel spinning combined with CNT also showed the promising potential of PAN/CNT composite fiber as precursor fiber of the next generation carbon fiber. High resolution transmission electron microscopy showed the highly ordered PAN crystal layer on the CNT, which attributed to the enhanced physical properties. The subsequent carbonization study revealed that carbonized PAN/CNT fibers have at least 50% higher tensile strength and modulus as compared to those of carbonized PAN fibers. Electrical conductivity of CNT containing carbon fiber was also 50% higher than that of carbonized PAN fiber. In order to have carbon fiber with high tensile strength, the smaller diameter precursor fiber is preferable. Bi-component gel spinning produced 1-2 mum precursor fiber, resulting in ˜1 mum carbon fiber. The tensile strength of the carbonized bi-component fiber (islands fibers) is as high as 6 GPa with tensile modulus of ˜500 GPa. Further processing optimization may lead to the next generation carbon fiber.

  5. Oligomer functionalized nanotubes and composites formed therewith

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zettl, Alexander K; Sainsbury, Toby; Frechet, Jean M.J.

    2014-03-18

    Disclosed herein is a sequential functionalization methodology for the covalent modification of nanotubes with between one and four repeat units of a polymer. Covalent attachment of oligomer units to the surface of nanotubes results in oligomer units forming an organic sheath around the nanotubes, polymer-functionalized-nanotubes (P-NTs). P-NTs possess chemical functionality identical to that of the functionalizing polymer, and thus provide nanoscale scaffolds which may be readily dispersed within a monomer solution and participate in the polymerization reaction to form a polymer-nanotube/polymer composite. Formation of polymer in the presence of P-NTs leads to a uniform dispersion of nanotubes within the polymer matrix, in contrast to aggregated masses of nanotubes in the case of pristine-NTs. The covalent attachment of oligomeric units to the surface of nanotubes represents the formation of a functional nanoscale building block which can be readily dispersed and integrated within the polymer to form a novel composite material.

  6. Gas Composition Sensing Using Carbon Nanotube Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing; Meyyappan, Meyya

    2012-01-01

    This innovation is a lightweight, small sensor for inert gases that consumes a relatively small amount of power and provides measurements that are as accurate as conventional approaches. The sensing approach is based on generating an electrical discharge and measuring the specific gas breakdown voltage associated with each gas present in a sample. An array of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in a substrate is connected to a variable-pulse voltage source. The CNT tips are spaced appropriately from the second electrode maintained at a constant voltage. A sequence of voltage pulses is applied and a pulse discharge breakdown threshold voltage is estimated for one or more gas components, from an analysis of the current-voltage characteristics. Each estimated pulse discharge breakdown threshold voltage is compared with known threshold voltages for candidate gas components to estimate whether at least one candidate gas component is present in the gas. The procedure can be repeated at higher pulse voltages to estimate a pulse discharge breakdown threshold voltage for a second component present in the gas. The CNTs in the gas sensor have a sharp (low radius of curvature) tip; they are preferably multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) or carbon nanofibers (CNFs), to generate high-strength electrical fields adjacent to the tips for breakdown of the gas components with lower voltage application and generation of high current. The sensor system can provide a high-sensitivity, low-power-consumption tool that is very specific for identification of one or more gas components. The sensor can be multiplexed to measure current from multiple CNT arrays for simultaneous detection of several gas components.

  7. Texturing Carbon-carbon Composite Radiator Surfaces Utilizing Atomic Oxygen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raack, Taylor

    2004-01-01

    Future space nuclear power systems will require radiator technology to dissipate excess heat created by a nuclear reactor. Large radiator fins with circulating coolant are in development for this purpose and an investigation of how to make them most efficient is underway. Maximizing the surface area while minimizing the mass of such radiator fins is critical for obtaining the highest efficiency in dissipating heat. Processes to develop surface roughness are under investigation to maximize the effective surface area of a radiator fin. Surface roughness is created through several methods including oxidation and texturing. The effects of atomic oxygen impingement on carbon-carbon surfaces are currently being investigated for texturing a radiator surface. Early studies of atomic oxygen impingement in low Earth orbit indicate significant texturing due to ram atomic oxygen. The surface morphology of the affected surfaces shows many microscopic cones and valleys which have been experimentally shown to increase radiation emittance. Further study of this morphology proceeded in the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF). Atomic oxygen experiments on the LDEF successfully duplicated the results obtained from materials in spaceflight by subjecting samples to 4.5 eV atomic oxygen from a fixed ram angle. These experiments replicated the conical valley morphology that was seen on samples subjected to low Earth orbit.

  8. CARBONIZED STARCH MICROCELLULAR FOAM-CELLULOSE FIBER COMPOSITE STRUCTURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew R. Rutledge

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available The production of microporous carbon foams from renewable starch microcellular foam-fiber (SMCF-Fiber composites is described. Carbon foams are used in applications such as thermal insulation, battery electrodes, filters, fuel cells, and medical devices. SMCF-Fiber compos-ites were created from an aquagel. The water in the aquagel was exchanged with ethanol and then dried and carbonized. Higher amylose content starches and fiber contents of up to 4% improved the processability of the foam. The SMCF structure revealed agglomerates of swollen starch granules connected by a web of starch with pores in the 50-200 nanometer range. Heating the SMCF-fiber in a nitrogen atmosphere to temperatures between 350-700˚C produced carbon foams with a three-dimensional closed cell foam structure with cell diameters around 50 microns and pore walls around 1-3 microns. The stress versus strain compression data for carbonized samples displayed a linear elastic region and a plateau indicative of brittle crushing, typical of an elastic-brittle foam. The carbon foam products from these renew-able precursors are promising carbon structures with moderate strength and low density.

  9. Nano-engineered composites: interlayer carbon nanotubes effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The concept of carbon nanotube interlayer was successfully introduced to carbon fiber/epoxy composites. This new hybrid laminated composites was characterized by Raman spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and tensile tests. An increase on peak stress close to 85% was witnessed when CNTs interlayer with 206.30 mg was placed to carbon fiber/epoxy laminates. The failure mechanisms are associated to CNTs distribution between and around carbon fibers. These CNTs are also responsible for crack bridging formation and the increase on peak stress. Initial stiffness is strongly affected by the CNT interlayer, however, changes on stiffness is associated to changes on nano/micro-structure due to damage. Three different behaviors can be described, i.e. for interlayers with ≈ 60 mg of CNT the failure mode is based on cracks between and around carbon fibers, while for interlayers with CNT contents between 136 mg and 185 mg cracks were spotted on fibers and inside the CNT/matrix mix. Finally, the third failure mechanism is based on carbon fiber breakage, as a strong interface between CNT/matrix mix and carbon fibers is observed. (author)

  10. Nano-engineered composites: interlayer carbon nanotubes effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glaucio Carley

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The concept of carbon nanotube interlayer was successfully introduced to carbon fiber/epoxy composites. This new hybrid laminated composites was characterized by Raman spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and tensile tests. An increase on peak stress close to 85% was witnessed when CNTs interlayer with 206.30 mg was placed to carbon fiber/epoxy laminates. The failure mechanisms are associated to CNTs distribution between and around carbon fibers. These CNTs are also responsible for crack bridging formation and the increase on peak stress. Initial stiffness is strongly affected by the CNT interlayer, however, changes on stiffness is associated to changes on nano/micro-structure due to damage. Three different behaviors can be described, i.e. for interlayers with ≈ 60 mg of CNT the failure mode is based on cracks between and around carbon fibers, while for interlayers with CNT contents between 136 mg and 185 mg cracks were spotted on fibers and inside the CNT/matrix mix. Finally, the third failure mechanism is based on carbon fiber breakage, as a strong interface between CNT/matrix mix and carbon fibers is observed.

  11. Nano-engineered composites: interlayer carbon nanotubes effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carley, Glaucio, E-mail: carleyone@hotmail.com [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Geraldo, Viviany; Oliveira, Sergio de [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Dept. de Fisica; Avila, Antonio Ferreira [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Dept. de Fisica

    2013-11-01

    The concept of carbon nanotube interlayer was successfully introduced to carbon fiber/epoxy composites. This new hybrid laminated composites was characterized by Raman spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and tensile tests. An increase on peak stress close to 85% was witnessed when CNTs interlayer with 206.30 mg was placed to carbon fiber/epoxy laminates. The failure mechanisms are associated to CNTs distribution between and around carbon fibers. These CNTs are also responsible for crack bridging formation and the increase on peak stress. Initial stiffness is strongly affected by the CNT interlayer, however, changes on stiffness is associated to changes on nano/micro-structure due to damage. Three different behaviors can be described, i.e. for interlayers with Almost-Equal-To 60 mg of CNT the failure mode is based on cracks between and around carbon fibers, while for interlayers with CNT contents between 136 mg and 185 mg cracks were spotted on fibers and inside the CNT/matrix mix. Finally, the third failure mechanism is based on carbon fiber breakage, as a strong interface between CNT/matrix mix and carbon fibers is observed. (author)

  12. Respiration and assimilation processes reflected in the carbon isotopic composition of atmospheric carbon dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper presents diurnal variations of concentration and carbon isotopic composition of atmospheric carbon dioxide caused by respiration and assimilation processes. Air samples were collected during early and late summer in 1998 in unpolluted area (village Guciow located near Roztocze National Park, SE Poland) in three different environments: uncultivated field on a hill, a meadow in the Wieprz river valley and a forest. The effect is very strong during intensive vegetation growth on a sunny day and clear night. The largest diurnal variations in atmospheric CO2 concentration and its carbon isotopic composition in June above the meadow were about 480 ppm and 10 pro mille, respectively. (author)

  13. The dynamic response of carbon fiber-filled polymer composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patterson B.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The dynamic (shock responses of two carbon fiber-filled polymer composites have been quantified using gas gun-driven plate impact experimentation. The first composite is a filament-wound, highly unidirectional carbon fiber-filled epoxy with a high degree of porosity. The second composite is a chopped carbon fiber- and graphite-filled phenolic resin with little-to-no porosity. Hugoniot data are presented for the carbon fiber-epoxy (CE composite to 18.6 GPa in the through-thickness direction, in which the shock propagates normal to the fibers. The data are best represented by a linear Rankine-Hugoniot fit: Us = 2.87 + 1.17 ×up(ρ0 = 1.536g/cm3. The shock wave structures were found to be highly heterogeneous, both due to the anisotropic nature of the fiber-epoxy microstructure, and the high degree of void volume. Plate impact experiments were also performed on a carbon fiber-filled phenolic (CP composite to much higher shock input pressures, exceeding the reactants-to-products transition common to polymers. The CP was found to be stiffer than the filament-wound CE in the unreacted Hugoniot regime, and transformed to products near the shock-driven reaction threshold on the principal Hugoniot previously shown for the phenolic binder itself. [19] On-going research is focused on interrogating the direction-dependent dyanamic response and dynamic failure strength (spall for the CE composite in the TT and 0∘ (fiber directions.

  14. Carbon nanotube/felt composite electrodes without polymer binders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosolen, J. Mauricio; Matsubara, E.Y.; Marchesin, Marcel S.; Lala, Stella M.; Montoro, L.A.; Tronto, S. [Departamento de Quimica-FFCLRP, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Ribeirao Preto 14040-930, SP (Brazil)

    2006-11-08

    In this work we have investigated the suitability of composite electrodes consisting of cup-stacked and bamboo-like carbon nanotubes (CNT) synthesized directly onto a carbon felt for both lithium storage and double-layer capacitance applications. The CNT/felt composite electrode was prepared using catalytic chemical vapor decomposition on the carbon felt. The microstructure of the electrodes was characterized by scanning electron microscopy. Electrochemical characterization of the CNT/felt, either submitted or not to acid treatment for extraction of the catalytic particles used during the CNT growth, was carried out using 1molL{sup -1} LiPF{sub 6} in mixtures of ethylene carbonate, dimethyl carbonate, diethyl carbonate, and propylene carbonate. The carbon nanotubes loading and the type of CNT, whether open or closed, on the felt were the most significant factors regarding the electrochemical properties of the composite. With respect to the application of the composite to lithium storage, an anomalous behavior in the reversible specific capacity as a function of the current was detected. The capacity was found to be large at higher current values. The best reversible specific capacity was found for the open-CNT/felt (275mAhg{sup -1} at 0.16Ag{sup -1}, and 200mAhg{sup -1} at 0.82Ag{sup -1}), on an area of 0.634mm{sup 2}. The double-layer capacitance of the CNT decreased with increasing current. In the case of the open-CNT with a CNT loading of 13.93mg, the composite provided 40.3{mu}Fcm{sup 2} or about 12Fg{sup -1} at 10mA of polarization current using 1molL{sup -1} LiPF{sub 6} in mixtures of ethylene carbonate and dimethyl carbonate. For the closed-CNT with a CNT loading of 9.3mg, the double-layer capacitance was 30Fg{sup -1} at 20mA in 1M H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}. (author)

  15. Analysis of Osteoblast Differentiation on Polymer Thin Films Embedded with Carbon Nanotubes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Woo Lee

    Full Text Available Osteoblast differentiation can be modulated by variations in order of nanoscale topography. Biopolymers embedded with carbon nanotubes can cause various orders of roughness at the nanoscale and can be used to investigate the dynamics of extracellular matrix interaction with cells. In this study, clear relationship between the response of osteoblasts to integrin receptor activation, their phenotype, and transcription of certain genes on polymer composites embedded with carbon nanotubes was demonstrated. We generated an ultrathin nanocomposite film embedded with carbon nanotubes and observed improved adhesion of pre-osteoblasts, with a subsequent increase in their proliferation. The expression of genes encoding integrin subunits α5, αv, β1, and β3 was significantly upregulated at the early of time-point when cells initially attached to the carbon nanotube/polymer composite. The advantage of ultrathin nanocomposite film for pre-osteoblasts was demonstrated by staining for the cytoskeletal protein vinculin and cell nuclei. The expression of essential transcription factors for osteoblastogenesis, such as Runx2 and Sp7 transcription factor 7 (known as osterix, was upregulated after 7 days. Consequently, the expression of genes that determine osteoblast phenotype, such as alkaline phosphatase, type I collagen, and osteocalcin, was accelerated on carbon nanotube embedded polymer matrix after 14 days. In conclusion, the ultrathin nanocomposite film generated various orders of nanoscale topography that triggered processes related to osteoblast bone formation.

  16. Carbon-carbon composites for orthopedic prosthesis and implants. CRADA final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burchell, T D; Klett, J W; Strizak, J P [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Baker, C [FMI, Biddeford, ME (United States)

    1998-01-21

    The prosthetic implant market is extensive. For example, because of arthritic degeneration of hip and knee cartilage and osteoporotic fractures of the hip, over 200,000 total joint replacements (TJRs) are performed in the United States each year. Current TJR devices are typically metallic (stainless steel, cobalt, or titanium alloy) and are fixed in the bone with polymethylacrylate (PMMA) cement. Carbon-carbon composite materials offer several distinct advantages over metals for TJR prosthesis. Their mechanical properties can be tailored to match more closely the mechanical properties of human bone, and the composite may have up to 25% porosity, the size and distribution of which may be controlled through processing. The porous nature of carbon-carbon composites will allow for the ingrowth of bone, achieving biological fixation, and eliminating the need for PMMA cement fixation.

  17. Influence of carbon fillers on the thermal conductivity of Poly (methyl methacrylate)/carbon composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chawla, Komal; Chauhan, Alok P. S.

    2016-04-01

    In the present research on carbon polymer composites, the effects of variation of the concentration of conductive fillers on the thermal conductivity of the resultant composite were studied. Carbon powders in the form of Carbon Fibers (CF) (200µm), Carbon Black (CB) (30-100 nm) and Graphite (75-100µm) were being considered as conductive fillers in the Poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) matrix. Nielsen model was found to be the best proposed model that incorporated geometric configuration comprising of both the orientation and shape of fillers. It was established that the calculated values of thermal conductivity of PMMA composites with single fillers of CF were higher than those of CB followed by Graphite. Furthermore, a visible synergy was observed between the combinations of these fillers such as Graphite and CF, Graphite and CB, CF and CB, as well as CB and CF.

  18. Attenuation characteristics of ultrasonic pulse in carbon/phenolic composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The presence of porosity in a fiber-reinforced composite may have a critical effect on the composite's mechanical properties and service performance. Detection and characterization of porosity by nondestructive, especially ultrasonic, testing have received considerable attention in recent years. In this paper, the velocity and attenuation of longitudinal and shear ultrasonic pulse in carbon/phenolic composite were measured using through-transmission technique. And the attenuation characteristics were determined and analyzed as a function of frequency. These results show that the main mechanism of attenuation is Rayleigh scattering from porosity and the change of the volume fraction of porosity is associated with that of attenuation slope.

  19. Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube/PMMA Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Fangming; Fisher, John; Winey, Karen

    2003-03-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) have demonstrated unique mechanical, thermal and electrical properties. Similar properties are expected for polymer/SWNT nanocomposites. A new processing method has been used to produce PMMA/SWNT composites, which provides better dispersion of SWNT in the polymer matrix. Optical microscopy of the samples show improved dispersion of SWNT in the PMMA matrix, which is the key factor of the composite performance. Aligned and unaligned composite samples have been made for both purified SWNT and functionalized SWNT with different SWNT loadings. The tensile, thermal conductivity, and electroconductivity measurements of these samples will be performed.

  20. Effect of epoxy coatings on carbon fibers during manufacture of carbon fiber reinforced resin matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The changes in oxygen and nitrogen during manufacture of the carbon fiber reinforced resin matrix composites were measured using the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy method. The effects of the change in oxygen and nitrogen on the strength of the carbon fibers were investigated and the results revealed that the change of the tensile strength with increasing heat curing temperature was attributed to the change in the surface flaws of the carbon fibers because the carbon fibers are sensitive to the surface flaws. The effect of the surface energy that was calculated using Kaelble's method on the strength of the carbon fibers was investigated. Furthermore, the surface roughness of the carbon fibers was measured using atom force microscopy. The change trend of roughness was reverse to that of the strength, which was because of the brittle fracture of the carbon fibers.

  1. Structural and biological properties of carbon nanotube composite films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narayan, Roger J. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332-0245 (United States)]. E-mail: roger.narayan@mse.gatech.edu; Berry, C.J. [Environmental Biotechnology Section, Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States); Brigmon, R.L. [Environmental Biotechnology Section, Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)

    2005-11-20

    Carbon nanotube composite films have been developed that exhibit unusual structural and biological properties. These novel materials have been created by pulsed laser ablation of graphite and bombardment of nitrogen ions at temperatures between 600 and 700 deg. C. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy and radial distribution function analysis demonstrate that this material consists of sp{sup 2}-bonded concentric ribbons that are wrapped approximately 15 deg. normal to the silicon substrate. The interlayer order in this material extends to approximately 15-30 A. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy data suggest that this material is predominantly trigonally coordinated. The carbon nanotube composite structure results from the use of energetic ions, which allow for non-equilibrium growth of graphitic planes. In vitro testing has revealed significant antimicrobial activity of carbon nanotube composite films against Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus warneri colonization. Carbon nanotube composite films may be useful for inhibiting microorganism attachment and biofilm formation in hemodialysis catheters and other medical devices.

  2. Percolation Effects In Electrical Conductivity Of Carbon Fibre Composites

    OpenAIRE

    Chippendale, Richard; Golosnoy, Igor O

    2011-01-01

    The effects due to percolation on the bulk electrical conductivity of Carbon Fibre Composites are studied in detail. To simulate the CFCs manufacturing process the fibres are placed randomly in the polymer matrix using Monte Carlo based simulation techniques. The electric conductivity of the CFCs was then analysed using finite element modelling.

  3. Thermoplastic polybutadiene-based polyurethane/carbon nanofiber composites

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Špírková, Milena; Duszová, A.; Poreba, Rafal; Kredatusová, Jana; Bureš, R.; Fáberová, M.; Šlouf, Miroslav

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 67, December (2014), s. 434-440. ISSN 1359-8368 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA13-06700S Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : carbon fibre * polymer–matrix composites (PMCs) * mechanical properties Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 2.983, year: 2014

  4. Thermoelectric power of multilayer compositions of aluminium and carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Changing the thermoelectric power monolayer and multilayer aluminium foil and multilayer foils compositions of aluminium and carbon nanotubes is the deformation ε < 60% due to the scattering of conduction electrons at dislocations and ε=(70 ...96)% - due to their scattering on the boundaries between the layers (thermoelectric size effect)

  5. Improved Composites Using Crosslinked, Surface-Modified Carbon Nanotube Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, James Stewart

    2014-01-01

    Individual carbon nanotubes (CNTs) exhibit exceptional tensile strength and stiffness; however, these properties have not translated well to the macroscopic scale. Premature failure of bulk CNT materials under tensile loading occurs due to the relatively weak frictional forces between adjacent CNTs, leading to poor load transfer through the material. When used in polymer matrix composites (PMCs), the weak nanotube-matrix interaction leads to the CNTs providing less than optimal reinforcement.Our group is examining the use of covalent crosslinking and surface modification as a means to improve the tensile properties of PMCs containing carbon nanotubes. Sheet material comprised of unaligned multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) was used as a drop-in replacement for carbon fiber in the composites. A variety of post-processing methods have been examined for covalently crosslinking the CNTs to overcome the weak inter-nanotube shear interactions, resulting in improved tensile strength and modulus for the bulk sheet material. Residual functional groups from the crosslinking chemistry may have the added benefit of improving the nanotube-matrix interaction. Composites prepared using these crosslinked, surface-modified nanotube sheet materials exhibit superior tensile properties to composites using the as received CNT sheet material.

  6. Potential release scenarios for carbon nanotubes used in composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    The expected widespread use of carbon nanotube (CNT)-composites in consumer products calls for an assessment of the possible release and exposure to workers, consumers and the environment. Release of CNTs may occur at all steps in the life cycle of products, but to date only limi...

  7. Hybrid Aluminum Composite Materials Based on Carbon Nanostructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana S. Koltsova

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available We investigated formation of carbon nanofibers grown by chemical deposition (CVD method using an acetylene-hydrogen mixture on the surface of micron-sized aluminum powder particles. To obtain uniform distribution of the carbon nanostructures on the particles we deposited nickel catalyst on the surface by spraying from the aqueous solution of nickel nitrate. It was found that increasing the time of the synthesis lowers the rate of growth of carbon nanostructures due to the deactivation of the catalyst. The Raman spectroscopy measurements confirm the presence of disordered carbon corresponding to CNFs in the specimen. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy showed the presence of aluminum carbide in the hot pressed samples. An aluminum composite material prepared using 1 wt.% CNFs obtained by uniaxial cold pressing and sintering showed 30% increase in the hardness compared to pure aluminum, whereas the composites prepared by hot pressing showed 80% increase in the hardness. Composite materials have satisfactory ductility. Thus, the aluminum based material reinforced with carbon nanostructures should be appropriate for creating high-strength and light compacts for aerospace and automotive applications and power engineering.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.21.3.7355

  8. Prediction on Carbon/Carbon Composites Ablative Performance by Artificial Neutral Net

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guanghui BAI; Songhe MENG; Boming ZHANG; Yang LIU

    2008-01-01

    A preliminary estimation of ablation property for carbon-carbon composites by artificial neutral net (ANN) method was presented.It was found that the carbon-carbon composites' density,degree of graphitization and the sort of matrix are the key controlling factors for its ablative performance.Then,a brief fuzzy mathe-matical relationship was established between these factors and ablative performance.Through experiments,the performance of the ANN was evaluated,which was used in the ablative performance prediction of C/C composites.When the training set,the structure and the training parameter of the net change,the best match ratio of these parameters was achieved.Based on the match ratio,this paper forecasts and evalu-ates the carbon-carbon ablation performance.Through experiences,the ablative performance prediction of carbon-carbon using ANN can achieve the line ablation rate,which satisfies the need of precision of practical engineering fields.

  9. Method of making carbon fiber-carbon matrix reinforced ceramic composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Brian (Inventor); Benander, Robert (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A method of making a carbon fiber-carbon matrix reinforced ceramic composite wherein the result is a carbon fiber-carbon matrix reinforcement is embedded within a ceramic matrix. The ceramic matrix does not penetrate into the carbon fiber-carbon matrix reinforcement to any significant degree. The carbide matrix is a formed in situ solid carbide of at least one metal having a melting point above about 1850 degrees centigrade. At least when the composite is intended to operate between approximately 1500 and 2000 degrees centigrade for extended periods of time the solid carbide with the embedded reinforcement is formed first by reaction infiltration. Molten silicon is then diffused into the carbide. The molten silicon diffuses preferentially into the carbide matrix but not to any significant degree into the carbon-carbon reinforcement. Where the composite is intended to operate between approximately 2000 and 2700 degrees centigrade for extended periods of time such diffusion of molten silicon into the carbide is optional and generally preferred, but not essential.

  10. Carbon Cryogel and Carbon Paper-Based Silicon Composite Anode Materials for Lithium-Ion Batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodworth, James; Baldwin, Richard; Bennett, William

    2010-01-01

    A variety of materials are under investigation for use as anode materials in lithium-ion batteries, of which, the most promising are those containing silicon. 6 One such material is a composite formed via the dispersion of silicon in a resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF) gel followed by pyrolysis. Two silicon-carbon composite materials, carbon microspheres and nanofoams produced from nano-phase silicon impregnated RF gel precursors have been synthesized and investigated. Carbon microspheres are produced by forming the silicon-containing RF gel into microspheres whereas carbon nano-foams are produced by impregnating carbon fiber paper with the silicon containing RF gel to create a free standing electrode. 1-5 Both materials have demonstrated their ability to function as anodes and utilize the silicon present in the material. Stable reversible capacities above 400 mAh/g for the bulk material and above 1000 mAh/g of Si have been observed.

  11. Silicon Composite Anode Materials for Lithium Ion Batteries Based on Carbon Cryogels and Carbon Paper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodworth, James; Baldwin, Richard; Bennett, William

    2010-01-01

    A variety of materials are under investigation for use as anode materials in lithium-ion batteries, of which, the most promising are those containing silicon. One such material is a composite formed via the dispersion of silicon in a resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF) gel followed by pyrolysis. Two silicon-carbon composite materials, carbon microspheres and nanofoams produced from nano-phase silicon impregnated RF gel precursors have been synthesized and investigated. Carbon microspheres are produced by forming the silicon-containing RF gel into microspheres whereas carbon nanofoams are produced by impregnating carbon fiber paper with the silicon containing RF gel to create a free standing electrode. Both materials have demonstrated their ability to function as anodes and utilize the silicon present in the material. Stable reversible capacities above 400 mAh/g for the bulk material and above 1000 mAh/g of Si have been observed.

  12. Evaluation of Mechanical Property of Carbon Fiber/Polypropylene Composite According to Carbon Fiber Surface Treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, the mechanical properties of a carbon fiber/polypropylene composite were evaluated according to the carbon fiber surface treatment. Carbon fiber surface treatments such as silane coupling agents and plasma treatment were performed to enhance the interfacial strength between carbon fibers and polypropylene. The treated carbon fiber surface was characterized by XP S, Sem, and single-filament tensile test. The interlaminar shear strength (Ilks) of the composite with respect to the surface treatment was determined by a short beam shear test. The test results showed that the Ilks of the plasma-treated specimen increased with the treatment time. The Ilks of the specimen treated with a silane coupling agent after plasma treatment increased by 48.7% compared to that of the untreated specimen

  13. Thermal and Mechanical Performance of a Carbon/Carbon Composite Spacecraft Radiator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhn, Jonathan; Benner, Steve; Butler, Dan; Silk, Eric

    1999-01-01

    Carbon-carbon composite materials offer greater thermal efficiency, stiffness to weight ratio, tailorability, and dimensional stability than aluminum. These lightweight thermal materials could significantly reduce the overall costs associated with satellite thermal control and weight. However, the high cost and long lead-time for carbon-carbon manufacture have limited their widespread usage. Consequently, an informal partnership between government and industrial personnel called the Carbon-Carbon Spacecraft Radiator Partnership (CSRP) was created to foster carbon-carbon composite use for thermally and structurally demanding space radiator applications. The first CSRP flight opportunity is on the New Millennium Program (NMP) Earth Orbiter-1 (EO-1) spacecraft, scheduled for launch in late 1999. For EO-1, the CSRP designed and fabricated a Carbon-Carbon Radiator (CCR) with carbon-carbon facesheets and aluminum honeycomb core, which will also serve as a structural shear panel. While carbon-carbon is an ideal thermal candidate for spacecraft radiators, in practice there are technical challenges that may compromise performance. In this work, the thermal and mechanical performance of the EO-1 CCR is assessed by analysis and testing. Both then-nal and mechanical analyses were conducted to predict the radiator response to anticipated launch and on-orbit loads. The thermal model developed was based on thermal balance test conditions. The thermal analysis was performed using SINDA version 4.0. Structural finite element modeling and analysis were performed using SDRC/1-DEAS and UAI/NASTRAN, respectively. In addition, the CCR was subjected to flight qualification thermal/vacuum and vibration tests. The panel meets or exceeds the requirements for space flight and demonstrates promise for future satellite missions.

  14. A comparative study of EMI shielding properties of carbon nanofiber and multi-walled carbon nanotube filled polymer composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yonglai; Gupta, Mool C; Dudley, Kenneth L; Lawrence, Roland W

    2005-06-01

    Electromagnetic interference shielding properties of carbon nanofiber- and multi-walled carbon nanotube-filled polystyrene composites were investigated in the frequency range of 8.2-12.4 GHz (X-band). It was observed that the shielding effectiveness of composites was frequency independent, and increased with the increase of carbon nanofiber or nanotube loading. At the same filler loading, multi-walled carbon nanotube-filled polystyrene composites exhibited higher shielding effectiveness compared to those filled with carbon nanofibers. In particular, carbon nanotubes were more effective than nanofibers in providing high EMI shielding at low filler loadings. The experimental data showed that the shielding effectiveness of the composite containing 7 wt% carbon nanotubes could reach more than 26 dB, implying that such a composite can be used as a potential electromagnetic interference shielding material. The dominant shielding mechanism of carbon nanotube-filled polystyrene composites was also discussed. PMID:16060155

  15. Fracture morphology of carbon fiber reinforced plastic composite laminates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinod Srinivasa

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP composites have been extensively used in fabrication of primary structures for aerospace, automobile and other engineering applications. With continuous and widespread use of these composites in several advanced technology, the frequency of failures is likely to increase. Therefore, to establish the reasons for failures, the fracture modes should be understood thoroughly and unambiguously. In this paper, CFRP composite have been tested in tension, compression and flexural loadings; and microscopic study with the aid of Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM has been performed on failed (fractured composite surfaces to identify the principle features of failure. Efforts have been made in correlating the fracture surface characteristics to the failure mode. The micro-mechanics analysis of failure serves as a useful guide in selecting constituent materials and designing composites from the failure behavior point of view. Also, the local failure initiation results obtained here has been reliably extended to global failure prediction.

  16. Fabrication of aluminum matrix composite reinforced with carbon nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    1.0 wt.% carbon nanotube (CNT) reinforced 2024A1 matrix composite was fabricated by cold isostatic press and subsequent hot extrusion techniques. The mechanical properties of the composite were measured by a tensile test. Meanwhile, the fracture surfaces were examined using field emission scanning electron microscopy. The experimental results show that CNTs are dispersed homogeneously in the composite and that the interfaces of the Al matrix and the CNT bond well. Although the tensile strength and the Young's modulus of the composite are enhanced markedly, the elongation does not decrease when compared with the matrix material fabricated under the same process. The reasons for the increments may be the extraordinary mechanical properties of CNTs, and the bridging and pulling-out role of CNTs in the Al matrix composite.

  17. Design of Carbon Composite Driveshaft for Ultralight Aircraft Propulsion System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Poul

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the design of the carbon fibre composite driveshaft. This driveshaft will be used for connection between piston engine and propulsor of the type of axial-flow fan. Three different versions of driveshaft were designed and produced. Version 1 if completely made of Al alloy. Version 2 is of hybrid design where the central part is made of high strength carbon composite and flanges are made of Al alloy. Adhesive bond is used for connection between flanges and the central CFRP tube. Version 3 differs from the version 2 by aplication of ultrahigh-strength carbon fibre on the central part. Dimensions and design conditions are equal for all three versions to obtain simply comparable results. Calculations of driveshafts are described in the paper. 

  18. Carbon-fiber composite molecular sieves for gas separation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jagtoyen, M.; Derbyshire, F. [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States)

    1996-08-01

    This report describes continuing work on the activation and characterization of formed carbon fiber composites. The composites are produced at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and activated at the Center for Applied Energy Research (CAER) using steam, CO{sub 2}, or O{sub 2} at different conditions of temperature and time, and with different furnace configurations. The general aims of the project are to produce uniformly activated samples with controlled pore structures for specialist applications such as gas separation and water treatment. In previous work the authors reported that composites produced from isotropic pitch fibers weighing up to 25g can be uniformly activated through the appropriate choice of reaction conditions and furnace configurations. They have now succeeded in uniformly activating composites of dimensions up to 12 x 7 x 6 cm, or up to about 166 gram - a scale-up factor of about six. Part of the work has involved the installation of a new furnace that can accommodate larger composites. Efforts were made to achieve uniform activation in both steam and CO{sub 2}. The authors have also succeeded in producing materials with very uniform and narrow pore size distributions by using a novel method involving low temperature oxygen chemisorption in combination with heat treatment in N{sub 2} at high temperatures. Work has also started on the activation of PAN based carbon fibers and fiber composites with the aim of producing composites with wide pore structures for use as catalyst supports. So far activation of the PAN fiber composites supplied by ORNL has been difficult which is attributed to the low reactivity of the PAN fibers. As a result, studies are now being made of the activation of the PAN fibers to investigate the optimum carbonization and activation conditions for PAN based fibers.

  19. Process Optimization of Bismaleimide (BMI) Resin Infused Carbon Fiber Composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrlich, Joshua W.; Tate, LaNetra C.; Cox, Sarah B.; Taylor, Brian J.; Wright, M. Clara; Faughnan, Patrick D.; Batterson, Lawrence M.; Caraccio, Anne J.; Sampson, Jeffery W.

    2013-01-01

    Engineers today are presented with the opportunity to design and build the next generation of space vehicles out of the lightest, strongest, and most durable materials available. Composites offer excellent structural characteristics and outstanding reliability in many forms that will be utilized in future aerospace applications including the Commercial Crew and Cargo Program and the Orion space capsule. NASA's Composites for Exploration (CoEx) project researches the various methods of manufacturing composite materials of different fiber characteristics while using proven infusion methods of different resin compositions. Development and testing on these different material combinations will provide engineers the opportunity to produce optimal material compounds for multidisciplinary applications. Through the CoEx project, engineers pursue the opportunity to research and develop repair patch procedures for damaged spacecraft. Working in conjunction with Raptor Resins Inc., NASA engineers are utilizing high flow liquid infusion molding practices to manufacture high-temperature composite parts comprised of intermediate modulus 7 (IM7) carbon fiber material. IM7 is a continuous, high-tensile strength composite with outstanding structural qualities such as high shear strength, tensile strength and modulus as well as excellent corrosion, creep, and fatigue resistance. IM7 carbon fiber, combined with existing thermoset and thermoplastic resin systems, can provide improvements in material strength reinforcement and deformation-resistant properties for high-temperature applications. Void analysis of the different layups of the IM7 material discovered the largest total void composition within the [ +45 , 90 , 90 , -45 ] composite panel. Tensile and compressional testing proved the highest mechanical strength was found in the [0 4] layup. This paper further investigates the infusion procedure of a low-cost/high-performance BMI resin into an IM7 carbon fiber material and the

  20. Supercapacitors based on carbon nanotube fuzzy fabric structural composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alresheedi, Bakheet Awad

    Supercapacitors used in conjunction with batteries offer a solution to energy storage and delivery problems in systems where high power output is required, such as in fully electric cars. This project aimed to enhance current supercapacitor technology by fabricating activated carbon on a substrate consisting of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) grown on a carbon fiber fabric (fuzzy fabric). The fuzzy surface of CNTs lowers electrical resistance and increases porosity, resulting in a flexible fabric with high specific capacitance. Experimental results confirm that the capacitance of activated carbon fabricated on the fuzzy fiber composite is significantly higher than when activated carbon is formed simply on a bare carbon fiber substrate, indicating the usefulness of CNTs in supercapacitor technology. The fabrication of the fuzzy fiber based carbon electrode was fairly complex. The processing steps included composite curing, stabilization, carbonization and activation. Ratios of the three basic ingredients for the supercapacitor (fiber, CNT and polymer matrix) were investigated through experimentation and Grey relational analysis. The aim of Grey relational analysis was to examine factors that affect the overall performance of the supercapacitor. It is based on finding relationships in both independent and interrelated data series (parameters). Using this approach, it was determined that the amount of CNTs on the fiber surface plays a major role in the capacitor properties. An increased amount of CNTs increases the surface area and electrical conductivity of the substrate, while also reducing the required time of activation. Technical advances in the field of Materials and Structures are usually focused on attaining superior performance while reducing weight and cost. To achieve such combinations, multi-functionality has become essential; namely, to reduce weight by imparting additional functions simultaneously to a single material. In this study, a structural composite with

  1. Trial manufacturing of titanium-carbon steel composite overpack

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Honma, Nobuyuki; Chiba, Takahiko; Tanai, Kenji [Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Inst., Waste Management and Fuel Cycle Research Center, Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1999-11-01

    This paper reports the results of design analysis and trial manufacturing of full-scale titanium-carbon steel composite overpacks. The overpack is one of the key components of the engineered barrier system, hence, it is necessary to confirm the applicability of current technique in their manufacture. The required thickness was calculated according to mechanical resistance analysis, based on models used in current nuclear facilities. The Adequacy of the calculated dimensions was confirmed by finite-element methods. To investigate the necessity of a radiation shielding function of the overpack, the irradiation from vitrified waste has been calculated. As a result, it was shown that shielding on handling and transport equipment is a more reasonable and practical approach than to increase thickness of overpack to attain a self-shielding capability. After the above investigation, trial manufacturing of full-scale model of titanium-carbon steel composite overpack has been carried out. For corrosion-resistant material, ASTM Grade-2 titanium was selected. The titanium layer was bonded individually to a cylindrical shell and fiat cover plates (top and bottom) made of carbon steel. For the cylindrical shell portion, a cylindrically formed titanium layer was fitted to the inner carbon steel vessel by shrinkage. For the flat cover plates (top and bottom), titanium plate material was coated by explosive bonding. Electron beam welding and gas metal arc welding were combined to weld of the cover plates to the body. No significant failure was evident from inspections of the fabrication process, and the applicability of current technology for manufacturing titanium-carbon steel composite overpack was confirmed. Future research and development items regarding titanium-carbon steel composite overpacks are also discussed. (author)

  2. Trial manufacturing of titanium-carbon steel composite overpack

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports the results of design analysis and trial manufacturing of full-scale titanium-carbon steel composite overpacks. The overpack is one of the key components of the engineered barrier system, hence, it is necessary to confirm the applicability of current technique in their manufacture. The required thickness was calculated according to mechanical resistance analysis, based on models used in current nuclear facilities. The Adequacy of the calculated dimensions was confirmed by finite-element methods. To investigate the necessity of a radiation shielding function of the overpack, the irradiation from vitrified waste has been calculated. As a result, it was shown that shielding on handling and transport equipment is a more reasonable and practical approach than to increase thickness of overpack to attain a self-shielding capability. After the above investigation, trial manufacturing of full-scale model of titanium-carbon steel composite overpack has been carried out. For corrosion-resistant material, ASTM Grade-2 titanium was selected. The titanium layer was bonded individually to a cylindrical shell and fiat cover plates (top and bottom) made of carbon steel. For the cylindrical shell portion, a cylindrically formed titanium layer was fitted to the inner carbon steel vessel by shrinkage. For the flat cover plates (top and bottom), titanium plate material was coated by explosive bonding. Electron beam welding and gas metal arc welding were combined to weld of the cover plates to the body. No significant failure was evident from inspections of the fabrication process, and the applicability of current technology for manufacturing titanium-carbon steel composite overpack was confirmed. Future research and development items regarding titanium-carbon steel composite overpacks are also discussed. (author)

  3. Activation and micropore structure of carbon-fiber composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jagtoyen, M.; Derbyshire, F.; Kimber, G. [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States). Center for Applied Energy Research

    1997-12-01

    Rigid, high surface area activated carbon fiber composites have been produced with high permeabilities for environmental applications in gas and water purification. The project involves a collaboration between the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the Center for Applied Energy Research (CAER), University of Kentucky. The main focus of recent work has been to find a satisfactory means to uniformly activate large samples of carbon fiber composites to produce controlled pore structures. Processes have been developed using activation in steam and CO{sub 2}, and a less conventional method involving oxygen chemisorption and subsequent heat treatment. Another objective has been to explore applications for the activated composites in environmental applications related to fossil energy production.

  4. Mesoporous carbon composite for CO{sub 2} capture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Chih-Chau; Jin, Zhong; Lu, Wei; Sun, Zhengzong; Alemany, Lawrence; Tour, James M. [Rice University, Houston, TX (United States); Lomeda, Jay R.; Flatt, Austen K. [Nalco Company, Naperville, IL (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Herein we report a carbon based technology that can be used to rapidly adsorb and release CO{sub 2}. CO{sub 2} uptake by the synthesized composites was determined using a gravimetric method at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. 39% polyethylenimine-mesocarbon (PEI-CMK-3) composite had {approx} 12 wt% CO{sub 2} uptake capacity and a 37% polyvinylamine meso-carbon (PVA-CMK-3) composite had {approx} 13 wt% CO{sub 2} uptake capacity. The sorbents were easily regenerated at 75 deg C and exhibit excellent stability over multiple regeneration cycles. CO{sub 2} uptake was equivalent when using 10% CO{sub 2} in 90% CH{sub 4}, C{sub 2}H{sub 6} and C{sub 3}H{sub 9} mixture, underscoring the efficacy for CO{sub 2} separation from natural gas. (author)

  5. Electron beam processing of carbon fibre reinforced braided composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The possibility of producing a new type carbon fibre reinforced composite profile has been examined by applying braiding, a well-known process of textile technology. Pipe and hollow profile composite products can be manufactured this way by applying Electron Beam curing. The fabric-like braided reinforcing structure was manufactured out of Hungarian-made carbon fibre roving of 48,000 elementary fibres. The mutual irradiation of the system impregnated with epoxy-acrylate oligomer by 8 MeV EB resulted in better mechanical properties then conventional chemical curing. Owing to its low density and high specific strength this new composite product can possibly be applied in dynamically loaded structures e.g. in the automotive industry

  6. Electrical properties of multiwalled carbon nanotube reinforced fused silica composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Changshu; Pan, Yubai; Liu, Xuejian; Shi, Xiaomei; Sun, Xingwei; Guo, Jingkun

    2006-12-01

    Multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWCNT)-fused silica composite powders were synthesized by solgel method and dense bulk composites were successfully fabricated via hot-pressing. This composite was characterized by XRD, HRTEM, and FESEM. MWCNTs in the hot-pressed composites are in their integrity observed by HRTEM. The electrical properties of MWCNT-fused silica composites were measured and analyzed. The electrical resistivity was found to decrease with the increase in the amount of the MWCNT loading in the composite. When the volume percentage of the MWCNTs increased to 5 vol%, the electrical resistivity of the composite is 24.99 omega cm, which is a decrease of twelve orders of value over that of pure fused silica matrix. The electrical resistivity further decreases to 1.742 omega. cm as the concentration of the MWCNTs increased to 10 vol%. The dielectric properties of the composites were also measured at the frequency ranging from 12.4 to 17.8 GHz (Ku band) at room temperature. The experimental results reveal that the dielectric properties are extremely sensitive to the volume percentage of the MWCNTs, and the permittivities, especially the imaginary permittivities, increase dramatically with the increase in the concentration of the MWCNTs. The improvement of dielectric properties in high frequency region mainly originates from the greatly increasing electrical properties of the composite. PMID:17256338

  7. Electron beam processing of carbon fibre reinforced braided composites beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Complete text of publication follows. In this paper the possibility of producing a new type carbon fiber reinforced composite is examined by applying braiding, a well-known process of textile technology. The appearance of the new Hungarian carbon fiber with excellent mechanical properties in the market enables the development of newer type carbon fiber reinforced composites in the continuously widening range of engineering applications. Advanced hollow profiles, pipes and other composite products can be manufactured in continuous operation. A new way of composite production of this kind is the manufacturing of reinforcing structure by braiding technology producing a composite with sufficient mechanical properties from this cross directional fabric-like textile structure by impregnation. This manufacturing process can complete the variety of hollow products serving the same purpose as pultrusion or filament winding. This way a profile type framework element with a hollow cross section is manufactured having favorable mechanical properties. Owing to its small mass and high specific strength this product can be applied in dynamically loaded structures e.g. in the automotive industry. For crosslinking of the matrix the method of high-speed electron beam curing has been examined in order to reach continuous operation. The field of use and application of carbon fiber braided structures has a great chance especially in machine engineering and in the automotive industry. The main reason for this is that braiding processes are capable of producing structures having good mechanical properties at a low processing price. The mass of the composite load-bearing structure produced this way is one fifth of the steel product having similar geometry, and its specific mechanical properties are nearly as good as that of the most commonly applied semiproduct and structural component, the welded steel profile

  8. Diet control on carbon isotopic composition of land snail shell carbonate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU ZongXiu; GU ZhaoYan; WU NaiQin; XU Bing

    2007-01-01

    Carbon isotope compositions for both the carbonate shells and soft bodies (organic tissue) of living land snails collected mostly from the Loess Plateau, China have been measured. The result shows that δ13C values range from -13.1‰ to -4.3‰ for the aragonite shell samples and from -26.8‰ to -18.0‰ for the soft body samples. Although the shells are enriched in 13C relative to the bodies averagely by 14.2(±0.8)‰, the shell δ13Ca values are closely correlated to the body δ13Corg values, expressed as δ13Ca = 1.021 δ13Corg + 14.38 (R = 0.965; N = 31). This relationship indicates that δ13Ca is primarily a function of the isotopic composition of the snail diets since previous studies have proved that the snail body is the same as their food in carbon isotope composition. In other words, carbon isotope compo-sition of the carbonate shell can be used as a proxy to estimate the dietary 13C abundance of the land snails. The data also support that the 13C enrichment of the carbonate shells results mainly from the equilibrium fractionations between the metabolic CO2, HCO3- in the hemolymph and shell aragonite, and partially from kinetic fractionations when snail shells form during their activity.

  9. Composite supercapacitor electrodes made of activated carbon/PEDOT:PSS and activated carbon/doped PEDOT

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    T S Sonia; P A Mini; R Nandhini; Kalluri Sujith; Balakrishnan Avinash; S V Nair; K R V Subramanian

    2013-08-01

    In this paper, we report on the high electrical storage capacity of composite electrodes made from nanoscale activated carbon combined with either poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) or PEDOT doped with multiple dopants such as ammonium persulfate (APS) and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO). The composites were fabricated by electropolymerization of the conducting polymers (PEDOT:PSS, doped PEDOT) onto the nanoscale activated carbon backbone, wherein the nanoscale activated carbon was produced by ball-milling followed by chemical and thermal treatments. Activated carbon/PEDOT:PSS yielded capacitance values of 640 F g-1 and 26mF cm-2, while activated carbon/doped PEDOT yielded capacitances of 1183 F g-1 and 42 mF cm-2 at 10 mV s-1. This is more than five times the storage capacity previously reported for activated carbon–PEDOT composites. Further, use of multiple dopants in PEDOT improved the storage performance of the composite electrode well over that of PEDOT:PSS. The composite electrodes were characterized for their electrochemical behaviour, structural and morphological details and electronic conductivity and showed promise as high-performance energy storage systems.

  10. BASIC PROPERTIES OF REFERENCE CROSSPLY CARBON-FIBER COMPOSITE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corum, J.M.

    2001-01-11

    This report provides basic in-air property data and correlations-tensile, compressive, shear, tensile fatigue, and tensile creep-for a reference carbon-fiber composite being characterized as a part of the Durability of Carbon-Fiber Composites Project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The overall goal of the project, which is sponsored by the Department of Energy's Office of Advanced Automotive Materials and is closely coordinated with the Advanced Composites Consortium, is to develop durability-based design guidance for polymeric composites for automotive structural applications. The composite addressed here is a {+-}45{degree} crossply consisting of continuous Thornel T300 fibers in a Baydur 420 IMR urethane matrix. Basic tensile, compressive, and shear properties are tabulated for the temperature range from {minus}40 to 120 C. Fatigue response at room-temperature and 120 C are presented, and creep and creep rupture at room temperature only are reported. In all cases, two fiber orientations--0/90{degree} and {+-}45{degree}--relative to the specimen axes are addressed. The properties and correlations presented are interim in nature. They are intended as a baseline for planning a full durability test program on this reference composite.

  11. Carbon and oxygen isotope compositions of the carbonate facies in the Vindhyan Supergroup, central India

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Banerjee; S K Bhattacharya; S Sarkar

    2006-02-01

    The Vindhyan sedimentary succession in central India spans a wide time bracket from the Paleopro- terozoic to the Neoproterozoic period.Chronostratigraphic significance of stable carbon and oxygen isotope ratios of the carbonate phase in Vindhyan sediments has been discussed in some recent studies.However,the subtle controls of facies variation,depositional setting and post-depositional diagenesis on stable isotope compositions are not yet clearly understood.The Vindhyan Super- group hosts four carbonate units,exhibiting a wide variability in depositional processes and paleogeography.A detailed facies-specific carbon and oxygen isotope study of the carbonate units was undertaken by us to investigate the effect of these processes and to identify the least altered isotope values.It is seen that both carbon and oxygen isotope compositions have been affected by early meteoric water diagenesis.The effect of diagenetic alteration is,however,more pronounced in case of oxygen isotopes than carbon isotopes.Stable isotope compositions remained insensitive to facies only when sediments accumulated in a shallow shelf setting without being exposed.Major alteration of original isotope ratios was observed in case of shallow marine carbonates,which became exposed to meteoric fluids during early diagenetic stage.Duration of exposure possibly determined the magnitude of alteration and shift from the original values.Moreover,dolomitization is found to be accompanied by appreciable alteration of isotope compositions in some of the carbonates.The present study suggests that variations in sediment depositional settings,in particular the possibility of subaerial exposure,need to be considered while extracting chronostratigraphic signi ficance from 13C data.

  12. Paper-based ultracapacitors with carbon nanotubes-graphene composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Jian, E-mail: lijian@gwu.edu, E-mail: keidar@gwu.edu; Cheng, Xiaoqian; Brand, Cameron; Shashurin, Alexey; Keidar, Michael, E-mail: lijian@gwu.edu, E-mail: keidar@gwu.edu [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, The George Washington University, Washington, DC 20052 (United States); Sun, Jianwei; Reeves, Mark [Department of Physics, The George Washington University, Washington, DC 20052 (United States)

    2014-04-28

    In this paper, a paper-based ultracapacitors were fabricated by the rod-rolling method with the ink of carbon nanomaterials, which were synthesized by arc discharge under various magnetic conditions. Composites of carbon nanostructures, including high-purity single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and graphene flakes were synthesized simultaneously in a magnetically enhanced arc. These two nanostructures have promising electrical properties and synergistic effects in the application of ultracapacitors. Scanning electron microscope, transmission electron microscope, and Raman spectroscopy were employed to characterize the properties of carbon nanostructures and their thin films. The sheet resistance of the SWCNT and composite thin films was also evaluated by four-point probe from room temperature to the cryogenic temperature as low as 90 K. In addition, measurements of cyclic voltammetery and galvanostatic charging/discharging showed the ultracapacitor based on composites possessed a superior specific capacitance of up to 100 F/g, which is around three times higher than the ultracapacitor entirely fabricated with SWCNT.

  13. Paper-based ultracapacitors with carbon nanotubes-graphene composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jian; Cheng, Xiaoqian; Sun, Jianwei; Brand, Cameron; Shashurin, Alexey; Reeves, Mark; Keidar, Michael

    2014-04-01

    In this paper, a paper-based ultracapacitors were fabricated by the rod-rolling method with the ink of carbon nanomaterials, which were synthesized by arc discharge under various magnetic conditions. Composites of carbon nanostructures, including high-purity single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and graphene flakes were synthesized simultaneously in a magnetically enhanced arc. These two nanostructures have promising electrical properties and synergistic effects in the application of ultracapacitors. Scanning electron microscope, transmission electron microscope, and Raman spectroscopy were employed to characterize the properties of carbon nanostructures and their thin films. The sheet resistance of the SWCNT and composite thin films was also evaluated by four-point probe from room temperature to the cryogenic temperature as low as 90 K. In addition, measurements of cyclic voltammetery and galvanostatic charging/discharging showed the ultracapacitor based on composites possessed a superior specific capacitance of up to 100 F/g, which is around three times higher than the ultracapacitor entirely fabricated with SWCNT.

  14. Processing and properties of carbon nanotubes reinforced aluminum composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon nanotubes reinforced aluminum matrix composites were fabricated by isostatic pressing followed hot extrusion techniques. Differential scanning calorimetric, X-ray diffraction, field emission scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy has been carried out to examine the reaction condition of nanotubes and aluminum, and to analyze the composites structure. The effects of nanotubes content on mechanical properties of composites were investigated. Experimental results showed that nanotubes are homogeneously distributed in the composites. Some nanotubes act as bridges across cracks, others are pulled-out on fracture surfaces of composites. However, nanotubes react with aluminum and form Al4C3 phases when the temperature is above 656.3 deg. C. The nanotubes content affects significantly mechanical properties of composites. Meanwhile, the 1.0 wt.% nanotube/2024Al composite is found to exhibit the highest tensile strength and Young's modulus. The maximal increments of tensile strength and Young's modulus of the composite, compared with the 2024Al matrix, are 35.7% and 41.3%, respectively

  15. Special Polymer/Carbon Composite Films for Detecting SO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homer, Margie; Ryan, Margaret; Yen, Shiao-Pin; Kisor, Adam; Jewell, April; Shevade, Abhijit; Manatt, Kenneth; Taylor, Charles; Blanco, Mario; Goddard, William

    2008-01-01

    A family of polymer/carbon films has been developed for use as sensory films in electronic noses for detecting SO2 gas at concentrations as low as 1 part per million (ppm). Most previously reported SO2 sensors cannot detect SO2 at concentrations below tens of ppm; only a few can detect SO2 at 1 ppm. Most of the sensory materials used in those sensors (especially inorganic ones that include solid oxide electrolytes, metal oxides, and cadmium sulfide) must be used under relatively harsh conditions that include operation and regeneration at temperatures greater than 100 C. In contrast, the present films can be used to detect 1 ppm of SO2 at typical opening temperatures between 28 and 32 C and can be regenerated at temperatures between 36 and 40 C. The basic concept of making sensing films from polymer/carbon composites is not new. The novelty of the present family of polymer/carbon composites lies in formulating the polymer components of these composites specifically to optimize their properties for detecting SO2. First-principles quantum-mechanical calculations of the energies of binding of SO2 molecules to various polymer functionalities are used as a guide for selecting polymers and understanding the role of polymer functionalities in sensing. The polymer used in the polymer-carbon composite is a copolymer of styrene derivative units with vinyl pyridine or substituted vinyl pyridine derivative units. To make a substituted vinyl pyridine for use in synthesizing such a polymer, poly(2-vinyl pyridine) that has been dissolved in methanol is reacted with 3-chloropropylamine that has been dissolved in a solution of methanol. The methanol is then removed to obtain the copolymer. Later, the copolymer can be dissolved in an appropriate solvent with a suspension of carbon black to obtain a mixture that can be cast and then dried to obtain a sensory film.

  16. Effect of slag composition on iron nuggets formation from carbon composite pellets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Eloy Anduze Nogueira

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Iron-carbon nuggets can be obtained by high temperature reduction of iron ore by carbonaceous material when both are agglomerated together as a carbon composite pellet. During this process, the stable oxides contained in the materials will form a slag. This work investigates the effect of this slag composition on iron nugget formation. Pellets were prepared with iron ore and two different carbonaceous materials. Through the addition of Portland® cement, silica and alumina the slag composition was varied to adjust the expected liquidus temperature to 1573 and 2273 K. It has been shown that the formation of iron nuggets is favored for slags presenting low liquidus temperature. In order to further investigate this phenomenon, pellets containing iron powder and carbonaceous material, together with previously prepared slags, were also submitted to high temperature, and it has been shown that iron carburization depends on slag composition.

  17. Properties of Multifunctional Hybrid Carbon Nanotube/Carbon Fiber Polymer Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cano, Roberto J.; Kang, Jin Ho; Grimsley, Brian W.; Ratcliffe, James G.; Siochi, Emilie J.

    2016-01-01

    For aircraft primary structures, carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) composites possess many advantages over conventional aluminum alloys due to their light weight, higher strength- and stiffness-to-weight ratios, and low life-cycle maintenance costs. However, the relatively low electrical and thermal conductivities of CFRP composites fail to provide structural safety in certain operational conditions such as lightning strikes. Carbon nanotubes (CNT) offer the potential to enhance the multi-functionality of composites with improved thermal and electrical conductivity. In this study, hybrid CNT/carbon fiber (CF) polymer composites were fabricated by interleaving layers of CNT sheets with Hexcel® IM7/8852 prepreg. Resin concentrations from 1 wt% to 50 wt% were used to infuse the CNT sheets prior to composite fabrication. The interlaminar properties of the resulting hybrid composites were characterized by mode I and II fracture toughness testing. Fractographical analysis was performed to study the effect of resin concentration. In addition, multi-directional physical properties like thermal conductivity of the orthotropic hybrid polymer composite were evaluated.

  18. Synergetic Effects of Mechanical Properties on Graphene Nanoplatelet and Multiwalled Carbon Nanotube Hybrids Reinforced Epoxy/Carbon Fiber Composites

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Graphene nanoplatelets (GNPs) and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are novel nanofillers possessing attractive characteristics, including robust compatibility with most polymers, high absolute strength, and cost effectiveness. In this study, an outstanding synergetic effect on the grapheme nanoplatelets (GNPs) and multiwalled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) hybrids were used to reinforce epoxy composite and epoxy/carbon fiber composite laminates to enhance their mechanical properties. The mechanical propertie...

  19. The mechanical property and resistance ability to atomic oxygen corrosion of boron modified carbon/carbon composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Before being densified by chemical vapor deposition, carbon preform was modified by boron. The mechanical property and resistance to atomic oxygen corrosion of carbon/carbon composites were investigated. The results show that fiber surface modification induces the deposition of high texture pyrocarbon and a moderate interfacial transition layer between carbon fibers and matrix carbon. After being modified by boron, the flexural and compressive strength of carbon/carbon composite is significantly increased. The bending curve has been adjusted with obvious pseudo-ductility phenomenon. The resistance ability to atomic oxygen corrosion is improved significantly. The mass loss and corrosion degree of the modified composite are lower than that of pure carbon/carbon composite

  20. Multi-physical field coupling simulation of TCVI process for preparing carbon/carbon composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    To prepare Carbon/Carbon (C/C) composites with advanced performance, the thermal gradient chemical vapor infiltration (TCVI) process has been optimized by simulation. A 2D axisymmetric unstable model was built, which included convection, conduction, diffusion, densification reactions in the pores and the evolution of the porous medium. The multi-physical field coupling model was solved by finite element method (FEM) and iterative calculation. The time evolution of the fluid, temperature and preform density field were obtained by the calculation. It is indicated that convection strongly affects the temperature field. For the preform of carbon/carbon composites infiltrated for 100 h by TCVI, the radial average densities from simulation agrees well with those from experiment. The model is validated to be reliable and the simulation has capability of forecasting the process.

  1. Composite electrode of carbon nanotubes and vitreous carbon for electron field emission

    OpenAIRE

    Matsubara, EY; Rosolen, JM; Silva, SRP

    2008-01-01

    In this work, the electron field emission behaviour of electrodes formed by carbon nanotubes (CNTs) grown onto monolithic vitreous carbon (VCarbon) substrates with microcavities is presented. Scanning electron microscopy was used to characterize the microstructure of the films. Tungsten probes, stainless steel sphere, and phosphor electrodes were employed in the electron field emission study. The CNT/VCarbon composite represents a route to inexpensive excellent large area electron emission ca...

  2. Mechanical Properties of Low-Density SiC-Coated Carbon-Bonded Carbon Fiber Composites

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ahmed, A. S.; Chlup, Zdeněk; Dlouhý, Ivo; Rawlings, R. D.; Boccaccini, A. R.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 9, č. 2 (2012), s. 401-412. ISSN 1546-542X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA101/09/1821 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20410507 Keywords : SiC coating * Carbon bonded * Carbon Fiber Composites * Fracture Toughness Subject RIV: JH - Ceramics, Fire-Resistant Materials and Glass Impact factor: 1.153, year: 2012

  3. ABLATION PROPERTY OF SiC-TaSi2 COATED CARBON/CARBON COMPOSITES

    OpenAIRE

    SHUPING LI; KEZHI LI; HEJUN LI

    2010-01-01

    To prevent the carbon/carbon (C/C) composites from ablation, a new type of ablation protective coating was prepared on the surface of the C/C composites by a step pack cementation technique. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis show, the coatings obtained by pack cementation were silicon carbide/tantalum silicide (SiC-TaSi2). The ablation behavior of the coated samples were evaluated by the oxyacetylene flame. The results show that, the SiC-TaSi2 coating can...

  4. Radiation stability of carbon-carbon composites after high-temperature neutron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon-carbon composites of fibers (CCCF) differing in construction and structure are investigated in the present work under conditions of neutron irradiation. The minimal cross section of the samples (4 x 4, 5 x 5, 8 x 8 mm) was chosen on the basis of the structural features of the composite and the sizes of the product. The following characteristics were determined for samples before and after irradiation: density, bending, compression strength, dynamic elastic modulus, thermal conductivity, electrical resistivity, thermal coefficient of linear expansion, and unit-cell constant. 1 ref., 1 fig., 1 tab

  5. Carbon fiber composite characterization in adverse thermal environments.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez-Vasquez, Sylvia; Brown, Alexander L.; Hubbard, Joshua A.; Ramirez, Ciro J.; Dodd, Amanda B.

    2011-05-01

    The behavior of carbon fiber aircraft composites was studied in adverse thermal environments. The effects of resin composition and fiber orientation were measured in two test configurations: 102 by 127 millimeter (mm) test coupons were irradiated at approximately 22.5 kW/m{sup 2} to measure thermal response, and 102 by 254 mm test coupons were irradiated at approximately 30.7 kW/m{sup 2} to characterize piloted flame spread in the vertically upward direction. Carbon-fiber composite materials with epoxy and bismaleimide resins, and uni-directional and woven fiber orientations, were tested. Bismaleimide samples produced less smoke, and were more resistant to flame spread, as expected for high temperature thermoset resins with characteristically lower heat release rates. All materials lost approximately 20-25% of their mass regardless of resin type, fiber orientation, or test configuration. Woven fiber composites displayed localized smoke jetting whereas uni-directional composites developed cracks parallel to the fibers from which smoke and flames emanated. Swelling and delamination were observed with volumetric expansion on the order of 100% to 200%. The purpose of this work was to provide validation data for SNL's foundational thermal and combustion modeling capabilities.

  6. Superior piezoelectric composite films: taking advantage of carbon nanomaterials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piezoelectric composites comprising an active phase of ferroelectric ceramic and a polymer matrix have recently found numerous sensory applications. However, it remains a major challenge to further improve their electromechanical response for advanced applications such as precision control and monitoring systems. We here investigated the incorporation of graphene platelets (GnPs) and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs), each with various weight fractions, into PZT (lead zirconate titanate)/epoxy composites to produce three-phase nanocomposites. The nanocomposite films show markedly improved piezoelectric coefficients and electromechanical responses (50%) besides an enhancement of ∼200% in stiffness. The carbon nanomaterials strengthened the impact of electric field on the PZT particles by appropriately raising the electrical conductivity of the epoxy. GnPs have been proved to be far more promising in improving the poling behavior and dynamic response than MWNTs. The superior dynamic sensitivity of GnP-reinforced composite may be caused by the GnPs’ high load transfer efficiency arising from their two-dimensional geometry and good compatibility with the matrix. The reduced acoustic impedance mismatch resulting from the improved thermal conductance may also contribute to the higher sensitivity of GnP-reinforced composite. This research pointed out the potential of employing GnPs to develop highly sensitive piezoelectric composites for sensing applications. (paper)

  7. Fractal characterization of pore microstructure evolution in carbon/carbon composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI MiaoLing; QI LeHua; LI HeJun; XU GuoZhong

    2009-01-01

    A fractal characterization approach was proposed to research pore microstructure evolution in carbon/carbon (C/C) composites during the chemical vapor infiltration process. The data obtained from mercury porosimetry determinations were analyzed using the sponge fractal model and the thermodynamics relation fractal model, respectively. The fractal dimensions of C/C composites at different densification stages were evaluated. The pore microstructure evolution with densification time was studied by fractal dimension analysis. The results showed that ClC composites belong to porous fractal structure. The fractal dimensions increase on the whole with decreasing porosity as the densification proceeds. The fractal dimensions are influenced by the texture of pyrocarbon and decrease with increasing anisotropy from isotropic pyrocarbon to high textural one. Both the complicacy of pore structure and the textural morphology of pyrocarbon can be represented simultaneously by the fractal dimension. The pore evolution of C/C composites in the densification process can be monitored using fractal dimension.

  8. Effect of carbon nanofibre addition on the mechanical properties of different f carbon-epoxy composites

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    I Srikanth; Suresh Kumar; Vajinder Singh; B Rangababu; Partha Ghosal; Ch Subrahmanyam

    2015-04-01

    Carbon-epoxy (C-epoxy) laminated composites having different fibre volume fractions (40, 50, 60 and 70) were fabricated with and without the addition of aminofunctionalized carbon nanofibres (A-CNF). Flexural strength, interlaminar shear strength (ILSS) and tensile strength of the composite laminates were determined. It was observed that, the ability of A-CNF to enhance the mechanical properties of C-epoxy diminished significantly as the fibre volume fraction (f) of the C-epoxy increased from 40 to 60. At 70f, the mechanical properties of the A-CNF reinforced C-epoxy were found to be lower compared to the C-epoxy composite made without the addition of A-CNF. In this paper suitable mechanisms for the observed trends are proposed on the basis of the fracture modes of the composite.

  9. Copper-Carbon and Aluminum-Carbon Composites Fabricated by Powder Metallurgy Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvain, Jean-François; Veillère, Amélie; Lu, Yongfeng

    2014-07-01

    The increase in both power and packing densities in power electronic devices has led to an increase in the market demand for effective heat-dissipating materials, with high thermal conductivity and thermal- expansion coefficient compatible with chip materials still ensuring the reliability of the power modules. In this context, metal matrix composites: carbon fibers and diamond-reinforced copper and aluminum matrix composites among them are considered very promising as a next generation of thermal-management materials in power electronic packages. These composites exhibit enhanced thermal properties compared to pure copper combined with lower density. This article presents the fabrication techniques of copper/carbon fibers and copper/diamond and aluminum/carbon fibers composite films by powder metallurgy and hot pressing. The thermal analyses clearly indicate that interfacial treatments are required in these composites to achieve high thermomechanical properties. Interfaces (through novel chemical and processing methods), when selected carefully and processed properly will form the right chemical/mechanical link between metal and carbon, enhancing all the desired thermal properties while minimizing the deleterious effect.

  10. Copper-carbon and aluminum-carbon composites fabricated by powder metallurgy processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The increase in both power and packing densities in power electronic devices has led to an increase in the market demand for effective heat-dissipating materials, with high thermal conductivity and thermal- expansion coefficient compatible with chip materials still ensuring the reliability of the power modules. In this context, metal matrix composites: carbon fibers and diamond-reinforced copper and aluminum matrix composites among them are considered very promising as a next generation of thermal-management materials in power electronic packages. These composites exhibit enhanced thermal properties compared to pure copper combined with lower density. This article presents the fabrication techniques of copper/carbon fibers and copper/diamond and aluminum/carbon fibers composite films by powder metallurgy and hot pressing. The thermal analyses clearly indicate that interfacial treatments are required in these composites to achieve high thermomechanical properties. Interfaces (through novel chemical and processing methods), when selected carefully and processed properly will form the right chemical/mechanical link between metal and carbon, enhancing all the desired thermal properties while minimizing the deleterious effect.

  11. Hybrid carbon fiber/carbon nanotube composites for structural damping applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were grown on the surface of carbon fibers utilizing a relatively low temperature synthesis technique; graphitic structures by design (GSD). To probe the effects of the synthesis protocols on the mechanical properties, other samples with surface grown CNTs were prepared using catalytic chemical vapor deposition (CCVD). The woven graphite fabrics were thermally shielded with a thin film of SiO2 and CNTs were grown on top of this film. Raman spectroscopy and electron microscopy revealed the grown species to be multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). The damping performance of the hybrid CNT–carbon fiber-reinforced epoxy composite was examined using dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA). Mechanical testing confirmed that the degradations in the strength and stiffness as a result of the GSD process are far less than those encountered through using the CCVD technique and yet are negligible compared to the reference samples. The DMA results indicated that, despite the minimal degradation in the storage modulus, the loss tangent (damping) for the hybrid composites utilizing GSD-grown MWCNTs improved by 56% compared to the reference samples (based on raw carbon fibers with no surface treatment or surface grown carbon nanotubes) over the frequency range 1–60 Hz. These results indicated that the energy dissipation in the GSD-grown MWCNTs composite can be primarily attributed to the frictional sliding at the nanotube/epoxy interface and to a lesser extent to the stiff thermal shielding SiO2 film on the fiber/matrix interface. (paper)

  12. Composite electrodes of activated carbon derived from cassava peel and carbon nanotubes for supercapacitor applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taer, E.; Iwantono, Yulita, M.; Taslim, R.; Subagio, A.; Salomo, Deraman, M.

    2013-09-01

    In this paper, a composite electrode was prepared from a mixture of activated carbon derived from precarbonization of cassava peel (CP) and carbon nanotubes (CNTs). The activated carbon was produced by pyrolysis process using ZnCl2 as an activation agent. A N2 adsorption-desorption analysis for the sample indicated that the BET surface area of the activated carbon was 1336 m2 g-1. Difference percentage of CNTs of 0, 5, 10, 15 and 20% with 5% of PVDF binder were added into CP based activated carbon in order to fabricate the composite electrodes. The morphology and structure of the composite electrodes were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) techniques. The SEM image observed that the distribution of CNTs was homogeneous between carbon particles and the XRD pattern shown the amorphous structure of the sample. The electrodes were fabricated for supercapacitor cells with 316L stainless steel as current collector and 1 M sulfuric acid as electrolyte. An electrochemical characterization was performed by using an electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) method using a Solatron 1286 instrument and the addition of CNTs revealed to improve the resistant and capacitive properties of supercapacitor cell.

  13. Hybrid carbon fiber/carbon nanotube composites for structural damping applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tehrani, M.; Safdari, M.; Boroujeni, A. Y.; Razavi, Z.; Case, S. W.; Dahmen, K.; Garmestani, H.; Al-Haik, M. S.

    2013-04-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were grown on the surface of carbon fibers utilizing a relatively low temperature synthesis technique; graphitic structures by design (GSD). To probe the effects of the synthesis protocols on the mechanical properties, other samples with surface grown CNTs were prepared using catalytic chemical vapor deposition (CCVD). The woven graphite fabrics were thermally shielded with a thin film of SiO2 and CNTs were grown on top of this film. Raman spectroscopy and electron microscopy revealed the grown species to be multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). The damping performance of the hybrid CNT-carbon fiber-reinforced epoxy composite was examined using dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA). Mechanical testing confirmed that the degradations in the strength and stiffness as a result of the GSD process are far less than those encountered through using the CCVD technique and yet are negligible compared to the reference samples. The DMA results indicated that, despite the minimal degradation in the storage modulus, the loss tangent (damping) for the hybrid composites utilizing GSD-grown MWCNTs improved by 56% compared to the reference samples (based on raw carbon fibers with no surface treatment or surface grown carbon nanotubes) over the frequency range 1-60 Hz. These results indicated that the energy dissipation in the GSD-grown MWCNTs composite can be primarily attributed to the frictional sliding at the nanotube/epoxy interface and to a lesser extent to the stiff thermal shielding SiO2 film on the fiber/matrix interface.

  14. Preparation and properties of gluten/calcium carbonate composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Min Zuo; Zheng Zheng Lai; Yi Hu Song; Qiang Zheng

    2008-01-01

    Environment friendly thermosetting composites were prepared by blending wheat gluten (WG) as matrix, calcium carbonate (CaCO3) as filler and glycerol as plasticizer followed by compression molding the mixture at 120 ℃ to crosslink the WG matrix. Morphology observation showed that the CaCO3 particles were finely dispersed in matrix. Incorporation of CaCO3 up to 10 wt% into the composites caused Young's modulus and tensile strength to increase markedly. On the other hand, the moisture absorption and elongation at break decreased slightly.

  15. Interfacial Properties Modification of Carbon Fiber/ Polyarylacetylene Composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FU Hong-jun; MA Chong-qi; KUANG Nai-hang; LUAN Shi-lin

    2007-01-01

    This work was dedicated to performing surface oxidation and coating treatments on carbon fibers (CF) and investigating the changes of fiber surface properties after these treatments, including surface composition, relative volume of functional groups, and surface topography with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and atom force microscopy (AFM) technology. The results show that,after oxidation treatments, interfacial properties between CF and non-polar polyarylacetylene (PAA) resin are remarkably modified by removing weak surface layers and increasing fiber surface roughness. Coating treatment by high char phenolic resin solution after oxidation makes interface of CF/PAA composites to be upgraded and the interfacial properties further bettered.

  16. Tin oxide-carbon nanotube composite for NOx sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Dong Mi; Jung, Hyuck; Hoa, Nguyen Duc; Kim, Dojin; Hong, Soon-Ku; Kim, Hyojin

    2012-02-01

    Tin oxide-single wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) nano composites are synthesized for gas sensor application. The fabrication includes deposition of porous SWCNTs on thermally oxidized SiO2 substrates followed by rheotaxial growth of Sn and thermal oxidation at 300, 400, 500, and 600 degrees C in air. The effects of oxidation temperature on morphology, microstructure, and gas sensing properties are investigated for process optimization. The tin monoxide oxidized at 400 degrees C showed the highest response at the operating temperature of 200 degrees C. Under the optimized test condition, the composite structure showed better response than both structures of SWCNTs and thin film SnO. PMID:22629971

  17. Fabrication of Carbon Nanotube - Chromium Carbide Composite Through Laser Sintering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ze; Gao, Yibo; Liang, Fei; Wu, Benxin; Gou, Jihua; Detrois, Martin; Tin, Sammy; Yin, Ming; Nash, Philip; Tang, Xiaoduan; Wang, Xinwei

    2016-03-01

    Ceramics often have high hardness and strength, and good wear and corrosion resistance, and hence have many important applications, which, however, are often limited by their poor fracture toughness. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) may enhance ceramic fracture toughness, but hot pressing (which is one typical approach of fabricating CNT-ceramic composites) is difficult to apply for applications that require localized heat input, such as fabricating composites as surface coatings. Laser beam may realize localized material sintering with little thermal effect on the surrounding regions. However, for the typical ceramics for hard coating applications (as listed in Ref.[1]), previous work on laser sintering of CNT-ceramic composites with mechanical property characterizations has been very limited. In this paper, research work has been reported on the fabrication and characterization of CNT-ceramic composites through laser sintering of mixtures of CNTs and chromium carbide powders. Under the studied conditions, it has been found that laser-sintered composites have a much higher hardness than that for plasma-sprayed composites reported in the literature. It has also been found that the composites obtained by laser sintering of CNTs and chromium carbide powder mixtures have a fracture toughness that is ~23 % higher than the material obtained by laser sintering of chromium carbide powders without CNTs.

  18. Controlled degradation pattern of hydroxyapatite/calcium carbonate composite microspheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ning; Zhong, Qiwei; Zhou, Ying; Kundu, Subhas C; Yao, Juming; Cai, Yurong

    2016-06-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HAP) is widely used in clinic due to its good biocompatibility and osteoconductivity except for its slow degradation speed. In the present study, spherical calcium carbonate (CaCO3 ) is fabricated in the presence of silk protein sericin, which is transmuted into HAP microsphere in phosphate solution with the assistance of microwave irradiation. The effect of reaction conditions on the conversion of CaCO3 is investigated including reaction time, chemical composition of phosphate solution, and microwave power to get a series of HAP/CaCO3 composites. The degradation property of the composites is evaluated in vitro. Results show the degradation speed of the composite with higher HAP content is slower. The degradation rate of the composite could be changed effectively by modulating the proportion of HAP and CaCO3 . This work provides a feasible method for the preparation of spherical HAP/CaCO3 composite with controllable degradability. The composite thus obtained may be an ideal material for bone tissue engineering application. Microsc. Res. Tech. 79:518-524, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27037606

  19. Smart Behavior of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Cement-based Composite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    The electrical characteristics of cement-based material can be remarkably improved by the addition of short carbon fibers.Carbon fiber reinforced cement composite (CFRC) is an intrinsically smart material that can sense not only the stress andstrain, but also the temperature. In this paper, variations of electrical resistivity with external applied load, and relationof thermoelectric force and temperature were investigated. Test results indicated that the electrical signal is related to theincrease in the material volume resistivity during crack generation or propagation and the decrease in the resistivity duringcrack closure. Moreover, it was found that the fiber addition increased the linearity and reversibility of the Seebeck effect inthe cement-based materials. The change of electrical characteristics reflects large amount of information of inner damage andtemperature differential of composite, which can be used for stress-strain or thermal self-monitoring by embedding it in theconcrete structures.

  20. Strengthening of building structures using carbon composite materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.V. Paranicheva

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Currently, the question of ensuring the reliability of various building structures both at the stage of their construction and during operation is very urgent. There are a lot of different ways and constructive methods of structures strengthening. Аt the same time, traditional ways of concrete structures strengthening with steel reinforcement are such expensive, time consuming and in some cases require to interrupt the building operation. As an alternative, it is proposed to use composite materials based on high-strength carbon fibers.The authors consider the properties, advantages, disadvantages and the methods of application of these materials. This article presents results of a technical survey carried out in a public building in 2009. In this building the CFRP was used to strengthen concrete slabs, resting on the crossbar consoles. The calculation of the strength is adduced and the section selection is made. The authors demonstrate their conclusions about the feasibility of using carbon composite materials.

  1. Prospects in using carbon-carbon composite materials based on viscose carbon fibers for the space technology needs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Due to the unique combination of low density, high mechanical strength under elevated temperatures, high resistance to thermal shock loads and ablation resistance, carbon-carbon composite materials (CCCM) are widely used for manufacturing of highly thermally loaded structural components. The important scientific and technical difficulty is to increase and stabilize CCCM properties, reduce cost and leads to searching for new raw materials and engineering solutions. The article describes the prospects of replacing carbon fiber fills based on PAN-precursors which are traditionally used for producing CCCM by carbon fillers on the basis of viscose raw material; shows the advantages of using viscose-based carbon fibers when forming products of complex shape as well as the possibility of obtaining products with high functional characteristics. The creation of CCCM of layered reinforcement structure, in which carbon fabric layers interleave with layers of discontinuous carbon fibers, enabled to increase the overall density of carbon composites, to ensure sufficiently high level of mechanical characteristics and resistance to ablation

  2. Green design and multidisciplinary optimization of carbon nanotube composite structures

    OpenAIRE

    Morillo, Carlos; Bugeda Castelltort, Gabriel; Lee, D.S.; Oller Martínez, Sergio Horacio

    2013-01-01

    This work develops a multi-objective design optimisation method for Carbon Nanotube Composite Structures (CNTCSs) using Genetic Algorithm and Finite Element Analysis (FEA). Two design problems are considered: the first is an optimisation problem to improve the mechanical properties (weight-displacement) of the CNTCSs, minimizing the Not Adherence Green Design Principles (NoAGDP); the second is an optimisation problem to improve the same mechanical properties also minimizing the cost of the C...

  3. Processable Conducting Polyaniline, Carbon Nanotubes, Graphene and Their Composites

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Kan

    2014-01-01

    Good processability is often required for applications of conducting materials like polyaniline (PANI), carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and graphene. This can be achieved by either physical stabilization or chemical functionalization. Functionalization usually expands the possible applications for the conducting materials depending on the properties of the functional groups. Processable conducting materials can also be combined with other co-dissolving materials to prepare composites with desired che...

  4. Toughened carbon fiber fabric-reinforced pCBT composites

    OpenAIRE

    Abt, Tobias Martin; Krager-Kocsis, Joseph; Sánchez Soto, Miguel

    2014-01-01

    Toughened carbon fiber-fabric reinforced polymerized cyclic butylene terephthalate (pCBT) composites were obtained by chemical modification of cyclic butylene terephthalate (CBT) with small amounts of epoxy resin and isocyanates as chain extenders. Homogeneous CBT/epoxy and CBT/isocyanate blends were prepared by melt blending the components in a lab-scale batch mixer at low temperatures and high shear rate. Melt blending was stopped before the ring-opening polymerizati...

  5. Tuneable PTC effect in polymer-wax-carbon composite resistors

    OpenAIRE

    Maeder, Thomas; Jacq, Caroline; Ammon, Ludivine; Ryser, Peter

    2013-01-01

    The resistivity dependence on temperature of composite resistors made of carbon fillers dispersed in an organic matrix are known to be strongly affected by the matrix thermal expansion. High positive temperature coefficient (PTC) effects, i.e. essentially switching from resistive to quasi-insulating behaviour, can be caused by phase changes in the matrix and the assorted volume expansion, a behaviour that has been previously shown with both simple organic waxes (low temperatures) and semicrys...

  6. Processing of thermo-structural carbon-fiber reinforced carbon composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Cláudio Pardini

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The present work describes the processes used to obtain thermostructural Carbon/Carbon composites. The processing of these materials begins with the definition of the architecture of the carbon fiber reinforcement, in the form of stacked plies or in the form of fabrics or multidirectional reinforcement. Incorporating fiber reinforcement into the carbon matrix, by filling the voids and interstices, leads to the densification of the material and a continuous increase in density. There are two principal processing routes for obtaining these materials: liquid phase processing and gas phase processing. In both cases, thermal processes lead to the formation of a carbon matrix with specific properties related to their precursor. These processes also differ in terms of yield. With liquid phase impregnation the yield is around 45 per cent, while gas phase processing yields around 15 per cent.

  7. High Volume Fraction Carbon Nanotube Composites for Aerospace Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siochi, Emilie J.; Kim, Jae-Woo; Sauti, Godfrey; Cano, Roberto J.; Wincheski, Russell A.; Ratcliffe, James G.; Czabaj, Michael; Jensen, Benjamin D.; Wise, Kristopher E.

    2015-01-01

    Reported nanoscale mechanical properties of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) suggest that their use may enable the fabrication of significantly lighter structures for use in space applications. To be useful in the fabrication of large structures, however, their attractive nanoscale properties must be retained as they are scaled up to bulk materials and converted into practically useful forms. Advances in CNT production have significantly increased the quantities available for use in manufacturing processes, but challenges remain with the retention of nanoscale properties in larger assemblies of CNTs. This work summarizes recent progress in producing carbon nanotube composites with tensile properties approaching those of carbon fiber reinforced polymer composites. These advances were achieved in nanocomposites with CNT content of 70% by weight. The processing methods explored to yield these CNT composite properties will be discussed, as will the characterization and test methods that were developed to provide insight into the factors that contribute to the enhanced tensile properties. Technology maturation was guided by parallel advancements in computational modeling tools that aided in the interpretation of experimental data.

  8. and Carbon Fiber Reinforced 2024 Aluminum Alloy Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaczmar, Jacek W.; Naplocha, Krzysztof; Morgiel, Jerzy

    2014-08-01

    The microstructure and mechanical properties of 2024 aluminum alloy composite materials strengthened with Al2O3 Saffil fibers or together with addition of carbon fibers were investigated. The fibers were stabilized in the preform with silica binder strengthened by further heat treatment. The preforms with 80-90% porosity were infiltrated by direct squeeze casting method. The microstructure of the as-cast specimens consisted mainly of α-dendrites with intermetallic compounds precipitated at their boundaries. The homogenization treatment of the composite materials substituted silica binder with a mixture of the Θ phase and silicon precipitates distributed in the remnants of SiO2 amorphous phase. Outside of this area at the binder/matrix interface, fine MgO precipitates were also present. At surface of C fibers, a small amount of fine Al3C4 carbides were formed. During pressure infiltration of preforms containing carbon fibers under oxygen carrying atmosphere, C fibers can burn releasing gasses and causing cracks initiated by thermal stress. The examination of tensile and bending strength showed that reinforcing of aluminum matrix with 10-20% fibers improved investigated properties in the entire temperature range. The largest increase in relation to unreinforced alloy was observed for composite materials examined at the temperature of 300 °C. Substituting Al2O3 Saffil fibers with carbon fibers leads to better wear resistance at dry condition with no relevant effect on strength properties.

  9. Molecular Dynamics Modeling of Carbon Nanotubes and Their Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Lars R.; Pyrz, Ryszard

    2004-06-01

    The tensile modulus of individual nanotubes and nanotube-polypropylene composites has been determined using molecular dynamics simulations. Simulations of individual single-walled carbon nanotubes showed that their tensile modulus was dependent on the tube structure and the diameter if the diameter was below 1,6 nm. The tensile modulus was determined for an infinite single-walled carbon nanotube embedded in an amorphous polypropylene matrix and for a finite and capped single-walled carbon nanotube embedded in a polypropylene matrix. For the infinite nanotube-polypropylene system the modulus was found to correspond to the one given by the Voigt approximation. For the finite nanotube-polypropylene system the reinforcing effect of the nanotube was not very pronounced. A pull out simulation showed that the length of the nanotube in the simulation was much smaller than the critical length and hence no load transfer between the nanotube and the matrix existed.

  10. Temperature effects on polymer-carbon composite sensors: evaluating the role of polymer molecular weight and carbon loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homer, M. L.; Lim, J. R.; Manatt, K.; Kisor, A.; Lara, L.; Jewell, A. D.; Yen, S. -P. S.; Shevade, A. V.; Ryan, M. A.

    2003-01-01

    We report the effect of environmental condtions coupled with varying polymer properties and carbon loadings on the performance of polymer-carbon black composite film, used as sensing medium in the JPL Electronic Nose.

  11. Carbon fibre composite for ventilation air methane (VAM) capture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coal mine methane (CMM) is not only a hazardous greenhouse gas but is also a wasted energy resource, if not utilised. This paper evaluates a novel adsorbent material developed for capturing methane from ventilation air methane (VAM) gas in underground coal mines. The adsorbent material is a honeycomb monolithic carbon fibre composite (HMCFC) consisting of multiple parallel flow-through channels and the material exhibits unique features including low pressure drop, good mechanical properties, ability to handle dust-containing gas streams, good thermal and electrical conductivity and selective adsorption of gases. During this study, a series of HMCFC adsorbents (using different types of carbon fibres) were successfully fabricated. Experimental data demonstrated the proof-of-concept of using the HMCFC adsorbent to capture methane from VAM gas. The adsorption capacity of the HMCFC adsorbent was twice that of commercial activated carbon. Methane concentration of 0.56% in the inlet VAM gas stream is reduced to about 0.011% after it passes through the novel carbon fibre composite adsorbent material at ambient temperature and atmospheric pressure. This amounts to a maximum capture efficiency of 98%. These encouraging laboratory scale studies have prompted further large scale trials and economic assessment.

  12. Carbon and hydrogen isotopic compositions of New Zealand geothermal gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon and hydrogen isotopic compositions are reported for methane, hydrogen and carbon dioxide from four New Zealand geothermal areas; Ngawha, Wairakei, Broadlands and Tikitere. Carbon-13 contents are between -24.4 and -29.5 per mille (PDB) for methane, and between -3.2 and -9.1 per mille for carbon dioxide. Deuterium contents are between -142 and -197 per mille (SMOW) for methane and between -310 and -600 per mille for hydrogen. The different areas have different isotopic compositions with some general relationships to reservoir temperature. The isotopic exchange of hydrogen with water indicates acceptable reservoir temperatures of 180 to 260 deg C from most spring samples but often higher than measured temperatures in well samples. Indicated temperatures assuming 13C equilibria between CH4 and CO2 are 100 to 200 deg C higher than measured maxima. This difference may be due to partial isotopic equilibration or may reflect the origin of the methane. Present evidence cannot identify whether the methane is primordial, or from decomposing sediments or from reduction of magmatic CO2. The isotopic equilibria between CH4, CO2, H2 and H2O are reviewed and a new semiempirical temperature scale proposed for deuterium exchange between methane and water. (author)

  13. Water-soluble carbon nanotube compositions for drug delivery and medicinal applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tour, James M.; Lucente-Schultz, Rebecca; Leonard, Ashley; Kosynkin, Dmitry V.; Price, Brandi Katherine; Hudson, Jared L.; Conyers, Jr., Jodie L.; Moore, Valerie C.; Casscells, S. Ward; Myers, Jeffrey N.; Milas, Zvonimir L.; Mason, Kathy A.; Milas, Luka

    2014-07-22

    Compositions comprising a plurality of functionalized carbon nanotubes and at least one type of payload molecule are provided herein. The compositions are soluble in water and PBS in some embodiments. In certain embodiments, the payload molecules are insoluble in water. Methods are described for making the compositions and administering the compositions. An extended release formulation for paclitaxel utilizing functionalized carbon nanotubes is also described.

  14. Aligning carbon fibers in micro-extruded composite ink

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahajan, Chaitanya G.

    Direct write processes include a wide range of additive manufacturing techniques with the ability to fabricate structures directly onto planar and non-planar surfaces. Most additive manufacturing techniques use unreinforced polymers to produce parts. By adding carbon fiber as a reinforcing material, properties such as mechanical strength, electrical conductivity, and thermal conductivity can be enhanced. Carbon fibers can be long and continuous, or short and discontinuous. The strength of carbon fiber composite parts is greatly increased when the fibers are preferentially aligned. This research focuses on increasing the strength of additively manufactured parts reinforced using discontinuous carbon fibers that have been aligned during the micro extrusion process. A design of experiments (DOE) approach was used to identify significant process parameters affecting fiber alignment. Factors such as the length of carbon fibers, nozzle diameter, fiber loading fraction, air pressure, translational speed and standoff distance were considered. A two dimensional Fast Fourier Transform (2D FFT) was used to quantify the degree of fiber alignment in the extruded composite inks. ImageJ software supported by an oval profile plugin was used with micrographs of printed samples to obtain the carbon fiber alignment values. The optimal value for the factors was derived by identifying the significant main and interaction effects. Based on the results of the DOE, tensile test samples were printed with fibers aligned parallel and perpendicular to the tensile axis. A standard test method for tensile properties of plastic revealed that the extruded parts with fibers aligned along the tensile axis were better in tensile strength and modulus.

  15. Identification and Selection of Major Carbon Dioxide Stream Compositions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Last, George V.; Schmick, Mary T.

    2011-06-30

    A critical component in the assessment of long-term risk from geologic sequestration of CO2 is the ability to predict mineralogical and geochemical changes within storage reservoirs due to rock-brine-CO2 reactions. Impurities and/or other constituents selected for co-sequestration can affect both the chemical and physical (e.g. density, viscosity, interfacial tension) behavior of CO2 in the deep subsurface. These impurities and concentrations are a function of both the industrial source(s) of the CO2, as well as the carbon capture technology used to extract the CO2 and produce a concentrated stream for geologic sequestration. This report summarizes the relative concentrations of CO2 and other constituents in exhaust gases from major non-energy related industrial sources of CO2. Assuming that carbon-capture technology would remove most of the incondensable gases N2, O2, and Ar, leaving SO2 and NOx as the main impurities, we selected four test fluid compositions for use in geochemical experiments. These included: 1) a pure CO2 stream representative of food grade CO2 used in most enhanced oil recovery projects: 2) a test fluid composition containing low concentrations (0.5 mole %) SO2 and NOx (representative of that generated from cement production), 3) a test fluid composition with higher concentrations (2.5 mole %) of SO2, and 4) and test fluid composition containing 3 mole % H2S.

  16. Energy Absorption in Chopped Carbon Fiber Compression Molded Composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Starbuck, J.M.

    2001-07-20

    In passenger vehicles the ability to absorb energy due to impact and be survivable for the occupant is called the ''crashworthiness'' of the structure. To identify and quantify the energy absorbing mechanisms in candidate automotive composite materials, test methodologies were developed for conducting progressive crush tests on composite plate specimens. The test method development and experimental set-up focused on isolating the damage modes associated with the frond formation that occurs in dynamic testing of composite tubes. Quasi-static progressive crush tests were performed on composite plates manufactured from chopped carbon fiber with an epoxy resin system using compression molding techniques. The carbon fiber was Toray T700 and the epoxy resin was YLA RS-35. The effect of various material and test parameters on energy absorption was evaluated by varying the following parameters during testing: fiber volume fraction, fiber length, fiber tow size, specimen width, profile radius, and profile constraint condition. It was demonstrated during testing that the use of a roller constraint directed the crushing process and the load deflection curves were similar to progressive crushing of tubes. Of all the parameters evaluated, the fiber length appeared to be the most critical material parameter, with shorter fibers having a higher specific energy absorption than longer fibers. The combination of material parameters that yielded the highest energy absorbing material was identified.

  17. Energy Absorption in Chopped Carbon Fiber Compression Molded Composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In passenger vehicles the ability to absorb energy due to impact and be survivable for the occupant is called the ''crashworthiness'' of the structure. To identify and quantify the energy absorbing mechanisms in candidate automotive composite materials, test methodologies were developed for conducting progressive crush tests on composite plate specimens. The test method development and experimental set-up focused on isolating the damage modes associated with the frond formation that occurs in dynamic testing of composite tubes. Quasi-static progressive crush tests were performed on composite plates manufactured from chopped carbon fiber with an epoxy resin system using compression molding techniques. The carbon fiber was Toray T700 and the epoxy resin was YLA RS-35. The effect of various material and test parameters on energy absorption was evaluated by varying the following parameters during testing: fiber volume fraction, fiber length, fiber tow size, specimen width, profile radius, and profile constraint condition. It was demonstrated during testing that the use of a roller constraint directed the crushing process and the load deflection curves were similar to progressive crushing of tubes. Of all the parameters evaluated, the fiber length appeared to be the most critical material parameter, with shorter fibers having a higher specific energy absorption than longer fibers. The combination of material parameters that yielded the highest energy absorbing material was identified

  18. The composites based on plasticized starch and carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Jing; Zheng, Pengwu; Zhao, Feng; Ma, Xiaofei

    2013-08-01

    In this study, the nanocomposite films based on plasticized starch and modified-carbon nanotubes were prepared using a simple casting method. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were oxidized to prepare CNT oxide (OCNT) by Hummer's method, and OCNTs were reduced by glucose to obtain reduced CNT (RCNT). The thermogravimetric (TG) curves revealed that OCNTs and RCNTs contained about 15 and 8wt% oxygen-containing groups, respectively. The UV-vis spectra proved that CNTs with the aid of the dispersant TNWDIS, OCNTs and RCNTs possessed the good stability in water. As the fillers, CNTs, OCNTs and RCNTs were introduced into plasticized-starch (PS) matrix to obtain the composites. They had the obvious reinforcing effect on PS matrix. The composites containing 4wt% RCNT had the maximum tensile strength of 19.5MPa, in contrast to 3.89MPa of PS. Among of them, PS/CNT composites showed the best moisture resistance. And the PS-based CNT, OCNT and RCNT composites exhibited approximate electrical conductivities. PMID:23587994

  19. Medium density polyethylene composites with functionalized carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulikkathara, Merlyn X.; Kuznetsov, Oleksandr V.; Peralta, Ivana R. G.; Wei, Xin; Khabashesku, Valery N.

    2009-05-01

    A strong interface between the single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and polymer matrix is necessary to achieve enhanced mechanical properties of composites. In this work a series of sidewall-functionalized SWNTs have been investigated in order to evaluate the effect of functionalization on SWNT aspect ratio and composite interfacial chemistry and their role on mechanical properties of a medium density polyethylene (MDPE) matrix. Fluorinated nanotubes (F-SWNTs) were used as precursors for subsequent sidewall functionalization with long chain alkyl groups to produce an F-SWNT- C11H23 derivative. The latter was refluorinated to yield a new perfluorinated derivative, F-SWNT- C11FxHy. The functionalized SWNTs as well as the pristine SWNTs were integrated into an MDPE matrix at a 1 wt% loading. The nanotubes and composite materials were characterized with FTIR, Raman spectroscopy, NMR, XPS, AFM, SEM, TGA, DSC and tensile tests. When incorporated into polyethylene, the new perfluorinated derivative, F-SWNT- C11FxHy, yielded the highest tensile strength value among all nanotube/MDPE composite samples, showing a 52% enhancement in comparison with the neat MDPE. The 1 wt% SWNT/MDPE composite contained nanotubes with a larger aspect ratio but, due to a lack of interfacial chemistry, it resulted in less improvement in mechanical properties compared to the composites made with the fluorinated SWNT derivatives.

  20. Hot extruded carbon nanotube reinforced aluminum matrix composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Hansang; Leparoux, Marc

    2012-10-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) reinforced aluminum (Al) matrix composite materials were successfully fabricated by mechanical ball milling followed by powder hot extrusion processes. Microstructural analysis revealed that the CNTs were well dispersed at the boundaries and were aligned with the extrusion direction in the composites obtained. Although only a small quantity of CNTs were added to the composite (1 vol%), the Vickers hardness and the tensile strength were significantly enhanced, with an up to three-fold increase relative to that of pure Al. From the fractography of the extruded Al-CNT composite, several shapes were observed in the fracture surface, and this unique morphology is discussed based on the strengthening mechanism. The damage in the CNTs was investigated with Raman spectroscopy. However, the Al-CNT composite materials were not only strengthened by the addition of CNTs but also enhanced by several synergistic effects. The nanoindentation stress-strain curve was successfully constructed by setting the effective zero-load and zero-displacement points and was compared with the tensile stress-strain curve. The yield strengths of the Al-CNT composites from the nanoindentation and tensile tests were compared and discussed. We believe that the yield strength can be predicted using a simple nanoindentation stress/strain curve and that this method will be useful for materials that are difficult to machine, such as complex ceramics.

  1. Hot extruded carbon nanotube reinforced aluminum matrix composite materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) reinforced aluminum (Al) matrix composite materials were successfully fabricated by mechanical ball milling followed by powder hot extrusion processes. Microstructural analysis revealed that the CNTs were well dispersed at the boundaries and were aligned with the extrusion direction in the composites obtained. Although only a small quantity of CNTs were added to the composite (1 vol%), the Vickers hardness and the tensile strength were significantly enhanced, with an up to three-fold increase relative to that of pure Al. From the fractography of the extruded Al–CNT composite, several shapes were observed in the fracture surface, and this unique morphology is discussed based on the strengthening mechanism. The damage in the CNTs was investigated with Raman spectroscopy. However, the Al–CNT composite materials were not only strengthened by the addition of CNTs but also enhanced by several synergistic effects. The nanoindentation stress–strain curve was successfully constructed by setting the effective zero-load and zero-displacement points and was compared with the tensile stress–strain curve. The yield strengths of the Al–CNT composites from the nanoindentation and tensile tests were compared and discussed. We believe that the yield strength can be predicted using a simple nanoindentation stress/strain curve and that this method will be useful for materials that are difficult to machine, such as complex ceramics. (paper)

  2. Medium density polyethylene composites with functionalized carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A strong interface between the single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and polymer matrix is necessary to achieve enhanced mechanical properties of composites. In this work a series of sidewall-functionalized SWNTs have been investigated in order to evaluate the effect of functionalization on SWNT aspect ratio and composite interfacial chemistry and their role on mechanical properties of a medium density polyethylene (MDPE) matrix. Fluorinated nanotubes (F-SWNTs) were used as precursors for subsequent sidewall functionalization with long chain alkyl groups to produce an F-SWNT- C11H23 derivative. The latter was refluorinated to yield a new perfluorinated derivative, F-SWNT- C11FxHy. The functionalized SWNTs as well as the pristine SWNTs were integrated into an MDPE matrix at a 1 wt% loading. The nanotubes and composite materials were characterized with FTIR, Raman spectroscopy, NMR, XPS, AFM, SEM, TGA, DSC and tensile tests. When incorporated into polyethylene, the new perfluorinated derivative, F-SWNT- C11FxHy, yielded the highest tensile strength value among all nanotube/MDPE composite samples, showing a 52% enhancement in comparison with the neat MDPE. The 1 wt% SWNT/MDPE composite contained nanotubes with a larger aspect ratio but, due to a lack of interfacial chemistry, it resulted in less improvement in mechanical properties compared to the composites made with the fluorinated SWNT derivatives.

  3. Mechanical Properties of Resin-Based Carbon-Carbon Composites Modified with Needle Coke

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Balík, Karel; Gregor, Jiří; Černý, Martin; Klučáková, Martina

    Singapore : World Scientific, 1996 - (Palmer, K.; Marx , D.; Wright, M.), s. 371-379 ISBN 981-02-2801-5. [Carbon and Carbonaceous Composite Materials: Structure-Property Relationships. Malenovice (CZ), 10.10.1995-13.10.1995] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA104/94/1789

  4. Characterization of carbon/carbon composites prepared by different processing routes including liquid pitch densification process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon/carbon composites with an apparent density higher than 1.80 g/cm3 were prepared using a multi-step densification process. This consists of a pre-densification step followed by pitch impregnation/pyrolysis (I/P) cycles carried out under moderate pressure. Three pre-densification methods were investigated to significantly increase the apparent density of a raw preform to about 1.4 g/cm3. These were:(i) impregnation by carbonaceous powder slurry, (ii) film boiling chemical vapor infiltration, (iii) impregnation with a combination of synthetic pitch I/P and carbonaceous powder slurry. Composites were prepared from each of these three pre-densified materials, using a liquid pitch processing route with four I/P cycles with M50 petroleum pitch, under moderate pressures (10 MPa). As a reference a carbon/carbon composite was prepared using four I/P cycles with pitch. All four composites had different microstructural characteristics and different thermal properties. The influence of processing on thermal properties is discussed in relation to the microstructural characteristics. (authors)

  5. Self-lubricating carbon nanotube reinforced nickel matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nickel (Ni)--multiwalled carbon nanotube (CNT) composites have been processed in a monolithic form using the laser-engineered net shape (LENS) processing technique. Auger electron spectroscopy maps determined that the nanotubes were well dispersed and bonded in the nickel matrix and no interfacial chemical reaction products were determined in the as-synthesized composites. Mechanisms of solid lubrication have been investigated by micro-Raman spectroscopy spatial mapping of the worn surfaces to determine the formation of tribochemical products. The Ni-CNT composites exhibit a self-lubricating behavior, forming an in situ, low interfacial shear strength graphitic film during sliding, resulting in a decrease in friction coefficient compared to pure Ni.

  6. Electrical properties of foamed polypropylene/carbon black composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iliev, M.; Kotzev, G.; Vulchev, V.

    2016-02-01

    Polypropylene composites containing carbon black fillers were produced by vibration assisted extrusion process. Solid (unfoamed) composite samples were molded by conventional injection molding method, while structural foams were molded by a low pressure process. The foamed samples were evidenced to have a solid skin-foamed core structure which main parameters were found to depend on the quantity of material injected in the mold. The average bubbles' sizes and their distribution were investigated by scanning electron microscopy. It is established that the conductivity of the foamed samples gradually decreases when reducing the sample density. Nevertheless, the conductivity is found to be lower than the conductivity of the unfoamed samples both being of the same order. The flexural properties of the composites were studied and the results were discussed in the context of the structure parameters of the foamed samples.

  7. Fiber optic ultrasound transducers with carbon/PDMS composite coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosse, Charles A.; Colchester, Richard J.; Bhachu, Davinder S.; Zhang, Edward Z.; Papakonstantinou, Ioannis; Desjardins, Adrien E.

    2014-03-01

    Novel ultrasound transducers were created with a composite of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) that was dip coated onto the end faces of optical fibers. The CNTs were functionalized with oleylamine to allow for their dissolution in xylene, a solvent of PDMS. Ultrasound pulses were generated by illuminating the composite coating with pulsed laser light. At distances of 2 to 16 mm from the end faces, ultrasound pressures ranged from 0.81 to 0.07 MPa and from 0.27 to 0.03 MPa with 105 and 200 μm core fibers, respectively. Using an optical fiber hydrophone positioned adjacent to the coated 200 µm core optical fiber, ultrasound reflectance measurements were obtained from the outer surface of a sheep heart ventricle. The results of this study suggest that ultrasound transducers that comprise optical fibers with CNT-PDMS composite coatings may be suitable for miniature medical imaging probes.

  8. Magnetite decorated activated carbon composites for water purification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barala, Sunil Kumar; Arora, Manju; Saini, Parveen

    2013-06-01

    Activated carbon decorated with magnetite (ACMG) nanoparticles composites have been prepared by facile method via impregnation of AC with stable dispersion of superparamagnetic MG nanoparticles followed by drying. These composites exhibit both magnetic and porosity behavior which can be easily optimized by controlling the weight ratio of two phases. The structural, magnetic, thermal and morphological properties of these as synthesized ACMG samples were characterized by powder XRD, FTIR, VSM and SEM techniques. The ACMG powder has been used for water purification having methylene blue (MB) dye as an impurity. The nanoporosity of these composites allow rapid adsorption of MB and their magnetic behavior helps in single step separation of MB adsorbed ACMG particles by the application of external magnetic field.

  9. Mechanical testing and modelling of carbon-carbon composites for aircraft disc brakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Luke R.

    The objective of this study is to improve the understanding of the stress distributions and failure mechanisms experienced by carbon-carbon composite aircraft brake discs using finite element (FE) analyses. The project has been carried out in association with Dunlop Aerospace as an EPSRC CASE studentship. It therefore focuses on the carbon-carbon composite brake disc material produced by Dunlop Aerospace, although it is envisaged that the approach will have broader applications for modelling and mechanical testing of carbon-carbon composites in general. The disc brake material is a laminated carbon-carbon composite comprised of poly(acrylonitrile) (PAN) derived carbon fibres in a chemical vapour infiltration (CVI) deposited matrix, in which the reinforcement is present in both continuous fibre and chopped fibre forms. To pave the way for the finite element analysis, a comprehensive study of the mechanical properties of the carbon-carbon composite material was carried out. This focused largely, but not entirely, on model composite materials formulated using structural elements of the disc brake material. The strengths and moduli of these materials were measured in tension, compression and shear in several orientations. It was found that the stress-strain behaviour of the materials were linear in directions where there was some continuous fibre reinforcement, but non-linear when this was not the case. In all orientations, some degree of non-linearity was observed in the shear stress-strain response of the materials. However, this non-linearity was generally not large enough to pose a problem for the estimation of elastic moduli. Evidence was found for negative Poisson's ratio behaviour in some orientations of the material in tension. Additionally, the through-thickness properties of the composite, including interlaminar shear strength, were shown to be positively related to bulk density. The in-plane properties were mostly unrelated to bulk density over the range of

  10. Behavior of pure and modified carbon/carbon composites in atomic oxygen environment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-chong Liu; Lai-fei Cheng; Li-tong Zhang; Xin-gang Luan; Hui Mei

    2014-01-01

    Atomic oxygen (AO) is considered the most erosive particle to spacecraft materials in low earth orbit (LEO). Carbon fiber, car-bon/carbon (C/C), and some modified C/C composites were exposed to a simulated AO environment to investigate their behaviors in LEO. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), AO erosion rate calculation, and mechanical property testing were used to characterize the material properties. Results show that the carbon fiber and C/C specimens undergo significant degradation under the AO bombing. According to the effects of AO on C/C-SiC and CVD-SiC-coated C/C, a condensed CVD-SiC coat is a feasible approach to protect C/C composites from AO degradation.

  11. Single walled carbon nanotube network—Tetrahedral amorphous carbon composite film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Single walled carbon nanotube network (SWCNTN) was coated by tetrahedral amorphous carbon (ta-C) using a pulsed Filtered Cathodic Vacuum Arc system to form a SWCNTN—ta-C composite film. The effects of SWCNTN areal coverage density and ta-C coating thickness on the composite film properties were investigated. X-Ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements prove the presence of high quality sp3 bonded ta-C coating on the SWCNTN. Raman spectroscopy suggests that the single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) forming the network survived encapsulation in the ta-C coating. Nano-mechanical testing suggests that the ta-C coated SWCNTN has superior wear performance compared to uncoated SWCNTN

  12. Single walled carbon nanotube network—Tetrahedral amorphous carbon composite film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iyer, Ajai, E-mail: ajai.iyer@aalto.fi; Liu, Xuwen; Koskinen, Jari [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, School of Chemical Technology, Aalto University, POB 16200, 00076 Espoo (Finland); Kaskela, Antti; Kauppinen, Esko I. [NanoMaterials Group, Department of Applied Physics, School of Science, Aalto University, POB 15100, 00076 Espoo (Finland); Johansson, Leena-Sisko [Department of Forest Products Technology, School of Chemical Technology, Aalto University, POB 16400, 00076 Espoo (Finland)

    2015-06-14

    Single walled carbon nanotube network (SWCNTN) was coated by tetrahedral amorphous carbon (ta-C) using a pulsed Filtered Cathodic Vacuum Arc system to form a SWCNTN—ta-C composite film. The effects of SWCNTN areal coverage density and ta-C coating thickness on the composite film properties were investigated. X-Ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements prove the presence of high quality sp{sup 3} bonded ta-C coating on the SWCNTN. Raman spectroscopy suggests that the single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) forming the network survived encapsulation in the ta-C coating. Nano-mechanical testing suggests that the ta-C coated SWCNTN has superior wear performance compared to uncoated SWCNTN.

  13. 基于碳纳米管复合物的电化学生物传感器研究进展%Research progress of electrochemical biosensor based on carbon nanotubes complex

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩莉; 陶菡; 张义明; 张学俊

    2009-01-01

    In recent years, development of novel carbon nanotubes composite and their applications in electrochem-istry biosensor are the research focuses in materials and analytical chemistry field, the research process of electrochemical biosensor based on carbon nanotubes composite was previewed. Sensor based on carbon nanotubes-nanoparticles, carbon nanotubes-polymer and carbon nanotubes-ionic liquid composite were focused on.%新型碳纳米管复合物的开发及其在电化学生物传感器中的应用是近年来材料学和分析领域的研究热点.介绍了碳纳米管复合物在电化学生物传感领域的研究发展,重点对碳纳米管与纳米颗粒、聚合物及离子液体复合材料在电化学生物传感中的应用进行了论述.

  14. Wear-resistant metal-carbon composite coating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uglov, V.V.; Kuleshov, A.K.; Rusalsky, D.P. [Belorussian State Univ., Minsk (Belarus); Onate, J.I. [INASMET, Camino de Portuetxe 12, 20009, San Sebastian (Spain); Yang, S.-Z. [Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 603, 100080, Beijing (China)

    2000-06-01

    Carbon coatings containing a metallic component (zirconium, tantalum) were deposited with ion assistance on AISI M2 steel samples using a SVETLYACHOK source. The coatings were studied by Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Raman spectroscopy (RS) and pin-on-disc tribological tests. The results have shown that the carbon coatings contain up to 20 at.% of the metallic component. These coatings have an amorphous structure with sp{sup 3}-type bonds. The presence of the coating on the surface of AISI M2 steel reduces the friction coefficient by a factor of five under the tribological conditions investigated. It is found that the tribological properties of the coatings deposited with the assistance of metal ions are significantly better than those coatings deposited with assistance of carbon ions. The latter coatings had carbon atoms with mixed sp{sup 3}--sp{sup 2} bonds. The deposited composite carbon coatings are stable at a temperature of 100 C and allow a twofold improvement in the lifetime of fuel pump rods. (orig.)

  15. Preparation and physical properties of vapour-deposited carbon-carbon composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In its first part, this research thesis reports a bibliographical study on methods of preparation of various types of vapour-deposited (CVD) carbons, and the author notices that only structure and texture properties of these macroscopically homogeneous pyro-carbons have been studied in detail. For a better understanding of the behaviour of carbon-carbon composites, this thesis thus reports the study of the relationships between physical properties, macroscopic texture and microscopic structure. A densification installation and methods of characterisation have been developed. The fabrication process and its installation are presented (oven with its temperature and gas rate controls, study of its thermal gradient, substrate, heat treatments), and the study and characterisation of carbon-carbon composites are reported: structure and texture properties (studied by optic and scanning electronic microscopy, density measurements, and X-ray diffraction), physical properties (electronic paramagnetic resonance, static magnetism, electric and thermal conductivity). In the last part, the author comments and discusses the obtained results: conditions of preparation, existence, physical properties of the different observed microstructures

  16. Fully integrated patterned carbon nanotube strain sensors on flexible sensing skin substrates for structural health monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, Andrew R.; Kurata, Masahiro; Nishino, Hiromichi; Lynch, Jerome P.

    2016-04-01

    New advances in nanotechnology and material processing is creating opportunities for the design and fabrication of a new generation of thin film sensors that can used to assess structural health. In particular, thin film sensors attached to large areas of the structure surface has the potential to provide spatially rich data on the performance and health of a structure. This study focuses on the development of a fully integrated strain sensor that is fabricated on a flexible substrate for potentially use in sensing skins. This is completed using a carbon nanotube-polymer composite material that is patterned on a flexible polyimide substrate using optical lithography. The piezoresistive carbon nanotube elements are integrated into a complete sensing system by patterning copper electrodes and integrating off-the-shelf electrical components on the flexible film for expanded functionality. This diverse material utilization is realized in a versatile process flow to illustrate a powerful toolbox for sensing severity, location, and failure mode of damage on structural components. The fully integrated patterned carbon nanotube strain sensor is tested on a quarter-scale, composite beam column connection. The results and implications for future structural damage detection are discussed.

  17. Mechanical material characterization of an embedded Carbon nanotube in polymer matrix by employing an equivalent fiber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Pourasghar

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Effective elastic properties for carbon nanotube reinforced composites are obtained through a variety of micromechanics techniques. An embedded carbon nanotube  in  a  polymer  matrix  and  its surrounding  interphase  is  replaced with an equivalent fiber for  predicting  the  mechanical  properties of  the  carbon  nanotube/polymer composite. The effects of an interphase layer between the nanotubes and the polymer matrix as result of effective interphase layer is investigated. A modeling analysis investigating the effect of the aspect ratio on the tubes reinforcement mechanism has been carried out. The variations of mechanical properties with tube reduce, interphase thickness and waviness is investigated. Furthermore in this work, the classical theory concerning the mechanical efficiency of a matrix embedding finite length fibers has been modified by introducing the tube-to-tube Random Contact which explicitly accounts for the progressive reduction of the tubes effective aspect ratio as the filler content increases.

  18. Interfacial sliding in carbon nanotube/diamond matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon matrix-carbon nanotube (CNT) composites have a broad range of applications because of the exceptional mechanical properties of both matrix and fibers. Since interfacial sliding plays a key role in determining the strength and toughness of ceramic composites, here interface behavior during nanotube pull-out is studied using molecular dynamics models. The degree of interfacial coupling/adhesion between a diamond matrix and a carbon nanotube is captured through interstitial carbon atoms located in the interface, which can form bonds with both the matrix and CNT atoms. Bonding is accurately captured using the modified REBO potential of Pastewka et al. that introduces an environmental screening coefficient to better capture covalent bond breaking and reforming. Pull-out tests reveal that, after an initial transient, the pull-out force becomes constant, mimicking frictional sliding. The pull-out force is directly proportional to the number of interstitial atoms per unit area in the interface, showing that 'friction' is generated by the energy dissipated during breaking and reforming of bonds involving the interstitial atoms. The effective friction stresses are quite high (several GPa) for interstitial areal densities of 0.72-2.18 nm-2 and the energy dissipated during pull-out can thus be substantial. No differences were found in the pull-out of single wall nanotubes and double wall nanotubes having interwall sp3 bonding. These results demonstrate that 'friction-like' behavior can emerge from non-smooth interfaces and that chemical control of interfacial bonding in CNT can yield substantial sliding resistance and high potential toughening in nanoceramic composites.

  19. Laminate squeeze casting of carbon fiber reinforced aluminum matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Laminate squeeze casting shortens infiltration distance to half the fabric thickness. • Oxide scale on aluminum sheets serves as initial carbon–aluminum diffusion barrier. • Liquid infiltrates fiber fabrics from their respective neighboring aluminum layers. • Hydrostatic pressure in molten aluminum preserves the laminate configuration. • A good carbon fiber–aluminum matrix interface bond is achieved. - Abstract: Carbon fiber reinforced aluminum matrix composites show an excellent combination of lightweight, mechanical properties, ease of processing and low costs. However, standard liquid infiltration squeeze casting often requires complex preforms in order to control fiber configuration and distribution. It also requires relatively high pressures to overcome the pressure drop across the preform, which can lead to preform compaction and damage and can limit the maximum component thickness that can be thoroughly infiltrated. Therefore, a laminate squeeze casting process is investigated as alternative whereby alternate layers of fiber fabrics and aluminum sheets are hot consolidated. Liquid infiltrates the fiber fabrics from their two respective neighboring aluminum layers, thereby reducing the infiltration distance from the entire component height to only half the thickness of individual fiber layers. This results in a rapid and thorough infiltration. Composites with fiber contents between 7 and 14 vol% are successfully fabricated. Despite complete melting of the aluminum layers at 850 °C, optical and scanning electron microscopy investigations show that hydrostatic pressure practically preserves the laminate configuration during fabrication and no fiber agglomeration occurs. The composites show good fiber–matrix bonding. No noticeable fiber damage is observed despite some carbide formation primarily at interfaces. A composite hardness over 50% higher compared to the reference 6061 matrix alloy is achieved at a carbon fiber content of 7

  20. Use of Carbon Fiber Composite Molecular Sieves for Air Separation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, Frederick S [ORNL; Contescu, Cristian I [ORNL; Gallego, Nidia C [ORNL; Burchell, Timothy D [ORNL

    2005-09-01

    A novel adsorbent material, 'carbon fiber composite molecular sieve' (CFCMS), has been developed by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Its features include high surface area, large pore volume, and a rigid, permeable carbon structure that exhibits significant electrical conductivity. The unique combination of high adsorptive capacity, permeability, good mechanical properties, and electrical conductivity represents an enabling technology for the development of novel gas separation and purification systems. In this context, it is proposed that a fast-cycle air separation process that exploits a kinetic separation of oxygen and nitrogen should be possible using a CFCMS material coupled with electrical swing adsorption (ESA). The adsorption of O{sub 2}, N{sub 2}, and CO{sub 2} on activated carbon fibers was investigated using static and dynamic techniques. Molecular sieving effects in the activated carbon fiber were highlighted by the adsorption of CO{sub 2}, a more sensitive probe molecule for the presence of microporosity in adsorbents. The kinetic studies revealed that O2 was more rapidly adsorbed on the carbon fiber than N{sub 2}, and with higher uptake under equilibrium conditions, providing the fiber contained a high proportion of very narrow micropores. The work indicated that CFCMS is capable of separating O{sub 2} and N{sub 2} from air on the basis of the different diffusion rates of the two molecules in the micropore network of the activated carbon fibers comprising the composite material. In response to recent enquires from several potential users of CFCMS materials, attention has been given to the development of a viable continuous process for the commercial production of CFCMS material. As part of this effort, work was implemented on characterizing the performance of lignin-based activated carbon fiber, a potentially lower cost fiber than the pitch-based fibers used for CFCMS production to date. Similarly, to address engineering issues

  1. Carbon-Carbon Composites as Recuperator Materials for Direct Gas Brayton Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Of the numerous energy conversion options available for a space nuclear power plant (SNPP), one that shows promise in attaining reliable operation and high efficiency is the direct gas Brayton (GB) system. In order to increase efficiency, the GB system incorporates a recuperator that accounts for nearly half the weight of the energy conversion system (ECS). Therefore, development of a recuperator that is lighter and provides better performance than current heat exchangers could prove to be advantageous. The feasibility of a carbon-carbon (C/C) composite recuperator core has been assessed and a mass savings of 60% and volume penalty of 20% were projected. The excellent thermal properties, high-temperature capabilities, and low density of carbon-carbon materials make them attractive in the GB system, but development issues such as material compatibility with other structural materials in the system, such as refractory metals and superalloys, permeability, corrosion, joining, and fabrication must be addressed

  2. Cohesive zone model of carbon nanotube-coated carbon fiber/polyester composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It has been previously reported that the average properties of carbon nanotube-coated carbon fiber/polyester multiscale composites critically depend on the length and density of nanotubes on the fiber surface. In this paper the effect of nanotube length and density on the interfacial properties of the carbon nanotube-coated carbon fiber–polymer interface has been studied using shear lag and a cohesive zone model. The latter model incorporates frictional sliding after complete debonding between the fiber and matrix and has been developed to quantify the effect of nanotube coating on various interfacial characterizing parameters. Our numerical results indicate that fibers with an optimal coverage and length of nanotubes significantly increase the interfacial strength and friction between the fiber and polymer. However, they also embrittle the interface compared with bare fibers. (paper)

  3. Carbon-Carbon Composites as Recuperator Material for Direct Gas Brayton Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    RA Wolf

    2006-07-19

    Of the numerous energy conversion options available for a space nuclear power plant (SNPP), one that shows promise in attaining reliable operation and high efficiency is the direct gas Brayton (GB) system. In order to increase efficiency, the GB system incorporates a recuperator that accounts for nearly half the weight of the energy conversion system (ECS). Therefore, development of a recuperator that is lighter and provides better performance than current heat exchangers could prove to be advantageous. The feasibility of a carbon-carbon (C/C) composite recuperator core has been assessed and a mass savings of 60% and volume penalty of 20% were projected. The excellent thermal properties, high-temperature capabilities, and low density of carbon-carbon materials make them attractive in the GB system, but development issues such as material compatibility with other structural materials in the system, such as refractory metals and superalloys, permeability, corrosion, joining, and fabrication must be addressed.

  4. Study of the damaging mechanisms of a carbon - carbon composite bonded to copper under thermomechanical loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this work is to understand and to identify the damaging mechanisms of Carbon-Carbon composite bonded to copper under thermomechanical loading. The study of the composite allowed the development of non-linear models. These ones have been introduced in the finite elements analysis code named CASTEM 2000. They have been validated according to a correlation between simulation and mechanical tests on multi-material samples. These tests have also permitted us to better understand the behaviour of the bonding between composite and copper (damaging and fracture modes for different temperatures) under shear and tensile loadings. The damaging mechanisms of the bond under thermomechanical loading have been studied and identified according to microscopic observations on mock-ups which have sustained thermal cycling tests: some cracks appear in the composite, near the bond between the composite and the copper. The correlation between numerical and experimental results have been improved because of the reliability of the composite modelization, the use of residual stresses and the results of the bond mechanical characterisation. (author)

  5. Study of the damaging mechanisms of a copper / carbon - carbon composite under thermomechanical loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this work is to understand and to identify the damaging mechanisms of Carbon-Carbon composite bonded to copper under thermomechanical loading. The study of the composite allowed the development of non-linear models. These ones have been introduced in the finite elements analysis code named CASTEM2000. They have been validated according to a correlation between simulation and mechanical tests on multi-material samples. These tests have also permitted us to better understand the behaviour of the bonding between composite and copper (damaging and fracture modes for different temperatures) under shear and tensile loadings. The damaging mechanisms of the bond under thermomechanical loading have been studied and identified according to microscopic observations on mock-ups which have sustained thermal cycling tests: some cracks appear in the composite, near the bond between the composite and the copper. The correlation between numerical and experimental results have been improved because of the reliability of the composite modelization, the use of residual stresses and the results of the bond mechanical characterization. (author)

  6. Enhanced capacitive deionization of graphene/mesoporous carbon composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dengsong; Wen, Xiaoru; Shi, Liyi; Yan, Tingting; Zhang, Jianping

    2012-09-01

    Capacitive deionization (CDI) with low-energy consumption and no secondary waste is emerging as a novel desalination technology. Graphene/mesoporous carbon (GE/MC) composites have been prepared via a direct triblock-copolymer-templating method and used as CDI electrodes for the first time. The influences of GE content on the textural properties and electrochemical performance were studied. The transmission electron microscopy and nitrogen adsorption-desorption analysis indicate that mesoporous structures are well retained and the composites display improved specific surface area and pore size distribution, as well as pore volume. Well dispersed GE nanosheets are deduced to be beneficial for enhanced electrical conductivity. The electrochemical performance of electrodes in an NaCl aqueous solution was characterized by cyclic voltammetry, galvanostatic charge-discharge and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurements. The composite electrodes perform better on the capacitance values, conductive behaviour, rate performance and cyclic stability. The desalination capacity of the electrodes was evaluated by a batch mode electrosorptive experiment and the amount of adsorbed ions can reach 731 μg g⁻¹ for the GE/MC composite electrode with a GE content of 5 wt%, which is much higher than that of MC alone (590 μg g⁻¹). The enhanced CDI performance of the composite electrodes can be attributed to the better conductive behaviour and higher specific surface area. PMID:22836788

  7. Fabrication and characterization of carbon nanotube reinforced magnesium matrix composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mindivan, Harun, E-mail: hmindivan@hotmail.com [Bilecik S.E. University, Department of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, 11210, Gulumbe, Bilecik (Turkey); Efe, Arife; Kosatepe, A. Hadi [Atatürk University, Department of Nanoscience and Nanoengineering, 25240, Erzurum (Turkey); Kayali, E.Sabri [Istanbul Technical University, Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, 34469 Maslak, Istanbul (Turkey)

    2014-11-01

    Highlights: • Carbon nanotube (CNT) reinforced magnesium (Mg chips) matrix composite rod was successfully fabricated by mechanical ball milling, cold pressing and subsequently hot extrusion process without sintering step. • CNT content has effect on the microstructure, mechanical, corrosion and wear properties of the composites. • The small amount CNT addition to the Mg matrix improved the hardness, wear and corrosion resistances of the composites. - Abstract: In the present investigation, Mg chips are recycled to produce Mg–6 wt.% Al reinforced with 0.5, 1, 2 and 4 wt.% nanosized CNTs by mechanical ball milling, cold pressing and subsequently hot extrusion process without sintering step. The microstructure, mechanical properties and corrosion behavior of Mg/Al without CNT (base alloy) and composites were evaluated. The distribution of CNTs was analyzed using a Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) equipped with Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS) analyzer and a Wavelength Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence spectrometer (WDXRF). Microstructural analysis revealed that the CNTs on the Mg chips were present throughout the extrusion direction and the uniform distribution of CNTs at the chip surface decreased with increase in the CNT content. The results of the mechanical and corrosion test showed that small addition of CNTs (0.5 wt.%) evidently improved the hardness and corrosion resistance of the composite by comparing with the base alloy, while increase in the CNT weight fraction in the initial mixture resulted in a significant decrease of hardness, compression strength, wear rate and corrosion resistance.

  8. Rapid Fabrication of Carbide Matrix/Carbon Fiber Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Brian E.; Bernander, Robert E.

    2007-01-01

    Composites of zirconium carbide matrix material reinforced with carbon fibers can be fabricated relatively rapidly in a process that includes a melt infiltration step. Heretofore, these and other ceramic matrix composites have been made in a chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) process that takes months. The finished products of the CVI process are highly porous and cannot withstand temperatures above 3,000 F (approx.1,600 C). In contrast, the melt-infiltration-based process takes only a few days, and the composite products are more nearly fully dense and have withstood temperatures as high as 4,350 F (approx.2,400 C) in a highly oxidizing thrust chamber environment. Moreover, because the melt- infiltration-based process takes much less time, the finished products are expected to cost much less. Fabrication begins with the preparation of a carbon fiber preform that, typically, is of the size and shape of a part to be fabricated. By use of low-temperature ultraviolet-enhanced chemical vapor deposition, the carbon fibers in the preform are coated with one or more interfacial material(s), which could include oxides. The interfacial material helps to protect the fibers against chemical attack during the remainder of the fabrication process and against oxidation during subsequent use; it also enables slippage between the fibers and the matrix material, thereby helping to deflect cracks and distribute loads. Once the fibers have been coated with the interfacial material, the fiber preform is further infiltrated with a controlled amount of additional carbon, which serves as a reactant for the formation of the carbide matrix material. The next step is melt infiltration. The preform is exposed to molten zirconium, which wicks into the preform, drawn by capillary action. The molten metal fills most of the interstices of the preform and reacts with the added carbon to form the zirconium carbide matrix material. The zirconium does not react with the underlying fibers because they

  9. Electromagnetic interference shielding properties of carbon nanotube buckypaper composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preformed carbon nanotube thin films (10-20 μm), or buckypapers (BPs), consist of dense and entangled nanotube networks, which demonstrate high electrical conductivity and provide potential lightweight electromagnetic interference (EMI) solutions for composite structures. Nanocomposite laminates consisting of various proportions of single-walled and multi-walled carbon nanotubes, having different conductivity, and with different stacking structures, were studied. Single-layer BP composites showed shielding effectiveness (SE) of 20-60 dB, depending on the BP conductivity within a 2-18 GHz frequency range. The effects on EMI SE performance of composite laminate structures made with BPs of different conductivity values and epoxy or polyethylene insulating layer stacking sequences were studied. The results were also compared against the predictions from a modified EMI SE model. The predicted trends of SE value and frequency dependence were consistent with the experimental results, revealing that adjusting the number of BP layers and appropriate arrangement of the BP conducting layers and insulators can increase the EMI SE from 45 dB to close to 100 dB owing to the utilization of the double-shielding effect.

  10. Boron carbide/carbon composite material and production process therefor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The boron carbide/carbon composite material of the present invention comprises from 15 to 40% by volume of graphite and the balance of two kinds of powdery boron carbides X and Y having different average grain sizes. The average grain size of the powdery boron carbide X is less than 1/2 of the average grain size of the boron carbide Y, and the composite material comprises more than 10% by volume of the powdery boron carbide X and more than 30% by volume of the powdery boron carbide Y. They are press-molded under heating at a temperature range of 480 to 600degC, followed by sintering. A binder pitch of less evaporation ingredient melting upon heating is used as a binder. Since the pitch of satisfactory melting property is used, there is no worry that binding property lacks to reduce the lowering of the strength even if a great amount of powdery boron carbide is added. Further, since a carbonization yield is improved due to less evaporation content, density and strength of the composite material can be increased. (T.M.)

  11. Electromagnetic interference shielding properties of carbon nanotube buckypaper composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jin Gyu; Louis, Jeffrey; Cheng, Qunfeng; Bao, Jianwen; Smithyman, Jesse; Liang, Richard; Wang, Ben; Zhang, Chuck; Brooks, James S; Kramer, Leslie; Fanchasis, Percy; Dorough, David

    2009-10-14

    Preformed carbon nanotube thin films (10-20 microm), or buckypapers (BPs), consist of dense and entangled nanotube networks, which demonstrate high electrical conductivity and provide potential lightweight electromagnetic interference (EMI) solutions for composite structures. Nanocomposite laminates consisting of various proportions of single-walled and multi-walled carbon nanotubes, having different conductivity, and with different stacking structures, were studied. Single-layer BP composites showed shielding effectiveness (SE) of 20-60 dB, depending on the BP conductivity within a 2-18 GHz frequency range. The effects on EMI SE performance of composite laminate structures made with BPs of different conductivity values and epoxy or polyethylene insulating layer stacking sequences were studied. The results were also compared against the predictions from a modified EMI SE model. The predicted trends of SE value and frequency dependence were consistent with the experimental results, revealing that adjusting the number of BP layers and appropriate arrangement of the BP conducting layers and insulators can increase the EMI SE from 45 dB to close to 100 dB owing to the utilization of the double-shielding effect. PMID:19755727

  12. Highly energetic compositions based on functionalized carbon nanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Qi-Long; Gozin, Michael; Zhao, Feng-Qi; Cohen, Adva; Pang, Si-Ping

    2016-02-25

    In recent years, research in the field of carbon nanomaterials (CNMs), such as fullerenes, expanded graphite (EG), carbon nanotubes (CNTs), graphene, and graphene oxide (GO), has been widely used in energy storage, electronics, catalysts, and biomaterials, as well as medical applications. Regarding energy storage, one of the most important research directions is the development of CNMs as carriers of energetic components by coating or encapsulation, thus forming safer advanced nanostructures with better performances. Moreover, some CNMs can also be functionalized to become energetic additives. This review article covers updated preparation methods for the aforementioned CNMs, with a more specific orientation towards the use of these nanomaterials in energetic compositions. The effects of these functionalized CNMs on thermal decomposition, ignition, combustion and the reactivity properties of energetic compositions are significant and are discussed in detail. It has been shown that the use of functionalized CNMs in energetic compositions greatly improves their combustion performances, thermal stability and sensitivity. In particular, functionalized fullerenes, CNTs and GO are the most appropriate candidate components in nanothermites, solid propellants and gas generators, due to their superior catalytic properties as well as facile preparation methods. PMID:26880518

  13. Sulfonated mesoporous silica–carbon composites and their use as solid acid catalysts

    OpenAIRE

    Valle Vigón, Patricia; Sevilla Solís, Marta; Fuertes Arias, Antonio Benito

    2012-01-01

    [EN] The synthesis of highly functionalized porous silica–carbon composites made up of sulfonic groups attached to a carbon layer coating the pores of three types of mesostructured silica (i.e. SBA-15, KIT-6 and mesocellular silica) is presented. The synthesis procedure involves the following steps: (a) removal of the surfactant, (b) impregnation of the silica pores with a carbon precursor, (c) carbonization and (d) sulfonation. The resulting silica–carbon composites contain ∼30 wt % of carbo...

  14. Effect of carbon nanotubes upon emissions from cutting and sanding carbon fiber-epoxy composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are being incorporated into structural composites to enhance material strength. During fabrication or repair activities, machining nanocomposites may release CNTs into the workplace air. An experimental study was conducted to evaluate the emissions generated by cutting and sanding on three types of epoxy-composite panels: Panel A containing graphite fibers, Panel B containing graphite fibers and carbon-based mat, and Panel C containing graphite fibers, carbon-based mat, and multi-walled CNTs. Aerosol sampling was conducted with direct-reading instruments, and filter samples were collected for measuring elemental carbon (EC) and fiber concentrations. Our study results showed that cutting Panel C with a band saw did not generate detectable emissions of fibers inspected by transmission electron microscopy but did increase the particle mass, number, and EC emission concentrations by 20–80 % compared to Panels A and B. Sanding operation performed on two Panel C resulted in fiber emission rates of 1.9 × 108 and 2.8 × 106 fibers per second (f/s), while no free aerosol fibers were detected from sanding Panels A and B containing no CNTs. These free CNT fibers may be a health concern. However, the analysis of particle and EC concentrations from these same samples cannot clearly indicate the presence of CNTs, because extraneous aerosol generation from machining the composite epoxy material increased the mass concentrations of the EC

  15. Effect of carbon nanotubes upon emissions from cutting and sanding carbon fiber-epoxy composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heitbrink, William A. [LMK OSH Consulting LLC (United States); Lo, Li-Ming, E-mail: LLo@cdc.gov [Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Division of Applied Research and Technology, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) (United States)

    2015-08-15

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are being incorporated into structural composites to enhance material strength. During fabrication or repair activities, machining nanocomposites may release CNTs into the workplace air. An experimental study was conducted to evaluate the emissions generated by cutting and sanding on three types of epoxy-composite panels: Panel A containing graphite fibers, Panel B containing graphite fibers and carbon-based mat, and Panel C containing graphite fibers, carbon-based mat, and multi-walled CNTs. Aerosol sampling was conducted with direct-reading instruments, and filter samples were collected for measuring elemental carbon (EC) and fiber concentrations. Our study results showed that cutting Panel C with a band saw did not generate detectable emissions of fibers inspected by transmission electron microscopy but did increase the particle mass, number, and EC emission concentrations by 20–80 % compared to Panels A and B. Sanding operation performed on two Panel C resulted in fiber emission rates of 1.9 × 10{sup 8} and 2.8 × 10{sup 6} fibers per second (f/s), while no free aerosol fibers were detected from sanding Panels A and B containing no CNTs. These free CNT fibers may be a health concern. However, the analysis of particle and EC concentrations from these same samples cannot clearly indicate the presence of CNTs, because extraneous aerosol generation from machining the composite epoxy material increased the mass concentrations of the EC.

  16. Hybrid Carbon Fibers/Carbon Nanotubes Structures for Next Generation Polymeric Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Doorn

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Pitch-based carbon fibers are commonly used to produce polymeric carbon fiber structural composites. Several investigations have reported different methods for dispersing and subsequently aligning carbon nanotubes (CNTs as a filler to reinforce polymer matrix. The significant difficulty in dispersing CNTs suggested the controlled-growth of CNTs on surfaces where they are needed. Here we compare between two techniques for depositing the catalyst iron used toward growing CNTs on pitch-based carbon fiber surfaces. Electrochemical deposition of iron using pulse voltametry is compared to DC magnetron iron sputtering. Carbon nanostructures growth was performed using a thermal CVD system. Characterization for comparison between both techniques was compared via SEM, TEM, and Raman spectroscopy analysis. It is shown that while both techniques were successful to grow CNTs on the carbon fiber surfaces, iron sputtering technique was capable of producing more uniform distribution of iron catalyst and thus multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs compared to MWCNTs grown using the electrochemical deposition of iron.

  17. Molecular and carbon isotopic compositions of gas inclusions of deep carbonate rocks in the Tarim Basin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Shixin; WANG Xianbin; MENG Zifang; LI Yuan; Paul Farrimond; LI Liwu; DUAN Yi

    2004-01-01

    Gaseous components of gas inclusions in deep carbonate rocks (>5700 m) from the Tacan 1 well were analyzed by online mass spectrometry by means of either the stepwise heating technique or vacuum electromagnetism crushing. The carbon isotopic compositions of gases released by vacuum electromagnetism crushing were also measured. Although the molecular compositions of gas inclusions show differences between the two methods, the overall characteristics are that gas inclusions mainly contain CO2, whilst hydrocarbon gases, such as CH4, C2H6 and C3H8, are less abundant. The content of CO is higher in the stepwise heating experiment than that in the method of vacuum electromagnetism crushing, and there are only minor amounts of N2, H2 and O2 in gas inclusions. Methane δ13C values of gas inclusions in Lower Ordovician and Upper Cambrian rocks (from 5713.7 to 6422 m; -52‰-63‰) are similar to those of bacterial methane, but their chemical compositions do not exhibit the dry character in comparison with biogenic gases. These characteristics of deep gas inclusions may be related to the migration fractionation. Some deep natural gases with light carbon isotopic characteristics in the Tazhong Uplift may have a similar origin. The δ13C1 values of gas inclusions in Lower Cambrian rocks (7117-7124 m) are heavier (-39‰), consistent with highly mature natural gases. Carbon isotopic compositions of CO2 in the gas inclusions of deep carbonate rocks are similar (from -4‰ to -13‰) to those of deep natural gases, indicating predominantly an inorganic origin.

  18. Modeling of carbon nanotubes, graphene and their composites

    CERN Document Server

    Silvestre, Nuno

    2014-01-01

    This book contains ten chapters, authored by world experts in the field of simulation at nano-scale and aims to demonstrate the potentialities of computational techniques to model the mechanical behavior of nano-materials, such as carbon nanotubes, graphene and their composites. A large part of the research currently being conducted in the fields of materials science and engineering mechanics is devoted to carbon nanotubes, graphene and their applications. In this process, computational modeling is a very attractive research tool due to the difficulties in manufacturing and testing of nano-materials. Both atomistic modeling methods, such as molecular mechanics and molecular dynamics, and continuum modeling methods are being intensively used. Continuum modeling offers significant advantages over atomistic modeling such as the reduced computational effort, the capability of modeling complex structures and bridging different analysis scales, thus enabling modeling from the nano- to the macro-scale. On the oth...

  19. A dense and strong bonding collagen film for carbon/carbon composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, Sheng; Li, Hejun, E-mail: lihejun@nwpu.edu.cn; Li, Kezhi; Lu, Jinhua; Zhang, Leilei

    2015-08-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Significantly enhancement of biocompatibility on C/C composites by preparing a collagen film. • The dense and continuous collagen film had a strong bonding strength with C/C composites after dehydrathermal treatment (DHT) crosslink. • Numerous oxygen-containing functional groups formed on the surface of C/C composites without matrix damage. - Abstract: A strong bonding collagen film was successfully prepared on carbon/carbon (C/C) composites. The surface conditions of the modified C/C composites were detected by contact angle measurements, scanning electron microscope (SEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Raman spectra. The roughness, optical morphology, bonding strength and biocompatibility of collagen films at different pH values were detected by confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM), universal test machine and cytology tests in vitro. After a 4-h modification in 30% H{sub 2}O{sub 2} solution at 100 °C, the contact angle on the surface of C/C composites was decreased from 92.3° to 65.3°. Large quantities of hydroxyl, carboxyl and carbonyl functional groups were formed on the surface of the modified C/C composites. Then a dense and continuous collagen film was prepared on the modified C/C substrate. Bonding strength between collagen film and C/C substrate was reached to 8 MPa level when the pH value of this collagen film was 2.5 after the preparing process. With 2-day dehydrathermal treatment (DHT) crosslinking at 105 °C, the bonding strength was increased to 12 MPa level. At last, the results of in vitro cytological test showed that this collagen film made a great improvement on the biocompatibility on C/C composites.

  20. Preparation and characterization of carbon nanofiber-polymide composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaobing

    Carbon nanofibers (CNFs) are potentially excellent reinforcements in polymer-based composites due to very good mechanical properties, thermal and electrical conductivity, and low cost to manufacture. The dispersion of fibers and the interfacial interaction with the polymer matrix need to be improved for CNF composites to achieve this potential. Treatment of the nanofiber surface with groups that are compatible with the polymer is key to addressing these issues. Attached functional groups may enhance the adhesion between reinforcement phase and matrix phase and reduce the slip of polymer chains on the surfaces of fibers. As a result, load can be transferred to fibers efficiently. In this investigation, CNFs were used as reinforcements in a polyimide (PI) matrix to produce a composite. To improve dispersion of fibers as well as interfacial adhesion, oxidized carbon nanofibers (OCNFs) were functionalized by covalently attaching 1,4-phenylenediamine (1,4-PDA) or polyimide oligomer to the surfaces. The functionalization with diamine was carried out either through direct reaction with OCNFs in dimethylacetimide (DMAc) solvent or through a two-step approach in which oxidized fibers were reacted with thionyl chloride (SOCl2) to improve surface reactivity followed by reaction with PDA in DMAc. The PDA was successfully bonded to the surfaces of fibers using both strategies. The further attachment of oligomer proceeded as expected in DMAc. The functionalized CNFs were characterized using Raman spectroscopy, thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) to confirm the functionalization reaction. Raman spectra and XPS spectra qualitatively indicated target chemical bonds were formed in each reaction step. Quantifications of TGA and XPS consistently supported that desired chemical moieties were present on the surfaces of fibers. In short, the interfaces of fibers were tailored with groups that would mimic the structure of polyimide and can

  1. Carbon Nanotube-Conducting Polymer Composites Based Solar Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Prakash; R.Somani; M.Umeno

    2007-01-01

    1 Results Combination of carbon nanotubes (CN) with polymers is important for application towards value added composites,solar cells,fuel cells etc.Especially interesting is the combination of CN with π-conjugated polymers because of the potential interaction between the highly delocalized π-electrons of the CN and the π-electrons correlated with the lattice of polymer skeleton.Efficient exciton dissociation due to electron transfer from the photoexcited polymer to CN is of interest for photovoltaic app...

  2. Deuterium trapping in carbon fiber composites exposed to D plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Airapetov, A. [Plasma Physics Department, Moscow Engineering and Physics Institute, Kashirskoe Shosse 31, Moscow 115409 (Russian Federation); Begrambekov, L., E-mail: lbb@plasma.mephi.r [Plasma Physics Department, Moscow Engineering and Physics Institute, Kashirskoe Shosse 31, Moscow 115409 (Russian Federation); Brosset, C.; Gunn, J.P.; Grisolia, C. [Association EURATOM-CEA, CEA/DSM/DRFC Cadarache, 13108 St. Paul lez Durance (France); Kuzmin, A. [Plasma Physics Department, Moscow Engineering and Physics Institute, Kashirskoe Shosse 31, Moscow 115409 (Russian Federation); Loarer, T.; Lipa, M.; Monier-Garbet, P. [Association EURATOM-CEA, CEA/DSM/DRFC Cadarache, 13108 St. Paul lez Durance (France); Shigin, P. [Plasma Physics Department, Moscow Engineering and Physics Institute, Kashirskoe Shosse 31, Moscow 115409 (Russian Federation); Tsitrone, E. [Association EURATOM-CEA, CEA/DSM/DRFC Cadarache, 13108 St. Paul lez Durance (France); Zakharov, A. [Plasma Physics Department, Moscow Engineering and Physics Institute, Kashirskoe Shosse 31, Moscow 115409 (Russian Federation)

    2009-06-15

    Deuterium trapping in carbon fiber composite N11 and pyrolitic graphite PG99 irradiated with plasma ions and electrons was examined with thermal desorption spectrometry. It has been found that the deuterium trapping takes place even at ion and electron energies of about 10 eV. For equal ion fluences, the deuterium retention and probability of CD{sub 4} formation are higher for ion irradiation at lower ion flux. Peculiarities of the deuterium retention and CD{sub 4} formation are explained; driving forces and mechanisms of the D trapping are discussed.

  3. Laser ultrasound technology for fault detection on carbon fiber composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyrkammer, Robert; Reitinger, Bernhard; Grün, Hubert; Sekelja, Jakov; Burgholzer, Peter

    2014-05-01

    The marching in of carbon fiber reinforced polymers (CFRPs) to mass production in the aeronautic and automotive industry requires reliable quality assurance methods. Laser ultrasound (LUS) is a promising nondestructive testing technique for sample inspection. The benefits compared to conventional ultrasound (US) testing are couplant free measurements and an easy access to complex shapes due to remote optical excitation and detection. Here the potential of LUS is present on composite test panels with relevant testing scenarios for industry. The results are evaluated in comparison to conventional ultrasound used in the aeronautic industry.

  4. Enhanced actuation in functionalized carbon nanotube–Nafion composites

    KAUST Repository

    Lian, Huiqin

    2011-08-01

    The fabrication and electromechanical performance of functionalized carbon nanotube (FCNT)-Nafion composite actuators were studied. The CNTs were modified successfully with polyethylene glycol (PEG), as verified by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images show that the FCNTs are homogeneously dispersed in the Nafion matrix. The properties of FCNT-Nafion composites in terms of water uptake, ion exchange capacity, proton conductivity, dynamic mechanical properties, and actuation behavior were evaluated. The results show that the sample with 0.5 wt% FCNT exhibits the best overall behavior. Its storage modulus is 2.4 times higher than that of Nafion. In addition, the maximum generated strain and the blocking force for the same sample are 2 and 2.4 times higher compared to the neat Nafion actuator, respectively. © 2011 Elsevier B.V.

  5. INFLUENCE OF HEAT TREATMENT ON OXIDATION PROPERTIES OF C/C COMPOSITES FABRICATED BY HIGH PRESSURE IMPREGNATION CARBONIZATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Q.Chen; H.J.Li; A.J.Li; H.M.Han; K.Z.Li

    2004-01-01

    Felt base carbon/carbon composites fabricated by super-high pressure impregnation carbonization process (SPIC) were heat treated at high temperature 2773K. The oxidation properties of felt base carbon/carbon composites were investigated at different temperatures (773-1173K), and the microstructures of carbon/carbon composites were studied by SEM and X-ray diffraction. The experimental results showed that the interlaminar distance of (002) plane (doo2) deceased while the microcrystalline stack height (Lc) increased. The oxidation rate of felt base carbon/carbon composites was invariable at certain temperatures. The oxidation mechanism of carbon/carbon composites changed remarkably at the oxidation temperature 973K. At the initial oxidation stage of carbon/carbon composites, carbon matrix was oxidized much more rapidly than carbon felt.

  6. The Li isotope composition of modern biogenic carbonates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dellinger, M.; West, A. J.; Adkins, J. F.; Paris, G.; Eagle, R.; Freitas, P. S.; Bagard, M. L.; Ries, J. B.; Corsetti, F. A.; Pogge von Strandmann, P.; Ullmann, C. V.

    2015-12-01

    The lithium stable isotope composition (δ7Li) of sedimentary carbonates has great potential to unravel weathering rates and intensity in the past, with implications for understanding the carbon cycle over geologic time. However, so far very little is known about the potential influence of fractionation of the stable Li isotope composition of biogenic carbonates. Here, we investigate the δ7Li of various organisms (particularly mollusks, echinoderms and brachiopods) abundant in the Phanerozoic record, in order to understand which geologic archives might provide the best targets for reconstructing past seawater composition. The range of measured samples includes (i) modern calcite and aragonite shells from variable natural environments, (ii) shells from organisms grown under controlled conditions (temperature, salinity, pCO2), and (iii) fossil shells from a range of species collected from Miocene deposits. When possible, both the inner and outer layers of bivalves were micro-sampled to assess the intra-shell heterogeneity. For calcitic shells, the measured δ7Li of bivalve species range from +32 to +41‰ and is systematically enriched in the heavy isotope relative to seawater (31 ‰) and to inorganic calcite, which is characterized by Δ7Licalcite-seawater = -2 to -5‰ [1]. The Li isotope composition of aragonitic bivalves, ranging from +16 to +22‰, is slightly fractionated to both high and low δ7Li relative to inorganic aragonite. The largest intra-shell Li isotope variability is observed for mixed calcite-aragonite shells (more than 20‰) whereas in single mineralogy shells, intra-shell δ7Li variability is generally less than 3‰. Overall, these results suggest a strong influence of vital effects on Li isotopes during bio-calcification of bivalve shells. On the contrary, measured brachiopods systematically exhibit fractionation that is very similar to inorganic calcite, with a mean δ7Li of 27.0±1.5‰, suggesting that brachiopods may provide good

  7. Reduction of iron-oxide-carbon composites: part III. Shrinkage of composite pellets during reduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halder, S.; Fruehan, R.J. [Praxair Inc., Tonawanda, NY (United States). Praxair Technological Center

    2008-12-15

    This article involves the evaluation of the volume change of iron-oxide-carbon composite pellets and its implications on reduction kinetics under conditions prevalent in a rotary hearth furnace (RHF) that were simulated in the laboratory. The pellets, in general, were found to shrink considerably during the reduction due to the loss of carbon and oxygen from the system, sintering of the iron-oxide, and formation of a molten slag phase at localized regions inside the pellets due to the presence of binder and coal/wood-charcoal ash at the reduction temperatures. One of the shortcomings of the RHF ironmaking process has been the inability to use multiple layers of composite pellets because of the impediment in heat transport to the lower layers of a multilayer bed. However, pellet shrinkage was found to have a strong effect on the reduction kinetics by virtue of enhancing the external heat transport to the lower layers. The volume change of the different kinds of composite pellets was studied as a function of reduction temperature and time. The estimation of the change in the amount of external heat transport with varying pellet sizes for a particular layer of a multilayer bed was obtained by conducting heat-transfer tests using inert low-carbon steel spheres. It was found that if the pellets of the top layer of the bed shrink by 30 pct, the external heat transfer to the second layer increases by nearly 6 times.

  8. 21 CFR 878.3500 - Polytetrafluoroethylene with carbon fibers composite implant material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... composite implant material. 878.3500 Section 878.3500 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION... Prosthetic Devices § 878.3500 Polytetrafluoroethylene with carbon fibers composite implant material. (a) Identification. A polytetrafluoroethylene with carbon fibers composite implant material is a porous...

  9. Crushing behavior of hybrid hexagonal/octagonal cellular composite system: Aramid/carbon hybrid composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Replacing the carbon/epoxy by aramid/epoxy did not affect the peak load. • The post crush force efficiency showed improvements by using aramid/epoxy packing. • The specific energy showed improvement by using aramid/epoxy packing. • Brittle fracture dominated the crush behavior for the carbon/epoxy packing. • Plastic deformation without fracture was observed for aramid/epoxy packing. - Abstract: In the current paper a series of experiments were conducted to assess the crashworthiness of cellular hexagonal/octagonal composite device. Each device composed of 6 cells of carbon fiber reinforced composite (CFRP). Different arrangements of the octagonal and the hexagonal cells were studied. All the configurations were filled with foam. The main objective of the current paper was to examine the effect of using the aramid/epoxy instead of the carbon/epoxy layers to pack the device. The specimens were tested under quasi-static compression loading up to complete crushing. The results showed that the packing material did not have a significant effect for the case of all hexagonal open cells. For the other configurations, introducing the aramid/epoxy instead of the carbon/epoxy showed improvements in the stroke efficiency, the crush load stability, the average crushing load, the energy absorbed and the specific energy absorption. In order to understand the mechanisms that led to this improvement, the packing material were examine after crushing using an optical microscope and a scanning electron microscope (SEM). For the carbon/epoxy, the images showed many failure mechanisms whereas, for the aramid/epoxy, only delamination was noted

  10. Influence of carbon source on the stable carbon isotopic composition of the seagrass Thalassia testudinum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of isotopically distinct organic carbon sources in sediments and CO2 enrichment on the stable carbon isotope composition of Thalassia testudinum (turtle grass) seedlings were investigated. Seedling leaves became increasingly 13C depleted in all treatments with time. In the CO2 enriched treatment, δ13C values for seedlings declined from -9.1 to -57.1 per mille over the nine month culture period; the latter value is the lightest stable carbon isotope composition ever reported for a higher plant. In all non-CO2-enriched treatments, δ13C values declined from -9.1 per mille at T=0 to between -18.3 and -22.2 per mille after nine months. The lack of treatment effect in the non-CO2-enriched cultures was probably due to the release and exchange of isotopically light CO2 from the CO2 enriched treatment within the relatively closed environment of the culture room. This exchange was reflected in media dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) δ13C values that indicated increasing 13C depletion relative to the initial compositions of the synthetic seawater salts. Depletion of 13C in leaf tissue of seedlings in the non-CO2-enriched treatments occurred faster than did media DIC 13C depletion, suggesting an increase in isotopic fractionation as seedlings grew. The reasons for this increasing fractionation are unclear, but they may reflect a decreasing contribution of isotopically heavy seed research and/or increasing availability of exogenous carbon. 18 refs, 1 fig., 2 tabs

  11. Hybrid S2/Carbon Epoxy Composite Armours Under Blast Loads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolce, F.; Meo, Michele; Wright, A.; French, M.; Bernabei, M.

    2012-06-01

    Civil and military structures, such as helicopters, aircrafts, naval ships, tanks or buildings are susceptible to blast loads as terroristic attacks increases, therefore there is the need to design blast resistant structures. During an explosion the peak pressure produced by shock wave is much greater than the static collapse pressure. Metallic structures usually undergo large plastic deformations absorbing blast energy before reaching equilibrium. Due to their high specific properties, fibre-reinforced polymers are being considered for energy absorption applications in blast resistant armours. A deep insight into the relationship between explosion loads, composite architecture and deformation/fracture behaviour will offer the possibility to design structures with significantly enhanced energy absorption and blast resistance performance. This study presents the results of a numerical investigation aimed at understanding the performance of a hybrid composite (glass/carbon fibre) plate subjected to blast loads using commercial LS-DYNA software. In particular, the paper deals with numerical 3D simulations of damages caused by air blast waves generated by C4 charges on two fully clamped rectangular plates made of steel and hybrid (S2/Carbon) composite, respectively. A Multi Materials Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian (MMALE) formulation was used to simulate the shock phenomenon. For the steel plates, the Johnson-Cook material model was employed. For the composite plates both in-plane and out-of-plane failure criteria were employed. In particular, a contact tiebreak formulation with a mixed mode failure criteria was employed to simulate delamination failure. As for the steel plates the results showed that excellent correlation with the experimental data for the two blast load conditions in terms of dynamic and residual deflection for two different C4 charges. For the composite plates the numerical results showed that, as expected, a wider delamination damage was observed

  12. Preparation and characterization of carbon/SiC nanowire/Na-doped carbonated hydroxyapatite multilayer coating for carbon/carbon composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leilei, Zhang, E-mail: zhangleilei1121@aliyun.com; Hejun, Li; Kezhi, Li; Shouyang, Zhang; Qiangang, Fu; Yulei, Zhang; Jinhua, Lu; Wei, Li

    2014-09-15

    Highlights: • CSH coatings were prepared by combination of magnetron sputter ion plating, CVD and UECD. • Na{sup +} and CO{sub 3}{sup 2−} were developed to co-substitute hydroxyapatite. • SiC nanowires were introduced into Na-doped carbonated hydroxyapatite. • CSH coatings showed excellent cell activity and cell proliferation behavior. - Abstract: A carbon/SiC nanowire/Na-doped carbonated hydroxyapatite multilayer coating (CSH coating) was prepared on carbon/carbon composites using a combination method of magnetron sputter ion plating, chemical vapor deposition and ultrasound-assisted electrochemical deposition procedure. The morphology, microstructure and chemical composition of the coating were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), Raman spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The results showed that the CSH coating was consisted of three components: carbon layer, SiC nanowires and Na-doped carbonated hydroxyapatite. The carbon layer provided a dense and uniform surface structure for the growth of SiC nanowires. The SiC nanowires exhibited a porous structure, favoring the infiltration of Na-doped carbonated hydroxyapatite crystals. The Na-doped carbonated hydroxyapatite could infiltrate into the pores of SiC nanowires and finally cover the SiC nanowires entirely with a needle shape. The osteoblast-like MG63 cells were employed to assess the in vitro biocompatibility of the CSH coating. The MG63 cells favorably spread and grew well across the CSH coating surface with plenty of filopods and microvilli, exhibiting excellent cell activity. Moreover, the CSH coating elicited higher cell proliferation as compared to bare carbon/carbon composites. In conclusion, the CSH offers great potential as a coating material for future medical application in hard tissue replacement.

  13. Preparation and characterization of carbon/SiC nanowire/Na-doped carbonated hydroxyapatite multilayer coating for carbon/carbon composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • CSH coatings were prepared by combination of magnetron sputter ion plating, CVD and UECD. • Na+ and CO32− were developed to co-substitute hydroxyapatite. • SiC nanowires were introduced into Na-doped carbonated hydroxyapatite. • CSH coatings showed excellent cell activity and cell proliferation behavior. - Abstract: A carbon/SiC nanowire/Na-doped carbonated hydroxyapatite multilayer coating (CSH coating) was prepared on carbon/carbon composites using a combination method of magnetron sputter ion plating, chemical vapor deposition and ultrasound-assisted electrochemical deposition procedure. The morphology, microstructure and chemical composition of the coating were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), Raman spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The results showed that the CSH coating was consisted of three components: carbon layer, SiC nanowires and Na-doped carbonated hydroxyapatite. The carbon layer provided a dense and uniform surface structure for the growth of SiC nanowires. The SiC nanowires exhibited a porous structure, favoring the infiltration of Na-doped carbonated hydroxyapatite crystals. The Na-doped carbonated hydroxyapatite could infiltrate into the pores of SiC nanowires and finally cover the SiC nanowires entirely with a needle shape. The osteoblast-like MG63 cells were employed to assess the in vitro biocompatibility of the CSH coating. The MG63 cells favorably spread and grew well across the CSH coating surface with plenty of filopods and microvilli, exhibiting excellent cell activity. Moreover, the CSH coating elicited higher cell proliferation as compared to bare carbon/carbon composites. In conclusion, the CSH offers great potential as a coating material for future medical application in hard tissue replacement

  14. Investigation of transient heat transfer in composite walls using carbon/epoxy composites as an example

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terpiłowski Janusz

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the application of similarity theory to investigations of transient heat transfer in materials with complex structure. It describes the theoretical-experimental method for identification and design of the structure of two-component composite walls based on the research of the thermal diffusivity for the composite and its matrix separately. The thermal diffusivity was measured by means of the modified flash method. The method was tested on two samples of double-layer ‘epoxy resin – polyamide’. All the investigated samples had the same diameter of 12 mm and thickness ranging from 1.39–2.60 mm and their equivalent value of thermal diffusivity ranging from (1.21–1.98×10−7 m2/s. Testing the method and research on carbon/epoxy composites was carried out at temperatures close to room temperature.

  15. Investigation of transient heat transfer in composite walls using carbon/epoxy composites as an example

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terpiłowski, Janusz; Gawron, Bartosz; Woroniak, Grzegorz

    2015-12-01

    The paper presents the application of similarity theory to investigations of transient heat transfer in materials with complex structure. It describes the theoretical-experimental method for identification and design of the structure of two-component composite walls based on the research of the thermal diffusivity for the composite and its matrix separately. The thermal diffusivity was measured by means of the modified flash method. The method was tested on two samples of double-layer `epoxy resin - polyamide'. All the investigated samples had the same diameter of 12 mm and thickness ranging from 1.39-2.60 mm and their equivalent value of thermal diffusivity ranging from (1.21-1.98)×10-7 m2/s. Testing the method and research on carbon/epoxy composites was carried out at temperatures close to room temperature.

  16. Facile Instep Synthesis of Palladium Nanoparticle/Carbon@Carbon Nanotube Composites for Electrooxidation of Xylitol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kannan, Ramanujam; Kim, Ae Rhan; Nahm, Kee Suk; Yoo, Dong Jin

    2016-03-01

    The development of a facile, instep, and eco-friendly synthesis method of mono-dispersed low quantity palladium nanoparticle/carbon@functionllized carbon nanotube composite (Pd@C-f-CNT)electrocatalytic material was developed for use in the electrooxidation of xylitol. The prepared nanocatalyst was analyzed by powder X-ray diffraction analysis, Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The electrocatalytic studies were performed using voltammetric methods. Formation of Pd NPs was observed within 2 min. The microscopic analysis showed 5- to 10-nm-sized Pd NPs that uniformly covered the CNT. The instep-formed carbon helped to improve the electrocatalytic activity of the catalyst. Our proposed method provides new insight for the development of highly efficient metal NPs/CNT nanocatalyst for direct alcohol fuel cell applications. PMID:27455674

  17. Fabrication of carbon/SiO2 composites from the hydrothermal carbonization process of polysaccharide and their adsorption performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yinhui; Li, Kunyu; Su, Min; Ren, Yanmei; Li, Ying; Chen, Jianxin; Li, Liang

    2016-11-20

    In this work, carbon/SiO2 composites, using amylose and tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) as raw materials, were successfully prepared by a facial hydrothermal carbonization process. The carbon/SiO2 composites were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM), Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS), transmission electron microscope (TEM), N2 adsorption and Thermogravimetric (TG) analysis. The composites, which were made up of amorphous SiO2 and amorphous carbon, were found to have hierarchical porous structures. The mass ratios of amylose and SiO2 and the hydrothermal carbonization time had significant effects on the morphology of the composites, which had three shapes including monodispersed spheres, porous pieces and the nano-fibers combined with nano-spheres structures. The adsorption performance of the composites was studied using Pb(2+) as simulated contaminants from water. When the mass ratio of amylose and SiO2 was 9/1, the hydrothermal time was 30h and the hydrothermal temperature was 180°C, the adsorption capacity of the composites achieved to 52mg/g. Experimental data show that adsorption kinetics of the carbon/SiO2 composites can be fitted well by the Elovich model, while the isothermal data can be perfectly described by the Langmuir adsorption model and Freundlich adsorption model. The maximum adsorption capacity of the carbon/SiO2 composites is 56.18mgg(-1). PMID:27561502

  18. Carbon Nanotube/Magnesium Composite as a Hydrogen Source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Min Kyu; Se, Kwon Oh; Kim, Min Joong; Hwang, Jae Won; Yoon, Byoung Young; Kwon, Hyuk Sang

    2015-11-01

    Hydrogen produced using the steam reforming process contains sulfur and carbon monoxide that are harmful to the Pt catalyst in proton-exchange-membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs). However, CO-free hydrogen can be generated from the hydrolysis of either Al in strongly alkaline water or Mg in neutral water with chlorides such as sea water. The hydrogen generation rate from the hydrolysis of Mg is extremely slow and linearly proportional to the corrosion rate of Mg in chloride water. In this work, we fabricated a carbon nanotube (CNT)--reinforced Mg--matrix composite by Spark Plasma Sintering as a fast hydrogen generation source for a PEMFC. The CNTs distributed in the Mg matrix act as numerous local cathodes, and hence cause severe galvanic corrosion between the Mg-matrix anode and CNT-cathode in NaCl solution. It was found that the hydrogen generation rate from the hydrolysis of the 5 vol.% CNT/Mg composite is 3300 times faster than that of the Mg without CNTs due primarily to the galvanic corrosion effect. PMID:26726603

  19. Conducting polymer/carbon nanocoil composite electrodes for efficient supercapacitors

    KAUST Repository

    Baby, Rakhi Raghavan

    2012-01-01

    Herein, we report for the first time, conducting polymer (polyaniline (PANI) and polypyrrole (PPY)) coated carbon nanocoils (CNCs) as efficient binder-free electrode materials for supercapacitors. CNCs act as a perfect backbone for the uniform distribution of the conducting polymers in the composites. In two electrode configuration, the samples exhibited high specific capacitance with the values reaching up to 360 and 202 F g -1 for PANI/CNCs and PPY/CNCs respectively. The values obtained for specific capacitance and maximum storage energy per unit mass of the composites were found to be comparable to one of the best reported values for polymer coated multi-walled carbon nanotubes. In addition, the fabricated PANI/CNC based supercapacitors exhibited a high value of 44.61 Wh kg -1 for maximum storage energy per unit mass. Although the devices exhibit an initial capacitance loss due to the instability of the polymer, the specific capacitance stabilizes at a fixed value after 500 charge-discharge cycles. © 2012 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  20. Template-free fabrication and morphology regulation of Ag@carbon composite structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Wenyan, E-mail: zhangwenyan8531@gmail.com [College of Material Engineering, Jinling Institute of Technology, Nanjing (China); Hao, Lingyun; Lin, Qin [College of Material Engineering, Jinling Institute of Technology, Nanjing (China); Lu, Chunhua; Xu, Zhongzi [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanjing Technology University, Nanjing (China); Chen, Xiaoyu [College of Material Engineering, Jinling Institute of Technology, Nanjing (China)

    2014-12-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • A simple and low-cost method to prepare Ag@C composite material. • AgNO{sub 3} plays an important role in tuning size and functional groups of products. • HTC reaction time is also a key factor for regulating the Ag@C structure. - Abstract: Ag–carbon composite materials were prepared without any template by hydrothermal carbonization of solvable starch. The composite materials are composed of Ag cores and carbonaceous shell to form a core–shell (Ag@carbon) structure. During the hydrothermal carbonization process, the aromatization and carbonization of solvable starch endowed the Ag@carbon composite structure with abundant aromatic, hydroxyl and carbonyl groups. The AgNO{sub 3} concentration and HTC reaction time are two important factors for regulating the size, morphology and functional groups of the composite material. With the increasing of AgNO{sub 3} concentration, morphologies of the composite material turned from spheres to wires.

  1. Creep Forming of Carbon-Reinforced Ceramic-Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughn, Wallace L.; Scotti, Stephan J.; Ashe, Melissa P.; Connolly, Liz

    2007-01-01

    A set of lecture slides describes an investigation of creep forming as a means of imparting desired curvatures to initially flat stock plates of carbon-reinforced ceramic-matrix composite (C-CMC) materials. The investigation is apparently part of a continuing effort to develop improved means of applying small CCMC repair patches to reinforced carbon-carbon leading edges of aerospace vehicles (e.g., space shuttles) prior to re-entry into the atmosphere of the Earth. According to one of the slides, creep forming would be an intermediate step in a process that would yield a fully densified, finished C-CMC part having a desired size and shape (the other steps would include preliminary machining, finish machining, densification by chemical vapor infiltration, and final coating). The investigation included experiments in which C-CMC disks were creep-formed by heating them to unspecified high temperatures for time intervals of the order of 1 hour while they were clamped into single- and double-curvature graphite molds. The creep-formed disks were coated with an oxidation- protection material, then subjected to arc-jet tests, in which the disks exhibited no deterioration after exposure to high-temperature test conditions lasting 490 seconds.

  2. Oxidation Behavior of Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Roy M.

    2008-01-01

    OXIMAP is a numerical (FEA-based) solution tool capable of calculating the carbon fiber and fiber coating oxidation patterns within any arbitrarily shaped carbon silicon carbide composite structure as a function of time, temperature, and the environmental oxygen partial pressure. The mathematical formulation is derived from the mechanics of the flow of ideal gases through a chemically reacting, porous solid. The result of the formulation is a set of two coupled, non-linear differential equations written in terms of the oxidant and oxide partial pressures. The differential equations are solved simultaneously to obtain the partial vapor pressures of the oxidant and oxides as a function of the spatial location and time. The local rate of carbon oxidation is determined at each time step using the map of the local oxidant partial vapor pressure along with the Arrhenius rate equation. The non-linear differential equations are cast into matrix equations by applying the Bubnov-Galerkin weighted residual finite element method, allowing for the solution of the differential equations numerically.

  3. Effect of Carbon Nanotube Reinforcement on Fracture Strength of Composite Adhesive Joints

    OpenAIRE

    Kwon, Young W.; Burkholder, Garrett L.; Pollak, Randall D.

    2016-01-01

    Research Project The objective of this research is to determine whether regular carbon nanotubes as well as functionalized carbon nanotubes can improve the joint strength of adhesives for composites and metals.

  4. Enhancement of Electrochemical Stability about Silicon/Carbon Composite Anode Materials for Lithium Ion Batteries

    OpenAIRE

    Wei Xiao; Chang Miao; Xuemin Yan; Qing Sun; Ping Mei

    2015-01-01

    Silicon/carbon (Si/C) composite anode materials are successfully synthesized by mechanical ball milling followed by pyrolysis method. The structure and morphology of the composite are characterized by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscope, respectively. The results show that the composite is composed of Si, flake graphite, and phenolic resin-pyrolyzed carbon, and Si and flake graphite are enwrapped by phenolic resin-pyrolyzed carbon, which can...

  5. Innovative Manufacturing of Carbon Nanotube-Loaded Fibrillar Polymer Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, R. J. T.; Bhattacharyya, D.; Fakirov, S.

    The concept of microfibrillar composite (MFC) has been used to create a new type of polymer composites, in which the reinforcing microfibrils are loaded with carbon nanotubes (CNT). Polyamide 66 (PA66) has been melt blended with polypropylene in a twin screw extruder with and without CNT, and thereafter cold drawn to create a fibrillar state as well as to align the CNT in the PA66 microfibrils. The drawn bristles were compression moulded at 180°C to prepare MFC plates. The scanning electron microscope (SEM) observations indicate near perfect distribution of CNT in the reinforcing PA66 microfibrils. Although the fibrillated PA66 is able to improve the tensile stiffness and strength as expected from the MFC structure, the incorporation of CNT does not exhibit any further enhancing effect. It rather adversely affects the mechanical properties due to poor interface adhesion between the matrix and the reinforcing microfibrils with the presence of CNT, as demonstrated by SEM. However, the resulting highly aligned CNT within the MFC are expected to affect the physical and functional properties of these composites.

  6. Optimization of interfacial microstructure and mechanical properties of carbon fiber/epoxy composites via carbon nanotube sizing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yao, Hongwei; Sui, Xianhang; Zhao, Zhongbo; Xu, Zhiwei; Chen, Lei, E-mail: chenlei@tjpu.edu.cn; Deng, Hui; Liu, Ya; Qian, Xiaoming, E-mail: qianxiaoming@tjpu.edu.cn

    2015-08-30

    Highlights: • Multiple sizing treatments were used to modify the surface of carbon fiber with carbon nanotubes. • The distribution state of carbon nanotubes in interface had a great effect on the performance of carbon fiber composites. • Interfacial microstructure changes brought by sizing treatment were detected by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and atomic force microscope. • Gradient interphase composed of carbon nanotubes and epoxy was favorable to improve the mechanical properties of carbon composites. - Abstract: Repetitious sizing treatment was used to modify the carbon fiber (CF) surface with carbon nanotubes (CNTs) for improving interfacial properties of CF/epoxy composites. Interlaminar shear and flexural results showed that mechanical properties of composites were significantly depended on the dispersion state and contents of CNTs in interfacial regions. Increases of 13.45% in interlaminar shear strength and 20.31% in flexural strength were achieved in quintuple sized-CF/epoxy composites, whereas excessive CNTs led to decrease of interfacial performance due to defects induced by agglomerated CNTs. Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and force modulation atomic force microscope were used to detect the structure of interfacial phase and results indicated that gradient interfacial structure with various thicknesses was formed due to CNT incorporation. This means that such a simple and efficient method to improve interfacial performance of composites via regulating the fiber–matrix interphase structure was developed and showed great commercial application potential.

  7. Optimization of interfacial microstructure and mechanical properties of carbon fiber/epoxy composites via carbon nanotube sizing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Multiple sizing treatments were used to modify the surface of carbon fiber with carbon nanotubes. • The distribution state of carbon nanotubes in interface had a great effect on the performance of carbon fiber composites. • Interfacial microstructure changes brought by sizing treatment were detected by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and atomic force microscope. • Gradient interphase composed of carbon nanotubes and epoxy was favorable to improve the mechanical properties of carbon composites. - Abstract: Repetitious sizing treatment was used to modify the carbon fiber (CF) surface with carbon nanotubes (CNTs) for improving interfacial properties of CF/epoxy composites. Interlaminar shear and flexural results showed that mechanical properties of composites were significantly depended on the dispersion state and contents of CNTs in interfacial regions. Increases of 13.45% in interlaminar shear strength and 20.31% in flexural strength were achieved in quintuple sized-CF/epoxy composites, whereas excessive CNTs led to decrease of interfacial performance due to defects induced by agglomerated CNTs. Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and force modulation atomic force microscope were used to detect the structure of interfacial phase and results indicated that gradient interfacial structure with various thicknesses was formed due to CNT incorporation. This means that such a simple and efficient method to improve interfacial performance of composites via regulating the fiber–matrix interphase structure was developed and showed great commercial application potential

  8. Experimental and numerical studies on the sensitivity of carbon fibre/silicone rubber composite sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flexible conductive composite sensors are of great importance for applications in structural monitoring due to their low cost, high durability and excellent compatibility. In this work, carbon fibre/silicone rubber composites were prepared and their sensitivity near the percolation threshold was investigated experimentally and theoretically. Results show that carbon fibre/silicone rubber composites have great mechanical and sensitivity even under high strain conditions. Two models based on the tunnelling effect and general effective medium theory were found to understand the sensitivity of composites with lower and higher fractions of carbon fibre. Moreover, the reversibility of the sensing performance is improved with the increase of carbon fibre addition. (paper)

  9. Effects of Atomic-Scale Structure on the Fracture Properties of Amorphous Carbon - Carbon Nanotube Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Benjamin D.; Wise, Kristopher E.; Odegard, Gregory M.

    2015-01-01

    The fracture of carbon materials is a complex process, the understanding of which is critical to the development of next generation high performance materials. While quantum mechanical (QM) calculations are the most accurate way to model fracture, the fracture behavior of many carbon-based composite engineering materials, such as carbon nanotube (CNT) composites, is a multi-scale process that occurs on time and length scales beyond the practical limitations of QM methods. The Reax Force Field (ReaxFF) is capable of predicting mechanical properties involving strong deformation, bond breaking and bond formation in the classical molecular dynamics framework. This has been achieved by adding to the potential energy function a bond-order term that varies continuously with distance. The use of an empirical bond order potential, such as ReaxFF, enables the simulation of failure in molecular systems that are several orders of magnitude larger than would be possible in QM techniques. In this work, the fracture behavior of an amorphous carbon (AC) matrix reinforced with CNTs was modeled using molecular dynamics with the ReaxFF reactive forcefield. Care was taken to select the appropriate simulation parameters, which can be different from those required when using traditional fixed-bond force fields. The effect of CNT arrangement was investigated with three systems: a single-wall nanotube (SWNT) array, a multi-wall nanotube (MWNT) array, and a SWNT bundle system. For each arrangement, covalent bonds are added between the CNTs and AC, with crosslink fractions ranging from 0-25% of the interfacial CNT atoms. The SWNT and MWNT array systems represent ideal cases with evenly spaced CNTs; the SWNT bundle system represents a more realistic case because, in practice, van der Waals interactions lead to the agglomeration of CNTs into bundles. The simulation results will serve as guidance in setting experimental processing conditions to optimize the mechanical properties of CNT

  10. Carbon Dioxide Sealing Capacity: Textural or Compositional Controls?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cranganu, Constantin; Soleymani, Hamidreza; Sadiqua, Soleymani; Watson, Kieva

    2013-11-30

    This research project is aiming to assess the carbon dioxide sealing capacity of most common seal-rocks, such as shales and non-fractured limestones, by analyzing the role of textural and compositional parameters of those rocks. We hypothesize that sealing capacity is controlled by textural and/or compositional pa-rameters of caprocks. In this research, we seek to evaluate the importance of textural and compositional parameters affecting the sealing capacity of caprocks. The conceptu-al framework involves two testable end-member hypotheses concerning the sealing ca-pacity of carbon dioxide reservoir caprocks. Better understanding of the elements controlling sealing quality will advance our knowledge regarding the sealing capacity of shales and carbonates. Due to relatively low permeability, shale and non-fractured carbonate units are considered relatively imper-meable formations which can retard reservoir fluid flow by forming high capillary pres-sure. Similarly, these unites can constitute reliable seals for carbon dioxide capture and sequestration purposes. This project is a part of the comprehensive project with the final aim of studying the caprock sealing properties and the relationship between microscopic and macroscopic characteristics of seal rocks in depleted gas fields of Oklahoma Pan-handle. Through this study we examined various seal rock characteristics to infer about their respective effects on sealing capacity in special case of replacing reservoir fluid with super critical carbon dioxide (scCO{sub 2}). To assess the effect of textural and compositional properties on scCO{sub 2} maximum reten-tion column height we collected 30 representative core samples in caprock formations in three counties (Cimarron, Texas, Beaver) in Oklahoma Panhandle. Core samples were collected from various seal formations (e.g., Cherokee, Keys, Morrowan) at different depths. We studied the compositional and textural properties of the core samples using several techniques

  11. Numerical simulation of isothermal chemical vapor infiltration process in fabrication of carbon-carbon composites by finite element method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李克智; 李贺军; 姜开宇

    2000-01-01

    The chemical vapor infiltration process in fabrication of carbon-carbon composites is highly inefficient and requires long processing time. These limitations add considerably to the cost of fabrication and restrict the application of this material. Efforts have been made to study the CVI process in fabrication of carbon-carbon composites by computer simulation and predict the process parameters, density, porosity, etc. According to the characteristics of CVI process, the basic principle of FEM and mass transport, the finite element model has been established. Incremental finite element equations and the elemental stiffness matrices have been derived for the first time. The finite element program developed by the authors has been used to simulate the ICVI process in fabrication of carbon-carbon composites. Computer color display of simulated results can express the densification and distributions of density and porosity in preform clearly. The influence of process parameters on the densification of prefo

  12. Frictional and wear properties of cobalt/multiwalled carbon nanotube composite films formed by electrodeposition

    OpenAIRE

    Arai, Susumu; Miyagawa, Kazuaki

    2013-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have solid lubricity due to their unique structure, and as such, CNT composites are also expected to exhibit superior tribological properties. In this study, Co/CNT composite films were fabricated using a composite electrodeposition technique, and their tribological properties were investigated. Three different sizes of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were used as the CNTs in this study. The microstructures of the composite films were examined using scanning elec...

  13. Comparison of Properties of Polymer Composite Materials Reinforced with Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zygoń P.

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanotubes because of their high mechanical, optical or electrical properties, have found use as semiconducting materials constituting the reinforcing phase in composite materials. The paper presents the results of the studies on the mechanical properties of polymer composites reinforced with carbon nanotubes (CNT. Three-point bending tests were carried out on the composites. The density of each obtained composite was determined as well as the surface roughness and the resistivity at room temperature.

  14. Single-walled carbon nanotube networks in conductive composite materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bârsan, Oana A; Hoffmann, Günter G; van der Ven, Leo G J; de With, G Bert

    2014-01-01

    Electrically conductive composite materials can be used for a wide range of applications because they combine the advantages of a specific polymeric material (e.g., thermal and mechanical properties) with the electrical properties of conductive filler particles. However, the overall electrical behaviour of these composite materials is usually much below the potential of the conductive fillers, mainly because by mixing two different components, new interfaces and interphases are created, changing the properties and behaviours of both. Our goal is to characterize and understand the nature and influence of these interfaces on the electrical properties of composite materials. We have improved a technique based on the use of sodium carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) to disperse single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) in water, followed by coating glass substrates, and drying and removing the CMC with a nitric acid treatment. We used electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy techniques to characterize the SWCNT films, and developed an in situ resistance measurement technique to analyse the influence of both the individual components and the mixture of an epoxy/amine system on the electrical behaviour of the SWCNTs. The results showed that impregnating a SWCNT network with a polymer is not the only factor that affects the film resistance; air exposure, temperature, physical and chemical properties of the individual polymer components, and also the formation of a polymeric network, can all have an influence on the macroscopic electrical properties of the initial SWCNT network. These results emphasize the importance of understanding the effects that each of the components can have on each other before trying to prepare an efficient polymer composite material. PMID:25430670

  15. Fabrication and Characterisation of carbon nanotube composites for strain sensor applications

    OpenAIRE

    Keulemans, Grim; Ceyssens, Frederik; De Volder, Michaël; Seo, Jin Won; Puers, Robert

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports on the fabrication of carbon nanotube (CNT) composites based on poly-dimethylsiloxane (PDMS). Both composites using multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) as well as composites using vertically aligned carbon nano-tubes (VACNTs) as conductive filler elements have been investigated. The MWCNT/PDMS composites show a quasi-linear piezoresistance response with gauge factors between 0.8 and 2.3. The VACNT/PDMS composites behave in a similar way realizing a gauge factor of 1.4. Th...

  16. Si-doped composite carbon as anode of lithium ion batteries

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭华军; 李新海; 王志兴; 彭文杰; 郭永兴

    2003-01-01

    Si-doped composite material was prepared by coating artificial graphite with the mixture of phenol resin and polysilicone and following with heat-treatment at 1 050 ℃ in an argon gas atmosphere. The structure and characteristics of the composite carbon were determined by means of XRD, SEM, BET surface area and electrochemical measurements. The new carbon material has a disordered carbon/graphite composite structure, with silicon doped in the disordered carbon. Compared with the pristine graphite, the electrochemical performance is improved for the Si-doped composite carbon with large reversible capacity of 312.6 mAh/g, high initial charge/discharge efficiency of 88.61%, and excellent cycle stability. The prototype batteries using the composite carbon as anode material have large discharge capacity of 845 mAh and high capacity retention ratio of 95.80% at the 200th cycle.

  17. SURFACE HYDROPHILIC MODIFICATION FOR CARBON/CARBON COMPOSITES AND ITS EFFECT ON THE BONDING STRENGTH OF HYDROXYAPATITE COATING

    OpenAIRE

    LEILEI ZHANG; HEJUN LI; QIANG SONG; KEZHI LI; JINHUA LU; WEI LI; Mikhalovsky, Sergey V.; SHENG CAO

    2014-01-01

    In order to improve the bonding strength of hydroxyapatite coating on carbon/carbon composites, a surface hydrophilic modification was performed on carbon/carbon composites using a combination of H2O2 and FeSO4 ⋅ 7H2O under ultraviolet irradiation. The hydroxyapatite coating was prepared by an ultrasound-assisted electrochemical deposition method. The results showed that the surface hydrophilic modification introduced a large number of oxygen-containing functional groups (C=O, C–O and COOH gr...

  18. Electrically Conductive Multiphase Polymer Blend Carbon-Based Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brigandi, Paul James

    The use of multiphase polymer blends provides unique morphologies and properties to reduce the percolation concentration and increase conductivity of carbon-based polymer composites. These systems offer improved conductivity, temperature stability and selective distribution of the conductive filler through unique morphologies at significantly lower conductive filler concentration. In this work, the kinetic and thermodynamic effects on a series of multiphase conductive polymer composites were investigated. The polymer blend phase morphology, filler distribution, electrical conductivity, and rheological properties of CB-filled PP/PMMA/EAA conductive polymer composites were determined. Thermodynamic and kinetic parameters were found to influence the morphology development and final composite properties. The morphology and CB distribution were found to be kinetically driven when annealed for a short period of time following the shear-intensive mixing process, whereas the three-phase polymer blend morphology is driven by thermodynamics when given sufficient time under high temperature annealing conditions in the melt state. At short annealing times, the CB distribution was influenced by the compounding sequence where the CB was added after being premixed with one of the polymer phases or directly added to the three phase polymer melt, but again was thermodynamically driven at longer annealing times with the CB migrating to the EAA phase. The resistivity was found to decrease by a statistically significant amount to similar levels for all of the composite systems with increasing annealing time, providing evidence of gradual phase coalescence to a tri-continuous morphology and CB migration. The addition of CB via the PP and EAA masterbatch results in significantly faster percolation and lower resistivity compared to when added direct to the system during compounding after 30 minutes annealing by a statistically significant amount. Dynamic oscillatory shear rheology using

  19. Effects of processing conditions on the physical and electrochemical properties of carbon aerogel composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tran, T.D.; Lenz, D.; Kinoshita, K.; Droege, M.

    1998-07-01

    The carbon aerogel/carbon paper composites have physical properties similar to those of monolithic carbon aerogels but do not require supercritical extraction during fabrication. The resorcinol-formaldehyde based carbon aerogel phase is intertwined between the fibers of a commercial carbon paper. The resulting composites have variable densities (0.4--0.6 g/cc), high surface areas (300--600 m{sup 2}/g), and controllable pore sizes and pore distribution. The effects of the resorcinol-formaldehyde concentrations (50--70{degree} w/v) and the pyrolysis temperature (600--1,050 C) were studied in an attempt to tailor the aerogel microstructure and properties. The composite physical properties and structure were analyzed by transmission electron microscopy and multipoint-BET analyses and related to electrochemical capacitive data in 5M KOH. These thin carbon aerogel/carbon paper composite electrodes are used in experiments with electrochemical double-layer capacitors and capacitive deionization.

  20. Effects of processing conditions on the physical and electrochemical properties of carbon aerogel composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tran, T D; Lenz, D; Kinoshita, K; Droege, M

    2000-10-26

    The carbon aerogel/carbon paper composites have physical properties similar to those of monolithic carbon aerogels but do not require supercritical extraction during fabrication. The resorcinol-formaldehyde based carbon aerogel phase is intertwined between the fibers of a commercial carbon paper. The resulting composites have variable densities (0.4-0.6 g/cc), high surface areas (300-600 m{sup 2}/g), and controllable pore sizes and pore distribution. The effects of the resorcinol-formaldehyde concentrations (50-70% w/v) and the pyrolysis temperature (600-1050 C) were studied in an attempt to tailor the aerogel microstructure and properties. The composite physical properties and structure were analyzed by transmission electron microscopy and multipoint-BET analyses and related to electrochemical capacitive data in 5M KOH. These thin carbon aerogel/carbon paper composite electrodes are used in experiments with electrochemical double-layer capacitors and capacitive deionization.

  1. Effect of carbon nanotubes and processing methods on the properties of carbon nanotube/polypropylene composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahoo, Nanda Gopal; Thet, Naing Tun; Tan, Qing Hao; Li, Lin; Chan, Siew Hwa; Zhao, Jianhong; Yu, Suzhu

    2009-10-01

    The effect of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and processing methods on the morphological, crystalline, dynamic mechanical, mechanical and electrical properties of MWCNT/polypropylene (PP) composites has been investigated by using field emission scanning electron microscopy (SEM), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA), tensile and electric conductivity tests. The MWCNTs have been functionalized covalently and noncovalently for better dispersion in the PP matrix. A homogeneous dispersion of MWCNTs was achieved in the PP matrix as evidenced by scanning electron microscopy. Differential scanning calorimetric (DSC) results confirmed that the incorporation of the MWCNTs effectively enhanced the crystallization of the PP matrix through heterogeneous nucleation. The glass transition temperature increased from 8 degrees C for the pure PP to 26 degrees C for the composite with 10 wt% MWCNT-COOH. The present investigation revealed that the mechanical, thermal as well as electrical properties of carbon nanotubes filled polymer composites were strongly dependent on the state of dispersion, mixing and processing methods. PMID:19908474

  2. Modeling of CVI process in fabrication of carbon/carbon composites by an artificial neural network

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI; Aijun; (李爱军); LI; Hejun; (李贺军); LI; Kezhi; (李克智); GU; Zhengbing; (顾正彬)

    2003-01-01

    The chemical vapor infiltration(CVI) process in fabrication of carbon-carbon composites is very complex and highly inefficient, which adds considerably to the cost of fabrication and limits the application of the material. This paper tries to use a supervised artificial neural network(ANN) to model the nonlinear relationship between parameters of isothermal CVI(ICVI) processes and physical properties of C/C composites. A model for preprocessing dataset and selecting its topology is developed using the Levenberg-Marquardt training algorithm and trained with comprehensive dataset of tubal C/C components collected from experimental data and abundant simulated data obtained by the finite element method. A basic repository on the domain knowledge of CVI processes is established via sufficient data mining by the network. With the help of the repository stored in the trained network, not only the time-dependent effects of parameters in CVI processes but also their coupling effects can be analyzed and predicted. The results show that the ANN system is effective and successful for optimizing CVI processes in fabrication of C/C composites.

  3. Study of Composite Interface Fracture and Crack Growth Monitoring Using Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bily, Mollie A.; Kwon, Young W.; Pollak, Randall D.

    2010-08-01

    Interface fracture of woven fabric composite layers was studied using Mode II fracture testing. Both carbon fiber and E-glass fiber composites were used with a vinyl ester resin. First, the single-step cured (i.e., co-cured) composite interface strength was compared to that of the two-step cured interface as used in the scarf joint technique. The results showed that the two-step cured interface was as strong as the co-cured interface. Carbon nanotubes were then applied to the composite interface using two-step curing, and then followed by Mode II fracture testing. The results indicated a significant improvement of the interface fracture toughness due to the dispersed carbon nanotube layer for both carbon fiber and E-glass fiber composites. The carbon nanotube layer was then evaluated as a means to monitor crack growth along the interface. Because carbon nanotubes have very high electrical conductivity, the electrical resistance was measured through the interface as a crack grew, thus disrupting the carbon nanotube network and increasing the resistance. The results showed a linear relationship between crack length and interface resistance for the carbon fiber composites, and allowed initial detection of failure in the E-glass fiber composites. This study demonstrated that the application of carbon nanotubes along a critical composite interface not only improves fracture properties but can also be used to detect and monitor interfacial damage.

  4. Dispersive hole transport in polymer:carbon nanotube composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The hole transport properties of poly(2-methoxy, 5-(2'-ethyl-hexoxy)-p-phenylene vinylene) (MEH-PPV) blended with acid oxidized multiwall carbon nanotubes (COOH-MWCNTs) were investigated in a diode configuration using the time-of-flight (TOF) photocurrent method. While the room temperature hole mobility in pure MEH-PPV films was non-dispersive with positive field dependent mobility, MEH-PPV:COOH-MWCNT blended devices exhibited dispersive transport and negative field dependent mobility. This indicates that the hole mobility in this composite is influenced by positional disorder caused by the presence of COOH-MWCNTs in the MEH-PPV matrix. These results strongly suggest that the distribution of COOH-MWCNTs optimising in the organic matrix is important for charge transport in the high mobility nanotube component to be activated, when used in hybrid material systems.

  5. Evolution of Electronic Circuits using Carbon Nanotube Composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massey, M K; Kotsialos, A; Volpati, D; Vissol-Gaudin, E; Pearson, C; Bowen, L; Obara, B; Zeze, D A; Groves, C; Petty, M C

    2016-01-01

    Evolution-in-materio concerns the computer controlled manipulation of material systems using external stimuli to train or evolve the material to perform a useful function. In this paper we demonstrate the evolution of a disordered composite material, using voltages as the external stimuli, into a form where a simple computational problem can be solved. The material consists of single-walled carbon nanotubes suspended in liquid crystal; the nanotubes act as a conductive network, with the liquid crystal providing a host medium to allow the conductive network to reorganise when voltages are applied. We show that the application of electric fields under computer control results in a significant change in the material morphology, favouring the solution to a classification task. PMID:27558444

  6. Physical Characterization and Steam Chemical Reactivity of Carbon Fiber Composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderl, Robert Andrew; Pawelko, Robert James; Smolik, Galen Richard

    2001-05-01

    This report documents experiments and analyses that have been done at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) to measure the steam chemical reactivity of two types of carbon fiber composites, NS31 and NB31, proposed for use at the divertor strike points in an ITER-like tokamak. These materials are 3D CFCs constituted by a NOVOLTEX preform and densified by pyrocarbon infiltration and heat treatment. NS31 differs from NB31 in that the final infiltration was done with liquid silicon to reduce the porosity and enhance the thermal conductivity of the CFC. Our approach in this work was twofold: (1) physical characterization measurements of the specimens and (2) measurements of the chemical reactivity of specimens exposed to steam.

  7. Surface modified carbon nanoparticle papers and applications on polymer composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, Xilian

    Free-standing paper like materials are usually employed as protective layers, chemical filters, components of electrical batteries or supercapacitors, adhesive layers, and electronic or optoelectric components. Free-standing papers made from carbon nanoparticles have drawn increased interest because they have a variety of superior chemical and physical characteristics, such as light weight, high intrinsic mechanical properties, and extraordinary high electrical conductivity. Nanopapers fabricated from 1- D shape carbon nanofibers (CNFs) and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are promising reinforcing materials for polymer composites, because the highly porous CNF and CNT nanopapers (porosity ˜80% and ˜70% respectively) can be impregnated with matrix polymers. In the first part of this work, polyaniline (PANI) was used to functionalize the surface of CNFs, and the resultant carbon nanopapers presented impressive mechanical strength and electrical conductivity that it could be used in the in-mold coating (IMC)/ injection molding process to achieve high electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding effectiveness. Aniline modified (AF) CNT nanopapers were used as a 3D network in gas separation membranes. The resultant composite membranes demonstrated better and stable CO2 permeance and CO 2/H2 selectivity in a high temperature (107°C) and high pressure (15-30 atm) gas separation process, not achievable by conventional polymer membranes. In the second part, we demonstrated that 2-D graphene (GP) or graphene oxide (GO) nanosheets could be tightly packed into a film which was impermeable to most gases and liquids. GP or GO nanopapers could be coated on polymer composites. In order to achieve well-dispersed single-layer graphene in aqueous medium, we developed a facile approach to synthesize functional GP bearing benzenesulfonic acid groups which allow the preparation of nanopapers by water based assembly. With the optimized processing conditions, our best GP nanopapers could reach

  8. Carbon Nanotube Enhanced Aerospace Composite Materials A New Generation of Multifunctional Hybrid Structural Composites

    CERN Document Server

    Kostopoulos, V

    2013-01-01

    The well documented increase in the use of high performance composites as structural materials in aerospace components is continuously raising the demands in terms of dynamic performance, structural integrity, reliable life monitoring systems and adaptive actuating abilities. Current technologies address the above issues separately; material property tailoring and custom design practices aim to the enhancement of dynamic and damage tolerance characteristics, whereas life monitoring and actuation is performed with embedded sensors that may be detrimental to the structural integrity of the component. This publication explores the unique properties of carbon nanotubes (CNT) as an additive in the matrix of Fibre Reinforced Plastics (FRP), for producing structural composites with improved mechanical performance as well as sensing/actuating capabilities. The successful combination of the CNT properties and existing sensing actuating technologies leads to the realization of a multifunctional FRP structure. The curre...

  9. Self-assembly of graphitic carbon nitride nanosheets–carbon nanotube composite for electrochemical simultaneous determination of catechol and hydroquinone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: Schematic diagram of hydrothermal synthesis graphitic carbon nitride nanosheets-carbon nanotube composite and theirs application for electrochemical sensing catechol and hydroquinone. - Highlights: • Self-assembly of graphitic carbon nitride nanosheets-carbon nanotube composite. • CNNS-CNT show more stronger conductivity than CNNS and CNT. • CNNS-CNT has been performed for detection of catechol and hydroquinone. • The probe was applied to detect practical samples with satisfactory results. - Abstract: In this paper, three-dimensional (3D) graphitic carbon nitride nanosheets-carbon nanotube (CNNS-CNT) composite was synthesized via hydrothermal reaction of 2D CNNS and 1D CNT-COOH by π-π stacking and electrostatic interactions. This CNNS-CNT composite was characterized by transmission electron microscope, scanning electron microscope, x-ray diffraction and fourier-transform infrared. In addition, the CNNS-CNT composite displayed excellent conductivity comparing with CNNS and CNT-COOH monomer. This composite was applied for electrochemical simultaneous determination of catechol (CC) and hydroquinone (HQ) with good sensitivity, wide linear range and low detection limit. In addition, this CNNS-CNT composite modified electrode was also applied to detect practical samples with satisfactory results

  10. Effect of fibre coating and geometry on the tensile properties of hybrid carbon nanotube coated carbon fibre reinforced composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Growth of CNT on carbon fibre (CF) was conducted via floating catalyst CVD process. • CNT-coated CF reinforced polypropylene composites were fabricated and characterized. • Theoretical prediction of composite tensile properties was conducted via mathematical approach. • Acceptable validation was found between experimental and estimated tensile properties. - Abstract: Hierarchically structured hybrid composites are ideal engineered materials to carry loads and stresses due to their high in-plane specific mechanical properties. Growing carbon nanotubes (CNTs) on the surface of high performance carbon fibres (CFs) provides a means to tailor the mechanical properties of the fibre–resin interface of a composite. The growth of CNT on CF was conducted via floating catalyst chemical vapor deposition (CVD). The mechanical properties of the resultant fibres, carbon nanotube (CNT) density and alignment morphology were shown to depend on the CNT growth temperature, growth time, carrier gas flow rate, catalyst amount, and atmospheric conditions within the CVD chamber. Carbon nanotube coated carbon fibre reinforced polypropylene (CNT-CF/PP) composites were fabricated and characterized. A combination of Halpin–Tsai equations, Voigt–Reuss model, rule of mixture and Krenchel approach were used in hierarchy to predict the mechanical properties of randomly oriented short fibre reinforced composite. A fractographic analysis was carried out in which the fibre orientation distribution has been analyzed on the composite fracture surfaces with Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) and image processing software. Finally, the discrepancies between the predicted and experimental values are explained

  11. Composite catalysts supported on modified carbon substrates and methods of making the same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popov, Branko N.; Subramanian, Nalini; Colon-Mercado, Hector R.

    2009-11-17

    A method of producing a composite carbon catalyst is generally disclosed. The method includes oxidizing a carbon precursor (e.g., carbon black). Optionally, nitrogen functional groups can be added to the oxidized carbon precursor. Then, the oxidized carbon precursor is refluxed with a non-platinum transitional metal precursor in a solution. Finally, the solution is pyrolyzed at a temperature of at least about 500.degree. C.

  12. Improving Fatigue Performance of GFRP Composite Using Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moneeb Genedy

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Glass fiber reinforced polymers (GFRP have become a preferable material for reinforcing or strengthening reinforced concrete structures due to their corrosion resistance, high strength to weight ratio, and relatively low cost compared with carbon fiber reinforced polymers (CFRP. However, the limited fatigue life of GFRP hinders their use in infrastructure applications. For instance, the low fatigue life of GFRP caused design codes to impose stringent stress limits on GFRP that rendered their use non-economic under significant cyclic loads in bridges. In this paper, we demonstrate that the fatigue life of GFRP can be significantly improved by an order of magnitude by incorporating Multi-Wall Carbon Nanotubes (MWCNTs during GFRP fabrication. GFRP coupons were fabricated and tested under static tension and cyclic tension with mean fatigue stress equal to 40% of the GFRP tensile strength. Microstructural investigations using scanning electron microscopy (SEM and Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR spectroscopy were used for further investigation of the effect of MWCNTs on the GFRP composite. The experimental results show the 0.5 wt% and the 1.0 wt% MWCNTs were able to improve the fatigue life of GFRP by 1143% and 986%, respectively, compared with neat GFRP.

  13. PTCR effect in carbon black/copolymer composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Some materials show an abrupt increase in resistivity when the temperature changes only over a few degrees. This phenomenon, known as PTCR effect (positive temperature coefficient of resistivity), has been largely studied in the last few years, due to its potential applications in industry. Particularly, it can be used in auto controlled heaters, temperature sensors, protection circuits and in security systems for power electronic circuits. In this work we present the study of the electrical properties of the percolating system carbon black particles filled with ethylene butylacrylate copolymer composite (EBA), in the temperature range from -100 to 100 oC and in frequencies between 10 Hz and 100 kHz. The PTCR effect was observed at temperatures slightly above the room temperature, for concentrations higher than that of the percolation critical concentration. The mechanism responsible for the change in resistivity, at this stage, is predominantly tunnelling, wherein the conductive filler particles are not in physical contact, and the electrons tunnel through the insulating gap between them. At low temperatures, such as below and close to the glass transition temperature, the DC conductivity obeys the Arrhenius law. The calculated activation energy values are independent of carbon black contents inside the copolymer matrix, suggesting that these particles do not interact significantly with the chain segments of the macromolecules in the EBA copolymer.

  14. MnO-carbon hybrid nanofiber composites as superior anode materials for lithium-ion batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MnO-carbon hybrid nanofiber composites are fabricated by electrospinning polyimide/manganese acetylacetonate precursor and a subsequent carbonization process. The composition, phase structure and morphology of the composites are characterized by scanning and transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and thermogravimetric analysis. The results indicate that the composites exhibit good nanofibrous morphology with MnO nanoparticles uniformly encapsulated by carbon nanofibers. The hybrid nanofiber composites are used directly as freestanding anodes for lithium-ion batteries to evaluate their electrochemical properties. It is found that the optimized MnO-carbon nanofiber composite can deliver a high reversible capacity of 663 mAh g−1, along with excellent cycling stability and good rate capability. The superior performance enables the composites to be promising candidates as an anode alternative for high-performance lithium-ion batteries

  15. Carbon felt supported carbon nanotubes catalysts composite electrode for vanadium redox flow battery application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Guanjie; Jia, Chuankun; Liu, Jianguo; Yan, Chuanwei

    2012-12-01

    A modified electrode for vanadium redox flow battery (VRFB) has been developed in this paper. The electrode is based on a traditional carbon felt (CF) grafted with the short-carboxylic multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). The microstructure and electrochemical property of the modified electrode as well as the performance of the VRFB single cell with it have been characterized. The results show that the MWCNTs are evenly dispersed and adhere to the surface of carbon fibres in the CF. The electrochemical activities of the modified CF electrode have been improved dramatically and the reversibility of the VO2+/VO2+ and V3+/V2+ redox couples increased greatly. The VRFB single cell with the modified CF exhibits higher coulombic efficiency (93.9%) and energy efficiency (82.0%) than that with the pristine CF. The SEM analysis shows that the MWCNTs still cohere with carbon fibres after charge and discharge test, indicating the stability of the MWCNTs in flowing electrolyte. Therefore, the composite electrode presents considerable potential for the commercial application of CF in VRFB.

  16. Carbon and glass hierarchical fibers: Influence of carbon nanotubes on tensile, flexural and impact properties of short fiber reinforced composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Dense CNT were grown on carbon fiber and glass fiber by use of floating catalyst CVD method. ► CNT showed different growing mechanism on carbon and glass fiber. ► Short fiber-CNT-composites showed enhanced mechanical properties. ► CNT coating enhanced fiber–matrix interaction and acted as additional reinforcement. -- Abstract: Dense carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were grown uniformly on the surface of carbon fibers and glass fibers to create hierarchical fibers by use of floating catalyst chemical vapor deposition. Morphologies of the CNTs were investigated using scanning electronic microscope (SEM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM). Larger diameter dimension and distinct growing mechanism of nanotubes on glass fiber were revealed. Short carbon and glass fiber reinforced polypropylene composites were fabricated using the hierarchical fibers and compared with composites made using neat fibers. Tensile, flexural and impact properties of the composites were measured, which showed evident enhancement in all mechanical properties compared to neat short fiber composites. SEM micrographs of composite fracture surface demonstrated improved adhesion between CNT-coated fiber and the matrix. The enhanced mechanical properties of short fiber composites was attributed to the synergistic effects of CNTs in improving fiber–matrix interfacial properties as well as the CNTs acting as supplemental reinforcement in short fiber-composites.

  17. Piezoresistivity in Carbon Fiber Reinforced Cement Based Composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bing CHEN; Keru WU; Wu YAO

    2004-01-01

    The resu lts of some i nteresti ng investigation on the piezoresistivity of ca rbon fi ber reinforced cement based com posites (CFRC) are presented with the prospect of developing a new nondestructive testing method to assess the integrity of the composite. The addition of short carbon fibers to cement-based mortar or concrete improves the structural performance and at the same time significantly decreases the bulk electrical resistivity. This makes CFRC responsive to the smart behavior by measuring the resistance change with uniaxial pressure. The piezoresistivity of CFRC under different stress was studied, at the same time the damage occurring inner specimens was detected by acoustic emission as well. Test results show that there exists a marking pressure dependence of the conductivity in CFRC, in which the so-called negative pressure coefficient of resistive (NPCR) and positive pressure coefficient of resistive (PPCR) are observed under low and high pressure. Under constant pressures, time-dependent resistivity is an outstanding characteristic for the composites, which is defined as resistance creep. The breakdown and rebuild-up process of conductive network under pressure may be responsible for the pressure dependence of resistivity.

  18. Processing and performance of nanophased braided carbon/epoxy composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A systematic study has been carried out to investigate mechanical properties of 2D nanophased braided carbon/epoxy composites. SC-15 epoxy with three types of braided fabrics: ±45 deg., 0/±45 deg., and 0/±60 deg. was used to fabricate composite laminates using vacuum assisted resin infusion molding (VARIM) process. Low-velocity impact (LVI), ultrasonic nondestructive evaluation (NDE) and 3-point bend flexure studies were carried out on biaxial and triaxial braided samples. Impact parameters like peak load and absorbed energy were calculated. All the LVI tested samples were then subjected to ultrasonic c-scan testing to determine the damage size. From the results it was seen that laminates sustained the impact load without any damage at 10 J, a little damage at 20 J and more damage at 30 J. From the ultrasonic tests it was seen that the biaxial ±45 deg. laminates had lowest damage. Flexural test showed the highest flexural strength and stiffness for triaxial 0 deg./±45 deg. An investigation was also carried out to improve the properties of the braided laminates by introducing Nanomer I-28E nanoclay, a surface modified montmorillonite mineral, into SC-15 epoxy matrix. Different weight percentages of nanoclay were dispersed in SC-15 epoxy. Highest properties were obtained for samples with 1% by weight of nanoclay reinforcement.

  19. Processing and performance of nanophased braided carbon/epoxy composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hosur, Mahesh V., E-mail: hosur@tuskegee.ed [Center for Advanced Materials, Tuskegee University, Tuskegee, AL 36088 (United States); Islam, Md. Mazedul; Jeelani, Shaik [Center for Advanced Materials, Tuskegee University, Tuskegee, AL 36088 (United States)

    2010-04-15

    A systematic study has been carried out to investigate mechanical properties of 2D nanophased braided carbon/epoxy composites. SC-15 epoxy with three types of braided fabrics: +-45 deg., 0/+-45 deg., and 0/+-60 deg. was used to fabricate composite laminates using vacuum assisted resin infusion molding (VARIM) process. Low-velocity impact (LVI), ultrasonic nondestructive evaluation (NDE) and 3-point bend flexure studies were carried out on biaxial and triaxial braided samples. Impact parameters like peak load and absorbed energy were calculated. All the LVI tested samples were then subjected to ultrasonic c-scan testing to determine the damage size. From the results it was seen that laminates sustained the impact load without any damage at 10 J, a little damage at 20 J and more damage at 30 J. From the ultrasonic tests it was seen that the biaxial +-45 deg. laminates had lowest damage. Flexural test showed the highest flexural strength and stiffness for triaxial 0 deg./+-45 deg. An investigation was also carried out to improve the properties of the braided laminates by introducing Nanomer I-28E nanoclay, a surface modified montmorillonite mineral, into SC-15 epoxy matrix. Different weight percentages of nanoclay were dispersed in SC-15 epoxy. Highest properties were obtained for samples with 1% by weight of nanoclay reinforcement.

  20. Enrichment of ventilation air methane (VAM) with carbon fiber composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Jun-Seok; Su, Shi; Yu, Xin Xiang

    2014-05-20

    Treatment of ventilation air methane (VAM) with cost-effective technologies has been an ongoing challenge due to its high volumetric flow rate with low and variable methane concentrations. In this work, honeycomb monolithic carbon fiber composites were developed and employed to capture VAM with a large-scale test unit at various conditions such as VAM concentration, ventilation air (VA) flow rate, temperature, and purging fluids. Regardless of inlet VAM concentrations, methane was captured at almost 100%. To regenerate the composites, the initial vacuum swing followed by combined temperature and vacuum swing adsorption (TVSA) was applied. It was found that initial vacuum swing is a control step for the final methane concentration having 5 or 11 times the VAM enrichment by one-step adsorption, which is, to our knowledge, the best performance achieved in VAM enrichment technologies worldwide. Five-time enriched VAM can be utilized as a principle fuel for lean burn turbine. Also, it can be further enriched by second step adsorption to more than 25% which then can be used for commercially available gas engines. In this way, the final product can be out of the methane explosive range (5-15%). PMID:24787090

  1. High Temperature Resin/Carbon Nanotube Composite Fabrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghose, Sayata; Watson, Kent A.; Sun, Keun J.; Criss, Jim M.; Siochi, Emilie J.; Connell, John W.

    2006-01-01

    For the purpose of incorporating multifunctionality into advanced composites, blends of phenylethynyl terminated imides-330 (PETI-330) and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were prepared, characterized and fabricated into moldings. PETI-330/MWCNT mixtures were prepared at concentrations ranging from 3 to 25 weight percent by dry mixing the components in a ball mill. The resulting powders were characterized for degree of mixing, thermal and rheological properties. Based on the characterization results, PETI-330/MWCNT samples were scaled up to approximately 300 g and used to fabricate moldings by injecting the mixtures at 260-280 deg C into a stainless steel tool followed by curing for 1 h at 371 deg C. The tool was designed to impart a degree of shear during the injection process in an attempt to achieve some alignment of the MWCNTs in the flow direction. Obtained moldings were subsequently characterized for thermal, mechanical, and electrical properties. The degree of dispersion and alignment of MWCNTs were investigated using high-resolution scanning electron microscopy. The preparation and preliminary characterization of PETI-330/MWCNT composites will be discussed.

  2. Process Optimization of Bismaleimide (BMI) Resin Infused Carbon Fiber Composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrlich, Joshua W.; Tate, LaNetra C.; Cox, Sarah B.; Taylor, Brian J.; Wright, M. Clara; Caraccio, Anne J.; Sampson, Jeffery W.

    2013-01-01

    Bismaleimide (BMI) resins are an attractive new addition to world-wide composite applications. This type of thermosetting polyimide provides several unique characteristics such as excellent physical property retention at elevated temperatures and in wet environments, constant electrical properties over a vast array of temperature settings, and nonflammability properties as well. This makes BMI a popular choice in advance composites and electronics applications [I]. Bismaleimide-2 (BMI-2) resin was used to infuse intermediate modulus 7 (IM7) based carbon fiber. Two panel configurations consisting of 4 plies with [+45deg, 90deg]2 and [0deg]4 orientations were fabricated. For tensile testing, a [90deg]4 configuration was tested by rotating the [0deg]4 configirration to lie orthogonal with the load direction of the test fixture. Curing of the BMI-2/IM7 system utilized an optimal infusion process which focused on the integration of the manufacturer-recommended ramp rates,. hold times, and cure temperatures. Completion of the cure cycle for the BMI-2/IM7 composite yielded a product with multiple surface voids determined through visual and metallographic observation. Although the curing cycle was the same for the three panellayups, the surface voids that remained within the material post-cure were different in abundance, shape, and size. For tensile testing, the [0deg]4 layup had a 19.9% and 21.7% greater average tensile strain performance compared to the [90deg]4 and [+45deg, 90deg, 90deg,-45degg] layups, respectively, at failure. For tensile stress performance, the [0deg]4 layup had a 5.8% and 34.0% greater average performance% than the [90deg]4 and [+45deg, 90deg, 90deg,-45deg] layups.

  3. Processable Conducting Polyaniline, Carbon Nanotubes, Graphene and Their Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kan

    Good processability is often required for applications of conducting materials like polyaniline (PANI), carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and graphene. This can be achieved by either physical stabilization or chemical functionalization. Functionalization usually expands the possible applications for the conducting materials depending on the properties of the functional groups. Processable conducting materials can also be combined with other co-dissolving materials to prepare composites with desired chemical and physical properties. Polyanilines (PANI) doped with dodecylbenzenesulfonic acid (DBSA) are soluble in many organic solvents such as chloroform and toluene. Single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) can be dispersed into PANI/DBSA to form homogeneous solutions. PANI/DBSA functions as a conducting surfactant for SWCNTs. The mixture can be combined with two-parts polyurethanes that co-dissolve in the organic solvent to produce conducting polymer composites. The composite mixtures can be applied onto various substrates by simple spray-on methods to obtain transparent and conducting coatings. Graphene, a single layer of graphite, has drawn intense interest for its unique properties. Processable graphene has been produced in N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone (NMP) by a one-step solvothermal reduction of graphite oxide without the aid of any reducing reagent and/or surfactant. The as-synthesized graphene disperses well in a variety of organic solvents such as dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO), ethanol and tetrahydrogenfuran (THF). The conductivity of solvothermal reduced graphite oxide is comparable to hydrazine reduced graphite oxide. Attempts were made to create intrinsically conducting glue comparable to mussel adhesive protiens using polyaniline and graphene. Mussels can attach to a variety of substrates under water. Catechol residue in 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA) is the key to the wet adhesion. Tyrosine and phosphoserine with primary alkyl amine groups also participate in adhesion. A

  4. Modeling Environmental Controls on the Carbon Isotope Composition of Ecosystem Respired Carbon Dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, T.; Flanagan, L. B.

    2006-12-01

    Our main objective was to test whether the carbon isotope composition of ecosystem respired CO2 varied in response to environmental conditions in a manner consistent with well-known leaf-level studies of photosynthetic 13C discrimination. We developed an ecosystem-scale model that calculated leaf CO2 assimilation, stomatal conductance and chloroplast CO2 concentration separately for sunlit and shaded leaves within multiple canopy layers. The stomatal conductance model was linked to differences in water potential and resistances in the hydraulic pathway between the soil and the tree foliage. This part of the ecosystem model was validated by comparison to leaf-level gas exchange measurements and estimates of ecosystem-scale photosynthesis (GEP). The estimates of GEP were based on eddy covariance measurements of net ecosystem CO2 exchange (NEE) and the Fluxnet-Canada Research Network standard protocol for partitioning NEE into GEP and total ecosystem respiration (TER). The carbon isotope composition of carbohydrate formed during photosynthesis was calculated based on the Farquhar model of isotope effects. Total ecosystem respiration was modeled, based on measured temperature and soil moisture, as the sum of four components (1) above-ground plant, (2) root, (3) litter, and (4) mineral soil. We applied a variety of techniques to allocate the contribution of these different components so that modeled TER was consistent with TER calculated from NEE measurements. The carbon isotope composition of CO2 released during above-ground plant and root respiration was calculated based on an assimilated-weighted average of carbohydrate fixed during a variable number of days previous to the day of respiration. The isotope composition of CO2 released by litter and mineral soil respiration was based on measurements of the δ13C values of these components (we assumed no isotope fractionation during respiration) and held constant in all calculations. The model was compared to

  5. Fractal characterization of pore microstructure evolution in carbon/carbon composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    A fractal characterization approach was proposed to research pore microstructure evolution in car- bon/carbon (C/C) composites during the chemical vapor infiltration process. The data obtained from mercury porosimetry determinations were analyzed using the sponge fractal model and the thermo- dynamics relation fractal model, respectively. The fractal dimensions of C/C composites at different densification stages were evaluated. The pore microstructure evolution with densification time was studied by fractal dimension analysis. The results showed that C/C composites belong to porous frac- tal structure. The fractal dimensions increase on the whole with decreasing porosity as the densifica- tion proceeds. The fractal dimensions are influenced by the texture of pyrocarbon and decrease with increasing anisotropy from isotropic pyrocarbon to high textural one. Both the complicacy of pore structure and the textural morphology of pyrocarbon can be represented simultaneously by the fractal dimension. The pore evolution of C/C composites in the densification process can be monitored using fractal dimension.

  6. Prediction of Material Properties of Nanostructured Polymer Composites Using Atomistic Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinkley, J.A.; Clancy, T.C.; Frankland, S.J.V.

    2009-01-01

    Atomistic models of epoxy polymers were built in order to assess the effect of structure at the nanometer scale on the resulting bulk properties such as elastic modulus and thermal conductivity. Atomistic models of both bulk polymer and carbon nanotube polymer composites were built. For the bulk models, the effect of moisture content and temperature on the resulting elastic constants was calculated. A relatively consistent decrease in modulus was seen with increasing temperature. The dependence of modulus on moisture content was less consistent. This behavior was seen for two different epoxy systems, one containing a difunctional epoxy molecule and the other a tetrafunctional epoxy molecule. Both epoxy structures were crosslinked with diamine curing agents. Multifunctional properties were calculated with the nanocomposite models. Molecular dynamics simulation was used to estimate the interfacial thermal (Kapitza) resistance between the carbon nanotube and the surrounding epoxy matrix. These estimated values were used in a multiscale model in order to predict the thermal conductivity of a nanocomposite as a function of the nanometer scaled molecular structure.

  7. Copper-decorated carbon nanotubes-based composite electrodes for nonenzymatic detection of glucose

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pop, A.; Manea, F.; Orha, C.; Motoc, S.; Llinoiu, E.; Vaszilcsin, N.; Schoonman, J.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to prepare three types of multiwall carbon nanotubes (CNT)-based composite electrodes and to modify their surface by copper electrodeposition for nonenzymatic oxidation and determination of glucose from aqueous solution. Copper-decorated multiwall carbon nanotubes composite

  8. Copper-decorated carbon nanotubes-based composite electrodes for nonenzymatic detection of glucose

    OpenAIRE

    Pop, A.(National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Bucharest, Romania); Manea, F.; Orha, C.; Motoc, S.; Llinoiu, E.; Vaszilcsin, N.; Schoonman, J.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to prepare three types of multiwall carbon nanotubes (CNT)-based composite electrodes and to modify their surface by copper electrodeposition for nonenzymatic oxidation and determination of glucose from aqueous solution. Copper-decorated multiwall carbon nanotubes composite electrode (Cu/CNT-epoxy) exhibited the highest sensitivity to glucose determination.

  9. Mechanical Testing of Carbon-Carbon Composite for Applications in Human Spine Surgery in the Form of Intervertebral Cages

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sochor, M.; Balík, Karel; Suchý, Tomáš; Sedláček, R.; Tichý, P.

    Praha : Ústav struktury a mechaniky hornin AV ČR, 2003 - (Kolář, F.), s. - [Czech-Polish Workshop on Testing of Composite Materials. Praha (CZ), 11.09.2003-12.09.2003] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA106/00/1407 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z3046908 Keywords : carbon-carbon composite * mechanical testing * biocompatibility Subject RIV: JH - Ceramics, Fire-Resistant Materials and Glass

  10. Direct Electrochemistry of Glucose Oxidase on Novel Free-Standing Nitrogen-Doped Carbon Nanospheres@Carbon Nanofibers Composite Film

    OpenAIRE

    Xueping Zhang; Dong Liu; Libo Li; Tianyan You

    2015-01-01

    We have proposed a novel free-standing nitrogen-doped carbon nanospheres@carbon nanofibers (NCNSs@CNFs) composite film with high processability for the investigation of the direct electron transfer (DET) of glucose oxidase (GOx) and the DET-based glucose biosensing. The composites were simply prepared by controlled thermal treatment of electrospun polypyrrole nanospheres doped polyacrylonitrile nanofibers (PPyNSs@PAN NFs). Without any pretreatment, the as-prepared material can directly serve ...

  11. Adhesion, differentiation and immune activation of human osteogenic cells in cultures on carbon-fibre reinforced carbon composites

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bačáková, Lucie; Starý, V.; Glogar, Petr; Lisá, Věra

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 6, - (2003), s. 8-9. ISSN 1429-7248. [Konferencja Naukowa "Biomaterialy w medycynie i weterynarii" /13./. Rytro, 09.10.2003-12.10.2003] R&D Projects: GA MŠk OC 527.130 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z3046908; CEZ:AV0Z5011922 Keywords : carbon-carbon composites * surface properties * bone tissue engineering Subject RIV: JI - Composite Materials

  12. Designing of epoxy composites reinforced with carbon nanotubes grown carbon fiber fabric for improved electromagnetic interference shielding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. P. Singh

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In this letter, we report preparation of strongly anchored multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs carbon fiber (CF fabric preforms. These preforms were reinforced in epoxy resin to make multi scale composites for microwave absorption in the X-band (8.2-12.4GHz. The incorporation of MWCNTs on the carbon fabric produced a significant enhancement in the electromagnetic interference shielding effectiveness (EMI-SE from −29.4 dB for CF/epoxy-composite to −51.1 dB for CF-MWCNT/epoxy multiscale composites of 2 mm thickness. In addition to enhanced EMI-SE, interlaminar shear strength improved from 23 MPa for CF/epoxy-composites to 50 MPa for multiscale composites indicating their usefulness for making structurally strong microwave shields.

  13. Designing of epoxy composites reinforced with carbon nanotubes grown carbon fiber fabric for improved electromagnetic interference shielding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, B. P.; Choudhary, Veena; Saini, Parveen; Mathur, R. B.

    2012-06-01

    In this letter, we report preparation of strongly anchored multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) carbon fiber (CF) fabric preforms. These preforms were reinforced in epoxy resin to make multi scale composites for microwave absorption in the X-band (8.2-12.4GHz). The incorporation of MWCNTs on the carbon fabric produced a significant enhancement in the electromagnetic interference shielding effectiveness (EMI-SE) from -29.4 dB for CF/epoxy-composite to -51.1 dB for CF-MWCNT/epoxy multiscale composites of 2 mm thickness. In addition to enhanced EMI-SE, interlaminar shear strength improved from 23 MPa for CF/epoxy-composites to 50 MPa for multiscale composites indicating their usefulness for making structurally strong microwave shields.

  14. The mechanics and biocompatibility characteristics of carbon nanotubes-polyurethane composite membranes:a preliminary study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To discuss the mechanics and biocompatibility characteristics of carbon nanotubes-polyurethane composite membranes. Methods: The mechanics property of carbon nanotubes-polyurethane composite membranes with different carbon nanotubes contents were tested by universal material testing machine. The surface of the membranes was observed by electron microscope when the stent was bent 90 degree. And its cytotoxicity was tested by cultivating study with 7721 cell. The metallic stent that was covered with carbon nanotubes-polyurethane composite membrane by using dip-coating method was inserted in rabbit esophagus in order to evaluate its biocompatibility in vivo. Results: Composite membranes tensile strength (MPa) and elongation at break (%) were 4.62/900, 6.05/730, 8.26/704 and 5.7/450 when the carbon nanotubes contents were 0%, 0.1%, 0.3% and 0.5%, respectively. If the stent was bent at 90 degree, its surface was still smooth without any fractures when it was scanned by electron microscope.Composite membranes had critical cytotoxicity when its carbon nanotubes content was up to 0.5% and 1.0%. No fissure nor degradation of composite membranes occurred at 30 days after composite membrane covered metallic stent was inserted in rabbit esophagus. Conclusion: When moderate carbon nanotubes are added into polyurethane composite membrane, the mechanics and biocompatibility characteristics of the polyurethane composite membrane can be much improved. (authors)

  15. Preparation and characterization of morph-genetic aluminum nitride/carbon composites from filter paper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morph-genetic aluminum nitride/carbon composites with cablelike structure were prepared from filter paper template through the surface sol-gel process and carbothermal nitridation reaction. The resulting materials have a hierarchical structure originating from the morphology of cellulose paper. The aluminum nitride/carbon composites have the core-shell microstructure, the core is graphitic carbon, and the shell is aluminum nitride nanocoating formed by carbothermal nitridation reduction of alumina with the interfacial carbon in nitrogen atmosphere. Scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and transmission electron microscope were employed to characterize the structural morphology and phase compositions of the final products

  16. Mechanical properties of Cu-based composites reinforced by carbon nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    Cu-based composites reinforced by 0 % ~25 % (volume fraction) carbon nanotubes were prepared. The fracture behaviors and the rolling properties of the composites and the effects of the volume fraction of the carbon nanotubes were studied. The experimental results show that the fracture toughness of the composites is related to the pulling-out and bridging of the carbon nanotubes in the fracture process. With the volume fraction of the carbon nanotubes increasing, the Vicker' s hardness and the compactness of the composites increase first and then decrease. The peaks of the hardness and the compactness occur at 12 % ~15 % of volume fraction of carbon nanotubes. Some proper ratio of rolling reduction benefits to the comprehensive mechanical properties of the composites.

  17. Poly(methyl methacrylate)/multi-wall carbon nanotubes composites prepared by solvent cast technique: Composites electrical percolation threshold

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Slobodian, P.; Lengálová, A.; Sáha, P.; Šlouf, Miroslav

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 26, č. 16 (2007), s. 1705-1712. ISSN 0731-6844 Grant ostatní: GA ČR(CZ) GP106/05/P189 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : carbon nanotubes * MWNT * polymer composites Subject RIV: JI - Composite Materials Impact factor: 0.417, year: 2007

  18. Electron spectroscopy of rubber and resin-based composites containing 2D carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Composite materials with 2D carbon (graphene and/or single wall carbon nanotubes) are very promising due to their extraordinary electrical and mechanical properties. Graphene and natural rubber composites, which may be used for the gaskets or sealants, were prepared by ultrasonically assisted latex-mixing exfoliation and in-situ reduction process, with two vulcanization approaches: roll-mixing and hot-pressing. Also the resin-based composites, filled with micro-particles of Ag and graphene or carbon nanotubes, have been studied. The standards for the compositional characterization of these materials still are not established. In addition to the mostly used techniques, such as Raman spectroscopy and electron microscopy, also Auger electron spectroscopy can be employed for the identification of graphene. In this study, the shape of C KVV peak, excited by electron beam and X-ray photons, has been investigated in different composite materials containing graphene and carbon nanotubes. A spectroscopic method for 2D carbon recognition, based on the Dx parameter which is determined from C KVV signal excited by X-ray photons, was proposed and verified. Even a small content of graphene in different types of composites was sufficient for this recognition due to the dominating presence of graphene on the surface of composites. - Highlights: • Chemical composition of the rubber composites was determined by XPS. • Auger spectrum of carbon was used for graphene identification in composites. • Small content of graphene was sufficient for its recognition from the D parameter

  19. Electron spectroscopy of rubber and resin-based composites containing 2D carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaciulis, S., E-mail: saulius.kaciulis@ismn.cnr.it [Institute for the Study of Nanostructured Materials, ISMN-CNR, P.O. Box 10, Monterotondo Stazione, 00015 Roma (Italy); Mezzi, A.; Balijepalli, S.K. [Institute for the Study of Nanostructured Materials, ISMN-CNR, P.O. Box 10, Monterotondo Stazione, 00015 Roma (Italy); Lavorgna, M. [Institute of Polymers, Composites and Biomaterials, IPCB-CNR, P.le Fermi, 80055 Napoli (Italy); Xia, H.S. [State Key Laboratory of Polymer Materials Engineering, Sichuan University, Chengdu, 610065 Sichuan (China)

    2015-04-30

    Composite materials with 2D carbon (graphene and/or single wall carbon nanotubes) are very promising due to their extraordinary electrical and mechanical properties. Graphene and natural rubber composites, which may be used for the gaskets or sealants, were prepared by ultrasonically assisted latex-mixing exfoliation and in-situ reduction process, with two vulcanization approaches: roll-mixing and hot-pressing. Also the resin-based composites, filled with micro-particles of Ag and graphene or carbon nanotubes, have been studied. The standards for the compositional characterization of these materials still are not established. In addition to the mostly used techniques, such as Raman spectroscopy and electron microscopy, also Auger electron spectroscopy can be employed for the identification of graphene. In this study, the shape of C KVV peak, excited by electron beam and X-ray photons, has been investigated in different composite materials containing graphene and carbon nanotubes. A spectroscopic method for 2D carbon recognition, based on the D{sub x} parameter which is determined from C KVV signal excited by X-ray photons, was proposed and verified. Even a small content of graphene in different types of composites was sufficient for this recognition due to the dominating presence of graphene on the surface of composites. - Highlights: • Chemical composition of the rubber composites was determined by XPS. • Auger spectrum of carbon was used for graphene identification in composites. • Small content of graphene was sufficient for its recognition from the D parameter.

  20. Influence of Tree Species Composition and Community Structure on Carbon Density in a Subtropical Forest.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanqiu Hu

    Full Text Available We assessed the impact of species composition and stand structure on the spatial variation of forest carbon density using data collected from a 4-ha plot in a subtropical forest in southern China. We found that 1 forest biomass carbon density significantly differed among communities, reflecting a significant effect of community structure and species composition on carbon accumulation; 2 soil organic carbon density increased whereas stand biomass carbon density decreased across communities, indicating that different mechanisms might account for the accumulation of stand biomass carbon and soil organic carbon in the subtropical forest; and 3 a small number of tree individuals of the medium- and large-diameter class contributed predominantly to biomass carbon accumulation in the community, whereas a large number of seedlings and saplings were responsible for a small proportion of the total forest carbon stock. These findings demonstrate that both biomass carbon and soil carbon density in the subtropical forest are sensitive to species composition and community structure, and that heterogeneity in species composition and stand structure should be taken into account to ensure accurate forest carbon accounting.

  1. Electroadsorption Desalination with Carbon Nanotube/PAN-Based Carbon Fiber Felt Composites as Electrodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Liu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The chemical vapor deposition method is used to prepare CNT (carbon nanotube/PCF (PAN-based carbon fiber felt composite electrodes in this paper, with the surface morphology of CNT/PCF composites and electroadsorption desalination performance being studied. Results show such electrode materials with three-dimensional network nanostructures having a larger specific surface area and narrower micropore distribution, with a huge number of reactive groups covering the surface. Compared with PCF electrodes, CNT/PCF can allow for a higher adsorption and desorption rate but lower energy consumption; meanwhile, under the condition of the same voltage change, the CNT/PCF electrodes are provided with a better desalination effect. The study also found that the higher the original concentration of the solution, the greater the adsorption capacity and the lower the adsorption rate. At the same time, the higher the solution’s pH, the better the desalting; the smaller the ions’ radius, the greater the amount of adsorption.

  2. Electroadsorption desalination with carbon nanotube/PAN-based carbon fiber felt composites as electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Zhou, Junbo

    2014-01-01

    The chemical vapor deposition method is used to prepare CNT (carbon nanotube)/PCF (PAN-based carbon fiber felt) composite electrodes in this paper, with the surface morphology of CNT/PCF composites and electroadsorption desalination performance being studied. Results show such electrode materials with three-dimensional network nanostructures having a larger specific surface area and narrower micropore distribution, with a huge number of reactive groups covering the surface. Compared with PCF electrodes, CNT/PCF can allow for a higher adsorption and desorption rate but lower energy consumption; meanwhile, under the condition of the same voltage change, the CNT/PCF electrodes are provided with a better desalination effect. The study also found that the higher the original concentration of the solution, the greater the adsorption capacity and the lower the adsorption rate. At the same time, the higher the solution's pH, the better the desalting; the smaller the ions' radius, the greater the amount of adsorption. PMID:24963504

  3. Extremely High Thermal Conductivity of Aligned Carbon Nanotube-Polyethylene Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Quanwen; Liu, Zhichun; Liu, Wei; Deng, Chengcheng; Yang, Nuo

    2015-11-01

    The ultra-low thermal conductivity of bulk polymers may be enhanced by combining them with high thermal conductivity materials such as carbon nanotubes. Different from random doping, we find that the aligned carbon nanotube-polyethylene composites has a high thermal conductivity by non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. The analyses indicate that the aligned composite not only take advantage of the high thermal conduction of carbon nanotubes, but enhance thermal conduction of polyethylene chains.

  4. Liquid Phase Plasma Synthesis of Iron Oxide/Carbon Composite as Dielectric Material for Capacitor

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Iron oxide/carbon composite was synthesized using a liquid phase plasma process to be used as the electrode of supercapacitor. Spherical iron oxide nanoparticles with the size of 5~10 nm were dispersed uniformly on carbon powder surface. The specific capacitance of the composite increased with increasing quantity of iron oxide precipitate on the carbon powder up to a certain quantity. When the quantity of the iron oxide precipitate exceeds the threshold, however, the specific capacitance was ...

  5. Carbon nanotube reinforced hybrid composites: Computational modeling of environmental fatigue and usability for wind blades

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dai, Gaoming; Mishnaevsky, Leon

    2015-01-01

    The potential of advanced carbon/glass hybrid reinforced composites with secondary carbon nanotube reinforcement for wind energy applications is investigated here with the use of computational experiments. Fatigue behavior of hybrid as well as glass and carbon fiber reinforced composites with and...... automatically using the Python based code. 3D computational studies of environment and fatigue analyses of multiscale composites with secondary nano-scale reinforcement in different material phases and different CNTs arrangements are carried out systematically in this paper. It was demonstrated that composites...... with the secondary CNT reinforcements (especially, aligned tubes) present superior fatigue performances than those without reinforcements, also under combined environmental and cyclic mechanical loading. This effect is stronger for carbon composites, than for hybrid and glass composites....

  6. On the elastic properties of carbon nanotube-based composites: modelling and characterization

    CERN Document Server

    Thostenson, E T

    2003-01-01

    The exceptional mechanical and physical properties observed for carbon nanotubes has stimulated the development of nanotube-based composite materials, but critical challenges exist before we can exploit these extraordinary nanoscale properties in a macroscopic composite. At the nanoscale, the structure of the carbon nanotube strongly influences the overall properties of the composite. The focus of this research is to develop a fundamental understanding of the structure/size influence of carbon nanotubes on the elastic properties of nanotube-based composites. Towards this end, the nanoscale structure and elastic properties of a model composite system of aligned multi-walled carbon nanotubes embedded in a polystyrene matrix were characterized, and a micromechanical approach for modelling of short fibre composites was modified to account for the structure of the nanotube reinforcement to predict the elastic modulus of the nanocomposite as a function of the constituent properties, reinforcement geometry and nanot...

  7. Electroless plating Ni-P matrix composite coating reinforced by carbon nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邓福铭; 陈小华; 陈卫祥; 李文铸

    2004-01-01

    Ni-P matrix composite coating reinforced by carbon nanotubes (CNTs) was deposited by electroless plating. The most important factors that influence the content of carbon nanotubes in deposits, such as agitation, surfactant and carbon nanotubes concentration in the plating bath were investigated. The surface morphology, structure and properties of the Ni-P-CNTs coating were examined. It is found that the maximum content of carbon nanotubes in the deposits is independent of carbon nanotubes concentration in the plating bath when it is up to 5 mg/L. The test results show that the carbon nanotubes co-deposited do not change the structure of the Ni-P matrix of the composite coating, but greatly increase the hardness and wear resistance and decrease the friction coefficient of the Ni-PCNTs composite coating with increasing content of carbon nanotubes in deposits.

  8. Effects of Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes on The Mechanical Properties of Glass/Polyester Composites

    OpenAIRE

    M. Mehrdad Shokrieh; A Saeedi; M. Chitsazzadeh

    2012-01-01

    Excellent mechanical properties of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) make them outstanding candidate reinforcements to enhance mechanical properties of conventional composites. The glass/polyester composites are widely used in many industries and applications. Improving the mechanical properties of such composites with addition of CNTs can increase their applications. In this research, multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) at different weight ratios (0.05, 0.1, 0.3, 0.5 wt.%) were added to chopped stran...

  9. Pseudo-ductility in intermingled carbon/glass hybrid composites with highly aligned discontinuous fibres

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Hana; Longana, Marco L; Jalalvand, Meisam; WISNOM, Michael R.; Potter, Kevin D

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this research is to manufacture intermingled hybrid composites using aligned discontinuous fibres to achieve pseudo-ductility. Hybrid composites, made with different types of fibres that provide a balanced suite of modulus, strength and ductility, allow avoiding catastrophic failure that is a key limitation of composites. Two different material combinations of high strength carbon/E-glass and high modulus carbon/E-glass were selected. Several highly aligned and well dispersed short...

  10. Hybrid Carbon Fiber/ZnO Nanowires Polymeric Composite for Stuctural and Energy Harvesting Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Masghouni, Nejib

    2014-01-01

    Despite the many attractive features of carbon fiber reinforced polymers (FRPs) composites, they are prone to failure due to delamination. The ability to tailor the fiber/matrix interface FRPs is crucial to the development of composite materials with enhanced structural performance. In this dissertation, ZnO nanowires (NWs) were grown on the surface of carbon fibers utilizing low temperature hydrothermal synthesis technique prior to the hybrid composite fabrication. The scanning electron micr...

  11. Effects of Strain-Induced Crystallization on Mechanical Properties of Elastomeric Composites Containing Carbon Nanotubes and Carbon Black

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of strain-induced crystallization (SIC) on the mechanical properties of elastomeric composites as functions of extension ratio (λ), multi walled carbon nanotube (CNT) content, and carbon black (CB) content are investigated. The differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) analysis shows that the degree of crystallinity increases with the increase in the CB and CNT content. As λ increases, the glass transition temperature (Tg) of the composites increases, and the latent heat of crystallization (LHc) of the composites is maximum at λ=1.5. It is found that the mechanical properties have a linear relation with LHc, depending on the CNT content. According to the TGA (thermogravimetric analysis), the weight loss of the composite matrix is 94.3% and the weight of the composites decreases with the filler content. The ratio of tensile modulus (Ecomp/ Ematrix) is higher than that of tensile strength (σcomp/ σmatrix) because of the CNT orientation inside the elastomeric composites

  12. Copper ions removal from water using functionalized carbon nanotubes–mullite composite as adsorbent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • CNTs–mullite composite was prepared via chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method. • The prepared composite was modified with concentrated nitric acid and chitosan. • The modified CNTs–mullite composites were used as novel adsorbents. • Copper ion removal from water by the prepared adsorbents was performed. • Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms and two kinetic models were applied to fit the experimental data. - Abstract: Carbon nanotubes–mullite composite was synthesized by direct growth of carbon nanotubes on mullite particles via chemical vapor deposition method using cyclohexanol and ferrocene as carbon precursor and catalyst, respectively. The carbon nanotubes–mullite composite was oxidized with concentrated nitric acid and functionalized with chitosan and then used as a novel adsorbent for copper ions removal from water. The results demonstrated that modification with concentrated nitric acid and chitosan improves copper ions adsorption capacity of the prepared composite, significantly. Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms and two kinetic models were applied to fit the experimental data. The carbon nanotubes growth on mullite particles to form the carbon nanotubes–mullite composite with further modification is an inherently safe approach for many promising environmental applications to avoid some concerns regarding environment, health and safety. It was found that the modified carbon nanotubes–mullite composite can be considered as an excellent adsorbent for copper ions removal from water

  13. Copper ions removal from water using functionalized carbon nanotubes–mullite composite as adsorbent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tofighy, Maryam Ahmadzadeh; Mohammadi, Toraj, E-mail: torajmohammadi@iust.ac.ir

    2015-08-15

    Highlights: • CNTs–mullite composite was prepared via chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method. • The prepared composite was modified with concentrated nitric acid and chitosan. • The modified CNTs–mullite composites were used as novel adsorbents. • Copper ion removal from water by the prepared adsorbents was performed. • Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms and two kinetic models were applied to fit the experimental data. - Abstract: Carbon nanotubes–mullite composite was synthesized by direct growth of carbon nanotubes on mullite particles via chemical vapor deposition method using cyclohexanol and ferrocene as carbon precursor and catalyst, respectively. The carbon nanotubes–mullite composite was oxidized with concentrated nitric acid and functionalized with chitosan and then used as a novel adsorbent for copper ions removal from water. The results demonstrated that modification with concentrated nitric acid and chitosan improves copper ions adsorption capacity of the prepared composite, significantly. Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms and two kinetic models were applied to fit the experimental data. The carbon nanotubes growth on mullite particles to form the carbon nanotubes–mullite composite with further modification is an inherently safe approach for many promising environmental applications to avoid some concerns regarding environment, health and safety. It was found that the modified carbon nanotubes–mullite composite can be considered as an excellent adsorbent for copper ions removal from water.

  14. Properties and application of carbon composite brick for blast furnace hearth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiao K.X.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A type of carbon composite brick was produced via the microporous technique using natural flack graphite, α-Al2O3 and high-quality bauxite chamotte (Al2O3≥87 mass% as raw materials with fine silicon powder as additive. The composition and microstructure of the obtained carbon composite were characterized using chemical analysis, XRD and SEM with EDS. The high temperature properties of thermal conductivity, oxidization and corrosion by molten slag and hot metal of the composite were analyzed. Based on these, the type of carbon composite brick worked in a blast furnace hearth for six years was further sampled at different positions. The protective layer was found and its chemical composition and microscopic morphology were investigated. It is found that the carbon composite brick combines the good properties of both the conventional carbon block and ceramic cup refractory. The protective layer near the hot face consists of two separated sublayers, i.e. the slag layer and the carbon layer. A certain amount of slag phase is contained in the carbon layer, which is caused by the reaction of coke ash with the refractory. No obvious change in the chemical composition of the protective layer along the depth of the sidewall is found. This work provides a useful guidance for the extension of the lifetime of blast furnace hearths.

  15. An in situ Raman spectroscopy study of stress transfer between carbon nanotubes and polymer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The transfer mechanism of applied stress in single-wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT)/poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) nanocomposites was investigated using in situ Raman spectroscopy on composite fibers. These SWCNT/PMMA nanocomposite fibers have no specific SWCNT-polymer interactions and the high degree of nanotube alignment minimizes the contributions from nanotube-nanotube interactions. Although tensile testing found significantly improved overall mechanical properties of the fibers, effective stress transfer to SWCNTs is limited to a small strain regime (ε<0.2%). At higher strains, the stress on the SWCNTs decreases due to the slippage at the nanotube-polymer interface. Slippage was also evident in scanning electron micrographs of fracture surfaces produced by tensile testing of the composite fibers. Above ε = 0.2%, the strain-induced slippage was accompanied by irreversible responses in stress and Raman peak shifts. This paper shows that efficient stress transfer to nanotubes as monitored by Raman spectroscopy is crucial to improving the mechanical properties of polymer nanocomposites and to detecting internal damage in nanocomposites.

  16. Thermal Energy in Carbon Nanotube and Graphene Composite Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiffres, Scott N.

    Low-dimensional materials, like carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and graphene, possess extraordinary properties---higher thermal conductivity than any bulk material, mechanical strength 10-100 times greater than steel on a mass basis, and electrical current capacity 1000 times greater than copper. While composites incorporating these low-dimensional materials promise solutions to global sustainability challenges, significant transport barriers exist at the matrix interface that influence the composite properties. My PhD research sought to address this knowledge gap. I've experimentally explored how CNTs and graphene impact thermal conductivity when added in small volume fractions to gases, liquids and solids through the study of CNT aerogels (ultra lightweight, 8 kg/m3, 99.6% void space), and phase change nanocomposites (hexadecane-graphene). I measured the thermal conductivity of the CNT aerogel with various filling gases versus pressure using a novel technique that targeted ultralow thermal conductivity materials, called metal-coated 3o. I observed amplified energy transport length scales resulting from low gas accommodation, which is a general feature of carbon based nanoporous materials. Our evidence also shows that despite the high thermal conductivity of CNTs, thermal conduction through the CNT network is limited by the high thermal boundary resistance at van der Waals bonded CNT junctions. In the second system, I studied thermal and electrical conductivity of hexadecane- multi-layered-graphene (MLG) phase change nanocomposites to understand how morphology of the MLG network impacts transport. By adjusting the freezing rate, the electrical conductivity in the solid phase can be tuned between 1 and 5 orders-of-magnitude and the solid-liquid thermal conductivity ratio can be varied between 2.6 to 3.0. This research has yielded interesting insights into the tunability of nanocomposites and the physics underlying it, including evidence to indicate that the presence of

  17. Densification and microstructure of carbon/carbon composites prepared by chemical vapor infiltration using ethanol as precursor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Chemical vapor infiltration of carbon fiber felts with uniform initial bulk density of 0.47 g·cm-3 was investigated at the ethanol partial pressures of 5-20 kPa,as well as the temperatures of 1050,1100,1150 and 1200°C.Ethanol,diluted by nitrogen,was employed as the precursor of pyrolytic carbon.Polarized light microscopy(PLM),scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction were adopted to study the texture of pyrolytic carbon deposited at various temperatures.A change from medium-to high-textured pyrolytic carbon was observed in the sample infiltrated at 1050°C.Whereas,homogeneous high-textured pyrolytic carbons were deposited at the temperatures of 1100,1150 and 1200°C.Extinction angles of 19°-21° were determined for different regions in the samples densified at the temperatures ranging from 1100 to 1200°C.Scanning electron microscopy of the fracture surface after bending test indicated that the prepared carbon/carbon composite samples exhibited a pseudo-plastic fracture behavior.In addition,fracture behavior of the carbon/carbon samples was obviously effected by their infiltration temperature.The fracture mode of C/C composites was transformed from shearing failure to tensile breakage with increasing infiltration temperature. Results of this study show that ethanol is a promising carbon source to synthesize carbon/carbon composites with homogeneously high-textured pyrolytic carbon over a wide range of temperatures(from 1100 to 1200°C).

  18. Designing of epoxy composites reinforced with carbon nanotubes grown carbon fiber fabric for improved electromagnetic interference shielding

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, B. P.; Veena Choudhary; Parveen Saini; Mathur, R.B.

    2012-01-01

    In this letter, we report preparation of strongly anchored multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) carbon fiber (CF) fabric preforms. These preforms were reinforced in epoxy resin to make multi scale composites for microwave absorption in the X-band (8.2-12.4GHz). The incorporation of MWCNTs on the carbon fabric produced a significant enhancement in the electromagnetic interference shielding effectiveness (EMI-SE) from −29.4 dB for CF/epoxy-composite to −51.1 dB for CF-MWCNT/epoxy multiscale comp...

  19. Carbon-based composite electrocatalysts for low temperature fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popov, Branko N. (Columbia, SC); Lee, Jog-Won (Columbia, SC); Subramanian, Nalini P. (Kennesaw, GA); Kumaraguru, Swaminatha P. (Honeoye Falls, NY); Colon-Mercado, Hector R. (Columbia, SC); Nallathambi, Vijayadurga (T-Nagar, IN); Li, Xuguang (Columbia, SC); Wu, Gang (West Columbia, SC)

    2009-12-08

    A process for synthesis of a catalyst is provided. The process includes providing a carbon precursor material, oxidizing the carbon precursor material whereby an oxygen functional group is introduced into the carbon precursor material, and adding a nitrogen functional group into the oxidized carbon precursor material.

  20. The application of transient thermography for the thermal characterisation of carbon fibre/epoxy composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Wróbel

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Primary purpose of the present experimental study was to evaluate the local fibre content in carbon fibre/epoxy composites using transient thermography.Design/methodology/approach: The experiments have been performed using transient thermography to obtain the thermograms for carbon/epoxy specimens with different carbon fibre content. From obtained thermograms the thermal diffusivity values were determined and compared for each specimen and correlated with carbon content. The composites were two times tested using two different heating conditions to check the conformity of determined diffusivity values.Findings: It was found from obtained results that composites with different carbon fibre content had different values of thermal diffusivity, indicating that transient thermography can be considered as a non-destructive testing method for fiber content evaluation in CFRP composites.Research limitations/implications: Developed empirical formula is not universal for any other fibre reinforced polymer composite, so different relationships should be determined for different composites.Practical implications: The results obtained from present experiment would be of great importance in the industrial applications to obtain first estimate of carbon fibre content in fibre reinforced composite materials.Originality/value: The originality of present investigation is in application of transient thermography for local fibre content evaluation in polymer composite materials. The method should be of interest for the industrial quality control applications and is of great importance for composite products with high failure-free requirements.

  1. Na-doped hydroxyapatite coating on carbon/carbon composites: Preparation, in vitro bioactivity and biocompatibility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Na-HA coating with a thickness of 10 ± 2 μm was directly prepared onto C/C using ECD. ► The shear bonding strength of Na-HA coating on C/C is 5.55 ± 0.77 MPa. ► Na-HA coated C/C can rapidly induce bone-like apatite nucleation and growth on its surface in SBF. ► The Na-HA coating was better to improve the biocompatibility of C/C compared with HA coating. - Abstract: Na-doped hydroxyapatite (Na-HA) coating was directly prepared onto carbon/carbon (C/C) composites using electrochemical deposition (ECD) and the mean thickness of the coating is approximately 10 ± 2 μm. The formed Na-HA crystals which are Ca-deficient, are rod-like with a hexagonal cross section. The Na/P molar ratios of the coating formed on C/C substrate is 0.097. During the deposition, the Na-HA crystals grow in both radial and longitudinal directions, and faster along the longitudinal direction. The pattern formation of crystal growth leads to dense coating which would help to increase the bonding strength of the coating. The average shear bonding strength of Na-HA coating on C/C is 5.55 ± 0.77 MPa. The in vitro bioactivity of the Na-HA coated C/C composites were investigated by soaking the samples in a simulated body fluid (SBF) for 14 days. The results indicate that the Na-HA coated C/C composites can rapidly induce bone-like apatite nucleation and growth on its surface in SBF. The in vitro cellular biocompatibility tests reveal that the Na-HA coating was better to improve the in vitro biocompatibility of C/C composites compared with hydroxyapatite (HA) coating. It was suggested that the Na-HA coating might be an effective method to improve the surface bioactivity and biocompatibility of C/C composites.

  2. Hybrid carbon/glass fiber composites: Micromechanical analysis of structure–damage resistance relationships

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mishnaevsky, Leon; Dai, Gaoming

    2014-01-01

    A computational study of the effect of microstructure of hybrid carbon/glass fiber composites on their strength is presented. Unit cells with hundreds of randomly located and misaligned fibers of various properties and arrangements are subject to tensile and compression loading, and the evolution...... of fiber damages is analyzed in numerical experiments. The effects of fiber clustering, matrix properties, nanoreinforcement, load sharing rules on the strength and damage resistance of composites are studied. It was observed that hybrid composites under uniform displacement loading might have lower...... strength than pure composites, while the strength of hybrid composites under inform force loading increases steadily with increasing the volume content of carbon fibers....

  3. Liquid composite molding-processing and characterization of fiber-reinforced composites modified with carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeiler, R.; Khalid, U.; Kuttner, C.; Kothmann, M.; Dijkstra, D. J.; Fery, A.; Altstädt, V.

    2014-05-01

    The increasing demand in fiber-reinforced plastics (FRPs) necessitates economic processing of high quality, like the vacuum-assisted resin transfer molding (VARTM) process. FRPs exhibit excellent in-plane properties but weaknesses in off-plane direction. The addition of nanofillers into the resinous matrix phase embodies a promising approach due to benefits of the nano-scaled size of the filler, especially its high surface and interface areas. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are preferable candidates for resin modification in regard of their excellent mechanical properties and high aspect ratios. However, especially the high aspect ratios give rise to withholding or filtering by fibrous fabrics during the impregnation process, i.e. length dependent withholding of tubes (short tubes pass through the fabric, while long tubes are restrained) and a decrease in the local CNT content in the laminate along the flow path can occur. In this study, hybrid composites containing endless glass fiber reinforcement and surface functionalized CNTs dispersed in the matrix phase were produced by VARTM. New methodologies for the quantification of the filtering of CNTs were developed and applied to test laminates. As a first step, a method to analyze the CNT length distribution before and after injection was established for thermosetting composites to characterize length dependent withholding of nanotubes. The used glass fiber fabric showed no perceptible length dependent retaining of CNTs. Afterward, the resulting test laminates were examined by Raman spectroscopy and compared to reference samples of known CNT content. This Raman based technique was developed further to assess the quality of the impregnation process and to quantitatively follow the local CNT content along the injection flow in cured composites. A local decline in CNT content of approx. 20% was observed. These methodologies allow for the quality control of the filler content and size-distribution in CNT based hybrid

  4. Carbon and Oxygen Isotopic Composition of Surface-Sediment Carbonate in Bosten Lake (Xinjiang, China) and its Controlling Factors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Chengjun; Steffen MISCHKE; ZHENG Mianping; Alexander PROKOPENKO; GUO Fangqin; FENG Zhaodong

    2009-01-01

    Bosten Lake is a mid-latitude lake with water mainly supplied by melting ice and snow in the Tianshan Mountains. The depositional environment of the lake is spatially not uniform due to the proximity of the major inlet and the single outlet in the western part of the lake. The analytical results show that the carbon and oxygen isotopic composition of recent lake sediments is related to this specific lacustrine depositional environment and to the resulting carbonate mineralogy. In the southwestern lake region between the Kaidu River inlet and the Kongqi River outlet, carbon isotope composition (δ13C) values of the carbonate sediment (-1‰ to -2‰) have no relation to the oxygen isotope composition of the carbonate (δ18O) values (-7‰ to -8‰), with both isotopes showing a low variability. The carbonate content is low (<20%). Carbonate minerals analyzed by X-ray diffraction are mainly composed of calcite, while aragonite was not recorded. The salinity of the lake water is low in the estuary region as a result of the Kaidu River inflow. In comparison, the carbon and oxygen isotope values are higher in the middle and eastern parts of the lake, with δ13C values between approximately +0.5‰ and +3‰, and δ18O values between -1‰ and -5‰. There is a moderate correlation between the stable oxygen and carbon isotopes, with a coefficient of correlation r of approximately 0.63. This implies that the lake water has a relatively short residence time. Carbonate minerals constitute calcite and aragonite in the middle and eastern region of the lake. Aragonite and Mg-calcite are formed at higher lake water salinity and temperatures, and larger evaporation effects. More saline lake water in the middle and eastern region of the lake and the enhanced isotopic equilibrium between water and atmospheric CO2 cause the correlating carbon and oxygen isotope values determined for aragonite and Mg-calcite. Evaporation and biological processes are the main reasons for the salinity

  5. Isotopic composition of carbon and nitrogen in ureilitic fragments of the Almahata Sitta meteorite

    OpenAIRE

    Downes, Hilary; Abernethy, F.A.J.; Smith, C.L.; Ross, A. J.; Verchovsky, A. B.; Grady, M. M.; Jenniskens, P.; Shaddad, M.H.

    2015-01-01

    This study characterizes carbon and nitrogen abundances and isotopic compositions in ureilitic fragments of Almahata Sitta. Ureilites are carbon-rich (containing up to 7 wt% C) and were formed early in solar system history, thus the origin of carbon in ureilites has significance for the origin of solar system carbon. These samples were collected soon after they fell, so they are among the freshest ureilite samples available and were analyzed using stepped combustion mass spectrometry. They co...

  6. Research of carbon composite material for nonlinear finite element method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jung Ho; Garg, Mohit; Kim, Ji Hoon

    2012-04-01

    Works on the absorption of collision energy in the structural members are carried out widely with various material and cross-sections. And, with ever increasing safety concerns, they are presently applied in various fields including railroad trains, air crafts and automobiles. In addition to this, problem of lighting structural members became important subject by control of exhaust gas emission, fuel economy and energy efficiency. CFRP(Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastics) usually is applying the two primary structural members because of different result each design parameter as like stacking thickness, stacking angle, moisture absorption ect. We have to secure the data for applying primary structural members. But it always happens to test design parameters each for securing the data. So, it has much more money and time. We can reduce the money and the time, if can ensure the CFRP material properties each design parameters. In this study, we experiment the coupon test each tension, compression and shear using CFRP prepreg sheet and simulate non-linear analyze at the sources - test result, Caron longitudinal modulus and matrix poisson's ratio using GENOAMQC is specialized at Composite analysis. And then we predict the result that specimen manufacture changing stacking angle and experiment in such a way of test method using GENOA-MCQ.

  7. Mechanical Properties of Triaxial Braided Carbon/Epoxy Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, C. L.; Roberts, G. D.; Braley, M. S.; Xie, M.; Booker, M. J.

    2003-01-01

    In an on-going effort to increase the safety and efficiency of turbine engines, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration is exploring lightweight alternatives to the metal containment structures that currently encase commercial jet engines. Epoxy reinforced with braided carbon fibers is a candidate structural material which may be suitable for an engine case. This paper reports flat-coupon mechanical-property experiments performed to compliment previously reported subcomponent impact testing and analytical simulation of containment structures. Triaxial-braid T700/5208 epoxy and triaxial-braid T700h436 toughened epoxy composites were evaluated. Also, two triaxial-braid architectures (0 degrees plus or minus 60 degrees, and 0 degrees plus or minus 45 degrees) with the M36 resin were evaluated through tension, compression, and shear testing. Tensile behavior was compared between standard straight-sided specimens (ASTM D3039) and bow-tie specimens. Both double-notch shear (ASTM D3846) and Iosepescu (ASTM D5379) tests were performed as well. The M36/O degrees plus or minus 45 degrees configuration yield the best response when measurements were made parallel to the axial tows. Conversely, the M36/0 degrees plus or minus 60 degrees configuration was best when measurements were made perpendicular to the axial tows. The results were used to identify critical properties and to augment the analysis of impact experiments.

  8. Carbon and oxygen isotopic composition of the carbonates from the Jacupiranga and Catalao I carbonatite complexes, Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morikiyo, Toshiro (Shinshu Univ., Matsumoto, Nagano (Japan). Faculty of Science); Hirano, Hideo; Matsuhisa, Yukihiro

    1990-11-01

    Carbon and oxygen isotope compositions were measured for carbonates from the Jacupiranga and Catalao I carbonatite complexes in Brazil. The {delta}{sup 13}C values of the Jacupiranga carbonates are uniform, ranging from -6.4 to -5.6 per mille with the average of -6.07 per mille. Except for one sample, the {delta}{sup 18}O values of the carbonates are between 7.1 and 8.1 per mille, and the average value is 7.6 per mille. The isotopic compositions of the Jacupiranga carbonates represent the value of primary igneous carbonatite. The {delta}{sup 13}C values of dolomites are about 0.5 per mille higher than those of calcites. The {delta}{sup 13}C values of carbonates from the Catalao I complex range from -6.8 to -5.2 per mille with the average of -5.83 per mille. Those values are similar to the values of the Jacupiranga carbonates. However, oxygen isotopic compositions of the Catalao I carbonates show a wide range of 8.4 to 22.3 per mille. Carbonates with the lowest {delta}{sup 18}O values in the complex are considered to represent the igneous stage. Carbonates with extremely high {delta}{sup 18}O values of about 22 per mille are considered to have precipitated from low-temperature hydrothermal fluids. The group of intermediate {delta}{sup 18}O values indicates a variable degree of contamination by the {delta}{sup 18}O-rich hydrothermal carbonates. The contribution of secondary stage hydrothermal carbonates seems to be significant in the Catalao I complex as compared with the Jacupiranga complex. The development of a network structure in the Catalao I complex may have enhanced the circulation of the later stage hydrothermal fluids. (author).

  9. Synthesis, characterization and electrochemical behavior of polypyrrole/carbon nanotube composites using organometallic-functionalized carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thorn-like, organometallic-functionalized carbon nanotubes were successfully developed via a novel microwave hydrothermal route. The organometallic complex with methyl orange and iron (III) chloride served as reactive seed template, resulting in the oriented polymerization of pyrrole on the modified carbon nanotubes without the assistance of other oxidants. Morphological and structural characterizations of the carbon nanotube/methyl orange-iron (III) chloride and polypyrrole/carbon nanotube composites were examined using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), infrared spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The electrochemical property of the polypyrrole/carbon nanotube composite was elucidated by cyclic voltammetry and galvanostatic charge-discharge. A specific capacitance of 304 F g-1 was obtained within the potential range of -0.5-0.5 V in 1 M KCl solution.

  10. Stable isotope composition of atmospheric carbon monoxide. A modelling study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study aims at an improved understanding of the stable carbon and oxygen isotope composition of the carbon monoxide (CO) in the global atmosphere by means of numerical simulations. At first, a new kinetic chemistry tagging technique for the most complete parameterisation of isotope effects has been introduced into the Modular Earth Submodel System (MESSy) framework. Incorporated into the ECHAM/MESSy Atmospheric Chemistry (EMAC) general circulation model, an explicit treatment of the isotope effects on the global scale is now possible. The expanded model system has been applied to simulate the chemical system containing up to five isotopologues of all carbon- and oxygen-bearing species, which ultimately determine the δ13C, δ18O and Δ17O isotopic signatures of atmospheric CO. As model input, a new stable isotope-inclusive emission inventory for the relevant trace gases has been compiled. The uncertainties of the emission estimates and of the resulting simulated mixing and isotope ratios have been analysed. The simulated CO mixing and stable isotope ratios have been compared to in-situ measurements from ground-based observatories and from the civil-aircraft-mounted CARIBIC-1 measurement platform. The systematically underestimated 13CO/12CO ratios of earlier, simplified modelling studies can now be partly explained. The EMAC simulations do not support the inferences of those studies, which suggest for CO a reduced input of the highly depleted in 13C methane oxidation source. In particular, a high average yield of 0.94 CO per reacted methane (CH4) molecule is simulated in the troposphere, to a large extent due to the competition between the deposition and convective transport processes affecting the CH4 to CO reaction chain intermediates. None of the other factors, assumed or disregarded in previous studies, however hypothesised to have the potential in enriching tropospheric CO in 13C, were found significant when explicitly simulated. The inaccurate surface

  11. The mechanical properties measurement of multiwall carbon nanotube reinforced nanocrystalline aluminum matrix composite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, Manjula, E-mail: manjula.physics@gmail.com; Pal, Hemant; Sharma, Vimal [Department of Physics, NIT Hamirpur (HP) - 177005 (India)

    2015-05-15

    Nanocrystalline aluminum matrix composite containing carbon nanotubes were fabricated using physical mixing method followed by cold pressing. The microstructure of the composite has been investigated using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy techniques. These studies revealed that the carbon nanotubes were homogeneously dispersed throughout the metal matrix. The consolidated samples were pressureless sintered in inert atmosphere to further actuate a strong interface between carbon nanotubes and aluminum matrix. The nanoindentation tests carried out on considered samples showed that with the addition of 0.5 wt% carbon nanotubes, the hardness and elastic modulus of the aluminum matrix increased by 21.2 % and 2 % repectively. The scratch tests revealed a decrease in the friction coefficient of the carbon nanotubes reinforced composite due to the presence of lubricating interfacial layer. The prepared composites were promising entities to be used in the field of sporting goods, construction materials and automobile industries.

  12. Preparation of mesoporous carbon/polypyrrole composite materials and their supercapacitive properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WU-JUN ZOU

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available We synthesized mesoporous carbons/polypyrrole composites, using a chemical oxidative polymerization and calcium carbonate as a sacrificial template. N2 adsorption-desorption method, Fourier infrared spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy were used to characterize the structure and morphology of the composites. The measurement results indicated that as-synthesized carbon with the disordered mesoporous structure and a pore size of approximately 5 nm was uniformly coated by polypyrrole. The electrochemical behavior of the resulting composite was examined by cyclic voltammetry and cycle life measurements, and the obtained results showed that the specific capacitance of the resulting composite electrode was as high as 313 F g−1, nearly twice the capacitance of pure mesoporous carbon electrode (163 F g–1. This reveals that the electrochemical performance of these materials is governed by a combination of the electric double layer capacitance of mesoporous carbon and pseudocapacitance of polypyrrole.

  13. TECHNICAL NOTE: Design and development of electromagnetic absorbers with carbon fiber composites and matching dielectric layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neo, C. P.; Varadan, V. K.

    2001-10-01

    Radar absorbing materials are designed and developed with carbon fibers and suitable matching layers. Complex permittivities of carbon fiber composite are predicted on the basis that the modulus of permittivity obeys a logarithmic law of mixtures and the dielectric loss tangents are related through a linear law of mixtures. Linear regression analysis performed on the data points provides the constants which are used to predict the effective permittivities of carbon fiber composite at different frequencies. Using the free space measurement system, complex permittivities of the lossy dielectric at different frequencies are obtained. These complex permittivities are used to predict the reflectivity of a thin lossy dielectric layer on carbon fiber composite substrate. The predicted results agree quite well with the measured data. It is interesting to note that the thin lossy dielectric layer, about 0.03 mm thick, has helped to reduce the reflectivity of the 5.2 mm thick carbon fiber composite considerably.

  14. Fe3O4/carbon coated silicon ternary hybrid composite as supercapacitor electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Silicon was covered with carbon by thermal vapor deposition. • Carbon layer prevent exposure of silicon to reactive electrolyte. • Fe3O4 contents in the composites optimized for electrochemical performance. • Fe3O4/carbon coated Si exhibits higher electrochemical performance than raw Si. - Abstract: In this study, Fe3O4/carbon-coated Si ternary hybrid composites were fabricated. A carbon layer was directly formed on the surface of Si by the thermal vapor deposition. The carbon-coating layer not only prevented the contact between Si and reactive electrolyte but also provided anchoring sites for the deposition of Fe3O4. Fe3O4 nanoparticles were deposited on the surface of carbon-coated Si by the hydrazine reducing method. The morphology and structure of Fe3O4 and carbon layer were characterized via X-ray diffractometry, field emission scanning electron microscopy, field emission transmission electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and thermogravimetric analyses. These characterizations indicate that a carbon layer was fully coated on the Si particles, and Fe3O4 particles were homogeneously deposited on the carbon-coated Si particles. The Fe3O4/carbon-coated Si electrode exhibited enhanced electrochemical performance, attributed to the high conductivity and stability of carbon layer and pseudocapacitive reaction of Fe3O4. The proposed ternary-hybrid composites may be potentially useful for the fabrication of high-performance electrodes

  15. Mathematical modelling of the composition of a high-strength composite concrete containing blended carbonate additive

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new high-strength concrete has been developed on the basis of the utilization of the blended carbonates as an active additive (BCA). The main technological features are the preliminary mechanical-chemical activation of this natural mineral product and the stage method of production. A three-parameter polynomial model has been developed for determining the amount of the main formulation components - Portland cement, BCA and water/cement ratio by evaluation of their influence on the changes of the compressive strength for one-year time period of the hardening. The experimental plan contains 27 tests. The regression equations have been calculated for five ages. The obtained regression coefficients reflecting the trend and the effect of the three factors on the output data during the investigated period have been analyzed. The compressive strength depending on two factors has been plotted for the ages of 28 and 365 days, the value of the third factor being constant. They are important for the construction practice and they display the whole spectrum of possibilities for variation of the formulation parameters, achieving at the same time the specified design strength. Key words: high-strength composite concrete, blended carbonate additive, polynomial model, regression, compressive strength

  16. Mechanical and wet tribological properties of carbon fabric/phenolic composites with different weave filaments counts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenbin, Li; Jianfeng, Huang; Jie, Fei; Liyun, Cao; Chunyan, Yao

    2015-10-01

    Carbon fabric/phenolic composites with different weave filaments counts were prepared by dip-coating and hot-press techniques, and then their mechanical and wet tribological properties were investigated based on the analysis of the three-dimensional surface profiles and the pore structures. Results show that the mechanical properties (elastic modulus, flexural modulus, tensile modulus, flexural strength and tensile strength) of the 3K carbon fabric/phenolic composites (Composite A) are better than that of the 12K carbon fabric/phenolic composites (Composite B). Fractured surfaces observation suggests that the dominant tensile failure mechanism is fiber breakage for Composite A and matrix fracture for Composite B. Compared with Composite B, Composite A possesses high friction coefficient in different loads and at different sliding speeds, and the friction coefficient of Composite A is more sensitive to load and sliding speed. The wear rate of Composite B is 39% greater than that of Composite A and the wear features of worn surfaces demonstrate the excellent wear resistance for Composite A. Based on the observation of worn surface, the wear mechanisms are presented.

  17. Preparation of carbon nanotube composite material with metal matrix by electroplating

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    AN Bai-gang; LI Li-xiang; Li Hong-xi

    2005-01-01

    It is demonstrated that the nickel can be deposited directly on the surface of carbon nanotubes without pre-sensitization by Sn2+ and Pd2+ in a watt bath containing suspended nanotubes by electroplating. The nickel is deposited as spherical nanoparticle on the nanotubes. By increasing reaction time, the carbon nanotube is fully coated with nickel. A probable model, which represents the formation process of carbon nanotube-nickel composites by electroplating, is presented. The results show that this method is efficient and simple for preparing carbon nanotube-metal composite.

  18. Carbon nanotube composites prepared by ultrasonically assisted twin screw extrusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Todd

    to various degrees. An apparatus for high temperature resin transfer molding (HT-RTM) was designed and built to produce PETI-8 and PETI-330/carbon fabric composite panels. Performance of the panels was tested at various temperatures. The produced panels exhibited low void content in wetted areas and had higher short beam shear properties in comparison with vacuum assisted resin transfer moldings. To investigate the environmental aspects of nanomaterials, a testing apparatus was designed and manufactured to study the effectiveness of particulate respirators at filtering CNTs. Three different grades of respirators were evaluated for their effectiveness to prevent the inhalation of CNTs. Dust masks, commonly used in a processing environment, were found to be highly ineffective at preventing the inhalation of CNTs. However, respirators with a National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) rating of P95 or greater were shown to prevent the inhalation of CNTs under normal breathing conditions.

  19. UV-cured adhesives for carbon fiber composite applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Hsiao-Chun

    Carbon fiber composite materials are increasingly used in automobile, marine, and aerospace industries due to their unique properties, including high strength, high stiffness and low weight. However, due to their brittle characteristic, these structures are prone to physical damage, such as a bird strike or impact damage. Once the structure is damaged, it is important to have fast and reliable temporary repair until the permanent repair or replacement can take place. In this dissertation, UV-based adhesives were used to provide a bonding strength for temporary repair. Adhesively bonded patch repair is an efficient and effective method for temporary repair. In this study, precured patches (hard patches) and dry fabric patches with laminating resins (soft patches) were performed. UV-based epoxy adhesives were applied to both patch repair systems. For precured patch repair, the bonding strengths were investigated under different surface treatments for bonding area and different adhesives thicknesses. The shear stresses of different UV exposure times and curing times were tested. Besides, the large patch repair was investigated as well. For soft patch repair, the hand wet lay-up was applied due to high viscosity of UV resins. A modified single lap shear testing (ASTM D5868) was applied to determine the shear stress. The large patches used fiber glass instead of carbon fiber to prove the possibility of repair with UV epoxy resin by hand wet lay-up process. The hand lay-up procedure was applied and assisted by vacuum pressure to eliminate the air bubbles and consolidate the patches. To enhance the bonding strength and effective soft patch repair, vacuum assisted resin transferring molding (VaRTM) is the better option. However, only low viscosity resins can be operated by VaRTM. Hence, new UV-based adhesives were formulated. The new UV-based adhesives included photoinitiator (PI), epoxy and different solvents. Solvents were used to compound the photoinitiator into epoxy

  20. Toughness and Hot/Wet Properties of a Novel Modified BMI/Carbon Fiber Composite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The toughness and hot/wet properties of a novel modified bismaleimide (BMI) 5428/carbon fiber composite was investigated. Results indicate that the prepared BMI/T700 composite owns high toughness, excellent hot/wet properties and mechanical properties. The compression strength after impact (CAl) of 5428/T700 composite is 260 MPa, and the results of hot/wet test show that the long-term service temperature of 5428/T700 composite can maintain at 170°C.

  1. Metal matrix composites reinforced with SiC long fibers and carbon nanomaterials produced by electrodeposition

    OpenAIRE

    Abdul Karim, Muhammad Ramzan

    2015-01-01

    The research work of this PhD thesis was done on the study, production and characterization of two types of metal matrix composites: 1) fiber reinforced metal matrix composites and, 2) carbon nanomaterials reinforced metal matrix composites. In fiber reinforced metal matrix composites, a metal or an alloy is reinforced with continuous or discontinuous fibers in order to improve the specific strength and stiffness at high temperatures. For example superalloys are the typical materials for the ...

  2. First-wall tile attachment using carbon-carbon composite fittings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As the reality of a tokamak device capable of achieving sustained burn missions approaches, the need for a reliable and maintainable plasma-interfacing first wall becomes more evident. This is especially true of compact ignition tokamaks such as LITE, ISP, and Ignitor. Current studies indicate that the compact ignition tokamak may be designed for inertial cooling using a cryogen such as liquid nitrogen, for active cooling using water, or for a combination of inertial (LN2) and active (H2O) cooling. In none of these cases it is anticipated that the first wall proper will be actively cooled. Based on limiter development for operating tokamaks such as the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor and on supporting engineering studies, an array of monolithic graphite blocks or tiles of appropriate thickness, size, and shape appears to be the most effective approach for a first-wall design. The entire internal wetted surface of the vacuum vessel, exclusive of penetrations and minimal clearance (∼ 1.5 mm) between tiles, will be covered by the monolithic graphite tiles. One of the major challenges of this first-wall approach will be the physical attachment of the tiles to the vacuum vessel inner surface. This paper presents unique first-wall tile attachment concepts that use structural attachment of the graphite tiles to an Inconel 625 vacuum vessel with carbon-carbon composite structural/mechanical elements

  3. Interlaminar failure criteria for multi-layered carbon/carbon composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon/Carbon composites (C/C) have recently been studied and developed for structural applications in the field of aerospace and power generator technologies. However, C/C has low interlaminar strength. Therefore, it is important to evaluate interlaminar fracture properties and test methods for interlaminar strength. In the present paper, each of the ILSS (interlaminar shear strength), the ILTS (interlaminar tensile strength) and the interlaminar mixed-mode strength with the coexistence of interlaminar shear and tensile or compressive stresses was studied by using several different test methods on C/C. The ILSS was obtained by using the SBS (short beam shear) test, the DNS (double notch shear) test, the Arcan test and the quasi-Arcan shear mode test. The ILTS was obtained by using the Arcan test and the quasi-Arcan tensile mode test. The interlaminar mixed-mode strength was obtained by the Arcan test. Comparisons of respective tests and several laminate configurations were conducted using microscopic failure mechanism and 3-dimensional FEM analysis. Both Von-Mises, Tsai-Hill and Tsai-Wu failure criterions were used to explain the mixed-mode fracture behavior. Effects of notch stress concentration were found negligible based on FEM analysis and experimental results. (author)

  4. Numerical investigations of using carbon foam/PCM/Nano carbon tubes composites in thermal management of electronic equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • A numerical model to predict thermal management of electronic modules using different composite materials. • Effect of insertion of RT65 as PCM and MWCNTs as thermal enhancer in the carbon foam micro cells is evaluated. • Delay and decrease of modules temperature increase with the inclusion of PCM and MWCNTs in the module. • Model prediction of previous experimental data was obtained. - Abstract: A numerical investigation of predicting thermal characteristics of electronic equipment using carbon foam matrix saturated with phase change material (PCM) and Nano carbon tubes as thermal management modules is presented. To study the effect of insertion of RT65 and Nano carbon tubes in carbon foam matrices of different porosities, three different modules; namely Pure CF-20, CF20 + RT65, and CF-20 + RT65/Nano carbon modules are numerically tested at different values of carbon foam porosities. Mathematical model is obtained using volume averaging technique based on single-domain energy equation and a control volume based numerical scheme. Interfacial effects influencing heat transfer process at enclosure wall, module surface and different interfacial surfaces within the composite have been addressed. Governing equations have been solved using a CFD code (Thétis, (http://thetis.enscbp.fr)). Mathematical model is validated by comparing its prediction with previous experimental measurements for pure CF-20 foam and CF-20 + RT65 composite modules. The model is used to predict thermal characteristics of CF-20 + RT65/Nano carbon tubes composite as a thermal management modules. Results reveal that insertion of RT65/MWCNTs in CF-20 leads to a 11.5% reduction in the module surface temperature for carbon foam porosities less than 75%. The reduction decrease to 7.8% for a porosity of 88%. Numerical results of transient and steady state temperature histories at different depths within the module are compared with previous experimental data and fair agreement is

  5. Effect of electropolymer sizing of carbon fiber on mechanical properties of phenolic resin composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Jin; FAN Qun; CHEN Zhen-hua; HUANG Kai-bing; CHENG Ying-liang

    2006-01-01

    Carbon fiber/phenolic resin composites were reinforced by the carbon fiber sized with the polymer films of phenol,m-phenylenediamine or acrylic acid,which was electropolymerized by cyclic voltammetry or chronopotentiometry. The contact angles of the sized carbon fibers with deionized water and diiodomethane were measured by the wicking method based on the modified Washburn equation,to show the effects of the different electropolymer film on the surface free energy of the carbon fiber after sizing by the electropolymerization. Compared with the unsized carbon fiber,which has 85.6°of contact angle of water,52.2° of contact angle of diiodomethane,and 33.1 mJ/m2 of surface free energy with 29.3 mJ/m2 of dispersive components (γL) and 3.8 mJ/m2 of polar components (γsp),respectively. It is found that the electropolymer sized carbon fiber tends to reduce the surface energy due to the decrease of dispersive γL with the increase of the polymer film on the surface of the carbon fiber that plays an important role in improving the mechanical properties of carbon/phenolic resin composites. Compared with the phenolic resin composites reinforced by the unsized carbon fiber,the impact,flexural and interlaminar shear strength of the phenolic resin composites were improved by 44 %,68% and 87% when reinforced with the carbon fiber sized by the electropolymer of m-phenylenediamine,66%,100%,and 112% by the electropolymer of phenol,and 20%,80 %,100% by the electropolymer of acrylic acid. The results indicate the skills of electropolymerization may provide a feasible method for the sizing of carbon fiber in a composite system,so as to improve the interfacial performance between the reinforce materials and the matrix and to increase the mechanical properties of the composites.

  6. Effect of carbon nanofibers on tensile and compressive characteristics of hollow particle filled composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of presence of carbon nanofibers on the tensile and compressive properties of hollow particle filled composites is studied. Such composites, called syntactic foams, are known to have high specific modulus and low moisture absorption capabilities and are finding applications as core materials in aerospace and marine sandwich structures. The results of this study show that addition of 0.25 wt.% carbon nanofibers results in improvement in tensile modulus and strength compared to similar syntactic foam compositions that did not contain nanofibers. Compressive modulus decreased and strength remained largely unchanged for most compositions. Tensile and compressive failure features are analyzed using scanning electron microscopy.

  7. Lightweight Ceramic Composition of Carbon Silicon Oxygen and Boron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leiser, Daniel B. (Inventor); Hsu, Ming-Ta (Inventor); Chen, Timothy S. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    Lightweight, monolithic ceramics resistant to oxidation in air at high temperatures are made by impregnating a porous carbon preform with a sol which contains a mixture of tetraethoxysilane, dimethyldiethoxysilane and trimethyl borate. The sol is gelled and dried on the carbon preform to form a ceramic precursor. The precursor is pyrolyzed in an inert atmosphere to form the ceramic which is made of carbon, silicon, oxygen and boron. The carbon of the preform reacts with the dried gel during the pyrolysis to form a component of the resulting ceramic. The ceramic is of the same size, shape and form as the carbon precursor. Thus, using a porous, fibrous carbon precursor, such as a carbon felt, results in a porous, fibrous ceramic. Ceramics of the invention are useful as lightweight tiles for a reentry spacecraft.

  8. Insight into the Broad Field of Polymer Nanocomposites: From Carbon Nanotubes to Clay Nanoplatelets, via Metal Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Stefanescu

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Highly ordered polymer nanocomposites are complex materials that display a rich morphological behavior owing to variations in composition, structure, and properties on a nanometer length scale. Metal-polymer nanocomposite materials are becoming more popular for applications requiring low cost, high metal surface areas. Catalytic systems seem to be the most prevalent application for a wide range of metals used in polymer nanocomposites, particularly for metals like Pt, Ni, Co, and Au, with known catalytic activities. On the other hand, among the most frequently utilized techniques to prepare polymer/CNT and/or polymer/clay nanocomposites are approaches like melt mixing, solution casting, electrospinning and solid-state shear pulverization. Additionally, some of the current and potential applications of polymer/CNT and/or polymer/clay nanocomposites include photovoltaic devices, optical switches, electromagnetic interference (EMI shielding, aerospace and automotive materials, packaging, adhesives and coatings. This extensive review covers a broad range of articles, typically from high impact-factor journals, on most of the polymer-nanocomposites known to date: polymer/carbon nanotubes, polymer/metal nanospheres, and polymer/clay nanoplatelets composites. The various types of nanocomposites are described form the preparation stages to performance and applications. Comparisons of the various types of nanocomposites are conducted and conclusions are formulated.

  9. Modelling carbon isotope composition of dissolved inorganic carbon and methane in marine porewaters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meister, Patrick; Liu, Bo; Khalili, Arzhang; Barker Jørgensen, Bo

    2014-05-01

    Carbon isotope compositions of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and methane (CH4) in marine sedimentary porewaters at near surface temperatures show extremely large variation in apparent fractionation covering a range from -100 ‰ to +30 ‰. This fractionation is essentially the result of microbial activity, but the mechanisms and factors controlling this fractionation are still incompletely understood. This study provides a reaction transport model approach to evaluate the effects of the most important processes and factors on carbon isotope distribution with the goal to better understand carbon isotope distribution in modern sediment porewaters and in the geological record. Our model results show that kinetic fractionation during methanogenesis, both through the acetoclastic and autotrophic pathways, results in a nearly symmetrical distribution of δ13C values in DIC and CH4 with respect to the isotope value of buried organic matter. An increased fractionation factor during methanogenesis leads to a larger difference between δ13CDIC and δ13CCH4. Near the sulphate methane transition zone, DIC is more depleted in 13C due to diffusive mixing with DIC produced by anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) and organoclastic sulphate reduction. The model also shows that an upward decrease in δ13CCH4 near the SMT can only be caused by equilibrium fractionation during AOM including a backward "leakage" of carbon from DIC to CH4 through the enzymatic pathway. However, this effect of reversibility has no influence on the DIC pool as long as methane is completely consumed at the SMT. Only a release of methane at the sediment-water interface, due to a fraction of the methane escaping re-oxidation, results in a small shift towards more positive δ13CDIC values. Methane escape at the SMT is possible if either the methane flux is too high to be entirely oxidized by AOM, or if bubbles of methane gas by-pass the sulphate reduction zone and escape episodically into the water column

  10. Carbide Coatings for Nickel Alloys, Graphite and Carbon/Carbon Composites to be used in Fluoride Salt Valves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagle, Denis [Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States); Zhang, Dajie [Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2015-10-22

    The focus of this research was concerned with developing materials technology that supports the evolution of Generation IV Advanced High Temperature Reactor (AHTR) concepts. Specifically, we investigate refractory carbide coatings for 1) nickel alloys, and 2) commercial carbon-carbon composites (CCCs). Numerous compelling reasons have driven us to focus on carbon and carbide materials. First, unlike metals, the strength and modulus of CCCs increase with rising temperature. Secondly, graphite and carbon composites have been proven effective for resisting highly corrosive fluoride melts such as molten cryolite [Na₃AlF₆] at ~1000°C in aluminum reduction cells. Thirdly, graphite and carbide materials exhibit extraordinary radiation damage tolerance and stability up to 2000°C. Finally, carbides are thermodynamically more stable in liquid fluoride salt than the corresponding metals (i.e. Cr and Zr) found in nickel based alloys.

  11. IMPROVEMENT OF EFFICIENCY OF GREY CAST IRON MODIFICATION DUE TO INTRODUCTION OF CARBON MODIFIER INTO COMPOSITION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. F. Lovshenko

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available It is shown that introduction carbon into modifier composition and increase of its dispersion degree due to spatter on high-melting particles or due to mechanical alloying increases modifier efficiency for grey cast iron.

  12. Injection Molding of Polystyrene Matrix Composites Filled with Vapor Grown Carbon Fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enomoto, Kazuki; Yasuhara, Toshiyuki; Ohtake, Naoto; Kato, Kazunori

    Vapor grown carbon fiber (VGCF) is a kind of carbon nanotube (CNT), which has outstanding properties such as high mechanical strength and high electrical conductivity. In this study, injection molding properties of polystyrene (PS) filled with VGCF and evaluation of mechanical and electrical properties are discussed in comparison with composites in which conventional carbon fillers were filled. As a result, volume resistivity of VGCF/PS composites dropped significantly between VGCF concentration of 3 and 4vol.%. Resistivity of the composites filled with VGCF was 1.2×102Ω·cm when VGCF concentration was 11.6vol.%. The resistivity was significantly lower than that of composites which were filled with conventional carbon fillers. The elastic modulus slightly increases with increasing VGCF concentration, whereas the tensile strength slightly decreases in the VGCF concentration in the range from 0 to 12vol.%.

  13. TENSILE AND FLEXURAL STUDIES ON GLASS - CARBON HYBRID COMPOSITES SUBJECTED TO LOW FREQUENCY CYCLIC LOADING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Poyyathappan

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Glass fiber reinforced polymeric composite (GFRP, Carbon fiber reinforced polymeric composite (CFRP, glass-carbon-glass, carbon-glass-carbon hybrid composite laminates have been prepared by hand layup method. The test specimens have been prepared according to ASTM standard size to carry out the tensile and flexural tests. Six specimens with 0±90° orientation have been prepared for both the tests. The specimens have been subjected to low frequency cyclic load for specific duration prior to the flexural bending analysis. Three point bend method has been adopted to find out the flexural strength and flexural modulus. Flexural strength and modulus have been calculated from the load deflection curve obtained from the tensometer for respective specimens. The results show that the hybrid composites have better flexural properties than the GFRP.

  14. Synthesis of unsaturated polyesters for improved interfacial strength in carbon fibre composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gamstedt, E.K.; Skrifvars, M.; Jacobsen, T. K.;

    2002-01-01

    Carbon fibres are gaining use as reinforcement in glass fibre/polyester composites for increased stiffness as a hybrid composite. The mechanics and chemistry of the carbon fibre–polyester interface should be addressed to achieve an improvement also in fatigue performance and off-axis strength. To...... make better use of the versatility of unsaturated polyesters in a carbon fibre composite, a set of unsaturated polyester resins have been synthesized with different ratios of maleic anhydride, o-phthalic anhydride and 1,2-propylene glycol as precursors. The effective interfacial strength was determined...... by micro-Raman spectroscopy of a single-fibre composite tested in tension. The interfacial shear strength with untreated carbon fibres increased with increasing degree of unsaturation of the polyester, which is controlled by the relative amount of maleic anhydride. This can be explained by a...

  15. Adsorption and desorption performance of benzene over hierarchically structured carbon-silica aerogel composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dou, Baojuan; Li, Jinjun; Wang, Yufei; Wang, Hailin; Ma, Chunyan; Hao, Zhengping

    2011-11-30

    Hierarchically structured carbon-silica aerogel (CSA) composites were synthesized from cheap water glass precursors and granulated activated carbon via a post-synthesis surface modification with trimethylchlorosilane (TMCS) and a low-cost ambient pressure drying procedure. The resultant CSA composites possess micro/mesoporous structure and hydrophobic surface. The adsorption and desorption performance of benzene on carbon-silica aerogel composite (CSA-2) under static and dynamic conditions were investigated, comparing with pure silica aerogel (CSA-0) and microporous activated carbon (AC). It was found that CSA-2 has high affinity towards aromatic molecules and fast adsorption kinetics. Excellent performance of dynamic adsorption and desorption observed on CSA-2 is related to its higher adsorption capacity than CSA-0 and less mass transfer resistance than AC, arising from the well-developed microporosity and open foam mesostructure in the CSA composites. PMID:21962860

  16. Geometry Effect of Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotube on Elastic Modulus of Polymer Composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The high Young's modulus and tensile strength of carbon nanotubes has attracted great attention from the research community given the potential for developing super-strong, super-stiff composites with carbon nanotube reinforcements. Over the decades, the strength and stiffness of carbon nanotube-reinforced polymer nanocomposites have been researched extensively. However, unfortunately, such strong composite materials have not been developed yet. It has been reported that the efficiency of load transfer in such systems is critically dependent on the quality of adhesion between the nanotubes and the polymer chains. In addition, the waviness and orientation of the nanotubes embedded in a matrix reduce the reinforcement effectiveness. In this study, we carried out performed micromechanics-based numerical modeling and analysis by varying the geometry of carbon nanotubes including their aspect ratio, orientation, and waviness. The results of this analysis allow for a better understanding of the load transfer capabilities of carbon nanotube-reinforced polymer composites

  17. Geometry Effect of Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotube on Elastic Modulus of Polymer Composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suhn, Jonghwan [Sungkyunkwan Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-01-15

    The high Young's modulus and tensile strength of carbon nanotubes has attracted great attention from the research community given the potential for developing super-strong, super-stiff composites with carbon nanotube reinforcements. Over the decades, the strength and stiffness of carbon nanotube-reinforced polymer nanocomposites have been researched extensively. However, unfortunately, such strong composite materials have not been developed yet. It has been reported that the efficiency of load transfer in such systems is critically dependent on the quality of adhesion between the nanotubes and the polymer chains. In addition, the waviness and orientation of the nanotubes embedded in a matrix reduce the reinforcement effectiveness. In this study, we carried out performed micromechanics-based numerical modeling and analysis by varying the geometry of carbon nanotubes including their aspect ratio, orientation, and waviness. The results of this analysis allow for a better understanding of the load transfer capabilities of carbon nanotube-reinforced polymer composites.

  18. High-flux water desalination with interfacial salt sieving effect in nanoporous carbon composite membranes

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Wei; Zhang, Qiang; Fan, Zhongli; Huang, Kuo-Wei; Zhang, Xixiang; Lai, Zhiping; Sheng, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Nanoporous carbon composite membranes, comprising a layer of porous carbon fiber structures with an average channel width of 30-60 nm grown on a porous ceramic substrate, are found to exhibit robust desalination effect with high freshwater flux. In three different membrane processes of vacuum membrane distillation, reverse osmosis and forward osmosis, the carbon composite membrane showed 100% salt rejection with 3.5 to 20 times higher freshwater flux compared to existing polymeric membranes. Thermal accounting experiments found that at least 80% of the freshwater pass through the carbon composite membrane with no phase change. Molecular dynamics simulations revealed a unique salt rejection mechanism. When seawater is interfaced with either vapor or the surface of carbon, one to three interfacial atomic layers contain no salt ions. Below the liquid entry pressure, the salt solution is stopped at the openings to the porous channels and forms a meniscus, while the surface layer of freshwater can feed the surface...

  19. Shockwave response of two carbon fiber-polymer composites to 50 GPa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dattelbaum, Dana M.; Coe, Joshua D.; Rigg, Paulo A.; Scharff, R. Jason; Gammel, J. Tinka

    2014-11-01

    Shock compression of two molded, carbon fiber-filled polymer composites was performed in gas gun-driven plate impact experiments at impact velocities up to ≈5 km/s. Hugoniot states for both composites were obtained from chopped carbon fibers, bound by either phenolic or cyanate ester polymeric resins. Their dynamic responses were similar, although the 10 wt. % difference of carbon fill produced measureable divergence in shock compressibility. The chopped carbon fibers in the polymer matrix led to moderately anisotropic shocks, particularly when compared with the more commonly encountered filament-wound carbon fiber-epoxy composites. A discontinuity, or cusp, was observed in the principal Hugoniot of both materials near 25 GPa. We attribute the accompanying volume collapse to shock-driven chemical decomposition above this condition. Inert and reacted products equations of state were used to capture the response of the two materials below and above the cusp.

  20. Effect of Test Specimen Shape and Size on Interlaminar Tensile Properties of Advanced Carbon-Carbon Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughn, Wallace L.

    2015-01-01

    The interlaminar tensile strength of 1000-tow T-300 fiber ACC-6 carbon-carbon composites was measured using the method of bonding the coupons to adherends at room temperature. The size, 0.70 to 1.963 inches maximum width or radius, and shape, round or square, of the test coupons were varied to determine if the test method was sensitive to these variables. Sixteen total variations were investigated and the results modeled.