WorldWideScience

Sample records for carbon nanotube-based labels

  1. Label-Free Electrical Detection Using Carbon Nanotube-Based Biosensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenzo Maehashi

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Label-free detections of biomolecules have attracted great attention in a lot of life science fields such as genomics, clinical diagnosis and practical pharmacy. In this article, we reviewed amperometric and potentiometric biosensors based on carbon nanotubes (CNTs. In amperometric detections, CNT-modified electrodes were used as working electrodes to significantly enhance electroactive surface area. In contrast, the potentiometric biosensors were based on aptamer-modified CNT field-effect transistors (CNTFETs. Since aptamers are artificial oligonucleotides and thus are smaller than the Debye length, proteins can be detected with high sensitivity. In this review, we discussed on the technology, characteristics and developments for commercialization in label-free CNT-based biosensors.

  2. Carbon Nanotube Based Molecular Electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Deepak; Saini, Subhash; Menon, Madhu

    1998-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes and the nanotube heterojunctions have recently emerged as excellent candidates for nanoscale molecular electronic device components. Experimental measurements on the conductivity, rectifying behavior and conductivity-chirality correlation have also been made. While quasi-one dimensional simple heterojunctions between nanotubes with different electronic behavior can be generated by introduction of a pair of heptagon-pentagon defects in an otherwise all hexagon graphene sheet. Other complex 3- and 4-point junctions may require other mechanisms. Structural stability as well as local electronic density of states of various nanotube junctions are investigated using a generalized tight-binding molecular dynamics (GDBMD) scheme that incorporates non-orthogonality of the orbitals. The junctions investigated include straight and small angle heterojunctions of various chiralities and diameters; as well as more complex 'T' and 'Y' junctions which do not always obey the usual pentagon-heptagon pair rule. The study of local density of states (LDOS) reveal many interesting features, most prominent among them being the defect-induced states in the gap. The proposed three and four pointjunctions are one of the smallest possible tunnel junctions made entirely of carbon atoms. Furthermore the electronic behavior of the nanotube based device components can be taylored by doping with group III-V elements such as B and N, and BN nanotubes as a wide band gap semiconductor has also been realized in experiments. Structural properties of heteroatomic nanotubes comprising C, B and N will be discussed.

  3. Single walled carbon nanotube-based electrical biosensor for the label-free detection of pathogenic bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yoo, S. M.; Baek, Y. K.; Shin, S.

    2016-01-01

    We herein describe the development of a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT)-based electrical biosensor consisting of a two-terminal resistor, and report its use for the specific, label-free detection of pathogenic bacteria via changes in conductance. The ability of this biosensor to recognize....... This SWNT-based electrical biosensor will prove useful for the development of highly sensitive and specific handheld pathogen detectors....

  4. Carbon Nanotube-Based Synthetic Gecko Tapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhinojwala, Ali

    2008-03-01

    Wall-climbing geckos have unique ability to attach to different surfaces without the use of any viscoelastic glues. On coming in contact with any surface, the micron-size gecko foot-hairs deform, enabling molecular contact over large areas, thus translating weak van der Waals (vdW) interactions into enormous shear forces. We will present our recent results on the development of synthetic gecko tape using aligned carbon nanotubes to mimic the keratin hairs found on gecko feet. The patterned carbon nanotube-based gecko tape can support a shear stress (36 N/cm^2) nearly four times higher than the gecko foot and sticks to a variety of surfaces, including Teflon. Both the micron-size setae (replicated by nanotube bundles) and nanometer-size spatulas (individual nanotubes) are necessary to achieve macroscopic shear adhesion and to translate the weak vdW interactions into high shear forces. The carbon nanotube based tape offers an excellent synthetic option as a dry conductive reversible adhesive in microelectronics, robotics and space applications. The mechanism behind these large shear forces and self-cleaning properties of these carbon nanotube based synthetic gecko tapes will be discussed. This work was performed in collaboration with graduate students Liehui Ge, and Sunny Sethi, and collaborators from RPI; Lijie Ci and Professor Pulickel Ajayan.

  5. Single-walled carbon nanotubes based chemiresistive genosensor for label-free detection of human rheumatic heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Swati; Kumar, Ashok; Khare, Shashi; Mulchandani, Ashok; Rajesh

    2014-11-01

    A specific and ultrasensitive, label free single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) based chemiresistive genosensor was fabricated for the early detection of Streptococcus pyogenes infection in human causing rheumatic heart disease. The mga gene of S. pyogenes specific 24 mer ssDNA probe was covalently immobilized on SWNT through a molecular bilinker, 1-pyrenemethylamine, using carbodiimide coupling reaction. The sensor was characterized by the current-voltage (I-V) characteristic curve and scanning electron microscopy. The sensing performance of the sensor was studied with respect to changes in conductance in SWNT channel based on hybridization of the target S. pyogenes single stranded genomic DNA (ssG-DNA) to its complementary 24 mer ssDNA probe. The sensor shows negligible response to non-complementary Staphylococcus aureus ssG-DNA, confirming the specificity of the sensor only with S. pyogenes. The genosensor exhibited a linear response to S. pyogenes G-DNA from 1 to1000 ng ml-1 with a limit of detection of 0.16 ng ml-1.

  6. Single-walled carbon nanotubes based chemiresistive genosensor for label-free detection of human rheumatic heart disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Swati; Kumar, Ashok, E-mail: rajesh-csir@yahoo.com, E-mail: ashokigib@rediffmail.com [CSIR-Institute of Genomics and Integrative Biology, Mall Road, Delhi 110007 (India); Academy of Scientific and Innovative Research (AcSIR), New Delhi (India); Khare, Shashi [National Centre for Disease Control, Sham Nath Marg, Delhi 110054 (India); Mulchandani, Ashok [Department of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, University of California, Riverside, California 92521 (United States); Rajesh, E-mail: rajesh-csir@yahoo.com, E-mail: ashokigib@rediffmail.com [CSIR-National Physical Laboratory, Dr. K. S. Krishnan Road, New Delhi 110012 (India)

    2014-11-24

    A specific and ultrasensitive, label free single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) based chemiresistive genosensor was fabricated for the early detection of Streptococcus pyogenes infection in human causing rheumatic heart disease. The mga gene of S. pyogenes specific 24 mer ssDNA probe was covalently immobilized on SWNT through a molecular bilinker, 1-pyrenemethylamine, using carbodiimide coupling reaction. The sensor was characterized by the current-voltage (I-V) characteristic curve and scanning electron microscopy. The sensing performance of the sensor was studied with respect to changes in conductance in SWNT channel based on hybridization of the target S. pyogenes single stranded genomic DNA (ssG-DNA) to its complementary 24 mer ssDNA probe. The sensor shows negligible response to non-complementary Staphylococcus aureus ssG-DNA, confirming the specificity of the sensor only with S. pyogenes. The genosensor exhibited a linear response to S. pyogenes G-DNA from 1 to1000 ng ml{sup −1} with a limit of detection of 0.16 ng ml{sup −1}.

  7. Carbon Nanotubes Based Quantum Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jian-Ping

    1999-01-01

    This document represents the final report for the NASA cooperative agreement which studied the application of carbon nanotubes. The accomplishments are reviewed: (1) Wrote a review article on carbon nanotubes and its potentials for applications in nanoscale quantum devices. (2) Extensive studies on the effects of structure deformation on nanotube electronic structure and energy band gaps. (3) Calculated the vibrational spectrum of nanotube rope and the effect of pressure. and (4) Investigate the properties of Li intercalated nanotube ropes and explore their potential for energy storage materials and battery applications. These studies have lead to four publications and seven abstracts in international conferences.

  8. Label-free detection of cardiac troponin-I using gold nanoparticles functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes based chemiresistive biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajesh, Sharma, Vikash; Puri, Nitin K.; Singh, Rajiv K.; Biradar, Ashok M.; Mulchanadani, Ashok

    2013-11-01

    We report a specific and ultrasensitive, label-free chemiresistive biosensor based on mercaptopropionic acid capped gold nanoparticles (GNP) functionalized single walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) hybrid for the detection of cardiac specific biomarker troponin-I (cTnI). GNPs were attached to SWNTs through a molecular linker 1-pyrenemethylamine. The highly specific cTnI antibody was covalently immobilized on GNPs through capping agent using carbodiimide coupling reaction. The cTnI interaction to its corresponding antibody was studied with respect to changes in conductance in SWNTs channel, and a detailed field-effect transistor characteristic was delineated. The device exhibited a linear response to cTnI from 0.01 to 10 ng ml-1.

  9. Carbon nanotube based transparent conductive thin films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, X; Rajamani, R; Stelson, K A; Cui, T

    2006-07-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) based optically transparent and electrically conductive thin films are fabricated on plastic substrates in this study. Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are chemically treated with a mixture of concentrated sulfuric acid and nitric acid before being dispersed in aqueous surfactant-contained solutions. SWNT thin films are prepared from the stable SWNT solutions using wet coating techniques. The 100 nm thick SWNT thin film exhibits a surface resistivity of 6 kohms/square nanometer with an average transmittance of 88% on the visible light range, which is three times better than the films prepared from the high purity as-received SWNTs.

  10. Carbon Nanotube-Based Permeable Membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holt, J K; Park, H G; Bakajin, O; Noy, A; Huser, T; Eaglesham, D

    2004-04-06

    A membrane of multiwalled carbon nanotubes embedded in a silicon nitride matrix was fabricated for use in studying fluid mechanics on the nanometer scale. Characterization by fluorescent tracer diffusion and scanning electron microscopy suggests that the membrane is void-free near the silicon substrate on which it rests, implying that the hollow core of the nanotube is the only conduction path for molecular transport. Assuming Knudsen diffusion through this nanotube membrane, a maximum helium transport rate (for a pressure drop of 1 atm) of 0.25 cc/sec is predicted. Helium flow measurements of a nanoporous silicon nitride membrane, fabricated by sacrificial removal of carbon, give a flow rate greater than 1x10{sup -6} cc/sec. For viscous, laminar flow conditions, water is estimated to flow across the nanotube membrane (under a 1 atm pressure drop) at up to 2.8x10{sup -5} cc/sec (1.7 {micro}L/min).

  11. Carbon nanotube based hybrid nanocarbon foam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahrizan Jamal, M.; Zhang, Mei

    2017-03-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) based nanocarbon foams (NFs) and the hybrid nanocarbon foams (HNFs) are fabricated in this work. The NFs are formed by using poly(methyl methacrylate) microspheres as a template to create micro-scaled pores. The cell walls are made of CNT networks with nano-scaled pores. The interconnections among CNTs are secured using graphene and nanographite generated via carbonization of polyacrylonitrile. The resulting NFs are ultra-lightweight, highly elastic, electrically and thermally conductive, and robust in structure. The HNFs are made by infiltrating thermoplastic polymer into the NFs in a controllable procedure. Compared to NFs, the HNFs have much higher strength, same electrical conductivity, and limited increase in density. The compressive strength of the HNF increased more than 50 times while the density was changed less than 10 times due to the polymer infiltration. It is found that the deformed HNFs can recover in both structure and property when they are heated over the glass transition temperature of the infiltrated polymer. Such remarkable healing capability could broaden the applications of the HNFs.

  12. Carbon nanotube-based coatings on titanium

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elzbieta Dlugon; Wojciech Simka; Aneta Fraczek-Szczypta; Wiktor Niemiec; Jaroslaw Markowski; Marzena Szymanska; Marta Blazewicz

    2015-09-01

    This paper reports results of the modification of titanium surface with multiwalled carbon nanotubes (CNTs). The Ti samples were covered with CNTs via electrophoretic deposition (EPD) process. Prior to EPD process, CNTs were functionalized by chemical treatment. Mechanical, electrochemical and biological properties of CNT-covered Ti samples were studied and compared to those obtained for unmodified titanium surface. Atomic force microscopy was used to investigate the surface topography. To determine micromechanical characteristics of CNT-covered metallic samples indentation tests were conducted. Throughout electrochemical studies were performed in order to characterize the impact of the coating on the corrosion of titanium substrate. In vitro experiments were conducted using the human osteoblast NHOst cell line. CNT layers shielded titanium from corrosion gave the surface-enhanced biointegrative properties. Cells proliferated better on the modified surface in comparison to unmodified titanium. The deposited layer enhanced cell adhesion and spreading as compared to titanium sample.

  13. Carbon Nanotube-Based Chemical Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyyappan, M

    2016-04-27

    The need to sense gases and vapors arises in numerous scenarios in industrial, environmental, security and medical applications. Traditionally, this activity has utilized bulky instruments to obtain both qualitative and quantitative information on the constituents of the gas mixture. It is ideal to use sensors for this purpose since they are smaller in size and less expensive; however, their performance in the field must match that of established analytical instruments in order to gain acceptance. In this regard, nanomaterials as sensing media offer advantages in sensitivity, preparation of chip-based sensors and construction of electronic nose for selective detection of analytes of interest. This article provides a review of the use of carbon nanotubes in gas and vapor sensing. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Carbon-Nanotube-Based Chemical Gas Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaul, Arunpama B.

    2010-01-01

    Conventional thermal conductivity gauges (e.g. Pirani gauges) lend themselves to applications such as leak detectors, or in gas chromatographs for identifying various gas species. However, these conventional gauges are physically large, operate at high power, and have a slow response time. A single-walled carbon-nanotube (SWNT)-based chemical sensing gauge relies on differences in thermal conductance of the respective gases surrounding the CNT as it is voltage-biased, as a means for chemical identification. Such a sensor provides benefits of significantly reduced size and compactness, fast response time, low-power operation, and inexpensive manufacturing since it can be batch-fabricated using Si integrated-circuit (IC) process technology.

  15. Carbon nanotube based NEMS actuators and sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forney, Michael; Poler, Jordan

    2011-03-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) have been widely studied due to superior mechanical and electrical properties. We have grown vertically aligned SWNTs (VA-SWNTs) onto microcantilever (MC) arrays, which provides an architecture for novel actuators and sensors. Raman spectroscopy confirms that the CVD-grown nanotubes are SWNTs and SEM confirms aligned growth. As an actuator, this hybrid MC/VA-SWNT system can be electrostatically modulated. SWNTs are excellent electron acceptors, so we can charge up the VA-SWNT array by applying a voltage. The electrostatic repulsion among the charged SWNTs provides a surface stress that induces MC deflection. Simulation results show that a few electrons per SWNT are needed for measureable deflections, and experimental actuators are being characterized by SEM, Raman, and an AFM optical lever system. The applied voltage is sinusoidally modulated, and deflection is measured with a lock-in amplifier. These actuators could be used for nano-manipulation, release of drugs from a capsule, or nano-valves. As a sensor, this MC/VA-SWNT system offers an improved sensitivity for chemical and bio-sensing compared to surface functionalized MC-based sensors. Those sensors only have a 2D sensing surface, but a MC/VA-SWNT system has significantly more sensing surface because the VA-SWNTs extend microns off the MC surface.

  16. Pristine carbon nanotubes based resistive temperature sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Md Bayazeed; Saini, Sudhir Kumar; Sharma, Daya Shankar; Agarwal, Pankaj B.

    2016-04-01

    A good sensor must be highly sensitive, faster in response, of low cost cum easily producible, and highly reliable. Incorporation of nano-dimensional particles/ wires makes conventional sensors more effective in terms of fulfilling the above requirements. For example, Carbon Nanotubes (CNTs) are promising sensing element because of its large aspect ratio, unique electronic and thermal properties. In addition to their use for widely reported chemical sensing, it has also been explored for temperature sensing. This paper presents the fabrication of CNTs based temperature sensor, prepared on silicon substrate using low cost spray coating method, which is reliable and reproducible method to prepare uniform CNTs thin films on any substrate. Besides this, simple and inexpensive method of preparation of dispersion of single walled CNTs (SWNTs) in 1,2 dichlorobenzene by using probe type ultrasonicator for debundling the CNTs for improving sensor response were used. The electrical contacts over the dispersed SWNTs were taken using silver paste electrodes. Fabricated sensors clearly show immediate change in resistance as a response to change in temperature of SWNTs. The measured sensitivity (change in resistance with temperature) of the sensor was found ˜ 0.29%/°C in the 25°C to 60°C temperature range.

  17. Three-dimensional carbon nanotube based photovoltaics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flicker, Jack

    2011-12-01

    Photovoltaic (PV) cells with a three dimensional (3D) morphology are an exciting new research thrust with promise to create cheaper, more efficient solar cells. This work introduces a new type of 3D PV device based on carbon nanotube (CNT) arrays. These arrays are paired with the thin film heterojunction, CdTe/CdS, to form a complete 3D carbon nanotube PV device (3DCNTPV). Marriage of a complicated 3D structure with production methods traditionally used for planar CdTe solar cell is challenging. This work examines the problems associated with processing these types of cells and systematically alters production methods of the semiconductor layers and electrodes to increase the short circuit current (Isc), eliminate parasitic shunts, and increase the open circuit voltage (Voc). The main benefit of 3D solar cell is the ability to utilize multiple photon interactions with the solar cell surface. The three dimensionality allows photons to interact multiple times with the photoactive material, which increases the absorption and the overall power output over what is possible with a two dimensional (2D) morphology. To quantify the increased power output arising from these multiple photon interactions, a new absorption efficiency term, eta3D, is introduced. The theoretical basis behind this new term and how it relates to the absorption efficiency of a planar cell, eta 2D, is derived. A unique model for the average number of multiple photon impingements, Gamma, is proposed based on three categories of 3D morphology: an infinite trench, an enclosed box, and an array of towers. The derivation of eta3D and Gamma for these 3D PV devices gives a complete picture of the enhanced power output over 2D cells based on CNT array height, pitch, radius, and shape. This theory is validated by monte carlo simulations and experiment. This new type of 3D PV devices has been shown to work experimentally. The first 3DCNTPV cells created posses Isc values of 0.085 to 17.872mA/cm2 and Voc values

  18. Carbon-Nanotube-Based Electrodes for Biomedical Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jun; Meyyappan, M.

    2008-01-01

    A nanotube array based on vertically aligned nanotubes or carbon nanofibers has been invented for use in localized electrical stimulation and recording of electrical responses in selected regions of an animal body, especially including the brain. There are numerous established, emerging, and potential applications for localized electrical stimulation and/or recording, including treatment of Parkinson s disease, Tourette s syndrome, and chronic pain, and research on electrochemical effects involved in neurotransmission. Carbon-nanotube-based electrodes offer potential advantages over metal macroelectrodes (having diameters of the order of a millimeter) and microelectrodes (having various diameters ranging down to tens of microns) heretofore used in such applications. These advantages include the following: a) Stimuli and responses could be localized at finer scales of spatial and temporal resolution, which is at subcellular level, with fewer disturbances to, and less interference from, adjacent regions. b) There would be less risk of hemorrhage on implantation because nano-electrode-based probe tips could be configured to be less traumatic. c) Being more biocompatible than are metal electrodes, carbon-nanotube-based electrodes and arrays would be more suitable for long-term or permanent implantation. d) Unlike macro- and microelectrodes, a nano-electrode could penetrate a cell membrane with minimal disruption. Thus, for example, a nanoelectrode could be used to generate an action potential inside a neuron or in proximity of an active neuron zone. Such stimulation may be much more effective than is extra- or intracellular stimulation via a macro- or microelectrode. e) The large surface area of an array at a micron-scale footprint of non-insulated nanoelectrodes coated with a suitable electrochemically active material containing redox ingredients would make it possible to obtain a pseudocapacitance large enough to dissipate a relatively large amount of electric charge

  19. Gecko-inspired carbon nanotube-based self-cleaning adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sethi, Sunny; Ge, Liehui; Ci, Lijie; Ajayan, P M; Dhinojwala, Ali

    2008-03-01

    The design of reversible adhesives requires both stickiness and the ability to remain clean from dust and other contaminants. Inspired by gecko feet, we demonstrate the self-cleaning ability of carbon nanotube-based flexible gecko tapes.

  20. Systems and Methods for Fabricating Carbon Nanotube-Based Vacuum Electronic Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manohara, Harish (Inventor); Toda, Risaku (Inventor); Del Castillo, Linda Y. (Inventor); Murthy, Rakesh (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    Systems and methods in accordance with embodiments of the invention proficiently produce carbon nanotube-based vacuum electronic devices. In one embodiment a method of fabricating a carbon nanotube-based vacuum electronic device includes: growing carbon nanotubes onto a substrate to form a cathode; assembling a stack that includes the cathode, an anode, and a first layer that includes an alignment slot; disposing a microsphere partially into the alignment slot during the assembling of the stack such that the microsphere protrudes from the alignment slot and can thereby separate the first layer from an adjacent layer; and encasing the stack in a vacuum sealed container.

  1. A new nonlinear model for analyzing the behaviour of carbon nanotube-based resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farokhi, Hamed; Païdoussis, Michael P.; Misra, Arun K.

    2016-09-01

    The present study develops a new size-dependent nonlinear model for the analysis of the behaviour of carbon nanotube-based resonators. In particular, based on modified couple stress theory, the fully nonlinear equations of motion of the carbon nanotube-based resonator are derived using Hamilton's principle, taking into account both the longitudinal and transverse displacements. Molecular dynamics simulation is then performed in order to verify the validity of the developed size-dependent continuum model at the nano scale. The nonlinear partial differential equations of motion of the system are discretized by means of the Galerkin technique, resulting in a high-dimensional reduced-order model of the system. The pseudo-arclength continuation technique is employed to examine the nonlinear resonant behaviour of the carbon nanotube-based resonator. A new universal pull-in formula is also developed for predicting the occurrence of the static pull-in and validated using numerical simulations.

  2. Mechanically robust, electrically conductive ultralow-density carbon nanotube-based aerogels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worsley, Marcus A; Baumann, Theodore F; Satcher, Jr., Joe H

    2014-04-01

    A method of making a mechanically robust, electrically conductive ultralow-density carbon nanotube-based aerogel, including the steps of dispersing nanotubes in an aqueous media or other media to form a suspension, adding reactants and catalyst to the suspension to create a reaction mixture, curing the reaction mixture to form a wet gel, drying the wet gel to produce a dry gel, and pyrolyzing the dry gel to produce the mechanically robust, electrically conductive ultralow-density carbon nanotube-based aerogel. The aerogel is mechanically robust, electrically conductive, and ultralow-density, and is made of a porous carbon material having 5 to 95% by weight carbon nanotubes and 5 to 95% carbon binder.

  3. Mechanically robust, electrically conductive ultralow-density carbon nanotube-based aerogels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Worsley, Marcus A.; Baumann, Theodore F.; Satcher, Jr, Joe H.

    2016-07-05

    A method of making a mechanically robust, electrically conductive ultralow-density carbon nanotube-based aerogel, including the steps of dispersing nanotubes in an aqueous media or other media to form a suspension, adding reactants and catalyst to the suspension to create a reaction mixture, curing the reaction mixture to form a wet gel, drying the wet gel to produce a dry gel, and pyrolyzing the dry gel to produce the mechanically robust, electrically conductive ultralow-density carbon nanotube-based aerogel. The aerogel is mechanically robust, electrically conductive, and ultralow-density, and is made of a porous carbon material having 5 to 95% by weight carbon nanotubes and 5 to 95% carbon binder.

  4. On the elastic properties of carbon nanotube-based composites: modelling and characterization

    CERN Document Server

    Thostenson, E T

    2003-01-01

    The exceptional mechanical and physical properties observed for carbon nanotubes has stimulated the development of nanotube-based composite materials, but critical challenges exist before we can exploit these extraordinary nanoscale properties in a macroscopic composite. At the nanoscale, the structure of the carbon nanotube strongly influences the overall properties of the composite. The focus of this research is to develop a fundamental understanding of the structure/size influence of carbon nanotubes on the elastic properties of nanotube-based composites. Towards this end, the nanoscale structure and elastic properties of a model composite system of aligned multi-walled carbon nanotubes embedded in a polystyrene matrix were characterized, and a micromechanical approach for modelling of short fibre composites was modified to account for the structure of the nanotube reinforcement to predict the elastic modulus of the nanocomposite as a function of the constituent properties, reinforcement geometry and nanot...

  5. A Review: Carbon Nanotube-Based Piezoresistive Strain Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waris Obitayo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of carbon nanotubes for piezoresistive strain sensors has acquired significant attention due to its unique electromechanical properties. In this comprehensive review paper, we discussed some important aspects of carbon nanotubes for strain sensing at both the nanoscale and macroscale. Carbon nanotubes undergo changes in their band structures when subjected to mechanical deformations. This phenomenon makes them applicable for strain sensing applications. This paper signifies the type of carbon nanotubes best suitable for piezoresistive strain sensors. The electrical resistivities of carbon nanotube thin film increase linearly with strain, making it an ideal material for a piezoresistive strain sensor. Carbon nanotube composite films, which are usually fabricated by mixing small amounts of single-walled or multiwalled carbon nanotubes with selected polymers, have shown promising characteristics of piezoresistive strain sensors. Studies also show that carbon nanotubes display a stable and predictable voltage response as a function of temperature.

  6. Systems and Methods for Implementing Robust Carbon Nanotube-Based Field Emitters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manohara, Harish (Inventor); Kristof, Valerie (Inventor); Toda, Risaku (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    Systems and methods in accordance with embodiments of the invention implement carbon nanotube-based field emitters. In one embodiment, a method of fabricating a carbon nanotube field emitter includes: patterning a substrate with a catalyst, where the substrate has thereon disposed a diffusion barrier layer; growing a plurality of carbon nanotubes on at least a portion of the patterned catalyst; and heating the substrate to an extent where it begins to soften such that at least a portion of at least one carbon nanotube becomes enveloped by the softened substrate.

  7. Carbon nanotube based stationary phases for microchip chromatography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Klaus Bo; Kutter, Jörg Peter

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this article is to provide an overview and critical evaluation of the use of carbon nanotubes and related carbon-based nanomaterials for microchip chromatography. The unique properties of carbon nanotubes, such as a very high surface area and intriguing adsorptive behaviour, have...... already been demonstrated in more classical formats, for improved separation performance in gas and liquid chromatography, and for unique applications in solid phase extraction. Carbon nanotubes are now also entering the field of microfluidics, where there is a large potential to be able to provide...... integrated, tailor-made nanotube columns by means of catalytic growth of the nanotubes inside the fluidic channels. An evaluation of the different implementations of carbon nanotubes and related carbon-based nanomaterials for microfluidic chromatography devices is given in terms of separation performance...

  8. Carbon Nanotube Based Microfluidic Elements for Filtration and Concentration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bakajin, O; Ben-Barak, N; Peng, J; Noy, A

    2003-06-25

    We have developed a method for integration of patterned arrays of carbon nanotubes or the ''nanotube mesh'' into microfabricated channels. The method includes standard lithographic methods for patterning and etching the substrate, followed by catalyst patterning, CVD deposition of nanotubes, and anodic bonding of coverslip top. We will describe a carbon nanotube filtering device fabricated using this method and discuss the use of carbon nanotube arrays as molecular concentration and separation media.

  9. Carbon nanotube-based functional materials for optical limiting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu; Lin, Ying; Liu, Ying; Doyle, James; He, Nan; Zhuang, Xiaodong; Bai, Jinrui; Blau, Werner J

    2007-01-01

    Optical limiting is an important application of nonlinear optics, useful for the protection of human eyes, optical elements, and optical sensors from intense laser pulses. An optical limiter is such a device that strongly attenuates high intensity light and potentially damaging light such as focused laser beams, whilst allowing for the high transmission of ambient light. Optical limiting properties of carbon nanotube suspensions, solubilized carbon nanotubes, small molecules doped carbon nanotubes and polymer/carbon nanotube composites have been reviewed. The optical limiting responses of carbon nanotube suspensions are shown to be dominated by nonlinear scattering as a result of thermally induced solvent-bubble formation and sublimation of the nanotubes, while the solubilized carbon nanotubes optically limit through nonlinear absorption mechanism and exhibit significant solution-concentration-dependent optical limiting responses. In the former case the optical limiting results are independent of nanotube concentrations at the same linear transmittance as that of the solubilized systems. Many efforts have been invested into the research of polymer/carbon nanotube composites in an attempt to allow for the fabrication of films required for the use of nanotubes in a real optical limiting application. The higher carbon nanotube content samples block the incident light more effectively at higher incident energy densities or intensities. The optical limiting mechanism of these composite materials is quite complicated. Besides nonlinear scattering contribution to the optical limiting, there may also be other contributions e.g., nonlinear absorption, nonlinear refraction, electronic absorption and others to the optical limiting. Further improvements in the optical limiting efficiency of the composites and in the dispersion and alignment properties of carbon nanotubes in the polymer matrix could be realized by variation of both nanostructured guest and polymer host, and by

  10. Carbon nanotube-based separation columns for microchip electrochromatography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, K. B.; Delacourt, B.; Kutter, Jörg P.

    2015-01-01

    the fabrication and operation protocols for devices with microfabricated carbon nanotube stationary phases for reversephase chromatography. In this protocol, the lithographically defined stationary phase is fabricated in the channel before bonding of a lid, thereby circumventing the difficult packaging procedures...

  11. Roll-to-Roll production of carbon nanotubes based supercapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jingyi; Childress, Anthony; Karakaya, Mehmet; Roberts, Mark; Arcilla-Velez, Margarita; Podila, Ramakrishna; Rao, Apparao

    2014-03-01

    Carbon nanomaterials provide an excellent platform for electrochemical double layer capacitors (EDLCs). However, current industrial methods for producing carbon nanotubes are expensive and thereby increase the costs of energy storage to more than 10 Wh/kg. In this regard, we developed a facile roll-to-roll production technology for scalable manufacturing of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) with variable density on run-of-the-mill kitchen Al foils. Our method produces MWNTs with diameter (heights) between 50-100 nm (10-100 μm), and a specific capacitance as high as ~ 100 F/g in non-aqueous electrolytes. In this talk, the fundamental challenges involved in EDLC-suitable MWNT growth, roll-to-roll production, and device manufacturing will be discussed along with electrochemical characteristics of roll-to-roll MWNTs. Research supported by NSF CMMI Grant1246800.

  12. Carbon nanotube-based superconducting and ferromagnetic hybrid systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Man, H.T.

    2006-01-01

    Carbon Nanotubes are molecules with exceptional physical properties that are most useful for applications in the growing field of nanotechnology. In addition, because of its special electrical properties, they are extremely useful for experiments on the fundamental properties of one-dimensional elec

  13. Carbon Nanotube-Based Separation Columns for Microchip Electrochromatography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Klaus Bo; Delacourt, B.; Kutter, Jörg Peter

    2015-01-01

    the fabrication and operation protocols for devices with microfabricated carbon nanotube stationary phases for reverse-phase chromatography. In this protocol, the lithographically defined stationary phase is fabricated in the channel before bonding of a lid, thereby circumventing the difficult packaging...

  14. Carbon nanotube-based heterostructures for solar energy applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lei; Liu, Haiqing; Konik, Robert M; Misewich, James A; Wong, Stanislaus S

    2013-10-21

    One means of combining the unique physical and chemical properties of both carbon nanotubes and complementary material motifs (such as metal sulfide quantum dots (QDs), metal oxide nanostructures, and polymers) can be achieved by generating carbon nanotube (CNT)-based heterostructures. These materials can be subsequently utilized as novel and interesting constituent building blocks for the assembly of functional light energy harvesting devices and because of their architectural and functional flexibility, can potentially open up novel means of using and taking advantage of existing renewable energy sources. In this review, we present the reliable and reproducible synthesis of several unique model CNT-based heterostructured systems as well as include an accompanying discussion about the charge transfer and energy flow properties of these materials for their potential incorporation into a range of practical solar energy conversion devices.

  15. Carbon Nanotubes Based Glucose Needle-type Biosensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Li

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available A novel needle-type biosensor based on carbon nanotubes is reported. Thebiosensor was prepared by packing a mixture of multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs,graphite powder and glucose oxidase (Gox freeze-dried powder into a glass capillary of 0.5mm inner diameter. The resulting amperometric biosensor was characterizedelectrochemically using amperometry in the presence of hydrogen peroxide and in thepresence of glucose. The glucose biosensor sensitivity was influenced by the glucoseoxidase concentration within the MWCNTs mixture. The optimized glucose needle-typebiosensor displayed better sensitivity and stability, and a detected range of up to 20 mM.Based on its favorable stability, the needle biosensor was first time used in real-timemonitoring system as a kind of online glucose detector. The decay of current response isless than 10% after 24-hour continuous observation.

  16. Carbon Nanotube Based Groundwater Remediation: The Case of Trichloroethylene

    OpenAIRE

    Kshitij C. Jha; Zhuonan Liu; Hema Vijwani; Mallikarjuna Nadagouda; Mukhopadhyay, Sharmila M.; Mesfin Tsige

    2016-01-01

    Adsorption of chlorinated organic contaminants (COCs) on carbon nanotubes (CNTs) has been gaining ground as a remedial platform for groundwater treatment. Applications depend on our mechanistic understanding of COC adsorption on CNTs. This paper lays out the nature of competing interactions at play in hybrid, membrane, and pure CNT based systems and presents results with the perspective of existing gaps in design strategies. First, current remediation approaches to trichloroethylene (TCE), th...

  17. Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes Based Cryogenic Temperature Sensor Platforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monea, Bogdan Florian; Ionete, Eusebiu Ilarian; Spiridon, Stefan Ionut; Leca, Aurel; Stanciu, Anda; Petre, Emil; Vaseashta, Ashok

    2017-09-10

    We present an investigation consisting of single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) based cryogenic temperature sensors, capable of measuring temperatures in the range of 2-77 K. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) due to their extremely small size, superior thermal and electrical properties have suggested that it is possible to create devices that will meet necessary requirements for miniaturization and better performance, by comparison to temperature sensors currently available on the market. Starting from SWCNTs, as starting material, a resistive structure was designed. Employing dropcast method, the carbon nanotubes were deposited over pairs of gold electrodes and in between the structure electrodes from a solution. The procedure was followed by an alignment process between the electrodes using a dielectrophoretic method. Two sensor structures were tested in cryogenic field down to 2 K, and the resistance was measured using a standard four-point method. The measurement results suggest that, at temperatures below 20 K, the temperature coefficient of resistance average for sensor 1 is 1.473%/K and for sensor 2 is 0.365%/K. From the experimental data, it can be concluded that the dependence of electrical resistance versus temperature can be approximated by an exponential equation and, correspondingly, a set of coefficients are calculated. It is further concluded that the proposed approach described here offers several advantages, which can be employed in the fabrication of a microsensors for cryogenic applications.

  18. Carbon nanotube based gecko inspired self-cleaning adhesives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sethi, Sunny; Ge, Liehui; Ajayan, Pulickel; Ali, Dhinojwala

    2008-03-01

    Wall climbing organisms like geckos have unique ability to attach to different surfaces without use of any viscoelastic material. The hairy structure found in gecko feet allows them to obtain intimate contact over a large area thus allowing then to adhere using van der Waals interactions. Not only high adhesion, the geometry of the hairs makes gecko feet self cleaning, thus allowing them to walk continuously without worrying about loosing adhesive strength. Such properties if mimicked synthetically could form basis of a new class of materials, which, unlike conventional adhesives would show two contradictory properties, self cleaning and high adhesion. Such materials would form essential component of applications like wall climbing robot. We tried to synthesize such material using micropatterened vertically aligned carbon nanotubes. When dealing with large areas, probability of defects in the structure increase, forming patterns instead of using uniform film of carbon nanotubes helps to inhibit crack propagation, thus gives much higher adhesive strength than a uniform film. When carbon nanotube patterns with optimized aspect ratio are used, both high adhesion and self cleaning properties are observed.

  19. Monitoring Mechanical Motion of Carbon Nanotube based Nanomotor by Optical Absorption Spectrum

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Baomin; Wang, Zhan; Wang, Yong; Liu, Kaihui

    2016-01-01

    The optical absorption spectrums of nanomotors made from double-wall carbon nanotubes have been calculated with the time-dependent density functional based tight binding method. When the outer short tube of the nanomotor moves along or rotates around the inner long tube, the peaks in the spectrum will gradually evolve and may shift periodically, the amplitude of which can be as large as hundreds of meV. We show that the features and behaviors of the optical absorption spectrum could be used to monitor the mechanical motions of the double-wall carbon nanotube based nanomotor.

  20. Heat dissipation for microprocessor using multiwalled carbon nanotubes based liquid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung Thang, Bui; Trinh, Pham Van; Chuc, Nguyen Van; Khoi, Phan Hong; Minh, Phan Ngoc

    2013-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are one of the most valuable materials with high thermal conductivity (2000 W/m · K compared with thermal conductivity of Ag 419 W/m · K). This suggested an approach in applying the CNTs in thermal dissipation system for high power electronic devices, such as computer processor and high brightness light emitting diode (HB-LED). In this work, multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) based liquid was made by COOH functionalized MWCNTs dispersed in distilled water with concentration in the range between 0.2 and 1.2 gram/liter. MWCNT based liquid was used in liquid cooling system to enhance thermal dissipation for computer processor. By using distilled water in liquid cooling system, CPU's temperature decreases by about 10°C compared with using fan cooling system. By using MWCNT liquid with concentration of 1 gram/liter MWCNTs, the CPU's temperature decreases by 7°C compared with using distilled water in cooling system. Theoretically, we also showed that the presence of MWCNTs reduced thermal resistance and increased the thermal conductivity of liquid cooling system. The results have confirmed the advantages of the MWCNTs for thermal dissipation systems for the μ -processor and other high power electronic devices.

  1. Carbon Nanotube Based Chemical Sensors for Space and Terrestrial Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing; Lu, Yijiang

    2009-01-01

    A nanosensor technology has been developed using nanostructures, such as single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs), on a pair of interdigitated electrodes (IDE) processed with a silicon-based microfabrication and micromachining technique. The IDE fingers were fabricated using photolithography and thin film metallization techniques. Both in-situ growth of nanostructure materials and casting of the nanostructure dispersions were used to make chemical sensing devices. These sensors have been exposed to nitrogen dioxide, acetone, benzene, nitrotoluene, chlorine, and ammonia in the concentration range of ppm to ppb at room temperature. The electronic molecular sensing of carbon nanotubes in our sensor platform can be understood by intra- and inter-tube electron modulation in terms of charge transfer mechanisms. As a result of the charge transfer, the conductance of p-type or hole-richer SWNTs in air will change. Due to the large surface area, low surface energy barrier and high thermal and mechanical stability, nanostructured chemical sensors potentially can offer higher sensitivity, lower power consumption and better robustness than the state-of-the-art systems, which make them more attractive for defense and space applications. Combined with MEMS technology, light weight and compact size sensors can be made in wafer scale with low cost. Additionally, a wireless capability of such a sensor chip can be used for networked mobile and fixed-site detection and warning systems for military bases, facilities and battlefield areas.

  2. Heat Dissipation for Microprocessor Using Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes Based Liquid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bui Hung Thang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanotubes (CNTs are one of the most valuable materials with high thermal conductivity (2000 W/m·K compared with thermal conductivity of Ag 419 W/m·K. This suggested an approach in applying the CNTs in thermal dissipation system for high power electronic devices, such as computer processor and high brightness light emitting diode (HB-LED. In this work, multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs based liquid was made by COOH functionalized MWCNTs dispersed in distilled water with concentration in the range between 0.2 and 1.2 gram/liter. MWCNT based liquid was used in liquid cooling system to enhance thermal dissipation for computer processor. By using distilled water in liquid cooling system, CPU’s temperature decreases by about 10°C compared with using fan cooling system. By using MWCNT liquid with concentration of 1 gram/liter MWCNTs, the CPU’s temperature decreases by 7°C compared with using distilled water in cooling system. Theoretically, we also showed that the presence of MWCNTs reduced thermal resistance and increased the thermal conductivity of liquid cooling system. The results have confirmed the advantages of the MWCNTs for thermal dissipation systems for the μ-processor and other high power electronic devices.

  3. Predicting the effective thermal conductivity of carbon nanotube based nanofluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sastry, N N Venkata; Bhunia, Avijit; Sundararajan, T; Das, Sarit K [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Madras, Chennai 600 036 (India)

    2008-02-06

    Adding a small volume fraction of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) to a liquid enhances the thermal conductivity significantly. Recent experimental findings report an anomalously wide range of enhancement values that continue to perplex the research community and remain unexplained. In this paper we present a theoretical model based on three-dimensional CNT chain formation (percolation) in the base liquid and the corresponding thermal resistance network. The model considers random CNT orientation and CNT-CNT interaction forming the percolating chain. Predictions are in good agreement with almost all available experimental data. Results show that the enhancement critically depends on the CNT geometry (length), volume fraction, thermal conductivity of the base liquid and the nanofluid (CNT-liquid suspension) preparation technique. Based on the physical mechanism of heat conduction in the nanofluid, we introduce a new dimensionless parameter that alone characterizes the nanofluid thermal conductivity with reasonable accuracy ({approx} {+-} 5%)

  4. Predicting the effective thermal conductivity of carbon nanotube based nanofluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkata Sastry, N N; Bhunia, Avijit; Sundararajan, T; Das, Sarit K

    2008-02-06

    Adding a small volume fraction of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) to a liquid enhances the thermal conductivity significantly. Recent experimental findings report an anomalously wide range of enhancement values that continue to perplex the research community and remain unexplained. In this paper we present a theoretical model based on three-dimensional CNT chain formation (percolation) in the base liquid and the corresponding thermal resistance network. The model considers random CNT orientation and CNT-CNT interaction forming the percolating chain. Predictions are in good agreement with almost all available experimental data. Results show that the enhancement critically depends on the CNT geometry (length), volume fraction, thermal conductivity of the base liquid and the nanofluid (CNT-liquid suspension) preparation technique. Based on the physical mechanism of heat conduction in the nanofluid, we introduce a new dimensionless parameter that alone characterizes the nanofluid thermal conductivity with reasonable accuracy (∼ ± 5%).

  5. A carbon nanotube based ammonia sensor on cotton textile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jin-Woo; Kim, Beomseok; Li, Jing; Meyyappan, M.

    2013-05-01

    A single-wall carbon nanotube (CNT) based ammonia (NH3) sensor was implemented on a cotton yarn. Two types of sensors were fabricated: Au/sensing CNT/Au and conducting/sensing/conducting all CNT structures. Two perpendicular Au wires were designed to contact CNT-cotton yarn for metal-CNT sensor, whereas nanotubes were used for the electrode as well as sensing material for the all CNT sensor. The resistance shift of the CNT network upon NH3 was monitored in a chemiresistor approach. The CNT-cotton yarn sensors exhibited uniformity and repeatability. Furthermore, the sensors displayed good mechanical robustness against bending. The present approach can be utilized for low-cost smart textile applications.

  6. 3D Printing of Carbon Nanotubes-Based Microsupercapacitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Wei; Zhou, Han; Li, Ben Q; Ding, Shujiang

    2017-02-08

    A novel 3D printing procedure is presented for fabricating carbon-nanotubes (CNTs)-based microsupercapacitors. The 3D printer uses a CNTs ink slurry with a moderate solid content and prints a stream of continuous droplets. Appropriate control of a heated base is applied to facilitate the solvent removal and adhesion between printed layers and to improve the structure integrity without structure delamination or distortion upon drying. The 3D-printed electrodes for microsupercapacitors are characterized by SEM, laser scanning confocal microscope, and step profiler. Effect of process parameters on 3D printing is also studied. The final solid-state microsupercapacitors are assembled with the printed multilayer CNTs structures and poly(vinyl alcohol)-H3PO4 gel as the interdigitated microelectrodes and electrolyte. The electrochemical performance of 3D printed microsupercapacitors is also tested, showing a significant areal capacitance and excellent cycle stability.

  7. Recent advances in Carbon Nanotube based Enzymatic Fuel Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serge eCosnier

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This review summarizes recent trends in the field of enzymatic fuel cells. Thanks to the high specificity of enzymes, biofuel cells can generate electrical energy by oxidation of a targeted fuel (sugars, alcohols or hydrogen at the anode and reduction of oxidants (O2, H2O2 at the cathode in complex media. The combination of carbon nanotubes, enzymes and redox mediators was widely exploited to develop biofuel cells since the electrons, involved in the bio-electrocatalytic processes, can be efficiently transferred from or to an external circuit. Original approaches to construct electron transfer based CNT-bioelectrodes and impressive biofuel cell performances are reported as well as biomedical applications.

  8. Carbon Nanotube Based Groundwater Remediation: The Case of Trichloroethylene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, Kshitij C; Liu, Zhuonan; Vijwani, Hema; Nadagouda, Mallikarjuna; Mukhopadhyay, Sharmila M; Tsige, Mesfin

    2016-07-21

    Adsorption of chlorinated organic contaminants (COCs) on carbon nanotubes (CNTs) has been gaining ground as a remedial platform for groundwater treatment. Applications depend on our mechanistic understanding of COC adsorption on CNTs. This paper lays out the nature of competing interactions at play in hybrid, membrane, and pure CNT based systems and presents results with the perspective of existing gaps in design strategies. First, current remediation approaches to trichloroethylene (TCE), the most ubiquitous of the COCs, is presented along with examination of forces contributing to adsorption of analogous contaminants at the molecular level. Second, we present results on TCE adsorption and remediation on pure and hybrid CNT systems with a stress on the specific nature of substrate and molecular architecture that would contribute to competitive adsorption. The delineation of intermolecular interactions that contribute to efficient remediation is needed for custom, scalable field design of purification systems for a wide range of contaminants.

  9. Carbon Nanotube Based Groundwater Remediation: The Case of Trichloroethylene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kshitij C. Jha

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Adsorption of chlorinated organic contaminants (COCs on carbon nanotubes (CNTs has been gaining ground as a remedial platform for groundwater treatment. Applications depend on our mechanistic understanding of COC adsorption on CNTs. This paper lays out the nature of competing interactions at play in hybrid, membrane, and pure CNT based systems and presents results with the perspective of existing gaps in design strategies. First, current remediation approaches to trichloroethylene (TCE, the most ubiquitous of the COCs, is presented along with examination of forces contributing to adsorption of analogous contaminants at the molecular level. Second, we present results on TCE adsorption and remediation on pure and hybrid CNT systems with a stress on the specific nature of substrate and molecular architecture that would contribute to competitive adsorption. The delineation of intermolecular interactions that contribute to efficient remediation is needed for custom, scalable field design of purification systems for a wide range of contaminants.

  10. Carbon nanotube based sensors and fluctuation enhanced sensing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kukovecz, Akos; Konya, Zoltan; Haspel, Henrik; Mohl, Melinda; Sapi, Andras; Kiricsi, Imre [Department of Applied and Environmental Chemistry, University of Szeged (Hungary); Molnar, Daniel; Heszler, Peter [Research Group on Laser Physics of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, University of Szeged (Hungary); Kordas, Krisztian; Maeklin, Jani; Halonen, Niina; Toth, Geza [Microelectronics and Materials Physics Laboratories, and EMPART Research Group of Infotech Oulu, University of Oulu (Finland); Gingl, Zoltan; Mingesz, Robert [Department of Experimental Physics, University of Szeged (Hungary); Moilanen, Hannu [Laserprobe LP Ltd., Oulu (Finland); Roth, Siegmar [Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research, Stuttgart (Germany); Vajtai, Robert; Ajayan, Pulickel M. [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science, Rice University, Houston, TX (United States); Pouillon, Yann; Rubio, Angel [Nano-Bio Spectroscopy Group y ETSF Scientific Development Centre, Dpto. Fisica de Materiales, Universidad del Pais Vasco, Centro de Fisica de Materiales CSIC-UPV/EHU-MPC y DIPC, San Sebastian (Spain)

    2010-04-15

    Drop-cast thin films of multi-walled carbon nanotubes are used as gas sensors in a four-probe measurement setup. The novelty of the approach is that the sensor information is extracted from the noise of the dc resistance data using Fluctuation Enhanced Sensing (FES). We investigate the effects of measurement duration, gate voltage and frequency window on the chemical selectivity of the MWCNT-FES sensor. The selectivity of the device is superior to those of conventional gas sensors, and preliminary experiments indicate that it may also be possible to extract quantitative information from the noise. (copyright 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  11. A carbon nanotube based x-ray detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boucher, Richard A.; Bauch, Jürgen; Wünsche, Dietmar; Lackner, Gerhard; Majumder, Anindya

    2016-11-01

    X-ray detectors based on metal-oxide semiconductor field effect transistors couple instantaneous measurement with high accuracy. However, they only have a limited measurement lifetime because they undergo permanent degradation due to x-ray beam exposure. A field effect transistor based on carbon nanotubes (CNTs), however, overcomes this drawback of permanent degradation, because it can be reset into its starting state after being exposed to the x-ray beam. In this work the CNTs were deposited using a dielectrophoresis method on SiO2 coated p-type (boron-doped) Si substrates. For the prepared devices a best gate voltage shift of 244 V Gy-1 and a source-drain current sensitivity of 382 nA Gy-1 were achieved. These values are larger than those reached by the currently used MOSFET based devices.

  12. Actuation mechanisms of carbon nanotube-based architectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geier, Sebastian; Mahrholz, Thorsten; Wierach, Peter; Sinapius, Michael

    2016-04-01

    State of the art smart materials such as piezo ceramics or electroactive polymers cannot feature both, mechanical stiffness and high active strain. Moreover, properties like low density, high mechanical stiffness and high strain at the same time driven by low energy play an increasingly important role for their future application. Carbon nanotubes (CNT), show this behavior. Their active behavior was observed 1999 the first time using paper-like mats made of CNT. Therefore the CNT-papers are electrical charged within an electrolyte thus forming a double- layer. The measured deflection of CNT material is based on the interaction between the charged high surface area formed by carbon nanotubes and ions provided by the electrolyte. Although CNT-papers have been extensively analyzed as well at the macro-scale as nano-scale there is still no generally accepted theory for the actuation mechanism. This paper focuses on investigations of the actuation mechanisms of CNT-papers in comparison to vertically aligned CNT-arrays. One reason of divergent results found in literature might be attributed to different types of CNT samples. While CNT-papers represent architectures of short CNTs which need to bridge each other to form the dimensions of the sample, the continuous CNTs of the array feature a length of almost 3 mm, along which the experiments are carried out. Both sample types are tested within an actuated tensile test set-up under different conditions. While the CNT-papers are tested in water-based electrolytes with comparably small redox-windows the hydrophobic CNT-arrays are tested in ionic liquids with comparatively larger redox-ranges. Furthermore an in-situ micro tensile test within an SEM is carried out to prove the optimized orientation of the MWCNTs as result of external load. It was found that the performance of CNT-papers strongly depends on the test conditions. However, the CNT-arrays are almost unaffected by the conditions showing active response at negative

  13. Single-Walled Carbon-Nanotubes-Based Organic Memory Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sundes Fakher

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The electrical behaviour of organic memory structures, based on single-walled carbon-nanotubes (SWCNTs, metal–insulator–semiconductor (MIS and thin film transistor (TFT structures, using poly(methyl methacrylate (PMMA as the gate dielectric, are reported. The drain and source electrodes were fabricated by evaporating 50 nm gold, and the gate electrode was made from 50 nm-evaporated aluminium on a clean glass substrate. Thin films of SWCNTs, embedded within the insulating layer, were used as the floating gate. SWCNTs-based memory devices exhibited clear hysteresis in their electrical characteristics (capacitance–voltage (C–V for MIS structures, as well as output and transfer characteristics for transistors. Both structures were shown to produce reliable and large memory windows by virtue of high capacity and reduced charge leakage. The hysteresis in the output and transfer characteristics, the shifts in the threshold voltage of the transfer characteristics, and the flat-band voltage shift in the MIS structures were attributed to the charging and discharging of the SWCNTs floating gate. Under an appropriate gate bias (1 s pulses, the floating gate is charged and discharged, resulting in significant threshold voltage shifts. Pulses as low as 1 V resulted in clear write and erase states.

  14. Carbon nanotube-based bioceramic grafts for electrotherapy of bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mata, D; Horovistiz, A L; Branco, I; Ferro, M; Ferreira, N M; Belmonte, M; Lopes, M A; Silva, R F; Oliveira, F J

    2014-01-01

    Bone complexity demands the engineering of new scaffolding solutions for its reconstructive surgery. Emerging bone grafts should offer not only mechanical support but also functional properties to explore innovative bone therapies. Following this, ceramic bone grafts of Glass/hydroxyapatite (HA) reinforced with conductive carbon nanotubes (CNTs) - CNT/Glass/HA - were prepared for bone electrotherapy purposes. Computer-aided 3D microstructural reconstructions and TEM analysis of CNT/Glass/HA composites provided details on the CNT 3D network and further correlation to their functional properties. CNTs are arranged as sub-micrometric sized ropes bridging homogenously distributed ellipsoid-shaped agglomerates. This arrangement yielded composites with a percolation threshold of pc=1.5vol.%. At 4.4vol.% of CNTs, thermal and electrical conductivities of 1.5W·m(-1)·K(-1) and 55S·m(-1), respectively, were obtained, matching relevant requisites in electrical stimulation protocols. While the former avoids bone damaging from Joule's heat generation, the latter might allow the confinement of external electrical fields through the conductive material if used for in vivo electrical stimulation. Moreover, the electrically conductive bone grafts have better mechanical properties than those of the natural cortical bone. Overall, these highly conductive materials with controlled size CNT agglomerates might accelerate bone bonding and maximize the delivery of electrical stimulation during electrotherapy practices.

  15. Carbon nanotube-based supercapacitors using low cost collectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amirhoseiny, Maryam; Zandi, Majid; Mosayyebi, Abolghasem; Khademian, Mehrzad

    2016-01-01

    In this work, electrochemical double layer supercapacitors were fabricated using multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) composite microfilm as electrode. To improve the electrochemical properties, MWCNTs were functionalized with -COOH by acid treatments. CNT/PVA films have been deposited on different current collectors by spin coating to drastically enhance the electrode performance. Electrode fabrication involved various stages preparing of the CNT composite, and coating of the CNT/PVA paste on different substrates which also served as current collector. Al, Ni and graphite were used and compared as current collectors. The surface morphology of the fabricated electrodes was investigated with scanning electrode microscopy (SEM). Overall cell performance was evaluated with a multi-channel potentiostat/galvanostat analyzer. Each supercapacitor cell was subjected to charge-discharge cycling study at different current rates from 0.2Ag-1 to 1Ag-1. The results showed that graphite-based electrodes offer advantages of significantly higher conductivity and superior capacitive behavior compared to thin film electrodes formed on Ni and Al current collectors. The specific capacitance of graphite based electrode is found to be 29Fg-1.

  16. Fowler Nordheim theory of carbon nanotube based field emitters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parveen, Shama; Kumar, Avshish; Husain, Samina; Husain, Mushahid

    2017-01-01

    Field emission (FE) phenomena are generally explained in the frame-work of Fowler Nordheim (FN) theory which was given for flat metal surfaces. In this work, an effort has been made to present the field emission mechanism in carbon nanotubes (CNTs) which have tip type geometry at nanoscale. High aspect ratio of CNTs leads to large field enhancement factor and lower operating voltages because the electric field strength in the vicinity of the nanotubes tip can be enhanced by thousand times. The work function of nanostructure by using FN plot has been calculated with reverse engineering. With the help of modified FN equation, an important formula for effective emitting area (active area for emission of electrons) has been derived and employed to calculate the active emitting area for CNT field emitters. Therefore, it is of great interest to present a state of art study on the complete solution of FN equation for CNTs based field emitter displays. This manuscript will also provide a better understanding of calculation of different FE parameters of CNTs field emitters using FN equation.

  17. Carbon Nanotube-Based Structural Health Monitoring Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wincheski, Russell; Jordan, Jeffrey; Oglesby, Donald; Watkins, Anthony; Patry, JoAnne; Smits, Jan; Williams, Phillip

    2011-01-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT)-based sensors for structural health monitoring (SHM) can be embedded in structures of all geometries to monitor conditions both inside and at the surface of the structure to continuously sense changes. These CNTs can be manipulated into specific orientations to create small, powerful, and flexible sensors. One of the sensors is a highly flexible sensor for crack growth detection and strain field mapping that features a very dense and highly ordered array of single-walled CNTs. CNT structural health sensors can be mass-produced, are inexpensive, can be packaged in small sizes (0.5 micron(sup 2)), require less power than electronic or piezoelectric transducers, and produce less waste heat per square centimeter than electronic or piezoelectric transducers. Chemically functionalized lithographic patterns are used to deposit and align the CNTs onto metallic electrodes. This method consistently produces aligned CNTs in the defined locations. Using photo- and electron-beam lithography, simple Cr/Au thin-film circuits are patterned onto oxidized silicon substrates. The samples are then re-patterned with a CNT-attracting, self-assembled monolayer of 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES) to delineate the desired CNT locations between electrodes. During the deposition of the solution-suspended single- wall CNTs, the application of an electric field to the metallic contacts causes alignment of the CNTs along the field direction. This innovation is a prime candidate for smart skin technologies with applications ranging from military, to aerospace, to private industry.

  18. Molecular dynamics simulations of carbon nanotube-based gears

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jie; Globus, Al; Jaffe, Richard; Deardorff, Glenn

    1997-09-01

    We use a molecular dynamics simulation to investigate the properties and design space of molecular gears fashioned from carbon nanotubes with teeth added via a benzyne reaction known to occur with 0957-4484/8/3/001/img1. Brenner's reactive hydrocarbon potential is used to model interatomic forces within each molecular gear. A Lennard - Jones 6 - 12 potential or the Buckingham 0957-4484/8/3/001/img2 potential plus electrostatic interaction terms are used for intermolecular interactions between gears. A number of gear and gear/shaft configurations are simulated on parallel computers. One gear is powered by forcing the atoms near the end of the nanotube to rotate, and a second gear is allowed to rotate by keeping the atoms near the end of its nanotube constrained to a cylinder. The meshing aromatic gear teeth transfer angular momentum from the powered gear to the driven gear. Results suggest that these gears can operate at up to 50 - 100 GHz in a vacuum at room temperature. The failure mode involves tooth slip, not bond breaking, so failed gears can be returned to operation by lowering the temperature and/or rotation rate.

  19. A Review of Carbon Nanotubes-Based Gas Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun Wang

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Gas sensors have attracted intensive research interest due to the demand of sensitive, fast response, and stable sensors for industry, environmental monitoring, biomedicine, and so forth. The development of nanotechnology has created huge potential to build highly sensitive, low cost, portable sensors with low power consumption. The extremely high surface-to-volume ratio and hollow structure of nanomaterials is ideal for the adsorption of gas molecules. Particularly, the advent of carbon nanotubes (CNTs has fuelled the inventions of gas sensors that exploit CNTs' unique geometry, morphology, and material properties. Upon exposure to certain gases, the changes in CNTs' properties can be detected by various methods. Therefore, CNTs-based gas sensors and their mechanisms have been widely studied recently. In this paper, a broad but yet in-depth survey of current CNTs-based gas sensing technology is presented. Both experimental works and theoretical simulations are reviewed. The design, fabrication, and the sensing mechanisms of the CNTs-based gas sensors are discussed. The challenges and perspectives of the research are also addressed in this review.

  20. Fowler Nordheim theory of carbon nanotube based field emitters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parveen, Shama; Kumar, Avshish [Department of Physics, Jamia Millia Islamia (Central University), New Delhi (India); Husain, Samina [Centre for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Jamia Millia Islamia (Central University), New Delhi (India); Husain, Mushahid, E-mail: mush_reslab@rediffmail.com [Department of Physics, Jamia Millia Islamia (Central University), New Delhi (India)

    2017-01-15

    Field emission (FE) phenomena are generally explained in the frame-work of Fowler Nordheim (FN) theory which was given for flat metal surfaces. In this work, an effort has been made to present the field emission mechanism in carbon nanotubes (CNTs) which have tip type geometry at nanoscale. High aspect ratio of CNTs leads to large field enhancement factor and lower operating voltages because the electric field strength in the vicinity of the nanotubes tip can be enhanced by thousand times. The work function of nanostructure by using FN plot has been calculated with reverse engineering. With the help of modified FN equation, an important formula for effective emitting area (active area for emission of electrons) has been derived and employed to calculate the active emitting area for CNT field emitters. Therefore, it is of great interest to present a state of art study on the complete solution of FN equation for CNTs based field emitter displays. This manuscript will also provide a better understanding of calculation of different FE parameters of CNTs field emitters using FN equation.

  1. Multi-walled carbon nanotube-based RF antennas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elwi, Taha A; Al-Rizzo, Hussain M; Rucker, Daniel G; Dervishi, Enkeleda; Li, Zhongrui; Biris, Alexandru S

    2010-01-29

    A novel application that utilizes conductive patches composed of purified multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) embedded in a sodium cholate composite thin film to create microstrip antennas operating in the microwave frequency regime is proposed. The MWCNTs are suspended in an adhesive solvent to form a conductive ink that is printed on flexible polymer substrates. The DC conductivity of the printed patches was measured by the four probe technique and the complex relative permittivity was measured by an Agilent E5071B probe. The commercial software package, CST Microwave Studio (MWS), was used to simulate the proposed antennas based on the measured constitutive parameters. An excellent agreement of less than 0.2% difference in resonant frequency is shown. Simulated and measured results were also compared against identical microstrip antennas that utilize copper conducting patches. The proposed MWCNT-based antennas demonstrate a 5.6% to 2.2% increase in bandwidth, with respect to their corresponding copper-based prototypes, without significant degradation in gain and/or far-field radiation patterns.

  2. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Carbon Nanotube Based Gears

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jie; Globus, Al; Jaffe, Richard; Deardorff, Glenn; Chancellor, Marisa K. (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    We used molecular dynamics to investigate the properties and design space of molecular gears fashioned from carbon nanotubes with teeth added via a benzyne reaction known to occur with C60. A modified, parallelized version of Brenner's potential was used to model interatomic forces within each molecule. A Leonard-Jones 6-12 potential was used for forces between molecules. One gear was powered by forcing the atoms near the end of the buckytube to rotate, and a second gear was allowed.to rotate by keeping the atoms near the end of its buckytube on a cylinder. The meshing aromatic gear teeth transfer angular momentum from the powered gear to the driven gear. A number of gear and gear/shaft configurations were simulated. Cases in vacuum and with an inert atmosphere were examined. In an extension to molecular dynamics technology, some simulations used a thermostat on the atmosphere while the hydrocarbon gear's temperature was allowed to fluctuate. This models cooling the gears with an atmosphere. Results suggest that these gears can operate at up to 50-100 gigahertz in a vacuum or inert atmosphere at room temperature. The failure mode involves tooth slip, not bond breaking, so failed gears can be returned to operation by lowering temperature and/or rotation rate. Videos and atomic trajectory files in xyz format are presented.

  3. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Carbon Nanotube Based Gears

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jie; Globus, Al; Jaffe, Richard; Deardorff, Glenn; Chancellor, Marisa K. (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    We used molecular dynamics to investigate the properties and design space of molecular gears fashioned from carbon nanotubes with teeth added via a benzyne reaction known to occur with C60. A modified, parallelized version of Brenner's potential was used to model interatomic forces within each molecule. A Leonard-Jones 6-12 potential was used for forces between molecules. One gear was powered by forcing the atoms near the end of the buckytube to rotate, and a second gear was allowed.to rotate by keeping the atoms near the end of its buckytube on a cylinder. The meshing aromatic gear teeth transfer angular momentum from the powered gear to the driven gear. A number of gear and gear/shaft configurations were simulated. Cases in vacuum and with an inert atmosphere were examined. In an extension to molecular dynamics technology, some simulations used a thermostat on the atmosphere while the hydrocarbon gear's temperature was allowed to fluctuate. This models cooling the gears with an atmosphere. Results suggest that these gears can operate at up to 50-100 gigahertz in a vacuum or inert atmosphere at room temperature. The failure mode involves tooth slip, not bond breaking, so failed gears can be returned to operation by lowering temperature and/or rotation rate. Videos and atomic trajectory files in xyz format are presented.

  4. Carbon Nanotube Based Nano-Electro-Mechanical Systems (NEMS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jie; Dai, Hongjie; Saini, Subhash

    1998-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNT) enable nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS) because of their inherent nanostructure, intrinsic electric conductivity and mechanical resilience. The collaborative work between Stanford (experiment) and NASA Ames (theory and simulation) has made progress in two types of CNT based NEMS for nanoelectronics and sensor applications. The CNT tipped scanning probe microscopy (SPM) is a NEMS in which CNT tips are used for nanoscale probing, imaging and manipulating. It showed great improvement in probing surfaces and biological systems over conventional tips. We have recently applied it to write (lithography) and read (image) uniform SiO2 lines on large Si surface area at speed up to 0.5 mm per s. Preliminary work using approximately 10 nm multiwall nanotube tips produced approximately 10 nm structures and showed that the CNT tips didn't wear down when crashed as conventional tips often do. This presents a solution to the long standing tip-wear problem in SPM nanolithography. We have also explored potential of CNT tips in imaging DNA in water. Preliminary experiment using 10 nm CNT tips reached 5 nm resolution. The 1 nm nanolithography and 1 nm DNA imaging can be expected by using approximately 1 nm CNT tips. In contrast to CNT tipped SPM, we also fabricated CNT devices on silicon wafer in which CNTs connect patterned metallic lines on SiO2/Si by a simple chemical vapor deposition process. Using conventional lithography for silicon wafer, we have been able to obtain CNT based transistors and sensors. Investigations of the CNT NEMS as physical, biological and chemical sensors are in progress and will be discussed.

  5. Critical Role of the Sorting Polymer in Carbon Nanotube-Based Minority Carrier Devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mallajosyula, Arun T.; Nie, Wanyi; Gupta, Gautam; Blackburn, Jeffrey L.; Doorn, Stephen K.; Mohite, Aditya D.

    2016-12-27

    A prerequisite for carbon nanotube-based optoelectronic devices is the ability to sort them into a pure semiconductor phase. One of the most common sorting routes is enabled through using specific wrapping polymers. Here we show that subtle changes in the polymer structure can have a dramatic influence on the figures of merit of a carbon nanotube-based photovoltaic device. By comparing two commonly used polyfluorenes (PFO and PFO-BPy) for wrapping (7,5) and (6,5) chirality SWCNTs, we demonstrate that they have contrasting effects on the device efficiency. We attribute this to the differences in their ability to efficiently transfer charge. Although PFO may act as an efficient interfacial layer at the anode, PFO-BPy, having the additional pyridine side groups, forms a high resistance layer degrading the device efficiency. By comparing PFO|C60 and C60-only devices, we found that presence of a PFO layer at low optical densities resulted in the increase of all three solar cell parameters, giving nearly an order of magnitude higher efficiency over that of C60-only devices. In addition, with a relatively higher contribution to photocurrent from the PFO-C60 interface, an open circuit voltage of 0.55 V was obtained for PFO-(7,5)-C60 devices. On the other hand, PFO-BPy does not affect the open circuit voltage but drastically reduces the short circuit current density. These results indicate that the charge transport properties and energy levels of the sorting polymers have to be taken into account to fully understand their effect on carbon nanotube-based solar cells.

  6. Considerably improved photovoltaic performance of carbon nanotube-based solar cells using metal oxide layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Feijiu; Kozawa, Daichi; Miyauchi, Yuhei; Hiraoka, Kazushi; Mouri, Shinichiro; Ohno, Yutaka; Matsuda, Kazunari

    2015-02-18

    Carbon nanotube-based solar cells have been extensively studied from the perspective of potential application. Here we demonstrated a significant improvement of the carbon nanotube solar cells by the use of metal oxide layers for efficient carrier transport. The metal oxides also serve as an antireflection layer and an efficient carrier dopant, leading to a reduction in the loss of the incident solar light and an increase in the photocurrent, respectively. As a consequence, the photovoltaic performance of both p-single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT)/n-Si and n-SWNT/p-Si heterojunction solar cells using MoOx and ZnO layers is improved, resulting in very high photovoltaic conversion efficiencies of 17.0 and 4.0%, respectively. These findings regarding the use of metal oxides as multifunctional layers suggest that metal oxide layers could improve the performance of various electronic devices based on carbon nanotubes.

  7. Novel self-sensing carbon nanotube-based composites for rehabilitation of structural steel members

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Shafique; Doshi, Sagar; Schumacher, Thomas; Thostenson, Erik T.; McConnell, Jennifer

    2016-02-01

    Fatigue and fracture are among the most critical forms of damage in metal structures. Fatigue damage can initiate from microscopic defects (e.g., surface scratches, voids in welds, and internal defects) and initiate a crack. Under cyclic loading, these cracks can grow and reach a critical level to trigger fracture of the member which leads to compromised structural integrity and, in some cases, catastrophic failure of the entire structure. In our research, we are investigating a solution using carbon nanotube-based sensing composites, which have the potential to simultaneously rehabilitate and monitor fatigue-cracked structural members. These composites consist of a fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP) layer and a carbon nanotube-based sensing layer, which are integrated to form a novel structural self-sensing material. The sensing layer is composed of a non-woven aramid fabric that is coated with carbon nanotubes (CNT) to form an electrically conductive network that is extremely sensitive to detecting deformation as well as damage accumulation via changes in the resistance of the CNT network. In this paper, we introduce the sensing concept, describe the manufacturing of a model sensing prototype, and discuss a set of small-scale laboratory experiments to examine the load-carrying capacity and damage sensing response.

  8. Carbon nanotube-based sensing devices for human Arginase-1 detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Baldo

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available A new carbon nanotube-based device for detection of Arginase 1 (ARG-1 was produced. Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs were deposited between electrodes by dielectrophoresis (DEP in an accurate and reproducible way. This deposition method has the advantages of low cost and room temperature conditions and therefore, can be used on different kinds of substrates (silicon, glass, plastics allowing for large scale production of chemical or biological sensors. Scanning electrical microscope (SEM and electrical characterization have been performed on the biosensors before and after protein exposure. The devices were tested in the present work for the detection of ARG-1. They show high sensitivity and reproducibility, and can be easily and suitably modified to detect other proteins.

  9. Influence of functionalization on mechanical and electrical properties of carbon nanotube-based silver composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Hemant; Sharma, Vimal; Sharma, Manjula

    2014-05-01

    In this study, we have extended the molecular-level mixing method to fabricate multiwall carbon nanotube (CNT)-reinforced silver nanocomposites. The multiwall nanotubes used in the synthesis process were dispersed by two ways viz. covalent and non-covalent functionalization techniques. To elucidate the comparative effects of functionalization, structural, mechanical and electrical properties of nanocomposites were evaluated before and after sintering. The structural characterization revealed that the nanotubes were embedded, anchored and homogenously dispersed within the silver matrix. Hardness and Young's modulus of nanotube-reinforced nanocomposite were increased by a factor of 1-1.6 times than that of pure silver, even before and after the sintering. Covalently functionalized nanotube-based composites have shown more enhanced mechanical properties. The CNT reinforcement also improved the electrical conductivity of low-conducting nanosilver matrix before sintering. Non-covalently functionalized nanotube-based nanosilver composites showed more increased electrical conductivity before sintering. But a negative reinforcement effect was observed in high-conducting bulk silver matrix after the sintering. Thus, covalent functionalization might be appropriate for mechanical improvement in low-strength materials. However, non-covalent functionalization is suitable for electrical enhancement in low-conducting nanomaterials.

  10. Modelling the nonlinear behaviour of double walled carbon nanotube based resonator with curvature factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Ajay M.; Joshi, Anand Y.

    2016-10-01

    This paper deals with the nonlinear vibration analysis of a double walled carbon nanotube based mass sensor with curvature factor or waviness, which is doubly clamped at a source and a drain. Nonlinear vibrational behaviour of a double-walled carbon nanotube excited harmonically near its primary resonance is considered. The double walled carbon nanotube is harmonically excited by the addition of an excitation force. The modelling involves stretching of the mid plane and damping as per phenomenon. The equation of motion involves four nonlinear terms for inner and outer tubes of DWCNT due to the curved geometry and the stretching of the central plane due to the boundary conditions. The vibrational behaviour of the double walled carbon nanotube with different surface deviations along its axis is analyzed in the context of the time response, Poincaré maps and Fast Fourier Transformation diagrams. The appearance of instability and chaos in the dynamic response is observed as the curvature factor on double walled carbon nanotube is changed. The phenomenon of Periodic doubling and intermittency are observed as the pathway to chaos. The regions of periodic, sub-harmonic and chaotic behaviour are clearly seen to be dependent on added mass and the curvature factors in the double walled carbon nanotube. Poincaré maps and frequency spectra are used to explicate and to demonstrate the miscellany of the system behaviour. With the increase in the curvature factor system excitations increases and results in an increase of the vibration amplitude with reduction in excitation frequency.

  11. A Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotube-based Biosensor for Monitoring Microcystin-LR in Sources of Drinking Water Supplies

    Science.gov (United States)

    A multi-walled carbon nanotube-based electrochemical biosensor is developed for monitoring microcystin-LR (MC-LR), a toxic cyanobacterial toxin, in sources of drinking water supplies. The biosensor electrodes are fabricated using dense, mm-long multi-walled CNT (MWCNT) arrays gro...

  12. A Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotube-based Biosensor for Monitoring Microcystin-LR in Sources of Drinking Water Supplies

    Science.gov (United States)

    A multi-walled carbon nanotube-based electrochemical biosensor is developed for monitoring microcystin-LR (MC-LR), a toxic cyanobacterial toxin, in sources of drinking water supplies. The biosensor electrodes are fabricated using dense, mm-long multi-walled CNT (MWCNT) arrays gro...

  13. Frequency Shift of Carbon-Nanotube-Based Mass Sensor Using Nonlocal Elasticity Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Haw-Long

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The frequency equation of carbon-nanotube-based cantilever sensor with an attached mass is derived analytically using nonlocal elasticity theory. According to the equation, the relationship between the frequency shift of the sensor and the attached mass can be obtained. When the nonlocal effect is not taken into account, the variation of frequency shift with the attached mass on the sensor is compared with the previous study. According to this study, the result shows that the frequency shift of the sensor increases with increasing the attached mass. When the attached mass is small compared with that of the sensor, the nonlocal effect is obvious and increasing nonlocal parameter decreases the frequency shift of the sensor. In addition, when the location of the attached mass is closer to the free end, the frequency shift is more significant and that makes the sensor reveal more sensitive. When the attached mass is small, a high sensitivity is obtained.

  14. Charge transport in carbon nanotubes based materials: a Kubo-Greenwood computational approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Hiroyuki; Triozon, François; Kobayashi, Nobuhiko; Hirose, Kenji; Roche, Stephan

    2009-05-01

    In this contribution, we present a numerical study of quantum transport in carbon nanotubes based materials. After a brief presentation of the computational approach used to investigate the transport coefficient (Kubo method), the scaling properties of quantum conductance in ballistic regime as well as in the diffusive regimes are illustrated. The impact of elastic (impurities) and dynamical disorders (phonon vibrations) are analyzed separately, with the extraction of main transport length scales (mean free path and localization length), as well as the temperature dependence of the nanotube resistance. The results are found in very good agreement with both analytical results and experimental data, demonstrating the predictability efficiency of our computational strategy. To cite this article: H. Ishii et al., C. R. Physique 10 (2009).

  15. Single-wall carbon nanotube-based proton exchange membrane assembly for hydrogen fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girishkumar, G; Rettker, Matthew; Underhile, Robert; Binz, David; Vinodgopal, K; McGinn, Paul; Kamat, Prashant

    2005-08-30

    A membrane electrode assembly (MEA) for hydrogen fuel cells has been fabricated using single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) support and platinum catalyst. Films of SWCNTs and commercial platinum (Pt) black were sequentially cast on a carbon fiber electrode (CFE) using a simple electrophoretic deposition procedure. Scanning electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy showed that the nanotubes and the platinum retained their nanostructure morphology on the carbon fiber surface. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) revealed that the carbon nanotube-based electrodes exhibited an order of magnitude lower charge-transfer reaction resistance (R(ct)) for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) than did the commercial carbon black (CB)-based electrodes. The proton exchange membrane (PEM) assembly fabricated using the CFE/SWCNT/Pt electrodes was evaluated using a fuel cell testing unit operating with H(2) and O(2) as input fuels at 25 and 60 degrees C. The maximum power density obtained using CFE/SWCNT/Pt electrodes as both the anode and the cathode was approximately 20% better than that using the CFE/CB/Pt electrodes.

  16. Analysis of Tribological Behavior of Carbon Nanotube Based Industrial Mineral Gear Oil 250 cSt Viscosity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shubrajit Bhaumik

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper investigates the exceptional antiwear and extreme pressure properties of multiwalled carbon nanotube based mineral oil. Different samples of oil containing varying proportions of MWNT (MWNT and graphite were prepared. The samples were tested for their antiwear and load bearing capacity according to ASTM G99 and ASTM D-2783 standards. After pass load test in four ball tester the rubbed surfaces were investigated with Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM images. The wear test results show a decrease wear by 70–75% in case of multiwalled nanotube based mineral oil as compared with pure mineral oil. Furthermore, it has been observed that the load bearing capacity in case of multiwalled carbon nanotube based mineral oil increases by 20% as compared to pure mineral oil. A comparison in the antiwear and load bearing capacity properties of graphite and nanotube based mineral oil was studied which showed the inefficiency of graphite based lubricant over MWNT based oil. Thus, the finding would be helpful in developing new nanoparticle based lubricants.

  17. Development of Carbon Nanotube-Based Sensor to Monitor Crack Growth in Cracked Aluminum Structures Underneath Composite Patching

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-01

    carbon nanotube/epoxy composites,” Carbon, vol. 44, no. 14, pp. 3022–3029, Nov. 2006. [15] I. D. Rosca and S. V. Hoa , “Highly conductive...nanotube- based sensor- A review,” IEEE Sensors Journal, vol. 7, no. 1-2, pp. 266–284, Jan.–Feb., 2007. [23] M. Nofar, S. V. Hoa and M. D. Pugh

  18. Rectifying Properties of a Nitrogen/Boron-Doped Capped-Carbon-Nanotube-Based Molecular Junction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Peng; LIU De-Sheng; ZHANG Ying; WANG Pei-Ji; ZHANG Zhong

    2011-01-01

    @@ Based on the non-equilibrium Green's function method and first-principles density functional theory calculations, we investigate the electronic transport properties of a nitrogen/boron-doped capped-single-walled carbonnanotube-based molecular junction.Obvious rectifying behavior is observed and it is strongly dependent on the doping site.The best rectifying performance can be carried out when the nitrogen/boron atom dopes at a carbon site in the second layer.Moreover, the rectifying performance can be further improved by adjusting the distance between the Cso nanotube caps.%Based on the non-equilibrium Green's function method and first-principles density functional theory calculations, we investigate the electronic transport properties of a nitrogen/boron-doped capped-single-walled carbon-nanotube-based molecular junction. Obvious rectifying behavior is observed and it is strongly dependent on the doping site. The best rectifying performance can be carried out when the nitrogen/boron atom dopes at a carbon site in the second layer. Moreover, the rectifying performance can be further improved by adjusting the distance between the C60 nanotube caps.

  19. Controlling the Cross-Sensitivity of Carbon Nanotube-Based Gas Sensors to Water Using Zeolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Gwyn P; Buckley, David J; Adedigba, Abdul-Lateef; Sankar, Gopinathan; Skipper, Neal T; Parkin, Ivan P

    2016-10-05

    Carbon nanotube-based gas sensors can be used to detect harmful environmental pollutants such as NO2 at room temperature. Although they show promise as low-powered, sensitive, and affordable monitoring devices, cross-sensitivity of functionalized carbon nanotubes to water vapor often obscures the detection of target molecules. This is a barrier to adoption for monitoring of airborne pollutants because of the varying humidity levels found in real world environments. Zeolites, also known as molecular sieves because of their selective adsorption properties, are used in this work to control the cross-sensitivity of single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT)-based sensors to water vapor. Zeolites incorporated into the sensing layer are found to reduce interference effects that would otherwise obscure the identification of NO2 gas, permitting repeatable detection over a range of relative humidities. This significant improvement is found to depend on the arrangement of the SWCNT-zeolite layers in the sensing device, as well as the hydrophilicity of the chosen zeolite.

  20. Processing and Characterization of a Novel Distributed Strain Sensor Using Carbon Nanotube-Based Nonwoven Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongbo Dai

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the development of an innovative carbon nanotube-based non-woven composite sensor that can be tailored for strain sensing properties and potentially offers a reliable and cost-effective sensing option for structural health monitoring (SHM. This novel strain sensor is fabricated using a readily scalable process of coating Carbon nanotubes (CNT onto a nonwoven carrier fabric to form an electrically-isotropic conductive network. Epoxy is then infused into the CNT-modified fabric to form a free-standing nanocomposite strain sensor. By measuring the changes in the electrical properties of the sensing composite the deformation can be measured in real-time. The sensors are repeatable and linear up to 0.4% strain. Highest elastic strain gage factors of 1.9 and 4.0 have been achieved in the longitudinal and transverse direction, respectively. Although the longitudinal gage factor of the newly formed nanocomposite sensor is close to some metallic foil strain gages, the proposed sensing methodology offers spatial coverage, manufacturing customizability, distributed sensing capability as well as transverse sensitivity.

  1. Analytical Calculation of Sensing Parameters on Carbon Nanotube Based Gas Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elnaz Akbari

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Carbon Nanotubes (CNTs are generally nano-scale tubes comprising a network of carbon atoms in a cylindrical setting that compared with silicon counterparts present outstanding characteristics such as high mechanical strength, high sensing capability and large surface-to-volume ratio. These characteristics, in addition to the fact that CNTs experience changes in their electrical conductance when exposed to different gases, make them appropriate candidates for use in sensing/measuring applications such as gas detection devices. In this research, a model for a Field Effect Transistor (FET-based structure has been developed as a platform for a gas detection sensor in which the CNT conductance change resulting from the chemical reaction between NH3 and CNT has been employed to model the sensing mechanism with proposed sensing parameters. The research implements the same FET-based structure as in the work of Peng et al. on nanotube-based NH3 gas detection. With respect to this conductance change, the I–V characteristic of the CNT is investigated. Finally, a comparative study shows satisfactory agreement between the proposed model and the experimental data from the mentioned research.

  2. Bridged single-walled carbon nanotube-based atomic-scale mass sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali-Akbari, H. R.; Shaat, M.; Abdelkefi, A.

    2016-08-01

    The potentials of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) as mechanical resonators for atomic-scale mass sensing are presented. To this aim, a nonlocal continuum-based model is proposed to study the dynamic behavior of bridged single-walled carbon nanotube-based mass nanosensors. The carbon nanotube (CNT) is considered as an elastic Euler-Bernoulli beam with von Kármán type geometric nonlinearity. Eringen's nonlocal elastic field theory is utilized to model the interatomic long-range interactions within the structure of the CNT. This developed model accounts for the arbitrary position of the deposited atomic-mass. The natural frequencies and associated mode shapes are determined based on an eigenvalue problem analysis. An atom of xenon (Xe) is first considered as a specific case where the results show that the natural frequencies and mode shapes of the CNT are strongly dependent on the location of the deposited Xe and the nonlocal parameter of the CNT. It is also indicated that the first vibrational mode is the most sensitive when the mass is deposited at the middle of a single-walled carbon nanotube. However, when deposited in other locations, it is demonstrated that the second or third vibrational modes may be more sensitive. To investigate the sensitivity of bridged single-walled CNTs as mass sensors, different noble gases are considered, namely Xe, argon (Ar), and helium (He). It is shown that the sensitivity of the single-walled CNT to the Ar and He gases is much lower than the Xe gas due to the significant decrease in their masses. The derived model and performed analysis are so needed for mass sensing applications and particularly when the detected mass is randomly deposited.

  3. Pronounced Hysteresis and High Charge Storage Stability of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube-Based Field-Effect Transistors

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, S.G.; Sellin, P.

    2005-01-01

    In this letter, pronounced hysteresis loops were observed in single-walled carbon nanotube-based field-effect transistors (CNTFETs). The shift in threshold voltage was found to increase with increasing gate voltage sweep ranges. A significant enhancement in the charge storage stability over 14 days was obtained at room temperature after a two-stage hydrogen and air annealing process was applied to the CNTFETs. The passivation of interface traps by annealing in hydrogen and the removal of phys...

  4. Analysis of Tribological Behavior of Carbon Nanotube Based Industrial Mineral Gear Oil 250 cSt Viscosity

    OpenAIRE

    Shubrajit Bhaumik; Prabhu, S.; Kingsly Jeba Singh

    2014-01-01

    The paper investigates the exceptional antiwear and extreme pressure properties of multiwalled carbon nanotube based mineral oil. Different samples of oil containing varying proportions of MWNT (MWNT) and graphite were prepared. The samples were tested for their antiwear and load bearing capacity according to ASTM G99 and ASTM D-2783 standards. After pass load test in four ball tester the rubbed surfaces were investigated with Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) images. The wear test results s...

  5. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of a Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotube Based Gear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jie; Globus, Al; Srivastava, Deepak; Chancellor, Marisa K. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    We used molecular dynamics to investigate the properties of a multi-walled carbon nanotube based gear. Previous work computationally suggested that molecular gears fashioned from (14,0) single-walled carbon nanotubes operate well at 50-100 gigahertz. The gears were formed from nanotubes with teeth added via a benzyne reaction known to occur with C60. A modified, parallelized version of Brenner's potential was used to model interatomic forces within each molecule. A Leonard-Jones 6-12 potential was used for forces between molecules. The gear in this study was based on the smallest multi-walled nanotube supported by some experimental evidence. Each gear was a (52,0) nanotube surrounding a (37,10) nanotube with approximate 20.4 and 16,8 A radii respectively. These sizes were chosen to be consistent with inter-tube spacing observed by and were slightly larger than graphite inter-layer spacings. The benzyne teeth were attached via 2+4 cycloaddition to exterior of the (52,0) tube. 2+4 bonds were used rather than the 2+2 bonds observed by Hoke since 2+4 bonds are preferred by naphthalene and quantum calculations by Jaffe suggest that 2+4 bonds are preferred on carbon nanotubes of sufficient diameter. One gear was 'powered' by forcing the atoms near the end of the outside buckytube to rotate to simulate a motor. A second gear was allowed to rotate by keeping the atoms near the end of its outside buckytube on a cylinder. The ends of both gears were constrained to stay in an approximately constant position relative to each other, simulating a casing, to insure that the gear teeth meshed. The stiff meshing aromatic gear teeth transferred angular momentum from the powered gear to the driven gear. The simulation was performed in a vacuum and with a software thermostat. Preliminary results suggest that the powered gear had trouble turning the driven gear without slip. The larger radius and greater mass of these gears relative to the (14,0) gears previously studied requires a

  6. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of a Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotube Based Gear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jie; Globus, Al; Srivastava, Deepak; Chancellor, Marisa K. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    We used molecular dynamics to investigate the properties of a multi-walled carbon nanotube based gear. Previous work computationally suggested that molecular gears fashioned from (14,0) single-walled carbon nanotubes operate well at 50-100 gigahertz. The gears were formed from nanotubes with teeth added via a benzyne reaction known to occur with C60. A modified, parallelized version of Brenner's potential was used to model interatomic forces within each molecule. A Leonard-Jones 6-12 potential was used for forces between molecules. The gear in this study was based on the smallest multi-walled nanotube supported by some experimental evidence. Each gear was a (52,0) nanotube surrounding a (37,10) nanotube with approximate 20.4 and 16,8 A radii respectively. These sizes were chosen to be consistent with inter-tube spacing observed by and were slightly larger than graphite inter-layer spacings. The benzyne teeth were attached via 2+4 cycloaddition to exterior of the (52,0) tube. 2+4 bonds were used rather than the 2+2 bonds observed by Hoke since 2+4 bonds are preferred by naphthalene and quantum calculations by Jaffe suggest that 2+4 bonds are preferred on carbon nanotubes of sufficient diameter. One gear was 'powered' by forcing the atoms near the end of the outside buckytube to rotate to simulate a motor. A second gear was allowed to rotate by keeping the atoms near the end of its outside buckytube on a cylinder. The ends of both gears were constrained to stay in an approximately constant position relative to each other, simulating a casing, to insure that the gear teeth meshed. The stiff meshing aromatic gear teeth transferred angular momentum from the powered gear to the driven gear. The simulation was performed in a vacuum and with a software thermostat. Preliminary results suggest that the powered gear had trouble turning the driven gear without slip. The larger radius and greater mass of these gears relative to the (14,0) gears previously studied requires a

  7. Electrical characterization and microwave application of polyacrylonitrile/carbon nanotube-based carbon fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sano, Eiichi; Watanuki, Takehito; Ikebe, Masayuki; Fugetsu, Bunshi

    2017-09-01

    The addition of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in polyacrylonitrile (PAN) precursor is an effective way to increase the electrical conductivity of derived carbon fibers. The electrical conductivity of 4.9 × 104 S/m for a PAN-based carbon fiber at room temperature increases to 9.4 × 104 S/m by adding 0.5 wt % CNTs. The measured conductivity for both PAN/CNT- and PAN-based carbon fibers monotonically increases as the temperature increases from 10 and 300 K. An attempt to explain the measured temperature dependences of electrical conductivities by various carrier transport models showed that a simple two-carrier model can give reasonable electron and hole mobility. A monopole antenna fabricated with PAN/CNT-based carbon fibers shows a gain of 2.3 dBi at 2.4 GHz, which is only 0.2 dB smaller than that of a reference (Cu-wire) monopole antenna. This result suggests the possibility of using PAN/CNT-based carbon fibers as antenna elements.

  8. Carbon nanotubes-based chemiresistive immunosensor for small molecules: Detection of nitroaromatic explosives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Miso; Cella, Lakshmi N; Chen, Wilfred; Myung, Nosang V.

    2010-01-01

    In recent years, there has been a growing focus on use of one-dimensional (1-D) nanostructures, such as carbon nanotubes and nanowires, as transducer elements for label-free chemiresistive/field-effect transistor biosensors as they provide label-free and high sensitivity detection. While research to-date has elucidated the power of carbon nanotubes- and other 1-D nanostructure- based field effect transistors immunosensors for large charged macromolecules such as proteins and viruses, their application to small uncharged or charged molecules has not been demonstrated. In this paper we report a single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs)-based chemiresistive immunosensor for label-free, rapid, sensitive and selective detection of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT), a small molecule. The newly developed immunosensor employed a displacement mode/format in which SWNTs network forming conduction channel of the sensor was first modified with trinitrophenyl (TNP), an analog of TNT, and then ligated with the anti-TNP single chain antibody. Upon exposure to TNT or its derivatives the bound antibodies were displaced producing a large change, several folds higher than the noise, in the resistance/conductance of SWNTs giving excellent limit of detection, sensitivity and selectivity. The sensor detected between 0.5 ppb and 5000 ppb TNT with good selectivity to other nitroaromatic explosives and demonstrated good accuracy for monitoring TNT in untreated environmental water matrix. We believe this new displacement format can be easily generalized to other one-dimensional nanostructure-based chemiresistive immuno/affinity-sensors for detecting small and/or uncharged molecules of interest in environmental monitoring and health care. PMID:20688506

  9. A better carbon footprint label

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thøgersen, John; Nielsen, Kristian S.

    2016-01-01

    , participants saw the original Carbon Trust label and in the other condition they saw the same label, but with traffic light colors added to communicate the product’s relative performance in terms of carbon footprint. All included attributes were found to have a significant impact on consumer choices...

  10. A carbon nanotubes based ATP apta-sensing platform and its application in cellular assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Libing; Wei, Hui; Li, Jing; Li, Tao; Li, Dan; Li, Yunhui; Wang, Erkang

    2010-04-15

    In this paper, a sensitive and selective fluorescent aptasensor for adenosine triphosphate (ATP) detection is constructed, based on the noncovalent assembly of dye-labeled ATP aptamer and single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). In the absence of ATP, the dye tethered to the ATP aptamer is close to SWNTs, which can effectively quench fluorescence of the dye. Upon adding ATP, the fluorophore keeps away from the quencher, since ATP specifically binds to the aptamer and competes with carbon nanotubes, resulting in an increase in the fluorescence intensity. This enables ATP to be detected down to 4.5nM. To the best of our knowledge, this is the most sensitive fluorescent ATP aptasensor. In addition, prominent fluorescence signals were obtained in cellular ATP assays, thus the aptasensor could be used to detect ATP in real samples.

  11. Heat dissipation for the Intel Core i5 processor using multiwalled carbon-nanotube-based ethylene glycol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thang, Bui Hung; Trinh, Pham Van; Quang, Le Dinh; Khoi, Phan Hong; Minh, Phan Ngoc [Vietnam Academy of Science and Technology, Ho Chi Minh CIty (Viet Nam); Huong, Nguyen Thi [Hanoi University of Science, Hanoi (Viet Nam); Vietnam National University, Hanoi (Viet Nam)

    2014-08-15

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are some of the most valuable materials with high thermal conductivity. The thermal conductivity of individual multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) grown by using chemical vapor deposition is 600 ± 100 Wm{sup -1}K{sup -1} compared with the thermal conductivity 419 Wm{sup -1}K{sup -1} of Ag. Carbon-nanotube-based liquids - a new class of nanomaterials, have shown many interesting properties and distinctive features offering potential in heat dissipation applications for electronic devices, such as computer microprocessor, high power LED, etc. In this work, a multiwalled carbon-nanotube-based liquid was made of well-dispersed hydroxyl-functional multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT-OH) in ethylene glycol (EG)/distilled water (DW) solutions by using Tween-80 surfactant and an ultrasonication method. The concentration of MWCNT-OH in EG/DW solutions ranged from 0.1 to 1.2 gram/liter. The dispersion of the MWCNT-OH-based EG/DW solutions was evaluated by using a Zeta-Sizer analyzer. The MWCNT-OH-based EG/DW solutions were used as coolants in the liquid cooling system for the Intel Core i5 processor. The thermal dissipation efficiency and the thermal response of the system were evaluated by directly measuring the temperature of the micro-processor using the Core Temp software and the temperature sensors built inside the micro-processor. The results confirmed the advantages of CNTs in thermal dissipation systems for computer processors and other high-power electronic devices.

  12. A heparin-functionalized carbon nanotube-based affinity biosensor for dengue virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasik, Daniel; Mulchandani, Ashok; Yates, Marylynn V

    2017-05-15

    Dengue virus is an arthropod-borne virus transmitted primarily by Aedes mosquitos and is major cause of disease in tropical and subtropical regions. Colloquially known as Dengue Fever, infection can cause hemorrhagic disorders and death in humans and non-human primates. We report a novel electronic biosensor based on a single-walled carbon nanotube network chemiresistive transducer that is functionalized with heparin for low-cost, label-free, ultra-sensitive, and rapid detection of whole dengue virus (DENV). Heparin, an analog of the heparan sulfate proteoglycans that are receptors for dengue virus during infection of Vero cells and hepatocytes, was used for the first time in a biosensor as a biorecognition element instead of traditional antibody. Detection of DENV in viral culture supernatant has similar sensitivity as the corresponding viral titer in phosphate buffer despite the presence of growth media and Vero cell lysate. The biosensor demonstrated sensitivity within the clinically relevant range for humans and infected Aedes aegypti. It has potential application in clinical diagnosis and can improve point-of-care diagnostics of dengue infection. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Substrate pre-treatment of flexible material for printed electronics with carbon nanotube based ink

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denneulin, Aurore; Bras, Julien; Blayo, Anne; Neuman, Charles

    2011-02-01

    In this work, an innovative solution was developed in order to make paper-based material, used traditionally in the packaging and labelling industries, compatible with the printing of functional conductive inks. In order to avoid the deterioration of the ink functionalities due to different paper properties, a UV-curing inkjettable primer layer was developed. This pre-treatment enables homogeneous surface properties such as smoothness, absorption capacity and surface energy to be obtained, for almost all the examined substrates. To confirm the positive impact of such pre-treatment, conductivity has been measured when using a new conductive ink, combining the processability of the PEDOT-PSS conductive polymer with the high electrical properties of carbon nanotubes (CNTs). Significant improvement has been measured for all paper materials and similar conductivity (close to reference PET film) has been obtained whatever the substrate involved. This pre-treatment now makes it possible to consider paper-based material as a potential substrate for printed electronics. In this case, the substrate adaptation technique offers an innovative solution to produce low-cost and flexible electronics.

  14. Substrate pre-treatment of flexible material for printed electronics with carbon nanotube based ink

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denneulin, Aurore, E-mail: Aurore@polypore.fr [Polypore - 27, bd Louise Michel, F-92230 Gennevilliers (France); Laboratory of Pulp and Paper Science and Graphic Arts (LGP2) (UMR 5518 CNRS-CTP-INPG), Grenoble Institute of Technology, INP Grenoble - PAGORA, 461 Rue de la Papeterie, BP 65, 38402 St Martin d' Heres Cedex (France); Bras, Julien, E-mail: Julien.Bras@grenoble-inp.fr [Laboratory of Pulp and Paper Science and Graphic Arts (LGP2) (UMR 5518 CNRS-CTP-INPG), Grenoble Institute of Technology, INP Grenoble - PAGORA, 461 Rue de la Papeterie, BP 65, 38402 St Martin d' Heres Cedex (France); Blayo, Anne, E-mail: Anne.Blayo@grenoble-inp.fr [Laboratory of Pulp and Paper Science and Graphic Arts (LGP2), UMR 5518 CNRS-CTP-INPG, Grenoble Institute of Technology (INP Grenoble - PAGORA), 461 Rue de la Papeterie, BP 65, 38402 St Martin d' Heres Cedex (France); Neuman, Charles [Polypore - 27, bd Louise Michel, F-92230 Gennevilliers (France)

    2011-02-01

    In this work, an innovative solution was developed in order to make paper-based material, used traditionally in the packaging and labelling industries, compatible with the printing of functional conductive inks. In order to avoid the deterioration of the ink functionalities due to different paper properties, a UV-curing inkjettable primer layer was developed. This pre-treatment enables homogeneous surface properties such as smoothness, absorption capacity and surface energy to be obtained, for almost all the examined substrates. To confirm the positive impact of such pre-treatment, conductivity has been measured when using a new conductive ink, combining the processability of the PEDOT-PSS conductive polymer with the high electrical properties of carbon nanotubes (CNTs). Significant improvement has been measured for all paper materials and similar conductivity (close to reference PET film) has been obtained whatever the substrate involved. This pre-treatment now makes it possible to consider paper-based material as a potential substrate for printed electronics. In this case, the substrate adaptation technique offers an innovative solution to produce low-cost and flexible electronics.

  15. Psychological effectiveness of carbon labelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beattie, Geoffrey

    2012-04-01

    Despite the decision by supermarket-giant Tesco to delay its plan to add carbon-footprint information onto all of its 70,000 products, carbon labelling, if carefully designed, could yet change consumer behaviour. However, it requires a new type of thinking about consumers and much additional work.

  16. Protein functionalized carbon nanotubes-based smart lab-on-a-chip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Md Azahar; Solanki, Pratima R; Srivastava, Saurabh; Singh, Samer; Agrawal, Ved V; John, Renu; Malhotra, Bansi D

    2015-03-18

    A label-free impedimetric lab on a chip (iLOC) is fabricated using protein (bovine serum albumin) and antiapolipoprotein B functionalized carbon nanotubes-nickel oxide (CNT-NiO) nanocomposite for low-density lipoprotein (LDL) detection. The antiapolipoprotein B (AAB) functionalized CNT-NiO microfluidic electrode is assembled with polydimethylsiloxane rectangular microchannels (cross section: 100 × 100 μm). Cytotoxicity of the synthesized CNTs, NiO nanoparticles, and CNT-NiO nanocomposite has been investigated in the presence of lung epithelial cancer A549 cell line using MTT assay. The CNT-NiO nanocomposite shows higher cell viability at a concentration of 6.5 μg/mL compared to those using individual CNTs. The cell viability and proliferation studies reveal that the toxicity increases with increasing CNTs concentration. The X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies have been used to quantify the functional groups present on the CNT-NiO electrode surface before and after proteins functionalization. The binding kinetic and electrochemical activities of CNT-NiO based iLOC have been conducted using chronocoulometry and impedance spectroscopic techniques. This iLOC shows excellent sensitivity of 5.37 kΩ (mg/dL)(-1) and a low detection limit of 0.63 mg/dL in a wide concentration range (5-120 mg/dL) of LDL. The binding kinetics of antigen-antibody interaction of LDL molecules reveal a high association rate constant (8.13 M(-1) s(-1)). Thus, this smart nanocomposite (CNT-NiO) based iLOC has improved stability and reproducibility and has implications toward in vivo diagnostics.

  17. Single-walled carbon nanotube based transparent immunosensor for detection of a prostate cancer biomarker osteopontin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, Abhinav; Hong, Seongkyeol; Singh, Renu [School of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST), Ulsan 689-798 (Korea, Republic of); Jang, Jaesung, E-mail: jjang@unist.ac.kr [School of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST), Ulsan 689-798 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Biomedical Engineering, Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST), Ulsan 689-798 (Korea, Republic of); School of Materials Science and Engineering, Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST), Ulsan 689-798 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-04-15

    Highlights: • A transparent CNT immunosensor is presented for detection of a prostate cancer biomarker osteopontin. • This immunosensor showed a highly linear and reproducible behavior from 1 pg mL{sup −1} to 1 μg mL{sup −1}. • The limit of detection of the immunosensor was 0.3 pg mL{sup −1}. • This immunosensor demonstrated high selectivity against bovine serum albumin and human serum. - Abstract: Osteopontin (OPN) is involved in almost all steps of cancer development, and it is being investigated as a potential biomarker for a diagnosis and prognosis of prostate cancer. Here, we report a label-free, highly sensitive and transparent immunosensor based on single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) for detection of OPN. A high density of −COOH functionalized SWCNTs was deposited between two gold/indium tin oxide electrodes on a glass substrate by dielectrophoresis. Monoclonal antibodies specific to OPN were covalently immobilized on the SWCNTs. Relative resistance change of the immunosensors was measured as the concentration of OPN in phosphate buffer saline (PBS) and human serum was varied from 1 pg mL{sup −1} to 1 μg mL{sup −1} for different channel lengths of 2, 5, and 10 μm, showing a highly linear and reproducible behavior (R{sup 2} > 97%). These immunosensors were also specific to OPN against another test protein, bovine serum albumin, PBS and human serum, showing that a limit of detection for OPN was 0.3 pg mL{sup −1}. This highly sensitive and transparent immunosensor has a great potential as a simple point-of-care test kit for various protein biomarkers.

  18. Electrical and optical properties of reduced graphene oxide and multi-walled carbon nanotubes based nanocomposites: A comparative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goumri, Meryem; Lucas, Bruno; Ratier, Bernard; Baitoul, Mimouna

    2016-10-01

    Graphene and multi-walled carbon nanotubes have attracted interest for a number of potential applications. One of the most actively pursued applications uses graphene and carbon nanotubes as a transparent conducting electrode in solar cells, displays or touch screens. In this work, in situ reduced graphene oxide/Poly (vinyl alcohol) and multi-walled carbon nanotubes/Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate/Poly (vinyl alcohol) composites were prepared by water dispersion and different reduction treatments. Comparative studies were conducted to explore the electrical and optical properties of nanocomposites based on graphene and multi-walled carbon nanotubes. A thermal reduction of graphene oxide was more effective, producing films with sheet resistances as low as 102-103 Ω/square with 80% transmittance for 550 nm light. The percolation threshold of the thermally reduced graphene oxide composites (0.35 vol%) was much lower than that of the chemically reduced graphene oxide composites (0.57 vol%), and than that of the carbon nanotubes composites (0.47 vol%). The Seebeck coefficient of graphene oxide films changes from about 40 μV/K to -30 μV/K after an annealing of three hours at 200 °C. The optical absorption of the nanocomposites showed a high absorbance in near UV regions and the photoluminescence enhancement was achieved at 1 wt% graphene loading, while the carbon nanotubes based composite presents a significant emission at 0.7 wt% followed with a photoluminescence quenching at higher fraction of the nanofillers 1.6 wt% TRGO and 1 wt% MWCNTs.

  19. Mechanically robust, electrically conductive ultralow-density carbon nanotube-based aerogels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Worsley, Marcus A.; Baumann, Theodore F.; Satcher, Jr., Joe H.

    2016-10-04

    Disclosed here is a device comprising a porous carbon aerogel or composite thereof as an energy storage material, catalyst support, sensor or adsorbent, wherein the porous carbon aerogel comprises a network of interconnected struts comprising carbon nanotube bundles covalently crosslinked by graphitic carbon nanoparticles, wherein the carbon nanotubes account for 5 to 95 wt. % of the aerogel and the graphitic carbon nanoparticles account for 5 to 95 wt. % of the aerogel, and wherein the aerogel has an electrical conductivity of at least 10 S/m and is capable of withstanding strains of more than 10% before fracture.

  20. Carbon Nanotube-Based Adsorbents for Ultrafine Particulate and Volatile Air Contaminants Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — While the protective qualities of activated carbon have been enhanced by the addition of specific metal salts, activated carbon technology has changed little over...

  1. Carbon nanotube based multi electrode arrays for neuronal interfacing: progress and prospects

    OpenAIRE

    Yael eHanein; Lilach eBareket-Keren

    2013-01-01

    Carbon nanotube coatings have been demonstrated over the past several years as a promising material for neuronal interfacing applications. In particular, in the realm of neuronal implants, carbon nanotubes have major advantages owing to their unique mechanical and electrical properties. Here we review recent investigations utilizing carbon nanotubes in neuro-interfacing applications. Cell adhesion, neuronal engineering and multi electrode recordings with carbon nanotubes are described. We als...

  2. Carbon nanotube based multi electrode arrays for neuronal interfacing: progress and prospects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yael eHanein

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanotube coatings have been demonstrated over the past several years as a promising material for neuronal interfacing applications. In particular, in the realm of neuronal implants, carbon nanotubes have major advantages owing to their unique mechanical and electrical properties. Here we review recent investigations utilizing carbon nanotubes in neuro-interfacing applications. Cell adhesion, neuronal engineering and multi electrode recordings with carbon nanotubes are described. We also highlight prospective advances in this field, in particular, progress towards flexible, bio-compatible carbon nanotubes technology.

  3. Carbon nanotube based biomedical agents for heating, temperature sensoring and drug delivery

    CERN Document Server

    Klingeler, Ruediger; Buechner, Bernd

    2009-01-01

    Due to their extraordinary physical and chemical properties carbon nanotubes reveal a promising potential as biomedical agents for heating, temperature sensoring and drug delivery on the cellular level. Filling carbon nanotubes with tailored materials realises nanoscaled containers in which the active content is encapsulated by a protecting carbon shell. We describe different synthesis routes and show the structural and magnetic properties of carbon nanotubes. In particular, the filling with magnetic materials offers the potential for hyperthermia applications while the insertion of NMR active substances allows the usage as markers and sensors. The potential of carbon nanotubes for biomedical applications is highlighted by hyperthermia studies which prove their applicability for local in-situ heating. In addition we have shown that a non-invasive temperature control by virtue of a carbon-wrapped nanoscaled thermometer and filling with anti-cancer drugs is possible.

  4. Carbon Nanotube Based Electric Propulsion Thruster with Low Power Consumption Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This SBIR project is to develop field emission electric propulsion (FEEP) thruster using carbon nanotubes (CNT) integrated anode. FEEP thrusters have gained...

  5. Carbon nanotube-based coatings to induce flow enhancement in hydrophilic nanopores

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wagemann, Enrique; Walther, Jens Honore; Zambrano, Harvey

    2016-01-01

    that carbon nanotubes (CNTs) feature ultrafast waterflow rates which result in flow enhancements of 1 to 5 orders of magnitude compared to Hagen-Poiseuille predictions. In the present study, CNT-based coatings are considered to induce water flow enhancement in silica nanopores with different radius. We......-walled carbon nanotubes implemented as coating material in silica nanopores....

  6. Carbon nanotube based separation columns for high electrical field strengths in microchip electrochromatography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Klaus Bo; Chen, Miaoxiang Max; Mølhave, Kristian

    2011-01-01

    Patterning carbon nanotubes into an array of pillars makes it possible to increase the electrical field strength applied across a separation column by more than one order of magnitude.......Patterning carbon nanotubes into an array of pillars makes it possible to increase the electrical field strength applied across a separation column by more than one order of magnitude....

  7. Copper-decorated carbon nanotubes-based composite electrodes for nonenzymatic detection of glucose

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pop, A.; Manea, F.; Orha, C.; Motoc, S.; Llinoiu, E.; Vaszilcsin, N.; Schoonman, J.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to prepare three types of multiwall carbon nanotubes (CNT)-based composite electrodes and to modify their surface by copper electrodeposition for nonenzymatic oxidation and determination of glucose from aqueous solution. Copper-decorated multiwall carbon nanotubes composite

  8. Nondestructive Evaluation Techniques for Development and Characterization of Carbon Nanotube Based Superstructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wincheski, Buzz; Kim, Jae-Woo; Sauti, Godfrey; Wainwright, Elliot; Williams, Phillip; Siochi, Emile J.

    2014-01-01

    Recently, multiple commercial vendors have developed capability for the production of large-scale quantities of high-quality carbon nanotube sheets and yarns. While the materials have found use in electrical shielding applications, development of structural systems composed of a high volume fraction of carbon nanotubes is still lacking. A recent NASA program seeks to address this by prototyping a structural nanotube composite with strength-toweight ratio exceeding current state-of-the-art carbon fiber composites. Commercially available carbon nanotube sheets, tapes, and yarns are being processed into high volume fraction carbon nanotube-polymer nanocomposites. Nondestructive evaluation techniques have been applied throughout this development effort for material characterization and process control. This paper will report on the progress of these efforts, including magnetic characterization of residual catalyst content, Raman scattering characterization of nanotube diameter, defect ratio, and nanotube strain, and polarized Raman scattering for characterization of nanotube alignment.

  9. DQ thermal buckling analysis of embedded curved carbon nanotubes based on nonlocal elasticity theory

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Setoodeh, AliReza; Derahaki, Morteza; Bavi, Navid

    2015-01-01

    Abstract To investigate the thermal buckling of curved carbon nanotubes (CCNTs) embedded in an elastic medium, nonlocal elasticity theory is employed in combination with the theory of thin curved beams...

  10. Effect of sintering on mechanical and electrical properties of carbon nanotube based silver nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, H.; Sharma, V.

    2015-03-01

    Nanocrystalline (single and multiwall) carbon nanotube reinforced silver nanocomposites are successfully synthesized by a modified molecular level mixing method. These materials are subsequently sintered up to 800 °C in inert atmosphere for 12 h. To elucidate the effect of sintering, micro-structural, mechanical and electrical properties of fabricated nanocomposites are evaluated before and after sintering. Scanning and transmission electron microscopic characterization have revealed that the carbon nanotubes are embedded, anchored and homogenously dispersed in silver matrix. Measured hardness and Young's modulus of fabricated nanocomposites are increased by 20-30 % after sintering. The carbon nanotube reinforcement has also improved electrical conductivity of low conducting nano-silver matrix before sintering. However, negative reinforcement effect is observed in high conducting bulk silver matrix after sintering. Comparatively improved mechanical and electrical properties of single wall carbon nanotube reinforced nanocomposites than multiwall nanotube reinforced nanocomposite are observed, which are correlated with high aspect ratio and larger effective contact surface area of single wall carbon nanotubes.

  11. Carbon nanotube-based sensor and method for detection of crack growth in a structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smits, Jan M. (Inventor); Kite, Marlen T. (Inventor); Moore, Thomas C. (Inventor); Wincheski, Russell A. (Inventor); Ingram, JoAnne L. (Inventor); Watkins, Anthony N. (Inventor); Williams, Phillip A. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A sensor has a plurality of carbon nanotube (CNT)-based conductors operatively positioned on a substrate. The conductors are arranged side-by-side, such as in a substantially parallel relationship to one another. At least one pair of spaced-apart electrodes is coupled to opposing ends of the conductors. A portion of each of the conductors spanning between each pair of electrodes comprises a plurality of carbon nanotubes arranged end-to-end and substantially aligned along an axis. Because a direct correlation exists between the resistance of a carbon nanotube and its strain, changes experienced by the portion of the structure to which the sensor is coupled induce a corresponding change in the electrical properties of the conductors, thereby enabling detection of crack growth in the structure.

  12. Carbon Nanotube Based Molecular Electronics and Motors: A View from Classical and Quantum Dynamics Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Deepak; Saini, Subhash (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    The tubular forms of fullerenes popularly known as carbon nanotubes are experimentally produced as single-, multiwall, and rope configurations. The nanotubes and nanoropes have shown to exhibit unusual mechanical and electronic properties. The single wall nanotubes exhibit both semiconducting and metallic behavior. In short undefected lengths they are the known strongest fibers which are unbreakable even when bent in half. Grown in ropes their tensile strength is approximately 100 times greater than steel at only one sixth the weight. Employing large scale classical and quantum molecular dynamics simulations we will explore the use of carbon nanotubes and carbon nanotube junctions in 2-, 3-, and 4-point molecular electronic device components, dynamic strength characterization for compressive, bending and torsional strains, and chemical functionalization for possible use in a nanoscale molecular motor. The above is an unclassified material produced for non-competitive basic research in the nanotechnology area.

  13. Sub percolation threshold carbon nanotube based polyvinylidene fluoride polymer-polymer composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Cedric Antony

    The study of piezoelectric materials has traditionally focused largely on homogeneous crystalline or semi-crystalline materials. This research focuses on the concept of piezoelectric composites using selective microstructural reinforcement in the piezoelectric material to improve the piezoelectric properties. This is done using a polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) and carbon nanotube composite as the model system. A multi-tiered engineering approach is taken to understand the material (experimental and computational analyses) and design a composite system which provides an effective platform for future research in piezoelectric improvement. A finite element analysis is used to evaluate the ability of carbon nanotubes to generate a heterogeneous electric field where local improvements in electric field produce an increase in the effective piezoelectric strength. The study finds that weight percent and aspect ratio of the carbon nanotubes are of key importance while formations of percolating networks are detrimental to performance. This motivates investigation into electrospinning into a method of producing sub percolation threshold composites with large carbon nanotube content. However, the electrospun fabrics have too low of a dielectric strength to sustain high strength electric fields. This is studied within the context of high voltage physics and a solution inspired by traditional composites manufacturing is proposed wherein the electrospun fiber mat is used as the fiber reinforcing component of a polymer-polymer composite. This composite is thoroughly analyzed to show that it allows for a high dielectric strength combined with high carbon nanotube content. It is also shown that the PVDF contains the proper crystal structure to allow for piezoelectric properties. Furthermore, the addition of carbon nanotubes greatly improves the strength and stiffness of the composite, as well as affecting the internal electric field response to an applied voltage. These qualities

  14. Multifunctional Carbon Nanotube-Based Sensors for Damage Detection and Self Healing in Structural Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-29

    processing of thick-section composites, an alternative approach to the traditional calendering method of carbon nanotube dispersion has been...accomplished using a high shear stress field [2]. This method of dispersion incorporates a calendering approach through which large agglomerates of nanotubes...comparison of the different microstructural configurations resulting from the calendering approach vs. the sizing approach. The electrical conductivity of

  15. Carbon nanotube-based structural health monitoring for fiber reinforced composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hao; Liu, Kan; Mardirossian, Aris; Heider, Dirk; Thostenson, Erik

    2017-04-01

    In fiber reinforced composite materials, the modes of damage accumulation, ranging from microlevel to macro-level (matrix cracks development, fiber breakage, fiber-matrix de-bonding, delamination, etc.), are complex and hard to be detected through conventional non-destructive evaluation methods. Therefore, in order to assure the outstanding structural performance and high durability of the composites, there has been an urgent need for the design and fabrication smart composites with self-damage sensing capabilities. In recent years, the macroscopic forms of carbon nanotube materials have been maturely investigated, which provides the opportunity for structural health monitoring based on the carbon nanotubes that are integrated in the inter-laminar areas of advanced fiber composites. Here in this research, advanced fiber composites embedded with laminated carbon nanotube layers are manufactured for damage detection due to the relevant spatial electrical property changes once damage occurs. The mechanical-electrical coupling response is recorded and analyzed during impact test. The design and manufacturing of integrating the carbon nanotubes intensely affect the detecting sensitivity and repeatability of the integrated multifunctional sensors. The ultimate goal of the reported work is to develop a novel structural health monitoring method with the capability of reporting information on the damage state in a real-time way.

  16. Study of Electromagnetic Wave Absorption Properties of Carbon Nanotubes-Based Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-29

    Publications: [1]. G. L. Zhao, Z. Ye, Z. Li, J. A. Roberts, "New carbon nanotube-epoxy composite for dampening microwave cavity resonance", IEEE Xplore ...Nanotechnology ( IEEE - NANO), 2012 12th IEEE Conference on 20-23 Aug. 2012. [2]. Z. Li, G. L. Zhao, P. Zhang, S. Guo, J. Tang, " Thermoelectric

  17. Production and Characterization of Carbon Nanotubes and Nanotube-Based Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolaev, Pavel; Arepalli, Sivaram; Holmes, William; Gorelik, Olga; Files, Brad; Scott, Carl; Santos, Beatrice; Mayeaux, Brian; Victor, Joe

    1999-01-01

    The Nobel Prize winning discovery of the Buckuball (C60) in 1985 at Rice University by a group including Dr. Richard Smalley led to the whole new class of carbon allotropes including fullerenes and nanotubes. Especially interesting from many viewpoints are single-walled carbon nanotubes, which structurally are like a single graphitic sheet wrapped around a cylinder and capped at the ends. This cylinders have diameter as small as 0.5 - 2 nm (1/100,000th the diameter of a human hair) and are as long as 0.1 - 1 mm. Nanotubes are really individual molecules and believed to be defect-free, leading to high tensile strength despite their low density. Additionally, these fibers exhibit electrical conductivity as high as copper, thermal conductivity as high as diamond, strength 100 times higher than steel at one-sixth the weight, and high strain to failure. Thus it is believed that developments in the field of nanotechnology will lead to stronger and lighter composite materials for next generation spacecraft. Lack of a bulk method of production is the primary reason nanotubes are not used widely today. Toward this goal JSC nanotube team is exploring three distinct production techniques: laser ablation, arc discharge and chemical vapor deposition (CVD, in collaboration with Rice University). In laser ablation technique high-power laser impinges on the piece of carbon containing small amount of catalyst, and nanotubes self-assemble from the resulting carbon vapor. In arc generator similar vapor is created in arc discharge between carbon electrodes with catalyst. In CVD method nanotubes grow at much lower temperature on small catalyst particles from carbon-containing feedstock gas (methane or carbon monoxide). As of now, laser ablation produces cleanest material, but mass yield is rather small. Arc discharge produces grams of material, but purity is low. CVD technique is still in baby steps, but preliminary results look promising, as well as perspective of scaling the process

  18. Production and Characterization of Carbon Nanotubes and Nanotube-Based Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolaev, Pavel; Arepalli, Sivaram; Holmes, William; Gorelik, Olga; Files, Brad; Scott, Carl; Santos, Beatrice; Mayeaux, Brian; Victor, Joe

    1999-01-01

    The Nobel Prize winning discovery of the Buckuball (C60) in 1985 at Rice University by a group including Dr. Richard Smalley led to the whole new class of carbon allotropes including fullerenes and nanotubes. Especially interesting from many viewpoints are single-walled carbon nanotubes, which structurally are like a single graphitic sheet wrapped around a cylinder and capped at the ends. This cylinders have diameter as small as 0.5 - 2 nm (1/100,000th the diameter of a human hair) and are as long as 0.1 - 1 mm. Nanotubes are really individual molecules and believed to be defect-free, leading to high tensile strength despite their low density. Additionally, these fibers exhibit electrical conductivity as high as copper, thermal conductivity as high as diamond, strength 100 times higher than steel at one-sixth the weight, and high strain to failure. Thus it is believed that developments in the field of nanotechnology will lead to stronger and lighter composite materials for next generation spacecraft. Lack of a bulk method of production is the primary reason nanotubes are not used widely today. Toward this goal JSC nanotube team is exploring three distinct production techniques: laser ablation, arc discharge and chemical vapor deposition (CVD, in collaboration with Rice University). In laser ablation technique high-power laser impinges on the piece of carbon containing small amount of catalyst, and nanotubes self-assemble from the resulting carbon vapor. In arc generator similar vapor is created in arc discharge between carbon electrodes with catalyst. In CVD method nanotubes grow at much lower temperature on small catalyst particles from carbon-containing feedstock gas (methane or carbon monoxide). As of now, laser ablation produces cleanest material, but mass yield is rather small. Arc discharge produces grams of material, but purity is low. CVD technique is still in baby steps, but preliminary results look promising, as well as perspective of scaling the process

  19. Carbon Nanotube-Based Permeable Membranes: A Platform for Studying Nanofluidics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holt, J K; Park, H G; Noy, A; Huser, T; Eaglesham, D; Bakajin, O

    2004-05-25

    A membrane of multiwalled carbon nanotubes embedded in a silicon nitride matrix was fabricated for use in studying fluid mechanics on the nanometer scale. Characterization by fluorescent tracer diffusion and scanning electron microscopy suggests that the membrane is void-free near the silicon substrate on which it rests, implying that the hollow core of the nanotube is the only conduction path for molecular transport. Nitrogen flow measurements of a nanoporous silicon nitride membrane, fabricated by sacrificial removal of carbon, give a flow rate of 0.086 cc/sec. Calculations of water flow across a nanotube membrane give a rate of 2.1x10{sup -6} cc/sec (0.12 {micro}L/min).

  20. Self-propelled carbon nanotube based microrockets for rapid capture and isolation of circulating tumor cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Shashwat S.; Jalota-Badhwar, Archana; Zope, Khushbu R.; Todkar, Kiran J.; Mascarenhas, Russel R.; Chate, Govind P.; Khutale, Ganesh V.; Bharde, Atul; Calderon, Marcelo; Khandare, Jayant J.

    2015-05-01

    Here, we report a non-invasive strategy for isolating cancer cells by autonomously propelled carbon nanotube (CNT) microrockets. H2O2-driven oxygen (O2) bubble-propelled microrockets were synthesized using CNT and Fe3O4 nanoparticles in the inner surface and covalently conjugating transferrin on the outer surface. Results show that self-propellant microrockets can specifically capture cancer cells.Here, we report a non-invasive strategy for isolating cancer cells by autonomously propelled carbon nanotube (CNT) microrockets. H2O2-driven oxygen (O2) bubble-propelled microrockets were synthesized using CNT and Fe3O4 nanoparticles in the inner surface and covalently conjugating transferrin on the outer surface. Results show that self-propellant microrockets can specifically capture cancer cells. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr01797a

  1. Monitoring of Glucose in Beer Brewing by a Carbon Nanotubes Based Nylon Nanofibrous Biosensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Mason

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This work presents the design, preparation, and characterization of a novel glucose electrochemical biosensor based on the immobilization of glucose oxidase (GOX into a nylon nanofibrous membrane (NFM prepared by electrospinning and functionalized with multiwalled carbon nanotubes (CNT. A disc of such GOX/CNT/NFM membrane (40 μm in thickness was used for coating the surface of a glassy carbon electrode. The resulting biosensor was characterized by cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometry, with ferrocene methanol as mediator. The binding of GOX around the CNT/NFM greatly enhances the electron transfer, which results in a biosensor with a current five times higher than without CNT. The potential usefulness of the proposed biosensor was demonstrated with the analysis of glucose in commercial beverages and along the monitoring of the brewing process for making beer, from the mashing to the fermentation steps.

  2. Carbon Nanotube-based Super Nanotube: Tailorable Thermal Conductivity at Three-dimensional

    CERN Document Server

    Zhan, Haifei; Gu, Yuantong

    2015-01-01

    The advancements of nanomaterials or nanostructures have enabled the possibility of fabricating multifunctional materials that hold great promises in engineering applications. The carbon nanotube (CNT)-based nanostructure is one representative building block for such multifunctional materials. Based on a series of in silico studies, we report the tailorability of the thermal conductivity of a three-dimensional CNT-based nanostructure, i.e., the single wall CNT (SWNT)-based super nanotube (ST). It is shown that the thermal conductivity of STs varies with different connecting carbon rings, and the ST with longer constituent SWNTs and larger diameter yield to a smaller thermal conductivity. Further results reveal that the inverse of the ST thermal conductivity exhibits a good linear relationship with the inverse of its length. Particularly, it is found that the thermal conductivity exhibits an approximately proportional relationship with the inverse of the temperature, but appears insensitive to the axial strain...

  3. Self-propelled carbon nanotube based microrockets for rapid capture and isolation of circulating tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Shashwat S; Jalota-Badhwar, Archana; Zope, Khushbu R; Todkar, Kiran J; Mascarenhas, Russel R; Chate, Govind P; Khutale, Ganesh V; Bharde, Atul; Calderon, Marcelo; Khandare, Jayant J

    2015-05-21

    Here, we report a non-invasive strategy for isolating cancer cells by autonomously propelled carbon nanotube (CNT) microrockets. H2O2-driven oxygen (O2) bubble-propelled microrockets were synthesized using CNT and Fe3O4 nanoparticles in the inner surface and covalently conjugating transferrin on the outer surface. Results show that self-propellant microrockets can specifically capture cancer cells.

  4. Fabrication and Electrochemical Properties of Carbon Nanotube-based Composite Electrodes for Electrochemical Capacitor Applications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kwang; Bum; Kim

    2007-01-01

    1 Results Electrochemical capacitors (ECs) are expected to be used in hybrid electric vehicles in combination with batteries or fuel cells because of their higher power density than batteries. ECs using electrical double layer capacitance of carbon based materials and pseudocapacitance of transition metal oxides are called electrochemical double layer capacitors (EDLC) and supercapacitors (or pseudocapacitor), respectively. Transition metal oxides are considered the best candidates for high energy dens...

  5. Variational principles for transversely vibrating multiwalled carbon nanotubes based on nonlocal Euler-Bernoulli beam model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adali, Sarp

    2009-05-01

    Variational principles are derived for multiwalled carbon nanotubes undergoing vibrations. Derivations are based on the continuum modeling with the Euler-Bernoulli beam representing the nanotubes and small scale effects taken into account via the nonlocal elastic theory. Hamilton's principle for multiwalled nanotubes is given and Rayleigh's quotient for the frequencies is derived for nanotubes undergoing free vibrations. Natural and geometric boundary conditions are derived which lead to a set of coupled boundary conditions due to nonlocal effects.

  6. Development of a Polymer-carbon Nanotubes based Economic Solar Collector

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, S. I.; Kissick, John; Spence, Stephen; Boyle, Christine

    2014-01-01

    A low cost solar collector was developed by using polymeric components as opposed to metal and glass components of traditional solar collectors. In order to utilize polymers for the absorber of the solar collector, Carbon Nanotubes (CNT) has been added as a filler to improve the thermal conductivity and the solar absorptivity of polymers. The solar collector was designed as a multi-layer construction with considering the economic manufacturing. Through the mathematical heat transfer analysis,...

  7. Vibration signature analysis of single walled carbon nanotube based nanomechanical sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Anand Y.; Harsha, S. P.; Sharma, Satish C.

    2010-06-01

    In the present paper, the simulation of the mechanical responses of individual carbon nanotubes treated as thin shells with thickness has been done using FEM. The resonant frequencies of the fixed free and the bridged SWCNT have been investigated. This analysis explores the resonant frequency shift of SWCNTs caused by the changes in the size of CNT in terms of length as well as the masses. The results showed the sensitivity of the single walled carbon nanotubes to different masses and different lengths. The results indicate that the mass sensitivity of carbon nanotube nanobalances can reach 10 -21 g and the mass sensitivity increases when smaller size nanotube resonators are used in mass sensors. The vibration signature exhibits super-harmonic and sub-harmonic response with different level of mass. In order to explore the suitability of the SWCNT as a mass detector device, the simulation results of the resonant frequency of fixed free SWCNT are compared to the published experimental data. It is shown that the FEM simulation results are in good agreement with the experimental data and hence the current modelling approach is suitable as a coupled-field design tool for the development of SWCNT-based NEMS applications.

  8. Vibration Analysis of Randomly Oriented Carbon Nanotube Based on FGM Beam Using Timoshenko Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Amin Rashidifar

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The carbon nanotube (CNT reinforced functionally graded materials (FGM are expected to be the new generation materials having wide range of unexplored potential applications in various technological areas such as aerospace and structural and chemical industry. The present work deals with the finite element modeling and free vibration analysis of CNT based functionally graded beam using three-dimensional Timoshenko beam theory. It has been assumed that the material properties of CNT based FG beam vary only along the thickness and these properties are evaluated by rule of mixture. The extended Hamilton principle has been applied to find out the governing equations of CNT based FG beam. Finite element method is used to solve governing equation with the exact shape functions. Initial analysis deals with CNTs assumed to be oriented along the length direction only. But practically it is not possible. So, further work deals with the free vibration analysis of functionally graded nanocomposite beams reinforced by randomly oriented straight single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs. The Eshelby-Mori-Tanaka approach based on an equivalent fiber is used to investigate the material properties of the beam. Results are presented in tabular and graphical forms to show the effects of carbon nanotube orientations, slenderness ratios, and boundary conditions on the dynamic behavior of the beam.

  9. Potentiometric online detection of aromatic hydrocarbons in aqueous phase using carbon nanotube-based sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washe, Alemayehu P; Macho, Santiago; Crespo, Gastón A; Rius, F Xavier

    2010-10-01

    Surfaces made of entangled networks of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) display a strong adsorption affinity for aromatic hydrocarbons. Adsorption of these compounds onto the walls of SWCNTs changes the electrical characteristics of the SWCNT-solution interface. Using these features, we have developed a potentiometric sensor to detect neutral aromatic species. Specifically, we can detect online aromatic hydrocarbons in industrial coolant water. Our chromatographic results confirm the adsorption of toluene onto the walls of carbon nanotubes, and our impedance spectroscopy data show the change in the double layer capacitance of the carbon nanotube-solution interface upon addition of toluene, thus confirming the proposed sensing mechanism. The sensor showed a toluene concentration dependent EMF response that follows the shape of an adsorption isotherm and displayed an immediate response to the presence of toluene with a detection limit of 2.1 ppm. The sensor does not respond to other nonaromatic hydrocarbons that may coexist with aromatic hydrocarbons in water. It shows a qualitative sensitivity and selectivity of 100% and 83%, respectively, which confirms its ability to detect aromatic hydrocarbons in aqueous solutions. The sensor showed an excellent ability to immediately detect the presence of toluene in actual coolant water. Its operational characteristics, including its fast response, low cost, portability, and easy use in online industrial applications, improve those of current chromatographic or spectroscopic techniques.

  10. Carbon-nanotube-based single electron memories processed by double self-assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchiat, Vincent; Marty, Laetitia; Naud, Cecile; Bonhomme, Aurore; Andre, Emmanuel; Iaia, Antonio; Richard, Emmanuelle

    2005-03-01

    We demonstrate wafer-scale integration and operation of single electron memories based on carbon nanotube field effect transistors (CNFETs). Our method involves a two step double self assembly process. The first step consists of a Hot-Filament CVD growth and in situ electrical connection of single walled carbon nanotubes on a predefined submicron catalytic template acting as contact electrodes. We obtain a overall integration yield of semiconducting carbon nanotubes exhibiting field effect that can exceed 50% for 9000 devices on a 2 inches wafer. The second step is a wet step which consists of local functionalization and controlled attachment of a colloidal gold bead of radius 15nm on the nanotube. The sample is then coated with parylene dielectric followed by deposition of a top gate electrode aligned with respect to the nanotubes. The bead acts as a storage node for the memory while the CNFETs operated in the subthreshold regime behave as electrometers with exponential amplification. Operation of devices with retention of single charge quantum is successfully demonstrated at liquid helium temperature. Depending on the nanotube-dot coupling, the transfer of a single electron into the gold dot can lead up to one order of magnitude increase of the CNFET channel current.

  11. Carbon Nanotube-Based Electrochemical Sensor for the Determination of Anthraquinone Hair Dyes in Wastewaters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo de Oliveira

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The present work describes the development of a voltammetric sensor for the selective determination of Acid Green 25 (AG25 hair dye, widely used in commercial temporary hair dyes. The method is based on a glassy carbon electrode modified with multiwalled carbon nanotubes activated in the presence of sulfuric acid, where the anthraquinone group present as a chromophore in the dye molecule is reduced at −0.44 V vs. Ag/AgCl in a reversible process involving two electrons in Britton-Robinson (B-R buffer solution at pH 4.0. Analytical curves were obtained using square wave voltammetry in the range from 1.0 × 10−7 to 7.0 × 10−6 mol·L−1, achieving a detection limit of 2.7 × 10−9 mol·L−1. The voltammograms recorded for the Acid Black 1 (AB1 dye showed that the azo groups of the dye were reduced on the carbon nanotube-modified electrode (CNTME, presenting a pair of redox peaks at −0.27 V and −0.24 V in the reverse scan. Under these experimental conditions, both dyes could be detected in the water sample, since the AG25 dye is reduced at −0.47 V. The presence of other hair dyes bearing other chromophore groups, such as Acid Black 1, Acid Red 33 and basic blue 99, did not interfere with the method, which showed an average recovery of 96.7 ± 3.5% (n = 5 for AG25 dye determination in the presence of all of these dyes. The method was successfully applied to tap water and wastewater samples collected from a water treatment plant.

  12. Carbon Nanotubes-Based Potentiometric Bio-Sensors for Determination of Urea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa Jaworska

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The possibility of using disposable plastic-carbon potentiometric sensors as enzyme biosensors was examined. Urease enzyme was immobilized on poly(vinyl chloride based H+- or NH4+-selective membranes using cellulose acetate. This approach has resulted in a potentiometric response on changing the pH of the solution or NH4+ ion content due to an enzymatic reaction that occurs between urease and urea. Both types of potentiometric biosensors for urea were characterized by good analytical parameters as high sensitivity and fast response time.

  13. Gas sensing properties of branched carbon nanotube-based structures using a novel low voltage emission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darbari, S; Azimi, S; Abdi, Y; Mohajerzadeh, S

    2012-11-01

    Branched carbon nanostructures have been successfully grown on interdigital comb-like structures for a gas sensing application. Field emission scanning electron microscopy has been utilized to investigate the morphology and structure of the grown nanostructures at different stages of growth process. Tunneling current of the fabricated sensor has been measured when a monotonically increasing voltage is applied between the electrodes. The effect of exposure to three different gases on the measured current has been studied. A data processing on the measured current voltage characteristics results in the evolution of various peaks at distinct voltages which depends on the type of the gas.

  14. Breakdown voltage reduction by field emission in multi-walled carbon nanotubes based ionization gas sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saheed, M. Shuaib M.; Muti Mohamed, Norani; Arif Burhanudin, Zainal, E-mail: zainabh@petronas.com.my [Centre of Innovative Nanostructures and Nanodevices, Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, Bandar Seri Iskandar, 31750 Tronoh, Perak (Malaysia)

    2014-03-24

    Ionization gas sensors using vertically aligned multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) are demonstrated. The sharp tips of the nanotubes generate large non-uniform electric fields at relatively low applied voltage. The enhancement of the electric field results in field emission of electrons that dominates the breakdown mechanism in gas sensor with gap spacing below 14 μm. More than 90% reduction in breakdown voltage is observed for sensors with MWCNT and 7 μm gap spacing. Transition of breakdown mechanism, dominated by avalanche electrons to field emission electrons, as decreasing gap spacing is also observed and discussed.

  15. An approach to a multi walled carbon nanotube based mass sensor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mateiu, Ramona Valentina; Davis, Zachary James; Madsen, Dorte Nørgaard;

    2004-01-01

    We propose an approach to a nanoscale mass sensor based on a gold electrode structure, on which a multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) bridge can be placed and soldered. The structure is comprised of three electrodes with a width of 2 or 4 mum. Two outer electrodes with a length of 10 or 15 mum...... the bridging nanotube. The free standing MWCNTs were fabricated by chemical vapour deposition of Fe(H) phthalocyanine. A nanomanipulator with an x - y - z translation stage was used for placing the MWCNTs across the source-drain electrodes. The nanotubes were soldered onto the substrate by electron beam...

  16. Measurement of Contractile Activity in Small Animal's Digestive Organ by Carbon Nanotube-Based Force Transducer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirata, Takamichi; Takeda, Naoki; Tsutsui, Chihiro; Koike, Kanako; Shimatani, Yuichi; Sakai, Takafumi; Akiya, Masahiro; Taguchi, Akira

    2011-03-01

    A carbon nanotube (CNT)-based force transducer designed to be embedded in the body of a live animal was fabricated and implanted into the stomach of a rat omit to measure contractile movement. The transducer comprised dispersed poly(ethylene glycol)-grafted multiwalled CNTs applied to a comb-like Au-electrode formed on a poly(dimethylsiloxane) sheet. The implanted rat was injected with acetylcholine to induce muscular contractions and changes in the resistance of the transducer were measured. Such changes arise owing to strain in the CNT network upon distortion. The measured resistance change was found to be proportional to the concentration of injected acetylcholine.

  17. Building a multi-walled carbon nanotube-based mass sensor with the atomic force microscope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mateiu, Ramona Valentina; Kuhle, A.; Marie, Rodolphe Charly Willy;

    2005-01-01

    We report an approach for building a mass sensor based on multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT). We propose a method with a great potential for the positioning of MWCNTs based on self-assembly onto patterned hydrophilic areas. For the experiments ultra flat mica substrates covered with gold...... are used. The gold substrate is first covered with hydrophobic thiol molecules: octadecanthiol. The octadecanthiol molecules are then selectively removed from small areas by nanoshaving the gold substrate with the tip of an atomic force microscope (AFM) operating in contact mode. Hydrophilic thiols (2...

  18. Development of novel graphene and carbon nanotubes based multifunctional polymer matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, S. N.; Khan, M. O.; Naguib, H. E.

    2014-05-01

    This paper investigates strategies to alter the nano-and-microstructures of carbon-based filler-reinforced polymer matrix composites (PMCs). The matrix materials being studied in this work include polyphenylene sulfide (PPS) and liquid crystal polymer (LCP). A set of experiments were performed to investigate various strategies (i) to fabricate a morphological structure within the polymer matrix; (ii) to develop a thermally and electrically conductive network of nano-scaled fillers; and (iii) to produce a thermally conductive but electrically insulative network of hybrid fillers of nano-and-micro scales. The PMCs' structure-to-property relationships, including electrical and thermal properties, were revealed. In particular, the composites' effective thermal conductivities could be increased by as much as 10-folded over the neat polymers. By structuring the embedded electrically conductive pathways in the PMCs, their electrical conductivities could be tailored to levels that ranged from those of electrical insulators to those of semi-conductors. These multifunctional carbon-based filler-reinforced PMCs are envisioned to be potential solutions of various engineering problems. For example, light-weight thermally conductive PMCs with tailored electrical conductivities can serve as a new family of materials for electronic packaging or heat management applications.

  19. Growth of half-meter long carbon nanotubes based on Schulz-Flory distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rufan; Zhang, Yingying; Zhang, Qiang; Xie, Huanhuan; Qian, Weizhong; Wei, Fei

    2013-07-23

    The Schulz-Flory distribution is a mathematical function that describes the relative ratios of polymers of different length after a polymerization process, based on their relative probabilities of occurrence. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are big carbon molecules which have a very high length-to-diameter ratio, somewhat similar to polymer molecules. Large amounts of ultralong CNTs have not been obtained although they are highly desired. Here, we report that the Schulz-Flory distribution can be applied to describe the relative ratios of CNTs of different lengths produced with a floating chemical vapor deposition process, based on catalyst activity/deactivation probability. With the optimized processing parameters, we successfully synthesized 550-mm-long CNTs, for which the catalyst deactivation probability of a single growth step was ultralow. Our finding bridges the Schulz-Flory distribution and the synthesis of one-dimensional nanomaterials for the first time, and sheds new light on the rational design of process toward controlled production of nanotubes/nanowires.

  20. Carbon nanotube-based electrochemical biosensing platforms: fundamentals, applications, and future possibilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luong, John H T; Male, Keith B; Hrapovic, Sabahudin

    2007-01-01

    Biosensors can be considered as a most plausible and exciting application area for nanobiotechnology. The recent bloom of nanofabrication technology and biofunctionalization methods of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) has stimulated significant research interest to develop CNT-based biosensors for monitoring biorecognition events and biocatalytic processes. The unique properties of CNTs, rolled-up sheets of carbon atoms with a diameter less than 1 nm, offer excellent prospects for interfacing biological recognition events with electronic signal transduction. CNT-based biosensors could be developed to sense only a few or even a single molecule of a chemical or biological agent. Both hydrogen peroxide and NADH, two by-products of over 300 oxidoreductases, are efficiently oxidized by CNT-modified electrodes at significantly lower potentials with minimal surface fouling. This appealing feature enables the development of useful biosensors for diversified applications. Aligned CNT "forests" can act as molecular wires to allow efficient electron transfer between the detecting electrode and the redox centers of enzymes to fabricate reagentless biosensors. Electrochemical sensing for DNA can greatly benefit from the use of CNT based platforms since guanine, one of the four bases, can be detected with significantly enhanced sensitivity. CNTs fluoresce, or emit light after absorbing light, in the near infrared region and retain their ability to fluoresce over time. This feature will allow CNT-based sensors to transmit information from inside the body. The combination of micro/nanofabrication and chemical functionalization, particularly nanoelectrode assembly interfaced with biomolecules, is expected to pave the way to fabricate improved biosensors for proteins, chemicals, and pathogens. However, several technical challenges need to be overcome to tightly integrate CNT-based platforms with sampling, fluidic handling, separation, and other detection principles. The biosensing platform

  1. Carbon Nanotube-Based Nanomechanical Sensor: Theoretical Analysis of Mechanical and Vibrational Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshiaki Natsuki

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews the recent research of carbon nanotubes (CNTs used as nanomechanical sensing elements based mainly on theoretical models. CNTs have demonstrated considerable potential as nanomechanical mass sensor and atomic force microscope (AFM tips. The mechanical and vibrational characteristics of CNTs are introduced to the readers. The effects of main parameters of CNTs, such as dimensions, layer number, and boundary conditions on the performance characteristics are investigated and discussed. It is hoped that this review provides knowledge on the application of CNTs as nanomechanical sensors and computational methods for predicting their properties. Their theoretical studies based on the mechanical properties such as buckling strength and vibration frequency would give a useful reference for designing CNTs as nanomechanical mass sensor and AFM probes.

  2. CFD Analysis for Optimum Thermal Design of Carbon Nanotube Based Micro-Channel Heatsink

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Mahbub

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanotube (CNT is considered as an ideal material for thermal management in electronic packaging because of its extraordinary high thermal conductivity. Fabricated onto a silicon substrate to form micro-channels, the CNT based cooling fins show high heat dissipation efficiency. A series of 2D and 3D CFD simulations have been carried out for CNT based micro-channel cooling architectures based on one and two dimensional fin array in this paper using COMSOL 4.0a software. Micro-channels are generally regarded as an effective method for the heat transfer in electronic products. The influence of various fluids, micro-fin structures, fluid velocity and heating powers on cooling effects have been simulated and compared in this study. Steady-state thermal stress analyses for the forced convection heat transfer are also performed to determine maximum allowable stress and deflections for the different types of cooling assembly.

  3. Using of Multiwall Carbon Nanotube Based Nanofluid in the Heat Pipe to Get Better Thermal Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Bakhshan

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Thermal performance of a cylindrical heat pipe is investigated numerically. Three different types of water based nanofluids, namely, Al2O3 + Water, Diamond + Water, and Multi-Wall Carbon Nano tube (MWCNT + Water, have been used. The influence of using the simple nanofluids and MWCNT nanofluid on the heat pipe characteristics such as liquid velocity, pressure profile, temperature profile, thermal resistance, and heat transfer coefficient of heat pipe has been studied. A new correlation developed by Bakhshan and Saljooghi (2014 for viscosity of nanofluids has been implemented. The results show, a good agreement with the available analytical and experimental data. Also the results show, that the MWCNT based nanofluid has lower thermal resistance, higher heat transfer coefficient, and lower temperature difference between evaporator and condenser sections, so it has good thermal specifications as a working fluid for use in heat pipes. The prepared code has capability for parametric studies also.

  4. Carbon-Nanotube-Based Electrochemical Double-Layer Capacitor Technologies for Spaceflight Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arepalli, S.; Fireman, H.; Huffman, C.; Maloney, P.; Nikolaev, P.; Yowell, L.; Kim, K.; Kohl, P. A.; Higgins, C. D.; Turano, S. P.

    2005-01-01

    Electrochemical double-layer capacitors, or supercapacitors, have tremendous potential as high-power energy sources for use in low-weight hybrid systems for space exploration. Electrodes based on single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) offer exceptional power and energy performance due to the high surface area, high conductivity, and the ability to functionalize the SWCNTs to optimize capacitor properties. This paper will report on the preparation of electrochemical capacitors incorporating SWCNT electrodes and their performance compared with existing commercial technology. Preliminary results indicate that substantial increases in power and energy density are possible. The effects of nanotube growth and processing methods on electrochemical capacitor performance is also presented. The compatibility of different SWCNTs and electrolytes was studied by varying the type of electrolyte ions that accumulate on the high-surface-area electrodes.

  5. Novel Carbon Nanotube-Based Nanostructures for High-Temperature Gas Sensing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhi Chen; Kozo Saito

    2008-08-31

    The primary objective of this research is to examine the feasibility of using vertically aligned multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) as a high temperature sensor material for fossil energy systems where reducing atmospheres are present. In the initial period of research, we fabricated capacitive sensors for hydrogen sensing using vertically aligned MWCNTs. We found that CNT itself is not sensitive to hydrogen. Moreover, with the help of Pd electrodes, hydrogen sensors based on CNTs are very sensitive and fast responsive. However, the Pd-based sensors can not withstand high temperature (T<200 C). In the last year, we successfully fabricated a hydrogen sensor based on an ultra-thin nanoporous titanium oxide (TiO{sub 2}) film supported by an AAO substrate, which can operate at 500 C with hydrogen concentrations in a range from 50 to 500 ppm.

  6. Electrical and mechanical characterisation of single wall carbon nanotubes based composites for tissue engineering applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whulanza, Yudan; Battini, Elena; Vannozzi, Lorenzo; Vomero, Maria; Ahluwalia, Arti; Vozzi, Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the realisation of conductive matrices for application to tissue engineering research. We used poly(L-lactide (PLLA)), poly(epsilon-caprolactone) (PCL), and poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) as polymer matrix, because they are biocompatible and biodegradable. The conductive property was integrated to them by adding single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) into the polymer matrix. Several SWNTs concentrations were introduced aiming to understand how they influence and modulate mechanical properties, impedance features and electric percolation threshold of polymer matrix. It was observed that a concentration of 0.3% was able to transform insulating matrix into conductive one. Furthermore, a conductive model of the SWNT/polymer was developed by applying power law of percolation threshold.

  7. Bioinspired Multifunctional Superhydrophobic Surfaces with Carbon-Nanotube-Based Conducting Pastes by Facile and Scalable Printing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Joong Tark; Kim, Byung Kuk; Woo, Jong Seok; Jang, Jeong In; Cho, Joon Young; Jeong, Hee Jin; Jeong, Seung Yol; Seo, Seon Hee; Lee, Geon-Woong

    2017-03-01

    Directly printed superhydrophobic surfaces containing conducting nanomaterials can be used for a wide range of applications in terms of nonwetting, anisotropic wetting, and electrical conductivity. Here, we demonstrated that direct-printable and flexible superhydrophobic surfaces were fabricated on flexible substrates via with an ultrafacile and scalable screen printing with carbon nanotube (CNT)-based conducting pastes. A polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS)-polyethylene glycol (PEG) copolymer was used as an additive for conducting pastes to realize the printability of the conducting paste as well as the hydrophobicity of the printed surface. The screen-printed conducting surfaces showed a high water contact angle (WCA) (>150°) and low contact angle hysteresis (WCA superhydrophobic surfaces also showed sticky superhydrophobic characteristics and were used to transport water droplets. Moreover, fabricated films on metal meshes were used for an oil/water separation filter, and liquid evaporation behavior was investigated on the superhydrophobic and conductive thin-film heaters by applying direct current voltage to the film.

  8. Intrinsic memory function of carbon nanotube-based ferroelectric field-effect transistor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Wangyang; Xu, Zhi; Bai, Xuedong; Gu, Changzhi; Wang, Enge

    2009-03-01

    We demonstrate the intrinsic memory function of ferroelectric field-effect transistors (FeFETs) based on an integration of individual single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and epitaxial ferroelectric films. In contrast to the previously reported "charge-storage" CNT-FET memories, whose operations are haunted by a lack of control over the "charge traps", the present CNT-FeFETs exhibit a well-defined memory hysteresis loop induced by the reversible remnant polarization of the ferroelectric films. Large memory windows approximately 4 V, data retention time up to 1 week, and ultralow power consumption (energy per bit) of femto-joule, are highlighted in this report. Further simulations and experimental results show that the memory device is valid under operation voltage less than 1 V due to an electric-field enhancement effect induced by the ultrathin SWCNTs.

  9. Carbon Nanotube-Based Digital Vacuum Electronics and Miniature Instrumentation for Space Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manohara, H.; Toda, R.; Lin, R. H.; Liao, A.; Mojarradi, M.

    2010-01-01

    JPL has developed high performance cold cathodes using arrays of carbon nanotube bundles that produce > 15 A/sq cm at applied fields of 5 to 8 V/micron without any beam focusing. They have exhibited robust operation in poor vacuums of 10(exp -6) to 10(exp -4) Torr- a typically achievable range inside hermetically sealed microcavities. Using these CNT cathodes JPL has developed miniature X-ray tubes capable of delivering sufficient photon flux at acceleration voltages of electronics potentially for Venus in situ missions and defense applications. These digital vacuum electronic devices are inherently high-temperature tolerant and radiation insensitive. Device design, fabrication and DC switching operation at temperatures up to 700 C are presented in this paper.

  10. Electrophoretically deposited multiwalled carbon nanotube based amperometric genosensor for E.coli detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhardwaj, Hema; Solanki, Shipra; Sumana, Gajjala

    2016-04-01

    This work reports on a sensitive and selective genosensor fabrication method for Escherichia coli (E.coli) detection. The functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) synthesized via chemical vapour deposition have been deposited electrophoretically onto indium tin oxide coated glass surface and have been utilized as matrices for the covalent immobilization of E.coli specific probe oligonucleotide that was identified from the 16s rRNA coding region of the E.coli genome. This fabricated functionalized MWCNT based platform sought to provide improved fundamental characteristics to electrode interface in terms of electro-active surface area and diffusion coefficient. Electrochemical cyclic voltammetry revealed that this genosensor exhibits a linear response to complementary DNA in the concentration range of 10-7 to 10-12 M with a detection limit of 1×10-12 M.

  11. Determination of calcium ion in sap using carbon nanotube-based ion-selective electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, Rafael; Riu, Jordi; Rius, F Xavier

    2010-08-01

    A new reduced-size solid-state electrode using carbon nanotubes as the transducing layer has been developed for the direct determination of Ca(2+) in sap, overcoming problems encountered by commercial ISEs analysing real complex samples. We show that this solid-contact ISE, which can be easily miniaturized, can be used directly in diluted real samples without any other pretreatment. The performance parameters of the new ISE include a Nernstian slope and excellent stability, good coefficients of selectivity, range of linearity (10(-5) to 10(-2.5) M) and limit of detection (10(-6.2) M), thus making it an excellent tool for determining Ca(2+) in a wide range of plant species.

  12. Carbon nanotube based X-ray sources: Applications in pre-clinical and medical imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yueh Z.; Burk, Laurel; Wang, Ko-Han; Cao, Guohua; Lu, Jianping; Zhou, Otto

    2011-08-01

    Field emission offers an alternate method of electron production for Bremsstrahlung based X-ray tubes. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) serve as very effective field emitters, allowing them to serve as electron sources for X-ray sources, with specific advantages over traditional thermionic tubes. CNT derived X-ray sources can create X-ray pulses of any duration and frequency, gate the X-ray pulse to any source and allow the placement of many sources in close proximity.We have constructed a number of micro-CT systems based on CNT X-ray sources for applications in small animal imaging, specifically focused on the imaging of the heart and lungs. This paper offers a review of the pre-clinical applications of the CNT based micro-CT that we have developed. We also discuss some of the current and potential clinical applications of the CNT X-ray sources.

  13. Fabrication of single-walled carbon-nanotube-based pressure sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stampfer, C; Helbling, T; Obergfell, D; Schöberle, B; Tripp, M K; Jungen, A; Roth, S; Bright, V M; Hierold, C

    2006-02-01

    We report on the fabrication and characterization of bulk micromachined pressure sensors based on individual single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) as the active electromechanical transducer elements. The electromechanical sensor device consists of an individual electrically connected SWNT adsorbed on top of a 100-nm-thick atomic layer deposited (ALD) circular alumina (Al(2)O(3)) membrane with a radius in the range of 50-100 microm. A white light interferometer (WLI) was used to measure the deflection of the membrane due to differential pressure, and the mechanical properties of the device were characterized by bulge testing. Finally, we performed the first electromechanical measurements on strained metallic SWNTs adhering to a membrane and found a piezoresistive gauge factor of approximately 210 for metallic SWNTs.

  14. Multi-walled carbon nanotubes based catalyst plasmon resonance light scattering analysis of tetracycline hydrochloride

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    It was found that multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) could catalyze the redox reaction between chlorauric acid (HAuCl4) and reductive drugs such as tetracycline hydrochloride (TC), producing gold nanoparticles (Au NPs). By measuring the plasmon resonance light scattering (PRLS) signals of the resulting Au NPs, tetracycline hydrochloride can be detected simply and rapidly with a linear range of 4―26 μmol/L, a correlated coefficient (r ) of 0.9955, and a limit of detection (3σ) of 6.0 nmol/L. This method has been successfully applied to the detection of tetracycline hydrochloride tablets in clinic with the recovery of 101.9% and that of fresh urine samples with the recovery of 98.3%―102.0%.

  15. Viscoelastic wave propagation in the viscoelastic single walled carbon nanotubes based on nonlocal strain gradient theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yugang; Liu, Ying; Zhao, Dong

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, the viscoelastic wave propagation in an embedded viscoelastic single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) is studied based on the nonlocal strain gradient theory. The characteristic equation for the viscoelastic wave in SWCNTs is derived. The emphasis is placed on the influence of the tube diameter on the viscoelastic wave dispersion. A blocking diameter is observed, above which the wave could not propagate in SWCNTs. The results show that the blocking diameter is greatly dependent on the damping coefficient, the nonlocal and the strain gradient length scale parameters, as well as the Winkler modulus of the surrounding elastic medium. These findings may provide a prospective application of SWCNTs in nanodevices and nanocomposites.

  16. Morphology and Cure Behavior of Multi-walled Carbon Nanotubes-based Thermally Conductive Adhesive

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Junxia; YAN Shilin; HE Yunban; YAN Fei; XIE Beiping

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated the cure behavior of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) based thermally conductive adhesive by comprehensively thermal analysis, which presented extremely complicated variability of conversion ratioαas a function of temperature with synergistic action of positive effect and negative volume-blocking effect of MWCNTs and cross-linked network of cured polymer molecules. Due to the decomposition of MWCNTs and degradation of polymer, the mass drop is dramatically obvious over the temperature range of 330-370℃. Binary resins filled with acid-treated MWCNTs present similar reaction interval as neat epoxy and matrix resins, which is distinct from the material filled with raw MWCNTs. The alteration of the crystalline temperature and cure temperature of resins is attributed to heterogeneous nucleation of MWCNTs in matrix resins. The-COOH group of acid-treated MWCNTs reacts with epoxy groups and thus generates cross-linking, accelerates the reaction rate and reduces the cure temperature.

  17. Shear deformable deformation of carbon nanotubes based on a new analytical nonlocal Timoshenko beam nodel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Jianming; Yang, Yang [Department of Engineering Mechanics, Kunming University of Science and Technology, Kunming 650051, Yunnan (China)

    2015-03-10

    According to Hamilton’s principle, a new mathematical model and analytical solutions for nonlocal Timoshenko beam model (ANT) is established based on nonlocal elastic continuum theory when shear deformation and nonlocal effect are considered. The new ANT equilibrium equations and boundary conditions are derived for bending analysis of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with simply supported, clamped and cantilever. The ANT deflection solutions demonstrate that the CNT stiffness is enhanced by the presence of nonlocal stress effects. Furthermore, the new ANT model concluded verifiable bending behaviors for a cantilever CNT with point load at the free end, which depends on the strength of nonlocal stress. Therefore, this new model will gives a better prediction for mechanical behaviors of nanostructures.

  18. Detection of airborne carbon nanotubes based on the reactivity of the embedded catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neubauer, N; Kasper, G

    2015-01-01

    A previously described method for detecting catalyst particles in workplace air((1,2)) was applied to airborne carbon nanotubes (CNT). It infers the CNT concentration indirectly from the catalytic activity of metallic nanoparticles embedded as part of the CNT production process. Essentially, one samples airborne CNT onto a filter enclosed in a tiny chemical reactor and then initiates a gas-phase catalytic reaction on the sample. The change in concentration of one of the reactants is then determined by an IR sensor as measure of activity. The method requires a one-point calibration with a CNT sample of known mass. The suitability of the method was tested with nickel containing (25 or 38% by weight), well-characterized multi-walled CNT aerosols generated freshly in the lab for each experiment. Two chemical reactions were investigated, of which the oxidation of CO to CO2 at 470°C was found to be more effective, because nearly 100% of the nickel was exposed at that temperature by burning off the carbon, giving a linear relationship between CO conversion and nickel mass. Based on the investigated aerosols, a lower detection limit of 1 μg of sampled nickel was estimated. This translates into sampling times ranging from minutes to about one working day, depending on airborne CNT concentration and catalyst content, as well as sampling flow rate. The time for the subsequent chemical analysis is on the order of minutes, regardless of the time required to accumulate the sample and can be done on site.

  19. Continuous Carbon Nanotube-Based Fibers and Films for Applications Requiring Enhanced Heat Dissipation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Peng; Fan, Zeng; Mikhalchan, Anastasiia; Tran, Thang Q; Jewell, Daniel; Duong, Hai M; Marconnet, Amy M

    2016-07-13

    The production of continuous carbon nanotube (CNT) fibers and films has paved the way to leverage the superior properties of individual carbon nanotubes for novel macroscale applications such as electronic cables and multifunctional composites. In this manuscript, we synthesize fibers and films from CNT aerogels that are continuously grown by floating catalyst chemical vapor deposition (FCCVD) and measure thermal conductivity and natural convective heat transfer coefficient from the fiber and film. To probe the mechanisms of heat transfer, we develop a new, robust, steady-state thermal characterization technique that enables measurement of the intrinsic fiber thermal conductivity and the convective heat transfer coefficient from the fiber to the surrounding air. The thermal conductivity of the as-prepared fiber ranges from 4.7 ± 0.3 to 28.0 ± 2.4 W m(-1) K(-1) and depends on fiber volume fraction and diameter. A simple nitric acid treatment increases the thermal conductivity by as much as a factor of ∼3 for the fibers and ∼6.7 for the thin films. These acid-treated CNT materials demonstrate specific thermal conductivities significantly higher than common metals with the same absolute thermal conductivity, which means they are comparatively lightweight, thermally conductive fibers and films. Beyond thermal conductivity, the acid treatment enhances electrical conductivity by a factor of ∼2.3. Further, the measured convective heat transfer coefficients range from 25 to 200 W m(-2) K(-1) for all fibers, which is higher than expected for macroscale materials and demonstrates the impact of the nanoscale CNT features on convective heat losses from the fibers. The measured thermal and electrical performance demonstrates the promise for using these fibers and films in macroscale applications requiring effective heat dissipation.

  20. Carbon nanotube-based glucose oxidase nanocomposite anode materials for bio-fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudzik, Jonathan

    The field of nanotechnology has benefited medicine, science, and engineering. The advent of Carbon Nanotubes (CNTs) and protein-inorganic interfacing have received much attention due to their unique nanostructures which can be modified to act as a scaffold to house proteins or create nanowires. The current trend incorporates the robustness and specificity characteristics of proteins to the mechanical strength, enlarged surface area, and conductive capabilities emblematic of their inorganic counterparts. Bio-Fuel Cells (BFCs) and Biosensors remain at the forefront and devices such as implantable glucose monitors are closer to realization than ever before. This research strives to exploit potential energy from the eukaryotic enzyme Glucose Oxidase (GOx) during oxidation of its substrate, glucose. During this process, a two-electron transfer occurs at its two FAD redox centres which can be harnessed via an electrochemical setup involving a Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotube (MWCNTs) modified electrode. The objective is to develop a MWCNT-GOx bionanocomposite capable of producing and sustaining a competitive power output. To help with this aim, investigation into a crosslinked enzyme cluster (CEC) immobilization technique is envisioned to amplify power output due to its highly concentrated, reusable, and thermally stable characteristics. Numerous CEC-GOx-MWCNT composites were fabricated with the highest initial output reaching 170 muW/cm 2. It was hypothesized that the carbohydrate moiety increased tunnelling distance and therefore hindered electron transfer. Efforts to produce a recombinant GOx without the encumbrance were unsuccessful. Two sub-clone constructs were explored and although a recombinant protein was identified, it was not confirmed to be GOx. BFC testing on bionanocomposites integrating non-glycosylated GOx could not be performed although there remains a strong contention that the recombinant would demonstrate superior power densities in comparison to its

  1. Carbon Nanotube Based Nanotechnology for NASA Mission Needs and Societal Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing; Meyyappan, M.

    2011-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNT) exhibit extraordinary mechanical properties and unique electronic properties and therefore, have received much attention for more than a decade now for a variety of applications ranging from nanoelectronics, composites to meeting needs in energy, environmental and other sectors. In this talk, we focus on some near term potential of CNT applications for both NASA and other Agency/societal needs. The most promising and successful application to date is a nano chem sensor at TRL 6 that uses a 16-256 sensor array in the construction of an electronic nose. Pristine, doped, functionalized and metal-loaded SWCNTs are used as conducting materials to provide chemical variation across the individual elements of the sensor array. This miniaturized sensor has been incorporated in an iPhone for homeland security applications. Gases and vapors relevant to leak detection in crew vehicles, biomedical, mining, chemical threats, industrial spills and others have been demonstrated. SWCNTs also respond to radiation exposure via a change in conductivity and therefore, a similar strategy is being pursued to construct a radiation nose to identify radiation sources (gamma, protons, neutrons, X-ray, etc.) with their energy levels. Carbon nanofibers (CNFs) grown using plasma enhanced CVD typically are vertical, individual, freestanding structures and therefore, are ideal for construction of nanoelectrodes. A nanoelectrode array (NEA) can be the basis for an affinity-based biosensor to meet the needs in applications such as lab-on-a-chip, environmental monitoring, cancer diagnostics, biothreat monitoring, water and food safety and others. A couple of demonstrations including detection of e-coli and ricin will be discussed. The NEA is also useful for implantation in the brain for deep brain stimulation and neuroengineering applications. Miniaturization of payload such as science instrumentation and power sources is critical to reduce launch costs. High current density

  2. Modeling of Energy Transfer for Carbon Nanotube-Based Precision Machining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Basil T.; Pinar Menguc, M.; Vallance, R. Ryan; Rao, Apparao M.

    2003-03-01

    INTRODUCTION Possible use of electron emission from carbon nanotubes (CNTs) for precision machining has been realized only recently. It is hypothesized that by coupling CNT electron emission with radiation transfer mechanism nano-scaled machining can be achieved. A laser, for example, can be used to raise the temperature of the workpiece near its melting point, and a carbon nanotube is then used to transfer additional energy required to the workpiece to complete the removal of minute amount of materials for nanomachining process. To investigate this hypothesis, a detailed numerical/analytical study is conducted. Electron transfer is modeled using a Monte Carlo approach, and a detailed radiation transfer model, including Fresnel reflections is adapted. Based on the numerical simulations we found that a power of one-tenth of a watt is required from a CNT alone to raise the temperature of gold beyond its melting point. However, using a localized heating with a laser, the required power can be reduced by roughly more than a half. This paper outlines the details of the numerical simulation and establishes a set of design guidelines for future nanomachining modalities. We are interested in nanomachining using the CNTs. Our objective is to determine if we can effectively remove tens of atoms from the workpiece by electron transfer from a single CNT and proper laser heating from either side of the workpiece. To reach our goal, energy transfer from a single CNT may not be sufficient. One way to overcome this setback is to preheat the workpiece to a certain temperature through a bulk heating, and using a subsequent localized heating by the laser beam to further increase the temperature of a specified location. Thus only a minimum amount of energy is required from the nanotube to process the material, i.e. to remove tens of atoms. Due to the complicated interactions between propagating electrons and the solid material, obtaining a physically realistic theoretical analysis

  3. Estimation of local concentration from measurements of stochastic adsorption dynamics using carbon nanotube-based sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Hong; Lee, Jay H. [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Braatz, Richard D. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Cambridge (United States)

    2016-01-15

    This paper proposes a maximum likelihood estimation (MLE) method for estimating time varying local concentration of the target molecule proximate to the sensor from the time profile of monomolecular adsorption and desorption on the surface of the sensor at nanoscale. Recently, several carbon nanotube sensors have been developed that can selectively detect target molecules at a trace concentration level. These sensors use light intensity changes mediated by adsorption or desorption phenomena on their surfaces. The molecular events occurring at trace concentration levels are inherently stochastic, posing a challenge for optimal estimation. The stochastic behavior is modeled by the chemical master equation (CME), composed of a set of ordinary differential equations describing the time evolution of probabilities for the possible adsorption states. Given the significant stochastic nature of the underlying phenomena, rigorous stochastic estimation based on the CME should lead to an improved accuracy over than deterministic estimation formulated based on the continuum model. Motivated by this expectation, we formulate the MLE based on an analytical solution of the relevant CME, both for the constant and the time-varying local concentrations, with the objective of estimating the analyte concentration field in real time from the adsorption readings of the sensor array. The performances of the MLE and the deterministic least squares are compared using data generated by kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) simulations of the stochastic process. Some future challenges are described for estimating and controlling the concentration field in a distributed domain using the sensor technology.

  4. Sensing human physiological response using wearable carbon nanotube-based fabrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Long; Loh, Kenneth J.; Koo, Helen S.

    2016-04-01

    Flexible and wearable sensors for human monitoring have received increased attention. Besides detecting motion and physical activity, measuring human vital signals (e.g., respiration rate and body temperature) provide rich data for assessing subjects' physiological or psychological condition. Instead of using conventional, bulky, sensing transducers, the objective of this study was to design and test a wearable, fabric-like sensing system. In particular, multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT)-latex thin films of different MWCNT concentrations were first fabricated using spray coating. Freestanding MWCNT-latex films were then sandwiched between two layers of flexible fabric using iron-on adhesive to form the wearable sensor. Second, to characterize its strain sensing properties, the fabric sensors were subjected to uniaxial and cyclic tensile load tests, and they exhibited relatively stable electromechanical responses. Finally, the wearable sensors were placed on a human subject for monitoring simple motions and for validating their practical strain sensing performance. Overall, the wearable fabric sensor design exhibited advances such as flexibility, ease of fabrication, light weight, low cost, noninvasiveness, and user comfort.

  5. Processing strategies for smart electroconductive carbon nanotube-based bioceramic bone grafts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mata, D.; Oliveira, F. J.; Ferreira, N. M.; Araújo, R. F.; Fernandes, A. J. S.; Lopes, M. A.; Gomes, P. S.; Fernandes, M. H.; Silva, R. F.

    2014-04-01

    Electroconductive bone grafts have been designed to control bone regeneration. Contrary to polymeric matrices, the translation of the carbon nanotube (CNT) electroconductivity into oxide ceramics is challenging due to the CNT oxidation during sintering. Sintering strategies involving reactive-bed pressureless sintering (RB + P) and hot-pressing (HP) were optimized towards prevention of CNT oxidation in glass/hydroxyapatite (HA) matrices. Both showed CNT retentions up to 80%, even at 1300 °C, yielding an increase of the electroconductivity in ten orders of magnitude relative to the matrix. The RB + P CNT compacts showed higher electroconductivity by ˜170% than the HP ones due to the lower damage to CNTs of the former route. Even so, highly reproducible conductivities with statistical variation below 5% and dense compacts up to 96% were only obtained by HP. The hot-pressed CNT compacts possessed no acute toxicity in a human osteoblastic cell line. A normal cellular adhesion and a marked orientation of the cell growth were observed over the CNT composites, with a proliferation/differentiation relationship favouring osteoblastic functional activity. These sintering strategies offer new insights into the sintering of electroconductive CNT containing bioactive ceramics with unlimited geometries for electrotherapy of the bone tissue.

  6. Development of functionalized multi-walled carbon-nanotube-based alginate hydrogels for enabling biomimetic technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joddar, Binata; Garcia, Eduardo; Casas, Atzimba; Stewart, Calvin M.

    2016-08-01

    Alginate is a hydrogel commonly used for cell culture by ionically crosslinking in the presence of divalent Ca2+ ions. However these alginate gels are mechanically unstable, not permitting their use as scaffolds to engineer robust biological bone, breast, cardiac or tumor tissues. This issue can be addressed via encapsulation of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) serving as a reinforcing phase while being dispersed in a continuous phase of alginate. We hypothesized that adding functionalized MWCNT to alginate, would yield composite gels with distinctively different mechanical, physical and biological characteristics in comparison to alginate alone. Resultant MWCNT-alginate gels were porous, and showed significantly less degradation after 14 days compared to alginate alone. In vitro cell-studies showed enhanced HeLa cell adhesion and proliferation on the MWCNT-alginate compared to alginate. The extent of cell proliferation was greater when cultured atop 1 and 3 mg/ml MWCNT-alginate; although all MWCNT-alginates lead to enhanced cell cluster formation compared to alginate alone. Among all the MWCNT-alginates, the 1 mg/ml gels showed significantly greater stiffness compared to all other cases. These results provide an important basis for the development of the MWCNT-alginates as novel substrates for cell culture applications, cell therapy and tissue engineering.

  7. Wearable carbon nanotube-based fabric sensors for monitoring human physiological performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Long; Loh, Kenneth J.

    2017-05-01

    A target application of wearable sensors is to detect human motion and to monitor physical activity for improving athletic performance and for delivering better physical therapy. In addition, measuring human vital signals (e.g., respiration rate and body temperature) provides rich information that can be used to assess a subject’s physiological or psychological condition. This study aims to design a multifunctional, wearable, fabric-based sensing system. First, carbon nanotube (CNT)-based thin films were fabricated by spraying. Second, the thin films were integrated with stretchable fabrics to form the fabric sensors. Third, the strain and temperature sensing properties of sensors fabricated using different CNT concentrations were characterized. Furthermore, the sensors were demonstrated to detect human finger bending motions, so as to validate their practical strain sensing performance. Finally, to monitor human respiration, the fabric sensors were integrated with a chest band, which was directly worn by a human subject. Quantification of respiration rates were successfully achieved. Overall, the fabric sensors were characterized by advantages such as flexibility, ease of fabrication, lightweight, low-cost, noninvasiveness, and user comfort.

  8. Sustaining GHz oscillation of carbon nanotube based oscillators via a MHz frequency excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motevalli, Benyamin; Taherifar, Neda; Zhe Liu, Jefferson

    2016-05-01

    There have been intensive studies to investigate the properties of gigahertz nano-oscillators based on multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). Many of these studies, however, revealed that the unique telescopic translational oscillations in such devices would damp quickly due to various energy dissipation mechanisms. This challenge remains the primary obstacle against its practical applications. Herein, we propose a design concept in which a GHz oscillation could be re-excited by a MHz mechanical motion. This design involves a triple-walled CNT, in which sliding of the longer inner tube at a MHz frequency can re-excite and sustain a GHz oscillation of the shorter middle tube. Our molecular dynamics (MD) simulations prove this design concept at ˜10 nm scale. A mathematical model is developed to explore the feasibility at a larger size scale. As an example, in an oscillatory system with the CNT’s length above 100 nm, the high oscillatory frequency range of 1.8-3.3 GHz could be excited by moving the inner tube at a much lower frequency of 53.4 MHz. This design concept together with the mechanical model could energize the development of GHz nano-oscillators in miniaturized electro-mechanical devices.

  9. Performance of a 60 F carbon nanotubes-based supercapacitor for hybrid power sources

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaofeng Wang; Dianbo Ruan; Zheng You; Yiqiang Lu; Qiqian Sha

    2005-01-01

    A supercapacitor based on charge storage at the interface between a high surface area carbon nanotube electrode and a LiClO4/PC electrolyte was assembled. The performance of the capacitor depends on not only the material used in the cell but also the construction of the cell. From a constant charge-discharge test, the capacitance of 60 F was obtained. The performance of the power power supercapacitor were demonstrated with a cell of the maximum operating voltage of 2.5 V. A hybrid power source consisting of a lithium ionic battery and the 60 F supercapacitor was demonstrated to power successfully a simulated power load encountered in GSM portable communication equipment. The addition of the supercapacitor to the power train of a cellular phone results in significantly more energy from the battery being used by the load. The experiments indicate that more than 33.8% energy is utilized by load and less stored energy is dissipated within the battery for each charge-discharge cycle.

  10. Scratch-resistant, highly conductive, and high-strength carbon nanotube-based composite yarns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Kai; Sun, Yinghui; Lin, Xiaoyang; Zhou, Ruifeng; Wang, Jiaping; Fan, Shoushan; Jiang, Kaili

    2010-10-26

    High-strength and conductive carbon nanotube (CNT) yarns are very attractive in many potential applications. However, there is a difficulty when simultaneously enhancing the strength and conductivity of CNT yarns. Adding some polymers into CNT yarns to enhance their strength will decrease their conductivity, while treating them in acid or coating them with metal nanoparticles to enhance their conductivity will reduce their strength. To overcome this difficulty, here we report a method to make high-strength and highly conductive CNT-based composite yarns by using a continuous superaligned CNT (SACNT) yarn as a conductive framework and then inserting polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) into the intertube spaces of the framework through PVA/dimethyl sulphoxide solution to enhance the strength of yarns. The as-produced CNT/PVA composite yarns possess very high tensile strengths up to 2.0 GPa and Young's moduli more than 120 GPa, much higher than those of the CNT/PVA yarns reported. The electric conductivity of as-produced composite yarns is as high as 9.2 × 10(4) S/m, comparable to HNO(3)-treated or Au nanoparticle-coated CNT yarns. These composite yarns are flexible, lightweight, scratch-resistant, very stable in the lab environment, and resistant to extremely humid ambient and as a result can be woven into high-strength and heatable fabrics, showing potential applications in flexible heaters, bullet-proof vests, radiation protection suits, and spacesuits.

  11. Carbon Nanotube-Based Digital Vacuum Electronics and Miniature Instrumentation for Space Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manohara, H.; Toda, R.; Lin, R. H.; Liao, A.; Mojarradi, M.

    2010-01-01

    JPL has developed high performance cold cathodes using arrays of carbon nanotube bundles that produce > 15 A/sq cm at applied fields of 5 to 8 V/micron without any beam focusing. They have exhibited robust operation in poor vacuums of 10(exp -6) to 10(exp -4) Torr- a typically achievable range inside hermetically sealed microcavities. Using these CNT cathodes JPL has developed miniature X-ray tubes capable of delivering sufficient photon flux at acceleration voltages of <20kV to perform definitive mineralogy on planetary surfaces; mass ionizers that offer two orders of magnitude power savings, and S/N ratio better by a factor of five over conventional ionizers. JPL has also developed a new class of programmable logic gates using CNT vacuum electronics potentially for Venus in situ missions and defense applications. These digital vacuum electronic devices are inherently high-temperature tolerant and radiation insensitive. Device design, fabrication and DC switching operation at temperatures up to 700 C are presented in this paper.

  12. Aligned carbon nanotube based ultrasonic microtransducers for durability monitoring in civil engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lebental, B [Universite Paris-Est, IFSTTAR, 58 boulevard Lefebvre, 75732 Paris Cedex 15 (France); Chainais, P [INRIA Lille-Nord Europe (SEQUEL), 40 avenue Halley, 59650 Villeneuve d' Ascq (France); Chenevier, P [SPEC, IRAMIS, CEA/Saclay, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Chevalier, N; Delevoye, E; Fabbri, J-M; Nicoletti, S; Renaux, P; Ghis, A, E-mail: berengere.lebental@ifsttar.fr [CEA, LETI, MINATEC Campus, F-38054 Grenoble (France)

    2011-09-30

    Structural health monitoring of porous materials such as concrete is becoming a major component in our resource-limited economy, as it conditions durable exploitation of existing facilities. Durability in porous materials depends on nanoscale features which need to be monitored in situ with nanometric resolution. To address this problem, we put forward an approach based on the development of a new nanosensor, namely a capacitive micrometric ultrasonic transducer whose vibrating membrane is made of aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT). Such sensors are meant to be embedded in large numbers within a porous material in order to provide information on its durability by monitoring in situ neighboring individual micropores. In the present paper, we report on the feasibility of the key building block of the proposed sensor: we have fabricated well-aligned, ultra-thin, dense SWNT membranes that show above-nanometer amplitudes of vibration over a large range of frequencies spanning from 100 kHz to 5 MHz.

  13. Carbon Nanotube-Based Digital Vacuum Electronics and Miniature Instrumentation for Space Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manohara, H.; Toda, R.; Lin, R. H.; Liao, A.; Mojarradi, M.

    2010-01-01

    JPL has developed high performance cold cathodes using arrays of carbon nanotube bundles that produce > 15 A/sq cm at applied fields of 5 to 8 V/micron without any beam focusing. They have exhibited robust operation in poor vacuums of 10(exp -6) to 10(exp -4) Torr- a typically achievable range inside hermetically sealed microcavities. Using these CNT cathodes JPL has developed miniature X-ray tubes capable of delivering sufficient photon flux at acceleration voltages of <20kV to perform definitive mineralogy on planetary surfaces; mass ionizers that offer two orders of magnitude power savings, and S/N ratio better by a factor of five over conventional ionizers. JPL has also developed a new class of programmable logic gates using CNT vacuum electronics potentially for Venus in situ missions and defense applications. These digital vacuum electronic devices are inherently high-temperature tolerant and radiation insensitive. Device design, fabrication and DC switching operation at temperatures up to 700 C are presented in this paper.

  14. Quantitative Conductive Atomic Force Microscopy on Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube-Based Polymer Composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bârsan, Oana A; Hoffmann, Günter G; van der Ven, Leendert G J; de With, Gijsbertus

    2016-08-03

    Conductive atomic force microscopy (C-AFM) is a valuable technique for correlating the electrical properties of a material with its topographic features and for identifying and characterizing conductive pathways in polymer composites. However, aspects such as compatibility between tip material and sample, contact force and area between the tip and the sample, tip degradation and environmental conditions render quantifying the results quite challenging. This study aims at finding the suitable conditions for C-AFM to generate reliable, reproducible, and quantitative current maps that can be used to calculate the resistance in each point of a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) network, nonimpregnated as well as impregnated with a polymer. The results obtained emphasize the technique's limitation at the macroscale as the resistance of these highly conductive samples cannot be distinguished from the tip-sample contact resistance. Quantitative C-AFM measurements on thin composite sections of 150-350 nm enable the separation of sample and tip-sample contact resistance, but also indicate that these sections are not representative for the overall SWCNT network. Nevertheless, the technique was successfully used to characterize the local electrical properties of the composite material, such as sample homogeneity and resistance range of individual SWCNT clusters, at the nano- and microscale.

  15. Aligned carbon nanotube based ultrasonic microtransducers for durability monitoring in civil engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebental, B; Chainais, P; Chenevier, P; Chevalier, N; Delevoye, E; Fabbri, J-M; Nicoletti, S; Renaux, P; Ghis, A

    2011-09-30

    Structural health monitoring of porous materials such as concrete is becoming a major component in our resource-limited economy, as it conditions durable exploitation of existing facilities. Durability in porous materials depends on nanoscale features which need to be monitored in situ with nanometric resolution. To address this problem, we put forward an approach based on the development of a new nanosensor, namely a capacitive micrometric ultrasonic transducer whose vibrating membrane is made of aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT). Such sensors are meant to be embedded in large numbers within a porous material in order to provide information on its durability by monitoring in situ neighboring individual micropores. In the present paper, we report on the feasibility of the key building block of the proposed sensor: we have fabricated well-aligned, ultra-thin, dense SWNT membranes that show above-nanometer amplitudes of vibration over a large range of frequencies spanning from 100 kHz to 5 MHz.

  16. Carbon nanotube-based nanocarriers: the importance of keeping it clean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delogu, Lucia G; Stanford, Stephanie M; Santelli, Eugenio; Magrini, Andrea; Bergamaschi, Antonio; Motamedchaboki, Khatereh; Rosato, Nicola; Mustelin, Tomas; Bottini, Nunzio; Bottini, Massimo

    2010-08-01

    Nanotechnology-introduced materials have promising applications as nanocarriers for drugs, peptides, proteins and nucleic acids. Several studies showed that the geometry (shape and size) and chemical properties of nanoparticles affect the kinetics and pathways of cellular uptake and their intracellular trafficking and signaling. Accurate physico-chemical characterization of nanoparticles customarily precedes their use in cell biology and in vivo experiments. However, a fact that is easily overlooked is that nanomaterials decorated with organic matter or resuspended in aqueous buffers can be theoretically contaminated by fungal and bacterial microorganisms. While investigating the effects of extensively characterized PEGylated carbon nanotubes (PNTs) on T lymphocyte activation, we demonstrated bacterial contamination of PNTs, which correlated with low reproducibility and artifacts in cell signaling assays. Contamination and artifacts were easily eliminated by preparing the materials in sterile conditions. We propose that simple sterile preparation procedures should be adopted and sterility evaluation of nanoparticles should be customarily performed, prior to assessing nanoparticle intracellular internalization, trafficking and their effects on cells and entire organisms.

  17. Morphology of PEDOT:PSS/SWCNT Composites: Insight into Carbon Nanotube Based Organic Thermoelectric Matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etampawala, Thusitha; Tehrani, Mehran; Dadmun, Mark

    2015-03-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) loaded poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrene sulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) nanocomposites are promising materials as the active layer in organic thermoelectric devices. Improvements in the thermoelectric performance of these nanocomposites have been hampered by the lack of an understanding of the correlation between thermo-electrical performance and morphology. In this study, the morphology of highly conducting single walled CNT/PEDOT:PSS nanocomposites were probed by small and ultra-small angle neutron scattering (SANS and USANS respectively) as a function of CNT loading (10wt%, 30wt% and 50wt%,), sonication duration to control the CNT dispersion, and presence and absence of ethylene glycol (EG) in the deposition solution of PEDOT:PSS. The morphology of these composites is currently being correlated to their thermo-electric performance. The SANS and USANS profiles were analyzed with the hierarchical Beaucage model. Further, the USANS data were fit to a two ellipsoidal form factor, which is consistent with the analysis of the USANS data by the Beaucage model and SEM results. These results reveal that the sonication duration and presence of EG effectively de-bundle the CNTs and disperse them in the PEDOT:PSS matrix.

  18. Carbon nanotube-based polymer nanocomposites: Fractal network to hierarchical morphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Tirtha

    The dispersion of anisotropic nanoparticles such as single-walled carbon nanotubes in polymeric matrices promises the ability to develop advanced materials with controlled and tailored combinations of properties. However, dispersion of such nanotubes in a polymer matrix is an extremely challenging task due to strong attractive interactions between the nanotubes. The successful dispersion of single-walled carbon nanotubes in poly(ethylene oxide) using an anionic surfactant (lithium dodecyl sulfate) as compatibilizer is reported here. The geometrical percolation threshold (pc, in vol %) of nanotubes, as revealed by melt-state rheological measurements, is found to be at ˜ 0.09 vol % loading, which corresponds to an effective tube anisotropy of ˜ 650. The system shows an even earlier development of the electrical percolation at 0.03 vol % SWNT loading as obtained by electrical conductivity measurements. In their quiescent state, the nanotubes show hierarchical fractal network (mass fractal dimension ˜ 2.3 +/- 0.2) made of aggregated flocs. Inside the floc, individual or small bundles of nanotubes overlap each other to form a dense mesh. The interfloc interactions provides the stress bearing capacity for these nano composites and are responsible for the unique modulus scaling of these systems (˜(p-pc)delta, 3.0 ≤ delta ≤ 4.5). The interaction is inversely related to the particle dispersion state, which influences the absolute values of the viscoelastic parameters. As a direct consequence of the self-similar fractal network, the linear flow properties display 'time-temperature-composition' superposition. This superposability can be extended for non-linear deformations when the non-linear properties are scaled by the local strain experienced by the elements of the network. More interestingly, under steady shear, these nanocomposites show network-independent behavior. The absolute stress value is a function of the nanotube loading, but the characteristic time

  19. Modeling the electromechanical and strain response of carbon nanotube-based nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Bo Mi; Loh, Kenneth J.; Burton, Andrew R.; Loyola, Bryan R.

    2014-04-01

    Over the last few decades, carbon nanotube (CNT)-based thin films or nanocomposites have been widely investigated as a multifunctional material. The proposed applications extend beyond sensing, ultra-strong coatings, biomedical grafts, and energy harvesting, among others. In particular, thin films characterized by a percolated and random distribution of CNTs within a flexible polymeric matrix have been shown to change its electrical properties in response to applied strains. While a plethora of experimental work has been conducted, modeling their electromechanical response remains challenging. Furthermore, their design and optimization require the derivation of accurate electromechanical models that could predict thin film response to applied strains. Thus, the objective of this study is to implement a percolation-based piezoresistive model that could explain the underlying mechanisms for strain sensing. First, a percolation-based model with randomly distributed, straight CNTs was developed in MATLAB. Second, the number of CNTs within a unit area was varied to explore its influence on percolation probability. Then, to understand how the film's electrical properties respond to strain, two different models were implemented. Both models calculated the geometrical response of the film and CNTs due to applied uniaxial strains. The first model considered the fact that the electrical resistance of individual CNTs changed depending solely on its length between junctions. The other model further explored the idea of incorporating strain sensitivity of individual CNTs. The electromechanical responses and the strain sensitivities of the two models were compared by calculating how their bulk resistance varied due to applied tensile and compressive strains. The numerical model results were then qualitatively compared to experimental results reported in the literature.

  20. Synthesis, Characterization and Utility of Carbon Nanotube Based Hybrid Sensors in Bioanalytical Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badhulika, Sushmee

    The detection of gaseous analytes and biological molecules is of prime importance in the fields of environmental pollution control, food and water - safety and analysis; and medical diagnostics. This necessitates the development of advanced and improved technology that is reliable, inexpensive and suitable for high volume production. The conventional sensors are often thin film based which lack sensitivity due to the phenomena of current shunting across the charge depleted region when an analyte binds with them. One dimensional (1-D) nanostructures provide a better alternative for sensing applications by eliminating the issue of current shunting due to their 1-D geometries and facilitating device miniaturization and low power operations. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are 1-D nanostructures that possess small size, high mechanical strength, high electrical and thermal conductivity and high specific area that have resulted in their wide spread applications in sensor technology. To overcome the issue of low sensitivity of pristine CNTs and to widen their scope, hybrid devices have been fabricated that combine the synergistic properties of CNTs along with materials like metals and conducting polymers (CPs). CPs exhibit electronic, magnetic and optical properties of metals and semiconductors while retaining the processing advantages of polymers. Their high chemical sensitivity, room temperature operation and tunable charge transport properties has made them ideal for use as transducing elements in chemical sensors. In this dissertation, various CNT based hybrid devices such as CNT-conducting polymer and graphene-CNT-metal nanoparticles based sensors have been developed and demonstrated towards bioanalytical applications such as detection of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and saccharides. Electrochemical polymerization enabled the synthesis of CPs and metal nanoparticles in a simple, cost effective and controlled way on the surface of CNT based platforms thus resulting in

  1. Investigations of niobium carbide contact for carbon-nanotube-based devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, L.; Chor, E. F.; Wu, Y.; Guo, Z.

    2010-03-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) field effect transistors (FETs) with Nb contacts have been fabricated and upon annealing in vacuum at 700 °C for 1 h, niobium carbide (Nb2C) is formed at the Nb/SWCNT interface. The Nb2C/SWCNT contacts demonstrate a very small Schottky barrier height of ~ 18 meV (decreased by > 80% relative to that of pristine Nb/SWCNT contact of ~ 98 meV) to p-type transport. This is attributed to the higher work function of Nb2C (~5.2 eV) than Nb (~4.3 eV) and better bonding between Nb2C and SWCNTs. The performance of Nb2C-contacted SWCNT FETs is as follows: the p-channel ON current is as high as 0.5 µA at VDS = 0.1 V, the ION/IOFF ratio is up to ~ 105 and the subthreshold slope is ~ 550 mV/dec, which is as good as that of titanium carbide (TiC-) and Pd-contacted SWCNT FETs. Compared with TiC, Nb2C contacts yield more unipolar p-type SWCNT FETs, as a result of the Nb2Cs higher work function. More importantly, Nb2C contacts can form near-ohmic contacts to both large-(>=1.6 nm) and small-diameter (~1 nm) SWCNTs, while Pd can only form near-ohmic contacts for large-diameter SWCNTs. Moreover, the Nb2C contacts demonstrate good stability in air.

  2. Investigations of niobium carbide contact for carbon-nanotube-based devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, L; Chor, E F [Centre for Optoelectronics, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, National University of Singapore, Blk E3 02-07, Engineering Drive 3, Singapore 117576 (Singapore); Wu, Y [Information Storage Materials Laboratory, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, National University of Singapore, WS2, 03-25, 1 Engineering Drive 3, Singapore 117576 (Singapore); Guo, Z, E-mail: g0403704@nus.edu.sg [Data Storage Institute, 5 Engineering Drive 1, Singapore 117608 (Singapore)

    2010-03-05

    Single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) field effect transistors (FETs) with Nb contacts have been fabricated and upon annealing in vacuum at 700 deg. C for 1 h, niobium carbide (Nb{sub 2}C) is formed at the Nb/SWCNT interface. The Nb{sub 2}C/SWCNT contacts demonstrate a very small Schottky barrier height of {approx} 18 meV (decreased by > 80% relative to that of pristine Nb/SWCNT contact of {approx} 98 meV) to p-type transport. This is attributed to the higher work function of Nb{sub 2}C ({approx}5.2 eV) than Nb ({approx}4.3 eV) and better bonding between Nb{sub 2}C and SWCNTs. The performance of Nb{sub 2}C-contacted SWCNT FETs is as follows: the p-channel ON current is as high as 0.5 {mu}A at V{sub DS} = 0.1 V, the I{sub ON}/I{sub OFF} ratio is up to {approx} 10{sup 5} and the subthreshold slope is {approx} 550 mV/dec, which is as good as that of titanium carbide (TiC-) and Pd-contacted SWCNT FETs. Compared with TiC, Nb{sub 2}C contacts yield more unipolar p-type SWCNT FETs, as a result of the Nb{sub 2}Cs higher work function. More importantly, Nb{sub 2}C contacts can form near-ohmic contacts to both large-({>=}1.6 nm) and small-diameter ({approx}1 nm) SWCNTs, while Pd can only form near-ohmic contacts for large-diameter SWCNTs. Moreover, the Nb{sub 2}C contacts demonstrate good stability in air.

  3. Electron optics simulation for designing carbon nanotube based field emission x-ray source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sultana, Shabana

    In this dissertation, electron optics simulation for designing carbon nanotube (CNT) based field emission x-ray source for medical imaging applications will be presented. However, for design optimization of x-ray tubes accurate electron beam optics simulation is essential. To facilitate design of CNT x-ray sources a commercial 3D finite element software has been chosen for extensive simulation. The results show that a simplified model of uniform electron field emission from the cathode surface is not sufficient when compared to experimental measurements. This necessitated the development of a refined model to describe a macroscopic field emission CNT cathode for electron beam optics simulations. The model emulates the random distribution of CNTs and the associated variation of local field enhancement factor. The main parameter of the model has been derived empirically from the experimentally measured I-V characteristics of the CNT cathode. Simulation results based on this model agree well with experiments which include measurements of the transmission rate and focus spot size. The model provides a consistent simulation platform for optimization of electron beam optics in CNT x-ray source design. A systematic study of electron beam optics in CNT x-ray tubes led to the development of a new generation of compact x-ray source with multiple pixels. A micro focus field emission x-ray source with a variable focal spot size has been fully characterized and evaluated. It has been built and successfully integrated into micro-CT scanners which are capable of dynamic cardiac imaging of free-breathing small animals with high spatial and temporal resolutions. In addition a spatially distributed high power multi-beam x-ray source has also been designed and integrated into a stationary digital breast tomosynthesis (s-DBT) configuration. This system has the potential to reduce the total scan time to 4 seconds and yield superior image quality in breast imaging.

  4. Characteristics of cesium ion sorption from aqueous solution on bentonite- and carbon nanotube-based composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Shubin [Graduate School of Science and Technology, Shizuoka University, Hamamatsu 432-8561 (Japan); Key Laboratory of Novel Thin Film Solar Cells, Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Han, Cho [Graduate School of Engineering, Shizuoka University, Hamamatsu 432-8561 (Japan); Wang, Xiangke [Key Laboratory of Novel Thin Film Solar Cells, Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Faculty of Engineering, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah 21589 (Saudi Arabia); Nagatsu, Masaaki, E-mail: tmnagat@ipc.shizuoka.ac.jp [Graduate School of Science and Technology, Shizuoka University, Hamamatsu 432-8561 (Japan); Graduate School of Engineering, Shizuoka University, Hamamatsu 432-8561 (Japan)

    2014-06-01

    Highlights: • The effects of cation and hydroxyl exchanges on Cs{sup +} sorption are investigated. • The CS-g-CNTs and the CS-g-bentonite composites are designed. • The effect of different cations on Cs{sup +} adsorption is detected. • The cation-exchange is much more effective in Cs{sup +} sorption than the hydroxyl group. • We give the future directions of new and selective adsorbents for Cs{sup +} ions. - Abstract: The technology development of Cs{sup +} capture from aqueous solution is crucial for the disposal of nuclear waste and still remains a significant challenge. Previous researches have been proven that ion exchanges with the cations and hydroxyl exchange are the main sorption mechanisms for Cs{sup +}. Therefore, how important are the cation exchange and the hydroxyl exchange mechanisms to Cs{sup +} sorption? And whether can we improve the sorption capacity of the material by increasing the amount of hydroxyl groups? With these in mind, we herein designed the chitosan-grafted carbon nanotubes (CS-g-CNTs) and the chitosan-grafted bentonite (CS-g-bentonite) by plasma-induced grafting method. The interactions of Cs{sup +} with CNTs, bentonite, CS-g-CNTs and CS-g-bentonite composites were investigated. The sorption of Cs{sup +} is mainly dominated by strong cation exchange in monovalent Group I and divalent Group II. And the cation-exchange mechanism is much more effective than the hydroxyl group exchange. The effect of hydroxyl groups is dependent on the property of the matrix. We cannot improve the Cs adsorption capacity of material for Cs{sup +} only by increasing the amount of hydroxyl groups in any case. The spatial structure and the cation-exchange capacity of the material are important factors for choosing the sorbent for Cs{sup +} removal from radioactive waste water.

  5. Development of a Carbon Nanotube-Based Micro-CT and its Applications in Preclinical Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burk, Laurel May

    Due to the dependence of researchers on mouse models for the study of human disease, diagnostic tools available in the clinic must be modified for use on these much smaller subjects. In addition to high spatial resolution, cardiac and lung imaging of mice presents extreme temporal challenges, and physiological gating methods must be developed in order to image these organs without motion blur. Commercially available micro-CT imaging devices are equipped with conventional thermionic x-ray sources and have a limited temporal response and are not ideal for in vivo small animal studies. Recent development of a field-emission x-ray source with carbon nanotube (CNT) cathode in our lab presented the opportunity to create a micro-CT device well-suited for in vivo lung and cardiac imaging of murine models for human disease. The goal of this thesis work was to present such a device, to develop and refine protocols which allow high resolution in vivo imaging of free-breathing mice, and to demonstrate the use of this new imaging tool for the study many different disease models. In Chapter 1, I provide background information about x-rays, CT imaging, and small animal micro-CT. In Chapter 2, CNT-based x-ray sources are explained, and details of a micro-focus x-ray tube specialized for micro-CT imaging are presented. In Chapter 3, the first and second generation CNT micro-CT devices are characterized, and successful respiratory- and cardiac-gated live animal imaging on normal, wild-type mice is achieved. In Chapter 4, respiratory-gated imaging of mouse disease models is demonstrated, limitations to the method are discussed, and a new contactless respiration sensor is presented which addresses many of these limitations. In Chapter 5, cardiac-gated imaging of disease models is demonstrated, including studies of aortic calcification, left ventricular hypertrophy, and myocardial infarction. In Chapter 6, several methods for image and system improvement are explored, and radiation

  6. Materials Integration and Doping of Carbon Nanotube-based Logic Circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geier, Michael

    Over the last 20 years, extensive research into the structure and properties of single- walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) has elucidated many of the exceptional qualities possessed by SWCNTs, including record-setting tensile strength, excellent chemical stability, distinctive optoelectronic features, and outstanding electronic transport characteristics. In order to exploit these remarkable qualities, many application-specific hurdles must be overcome before the material can be implemented in commercial products. For electronic applications, recent advances in sorting SWCNTs by electronic type have enabled significant progress towards SWCNT-based integrated circuits. Despite these advances, demonstrations of SWCNT-based devices with suitable characteristics for large-scale integrated circuits have been limited. The processing methodologies, materials integration, and mechanistic understanding of electronic properties developed in this dissertation have enabled unprecedented scales of SWCNT-based transistor fabrication and integrated circuit demonstrations. Innovative materials selection and processing methods are at the core of this work and these advances have led to transistors with the necessary transport properties required for modern circuit integration. First, extensive collaborations with other research groups allowed for the exploration of SWCNT thin-film transistors (TFTs) using a wide variety of materials and processing methods such as new dielectric materials, hybrid semiconductor materials systems, and solution-based printing of SWCNT TFTs. These materials were integrated into circuit demonstrations such as NOR and NAND logic gates, voltage-controlled ring oscillators, and D-flip-flops using both rigid and flexible substrates. This dissertation explores strategies for implementing complementary SWCNT-based circuits, which were developed by using local metal gate structures that achieve enhancement-mode p-type and n-type SWCNT TFTs with widely separated and

  7. Activated carbon and single-walled carbon nanotube based electrochemical capacitor in 1 M LiPF{sub 6} electrolyte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azam, M.A., E-mail: asyadi@utem.edu.my [Carbon Research Technology Research Group, Faculty of Manufacturing Engineering, Universiti Teknikal Malaysia Melaka, Hang Tuah Jaya, 76100 Durian Tunggal, Melaka (Malaysia); Jantan, N.H.; Dorah, N.; Seman, R.N.A.R.; Manaf, N.S.A. [Carbon Research Technology Research Group, Faculty of Manufacturing Engineering, Universiti Teknikal Malaysia Melaka, Hang Tuah Jaya, 76100 Durian Tunggal, Melaka (Malaysia); Kudin, T.I.T. [Ionics Materials & Devices Research Laboratory, Faculty of Applied Sciences, Universiti Teknologi MARA, Shah Alam, Selangor (Malaysia); Yahya, M.Z.A. [Ionics Materials & Devices Research Laboratory, Faculty of Applied Sciences, Universiti Teknologi MARA, Shah Alam, Selangor (Malaysia); National Defence University of Malaysia, Kem Sungai Besi, 57000 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • Activated carbon and single-walled CNT based electrochemical capacitor. • Electrochemical analysis by means of CV, charge/discharge and impedance. • 1 M LiPF{sub 6} non-aqueous solution as an electrolyte. • AC/SWCNT electrode exhibits a maximum capacitance of 60.97 F g{sup −1}. - Abstract: Carbon nanotubes have been extensively studied because of their wide range of potential application such as in nanoscale electric circuits, textiles, transportation, health, and the environment. Carbon nanotubes feature extraordinary properties, such as electrical conductivities higher than those of copper, hardness and thermal conductivity higher than those of diamond, and strength surpassing that of steel, among others. This research focuses on the fabrication of an energy storage device, namely, an electrochemical capacitor, by using carbon materials, i.e., activated carbon and single-walled carbon nanotubes, of a specific weight ratio as electrode materials. The electrolyte functioning as an ion carrier is 1 M lithium hexafluorophosphate. Variations in the electrochemical performance of the device, including its capacitance, charge/discharge characteristics, and impedance, are reported in this paper. The electrode proposed in this work exhibits a maximum capacitance of 60.97 F g{sup −1} at a scan rate of 1 mV s{sup −1}.

  8. Dynamic response of a carbon nanotube-based rotary nano device with different carbon-hydrogen bonding layout

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yin, Hang [College of Water Resources and Architectural Engineering, Northwest A& F University, Yangling 712100 (China); Cai, Kun, E-mail: caikun1978@163.com [College of Water Resources and Architectural Engineering, Northwest A& F University, Yangling 712100 (China); Wan, Jing [College of Water Resources and Architectural Engineering, Northwest A& F University, Yangling 712100 (China); Gao, Zhaoliang, E-mail: coopcg@163.com [Institute of Soil and Water Conservation, Northwest A& F University, Yangling, 712100 (China); Chen, Zhen [State Key Laboratory of Structural Analysis for Industrial Equipment, Department of Engineering Mechanics, Faculty of Vehicle Engineering and Mechanics, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China)

    2016-03-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • The rotational transmission performance of a rotational transmission system (RTS) with different types of C−H bonding layouts on the edge of motor and rotor is investigated using MD simulation method. • The L–J interaction between covalently bonded hydrogen atoms and sp1 carbon atoms is too weak to support a stable rotational transmission when only the motor or rotor has bonded hydrogen atoms. • When both the motor and rotor have the same C−H bonding layout on their adjacent ends, a stable output rotational speed of rotor can be obtained. • A low input rotational speed (e.g., 100 GHz) would lead to a synchronous rotational transmission if the system has (+0.5H) C−H bonding layout. - Abstract: In a nano rotational transmission system (RTS) which consists of a single walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) as the motor and a coaxially arranged double walled carbon nanotube (DWCNT) as a bearing, the interaction between the motor and the rotor in bearing, which has great effects on the response of the RTS, is determined by their adjacent edges. Using molecular dynamics (MD) simulation, the interaction is analyzed when the adjacent edges have different carbon-hydrogen (C−H) bonding layouts. In the computational models, the rotor in bearing and the motor with a specific input rotational speed are made from the same armchair SWCNT. Simulation results demonstrate that a perfect rotational transmission could happen when the motor and rotor have the same C−H bonding layout on their adjacent ends. If only half or less of the carbon atoms on the adjacent ends are bonded with hydrogen atoms, the strong attraction between the lower speed (100 GHz) motor and rotor leads to a synchronous rotational transmission. If only the motor or the rotor has C−H bonds on their adjacent ends, no rotational transmission happens due to weak interaction between the bonded hydrogen atoms on one end with the sp{sup 1} bonded carbon atoms on the other

  9. Conducting polymer functionalized single-walled carbon nanotube based chemiresistive biosensor for the detection of human cardiac myoglobin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puri, Nidhi [CSIR-National Physical Laboratory, Dr. K. S. Krishnan Road, New Delhi 110012 (India); Department of Physics, Faculty of Natural Sciences, Jamia Millia Islamia, New Delhi 110025 (India); Niazi, Asad [Department of Physics, Faculty of Natural Sciences, Jamia Millia Islamia, New Delhi 110025 (India); Biradar, Ashok M.; Rajesh, E-mail: rajesh-csir@yahoo.com, E-mail: adani@engr.ucr.edu [CSIR-National Physical Laboratory, Dr. K. S. Krishnan Road, New Delhi 110012 (India); Mulchandani, Ashok, E-mail: rajesh-csir@yahoo.com, E-mail: adani@engr.ucr.edu [Department of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, University of California, Riverside, California 92521 (United States)

    2014-10-13

    We report the fabrication of a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) based ultrasensitive label-free chemiresistive biosensor for the detection of human cardiac biomarker, myoglobin (Ag-cMb). Poly(pyrrole-co-pyrrolepropylic acid) with pendant carboxyl groups was electrochemically deposited on electrophoretically aligned SWNT channel, as a conducting linker, for biomolecular immobilization of highly specific cardiac myoglobin antibody. The device was characterized by scanning electron microscopy, source-drain current-voltage (I-V), and charge-transfer characteristic studies. The device exhibited a linear response with a change in conductance in SWNT channel towards the target, Ag-cMb, over the concentration range of 1.0 to 1000 ng ml{sup −1} with a sensitivity of ∼118% per decade with high specificity.

  10. Modification of anisotropic plasma diffusion via auxiliary electrons emitted by a carbon nanotubes-based electron gun in an electron cyclotron resonance ion source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malferrari, L; Odorici, F; Veronese, G P; Rizzoli, R; Mascali, D; Celona, L; Gammino, S; Castro, G; Miracoli, R; Serafino, T

    2012-02-01

    The diffusion mechanism in magnetized plasmas is a largely debated issue. A short circuit model was proposed by Simon, assuming fluxes of lost particles along the axial (electrons) and radial (ions) directions which can be compensated, to preserve the quasi-neutrality, by currents flowing throughout the conducting plasma chamber walls. We hereby propose a new method to modify Simon's currents via electrons injected by a carbon nanotubes-based electron gun. We found this improves the source performances, increasing the output current for several charge states. The method is especially sensitive to the pumping frequency. Output currents for given charge states, at different auxiliary electron currents, will be reported in the paper and the influence of the frequency tuning on the compensation mechanism will be discussed.

  11. Comparative study of multi walled carbon nanotubes-based electrodes in micellar media and their application to micellar electrokinetic capillary chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chicharro, Manuel; Arribas, Alberto Sánchez; Moreno, Mónica; Bermejo, Esperanza; Zapardiel, Antonio

    2007-12-15

    This work reports on a comparative study of the electrochemical performance of carbon nanotubes-based electrodes in micellar media and their application for amperometric detection in micellar electrokinetic capillary chromatography (MEKC) separations. These electrodes were prepared in two different ways: immobilization of a layer of carbon nanotubes dispersed in polyethylenimine (PEI), ethanol or Nafion onto glassy carbon electrodes or preparation of paste electrodes using mineral oil as binder. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was employed for surface morphology characterization while cyclic voltammetry of background electrolyte was used for capacitance estimation. The amperometric responses to hydrogen peroxide, amitrol, diuron and 2,3-dichlorophenol (2,3CP) in the presence and in the absence of sodium dodecylsulphate (SDS) were studied by flow injection analysis (FIA), demonstrating that the electrocatalytic activity, background current and electroanalytical performance were strongly dependent on the electrodes preparation procedure. Glassy carbon electrodes modified with carbon nanotubes dispersed in PEI (GC/(CNT/PEI)) displayed the most adequate performance in micellar media, maintaining good electrocatalytic properties combined with acceptable background currents and resistance to passivation. The advantages of using GC/(CNT/PEI) as detectors in capillary electrophoresis were illustrated for the MEKC separations of phenolic pollutants (phenol, 3-chlorophenol, 2,3-dichlorophenol and 4-nitrophenol) and herbicides (amitrol, asulam, diuron, fenuron, monuron and chlortoluron).

  12. Synthesis of carbon-14 labeled vigabatrin. [Antieplileptic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuster, A.J.; Wagner, E.R. (Marion Merrell Dow Inc, Indianapolis, IN (United States))

    1993-01-01

    Carbon-14 labeled vigabatrin was synthesized in 5 steps from 5-hydroxymethyl-2-pyrrolidone tosylate and NaCN-[[sup 14]C]. A key step involved reduction of the resulting nitrile in the presence of excess dimethylamine to give the dimethylamino-ethyl 2-pyrrolidone derivative in one step. This afforded an overall radiochemical yield of 22% and radiochemical purity greater than 98%. (Author).

  13. Synthesis of carbon-14 labeled doxylamine succinate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rao, P.N.; Damodaran, K.M.

    1986-05-01

    Doxylamine succinate, N,N-dimethyl-2-(1-phenyl-1-(2-pyridinyl)-ethoxy)ethanamine succinate is an antihistamine used primarily as a sedative. Carbon-14 labeled doxylamine succinate, required for toxicological studies, was synthesized in two steps starting from 2-benzoyl pyridine.

  14. Single-walled and multi-walled carbon nanotubes based drug delivery system: Cancer therapy: A review

    OpenAIRE

    Dineshkumar, B.; Krishnakumar, K; A R Bhatt; D Paul; Cherian, J; John, A.; S. Suresh

    2015-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are advanced nano-carrier for delivery of drugs especially anti-cancer drugs. In the field of CNT-based drug delivery system, both single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and multi-walled nanotubes (MWCNTs) can be used for targeting anticancer drugs in tissues and organs, where the high therapeutic effect is necessary. Benefits of the carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in drug delivery systems are; avoiding solvent usage and reducing the side effects. Therefore, the present revie...

  15. Single-walled and multi-walled carbon nanotubes based drug delivery system: Cancer therapy: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Dineshkumar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanotubes (CNTs are advanced nano-carrier for delivery of drugs especially anti-cancer drugs. In the field of CNT-based drug delivery system, both single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs and multi-walled nanotubes (MWCNTs can be used for targeting anticancer drugs in tissues and organs, where the high therapeutic effect is necessary. Benefits of the carbon nanotubes (CNTs in drug delivery systems are; avoiding solvent usage and reducing the side effects. Therefore, the present review article described about achievement of SWCNTs and MWCNTs to deliver the anticancer drugs with different cancerous cell lines.

  16. Single-walled and multi-walled carbon nanotubes based drug delivery system: Cancer therapy: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dineshkumar, B; Krishnakumar, K; Bhatt, A R; Paul, D; Cherian, J; John, A; Suresh, S

    2015-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are advanced nano-carrier for delivery of drugs especially anti-cancer drugs. In the field of CNT-based drug delivery system, both single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and multi-walled nanotubes (MWCNTs) can be used for targeting anticancer drugs in tissues and organs, where the high therapeutic effect is necessary. Benefits of the carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in drug delivery systems are; avoiding solvent usage and reducing the side effects. Therefore, the present review article described about achievement of SWCNTs and MWCNTs to deliver the anticancer drugs with different cancerous cell lines.

  17. Design and adaptation of miniaturized electrochemical devices integrating carbon nanotube-based sensors to commercial CE equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arribas, Alberto Sánchez; Moreno, Mónica; Bermejo, Esperanza; Angeles Lorenzo, M; Zapardiel, Antonio; Chicharro, Manuel

    2009-10-01

    The design of new electrochemical devices integrating carbon nanotube sensors and their adaptation to commercial CE equipments are described. One of these designs was made for using commercial screen-printed electrodes, whereas the second was projected for coupling commercial glassy carbon electrodes. The electrochemical characterization of these devices revealed that their hydrodynamic behaviour is strongly influenced by the electrode modification with multi-wall carbon nanotubes that provided faster and/or more sensitive signals. The analytical applicability of these devices was illustrated for the CZE separation of chlorinated phenols and the MEKC separation of endocrine disruptors, where the use of carbon nanotube sensors has proved to be advantageous when compared with unmodified ones, with good electrocatalytic properties combined with acceptable background currents and a remarkable resistance to passivation.

  18. On the Strength of the Carbon Nanotube-Based Space Elevator Cable: From Nano- to Mega-Mechanics

    OpenAIRE

    Pugno, Nicola M.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper different deterministic and statistical models, based on new quantized theories proposed by the author, are presented to estimate the strength of a real, thus defective, space elevator cable. The cable, of ~100 megameters in length, is composed by carbon nanotubes, ~100 nanometers long: thus, its design involves from the nano- to the mega-mechanics. The predicted strengths are extensively compared with the experiments and the atomistic simulations on carbon nanotubes available i...

  19. Effects of initial stress on transverse wave propagation in carbon nanotubes based on Timoshenko laminated beam models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, H.; Wang, X.

    2006-01-01

    Based on Timoshenko laminated beam models, this paper investigates the influence of initial stress on the vibration and transverse wave propagation in individual multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) under ultrahigh frequency (above 1 THz), in which the initial stress in the MWNTs can occur due to thermal or lattice mismatch between different materials. Considering van der Waals force interaction between two adjacent tubes and effects of rotary inertia and shear deformation, results show that the initial stress in individual multi-wall carbon nanotubes not only affects the number of transverse wave speeds and the magnitude of transverse wave speeds, but also terahertz critical frequencies at which the number of wave speeds changes. When the initial stress in individual multi-wall carbon nanotubes is the compressive stress, transverse wave speeds decrease and the vibration amplitude ratio of two adjacent tubes increases. When the initial stress in individual multi-wall carbon nanotubes is the tensile stress, transverse wave speeds increase and the vibration amplitude ratio of two adjacent tubes decreases. The investigation of the effects of initial stress on transverse wave propagation in carbon nanotubes may be used as a useful reference for the application and the design of nanoelectronic and nanodrive devices, nano-oscillators, and nanosensors, in which carbon nanotubes act as basic elements.

  20. Single-walled carbon nanotube-based polymer monoliths for the enantioselective nano-liquid chromatographic separation of racemic pharmaceuticals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Marwa; Yajadda, Mir Massoud Aghili; Han, Zhao Jun; Su, Dawei; Wang, Guoxiu; Ostrikov, Kostya Ken; Ghanem, Ashraf

    2014-09-19

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes were encapsulated into different polymer-based monolithic backbones. The polymer monoliths were prepared via the copolymerization of 20% monomers, glycidyl methacrylate, 20% ethylene glycol dimethacrylate and 60% porogens (36% 1-propanol, 18% 1,4-butanediol) or 16.4% monomers (16% butyl methacrylate, 0.4% sulfopropyl methacrylate), 23.6% ethylene glycol dimethacrylate and 60% porogens (36% 1-propanol, 18% 1,4-butanediol) along with 6% single-walled carbon nanotubes aqueous suspension. The effect of single-walled carbon nanotubes on the chiral separation of twelve classes of pharmaceutical racemates namely; α- and β-blockers, antiinflammatory drugs, antifungal drugs, dopamine antagonists, norepinephrine-dopamine reuptake inhibitors, catecholamines, sedative hypnotics, diuretics, antihistaminics, anticancer drugs and antiarrhythmic drugs was investigated. The enantioselective separation was carried out under multimodal elution to explore the chiral recognition capabilities of single-walled carbon nanotubes using reversed phase, polar organic and normal phase chromatographic conditions using nano-liquid chromatography. Baseline separation was achieved for celiprolol, chlorpheniramine, etozoline, nomifensine and sulconazole under multimodal elution conditions. Satisfactory repeatability was achieved through run-to-run, column-to-column and batch-to-batch investigations. Our findings demonstrate that single-walled carbon nanotubes represent a promising stationary phase for the chiral separation and may open the field for a new class of chiral selectors.

  1. Determination of the effective Young's modulus of vertically aligned carbon nanotube arrays: a simple nanotube-based varactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olofsson, Niklas; Ek-Weis, Johan; Eriksson, Anders; Idda, Tonio; Campbell, Eleanor E B

    2009-09-23

    The electromechanical properties of arrays of vertically aligned multiwalled carbon nanotubes were studied in a parallel plate capacitor geometry. The electrostatic actuation was visualized using both optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy, and highly reproducible behaviour was achieved for actuation voltages below the pull-in voltage. The walls of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes behave as solid cohesive units. The effective Young's modulus for the carbon nanotube arrays was determined by comparing the actuation results with the results of electrostatic simulations and was found to be exceptionally low, of the order of 1-10 MPa. The capacitance change and Q-factor were determined by measuring the frequency dependence of the radio-frequency transmission. Capacitance changes of over 20% and Q-factors in the range 100-10 were achieved for a frequency range of 0.2-1.5 GHz.

  2. Carbon Nanotube-Based Supercapacitors with Excellent ac Line Filtering and Rate Capability via Improved Interfacial Impedance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangom, Yverick; Tang, Xiaowu Shirley; Nazar, Linda F

    2015-07-28

    We report the fabrication of high-performance, self-standing composite sp(2)-carbon supercapacitor electrodes using single-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) as conductive binder. The 3-D mesoporous mesh architecture of CNT-based composite electrodes grants unimpaired ionic transport throughout relatively thick films and allows superior performance compared to graphene-based devices at an ac line frequency of 120 Hz. Metrics of 601 μF/cm(2) with a -81° phase angle and a rate capability (RC) time constant of 199 μs are obtained for thin carbon films. The free-standing carbon films were obtained from a chlorosulfonic acid dispersion and interfaced to stainless steel current collectors with various surface treatments. CNT electrodes were able to cycle at 200 V/s and beyond, still showing a characteristic parallelepipedic cyclic votammetry shape at 1 kV/s. Current densities are measured in excess of 6400 A/g, and the electrodes retain more than 98% capacity after 1 million cycles. These promising results are attributed to a reduction of series resistance in the film through the CNT conductive network and especially to the surface treatment of the stainless steel current collector.

  3. Outstanding field emission properties of wet-processed titanium dioxide coated carbon nanotube based field emission devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jinzhuo; Xu, Peng; Ou-Yang, Wei; Chen, Xiaohong; Guo, Pingsheng; Li, Jun; Piao, Xianqing; Wang, Miao; Sun, Zhuo

    2015-02-01

    Field emission devices using a wet-processed composite cathode of carbon nanotube films coated with titanium dioxide exhibit outstanding field emission characteristics, including ultralow turn on field of 0.383 V μm-1 and threshold field of 0.657 V μm-1 corresponding with a very high field enhancement factor of 20 000, exceptional current stability, and excellent emission uniformity. The improved field emission properties are attributed to the enhanced edge effect simultaneously with the reduced screening effect, and the lowered work function of the composite cathode. In addition, the highly stable electron emission is found due to the presence of titanium dioxide nanoparticles on the carbon nanotubes, which prohibits the cathode from the influence of ions and free radical created in the emission process as well as residual oxygen gas in the device. The high-performance solution-processed composite cathode demonstrates great potential application in vacuum electronic devices.

  4. Design of carbon nanotube-based gas-diffusion cathode for O{sub 2} reduction by multicopper oxidases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lau, Carolin; Adkins, Emily R.; Atanassov, Plamen [University of New Mexico, Center for Emerging Energy Technologies, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Ramasamy, Ramaraja P. [Microbiology and Applied Biochemistry, Airbase Sciences, Air Force Research Laboratory, Tyndall Air Force Base, FL (United States); Nano-Electrochemistry Laboratory, Faculty of Engineering, University of Georgia, Athens, GA (United States); Luckarift, Heather R.; Johnson, Glenn R. [Microbiology and Applied Biochemistry, Airbase Sciences, Air Force Research Laboratory, Tyndall Air Force Base, FL (United States)

    2012-01-15

    Multicopper oxidases, such as laccase or bilirubin oxidase, are known to reduce molecular oxygen at very high redox potentials, which makes them attractive biocatalysts for enzymatic cathodes in biological fuel cells. By designing an enzymatic gas-diffusion electrode, molecular oxygen can be supplied through the gaseous phase, avoiding solubility and diffusion limitations typically associated with liquid electrolytes. In doing so, the current density of enzymatic cathodes can theoretically be enhanced. This publication presents a material study of carbon/Teflon composites that aim to optimize the functionality of the gas-diffusion and catalytic layers for application in enzymatic systems. The modification of the catalytic layer with multiwalled carbon nanotubes, for example, creates the basis for stronger {pi}-{pi} stacking interactions through tethered enzymatic linkers, such as pyrenes or perylene derivates. Cyclic voltammograms show the effective direct electron contact of laccase with carbon nanotube-modified electrodes via tethered crosslinking molecules as a model system. The polarization behavior of laccase-modified gas-diffusion electrodes reveals open-circuit potentials of +550 mV (versus Ag/AgCl) and current densities approaching 0.5 mA cm{sup 2} (at zero potential) in air-breathing mode. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  5. Synthesis of carbon-14 and tritium labeled methylprednisolone suleptanate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stolle, W.T.; Runge, T.A.; Hsi, R.S.P. (Upjohn Co., Kalamazoo, MI (United States))

    1990-05-01

    Methylprednisolone suleptanate was initially labeled with tritium in the A-ring of the steroid portion of the molecule, and with carbon-14 at both carboxylic carbons of the suberic acid portion of the side chain. However these labels proved to lack total metabolic stability after administration to rats. Subsequently a second pair of labeled methylprednisolone suleptanates was synthesized, with tritium at C-7 in the B-ring of the steroid and carbon-14 exclusively at the carboxamide carbon in the side chain. These labeled compounds showed excellent metabolic stability of both the tritium and carbon-14 labels, and should be well suited for conducting drug disposition studies. (author).

  6. Implementation of a safe-by-design approach in the development of new open pilot lines for the manufacture of carbon nanotube-based nano-enabled products

    Science.gov (United States)

    López de Ipiña, Jesús M.; Hernan, Angel; Cenigaonaindia, Xabier; Insunza, Mario; Florez, Sonia; Seddon, Richard; Vavouliotis, Antonios; Kostopoulos, Vasilios; Latko, Paulina; Durałek, Paweł; Kchit, Nadir

    2017-06-01

    The project PLATFORM (H2020, GA 646307) aims to develop three new pilot lines (PPLs) for the manufacture of carbon nanotube-based nano-enabled products (buckypapers, treated prepregs, doped veils), for the European aeronautics and automotive industries (a Technology Readiness Level 6 - TRL6 - is expected at the end of the project). The Machinery Directive 2006/42/EC (MD) - transposed into the respective national legislations - is the European regulatory framework for the design and construction of new machinery, as the future PPLs. PPLs are not required to comply with the provisions of the MD until they are put into service - expected in 2020, after project completion - but then, the MD will be fully applicable. In this regulatory context, the project PLATFORM is aligning the design of the PPLs according to the MD requirements, in order to facilitate the CE marking in 2020 (TRL9) and avoid potential economic costs associated with future re-adaptations or modifications needed to ensure compliance with the MD. This paper discusses the methodological approach followed by the project PLATFORM to integrate all the nanosafety aspects in the design of the PPLs, in order to achieve safe designs in conformity with the relevant Essential Health and Safety Requirements (EHSRs) of the MD. Since machinery must be designed and constructed taking into account the results of the risk assessment (RA), this paper describes the systematic and iterative approach for RA and risk reduction followed to eliminate hazards as far practicable and to adequately reduce risks by the implementation of protective measures. This process has been guided by the harmonized standards EN ISO 12100 and EN ISO 14123, taking the relevant phases of life cycle, expected uses and operation modes of the PPLs into account. A specific tool to guide the safe design of the PPLs and facilitate the RA process has also been produced by the project (PLATFORM - SbD toolkit).

  7. Rayleigh-Ritz Vibrational Analysis of Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes Based on the Nonlocal Flügge Shell Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Rouhi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A nonlocal elastic shell model considering the small scale effects is developed to study the free vibrations of multiwalled carbon nanotubes subject to different types of boundary conditions. Based on the nonlocal elasticity and the Flügge shell theory, the governing equations are derived which include the interaction of van der Waals forces between adjacent and nonadjacent layers. To analytically solve the problem, the Rayleigh-Ritz method is employed. In the present analysis, different combinations of layerwise boundary conditions are taken into account. Some new intertube resonant frequencies and the associated noncoaxial vibrational modes are identified owing to incorporating circumferential modes into the shell model.

  8. Size-dependent characteristics of electrostatically actuated fluid-conveying carbon nanotubes based on modified couple stress theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fakhrabadi, Mir Masoud Seyyed; Rastgoo, Abbas; Ahmadian, Mohammad Taghi

    2013-01-01

    The paper presents the effects of fluid flow on the static and dynamic properties of carbon nanotubes that convey a viscous fluid. The mathematical model is based on the modified couple stress theory. The effects of various fluid parameters and boundary conditions on the pull-in voltages are investigated in detail. The applicability of the proposed system as nanovalves or nanosensors in nanoscale fluidic systems is elaborated. The results confirm that the nanoscale system studied in this paper can be properly applied for these purposes.

  9. A Carbon Nanotube-based NEMS Parametric Amplifier for Enhanced Radio Wave Detection and Electronic Signal Amplification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aleman, B J; Sussman, A; Zettl, A [Physics Department, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Mickelson, W, E-mail: azettl@berkeley.edu [Center of Integrated Nanomechanical Systems, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2011-07-20

    We propose a scheme for a parametric amplifier based on a single suspended carbon nanotube field-emitter. This novel electromechanical nanotube device acts as a phase-sensitive, variable-gain, band-pass-filtering amplifier for electronic signal processing and, at the same time, can operate as a variable-sensitivity, tuneable detector and transducer of radio frequency electromagnetic waves. The amplifier can exhibit infinite gain at pumping voltages much less than 10 Volts. Additionally, the amplifier's low overhead power consumption (10-1000 nW) make it exceptionally attractive for ultra-low-power applications.

  10. Vibrational behavior of single-walled carbon nanotubes based on cylindrical shell model using wave propagation approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muzamal Hussain

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The vibration analysis, based on the Donnell thin shell theory, of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs has been investigated. The wave propagation approach in standard eigenvalue form has been employed in order to derive the characteristic frequency equation describing the natural frequencies of vibration in SWCNTs. The complex exponential functions, with the axial modal numbers that depend on the boundary conditions stated at edges of a carbon nanotube, have been used to compute the axial modal dependence. In our new investigations, the vibration frequency spectra are obtained and calculated for various physical parameters like length-to-diameter ratios for armchair and zigzag SWCNTs for different modes and in-plane rigidity and mass density per unit lateral area for armchair and zigzag SWCNTs on the vibration frequencies. The computer software MATLAB is used in order to compute these frequencies of the SWCNTs. The results obtained from wave propagation method are found to be in satisfactory agreement with that obtained through the previously known numerical molecular dynamics simulations.

  11. Stable and sensitive flow-through monitoring of phenol using a carbon nanotube based screen printed biosensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alarcon, G; Guix, M; Ambrosi, A; Merkoci, A [Nanobioelectronics and Biosensors Group, Catalan Institute of Nanotechnology, Campus UAB, 08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona, Catalonia (Spain); Ramirez Silva, M T [Departamento de Quimica, Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana Iztapalapa, 09340 Mexico Distrito Federal (Mexico); Palomar Pardave, M E, E-mail: arben.merkoci.icn@uab.es [Departamento de Materiales, Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana, Azcapotzalco, 02200 Mexico Distrito Federal (Mexico)

    2010-06-18

    A stable and sensitive biosensor for phenol detection based on a screen printed electrode modified with tyrosinase, multiwall carbon nanotubes and glutaraldehyde is designed and applied in a flow injection analytical system. The proposed carbon nanotube matrix is easy to prepare and ensures a very good entrapment environment for the enzyme, being simpler and cheaper than other reported strategies. In addition, the proposed matrix allows for a very fast operation of the enzyme, that leads to a response time of 15 s. Several parameters such as the working potential, pH of the measuring solution, biosensor response time, detection limit, linear range of response and sensitivity are studied. The obtained detection limit for phenol was 0.14 x 10{sup -6} M. The biosensor keeps its activity during continuous FIA measurements at room temperature, showing a stable response (RSD 5%) within a two week working period at room temperature. The developed biosensor is being applied for phenol detection in seawater samples and seems to be a promising alternative for automatic control of seawater contamination. The developed detection system can be extended to other enzyme biosensors with interest for several other applications.

  12. A carbon nanotube-based high-sensitivity electrochemical immunosensor for rapid and portable detection of clenbuterol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Gang; Chen, Haode; Peng, Hongzhen; Song, Shiping; Gao, Jimin; Lu, Jianxin; Ding, Min; Li, Lanying; Ren, Shuzhen; Zou, Ziying; Fan, Chunhai

    2011-10-15

    Carbon nanotubes have shown their unique advantages of mechanical, chemical and electronic properties in bioanalysis. We herein report a new method to efficiently and reproducibly prepare multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs)-protein sensing layers for electrochemical immunosensors. This method employs centrifugation to prepare a conjugate of MWNTs and goat anti mouse-immunoglobulin G (IgG) (secondary antibody). The conjugates were then deposited on screen-printed electrodes to form a nanostructured layer (MWNT-I layer). CLB monoclonal antibody was assembled through its binding to the secondary antibody. The MWNT-I layer-based electrodes were used for rapid and sensitive amperometric immunosensing detection of clenbuterol (CLB) in swine urine samples. Horseradish peroxidase-coupled CLB (CLB-HRP) competed with free CLB in the samples to bind the monoclonal antibody. It has shown significantly higher sensitivity and better reproducibility than the chemical conjugation method. This MWNT-based immunosensor is highly sensitive, leading to a limit of detection of 0.1 ng/mL within a rapid assay time of 16 min. Its sensitivity is at least 1 order of magnitude higher than that of a normal immunosensor (without MWNTs). The sensing device is portable with disposable screen-printed electrode, satisfactorily meeting the requirements for field detection of food security-related species.

  13. Outstanding field emission properties of wet-processed titanium dioxide coated carbon nanotube based field emission devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Jinzhuo; Ou-Yang, Wei, E-mail: ouyangwei@phy.ecnu.edu.cn; Chen, Xiaohong; Guo, Pingsheng; Piao, Xianqing; Sun, Zhuo [Engineering Research Center for Nanophotonics and Advanced Instrument, Ministry of Education, Department of Physics, East China Normal University, 3663 North Zhongshan Road, Shanghai 200062 (China); Xu, Peng; Wang, Miao [Department of Physics, Zhejiang University, 38 ZheDa Road, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Li, Jun [Department of Electronic Science and Technology, Tongji University, 4800 Caoan Road, Shanghai 201804 (China)

    2015-02-16

    Field emission devices using a wet-processed composite cathode of carbon nanotube films coated with titanium dioxide exhibit outstanding field emission characteristics, including ultralow turn on field of 0.383 V μm{sup −1} and threshold field of 0.657 V μm{sup −1} corresponding with a very high field enhancement factor of 20 000, exceptional current stability, and excellent emission uniformity. The improved field emission properties are attributed to the enhanced edge effect simultaneously with the reduced screening effect, and the lowered work function of the composite cathode. In addition, the highly stable electron emission is found due to the presence of titanium dioxide nanoparticles on the carbon nanotubes, which prohibits the cathode from the influence of ions and free radical created in the emission process as well as residual oxygen gas in the device. The high-performance solution-processed composite cathode demonstrates great potential application in vacuum electronic devices.

  14. Wave dispersion in viscoelastic single walled carbon nanotubes based on the nonlocal strain gradient Timoshenko beam model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yugang; Liu, Ying; Zhao, Dong

    2017-03-01

    Based on the nonlocal strain gradient theory and Timoshenko beam model, the properties of wave propagation in a viscoelastic single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) are investigated. The characteristic equations for flexural and shear waves in visco-SWCNTs are established. The influence of the tube size on the wave dispersion is clarified. For a low damping coefficient, threshold diameter for shear wave (SW) is observed, below which the phase velocity of SW is equal to zero, whilst flexural wave (FW) always exists. For a high damping coefficient, SW is absolutely constrained, and blocking diameter for FW is observed, above which the wave propagation is blocked. The effects of the wave number, nonlocal and strain gradient length scale parameters on the threshold and blocking diameters are discussed in detail.

  15. Imperfection Sensitivity of Nonlinear Vibration of Curved Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes Based on Nonlocal Timoshenko Beam Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iman Eshraghi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Imperfection sensitivity of large amplitude vibration of curved single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs is considered in this study. The SWCNT is modeled as a Timoshenko nano-beam and its curved shape is included as an initial geometric imperfection term in the displacement field. Geometric nonlinearities of von Kármán type and nonlocal elasticity theory of Eringen are employed to derive governing equations of motion. Spatial discretization of governing equations and associated boundary conditions is performed using differential quadrature (DQ method and the corresponding nonlinear eigenvalue problem is iteratively solved. Effects of amplitude and location of the geometric imperfection, and the nonlocal small-scale parameter on the nonlinear frequency for various boundary conditions are investigated. The results show that the geometric imperfection and non-locality play a significant role in the nonlinear vibration characteristics of curved SWCNTs.

  16. A styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR)/carbon nanotube-based smart force sensor for automotive tire deformation monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Min-Young; Kim, Ji-Sik; Lee, Ho-Geun; Choi, Seung-Bok; Kim, Gi-Woo

    2016-04-01

    This paper provides a preliminary study on the piezoresistive effect of a styrene-butadiene Rubber (SBR), one of the main ingredients of automotive tire, dispersed with carbon nanotubes (CNTs) to explore its feasibility as a force sensor embedded in automotive tires. Typically, the application of CNTs has been successfully applied to the mechanical sensing technology such as a stress/strain and impact sensor. In this study, the potential of using the SBR/CNT as a force sensor for monitoring automotive tire deformation is evaluated for the first time. Experimental results show that the electrical resistance of the SBR/CNT composite changes in response to the sinusoidal loading, as well as static compressive load. These piezoresistive responses of the SBR/CNT composite will be used for sensing the tire deformation caused by the vehicle loading or cracks of tires.

  17. Targeted therapy of SMMC-7721 liver cancer in vitro and in vivo with carbon nanotubes based drug delivery system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Zongfei; Lin, Gaofeng; Lu, Qinghua; Meng, Lingjie; Shen, Xizhong; Dong, Ling; Fu, Chuanlong; Zhang, Xiaoke

    2012-01-01

    A new type of drug delivery system (DDS) involved chitosan (CHI) modified single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) for controllable loading/release of anti-cancer doxorubicin (DOX) was constructed. CHI was non-covalently wrapped around SWNTs, imparting water-solubility and biocompatibility to the nanotubes. Folic acid (FA) was also bounded to the outer CHI layer to realize selective killing of tumor cells. The targeting DDS could effectively kill the HCC SMMC-7721 cell lines and depress the growth of liver cancer in nude mice, showing superior pharmaceutical efficiency to free DOX. The results of the blood routine and serum biochemical parameters, combined with the histological examinations of vital organs, demonstrating that the targeting DDS had negligible in vivo toxicity. Thus, this DDS is promising for high treatment efficacy and low side effects for future cancer therapy.

  18. Design and characterization of a carbon-nanotube-based micro-focus x-ray tube for small animal imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sultana, Shabana; Calderón-Colón, Xiomara; Cao, Guohua; Zhou, Otto; Lu, Jianping

    2010-04-01

    We report the progress in development of carbon nanotube (CNT) field emission micro-focus x-ray tubes for dynamic small animal imaging with high spatial and temporal resolution. Extensive electron optics simulations were performed to study the focusing structure and optimize the tube design. 3D finite element analysis was used for modeling and simulating electron beam optics. A simple and intuitive model is developed to model the field emission properties of CNT cathodes. The dependence of focus spot size and the anode current on the gate extracting voltage, the focusing voltages, the gate mesh geometry, and other geometric parameters were studied. Several tubes were built according to the optimal design. The experimentally measured focus spot size and its dependence on the focus voltages were found to be in quantitative agreement with simulations.

  19. Carbon Nanotube-based Nanohybrid Materials as Counter Electrode for Highly Efficient Dye-sensitized Solar Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ji-Soo; Sim, Eun-Ju; Dao, Van-Duong; Choi, Ho-Suk [Chungnam National University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-04-15

    In this study, we present an excellent approach for easily and uniformly immobilizing Pt, Au and bimetallic PtAu nanoparticles (NPs) on a multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWNT)-coated layer through dry plasma reduction. The NPs are stably and uniformly immobilized on the surface of MWNTs and the nanohybrid materials are applied to counter electrode (CE) of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs). The electrochemical properties of CEs are examined through cyclic voltammogram, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, and Tafel measurements. As a result, both electrochemical catalytic activity and electrical conductivity are highest for PtAu/MWNT electrode. The DSC employing PtAu/MWNT CE exhibits power conversion efficiency of 7.9%. The efficiency is better than those of devices with MWNT (2.6%), AuNP/MWNT (2.7%) and PtNP/MWNT (7.5%) CEs.

  20. Fabrication of platinum-decorated single-walled carbon nanotube based hydrogen sensors by aerosol jet printing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Rui; Ding, Haiyan; Lin, Jian; Shen, Fangping; Cui, Zheng; Zhang, Ting

    2012-12-21

    The coffee ring effect is reduced effectively and a hydrogen sensor with platinum-decorated single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) is prepared by aerosol jet printing (AJP) technology. The stable aqueous solution of platinum functional SWCNTs is prepared by a series of chemical and physical processes and the electrode array is formed by micro-fabrication technology. The AJP process is also researched in detail including the number of printing passes and the printing distance between electrodes. Then, the functional SWCNT aqueous solution is printed on the electrode array and the response of this sensor to the hydrogen is measured carefully. The results show that a functional SWCNT sensor has excellent sensing properties toward hydrogen.

  1. Mechanical, electrical, and thermal expansion properties of carbon nanotube-based silver and silver-palladium alloy composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hemant Pal; Vimal Sharma

    2014-01-01

    The mechanical, electrical, and thermal expansion properties of carbon nanotube (CNT)-based silver and silver–palladium (10:1, w/w) alloy nanocomposites are reported. To tailor the properties of silver, CNTs were incorporated into a silver matrix by a modified mo-lecular level-mixing process. CNTs interact weakly with silver because of their non-reactive nature and lack of mutual solubility. Therefore, palladium was utilized as an alloying element to improve interfacial adhesion. Comparative microstructural characterizations and property evaluations of the nanocomposites were performed. The structural characterizations revealed that decorated type-CNTs were dispersed, em-bedded, and anchored into the silver matrix. The experimental results indicated that the modification of the silver and silver–palladium nanocomposite with CNT resulted in increases in the hardness and Young’s modulus along with concomitant decreases in the electrical con-ductivity and the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE). The hardness and Young’s modulus of the nanocomposites were increased by 30%-40% whereas the CTE was decreased to 50%-60% of the CTE of silver. The significantly improved CTE and the mechanical proper-ties of the CNT-reinforced silver and silver–palladium nanocomposites are correlated with the intriguing properties of CNTs and with good interfacial adhesion between the CNTs and silver as a result of the fabrication process and the contact action of palladium as an alloying ele-ment.

  2. A novel multi-walled carbon nanotube-based antibody conjugate for quantitative and semi-quantitative lateral flow assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wenjuan; Hu, Xiaolong; Liu, Jia; Zhang, Yurong; Lu, Jianzhong; Zeng, Libo

    2017-10-01

    In this study, the multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were applied in lateral flow strips (LFS) for semi-quantitative and quantitative assays. Firstly, the solubility of MWCNTs was improved using various surfactants to enhance their biocompatibility for practical application. The dispersed MWCNTs were conjugated with the methamphetamine (MET) antibody in a non-covalent manner and then manufactured into the LFS for the quantitative detection of MET. The MWCNTs-based lateral flow assay (MWCNTs-LFA) exhibited an excellent linear relationship between the values of test line and MET when its concentration ranges from 62.5 to 1500 ng/mL. The sensitivity of the LFS was evaluated by conjugating MWCNTs with HCG antibody and the MWCNTs conjugated method is 10 times more sensitive than the one conjugated with classical colloidal gold nanoparticles. Taken together, our data demonstrate that MWCNTs-LFA is a more sensitive and reliable assay for semi-quantitative and quantitative detection which can be used in forensic analysis.

  3. Heating-Rate-Triggered Carbon-Nanotube-based 3-Dimensional Conducting Networks for a Highly Sensitive Noncontact Sensing Device

    KAUST Repository

    Tai, Yanlong

    2016-01-28

    Recently, flexible and transparent conductive films (TCFs) are drawing more attention for their central role in future applications of flexible electronics. Here, we report the controllable fabrication of TCFs for moisture-sensing applications based on heating-rate-triggered, 3-dimensional porous conducting networks through drop casting lithography of single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT)/poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)-polystyrene sulfonate (PEDOT:PSS) ink. How ink formula and baking conditions influence the self-assembled microstructure of the TCFs is discussed. The sensor presents high-performance properties, including a reasonable sheet resistance (2.1 kohm/sq), a high visible-range transmittance (>69%, PET = 90%), and good stability when subjected to cyclic loading (>1000 cycles, better than indium tin oxide film) during processing, when formulation parameters are well optimized (weight ratio of SWCNT to PEDOT:PSS: 1:0.5, SWCNT concentration: 0.3 mg/ml, and heating rate: 36 °C/minute). Moreover, the benefits of these kinds of TCFs were verified through a fully transparent, highly sensitive, rapid response, noncontact moisture-sensing device (5 × 5 sensing pixels).

  4. A fully roll-to-roll gravure-printed carbon nanotube-based active matrix for multi-touch sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Wookyu; Koo, Hyunmo; Sun, Junfeng; Noh, Jinsoo; Kwon, Kye-Si; Yeom, Chiseon; Choi, Younchang; Chen, Kevin; Javey, Ali; Cho, Gyoujin

    2015-12-01

    Roll-to-roll (R2R) printing has been pursued as a commercially viable high-throughput technology to manufacture flexible, disposable, and inexpensive printed electronic devices. However, in recent years, pessimism has prevailed because of the barriers faced when attempting to fabricate and integrate thin film transistors (TFTs) using an R2R printing method. In this paper, we report 20 × 20 active matrices (AMs) based on single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) with a resolution of 9.3 points per inch (ppi) resolution, obtained using a fully R2R gravure printing process. By using SWCNTs as the semiconducting layer and poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) as the substrate, we have obtained a device yield above 98%, and extracted the key scalability factors required for a feasible R2R gravure manufacturing process. Multi-touch sensor arrays were achieved by laminating a pressure sensitive rubber onto the SWCNT-TFT AM. This R2R gravure printing system overcomes the barriers associated with the registration accuracy of printing each layer and the variation of the threshold voltage (Vth). By overcoming these barriers, the R2R gravure printing method can be viable as an advanced manufacturing technology, thus enabling the high-throughput production of flexible, disposable, and human-interactive cutting-edge electronic devices based on SWCNT-TFT AMs.

  5. Development of a Carbon Nanotube-Based Touchscreen Capable of Multi-Touch and Multi-Force Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wonhyo Kim

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available A force sensing touchscreen, which detects touch point and touch force simultaneously by sensing a change in electric capacitance, was designed and fabricated. It was made with single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs which have better mechanical and chemical characteristics than the indium-tin-oxide transparent electrodes used in most contemporary touchscreen devices. The SWCNTs, with a transmittance of about 85% and electric conductivity of 400 Ω per square; were coated and patterned on glass and polyethyleneterephthalate (PET film substrates. The constructed force sensing touchscreen has a total size and thickness of 62 mm × 100 mm × 1.4 mm, and is composed of 11 driving line and 19 receiving line channels. The gap between the channels was designed to be 20 µm, taking visibility into consideration, and patterned by a photolithography and plasma etching processes. The mutual capacitance formed by the upper and lower transparent electrodes was initially about 2.8 pF and, on applying a 500 gf force with a 3 mm diameter tip, it showed a 25% capacitance variation. Furthermore, the touchscreen can detect multiple touches and forces simultaneously and is unaffected by touch material characteristics, such as conductance or non-conductance.

  6. Effect of a concave grid mesh in a carbon nanotube-based field emission X-ray source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyun Suk; Castro, Edward Joseph D. [Regional Innovation Center for Next Generation Industrial Radiation Technology, Division of Microelectronics and Display Technology, Iksan (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Choong Hun, E-mail: chlee12345@gmail.com [Regional Innovation Center for Next Generation Industrial Radiation Technology, Division of Microelectronics and Display Technology, Iksan (Korea, Republic of); Solar Cell Research Institute, Wonkwang University, Iksan (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • Successful design using a concave grid mesh for the focusing electron. • Much better X-ray image due to the concave grid mesh. • Higher anode current efficiency using the concave grid mesh versus a flat grid mesh. - Abstract: This study introduces a simple approach to improve the X-ray image quality produced by the carbon nanotube (CNT) field emitter X-ray source by altering the geometrical shape of the grid mesh from the conventional flat shape to a concave one in a typical triode structure. The concave shape of the grid electrode increases the effective number of the grid cells in the mesh, which exerted an electric field in the direction of the emitted electrons, thereby increasing the emission current reaching the anode. Furthermore, the curved mesh (concave grid mesh), which was responsible for the extraction of electrons from the field emitter, exhibited a focusing effect on the electron beam trajectory thereby, reducing the focal spot size impinging on the anode and resulted in a better spatial resolution of the X-ray images produced.

  7. Characterization and In Vitro Sustained Release of Silibinin from pH Responsive Carbon Nanotube-Based Drug Delivery System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia M. Tan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study was to develop and characterize an in vitro sustained release formulation of silibinin (SB using commercially available carboxylated multiwalled carbon nanotubes (COOH-MWCNTs and to investigate cytotoxicity action of the synthesized nanohybrid (SB-MWCNTs. The resulting nanohybrid was characterized with Fourier transform infrared (FTIR, Raman spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA, ultraviolet-visible spectrophotometry (UV-Vis, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM. FTIR, Raman spectroscopy, and TGA analysis confirmed the adsorption of SB molecules to the COOH-MWCNTs. The release of SB from the COOH-MWCNTs nanocarrier was found to be sustained and pH-dependent. The maximum percentage release of SB from the nanocarrier reached approximately 96.6% and 43.1% within 1000 minutes when exposed to pH 7.4 and pH 4.8 solutions, respectively. It was observed that the release of kinetic behaviour of SB from the MWCNTs nanocarrier conformed well to pseudo-second order kinetic model. The obtained MTT result showed that the SB-MWCNTs exhibited enhanced cytotoxicity to human cancer cell lines in comparison with free SB at lower concentrations. These results suggest that SB-MWCNTs nanohybrid may be a promising nanodrug delivery system with sustained release property for the treatment of cancers.

  8. Role of the Material Electrodes on Resistive Behaviour of Carbon Nanotube-Based Gas Sensors for H2S Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Lucci

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Miniaturized gas-sensing devices that use single-walled carbon nanotubes as active material have been fabricated using two different electrode materials, namely, Au/Cr and NbN. The resistive sensors have been assembled aligning by dielectrophoresis the nanotube bundles between 40 μm spaced Au/Cr or NbN multifinger electrodes. The sensing devices have been tested for detection of the H2S gas, in the concentration range 10–100 ppm, using N2 as carrier gas. No resistance changes were detected using sensor fabricated with NbN electrodes, whereas the response of the sensor fabricated with Au/Cr electrodes was characterized by an increase of the resistance upon gas exposure. The main performances of this sensor are a detection limit for H2S of 10 ppm and a recovery time of few minutes. The present study suggests that the mechanism involved in H2S gas detection is not a direct charge transfer between molecules and nanotubes. The hypothesis is that detection occurs through passivation of the Au surfaces by H2S molecules and modification of the contact resistance at the Au/nanotube interface.

  9. Robotic voltammetry with carbon nanotube-based sensors: a superb blend for convenient high-quality antimicrobial trace analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theanponkrang, Somjai; Suginta, Wipa; Weingart, Helge; Winterhalter, Mathias; Schulte, Albert

    2015-01-01

    A new automated pharmacoanalytical technique for convenient quantification of redox-active antibiotics has been established by combining the benefits of a carbon nanotube (CNT) sensor modification with electrocatalytic activity for analyte detection with the merits of a robotic electrochemical device that is capable of sequential nonmanual sample measurements in 24-well microtiter plates. Norfloxacin (NFX) and ciprofloxacin (CFX), two standard fluoroquinolone antibiotics, were used in automated calibration measurements by differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) and accomplished were linear ranges of 1–10 μM and 2–100 μM for NFX and CFX, respectively. The lowest detectable levels were estimated to be 0.3±0.1 μM (n=7) for NFX and 1.6±0.1 μM (n=7) for CFX. In standard solutions or tablet samples of known content, both analytes could be quantified with the robotic DPV microtiter plate assay, with recoveries within ±4% of 100%. And recoveries were as good when NFX was evaluated in human serum samples with added NFX. The use of simple instrumentation, convenience in execution, and high effectiveness in analyte quantitation suggest the merger between automated microtiter plate voltammetry and CNT-supported electrochemical drug detection as a novel methodology for antibiotic testing in pharmaceutical and clinical research and quality control laboratories. PMID:25670899

  10. Carbon Nanotube-based Cold Cathode for High Power MicrowaveVacuum Electronic Devices: A Potential Field Emitter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Verma

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanotubes (CNTs can be grown in the form of small, sharp spikes capable of carrying very highcurrent densities which suggest great potential application of CNTs as cold cathode in high power microwavevacuum device applications. These cold cathode vacuum microwave devices are expected to be ideally suitedfor air-borne and space applications. This paper  reports the initial efforts made in the development of coldcathode using PECVD grown vertically-aligned matrix of CNTs with uniform height and optimum tip densityon silicon substrate. The high aspect ratio (of the order of 10,000 and novel electrical, mechanical, and thermalproperties of the CNT are found to be very attractive characteristics for emission of large and stable currentdensities at reasonably low field. The field emission current voltage characteristics of a typical cathode gaveemission current density in excess of 35 mA/cm2 at reasonably low field. The emission current in most of thesamples is found to be stable over long period of time but is greatly effected by the vacuum condition duringmeasurement. The initial measured data suggests great promise for achieving high current densities at practicalelectric fields.Defence Science Journal, 2008, 58(5, pp.650-654, DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.14429/dsj.58.1688

  11. Robotic voltammetry with carbon nanotube-based sensors: a superb blend for convenient high-quality antimicrobial trace analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theanponkrang S

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Somjai Theanponkrang,1,2 Wipa Suginta,2,3 Helge Weingart,4 Mathias Winterhalter,4 Albert Schulte1,2 1School of Chemistry, 2Biochemistry–Electrochemistry Research Unit, Institute of Science, 3School of Biochemistry, Suranaree University of Technology, Nakhon Ratchasima, Thailand; 4Life Sciences, School of Engineering and Science, Jacobs University Bremen, Bremen, Germany Abstract: A new automated pharmacoanalytical technique for convenient quantification of redox-active antibiotics has been established by combining the benefits of a carbon nanotube (CNT sensor modification with electrocatalytic activity for analyte detection with the merits of a robotic electrochemical device that is capable of sequential nonmanual sample measurements in 24-well microtiter plates. Norfloxacin (NFX and ciprofloxacin (CFX, two standard fluoroquinolone antibiotics, were used in automated calibration measurements by differential pulse voltammetry (DPV and accomplished were linear ranges of 1–10 µM and 2–100 µM for NFX and CFX, respectively. The lowest detectable levels were estimated to be 0.3±0.1 µM (n=7 for NFX and 1.6±0.1 µM (n=7 for CFX. In standard solutions or tablet samples of known content, both analytes could be quantified with the robotic DPV microtiter plate assay, with recoveries within ±4% of 100%. And recoveries were as good when NFX was evaluated in human serum samples with added NFX. The use of simple instrumentation, convenience in execution, and high effectiveness in analyte quantitation suggest the merger between automated microtiter plate voltammetry and CNT-supported electrochemical drug detection as a novel methodology for antibiotic testing in pharmaceutical and clinical research and quality control laboratories. Keywords: antibiotics, electroanalysis, automation, microtiter plates, pharmaceutical screening, pharmacoanalytics

  12. Thermal effects on nonlinear vibration of a carbon nanotube-based mass sensor using finite element analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Dong-Keun; Kim, Chang-Wan; Yang, Hyun-Ik

    2017-01-01

    In the present study we carried out a dynamic analysis of a CNT-based mass sensor by using a finite element method (FEM)-based nonlinear analysis model of the CNT resonator to elucidate the combined effects of thermal effects and nonlinear oscillation behavior upon the overall mass detection sensitivity. Mass sensors using carbon nanotube (CNT) resonators provide very high sensing performance. Because CNT-based resonators can have high aspect ratios, they can easily exhibit nonlinear oscillation behavior due to large displacements. Also, CNT-based devices may experience high temperatures during their manufacture and operation. These geometrical nonlinearities and temperature changes affect the sensing performance of CNT-based mass sensors. However, it is very hard to find previous literature addressing the detection sensitivity of CNT-based mass sensors including considerations of both these nonlinear behaviors and thermal effects. We modeled the nonlinear equation of motion by using the von Karman nonlinear strain-displacement relation, taking into account the additional axial force associated with the thermal effect. The FEM was employed to solve the nonlinear equation of motion because it can effortlessly handle the more complex geometries and boundary conditions. A doubly clamped CNT resonator actuated by distributed electrostatic force was the configuration subjected to the numerical experiments. Thermal effects upon the fundamental resonance behavior and the shift of resonance frequency due to attached mass, i.e., the mass detection sensitivity, were examined in environments of both high and low (or room) temperature. The fundamental resonance frequency increased with decreasing temperature in the high temperature environment, and increased with increasing temperature in the low temperature environment. The magnitude of the shift in resonance frequency caused by an attached mass represents the sensing performance of a mass sensor, i.e., its mass detection

  13. Rapid extraction and quantitative detection of the herbicide diuron in surface water by a hapten-functionalized carbon nanotubes based electrochemical analyzer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Priyanka; Bhalla, Vijayender; Tuteja, Satish; Kukkar, Manil; Suri, C Raman

    2012-05-21

    A solid phase extraction micro-cartridge containing a non-polar polystyrene absorbent matrix was coupled with an electrochemical immunoassay analyzer (EIA) and used for the ultra-sensitive detection of the phenyl urea herbicide diuron in real samples. The EIA was fabricated by using carboxylated carbon nanotubes (CNTs) functionalized with a hapten molecule (an amine functionalized diuron derivative). Screen printed electrodes (SPE) were modified with these haptenized CNTs and specific in-house generated anti diuron antibodies were used for bio-interface development. The immunodetection was realized in a competitive electrochemical immunoassay format using alkaline phosphatase labeled secondary anti-IgG antibody. The addition of 1-naphthyl phosphate substrate resulted in the production of an electrochemically active product, 1-naphthol, which was monitored by using differential pulse voltammetry (DPV). The assay exhibited excellent sensitivity and specificity having a dynamic response range of 0.01 pg mL(-1) to 10 μg mL(-1) for diuron with a limit of detection of around 0.1 pg mL(-1) (n = 3) in standard water samples. The micro-cartridge coupled hapten-CNTs modified SPE provided an effective and efficient electrochemical immunoassay for the real-time monitoring of pesticides samples with a very high degree of sensitivity.

  14. Synthesis of pentamidine labelled with tritium and carbon-14

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hesk, D.; Jones, J.R. (Surrey Univ., Guildford (UK). Dept. of Chemistry); Lockley, W.J.S.; Wilkinson, D.J. (Fisons plc, Loughborough (UK). Pharmaceutical Div.)

    1990-11-01

    Tritium labelled pentamidine has been prepared with a specific activity of 90 mCi mmol{sup -1} using a one-step exchange reaction between the unlabelled drug and tritiated water. The labelling utilised a homogeneous rhodium trichloride catalyst and yielded pentamidine regiospecifically labelled in the positions ortho to the amidine groups. Carbon-14 labelled pentamidine was prepared via a seven-step procedure in which the isotope was introduced via a nucleophilic substitution of 4-bromo-phenol with copper(I) ({sup 14}C)cyanide. (author).

  15. Enhancing the electrical conductivity of carbon-nanotube-based transparent conductive films using functionalized few-walled carbon nanotubes decorated with palladium nanoparticles as fillers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yu-An; Tai, Nyan-Hwa; Chen, Swe-Kai; Tsai, Tsung-Yen

    2011-08-23

    This work demonstrates the processing and characterization of the transparent and highly electrically conductive film using few-walled carbon nanotubes (FWCNTs) decorated with Pd nanoparticles as fillers. The approach included functionalizing the FWCNTs, immersing them in an aqueous solution of palladate salts, and subsequently subjecting them to a reduction reaction in H(2). Field-emission scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy images showed that the functionalized FWCNTs (f-FWCNTs) were decorated with uniform and homogeneous Pd nanoparticles with an average diameter of 5 nm. A shift of the G-band to a higher frequency in the Raman spectra of the Pd-decorated f-FWCNTs (Pd@f-FWCNTs) illustrates that the p-type doping effect was enhanced. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy showed that PdCl(2) was the primary decoration compound on the f-FWCNTs prior to the reduction reaction and that Pd nanoparticles were the only decorated nanoparticles after H(2) reduction. The contact resistance between the metallic materials and the semiconducting CNTs in FWCNTs, controlled by the Schottky barrier, was significantly decreased compared to the pristine FWCNTs. The decrease in contact resistance is attributed to the 0.26 eV increase of the work function of the Pd@f-FWCNTs. Extremely low sheet resistance of 274 ohm/sq of the poly(ethylene terephthalate) substrates coated with Pd@f-FWCNTs was attained, which was 1/25 the resistance exhibited by those coated with FWCNTs, whereas the same optical transmittance of 81.65% at a wavelength of 550 nm was maintained. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  16. Carbon "Quantum" Dots for Fluorescence Labeling of Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jia-Hui; Cao, Li; LeCroy, Gregory E; Wang, Ping; Meziani, Mohammed J; Dong, Yiyang; Liu, Yuanfang; Luo, Pengju G; Sun, Ya-Ping

    2015-09-02

    The specifically synthesized and selected carbon dots of relatively high fluorescence quantum yields were evaluated in their fluorescence labeling of cells. For the cancer cell lines, the cellular uptake of the carbon dots was generally efficient, resulting in the labeling of the cells with bright fluorescence emissions for both one- and two-photon excitations from predominantly the cell membrane and cytoplasm. In the exploration on labeling the live stem cells, the cellular uptake of the carbon dots was relatively less efficient, though fluorescence emissions could still be adequately detected in the labeled cells, with the emissions again predominantly from the cell membrane and cytoplasm. This combined with the observed more efficient internalization of the same carbon dots by the fixed stem cells might suggest some significant selectivity of the stem cells toward surface functionalities of the carbon dots. The needs and possible strategies for more systematic and comparative studies on the fluorescence labeling of different cells, including especially live stem cells, by carbon dots as a new class of brightly fluorescent probes are discussed.

  17. Synthesis of carbon-13 and carbon-14 labelled triazolo-1,4-benzodiazepines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banks, W.R.; Hawi, A.A.; Digenis, G.A. (Kentucky Univ., Lexington, KY (USA). College of Pharmacy)

    1989-04-01

    An efficient two-step synthesis of 8-chloro-1-methyl-6-phenyl-(3H)-S-triazolo-(4,3-a)(1,4)-benzodiazepine (alprazolam) and 8-chloro-6-(2-chlorophenyl)-1-methyl-(3H)-S-triazolo-(4,3-a)(1,4)-benzodiazepine (triazolam) labelled with carbon-13 or carbon-14 from their corresponding hydrazines is reported. The method involved acylation of the appropriate hydrazine using the mixed carbonic anhydride of sodium ({sup 13}C) or ({sup 14}C) acetate and isobutylchloroformate under mild conditions. Thermolysis of the resulting acetylhydrazides gave the target carbon-14 and carbon-13 labelled compounds in good yields. (author).

  18. Determination of the effective Young's modulus of vertically aligned carbon nanotube arrays: a simple nanotube-based varactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olofsson, Niklas; Eriksson, Anders [Department of Physics, Goeteborg University, SE-41296 Goeteborg (Sweden); Ek-Weis, Johan; Campbell, Eleanor E B [School of Chemistry, Edinburgh University, West Mains Road, Edinburgh EH9 3JJ (United Kingdom); Idda, Tonio, E-mail: eleanor.campbell@ed.ac.u [LAAS-CNRS, 7 Avenue du Colonel Roche, 31077 Toulouse Cedex (France)

    2009-09-23

    The electromechanical properties of arrays of vertically aligned multiwalled carbon nanotubes were studied in a parallel plate capacitor geometry. The electrostatic actuation was visualized using both optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy, and highly reproducible behaviour was achieved for actuation voltages below the pull-in voltage. The walls of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes behave as solid cohesive units. The effective Young's modulus for the carbon nanotube arrays was determined by comparing the actuation results with the results of electrostatic simulations and was found to be exceptionally low, of the order of 1-10 MPa. The capacitance change and Q-factor were determined by measuring the frequency dependence of the radio-frequency transmission. Capacitance changes of over 20% and Q-factors in the range 100-10 were achieved for a frequency range of 0.2-1.5 GHz.

  19. Combustion method for assay of biological materials labeled with carbon-14 or tritium, or double-labeled

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huebner, L. G.; Kisieleski, W. E.

    1969-01-01

    Dry catalytic combustion at high temperatures is used for assaying biological materials labeled carbon-14 and tritium, or double-labeled. A modified oxygen-flask technique is combined with standard vacuum-line techniques and includes convenience of direct in-vial collection of final combustion products, giving quantitative recovery of tritium and carbon-14.

  20. Developments in Analytical Chemistry: Acoustically Levitated Drop Reactors for Enzyme Reaction Kinetics and Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube-Based Sensors for Detection of Toxic Organic Phosphonates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, Christopher Ryan

    2009-01-01

    Developments in analytical chemistry were made using acoustically levitated small volumes of liquid to study enzyme reaction kinetics and by detecting volatile organic compounds in the gas phase using single-walled carbon nanotubes. Experience gained in engineering, electronics, automation, and software development from the design and…

  1. Consumer Responses to the Carbon Labelling of Food: A Real Life Experiment in a Canteen Practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spaargaren, G.; Koppen, van C.S.A.; Janssen, A.M.; Hendriksen, A.; Kolfschoten, C.J.

    2013-01-01

    The emerging debate on the climate impact of food is expected to result in the carbon labelling of food in the future. As yet, consumer responses to carbon labels are not well researched. A real life experiment was developed to study consumer responses to new carbon labels for food. A ‘light’ and a

  2. Passively Q-switched Er,Yb:GdAl3(BO3)4 laser with single-walled carbon nanotube based saturable absorber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorbachenya, K. N.; Kisel, V. E.; Yasukevich, A. S.; Prudnikova, M. B.; Maltsev, V. V.; Leonyuk, N. I.; Choi, S. Y.; Rotermund, F.; Kuleshov, N. V.

    2017-03-01

    We demonstrate a passively Q-switched Er,Yb:GdAl3(BO3)4 diode-pumped laser emitting near 1.5 µm. By using a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) as a saturable absorber, Q-switched laser pulses with energy of 0.8 µJ and duration of 130 ns at a maximum repetition rate of 500 kHz were obtained at 1550 nm.

  3. Ultra-high speed all-optical signal processing using silicon waveguides and a carbon nanotubes based mode-locked laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ji, Hua

    This thesis concerns the use of nano-engineered silicon waveguides for ultra-high speed optical serial data signal processing. The fundamental nonlinear properties of nano-engineered silicon waveguides are characterized. Utilizing the nonlinear effect in nano-engineered silicon waveguides...... for demultiplexing of 1.28 Tbit/s optical time division multiplexing data signal is investigated. A sampling system for ultra-high speed signal waveforms based on nano-engineered silicon waveguide is explored. To set up a sampling source, using carbon nanotubes for generating ultra-short pulses is pursued. A silicon...

  4. Yeast and carbon nanotube based biocatalyst developed by synergetic effects of covalent bonding and hydrophobic interaction for performance enhancement of membraneless microbial fuel cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christwardana, Marcelinus; Kwon, Yongchai

    2017-02-01

    Membraneless microbial fuel cell (MFC) employing new microbial catalyst formed as yeast cultivated from Saccharomyces cerevisiae and carbon nanotube (yeast/CNT) is suggested. To analyze its catalytic activity and performance and stability of MFC, several characterizations are performed. According to the characterizations, the catalyst shows excellent catalytic activities by facile transfer of electrons via reactions of NAD, FAD, cytochrome c and cytochrome a3, while it induces high maximum power density (MPD) (344mW·m(-2)). It implies that adoption of yeast induces increases in catalytic activity and MFC performance. Furthermore, MPD is maintained to 86% of initial value even after eight days, showing excellent MFC stability.

  5. Development of carbon nanotubes based gas diffusion layers by in situ chemical vapor deposition process for proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kannan, A. M.; Kanagala, P.; Veedu, V.

    A proprietary in situ chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process was developed for gas diffusion layer (GDL) by growing a micro-porous layer on the macro-porous, non-woven fibrous carbon paper. The characteristics of the GDL samples such as, surface morphology, wetting characteristics, and cross-section were characterized using electron microscopes, goniometer and focused ion beam, respectively. Fuel cell performance of the GDLs was evaluated using single cell with hydrogen/oxygen as well as hydrogen/air at ambient pressure, at elevated temperature and various RH conditions using Nafion-212 as an electrolyte. The GDLs with in situ growth of micro-porous layers containing carbon nanotubes (CNTs) without any hydrophobic agent showed significant improvement in mechanical robustness as well as fuel cell performance at elevated temperature at lower RH conditions. The micro-porous layer of the GDLs as seen under scanning electron microscope showed excellent surface morphology with surface homogeneity through reinforcement by the multi-walled CNTs.

  6. NO x gas detection characteristics in FET-type multi-walled carbon nanotube-based gas sensors for various electrode spacings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun Soo; Jang, Kyung Uk; Kim, Tae Wan

    2016-03-01

    In this study, we fabricated a p-channel FET-type NO x gas sensor by using multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have good electronic, chemical-stability, and sensitivity characteristics. In particular, gas sensors require characteristics such as high speed, selectivity, and sensitivity. The fabricated sensor was used to detect NO x gas for different values of the gate-source voltage (V gs ) and the electrode spacings (30, 60, 90, and 120 μm). The gas sensor that absorbed NO x gas molecules showed a decrease in resistance. The sensitivity of the gas sensor was increased by increasing the electrode spacing. Additionally, while changing the Vgs and the temperature inside the chamber for the MWCNT gas sensor, we obtained the sensitivity and the normalized response for detecting NO x gas. We also obtained the adsorption energy (U a ) by using Arrhenius plots based on the reduction of resistance due to voltage variations. The adsorption energy was found to increase with increasing applied voltage.

  7. Electrocatalytic Synthesis of Ammonia at Room Temperature and Atmospheric Pressure from Water and Nitrogen on a Carbon-Nanotube-Based Electrocatalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shiming; Perathoner, Siglinda; Ampelli, Claudio; Mebrahtu, Chalachew; Su, Dangsheng; Centi, Gabriele

    2017-03-01

    Ammonia is synthesized directly from water and N2 at room temperature and atmospheric pressure in a flow electrochemical cell operating in gas phase (half-cell for the NH3 synthesis). Iron supported on carbon nanotubes (CNTs) was used as the electrocatalyst in this half-cell. A rate of ammonia formation of 2.2×10(-3)  gNH3  m(-2)  h(-1) was obtained at room temperature and atmospheric pressure in a flow of N2 , with stable behavior for at least 60 h of reaction, under an applied potential of -2.0 V. This value is higher than the rate of ammonia formation obtained using noble metals (Ru/C) under comparable reaction conditions. Furthermore, hydrogen gas with a total Faraday efficiency as high as 95.1 % was obtained. Data also indicate that the active sites in NH3 electrocatalytic synthesis may be associated to specific carbon sites formed at the interface between iron particles and CNT and able to activate N2 , making it more reactive towards hydrogenation.

  8. Nanosecond soliton pulse generation by mode-locked erbium-doped fiber laser using single-walled carbon-nanotube-based saturable absorber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Mohd Afiq; Harun, Sulaiman Wadi; Zulkepely, Nurul Rozullyah; Nor, Roslan Md; Ahmad, Fauzan; Ahmad, Harith

    2012-12-20

    We demonstrate a simple and low cost mode-locked erbium-doped fiber laser (EDFL) operating in the nanosecond region using a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT)-based saturable absorber (SA). A droplet of SWCNT solution is applied on the end of a fiber ferrule, which is then mated to another clean connector ferrule to construct an SA. Then the SA is integrated into a ring EDFL cavity for nanosecond pulse generation. The EDFL operates at around 1570.4 nm, with a soliton-like spectrum with small Kelly sidebands, which confirms the attainment of the anomalous dispersion. It produces a soliton pulse train with a 332 ns width, repetition rate of 909.1 kHz, an average output power of 0.31 mW, and energy of 0.34 nJ at the maximum pump power of 130.8 mW.

  9. Investigation on the Vibration of Carbon Nanotube Based Mass Sensors%碳纳米管质量传感器振动特性研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈越; 李明林

    2015-01-01

    基于欧拉-伯努利梁理论对单壁碳纳米管质量传感器的振动特性进行研究。分别考虑悬臂梁式和两端固定式碳纳米管质量传感器,研究吸附质量对其谐振频率漂移的影响。推导出任意位置的吸附质量下,碳纳米管质量传感器的等效刚度、等效质量和谐振频率的解析表达式,推导出传感器的非线性应用方程及其简化形式。在特定位置下吸附质量对不同长度碳纳米管谐振频率的影响进行了研究。数值仿真结果表明,对于不同的边界约束和特定的吸附位置条件下,吸附质量越大、碳纳米管的长度越短,导致的碳纳米管频率漂移越大。对于8 nm长的碳纳米管,在悬臂式约束下,吸附质量越远离固定端,引起的频率漂移越大。而在两端固定约束下,则是吸附质量越靠近固定端,频率漂移越大。揭示了传感器的谐振特性,有助于促进碳纳米管在纳机谐振器领域的推广应用。%Vibrational properties of single-wal ed carbon nanotubes ( SWCNTs) as a mass sensor is examined using Euler–Ber-noul i beam theory based approach. ln order to figure out how the attached mass affects the resonant frequency of the carbon nano-tube resonators, the resonators both in bridged and in cantilevered configurations are studied. Firstly, analytical formulas of equiva-lent stiffness, equivalent mass and resonant frequency are developed for CNT-based nanoresonators with attached mass at any lo-cation. ln addition, a simplified form of the nonlinear sensor equation and image analysis of the relationship among load location, the attached mass and resonant frequency have been investigated. Then for different lengths of SWCNTs, the influence of the attached mass in a specific location on the resonant frequency has been derived. The simulation results indicate that in the condition of differ-ent boundary constraints and the specific adsorption location, the heavier

  10. Carbon nanotube-based substrates promote cardiogenesis in brown adipose-derived stem cells via β1-integrin-dependent TGF-β1 signaling pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun H

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Hongyu Sun,1,* Yongchao Mou,2,* Yi Li,3,* Xia Li,4,* Zi Chen,2 Kayla Duval,2 Zhu Huang,1 Ruiwu Dai,1 Lijun Tang,1 Fuzhou Tian1 1Department of General Surgery, Chengdu Military General Hospital, Chengdu, People’s Republic of China; 2Thayer School of Engineering, Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH, USA; 3Department of Cardiology, The General Hospital of Chinese People’s Armed Police Forces, Beijing, People’s Republic of China; 4Affiliated Hospital of Academy of Military Medical Sciences, Beijing, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Stem cell-based therapy remains one of the promising approaches for cardiac repair and regeneration. However, its applications are restricted by the limited efficacy of cardiac differentiation. To address this issue, we examined whether carbon nanotubes (CNTs would provide an instructive extracellular microenvironment to facilitate cardiogenesis in brown adipose-derived stem cells (BASCs and to elucidate the underlying signaling pathways. In this study, we systematically investigated a series of cellular responses of BASCs due to the incorporation of CNTs into collagen (CNT-Col substrates that promoted cell adhesion, spreading, and growth. Moreover, we found that CNT-Col substrates remarkably improved the efficiency of BASCs cardiogenesis by using fluorescence staining and quantitative real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Critically, CNTs in the substrates accelerated the maturation of BASCs-derived cardiomyocytes. Furthermore, the underlying mechanism for promotion of BASCs cardiac differentiation by CNTs was determined by immunostaining, quantitative real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, and Western blotting assay. It is notable that β1-integrin-dependent TGF-β1 signaling pathway modulates the facilitative effect of CNTs in cardiac differentiation of BASCs. Therefore, it is an efficient approach to regulate cardiac

  11. [Determination of 21 organophosphorus pesticides in tea by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry coupled with hydroxylated multi-walled carbon nanotubes based on dispersive solid-phase extraction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rong, Jiefeng; Wei, Hang; Li, Yijun; Huang, Huoshui; Xu, Meizhu

    2016-02-01

    A rapid determination method of 21 organophosphorus pesticides in tea was developed by QuEChERS method using modified multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs-OH), primary-secondary amine (PSA) and MgSO4 coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The pesticide residues in tea were extracted with a hexane-acetone (2:1, v/v) mixture, and cleaned up by dispersive solid-phase extraction using MWCNTs-OH and primary-secondary amine (PSA) as the sorbents. After centrifugation and filtration, the target compounds were analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and quantified by the external standard method. Under the optimized conditions, good linearities were obtained in the range of 0. 01- 0. 50 mg/kg. The average recoveries were in the range of 81. 5% -109. 4% at three spiked levels, with relative standard deviations (RSDs, n = 5 ) of 2. 3% - 10. 6%. The limits of quantification were 0. 001-0. 040 mg/kg. This method is simple, fast, sensitive, cheap, and can meet the requirements of the rapid detection of organophosphorus pesticides in tea.

  12. Multi-walled carbon nanotube-based ternary rare earth (Eu3+, Tb3+) hybrid materials with organically modified silica-oxygen bridge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qiu-Ping; Yan, Bing

    2012-08-15

    A series of ternary rare earth (Eu(3+), Tb(3+)) complexes are covalently coated to the 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) by a simple in situ sol-gel method by the bifunctional silylated monomer TTA-Si and TAA-Si (TTA-Si and TAA-Si are 3-(triethoxysilyl)propylisocyanate (TEPIC) modified thenoyltrifluoroacetone (TTA) and trifluoroacetylacetone (TAA), respectively). The resulting materials are characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectra, scanning electronic microscope, transmission electron microscope, thermogravimetric analysis, ultraviolet visible diffused reflection measure, photoluminescence spectra, and X-ray diffraction. The photoluminesce measurements indicated that these hybrids exhibit characteristic red and green luminescence originating from the corresponding ternary rare earth ion (Eu(3+), Tb(3+)). The luminescence quenching effect of MWCNT networks have been successfully restrained by coating a relatively thicker silica-oxygen-based organic-inorganic complex. Furthermore, the fluorescence lifetimes and emission quantum efficiencies of Eu(3+) hybrid materials are also determined. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Photothermal-Responsive Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube-Based Ultrathin Membranes for On/Off Switchable Separation of Oil-in-Water Nanoemulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Liang; Gao, Shoujian; Ding, Xianguang; Wang, Dong; Jiang, Jiang; Jin, Jian; Jiang, Lei

    2015-05-26

    Oil-contaminated wastewater threatens our environment and health, especially that stabilized by surfactants. Conventional separation protocols become invalid for those surfactant-stabilized nanoemulsions due to their nanometer-sized droplets and extremely high stability. In this paper, photothermal-responsive ultrathin Au nanorods/poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-acrylamide) cohybrid single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) nanoporous membranes are constructed. Such membranes are capable of separating oil-in-water nanoemulsions with a maximum flux up to 35 890 m(2)·h(-1)·bar(-1) because they feature hydrophilicity, underwater oleophobicity, and nanometer pore sizes. It is remarkable that the permeation flux can be simply modulated by light illumination during the process of separation, due to the incorporation of thermal-responsive copolymers and Au nanorods. Meanwhile, it shows ultrahigh separation efficiency (>99.99%) and desired antifouling and recyclability properties. We anticipate that our ultrathin photothermal-responsive SWCNT-based membranes provide potential for the generation of point-of-use water treatment devices.

  14. Scalability of carbon-nanotube-based thin film transistors for flexible electronic devices manufactured using an all roll-to-roll gravure printing system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, Hyunmo; Lee, Wookyu; Choi, Younchang; Sun, Junfeng; Bak, Jina; Noh, Jinsoo; Subramanian, Vivek; Azuma, Yasuo; Majima, Yutaka; Cho, Gyoujin

    2015-09-01

    To demonstrate that roll-to-roll (R2R) gravure printing is a suitable advanced manufacturing method for flexible thin film transistor (TFT)-based electronic circuits, three different nanomaterial-based inks (silver nanoparticles, BaTiO3 nanoparticles and single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs)) were selected and optimized to enable the realization of fully printed SWNT-based TFTs (SWNT-TFTs) on 150-m-long rolls of 0.25-m-wide poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET). SWNT-TFTs with 5 different channel lengths, namely, 30, 80, 130, 180, and 230 μm, were fabricated using a printing speed of 8 m/min. These SWNT-TFTs were characterized, and the obtained electrical parameters were related to major mechanical factors such as web tension, registration accuracy, impression roll pressure and printing speed to determine whether these mechanical factors were the sources of the observed device-to-device variations. By utilizing the electrical parameters from the SWNT-TFTs, a Monte Carlo simulation for a 1-bit adder circuit, as a reference, was conducted to demonstrate that functional circuits with reasonable complexity can indeed be manufactured using R2R gravure printing. The simulation results suggest that circuits with complexity, similar to the full adder circuit, can be printed with a 76% circuit yield if threshold voltage (Vth) variations of less than 30% can be maintained.

  15. Consumer Perceptions of Climate Changes and WTP for Mandatory Implementation of Low Carbon Labels: The Case of South Korea

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Hyeyoung; House, Lisa; KIM, TAE-KYUN

    2014-01-01

    Voluntarily implemented carbon labels have shown that there is a lack of motivation by companies to develop technology to reduce carbon emissions. This study examined consumer values for mandatory carbon labels in South Korea. Considering the altruistic nature of carbon labels, we asked about individuals’ perceptions about the impact of climate change on their personal lives to measure consumer preference for carbon labels. Significant preference for mandatory carbon labels reflected Koreans’...

  16. Multiwalled carbon nanotube based molecular imprinted polymer for trace determination of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyaceticacid in natural water samples using a potentiometric method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anirudhan, Thayyath S.; Alexander, Sheeba

    2014-06-01

    A novel potentiometric sensor based on ion imprinted polymer inclusion membrane (IPIM) was prepared from the modification of multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) based molecularly imprinted polymer for the trace determination of the pesticide 2,4-D (2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid) in natural water samples. MWCNTs are initially functionalized with vinyl groups through nitric acid oxidation along with reacting by allylamine. MWCNT based imprinted polymer (MWCNT-MIP) was synthesized by means of methacrylic acid (MAA) as the monomer, trimethylol propane trimethacrylate (TRIM) as the cross linker, α,α‧-azobisisobutyronitrile (AIBN) as the initiator and 2,4-D an organochlorine pesticide molecule as the template. Organized material was characterized by means of FTIR, XRD and SEM analyses. The sensing membrane was developed by the inclusion of 2,4-D imprinted polymer materials in the polyvinyl chloride (PVC) matrix. The optimization of operational parameters normally used such as amount and nature of plasticizers sensing material, pH and response time was conducted. From the non-imprinted (NIPIM) and imprinted polymer inclusion membrane (IPIM) sensors the response behavior of 2,4-D was compared under optimum conditions. The IPIM sensor responds in the range of 1 × 10-9-1 × 10-5 M and the detection limit was found to be 1.2 × 10-9 M. The stability of MWCNT-IPIM sensor was checked by various methods and it is found to be 3 months and it can be reused many times without losing its sensitivity. For the application of sensor experiments with ground and tap water samples were performed.

  17. Accelerated killing of cancer cells using a multifunctional single-walled carbon nanotube-based system for targeted drug delivery in combination with photothermal therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeyamohan P

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Prashanti Jeyamohan, Takashi Hasumura, Yutaka Nagaoka, Yasuhiko Yoshida, Toru Maekawa, D Sakthi Kumar Bio-Nano Electronics Research Centre, Graduate School of Interdisciplinary New Science, Toyo University, Kawagoe, Japan Abstract: The photothermal effect of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs in combination with the anticancer drug doxorubicin (DOX for targeting and accelerated destruction of breast cancer cells is demonstrated in this paper. A targeted drug-delivery system was developed for selective killing of breast cancer cells with polyethylene glycol biofunctionalized and DOX-loaded SWCNTs conjugated with folic acid. In our work, in vitro drug-release studies showed that the drug (DOX binds at physiological pH (pH 7.4 and is released only at a lower pH, ie, lysosomal pH (pH 4.0, which is the characteristic pH of the tumor environment. A sustained release of DOX from the SWCNTs was observed for a period of 3 days. SWCNTs have strong optical absorbance in the near-infrared (NIR region. In this special spectral window, biological systems are highly transparent. Our study reports that under laser irradiation at 800 nm, SWCNTs exhibited strong light–heat transfer characteristics. These optical properties of SWCNTs open the way for selective photothermal ablation in cancer therapy. It was also observed that internalization and uptake of folate-conjugated NTs into cancer cells was achieved by a receptor-mediated endocytosis mechanism. Results of the in vitro experiments show that laser was effective in destroying the cancer cells, while sparing the normal cells. When the above laser effect was combined with DOX-conjugated SWCNTs, we found enhanced and accelerated killing of breast cancer cells. Thus, this nanodrug-delivery system, consisting of laser, drug, and SWCNTs, looks to be a promising selective modality with high treatment efficacy and low side effects for cancer therapy. Keywords: cancer, nanotherapy, SWCNTs, targeted drug delivery

  18. Formation of Carbon Nanotube Based Gears: Quantum Chemistry and Molecular Mechanics Study of the Electrophilic Addition of o-Benzyne to Fullerenes, Graphene, and Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffe, Richard; Han, Jie; Globus, Al; Chancellor, Marisa K. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Considerable progress has been made in recent years in chemical functionalization of fullerene molecules. In some cases, the predominant reaction products are different from those obtained (using the same reactants) from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). One such example is the cycloaddition of o-benzyne to C60. It is well established that benzyne adds across one of the rings in naphthalene, anthracene and other PAHs forming the [2+4] cycloaddition product (benzobicyclo[2.2.2.]-octatriene with naphthalene and triptycene with anthracene). However, Hoke et al demonstrated that the only reaction path for o-benzyne with C60 leads to the [2+2] cycloaddition product in which benzyne adds across one of the interpentagonal bonds (forming a cyclobutene ring in the process). Either reaction product results in a loss of aromaticity and distortion of the PAH or fullerene substrate, and in a loss of strain in the benzyne. It is not clear, however, why different products are preferred in these cases. In the current paper, we consider the stability of benzyne-nanotube adducts and the ability of Brenner's potential energy model to describe the structure and stability of these adducts. The Brenner potential has been widely used for describing diamondoid and graphitic carbon. Recently it has also been used for molecular mechanics and molecular dynamics simulations of fullerenes and nanotubes. However, it has not been tested for the case of functionalized fullerenes (especially with highly strained geometries). We use the Brenner potential for our companion nanogear simulations and believe that it should be calibrated to insure that those simulations are physically reasonable. In the present work, Density Functional theory (DFT) calculations are used to determine the preferred geometric structures and energetics for this calibration. The DFT method is a kind of ab initio quantum chemistry method for determining the electronic structure of molecules. For a given basis set

  19. Establishment of the carbon label mechanism of coal chemical products based oncarbon footprint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Bishan

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT After redefining the carbon footprint and carbon label, the paper analyzesthe significance of the carbon labels under the background of the low carbon economy development, and establishes the concept of model of the carbon labels mechanism to chemical products. At the same time, the paper quantitatively studies carbon label data sourceof three kinds of coal chemical industry power products, which are fromhaving not CCS technologies of supercritical boiler of coal, using CCS technologies of supercritical boiler of coal and adopting CCS and IGCC technologies to power generation in CCI. Based on the three kinds of differences, the paper puts forward of establishing the carbon labels mechanism of chemical products under the low carbon consumption.

  20. Carbon Nanotube-based Supercapacitor Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — To address NASA Goddard Space Flight Center's need for improved cost-effective, low mass and low volume devices or methods to store electrical energy onboard long...

  1. Follow the Carbon: Isotopic Labeling Studies of Early Earth Aerosol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, Raea K; Day, Douglas A; Jimenez, Jose L; Tolbert, Margaret A

    2016-11-01

    Despite the faint young Sun, early Earth might have been kept warm by an atmosphere containing the greenhouse gases CH4 and CO2 in mixing ratios higher than those found on Earth today. Laboratory and modeling studies suggest that an atmosphere containing these trace gases could lead to the formation of organic aerosol haze due to UV photochemistry. Chemical mechanisms proposed to explain haze formation rely on CH4 as the source of carbon and treat CO2 as a source of oxygen only, but this has not previously been verified experimentally. In the present work, we use isotopically labeled precursor gases and unit-mass resolution (UMR) and high-resolution (HR) aerosol mass spectrometry to examine the sources of carbon and oxygen to photochemical aerosol formed in a CH4/CO2/N2 atmosphere. UMR results suggest that CH4 contributes 70-100% of carbon in the aerosol, while HR results constrain the value from 94% to 100%. We also confirm that CO2 contributes approximately 10% of the total mass to the aerosol as oxygen. These results have implications for the geochemical interpretations of inclusions found in Archean rocks on Earth and for the astrobiological potential of other planetary atmospheres. Key Words: Atmosphere-Early Earth-Planetary atmospheres-Carbon dioxide-Methane. Astrobiology 16, 822-830.

  2. Biosynthetic labeling of hypusine in mammalian cells. Carbon-hydrogen bond fissions revealed by dual labeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, M.H.; Folk, J.E.

    1986-10-25

    Using a dual-label technique in which /sup 3/H- and /sup 14/C-labeled forms of putrescine and of spermidine were employed as biosynthetic precursors of hypusine, two -C-H bond cleavages were detected during production of this unique amino acid in Chinese hamster ovary cells. One of these cleavages occurs at C-1 of the 4-aminobutyl group during its transfer from the secondary amine nitrogen of spermidine to the nitrogen at the epsilon-position of a specific lysine residue in the polypeptide precursor of eukaryotic initiation factor 4D. Breakage of the other -C-H bond takes place at C-2 in this aminobutyl segment after it has been coupled to lysine to form the intermediate deoxyhypusine residue. Hydroxylation at this carbon atom, which constitutes the last step in hypusine biosynthesis, is the cause of bond cleavage. The data obtained are consistent with a notion that no additional -C-H bond fissions occur during hypusine biosynthesis. Our findings permit suggestion of a mechanism for enzymic aminobutyl group transfer in which 4-aminobutyraldehyde produced by oxidative cleavage of spermidine is coupled with the epsilon-amino group of a specific lysine residue to form an enzyme-bound imine intermediate.

  3. Fluorescence labeling of carbon nanotubes and visualization of a nanotube-protein hybrid under fluorescence microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimura, Shige H; Khan, Shahbaz; Maruyama, Hiroyuki; Nakayama, Yoshikazu; Takeyasu, Kunio

    2011-04-11

    Biological applications of carbon nanotubes have been hampered by the inability to visualize them using conventional optical microscope, which is the most common tool for the observation and measurement of biological processes. Recently, a number of fluorescence labeling methods for biomolecules and various fluorescence probes have been developed and widely utilized in biological fields. Therefore, labeling carbon nanotubes with such fluorophores under physiological conditions will be highly useful in their biological applications. In this Article, we present a method to fluorescently label nanotubes by combining a detergent and a fluorophore commonly used in biological experiments. Fluorophores carrying an amino group (Texas Red hydrazide or BODIPY FL-hydrazide) were covalently attached to the hydroxyl groups of Tween 20 using carbonyldiimidazole. Fluorescence microscopy demonstrated that nanotubes were efficiently solubilized and labeled by this fluorescently labeled detergent. By using this technique, we also demonstrated multicolor fluorescence imaging of a nanotube-protein hybrid.

  4. Long-term stem cell labeling by collagen-functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Hongli; Cai, Rong; Kawazoe, Naoki; Chen, Guoping

    2014-01-01

    The monitoring of grafted stem cells is crucial to assess the efficiency, effectiveness and safety of such stem cell-based therapies. In this regard, a reliable and cytocompatible labeling method for stem cells is critically needed. In this study, the collagen-functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes (Col-SWCNTs) were used as imaging probes for labeling of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) and the inherent Raman scattering of SWCNTs was used to image the SWCNT-labeled cells. The results showed that the Col-SWCNTs exhibit efficient cellular internalization by hMSCs without affecting their proliferation and differentiation. The prolonged dwell time of Col-SWCNTs in cells ensured the long-term labeling for up to 2 weeks. This work reveals the potential of Col-SWCNTs as probes for long-term stem cell labeling.

  5. Synthesis of carbon-11, fluorine-18, and nitrogen-13 labeled radiotracers for biomedical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fowler, J.S.; Wolf, A.P.

    1981-01-01

    A number of reviews, many of them recent, have appeared on various aspects of /sup 11/C, /sup 18/F and /sup 13/N-labeled radiotracers. This monograph treats the topic principally from the standpoint of synthetic organic chemistry while keeping in perspective the necessity of integrating the organic chemistry with the design and ultimate application of the radiotracer. Where possible, recent examples from the literature of organic synthesis are introduced to suggest potentially new routes which may be applied to problems in labeling organic molecules with the short-lived positron emitters, carbon-11, fluorine-18, and nitrogen-13. The literature survey of carbon-11, fluorine-18 and nitrogen-13 labeled compounds presented are of particular value to scientists working in this field. Two appendices are also included to provide supplementary general references. A subject index concludes this volume.

  6. The leachability of carbon-14-labelled 3,4-benzopyrene from coal ash into aqueous systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Besemer, A.C.; Kanij, J.

    1984-01-01

    The leachability of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from coal ash into aqueous systems was studied. Carbon-14-labeled 3,4-Benzopyrene (BaP) was deposited on coal fly ash by adsorption from the liquid phase in quantities of about 10 ??g/g ash. After a thermal treatment in air at 120??C for 2 hours t

  7. The leachability of carbon-14-labelled 3,4-benzopyrene from coal ash into aqueous systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Besemer, A.C.; Kanij, J.

    1984-01-01

    The leachability of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from coal ash into aqueous systems was studied. Carbon-14-labeled 3,4-Benzopyrene (BaP) was deposited on coal fly ash by adsorption from the liquid phase in quantities of about 10 ??g/g ash. After a thermal treatment in air at 120??C for 2 hours

  8. A perspective on tritium versus carbon-14: ensuring optimal label selection in pharmaceutical research and development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krauser, Joel A

    2013-01-01

    Tritium ((3) H) and carbon-14 ((14) C) labels applied in pharmaceutical research and development each offer their own distinctive advantages and disadvantages coupled with benefits and risks. The advantages of (3) H have a higher specific activity, shorter half-life that allows more manageable waste remediation, lower material costs, and often more direct synthetic routes. The advantages of (14) C offer certain analytical benefits and less potential for label loss. Although (3) H labels offer several advantages, they might be overlooked as a viable option because of the concerns about its drawbacks. A main drawback often challenged is metabolic liability. These drawbacks, in some cases, might be overstated leading to underutilization of a perfectly viable option. As a consequence, label selection may automatically default to (14) C, which is a more conservative approach. To challenge this '(14) C-by-default' approach, pharmaceutical agents with strategically selected (3) H-labeling positions based on non-labeled metabolism data have been successfully implemented and evaluated for (3) H loss. From in-house results, the long term success of projects clearly would benefit from a thorough, objective, and balanced assessment regarding label selection ((3) H or (14) C). This assessment should be based on available project information and scientific knowledge. Important considerations are project applicability (preclinical and clinical phases), synthetic feasibility, costs, and timelines. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Simulation of Carbon Nanotube-based Heat Dissipation of High Power LED Lamp%碳纳米管在大功率LED灯具中的散热模拟

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄海波; 王元樟; 李爱玉; 程再军; 刘正达

    2016-01-01

    A finite element simulation of carbon nanotubes function in high power LED thermal management was conducted using FloEFD software in order to find out how carbon nanotube functions in heat dissipation of high power electronic devices. A simplified heat conduction model of multi⁃walled carbon nanotube arrays was established, and effective thermal conductivity of the multi⁃walled carbon nanotube array calculated based on the model. The steady⁃state temperature distributions of the LED with different thermal interface materials were then compared. It is shown that carbon nanotube arrays can greatly improve the thermal management performance of lamps, and that carbon nanotube polyurethane composite coating can greatly reduce the junction temperature.%用基于有限元方法的FloEFD软件,对碳纳米管在大功率发光二极管( LED)热管理中的应用进行模拟。建立起一个多壁碳纳米管阵列热传导的简化模型,据此模型对多壁碳纳米管阵列的等效热导率进行了计算。通过对采用不同热界面材料后LED灯具的稳态温度场分布的比较,发现碳纳米管阵列能大大提高灯具的热管理性能。模拟结果显示,采用聚氨酯碳纳米管复合材料涂层能大大降低结温。

  10. Rapid prototyping of nanotube-based devices using topology-optimized microgrippers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sardan, Özlem; Eichhorn, Volkmar; Petersen, D.H.

    2008-01-01

    Nanorobotic handling of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) using microgrippers is one of the most promising approaches for the rapid characterization of the CNTs and also for the assembly of prototypic nanotube-based devices. In this paper, we present pick-and-place nanomanipulation of multi-walled CNTs...... as well as close. Topology optimization leads to a 10-100 times improvement of the gripping force compared to conventional designs of similar size. Furthermore, we improved our nanorobotic system to offer more degrees of freedom. TEM investigation of the CNTs shows that the multi-walled tubes are coated...

  11. [Quantifying soil autotrophic microbes-assimilated carbon input into soil organic carbon pools following continuous 14C labeling].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Ran; Chen, Xiao-Juan; Wu, Xiao-Hong; Jian, Yan; Yuan, Hong-Zhao; Ge, Ti-Da; Sui, Fang-Gong; Tong, Cheng-Li; Wu, Jin-Shui

    2013-07-01

    Soil autotrophic microbe has been found numerous and widespread. However, roles of microbial autotrophic processes and the mechanisms of that in the soil carbon sequestration remain poorly understood. Here, we used soils incubated for 110 days in a closed, continuously labeled 14C-CO2 atmosphere to measure the amount of labeled C incorporated into the microbial biomass. The allocation of 14C-labeled assimilated carbon in variable soil C pools such as dissolved organic C (DOC) and microbial biomass C (MBC) were also examined over the 14C labeling span. The results showed that significant amounts of 14C-SOC were measured in paddy soils, which ranged from 69.06-133.81 mg x kg(-1), accounting for 0.58% to 0.92% of the total soil organic carbon (SOC). The amounts of 14C in the dissolved organic C (14C-DOC) and in the microbial biomass C (14C-MBC) were dependent on the soils, ranged from 2.54 to 8.10 mg x kg(-1), 19.50 to 49.16 mg x kg(-1), respectively. There was a significantly positive linear relationship between concentrations of 14C-SOC and 14C-MBC (R2 = 0.957**, P < 0.01). The 14C-DOC and 14C-MBC as proportions of total DOC, MBC, were 5.65%-24.91% and 4.23%-20.02%, respectively. Moreover, the distribution and transformation of microbes-assimilated-derived C had a greater influence on the dynamics of DOC and MBC than that on the dynamics of SOC. These data provide new insights into the importance of microorganisms in the fixation of atmospheric CO2 and of the potentially significant contributions made by microbial autotrophy to terrestrial C cycling.

  12. Classifying carbon credit buyers according to their attitudes towards and involvement in CDM sustainability labels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parnphumeesup, Piya, E-mail: pp66@hw.ac.uk [International Centre for Island Technology (ICIT), Institute of Petroleum Engineering, Heriot-Watt University, Old Academy, Back Road, Stromness, Orkney KW16 3AW, Scotland (United Kingdom); Kerr, Sandy A. [International Centre for Island Technology (ICIT), Institute of Petroleum Engineering, Heriot-Watt University, Old Academy, Back Road, Stromness, Orkney KW16 3AW, Scotland (United Kingdom)

    2011-10-15

    Carbon markets are increasingly conscious of the social and environmental 'quality' of credits delivered by CDM projects. Consequently carbon credits are no longer viewed as a homogenous good and buyers now differentiate between credits supplied by different types of CDM project. The objective of this paper is to classify CER buyers according to their attitudes towards and preferences for CDM sustainability labels. K-means clustering was used to segment a sample of buyers into two clusters. The results indicate that two clear clusters exist with distinct profile patterns. Moreover, the results of discriminant analysis confirmed that the two-cluster solution was valid. Finally, the results of the chi-square analysis and a cross-tabulation showed that these two clusters were significantly different in: organization type; level of paid up capital; perception of sustainable development benefits; perception of return on investment; perception of image of the sustainability labeling; participation in the voluntary market; the project priority; knowledge in the sustainability label; attitude towards the host country's duty; and their willingness to pay. - Highlights: > The K-means clustering was used to classify CER buyers in the primary market. > The carbon market is divided into two: the premium market; and the normal market. > Governments tend to be members of the premium market. > 82% of members in the premium market are willing to pay a price premium for CERs.

  13. Synthesis of carbon-11 labeled dexetimide and levetimide for studying muscarinic acetylcholine receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dannals, R.F.; Langstrom, B.; Ravert, H.T.; Wilson, A.A.; Wagner, H.N. Jr.

    1985-05-01

    The localization and quantitation of the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (m-AChR) in the living human brain using a non-invasive method, such as positron emission tomography (PET), may provide valuable information about receptor changes which have been observed post mortem in patients with Huntington's chorea and Alzheimer's dementia, as well as normal brain mechanisms mediated by the m-AChR. Although quinuclidinyl benzilate has been radioiodinated and radiomethylatd, the former is not useful with PET and the latter does not penetrate the blood-brain barrier; therefore, the authors chose to radiolabel dexetimide, a ligand which labels m-AChR in vitro and in vivo, and levetimide, its inactive enantiomer. Carbon-11 labeled carbon dioxide is bubbled through a tetrahydrofuran (THF) solution of phenylmagnesium chloride (1 M, l ml) after which 2 mg of lithium aluminium hydride is added in THF (500 ..mu..l). After evaporation of the solvent, 48% hydriodic acid (l ml) is added and the solution is heated for 1 minute. Carbon-11 labeled benzyl iodide is extracted into methylene chloride, added to a solution of nor-benzyl dexetimide or levetimide, and heated for several minutes. Purification is accomplished using semi-preparative reverse phase high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Analytical HPLC is used to determine the radiochemical purity and specific activity.

  14. Carbon transfer from photosynthesis to below ground fine root/hyphae respiration in Quercus serrata using stable carbon isotope pulse labeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dannoura, M.; Kominami, Y.; Takanashi, S.; Takahashi, K.

    2013-12-01

    Studying carbon allocation in trees is a key to better understand belowground carbon cycle and its response to climate change. Tracing 13C in tree and soil compartments after pulse labeling is one of powerful tool to study the fate of carbon in forest ecosystems. This experiment was conducted in Yamashiro experimental forest, Kyoto, Japan. Annual mean temperature and precipitation from 1994 to 2009 are 15.5 ° C and 1,388 mm respectively. The branch pulse labeling were done 7 times in 2011 using same branch of Quercus serrata (H:11.7 m, DBH; 33.7 cm) to see seasonal variations of carbon velocity. Whole crown labeling of Quercus serrata (H:9 m, DBH; 13.7 cm) was done in 2012 to study carbon allocation and to especially focus on belowground carbon flux until to the hyphae respiration. Pure 13CO2 (99.9%) was injected to the labeling chamber which was set to branch or crown. Then, after one hour of branch labeling and 3.5 hour for crown labeling, the chamber was opened. Trunk respiration chambers, fine root chambers and hyphae chambers were set to the target tree to trace labeled carbon in the CO2 efflux. 41 μm mesh was used to exclude ingrowth of roots into hyphae chambers. The results show that the velocity of carbon through the tree varied seasonally, with higher velocity in summer than autumn, averaging 0.47 m h-1. Half-lives of labeled carbon in autotrophic respiration were similar above and below ground during the growing season, but they were twice longer in trunk than in root in autumn. From the whole crown labeling done end of growing season, the 13CO2 signal was observed 25 hours after labeling in trunk chamber and 34-37.7 hours after labeling in fine root and hyphae respiration almost simultaneously. Half-lives of 13 was longer in trunk than below ground. Trunk respiration was still using labelled carbon during winter suggesting that winter trunk respiration is partly fueled by carbon stored in the trunk at the end of the growing season.

  15. Short-term carbon and nitrogen cycling in urine patches assessed by combined carbon-13 and nitrogen-15 labelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ambus, Per; Petersen, S.O.; Soussana, J.F.

    2007-01-01

    Urine deposition by grazing animals is known to, induce large NO emissions as a result of increased nitrification and denitrification in the soil. This is brought about by the increased N availability from the urine, in combination very likely also with increased organic C availability. Possible...... sources for C include the urine itself, increased solubility of soil C, lysis of microbial cells and leakage of C from scorched roots. The objective of this experiment was to test the hypothesis that: (i) urine deposition causes an increase in root-derived degradable C compounds in the soil, which (ii......) fuel denitrification activity and N2O production. The study took advantage of carbon-13 pulse labelling the plant tissue combined with application of nitrogen-15 labelled synthetic urine as an attempt to identify the sources of N2O. Over a 6 weeks course, the CO2 evolved in response to urine...

  16. Carbon isotope labeling in boreal forests to assess roles of fungal species in decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treseder, K. K.; Czimczik, C. I.; Trumbore, S. E.; Allison, S. D.

    2006-12-01

    We used 14C and 13C labeling to assess the in situ respiration of alanine-, starch-, and lignocellulose-derived carbon from the sporocarps of particular fungal species fruiting in a boreal forest in Alaska. By measuring isotopically-labeled respiration of sporocarps, which can be identified to species, we were able to attribute turnover of carbon compounds to specific fungal groups. Moreover, collection of sporocarp respiration is non-destructive, so we could return to the same sporocarps to collect a time series of measurements that spanned hours to days. We tested the hypotheses that alanine and starch turn over more quickly than lignocellulose, and that saprotrophic fungi would use starch-C and lignocellulose-C but ectomycorrhizal fungi would not. Small amounts of 14C-labeled alanine (about 100,000 permil) were dispensed into the soil within three meters of sporocarps of the ectomycorrhizal fungus Lactarius alnicola. Δ14CO2 values of sporocarp respiration climbed from 75.8 +/- 6.3 permil to 7855 +/- 3940 permil within one hour of additions, indicating that the fungus quickly acquired, transported, and transformed the alanine-C. In a separate approach, a mixture of 13C-labeled starch (about 15,000 permil) and 14C-labeled lignocellulose (about 36,000 permil) was applied in 9 m2 plots containing sporocarps of the ectomycorrhizal genera Phellodon and Sarcodon and the saprotrophic genera Lycoperdon and Polyporus. An unlabeled control plot was also established. We observed no detectable increase in 14CO2 or 13CO2 over a 144 hour period, suggesting that neither ectomycorrhizal nor saprotrophic fungi significantly broke down starch or lignocellulose during this time. The alanine experiment is one of the first to indicate that ectomycorrhizal fungi can influence the spatial distribution and storage of soil carbon over short time scales. This influence may be restricted to carbon of organic compounds like amino acids. In contrast, starch was not transformed quickly even

  17. Nanotube-Based Chemical and Biomolecular Sensors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    J.Koh; B.Kim; S.Hong; H.Lim; H.C.Choi

    2008-01-01

    We present a brief review about recent results regarding carbon nanotube (CNT)-based chemical and biomolecular sensors. For the fabrication of CNT-based sensors, devices containing CNT channels between two metal electrodes are first fabricated usually via chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process or "surface programmed assembly" method. Then, the CNT surfaces are often functionalized to enhance the selectivity of the sensors. Using this process, highly-sensitive CNT-based sensors can be fabricated for the selective detection of various chemical and biological molecules such as hydrogen, ammonia, carbon monoxide, chlorine gas, DNA, glucose, alcohol, and proteins.

  18. Caffeine content of prepackaged national-brand and private-label carbonated beverages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, K-H; Bell, L N

    2007-08-01

    Caffeine is a well-known stimulant that is added as an ingredient to various carbonated soft drinks. Due to its stimulatory and other physiological effects, individuals desire to know the exact amount of caffeine consumed from these beverages. This study analyzed the caffeine contents of 56 national-brand and 75 private-label store-brand carbonated beverages using high-performance liquid chromatography. Caffeine contents ranged from 4.9 mg/12 oz (IGA Cola) to 74 mg/12 oz (Vault Zero). Some of the more common national-brand carbonated beverages analyzed in this study with their caffeine contents were Coca-Cola (33.9 mg/12 oz), Diet Coke (46.3 mg/12 oz), Pepsi (38.9 mg/12 oz), Diet Pepsi (36.7 mg/12 oz), Dr Pepper (42.6 mg/12 oz), Diet Dr Pepper (44.1 mg/12 oz), Mountain Dew (54.8 mg/12 oz), and Diet Mountain Dew (55.2 mg/12 oz). The Wal-Mart store-brand beverages with their caffeine contents were Sam's Cola (12.7 mg/12 oz), Sam's Diet Cola (13.3 mg/12 oz), Dr Thunder (30.6 mg/12 oz), Diet Dr Thunder (29.9 mg/12 oz), and Mountain Lightning (46.5 mg/12 oz). Beverages from 14 other stores were also analyzed. Most store-brand carbonated beverages were found to contain less caffeine than their national-brand counterparts. The wide range of caffeine contents in carbonated beverages indicates that consumers would benefit from the placement of caffeine values on food labels.

  19. Photopromoted carbonylation of olefins with carbon dioxide and labelling studies with 13CO2 and 13CH3OH

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YIN Jingmei; GAO Dabin; HU Jiehan; ZHOU Guangyun; JIA Yingping; WANG Xiangsheng

    2003-01-01

    Photopromoted carbonylation of olefins with carbon dioxide can be completed in ambient conditions (room temperatures and atmospheric pressure) by Co(OAc)2 catalysis. It was found that in carbonyl carbons of methyl ester of aliphatic acid 50% is from CO2 and the other 50% from CH3OH by labelling experimental with 13CO2 and 13CH3OH.

  20. A novel synthesis of carbon-labelled quinolone-3-carboxylic acid antibacterials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carr, R.M.; Sutherland, D.R. (Glaxo Research and Development Ltd., Greenford (United Kingdom). Isotope Chemistry Group)

    1994-10-01

    3-Iodoquinolones were prepared from the corresponding quinolone-3-carboxylic acids by Hunsdiecker-type iododecarboxylation reactions with lead tetraacetate and iodine. Cyanation of the iodo compounds with mixtures of potassium [[sup 13]C]cyanide and copper (1) iodide, gave [3-[sup 13]C]cyanoquinolones which on acidic hydrolysis afforded quinolone-[3-[sup 13]C]carboxylic acids. In this way, nalidixic acid, an immediate precursor of norfloxacin, and quinolone WIN57273 were labelled with carbon-13 in the metabolically stable carboxylic acid fragment. (author).

  1. Carbon Nanostructure-Based Field-Effect Transistors for Label-Free Chemical/Biological Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PingAn Hu

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Over the past decade, electrical detection of chemical and biological species using novel nanostructure-based devices has attracted significant attention for chemical, genomics, biomedical diagnostics, and drug discovery applications. The use of nanostructured devices in chemical/biological sensors in place of conventional sensing technologies has advantages of high sensitivity, low decreased energy consumption and potentially highly miniaturized integration. Owing to their particular structure, excellent electrical properties and high chemical stability, carbon nanotube and graphene based electrical devices have been widely developed for high performance label-free chemical/biological sensors. Here, we review the latest developments of carbon nanostructure-based transistor sensors in ultrasensitive detection of chemical/biological entities, such as poisonous gases, nucleic acids, proteins and cells.

  2. Multiscale modeling and simulation of nanotube-based torsional oscillators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Shaoping

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstractIn this paper, we propose the first numerical study of nanotube-based torsional oscillators via developing a new multiscale model. The edge-to-edge technique was employed in this multiscale method to couple the molecular model, i.e., nanotubes, and the continuum model, i.e., the metal paddle. Without losing accuracy, the metal paddle was treated as the rigid body in the continuum model. Torsional oscillators containing (10,0 nanotubes were mainly studied. We considered various initial angles of twist to depict linear/nonlinear characteristics of torsional oscillators. Furthermore, effects of vacancy defects and temperature on mechanisms of nanotube-based torsional oscillators were discussed.

  3. Carbon nanotubes based nafion composite membranes for fuel cell applications

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Cele, NP

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available surface oxidation as well as functionalisation in composite membranes was investigated by focussing on three aspects: thermo-mechanical stability, thermal degradation and proton conductivity. The oCNTs-containing Nafion composite membrane exhibited...

  4. Carbon Nanotube-Based Adsorbents for Volatile Air Contaminants Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In completing the Phase I SBIR, Agave BioSystems and the Universities Space Research Association, have successfully demonstrated proof of concept for the use of...

  5. Carbon nanotube based VLSI interconnects analysis and design

    CERN Document Server

    Kaushik, Brajesh Kumar

    2015-01-01

    The brief primarily focuses on the performance analysis of CNT based interconnects in current research scenario. Different CNT structures are modeled on the basis of transmission line theory. Performance comparison for different CNT structures illustrates that CNTs are more promising than Cu or other materials used in global VLSI interconnects. The brief is organized into five chapters which mainly discuss: (1) an overview of current research scenario and basics of interconnects; (2) unique crystal structures and the basics of physical properties of CNTs, and the production, purification and applications of CNTs; (3) a brief technical review, the geometry and equivalent RLC parameters for different single and bundled CNT structures; (4) a comparative analysis of crosstalk and delay for different single and bundled CNT structures; and (5) various unique mixed CNT bundle structures and their equivalent electrical models.

  6. Carbon Nanotube-Based Separation Columns for Microchip Electrochromatography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Klaus Bo; Delacourt, B.; Kutter, Jörg Peter

    2015-01-01

    Fabrication of the stationary phase for microchip chromatography is most often done by packing of the individual separation channel after fabrication of the microfluidic chip, which is a very time-consuming and costly process (Kutter. J Chromatogr A 1221:72–82, 2012). Here, we describe in detail...

  7. Suitability of Cell-Based Label-Free Detection for Cytotoxicity Screening of Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Meindl

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cytotoxicity testing of nanoparticles (NPs by conventional screening assays is often complicated by interference. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs are particularly difficult to assess. To test the suitability of cell-based label-free techniques for this application, a panel of CNTs with different diameters and surface functionalizations was assessed by impedance-based technique (xCELLigence RTCA and automated microscopy (Cell-IQ compared to formazan bioreduction (MTS assay. For validation of the label-free systems different concentrations of ethanol and of amine (AMI polystyrene NPs were used. CNTs were evaluated in various cell lines, but only endothelial EAhy926 cells and L929 and V79 fibroblasts could be evaluated in all systems. Polystyrene particles obtained similar results in all assays. All systems identified thin (20 nm CNTs, but detection by xCELLigence system was less sensitive to CNT-induced cytotoxicity. Despite advantages, such as continuous monitoring and more detailed analysis of cytotoxic effects, label-free techniques cannot be generally recommended for cytotoxicity screening of NPs.

  8. Carbon-11 labelling of an inhibitor of acetylcholinesterase: [[sup 11]C]physostigmine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonnot-Lours, S.; Crouzel, C.; Prenant, C.; Hinnen, F. (CEA, 91 - Orsay (France). Service Hospitalier Frederic Joliot)

    1993-01-01

    Physostigmine, an alkaloid from calabar bean is a strong inhibitor of acetylcholinesterase and has been used clinically in the treatment of glaucoma, atropine intoxication, myasthenia gravis and more recently, in experimental trials in Alzheimer's disease. In order to study the AChE activity in the brain by positron emission tomography, we have undertaken the labelling of physostigmine with carbon-11. The synthesis involves the reaction of [[sup 11]C]methylisocyanate with eseroline. [[sup 11]C]Methylisocyanate was obtained by heating [[sup 11]C]acetylchloride with tetrabutylammonium azide in toluene. The synthesis of [[sup 11]C]CH[sub 3]COC1 involves the carbonation of methylmagnesium bromide in THF with cyclotron produced [[sup 11]C]carbon dioxide and the addition of phthaloyl dichloride. The [[sup 11]C]methylisocyanate is distilled into a solution of eseroline in ether with a small piece of sodium. After 10 minutes at 25[sup o]C, the solution is purified by HPLC and the appropriate fraction collected. Starting with 55.5 GBq (1.5 Ci) of [[sup 11]C]carbon dioxide, 0.92-1.48 GBq (25-40 mCi) of [[sup 11]C]Physostigmine are obtained 57 minutes after EOB. (author).

  9. Construction of label-free electrochemical immunosensor on mesoporous carbon nanospheres for breast cancer susceptibility gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, Haixia; Zhang, Yong; Wu, Dan; Ma, Hongmin; Li, Xiaojing; Li, Yan; Wang, Huan; Li, He; Du, Bin [Key Laboratory of Chemical Sensing and Analysis in Universities of Shandong, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, University of Jinan, Jinan 250022 (China); Wei, Qin, E-mail: sdjndxwq@163.com [Key Laboratory of Chemical Sensing and Analysis in Universities of Shandong, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, University of Jinan, Jinan 250022 (China)

    2013-04-03

    Highlights: ► The immunosensor is designed to determine breast cancer susceptibility gene. ► Mesoporous carbon nanospheres (MCN) have great adsorption capacity. ► MCN could enhance the electroactivity of toluidine blue. ► Room temperature ionic liquid should increase the electrochemical signal. -- Abstract: In this contribution, mesoporous carbon nanospheres (MCN) were used to fabricate a label-free electrochemical immunosensor for breast cancer susceptibility gene (BRCAl). The detection platform was constructed by conjugation of anti-BRCA1 on glassy carbon electrodes which were modified by mesoporous carbon nanospheres–toluidine blue nanocomposite (MCN–TB)/room temperature ionic-liquid (RTIL) composited film. TB was adsorbed onto MCN and acted as a redox probe. The electroactivity of TB was greatly enhanced in the presence of MCN. The good conductivity of MCN and BMIM·BF{sub 4} could promote the electron transfer and thus enhance the detection sensitivity. Moreover, the large surface area of MCN and the protein-binding properties of BMIM·BF{sub 4} could greatly increase the antibody loading. The specific antibody–antigen immunoreaction on the electrode surface resulted in a decrease of amperometric signal of the electrode. Under optimized conditions, the amperometric signal decreased linearly with BRCAl concentration in the range of 0.01–15 ng mL{sup −1} with a low detection limit of 3.97 pg mL{sup −1}. The immunosensor exhibits high sensitivity, good selectivity and stability.

  10. Carbon transfer from the host to Tuber melanosporum mycorrhizas and ascocarps followed using a 13C pulse-labeling technique.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    François Le Tacon

    Full Text Available Truffles ascocarps need carbon to grow, but it is not known whether this carbon comes directly from the tree (heterotrophy or from soil organic matter (saprotrophy. The objective of this work was to investigate the heterotrophic side of the ascocarp nutrition by assessing the allocation of carbon by the host to Tuber melanosporum mycorrhizas and ascocarps. In 2010, a single hazel tree selected for its high truffle (Tuber melanosporum production and situated in the west part of the Vosges, France, was labeled with (13CO2. The transfer of (13C from the leaves to the fine roots and T. melanosporum mycorrhizas was very slow compared with the results found in the literature for herbaceous plants or other tree species. The fine roots primarily acted as a carbon conduit; they accumulated little (13C and transferred it slowly to the mycorrhizas. The mycorrhizas first formed a carbon sink and accumulated (13C prior to ascocarp development. Then, the mycorrhizas transferred (13C to the ascocarps to provide constitutive carbon (1.7 mg of (13C per day. The ascocarps accumulated host carbon until reaching complete maturity, 200 days after the first labeling and 150 days after the second labeling event. This role of the Tuber ascocarps as a carbon sink occurred several months after the end of carbon assimilation by the host and at low temperature. This finding suggests that carbon allocated to the ascocarps during winter was provided by reserve compounds stored in the wood and hydrolyzed during a period of frost. Almost all of the constitutive carbon allocated to the truffles (1% of the total carbon assimilated by the tree during the growing season came from the host.

  11. Carbon transfer from the host to Tuber melanosporum mycorrhizas and ascocarps followed using a 13C pulse-labeling technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Tacon, François; Zeller, Bernd; Plain, Caroline; Hossann, Christian; Bréchet, Claude; Robin, Christophe

    2013-01-01

    Truffles ascocarps need carbon to grow, but it is not known whether this carbon comes directly from the tree (heterotrophy) or from soil organic matter (saprotrophy). The objective of this work was to investigate the heterotrophic side of the ascocarp nutrition by assessing the allocation of carbon by the host to Tuber melanosporum mycorrhizas and ascocarps. In 2010, a single hazel tree selected for its high truffle (Tuber melanosporum) production and situated in the west part of the Vosges, France, was labeled with (13)CO2. The transfer of (13)C from the leaves to the fine roots and T. melanosporum mycorrhizas was very slow compared with the results found in the literature for herbaceous plants or other tree species. The fine roots primarily acted as a carbon conduit; they accumulated little (13)C and transferred it slowly to the mycorrhizas. The mycorrhizas first formed a carbon sink and accumulated (13)C prior to ascocarp development. Then, the mycorrhizas transferred (13)C to the ascocarps to provide constitutive carbon (1.7 mg of (13)C per day). The ascocarps accumulated host carbon until reaching complete maturity, 200 days after the first labeling and 150 days after the second labeling event. This role of the Tuber ascocarps as a carbon sink occurred several months after the end of carbon assimilation by the host and at low temperature. This finding suggests that carbon allocated to the ascocarps during winter was provided by reserve compounds stored in the wood and hydrolyzed during a period of frost. Almost all of the constitutive carbon allocated to the truffles (1% of the total carbon assimilated by the tree during the growing season) came from the host.

  12. Label-free electronic detection of bio-toxins using aligned carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palaniappan, Al; Goh, W H; Fam, D W H; Rajaseger, G; Chan, C E Z; Hanson, B J; Moochhala, S M; Mhaisalkar, S G; Liedberg, B

    2013-05-15

    A facile route for sensitive label-free detection of bio-toxins using aligned single walled carbon nanotubes is described. This approach involves patterning of a catalyst on the surface of a quartz substrate using a sub-100 μm stripe-patterned polydimethylsiloxane stamp for aligned carbon nanotube generation followed by fabrication of field effect transistor (FET). Atomic force microscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy are employed to characterize the synthesized nanotubes. Unlike previous reports, the adopted approach enables direct electronic detection of bio-toxins with sensitivities comparable to ELISA. As a proof of concept, the fabricated FET responds to nM concentration levels (with a LOD of ∼2 nM) of epsilon toxin produced by Clostridium perfringens and a prominent food toxin. This facile approach could be customized to detect other classes of toxins and biomarkers upon appropriate functionalization of the aligned carbon nanotubes. Finally, we demonstrate the use of the FET-platform for detection of toxin in more complex matrices such as orange juice.

  13. Electrochemical detection of leukemia oncogenes using enzyme-loaded carbon nanotube labels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ai Cheng; Du, Dan; Chen, Baowei; Heng, Chew-Kiat; Lim, Tit-Meng; Lin, Yuehe

    2014-09-07

    Here we describe an ultrasensitive electrochemical nucleic acids assay amplified by carbon nanotubes (CNTs)-based labels for the detection of human acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) related p185 BCR-ABL fusion transcript. The carboxylated CNTs were functionalized with horseradish peroxidase (HRP) molecules and target-specific detection probes (DP) via diimide-activated amidation, and used to label and amplify target hybridization signal. The activity of captured HRP was monitored by square-wave voltammetry measuring the electroactive enzymatic product in the presence of 2-aminophenol and hydrogen peroxide substrate solution. The effect of DP and HRP loading of the CNT-based labels on its signal-to-noise ratio of electrochemical detection was studied systematically for the first time. Under optimized conditions, the signal-amplified assay achieved a detection limit of 83 fM targets oligonuecleotides and a 4-order wide dynamic range of target concentration. The resulting assay allowed a robust discrimination between the perfect match and a three-base mismatch sequence. When subjected to full-length (491 bp) DNA oncogene, the approach demonstrated a detection limit of approximately 33 pg of the target gene. The high sensitivity and specificity of assay enabled PCR-free detection of target transcripts in as little as 65 ng of mRNA extracted from positive ALL cell lines SUP-B15, in comparison to those obtained from negative cell lines HL-60. The approach holds promise for simple, low cost and ultrasensitive electrochemical nucleic acids detection in portable devices, point-of-care and early disease diagnostic applications.

  14. Endowing carbon nanotubes with superparamagnetic properties: applications for cell labeling, MRI cell tracking and magnetic manipulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamanna, Giuseppe; Garofalo, Antonio; Popa, Gabriela; Wilhelm, Claire; Bégin-Colin, Sylvie; Felder-Flesch, Delphine; Bianco, Alberto; Gazeau, Florence; Ménard-Moyon, Cécilia

    2013-05-21

    Coating of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with magnetic nanoparticles (NPs) imparts novel magnetic, optical, and thermal properties with potential applications in the biomedical domain. Multi-walled CNTs have been decorated with iron oxide superparamagnetic NPs. Two different approaches have been investigated based on ligand exchange or "click chemistry". The presence of the NPs on the nanotube surface allows conferring magnetic properties to CNTs. We have evaluated the potential of the NP/CNT hybrids as a contrast agent for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and their interactions with cells. The capacity of the hybrids to magnetically monitor and manipulate cells has also been investigated. The NP/CNTs can be manipulated by a remote magnetic field with enhanced contrast in MRI. They are internalized into tumor cells without showing cytotoxicity. The labeled cells can be magnetically manipulated as they display magnetic mobility and are detected at a single cell level through high resolution MRI.

  15. The transformation and fate of sub-Arctic microphytobenthos carbon revealed through 13C-labeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oakes, Joanne M.; Rysgaard, Søren; Glud, Ronnie N.

    2016-01-01

    Microphytobenthos (MPB) at higher latitudes has been poorly studied. This study used pulse-chase C-13-labeling to investigate the production, processing, and fate of MPB-derived carbon (MPB-C) in sub-Arctic intertidal sediments over 31 d. Gross primary production (2.1 mmolCm(-2)h(-1)+/- 0.4 mmol......Cm(-2)h(-1)) was comparable to that reported for temperate regions. Some of the C-13 fixed by sub-Arctic MPB was rapidly (within 0.5 d) transferred to deeper sediments (below 2 cm), but most was retained within surface sediments (>70.2% of the C-13 present at any time during the study). At any time, MPB...

  16. Chiral dimethylamine flutamide derivatives-modeling, synthesis, androgen receptor affinities and carbon-11 labeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacobson, Orit [Department of Medical Biophysics and Nuclear Medicine, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Hadassah Hospital, Jerusalem 91120 (Israel); Laky, Desideriu [Department of Medical Biophysics and Nuclear Medicine, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Hadassah Hospital, Jerusalem 91120 (Israel); Carlson, Kathryn E. [Department of Chemistry, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Elgavish, Sharona [Bioinformatics Unit, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem 91120 (Israel); Gozin, Michael [School of Chemistry, Raymond and Beverly Sackler Faculty of Exact Sciences, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel); Even-Sapir, Einat [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 64239 (Israel); Leibovitc, Ilan [Department of Urology, Meir Medical Center, Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Kfar Sava 44281 (Israel); Gutman, Mordechai [Department of Surgery A, Sapir Medical Center, Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Kfar Sava 44281 (Israel); Chisin, Roland [Department of Medical Biophysics and Nuclear Medicine, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Hadassah Hospital, Jerusalem 91120 (Israel); Katzenellenbogen, John A. [Department of Chemistry, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Mishani, Eyal [Department of Medical Biophysics and Nuclear Medicine, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Hadassah Hospital, Jerusalem 91120 (Israel)]. E-mail: mishani@md.huji.ac.il

    2006-08-15

    Most prostate cancers are androgen dependent upon initial diagnosis. On the other hand, some very aggressive forms of prostate cancer were shown to have lost the expression of the androgen receptor (AR). Although the AR is routinely targeted in endocrine treatment, the clinical outcome remains suboptimal. Therefore, it is crucial to demonstrate the presence and activity of the AR in each case of prostate cancer, before and after treatment. While noninvasive positron emission tomography (PET) has the potential to determine AR expression of tumor cells in vivo, fully optimized PET imaging agents are not yet available. Based on molecular modeling, three novel derivatives of hydroxyflutamide (Compounds 1-3) were designed and synthesized. They contain an electron-rich group (dimethylamine) located on the methyl moiety, which may confer a better stability to the molecule in vivo. Compounds 1-3 have AR binding that is similar or higher than that of the currently used commercial drugs. An automated carbon-11 radiolabeling route was developed, and the compounds were successfully labeled with a 10-15% decay-corrected radiochemical yield, 99% radiochemical purity and a specific activity of 4Ci/{mu}mol end of bombardment (n=15). These labeled biomarkers may facilitate the future quantitative molecular imaging of AR-positive prostate cancer using PET and may also allow for image-guided treatment of prostate cancer.

  17. Carbon-11 and iodine-123 labelled iomazenil: a direct PET-SPET comparison

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westera, G. [Div. of Nuclear Medicine, Dept. of Radiology, Univ. Hospital Zurich (Switzerland); Buck, A. [Div. of Nuclear Medicine, Dept. of Radiology, Univ. Hospital Zurich (Switzerland); Burger, C. [Div. of Nuclear Medicine, Dept. of Radiology, Univ. Hospital Zurich (Switzerland); Leenders, K.L. [Paul Scherrer Inst., Villigen (Switzerland); Schulthess, G.K. von [Div. of Nuclear Medicine, Dept. of Radiology, Univ. Hospital Zurich (Switzerland); Schubiger, A.P. [Paul Scherrer Inst., Villigen (Switzerland)

    1996-01-01

    The benzodiazepine receptor ligand iomazenil was labelled with carbon-11 to allow a direct positron emission tomography/single-photon emission tomography (PET/SPET) comparison with the well-known iodine-123 labelled compound. Imaging showed the same regional distribution for both modalities. Blood sample activity was corrected for metabolites by extraction with chloroform and high-performance liquid chromatographic analysis. Metabolism is very fast: 5 Min after application more than 85% of the plasma activity is present as hydrophilic metabolites. Kinetic methods were used to obtain regional estimates of transport rate constants and receptor concentrations. A three-compartment model was employed which gave transport rate constants for brain uptake (K{sub 1}) and the distribution volume for the specifically receptor bound compartment (DV{sub S}). K{sub 1} varied from 0.32 to 0.50 ml/min per gram for the cortical regions, cerebellum, thalamus and striatum for PET and SPET. The coefficient of variation of the SPET parameters was quite comparable to that of the PET parameters, especially after 180 min (PET 90 min) study duration. Thus quantitative benzodiazepine receptor information can be obtained from dynamic SPET imaging in the same way as with PET. (orig./MG)

  18. Label-free electrochemical impedance detection of kinase and phosphatase activities using carbon nanofiber nanoelectrode arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yifen; Syed, Lateef; Liu, Jianwei; Hua, Duy H.; Li, Jun

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate the feasibility of a label-free electrochemical method to detect the kinetics of phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of surface-attached peptides catalyzed by kinase and phosphatase, respectively. The peptides with a sequence specific to c-Src tyrosine kinase and protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) were first validated with ELISA-based protein tyrosine kinase assay and then functionalized on vertically aligned carbon nanofiber (VACNF) nanoelectrode arrays (NEAs). Real-time electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (REIS) measurements showed reversible impedance changes upon the addition of c-Src kinase and PTP1B phosphatase. Only a small and unreliable impedance variation was observed during the peptide phosphorylation, but a large and fast impedance decrease was observed during the peptide dephosphorylation at different PTP1B concentrations. The REIS data of dephosphorylation displayed a well-defined exponential decay following the Michaelis-Menten heterogeneous enzymatic model with a specific constant, kcat/Km, of (2.1 ± 0.1) × 107 M−1 s−1. Consistent values of the specific constant was measured at PTP1B concentration varying from 1.2 to 2.4 nM with the corresponding electrochemical signal decay constant varying from 38.5 to 19.1 s. This electrochemical method can be potentially used as a label-free method for profiling enzyme activities in fast reactions. PMID:22935373

  19. The preparation of glucose uniformly labelled with carbon-14; Preparacion de glucosa uniformemente marcada con carbono-14

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, M. D.; Suarez, C.; Rodrigo, M. E.

    1978-07-01

    The plant, (Zea mais, L) and culture conditions for an optimum production of glucose has been chosen. To achieve the labelling of glucose, photosynthesis and carboxylation are carried on, under an artificial atmosphere of 14CO{sub 2} produced from 14{sup C}-barium carbonate. Following photosynthesis the sugars are extracted, and then the extract purified by several methods. The purified glucose is finally, degraded and the specific radioactivity is determined in each of its carbon atoms. (Author) 37 refs.

  20. An automated growth enclosure for metabolic labeling of Arabidopsis thaliana with 13C-carbon dioxide - an in vivo labeling system for proteomics and metabolomics research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Xiao-Yuan

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Labeling whole Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana plants to high enrichment with 13C for proteomics and metabolomics applications would facilitate experimental approaches not possible by conventional methods. Such a system would use the plant's native capacity for carbon fixation to ubiquitously incorporate 13C from 13CO2 gas. Because of the high cost of 13CO2 it is critical that the design conserve the labeled gas. Results A fully enclosed automated plant growth enclosure has been designed and assembled where the system simultaneously monitors humidity, temperature, pressure and 13CO2 concentration with continuous adjustment of humidity, pressure and 13CO2 levels controlled by a computer running LabView software. The enclosure is mounted on a movable cart for mobility among growth environments. Arabidopsis was grown in the enclosure for up to 8 weeks and obtained on average >95 atom% enrichment for small metabolites, such as amino acids and >91 atom% for large metabolites, including proteins and peptides. Conclusion The capability of this labeling system for isotope dilution experiments was demonstrated by evaluation of amino acid turnover using GC-MS as well as protein turnover using LC-MS/MS. Because this 'open source' Arabidopsis 13C-labeling growth environment was built using readily available materials and software, it can be adapted easily to accommodate many different experimental designs.

  1. Construction of magnetic-carbon-quantum-dots-probe-labeled apoferritin nanocages for bioimaging and targeted therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yao HC

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Hanchun Yao,1,2 Li Su,1 Man Zeng,1 Li Cao,1 Weiwei Zhao,1 Chengqun Chen,3 Bin Du,1,2 Jie Zhou1,2 1School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Zhengzhou University, 2Collaborative Innovation Center of Drug Research and Safety Evaluation, Henan Province, 3Department of Pharmacy, The First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Carbon dots (CDs are one of the most highlighted carbon-based materials for biological applications, such as optical imaging nanoprobes, which are used for labeling cells in cancer treatment mainly due to their biocompatibility and unique optical properties. In this study, gadolinium (Gd-complex-containing CDs were obtained through a one-step microwave method to develop multimodal nanoprobes integrating the advantages of optical and magnetic imaging. The obtained Gd-CDs exhibited highly fluorescent properties with excellent water solubility and biological compatibility. Natural apoferritin (AFn nanocages, an excellent drug delivery carrier, are hollow in structure, with their pH-dependent, unfolding–refolding process at pH 2.0 and 7.4. The chemotherapeutic drug doxorubicin (DOX can be highly effective and encapsulated into AFn cavity. A widely used tumor-targeting molecule, folic acid (FA, functionalized the surface of AFn to obtain an active tumor targeting effect on MCF-7 cells and malignant tumors in mice models. In this study, an AFn nanocarrier encapsulating high concentration of DOX labeled with magnetic and fluorescent Gd-CDs probe was developed. Gd-CDs exhibited a unique green photoluminescence and almost no toxicity compared with free GdCl3. Furthermore, Gd-doped CDs significantly increased the circulation time and decreased the toxicity of Gd3+ in in vitro and in vivo magnetic resonance imaging, which demonstrated that the AFn nanocages labeled with Gd-CD compounds could serve as an excellent T1 contrast agent for magnetic resonance imaging. The self

  2. Long-term steady state 13C labelling to investigate carbon turnover in plant soil systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Falcimagne

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available We have set up a facility allowing steady state 13CO2 labeling of short stature vegetation (12 m2 for several years. 13C labelling is obtained by scrubbing the CO2 from outdoors air with a self-regenerating molecular sieve and by replacing it with 13C depleted (−34.7±0.03‰ fossil-fuel derived CO2 The facility, which comprises 16 replicate mesocosms, allows tracing the fate of photosynthetic carbon in plant-soil systems in natural light and at outdoors temperature. This method was applied during 2 yrs to temperate grassland monoliths (0.5×0.5×0.4 m sampled in a long term grazing experiment. During daytime, the canopy enclosure in each mesocosm was supplied in an open flow (0.67–0.88 volume per minute with modified air (43% scrubbed air and 57% cooled and humidified ambient air at mean CO2 concentration of 425 µmol mol−1 and δ13C of −21.5±0.27‰. Above and belowground CO2 fluxes were continuously monitored. The difference in δ13C between the CO2 at the outlet and at the inlet of each canopy enclosure was not significant (−0.35±0.39‰. Due to mixing with outdoors air, the CO2 concentration at enclosure inlet followed a seasonal cycle, often found in urban areas, where δ13C of CO2 is lower in winter than in summer. Mature C3 grass leaves were sampled monthly in each mesocosm, as well as leave from pot-grown control C4 (Paspalum dilatatum. The mean δ13C of fully labelled C3 and C4 leaves reached −41.4±0.67 and −28.7±0.39‰ respectively. On average, the labelling reduced by 12.7‰ the δ13C of C3 grass leaves. The isotope mass balance technique was used to calculate the fraction of "new" C in the soil organic matter (SOM above 0.2 mm. A first order exponential decay model fitted to "old" C data showed that reducing aboveground disturbance by cutting increased from 22 to 31 months the mean residence time of belowground organic C (>0.2 mm in the top soil.

  3. Synthesis of carbon nanohorns/chitosan/quantum dots nanocomposite and its applications in cells labeling and in vivo imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Jing; He, Zhe [Chemistry Department, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110819 (China); Guo, Changrun [College of Life Sciences, Jilin University, Changchun 130023 (China); Wang, Liping, E-mail: wanglp@jlu.edu.cn [College of Life Sciences, Jilin University, Changchun 130023 (China); Xu, Shukun, E-mail: xushukun46@126.com [Chemistry Department, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110819 (China)

    2014-01-15

    Due to the unique optical and chemical features of quantum dots and the special structural advantages of carbon nanohorns, it is highly desirable to synthesize nanohorns/quantum dots nanocompsite which can be applied in cell labeling and in vivo imaging. Here, we report a new method which uses chitosan as connector to synthesize nanohorns/chitosan/quantum dots fluorescent nanocomposite. Further more, the synthesized nanocomposite demonstrated strong red fluorescence and had been successfully used in Hela cells labeling and in vivo imaging of Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans). -- Highlights: Carbon nanohorn/chitosan/QDs nanocomposite was prepared by covalent linkage The nanocomposite was successfully used in the labeling of HeLa cells The nanocomposite was used for in vivo imaging with C. elegans as animal mode.

  4. Preparation of {sup 14}C-Labeled Multi-walled Carbon Nano-tubes for Biodistribution Investigations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Georgin, D.; Czarny, B.; Botquin, M.; Mayne-L' Hermite, M.; Pinault, M.; Bouchet-Fabre, B.; Carriere, M.; Poncy, J.L.; Chau, Q.; Maximilien, R.; Dive, V.; Taran, F. [CEA, IBITECS, SCBM, 91191 Gif sur Yvette (France); CEA, IBITECS, SIMOPRO, 91191 Gif sur Yvette (FR); CEA, IRAMIS, SPAM, 91191 Gif sur Yvette (FR); CEA, IRAMIS, SCM, 91191 Gif sur Yvette (FR); CEA, IRCM, SREIT, 91680 Bruyeres le Chatel (FR)

    2009-07-01

    A new method allowing the {sup 14}C-labeling of carboxylic acid functions of carbon nano-tubes is described. The key step of the labeling process is a de-carbonylation reaction that has been developed and optimized with the help of a screening method. The optimized process has been successfully applied to multi-walled carbon nano-tubes (MWNTs), and the corresponding {sup 14}C-labeled nano-tubes were used to investigate their in vivo behavior. Preliminary results obtained after i.v. contamination of rats revealed liver as the main target organ. Radiolabeling of NTs with a long-life radioactive nucleus like {sup 14}C, coupled to a highly sensitive autoradiographic method, that provides a unique detection threshold, will make it possible to determine for a long time period whether or not NTs remain in any organs after animal exposure. (authors)

  5. Label-free fluorimetric detection of CEA using carbon dots derived from tomato juice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Hong; Wang, Lan; Zhuo, Yan; Zhou, Zinan; Yang, Xiaoming

    2016-12-15

    A facile-green strategy to synthesize carbon dots (CDs) with a quantum yield (QY) of nearly 13.9% has been built up, while tomato juice served as the carbon source. Interestingly, not only the precursor of CDs and the whole synthesis procedure were environmental-friendly, but this type of CDs also exhibited multiple advantages including high fluorescent QY, excellent photostability, non-toxicity and satisfactory stability. Significantly, a label-free sensitive assay for detecting carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) in a continuous and recyclable way has been proposed on the basis of adsorption and desorption of aptamers by the surface of CDs through a competitive mechanism. To be specific, the richness of carboxyl groups of the CDs enabled strong adsorption of ssDNA to the surface of CDs through π-π stacking interactions, resulting in the effective fluorescence quenching by forming CDs-aptamer complexes. The stronger binding affinity between CEA and CEA-aptamer than the π-π stacking interactions has been taken advantage to achieve immediate recovery of the fluorescence of CDs once CEA was introduced. Thereby, quantitative evaluation of CEA concentration in a broad range from 1ngmL(-1) to 0.5ngmL(-1) with the detection limit of 0.3ngmL(-1) was realized in this way. This strategy can be applied in a recyclable way, broadening the sensing application of CDs with biocompatibility. Besides, the CDs were used for cell imaging, potentiating them towards diverse purposes.

  6. Specific carbon-13 labelling of leucine residues in human growth hormone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christensen, T.; Jensen, E.B.; Junker, F.; Dalboege, H. (Novo Nordisk A/S, Bagsvaerd (Denmark)); Abildgaard, F.; Led, J.J. (Department of Chemistry, University of Copenhagen, The H.C. Oersted Institute (Denmark))

    1992-01-01

    Biosynthetic human growth hormone specifically {sup 13}C-labelled in the carbonyl positions of all 26 leucine residues has been obtained by recombiant DNA techniques using {sup 13}C-labelled leucine and an E. coli strain that requires leucine. It is shown that, on the whole, the labelling is specific with no significant mislabelling as would have been the case had the {sup 13}C-labelled leucine been metabolized. (au).

  7. Preparation of a carbon-11 labelled analgesic -(N-methyl-/sup 11/C)meptazinol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turton, D.R.; Luthra, S.K.; Pike, V.W.; Kensett, M.J.

    1987-09-01

    A procedure for labelling the novel analgesic, meptazinol ((+)1-methyl-3-ethyl-3-(m-hydroxyphenyl)tetrahydroazepine), with the positron-emitting radionuclide, carbon-11 has been developed in order to permit the pharmacokinetics of this analgesic to be studied in man. The procedure involves the reaction of (/sup 11/C)iodomethane with normeptazinol in ethanol, evaporation of any unreacted (/sup 11/C)iodomethane, purification by HPLC and removal of solvent. Subsequent solubilisation of the radioactive product in ethanol plus isotonic saline and sterilisation by filtration produces a safely-injectable solution of (N-methyl- /sup 11/C)meptazinol in 14% radiochemical yield. The specific activity of the product is up to 7.4 GBq/..mu..mol at the end of radiosynthesis. Preparations have been shown to be radiochemically pure and to be free of normeptazinol by analytical HPLC and TLC. That the radioactive product is (N-methyl- /sup 11/C)meptazinol has been unequivocally demonstrated by co-inclusion of /sup 13/C-enriched iodomethane in the radiosynthesis and examination of the product by broad-band proton-decoupled Fourier transform /sup 13/C-NMR spectroscopy.

  8. Acting Globally: Potential Carbon Emissions Mitigation Impacts from an International Standards and Labelling Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McNeil, Michael A; Letschert, Virginie E.; de la Rue du Can, Stephane; Egan, Christine

    2009-05-29

    This paper presents an analysis of the potential impacts of an international initiative designed to support and promote the development and implementation of appliances standards and labelling programs throughout the world. As part of previous research efforts, LBNL developed the Bottom Up Energy Analysis System (BUENAS), an analysis framework that estimates impact potentials of energy efficiency policies on a global scale. In this paper, we apply this framework to an initiative that would result in the successful implementation of programs focused on high priority regions and product types, thus evaluating the potential impacts of such an initiative in terms of electricity savings and carbon mitigation in 2030. In order to model the likely parameters of such a program, we limit impacts to a five year period starting in 2009, but assume that the first 5 years of a program will result in implementation of 'best practice' minimum efficiency performance standards by 2014. The 'high priority' regions considered are: Brazil, China, the European Union,India, Mexico and the United States. The products considered are: refrigerators, air conditioners, lighting (both fluorescent and incandescent), standby power (for consumer electronics) and televisions in the residential sector, and air conditioning and lighting in commercial buildings. In 2020, these regions and enduses account for about 37percent of global residential electricity and 29percent of electricity in commercial buildings. We find that 850Mt of CO2 could be saved in buildings by 2030 compared to the baseline forecast.

  9. Design and Analysis of Nanotube-Based Memory Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andersen David

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In this paper, we proposed a nanoelectromechanical design as memory cells. A simple design contains a double-walled nanotube-based oscillator. Atomistic materials are deposed on the outer nanotube as electrodes. Once the WRITE voltages are applied on electrodes, the induced electromagnetic force can overcome the interlayer friction between the inner and outer tubes so that the oscillator can provide stable oscillations. The READ voltages are employed to indicate logic 0/1 states based on the position of the inner tube. A new continuum modeling is developed in this paper to analyze large models of the proposed nanoelectromechanical design. Our simulations demonstrate the mechanisms of the proposed design as both static and dynamic random memory cells.

  10. Preparation of carbon quantum dots with a high quantum yield and the application in labeling bovine serum albumin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Pengpeng; Zhang, Changchang; Liu, Xiang, E-mail: liuxiang@ahut.edu.cn; Cui, Ping, E-mail: cokecp@sohu.com

    2016-04-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Cheap carbon quantum dots (CQDs) with a high quantum yield were prepared. • The preparation process and surface functionalization on CQDs are rather facile. • Such functionalized CQDs can be attached to BSA covalently. • This predicts that some biomolecules can be labeled by the fluorescent CQDs. - Abstract: An economic and green approach of manufacturing carbon quantum dots (CQDs) with a high quantum yield (denoted with HQY-CQDs) and the application in labeling bovine serum albumin (BSA) were described in detail in this work. Firstly, the cheap resources of citric acid and glycine were pyrolysed in drying oven for preparing the CQDs. Then the product was immersed in tetrahydrofuran for 8 h. HQY-CQDs were obtained by removing tetrahydrofuran from the supernate and were evaluated that they possessed a much higher quantum yield compared with that without dealing with tetrahydrofuran and a wonderful photo-bleaching resistance. Such HQY-CQDs could be functionalized by N-hydroxysuccinimide and successively combined with BSA covalently. Thus fluorescent labeling on BSA was realized. The HQY-CQDs were demonstrated with transmission electron microscopy and the chemical modification with N-hydroxysuccinimide was proved by infrared and X-ray photoelectron spectra. Labeling BSA with the HQY-CQDs was confirmed by gel electrophoresis and fluorescence imaging.

  11. PET imaging of soluble yttrium-86-labeled carbon nanotubes in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael R McDevitt

    Full Text Available The potential medical applications of nanomaterials are shaping the landscape of the nanobiotechnology field and driving it forward. A key factor in determining the suitability of these nanomaterials must be how they interface with biological systems. Single walled carbon nanotubes (CNT are being investigated as platforms for the delivery of biological, radiological, and chemical payloads to target tissues. CNT are mechanically robust graphene cylinders comprised of sp(2-bonded carbon atoms and possessing highly regular structures with defined periodicity. CNT exhibit unique mechanochemical properties that can be exploited for the development of novel drug delivery platforms. In order to evaluate the potential usefulness of this CNT scaffold, we undertook an imaging study to determine the tissue biodistribution and pharmacokinetics of prototypical DOTA-functionalized CNT labeled with yttrium-86 and indium-111 ((86Y-CNT and (111In-CNT, respectively in a mouse model.The (86Y-CNT construct was synthesized from amine-functionalized, water-soluble CNT by covalently attaching multiple copies of DOTA chelates and then radiolabeling with the positron-emitting metal-ion, yttrium-86. A gamma-emitting (111In-CNT construct was similarly prepared and purified. The constructs were characterized spectroscopically, microscopically, and chromatographically. The whole-body distribution and clearance of yttrium-86 was characterized at 3 and 24 hours post-injection using positron emission tomography (PET. The yttrium-86 cleared the blood within 3 hours and distributed predominantly to the kidneys, liver, spleen and bone. Although the activity that accumulated in the kidney cleared with time, the whole-body clearance was slow. Differential uptake in these target tissues was observed following intravenous or intraperitoneal injection.The whole-body PET images indicated that the major sites of accumulation of activity resulting from the administration of (86Y-CNT were

  12. Nanotube-based source of charges for experiments with solid helium at low temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borisenko, D. N.; Walmsley, P. M.; Golov, A. I.; Kolesnikov, N. N.; Kotov, Yu. V.; Levchenko, A. A.; Mezhov-Deglin, L. P.; Fear, M. J.

    2015-07-01

    Methods of preparation of the field-emission sources of charges from carbon nanotubes suitable for study of injected charges in solid helium at low temperatures T nanotubes onto a flat copper substrate or by mechanical rubbing of nanotubes into porous metal surface. The test study of the voltage-current characteristics of a diode cell with the nanotube source in superfluid He II have shown that at voltages above 120 V one can observe a relatively large current I ≥ 10-13 A of negative charges in liquid helium. The field and temperature dependences of positive and negative currents in solid 4He were studied in samples grown by the blocked capillary technique. Usage of the nanotube based source of injected charges had permitted us for the first time to observe motion of the positive charges in solid helium at temperatures below 0.1 K. The current-voltage dependence could be described by a power law I ˜Uα , with the value of the exponent α ≫ 2, much higher than what one would expect for the regime of space charge limited currents.

  13. Multiscale modeling of graphene- and nanotube-based reinforced polymer nanocomposites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montazeri, A. [Computational Physical Sciences Research Laboratory, School of Nano-Science, Institute for Research in Fundamental Sciences (IPM), Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rafii-Tabar, H., E-mail: rafii-tabar@nano.ipm.ac.ir [Computational Physical Sciences Research Laboratory, School of Nano-Science, Institute for Research in Fundamental Sciences (IPM), Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, and Research Centre for Medical Nanotechnology and Tissue Engineering, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Evin, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-10-31

    A combination of molecular dynamics, molecular structural mechanics, and finite element method is employed to compute the elastic constants of a polymeric nanocomposite embedded with graphene sheets, and carbon nanotubes. The model is first applied to study the effect of inclusion of graphene sheets on the Young modulus of the composite. To explore the significance of the nanofiller geometry, the elastic constants of nanotube-based and graphene-based polymer composites are computed under identical conditions. The reinforcement role of these nanofillers is also investigated in transverse directions. Moreover, the dependence of the nanocomposite's axial Young modulus on the presence of ripples on the surface of the embedded graphene sheets, due to thermal fluctuations, is examined via MD simulations. Finally, we have also studied the effect of sliding motion of graphene layers on the elastic constants of the nanocomposite. -- Highlights: → A hierarchical MD/FEM multiscale model of nanocomposites is developed. → At low nanofiller content, graphene layers perform significantly better than CNTs. → Ripples in the graphene layers reduce the Young modulus of nanocomposites. → The elastic moduli is considerably affected by the shear of graphene layers.

  14. 我国食品行业建立食品碳标签标识探析%Study on Establishing Carbon Label of China Food Industry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马爱进; 赵海珍

    2011-01-01

    低碳经济号召下,发展以低能耗、低污染、低排放为基础的低碳食品已成为越来越多人的共识.食品碳足迹分析有助于了解食品生产温室气体碳排放和寻找碳减排策略.本文对食品碳足迹与碳标签相关概念进行了介绍,分析了国内外实施食品碳标签的现状,对我国建立食品碳标签体系的意义进行了阐述,为促进我国食品碳标签体系的发展提供借鉴与参考.%Under the advocacy of low-carbon economy, the development of low power consumption, low pollution, low carbon emission-based food has attracted more and more attention. Food carbon footprint can help companies understand carbon emission of food products and take further feasible measures to reduce it. This paper introduced the related concepts of food carbon footprint and food carbon label, analyzed the status of both domestic and foreign product carbon label, described the significance of establishing food carbon labeling system in China. The paper will provide reference for building the carbon label system of food industry in China.

  15. A synthetic approach to carbon-14 labeled anti-bacterial naphthyridine and quinolone carboxylic acids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ekhato, I.V.; Huang, C.C. (Parke, Davis and Co., Ann Arbor, MI (United States))

    1993-09-01

    Labeled versions of (S)-clinafloxacin (1) and two napththyridine carboxylic acid anti-bacterial compounds 2 and 3 which are currently in development were synthesized. Preparations started from hitherto unknown bromo compounds 22 and 10, from which the corresponding [sup 14]C-labeled aromatic carboxylic acids 23 and 12 were generated by metal-halogen exchange followed by carboxylation reaction. Details of these preparations are given. (author).

  16. Surfactant-free Gd3+-ion-containing carbon nanotube MRI contrast agents for stem cell labeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gizzatov, Ayrat; Hernández-Rivera, Mayra; Keshishian, Vazrik; Mackeyev, Yuri; Law, Justin J.; Guven, Adem; Sethi, Richa; Qu, Feifei; Muthupillai, Raja; Cabreira-Hansen, Maria Da Graça; Willerson, James T.; Perin, Emerson C.; Ma, Qing; Bryant, Robert G.; Wilson, Lon J.

    2015-07-01

    There is an ever increasing interest in developing new stem cell therapies. However, imaging and tracking stem cells in vivo after transplantation remains a serious challenge. In this work, we report new, functionalized and high-performance Gd3+-ion-containing ultra-short carbon nanotube (US-tube) MRI contrast agent (CA) materials which are highly-water-dispersible (ca. 35 mg ml-1) without the need of a surfactant. The new materials have extremely high T1-weighted relaxivities of 90 (mM s)-1 per Gd3+ ion at 1.5 T at room temperature and have been used to safely label porcine bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells for MR imaging. The labeled cells display excellent image contrast in phantom imaging experiments, and TEM images of the labeled cells, in general, reveal small clusters of the CA material located within the cytoplasm with 109 Gd3+ ions per cell.There is an ever increasing interest in developing new stem cell therapies. However, imaging and tracking stem cells in vivo after transplantation remains a serious challenge. In this work, we report new, functionalized and high-performance Gd3+-ion-containing ultra-short carbon nanotube (US-tube) MRI contrast agent (CA) materials which are highly-water-dispersible (ca. 35 mg ml-1) without the need of a surfactant. The new materials have extremely high T1-weighted relaxivities of 90 (mM s)-1 per Gd3+ ion at 1.5 T at room temperature and have been used to safely label porcine bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells for MR imaging. The labeled cells display excellent image contrast in phantom imaging experiments, and TEM images of the labeled cells, in general, reveal small clusters of the CA material located within the cytoplasm with 109 Gd3+ ions per cell. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: NMRD profiles, the Fourier transforms of the EXAFS data, EXAFS curve fitting data, cell viability data. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr02078f

  17. Seasonal variations of belowground carbon transfer assessed by in situ 13CO2 pulse labelling of trees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epron, D.; Ngao, J.; Dannoura, M.; Bakker, M. R.; Zeller, B.; Bazot, S.; Bosc, A.; Plain, C.; Lata, J. C.; Priault, P.; Barthes, L.; Loustau, D.

    2011-05-01

    Soil CO2 efflux is the main source of CO2 from forest ecosystems and it is tightly coupled to the transfer of recent photosynthetic assimilates belowground and their metabolism in roots, mycorrhiza and rhizosphere microorganisms feeding on root-derived exudates. The objective of our study was to assess patterns of belowground carbon allocation among tree species and along seasons. Pure 13CO2 pulse labelling of the entire crown of three different tree species (beech, oak and pine) was carried out at distinct phenological stages. Excess 13C in soil CO2 efflux was tracked using tuneable diode laser absorption spectrometry to determine time lags between the start of the labelling and the appearance of 13C in soil CO2 efflux and the amount of 13C allocated to soil CO2 efflux. Isotope composition (δ13C) of CO2 respired by fine roots and soil microbes was measured at several occasions after labelling, together with δ13C of bulk root tissue and microbial carbon. Time lags ranged from 0.5 to 1.3 days in beech and oak and were longer in pine (1.6-2.7 days during the active growing season, more than 4 days during the resting season), and the transfer of C to the microbial biomass was as fast as to the fine roots. The amount of 13C allocated to soil CO2 efflux was estimated from a compartment model. It varied between 1 and 21 % of the amount of 13CO2 taken up by the crown, depending on the species and the season. While rainfall exclusion that moderately decreased soil water content did not affect the pattern of carbon allocation to soil CO2 efflux in beech, seasonal patterns of carbon allocation belowground differed markedly between species, with pronounced seasonal variations in pine and beech. In beech, it may reflect competition with the strength of other sinks (aboveground growth in late spring and storage in late summer) that were not observed in oak. We report a fast transfer of recent photosynthates to the mycorhizosphere and we conclude that the patterns of carbon

  18. Seasonal variations of belowground carbon transfer assessed by in situ 13CO2 pulse labelling of trees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Barthes

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Soil CO2 efflux is the main source of CO2 from forest ecosystems and it is tightly coupled to the transfer of recent photosynthetic assimilates belowground and their metabolism in roots, mycorrhiza and rhizosphere microorganisms feeding on root-derived exudates. The objective of our study was to assess patterns of belowground carbon allocation among tree species and along seasons. Pure 13CO2 pulse labelling of the entire crown of three different tree species (beech, oak and pine was carried out at distinct phenological stages. Excess 13C in soil CO2 efflux was tracked using tuneable diode laser absorption spectrometry to determine time lags between the start of the labelling and the appearance of 13C in soil CO2 efflux and the amount of 13C allocated to soil CO2 efflux. Isotope composition (δ13C of CO2 respired by fine roots and soil microbes was measured at several occasions after labelling, together with δ13C of bulk root tissue and microbial carbon. Time lags ranged from 0.5 to 1.3 days in beech and oak and were longer in pine (1.6–2.7 days during the active growing season, more than 4 days during the resting season, and the transfer of C to the microbial biomass was as fast as to the fine roots. The amount of 13C allocated to soil CO2 efflux was estimated from a compartment model. It varied between 1 and 21 % of the amount of 13CO2 taken up by the crown, depending on the species and the season. While rainfall exclusion that moderately decreased soil water content did not affect the pattern of carbon allocation to soil CO2 efflux in beech, seasonal patterns of carbon allocation belowground differed markedly between species, with pronounced seasonal variations in pine and beech. In beech, it may reflect competition with the strength of other sinks (aboveground growth in late spring and storage in late summer that were not observed in oak. We report a fast transfer of recent photosynthates to the mycorhizosphere and we conclude that the

  19. Preparation of carbon quantum dots with a high quantum yield and the application in labeling bovine serum albumin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Pengpeng; Zhang, Changchang; Liu, Xiang; Cui, Ping

    2016-04-01

    An economic and green approach of manufacturing carbon quantum dots (CQDs) with a high quantum yield (denoted with HQY-CQDs) and the application in labeling bovine serum albumin (BSA) were described in detail in this work. Firstly, the cheap resources of citric acid and glycine were pyrolysed in drying oven for preparing the CQDs. Then the product was immersed in tetrahydrofuran for 8 h. HQY-CQDs were obtained by removing tetrahydrofuran from the supernate and were evaluated that they possessed a much higher quantum yield compared with that without dealing with tetrahydrofuran and a wonderful photo-bleaching resistance. Such HQY-CQDs could be functionalized by N-hydroxysuccinimide and successively combined with BSA covalently. Thus fluorescent labeling on BSA was realized. The HQY-CQDs were demonstrated with transmission electron microscopy and the chemical modification with N-hydroxysuccinimide was proved by infrared and X-ray photoelectron spectra. Labeling BSA with the HQY-CQDs was confirmed by gel electrophoresis and fluorescence imaging.

  20. Correlative Fluorescence and Scanning Electron Microscopy of Labelled Core Fucosylated Glycans Using Cryosections Mounted on Carbon-Patterned Glass Slides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vancová, Marie; Nebesářová, Jana

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study is co-localization of N-glycans with fucose attached to N-acetylglucosamine in α1,3 linkage, that belong to immunogenic carbohydrate epitopes in humans, and N-glycans with α1,6-core fucose typical for mammalian type of N-linked glycosylation. Both glycan epitopes were labelled in cryosections of salivary glands isolated from the tick Ixodes ricinus. Salivary glands secrete during feeding many bioactive molecules and influence both successful feeding and transmission of tick-borne pathogens. For accurate and reliable localization of labelled glycans in both fluorescence and scanning electron microscopes, we used carbon imprints of finder or indexed EM grids on glass slides. We discuss if the topographical images can provide information about labelled structures, the working setting of the field-emission scanning electron microscope and the influence of the detector selection (a below-the-lens Autrata improved YAG detector of back-scattered electrons; in-lens and conventional Everhart-Thornley detectors of secondary electrons) on the imaging of gold nanoparticles, quantum dots and osmium-stained membranes.

  1. Correlative Fluorescence and Scanning Electron Microscopy of Labelled Core Fucosylated Glycans Using Cryosections Mounted on Carbon-Patterned Glass Slides.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Vancová

    Full Text Available The aim of the study is co-localization of N-glycans with fucose attached to N-acetylglucosamine in α1,3 linkage, that belong to immunogenic carbohydrate epitopes in humans, and N-glycans with α1,6-core fucose typical for mammalian type of N-linked glycosylation. Both glycan epitopes were labelled in cryosections of salivary glands isolated from the tick Ixodes ricinus. Salivary glands secrete during feeding many bioactive molecules and influence both successful feeding and transmission of tick-borne pathogens. For accurate and reliable localization of labelled glycans in both fluorescence and scanning electron microscopes, we used carbon imprints of finder or indexed EM grids on glass slides. We discuss if the topographical images can provide information about labelled structures, the working setting of the field-emission scanning electron microscope and the influence of the detector selection (a below-the-lens Autrata improved YAG detector of back-scattered electrons; in-lens and conventional Everhart-Thornley detectors of secondary electrons on the imaging of gold nanoparticles, quantum dots and osmium-stained membranes.

  2. Propionyl-l-carnitine: Labelling in the N-methyl position with Carbon-11 and pharmacokinetic studies in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davenport, Raymond J.; Law, Marilyn P.; Pike, Victor W.; Osman, Safiye; Poole, Keith G

    1995-08-01

    The prospective therapeutic, propionyl-l-carnitine, was labelled in the N-methyl position with the positron-emitter, carbon-11 (t{sub (1(2))} = 20.4 min), with a view to studying its pharmacokinetics in humans using PET. Labelling was achieved by methylating nor-propionyl-l-carnitine hydrochloride with no-carrier-added [{sup 11}C]iodomethane (produced from cyclotron-produced [{sup 11}C]carbon dioxide) in ethanol in the presence of 1,2,2,6,6,-pentamethylpiperidine. HPLC of the reaction mixture on a strong cation exchange column provided high purity [N-methyl-{sup 11}C]propionyl-l-carnitine in 62% radiochemical yield (decay-corrected from [{sup 11}C]iodomethane), ready for intravenous administration within 35 min from the end of radionuclide production. [N-methyl-{sup 11}C]Propionyl-l-carnitine, given intravenously to rats, cleared rapidly from plasma. A slow uptake of radioactivity into myocardium and striated muscle was observed. In plasma, unchanged tracer represented 84% of the radioactivity at 2.5 min and 2.5% of the radioactivity at 60 min. In heart, unchanged tracer represented 18% of radioactivity at 2.5 min and 2.4% at 15 min. The remainder of radioactivity detected in plasma and heart was identified as [N-methyl-{sup 11}C]l-carnitine and [N-methyl-{sup 11}C]acetyl-l-carnitine.

  3. Asymmetric Synthesis of Carbon-11 Labelled alpha-Amino Acids for PET

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Popkov, Alexander; Elsinga, Philip H.

    2013-01-01

    For PET applications in oncological and neurological diagnostics, amino acids have been studied both clinically and pre-clinically during the last 35 years. Nowadays two applications of labelled amino acids for visualisation of tumours attract the main attention: [C-11] or [F-18]amino acids as

  4. Pharmaceutical preparation of oxygen-15 labelled molecular oxygen and carbon monoxide gasses in a hospital setting.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luurtsema, Geert; Boellaard, Ronald; Greuter, Henri; Rijbroek, Abraham; Takkenkamp, Kevin; de Geest, Frank; Buijs, Fred; Hendrikse, NH; Franssen, Eric; van Lingen, Arthur; Lammertsma, Adriaan A.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Clinical positron emission tomography (PET) requires safe and effective PET radiopharmaceuticals. Tracers used for measuring oxygen consumption and blood volume are [(15)O]O(2) and [(15)O]CO, respectively. In general, these oxygen-15 labelled tracers are produced using a cyclotron that a

  5. Asymmetric Synthesis of Carbon-11 Labelled alpha-Amino Acids for PET

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Popkov, Alexander; Elsinga, Philip H.

    2013-01-01

    For PET applications in oncological and neurological diagnostics, amino acids have been studied both clinically and pre-clinically during the last 35 years. Nowadays two applications of labelled amino acids for visualisation of tumours attract the main attention: [C-11] or [F-18]amino acids as subst

  6. Spatiotemporal transfer of carbon-14-labelled photosynthate from ectomycorrhizal Pinus densiflora seedlings to extraradical mycelia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Bingyun; Nara, Kazuhide; Hogetsu, Taizo

    2002-04-01

    Seedlings of Pinus densiflora colonized by an unidentified ectomycorrhizal fungus (T01) were labelled photosynthetically with 14C. Movement of 14C-labelled photosynthates within the underground part of the seedlings was investigated by temporal autoradiography using an imaging plate. Within 1 day, 14C was transferred from the shoot to the underground part that included roots, mycorrhizae, and the extraradical mycelium; within 3 days, the 14C in the underground part reached its maximum density. Mycorrhizae and actively growing root tips were large C sinks. Three days after 14C labelling, counts of 14C radioactivity in the underground part of the mycorrhizal seedlings were 2.6 times those of nonmycorrhizal seedlings. The mycorrhizae of mycorrhizal plants accumulated 5.2 times the 14C counts in the short-root tips of nonmycorrhizal plants. 14C counts in various areas of the extraradical mycelium demonstrated that all 14C-photosynthate transfer from the host root to the extraradical mycelium occurred within 3 days after 14C labelling, and that there was only a short lag of < 1 day between 14C accumulation in the basal and distal parts of the mycelium. Although more 14C accumulated in the distal than in the basal parts, 14C counts per unit hyphal biomass were similar between the two. These results suggest that 14C spread rapidly throughout the entire mycelium. Thirteen days after 14C labelling, we estimated 14C allocation to extraradical mycelia by taking autoradiographs after removing host roots. About 24% of 14C counts in the underground part of the mycorrhizal seedlings had been allocated to extraradical mycelia in this system, indicating that the fugal mycelium is an important sink for photosynthates.

  7. NMR experiments for the measurement of proton-proton and carbon-carbon residual dipolar couplings in uniformly labelled oligosaccharides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin-Pastor, Manuel [Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, Laboratorio Integral de Estructura de Biomoleculas Jose. R. Carracido, Unidade de Resonancia Magnetica, RIAIDT (Spain)], E-mail: mmartin@usc.es; Canales-Mayordomo, Angeles; Jimenez-Barbero, Jesus [Departamento de Estructura y funcion de proteinas, Centro de Investigaciones Biologicas, CSIC (Spain)], E-mail: jjbarbero@cib.csic.es

    2003-08-15

    A 2D-HSQC-carbon selective/proton selective-constant time COSY, 2D-HSQC-(sel C, sel H)-CT COSY experiment, which is applicable to uniformly {sup 13}C isotopically enriched samples (U-{sup 13}C) of oligosaccharides or oligonucleotides is proposed for the measurement of proton-proton RDC in crowded regions of 2D-spectra. In addition, a heteronuclear constant time-COSY experiment, {sup 13}C-{sup 13}C CT-COSY, is proposed for the measurement of one bond carbon-carbon RDC in these molecules. These two methods provide an extension, to U-{sup 13}C molecules, of the original homonuclear constant time-COSY experiment proposed by Tian et al. (1999) for saccharides. The combination of a number of these RDC with NOE data may provide the method of choice to study oligosaccharide conformation in the free and receptor-bound state.

  8. Preferred carbon precursors for lipid labelling in the heterotrophic endosperm of developing oat (Avena sativa L.) grains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimberg, Åsa

    2014-10-01

    Oat (Avena sativa L.) is unusual among the cereal grains in storing high amounts of oil in the endosperm; up to 90% of total grain oil. By using oat as a model species for oil metabolism in the cereal endosperm, we can learn how to develop strategies to redirect carbon from starch to achieve high-oil yielding cereal crops. Carbon precursors for lipid synthesis were compared in two genetically close oat cultivars with different endosperm oil content (about 6% and 10% of grain dw, medium-oil; MO, and high-oil; HO cultivar, respectively) by supplying a variety of (14)C-labelled substrates to the grain from both up- and downstream parts of glycolysis, either through detached oat panicles in vitro or by direct injection in planta. When supplied by direct injection, (14)C from acetate was identified to label the lipid fraction of the grain to the highest extent among substrates tested; 46% of net accumulated (14)C, demonstrating its applicability as a marker for lipids in the endosperm. Time course analyses of injected (14)C acetate during grain development suggested a more efficient transfer of fatty acids from polar lipids to triacylglycerol in the HO as compared to the MO cultivar, and turnover of triacylglycerol was suggested to not play a major role for the final oil content of oat grain endosperm despite the low amount of protective oleosins in this tissue. Moreover, availability of light was shown to drastically affect grain net carbon accumulation from (14)C-sucrose when supplied through detached panicles for the HO cultivar.

  9. Laser capture microdissection and genetic analysis of carbon-labeled Kupffer cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Stephan Gehring; Edmond Sabo; Maryann E San Martin; Elizabeth M Dickson; Chao-Wen Cheng; Stephen H Gregory

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To develop a method of labeling and microdissecting mouse Kupffer cells within an extraordinarily short period of time using laser capture microdissection (LCM). METHODS: Tissues are complex structures comprised of a heterogeneous population of interconnected cells. LCM offers a method of isolating a single cell type from specific regions of a tissue section. LCM is an essential approach used in conjunction with molecular analysis to study the functional interaction of cells in their native tissue environment. The process of labeling and acquiring cells by LCM prior to mRNA isolation can be elaborate, thereby subjecting the RNA to considerable degradation. Kupffer cell labeling is achieved by injecting India ink intravenously, thus circumventing the need for in vitro staining. The significance of this novel approach was validated using a cholestatic liver injury model. RESULTS: mRNA extracted from the microdissected cell population displayed marked increases in colonystimulating factor-1 receptor and Kupffer cell receptor message expression, which demonstrated Kupffer cell enrichment. Gene expression by Kupffer cells derived from bile-duct-ligated, versus sham-operated, mice was compared. Microarray analysis revealed a significant (2.5-fold, q value < 10) change in 493 genes. Based on this fold-change and a standardized PubMed search, 10 genes were identified that were relevant to the ability of Kupffer cells to suppress liver injury.CONCLUSION: The methodology outlined herein provides an approach to isolating high quality RNA from Kupffer cells, without altering the tissue integrity.

  10. Carbon nanomaterial-based electrochemical biosensors for label-free sensing of environmental pollutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramnani, Pankaj; Saucedo, Nuvia M; Mulchandani, Ashok

    2016-01-01

    Carbon allotropes such as graphene and carbon nanotubes, have been incorporated in electrochemical biosensors for highly sensitive and selective detection of various analytes. The superior physical and electrical properties like high carrier mobility, ambipolar electric field effect, high surface area, flexibility and their compatibility with microfabrication techniques makes these carbon nanomaterials easy to integrate in field-effect transistor (FET)/chemiresistor type configuration which is suitable for portable and point-of-use/field-deployable sensors. This review covers the synthesis of carbon nanostructures (graphene and CNTs) and their integration into devices using various fabrication methods. Finally, we discuss the recent reports showing different sensing platforms that incorporate biomolecules like enzymes, antibodies and aptamers as recognition elements for fabrication of simple, low cost, compact biosensors that can be used for on-site, rapid environmental monitoring of environmental pollutants like pathogens, heavy metals, pesticides and explosives. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Label-free SERS detection of relevant bioanalytes on silver-coated carbon nanotubes: The case of cocaine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanles-Sobrido, Marcos; Rodríguez-Lorenzo, Laura; Lorenzo-Abalde, Silvia; González-Fernández, África; Correa-Duarte, Miguel A.; Alvarez-Puebla, Ramón A.; Liz-Marzán, Luis M.

    2009-09-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopy can be used for the label-free determination and quantification of relevant small biometabolites that are hard to identify by conventional immunological methods, in the absence of labelling. In this work, detection is based on monitoring the vibrational changes occurring at a specific biointerface (a monoclonal antibody, mAb) supported on silver-coated carbon nanotubes (CNT@Ag). Engineered CNT@Ag play a key role, as they offer a stable substrate to support the biointerface, with a high density of hot spots. Proof of concept is demonstrated through the analysis and quantification of the main cocaine metabolite benzoylecgonine. These results open a new avenue toward the generation of portable sensors for fast ultradetection and quantification of relevant metabolites. The use of discrete particles (CNT@Ag@mAb) rather than rough films, or other conventional SERS supports, will also enable a safe remote interrogation of highly toxic sources in environmental problems or in biological fluids.Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopy can be used for the label-free determination and quantification of relevant small biometabolites that are hard to identify by conventional immunological methods, in the absence of labelling. In this work, detection is based on monitoring the vibrational changes occurring at a specific biointerface (a monoclonal antibody, mAb) supported on silver-coated carbon nanotubes (CNT@Ag). Engineered CNT@Ag play a key role, as they offer a stable substrate to support the biointerface, with a high density of hot spots. Proof of concept is demonstrated through the analysis and quantification of the main cocaine metabolite benzoylecgonine. These results open a new avenue toward the generation of portable sensors for fast ultradetection and quantification of relevant metabolites. The use of discrete particles (CNT@Ag@mAb) rather than rough films, or other conventional SERS supports, will also

  12. Carbon transfer, partitioning and residence time in the plant-soil system: a comparison of two 13CO2 labelling techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studer, M. S.; Siegwolf, R. T. W.; Abiven, S.

    2014-03-01

    Various 13CO2 labelling approaches exist to trace carbon (C) dynamics in plant-soil systems. However, it is not clear if the different approaches yield the same results. Moreover, there is no consistent way of data analysis to date. In this study we compare with the same experimental setup the two main techniques: pulse and continuous labelling. We evaluate how these techniques perform to estimate the C transfer time, the C partitioning along time and the C residence time in different plant-soil compartments. We used identical plant-soil systems (Populus deltoides × nigra, Cambisol soil) to compare the pulse labelling approach (exposure to 99 atom % 13CO2 for three hours, traced for eight days) with a continuous labelling (exposure to 10 atom % 13CO2, traced for 14 days). The experiments were conducted in climate chambers under controlled environmental conditions. Before label addition and at four successive sampling dates, the plant-soil systems were destructively harvested, separated into leaves, petioles, stems, cuttings, roots and soil and soil microbial biomass was extracted. The soil CO2 efflux was sampled throughout the experiment. To model the C dynamics we used an exponential function to describe the 13C signal decline after pulse labelling. For the evaluation of the 13C distribution during the continuous labelling we applied a logistic function. Pulse labelling is best suited to assess the minimum C transfer time from the leaves to other compartments, while continuous labelling can be used to estimate the mean transfer time through a compartment, including short-term storage pools. The C partitioning between the plant-soil compartments obtained was similar for both techniques, but the time of sampling had a large effect: shortly after labelling the allocation into leaves was overestimated and the soil 13CO2 efflux underestimated. The results of belowground C partitioning were consistent for the two techniques only after eight days of labelling, when the

  13. Construction of magnetic-carbon-quantum-dots-probe-labeled apoferritin nanocages for bioimaging and targeted therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Yao HC; Su L.; Zeng M; Cao L.; Zhao WW; Chen CQ; Du B; Zhou J

    2016-01-01

    Hanchun Yao,1,2 Li Su,1 Man Zeng,1 Li Cao,1 Weiwei Zhao,1 Chengqun Chen,3 Bin Du,1,2 Jie Zhou1,2 1School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Zhengzhou University, 2Collaborative Innovation Center of Drug Research and Safety Evaluation, Henan Province, 3Department of Pharmacy, The First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Carbon dots (CDs) are one of the most highlighted carbon-based materials for biological applications, such as opt...

  14. In vivo kinetics and displacement study of a carbon-11-labeled hallucinogen, N,N-(/sup 11/C)dimethyltryptamine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yanai, Kazuhiko; Ido, Tatsuo; Ishiwata, Kiichi; Takahashi, Toshihiro; Iwata, Ren; Hatazawa, Jun; Matsuzawa, Taiju

    1986-07-01

    The endogenous hallucinogen, N,N-dimethyltryptamine (DMT), was labeled with carbon-11 and its regional distribution in rat brain studied. (/sup 11/C)DMT showed higher accumulation in the cerebral cortex, caudate putamen, and amygdaloid nuclei. Studies of the subcellular distribution of (/sup 11/C)DMT revealed the specific localization in the fractions enriched with serotonin receptors only when a very low dose was injected into rats. The proportions of the radioactivity in receptor-rich fractions were greatly enhanced by pretreatment with the monoamine oxidase inhibitor, pargyline. Specific binding of (/sup 11/C)DMT to serotonin receptors in dog brain was demonstrated by a positron emission tomographic study in which 5-methoxy-N,N-dimethyltryptamine caused approximately 20% displacement of the radioligand from the receptors.

  15. Detection of Cu2+ in Water Based on Histidine-Gold Labeled Multiwalled Carbon Nanotube Electrochemical Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rilong Zhu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on the strong interaction between histidine and copper ions and the signal enhancement effect of gold-labeling carbon nanotubes, an electrochemical sensor is established and used to measure copper ions in river water. In this study the results show that the concentrations of copper ion have well linear relationship with the peak current in the range of 10−11–10−7 mol/L, and the limit of detection is 10−12 mol/L. When using this method to detect copper ions in the Xiangjiang River, the test results are consistent with the atomic absorption method. This study shows that the sensor is convenient to be used in daily monitoring of copper ions in river water.

  16. Detection of Cu2+ in Water Based on Histidine-Gold Labeled Multiwalled Carbon Nanotube Electrochemical Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Rilong; Zhou, Gangqiang; Tang, Fengxia; Wang, Yeyao

    2017-01-01

    Based on the strong interaction between histidine and copper ions and the signal enhancement effect of gold-labeling carbon nanotubes, an electrochemical sensor is established and used to measure copper ions in river water. In this study the results show that the concentrations of copper ion have well linear relationship with the peak current in the range of 10−11–10−7 mol/L, and the limit of detection is 10−12 mol/L. When using this method to detect copper ions in the Xiangjiang River, the test results are consistent with the atomic absorption method. This study shows that the sensor is convenient to be used in daily monitoring of copper ions in river water.

  17. Ultrasensitive enzyme-free immunoassay for squamous cell carcinoma antigen using carbon supported Pd-Au as electrocatalytic labels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jian; Du, Bin; Zhang, Xiaoyue; Guo, Aiping; Zhang, Yong; Wu, Dan; Ma, Hongmin; Wei, Qin

    2014-06-23

    A novel nonenzymatic sandwich-type electrochemical immunosensor has been developed to detect squamous cell carcinoma antigen (SCCA). Nitrogen-doped graphene sheet (N-GS) was used to increase capacity of capturing primary antibodies (Ab1). Carbon-supported Pd-Au binary nanoparticles (Pd-Au/C) were synthesized and used to label secondary antibodies (Ab2). The specific binding of SCCA and antibodies enabled a quantitative attachment of Pd-Au/C on the electrode surface. Electrocatalytic analysis showed that the prepared Pd-Au/C exhibit excellent electrocatalytic activity towards hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). We use current response of electrocatalytic labels Pd-Au/C to detect the concentration of SCCA. The unique nonenzymatic immunosensor exhibits a relatively wide linear range from 0.005 to 2 ng mL(-1) and high sensitivity with a low detection limit of 1.7 pg mL(-1). The immunsensor also shows good reproducibility (4.2%) and stability (5.8%), which makes it an enormous application prospect in clinical research.

  18. Design, synthesis and evaluation of (18)F-labeled cationic carbonic anhydrase IX inhibitors for PET imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhengxing; Lau, Joseph; Zhang, Chengcheng; Colpo, Nadine; Nocentini, Alessio; Supuran, Claudiu T; Bénard, François; Lin, Kuo-Shyan

    2017-12-01

    Carbonic anhydrase IX (CA-IX) is a marker for tumor hypoxia, and its expression is negatively correlated with patient survival. CA-IX represents a potential target for eliminating hypoxic cancers. We synthesized fluorinated cationic sulfonamide inhibitors 1-3 designed to target CA-IX. The binding affinity for CA-IX ranged from 0.22 to 0.96 μM. We evaluated compound 2 as a diagnostic PET imaging agent. Compound 2 was radiolabeled with (18)F in 10 ± 4% decay-corrected radiochemical yield with 85.1 ± 70.3 GBq/μmol specific activity and >98% radiochemical purity. (18)F-labeled 2 was stable in mouse plasma at 37 °C after 1 h incubation. PET/CT imaging was conducted at 1 h post-injection in a human colorectal cancer xenograft model. (18)F-labeled 2 cleared through hepatobiliary and renal pathways. Tumor uptake was approximately 0.41 ± 0.06% ID/g, with a tumor-to-muscle ratio of 1.99 ± 0.25. Subsequently, tumor xenografts were visualized with moderate contrast. This study demonstrates the use of a cationic motif for conferring isoform selectively for CA-IX imaging agents.

  19. Stable carbon isotope labeling reveals different carry-over effects between functional types of tropical trees in an Ethiopian mountain forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krepkowski, Julia; Gebrekirstos, Aster; Shibistova, Olga; Bräuning, Achim

    2013-07-01

    We present an intra-annual stable carbon isotope (δ(13)C) study based on a labeling experiment to illustrate differences in temporal patterns of recent carbon allocation to wood structures of two functional types of trees, Podocarpus falcatus (a late-successional evergreen conifer) and Croton macrostachyus (a deciduous broadleaved pioneer tree), in a tropical mountain forest in Ethiopia. Dendrometer data, wood anatomical thin sections, and intra-annual δ(13)C analyses were applied. Isotope data revealed a clear annual growth pattern in both studied species. For P. falcatus, it was possible to synchronize annual δ(13) C peaks, wood anatomical structures and monthly precipitation patterns. The labeling signature was evident for three consecutive years. For C. macrostachyus, isotope data illustrate a rapid decline of the labeling signal within half a year. Our δ(13)C labeling study indicates a distinct difference in carryover effects between trees of different functional types. A proportion of the labeled δ(13)C is stored in reserves of wood parenchyma for up to 3 yr in P. falcatus. By contrast, C. macrostachyus shows a high turnover of assimilates and a carbon carryover effect is only detectable in the subsequent year.

  20. Nanotube-based Sensors and Systems for Outer Planetary Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noca, F.; Hunt, B. D.; Hoenk, M. E.; Choi, D.; Kowalczyk, R.; Williams, R.; Xu, J.; Koumoutsakos, P.

    2001-01-01

    Direct sensing and processing at the nanometer scale offer NASA the opportunity to expand its capabilities in deep space exploration, particularly for the search for signatures of life, the analysis of planetary oceans and atmospheres, and communications systems. Carbon nanotubes, with their unique mechanical, electrical, and radiation-tolerant properties, are a promising tool for this exploration. We are developing devices based on carbon nanotubes, including sensors, actuators, and oscillators. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  1. Direct uptake of organic carbon by grass roots and allocation in leaves and phytoliths: 13C labeling evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandre, A.; Balesdent, J.; Cazevieille, P.; Chevassus-Rosset, C.; Signoret, P.; Mazur, J.-C.; Harutyunyan, A.; Doelsch, E.; Basile-Doelsch, I.; Miche, H.; Santos, G. M.

    2015-12-01

    In the rhizosphere, the uptake of low molecular weight carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) by plant roots has been well documented. While organic N uptake relatively to total uptake is important, organic C uptake is supposed to be low relatively to the plant's C budget. Recently, radiocarbon analyses demonstrated that a fraction of C from the soil was occluded in amorphous silica micrometric particles that precipitate in plant cells (phytoliths). Here, we investigated whether and in which extent organic C absorbed by grass roots, under the form of either intact amino acids (AAs) or microbial metabolites, can feed the organic C occluded in phytoliths. For this purpose we added 13C- and 15N-labeled AAs to the silicon-rich hydroponic solution of the grass Festuca arundinacea. The experiment was designed to prevent C leakage from the labeled nutritive solution to the chamber atmosphere. After 14 days of growth, the 13C and 15N enrichments (13C-excess and 15N-excess) in the roots, stems and leaves, and phytoliths, as well as the 13C-excess in AAs extracted from roots and stems and leaves, were quantified relatively to a control experiment in which no labelled AAs were added. The net uptake of 13C derived from the labeled AAs supplied to the nutritive solution (AA-13C) by Festuca arundinacea represented 4.5 % of the total AA-13C supply. AA-13C fixed in the plant represented only 0.13 % of total C. However, the experimental conditions may have underestimated the extent of the process under natural and field conditions. Previous studies showed that 15N and 13C can be absorbed by the roots in several organic and inorganic forms. In the present experiment, the fact that phenylalanine and methionine, that were supplied in high amount to the nutritive solution, were more 13C-enriched than other AAs in the roots and stems and leaves strongly suggested that part of AA-13C was absorbed and translocated in its original AA form. The concentration of AA-13C represented only 0.15 % of the

  2. Direct uptake of organically derived carbon by grass roots and allocation in leaves and phytoliths: 13C labeling evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandre, Anne; Balesdent, Jérôme; Cazevieille, Patrick; Chevassus-Rosset, Claire; Signoret, Patrick; Mazur, Jean-Charles; Harutyunyan, Araks; Doelsch, Emmanuel; Basile-Doelsch, Isabelle; Miche, Hélène; Santos, Guaciara M.

    2016-03-01

    In the rhizosphere, the uptake of low-molecular-weight carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) by plant roots has been well documented. While organic N uptake relative to total uptake is important, organic C uptake is supposed to be low relative to the plant's C budget. Recently, radiocarbon analyses demonstrated that a fraction of C from the soil was occluded in amorphous silica micrometric particles that precipitate in plant cells (phytoliths). Here, we investigated whether and to what extent organically derived C absorbed by grass roots can feed the C occluded in phytoliths. For this purpose we added 13C- and 15N-labeled amino acids (AAs) to the silicon-rich hydroponic solution of the grass Festuca arundinacea. The experiment was designed to prevent C leakage from the labeled nutritive solution to the chamber atmosphere. After 14 days of growth, the 13C and 15N enrichments (13C excess and 15N excess) in the roots, stems and leaves as well as phytoliths were measured relative to a control experiment in which no labeled AAs were added. Additionally, the 13C excess was measured at the molecular level, in AAs extracted from roots and stems and leaves. The net uptake of labeled AA-derived 13C reached 4.5 % of the total AA 13C supply. The amount of AA-derived 13C fixed in the plant was minor but not nil (0.28 and 0.10 % of total C in roots and stems/leaves, respectively). Phenylalanine and methionine that were supplied in high amounts to the nutritive solution were more 13C-enriched than other AAs in the plant. This strongly suggested that part of AA-derived 13C was absorbed and translocated into the plant in its original AA form. In phytoliths, AA-derived 13C was detected. Its concentration was on the same order of magnitude as in bulk stems and leaves (0.15 % of the phytolith C). This finding strengthens the body of evidences showing that part of organic compounds occluded in phytoliths can be fed by C entering the plant through the roots. Although this experiment was done in

  3. Metabolism of carbon-14-labeled benzene and toluene in avocado fruit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jansen, E.F.; Olson, A.C.

    1969-01-01

    The method of exposing avocado fruit to /sup 14/C labeled benzene or toluene was as follows. Fuerte variety avocado fruit was used. It was exposed to the vapor of the hydrocarbons which were circulated in a container. Three mature preclimacteric fruit were used in each experiment. The nonvolatile metabolites from both hydrocarbons were separated into classes of compounds by their solution in water, separation of lipids, and passage of the aqueous solution through ion exchange columns. The results indicate that in avocados the relatively inert hydrocarbons benzene and toluene are metabolized to a series of compounds, toluene to a greater extent than benzene. Both are metabolized to a small but significant extent to CO/sub 2/. 7 references, 2 tables.

  4. Validation in an animal model of the carbon 13-labeled mixed triglyceride breath test for the detection of intestinal fat malabsorption

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kalivianakis, M; Elstrodt, J; Havinga, R; Kuipers, F; Stellaard, F; Sauer, PJJ; Vonk, RJ; Verkade, HJ

    1999-01-01

    Objective: To determine, in a rat model of fat malabsorption, the potency of the carbon 13-labeled mixed triglyceride (C-13-MTG) breath test as a noninvasive, patient-friendly replacement for classic fat balance studies, Study design: Comparison of the percentage of Fat absorption, detected by fat b

  5. Label-Free Detection of Cardiac Troponin-I Using Carbon Nanofiber Based Nanoelectrode Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Periyakaruppan, Adaikkappan; Koehne, Jessica Erin; Gandhiraman, Ram P.; Meyyappan, M.

    2013-01-01

    A sensor platform based on vertically aligned carbon nanofibers (CNFs) has been developed. Their inherent nanometer scale, high conductivity, wide potential window, good biocompatibility and well-defined surface chemistry make them ideal candidates as biosensor electrodes. A carbon nanofiber (CNF) multiplexed array has been fabricated with 9 sensing pads, each containing 40,000 carbon nanofibers as nanoelectrodes. Here, we report the use of vertically aligned CNF nanoelectrodes for the detection of cardiac Troponin-I for the early diagnosis of myocardial infarction. Antibody, antitroponin, probe immobilization and subsequent binding to human cardiac troponin-I were characterized using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry techniques. Each step of the modification process resulted in changes in electrical capacitance or resistance to charge transfer due to the changes at the electrode surface upon antibody immobilization and binding to the specific antigen. This sensor demonstrates high sensitivity, down to 0.2 ng/mL, and good selectivity making this platform a good candidate for early stage diagnosis of myocardial infarction.

  6. The enzyme-inhibitor approach to cell-selective labelling. Pt. 1; Sulphonamide inhibitors of carbonic anhydrase as carriers for red cell labelling: in vitro uptake of pIBS by human red blood cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Jaspal; Wyeth, P. (Southampton Univ. (UK))

    1991-01-01

    Red cell carbonic anhydrase is identified as an ideal target in an enzyme-inhibitor approach to radiolabel localisation. Current problems in blood pool labelling could be overcome by using selective sulphonamide inhibitors as carriers. p-Iodobenzenesulphonamide (pIBS) was selected as the choice reagent for red blood cell labelling. Rapid uptake of ({sup 125}I)-pIBS was found in vitro, consistent with passive diffusion across the cell membrane. The intracellular binding could be attributed to interaction with two specific acceptor sites, with dissociation constants of 4.9 +- 1.0 and 0.10+- 0.05 {mu}mol dm{sup -3}, and maximum binding capacities of 166 +- 5 and 19.9 +- 1.0 {mu}mol dm{sup -3}, respectively under the experimental conditions. These data correlate with the two major carbonic anhydrase isozymes; acceptor assignments were confirmed by gel chromatography of the red cell lysate. (author).

  7. Short-term carbon and nitrogen cycling in urine patches assessed by combined carbon-13 and nitrogen-15 labelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ambus, Per; Petersen, S.O.; Soussana, J.F.

    2007-01-01

    sources for C include the urine itself, increased solubility of soil C, lysis of microbial cells and leakage of C from scorched roots. The objective of this experiment was to test the hypothesis that: (i) urine deposition causes an increase in root-derived degradable C compounds in the soil, which (ii......Urine deposition by grazing animals is known to, induce large NO emissions as a result of increased nitrification and denitrification in the soil. This is brought about by the increased N availability from the urine, in combination very likely also with increased organic C availability. Possible...... application was equal to the quantity of organic C added. Immediately after the application, 87% of the respired CO2 appeared to be from the urine, and respiration of plant-derived C was temporarily decreased. The cumulated amount of respired C-13 plant carbon, however, was unaltered by the urine treatment...

  8. Carbon-11 labeled diacylglycerol for signal transduction imaging by positron CT. Evaluation of the quality and safety for clinical use

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujii, Ryou [Nishijin Hospital, Kyoto (Japan); Imahori, Yoshio; Ido, Tatsuo [and others

    1995-02-01

    To elucidate the synaptic transmission in the neural system, we have been developing fundamental studies for intracellular signaling. For clinical application of carbon-11 labeled diacylglycerol (1-[1-{sup 11}C]butyryl-2-palmitoyl-rac-glycerol: {sup 11}C-DAG) using positron emission computed tomography (PET), we evaluated the quality and the safety of {sup 11}C-DAG as the solution for injection. As a result, {sup 11}C-DAG was synthesized within 50 minutes, including the preparation step for injection. The half life time and energy spectrum of {sup 11}C-DAG were the same as the physical character of carbon-11, and other radioisotopes were not detected. In the quality control, {sup 11}C-DAG solution was negative in the examination of bacterial contamination and the pyrogen test in three successive synthesis procedures. In the acute toxicity test by administration of {sup 11}C-DAG and 100 {mu}mol/kg of non-radioactive DAG to the rat intravenously, the systemic condition of the rat was not changed and no abnormalities were found in any organ 24 hours after administration. These findings indicated the safety of {sup 11}C-DAG solution. Clinical application of {sup 11}C-DAG using positron emission tomography may be useful to elucidate the dysfunction of intracellular signaling in disorders of higher cortical function such as Alzheimer disease. (author).

  9. Use of 13C Labeled Carbon Tetrachloride to Demonstrate the Transformation to Carbon Dioxide under Anaerobic Conditions in a Continuous Flow Column

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semprini, L.; Azizian, M.

    2012-12-01

    The demonstration of transformation of chlorinated aliphatic compounds (CAHs) in the subsurface is a challenge, especially when the products are carbon dioxide (CO2) and chloride ion. The groundwater contaminant carbon tetrachloride (CT) is of particular interest since a broad range of transformation products can be potentially formed under anaerobic conditions. The ability to demonstrate the transformation of CT to CO2 as a non toxic endproduct, is also of great interest. Results will be presented from a continuous flow column study where 13C labeled CT was used to demonstrate its transformation to CO2. The column was packed with a quartz sand and bioaugmented the Evanite Culture (EV) that is capable of transforming tetrachloroethene (PCE) to ethene. The column was continously fed a synthetic groundwater that was amended with PCE (0.10 mM) and either formate (1.5 mM) or lactate (1.1 mM), which ferments to produce hydrogen (H2) as the ultimate electron donor. Earlier CT transformation studies with the column, in the absence of sulfate reduction, and with formate added as a donor found CT (0.015 mM) was over 98% transformed with about 20% converted to chloroform (CF) (0.003 mM) and with a transient detection of chloromethane (CM). Methane and carbon disulfide, as potential products, were not detected. Neither CT nor CF inhibited the reductive dehalogenation of PCE to ethene. A series of transient studies conducted after these initial CT transformation tests, but in the absence of CT, showed formate remained an effective substrate for maintaining sulfate reduction and PCE transformation. Lactate, which was effectively fermented prior to CT addition, was not effectively fermented, with propionate accumulating as a fermentation product. When lactate was added, PCE was mainly transformed to cis-dichloroethene (cis-DCE) and VC, and sulfate reduction did not occur. In order to restore effective lactate fermentation the column was then bioaugmented with an EV culture that

  10. Production and application of synthetic precursors labeled with carbon-11 and fluorine-18

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferrieri, R.A.

    2001-04-02

    It is evident from this chapter that there is enormous flexibility both in the selection of the nature of the radioisotope and ways to generate it, as well as in the selection of the labeling precursor to appropriately attach that radioisotope to some larger biomolecule of interest. The arsenal of radiolabeling precursors now available to the chemist is quite extensive, and without a doubt will continue to grow as chemists develop new ones. However, the upcoming years will perhaps reflect a greater effort in refining existing methods for preparing some of those precursors that are already available to us. For example, the use of solid-phase reactions to accomplish in a single step what would normally take several using conventional solvent-based reactions has already been shown to work in many occasions. The obvious advantage here is that processes become more amenable to system automation thus affording greater reliability in day-to-day operations. There are perhaps other technologies in science that have yet to be realized by the chemist in the PET laboratory that could provide a similar or even a greater benefit. One only needs to be open to new ideas, and imaginative enough to apply them to the problems at hand.

  11. Carbon-11 labelled ketamine-synthesis, distribution in mice and PET studies in baboons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiue, C.-Y.; Vallabhahosula, Shankar; Wolf, Alfred P.; Dewey, Stephen L.; Fowler, Joanna S.; Schlyer, David J.; Arnett, Carroll D.; Zhou Yiguo

    1997-02-01

    No-carrier-added (NCA)[{sup 11}C]({+-})-ketamine (2a) and its enantiomers (+)-2b and (-)-2c were synthesized by methylation of the corresponding norketamine (1a-c) with [{sup 11}C]H{sub 3}I in an overall radiochemical yield of 20% (EOB) with specific activities of 0.35-0.45 Ci/{mu}mole at EOB in a synthesis time of 40 min from EOB. Compound 2a was metabolized rapidly in mouse brain and labeled metabolites appeared in baboon plasma. PET studies of compounds 2a-c in a baboon showed that influx of compounds 2a-c into the brain was high for the first few min but radioactivity then declined rapidly. Although the retention of radioactivity in the baboon striatum was not significantly different for 2a-c 20 min post-injection, graphical analysis of time-activity data for each enantiomer and for the racemate in baboon striatum suggested that (+)-ketamine may interact with receptors slightly more effectively than its (-)-enantiomer or racemate. However, due to its rapid metabolism in the brain and a similar uptake in the striatum and cerebellum, [{sup 11}C]ketamine may not be an ideal tracer for studying NMDA receptor with PET.

  12. Carbon-11 labeled cathepsin K inhibitors: syntheses and preliminary in vivo evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodnick, Melissa E; Shao, Xia; Kozloff, Kenneth M; Scott, Peter J H; Kilbourn, Michael R

    2014-01-01

    Cathepsin K is a cysteine peptidase primarily located in osteoclasts, cells involved in normal growth and remodeling of bone but that are also responsible for bone loss in osteolytic diseases such as osteoporosis. In vivo imaging of cathepsin K may provide a method to assess changes in osteoclast numbers in such disease states. To that end, two high-affinity and selective cathepsin K inhibitors were radiolabeled with carbon-11. In vivo microPET imaging studies demonstrated uptake and prolonged retention of radioactivity in actively growing or remodeling bone regions (e.g., distal ulnar, carpal, distal and proximal humeral, distal femur, proximal tibia, tail vertebrae). Uptake into bone could be blocked by pre- or co-injection of unlabeled ligand, supporting a specific and saturable binding mechanism for radiotracer localization. These proof-of-concept studies indicate that radiolabeled cathepsin K inhibitors may have potential as in vivo imaging radiotracers for assessing changes of osteoclast numbers in osteolytic diseases.

  13. Exploration of the labeling of [11C]Tubastatin A at the hydroxamic acid site with [11C]carbon monoxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Shuiyu; Zhang, Yi; Kalin, Jay; Cai, Lisheng; Kozikowski, Alan P.; Pike, Victor W.

    2015-01-01

    We aimed to label tubastatin A (1) with carbon-11 (t1/2 = 20.4 min) in the hydroxamic acid site to provide a potential radiotracer for imaging histone deacetylase 6 (HDAC6) in vivo with positron emission tomography (PET). Initial attempts at a one-pot Pd-mediated insertion of [11C]carbon monoxide between the aryl iodide (2) and hydroxylamine gave low radiochemical yields (< 5%) of [11C]1. Labeling was achieved in useful radiochemical yields (16.1 ± 5.6%, n = 4) through a two-step process based on Pd-mediated insertion of [11C]carbon monoxide between the aryl iodide (2) and p-nitrophenol to give the [11C]p-nitrophenyl ester ([11C]5), followed by ultrasound-assisted hydroxyaminolysis of the activated ester with excess hydroxylamine in DMSO/THF mixture in the presence of a strong phosphazene base P1-t-Bu. However, the success in labeling the hydroxamic acid group of [11C]tubastatin A was not transferable to the labeling of three other model hydroxamic acids. PMID:26647018

  14. In vivo evaluation of carbon-11-labelled non-sarcosine-based glycine transporter 1 inhibitors in mice and conscious monkeys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toyohara, Jun [Division of Clinical Neuroscience, Chiba University Center for Forensic Mental Health, Chiba, Japan 260-8670 (Japan); Positron Medical Center, Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Gerontology, Tokyo, Japan 173-0022 (Japan); Ishiwata, Kiichi; Sakata, Muneyuki [Positron Medical Center, Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Gerontology, Tokyo, Japan 173-0022 (Japan); Wu, Jin [Division of Clinical Neuroscience, Chiba University Center for Forensic Mental Health, Chiba, Japan 260-8670 (Japan); Nishiyama, Shingo; Tsukada, Hideo [Central Research Laboratory, Hamamatsu Photonics K.K., Shizuoka, Japan 434-8601 (Japan); Hashimoto, Kenji, E-mail: hashimoto@faculty.chiba-u.j [Division of Clinical Neuroscience, Chiba University Center for Forensic Mental Health, Chiba, Japan 260-8670 (Japan)

    2011-05-15

    Introduction: Glycine transporter 1 (GlyT-1) is an attractive target in positron emission tomography (PET) studies. Here, we report the in vivo evaluation of three carbon-11-labelled non-sarcosine-type GlyT-1 inhibitors - [{sup 11}C]SA1, [{sup 11}C]SA2 and [{sup 11}C]SA3 - as novel PET tracers for GlyT-1. Methods: The regional brain distributions of the three compounds in mice were studied at baseline and under receptor-blockade conditions with co-injection of carrier loading or pretreatment with an excess of selective GlyT-1 inhibitors (ALX-5407 and SSR504734). Metabolic stability was investigated by radio high-performance liquid chromatography. Dynamic PET scans in conscious monkeys were performed with/without selective GlyT-1 inhibitors. Results: The IC{sub 50} values of SA1, SA2 and SA3 were 9.0, 6400 and 39.7 nM, respectively. The regional brain uptakes of [{sup 11}C]SA1 and [{sup 11}C]SA3 in mice were heterogeneous and consistent with the known distribution of GlyT-1. [{sup 11}C]SA2 showed low and homogeneous uptake in the brain. Most radioactivity in the brain was detected in unchanged form, although peripherally these compounds were degraded. Carrier loading decreased the uptake of [{sup 11}C]SA1 in GlyT-1-rich regions. However, similar reductions were not observed with [{sup 11}C]SA3. Pretreatment with ALX-5407 decreased the uptake of [{sup 11}C]SA1 in GlyT-1-rich regions. In the monkey at baseline, regional brain uptake of [{sup 11}C]SA1 was heterogeneous and consistent with the known GlyT-1 distribution. Pretreatment with selective GlyT-1 inhibitors significantly decreased the distribution volume ratio of [{sup 11}C] SA1 in GlyT-1-rich regions. Conclusions: [{sup 11}C]SA1 has the most suitable profile among the three carbon-11-labelled GlyT-1 inhibitors. Lead optimization of [{sup 11}C]SA1 structure will be required to achieve in vivo selective GlyT-1 imaging.

  15. Tunable and label-free virus enrichment for ultrasensitive virus detection using carbon nanotube arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Yin-Ting; Tang, Yi; Sebastian, Aswathy; Dasgupta, Archi; Perea-Lopez, Nestor; Albert, Istvan; Lu, Huaguang; Terrones, Mauricio; Zheng, Si-Yang

    2016-01-01

    Viral infectious diseases can erupt unpredictably, spread rapidly, and ravage mass populations. Although established methods, such as polymerase chain reaction, virus isolation, and next-generation sequencing have been used to detect viruses, field samples with low virus count pose major challenges in virus surveillance and discovery. We report a unique carbon nanotube size-tunable enrichment microdevice (CNT-STEM) that efficiently enriches and concentrates viruses collected from field samples. The channel sidewall in the microdevice was made by growing arrays of vertically aligned nitrogen-doped multiwalled CNTs, where the intertubular distance between CNTs could be engineered in the range of 17 to 325 nm to accurately match the size of different viruses. The CNT-STEM significantly improves detection limits and virus isolation rates by at least 100 times. Using this device, we successfully identified an emerging avian influenza virus strain [A/duck/PA/02099/2012(H11N9)] and a novel virus strain (IBDV/turkey/PA/00924/14). Our unique method demonstrates the early detection of emerging viruses and the discovery of new viruses directly from field samples, thus creating a universal platform for effectively remediating viral infectious diseases. PMID:27730213

  16. Development and comparison of immunochromatographic strips with three nanomaterial labels: Colloidal gold, nanogold-polyaniline-nanogold microspheres (GPGs) and colloidal carbon for visual detection of salbutamol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bing; Wang, Lingling; Tong, Bei; Zhang, Yan; Sheng, Wei; Pan, Mingfei; Wang, Shuo

    2016-11-15

    In this study, the three nanomaterials: colloidal gold, nanogold-polyaniline-nanogold microspheres (GPGs) and colloidal carbon were respectively labeled with the antibody against salbutamol (SAL). We aimed to develop immunochromatographic strips with these nanomaterial labels and determine their performance in visual detection of SAL. For the colloidal gold-based strip, the detection limit of SAL was 1.0µgL(-1) in standard solution and 5.0µgkg(-1) in meat samples. For the GPG- and colloidal carbon-based strips, the limit of detection was 2.0µgL(-1) in standard solution and 10µgkg(-1) in meat samples. The results obtained using the test strips were found to be highly consistent with those obtained using a commercial kit, indicating the high accuracy of these strips. The three strips were also found to be stable up to 18 weeks under laboratory conditions. In terms of sensitivity, the colloidal gold-based strip was slightly better than the other two. For the GPG- and colloidal carbon-based strips, the difference between the results obtained for different batches was small (high consistency), and the stability was much better than that of the colloidal gold-based one. Our results indicate that colloidal carbon can be used as a label in immunochromatographic tests; it can also help reduce the cost involved and scale-up the production. The use of immunochromatographic test strips labeled with colloidal carbon can be a rapid and inexpensive method for SAL assays in on-site applications.

  17. Polydopamine Coated Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes as a Versatile Platform with Radionuclide Labeling for Multimodal Tumor Imaging and Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, He; Chao, Yu; Liu, Jingjing; Huang, Jie; Pan, Jian; Guo, Wanliang; Wu, Jizhi; Sheng, Mao; Yang, Kai; Wang, Jian; Liu, Zhuang

    2016-01-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) with various unique properties have attracted great attention in cancer theranostics. Herein, SWNTs are coated with a shell of polydopamine (PDA), which is further modified by polyethylene glycol (PEG). The PDA shell in the obtained SWNT@PDA-PEG could chelate Mn(2+), which together with metallic nanoparticulate impurities anchored on SWNTs offer enhanced both T1 and T2 contrasts under magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Meanwhile, also utilizing the PDA shell, radionuclide (131)I could be easily labeled onto SWNT@PDA-PEG, enabling nuclear imaging and radioisotope cancer therapy. As revealed by MR & gamma imaging, efficient tumor accumulation of SWNT@PDA-(131)I-PEG is observed after systemic administration into mice. By further utilizing the strong near-infarared (NIR) absorbance of SWNTs, NIR-triggered photothermal therapy in combination with (131)I-based radioisotope therapy is realized in our animal experiments, in which a remarkable synergistic antitumor therapeutic effect is observed compared to monotherapies. Our work not only presents a new type of theranostic nanoplatform based on SWNTs, but also suggests the promise of PDA coating as a general approach to modify nano-agents and endow them with highly integrated functionalities.

  18. Analysis of carbon and nitrogen co-metabolism in yeast by ultrahigh-resolution mass spectrometry applying {sup 13}C- and {sup 15}N-labeled substrates simultaneously

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blank, Lars M. [TU Dortmund University, Laboratory of Chemical Biotechnology, Department of Biochemical and Chemical Engineering, Dortmund (Germany); RWTH Aachen University, Institute of Applied Microbiology - iAMB, Aachen Biology and Biotechnology - ABBt, Aachen (Germany); Desphande, Rahul R. [TU Dortmund University, Laboratory of Chemical Biotechnology, Department of Biochemical and Chemical Engineering, Dortmund (Germany); Michigan State University, Department of Plant Biology, East Lansing, MI (United States); Schmid, Andreas [TU Dortmund University, Laboratory of Chemical Biotechnology, Department of Biochemical and Chemical Engineering, Dortmund (Germany); Hayen, Heiko [Leibniz-Institut fuer Analytische Wissenschaften-ISAS-e.V, Dortmund (Germany); University of Wuppertal, Department of Food Chemistry, Wuppertal (Germany)

    2012-06-15

    Alternative metabolic pathways inside a cell can be deduced using stable isotopically labeled substrates. One prerequisite is accurate measurement of the labeling pattern of targeted metabolites. Experiments are generally limited to the use of single-element isotopes, mainly {sup 13}C. Here, we demonstrate the application of direct infusion nanospray, ultrahigh-resolution Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance-mass spectrometry (FTICR-MS) for metabolic studies using differently labeled elemental isotopes simultaneously - i.e., {sup 13}C and {sup 15}N - in amino acids of a total protein hydrolysate. The optimized strategy for the analysis of metabolism by a hybrid linear ion trap-FTICR-MS comprises the collection of multiple adjacent selected ion monitoring scans. By limiting both the width of the mass range and the number of ions entering the ICR cell with automated gain control, sensitive measurements of isotopologue distribution were possible without compromising mass accuracy and isotope intensity mapping. The required mass-resolving power of more than 60,000 is only achievable on a routine basis by FTICR and Orbitrap mass spectrometers. Evaluation of the method was carried out by comparison of the experimental data to the natural isotope abundances of selected amino acids and by comparison to GC/MS results obtained from a labeling experiment with {sup 13}C-labeled glucose. The developed method was used to shed light on the complexity of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae carbon-nitrogen co-metabolism by administering both {sup 13}C-labeled glucose and {sup 15}N-labeled alanine. The results indicate that not only glutamate but also alanine acts as an amino donor during alanine and valine synthesis. Metabolic studies using FTICR-MS can exploit new possibilities by the use of multiple-labeled elemental isotopes. (orig.)

  19. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy investigation of multiwall carbon nanotube/nickel oxide nanocomposite thin films

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Roro, Kittessa T

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Owing to their unique electronic and optical properties, nanocomposite thin films are widely used for converting solar radiation therapy into other conventional energy forms, such as heat and electricity. Carbon nanotube-based composites which can...

  20. Magneto-Elastic Vibration of Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes based on a Rigorous Van Der Waals Interaction%基于严格范德华力作用的多壁碳纳米管磁弹性振动

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张薇; 王熙

    2013-01-01

    给出了一种求解在任意两管之间严格范德华力相互作用下多壁碳纳米管磁弹性振动频率的解析方法.研究结果表明,在轴向磁场的作用下,严格范德华力相互作用对多壁碳纳米管最高磁弹性振动频率的影响大于对最低振动频率的影响;严格范德华力作用下多壁碳纳米管的最高磁弹性振动频率要高于经典范德华力作用下多壁碳纳米管的最高磁弹性振动频率;严格范德华力对磁弹性振动频率的影响依赖于碳纳米管层间距的变化和管的层数,且随着多壁碳纳米管层数的增加而趋于一个稳定值.本文的研究结果对于碳纳米管作为基本元件在纳米电子元件中的实际应用具有一定的参考价值.%This paper presents an analytical method to solve magneto-elastic vibrations of multiwall carbon nanotubes under a rigorous van der Waals interaction. Results show that under the axial magnetic field, the effects of the rigorous van der Waals force on the highest frequency of multi-walled carbon tubes are larger than the effects on its lowest frequency, and the highest frequency of multi-walled carbon tubes under rigorous van der Waals force is higher than that under classical van der Waals force. The influence of rigorous van der Waals force on magneto-elastic frequency depends on the change of interlayer spacing and the layer numbers of tubes and as the layer numbers increase the influence tends to a steady value. The investigation result is a valuable reference for the carbon nanotubes's practical application as basic electromagnetic elements.

  1. Microbial carbon recycling: an underestimated process controlling soil carbon dynamics - Part 2: A C3-C4 vegetation change field labelling experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basler, A.; Dippold, M.; Helfrich, M.; Dyckmans, J.

    2015-11-01

    The mean residence times (MRT) of different compound classes of soil organic matter (SOM) do not match their inherent recalcitrance to decomposition. One reason for this is the stabilization within the soil matrix, but recycling, i.e. the reuse of "old" organic material to form new biomass may also play a role as it uncouples the residence times of organic matter from the lifetime of discrete molecules in soil. We analysed soil sugar dynamics in a natural 30-year old labelling experiment after a wheat-maize vegetation change to determine the extent of recycling and stabilization by assessing differences in turnover dynamics between plant and microbial-derived sugars: while plant-derived sugars are only affected by stabilization processes, microbial sugars may be subject to both, stabilization and recycling. To disentangle the dynamics of soil sugars, we separated different density fractions (free particulate organic matter (fPOM), light occluded particulate organic matter (≤ 1.6 g cm-3; oPOM1.6), dense occluded particulate organic matter (≤ 2 g cm-3; oPOM2) and mineral-associated organic matter (> 2 g cm-3; mineral)) of a silty loam under long-term wheat and maize cultivation. The isotopic signature of neutral sugars was measured by high pressure liquid chromatography coupled to isotope ratio mass spectrometry (HPLC/IRMS), after hydrolysis with 4 M Trifluoroacetic acid. While apparent MRT of sugars were comparable to total organic carbon in the bulk soil and mineral fraction, the apparent MRT of sugar carbon in the oPOM fractions were considerably lower than those of the total carbon of these fractions. This indicates that oPOM formation was fuelled by microbial activity feeding on new plant input. In the bulk soil, MRT of the mainly plant-derived xylose were significantly lower than those of mainly microbial-derived sugars like galactose, rhamnose, fucose, indicating that recycling of organic matter is an important factor regulating organic matter dynamics in

  2. 用于染料敏化太阳能电池的多壁碳纳米管基对电极的制备与表征%Fabrication and characterization of a multi-walled carbon nanotube-based counter electrode for dye-sensitized solar cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑威; 齐涛; 张永超; 石海英; 田均庆

    2015-01-01

    A counter-electrode ( CE) for dye-sensitized solar cells ( DSSCs) was prepared by coating a slurry containing acid-oxi-dized multi-wall carbon nanotubes and nano-graphite powder onto a fluorine-doped tin oxide conducting glass substrate. The samples were characterized by SEM, TEM, EDS and IR spectroscopy. The CE performance in the DSSCs with MgO-doped TiO2 as the pho-toanode was investigated by measurements of current-voltage curves, cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectrosco-py. Results show that the cell with the CE exhibits the best photoelectric properties of all the carbon-based CEs investigated. The short-circuit current density (Jsc) is 4. 67 mA/cm2, the open-circuit voltage (Voc) is 0. 53 V and photoelectric conversion efficiency is up to 4. 10%, which are comparable with those of the Pt-based CE in DSSCs.%经酸化处理的多壁碳纳米管( MWCNTs)与纳米石墨复合后沉积在FTO导电玻璃基底上制备出染料敏华太阳能电池薄膜对电极. 利用SEM﹑TEM﹑EDS与IR光谱对其进行表征. 以MgO掺杂的TiO2 薄膜为光阳极对电池通过循环伏安法( CV曲线)﹑电化学阻抗谱( EIS)和伏安特性曲线( J-V)进行光电性能分析. 结果表明:酸化处理的MWCNTs与纳米石墨复合对电极展现出优异的光催化性能,有利于电池光电性能的提高. 电池开路电压及短路电流密度分别可达 0. 53 V﹑4. 67 mA/cm2 ,其光电转换效率达到4. 10%,与铂对电极的性能相当.

  3. Label-free capture of breast cancer cells spiked in buffy coats using carbon nanotube antibody micro-arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khosravi, Farhad; Trainor, Patrick; Rai, Shesh N; Kloecker, Goetz; Wickstrom, Eric; Panchapakesan, Balaji

    2016-04-01

    We demonstrate the rapid and label-free capture of breast cancer cells spiked in buffy coats using nanotube-antibody micro-arrays. Single wall carbon nanotube arrays were manufactured using photo-lithography, metal deposition, and etching techniques. Anti-epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) antibodies were functionalized to the surface of the nanotube devices using 1-pyrene-butanoic acid succinimidyl ester functionalization method. Following functionalization, plain buffy coat and MCF7 cell spiked buffy coats were adsorbed on to the nanotube device and electrical signatures were recorded for differences in interaction between samples. A statistical classifier for the 'liquid biopsy' was developed to create a predictive model based on dynamic time warping to classify device electrical signals that corresponded to plain (control) or spiked buffy coats (case). In training test, the device electrical signals originating from buffy versus spiked buffy samples were classified with ∼100% sensitivity, ∼91% specificity and ∼96% accuracy. In the blinded test, the signals were classified with ∼91% sensitivity, ∼82% specificity and ∼86% accuracy. A heatmap was generated to visually capture the relationship between electrical signatures and the sample condition. Confocal microscopic analysis of devices that were classified as spiked buffy coats based on their electrical signatures confirmed the presence of cancer cells, their attachment to the device and overexpression of EpCAM receptors. The cell numbers were counted to be ∼1-17 cells per 5 μl per device suggesting single cell sensitivity in spiked buffy coats that is scalable to higher volumes using the micro-arrays.

  4. Facile radiosynthesis of new carbon-11-labeled propanamide derivatives as selective androgen receptor modulator (SARM) radioligands for prostate cancer imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Mingzhang; Wang, Min; Miller, Kathy D; Zheng, Qi-Huang

    2011-12-11

    The androgen receptor (AR) is an attractive target for the treatment and molecular imaging of prostate cancer. New carbon-11-labeled propanamide derivatives were first designed and synthesized as selective androgen receptor modulator (SARM) radioligands for prostate cancer imaging using the biomedical imaging technique positron emission tomography (PET). The target tracers, (S)-N-(4-cyano-3-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl)-2-hydroxy-3-(2-[(11)C]methoxyphenoxy)-2-methylpropanamide ([(11)C]8a), (S)-2-hydroxy-3-(2-[(11)C]methoxyphenoxy)-2-methyl-N-(4-nitro-3-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl)propanamide ([(11)C]8 e), (S)-N-(4-cyano-3-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl)-2-hydroxy-3-(4-[(11)C]methoxyphenoxy)-2-methylpropanamide ([(11)C]8c) and (S)-2-hydroxy-3-(4-[(11)C]methoxyphenoxy)-2-methyl-N-(4-nitro-3-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl)propanamide ([(11)C]8 g), were prepared by O-[(11)C]methylation of their corresponding precursors, (S)-N-(4-cyano-3-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl)-2-hydroxy-3-(2-hydroxyphenoxy)-2-methylpropanamide (9a), (S)-2-hydroxy-3-(2-hydroxyphenoxy)-2-methyl-N-(4-nitro-3-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl)propanamide (9b), (S)-N-(4-cyano-3-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl)-2-hydroxy-3-(4-hydroxyphenoxy)-2-methylpropanamide (9 c) and (S)-2-hydroxy-3-(4-hydroxyphenoxy)-2-methyl-N-(4-nitro-3-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl)propanamide (9 d), with [(11)C]CH(3)OTf under basic conditions and isolated by a simplified C-18 solid-phase extraction (SPE) method in 55 ± 5% (n = 5) radiochemical yields based on [(11)C]CO(2) and decay corrected to end of bombardment (EOB). The overall synthesis time from EOB was 23 min, the radiochemical purity was >99%, and the specific activity at end of synthesis (EOS) was 277.5 ± 92.5 GBq/μmol (n = 5). Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Label-free capture of breast cancer cells spiked in buffy coats using carbon nanotube antibody micro-arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khosravi, Farhad; Trainor, Patrick; Rai, Shesh N.; Kloecker, Goetz; Wickstrom, Eric; Panchapakesan, Balaji

    2016-04-01

    We demonstrate the rapid and label-free capture of breast cancer cells spiked in buffy coats using nanotube-antibody micro-arrays. Single wall carbon nanotube arrays were manufactured using photo-lithography, metal deposition, and etching techniques. Anti-epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) antibodies were functionalized to the surface of the nanotube devices using 1-pyrene-butanoic acid succinimidyl ester functionalization method. Following functionalization, plain buffy coat and MCF7 cell spiked buffy coats were adsorbed on to the nanotube device and electrical signatures were recorded for differences in interaction between samples. A statistical classifier for the ‘liquid biopsy’ was developed to create a predictive model based on dynamic time warping to classify device electrical signals that corresponded to plain (control) or spiked buffy coats (case). In training test, the device electrical signals originating from buffy versus spiked buffy samples were classified with ˜100% sensitivity, ˜91% specificity and ˜96% accuracy. In the blinded test, the signals were classified with ˜91% sensitivity, ˜82% specificity and ˜86% accuracy. A heatmap was generated to visually capture the relationship between electrical signatures and the sample condition. Confocal microscopic analysis of devices that were classified as spiked buffy coats based on their electrical signatures confirmed the presence of cancer cells, their attachment to the device and overexpression of EpCAM receptors. The cell numbers were counted to be ˜1-17 cells per 5 μl per device suggesting single cell sensitivity in spiked buffy coats that is scalable to higher volumes using the micro-arrays.

  6. Carbon Nanotubes – Interactions with Biological Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Reis, Joana; Capela-Silva, Fernando; Potes, José; Fonseca, Alexandra; Oliveira, Mónica; Kanagaraj, Subramani; Marques, António Torres

    2011-01-01

    his book chapter discusses the prospective biomedical applications of carbon nanotubes based materials, the impact of carbon nanotubes properties in the interaction with biological systems. Protein adsorption, impact on cell viability and cytokine production are explored. Potential respiratory and dermal toxicity are reviewed, as the difficulties on studying the biological response. In face of recent studies, special attention is drawn upon promising orthopaedic use.

  7. Seasonal patterns of carbon allocation to respiratory pools in 60-yr-old deciduous (Fagus sylvatica) and evergreen (Picea abies) trees assessed via whole-tree stable carbon isotope labeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuptz, Daniel; Fleischmann, Frank; Matyssek, Rainer; Grams, Thorsten E E

    2011-07-01

    • The CO(2) efflux of adult trees is supplied by recent photosynthates and carbon (C) stores. The extent to which these C pools contribute to growth and maintenance respiration (R(G) and R(M), respectively) remains obscure. • Recent photosynthates of adult beech (Fagus sylvatica) and spruce (Picea abies) trees were labeled by exposing whole-tree canopies to (13) C-depleted CO(2). Label was applied three times during the year (in spring, early summer and late summer) and changes in the stable C isotope composition (δ(13) C) of trunk and coarse-root CO(2) efflux were quantified. • Seasonal patterns in C translocation rate (CTR) and fractional contribution of label to CO(2) efflux (F(Label-Max)) were found. CTR was fastest during early summer. In beech, F(Label-Max) was lowest in spring and peaked in trunks during late summer (0.6 ± 0.1, mean ± SE), whereas no trend was observed in coarse roots. No seasonal dynamics in F(Label-Max) were found in spruce. • During spring, the R(G) of beech trunks was largely supplied by C stores. Recent photosynthates supplied growth in early summer and refilled C stores in late summer. In spruce, CO(2) efflux was constantly supplied by a mixture of stored (c. 75%) and recent (c. 25%) C. The hypothesis that R(G) is exclusively supplied by recent photosynthates was rejected for both species.

  8. Catalytic wet air oxidation of bisphenol A solution in a batch-recycle trickle-bed reactor over titanate nanotube-based catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Renata; Erjavec, Boštjan; Senila, Marin; Pintar, Albin

    2014-10-01

    Catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO) is classified as an advanced oxidation process, which proved to be highly efficient for the removal of emerging organic pollutant bisphenol A (BPA) from water. In this study, BPA was successfully removed in a batch-recycle trickle-bed reactor over bare titanate nanotube-based catalysts at very short space time of 0.6 min gCAT g(-1). The as-prepared titanate nanotubes, which underwent heat treatment at 600 °C, showed high activity for the removal of aqueous BPA. Liquid-phase recycling (5- or 10-fold recycle) enabled complete BPA conversion already at 200 °C, together with high conversion of total organic carbon (TOC), i.e., 73 and 98 %, respectively. The catalyst was chemically stable in the given range of operating conditions for 189 h on stream.

  9. 多壁碳纳米管分散固相萃取-LC-MS/MS法分析烟草中114种农药残留%Simultaneous Determination of 114 Pesticide Residues in Tobacco by Multi-walled Carbon Nanotube-based Dispersive Solid Phase Extraction and LC-MS/MS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    余斐; 陈黎; 艾丹; 潘立宁; 胡斌; 刘惠民

    2015-01-01

    建立了一种以多壁碳纳米管(MWCNTs)为吸附剂的分散固相萃取(DSPE)、液相色谱-串联质谱(LC-MS/MS)测定烟草中114种农药残留的分析方法。通过优化实验,选择并确定了MWCNTs的型号和用量,在QuEChERS方法的基础上改善了样品净化效果。结果表明:①以外径>50 nm、用量5 mg的MWCNTs为净化剂材料,可以获得比N-丙基乙二胺(PSA)更好的净化效果。②工作曲线线性良好(r2>0.999),3个添加水平(0.02,0.05,0.20 mg/kg)的平均回收率为69%~119%,相对标准偏差为1%~19%,方法定量限(LOQ)在0.2~40.0μg/kg之间。该方法准确度高、灵敏度好、操作简便,适合用于烟草样品中114种农药残留的检测。%A method combining dispersive solid phase extraction (DSPE), wherein multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were used as adsorption material, with liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) was developed for simultaneously determining 114 pesticide residues in tobacco. The type and adding rate of MWCNTs were optimized by experiments, and the purification of samples was improved by QuEChERS method. The results showed that: 1) It was more efficient using 5 mg MWCNTs of above 50 nm in external diameter than using N-Propylethane-1,2-diamine (PSA) in sample purification. 2) The calibration curve presented good linearity (r2>0.999). The average recoveries at spiked levels of 0.02, 0.05 and 0.20 mg/kg ranged from 69% to 119% with the relative standard deviations of 1%-19%, and the LOQs of the method were in the range of 0.2-40.0 g/kg. The developed method is accurate, sensitive, convenient, and suitable.

  10. Investigation of the degradation of 13C-labeled fungal biomass in soil - fate of carbon in a soil bioreactor system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweigert, Michael; Fester, Thomas; Miltner, Anja; Kaestner, Matthias

    2015-04-01

    Nutrient balances and degradation processes in boreal forests are mainly influenced by interactions of plant roots and ectomycorrhizal fungi. Plants benefit from nitrogen compounds provided by their symbiotic interaction partner. In return ectomycorrhiza are provided by large amounts of carbon from the plants which is used for the synthesis of hyphal networks in soil and for metabolic activity for nutrient uptake. Therefore, ectomycorrhizal fungi play a major role in ecosystems of boreal forests and are consequently an important sink for carbon by building large amount of mycelia. Recently, it has been shown that microbial biomass residues contribute significantly to soil organic matter formation. This suggests that also residues of ectomycorrhizal fungi may be an important source for soil organic matter formation in forest soils where these fungi are abundant. However, the fate of ectomycorrhizal biomass residues in soils is unknown. We therefore investigated the fate of ectomycorrhizal biomass in soil in a soil bioreactor system to quantify the contribution of this material to soil organic matter formation. As a model organism, we selected Laccaria bicolor, which was labelled by growing the fungus on 13C glucose. The stable isotope-labeled biomass was then homogenized and incubated in a podzol from a typical forest site in Central Germany. The fate of the labeled biomass was traced by analyzing the amount of 13C mineralized and the amount remaining in the soil. The fungal biomass carbon was mineralized rather rapidly during the first 50 days. Then the mineralization rate slowed down, but mineralization continued until the end of the experiment, when approximately 40% of the 13C was mineralized and 60% remained in soil. In addition, we analyzed biomolecules such as fatty acids to trace the incorporation of the L. bicolor-derived biomass carbon into other microorganisms and to identify potential primary consumers of fungal biomass. By these analyses, we found a

  11. Paying for sustainability: A cross-cultural analysis of consumers’ valuations of food and non-food products labeled for carbon and water footprints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grebitus, Carola; Steiner, Bodo; Veeman, Michele

    2016-01-01

    Increasing environmental concerns of consumers and global supply chains center on the impacts of carbon dioxide emissions and water usage. This study analyzes consumers’ preferences for sustainable products as indicated by water and carbon footprint labels, enabling a rare cross-cultural comparison....... We conduct discrete choice experiments in Canada and Germany to identify possible cross-cultural effects. Four products were considered contrasting food and non-food staple products, plant-based and animal-based foods, and processed and unprocessed food items. Results from mixed logit models suggest...... that each national group of consumers is – irrespective of their cultural background – highly heterogeneous in the discounts required for them to purchase products with larger carbon footprints. The non-food product is discounted most with regard to water usage, followed by the plant product, suggesting...

  12. The Distribution of Radioactivity in the Mouse Following Administration of Dibenzanthracene Labeled in the 9 and 10 Positions with Carbon Fourteen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heidelberger, Charles; Jones, Hardin, B.

    1948-01-30

    Dibenzanthracene, labeled in the 9 and 10 positions with carbon fourteen has been administered to mice intravenously and by stomach tube as an aqueous colloid, and intraperitoneally, subcutaneously, and by stomach tube in tricaprylin solution. The distribution of radioactivity in the mice at various time intervals after administration of the carcinogen has been determined. The radioactivity is rapidly eliminated, largely through the feces, and ordinarily very little is absorbed. The distribution and rate of elimination depends upon the mode of administration. There is an appreciable quantity of radioactivity in tumors produced several months after a single subcutaneous injection of dibenzanthracene. There appear to be no detectable effects from the radiation of the labeled carcinogen.

  13. Sensitive electrochemical immunoassay for chlorpyrifos by using flake-like Fe3O4 modified carbon nanotubes as the enhanced multienzyme label.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zihong; Wang, Weihua; Wen, Haibin; Gan, Cuifen; Lei, Hongtao; Liu, Yingju

    2015-10-29

    A highly sensitive electrochemical immunoassay of chlorpyrifos (CPF) was developed by using a biocompatible quinone-rich polydopamine nanospheres modified glass carbon electrode as the sensor platform and multi-horseradish peroxidase-flake like Fe3O4 coated carbon nanotube nanocomposites as the signal label. Due to the quinone-rich polydopamine nanospheres, the platform exhibited excellent fixing capacity by simple coating of sticky polydopamine nanospheres and subsequent oxidization. By coprecipitation of Fe(3+) and Fe(2+) on polydopamine modified carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with the aid of ethylene glycol (EG), the flake-like Fe3O4 coated CNTs (CNTs@f-Fe3O4) were synthesized and chosen as the carrier of multi-enzyme label due to the high loading of secondary antibody (Ab2) and horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and also the peroxidase-mimic activity of Fe3O4. Under the optimum conditions, the immunosensor can detect CPF over a wide range with a detection limit of 6.3 pg/mL. Besides, the high specificity, reproducibility and stability of the proposed immunosensor were also proved. The preliminary application in real sample showed good recoveries, indicating it holds promise for fast analysis of CPF in aquatic environment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotube based sensors for distributed methane leak detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    This paper presents a highly sensitive, energy efficient and low-cost distributed methane (CH4) sensor system (DMSS) for continuous monitoring, detection and localization of CH4 leaks in natural gas infrastructure such as transmission and distribution pipelines, wells, and produc...

  15. Carbon Nanotube Based Electric Propulsion Thruster with Low Power Consumption Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Field emission electric propulsion (FEEP) thrusters have gained considerable attention for spacecrafts disturbance compensation because of excellent characteristics....

  16. Magnesium oxide grafted carbon nanotubes based impedimetric genosensor for biomedical application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Manoj Kumar; Ali, Md Azahar; Srivastava, Saurabh; Agrawal, Ved Varun; Ansari, S G; Malhotra, Bansi D

    2013-12-15

    Nanostructured magnesium oxide (sizeoxide (ITO) coated glass electrode and have been utilized for Vibrio cholerae detection. Aminated 23 bases single stranded DNA (NH2-ssDNA) probe sequence (O1 gene) of V. cholerae has been covalently functionalized onto nMgO-cMWCNTs/ITO electrode surface using EDC-NHS chemistry. This DNA functionalized MgO grafted cMWCNTs electrode has been characterized using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and electrochemical techniques. The results of XPS studies reveal that sufficient O-C=O groups present at the nMgO-cMWCNTs surface are utilized for DNA binding. The results of hybridization studies conducted with fragmented target DNA (ftDNA) of V. cholerae using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) reveal sensitivity as 3.87 Ω ng(-1) cm(-2), detection limit of ~21.70 ng µL(-1) in the linear range of 100-500 ng µL(-1) and stability of about 120 days. The proposed DNA functionalized nMgO-cMWCNTs nanomatrix provides a novel impedimetric platform for the fabrication of a compact genosensor device for biomedical application.

  17. Highly conductive and transparent carbon nanotube-based electrodes for ultrathin and stretchable organic solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Qingxia; Zhang, Qiang; Zhou, Wenbin; Yang, Feng; Zhang, Nan; Xiao, Shiqi; Gu, Xiaogang; Xiao, Zhuojian; Chen, Huiliang; Wang, Yanchun; Liu, Huaping; Zhou, Weiya

    2017-02-01

    Not Available Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2012CB932302), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11634014, 51172271, 51372269, and 51472264), and the “Strategic Priority Research Program” of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (Grant No. XDA09040202).

  18. Bromine-76 and carbon-11 labelled NNC 13-8199, metabolically stable benzodiazepine receptor agonists as radioligands for positron emission tomography (PET)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foged, C. [Karolinska Institutet, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Psychiatry Section, Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden)]|[Novo Nordisk A/S, Health Care Discovery and Development, Maaloev (Denmark); Halldin, C.; Pauli, S.; Suhara, T.; Swahn, C.G.; Karlsson, P.; Farde, L. [Karolinska Institutet, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Psychiatry Section, Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden); Loc`h, C.; Maziere, B.; Maziere, M. [Service Hospitalier Frederic Joliot, CEA, Orsay (France); Hansen, H.C. [Novo Nordisk A/S, Health Care Discovery and Development, Maaloev (Denmark)

    1997-10-01

    NNC 13-8241 has recently been labelled with iodine-123 and developed as a metabolically stable benzodiazepine receptor ligand for single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) in monkeys and man. NNC 13-8199 is a bromo-analogue of NNC 13-8241. This partial agonist binds selectively and with subnanomolar affinity to the benzodiazepine receptors. We prepared {sup 76}Br labelled NNC 13-8199 from the trimethyltin precursor by the chloramine-T method. Carbon-11 labelled NNC 13-8199 was synthesised by N-alkylation of the nitrogen of the amide group with [{sup 11}C]methyl iodide. Positron emission tomography (PET) examination with the two radioligands in monkeys demonstrated a high uptake of radioactivity in the occipital, temporal and frontal cortex. In the study with [{sup 76}Br]NNC 13-8199, the monkey brain uptake continued to increase until the time of displacement with flumazenil at 215 min after injection. For both radioligands the radioactivity in the cortical brain regions was markedly reduced after displacement with flumazenil. More than 98% of the radioactivity in monkey plasma represented unchanged radioligand 40 min after injection. The low degree of metabolism indicates that NNC 13-8199 is metabolically much more stable than hitherto developed PET radioligands for imaging of benzodiazepine receptors in the primate brain. [{sup 76}Br]NNC 13-8199 has potential as a radioligand in human PET studies using models where a slow metabolism is an advantage. (orig.) With 8 figs., 28 refs.

  19. Food Labels

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Surgery? Choosing the Right Sport for You Shyness Food Labels KidsHealth > For Teens > Food Labels Print A ... have at least 95% organic ingredients. continue Making Food Labels Work for You The first step in ...

  20. Innovative method for carbon dioxide determination in human postmortem cardiac gas samples using headspace-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and stable labeled isotope as internal standard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varlet, V; Smith, F; de Froidmont, S; Dominguez, A; Rinaldi, A; Augsburger, M; Mangin, P; Grabherr, S

    2013-06-19

    A novel approach to measure carbon dioxide (CO2) in gaseous samples, based on a precise and accurate quantification by (13)CO2 internal standard generated in situ is presented. The main goal of this study was to provide an innovative headspace-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (HS-GC-MS) method applicable in the routine determination of CO2. The main drawback of the GC methods discussed in the literature for CO2 measurement is the lack of a specific internal standard necessary to perform quantification. CO2 measurement is still quantified by external calibration without taking into account analytical problems which can often occur considering gaseous samples. To avoid the manipulation of a stable isotope-labeled gas, we have chosen to generate in situ an internal labeled standard gas ((13)CO2) on the basis of the stoichiometric formation of CO2 by the reaction of hydrochloric acid (HCl) with sodium hydrogen carbonate (NaH(13)CO3). This method allows a precise measurement of CO2 concentration and was validated on various human postmortem gas samples in order to study its efficiency. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. A hypersaline microbial mat from the Pacific Atoll Kiritimati: insights into composition and carbon fixation using biomarker analyses and a 13C-labeling approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bühring, S I; Smittenberg, R H; Sachse, D; Lipp, J S; Golubic, S; Sachs, J P; Hinrichs, K-U; Summons, R E

    2009-06-01

    Modern microbial mats are widely recognized as useful analogs for the study of biogeochemical processes relevant to paleoenvironmental reconstruction in the Precambrian. We combined microscopic observations and investigations of biomarker composition to investigate community structure and function in the upper layers of a thick phototrophic microbial mat system from a hypersaline lake on Kiritimati (Christmas Island) in the Northern Line Islands, Republic of Kiribati. In particular, an exploratory incubation experiment with (13)C-labeled bicarbonate was conducted to pinpoint biomarkers from organisms actively fixing carbon. A high relative abundance of the cyanobacterial taxa Aphanocapsa and Aphanothece was revealed by microscopic observation, and cyanobacterial fatty acids and hydrocarbons showed (13)C-uptake in the labeling experiment. Microscopic observations also revealed purple sulfur bacteria (PSB) in the deeper layers. A cyclic C(19:0) fatty acid and farnesol were attributed to this group that was also actively fixing carbon. Background isotopic values indicate Calvin-Benson cycle-based autotrophy for cycC(19:0) and farnesol-producing PSBs. Biomarkers from sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) in the top layer of the mat and their (13)C-uptake patterns indicated a close coupling between SRBs and cyanobacteria. Archaeol, possibly from methanogens, was detected in all layers and was especially abundant near the surface where it contained substantial amounts of (13)C-label. Intact glycosidic tetraether lipids detected in the deepest layer indicated other archaea. Large amounts of ornithine and betaine bearing intact polar lipids could be an indicator of a phosphate-limited ecosystem, where organisms that are able to substitute these for phospholipids may have a competitive advantage.

  2. Carbon transitions from either Calvin cycle or transitory starch to heteroglycans as revealed by (14) C-labeling experiments using protoplasts from Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malinova, Irina; Steup, Martin; Fettke, Joerg

    2013-09-01

    Plants metabolize transitory starch by precisely coordinated plastidial and cytosolic processes. The latter appear to include the action of water-soluble heteroglycans (SHGin ) whose monosaccharide pattern is similar to that of apoplastic glycans (SHGex ) but, unlike SHGex , SHGin strongly interacts with glucosyl transferases. In this study, we analyzed starch metabolism using mesophyll protoplasts from wild-type plants and two knock-out mutants [deficient in the cytosolic transglucosidase, disproportionating isoenzyme 2 (DPE2) or the plastidial phosphoglucomutase (PGM1)] from Arabidopsis thaliana. Protoplasts prelabeled by photosynthetic (14) CO2 fixation were transferred to an unlabeled medium and were darkened or illuminated. Carbon transitions from the Calvin cycle or from starch to both SHGin and SHGex were analyzed. In illuminated protoplasts, starch turn-over was undetectable but darkened protoplasts continuously degraded starch. During illumination, neither the total (14) C content nor the labeling patterns of the sugar residues of SHGin were significantly altered but both the total amount and the labeling of the constituents of SHGex increased with time. In darkened protoplasts, the (14) C-content of most of the sugar residues of SHGin transiently and strongly increased and then declined. This effect was not observed in any SHGex constituent. In darkened DPE2-deficient protoplasts, none of the SHGin constituents exhibited an essential transient increase in labeling. In contrast, some residues of SHGin from the PGM1 mutant exhibited a transient increase in label but this effect significantly differed from that of the wild type. Two conclusions are reached: first, SHGin and SHGex exert different metabolic functions and second, SHGin is directly involved in starch degradation.

  3. Conversion to lanthanum carbonate monotherapy effectively controls serum phosphorus with a reduced tablet burden: a multicenter open-label study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matalon Albert

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lanthanum carbonate (FOSRENOL® is an effective, well-tolerated phosphate binder. The ability of lanthanum to reduce serum phosphorus levels to ≤5.5 mg/dL in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD was assessed in a clinical practice setting. Methods A 16-week, phase IV study enrolled 2763 patients at 223 US sites to evaluate the efficacy of lanthanum carbonate in controlling serum phosphorus in patients with ESRD, and patient and physician satisfaction with, and preference for, lanthanum carbonate after conversion from other phosphate-binder medications. Patients received lanthanum carbonate prescriptions from physicians. These prescriptions were filled at local pharmacies rather than obtaining medication at the clinical trial site. Changes from serum phosphorus baseline values were analyzed using paired t tests. Patient and physician preferences for lanthanum carbonate versus previous medications were assessed using binomial proportion tests. Satisfaction was analyzed using the McNemar test. Daily dose, tablet burden, and laboratory values including albumin-adjusted serum calcium, calcium × phosphorus product, and parathyroid hormone levels were secondary endpoints. Results Serum phosphorus control (≤5.5 mg/dL was effectively maintained in patients converting to lanthanum carbonate monotherapy; 41.6% of patients had controlled serum phosphate levels at 16 weeks. Patients and physicians expressed markedly higher satisfaction with lanthanum carbonate, and preferred lanthanum carbonate over previous medication. There were significant reductions in daily dose and daily tablet burden after conversion to lanthanum carbonate. Conclusions Serum phosphorus levels were effectively maintained in patients converted from other phosphate-binder medications to lanthanum carbonate, with increased satisfaction and reduced tablet burden. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT0016012

  4. More than a century of Grain for Green Program is expected to restore soil carbon stock on alpine grassland revealed by field {sup 13}C pulse labeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Qi; Chen, Dongdong; Zhao, Liang [Key Laboratory of Adaptation and Evolution of Plateau Biota, Northwest Institute of Plateau Biology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xining 810008, Qinghai (China); Yang, Xue [Department of Education of Qinghai Province, Xining 810008, Qinghai (China); Xu, Shixiao [Key Laboratory of Adaptation and Evolution of Plateau Biota, Northwest Institute of Plateau Biology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xining 810008, Qinghai (China); Zhao, Xinquan, E-mail: xqzhao@nwipb.cas.cn [Key Laboratory of Adaptation and Evolution of Plateau Biota, Northwest Institute of Plateau Biology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xining 810008, Qinghai (China); Chengdu Institute of Biology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Chengdu 10041, Sichuan (China)

    2016-04-15

    Anthropogenic changes in land use/cover have altered the vegetation, soil, and carbon (C) cycling on the Qinghai–Tibetan Plateau (QTP) over the last ~ 50 years. As a result, the Grain for Green Program (GfGP) has been widely implemented over the last 10 years to mitigate the impacts of cultivation. To quantify the effects of the GfGP on C partitioning and turnover rates at the ecosystem scale, an in situ {sup 13}C pulse labeling experiment was conducted on natural and GfGP grasslands in an agro-pastoral ecotone in the Lake Qinghai region on the QTP. We found that there were significant differences in the C stocks of all the considered pools in both the natural and GfGP grasslands, with higher CO{sub 2} uptake rates in the GfGP grassland than that in the natural grassland. Partitioning of photoassimilate (% of recovered {sup 13}C) in C pools of both grasslands was similar 25 days after labeling, except in the roots of the 0–15 and 5–15 cm soil layer. Soil organic C (SOC) sequestration rate in the GfGP grassland was 11.59 ± 1.89 g C m{sup −2} yr{sup −1} significantly greater than that in the natural grassland. The results confirmed that the GfGP is an efficient approach for grassland restoration and C sequestration. However, it will take more than a century (119.19 ± 20.26 yr) to restore the SOC stock from the current cropland baseline level to the approximate level of natural grassland. We suggest that additional measures are needed in the selection of suitable plant species for vegetation restoration, and in reasonable grazing management. - Highlights: • Grain for Green Project initiated in 1999 converts cropland to grassland/shrubland. • Impact of Grain for Green on carbon cycling on Qinghai–Tibetan Plateau is unknown. • Effects on carbon partitioning and turnover were accessed by {sup 13}CO{sub 2} pulse labeling. • Different mass of {sup 13}C in excess, similar {sup 13}C partitioning are shown in grasslands. • Soil organic carbon of

  5. The effect of elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration on gross nitrogen and carbon dynamics in a permanent grassland: A field pulse-labeling study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moser, Gerald; Gorenflo, André; Keidel, Lisa; Brenzinger, Kristof; Elias, Dafydd; McNamara, Niall; Maček, Irena; Vodnik, Dominik; Braker, Gesche; Schimmelpfennig, Sonja; Gerstner, Judith; Müller, Christoph

    2014-05-01

    To predict ecosystem reactions to elevated atmospheric CO2 (eCO2) it is essential to understand the interactions between plant carbon input, microbial community composition and activity and associated nutrient dynamics. Long-term observations (> 14 years) within the Giessen Free Air Carbon dioxide Enrichment (Giessen FACE) study on permanent grassland showed next to an enhanced biomass production an unexpected strong positive feedback effect on ecosystem respiration and nitrous oxide (N2O) production. The overall goal of this study is to understand the long-term effects of eCO2 and carbon input on microbial community composition and activity as well as the associated nitrogen dynamics, N2O production and plant N uptake in the Giessen FACE study on permanent grassland. A combination of 13CO2 pulse labelling with 15N tracing of 15NH4+ and 15NO3- was carried out in situ. Different fractions of soil organic matter (recalcitrant, labile SOM) and the various mineral N pools in the soil (NH4+, NO3-), gross N transformation rates, pool size dependent N2O and N2 emissions as well as N species dependent plant N uptake rates and the origin of the CO2 respiration have been quantified. Microbial analyses include exploring changes in the composition of microbial communities involved in the turnover of NH4+, NO3-, N2O and N2, i.e. ammonia oxidizing, denitrifying, and microbial communities involved in dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonia (DNRA). mRNA based analyses will be employed to comparably evaluate the long-term effects of eCO2 on the structure and abundance of these communities, while transcripts of these genes will be used to target the fractions of the communities which actively contribute to N transformations. We quantified the contribution of mycorrhizae on N2O emissions and observed the phenological development of the mycorrhizae after the labeling.

  6. Halloysite nanotube-based electrospun ceramic nanofibre mat: a novel support for zeolite membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhuwen; Zeng, Jiaying; Lv, Dong; Gao, Jinqiang; Zhang, Jian; Bai, Shan; Li, Ruili; Hong, Mei; Wu, Jingshen

    2016-12-01

    Some key parameters of supports such as porosity, pore shape and size are of great importance for fabrication and performance of zeolite membranes. In this study, we fabricated millimetre-thick, self-standing electrospun ceramic nanofibre mats and employed them as a novel support for zeolite membranes. The nanofibre mats were prepared by electrospinning a halloysite nanotubes/polyvinyl pyrrolidone composite followed by a programmed sintering process. The interwoven nanofibre mats possess up to 80% porosity, narrow pore size distribution, low pore tortuosity and highly interconnected pore structure. Compared with the commercial α-Al2O3 supports prepared by powder compaction and sintering, the halloysite nanotube-based mats (HNMs) show higher flux, better adsorption of zeolite seeds, adhesion of zeolite membranes and lower Al leaching. Four types of zeolite membranes supported on HNMs have been successfully synthesized with either in situ crystallization or a secondary growth method, demonstrating good universality of HNMs for supporting zeolite membranes.

  7. Halloysite nanotube-based electrospun ceramic nanofibre mat: a novel support for zeolite membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhuwen; Zeng, Jiaying; Lv, Dong; Gao, Jinqiang; Zhang, Jian; Bai, Shan; Li, Ruili; Wu, Jingshen

    2016-01-01

    Some key parameters of supports such as porosity, pore shape and size are of great importance for fabrication and performance of zeolite membranes. In this study, we fabricated millimetre-thick, self-standing electrospun ceramic nanofibre mats and employed them as a novel support for zeolite membranes. The nanofibre mats were prepared by electrospinning a halloysite nanotubes/polyvinyl pyrrolidone composite followed by a programmed sintering process. The interwoven nanofibre mats possess up to 80% porosity, narrow pore size distribution, low pore tortuosity and highly interconnected pore structure. Compared with the commercial α-Al2O3 supports prepared by powder compaction and sintering, the halloysite nanotube-based mats (HNMs) show higher flux, better adsorption of zeolite seeds, adhesion of zeolite membranes and lower Al leaching. Four types of zeolite membranes supported on HNMs have been successfully synthesized with either in situ crystallization or a secondary growth method, demonstrating good universality of HNMs for supporting zeolite membranes. PMID:28083098

  8. Metabolite labelling reveals hierarchies in Clostridium acetobutylicum that selectively channel carbons from sugar mixtures towards biofuel precursors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aristilde, Ludmilla

    2017-01-01

    Clostridial fermentation of cellulose and hemicellulose relies on the cellular physiology controlling the metabolism of the cellulosic hexose sugar (glucose) with respect to the hemicellulosic pentose sugars (xylose and arabinose) and the hemicellulosic hexose sugars (galactose and mannose). Here, liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry and stable isotope tracers in Clostridium acetobutylicum were applied to investigate the metabolic hierarchy of glucose relative to the different hemicellulosic sugars towards two important biofuel precursors, acetyl-coenzyme A and butyryl-coenzyme A. The findings revealed constitutive metabolic hierarchies in C. acetobutylicum that facilitate (i) selective investment of hemicellulosic pentoses towards ribonucleotide biosynthesis without substantial investment into biofuel production and (ii) selective contribution of hemicellulosic hexoses through the glycolytic pathway towards biofuel precursors. Long-term isotopic enrichment demonstrated incorporation of both pentose sugars into pentose-phosphates and ribonucleotides in the presence of glucose. Kinetic labelling data, however, showed that xylose was not routed towards the biofuel precursors but there was minor contribution from arabinose. Glucose hierarchy over the hemicellulosic hexoses was substrate-dependent. Kinetic labelling of hexose-phosphates and triose-phosphates indicated that mannose was assimilated but not galactose. Labelling of both biofuel precursors confirmed this metabolic preference. These results highlight important metabolic considerations in the accounting of clostridial mixed-sugar utilization. © 2016 The Authors. Microbial Biotechnology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Society for Applied Microbiology.

  9. Relocation of carbon from decomposition of {sup 14}C-labelled needle and fine root litter in peat soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Domish, T.; Laine, J.; Laiho, R. [Helsinki Univ. (Finland). Dept. of Forest Ecology; Finer, L. [Finnish Forest Research Inst. (Finland). Joensuu Research Station; Karsisto, M. [Finnish Forest Research Inst. (Finland). Dept. of Forest Ecology

    1996-12-31

    Drainage of peatlands promotes a shift of biomass and production from the ground vegetation to the trees. Thus, the above-ground (e.g. needles) and below-ground (roots) litter production of trees increases. Fine roots in particular are an important factor in the carbon and nutrient cycle in forest ecosystems. A major part of the annual net primary production of trees may be allocated below ground, the relative proportion being smaller on fertile sites than on less fertile ones. For modelling the carbon balance of drained peatlands, it is important to know the fate of carbon from newly introduced and decomposing litter. Newly added and fertilised tree litter material may be decomposed at a rate different than litter from the ground vegetation. The objectives of this study are to study the pathways of decomposing litter carbon in peat soil and to evaluate the use of the litterbag method in a controlled environment. (9 refs.)

  10. In situ 13CO2 pulse labelling of field-grown eucalypt trees revealed the effects of potassium nutrition and throughfall exclusion on phloem transport of photosynthetic carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epron, Daniel; Cabral, Osvaldo Machado Rodrigues; Laclau, Jean-Paul; Dannoura, Masako; Packer, Ana Paula; Plain, Caroline; Battie-Laclau, Patricia; Moreira, Marcelo Zacharias; Trivelin, Paulo Cesar Ocheuze; Bouillet, Jean-Pierre; Gérant, Dominique; Nouvellon, Yann

    2016-01-01

    Potassium (K) is an important limiting factor of tree growth, but little is known of the effects of K supply on the long-distance transport of photosynthetic carbon (C) in the phloem and of the interaction between K fertilization and drought. We pulse-labelled 2-year-old Eucalyptus grandis L. trees grown in a field trial combining K fertilization (+K and -K) and throughfall exclusion (+W and -W), and we estimated the velocity of C transfer by comparing time lags between the uptake of (13)CO2 and its recovery in trunk CO2 efflux recorded at different heights. We also analysed the dynamics of the labelled photosynthates recovered in the foliage and in the phloem sap (inner bark extract). The mean residence time of labelled C in the foliage was short (21-31 h). The time series of (13)C in excess in the foliage was affected by the level of fertilization, whereas the effect of throughfall exclusion was not significant. The velocity of C transfer in the trunk (0.20-0.82 m h(-1)) was twice as high in +K trees than in -K trees, with no significant effect of throughfall exclusion except for one +K -W tree labelled in the middle of the drought season that was exposed to a more pronounced water stress (midday leaf water potential of -2.2 MPa). Our results suggest that besides reductions in photosynthetic C supply and in C demand by sink organs, the lower velocity under K deficiency is due to a lower cross-sectional area of the sieve tubes, whereas an increase in phloem sap viscosity is more likely limiting phloem transport under drought. In all treatments, 10 times less (13)C was recovered in inner bark extracts at the bottom of the trunk when compared with the base of the crown, suggesting that a large part of the labelled assimilates has been exported out of the phloem and replaced by unlabelled C. This supports the 'leakage-retrieval mechanism' that may play a role in maintaining the pressure gradient between source and sink organs required to sustain high

  11. [Microbial synthesis of deuterium labelled L-phenylalanine with different levels of isotopic enrichment by facultative methylotrophic bacterium Brevibacterium methylicum with RMP assimilation of carbon].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosin, O V; Shvets, V I; Skladnev, D A; Ignatov, I

    2014-01-01

    The preparative microbial synthesis of amino acids labelled with stable isotopes, including deuterium ( 2 H), suitable for biomedical applications by methylotrophic bacteria was studied using L-phenylalanine as example. This amino acid is secreted by Gram-negative aerobic facultative methylotrophic bacteria Brevibacterium methylicum, assimilating methanol via ribulose-5-monophosphate (RMP) cycle of assimilation of carbon, The data on adaptation of L-phenylalanine secreted by methylotrophic bacterium В. methylicum to the maximal concentration of deuterium in the growth medium with 98% 2 Н 2 O and 2% [ 2 Н]methanol, and biosynthesis of deuterium labelled L-phenylalanine With different levels of enrichment are presented. The strain was adapted by means of plating initial cells on firm (2% agarose) minimal growth media with an increasing gradient of 2 Н 2 O concentration from 0; 24.5; 49.0; 73.5 up to 98% 2 Н 2 O followed by subsequent selection of separate colonies stable to the action of 2 Н 2 O. These colonies were capable to produce L-phenylalanine. L-phenylalanine was extracted from growth medium by extraction with isopropanol with the subsequent crystallization in ethanol (output 0.65 g/l). The developed method of microbial synthesis allows to obtain deuterium labelled L-phenylalanine with different levels of isotopic enrichment, depending on concentration of 2 Н 2 O in growth media, from 17% (on growth medium with 24,5% 2 Н 2 O) up to 75% (on growth medium with 98% 2 Н 2 O) of deuterium in the molecule that is confirmed with the data of the electron impact (EI) mass- spectrometry analysis of methyl ethers of N-dimethylamino(naphthalene)-5-sulfochloride (dansyl) phenylalanine in these experimental conditions.

  12. Use of (13) C- and phosphate (18) O-labeled substrate for studying phosphorus and carbon cycling in soils: a proof of concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Avner; Angert, Alon

    2017-06-15

    Stable isotope tracers are commonly used to track the transformations of organic carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) in soils but they have not been used to follow coupled cycles of phosphorus (P) and C because P has only one stable isotope. A novel dually labeled substrate, composed of a (13) C-labeled glucose backbone attached to a phosphate group with known δ(18) OP value, was used to follow the fate of C and P derived from the same compound. The substrate was amended to soils from two natural oak forests, differing in their P levels, and the δ(13) C values of respired CO2 and the δ(18) OP values of soil bioavailable P were measured. The δ(18) OP values of the phosphate accumulated in the soil deviated from the expected value of P that is released from phosphomonoesters by enzymatic reactions (3.7 ‰) and were driven towards isotopic equilibrium with soil water (21.1 ‰), a process which is produced as part of microbial metabolism. This suggests that the substrate's P passed through the microbial biomass before accumulating in the soil, reflecting the rapid microbial turnover rate of the added P. A higher fraction of the substrate-C was respired in the higher P soil by the end of the incubation (20.3 % in comparison with 9.1 % in the lower P soil), indicating stronger energy limitation in the higher P soils. The higher (13) C glucose respiration in the higher P soil also triggered a stronger priming effect than in the lower P soil. Our approach demonstrates that (13) C- and P-(18) O-dually labeled tracers provide invaluable data on the fate of organic P and C in soils. We encourage biogeochemists and soil scientists to develop similar tracers of this kind. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Conversion of methanol to hydrocarbons over ZSM-5 zeolite: an examination of the role of aromatic hydrocarbons using /sup 13/carbon and deuterium-labeled feeds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mole, T.; Bett, G.; Seddon, D.

    1983-12-01

    A mechanism is suggested for the acceleration by aromatic hydrocarbons of zeolite-catalyzed methanol conversion. According to this mechanism, the aromatic hydrocarbon undergoes successive ring methylation, prototropic conversion to an exo-methylene-cyclohexadiene, side-chain methylation, and ring de-ethylation. The overall result is that two methanol molecules give an ethylene molecule. The mechanism is supported by various reactions observed over ZSM-5 catalyst at methanol conversion temperatures: (I) deuteration of p-xylene by D/sub 2/O in the ring and methyl positions; (II) de-alkylation of p-ethyltoluene and n-propylbenzene; and (III) incorporation of the aromatic carbon of benzenes and alkylbenzenes into ethylene product, as revealed by /sup 13/C-labeling studies. 3 tables.

  14. A competitive strategy coupled with endonuclease-assisted target recycling for DNA detection using silver-nanoparticle-tagged carbon nanospheres as labels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Zhu; Gao, Fenglei; Lei, Jianping; Dong, Haifeng; Ju, Huangxian

    2012-10-22

    A simple competitive strategy was designed for the sensitive detection of sequence-specific DNA by combining endonuclease-assisted target recycling and electrochemical stripping analysis of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs). The AgNP-tagged carbon nanospheres were synthesized by means of in situ reduction of Ag(+) adsorbed onto a negatively charged polyelectrolyte layer and functionalized with streptavidin for binding biotin-labeled DNA strands. The labeled strand was captured on the DNA sensor surface by competitive hybridization of biotinated primer 1 and its cleaved product. The cleaved product could be amplified in homogeneous solution by endonuclease-assisted target recycling with a Y-shaped junction DNA structure, thus leading to the correlation of the stripping signal to the target concentration. The functionalized nanosphere was characterized with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. The proposed method showed a linear range from 0.1 to 1000 fM with a limit of detection of 0.066 fM (3σ) and good selectivity for base discrimination. The designed strategy provided a sensitive tool for DNA analysis and could be widely applied in bioanalysis and biomedicine.

  15. Does race matters in consumers' stated preferences for water and carbon footprints labelled food products? Insights from black and white South Africans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owusu-Sekyere, Enoch; Jordaan, Henry

    2017-04-01

    In recent years, governments, policy-makers, and managers of private food companies and agribusinesses are interested in understanding how consumers will react to environmentally sustainable attributes and information on food product labels. This study examines consumers' stated preferences for water and carbon footprints labelled food products from the viewpoint of black and white South Africans. Discrete choice experimental data was collected from black and white consumers to possibly assess cross-ethnic variations in preferences for environmentally sustainable products. Two widely purchased livestock products were chosen for the choice experiment. We found that consumers' preferences for environmentally sustainable attributes vary significantly between black and white South Africans. Our findings revealed that there are profound heterogeneous consumer segments within black and white respondents. The heterogeneity within both sub-samples is better explained at the segment level, rather than at individual level. For both product categories, the findings revealed that there are more distinct consumer segments among black respondents, relative to white respondents. The black respondents consist of water sustainability advocates, carbon reduction advocates, keen environmentalist and environmental neutrals. The white respondents entail keen environmentalist, environmental cynics, and environmental neutrals. The inherent significant variations in preferences for environmentally sustainable attributes across segments and racial groups would help in formulating feasible, and segment-specific environmental sustainability policies and marketing strategies aimed at changing consumers' attitude towards environmentally sustainable products. Demographic targeting of consumer segments, sustainability awareness and segment-specific educational campaigns meant to enhance subjective and objective knowledge on environmental sustainability are important tools for food companies and

  16. Intraseasonal carbon sequestration and allocation in larch trees growing on permafrost in Siberia after (13)C labeling (two seasons of 2013-2014 observation).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masyagina, Oxana; Prokushkin, Anatoly; Kirdyanov, Alexander; Artyukhov, Aleksey; Udalova, Tatiana; Senchenkov, Sergey; Rublev, Aleksey

    2016-12-01

    This research is an attempt to study seasonal translocation patterns of photoassimilated carbon within trees of one of the high latitudes widespread deciduous conifer species Larix gmelinii (Rupr. Rupr). For this purpose, we applied whole-tree labeling by (13)CO2, which is a powerful and effective tool for tracing newly developed assimilates translocation to tissues and organs of a tree. Experimental plot has been established in a mature 105-year-old larch stand located within the continuous permafrost area near Tura settlement (Central Siberia, 64°17'13″N, 100°11'55″E, 148 m a.s.l.). Measurements of seasonal photosynthetic activity and foliage parameters (i.e., leaf length, area, biomass, etc.), and sampling were arranged from early growing season (June 8, 2013; May 14, 2014) until yellowing and senescence of needles (September 17, 2013; September 14, 2014). Labeling by (13)C of the tree branch (June 2013, for 3 branch replicates in 3 different trees) and the whole tree was conducted at early (June 2014), middle (July 2014), and late (August 2013) phase of growing season (for different trees in 3 replicates each time) by three pulses [(CO2)max = 3000-4000 ppmv, (13)CO2 (30 % v/v)]. We found at least two different patterns of carbon translocation associated with larch CO2 assimilation depending on needle phenology. In early period of growing season (June), (13)C appearing in newly developed needles is a result of remobilized storage material use for growth purposes. Then approximately at the end of June, growth processes is switching to storage processes lasting to the end of growing season.

  17. Facile synthesis of carbon-11-labeled arylpiperazinylthioalkyl derivatives as new PET radioligands for imaging of 5-HT{sub 1A}R

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao Mingzhang; Wang Min [Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences, Indiana University School of Medicine, 1345 West 16th Street, L3-208, Indianapolis, IN 46202-2111 (United States); Zheng Qihuang, E-mail: qzheng@iupui.edu [Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences, Indiana University School of Medicine, 1345 West 16th Street, L3-208, Indianapolis, IN 46202-2111 (United States)

    2012-03-15

    Carbon-11-labeled arylpiperazinylthioalkyl derivatives, 2-((4-(4-(2-[{sup 11}C]methoxyphenyl)piperazin-1-yl)butyl)thio)benzo[d]oxazole ([{sup 11}C]5a), 2-((4-(4-(2-[{sup 11}C]methoxyphenyl)piperazin-1-yl)butyl)thio)-5,7-dimethylbenzo [d]oxazole ([{sup 11}C]5c), 2-((4-(4-(2-[{sup 11}C]methoxyphenyl)piperazin-1-yl)butyl)thio)benzo[d]thiazole ([{sup 11}C]5e), 2-((6-(4-(2-[{sup 11}C]methoxyphenyl)piperazin-1-yl)hexyl)thio)benzo[d]oxazole ([{sup 11}C]5g), 2-((6-(4-(2-[{sup 11}C]methoxyphenyl)piperazin-1-yl)hexyl)thio)-5,7-dimethylbenzo [d]oxazole ([{sup 11}C]5i), and 2-((6-(4-(2-[{sup 11}C]methoxyphenyl)piperazin-1-yl)hexyl)thio)benzo[d]thiazole ([{sup 11}C]5k), were prepared from their corresponding phenol precursors with [{sup 11}C]CH{sub 3}OTf through O-[{sup 11}C]methylation and isolated by a simplified solid-phase extraction (SPE) method using a Sep-Pak Plus C18 cartridge in 50-60% (n=5) radiochemical yields based on [{sup 11}C]CO{sub 2} and decay corrected to end of bombardment (EOB). The overall synthesis time from EOB was 23 min, the radiochemical purity was >99%, and the specific activity at end of synthesis (EOS) was 277.5{+-}92.5 GBq/{mu}mol (n=5). - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer New arylpiperazinylthioalkyl derivatives were synthesized. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer New carbon-11-labeled arylpiperazinylthioalkyl derivatives were synthesized. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Simplified solid-phase extraction (SPE) method was employed in radiosynthesis.

  18. Dansyl-labeled anionic amphiphile with a hexadecanoic carbon chain: synthesis and detection for shape transitions in organized molecular assemblies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Lining; Xia, Huiyun; Wang, Xiaoman; Li, Li; Chen, Huaxin

    2015-03-15

    The probing properties of a new fluorophore-labeled anionic surfactant, sodium 16-(N-dansyl)aminocetylate (16-DAN-ACA) were investigated systematically in molecular assemblies, especially in the transitions between micelles and vesicles. 16-DAN-ACA can efficiently differentiate the two different aggregate types in mixed cationic and anionic surfactant systems. The fluorescence anisotropy of 16-DAN-ACA was found to be sensitive for directly detecting the micellar growth in micelles containing oppositely charged surfactants; both cationic cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) systems and anionic sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) systems were studied. The results indicated that the 16-DAN-ACA is a good fluorescent probe for differentiating the different aggregates, and even more can be used to detect the micellar growth.

  19. One-pot green synthesis of N-doped carbon quantum dots for cell nucleus labelling and copper (Ⅱ) detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ci, Jiliang; Tian, Ye; Kuga, Shigenori; Niu, Zhongwei; Wu, Min; Huang, Yong

    2017-09-21

    The doping of nitrogen into carbon quantum dots was vitally important for improvement of fluorescence performance. However, the synthesis of nitrogen-doped carbon quantum dots (N-CQDs) was usually conducted under strong acid and high temperature, which would result in the environmental pollution and energy consumption. Herein, the N-CQDs were prepared by a mild one-pot hydrothermal process. The hydrothermal reaction temperature was adjusted to control the particle size, N/C atomic ratio and quantum yield. The products were water-soluble with narrow particle size distribution and good dispersion stability in wide pH range. The N-CQDs could penetrate into HeLa cell nucleus without any further functionalization. Moreover, the fluorescence of N-CQDs could be selectively quenched by Cu2+, suggesting application of detecting Cu2+ in human plasma. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Carbon nanotube enhanced label-free detection of microRNAs based on hairpin probe triggered solid-phase rolling-circle amplification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Qianqian; Wang, Ying; Deng, Ruijie; Lin, Lei; Liu, Yang; Li, Jinghong

    2014-12-01

    The detection of microRNAs (miRNAs) is imperative for gaining a better understanding of the functions of these biomarkers and has great potential for the early diagnosis of human disease. High sensitivity and selectivity for miRNA detection brings new challenges. Herein, an ultrasensitive protocol for electrochemical detection of miRNA is designed through carbon nanotube (CNT) enhanced label-free detection based on hairpin probe triggered solid-phase rolling-circle amplification (RCA). Traditionally, RCA, widely applied for signal enhancement in the construction of a variety of biosensors, has an intrinsic limitation of ultrasensitive detection, as it is difficult to separate the enzymes, templates, and padlock DNAs from the RCA products in the homogeneous solution. We purposely designed a solid-phase RCA strategy, using CNTs as the solid substrate, integrated with a hairpin structured probe to recognize target miRNA. In the presence of miRNA the stem-loop structure will be unfolded, triggering the CNT based RCA process. Due to the efficient blocking effect originating from the polymeric RCA products, the label-free assay of miRNA exhibits an ultrasensitive detection limit of 1.2 fM. Furthermore, the protocol possesses excellent specificity for resolving lung cancer-related let-7 family members which have only one-nucleotide variations. The high sensitivity and selectivity give the method great potential for applications in online diagnostics and in situ detection in long-term development.The detection of microRNAs (miRNAs) is imperative for gaining a better understanding of the functions of these biomarkers and has great potential for the early diagnosis of human disease. High sensitivity and selectivity for miRNA detection brings new challenges. Herein, an ultrasensitive protocol for electrochemical detection of miRNA is designed through carbon nanotube (CNT) enhanced label-free detection based on hairpin probe triggered solid-phase rolling-circle amplification

  1. Polydopamine Coated Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes as a Versatile Platform with Radionuclide Labeling for Multimodal Tumor Imaging and Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, He; Chao, Yu; Liu, Jingjing; Huang, Jie; Pan, Jian; Guo, Wanliang; Wu, Jizhi; Sheng, Mao; Yang, Kai; Wang,Jian; Liu, Zhuang

    2016-01-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) with various unique properties have attracted great attention in cancer theranostics. Herein, SWNTs are coated with a shell of polydopamine (PDA), which is further modified by polyethylene glycol (PEG). The PDA shell in the obtained SWNT@PDA-PEG could chelate Mn2+, which together with metallic nanoparticulate impurities anchored on SWNTs offer enhanced both T1 and T2 contrasts under magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Meanwhile, also utilizing the PDA shell...

  2. Poly(dopamine) coated gold nanocluster functionalized electrochemical immunosensor for brominated flame retardants using multienzyme-labeling carbon hollow nanochains as signal amplifiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Mouhong; Liu, Yingju; Chen, Xiaofen; Fei, Shidong; Ni, Chunlin; Fang, Yueping; Liu, Chengbin; Cai, Qingyun

    2013-07-15

    An electrochemical, signal amplified immunosensor was developed to detect 3-bromobiphenyl (BBP) by using a bio-inspired polydopamine (PDOP)/gold nanocluster (AuNc) as the sensor platform and multienzyme-labeled carbon hollow nanochains as the signal amplifier. The self-polymerized dopamine membrane on the AuNc-modified indium tin oxide (ITO) electrode were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), contact angle and electrochemical measurements. Such PDOP/AuNc platform featured the mild cross-linking reaction with the dense immobilization of BBP-antigens (BBP-Ag). Moreover, by using multiple horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and secondary antibodies (Ab2) modified one-dimensional carbon hollow nanochains (CHNc) as the signal enhancer, it held promise for improving the sensitivity and detection limit of the immunoassay. Based on the competitive immunoassay protocol, this immunosensor showed a linear range from 1 pM to 2 nM for BBP with a detection limit of 0.5 pM. Also, it exhibited high sensitivity, wide linear range, acceptable stability and reproducibility on a promising immobilization platform using a novel signal amplifier, which may extend its application in other environmental monitoring. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. A Highly Selective and Sensitive Fluorescence Detection Method of Glyphosate Based on an Immune Reaction Strategy of Carbon Dot Labeled Antibody and Antigen Magnetic Beads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Duo; Lin, Bixia; Cao, Yujuan; Guo, Manli; Yu, Ying

    2016-08-03

    A sensitive fluorescence detection method for glyphosate (GLY) was established based on immune reaction. First, carbon dot labeled antibodies (lgG-CDs) which were able to specifically identify glyphosate were prepared with the environmentally friendly carbon dots (CDs) and glyphosate antibody (lgG). lgG-CDs could be used to in situ visualize the distribution of glyphosate in plant tissues. In order to eliminate the effects of excess lgG-CDs on the determination of GLY, antigen magnetic beads Fe3O4-GLY based on magnetic nanoparticles Fe3O4 and glyphosate were constructed and utilized to couple with the excess lgG-CDs. After magnetic separation to remove antigen magnetic beads, there was a linear relationship between the fluorescence intensity of lgG-CDs and the logarithmic concentration of glyphosate in the range of 0.01-80 μg/mL with a detection limit of 8 ng/mL. The method was used for the detection of glyphosate in Pearl River water, tea, and soil samples with satisfactory recovery ratio between 87.4% and 103.7%.

  4. Carbon Metabolism of Soil microorganisms at Low Temperatures: Position-Specific 13C Labeled Glucose Reveals the Story

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apostel, C.; Bore, E. K.; Halicki, S.; Kuzyakov, Y.; Dippold, M.

    2015-12-01

    Metabolic pathway activities at low temperature are not well understood, despite the fact that the processes are relevant for many soils globally and seasonally. To analyze soil metabolism at low temperature, isotopomeres of position-specifically 13C labeled glucose were applied at three temperature levels; +5, -5 -20 oC. In additon, one sterilization treatment with sodium azide at +5 oC was also performed. Soils were incubated for 1, 3 and 10 days while soil samples at -20 oC were additionally sampled after 30 days. The 13C from individual molecule position in respired CO2 was quantifed. Incorporation of 13C in bulk soil, extractable microbial biomass by chloroform fumigation extraction (CFE) and cell membranes of different microbial communities classified by 13C phospholipid fatty acid analysis (PLFA) was carried out. Our 13CO2 data showed a dominance of C-1 respiration at +5 °C for treatments with and without sodium azide, but total respiration for sodium azide inhibited treatments increased by 14%. In contrast, at -5 and -20 oC metabolic behavior showed intermingling of preferential respiration of the glucose C-4 and C-1 positions. Therefore, at +5 °C, pentose phosphate pathway activity is a dominant metabolic pathway used by microorganisms to metabolize glucose. The respiration increase due to NaN3 inhibition was attributed to endoenzymes released from dead organisms that are stabilized at the soil matrix and have access to suitable substrate and co-factors to permit their funtions. Our PLFA analysis showed that incorporation of glucose 13C was higher in Gram negative bacteria than other microbial groups as they are most competitive for LMWOS. Only a limited amount of microbial groups maintained their glucose utilizing activity at -5 and -20 °C and they strongly shifted towards a metabolization of glucose via both glycolysis and pentose phosphate pathways indicating both growth and cellular maintenance. This study revealed a remarkable microbial acitivity

  5. Synthesis and carbon-11 labeling of (R)- and (S)-thionisoxetine, norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors, potential radioligands for positron emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azzurra Filannino, Maria [Institute of Molecular Bioimaging and Physiology, CNR, University of Milano-Bicocca, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Via Olgettina 60, 20132 Milan (Italy); Matarrese, Mario [Institute of Molecular Bioimaging and Physiology, CNR, University of Milano-Bicocca, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Via Olgettina 60, 20132 Milan (Italy)], E-mail: matarrese.mario@hsr.it; Turolla, Elia Anna; Masiello, Valeria; Moresco, Rosa Maria; Todde, Sergio; Verza, Elisa [Institute of Molecular Bioimaging and Physiology, CNR, University of Milano-Bicocca, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Via Olgettina 60, 20132 Milan (Italy); Magni, Fulvio [University of Milano-Bicocca, DIMESAB, via Cadore 48, 20052 Monza (Italy); Cattaneo, Angela; Bachi, Angela [Institute of Molecular Bioimaging and Physiology, CNR, University of Milano-Bicocca, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Via Olgettina 60, 20132 Milan (Italy); Kienle, Marzia Galli [University of Milano-Bicocca, DIMESAB, via Cadore 48, 20052 Monza (Italy); Fazio, Ferruccio [Institute of Molecular Bioimaging and Physiology, CNR, University of Milano-Bicocca, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Via Olgettina 60, 20132 Milan (Italy)

    2007-11-15

    Standards and des-methyl precursors of (R)- and (S)-thionisoxetine, potent and selective norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors, were synthesized and radiolabeled with carbon-11. Both enantiomers of the N-methyl-3-(2-thiomethylphenoxy)-3-phenylpropanamine and the 3-(2-thiomethylphenoxy)-3-phenylpropylamine were obtained via multi-step syntheses, while the radiosyntheses were carried out using [{sup 11}C]CH{sub 3}I. The radiochemical yields were 26%, decay corrected and the specific radioactivity ranging from 2 to 3 Ci/{mu}mol. The HPLC analyses were performed using a chiral column: during the radiolabeling, no racemization occurred and the isomers were synthesized with high enantiomeric purity.

  6. Carbon-11 labeled stilbene derivatives from natural products for the imaging of Aβ plaques in the brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cui, Mengchao; Tang, Ruikun; Li, Zijing; Jia, Hongmei; Liu, Boli [Beijing Normal Univ. (China). Key Laboratory of Radiopharmaceuticals; Zhang, Jinming; Zhang, Xiaojun [Chinese PLA General Hospital, Beijing (China). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine

    2014-04-01

    Four stilbene derivatives from natural products were screened as novel β-amyloid (Aβ) imaging ligands. In vitro binding assay showed that the methylated ligand, (E)-1-methoxy-4-styrylbenzene (8) displayed high binding affinity to Aβ{sub 1-42} aggregates (K{sub i} = 19.5 nM). Moreover, the {sup 11}C-labeled ligand, [{sup 11}C]8 was prepared through an O-methylation reaction using [{sup 11}C]CH{sub 3}OTf. In vitro autoradiography with sections of transgenic mouse brain also confirmed the high and specific binding of [{sup 11}C]8 to Aβ plaques. In vivo biodistribution experiments in normal mice indicated that [{sup 11}C]8 displayed high initial uptake (9.41 ± 0.51% ID/g at 5 min post-injection) into and rapid washout from the brain, with a brain{sub 5} {sub min}/brain{sub 30} {sub min} ratio of 6.63. These preliminary results suggest that [{sup 11}C]8 may be served as a novel Aβ imaging probe for PET. (orig.)

  7. A Label-Free Microelectrode Array Based on One-Step Synthesis of Chitosan–Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotube–Thionine for Ultrasensitive Detection of Carcinoembryonic Antigen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huiren Xu

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA has been an extensively used tumor marker responsible for clinical early diagnosis of cervical carcinomas, and pancreatic, colorectal, gastric and lung cancer. Combined with micro-electro mechanical system (MEMS technology, it is important to develop a novel immune microelectrode array (MEA not only for rapid analysis of serum samples, but also for cell detection in vitro and in vivo. In this work, we depict a simple approach to modify chitosan–multi-walled carbon nanotubes–thionine (CS–MWCNTs–THI hybrid film through one-step electrochemical deposition and the CS-MWCNTs-THI hybrid films are successfully employed to immobilize anti-CEA for fabricating simple, label-free, and highly sensitive electro-chemical immune MEAs. The detection principle of immune MEA was based on the fact that the increasing formation of the antigen-antibody immunocomplex resulted in the decreased response currents and the relationship between the current reductions with the corresponding CEA concentrations was directly proportional. Experimental results indicated that the label-free MEA had good selectivity and the limit of detection for CEA is 0.5 pg/mL signal to noise ratio (SNR = 3. A linear calibration plot for the detection of CEA was obtained in a wide concentration range from 1 pg/mL to 100 ng/mL (r = 0.996. This novel MEA has potential applications for detecting CEA for the research on cancer cells and cancer tissue slices as well as for effective early diagnosis.

  8. DNA-stabilized silver nanoclusters and carbon nanoparticles oxide: A sensitive platform for label-free fluorescence turn-on detection of HIV-DNA sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Yu-Dan; Xia, Li; Xu, Dang-Dang; Xing, Xiao-Jing; Pang, Dai-Wen; Tang, Hong-Wu

    2016-11-15

    Based on the remarkable difference between the interactions of carbon nanoparticles (CNPs) oxide with single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) and double-stranded DNA (dsDNA), and the fact that fluorescence of DNA-stabilized silver nanoclusters (AgNCs) can be quenched by CNPs oxide, DNA-functionalized AgNCs were applied as label-free fluorescence probes and a novel fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) sensor was successfully constructed for the detection of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) DNA sequences. CNPs oxide were prepared with the oxidation of candle soot, hence it is simple, time-saving and low-cost. The strategy of dual AgNCs probes was applied to improve the detection sensitivity by using dual- probe capturing the same target DNA in a sandwich mode and as the fluorescence donor, and using CNPs oxide as the acceptor. In the presence of target DNA, a dsDNA hybrid forms, leading to the desorption of the ssDNA-AgNCs probes from CNPs oxide, and the recovering of fluorescence of the AgNCs in a HIV-DNA concentration-dependent manner. The results show that HIV-DNA can be detected in the range of 1-50nM with a detection limit of 0.40nM in aqueous buffer. The method is simple, rapid and sensitive with no need of labeled fluorescent probes, and moreover, the design of fluorescent dual-probe makes full use of the excellent fluorescence property of AgNCs and further improves the detection sensitivity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Utilization of carbon 13-labelled stable isotopes for studying drug toxicity on cellular metabolism; Utilisation d`isotopes stables marques au carbone 13 pour etudier la toxicite de drogues au niveau du metabolisme cellulaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herve, M.; Wietzerbin, J.; Tran-Dinh, S. [CEA Centre d`Etudes de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France). Dept. de Biologie Cellulaire et Moleculaire

    1994-12-31

    A new approach for studying the effects of two drugs, amphotericine B (AMB), an anti-fungal antibiotic, and 2-deoxy-D-glucose (DG), on the glucose metabolism in brewer yeast cells (Saccharomyces cerevisiae), is presented; AMB interacts with the membrane sterols, inducing formation of pores through which ions and small molecules can pass. DG may enter in the cytosol, where it is phosphoryled by hexokinase into deoxy-D-glucose 6-phosphate (DG6P) which disappears very slowly. DG slows down the glycolysis process and induces the formation of new substances. This paper shows the advantages of utilizing carbon 13-labelled substrates combined to the NMR-13C and NMR-1H techniques. 6 figs., 5 refs.

  10. Nutrition Labeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grunert, Klaus G

    2013-01-01

    because consumers will avoid products that the label shows to be nutritionally deficient, but also because food producers will try to avoid marketing products that appear, according to the label, as nutritionally problematic, for example, because of a high content of saturated fat or salt. Nutrition......Nutrition labeling refers to the provision of information on a food product’s nutritional content on the package label. It can serve both public health and commercial purposes. From a public health perspective, the aim of nutrition labeling is to provide information that can enable consumers...... to make healthier choices when choosing food products. Nutrition labeling is thus closely linked to the notion of the informed consumer, that chooses products according to their aims, on the basis of the information at their disposal. Because many consumers are assumed to be interested in making healthy...

  11. Nutrition Labeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grunert, Klaus G

    2013-01-01

    because consumers will avoid products that the label shows to be nutritionally deficient, but also because food producers will try to avoid marketing products that appear, according to the label, as nutritionally problematic, for example, because of a high content of saturated fat or salt. Nutrition......Nutrition labeling refers to the provision of information on a food product’s nutritional content on the package label. It can serve both public health and commercial purposes. From a public health perspective, the aim of nutrition labeling is to provide information that can enable consumers...... to make healthier choices when choosing food products. Nutrition labeling is thus closely linked to the notion of the informed consumer, that chooses products according to their aims, on the basis of the information at their disposal. Because many consumers are assumed to be interested in making healthy...

  12. Ultrasensitive sandwich-type electrochemical immunosensor based on a novel signal amplification strategy using highly loaded palladium nanoparticles/carbon decorated magnetic microspheres as signal labels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Lei; Guo, Zhankui; Yan, Tao; Ma, Hongmin; Du, Bin; Li, Yueyun; Wei, Qin

    2015-06-15

    An ultrasensitive sandwich-type electrochemical immunosensor for quantitative detection of alpha fetoprotein (AFP) was proposed based on a novel signal amplification strategy in this work. Carbon decorated Fe3O4 magnetic microspheres (Fe3O4@C) with large specific surface area and good adsorption property were used as labels to anchor palladium nanoparticles (Pd NPs) and the secondary antibodies (Ab2). Pd NPs were loaded on Fe3O4@C to obtain Fe3O4@C@Pd with core-shell structure by electrostatic attraction, which were further used to immobilize Ab2 due to the bonding of Pd-NH2. A signal amplification strategy was the noble metal nanoparticles, such as Pd NPs, exhibiting high electrocatalytic activities toward hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) reduction. This signal amplification was novel not only because of the great capacity, but also the ease of magnetic separation from the sample solution based on their magnetic property. Moreover, carboxyl-functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs-COOH) were used for the immobilization of primary antibodies (Ab1). Therefore, high sensitivity could be realized by the designed immunosensor based on this novel signal amplification strategy. Under optimal conditions, the immunosensor exhibited a wide linear range of 0.5 pg/mL to 10 ng/mL toward AFP with a detection limit of 0.16 pg/mL (S/N=3). Moreover, it revealed good selectivity, acceptable reproducibility and stability, indicating a potential application in clinical monitoring of tumor biomarkers. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Synthesis and biological evaluation of carbon-11- and fluorine-18-labeled 2-oxoquinoline derivatives for type 2 cannabinoid receptor positron emission tomography imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evens, Nele [Laboratory for Radiopharmacy, K.U. Leuven, 3000 Leuven (Belgium); Muccioli, Giulio G. [Unite de Chimie Pharmaceutique et de Radiopharmacie, U.C. Louvain, 1200 Bruxelles (Belgium); Houbrechts, Nele [Laboratory for Radiopharmacy, K.U. Leuven, 3000 Leuven (Belgium); Lambert, Didier M. [Unite de Chimie Pharmaceutique et de Radiopharmacie, U.C. Louvain, 1200 Bruxelles (Belgium); Verbruggen, Alfons M. [Laboratory for Radiopharmacy, K.U. Leuven, 3000 Leuven (Belgium); Van Laere, Koen [Division of Nuclear Medicine, K.U. Leuven, 3000 Leuven (Belgium); Bormans, Guy M. [Laboratory for Radiopharmacy, K.U. Leuven, 3000 Leuven (Belgium)], E-mail: guy.bormans@pharm.kuleuven.be

    2009-05-15

    Introduction: The type 2 cannabinoid (CB{sub 2}) receptor is part of the endocannabinoid system and has been suggested as a mediator of several central and peripheral inflammatory processes. Imaging of the CB{sub 2} receptor has been unsuccessful so far. We synthesized and evaluated a carbon-11- and a fluorine-18-labeled 2-oxoquinoline derivative as new PET tracers with high specificity and affinity for the CB{sub 2} receptor. Methods: Two 2-oxoquinoline derivatives were synthesized and radiolabeled with either carbon-11 or fluorine-18. Their affinity and selectivity for the human CB{sub 2} receptor were determined. Biological evaluation was done by biodistribution, radiometabolite and autoradiography studies in mice. Results: In vitro studies showed that both compounds are high affinity CB{sub 2}-specific inverse agonists. Biodistribution study of the tracers in mice showed a high in vivo initial brain uptake and fast brain washout, in accordance with the low CB{sub 2} receptor expression levels in normal brain. A persistently high in vivo binding to the spleen was observed, which was inhibited by pretreatment with two structurally unrelated CB{sub 2} selective inverse agonists. In vitro autoradiography studies with the radioligands confirmed CB{sub 2}-specific binding to the mouse spleen. Conclusion: We synthesized two novel CB{sub 2} receptor PET tracers that show high affinity/selectivity for CB{sub 2} receptors. Both tracers show favourable characteristics as radioligands for central and peripheral in vivo visualization of the CB{sub 2} receptor and are promising candidates for primate and human CB{sub 2} PET imaging.

  14. Ultrasensitive Label-Free Sensing of IL-6 Based on PASE Functionalized Carbon Nanotube Micro-Arrays with RNA-Aptamers as Molecular Recognition Elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khosravi, Farhad; Loeian, Seyed Masoud; Panchapakesan, Balaji

    2017-04-17

    This study demonstrates the rapid and label-free detection of Interleukin-6 (IL-6) using carbon nanotube micro-arrays with aptamer as the molecular recognition element. Single wall carbon nanotubes micro-arrays biosensors were manufactured using photo-lithography, metal deposition, and etching techniques. Nanotube biosensors were functionalized with 1-Pyrenebutanoic Acid Succinimidyl Ester (PASE) conjugated IL-6 aptamers. Real time response of the sensor conductance was monitored with increasing concentration of IL-6 (1 pg/mL to 10 ng/mL), exposure to the sensing surface in buffer solution, and clinically relevant spiked blood samples. Non-specific Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA), PBS samples, and anti-IgG functionalized devices gave similar signatures in the real time conductance versus time experiments with no significant change in sensor signal. Exposure of the aptamer functionalized nanotube surface to IL-6 decreased the conductance with increasing concentration of IL-6. Experiments based on field effect transistor arrays suggested shift in drain current versus gate voltage for 1 pg and 1 ng of IL-6 exposure. Non-specific BSA did not produce any appreciable shift in the Ids versus Vg suggesting specific interactions of IL-6 on PASE conjugated aptamer surface gave rise to the change in electrical signal. Both Z axis and phase image in an Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) suggested unambiguous molecular interaction of the IL-6 on the nanotube-aptamer surface at 1 pg/mL concentration. The concentration of 1 pg falls below the diagnostic gray zone for cancer (2.3 pg-4 ng/mL), which is an indicator of early stage cancer. Thus, nanotube micro-arrays could potentially be developed for creating multiplexed assays involving cancer biomarker proteins and possibly circulating tumor cells all in a single assay using PASE functionalization protocol.

  15. Carbon dots prepared by hydrothermal treatment of dopamine as an effective fluorescent sensing platform for the label-free detection of iron(III) ions and dopamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Konggang; Wang, Jiasi; Ren, Jinsong; Qu, Xiaogang

    2013-05-27

    A facile, economic and green one-step hydrothermal synthesis route using dopamine as source towards photoluminescent carbon nanoparticles (CNPs) is proposed. The as-prepared CNPs have an average size about 3.8 nm. The emission spectra of the CNPs are broad, ranging from approximately 380 (purple) to approximately 525 nm (green), depending on the excitation wavelengths. Due to the favorable optical properties, the CNPs can readily enter into A549 cells and has been used for multicolor biolabeling and bioimaging. Most importantly, the as-prepared CNPs contain distinctive catechol groups on their surfaces. Due to the special response of catechol groups to Fe(3+) ions, we further demonstrate that such wholly new CNPs can serve as a very effective fluorescent sensing platform for label-free sensitive and selective detection of Fe(3+) ions and dopamine with a detection limit as low as 0.32 μM and 68 nM, respectively. The new "mix-and-detect" strategy is simple, green, and exhibits high sensitivity and selectivity. The present method was also applied to the determination of Fe(3+) ions in real water samples and dopamine in human urine and serum samples successfully. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Highly sensitive chemiluminescence immunoassay on chitosan membrane modified paper platform using TiO2 nanoparticles/multiwalled carbon nanotubes as label.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Weiping; Ge, Shenguang; Wang, Shoumei; Yan, Mei; Ge, Lei; Yu, Jinghua

    2013-01-01

    A highly sensitive chemiluminescence (CL) immunoassay was incorporated into a low-cost microfluidic paper-based analytical device (μ-PAD) to fabricate a facile paper-based CL immunodevice (denoted as μ-PCLI). This μ-PCLI was constructed by covalently immobilizing capture antibody on a chitosan membrane modified μ-PADs, which was developed by simple wax printing methodology. TiO2 nanoparticles coated multiwalled carbon nanotubes (TiO2/MWCNTs) were synthesized as an amplification catalyst tag to label signal antibody (Ab2). After sandwich-type immunoreactions, the TiO2/MWCNTs were captured on the surface of μ-PADs to catalyze the luminol-p-iodophenol-H2O2 CL system, which produced an enhanced CL emission. Using prostate-specific antigen as a model analyte, the approach provided a good linear response range from 0.001 to 20 ng/mL with a low detection limit of 0.8 pg/mL under optimal conditions. This μ-PCLI showed good reproducibility, selectivity and stability. The assay results of prostate-specific antigen in clinical serum samples were in good agreement with that obtained by commercially used electrochemiluminescence methods at the Cancer Research Center of Shandong Tumor Hospital (Jinan, Shandong Province, China). This μ-PCLI could be very useful to realize highly sensitive, qualitative point-of-care testing in developing or developed countries.

  17. Regioselective synthesis of isotopically labeled Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinolic acid A (THCA-A-D3) by reaction of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol-D3 with magnesium methyl carbonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Nadine; Wohlfarth, Ariane; Müller, Michael; Auwärter, Volker

    2012-10-10

    For the reliable quantification of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinolic acid A (THCA-A), the biogenetic precursor of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), in biological matrices by LC-MS/MS and GC-MS(/MS), an isotopically labeled internal standard was synthesized starting from Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol-D(3) (THC-D(3)). Synthesis strategy was based on a method reported by Mechoulam et al. in 1969 using magnesium methyl carbonate (MMC) as carboxylation reagent for the synthesis of cannabinoid acids. Preliminary experiments with THC to optimize yield of the product (THCA-A) resulted in the synthesis of the positional isomer tetrahydrocannabinolic acid B (THCA-B) as a byproduct. Using the optimized conditions for the desired isomer, THCA-A-D(3) was prepared and isolated with a yield of approx. 10% after two synthesis cycles. Isotope purity was estimated to be >99% by relative abundance of the molecular ions. The synthesized compound proved to be suitable as an internal standard for quantification of THCA-A in serum and hair samples of cannabis consumers.

  18. Label-free impedimetric aptasensor for detection of femtomole level acetamiprid using gold nanoparticles decorated multiwalled carbon nanotube-reduced graphene oxide nanoribbon composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fei, Airong; Liu, Qian; Huan, Juan; Qian, Jing; Dong, Xiaoya; Qiu, Baijing; Mao, Hanping; Wang, Kun

    2015-08-15

    Gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) decorated multiwalled carbon nanotube-reduced graphene oxide nanoribbon (Au/MWCNT-rGONR) composites were synthesized by a one-pot reaction. By employing the resulting Au/MWCNT-rGONR composites as the support for aptamer immobilization, we developed an ultrasensitive label-free electrochemical impedimetric aptasensor for acetamiprid detection, which was based on that the variation of electron transfer resistance was relevant to the formation of acetamiprid-aptamer complex at the modified electrode surface. Compared with pure Au NPs and MWCNT-rGONR, the Au/MWCNT-rGONR composites modified electrode was the most sensitive aptasensing platform for the determination of acetamiprid. The proposed aptasensor displayed a linear response for acetamiprid in the range from 5×10(-14) M to 1×10(-5) M with an extremely low detection limit of 1.7×10(-14) M (S/N=3). In addition, this impedimetric aptasensor possessed great advantages including the simple operation process, low-cost, selectivity and sensitivity, which provided a promising model for the aptamer-based detection with a direct impedimetric method.

  19. Sustainability Labeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dam, van Y.K.

    2017-01-01

    Sustainability labeling originated from a need to protect the identity of alternative systems of food production and to increase market transparency. From the 1980s onwards sustainability labeling has changed into a policy instrument replacing direct government regulation of the food market, and a

  20. Carbon nanotubes from synthesis to in vivo biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajid, Muhammad Imran; Jamshaid, Usama; Jamshaid, Talha; Zafar, Nadiah; Fessi, H; Elaissari, Abdelhamid

    2016-03-30

    Owing to their unique and interesting properties, extensive research round the globe has been carried out on carbon nanotubes and carbon nanotubes based systems to investigate their practical usefulness in biomedical applications. The results from these studies demonstrate a great promise in their use in targeted drug delivery systems, diagnostic techniques and in bio-analytical applications. Although, carbon nanotubes possess quite interesting properties, which make them potential candidates in the biomedical science, but they also have some inherent properties which arise great concern regarding their biosafety. In this comprehensive review, we have discussed different aspects of carbon nanotubes and carbon nanotube based systems related to biomedical applications. In the beginning, a short historical account of these tiny yet powerful particles is given followed by discussion regarding their types, properties, methods of synthesis, large scale production method, purification techniques and characterization aspects of carbon nanotubes. In the second part of the review, the functionalization of carbon nanotubes is reviewed in detail, which is not only important to make them biocompatible and stable in biological systems but also render them a great property of loading various biomolecules, diagnostic and therapeutic moieties resulting in diversified applications. In the final part of the review, emphasis is given on the pharmacokinetic aspects of carbon nanotubes including administration routes, absorption mechanisms, distribution and elimination of carbon nanotubes based systems. Lastly, a comprehensive account about the potential biomedical applications has been given followed by insights into the future.

  1. Preparation of fluorescence nano -labeling material carbon quantum dots%纳米标记材料荧光碳点的制备

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周尽晖; 金玲; 丁玲; 彭泽泽; 刘茂兰; 韩秀金; 赵庆祝; 贾旭升; 黄泽波

    2015-01-01

    The water -soluble fluorescent carbon quantum dots (CQDs)with glucose as a carbon source and polyethylene glycol (PEG)as dispersant and surface modifier,were synthesized in aqueous medium by microwave irradiation and hydrothermal methods respectively in order to explore the preparation of CQDs.The effect of reaction temperature,time,PEG/glucose molar ratios and pH value on the fluorescence properties of CQDs were discussed by using orthogonal experiment method.The results suggest the influence factors from main to secondary are the reaction time,reactant mole ratio and reaction temperature.The reaction temperature 180 ℃,reaction time 2.5 min,PEG -200 /glucose molar ratio 6 ∶1 and pH =9 are the optimal condition of microwave synthesis of CQDs.And under the resulting optimized conditions,the optical properties of CQDs obtained by the hydrothermal and microwave irradiation two methods are compared preliminary.The results show that the performance of carbon quantum dots prepared by hydrothermal method is superior to that of microwave method.But the two preparation methods of fluorescent CQDs have both good fluorescence properties.They can be used in the field of fluorescent labeling.%以葡萄糖为碳源,以聚乙二醇(PEG)为分散剂和表面修饰剂,采用微波法和水热法2种加热方法,探索了水溶性荧光纳米碳量子点(Carbon Quantum Dots,CQDs)的制备;探讨了碳量子点制备过程中反应温度、反应时间、PEG/葡萄糖摩尔比和 pH 值对碳量子点荧光性能的影响.实验结果表明,微波法合成碳量子点的影响因素的排列顺序为:反应时间>反应物摩尔比>反应温度,反应时间为2.5 min、摩尔比 n(PEG -200):n(葡萄糖)=6∶1、反应温度为180℃,pH =9为微波法合成荧光碳量子点的最优条件,并在此优化条件下,对微波法和水热法制备的碳量子点的光学性质进行了初步比较,结果显示,水热法制

  2. Distribution and Biomarker of Carbon-14 Labeled Fullerene C60 ([14C(U)]C60) in Pregnant and Lactating Rats and their Offspring after Maternal Intravenous Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Rodney W.; Fennell, Timothy R.; Wingard, Christopher J.; Mortensen, Ninell P.; Holland, Nathan A.; Shannahan, Jonathan H.; Pathmasiri, Wimal; Lewin, Anita H.; Sumner, Susan C. J.

    2015-01-01

    A comprehensive distribution study was conducted in pregnant and lactating rats exposed to a suspension of uniformly carbon-14 labeled C60 ([14C(U)]C60). Rats were administered [14C(U)]C60 (~0.2 mg [14C(U)]C60/kg body weight) or 5% polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP)-saline vehicle via a single tail vein injection. Pregnant rats were injected on gestation day (GD) 11 (terminated with fetuses after either 24h or 8d), GD15 (terminated after 24h or 4d), or GD18 (terminated after 24h). Lactating rats were injected on postnatal day 8 and terminated after 24h, 3d or 11d. The distribution of radioactivity in pregnant dams was influenced by both the state of pregnancy and time of termination after exposure. The percentage of recovered radioactivity in pregnant and lactating rats was highest in liver and lungs. Radioactivity was quantitated in over 20 tissues. Radioactivity was found in placenta and in fetuses of pregnant dams, and in the milk of lactating rats and in pups. Elimination of radioactivity was <2% in urine and feces at each time point. Radioactivity remained in blood circulation up to 11 days after [14C(U)]C60 exposure. Biomarkers of inflammation, cardiovascular injury and oxidative stress were measured to study the biological impacts of [14C(U)]C60 exposure. Oxidative stress were elevated in female pups of exposed dams. Metabolomics analysis of urine showed that [14C(U)]C60 exposure to pregnant rats impacted the pathways of vitamin B, regulation of lipid and sugar metabolism and aminoacyl-tRNA biosynthesis. This study demonstrated that [14C(U)]C60 crosses the placenta at all stages of pregnancy examined, and is transferred to pups via milk. PMID:26081520

  3. A Thermal Model for Carbon Nanotube Interconnects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohsin, Kaji Muhammad; Srivastava, Ashok; Sharma, Ashwani K.; Mayberry, Clay

    2013-01-01

    In this work, we have studied Joule heating in carbon nanotube based very large scale integration (VLSI) interconnects and incorporated Joule heating influenced scattering in our previously developed current transport model. The theoretical model explains breakdown in carbon nanotube resistance which limits the current density. We have also studied scattering parameters of carbon nanotube (CNT) interconnects and compared with the earlier work. For 1 µm length single-wall carbon nanotube, 3 dB frequency in S12 parameter reduces to ~120 GHz from 1 THz considering Joule heating. It has been found that bias voltage has little effect on scattering parameters, while length has very strong effect on scattering parameters.

  4. One-step, green, and economic synthesis of water-soluble photoluminescent carbon dots by hydrothermal treatment of wheat straw, and their bio-applications in labeling, imaging, and sensing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuan, Ming; Zhong, Ruibo; Gao, Haiyang; Li, Wanrong; Yun, Xiaoling; Liu, Jingran; Zhao, Xinmin; Zhao, Guofen; Zhang, Feng, E-mail: fengzhang1978@hotmail.com

    2015-11-15

    Graphical abstract: Water-soluble photoluminescent carbon dots can be synthesized simply by a green, economic and one-pot hydrothermal treatment of wheat straw with ∼20% yield, in addition to the compact size and robust photostability they are experimentally demonstrated for multiplexed applications such as sensing ions and labeling and imaging for inorganic nanostructures, cells and even nematodes. The converting biomass wastes to promising biocompatible nanomaterials could be a “one-stone-two-birds” strategy to other carbon-containing biomass waste for a highly effectively carbon recycling use and sustainable energy and environment future. - Highlights: • Photoluminescent carbon dots can be synthesized by wheat straw with about 20% yield. • Carbon dots can be used for both nonliving and living labeling, imaging, and sensing. • Carbon dots can be used as a fluorescent ink. - Abstract: The use of biomass as renewable and sustainable energy source has attracted the attention of politics and research and development (R&D) facilities around the world. Agricultural straw acts as a typical biowaste, which still needs highly effective recycling to save the biomass urgently at present. Photoluminescent carbon dots (C-dots) are novel biocompatible nanomaterials that have been proved to be produced from many carbon-abundant materials and hold great promise for the modern nanobiomedicine. In order to realize a “one-stone-two-birds” strategy, we report a green, economic, one-pot method in this article for synthesizing photoluminescent C-dots by hydrothermal treatment of wheat straw. Using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD), we show that the as-prepared C-dots are amorphous in structure and are mainly composed of carbon. Their tiny size (<2 nm), combined with the characteristic excitation-dependent relatively bright emission, and robust photostability made the C-dots a potential biocompatible nanomaterial for bio-applications. We

  5. Synthesis of carbon-13 labelled carbonaceous deposits and their evaluation for potential use as surrogates to better understand the behaviour of the carbon-14-containing deposit present in irradiated PGA graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, L.; Walker, S.; Bond, G.; Eccles, H.; Heard, P. J.; Scott, T. B.; Williams, S. J.

    2016-03-01

    The present work has used microwave plasma chemical vapour deposition to generate suitable isotopically labelled carbonaceous deposits on the surface of Pile Grade A graphite for use as surrogates for studying the behaviour of the deposits observed on irradiated graphite extracted from UK Magnox reactors. These deposits have been shown elsewhere to contain an enhanced concentration of 14C compared to the bulk graphite. A combination of Raman spectroscopy, ion beam milling with scanning electron microscopy and secondary ion mass spectrometry were used to determine topography and internal morphology in the formed deposits. Direct comparison was made against deposits found on irradiated graphite samples trepanned from a Magnox reactor core and showed a good similarity in appearance. This work suggests that the microwave plasma chemical vapour deposition technique is of value in producing simulant carbon deposits, being of sufficiently representative morphology for use in non-radioactive surrogate studies of post-disposal behaviour of 14C-containing deposits on some irradiated Magnox reactor graphite.

  6. Research on Consumer Behavior Regarding Food with Carbon Labeling:a Literature Review%碳标签食品的消费者行为相关研究:一个文献综述

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张斌; 何艳; 王丹萍

    2013-01-01

      在减少碳排放的过程中,许多国家往往将重点放在工业生产方面,而忽视了居民日常消费特别是食品消费的碳减排。碳标签食品正是试图通过鼓励消费者选择低碳排放的食品来改变这一状况。但这种方式能否如愿很大程度上取决于消费者是否关注环境的恶化以及是否愿意为碳标签食品支付额外的费用。因此,文章综述了国外关于碳标签食品的理论基础、认知、影响消费者行为的因素和支付意愿研究方法的相关文献。这对于我国推进碳标签食品体系的建立,进而降低食品消费的碳排放具有重要的现实意义和普遍意义。%Many countries merely focus on reducing industrial carbon emission while ignoring carbon discharge from consump⁃tion of daily necessities,especially food.Food with carbon labeling is an attempt to encourage consumers to choose food with low carbon emission.The effectiveness of this move is largely determined by consumers’awareness of environmental degrada⁃tion and their willingness to pay extra money for such food.The paper reviews literature about studies on the cognition of food with carbon labeling, related theories,and factors influencing consumer choices, and approaches to consumer willingness.It is of practical and universal value in promoting the establishment of China’s food carbon labeling mechanism so as to cut carbon emission from food consumption.

  7. Synthesis and biological evaluation of a {sup 99m}Tc-labelled sulfonamide conjugate for in vivo visualization of carbonic anhydrase IX expression in tumor hypoxia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akurathi, Vamsidhar [Laboratory for Radiopharmacy, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, 3000 Leuven (Belgium); Dubois, Ludwig; Lieuwes, Natasja G. [Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO), GROW School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, University of Maastricht, 6200 Maastricht (Netherlands); Chitneni, Satish K. [Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Centre, Durham, NC 27710 (United States); Cleynhens, Bernard J. [Laboratory for Radiopharmacy, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, 3000 Leuven (Belgium); Vullo, Daniela; Supuran, Claudiu T. [Universita degli Studi di Firenze, Polo Scientifico, Laboratorio di Chimica Bioinorganica, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino, Florence (Italy); Verbruggen, Alfons M. [Laboratory for Radiopharmacy, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, 3000 Leuven (Belgium); Lambin, Philippe [Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO), GROW School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, University of Maastricht, 6200 Maastricht (Netherlands); Bormans, Guy M., E-mail: guy.bormans@pharm.kuleuven.b [Laboratory for Radiopharmacy, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, 3000 Leuven (Belgium)

    2010-07-15

    Introduction: Carbonic anhydrase (CA) IX is a transmembrane protein overexpressed in many frequently occurring tumors associated with tumor hypoxia. Sulfonamides and their bioisosteres are known to inhibit CA IX activity. In this study, 4-(2-aminoethyl)benzenesulfonamide was conjugated to a tridentate ligand, N-2-picolyl-N-acetic acid and labeled with a {sup 99m}Tc(I)-tricarbonyl moiety resulting in [{sup 99m}Tc(CO){sub 3} (L)] (L=N-(pyridin-2-yl-methyl)-N[2-(4-sulfamoylphenyl)-ethyl]aminoethyl acetate) complex, [{sup 99m}Tc]-5. Similarly the corresponding rhenium congener (Re-4) was synthesized. The in vitro CA IX affinity and inhibitory activity of Re-4 were determined and [{sup 99m}Tc]-5 was evaluated as a tracer for in vivo visualisation of CA IX expression. Methods: Evaluation of the in vitro affinity (inhibition constant, K{sub i}) of Re-4 for CA isozymes I, II, IX and XII was carried out by assaying the CA catalyzed CO{sub 2} hydration activity and efficacy studies were performed in HT 29 cell lines expressing CA IX under normoxia or hypoxia. Biodistribution studies of [{sup 99m}Tc]-5 were performed in xenograft mice bearing CA IX expressing tumors. Results: The in vitro affinity of Re-4 for CA IX was 58 nM and CA IX induced acidification of extracellular medium was efficiently reduced (P<.05) in the presence of 1 mM Re-4. Biodistribution studies indicated a maximal tumor uptake of [{sup 99m}Tc]-5 of 0.1% ID/g at 30 min post injection. Conclusion: [{sup 99m}Tc]-5 and its rhenium congener were synthesized and characterized. In vitro studies showed that the rhenium compound has a high affinity for CA IX and effectively inhibits CA IX activity. In vivo studies revealed a limited tracer accumulation in a CA IX expressing tumor but with increasing tumor-to-blood activity ratios as a function of time.

  8. A label-free amperometric immunosensor for detection of zearalenone based on trimetallic Au-core/AgPt-shell nanorattles and mesoporous carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Lei; Chao, Yingjun; Cao, Wei, E-mail: chm_caow@ujn.edu.cn; Wang, Yulan; Luo, Chuannan; Pang, Xuehui; Fan, Dawei; Wei, Qin, E-mail: sdjndxwq@163.com

    2014-10-17

    Highlights: • Au@AgPt nanorattles have special structure of Au-core and imperfect AgPt-shell. • Au@AgPt are proposed for the first time applied in electrochemical immunosensor. • Substrate materials MC/Au@AgPt possess excellent conductivity and high surface area. • The proposed immunosensor exhibits a low detection limit of 1.7 pg mL{sup −1}. - Abstract: A novel label-free amperometric immunosensor is proposed for the ultrasensitive detection of zearalenone (ZEN) based on mesoporous carbon (MC) and trimetallic nanorattles (core/shell particles with movable cores encapsulated in the shells). The nanorattles are composed of special Au-core and imperfect AgPt-shell structure (Au@AgPt). The Au@AgPt nanorattles are loaded onto the MC by physical adsorption. The structure of the Au@AgPt nanorattles was characterized by using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) confirmed the composition of the synthesized nanorattles. Compared with monometallic and bimetallic nanoparticles (NPs), Au@AgPt nanorattles show a higher electron transfer rate due to the synergistic effect of the Au, Ag and Pt NPs. MC further improves the sensitivity of the immunosensor because of its extraordinarily large specific surface area, suitable pore arrangement and outstanding conductivity. The large specific surface area of MC and MC@Au@AgPt were characterized by the BET method. ZEN antibodies are immobilized onto the nanorattles via Ag–NH{sub 2} bonds and Pt–NH{sub 2} bonds. Cyclic voltammetry and square wave voltammetry were used to characterize the recognizability of ZEN. Under optimum experimental conditions, the proposed immunosensor exhibited a low detection limit (1.7 pg mL{sup −1}), a wide linear range (from 0.005 to 15 ng mL{sup −1}) as well as good stability, reproducibility and selectivity. The sensor can be used in clinical analysis.

  9. Comparative biodistribution and metabolism of carbon-11-labeled N-[2-(dimethylamino)ethyl]acridine-4-carboxamide and DNA-intercalating analogues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osman, S; Rowlinson-Busza, G; Luthra, S K; Aboagye, E O; Brown, G D; Brady, F; Myers, R; Gamage, S A; Denny, W A; Baguley, B C; Price, P M

    2001-04-01

    The tricyclic carboxamide N-[2-(dimethylamino)ethyl]acridine-4-carboxamide (DACA) is a DNA-intercalating agent capable of inhibiting both topoisomerases I and II and is currently in Phase II clinical trial. Many related analogues have been developed, but despite their potent in vitro cytotoxicities, they exhibit poor extravascular distribution. As part of an ongoing drug development program to obtain related "minimal intercalators" with lower DNA association constants, we have compared the biodistribution and metabolite profiles of the prototype compound, DACA, with three analogues to aid rational drug selection. All of these compounds share a common structural feature, N-dimethyl side chain, which was radiolabeled with the positron-emitting radioisotope, carbon-11. This strategy was selected because it allows promising candidates emerging from preclinical studies in animals to be evaluated rapidly in humans using positron emission tomography (PET). The acridine DACA, the phenazine SN 23490, the pyridoquinoline SN 23719, and the dibenzodioxin SN 23935 were found to be cytotoxic in in vitro assays with an IC50 of 1.4-1.8 microM, 0.4-0.6 microM, 1.3-1.6 microM, and 24-36 microM, respectively, in HT29, U87MG, and A375M cell lines. Ex vivo biodistribution studies with carbon-11 radiolabeled compounds in mice bearing human tumor xenografts showed rapid clearance of 11C-radioactivity (parent drug and metabolites) from blood and the major organs. Rapid hepatobiliary clearance and renal excretion were also observed. There was low [DACA, [11C](9-methoxyphenazine-1-carboxamide (SN 23490), [11C]2-(4-pyridyl)quinoline-8-carboxamide (SN 23719), and [11C]dibenzo[1,4]dioxin-1-carboxamide (SN 23935) at 30 min were 2.9 +/- 1.1, 2.3 +/- 0.6, 2.6 +/- 0.6, and 0.7 +/- 0.2, respectively. For SN 23719, the distribution of 11C-radioactivity in normal tissues and tumors determined ex vivo was in broad agreement with that determined in vivo by whole body PET scanning. [11C]DACA was rapidly

  10. Computational Nanotechnology of Molecular Materials, Electronics, and Actuators with Carbon Nanotubes and Fullerenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Deepak; Menon, Madhu; Cho, Kyeongjae; Biegel, Bryan (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The role of computational nanotechnology in developing next generation of multifunctional materials, molecular scale electronic and computing devices, sensors, actuators, and machines is described through a brief review of enabling computational techniques and few recent examples derived from computer simulations of carbon nanotube based molecular nanotechnology.

  11. Study of Carbon Nanotube-Substrate Interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaqueline S. Soares

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Environmental effects are very important in nanoscience and nanotechnology. This work reviews the importance of the substrate in single-wall carbon nanotube properties. Contact with a substrate can modify the nanotube properties, and such interactions have been broadly studied as either a negative aspect or a solution for developing carbon nanotube-based nanotechnologies. This paper discusses both theoretical and experimental studies where the interaction between the carbon nanotubes and the substrate affects the structural, electronic, and vibrational properties of the tubes.

  12. Nanosensors for the smart city : new insight on promising carbon nanotubes devices

    OpenAIRE

    Lebental, Bérengère

    2011-01-01

    The development of nanosensors for the smart-city is discussed in the framework of the Sense-City Equipex project. Two types of carbon nanotubes based sensors are discussed, a field effect transistor using a carbon nanotubes randow network as channel for humidity sensing and a microsonar using an aligned array of carbon nanotubes as vibrating membrane for microporosity monitoring in concrete. The Sense-city project is also described.

  13. Carbon-Nanotube-Based Epoxy Matrix Thermal Interface Materials for Thermal Management in Load Bearing Aerospace Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-12

    electron scattering at the grain boundaries as well as the twin boundaries in addition to the scattering from the boundary surface at lower temperatures...measurements are obtained by ellipsometry and profilometer. The estimation of the mean grain size in both films and the evidence of twin boundaries are...5c,d) also reveal the presence of twin boundaries in both Sn films more often than grain boundaries. Moreover, the density of twin boundaries in

  14. Design of Carbon Nanotube-Based Gas-Diffusion Cathode for O2 Reduction by Multicopper Oxidases (Postprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-04

    Comm. 2004 , 6 , 526 . [ 35 ] S. Calabrese Barton , Electrochim. Acta 2005 , 50 , 2145 . [ 36 ] A. M. Kuznetsov , V. A...E. Piles , D. Lehnert , S. Calabrese Barton , R. Rincon , P. Atanassov , Electroanal. 2008 , 20 , 1099 . 7bH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim wileyonlinelibrary.com

  15. Synthesis of a water-soluble analog of 6-methyl-3-N-alkyl catechol labeled with carbon 13: NMR approach to the reactivity of poison ivy/oak sensitizers toward proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goetz, G; Meschkat, E; Lepoittevin, J P

    1999-04-19

    A 13-C labeled water soluble derivative of alkylcatechol was synthesized and reacted with human serum albumin in phosphate buffer at pH 7.4 in air to allow a slow oxidation of the catechol into orthoquinone. The formation of several adducts was evidenced by a combination of 13C and 1H-13C correlation NMR. Although some adducts could result from a classical o-quinone formation - Michael type addition, our results suggest that a second pathway, involving a direct reaction of a carbon centered radical with proteins could be an important mechanism in the formation of modified proteins.

  16. Food labels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Selsøe Sørensen, Henrik; Clement, Jesper; Gabrielsen, Gorm

    2012-01-01

    The food industry develops tasty and healthy food but fails to deliver the message to all consumers. The consumers’ background knowledge is essential for how they find and decode relevant elements in the cocktail of signs which fight for attention on food labels. In this exploratory study, we find...... evidence for dividing consumers into two profiles: one relying on general food knowledge and another using knowledge related to signpost labels. In a combined eyetracking and questionnaire survey we analyse the influence of background knowledge and identify different patterns of visual attention...... for the two consumer profiles. This underlines the complexity in choosing and designing the ‘right’ elements for a food package that consumers actually look at and are able to make rational use of. In spite of any regulation of food information provided by authorities, consumers will still be confronted...

  17. ANALYSIS OF MATERIAL MECHANICAL PROPERTIES FOR SINGLE-WALLED CARBON NANOTUBES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fu Yiming; Xu Xiaoxian

    2005-01-01

    Abstract The carbon-carbon bond between two nearest-neighboring atoms is modeled as a beam and the single-walled carbon nanotubes are treated as the space frame structures in order to analyze the mechanical properties of carbon nanotubes. Based on the theory of TersoffBrenner force field, the energy relationships between the carbon-carbon bond and the beam model are obtained, and the stiffness parameters of the beam are determined. By applying the present model, the Young's moduli of the single-walled carbon nanotubes with different tube diameters are determined. And the present results are compared with available data.

  18. Sustainability labels on food products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grunert, Klaus G; Hieke, Sophie; Wills, Josephine

    2014-01-01

    of sustainability was limited, but understanding of four selected labels (Fair Trade, Rainforest Alliance, Carbon Footprint, and Animal Welfare) was better, as some of them seem to be self-explanatory. The results indicated a low level of use, no matter whether use was measured as self-reported use of different......This study investigates the relationship between consumer motivation, understanding and use of sustainability labels on food products (both environmental and ethical labels), which are increasingly appearing on food products. Data was collected by means of an online survey implemented in the UK...... types of information available on food labels or as use inferred from the results of a choice-based conjoint analysis. Hierarchical regression indicated that use is related to both motivation and understanding, and that both motivation, understanding and use are affected by demographic characteristics...

  19. Introduction to Pesticide Labels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesticide product labels provide critical information about how to safely and legally handle and use pesticide products. Unlike most other types of product labels, pesticide labels are legally enforceable. Learn about pesticide product labels.

  20. Food Label and You

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Products Food Home Food Ingredients, Packaging & Labeling Labeling & Nutrition The Food Label and You — Video Share Tweet ... FDA has issued final changes to update the Nutrition Facts label for packaged foods. For more information, ...

  1. Defect-related hysteresis in nanotube-based nano-electromechanical systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pantelides Sokrates

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The electronic properties of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs depend on the positions of their walls with respect to neighboring shells. This fact can enable several applications of MWCNTs as nano-electromechanical systems (NEMS. In this article, we report the findings of a first-principles study on the stability and dynamics of point defects in double-walled carbon nanotubes (DWCNTs and their role in the response of the host systems under inter-tube displacement. Key defect-related effects, namely, sudden energy changes and hysteresis, are identified, and their relevance to a host of MWCNT-based NEMS is highlighted. The results also demonstrate the dependence of these effects on defect clustering and chirality of DWCNT shells.

  2. Effect of synthetic carbon amino saccharides on the transfer of labeled mineral 45Ca2+ and 32PO 4 3- ions from drinking water to blood serum in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarrete, J. M.; Muller, G.; Martinez, T.; Cabrera, L.; Gracia, I.; Fabila, L.; Urbina, V. M.

    2006-01-01

    The favorable effects of fulvic acids as fertilizers are very well known and they have been used long time ago in their natural state in dead leaves. Their extraction from natural sources is rather expensive, but the production of very similar carbon amino saccharides by sugar oxidation has been industrially applied in Mexico. Good properties of this commercial product as fertilizer have been proved empirically in different crops as well as at laboratory level, by the efficient absorption of radioactive labeled mineral ions in vegetables when they are carried by this synthetic organic matter in aqueous solution. Now, its effect has been tested by filtration of radioactively labeled 45Ca2+ and 32PO 4 3- ions from drinking water to blood serum through mice liver and kidneys. The results indicate that the filtration and diffusion of these mineral ions also improved, the same that in vegetables, in the presence of the synthetic carbon amino saccharides highly soluble in water. These results suggest the appropriateness of further research to evaluate their possible use either as a dietary complement or as auxiliaries in the treatment of liver and kidney diseases.

  3. Single-walled carbon nanotubes as near-infrared optical biosensors for life sciences and biomedicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Astha; Homayoun, Aida; Bannister, Christopher W; Yum, Kyungsuk

    2015-03-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes that emit photostable near-infrared fluorescence have emerged as near-infrared optical biosensors for life sciences and biomedicine. Since the discovery of their near-infrared fluorescence, researchers have engineered single-walled carbon nanotubes to function as an optical biosensor that selectively modulates its fluorescence upon binding of target molecules. Here we review the recent advances in the single-walled carbon nanotube-based optical sensing technology for life sciences and biomedicine. We discuss the structure and optical properties of single-walled carbon nanotubes, the mechanisms for molecular recognition and signal transduction in single-walled carbon nanotube complexes, and the recent development of various single-walled carbon nanotube-based optical biosensors. We also discuss the opportunities and challenges to translate this emerging technology into biomedical research and clinical use, including the biological safety of single-walled carbon nanotubes. The advances in single-walled carbon nanotube-based near-infrared optical sensing technology open up a new avenue for in vitro and in vivo biosensing with high sensitivity and high spatial resolution, beneficial for many areas of life sciences and biomedicine.

  4. A glass-sealed field emission x-ray tube based on carbon nanotube emitter for medical imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, Seung Jun; Jeong, Jaeik; Ahn, Jeung Sun; Park, Hunkuk; Kwak, Junghwan; Noh, Eunkyong; Paik, Sanghyun; Kim, Seung Hoon; Ryu, Jehwang

    2016-04-01

    We report the design and fabrication of a carbon nanotube based a glass-sealed field emission x-ray tube without vacuum pump. The x-ray tube consists of four electrodes with anode, focuser, gate, and cathode electrode. The shape of cathode is rectangular for isotropic focal spot size at anode target. The obtained x-ray images show clearly micrometer scale.

  5. On Online Labeling with Polynomially Many Labels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Babka, Martin; Bulánek, Jan; Cunat, Vladimír

    2012-01-01

    In the online labeling problem with parameters n and m we are presented with a sequence of nkeys from a totally ordered universe U and must assign each arriving key a label from the label set {1,2,…,m} so that the order of labels (strictly) respects the ordering on U. As new keys arrive it may be...

  6. Carbon-13 (13C) labeling of Bacillus subtilis vegetative cells and spores: suitability for DNA stable isotope probing (DNA-SIP) of spores in soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, Wayne L; Fedenko, Jeffrey; Schuerger, Andrew C

    2009-07-01

    To test the suitability of DNA stable isotope probing (DNA-SIP) for characterizing bacterial spore populations in soils, the properties of Bacillus subtilis cells and spores intensely labeled with [(13)C]glucose were characterized. Spore germination, vegetative growth rates, and sporulation efficiency were indistinguishable on glucose versus [(13)C]glucose, as were spore wet heat and UV resistance. Unlabeled and (13)C-labeled spores contained 1.0989 and 74.336 at.% (13)C, and exhibited wet densities of 1.356 and 1.365 g/ml, respectively. Chromosomal DNAs containing (12)C versus (13)C were readily separated by their different buoyant densities in cesium chloride/ethidium bromide gradients.

  7. Reconstruction of central carbon metabolism in Sulfolobus solfataricus using a two-dimensional gel electrophoresis map, stable isotope labelling and DNA microarray analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snijders, B.P.L.; Walther, J.; Peter, S.; Kinnman, I.; Vos, de M.J.G.; Werken, van de H.J.G.; Brouns, S.J.J.; Oost, van der J.; Wright, P.C.

    2006-01-01

    In the last decade, an increasing number of sequenced archaeal genomes have become available, opening up the possibility for functional genomic analyses. Here, we reconstructed the central carbon metabolism in the hyperthermophilic crenarchaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus (glycolysis, gluconeogenesis an

  8. Reconstruction of central carbon metabolism in Sulfolobus solfataricus using a two-dimensional gel electrophoresis map, stable isotope labelling and DNA microarray analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snijders, B.P.L.; Walther, J.; Peter, S.; Kinnman, I.; Vos, de M.J.G.; Werken, van de H.J.G.; Brouns, S.J.J.; Oost, van der J.; Wright, P.C.

    2006-01-01

    In the last decade, an increasing number of sequenced archaeal genomes have become available, opening up the possibility for functional genomic analyses. Here, we reconstructed the central carbon metabolism in the hyperthermophilic crenarchaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus (glycolysis, gluconeogenesis

  9. Carbon nanotube membranes with ultrahigh specific adsorption capacity for water desalination and purification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hui Ying; Han, Zhao Jun; Yu, Siu Fung; Pey, Kin Leong; Ostrikov, Kostya; Karnik, Rohit

    2013-01-01

    Development of technologies for water desalination and purification is critical to meet the global challenges of insufficient water supply and inadequate sanitation, especially for point-of-use applications. Conventional desalination methods are energy and operationally intensive, whereas adsorption-based techniques are simple and easy to use for point-of-use water purification, yet their capacity to remove salts is limited. Here we report that plasma-modified ultralong carbon nanotubes exhibit ultrahigh specific adsorption capacity for salt (exceeding 400% by weight) that is two orders of magnitude higher than that found in the current state-of-the-art activated carbon-based water treatment systems. We exploit this adsorption capacity in ultralong carbon nanotube-based membranes that can remove salt, as well as organic and metal contaminants. These ultralong carbon nanotube-based membranes may lead to next-generation rechargeable, point-of-use potable water purification appliances with superior desalination, disinfection and filtration properties.

  10. Electronic transport properties of metallic single-walled carbon nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹觉先; 颜晓红; 肖杨; 丁建文

    2003-01-01

    We have calculated the differential conductance of metallic carbon nanotubes by the scatter matrix method. It is found that the differential conductance of metallic nanotube-based devices oscillates as a function of the bias voltage between the two leads and the gate voltage. Oscillation period T is directly proportional to the reciprocal of nanotube length. In addition, we found that electronic transport properties are sensitive to variation of the length of the nanotube.

  11. One-step, green, and economic synthesis of water-soluble photoluminescent carbon dots by hydrothermal treatment of wheat straw, and their bio-applications in labeling, imaging, and sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Ming; Zhong, Ruibo; Gao, Haiyang; Li, Wanrong; Yun, Xiaoling; Liu, Jingran; Zhao, Xinmin; Zhao, Guofen; Zhang, Feng

    2015-11-01

    The use of biomass as renewable and sustainable energy source has attracted the attention of politics and research and development (R&D) facilities around the world. Agricultural straw acts as a typical biowaste, which still needs highly effective recycling to save the biomass urgently at present. Photoluminescent carbon dots (C-dots) are novel biocompatible nanomaterials that have been proved to be produced from many carbon-abundant materials and hold great promise for the modern nanobiomedicine. In order to realize a "one-stone-two-birds" strategy, we report a green, economic, one-pot method in this article for synthesizing photoluminescent C-dots by hydrothermal treatment of wheat straw. Using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD), we show that the as-prepared C-dots are amorphous in structure and are mainly composed of carbon. Their tiny size (bio-applications. We have experimentally demonstrated their potential applications in biomedical labeling, imaging, and sensing/detecting. The high yield (∼20%) of C-dots from wheat straw may suggest a new economic strategy for recycling biowaste.

  12. Carbon Nanotube Electron Sources: From Electron Beams to Energy Conversion and Optophononics

    OpenAIRE

    Alireza Nojeh

    2014-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes have a host of properties that make them excellent candidates for electron emitters. A significant amount of research has been conducted on nanotube-based field-emitters over the past two decades, and they have been investigated for devices ranging from flat-panel displays to vacuum tubes and electron microscopes. Other electron emission mechanisms from carbon nanotubes, such as photoemission, secondary emission, and thermionic emission, have also been studied, although to a ...

  13. Electrochemical immunoassay of benzo[a]pyrene based on dual amplification strategy of electron-accelerated Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}/polyaniline platform and multi-enzyme-functionalized carbon sphere label

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin Mouhong [Institute of Biomaterials, College of Sciences, South China Agricultural University, Guangzhou 510642, Guangdong Province (China); Liu Yingju, E-mail: liuyingju@hotmail.com [Institute of Biomaterials, College of Sciences, South China Agricultural University, Guangzhou 510642, Guangdong Province (China); Sun Zihong; Zhang Shenglai; Yang Zhuohong [Institute of Biomaterials, College of Sciences, South China Agricultural University, Guangzhou 510642, Guangdong Province (China); Ni Chunlin, E-mail: niclchem@scau.edu.cn [Institute of Biomaterials, College of Sciences, South China Agricultural University, Guangzhou 510642, Guangdong Province (China)

    2012-04-13

    Graphical abstract: Schematic representation of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}/PANI/Nafion-based immunosensor using multi-HRP-HCS-Ab{sub 2} bioconjugates as labels. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An electrochemical immunosensor for high sensitive detection of BaP. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A dual amplification strategy by Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}/PANI/Nafion film and multi-HRP-HCS-Ab{sub 2} label. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An accelerated electron transfer pathway by the Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}/PANI/Nafion film. - Abstract: An electrochemical immunosensor, basing on a dual amplification strategy by employing a biocompatible Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}/polyaniline/Nafion (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}/PANI/Nafion) layer as sensor platform and multi-enzyme-antibody functionalized highly-carbonized spheres (multi-HRP-HCS-Ab{sub 2}) as label, was constructed for sensitive detection of benzo[a]pyrene (BaP). The stable film, Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}/PANI/Nafion, can not only immobilize biomolecules, but also catalyze the reduction of hydrogen peroxide, indicating an accelerated electron transfer pathway of the platform. The experimental conditions, including the concentration of Nafion, concentration of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}/polyaniline (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}/PANI), pH of the detection solution and concentrations of biomolecules, were studied in detail. Basing on a competitive immunoassay, the current change was proportional to the logarithm of BaP concentration in the range of 8 pM and 2 nM with the detection limit of 4 pM. The proposed immunosensor exhibited acceptable reproducibility and stability. This new type of dual amplification strategy may provide potential applications for the detection of environmental pollutants.

  14. In vivo visualization of alpha-synuclein deposition by carbon-11-labelled 2-[2-(2-dimethylaminothiazol-5-yl)ethenyl]-6-[2-(fluoro)ethoxy]benzoxazole positron emission tomography in multiple system atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuchi, Akio; Takeda, Atsushi; Okamura, Nobuyuki; Tashiro, Manabu; Hasegawa, Takafumi; Furumoto, Shozo; Kobayashi, Michiko; Sugeno, Naoto; Baba, Toru; Miki, Yasuo; Mori, Fumiaki; Wakabayashi, Koichi; Funaki, Yoshihito; Iwata, Ren; Takahashi, Shoki; Fukuda, Hiroshi; Arai, Hiroyuki; Kudo, Yukitsuka; Yanai, Kazuhiko; Itoyama, Yasuto

    2010-06-01

    The histopathological hallmark of multiple system atrophy is the appearance of intracellular inclusion bodies, named glial cytoplasmic inclusions, which are mainly composed of alpha-synuclein fibrils. In vivo visualization of alpha-synuclein deposition should be used for the diagnosis and assessment of therapy and severity of pathological progression in multiple system atrophy. Because 2-[2-(2-dimethylaminothiazol-5-yl)ethenyl]-6-[2-(fluoro)ethoxy] benzoxazole could stain alpha-synuclein-containing glial cytoplasmic inclusions in post-mortem brains, we compared the carbon-11-labelled 2-[2-(2-dimethylaminothiazol-5-yl)ethenyl]-6-[2-(fluoro)ethoxy] benzoxazole positron emission tomography findings of eight multiple system atrophy cases to those of age-matched normal controls. The positron emission tomography data demonstrated high distribution volumes in the subcortical white matter (uncorrected P benzoxazole positron emission tomography is a promising surrogate marker for monitoring intracellular alpha-synuclein deposition in living brains.

  15. Food Label and You

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Animal & Veterinary Cosmetics Tobacco Products Food Home Food Ingredients, Packaging & Labeling Labeling & Nutrition The Food Label and You — Video Share Tweet Linkedin Pin ...

  16. Ultra High Energy Density Cathodes with Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-10

    34Enhanced Capacity and Rate Capability of Carbon Nanotube Based Anodes with Titanium Contacts for Lithium Ion Batteries," ACS Nano, vol. 4, pp. 6121- 6131...2010/10/26 2010. [2] S. L. Chou, et al., "Silicon/Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Composite Paper as a Flexible Anode Material for Lithium Ion...AFRL-RV-PS- AFRL-RV-PS- TR-2013-0170 TR-2013-0170 ULTRA HIGH ENERGY DENSITY CATHODES WITH CARBON NANOTUBES Brian J. Landi, et al. Rochester

  17. Synthesis of organic substances labelled with {sup 14}C and {sup 35}S; Syntheses de molecules organiques marquees par le carbone-14 et le soufre-35

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pichat, L. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1958-07-01

    After a brief history of the development of the Section des Molecules marquees of the Frenchmic Energy Commission, the author gives an outline of the synthesis of the following labelled compounds: benzene {sup 14}C-6; phenyl-p-fluorophenyl, thienyl-2 {beta} alanines {beta} {sup 14}C; noradrenaline {beta} {sup 14}C (arterenol {beta} {sup 14}C), dotriacontane {sup 14}C-16-17, aminoethane sulfinic acid (hypotaurine {sup 35}S). (author)Fren. [French] Apres un bref historique du developpement de la Section des Molecules marquees du Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique fran is, l'auteur donne un resume des syntheses des composes marques suivants: benzene {sup 14}C-6; phenyl-p-fluorophenyl, thienyl-2 {beta} alamines {beta} {sup 14}C; noradrenaline {beta} {sup 14}C (arterenol {beta} {sup 14}C), dotriacontane {sup 14}C-16-17, acide aminoethane sulfinique (hypotaurine {sup 35}S). (auteur)

  18. Deep Label Distribution Learning With Label Ambiguity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Bin-Bin; Xing, Chao; Xie, Chen-Wei; Wu, Jianxin; Geng, Xin

    2017-06-01

    Convolutional Neural Networks (ConvNets) have achieved excellent recognition performance in various visual recognition tasks. A large labeled training set is one of the most important factors for its success. However, it is difficult to collect sufficient training images with precise labels in some domains such as apparent age estimation, head pose estimation, multi-label classification and semantic segmentation. Fortunately, there is ambiguous information among labels, which makes these tasks different from traditional classification. Based on this observation, we convert the label of each image into a discrete label distribution, and learn the label distribution by minimizing a Kullback-Leibler divergence between the predicted and ground-truth label distributions using deep ConvNets. The proposed DLDL (Deep Label Distribution Learning) method effectively utilizes the label ambiguity in both feature learning and classifier learning, which help prevent the network from over-fitting even when the training set is small. Experimental results show that the proposed approach produces significantly better results than state-of-the-art methods for age estimation and head pose estimation. At the same time, it also improves recognition performance for multi-label classification and semantic segmentation tasks.

  19. Label-free detection of Staphylococcus aureus in skin using real-time potentiometric biosensors based on carbon nanotubes and aptamers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelada-Guillén, Gustavo A; Sebastián-Avila, José Luis; Blondeau, Pascal; Riu, Jordi; Rius, F Xavier

    2012-01-15

    In this paper we report the first biosensor that is able to detect Staphylococcus aureus in real-time. A network of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) acts as an ion-to-electron potentiometric transducer and anti-S. aureus aptamers are the recognition element. Carbon nanotubes were functionalized with aptamers using two different approaches: (1) non-covalent adsorption of drop-casted pyrenil-modified aptamers onto the external walls of the SWCNTs; and (2) covalent bond formation between amine-modified aptamers and carboxylic groups previously introduced by oxidation at the ends of the SWCNTs. Both of these approaches yielded functional biosensors but there were large differences in the minimum detectable bacteria concentration and sensitivity values. With covalent functionalization, the minimum concentration detected was 8×10(2)colony-forming units (CFU)/mL and the sensitivity was 0.36 mV/Decade. With the non-covalent approach, the sensitivity was higher (1.52 mV/Decade) but the minimum concentration detected was greatly affected (10(7) CFU/mL). In both cases, potential as a function of Decade of bacteria concentration was linear. Functional biosensors were used to test real samples from freshly excised pig skin, contaminated with the target microorganism, as a surrogate for human skin.

  20. Reciprocal C-13-labeling: A method for investigating the catabolism of cosubstrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, B.; Nielsen, Jette

    2002-01-01

    The principle of reciprocal labeling is to use a uniformly C-13-labeled substrate as the primary carbon source and a naturally labeled cosubstrate. Metabolites derived from a naturally labeled cosubstrate, in this case amino acids, can then be identified by their relatively lower content of C-13,...

  1. Synthesis and utilization of carbon nanotubes for fabrication of electrochemical biosensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawal, Abdulazeez T., E-mail: abdul.lawal@yahoo.com

    2016-01-15

    Graphical abstract: Carbon nanotubes. - Highlights: • This review discusses synthesis and applications of carbon nanotubes sensors. • The review summarizes contributions of carbon nanotube to electrochemical biosensor. • Good electrical conductivity makes carbon nanotubes a good material for biosensors. • Carbon nanotubes promotes electron transfer that aids biosensing of biomolecules. - Abstract: This review summarizes the most recent contributions in the fabrication of carbon nanotubes-based electrochemical biosensors in recent years. It discusses the synthesis and application of carbon nanotubes to the assembly of carbon nanotube-based electrochemical sensors, its analytical performance and future expectations. An increasing number of reviews and publications involving carbon nanotubes sensors have been reported ever since the first design of carbon nanotube electrochemical biosensors. The large surface area and good electrical conductivity of carbon nanotubes allow them to act as “electron wire” between the redox center of an enzyme or protein and an electrode's surface, which make them very excellent material for the design of electrochemical biosensors. Carbon nanotubes promote the different rapid electron transfers that facilitate accurate and selective detection of cytochrome-c, β-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, hemoglobin and biomolecules, such as glucose, cholesterol, ascorbic acid, uric acid, dopamine pesticides, metals ions and hydrogen peroxide.

  2. New {alpha}{sub 1}-adrenoceptor antagonists derived from the antipsychotic sertindole - carbon-11 labelling and pet examination of brain uptake in the cynomolgus monkey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balle, Thomas E-mail: tb@dfuni.dk; Halldin, Christer; Andersen, Linus; Hjorth Alifrangis, Lene; Badolo, Lassina; Gjervig Jensen, Klaus; Chou, Y.-W.; Andersen, Kim; Perregaard, Jens; Farde, Lars

    2004-04-01

    Central {alpha}{sub 1}-adrenergic receptors are potential targets for recently developed antipsychotic drugs. Two new 11C labeled potent and selective {alpha}{sub 1}-adrenoceptor antagonists, 1- [2- [4-[1-(4-fluorophenyl)-5-(2-[{sup 11}C]methyl-tetrazol-5-yl)-1H-indol-3-yl]-1- pipridinyl]ethyl]-imidazolidin-2-one ([{sup 11}C]2) and 1- [2- [4-[1-(4-fluorophenyl)-5-(1-[{sup 11}C]methyl-(1,2,3-triazol-4-yl) -1H-indol-3-yl]- 1-piperidinyl]ethyl]-imidazolidin-2-one ([{sup 11}C]3) were prepared and evaluated for imaging of central {alpha}{sub 1}-adrenergic receptors in the cynomolgus monkey brain. For both compounds, the total brain radioactivity was only about 0.6% of the radioactivity injected i.v. There was no evident binding in regions known to contain {alpha}{sub 1}-adrenoceptors. This observation suggests that the affinity of the radioligands in primates in vivo is not sufficient to provide a signal for specific binding that can be differentiated from the background. In addition, active efflux by P-glycoprotein may be responsible for the low total brain-uptake of the two radioligands. Both compounds showed a highly polarised and verapamile sensitive transport across monolayers of Caco-2 cells. The total brain-uptake of [{sup 3}H]2 was 6 times higher in mdr1a(-/-) knock-out mice lacking the gene encoding P-glycoprotein compared to wild type mice. Pretreatment of one monkey with Cyclosporin A (15 mg/kg) resulted in 40% higher brain uptake for [{sup 11}C]3 when compared with baseline. These observations support the view that efflux by P-glycoprotein can be of quantitative importance for the total brain-uptake of some PET radioligands.

  3. Synthesis and in Vivo Biological Evaluation of (68)Ga-Labeled Carbonic Anhydrase IX Targeting Small Molecules for Positron Emission Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sneddon, Deborah; Niemans, Raymon; Bauwens, Matthias; Yaromina, Ala; van Kuijk, Simon J A; Lieuwes, Natasja G; Biemans, Rianne; Pooters, Ivo; Pellegrini, Paul A; Lengkeek, Nigel A; Greguric, Ivan; Tonissen, Kathryn F; Supuran, Claudiu T; Lambin, Philippe; Dubois, Ludwig; Poulsen, Sally-Ann

    2016-07-14

    Tumor hypoxia contributes resistance to chemo- and radiotherapy, while oxygenated tumors are sensitive to these treatments. The indirect detection of hypoxic tumors is possible by targeting carbonic anhydrase IX (CA IX), an enzyme overexpressed in hypoxic tumors, with sulfonamide-based imaging agents. In this study, we present the design and synthesis of novel gallium-radiolabeled small-molecule sulfonamides targeting CA IX. The compounds display favorable in vivo pharmacokinetics and stability. We demonstrate that our lead compound, [(68)Ga]-2, discriminates CA IX-expressing tumors in vivo in a mouse xenograft model using positron emission tomography (PET). This compound shows specific tumor accumulation and low uptake in blood and clears intact to the urine. These findings were reproduced in a second study using PET/computed tomography. Small molecules investigated to date utilizing (68)Ga for preclinical CA IX imaging are scarce, and this is one of the first effective (68)Ga compounds reported for PET imaging of CA IX.

  4. Multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs)-doped polypyrrole DNA biosensor for label-free detection of genetically modified organisms by QCM and EIS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truong, Thi Ngoc Lien; Tran, Dai Lam; Vu, Thi Hong An; Tran, Vinh Hoang; Duong, Tuan Quang; Dinh, Quang Khieu; Tsukahara, Toshifumi; Lee, Young Hoon; Kim, Jong Seung

    2010-01-15

    In this paper, we describe DNA electrochemical detection for genetically modified organism (GMO) based on multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs)-doped polypyrrole (PPy). DNA hybridization is studied by quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). An increase in DNA complementary target concentration results in a decrease in the faradic charge transfer resistance (R(ct)) and signifying "signal-on" behavior of MWCNTs-PPy-DNA system. QCM and EIS data indicated that the electroanalytical MWCNTs-PPy films were highly sensitive (as low as 4pM of target can be detected with QCM technique). In principle, this system can be suitable not only for DNA but also for protein biosensor construction.

  5. Carbon Nanotubes as Active Components for Gas Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-De Zhang

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The unique structure of carbon nanotubes endows them with fantastic physical and chemical characteristics. Carbon nanotubes have been widely studied due to their potential applications in many fields including conductive and high-strength composites, energy storage and energy conversion devices, sensors, field emission displays and radiation sources, hydrogen storage media, and nanometer-sized semiconductor devices, probes, and quantum wires. Some of these applications have been realized in products, while others show great potentials. The development of carbon nanotubes-based sensors has attracted intensive interest in the last several years because of their excellent sensing properties such as high selectivity and prompt response. Carbon nanotube-based gas sensors are summarized in this paper. Sensors based on single-walled, multiwalled, and well-aligned carbon nanotubes arrays are introduced. Modification of carbon nanotubes with functional groups, metals, oxides, polymers, or doping carbon nanotubes with other elements to enhance the response and selectivity of the sensors is also discussed.

  6. Synthesis of carbon-11 labeled 1-(3,4-dimethoxybenzyl)-2,2-dimethyl-1,2,3,4-tetrahydroisoquinolinium derivatives as new potential PET SK{sub Ca} channel imaging agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao Mingzhang; Wang Min [Department of Radiology, Indiana University School of Medicine, 1345 West 16th Street, L-3 Room 202, Indianapolis, IN 46202 (United States); Zheng Qihuang [Department of Radiology, Indiana University School of Medicine, 1345 West 16th Street, L-3 Room 202, Indianapolis, IN 46202 (United States)], E-mail: qzheng@iupui.edu

    2008-02-15

    Small conductance Ca{sup 2+}-activated K{sup +} (SK{sub Ca}) channels play an important role in many functions such as neuronal communication and behavioral plasticity, secretion, and cell proliferation. SK{sub Ca} channel modulation is associated with various brain, heart, and cancer diseases. N-methyl-laudanosine and its structurally related derivatives, substituted 1-(3,4-dimethoxybenzyl)-2,2-dimethyl-1,2,3,4-tetrahydroisoquinoliniums, are reversible and selective SK{sub Ca} channel blockers. Carbon-11 labeled N-methyl-laudanosine and its tetrahydroisoquinolinium derivatives may serve as new probes for positron emission tomography (PET) to image SK{sub Ca} channels in the brain, heart, and cancer. The key intermediates, substituted isoquinolines (3a-c), were synthesized using a modification of the Pomeranz-Fritsch procedure. The precursors, substituted 1-(3,4-dimethoxybenzyl)-2-methyl-1,2,3,4-tetrahydroisoquinolines (8a-c), and their corresponding reference standards, substituted 1-(3,4-dimethoxybenzyl)-2,2-dimethyl-1,2,3,4-tetrahydroisoquinoliniums (9a-c), were synthesized from compounds 3a-c with 3,4-dimethoxybenzyl chloride (2) in multiple steps with moderate to excellent chemical yields. The precursor 6,7-dimethoxy-1-(3,4-dimethoxybenzyl)-2-methyl-1,2,3, 4-tetrahydroisoquinoline (10) was commercially available, and the methylation of compound 10 with methyl iodide provided N-methyl-laudanosine (11). The target quaternary ammonium tracers, carbon-11 labeled 1-(3,4-dimethoxybenzyl)-2,2-dimethyl-1,2,3,4-tetrahydroisoquinoliniums ([{sup 11}C]9a-c and [{sup 11}C]11), were prepared by N-[{sup 11}C]methylation of the tertiary amine precursors (8a-c and 10) with [{sup 11}C]methyl triflate and isolated by a simplified solid-phase extraction (SPE) purification using a SiO{sub 2} or cation-exchange CM Sep-Pak cartridge in 40-65% radiochemical yields.

  7. Electrical conductivity of metal–carbon nanotube structures: Effect of length and doping

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R Nigam; S Habeeb; A Priyadarshi; N Jaggi

    2014-08-01

    The electrical properties of asymmetric metal–carbon nanotube (CNT) structures have been studied using density functional theory and non-equilibrium Green’s function method with Atomistix tool kit. The models with asymmetric metal contacts and carbon nanotube bear resemblance to experimental set-ups. The study shows the effect of varying length of carbon nanotube on electronic transmission and conductance of various structures. The effects of silicon doping on CNT-based structures have also been studied. The conductance of structure with longer CNT is more compared with shorter CNT. Silicon doping increases the conductivity of carbon nanotube-based structure.

  8. The preparation of nucleotides uniformly labelled with carbon-14 by biosynthetic methods. Isolation of adenylic, uridylic, cytidylic,and guanylic acids, from the alkaline hydrolysate of escherichia coli RNA; Preparacion de nucleiotidos uniformemente marcados con 14{sup C}, por via biosintetica. Aislamiento de los acidos adenilico, uridilico, citidilico y guanilico, procedentes de la hidrolisis alcalina de RNA de escherichia Coli.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia Pineda, M. D.; Pacheco Lopez, J.

    1978-07-01

    A method is described for the preparation and analysis of adenylic, uri dilic, cytidi- 11c and guanylic acids, labelled with 14{sup C}. Escherichia coli cells have been labelled by growing them in a medi dia containing glucose-14{sup C} as their only source of carbon. RNA is isolated from the cells, and after hydrolysis of the molecule the resulting nucleotides are separated by gel filtration and exchange chromatography. Chemical and radiochemical purity of the Isolated nucleotides is determined, and also its specific radioactivity. (Author) 30 refs.

  9. Soil organic carbon can be up-taken by plant roots and stored in plant biosilica: NanoSIMS and isotopic labeling evidences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandre, Anne; Santos, Guaciara M.; balesdent, Jerôme; Basile-Doelsch, Isabelle; Borschneck, Daniel; Cazevieille, Patrick; Chevassus-Rosset, Claire; Doelsch, Emmanuel; Harutyunyan, Araks; Lemee, Laurent; Mazur, Jean-Charles; Reyerson, Paul; Signoret, Patrick

    2015-04-01

    Plant biosilica particles called phytoliths contain occluded organic compounds (phytC). Over the last few years, phytC content, nature, origin, paleoenvironmental meaning and impact in the global C cycle has been the subject of increasing debate[1, 2]. Inconsistencies in phytC quantification were fed by the scarcity of in-situ characterization of phytC in phytoliths and by inadequate extraction methods[3]. Very recently, 14C-AMS analyses of soil organic matter (SOM), amendments, plant tissues, atmospheric CO2 and phytolith samples, evidenced that a small but significant pool of phytC is not photosynthetic but derived from old SOM[4,5]. From there, several investigations were started to go further into the characterization of phytC and the mechanisms in play behind old SOM absorption by plant roots and old SOM occlusion in plant biosilica. Here, we first reconstruct at high spatial resolution the 3-dimentional location of phytC and its C/N signature using 3D X-ray microscopy and Nano-scale Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (NanoSIMS). A pool of phytC appears homogeneously distributed in the silica structure and its C:N estimate is in the range of amino acid signatures[6]. Then, we use 13C and 15N-labelled amino acids monitored from an hydroponic solution to grass roots, stems, leaves and phytoliths to evidence that amino acids are absorbed as such by the roots and are concentrated in phytC rather than in the plant tissues. These findings strengthen and complement the 14C evidences. Both of them dissuade attempts to use phytC as a proxy of plant C. Further, they open new avenues of investigation regarding the processes which drive SOM mobilization by plant uptake, for a better understanding of soil/plant interactions involved in the terrestrial C cycle. [1] Santos et al. 2010. Radiocarbon 52:113 [2] Santos et al. 2012. Biogeosci. 9:1873 [3] Corbineau et al. 2013 R. Paleobot. Palyn. 197: 179 [4] Reyerson et al. 2013 AGU Fall meeting 2013 (1803125) [5] Santos et al. 2014

  10. A Thermal Model for Carbon Nanotube Interconnects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clay Mayberry

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we have studied Joule heating in carbon nanotube based very large scale integration (VLSI interconnects and incorporated Joule heating influenced scattering in our previously developed current transport model. The theoretical model explains breakdown in carbon nanotube resistance which limits the current density. We have also studied scattering parameters of carbon nanotube (CNT interconnects and compared with the earlier work. For 1 µm length single-wall carbon nanotube, 3 dB frequency in S12 parameter reduces to ~120 GHz from 1 THz considering Joule heating. It has been found that bias voltage has little effect on scattering parameters, while length has very strong effect on scattering parameters.

  11. A label-free aptasensor based on polyethyleneimine wrapped carbon nanotubes in situ formed gold nanoparticles as signal probe for highly sensitive detection of dopamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azadbakht, Azadeh; Roushani, Mahmoud; Abbasi, Amir Reza; Menati, Saeid; Derikvand, Zohreh

    2016-11-01

    Herein, a highly sensitive and selective aptamer biosensor for quantitative detection of a model target, dopamine (DA), was developed by using a gold (Au) electrode modified with highly dispersed gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and acid-oxidized carbon nanotubes (CNTs-COOH) functionalized with polyethyleneimine (PEI). Amine-terminated12-mercaptureprobe (ssDNA1) as a capture probe and specific DA-aptamer (ssDNA2) as a detection probe was immobilized on the surface of a modified electrode via the formation of covalent amide bond and hybridization, respectively. Methylene blue (MB) was used as the redox probe, which was intercalated into the aptamer through the specific interaction with its guanine bases. In the presence of DA, the interaction between aptamer and DA displaced the MB from the electrode surface, rendering a lowered electrochemical signal attributed to decreased amount of adsorbed MB. The developed electrochemical DA aptasensor showed a good linear response to DA from 5 to 300nM with detection limit of 2.1nM. The biosensor also exhibited satisfactory selectivity and could be successfully used to detect DA in blood serum sample.

  12. Resonance Raman spectroscopy of chemically modified and isotopically labelled purple membranes: I. A critical examination of the carbon-nitrogen vibrational modes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ehrenberg, B. (Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY); Lemley, A.T.; Lewis, A.; Zastrow, M.V.; Crespi, H.L.

    1980-01-01

    Resonance Raman spectra of bacteriorhodopsin are compared to the spectra of this protein modified in the following ways: (1) selective deuteration at the C-15 carbon atom of retinal, (2) full deuteration of the retinal, (3) the addition of a conjugated double bond in the ..beta..-ionone ring (3-dehydroretinal), (4) full deuteration of the protein and lipid components, (5) /sup 15/N enrichment of the entire membrane and (6) deuteration of the entire membrane. A detailed comparison of the /sup 15/N-enriched membrane and naturally occurring purple membrane from 800 cm/sup -1/ to 1700 cm/sup -1/ reveals that /sup 15/N enrichment affects the frequency of only two vibrational modes. These occur at 1642 cm/sup -1/ and 1620 cm/sup -1/ in naturally occurring purple membrane and at 1628 cm/sup -1/ and 1615 cm/sup -1/ in the /sup 15/N-enriched samples. Therefore, this pair of bands reflects the states of protonation of the Schiff base.

  13. Hyphenation of ionic liquid albumin glassy carbon biosensor or protein label-free sensor with differential pulse stripping voltammetry for interaction studies of human serum albumin with fenoprofen enantiomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abd El-Hady, Deia; Youssef, Ahmed K

    2013-04-15

    A new biosensor or protein label-free sensor composed of 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphates (BMIMPF6)-human serum albumin (HSA) film on glassy carbon electrode (GCE) was produced. Unfortunately, the native proteins themselves are often unstable in physiological conditions. Here, we introduced conjugation with ionic liquid (IL) such as BMIMPF6 which improved the stability and binding affinity of protein onto GCE. A rapid, simple and reliable method for the chiral discrimination and real time protein binding studies of fenoprofen enantiomers with HSA was developed by hyphenating ionic liquid albumin glassy carbon (ILAGC) biosensor with differential pulse cathodic stripping voltammetry under physiological conditions. The electrochemical behavior of chiral fenoprofen was monitored by cyclic voltammetry, from which large response was obtained from l-fenoprofen. The surface coverage of fenoprofen enantiomers was calculated by double potential-step chronocoulometry. The binding constants of chiral fenoprofen with HSA were estimated to be 3.2×10(5)±0.3 L mol(-1) and 0.8×10(4)±0.4 L mol(-1) for L- and D-fenoprofen, respectively giving acceptable precision (SD ≤ 0.4) and good agreement with the literature values. The competitive interactions of ibuprofen with fenoprofen enantiomers-HSA were studied giving a significant decreasing in the binding degrees of analytes to HSA. The reciprocal competitive experiments indicated that L-fenoprofen replaced D-fenoprofen from HSA. The proposed electrochemical biosensor holds great potential for chiral discrimination and real time binding studies of drugs with protein. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Database of normal human cerebral blood flow, cerebral blood volume, cerebral oxygen extraction fraction and cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen measured by positron emission tomography with {sup 15}O-labelled carbon dioxide or water, carbon monoxide and oxygen: a multicentre study in Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ito, Hiroshi [Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Akita Research Institute of Brain and Blood Vessels, Akita (Japan); Department of Nuclear Medicine and Radiology, Division of Brain Sciences, Institute of Development, Aging and Cancer, Tohoku University, 4-1 Seiryo-Machi, 980-8575, Aoba-Ku, Sendai (Japan); Kanno, Iwao [Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Akita Research Institute of Brain and Blood Vessels, Akita (Japan); Kato, Chietsugu [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Hokkaido University School of Medicine, Sapporo (Japan); Sasaki, Toshiaki [Cyclotoron Research Center, Iwate Medical University, Morioka (Japan); Ishii, Kenji [Positron Medical Center, Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Gerontology, Tokyo (Japan); Ouchi, Yasuomi [Positron Medical Center, Hamamatsu Medical Center, Hamakita (Japan); Iida, Akihiko [Nagoya City Rehabilitation Center, Nagoya (Japan); Okazawa, Hidehiko [PET Unit, Research Institute, Shiga Medical Center, Moriyama (Japan); Hayashida, Kohei [Department of Radiology, National Cardiovascular Center, Suita, Osaka (Japan); Tsuyuguchi, Naohiro [Department of Neurosurgery, Osaka City University Medical School, Osaka (Japan); Ishii, Kazunari [Division of Imaging Research, Hyogo Institute for Aging Brain and Cognitive Disorders, Himeji, Hyogo (Japan); Kuwabara, Yasuo [Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Senda, Michio [Department of Image-based Medicine, Institute of Biomedical Research and Innovation, Kobe (Japan)

    2004-05-01

    Measurement of cerebral blood flow (CBF), cerebral blood volume (CBV), cerebral oxygen extraction fraction (OEF) and cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO{sub 2}) by positron emission tomography (PET) with oxygen-15 labelled carbon dioxide (C{sup 15}O{sub 2}) or {sup 15}O-labelled water (H{sub 2}{sup 15}O), {sup 15}O-labelled carbon monoxide (C{sup 15}O) and {sup 15}O-labelled oxygen ({sup 15}O{sub 2}) is useful for diagnosis and treatment planning in cases of cerebrovascular disease. The measured values theoretically depend on various factors, which may differ between PET centres. This study explored the applicability of a database of {sup 15}O-PET by examining between-centre and within-centre variation in values. Eleven PET centres participated in this multicentre study; seven used the steady-state inhalation method, one used build-up inhalation and three used bolus administration of C{sup 15}O{sub 2} (or H{sub 2}{sup 15}O) and {sup 15}O{sub 2}. All used C{sup 15}O for measurement of CBV. Subjects comprised 70 healthy volunteers (43 men and 27 women; mean age 51.8{+-}15.1 years). Overall mean{+-}SD values for cerebral cortical regions were: CBF=44.4{+-}6.5 ml 100 ml{sup -1} min{sup -1}; CBV=3.8{+-}0.7 ml 100 ml{sup -1}; OEF=0.44{+-}0.06; CMRO{sub 2}=3.3{+-}0.5 ml 100 ml{sup -1} min{sup -1}. Significant between-centre variation was observed in CBV, OEF and CMRO{sub 2} by one-way analysis of variance. However, the overall inter-individual variation in CBF, CBV, OEF and CMRO{sub 2} was acceptably small. Building a database of normal cerebral haemodynamics obtained by the{sup 15}O-PET methods may be practicable. (orig.)

  15. Label-free characterization of carbonic anhydrase-novel inhibitor interactions using surface plasmon resonance, isothermal titration calorimetry and fluorescence-based thermal shift assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogez-Florent, Tiphaine; Duhamel, Laetitia; Goossens, Laurence; Six, Perrine; Drucbert, Anne-Sophie; Depreux, Patrick; Danzé, Pierre-Marie; Landy, David; Goossens, Jean-François; Foulon, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    This work describes the development of biophysical unbiased methods to study the interactions between new designed compounds and carbonic anhydrase II (CAII) enzyme. These methods have to permit both a screening of a series of sulfonamide derivatives and the identification of a lead compound after a thorough study of the most promising molecules. Interactions data were collected using surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and thermal shift assay (TSA). In the first step, experiments were performed with bovine CAII isoform and were extended to human CAII. Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) experiments were also conducted to obtain thermodynamics parameters necessary for the processing of the TSA data. Results obtained with this reference methodology demonstrate the effectiveness of SPR and TSA. KD values obtained from SPR data were in perfect accordance with ITC. For TSA, despite the fact that the absolute values of KD were quite different, the same affinity scale was obtained for all compounds. The binding affinities of the analytes studied vary by more than 50 orders of magnitude; for example, the KD value determined by SPR were 6 ± 4 and 299 ± 25 nM for compounds 1 and 3, respectively. This paper discusses some of the theoretical and experimental aspects of the affinity-based methods and evaluates the protein consumption to develop methods for the screening of further new compounds. The double interest of SPR, that is, for screening and for the quick thorough study of the interactions parameters (ka , kd , and KD ), leads us to choose this methodology for the study of new potential inhibitors. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. The Biosynthesis of Deuterium Labeled Amino Acids Using a Strain of Facultative Methylotrophic Bacterium Вrevibacterium Methylicum 5662 With RuMP Cycle of Carbon Assimilation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleg Mosin

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available We used Gram-positive aerobic facultative methylotrophic bacterium, Brevibacterium methylicum, L-phenylalanine producer with ribulose-5-monophosphate (RuMP cycle for carbon assimilation for microbiological preparation of [2H]phenylalanine via conversion of low molecular weight substrates ([U-2H]MeOH and 2H2O. For this purpose, the cells of the methylotroph with improved growth characteristics were used on minimal salt media M9 supplemented with 2 % (v/v [U-2H]MeOH and increasing gradient of 2Н2O concentration from 0; 24,5; 49,0; 73,5 up to 98 % (v/v 2Н2O. L-phenylalanine was isolated from the growth medium after adding 5 M 2HCl (in 2Н2О, pH = 2,0 by extraction with isopropanol and subsequent crystallization in ethanol (output 0,65 g/l. Alanine, valine, and leucine/isoleucine were produced and accumulated exogenously in amounts of 5–6 mol in addition to the main product of biosynthesis. The method allows to obtain [2Н]amino acids with different levels of deuterium enrichment, depending on 2Н2O concentration in growth media, from 17 atom% 2Н (2 deuterium atoms (on the growth medium with 24,5 % (v/v 2Н2О up to 75 atom% 2Н (6 deuterium atoms (on the growth medium with 98 % (v/v 2Н2О with introduction of deuterium to benzyl С6Н5СН2-fragment of molecule that is confirmed with the data of electron impact (EI mass spectrometry analysis of methyl ethers of N-5-dimethylamino(naphthalene-1-sulfochloride [2H]amino acids after the separation by reverse-phase HPLC.

  17. Design and fabrication of carbon nanotube field-emission cathode with coaxial gate and ballast resistor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yonghai; Yeow, John T W; Jaffray, David A

    2013-10-25

    A low density vertically aligned carbon nanotube-based field-emission cathode with a ballast resistor and coaxial gate is designed and fabricated. The ballast resistor can overcome the non-uniformity of the local field-enhancement factor at the emitter apex. The self-aligned fabrication process of the coaxial gate can avoid the effects of emitter tip misalignment and height non-uniformity.

  18. Medium scale carbon nanotube thin film integrated circuits on flexible plastic substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, John A; Cao, Qing; Alam, Muhammad; Pimparkar, Ninad

    2015-02-03

    The present invention provides device components geometries and fabrication strategies for enhancing the electronic performance of electronic devices based on thin films of randomly oriented or partially aligned semiconducting nanotubes. In certain aspects, devices and methods of the present invention incorporate a patterned layer of randomly oriented or partially aligned carbon nanotubes, such as one or more interconnected SWNT networks, providing a semiconductor channel exhibiting improved electronic properties relative to conventional nanotubes-based electronic systems.

  19. Electro-induced mechanical and thermal responses of carbon nanotube fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Fancheng; Zhang, Xiaohua; Li, Ru; Zhao, Jingna; Xuan, Xiaohui; Wang, Xinhao; Zou, Jingyun; Li, Qingwen

    2014-04-23

    The electromechanical and electrothermal responses of carbon nanotube fibers provide new ways to use energy conversion, including the modulation of assembly structures by alternative densification and relaxation. The most efficient way to strengthen the tensile strength up to 2.32-2.50 GPa is shown as well as a microscale, nanotube-based Chinese calligraphy brush. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Pesticide Product Label System

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Pesticide Product Label System (PPLS) provides a collection of pesticide product labels (Adobe PDF format) that have been approved by EPA under Section 3 of the...

  1. Food Label and You

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... has issued final changes to update the Nutrition Facts label for packaged foods. For more information, see Changes to the Nutrition Facts Label . FDA presents an entertaining and educational tool ...

  2. Semiotic labelled deductive systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nossum, R.T. [Imperial College of Science, Technology and Medicine, London (United Kingdom)

    1996-12-31

    We review the class of Semiotic Models put forward by Pospelov, as well as the Labelled Deductive Systems developed by Gabbay, and construct an embedding of Semiotic Models into Labelled Deductive Systems.

  3. Electronic Submission of Labels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesticide registrants can provide draft and final labels to EPA electronically for our review as part of the pesticide registration process. The electronic submission of labels by registrants is voluntary but strongly encouraged.

  4. Mental Labels and Tattoos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyatt, I. Ralph

    1977-01-01

    Discusses the ease with which mental labels become imprinted in our system, six basic axioms for maintaining negative mental tattoos, and psychological processes for eliminating mental tattoos and labels. (RK)

  5. A Label to Regulate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tricoire, Aurélie; Boxenbaum, Eva; Laurent, Brice

    This paper examines the role labelling plays in the government of the contemporary economy.1Drawing on a detailed study of BBC-Effinergy, a French label for sustainable construction, we showhow the adoption and evolution of voluntary labels can be seen as emblematic of a governmentthrough experim...... experiment engaging 4 operations: stimulating market anticipations, focussing politicalconsultations, producing collective expertise and containing the regulatory transcription of the label....

  6. Hemoglobin Labeled by Radioactive Lysine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bale, W. F.; Yuile, C. L.; DeLaVergne, L.; Miller, L. L.; Whipple, G. H.

    1949-12-08

    This paper reports on the utilization of tagged epsilon carbon of DL-lysine by a dog both anemic and hypoproteinemic due to repeated bleeding plus a diet low in protein. The experiment extended over period of 234 days, a time sufficient to indicate an erythrocyte life span of at least 115 days based upon the rate of replacement of labeled red cell proteins. The proteins of broken down red cells seem not to be used with any great preference for the synthesis of new hemoglobin.

  7. Labeling Schemes with Queries

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    We study the question of ``how robust are the known lower bounds of labeling schemes when one increases the number of consulted labels''. Let $f$ be a function on pairs of vertices. An $f$-labeling scheme for a family of graphs $\\cF$ labels the vertices of all graphs in $\\cF$ such that for every graph $G\\in\\cF$ and every two vertices $u,v\\in G$, the value $f(u,v)$ can be inferred by merely inspecting the labels of $u$ and $v$. This paper introduces a natural generalization: the notion of $f$-...

  8. Preparation of fluorescent carbon nanoparticles and application in the cell labeling*%荧光碳纳米粒子的制备及其在细胞标记中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩文英; 常云珍; 高飞

    2011-01-01

    In biological and medical fields, one of the important content in biomedical analysis is to stain,modify, labell and detect cells and biomolecules. In recent years, combining nano-materials and bio-detection technology makes an important development of the detection of biological molecules. In this work multicolor fluorescent carbon nanoparticles(CNPs) were prepared from the combustion soot of candles by refluxing in a mixed oxidants(30%H2O2/AcOH in V: V=2:1 ).Hela cells were labeled with varied concentrations of solutions of fluorescent CNPs and observed by the eonfocal laser scanning fluorescence microscope. Experimental results have shown that the fluorescent CNPS are excellent biomarkers for Hela cells. Owing to their advantages such as non-toxic,chemical inertness, biocompatibility, multi-colored marking, high luminous intensity and photochemical stability,fluorescent CNPs are hopefully qualified to be biomarker-candidates which are important in the application in biological and medical fields.%在生物医学领域,对细胞、生物分子进行染色、修饰标记和检测一直是生物医学分析的重要内容.近年来,纳米材料与生物检测技术的结合,使得生物分子的检测有了重要的发展.用30%H2O2/ACOH(V∶V=2∶1)混合氧化性酸溶液回流蜡烛烟炱制备得到荧光碳纳米粒子,用不同浓度的荧光碳纳米粒子对Hela细胞进行荧光标记,在激光共聚焦荧光显微镜下观察得到荧光标记图像.结果表明,荧光碳纳米粒子能够有效地对Hela细胞进行荧光标记.荧光碳纳米粒子具有无毒、化学惰性和良好的生物相容性,可进行多色标记,并且发光强度高,光化学稳定性好,在生物医药领域具有重要的应用价值.

  9. Radiosynthesis of [{sup 11}C]D.P.A.-713, [{sup 11}C]D.P.A.-715 and [{sup 11}C]clinme, selected carbon-11-labelled novel potential radioligands for imaging the peripheral benzodiazepine receptors with PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dolle, F.; Thominiaux, C.; Hinnen, F.; Demphel, S.; Le helleix, S.; Chauveau, F.; Boutin, H.; Herard, A.S.; Hantraye, P.; Tavitian, B. [Service Hospitalier Frederic Joliot, I2BM/DSV, 91 - Orsay (France); Kassiou, M.; James, M.; Creelman, A.; Fulton, R. [Sydney Univ., Brain and Mind Research Institute, NSW (Australia); Kassiou, M. [Sydney Univ., Discipline of Medical Radiations, Sciences and School of Chemistry, NSW (Australia); Katsifis, A.; Greguric, I.; Mattner, F.; Loch, C. [Radiopharmaceuticals Research Institute, ANSTO, NSW (Australia); Selleri, S. [Degli Studi di Firenze Univ., Dipt. di Scienze Farmaceutiche (Italy)

    2008-02-15

    {sup 11}C P.K.11195 is not only the oldest, but also the most widely used PET radiotracer for in vivo imaging of the peripheral benzodiazepine receptors (P.B.R. or translocator protein (18 kDa, T.S.P.O.). With the aim of developing a new PET imaging probe for the in vivo study of the P.B.R., two pyrazol [1,5-a]pyrimidineacetamides (D.P.A.-713 and D.P.A.-715) and one imidazol[1,2-a]pyridine-acetamide (C.L.I.N.M.E.) were radiolabelled with the positron emitters carbon{sup 11} (half life: 20.38 min) [1-5]. Briefly, C.L.I.N.M.E. (2-[6-chloro-2(4-iodophenyl)-imidazol[1,2-a]pyridin-3-yl] -N-ethyl-N-methyl-acetamide) was labelled at its methyl-acetamide moity chain from the corresponding nor-analogue using[{sup 11}C]methyl iodide (in D.M.S.O./D.M.F (100/200 {mu}L) containing powdered K.O.H. (3-5 mg) at 110 degrees C for 3 min. D.P.A.-713 (N,N-diethyl-2-[2-(4-methoxy-phenyl)-5,7-dimethyl-pyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidin -3-yl]acetamide) and D.P.A.-715 (N,N-diethyl-2-[2-(4-methoxy-phenyl)-5,7-bis-tri-fluoro-methyl-pyrazolo [1,5-a]pyrimidin-3-yl]acetamide) were labelled at their aromatic methoxy groups from the corresponding nor-derivatives using [{sup 11}C]methyl triflate (in acetone (300{mu}L) containing aq. 3 M NaOH (4{mu}L) at 110 degrees C for 1 min). All radioligands were purified using semi preparative Zorbax reverse phase H.P.L.C., were adequately formulated for in vivo injection within 30 min and were found to be > 95% chemically and radiochemically pure. (N.C.)

  10. Carbon nanotubes in neuroregeneration and repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabbro, Alessandra; Prato, Maurizio; Ballerini, Laura

    2013-12-01

    In the last decade, we have experienced an increasing interest and an improved understanding of the application of nanotechnology to the nervous system. The aim of such studies is that of developing future strategies for tissue repair to promote functional recovery after brain damage. In this framework, carbon nanotube based technologies are emerging as particularly innovative tools due to the outstanding physical properties of these nanomaterials together with their recently documented ability to interface neuronal circuits, synapses and membranes. This review will discuss the state of the art in carbon nanotube technology applied to the development of devices able to drive nerve tissue repair; we will highlight the most exciting findings addressing the impact of carbon nanotubes in nerve tissue engineering, focusing in particular on neuronal differentiation, growth and network reconstruction.

  11. Detection of gas atoms with carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arash, B.; Wang, Q.

    2013-01-01

    Owning to their unparalleled sensitivity resolution, nanomechanical resonators have excellent capabilities in design of nano-sensors for gas detection. The current challenge is to develop new designs of the resonators for differentiating distinct gas atoms with a recognizably high sensitivity. In this work, the characteristics of impulse wave propagation in carbon nanotube-based sensors are investigated using molecular dynamics simulations to provide a new method for detection of noble gases. A sensitivity index based on wave velocity shifts in a single-walled carbon nanotube, induced by surrounding gas atoms, is defined to explore the efficiency of the nano-sensor. The simulation results indicate that the nano-sensor is able to differentiate distinct noble gases at the same environmental temperature and pressure. The inertia and the strengthening effects by the gases on wave characteristics of carbon nanotubes are particularly discussed, and a continuum mechanics shell model is developed to interpret the effects.

  12. Semiconductor nanorod-carbon nanotube biomimetic films for wire-free photostimulation of blind retinas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bareket, Lilach; Waiskopf, Nir; Rand, David; Lubin, Gur; David-Pur, Moshe; Ben-Dov, Jacob; Roy, Soumyendu; Eleftheriou, Cyril; Sernagor, Evelyne; Cheshnovsky, Ori; Banin, Uri; Hanein, Yael

    2014-11-12

    We report the development of a semiconductor nanorod-carbon nanotube based platform for wire-free, light induced retina stimulation. A plasma polymerized acrylic acid midlayer was used to achieve covalent conjugation of semiconductor nanorods directly onto neuro-adhesive, three-dimensional carbon nanotube surfaces. Photocurrent, photovoltage, and fluorescence lifetime measurements validate efficient charge transfer between the nanorods and the carbon nanotube films. Successful stimulation of a light-insensitive chick retina suggests the potential use of this novel platform in future artificial retina applications.

  13. Succesful labelling schemes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juhl, Hans Jørn; Stacey, Julia

    2001-01-01

    It is usual practice to evaluate the success of a labelling scheme by looking at the awareness percentage, but in many cases this is not sufficient. The awareness percentage gives no indication of which of the consumer segments that are aware of and use labelling schemes and which do not. In the ......It is usual practice to evaluate the success of a labelling scheme by looking at the awareness percentage, but in many cases this is not sufficient. The awareness percentage gives no indication of which of the consumer segments that are aware of and use labelling schemes and which do not....... In the spring of 2001 MAPP carried out an extensive consumer study with special emphasis on the Nordic environmentally friendly label 'the swan'. The purpose was to find out how much consumers actually know and use various labelling schemes. 869 households were contacted and asked to fill in a questionnaire...... it into consideration when I go shopping. The respondent was asked to pick the most suitable answer, which described her use of each label. 29% - also called 'the labelling blind' - responded that they basically only knew the recycling label and the Government controlled organic label 'Ø-mærket'. Another segment of 6...

  14. An Ultrasensitive Electrochemiluminescent Immunoassay for Aflatoxin M1 in Milk, Based on Extraction by Magnetic Graphene and Detection by Antibody-Labeled CdTe Quantumn Dots-Carbon Nanotubes Nanocomposite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning Gan

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available An ultrasensitive electrochemiluminescent immunoassay (ECLIA for aflatoxins M1 (ATM1 in milk using magnetic Fe3O4-graphene oxides (Fe-GO as the absorbent and antibody-labeled cadmium telluride quantum dots (CdTe QDs as the signal tag is presented. Firstly, Fe3O4 nanoparticles were immobilized on GO to fabricate the magnetic nanocomposites, which were used as absorbent to ATM1. Secondly, aflatoxin M1 antibody (primary antibody, ATM1 Ab1, was attached to the surface of the CdTe QDs-carbon nanotubes nanocomposite to form the signal tag (ATM1 Ab1/CdTe-CNT. The above materials were characterized. The optimal experimental conditions were obtained. Thirdly, Fe-GO was employed for extraction of ATM1 in milk. Results indicated that it can adsorb ATM1 efficiently and selectively within a large extent of pH from 3.0 to 8.0. Adsorption processes reached 95% of the equilibrium within 10 min. Lastly, the ATM1 with a serial of concentrations absorbed on Fe-GO was conjugated with ATM1 Ab1/CdTe-CNT signal tag based on sandwich immunoassay. The immunocomplex can emit a strong ECL signal whose intensity depended linearly on the logarithm of ATM1 concentration from 1.0 to 1.0 × 105 pg/mL, with the detection limit (LOD of 0.3 pg/mL (S/N = 3. The method was more sensitive for ATM1 detection compared to the ELISA method. Finally, ten samples of milk were tested based on the immunoassay. The method is fast and requires very little sample preparation, which was suitable for high-throughput screening of mycotoxins in food.

  15. Distribution and biomarkers of Carbon-14 labeled fullerene C60 ([14C(U)]C60) in female rats and mice for up to 30 days after intravenous exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumner, Susan C. J.; Snyder, Rodney W.; Wingard, Christopher; Mortensen, Ninell P.; Holland, Nathan A.; Shannahan, Jonathan H.; Dhungana, Suraj; Pathmasiri, Wimal; Han, Li; Lewin, Anita H.; Fennell, Timothy R.

    2016-01-01

    A comprehensive distribution study was conducted in female rats and mice exposed to a suspension of uniformly carbon-14 labeled C60 ([14C(U)]C60). Rodents were administered [14C(U)]C60 (~0.9 mg /kg body weight) or 5% PVP-saline vehicle alone via a single tail vein injection. Tissues were collected at 1 hour, 1, 7, 14 and 30 days after administration. A separate group of rodents received 5 daily injections of suspensions of either [14C(U)]C60 or vehicle with tissue collection 14 days post exposure. Radioactivity was detected in over 20 tissues at all time period. The highest concentration of radioactivity in rodents at each time point was in liver, lungs and spleen. Elimination of [14C(U)]C60 was <2% in urine and feces at any 24 hour time points. [14C(U)]C60 and [14C(U)]C60-retinol were detected in liver of rats and together accounted for ~99% and ~56% of the total recovered at 1 and 30 days post exposure, respectively. The blood radioactivity at 1 hour after [14C(U)]C60 exposure was four-fold higher in rats than in mice; blood radioactivity was still in circulation at 30 days post [14C(U)]C60 exposure in both species (<1%). Levels of oxidative stress markers increased by 5 days after exposure and remained elevated, while levels of inflammation markers initially increased and then returned to control values. The level of cardiovascular marker vWF, increased in rats, but remained at control levels in mice. This study demonstrates that [14C(U)]C60 is retained in female rodents with little elimination by 30 days after i.v. exposure, and leads to systemic oxidative stress. PMID:25727383

  16. 40 CFR 600.307-86 - Fuel economy label format requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Fuel economy label format requirements...) ENERGY POLICY FUEL ECONOMY AND CARBON-RELATED EXHAUST EMISSIONS OF MOTOR VEHICLES Fuel Economy Regulations for 1977 and Later Model Year Automobiles-Labeling § 600.307-86 Fuel economy label format...

  17. Food Label and You

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... En Español Search FDA Submit search Popular Content Home Food Drugs Medical Devices Radiation-Emitting Products Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Animal & Veterinary Cosmetics Tobacco Products Food Home Food Ingredients, Packaging & Labeling Labeling & Nutrition The Food ...

  18. Are we ready for spray-on carbon nanotubes?

    OpenAIRE

    Maynard, Andrew D.

    2016-01-01

    Earlier this year, British sculptor, Anish Kapoor was given exclusive rights to use a new spray-on carbon nanotube-based paint. The material, produced by UK-based Surrey NanoSystems and marketed as Vantablack S-VIS, can be applied to a range of surfaces, and absorbs well over 99% of the light that falls onto it. It is claimed to be the world's blackest paint, and there is growing interest in its use in works of art and high-end consumer products. It's easy to see the appeal of Vantablack S-VI...

  19. Are we ready for spray-on carbon nanotubes?

    OpenAIRE

    Maynard, Andrew D.

    2016-01-01

    Earlier this year, British sculptor, Anish Kapoor was given exclusive rights to use a new spray-on carbon nanotube-based paint. The material, produced by UK-based Surrey NanoSystems and marketed as Vantablack S-VIS, can be applied to a range of surfaces, and absorbs well over 99% of the light that falls onto it. It is claimed to be the world's blackest paint, and there is growing interest in its use in works of art and high-end consumer products. It's easy to see the appeal of Vantablack S-VI...

  20. Aerosol printed carbon nanotube strain sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Bradley; Yoon, Hwan-Sik

    2012-04-01

    In recent years, printed electronics have received attention as a method to produce low-cost macro electronics on flexible substrates. In this regard, inkjet and aerosol printing have been the primary printing methods for producing passive electrical components, transistors, and a number of sensors. In this research, a custom aerosol printer was utilized to create a strain sensor capable of measuring static and dynamic strain. The proposed sensor was created by aerosol printing a multiwall carbon nanotube solution onto an aluminum beam covered with an insulating layer. After printing the carbon nanotube-based sensor, the sensor was tested under quasi-static and vibration strain conditions, and the results are presented. The results show that the printed sensor could potentially serve as an effective method for measuring dynamic strain of structural components.