WorldWideScience

Sample records for carbon nanotube films

  1. Piezoresistive Sensors Based on Carbon Nanotube Films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    L(U) Jian-wei; WANG Wan-lu; LIAO Ke-jun; WANG Yong-tian; LIU CHang-lin; Zeng Qing-gao

    2005-01-01

    Piezoresistive effect of carbon nanotube films was investigated by a three-point bending test.Carbon nanotubes were synthesized by hot filament chemical vapor deposition.The experimental results showed that the carbon nanotubes have a striking piezoresistive effect.The relative resistance was changed from 0 to 10.5×10-2 and 3.25×10-2 for doped and undoped films respectively at room temperature when the microstrain under stress from 0 to 500. The gauge factors for doped and undoped carbon nanotube films under 500 microstrain were about 220 and 67 at room temperature, respectively, exceeding that of polycrystalline silicon (30) at 35℃.The origin of the resistance changes in the films may be attributed to a strain-induced change in the band gap for the doped tubes and the defects for the undoped tubes.

  2. Piezoresistive effect in carbon nanotube films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    The piezoresistive effect of the pristine carbon nanotube (CNT) films has been studied. Carbon nanotubes were synthesized by hot filament chemical vapor deposition. The piezoresistive effect in the pristine CNT films was studied by a three-point bending test. The gauge factor for the pristine CNT films under 500 microstrains was found to be at least 65 at room temperature, and increased with temperature, exceeding that of polycrystalline silicon (30) at 35℃. The origin of the piezoresistivity in CNT films may be ascribed to a pressure-induced change in the band gap and the defects.

  3. Carbon nanotube based transparent conductive thin films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, X; Rajamani, R; Stelson, K A; Cui, T

    2006-07-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) based optically transparent and electrically conductive thin films are fabricated on plastic substrates in this study. Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are chemically treated with a mixture of concentrated sulfuric acid and nitric acid before being dispersed in aqueous surfactant-contained solutions. SWNT thin films are prepared from the stable SWNT solutions using wet coating techniques. The 100 nm thick SWNT thin film exhibits a surface resistivity of 6 kohms/square nanometer with an average transmittance of 88% on the visible light range, which is three times better than the films prepared from the high purity as-received SWNTs.

  4. Pulsed laser deposition of carbon nanotube and polystyrene-carbon nanotube composite thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stramel, A. A.; Gupta, M. C.; Lee, H. R.; Yu, J.; Edwards, W. C.

    2010-12-01

    In this work, we report on the fabrication of carbon nanotube thin films via pulsed laser deposition using a pulsed, diode pumped, Tm:Ho:LuLF laser with 2 μm wavelength. The thin films were deposited on silicon substrates using pure carbon nanotube targets and polystyrene-carbon nanotube composite targets. Raman spectra, scanning electron micrographs, and transmission electron micrographs show that carbon nanotubes are present in the deposited thin films, and that the pulsed laser deposition process causes minimal degradation to the quality of the nanotubes when using pure carbon nanotube targets.

  5. A statistical mechanics model of carbon nanotube macro-films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    Carbon nanotube macro-films are two-dimensional films with micrometer thickness and centimeter by centimeter in-plane dimension.These carbon nanotube macroscopic assemblies have attracted significant attention from the material and mechanics communities recently because they can be easily handled and tailored to meet specific engineering needs.This paper reports the experimental methods on the preparation and characterization of single-walled carbon nanotube macro-films,and a statistical mechanics model on ...

  6. Carbon Nanotube Thin-Film Antennas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puchades, Ivan; Rossi, Jamie E; Cress, Cory D; Naglich, Eric; Landi, Brian J

    2016-08-17

    Multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) and single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) dipole antennas have been successfully designed, fabricated, and tested. Antennas of varying lengths were fabricated using flexible bulk MWCNT sheet material and evaluated to confirm the validity of a full-wave antenna design equation. The ∼20× improvement in electrical conductivity provided by chemically doped SWCNT thin films over MWCNT sheets presents an opportunity for the fabrication of thin-film antennas, leading to potentially simplified system integration and optical transparency. The resonance characteristics of a fabricated chlorosulfonic acid-doped SWCNT thin-film antenna demonstrate the feasibility of the technology and indicate that when the sheet resistance of the thin film is >40 ohm/sq no power is absorbed by the antenna and that a sheet resistance of antenna. The dependence of the return loss performance on the SWCNT sheet resistance is consistent with unbalanced metal, metal oxide, and other CNT-based thin-film antennas, and it provides a framework for which other thin-film antennas can be designed.

  7. Electromagnetic characteristics of carbon nanotube film materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Wei

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanotube (CNT possesses remarkable electrical conductivity, which shows great potential for the application as electromagnetic shielding material. This paper aims to characterize the electromagnetic parameters of a high CNT loading film by using waveguide method. The effects of layer number of CNT laminate, CNT alignment and resin impregnation on the electromagnetic characteristics were analyzed. It is shown that CNT film exhibits anisotropic electromagnetic characteristic. Pristine CNT film shows higher real part of complex permittivity, conductivity and shielding effectiveness when the polarized direction of incident wave is perpendicular to the winding direction of CNT film. For the CNT film laminates, complex permittivity increases with increasing layer number, and correspondingly, shielding effectiveness decreases. The five-layer CNT film shows extraordinary shielding performance with shielding effectiveness ranging from 67 dB to 78 dB in X-band. Stretching process induces the alignment of CNTs. When aligned direction of CNTs is parallel to the electric field, CNT film shows negative permittivity and higher conductivity. Moreover, resin impregnation into CNT film leads to the decrease of conductivity and shielding effectiveness. This research will contribute to the structural design for the application of CNT film as electromagnetic shielding materials.

  8. ELECTROCHEMICAL INVESTIGATION ON CARBON NANOTUBE FILM WITH DIFFERENT PRETREATMENTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    C.G. Hu; W.L. Wang; Y. Ma; W. Zhu

    2003-01-01

    Wide potential windows were found at carbon nanotube film electrodes in neutral solutions after being treated with nitric acid and mixed acid. Electrochemical reversibility was investigated at carbon nanotube films with different pretreatments for ferri/ferrocyanide and quinone /hydroquinone. Carbon nanotube film electrodes presented quasi-reversible electrochemical behavior for both electrolytes. In the range of scan rate, carbon nanotube film electrodes treated with acids showed heterogeneous electron-transfer properties, which was mainly controlled by its electron state density on the surface of the film. On the whole, the carbon nanotube electrode with nitric acid treatment presented the best electrochemical behaviors, so we chose it as an analytical electrode to determine the trace compound in dilute solution. The results demonstrated that this new electrode material exhibits superior performance characteristics for the detection of azide anion.

  9. Thermal Conductivity of Carbon Nanotube Composite Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngo, Quoc; Cruden, Brett A.; Cassell, Alan M.; Walker, Megan D.; Koehne, Jessica E.; Meyyappan, M.; Li, Jun; Yang, Cary Y.

    2004-01-01

    State-of-the-art ICs for microprocessors routinely dissipate power densities on the order of 50 W/sq cm. This large power is due to the localized heating of ICs operating at high frequencies, and must be managed for future high-frequency microelectronic applications. Our approach involves finding new and efficient thermally conductive materials. Exploiting carbon nanotube (CNT) films and composites for their superior axial thermal conductance properties has the potential for such an application requiring efficient heat transfer. In this work, we present thermal contact resistance measurement results for CNT and CNT-Cu composite films. It is shown that Cu-filled CNT arrays enhance thermal conductance when compared to as-grown CNT arrays. Furthermore, the CNT-Cu composite material provides a mechanically robust alternative to current IC packaging technology.

  10. Piezoresistive Effect of Doped carbon Nanotube/Cellulose Films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王万录; 廖克俊; 李勇; 王永田

    2003-01-01

    The strain-induced resistance changes in iodine-doped and undoped carbon nanotube films were investigated by a three-point bending test. Carbon nanotubes were fabricated by hot filament chemical vapour deposition. The experimental results showed that there has a striking piezoresistive effect in carbon nanotube films. The gauge factor for I-doped and undoped carbon nanotube films under 500 microstrain was about 125 and 65 respectively at room temperature, exceeding that of polycrystalline silicon (30) at 35℃. The origin of the piezoresistivity in the films may be ascribed to a strain-induced change in the band gap for the doped tubes and to the intertube contact resistance for the undoped tubes.

  11. Scattering of terahertz radiation from oriented carbon nanotube films

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eichhorn, Finn; Jepsen, Peter Uhd; Schroeder, Nicholas;

    2009-01-01

    Session title: IThC-THz Interactions with Condensed Matter. We report on the use of terahertz time-domain spectroscopy to measure scattering from multi-walled carbon nanotubes aligned normal to the film plane. Measurements indicate scattering from the nanotubes is significantly stronger than...

  12. Assembly and Applications of Carbon Nanotube Thin Films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hongwei ZHU; Bingqing WEI

    2008-01-01

    The ultimate goal of current research on carbon nanotubes (CNTs) is to make breakthroughs that advance nanotechnological applications of bulk CNT materials. Especially, there has been growing interest in CNT thin films because of their unique and usually enhanced properties and tremendous potential as components for use in nano-electronic and nano-mechanical device applications or as structural elements in various devices. If a synthetic or a post processing method can produce high yield of nanotube thin films, these structures will provide tremendous potential for fundamental research on these devices. This review will address the synthesis, the post processing and the device applications of self-assembled nanotube thin films.

  13. Terahertz Science and Technology of Macroscopically Aligned Carbon Nanotube Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kono, Junichiro

    One of the outstanding challenges in nanotechnology is how to assemble individual nano-objects into macroscopic architectures while preserving their extraordinary properties. For example, the one-dimensional character of electrons in individual carbon nanotubes leads to extremely anisotropic transport, optical, and magnetic phenomena, but their macroscopic manifestations have been limited. Here, we describe methods for preparing macroscopic films, sheets, and fibers of highly aligned carbon nanotubes and their applications to basic and applied terahertz studies. Sufficiently thick films act as ideal terahertz polarizers, and appropriately doped films operate as polarization-sensitive, flexible, powerless, and ultra-broadband detectors. Together with recently developed chirality enrichment methods, these developments will ultimately allow us to study dynamic conductivities of interacting one-dimensional electrons in macroscopic single crystals of single-chirality single-wall carbon nanotubes.

  14. Acceleration sensing based on piezoresistive effect of carbon nanotube films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEI Feng-yan; SHEN Hui-juan; CAO Chun-lan; LIAO Ke-jun; HU Chen-guo

    2006-01-01

    Based on piezoresistive effect,the acceleration sensitivity of multi-walled canbon nanotube (MWNT) films was investigated.A three-point bending technique was presented to measure the piezoresistivity,which used a bending stress applied to the samples while making MWNT films wheeling with a rotational machine.The experimental results showed that the fractional increase in resistance increases linearly versus the increase of centripetal acceleration,and there is a linear relationship between the acceleration and the strain.These shed light on using carbon nanotube films as acceleration sensors for many potential applications.

  15. Carbon Nanotubes for Thin Film Transistor: Fabrication, Properties, and Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yucui Wu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We review the present status of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs for their production and purification technologies, as well as the fabrication and properties of single-walled carbon nanotube thin film transistors (SWCNT-TFTs. The most popular SWCNT growth method is chemical vapor deposition (CVD, including plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD, floating catalyst chemical vapor deposition (FCCVD, and thermal CVD. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs used to fabricate thin film transistors are sorted by electrical breakdown, density gradient ultracentrifugation, or gel-based separation. The technologies of applying CNT random networks to work as the channels of SWCNT-TFTs are also reviewed. Excellent work from global researchers has been benchmarked and analyzed. The unique properties of SWCNT-TFTs have been reviewed. Besides, the promising applications of SWCNT-TFTs have been explored. Finally, the key issues to be solved in future have been summarized.

  16. Unzipped Nanotube Sheet Films Converted from Spun Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes by O2 Plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jangr, Hoon-Sik; Jeon, Sang Koo; Shim, Dae Seob; Lee, Nam Hee; Nahm, Seung Hoon

    2015-11-01

    Large-scale graphene or carbon nanotube (CNT) films are good candidates for transparent flexible electrodes, and the strong interest in graphene and CNT films has motivated the scalable production of a good-conductivity and an optically transmitting film. Unzipping techniques for converting CNTs to graphene are especially worthy of notice. Here, we performed nanotube unzipping of the spun multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) to produce networked graphene nanoribbon (GNR) sheet films using an 02 plasma etching method, after which we produced the spun MWCNT film by continually pulling MWCNTs down from the vertical well aligned MWCNTs on the substrate. The electrical resistance was slightly decreased and the optical transmittance was significantly increased when the spun MWCNT films were etched for 20 min by O2 plasma of 100 mA. Plasma etching for the optimized time, which does not change the thickness of the spun MWCNT films, improved the electrical resistance and the optical transmittance.

  17. Electrochemiluminescent Properties of Organic Films with Incorporated Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu.T. Zholudov

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This work describes the study of the electrochemical and electrochemiluminescent properties of electrodes modified by films of polyvinyl alcohol containing luminophor tris-bipyridine ruthenium and carbon nanotubes. Studied electrode structures showed good applicability for the development of nanotechnological ECL-sensors intended for the assay in aqueous mediums.

  18. Nanocomposite fibers and film containing polyolefin and surface-modified carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chu,Benjamin (Setauket, NY); Hsiao, Benjamin S. (Setauket, NY)

    2010-01-26

    Methods for modifying carbon nanotubes with organic compounds are disclosed. The modified carbon nanotubes have enhanced compatibility with polyolefins. Nanocomposites of the organo-modified carbon nanotubes and polyolefins can be used to produce both fibers and films having enhanced mechanical and electrical properties, especially the elongation-to-break ratio and the toughness of the fibers and/or films.

  19. Carbon Nanotube Film-Based Speaker Developed in Tsinghua University

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    @@ A research group from Tsinghua University led by Prof.Fan Shoushan,Member of the Chinese Academy of Sciences,and Jiang Kaili,associate professor of Physics,found that carbon nanotube thin film could act as a speaker once fed by audio frequency electric currents.These carbon nanotube loudspeakers are only tens of a nanometer thick,transparent,flexible and stretchable,which can be further tailored into any shape and size.These results have been published in the journal Nano Letter.

  20. Structural and biological properties of carbon nanotube composite films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narayan, Roger J. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332-0245 (United States)]. E-mail: roger.narayan@mse.gatech.edu; Berry, C.J. [Environmental Biotechnology Section, Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States); Brigmon, R.L. [Environmental Biotechnology Section, Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)

    2005-11-20

    Carbon nanotube composite films have been developed that exhibit unusual structural and biological properties. These novel materials have been created by pulsed laser ablation of graphite and bombardment of nitrogen ions at temperatures between 600 and 700 deg. C. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy and radial distribution function analysis demonstrate that this material consists of sp{sup 2}-bonded concentric ribbons that are wrapped approximately 15 deg. normal to the silicon substrate. The interlayer order in this material extends to approximately 15-30 A. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy data suggest that this material is predominantly trigonally coordinated. The carbon nanotube composite structure results from the use of energetic ions, which allow for non-equilibrium growth of graphitic planes. In vitro testing has revealed significant antimicrobial activity of carbon nanotube composite films against Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus warneri colonization. Carbon nanotube composite films may be useful for inhibiting microorganism attachment and biofilm formation in hemodialysis catheters and other medical devices.

  1. Carbon Nanotube Thin Film Transistors for Flat Panel Display Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Xuelei; Xia, Jiye; Dong, Guodong; Tian, Boyuan; Peng, Lianmao

    2016-12-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are promising materials for both high performance transistors for high speed computing and thin film transistors for macroelectronics, which can provide more functions at low cost. Among macroelectronics applications, carbon nanotube thin film transistors (CNT-TFT) are expected to be used soon for backplanes in flat panel displays (FPDs) due to their superior performance. In this paper, we review the challenges of CNT-TFT technology for FPD applications. The device performance of state-of-the-art CNT-TFTs are compared with the requirements of TFTs for FPDs. Compatibility of the fabrication processes of CNT-TFTs and current TFT technologies are critically examined. Though CNT-TFT technology is not yet ready for backplane production line of FPDs, the challenges can be overcome by close collaboration between research institutes and FPD manufacturers in the short term.

  2. Carbon nanotube composite materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Bryan, Gregory; Skinner, Jack L; Vance, Andrew; Yang, Elaine Lai; Zifer, Thomas

    2015-03-24

    A material consisting essentially of a vinyl thermoplastic polymer, un-functionalized carbon nanotubes and hydroxylated carbon nanotubes dissolved in a solvent. Un-functionalized carbon nanotube concentrations up to 30 wt % and hydroxylated carbon nanotube concentrations up to 40 wt % can be used with even small concentrations of each (less than 2 wt %) useful in producing enhanced conductivity properties of formed thin films.

  3. Thermal property tuning in aligned carbon nanotube films and random entangled carbon nanotube films by ion irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jing [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Texas A& M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States); Chen, Di; Wang, Xuemei [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Texas A& M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States); Bykova, Julia S.; Zakhidov, Anvar A. [The Alan G. MacDiarmid NanoTech Institute, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, Texas 75080 (United States); Shao, Lin, E-mail: lshao@tamu.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Texas A& M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States); Department of Nuclear Engineering, Texas A& M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States)

    2015-10-12

    Ion irradiation effects on thermal property changes are compared between aligned carbon nanotube (A-CNT) films and randomly entangled carbon nanotube (R-CNT) films. After H, C, and Fe ion irradiation, a focusing ion beam with sub-mm diameter is used as a heating source, and an infrared signal is recorded to extract thermal conductivity. Ion irradiation decreases thermal conductivity of A-CNT films, but increases that of R-CNT films. We explain the opposite trends by the fact that neighboring CNT bundles are loosely bonded in A-CNT films, which makes it difficult to create inter-tube linkage/bonding upon ion irradiation. In a comparison, in R-CNT films, which have dense tube networking, carbon displacements are easily trapped between touching tubes and act as inter-tube linkage to promote off-axial phonon transport. The enhancement overcomes the phonon transport loss due to phonon-defect scattering along the axial direction. A model is established to explain the dependence of thermal conductivity changes on ion irradiation parameters including ion species, energies, and current.

  4. Properties of electrophoretically deposited single wall carbon nanotube films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Junyoung; Jalali, Maryam; Campbell, Stephen A., E-mail: campb001@umn.edu

    2015-08-31

    This paper describes techniques for rapidly producing a carbon nanotube thin film by electrophoretic deposition at room temperature and determines the film mass density and electrical/mechanical properties of such films. The mechanism of electrophoretic deposition of thin layers is explained with experimental data. Also, film thickness is measured as a function of time, electrical field and suspension concentration. We use Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy to determine the film mass density. Films created in this manner have a resistivity of 2.14 × 10{sup −3} Ω·cm, a mass density that varies with thickness from 0.12 to 0.54 g/cm{sup 3}, and a Young's modulus between 4.72 and 5.67 GPa. The latter was found to be independent of thickness from 77 to 134 nm. We also report on fabricating free-standing films by removing the metal seed layer under the CNT film, and selectively etching a sacrificial layer. This method could be extended to flexible photovoltaic devices or high frequency RF MEMS devices. - Highlights: • We explain the electrophoretic deposition process and mechanism of thin SWCNT film deposition. • Characterization of the SWCNT film properties including density, resistivity, transmittance, and Young's modulus. • The film density and resistivity are found to be a function of the film thickness. • Techniques developed to create free standing layers of SW-CNTs for flexible electronics and mechanical actuators.

  5. High conductivity transparent carbon nanotube films deposited from superacid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hecht, David S; Lee, Roland; Hu Liangbing [Unidym Incorporated, 1244 Reamwood Drive, Sunnyvale, CA 94089 (United States); Heintz, Amy M; Moore, Bryon; Cucksey, Chad; Risser, Steven, E-mail: dhecht@gmail.com [Battelle, 505 King Avenue, Columbus, OH 43201 (United States)

    2011-02-18

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were deposited from a chlorosulfonic superacid solution onto PET substrates by a filtration/transfer method. The sheet resistance and transmission (at 550 nm) of the films were 60 {Omega}/sq and 90.9% respectively, which corresponds to a DC conductivity of 12 825 S cm{sup -1} and a DC/optical conductivity ratio of 64.1. This is the highest DC conductivity reported for CNT thin films to date, and attributed to both the high quality of the CNT material and the exfoliation/doping by the superacid. This work demonstrates that CNT transparent films have not reached the conductivity limit; continued improvements will enable these films to be used as the transparent electrode for applications in solid state lighting, LCD displays, touch panels, and photovoltaics.

  6. High conductivity transparent carbon nanotube films deposited from superacid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hecht, David S; Heintz, Amy M; Lee, Roland; Hu, Liangbing; Moore, Bryon; Cucksey, Chad; Risser, Steven

    2011-02-18

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were deposited from a chlorosulfonic superacid solution onto PET substrates by a filtration/transfer method. The sheet resistance and transmission (at 550 nm) of the films were 60 Ω/sq and 90.9% respectively, which corresponds to a DC conductivity of 12,825 S cm(-1) and a DC/optical conductivity ratio of 64.1. This is the highest DC conductivity reported for CNT thin films to date, and attributed to both the high quality of the CNT material and the exfoliation/doping by the superacid. This work demonstrates that CNT transparent films have not reached the conductivity limit; continued improvements will enable these films to be used as the transparent electrode for applications in solid state lighting, LCD displays, touch panels, and photovoltaics.

  7. Removal of Ozone by Carbon Nanotubes/Quartz Fiber Film.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shen; Nie, Jingqi; Wei, Fei; Yang, Xudong

    2016-09-01

    Ozone is recognized as a harmful gaseous pollutant, which can lead to severe human health problems. In this study, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were tested as a new approach for ozone removal. The CNTs/quartz fiber film was fabricated through growth of CNTs upon pure quartz fiber using chemical vapor deposition method. Ozone conversion efficiency of the CNTs/quartz fiber film was tested for 10 h and compared with that of quartz film, activated carbon (AC), and a potassium iodide (KI) solution under the same conditions. The pressure resistance of these materials under different airflow rates was also measured. The results showed that the CNTs/quartz fiber film had better ozone conversion efficiency but also higher pressure resistance than AC and the KI solution of the same weight. The ozone removal performance of the CNTs/quartz fiber film was comparable with AC at 20 times more weight. The CNTs played a dominant role in ozone removal by the CNTs/quartz fiber film. Its high ozone conversion efficiency, lightweight and free-standing properties make the CNTs/quartz fiber film applicable to ozone removal. Further investigation should be focused on reducing pressure resistance and studying the CNT mechanism for removing ozone.

  8. Anisotropic conductance of the multiwall carbon nanotube array/silicone elastomer composite film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yao Yuan; Liu Changhong; Fan Shoushan [Tsinghua-Foxconn Nanotechnology Research Center and Department of Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2006-09-14

    Multiwall carbon nanotube array/silicone elastomer composite films have been fabricated with an in situ injection modelling method. The transverse conductivity of the composite films is larger than the lateral conductivity because the aligned carbon nanotube array is embedded into the polymer matrix. The nonlinear I-V curve has been analysed and the temperature-dependent transport behaviour has been investigated.

  9. ELECTROANALYTICAL APPLICATIONS OF CARBOXYL-MODIFIED CARBON NANOTUBE FILM ELECTRODES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    C.G. Hu; W.L. Wang; K.J. Liao; W. Zhu

    2003-01-01

    The electrochemical behavior of a carboxyl-modified carbon nanotube films was investigated to explore its possibility in electroanalytical applicaton. Cyclic voltammetry of quinone was conducted in 1mol/L Na2SO4, which showed a stable, quasi-reversible voltammetric response for quinone / hydroquinone, and the anodic and the cathodic peak potentials were 0.657V and -0.029V (vs. SCE) at a scan rate of 0.1V.s-1, respectively. Both anodic and cathodic peak currents depended linearly on the square root of the scan rate over the range of 0.01-0. 5 V.s-1, which suggested that the process of the electrode reactions was diffusion-controlled. Carboxyl-modified carbon nanotube electrodes made it possible to determine low level of dopamine selectively in the presence of a large excess of ascorbic acid in acidic media using derivative voltammetry.The results obtained were discussed in details. This work demonstrates the potential of carboxyl-modified carbon nanotube electrodes for electroanalytical applications.

  10. Formation of single-walled carbon nanotube thin films enriched with semiconducting nanotubes and their application in photoelectrochemical devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Li; Tezuka, Noriyasu; Umeyama, Tomokazu; Imahori, Hiroshi; Chen, Yuan

    2011-04-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) thin films, containing a high-density of semiconducting nanotubes, were obtained by a gel-centrifugation method. The agarose gel concentration and centrifugation force were optimized to achieve high semiconducting and metallic nanotube separation efficiency at 0.1 wt% agarose gel and 18,000g. The thickness of SWCNT films can be precisely controlled from 65 to 260 nm with adjustable transparency. These SWCNT films were applied in photoelectrochemical devices. Photocurrents generated by semiconducting SWCNT enriched films are 15-35% higher than those by unsorted SWCNT films. This is because of reducing exciton recombination channels as a result of the removal of metallic nanotubes. Thinner films generate higher photocurrents because charge carriers have less chances going in metallic nanotubes for recombination, before they can reach electrodes. Developing more scalable and selective methods for high purity semiconducting SWCNTs is important to further improve the photocurrent generation efficiency by using SWCNT-based photoelectrochemical devices.

  11. Printable thin film supercapacitors using single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaempgen, Martti; Chan, Candace K; Ma, J; Cui, Yi; Gruner, George

    2009-05-01

    Thin film supercapacitors were fabricated using printable materials to make flexible devices on plastic. The active electrodes were made from sprayed networks of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) serving as both electrodes and charge collectors. Using a printable aqueous gel electrolyte as well as an organic liquid electrolyte, the performances of the devices show very high energy and power densities (6 W h/kg for both electrolytes and 23 and 70 kW/kg for aqueous gel electrolyte and organic electrolyte, respectively) which is comparable to performance in other SWCNT-based supercapacitor devices fabricated using different methods. The results underline the potential of printable thin film supercapacitors. The simplified architecture and the sole use of printable materials may lead to a new class of entirely printable charge storage devices allowing for full integration with the emerging field of printed electronics.

  12. Printable Thin Film Supercapacitors Using Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    KAUST Repository

    Kaempgen, Martti

    2009-05-13

    Thin film supercapacitors were fabricated using printable materials to make flexible devices on plastic. The active electrodes were made from sprayed networks of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) serving as both electrodes and charge collectors. Using a printable aqueous gel electrolyte as well as an organic liquid electrolyte, the performances of the devices show very high energy and power densities (6 W h/kg for both electrolytes and 23 and 70 kW/kg for aqueous gel electrolyte and organic electrolyte, respectively) which is comparable to performance in other SWCNT-based supercapacitor devices fabricated using different methods. The results underline the potential of printable thin film supercapacitors. The simplified architecture and the sole use of printable materials may lead to a new class of entirely printable charge storage devices allowing for full integration with the emerging field of printed electronics. © 2009 American Chemical Society.

  13. Reinforced films based on cross-linked water-soluble sulfonated carbon nanotubes with sulfonated polystyrene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Ying; Haiping, Hong; Guiver, Michael; Welsh, Jeffry S

    2009-09-01

    Reinforced films based on sulfonated polystyrene cross-linked with water-soluble sulfonated carbon nanotubes were fabricated using a free-standing film-making method. Transmission and scanning electron microscopy (TEM and SEM), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were used to verify the cross-linking reaction. The mechanical properties of these films demonstrated that the tensile strength increases with an increase in the sulfonated nanotube concentration. At 5 wt% nanotube loading, the tensile strength increased 84% compared with polymer containing no nanotube loading. The relationships between structure and mechanical properties are discussed and a possible direction for making ultra thin and ultra lightweight film is proposed.

  14. Flexible Carbon Nanotube Films for High Performance Strain Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olfa Kanoun

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Compared with traditional conductive fillers, carbon nanotubes (CNTs have unique advantages, i.e., excellent mechanical properties, high electrical conductivity and thermal stability. Nanocomposites as piezoresistive films provide an interesting approach for the realization of large area strain sensors with high sensitivity and low manufacturing costs. A polymer-based nanocomposite with carbon nanomaterials as conductive filler can be deposited on a flexible substrate of choice and this leads to mechanically flexible layers. Such sensors allow the strain measurement for both integral measurement on a certain surface and local measurement at a certain position depending on the sensor geometry. Strain sensors based on carbon nanostructures can overcome several limitations of conventional strain sensors, e.g., sensitivity, adjustable measurement range and integral measurement on big surfaces. The novel technology allows realizing strain sensors which can be easily integrated even as buried layers in material systems. In this review paper, we discuss the dependence of strain sensitivity on different experimental parameters such as composition of the carbon nanomaterial/polymer layer, type of polymer, fabrication process and processing parameters. The insights about the relationship between film parameters and electromechanical properties can be used to improve the design and fabrication of CNT strain sensors.

  15. Aligned carbon nanotube thin films for DNA electrochemical sensing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berti, F. [Department of Chemistry, University of Florence, Via della Lastruccia 3, Sesto Fiorentino, Firenze 50019 (Italy); Lozzi, L. [Department of Physics, University of L' Aquila, Coppito, L' Aquila 67100 (Italy); Palchetti, I. [Department of Chemistry, University of Florence, Via della Lastruccia 3, Sesto Fiorentino, Firenze 50019 (Italy); Santucci, S. [Department of Physics, University of L' Aquila, Coppito, L' Aquila 67100 (Italy); Marrazza, G. [Department of Chemistry, University of Florence, Via della Lastruccia 3, Sesto Fiorentino, Firenze 50019 (Italy)], E-mail: giovanna.marrazza@unifi.it

    2009-09-01

    Carbon nanotubes are interesting materials for DNA electrochemical sensing due to their unique electric properties: high surface area, fast heterogeneous electron transfer, and electrochemical stability. In this work aligned Carbon NanoTube (CNT) thin films were designed and tested as candidate platforms for DNA immobilization and for the development of an electrochemical genosensor. The films were prepared by Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) using acetylene and ammonia as precursor gases and nickel particles as catalyst. A preliminary electrochemical characterization was performed using cyclic voltammetry since, so far, these films have been used only for gas sensing. The surfaces were then covalently functionalized with a DNA oligonucleotide probe, complementary to the sequence of the most common inserts in the GMOs: the Promoter 35S. The genosensor format involved the immobilization of the probe onto the sensor surface, the hybridization with the target-sequence and the electrochemical detection of the duplex formation. Careful attention was paid to the probe immobilization conditions in order to minimize the signal due to non-specifically adsorbed sequences. For the detection of the hybridization event both label-free and enzyme-labelled methods were investigated. In case of the enzyme-labelled method a target concentration at nanomolar level can be easily detected, with a linear response from 50 nM to 200 nM, whereas the label-free method showed a linear response between 0.5 {mu}M and 10 {mu}M. The reproducibility was 11% and 20% with the enzyme-labelled method and the label-free method, respectively. The batch-to-batch reproducibility of the different sensors was also evaluated.

  16. Alignment of muscle precursor cells on the vertical edges of thick carbon nanotube films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, Ian; Gestmann, Ingo; Wright, Andrew C

    2013-10-01

    The development of scaffolds and templates is an essential aspect of tissue engineering. We show that thick (>0.5 mm) vertically aligned carbon nanotube films, made by chemical vapour deposition, can be used as biocompatible substrates for the directional alignment of mouse muscle cells where the cells grow on the exposed sides of the films. Ultra high resolution scanning electron microscopy reveals that the films themselves consist mostly of small diameter (10 nm) multi-wall carbon nanotubes of wavy morphology with some single wall carbon nanotubes. Our findings show that for this alignment to occur the nanotubes must be in pristine condition. Mechanical wiping of the films to create directional alignment is detrimental to directional bioactivity. Larger areas for study have been formed from a composite of multiply stacked narrow strips of nanotubes wipe-transferred onto elastomer supports. These composite substrates appear to show a useful degree of alignment of the cells.

  17. Generation of mirage effect by heated carbon nanotube thin film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tong, L. H. [Department of Modern Mechanics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); USTC-CityU Joint Advanced Research Centre, Suzhou, Jiangsu 215123 (China); Lim, C. W., E-mail: bccwlim@cityu.edu.hk [USTC-CityU Joint Advanced Research Centre, Suzhou, Jiangsu 215123 (China); Department of Civil and Architectural Engineering, City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon, Hong Kong, People’s Republic of China and City University of Hong Kong Shenzhen Research Institute, Shenzhen 518057 (China); Li, Y. C. [Department of Modern Mechanics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Zhang, Chuanzeng; Quoc Bui, Tinh [Department of Civil Engineering, University of Siegen, Paul-Bonatz-Str. 9-11, D-57076 Siegen (Germany)

    2014-06-28

    Mirage effect, a common phenomenon in nature, is a naturally occurring optical phenomenon in which lights are bent due to the gradient variation of refraction in the temperature gradient medium. The theoretical analysis of mirage effect generated by heated carbon nanotube thin film is presented both for gas and liquid. Excellent agreement is demonstrated through comparing the theoretical prediction with published experimental results. It is concluded from the theoretical prediction and experimental observation that the mirage effect is more likely to happen in liquid. The phase of deflected optical beam is also discussed and the method for measurement of thermal diffusivity of medium is theoretically verified. Furthermore, a method for measuring the refractive index of gas by detecting optical beam deflection is also presented in this paper.

  18. Laser Processing of Carbon Nanotube Transparent Conducting Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Andrew

    Transparent conducting films, or TCFs, are 2D electrical conductors with the ability to transmit light. Because of this, they are used in many popular electronics including smart phones, tablets, solar panels, and televisions. The most common material used as a TCF is indium tin oxide, or ITO. Although ITO has great electrical and optical characteristics, it is expensive, brittle, and difficult to pattern. These limitations have led researchers toward other materials for the next generation of displays and touch panels. The most promising material for next generation TCFs is carbon nanotubes, or CNTs. CNTs are cylindrical tubes of carbon no more than a few atoms thick. They have different electrical and optical properties depending on their atomic structure, and are extremely strong. As an electrode, they conduct electricity through an array of randomly dispersed tubes. The array is highly transparent because of gaps between the tubes, and size and optical properties of the CNTs. Many research groups have tried making CNT TCFs with opto-electric properties similar to ITO but have difficultly achieving high conductivity. This is partly attributed to impurities from fabrication and a mix of different tube types, but is mainly caused by low junction conductivity. In functionalized nanotubes, junction conductivity is impaired by covalently bonded molecules added to the sidewalls of the tubes. The addition of this molecule, known as functionalization, is designed to facilitate CNT dispersion in a solvent by adding properties of the molecule to the CNTs. While necessary for a good solution, functionalization decreases the conductivity in the CNT array by creating defects in the tube's structures and preventing direct inter-carbon bonding. This research investigates removing the functional coating (after tube deposition) by laser processing. Laser light is able to preferentially heat the CNTs because of their optical and electrical properties. Through local conduction

  19. Anthocyanin-sensitized solar cells using carbon nanotube films as counter electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Hongwei; Zeng, Haifeng; Subramanian, Venkatachalam; Masarapu, Charan; Hung, Kai-Hsuan; Wei, Bingqing

    2008-11-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) films have been used as counter electrodes in natural dye-sensitized (anthocyanin-sensitized) solar cells to improve the cell performance. Compared with conventional cells using natural dye electrolytes and platinum as the counter electrodes, cells with a single-walled nanotube (SWNT) film counter electrode show comparable conversion efficiency, which is attributed to the increase in short circuit current density due to the high conductivity of the SWNT film.

  20. Electron Damage Effects on Carbon Nanotube Thin Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    antennas surrounding the acceleration column, and the banks of diodes under the RF antennas... diode banks. The tank is filled with SF6 at a pressure of 95 psi to minimize arcing in the accelerator...the diamond structure, graphite or graphene , and more recently the carbon nanotube and Buckyballs shown in Figure 2. Each of these carbon arrangements

  1. Self-fabrication of 3D Patterns on Aligned Carbon Nanotubes Films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    Because of its outstanding performance, an aligned nanotube film with micropatterns has been a research focus in the field of nano-science and technology. Although quite a number of researchers have been successful in constructing such patterns, the precondition for the success, until recently, is to obtain the patterned substrates in advance.A research group at the CAS Institute of Chemistry (ICCAS) has succeeded in self-assembly of threedimensional (3-D) micropatterns on aligned carbon nanotube films.

  2. Field Emission Properties of the Dendritic Carbon Nanotubes Film Embedded with ZnO Quantum Dots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu Zuo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Response on the effects of individual differences of common carbon nanotubes on the field emission current stability and the luminescence uniformity of cathode film, a new type of cathode film made of dendritic carbon nanotubes embedded with Zinc oxide quantum dots is proposed. The film of dendritic carbon nanotubes was synthesized through high-temperature pyrolysis of iron phthalocyanine on a silicon substrate coated with zinc oxide nanoparticles. The dendritic structure looks like many small branches protrude from the main branches in SEM and TEM images, and both the branch and the trunk are embedded with Zinc oxide quantum dots. The turn-on field of the dendritic structure film is ∼1.3 V/μm at a current of 2 μA, which is much lower than that of the common carbon nanotube film, and the emission current and the luminescence uniformity are better than that of the common one. The whole film emission uniformity has been improved because the multi-emission sites out from the dendritic structure carbon nanotubes cover up the failure and defects of the single emission site.

  3. Semiconductor nanorod-carbon nanotube biomimetic films for wire-free photostimulation of blind retinas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bareket, Lilach; Waiskopf, Nir; Rand, David; Lubin, Gur; David-Pur, Moshe; Ben-Dov, Jacob; Roy, Soumyendu; Eleftheriou, Cyril; Sernagor, Evelyne; Cheshnovsky, Ori; Banin, Uri; Hanein, Yael

    2014-11-12

    We report the development of a semiconductor nanorod-carbon nanotube based platform for wire-free, light induced retina stimulation. A plasma polymerized acrylic acid midlayer was used to achieve covalent conjugation of semiconductor nanorods directly onto neuro-adhesive, three-dimensional carbon nanotube surfaces. Photocurrent, photovoltage, and fluorescence lifetime measurements validate efficient charge transfer between the nanorods and the carbon nanotube films. Successful stimulation of a light-insensitive chick retina suggests the potential use of this novel platform in future artificial retina applications.

  4. Carbon nanotube network thin-film transistors on flexible/stretchable substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takei, Kuniharu; Takahashi, Toshitake; Javey, Ali

    2016-03-29

    This disclosure provides systems, methods, and apparatus for flexible thin-film transistors. In one aspect, a device includes a polymer substrate, a gate electrode disposed on the polymer substrate, a dielectric layer disposed on the gate electrode and on exposed portions of the polymer substrate, a carbon nanotube network disposed on the dielectric layer, and a source electrode and a drain electrode disposed on the carbon nanotube network.

  5. Aligned carbon nanotube, graphene and graphite oxide thin films via substrate-directed rapid interfacial deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Arcy, Julio M; Tran, Henry D; Stieg, Adam Z; Gimzewski, James K; Kaner, Richard B

    2012-05-21

    A procedure for depositing thin films of carbon nanostructures is described that overcomes the limitations typically associated with solution based methods. Transparent and conductively continuous carbon coatings can be grown on virtually any type of substrate within seconds. Interfacial surface tension gradients result in directional fluid flow and film spreading at the water/oil interface. Transparent films of carbon nanostructures are produced including aligned ropes of single-walled carbon nanotubes and assemblies of single sheets of chemically converted graphene and graphite oxide. Process scale-up, layer-by-layer deposition, and a simple method for coating non-activated hydrophobic surfaces are demonstrated.

  6. Magnetic studies of polystyrene/iron-filled multi-wall carbon nanotube composite films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarova, T. L.; Zakharchuk, I.; Geydt, P.; Lahderanta, E.; Komlev, A. A.; Zyrianova, A. A.; Kanygin, M. A.; Sedelnikova, O. V.; Suslyaev, V. I.; Bulusheva, L. G.; Okotrub, A. V.

    2016-10-01

    Polystyrene/iron-filled multi-wall carbon nanotube composite films were prepared by solution processing, forge-rolling and stretching methods. Elongated iron carbide nanoparticles formed because of catalytic growth are situated inside the hollow cavity of the nanotubes. Magnetic susceptibility measurements as well as records of isothermal hysteresis loops performed in three perpendicular directions of magnetic field confirmed that the nanotubes have a preferential alignment in the matrix. Strong diamagnetic anisotropy in the composites emerges not only from the MWCNTs but also from the polystyrene matrix. The polymer sticks to the honeycomb lattice through the interaction of the π-orbitals of the phenyl ring and those of the carbon nanotube, contributing to anisotropic diamagnetic response. The contribution of iron nanoparticles to overall magnetic response strongly depends on nanotube concentration in the composite as well as on matrix-filler non-covalent stacking, which influences magnetic interparticle interactions.

  7. Sheet resistances of composite films prepared from chemically-reduced graphite oxides and multiwalled carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Weontae; Kim, Daehan; Jeong, Euh Duck; Bae, Jong-Seong

    2013-12-01

    Graphite oxides (GOs) were spray-coated on a glass substrate to prepare the GO film, and the film was soaked in a HI aqueous solution to make a chemically-reduced GO (rGO) film. The rGOs were successfully prepared by using a chemical reduction of as-made GOs, but their surfaces were seriously damaged during the chemical treatments. The Sheet resistances of rGO and rGO/multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWNT) films were characterized as functions of the film's thickness and the number of MWNTs added to the rGO films.

  8. Wafer-scale monodomain films of spontaneously aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xiaowei; Gao, Weilu; Xie, Lijuan; Li, Bo; Zhang, Qi; Lei, Sidong; Robinson, John M.; Hároz, Erik H.; Doorn, Stephen K.; Wang, Weipeng; Vajtai, Robert; Ajayan, Pulickel M.; Adams, W. Wade; Hauge, Robert H.; Kono, Junichiro

    2016-07-01

    The one-dimensional character of electrons, phonons and excitons in individual single-walled carbon nanotubes leads to extremely anisotropic electronic, thermal and optical properties. However, despite significant efforts to develop ways to produce large-scale architectures of aligned nanotubes, macroscopic manifestations of such properties remain limited. Here, we show that large (>cm2) monodomain films of aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes can be prepared using slow vacuum filtration. The produced films are globally aligned within ±1.5° (a nematic order parameter of ∼1) and are highly packed, containing 1 × 106 nanotubes in a cross-sectional area of 1 μm2. The method works for nanotubes synthesized by various methods, and film thickness is controllable from a few nanometres to ∼100 nm. We use the approach to create ideal polarizers in the terahertz frequency range and, by combining the method with recently developed sorting techniques, highly aligned and chirality-enriched nanotube thin-film devices. Semiconductor-enriched devices exhibit polarized light emission and polarization-dependent photocurrent, as well as anisotropic conductivities and transistor action with high on/off ratios.

  9. Analysis of Osteoblast Differentiation on Polymer Thin Films Embedded with Carbon Nanotubes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Woo Lee

    Full Text Available Osteoblast differentiation can be modulated by variations in order of nanoscale topography. Biopolymers embedded with carbon nanotubes can cause various orders of roughness at the nanoscale and can be used to investigate the dynamics of extracellular matrix interaction with cells. In this study, clear relationship between the response of osteoblasts to integrin receptor activation, their phenotype, and transcription of certain genes on polymer composites embedded with carbon nanotubes was demonstrated. We generated an ultrathin nanocomposite film embedded with carbon nanotubes and observed improved adhesion of pre-osteoblasts, with a subsequent increase in their proliferation. The expression of genes encoding integrin subunits α5, αv, β1, and β3 was significantly upregulated at the early of time-point when cells initially attached to the carbon nanotube/polymer composite. The advantage of ultrathin nanocomposite film for pre-osteoblasts was demonstrated by staining for the cytoskeletal protein vinculin and cell nuclei. The expression of essential transcription factors for osteoblastogenesis, such as Runx2 and Sp7 transcription factor 7 (known as osterix, was upregulated after 7 days. Consequently, the expression of genes that determine osteoblast phenotype, such as alkaline phosphatase, type I collagen, and osteocalcin, was accelerated on carbon nanotube embedded polymer matrix after 14 days. In conclusion, the ultrathin nanocomposite film generated various orders of nanoscale topography that triggered processes related to osteoblast bone formation.

  10. Analysis of Osteoblast Differentiation on Polymer Thin Films Embedded with Carbon Nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jin Woo; Park, Jin-Woo; Khang, Dongwoo

    2015-01-01

    Osteoblast differentiation can be modulated by variations in order of nanoscale topography. Biopolymers embedded with carbon nanotubes can cause various orders of roughness at the nanoscale and can be used to investigate the dynamics of extracellular matrix interaction with cells. In this study, clear relationship between the response of osteoblasts to integrin receptor activation, their phenotype, and transcription of certain genes on polymer composites embedded with carbon nanotubes was demonstrated. We generated an ultrathin nanocomposite film embedded with carbon nanotubes and observed improved adhesion of pre-osteoblasts, with a subsequent increase in their proliferation. The expression of genes encoding integrin subunits α5, αv, β1, and β3 was significantly upregulated at the early of time-point when cells initially attached to the carbon nanotube/polymer composite. The advantage of ultrathin nanocomposite film for pre-osteoblasts was demonstrated by staining for the cytoskeletal protein vinculin and cell nuclei. The expression of essential transcription factors for osteoblastogenesis, such as Runx2 and Sp7 transcription factor 7 (known as osterix), was upregulated after 7 days. Consequently, the expression of genes that determine osteoblast phenotype, such as alkaline phosphatase, type I collagen, and osteocalcin, was accelerated on carbon nanotube embedded polymer matrix after 14 days. In conclusion, the ultrathin nanocomposite film generated various orders of nanoscale topography that triggered processes related to osteoblast bone formation.

  11. Optical Properties of Single-Wall Carbon Nanotube Films Deposited on Si/SiO2 Wafers

    OpenAIRE

    Soetedjo, Hariyadi; Mora, Maria F.; Garcia, Carlos D.

    2010-01-01

    The paper describes a set of simple experiments performed to develop an optical model to describe Si/SiO2 substrates coated with two transparent films of carbon nanotubes. The final goal is to use such optical model to investigate the interaction of proteins with carbon nanotubes. Experiments were performed to assess light reflection as a function of the wavelength or angle of incidence using two substrates (same material, different amounts) composed of oxidized carbon nanotubes. The experime...

  12. Carbon nanotube transistors with graphene oxide films as gate dielectrics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Carbon nanomaterials,including the one-dimensional(1-D) carbon nanotube(CNT) and two-dimensional(2-D) graphene,are heralded as ideal candidates for next generation nanoelectronics.An essential component for the development of advanced nanoelectronics devices is processing-compatible oxide.Here,in analogy to the widespread use of silicon dioxide(SiO2) in silicon microelectronic industry,we report the proof-of-principle use of graphite oxide(GO) as a gate dielectrics for CNT field-effect transistor(FET) via a fast and simple solution-based processing in the ambient condition.The exceptional transistor characteristics,including low operation voltage(2 V),high carrier mobility(950 cm2/V-1 s-1),and the negligible gate hysteresis,suggest a potential route to the future all-carbon nanoelectronics.

  13. Polymyxin-coated Au and carbon nanotube electrodes for stable [NiFe]-hydrogenase film voltammetry.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoeben, F.J.M.; Heller, I.; Albracht, S.P.J.; Dekker, C.; Lemay, S.G.; Heering, H.A.

    2008-01-01

    We report on the use of polymyxin (PM), a cyclic cationic lipodecapeptide, as an electrode modifier for studying protein film voltammetry (PFV) on Au and single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) electrodes. Pretreating the electrodes with PM allows for the subsequent immobilization of an active submonol

  14. Dispersion and film-forming properties of poly(acrylic acid)-stabilized carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saint-Aubin, Karell; Poulin, Philippe; Saadaoui, Hassan; Maugey, Maryse; Zakri, Cécile

    2009-11-17

    We present a detailed study of the influence of pH on the dispersion and film-forming properties of poly(acrylic acid)-stabilized carbon nanotubes. Poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) is a weak polyelectrolyte, with a pH-responsive behavior in aqueous solution. We obtain quantitative UV-visible measurements to show that the amount of polyelectrolyte in optimal pH conditions is weak, showing a good efficiency of the polymer as a carbon nanotube dispersing agent. The best dispersion conditions are achieved at pH 5, a value close to the pK(a) of PAA. Apart from this tenuous pH value, the PAA is not efficient at stabilizing nanotubes and atomic force microscopy allows us to explain the delicate balance between the PAA adsorption and the suspension stability. This study finally permits optimal conditions for making homogeneous and conductive composite films to be determined.

  15. Passive wireless strain and pH sensing using carbon nanotube-gold nanocomposite thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loh, Kenneth J.; Lynch, Jerome P.; Kotov, Nicholas A.

    2007-04-01

    The recent development of wireless sensors for structural health monitoring has revealed their strong dependency on portable, limited battery supplies. Unlike current wireless sensors, passive radio frequency identification (RFID) systems based on inductive coupling can wirelessly receive power from a portable reader while transmitting collected data back. In this paper, preliminary results of a novel inductively coupled strain and corrosion sensor based upon material fabrication techniques from the nanotechnology field are presented. By varying polyelectrolyte species during a layer-by-layer fabrication process, carbon nanotube-polyelectrolyte multilayer thin film sensors sensitive to different mechanical (e.g. strain) and chemical (e.g. pH) stimuli can be produced. Validation studies conducted with different carbon nanotube thin films designed as either strain or pH sensors reveal high sensitivity and linear performance. When coupled with a copper inductive coil antenna, resulting RFID-based sensors exhibit wirelessly readable changes in resonant frequency and bandwidth. Furthermore, a carbon nanotube-gold nanocomposite thin film is fabricated and patterned into a highly conductive coil structure to realize a novel thin film inductive antenna. Preliminary results indicate that nanotube-gold nanocomposites exhibit resonance conditions, holding great promise for future RFID applications.

  16. Facile fabrication of robust superhydrophobic multilayered film based on bioinspired poly(dopamine)-modified carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jin-lei; Ren, Ke-feng; Chang, Hao; Zhang, Shi-miao; Jin, Lie-jiang; Ji, Jian

    2014-02-21

    Thin organic films containing carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have received increasing attention in many fields. In this study, a robust thin superhydrophobic film has been created by using layer-by-layer assembly of the carbon nanotubes wrapped by poly(dopamine) (CNT@PDA) and poly(ethyleneimine) (PEI). UV-vis spectroscopy, ellipsometry, and quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) measurements confirmed that the sequential deposition of PEI and CNT@PDA resulted in a linear growth of the (PEI-CNT@PDA) film. This thin film contained as much as 77 wt% CNTs. Moreover, a very stable and flexible free-standing (PEI-CNT@PDA) film could be obtained by employing cellulose acetate (CA) as a sacrificial layer. The film could even withstand ultrasonication in saturated SDS aqueous solution for 30 min. SEM observations indicated that the ultrathin film consisted of nanoscale interpenetrating networks of entangled CNTs and exhibited a very rough surface morphology. The (PEI-CNT@PDA) film turned superhydrophobic after being coated with a low-surface-energy compound. The superhydrophobic films showed excellent resistance against the adhesion of both platelets and Escherichia coli (E. coli). The (PEI-CNT@PDA) films and the proposed methodology may find applications in the area of medical devices to reduce device-associated thrombosis and infection.

  17. Modeling the interaction Between Ethylene Diamine and Water Films on the Surface of a Carbon Nanotube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffe, Richard L.; Walther, Jens H.; Zimmerli, Urs; Koumoutsakos, Petros

    2004-01-01

    It has been observed that a carbon nanotube (CNT) AFM tip coated with ethylene diamine (EDA) penetrates the liquid water-air interface more easily than an uncoated nanotube tip. The EDA coating remains intact through repeated cycles of dipping and removal. In order to understand the physical basis for this observation, we use ab initio quantum chemistry calculations to study the EDA-CNT-water interaction and to parameterize a force field describing this system. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are carried out for EDA-water mixtures and an EDA-coated carbon nanotube immmed in water. These simulations are similar to our earlier MD study that characterized the CNT-water interface. The attractive CNT-EDA and CNT-water interactions arise primarily from van der Waals forces, and the EDA-EDA, EDA-water and water-water interactions are mainly due to hydrogen bond formation. The binding energ of single EDA molecule to the nanotube is nearly three times larger than the corresponding value found for water (4.3 versus 1.5 kcal mol, respectively). The EDA molecules readily stick to and diffuse along the CNT surface. As a resulf mixing of the EDA and water films does not occur on the timescale of the MD simulations. The EDA film reduces the hydrophobicity of the nanotube surface and acts like a prototypical surfactant in stabilizing the suspension of carbon nanotubes in water. For this presentation, we use the MD simulations to determine how the presence of the carbon nanotube surface perturbs the properties of EDA-water mixtures.

  18. Dry-Transfer of Aligned Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes for Flexible Transparent Thin Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Cole

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Herein we present an inexpensive facile wet-chemistry-free approach to the transfer of chemical vapour-deposited multiwalled carbon nanotubes to flexible transparent polymer substrates in a single-step process. By controlling the nanotube length, we demonstrate accurate control over the electrical conductivity and optical transparency of the transferred thin films. Uniaxial strains of up to 140% induced only minor reductions in sample conductivity, opening up a number of applications in stretchable electronics. Nanotube alignment offers enhanced functionality for applications such as polarisation selective electrodes and flexible supercapacitor substrates. A capacitance of 17 F/g was determined for supercapacitors fabricated from the reported dry-transferred MWCNTs with the corresponding cyclic voltagrams showing a clear dependence on nanotube length.

  19. Development of electrochemical oxidase biosensors based on carbon nanotube-modified carbon film electrodes for glucose and ethanol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gouveia-Caridade, Carla; Pauliukaite, Rasa; Brett, Christopher M.A. [Departamento de Quimica, Faculdade de Ciencias e Tecnologia, Universidade de Coimbra, 3004-535 Coimbra (Portugal)

    2008-10-01

    Functionalised multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were cast on glassy carbon (GC) and carbon film electrodes (CFE), and were characterised electrochemically and applied in a glucose-oxidase-based biosensor. MWCNT-modified carbon film electrodes were then used to develop an alcohol oxidase (AlcOx) biosensor, in which AlcOx-BSA was cross-linked with glutaraldehyde and attached by drop-coating. The experimental conditions, applied potential and pH, for ethanol monitoring were optimised, and ethanol was determined amperometrically at -0.3 V vs. SCE at pH 7.5. Electrocatalytic effects of MWCNT were observed with respect to unmodified carbon film electrodes. The sensitivity obtained was 20 times higher at carbon film/MWCNT-based biosensors than without MWCNT. (author)

  20. Dynamics of capillary infiltration of liquids into a highly aligned multi-walled carbon nanotube film.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boncel, Sławomir; Walczak, Krzysztof Z; Koziol, Krzysztof K K

    2011-01-01

    The physical compatibility of a highly aligned carbon nanotube (HACNT) film with liquids was established using a fast and convenient experimental protocol. Two parameters were found to be decisive for the infiltration process. For a given density of nanotube packing, the thermodynamics of the infiltration process (wettability) were described by the contact angle between the nanotube wall and a liquid meniscus (θ). Once the wettability criterion (θ capillarity for a steady process (Lucas-Washburn law), where the nanoscale capillary force, here supported by gravity, is compensated by viscous drag. This most general theory of capillarity can be applied in a prediction of both wettability of HACNT films and the dynamics of capillary rise in the intertube space in various technological applications.

  1. Carbon nanotube detectors for microchip CE: comparative study of single-wall and multiwall carbon nanotube, and graphite powder films on glassy carbon, gold, and platinum electrode surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pumera, Martin; Merkoçi, Arben; Alegret, Salvador

    2007-04-01

    The performance of microchip electrophoresis/electrochemistry system with carbon nanotube (CNT) film electrodes was studied. Electrocatalytic activities of different carbon materials (single-wall CNT (SWCNT), multiwall CNT (MWCNT), carbon powder) cast on different electrode substrates (glassy carbon (GC), gold, and platinum) were compared in a microfluidic setup and their performance as microchip electrochemical detectors was assessed. An MWCNT film on a GC electrode shows electrocatalytic effect toward oxidation of dopamine (E(1/2) shift of 0.09 V) and catechol (E(1/2) shift of 0.19 V) when compared to a bare GC electrode, while other CNT/carbon powder films on the GC electrode display negligible effects. Modification of a gold electrode by graphite powder results in a strong electrocatalytic effect toward oxidation of dopamine and catechol (E(1/2) shift of 0.14 and 0.11 V, respectively). A significant shift of the half-wave potentials to lower values also provide the MWCNT film (E(1/2) shift of 0.08 and 0.08 V for dopamine and catechol, respectively) and the SWCNT film (E(1/2) shift of 0.10 V for catechol) when compared to a bare gold electrode. A microfluidic device with a CNT film-modified detection electrode displays greatly improved separation resolution (R(s)) by a factor of two compared to a bare electrode, reflecting the electrocatalytic activity of CNT.

  2. Zipping, entanglement, and the elastic modulus of aligned single-walled carbon nanotube films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Won, Yoonjin; Gao, Yuan; Panzer, Matthew A; Xiang, Rong; Maruyama, Shigeo; Kenny, Thomas W; Cai, Wei; Goodson, Kenneth E

    2013-12-17

    Reliably routing heat to and from conversion materials is a daunting challenge for a variety of innovative energy technologies--from thermal solar to automotive waste heat recovery systems--whose efficiencies degrade due to massive thermomechanical stresses at interfaces. This problem may soon be addressed by adhesives based on vertically aligned carbon nanotubes, which promise the revolutionary combination of high through-plane thermal conductivity and vanishing in-plane mechanical stiffness. Here, we report the data for the in-plane modulus of aligned single-walled carbon nanotube films using a microfabricated resonator method. Molecular simulations and electron microscopy identify the nanoscale mechanisms responsible for this property. The zipping and unzipping of adjacent nanotubes and the degree of alignment and entanglement are shown to govern the spatially varying local modulus, thereby providing the route to engineered materials with outstanding combinations of mechanical and thermal properties.

  3. Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotube-Doped Tungsten Oxide Thin Films for Hydrogen Gas Sensing

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    In this work we have fabricated hydrogen gas sensors based on undoped and 1 wt% multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT)-doped tungsten oxide (WO3) thin films by means of the powder mixing and electron beam (E-beam) evaporation technique. Hydrogen sensing properties of the thin films have been investigated at different operating temperatures and gas concentrations ranging from 100 ppm to 50,000 ppm. The results indicate that the MWCNT-doped WO3 thin film exhibits high sensitivity and selectivity ...

  4. Electrochemical preparation and electrochemical behavior of polypyrrole/carbon nanotube composite films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xue-tong ZHANG; Wen-hui SONG

    2009-01-01

    Polypyirole/multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWNT) composite fihns were electrochemically depos-ited in the presence of an ionic surfactant, sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), acting as both supporting electrolyte and dispersant. The effects of the surfactant and the MWNT concentrations on the structure at the resulting composite films were investigated. The electrochemical behavior of the resulting polypyrrole/MWNT composite film was investigated aS well bv cyclic voltammogram. The effect of the additional alternating electric field applied during the constant direct potential electrochemical deposition on the morphology and electrochemical behavior of the resulting composite film was also investigated in this study.

  5. Organic nanodielectrics for low voltage carbon nanotube thin film transistors and complementary logic gates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hur, Seung-Hyun; Yoon, Myung-Han; Gaur, Anshu; Shim, Moonsub; Facchetti, Antonio; Marks, Tobin J; Rogers, John A

    2005-10-12

    We report the implementation of three dimensionally cross-linked, organic nanodielectric multilayers as ultrathin gate dielectrics for a type of thin film transistor device that uses networks of single-walled carbon nanotubes as effective semiconductor thin films. Unipolar n- and p-channel devices are demonstrated by use of polymer coatings to control the behavior of the networks. Monolithically integrating these devices yields complementary logic gates. The organic multilayers provide exceptionally good gate dielectrics for these systems and allow for low voltage, low hysteresis operation. The excellent performance characteristics suggest that organic dielectrics of this general type could provide a promising path to SWNT-based thin film electronics.

  6. Magnetic studies of polystyrene/iron-filled multi-wall carbon nanotube composite films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makarova, T.L., E-mail: Tatyana.makarova@lut.fi [Lappeenranta University of Technology, FI-53851 Lappeenranta (Finland); Ioffe Institute, St Petersburg 194021 (Russian Federation); Zakharchuk, I.; Geydt, P.; Lahderanta, E. [Lappeenranta University of Technology, FI-53851 Lappeenranta (Finland); Komlev, A.A. [St Petersburg State Electrotechnical University, St Petersburg 197376 (Russian Federation); Zyrianova, A.A. [Ioffe Institute, St Petersburg 194021 (Russian Federation); Kanygin, M.A. [Nikolaev Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, SB RAS, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Sedelnikova, O.V. [Nikolaev Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, SB RAS, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Suslyaev, V.I [Tomsk State University, Tomsk 634050 (Russian Federation); Bulusheva, L.G.; Okotrub, A.V. [Nikolaev Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, SB RAS, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation)

    2016-10-01

    Polystyrene/iron-filled multi-wall carbon nanotube composite films were prepared by solution processing, forge-rolling and stretching methods. Elongated iron carbide nanoparticles formed because of catalytic growth are situated inside the hollow cavity of the nanotubes. Magnetic susceptibility measurements as well as records of isothermal hysteresis loops performed in three perpendicular directions of magnetic field confirmed that the nanotubes have a preferential alignment in the matrix. Strong diamagnetic anisotropy in the composites emerges not only from the MWCNTs but also from the polystyrene matrix. The polymer sticks to the honeycomb lattice through the interaction of the π-orbitals of the phenyl ring and those of the carbon nanotube, contributing to anisotropic diamagnetic response. The contribution of iron nanoparticles to overall magnetic response strongly depends on nanotube concentration in the composite as well as on matrix-filler non-covalent stacking, which influences magnetic interparticle interactions. - Highlights: • . Nanotube/polystyrene composites were prepared by stretching and forge-rolling methods. • Anisotropic response of the composites mainly comes from the phenyl aromatic rings. • Magnetism of iron-based nanoparticles is governed by interactions with the matrix.

  7. Ultrafast carrier dynamics in purified and as-grown single-walled carbon nanotube films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Long Yong-Bing; Song Li; Zhang Chun-Yu; Wang Li; Fu Pan-Ming; Zhang Zhi-Guo; Xie Si-Shen; Wang Guo-Ping

    2005-01-01

    Ultrafast time-resolved optical transmissions in purified and as-grown single-walled carbon nanotube films are measured at a temperature of 200K. The signal of the purified sample shows a crossover from photobleaching to photoabsorption. The former and the latter are interpreted as the state filling and the red shift of the π-plasmon,respectively. The signal of the as-grown sample can be perfectly fitted by a single-exponential with a time constant of 232fs. The disappearance of the negative component in the as-grown sample is attributed to the charge transfer between the semiconducting nanotubes and the impurities.

  8. Transparent conducting film: Effect of mechanical stretching to optical and electrical properties of carbon nanotube mat

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Tsuyoshi Saotome; Hansang Kim; David Lashmore; H Thomas Hahn

    2011-07-01

    We describe in this paper a transparent conducting film (TCF). It is a fibrous layer of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs), labeled a dilute CNT mat, that was prepared and unidirectionally stretched to improve both the optical and electrical properties. After stretching by 80% strain, transmittance at 550 nm wavelength was improved by 37% and sheet resistance was reduced to 71% of the original value. The improvement of the transmittance can be explained by increased area of the CNT mat after stretch, and the reduced sheet resistance can be explained by increased density of the CNT alignment in lateral direction due to contraction. Based on the microscopic observation before and after stretch, models to describe the phenomena are proposed. By further expanding on this method, it may be possible to obtain a transparent conducting carbon nanotube film which is crack-resistant for solar cell applications.

  9. Plasma-Etching of Spray-Coated Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Films for Biointerfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Joon Hyub; Lee, Jun-Yong; Min, Nam Ki

    2012-08-01

    We present an effective method for the batch fabrication of miniaturized single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) film electrodes using oxygen plasma etching. We adopted the approach of spray-coating for good adhesion of the SWCNT film onto a pre-patterned Pt support and used O2 plasma patterning of the coated films to realize efficient biointerfaces between SWCNT surfaces and biomolecules. By these approaches, the SWCNT film can be easily integrated into miniaturized electrode systems. To demonstrate the effectiveness of plasma-etched SWCNT film electrodes as biointerfaces, Legionella antibody was selected as analysis model owing to its considerable importance to electrochemical biosensors and was detected using plasma-etched SWCNT film electrodes and a 3,3',5,5'-tetramethyl-benzidine dihydrochloride/horseradish peroxidase (TMB/HRP) catalytic system. The response currents increased with increasing concentration of Legionella antibody. This result indicates that antibodies were effectively immobilized on plasma-etched and activated SWCNT surfaces.

  10. Structural stability of transparent conducting films assembled from length purified single-wall carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. M. Harris; G. R. S. Iyer; D. O. Simien; J. A. Fagan; J. Y. Huh; J. Y. Chung; S. D. Hudson; J. Obrzut; J. F. Douglas; C. M. Stafford; E. K. Hobbie

    2011-01-01

    Single-wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) films show significant promise for transparent electronics applications that demand mechanical flexibility, but durability remains an outstanding issue. In this work, thin membranes of length purified single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) are uniaxially and isotropically compressed by depositing them on prestrained polymer substrates. Upon release of the strain, the topography, microstructure, and conductivity of the films are characterized using a combination of optical/fluorescence microscopy, light scattering, force microscopy, electron microscopy, and impedance spectroscopy. Above a critical surface mass density, films assembled from nanotubes of well-defined length exhibit a strongly nonlinear mechanical response. The measured strain dependence reveals a dramatic softening that occurs through an alignment of the SWCNTs normal to the direction of prestrain, which at small strains is also apparent as an anisotropic increase in sheet resistance along the same direction. At higher strains, the membrane conductivities increase due to a compression-induced restoration of conductive pathways. Our measurements reveal the fundamental mode of elasto-plastic deformation in these films and suggest how it might be suppressed.

  11. Continuous production of carbon nanotubes and diamond films by swirled floating catalyst chemical vapour deposition method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.E. Iyuke

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Various techniques for the synthesis of carbon nanotubes (CNTs are being developed to meet an increasing demand as a result of their versatile applications. Swirled floating catalyst chemical vapour deposition (SFCCVD is one of these techniques. This method was used to synthesise CNTs on a continuous basis using acetylene gas as a carbon source, ferrocene dissolved in xylene as a catalyst precursor, and both hydrogen and argon as carrier gases. Transmission electron microscopy analyses revealed that a mixture of single and multi-wall carbon nanotubes and other carbon nanomaterials were produced within the pyrolytic temperature range of 900–1 100°C and acetylene flow rate range of 118–370 ml min–1. Image comparison of raw and purified products showed that low contents of iron particles and amorphous carbon were contained in the synthesised carbon nanotubes. Diamond films were produced at high ferrocene concentration, hydrogen flow rate and pyrolysis temperatures, while carbon nanoballs were formed and attached to the surface of theCNTs at low ferrocene content and low pyrolysis temperature.

  12. Hybrid Graphene and Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Films for Enhanced Phase-Change Heat Transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Han; Yun, Hyung Duk; Kwon, Soon-Yong; Bang, In Cheol

    2016-02-10

    Nucleate boiling is an effective heat transfer method in power generation systems and cooling devices. In this letter, hybrid graphene/single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT), graphene, and SWCNT films deposited on indium tin oxide (ITO) surfaces were fabricated to investigate the enhancement of nucleate boiling phenomena described by the critical heat flux and heat transfer coefficient. The graphene films were grown on Cu foils and transferred to ITO surfaces. Furthermore, SWCNTs were deposited on the graphene layer to fabricate hybrid graphene/SWCNT films. We determined that the hybrid graphene/SWCNT film deposited on an ITO surface is the most effective heat transfer surface in pool boiling because of the interconnected network of carbon structures.

  13. Photoluminescence Imaging of Polyfluorene Surface Structures on Semiconducting Carbon Nanotubes: Implications for Thin Film Exciton Transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Nicolai F; Pramanik, Rajib; Dowgiallo, Anne-Marie; Ihly, Rachelle; Blackburn, Jeffrey L; Doorn, Stephen K

    2016-12-27

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) have potential to act as light-harvesting elements in thin film photovoltaic devices, but performance is in part limited by the efficiency of exciton diffusion processes within the films. Factors contributing to exciton transport can include film morphology encompassing nanotube orientation, connectivity, and interaction geometry. Such factors are often defined by nanotube surface structures that are not yet well understood. Here, we present the results of a combined pump-probe and photoluminescence imaging study of polyfluorene (PFO)-wrapped (6,5) and (7,5) SWCNTs that provide additional insight into the role played by polymer structures in defining exciton transport. Pump-probe measurements suggest exciton transport occurs over larger length scales in films composed of PFO-wrapped (7,5) SWCNTs, compared to those prepared from PFO-bpy-wrapped (6,5) SWCNTs. To explore the role the difference in polymer structure may play as a possible origin of differing transport behaviors, we performed a photoluminescence imaging study of individual polymer-wrapped (6,5) and (7,5) SWCNTs. The PFO-bpy-wrapped (6,5) SWCNTs showed more uniform intensity distributions along their lengths, in contrast to the PFO-wrapped (7,5) SWCNTs, which showed irregular, discontinuous intensity distributions. These differences likely originate from differences in surface coverage and suggest the PFO wrapping on (7,5) nanotubes produces a more open surface structure than is available with the PFO-bpy wrapping of (6,5) nanotubes. The open structure likely leads to improved intertube coupling that enhances exciton transport within the (7,5) films, consistent with the results of our pump-probe measurements.

  14. Photoluminescence Imaging of Polyfluorene Surface Structures on Semiconducting Carbon Nanotubes: Implications for Thin Film Exciton Transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartmann, Nicolai F.; Pramanik, Rajib; Dowgiallo, Anne-Marie; Ihly, Rachelle; Blackburn, Jeffrey L.; Doorn, Stephen K.

    2016-12-27

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) have potential to act as light-harvesting elements in thin film photovoltaic devices, but performance is in part limited by the efficiency of exciton diffusion processes within the films. Factors contributing to exciton transport can include film morphology encompassing nanotube orientation, connectivity, and interaction geometry. Such factors are often defined by nanotube surface structures that are not yet well understood. Here, we present the results of a combined pump-probe and photoluminescence imaging study of polyfluorene (PFO)-wrapped (6,5) and (7,5) SWCNTs that provide additional insight into the role played by polymer structures in defining exciton transport. Pump-probe measurements suggest exciton transport occurs over larger length scales in films composed of PFO-wrapped (7,5) SWCNTs, compared to those prepared from PFO-bpy-wrapped (6,5) SWCNTs. To explore the role the difference in polymer structure may play as a possible origin of differing transport behaviors, we performed a photoluminescence imaging study of individual polymer-wrapped (6,5) and (7,5) SWCNTs. The PFO-bpy-wrapped (6,5) SWCNTs showed more uniform intensity distributions along their lengths, in contrast to the PFO-wrapped (7,5) SWCNTs, which showed irregular, discontinuous intensity distributions. These differences likely originate from differences in surface coverage and suggest the PFO wrapping on (7,5) nanotubes produces a more open surface structure than is available with the PFO-bpy wrapping of (6,5) nanotubes. The open structure likely leads to improved intertube coupling that enhances exciton transport within the (7,5) films, consistent with the results of our pump-probe measurements.

  15. Deposition and characterization of carbon nanotubes (CNTS) based films for sensing applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dissanayake, Amila C.

    The advent of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) has opened up lot of novel applications because of their unique electrical and mechanical properties. CNTs are well known material for its exceptional electrical, mechanical, optical, thermal and chemical properties. A single-wall nanotube (SWNT) can be either semiconducting, metallic or semi-metallic, based on its chirality and diameter. SWNTs can be used in transistor device as active channels due to high electron mobility (~10000 cm2/(V s), electrical interconnects, nano-scale circuits, field-emission displays, light-emitting devices and thermal heat sinks due to low resistivity, high current density (~109A cm-2 ) and high thermal conductivity (~3500 W m-1). Further, their high Young's modulus and fracture stress is suitable for various sensing applications such as strain/pressure and use in chemical/biological sensors. This work mainly involves the deposition of CNT-based films following two different methods via a conventional microwave chemical vapor deposition (MWCVD) and spinning CNT-composites, and explored the possibility of using CNT-based films in strain gauge applications. Deposited films are characterized and analyzed for their structure, microstructure, composition and electrical properties. Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS), X-ray Reflectivity (XRR), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), X-ray Diffraction (XRD), X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and electrical impedance measurement techniques are used to characterize the films prepared by both the above mentioned methods. The synthesis/deposition process is improved based on the observed films properties. A carbon nanotube forest grown on the Si (100) substrate with Ni as a catalyst using CVD system shows an amorphous nature due to loss of catalytic activity of Ni nano-islands. XPS and RBS data show Ni nano-particles diffused into the Si substrate and surface layer of Ni particles turns out to nickel silicide. The

  16. Nanostructured films from phthalocyanine and carbon nanotubes: surface morphology and electrical characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brito, Jackeline B; Gomes, Douglas J C; Justina, Vanessa D; Lima, Aline M F; Olivati, Clarissa A; Silva, Josmary R; de Souza, Nara C

    2012-02-01

    We report on the investigation of the surface morphology and DC conductivity of nanostructured layer-by-layer (LbL) films from nickel tetrasulfonated phthalocyanine (NiTsPc) alternated with either multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs/NiTsPc) or multi-walled carbon nanotubes dispersed in chitosan (MWNTs+Ch/NiTsPc). We have explored the surface morphology of the films by using fractal concepts and dynamic scale laws. The MWNTs/NiTsPc LbL films were found to have a fractal dimension of ca. 2, indicating a quasi Euclidean surface. MWNTs+Ch/NiTsPc LbL films are described by the Lai-Das Sarma-Villain (LDV) model, which predicts the deposition of particles and their subsequent relaxation. An increase in the wetting contact angle of MWNTs+Ch/NiTsPc LbL films was observed, as compared with MWNTs/NiTsPc LbL films, which presented an increase in the fractal dimension of the first system. Room temperature conductivities were found be ca. 0.45 S/cm for MWNTs/NiTsPc and 1.35 S/cm for MWNTs+Ch/NiTsPc.

  17. Continuous Preparation of Copper/Carbon Nanotube Composite Films and Application in Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Xiao Gang; Le Wu, Min; Wang, Xiao Xia; Zhong, Xin Hua; Zhao, Ke; Wang, Jian Nong

    2016-02-08

    Realizing the continuous and large scale preparation of particle/carbon nanotube (CNT) composites with enhanced functionalities, and broad applications in energy conversion, harvesting, and storage systems, remains as a big challenge. Here, we report a scalable strategy to continuously prepare particle/CNT composite films in which particles are confined by CNT films. This is achieved by the continuous condensation and deposition of a cylindrical assembly of CNTs on a paper strip and the in situ incorporation of particles during the layer-by-layer deposition process. A Cu/CNT composite film is prepared as an example; such a film exhibits very high power conversion efficiency when it is used as a counter electrode in a solar cell, compared with previous materials under otherwise identical conditions. The proposed method can be extended to other CNT-based composite films with excellent functionalities for wide applications.

  18. Laser images recording on aerosol-synthesized single-walled carbon nanotube films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikheev, G. M.; Mikheev, K. G.; Anoshkin, I. V.; Nasibulin, A. G.

    2015-09-01

    It is shown that images on semitransparent conducting films of aerosol-synthesized single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) can be recorded using focused low-power radiation of a He-Ne laser operating at a wavelength of 632.8 nm. Both free-standing films and those deposited on glass or polymer substrates can be used. Laser recording of images on the polymer-supported films is possible due to their transparency increased as a result of chemical reactions between iron nanoparticles encapsulated in SWCNTs and the products of local thermal decomposition of the polymer. Recording on the free-standing SWCNT films and those supported on glass substrates was performed upon acid treatment of the film surface.

  19. Ultrafast graphene and carbon nanotube film patterning by picosecond laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobrinetskiy, Ivan I.; Emelianov, Alexey V.; Otero, Nerea; Romero, Pablo M.

    2016-03-01

    Carbon nanomaterials is among the most promising technologies for advanced electronic applications, due to their extraordinary chemical and physical properties. Nonetheless, after more than two decades of intensive research, the application of carbon-based nanostructures in real electronic and optoelectronic devices is still a big challenge due to lack of scalable integration in microelectronic manufacturing. Laser processing is an attractive tool for graphene device manufacturing, providing a large variety of processes through direct and indirect interaction of laser beams with graphene lattice: functionalization, oxidation, reduction, etching and ablation, growth, etc. with resolution down to the nanoscale. Focused laser radiation allows freeform processing, enabling fully mask-less fabrication of devices from graphene and carbon nanotube films. This concept is attractive to reduce costs, improve flexibility, and reduce alignment operations, by producing fully functional devices in single direct-write operations. In this paper, a picosecond laser with a wavelength of 515 nm and pulse width of 30 ps is used to pattern carbon nanostructures in two ways: ablation and chemical functionalization. The light absorption leads to thermal ablation of graphene and carbon nanotube film under the fluence 60-90 J/cm2 with scanning speed up to 2 m/s. Just under the ablation energy, the two-photon absorption leads to add functional groups to the carbon lattice which change the optical properties of graphene. This paper shows the results of controlled modification of geometrical configuration and the physical and chemical properties of carbon based nanostructures, by laser direct writing.

  20. Mechanical properties and interfacial characteristics of carbon-nanotube-reinforced epoxy thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaojing; Thwe, Moe Moe; Shearwood, Christopher; Liao, Kin

    2002-10-01

    Multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNT) reinforced epoxy composite thin films were prepared by a microfabrication process and their elastic modulus was determined using a shaft-loaded blister test and linear and nonlinear elasticity models. Compared to net resin thin films, a 20% increase in elastic modulus was seen when 0.1 wt % MWNTs were added, suggesting MWNT alignment by spin coating. Electron microscopic observations of the fracture surfaces suggested high interfacial shear stress between MWNTs and the epoxy matrix, a result supported by both molecular mechanics simulation and micromechanics calculations.

  1. Physical, Physicochemical, Mechanical, and Structural Characterization of Films Based on Gelatin/Glycerol and Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Israel Sifuentes-Nieves

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A new method to prepare glycerol/gelatin based films, by doping the film with carbon nanotubes (CNTs and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS, was proposed. SDS was used to disperse CNTs in gelatin/glycerol films as follows: gelatin/glycerol (GG incubated with equal concentrations of CNT and SDS; GG with 0.001% w/w CNT/SDS; GG with 0.002% CNT/SDS and GG with 0.004% CNT/SDS. Diffractograms of CNT/SDS /glycerol films showed an amorphous structure, being consistent with thermograms involving temperature and fusion enthalpy. Mechanical tests showed 30% increase in elongation at break of GG with 0.004% CNT/SDS, with respect to gelatin/glycerol/SDS control. Samples with CNT had increased water vapor permeability (WVP. The film fractal dimension indicated that, with the addition of the highest concentration of CNT, films with a homogeneous surface were obtained, with probable nanotube inclusion in the protein matrix. According to the results, the easy method used to prepare gelatin composite materials gave place to films with better physical, mechanical, and thermal properties.

  2. Nitrogen doping in carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewels, C P; Glerup, M

    2005-09-01

    Nitrogen doping of single and multi-walled carbon nanotubes is of great interest both fundamentally, to explore the effect of dopants on quasi-1D electrical conductors, and for applications such as field emission tips, lithium storage, composites and nanoelectronic devices. We present an extensive review of the current state of the art in nitrogen doping of carbon nanotubes, including synthesis techniques, and comparison with nitrogen doped carbon thin films and azofullerenes. Nitrogen doping significantly alters nanotube morphology, leading to compartmentalised 'bamboo' nanotube structures. We review spectroscopic studies of nitrogen dopants using techniques such as X-ray photoemission spectroscopy, electron energy loss spectroscopy and Raman studies, and associated theoretical models. We discuss the role of nanotube curvature and chirality (notably whether the nanotubes are metallic or semiconducting), and the effect of doping on nanotube surface chemistry. Finally we review the effect of nitrogen on the transport properties of carbon nanotubes, notably its ability to induce negative differential resistance in semiconducting tubes.

  3. Carbon nanotube solar cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colin Klinger

    Full Text Available We present proof-of-concept all-carbon solar cells. They are made of a photoactive side of predominantly semiconducting nanotubes for photoconversion and a counter electrode made of a natural mixture of carbon nanotubes or graphite, connected by a liquid electrolyte through a redox reaction. The cells do not require rare source materials such as In or Pt, nor high-grade semiconductor processing equipment, do not rely on dye for photoconversion and therefore do not bleach, and are easy to fabricate using a spray-paint technique. We observe that cells with a lower concentration of carbon nanotubes on the active semiconducting electrode perform better than cells with a higher concentration of nanotubes. This effect is contrary to the expectation that a larger number of nanotubes would lead to more photoconversion and therefore more power generation. We attribute this to the presence of metallic nanotubes that provide a short for photo-excited electrons, bypassing the load. We demonstrate optimization strategies that improve cell efficiency by orders of magnitude. Once it is possible to make semiconducting-only carbon nanotube films, that may provide the greatest efficiency improvement.

  4. Stretchable and flexible high-strain sensors made using carbon nanotubes and graphite films on natural rubber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadakaluru, Sreenivasulu; Thongsuwan, Wiradej; Singjai, Pisith

    2014-01-06

    Conventional metallic strain sensors are flexible, but they can sustain maximum strains of only ~5%, so there is a need for sensors that can bear high strains for multifunctional applications. In this study, we report stretchable and flexible high-strain sensors that consist of entangled and randomly distributed multiwall carbon nanotubes or graphite flakes on a natural rubber substrate. Carbon nanotubes/graphite flakes were sandwiched in natural rubber to produce these high-strain sensors. Using field emission scanning electron microscopy, the morphology of the films for both the carbon nanotube and graphite sensors were assessed under different strain conditions (0% and 400% strain). As the strain was increased, the films fractured, resulting in an increase in the electrical resistance of the sensor; this change was reversible. Strains of up to 246% (graphite sensor) and 620% (carbon nanotube sensor) were measured; these values are respectively ~50 and ~120 times greater than those of conventional metallic strain sensors.

  5. The effect of dry shear aligning of nanotube thin films on the photovoltaic performance of carbon nanotube–silicon solar cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benedikt W. Stolz

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Recent results in the field of carbon nanotube–silicon solar cells have suggested that the best performance is obtained when the nanotube film provides good coverage of the silicon surface and when the nanotubes in the film are aligned parallel to the surface. The recently developed process of dry shear aligning – in which shear force is applied to the surface of carbon nanotube thin films in the dry state, has been shown to yield nanotube films that are very flat and in which the surface nanotubes are very well aligned in the direction of shear. It is thus reasonable to expect that nanotube films subjected to dry shear aligning should outperform otherwise identical films formed by other processes. In this work, the fabrication and characterisation of carbon nanotube–silicon solar cells using such films is reported, and the photovoltaic performance of devices produced with and without dry shear aligning is compared.

  6. Voltammetric determination of theophylline at a Nafion/multi-wall carbon nanotubes composite film-modified glassy carbon electrode

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Suling Yang; Ran Yang; Gang Li; Jianjun Li; Lingbo Qu

    2010-11-01

    A Nafion/multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) composite film-modified electrode was fabricated and applied to the sensitive and convenient determination of theophylline (TP). Multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) were easily dispersed homogeneously into 0.1% Nafion methanol solution by sonication. Appropriate amount of Nafion/MWNTs suspension was coated on a glassy carbon electrode. After evaporating methanol, a Nafion/MWNTs composite film-modified electrode was achieved. TP could effectively accumulate at Nafion/MWNTs composite film-modified electrode and cause a sensitive anodic peak at around 1180 mV (vs SCE) in 0.01 mol/L H2SO4 medium (pH 1.8). In contrast with the bare glassy carbon electrode, Nafion film-modified electrode, Nafion/MWNTs film-modified electrode could remarkably increase the anodic peak current and decreased the overpotential of TP oxidation. Under the optimized conditions, the anodic peak current was proportional to TP concentration in the range of 8.0 × 10-8-6.0 × 10-5 mol/L, with a detection limit of 2.0 × 10-8 mol/L. This newly developed method was used to determine TP in drug samples with good percentage of recoveries.

  7. Transparent conducting film: Effect of vacuum filtration of carbon nanotube suspended in oleum

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Tsuyoshi Saotome; Hansang Kim; Zhe Wang; David Lashmore; H Thomas Hahn

    2011-07-01

    Vacuum filtration process to fabricate a transparent conducting carbon nanotube (CNT) film is reported. A CNT mat, which is a fibrous sheet of long multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNT), was prepared and dispersed in oleum by solution-sonication. The suspension was then vacuum filtered to obtain a thin MWNT layer with improved dispersion. Sheet resistance of the obtained MWNT layer was increased despite the improved dispersion. SEM micrographs and energy dispersive spectroscopy results indicated that the increase of the sheet resistance could be attributed to degradation and oxidation of the MWNT bundles. Though the chemical approach in this study did not improve the electrical property of the CNT mat, a mechanical approach proposed in our recent work was deemed suitable to enhance optical and electrical properties of the CNT mat.

  8. Effect of Substrate Morphology on Growth and Field Emission Properties of Carbon Nanotube Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar Vikram

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstractCarbon nanotube (CNT films were grown by microwave plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition process on four types of Si substrates: (i mirror polished, (ii catalyst patterned, (iii mechanically polished having pits of varying size and shape, and (iv electrochemically etched. Iron thin film was used as catalytic material and acetylene and ammonia as the precursors. Morphological and structural characteristics of the films were investigated by scanning and transmission electron microscopes, respectively. CNT films of different morphology such as vertically aligned, randomly oriented flowers, or honey-comb like, depending on the morphology of the Si substrates, were obtained. CNTs had sharp tip and bamboo-like internal structure irrespective of growth morphology of the films. Comparative field emission measurements showed that patterned CNT films and that with randomly oriented morphology had superior emission characteristics with threshold field as low as ~2.0 V/μm. The defective (bamboo-structure structures of CNTs have been suggested for the enhanced emission performance of randomly oriented nanotube samples.

  9. Highly conductive, transparent flexible films based on open rings of multi-walled carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ko, Wen-Yin; Su, Jun-Wei; Guo, Chian-Hua; Fu, Shu-Juan; Hsu, Chuen-Yuan; Lin, Kuan-Jiuh, E-mail: kjlin@dragon.nchu.edu.tw

    2011-09-01

    Open rings of multi-walled carbon nanotubes were stacked to form porous networks on a poly(ethylene terephthalate) substrate to form a flexible conducting film (MWCNT-PET) with good electrical conductivity and transparency by a combination of ultrasonic atomization and spin-coating technique. To enhance the electric flexibility, we spin-coated a cast film of poly(vinyl alcohol) onto the MWCNT-PET substrate, which then underwent a thermo-compression process. Field-emission scanning electron microscopy of the cross-sectional morphology illustrates that the film has a robust network with a thickness of {approx} 175 nm, and it remarkably exhibits a sheet resistance of approximately 370 {Omega}/sq with {approx} 77% transmittance at 550 nm even after 500 bending cycles. This electrical conductivity is much superior to that of other MWCNT-based transparent flexible films.

  10. Continuous Preparation of Carbon Nanotube Film and Its Applications in Fuel and Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Xiao Gang; Huang, Xin Xin; Wang, Xiao Xia; Zhong, Xin Hua; Meng, Xin Xin; Wang, Jian Nong

    2016-03-01

    So far, simultaneously realizing the continuous, controllable, and scalable preparation of carbon nanotube (CNT) film has remained a big challenge. Here, we report a scalable approach to continuously prepare CNT film with good control of film size and thickness. This is achieved through the layer-by-layer condensation and deposition of a cylindrical CNT assembly that is continuously produced from a floating catalyst CVD reactor on a paper strip. The promising applications of such a film are demonstrated by directly using it as an effective protecting layer for the Pt/C catalyst in proton exchange membrane fuel cells and as an efficient counter electrode material in quantum-dot-sensitized solar cells.

  11. Efficient coating of transparent and conductive carbon nanotube thin films on plastic substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ng, M H Andrew; Hartadi, Lysia T; Tan Huiwen; Poa, C H Patrick [Institute of Materials Research and Engineering, 3 Research Link, 117602 (Singapore)], E-mail: patrick-poa@imre.a-star.edu.sg

    2008-05-21

    Optically transparent and electrically conductive single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) thin films were fabricated at room temperature using a dip-coating technique. The film transparency and sheet resistance can be easily tailored by controlling the number of coatings. Aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTS) was used as an adhesion promoter and, together with surfactant Triton X-100, greatly improved the SWNTs coating. Only five coats were required to obtain a sheet resistance of 2.05 {omega}{open_square} and film transparency of 84 %T. The dip-coated film after post-deposition treatment with nitric acid has a sheet resistance as low as 130 {omega}{open_square} at 69 %T. This technique is suitable for large-scale SWNT coating at room temperature and can be used on different types of substrates such as glass and plastics. This paper will discuss the role of the adhesion promoter and surfactant in the coating process.

  12. Carbon nanotube network varactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Generalov, A. A.; Anoshkin, I. V.; Erdmanis, M.; Lioubtchenko, D. V.; Ovchinnikov, V.; Nasibulin, A. G.; Räisänen, A. V.

    2015-01-01

    Microelectromechanical system (MEMS) varactors based on a freestanding layer of single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) films were designed, fabricated and tested. The freestanding SWCNT film was employed as a movable upper patch in the parallel plate capacitor of the MEMS. The measurements of the SWCNT varactors show very high tunability, nearly 100%, of the capacitance with a low actuation voltage of 10 V. The functionality of the varactor is improved by implementing a flexible nanocellulose aerogel filling.

  13. Skin-like pressure and strain sensors based on transparent elastic films of carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipomi, Darren J.; Vosgueritchian, Michael; Tee, Benjamin C.-K.; Hellstrom, Sondra L.; Lee, Jennifer A.; Fox, Courtney H.; Bao, Zhenan

    2011-12-01

    Transparent, elastic conductors are essential components of electronic and optoelectronic devices that facilitate human interaction and biofeedback, such as interactive electronics, implantable medical devices and robotic systems with human-like sensing capabilities. The availability of conducting thin films with these properties could lead to the development of skin-like sensors that stretch reversibly, sense pressure (not just touch), bend into hairpin turns, integrate with collapsible, stretchable and mechanically robust displays and solar cells, and also wrap around non-planar and biological surfaces such as skin and organs, without wrinkling. We report transparent, conducting spray-deposited films of single-walled carbon nanotubes that can be rendered stretchable by applying strain along each axis, and then releasing this strain. This process produces spring-like structures in the nanotubes that accommodate strains of up to 150% and demonstrate conductivities as high as 2,200 S cm-1 in the stretched state. We also use the nanotube films as electrodes in arrays of transparent, stretchable capacitors, which behave as pressure and strain sensors.

  14. Skin-like pressure and strain sensors based on transparent elastic films of carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipomi, Darren J; Vosgueritchian, Michael; Tee, Benjamin C-K; Hellstrom, Sondra L; Lee, Jennifer A; Fox, Courtney H; Bao, Zhenan

    2011-10-23

    Transparent, elastic conductors are essential components of electronic and optoelectronic devices that facilitate human interaction and biofeedback, such as interactive electronics, implantable medical devices and robotic systems with human-like sensing capabilities. The availability of conducting thin films with these properties could lead to the development of skin-like sensors that stretch reversibly, sense pressure (not just touch), bend into hairpin turns, integrate with collapsible, stretchable and mechanically robust displays and solar cells, and also wrap around non-planar and biological surfaces such as skin and organs, without wrinkling. We report transparent, conducting spray-deposited films of single-walled carbon nanotubes that can be rendered stretchable by applying strain along each axis, and then releasing this strain. This process produces spring-like structures in the nanotubes that accommodate strains of up to 150% and demonstrate conductivities as high as 2,200 S cm(-1) in the stretched state. We also use the nanotube films as electrodes in arrays of transparent, stretchable capacitors, which behave as pressure and strain sensors.

  15. Dynamics of capillary infiltration of liquids into a highly aligned multi-walled carbon nanotube film

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sławomir Boncel

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The physical compatibility of a highly aligned carbon nanotube (HACNT film with liquids was established using a fast and convenient experimental protocol. Two parameters were found to be decisive for the infiltration process. For a given density of nanotube packing, the thermodynamics of the infiltration process (wettability were described by the contact angle between the nanotube wall and a liquid meniscus (θ. Once the wettability criterion (θ < 90° was met, the HACNT film (of free volume equal to 91% was penetrated gradually by the liquid in a rate that can be linearly correlated to dynamic viscosity of the liquid (η. The experimental results follow the classical theory of capillarity for a steady process (Lucas–Washburn law, where the nanoscale capillary force, here supported by gravity, is compensated by viscous drag. This most general theory of capillarity can be applied in a prediction of both wettability of HACNT films and the dynamics of capillary rise in the intertube space in various technological applications.

  16. Monitoring structural defects and crystallinity of carbon nanotubes in thin films

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S S Mahajan; M D Bambole; S P Gokhale; A B Gaikwad

    2010-03-01

    We report the influence of catalyst formulation and reaction temperature on the formation of carbon nanotube (CNT) thin films by the chemical vapour deposition (CVD) method. Thin films of CNTs were grown on Fe–Mo/Al2O3-coated silicon wafer by thermal decomposition of methane at different temperatures ranging from 800 to 1000°C. The electron microscopic investigations, SEM as well as HRTEM, of the as-grown CNT thin films revealed the growth of uniform multi-walled CNTs in abundance. The intensity ratio of D-band to G-band and FWHM of G-band through Raman measurements clearly indicated the dependency of structural defects and crystallinity of CNTs in thin films on the catalyst formulation and CVD growth temperature. The results suggest that thin films of multi-walled CNTs with negligible amount of defects in the nanotube structure and very high crystallinity can be obtained by thermal CVD process at 925°C.

  17. Carbon nanotube thin film strain sensor models assembled using nano- and micro-scale imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Bo Mi; Loh, Kenneth J.; Yang, Yuan-Sen

    2017-02-01

    Nanomaterial-based thin films, particularly those based on carbon nanotubes (CNT), have brought forth tremendous opportunities for designing next-generation strain sensors. However, their strain sensing properties can vary depending on fabrication method, post-processing treatment, and types of CNTs and polymers employed. The objective of this study was to derive a CNT-based thin film strain sensor model using inputs from nano-/micro-scale experimental measurements of nanotube physical properties. This study began with fabricating ultra-low-concentration CNT-polymer thin films, followed by imaging them using atomic force microscopy. Image processing was employed for characterizing CNT dispersed shapes, lengths, and other physical attributes, and results were used for building five different types of thin film percolation-based models. Numerical simulations were conducted to assess how the morphology of dispersed CNTs in its 2D matrix affected bulk film electrical and electromechanical (strain sensing) properties. The simulation results showed that CNT morphology had a significant impact on strain sensing performance.

  18. An experimental study of nonlinear behaviour of capacitance in graphene/carbon nanotube hybrid films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsawafi, Suaad; Wang, Xiao; Jin, Jie; Song, Mo

    2016-06-01

    Graphene (G) and graphene oxide (GO)/carbon nanotubes (CNTs) hybrid films were fabricated as high performance electrode materials by a simple water solution casting method with different contents of single-wall CNT (SWCNT), multi wall CNT (MWCNT) and multi wall CNT with hydroxyl group (MWCNT-OH). The films with MWCNTs showed a layered, interconnected and well entangled structure at nano-scale. With increasing CNT contents, the capacitance of the G/MWCNT and GO/MWCNT films raised almost linearly and their resistance reduced. G/SWCNT and GO/SWCNT films did not form layered structures leading to a very low capacitance. Nonlinear behaviour of the capacitance with voltage has been observed in the G/MWCNT and GO/MWCNT hybrid films. The length and thickness of the hybrid film have significant influences on the capacitance. The capacitance and conductivity increase with increasing the thickness and decrease with increasing the length of the hybrid films. For the application of graphene/CNT hybrid films as electrodes, these characters could be taken into account.

  19. Swift heavy ion induced modifications of single walled carbon nanotube thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vishalli, E-mail: vishalli_2008@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, Panjab University, Chandigarh 160014 (India); Raina, K.K. [Materials Research Laboratory, School of Physics and Materials Science, Thapar University, P.O. Box 32, Patiala 147004, Punjab (India); Avasthi, D.K. [Materials Science Group, Inter University Accelerator Centre, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, P.O. Box 10502, New Delhi 110067 (India); Srivastava, Alok [Department of Chemistry, Panjab University, Chandigarh 160014 (India); Dharamvir, Keya [Department of Physics, Panjab University, Chandigarh 160014 (India)

    2016-04-15

    Thin films of single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) were prepared by Langmuir–Blodgett method and irradiated with swift heavy ions, carbon and nickel each of energy 60 MeV. The ion beams have different electronic energy loss (S{sub e}) values and the samples were exposed to various irradiation doses. The irradiated films were characterized using Raman and optical absorption spectroscopy. Raman spectroscopy results indicate the competing processes of defect creation and healing (annealing) of SWCNTs at lower fluences, while at higher fluences defect creation or damage dominates. In UV–Vis–NIR spectroscopy we find that there is decrease in the intensity of characteristic peaks with every increasing fluence, indicating decrease in the optically active states with irradiation.

  20. Multiwalled carbon nanotube/polydimethylsiloxane composite films as high performance flexible electric heating elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Jing; Jeong, Young Gyu, E-mail: ygjeong@cnu.ac.kr [Department of Advanced Organic Materials and Textile System Engineering, Chungnam National University, Daejeon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-08-04

    High performance elastomeric electric heating elements were prepared by incorporating various contents of pristine multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) in polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) matrix by using an efficient solution-casting and curing technique. The pristine MWCNTs were identified to be uniformly dispersed in the PDMS matrix and the electrical percolation of MWCNTs was evaluated to be at ∼0.27 wt. %, where the electrical resistivity of the MWCNT/PDMS composite films dropped remarkably. Accordingly, the composite films with higher MWCNT contents above 0.3 wt. % exhibit excellent electric heating performance in terms of temperature response rapidity and electric energy efficiency at constant applied voltages. In addition, the composite films, which were thermally stable up to 250 °C, showed excellent heating-cooling cyclic performance, which was associated with operational stability in actual electric heating applications.

  1. Fabrication of flexible transparent conductive films from long double-walled carbon nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoki Imazu

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The fabrication of flexible transparent conducting films (TCFs is important for the development of the next-generation flexible devices. In this study, we used double-walled carbon nanotubes (DWCNTs as the starting material and described a fabrication method of flexible TCFs. We have determined in a quantitative way that the key factors are the length and the dispersion states of the DWCNTs as well as the weight-ratios of dispersant polymer/DWCNTs. By controlling such factors, we have readily fabricated a flexible highly transparent (94% transmittance and conductive (surface resistivity = 320 Ω sq−1 DWCNT film without adding any chemical doping that is often used to reduce the surface resistivity. By applying a wet coating, we have succeeded in the fabrication of large-scale conducting transparent DWCNT films based on the role-to-role method.

  2. Improvement of luminescent stability from carbon nanotube field emission display based on printed CNT film

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZENG; Fanguang; ZHU; Changchun; LIU; Xinghui

    2006-01-01

    Aiming at the influences of poor contact at carbon nanotube (CNT)/electrode interface on luminescence stability in printed CNT film, a new co-sintering process for cathode fabrication was presented to improve the luminescent stability of fully printed CNT-FED. By co-sintering the printed silver and CNT layers, CNTs geometrically matched with Ag surface and/or embedded into Ag layer at the bottom of the co-sintered film, large CNTs block and bulk silver nested each other at the top of the co-sintered film. All these structures increased the contact area at CNT/Ag interface, which could increase the probability of forming ohmic contact at CNT/Ag interface. The luminescent stability of printed CNT-FED with co-sintered cathode could be improved as 5.6 times high as that of common devices.

  3. In-plane Thermal and Electrical Transport Through Single-walled Carbon Nanotube Thin Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, A. J.; Avery, A. D.; Mistry, K. S.; Zink, B. L.; Olsen, M. L.; Parilla, P. A.; Blackburn, J. L.

    2014-03-01

    Recent advances in both chemical processing and fabrication techniques have enabled the development of a variety of new nanostructured materials for energy conversion technologies. Single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) networks may enable a number of cost-effective energy technologies, including transparent conductors for photovoltaics and thermoelectric composites. For such applications, a fundamental understanding of the physics governing their thermal and electrical properties is needed. Transport in SWNT networks is highly anisotropic; therefore the ability to measure the in-plane transport, both thermal and electrical, for these systems is extremely important. In this talk, we discuss the dispersion of highly enriched semiconducting SWNTs in organic solvents and deposition techniques optimized to enable measurements of in-plane transport of uniform thin films. We present results from in-plane thermal and electrical measurements as well as optical properties of SWNT:polymer thin films. Finally, we discuss the application of these results to developing nanocomposite films optimized for thermoelectric applications.

  4. Densely Packed Linear Assembles of Carbon Nanotube Bundles in Polysiloxane-Based Nanocomposite Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-Baek Cho

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Linear assemblies of carbon nanotubes (LACNTs were fabricated and controlled in polysiloxane-based nanocomposite films and the effects of the LACNTs on the thermal and electrical properties of the films were investigated. CNTs were dispersed by mechanical stirring and sonication in a prepolymer of polysiloxane. Homogeneous suspensions were cast on polyamide spacers and oriented by linear-assembly by applying DC and switching DC electric fields before the mixture became cross-linked. Densely packed LACNTs that fixed the composite film surfaces were fabricated with various structures and thicknesses that depended on the DC and switching DC conditions. Polymer nanocomposites with different LACNT densities exhibited enhanced thermal and electrical conductivities and high optical transmittances. They are considered promising structural materials for electronic sectors in automotive and aerospace applications.

  5. Multi-walled Carbon Nanotube Film Sensor for Ethanol Gas Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongzhi Zhang

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWNTs film-based sensor on the substrate of printed circuit board (PCB with interdigital electrodes (IDE were fabricated using layer-by-layer self-assembly, and the electrical properties of MWNTs film sensor were investigated through establishing models involved with number of self-assembled layers and IDE finger gap, and also its ethanol gas-sensing properties with varying gas concentration are characterized at room temperature.Through comparing with the thermal evaporation method, the experiment results shown that the layer-by-layer self-assembled MWNTs film sensor have a faster response and more sensitive resistance change when exposed to ethanol gas, indicated a prospective application for ethanol gas detection with high performance and low-cost.

  6. Electrical conductivity and electromagnetic interference shielding characteristics of multiwalled carbon nanotube filled polyurethane composite films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son Hoang, Anh

    2011-06-01

    Multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were homogeneously dispersed in a pure polyurethane resin by grinding in a planetary ball mill. The structure and surface morphology of the MWCNTs and MWCNT/polyurethane composites were studied by filed emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) methods. The electrical conductivity at room temperature and electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding effectiveness (SE) of the composite films with different MWCNT loadings were investigated and the measurement of EMI SE was carried out in a frequency range of 8-12 GHz (X-band). The experimental results show that with a low MWCNT concentration the composite films could achieve a high conductivity and their EMI SE has a strong dependence on MWCNT content. For the composite films with 22 wt% of MWCNTs, the EMI SE attained an average value of 20 dB, so that the shielding effect reduced the penetrating power to 1%.

  7. High adhesion transparent conducting films using graphene oxide hybrid carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Da, Shi-Xun; Wang, Jie; Geng, Hong-Zhang; Jia, Song-Lin; Xu, Chun-Xia; Li, Lin-Ge; Shi, Pei-Pei; Li, Guangfen

    2017-01-01

    Flexible transparent conducting films (TCFs) with carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have attracted more and more attention for their wide range of potential applications. While, there are still some problems to be solved on several aspects. In this study, a graphene oxide/carbon nanotube (GO/CNT) hybrid TCF was fabricated through the simple spray coating method. GO sheets were introduced to form new electron transporting channels. It was found that the best optoelectronic property films were fabricated when the ratio of GO/CNT is 1.5:1.0, which the sheet resistance of the film was found to be 146 Ω/sq at the transmittance of 86.0%. Due to the two-dimensional structure and the oxidation groups of GO sheets, flatness and wettability of the electrode surface was improved obviously. Adhesion factor of the TCFs was calculated by the change of transparent and sheet resistance after trial test, the addition of GO sheets enhanced the adhesion dramatically and the mechanism was analyzed. Improvements of conductivity, flatness, wettability and adhesion above are all advantageous for the solution-based processing of organic electronics for spraying and printing.

  8. Carbon Nanotube Thin Film Biosensors for Sensitive and Reproducible Whole Virus Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Himadri S. Mandal, Zhengding Su, Andrew Ward, Xiaowu (Shirley Tang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Here, we report the label-free, sensitive, and real-time electrical detection of whole viruses using carbon nanotube thin film (CNT-TF field effect devices. Selective detection of approximately 550 model viruses, M13-bacteriophage, is demonstrated using a simple two-terminal (no gate electrode configuration. Chemical gating through specific antibody-virus binding on CNT surface is proposed to be the sensing mechanism. Compared to electrical impedance sensors with identical microelectrode dimensions (no CNT, the CNT-TF sensors exhibit sensitivity 5 orders higher. We believe the reported approach could lead to a reproducible and cost-effective solution for rapid viral identification.

  9. Plasma breaking of thin films into nano-sized catalysts for carbon nanotube synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, J.S.; Umeda, K.; Uchino, K.; Nakashima, H.; Muraoka, K

    2003-07-15

    Iron thin films deposited by pulse laser deposition (PLD) were broken into uniform nano-sized catalysts by plasma bombardment for carbon nanotube (CNT) synthesis. Size distributions of broken catalysts were obtained in terms of plasma discharge conditions. Vertically arranged high-density (10{sup 13} per m{sup 2}) CNTs were synthesized using microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition (MP-CVD) system and the gas mixture of N{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} on optimally broken catalysts with few carbonaceous particles on a large area Si substrate. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Raman spectroscopy (RS) were used to evaluate the obtained CNTs.

  10. Continuous Electron Doping of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Films Using Inkjet Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuzaki, Satoki; Nobusa, Yuki; Shimizu, Ryo; Yanagi, Kazuhiro; Kataura, Hiromichi; Takenobu, Taishi

    2012-06-01

    The fabrication of logic circuits using the inkjet technique has attracted especially strong interest owing to wide range applications such as flexible and printed electronics. Although logic circuits fabricated using the inkjet method have already been accomplished, the precise control of gate threshold voltages has not been realized yet. In this study, we have demonstrated electron doping of single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) films by inkjet printing of dilute poly(ethylene imine) (PEI) ink. We have successfully obtained the continuous threshold voltage shift by varying the number of doping steps, indicating that the carrier concentration in PEI ink is much lower than that of our previous work.

  11. Continuous Carbon Nanotube-Based Fibers and Films for Applications Requiring Enhanced Heat Dissipation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Peng; Fan, Zeng; Mikhalchan, Anastasiia; Tran, Thang Q; Jewell, Daniel; Duong, Hai M; Marconnet, Amy M

    2016-07-13

    The production of continuous carbon nanotube (CNT) fibers and films has paved the way to leverage the superior properties of individual carbon nanotubes for novel macroscale applications such as electronic cables and multifunctional composites. In this manuscript, we synthesize fibers and films from CNT aerogels that are continuously grown by floating catalyst chemical vapor deposition (FCCVD) and measure thermal conductivity and natural convective heat transfer coefficient from the fiber and film. To probe the mechanisms of heat transfer, we develop a new, robust, steady-state thermal characterization technique that enables measurement of the intrinsic fiber thermal conductivity and the convective heat transfer coefficient from the fiber to the surrounding air. The thermal conductivity of the as-prepared fiber ranges from 4.7 ± 0.3 to 28.0 ± 2.4 W m(-1) K(-1) and depends on fiber volume fraction and diameter. A simple nitric acid treatment increases the thermal conductivity by as much as a factor of ∼3 for the fibers and ∼6.7 for the thin films. These acid-treated CNT materials demonstrate specific thermal conductivities significantly higher than common metals with the same absolute thermal conductivity, which means they are comparatively lightweight, thermally conductive fibers and films. Beyond thermal conductivity, the acid treatment enhances electrical conductivity by a factor of ∼2.3. Further, the measured convective heat transfer coefficients range from 25 to 200 W m(-2) K(-1) for all fibers, which is higher than expected for macroscale materials and demonstrates the impact of the nanoscale CNT features on convective heat losses from the fibers. The measured thermal and electrical performance demonstrates the promise for using these fibers and films in macroscale applications requiring effective heat dissipation.

  12. Synthesis and investigation of PMMA films with homogeneously dispersed multiwalled carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pantoja-Castro, M.A., E-mail: m_pantojaq@yahoo.com.mx [Facultad de Ingeniería Química, Universidad Michoacana de San Nicolás de Hidalgo, Av. J. Múgica S/N Col., Villa Universidad, CP 58040 Morelia, Michoacán (Mexico); Pérez-Robles, J.F. [Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados del IPN, Unidad Querétaro, Libramiento Norponiente #2000, Fracc. Real de Juriquilla, CP 76230 Querétaro (Mexico); González-Rodríguez, H. [Facultad de Ingeniería Química, Universidad Michoacana de San Nicolás de Hidalgo, Av. J. Múgica S/N Col., Villa Universidad, CP 58040 Morelia, Michoacán (Mexico); Vorobiev-Vasilievitch, Y. [Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados del IPN, Unidad Querétaro, Libramiento Norponiente #2000, Fracc. Real de Juriquilla, CP 76230 Querétaro (Mexico); Martínez-Tejada, H.V. [Instituto de Energía, Materiales y Medio Ambiente, Universidad Pontificia Bolivariana, Circular 1 No. 70-01, Bloque 22, Medellín (Colombia); Velasco-Santos, C. [Centro de Física Aplicada y Tecnología Avanzada, Universidad Autónoma de México, Av. Boulevard Juriquilla, No. 3001 Juriquilla, CP 76230 Querétaro (Mexico)

    2013-07-15

    Multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNT) modified by 2.2′-azoiso-butyronitrile (AIBN) were incorporated into methyl methacrylate (MMA) by sonochemistry method, resulting in homogenous dispersion of MWNT, which makes possible to obtain flexible conductive polymer-matrix nanocomposites films of PMMA, with MWNT concentrations ranging from 0 to 0.5 wt%. Modified MWNT (AIBN-MWNT) were studied by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR), Raman spectroscopy, X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) and through visual observations in order to compare the dispersion in 2-propanone and toluene with that of pristine MWNT. Synthesized PMMA-AIBN-MWNT films were studied by FT-IR and Raman spectroscopy. Using FT-IR for the AIBN-MWNT it was not possible to identify any group or groups attached to the nanotubes. Raman spectroscopy shows a small modification in the Lorentzian peaks ratio I{sub D/G} of AIBN-MWNT, meanwhile XPS showed that atomic compositions does not change for AIBN-MWNT compared to the pristine nanotubes. Also by impedance it was analyzed the conductivity of PMMA-MWNT films and the results showed a threshold percolation at 0.5 wt%. FT-IR and Raman analyses for PMMA-AIBN-MWNT composite indicate a covalent bonding between PMMA and MWNT due to the opening of π-bonds of the nanotubes, which is related with a possible proposed reaction scheme. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • We used sonochemistry-in situ polymerization to disperse MWNT very soon in PMMA. • A high and homogenous dispersion of MWNT in PMMA was achieved. • The modification of MWNT by AIBN was analyzed using Raman. • A covalent bonding between PMMA and MWNT was analyzed by FT-IR and Raman. • According to the results of PMMA-MWNT it was proposed a scheme reaction.

  13. 177 fs erbium-doped fiber laser mode locked with a cellulose polymer film containing single-wall carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tausenev, A. V.; Obraztsova, E. D.; Lobach, A. S.; Chernov, A. I.; Konov, V. I.; Kryukov, P. G.; Konyashchenko, A. V.; Dianov, E. M.

    2008-04-01

    A mode-locked soliton erbium-doped fiber laser generating 177fs pulses is demonstrated. The laser pumped by a 85mW, 980nm laser diode emits 7mW at 1.56μm at a pulse repetition rate of 50MHz. Passive mode locking is achieved with a saturable absorber made of a high-optical quality film based on cellulose derivative with dispersed carbon single-wall nanotubes. The film is prepared with the original technique by using carbon nanotubes synthesized by the arc-discharge method.

  14. Fabrication of transparent and conductive carbon nanotube/polyvinyl butyral films by a facile solution surface dip coating method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuanqing; Yu, Ting; Pui, Tzesian; Chen, Peng; Zheng, Lianxi; Liao, Kin

    2011-06-01

    We present a simple solution surface dip coating method for fabricating transparent and conductive carbon nanotube/polyvinyl butyral (CNT/PVB) composite films. This fabrication process is simple to scale production and requires only ethanol and water as solvents, which is green and environment friendly.We present a simple solution surface dip coating method for fabricating transparent and conductive carbon nanotube/polyvinyl butyral (CNT/PVB) composite films. This fabrication process is simple to scale production and requires only ethanol and water as solvents, which is green and environment friendly. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental section. See DOI: 10.1039/c1nr10302d

  15. Light-induced vibration characteristics of free-standing carbon nanotube films fabricated by vacuum filtration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Junying; Zhu, Yong, E-mail: yongzhu@cqu.edu.cn; Wang, Ning; Zhang, Jie [The Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Technology and System, Education Ministry of China, Chongqing University, Chongqing, 400044 (China); Wang, Xin [State Key Laboratory of Electronic Thin Films and Integrated Devices, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu, 610054 (China)

    2014-07-14

    In this paper, we fabricated carbon nanotube (CNT) films with different thickness by vacuum filtration method, and the films were separated from Mixed Cellulose Ester membranes with burn-off process. The thickness of CNT films with different concentrations of CNTs 50 mg, 100 mg, 150 mg, and 200 mg are 10.36 μm, 20.90 μm, 30.19 μm, and 39.98 μm respectively. The CNT bundles are homogeneously distributed and entangled with each other, and still maintain 2D continuous network structures after burn-off process. The optical absorptivity of the films is between 84% and 99% at wavelengths ranging from 400 nm to 2500 nm. Vibration characteristics were measured with the Fabry-Perot (F-P) interferometer vibration measurement system. CNT films vibrate only under the xenon light irradiating perpendicularly to the surface. Vibration recorded by Fabry-Perot interferometer is considered to be caused by the time-dependent thermal moment, which is due to the temperature differences of two sides of CNT films. The vibration frequency spectrums between 0.1 ∼ 0.5 Hz were obtained by the Fast Fourier Transform spectra from time domain to frequency domain, and showed a linear relationship with films thickness, which is in accordance with theoretical model of thermal induced vibration.

  16. Method for synthesizing carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Hongyou

    2012-09-04

    A method for preparing a precursor solution for synthesis of carbon nanomaterials, where a polar solvent is added to at least one block copolymer and at least one carbohydrate compound, and the precursor solution is processed using a self-assembly process and subsequent heating to form nanoporous carbon films, porous carbon nanotubes, and porous carbon nanoparticles.

  17. A review of production methods of carbon nanotube and graphene thin films for electrothermal applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janas, D.; Koziol, K. K.

    2014-02-01

    Electrothermal materials transform electric energy into heat due to the Joule effect. To date, resistive wires made of heavy metal alloys have primarily been used as the heat source in many appliances surrounding us. Recent discoveries in the field of carbon nanostructures revealed that they can offer a spectrum of advantages over the traditional materials. We review the production methods of thin films composed of carbon nanotubes or graphene and depict how they can be used as conductive coatings for electrothermal applications. We screen all reports from the field up to now and highlight the features of designed nanoheaters. A particular focus is placed on the analysis of general findings of how to tune their electrothermal properties, why carbon nanostructure devices operate the way they do and in what aspects they are superior to the currently available materials on the market.

  18. Highly Uniform Thin-Film Transistors Printed on Flexible Plastic Films with Morphology-Controlled Carbon Nanotube Network Channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Numata, Hideaki; Ihara, Kazuki; Saito, Takeshi; Endoh, Hiroyuki; Nihey, Fumiyuki

    2012-05-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) transistor arrays were fabricated on plastic films by printing. All the device elements were directly patterned by maskless printing without any additional patterning process, and minimum materials were used. During fabrication, the morphology of the CNT random network was controlled by an adsorption mechanism on the surface to be printed, which resulted in excellent and uniform electrical properties. The field-effect mobility was further improved by post-treatment to modify the morphology of the CNT network. These results are promising for realizing printed electronics integrated with CNT transistors.

  19. Electrical Transport Properties of Ni95Ti5 Catalyzed Multi wall Carbon Nanotubes Film

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zishan Husain Khan

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanotubes (CNTs can be understood as one or more graphite sheets rolled up into a seamless cylinder. CNTs have gained much attention and scientific interest due to their unique properties and potential applications since their discovery in 1991. In the present work, we have deposited Ni95Ti5 film using thermal deposition method. Finally, the Ni95Ti5 catalyzed multi wall carbon nanotubes (MWNTs are grown on silicon substrate using low pressure chemical vapor deposition (LPCVD method and the electrical transport properties of this MWNTs film are studied over a temperature range (284–4K to explain the conduction mechanism. We have suggested two types of conduction mechanism for the entire temperature range. For the temperature region (284–220K, the conduction is due to thermally activated process, whereas the conduction takes place via variable range hopping (VRH for the temperature range of (220–4K. The VRH mechanism changes from three dimensions to two dimensions as we move down to the temperature below 50K. Therefore, the data for the temperature region (220–50K is plotted for three dimensional variable range hopping (3D VRH model and the two dimensional variable range hopping (2D VRH for lower temperature range of (50–4K. These VRH models give a good fit to the experimental data. Using these models, we have calculated various interesting electrical parameters such as activation energy, density of states, hopping distance and hopping energy.

  20. Increasing mouse embryonic fibroblast cells adhesion on superhydrophilic vertically aligned carbon nanotube films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lobo, A.O., E-mail: loboao@yahoo.com [Laboratory of Biomedical Nanotechnology (NanoBio), Instituto de Pesquisa e Desenvolvimento (IP and D), Universidade do Vale do Paraiba UniVap, Avenida Shishima Hifumi 2911, Sao Jose dos Campos, 12244-000, SP (Brazil) and Laboratory of Biomedical Vibrational Spectroscopy (LEVB), Instituto de Pesquisa e Desenvolvimento (IP and D), Universidade do Vale do Paraiba UniVap, Avenida Shishima Hifumi 2911, Sao Jose dos Campos, 12244-000, SP (Brazil); Marciano, F.R. [Laboratory of Biomedical Nanotechnology (NanoBio), Instituto de Pesquisa e Desenvolvimento (IP and D), Universidade do Vale do Paraiba UniVap, Avenida Shishima Hifumi 2911, Sao Jose dos Campos, 12244-000, SP (Brazil); Laboratory of Biomedical Vibrational Spectroscopy LEVB, Instituto de Pesquisa e Desenvolvimento (IP and D), Universidade do Vale do Paraiba (UniVap), Avenida Shishima Hifumi 2911, Sao Jose dos Campos, 12244-000, SP (Brazil); Ramos, S.C. [Laboratorio Associado de Sensores e Materiais (LAS), Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais (INPE), Avenida dos Astronautas 1758, Sao Jose dos Campos, 12.245-970, SP (Brazil); Machado, M.M. [Centro Multidisciplinar para Investigacao Biologica na Area da Ciencia em Animais de Laboratorio (CEMIB), Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), Rua 05 de Junho s/no, Cidade Universitaria ' Zeferino Vaz' , 13083-877, Campinas (Brazil); Corat, E.J. [Laboratorio Associado de Sensores e Materiais (LAS), Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais (INPE), Avenida dos Astronautas 1758, Sao Jose dos Campos, 12.245-970, SP (Brazil); Corat, M.A.F. [Centro Multidisciplinar para Investigacao Biologica na Area da Ciencia em Animais de Laboratorio (CEMIB), Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), Rua 05 de Junho s/no, Cidade Universitaria ' Zeferino Vaz' , 13083-877, Campinas (Brazil)

    2011-10-10

    We have analyzed the adhesion of mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) genetically modified by green fluorescence protein (GFP) gene cultured on vertically-aligned carbon nanotubes (VACNTs) after 6 days. The VACNTs films grown on Ti were obtained by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition process using Fe catalyst and submitted to an oxygen plasma treatment, for 2 min, at 400 V and 80 mTorr, to convert them to superhydrophilic. Cellular adhesion and morphology were analyzed by scanning electron, fluorescence microscopy, and thermodynamics analysis. Characterizations of superhydrophilic VACNTs films were evaluated by contact angle and X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy. Differences of crowd adhered cells, as well as their spreading on superhydrophilic VACNTs scaffolds, were evaluated using focal adhesion analysis. This study was the first to demonstrate, in real time, that the wettability of VACNTs scaffolds might have enhanced and differential adherence patterns to the MEF-GFP on VACNTs substrates. Highlights: {yields} A simple oxygen plasma treatment was used to obtain superhydrophilic CNT films. {yields} Superhydrophilic CNTs films were successfully produced by incorporation of carboxylic groups. {yields} Cellular adhesion on superhydrophilic VACNT films was analyzed in real time. {yields} Wettability of CNT films directly affects the cellular migration, proliferation and adhesion.

  1. Enhanced dielectric performance in polymer composite films with carbon nanotube-reduced graphene oxide hybrid filler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jin-Young; Kim, TaeYoung; Suk, Ji Won; Chou, Harry; Jang, Ji-Hoon; Lee, Jong Ho; Kholmanov, Iskandar N; Akinwande, Deji; Ruoff, Rodney S

    2014-08-27

    The electrical conductivity and the specific surface area of conductive fillers in conductor-insulator composite films can drastically improve the dielectric performance of those films through changing their polarization density by interfacial polarization. We have made a polymer composite film with a hybrid conductive filler material made of carbon nanotubes grown onto reduced graphene oxide platelets (rG-O/CNT). We report the effect of the rG-O/CNT hybrid filler on the dielectric performance of the composite film. The composite film had a dielectric constant of 32 with a dielectric loss of 0.051 at 0.062 wt% rG-O/CNT filler and 100 Hz, while the neat polymer film gave a dielectric constant of 15 with a dielectric loss of 0.036. This is attributed to the increased electrical conductivity and specific surface area of the rG-O/CNT hybrid filler, which results in an increase in interfacial polarization density between the hybrid filler and the polymer.

  2. Thermal conductivity of a film of single walled carbon nanotubes measured with infrared thermal imager

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Ya; Inoue, Taiki; Xiang, Rong; Chiashi, Shohei; Maruyama, Shigeo

    Heat dissipation has restricted the modern miniaturization trend with the development of electronic devices. Theoretically proven to be with high axial thermal conductivity, single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT) have long been expected to cool down the nanoscale world. Even though the tube-tube contact resistance limits the capability of heat transfer of the bulk film, the high intrinsic thermal conductivity of SWNT still glorify the application of films of SWNT network as a thermal interface material. In this work, we proposed a new method to straightly measure the thermal conductivity of SWNT film. We bridged two cantilevered Si thin plate with SWNT film, and kept a steady state heat flow in between. With the infrared camera to record the temperature distribution, the Si plates with known thermal conductivity can work as a reference to calculate the heat flux going through the SWNT film. Further, the thermal conductivity of the SWNT film can be obtained through Fourier's law after deducting the effect of thermal radiation. The sizes of the structure, the heating temperature, the vacuum degree and other crucial impact factors are carefully considered and analyzed. The author Y. F. was supported through the Advanced Integration Science Innovation Education and Research Consortium Program by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sport, Science and Technology.

  3. Multi-Directional Growth of Aligned Carbon Nanotubes Over Catalyst Film Prepared by Atomic Layer Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Kai

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The structure of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs severely depends on the properties of pre-prepared catalyst films. Aiming for the preparation of precisely controlled catalyst film, atomic layer deposition (ALD was employed to deposit uniform Fe2O3 film for the growth of CNT arrays on planar substrate surfaces as well as the curved ones. Iron acetylacetonate and ozone were introduced into the reactor alternately as precursors to realize the formation of catalyst films. By varying the deposition cycles, uniform and smooth Fe2O3 catalyst films with different thicknesses were obtained on Si/SiO2 substrate, which supported the growth of highly oriented few-walled CNT arrays. Utilizing the advantage of ALD process in coating non-planar surfaces, uniform catalyst films can also be successfully deposited onto quartz fibers. Aligned few-walled CNTs can be grafted on the quartz fibers, and they self-organized into a leaf-shaped structure due to the curved surface morphology. The growth of aligned CNTs on non-planar surfaces holds promise in constructing hierarchical CNT architectures in future.

  4. Exploiting the hierarchical morphology of single-walled and multi-walled carbon nanotube films for highly hydrophobic coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco De Nicola

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Self-assembled hierarchical solid surfaces are very interesting for wetting phenomena, as observed in a variety of natural and artificial surfaces. Here, we report single-walled (SWCNT and multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT thin films realized by a simple, rapid, reproducible, and inexpensive filtration process from an aqueous dispersion, that was deposited at room temperature by a dry-transfer printing method on glass. Furthermore, the investigation of carbon nanotube films through scanning electron microscopy (SEM reveals the multi-scale hierarchical morphology of the self-assembled carbon nanotube random networks. Moreover, contact angle measurements show that hierarchical SWCNT/MWCNT composite surfaces exhibit a higher hydrophobicity (contact angles of up to 137° than bare SWCNT (110° and MWCNT (97° coatings, thereby confirming the enhancement produced by the surface hierarchical morphology.

  5. Flexible carbon nanotube/polyaniline paper-like films and their enhanced electrochemical properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meng, Chuizhou; Liu, Changhong; Fan, Shoushan [Tsinghua-Foxconn Nanotechnology Research Center and Department of Physics, Tsinghua University, Room 215, Nanoscience Building 1 Qinghua Yuan, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2009-01-15

    The carbon nanotube/polyaniline (CNT/PANI) composites have important potential applications as the electrodes in energy storage devices for their attractive electrochemical properties. In this work, we report a novel method to prepare the interesting paper-like CNT/PANI composites by using the CNT network as the template. Compared with the conventional brittle CNT/PANI composites, these paper-like composites were much thin and flexible. This work demonstrates a new approach, which may transform a brittle polymer into flexible films. Meanwhile, these film electrodes showed much superior electrochemical performance such as higher specific capacitance, lower internal resistivity, and more stability under different current loads. These paper-like composite electrodes have promising applications in new kinds of energy storage devices. (author)

  6. Wet catalyst-support films for production of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, Noe T; Hamilton, Christopher E; Pint, Cary L; Orbaek, Alvin; Yao, Jun; Frosinini, Aldo L; Barron, Andrew R; Tour, James M; Hauge, Robert H

    2010-07-01

    A procedure for vertically aligned carbon nanotube (VA-CNT) production has been developed through liquid-phase deposition of alumoxanes (aluminum oxide hydroxides, boehmite) as a catalyst support. Through a simple spin-coating of alumoxane nanoparticles, uniform centimer-square thin film surfaces were coated and used as supports for subsequent deposition of metal catalyst. Uniform VA-CNTs are observed to grow from this film following deposition of both conventional evaporated Fe catalyst, as well as premade Fe nanoparticles drop-dried from the liquid phase. The quality and uniformity of the VA-CNTs are comparable to growth from conventional evaporated layers of Al(2)O(3). The combined use of alumoxane and Fe nanoparticles to coat surfaces represents an inexpensive and scalable approach to large-scale VA-CNT production that makes chemical vapor deposition significantly more competitive when compared to other CNT production techniques.

  7. Luminescence of carbon nanotube bulbs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI ChuanGang; WU DeHai; WANG KunLin; WEI JinQuan; WEI BingQing; ZHU HongWei; WANG ZhiCheng; LUO JianBin; LIU WenJin; ZHENG MingXin

    2007-01-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) bulbs made of decimeter-scale double-walled carbon nanotube (DWCNT) strands and films were fabricated and their luminescence properties, including the lighting efficiency, voltage-current relation and thermal stability were investigated. The results show that the DWCNT bulb has a comparable spectrum of visible light with tungsten bulb and its average efficiency is 40% higher than that of a tungsten filament at the same temperature (1400-2300 K). The nanotube filaments show both resistance and thermal stability over a large temperature region. No obvious damage was found for a nanotube bulb illuminating at 2300 K for more than 24 hours in vacuum.

  8. Highly air- and moisture-stable hole-doped carbon nanotube films achieved using boron-based oxidant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funahashi, Kazuma; Tanaka, Naoki; Shoji, Yoshiaki; Imazu, Naoki; Nakayama, Ko; Kanahashi, Kaito; Shirae, Hiroyuki; Noda, Suguru; Ohta, Hiromichi; Fukushima, Takanori; Takenobu, Taishi

    2017-03-01

    Hole doping into carbon nanotubes can be achieved. However, the doped nanotubes usually suffer from the lack of air and moisture stability, thus, they eventually lose their improved electrical properties. Here, we report that a salt of the two-coordinate boron cation Mes2B+ (Mes: 2,4,6-trimethylphenyl group) can serve as an efficient hole-doping reagent to produce nanotubes with markedly high stability in the presence of air and moisture. Upon doping, the resistances of the nanotubes decreased, and these states were maintained for one month in air. The hole-doped nanotube films showed a minimal increase in resistance even upon humidification with a relative humidity of 90%.

  9. Photothermoelectric p-n junction photodetector with intrinsic broadband polarimetry based on macroscopic carbon nanotube films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xiaowei; Wang, Xuan; Nanot, Sébastien; Cong, Kankan; Jiang, Qijia; Kane, Alexander A; Goldsmith, John E M; Hauge, Robert H; Léonard, François; Kono, Junichiro

    2013-08-27

    Light polarization is used in the animal kingdom for communication, navigation, and enhanced scene interpretation and also plays an important role in astronomy, remote sensing, and military applications. To date, there have been few photodetector materials demonstrated to have direct polarization sensitivity, as is usually the case in nature. Here, we report the realization of a carbon-based broadband photodetector, where the polarimetry is intrinsic to the active photodetector material. The detector is based on p-n junctions formed between two macroscopic films of single-wall carbon nanotubes. A responsivity up to ~1 V/W was observed in these devices, with a broadband spectral response spanning the visible to the mid-infrared. This responsivity is about 35 times larger than previous devices without p-n junctions. A combination of experiment and theory is used to demonstrate the photothermoelectric origin of the responsivity and to discuss the performance attributes of such devices.

  10. Using in-situ polymerization of conductive polymers to enhance the electrical properties of solution-processed carbon nanotube films and fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Ranulfo; Pan, Lijia; Fuller, Gerald G; Bao, Zhenan

    2014-07-09

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes/polymer composites typically have limited conductivity due to a low concentration of nanotubes and the insulating nature of the polymers used. Here we combined a method to align carbon nanotubes with in-situ polymerization of conductive polymer to form composite films and fibers. Use of the conducting polymer raised the conductivity of the films by 2 orders of magnitude. On the other hand, CNT fiber formation was made possible with in-situ polymerization to provide more mechanical support to the CNTs from the formed conducting polymer. The carbon nanotube/conductive polymer composite films and fibers had conductivities of 3300 and 170 S/cm, respectively. The relatively high conductivities were attributed to the polymerization process, which doped both the SWNTs and the polymer. In-situ polymerization can be a promising solution-processable method to enhance the conductivity of carbon nanotube films and fibers.

  11. Preparation and characterization of poly[Ni(salen)(crown receptor)]/multi-walled carbon nanotube composite films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tedim, J.; Hillman, A.R. [Department of Chemistry, University of Leicester, Leicester LE1 7 RH (United Kingdom); Goncalves, F.; Pereira, M.F.R.; Figueiredo, J.L. [Laboratorio de Catalise e Materiais, Departamento de Engenharia Quimica, Faculdade de Engenharia, Universidade do Porto, 4200-465 Porto (Portugal); Moura, C. [CIQ, Departamento de Quimica, Faculdade de Ciencias, Universidade do Porto, 4169-007 Porto (Portugal); Freire, C. [REQUIMTE, Departamento de Quimica, Faculdade de Ciencias, Universidade do Porto, 4169-007 Porto (Portugal)

    2008-10-01

    Nanocomposite films comprising multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) embedded within poly[Ni(3-Mesalophen-b15-c5)] were deposited on Pt and ITO electrode surfaces by the potentiodynamic polymerisation of [Ni(3-Mesalophen-b15-c5)] from solutions containing dispersed MWCNTs. Composites incorporating carbon nanotubes subject to a range of oxidising pre-treatments were compared with those incorporating untreated carbon nanotubes and with the pure polymer. In both cases, the use of CH{sub 3}CN and CH{sub 2}Cl{sub 2} as fabrication and characterization media were explored. Films were characterized by voltammetry, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and scanning electron microscope (SEM). The coating of the carbon nanotubes with polymer varied significantly with pre-treatment and solvent medium; this influenced the final composite morphology and electrical properties. Performance enhancement of the polymer component by the presence of the carbon nanotubes was manifested through the ability to store charge and the ease with which this could be accomplished; these were parameterized via increased redox capacitance and decreased charge-transfer resistance, respectively. Correlation of impedance parameters with SEM images provided a morphological rationale for composite electrical properties. (author)

  12. A review of fabrication and applications of carbon nanotube film-based flexible electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Steve; Vosguerichian, Michael; Bao, Zhenan

    2013-02-01

    Flexible electronics offer a wide-variety of applications such as flexible circuits, flexible displays, flexible solar cells, skin-like pressure sensors, and conformable RFID tags. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are a promising material for flexible electronics, both as the channel material in field-effect transistors (FETs) and as transparent electrodes, due to their high intrinsic carrier mobility, conductivity, and mechanical flexibility. In this feature article, we review the recent progress of CNTs in flexible electronics by describing both the processing and the applications of CNT-based flexible devices. To employ CNTs as the channel material in FETs, single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are used. There are generally two methods of depositing SWNTs on flexible substrates--transferring CVD-grown SWNTs or solution-depositing SWNTs. Since CVD-grown SWNTs can be highly aligned, they often outperform solution-processed SWNT films that are typically in the form of random network. However, solution-based SWNTs can be printed at a large-scale and at low-cost, rendering them more appropriate for manufacturing. In either case, the removal of metallic SWNTs in an effective and a scalable manner is critical, which must still be developed and optimized. Nevertheless, promising results demonstrating SWNT-based flexible circuits, displays, RF-devices, and biochemical sensors have been reported by various research groups, proving insight into the exciting possibilities of SWNT-based FETs. In using carbon nanotubes as transparent electrodes (TEs), two main strategies have been implemented to fabricate highly conductive, transparent, and mechanically compliant films--superaligned films of CNTs drawn from vertically grown CNT forests using the ``dry-drawing'' technique and the deposition or embedding of CNTs onto flexible or stretchable substrates. The main challenge for CNT based TEs is to fabricate films that are both highly conductive and transparent. These CNT based TEs have

  13. Hydrogen sensing performance of WO3 thin film by using multi - wall carbon nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Ghasempour

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The WO3/MWNTs hybrid gas sensitive films were prepared by spin-coating on alumina substrate. The structure, morphology and chemical composition of the functionalized MWNTs and WO3/MWNTs hybrid films were studied by SEM, TEM, XRD, Raman, DLS and XPS methods. The MWCNT were initially functionalized (f-MWNTs. Dispersion and surface reactivity of MWNTs was improved because of oxygenate groups on MWNTs surface. Results showed WO3 nanoparticles were nucleated on oxygenated group on surface of f-MWNTs in hybrid suspension. After coating and annealing the films at 350 , the response of hybrid WO3/MWNTs films was measured. In addition, adding a little amount of MWNTs (the ratio of MWNTs/W less than 5/1000 wt% increased the hydrogen sensitivity so that the hybrid films showed an increase of 50 times compared to pure tungsten oxide layer in response to the 10000 ppm hydrogen concentration. Considering the results, the identification of these structures appear tobe 10 ppm hydrogen gas. With the addition of carbon nanotubes, the working temperature of pure tungsten oxide layers (400 reduced to 200 in hybrid layer. The gas sensitivity is suggested to have risendue to mainly the increase in the surface area as well as development of two types of depletion layers, one at the WO3/ MWNTs hetero junction and the other at WO3 grain boundaries.

  14. Vanadium oxide-carbon nanotube composite films characterized by spectroscopic ellipsometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Qiong; Xu, Xiangdong; Gu, Yu; Wang, Meng; Yao, Jie; Jiang, Yadong; Sun, Minghui; Ao, Tianhong; Lian, Yuxiang; Wang, Fu; Li, Xinrong

    2016-10-01

    Spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) is utilized to characterize the vanadium oxide (VO x )-single walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) composite films prepared by sol-gel. Five Tauc-Lorentz oscillators model is employed to describe the dispersions in the optical responses of VO x and VO x -SWCNT thin films. Results reveal that if the SWCNT concentration in the composite film is increased, the refractive index is decreased, while the extinction coefficient is increased. Moreover, higher SWCNT content leads to lower optical band gap (E g) but larger localized state (E e). Interestingly, both E g and E e values reach saturated at a SWCNT content of ~8 wt%. Particularly, the peak transition energies of the 5 Tauc-Lorentz oscillators have been assigned to the specific transitions according to the band structures of VO x . This work reveals the feasibility of investigating the optical properties and microstructures of VO x -SWCNT composite films by SE. These experimental results will be helpful for better understanding the VO x -SWCNT composite films, and promoting future characterizations of other SWCNT-based composites by SE.

  15. Studies of Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caneba, Gerard T.

    2005-01-01

    The fellowship experience for this summer for 2004 pertains to carbon nanotube coatings for various space-related applications. They involve the following projects: (a) EMI protection films from HiPco-polymers, and (b) Thermal protection nanosilica materials. EMI protection films are targeted to be eventually applied onto casings of laptop computers. These coatings are composites of electrically-conductive SWNTs and compatible polymers. The substrate polymer will be polycarbonate, since computer housings are typically made of carbon composites of this type of polymer. A new experimental copolymer was used last year to generate electrically-conductive and thermal films with HiPco at 50/50 wt/wt composition. This will be one of the possible formulations. Reference films will be base polycarbonate and neat HiPco onto polycarbonate films. Other coating materials that will be tried will be based on HiPco composites with commercial enamels (polyurethane, acrylic, polyester), which could be compatible with the polycarbonate substrate. Nanosilica fibers are planned for possible use as thermal protection tiles on the shuttle orbiter. Right now, microscale silica is used. Going to the nanoscale will increase the surface-volume-per-unit-area of radiative heat dissipation. Nanoscale carbon fibers/nanotubes can be used as templates for the generation of nanosilica. A sol-gel operation is employed for this purpose.

  16. Ultraviolet and infrared studies of the single-walled and multi-walled carbon nanotube films with different thickness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abouelsayed, A., E-mail: a_sobhi77@yahoo.com [Spectroscopy Department, Physics Division, National Research Centre, 33 El Bohouth st. (Former El Tahrir st.), Dokki, Giza P.O. 12622 (Egypt); Eisa, Wael H. [Spectroscopy Department, Physics Division, National Research Centre, 33 El Bohouth st. (Former El Tahrir st.), Dokki, Giza P.O. 12622 (Egypt); Dawy, M. [Physical Chemistry Department, Inorganic Chemical Industries and Mineral Resources Division National Research Centre, 33 El Bohouth st. (former El Tahrir st.), Dokki, Giza P.O. 12622 (Egypt); Shabaka, A. [Spectroscopy Department, Physics Division, National Research Centre, 33 El Bohouth st. (Former El Tahrir st.), Dokki, Giza P.O. 12622 (Egypt)

    2016-02-15

    Ultraviolet and infrared transmission measurements on an unoriented single-wall (SWCNTs) and multi-wall (MWCNTs) carbon nanotubes films were performed over a frequency range 190–2500 nm for the four different films. A clear change in the fine structure of the infrared spectrum for different films. The higher-energy optical absorption bands, which correspond to transitions across the Van Hove singularities, are not observed in the measured frequency range in the case of MWCNTs films. The broad excitation in the low-energy range below 0.025 eV (Drude peak (E{sub M0})) are attributed to the contributions from metallic carriers localized in a finite length. This Drude peak (E{sub M0}) at low-energies is decreased in in case of MWCNTs, which suggests a progressive transition of metallic tubes to insulating state. The unoriented MWCNTs films have an average thickness of about 200–400 nm. The scanning electron microscope pictures of the SWCNTs and the MWCNTs films illustrate the morphological differences between the four studied samples. The volume fraction of the carbon nanotubes in all films appears to be the same, although there is a difference for particles other than nanotubes in the films.

  17. Electrical Transport and Magnetoresistance in Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vitaly KSENEVICH

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Electrical transport properties and magnetoresistance of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNT films were investigated within temperature range (2 – 300 K and in magnetic fields up to 8 T. A crossover between metallic (dR/dT > 0 and non-metallic (dR/dT < 0 temperature dependence of the resistance as well as low-temperature saturation of the resistance in high bias regime indicated on the diminishing of role of the contact barriers between individual nanotubes essential for the charge transport in SWCNT arrays. The magnetoresistance (MR data demonstrated influence of weak localization and electron-electron interactions on charge transport properties in SWCNT films. The low-field negative MR with positive upturn was observed at low temperatures. At T > 10 K only negative MR was observed in the whole range of available magnetic fields. The negative MR can be approximated using 1D weak localization (WL model. The low temperature positive MR is induced by contribution from electron-electron interactions. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.20.2.6311

  18. Carbon nanotube nanoelectrode arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Zhifeng; Lin, Yuehe; Yantasee, Wassana; Liu, Guodong; Lu, Fang; Tu, Yi

    2008-11-18

    The present invention relates to microelectode arrays (MEAs), and more particularly to carbon nanotube nanoelectrode arrays (CNT-NEAs) for chemical and biological sensing, and methods of use. A nanoelectrode array includes a carbon nanotube material comprising an array of substantially linear carbon nanotubes each having a proximal end and a distal end, the proximal end of the carbon nanotubes are attached to a catalyst substrate material so as to form the array with a pre-determined site density, wherein the carbon nanotubes are aligned with respect to one another within the array; an electrically insulating layer on the surface of the carbon nanotube material, whereby the distal end of the carbon nanotubes extend beyond the electrically insulating layer; a second adhesive electrically insulating layer on the surface of the electrically insulating layer, whereby the distal end of the carbon nanotubes extend beyond the second adhesive electrically insulating layer; and a metal wire attached to the catalyst substrate material.

  19. Raman microscopy mapping for the purity assessment of chirality enriched carbon nanotube networks in thin- film transistors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhao Li; Jianfu Ding; Paul Finnie; Jacques Lefebvre; Fuyong Cheng; ChristopherT. Kingston; Patrick R. L. Malenfant

    2015-01-01

    With recent improvements in carbon nanotube separation methods, the accurate determination of residual metallic carbon nanotubes in a purified nanotube sample is important, particularly for those interested in using semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) in electronic device applications such as thin-film transistors (TFTs). This work demonstrates that Raman microscopy mapping is a powerful characterization tool for quantifying residual metallic carbon nanotubes present in highly enriched semiconducting nanotube networks. Raman mapping correlates well with absorption spectroscopy, yet it provides greater differentiation in purity. Electrical data from TFTs with channel lengths of 2.5 and 5μ m demonstrate the utility of the method. By comparing samples with nominal purities of 99.0% and 99.8%, a clear differentiation can be made when evaluating the current on/off ratio as a function of channel length, and thus the Raman mapping method provides a means to guide device fabrication by correlating SWCNT network density and purity with TFT channel scaling.

  20. Characterization of the Mechanical and Electromechanical Properties of Carbon Nanotube-Latex Thin Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Long

    The safe, reliable, and efficient operation of structural systems can be undermined by various damage modes. To identify and respond to structural damage in a timely fashion, technologies for structural health monitoring (SHM) have been extensively studied and widely applied in practice. In this context, strain sensors play a crucial role in evaluating structural performance, as they can provide insights about internal stresses within structural components. As compared to conventional rigid and locally implemented strain sensors, piezoresistive nanostructured materials provide considerable opportunities for developing flexible, light-weight, and densely distributed sensors or "sensing skins." Although many types of nanomaterial-based strain sensors have been fabricated, most of them rely on complicated and expensive manufacturing procedures, which hinder their large-scale applications. To address the aforementioned limitations, this thesis proposes the development, optimization, and characterization of a type of spray-fabricated carbon nanotube (CNT)-based thin film strain sensor. By using spray coating or airbrushing, thin films can be coated and readily applied onto large structural surfaces. It was found that the mechanical and electrical properties of the nanocomposite films could be optimized by modifying CNT concentrations and conducting post-fabrication annealing. Overall, the CNT nanocomposite films possess favorable mechanical properties as well as stable and reversible electromechanical properties, rendering them promising candidates as strain sensors suitable for SHM applications.

  1. Carbon Nanotube/Conductive Additive/Space Durable Polymer Nanocomposite Films for Electrostatic Charge Dissipation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Joseph G., Jr.; Watson, Kent A.; Delozier, Donavon M.; Connell, John W.

    2003-01-01

    Thin film membranes of space environmentally stable polymeric materials possessing low color/solar absorptivity (alpha) are of interest for potential applications on Gossamer spacecraft. In addition to these properties, sufficient electrical conductivity is required in order to dissipate electrostatic charge (ESC) build-up brought about by the charged orbital environment. One approach to achieve sufficient electrical conductivity for ESC mitigation is the incorporation of single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). However, when the SWNTs are dispersed throughout the polymer matrix, the nanocomposite films tend to be significantly darker than the pristine material resulting in a higher alpha. The incorporation of conductive additives in combination with a decreased loading level of SWNTs is one approach for improving alpha while retaining conductivity. Taken individually, the low loading level of conductive additives and SWNTs is insufficient in achieving the percolation level necessary for electrical conductivity. When added simultaneously to the film, conductivity is achieved through a synergistic effect. The chemistry, physical, and mechanical properties of the nanocomposite films will be presented.

  2. Electrical Conductance Tuning and Bistable Switching in Poly(N-vinylcarbazole)-Carbon Nanotube Composite Films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Gang; Ling, Qi-Dan; Teo, Eric Yeow Hwee; Zhu, Chun-Xiang; Chan, D Siu-Hung; Neoh, Koon-Gee; Kang, En-Tang

    2009-07-28

    By varying the carbon nanotube (CNT) content in poly(N-vinylcarbazole) (PVK) composite thin films, the electrical conductance behavior of an indium-tin oxide/PVK-CNT/aluminum (ITO/PVK-CNT/Al) sandwich structure can be tuned in a controlled manner. Distinctly different electrical conductance behaviors, such as (i) insulator behavior, (ii) bistable electrical conductance switching effects (write-once read-many-times (WORM) memory effect and rewritable memory effect), and (iii) conductor behavior, are discernible from the current density-voltage characteristics of the composite films. The turn-on voltage of the two bistable conductance switching devices decreases and the ON/OFF state current ratio of the WORM device increases with the increase in CNT content of the composite film. Both the WORM and rewritable devices are stable under a constant voltage stress or a continuous pulse voltage stress, with an ON/OFF state current ratio in excess of 10(3). The conductance switching effects of the composite films have been attributed to electron trapping in the CNTs of the electron-donating/hole-transporting PVK matrix.

  3. Large-scale complementary macroelectronics using hybrid integration of carbon nanotubes and IGZO thin-film transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Haitian; Cao, Yu; Zhang, Jialu; Zhou, Chongwu

    2014-06-13

    Carbon nanotubes and metal oxide semiconductors have emerged as important materials for p-type and n-type thin-film transistors, respectively; however, realizing sophisticated macroelectronics operating in complementary mode has been challenging due to the difficulty in making n-type carbon nanotube transistors and p-type metal oxide transistors. Here we report a hybrid integration of p-type carbon nanotube and n-type indium-gallium-zinc-oxide thin-film transistors to achieve large-scale (>1,000 transistors for 501-stage ring oscillators) complementary macroelectronic circuits on both rigid and flexible substrates. This approach of hybrid integration allows us to combine the strength of p-type carbon nanotube and n-type indium-gallium-zinc-oxide thin-film transistors, and offers high device yield and low device variation. Based on this approach, we report the successful demonstration of various logic gates (inverter, NAND and NOR gates), ring oscillators (from 51 stages to 501 stages) and dynamic logic circuits (dynamic inverter, NAND and NOR gates).

  4. High enzymatic activity preservation with carbon nanotubes incorporated in urease-lipid hybrid Langmuir-Blodgett films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caseli, Luciano; Siqueira, José Roberto

    2012-03-27

    The search for optimized architectures, such as thin films, for the production of biosensors has been challenged in recent decades, and thus, the understanding of molecular interactions that occur at interfaces is essential to improve the construction of nanostructured devices. In this study, we investigated the possibility of using carbon nanotubes in hybrid Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) films of lipids and urease to improve the catalytic performance of the immobilized enzyme. The molecular interactions were first investigated at the air-water interface with the enzyme adsorbed from the aqueous subphase onto Langmuir monolayers of dimyristoylphosphatidic acid (DMPA). The transfer to solid supports as LB films and the subsequent incorporation of carbon nanotubes in the hybrid film permitted us to evaluate how these nanomaterials changed the physical properties of the ultrathin film. Colorimetric measurments indicated that the presence of nanotubes preserved and enhanced the enzyme activity of the film, even after 1 month. These results show that the use of such hybrid films is promising for the development of biosensors with an optimized performance.

  5. Carbon nanotube quantum dots

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sapmaz, S.

    2006-01-01

    Low temperature electron transport measurements on individual single wall carbon nanotubes are described in this thesis. Carbon nanotubes are small hollow cylinders made entirely out of carbon atoms. At low temperatures (below ~10 K) finite length nanotubes form quantum dots. Because of its small si

  6. Synthesis of carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awasthi, Kalpana; Srivastava, Anchal; Srivastava, O N

    2005-10-01

    Carbon nanotubes play a fundamental role in the rapidly developing field of nanoscience and nanotechnology because of their unique properties and high potential for applications. In this article, the different synthesis methods of carbon nanotubes (both multi-walled and single-walled) are reviewed. From the industrial point of view, the chemical vapor deposition method has shown advantages over laser vaporization and electric arc discharge methods. This article also presents recent work in the controlled synthesis of carbon nanotubes with ordered architectures. Special carbon nanotube configurations, such as nanocoils, nanohorns, bamboo-shaped and carbon cylinder made up from carbon nanotubes are also discussed.

  7. Electrochemical detection of amaranth in food based on the enhancement effect of carbon nanotube film.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Peng; Hu, Xiaozhong; Cheng, Qin; Zhao, Xiaoya; Fu, Xiaofang; Wu, Kangbing

    2010-12-08

    Amaranth is widely added to food and can cause many adverse health effects when it is excessively consumed. Therefore, the monitoring of amaranth is quite important. Herein, an electrochemical sensor for the sensitive and rapid detection of amaranth was reported using multiwall carbon nanotube (MWNT) as the sensing film. Due to the large surface area and high accumulation efficiency, the MWNT sensor showed a strong enhancement effect on the oxidation of amaranth, and greatly increased the current signal. The detection conditions such as pH value, amount of MWNT, accumulation potential and time were optimized. The linear range is from 40 nM to 0.8 μM, and the limit of detection is 35 nM. Finally, the new sensor was successfully employed to detect amaranth in soft drinks, and the results were tested by high-performance liquid chromatography.

  8. Metal contact effect on the performance and scaling behavior of carbon nanotube thin film transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Jiye; Dong, Guodong; Tian, Boyuan; Yan, Qiuping; Zhang, Han; Liang, Xuelei; Peng, Lianmao

    2016-05-01

    Metal-tube contact is known to play an important role in carbon nanotube field-effect transistors (CNT-FETs) which are fabricated on individual CNTs. Less attention has been paid to the contact effect in network type carbon nanotube thin film transistors (CNT-TFTs). In this study, we demonstrate that contact plays an even more important role in CNT-TFTs than in CNT-FETs. Although the Schottky barrier height at the metal-tube contact can be tuned by the work function of the metal, similar to the case in CNT-FETs, the contact resistance (Rc) forms a much higher proportion of the total resistance in CNT-TFTs. Interestingly, the contact resistivity was found to increase with channel length, which is a consequence of the percolating nature of the transport in CNT films, and this behavior does not exist in CNT-FETs and normal 2D Ohmic conductors. Electrical transport in CNT-TFTs has been predicted to scale with channel length by stick percolation theory. However, the scaling behavior is also impacted, or even covered up by the effect of Rc. Once the contact effect is excluded, the covered scaling behavior can be revealed correctly. A possible way of reducing Rc in CNT-TFTs was proposed. We believe the findings in this paper will strengthen our understanding of CNT-TFTs, and even accelerate the commercialization of CNT-TFT technology.Metal-tube contact is known to play an important role in carbon nanotube field-effect transistors (CNT-FETs) which are fabricated on individual CNTs. Less attention has been paid to the contact effect in network type carbon nanotube thin film transistors (CNT-TFTs). In this study, we demonstrate that contact plays an even more important role in CNT-TFTs than in CNT-FETs. Although the Schottky barrier height at the metal-tube contact can be tuned by the work function of the metal, similar to the case in CNT-FETs, the contact resistance (Rc) forms a much higher proportion of the total resistance in CNT-TFTs. Interestingly, the contact

  9. A Novel Reactive Gas Source and Its Application to Carbon Nanotube Film Deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Nan; CHEN Han-Yuan; QIAN Sheng-Fa

    2005-01-01

    @@ Generally, gaseous discharge at pressure higher than 10 kPa will collapse to filamentary form or streamer, which will produce a non-uniform treatment on the sample surface. Thus, atmospheric pressure glow discharge (APGD) is developed. However the realization of the APGD is not obvious, it needs special conditions. We propose a new concept to solve the non-uniformity problem. By using a grid electrode and putting the sample downstream of the discharge plasma, the streamers, instead of striking on sample surface, will strike on the grid, and the neutral active species produced in the discharge diffuse out to reach the sample surface uniformly. Finally, a carbon nanotube (CNT) film was produced to test this new concept.

  10. Inkjet printed circuits based on ambipolar and p-type carbon nanotube thin-film transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Bongjun; Geier, Michael L.; Hersam, Mark C.; Dodabalapur, Ananth

    2017-01-01

    Ambipolar and p-type single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) thin-film transistors (TFTs) are reliably integrated into various complementary-like circuits on the same substrate by inkjet printing. We describe the fabrication and characteristics of inverters, ring oscillators, and NAND gates based on complementary-like circuits fabricated with such TFTs as building blocks. We also show that complementary-like circuits have potential use as chemical sensors in ambient conditions since changes to the TFT characteristics of the p-channel TFTs in the circuit alter the overall operating characteristics of the circuit. The use of circuits rather than individual devices as sensors integrates sensing and signal processing functions, thereby simplifying overall system design. PMID:28145438

  11. Memory operation devices based on light-illumination ambipolar carbon-nanotube thin-film-transistors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aïssa, B., E-mail: aissab@emt.inrs.ca [Qatar Environment and Energy Research Institute (QEERI), Qatar Foundation, P.O. Box 5825, Doha (Qatar); Centre Energie, Matériaux et Télécommunications, INRS, 1650, Boulevard Lionel-Boulet Varennes, Quebec J3X 1S2 (Canada); Nedil, M. [Telebec Wireless Underground Communication Laboratory, UQAT, 675, 1ère Avenue, Val d' Or, Quebec J9P 1Y3 (Canada); Kroeger, J. [NanoIntegris & Raymor Nanotech, Raymor Industries Inc., 3765 La Vérendrye, Boisbriand, Quebec J7H 1R8 (Canada); Haddad, T. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec H3A 0B8 (Canada); Rosei, F. [Centre Energie, Matériaux et Télécommunications, INRS, 1650, Boulevard Lionel-Boulet Varennes, Quebec J3X 1S2 (Canada)

    2015-09-28

    We report the memory operation behavior of a light illumination ambipolar single-walled carbon nanotube thin film field-effect transistors devices. In addition to the high electronic-performance, such an on/off transistor-switching ratio of 10{sup 4} and an on-conductance of 18 μS, these memory devices have shown a high retention time of both hole and electron-trapping modes, reaching 2.8 × 10{sup 4} s at room temperature. The memory characteristics confirm that light illumination and electrical field can act as an independent programming/erasing operation method. This could be a fundamental step toward achieving high performance and stable operating nanoelectronic memory devices.

  12. Inkjet printed circuits based on ambipolar and p-type carbon nanotube thin-film transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Bongjun; Geier, Michael L.; Hersam, Mark C.; Dodabalapur, Ananth

    2017-02-01

    Ambipolar and p-type single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) thin-film transistors (TFTs) are reliably integrated into various complementary-like circuits on the same substrate by inkjet printing. We describe the fabrication and characteristics of inverters, ring oscillators, and NAND gates based on complementary-like circuits fabricated with such TFTs as building blocks. We also show that complementary-like circuits have potential use as chemical sensors in ambient conditions since changes to the TFT characteristics of the p-channel TFTs in the circuit alter the overall operating characteristics of the circuit. The use of circuits rather than individual devices as sensors integrates sensing and signal processing functions, thereby simplifying overall system design.

  13. Inkjet printed circuits based on ambipolar and p-type carbon nanotube thin-film transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Bongjun; Geier, Michael L; Hersam, Mark C; Dodabalapur, Ananth

    2017-02-01

    Ambipolar and p-type single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) thin-film transistors (TFTs) are reliably integrated into various complementary-like circuits on the same substrate by inkjet printing. We describe the fabrication and characteristics of inverters, ring oscillators, and NAND gates based on complementary-like circuits fabricated with such TFTs as building blocks. We also show that complementary-like circuits have potential use as chemical sensors in ambient conditions since changes to the TFT characteristics of the p-channel TFTs in the circuit alter the overall operating characteristics of the circuit. The use of circuits rather than individual devices as sensors integrates sensing and signal processing functions, thereby simplifying overall system design.

  14. Inkjet printing of flexible high-performance carbon nanotube transparent conductive films by ``coffee ring effect''

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimoni, Allon; Azoubel, Suzanna; Magdassi, Shlomo

    2014-09-01

    Transparent and flexible conductors are a major component in many modern optoelectronic devices, such as touch screens for smart phones, displays, and solar cells. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) offer a good alternative to commonly used conductive materials, such as metal oxides (e.g. ITO) for flexible electronics. The production of transparent conductive patterns, and arrays composed of connected CNT ``coffee rings'' on a flexible substrate poly(ethylene terephthalate), has been reported. Direct patterning is achieved by inkjet printing of an aqueous dispersion of CNTs, which self-assemble at the rim of evaporating droplets. After post-printing treatment with hot nitric acid, the obtained TCFs are characterized by a sheet resistance of 156 Ω sq-1 and transparency of 81% (at 600 nm), which are the best reported values obtained by inkjet printing of conductive CNTs. This makes such films very promising as transparent conductors for various electronic devices, as demonstrated by using an electroluminescent device.

  15. 25th anniversary article: carbon nanotube- and graphene-based transparent conductive films for optoelectronic devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Jinhong; Pei, Songfeng; Ma, Laipeng; Cheng, Hui-Ming

    2014-04-02

    Carbon nanotube (CNT)- and graphene (G)-based transparent conductive films (TCFs) are two promising alternatives for commonly-used indium tin oxide-based TCFs for future flexible optoelectronic devices. This review comprehensively summarizes recent progress in the fabrication, properties, modification, patterning, and integration of CNT- and G-TCFs into optoelectronic devices. Their potential applications and challenges in optoelectronic devices, such as organic photovoltaic cells, organic light emitting diodes and touch panels, are discussed in detail. More importantly, their key characteristics and advantages for use in these devices are compared. Despite many challenges, CNT- and G-TCFs have demonstrated great potential in various optoelectronic devices and have already been used for some products like touch panels of smartphones. This illustrates the significant opportunities for the industrial use of CNTs and graphene, and hence pushes nanoscience and nanotechnology one step towards practical applications.

  16. All-printed and transparent single walled carbon nanotube thin film transistor devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajed, Farzam; Rutherglen, Christopher

    2013-09-01

    We present fully transparent single-walled all-carbon nanotube thin film transistors (SWCNT TFT) fabricated using low-cost inkjet printing methods. Such a demonstration provides a platform towards low cost fully printed transparent electronics. The SWCNT TFTs were printed with metallic and semiconducting SWCNT using a room temperature printing process, without the requirement of expensive cleanroom facilities. The unoptimized SWCNT TFTs fabricated exhibited an Ion/off ratio of 92 and mobility of 2.27 cm2V-1s-1 and transmissivity of 82%. The combination of both high electrical performance and high transparency make all-SWCNT TFTs desirable for next generation transparent display backplanes and products such as Google Glass.

  17. Metal-electrode-free Window-like Organic Solar Cells with p-Doped Carbon Nanotube Thin-film Electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Il; Delacou, Clement; Kaskela, Antti; Kauppinen, Esko I.; Maruyama, Shigeo; Matsuo, Yutaka

    2016-08-01

    Organic solar cells are flexible and inexpensive, and expected to have a wide range of applications. Many transparent organic solar cells have been reported and their success hinges on full transparency and high power conversion efficiency. Recently, carbon nanotubes and graphene, which meet these criteria, have been used in transparent conductive electrodes. However, their use in top electrodes has been limited by mechanical difficulties in fabrication and doping. Here, expensive metal top electrodes were replaced with high-performance, easy-to-transfer, aerosol-synthesized carbon nanotubes to produce transparent organic solar cells. The carbon nanotubes were p-doped by two new methods: HNO3 doping via ‘sandwich transfer’, and MoOx thermal doping via ‘bridge transfer’. Although both of the doping methods improved the performance of the carbon nanotubes and the photovoltaic performance of devices, sandwich transfer, which gave a 4.1% power conversion efficiency, was slightly more effective than bridge transfer, which produced a power conversion efficiency of 3.4%. Applying a thinner carbon nanotube film with 90% transparency decreased the efficiency to 3.7%, which was still high. Overall, the transparent solar cells had an efficiency of around 50% that of non-transparent metal-based solar cells (7.8%).

  18. Metal-electrode-free Window-like Organic Solar Cells with p-Doped Carbon Nanotube Thin-film Electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Il; Delacou, Clement; Kaskela, Antti; Kauppinen, Esko I; Maruyama, Shigeo; Matsuo, Yutaka

    2016-08-16

    Organic solar cells are flexible and inexpensive, and expected to have a wide range of applications. Many transparent organic solar cells have been reported and their success hinges on full transparency and high power conversion efficiency. Recently, carbon nanotubes and graphene, which meet these criteria, have been used in transparent conductive electrodes. However, their use in top electrodes has been limited by mechanical difficulties in fabrication and doping. Here, expensive metal top electrodes were replaced with high-performance, easy-to-transfer, aerosol-synthesized carbon nanotubes to produce transparent organic solar cells. The carbon nanotubes were p-doped by two new methods: HNO3 doping via 'sandwich transfer', and MoOx thermal doping via 'bridge transfer'. Although both of the doping methods improved the performance of the carbon nanotubes and the photovoltaic performance of devices, sandwich transfer, which gave a 4.1% power conversion efficiency, was slightly more effective than bridge transfer, which produced a power conversion efficiency of 3.4%. Applying a thinner carbon nanotube film with 90% transparency decreased the efficiency to 3.7%, which was still high. Overall, the transparent solar cells had an efficiency of around 50% that of non-transparent metal-based solar cells (7.8%).

  19. Growth of graphite film over the tops of vertical carbon nanotubes using Ni/Ti/Si substrate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chia-chih Chuang; Wei-long Liu; Wen-jauh Chen; Jin-hua Huang

    2009-01-01

    A substrate with Ni/Ti/Si structure was used to grow vertical carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with a graphite film over CNT tops by thermal chemical vapor deposition with CH4 gas as carbon source.The carbon nanotubes and the substrate were character-ized by a field emission scanning electron microscope for the morphologies,a transmission electron microscope for the microstruc-tures,a Raman spectrograph for the crystallinity,and an Auger electron spectrometer for the depth distribution of elements.The re-sult shows that when the thickness ratio of Ni layer to Ti layer in substrate is about i,a graphite film with relatively good quality canbe formed on the CNT tops.

  20. Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotube-Doped Tungsten Oxide Thin Films for Hydrogen Gas Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adisorn Tuantranont

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available In this work we have fabricated hydrogen gas sensors based on undoped and 1 wt% multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT-doped tungsten oxide (WO3 thin films by means of the powder mixing and electron beam (E-beam evaporation technique. Hydrogen sensing properties of the thin films have been investigated at different operating temperatures and gas concentrations ranging from 100 ppm to 50,000 ppm. The results indicate that the MWCNT-doped WO3 thin film exhibits high sensitivity and selectivity to hydrogen. Thus, MWCNT doping based on E-beam co-evaporation was shown to be an effective means of preparing hydrogen gas sensors with enhanced sensing and reduced operating temperatures. Creation of nanochannels and formation of p-n heterojunctions were proposed as the sensing mechanism underlying the enhanced hydrogen sensitivity of this hybridized gas sensor. To our best knowledge, this is the first report on a MWCNT-doped WO3 hydrogen sensor prepared by the E-beam method.

  1. Multi-walled carbon nanotube-doped tungsten oxide thin films for hydrogen gas sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wongchoosuk, Chatchawal; Wisitsoraat, Anurat; Phokharatkul, Ditsayut; Tuantranont, Adisorn; Kerdcharoen, Teerakiat

    2010-01-01

    In this work we have fabricated hydrogen gas sensors based on undoped and 1 wt% multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT)-doped tungsten oxide (WO(3)) thin films by means of the powder mixing and electron beam (E-beam) evaporation technique. Hydrogen sensing properties of the thin films have been investigated at different operating temperatures and gas concentrations ranging from 100 ppm to 50,000 ppm. The results indicate that the MWCNT-doped WO(3) thin film exhibits high sensitivity and selectivity to hydrogen. Thus, MWCNT doping based on E-beam co-evaporation was shown to be an effective means of preparing hydrogen gas sensors with enhanced sensing and reduced operating temperatures. Creation of nanochannels and formation of p-n heterojunctions were proposed as the sensing mechanism underlying the enhanced hydrogen sensitivity of this hybridized gas sensor. To our best knowledge, this is the first report on a MWCNT-doped WO(3) hydrogen sensor prepared by the E-beam method.

  2. Effect of spray process conditions on uniformity of carbon nanotube thin films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du Choi, Soon; Kim, Duckjong; Kang, Yong-Pil; Jang, Dong Hwan

    2012-07-01

    Industrial use of carbon nanotube (CNT) films is increasing rapidly due to their good physical properties and high economic feasibility. Spray coating process is one of feasible approaches for large area CNT films. Uniform spray coating is an important issue in applications requiring large area conductive films. In the present work, we developed a numerical model for the prediction of CNT deposition thickness distribution in the spray process and validated the numerical work by using experimental data obtained in this study. We investigated the deposition thickness distributions according to various process parameters by using the numerical model. We found that the pitch of the nozzle path is a key parameter affecting the deposition thickness uniformity and that there is optimal pitch value for unfirom and productive coating. We also discussed future research direction for improved numerical simulation tool. Since the present numerical model is also applicable to simulation of spray process on curvy substrate, the numerical model could be an imporatnt step toward a powerful simulation tool for design and optimization of the nanomaterial spray process.

  3. Growing and Etching MoS2 on Carbon Nanotube Film for Enhanced Electrochemical Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiyu Xu

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In this work we directly synthesized molybdenum disulfide (MoS2 nanosheets on carbon nanotube film (MoS2@CNT via a two-step chemical vapor deposition method (CVD. By etching the obtained MoS2@CNT into 10% wt HNO3, the morphology of MoS2 decorated on CNT bundles was modulated, resulting in more catalytic active MoS2 edges being exposed for significantly enhanced electrochemical performance. Our results revealed that an 8 h acid etching sample exhibited the best performance for the oxygen evolution reaction, i.e., the current density reached 10 mA/cm2 under 375 mV over-potential, and the tafel slope was as low as 94 mV/dec. The enhanced behavior was mainly originated from the more catalytic sites in MoS2 induced by the acid etching treatment and the higher conductivity from the supporting CNT films. Our study provides a new route to produce two-dimensional layers on CNT films with tunable morphology, and thus may open a window for exploring its promising applications in the fields of catalytic-, electronic-, and electrochemical-related fields.

  4. Recent trends in preparation and application of carbon nanotube-graphene hybrid thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thanh Dang, Van; Dung Nguyen, Duc; Thanh Cao, Thi; Le, Phuoc Huu; Tran, Dai Lam; Phan, Ngoc Minh; Chuc Nguyen, Van

    2016-09-01

    The combination of one-dimensional (1D) carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and two-dimensional (2D) graphene materials to generate three-dimensional (3D) carbon nanotube-graphene hybrid thin films (CNGHTFs) has attracted great attention owing to their intriguing properties via the synergistic effects of these two materials on their electrical, optical, and electrochemical properties in comparison with their individual components. This review aims to provide a brief introduction of recent trends in preparation methodologies and some outstanding applications of CNGHTFs. It contains two main scientific subjects. The first of these is the research on preparation techniques of CNGHTFs, including reduction agent-assisted mechanical blending of reduced graphene oxide (rGO) and CNTs, hybridization methods for layer-by-layer (LBL) assembly of CNTs and rGO sheets, multi-step methods using combinations of a solution and chemical vapor deposition (CVD) processing, one-step growth of CNGHTFs by the CVD method, and modified CVD methods via thermal deposition of carbon source on catalyst surfaces. The advantages and disadvantages of the preparation methods of CNGHTFs are presented and discussed in detail. The second scientific subject of the review is the research on some outstanding applications of CNGHTFs in various research fields, including transparent conductors, electron field emitters, field-effect transistors, biosensors and supercapacitors. In most cases, the CNGHTFs showed superior performances than those of the pristine GO/graphene or CNT materials. Therefore, the CNGHTFs exhibit as high-potential materials for various practical applications. Opportunites and challenges in the fields are also presented.

  5. Effect of Continuous Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes on Thermal and Mechanical Properties of Flexible Composite Film

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Eun Cha

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available To investigate the effect of continuous multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs on the thermal and mechanical properties of composites, we propose a fabrication method for a buckypaper-filled flexible composite film prepared by a two-step process involving buckypaper fabrication using vacuum filtration of MWCNTs, and composite film fabrication using the dipping method. The thermal conductivity and tensile strength of the composite film filled with the buckypaper exhibited improved results, respectively 76% and 275% greater than those of the individual MWCNT-filled composite film. It was confirmed that forming continuous MWCNT fillers is an important factor which determines the physical characteristics of the composite film. In light of the study findings, composite films using buckypaper as a filler and polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS as a flexible matrix have sufficient potential to be applied as a heat-dissipating material, and as a flexible film with high thermal conductivity and excellent mechanical properties.

  6. A comparative study of the field emission properties of aligned carbon nanostructures films, from carbon nanotubes to diamond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Normand, F.; Cojocaru, C. S.; Fleaca, C.; Li, J. Q.; Vincent, P.; Pirio, G.; Gangloff, L.; Nedellec, Y.; Legagneux, P.

    2007-05-01

    The electron field emission properties of different graphitic and diamond-like nanostructures films are compared. They are prepared in the same CVD chamber on SiO{2}/Si(100) and Si(100) flat surfaces, respectively. These nanostructures are thoroughly characterized by scanning electron emission (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES). Films of dense aligned carbon nanotubes by far display the lowest threshold fields around few V/μ m and the largest emission currents. Carbon nanofibers, with platelet arrangement of the graphitic planes parallel to the substrate, exhibit higher emission thresholds around 10 V/μ m. Diamond nanostructures, either modified through ammonia incorporation within the gas phase or not, exhibit the largest emission threshold around 25 V/μ m. The high enhancement factors, deduced from the Fowler-Nordheim plots, can explain the low emission thresholds whereas limitations to the electron transport ever occur through different processes (i) surface modifications of the surface, as the transformation of the SiO{2} barrier layer into SiN{x} in the presence of ammonia evidenced by XPS; (ii) different orientation of the graphitic basal planes relative to the direction of electron transport (carbon nanofiber) and (iii) presence of a graphitic nest at the interface of the carbon nanostructure and the substrate, observed when catalyst is deposited through mild evaporation.

  7. Effect of Catalyst Film Thickness on Growth Morphology, Surface Wettability and Drag Reduction Property of Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Weiwei; Zhou, Zhiping; Li, Gang; Li, Ping

    2016-10-01

    Nickel films were deposited on silicon substrates using magnetron sputtering method. The pretreatment process of nickel films under high temperature and ammonia atmosphere was investigated. The thickness of nickel film has a great influence on growth morphology of carbon nanotubes (CNTs). Too large or too small thickness would do harm to the orientated growth of CNTs. The inner structure, elements composition and growth mechanism have been confirmed by TEM and EDX characterization. The surface wettability and drag reduction property of CNTs were investigated. This paper can provide a new, effective method to further develop the practical application in micro/nano devices field.

  8. Effect of acetylene flow rate on morphology and structure of carbon nanotube thick films grown by thermal chemical vapor deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAO Zhangyi; SUN Zhuo; GUO Pingsheng; CHEN Yiwei

    2007-01-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) films were grown on nickel foil substrates by thermal chemical vapor deposition (CVD) with acetylene and hydrogen as the precursors. The morphology and structure of CNTs depending on the acetylene flow rate were characterized by a scanning electron microscope (SEM),a transmission electron microscope (TEM) and a Raman spectrometer,respectively.The effect of acetylene flow rate on the morphology and structure of CNT films was investigated.By increasing the acetylene flow rate from 10 to 90 sccm (standard cubic centimeter perminute),the yield and the diameter of CNTs increase.Also, the defects and amorphous phase in CNT films increase with increasing acetylene flow rate.

  9. Graphene-carbon nanotube hybrid materials and use as electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tour, James M.; Zhu, Yu; Li, Lei; Yan, Zheng; Lin, Jian

    2016-09-27

    Provided are methods of making graphene-carbon nanotube hybrid materials. Such methods generally include: (1) associating a graphene film with a substrate; (2) applying a catalyst and a carbon source to the graphene film; and (3) growing carbon nanotubes on the graphene film. The grown carbon nanotubes become covalently linked to the graphene film through carbon-carbon bonds that are located at one or more junctions between the carbon nanotubes and the graphene film. In addition, the grown carbon nanotubes are in ohmic contact with the graphene film through the carbon-carbon bonds at the one or more junctions. The one or more junctions may include seven-membered carbon rings. Also provided are the formed graphene-carbon nanotube hybrid materials.

  10. Single-walled carbon nanotube transparent conductive films fabricated by reductive dissolution and spray coating for organic photovoltaics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ostfeld, Aminy E.; Arias, Ana Claudia, E-mail: acarias@eecs.berkeley.edu [Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Catheline, Amélie [Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Linde Nanomaterials, Linde LLC, 1970 Diamond Street, San Marcos, California 92078 (United States); Ligsay, Kathleen; Kim, Kee-Chan; Fogden, Siân [Linde Nanomaterials, Linde LLC, 1970 Diamond Street, San Marcos, California 92078 (United States); Chen, Zhihua [Polyera Corporation, 8045 Lamon Avenue, Skokie, Illinois 60077 (United States); Facchetti, Antonio [Polyera Corporation, 8045 Lamon Avenue, Skokie, Illinois 60077 (United States); Center of Excellence for Advanced Materials Research, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah 21589 (Saudi Arabia)

    2014-12-22

    Solutions of unbundled and unbroken single-walled carbon nanotubes have been prepared using a reductive dissolution process. Transparent conductive films spray-coated from these solutions show a nearly twofold improvement in the ratio of electrical conductivity to optical absorptivity versus those deposited from conventional aqueous dispersions, due to substantial de-aggregation and sizable nanotube lengths. These transparent electrodes have been utilized to fabricate P3HT-PCBM organic solar cells achieving power conversion efficiencies up to 2.3%, comparable to those of solar cells using indium tin oxide transparent electrodes.

  11. Functionalized carbon nanotubes in ZnO thin films for photoinactivation of bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akhavan, O. [Department of Physics, Sharif University of Technology, P.O. Box 11155-9161, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Institute for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Sharif University of Technology, P.O. Box 14588-89694, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Azimirad, R., E-mail: azimirad@yahoo.com [Malek-Ashtar University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Safa, S. [Department of Nanotechnology, Faculty of Engineering, Tarbiat Modares University, P.O. Box 14115-143, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-10-17

    Highlights: {yields} Unfunctionalized and functionalized MWCNT/ZnO thin films were synthesized by sol-gel method. {yields} Zn-O-C carbonaceous bonds formed in the functionalized MWCNT/ZnO thin films. {yields} The functionalized MWCNT/ZnO had stronger photoinactivation of the bacteria than the unfunctionalize type. {yields} 10 wt% functionalized MWCNT content had the optimum antibacterial property. - Abstract: Two types of unfunctionalized and functionalized multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were prepared to be applied in fabrication of MWCNT-ZnO nanocomposite thin films with various MWCNT contents. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy indicated formation of functional groups on surface of the functionalized MWCNTs in the MWCNT-ZnO nanocomposite. Formation of the effective carbonaceous bonds between the ZnO and the MWCNTs was also investigated through photoinactivation of Escherichia coli bacteria on surface of the both unfunctionalized and functionalized MWCNT-ZnO nanocomposites. The functionalized MWCNT-ZnO nanocomposites showed significantly stronger photoinactivation of the bacteria than the unfunctionalized ones, for all of the various MWCNT contents (from 2 to 30 wt%). While the functionalized MWCNT-ZnO nanocomposites with the optimum MWCNT content of 10 wt% inactivated whole of the bacteria after 10 min UV-visible light irradiation, the unfunctionalized ones could inactivate only 63% of the bacteria under the same conditions. The significant enhancement of the photoinactivation of the bacteria onto the surface of the functionalized MWCNT-ZnO nanocomposites was assigned to charge transfer through Zn-O-C bands formed between the Zn atoms of the ZnO film and oxygen atoms of the carboxylic functional groups of the functionalized MWCNTs.

  12. A resistive-type sensor based on flexible multi-walled carbon nanotubes and polyacrylic acid composite films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jeongah; Cho, Daehwan; Jeong, Youngjin

    2013-09-01

    A humidity sensor film was fabricated by loading high numbers of multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) in a poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) polymer matrix containing poly(4-styrenesulfonic acid) (PSS) to enhance the MWCNT dispersion. Cross-section images demonstrate that the MWCNTs distribute evenly throughout the matrix. The fabrication processes and sensing mechanisms of the film are explained to investigate the flexible properties and humidity-sensing characteristics of the film. The film loaded with 33 wt% MWCNTs is much more flexible than an overhead projector (OHP) film and shows similar electrical resistance to pure CNT Bucky paper. The sensor film composed of 1:2 MWCNTs:PAA is highly sensitive to humidity (0.069/%RH) and displays good linearity (0.99).

  13. Interfacial thermal resistance and thermal rectification in carbon nanotube film-copper systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Zheng; Liu, Danyang; Zhang, Guang; Li, Qingwei; Liu, Changhong; Fan, Shoushan

    2017-03-02

    Thermal rectification occurring at interfaces is an important research area, which contains deep fundamental physics and has extensive application prospects. In general, the measurement of interfacial thermal rectification is based on measuring interfacial thermal resistance (ITR). However, ITRs measured via conventional methods cannot avoid extra thermal resistance asymmetry due to the contact between the sample and the thermometer. In this study, we employed a non-contact infrared thermal imager to monitor the temperature of super-aligned carbon nanotube (CNT) films and obtain the ITRs between the CNT films and copper. The ITRs along the CNT-copper direction and the reverse direction are in the ranges of 2.2-3.6 cm(2) K W(-1) and 9.6-11.9 cm(2) K W(-1), respectively. The obvious difference in the ITRs of the two directions shows a significant thermal rectification effect, and the rectifying coefficient ranges between 0.57 and 0.68. The remarkable rectification factor is extremely promising for the manufacture of thermal transistors with a copper/CNT/copper structure and further thermal logic devices. Moreover, our method could be extended to other 2-dimensional materials, such as graphene and MoS2, for further explorations.

  14. Carbon nanotubes paste sensor modified with bismuth film for determination of metallic ions in ethanol fuel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe Augusto Gorla

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In the present study an anodic stripping voltammetric method using a bismuth film modified carbon nanotubes paste electrode for simultaneous determination of metals Zn2+, Cd2+and Pb2+in ethanol fuel is described. The metallic ions were preconcentrated on the bismuth film in the time and deposition potential of 500 s and -1.2 V and the stripping step was carried out by square wave voltammetry (frequency of 15 Hz, pulse amplitude of 25 mV and potential step of 5 mV. Acetate buffer at 0.1 mol L-1concentration and pH 4.5 was used as support electrolyte. The method showed linearity including the analytical blank up to 48.39 ?g L-1 for the metals and the obtained limits of detection were 3.36, 0.32 and 0.47 ?g L-1for Zn2+, Cd2+and Pb2+, respectively. The proposed method was applied in ethanol fuel samples.

  15. Inkjet printing of multi-walled carbon nanotube/polymer composite thin film for interconnection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lok, Boon Keng; Ng, You Min; Liang, Yen Nan; Hu, Xiao

    2010-07-01

    In this paper, multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) ink was selectively patterned by inkjet printing on substrates to form conductive traces and electrodes for interconnection application. MWCNT was firstly functionalized using concentrated acid and dispersed in deionized water to form a colloidal solution. Various concentrations of MWCNT were formulated to test the stability of the solution. The printability of the MWCNT ink was examined against printing temperature, ink concentration and ink droplet pitch. Rheological properties of the ink were determined by rheometer and sessile drop method. The electrical conductivity of the MWCNT pattern was measured against multiple printing of MWCNT on the same pattern (up to 10 layers). While single layer printing pattern exhibited highest resistance, the CNT entangled together and formed a random network with more printed layers has higher conductivity. The electrical properties of the printed film was compared to a composite ink of CNT and conducting polymer (CNT ink was mixed with conductive polymer solution, Poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)-Poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS)). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to observe the surface structure and atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to study the morphology of the printed film under different conditions.

  16. Third Sound Measurements of Superfluid 4He Films on Multiwall Carbon Nanotubes Below 1 K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menachekanian, Emin; Iaia, Vito; Li, Andrew; Chen, Bob; Williams, Gary

    2014-03-01

    Third sound is studied for superfluid films of 4He adsorbed on multiwall carbon nanotubes of average diameter 12 Angstroms packed into an annular resonator. The third sound is generated with mechanical oscillation of the cell, and detected with carbon bolometers. A filling curve at temperatures near 250 mK shows oscillations in the third sound velocity, with maxima at the completion of the third and fourth atomic layers. The ``dead'' layer appears to be close to two atomic layers, about one layer thinner than previously found for flat graphite surfaces. We attribute this weaker binding to the effect of the cylindrical geometry on the van der Waals potential, the repulsive surface tension forces from the high curvature, and the lower density of the tubes compared to graphite. At the completion of the third layer there is a sudden reduction of the superfluid onset temperature, and then a recovery back to the Kosterlitz-Thouless linear dependence, forming re-entrant superfluidity. In a small region around 2.5 layers there is very anomalous behavior in the low-temperature variation of the third sound velocity, which is found to increase linearly with temperature. This could be related to changes in the gas-liquid coexistence at this intermediate fill. Work supported in part by the Nation Science Foundation, Grant DMR 0906467.

  17. A multiwall carbon nanotubes film-modified carbon fiber ultramicroelectrode for the determination of nitric oxide radical in liver mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yazhen; Li, Qing; Hu, Shengshui

    2005-02-01

    A novel chemically modified electrode based on the multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) film-coated carbon fiber ultramicroelectrode (CFUE) has been described for the determination of nitric oxide radical (.NO). The electrochemical behaviors of MWNTs-modified CFUE have been characterized in 0.2 mmol L(-1) K(4)Fe(CN)(6) and 0.1 mol L(-1) KCl solution. The Nafion film was used to avoid some electroactive interferences. The amount of Nafion was optimized, and some possible interferents [such as nitrite (NO(2)(-)), nitrate (NO(3)(-)), ascorbate, dopamine (DA), l-arginine (l-Arg), etc.] were tested and evaluated. The oxidation peak current of .NO increases significantly at the MWNT/Nafion-modified CFUE, in contrast to that at the bare and the Nafion-modified CFUE, and the oxidation peak potential is at 0.78 V (vs. SCE), which can be used for the detection of .NO. The oxidation peak current is linearly with the concentration of .NO from 2x10(-7) to 8.6x10(-5) mol L(-1), and the detection limit is 2x10(-8) mol L(-1). The liver mitochondria in Carassius auratus were isolated and .NO release from mitochondria was monitored by using this ultramicroelectrode system.

  18. Scalable fabrication of multifunctional freestanding carbon nanotube/polymer composite thin films for energy conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaokai; Gittleson, Forrest; Carmo, Marcelo; Sekol, Ryan C; Taylor, André D

    2012-02-28

    Translating the unique properties of individual single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) to the macroscale while simultaneously incorporating additional functionalities into composites has been stymied by inadequate assembly methods. Here we describe a technique for developing multifunctional SWNT/polymer composite thin films that provides a fundamental engineering basis to bridge the gap between their nano- and macroscale properties. Selected polymers are infiltrated into a Mayer rod coated conductive SWNT network to fabricate solar cell transparent conductive electrodes (TCEs), fuel cell membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs), and lithium ion battery electrodes. Our TCEs have an outstanding optoelectronic figure of merit σ(dc)/σ(ac) of 19.4 and roughness of 3.8 nm yet are also mechanically robust enough to withstand delamination, a step toward scratch resistance necessary for flexible electronics. Our MEAs show platinum utilization as high as 1550 mW/mg(Pt), demonstrating our technique's ability to integrate ionic conductivity of the polymer with electrical conductivity of the SWNTs at the Pt surface. Our battery anodes, which show reversible capacity of ∼850 mAh/g after 15 cycles, demonstrate the integration of electrode and separator to simplify device architecture and decrease overall weight. Each of these applications demonstrates our technique's ability to maintain the conductivity of SWNT networks and their dispersion within a polymer matrix while concurrently optimizing key complementary properties of the composite. Here, we lay the foundation for the assembly of nanotubes and nanostructured components (rods, wires, particles, etc.) into macroscopic multifunctional materials using a low-cost and scalable solution-based processing technique.

  19. Screen printing as a scalable and low-cost approach for rigid and flexible thin-film transistors using separated carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Xuan; Chen, Haitian; Gu, Xiaofei; Liu, Bilu; Wang, Wenli; Cao, Yu; Wu, Fanqi; Zhou, Chongwu

    2014-12-23

    Semiconducting single-wall carbon nanotubes are very promising materials in printed electronics due to their excellent mechanical and electrical property, outstanding printability, and great potential for flexible electronics. Nonetheless, developing scalable and low-cost approaches for manufacturing fully printed high-performance single-wall carbon nanotube thin-film transistors remains a major challenge. Here we report that screen printing, which is a simple, scalable, and cost-effective technique, can be used to produce both rigid and flexible thin-film transistors using separated single-wall carbon nanotubes. Our fully printed top-gated nanotube thin-film transistors on rigid and flexible substrates exhibit decent performance, with mobility up to 7.67 cm2 V(-1) s(-1), on/off ratio of 10(4)∼10(5), minimal hysteresis, and low operation voltage (flexible macroelectronics, and low-cost display electronics.

  20. Selection of isolated and individual single-walled carbon nanotube from a film and its usage in nanodevices

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Gong-Tang

    2011-01-01

    Individual and isolated single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are important for fabricating relevant nanodevices and studying the properties of the SWNT devices. In this work, we demonstrate that individual and isolated SWNT can be selected and obtained from a film containing a huge number of SWNTs. By using both the polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) as a negative resist and the electron beam lithography, the selected SWNT can be fixed on a substrate, while the other SWNTs in the film can lift off. The selected SWNT can be used to fabricate nanodevice and a gas sensor of oxygen is demonstrated in this work.

  1. Acid yellow 9 as a dispersing agent for carbon nanotubes: preparation of redox polymer-carbon nanotube composite film and its sensing application towards ascorbic acid and dopamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, S Ashok; Wang, Sea-Fue; Yang, Thomas C-K; Yeh, Chun-Ting

    2010-08-15

    In this study, we show that acid yellow 9 (4-amino-1-1'-azobenzene-3,4'-disulfonicacid, AY) is a good stabilizing agent for multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). MWCNTs dispersed in AY solution was remained stable about three months and even remained stable after centrifugation at 10,000 rpm for 30 min. Using MWCNTs/AY dispersion, thin-films were prepared on indium tin oxide coated glass electrode and glassy carbon electrodes. Further, dried films of MWCNTs/AY were subjected to electropolymerization in 0.1M H(2)SO(4) solution. Adsorbed AY molecules on MWCNTs get polymerized and they yield a polymer-MWCNTs nanocomposite film on electrode surface which is found to be electrochemically active in wide pH range (1-11). Characterization studies were performed using cyclic voltammetry and SEM. These studies are supported that hybrid material PAY/MWCNTs was obtained. Moreover, newly synthesized PAY-MWCNTs composite film showed excellent electrocatalytic activity towards oxidation of dopamine (DA) and ascorbic acid (AA) with high sensitivity in physiological pH. Linear sweep voltammetry was employed to the determination of DA in the presence of AA in the range of 2x10(-7) to 1.4x10(-6) M. Amperometry was employed to determination of AA at 0.0 V in the range from 1x10(-6) to 5.6x10(-5) M, and DA, uric acid are not interfered on the steady-state current of AA. In addition, real samples such as dopamine injection and AA spiked into human urine were analyzed using PAY/MWCNTs composite modified electrode and satisfactory results were obtained.

  2. Super-high-frequency shielding properties of excimer-laser-synthesized-single-wall-carbon-nanotubes/polyurethane nanocomposite films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aïssa, B.; Laberge, L. L.; Habib, M. A.; Denidni, T. A.; Therriault, D.; El Khakani, M. A.

    2011-04-01

    Electromagnetic shielding attenuation (ESA) properties of carbon nanotubes/polymer nanocomposite films, in the super high frequency (SHF) X-band (7-12 GHz) domain are studied. The nanocomposite films consisted of thermoset polyurethane (PU) resin blended with single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) mats, and deposited on fused quartz substrates. Two different approaches were used to achieve the nanocomposite films, namely (i) through the on-substrate "all-laser" growth approach of SWCNTs directly onto substrate, followed by their infiltration by the PU resin, and (ii) by appropriately dispersing the chemically-purified SWCNTs (in the soot form) into the PU matrix and their subsequent deposition onto quartz substrates by means of a solvent casting process. Characterizations of the ESA properties of the developed nanocomposite films show that they exhibit systematically a deep shielding band, centered at around 9.5 GHz, with an attenuation as high as |- 30| dB, recorded for SWCNT loads of 2.5 wt. % and above. A direct correlation is established between the electrical conductivity of the nanocomposite films and their electromagnetic shielding capacity. The SWCNTs/PU nanocomposites developed here are highly promising shielding materials as SHF notch filters, as their ESA capacity largely exceeds the target value of |- 20| dB generally requested for commercial applications.

  3. Solution-processed zinc oxide nanoparticles/single-walled carbon nanotubes hybrid thin-film transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fangmei; Sun, Jia; Qian, Chuan; Hu, Xiaotao; Wu, Han; Huang, Yulan; Yang, Junliang

    2016-09-01

    Solution-processed thin-film transistors (TFTs) are the essential building blocks for manufacturing the low-cost and large-area consumptive electronics. Herein, solution-processed TFTs based on the composites of zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles and single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) were fabricated by the methods of spin-coating and doctor-blading. Through controlling the weight of SWCNTs, the ZnO/SWCNTs TFTs fabricated by spin-coating demonstrated a field-effect mobility of 4.7 cm2/Vs and a low threshold voltage of 0.8 V, while the TFTs devices fabricated by doctor-blading technique showed reasonable electrical performance with a mobility of 0.22 cm2/Vs. Furthermore, the ion-gel was used as an efficient electrochemical gate dielectric because of its large electric double-layer capacitance. The operating voltage of all the TFTs devices is as low as 4.0 V. The research suggests that ZnO/SWCNTs TFTs have the potential applications in low-cost, large-area and flexible consumptive electronics, such as chemical-biological sensors and smart label.

  4. Dry-Deposited Transparent Carbon Nanotube Film as Front Electrode in Colloidal Quantum Dot Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoliang; Aitola, Kerttu; Hägglund, Carl; Kaskela, Antti; Johansson, Malin B; Sveinbjörnsson, Kári; Kauppinen, Esko I; Johansson, Erik M J

    2017-01-20

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) show great potential as an alternative material for front electrodes in photovoltaic applications, especially for flexible devices. In this work, a press-transferred transparent SWCNT film was utilized as front electrode for colloidal quantum dot solar cells (CQDSCs). The solar cells were fabricated on both glass and flexible substrates, and maximum power conversion efficiencies of 5.5 and 5.6 %, respectively, were achieved, which corresponds to 90 and 92 % of an indium-doped tin oxide (ITO)-based device (6.1 %). The SWCNTs are therefore a very good alternative to the ITO-based electrodes especially for flexible solar cells. The optical electric field distribution and optical losses within the devices were simulated theoretically and the results agree with the experimental results. With the optical simulations that were performed it may also be possible to enhance the photovoltaic performance of SWCNT-based solar cells even further by optimizing the device configuration or by using additional optical active layers, thus reducing light reflection of the device and increasing light absorption in the quantum dot layer.

  5. Liquid spreading on ceramic-coated carbon nanotube films and patterned microstructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hangbo; Hart, A. John

    2015-11-01

    We study the capillary-driven liquid spreading behavior on films and microstructures of ceramic-coated vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs) fabricated on quartz substrates. The nanoscale porosity and micro-scale dimensions of the CNT structures, which can be precisely varied by the fabrication process, enable quantitative measurements that can be related to analytical models of the spreading behavior. Moreover, the conformal alumina coating by atomic layer deposition (ALD) prevents capillary-induced deformation of the CNTs upon meniscus recession, which has complicated previous studies of this topic. Washburn-like liquid spreading behavior is observed on non-patterned CNT surfaces, and is explained using a scaling model based on the balance of capillary driving force and the viscous drag force. Using these insights, we design patterned surfaces with controllable spreading rates and study the contact line pinning-depinning behavior. The nanoscale porosity, controllable surface chemistry, and mechanical stability of coated CNTs provide significantly enhanced liquid-solid interfacial area compared to solid microstructures. As a result, these surface designs may be useful for applications such as phase-change heat transfer and electrochemical energy storage. Funding for this project is provided by the National Institutes of Health and the MIT Center for Clean Water and Clean Energy supported by the King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals.

  6. A facile and low-cost length sorting of single-wall carbon nanotubes by precipitation and applications for thin-film transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gui, Hui; Chen, Haitian; Khripin, Constantine Y; Liu, Bilu; Fagan, Jeffrey A; Zhou, Chongwu; Zheng, Ming

    2016-02-14

    Semiconducting single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) with long lengths are highly desirable for many applications such as thin-film transistors and circuits. Previously reported length sorting techniques usually require sophisticated instrumentation and are hard to scale up. In this paper, we report for the first time a general phenomenon of a length-dependent precipitation of surfactant-dispersed carbon nanotubes by polymers, salts, and their combinations. Polyelectrolytes such as polymethacrylate (PMAA) and polystyrene sulfonate (PSS) are found to be especially effective on cholate and deoxycholate dispersed SWCNTs. By adding PMAA to these nanotube dispersions in a stepwise fashion, we have achieved nanotube precipitation in a length-dependent order: first nanotubes with an average length of 650 nm, and then successively of 450 nm, 350 nm, and 250 nm. A similar effect of nanotube length sorting has also been observed for PSS. To demonstrate the utility of the length fractionation, the 650 nm-long nanotube fraction was subjected to an aqueous two-phase separation to obtain semiconducting enriched nanotubes. Thin-film transistors fabricated with the resulting semiconducting SWCNTs showed a carrier mobility up to 18 cm(2) (V s)(-1) and an on/off ratio up to 10(7). Our result sheds new light on the phase behavior of aqueous nanotube dispersions under high concentrations of polymers and salts, and offers a facile, low-cost, and scalable method to produce length sorted semiconducting nanotubes for macroelectronics applications.

  7. All-Printed Thin-Film Transistor Based on Purified Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes with Linear Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guiru Gu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We report an all-printed thin-film transistor (TFT on a polyimide substrate with linear transconductance response. The TFT is based on our purified single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT solution that is primarily consists of semiconducting carbon nanotubes (CNTs with low metal impurities. The all-printed TFT exhibits a high ON/OFF ratio of around 103 and bias-independent transconductance over a certain gate bias range. Such bias-independent transconductance property is different from that of conventional metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFETs due to the special band structure and the one-dimensional (1D quantum confined density of state (DOS of CNTs. The bias-independent transconductance promises modulation linearity for analog electronics.

  8. Totally embedded hybrid thin films of carbon nanotubes and silver nanowires as flat homogenous flexible transparent conductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillai, Suresh Kumar Raman; Wang, Jing; Wang, Yilei; Sk, Md Moniruzzaman; Prakoso, Ari Bimo; Rusli; Chan-Park, Mary B.

    2016-12-01

    There is a great need for viable alternatives to today’s transparent conductive film using largely indium tin oxide. We report the fabrication of a new type of flexible transparent conductive film using silver nanowires (AgNW) and single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) networks which are fully embedded in a UV curable resin substrate. The hybrid SWCNTs-AgNWs film is relatively flat so that the RMS roughness of the top surface of the film is 3 nm. Addition of SWCNTs networks make the film resistance uniform; without SWCNTs, sheet resistance of the surface composed of just AgNWs in resin varies from 20 Ω/sq to 107 Ω/sq. With addition of SWCNTs embedded in the resin, sheet resistance of the hybrid film is 29 ± 5 Ω/sq and uniform across the 47 mm diameter film discs; further, the optimized film has 85% transparency. Our lamination-transfer UV process doesn’t need solvent for sacrificial substrate removal and leads to good mechanical interlocking of the nano-material networks. Additionally, electrochemical study of the film for supercapacitors application showed an impressive 10 times higher current in cyclic voltammograms compared to the control without SWCNTs. Our fabrication method is simple, cost effective and enables the large-scale fabrication of flat and flexible transparent conductive films.

  9. Layer-by-layer assembled carbon nanotube films with molecule recognition function and lower capacitive background current.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Bo; Zeng, Jinxiang; Luo, Guangming; Luo, Shenglian; Wei, Wanzhi; Li, Jun

    2009-02-01

    Multilayer films of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) with molecule recognition function were assembled on glassy carbon (GC) electrode with lower capacitive background current by two steps: first, MWCNTs interacted with beta-cyclodextrin (beta-CD) with the aid of sonication to form beta-CD-MWCNTs nanocomposite, then the beta-CD-MWCNTs nanocomposite was assembled on GC electrode using layer-by-layer (LBL) method based on electrostatic interaction of positively charged biopolymer chitosan and negatively charged MWCNTs. The assembled beta-CD-MWCNTs multilayer films were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and cyclic voltammetry. The SEM indicated that the MWCNTs multilayer films with beta-CD were somewhat more compact than that of the MWCNTs multilayer films without beta-CD. The cyclic voltammetric results indicated that the assembled MWCNTs with beta-CD on GC electrode exhibited lower capacitive background current than the assembled MWCNTs without beta-CD. The MWCNTs multilayer films with beta-CD were studied with respect to the electrocatalytic activity toward dopamine (DA). Compared with the MWCNTs multilayer films without beta-CD, the MWCNTs multilayer films with beta-CD possesses a much lower capacitive background current and higher electrocatalytic activity in phosphate buffer, which was ascribed to the relatively compact three-dimensional structure of the MWCNTs multilayer films with beta-CD and the excellent molecule recognition function of beta-CD.

  10. Correlation between droplet-induced strain actuation and voltage generation in single-wall carbon nanotube films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zheng; Hu, Lijun; Liu, Ji; Qiu, Caiyu; Zhou, Haiqing; Hashim, Daniel P; Shi, Gang; Peng, Cheng; Najmaei, Sina; Sun, Lianfeng; Lou, Jun; Ajayan, Pulickel M

    2011-12-14

    In this paper, a method of strain actuation of single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) films using droplets is examined, and the physical origin of an open-circuit voltage (Voc)-observed across the film during this process-is explored. We demonstrate that droplet actuation is driven by the formation of a capillary bridge between the suspended SWNT films and the substrates, which deforms the films by wetting forces during evaporation. The induced strain is further evaluated and analyzed using dynamic Raman and two-dimensional correlation spectra. Supported by theoretical calculations, our experiments reveal the time and strain dependency of the capillary bridge's midpoint directional movement. This relationship is applied to display the correlation between the induced strain and the measured Voc.

  11. Titanium dioxide nanotube films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roman, Ioan, E-mail: roman@metav-cd.ro [S.C. METAV-Research and Development S.R.L., Bucharest, 31C. A. Rosetti, 020011 (Romania); Trusca, Roxana Doina; Soare, Maria-Laura [S.C. METAV-Research and Development S.R.L., Bucharest, 31C. A. Rosetti, 020011 (Romania); Fratila, Corneliu [Research and Development National Institute for Nonferrous and Rare Metals, Pantelimon, 102 Biruintei, 077145 (Romania); Krasicka-Cydzik, Elzbieta [University of Zielona Gora, Department of Biomedical Engineering Division, 9 Licealna, 65-417 (Poland); Stan, Miruna-Silvia; Dinischiotu, Anca [University of Bucharest, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 36-46 Mihail Kogalniceanu, 050107 (Romania)

    2014-04-01

    Titania nanotubes (TNTs) were prepared by anodization on different substrates (titanium, Ti6Al4V and Ti6Al7Nb alloys) in ethylene glycol and glycerol. The influence of the applied potential and processing time on the nanotube diameter and length is analyzed. The as-formed nanotube layers are amorphous but they become crystalline when subjected to subsequent thermal treatment in air at 550 °C; TNT layers grown on titanium and Ti6Al4V alloy substrates consist of anatase and rutile, while those grown on Ti6Al7Nb alloy consist only of anatase. The nanotube layers grown on Ti6Al7Nb alloy are less homogeneous, with supplementary islands of smaller diameter nanotubes, spread across the surface. Better adhesion and proliferation of osteoblasts was found for the nanotubes grown on all three substrates by comparison to an unprocessed titanium plate. The sensitivity towards bovine alkaline phosphatase was investigated mainly by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy in relation to the crystallinity, the diameter and the nature of the anodization electrolyte of the TNT/Ti samples. The measuring capacity of the annealed nanotubes of 50 nm diameter grown in glycerol was demonstrated and the corresponding calibration curve was built for the concentration range of 0.005–0.1 mg/mL. - Highlights: • Titania nanotubes (TNTs) on Ti, Ti6Al4V and Ti6Al7Nb substrates were prepared. • Quantitative dependences of anodization conditions on TNT features were established. • Morphology and electrochemical tests revealed inhomogeneity of TNT/Ti6Al7Nb films. • Particular characteristics of TNT films induce electrochemical sensitivity to ALP. • Annealed TNT/Ti impedimetric sensitivity towards ALP was demonstrated and quantified.

  12. Compressive Response of Vertically Aligned Carbon Nanotube Films Gleaned from in Situ Flat-Punch Indentations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-14

    individual multiwalled carbon nano - tubes using nanoindentation. Appl. Phys. Lett. 87, 103109 (2005). 8. S. Pathak, Z.G. Cambaz, S.R. Kalidindi, J.G...between the tubes (van der Waals ) is thought to balance the bending strain energy of their arrangement, resulting in a stable low energy configuration...bundles: An in situ study. ACS Nano 6(3), 2189–2197 (2012). 10. M. Kumar and Y. Ando: Chemical vapor deposition of carbon nanotubes: A review on growth

  13. Development of Novel Magnetic Metal Oxide Thin Films and Carbon Nanotube Materials for Potential Device Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-09

    materials with applications in areas such as magnetic recording, magnetic sensing devices and high frequency planar microwave devices. Emphasis has been... emission SEM/STEM. For STEM imaging, some nanotubes were scrapped off SiO2 substrate and dispersed in dimethylformamide the resulting solution was dripped...on holey carbon coated carbon TEM grid for SEM and STEM analysis. VSM measurements were carried out using Vector Magnetometer Model 10 VSM system

  14. Carbon nanotube polymer composition and devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Gao; Johnson, Stephen; Kerr, John B.; Minor, Andrew M.; Mao, Samuel S.

    2011-06-14

    A thin film device and compound having an anode, a cathode, and at least one light emitting layer between the anode and cathode, the at least one light emitting layer having at least one carbon nanotube and a conductive polymer.

  15. Analysis of variance on thickness and electrical conductivity measurements of carbon nanotube thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Min-Yang; Yang, Mingchia; Vargas, Emily; Neff, Kyle; Vanli, Arda; Liang, Richard

    2016-09-01

    One of the major challenges towards controlling the transfer of electrical and mechanical properties of nanotubes into nanocomposites is the lack of adequate measurement systems to quantify the variations in bulk properties while the nanotubes were used as the reinforcement material. In this study, we conducted one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) on thickness and conductivity measurements. By analyzing the data collected from both experienced and inexperienced operators, we found some operation details users might overlook that resulted in variations, since conductivity measurements of CNT thin films are very sensitive to thickness measurements. In addition, we demonstrated how issues in measurements damaged samples and limited the number of replications resulting in large variations in the electrical conductivity measurement results. Based on this study, we proposed a faster, more reliable approach to measure the thickness of CNT thin films that operators can follow to make these measurement processes less dependent on operator skills.

  16. Electrogenerated chemiluminescence from R(bpy)3(2+) ion-exchanged in carbon nanotube/perfluorosulfonated ionomer composite films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Zhihui; Dong, Shaojun

    2004-05-15

    The electrochemistry and electrogenerated chemiluminescence (ECL) of ruthenium(II) tris(bipyridine) (Ru(bpy)(3)(2+)) ion-exchanged in carbon nanotube (CNT)/Nafion composite films were investigated with tripropylamine (TPA) as a coreactant at a glassy carbon (GC) electrode. The major goal of this work was to investigate and develop new materials and immobilization approaches for the fabrication of ECL-based sensors with improved sensitivity, reactivity, and long-term stability. Ru(bpy)(3)(2+) could be strongly incorporated into Nafion film, but the rate of charge transfer was relative slow and its stability was also problematic. The interfusion of CNT in Nafion resulted in a high peak current of Ru(bpy)(3)(2+) and high ECL intensity. The results indicated that the composite film had more open structures and a larger surface area allowing faster diffusion of Ru(bpy)(3)(2+) and that the CNT could adsorb Ru(bpy)(3)(2+) and also acted as conducting pathways to connect Ru(bpy)(3)(2+) sites to the electrode. In the present work, the sensitivity of the ECL system at the CNT/Nafion film-modified electrodes was more than 2 orders of magnitude higher than that observed at a silica/Nafion composite film-modified electrode and 3 orders of magnitude higher than that at pure Nafion films. The CNT/Nafion composite film-modified GC electrodes also exhibited long-term stability.

  17. Nanomechanics of carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kis, Andras; Zettl, Alex

    2008-05-13

    Some of the most important potential applications of carbon nanotubes are related to their mechanical properties. Stiff sp2 bonds result in a Young's modulus close to that of diamond, while the relatively weak van der Waals interaction between the graphitic shells acts as a form of lubrication. Previous characterization of the mechanical properties of nanotubes includes a rich variety of experiments involving mechanical deformation of nanotubes using scanning probe microscopes. These results have led to promising prototypes of nanoelectromechanical devices such as high-performance nanomotors, switches and oscillators based on carbon nanotubes.

  18. Electrochemical determination of sulphide at multi-walled carbon nanotubes-dihexadecyl hydrogen phosphate composite film modified electrodes based on in situ synthesis of methylene blue

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    An Min Xiang; Li Zhou; Cheng Guo Hu; Sheng Shui Hu

    2008-01-01

    A novel electrochemical method for the determination of sulphide at a multi-walled carbon nanotube-dihexadecyl hydrogenphosphate composite film coated glassy carbon electrode (MWNTs-DHP/GCE) based on in situ synthesis of methylene blue (MB)was established.

  19. Supramolecular architectures in layer-by-layer films of single-walled carbon nanotubes, chitosan and cobalt (II) phthalocyanine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sousa Luz, Roberto A. de; Martins, Marccus Victor A.; Magalhaes, Janildo L. [Departamento de Quimica, Centro de Ciencias da Natureza, Universidade Federal do Piaui, Teresina - PI, CEP 64049-550 (Brazil); Siqueira, Jose R. [Instituto de Ciencias Exatas, Naturais e Educacao, Universidade Federal do Triangulo Mineiro, Uberaba - MG, CEP 38025-180, Brazil (Brazil); Zucolotto, Valtencir; Oliveira, Osvaldo N. [Instituto de Fisica de Sao Carlos, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Sao Carlos - SP, CEP 13560-970 (Brazil); Crespilho, Frank N. [Centro de Ciencias Naturais e Humanas, Universidade Federal do ABC, Santo Andre - SP, CEP 09210-170 (Brazil); Cantanhede da Silva, Welter, E-mail: welter@ufpi.edu.br [Departamento de Quimica, Centro de Ciencias da Natureza, Universidade Federal do Piaui, Teresina - PI, CEP 64049-550 (Brazil)

    2011-11-01

    Highlights: {yields} Platforms were assembled from cobalt phthalocyanine, chitosan and carbon nanotubes. {yields} Supramolecular organization of multilayer films was investigated. {yields} Increase of the supramolecular charge transfer after carbon nanotube incorporation. {yields} Functional modulation based on constitutional dynamic chemistry was achieved. - Abstract: The building of supramolecular structures in nanostructured films has been exploited for a number of applications, with the film properties being controlled at the molecular level. In this study, we report on the layer-by-layer (LbL) films combining cobalt (II) tetrasulfonated phthalocyanine (CoTsPc), chitosan (Chit) and single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) in two architectures, {l_brace}Chit/CoTsPc{r_brace}{sub n} and {l_brace}Chit-SWCNTs/CoTsPc{r_brace}{sub n} (n = 1-10). The physicochemical properties of the films were evaluated and the multilayer formation was monitored with microgravimetry measurements using a quartz microbalance crystal and an electrochemical technique. According to atomic force microscopy (AFM) results, the incorporation of SWCNTs caused the films to be thicker, with a thickness ca. 3 fold that of a 2-bilayer LbL film with no SWCNTs. Cyclic voltammetry revealed a quasi-reversible, one electron process with E{sub 1/2} at -0.65 V (vs SCE) and an irreversible oxidation process at 0.80 V in a physiological medium for both systems, which can be attributed to [CoTsPc(I)]{sup 5-}/[CoTsPc(II)]{sup 4-} and CoTsPc(II) to CoTsPc(III), respectively. The {l_brace}Chit-SWCNTs/CoTsPc{r_brace}{sub 5} multilayer film exhibited an increased faradaic current, probably associated with the supramolecular charge transfer interaction between cobalt phthalocyanine and SWCNTs. The results demonstrate that an intimate contact at the supramolecular level between functional SWCNTs immobilized into biocompatible chitosan polymer and CoTsPc improves the electron flow from CoTsPc redox sites to the

  20. Organic modification of carbon nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The organic modification of carbon nanotubes is a novel research field being developed recently. In this article, the history and newest progress of organic modification of carbon nanotubes are reviewed from two aspects:organic covalent modification and organic noncovalent modification of carbon nanotubes. The preparation and properties of organic modified carbon nanotubes are discussed in detail. In addition, the prospective development of organic modification of carbon nanotubes is suggested.

  1. Enhanced field emission from cerium hexaboride coated multiwalled carbon nanotube composite films: A potential material for next generation electron sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patra, Rajkumar; Ghosh, S., E-mail: santanu1@physics.iitd.ac.in [Nanostech Laboratory, Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, New Delhi-16 (India); Sheremet, E.; Rodriguez, R. D.; Lehmann, D.; Gordan, O. D.; Zahn, D. R. T. [Semiconductor Physics, Technische Universität Chemnitz, 09126 Chemnitz (Germany); Jha, M.; Ganguli, A. K. [Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, New Delhi-16 (India); Schmidt, H. [Material Systems for Nanoelectronics, Technische Universität Chemnitz, 09126 Chemnitz (Germany); Schulze, S. [Solid Surfaces Analysis, Technische Universität Chemnitz, 09126 Chemnitz (Germany); Schmidt, O. G. [Material Systems for Nanoelectronics, Technische Universität Chemnitz, 09126 Chemnitz (Germany); Institute for Integrative Nanosciences, IFW Dresden, Helmholtzstrasse 20, 01069 Dresden (Germany)

    2014-03-07

    Intensified field emission (FE) current from temporally stable cerium hexaboride (CeB{sub 6}) coated carbon nanotubes (CNTs) on Si substrate is reported aiming to propose the new composite material as a potential candidate for future generation electron sources. The film was synthesized by a combination of chemical and physical deposition processes. A remarkable increase in maximum current density, field enhancement factor, and a reduction in turn-on field and threshold field with comparable temporal current stability are observed in CeB{sub 6}-coated CNT film when compared to pristine CeB{sub 6} film. The elemental composition and surface morphology of the films, as examined by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and energy dispersive X-ray measurements, show decoration of CeB{sub 6} nanoparticles on top and walls of CNTs. Chemical functionalization of CNTs by the incorporation of CeB{sub 6} nanoparticles is evident by a remarkable increase in intensity of the 2D band in Raman spectrum of coated films as compared to pristine CeB{sub 6} films. The enhanced FE properties of the CeB{sub 6} coated CNT films are correlated to the microstructure of the films.

  2. The structure and optical properties of regio-regular poly(3-hexylthiophene) and carboxylic multi-walled carbon nanotubes composite films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Han-Dong; Zheng, Fei; Xu, Wei-Long; Yuan, Wei-Hao; Zhu, Meng-Qi; Hao, Xiao-Tao

    2014-12-01

    The introduction of small amounts of carboxylic multi-walled carbon nanotubes into regio-regular poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) can vary the structure and optical properties of the polymer. The microstructure of the composite film was analysed by various techniques including x-ray diffraction, ultraviolet-visible optical absorption, Raman spectroscopy, and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy. It is shown that the presence of carbon nanotubes can improve the crystallinity and increase the conjugation length of P3HT in the films. Furthermore, an obvious photoluminescence quenching is observed in the P3HT/CNTs composite films, suggesting the possibility of photoinduced electron transfer between P3HT and carbon nanotubes due to the π-π interaction of these two components. These results are important for applications in bulk heterojunction solar cells and organic photo-detectors.

  3. Morphological and compositional engineering of Ni/carbon nanotube composite film via a novel cyclic voltammetric route

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Yu Jun Yang

    2012-08-01

    Ni/multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) composite films were deposited on the glassy carbon electrode (GCE) by a Ni plating bath containing homogeneously dispersed MWCNTs using polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) as dispersion additive. Incorporation of MWCNTs into Ni matrix was greatly enhanced by the application of cyclic voltammetric (CV) deposition technique. The structure and nature of the Ni/MWCNT were characterized by field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The results show that the content of MWCNT and the morphology of the deposited Ni/MWCNT composite film can be controlled by selecting the appropriate electroplating conditions. Further study indicates that the obtained Ni/MWCNT showed excellent electro-catalytic activity for the oxidation of ethanol in alkaline solution.

  4. Reversible conversion of water-droplet mobility from rollable to pinned on a superhydrophobic functionalized carbon nanotube film.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jin; Zhang, Zhaozhu; Men, Xuehu; Xu, Xianghui; Zhu, Xiaotao

    2010-06-01

    Poly(acrylic acid)-block-polystyrene (PAA-b-PS) functionalized multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) were prepared by nitroxide-mediated "living" free-radical polymerization. The product functionalized MWNTs (MWNT-PAA-b-PS) contained 20% by weight PAA-b-PS based on the infrared spectroscopy analysis and thermal gravimetric analysis. Such MWNT-PAA-b-PS nanoparticles can be used in spray coating method to fabricate superhydrophobic MWNT films, and water-droplet mobility on the superhydrophobic film can be reversibly converted from rollable to pinned through adjusting the appearance of PAA chains on the topmost surface of the film. Switching mechanism has been discussed in detail. We also directly observed the air-solid-liquid interface from the above of a water droplet by a microscope to confirm the superhydrophobic states, and proved that the transition between the wettability states appeared on the same surface with reversible conversion of water-droplet mobility.

  5. Crack-free and scalable transfer of carbon nanotube arrays into flexible and highly thermal conductive composite film.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Miao; Chen, Hongyuan; Lin, Wei; Li, Zhuo; Li, Qiang; Chen, Minghai; Meng, Fancheng; Xing, Yajuan; Yao, Yagang; Wong, Ching-ping; Li, Qingwen

    2014-01-08

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) arrays show great promise in developing anisotropic thermal conductive composites for efficiently dissipating heat from high-power devices along thickness direction. However, CNT arrays are always grown on some substrates and liable to be deformed and broken into pieces during transfer and solution treatment. In the present study, we intentionally synthesized well-crystallized and large-diameter (~80 nm) multiwalled CNT (MWCNT) arrays by floating catalyst chemical vapor deposition (FCCVD) method. Such arrays provided high packing density and robust structure from collapse and crack formation during post solution treatment and therefore favored to maintain original thermal and electrical conductive paths. Under optimized condition, the CNT arrays can be transferred into flexible composite films. Furthermore, the composite film also exhibited excellent thermal conductivity at 8.2 W/(m·K) along thickness direction. Such robust, flexible, and highly thermal conductive composite film may enable some prospective applications in advanced thermal management.

  6. Electronic and optoelectronic devices based on chirality-enriched wafer-scale single-wall carbon nanotube thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Weilu; He, Xiaowei; Xie, Lijuan; Zhang, Qi; Haroz, Erik; Doorn, Stephen K.; Kono, Junichiro

    2015-03-01

    The unique and rich material properties of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) make them attractive for nano-electronic and optoelectronic applications. Slight changes in tube diameter and wrapping angle, defined by the chirality indices (n, m), can dramatically modify the bandstructure, which can be utilized for designing devices with tailored properties. However, it remains to be a challenge to fabricate macroscopic, single-chirality devices. Here, we introduce a simple way of producing chirality-enriched wafer-scale SWCNT films by combining recently developed solution-based polymer-modified sorting method and vacuum filtration. The produced thin films can be easily transferred onto any substrate to have a CMOS compatible wafer. We fabricated a transistor of (6,5)-enriched SWCNTs with an on/off ratio >103. Large-scale photothermoelectric-effect-based and photovoltaic-effect-based photodetectors made of (6,6)- and (6,5)-enriched films, respectively, will also be discussed.

  7. Ultrahigh Carrier Mobility Achieved in Photoresponsive Hybrid Perovskite Films via Coupling with Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Feng

    2017-02-22

    Organolead trihalide perovskites have drawn substantial interest for photovoltaic and optoelectronic applications due to their remarkable physical properties and low processing cost. However, perovskite thin films suffer from low carrier mobility as a result of their structural imperfections such as grain boundaries and pinholes, limiting their device performance and application potential. Here we demonstrate a simple and straightforward synthetic strategy based on coupling perovskite films with embedded single-walled carbon nanotubes. We are able to significantly enhance the hole and electron mobilities of the perovskite film to record-high values of 595.3 and 108.7 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) , respectively. Such a synergistic effect can be harnessed to construct ambipolar phototransistors with an ultrahigh detectivity of 3.7 × 10(14) Jones and a responsivity of 1 × 10(4) A W(-1) , on a par with the best devices available to date. The perovskite/carbon nanotube hybrids should provide a platform that is highly desirable for fields as diverse as optoelectronics, solar energy conversion, and molecular sensing.

  8. A Review: Carbon Nanotube-Based Piezoresistive Strain Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waris Obitayo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of carbon nanotubes for piezoresistive strain sensors has acquired significant attention due to its unique electromechanical properties. In this comprehensive review paper, we discussed some important aspects of carbon nanotubes for strain sensing at both the nanoscale and macroscale. Carbon nanotubes undergo changes in their band structures when subjected to mechanical deformations. This phenomenon makes them applicable for strain sensing applications. This paper signifies the type of carbon nanotubes best suitable for piezoresistive strain sensors. The electrical resistivities of carbon nanotube thin film increase linearly with strain, making it an ideal material for a piezoresistive strain sensor. Carbon nanotube composite films, which are usually fabricated by mixing small amounts of single-walled or multiwalled carbon nanotubes with selected polymers, have shown promising characteristics of piezoresistive strain sensors. Studies also show that carbon nanotubes display a stable and predictable voltage response as a function of temperature.

  9. Engineering Crack Formation in Carbon Nanotube-Silver Nanoparticle Composite Films for Sensitive and Durable Piezoresistive Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran Hoang, Phong; Salazar, Nicolas; Porkka, Thomas Nolan; Joshi, Kunal; Liu, Tao; Dickens, Tarik J.; Yu, Zhibin

    2016-09-01

    We report highly sensitive and reliable strain sensors based on silver nanoparticle (AgNP) and carbon nanotube (CNT) composite thin films. The CNT/AgNP was prepared by a screen printing process using a mixture of a CNT paste and an AgNP ink. It is discovered that the sensitivity of such sensors are highly dependent on the crack formation in the composites. By altering the substrate use and the relative ratios of AgNPs and CNTs, the formation and propagation of cracks can be properly engineered, leading to piezoresistive strain sensors with enhanced sensitivity and robustness.

  10. Engineering Crack Formation in Carbon Nanotube-Silver Nanoparticle Composite Films for Sensitive and Durable Piezoresistive Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran Hoang, Phong; Salazar, Nicolas; Porkka, Thomas Nolan; Joshi, Kunal; Liu, Tao; Dickens, Tarik J; Yu, Zhibin

    2016-12-01

    We report highly sensitive and reliable strain sensors based on silver nanoparticle (AgNP) and carbon nanotube (CNT) composite thin films. The CNT/AgNP was prepared by a screen printing process using a mixture of a CNT paste and an AgNP ink. It is discovered that the sensitivity of such sensors are highly dependent on the crack formation in the composites. By altering the substrate use and the relative ratios of AgNPs and CNTs, the formation and propagation of cracks can be properly engineered, leading to piezoresistive strain sensors with enhanced sensitivity and robustness.

  11. Temperature dependence of photoconductivity at 0.7 eV in single-wall carbon nanotube films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yukitaka Matsuoka, Akihiko Fujiwara, Naoki Ogawa, Kenjiro Miyano, Hiromichi Kataura, Yutaka Maniwa, Shinzo Suzuki and Yohji Achiba

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Temperature dependence of photoconductivity has been investigated for single-wall carbon nanotube films at 0.7 eV. In order to clarify the effect of atmosphere on photoconductivity, measurements have been performed under helium and nitrogen gas flow in the temperature range from 10 K to room temperature (RT and from 100 K to RT, respectively. Photoconductive response monotonously increases with a decrease in temperature and tends to saturate around 10 K. No clear difference in photoconductive response under different atmosphere was observed. We discuss the mechanism of photoconductivity at 0.7 eV.

  12. Unsorted single walled carbon nanotubes enabled the fabrication of high performance organic thin film transistors with low cost metal electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smithson, Chad S; Zhu, Shiping; Wigglesworth, Tony; Wu, Yiliang

    2013-10-09

    Transistors with a diketopyrrolopyrrole-quarterthiophene (DPP-QT) semiconductor and low-cost Al or Cu electrodes were studied. Albeit a large charge injection resistance exists between DPP-QT and Al or Cu, the resistance was dramatically reduced when unsorted single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) were blended into the DPP-QT film. This led to a high mobility of 0.64 and 1.1 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1), respectively, for Al and Cu devices, which is similar or even better than the device using gold electrodes (0.78 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1)).

  13. Characterization of acid-treated carbon nanotube thin films by means of Raman spectroscopy and field-effect response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhi-Bin; Li, Jiantong; Cabezas, Ana López; Zhang, Shi-Li

    2009-07-01

    By combining Raman spectroscopy with transistor transfer characteristics, acid treatment of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) in a mixture of concentrated HNO 3/H 2SO 4 has been characterized. The acid treatment results in a sharp decrease in the Raman resonant signals of the metallic SWCNTs but no observable change in those of the semiconducting SWCNTs. However, the acid treatment causes disappearing gate modulation of the thin-film transistors made of the SWCNTs, contrary to what would be expected referring to the Raman results. These experimental results suggest that the energy band of the semiconducting SWCNTs is significantly affected by absorbates induced by the acid treatment.

  14. Enhanced electrocatalytic oxygen evolution of α-Co(OH)2 nanosheets on carbon nanotube/polyimide films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yimin; Li, Xin; Wang, Tingxia; Wang, Chunming

    2016-05-01

    The future of energy supply depends on innovative breakthroughs in the development of highly efficient, sustainable and low-cost systems for renewable energy conversion and storage. Water splitting is a promising and appealing solution. In this work, we report Co(OH)2 on the carbon nanotube/polyimide film (PI/CNT-Co(OH)2) as an efficient electrocatalyst for the oxygen evolution reaction (OER). The PI/CNT film allows intimate growth of Co(OH)2 nanosheets on its surface. The nanosheet structure of Co(OH)2 and the underlying PI/CNT film facilitate the good OER performance of the PI/CNT-Co(OH)2 film. Co(OH)2 nanosheets on the PI/CNT film afford an earlier onset of oxygen evolution, a low overpotential of 317 mV and a small Tafel slope of 49 mV per decade in alkaline media. This work applies the PI/CNT film in water splitting to enhance the OER electrocatalytic activity of Co(OH)2, which opens up a promising avenue for the exploration of highly active electrocatalysts that can replace noble-metal based catalysts for the OER.The future of energy supply depends on innovative breakthroughs in the development of highly efficient, sustainable and low-cost systems for renewable energy conversion and storage. Water splitting is a promising and appealing solution. In this work, we report Co(OH)2 on the carbon nanotube/polyimide film (PI/CNT-Co(OH)2) as an efficient electrocatalyst for the oxygen evolution reaction (OER). The PI/CNT film allows intimate growth of Co(OH)2 nanosheets on its surface. The nanosheet structure of Co(OH)2 and the underlying PI/CNT film facilitate the good OER performance of the PI/CNT-Co(OH)2 film. Co(OH)2 nanosheets on the PI/CNT film afford an earlier onset of oxygen evolution, a low overpotential of 317 mV and a small Tafel slope of 49 mV per decade in alkaline media. This work applies the PI/CNT film in water splitting to enhance the OER electrocatalytic activity of Co(OH)2, which opens up a promising avenue for the exploration of highly active

  15. Polymer Self-assembly on Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giulianini, Michele; Motta, Nunzio

    This chapter analyses the poly(3-hexylthiophene) self-assembly on carbon nanotubes and the interaction between the two materials forming a new hybrid nanostructure. The chapter starts with a review of the several studies investigating polymers and biomolecules self-assembled on nanotubes. Then conducting polymers and polythiophenes are briefly introduced. Accordingly, carbon nanotube structure and properties are reported in Sect. 3. The experimental section starts with the bulk characterisation of polymer thin films with the inclusion of uniformly distributed carbon nanotubes. By using volume film analysis techniques (AFM, TEM, UV-Vis and Raman), we show how the polymer's higher degree of order is a direct consequence of interaction with carbon nanotubes. Nevertheless, it is through the use of nanoscale analysis and molecular dynamic simulations that the self-assembly of the polymer on the nanotube surface can be clearly evidenced and characterised. In Sect. 6, the effect of the carbon templating structure on the P3HT organisation on the surface is investigated, showing the chirality-driven polymer assembly on the carbon nanotube surface. The interaction between P3HT and CNTs brings also to charge transfer, with the modification of physical properties for both species. In particular, the alteration of the polymer electronic properties and the modification of the nanotube mechanical structure are a direct consequence of the P3HT π-π stacking on the nanotube surface. Finally, some considerations based on molecular dynamics studies are reported in order to confirm and support the experimental results discussed.

  16. Physical Removal of Metallic Carbon Nanotubes from Nanotube Network Devices Using a Thermal and Fluidic Process

    OpenAIRE

    Ford, Alexandra C.; Shaughnessy, Michael; Wong, Bryan M.; Kane, Alexander A.; Kuznetsov, Oleksandr V.; Krafcik, Karen L.; Billups, W. E.; Hauge, Robert H.; Léonard, François

    2013-01-01

    Electronic and optoelectronic devices based on thin films of carbon nanotubes are currently limited by the presence of metallic nanotubes. Here we present a novel approach based on nanotube alkyl functionalization to physically remove the metallic nanotubes from such network devices. The process relies on preferential thermal desorption of the alkyls from the semiconducting nanotubes and the subsequent dissolution and selective removal of the metallic nanotubes in chloroform. The approach is ...

  17. Complexes of carbon nanotubes with oligonucleotides in thin Langmuir-Blodgett films to detect electrochemically hybridization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egorov, A. S.; Egorova, V. P.; Krylova, H. V.; Lipnevich, I. V.; Orekhovskaya, T. I.; Veligura, A. A.; Govorov, M. I.; Shulitsky, B. G.

    2014-10-01

    Self-assembled complexes consisting of thin multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and DNA-oligonucleotides which are able to a cooperative binding to complementary oligonucleotides have been investigated. It was establised a high-performance charge transport in nanostructured Langmuir-Blodgett complexes thin MWCNTs/DNA. A method to electrochemically detect DNA hybridization on the self-organized structures has been proposed.

  18. A Comparative Study of Three Different Chemical Vapor Deposition Techniques of Carbon Nanotube Growth on Diamond Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    1187–1194, 2010. [28] L. T. Sun, J. L. Gong , Z. Y. Zhu et al., “Nanocrystalline diamond from carbon nanotubes,” Applied Physics Letters, vol. 84, no. 15...pp. 759–760, 1994. [33] G. Zhang, P. Qi , X. Wang et al., “Hydrogenation and hydro- carbonation and etching of single-walled carbon nanotubes,” Journal

  19. Electroanalytical properties of cytochrome c by direct electrochemistry on multi-walled carbon nanotubes incorporated with DNA biocomposite film.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shie, Jan-Wei; Yogeswaran, Umasankar; Chen, Shen-Ming

    2008-02-15

    A novel conductive biocomposite film (MWCNTs-DNA-cyt c) which contains multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) along with the incorporation of DNA and cytochrome c (cyt c) has been synthesized on glassy carbon electrode (GCE), gold (Au), indium tin oxide (ITO) and screen printed carbon electrode (SPCE) by potentiostatic methods. The presence of both MWCNTs and DNA in the biocomposite film enhances the surface coverage concentration (Gamma), increases the electron transfer rate constant (K(s)) up to 21% and decreases the degradation of cyt c during the cycling. The biocomposite film also exhibits a promising enhanced electrocatalytic activity towards the reduction of halogen oxyanions and oxidation of biochemical compounds such as ascorbic acid and l-cysteine. The cyclic voltammetry has been used for the measurement of electroanalytical properties of analytes by means of biocomposite film modified GCEs. The sensitivity of MWCNTs-DNA-cyt c modified GCE possess higher values than the values obtained for DNA-cyt c film modified GCE. Further, the reduction potentials of halogen oxyanions E(pc), clearly shows that the activity of the biocomposite is dependent on the electronegativity of halogen oxyanions. Electrochemical quartz crystal microbalance studies revealed the enhancements in the functional properties of MWCNTs, DNA and cyt c. We have studied the surface morphology of the biocomposite films using scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy, which revealed that DNA and cyt c have been incorporated on MWCNTs. Finally, the flow injection analysis has been used for the amperometric detection of analytes at MWCNTs-DNA-cyt c film modified SPCE.

  20. Variable range hopping in single-wall carbon nanotube thin films: a processing-structure-property relationship study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Sida; Liu, Tao; Benjamin, Shermane M; Brooks, James S

    2013-07-09

    By varying the ultrasonication and ultracentrifugation conditions, single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) dispersions with a broad range of SWCNT length and diameter (L = 342-3330 nm; d = 0.5-12 nm) were prepared and characterized by a preparative ultracentrifuge method (PUM) and dynamic light scattering (DLS) technique. The well-characterized dispersions were then fabricated into SWCNT thin films by spray coating. Combined optical, spectroscopic, and temperature-dependent electrical measurements were performed to study the effect of SWCNT structures on the charge transport behavior of SWCNT thin films. Regardless of SWCNT size in the dispersion and the thin film thickness, the three-dimensional variable range hopping (3D VRH) conduction model was found to be appropriate in explaining the temperature-dependent sheet resistance results for all SWCNT thin films prepared in this study. More importantly, with the SWCNT structural information determined by the PUM method, we were able to identify a strong correlation between the length of SWCNTs and the 3D VRH parameter T0, the Mott characteristic temperature. When the SWCNT length is less than ∼700 nm, the T0 of SWCNT thin films shows a drastic increase, but when the length is greater than ~700 nm, T0 is only weakly dependent on the SWCNT length. Under the framework of traditional VRH, we further conclude that the electron localization length of SWCNT thin films shows a similar dependence on the SWCNT length.

  1. High-Performance Complementary Transistors and Medium-Scale Integrated Circuits Based on Carbon Nanotube Thin Films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yingjun; Ding, Li; Han, Jie; Zhang, Zhiyong; Peng, Lian-Mao

    2017-03-29

    Solution-derived carbon nanotube (CNT) network films with high semiconducting purity are suitable materials for the wafer-scale fabrication of field-effect transistors (FETs) and integrated circuits (ICs). However, it is challenging to realize high-performance complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) FETs with high yield and stability on such CNT network films, and this difficulty hinders the development of CNT-film-based ICs. In this work, we developed a doping-free process for the fabrication of CMOS FETs based on solution-processed CNT network films, in which the polarity of the FETs was controlled using Sc or Pd as the source/drain contacts to selectively inject carriers into the channels. The fabricated top-gated CMOS FETs showed high symmetry between the characteristics of n- and p-type devices and exhibited high-performance uniformity and excellent scalability down to a gate length of 1 μm. Many common types of CMOS ICs, including typical logic gates, sequential circuits, and arithmetic units, were constructed based on CNT films, and the fabricated ICs exhibited rail-to-rail outputs because of the high noise margin of CMOS circuits. In particular, 4-bit full adders consisting of 132 CMOS FETs were realized with 100% yield, thereby demonstrating that this CMOS technology shows the potential to advance the development of medium-scale CNT-network-film-based ICs.

  2. Inkjet Printing of Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan P. Tortorich

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available In an attempt to give a brief introduction to carbon nanotube inkjet printing, this review paper discusses the issues that come along with preparing and printing carbon nanotube ink. Carbon nanotube inkjet printing is relatively new, but it has great potential for broad applications in flexible and printable electronics, transparent electrodes, electronic sensors, and so on due to its low cost and the extraordinary properties of carbon nanotubes. In addition to the formulation of carbon nanotube ink and its printing technologies, recent progress and achievements of carbon nanotube inkjet printing are reviewed in detail with brief discussion on the future outlook of the technology.

  3. Carbon nanotubes film preparation on 3D structured silicon substrates by spray coating technique for application in solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Y.; Li, M.; Lin, C.; Liu, P.; Zhang, J.

    2014-11-01

    This paper firstly reports the preparation of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) film on silicon substrate of three-dimensional (3D) inverted pyramid structure (IPS) by spray coating. The effect of different substrate temperatures, spraying times and opening sizes on CNTs sidewall covering properties were investigated. The results show that the CNTs covering ratio of sidewall is much lower than that of flat surface and gradually decrease with depth. 40μm×40μm opening obtained the best sidewall covering by CNTs suspension of 40μg/ml at 120°C after 30min spraying so that the CNTs can reach the bottom of IPS and cover about 68.9% sidewall area. At last, it is demonstrated that the output power of the CNTs film-Si solar cell can be enhanced 5.7 times by this method compared to that of the plane structure.

  4. Dynamic mechanical analysis of single walled carbon nanotubes/polymethyl methacrylate nanocomposite films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ali Badawi; N. Al-Hosiny

    2015-01-01

    Dynamic mechanical properties of nanocomposite films with different ratios of single walled carbon nan-otubes/polymethyl methacrylate (SWCNTs/PMMA) are studied. Nanocomposite films of different ratios (0, 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 weight percent (wt%)) of SWCNTs/PMMA are fabricated by using a casting technique. The morphological and struc-tural properties of both SWCNT powder and SWCNTs/PMMA nanocomposite films are investigated by using a high resolution transmission electron microscope and x-ray diffractometer respectively. The mechanical properties including the storage modulus, loss modulus, loss factor (tanδ) and stiffness of the nanocomposite film as a function of tempera-ture are recorded by using a dynamic mechanical analyzer at a frequency of 1 Hz. Compared with pure PMMA film, the nanocomposite films with different ratios of SWCNTs/PMMA are observed to have enhanced storage moduli, loss moduli and high stiffness, each of which is a function of temperature. The intensity of the tanδ peak for pure PMMA film is larger than those of the nanocomposite films. The glass transition temperature (Tg) of SWCNTs/PMMA nanocomposite film shifts towards the higher temperature side with respect to pure PMMA film from 91.2 ◦C to 99.5 ◦C as the ratio of SWCNTs/PMMA increases from 0 to 2.0 wt%.

  5. Sheet resistance characterization of locally anisotropic transparent conductive films made of aligned metal-enriched single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hosung; Kim, Duckjong; Baik, Seunghyun

    2014-09-21

    One-dimensional conductive fillers such as single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) can be aggregated and aligned during transparent conductive film (TCF) formation by the vacuum filtration method. The potential error of analysing the average sheet resistance of these anisotropic films, using the four-point probe in-line method and the conversion formula developed assuming uniform isotropic material properties, was systematically investigated by finite element analysis and experiments. The finite element analysis of anisotropic stripe-patterned TCFs with alternating low (ρ1) and high (ρ2) resistivities revealed that the estimated average sheet resistance approached ρ1/t when the probes were parallel to the aligned nanotubes. The thickness of the film is t. It was more close to ρ2/t when the probes were perpendicular to the aligned tubes. Indeed, TCFs fabricated by the vacuum filtration method using metal-enriched SWNTs exhibited highly anisotropic local regions where tubes were aggregated and aligned. The local sheet resistances of randomly oriented, aligned, and perpendicular tube regions of the TCF at a transmittance of 89.9% were 5000, 2.4, and 12 300 Ω □(-1), respectively. Resistivities of the aggregated and aligned tube region (ρ1 = 1.2 × 10(-5) Ω cm) and the region between tubes (ρ2 = 6.2 × 10(-2) Ω cm) could be approximated with the aid of finite element analysis. This work demonstrates the potential error of characterizing the average sheet resistance of anisotropic TCFs using the four-point probe in-line method since surprisingly high or low values could be obtained depending on the measurement angle. On the other hand, a better control of aggregation and alignment of nanotubes would realize TCFs with a very small anisotropic resistivity and a high transparency.

  6. Fabrication of multiwalled carbon nanotube-polyaniline/platinum nanocomposite films toward improved performance for a cholesterol amperometric biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, ZeHong; Cheng, XiaoDan; Tan, JianHong; Gan, Xianxue

    2016-11-01

    A simple and high sensitive cholesterol amperometric biosensor, which is based on in situ electropolymerization of multi-walled carbon nanotube-polyaniline (MWCNT-PANI) nanocomposite and electrodeposition of platinum nanoparticle (nano-Pt) films onto the glassy carbon electrode surface for cholesterol oxidase immobilization, was constructed in this study. The preparation process of the modified electrode was characterized by cyclic voltammetry, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and chronoamperometry. Because of the synergistic electrocatalytic activity between MWCNT-PANI nanocomposites and nano-Pt, the cholesterol biosensor exhibited an excellent performance with a linear range of 2.0-510.0 µM, a detection limit of 0.8 µM (signal-to-noise ratio = 3), a high sensitivity of 109.9 µA mM(-1) , and a short response time within 5 Sec. Moreover, the reproducibility, stability, and selectivity of the biosensor were also investigated.

  7. Nano-structural characteristics of carbon nanotube-polymer composite films for high-amplitude optoacoustic generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baac, Hyoung Won; Ok, Jong G; Lee, Taehwa; Guo, L Jay

    2015-09-14

    We demonstrate nano-structural characteristics of carbon nanotube (CNT)-polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) composite films that can be used as highly efficient and robust ultrasound transmitters for diagnostic and therapeutic applications. An inherent architecture of the nano-composite provides unique thermal, optical, and mechanical properties that are accommodated not just for efficient energy conversion but also for extraordinary robustness against pulsed laser ablation. First, we explain a thermoacoustic transfer mechanism within the nano-composite. CNT morphologies are examined to determine a suitable arrangement for heat transfer to the surrounding PDMS. Next, we introduce an approach to enhance optical extinction of the composite films, which uses shadowed deposition of a thin Au layer through an as-grown CNT network. Finally, the transmitter robustness is quantified in terms of laser-induced damage threshold. This reveals that the CNT-PDMS films can withstand an order-of-magnitude higher optical fluence (and extinction) than a Cr film used as a reference. Such robustness is crucial to increase the maximum-available optical energy for optoacoustic excitation and pressure generation. All of these structure-originated characteristics manifest the CNT-PDMS composite films as excellent optoacoustic transmitters for high-amplitude and high-frequency ultrasound generation.

  8. Carbon Nanotube-Poly(vinylalcohol) Nanocomposite Film Devices: Applications for Femtosecond Fiber Laser Mode Lockers and Optical Amplifier Noise Suppressors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakakibara, Youichi; Rozhin, Aleksey G.; Kataura, Hiromichi; Achiba, Yohji; Tokumoto, Madoka

    2005-04-01

    We fabricated single-wall carbon nanotube (SWNT)/poly(vinylalcohol) (PVA) nanocomposite freestanding films and examined their application in devices in which the saturable absorption of SWNTs at near-infrared optical telecommunication wavelengths can be utilized. In a passively mode-locked fiber laser, we integrated a 30-μm-thick SWNT/PVA film into a fiber connection adaptor with the film sandwiched by a pair of fiber ferrules. A ring fiber laser with a SWNT/PVA saturable absorber was operated very easily in the mode-locked short-pulse mode with a pulse width of about 500 fs. Reproducible stable device performance was confirmed. In examining noise suppression for optical amplifiers, mixed light of semiconductor amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) source and 370 fs laser pulses was passed through a 100-μm-thick SWNT/PVA film. The transmission loss of the femtosecond pulse light was smaller than that of the ASE light. This proved that the SWNT/PVA film has the ability to suppress ASE noise.

  9. Direct growth of single-walled carbon nanotubes on conducting ZnO films and its field emission properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Yo-Sep; Bae, Eun Ju; Kim, Un Jeong; Park, Wanjun; Hwang, Cheol Seong

    2006-09-01

    Despite the necessity of direct growth of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) on conducting films for versatility of designing device architectures for nanoelectronics and optoelectronics, most of SWNT growths have been carried out on insulating films or supporting materials such as SiO2 and Al2O3. Here, the authors report that conducting ZnO films can be used as both an underlying layer for the SWNT growth and an electrode for device operation. ZnO films with a resistivity in the order of 10-3Ωcm were deposited by atomic layer deposition. SWNTs were directly grown on the ZnO film by water plasma chemical vapor deposition. The authors demonstrate field emission properties from the SWNT/ZnO cathode, of which the turn-on electric field for a current density of 10μA /cm2 and the field enhancement factor are 1.8V/μm and 3200, respectively.

  10. Nano-structural characteristics of carbon nanotube-polymer composite films for high-amplitude optoacoustic generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baac, Hyoung Won; Ok, Jong G.; Lee, Taehwa; Jay Guo, L.

    2015-08-01

    We demonstrate nano-structural characteristics of carbon nanotube (CNT)-polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) composite films that can be used as highly efficient and robust ultrasound transmitters for diagnostic and therapeutic applications. An inherent architecture of the nano-composite provides unique thermal, optical, and mechanical properties that are accommodated not just for efficient energy conversion but also for extraordinary robustness against pulsed laser ablation. First, we explain a thermoacoustic transfer mechanism within the nano-composite. CNT morphologies are examined to determine a suitable arrangement for heat transfer to the surrounding PDMS. Next, we introduce an approach to enhance optical extinction of the composite films, which uses shadowed deposition of a thin Au layer through an as-grown CNT network. Finally, the transmitter robustness is quantified in terms of laser-induced damage threshold. This reveals that the CNT-PDMS films can withstand an order-of-magnitude higher optical fluence (and extinction) than a Cr film used as a reference. Such robustness is crucial to increase the maximum-available optical energy for optoacoustic excitation and pressure generation. All of these structure-originated characteristics manifest the CNT-PDMS composite films as excellent optoacoustic transmitters for high-amplitude and high-frequency ultrasound generation.

  11. Templated Growth of Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siochik Emilie J. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A method of growing carbon nanotubes uses a synthesized mesoporous si lica template with approximately cylindrical pores being formed there in. The surfaces of the pores are coated with a carbon nanotube precu rsor, and the template with the surfaces of the pores so-coated is th en heated until the carbon nanotube precursor in each pore is convert ed to a carbon nanotube.

  12. Hydrogen peroxide biosensor based on electrodeposition of zinc oxide nanoflowers onto carbon nanotubes film electrode

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hui Ping Bai; Xu Xiao Lu; Guang Ming Yang; Yun Hui Yang

    2008-01-01

    A new amperometric biosensor for hydrogen peroxide was developed based on adsorption of horseradish peroxidase at the glassy carbon electrode modified with zinc oxide nanoflowers produced by electrodeposition onto multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) firm. The morphology of the MWNTs/nano-ZnO electrode has been investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and the electrochemical performance of the electrode has also been studied by amperometric method. The resulting electrode offered an excellent detection for hydrogen peroxide at -0.11 V with a linear response range of 9.9 × 10(-7) to 2.9 × 10(-3) mol/L with a correlation coefficient of 0.991, and response time <5 s. The biosensor displays rapid response and expanded linear response range, and excellent stability.

  13. Carbon nanotube junctions and devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Postma, H.W.Ch.

    2001-01-01

    In this thesis Postma presents transport experiments performed on individual single-wall carbon nanotubes. Carbon nanotubes are molecules entirely made of carbon atoms. The electronic properties are determined by the exact symmetry of the nanotube lattice, resulting in either metallic or semiconduct

  14. Optical Detection of Paraoxon Using Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Films with Attached Organophosphorus Hydrolase-Expressed Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Intae Kim

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In whole-cell based biosensors, spectrophotometry is one of the most commonly used methods for detecting organophosphates due to its simplicity and reliability. The sensor performance is directly affected by the cell immobilization method because it determines the amount of cells, the mass transfer rate, and the stability. In this study, we demonstrated that our previously-reported microbe immobilization method, a microbe-attached single-walled carbon nanotube film, can be applied to whole-cell-based organophosphate sensors. This method has many advantages over other whole-cell organophosphate sensors, including high specific activity, quick cell immobilization, and excellent stability. A device with circular electrodes was fabricated for an enlarged cell-immobilization area. Escherichia coli expressing organophosphorus hydrolase in the periplasmic space and single-walled carbon nanotubes were attached to the device by our method. Paraoxon was hydrolyzed using this device, and detected by measuring the concentration of the enzymatic reaction product, p-nitrophenol. The specific activity of our device was calculated, and was shown to be over 2.5 times that reported previously for other whole-cell organophosphate sensors. Thus, this method for generation of whole-cell-based OP biosensors might be optimal, as it overcomes many of the caveats that prevent the widespread use of other such devices.

  15. Printed thin film transistors and CMOS inverters based on semiconducting carbon nanotube ink purified by a nonlinear conjugated copolymer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wenya; Dou, Junyan; Zhao, Jianwen; Tan, Hongwei; Ye, Jun; Tange, Masayoshi; Gao, Wei; Xu, Weiwei; Zhang, Xiang; Guo, Wenrui; Ma, Changqi; Okazaki, Toshiya; Zhang, Kai; Cui, Zheng

    2016-02-28

    Two innovative research studies are reported in this paper. One is the sorting of semiconducting carbon nanotubes and ink formulation by a novel semiconductor copolymer and second is the development of CMOS inverters using not the p-type and n-type transistors but a printed p-type transistor and a printed ambipolar transistor. A new semiconducting copolymer (named P-DPPb5T) was designed and synthesized with a special nonlinear structure and more condensed conjugation surfaces, which can separate large diameter semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes (sc-SWCNTs) from arc discharge SWCNTs according to their chiralities with high selectivity. With the sorted sc-SWCNTs ink, thin film transistors (TFTs) have been fabricated by aerosol jet printing. The TFTs displayed good uniformity, low operating voltage (±2 V) and subthreshold swing (SS) (122-161 mV dec(-1)), high effective mobility (up to 17.6-37.7 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1)) and high on/off ratio (10(4)-10(7)). With the printed TFTs, a CMOS inverter was constructed, which is based on the p-type TFT and ambipolar TFT instead of the conventional p-type and n-type TFTs. Compared with other recently reported inverters fabricated by printing, the printed CMOS inverters demonstrated a better noise margin (74% 1/2 Vdd) and was hysteresis free. The inverter has a voltage gain of up to 16 at an applied voltage of only 1 V and low static power consumption.

  16. Carbon nanotubes for supercapacitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Hui; Li, Jianyi; Feng, Yuanping

    2010-01-05

    As an electrical energy storage device, supercapacitor finds attractive applications in consumer electronic products and alternative power source due to its higher energy density, fast discharge/charge time, low level of heating, safety, long-term operation stability, and no disposable parts. This work reviews the recent development of supercapacitor based on carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and their composites. The purpose is to give a comprehensive understanding of the advantages and disadvantages of carbon nanotubes-related supercapacitor materials and to find ways for the improvement in the performance of supercapacitor. We first discussed the effects of physical and chemical properties of pure carbon nanotubes, including size, purity, defect, shape, functionalization, and annealing, on the supercapacitance. The composites, including CNTs/oxide and CNTs/polymer, were further discussed to enhance the supercapacitance and keep the stability of the supercapacitor by optimally engineering the composition, particle size, and coverage.

  17. Carbon Nanotubes for Supercapacitor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Jianyi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract As an electrical energy storage device, supercapacitor finds attractive applications in consumer electronic products and alternative power source due to its higher energy density, fast discharge/charge time, low level of heating, safety, long-term operation stability, and no disposable parts. This work reviews the recent development of supercapacitor based on carbon nanotubes (CNTs and their composites. The purpose is to give a comprehensive understanding of the advantages and disadvantages of carbon nanotubes-related supercapacitor materials and to find ways for the improvement in the performance of supercapacitor. We first discussed the effects of physical and chemical properties of pure carbon nanotubes, including size, purity, defect, shape, functionalization, and annealing, on the supercapacitance. The composites, including CNTs/oxide and CNTs/polymer, were further discussed to enhance the supercapacitance and keep the stability of the supercapacitor by optimally engineering the composition, particle size, and coverage.

  18. Dye-sensitized solar cells based on anatase TiO 2 hollow spheres/carbon nanotube composite films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jiaguo; Fan, Jiajie; Cheng, Bei

    Dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) based on anatase TiO 2 hollow spheres (TiO2HS)/multi-walled carbon nanotubes (CNT) nanocomposite films are prepared by a directly mechanical mixing and doctor blade method. The prepared samples are characterized by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, UV-vis absorption spectroscopy and N 2 adsorption-desorption isotherms. The photoelectric conversion performances of the DSSCs based on TiO2HS/CNT composite film electrodes are also compared with commercial-grade Degussa P25 TiO 2 nanoparticles (P25)/CNT composite solar cells at the same film thickness. The results indicate that the photoelectric conversion efficiencies (η) of the TiO2HS/CNT composite DSSCs are dependent on CNT loading in the electrodes. A small amount of CNT clearly enhances DSSC efficiency, while excessive CNT loading significantly lowers their performance. The former is because CNT enhance the transport of electrons from the films to FTO substrates. The latter is due to high CNT loading shielding the visible light from being adsorbed by dyes.

  19. The development of chloride ion selective polypyrrole thin film on a layer-by-layer carbon nanotube working electrode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Lynch, Jerome

    2011-04-01

    A chloride ion selective thin film sensor is proposed for measuring chloride ion concentration, which is an environmental parameter correlated to corrosion. In this work, electrochemical polymerization of Polypyrrole (PPy) doped with chloride ions was achieved on the top of a carbon nanotube (CNT) thin film as a working electrode in an electrochemical cell. The underlying CNT layer conjugated with doped PPy thin film can form a multifunctional "selfsensing" material platform for chloride ion detection in a concrete environment. The paper presents the first type of work using CNT and PPy as hybrid materials for chloride ion sensing. Electrochemical polymerization of PPy results in oxidation that yields an average of one positive charge distributed over four pyrrole units. This positive charge is compensated by negatively-charged chloride ions in the supporting electrolyte. In effect, the chloride ion-doped PPy has become molecularly imprinted with chloride ions thereby providing it with some degree of perm-selectivity for chloride ions. The detection limit of the fabricated chloride ion-doped PPy thin film can reach 10-8 M and selectivity coefficients are comparable to those in the literature. The reported work aims to lay a strong foundation for detecting chloride ion concentrations in the concrete environment.

  20. Wearable and sensitive heart-rate detectors based on PbS quantum dot and multiwalled carbon nanotube blend film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Liang; Dong, Dongdong; Qiao, Keke; Cheng, Yibing; Tang, Jiang, E-mail: jtang@mail.hust.edu.cn, E-mail: songhs-wnlo@mail.hust.edu.cn; Song, Haisheng, E-mail: jtang@mail.hust.edu.cn, E-mail: songhs-wnlo@mail.hust.edu.cn [Wuhan National Laboratory for Optoelectronics (WNLO), Huazhong University of Science and Technology, 1037 Luoyu Road, Wuhan, Hubei 430074 (China); He, Jungang; Li, Min; Liu, Huan [School of Optical and Electronic Information, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, 1037 Luoyu Road, Wuhan, Hubei 430074 (China); Cao, Furong [Air Force Early Warning Academy, Wuhan, Hubei 430019 (China)

    2014-10-13

    Wearable and sensitive photodetectors (PDs) have been demonstrated based on a blend film of PbS quantum dots (QDs) and QDs modified multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). Owing to the synergetic effect from high light sensitivity of PbS QDs and excellent conductive and mechanical properties of MWCNTs, the blend PDs show high sensitivity and flexibility performance: device responsivity and detectivity reach 583 mA/W and 3.25 × 10{sup 12 }Jones, respectively, and could stand large number (at least 10 000 cycles) and wide angle (up to 80°) bending. Furthermore, the wearable and sensitive PDs have been applied to measure the heart rate in both red and near infrared (NIR) ranges. The presented PDs are expected to work as sensor candidates in integrated electronic skin.

  1. Ion-modulated nonlinear electronic transport in carbon nanotube bundle/RbAg4I5 thin film composite nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jia-Lin; Zhang, Wei; Wei, Jinquan; Gu, Bingfu

    2014-01-01

    We have explored the ion-modulated electronic transport properties of mixed ionic-electronic conductor (MIEC) composite nanostructures made of superionic conductor RbAg4I5 films and carbon nanotube (CNT) bundle spiderwebs. Our experimental and theoretical studies indicate that the formation of ion-electron bound states (IEBSs) leads to strong ion-electron interference effect and interesting electronic transport of CNT, such as nonlinear current-voltage (I-V) characteristics and novel temperature dependence of the current. With increasing temperature, the hybrid nanostructures show rich phases with different dependence of current on temperature, which is related to the structural phase transition of RbAg4I5 and the transition of dissociation of IEBSs. The ion-modulation of the electric conductivity in such MIEC composite nanostructures with great tunability has been used to design new ionic-electronic composite nano-devices with function like field effect transistor.

  2. Fabrication of Au nanoparticle/double-walled carbon nanotube film/TiO2 nanotube array/Ti heterojunctions with low resistance state for broadband photodetectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yan; Zhang, Guowei; Dong, Zhanmin; Wei, Jinquan; Zhu, Jia-Lin; Sun, Jia-Lin

    2017-03-01

    A broadband photodetector based on Au nanoparticle/double-walled carbon nanotube film/TiO2 nanotube array /Ti multilayer heterojunction structures has been fabricated. A pre-electroforming process at a voltage bias of 35 V was used to switch the photodetector from a high resistance state to a low resistance state. At a voltage bias of 1 V under 532-nm laser illumination in air, the photoresponsivity of the device reached 15.41 mA W-1, which is enhanced by approximately 1.91 times when compared with that of device before deposition of Au nanoparticles. In addition, in a vacuum under a voltage bias of 1 V, the photoresponsivity of the device reached 23.29 mA W-1 and 6.85 mA W-1 at 532 nm and 1064 nm, respectively. The surface plasmon polaritons of the Au nanoparticles allowed extension of the sensitivity of the photosensitive regions into the mid-infrared range. The experimental results show that the device photoresponsivity reached 2.26 mA W-1 at a voltage bias of 1 V under 10.6-μm laser illumination in air.

  3. Light-Weight Free-Standing Carbon Nanotube-Silicon Films for Anodes of Lithium Ion Batteries

    KAUST Repository

    Cui, Li-Feng

    2010-07-27

    Silicon is an attractive alloy-type anode material because of its highest known capacity (4200 mAh/g). However, lithium insertion into and extraction from silicon are accompanied by a huge volume change, up to 300%, which induces a strong strain on silicon and causes pulverization and rapid capacity fading due to the loss of the electrical contact between part of silicon and current collector. Si nanostructures such as nanowires, which are chemically and electrically bonded to the current collector, can overcome the pulverization problem, however, the heavy metal current collectors in these systems are larger in weight than Si active material. Herein we report a novel anode structure free of heavy metal current collectors by integrating a flexible, conductive carbon nanotube (CNT) network into a Si anode. The composite film is free-standing and has a structure similar to the steel bar reinforced concrete, where the infiltrated CNT network functions as both mechanical support and electrical conductor and Si as a high capacity anode material for Li-ion battery. Such free-standing film has a low sheet resistance of ∼30 Ohm/sq. It shows a high specific charge storage capacity (∼2000 mAh/g) and a good cycling life, superior to pure sputtered-on silicon films with similar thicknesses. Scanning electron micrographs show that Si is still connected by the CNT network even when small breaking or cracks appear in the film after cycling. The film can also "ripple up" to release the strain of a large volume change during lithium intercalation. The conductive composite film can function as both anode active material and current collector. It offers ∼10 times improvement in specific capacity compared with widely used graphite/copper anode sheets. © 2010 American Chemical Society.

  4. Synthesis of polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS) functionalized carbon nanotubes for improved dispersion in polyurethane films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kou, Xiaonan

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) polymer nanocomposites are promising advanced materials. These materials exhibit the advantages of traditional polymeric materials, such as being light weight and easy to process, combined with the potential to exhibit enhanced mechanical, thermal and electrical properties compared to pure polymers. To achieve substantial improvement of composite properties at low CNT loading, uniform dispersion of CNTs in the polymer matrix and strong CNT-polymer interfacial interaction are needed. However, it is difficult to achieve adequate dispersion and interfacial interactions due to the inert nature of CNTs. In this project, polyhedral oligomeric silsequioxane (POSS) will be used as a dispersing agent for multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) in polyurethane (PU) matrices. This dissertation consists of six chapters. Chapter I provides a detailed introduction of the fundamental knowledge of CNTs, PU, and POSS. At the end of this chapter, the motivation and rationale of this research are given. Chapter II establishes the overall goal and specific objectives of this research. Chapter III describes the synthesis and characterization of three POSS modified CNTs and one organosilane modified CNT. Grafting efficiency of the different grafted molecules are calculated and compared. Chapter IV discusses the dispersion behavior of four covalently modified CNTs in both solvents and PU matrices. Differences in dispersion behaviors of the modified CNTs are correlated to the solubility parameters of the grafting molecules and the surface structures of modified CNTs. Chapter V provides further discussion of the dispersion of POSS and silane modified CNTs by reviewing the assessment of the physical properties of PU composites containing the modified CNTs. Morphological, thermal, mechanical and electrical properties are used to estimate the interactions of the modified CNTs with the PU matrix. Chapter VI explores the function of the trisilanolphenyl POSS lithium salt

  5. A comparative study of the field emission properties of aligned carbon nanostructures films, from carbon nanotubes to diamond

    OpenAIRE

    Le Normand, Francois; Cojocaru, Costel Sorin; Fleaca, Claudiu; Li, J. Q.; Vincent, Pascal; Pirio, Gilles; Gangloff, Laurent; Nedellec, Yanick; Legagneux, Pierre

    2007-01-01

    International audience; The electron field emission properties of different graphitic and diamond-like nanostructures films are compared. They are prepared in the same CVD chamber on SiO{2}/Si(100) and Si(100) flat surfaces, respectively. These nanostructures are thoroughly characterized by scanning electron emission (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES). Films of dense aligned carbon nan...

  6. Carbon nanotube filters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, A.; Srivastava, O. N.; Talapatra, S.; Vajtai, R.; Ajayan, P. M.

    2004-09-01

    Over the past decade of nanotube research, a variety of organized nanotube architectures have been fabricated using chemical vapour deposition. The idea of using nanotube structures in separation technology has been proposed, but building macroscopic structures that have controlled geometric shapes, density and dimensions for specific applications still remains a challenge. Here we report the fabrication of freestanding monolithic uniform macroscopic hollow cylinders having radially aligned carbon nanotube walls, with diameters and lengths up to several centimetres. These cylindrical membranes are used as filters to demonstrate their utility in two important settings: the elimination of multiple components of heavy hydrocarbons from petroleum-a crucial step in post-distillation of crude oil-with a single-step filtering process, and the filtration of bacterial contaminants such as Escherichia coli or the nanometre-sized poliovirus (~25 nm) from water. These macro filters can be cleaned for repeated filtration through ultrasonication and autoclaving. The exceptional thermal and mechanical stability of nanotubes, and the high surface area, ease and cost-effective fabrication of the nanotube membranes may allow them to compete with ceramic- and polymer-based separation membranes used commercially.

  7. Carbon nanotubes for microelectronics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Andrew P; Duesberg, Georg S; Seidel, Robert V; Liebau, Maik; Unger, Eugen; Pamler, Werner; Kreupl, Franz; Hoenlein, Wolfgang

    2005-04-01

    Despite all prophecies of its end, silicon-based microelectronics still follows Moore's Law and continues to develop rapidly. However, the inherent physical limits will eventually be reached. Carbon nanotubes offer the potential for further miniaturization as long as it is possible to selectively deposit them with defined properties.

  8. A flexible alkaline rechargeable Ni/Fe battery based on graphene foam/carbon nanotubes hybrid film.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jilei; Chen, Minghua; Zhang, Lili; Jiang, Jian; Yan, Jiaxu; Huang, Yizhong; Lin, Jianyi; Fan, Hong Jin; Shen, Ze Xiang

    2014-12-10

    The development of portable and wearable electronics has promoted increasing demand for high-performance power sources with high energy/power density, low cost, lightweight, as well as ultrathin and flexible features. Here, a new type of flexible Ni/Fe cell is designed and fabricated by employing Ni(OH)2 nanosheets and porous Fe2O3 nanorods grown on lightweight graphene foam (GF)/carbon nanotubes (CNTs) hybrid films as electrodes. The assembled f-Ni/Fe cells are able to deliver high energy/power densities (100.7 Wh/kg at 287 W/kg and 70.9 Wh/kg at 1.4 kW/kg, based on the total mass of active materials) and outstanding cycling stabilities (retention 89.1% after 1000 charge/discharge cycles). Benefiting from the use of ultralight and thin GF/CNTs hybrid films as current collectors, our f-Ni/Fe cell can exhibit a volumetric energy density of 16.6 Wh/l (based on the total volume of full cell), which is comparable to that of thin film battery and better than that of typical commercial supercapacitors. Moreover, the f-Ni/Fe cells can retain the electrochemical performance with repeated bendings. These features endow our f-Ni/Fe cells a highly promising candidate for next generation flexible energy storage systems.

  9. Flexible Transparent Films Based on Nanocomposite Networks of Polyaniline and Carbon Nanotubes for High-Performance Gas Sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Pengbo; Wen, Xuemei; Sun, Chaozheng; Chandran, Bevita K; Zhang, Han; Sun, Xiaoming; Chen, Xiaodong

    2015-10-28

    A flexible, transparent, chemical gas sensor is assembled from a transparent conducting film of carbon nanotube (CNT) networks that are coated with hierarchically nanostructured polyaniline (PANI) nanorods. The nanocomposite film is synthesized by in-situ, chemical oxidative polymerization of aniline in a functional multiwalled CNT (FMWCNT) suspension and is simultaneously deposited onto a flexible polyethylene terephthalate (PET) substrate. An as-prepared flexible transparent chemical gas sensor exhibits excellent transparency of 85.0% at 550 nm using the PANI/FMWCNT nanocomposite film prepared over a reaction time of 8 h. The sensor also shows good flexibility, without any obvious decrease in performance after 500 bending/extending cycles, demonstrating high-performance, portable gas sensing at room temperature. This superior performance could be attributed to the improved electron transport and collection due to the CNTs, resulting in reliable and efficient sensing, as well as the high surface-to-volume ratio of the hierarchically nanostructured composites. The excellent transparency, improved sensing performance, and superior flexibility of the device, may enable the integration of this simple, low-cost, gas sensor into handheld flexible transparent electronic circuitry and optoelectronic devices.

  10. Nanostructured multilayer thin films of multiwalled carbon nanotubes/gold nanoparticles/glutathione for the electrochemical detection of dopamine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Detsri, Ekarat; Rujipornsakul, Sirilak; Treetasayoot, Tanapong; Siriwattanamethanon, Pawarit

    2016-10-01

    In the present study, multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), gold nanoparticles (AuNPs), and glutathione (GSH) were used to fabricate multilayer nanoscale thin films. The composite thin films were fabricated by layer-by-layer technique as the films were constructed by the alternate deposition of cationic and anionic polyelectrolytes. The MWCNTs were modified via a noncovalent surface modification method using poly(diallydimethylammonium chloride) to form a cationic polyelectrolyte. An anionic polyelectrolyte was prepared by the chemical reduction of HAuCl4 using sodium citrate as both the stabilizing and reducing agent to form anionic AuNPs. GSH was used as an electrocatalyst toward the electro-oxidation of dopamine. The constructed composite electrode exhibits excellent electrocatalytic activity toward dopamine with a short response time and a wide linear range from 1 to 100 μmol/L. The limits of detection and quantitation of dopamine are (0.316 ± 0.081) μmol/L and (1.054 ± 0.081) μmol/L, respectively. The method is satisfactorily applied for the determination of dopamine in plasma and urine samples to obtain the recovery in the range from 97.90% to 105.00%.

  11. Study of optical properties of vacuum evaporated carbon nanotube containing Se80Te16Cu4 thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upadhyay, A. N.; Tiwari, R. S.; Singh, Kedar

    2016-08-01

    Thin films of Se80Te16Cu4 glassy alloy and 3 wt.% of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) containing Se80Te16Cu4 glassy composite were deposited on clean glass substrate by thermal evaporation technique. The scanning electron microscope and energy dispersive x-ray analysis were performed to investigate the surface morphology and elemental composition of as synthesised samples. The reflectance and transmittance spectra of as-deposited thin films were recorded (200-1100 nm) by using UV/VIS/NIR spectrophotometer. The optical band gap and optical constants such as absorption coefficient (α), refractive index (n) and extinction coefficient (k) of Se80Te16Cu4 and 3 wt.% CNTs-Se80Te16Cu4 glassy composite thin films were calculated. It is observed that optical properties alter due to CNTs incorporation in Se80Te16Cu4 glassy alloy. Effect on optical properties due to CNTs incorporation can be explained in terms of concentration of unsaturated bonds/defects in the localised states.

  12. Improved Bi Film Wrapped Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes for Ultrasensitive Electrochemical Detection of Trace Cr(VI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Shilin; Xue, Zi-Ling; Xu, Lina; Gu, Yingying; Miao, Yuqing

    2014-01-01

    We report here the successful fabrication of an improved Bi film wrapped single walled carbon nanotubes modified glassy carbon electrode (Bi/SWNTs/GCE) as a highly sensitive platform for ultratrace Cr(VI) detection through catalytic adsorptive cathodic stripping voltammetry (AdCSV). The introduction of negatively charged SWNTs extraordinarily decreased the size of Bi particles to nanoscale due to electrostatic interaction which made Bi(III) cations easily attracted onto the surface of SWNTs in good order, leading to higher quality of Bi film deposition. The obtained Bi/SWNTs composite was well characterized with electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), the static water contact angle and the voltammetric measurements. The results demonstrates the improvements in the quality of Bi film deposited on the surface of SWNTs such as faster speed of electron transfer, more uniform and smoother morphology, better hydrophilicity and higher stripping signal. Using diethylene triaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) as complexing ligand, the fabricated electrode displays a well-defined and highly sensitive peak for the reduction of Cr(III)-DTPA complex at −1.06 V (vs. Ag/AgCl) with a linear concentration range of 0–25 nM and a fairly low detection limit of 0.036 nM. No interference was found in the presence of coexisting ions, and good recoveries were achieved for the analysis of a river sample. In comparison to previous approaches using Bi film modified GCE, the newly designed electrode exhibits better reproducibility and repeatability towards aqueous detection of trace Cr(VI) and appears to be very promising as the basis of a highly sensitive and selective voltammetric procedure for Cr(VI) detection at trace level in real samples. PMID:24771881

  13. Improved Bi Film Wrapped Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes for Ultrasensitive Electrochemical Detection of Trace Cr(VI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, Ruizhuo; Zhang, Wangyao; Zhou, Shilin; Xue, Zi-Ling; Xu, Lina; Gu, Yingying; Miao, Yuqing

    2013-12-15

    We report here the successful fabrication of an improved Bi film wrapped single walled carbon nanotubes modified glassy carbon electrode (Bi/SWNTs/GCE) as a highly sensitive platform for ultratrace Cr(VI) detection through catalytic adsorptive cathodic stripping voltammetry (AdCSV). The introduction of negatively charged SWNTs extraordinarily decreased the size of Bi particles to nanoscale due to electrostatic interaction which made Bi(III) cations easily attracted onto the surface of SWNTs in good order, leading to higher quality of Bi film deposition. The obtained Bi/SWNTs composite was well characterized with electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), the static water contact angle and the voltammetric measurements. The results demonstrates the improvements in the quality of Bi film deposited on the surface of SWNTs such as faster speed of electron transfer, more uniform and smoother morphology, better hydrophilicity and higher stripping signal. Using diethylene triaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) as complexing ligand, the fabricated electrode displays a well-defined and highly sensitive peak for the reduction of Cr(III)-DTPA complex at -1.06 V (vs. Ag/AgCl) with a linear concentration range of 0-25 nM and a fairly low detection limit of 0.036 nM. No interference was found in the presence of coexisting ions, and good recoveries were achieved for the analysis of a river sample. In comparison to previous approaches using Bi film modified GCE, the newly designed electrode exhibits better reproducibility and repeatability towards aqueous detection of trace Cr(VI) and appears to be very promising as the basis of a highly sensitive and selective voltammetric procedure for Cr(VI) detection at trace level in real samples.

  14. Photoelectrochemical, photophysical and morphological studies of electrostatic layer-by-layer thin films based on poly(p-phenylenevinylene) and single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, L C P; Zucolotto, V; Domingues, R A; Atvars, T D Z; Nogueira, A F

    2011-11-01

    The preparation of multilayer films based on poly(p-phenylenevinylene) (PPV) and carboxylic-functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT-COOH) by electrostatic interaction using the layer-by-layer (LbL) deposition method is reported herein. The multilayer build-up, monitored by UV-Vis and photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopies, displayed a linear behavior with the number of PPV and SWNT-COOH layers deposited that undergo deviation and spectral changes for thicker films. Film morphology was evaluated by AFM and epifluorescence microscopies showing remarkable changes after incorporation of SWNT-COOH layers. Films without SWNT show roughness and present dispersed grains; films with SWNT-COOH layers are flatter and some carbon nanotube bundles can be visualized. The photoinduced charge transfer from the conducting polymer to SWNT-COOH was analyzed by PL quenching either by the decrease of the emission intensity or by the presence of dark domains in the epifluorescence micrographs. Photoelectrochemical characterization was performed under white light and the films containing SWNT-COOH displayed photocurrent values between 2.0 μA cm(-2) and 7.5 μA cm(-2), as the amount of these materials increases in the film. No photocurrent was observed for the film without carbon nanotubes. Photocurrent generation was enhanced and became more stable when an intermediate layer of PEDOT:PSS was interposed between the active layer and the ITO electrode, indicating an improvement in hole transfer to the contacts. Our results indicate that these multilayer films are promising candidates as active layers for organic photovoltaic cells.

  15. Stretchable and Flexible High-Strain Sensors Made Using Carbon Nanotubes and Graphite Films on Natural Rubber

    OpenAIRE

    Sreenivasulu Tadakaluru; Wiradej Thongsuwan; Pisith Singjai

    2014-01-01

    Conventional metallic strain sensors are flexible, but they can sustain maximum strains of only ∼5%, so there is a need for sensors that can bear high strains for multifunctional applications. In this study, we report stretchable and flexible high-strain sensors that consist of entangled and randomly distributed multiwall carbon nanotubes or graphite flakes on a natural rubber substrate. Carbon nanotubes/graphite flakes were sandwiched in natural rubber to produce these high-strain sensors. U...

  16. A comparison between powders and thin films of single-walled carbon nanotubes for the adsorption behaviors of phenylalanine and glycine by XANES study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    IBRAHIM; Kurash

    2010-01-01

    We have compared the adsorption behaviors between single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) powders and thin films with amino acids such as phenylalanine and glycine by using the X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy. On SWCNT powders very weak adsorption occurs as confirmed also by studies at high solution concentrations. The comparison of the adsorption behaviors with previous reports for thin films of SWCNTs shows that, due to their compact structure, thin films favor the adsorption of amino acids and represent themselves good candidate for a reliable evaluation of the interaction among amino acids and SWCNTs.

  17. The Toxicology of Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donaldson, Ken; Poland, Craig; Duffin, Rodger; Bonner, James

    2012-06-01

    1. Carbon nanotube structure, synthesis and applications C. Singh and W. Song; 2. The aerodynamic behaviour and pulmonary deposition of carbon nanotubes A. Buckley, R. Smith and R Maynard; 3. Utilising the concept of the biologically effective dose to define the particle and fibre hazards of carbon nanotubes K. Donaldson, R. Duffin, F. Murphy and C. Poland; 4. CNT, biopersistence and the fibre paradigm D. Warheit and M. DeLorme; 5. Length-dependent retention of fibres in the pleural space C. Poland, F. Murphy and K. Donaldson; 6. Experimental carcinogenicity of carbon nanotubes in the context of other fibres K. Unfried; 7. Fate and effects of carbon nanotubes following inhalation J. Ryman-Rasmussen, M. Andersen and J. Bonner; 8. Responses to pulmonary exposure to carbon nanotubes V. Castranova and R. Mercer; 9. Genotoxicity of carbon nanotubes R. Schins, C. Albrecht, K. Gerloff and D. van Berlo; 10. Carbon nanotube-cellular interactions; macrophages, epithelial and mesothelial cells V. Stone, M. Boyles, A. Kermanizadeh, J. Varet and H. Johnston; 11. Systemic health effects of carbon nanotubes following inhalation J. McDonald; 12. Dosimetry and metrology of carbon nanotubes L. Tran, L. MacCalman and R. Aitken; Index.

  18. Carbon Nanotube Purification and Functionalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebron, Marisabel; Mintz, Eric; Smalley, Richard E.; Meador, Michael A.

    2003-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes have the potential to significantly enhance the mechanical, thermal, and electrical properties of polymers. However, dispersion of carbon nanotubes in a polymer matrix is hindered by the electrostatic forces that cause them to agglomerate. Chemical modification of the nanotubes is necessary to minimize these electrostatic forces and promote adhesion between the nanotubes and the polymer matrix. In a collaborative research program between Clark Atlanta University, Rice University, and NASA Glenn Research Center several approaches are being explored to chemically modify carbon nanotubes. The results of this research will be presented.

  19. A Novel Electrochemical Sensor for Probing Doxepin Created on a Glassy Carbon Electrode Modified with Poly(4-Amino- benzoic Acid/Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes Composite Film

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji-Lie Kong

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available A novel electrochemical sensor for sensitive detection of doxepin was prepared, which was based on a glassy carbon electrode modified with poly(4-aminobenzoic acid/multi-walled carbon nanotubes composite film [poly(4-ABA/MWNTs/GCE]. The sensor was characterized by scanning electron microscopy and electrochemical methods. It was observed that poly(4-ABA/MWNTs/GCE showed excellent preconcentration function and electrocatalytic activities towards doxepin. Under the selected conditions, the anodic peak current was linear to the logarithm of doxepin concentration in the range from 1.0 ´ 10−9 to 1.0 ´ 10−6 M, and the detection limit obtained was 1.0 × 10−10 M. The poly(4-ABA/MWNTs/GCE was successfully applied in the measurement of doxepin in commercial pharmaceutical formulations, and the analytical accuracy was confirmed by comparison with a conventional ultraviolet spectrophotometry assay.

  20. An evaluation of chondrocyte morphology and gene expression on superhydrophilic vertically-aligned multi-walled carbon nanotube films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antonioli, Eliane, E-mail: eliane.antonioli@einstein.br [Research and Education Institute, Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Lobo, Anderson O., E-mail: aolobo@univap.br [Laboratory of Biomedical Nanotechnology, Universidade do Vale do Paraiba, Sao Jose dos Campos, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Ferretti, Mario, E-mail: ferretti@einstein.br [Research and Education Institute, Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Ortophedic Division, Federal University of Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Cohen, Moises, E-mail: m.cohen@uol.com.br [Research and Education Institute, Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Ortophedic Division, Federal University of Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Marciano, Fernanda R., E-mail: femarciano@uol.com.br [Laboratory of Biomedical Nanotechnology, Universidade do Vale do Paraiba, Sao Jose dos Campos, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Corat, Evaldo J., E-mail: corat@las.inpe.br [Laboratorio Associado de Sensores e Materiais, Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais, Sao Jose dos Campos, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Trava-Airoldi, Vladimir J., E-mail: vladimir@las.inpe.br [Laboratorio Associado de Sensores e Materiais, Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais, Sao Jose dos Campos, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2013-03-01

    Cartilage serves as a low-friction and wear-resistant articulating surface in diarthrodial joints and is also important during early stages of bone remodeling. Recently, regenerative cartilage research has focused on combinations of cells paired with scaffolds. Superhydrophilic vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (VACNTs) are of particular interest in regenerative medicine. The aim of this study is to evaluate cell expansion of human articular chondrocytes on superhydrophilic VACNTs, as well as their morphology and gene expression. VACNT films were produced using a microwave plasma chamber on Ti substrates and submitted to an O{sub 2} plasma treatment to make them superhydrophilic. Human chondrocytes were cultivated on superhydrophilic VACNTs up to five days. Quantitative RT-PCR was performed to measure type I and type II Collagen, Sox9, and Aggrecan mRNA expression levels. The morphology was analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and confocal microscopy. SEM images demonstrated that superhydrophilic VACNTs permit cell growth and adhesion of human chondrocytes. The chondrocytes had an elongated morphology with some prolongations. Chondrocytes cultivated on superhydrophilic VACNTs maintain the level expression of Aggrecan, Sox9, and Collagen II determined by qPCR. This study was the first to indicate that superhydrophilic VACNTs may be used as an efficient scaffold for cartilage or bone repair. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Chondrocytes were cultivated on Superhydrophilic Vertically Aligned Multiwall Carbon Nanotubes (VACNT). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We have shown a correlation between gene expression and thermodynamics aspects. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Superhydrhophilic VACNT will be an excellent substrate for cartilage and bone tissue regeneration.

  1. Temperature-responsive polymer/carbon nanotube hybrids: smart conductive nanocomposite films for modulating the bioelectrocatalysis of NADH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xin; Liu, Yang; Lu, Jin; Zhou, Jianhua; Li, Jinghong

    2012-03-19

    A temperature-sensitive polymer/carbon nanotube interface with switchable bioelectrocatalytic capability was fabricated by self-assembly of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)-grafted multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNT-g-PNIPAm) onto the PNIPAm-modified substrate. Electron microscopy and electrochemical measurements revealed that these fairly thick (>6 μm) and highly porous nanocomposite films exhibited high conductivity and electrocatalytic activity. The morphological transitions in both the tethered PNIPAm chains on a substrate and those polymers wrapping around the MWNT surface resulted in the opening, closing, or tuning of its permeability, and simultaneously an electron-transfer process took place through the channels formed in the nanostructure in response to temperature change. By combining the good electron-transfer and electrochemical catalysis capabilities, the large surface area, and good biocompatibility of MWNTs with the responsive features of PNIPAm, reversible temperature-controlled bioelectrocatalysis of 1,4-dihydro-β-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide with improved sensitivity has been demonstrated by cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurements. The mechanism behind this approach was studied by Raman spectroscopy, in situ attenuated total reflection FTIR spectroscopy, and contact angle measurements. The results also suggested that the synergetic or cooperative interactions of PNIPAm with MWNTs gave rise not only to an increase in surface wettability, but also to the enhancement of the interfacial thermoresponsive behavior. This bioelectrocatalytic "smart" system has potential applications in the design of biosensors and biofuel cells with externally controlled activity. Furthermore, this concept might be proposed for biomimetics, interfacial engineering, bioelectronic devices, and so forth.

  2. Production of carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Journet, C.; Bernier, P.

    Carbon nanostructures such as single-walled and multi-walled nanotubes (SWNTs and MWNTs) or graphitic polyhedral nanoparticles can be produced using various methods. Most of them are based on the sublimation of carbon under an inert atmosphere, such as the electric arc discharge process, the laser ablation method, or the solar technique. But chemical methods can also be used to synthesize these kinds of carbon materials: the catalytic decomposition of hydrocarbons, the production by electrolysis, the heat treatment of a polymer, the low temperature solid pyrolysis, or the in situ catalysis.

  3. New amperometric glucose biosensor by entrapping glucose oxidase into chitosan/nanoporous ZrO2/multiwalled carbon nanotubes nanocomposite film

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEI Wan-zhi; ZHAI Xiu-rong; ZENG Jin-xiang; GAO Yan-ping; GONG Shu-guo

    2007-01-01

    A new nanocomposite material for construction of glucose biosensor was prepared. The biosensor was formed by entrapping glucose oxidase(Gox) into chitosan/nanoporous ZrO2/multiwalled carbon nanotubes nanocomposite film.In this biosensing thin film.the multiwalled carbon nanotubes can effectively catalyze hydrogen peroxide and nanoporous ZrO2, can enhance the stability of the immobilized enzyme. The resulting biosensor provides a very effective matrix for the immobilization of glucose oxidase and exhibits a wide linear response range from 8 μmol/L to 3 mmol/L with a correlation coefficient of 0.994 for the detection of glucose.And the response time and detection limit of the biosensor are determined to be 6 S and 3.5 μmaol/L.respectively. Another attractive characteristic is that the biosensor is inexpensive. stable and reliable.

  4. High performance nanocomposite thin film transistors with bilayer carbon nanotube-polythiophene active channel by ink-jet printing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Gen-Wen; Li, Flora M.; Beecher, Paul; Nathan, Arokia; Wu, Yiliang; Ong, Beng S.; Milne, William I.

    2009-12-01

    Nanocomposite thin film transistors (TFTs) based on nonpercolating networks of single-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and polythiophene semiconductor [poly[5,5'-bis(3-dodecyl-2-thienyl)-2,2'-bithiophene] (PQT-12)] thin film hosts are demonstrated by ink-jet printing. A systematic study on the effect of CNT loading on the transistor performance and channel morphology is conducted. With an appropriate loading of CNTs into the active channel, ink-jet printed composite transistors show an effective hole mobility of 0.23 cm2 V-1 s-1, which is an enhancement of more than a factor of 7 over ink-jet printed pristine PQT-12 TFTs. In addition, these devices display reasonable on/off current ratio of 105-106, low off currents of the order of 10 pA, and a sharp subthreshold slope (polythiophene polymers and nonpercolating CNTs, where the CNT density in the bilayer structure substantially influences the morphology and transistor performance of polythiophene. Therefore, optimized loading of ink-jet printed CNTs is crucial to achieve device performance enhancement. High performance ink-jet printed nanocomposite TFTs can present a promising alternative to organic TFTs in printed electronic applications, including displays, sensors, radio-frequency identification (RFID) tags, and disposable electronics.

  5. Wiring-up carbon single wall nanotubes to polycrystalline inorganic semiconductor thin films: low-barrier, copper-free back contact to CdTe solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Adam B; Khanal, Rajendra R; Song, Zhaoning; Zartman, Rosa M; DeWitt, Jonathan L; Stone, Jon M; Roland, Paul J; Plotnikov, Victor V; Carter, Chad W; Stayancho, John M; Ellingson, Randall J; Compaan, Alvin D; Heben, Michael J

    2013-11-13

    We have discovered that films of carbon single wall nanotubes (SWNTs) make excellent back contacts to CdTe devices without any modification to the CdTe surface. Efficiencies of SWNT-contacted devices are slightly higher than otherwise identical devices formed with standard Au/Cu back contacts. The SWNT layer is thermally stable and easily applied with a spray process, and SWNT-contacted devices show no signs of degradation during accelerated life testing.

  6. Carbon Nanotube Thermoelectric Coolers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-02-06

    conductance. Inside thecentral section of the carbon nanotube, we obtained an impressive Peltier cooling 57 K down from the liquid nitrogentemperature. 15... trapped charges or dipoles) that occur either at the interface between the CNT and the gate dielectric (interface defects) or at some position within... liquid nitrogen temperature 77T  K up to hot 134 8T  K, or decreases from 77T  K down to about cold 20 6T  K, thus evidencing a strong

  7. Carbon nanotube biosensors

    OpenAIRE

    Tîlmaciu, Carmen-Mihaela; Morris, May C

    2015-01-01

    Nanomaterials possess unique features which make them particularly attractive for biosensing applications. In particular, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) can serve as scaffolds for immobilization of biomolecules at their surface, and combine several exceptional physical, chemical, electrical, and optical characteristics properties which make them one of the best suited materials for the transduction of signals associated with the recognition of analytes, metabolites, or disease biomarkers. Here we pr...

  8. Amperometric bienzyme glucose biosensor based on carbon nanotube modified electrode with electropolymerized poly(toluidine blue O) film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Wenju [Department of Chemistry, Hong Kong Baptist University, Kowloon Tong (Hong Kong); Wang Fang [Department of Chemistry, Hong Kong Baptist University, Kowloon Tong (Hong Kong)] [Department of Chemistry, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Yao Yanli [Department of Chemistry, Hong Kong Baptist University, Kowloon Tong (Hong Kong); Hu Shengshui [Department of Chemistry, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Shiu, Kwok-Keung, E-mail: kkshiu@hkbu.edu.h [Department of Chemistry, Hong Kong Baptist University, Kowloon Tong (Hong Kong)

    2010-09-30

    The amperometric bienzyme glucose biosensor utilizing horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and glucose oxidase (GOx) immobilized in poly(toluidine blue O) (PTBO) film was constructed on multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWNT) modified glassy carbon electrode. The HRP layer could be used to analyze hydrogen peroxide with toluidine blue O (TBO) mediators, while the bienzyme system (HRP + GOx) could be utilized for glucose determination. Glucose underwent biocatalytic oxidation by GOx in the presence of oxygen to yield H{sub 2}O{sub 2} which was further reduced by HRP at the MWNT-modified electrode with TBO mediators. In the absence of oxygen, glucose oxidation proceeded with electron transfer between GOx and the electrode mediated by TBO moieties without H{sub 2}O{sub 2} production. The bienzyme electrode offered high sensitivity for amperometric determination of glucose at low potential, displaying Michaelis-Menten kinetics. The bienzyme glucose biosensor displayed linear response from 0.1 to 1.2 mM with a sensitivity of 113 mA M{sup -1} cm{sup -2} at an applied potential of -0.10 V in air-saturated electrolytes.

  9. From Carbon Nanotube Crystals to Carbon Nanotube Flowers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Zhengjun; ZHAO Ye; ZHOU Ya

    2005-01-01

    We have investigated the very initial deposition stages of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) with ferrocene (Fe(C5H5)2) and xylene (C8H10) for growing carbon nanotubes, and made clear that the mechanism for the self-organization behaviors of nanotubes at different growth stages by this approach. For instance, the organization of nanotubes into flower-like structures at prolonged deposition is developed from the crystal-like structures formed at early growth stages, both of which are closely related to and determined by the very initial deposition stages of this CVD approach. Based on this approach, ways have been established to build up different architectures of carbon nanotubes, by controlling the initial deposition stages of the CVD process, with which we have realized the selective growth of self-organized carbon nanotube structures. This study provides a new idea for growing carbon nanotube architectures by CVD.

  10. Carbon Nanotubes Based Quantum Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jian-Ping

    1999-01-01

    This document represents the final report for the NASA cooperative agreement which studied the application of carbon nanotubes. The accomplishments are reviewed: (1) Wrote a review article on carbon nanotubes and its potentials for applications in nanoscale quantum devices. (2) Extensive studies on the effects of structure deformation on nanotube electronic structure and energy band gaps. (3) Calculated the vibrational spectrum of nanotube rope and the effect of pressure. and (4) Investigate the properties of Li intercalated nanotube ropes and explore their potential for energy storage materials and battery applications. These studies have lead to four publications and seven abstracts in international conferences.

  11. Membraneless glucose/oxygen enzymatic fuel cells using redox hydrogel films containing carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacAodha, Domhnall; Ó Conghaile, Peter; Egan, Brenda; Kavanagh, Paul; Leech, Dónal

    2013-07-22

    Co-immobilisation of three separate multiple blue copper oxygenases, a Myceliophthora thermophila laccase, a Streptomyces coelicolor laccase and a Myrothecium verrucaria bilirubin oxidase, with an [Os(2,2'-bipyridine)2 (polyvinylimidazole)10Cl](+/2+) redox polymer in the presence of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) on graphite electrodes results in enzyme electrodes that produce current densities above 0.5 mA cm(-2) for oxygen reduction at an applied potential of 0 V versus Ag/AgCl. Fully enzymatic membraneless fuel cells are assembled with the oxygen-reducing enzyme electrodes connected to glucose-oxidising anodes based on co-immobilisation of glucose oxidase or a flavin adenine dinucleotide-dependent glucose dehydrogenase with an [Os(4,4'-dimethyl-2,2'-bipyridine)2(polyvinylimidazole)10Cl](+/2+) redox polymer in the presence of MWCNTs on graphite electrodes. These fuel cells can produce power densities of up to 145 μW cm(-2) on operation in pH 7.4 phosphate buffer solution at 37 °C containing 150 mM NaCl, 5 mM glucose and 0.12 mM O2. The fuel cells based on Myceliophthora thermophila laccase enzyme electrodes produce the highest power density if combined with glucose oxidase-based anodes. Although the maximum power density of a fuel cell of glucose dehydrogenase and Myceliophthora thermophila laccase enzyme electrodes decreases from 110 μW cm(-2) in buffer to 60 μW cm(-2) on testing in artificial plasma, it provides the highest power output reported to date for a fully enzymatic glucose-oxidising, oxygen-reducing fuel cell in artificial plasma.

  12. Fabrication of highly conductive and transparent thin films from single-walled carbon nanotubes using a new non-ionic surfactant via spin coating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Jea Woong; Jung, Jae Woong; Lee, Jea Uk; Jo, Won Ho

    2010-09-28

    Oligothiophene-terminated poly(ethylene glycol) was synthesized and used as a non-ionic and amphiphilic surfactant for fabricating high-quality single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) films by a simple spin coating method. The absence of charge repulsion between SWCNT/surfactant complexes successfully leads to formation of a dense network of SWCNTs on the substrate through a single deposition of spin coating. When the SWCNT film was treated with nitric acid and thionyl chloride after washed with dichloromethane and water, a high-performance SWCNT film with the sheet resistance of 59 ohm/sq and the transparency of 71% at 550 nm was successfully obtained. Since the SWCNT film exhibits a high value of σ(dc)/σ(ac) (∼17) and excellent dimensional stability after releasing from the substrate, the film can be used as a transparent electrode in flexible optoelectronic devices.

  13. Growth of a single-wall carbon nanotube film and its patterning as an n-type field effect transistor device using an integrated circuit compatible process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiau, S H; Gau, C [Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, and Center for Micro/Nano Science and Technology, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan (China); Liu, C W; Dai, B T [National Nano Device Laboratories, No. 27, Nanke 3rd Road, Science-based Industrial Park, Hsin-shi, Tainan, Taiwan (China)], E-mail: gauc@mail.ncku.edu.tw

    2008-03-12

    This study presents the synthesis of a dense single-wall carbon nanotube (SWNT) network on a silicon substrate using alcohol as the source gas. The nanosize catalysts required are made by the reduction of metal compounds in ethanol. The key point in spreading the nanoparticles on the substrate, so that the SWNT network can be grown over the entire wafer, is making the substrate surface hydrophilic. This SWNT network is so dense that it can be treated like a thin film. Methods of patterning this SWNT film with integrated circuit compatible processes are presented and discussed for the first time in the literature. Finally, fabrication and characteristic measurements of a field effect transistor (FET) using this SWNT film are also demonstrated. This FET is shown to have better electronic properties than any other kind of thin film transistor. This thin film with good electronic properties can be readily applied in the processing of many other SWNT electronic devices.

  14. Anticorrosion Coating of Carbon Nanotube/Polytetrafluoroethylene Composite Film on the Stainless Steel Bipolar Plate for Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshiyuki Show

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Composite film of carbon nanotube (CNT and polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE was formed from dispersion fluids of CNT and PTFE. The composite film showed high electrical conductivity in the range of 0.1–13 S/cm and hydrophobic nature. This composite film was applied to stainless steel (SS bipolar plates of the proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC as anticorrosion film. This coating decreased the contact resistance between the surface of the bipolar plate and the membrane electrode assembly (MEA of the PEMFC. The output power of the fuel cell is increased by 1.6 times because the decrease in the contact resistance decreases the series resistance of the PEMFC. Moreover, the coating of this composite film protects the bipolar plate from the surface corrosion.

  15. The fabrication of vertically aligned and periodically distributed carbon nanotube bundles and periodically porous carbon nanotube films through a combination of laser interference ablation and metal-catalyzed chemical vapor deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Dajun; Lin, Wei; Guo, Rui; Wong, C P; Das, Suman

    2012-06-01

    Scalable fabrication of carbon nanotube (CNT) bundles is essential to future advances in several applications. Here, we report on the development of a simple, two-step method for fabricating vertically aligned and periodically distributed CNT bundles and periodically porous CNT films at the sub-micron scale. The method involves laser interference ablation (LIA) of an iron film followed by CNT growth via iron-catalyzed chemical vapor deposition. CNT bundles with square widths ranging from 0.5 to 1.5 µm in width, and 50-200 µm in length, are grown atop the patterned catalyst over areas spanning 8 cm(2). The CNT bundles exhibit a high degree of control over square width, orientation, uniformity, and periodicity. This simple scalable method of producing well-placed and oriented CNT bundles demonstrates a high application potential for wafer-scale integration of CNT structures into various device applications, including IC interconnects, field emitters, sensors, batteries, and optoelectronics, etc.

  16. Characteristics of a novel calix[8]arene modified with carbon nanotubes thin films for metal cations detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Supian, Faridah Lisa; Bakar, Suriani Abu; Azahari, Noor Azyyati; Richardson, Tim H.

    2013-05-01

    This study focuses on the properties of a novel calix[8]arene that have been modified with carbon nanotubes (CNT) as ion sensor application. Calix[8]arene modified with carbon nanotubes were done by mixing CNT (Calix8A-CNT) with a novel calix[8]arene in a long ultrasonication process. This study is interesting due to the process on the attaching of the functionalization of the calixarene on the carbon nanotubes outer wall. Morphological and spectroscopic studies of Calix8A-CNT were done using Π-A isotherm, Surface Potential Probe (S-Pot), Field mission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and Raman spectroscopy in order to understand the behavior in the molecular level. This water-soluble supramolecular hybrid materials have potential as metal cations detection and nanoelectronics applications, yet the CNT provide the thermal stability to the polymers.

  17. Lithium interaction with carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nalimova, V.A. [Moskovskij Gosudarstvennyj Univ., Moscow (Russian Federation). Khimicheskij Fakul`tet; Sklovsky, D.E. [Moskovskij Gosudarstvennyj Univ., Moscow (Russian Federation). Khimicheskij Fakul`tet; Bondarenko, G.N. [Topcheiv Institute of Petrochemical Synthesis, Leninsky Prospekt, 29, Moscow (Russian Federation); Alvergnat-Gaucher, H. [CRMD, CNRS, Universite d`Orleans, 1B rue de la Ferollerie, 45071, Orleans Cedex 02 (France); Bonnamy, S. [CRMD, CNRS, Universite d`Orleans, 1B rue de la Ferollerie, 45071, Orleans Cedex 02 (France); Beguin, F. [CRMD, CNRS, Universite d`Orleans, 1B rue de la Ferollerie, 45071, Orleans Cedex 02 (France)

    1997-05-01

    Lithium interaction with catalytic carbon nanotubes under high-pressure conditions was studied. A large amount of Li (2Li/C) reacted with the carbon nanotubes forming an intercalation compound (I{sub c}{proportional_to}4.1 A) which follows from X-ray diffraction and IR spectroscopy data. We cannot exclude also the possibility of insertion of a part of Li into the channel of the nanotubes. (orig.)

  18. Carbon nanotube Archimedes screws.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oroszlány, László; Zólyomi, Viktor; Lambert, Colin J

    2010-12-28

    Recently, nanomechanical devices composed of a long stationary inner carbon nanotube and a shorter, slowly rotating outer tube have been fabricated. In this paper, we study the possibility of using such devices as nanoscale transducers of motion into electricity. When the outer tube is chiral, we show that such devices act like quantum Archimedes screws, which utilize mechanical energy to pump electrons between reservoirs. We calculate the pumped charge from one end of the inner tube to the other, driven by the rotation of a chiral outer nanotube. We show that the pumped charge can be greater than one electron per 360° rotation, and consequently, such a device operating with a rotational frequency of 10 MHz, for example, would deliver a current of ≈1 pAmp.

  19. Simultaneous determination of nitrophenol isomers at the single-wall carbon nanotube compound conducting polymer film modified electrode

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Hui; WANG Zhenhui; ZHOU Shuping

    2005-01-01

    Based on the molecular recognition ability of conductive polymer and the peculiar properties of carbon nanotubes, a novel single wall nanotubes (SWNTs) compound poly(4- aminopyridine) modified electrode (SWNTs/POAPE) is prepared at glass carbon electrode (GCE). The electrochemistry response of nitrophenol isomers is studied at the SWNTs/POAPE. The result indicates that o-, m- and p-nitrophenol are separated entirely at the SWNTs/POAPE interface. The electrode present here can be easily used to determine nitrophenol isomers simultaneously with higher sensitivity.

  20. Influence of the diameter of single-walled carbon nanotube bundles on the optoelectronic performance of dry-deposited thin films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustonen, Kimmo; Susi, Toma; Kaskela, Antti; Laiho, Patrik; Tian, Ying; Nasibulin, Albert G; Kauppinen, Esko I

    2012-01-01

    The optoelectronic performance of thin films of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) was studied with respect to the properties of both individual nanotubes and their bundles. The SWCNTs were synthesized in a hot wire generator aerosol reactor, collected by gas filtration and dry-transferred onto various substrates. By thus completely avoiding liquid dispersion steps, we were able to avoid any artifacts from residual surfactants or sonication. We found that bundle lengths determined the thin-film performance, as would be expected for highly resistive bundle-bundle junctions. However, we found no evidence that contact resistances were affected by the bundle diameters, although they did play a secondary role by simply affecting the absorption. The individual SWCNT diameters and their graphitization level as gauged by the Raman D band intensity did not show any clear correlation with the overall performance.

  1. Influence of the diameter of single-walled carbon nanotube bundles on the optoelectronic performance of dry-deposited thin films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimmo Mustonen

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The optoelectronic performance of thin films of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs was studied with respect to the properties of both individual nanotubes and their bundles. The SWCNTs were synthesized in a hot wire generator aerosol reactor, collected by gas filtration and dry-transferred onto various substrates. By thus completely avoiding liquid dispersion steps, we were able to avoid any artifacts from residual surfactants or sonication. We found that bundle lengths determined the thin-film performance, as would be expected for highly resistive bundle–bundle junctions. However, we found no evidence that contact resistances were affected by the bundle diameters, although they did play a secondary role by simply affecting the absorption. The individual SWCNT diameters and their graphitization level as gauged by the Raman D band intensity did not show any clear correlation with the overall performance.

  2. Encapsulate-and-peel: fabricating carbon nanotube CMOS integrated circuits in a flexible ultra-thin plastic film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Pingqi; Zhang, Qing

    2014-02-01

    Fabrication of single-walled carbon nanotube thin film (SWNT-TF) based integrated circuits (ICs) on soft substrates has been challenging due to several processing-related obstacles, such as printed/transferred SWNT-TF pattern and electrode alignment, electrical pad/channel material/dielectric layer flatness, adherence of the circuits onto the soft substrates etc. Here, we report a new approach that circumvents these challenges by encapsulating pre-formed SWNT-TF-ICs on hard substrates into polyimide (PI) and peeling them off to form flexible ICs on a large scale. The flexible SWNT-TF-ICs show promising performance comparable to those circuits formed on hard substrates. The flexible p- and n-type SWNT-TF transistors have an average mobility of around 60 cm2 V-1 s-1, a subthreshold slope as low as 150 mV dec-1, operating gate voltages less than 2 V, on/off ratios larger than 104 and a switching speed of several kilohertz. The post-transfer technique described here is not only a simple and cost-effective pathway to realize scalable flexible ICs, but also a feasible method to fabricate flexible displays, sensors and solar cells etc.

  3. Preparation of electrochemically reduced graphene oxide/multi-wall carbon nanotubes hybrid film modified electrode, and its application to amperometric sensing of rutin

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Uling Yang; Gang Li; Meifang Hu; Lingbo Qu

    2014-07-01

    Through a facile electrochemical method, we prepared an electrochemically reduced graphene oxide (ERGO)/multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) hybrid film modified glassy carbon electrode (GCE), and characterized it by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and x-ray diffraction (XRD) The experimental results demonstrated that ERGO-MWNTs/GCE exhibited excellent electrocatalytic activity toward rutin as evidenced by the significant enhancement of redox peak currents in comparison with a bare GCE, ERGO/GCE and MWNTs/GCE. This method has been applied for the direct determination of rutin in real samples with satisfactory results.

  4. Determination of Dopamine in the Presence of Ascorbic Acid by Nafion and Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Film Modified on Carbon Fiber Microelectrode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haesang Jeong

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Carbon fiber microelectrode (CFME modified by Nafion and single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs was studied by voltammetric methods in phosphate buffer saline (PBS solution at pH 7.4. The Nafion-SWNTs/CFME modified microelectrode exhibited strongly enhanced voltammetric sensitivity and selectivity towards dopamine (DA determination in the presence of ascorbic acid (AA. Nafion-SWNTs film accelerated the electron transfer reaction of DA, but Nafion film as a negatively charged polymer restrained the electrochemical response of AA. Voltammetric techniques separated the anodic peaks of DA and AA, and the interference from AA was effectively excluded from DA determination. Linear calibration plots were obtained in the DA concentration range of 10 nM - 10 μM and the detection limit of the anodic current was determined to be 5 nM at a signal-to-noise ratio of 3. The study results demonstrate that DA can be determined without any interference from AA at the modified microelectrode, thereby increasing the sensitivity, selectivity, and reproducibility and stability.

  5. Carbon Nanotubes and Modern Nanoagriculture

    KAUST Repository

    Bayoumi, Maged Fouad

    2015-01-27

    Since their discovery, carbon nanotubes have been prominent members of the nanomaterial family. Owing to their extraordinary physical, chemical, and mechanical properties, carbon nanotubes have been proven to be a useful tool in the field of plant science. They were frequently perceived to bring about valuable biotechnological and agricultural applications that still remain beyond experimental realization. An increasing number of studies have demonstrated the ability of carbon nanotubes to traverse different plant cell barriers. These studies, also, assessed the toxicity and environmental impacts of these nanomaterials. The knowledge provided by these studies is of practical and fundamental importance for diverse applications including intracellular labeling and imaging, genetic transformation, and for enhancing our knowledge of plant cell biology. Although different types of nanoparticles have been found to activate physiological processes in plants, carbon nanotubes received particular interest. Following addition to germination medium, carbon nanotubes enhanced root growth and elongation of some plants such as onion, cucumber and rye-grass. They, also, modulated the expression of some genes that are essential for cell division and plant development. In addition, multi-walled carbon nanotubes were evidenced to penetrate thick seed coats, stimulate germination, and to enhance growth of young tomato seedlings. Multi-walled carbon nanotubes can penetrate deeply into the root system and further distribute into the leaves and the fruits. In recent studies, carbon nanotubes were reported to be chemically entrapped into the structure of plant tracheary elements. This should activate studies in the fields of plant defense and wood engineering. Although, all of these effects on plant physiology and plant developmental biology have not been fully understood, the valuable findings promises more research activity in the near future toward complete scientific understanding of

  6. Enhancement of Natural Convection by Carbon Nanotube Films Covered Microchannel-Surface for Passive Electronic Cooling Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guang; Jiang, Shaohui; Yao, Wei; Liu, Changhong

    2016-11-16

    Owing to the outstanding properties of thermal conduction, lightweight, and chemical durability, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have revealed promising applications in thermal management materials. Meanwhile, the increasingly popular portable electronics and the rapid development of space technology need lighter weight, smaller size, and more effective thermal management devices. Here, a novel kind of heat dissipation devices based on the superaligned CNT films and underlying microchannels is proposed, and the heat dissipation properties are measured at the natural condition. Distinctive from previous studies, by combining the advantages of microchannels and CNTs, such a novel heat dissipation device enables superior natural convection heat transfer properties. Our findings prove that the novel CNT-based devices could show an 86.6% larger total natural heat dissipation properties than bare copper plate. Further calculations of the radiation and natural convection heat transfer properties demonstrate that the excellent passive cooling properties of these CNT-based devices are primarily caused by the reinforcement of the natural convection heat transfer properties. Furthermore, the heat dissipation mechanisms are briefly discussed, and we propose that the very high heat transfer coefficients and the porous structures of superaligned CNT films play critical roles in reinforcing the natural convection. The novel CNT-based heat dissipation devices also have advantages of energy-saving, free-noise, and without additional accessories. So we believe that the CNT-based heat dissipation devices would replace the traditional metal-finned heat dissipation devices and have promising applications in electronic devices, such as photovoltaic devices, portable electronic devices, and electronic displays.

  7. The effect of annealing temperature on electrical and optical properties of transparent and conductive thin films fabicated of multi-walled carbon nanotube/Ag nanowires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A zilaee

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Transparent and conductive thin films of multi-walled carbon nanotube/ Ag nanowires were fabricated using spin coating technique. In order to improve the electrical conductivity and the optical properties, the layers were annealed from room temperature to 350 °C for 30 minutes. The measurements revealed that annealing caused electrical conductivity of fabricated thin layes to be improved. The optimum annealing temperature for improving these properties was deduced 285 °C. For all different film thicknesses from about 89 to 183 nm it was observed that the presence of nanowires has improved the film’s electrical conductivity in all tempretures. The best ratio of DC conductivity to optical conductivity of the films, which is accounted as films figure of merit, was measured at 285 °C for all Ag percentages. Sheet resistance and optical transmittance were measured by four-point probe technique and UV-Vis spectrophotometer, respectively

  8. Dielectric behavior of a flexible three-phase polyimide/BaTiO3/multi-walled carbon nanotube composite film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Junli; Qi, Shengli; Sun, Yiyi; Tian, Guofeng; Wu, Dezhen

    2016-11-01

    A three-phase composite film was produced by inserting multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and BaTiO3 nanoparticles into polyimide (PI). The combination of in-situ polymerization and water-based preparation involved in the experiment ensured fillers’ homogeneous dispersion in the matrix, which led to flexible shape of the composite films. The dielectric properties of composite films as a function of the frequency and the volume fraction of MWCNTs were studied. Such composite film displayed a high dielectric constant (314.07), low dielectric loss and excellent flexibility at 100Hz in the neighborhood of percolation threshold (9.02 vol%) owing to the special microcapacitor structure. The experimental results were highly consistent with the power law of percolation theory.

  9. Carbon Nanotubes for Space Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyyappan, Meyya

    2000-01-01

    The potential of nanotube technology for NASA missions is significant and is properly recognized by NASA management. Ames has done much pioneering research in the last five years on carbon nanotube growth, characterization, atomic force microscopy, sensor development and computational nanotechnology. NASA Johnson Space Center has focused on laser ablation production of nanotubes and composites development. These in-house efforts, along with strategic collaboration with academia and industry, are geared towards meeting the agency's mission requirements. This viewgraph presentation (including an explanation for each slide) outlines the research focus for Ames nanotechnology, including details on carbon nanotubes' properties, applications, and synthesis.

  10. Electrochemical determination of dopamine in the presence of ascorbic acid based on the gold nanorods/carbon nanotubes composite film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng Chunyan, E-mail: dengchunyan81@126.com [Key Laboratory of Resources Chemistry of Nonferrous Metals, Central South University, Changsha, 410083 (China); Chen Jinzhuo; Yang Minghui [Key Laboratory of Resources Chemistry of Nonferrous Metals, Central South University, Changsha, 410083 (China); Nie Zhou [State Key Laboratory of Chemo/Biosensing and Chemometrics, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Si Shihui [Key Laboratory of Resources Chemistry of Nonferrous Metals, Central South University, Changsha, 410083 (China)

    2011-10-01

    Highlights: > The GNR/CNT/GC electrode was fabricated simply. It has higher catalytic activity towards the oxidation of DA and ascorbic acid (AA). The selective determination of DA was carried out with low detection limit (0.8 nM, S/N = 3). The proposed method was feasible to detect the concentration of DA in human blood serum. - Abstract: In this paper, the gold nanorods (GNRs)/multiwalled carbon nanotubes (CNT) composite film-modified glassy carbon (GC) electrode was fabricated simply by the electrostatic interaction between the positively charged GNRs and the negatively charged CNT. And the GNRs/CNT/GC electrode was used for the selective and sensitive determination of dopamine (DA) in the presence of ascorbic acid (AA). It was found that the GNRs/CNT/GC electrode had higher catalytic activity towards the oxidation of DA and ascorbic acid (AA) comparing with the bare GC and CNT/GC electrodes. It may be due to the synergic effect of GNRs and CNT, because the surface area of the GNRs/CNT/GC electrode increased, the edge plan sites presented on the CNT surface can improve the electron transfer between the modified electrode and DA, and the rod-shaped gold may be served as the mediator for the oxidation of dopamine and provided the electrocatalytic ability. Moreover, the voltammetric peaks of AA and DA were separated enough at the GNRs/CNT/GC electrode, which was sufficiently enough for the selective determination of DA. Thus, the selective determination of DA was carried out with low detection limit (0.8 nM, S/N = 3). Also it was obtained that the proposed method was feasible to detect the concentration of DA in human blood serum. Therefore, it can be concluded that the GNRs/CNT modified electrode may be advantageous for the DA determination.

  11. Density controlled carbon nanotube array electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Zhifeng F.; Tu, Yi

    2008-12-16

    CNT materials comprising aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with pre-determined site densities, catalyst substrate materials for obtaining them and methods for forming aligned CNTs with controllable densities on such catalyst substrate materials are described. The fabrication of films comprising site-density controlled vertically aligned CNT arrays of the invention with variable field emission characteristics, whereby the field emission properties of the films are controlled by independently varying the length of CNTs in the aligned array within the film or by independently varying inter-tubule spacing of the CNTs within the array (site density) are disclosed. The fabrication of microelectrode arrays (MEAs) formed utilizing the carbon nanotube material of the invention is also described.

  12. Integrated fast assembly of free-standing lithium titanate/carbon nanotube/cellulose nanofiber hybrid network film as flexible paper-electrode for lithium-ion batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Shaomei; Feng, Xin; Song, Yuanyuan; Xue, Xin; Liu, Hongjiang; Miao, Miao; Fang, Jianhui; Shi, Liyi

    2015-05-27

    A free-standing lithium titanate (Li4Ti5O12)/carbon nanotube/cellulose nanofiber hybrid network film is successfully assembled by using a pressure-controlled aqueous extrusion process, which is highly efficient and easily to scale up from the perspective of disposable and recyclable device production. This hybrid network film used as a lithium-ion battery (LIB) electrode has a dual-layer structure consisting of Li4Ti5O12/carbon nanotube/cellulose nanofiber composites (hereinafter referred to as LTO/CNT/CNF), and carbon nanotube/cellulose nanofiber composites (hereinafter referred to as CNT/CNF). In the heterogeneous fibrous network of the hybrid film, CNF serves simultaneously as building skeleton and a biosourced binder, which substitutes traditional toxic solvents and synthetic polymer binders. Of importance here is that the CNT/CNF layer is used as a lightweight current collector to replace traditional heavy metal foils, which therefore reduces the total mass of the electrode while keeping the same areal loading of active materials. The free-standing network film with high flexibility is easy to handle, and has extremely good conductivity, up to 15.0 S cm(-1). The flexible paper-electrode for LIBs shows very good high rate cycling performance, and the specific charge/discharge capacity values are up to 142 mAh g(-1) even at a current rate of 10 C. On the basis of the mild condition and fast assembly process, a CNF template fulfills multiple functions in the fabrication of paper-electrode for LIBs, which would offer an ever increasing potential for high energy density, low cost, and environmentally friendly flexible electronics.

  13. Investigation on single walled carbon nanotube thin films deposited by Langmuir Blodgett method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vishalli,, E-mail: vishalli-2008@yahoo.com; Dharamvir, Keya [Department of Physics, Panjab University, Chandigarh (India); Kaur, Ramneek; Raina, K. K. [Materials Research Laboratory, School of Physics and Materials Science, Thapar University, Patiala (India)

    2015-05-15

    Langmuir Blodgett is a technique to deposit a homogeneous film with a fine control over thickness and molecular organization. Thin films of functionalized SWCNTs have been prepared by Langmuir Blodgett method. The good surface spreading properties of SWCNTs at air/water interface are indicated by surface pressure-area isotherm and the monolayer formed on water surface is transferred onto the quartz substrate by vertical dipping. A multilayer film is thus obtained in a layer by layer manner. The film is characterized by Atomic Force Microscope (AFM), UV-Vis-NIR spectroscopy and FTIR.AFM shows the surface morphology of the deposited film. UV-Vis-NIR spectroscopy shows the characteristic peaks of semiconducting SWCNTs. The uniformity of LB film can be used further in understanding the optical and electrical behavior of these materials.

  14. Carbon Nanotube Biosensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen-Mihaela eTilmaciu

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Nanomaterials possess unique features which make them particularly attractive for biosensing applications. In particular Carbon Nanotubes (CNTs can serve as scaffolds for immobilization of biomolecules at their surface, and combine several exceptional physical, chemical, electrical and optical characteristics properties which make them one of the best suited materials for the transduction of signals associated with the recognition of analytes, metabolites or disease biomarkers. Here we provide a comprehensive review on these carbon nanostructures, in which we will describe their structural and physical properties, discuss functionalization and cellular uptake, biocompatibility and toxicity issues. We further review historical developments in the field of biosensors, and describe the different types of biosensors which have been developed over time, with specific focus on CNT-conjugates engineered for biosensing applications, and in particular detection of cancer biomarkers.

  15. Carbon nanotube biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tîlmaciu, Carmen-Mihaela; Morris, May C.

    2015-01-01

    Nanomaterials possess unique features which make them particularly attractive for biosensing applications. In particular, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) can serve as scaffolds for immobilization of biomolecules at their surface, and combine several exceptional physical, chemical, electrical, and optical characteristics properties which make them one of the best suited materials for the transduction of signals associated with the recognition of analytes, metabolites, or disease biomarkers. Here we provide a comprehensive review on these carbon nanostructures, in which we describe their structural and physical properties, functionalization and cellular uptake, biocompatibility, and toxicity issues. We further review historical developments in the field of biosensors, and describe the different types of biosensors which have been developed over time, with specific focus on CNT-conjugates engineered for biosensing applications, and in particular detection of cancer biomarkers. PMID:26579509

  16. Use of alkali metal salts to prepare high purity single-walled carbon nanotube solutions and thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashour, Rakan F.

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) display interesting electronic and optical properties desired for many advanced thin film applications, such as transparent conductive electrodes or thin-film transistors. Large-scale production of SWCNTs generally results in polydispersed mixtures of nanotube structures. Since SWCNT electronic character (conducting or semiconducting nature) depends on the nanotube structure, application performance is being held back by this inability to discretely control SWCNT synthesis. Although a number of post-production techniques are able to separate SWCNTs based on electronic character, diameter, or chirality, most still suffer from the disadvantage of high costs of materials, equipment, or labor intensity to be relevant for large-scale production. On the other hand, chromatographic separation has emerged as a method that is compatible with large scale separation of metallic and semiconducting SWCNTs. In this work, SWCNTs, in an aqueous surfactant suspension of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), are separated by their electronic character using a gel chromatography process. Metallic SWCNTs (m-SWCNTs) are collected as initial fractions since they show minimum interaction with the gel medium, whereas, semiconducting SWCNTs (sc- SWCNTs) remain adsorbed to the gel. The process of sc-SWCNT retention in the gel is found to be driven by the packing density of SDS around the SWCNTs. Through a series of separation experiments, it is shown that sc-SWCNTs can be eluted from the gel simply by disturbing the configuration of the SDS/SWCNT micellar structure. This is achieved by either introducing a solution containing a co-surfactant, such as sodium cholate (SC), or solutions of alkali metal ionic salts. Analysis of SWCNT suspensions by optical absorption provides insights into the effect of changing the metal ion (M+ = Li+, Na+, and K+) in the eluting solution. Salts with smaller metal ions (e.g. Li+) require higher concentrations to achieve

  17. Atomic transportation via carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Quan

    2009-01-01

    The transportation of helium atoms in a single-walled carbon nanotube is reported via molecular dynamics simulations. The efficiency of the atomic transportation is found to be dependent on the type of the applied loading and the loading rate as well as the temperature in the process. Simulations show the transportation is a result of the van der Waals force between the nanotube and the helium atoms through a kink propagation initiated in the nanotube.

  18. Aligned carbon nanotubes for nanoelectronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Won Bong; Bae, Eunju; Kang, Donghun; Chae, Soodoo; Cheong, Byung-ho; Ko, Ju-hye; Lee, Eungmin; Park, Wanjun

    2004-10-01

    We discuss the central issues to be addressed for realizing carbon nanotube (CNT) nanoelectronics. We focus on selective growth, electron energy bandgap engineering and device integration. We have introduced a nanotemplate to control the selective growth, length and diameter of CNTs. Vertically aligned CNTs are synthesized for developing a vertical CNT-field effect transistor (FET). The ohmic contact of the CNT/metal interface is formed by rapid thermal annealing. Diameter control, synthesis of Y-shaped CNTs and surface modification of CNTs open up the possibility for energy bandgap modulation. The concepts of an ultra-high density transistor based on the vertical-CNT array and a nonvolatile memory based on the top gate structure with an oxide-nitride-oxide charge trap are also presented. We suggest that the deposited memory film can be used for the quantum dot storage due to the localized electric field created by a nano scale CNT-electron channel.

  19. Carbon nanotubes: engineering biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez-Gualdrón, Diego A; Burgos, Juan C; Yu, Jiamei; Balbuena, Perla B

    2011-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are cylinder-shaped allotropic forms of carbon, most widely produced under chemical vapor deposition. They possess astounding chemical, electronic, mechanical, and optical properties. Being among the most promising materials in nanotechnology, they are also likely to revolutionize medicine. Among other biomedical applications, after proper functionalization carbon nanotubes can be transformed into sophisticated biosensing and biocompatible drug-delivery systems, for specific targeting and elimination of tumor cells. This chapter provides an introduction to the chemical and electronic structure and properties of single-walled carbon nanotubes, followed by a description of the main synthesis and post-synthesis methods. These sections allow the reader to become familiar with the specific characteristics of these materials and the manner in which these properties may be dependent on the specific synthesis and post-synthesis processes. The chapter ends with a review of the current biomedical applications of carbon nanotubes, highlighting successes and challenges.

  20. Development of Novel Magnetic Metal Oxide Films and Carbon Nanotube Materials for Magnetic Device Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-23

    epitaxial cobalt ferrite thin films, Phys. Rev. B 76, 054405 (2007). 5. J-P Zhou, H-C He, and C-W Nan, Effects of substrate temperature and oxygen ...report on low 20 temperature magnetization and torque studies on out tri-layered Spin Spring Films. In order to enhance the observed spin effect , we...Korey Pough , Abebe Kebede, Dereje Seifu, Destenie Knock . Magnetic Properties of Iron Chalcogenide Superconducting Materials for Energy Storage

  1. Effect of Nanotube Film Thickness on the Performance of Nanotube-Silicon Hybrid Solar Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tune, Daniel D.; Shapter, Joseph G.

    2013-01-01

    The results of measurements on solar cells made from randomly aligned thin films of single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) on n-type monocrystalline silicon are presented. The films are made by vacuum filtration from aqueous TritonX-100 suspensions of large diameter arc-discharge SWCNTs. The dependence of the solar cell performance on the thickness of the SWCNT film is shown in detail, as is the variation in performance due to doping of the SWCNT film with SOCl2.

  2. Electrocatalytic Oxidation and Ion Chromatography Detection of S2O32-, SO32-, I- and SCN- at Glassy Carbon Electrode with Functionalized Multi-Wall Carbon Nanotubes Film

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Ji-ming; WANG Yan-ping; XIAN Yue-zhong; JIN Li-tong

    2004-01-01

    In this research, a glassy carbon electrode modified with the functionalized multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWNT-COOHs) film was used as an amperometric sensor for the determination of S2O32-, SO23-, I- and SCN-. The electrochemical behavior of those oxidizable inorganic anions at this modified electrode was studied by means of cyclic voltammetry(CV). The experimental results indicate that the modified electrode exhibits a high electrocatalytic activity towards the oxidation of those anions with a relatively high sensitivity, a good stability and a long-life. Separated by ion chromatography(IC) with 1.25 mmol/L H2SO4 as an eluent,those oxidizable anions can be determined by the MWNT-COOHs modified electrode successfully. Under the optimal chromatographic conditions, the detection limits are 1.5 × 10-7 mol/L for S2O23-, 2. 5 × 10-7 mol/L for SO32-, 1.2 × 10-7 mol/L for I- and 2. 0 × 10-7 mol/L for SCN-, respectively. The method was applied successfully to the determination of those anions in environmental water.

  3. Determination of the DC Electrical Conductivity of Multiwalled Carbon Nanotube Films and Graphene Layers from Noncontact Time-Domain Terahertz Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Dadrasnia

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Measuring the DC conductivity of very thin films could be rather difficult because of the electrical contact issue. This DC conductivity can, however, be extracted from noncontact measurements at GHz and THz frequencies using elaborated conductivity models that nicely fit the experimental data. Here we employ this technique to study the DC conductivity of fragile nanometer-thick films of multiwalled carbon nanotubes and monolayer graphene. The THz response of the films is measured by THz time-domain spectroscopy. We show that the THz conductivity of the samples is well fitted by either Drude-Lorentz model or Drude-Smith model, giving information on the physics of electrical conductivity in these materials. This extraction procedure is validated by the good agreement between the so-obtained DC conductivity and the one measured with a classical 4-point probe in-line contact method.

  4. Poly (3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) and poly (3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)-few walled carbon nanotube (PEDOT-FWCNT) nanocomposite based thin films for Schottky diode application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, Bhavana, E-mail: bgupta1206@gmail.com [Surface and Nanoscience Division, Materials Science Group, Indira Gandhi Centre of Atomic Research, Kalpakkam, Tamil Nadu 603102 (India); Mehta, Minisha, E-mail: mehta.mini@gmail.com [Surface and Nanoscience Division, Materials Science Group, Indira Gandhi Centre of Atomic Research, Kalpakkam, Tamil Nadu 603102 (India); Melvin, Ambrose [Catalysis Division, CSIR-National Chemical Laboratory, Dr. Homi Bhabha, Pune 411008 (India); Kamalakannan, R.; Dash, S.; Kamruddin, M.; Tyagi, A.K. [Surface and Nanoscience Division, Materials Science Group, Indira Gandhi Centre of Atomic Research, Kalpakkam, Tamil Nadu 603102 (India)

    2014-10-15

    Transparent, conductive films of poly (3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) and poly (3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)-few walled carbon nanotube (PEDOT-FWCNT) nanocomposite were synthesized by in-situ oxidative polymerization and investigated for their Schottky diode property. The prepared films were characterized by UV–Vis spectroscopy, thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA), surface resistivity, cyclic voltametery, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). SEM reveals the formation of homogeneous and adhesive polymer films while HRTEM confirms the uniform wrapping of polymer chains around the nanotube walls for PEDOT-FWCNT film. Improved thermal stability, conductivity and charge storage property of PEDOT in the presence of FWCNT is observed. Among different compositions, 5 wt. % of FWCNT is found to be optimum with sheet resistance and transmittance of 500 Ω sq{sup −1} and 77%, respectively. Moreover, the electronic and junction properties of polymer films were studied and compared by fabricating sandwich type devices with a configuration of Al/PEDOT or PEDOT-FWCNT nanocomposite/indium tin oxide (ITO) coated glass. The measured current density-voltage characteristics show typical rectifying behavior for both configurations. However, enhanced rectification ratio and higher forward current density is observed in case of PEDOT-FWCNT based Schottky diode. Furthermore, reliability test depicts smaller hysteresis effect and better performance of PEDOT-FWCNT based diodes. - Highlights: • Single step synthesis of PEDOT and PEDOT-FWCNT nanocomposites films via in-situ oxidative polymerization. • Thermal, electrical and electrochemical properties of films show positive effect of FWCNT on PEDOT films. • Schottky diodes based on metal Al/PEDOT or PEDOT-FWCNT composites/ITO glass are fabricated. • Improved electrical characteristics with better reliability is achieved for PEDOT-FWCNT based diodes.

  5. Microfabricated electroactive carbon nanotube actuators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahluwalia, Arti; Baughman, Ray H.; De Rossi, Danilo; Mazzoldi, Alberto; Tesconi, Mario; Tognetti, Alessandro; Vozzi, Giovanni

    2001-07-01

    A variety of microfabrication techniques have been developed at the University of Pisa. They are based either on pressure or piston actuated microsyringes or modified ink-jet printers. This work present the results of a study aimed at fabricating carbon nanotube (NT) actuators using micro-syringes. In order to prevent the nanotubes from aggregating into clumps, they were enclosed in a partially cross-linked polyvinylalcohol - polyallylamine matrix. After sonication the solution remained homogenously dispersed for about 40 minutes, which was sufficient time for deposition. Small strips of NT, about 5 mm across and 15 mm long were deposited. Following deposition, the films were baked at 80 degree(s)C and their thickness, impedance and mechanical resistance measured. The results indicate that 50 minutes of baking time is sufficient to give a constant resistivity of 1.12 x 10-2 (Omega) m per layer similar to a typical semiconductor, and each layer has a thickness of about 6 micrometers .

  6. Functionalization of Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khare, Bishun N. (Inventor); Meyyappan, Meyya (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    Method and system for functionalizing a collection of carbon nanotubes (CNTs). A selected precursor gas (e.g., H2 or F2 or CnHm) is irradiated to provide a cold plasma of selected target species particles, such as atomic H or F, in a first chamber. The target species particles are d irected toward an array of CNTs located in a second chamber while suppressing transport of ultraviolet radiation to the second chamber. A CNT array is functionalized with the target species particles, at or below room temperature, to a point of saturation, in an exposure time interval no longer than about 30 sec. *Discrimination against non-target species is provided by (i) use of a target species having a lifetime that is much greater than a lifetime of a non-target species and/or (2) use of an applied magnetic field to discriminate between charged particle trajectories for target species and for non-target species.

  7. Carbon Nanotube Electron Gun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Cattien V. (Inventor); Ribaya, Bryan P. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    An electron gun, an electron source for an electron gun, an extractor for an electron gun, and a respective method for producing the electron gun, the electron source and the extractor are disclosed. Embodiments provide an electron source utilizing a carbon nanotube (CNT) bonded to a substrate for increased stability, reliability, and durability. An extractor with an aperture in a conductive material is used to extract electrons from the electron source, where the aperture may substantially align with the CNT of the electron source when the extractor and electron source are mated to form the electron gun. The electron source and extractor may have alignment features for aligning the electron source and the extractor, thereby bringing the aperture and CNT into substantial alignment when assembled. The alignment features may provide and maintain this alignment during operation to improve the field emission characteristics and overall system stability of the electron gun.

  8. Carbon nanotube biconvex microcavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butt, Haider; Yetisen, Ali K.; Ahmed, Rajib; Yun, Seok Hyun; Dai, Qing

    2015-03-01

    Developing highly efficient microcavities with predictive narrow-band resonance frequencies using the least amount of material will allow the applications in nonlinear photonic devices. We have developed a microcavity array that comprised multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) organized in a biconvex pattern. The finite element model allowed designing microcavity arrays with predictive transmission properties and assessing the effects of the microarray geometry. The microcavity array demonstrated negative index and produced high Q factors. 2-3 μm tall MWCNTs were patterned as biconvex microcavities, which were separated by 10 μm in an array. The microcavity was iridescent and had optical control over the diffracted elliptical patterns with a far-field pattern, whose properties were predicted by the model. It is anticipated that the MWCNT biconvex microcavities will have implications for the development of highly efficient lenses, metamaterial antennas, and photonic circuits.

  9. Enhanced Carbon Nanotube Ultracapacitors Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed innovation utilizes carbon nanotubes (CNTs) coated with pseudo-capacitive MnO2 material as nano-composite electrode and ionic electrolyte for the...

  10. Carbon nanotubes for coherent spintronics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuemmeth, Ferdinand; Churchill, H O H; Herring, P K;

    2010-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes bridge the molecular and crystalline quantum worlds, and their extraordinary electronic, mechanical and optical properties have attracted enormous attention from a broad scientific community. We review the basic principles of fabricating spin-electronic devices based on individua...

  11. Molybdenum Disulfide Sheathed Carbon Nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu Chun SONG; Zhu De XU; Yi Fan ZHENG; Gui HAN; Bo LIU; Wei Xiang CHEN

    2004-01-01

    Single and double layered MoS2-coated multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNs) were successfully prepared by pyrolyzing (NH4)2MoS4-coated multiwalled carbon nanotubes in an H2 atmosphere at 900℃. MoS2-coated MWCNs would be expected to have different tribological and mechanical properties compared to MoS2, so it may have potential applications in many fields.

  12. Selective functionalization of carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strano, Michael S. (Inventor); Usrey, Monica (Inventor); Barone, Paul (Inventor); Dyke, Christopher A. (Inventor); Tour, James M. (Inventor); Kittrell, W. Carter (Inventor); Hauge, Robert H. (Inventor); Smalley, Richard E. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    The present invention is directed toward methods of selectively functionalizing carbon nanotubes of a specific type or range of types, based on their electronic properties, using diazonium chemistry. The present invention is also directed toward methods of separating carbon nanotubes into populations of specific types or range(s) of types via selective functionalization and electrophoresis, and also to the novel compositions generated by such separations.

  13. Carbon nanotubes for coherent spintronics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuemmeth, Ferdinand; Churchill, H O H; Herring, P K

    2010-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes bridge the molecular and crystalline quantum worlds, and their extraordinary electronic, mechanical and optical properties have attracted enormous attention from a broad scientific community. We review the basic principles of fabricating spin-electronic devices based on individual......, electrically-gated carbon nanotubes, and present experimental efforts to understand their electronic and nuclear spin degrees of freedom, which in the future may enable quantum applications....

  14. A carbon nanotube/polyvanillin composite film as an electrocatalyst for the electrochemical oxidation of nitrite and its application as a nitrite sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng Dongyun [College of Chemistry and Molecular Science, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); State Key Laboratory of Transducer Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences (China); Hu Chengguo [College of Chemistry and Molecular Science, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); State Key Laboratory of Transducer Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences (China)], E-mail: cghu@whu.edu.cn; Peng Yanfen [College of Chemistry and Molecular Science, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); State Key Laboratory of Transducer Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences (China); Hu Shengshui [College of Chemistry and Molecular Science, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); State Key Laboratory of Transducer Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences (China)], E-mail: sshu@whu.edu.cn

    2009-08-30

    We report a simple method for the stable dispersion of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) in water by vanillin and controllable surface addition onto carbon fiber microelectrodes (CFE) via electropolymerization. We have characterized these polyvanillin-carbon nanotube (PVN-MWNT) composite films with techniques including scanning electron microscopy (SEM), infrared spectroscopy (IR) and voltammetry. These investigations showed that the films have a uniform porous nanostructure with a large surface area. This PVN-MWNT composite-modified CFE (PVN-MWNT/CFE) exhibited a sensitive response to the electrochemical oxidation of nitrite. Under optimal working conditions, the oxidation peak current of nitrite linearly increased with its concentration in the range of 0.2 {mu}M-3.1 mM, with the system exhibiting a lower detection limit of 50 nM (S/N = 3). We successfully applied the PVN-MWNT/CFE system to the determination of nitrite from lake water. The efficient recovery of nitrite indicated that this electrode was able to detect nitrite in real samples.

  15. Fabrication and Properties of 3D Graphene Oxide Nanoribbons-carbon Nanotubes/TPU Composite Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHENG Hui-dong

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available A solution method for modifying thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU by the introduction of 3D functionalized nanohybrids composed of two-dimensional GONRs and one-dimensional CNTs was applied. FTIR, XRD, XPS and TEM were employed to characterize the structure and properties of GONRs-CNTs hybrids before and after modification. The functionalized GONRs-CNTs (pGONRs-CNTs/TPU composite films were subsequently prepared by solution coating method on a coating machine. Furthermore, by means of oxygen transmission rate test, tensile test and the observation of surface morphology, the synergetic effect between GONRs and CNTs and the effect of different pGONRs-CNTs content on the barrier and tensile properties of TPU composite films were also studied. The results show that a unique three-dimensional (3D crosslinked nanostructure is successfully obtained, in which GONRs are bridged by CNTs. We also find that the as-prepared pGONRs-CNTs with neat shape and low defect are evenly dispersed in TPU matrix and form strong interfacial adhesion with the matrix, while the existing of CNTs play the role of supporting frame to prevent GONRs from sliding and aggregation; modified by phenyl isocyanate, the lipophilicity of pGONRs-CNTs composite is obviously improved, while, by the introduction of huge isocyanate, the interlayer spacing is further improved, which is good for uniform dispersion in the polymer matrix. As a result, when the mass fraction of pGONRs-CNTs is 0.5%, the barrier and tensile properties of pGONRs-CNTs/TPU composite films reach to the optimal values:the oxygen transmission rate decreases by 63.08% and the tensile strength increases by 46.55%, compared with those of the neat TPU, which will lead to great benefit for the barrier and mechanical properties of TPU films.

  16. Highly Conductive, Transparent Flexible Films Based on Metal Nanoparticle-Carbon Nanotube Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Yin Ko

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Metallic nanoparticles decorated on MWCNTs based transparent conducting thin films (TCFs show a cheap and efficient option for the applications in touch screens and the replacement of the ITO film because of their interesting properties of electrical conductivity, mechanical property, chemical inertness, and other unique properties, which may not be accessible by their individual components. However, a great challenge that always remains is to develop effective ways to prepare junctions between metallic nanoparticles and MWCNTs for the improvement of high-energy barriers, high contact resistances, and weak interactions which could lead to the formation of poor conducting pathways and result in the CNT-based devices with low mechanical flexibility. Herein, we not only discuss recent progress in the preparation of MNP-CNT flexible TCFs but also describe our research studies in the relevant areas. Our result demonstrated that the MNP-CNT flexible TCFs we prepared could achieve a highly electrical conductivity with the sheet resistance of ~100 ohm/sq with ~80% transmittance at 550 nm even after being bent 500 times. This electrical conductivity is much superior to the performances of other MWCNT-based transparent flexible films, making it favorable for next-generation flexible touch screens and optoelectronic devices.

  17. Carbon nanotube-based functional materials for optical limiting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu; Lin, Ying; Liu, Ying; Doyle, James; He, Nan; Zhuang, Xiaodong; Bai, Jinrui; Blau, Werner J

    2007-01-01

    Optical limiting is an important application of nonlinear optics, useful for the protection of human eyes, optical elements, and optical sensors from intense laser pulses. An optical limiter is such a device that strongly attenuates high intensity light and potentially damaging light such as focused laser beams, whilst allowing for the high transmission of ambient light. Optical limiting properties of carbon nanotube suspensions, solubilized carbon nanotubes, small molecules doped carbon nanotubes and polymer/carbon nanotube composites have been reviewed. The optical limiting responses of carbon nanotube suspensions are shown to be dominated by nonlinear scattering as a result of thermally induced solvent-bubble formation and sublimation of the nanotubes, while the solubilized carbon nanotubes optically limit through nonlinear absorption mechanism and exhibit significant solution-concentration-dependent optical limiting responses. In the former case the optical limiting results are independent of nanotube concentrations at the same linear transmittance as that of the solubilized systems. Many efforts have been invested into the research of polymer/carbon nanotube composites in an attempt to allow for the fabrication of films required for the use of nanotubes in a real optical limiting application. The higher carbon nanotube content samples block the incident light more effectively at higher incident energy densities or intensities. The optical limiting mechanism of these composite materials is quite complicated. Besides nonlinear scattering contribution to the optical limiting, there may also be other contributions e.g., nonlinear absorption, nonlinear refraction, electronic absorption and others to the optical limiting. Further improvements in the optical limiting efficiency of the composites and in the dispersion and alignment properties of carbon nanotubes in the polymer matrix could be realized by variation of both nanostructured guest and polymer host, and by

  18. Properties of Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masood, Samina; Bullmore, Daniel; Duran, Michael; Jacobs, Michael

    2012-10-01

    Different synthesizing methods are used to create various nanostructures of carbon; we are mainly interested in single and multi-wall carbon nanotubes, (SWCNTs) and (MWCNTs) respectively. The properties of these tubes are related to their synthetic methods, chirality, and diameter. The extremely sturdy structure of CNTs, with their distinct thermal and electromagnetic properties, suggests a tremendous use of these tubes in electronics and medicines. Here, we analyze various physical properties of SWCNTs with a special emphasis on electromagnetic and chemical properties. By examining their electrical properties, we demonstrate the viability of discrete CNT based components. After considering the advantages of using CNTs over microstructures, we make a case for the advancement and development of nanostructures based electronics. As for current CNT applications, it's hard to overlook their use and functionality in the development of cancer treatment. Whether the tubes are involved in chemotherapeutic drug delivery, molecular imaging and targeting, or photodynamic therapy, we show that the remarkable properties of SWCNTs can be used in advantageous ways by many different industries.

  19. Carbon nanotube computer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shulaker, Max M; Hills, Gage; Patil, Nishant; Wei, Hai; Chen, Hong-Yu; Wong, H-S Philip; Mitra, Subhasish

    2013-09-26

    The miniaturization of electronic devices has been the principal driving force behind the semiconductor industry, and has brought about major improvements in computational power and energy efficiency. Although advances with silicon-based electronics continue to be made, alternative technologies are being explored. Digital circuits based on transistors fabricated from carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have the potential to outperform silicon by improving the energy-delay product, a metric of energy efficiency, by more than an order of magnitude. Hence, CNTs are an exciting complement to existing semiconductor technologies. Owing to substantial fundamental imperfections inherent in CNTs, however, only very basic circuit blocks have been demonstrated. Here we show how these imperfections can be overcome, and demonstrate the first computer built entirely using CNT-based transistors. The CNT computer runs an operating system that is capable of multitasking: as a demonstration, we perform counting and integer-sorting simultaneously. In addition, we implement 20 different instructions from the commercial MIPS instruction set to demonstrate the generality of our CNT computer. This experimental demonstration is the most complex carbon-based electronic system yet realized. It is a considerable advance because CNTs are prominent among a variety of emerging technologies that are being considered for the next generation of highly energy-efficient electronic systems.

  20. Carbon Nanotube Purification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delzeit, Lance D. (Inventor); Delzeit, Clement J. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    A method for cleaning or otherwise removing amorphous carbon and other residues that arise in growth of a carbon nanotube (CNT) array. The CNT array is exposed to a plurality of hydroxyls or hydrogen, produced from a selected vapor or liquid source such as H2O or H2O2. and the hydroxyls or hydrogen (neutral or electrically charged) react with the residues to produce partly or fully dissolved or hydrogenated or hydroxylizated products that can be removed or separated from the CNT array. The hydroxyls or hydrogen can be produced by heating the CNT array, residue and selected vapor or liquid source or by application of an electromagnetic excitation signal with a selected frequency or range of frequencies to dissociate the selected vapor or liquid. The excitation frequency can be chirped to cover a selected range of frequencies corresponding to dissociation of the selected vapor or liquid. Sonication may be uscd to supplement dissociation of the H2O and/or H2O2.

  1. Bone Marrow Stem Cells Response to Collagen/Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes-COOHs Nanocomposite Films with Transforming Growth Factor Beta 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianhua; He, Chaolong; Cheng, Niangmei; Yang, Qiu; Chen, Mingmao; You, Lijun; Zhang, Qiqing

    2015-07-01

    Single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) have attractive biochemical properties such as strong cell adhesion and protein absorption, which are very useful for a cell cultivation scaffold. In this study, collagen/SWNT-COOHs nanocomposite films composed of regenerated fish collagen and SWNT-COOHs (0, 0.5, 1.0 and 2.0 weight percent) were prepared by mixing solubilized pepsin-soluble collagen with solutions of SWNT-COOHs. Morphological observation by SEM indicated the homogenous dispersion of SWNT-COOHs in the collagen matrix. The application of FTIR confirmed that the process we applied to prepare the composites did not destroy the native structures of collagen and composites were crosslinked by D-ribose. The biocompatibility was evaluated in vitro using SD rat bone marrow stem cells (BMSCs). Compared with films without transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1), films with TGF-β1 had superior performance on promotion of cell growth. Compared with pure collagen film with TGF-β1, SWNT-containing films might promote cellular functions by adsorbing more growth factors. In conclusion, the study suggested that the collagen/SWNT-COOHs nanocomposite films with TGF-β1 were expected to be useful scaffolds in cartilage tissue engineering.

  2. Self-mode-locking in erbium-doped fibre lasers with saturable polymer film absorbers containing single-wall carbon nanotubes synthesised by the arc discharge method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tausenev, Anton V.; Obraztsova, Elena D.; Lobach, A. S.; Chernov, A. I.; Konov, Vitalii I.; Konyashchenko, Aleksandr V.; Kryukov, P. G.; Dianov, Evgenii M.

    2007-03-01

    We studied the ring and linear schemes of erbium-doped fibre lasers in which passive mode locking was achieved with the help of saturable absorbers made of high-optical quality films based on cellulose derivatives with dispersed single-wall carbon nanotubes. The films were prepared by the original method with the use of nanotubes synthesised by the arc discharge method. The films exhibit nonlinear absorption at a wavelength of 1.5 μm. Pulses in the form of optical solitons of duration 1.17 ps at a avelength of 1.56 μm were generated in the ring scheme of the erbium laser. The average output power was 1.1 mW at a pulse repetition rate of 20.5 MHz upon pumping by the 980-nm, 25-mW radiation from a laser diode. The pulse duration in the linear scheme was reduced to 466 fs for the output power up to 4 mW and a pulse repetition rate of 28.5 MHz. The specific feature of these lasers is a low pump threshold in the regime of generation of ultrashort pulses.

  3. Synthesis of Aligned Carbon Nanotubes by Thermal Chemical Vapor Deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Gang; ZHOU Ming; MA Weiwei; CAI Lan

    2009-01-01

    Single crystal silicon was found to be very beneficial to the growth of aligned carbon nanotubes by chemical vapor deposition with C2H2 as carbon source. A thin film of Ni served as catalyst was deposited on the Si substrate by the K575X Peltier Cooled High Resolution Sputter Coater before growth. The growth properties of carbon nanotubes were studied as a function of the Ni catalyst layer thickness. The diameter, growth rate and areal density of the carbon nanotubes were controlled by the initial thickness of the catalyst layer. Steric hindrance between nanotubes forces them to grow in well-aligned manner at an initial stage of growth. Transmission electron microscope analysis revealed that nanotubes grew by a tip growth mechanism.

  4. Degradation of optical properties of a film-type single-wall carbon nanotubes saturable absorber (SWNT-SA) with an Er-doped all-fiber laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Sung Yoon; Kim, Kyung-Soo; Kim, Jungwon; Kim, Soohyun

    2012-06-04

    Single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are promising materials for saturable absorbers (SAs) in mode-locked lasers. However it has been widely recognized that the degradation of optical properties of film-type SWNTs used in femtosecond mode-locked lasers limits the achievable long-term stability of such lasers. In this paper, we study the degradation of optical properties of SWNT-SA fabricated as sandwich type using HiPCO SWNTs with an Er-doped all-fiber laser. The thresholds of laser pump power are examined to avoid the damage of the SWNT-SA. Based on the proposed analysis, it is shown that all-fiber laser pulses of 300 fs pulse width, 3.85 mW average output power, 211.7 MW/cm² peak intensity and 69.9 MHz repetition rate can be reliably generated without any significant damage to the SWNT-SA film.

  5. Probing Photosensitization by Functionalized Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) photosensitize the production of reactive oxygen species that can damage organisms by biomembrane oxidation or mediate CNTs' environmental transformations. The photosensitized nature of derivatized carbon nanotubes from various synthetic methods, and thus ...

  6. Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes for Flexible Electronics and Sensors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiuyun SUN; Yugang SUN

    2008-01-01

    This article reviews the use of electronic quality single-walled carbon nanotubes grown via chemical vapor deposition (CVD) approaches at high temperatures as building blocks for fabricating flexible field-effect devices, such as thin-film transistors (TFTs) and chemical sensors. Dry transfer printing technique is developed for forming films of CVD nanotubes on low-temperature plastic substrates. Examples of TFTs with the use of nanotubes and thin dielectrics and hydrogen sensors with the use of nanotubes decorated with palladium nanoparticles are discussed in detail to demonstrate the promising potentiality of single-walled carbon nanotubes for building high performance flexible devices, which can find applications where traditional devices on rigid substrates are not suitable.

  7. A 113 fs fiber laser operating at 1.56 mum using a cascadable film-type saturable absorber with P3HT-incorporated single-wall carbon nanotubes coated on polyamide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shohda, Fumio; Nakazawa, Masataka; Mata, Junji; Tsukamoto, Jun

    2010-04-26

    We successfully fabricated a cascadable film-type single-wall carbon nanotube (SWNT) saturable absorber coated on aromatic polyamide film, in which the saturable absorption effect can be controlled with the number of films. A conductive polymer P3HT (poly-3-hexylthiophene) was adopted to obtain a uniform SWNT solution. We applied saturable absorber films to a passively mode-locked fiber laser and successfully generated a 113 fs, 42 MHz pulse by inserting two film layers between fiber connectors in the cavity.

  8. Carbon Nanotube Based Molecular Electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Deepak; Saini, Subhash; Menon, Madhu

    1998-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes and the nanotube heterojunctions have recently emerged as excellent candidates for nanoscale molecular electronic device components. Experimental measurements on the conductivity, rectifying behavior and conductivity-chirality correlation have also been made. While quasi-one dimensional simple heterojunctions between nanotubes with different electronic behavior can be generated by introduction of a pair of heptagon-pentagon defects in an otherwise all hexagon graphene sheet. Other complex 3- and 4-point junctions may require other mechanisms. Structural stability as well as local electronic density of states of various nanotube junctions are investigated using a generalized tight-binding molecular dynamics (GDBMD) scheme that incorporates non-orthogonality of the orbitals. The junctions investigated include straight and small angle heterojunctions of various chiralities and diameters; as well as more complex 'T' and 'Y' junctions which do not always obey the usual pentagon-heptagon pair rule. The study of local density of states (LDOS) reveal many interesting features, most prominent among them being the defect-induced states in the gap. The proposed three and four pointjunctions are one of the smallest possible tunnel junctions made entirely of carbon atoms. Furthermore the electronic behavior of the nanotube based device components can be taylored by doping with group III-V elements such as B and N, and BN nanotubes as a wide band gap semiconductor has also been realized in experiments. Structural properties of heteroatomic nanotubes comprising C, B and N will be discussed.

  9. Cytotoxicity of carbon nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Ying; LI WenXin

    2008-01-01

    With large-scale production and application at large scale, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) may cause ad-verse response to the environment and human health. Thus, study on bio-effects and safety of CNTs has attracted great attention from scientists and governments worldwide. This report briefly summa-rizes the main results from the in vitro toxicity study of CNTs. The emphasis is placed on the descrip-tion of a variety of factors affecting CNTs cytotoxicity, including species of CNTs, impurities contained,lengths of CNTs, aspect ratios, chemical modification, and assaying methods of cytotoxicity. However,experimental information obtained thus far on CNTs' cytotoxicity is lacking in comparability, and some-times there is controversy about it. In order to assess more accurately the potential risks of CNTs to human health, we suggest that care should be taken for issues such as chemical modification and quantitative characterization of CNTa in cytotoxicity assessment. More importantly, studies on physical and chemical mechanisms of CNTs' cytotoxicity should be strengthened; assaying methods and evaluating criteria characterized by nanotoxicology should be gradually established.

  10. Cytotoxicity of carbon nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    With large-scale production and application at large scale, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) may cause ad-verse response to the environment and human health. Thus, study on bio-effects and safety of CNTs has attracted great attention from scientists and governments worldwide. This report briefly summa-rizes the main results from the in vitro toxicity study of CNTs. The emphasis is placed on the descrip-tion of a variety of factors affecting CNTs cytotoxicity, including species of CNTs, impurities contained, lengths of CNTs, aspect ratios, chemical modification, and assaying methods of cytotoxicity. However, experimental information obtained thus far on CNTs’ cytotoxicity is lacking in comparability, and some-times there is controversy about it. In order to assess more accurately the potential risks of CNTs to human health, we suggest that care should be taken for issues such as chemical modification and quantitative characterization of CNTs in cytotoxicity assessment. More importantly, studies on physical and chemical mechanisms of CNTs’ cytotoxicity should be strengthened; assaying methods and evaluating criteria characterized by nanotoxicology should be gradually established.

  11. Epitaxial Growth of Aligned and Continuous Carbon Nanofibers from Carbon Nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Xiaoyang; Zhao, Wei; Zhou, Wenbin; Liu, Peng; Luo, Shu; Wei, Haoming; Yang, Guangzhi; Yang, Junhe; Cui, Jie; Yu, Richeng; Zhang, Lina; Wang, Jiaping; Li, Qunqing; Zhou, Weiya; Zhao, Weisheng; Fan, Shoushan; Jiang, Kaili

    2017-02-28

    Exploiting the superior properties of nanomaterials at macroscopic scale is a key issue of nanoscience. Different from the integration strategy, "additive synthesis" of macroscopic structures from nanomaterial templates may be a promising choice. In this paper, we report the epitaxial growth of aligned, continuous, and catalyst-free carbon nanofiber thin films from carbon nanotube films. The fabrication process includes thickening of continuous carbon nanotube films by gas-phase pyrolytic carbon deposition and further graphitization of the carbon layer by high-temperature treatment. As-fabricated nanofibers in the film have an "annual ring" cross-section, with a carbon nanotube core and a graphitic periphery, indicating the templated growth mechanism. The absence of a distinct interface between the carbon nanotube template and the graphitic periphery further implies the epitaxial growth mechanism of the fiber. The mechanically robust thin film with tunable fiber diameters from tens of nanometers to several micrometers possesses low density, high electrical conductivity, and high thermal conductivity. Further extension of this fabrication method to enhance carbon nanotube yarns is also demonstrated, resulting in yarns with ∼4-fold increased tensile strength and ∼10-fold increased Young's modulus. The aligned and continuous features of the films together with their outstanding physical and chemical properties would certainly promote the large-scale applications of carbon nanofibers.

  12. Hybrid Composite of Polyaniline Containing Carbon Nanotube

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Carbon nanotube-polyaniline hybrid material was synthesized by emulsion polymerization in-situ. The morphology of hybrid material was studied by TEM and X-ray diffraction. The conductivity of nanocomposite increases with the increasing of carbon nanotube content because of the new conductivity passageways formed by carbon nanotubes.

  13. Synthesis and Application of Carbon Nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qun Zeng; Zhenhua Li; Yuhong Zhou

    2006-01-01

    Owing to the unique structure, the superior physical and chemical properties, the super strong mechanical performances, and so on, carbon nanotubes have attracted the attention of researchers all over the world. In this article, the basic properties and the main production processes of carbon nanotubes are introduced in brief, and the progress of applied research for carbon nanotubes is reviewed.

  14. In silico assembly and nanomechanical characterization of carbon nanotube buckypaper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cranford, Steven W; Buehler, Markus J

    2010-07-01

    Carbon nanotube sheets or films, also known as 'buckypaper', have been proposed for use in actuating, structural and filtration systems, based in part on their unique and robust mechanical properties. Computational modeling of such a fibrous nanostructure is hindered by both the random arrangement of the constituent elements as well as the time- and length-scales accessible to atomistic level molecular dynamics modeling. Here we present a novel in silico assembly procedure based on a coarse-grain model of carbon nanotubes, used to attain a representative mesoscopic buckypaper model that circumvents the need for probabilistic approaches. By variation in assembly parameters, including the initial nanotube density and ratio of nanotube type (single- and double-walled), the porosity of the resulting buckypaper can be varied threefold, from approximately 0.3 to 0.9. Further, through simulation of nanoindentation, the Young's modulus is shown to be tunable through manipulation of nanotube type and density over a range of approximately 0.2-3.1 GPa, in good agreement with experimental findings of the modulus of assembled carbon nanotube films. In addition to carbon nanotubes, the coarse-grain model and assembly process can be adapted for other fibrous nanostructures such as electrospun polymeric composites, high performance nonwoven ballistic materials, or fibrous protein aggregates, facilitating the development and characterization of novel nanomaterials and composites as well as the analysis of biological materials such as protein fiber films and bulk structures.

  15. Carbon nanotube--poly(3-octylthiophene) composite photovoltaic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, David L; Czerw, Richard; Harrison, Benjamin

    2006-07-01

    The effects of varying nanotube loading/concentration in carbon nanotube-poly(3-octylthiophene) blends used as thin film photovoltaic cells, have been studied. The network of single walled nanotubes clearly aids in exciton separation and modifies carrier mobility within the active layer as suggested by a bulk heterojunction model. Further, modifications to the metal-polymer interface occur with the addition of nanotubes leading to variations in the observed VOC of the photovoltaic cells. Finally, the "nanocomposite" devices exhibit significant enhancements to external power conversion efficiencies, with the overall efficiency strongly dependent on device design parameters such as the addition of buffer layers.

  16. Production of carbon nanotubes by the magnetron DC sputtering method

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Antonenko, SV; Mal'tsev, SN

    2005-01-01

    Carbon films containing multiwall nanotubes were produced by the magnetron de sputtering method. A graphite disc with Y and Ni catalyst plates was used as a target. The structural and morphological properties of the films were investigated using a JEM 2000EXII transmission electron microscope. The f

  17. Terahertz Response of Carbon Nanotubes and Graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawano, Yukio

    2015-12-01

    The terahertz (THz) research field is expected to serve as a new platform for studying low-energy excitation in solids and higher-order structures in large molecules, and for realizing applications in medicine, agriculture, security, and high-capacity communications. The THz frequency region, however, is located between the electronic and photonic bands, hampering the development of basic components like detectors and sources. This article presents an overview of basic background information about THz waves and THz detector applications and describes the THz response of carbon-based low-dimensional systems, such as single carbon nanotubes (CNT), CNT-array films, and graphene.

  18. Hydrodynamic properties of carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walther, J H; Werder, T; Jaffe, R L; Koumoutsakos, P

    2004-06-01

    We study water flowing past an array of single walled carbon nanotubes using nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. For carbon nanotubes mounted with a tube spacing of 16.4 x 16.4 nm and diameters of 1.25 and 2.50 nm, respectively, we find drag coefficients in reasonable agreement with the macroscopic, Stokes-Oseen solution. The slip length is -0.11 nm for the 1.25 nm carbon nanotube, and 0.49 for the 2.50 nm tube for a flow speed of 50 m/s, respectively, and 0.28 nm for the 2.50 nm tube at 200 m/s. A slanted flow configuration with a stream- and spanwise velocity component of 100 ms(-1) recovers the two-dimensional results, but exhibits a significant 88 nm slip along the axis of the tube. These results indicate that slip depends on the particular flow configuration.

  19. Adsorption on the carbon nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DING Yi; YANG Xiao-bao; NI Jun

    2006-01-01

    Adsorption on single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) is a subject of growing experimental and theoretical interest.The possible adsorbed patterns of atoms and molecules on the single-walled carbon nanotubes vary with the diameters and chirality of the tubes due to the confinement.The curvature of the carbon nanotube surface enlarges the distance of the adsorbate atoms and thus enhances the stability of high coverage structures of adsorbate.There exist two novel high-coverage stable structures of potassium adsorbed on SWCNTs,which are not stable on graphite.The electronic properties of SWCNTs can be modified by adsorbate atoms and metal-semiconductor and semiconductor-semi-conductor transitions can be achieved by the doping of alkali atoms.

  20. Carbon Nanotube Flexible and Stretchable Electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Le; Wang, Chuan

    2015-08-01

    The low-cost and large-area manufacturing of flexible and stretchable electronics using printing processes could radically change people's perspectives on electronics and substantially expand the spectrum of potential applications. Examples range from personalized wearable electronics to large-area smart wallpapers and from interactive bio-inspired robots to implantable health/medical apparatus. Owing to its one-dimensional structure and superior electrical property, carbon nanotube is one of the most promising material platforms for flexible and stretchable electronics. Here in this paper, we review the recent progress in this field. Applications of single-wall carbon nanotube networks as channel semiconductor in flexible thin-film transistors and integrated circuits, as stretchable conductors in various sensors, and as channel material in stretchable transistors will be discussed. Lastly, state-of-the-art advancement on printing process, which is ideal for large-scale fabrication of flexible and stretchable electronics, will also be reviewed in detail.

  1. Carbon Nanotube Flexible and Stretchable Electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Le; Wang, Chuan

    2015-12-01

    The low-cost and large-area manufacturing of flexible and stretchable electronics using printing processes could radically change people's perspectives on electronics and substantially expand the spectrum of potential applications. Examples range from personalized wearable electronics to large-area smart wallpapers and from interactive bio-inspired robots to implantable health/medical apparatus. Owing to its one-dimensional structure and superior electrical property, carbon nanotube is one of the most promising material platforms for flexible and stretchable electronics. Here in this paper, we review the recent progress in this field. Applications of single-wall carbon nanotube networks as channel semiconductor in flexible thin-film transistors and integrated circuits, as stretchable conductors in various sensors, and as channel material in stretchable transistors will be discussed. Lastly, state-of-the-art advancement on printing process, which is ideal for large-scale fabrication of flexible and stretchable electronics, will also be reviewed in detail.

  2. Carbon nanotube-polymer composite actuators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gennett, Thomas; Raffaelle, Ryne P.; Landi, Brian J.; Heben, Michael J.

    2008-04-22

    The present invention discloses a carbon nanotube (SWNT)-polymer composite actuator and method to make such actuator. A series of uniform composites was prepared by dispersing purified single wall nanotubes with varying weight percents into a polymer matrix, followed by solution casting. The resulting nanotube-polymer composite was then successfully used to form a nanotube polymer actuator.

  3. Carbon nanotubes reinforced chitosan films: mechanical properties and cell response of a novel biomaterial for cardiovascular tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroustalli, A; Zisimopoulou, A E; Koch, S; Rongen, L; Deligianni, D; Diamantouros, S; Athanassiou, G; Kokozidou, M; Mavrilas, D; Jockenhoevel, S

    2013-12-01

    Carbon nanotubes have been proposed as fillers to reinforce polymeric biomaterials for the strengthening of their structural integrity to achieve better biomechanical properties. In this study, a new polymeric composite material was introduced by incorporating various low concentrations of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) into chitosan (CS), aiming at achieving a novel composite biomaterial with superior mechanical and biological properties compared to neat CS, in order to be used in cardiovascular tissue engineering applications. Both mechanical and biological characteristics in contact with the two relevant cell types (endothelial cells and vascular myofibroblasts) were studied. Regarding the mechanical behavior of MWCNT reinforced CS (MWCNT/CS), 5 and 10 % concentrations of MWCNTs enhanced the mechanical behavior of CS, with that of 5 % exhibiting a superior mechanical strength compared to 10 % concentration and neat CS. Regarding biological properties, MWCNT/CS best supported proliferation of endothelial and myofibroblast cells, MWCNTs and MWCNT/CS caused no apoptosis and were not toxic of the examined cell types. Conclusively, the new material could be suitable for tissue engineering (TE) and particularly for cardiovascular TE applications.

  4. Electrochemical sensing of DNA immobilization and hybridization based on carbon nanotubes/nano zinc oxide/chitosan composite film

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Zhang; Tao Yang; Da Ming Huang; Kui Jiao

    2008-01-01

    A novel electrochemical DNA biosensor based on zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs)for DNA immobilization and enhanced hybridization detection is presented. The MWNTs/nano ZnO/chitosan composite filmmodified glassy carbon electrode (MWNTs/ZnO/CHIT/GCE) was fabricated and DNA probes were immobilized on the electrodesurface. The hybridization events were monitored by differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) using methylene blue (MB) as anindicator. The sensor can effectively discriminate different DNA sequences related to PAT gene in the.transgenic corn, with adetection limit of 2.8×10-12 mol/L of target sequence.2008 Kui Jiao. Published by Elsevier B.V. on behalf of Chinese Chemical Society. All rights reserved.

  5. Adsorption of Gases on Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mbaye, Mamadou Thiao

    2014-01-01

    This research focus in studying the interaction between various classical and quantum gases with novel carbon nanostructures, mainly carbon nanotubes (CNTs). Since their discovery by the Japanese physicist Sumio Iijima [1] carbon nanotubes have, experimentally and theoretically, been subjected to many scientific investigation. Studies of adsorption on CNTs are particularly directed toward their better usage in gas storage, gas separation, catalyst, drug delivery, and water purification. We explore the adsorption of different gases entrapped in a single, double, or multi-bundles of CNTs using computer simulations. The first system we investigate consists of Ar and Kr films adsorbed on zigzag or armchair nanotubes. Our simulations revealed that Kr atoms on intermediate size zigzag NTs undergo two phase transitions: A liquid-vapor (L→V), and liquid-commensurate (L→CS) with a fractional coverage of one Kr atoms adsorbed for every four carbon atoms. For Ar on zigzag and armchair NTs, the only transition observed is a L→V. In the second problem, we explore the adsorption of CO2 molecules in a nanotube bundle and calculate the isosteric heat of adsorption of the entrapped molecules within the groove. We observed that the lower the temperature, the higher the isosteric of adsorption. Last, we investigate the adsorption of hydrogen, Helium, and Neon gases on the groove site of two parallel nanotubes. At low temperature, the transverse motion on the plane perpendicular to the tubes' axis is frozen out and as a consequence, the heat capacity is reduced to 1/2. At high temperature, the atoms gain more degree of freedom and as a consequence the heat capacity is 5/2.

  6. Modified carbon nanotubes and methods of forming carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heintz, Amy M.; Risser, Steven; Elhard, Joel D.; Moore, Bryon P.; Liu, Tao; Vijayendran, Bhima R.

    2016-06-14

    In this invention, processes which can be used to achieve stable doped carbon nanotubes are disclosed. Preferred CNT structures and morphologies for achieving maximum doping effects are also described. Dopant formulations and methods for achieving doping of a broad distribution of tube types are also described.

  7. Surface-enhanced oxidation and detection of Sunset Yellow and Tartrazine using multi-walled carbon nanotubes film-modified electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Weikang; Liu, Tao; Zheng, Xiaojiang; Huang, Wensheng; Wan, Chidan

    2009-11-01

    The insoluble multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNT) was successfully dispersed into water in the presence of hydrophobic surfactant. After that, MWNT film-coated glassy carbon electrode (GCE) was achieved via dip-coating and evaporating water. Owing to huge surface area, high sorption capacity and subtle electronic properties, MWNT film exhibits highly efficient accumulation efficiency as well as considerable surface enhancement effects to Sunset Yellow and Tartrazine. As a result, the oxidation peak currents of Sunset Yellow and Tartrazine remarkably increase at the MWNT film-modified GCE. Based on this, a novel electrochemical method was developed for the simultaneous determination of Sunset Yellow and Tartrazine. The limits of detection are 10.0 ng mL(-1) (2.2 x 10(-8)mol L(-1)) and 0.1 microg mL(-1) (1.88 x 10(-7)mol L(-1)) for Sunset Yellow and Tartrazine. Finally, the proposed method was successfully used to detect Sunset Yellow and Tartrazine in soft drinks.

  8. Electromagnetic interference shielding effectiveness of composite carbon nanotube macro-film at a high frequency range of 40 GHz to 60 GHz

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zi Ping Wu

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The electromagnetic interference (EMI shielding effectiveness (SE of carbon nanotube (CNT macro-film that is adhered to common cloth to maintain the light weight, silk-like quality, and smooth surface of the material for EMI shielding is investigated. The results show that a high and stable EMI SE of 48 dB to 57 dB at 40 GHz to 60 GHz was obtained by the macro-film with a thickness of only ∼4 μm. The composite CNT macro-film is easily manipulated, and its EMI property is significantly different from that of traditional electromagnetic shielding materials that show a lower EMI SE with increasing frequency. For example, the EMI SE of Cu foils decrease from 75 dB to 35 dB as frequency increases from 25 GHz to 60 GHz. Considering their stable and outstanding EMI SE and easy manipulation, the composite CNT macro-films are expected to have potential applications in shielding against millimeter waves.

  9. Pyrolyzed thin film carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tai, Yu-Chong (Inventor); Liger, Matthieu (Inventor); Harder, Theodore (Inventor); Konishi, Satoshi (Inventor); Miserendino, Scott (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A method of making carbon thin films comprises depositing a catalyst on a substrate, depositing a hydrocarbon in contact with the catalyst and pyrolyzing the hydrocarbon. A method of controlling a carbon thin film density comprises etching a cavity into a substrate, depositing a hydrocarbon into the cavity, and pyrolyzing the hydrocarbon while in the cavity to form a carbon thin film. Controlling a carbon thin film density is achieved by changing the volume of the cavity. Methods of making carbon containing patterned structures are also provided. Carbon thin films and carbon containing patterned structures can be used in NEMS, MEMS, liquid chromatography, and sensor devices.

  10. Quantum transport in carbon nanotubes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laird, E.A.; Kuemmeth, F.; Steele, G.A.; Grove-Rasmussen, K.; Nygard, J.; Flensberg, K.; Kouwenhoven, L.P.

    2015-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes are a versatile material in which many aspects of condensed matter physics come together. Recent discoveries have uncovered new phenomena that completely change our understanding of transport in these devices, especially the role of the spin and valley degrees of freedom. This revie

  11. A Comparative Study of Three Different Chemical Vapor Deposition Techniques of Carbon Nanotube Growth on Diamond Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Betty T. Quinton

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper compares between the methods of growing carbon nanotubes (CNTs on diamond substrates and evaluates the quality of the CNTs and the interfacial strength. One potential application for these materials is a heat sink/spreader for high-power electronic devices. The CNTs and diamond substrates have a significantly higher specific thermal conductivity than traditional heat sink/spreader materials making them good replacement candidates. Only limited research has been performed on these CNT/diamond structures and their suitability of different growth methods. This study investigates three potential chemical vapor deposition (CVD techniques for growing CNTs on diamond: thermal CVD (T-CVD, microwave plasma-enhanced CVD (MPE-CVD, and floating catalyst thermal CVD (FCT-CVD. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM were used to analyze the morphology and topology of the CNTs. Raman spectroscopy was used to assess the quality of the CNTs by determining the ID/IG peak intensity ratios. Additionally, the CNT/diamond samples were sonicated for qualitative comparisons of the durability of the CNT forests. T-CVD provided the largest diameter tubes, with catalysts residing mainly at the CNT/diamond interface. The MPE-CVD process yielded non uniform defective CNTs, and FCT-CVD resulted in the smallest diameter CNTs with catalyst particles imbedded throughout the length of the nanotubes.

  12. Scalable nanomanufacturing of surfactant-free carbon nanotube inks for spray coatings with high conductivity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Colin Preston[1; Da Song[1; Jaiqi Dai[1; Zois Tsinas[2; John Bavier[3; John Cumings[1; Vince Ballarotto[3; Liangbing Hu[1

    2015-01-01

    Spray-coated carbon nanotube films offer a simple and printable solution for fabricating low cost, lightweight, and flexible thin-film electronics. However, current nanotube spray inks require either a disruptive surfactant or destructive surface functionalization to stabilize dispersions at the cost of the electrical properties of the deposited film. We demonstrate that high-purity few-walled carbon nanotubes may be stabilized in isopropanol after surface functionalization and that optimizing the ink stability dramatically enhances the conductivity of subsequent spray-coated thin films. We consequently report a surfactant-free carbon nanotube ink for spray-coated thin films with conductivities reaching 2,100 S/cm. Zeta-potential measurements, used to quantify the nanotube ink dispersion quality, directly demonstrate a positive correlation with the spray- coated film conductivity, which is the key metric for high-performance printed electronics.

  13. The effect of extended polymer chains on the properties of transparent multi-walled carbon nanotubes/poly(methyl methacrylate/acrylic acid) film.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yuan-Li; Tien, Hsi-Wen; Ma, Chen-Chi M; Yu, Yi-Hsiuan; Yang, Shin-Yi; Wei, Ming-Hsiung; Wu, Sheng-Yen

    2010-05-07

    Optically transparent and electrically conductive thin films composed of multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) reinforced polymethyl methacrylate/acrylic acid (PMMA/AA) were fabricated using a wire coating technique. Poly(acrylic acid) controls the level of MWCNT dispersion in aqueous mixtures and retains the well-dispersed state in the polymer matrix after solidification resulting from extended polymer chains by adjusting the pH value. The exfoliating the MWCNT bundles by extended polymer chains results in the excellent dispersion of MWCNT. It causes a lower surface electrical resistance at the same MWCNT content. The hydrophilic functional groups (-COO( - )NA( + )) also caused a decrease in the crystallization of PMMA and led to an increase in the transmittance.

  14. Spontaneous and specific myogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells on polyethylene glycol-linked multi-walled carbon nanotube films for skeletal muscle engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Chunyan; Andersen, Henrik; Ozyilmaz, Barbaros; Ramaprabhu, Sundara; Pastorin, Giorgia; Ho, Han Kiat

    2015-10-01

    This study explored the influence of polyethylene glycol-linked multi-walled carbon nanotube (PEG-CNT) films on skeletal myogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). PEG-CNT films were prepared with nanoscale surface roughness, orderly arrangement of PEG-CNTs, high hydrophilicity and high mechanical strength. Notably, PEG-CNT films alone could direct the skeletal myogenic differentiation of hMSCs in the absence of myogenic induction factors. The quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) showed that the non-induced hMSCs plated on the PEG-CNT films, compared to the negative control, presented significant up-regulation of general myogenic markers including early commitment markers of myoblast differentiation protein-1 (MyoD) and desmin, as well as a late phase marker of myosin heavy chain-2 (MHC). Corresponding protein analysis by immunoblot assays corroborated these results. Skeletal muscle-specific markers, fast skeletal troponin-C (TnC) and ryanodine receptor-1 (Ryr) were also significantly increased in the non-induced hMSCs on PEG-CNT films by RT-PCR. For these cells, the commitment to specific skeletal myoblasts was further proved by the absence of enhanced adipogenic, chondrogenic and osteogenic markers. This study elucidated that PEG-CNT films supported a dedicated differentiation of hMSCs into a skeletal myogenic lineage and can work as a promising material towards skeletal muscle injury repair.This study explored the influence of polyethylene glycol-linked multi-walled carbon nanotube (PEG-CNT) films on skeletal myogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). PEG-CNT films were prepared with nanoscale surface roughness, orderly arrangement of PEG-CNTs, high hydrophilicity and high mechanical strength. Notably, PEG-CNT films alone could direct the skeletal myogenic differentiation of hMSCs in the absence of myogenic induction factors. The quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) showed

  15. Carbon nanotube-graphene composite film as transparent conductive electrode for GaN-based light-emitting diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Chun Hong; Shen, Chao; M. Saheed, M. Shuaib; Mohamed, Norani Muti; Ng, Tien Khee; Ooi, Boon S.; Burhanudin, Zainal Arif

    2016-08-01

    Transparent conductive electrodes (TCE) made of carbon nanotube (CNT) and graphene composite for GaN-based light emitting diodes (LED) are presented. The TCE with 533-Ω/□ sheet resistance and 88% transmittance were obtained when chemical-vapor-deposition grown graphene was fused across CNT networks. With an additional 2-nm thin NiOx interlayer between the TCE and top p-GaN layer of the LED, the forward voltage was reduced to 5.12 V at 20-mA injection current. Four-fold improvement in terms of light output power was observed. The improvement can be ascribed to the enhanced lateral current spreading across the hybrid CNT-graphene TCE before injection into the p-GaN layer.

  16. Gold nanoparticles/water-soluble carbon nanotubes/aromatic diamine polymer composite films for highly sensitive detection of cellobiose dehydrogenase gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeng Guangming, E-mail: zgming@hnu.cn [College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Key Laboratory of Environmental Biology and Pollution Control (Hunan University), Ministry of Education, Changsha 410082 (China); Li Zhen, E-mail: happylizhen@yeah.ne [College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Key Laboratory of Environmental Biology and Pollution Control (Hunan University), Ministry of Education, Changsha 410082 (China); Tang Lin; Wu Mengshi; Lei Xiaoxia; Liu Yuanyuan; Liu Can; Pang Ya; Zhang Yi [College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Key Laboratory of Environmental Biology and Pollution Control (Hunan University), Ministry of Education, Changsha 410082 (China)

    2011-05-01

    Highlights: > Gold nanoparticles/multiwalled carbon nanotubes/poly (1,5-naphthalenediamine) modified electrode was fabricated. > The sensor was applied for the detection of cellobiose dehydrogenase genes. > An effective method to distribute MWCNTs and attach to the electrode was proposed. > The composite films greatly improved the sensitivity and enhanced the DNA immobilization. > The DNA biosensor exhibited fairly high sensitivity and quite low detection limit. - Abstract: An electrochemical sensor based on gold nanoparticles (GNPs)/multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs)/poly (1,5-naphthalenediamine) films modified glassy carbon electrode (GCE) was fabricated. The effectiveness of the sensor was confirmed by sensitive detection of cellobiose dehydrogenase (CDH) gene which was extracted from Phanerochaete chrysosporium using polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The monomer of 1,5-naphthalenediamine was electropolymerized on the GCE surface with abundant free amino groups which enhanced the stability of MWCNTs modified electrode. Congo red (CR)-functionalized MWCNTs possess excellent conductivity as well as high solubility in water which enabled to form the uniform and stable network nanostructures easily and created a large number of binding sites for electrodeposition of GNPs. The continuous GNPs together with MWCNTs greatly increased the surface area, conductivity and electrocatalytic activity. This electrode structure significantly improved the sensitivity of sensor and enhanced the DNA immobilization and hybridization. The thiol modified capture probes were immobilized onto the composite films-modified GCE by a direct formation of thiol-Au bond and horseradish peroxidase-streptavidin (HRP-SA) conjugates were labeled to the biotinylated detection probes through biotin-streptavidin bond. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and cyclic voltammetry (CV) were used to investigate the film assembly and DNA hybridization processes

  17. Peel test of spinnable carbon nanotube webs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khandoker, Noman; Hawkins, Stephen C.; Ibrahim, Raafat; Huynh, Chi P.

    2014-06-01

    This paper presents results of peel tests with spinnable carbon nanotube webs. Peel tests were performed to study the effect of orientation angles on interface energies between nanotubes. In absence of any binding agent the interface energy represents the Van Der Waals energies between the interacting nanotubes. Therefore, the effect of the orientations on Van Der Waals energies between carbon nanotubes is obtained through the peel test. It is shown that the energy for crossed nanotubes at 90° angle is lower than the energy for parallel nanotubes at 0° angle. This experimental observation was validated by hypothetical theoretical calculations.

  18. From carbon nanotubes to carbon atomic chains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casillas García, Gilberto; Zhang, Weijia; José-Yacamán, Miguel

    2010-10-01

    Carbyne is a linear allotrope of carbon. It is formed by a linear arrangement of carbon atoms with sp-hybridization. We present a reliable and reproducible experiment to obtain these carbon atomic chains using few-layer-graphene (FLG) sheets and a HRTEM. First the FLG sheets were synthesized from worm-like exfoliated graphite and then drop-casted on a lacey-carbon copper grid. Once in the TEM, two holes are opened near each other in a FLG sheet by focusing the electron beam into a small spot. Due to the radiation, the carbon atoms rearrange themselves between the two holes and form carbon fibers. The beam is concentrated on the carbon fibers in order excite the atoms and induce a tension until multi wall carbon nanotube (MWCNT) is formed. As the radiation continues the MWCNT breaks down until there is only a single wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT). Then, when the SWCNT breaks, an atomic carbon chain is formed, lasts for several seconds under the radiation and finally breaks. This demonstrates the stability of this carbon structure.

  19. Attachment of Gold Nanoparticles to Carbon Nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xi Cheng MA; Ning LUN; Shu Lin WEN

    2005-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes were initially chemically modified with an H2SO4-HNO3 treatment,and subsequently activated with Pd-Sn catalytic nuclei via a one-step activation approach. These activated nanotubes were used as precursors for obtaining gold nanoparticles-attached nanotubes via simple electroless plating. This approach provides an efficient method for attachment of metal nanostructures to carbon nanotubes. Such novel hybrid nanostructures are attractive for many applications.

  20. Advanced Physical Chemistry of Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jun; Pandey, Gaind P.

    2015-04-01

    The past decade has seen a surge of exciting research and applications of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) stimulated by deeper understanding of their fundamental properties and increasing production capability. The intrinsic properties of various CNTs were found to strongly depend on their internal microstructures. This review summarizes the fundamental structure-property relations of seamless tube-like single- and multiwalled CNTs and conically stacked carbon nanofibers, as well as the organized architectures of these CNTs (including randomly stacked thin films, parallel aligned thin films, and vertically aligned arrays). It highlights the recent development of CNTs as key components in selected applications, including nanoelectronics, filtration membranes, transparent conductive electrodes, fuel cells, electrical energy storage devices, and solar cells. Particular emphasis is placed on the link between the basic physical chemical properties of CNTs and the organized CNT architectures with their functions and performance in each application.

  1. Carbon nanotube growth by PECVD: a review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyyappan, M; Delzeit, Lance; Cassell, Alan; Hash, David [NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States)

    2003-05-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs), due to their unique electronic and extraordinary mechanical properties, have been receiving much attention for a wide variety of applications. Recently, plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD) has emerged as a key growth technique to produce vertically-aligned nanotubes. This paper reviews various plasma sources currently used in CNT growth, catalyst preparation and growth results. Since the technology is in its early stages, there is a general lack of understanding of growth mechanisms, the role of the plasma itself, and the identity of key species responsible for growth. This review is aimed at the low temperature plasma research community that has successfully addressed such issues, through plasma and surface diagnostics and modelling, in semiconductor processing and diamond thin film growth.

  2. Carbon nanotubes: present and future commercial applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Volder, Michael F L; Tawfick, Sameh H; Baughman, Ray H; Hart, A John

    2013-02-01

    Worldwide commercial interest in carbon nanotubes (CNTs) is reflected in a production capacity that presently exceeds several thousand tons per year. Currently, bulk CNT powders are incorporated in diverse commercial products ranging from rechargeable batteries, automotive parts, and sporting goods to boat hulls and water filters. Advances in CNT synthesis, purification, and chemical modification are enabling integration of CNTs in thin-film electronics and large-area coatings. Although not yet providing compelling mechanical strength or electrical or thermal conductivities for many applications, CNT yarns and sheets already have promising performance for applications including supercapacitors, actuators, and lightweight electromagnetic shields.

  3. Carbon nanotubes: controlled growth and application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang Liu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Notable progress has been made on the synthesis, properties and uses of carbon nanotubes (CNTs in the past two decades. However, the controlled growth of single-wall CNTs (SWCNTs with predefined and uniform structures remains a big challenge, and making full use of CNTs in applications still requires great effort. In this article, our strategies and recent progress on the controlled synthesis of SWCNTs by chemical vapor deposition are reviewed, and the applications of CNTs in lithium-ion batteries, transparent conductive films, and as connectors of metal atomic chains are discussed. Finally, future prospects for CNTs are considered.

  4. Film fabrication of Fe or Fe3O4 nanoparticles mixed with palmitic acid for vertically aligned carbon nanotube growth using Langmuir-Blodgett technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Kentaro; Kuriyama, Naoki; Takagiwa, Shota; Sato, Taiga; Kushida, Masahito

    2016-03-01

    Vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (VA-CNTs) were studied as a new catalyst support for polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs). Controlling the number density and the diameter of VA-CNTs may be necessary to optimize PEFC performance. As the catalyst for CNT growth, we fabricated Fe or Fe3O4 nanoparticle (NP) films by the Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) technique. The catalyst Fe or Fe3O4 NPs were widely separated by mixing with filler molecules [palmitic acid (C16)]. The number density of VA-CNTs was controlled by varying the ratio of catalyst NPs to C16 filler molecules. The VA-CNTs were synthesized from the catalyst NP-C16 LB films by thermal chemical vapor deposition (CVD) using acetylene gas as the carbon source. The developing solvents used in the LB technique and the hydrogen reduction conditions of CVD were optimized to improve the VA-CNT growth rate. We demonstrate that the proposed method can independently control both the density and the diameter of VA-CNTs.

  5. Effects of Ambient Air and Temperature on Ionic Gel Gated Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Thin-Film Transistor and Circuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huaping; Zhou, Lili

    2015-10-21

    Single-walled carbon nanotube thin-film transistor (SWCNT TFT) and circuits were fabricated by fully inkjet printing gold nanoparticles as source/drain electrodes, semiconducting SWCNT thin films as channel materials, PS-PMMA-PS/EMIM TFSI composite gel as gate dielectrics, and PEDOT/PSS as gate electrodes. The ionic gel gated SWCNT TFT shows reversible conversion from p-type transistor behavior in air to ambipolar features under vacuum due to reversible oxygen doping in semiconducting SWCNT thin films. The threshold voltages of ionic gel gated SWCNT TFT and inverters are largely shifted to the low value (0.5 V for p-region and 1.0 V for n-region) by vacuum annealing at 140 °C to exhausively remove water that is incorporated in the ionic gel as floating gates. The vacuum annealed ionic gel gated SWCNT TFT shows linear temperature dependent transconductances and threshold voltages for both p- and n-regions. The strong temperature dependent transconductances (0.08 μS/K for p-region, 0.4 μS/K for n-region) indicate their potential application in thermal sensors. In the other hand, the weak temperature dependent threshold voltages (-1.5 mV/K for p-region, -1.1 mV/K for n-region) reflect their excellent thermal stability.

  6. Engineered Molecular Chain Ordering in Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes/Polyaniline Composite Films for High-Performance Organic Thermoelectric Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liming; Yao, Qin; Xiao, Juanxiu; Zeng, Kaiyang; Qu, Sanyin; Shi, Wei; Wang, Qun; Chen, Lidong

    2016-06-21

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs)/polyaniline (PANI) composite films with enhanced thermoelectric properties were prepared by combining in situ polymerization and solution processing. Conductive atomic force microscopy and X-ray diffraction measurements confirmed that solution processing and strong π-π interactions between the PANI and SWNTs induced the PANI molecules to form a highly ordered structure. The improved degree of order of the PANI molecular arrangement increased the carrier mobility and thereby enhanced the electrical transport properties of PANI. The maximum in-plane electrical conductivity and power factor of the SWNTs/PANI composite films reached 1.44×10(3)  S cm(-1) and 217 μW m(-1)  K(-2) , respectively, at room temperature. Furthermore, a thermoelectric generator fabricated with the SWNTs/PANI composite films showed good electric generation ability and stability. A high power density of 10.4 μW cm(-2)  K(-1) was obtained, which is superior to most reported results obtained in organic thermoelectric modules.

  7. Structure, electronic properties, and aggregation behavior of hydroxylated carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    López-Oyama, A. B.; Silva-Molina, R. A.; Ruíz-García, J.; Guirado-López, R. A., E-mail: guirado@ifisica.uaslp.mx [Instituto de Física “Manuel Sandoval Vallarta,” Universidad Autónoma de San Luis Potosí, Álvaro Obregón 64, 78000 San Luis Potosí, San Luis Potosí (Mexico); Gámez-Corrales, R. [Departamento de Física, Universidad de Sonora, Apartado Postal 5-088, 83190, Hermosillo, Sonora (Mexico)

    2014-11-07

    We present a combined experimental and theoretical study to analyze the structure, electronic properties, and aggregation behavior of hydroxylated multiwalled carbon nanotubes (OH–MWCNT). Our MWCNTs have average diameters of ∼2 nm, lengths of approximately 100–300 nm, and a hydroxyl surface coverage θ∼0.1. When deposited on the air/water interface the OH–MWCNTs are partially soluble and the floating units interact and link with each other forming extended foam-like carbon networks. Surface pressure-area isotherms of the nanotube films are performed using the Langmuir balance method at different equilibration times. The films are transferred into a mica substrate and atomic force microscopy images show that the foam like structure is preserved and reveals fine details of their microstructure. Density functional theory calculations performed on model hydroxylated carbon nanotubes show that low energy atomic configurations are found when the OH groups form molecular islands on the nanotube's surface. This patchy behavior for the OH species is expected to produce nanotubes having reduced wettabilities, in line with experimental observations. OH doping yields nanotubes having small HOMO–LUMO energy gaps and generates a nanotube → OH direction for the charge transfer leading to the existence of more hole carriers in the structures. Our synthesized OH–MWCNTs might have promising applications.

  8. Bloch oscillations in carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jódar, Esther; Pérez-Garrido, Antonio; Rojas, Fernando

    2009-05-27

    Bloch oscillations arise when electrons are in a one-dimensional linear chain of atoms under a constant electric field. In this paper we show numerically that electrons in different types of carbon nanotubes show oscillations with a Bloch frequency proportional to the constant electric field applied along the nanotube axis. We show these oscillations, calculating the quadratic displacement as a function of the electric field. Because of the double periodicity of the nanotubes' geometry (the lattice constant and the lines of atoms) two frequencies appear, one twice the value of the other. These frequencies coincide perfectly with those predicted for a linear chain of atoms, taking into account the periodicity considered in each case.

  9. Bloch oscillations in carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jodar, Esther; Perez-Garrido, Antonio [Departamento Fisica Aplicada, Antiguo Hospital de Marina Campus Muralla del Mar, UPCT, Cartagena 30202 Murcia (Spain); Rojas, Fernando [Centro de Nanociencias y Nanotecnologia-UNAM, Apartado Postal 356, Ensenada, Baja California 22800 (Mexico)], E-mail: ejodar@upct.es

    2009-05-27

    Bloch oscillations arise when electrons are in a one-dimensional linear chain of atoms under a constant electric field. In this paper we show numerically that electrons in different types of carbon nanotubes show oscillations with a Bloch frequency proportional to the constant electric field applied along the nanotube axis. We show these oscillations, calculating the quadratic displacement as a function of the electric field. Because of the double periodicity of the nanotubes' geometry (the lattice constant and the lines of atoms) two frequencies appear, one twice the value of the other. These frequencies coincide perfectly with those predicted for a linear chain of atoms, taking into account the periodicity considered in each case. (fast track communication)

  10. Effect of Nanotube Film Thickness on the Performance of Nanotube-Silicon Hybrid Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel D. Tune

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The results of measurements on solar cells made from randomly aligned thin films of single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs on n-type monocrystalline silicon are presented. The films are made by vacuum filtration from aqueous TritonX-100 suspensions of large diameter arc-discharge SWCNTs. The dependence of the solar cell performance on the thickness of the SWCNT film is shown in detail, as is the variation in performance due to doping of the SWCNT film with SOCl2.

  11. Reinforced membrane based on crosslink reaction between water soluble sulfonated carbon nanotubes and sulfonated polystyrene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Ying; Hong, Haiping; Welsh, Jeffry S.

    2008-08-01

    Reinforced films based on sulfonated polystyrene cross-linked with water-soluble sulfonated carbon nanotubes were fabricated using a free-standing film-making method. Transmission and scanning electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and thermo-gravimetric analysis were used to verify the cross-linking reaction. The mechanical properties of these films demonstrated that the tensile strength increases with an increase in the sulfonated nanotube concentration. At 5 wt% nanotube loading, the tensile strength increased 84% compared with polymer containing no nanotube loading. The relationships between structure and mechanical properties are discussed and a possible direction for making ultra thin and ultra lightweight film is proposed

  12. Application of a Cu-chitosan/multiwalled carbon nanotube film-modified electrode for the sensitive determination of rutin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gholivand, Mohammad Bagher; Mohammadi-Behzad, Leila; Hosseinkhani, Hossein

    2016-01-15

    A new sensitive electrochemical sensor, a glassy carbon electrode modified with chemically cross-linked copper-complexed chitosan/multiwalled carbon nanotubes (Cu-CS/MWCNT/GCE), for rutin analysis was constructed. Experimental investigations of the influence of several parameters showed that the rutin can effectively accumulate on the surface of the Cu-CS/MWCNT/GCE, which accumulation caused a pair of well-defined redox peaks in the electrochemical signal when measurements were carried out in Britton-Robinson buffer solution (pH 3, 0.04 M). The surface of the Cu-CS/MWCNT/GCE was characterized by field-emission scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and X-ray diffractometry analysis. In a rutin concentration range of 0.05-100 μM and under optimized conditions, a linear relationship between the oxidation peak current of rutin and its concentration was obtained with a detection limit of 0.01 μM. The Cu-CS/MWCNT/GCE showed good selectivity, stability, and reproducibility. Moreover, the sensor was used to determine the presence of rutin in fruits with satisfactory results.

  13. Sensitive amperometric determination of methimazole based on the electrocatalytic effect of rutin/multi-walled carbon nanotube film.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorraji, Parisa S; Jalali, Fahimeh

    2015-02-01

    Electrochemical deposition was used to prepare a glassy carbon electrode modified with multi-walled carbon nanotubes and the glycosidic compound, rutin (R/MWCNTs/GCE). Cyclic voltammetry of the modified electrode in aqueous solution (pH8) showed a pair of well-defined, stable and reversible redox peaks with surface confined characteristics. The catechol moiety of rutin produced the voltammetric peaks via a 2 electron, 2 proton mechanism in the range of 0.0-0.4V (vs. Ag/AgCl). The transfer coefficient (α), heterogeneous electron transfer rate constant (ks), and surface concentration (Γ) for R/MWCNTs/GCE were calculated by using the cyclic voltammetric data. The modified electrode showed excellent catalytic activity toward oxidation of methimazole. Fixed-potential amperometry was used for sub-micromolar determination of methimazole at pH8. Linear dependence of anodic current to methimazole concentration was obtained in the range of 0.1-26μM of the drug with a limit of detection at 18nM. The modified electrode retained its initial response for at least 2weeks if stored in dry ambient conditions. The electrode was used for the amperometric determination of methimazole in formulations and spiked blood serum samples, successfully.

  14. Single wall carbon nanotubes and their electrical properties

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    薛增泉; 刘惟敏; 侯士敏; 施祖进; 顾镇南; 刘虹雯; 赵兴钰; 张兆祥; 吴绵雷; 彭练矛; 吴全德

    2000-01-01

    Single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) were synthesized and purified. A water colloid of SWCNTs was prepared and used to assemble SWCNTs onto a gold film surface. Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) images showed that short SWCNTs stood on gold film surfaces. Using STM tips made of SWCNTs, a crystal grain image of a gold thin film and an atomic resolution image of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite were successfully obtained. The electrical properties of short SWCNTs, which stood on the surface of gold film, were measured using STM. That SWCNTs stand on gold thin films is a promising technique for studying structures and properties of carbon nanotubes, as well as assembling and fabricating high-intensity coherent electron sources, field emission flat panel display, tips for scanning probe microscopes, new nanoelectronic devices, etc.

  15. Sol-gel thin-film based mesoporous silica and carbon nanotubes for the determination of dopamine, uric acid and paracetamol in urine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canevari, Thiago C; Raymundo-Pereira, Paulo A; Landers, Richard; Benvenutti, Edilson V; Machado, Sérgio A S

    2013-11-15

    This work describes the preparation, characterization and application of a hybrid material composed of disordered mesoporous silica (SiO2) modified with multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), obtained by the sol-gel process using HF as the catalyst. This hybrid material was characterized by N2 adsorption-desorption isotherms, X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), high resolution transmission microscopy (HR-TEM), Raman spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). This new hybrid material was used for the construction of a thin film on a glassy carbon electrode. The modified electrode using this material was designated SiO2/MWCNT/GCE. The electrocatalytic properties of the electrode toward dopamine, uric acid and paracetamol oxidation were studied by differential pulse voltammetry. Well-defined and separated oxidation peaks were observed in phosphate buffer solution at pH 7.0, in contrast with the ill-defined peaks observed with unmodified glassy carbon electrodes. The electrode had high sensitivity for the determination of dopamine, uric acid and paracetamol, with the limits of detection obtained using statistical methods, at 0.014, 0.068 and 0.098 µmol L(-1), respectively. The electrode presented some important advantages, including enhanced physical rigidity, surface renewability by polishing and high sensitivity, allowing the simultaneous determination of these three analytes in a human urine sample.

  16. Pressure-Induced Interlinking of Carbon Nanotubes

    OpenAIRE

    Yildirim, T.; Gulseren, O.; Kilic, C.; Ciraci, S.

    2000-01-01

    We predict new forms of carbon consisting of one and two dimensional networks of interlinked single wall carbon nanotubes, some of which are energetically more stable than van der Waals packing of the nanotubes on a hexagonal lattice. These interlinked nanotubes are further transformed with higher applied external pressures to more dense and complicated stable structures, in which curvature-induced carbon sp$^{3}$ re-hybridizations are formed. We also discuss the energetics of the bond format...

  17. Different Technical Applications of Carbon Nanotubes

    OpenAIRE

    Abdalla, S; Al-Marzouki, F.; Ahmed A. Al-Ghamdi; Abdel-Daiem, A.

    2015-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes have been of great interest because of their simplicity and ease of synthesis. The novel properties of nanostructured carbon nanotubes such as high surface area, good stiffness, and resilience have been explored in many engineering applications. Research on carbon nanotubes have shown the application in the field of energy storage, hydrogen storage, electrochemical supercapacitor, field-emitting devices, transistors, nanoprobes and sensors, composite material, templates, etc....

  18. Faster and Smaller with Carbon Nanotubes?

    OpenAIRE

    Seidel, Robert V.; Graham, Andrew P.; Duesberg, Georg S.; Liebau, Maik; Unger, Eugen; Kreupl, Franz; Hoenlein, Wolfgang

    2004-01-01

    Carbon Nanotubes seem to be one of the most promising candidates for nanoelectronic devices beyond presumable scaling limits of silicon and compound semiconductors and independent from lithographic limitations. Discovered only about a decade ago, there has been a tremendous advance in the field of carbon nanotubes. Their exciting properties, especially with respect to electronic applications, and their fabrication methods will be discussed. A variety of Carbon Nanotube...

  19. Carbon Nanotubes and Related Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kingsuk Mukhopadhyay

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanotubes have attracted the fancy of many scientists world wide. The small dimensions,strength, and the remarkable physical properties of these structures make them a unique material with a whole range of promising applications. In this review, the structural aspects, the advantages and disadvantages of different for their procedures synthesis, the qualitative and quantitative estimation of carbon nanotubes by different analytical techniques, the present status on their applications as well as the current challenges faced in the application field, national, in particular DRDO, DMSRDE status, and interest in this field, have been discussed.Defence Science Journal, 2008, 58(4, pp.437-450, DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.14429/dsj.58.1666

  20. Ballistic Fracturing of Carbon Nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozden, Sehmus; Machado, Leonardo D; Tiwary, ChandraSekhar; Autreto, Pedro A S; Vajtai, Robert; Barrera, Enrique V; Galvao, Douglas S; Ajayan, Pulickel M

    2016-09-21

    Advanced materials with multifunctional capabilities and high resistance to hypervelocity impact are of great interest to the designers of aerospace structures. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with their lightweight and high strength properties are alternative to metals and/or metallic alloys conventionally used in aerospace applications. Here we report a detailed study on the ballistic fracturing of CNTs for different velocity ranges. Our results show that the highly energetic impacts cause bond breakage and carbon atom rehybridizations, and sometimes extensive structural reconstructions were also observed. Experimental observations show the formation of nanoribbons, nanodiamonds, and covalently interconnected nanostructures, depending on impact conditions. Fully atomistic reactive molecular dynamics simulations were also carried out in order to gain further insights into the mechanism behind the transformation of CNTs. The simulations show that the velocity and relative orientation of the multiple colliding nanotubes are critical to determine the impact outcome.

  1. Carbon Nanotubes: Molecular Electronic Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Deepak; Saini, Subhash; Menon, Madhu

    1997-01-01

    The carbon Nanotube junctions have recently emerged as excellent candidates for use as the building blocks in the formation of nanoscale molecular electronic networks. While the simple joint of two dissimilar tubes can be generated by the introduction of a pair of heptagon-pentagon defects in an otherwise perfect hexagonal graphene sheet, more complex joints require other mechanisms. In this work we explore structural characteristics of complex 3-point junctions of carbon nanotubes using a generalized tight-binding molecular-dynamics scheme. The study of pi-electron local densities of states (LDOS) of these junctions reveal many interesting features, most prominent among them being the defect-induced states in the gap.

  2. Torsional Carbon Nanotube Artificial Muscles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foroughi, Javad; Spinks, Geoffrey M.; Wallace, Gordon G.; Oh, Jiyoung; Kozlov, Mikhail E.; Fang, Shaoli; Mirfakhrai, Tissaphern; Madden, John D. W.; Shin, Min Kyoon; Kim, Seon Jeong; Baughman, Ray H.

    2011-10-01

    Rotary motors of conventional design can be rather complex and are therefore difficult to miniaturize; previous carbon nanotube artificial muscles provide contraction and bending, but not rotation. We show that an electrolyte-filled twist-spun carbon nanotube yarn, much thinner than a human hair, functions as a torsional artificial muscle in a simple three-electrode electrochemical system, providing a reversible 15,000° rotation and 590 revolutions per minute. A hydrostatic actuation mechanism, as seen in muscular hydrostats in nature, explains the simultaneous occurrence of lengthwise contraction and torsional rotation during the yarn volume increase caused by electrochemical double-layer charge injection. The use of a torsional yarn muscle as a mixer for a fluidic chip is demonstrated.

  3. Synthesis and characterization of well-aligned carbon nitrogen nanotubes by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Well-aligned carbon nitrogen nanotube films have been synthesized successfully on mesoporous silica substrates by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition (MWPCVD) method. Studies on their morphology, structure, and composition by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), respectively, indicate that these nanotubes consist of linearly polymerized carbon nitrogen nanobells, and the nitrogen atoms have been doped into carbon netweork to form a new structure C1-xNx (x=0.16±0.01). X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) results of the samples further demonstrate that carbon bonds covalently with nitrogen in all the carbon nitrogen nanotube films.

  4. Carbon nanotubes in tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosi, Susanna; Ballerini, Laura; Prato, Maurizio

    2014-01-01

    As a result of their peculiar features, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are emerging in many areas of nanotechnology applications. CNT-based technology has been increasingly proposed for biomedical applications, to develop biomolecule nanocarriers, bionanosensors and smart material for tissue engineering purposes. In the following chapter this latter application will be explored, describing why CNTs can be considered an ideal material able to support and boost the growth and the proliferation of many kinds of tissues.

  5. A Thermal Model for Carbon Nanotube Interconnects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohsin, Kaji Muhammad; Srivastava, Ashok; Sharma, Ashwani K.; Mayberry, Clay

    2013-01-01

    In this work, we have studied Joule heating in carbon nanotube based very large scale integration (VLSI) interconnects and incorporated Joule heating influenced scattering in our previously developed current transport model. The theoretical model explains breakdown in carbon nanotube resistance which limits the current density. We have also studied scattering parameters of carbon nanotube (CNT) interconnects and compared with the earlier work. For 1 µm length single-wall carbon nanotube, 3 dB frequency in S12 parameter reduces to ~120 GHz from 1 THz considering Joule heating. It has been found that bias voltage has little effect on scattering parameters, while length has very strong effect on scattering parameters.

  6. OPPORTUNITIES OF BIOMEDICAL USE OF CARBON NANOTUBES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. V. Mitrofanova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanomaterials  –  materials,  whouse  structure  elements  has  proportions  doesn’t  exceed  100  nm.  In superdispersed state matter acquire new properties. In the last decade, carbon nanotubes become the most popular nanomaterials, that cause attention of representatives of various scientific field. The сarbon nanotubes offer new opportunities for biological and medical applications: imaging at the molecular, cellular and tissue levels, biosensors and electrodes based on carbon nanotubes, target delivery of various substances, radiation and photothermal therapy. The most promising of carbon nanotubes in the context of biomedical applications is their ability to penetrate the various tissues of the body and carry large doses of agents, providing diagnostic and therapeutic effects. Functionalized nanotubes are biodegradable. Other current direction of using carbon nanotubes in medicine and biology is to visualize objects on the molecular, cellular and tissue level. Associated with carbon nanotubes contrasting substances improve the visualization of cells and tissues, which can detected new patterns of development of the pathological process. Due to the vagueness of the question of biocompatibility and cytotoxicity of carbon nanotubes possibility of their practical application is hampered. Before the introduction of carbon nanotubes into practical health care is necessary to provide all the possible consequences of using nanotubes. High rates of properties and development of new nanostructures based on carbon nanotubes in the near future will lead to new advances related to the application and development of new parameters that will determine their properties and effects. In these review attention is paid to the structure, physico-chemical properties of nanotubes, their functionalization, pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics and all aspects of using of carbon nanotubes.

  7. Liquid surface model for carbon nanotube energetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solov'yov, Ilia; Mathew, Maneesh; Solov'yov, Andrey V.;

    2008-01-01

    an important insight in the energetics and stability of nanotubes of different chirality and might be important for the understanding of nanotube growth process. For the computations we use empirical Brenner and Tersoff potentials and discuss their applicability to the study of carbon nanotubes. From......In the present paper we developed a model for calculating the energy of single-wall carbon nanotubes of arbitrary chirality. This model, which we call as the liquid surface model, predicts the energy of a nanotube with relative error less than 1% once its chirality and the total number of atoms...... are known. The parameters of the liquid surface model and its potential applications are discussed. The model has been suggested for open end and capped nanotubes. The influence of the catalytic nanoparticle, atop which nanotubes grow, on the nanotube stability is also discussed. The suggested model gives...

  8. Al3+-directed self-assembly and their electrochemistry properties of three-dimensional dendriform horseradish peroxidase/polyacrylamide/platinum/single-walled carbon nanotube composite film.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Jingsi; Feng, Xiumei; Hu, Jianqiang; Chen, Xiaohua; Li, Aiqing

    2010-01-15

    A novel general methodology for protein immobilization and third-generation biosensor construction is demonstrated, which involves Al(3+)-directed polyacrylamide (PAM) self-assembly into an ordered dendriform structure, easily immobilizing enzymes and nanoparticles. Platinum/single-walled carbon nanotube (Pt/SWCNT) heterojunction nanomaterials were for the first time fabricated via an EDTA-directed synthesis strategy. The Pt/SWCNTs were employed as a supporting matrix to explore a novel immobilization and biosensing platform of redox proteins through cooperating Al(3+)-directed PAM self-assembly. Compared with the almost single-layer horseradish peroxidase (HRP)/PAM film electrode, multilayer HRP/PAM/Pt/SWCNT film electrode exhibited a pair of much stronger redox peaks at -0.22 V (vs. Ag/AgCl). Moreover, with advantages of the ordered multilayer HRP/PAM/Pt/SWCNT film, facilitated direct electron transfer of the metalloenzymes with an apparent heterogeneous electron transfer rate constant (k(s)) of 14.94+/-1.36 s(-1) and smaller peak-to-peak separation (DeltaE(p)) of about 37 mV was acquired on the PAM/Pt/SWCNT-based enzyme electrode. The PAM/Pt/SWCNT-based biosensor demonstrated significant electrocatalytic activity for the reduction of hydrogen peroxide with a small apparent Michaelis-Menten constant (87 microM), wide linear range (1-270 microM), very low detection limit (0.08 microM, S/N=3), and high sensitivity (372 mA cm(-2) M(-1)). Together, these indicated that the Al(3+)-directed HRP/PAM/Pt/SWCNT film was one of ideal candidate materials for direct electrochemistry of redox proteins and the construction of the related enzyme biosensors, and may find potential applications in biomedical, food, and environmental analysis and detection.

  9. Nanotube Film Electrode and an Electroactive Device Fabricated with the Nanotube Film Electrode and Methods for Making Same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Jin Ho (Inventor); Park, Cheol (Inventor); Harrison, Joycelyn S. (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    Disclosed is a single wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) film electrode (FE), all-organic electroactive device systems fabricated with the SWNT-FE, and methods for making same. The SWCNT can be replaced by other types of nanotubes. The SWCNT film can be obtained by filtering SWCNT solution onto the surface of an anodized alumina membrane. A freestanding flexible SWCNT film can be collected by breaking up this brittle membrane. The conductivity of this SWCNT film can advantageously be higher than 280 S/cm. An electroactive polymer (EAP) actuator layered with the SWNT-FE shows a higher electric field-induced strain than an EAP layered with metal electrodes because the flexible SWNT-FE relieves the restraint of the displacement of the polymeric active layer as compared to the metal electrode. In addition, if thin enough, the SWNT-FE is transparent in the visible light range, thus making it suitable for use in actuators used in optical devices.

  10. Enhancement of the optical response in a biodegradable polymer/azo-dye film by the addition of carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz Costanzo, Guadalupe; Ribba, Laura; Goyanes, Silvia; Ledesma, Silvia

    2014-04-01

    A new biodegradable photoresponsive material was developed using poly(lactic acid) (PLA) as the matrix material and Disperse Orange 3 (DO3) as photoisomerizable azo-dye. It was observed that the addition of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) leads to a new phenomenon consisting of an enhancement of the optical anisotropy in a wide range of temperatures. In particular, the optical anisotropy increases 100% at room temperature. Moreover, the material containing MWCNTs shows a faster optical response that is evidenced as an increase in the growth rate of optical anisotropy. Spectroscopic data is provided to study the interaction among DO3, MWCNTs and PLA. The enhancement of optical anisotropy obtained with the addition of MWCNTs was related to the glass transition temperature (Tg) of each material. Maximum optical anisotropy was obtained 15 °C below the Tg for both materials. Results are interpreted in terms of the interactions among DO3, MWCNTs and PLA and the packing density of the dye into the polymer chains. In memory of Professor Iñaki Mondragon.

  11. LDRD final report on carbon nanotube composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cahill, P.A.; Rand, P.B.

    1997-04-01

    Carbon nanotubes and their composites were examined using computational and experimental techniques in order to modify the mechanical and electrical properties of resins. Single walled nanotubes were the focus of the first year effort; however, sufficient quantities of high purity single walled nanotubes could not be obtained for mechanical property investigations. The unusually high electrical conductivity of composites loaded with <1% of multiwalled nanotubes is useful, and is the focus of continuing, externally funded, research.

  12. Effect of gate-dielectrics on the electrical characteristics of solution-processed single-wall-carbon-nanotube thin-film transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Tae-Jun

    2017-02-01

    High performance of solution-processed, single-wall-carbon-nanotube (SWCNT) thin-film transistors (TFTs) is investigated through the use in the different gate-dielectrics of silicon dioxide (SiO2), silicon nitride (SiNx), the bilayers of SiO2 and SiNx, and hexagonal boron-nitride (h-BN) thin films. The different interfacial characteristics affect the electrical characteristics of the SWCNT-TFTs including key device metrics. Significantly, the hysteresis window that is normally observed in drop-casted SWCNT-TFTs was majorly suppressed by the employment of a thin lower dielectric-constant material on a higher dielectricconstant material. Sub-2V operating SWCNT-TFTs with solution-processed h-BN gate dielectrics with good above- and sub-threshold characteristics are also investigated on the basis of interfacial characteristics underlying the device physics. Such performance can be realized by the suppressed interfacial impurity scattering through the chemically clean interface combined with optimized solution-process below 100 °C. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  13. Fabrication of a gas sensor array with micro-wells for VOCs gas sensing based on polymer/carbon nanotube thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Guangzhong; Xie, Tao; Zhu, Tao; Jiang, Yadong; Tai, Huiling

    2014-08-01

    In this paper, gas sensor array with micro-well was designed and prepared by Micro Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) technology. The micro-well and interdigital electrodes of sensor array were prepared using photolithography process, reactive ion etching (RIE) process, wet etching and conventional vacuum evaporation. In the manufacture process of the gas sensor array, KOH wet etching process was mainly discussed. The optimum etching processing parameters were as follows: 30 wt% KOH solution at 80 °C, a cooling back-flow device and a magnetic stirrer. The multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs)-polyethyleneoxide (PEO) and MWNTs-Polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) composite films were utilized as sensitive layers to test gas-sensing properties. Response performances of MWCNTs- PEO and MWNTs-PVP composite films to toluene vapor and methanol vapor at room temperature were investigated. The results revealed that the sensor array showed a larger sensitivity to toluene vapor than to methanol vapor. In addition, the sensing mechanisms were studied as well.

  14. Novel multiwalled carbon nanotubes-polyaniline composite film coated platinum wire for headspace solid-phase microextraction and gas chromatographic determination of phenolic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Wei; Zhao, Faqiong; Zeng, Baizhao

    2009-05-01

    A novel multiwalled carbon nanotubes-polyaniline composite (MWCNTs-PANI) film coated platinum wire was fabricated through electrochemical deposition. The coating was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrophotometry and thermogravimetry. It was found that the coating was porous and had large specific area and adsorption capacity; in the composite MWCNTs and polyaniline interacted with each other and the film kept stable up to 320 degrees C. The as-made fiber was used for the headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME) of some phenolic compounds (i.e. 2-chlorophenol, 2,4-dichlorophenol, 2-methylphenol, 3-methylphenol, 2,6-dimethylphenol, 2-nitrophenol), followed by gas chromatographic analysis. The MWCNTs-PANI coating showed better analytical performance than PANI. Under the optimized conditions, the detection limits were 1.89-65.9 ng L(-1), the relative standard deviations (RSDs) were 2.7-6.5% for six successive measurements with single fiber, the RSDs for fiber-to-fiber were 5.2-12.4%, the linear ranges exceeded two magnitudes with correlation coefficient above 0.992. The fiber could be used for more than 250 times without decrease of efficiency. The proposed method was successfully applied to the extraction and determination of phenolic compounds in water sample, and the recoveries were 87.7-111.5% for different analytes. In addition, the fiber also presented advantages of easy preparation and low cost. Therefore, it is a promising SPME fiber.

  15. Engineering carbon nanotubes and nanotube circuits using electrical breakdown.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, P G; Arnold, M S; Avouris, P

    2001-04-27

    Carbon nanotubes display either metallic or semiconducting properties. Both large, multiwalled nanotubes (MWNTs), with many concentric carbon shells, and bundles or "ropes" of aligned single-walled nanotubes (SWNTs), are complex composite conductors that incorporate many weakly coupled nanotubes that each have a different electronic structure. Here we demonstrate a simple and reliable method for selectively removing single carbon shells from MWNTs and SWNT ropes to tailor the properties of these composite nanotubes. We can remove shells of MWNTs stepwise and individually characterize the different shells. By choosing among the shells, we can convert a MWNT into either a metallic or a semiconducting conductor, as well as directly address the issue of multiple-shell transport. With SWNT ropes, similar selectivity allows us to generate entire arrays of nanoscale field-effect transistors based solely on the fraction of semiconducting SWNTs.

  16. Photovoltaic device using single wall carbon nanotubes and method of fabricating the same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biris, Alexandru S.; Li, Zhongrui

    2012-11-06

    A photovoltaic device and methods for forming the same. In one embodiment, the photovoltaic device has a silicon substrate, and a film comprising a plurality of single wall carbon nanotubes disposed on the silicon substrate, wherein the plurality of single wall carbon nanotubes forms a plurality of heterojunctions with the silicon in the substrate.

  17. Protolytic carbon film technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Renschler, C.L.; White, C.A.

    1996-04-01

    This paper presents a technique for the deposition of polyacrylonitrile (PAN) on virtually any surface allowing carbon film formation with only the caveat that the substrate must withstand carbonization temperatures of at least 600 degrees centigrade. The influence of processing conditions upon the structure and properties of the carbonized film is discussed. Electrical conductivity, microstructure, and morphology control are also described.

  18. Single-walled carbon nanotube/polyaniline/n-silicon solar cells: fabrication, characterization, and performance measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tune, Daniel D; Flavel, Benjamin S; Quinton, Jamie S; Ellis, Amanda V; Shapter, Joseph G

    2013-02-01

    Carbon nanotube-silicon solar cells are a recently investigated photovoltaic architecture with demonstrated high efficiencies. Silicon solar-cell devices fabricated with a thin film of conductive polymer (polyaniline) have been reported, but these devices can suffer from poor performance due to the limited lateral current-carrying capacity of thin polymer films. Herein, hybrid solar-cell devices of a thin film of polyaniline deposited on silicon and covered by a single-walled carbon nanotube film are fabricated and characterized. These hybrid devices combine the conformal coverage given by the polymer and the excellent electrical properties of single-walled carbon nanotube films and significantly outperform either of their component counterparts. Treatment of the silicon base and carbon nanotubes with hydrofluoric acid and a strong oxidizer (thionyl chloride) leads to a significant improvement in performance.

  19. Strain Dependence of Photoluminescense of Individual Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolaev, Pavel N.; Leeuw, Tonya K.; Tsyboulski, Dmitri A.; Bachilo, Sergei M.; Weisman, Bruce; Arepalli, Sivaram

    2007-01-01

    We have investigated strain dependence of photoluminescense (PL) spectra of single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNT). Nanotubes were sparsely dispersed in a thin PMMA film applied to acrylic bar, and strained in both compression and extension by bending this bar in either direction in a homebuilt four-point bending rig. The average surface strain was measured with high accuracy by a resistive strain gage applied on top of the film. The near infrared imaging and spectroscopy were performed on the inverted microscope equipped with high numerical aperture reflective objective lens and InGaAs CCD cameras. PL was excited with a diode laser at either 658, 730 or 785 nm, linearly polarized in the direction of the strain. We were able to measure (n,m) types and orientation of individual nanotubes with respect to strain direction and strain dependence of their PL maxima. It was found that PL peak shifts with respect to the values measured in SDS micelles are a sum of three components. First, a small environmental shift due to difference in the dielectric constant of the surrounding media, that is constant and independent of the nanotube type. Second, shift due to isotropic compression of the film during drying. Third, shifts produced by the uniaxial loading of the film in the experiment. Second and third shifts follow expression based on the first-order expansion of the TB hamiltonian. Their magnitude is proportional to the nanotube chiral angle and strain, and direction is determined by the nanotube quantum number. PL strain dependence measured for a number of various nanotube types allows to estimate TB carbon-carbon transfer integral.

  20. An electrochemical sensor for warfarin determination based on covalent immobilization of quantum dots onto carboxylated multiwalled carbon nanotubes and chitosan composite film modified electrode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gholivand, Mohammad Bagher, E-mail: mbgholivand2013@gmail.com; Mohammadi-Behzad, Leila

    2015-12-01

    A method is described for the construction of a novel electrochemical warfarin sensor based on covalent immobilization of CdS-quantum dots (CdS-QDs) onto carboxylated multiwalled carbon nanotubes/chitosan (CS) composite film on the surface of a glassy carbon electrode. The CdS-QDs/CS/MWCNTs were characterized by field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transform infra-red (FTIR) spectroscopy, XRD analysis and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The sensor showed optimum anodic stripping response within 90 s at an accumulation potential of 0.75 V. The modified electrode was used to detect the concentration of warfarin with a wide linear range of 0.05–80 μM and a detection limit (S/N = 3) of 8.5 nM. The proposed sensor has good storage stability, repeatability and reproducibility and was successfully applied for the determination of warfarin in real samples such as urine, serum and milk. - Highlights: • A new sensitive sensor for warfarin determination was developed. • The sensor was constructed based on covalent immobilization of CdS-QDs on the chitosan/MWCNTs/GCE. • The parameters affecting the stripping analysis of warfarin were optimized. • The proposed sensor is used for trace determination of warfarin in urine, serum and milk.

  1. Hydrogen peroxide biosensor based on gold nanoparticles/thionine/gold nanoparticles/multi-walled carbon nanotubes-chitosans composite film-modified electrode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Shenfeng; Zhu Xiaoying; Zhang Wei; Xie Guoming [Key Laboratory of Laboratory Medical Diagnostics, Ministry of Education, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400016 (China); Feng Wenli, E-mail: fengwlcqmu@sina.com [Key Laboratory of Laboratory Medical Diagnostics, Ministry of Education, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400016 (China)

    2012-01-15

    In this paper, an amperometric electrochemical biosensor for the detection of hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}), based on gold nanoparticles (GNPs)/thionine (Thi)/GNPs/multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs)-chitosans (Chits) composite film was developed. MWCNTs-Chits homogeneous composite was first dispersed in acetic acid solution and then the GNPs were in situ synthesized at the composite. The mixture was dripped on the glassy carbon electrode (GCE) and then the Thi was deposited by electropolymerization by Au-S or Au-N covalent bond effect and electrostatic adsorption effect as an electron transfer mediator. Finally, the mixture of GNPs and horseradish peroxidase (HRP) was assembled onto the modified electrode by covalent bond. The electrochemical behavior of the modified electrode was investigated by scanning electron microscope, cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometry. This study introduces the in situ-synthesized GNPs on the other surface of the modified materials in H{sub 2}O{sub 2} detection. The linear response range of the biosensor to H{sub 2}O{sub 2} concentration was from 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -7} mol L{sup -1} to 1.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3} mol L{sup -1} with a detection limit of 3.75 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -8} mol L{sup -1} (based on S/N = 3).

  2. Effect of Electron Drag on Performances of Carbon Nanotubes as Flow Sensors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    L(ü) Jian-wei; WANG Wan-lu; LIAO Ke-jun; CAO Chun-lan; LIU Cang-lin; ZENG Qing-gao

    2004-01-01

    Experimentally, the electron drag effect on carbon nanotube surface in flowing liquids was investigated. It was found that electric current could be generated in metallic carbon nanotubes immersed in the liquids. Carbon nanotubes were synthesized on Si substrate by hot filament chemical vapor deposition. The experimental results showed that the flow-induced current on the surface of carbon nanotube films was closely depended on the flow rate, concentration, properties and temperature of liquids. The flow-induced current was increased with the increasing of flow rate, concentration and temperature of liquids. The obtained results were discussed in detail.

  3. Plasticity and Kinky Chemistry of Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Deepak; Dzegilenko, Fedor

    2000-01-01

    Since their discovery in 1991, carbon nanotubes have been the subject of intense research interest based on early predictions of their unique mechanical, electronic, and chemical properties. Materials with the predicted unique properties of carbon nanotubes are of great interest for use in future generations of aerospace vehicles. For their structural properties, carbon nanotubes could be used as reinforcing fibers in ultralight multifunctional composites. For their electronic properties, carbon nanotubes offer the potential of very high-speed, low-power computing elements, high-density data storage, and unique sensors. In a continuing effort to model and predict the properties of carbon nanotubes, Ames accomplished three significant results during FY99. First, accurate values of the nanomechanics and plasticity of carbon nanotubes based on quantum molecular dynamics simulations were computed. Second, the concept of mechanical deformation catalyzed-kinky-chemistry as a means to control local chemistry of nanotubes was discovered. Third, the ease of nano-indentation of silicon surfaces with carbon nanotubes was established. The elastic response and plastic failure mechanisms of single-wall nanotubes were investigated by means of quantum molecular dynamics simulations.

  4. Dielectrophoretic assembly of carbon nanotube devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dimaki, Maria

    The purpose of this project has been to assemble single-walled carbon nanotubes on electrodes at the tip of a biocompatible cantilever and use these for chemical species sensing in air and liquid, for example in order to measure the local activity from ion channels in the cell membrane....... The electrical resistance of carbon nanotubes has been shown to be extremely sensitive to gas molecules. Dielectrophoresis is a method capable of quickly attracting nanotubes on microelectrodes by using an electric field, thus enabling nanotube integration in microsystems. Dielectrophoresis offers also...... the potential of distinguishing between nanotubes of different electrical properties, which is very important for the optimisation of the properties of the carbon nanotube sensors. Various cantilever and planar structures were designed, fabricated and tested both with multi-walled and single-walled carbon...

  5. Sorting carbon nanotubes for electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martel, Richard

    2008-11-25

    Because of their unique structure and composition, single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are at the interface between molecules and crystalline solids. They also present properties that are ideal for making lightweight, inexpensive, and flexible electronics. The raw material is composed of a heterogeneous mixture of SWNTs that differ in helicity and diameter and, therefore, requires purification and separation. In a series of groundbreaking experiments, a robust process serving this purpose was developed based on SWNTs encapsulated in surfactants and water. Ultracentrifugation in a density gradient combined with surfactant mixtures provided buoyant density differences, enabling enrichment for both diameter and electronic properties. A new paper in this issue explores further the process through the hydrodynamic properties of SWNT-surfactant complexes. The study reveals that we have just begun to uncover the dynamics and properties of nanotube-surfactant interactions and highlights the potential that could be gained from a better understanding of their chemistry. The time scale of integration of carbon nanotubes into electronics applications remains unclear, but the recent developments in sorting out SWNTs paves the way for improving on the properties of network-based SWNTs.

  6. Study of Carbon Nanotube-Substrate Interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaqueline S. Soares

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Environmental effects are very important in nanoscience and nanotechnology. This work reviews the importance of the substrate in single-wall carbon nanotube properties. Contact with a substrate can modify the nanotube properties, and such interactions have been broadly studied as either a negative aspect or a solution for developing carbon nanotube-based nanotechnologies. This paper discusses both theoretical and experimental studies where the interaction between the carbon nanotubes and the substrate affects the structural, electronic, and vibrational properties of the tubes.

  7. CARBON NANOTUBES: PROPERTIES AND APPLICATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, John, E.

    2009-07-24

    Carbon nanotubes were discovered in 1991 as a minority byproduct of fullerene synthesis. Remarkable progress has been made in the ensuing years, including the discovery of two basic types of nanotubes (single-wall and multi-wall), great strides in synthesis and purification, elucidation of many fundamental physical properties, and important steps towards practical applications. Both the underlying science and technological potential of SWNT can profitably be studied at the scale of individual tubes and on macroscopic assemblies such as fibers. Experiments on single tubes directly reveal many of the predicted quantum confinement and mechanical properties. Semiconductor nanowires have many features in common with nanotubes, and many of the same fundamental and practical issues are in play – quantum confinement and its effect on properties; possible device structures and circuit architectures; thermal management; optimal synthesis, defect morphology and control, etc. In 2000 we began a small effort in this direction, conducted entirely by undergraduates with minimal consumables support from this grant. With DOE-BES approval, this grew into a project in parallel with the carbon nanotube work, in which we studied of inorganic semiconductor nanowire growth, characterization and novel strategies for electronic and electromechanical device fabrication. From the beginnings of research on carbon nanotubes, one of the major applications envisioned was hydrogen storage for fuel-cell powered cars and trucks. Subsequent theoretical models gave mixed results, the most pessimistic indicating that the fundamental H2-SWNT interaction was similar to flat graphite (physisorption) with only modest binding energies implying cryogenic operation at best. New material families with encouraging measured properties have emerged, and materials modeling has gained enormously in predictive power, sophistication, and the ability to treat a realistically representative number of atoms. One of

  8. Advanced Multifunctional Properties of Aligned Carbon Nanotube-Epoxy Composites from Carbon Nanotube Aerogel Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Thang; Liu, Peng; Fan, Zeng; Ngern, Nigel; Duong, Hai

    2015-03-01

    Unlike previous methods of making carbon nanotube (CNT) thin films, aligned CNT thin films in this work are synthesized directly from CNT aerogels in a CVD process. CH4/H2/He gases and ferrocene/thiophene catalysts are mixed and reacted in the reactor at 1200 °C to form CNT aerogel socks. By pulling out the socks with a metal rod, CNT thin films with 15-nm diameter MWNTs are aligned and produced continuously at a speed of a few meters per minute. The number of the aligned CNT thin film layers/ thickness can also be controlled well. The as-synthesized aligned CNT films are further condensed by acetone spray and post-treated by UV light. The aligned CNT films without any above post-treatment have a high electrical conductivity of 400S/cm. We also develop aligned CNT-epoxy composites by infiltrating epoxy into the above aligned CNT thin films using Vacuum Assisted Resin Transfer Molding (VARTM) method. Our cost-effective fabrication method of the aligned CNT films is more advanced for developing the composites having CNT orientation control. The mechanical, electrical and optical properties of the aligned CNT epoxy composites are measured. About 2% of the aligned CNTs can enhance significantly the electrical conductivity and hardness of aligned CNT-epoxy composite films. Effects of morphologies, volume fraction, and alignment of the CNTs on the advanced multifunctional properties of the aligned CNT-epoxy composites are also quantified.

  9. Amorphous Carbon-Boron Nitride Nanotube Hybrids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae Woo (Inventor); Siochi, Emilie J. (Inventor); Wise, Kristopher E. (Inventor); Lin, Yi (Inventor); Connell, John (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A method for joining or repairing boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs). In joining BNNTs, the nanotube structure is modified with amorphous carbon deposited by controlled electron beam irradiation to form well bonded hybrid a-C/BNNT structures. In repairing BNNTs, the damaged site of the nanotube structure is modified with amorphous carbon deposited by controlled electron beam irradiation to form well bonded hybrid a-C/BNNT structures at the damage site.

  10. A Tunable Carbon Nanotube Oscillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sazonova, Vera

    2005-03-01

    Nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS) hold promise for a number of scientific and technological applications. Carbon nanotubes (NT) are perhaps the ultimate material for realizing a NEMS device as they are the stiffest material known, have low density, ultrasmall cross sections and can be defect-free. Equally important, a nanotube can act as a transistor and thus is able to sense its own motion. Here, we report the electrical actuation and detection of the guitar-string oscillation modes of doubly-clamped NT oscillators. We observed resonance frequencies in the 5MHz to 150MHz range with quality factors in the 50 to 100 range. We showed that the resonance frequencies can be widely tuned by a gate voltage. We also report on the temperature dependence of the quality factor and present a discussion of possible loss mechanisms.

  11. Mechanics of filled carbon nanotubes

    KAUST Repository

    Monteiro, A.O.

    2014-04-01

    The benefits of filling carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with assorted molecular and crystalline substances have been investigated for the past two decades. Amongst the study of new structural phases, defects, chemical reactions and varied types of host-guest interactions, there is one fundamental characterisation aspect of these systems that continues to be overlooked: the mechanical behaviour of filled CNTs. In contrast to their empty counterparts, the mechanics of filled CNTs is a subject where reports appear far and apart, this despite being key to the application of these materials in technological devices. In the following paragraphs, we review the work that has been carried out up to the present on the mechanics of filled CNTs. The studies discussed range from experimental resonant frequency essays performed within electron microscopes to modelling, via molecular dynamics, of three-point bending of nanotubes filled with gases. (C) 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Hydrogen Storage in Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Joseph; Gilbert, Matthew; Naab, Fabian; Savage, Lauren; Holland, Wayne; Duggan, Jerome; McDaniel, Floyd

    2004-10-01

    Hydrogen as a fuel source is an attractive, relatively clean alternative to fossil fuels. However, a major limitation in its use for the application of automobiles has been the requirement for an efficient hydrogen storage medium. Current hydrogen storage systems are: physical storage in high pressure tanks, metal hydride, and gas-on-solid absorption. However, these methods do not fulfill the Department of Energy's targeted requirements for a usable hydrogen storage capacity of 6.5 wt.%, operation near ambient temperature and pressure, quick extraction and refueling, reliability and reusability.Reports showing high capacity hydrogen storage in single-walled carbon nanotubes originally prompted great excitement in the field, but further research has shown conflicting results. Results for carbon nanostructures have ranged from less than 1 wt.% to 70 wt.%. The wide range of adsorption found in previous experiments results from the difficulty in measuring hydrogen in objects just nanometers in size. Most previous experiments relied on weight analysis and residual gas analysis to determine the amount of hydrogen being adsorbed by the CNTs. These differing results encouraged us to perform our own analysis on single-walled (SWNTs), double-walled (DWNTs), and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs), as well as carbon fiber. We chose to utilize direct measurement of hydrogen in the materials using elastic recoil detection analysis (ERDA). This work was supported by the National Science Foundation's Research Experience for Undergraduates and the University of North Texas.

  13. Novel capacitance-type humidity sensor based on multi-wall carbon nanotube/SiO2 composite films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Xiaowei; Zhao Zhengang; Li Tuo; Wang Xin

    2011-01-01

    A novel capacitance-type relative humidity (RH) sensor based on multi-wall carbon nanotubc/SiO2 (MWCNTs/SiO2) composite film is reported.Details of the fabrication process,possible sensing mechanism and sensing characteristics,such as linearity and sensitivity,are described.The capacitance of the MWCNTs/SiO2 composite film shows typical concentration percolation behavior with increasing MWCNT loading.At loadings below the percolation threshold (1.842wt%),the sensor capacitance increases obviously with increasing MWCNTs.The water condensed in the MWCNTs/SiO2 layer can lower the percolation threshold and increase the sensor capacitance.The sensor with MWCNT concentration of 1 wt% has the best properties.The sensor has a humidity sensitivity of about 673 pF/% RH and a linearity correlation of 0.98428.The response time of the sensor to RH is about 40 s and the recovery time is about 2 s.

  14. Lithography-free fabrication of carbon nanotube network transistors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Timmermans, Marina Y; Nasibulin, Albert G; Kauppinen, Esko I [NanoMaterials Group, Department of Applied Physics and Center for New Materials, Aalto University School of Science and Technology, PO Box 15100, 00076 Aalto (Finland); Grigoras, Kestutis; Franssila, Sami [Microfabrication Group, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Aalto University School of Science and Technology, PL 13000, 00076 Aalto (Finland); Hurskainen, Ville; Ermolov, Vladimir, E-mail: marina.timmermans@hut.fi, E-mail: kestas.grigoras@tkk.fi [Nokia Research Center, Itaemerenkatu 9, 00180 Helsinki (Finland)

    2011-02-11

    A novel non-lithographic technique for the fabrication of carbon nanotube thin film transistors is presented. The whole transistor fabrication process requires only one mask which is used both to pattern transistor channels based on aerosol synthesized carbon nanotubes and to deposit electrodes by metal evaporation at different angles. An important effect of electrodynamic focusing was utilized for the directed assembly of transistor channels with feature sizes smaller than the mask openings. This dry non-lithographic method opens up new avenues for device fabrication especially for low cost flexible and transparent electronics.

  15. Glucose oxidase immobilization onto carbon nanotube networking

    CERN Document Server

    Karachevtsev, V A; Zarudnev, E S; Karachevtsev, M V; Leontiev, V S; Linnik, A S; Lytvyn, O S; Plokhotnichenko, A M; Stepanian, S G

    2012-01-01

    When elaborating the biosensor based on single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs), it is necessary to solve such an important problem as the immobilization of a target biomolecule on the nanotube surface. In this work, the enzyme (glucose oxidase (GOX)) was immobilized on the surface of a nanotube network, which was created by the deposition of nanotubes from their solution in 1,2-dichlorobenzene by the spray method. 1-Pyrenebutanoic acid succinimide ester (PSE) was used to form the molecular interface, the bifunctional molecule of which provides the covalent binding with the enzyme shell, and its other part (pyrene) is adsorbed onto the nanotube surface. First, the usage of such a molecular interface leaves out the direct adsorption of the enzyme (in this case, its activity decreases) onto the nanotube surface, and, second, it ensures the enzyme localization near the nanotube. The comparison of the resonance Raman (RR) spectrum of pristine nanotubes with their spectrum in the PSE environment evidences the creat...

  16. Suspended carbon nanotubes coupled to superconducting circuits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schneider, B.H.

    2014-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes are unique candidates to study quantum mechanical properties of a nanomechanical resonator. However to access this quantum regime, present detectors are not yet sensitive enough. In this thesis we couple a carbon nanotube CNT mechanical resonator to a superconducting circuit which i

  17. Carbon Nanotubes – Interactions with Biological Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Reis, Joana; Capela-Silva, Fernando; Potes, José; Fonseca, Alexandra; Oliveira, Mónica; Kanagaraj, Subramani; Marques, António Torres

    2011-01-01

    his book chapter discusses the prospective biomedical applications of carbon nanotubes based materials, the impact of carbon nanotubes properties in the interaction with biological systems. Protein adsorption, impact on cell viability and cytokine production are explored. Potential respiratory and dermal toxicity are reviewed, as the difficulties on studying the biological response. In face of recent studies, special attention is drawn upon promising orthopaedic use.

  18. Multiscale Simulations of Carbon Nanotubes and Liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koumoutsakos, Petros

    2005-11-01

    We present molecular dynamics and hybrid continuum/atomistic simulations of carbon nanotubes in liquid environments with an emphasis on aqueous solutions. We emphasize computational issues such as interaction potentials and coupling techniques and their influence on the simulated physics. We present results from simulations of water flows inside and outside doped and pure carbon nanotubes and discuss their implications for experimental studies.

  19. Field emission characteristics of regular arrays of carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Ghamdi, A A; Al-Heniti, S; Al-Hazmi, F S; Faidah, Adel S; Shalaan, E; Husain, M

    2014-06-01

    The developments of electronic devices based on micron-sized vacuum electron sources during the last decades have triggered intense research on highly efficient carbon based thin film electron emitters. The synthesis of massive arrays of carbon nanotubes that are oriented on patterned Fe catalyst deposited on quartz substrates is reported. The well-ordered nanotubes can be used as electron field emission arrays. Scaling up of the synthesis process should be entirely compatible with the existing semiconductor processes, and should allow the development of nanotubes devices integrated into future technology. The emission from carbon nanotubes array is explained by Fowler-Nordheim tunneling of electrons from tip-like structures in the nanometer range, which locally amplify the applied field by the field enhancement factor beta. We found that the low pressure chemical vapour deposition (LPCVD) system can produce nanotubes capable of excellent emission currents at lower voltages. The carbon nanotubes array shows good field emission with turn on field E(alpha) = 1.30 V/microm at the current density of 3.50 mA/cm2 with enhancement factor beta = 1.22 x 10(2).

  20. Development of supercapacitors based on carbon nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Block-type electrodes made of carbon nanotubes were fabricated by different processes. The volumetric specific capacitance based on such electrodes reached 107 F/cm3, which proves carbon nanotubes to be ideal candidate materials for supercapacitors. The composite electrodes consisting of carbon nanotubes and RuO2.xH2O were developed by the deposition of RuO2 on the surface of carbon nanotubes. Supercapacitors based on the composite electrodes show much higher specific capacitance than those based on pure carbon nanotube ones. A specific capacitance of 600 F/g can be achieved when the weight percent of RuO2.xH2O in the composite electrodes reaches 75%. In addition, supercapacitors based on the composite electrodes show both high energy density and high power density characteristics.

  1. Development of supercapacitors based on carbon nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马仁志; 魏秉庆; 徐才录; 梁吉; 吴德海

    2000-01-01

    Block-type electrodes made of carbon nanotubes were fabricated by different processes. The volumetric specific capacitance based on such electrodes reached 107 F/cm3, which proves carbon nanotubes to be ideal candidate materials for supercapacitors. The composite electrodes consisting of carbon nanotubes and RuO2 ·xH2O were developed by the deposition of RuO2 on the surface of carbon nanotubes. Supercapacitors based on the composite electrodes show much higher specific capacitance than those based on pure carbon nanotube ones. A specific capacitance of 600 F/g can be achieved when the weight percent of RuO2· xH2O in the composite electrodes reaches 75% . In addition , supercapacitors based on the composite electrodes show both high energy density and high power density characteristics.

  2. Epitaxial Approaches to Carbon Nanotube Organization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismach, Ariel

    Carbon nanotubes have unique electronic, mechanical, optical and thermal properties, which make them ideal candidates as building blocks in nano-electronic and electromechanical systems. However, their organization into well-defined geometries and arrays on surfaces remains a critical challenge for their integration into functional nanosystems. In my PhD, we developed a new approach for the organization of carbon nanotubes directed by crystal surfaces. The principle relies on the guided growth of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) by atomic features presented on anisotropic substrates. We identified three different modes of surface-directed growth (or 'nanotube epitaxy'), in which the growth of carbon nanotubes is directed by crystal substrates: We first observed the nanotube unidirectional growth along atomic steps ('ledge-directed epitaxy') and nanofacets ('graphoepitaxy') on the surface of miscut C-plane sapphire and quartz. The orientation along crystallographic directions ('lattice-directed epitaxy') was subsequently observed by other groups on different crystals. We have proposed a "wake growth" mechanism for the nanotube alignment along atomic steps and nanofacets. In this mechanism, the catalyst nanoparticle slides along the step or facet, leaving the nanotube behind as a wake. In addition, we showed that the combination of surface-directed growth with external forces, such as electric-field and gas flow, can lead to the simultaneous formation of complex nanotube structures, such as grids and serpentines. The "wake growth" model, which explained the growth of aligned nanotubes, could not explain the formation of nanotube serpentines. For the latter, we proposed a "falling spaghetti" mechanism, in which the nanotube first grows by a free-standing process, aligned in the direction of the gas flow, then followed by absorption on the stepped surface in an oscillatory manner, due to the competition between the drag force caused by the gas flow on the suspended

  3. Growing carbon nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshinori Ando

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available The discovery of ‘fullerenes’ added a new dimension to the knowledge of carbon science1; and the subsequent discovery of ‘carbon nanotubes’ (CNTs, the elongated fullerene added a new dimension to the knowledge of technology2;. Today, ‘nanotechnology’ is a hot topic attracting scientists, industrialists, journalists, governments, and even the general public. Nanotechnology is the creation of functional materials, devices, and systems through control of matter on the nanometer scale and the exploitation of novel phenomena and properties of matter (physical, chemical, biological, electrical, etc. at that length scale. CNTs are supposed to be a key component of nanotechnology. Almost every week a new potential application of CNTs is identified, stimulating scientists to peep into this tiny tube with ever increasing curiosity.

  4. Improved synthesis of carbon nanotubes with junctions and of single-walled carbon nanotubes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    F L Deepak; A Govindaraj; C N R Rao

    2006-01-01

    Pyrolysis of thiophene over nickel nanoparticles dispersed on silica is shown to yield Yjunction carbon nanotubes with smaller diameters than those obtained by the pyrolysis of organometallicthiophene mixtures. In the presence of water vapour, the pyrolysis of organometallic-hydrocarbon mixtures yields single-walled nanotubes, as well as relatively narrow-diameter carbon nanotubes with Y-junctions. Pyrolysis of organometallic-hydrocarbon mixtures, in the absence of water vapour, only gives nanotubes with T- and Y-junctions.

  5. Coated carbon nanotube array electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Zhifeng; Wen, Jian; Chen, Jinghua; Huang, Zhongping; Wang, Dezhi

    2008-10-28

    The present invention provides conductive carbon nanotube (CNT) electrode materials comprising aligned CNT substrates coated with an electrically conducting polymer, and the fabrication of electrodes for use in high performance electrical energy storage devices. In particular, the present invention provides conductive CNTs electrode material whose electrical properties render them especially suitable for use in high efficiency rechargeable batteries. The present invention also provides methods for obtaining surface modified conductive CNT electrode materials comprising an array of individual linear, aligned CNTs having a uniform surface coating of an electrically conductive polymer such as polypyrrole, and their use in electrical energy storage devices.

  6. Carbon nanotube growth density control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delzeit, Lance D. (Inventor); Schipper, John F. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    Method and system for combined coarse scale control and fine scale control of growth density of a carbon nanotube (CNT) array on a substrate, using a selected electrical field adjacent to a substrate surface for coarse scale density control (by one or more orders of magnitude) and a selected CNT growth temperature range for fine scale density control (by multiplicative factors of less than an order of magnitude) of CNT growth density. Two spaced apart regions on a substrate may have different CNT growth densities and/or may use different feed gases for CNT growth.

  7. Purification of carbon nanotube by wet oxidation; Shisshiki sanka ni yoru carbon nanotube no seisei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morishita, K.; Takarada, T. [Gunma University, Gunma (Japan)

    1997-07-10

    In order to efficiently recover carbon nanotubes, the purification method by wet oxidation with orthoperiodic acid and perchloric acid is investigated. The reactivity of the carbonaceous material toward the acids depends on the type of carbon. Carbon nanotubes are selectively recovered under the mild oxidation conditions. The degree of purification depends on the concentration of orthoperiodic acid. It is suggested that wet oxidation is an effective method for purification of carbon nanotubes. 17 refs., 6 figs.

  8. Preparation and characterization of multi-walled carbon nanotube/hydroxyapatite nanocomposite film dip coated on Ti–6Al–4V by sol–gel method for biomedical applications: An in vitro study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abrishamchian, Alireza [Department of Dental Biomaterials, School of Dentistry/Research Center for Science and Technology in Medicine, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hooshmand, Tabassom, E-mail: hoshmand@sina.tums.ac.ir [Department of Dental Biomaterials, School of Dentistry/Research Center for Science and Technology in Medicine, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mohammadi, Mohammadreza [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Sharif University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Najafi, Farhood [Department of Resin and Additives, Institute for Color Science and Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-05-01

    In the present research, the introduction of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) into the hydroxyapatite (HA) matrix and dip coating of nanocomposite on titanium alloy (Ti–6Al–4V) plate was conducted in order to improve the performance of the HA-coated implant via the sol–gel method. The structural characterization and electron microscopy results confirmed well crystallized HA–MWCNT coating and homogenous dispersion of carbon nanotubes in the ceramic matrix at temperatures as low as 500 °C. The evaluation of the mechanical properties of HA and HA/MWCNT composite coatings with different weight percentages of MWCNTs showed that the addition of low concentrations of MWCNTs (0.5 and 1 wt.%) had improved effect on the mechanical properties of nanocomposite coatings. Moreover, this in vitro study ascertained the biocompatibility of the prepared sol–gel-derived HA/MWCNT composite coatings. - Highlights: ► Carbon nanotube/hydroxyapatite composite was successfully dip-coated on Ti by sol–gel. ► Well-crystallized HA–MWCNT and homogenous dispersion of nanotubes were obtained. ► Low concentration of CNTs improved the mechanical properties of composite coating. ► Biocompatibility of the prepared sol–gel-derived HA/MWCNT films was ascertained.

  9. Preparation of Electrically Conductive Polystyrene/Carbon Nanofiber Nanocomposite Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Luyi; O'Reilly, Jonathan Y.; Tien, Chi-Wei; Sue, Hung-Jue

    2008-01-01

    A simple and effective approach to prepare conductive polystyrene/carbon nanofiber (PS/CNF) nanocomposite films via a solution dispersion method is presented. Inexpensive CNF, which has a structure similar to multi-walled carbon nanotubes, is chosen as a nanofiller in this experiment to achieve conductivity in PS films. A good dispersion is…

  10. Fermentation based carbon nanotube multifunctional bionic composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentini, Luca; Bon, Silvia Bittolo; Signetti, Stefano; Tripathi, Manoj; Iacob, Erica; Pugno, Nicola M.

    2016-06-01

    The exploitation of the processes used by microorganisms to digest nutrients for their growth can be a viable method for the formation of a wide range of so called biogenic materials that have unique properties that are not produced by abiotic processes. Here we produced living hybrid materials by giving to unicellular organisms the nutrient to grow. Based on bread fermentation, a bionic composite made of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and a single-cell fungi, the Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast extract, was prepared by fermentation of such microorganisms at room temperature. Scanning electron microscopy analysis suggests that the CNTs were internalized by the cell after fermentation bridging the cells. Tensile tests on dried composite films have been rationalized in terms of a CNT cell bridging mechanism where the strongly enhanced strength of the composite is governed by the adhesion energy between the bridging carbon nanotubes and the matrix. The addition of CNTs also significantly improved the electrical conductivity along with a higher photoconductive activity. The proposed process could lead to the development of more complex and interactive structures programmed to self-assemble into specific patterns, such as those on strain or light sensors that could sense damage or convert light stimulus in an electrical signal.

  11. Enhancing conductivity of metallic carbon nanotube networks by transition metal adsorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ketolainen, T.; Havu, V.; Puska, M. J.

    2015-02-01

    The conductivity of carbon nanotube thin films is mainly determined by carbon nanotube junctions, the resistance of which can be reduced by several different methods. We investigate electronic transport through carbon nanotube junctions in a four-terminal configuration, where two metallic single-wall carbon nanotubes are linked by a group 6 transition metal atom. The transport calculations are based on the Green's function method combined with the density-functional theory. The transition metal atom is found to enhance the transport through the junction near the Fermi level. However, the size of the nanotube affects the improvement in the conductivity. The enhancement is related to the hybridization of chromium and carbon atom orbitals, which is clearly reflected in the character of eigenstates near the Fermi level. The effects of chromium atoms and precursor molecules remaining adsorbed on the nanotubes outside the junctions are also examined.

  12. Enhancing conductivity of metallic carbon nanotube networks by transition metal adsorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ketolainen, T., E-mail: tomi.ketolainen@aalto.fi; Havu, V.; Puska, M. J. [COMP, Department of Applied Physics, Aalto University, P.O. Box 11100, FI-00076 Aalto (Finland)

    2015-02-07

    The conductivity of carbon nanotube thin films is mainly determined by carbon nanotube junctions, the resistance of which can be reduced by several different methods. We investigate electronic transport through carbon nanotube junctions in a four-terminal configuration, where two metallic single-wall carbon nanotubes are linked by a group 6 transition metal atom. The transport calculations are based on the Green’s function method combined with the density-functional theory. The transition metal atom is found to enhance the transport through the junction near the Fermi level. However, the size of the nanotube affects the improvement in the conductivity. The enhancement is related to the hybridization of chromium and carbon atom orbitals, which is clearly reflected in the character of eigenstates near the Fermi level. The effects of chromium atoms and precursor molecules remaining adsorbed on the nanotubes outside the junctions are also examined.

  13. Electrochemical sensor using neomycin-imprinted film as recognition element based on chitosan-silver nanoparticles/graphene-multiwalled carbon nanotubes composites modified electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lian, Wenjing; Liu, Su; Yu, Jinghua; Li, Jie; Cui, Min; Xu, Wei; Huang, Jiadong

    2013-06-15

    A novel imprinted electrochemical sensor for neomycin recognition was developed based on chitosan-silver nanoparticles (CS-SNP)/graphene-multiwalled carbon nanotubes (GR-MWCNTs) composites decorated gold electrode. Molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) were synthesized by electropolymerization using neomycin as the template, and pyrrole as the monomer. The mechanism of the fabrication process and a number of factors affecting the activity of the imprinted sensor have been discussed and optimized. The characterization of imprinted sensor has been carried out by scanning electron microscope (SEM) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The performance of the proposed imprinted sensor has been investigated using cyclic voltammetry (CV) and amperometry. Under the optimized conditions, the linear range of the sensor was from 9×10(-9)mol/L to 7×10(-6)mol/L, with the limit of detection (LOD) of 7.63×10(-9)mol/L (S/N=3). The film exhibited high binding affinity and selectivity towards the template neomycin, as well as good reproducibility and stability. Furthermore, the proposed sensor was applied to determine the neomycin in milk and honey samples based on its good reproducibility and stability, and the acceptable recovery implied its feasibility for practical application.

  14. Preparation of Carbon Nanotube/TiO2 Mesoporous Hybrid Photoanode with Iron Pyrite (FeS2) Thin Films Counter Electrodes for Dye-Sensitized Solar Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilic, Bayram; Turkdogan, Sunay; Astam, Aykut; Ozer, Oguz Can; Asgin, Mansur; Cebeci, Hulya; Urk, Deniz; Mucur, Selin Pravadili

    2016-05-01

    Multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT)/TiO2 mesoporous networks can be employed as a new alternative photoanode in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). By using the MWCNT/TiO2 mesoporous as photoanodes in DSSC, we demonstrate that the MWCNT/TiO2 mesoporous photoanode is promising alternative to standard FTO/TiO2 mesoporous based DSSC due to larger specific surface area and high electrochemical activity. We also show that iron pyrite (FeS2) thin films can be used as an efficient counter electrode (CE), an alternative to the conventional high cost Pt based CE. We are able to synthesis FeS2 nanostructures utilizing a very cheap and easy hydrothermal growth route. MWCNT/TiO2 mesoporous based DSSCs with FeS2 CE achieved a high solar conversion efficiency of 7.27% under 100 mW cm‑2 (AM 1.5G 1-Sun) simulated solar irradiance which is considerably (slightly) higher than that of A-CNT/TiO2 mesoporous based DSSCs with Pt CE. Outstanding performance of the FeS2 CE makes it a very promising choice among the various CE materials used in the conventional DSSC and it is expected to be used more often to achieve higher photon-to-electron conversion efficiencies.

  15. Electrochemical sensor based on molecularly imprinted film at polypyrrole-sulfonated graphene/hyaluronic acid-multiwalled carbon nanotubes modified electrode for determination of tryptamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Xianrong; Liu, Su; Yu, Jinghua; Lian, Wenjing; Huang, Jiadong

    2012-01-15

    An imprinted electrochemical sensor based on polypyrrole-sulfonated graphene (PPy-SG)/hyaluronic acid-multiwalled carbon nanotubes (HA-MWCNTs) for sensitive detection of tryptamine was presented. Molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) were synthesized by electropolymerization using tryptamine as the template, and para-aminobenzoic acid (pABA) as the monomer. The surface feature of the modified electrode was characterized by cyclic voltammetry (CV). The proposed sensor was tested by chronoamperometry. Several important parameters controlling the performance of the molecularly imprinted sensor were investigated and optimized. The results showed that the PPy-SG composites films showed improved conductivity and electrochemical performances. HA-MWCNTs bionanocomposites could enhance the current response evidently. The good selectivity of the sensor allowed three discriminations of tryptamine from interferents, which include tyramine, dopamine and tryptophan. Under the optimal conditions, a linear ranging from 9.0×10(-8) mol L(-1) to 7.0×10(-5) mol L(-1) for the detection of tryptamine was observed with the detection limit of 7.4×10(-8) mol L(-1) (S/N=3). This imprinted electrochemical sensor was successfully employed to detect tryptamine in real samples.

  16. Amperometric determination of xanthine in fish meat by zinc oxide nanoparticle/chitosan/multiwalled carbon nanotube/polyaniline composite film bound xanthine oxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devi, Rooma; Yadav, Sandeep; Pundir, C S

    2012-02-07

    Xanthine oxidase (XOD) was immobilized on a composite film of zinc oxide nanoparticle/chitosan/carboxylated multiwalled carbon nanotube/polyaniline (ZnO-NP/CHIT/c-MWCNT/PANI) electrodeposited over the surface of a platinum (Pt) electrode. A xanthine biosensor was fabricated using XOD/ZnO-NP/CHIT/c-MWCNT/PANI/Pt as working electrode, Ag/AgCl as reference electrode and Pt wire as auxiliary electrode connected through a potentiostat. The ZnO-NPs were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and the enzyme electrode was characterized by cyclic voltammetry, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The biosensor showed optimum response within 4 s at 0.5 V potential, pH 7.0, 35 °C and linear range 0.1-100 μM with a detection limit of 0.1 μM. The enzyme electrode was employed for determination of xanthine in fish meat during storage. The electrode lost 30% of its initial activity after 80 uses over one month, when stored at 4 °C.

  17. Functionalized carbon nanotubes: biomedical applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vardharajula S

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Sandhya Vardharajula,1 Sk Z Ali,2 Pooja M Tiwari,1 Erdal Eroğlu,1 Komal Vig,1 Vida A Dennis,1 Shree R Singh11Center for NanoBiotechnology and Life Sciences Research, Alabama State University, Montgomery, AL, USA; 2Department of Microbiology, Osmania University, Hyderabad, IndiaAbstract: Carbon nanotubes (CNTs are emerging as novel nanomaterials for various biomedical applications. CNTs can be used to deliver a variety of therapeutic agents, including biomolecules, to the target disease sites. In addition, their unparalleled optical and electrical properties make them excellent candidates for bioimaging and other biomedical applications. However, the high cytotoxicity of CNTs limits their use in humans and many biological systems. The biocompatibility and low cytotoxicity of CNTs are attributed to size, dose, duration, testing systems, and surface functionalization. The functionalization of CNTs improves their solubility and biocompatibility and alters their cellular interaction pathways, resulting in much-reduced cytotoxic effects. Functionalized CNTs are promising novel materials for a variety of biomedical applications. These potential applications are particularly enhanced by their ability to penetrate biological membranes with relatively low cytotoxicity. This review is directed towards the overview of CNTs and their functionalization for biomedical applications with minimal cytotoxicity.Keywords: carbon nanotubes, cytotoxicity, functionalization, biomedical applications

  18. Selective intercalation of polymers in carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazilevsky, Alexander V; Sun, Kexia; Yarin, Alexander L; Megaridis, Constantine M

    2007-07-03

    A room-temperature, open-air method is devised to selectively intercalate relatively low-molecular-weight polymers (approximately 10-100 kDa) from dilute, volatile solutions into open-end, as-grown, wettable carbon nanotubes with 50-100 nm diameters. The method relies on a novel self-sustained diffusion mechanism driving polymers from dilute volatile solutions into carbon nanotubes and concentrating them there. Relatively low-molecular-weight polymers, such as poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO, 600 kDa) and poly(caprolactone) (PCL, 80 kDa), were encapsulated in graphitic nanotubes as confirmed by transmission electron microscopy, which revealed morphologies characteristic of mixtures in nanoconfinements affected by intermolecular forces. Whereas relatively small, flexible polymer molecules can conform to enter these nanotubes, larger macromolecules (approximately 1000 kDa) remain outside. The selective nature of this process is useful for filling nanotubes with polymers and could also be valuable in capping nanotubes.

  19. Synthesis of Vertically-Aligned Carbon Nanotubes from Langmuir-Blodgett Films Deposited Fe Nanoparticles on Al2O3/Al/SiO2/Si Substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takagiwa, Shota; Kanasugi, Osamu; Nakamura, Kentaro; Kushida, Masahito

    2016-04-01

    In order to apply vertically-aligned carbon nanotubes (VA-CNTs) to a new Pt supporting material of polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC), number density and outer diameter of CNTs must be controlled independently. So, we employed Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) technique for depositing CNT growth catalysts. A Fe nanoparticle (NP) was used as a CNT growth catalyst. In this study, we tried to thicken VA-CNT carpet height and inhibit thermal aggregation of Fe NPs by using Al2O3/Al/SiO2/Si substrate. Fe NP LB films were deposited on three typed of substrates, SiO2/Si, as-deposited Al2O3/Al/SiO2/Si and annealed Al2O3/Al/SiO2/Si at 923 K in Ar atmosphere of 16 Pa. It is known that Al2O3/Al catalyzes hydrocarbon reforming, inhibits thermal aggregation of CNT growth catalysts and reduces CNT growth catalysts. It was found that annealed Al2O3/Al/SiO2/Si exerted three effects more strongly than as-deposited Al2O3/Al/SiO2/Si. VA-CNTs were synthesized from Fe NPs-C16 LB films by thermal chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method. As a result, at the distance between two nearest CNTs 28 nm or less, VA-CNT carpet height on annealed Al2O3/Al/SiO2/Si was about twice and ten times thicker than that on SiO2/Si and that on as-deposited Al2O3/Al/SiO2/Si, respectively. Moreover, distribution of CNT outer diameter on annealed Al2O3/Al/SiO2/Si was inhibited compared to that on SiO2/Si. These results suggest that since thermal aggregation of Fe NPs is inhibited, catalyst activity increases and distribution of Fe NP size is inhibited.

  20. The enhancement of photo-thermo-electric conversion in tilted Bi2Sr2Co2O(y) thin films through coating a layer of single-wall carbon nanotubes light absorber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shufang; Bai, Zilong; Yan, Guoying; Zhang, Hongrui; Wang, Jianglong; Yu, Wei; Fu, Guangsheng

    2013-07-29

    Light-induced transverse thermoelectric effect has been investigated in c-axis tilted Bi(2)Sr(2)Co(2)O(y) thin films coated with a single-wall carbon nanotubes light absorption layer. Open-circuit voltage signals were detected when the sample surface was irradiated by different lasers with wavelengths ranging from ultraviolet to near-infrared and the voltage sensitivity was enhanced as a result of the increased light absorption at the carbon nanotubes layer. Moreover, the enhancement degree was found to be dependent on the laser wavelength as well as the absorption coating size. This work opens up new strategy toward the practical applications of layered cobaltites in photo-thermo-electric conversion devices.

  1. SYNTHESIS OF CARBON NANOTUBES FOR ACETYLENE DETECTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.Y. FAIZAH

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available A gas sensor, utilizing carbon nanotubes (CNTs in a pellet form for acetylene detection has been developed. This research was carried out to investigate the absorption effect of acetylene (C2H2 towards the change of resistance of carbon nanotubes pellet as sensor signal. Source Measurement Unit (SMU was used to study the gas sensing behaviour of resistance based sensors employing carbon nanotubes pellet as the active sensing element. Studies revealed that the absorption of acetylene into the carbon nanotubes pellet resulting in increase in pellet resistance. The changes are attributed to p-type conductivity in semiconducting carbon nanotubes. Carbon nanotubes used in this research was synthesized by means of Floating Catalyst Chemical Vapor Deposition (FC-CVD method. Benzene was used as a hydrocarbon source while ferrocene as a source of catalyst with Hydrogen and Argon as carrier and purge gas respectively. From the research, it was shown that carbon nanotubes show high sensitivity towards acetylene. The highest sensitivity recorded was 1.21, 1.16 and 17.86 for S1, S2 and S3 respectively. It is expected that many applications of CNT-based sensors will be explored in future as the interest of the nanotechnology research in this field increases.

  2. Air-stable conversion of separated carbon nanotube thin-film transistors from p-type to n-type using atomic layer deposition of high-κ oxide and its application in CMOS logic circuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jialu; Wang, Chuan; Fu, Yue; Che, Yuchi; Zhou, Chongwu

    2011-04-26

    Due to extraordinary electrical properties, preseparated, high purity semiconducting carbon nanotubes hold great potential for thin-film transistors (TFTs) and integrated circuit applications. One of the main challenges it still faces is the fabrication of air-stable n-type nanotube TFTs with industry-compatible techniques. Here in this paper, we report a novel and highly reliable method of converting the as-made p-type TFTs using preseparated semiconducting nanotubes into air-stable n-type transistors by adding a high-κ oxide passivation layer using atomic layer deposition (ALD). The n-type devices exhibit symmetric electrical performance compared with the p-type devices in terms of on-current, on/off ratio, and device mobility. Various factors affecting the conversion process, including ALD temperature, metal contact material, and channel length, have also been systematically studied by a series of designed experiments. A complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) inverter with rail-to-rail output, symmetric input/output behavior, and large noise margin has been further demonstrated. The excellent performance gives us the feasibility of cascading multiple stages of logic blocks and larger scale integration. Our approach can serve as the critical foundation for future nanotube-based thin-film macroelectronics.

  3. A Tester for Carbon Nanotube Mode Lockers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yong-Won; Yamashita, Shinji

    2007-05-01

    We propose and demonstrate a tester for laser pulsating operation of carbon nanotubes employing a circulator with the extra degree of freedom of the second port to access diversified nanotube samples. The nanotubes are deposited onto the end facet of a dummy optical fiber by spray method that guarantees simple sample loading along with the minimized perturbation of optimized laser cavity condition. Resultant optical spectra, autocorrelation traces and pulse train of the laser outputs with qualified samples are presented.

  4. Terahertz Conductivity of Single Walled Nanotube Films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩家广; 朱志远; 何峰; 廖怡; 王震遐; 张伟; 余礼平; 孙立涛; 王庭太

    2003-01-01

    The conductivity of single walled nanotube films is investigated with a combination of the Maxwel1-Garnett (MG)model and the Drude-Lorentzian (DL) model in the Terahertz region. A theoretical fit for Jeon's experiment is given and a decrease of the real conductivity with increasing frequency is predicted. Meanwhile, the MG and DL models are also discussed for different samples.

  5. Sorption of indium (III) onto carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alguacil, F J; Lopez, F A; Rodriguez, O; Martinez-Ramirez, S; Garcia-Diaz, I

    2016-08-01

    Indium has numerous applications in different industrial sectors and is not an abundant element. Therefore appropriate technology to recover this element from various process wastes is needed. This research reports high adsorption capacity of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) for In(III). The effects of pH, kinetics, isotherms and adsorption mechanism of MWCNT on In(III) adsorption were investigated and discussed in detail. The pH increases improves the adsorption capacity for In(III). The Langmuir adsorption model is the best fit with the experimental data. For the kinetic study, the adsorption onto MWCNT could be fitted to pseudo second-order. The adsorption of indium(III) can be described to a mechanism which consists of a film diffusion controlled process. Metal desorption can be achieved with acidic solutions.

  6. Enzymatic degradation of multiwalled carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yong; Allen, Brett L; Star, Alexander

    2011-09-01

    Because of their unique properties, carbon nanotubes and, in particular, multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) have been used for the development of advanced composite and catalyst materials. Despite their growing commercial applications and increased production, the potential environmental and toxicological impacts of MWNTs are not fully understood; however, many reports suggest that they may be toxic. Therefore, a need exists to develop protocols for effective and safe degradation of MWNTs. In this article, we investigated the effect of chemical functionalization of MWNTs on their enzymatic degradation with horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)). We investigated HRP/H(2)O(2) degradation of purified, oxidized, and nitrogen-doped MWNTs and proposed a layer-by-layer degradation mechanism of nanotubes facilitated by side wall defects. These results provide a better understanding of the interaction between HRP and carbon nanotubes and suggest an eco-friendly way of mitigating the environmental impact of nanotubes.

  7. Carbon nanotube fiber spun from wetted ribbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yuntian T; Arendt, Paul; Zhang, Xiefei; Li, Qingwen; Fu, Lei; Zheng, Lianxi

    2014-04-29

    A fiber of carbon nanotubes was prepared by a wet-spinning method involving drawing carbon nanotubes away from a substantially aligned, supported array of carbon nanotubes to form a ribbon, wetting the ribbon with a liquid, and spinning a fiber from the wetted ribbon. The liquid can be a polymer solution and after forming the fiber, the polymer can be cured. The resulting fiber has a higher tensile strength and higher conductivity compared to dry-spun fibers and to wet-spun fibers prepared by other methods.

  8. Methods for producing reinforced carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Zhifen; Wen, Jian Guo; Lao, Jing Y.; Li, Wenzhi

    2008-10-28

    Methods for producing reinforced carbon nanotubes having a plurality of microparticulate carbide or oxide materials formed substantially on the surface of such reinforced carbon nanotubes composite materials are disclosed. In particular, the present invention provides reinforced carbon nanotubes (CNTs) having a plurality of boron carbide nanolumps formed substantially on a surface of the reinforced CNTs that provide a reinforcing effect on CNTs, enabling their use as effective reinforcing fillers for matrix materials to give high-strength composites. The present invention also provides methods for producing such carbide reinforced CNTs.

  9. Ordered phases of cesium in carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Jeong Won; Hwang, Ho Jung; Song, Ki Oh; Choi, Won Young; Byun, Ki Ryang [Chung-Ang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Oh Keun [Semyung University, Jecheon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jun Ha [Sangmyung University, Chonan (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Won Woo [Juseong College, Cheongwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-10-15

    We investigate the structural phases of Cs in carbon nanotubes by using a structural optimization process applied to an atomistic simulation method. As the radius of the carbon nanotubes is increased, the structures are found in various phases from an atomic strand to multishell packs composed of coaxial cylindrical shells. Both helical structures and layered structures are found. The numbers of helical atom rows composed of coaxial tubes and the orthogonal vectors of the circular rolling of a triangular network can explain the structural phases of Cs in carbon nanotubes.

  10. Microcapsule carbon nanotube devices for therapeutic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulamarva, Arun; Raja, Pavan M. V.; Bhathena, Jasmine; Chen, Hongmei; Talapatra, Saikat; Ajayan, Pulickel M.; Nalamasu, Omkaram; Prakash, Satya

    2009-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes are a new class of nanomaterials that have immense potential in the field of biomedicine. Their ability to carry large quantities of therapeutic molecules makes them prime candidates for providing targeted delivery of therapeutics for use in various diseases. However, their utility is limited due to the problems faced during their delivery to target sites. This article for the first time describes the design of a novel microcapsule carbon nanotube targeted delivery device. This device has potential in the targeted delivery of carbon nanotubes in suitable membranes along with their cargo, safely and effectively to the target loci.

  11. Electrically conducting nanobiocomposites using carbon nanotubes and collagen waste fibers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meiyazhagan, Ashokkumar; Thangavel, Saravanamoorthy [Advanced Materials Laboratory, Center for Leather Apparel & Accessories Development, Central Leather Research Institute (Council of Scientific and Industrial Research), Adyar, Chennai 600020 (India); Hashim, Daniel P.; Ajayan, Pulickel M. [Department of Materials Science and NanoEngineering, Rice University, Houston, TX 77005 (United States); Palanisamy, Thanikaivelan, E-mail: thanik8@yahoo.com [Advanced Materials Laboratory, Center for Leather Apparel & Accessories Development, Central Leather Research Institute (Council of Scientific and Industrial Research), Adyar, Chennai 600020 (India)

    2015-05-01

    Electrically conducting hybrid biocomposite films were prepared using a simple and cost-effective method by incorporating different types of carbon nanotubes (XCNTs) viz., few walled carbon nanotube (FWCNT) and boron doped carbon nanotube (BCNT) into biopolymers. Collagen extracted from animal skin wastes was blended with guar gum and XCNTs in varying proportions to form flexible and electrically conducting hybrid films. We found that the electrical conductivity of both types of hybrid films increases radically as the XCNT loading increases. BCNT incorporated hybrid films show better electrical conductivity (3.0 × 10{sup −1} S/cm) than their FWCNT loaded counter parts (4.8 × 10{sup −4} S/cm) at a dosage of 2 wt.%. On the other hand, mechanical and other physical properties such as transparency, flexibility and surface smoothness of the developed hybrid films were affected as a function of XCNT concentration. We also demonstrated that the developed hybrid films lit up a LED lamp when inserted between batteries and the brightness of the emitted light depended on the XCNT loading. These results suggest a new way to transform an industrial biowaste into innovative advanced materials for applications in fields related to biomedicine, biosensors and electronics. - Highlights: • Hybrid nanobiocomposite films prepared using collagen, guar gum and CNTs. • Examined the effect of CNT doping on the properties of hybrid biocomposite films. • Higher CNT loading improved the conductivity radically, especially for BCNT. • The ability of developed hybrid films to lit up a LED lamp was demonstrated. • The results suggest a new way to transform biowaste into advanced materials.

  12. Highly oriented carbon nanotube papers made of aligned carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Ding; Song Pengcheng; Liu Changhong; Wu Wei; Fan Shoushan [Tsinghua-Foxconn Nanotechnology Research Center and Department of Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)], E-mail: chliu@tsinghua.edu.cn

    2008-02-20

    Paper-like carbon nanotube (CNT) materials have many important applications such as in catalysts, in filtration, actuators, capacitor or battery electrodes, and so on. Up to now, the most popular way of preparing buckypapers has involved the procedures of dispersion and filtration of a suspension of CNTs. In this work, we present a simple and effective macroscopic manipulation of aligned CNT arrays called 'domino pushing' in the preparation of the aligned thick buckypapers with large areas. This simple method can efficiently ensure that most of the CNTs are well aligned tightly in the buckypaper. The initial measurements indicate that these buckypapers have better performance on thermal and electrical conductance. These buckypapers with controllable structure also have many potential applications, including supercapacitor electrodes.

  13. The electrical conduction variation in stained carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Shih-Jye; Wei Fan, Jun; Lin, Chung-Yi

    2012-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes become stained from coupling with foreign molecules, especially from adsorbing gas molecules. The charge exchange, which is due to the orbital hybridization, occurred in the stained carbon nanotube induces electrical dipoles that consequently vary the electrical conduction of the nanotube. We propose a microscopic model to evaluate the electrical current variation produced by the induced electrical dipoles in a stained zigzag carbon nanotube. It is found that stronger orbital hybridization strengths and larger orbital energy differences between the carbon nanotube and the gas molecules help increasing the induced electrical dipole moment. Compared with the stain-free carbon nanotube, the induced electrical dipoles suppress the current in the nanotube. In the carbon nanotubes with induced dipoles the current increases as a result of increasing orbital energy dispersion via stronger hybridization couplings. In particular, at a fixed hybridization coupling, the current increases with the bond length for the donor-carbon nanotube but reversely for the acceptor-carbon nanotube.

  14. Methods for preparation of carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rakov, Eduard G [D.I. Mendeleev Russian University of Chemical Technology, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2000-01-31

    The most important methods of synthesis and purification of carbon nanotubes, a new form of material, are described. The prospects for increasing the scale of preparation processes and for more extensive application of nanotubes are evaluated. The bibliography includes 282 references.

  15. Carbon nanotubes for RF and microwaves

    OpenAIRE

    Burke, P. J.; Yu, Z; Rutherglen, C.

    2005-01-01

    In this invited overview paper we provide a brief up-to-date summary of the potential applications of carbon nanotubes for RF and microwave devices and systems. We focus in particular on the use of nanotubes as ultra-high speed interconnects in integrated circuits.

  16. Carbon nanotubes as heat dissipaters in microelectronics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pérez Paz, Alejandro; García-Lastra, Juan María; Markussen, Troels

    2013-01-01

    We review our recent modelling work of carbon nanotubes as potential candidates for heat dissipation in microelectronics cooling. In the first part, we analyze the impact of nanotube defects on their thermal transport properties. In the second part, we investigate the loss of thermal properties...

  17. Carbon Nanotubes for Human Space Flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Carl D.; Files, Brad; Yowell, Leonard

    2003-01-01

    Single-wall carbon nanotubes offer the promise of a new class of revolutionary materials for space applications. The Carbon Nanotube Project at NASA Johnson Space Center has been actively researching this new technology by investigating nanotube production methods (arc, laser, and HiPCO) and gaining a comprehensive understanding of raw and purified material using a wide range of characterization techniques. After production and purification, single wall carbon nanotubes are processed into composites for the enhancement of mechanical, electrical, and thermal properties. This "cradle-to-grave" approach to nanotube composites has given our team unique insights into the impact of post-production processing and dispersion on the resulting material properties. We are applying our experience and lessons-learned to developing new approaches toward nanotube material characterization, structural composite fabrication, and are also making advances in developing thermal management materials and electrically conductive materials in various polymer-nanotube systems. Some initial work has also been conducted with the goal of using carbon nanotubes in the creation of new ceramic materials for high temperature applications in thermal protection systems. Human space flight applications such as advanced life support and fuel cell technologies are also being investigated. This discussion will focus on the variety of applications under investigation.

  18. Thermal Characterization of Carbon Nanotubes by Photothermal Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leahu, G.; Li Voti, R.; Larciprete, M. C.; Sibilia, C.; Bertolotti, M.; Nefedov, I.; Anoshkin, I. V.

    2015-06-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are multifunctional materials commonly used in a large number of applications in electronics, sensors, nanocomposites, thermal management, actuators, energy storage and conversion, and drug delivery. Despite recent important advances in the development of CNT purity assessment tools and atomic resolution imaging of individual nanotubes by scanning tunnelling microscopy and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, the macroscale assessment of the overall surface qualities of commercial CNT materials remains a great challenge. The lack of quantitative measurement technology to characterize and compare the surface qualities of bulk manufactured and engineered CNT materials has negative impacts on the reliable and consistent nanomanufacturing of CNT products. In this paper it is shown how photoacoustic spectroscopy and photothermal radiometry represent useful non-destructive tools to study the optothermal properties of carbon nanotube thin films.

  19. Carbon nanotubes and graphene towards soft electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chae, Sang Hoon; Lee, Young Hee

    2014-04-01

    Although silicon technology has been the main driving force for miniaturizing device dimensions to improve cost and performance, the current application of Si to soft electronics (flexible and stretchable electronics) is limited due to material rigidity. As a result, various prospective materials have been proposed to overcome the rigidity of conventional Si technology. In particular, nano-carbon materials such as carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and graphene are promising due to outstanding elastic properties as well as an excellent combination of electronic, optoelectronic, and thermal properties compared to conventional rigid silicon. The uniqueness of these nano-carbon materials has opened new possibilities for soft electronics, which is another technological trend in the market. This review covers the recent progress of soft electronics research based on CNTs and graphene. We discuss the strategies for soft electronics with nano-carbon materials and their preparation methods (growth and transfer techniques) to devices as well as the electrical characteristics of transparent conducting films (transparency and sheet resistance) and device performances in field effect transistor (FET) (structure, carrier type, on/off ratio, and mobility). In addition to discussing state of the art performance metrics, we also attempt to clarify trade-off issues and methods to control the trade-off on/off versus mobility). We further demonstrate accomplishments of the CNT network in flexible integrated circuits on plastic substrates that have attractive characteristics. A future research direction is also proposed to overcome current technological obstacles necessary to realize commercially feasible soft electronics.

  20. Coulomb drag in multiwall armchair carbon nanotubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lunde, A.M.; Jauho, Antti-Pekka

    2004-01-01

    We calculate the transresistivity rho(21) between two concentric armchair nanotubes in a diffusive multiwall carbon nanotube as a function of temperature T and Fermi level epsilon(F). We approximate the tight-binding band structure by two crossing bands with a linear dispersion near the Fermi...... surface. The cylindrical geometry of the nanotubes and the different parities of the Bloch states are accounted for in the evaluation of the effective Coulomb interaction between charges in the concentric nanotubes. We find a broad peak in rho(21) as a function of temperature at roughly T similar to 0.4T...

  1. Flightweight Carbon Nanotube Magnet Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, J. N.; Schmidt, H. J.; Ruoff, R. S.; Chandrasekhar, V.; Dikin, D. A.; Litchford, R. J.

    2003-01-01

    Virtually all plasma-based systems for advanced airborne/spaceborne propulsion and power depend upon the future availability of flightweight magnet technology. Unfortunately, current technology for resistive and superconducting magnets yields system weights that tend to counteract the performance advantages normally associated with advanced plasma-based concepts. The ongoing nanotechnology revolution and the continuing development of carbon nanotubes (CNT), however, may ultimately relieve this limitation in the near future. Projections based on recent research indicate that CNTs may achieve current densities at least three orders of magnitude larger than known superconductors and mechanical strength two orders of magnitude larger than steel. In fact, some published work suggests that CNTs are superconductors. Such attributes imply a dramatic increase in magnet performance-to-weight ratio and offer real hope for the construction of true flightweight magnets. This Technical Publication reviews the technology status of CNTs with respect to potential magnet applications and discusses potential techniques for using CNT wires and ropes as a winding material and as an integral component of the containment structure. The technology shortfalls are identified and a research and technology strategy is described that addresses the following major issues: (1) Investigation and verification of mechanical and electrical properties, (2) development of tools for manipulation and fabrication on the nanoscale, (3) continuum/molecular dynamics analysis of nanotube behavior when exposed to practical bending and twisting loads, and (4) exploration of innovative magnet fabrication techniques that exploit the natural attributes of CNTs.

  2. Carbon nanotubes for thermal interface materials in microelectronic packaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Wei

    As the integration scale of transistors/devices in a chip/system keeps increasing, effective cooling has become more and more important in microelectronics. To address the thermal dissipation issue, one important solution is to develop thermal interface materials with higher performance. Carbon nanotubes, given their high intrinsic thermal and mechanical properties, and their high thermal and chemical stabilities, have received extensive attention from both academia and industry as a candidate for high-performance thermal interface materials. The thesis is devoted to addressing some challenges related to the potential application of carbon nanotubes as thermal interface materials in microelectronics. These challenges include: 1) controlled synthesis of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes on various bulk substrates via chemical vapor deposition and the fundamental understanding involved; 2) development of a scalable annealing process to improve the intrinsic properties of synthesized carbon nanotubes; 3) development of a state-of-art assembling process to effectively implement high-quality vertically aligned carbon nanotubes into a flip-chip assembly; 4) a reliable thermal measurement of intrinsic thermal transport property of vertically aligned carbon nanotube films; 5) improvement of interfacial thermal transport between carbon nanotubes and other materials. The major achievements are summarized. 1. Based on the fundamental understanding of catalytic chemical vapor deposition processes and the growth mechanism of carbon nanotube, fast synthesis of high-quality vertically aligned carbon nanotubes on various bulk substrates (e.g., copper, quartz, silicon, aluminum oxide, etc.) has been successfully achieved. The synthesis of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes on the bulk copper substrate by the thermal chemical vapor deposition process has set a world record. In order to functionalize the synthesized carbon nanotubes while maintaining their good vertical alignment

  3. Modification of carbon nanotubes and synthesis of polymeric composites involving the nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badamshina, E R; Gafurova, M P; Estrin, Yakov I [Institute of Problems of Chemical Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Chernogolovka, Moscow Region (Russian Federation)

    2010-12-29

    The results of studies, mainly published in recent years, on modification of carbon nanotubes and design of composites with these nanotubes for the manufacture of new-generation materials are generalized and analyzed. The methods of modification of the nanotubes by low- and high-molecular compounds and methods of polymer modification by carbon nanotubes are considered. Data on the properties of modified nanotubes are presented. The current and potential applications of materials based on the nanotubes are indicated.

  4. Purification of Carbon Nanotubes: Alternative Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Files, Bradley; Scott, Carl; Gorelik, Olga; Nikolaev, Pasha; Hulse, Lou; Arepalli, Sivaram

    2000-01-01

    Traditional carbon nanotube purification process involves nitric acid refluxing and cross flow filtration using surfactant TritonX. This is believed to result in damage to nanotubes and surfactant residue on nanotube surface. Alternative purification procedures involving solvent extraction, thermal zone refining and nitric acid refiuxing are used in the current study. The effect of duration and type of solvent to dissolve impurities including fullerenes and P ACs (polyaromatic compounds) are monitored by nuclear magnetic reasonance, high performance liquid chromatography, and thermogravimetric analysis. Thermal zone refining yielded sample areas rich in nanotubes as seen by scanning electric microscopy. Refluxing in boiling nitric acid seem to improve the nanotube content. Different procedural steps are needed to purify samples produced by laser process compared to arc process. These alternative methods of nanotube purification will be presented along with results from supporting analytical techniques.

  5. Deconvoluting hepatic processing of carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alidori, Simone; Bowman, Robert L.; Yarilin, Dmitry; Romin, Yevgeniy; Barlas, Afsar; Mulvey, J. Justin; Fujisawa, Sho; Xu, Ke; Ruggiero, Alessandro; Riabov, Vladimir; Thorek, Daniel L. J.; Ulmert, Hans David S.; Brea, Elliott J.; Behling, Katja; Kzhyshkowska, Julia; Manova-Todorova, Katia; Scheinberg, David A.; McDevitt, Michael R.

    2016-07-01

    Single-wall carbon nanotubes present unique opportunities for drug delivery, but have not advanced into the clinic. Differential nanotube accretion and clearance from critical organs have been observed, but the mechanism not fully elucidated. The liver has a complex cellular composition that regulates a range of metabolic functions and coincidently accumulates most particulate drugs. Here we provide the unexpected details of hepatic processing of covalently functionalized nanotubes including receptor-mediated endocytosis, cellular trafficking and biliary elimination. Ammonium-functionalized fibrillar nanocarbon is found to preferentially localize in the fenestrated sinusoidal endothelium of the liver but not resident macrophages. Stabilin receptors mediate the endocytic clearance of nanotubes. Biocompatibility is evidenced by the absence of cell death and no immune cell infiltration. Towards clinical application of this platform, nanotubes were evaluated for the first time in non-human primates. The pharmacologic profile in cynomolgus monkeys is equivalent to what was reported in mice and suggests that nanotubes should behave similarly in humans.

  6. Carbon Nanotube Composites: Strongest Engineering Material Ever?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayeaux, Brian; Nikolaev, Pavel; Proft, William; Nicholson, Leonard S. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    The primary goal of the carbon nanotube project at Johnson Space Center (JSC) is to fabricate structural materials with a much higher strength-to-weight ratio than any engineered material today, Single-wall nanotubes present extraordinary mechanical properties along with new challenges for materials processing. Our project includes nanotube production, characterization, purification, and incorporation into applications studies. Now is the time to move from studying individual nanotubes to applications work. Current research at JSC focuses on structural polymeric materials to attempt to lower the weight of spacecraft necessary for interplanetary missions. These nanoscale fibers present unique new challenges to composites engineers. Preliminary studies show good nanotube dispersion and wetting by the epoxy materials. Results of tensile strength tests will also be reported. Other applications of nanotubes are also of interest for energy storage, gas storage, nanoelectronics, field emission, and biomedical uses.

  7. Functionalized carbon nanotubes: biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vardharajula, Sandhya; Ali, Sk Z; Tiwari, Pooja M; Eroğlu, Erdal; Vig, Komal; Dennis, Vida A; Singh, Shree R

    2012-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are emerging as novel nanomaterials for various biomedical applications. CNTs can be used to deliver a variety of therapeutic agents, including biomolecules, to the target disease sites. In addition, their unparalleled optical and electrical properties make them excellent candidates for bioimaging and other biomedical applications. However, the high cytotoxicity of CNTs limits their use in humans and many biological systems. The biocompatibility and low cytotoxicity of CNTs are attributed to size, dose, duration, testing systems, and surface functionalization. The functionalization of CNTs improves their solubility and biocompatibility and alters their cellular interaction pathways, resulting in much-reduced cytotoxic effects. Functionalized CNTs are promising novel materials for a variety of biomedical applications. These potential applications are particularly enhanced by their ability to penetrate biological membranes with relatively low cytotoxicity. This review is directed towards the overview of CNTs and their functionalization for biomedical applications with minimal cytotoxicity.

  8. Carbon Nanotube Tape Vibrating Gyroscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Dennis Stephen (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A vibrating gyroscope includes a piezoelectric strip having length and width dimensions. The piezoelectric strip includes a piezoelectric material and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) substantially aligned and polled along the strip's length dimension. A spindle having an axis of rotation is coupled to the piezoelectric strip. The axis of rotation is parallel to the strip's width dimension. A first capacitance sensor is mechanically coupled to the spindle for rotation therewith. The first capacitance sensor is positioned at one of the strip's opposing ends and is spaced apart from one of the strip's opposing faces. A second capacitance sensor is mechanically coupled to the spindle for rotation therewith. The second capacitance sensor is positioned at another of the strip's opposing ends and is spaced apart from another of the strip's opposing faces. A voltage source applies an AC voltage to the piezoelectric strip.

  9. Carbon nanotubes – becoming clean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole Grobert

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanotubes (CNTs are now well into their teenage years. Early on, theoretical predictions and experimental data showed that CNTs possess chemical and mechanical properties that exceed those of many other materials. This has triggered intense research into CNTs. A variety of production methods for CNTs have been developed; chemical modification, functionalization, filling, and doping have been achieved; and manipulation, separation, and characterization of individual CNTs is now possible. Today, products containing CNTs range from tennis rackets and golf clubs to vehicle fenders, X-ray tubes, and Li ion batteries. Breakthroughs for CNT-based technologies are anticipated in the areas of nanoelectronics, biotechnology, and materials science. In this article, I review the current situation in CNT production and highlight the importance of clean CNT material for the success of future applications.

  10. Carbon nanotube heat-exchange systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendricks, Terry Joseph; Heben, Michael J.

    2008-11-11

    A carbon nanotube heat-exchange system (10) and method for producing the same. One embodiment of the carbon nanotube heat-exchange system (10) comprises a microchannel structure (24) having an inlet end (30) and an outlet end (32), the inlet end (30) providing a cooling fluid into the microchannel structure (24) and the outlet end (32) discharging the cooling fluid from the microchannel structure (24). At least one flow path (28) is defined in the microchannel structure (24), fluidically connecting the inlet end (30) to the outlet end (32) of the microchannel structure (24). A carbon nanotube structure (26) is provided in thermal contact with the microchannel structure (24), the carbon nanotube structure (26) receiving heat from the cooling fluid in the microchannel structure (24) and dissipating the heat into an external medium (19).

  11. A Thermal Model for Carbon Nanotube Interconnects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clay Mayberry

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we have studied Joule heating in carbon nanotube based very large scale integration (VLSI interconnects and incorporated Joule heating influenced scattering in our previously developed current transport model. The theoretical model explains breakdown in carbon nanotube resistance which limits the current density. We have also studied scattering parameters of carbon nanotube (CNT interconnects and compared with the earlier work. For 1 µm length single-wall carbon nanotube, 3 dB frequency in S12 parameter reduces to ~120 GHz from 1 THz considering Joule heating. It has been found that bias voltage has little effect on scattering parameters, while length has very strong effect on scattering parameters.

  12. Fabrication of porous carbon nanotube network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Jun-Wei; Fu, Shu-Juan; Gwo, Shangjr; Lin, Kuan-Jiuh; Lin, Kuna-Jiuh

    2008-11-21

    We used the spin-coating method combined with ultrasonic atomization as a continuous, one-step process to generate a two-dimensional honeycomb network that was constructed from pure multi-walled carbon nanotubes.

  13. Self Assembled Carbon Nanotube Enhanced Ultracapacitors Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The objective of this NASA STTR program is to develop single wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) based ultracapacitors for energy storage devices (ESD) application, using...

  14. Transparent and Electrically Conductive Carbon Nanotube-Polymer Nanocomposite Materials for Electrostatic Charge Dissipation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dervishi, E.; Biris, A. S.; Biris, A. R.; Lupu, D.; Trigwell, S.; Miller, D. W.; Schmitt, T.; Buzatu, D. A.; Wilkes, J. G.

    2006-01-01

    In recent years, nanocomposite materials have been extensively studied because of their superior electrical, magnetic, and optical properties and large number of possible applications that range from nano-electronics, specialty coatings, electromagnetic shielding, and drug delivery. The aim of the present work is to study the electrical and optical properties of carbon nanotube(CNT)-polymer nanocomposite materials for electrostatic charge dissipation. Single and multi-wall carbon nanotubes were grown by catalytic chemical vapor deposition (CCVD) on metal/metal oxide catalytic systems using acetylene or other hydrocarbon feedstocks. After the purification process, in which amorphous carbon and non-carbon impurities were removed, the nanotubes were functionalized with carboxylic acid groups in order to achieve a good dispersion in water and various other solvents. The carbon nanostructures were analyzed, both before and after functionalization by several analytical techniques, including microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and X-Ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Solvent dispersed nanotubes were mixed (1 to 7 wt %) into acrylic polymers by sonication and allowed to dry into 25 micron thick films. The electrical and optical properties of the films were analyzed as a function of the nanotubes' concentration. A reduction in electrical resistivity, up to six orders of magnitude, was measured as the nanotubes' concentration in the polymeric films increased, while optical transparency remained 85 % or higher relative to acrylic films without nanotubes.

  15. Controlled Deposition and Alignment of Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smits, Jan M. (Inventor); Wincheski, Russell A. (Inventor); Patry, JoAnne L. (Inventor); Watkins, Anthony Neal (Inventor); Jordan, Jeffrey D. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A carbon nanotube (CNT) attraction material is deposited on a substrate in the gap region between two electrodes on the substrate. An electric potential is applied to the two electrodes. The CNT attraction material is wetted with a solution defined by a carrier liquid having carbon nanotubes (CNTs) suspended therein. A portion of the CNTs align with the electric field and adhere to the CNT attraction material. The carrier liquid and any CNTs not adhered to the CNT attraction material are then removed.

  16. Carbon nanotube temperature and pressure sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivanov, Ilia N.; Geohegan, David B.

    2016-12-13

    The present invention, in one embodiment, provides a method of measuring pressure or temperature using a sensor including a sensor element composed of a plurality of carbon nanotubes. In one example, the resistance of the plurality of carbon nanotubes is measured in response to the application of temperature or pressure. The changes in resistance are then recorded and correlated to temperature or pressure. In one embodiment, the present invention provides for independent measurement of pressure or temperature using the sensors disclosed herein.

  17. Carbon nanotube temperature and pressure sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivanov, Ilia N.; Geohegan, David B.

    2016-11-15

    The present invention, in one embodiment, provides a method of measuring pressure or temperature using a sensor including a sensor element composed of a plurality of carbon nanotubes. In one example, the resistance of the plurality of carbon nanotubes is measured in response to the application of temperature or pressure. The changes in resistance are then recorded and correlated to temperature or pressure. In one embodiment, the present invention provides for independent measurement of pressure or temperature using the sensors disclosed herein.

  18. Carbon nanotube temperature and pressure sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivanov, Ilia N.; Geohegan, David B.

    2016-10-25

    The present invention, in one embodiment, provides a method of measuring pressure or temperature using a sensor including a sensor element composed of a plurality of carbon nanotubes. In one example, the resistance of the plurality of carbon nanotubes is measured in response to the application of temperature or pressure. The changes in resistance are then recorded and correlated to temperature or pressure. In one embodiment, the present invention provides for independent measurement of pressure or temperature using the sensors disclosed herein.

  19. [Hygienic evaluation of multilayer carbon nanotubes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haliullin, T O; Zalyalov, R R; Shvedova, A A; Tkachov, A G

    2015-01-01

    The authors demonstrate that traditional methods evaluating work conditions on contemporary innovative enterprises producing nanomaterials assess these conditions as harmless and safe. At the same time, special investigation methods enable to reveal new hazards for workers' health: the study results prove that workers engaged into multilayer carbon nanotubes production are exposed to multilayer carbon nanotubes aerosols in concentrations exceeding internationally acceptable levels of 1 μg/ml (NIOSH)--that can harm the workers' health.

  20. Carbon nanotube temperature and pressure sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Ilia N; Geohegan, David Bruce

    2013-10-29

    The present invention, in one embodiment, provides a method of measuring pressure or temperature using a sensor including a sensor element composed of a plurality of carbon nanotubes. In one example, the resistance of the plurality of carbon nanotubes is measured in response to the application of temperature or pressure. The changes in resistance are then recorded and correlated to temperature or pressure. In one embodiment, the present invention provides for independent measurement of pressure or temperature using the sensors disclosed herein.

  1. Carbon nanotubes field effect transistors biosensors

    OpenAIRE

    Martínez, M.T.; Tseng, Y. C.; Ormategui, N.; Loinaz, I.; Eritja Casadellà, Ramón; Salvador, Juan Pablo; Marco, María Pilar; Bokor, J.

    2012-01-01

    [EN] Carbon nanotube transistor arrays (CNTFETs) were used as biosensors to detect NA hybridization and to recognize two anabolic steroids, stanozolol (Stz) and methylboldenone (MB). Single strand DNA and antibodies specific for STz and MB were immobilized on the carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in situ in the device using two different approaches: direct noncovalent bonding of antibodies to the devices and covalently trough a polymer previously attached to the CNTFETs. A new approach to ensure specif...

  2. Filling of carbon nanotubes and nanofibres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reece D. Gately

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The reliable production of carbon nanotubes and nanofibres is a relatively new development, and due to their unique structure, there has been much interest in filling their hollow interiors. In this review, we provide an overview of the most common approaches for filling these carbon nanostructures. We highlight that filled carbon nanostructures are an emerging material for biomedical applications.

  3. ON THE CONTINUUM MODELING OF CARBON NANOTUBES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张鹏; 黄永刚; Philippe H.Geubelle; 黄克智

    2002-01-01

    We have recently proposed a nanoscale continuum theory for carbonnanotubes. The theory links continuum analysis with atomistic modeling by incor-porating interatomic potentials and atomic structures of carbon nanotubes directlyinto the constitutive law. Here we address two main issues involved in setting upthe nanoscale continuum theory for carbon nanotubes, namely the multi-body in-teratomic potentials and the lack of centrosymmetry in the nanotube structure. Weexplain the key ideas behind these issues in establishing a nanoscale continuum theoryin terms of interatomic potentials and atomic structures.

  4. On-chip highly sensitive saliva glucose sensing using multilayer films composed of single-walled carbon nanotubes, gold nanoparticles, and glucose oxidase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenjun Zhang

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available It is very important for human health to rapidly and accurately detect glucose levels in biological environments, especially for diabetes mellitus. We proposed a simple, highly sensitive, accurate, convenient, low-cost, and disposable glucose biosensor on a single chip. A working (sensor electrode, a counter electrode, and a reference electrode are integrated on a single chip through micro-fabrication. The working electrode is functionalized through a layer-by-layer (LBL assembly of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs and multilayer films composed of chitosan (CS, gold nanoparticles (GNp, and glucose oxidase (GOx to obtain high sensitivity and accuracy. The glucose sensor has following features: (1 direct electron transfer between GOx and the electrode surface; (2 on-a-chip; (3 glucose detection down to 0.1 mg/dL (5.6 μM; (4 good sensing linearity over 0.017–0.81 mM; (5 high sensitivity (61.4 μA/mM-cm2 with a small reactive area (8 mm2; (6 fast response; (7 high reproducibility and repeatability; (8 reliable and accurate saliva glucose detection. Thus, this disposable biosensor will be an alternative for real time tracking of glucose levels from body fluids, e.g. saliva, in a noninvasive, pain-free, accurate, and continuous way. In addition to being used as a disposable glucose biosensor, it also provides a suitable platform for on-chip electrochemical sensing for other chemical agents and biomolecules.

  5. Selective recognition of 5-hydroxytryptamine and dopamine on a multi-walled carbon nanotube-chitosan hybrid film-modified microelectrode array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Huiren; Wang, Li; Luo, Jinping; Song, Yilin; Liu, Juntao; Zhang, Song; Cai, Xinxia

    2015-01-08

    It is difficult to determine dopamine (DA) and 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) accurately because of the interference of ascorbic acid (AA) in vitro, which has a high concentration and can be oxidized at a potential close to DA and 5-HT at a conventional electrode, combined with the overlapping voltammetric signal of DA and 5-HT at a bare electrode. Herein, chitosan (CS) was used as a stabilizing matrix by electrochemical reaction, and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were modified onto the microelectrode array (MEA). The CS-MWCNT hybrid film-modified MEA was quite effective at simultaneously recognizing these species in a mixture and resolved the overlapping anodic peaks of AA, DA and 5-HT into three well-defined oxidation peaks in differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) at -80 mV, 105 mV and 300 mV (versus Ag|AgCl), respectively. The linear responses were obtained in the range of 5 × 10(-6) M to 2 × 10(-4) M for DA (r = 0.996) and in the range of 1 × 10(-5) M to 3 × 10(-4) M for 5-HT (r = 0.999) using the DPV under the presence of a single substance. While DA coexisted with 5-HT in the interference of 3 × 10(-4) M AA, the linear responses were obtained in the range of 1 × 10(-5) M to 3 × 10(-4) M for selective molecular recognition of DA (r = 0.997) and 5-HT (r = 0.997) using the DPV. Therefore, this proposed MEA was successfully used for selective molecular recognition and determination of DA and 5-HT using the DPV, which has a potential application for real-time determination in vitro experiments.

  6. Selective Recognition of 5-Hydroxytryptamine and Dopamine on a Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotube-Chitosan Hybrid Film-Modified Microelectrode Array

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huiren Xu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available It is difficult to determine dopamine (DA and 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT accurately because of the interference of ascorbic acid (AA in vitro, which has a high concentration and can be oxidized at a potential close to DA and 5-HT at a conventional electrode, combined with the overlapping voltammetric signal of DA and 5-HT at a bare electrode. Herein, chitosan (CS was used as a stabilizing matrix by electrochemical reaction, and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs were modified onto the microelectrode array (MEA. The CS-MWCNT hybrid film-modified MEA was quite effective at simultaneously recognizing these species in a mixture and resolved the overlapping anodic peaks of AA, DA and 5-HT into three well-defined oxidation peaks in differential pulse voltammetry (DPV at −80 mV, 105 mV and 300 mV (versus Ag|AgCl, respectively. The linear responses were obtained in the range of 5 × 10−6 M to 2 × 10−4 M for DA (r = 0.996 and in the range of 1 × 10−5 M to 3 × 10−4 M for 5-HT (r = 0.999 using the DPV under the presence of a single substance. While DA coexisted with 5-HT in the interference of 3 × 10−4 M AA, the linear responses were obtained in the range of 1 × 10−5 M to 3 × 10−4 M for selective molecular recognition of DA (r = 0.997 and 5-HT (r = 0.997 using the DPV. Therefore, this proposed MEA was successfully used for selective molecular recognition and determination of DA and 5-HT using the DPV, which has a potential application for real-time determination in vitro experiments.

  7. Enhancement of dye-sensitized solar cell efficiency using carbon nanotube/TiO2 nanocomposite thin films fabricated at various annealing temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullah, Huda; Razali, Mohd Zikri; Shaari, Sahbudin; Taha, Mohd Raihan

    2014-05-01

    To increase energy conversion efficiency of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs), carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were added to TiO2 gel-like solution. Modified acid-catalyzed sol-gel method was used with the doctor blade coating technique to obtain thin films of CNT/TiO2 nanocomposite photoanode. CNT/TiO2 paste was applied onto the conductive glass to generate a 0.25 cm2 active area which was later annealed at 350°C, 450°C, and 550°C for 60 min. Characterization of the CNT/TiO2 paste was performed using x-ray diffraction. Results showed that the crystalline phase of the particles was anatase. The micrograph obtained using field emission scanning electron microscopy demonstrated that the pastes are highly porous. Brunauer-Emmett-Teller analysis was performed to determine the CNT/TiO2 surface area and particle size. The DSSC with the CNT/TiO2 photoanodes annealed at 550°C showed the highest incident photon-to-charge carrier efficiency value of 0.95% compared with the DSSCs with photoanodes annealed at 350°C and 450°C (0.70% and 0.83%, respectively). The observed efficiencies of the DSSCs with CNT/TiO2 photoanode annealed at the three different temperatures were 2.62%, 2.65%, and 3.13%. The electrochemical impedance spectroscopy analysis showed that the DSSCs with photoanodes developed using the highest annealing temperature (550°C) have higher electron lifetime of 70.423 ms and lower effective recombination rate of 1.42 × 10-2 s-1, thereby improving the performance of CNT/TiO2 DSSCs.

  8. 碳纳米管薄膜的制备及其超疏水性研究%The Preparation of Carbon Nanotubes Films and Its Superhydrophobicity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李刚

    2012-01-01

    采用化学气相沉积法在平面硅基体上制备碳纳米管薄膜,并通过扫描电子显微镜、透射电子显微镜和接触角测量仪对样品进行形貌结构和浸润性质的表征.结果表明:碳纳米管的定向性主要由基体上催化剂粒子的分布控制,并遵循顶部生长生长机制;2种碳纳米管薄膜都具有较大的接触角,获得的定向碳纳米管表面具有微纳米复合结构是产生超疏水的主要原因.%Carbon nanotubes( CNTs) films were prepared on planar silicon substrates by chemical vapor deposition meth od. Scanning electron microscope( SEM) .transmission electron microscope(TEM) ,contact angle goniometer and rheometer were employed to characterize the morphologies,structures,wettabilities and rheological properties of as-prepared CNTs. It reveals that the distribution of catalyst particles determines the orientation of CNTs. The CNTs have a bamboo shaped mul tiwalled structure and grow by a tip growth mechanism. Whether CNTs arrange regularly or not,they will take on large con tact angles. The special surface structure with micro-papillae and nanoscale lotus-like papillae may be the main reason con tributing to the superhydrophobic surfaces of aligned CNTs.

  9. Carbon Nanotubes as Reinforcement of Cellulose Liquid Crystalline Responsive Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echeverria, Coro; Aguirre, Luis E; Merino, Esther G; Almeida, Pedro L; Godinho, Maria H

    2015-09-30

    The incorporation of small amount of highly anisotropic nanoparticles into liquid crystalline hydroxypropylcellulose (LC-HPC) matrix improves its response when is exposed to humidity gradients due to an anisotropic increment of order in the structure. Dispersed nanoparticles give rise to faster order/disorder transitions when exposed to moisture as it is qualitatively observed and quantified by stress-time measurements. The presence of carbon nanotubes derives in a improvement of the mechanical properties of LC-HPC thin films.

  10. Ozone Sensing Based on Palladium Decorated Carbon Nanotubes

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were easily and efficiently decorated with Pd nanoparticles through a vapor-phase impregnation-decomposition method starting from palladium acetylacetonates. The sensor device consisted on a film of sensitive material (MWCNTs-Pd) deposited by drop coating on platinum interdigitated electrodes on a SiO2 substrate. The sensor exhibited a resistance change to ozone (O3) with a response time of 60 s at different temperatures and the capability of detecting conc...

  11. Ultrahard carbon nanocomposite films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SIEGAL,MICHAEL P.; TALLANT,DAVID R.; PROVENCIO,PAULA P.; OVERMYER,DONALD L.; SIMPSON,REGINA L.; MARTINEZ-MIRANDA,L.J.

    2000-01-27

    Modest thermal annealing to 600 C of diamondlike amorphous-carbon (a-C) films grown at room temperature results in the formation of carbon nanocomposites with hardness similar to diamond. These nanocomposite films consist of nanometer-sized regions of high density a-C embedded in an a-C matrix with a reduced density of 5--10%. The authors report on the evolution of density and bonding topologies as a function of annealing temperature. Despite a decrease in density, film hardness actually increases {approximately} 15% due to the development of the nanocomposite structure.

  12. Ultrahard carbon nanocomposite films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siegal, M. P. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185-1421 (United States); Tallant, D. R. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185-1421 (United States); Provencio, P. N. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185-1421 (United States); Overmyer, D. L. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185-1421 (United States); Simpson, R. L. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185-1421 (United States); Martinez-Miranda, L. J. [Department of Materials and Nuclear Engineering, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States)

    2000-05-22

    Modest thermal annealing to 600 degree sign C of diamondlike amorphous-carbon (a-C) films grown at room temperature results in the formation of carbon nanocomposites with hardness similar to diamond. These nanocomposite films consist of nanometer-sized regions of high density a-C embedded in an a-C matrix with a reduced density of 5%-10%. We report on the evolution of density and bonding topologies as a function of annealing temperature. Despite a decrease in density, film hardness actually increases {approx}15% due to the development of the nanocomposite structure. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics.

  13. Method for nano-pumping using carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Insepov, Zeke; Hassanein, Ahmed

    2009-12-15

    The present invention relates generally to the field of nanotechnology, carbon nanotubes and, more specifically, to a method and system for nano-pumping media through carbon nanotubes. One preferred embodiment of the invention generally comprises: method for nano-pumping, comprising the following steps: providing one or more media; providing one or more carbon nanotubes, the one or more nanotubes having a first end and a second end, wherein said first end of one or more nanotubes is in contact with the media; and creating surface waves on the carbon nanotubes, wherein at least a portion of the media is pumped through the nanotube.

  14. Microchemical and Gaseous Sensors Using Carbon Nanotubes and MEMS Fabrication Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chung-Chiun; VanderWal, Randy; Hunter, Gary

    2003-01-01

    The objective of this research is to use a combination of carbon nanotubes and silicon-based microfabrication and micromachining processes to produce unique micro-sized chemical and gaseous sensors. Polished quartz substrate is used. Interdigitated structure is used for the sensing elements. Metallic catalysts for the growth of the carbon nanotube include copper, iron, nickel, and cobalt. Various thicknesses of the metallic catalysts are used in this study varying between 5 to 20 microns. Depositing of the metallic catalyst is accomplished using an ion-beam sputtering thin film technique and a shadow mask. Single wall carbon nanotubes are successfully formed over the metallic catalyst layer. Preliminary measurements of the carbon nanotubes show this nanotube contained film over the sensing elements which had a resistance value of 400 ohms at room temperature. This is a more conductive film comparing to metal oxide films, such as SnO2 or ZnO, that are now widely used in gaseous sensor research. Evaluation of the carbon nanotube film for potential gaseous sensing will be carried out.

  15. Fast readout of carbon nanotube mechanical resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meerwaldt, Harold; Singh, Vibhor; Schneider, Ben; Schouten, Raymond; van der Zant, Herre; Steele, Gary

    2013-03-01

    We perform fast readout measurements of carbon nanotube mechanical resonators. Using an electronic mixing scheme, we can detect the amplitude of the mechanical motion with an intermediate frequency (IF) of 46 MHz and a timeconstant of 1 us, up to 5 orders of magnitude faster than before. Previous measurements suffered from a low bandwidth due to the combination of the high resistance of the carbon nanotube and a large stray capacitance. We have increased the bandwidth significantly by using a high-impedance, close-proximity HEMT amplifier. The increased bandwidth should allow us to observe the nanotube's thermal motion and its transient response, approaching the regime of real-time detection of the carbon nanotube's mechanical motion.

  16. Manipulation and cutting of carbon nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Nanomanipulation plays an important role in nanofabrication, it is also a technology necessary in exploring the secrets of nanoworld, and it thus beco mesa start point to research future nanomachine. In this study, manipulation and cutting of carbon nanotubes have been conducted in order to examine whether we can move a nanocomponent from one site to another by using the tip of atomic fo rce microscope (AFM). The technique may also be valuable for providing the const ructive materials of nanofabrication. While exploring the method for manipulatin g and cutting of nanotubes, some new phenomena have been observed during the process. Results show that carbon nanotubes present a feature of deformation combin ing bending and distortion when subjected to large mechanical forces exerted by the tip of AFM. In special cases, long carbon nanotubes can be cut into two part s, by which we can remove the part where crystal lattice is flawed, and therefor e a perfect nanocomponent can be obtained.

  17. A Sensitive Simultaneous Determination of Adrenalin and Paracetamol on a Glassy Carbon Electrode Coated with a Film of Chitosan/Room Temperature Ionic Liquid/Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes Nanocomposite%A Sensitive Simultaneous Determination of Adrenalin and Paracetamol on a Glassy Carbon Electrode Coated with a Film of Chitosan/Room Temperature Ionic Liquid/Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes Nanocomposite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Babaei, Ali; Babazadeh, Mitra; Afrasiabi, Mohammad

    2011-01-01

    The present work demonstrates that simultaneous determination of adrenalin (AD) and paracetamol (PAR) can be performed on single-walled carbon nanotube/chitosan/ionic liquid modified glassy carbon electrode (SWCNT-CHIT-IL/GCE). The electro-oxidations of AD and PAR were investigated with cyclic voltammetry (CV), differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) and also chronoamperometry (CA) methods. DPV experiments showed that the oxidation peak currents of AD and PAR are proportional to the corresponding concentrations over the 1-580 μmol/L and 0.5-400 μmol/L ranges, respectively. The RSD at a concentration level of 15 μmol/L AD and 15 μmol/L PAR were 1.69% and 1.82%, respectively. Finally the modified electrode was used for simultaneous determination of AD and PAR in real samples with satisfactory results.

  18. Static and dynamic wetting measurements of single carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, Asa H; Cohen, Sidney R; Wagner, H Daniel

    2004-05-07

    Individual carbon nanotubes were immersed and removed from various organic liquids using atomic force microscopy. The carbon nanotube-liquid interactions could be monitored in situ, and accurate measurements of the contact angle between liquids and the nanotube surface were made. These wetting data were used to produce Owens and Wendt plots giving the dispersive and polar components of the nanotube surface.

  19. Selective detection of dopamine in the presence of uric acid using a gold nanoparticles-poly(luminol) hybrid film and multi-walled carbon nanotubes with incorporated β-cyclodextrin modified glassy carbon electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Dong; Dai, Jianyuan; Yuan, Hongyan; Lei, Ling; Xiao, Dan

    2011-10-15

    Gold nanoparticles-poly(luminol) (Plu-AuNPs) hybrid film and multi-walled carbon nanotubes with incorporated β-cyclodextrin modified glassy carbon electrode (β-CD-MWCNTs/Plu-AuNPs/GCE) was successfully prepared for simultaneous determination of dopamine (DA) and uric acid (UA). The surface of the modified electrode has been characterized by X-ray photo-electron spectroscopy (XPS), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), field-emission scanning electron microscope (SEM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM). Cyclic voltammetry (CV), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) have been used to investigate the β-CD-MWCNTs/Plu-AuNPs composite film. Gold nanoparticles anchored into poly(luminol) film exhibited catalytic activity for DA. MWCNTs with incorporated β-CD can greatly promote the direct electron transfer. In 0.10 M phosphate buffer solution (PBS, pH 7.0), the DPV response of the β-CD-MWCNTs/Plu-AuNPs/GCE sensor to DA is about 8-fold as compared with the Plu-AuNPs/GCE sensor, and the detection limit for DA is about one order of magnitude lower than the Plu-AuNPs/GCE sensor. The steady-state current response increases linearly with DA concentration from 1.0 × 10(-6) to 5.6 × 10(-5)M with a low detection limit (S/N=3) of 1.9 × 10(-7)M. Moreover, the interferences of ascorbic acid (AA) and uric acid (UA) are effectively diminished. The applicability of the prepared electrode has been demonstrated by measuring DA contents in dopamine hydrochloride injection.

  20. Polymerization initated at sidewalls of carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tour, James M. (Inventor); Hudson, Jared L. (Inventor); Krishnamoorti, Ramanan (Inventor); Yurekli, Koray (Inventor); Mitchell, Cynthia A. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    The present invention is directed to aryl halide (such as aryl bromide) functionalized carbon nanotubes that can be utilized in anionic polymerization processes to form polymer-carbon nanotube materials with improved dispersion ability in polymer matrices. In this process the aryl halide is reacted with an alkyllithium species or is reacted with a metal to replace the aryl-bromine bond with an aryl-lithium or aryl-metal bond, respectively. It has further been discovered that other functionalized carbon nanotubes, after deprotonation with a deprotonation agent, can similarly be utilized in anionic polymerization processes to form polymer-carbon nanotube materials. Additionally or alternatively, a ring opening polymerization process can be performed. The resultant materials can be used by themselves due to their enhanced strength and reinforcement ability when compared to their unbound polymer analogs. Additionally, these materials can also be blended with pre-formed polymers to establish compatibility and enhanced dispersion of nanotubes in otherwise hard to disperse matrices resulting in significantly improved material properties. The resultant polymer-carbon nanotube materials can also be used in drug delivery processes due to their improved dispersion ability and biodegradability, and can also be used for scaffolding to promote cellular growth of tissue.