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Sample records for carbon nanotube films

  1. Piezoresistive Sensors Based on Carbon Nanotube Films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    L(U) Jian-wei; WANG Wan-lu; LIAO Ke-jun; WANG Yong-tian; LIU CHang-lin; Zeng Qing-gao

    2005-01-01

    Piezoresistive effect of carbon nanotube films was investigated by a three-point bending test.Carbon nanotubes were synthesized by hot filament chemical vapor deposition.The experimental results showed that the carbon nanotubes have a striking piezoresistive effect.The relative resistance was changed from 0 to 10.5×10-2 and 3.25×10-2 for doped and undoped films respectively at room temperature when the microstrain under stress from 0 to 500. The gauge factors for doped and undoped carbon nanotube films under 500 microstrain were about 220 and 67 at room temperature, respectively, exceeding that of polycrystalline silicon (30) at 35℃.The origin of the resistance changes in the films may be attributed to a strain-induced change in the band gap for the doped tubes and the defects for the undoped tubes.

  2. Piezoresistive effect in carbon nanotube films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    The piezoresistive effect of the pristine carbon nanotube (CNT) films has been studied. Carbon nanotubes were synthesized by hot filament chemical vapor deposition. The piezoresistive effect in the pristine CNT films was studied by a three-point bending test. The gauge factor for the pristine CNT films under 500 microstrains was found to be at least 65 at room temperature, and increased with temperature, exceeding that of polycrystalline silicon (30) at 35℃. The origin of the piezoresistivity in CNT films may be ascribed to a pressure-induced change in the band gap and the defects.

  3. Preparation of single-walled carbon nanotube reinforced magnesia films

    OpenAIRE

    Du, C S; Pan, Ning

    2004-01-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT)/MgO composite films were fabricated by growing carbon nanotubes while simultaneously sintering a MgO film. The effect of iron and molybdenum concentrations in liquid catalysts and the effect of the density of carbon nanotubes in the composite films on the quality of the films were investigated. Microstructure analysis showed that SWNTs were uniformly grown in the MgO film. The presence of a controlled amount of carbon nanotubes in MgO films is believed to ...

  4. Multiwalled carbon nanotube film for strain sensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have studied the possibility of using multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) films as strain sensors. The MWCNT films were prepared by a solution/filtration method and were bonded directly onto specimens by a nonconductive adhesive. For comparison, conventional foil strain gages were also bonded to the structure on the opposite side. The specimens then underwent a uniaxial tensile load-unload cycle to evaluate them as strain sensors. To ensure good electrical contact between carbon nanotube film and the wires, a thin layer of copper was thermally deposited on both ends of the film as electrodes, and the wires were connected to the electrodes by silver ink. Wheatstone bridges were used to convert the resistance changes of the MWCNTs to voltage output. Results indicated that the output voltages were proportional to the strain readings from the stain indicator. The effect of temperature on the resistance was measured and the MWCNT film resistance was found to be independent of temperature over the range 273-363 K. The optimal film dimension for strain sensing was evaluated as well. Dynamic tests suggest that the MWCNTs were able to extract the structural signature. Our results indicate that MWCNT film is potentially useful for structural health monitoring and vibration control applications

  5. A statistical mechanics model of carbon nanotube macro-films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    Carbon nanotube macro-films are two-dimensional films with micrometer thickness and centimeter by centimeter in-plane dimension.These carbon nanotube macroscopic assemblies have attracted significant attention from the material and mechanics communities recently because they can be easily handled and tailored to meet specific engineering needs.This paper reports the experimental methods on the preparation and characterization of single-walled carbon nanotube macro-films,and a statistical mechanics model on ...

  6. Electromagnetic characteristics of carbon nanotube film materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Wei

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanotube (CNT possesses remarkable electrical conductivity, which shows great potential for the application as electromagnetic shielding material. This paper aims to characterize the electromagnetic parameters of a high CNT loading film by using waveguide method. The effects of layer number of CNT laminate, CNT alignment and resin impregnation on the electromagnetic characteristics were analyzed. It is shown that CNT film exhibits anisotropic electromagnetic characteristic. Pristine CNT film shows higher real part of complex permittivity, conductivity and shielding effectiveness when the polarized direction of incident wave is perpendicular to the winding direction of CNT film. For the CNT film laminates, complex permittivity increases with increasing layer number, and correspondingly, shielding effectiveness decreases. The five-layer CNT film shows extraordinary shielding performance with shielding effectiveness ranging from 67 dB to 78 dB in X-band. Stretching process induces the alignment of CNTs. When aligned direction of CNTs is parallel to the electric field, CNT film shows negative permittivity and higher conductivity. Moreover, resin impregnation into CNT film leads to the decrease of conductivity and shielding effectiveness. This research will contribute to the structural design for the application of CNT film as electromagnetic shielding materials.

  7. Superconductive niobium films coating carbon nanotube fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvato, M.; Lucci, M.; Ottaviani, I.; Cirillo, M.; Behabtu, N.; Young, C. C.; Pasquali, M.; Vecchione, A.; Fittipaldi, R.; Corato, V.

    2014-11-01

    Superconducting niobium (Nb) has been successfully obtained by sputter deposition on carbon nanotube fibers. The transport properties of the niobium coating the fibers are compared to those of niobium thin films deposited on oxidized Si substrates during the same deposition run. For niobium films with thicknesses above 300 nm, the niobium coating the fibers and the thin films show similar normal state and superconducting properties with critical current density, measured at T = 4.2 K, of the order of 105 A cm-2. Thinner niobium layers coating the fibers also show the onset of the superconducting transition in the resistivity versus temperature dependence, but zero resistance is not observed down to T = 1 K. We evidence by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and current-voltage measurements that the granular structure of the samples is the main reason for the lack of true global superconductivity for thicknesses below 300 nm.

  8. Superconductive niobium films coating carbon nanotube fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Superconducting niobium (Nb) has been successfully obtained by sputter deposition on carbon nanotube fibers. The transport properties of the niobium coating the fibers are compared to those of niobium thin films deposited on oxidized Si substrates during the same deposition run. For niobium films with thicknesses above 300 nm, the niobium coating the fibers and the thin films show similar normal state and superconducting properties with critical current density, measured at T = 4.2 K, of the order of 105 A cm−2. Thinner niobium layers coating the fibers also show the onset of the superconducting transition in the resistivity versus temperature dependence, but zero resistance is not observed down to T = 1 K. We evidence by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and current-voltage measurements that the granular structure of the samples is the main reason for the lack of true global superconductivity for thicknesses below 300 nm. (paper)

  9. ELECTROCHEMICAL INVESTIGATION ON CARBON NANOTUBE FILM WITH DIFFERENT PRETREATMENTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    C.G. Hu; W.L. Wang; Y. Ma; W. Zhu

    2003-01-01

    Wide potential windows were found at carbon nanotube film electrodes in neutral solutions after being treated with nitric acid and mixed acid. Electrochemical reversibility was investigated at carbon nanotube films with different pretreatments for ferri/ferrocyanide and quinone /hydroquinone. Carbon nanotube film electrodes presented quasi-reversible electrochemical behavior for both electrolytes. In the range of scan rate, carbon nanotube film electrodes treated with acids showed heterogeneous electron-transfer properties, which was mainly controlled by its electron state density on the surface of the film. On the whole, the carbon nanotube electrode with nitric acid treatment presented the best electrochemical behaviors, so we chose it as an analytical electrode to determine the trace compound in dilute solution. The results demonstrated that this new electrode material exhibits superior performance characteristics for the detection of azide anion.

  10. Synthesis and characterization of carbon nanotube reinforced copper thin films

    OpenAIRE

    Otto, Cornelia

    2006-01-01

    Two model composites of copper and carbon nanotubes were fabricated by very different deposition methods. Copper electrodeposition in a plating bath containing nanotubes created a 3D matrix of randomly oriented CNTs within a thick, 20 micron Cu film. In contrast, sandwiching a layer of well-separated nanotubes between two sub-micron sputtered Cu layers produced a 2D-composite with nanotubes lying parallel to the substrate surface. These composites, which were mechanically tested using var...

  11. Piezoresistive Effect of Doped carbon Nanotube/Cellulose Films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王万录; 廖克俊; 李勇; 王永田

    2003-01-01

    The strain-induced resistance changes in iodine-doped and undoped carbon nanotube films were investigated by a three-point bending test. Carbon nanotubes were fabricated by hot filament chemical vapour deposition. The experimental results showed that there has a striking piezoresistive effect in carbon nanotube films. The gauge factor for I-doped and undoped carbon nanotube films under 500 microstrain was about 125 and 65 respectively at room temperature, exceeding that of polycrystalline silicon (30) at 35℃. The origin of the piezoresistivity in the films may be ascribed to a strain-induced change in the band gap for the doped tubes and to the intertube contact resistance for the undoped tubes.

  12. Scattering of terahertz radiation from oriented carbon nanotube films

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eichhorn, Finn; Jepsen, Peter Uhd; Schroeder, Nicholas;

    2009-01-01

    Session title: IThC-THz Interactions with Condensed Matter. We report on the use of terahertz time-domain spectroscopy to measure scattering from multi-walled carbon nanotubes aligned normal to the film plane. Measurements indicate scattering from the nanotubes is significantly stronger than for...

  13. Assembly and Applications of Carbon Nanotube Thin Films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hongwei ZHU; Bingqing WEI

    2008-01-01

    The ultimate goal of current research on carbon nanotubes (CNTs) is to make breakthroughs that advance nanotechnological applications of bulk CNT materials. Especially, there has been growing interest in CNT thin films because of their unique and usually enhanced properties and tremendous potential as components for use in nano-electronic and nano-mechanical device applications or as structural elements in various devices. If a synthetic or a post processing method can produce high yield of nanotube thin films, these structures will provide tremendous potential for fundamental research on these devices. This review will address the synthesis, the post processing and the device applications of self-assembled nanotube thin films.

  14. Stretchable transistors with buckled carbon nanotube films as conducting channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Michael S; Xu, Feng

    2015-03-24

    Thin-film transistors comprising buckled films comprising carbon nanotubes as the conductive channel are provided. Also provided are methods of fabricating the transistors. The transistors, which are highly stretchable and bendable, exhibit stable performance even when operated under high tensile strains.

  15. Terahertz Science and Technology of Macroscopically Aligned Carbon Nanotube Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kono, Junichiro

    One of the outstanding challenges in nanotechnology is how to assemble individual nano-objects into macroscopic architectures while preserving their extraordinary properties. For example, the one-dimensional character of electrons in individual carbon nanotubes leads to extremely anisotropic transport, optical, and magnetic phenomena, but their macroscopic manifestations have been limited. Here, we describe methods for preparing macroscopic films, sheets, and fibers of highly aligned carbon nanotubes and their applications to basic and applied terahertz studies. Sufficiently thick films act as ideal terahertz polarizers, and appropriately doped films operate as polarization-sensitive, flexible, powerless, and ultra-broadband detectors. Together with recently developed chirality enrichment methods, these developments will ultimately allow us to study dynamic conductivities of interacting one-dimensional electrons in macroscopic single crystals of single-chirality single-wall carbon nanotubes.

  16. Effect of polarization of ultrafast laser irradiation on carbon nanotube film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selective patterning of carbon nanotubes film on transparent substrates was performed using a femtosecond laser. The high shock wave generated by the femtosecond laser effectively removed the carbon nanotubes without damage to the substrate. This process has many advantages because it is performed without chemicals and is easily applied to large-area patterning. It could also control the transparency and conductivity of carbon nanotubes film by selective removal of carbon nanotubes. Furthermore, a femtosecond laser does not cause any phase change in the CNTs, as usually occurs in focused ion beam irradiation of carbon nanotubes. The patterned single-walled carbon nanotube films on transparent substrate can be used as an electrode layer for touch panels of flexible or flat panel displays instead of indium tin oxide film. - Highlights: • Fabrication of topological architectures on carbon nanotube-based coatings. • Patterning of single-walled carbon nanotubes film to femtosecond laser pulses. • Femtosecond laser-induced nanotubes alignment

  17. Unzipped Nanotube Sheet Films Converted from Spun Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes by O2 Plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jangr, Hoon-Sik; Jeon, Sang Koo; Shim, Dae Seob; Lee, Nam Hee; Nahm, Seung Hoon

    2015-11-01

    Large-scale graphene or carbon nanotube (CNT) films are good candidates for transparent flexible electrodes, and the strong interest in graphene and CNT films has motivated the scalable production of a good-conductivity and an optically transmitting film. Unzipping techniques for converting CNTs to graphene are especially worthy of notice. Here, we performed nanotube unzipping of the spun multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) to produce networked graphene nanoribbon (GNR) sheet films using an 02 plasma etching method, after which we produced the spun MWCNT film by continually pulling MWCNTs down from the vertical well aligned MWCNTs on the substrate. The electrical resistance was slightly decreased and the optical transmittance was significantly increased when the spun MWCNT films were etched for 20 min by O2 plasma of 100 mA. Plasma etching for the optimized time, which does not change the thickness of the spun MWCNT films, improved the electrical resistance and the optical transmittance. PMID:26726645

  18. Computational and experimental studies of strain sensitive carbon nanotube films

    OpenAIRE

    Bu, Lei

    2014-01-01

    The excellent electrical and mechanical properties of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) provide interesting opportunities to realize new types of strain gauges. However, there are still challenges for the further development of CNT film strain gauges, for instance the lack of design rules, the homogeneity, stability and reproducibility of CNT films. This thesis aims to address these issues from two sides: simulation and experiment. Monte Carlo simulations show that both the sheet resistance and gauge f...

  19. Carbon Nanotube Film-Based Speaker Developed in Tsinghua University

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    @@ A research group from Tsinghua University led by Prof.Fan Shoushan,Member of the Chinese Academy of Sciences,and Jiang Kaili,associate professor of Physics,found that carbon nanotube thin film could act as a speaker once fed by audio frequency electric currents.These carbon nanotube loudspeakers are only tens of a nanometer thick,transparent,flexible and stretchable,which can be further tailored into any shape and size.These results have been published in the journal Nano Letter.

  20. Structural and biological properties of carbon nanotube composite films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narayan, Roger J. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332-0245 (United States)]. E-mail: roger.narayan@mse.gatech.edu; Berry, C.J. [Environmental Biotechnology Section, Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States); Brigmon, R.L. [Environmental Biotechnology Section, Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)

    2005-11-20

    Carbon nanotube composite films have been developed that exhibit unusual structural and biological properties. These novel materials have been created by pulsed laser ablation of graphite and bombardment of nitrogen ions at temperatures between 600 and 700 deg. C. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy and radial distribution function analysis demonstrate that this material consists of sp{sup 2}-bonded concentric ribbons that are wrapped approximately 15 deg. normal to the silicon substrate. The interlayer order in this material extends to approximately 15-30 A. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy data suggest that this material is predominantly trigonally coordinated. The carbon nanotube composite structure results from the use of energetic ions, which allow for non-equilibrium growth of graphitic planes. In vitro testing has revealed significant antimicrobial activity of carbon nanotube composite films against Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus warneri colonization. Carbon nanotube composite films may be useful for inhibiting microorganism attachment and biofilm formation in hemodialysis catheters and other medical devices.

  1. Films, Buckypapers and Fibers from Clay, Chitosan and Carbon Nanotubes

    OpenAIRE

    Marc in het Panhuis; Holly Warren; Higgins, Thomas M.

    2011-01-01

    The mechanical and electrical characteristics of films, buckypapers and fiber materials from combinations of clay, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and chitosan are described. The rheological time-dependent characteristics of clay are maintained in clay–carbon nanotube–chitosan composite dispersions. It is demonstrated that the addition of chitosan improves their mechanical characteristics, but decreases electrical conductivity by three-orders of magnitude compared to clay–CNT materials. We show that ...

  2. Carbon nanotube film anodes for flexible lithium ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Sora; Lee, Sehyun; Kim, Soyoung; Park, Kyung-Won; Cho, Daehwan; Jeong, Youngjin

    2015-04-01

    In this study, carbon nanotube (CNT) film anodes are prepared for use in flexible lithium ion batteries, and the electrochemical performance of the CNT film anodes is evaluated. The CNT films are synthesized via chemical vapor deposition and direct spinning. The films are heat-treated under a nitrogen atmosphere at a high temperature to study the effects of heat treatment on the battery performance. The electrodes made with the CNT films are characterized via charge-discharge test, cyclic voltammetry, and impedance measurement. The results indicate that batteries with films heat-treated under a nitrogen atmosphere show a higher capacity, which can be a result of their high crystalline perfection. The impedance analysis shows that a lower resistance at the interface can be obtained by using heat-treated films. The charge-discharge tests are carried out by adjusting the rate from C/2 to 10C, and when the rate slows from 10C to 1C, the capacity of the samples largely recovers. The nitrogen/heat-treated CNT film electrodes present a capacity that is twice as high, such as 2C, 5C, and 10C, than untreated CNT film electrodes. These results indicate that the carbon nanotube film anodes have high potential for use in portable and wearable computers due to their flexibility.

  3. Aligned Carbon Nanotube Thin Films from Liquid Crystal Polyelectrolyte Inks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tune, Daniel D; Blanch, Adam J; Shearer, Cameron J; Moore, Katherine E; Pfohl, Moritz; Shapter, Joseph G; Flavel, Benjamin S

    2015-11-25

    Single walled carbon nanotube thin films are fabricated by solution shearing from high concentration sodium nanotubide polyelectrolyte inks. The solutions are produced by simple stirring of the nanotubes with elemental sodium in dimethylacetamide, and the nanotubes are thus not subject to any sonication-induced damage. At such elevated concentrations (∼4 mg mL(-1)), the solutions exist in the liquid crystal phase and during deposition this order is transferred to the films, which are well aligned in the direction of shear with a 2D nematic order parameter of ∼0.7 determined by polarized absorption measurements. Compared to similarly formed films made from superacids, the polyelectrolyte films contain smaller bundles and a much narrower distribution of bundle diameters. After p-doping with an organic oxidizer, the films exhibit a very high DC electrical to optical conductivity ratio of σ(DC)/σ(OP) ∼ 35, corresponding to a calculated DC conductivity of over 7000 S cm(-1). When very thin (T550 ∼ 96%), smooth (RMS roughness, R(q) ∼ 2.2 nm), and highly aligned films made via this new route are used as the front electrodes of carbon nanotube-silicon solar cells, the power conversion efficiency is almost an order of magnitude greater than that obtained when using the much rougher (R(q) ∼ 20-30 nm) and less conductive (peak σ(DC)/σ(OP) ∼ 2.5) films formed by common vacuum filtration of the same starting material, and having the same transmittance. PMID:26511159

  4. Periodically striped films produced from super-aligned carbon nanotube arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report a novel way to draw films from super-aligned carbon nanotube arrays at large drawing angles. The obtained super-aligned carbon nanotube films have a periodically striped configuration with alternating thinner and thicker film sections, and the width of the stripes is equal to the height of the original arrays. Compared with ordinary uniform films, the striped films provide a better platform for understanding the mechanism of spinning films from arrays because carbon nanotube junctions are easily observed and identified at the boundary of the stripes. Further studies show that the carbon nanotube junctions are bottleneck positions for thermal conduction and mechanical strength of the film, but do not limit its electrical conduction. These films can be utilized as striped and high-degree polarized light emission sources. Our results will be valuable for new applications and future large-scale production of tunable super-aligned carbon nanotube films.

  5. Selective Deposition and Alignment of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes Assisted by Dielectrophoresis: From Thin Films to Individual Nanotubes

    OpenAIRE

    Li Pengfei; Xue Wei

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Dielectrophoresis has been used in the controlled deposition of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) with the focus on the alignment of nanotube thin films and their applications in the last decade. In this paper, we extend the research from the selective deposition of SWNT thin films to the alignment of small nanotube bundles and individual nanotubes. Electrodes with “teeth”-like patterns are fabricated to study the influence of the electrode width on the deposition an...

  6. Thermal property tuning in aligned carbon nanotube films and random entangled carbon nanotube films by ion irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jing [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Texas A& M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States); Chen, Di; Wang, Xuemei [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Texas A& M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States); Bykova, Julia S.; Zakhidov, Anvar A. [The Alan G. MacDiarmid NanoTech Institute, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, Texas 75080 (United States); Shao, Lin, E-mail: lshao@tamu.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Texas A& M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States); Department of Nuclear Engineering, Texas A& M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States)

    2015-10-12

    Ion irradiation effects on thermal property changes are compared between aligned carbon nanotube (A-CNT) films and randomly entangled carbon nanotube (R-CNT) films. After H, C, and Fe ion irradiation, a focusing ion beam with sub-mm diameter is used as a heating source, and an infrared signal is recorded to extract thermal conductivity. Ion irradiation decreases thermal conductivity of A-CNT films, but increases that of R-CNT films. We explain the opposite trends by the fact that neighboring CNT bundles are loosely bonded in A-CNT films, which makes it difficult to create inter-tube linkage/bonding upon ion irradiation. In a comparison, in R-CNT films, which have dense tube networking, carbon displacements are easily trapped between touching tubes and act as inter-tube linkage to promote off-axial phonon transport. The enhancement overcomes the phonon transport loss due to phonon-defect scattering along the axial direction. A model is established to explain the dependence of thermal conductivity changes on ion irradiation parameters including ion species, energies, and current.

  7. Thermal property tuning in aligned carbon nanotube films and random entangled carbon nanotube films by ion irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ion irradiation effects on thermal property changes are compared between aligned carbon nanotube (A-CNT) films and randomly entangled carbon nanotube (R-CNT) films. After H, C, and Fe ion irradiation, a focusing ion beam with sub-mm diameter is used as a heating source, and an infrared signal is recorded to extract thermal conductivity. Ion irradiation decreases thermal conductivity of A-CNT films, but increases that of R-CNT films. We explain the opposite trends by the fact that neighboring CNT bundles are loosely bonded in A-CNT films, which makes it difficult to create inter-tube linkage/bonding upon ion irradiation. In a comparison, in R-CNT films, which have dense tube networking, carbon displacements are easily trapped between touching tubes and act as inter-tube linkage to promote off-axial phonon transport. The enhancement overcomes the phonon transport loss due to phonon-defect scattering along the axial direction. A model is established to explain the dependence of thermal conductivity changes on ion irradiation parameters including ion species, energies, and current

  8. Properties of electrophoretically deposited single wall carbon nanotube films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Junyoung; Jalali, Maryam; Campbell, Stephen A., E-mail: campb001@umn.edu

    2015-08-31

    This paper describes techniques for rapidly producing a carbon nanotube thin film by electrophoretic deposition at room temperature and determines the film mass density and electrical/mechanical properties of such films. The mechanism of electrophoretic deposition of thin layers is explained with experimental data. Also, film thickness is measured as a function of time, electrical field and suspension concentration. We use Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy to determine the film mass density. Films created in this manner have a resistivity of 2.14 × 10{sup −3} Ω·cm, a mass density that varies with thickness from 0.12 to 0.54 g/cm{sup 3}, and a Young's modulus between 4.72 and 5.67 GPa. The latter was found to be independent of thickness from 77 to 134 nm. We also report on fabricating free-standing films by removing the metal seed layer under the CNT film, and selectively etching a sacrificial layer. This method could be extended to flexible photovoltaic devices or high frequency RF MEMS devices. - Highlights: • We explain the electrophoretic deposition process and mechanism of thin SWCNT film deposition. • Characterization of the SWCNT film properties including density, resistivity, transmittance, and Young's modulus. • The film density and resistivity are found to be a function of the film thickness. • Techniques developed to create free standing layers of SW-CNTs for flexible electronics and mechanical actuators.

  9. Properties of electrophoretically deposited single wall carbon nanotube films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes techniques for rapidly producing a carbon nanotube thin film by electrophoretic deposition at room temperature and determines the film mass density and electrical/mechanical properties of such films. The mechanism of electrophoretic deposition of thin layers is explained with experimental data. Also, film thickness is measured as a function of time, electrical field and suspension concentration. We use Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy to determine the film mass density. Films created in this manner have a resistivity of 2.14 × 10−3 Ω·cm, a mass density that varies with thickness from 0.12 to 0.54 g/cm3, and a Young's modulus between 4.72 and 5.67 GPa. The latter was found to be independent of thickness from 77 to 134 nm. We also report on fabricating free-standing films by removing the metal seed layer under the CNT film, and selectively etching a sacrificial layer. This method could be extended to flexible photovoltaic devices or high frequency RF MEMS devices. - Highlights: • We explain the electrophoretic deposition process and mechanism of thin SWCNT film deposition. • Characterization of the SWCNT film properties including density, resistivity, transmittance, and Young's modulus. • The film density and resistivity are found to be a function of the film thickness. • Techniques developed to create free standing layers of SW-CNTs for flexible electronics and mechanical actuators

  10. Structural anisotropy of magnetically aligned single wall carbon nanotube films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thick films of aligned single wall carbon nanotubes and ropes have been produced by filtration/deposition from suspension in strong magnetic fields. We measured mosaic distributions of rope orientations in the film plane, for samples of different thicknesses. For an ∼1 μm film the full width at half maximum (FWHM) derived from electron diffraction is 25 degree sign -28 degree sign . The FWHM of a thicker film (∼7 μm) measured by x-ray diffraction is slightly broader, 35±3 degree sign . Aligned films are denser than ordinary filter-deposited ones, and much denser than as-grown material. Optimization of the process is expected to yield smaller FWHMs and higher densities. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics

  11. Bimorph micro heat engines based on carbon nanotube freestanding films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikuno, Takashi; Fukano, Tatsuo; Higuchi, Kazuo; Takeda, Yasuhiko

    2015-11-01

    We have found that lightweight bimorph strips consisting of multiwalled carbon nanotube freestanding films (MWNT-FSFs) and Ni thin films exhibit a continuous bending-stretching motion on a hot plate even below the temperature of 100 °C in an environment at room temperature. In fact, the Ni/MWNT-FSFs exhibited this motion at a temperature difference of as small as 5 °C. The requirements of this motion have been qualitatively elucidated by a simulation based on a relaxation time approximation.

  12. Films, Buckypapers and Fibers from Clay, Chitosan and Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc in het Panhuis

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The mechanical and electrical characteristics of films, buckypapers and fiber materials from combinations of clay, carbon nanotubes (CNTs and chitosan are described. The rheological time-dependent characteristics of clay are maintained in clay–carbon nanotube–chitosan composite dispersions. It is demonstrated that the addition of chitosan improves their mechanical characteristics, but decreases electrical conductivity by three-orders of magnitude compared to clay–CNT materials. We show that the electrical response upon exposure to humid atmosphere is influenced by clay-chitosan interactions, i.e., the resistance of clay–CNT materials decreases, whereas that of clay–CNT–chitosan increases.

  13. Transmission properties of terahertz waves through asymmetric rectangular aperture arrays on carbon nanotube films

    OpenAIRE

    Yue Wang; Yijing Tong; Xin Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Transmission spectra of terahertz waves through a two-dimensional array of asymmetric rectangular apertures on super-aligned multi-walled carbon nanotube films were obtained experimentally. In this way, the anisotropic transmission phenomena of carbon nanotube films were observed. For a terahertz wave polarization parallel to the orientation of the carbon nanotubes and along the aperture short axis, sharp resonances were observed and the resonance frequencies coincided well with the surface p...

  14. Simulation of transport and 1/f noise in carbon nanotube films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper we present a simulator for electrical properties of carbon nanotube film field-effect transistors. The simulator, based on carbon nanotube physics uses Landauer formalism and Poisson equation. The total film is described as an electrical network. A modified nodal analysis provides DC and noise characteristics. These simulations are in good agreement with experimental results.

  15. ELECTROANALYTICAL APPLICATIONS OF CARBOXYL-MODIFIED CARBON NANOTUBE FILM ELECTRODES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    C.G. Hu; W.L. Wang; K.J. Liao; W. Zhu

    2003-01-01

    The electrochemical behavior of a carboxyl-modified carbon nanotube films was investigated to explore its possibility in electroanalytical applicaton. Cyclic voltammetry of quinone was conducted in 1mol/L Na2SO4, which showed a stable, quasi-reversible voltammetric response for quinone / hydroquinone, and the anodic and the cathodic peak potentials were 0.657V and -0.029V (vs. SCE) at a scan rate of 0.1V.s-1, respectively. Both anodic and cathodic peak currents depended linearly on the square root of the scan rate over the range of 0.01-0. 5 V.s-1, which suggested that the process of the electrode reactions was diffusion-controlled. Carboxyl-modified carbon nanotube electrodes made it possible to determine low level of dopamine selectively in the presence of a large excess of ascorbic acid in acidic media using derivative voltammetry.The results obtained were discussed in details. This work demonstrates the potential of carboxyl-modified carbon nanotube electrodes for electroanalytical applications.

  16. Thin film transistors of single-walled carbon nanotubes grown directly on glass substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report a transistor of randomly networked single-walled carbon nanotubes on a glass substrate. The carbon nanotube networks acting as the active components of the thin film transistor were selectively formed on the transistor channel areas that were previously patterned with catalysts to avoid the etching process for isolating nanotubes. The nanotube density was more than 50 μm-2, which is much larger than the percolation threshold. Transistors were successfully fabricated with a conducting and transparent ZnO for the back-side gate and the top-side gate. This allows the transparent electronics or suggests thin film applications of nanotubes for future opto-electronics

  17. Printable Thin Film Supercapacitors Using Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    KAUST Repository

    Kaempgen, Martti

    2009-05-13

    Thin film supercapacitors were fabricated using printable materials to make flexible devices on plastic. The active electrodes were made from sprayed networks of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) serving as both electrodes and charge collectors. Using a printable aqueous gel electrolyte as well as an organic liquid electrolyte, the performances of the devices show very high energy and power densities (6 W h/kg for both electrolytes and 23 and 70 kW/kg for aqueous gel electrolyte and organic electrolyte, respectively) which is comparable to performance in other SWCNT-based supercapacitor devices fabricated using different methods. The results underline the potential of printable thin film supercapacitors. The simplified architecture and the sole use of printable materials may lead to a new class of entirely printable charge storage devices allowing for full integration with the emerging field of printed electronics. © 2009 American Chemical Society.

  18. Recent progress in carbon nanotube-based flexible transparent conducting film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Hong-Zhang; Kim, Ki Kang; Lee, Young Hee

    2008-08-01

    Flexible transparent conducting films (TCFs) were fabricated on a PET substrate by various methods using carbon nanotubes dispersed in organic or water-based solution. Thin multi-walled carbon nanotubes, double-walled carbon nanotubes, and single-walled carbon nanotubes were used to compare the performance for TCFs. Optimal design rules for types of nanotubes, surfactants, the degree of dispersion, and film preparation methods were discussed. The TCFs were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, TGA, Raman, optical absorption spectra, and sheet resistance. The dispersion of CNTs in water and in bisolvent has been tried. A simple acid treatment on the TCF film increased the conductivity by about four times. Doping and functionalization techniques will be further introduced to improve the conductivity of the film.

  19. Influence of surface chemistry on inkjet printed carbon nanotube films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon nanotube ink chemistry and the proper formulation are crucial for direct-write printing of nanotubes. Moreover, the correct surface chemistry of the self-assembled monolayers that assist the direct deposition of carbon nanotubes onto the substrate is equally important to preserve orientation of the printed carbon nanotubes. We report that the successful formulation of two single walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) inks yields a consistent, homogenous printing pattern possessing the requisite viscosities needed for flow through the microcapillary nozzles of the inkjet printer with fairly modest drying times. The addition of an aqueous sodium silicate allows for a reliable method for forming a uniform carbon nanotube network deposited directly onto unfunctionalized surfaces such as glass or quartz via inkjet deposition. Furthermore, this sodium silicate ingredient helps preserve applied orientation to the printed SWNT solution. Sheet resistivity of this carbon nanotube ink formula printed on quartz decreases as a function of passes and is independent of the substrate. SWNTs were successfully patterned on Au. This amine-based surface chemistry dramatically helps improve the isolation stabilization of the printed SWNTs as seen in the atomic force microscopy (AFM) image. Lastly, using our optimized SWNT ink formula and waveform parameters in the Fuji materials printer, we are able to directly write/print SWNTs into 2D patterns. Dried ink pattern expose and help orient roped carbon nanotubes that are suspended in ordered arrays across the cracks.

  20. Aligned carbon nanotube thin films for DNA electrochemical sensing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berti, F. [Department of Chemistry, University of Florence, Via della Lastruccia 3, Sesto Fiorentino, Firenze 50019 (Italy); Lozzi, L. [Department of Physics, University of L' Aquila, Coppito, L' Aquila 67100 (Italy); Palchetti, I. [Department of Chemistry, University of Florence, Via della Lastruccia 3, Sesto Fiorentino, Firenze 50019 (Italy); Santucci, S. [Department of Physics, University of L' Aquila, Coppito, L' Aquila 67100 (Italy); Marrazza, G. [Department of Chemistry, University of Florence, Via della Lastruccia 3, Sesto Fiorentino, Firenze 50019 (Italy)], E-mail: giovanna.marrazza@unifi.it

    2009-09-01

    Carbon nanotubes are interesting materials for DNA electrochemical sensing due to their unique electric properties: high surface area, fast heterogeneous electron transfer, and electrochemical stability. In this work aligned Carbon NanoTube (CNT) thin films were designed and tested as candidate platforms for DNA immobilization and for the development of an electrochemical genosensor. The films were prepared by Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) using acetylene and ammonia as precursor gases and nickel particles as catalyst. A preliminary electrochemical characterization was performed using cyclic voltammetry since, so far, these films have been used only for gas sensing. The surfaces were then covalently functionalized with a DNA oligonucleotide probe, complementary to the sequence of the most common inserts in the GMOs: the Promoter 35S. The genosensor format involved the immobilization of the probe onto the sensor surface, the hybridization with the target-sequence and the electrochemical detection of the duplex formation. Careful attention was paid to the probe immobilization conditions in order to minimize the signal due to non-specifically adsorbed sequences. For the detection of the hybridization event both label-free and enzyme-labelled methods were investigated. In case of the enzyme-labelled method a target concentration at nanomolar level can be easily detected, with a linear response from 50 nM to 200 nM, whereas the label-free method showed a linear response between 0.5 {mu}M and 10 {mu}M. The reproducibility was 11% and 20% with the enzyme-labelled method and the label-free method, respectively. The batch-to-batch reproducibility of the different sensors was also evaluated.

  1. Generation of mirage effect by heated carbon nanotube thin film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tong, L. H. [Department of Modern Mechanics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); USTC-CityU Joint Advanced Research Centre, Suzhou, Jiangsu 215123 (China); Lim, C. W., E-mail: bccwlim@cityu.edu.hk [USTC-CityU Joint Advanced Research Centre, Suzhou, Jiangsu 215123 (China); Department of Civil and Architectural Engineering, City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon, Hong Kong, People’s Republic of China and City University of Hong Kong Shenzhen Research Institute, Shenzhen 518057 (China); Li, Y. C. [Department of Modern Mechanics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Zhang, Chuanzeng; Quoc Bui, Tinh [Department of Civil Engineering, University of Siegen, Paul-Bonatz-Str. 9-11, D-57076 Siegen (Germany)

    2014-06-28

    Mirage effect, a common phenomenon in nature, is a naturally occurring optical phenomenon in which lights are bent due to the gradient variation of refraction in the temperature gradient medium. The theoretical analysis of mirage effect generated by heated carbon nanotube thin film is presented both for gas and liquid. Excellent agreement is demonstrated through comparing the theoretical prediction with published experimental results. It is concluded from the theoretical prediction and experimental observation that the mirage effect is more likely to happen in liquid. The phase of deflected optical beam is also discussed and the method for measurement of thermal diffusivity of medium is theoretically verified. Furthermore, a method for measuring the refractive index of gas by detecting optical beam deflection is also presented in this paper.

  2. Generation of mirage effect by heated carbon nanotube thin film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, L. H.; Lim, C. W.; Li, Y. C.; Zhang, Chuanzeng; Quoc Bui, Tinh

    2014-06-01

    Mirage effect, a common phenomenon in nature, is a naturally occurring optical phenomenon in which lights are bent due to the gradient variation of refraction in the temperature gradient medium. The theoretical analysis of mirage effect generated by heated carbon nanotube thin film is presented both for gas and liquid. Excellent agreement is demonstrated through comparing the theoretical prediction with published experimental results. It is concluded from the theoretical prediction and experimental observation that the mirage effect is more likely to happen in liquid. The phase of deflected optical beam is also discussed and the method for measurement of thermal diffusivity of medium is theoretically verified. Furthermore, a method for measuring the refractive index of gas by detecting optical beam deflection is also presented in this paper.

  3. A micromachined carbon nanotube film cantilever-based energy cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Zhongcheng; He, Yuan; Tseng, Yi-Hsuan; O'Neal, Chad; Que, Long

    2012-08-24

    This paper reports a new type of energy cell based on micromachined carbon nanotube film (CNF)-lead zirconate titanate cantilevers that is fabricated on silicon substrates. Measurements found that this type of micro-energy cell generates both AC voltages due to the self-reciprocation of the microcantilevers and DC voltages due to the thermoelectric effect upon exposure to light and thermal radiation, resulting from the unique optical and thermal properties of the CNF. Typically the measured power density of the micro-energy cell can be from 4 to 300 μW cm(-2) when it is exposed to sunlight under different operational conditions. It is anticipated that hundreds of integrated micro-energy cells can generate power in the range of milliwatts, paving the way for the construction of self-powered micro- or nanosystems. PMID:22842491

  4. Generation of mirage effect by heated carbon nanotube thin film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirage effect, a common phenomenon in nature, is a naturally occurring optical phenomenon in which lights are bent due to the gradient variation of refraction in the temperature gradient medium. The theoretical analysis of mirage effect generated by heated carbon nanotube thin film is presented both for gas and liquid. Excellent agreement is demonstrated through comparing the theoretical prediction with published experimental results. It is concluded from the theoretical prediction and experimental observation that the mirage effect is more likely to happen in liquid. The phase of deflected optical beam is also discussed and the method for measurement of thermal diffusivity of medium is theoretically verified. Furthermore, a method for measuring the refractive index of gas by detecting optical beam deflection is also presented in this paper.

  5. Laser Processing of Carbon Nanotube Transparent Conducting Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Andrew

    Transparent conducting films, or TCFs, are 2D electrical conductors with the ability to transmit light. Because of this, they are used in many popular electronics including smart phones, tablets, solar panels, and televisions. The most common material used as a TCF is indium tin oxide, or ITO. Although ITO has great electrical and optical characteristics, it is expensive, brittle, and difficult to pattern. These limitations have led researchers toward other materials for the next generation of displays and touch panels. The most promising material for next generation TCFs is carbon nanotubes, or CNTs. CNTs are cylindrical tubes of carbon no more than a few atoms thick. They have different electrical and optical properties depending on their atomic structure, and are extremely strong. As an electrode, they conduct electricity through an array of randomly dispersed tubes. The array is highly transparent because of gaps between the tubes, and size and optical properties of the CNTs. Many research groups have tried making CNT TCFs with opto-electric properties similar to ITO but have difficultly achieving high conductivity. This is partly attributed to impurities from fabrication and a mix of different tube types, but is mainly caused by low junction conductivity. In functionalized nanotubes, junction conductivity is impaired by covalently bonded molecules added to the sidewalls of the tubes. The addition of this molecule, known as functionalization, is designed to facilitate CNT dispersion in a solvent by adding properties of the molecule to the CNTs. While necessary for a good solution, functionalization decreases the conductivity in the CNT array by creating defects in the tube's structures and preventing direct inter-carbon bonding. This research investigates removing the functional coating (after tube deposition) by laser processing. Laser light is able to preferentially heat the CNTs because of their optical and electrical properties. Through local conduction

  6. Durable transparent carbon nanotube films for flexible device components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes a durable carbon nanotube (CNT) film for flexible devices and its mechanical properties. Films as thin as 10 nm thick have properties approaching those of existing electrodes based on indium tin oxide (ITO) but with significantly improved mechanical properties. In uniaxial tension, strains as high as 25% are required for permanent damage and at lower strains resistance changes are slight and consistent with elastic deformation of the individual CNTs. A simple model confirms that changes in electrical resistance are described by a Poisson's ratio of 0.22. These films are also durable to cyclic loading, and even at peak strains of 10% no significant damage occurs after 250 cycles. The scratch resistance is also high as measured by nanoscratch, and for a 50 μm tip a load of 140 mN is required to cause initial failure. This is more than 5 times higher than is required to cause cracking in ITO. The robustness of the transparent conductive coating leads to significant improvement in device performance. In touch screen devices fabricated using CNT no failure occurs after a million actuations while for devices based on ITO electrodes 400,000 cycles are needed to cause failure. These durable electrodes hold the key to developing robust, large-area, lightweight, optoelectronic devices such as lighting, displays, electronic-paper, and printable solar cells. Such devices could hold the key to producing inexpensive green energy, providing reliable solid-state lighting, and significantly reducing our dependence on paper.

  7. Frictional and wear properties of cobalt/multiwalled carbon nanotube composite films formed by electrodeposition

    OpenAIRE

    Arai, Susumu; Miyagawa, Kazuaki

    2013-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have solid lubricity due to their unique structure, and as such, CNT composites are also expected to exhibit superior tribological properties. In this study, Co/CNT composite films were fabricated using a composite electrodeposition technique, and their tribological properties were investigated. Three different sizes of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were used as the CNTs in this study. The microstructures of the composite films were examined using scanning elec...

  8. Anthocyanin-sensitized solar cells using carbon nanotube films as counter electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Hongwei; Zeng, Haifeng; Subramanian, Venkatachalam; Masarapu, Charan; Hung, Kai-Hsuan; Wei, Bingqing

    2008-11-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) films have been used as counter electrodes in natural dye-sensitized (anthocyanin-sensitized) solar cells to improve the cell performance. Compared with conventional cells using natural dye electrolytes and platinum as the counter electrodes, cells with a single-walled nanotube (SWNT) film counter electrode show comparable conversion efficiency, which is attributed to the increase in short circuit current density due to the high conductivity of the SWNT film.

  9. Anthocyanin-sensitized solar cells using carbon nanotube films as counter electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) films have been used as counter electrodes in natural dye-sensitized (anthocyanin-sensitized) solar cells to improve the cell performance. Compared with conventional cells using natural dye electrolytes and platinum as the counter electrodes, cells with a single-walled nanotube (SWNT) film counter electrode show comparable conversion efficiency, which is attributed to the increase in short circuit current density due to the high conductivity of the SWNT film.

  10. Single walled carbon nanotube network—Tetrahedral amorphous carbon composite film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Single walled carbon nanotube network (SWCNTN) was coated by tetrahedral amorphous carbon (ta-C) using a pulsed Filtered Cathodic Vacuum Arc system to form a SWCNTN—ta-C composite film. The effects of SWCNTN areal coverage density and ta-C coating thickness on the composite film properties were investigated. X-Ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements prove the presence of high quality sp3 bonded ta-C coating on the SWCNTN. Raman spectroscopy suggests that the single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) forming the network survived encapsulation in the ta-C coating. Nano-mechanical testing suggests that the ta-C coated SWCNTN has superior wear performance compared to uncoated SWCNTN

  11. Single walled carbon nanotube network—Tetrahedral amorphous carbon composite film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iyer, Ajai, E-mail: ajai.iyer@aalto.fi; Liu, Xuwen; Koskinen, Jari [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, School of Chemical Technology, Aalto University, POB 16200, 00076 Espoo (Finland); Kaskela, Antti; Kauppinen, Esko I. [NanoMaterials Group, Department of Applied Physics, School of Science, Aalto University, POB 15100, 00076 Espoo (Finland); Johansson, Leena-Sisko [Department of Forest Products Technology, School of Chemical Technology, Aalto University, POB 16400, 00076 Espoo (Finland)

    2015-06-14

    Single walled carbon nanotube network (SWCNTN) was coated by tetrahedral amorphous carbon (ta-C) using a pulsed Filtered Cathodic Vacuum Arc system to form a SWCNTN—ta-C composite film. The effects of SWCNTN areal coverage density and ta-C coating thickness on the composite film properties were investigated. X-Ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements prove the presence of high quality sp{sup 3} bonded ta-C coating on the SWCNTN. Raman spectroscopy suggests that the single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) forming the network survived encapsulation in the ta-C coating. Nano-mechanical testing suggests that the ta-C coated SWCNTN has superior wear performance compared to uncoated SWCNTN.

  12. Alignment of muscle precursor cells on the vertical edges of thick carbon nanotube films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holt, Ian, E-mail: ian.holt@rjah.nhs.uk [Wolfson Centre for Inherited Neuromuscular Disease, RJAH Orthopaedic Hospital, Oswestry, Shropshire SY10 7AG (United Kingdom); Institute for Science and Technology in Medicine, Keele University, Keele, Staffordshire ST5 5BG (United Kingdom); Gestmann, Ingo, E-mail: Ingo.Gestmann@fei.com [FEI Europe B.V., Achtseweg Noord 5, 5651 Eindhoven (Netherlands); Wright, Andrew C., E-mail: a.wright@glyndwr.ac.uk [Advanced Materials Research Laboratory, Glyndwr University, Plas Coch, Mold Rd, Wrexham LL11 2AW (United Kingdom)

    2013-10-15

    The development of scaffolds and templates is an essential aspect of tissue engineering. We show that thick (> 0.5 mm) vertically aligned carbon nanotube films, made by chemical vapour deposition, can be used as biocompatible substrates for the directional alignment of mouse muscle cells where the cells grow on the exposed sides of the films. Ultra high resolution scanning electron microscopy reveals that the films themselves consist mostly of small diameter (10 nm) multi-wall carbon nanotubes of wavy morphology with some single wall carbon nanotubes. Our findings show that for this alignment to occur the nanotubes must be in pristine condition. Mechanical wiping of the films to create directional alignment is detrimental to directional bioactivity. Larger areas for study have been formed from a composite of multiply stacked narrow strips of nanotubes wipe-transferred onto elastomer supports. These composite substrates appear to show a useful degree of alignment of the cells. Highlights: • Highly oriented muscle precursor cells grown on edges of carbon nanotube pads • Mechanical treatment of nanotube pads highly deleterious to cell growth on edges • Larger areas created from wipe-transfer of narrow strips of nanotubes onto elastomer supports • Very high resolution SEM reveals clues to aligned cell growth.

  13. Alignment of muscle precursor cells on the vertical edges of thick carbon nanotube films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development of scaffolds and templates is an essential aspect of tissue engineering. We show that thick (> 0.5 mm) vertically aligned carbon nanotube films, made by chemical vapour deposition, can be used as biocompatible substrates for the directional alignment of mouse muscle cells where the cells grow on the exposed sides of the films. Ultra high resolution scanning electron microscopy reveals that the films themselves consist mostly of small diameter (10 nm) multi-wall carbon nanotubes of wavy morphology with some single wall carbon nanotubes. Our findings show that for this alignment to occur the nanotubes must be in pristine condition. Mechanical wiping of the films to create directional alignment is detrimental to directional bioactivity. Larger areas for study have been formed from a composite of multiply stacked narrow strips of nanotubes wipe-transferred onto elastomer supports. These composite substrates appear to show a useful degree of alignment of the cells. Highlights: • Highly oriented muscle precursor cells grown on edges of carbon nanotube pads • Mechanical treatment of nanotube pads highly deleterious to cell growth on edges • Larger areas created from wipe-transfer of narrow strips of nanotubes onto elastomer supports • Very high resolution SEM reveals clues to aligned cell growth

  14. Transmission properties of terahertz waves through asymmetric rectangular aperture arrays on carbon nanotube films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue Wang

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Transmission spectra of terahertz waves through a two-dimensional array of asymmetric rectangular apertures on super-aligned multi-walled carbon nanotube films were obtained experimentally. In this way, the anisotropic transmission phenomena of carbon nanotube films were observed. For a terahertz wave polarization parallel to the orientation of the carbon nanotubes and along the aperture short axis, sharp resonances were observed and the resonance frequencies coincided well with the surface plasmon polariton theory. In addition, the minima of the transmission spectra were in agreement with the location predicted by the theory of Wood’s anomalies. Furthermore, it was found that the resonance profiles through the carbon nanotube films could be well described by the Fano model.

  15. Carbon nanotube thin film transistors based on aerosol methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We demonstrate a fabrication method for high-performance field-effect transistors (FETs) based on dry-processed random single-walled carbon nanotube networks (CNTNs) deposited at room temperature. This method is an advantageous alternative to solution-processed and direct CVD grown CNTN FETs, which allows using various substrate materials, including heat-intolerant plastic substrates, and enables an efficient, density-controlled, scalable deposition of as-produced single-walled CNTNs on the substrate directly from the aerosol (floating catalyst) synthesis reactor. Two types of thin film transistor (TFT) structures were fabricated to evaluate the FET performance of dry-processed CNTNs: bottom-gate transistors on Si/SiO2 substrates and top-gate transistors on polymer substrates. Devices exhibited on/off ratios up to 105 and field-effect mobilities up to 4 cm2 V-1 s-1. The suppression of hysteresis in the bottom-gate device transfer characteristics by means of thermal treatment in vacuum and passivation by an atomic layer deposited Al2O3 film was investigated. A 32 nm thick Al2O3 layer was found to be able to eliminate the hysteresis.

  16. Continuous production of flexible carbon nanotube-based transparent conductive films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, I. Stuart; Motta, Marcelo S.; Schmidt, Ron K.; Windle, Alan H.

    2010-08-01

    This work shows a simple, single-stage, scalable method for the continuous production of high-quality carbon nanotube-polymer transparent conductive films from carbon feedstock. Besides the ease of scalability, a particular advantage of this process is that the concentration of nanotubes in the films, and thus transparency and conductivity, can be adjusted by changing simple process parameters. Therefore, films can be readily prepared for any application desired, ranging from solar cells to flat panel displays. Our best results show a surface resistivity of the order of 300 Ω square-1 for a film with 80% transparency, which is promising at this early stage of process development.

  17. Continuous production of flexible carbon nanotube-based transparent conductive films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work shows a simple, single-stage, scalable method for the continuous production of high-quality carbon nanotube-polymer transparent conductive films from carbon feedstock. Besides the ease of scalability, a particular advantage of this process is that the concentration of nanotubes in the films, and thus transparency and conductivity, can be adjusted by changing simple process parameters. Therefore, films can be readily prepared for any application desired, ranging from solar cells to flat panel displays. Our best results show a surface resistivity of the order of 300 Ω square-1 for a film with 80% transparency, which is promising at this early stage of process development.

  18. Continuous production of flexible carbon nanotube-based transparent conductive films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Stuart Fraser, Marcelo S Motta, Ron K Schmidt and Alan H Windle

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This work shows a simple, single-stage, scalable method for the continuous production of high-quality carbon nanotube-polymer transparent conductive films from carbon feedstock. Besides the ease of scalability, a particular advantage of this process is that the concentration of nanotubes in the films, and thus transparency and conductivity, can be adjusted by changing simple process parameters. Therefore, films can be readily prepared for any application desired, ranging from solar cells to flat panel displays. Our best results show a surface resistivity of the order of 300 Ω square-1 for a film with 80% transparency, which is promising at this early stage of process development.

  19. Rhodium thin film-carbon nanotube nanostructures: Synthesis, characterization and electron transfer properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rh thin films have been synthesized onto carbon nanotubes by pulsed laser deposition under vacuum and under 266 Pa of helium background pressure. Field emission scanning electron microscopy revealed two types of Rh films: (i) Rh film fabricated under vacuum was smooth and of closed structure and (ii) Rh prepared at 266 Pa of He was porous. Transmission electron microscopy showed that the smooth Rh film was made of highly interconnected particles of 2 nm diameter, whereas the porous film had a morphology of particles arranged into columns with particles having an average diameter of 5 nm. In addition, using high resolution transmission electron microscopy images, the Rh film thickness could be estimated to be about 20 nm. X-ray diffraction pattern showed well-crystallized thin films with a (111) intense orientation. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy confirmed the presence of metallic Rh at the surface of the carbon nanotubes. Preliminary evaluation of the electron transfer properties showed that porous Rh-carbon nanotubes exhibited reduced oxophilicity than smooth Rh. In addition, the porous Rh film offered larger electrochemical stability window between the onset of hydrogen adsorption and Rh oxide formation. Such interesting properties have important implications in many electroanalytical applications. - Highlights: • Pulsed laser synthesis used to deposit rhodium thin films onto carbon nanotubes. • Smooth and porous rhodium films verified by electron microscopy analyses • Electron transfer properties studied in sulfuric acid solution

  20. Selective Deposition and Alignment of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes Assisted by Dielectrophoresis: From Thin Films to Individual Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Pengfei

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Dielectrophoresis has been used in the controlled deposition of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs with the focus on the alignment of nanotube thin films and their applications in the last decade. In this paper, we extend the research from the selective deposition of SWNT thin films to the alignment of small nanotube bundles and individual nanotubes. Electrodes with “teeth”-like patterns are fabricated to study the influence of the electrode width on the deposition and alignment of SWNTs. The entire fabrication process is compatible with optical lithography-based techniques. Therefore, the fabrication cost is low, and the resulting devices are inexpensive. A series of SWNT solutions is prepared with concentrations ranging from 0.0125 to 0.2 mg/ml. The alignment of SWNT thin films, small bundles, and individual nanotubes is achieved under the optimized experimental conditions. The electrical properties of these samples are characterized; the linear current–voltage plots prove that the aligned SWNTs are mainly metallic nanotubes. The microscopy inspection of the samples demonstrates that the alignment of small nanotube bundles and individual nanotubes can only be achieved using narrow electrodes and low-concentration solutions. Our investigation shows that it is possible to deposit a controlled amount of SWNTs in desirable locations using dielectrophoresis.

  1. Multiwalled carbon nanotube films as small-sized temperature sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Bartolomeo, A.; Sarno, M.; Giubileo, F.; Altavilla, C.; Iemmo, L.; Piano, S.; Bobba, F.; Longobardi, M.; Scarfato, A.; Sannino, D.; Cucolo, A. M.; Ciambelli, P.

    2009-03-01

    We present the fabrication of thick and dense carbon nanotube networks in the form of freestanding films (CNTFs) and the study of their electric resistance as a function of the temperature, from 4 to 420 K. A nonmetallic behavior with a monotonic R(T ) and a temperature coefficient of resistance around -7×10-4 K-1 is generally observed. A behavioral accordance of the CNTF conductance with the temperature measured by a solid-state thermistor (ZnNO, Si, or Pt) is demonstrated, suggesting the possibility of using CNTFs as temperature small-sized (freely scalable) sensors, besides being confirmed by a wide range of sensitivity, fast response, and good stability and durability. Concerning electric behavior, we also underline that a transition from nonmetal to metal slightly below 273 K has been rarely observed. A model involving regions of highly anisotropic metallic conduction separated by tunneling barrier regions can explain the nonmetallic to metallic crossover based on the competing mechanisms of the metallic resistance rise and the barrier resistance lowering.

  2. Carbon nanotube network thin-film transistors on flexible/stretchable substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takei, Kuniharu; Takahashi, Toshitake; Javey, Ali

    2016-03-29

    This disclosure provides systems, methods, and apparatus for flexible thin-film transistors. In one aspect, a device includes a polymer substrate, a gate electrode disposed on the polymer substrate, a dielectric layer disposed on the gate electrode and on exposed portions of the polymer substrate, a carbon nanotube network disposed on the dielectric layer, and a source electrode and a drain electrode disposed on the carbon nanotube network.

  3. Dependence of Thermal Conductivity on Thickness in Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyung-Min; Shrestha, Ramesh; Dangol, Ashesh; Chang, Won Seok; Coker, Zachary; Choi, Tae-Youl

    2016-01-01

    Herein, we report experimentally dependence of thermal conductivity on thickness of single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) thin films; the measurements are based on the micropipette thermal sensor technique. Accurate and well resolved measurements of thermal conductivity made by the micropipette sensor showed a correlated behavior of thickness and thermal conductivity of CNT films that thermal conductivity decreased as thickness increased. The thickness dependence is explained by reduction of mean free path (MFP), which is induced by more intertubular junctions in more dense-packed carbon nanotube (CNT) networks; the thicker SWCNT films were revealed to have higher density. PMID:27398564

  4. Development of electrochemical oxidase biosensors based on carbon nanotube-modified carbon film electrodes for glucose and ethanol

    OpenAIRE

    Gouveia-Caridade, Carla; Pauliukaite, Rasa; Brett, Christopher M. A.

    2008-01-01

    Functionalised multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were cast on glassy carbon (GC) and carbon film electrodes (CFE), and were characterised electrochemically and applied in a glucose-oxidase-based biosensor. MWCNT-modified carbon film electrodes were then used to develop an alcohol oxidase (AlcOx) biosensor, in which AlcOx-BSA was cross-linked with glutaraldehyde and attached by drop-coating. The experimental conditions, applied potential and pH, for ethanol monitoring were optimised, and ...

  5. Nonhomogeneous morphology and the elastic modulus of aligned carbon nanotube films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) arrays offer the potential to develop nanostructured materials that leverage their outstanding physical properties. Vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (VACNTs), also named CNT forests, CNT arrays, or CNT turfs, can provide high heat conductivity and sufficient mechanical compliance to accommodate thermal expansion mismatch for use as thermal interface materials (TIMs). This paper reports measurements of the in-plane moduli of vertically aligned, single-walled CNT (SWCNT) and multi-walled CNT (MWCNT) films. The mechanical response of these films is related to the nonhomogeneous morphology of the grown nanotubes, such as entangled nanotubes of a top crust layer, aligned CNTs in the middle region, and CNTs in the bottom layer. To investigate how the entanglements govern the overall mechanical moduli of CNT films, we remove the crust layer consisting of CNT entanglements by etching the CNT films from the top. A microfabricated cantilever technique shows that crust removal reduces the resulting moduli of the etched SWCNT films by as much as 40%, whereas the moduli of the etched MWCNT films do not change significantly, suggesting a minimal crust effect on the film modulus for thick MWCNT films (>90 μm). This improved understanding will allow us to engineer the mechanical moduli of CNT films for TIMs or packaging applications. (paper)

  6. Nonhomogeneous morphology and the elastic modulus of aligned carbon nanotube films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Won, Yoonjin; Gao, Yuan; Guzman de Villoria, Roberto; Wardle, Brian L.; Xiang, Rong; Maruyama, Shigeo; Kenny, Thomas W.; Goodson, Kenneth E.

    2015-11-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) arrays offer the potential to develop nanostructured materials that leverage their outstanding physical properties. Vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (VACNTs), also named CNT forests, CNT arrays, or CNT turfs, can provide high heat conductivity and sufficient mechanical compliance to accommodate thermal expansion mismatch for use as thermal interface materials (TIMs). This paper reports measurements of the in-plane moduli of vertically aligned, single-walled CNT (SWCNT) and multi-walled CNT (MWCNT) films. The mechanical response of these films is related to the nonhomogeneous morphology of the grown nanotubes, such as entangled nanotubes of a top crust layer, aligned CNTs in the middle region, and CNTs in the bottom layer. To investigate how the entanglements govern the overall mechanical moduli of CNT films, we remove the crust layer consisting of CNT entanglements by etching the CNT films from the top. A microfabricated cantilever technique shows that crust removal reduces the resulting moduli of the etched SWCNT films by as much as 40%, whereas the moduli of the etched MWCNT films do not change significantly, suggesting a minimal crust effect on the film modulus for thick MWCNT films (>90 μm). This improved understanding will allow us to engineer the mechanical moduli of CNT films for TIMs or packaging applications.

  7. Enhanced mechanical properties and morphological characterizations of poly(vinyl alcohol) carbon nanotube composite films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei; Tao, Xiaoming; Xue, Pu; Cheng, Xiaoyin

    2005-12-01

    Tensile tests were carried out on free-standing composite films of poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) and multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) for different loading levels. Results show that overall mechanical properties of the composite were greatly improved as compared to the neat PVA film. For PVA-based materials at significant high loading level such as 9.1 wt.% MWNTs, considerable increases in Young's modulus, tensile strength and toughness by factors of 4.5, 2.7 and 4.1, respectively, were achieved. Raman, SEM, TEM, and DSC techniques were used to evaluate the PVA/MWNTs composite system. Strong acid-modification of the pristine MWNTs and the subsequent ultrasonication processing allowed good distribution of the nanotubes in the matrix. SEM together with DSC result shows apparent good wetting of the nanotubes by the PVA matrix, which are supportive of good interfacial bonding between the modified carbon nanotubes and the hosting polymer matrix.

  8. Transparent, conductive and flexible single-walled carbon nanotube films

    OpenAIRE

    Kaskela, Antti

    2013-01-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) networks have a large application potential for future electronics as transparent conductive films. SWCNT networks (SWCNT-N) offer improved flexibility when compared to the current industry standard transparent conductive films (TCF), an example of which is indium tin oxide (ITO). SWCNTs can be synthesised from abundant raw materials, whereas indium supply is limited and has been a target of aggressive trade policies, thus increasing supply risks and price v...

  9. Thermoelectric properties of single-wall carbon nanotube films: Effects of diameter and wet environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Daisuke; Ueda, Tomohiro; Nakai, Yusuke; Kyakuno, Haruka; Miyata, Yasumitsu; Yamamoto, Takahiro; Saito, Takeshi; Hata, Kenji; Maniwa, Yutaka

    2016-02-01

    The Seebeck coefficient S and the electrical resistivity ρ of single-wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) films were investigated as a function of the SWCNT diameter and carrier concentration. The S and ρ significantly changed in humid environments through p-type carrier doping. Experiments, combined with theoretical simulations based on the non-equilibrium Green’s function theory, indicated that the power factor P can be increased threefold by the enrichment of semiconducting SWCNTs, but the nanotube diameter has little effect. The improvement of the film resistivity strongly enhances the film thermoelectric performance, manifested as increasing the value of P above 1200 µW/(m·K2).

  10. Wafer-scale monodomain films of spontaneously aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xiaowei; Gao, Weilu; Xie, Lijuan; Li, Bo; Zhang, Qi; Lei, Sidong; Robinson, John M.; Hároz, Erik H.; Doorn, Stephen K.; Wang, Weipeng; Vajtai, Robert; Ajayan, Pulickel M.; Adams, W. Wade; Hauge, Robert H.; Kono, Junichiro

    2016-07-01

    The one-dimensional character of electrons, phonons and excitons in individual single-walled carbon nanotubes leads to extremely anisotropic electronic, thermal and optical properties. However, despite significant efforts to develop ways to produce large-scale architectures of aligned nanotubes, macroscopic manifestations of such properties remain limited. Here, we show that large (>cm2) monodomain films of aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes can be prepared using slow vacuum filtration. The produced films are globally aligned within ±1.5° (a nematic order parameter of ∼1) and are highly packed, containing 1 × 106 nanotubes in a cross-sectional area of 1 μm2. The method works for nanotubes synthesized by various methods, and film thickness is controllable from a few nanometres to ∼100 nm. We use the approach to create ideal polarizers in the terahertz frequency range and, by combining the method with recently developed sorting techniques, highly aligned and chirality-enriched nanotube thin-film devices. Semiconductor-enriched devices exhibit polarized light emission and polarization-dependent photocurrent, as well as anisotropic conductivities and transistor action with high on/off ratios.

  11. Analysis of Osteoblast Differentiation on Polymer Thin Films Embedded with Carbon Nanotubes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Woo Lee

    Full Text Available Osteoblast differentiation can be modulated by variations in order of nanoscale topography. Biopolymers embedded with carbon nanotubes can cause various orders of roughness at the nanoscale and can be used to investigate the dynamics of extracellular matrix interaction with cells. In this study, clear relationship between the response of osteoblasts to integrin receptor activation, their phenotype, and transcription of certain genes on polymer composites embedded with carbon nanotubes was demonstrated. We generated an ultrathin nanocomposite film embedded with carbon nanotubes and observed improved adhesion of pre-osteoblasts, with a subsequent increase in their proliferation. The expression of genes encoding integrin subunits α5, αv, β1, and β3 was significantly upregulated at the early of time-point when cells initially attached to the carbon nanotube/polymer composite. The advantage of ultrathin nanocomposite film for pre-osteoblasts was demonstrated by staining for the cytoskeletal protein vinculin and cell nuclei. The expression of essential transcription factors for osteoblastogenesis, such as Runx2 and Sp7 transcription factor 7 (known as osterix, was upregulated after 7 days. Consequently, the expression of genes that determine osteoblast phenotype, such as alkaline phosphatase, type I collagen, and osteocalcin, was accelerated on carbon nanotube embedded polymer matrix after 14 days. In conclusion, the ultrathin nanocomposite film generated various orders of nanoscale topography that triggered processes related to osteoblast bone formation.

  12. Controlled synthesis of high quality carbon nanotubes and their applications in transparent conductive films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dervishi, Enkeleda

    carbon formation, and higher crystallinity compared with the ones grown by the external furnace cCVD method. Lastly, this research presents the development and characterization of carbon nanotube polymer composites and conductive transparent nanotube thin film coatings. Electrostatic charge dissipation presents a major problem for applications ranging from electronics to space exploration. Nanotube polymer composites with new and improved bulk and surface properties were found to have the highest charge dissipation rates with decay times of seconds. Moreover, a comparative study of conductive transparent thin coatings on glass substrates using different types of CNTs is also discussed. The optoelectronic performance of the carbon nanotube films was found to strongly depend on many effects; including the ratio of metallic-to-semiconducting tubes, dispersion, length, diameter, wall number, and defects.

  13. Electrochemical Characterization of Films of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes and Their Possible Application in Supercapacitors

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Chong-yang; Bard, Allen J.; Wudl, Fred; Weitz, Iris; Heath, James R.

    1999-01-01

    Films of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) were cast from suspensions in several solvents on the surface of a Pt or Au electrode. Cyclic voltammetry of the films in MeCN did not show well-resolved waves (as distinct from films of C_(60) prepared in a similar manner). However, the increase in the effective capacitance of the electrode with a SWCNT film at 0.5 V vs. an AgQRE was 283 F/g, which is about twice that of carbon electrodes in nonaqueous solvents.

  14. Carbon nanotube macroelectronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jialu

    In this dissertation, I discuss the application of carbon nanotubes in macroelectronis. Due to the extraordinary electrical properties such as high intrinsic carrier mobility and current-carrying capacity, single wall carbon nanotubes are very desirable for thin-film transistor (TFT) applications such as flat panel display, transparent electronics, as well as flexible and stretchable electronics. Compared with other popular channel material for TFTs, namely amorphous silicon, polycrystalline silicon and organic materials, nanotube thin-films have the advantages of low-temperature processing compatibility, transparency, and flexibility, as well as high device performance. In order to demonstrate scalable, practical carbon nanotube macroelectroncis, I have developed a platform to fabricate high-density, uniform separated nanotube based thin-film transistors. In addition, many other essential analysis as well as technology components, such as nanotube film density control, purity and diameter dependent semiconducting nanotube electrical performance study, air-stable n-type transistor fabrication, and CMOS integration platform have also been demonstrated. On the basis of the above achievement, I have further demonstrated various kinds of applications including AMOLED display electronics, PMOS and CMOS logic circuits, flexible and transparent electronics. The dissertation is structured as follows. First, chapter 1 gives a brief introduction to the electronic properties of carbon nanotubes, which serves as the background knowledge for the following chapters. In chapter 2, I will present our approach of fabricating wafer-scale uniform semiconducting carbon nanotube thin-film transistors and demonstrate their application in display electronics and logic circuits. Following that, more detailed information about carbon nanotube thin-film transistor based active matrix organic light-emitting diode (AMOLED) displays is discussed in chapter 3. And in chapter 4, a technology to

  15. Carbon nanotube transistors with graphene oxide films as gate dielectrics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Carbon nanomaterials,including the one-dimensional(1-D) carbon nanotube(CNT) and two-dimensional(2-D) graphene,are heralded as ideal candidates for next generation nanoelectronics.An essential component for the development of advanced nanoelectronics devices is processing-compatible oxide.Here,in analogy to the widespread use of silicon dioxide(SiO2) in silicon microelectronic industry,we report the proof-of-principle use of graphite oxide(GO) as a gate dielectrics for CNT field-effect transistor(FET) via a fast and simple solution-based processing in the ambient condition.The exceptional transistor characteristics,including low operation voltage(2 V),high carrier mobility(950 cm2/V-1 s-1),and the negligible gate hysteresis,suggest a potential route to the future all-carbon nanoelectronics.

  16. In situ optical spectroelectrochemistry of single-walled carbon nanotube thin films

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zukalová, Markéta; Tarábek, Ján; Kalbáč, Martin; Kavan, Ladislav; Dunsch, L.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 12, č. 10 (2008), s. 1279-1284. ISSN 1432-8488 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC510 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : uv-vis spectroelectrochemistry * cyclic voltammetry * single-walled carbon nanotubes * thin film s * doping Subject RIV: CG - Electrochemistry Impact factor: 1.597, year: 2008

  17. Interfacial Surfactant Ordering in Thin Films of SDS-Encapsulated Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Sushanta K; Sengupta, Sanghamitra; Velarde, Luis

    2016-01-21

    The molecular self-assembly of surfactants on the surface of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) is currently a common strategy for the tuning of nanotube properties and the stabilization of carbon nanotube dispersions. Here, we report direct measurements of the degree of interfacial ordering for sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) surfactants adsorbed on colloidal, single-chirality enriched, SWCNTs within a solid film and investigate the dependence of surface alkyl chain order on the surfactant concentration in the precursor solution. The degree of order for the SWCNT-bound SDS molecules, is probed by vibrational sum frequency generation (VSFG) spectroscopy. We find concrete evidence for the presence of highly ordered surface structures at sufficiently high SDS concentrations, attributed here to cylindrical-like micelle assemblies with the SWCNT at the core. As the SDS concentration decreases, the interfacial order is found to decrease as well, generating a more disordered or random adsorption of surfactants on the nanotube surfaces. PMID:26730991

  18. Humidity Sensor Based on Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotube Thin Films

    OpenAIRE

    Cao, C. L.; Hu, C. G.; Fang, L.; Wang, S. X.; Y. S. TIAN; Pan, C. Y.

    2011-01-01

    The properties of the humidity sensors made of chemically treated and untreated multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) thin films are investigated systematically. It shows that both the chemically treated and untreated MWCNT thin films demonstrate humidity sensitive properties, but the former have stronger sensitivity than the latter. In the range of 11%–98% relative humidity (RH), the resistances of the chemically treated and untreated MWCNT humidity sensors increase 120% and 28%, respectively...

  19. Anomalous electrostatic potential properties in carbon nanotube thin films under a weak external electric field

    OpenAIRE

    Ishiyama, U; Cuong, Nguyen Thanh; Okada, Susumu

    2016-01-01

    Using density functional theory, we studied the electronic properties of carbon nanotube (CNT) thin films under an electric field. The carrier accumulation due to the electric field depends strongly on the CNT species forming the thin films. Under a low electron concentration, the injected electrons are distributed throughout the CNTs, leading to an unusual electric field between CNTs, the direction of which is opposite to that of the applied field. This unusual field response of CNT thin fil...

  20. Mechanical and biological properties of chitosan/carbon nanotube nanocomposite films

    OpenAIRE

    Aryaei, Ashkan; Jayatissa, Ahalapitiya H.; Jayasuriya, Ambalangodage C.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, different concentrations of multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) were homogeneously dispersed throughout the chitosan (CS) matrix. A simple solvent-cast method was used to fabricate chitosan films with 0.1, 0.5, and 1% of MWCNT with the average diameter around 30 nm. The CS/MWCNT films were characterized for structural, viscous and mechanical properties with optical microscopy, wide-angle X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, tensile test machine, and microindentation testing ...

  1. Densely Packed Linear Assembles of Carbon Nanotube Bundles in Polysiloxane-Based Nanocomposite Films

    OpenAIRE

    Hong-Baek Cho; Minh Triet Tan Huynh; Tadachika Nakayama; Son Thanh Nguyen; Hisayuki Suematsu; Tsuneo Suzuki; Weihua Jiang; Satoshi Tanaka; Yoshinori Tokoi; Soo Wohn Lee; Tohoru Sekino; Koichi Niihara

    2013-01-01

    Linear assemblies of carbon nanotubes (LACNTs) were fabricated and controlled in polysiloxane-based nanocomposite films and the effects of the LACNTs on the thermal and electrical properties of the films were investigated. CNTs were dispersed by mechanical stirring and sonication in a prepolymer of polysiloxane. Homogeneous suspensions were cast on polyamide spacers and oriented by linear-assembly by applying DC and switching DC electric fields before the mixture became cross-linked. Densely ...

  2. Preparation and electrochemical properties of gold nanoparticles containing carbon nanotubes-polyelectrolyte multilayer thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu Aimin, E-mail: aiminyu@swin.edu.au [College of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, Hubei Normal University, 435002 (China); Faculty of Life and Social Sciences, Swinburne University of Technology, Melbourne, VIC 3122 (Australia); Zhang Xing [College of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, Hubei Normal University, 435002 (China); School of Chemical and Mathematic Sciences, Murdoch University, Perth, WA 6150 (Australia); Zhang Haili; Han, Deyan [College of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, Hubei Normal University, 435002 (China); Knight, Allan R. [School of Chemical and Mathematic Sciences, Murdoch University, Perth, WA 6150 (Australia)

    2011-10-30

    Highlights: > Gold nanoparticles containing carbon nanotubes-polyelectrolyte multilayer thin films were prepared via layer-by-layer self-assembly technique. > The electron transfer behaviour of the hybrid thin films were investigated using an electrochemical probe. > The resulting thin films exhibited an electrocatalytic activity towards the oxidation of nitric oxide. - Abstract: Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT)/polyelectrolyte (PE) hybrid thin films were fabricated by alternatively depositing negatively charged MWCNT and positively charged (diallyldimethylammonium chloride) (PDDA) via layer-by-layer (LbL) assembly technique. The stepwise growth of the multilayer films of MWCNT and PDDA was characterized by UV-vis spectroscopy. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images indicated that the MWCNT were uniformly embedded in the film to form a network and the coverage density of MWCNT increased with layer number. Au nanoparticles (NPs) could be further adsorbed onto the film to form PE/MWCNT/Au NPs composite films. The electron transfer behaviour of multilayer films with different compositions were studied by cyclic voltammetry using [Fe(CN){sub 6}]{sup 3-/4-} as an electrochemical probe. The results indicated that the incorporation of MWCNT and Au NPs not only greatly improved the electronic conductivity of pure polyelectrolyte films, but also provided excellent electrocatalytic activity towards the oxidation of nitric oxide (NO).

  3. Dry-Transfer of Aligned Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes for Flexible Transparent Thin Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Cole

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Herein we present an inexpensive facile wet-chemistry-free approach to the transfer of chemical vapour-deposited multiwalled carbon nanotubes to flexible transparent polymer substrates in a single-step process. By controlling the nanotube length, we demonstrate accurate control over the electrical conductivity and optical transparency of the transferred thin films. Uniaxial strains of up to 140% induced only minor reductions in sample conductivity, opening up a number of applications in stretchable electronics. Nanotube alignment offers enhanced functionality for applications such as polarisation selective electrodes and flexible supercapacitor substrates. A capacitance of 17 F/g was determined for supercapacitors fabricated from the reported dry-transferred MWCNTs with the corresponding cyclic voltagrams showing a clear dependence on nanotube length.

  4. Multifractal characterization of single wall carbon nanotube thin films surface upon exposure to optical parametric oscillator laser irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study presents a multifractal approach, obtained with atomic force microscopy analysis, to characterize the structural evolution of single wall carbon nanotube thin films upon exposure to optical parametric oscillator laser irradiation at wavelength of 430 nm. Microstructure and morphological changes of carbon nanotube films deposited on different substrates (mica and TGX grating) were recorded by atomic force microscope. A detailed methodology for surface multifractal characterization, which may be applied for atomic force microscopy data, was presented. Multifractal analysis of surface roughness revealed that carbon nanotube films surface has a multifractal geometry at various magnifications. The generalized dimension Dq and the singularity spectrum f(α) provided quantitative values that characterize the local scale properties of carbon nanotube films surface morphology at nanometer scale. Multifractal analysis provides different yet complementary information to that offered by traditional surface statistical parameters.

  5. Distinguishing Field Effects from Charge Effects in the Optoelectronic Properties of Carbon Nanotube Films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have used charge-induced absorption to quantify the influence of injected charges on electro absorption measurements in single-wall carbon nanotube films. The interpretations of experimental measurements of X processes in nanotubes are simplified by taking into account the change in electron-electron interactions upon charge injection. Electro absorption spectra that are properly corrected for charge-induced effects show remarkable agreement with a simple Stark shift of the exciton transitions with no notable second-derivative contributions. Thus, distinguishing electric field effects from carrier density effects allows for a more rigorous calculation of exciton polarizability from electro absorption measurements, even in heterogeneous films. PACS: 78.67.Ch Nanotubes: optical properties of low-dimensional, mesoscopic, and nanoscale materials and structures.

  6. Titanyl phthalocyanine ambipolar thin film transistors making use of carbon nanotube electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The capability of efficiently injecting charge carriers into organic films and finely tuning their morphology and structure is crucial to improve the performance of organic thin film transistors (OTFTs). In this work, we investigate OTFTs employing carbon nanotubes (CNTs) as the source-drain electrodes and, as the organic semiconductor, thin films of titanyl phthalocyanine (TiOPc) grown by supersonic molecular beam deposition (SuMBD). While CNT electrodes have shown an unprecedented ability to improve charge injection in OTFTs, SuMBD is an effective technique to tune film morphology and structure. Varying the substrate temperature during deposition, we were able to grow both amorphous (low substrate temperature) and polycrystalline (high substrate temperature) films of TiOPc. Regardless of the film morphology and structure, CNT electrodes led to superior charge injection and transport performance with respect to benchmark Au electrodes. Vacuum annealing of polycrystalline TiOPc films with CNT electrodes yielded ambipolar OTFTs. (paper)

  7. Ultrafast carrier dynamics in purified and as-grown single-walled carbon nanotube films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Long Yong-Bing; Song Li; Zhang Chun-Yu; Wang Li; Fu Pan-Ming; Zhang Zhi-Guo; Xie Si-Shen; Wang Guo-Ping

    2005-01-01

    Ultrafast time-resolved optical transmissions in purified and as-grown single-walled carbon nanotube films are measured at a temperature of 200K. The signal of the purified sample shows a crossover from photobleaching to photoabsorption. The former and the latter are interpreted as the state filling and the red shift of the π-plasmon,respectively. The signal of the as-grown sample can be perfectly fitted by a single-exponential with a time constant of 232fs. The disappearance of the negative component in the as-grown sample is attributed to the charge transfer between the semiconducting nanotubes and the impurities.

  8. Electronic Durability of Flexible Transparent Films from Type-Specific Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, J; Iyer, S; Bernhardt, A; Huh, JY; Hudson, S; Fagan, J; Hobbie, E.

    2011-12-11

    The coupling between mechanical flexibility and electronic performance is evaluated for thin films of metallic and semiconducting single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) deposited on compliant supports. Percolated networks of type-purified SWCNTs are assembled as thin conducting coatings on elastic polymer substrates, and the sheet resistance is measured as a function of compression and cyclic strain through impedance spectroscopy. The wrinkling topography, microstructure and transparency of the films are independently characterized using optical microscopy, electron microscopy, and optical absorption spectroscopy. Thin films made from metallic SWCNTs show better durability as flexible transparent conductive coatings, which we attribute to a combination of superior mechanical performance and higher interfacial conductivity.

  9. Electronic durability of flexible transparent films from type-specific single-wall carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, John M; Iyer, Ganjigunte R Swathi; Bernhardt, Anna K; Huh, Ji Yeon; Hudson, Steven D; Fagan, Jeffrey A; Hobbie, Erik K

    2012-01-24

    The coupling between mechanical flexibility and electronic performance is evaluated for thin films of metallic and semiconducting single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) deposited on compliant supports. Percolated networks of type-purified SWCNTs are assembled as thin conducting coatings on elastic polymer substrates, and the sheet resistance is measured as a function of compression and cyclic strain through impedance spectroscopy. The wrinkling topography, microstructure and transparency of the films are independently characterized using optical microscopy, electron microscopy, and optical absorption spectroscopy. Thin films made from metallic SWCNTs show better durability as flexible transparent conductive coatings, which we attribute to a combination of superior mechanical performance and higher interfacial conductivity. PMID:22148890

  10. Thermionic cooling with functionalized carbon nanotube thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Feng, E-mail: fjin@bsu.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Ball State University, Muncie, Indiana 47306 (United States); Little, Scott [Department of Physics, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, Arkansas 72701 (United States)

    2015-03-16

    A large thermionic cooling effect is reported. Temperature reduction as much as 81 °C has been observed on a functionalized carbon nanotubes (CNTs) cathode surface. This cathode utilizes a thin coating of low work function barium strontium oxide emissive materials on top of the CNTs to lower the surface work function. This, combined with the field effect induced by the CNTs, results in an even lower effective work function, and thus strong thermionic emission. Strong thermionic emission is the underlying reason for the large cooling effect observed, and the largest emission current in this study is around 160 mA on a 0.0727 cm{sup 2} emitting surface at around 995 °C. Multiple samples were used in studying thermionic mission at cathode temperature ranging between 750 °C and 1100 °C, and in establishing correlation between the cooling effect and the emission current. Details of the cooling effect measurement are provided, and the measurement results show a clear linear dependence of temperature drop on thermionic emission current. The possible implication of this linear dependence is also discussed.

  11. Thermionic cooling with functionalized carbon nanotube thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A large thermionic cooling effect is reported. Temperature reduction as much as 81 °C has been observed on a functionalized carbon nanotubes (CNTs) cathode surface. This cathode utilizes a thin coating of low work function barium strontium oxide emissive materials on top of the CNTs to lower the surface work function. This, combined with the field effect induced by the CNTs, results in an even lower effective work function, and thus strong thermionic emission. Strong thermionic emission is the underlying reason for the large cooling effect observed, and the largest emission current in this study is around 160 mA on a 0.0727 cm2 emitting surface at around 995 °C. Multiple samples were used in studying thermionic mission at cathode temperature ranging between 750 °C and 1100 °C, and in establishing correlation between the cooling effect and the emission current. Details of the cooling effect measurement are provided, and the measurement results show a clear linear dependence of temperature drop on thermionic emission current. The possible implication of this linear dependence is also discussed

  12. Conductivity enhancement of multiwalled carbon nanotube thin film via thermal compression method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Wan-Lin; Wang, Kuang-Yu; Chang, Yao-Jen; Li, Yu-Ren; Yang, Po-Yu; Chen, Kuan-Neng; Cheng, Huang-Chung

    2014-08-01

    For the first time, the thermal compression method is applied to effectively enhance the electrical conductivity of carbon nanotube thin films (CNTFs). With the assistance of heat and pressure on the CNTFs, the neighbor multiwalled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) start to link with each other, and then these separated CNTs are twined into a continuous film while the compression force, duration, and temperature are quite enough for the reaction. Under the compression temperature of 400°C and the compression force of 100 N for 50 min, the sheet resistance can be reduced from 17 to 0.9 k Ω/sq for the CNTFs with a thickness of 230 nm. Moreover, the effects of compression temperature and the duration of thermal compression on the conductivity of CNTF are also discussed in this work.

  13. Transparent conducting film: Effect of mechanical stretching to optical and electrical properties of carbon nanotube mat

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Tsuyoshi Saotome; Hansang Kim; David Lashmore; H Thomas Hahn

    2011-07-01

    We describe in this paper a transparent conducting film (TCF). It is a fibrous layer of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs), labeled a dilute CNT mat, that was prepared and unidirectionally stretched to improve both the optical and electrical properties. After stretching by 80% strain, transmittance at 550 nm wavelength was improved by 37% and sheet resistance was reduced to 71% of the original value. The improvement of the transmittance can be explained by increased area of the CNT mat after stretch, and the reduced sheet resistance can be explained by increased density of the CNT alignment in lateral direction due to contraction. Based on the microscopic observation before and after stretch, models to describe the phenomena are proposed. By further expanding on this method, it may be possible to obtain a transparent conducting carbon nanotube film which is crack-resistant for solar cell applications.

  14. Electrical conductivity of single-wall carbon nanotube films in strong electric field

    OpenAIRE

    Seliuta, D; Subačius, L; Kašalynas, I; Shuba, M.; Paddubskaya, A.

    2013-01-01

    (Received 6 March 2013; accepted 26 April 2013; published online 14 May 2013) Carrier transport features in single-wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) films under strong electric fields (up to 105 V/cm) are presented. Application of electrical pulses of nanosecond duration allowed to minimize Joule heating and resolve intrinsic nonlinearities with the electric field. Investigations within a wide range of temperatures—4.2–300 K—indicated that carrier localization as well as tunneling t...

  15. Fabrication of flexible transparent conductive films from long double-walled carbon nanotubes

    OpenAIRE

    Naoki Imazu; Tsuyohiko Fujigaya; Naotoshi Nakashima

    2014-01-01

    The fabrication of flexible transparent conducting films (TCFs) is important for the development of the next-generation flexible devices. In this study, we used double-walled carbon nanotubes (DWCNTs) as the starting material and described a fabrication method of flexible TCFs. We have determined in a quantitative way that the key factors are the length and the dispersion states of the DWCNTs as well as the weight-ratios of dispersant polymer/DWCNTs. By controlling such factors, we have readi...

  16. Ink-jet printing of thin film transistors based on carbon nanotubes

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Jiantong

    2010-01-01

    The outstanding electrical and mechanical properties of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) may offer solutions to realizing high-mobility and high-bendability thin-film transistors (TFTs) for the emerging flexible electronics. This thesis aims to develop low-cost ink-jet printing techniques for high-performance TFTs based on pristine SWCNTs. The main challenge of this work is to suppress the effects of “metallic SWCNT contamination” and improve the device electrical performance. To this ...

  17. Structural stability of transparent conducting films assembled from length purified single-wall carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. M. Harris; G. R. S. Iyer; D. O. Simien; J. A. Fagan; J. Y. Huh; J. Y. Chung; S. D. Hudson; J. Obrzut; J. F. Douglas; C. M. Stafford; E. K. Hobbie

    2011-01-01

    Single-wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) films show significant promise for transparent electronics applications that demand mechanical flexibility, but durability remains an outstanding issue. In this work, thin membranes of length purified single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) are uniaxially and isotropically compressed by depositing them on prestrained polymer substrates. Upon release of the strain, the topography, microstructure, and conductivity of the films are characterized using a combination of optical/fluorescence microscopy, light scattering, force microscopy, electron microscopy, and impedance spectroscopy. Above a critical surface mass density, films assembled from nanotubes of well-defined length exhibit a strongly nonlinear mechanical response. The measured strain dependence reveals a dramatic softening that occurs through an alignment of the SWCNTs normal to the direction of prestrain, which at small strains is also apparent as an anisotropic increase in sheet resistance along the same direction. At higher strains, the membrane conductivities increase due to a compression-induced restoration of conductive pathways. Our measurements reveal the fundamental mode of elasto-plastic deformation in these films and suggest how it might be suppressed.

  18. Electrospray deposition of carbon nanotube thin films for flexible transparent electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Yinan; Xin, Guoqing; Nam, Jaewook; Cho, Sung Min; Chae, Heeyeop

    2013-09-01

    Flexible transparent carbon nanotube (CNT) electrodes were fabricated by electrospray deposition, a large-area scalable and cost-effective process. The carbon nanotubes were dispersed in N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF) and deposited on polyethylene terephthalate (PET) substrates by electrospray deposition process at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. Major process variables were characterized and optimized for the electrospray process development such as electric field between nozzle and substrates, CNT solution flowrate, gap between nozzle and substrates, solution concentration, solvent properties and surface temperature. The sheet resistance of the electrospray deposited CNT films were reduced by HNO3 doping process. 169 Omega/sq sheet resistance and 86% optical transmittance was achieved with low surface roughness of 1.2 nm. The films showed high flexibility and transparency, making them potential replacements of ITO or ZnO in such as solid state lighting, touch panels, and solar cells. Electrospray process is a scalable process and we believe that this process can be applied for large area carbon nanotube film formation. PMID:24205613

  19. Deposition and characterization of carbon nanotubes (CNTS) based films for sensing applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dissanayake, Amila C.

    The advent of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) has opened up lot of novel applications because of their unique electrical and mechanical properties. CNTs are well known material for its exceptional electrical, mechanical, optical, thermal and chemical properties. A single-wall nanotube (SWNT) can be either semiconducting, metallic or semi-metallic, based on its chirality and diameter. SWNTs can be used in transistor device as active channels due to high electron mobility (~10000 cm2/(V s), electrical interconnects, nano-scale circuits, field-emission displays, light-emitting devices and thermal heat sinks due to low resistivity, high current density (~109A cm-2 ) and high thermal conductivity (~3500 W m-1). Further, their high Young's modulus and fracture stress is suitable for various sensing applications such as strain/pressure and use in chemical/biological sensors. This work mainly involves the deposition of CNT-based films following two different methods via a conventional microwave chemical vapor deposition (MWCVD) and spinning CNT-composites, and explored the possibility of using CNT-based films in strain gauge applications. Deposited films are characterized and analyzed for their structure, microstructure, composition and electrical properties. Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS), X-ray Reflectivity (XRR), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), X-ray Diffraction (XRD), X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and electrical impedance measurement techniques are used to characterize the films prepared by both the above mentioned methods. The synthesis/deposition process is improved based on the observed films properties. A carbon nanotube forest grown on the Si (100) substrate with Ni as a catalyst using CVD system shows an amorphous nature due to loss of catalytic activity of Ni nano-islands. XPS and RBS data show Ni nano-particles diffused into the Si substrate and surface layer of Ni particles turns out to nickel silicide. The

  20. Microwave and Millimeter Wave Properties of Vertically-Aligned Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddadi, K.; Tripon-Canseliet, C.; Hivin, Q.; Ducournau, G.; Teo, E.; Coquet, P.; Tay, B. K.; Lepilliet, S.; Avramovic, V.; Chazelas, J.; Decoster, D.

    2016-05-01

    We present the experimental determination of the complex permittivity of vertically aligned single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) films grown on quartz substrates in the microwave regime from 10 MHz up to 67 GHz, with the electrical field perpendicular to the main axis of the carbon nanotubes (CNTs), based on coplanar waveguide transmission line approach together with the measurement of the microwave impedance of top metalized vertically—aligned SWCNTs grown on conductive silicon substrates up to 26 GHz. From coplanar waveguide measurements, we obtain a real part of the permittivity almost equal to unity, which is interpreted in terms of low carbon atom density (3 × 1019 at/cm3) associated with a very low imaginary part of permittivity (grown CNTs bundles.

  1. Co-sputtered MoRe thin films for carbon nanotube growth-compatible superconducting coplanar resonators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Götz, K J G; Blien, S; Stiller, P L; Vavra, O; Mayer, T; Huber, T; Meier, T N G; Kronseder, M; Strunk, Ch; Hüttel, A K

    2016-04-01

    Molybdenum rhenium alloy thin films can exhibit superconductivity up to critical temperatures of [Formula: see text]. At the same time, the films are highly stable in the high-temperature methane/hydrogen atmosphere typically required to grow single wall carbon nanotubes. We characterize molybdenum rhenium alloy films deposited via simultaneous sputtering from two sources, with respect to their composition as function of sputter parameters and their electronic dc as well as GHz properties at low temperature. Specific emphasis is placed on the effect of the carbon nanotube growth conditions on the film. Superconducting coplanar waveguide resonators are defined lithographically; we demonstrate that the resonators remain functional when undergoing nanotube growth conditions, and characterize their properties as function of temperature. This paves the way for ultra-clean nanotube devices grown in situ onto superconducting coplanar waveguide circuit elements. PMID:26901846

  2. Co-sputtered MoRe thin films for carbon nanotube growth-compatible superconducting coplanar resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Götz, K. J. G.; Blien, S.; Stiller, P. L.; Vavra, O.; Mayer, T.; Huber, T.; Meier, T. N. G.; Kronseder, M.; Strunk, Ch; Hüttel, A. K.

    2016-04-01

    Molybdenum rhenium alloy thin films can exhibit superconductivity up to critical temperatures of {T}{{c}}=15 {{K}}. At the same time, the films are highly stable in the high-temperature methane/hydrogen atmosphere typically required to grow single wall carbon nanotubes. We characterize molybdenum rhenium alloy films deposited via simultaneous sputtering from two sources, with respect to their composition as function of sputter parameters and their electronic dc as well as GHz properties at low temperature. Specific emphasis is placed on the effect of the carbon nanotube growth conditions on the film. Superconducting coplanar waveguide resonators are defined lithographically; we demonstrate that the resonators remain functional when undergoing nanotube growth conditions, and characterize their properties as function of temperature. This paves the way for ultra-clean nanotube devices grown in situ onto superconducting coplanar waveguide circuit elements.

  3. Carbon nanotube solar cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colin Klinger

    Full Text Available We present proof-of-concept all-carbon solar cells. They are made of a photoactive side of predominantly semiconducting nanotubes for photoconversion and a counter electrode made of a natural mixture of carbon nanotubes or graphite, connected by a liquid electrolyte through a redox reaction. The cells do not require rare source materials such as In or Pt, nor high-grade semiconductor processing equipment, do not rely on dye for photoconversion and therefore do not bleach, and are easy to fabricate using a spray-paint technique. We observe that cells with a lower concentration of carbon nanotubes on the active semiconducting electrode perform better than cells with a higher concentration of nanotubes. This effect is contrary to the expectation that a larger number of nanotubes would lead to more photoconversion and therefore more power generation. We attribute this to the presence of metallic nanotubes that provide a short for photo-excited electrons, bypassing the load. We demonstrate optimization strategies that improve cell efficiency by orders of magnitude. Once it is possible to make semiconducting-only carbon nanotube films, that may provide the greatest efficiency improvement.

  4. Graphene-based supercapacitor with carbon nanotube film as highly efficient current collector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flexible graphene-based thin film supercapacitors were made using carbon nanotube (CNT) films as current collectors and graphene films as electrodes. The graphene sheets were produced by simple electrochemical exfoliation, while the graphene films with controlled thickness were prepared by vacuum filtration. The solid-state supercapacitor was made by using two graphene/CNT films on plastic substrates to sandwich a thin layer of gelled electrolyte. We found that the thin graphene film with thickness <1 μm can greatly increase the capacitance. Using only CNT films as electrodes, the device exhibited a capacitance as low as ∼0.4 mF cm−2, whereas by adding a 360 nm thick graphene film to the CNT electrodes led to a ∼4.3 mF cm−2 capacitance. We experimentally demonstrated that the conductive CNT film is equivalent to gold as a current collector while it provides a stronger binding force to the graphene film. Combining the high capacitance of the thin graphene film and the high conductivity of the CNT film, our devices exhibited high energy density (8–14 Wh kg−1) and power density (250–450 kW kg−1). (paper)

  5. Ultrafast graphene and carbon nanotube film patterning by picosecond laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobrinetskiy, Ivan I.; Emelianov, Alexey V.; Otero, Nerea; Romero, Pablo M.

    2016-03-01

    Carbon nanomaterials is among the most promising technologies for advanced electronic applications, due to their extraordinary chemical and physical properties. Nonetheless, after more than two decades of intensive research, the application of carbon-based nanostructures in real electronic and optoelectronic devices is still a big challenge due to lack of scalable integration in microelectronic manufacturing. Laser processing is an attractive tool for graphene device manufacturing, providing a large variety of processes through direct and indirect interaction of laser beams with graphene lattice: functionalization, oxidation, reduction, etching and ablation, growth, etc. with resolution down to the nanoscale. Focused laser radiation allows freeform processing, enabling fully mask-less fabrication of devices from graphene and carbon nanotube films. This concept is attractive to reduce costs, improve flexibility, and reduce alignment operations, by producing fully functional devices in single direct-write operations. In this paper, a picosecond laser with a wavelength of 515 nm and pulse width of 30 ps is used to pattern carbon nanostructures in two ways: ablation and chemical functionalization. The light absorption leads to thermal ablation of graphene and carbon nanotube film under the fluence 60-90 J/cm2 with scanning speed up to 2 m/s. Just under the ablation energy, the two-photon absorption leads to add functional groups to the carbon lattice which change the optical properties of graphene. This paper shows the results of controlled modification of geometrical configuration and the physical and chemical properties of carbon based nanostructures, by laser direct writing.

  6. Analysis of dopamine on printed polymer thin film consisting of multi-walled carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A novel film consisting of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) was produced by means of a flexographic printing process on polycarbonate substrate. The electrochemical response of this MWCNT-PC film towards oxidation of dopamine to dopamine-o-quinone was investigated in phosphate buffer solution (pH 7) by means of cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The findings demonstrate that the MWCNT-PC film possesses good performance for the electrochemical oxidation of dopamine. Namely, the fabricated MWCNT-PC film having a detection limit and sensitivity of 4.06 μM and 0.823 A M-1 cm-2, respectively, seems to have greater detection ability towards dopamine/dopamine-o-quinone compared to other novel electrodes reported in the literature. The results of the present work are very promising and demonstrate that the MWCNT-PC film could be suitable for the electrochemical analysis of molecules with biological interest. (author)

  7. Effect of fluorination of carbon nanotubes on superhydrophobic properties of fluoro-based films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Long-Yue; Park, Soo-Jin

    2010-02-15

    In this work, we prepared multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) thin films on glass substrates with transparent, conductive, and superhydrophobic properties. MWCNTs were dispersed in fluoropolymer (FP) solutions for modification of their surface by grafting FP. A dip-coating process was used to prepare the films at a continuous speed and different numbers of coatings. The chemical compositions and microstructures of the prepared film surface were also investigated by using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The film showed 83.5% transmittance and a sheet resistance of 1.38x10(4)Omegasq(-1), and a high contact angle of 160.2 degrees . The 3D MWCNTs networks and the low surface energy of the FP play important roles in creating the superhydrophobic surface of the MWCNTs film. PMID:19919860

  8. Non-enzymatic analysis of glucose on printed films based on multi-walled carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report on the fabrication of an enzyme-free electrochemical sensor for glucose based on a printed film consisting of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). The MWCNT-based film can be produced by means of a flexographic printing process on a polycarbonate (PC) substrate. The electrochemical response of the MWCNT-based film (referred to as MWCNT-PC) towards the oxidation of glucose at pH 7 was studied by means of cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The MWCNT-PC film exhibits substantial electrocatalytic activity towards the oxidation of glucose at an anodic potential of 0.30 V (vs. Ag/AgCl). The findings reveal that the MWCNT-PC film enables non-enzymatic sensing of glucose with a detection limit as low as 2.16 μM and a sensitivity of 1045 μA.mM-1.cm-2. (author)

  9. Continuous Preparation of Copper/Carbon Nanotube Composite Films and Application in Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Xiao Gang; Le Wu, Min; Wang, Xiao Xia; Zhong, Xin Hua; Zhao, Ke; Wang, Jian Nong

    2016-02-01

    Realizing the continuous and large scale preparation of particle/carbon nanotube (CNT) composites with enhanced functionalities, and broad applications in energy conversion, harvesting, and storage systems, remains as a big challenge. Here, we report a scalable strategy to continuously prepare particle/CNT composite films in which particles are confined by CNT films. This is achieved by the continuous condensation and deposition of a cylindrical assembly of CNTs on a paper strip and the in situ incorporation of particles during the layer-by-layer deposition process. A Cu/CNT composite film is prepared as an example; such a film exhibits very high power conversion efficiency when it is used as a counter electrode in a solar cell, compared with previous materials under otherwise identical conditions. The proposed method can be extended to other CNT-based composite films with excellent functionalities for wide applications. PMID:26784865

  10. Fabrication of Carbon Nanotube Thin Films by Evaporation-Induced Self-Assembly

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Han

    2015-01-01

    In summary, we have prepared single-wall carbon nanotube (SWNT) thin films by the method of evaporation-induced self-assembly (EISA). Using the scalable two-plate or lens setups, sorts of different film types or patterns of SWNTs has been successfully fabricated directly from the evaporation of solvents and could be precisely controlled by the concentrations of SWNT in ambient conditions. The special geometry of meniscus as the capillary bridge has not only given rise to a much higher efficie...

  11. Transparent and flexible high-performance supercapacitors based on single-walled carbon nanotube films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanninen, Petri; Dang Luong, Nguyen; Hoang Sinh, Le; Anoshkin, Ilya V.; Tsapenko, Alexey; Seppälä, Jukka; Nasibulin, Albert G.; Kallio, Tanja

    2016-06-01

    Transparent and flexible energy storage devices have garnered great interest due to their suitability for display, sensor and photovoltaic applications. In this paper, we report the application of aerosol synthesized and dry deposited single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) thin films as electrodes for an electrochemical double-layer capacitor (EDLC). SWCNT films exhibit extremely large specific capacitance (178 F g‑1 or 552 μF cm‑2), high optical transparency (92%) and stability for 10 000 charge/discharge cycles. A transparent and flexible EDLC prototype is constructed with a polyethylene casing and a gel electrolyte.

  12. Transparent conducting film: Effect of vacuum filtration of carbon nanotube suspended in oleum

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Tsuyoshi Saotome; Hansang Kim; Zhe Wang; David Lashmore; H Thomas Hahn

    2011-07-01

    Vacuum filtration process to fabricate a transparent conducting carbon nanotube (CNT) film is reported. A CNT mat, which is a fibrous sheet of long multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNT), was prepared and dispersed in oleum by solution-sonication. The suspension was then vacuum filtered to obtain a thin MWNT layer with improved dispersion. Sheet resistance of the obtained MWNT layer was increased despite the improved dispersion. SEM micrographs and energy dispersive spectroscopy results indicated that the increase of the sheet resistance could be attributed to degradation and oxidation of the MWNT bundles. Though the chemical approach in this study did not improve the electrical property of the CNT mat, a mechanical approach proposed in our recent work was deemed suitable to enhance optical and electrical properties of the CNT mat.

  13. Fabrication of carbon nanotube films from alkyne-transition metal complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer, Vivekanantan S.; Vollhardt, K. Peter C.

    2007-08-28

    A simple method for the production or synthesis of carbon nanotubes as free-standing films or nanotube mats by the thermal decomposition of transition metal complexed alkynes with aryl, alkyl, alkenyl, or alkynyl substituents. In particular, transition metal (e.g. Co, Ni, Fe, Mo) complexes of diarylacetylenes, e.g. diphenylacetylene, and solid mixtures of these complexes with suitable, additional carbon sources are heated in a vessel. More specifically, the heating of the transition metal complex is completed at a temperature between 400-800.degree. C. and more particularly 550-700.degree. C. for between 0.1 to 24 hours and more particularly 0.5-3 hours in a sealed vessel under a partial pressure of argon or helium.

  14. Voltammetric determination of theophylline at a Nafion/multi-wall carbon nanotubes composite film-modified glassy carbon electrode

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Suling Yang; Ran Yang; Gang Li; Jianjun Li; Lingbo Qu

    2010-11-01

    A Nafion/multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) composite film-modified electrode was fabricated and applied to the sensitive and convenient determination of theophylline (TP). Multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) were easily dispersed homogeneously into 0.1% Nafion methanol solution by sonication. Appropriate amount of Nafion/MWNTs suspension was coated on a glassy carbon electrode. After evaporating methanol, a Nafion/MWNTs composite film-modified electrode was achieved. TP could effectively accumulate at Nafion/MWNTs composite film-modified electrode and cause a sensitive anodic peak at around 1180 mV (vs SCE) in 0.01 mol/L H2SO4 medium (pH 1.8). In contrast with the bare glassy carbon electrode, Nafion film-modified electrode, Nafion/MWNTs film-modified electrode could remarkably increase the anodic peak current and decreased the overpotential of TP oxidation. Under the optimized conditions, the anodic peak current was proportional to TP concentration in the range of 8.0 × 10-8-6.0 × 10-5 mol/L, with a detection limit of 2.0 × 10-8 mol/L. This newly developed method was used to determine TP in drug samples with good percentage of recoveries.

  15. Piezoresistivity of mechanically drawn single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) thin films-: mechanism and optimizing principle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obitayo, Waris

    The individual carbon nanotube (CNT) based strain sensors have been found to have excellent piezoresistive properties with a reported gauge factor (GF) of up to 3000. This GF on the other hand, has been shown to be structurally dependent on the nanotubes. In contrast, to individual CNT based strain sensors, the ensemble CNT based strain sensors have very low GFs e.g. for a single walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) thin film strain sensor, GF is ~1. As a result, studies which are mostly numerical/analytical have revealed the dependence of piezoresistivity on key parameters like concentration, orientation, length and diameter, aspect ratio, energy barrier height and Poisson ratio of polymer matrix. The fundamental understanding of the piezoresistive mechanism in an ensemble CNT based strain sensor still remains unclear, largely due to discrepancies in the outcomes of these numerical studies. Besides, there have been little or no experimental confirmation of these studies. The goal of my PhD is to study the mechanism and the optimizing principle of a SWCNT thin film strain sensor and provide experimental validation of the numerical/analytical investigations. The dependence of the piezoresistivity on key parameters like orientation, network density, bundle diameter (effective tunneling area), and length is studied, and how one can effectively optimize the piezoresistive behavior of a SWCNT thin film strain sensors. To reach this goal, my first research accomplishment involves the study of orientation of SWCNTs and its effect on the piezoresistivity of mechanically drawn SWCNT thin film based piezoresistive sensors. Using polarized Raman spectroscopy analysis and coupled electrical-mechanical test, a quantitative relationship between the strain sensitivity and SWCNT alignment order parameter was established. As compared to randomly oriented SWCNT thin films, the one with draw ratio of 3.2 exhibited ~6x increase on the GF. My second accomplishment involves studying the

  16. Spray deposition of steam treated and functionalized single-walled and multi-walled carbon nanotube films for supercapacitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steam purified, carboxylic and ester functionalized single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) and multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWNT) films with homogeneous distribution and flexible control of thickness and area were fabricated on polymeric and metallic substrates using a modified spray deposition technique. By employing a pre-sprayed polyelectrolyte, the adhesion of the carbon nanotube (CNT) films to the substrates was significantly enhanced by electrostatic interaction. Carboxylic and ester functionalization improved electrochemical performance when immersed in 0.1 M H2SO4 and the specific capacitance reached 155 and 77 F g-1 for carboxylic functionalized SWNT and MWNT films respectively. Compared with existing techniques such as hot pressing, vacuum filtration and dip coating, the ambient pressure spray deposition technique is suggested as particularly well suited for preparing CNT films at large scale for applications including providing electrodes for electrochemical supercapacitors and paper batteries.

  17. Effect of Substrate Morphology on Growth and Field Emission Properties of Carbon Nanotube Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar Vikram

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstractCarbon nanotube (CNT films were grown by microwave plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition process on four types of Si substrates: (i mirror polished, (ii catalyst patterned, (iii mechanically polished having pits of varying size and shape, and (iv electrochemically etched. Iron thin film was used as catalytic material and acetylene and ammonia as the precursors. Morphological and structural characteristics of the films were investigated by scanning and transmission electron microscopes, respectively. CNT films of different morphology such as vertically aligned, randomly oriented flowers, or honey-comb like, depending on the morphology of the Si substrates, were obtained. CNTs had sharp tip and bamboo-like internal structure irrespective of growth morphology of the films. Comparative field emission measurements showed that patterned CNT films and that with randomly oriented morphology had superior emission characteristics with threshold field as low as ~2.0 V/μm. The defective (bamboo-structure structures of CNTs have been suggested for the enhanced emission performance of randomly oriented nanotube samples.

  18. Carbon nanotube network varactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Microelectromechanical system (MEMS) varactors based on a freestanding layer of single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) films were designed, fabricated and tested. The freestanding SWCNT film was employed as a movable upper patch in the parallel plate capacitor of the MEMS. The measurements of the SWCNT varactors show very high tunability, nearly 100%, of the capacitance with a low actuation voltage of 10 V. The functionality of the varactor is improved by implementing a flexible nanocellulose aerogel filling. (paper)

  19. Carbon nanotube network varactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Generalov, A. A.; Anoshkin, I. V.; Erdmanis, M.; Lioubtchenko, D. V.; Ovchinnikov, V.; Nasibulin, A. G.; Räisänen, A. V.

    2015-01-01

    Microelectromechanical system (MEMS) varactors based on a freestanding layer of single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) films were designed, fabricated and tested. The freestanding SWCNT film was employed as a movable upper patch in the parallel plate capacitor of the MEMS. The measurements of the SWCNT varactors show very high tunability, nearly 100%, of the capacitance with a low actuation voltage of 10 V. The functionality of the varactor is improved by implementing a flexible nanocellulose aerogel filling.

  20. Efficient coating of transparent and conductive carbon nanotube thin films on plastic substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew Ng, M H; Hartadi, Lysia T; Tan, Huiwen; Patrick Poa, C H

    2008-05-21

    Optically transparent and electrically conductive single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) thin films were fabricated at room temperature using a dip-coating technique. The film transparency and sheet resistance can be easily tailored by controlling the number of coatings. Aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTS) was used as an adhesion promoter and, together with surfactant Triton X-100, greatly improved the SWNTs coating. Only five coats were required to obtain a sheet resistance of 2.05 [Formula: see text] and film transparency of 84 %T. The dip-coated film after post-deposition treatment with nitric acid has a sheet resistance as low as 130 [Formula: see text] at 69 %T. This technique is suitable for large-scale SWNT coating at room temperature and can be used on different types of substrates such as glass and plastics. This paper will discuss the role of the adhesion promoter and surfactant in the coating process. PMID:21825746

  1. Highly conductive, transparent flexible films based on open rings of multi-walled carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Open rings of multi-walled carbon nanotubes were stacked to form porous networks on a poly(ethylene terephthalate) substrate to form a flexible conducting film (MWCNT-PET) with good electrical conductivity and transparency by a combination of ultrasonic atomization and spin-coating technique. To enhance the electric flexibility, we spin-coated a cast film of poly(vinyl alcohol) onto the MWCNT-PET substrate, which then underwent a thermo-compression process. Field-emission scanning electron microscopy of the cross-sectional morphology illustrates that the film has a robust network with a thickness of ∼ 175 nm, and it remarkably exhibits a sheet resistance of approximately 370 Ω/sq with ∼ 77% transmittance at 550 nm even after 500 bending cycles. This electrical conductivity is much superior to that of other MWCNT-based transparent flexible films.

  2. Investigation of carbon nanotube-containing film on silicon substrates and its tribological behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zhiyong; Cheng, Xianhua

    2015-11-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were functionalized with Lanthanum (La) modifier and appropriate acid-treatment methods. CNT-containing film was deposited on silicon substrates via a self-assembly process. The formation and microstructure of La treated CNTs and CNT-containing film were characterized by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray photoelectron spectrometry (XPS) and water contact angle (WCA). Its tribological properties were evaluated with a UMT-2MT reciprocating friction tester. The results show that CNTs were adsorbed on silicon substrates by means of chemically bonding between La and oxygen-containing functional groups. The friction coefficient of the silicon substrates is reduced from 0.87 to 0.12 after the deposition of CNT-containing film on its surface. CNT-containing film shows excellent antiwear, friction reducing ability and load-carrying capacity due to excellent mechanical and self-lubrication properties of CNTs.

  3. Fabrication and electrochemical properties of free-standing single-walled carbon nanotube film electrodes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Niu Zhi-Qiang; Ma Wen-Jun; Dong Hai-Bo; Li Jin-Zhu; Zhou Wei-Ya

    2011-01-01

    An easily manipulative approach was presented to fabricate electrodes using free-standing single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) films grown directly by chemical vapor deposition. Electrochemical properties of the electrodes were investigated. In comparison with the post-deposited SWCNT papers, the directly grown SWCNT film electrodes manifested enhanced electrochemical properties and sensitivity of sensors as well as excellent electrocatalytic activities. A transition from macroelectrode to nanoelectrode behaviours was observed with the increase of scan rate. The heat treatment of the SWCNT film electrodes increased the current signals of electrochemical analyser and background current, because the heat-treatment of the SWCNTs in air could create more oxide defects on the walls of the SWCNTs and make the surfaces of SWCNTs more hydrophilic. The excellent electrochemical properties of the directly grown and heat-treated free-standing SWCNT film electrodes show the potentials in biological and electrocatalytic applications.

  4. Efficient coating of transparent and conductive carbon nanotube thin films on plastic substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Optically transparent and electrically conductive single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) thin films were fabricated at room temperature using a dip-coating technique. The film transparency and sheet resistance can be easily tailored by controlling the number of coatings. Aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTS) was used as an adhesion promoter and, together with surfactant Triton X-100, greatly improved the SWNTs coating. Only five coats were required to obtain a sheet resistance of 2.05 Ω□ and film transparency of 84 %T. The dip-coated film after post-deposition treatment with nitric acid has a sheet resistance as low as 130 Ω□ at 69 %T. This technique is suitable for large-scale SWNT coating at room temperature and can be used on different types of substrates such as glass and plastics. This paper will discuss the role of the adhesion promoter and surfactant in the coating process

  5. A flexible graphene/multiwalled carbon nanotube film as a high performance electrode material for supercapacitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → A flexible graphene/multiwalled carbon nanotube (GN/MWCNT) film fabricated by flow-directed assembly and hydrazine to reduce. → The MWCNTs in the obtained composite film not only efficiently increase the basal spacing but also bridge the defects for electron transfer between GN sheets. → The freestanding GN/MWCNT film has a potential application in flexible energy storage devices. - Abstract: A flexible graphene/multiwalled carbon nanotube (GN/MWCNT) film has been fabricated by flow-directed assembly from a complex dispersion of graphite oxide (GO) and pristine MWCNTs followed by the use of gas-based hydrazine to reduce the GO into GN sheets. The GN/MWCNT (16 wt.% MWCNTs) film characterized by Fourier transformation infrared spectra, X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscope has a layered structure with MWCNTs uniformly sandwiched between the GN sheets. The MWCNTs in the obtained composite film not only efficiently increase the basal spacing but also bridge the defects for electron transfer between GN sheets, increasing electrolyte/electrode contact area and facilitating transportation of electrolyte ion and electron into the inner region of electrode. Electrochemical data demonstrate that the GN/MWCNT film possesses a specific capacitance of 265 F g-1 at 0.1 A g-1 and a good rate capability (49% capacity retention at 50 A g-1), and displays an excellent specific capacitance retention of 97% after 2000 continuous charge/discharge cycles. The results of electrochemical measurements indicate that the freestanding GN/MWCNT film has a potential application in flexible energy storage devices.

  6. Skin-like pressure and strain sensors based on transparent elastic films of carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipomi, Darren J.; Vosgueritchian, Michael; Tee, Benjamin C.-K.; Hellstrom, Sondra L.; Lee, Jennifer A.; Fox, Courtney H.; Bao, Zhenan

    2011-12-01

    Transparent, elastic conductors are essential components of electronic and optoelectronic devices that facilitate human interaction and biofeedback, such as interactive electronics, implantable medical devices and robotic systems with human-like sensing capabilities. The availability of conducting thin films with these properties could lead to the development of skin-like sensors that stretch reversibly, sense pressure (not just touch), bend into hairpin turns, integrate with collapsible, stretchable and mechanically robust displays and solar cells, and also wrap around non-planar and biological surfaces such as skin and organs, without wrinkling. We report transparent, conducting spray-deposited films of single-walled carbon nanotubes that can be rendered stretchable by applying strain along each axis, and then releasing this strain. This process produces spring-like structures in the nanotubes that accommodate strains of up to 150% and demonstrate conductivities as high as 2,200 S cm-1 in the stretched state. We also use the nanotube films as electrodes in arrays of transparent, stretchable capacitors, which behave as pressure and strain sensors.

  7. Synthesis and characterization of magnetic carbon nanotubes/silsesquioxane nanocomposite thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osorio, Alice Gonçalves; Machado, Geraldo Beyer; Pereira, Marcelo Barbalho; Benvenutti, Edilson Valmir; Pereira, Luis Gustavo; Bergmann, Carlos Perez; Oliveira, Artur Harres de; Costa, Tania Maria Haas

    2016-05-01

    In the present study, magnetic carbon nanotubes (CNTs)/silsesquioxane nanocomposites were produced by sol-gel method and deposited as thin film by dip-coating process. Blank films and films with CNTs were characterized in order to evaluate their chemical composition and morphology. Profilometry technique showed the formation of films with 305 ± 22 nm of thickness for blank samples (without CNTs) and 173 ± 05 nm thickness for samples with CNTs. Microscopy techniques indicated the presence of CNTs well dispersed in the films and, with the aid of Raman and Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy, chemical composition of silsesquioxane matrix was evidenced and the presence of CNTs was confirmed in the films. Finally, the magnetic response of the deposited films was analyzed by Alternating Gradient-Field Magnetometer and results indicated that films reinforced with CNTs showed a hysteresis loop that indicates a coercivity of 103 Oe and the blank film did not show any significant response to the field applied. Hence, the authors suggest that this hybrid organic-inorganic material has potential to be applied as a new material for magnetic storage.

  8. Monitoring structural defects and crystallinity of carbon nanotubes in thin films

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S S Mahajan; M D Bambole; S P Gokhale; A B Gaikwad

    2010-03-01

    We report the influence of catalyst formulation and reaction temperature on the formation of carbon nanotube (CNT) thin films by the chemical vapour deposition (CVD) method. Thin films of CNTs were grown on Fe–Mo/Al2O3-coated silicon wafer by thermal decomposition of methane at different temperatures ranging from 800 to 1000°C. The electron microscopic investigations, SEM as well as HRTEM, of the as-grown CNT thin films revealed the growth of uniform multi-walled CNTs in abundance. The intensity ratio of D-band to G-band and FWHM of G-band through Raman measurements clearly indicated the dependency of structural defects and crystallinity of CNTs in thin films on the catalyst formulation and CVD growth temperature. The results suggest that thin films of multi-walled CNTs with negligible amount of defects in the nanotube structure and very high crystallinity can be obtained by thermal CVD process at 925°C.

  9. Catalyst-assisted vertical growth of carbon nanotubes on Inconel coated commercial copper foil substrates versus sputtered copper films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have compared the growth of multi-walled carbon nanotubes using thermal chemical vapor deposition (CVD) on two types of substrates, copper foils and sputtered copper films. In both cases an initial 12 nm thin film of Inconel is first deposited on the Cu before growing the nanotubes. The Inconel thin film can act as both a catalyst for nanotube growth as well as a support for the additional Fe catalyst that is supplied in the form of ferrocene during CVD growth. The surfaces of the underlying copper substrates are very different and play a role in the resulting carbon nanotube density. A quantitative analysis of the density and alignment of the resulting carbon nanotubes using scanning electron microscopy shows that the smooth surface of the sputtered copper substrate leads to improvement in vertical growth and density of nanotubes as opposed to the much rougher electropolished Cu foil. We show that this is related to the differences in catalyst islands distributions and graphitic crystallinity seen on the surfaces of the two types of substrates after heating the samples in the CVD chamber. This demonstrates that the surface of the starting substrate plays an important role in the subsequent catalyst surface distribution and therefore the resulting nanotube density.

  10. Vacuum filtration based formation of liquid crystal films of semiconducting carbon nanotubes and high performance transistor devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, we report ultra-thin liquid crystal films of semiconducting carbon nanotubes using a simple vacuum filtration process. Vacuum filtration of nanotubes in aqueous surfactant solution formed nematic domains on the filter membrane surface and exhibited local ordering. A 2D fast Fourier transform was used to calculate the order parameters from scanning electron microscopy images. The order parameter was observed to be sensitive to the filtration time demonstrating different regions of transformation namely nucleation of nematic domains, nanotube accumulation and large domain growth.Transmittance versus sheet resistance measurements of such films resulted in optical to dc conductivity of σ opt/σ dc = 9.01 indicative of purely semiconducting nanotube liquid crystal network.Thin films of nanotube liquid crystals with order parameters ranging from S = 0.1–0.5 were patterned into conducting channels of transistor devices which showed high I on/I off ratios from 10–19 800 and electron mobility values μ e = 0.3–78.8 cm2 (V-s)−1, hole mobility values μ h = 0.4–287 cm2 (V-s)−1. High I on/I off ratios were observed at low order parameters and film mass. A Schottky barrier transistor model is consistent with the observed transistor characteristics. Electron and hole mobilities were seen to increase with order parameters and carbon nanotube mass fractions. A fundamental tradeoff between decreasing on/off ratio and increasing mobility with increasing nanotube film mass and order parameter is therefore concluded. Increase in order parameters of nanotubes liquid crystals improved the electronic transport properties as witnessed by the increase in σ dc/σ opt values on macroscopic films and high mobilities in microscopic transistors. Liquid crystal networks of semiconducting nanotubes as demonstrated here are simple to fabricate, transparent, scalable and could find wide ranging device applications. (papers)

  11. Interface study between nanostructured tantalum nitride films and carbon nanotubes grown by chemical vapour deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Our paper deals with the understanding of the carbon nanotubes growth parameters following the use of specific thin nitride buffer films. • For a large choice of buffer, we use ultra thin films elaborated by the very new method: high power pulsed magnetron sputtering; it allows a larger nitrogen incorporation in the films and lead to out of equilibrium phase formation. • Then by a multiscale investigation, developing a structural, a chemical and a morphology approach, we lead to some conclusion on the correlation between the phase transition for the buffer and morphology transition for the CNTs. • That is a new and deep approach. - Abstract: We present the role of nitrogen content in tantalum nitride ultra-thin buffers, on the carbon nanotubes (CNTs) growth by chemical vapour deposition at 850 °C, assisted by ferrocene as catalyst source. Tantalum nitride (TaNx) films with a very large range of concentration x = [0, 1.8] and various nanostructures, from amorphous Ta(N) to Ta3N5, were deposited by Highly Pulsed Plasma Magnetron Sputtering. The buffer films are characterized after heat treatment at 850 °C, and after the CNT growth, by wide angle X-ray scattering in grazing incidence and scanning electron microscopy. The CNT diameter explored by transition electron microscopy shows an all-out value for under stoichiometric thin films (Ta1-N1−δ, Ta3-N5−δ) and a minimum value just above the stoichiometric phases (Ta1-N1+δ, Ta3-N5+δ). Firstly one shows that the buffer films under the heat treatment present surface modification highly dependent on their initial state, which influences the catalyst particles diffusion. Secondly at the stoichiometric TaN phase we show that a specific ternary phase FeTa2O6 is formed at the interface CNT/buffer, not present in the other cases, leading to a special CNT growth condition

  12. Carbon nanotube/Prussian blue thin films as cathodes for flexible, transparent and ITO-free potassium secondary battery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nossol, Edson; Souza, Victor H R; Zarbin, Aldo J G

    2016-09-15

    Thin films of either unpurified single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) or iron-filled multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) were deposited through the liquid-liquid interfacial route over plastic substrates, yielding transparent, flexible and ITO-free electrodes. The iron species presented in both electrodes (inside of the MWCNT cavities or outside of the SWCNT bundles, related to the catalyst remaining of the growth process) were employed as reactant to the electrosynthesis of Prussian blue (PB), yielding carbon nanotubes/Prussian blue nanocomposite thin films, which were characterized by Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, cyclic voltammetry and galvanostatic charge/discharge measurements. The nanocomposite films were employed as cathodes for flexible, transparent and ITO-free potassium batteries, showing reversible charge/discharge behavior and specific capacitance of 8.3mAhcm(-3) and 2.7mAhcm(-3) for SWCNT/PB and MWCNT/PB, respectively. PMID:27288576

  13. Negative refraction and self-collimation in the far infrared with aligned carbon nanotube films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study demonstrates the far-infrared self-collimation and low-loss transmission of aligned carbon nanotube (CNT) films or arrays. The anisotropic dielectric functions of the CNT array is modeled using the effective medium theory considering the degree of alignment. The spectral regions where hyperbolic dispersion is satisfied are in the far-infrared. In the hyperbolic regime, energy propagates inside the CNT film along the optical axis for nearly all incidence angles. The self-collimation effect is also examined for tilted CNT thin films by tracing the Poynting vector trajectories. Low-loss transmission is explored to understand the impact of alignment on the penetration depth and transmission through the film. In conjunction with the surface radiative properties, the self-collimation and transmission characteristics are distinguished between the two hyperbolic bands of the CNT film. The insight obtained from this work may lead to the utilization of CNT arrays in polarization filtering and infrared imaging. - Highlights: • Demonstrated far-infrared hyperbolic metamaterials based on aligned CNTs. • Demonstrated negative energy refraction angle and loss-enhanced transmission. • Demonstrated self-collimation in CNT thin films through energy streamlines. • Predicted reflectance and penetration depth for tilted CNT films. • Investigated the angle-dependent transmittance of tilted CNT films

  14. An experimental study of nonlinear behaviour of capacitance in graphene/carbon nanotube hybrid films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsawafi, Suaad; Wang, Xiao; Jin, Jie; Song, Mo

    2016-06-01

    Graphene (G) and graphene oxide (GO)/carbon nanotubes (CNTs) hybrid films were fabricated as high performance electrode materials by a simple water solution casting method with different contents of single-wall CNT (SWCNT), multi wall CNT (MWCNT) and multi wall CNT with hydroxyl group (MWCNT-OH). The films with MWCNTs showed a layered, interconnected and well entangled structure at nano-scale. With increasing CNT contents, the capacitance of the G/MWCNT and GO/MWCNT films raised almost linearly and their resistance reduced. G/SWCNT and GO/SWCNT films did not form layered structures leading to a very low capacitance. Nonlinear behaviour of the capacitance with voltage has been observed in the G/MWCNT and GO/MWCNT hybrid films. The length and thickness of the hybrid film have significant influences on the capacitance. The capacitance and conductivity increase with increasing the thickness and decrease with increasing the length of the hybrid films. For the application of graphene/CNT hybrid films as electrodes, these characters could be taken into account.

  15. Swift heavy ion induced modifications of single walled carbon nanotube thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vishalli; Raina, K. K.; Avasthi, D. K.; Srivastava, Alok; Dharamvir, Keya

    2016-04-01

    Thin films of single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) were prepared by Langmuir-Blodgett method and irradiated with swift heavy ions, carbon and nickel each of energy 60 MeV. The ion beams have different electronic energy loss (Se) values and the samples were exposed to various irradiation doses. The irradiated films were characterized using Raman and optical absorption spectroscopy. Raman spectroscopy results indicate the competing processes of defect creation and healing (annealing) of SWCNTs at lower fluences, while at higher fluences defect creation or damage dominates. In UV-Vis-NIR spectroscopy we find that there is decrease in the intensity of characteristic peaks with every increasing fluence, indicating decrease in the optically active states with irradiation.

  16. Multi-walled Carbon Nanotube Film Sensor for Ethanol Gas Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongzhi Zhang

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWNTs film-based sensor on the substrate of printed circuit board (PCB with interdigital electrodes (IDE were fabricated using layer-by-layer self-assembly, and the electrical properties of MWNTs film sensor were investigated through establishing models involved with number of self-assembled layers and IDE finger gap, and also its ethanol gas-sensing properties with varying gas concentration are characterized at room temperature.Through comparing with the thermal evaporation method, the experiment results shown that the layer-by-layer self-assembled MWNTs film sensor have a faster response and more sensitive resistance change when exposed to ethanol gas, indicated a prospective application for ethanol gas detection with high performance and low-cost.

  17. High-precision micropipette thermal sensor for measurement of thermal conductivity of carbon nanotubes thin film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, Ramesh

    The thesis describes novel glass micropipette thermal sensor fabricated in cost-effective manner and thermal conductivity measurement of carbon nanotubes (CNT) thin film using the developed sensor. Various micrometer-sized sensors, which range from 2 microm to 30 microm, were produced and tested. The capability of the sensor in measuring thermal fluctuation at micro level with an estimated resolution of +/-0.002°C is demonstrated. The sensitivity of sensors was recorded from 3.34 to 8.86 microV/°C, which is independent of tip size and dependent on the coating of Nickel. The detailed experimental setup for thermal conductivity measurement of CNT film is discussed and 73.418 W/m°C was determined as the thermal conductivity of the CNT film at room temperature.

  18. Fabrication of flexible transparent conductive films from long double-walled carbon nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoki Imazu

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The fabrication of flexible transparent conducting films (TCFs is important for the development of the next-generation flexible devices. In this study, we used double-walled carbon nanotubes (DWCNTs as the starting material and described a fabrication method of flexible TCFs. We have determined in a quantitative way that the key factors are the length and the dispersion states of the DWCNTs as well as the weight-ratios of dispersant polymer/DWCNTs. By controlling such factors, we have readily fabricated a flexible highly transparent (94% transmittance and conductive (surface resistivity = 320 Ω sq−1 DWCNT film without adding any chemical doping that is often used to reduce the surface resistivity. By applying a wet coating, we have succeeded in the fabrication of large-scale conducting transparent DWCNT films based on the role-to-role method.

  19. Densely Packed Linear Assembles of Carbon Nanotube Bundles in Polysiloxane-Based Nanocomposite Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-Baek Cho

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Linear assemblies of carbon nanotubes (LACNTs were fabricated and controlled in polysiloxane-based nanocomposite films and the effects of the LACNTs on the thermal and electrical properties of the films were investigated. CNTs were dispersed by mechanical stirring and sonication in a prepolymer of polysiloxane. Homogeneous suspensions were cast on polyamide spacers and oriented by linear-assembly by applying DC and switching DC electric fields before the mixture became cross-linked. Densely packed LACNTs that fixed the composite film surfaces were fabricated with various structures and thicknesses that depended on the DC and switching DC conditions. Polymer nanocomposites with different LACNT densities exhibited enhanced thermal and electrical conductivities and high optical transmittances. They are considered promising structural materials for electronic sectors in automotive and aerospace applications.

  20. Electrical conductivity and electromagnetic interference shielding characteristics of multiwalled carbon nanotube filled polyurethane composite films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son Hoang, Anh

    2011-06-01

    Multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were homogeneously dispersed in a pure polyurethane resin by grinding in a planetary ball mill. The structure and surface morphology of the MWCNTs and MWCNT/polyurethane composites were studied by filed emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) methods. The electrical conductivity at room temperature and electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding effectiveness (SE) of the composite films with different MWCNT loadings were investigated and the measurement of EMI SE was carried out in a frequency range of 8–12 GHz (X-band). The experimental results show that with a low MWCNT concentration the composite films could achieve a high conductivity and their EMI SE has a strong dependence on MWCNT content. For the composite films with 22 wt% of MWCNTs, the EMI SE attained an average value of 20 dB, so that the shielding effect reduced the penetrating power to 1%.

  1. High-performance carbon nanotube thin-film transistors on flexible paper substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Na; Yun, Ki Nam; Yu, Hyun-Yong; Lee, Cheol Jin, E-mail: cjlee@korea.ac.kr [School of Electrical Engineering, Korea University, Seoul 136-713 (Korea, Republic of); Shim, Joon Hyung [School of Mechanical Engineering, Korea University, Seoul 136-713 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-03-09

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) are promising materials as active channels for flexible transistors owing to their excellent electrical and mechanical properties. However, flexible SWCNT transistors have never been realized on paper substrates, which are widely used, inexpensive, and recyclable. In this study, we fabricated SWCNT thin-film transistors on photo paper substrates. The devices exhibited a high on/off current ratio of more than 10{sup 6} and a field-effect mobility of approximately 3 cm{sup 2}/V·s. The proof-of-concept demonstration indicates that SWCNT transistors on flexible paper substrates could be applied as low-cost and recyclable flexible electronics.

  2. High-performance carbon nanotube thin-film transistors on flexible paper substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) are promising materials as active channels for flexible transistors owing to their excellent electrical and mechanical properties. However, flexible SWCNT transistors have never been realized on paper substrates, which are widely used, inexpensive, and recyclable. In this study, we fabricated SWCNT thin-film transistors on photo paper substrates. The devices exhibited a high on/off current ratio of more than 106 and a field-effect mobility of approximately 3 cm2/V·s. The proof-of-concept demonstration indicates that SWCNT transistors on flexible paper substrates could be applied as low-cost and recyclable flexible electronics

  3. Synthesis and investigation of PMMA films with homogeneously dispersed multiwalled carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNT) modified by 2.2′-azoiso-butyronitrile (AIBN) were incorporated into methyl methacrylate (MMA) by sonochemistry method, resulting in homogenous dispersion of MWNT, which makes possible to obtain flexible conductive polymer-matrix nanocomposites films of PMMA, with MWNT concentrations ranging from 0 to 0.5 wt%. Modified MWNT (AIBN-MWNT) were studied by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR), Raman spectroscopy, X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) and through visual observations in order to compare the dispersion in 2-propanone and toluene with that of pristine MWNT. Synthesized PMMA-AIBN-MWNT films were studied by FT-IR and Raman spectroscopy. Using FT-IR for the AIBN-MWNT it was not possible to identify any group or groups attached to the nanotubes. Raman spectroscopy shows a small modification in the Lorentzian peaks ratio ID/G of AIBN-MWNT, meanwhile XPS showed that atomic compositions does not change for AIBN-MWNT compared to the pristine nanotubes. Also by impedance it was analyzed the conductivity of PMMA-MWNT films and the results showed a threshold percolation at 0.5 wt%. FT-IR and Raman analyses for PMMA-AIBN-MWNT composite indicate a covalent bonding between PMMA and MWNT due to the opening of π-bonds of the nanotubes, which is related with a possible proposed reaction scheme. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • We used sonochemistry-in situ polymerization to disperse MWNT very soon in PMMA. • A high and homogenous dispersion of MWNT in PMMA was achieved. • The modification of MWNT by AIBN was analyzed using Raman. • A covalent bonding between PMMA and MWNT was analyzed by FT-IR and Raman. • According to the results of PMMA-MWNT it was proposed a scheme reaction

  4. Synthesis and investigation of PMMA films with homogeneously dispersed multiwalled carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pantoja-Castro, M.A., E-mail: m_pantojaq@yahoo.com.mx [Facultad de Ingeniería Química, Universidad Michoacana de San Nicolás de Hidalgo, Av. J. Múgica S/N Col., Villa Universidad, CP 58040 Morelia, Michoacán (Mexico); Pérez-Robles, J.F. [Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados del IPN, Unidad Querétaro, Libramiento Norponiente #2000, Fracc. Real de Juriquilla, CP 76230 Querétaro (Mexico); González-Rodríguez, H. [Facultad de Ingeniería Química, Universidad Michoacana de San Nicolás de Hidalgo, Av. J. Múgica S/N Col., Villa Universidad, CP 58040 Morelia, Michoacán (Mexico); Vorobiev-Vasilievitch, Y. [Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados del IPN, Unidad Querétaro, Libramiento Norponiente #2000, Fracc. Real de Juriquilla, CP 76230 Querétaro (Mexico); Martínez-Tejada, H.V. [Instituto de Energía, Materiales y Medio Ambiente, Universidad Pontificia Bolivariana, Circular 1 No. 70-01, Bloque 22, Medellín (Colombia); Velasco-Santos, C. [Centro de Física Aplicada y Tecnología Avanzada, Universidad Autónoma de México, Av. Boulevard Juriquilla, No. 3001 Juriquilla, CP 76230 Querétaro (Mexico)

    2013-07-15

    Multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNT) modified by 2.2′-azoiso-butyronitrile (AIBN) were incorporated into methyl methacrylate (MMA) by sonochemistry method, resulting in homogenous dispersion of MWNT, which makes possible to obtain flexible conductive polymer-matrix nanocomposites films of PMMA, with MWNT concentrations ranging from 0 to 0.5 wt%. Modified MWNT (AIBN-MWNT) were studied by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR), Raman spectroscopy, X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) and through visual observations in order to compare the dispersion in 2-propanone and toluene with that of pristine MWNT. Synthesized PMMA-AIBN-MWNT films were studied by FT-IR and Raman spectroscopy. Using FT-IR for the AIBN-MWNT it was not possible to identify any group or groups attached to the nanotubes. Raman spectroscopy shows a small modification in the Lorentzian peaks ratio I{sub D/G} of AIBN-MWNT, meanwhile XPS showed that atomic compositions does not change for AIBN-MWNT compared to the pristine nanotubes. Also by impedance it was analyzed the conductivity of PMMA-MWNT films and the results showed a threshold percolation at 0.5 wt%. FT-IR and Raman analyses for PMMA-AIBN-MWNT composite indicate a covalent bonding between PMMA and MWNT due to the opening of π-bonds of the nanotubes, which is related with a possible proposed reaction scheme. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • We used sonochemistry-in situ polymerization to disperse MWNT very soon in PMMA. • A high and homogenous dispersion of MWNT in PMMA was achieved. • The modification of MWNT by AIBN was analyzed using Raman. • A covalent bonding between PMMA and MWNT was analyzed by FT-IR and Raman. • According to the results of PMMA-MWNT it was proposed a scheme reaction.

  5. Continuous Carbon Nanotube-Based Fibers and Films for Applications Requiring Enhanced Heat Dissipation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Peng; Fan, Zeng; Mikhalchan, Anastasiia; Tran, Thang Q; Jewell, Daniel; Duong, Hai M; Marconnet, Amy M

    2016-07-13

    The production of continuous carbon nanotube (CNT) fibers and films has paved the way to leverage the superior properties of individual carbon nanotubes for novel macroscale applications such as electronic cables and multifunctional composites. In this manuscript, we synthesize fibers and films from CNT aerogels that are continuously grown by floating catalyst chemical vapor deposition (FCCVD) and measure thermal conductivity and natural convective heat transfer coefficient from the fiber and film. To probe the mechanisms of heat transfer, we develop a new, robust, steady-state thermal characterization technique that enables measurement of the intrinsic fiber thermal conductivity and the convective heat transfer coefficient from the fiber to the surrounding air. The thermal conductivity of the as-prepared fiber ranges from 4.7 ± 0.3 to 28.0 ± 2.4 W m(-1) K(-1) and depends on fiber volume fraction and diameter. A simple nitric acid treatment increases the thermal conductivity by as much as a factor of ∼3 for the fibers and ∼6.7 for the thin films. These acid-treated CNT materials demonstrate specific thermal conductivities significantly higher than common metals with the same absolute thermal conductivity, which means they are comparatively lightweight, thermally conductive fibers and films. Beyond thermal conductivity, the acid treatment enhances electrical conductivity by a factor of ∼2.3. Further, the measured convective heat transfer coefficients range from 25 to 200 W m(-2) K(-1) for all fibers, which is higher than expected for macroscale materials and demonstrates the impact of the nanoscale CNT features on convective heat losses from the fibers. The measured thermal and electrical performance demonstrates the promise for using these fibers and films in macroscale applications requiring effective heat dissipation. PMID:27322344

  6. A comparative analysis of thin-film transistors using aligned and random-network carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duan Yan [School of Engineering and Computer Science, Washington State University, Mechanical Engineering (United States); Juhala, Jason L.; Griffith, Benjamin W. [School of Engineering and Computer Science, Washington State University, Electrical Engineering (United States); Xue Wei, E-mail: wxue@wsu.edu [School of Engineering and Computer Science, Washington State University, Mechanical Engineering (United States)

    2013-03-15

    The purpose of this project is to investigate the characterization of carbon nanotube (CNT) thin-film transistors based on two solution-based fabrication methods: dielectrophoretic deposition of aligned CNTs and self-assembly of random-network CNTs. The electrical characteristics of aligned and random-network CNT transistors are studied comparatively. In particular, the selection effect of metallic and semiconducting CNTs in the dielectrophoresis process is evaluated experimentally by comparing the output characteristics of the two transistors. Our results demonstrate that the self-assembly method produces a stronger field effect with a much higher on/off ratio (I{sub on}/I{sub off}). This phenomenon provides evidence that the metallic CNTs are more responsive to dielectrophoretic forces than their semiconducting counterparts under common deposition conditions. In addition, the nanotube-nanotube cross-junctions in random-network CNT films create additional energy barriers and result in a reduced electric current. Thus, additional consideration must be applied when using different fabrication methods in building CNT-based electronic devices.

  7. Steady heat conduction-based thermal conductivity measurement of single walled carbon nanotubes thin film using a micropipette thermal sensor

    OpenAIRE

    R. Shrestha; Lee, K. M.; Chang, W. S.; Kim, D. S.; Rhee, G H; Choi, T. Y.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we describe the thermal conductivity measurement of single-walled carbon nanotubes thin film using a laser point source-based steady state heat conduction method. A high precision micropipette thermal sensor fabricated with a sensing tip size varying from 2 μm to 5 μm and capable of measuring thermal fluctuation with resolution of ±0.01 K was used to measure the temperature gradient across the suspended carbon nanotubes (CNT) film with a thickness of 100 nm. We used a steady he...

  8. Light-induced vibration characteristics of free-standing carbon nanotube films fabricated by vacuum filtration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Junying; Zhu, Yong, E-mail: yongzhu@cqu.edu.cn; Wang, Ning; Zhang, Jie [The Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Technology and System, Education Ministry of China, Chongqing University, Chongqing, 400044 (China); Wang, Xin [State Key Laboratory of Electronic Thin Films and Integrated Devices, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu, 610054 (China)

    2014-07-14

    In this paper, we fabricated carbon nanotube (CNT) films with different thickness by vacuum filtration method, and the films were separated from Mixed Cellulose Ester membranes with burn-off process. The thickness of CNT films with different concentrations of CNTs 50 mg, 100 mg, 150 mg, and 200 mg are 10.36 μm, 20.90 μm, 30.19 μm, and 39.98 μm respectively. The CNT bundles are homogeneously distributed and entangled with each other, and still maintain 2D continuous network structures after burn-off process. The optical absorptivity of the films is between 84% and 99% at wavelengths ranging from 400 nm to 2500 nm. Vibration characteristics were measured with the Fabry-Perot (F-P) interferometer vibration measurement system. CNT films vibrate only under the xenon light irradiating perpendicularly to the surface. Vibration recorded by Fabry-Perot interferometer is considered to be caused by the time-dependent thermal moment, which is due to the temperature differences of two sides of CNT films. The vibration frequency spectrums between 0.1 ∼ 0.5 Hz were obtained by the Fast Fourier Transform spectra from time domain to frequency domain, and showed a linear relationship with films thickness, which is in accordance with theoretical model of thermal induced vibration.

  9. Microcontact printing for patterning carbon nanotube/polymer composite films with electrical conductivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogihara, Hitoshi; Kibayashi, Hiro; Saji, Tetsuo

    2012-09-26

    Patterned carbon nanotube (CNT)/acrylic resin composite films were prepared using microcontact printing (μCP). To prepare ink for μCP, CNTs were dispersed into propylene glycol monomethyl ether acetate (PGMEA) solution in which acrylic resin and a commercially available dispersant (Disperbyk-2001) dissolved. The resulting ink were spin-coated onto poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) stamps. By drying solvent components from the ink, CNT/polymer composite films were prepared over PDMS stamps. Contact between the stamps and glass substrates provided CNT/polymer composite patternings on the substrates. The transfer behavior of the CNT/polymer composite films depended on the thermal-treatment temperature during μCP; thermal treatment at temperatures near the glass-transition temperature (T(g)) of the acrylic resin was effective to form uniform patternings on substrates. Moreover, contact area between polymer and substrates also affect the transfer behavior. The CNT/polymer composite films showed high electrical conductivity, despite the nonconductivity of polymer components, because CNTs in the films were interconnected. The electrical conductivity of the composite films increased as CNT content in the film became higher; as a result, the composite patternings showed almost as high electrical conductivity as previously reported CNT/polymer bulk composites. PMID:22900673

  10. Light-induced vibration characteristics of free-standing carbon nanotube films fabricated by vacuum filtration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, we fabricated carbon nanotube (CNT) films with different thickness by vacuum filtration method, and the films were separated from Mixed Cellulose Ester membranes with burn-off process. The thickness of CNT films with different concentrations of CNTs 50 mg, 100 mg, 150 mg, and 200 mg are 10.36 μm, 20.90 μm, 30.19 μm, and 39.98 μm respectively. The CNT bundles are homogeneously distributed and entangled with each other, and still maintain 2D continuous network structures after burn-off process. The optical absorptivity of the films is between 84% and 99% at wavelengths ranging from 400 nm to 2500 nm. Vibration characteristics were measured with the Fabry-Perot (F-P) interferometer vibration measurement system. CNT films vibrate only under the xenon light irradiating perpendicularly to the surface. Vibration recorded by Fabry-Perot interferometer is considered to be caused by the time-dependent thermal moment, which is due to the temperature differences of two sides of CNT films. The vibration frequency spectrums between 0.1 ∼ 0.5 Hz were obtained by the Fast Fourier Transform spectra from time domain to frequency domain, and showed a linear relationship with films thickness, which is in accordance with theoretical model of thermal induced vibration.

  11. Luminescence of carbon nanotube bulbs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI ChuanGang; WU DeHai; WANG KunLin; WEI JinQuan; WEI BingQing; ZHU HongWei; WANG ZhiCheng; LUO JianBin; LIU WenJin; ZHENG MingXin

    2007-01-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) bulbs made of decimeter-scale double-walled carbon nanotube (DWCNT) strands and films were fabricated and their luminescence properties, including the lighting efficiency, voltage-current relation and thermal stability were investigated. The results show that the DWCNT bulb has a comparable spectrum of visible light with tungsten bulb and its average efficiency is 40% higher than that of a tungsten filament at the same temperature (1400-2300 K). The nanotube filaments show both resistance and thermal stability over a large temperature region. No obvious damage was found for a nanotube bulb illuminating at 2300 K for more than 24 hours in vacuum.

  12. Third Sound Generation in Superfluid 4He Films Adsorbed on Multiwall Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iaia, Vito; Menachekanian, Emin; Williams, Gary

    2014-03-01

    A technique is developed for generating third sound in superfluid 4He films coating the surface of multiwall carbon nanotubes. Third sound is a thickness and temperature wave of the helium film, and in our case we detect the temperature oscillations with a carbon resistance bolometer. The nanotubes are packed in an annular resonator that is vibrated with a mechanical shaker assembly consisting of a permanent magnet mounted on springs, and surrounded by a superconducting coil. The coil is driven with an oscillating current, vibrating the cell at that frequency. Sweeping the drive frequency over the range 100-200 Hz excites the resonant third sound mode of the cell, seen as a high-Q signal in the FFT analysis of the bolometer signal. A problem with our original cell was that the mechanical drive would also shake the dilution refrigerator cooling the cell to low temperatures, and increasing the drive would start to heat up the refrigerator and the cell, which were rigidly coupled together. A new configuration now suspends the cell as a pendulum on a string, with thermal contact made by copper wires. Piezo sensor measurements show this reduces the vibration reaching the refrigerator by two orders of magnitude, which should allow measurements at lower temperatures.

  13. Conducting polymer film-based immunosensors using carbon nanotube/antibodies doped polypyrrole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, Phuong Dinh; Hieu, Nguyen Van

    2011-09-01

    Carbon nanotube/polypyrrole/antibodies polymer films were synthesized successfully on microelectrodes by electrochemical deposition. Electropolymerization was performed at optimal range between -0.8 and +0.8 V at a scan rate of 50 mV s-1 in an electrochemical mini-cell containing monomer pyrroles, carbon nanotubes, and goat IgGs. The conducting polymer films were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectrometry, Raman spectra, and Field emission scanning electron microscopy. And then, it was prepared for immunosensor application to determine anti-goat IgGs. The results show that a linear range between 0.05 and 0.7 μg ml-1 for anti-goat IgGs detection was observed for immunosensor, a detection limit as low as 0.05 μg ml-1 and a response time of 1 min. The effect parameters of electropolymerization process on immunosensor response are also studied. It found that the immunosensor well active in 1.5 mg ml-1 CNT concentration, 2.5 mM pyrrole, 10 μg ml-1 goat IgGs.

  14. Conducting polymer film-based immunosensors using carbon nanotube/antibodies doped polypyrrole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon nanotube/polypyrrole/antibodies polymer films were synthesized successfully on microelectrodes by electrochemical deposition. Electropolymerization was performed at optimal range between -0.8 and +0.8 V at a scan rate of 50 mV s-1 in an electrochemical mini-cell containing monomer pyrroles, carbon nanotubes, and goat IgGs. The conducting polymer films were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectrometry, Raman spectra, and Field emission scanning electron microscopy. And then, it was prepared for immunosensor application to determine anti-goat IgGs. The results show that a linear range between 0.05 and 0.7 μg ml-1 for anti-goat IgGs detection was observed for immunosensor, a detection limit as low as 0.05 μg ml-1 and a response time of 1 min. The effect parameters of electropolymerization process on immunosensor response are also studied. It found that the immunosensor well active in 1.5 mg ml-1 CNT concentration, 2.5 mM pyrrole, 10 μg ml-1 goat IgGs.

  15. Increasing mouse embryonic fibroblast cells adhesion on superhydrophilic vertically aligned carbon nanotube films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have analyzed the adhesion of mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) genetically modified by green fluorescence protein (GFP) gene cultured on vertically-aligned carbon nanotubes (VACNTs) after 6 days. The VACNTs films grown on Ti were obtained by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition process using Fe catalyst and submitted to an oxygen plasma treatment, for 2 min, at 400 V and 80 mTorr, to convert them to superhydrophilic. Cellular adhesion and morphology were analyzed by scanning electron, fluorescence microscopy, and thermodynamics analysis. Characterizations of superhydrophilic VACNTs films were evaluated by contact angle and X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy. Differences of crowd adhered cells, as well as their spreading on superhydrophilic VACNTs scaffolds, were evaluated using focal adhesion analysis. This study was the first to demonstrate, in real time, that the wettability of VACNTs scaffolds might have enhanced and differential adherence patterns to the MEF-GFP on VACNTs substrates. Highlights: → A simple oxygen plasma treatment was used to obtain superhydrophilic CNT films. → Superhydrophilic CNTs films were successfully produced by incorporation of carboxylic groups. → Cellular adhesion on superhydrophilic VACNT films was analyzed in real time. → Wettability of CNT films directly affects the cellular migration, proliferation and adhesion.

  16. Increasing mouse embryonic fibroblast cells adhesion on superhydrophilic vertically aligned carbon nanotube films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lobo, A.O., E-mail: loboao@yahoo.com [Laboratory of Biomedical Nanotechnology (NanoBio), Instituto de Pesquisa e Desenvolvimento (IP and D), Universidade do Vale do Paraiba UniVap, Avenida Shishima Hifumi 2911, Sao Jose dos Campos, 12244-000, SP (Brazil) and Laboratory of Biomedical Vibrational Spectroscopy (LEVB), Instituto de Pesquisa e Desenvolvimento (IP and D), Universidade do Vale do Paraiba UniVap, Avenida Shishima Hifumi 2911, Sao Jose dos Campos, 12244-000, SP (Brazil); Marciano, F.R. [Laboratory of Biomedical Nanotechnology (NanoBio), Instituto de Pesquisa e Desenvolvimento (IP and D), Universidade do Vale do Paraiba UniVap, Avenida Shishima Hifumi 2911, Sao Jose dos Campos, 12244-000, SP (Brazil); Laboratory of Biomedical Vibrational Spectroscopy LEVB, Instituto de Pesquisa e Desenvolvimento (IP and D), Universidade do Vale do Paraiba (UniVap), Avenida Shishima Hifumi 2911, Sao Jose dos Campos, 12244-000, SP (Brazil); Ramos, S.C. [Laboratorio Associado de Sensores e Materiais (LAS), Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais (INPE), Avenida dos Astronautas 1758, Sao Jose dos Campos, 12.245-970, SP (Brazil); Machado, M.M. [Centro Multidisciplinar para Investigacao Biologica na Area da Ciencia em Animais de Laboratorio (CEMIB), Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), Rua 05 de Junho s/no, Cidade Universitaria ' Zeferino Vaz' , 13083-877, Campinas (Brazil); Corat, E.J. [Laboratorio Associado de Sensores e Materiais (LAS), Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais (INPE), Avenida dos Astronautas 1758, Sao Jose dos Campos, 12.245-970, SP (Brazil); Corat, M.A.F. [Centro Multidisciplinar para Investigacao Biologica na Area da Ciencia em Animais de Laboratorio (CEMIB), Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), Rua 05 de Junho s/no, Cidade Universitaria ' Zeferino Vaz' , 13083-877, Campinas (Brazil)

    2011-10-10

    We have analyzed the adhesion of mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) genetically modified by green fluorescence protein (GFP) gene cultured on vertically-aligned carbon nanotubes (VACNTs) after 6 days. The VACNTs films grown on Ti were obtained by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition process using Fe catalyst and submitted to an oxygen plasma treatment, for 2 min, at 400 V and 80 mTorr, to convert them to superhydrophilic. Cellular adhesion and morphology were analyzed by scanning electron, fluorescence microscopy, and thermodynamics analysis. Characterizations of superhydrophilic VACNTs films were evaluated by contact angle and X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy. Differences of crowd adhered cells, as well as their spreading on superhydrophilic VACNTs scaffolds, were evaluated using focal adhesion analysis. This study was the first to demonstrate, in real time, that the wettability of VACNTs scaffolds might have enhanced and differential adherence patterns to the MEF-GFP on VACNTs substrates. Highlights: {yields} A simple oxygen plasma treatment was used to obtain superhydrophilic CNT films. {yields} Superhydrophilic CNTs films were successfully produced by incorporation of carboxylic groups. {yields} Cellular adhesion on superhydrophilic VACNT films was analyzed in real time. {yields} Wettability of CNT films directly affects the cellular migration, proliferation and adhesion.

  17. Multi-Directional Growth of Aligned Carbon Nanotubes Over Catalyst Film Prepared by Atomic Layer Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Kai

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The structure of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs severely depends on the properties of pre-prepared catalyst films. Aiming for the preparation of precisely controlled catalyst film, atomic layer deposition (ALD was employed to deposit uniform Fe2O3 film for the growth of CNT arrays on planar substrate surfaces as well as the curved ones. Iron acetylacetonate and ozone were introduced into the reactor alternately as precursors to realize the formation of catalyst films. By varying the deposition cycles, uniform and smooth Fe2O3 catalyst films with different thicknesses were obtained on Si/SiO2 substrate, which supported the growth of highly oriented few-walled CNT arrays. Utilizing the advantage of ALD process in coating non-planar surfaces, uniform catalyst films can also be successfully deposited onto quartz fibers. Aligned few-walled CNTs can be grafted on the quartz fibers, and they self-organized into a leaf-shaped structure due to the curved surface morphology. The growth of aligned CNTs on non-planar surfaces holds promise in constructing hierarchical CNT architectures in future.

  18. Influence of duration time of CVD process on emissive properties of carbon nanotubes films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stępinska Izabela

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper various types of films made of carbon nanotubes (CNTs are presented. These films were prepared on different substrates (Al2O3, Si n-type by the two-step method. The two-step method consists of physical vapor deposition step, followed by chemical vapor deposition step (PVD/CVD. Parameters of PVD process were the same for all initial films, while the duration times of the second step - the CVD process, were different (15, 30 min.. Prepared films were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM, transmission electron microscopy (TEM and field emission (FE measurements. The I-E and F-N characteristics of electron emission were discussed in terms of various forms of CNT films. The value of threshold electric field ranged from few V/μm (for CNT dispersed rarely on the surface of the film deposited on Si up to ~20 V/μm (for Al2O3 substrate.

  19. Microfabrication and characterization of spray-coated single-wall carbon nanotube film strain gauges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present the design, fabrication, and characterization results of single-wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) film strain gauges for potential applications as highly sensitive strain, weight, or pressure sensors on the macro-scale. A batch microfabrication process was developed for practical device construction and packaging using spray-coated SWCNTs and a conventional semiconductor process. The prototype was characterized using a commercial metal foil gauge with tensile and compressive testing on a binocular load cell. Our test results demonstrated that the proposed SWCNT film gauges have a linear relationship between resistance changes and externally applied strain. The gauge factor ranged from 7.0 to 16.4 for four different micro-grid configurations, indicating that the maximum strain sensitivity of the prototype was approximately eight times greater than that of commercial gauges.

  20. Portable cholesterol detection with polyaniline-carbon nanotube film based interdigitated electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polyaniline-carboxylic multiwalled carbon nanotubes composite film (PANi-MWCNT) has been polymerized on the surface of interdigitated platinum electrode (fabricated by MEMS technology) which was compatibly connected to Autolab interface via universal serial bus (USB). An amperometric biosensor based on covalent immobilization of cholesterol oxidase (ChOx) on PANi–MWCNT film with potassium ferricyanide (FeCN) as the redox mediator was developed. The mediator helps to shuttle the electrons between the immobilized ChOx and the PANi-MWCNT electrode, therefore operating at a low potential of −0.3 V compared to the saturated calomel electrode (SCE). This potential precludes the interfering compounds from oxidization. The bio-electrode exhibits good linearity from 0.02 to 1.2 mM cholesterol concentration with a correlation coefficient of 0.9985

  1. Fabrication and electrochemical capacitance of hierarchical graphene/polyaniline/carbon nanotube ternary composite film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: A hierarchical film with coaxial polyaniline/carbon nanotube (PANI/CNT) nanocables uniformly sandwiched between graphene (GN) sheets was prepared by filtration of the complex dispersion of graphite oxide (GO) and PANI/CNT. Highlights: → A film composed of GN sheets, PANI and CNTs was fabricated. → The coaxial PANI/CNT nanocables uniformly sandwiched between the GN sheets. → The unique structure facilitates contact between electrolyte and electrode materials. → Each component provides unique function to achieve superior electrochemical properties. - Abstract: A film composed of graphene (GN) sheets, polyaniline (PANI) and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) has been fabricated by reducing a graphite oxide (GO)/PANI/CNT precursor prepared by flow-directed assembly from a complex dispersion of GO and PANI/CNT, followed by reoxidation and redoping of the reduced PANI in the composite to restore the conducting PANI structure. Scanning electron microscope images indicate that the ternary composite film is a layered structure with coaxial PANI/CNT nanocables uniformly sandwiched between the GN sheets. Such novel hierarchical structure with high electrical conductivity perfectly facilitates contact between electrolyte ions and PANI for faradaic energy storage and efficiently utilizes the double-layer capacitance at the electrode-electrolyte interfaces. The specific capacitance of the GN/PANI/CNT estimated by galvanostatic charge/discharge measurement is 569 F g-1 (or 188 F cm-3 for volumetric capacitance) at a current density of 0.1 A g-1. In addition, the GN/PANI/CNT exhibits good rate capability (60% capacity retention at 10 A g-1) and superior cycling stability (4% fade after 5000 continuous charge/discharge cycles).

  2. Third sound measurements of superfluid 4He films on multiwall carbon nanotubes below 1 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Third sound is studied for superfluid films of 4He adsorbed on multiwall carbon nanotubes packed into an annular resonator. The third sound is generated with mechanical oscillation of the cell, and detected with carbon bolometers. A filling curve at temperatures near 250 mK shows oscillations in the third sound velocity, with maxima at the completion of the 4th and 5th atomic layers. Sharp changes in the Q factor of the third sound are found at partial layer fillings. Temperature sweeps at a number of fill points show strong broadening effects on the Kosterlitz-Thouless (KT) transition, and rapidly increasing dissipation, in qualitative agreement with the predictions of Machta and Guyer. At the 4th layer completion there is a sudden reduction of the transition temperature TKT, and then a recovery back to linear variation with temperature, although the slope is considerably smaller than the KT prediction

  3. Studies of Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caneba, Gerard T.

    2005-01-01

    The fellowship experience for this summer for 2004 pertains to carbon nanotube coatings for various space-related applications. They involve the following projects: (a) EMI protection films from HiPco-polymers, and (b) Thermal protection nanosilica materials. EMI protection films are targeted to be eventually applied onto casings of laptop computers. These coatings are composites of electrically-conductive SWNTs and compatible polymers. The substrate polymer will be polycarbonate, since computer housings are typically made of carbon composites of this type of polymer. A new experimental copolymer was used last year to generate electrically-conductive and thermal films with HiPco at 50/50 wt/wt composition. This will be one of the possible formulations. Reference films will be base polycarbonate and neat HiPco onto polycarbonate films. Other coating materials that will be tried will be based on HiPco composites with commercial enamels (polyurethane, acrylic, polyester), which could be compatible with the polycarbonate substrate. Nanosilica fibers are planned for possible use as thermal protection tiles on the shuttle orbiter. Right now, microscale silica is used. Going to the nanoscale will increase the surface-volume-per-unit-area of radiative heat dissipation. Nanoscale carbon fibers/nanotubes can be used as templates for the generation of nanosilica. A sol-gel operation is employed for this purpose.

  4. Carbon nanotube nanoelectrode arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Zhifeng; Lin, Yuehe; Yantasee, Wassana; Liu, Guodong; Lu, Fang; Tu, Yi

    2008-11-18

    The present invention relates to microelectode arrays (MEAs), and more particularly to carbon nanotube nanoelectrode arrays (CNT-NEAs) for chemical and biological sensing, and methods of use. A nanoelectrode array includes a carbon nanotube material comprising an array of substantially linear carbon nanotubes each having a proximal end and a distal end, the proximal end of the carbon nanotubes are attached to a catalyst substrate material so as to form the array with a pre-determined site density, wherein the carbon nanotubes are aligned with respect to one another within the array; an electrically insulating layer on the surface of the carbon nanotube material, whereby the distal end of the carbon nanotubes extend beyond the electrically insulating layer; a second adhesive electrically insulating layer on the surface of the electrically insulating layer, whereby the distal end of the carbon nanotubes extend beyond the second adhesive electrically insulating layer; and a metal wire attached to the catalyst substrate material.

  5. Mechanical and biological properties of chitosan/carbon nanotube nanocomposite films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aryaei, Ashkan; Jayatissa, Ahalapitiya H; Jayasuriya, Ambalangodage C

    2014-08-01

    In this article, different concentrations of multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) were homogeneously dispersed throughout the chitosan (CS) matrix. A simple solvent-cast method was used to fabricate chitosan films with 0.1, 0.5, and 1% of MWCNT with the average diameter around 30 nm. The CS/MWCNT films were characterized for structural, viscous and mechanical properties with optical microscopy, wide-angle X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, tensile test machine, and microindentation testing machine. Murine osteoblasts were used to examine the cell viability and attachment of the nanocomposite films at two time points. In comparison to the pure chitosan film, the mechanical properties, including the tensile modulus and strength of the films, were greatly improved by increasing the percentage of MWCNT. Furthermore, adding MWCNT up to 1% increased the viscosity of the chitosan solution by 15%. However, adding MWCNT decreased the samples ductility and transparency. In biological point of view, no toxic effect on osteoblasts was observed in the presence of different percentages of MWCNT at day 3 and day 7. This investigation suggested MWCNT could be a promising candidate for improving chitosan mechanical properties without inducing remarkable cytotoxicity on bone cells. PMID:24108584

  6. Steady heat conduction-based thermal conductivity measurement of single walled carbon nanotubes thin film using a micropipette thermal sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, R.; Lee, K. M.; Chang, W. S.; Kim, D. S.; Rhee, G. H.; Choi, T. Y.

    2013-03-01

    In this paper, we describe the thermal conductivity measurement of single-walled carbon nanotubes thin film using a laser point source-based steady state heat conduction method. A high precision micropipette thermal sensor fabricated with a sensing tip size varying from 2 μm to 5 μm and capable of measuring thermal fluctuation with resolution of ±0.01 K was used to measure the temperature gradient across the suspended carbon nanotubes (CNT) film with a thickness of 100 nm. We used a steady heat conduction model to correlate the temperature gradient to the thermal conductivity of the film. We measured the average thermal conductivity of CNT film as 74.3 ± 7.9 W m-1 K-1 at room temperature.

  7. Electrical Transport and Magnetoresistance in Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vitaly KSENEVICH

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Electrical transport properties and magnetoresistance of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNT films were investigated within temperature range (2 – 300 K and in magnetic fields up to 8 T. A crossover between metallic (dR/dT > 0 and non-metallic (dR/dT < 0 temperature dependence of the resistance as well as low-temperature saturation of the resistance in high bias regime indicated on the diminishing of role of the contact barriers between individual nanotubes essential for the charge transport in SWCNT arrays. The magnetoresistance (MR data demonstrated influence of weak localization and electron-electron interactions on charge transport properties in SWCNT films. The low-field negative MR with positive upturn was observed at low temperatures. At T > 10 K only negative MR was observed in the whole range of available magnetic fields. The negative MR can be approximated using 1D weak localization (WL model. The low temperature positive MR is induced by contribution from electron-electron interactions. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.20.2.6311

  8. Raman microscopy mapping for the purity assessment of chirality enriched carbon nanotube networks in thin- film transistors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhao Li; Jianfu Ding; Paul Finnie; Jacques Lefebvre; Fuyong Cheng; ChristopherT. Kingston; Patrick R. L. Malenfant

    2015-01-01

    With recent improvements in carbon nanotube separation methods, the accurate determination of residual metallic carbon nanotubes in a purified nanotube sample is important, particularly for those interested in using semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) in electronic device applications such as thin-film transistors (TFTs). This work demonstrates that Raman microscopy mapping is a powerful characterization tool for quantifying residual metallic carbon nanotubes present in highly enriched semiconducting nanotube networks. Raman mapping correlates well with absorption spectroscopy, yet it provides greater differentiation in purity. Electrical data from TFTs with channel lengths of 2.5 and 5μ m demonstrate the utility of the method. By comparing samples with nominal purities of 99.0% and 99.8%, a clear differentiation can be made when evaluating the current on/off ratio as a function of channel length, and thus the Raman mapping method provides a means to guide device fabrication by correlating SWCNT network density and purity with TFT channel scaling.

  9. Role of direct covalent bonding in enhanced heat dissipation property of flexible graphene oxide–carbon nanotube hybrid film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The thermal conductivity of graphene oxide/multiwalled carbon nanotube (GO/MWCNT) hybrid films with and without covalent bonding is examined in this study. To fabricate chemically bonded GO/MWCNT hybrid films, chlorinated GO and amino-functionalized MWCNTs are bonded covalently. The mixtures of surface modified GO and MWCNT were filtered and then subjected to hot pressing to fabricate stacked films. Examination of these chemically bonded hybrid films reveal that chlorine-doped GO exhibits enhanced electrical properties because it creates hole charge carriers by attracting the electrons in GO towards chlorine. Enhanced electrical conductivity and low sheet resistance are observed also with increasing MWCNT loadings. On comparing the through-plane thermal properties, the chemically bonded hybrid films were found to exhibit higher thermal conductivity than do the physically bonded hybrid films because of the synergetic interaction of functional groups in GO and MWCNTs in the former films. However, excess addition of MWCNTs to the films leads to an increasing phonon scattering density and a decreased thermal conductivity. - Highlights: • Graphene oxide/carbon nanotube (GO/CNT) films are bonded covalently. • GO/CNT hybrid films are prepared through filtering and hot-pressing method. • Chemically bonded hybrid films exhibit enhanced electrical and thermal properties. • Enhanced thermal conductivity is explained according to increasing CNT contents

  10. Reduced graphene oxide and vertically aligned carbon nanotubes superhydrophilic films for supercapacitors devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zanin, H., E-mail: hudsonzanin@gmail.com [Associated Laboratory of Sensors and Materials of the National Institute for Space Research, Av. dos Astronautas 1758, Sao Jose dos Campos CEP 12227-010, SP (Brazil); Departamento de Semicondutores, Instrumentos e Fotônica, Faculdade de Engenharia Elétrica e Computação, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, UNICAMP, Campinas 13083-970 (Brazil); Saito, E., E-mail: esaito135@gmail.com [Associated Laboratory of Sensors and Materials of the National Institute for Space Research, Av. dos Astronautas 1758, Sao Jose dos Campos CEP 12227-010, SP (Brazil); Ceragioli, H.J., E-mail: helderjc@gmail.com [Departamento de Semicondutores, Instrumentos e Fotônica, Faculdade de Engenharia Elétrica e Computação, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, UNICAMP, Campinas 13083-970 (Brazil); Baranauskas, V., E-mail: vitor@dsif.fee.unicamp.br [Departamento de Semicondutores, Instrumentos e Fotônica, Faculdade de Engenharia Elétrica e Computação, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, UNICAMP, Campinas 13083-970 (Brazil); Corat, E.J., E-mail: corat@las.inpe.br [Associated Laboratory of Sensors and Materials of the National Institute for Space Research, Av. dos Astronautas 1758, Sao Jose dos Campos CEP 12227-010, SP (Brazil)

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Graphene nanosheets were produced onto wire rods. • RGO and VACNT-O were evaluated and compared as supercapacitor electrode. • RGO and VACNT-O have structural and electrochemical properties quite similars. • The materials present good specific capacitance, energy storage and power delivery. - Abstract: Reduced graphene oxide (RGO) and vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (VACNT) superhydrophilic films were prepared by chemical vapor deposition techniques for electrical energy storage investigations. These electrodes were characterized in terms of their material and electrochemical properties by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), surface wettability, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), energy dispersive and Raman spectroscopies, cyclic voltammetry (CV) and galvanostatic charge–discharge. We observed several physical structural and electrochemical similarities between these carbon-based materials with particular attention to very good specific capacitance, ultra-high energy storage and fast power delivery. Our results showed that the main difference between specific capacitance values is attributed to pseudocapacitive contribution and high density of multiwall nanotubes tips. In this work we have tested a supercapacitor device using the VACNT electrodes.

  11. Enhanced oxidation and detection of toxic ractopamine using carbon nanotube film-modified electrode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► The enhanced oxidation of ractopamine on MWCNT film surface was firstly studied. ► The oxidation occurred at phenolic hydroxyl groups and transferred two electrons. ► A sensitive and effective electrochemical sensor was developed for ractopamine. ► It was used to detect ractopamine in animal tissues, the recovery was satisfactory. - Abstract: Insoluble multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) was readily dispersed into water in the presence of dihexadecyl hydrogen phosphate, and then used to modify the surface of glassy carbon electrode (GCE) by means of solvent evaporation. Scanning electron microscopy test indicated that the GCE surface was coated with uniform MWCNT film. The resulting MWCNT film-modified GCE greatly enhanced the oxidation signal of ractopamine. The oxidation mechanism was studied, and it was found that the oxidation of ractopamine occurred at two phenolic hydroxyl groups, involving two protons and two electrons. Moreover, the influences of pH value, amount of MWCNT, accumulation potential and time were investigated on the oxidation signal of ractopamine. Based on the strong enhancement effect of MWCNT, a sensitive, rapid and simple electrochemical method was developed for the detection of ractopamine. The linear range was from 50 μg L−1 to 2 mg L−1, and the detection limit was 20 μg L−1. Finally, this method was successfully used to detect the content of ractopamine in pork and liver samples, and the recovery was in the range from 93.1% to 107.2%.

  12. Plumbing carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Chuanhong; Suenaga, Kazu; Iijima, Sumio

    2008-01-01

    Since their discovery, the possibility of connecting carbon nanotubes together like water pipes has been an intriguing prospect for these hollow nanostructures. The serial joining of carbon nanotubes in a controlled manner offers a promising approach for the bottom-up engineering of nanotube structures-from simply increasing their aspect ratio to making integrated carbon nanotube devices. To date, however, there have been few reports of the joining of two different carbon nanotubes. Here we demonstrate that a Joule heating process, and associated electro-migration effects, can be used to connect two carbon nanotubes that have the same (or similar) diameters. More generally, with the assistance of a tungsten metal particle, this technique can be used to seamlessly join any two carbon nanotubes-regardless of their diameters-to form new nanotube structures.

  13. Preparation and supercapacitance performance of manganese oxide nanosheets/graphene/carbon nanotubes ternary composite film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • The MnO2 nanosheets/graphene/MWCNT composite film with a porous sandwich structure was fabricated through a filtration-directed self-assembly. • The introduction of graphene and MWCNT restricts dense stacking of MnO2 nanosheets. • Ternary composite film exhibits impressive electrochemical performance compared to pure MnO2 nanosheets. - Abstract: A novel MnO2 nanosheets/graphene nanosheets/carboxylic multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MONS/GNS/cMWCNT) ternary composite film was fabricated through a filtration-directed self-assembly method. The Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images showed the porous sandwiched structure of MONS/GNS/cMWCNT with GNS providing a conductive substrate and cMWCNT functioning as a vertical electron pathway. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Raman spectra further confirmed that the introduction of GNS and cMWCNT restricted the serious aggregation of MONS, resulting in a higher specific area (691 m2g−1). As a result, the MONS/GNS/cMWCNT composite film exhibited higher specific capacitance (248 Fg−1 at 1 Ag−1 in 1 M Na2SO4), better rate performance (66.9% capacitance retention from 0.2 to 10 Ag−1) and cycling stability (86.5% retention after 3000 cycles) compared with those of pure dried MnO2 nanosheets

  14. Carbon Nanotube/Conductive Additive/Space Durable Polymer Nanocomposite Films for Electrostatic Charge Dissipation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Joseph G., Jr.; Watson, Kent A.; Delozier, Donavon M.; Connell, John W.

    2003-01-01

    Thin film membranes of space environmentally stable polymeric materials possessing low color/solar absorptivity (alpha) are of interest for potential applications on Gossamer spacecraft. In addition to these properties, sufficient electrical conductivity is required in order to dissipate electrostatic charge (ESC) build-up brought about by the charged orbital environment. One approach to achieve sufficient electrical conductivity for ESC mitigation is the incorporation of single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). However, when the SWNTs are dispersed throughout the polymer matrix, the nanocomposite films tend to be significantly darker than the pristine material resulting in a higher alpha. The incorporation of conductive additives in combination with a decreased loading level of SWNTs is one approach for improving alpha while retaining conductivity. Taken individually, the low loading level of conductive additives and SWNTs is insufficient in achieving the percolation level necessary for electrical conductivity. When added simultaneously to the film, conductivity is achieved through a synergistic effect. The chemistry, physical, and mechanical properties of the nanocomposite films will be presented.

  15. A Novel Reactive Gas Source and Its Application to Carbon Nanotube Film Deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Nan; CHEN Han-Yuan; QIAN Sheng-Fa

    2005-01-01

    @@ Generally, gaseous discharge at pressure higher than 10 kPa will collapse to filamentary form or streamer, which will produce a non-uniform treatment on the sample surface. Thus, atmospheric pressure glow discharge (APGD) is developed. However the realization of the APGD is not obvious, it needs special conditions. We propose a new concept to solve the non-uniformity problem. By using a grid electrode and putting the sample downstream of the discharge plasma, the streamers, instead of striking on sample surface, will strike on the grid, and the neutral active species produced in the discharge diffuse out to reach the sample surface uniformly. Finally, a carbon nanotube (CNT) film was produced to test this new concept.

  16. Inkjet printing of flexible high-performance carbon nanotube transparent conductive films by "coffee ring effect".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimoni, Allon; Azoubel, Suzanna; Magdassi, Shlomo

    2014-10-01

    Transparent and flexible conductors are a major component in many modern optoelectronic devices, such as touch screens for smart phones, displays, and solar cells. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) offer a good alternative to commonly used conductive materials, such as metal oxides (e.g. ITO) for flexible electronics. The production of transparent conductive patterns, and arrays composed of connected CNT "coffee rings" on a flexible substrate poly(ethylene terephthalate), has been reported. Direct patterning is achieved by inkjet printing of an aqueous dispersion of CNTs, which self-assemble at the rim of evaporating droplets. After post-printing treatment with hot nitric acid, the obtained TCFs are characterized by a sheet resistance of 156 Ω sq(-1) and transparency of 81% (at 600 nm), which are the best reported values obtained by inkjet printing of conductive CNTs. This makes such films very promising as transparent conductors for various electronic devices, as demonstrated by using an electroluminescent device. PMID:25014193

  17. Inkjet printing of flexible high-performance carbon nanotube transparent conductive films by ``coffee ring effect''

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimoni, Allon; Azoubel, Suzanna; Magdassi, Shlomo

    2014-09-01

    Transparent and flexible conductors are a major component in many modern optoelectronic devices, such as touch screens for smart phones, displays, and solar cells. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) offer a good alternative to commonly used conductive materials, such as metal oxides (e.g. ITO) for flexible electronics. The production of transparent conductive patterns, and arrays composed of connected CNT ``coffee rings'' on a flexible substrate poly(ethylene terephthalate), has been reported. Direct patterning is achieved by inkjet printing of an aqueous dispersion of CNTs, which self-assemble at the rim of evaporating droplets. After post-printing treatment with hot nitric acid, the obtained TCFs are characterized by a sheet resistance of 156 Ω sq-1 and transparency of 81% (at 600 nm), which are the best reported values obtained by inkjet printing of conductive CNTs. This makes such films very promising as transparent conductors for various electronic devices, as demonstrated by using an electroluminescent device.

  18. ULTRAHIGH MAGNETIC FIELD OPTICAL STUDY OF SINGLE-WALLED CARBON NANOTUBES FILM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukhtar Effendi

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Excitons in Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes (SWNTs have emerged as an ideal candidate for exploring one-dimensional (1-D exciton physics. Exciton states which dominate optical properties of SWNTs even at room temperature, are not clarify yet. The optical absorption spectra of aligned SWNTs films under ultra high magnetic fields up to 190 T are examined to investigate this issue. Shifting and splitting of the absorption peaks due to Aharonov-Bohm effect was observed clearly above 80 T in the configuration where the magnetic fields were applied in parallel to the alignment of SWNTs. The lowest singlet exciton state has been determined through the analysis of energy splitting of excitons by the application of magnetic fields.   Keywords: blue shift, optically active, optically inactive, red shift, single-turn coil system

  19. Memory operation devices based on light-illumination ambipolar carbon-nanotube thin-film-transistors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aïssa, B., E-mail: aissab@emt.inrs.ca [Qatar Environment and Energy Research Institute (QEERI), Qatar Foundation, P.O. Box 5825, Doha (Qatar); Centre Energie, Matériaux et Télécommunications, INRS, 1650, Boulevard Lionel-Boulet Varennes, Quebec J3X 1S2 (Canada); Nedil, M. [Telebec Wireless Underground Communication Laboratory, UQAT, 675, 1ère Avenue, Val d' Or, Quebec J9P 1Y3 (Canada); Kroeger, J. [NanoIntegris & Raymor Nanotech, Raymor Industries Inc., 3765 La Vérendrye, Boisbriand, Quebec J7H 1R8 (Canada); Haddad, T. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec H3A 0B8 (Canada); Rosei, F. [Centre Energie, Matériaux et Télécommunications, INRS, 1650, Boulevard Lionel-Boulet Varennes, Quebec J3X 1S2 (Canada)

    2015-09-28

    We report the memory operation behavior of a light illumination ambipolar single-walled carbon nanotube thin film field-effect transistors devices. In addition to the high electronic-performance, such an on/off transistor-switching ratio of 10{sup 4} and an on-conductance of 18 μS, these memory devices have shown a high retention time of both hole and electron-trapping modes, reaching 2.8 × 10{sup 4} s at room temperature. The memory characteristics confirm that light illumination and electrical field can act as an independent programming/erasing operation method. This could be a fundamental step toward achieving high performance and stable operating nanoelectronic memory devices.

  20. Metal contact effect on the performance and scaling behavior of carbon nanotube thin film transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Jiye; Dong, Guodong; Tian, Boyuan; Yan, Qiuping; Zhang, Han; Liang, Xuelei; Peng, Lianmao

    2016-05-01

    Metal-tube contact is known to play an important role in carbon nanotube field-effect transistors (CNT-FETs) which are fabricated on individual CNTs. Less attention has been paid to the contact effect in network type carbon nanotube thin film transistors (CNT-TFTs). In this study, we demonstrate that contact plays an even more important role in CNT-TFTs than in CNT-FETs. Although the Schottky barrier height at the metal-tube contact can be tuned by the work function of the metal, similar to the case in CNT-FETs, the contact resistance (Rc) forms a much higher proportion of the total resistance in CNT-TFTs. Interestingly, the contact resistivity was found to increase with channel length, which is a consequence of the percolating nature of the transport in CNT films, and this behavior does not exist in CNT-FETs and normal 2D Ohmic conductors. Electrical transport in CNT-TFTs has been predicted to scale with channel length by stick percolation theory. However, the scaling behavior is also impacted, or even covered up by the effect of Rc. Once the contact effect is excluded, the covered scaling behavior can be revealed correctly. A possible way of reducing Rc in CNT-TFTs was proposed. We believe the findings in this paper will strengthen our understanding of CNT-TFTs, and even accelerate the commercialization of CNT-TFT technology.Metal-tube contact is known to play an important role in carbon nanotube field-effect transistors (CNT-FETs) which are fabricated on individual CNTs. Less attention has been paid to the contact effect in network type carbon nanotube thin film transistors (CNT-TFTs). In this study, we demonstrate that contact plays an even more important role in CNT-TFTs than in CNT-FETs. Although the Schottky barrier height at the metal-tube contact can be tuned by the work function of the metal, similar to the case in CNT-FETs, the contact resistance (Rc) forms a much higher proportion of the total resistance in CNT-TFTs. Interestingly, the contact

  1. All-printed and transparent single walled carbon nanotube thin film transistor devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajed, Farzam; Rutherglen, Christopher

    2013-09-01

    We present fully transparent single-walled all-carbon nanotube thin film transistors (SWCNT TFT) fabricated using low-cost inkjet printing methods. Such a demonstration provides a platform towards low cost fully printed transparent electronics. The SWCNT TFTs were printed with metallic and semiconducting SWCNT using a room temperature printing process, without the requirement of expensive cleanroom facilities. The unoptimized SWCNT TFTs fabricated exhibited an Ion/off ratio of 92 and mobility of 2.27 cm2V-1s-1 and transmissivity of 82%. The combination of both high electrical performance and high transparency make all-SWCNT TFTs desirable for next generation transparent display backplanes and products such as Google Glass.

  2. Memory operation devices based on light-illumination ambipolar carbon-nanotube thin-film-transistors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report the memory operation behavior of a light illumination ambipolar single-walled carbon nanotube thin film field-effect transistors devices. In addition to the high electronic-performance, such an on/off transistor-switching ratio of 104 and an on-conductance of 18 μS, these memory devices have shown a high retention time of both hole and electron-trapping modes, reaching 2.8 × 104 s at room temperature. The memory characteristics confirm that light illumination and electrical field can act as an independent programming/erasing operation method. This could be a fundamental step toward achieving high performance and stable operating nanoelectronic memory devices

  3. Poly(brilliant green) and poly(thionine) modified carbon nanotube coated carbon film electrodes for glucose and uric acid biosensors

    OpenAIRE

    Ghica, M. Emilia; Christopher M. A. Brett

    2014-01-01

    Poly(brilliant green) (PBG) and poly(thionine) (PTH) films have been formed on carbon film electrodes (CFEs) modified with carbon nanotubes (CNT) by electropolymerisation using potential cycling. Voltammetric and electrochemical impedance characterisation were performed. Glucose oxidase and uricase, as model enzymes, were immobilised on top of PBG/CNT/CFE and PTH/CNT/CFE for glucose and uric acid (UA) biosensing. Amperometric determination of glucose and UA was carried out in phosphate buffer...

  4. Room temperature ammonia vapor sensing properties of transparent single walled carbon nanotube thin film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shobin, L. R.; Manivannan, S.

    2014-10-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) networks are identified as potential substitute and surpass the conventional indium doped tin oxide (ITO) in transparent conducting electrodes, thin-film transistors, solar cells, and chemical sensors. Among them, CNT based gas sensors gained more interest because of its need in environmental monitoring, industrial control, and detection of gases in warfare or for averting security threats. The unique properties of CNT networks such as high surface area, low density, high thermal conductivity and chemical sensitivity making them as a potential candidate for gas sensing applications. Commercial unsorted single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) were purified by thermal oxidation and acid treatment processes and dispersed in organic solvent N-methyl pyrolidone using sonication process in the absence of polymer or surfactant. Optically transparent SWCNT networks are realized on glass substrate by coating the dispersed SWCNT with the help of dynamic spray coating process at 200ºC. The SWCNT random network was characterized by scanning electron microscopy and UV-vis-NIR spectroscopy. Gas sensing property of transparent film towards ammonia vapor is studied at room temperature by measuring the resistance change with respect to the concentration in the range 0-1000 ppm. The sensor response is increased logarithmically in the concentration range 0 to 1000 ppm with the detection limit 0.007 ppm. The random networks are able to detect ammonia vapor selectively because of the high electron donating nature of ammonia molecule to the SWCNT. The sensor is reversible and selective to ammonia vapor with response time 70 seconds and recovery time 423 seconds for 62.5 ppm with 90% optical transparency at 550 nm.

  5. Covalent cum noncovalent functionalizations of carbon nanotubes for effective reinforcement of a solution cast composite film.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Wei; Chan-Park, Mary B

    2012-04-01

    Although carbon nanotubes have impressive tensile properties, exploiting these properties in composites, especially those made by the common solution casting technique, seems to be elusive thus far. The reasons could be partly due to the poor nanotube dispersion and the weak nanotube/matrix interface. To solve this dual pronged problem, we combine noncovalent and covalent functionalizations of nanotubes in a single system by the design and application of a novel dispersant, hydroxyl polyimide-graft-bisphenol A diglyceryl acrylate (PI(OH)-BDA), and use them with epoxidized single-walled carbon nanotubes (O-SWNTs). Our novel PI(OH)-BDA dispersant functionalizes the nanotubes noncovalently to achieve good dispersion of the nanotubes because of the strong π-π interaction due to main chain and steric hindrance of the BDA side chain. PI(OH)-BDA also functionalizes O-SWNTs covalently because it reacts with epoxide groups on the nanotubes, as well as the cyanate ester (CE) matrix used. The resulting solution-cast CE composites show 57%, 71%, and 124% increases in Young's modulus, tensile strength, and toughness over neat CE. These values are higher than those of composites reinforced with pristine SWNTs, epoxidized SWNTs, and pristine SWNTs dispersed with PI(OH)-BDA. The modulus and strength increase per unit nanotube weight fraction, i.e., dE/dW(NT) and dσ/dW(NT), are 175 GPa and 7220 MPa, respectively, which are significantly higher than those of other nanotube/thermosetting composites (22-70 GPa and 140-3540 MPa, respectively). Our study indicates that covalent cum noncovalent functionalization of nanotubes is an effective tool for improving both the nanotube dispersion and nanotube/matrix interfacial interaction, resulting in significantly improved mechanical reinforcement of the solution-cast composites. PMID:22432973

  6. Formation of electrically conducting, transparent films using silver nanoparticles connected by carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To achieve both optical transparency and electrical conductivity simultaneously, we fabricated a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT)/silver fiber-based transparent conductive film using silver fibers produced by the electrospinning method. Electrospun silver fibers provided a segregated structure with the silver nanoparticles within the fibrous microstructures as a framework. Additional deposition of SWNT/poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) doped with poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) layers resulted in a remarkable decrease in the surface resistance from very high value (> 3000 kΩ/sq) for the films of electrospun silver fibers, without affecting the optical transmittance at 550 nm. The surface resistance of the SWNT/silver film after the deposition of three layers decreased to 17 Ω/sq with 80% transmittance. Successive depositions of SWNT/PEDOT:PSS layers reduced the surface resistance to 2 Ω/sq without severe loss in optical transmittance (ca. 65%). The transparent conductive films exhibited a performance comparable to that of commercial indium tin oxide films. The individual silver nanoparticles within the electrospun fibers on the substrate were interconnected with SWNTs, which resulted in the efficient activation of a conductive network by bridging the gaps among separate silver nanoparticles. Such a construction of microscopically conductive networks with the minimum use of electrically conductive nanomaterials produced superior electrical conductivity, while maintaining the optical transparency. - Highlights: • Silver fibrous structures were produced by electrospinning method. • SWNTs/PEDOT:PSS was deposited on silver fibrous structures. • These films exhibited a low sheet resistance (∼ 17 Ω/sq) at ∼ 80% optical transparency. • Successive depositions of SWNT/PEDOT:PSS layers reduced the surface resistance to 2 Ω/sq

  7. Growth of graphite film over the tops of vertical carbon nanotubes using Ni/Ti/Si substrate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chia-chih Chuang; Wei-long Liu; Wen-jauh Chen; Jin-hua Huang

    2009-01-01

    A substrate with Ni/Ti/Si structure was used to grow vertical carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with a graphite film over CNT tops by thermal chemical vapor deposition with CH4 gas as carbon source.The carbon nanotubes and the substrate were character-ized by a field emission scanning electron microscope for the morphologies,a transmission electron microscope for the microstruc-tures,a Raman spectrograph for the crystallinity,and an Auger electron spectrometer for the depth distribution of elements.The re-sult shows that when the thickness ratio of Ni layer to Ti layer in substrate is about i,a graphite film with relatively good quality canbe formed on the CNT tops.

  8. Solution-processed carbon nanotube thin-film complementary static random access memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geier, Michael L.; McMorrow, Julian J.; Xu, Weichao; Zhu, Jian; Kim, Chris H.; Marks, Tobin J.; Hersam, Mark C.

    2015-11-01

    Over the past two decades, extensive research on single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) has elucidated their many extraordinary properties, making them one of the most promising candidates for solution-processable, high-performance integrated circuits. In particular, advances in the enrichment of high-purity semiconducting SWCNTs have enabled recent circuit demonstrations including synchronous digital logic, flexible electronics and high-frequency applications. However, due to the stringent requirements of the transistors used in complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) logic as well as the absence of sufficiently stable and spatially homogeneous SWCNT thin-film transistors, the development of large-scale SWCNT CMOS integrated circuits has been limited in both complexity and functionality. Here, we demonstrate the stable and uniform electronic performance of complementary p-type and n-type SWCNT thin-film transistors by controlling adsorbed atmospheric dopants and incorporating robust encapsulation layers. Based on these complementary SWCNT thin-film transistors, we simulate, design and fabricate arrays of low-power static random access memory circuits, achieving large-scale integration for the first time based on solution-processed semiconductors.

  9. Electrical conductivity and electromagnetic interference shielding characteristics of multiwalled carbon nanotube filled polyacrylate composite films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were homogeneously dispersed in pure acrylic emulsion by ultrasonication to prepare MWCNT/polyacrylate composites applied on building interior wall for electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding applications. The structure and surface morphology of the MWCNTs and MWCNT/polyacrylate composites were studied by field emission scanning microscopy (FESEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The electrical conductivity at room temperature and EMI shielding effectiveness (SE) of the composite films on concrete substrate with different MWCNT loadings were investigated and the measurement of EMI SE was carried out in two different frequency ranges of 100-1000 MHz (radio frequency range) and 8.2-12.4 GHz (X-band). The experimental results show that a low mass concentration of MWCNTs could achieve a high conductivity and the EMI SE of the MWCNT/polyacrylate composite films has a strong dependence on MWCNTs content in both two frequency ranges. The SE is higher in X-band than that in radio frequency range. For the composite films with 10 wt.% MWCNTs, the EMI SE of experiment agrees well with that of theoretical prediction in far field

  10. Fabrication and test of adhesion enhanced flexible carbon nanotube transparent conducting films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: Flexible TCFs were fabricated by a two-step spraying method using SWCNTs on pre-treated PET substrates and the adhesion was tested by ultrasonication resonance. - Highlights: • TCFs were fabricated using SWCNTs by a two-step spraying method. • PET substrates were pretreated with nitric acid to improve surface hydrophilicity. • Ultrasonication resonance method was introduced to test the adhesion of TCFs. • High adhesion SWCNT-TCFs with relatively low sheet resistance were obtained. - Abstract: This study introduced an innovative method to fabricate flexible transparent conducting films (TCFs) by spraying single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) solution, dispersed by sodium dodecyl benzene sulfonate (SDBS), on polyethylene terephthalate (PET) substrate. The PET substrates were pretreated with nitric acid to improve the surface hydrophilicity. The films were spray deposited on the pretreated PET substrates in a two-step spray coating method. The film conductivity was further improved by nitric acid. As a convenient process, ultrasonication resonance method was applied to test the adhesion of TCFs. Comparing with the traditional preparation method, the adhesion of TCFs was enhanced and the mechanism was analyzed. The morphologies and thicknesses of TCFs were characterized by scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy, while the Raman spectroscopy confirmed the structures of SWCNTs and the thickness changes of TCFs treated with different ultrasonication time

  11. Fabrication and test of adhesion enhanced flexible carbon nanotube transparent conducting films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Hu; Geng, Hong-Zhang, E-mail: genghz@tjpu.edu.cn; Meng, Yan; Wang, Yan; Xu, Xiao-Bing; Ding, Er-Xiong; Gao, Jing; Chen, Li-Ting; Ma, Shuai

    2014-09-15

    Graphical abstract: Flexible TCFs were fabricated by a two-step spraying method using SWCNTs on pre-treated PET substrates and the adhesion was tested by ultrasonication resonance. - Highlights: • TCFs were fabricated using SWCNTs by a two-step spraying method. • PET substrates were pretreated with nitric acid to improve surface hydrophilicity. • Ultrasonication resonance method was introduced to test the adhesion of TCFs. • High adhesion SWCNT-TCFs with relatively low sheet resistance were obtained. - Abstract: This study introduced an innovative method to fabricate flexible transparent conducting films (TCFs) by spraying single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) solution, dispersed by sodium dodecyl benzene sulfonate (SDBS), on polyethylene terephthalate (PET) substrate. The PET substrates were pretreated with nitric acid to improve the surface hydrophilicity. The films were spray deposited on the pretreated PET substrates in a two-step spray coating method. The film conductivity was further improved by nitric acid. As a convenient process, ultrasonication resonance method was applied to test the adhesion of TCFs. Comparing with the traditional preparation method, the adhesion of TCFs was enhanced and the mechanism was analyzed. The morphologies and thicknesses of TCFs were characterized by scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy, while the Raman spectroscopy confirmed the structures of SWCNTs and the thickness changes of TCFs treated with different ultrasonication time.

  12. Electrical conductivity and electromagnetic interference shielding characteristics of multiwalled carbon nanotube filled polyacrylate composite films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yong; Chen, Changxin; Zhang, Song; Ni, Yuwei; Huang, Jie

    2008-07-01

    Multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were homogeneously dispersed in pure acrylic emulsion by ultrasonication to prepare MWCNT/polyacrylate composites applied on building interior wall for electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding applications. The structure and surface morphology of the MWCNTs and MWCNT/polyacrylate composites were studied by field emission scanning microscopy (FESEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The electrical conductivity at room temperature and EMI shielding effectiveness (SE) of the composite films on concrete substrate with different MWCNT loadings were investigated and the measurement of EMI SE was carried out in two different frequency ranges of 100-1000 MHz (radio frequency range) and 8.2-12.4 GHz (X-band). The experimental results show that a low mass concentration of MWCNTs could achieve a high conductivity and the EMI SE of the MWCNT/polyacrylate composite films has a strong dependence on MWCNTs content in both two frequency ranges. The SE is higher in X-band than that in radio frequency range. For the composite films with 10 wt.% MWCNTs, the EMI SE of experiment agrees well with that of theoretical prediction in far field.

  13. Cementitious Composites Engineered with Embedded Carbon Nanotube Thin Films for Enhanced Sensing Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loh, Kenneth J.; Gonzalez, Jesus

    2015-07-01

    Cementitious composites such as concrete pavements are susceptible to different damage modes, which are primarily caused by repeated loading and long-term deterioration. There is even greater concern that damage could worsen and occur more frequently with the use of heavier vehicles or new aircraft carrying greater payloads. Thus, the objective of this research is to engineer cementitious composites with capabilities of self-sensing or detecting damage. The approach was to enhance the damage sensitivity of cementitious composites by incorporating multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNT) as part of the mix design and during casting. However, as opposed to directly dispersing MWNTs in the cement matrix, which is the current state-of-art, MWNT-based thin films were airbrushed and coated onto sand particles. The film-coated sand was then used as part of the mix design for casting mortar specimens. Mortar specimens were subjected to compressive cyclic loading tests while their electrical properties were recorded simultaneously. The results showed that the electrical properties of these cementitious composites designed with film-coated sand exhibited extremely high strain sensitivities. The electrical response was also stable and consistent between specimens.

  14. Selective absorption of carbon nanotube thin films for solar energy applications

    OpenAIRE

    Abendroth, Thomas; Althues, Holger; Mäder, Gerrit; Kaskel, Stefan; Beyer, Eckhard

    2015-01-01

    A new spectrally selective coating based on carbon nanotubes (CNTs) for solar thermal applications is demonstrated. For optimized coatings solar absorptance coefficients α>0.92 and thermal emittance coefficients ε

  15. Single-walled carbon nanotube transparent conductive films fabricated by reductive dissolution and spray coating for organic photovoltaics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ostfeld, Aminy E.; Arias, Ana Claudia, E-mail: acarias@eecs.berkeley.edu [Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Catheline, Amélie [Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Linde Nanomaterials, Linde LLC, 1970 Diamond Street, San Marcos, California 92078 (United States); Ligsay, Kathleen; Kim, Kee-Chan; Fogden, Siân [Linde Nanomaterials, Linde LLC, 1970 Diamond Street, San Marcos, California 92078 (United States); Chen, Zhihua [Polyera Corporation, 8045 Lamon Avenue, Skokie, Illinois 60077 (United States); Facchetti, Antonio [Polyera Corporation, 8045 Lamon Avenue, Skokie, Illinois 60077 (United States); Center of Excellence for Advanced Materials Research, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah 21589 (Saudi Arabia)

    2014-12-22

    Solutions of unbundled and unbroken single-walled carbon nanotubes have been prepared using a reductive dissolution process. Transparent conductive films spray-coated from these solutions show a nearly twofold improvement in the ratio of electrical conductivity to optical absorptivity versus those deposited from conventional aqueous dispersions, due to substantial de-aggregation and sizable nanotube lengths. These transparent electrodes have been utilized to fabricate P3HT-PCBM organic solar cells achieving power conversion efficiencies up to 2.3%, comparable to those of solar cells using indium tin oxide transparent electrodes.

  16. Single-walled carbon nanotube transparent conductive films fabricated by reductive dissolution and spray coating for organic photovoltaics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solutions of unbundled and unbroken single-walled carbon nanotubes have been prepared using a reductive dissolution process. Transparent conductive films spray-coated from these solutions show a nearly twofold improvement in the ratio of electrical conductivity to optical absorptivity versus those deposited from conventional aqueous dispersions, due to substantial de-aggregation and sizable nanotube lengths. These transparent electrodes have been utilized to fabricate P3HT-PCBM organic solar cells achieving power conversion efficiencies up to 2.3%, comparable to those of solar cells using indium tin oxide transparent electrodes

  17. Robust and aligned carbon nanotube/titania core/shell films for flexible TCO-free photoelectrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di, Jiangtao; Yong, Zhenzhong; Yao, Zhaojun; Liu, Xiangyang; Shen, Xiaojuan; Sun, Baoquan; Zhao, Zhigang; He, Huixin; Li, Qingwen

    2013-01-14

    Carbon nanotube (CNT)/semiconducting oxide hybrids are an ideal architecture for light-harvesting devices, in which the CNTs are expected to not only act as a scaffold but also provide fast transport paths for photogenerated charges in the oxide. However, the current potential of CNTs for charge transport is largely suppressed due to the nanotubes not being interconnected but isolated by the low conductive oxide coatings. Herein, a flexible and conductive CNT/TiO(2) core/shell heterostructure film is reported, with aligned and interconnected CNTs wrapped in a continuous TiO(2) coating. Without using additional transparent conducting oxide (TCO) substrates, this unique feature of the film boosts the incident photon-to-electron conversion efficiency to 32%, outperforming TiO(2) nanoparticle electrodes fabricated on TCO substrates. Moreover, the film shows high structural stability and can generate a stable photocurrent even after being bent hundreds of times. PMID:22965581

  18. Polypyrrole/carbon nanotube nanocomposite enhanced the electrochemical capacitance of flexible graphene film for supercapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xiangjun; Dou, Hui; Yuan, Changzhou; Yang, Sudong; Hao, Liang; Zhang, Fang; Shen, Laifa; Zhang, Luojiang; Zhang, Xiaogang

    2012-01-01

    The flexible electrodes have important potential applications in energy storage of portable electronic devices for their powerful structural properties. In this work, unique flexible films with polypyrrole/carbon nanotube (PPy/CNT) composite homogeneously distributed between graphene (GN) sheets are successfully prepared by flow-assembly of the mixture dispersion of GN and PPy/CNT. In such layered structure, the coaxial PPy/CNT nanocables can not only enlarge the space between GN sheets but also provide pseudo-capacitance to enhance the total capacitance of electrodes. According to the galvanostatic charge/discharge analysis, the mass and volume specific capacitances of GN-PPy/CNT (52 wt% PPy/CNT) are 211 F g-1 and 122 F cm-3 at a current density of 0.2 A g-1, higher than those of the GN film (73 F g-1 and 79 F cm-3) and PPy/CNT (164 F g-1 and 67 F cm-3). Significantly, the GN-PPy/CNT electrode shows excellent cycling stability (5% capacity loss after 5000 cycles) due to the flexible GN layer and the rigid CNT core synergistical releasing the intrinsic differential strain of PPy chains during long-term charge/discharge cycles.

  19. Amperometric Biosensor Based on Carbon Nanotube Functionalized by Redox Plasma-Polymerized Film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoshino, Tatsuya; Muguruma, Hitoshi

    2011-08-01

    A novel fabrication approach for the amperometric biosensor based on multilayer films containing carbon nanotubes (CNT), a plasma-polymerized film (PPF), and enzyme glucose oxidase (GOD) is reported. The configuration of the electrochemical electrode is sequentially composed of sputtered gold, lower acetonitrile PPF, CNT, redox PPF, GOD, and upper acetonitrile PPF (denoted as PPF/GOD/Redox-PPF/CNT/PPF/Au). The lower acetonitrile PPF deposited on Au acts as a permselective membrane, and as a scaffold for CNT layer formation. The upper acetonirile PPF directly deposited on GOD acts as a matrix for enzyme immobilization. The redox PPF polymerized by a monomer of dimethlyaminomethlyferrocene (DAF) is directly deposited onto CNTs. The surface of the functionalized CNT has redox sites of ferrocene groups that shuttle electrons from CNTs to the sensing surface of the Au electrode. The synergy between the redox PPF and CNT provides benefits in terms of lowering the operational potential and enhancing the sensitivity (current). The optimized glucose biosensor revealed a sensitivity of 2.0 µA mM-1 cm-2 at +0.4 V vs Ag/AgCl, a linear dynamic range of 4.9-27 mM, and a response time of 5 s.

  20. Omnidirectionally Stretchable High-Performance Supercapacitor Based on Isotropic Buckled Carbon Nanotube Films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jiali; Lu, Weibang; Pei, Shaopeng; Gong, Ke; Wang, Liyun; Meng, Linghui; Huang, Yudong; Smith, Joseph P; Booksh, Karl S; Li, Qingwen; Byun, Joon-Hyung; Oh, Youngseok; Yan, Yushan; Chou, Tsu-Wei

    2016-05-24

    The emergence of stretchable electronic devices has attracted intensive attention. However, most of the existing stretchable electronic devices can generally be stretched only in one specific direction and show limited specific capacitance and energy density. Here, we report a stretchable isotropic buckled carbon nanotube (CNT) film, which is used as electrodes for supercapacitors with low sheet resistance, high omnidirectional stretchability, and electro-mechanical stability under repeated stretching. After acid treatment of the CNT film followed by electrochemical deposition of polyaniline (PANI), the resulting isotropic buckled acid treated CNT@PANI electrode exhibits high specific capacitance of 1147.12 mF cm(-2) at 10 mV s(-1). The supercapacitor possesses high energy density from 31.56 to 50.98 μWh cm(-2) and corresponding power density changing from 2.294 to 28.404 mW cm(-2) at the scan rate from 10 to 200 mV s(-1). Also, the supercapacitor can sustain an omnidirectional strain of 200%, which is twice the maximum strain of biaxially stretchable supercapacitors based on CNT assemblies reported in the literature. Moreover, the capacitive performance is even enhanced to 1160.43-1230.61 mF cm(-2) during uniaxial, biaxial, and omnidirectional elongations. PMID:27096412

  1. Inkjet printing of multi-walled carbon nanotube/polymer composite thin film for interconnection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lok, Boon Keng; Ng, You Min; Liang, Yen Nan; Hu, Xiao

    2010-07-01

    In this paper, multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) ink was selectively patterned by inkjet printing on substrates to form conductive traces and electrodes for interconnection application. MWCNT was firstly functionalized using concentrated acid and dispersed in deionized water to form a colloidal solution. Various concentrations of MWCNT were formulated to test the stability of the solution. The printability of the MWCNT ink was examined against printing temperature, ink concentration and ink droplet pitch. Rheological properties of the ink were determined by rheometer and sessile drop method. The electrical conductivity of the MWCNT pattern was measured against multiple printing of MWCNT on the same pattern (up to 10 layers). While single layer printing pattern exhibited highest resistance, the CNT entangled together and formed a random network with more printed layers has higher conductivity. The electrical properties of the printed film was compared to a composite ink of CNT and conducting polymer (CNT ink was mixed with conductive polymer solution, Poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)-Poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS)). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to observe the surface structure and atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to study the morphology of the printed film under different conditions. PMID:21128484

  2. Copper Nanoparticle/Multiwalled Carbon Nanotube Composite Films with High Electrical Conductivity and Fatigue Resistance Fabricated via Flash Light Sintering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Hyun-Jun; Joo, Sung-Jun; Kim, Hak-Sung

    2015-11-18

    In this work, multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) were employed to improve the conductivity and fatigue resistance of flash light sintered copper nanoparticle (NP) ink films. The effect of CNT weight fraction on the flash light sintering and the fatigue characteristics of Cu NP/CNT composite films were investigated. The effect of carbon nanotube length was also studied with regard to enhancing the conductivity and fatigue resistance of flash light sintered Cu NP/CNT composite films. The flash light irradiation energy was optimized to obtain high conductivity Cu NP/CNT composite films. Cu NP/CNT composite films fabricated via optimized flash light irradiation had the lowest resistivity (7.86 μΩ·cm), which was only 4.6 times higher than that of bulk Cu films (1.68 μΩ·cm). It was also demonstrated that Cu NP/CNT composite films had better durability and environmental stability than those of Cu NPs only. PMID:26505908

  3. Carbon nanotubes decorating methods

    OpenAIRE

    A.D. Dobrzańska-Danikiewicz; D. Łukowiec; D. Cichock; W. Wolany

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The work is to present and characterise various methods of depositing carbon nanotubes with nanoparticles of precious metals, and also to present the results of own works concerning carbon nanotubes coated with platinum nanoparticles.Design/methodology/approach: Electron transmission and scanning microscopy has been used for imaging the structure and morphology of the nanocomposites obtained and the distribution of nanoparticles on the surface of carbon nanotubes.Findings: The studie...

  4. Functionalization of Carbon Nanotubes

    OpenAIRE

    Abraham, Jürgen

    2005-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes have an enormous potential due to their outstanding electronic, optical, and mechanical properties. However, any technological application is still hindered due to problems regarding the processibility of the pristine carbon nanotubes. In the past few years, it has been shown that the chemical modification of the carbon nanotubes is an inevitable step prior to their application. The first part of this work (chapter 3.1) was focused on the purification of pristine laser ablati...

  5. Electrochemistry of composite films of C 60 and multiwalled carbon nanotubes: A robust conductive matrix for the fine dispersion of fullerenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hua; Fan, Louzhen; Fang, Yueping; Yang, Shihe

    2005-09-01

    The electrochemical behavior of a C 60/MWCNT (multi-walled carbon nanotube) film cast on GC electrode in acetonitrile solution was investigated. Repeated cyclic voltammetric scans transformed the precursor to a C 60-MWCNT composite film which exhibited reversible electron-transfer reactions and superpose the redox feature of the bare MWCNTs with monotonic charge injection over the whole potential range. This is in contrast to both C 60 film and peapods of C 60 inside carbon nanotubes but resembles the behavior of C 60 dissolved in organic solutions. The formation and structure of the C 60-MWCNT composite films were studied by UV-Vis, FT-IR, and TEM.

  6. Inkjet printed transparent conductive films using water-dispersible single-walled carbon nanotubes treated by UV/ozone irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Young-In; Kim, Seil [Department of Fusion Chemical Engineering/Bionanotechnology, Hanyang University, Ansan 426-791 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kun-Jae [Advanced Materials and Processing Center, Institute for Advanced Engineering, Yongin 449-863 (Korea, Republic of); Myung, Nosang V. [Department of Chemical and Environmental Engineering and Center for Nanoscale Science and Engineering, University of California-Riverside, Riverside, CA 92521 (United States); Choa, Yong-Ho, E-mail: choa15@hanyang.ac.kr [Department of Fusion Chemical Engineering/Bionanotechnology, Hanyang University, Ansan 426-791 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-06-01

    Water-based single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) inks with excellent dispersibility for inkjet printed transparent conductive films were prepared by a simple and versatile UV/ozone treatment. The dispersion stability of the SWCNTs was enhanced by the increased oxygen-containing groups on the SWCNT surfaces which were created by the UV/ozone treatment. After inkjet printing of the ink to obtain transparent conductive patterns, circular rings in which most of the SWCNTs are concentrated at the rim were formed by coffee ring effect. The transparent conducting films were achieved by connecting and stacking the rings; the final films inkjet printed in 40 layers have a sheet resistance of 870 Ω sq{sup −1} at 80% optical transmittance in the wavelength of 550 nm. - Highlights: • Single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) surfaces were modified by UV/ozone treatment. • The surface properties of the SWCNTs were systematically investigated. • The transparent conductive films were fabricated by an inkjet printing. • The film with 40 layers had the sheet resistance of 0.87 kΩ sq{sup −1}. • The transmittance of the film is 80% in the visible range.

  7. Inkjet printed transparent conductive films using water-dispersible single-walled carbon nanotubes treated by UV/ozone irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Water-based single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) inks with excellent dispersibility for inkjet printed transparent conductive films were prepared by a simple and versatile UV/ozone treatment. The dispersion stability of the SWCNTs was enhanced by the increased oxygen-containing groups on the SWCNT surfaces which were created by the UV/ozone treatment. After inkjet printing of the ink to obtain transparent conductive patterns, circular rings in which most of the SWCNTs are concentrated at the rim were formed by coffee ring effect. The transparent conducting films were achieved by connecting and stacking the rings; the final films inkjet printed in 40 layers have a sheet resistance of 870 Ω sq−1 at 80% optical transmittance in the wavelength of 550 nm. - Highlights: • Single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) surfaces were modified by UV/ozone treatment. • The surface properties of the SWCNTs were systematically investigated. • The transparent conductive films were fabricated by an inkjet printing. • The film with 40 layers had the sheet resistance of 0.87 kΩ sq−1. • The transmittance of the film is 80% in the visible range

  8. Scalable fabrication of multifunctional freestanding carbon nanotube/polymer composite thin films for energy conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaokai; Gittleson, Forrest; Carmo, Marcelo; Sekol, Ryan C; Taylor, André D

    2012-02-28

    Translating the unique properties of individual single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) to the macroscale while simultaneously incorporating additional functionalities into composites has been stymied by inadequate assembly methods. Here we describe a technique for developing multifunctional SWNT/polymer composite thin films that provides a fundamental engineering basis to bridge the gap between their nano- and macroscale properties. Selected polymers are infiltrated into a Mayer rod coated conductive SWNT network to fabricate solar cell transparent conductive electrodes (TCEs), fuel cell membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs), and lithium ion battery electrodes. Our TCEs have an outstanding optoelectronic figure of merit σ(dc)/σ(ac) of 19.4 and roughness of 3.8 nm yet are also mechanically robust enough to withstand delamination, a step toward scratch resistance necessary for flexible electronics. Our MEAs show platinum utilization as high as 1550 mW/mg(Pt), demonstrating our technique's ability to integrate ionic conductivity of the polymer with electrical conductivity of the SWNTs at the Pt surface. Our battery anodes, which show reversible capacity of ∼850 mAh/g after 15 cycles, demonstrate the integration of electrode and separator to simplify device architecture and decrease overall weight. Each of these applications demonstrates our technique's ability to maintain the conductivity of SWNT networks and their dispersion within a polymer matrix while concurrently optimizing key complementary properties of the composite. Here, we lay the foundation for the assembly of nanotubes and nanostructured components (rods, wires, particles, etc.) into macroscopic multifunctional materials using a low-cost and scalable solution-based processing technique. PMID:22236330

  9. Improving Contact Interfaces in Fully Printed Carbon Nanotube Thin-Film Transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Changyong; Andrews, Joseph B; Kumar, Abhinay; Franklin, Aaron D

    2016-05-24

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) printed into thin films have been shown to yield high mobility, thermal conductivity, mechanical flexibility, and chemical stability as semiconducting channels in field-effect, thin-film transistors (TFTs). Printed CNT-TFTs of many varieties have been studied; however, there has been limited effort toward improving overall CNT-TFT performance. In particular, contact resistance plays a dominant role in determining the performance and degree of variability in the TFTs, especially in fully printed devices where the contacts and channel are both printed. In this work, we have systematically investigated the contact resistance and overall performance of fully printed CNT-TFTs employing three different printed contact materials-Ag nanoparticles, Au nanoparticles, and metallic CNTs-each in the following distinct contact geometries: top, bottom, and double. The active channel for each device was printed from the dispersion of high-purity (>99%) semiconducting CNTs, and all printing was carried out using an aerosol jet printer. Hundreds of devices with different channel lengths (from 20 to 500 μm) were fabricated for extracting contact resistance and determining related contact effects. Printed bottom contacts are shown to be advantageous compared to the more common top contacts, regardless of contact material. Further, compared to single (top or bottom) contacts, double contacts offer a significant decrease (>35%) in contact resistance for all types of contact materials, with the metallic CNTs yielding the best overall performance. These findings underscore the impact of printed contact materials and structures when interfacing with CNT thin films, providing key guidance for the further development of printed nanomaterial electronics. PMID:27097302

  10. A comparative study of field emission properties of carbon nanotube films prepared by vacuum filtration and screen-printing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A comprehensive comparative study of electron field emission properties of carbon nanotube (CNT) films prepared by vacuum filtration and screen-printing was carried out. Field emission performance of vacuum filtered CNT films with different filtered CNT suspension volumes was systematically studied, and the optimum electron emission was obtained with a low turn on field of ∼0.93 V/μm (at 1 μA/cm2) and a high field enhancement factor β of ∼9720. Comparing with screen-printed CNT films, vacuum filtered CNT films showed better electron emission performance, longer lifetime, and greater adhesive strength to substrates. This work reveals a potential use of vacuum filtered CNT films as field emission cathodes.

  11. Charge transport and photoresponses in a single-stranded DNA/single-walled carbon nanotube composite film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Wonseon; Lee, Eunmo; Kue Park, Jun; Eui Lee, Cheol

    2013-06-01

    Electrical conductivity and photoresponse measurements have been carried out on a single-stranded DNA (ssDNA)/single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) composite film in comparison to those of a SWNT film. While the temperature-dependent electrical conductivity of the pristine SWNT film was described well by the combined mechanism of a three-dimensional variable-range hopping and hopping conduction, that of the ssDNA/SWNT composite film followed a fluctuation-induced tunneling model. Besides, competition of photoexcited charge carrier generation and oxygen adsorption/photodesorption in the photoresponses of the films was observed and discussed in view of the role of the DNA wrapping. Thus, the biopolymer coating of the SWNTs is shown to play a significant role in modifying the charge dynamics of the composite system.

  12. The influence of organophilic clay on field electron emission uniformity and lifetime of screen printed carbon nanotube film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of adding clay, modified by a silane coupling agent, into the carbon nanotube (CNT) paste on the field electron emission and a lifetime of screen printed CNT film was studied. The composition of organophilic clay and CNTs was characterized by a combination of X-ray diffraction, and scanning electron microscopy. The incorporation of clay improved the dispersivity, adhesiveness, and conductive networking of paste, therewith enhancing the field emission's uniformity and stability. The improvement of this gas barrier on the CNT film by clay loading prevents emission degradation.

  13. Investigating the effect of carbon nanotube diameter and wall number in carbon nanotube/silicon heterojunction solar cells

    OpenAIRE

    Tom Grace; LePing Yu; Christopher Gibson; Daniel Tune; Huda Alturaif; Zeid Al Othman; Joseph Shapter

    2016-01-01

    Suspensions of single-walled, double-walled and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were generated in the same solvent at similar concentrations. Films were fabricated from these suspensions and used in carbon nanotube/silicon heterojunction solar cells and their properties were compared with reference to the number of walls in the nanotube samples. It was found that single-walled nanotubes generally produced more favorable results; however, the double and multi-walled nanotube films used in...

  14. Uncovering the ultimate performance of single-walled carbon nanotube films as transparent conductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustonen, K.; Laiho, P.; Kaskela, A.; Susi, T.; Nasibulin, A. G.; Kauppinen, E. I.

    2015-10-01

    The ultimate performance—ratio of electrical conductivity to optical absorbance—of single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) transparent conductive films (TCFs) is an issue of considerable application relevance. Here, we present direct experimental evidence that SWCNT bundling is detrimental for their performance. We combine floating catalyst synthesis of non-bundled, high-quality SWCNTs with an aggregation chamber, in which bundles with mean diameters ranging from 1.38 to 2.90 nm are formed from identical 3 μm long SWCNTs. The as-deposited TCFs from 1.38 nm bundles showed sheet resistances of 310 Ω/□ at 90% transparency, while those from larger bundles of 1.80 and 2.90 nm only reached values of 475 and 670 Ω/□, respectively. Based on these observations, we elucidate how networks formed by smaller bundles perform better due to their greater interconnectivity at a given optical density. Finally, we present a semi-empirical model for TCF performance as a function of SWCNT mean length and bundle diameter. This gives an estimate for the ultimate performance of non-doped, random network mixed-metallicity SWCNT TCFs at ˜80 Ω/□ and 90% transparency.

  15. Wafer scale fabrication of carbon nanotube thin film transistors with high yield

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Boyuan; Liang, Xuelei; Yan, Qiuping; Zhang, Han; Xia, Jiye; Dong, Guodong; Peng, Lianmao; Xie, Sishen

    2016-07-01

    Carbon nanotube thin film transistors (CNT-TFTs) are promising candidates for future high performance and low cost macro-electronics. However, most of the reported CNT-TFTs are fabricated in small quantities on a relatively small size substrate. The yield of large scale fabrication and the performance uniformity of devices on large size substrates should be improved before the CNT-TFTs reach real products. In this paper, 25 200 devices, with various geometries (channel width and channel length), were fabricated on 4-in. size ridged and flexible substrates. Almost 100% device yield were obtained on a rigid substrate with high out-put current (>8 μA/μm), high on/off current ratio (>105), and high mobility (>30 cm2/V.s). More importantly, uniform performance in 4-in. area was achieved, and the fabrication process can be scaled up. The results give us more confidence for the real application of the CNT-TFT technology in the near future.

  16. Evaluation of interface trap densities and quantum capacitance in carbon nanotube network thin-film transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, J.; Choi, B.; Choi, S.; Lee, J.; Lee, J.; Jeon, M.; Lee, Y.; Han, J.; Lee, J.; Kim, D. M.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, S.; Choi, S.-J.

    2016-07-01

    The interface trap density in single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) network thin-film transistors (TFTs) is a fundamental and important parameter for assessing the electronic performance of TFTs. However, the number of studies on the extraction of interface trap densities, particularly in SWNT TFTs, has been insufficient. In this work, we propose an efficient technique for extracting the energy-dependent interface traps in SWNT TFTs. From the measured dispersive, frequency-dependent capacitance–voltage (C–V) characteristics, the dispersive-free, frequency-independent C–V curve was obtained, thus enabling the extraction and analysis of the interface trap density, which was found to be approximately 8.2 × 1011 eV‑1 cm‑2 at the valence band edge. The frequency-independent C–V curve also allows further extraction of the quantum capacitance in the SWNT network without introducing any additional fitting process or parameters. We found that the extracted value of the quantum capacitance in SWNT networks is lower than the theoretical value in aligned SWNTs due to the cross point of SWNTs on the SWNT network. Therefore, the method proposed in this work indicates that the C–V measurement is a powerful tool for obtaining deep physical insights regarding the electrical performance of SWNT TFTs.

  17. Remarkably enhanced thermal transport based on a flexible horizontally-aligned carbon nanotube array film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Lin; Wang, Xiaotian; Su, Guoping; Tang, Dawei; Zheng, Xinghua; Zhu, Jie; Wang, Zhiguo; Norris, Pamela M.; Bradford, Philip D.; Zhu, Yuntian

    2016-01-01

    It has been more than a decade since the thermal conductivity of vertically aligned carbon nanotube (VACNT) arrays was reported possible to exceed that of the best thermal greases or phase change materials by an order of magnitude. Despite tremendous prospects as a thermal interface material (TIM), results were discouraging for practical applications. The primary reason is the large thermal contact resistance between the CNT tips and the heat sink. Here we report a simultaneous sevenfold increase in in-plane thermal conductivity and a fourfold reduction in the thermal contact resistance at the flexible CNT-SiO2 coated heat sink interface by coupling the CNTs with orderly physical overlapping along the horizontal direction through an engineering approach (shear pressing). The removal of empty space rapidly increases the density of transport channels, and the replacement of the fine CNT tips with their cylindrical surface insures intimate contact at CNT-SiO2 interface. Our results suggest horizontally aligned CNT arrays exhibit remarkably enhanced in-plane thermal conductivity and reduced out-of-plane thermal conductivity and thermal contact resistance. This novel structure makes CNT film promising for applications in chip-level heat dissipation. Besides TIM, it also provides for a solution to anisotropic heat spreader which is significant for eliminating hot spots. PMID:26880221

  18. Multifunctional carbon nanotube thin film composites by layer-by-layer assembly technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Bong Sup

    Polymeric layer-by-layer (LBL) assembly offers a pathway for multifunctional/multicomponent materials with molecular-scale control of stratified structures. Among the wide variety nanoscale building blocks such as nanowires and nanodots, single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are regarded as one of the most versatile because of their superior mechanical and electrical properties as well as geometrical perfection. In this thesis, LBL assembled SWNT thin film nanocomposites with high mechanical strength/toughness and with high electrical/optical properties are presented. Exceptional exfoliation state of SWNTs and controlled nm-thick layered structures are the basis for achieving tunable physical properties. Highly anisotropic features of SWNTs are translated into 2 dimensional alignments by meniscus combing technique during LBL assemblies. Advanced LBL assemblies by dewetting methods are also introduced, which significantly accelerate the process with improved lateral organization of nanowires. Furthermore, SWNT composite coating on commodity cotton yarns produced intelligent electronic textiles (e-textiles) with intrinsic humidity sensibility. This e-textile has been further combined with antigen/antibody sensing capability in order to develop a selective albumin biosensor which provides a direct route for the application of these materials as wearable biomonitoring and telemedicine sensors.

  19. Remarkably enhanced thermal transport based on a flexible horizontally-aligned carbon nanotube array film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Lin; Wang, Xiaotian; Su, Guoping; Tang, Dawei; Zheng, Xinghua; Zhu, Jie; Wang, Zhiguo; Norris, Pamela M.; Bradford, Philip D.; Zhu, Yuntian

    2016-02-01

    It has been more than a decade since the thermal conductivity of vertically aligned carbon nanotube (VACNT) arrays was reported possible to exceed that of the best thermal greases or phase change materials by an order of magnitude. Despite tremendous prospects as a thermal interface material (TIM), results were discouraging for practical applications. The primary reason is the large thermal contact resistance between the CNT tips and the heat sink. Here we report a simultaneous sevenfold increase in in-plane thermal conductivity and a fourfold reduction in the thermal contact resistance at the flexible CNT-SiO2 coated heat sink interface by coupling the CNTs with orderly physical overlapping along the horizontal direction through an engineering approach (shear pressing). The removal of empty space rapidly increases the density of transport channels, and the replacement of the fine CNT tips with their cylindrical surface insures intimate contact at CNT-SiO2 interface. Our results suggest horizontally aligned CNT arrays exhibit remarkably enhanced in-plane thermal conductivity and reduced out-of-plane thermal conductivity and thermal contact resistance. This novel structure makes CNT film promising for applications in chip-level heat dissipation. Besides TIM, it also provides for a solution to anisotropic heat spreader which is significant for eliminating hot spots.

  20. All-Printed Thin-Film Transistor Based on Purified Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes with Linear Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guiru Gu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We report an all-printed thin-film transistor (TFT on a polyimide substrate with linear transconductance response. The TFT is based on our purified single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT solution that is primarily consists of semiconducting carbon nanotubes (CNTs with low metal impurities. The all-printed TFT exhibits a high ON/OFF ratio of around 103 and bias-independent transconductance over a certain gate bias range. Such bias-independent transconductance property is different from that of conventional metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFETs due to the special band structure and the one-dimensional (1D quantum confined density of state (DOS of CNTs. The bias-independent transconductance promises modulation linearity for analog electronics.

  1. Selective Electrochemical Detection of Ciprofloxacin with a Porous Nafion/Multiwalled Carbon Nanotube Composite Film Electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gayen, Pralay; Chaplin, Brian P

    2016-01-27

    This study focuses on the development of electrochemical sensors for the detection of Ciprofloxacin (CFX) in natural waters and wastewater effluents. The sensors are prepared by depositing a layer of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) dispersed in a porous Nafion film on to a boron-doped diamond (BDD) electrode substrate. The porous-Nafion-MWCNT/BDD electrode enhanced detection of CFX due to selective adsorption, which was accomplished by a combination of electrostatic attraction at -SO3(-) sites in the porous Nafion film and the formation of charge assisted hydrogen bonding between CFX and -COOH MWCNT surface functional groups. By contrast, the bare BDD electrode did not show any activity for CFX oxidation. The sensors were selective for CFX detection in the presence of other antibiotics (i.e., amoxicillin) and other nontarget water constituents (i.e., Cl(-), Ca(2+), humic acid, sodium dodecylbenzenesulfonate, salicylic acid, 4-aminobenzoic acid, and 4-hydroxybenzoic acid). A limit of detection of 5 nM (S/N = 5.04 ± 0.26) in a 0.1 M KH2PO4 supporting electrolyte (pH = 4.5) was obtained using differential pulse voltammetry. The linear dynamic ranges with respect to CFX concentration were 0.005-0.05 μM and 0.05-10 μM, and the sensitivities were 41 ± 5.2 μA μM(-1) and 2.1 ± 0.22 μA μM(-1), respectively. Sensor fouling was observed at high concentrations of some organic compounds such as 1 mM 4-aminobenzoic acid and 4-hydroxybenzoic acid. However, a short cathodic treatment fully restores sensor response. The results indicate that these sensors have application in detecting CFX in natural waters and wastewater effluents. PMID:26711553

  2. Titanium dioxide nanotube films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roman, Ioan, E-mail: roman@metav-cd.ro [S.C. METAV-Research and Development S.R.L., Bucharest, 31C. A. Rosetti, 020011 (Romania); Trusca, Roxana Doina; Soare, Maria-Laura [S.C. METAV-Research and Development S.R.L., Bucharest, 31C. A. Rosetti, 020011 (Romania); Fratila, Corneliu [Research and Development National Institute for Nonferrous and Rare Metals, Pantelimon, 102 Biruintei, 077145 (Romania); Krasicka-Cydzik, Elzbieta [University of Zielona Gora, Department of Biomedical Engineering Division, 9 Licealna, 65-417 (Poland); Stan, Miruna-Silvia; Dinischiotu, Anca [University of Bucharest, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 36-46 Mihail Kogalniceanu, 050107 (Romania)

    2014-04-01

    Titania nanotubes (TNTs) were prepared by anodization on different substrates (titanium, Ti6Al4V and Ti6Al7Nb alloys) in ethylene glycol and glycerol. The influence of the applied potential and processing time on the nanotube diameter and length is analyzed. The as-formed nanotube layers are amorphous but they become crystalline when subjected to subsequent thermal treatment in air at 550 °C; TNT layers grown on titanium and Ti6Al4V alloy substrates consist of anatase and rutile, while those grown on Ti6Al7Nb alloy consist only of anatase. The nanotube layers grown on Ti6Al7Nb alloy are less homogeneous, with supplementary islands of smaller diameter nanotubes, spread across the surface. Better adhesion and proliferation of osteoblasts was found for the nanotubes grown on all three substrates by comparison to an unprocessed titanium plate. The sensitivity towards bovine alkaline phosphatase was investigated mainly by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy in relation to the crystallinity, the diameter and the nature of the anodization electrolyte of the TNT/Ti samples. The measuring capacity of the annealed nanotubes of 50 nm diameter grown in glycerol was demonstrated and the corresponding calibration curve was built for the concentration range of 0.005–0.1 mg/mL. - Highlights: • Titania nanotubes (TNTs) on Ti, Ti6Al4V and Ti6Al7Nb substrates were prepared. • Quantitative dependences of anodization conditions on TNT features were established. • Morphology and electrochemical tests revealed inhomogeneity of TNT/Ti6Al7Nb films. • Particular characteristics of TNT films induce electrochemical sensitivity to ALP. • Annealed TNT/Ti impedimetric sensitivity towards ALP was demonstrated and quantified.

  3. Highly Flexible Wrinkled Carbon Nanotube Thin Film Strain Sensor to Monitor Human Movement

    OpenAIRE

    Park, S-J; Kim, J; Chu, M.; Khine, M

    2016-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) on shape memory polymers result in densified, nano- to microscale wrinkles upon heat-induced shrinkage. These wrinkled CNT bundles can be transferred into soft materials similar to the human epidermis for extremely highly stretchable skin mountable strain sensors with a dynamic range of over 700%.

  4. Photon-drag in single-walled carbon nanotube and silver-palladium films: the effect of polarization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikheev, Konstantin G.; Saushin, Aleksandr S.; Zonov, Ruslan G.; Nasibulin, Albert G.; Mikheev, Gennady M.

    2016-03-01

    Polarization influence on the photovoltaic current raised due to the photon-drag effect in the single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) films and nanostructured silver-palladium (Ag/Pd) resistive films is examined at the wavelengths of 532 and 1064 nm of nanosecond laser pulses. The SWNT films were synthesized by the aerosol chemical vapor deposition technique. Ag/Pd films, consisting of AgPd alloy and palladium oxide (PdO), were prepared by burning a special paste on a ceramic substrate. The films obtained were characterized by Raman spectroscopy. It is shown that the Ag/Pd films Raman spectra consist of PdO peak that moves from 650 cm-1 to 628 cm-1 as the excitation He-Ne laser power increases. The photocurrent was measured at the oblique incidence of the laser beam on the film in the direction perpendicular to the plane of incidence. It is found that the transverse photocurrent in the SWNT films at circular polarization is absent and does not depend on the direction of the electric field vector rotation (the sign of the circular polarization) of the incident irradiation. The photocurrent in the Ag/Pd films at circular polarized irradiation is significant and depends on the circular polarization sign. The results obtained demonstrate the potential applications of the Ag/Pd resistive films as a sensor of the circular polarization sign of the incident light pulse in a wide wavelength range.

  5. Immobilization of carbon nanotubes on functionalized graphene film grown by chemical vapor deposition and characterization of the hybrid material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prashanta Dhoj Adhikari

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the surface functionalization of graphene films grown by chemical vapor deposition and fabrication of a hybrid material combining multi-walled carbon nanotubes and graphene (CNT–G. Amine-terminated self-assembled monolayers were prepared on graphene by the UV-modification of oxidized groups introduced onto the film surface. Amine-termination led to effective interaction with functionalized CNTs to assemble a CNT–G hybrid through covalent bonding. Characterization clearly showed no defects of the graphene film after the immobilization reaction with CNT. In addition, the hybrid graphene material revealed a distinctive CNT–G structure and p–n type electrical properties. The introduction of functional groups on the graphene film surface and fabrication of CNT–G hybrids with the present technique could provide an efficient, novel route to device fabrication.

  6. Immobilization of carbon nanotubes on functionalized graphene film grown by chemical vapor deposition and characterization of the hybrid material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report the surface functionalization of graphene films grown by chemical vapor deposition and fabrication of a hybrid material combining multi-walled carbon nanotubes and graphene (CNT–G). Amine-terminated self-assembled monolayers were prepared on graphene by the UV-modification of oxidized groups introduced onto the film surface. Amine-termination led to effective interaction with functionalized CNTs to assemble a CNT–G hybrid through covalent bonding. Characterization clearly showed no defects of the graphene film after the immobilization reaction with CNT. In addition, the hybrid graphene material revealed a distinctive CNT–G structure and p–n type electrical properties. The introduction of functional groups on the graphene film surface and fabrication of CNT–G hybrids with the present technique could provide an efficient, novel route to device fabrication. (paper)

  7. Enhanced field emission characteristics of nitrogen-doped carbon nanotube films grown by microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nitrogen-doped carbon nanotube (CNT) films have been synthesized by simple microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition technique. The morphology and structures were investigated by scanning electron microscopy and high resolution transmission electron microscopy. Morphology of the films was found to be greatly affected by the nature of the substrates. Vertically aligned CNTs were observed on mirror polished Si substrates. On the other hand, randomly oriented flower like morphology of CNTs was found on mechanically polished ones. All the CNTs were found to have bamboo structure with very sharp tips. These films showed very good field emission characteristics with threshold field in the range of 2.65-3.55 V/μm. CNT film with flower like morphology showed lower threshold field as compared to vertically aligned structures. Open graphite edges on the side surface of the bamboo-shaped CNT are suggested to enhance the field emission characteristics which may act as additional emission sites

  8. Improvement on wear resistance property of polyurethane film by compositing plasma-treated multi-walled carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Daisuke; Nakamura, Keiji

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the effect of plasma-treated multi-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) that are composited into a polyurethane (PU) film. In this journal article, we especially focused on one of mechanical properties of PU film, the wear resistance, to find how the plasma-treated CNTs give contributions to improve the resistance. Our experimental results showed that plasma-treated CNTs enhanced the wear resistance, in particular, when the CNTs treated with the plasma that was made of nitrogen-oxygen mixture gas. Then, we made measurements with infrared absorption spectroscopy to find the possible causes of the improvement. The measurement showed that the surface of the CNTs treated with nitrogen-oxygen plasma had an indication of isocyanate group, which generally hardens PU film. The plasma likely attached the functional group on CNTs, and then the CNTs added extra wear resistance of a polyurethane film.

  9. Anticorrosion Coating of Carbon Nanotube/Polytetrafluoroethylene Composite Film on the Stainless Steel Bipolar Plate for Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Yoshiyuki Show; Toshimitsu Nakashima; Yuta Fukami

    2013-01-01

    Composite film of carbon nanotube (CNT) and polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) was formed from dispersion fluids of CNT and PTFE. The composite film showed high electrical conductivity in the range of 0.1–13 S/cm and hydrophobic nature. This composite film was applied to stainless steel (SS) bipolar plates of the proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) as anticorrosion film. This coating decreased the contact resistance between the surface of the bipolar plate and the membrane electrode assemb...

  10. Thin films of single-walled carbon nanotubes promote human osteoblastic cells (Saos-2) proliferation in low serum concentrations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akasaka, Tsukasa, E-mail: akasaka@den.hokudai.ac.jp [Graduate School of Dental Medicine, Hokkaido University, Kita 13 Nishi 7, Kita-ku, Sapporo, 060-8586 (Japan); Yokoyama, Atsuro; Matsuoka, Makoto [Graduate School of Dental Medicine, Hokkaido University, Kita 13 Nishi 7, Kita-ku, Sapporo, 060-8586 (Japan); Hashimoto, Takeshi [Meijo Nano Carbon Co., Ltd., Otsubashi Bldg. 4F, 3-4-10, Marunouchi, Naka-ku, Nagoya, 460-0002 (Japan); Watari, Fumio [Graduate School of Dental Medicine, Hokkaido University, Kita 13 Nishi 7, Kita-ku, Sapporo, 060-8586 (Japan)

    2010-04-06

    One strategy used for the regeneration of bone is the development of cell culture substrates and scaffolds that can control osteoblast proliferation and differentiation. In recent investigations, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been utilized as scaffolds for osteoblastic cell cultures; however, there are only a few reports describing the proliferation of osteoblastic cells on thin CNT films; in particular, the effects of serum concentration on cell proliferation have not been studied. In the present study, we prepared culture dishes with homogeneous thin or thick films of non-modified CNTs and examined the effect of serum concentrations on human osteoblastic cells (Saos-2) proliferation in these culture dishes. We demonstrated that the ratio of cell proliferation was strongly affected by the concentration of serum. Interestingly, single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) thin films were found to be the most effective substrate for the proliferation of Saos-2 cells in low concentrations of serum. Thus, thin SWNT films may be used as an effective biomaterial for the culture of Saos-2 cells in low serum concentrations.

  11. Thin films of single-walled carbon nanotubes promote human osteoblastic cells (Saos-2) proliferation in low serum concentrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One strategy used for the regeneration of bone is the development of cell culture substrates and scaffolds that can control osteoblast proliferation and differentiation. In recent investigations, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been utilized as scaffolds for osteoblastic cell cultures; however, there are only a few reports describing the proliferation of osteoblastic cells on thin CNT films; in particular, the effects of serum concentration on cell proliferation have not been studied. In the present study, we prepared culture dishes with homogeneous thin or thick films of non-modified CNTs and examined the effect of serum concentrations on human osteoblastic cells (Saos-2) proliferation in these culture dishes. We demonstrated that the ratio of cell proliferation was strongly affected by the concentration of serum. Interestingly, single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) thin films were found to be the most effective substrate for the proliferation of Saos-2 cells in low concentrations of serum. Thus, thin SWNT films may be used as an effective biomaterial for the culture of Saos-2 cells in low serum concentrations.

  12. [NEURONAL DIFFERENTIATION OF PC12 CELL LINE AND MURINE NEURAL STEM CELLS ON THE CARBON NANOTUBES FILMS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posypanova, G A; Gaiduchenko, A I; Moskaleva, E Yu; Fedorov, G E

    2016-01-01

    The study of the interaction of nerve cells with specially designed substrates (scaffolds) with different surface characteristics at the nanoscale is a necessary step in the development of methods of stimulation of regeneration of nervous tissues, as well as to create next generation of bioelectronic devices. A promising material for such scaffolds may be carbon nanotubes (CNT) that are flexible films of graphene rolled into nano-sized cylindrical tubes. CNT were produced by chemical deposition from the gas phase. The analysis of the PC12 cells cultivated on quartz glass coated by carbon nanotubes films using electron and light microscopy has shown that CNT stimulate the proliferation and do not inhibit neuronal differentiation of PC12 cells. We have found that it is possible to obtain differentiated neurons from murine neural stem cells on the quartz glasses covered with CNT films. The data obtained indicate that the CNT films produced by chemical deposition from the gas phase onto quartz glass may be used as the electro conductive scaffold to obtain and study the functions of neural cells and possibly of mature neurons. PMID:27228654

  13. Applications of Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajayan, Pulickel M.; Zhou, Otto Z.

    Carbon nanotubes have attracted the fancy of many scientists worldwide. The small dimensions, strength and the remarkable physical properties of these structures make them a very unique material with a whole range of promising applications. In this review we describe some of the important materials science applications of carbon nanotubes. Specifically we discuss the electronic and electrochemical applications of nanotubes, nanotubes as mechanical reinforcements in high performance composites, nanotube-based field emitters, and their use as nanoprobes in metrology and biological and chemical investigations, and as templates for the creation of other nanostructures. Electronic properties and device applications of nanotubes are treated elsewhere in the book. The challenges that ensue in realizing some of these applications are also discussed from the point of view of manufacturing, processing, and cost considerations.

  14. Organic modification of carbon nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The organic modification of carbon nanotubes is a novel research field being developed recently. In this article, the history and newest progress of organic modification of carbon nanotubes are reviewed from two aspects:organic covalent modification and organic noncovalent modification of carbon nanotubes. The preparation and properties of organic modified carbon nanotubes are discussed in detail. In addition, the prospective development of organic modification of carbon nanotubes is suggested.

  15. Analysis of variance on thickness and electrical conductivity measurements of carbon nanotube thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Min-Yang; Yang, Mingchia; Vargas, Emily; Neff, Kyle; Vanli, Arda; Liang, Richard

    2016-09-01

    One of the major challenges towards controlling the transfer of electrical and mechanical properties of nanotubes into nanocomposites is the lack of adequate measurement systems to quantify the variations in bulk properties while the nanotubes were used as the reinforcement material. In this study, we conducted one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) on thickness and conductivity measurements. By analyzing the data collected from both experienced and inexperienced operators, we found some operation details users might overlook that resulted in variations, since conductivity measurements of CNT thin films are very sensitive to thickness measurements. In addition, we demonstrated how issues in measurements damaged samples and limited the number of replications resulting in large variations in the electrical conductivity measurement results. Based on this study, we proposed a faster, more reliable approach to measure the thickness of CNT thin films that operators can follow to make these measurement processes less dependent on operator skills.

  16. Meissner effect in films of ropes of boron-doped single-walled carbon nanotubes; Correlation with applied pressure and boron-doped multi-walled nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Superconductivity in carbon nanotubes (CNTs) is attracting considerable attention. Recently, we have reported successful boron doping into single-walled CNTs (SWNTs) and also revealed its correlation with superconductivity. In the present study, we report results of pressure-applied magnetization measurements in films consisting of ropes of boron-doped SWNTs. It reveals that Tc and magnitude for Meissner effect is mostly independent of applied pressure, while magnitude of graphite diamagnetism drastically increases as pressure increases. We also report result of resistance measurements in the samples and also correlation of boron doped SWNTs with multi-walled CNTs, in which we reported superconductivity previously.

  17. Mn(OH){sub 2}/multi-walled carbon nanotube composite thin films prepared by spray coating for flexible supercapacitive devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Jiun-Shing [Department of Materials Engineering, Tatung University, 40 Zhongshan North Road, 3rd Section, Taipei 104, Taiwan, ROC (China); Hu, Yi, E-mail: huyi@ttu.edu.tw [Department of Materials Engineering, Tatung University, 40 Zhongshan North Road, 3rd Section, Taipei 104, Taiwan, ROC (China); Chuang, Tao-Liang; Huang, Chien-Lung [Metal Industries Research and Development Centre, Kaohsiung, 1001 Kaonan Highway, Kaohsiung 81160, Taiwan, ROC (China)

    2013-10-01

    Mn(OH){sub 2}/multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) composite thin films were obtained by spray coating on flexible indium tin oxide/polyethylene terephthalate substrate. The precursors for thin film deposition were prepared by completely mixing MWCNTs and KMnO{sub 4} in deionized water. The morphological characteristics of the films were examined by field emission scanning electronic microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Phase evolution of the thin films was characterized by X-ray diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. As a result of the deposition process, Mn(OH){sub 2} did not only cover the surface of MWCNTs uniformly but also embed in MWCNTs. The capacitive properties of the thin films were investigated by electrochemical measurements and the capacitance increased as the weight ratio of KMnO{sub 4}/MWCNTs increased up to 1.6. The highest specific capacitance obtained at a scan rate of 20 mV s{sup −1} was 297.5 F/g for the composite thin film with the weight ratio of KMnO{sub 4}/MWCNTs of 1.2. - Highlights: • Mn(OH){sub 2}/carbon nanotube films on flexible substrate were obtained by spray coating. • Mn(OH){sub 2} uniformly covers on or embeds in the carbon nanotube. • The highest capacitance is 297.5 F/g with weight ratio of KMnO{sub 4}/carbon nanotube = 1.2.

  18. A Review: Carbon Nanotube-Based Piezoresistive Strain Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waris Obitayo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of carbon nanotubes for piezoresistive strain sensors has acquired significant attention due to its unique electromechanical properties. In this comprehensive review paper, we discussed some important aspects of carbon nanotubes for strain sensing at both the nanoscale and macroscale. Carbon nanotubes undergo changes in their band structures when subjected to mechanical deformations. This phenomenon makes them applicable for strain sensing applications. This paper signifies the type of carbon nanotubes best suitable for piezoresistive strain sensors. The electrical resistivities of carbon nanotube thin film increase linearly with strain, making it an ideal material for a piezoresistive strain sensor. Carbon nanotube composite films, which are usually fabricated by mixing small amounts of single-walled or multiwalled carbon nanotubes with selected polymers, have shown promising characteristics of piezoresistive strain sensors. Studies also show that carbon nanotubes display a stable and predictable voltage response as a function of temperature.

  19. Enhanced field emission from cerium hexaboride coated multiwalled carbon nanotube composite films: A potential material for next generation electron sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patra, Rajkumar; Ghosh, S., E-mail: santanu1@physics.iitd.ac.in [Nanostech Laboratory, Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, New Delhi-16 (India); Sheremet, E.; Rodriguez, R. D.; Lehmann, D.; Gordan, O. D.; Zahn, D. R. T. [Semiconductor Physics, Technische Universität Chemnitz, 09126 Chemnitz (Germany); Jha, M.; Ganguli, A. K. [Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, New Delhi-16 (India); Schmidt, H. [Material Systems for Nanoelectronics, Technische Universität Chemnitz, 09126 Chemnitz (Germany); Schulze, S. [Solid Surfaces Analysis, Technische Universität Chemnitz, 09126 Chemnitz (Germany); Schmidt, O. G. [Material Systems for Nanoelectronics, Technische Universität Chemnitz, 09126 Chemnitz (Germany); Institute for Integrative Nanosciences, IFW Dresden, Helmholtzstrasse 20, 01069 Dresden (Germany)

    2014-03-07

    Intensified field emission (FE) current from temporally stable cerium hexaboride (CeB{sub 6}) coated carbon nanotubes (CNTs) on Si substrate is reported aiming to propose the new composite material as a potential candidate for future generation electron sources. The film was synthesized by a combination of chemical and physical deposition processes. A remarkable increase in maximum current density, field enhancement factor, and a reduction in turn-on field and threshold field with comparable temporal current stability are observed in CeB{sub 6}-coated CNT film when compared to pristine CeB{sub 6} film. The elemental composition and surface morphology of the films, as examined by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and energy dispersive X-ray measurements, show decoration of CeB{sub 6} nanoparticles on top and walls of CNTs. Chemical functionalization of CNTs by the incorporation of CeB{sub 6} nanoparticles is evident by a remarkable increase in intensity of the 2D band in Raman spectrum of coated films as compared to pristine CeB{sub 6} films. The enhanced FE properties of the CeB{sub 6} coated CNT films are correlated to the microstructure of the films.

  20. Enhanced field emission from cerium hexaboride coated multiwalled carbon nanotube composite films: A potential material for next generation electron sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Intensified field emission (FE) current from temporally stable cerium hexaboride (CeB6) coated carbon nanotubes (CNTs) on Si substrate is reported aiming to propose the new composite material as a potential candidate for future generation electron sources. The film was synthesized by a combination of chemical and physical deposition processes. A remarkable increase in maximum current density, field enhancement factor, and a reduction in turn-on field and threshold field with comparable temporal current stability are observed in CeB6-coated CNT film when compared to pristine CeB6 film. The elemental composition and surface morphology of the films, as examined by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and energy dispersive X-ray measurements, show decoration of CeB6 nanoparticles on top and walls of CNTs. Chemical functionalization of CNTs by the incorporation of CeB6 nanoparticles is evident by a remarkable increase in intensity of the 2D band in Raman spectrum of coated films as compared to pristine CeB6 films. The enhanced FE properties of the CeB6 coated CNT films are correlated to the microstructure of the films

  1. Nanocrystalline cobalt oxides for carbon nanotube growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Kun; Jayatissa, Ahalapitiya H.; Jayasuriya, Ambalangodage C.

    2007-09-01

    Thin Films of nanocrystalline cobalt oxide were formed by sol-gel method. Structure, optical properties and surface properties of these films were investigated by numerous characterization techniques. These films were successfully fabricated on glass substrates below 500°C. . Micropatterns of cobalt oxide thin films were also fabricated on glass and silicon substrates by employing a lift-off method. Crystal size of these nanocrystalline cobalt films could be successfully controllable by varying the amount of cobalt precursors and number of layers. These films were used as the seeding layers for carbon nanotube growth in a CVD process By changing the concentration of monomer precursors in the solgel coating solutions, different size nanoclusters hence different size carbon nanotubes could be synthesized in CVD process. This method can be used for controlled growth of carbon nanotubes for many different applications. In this paper, detail of these experimental results will be presented.

  2. Morphological and compositional engineering of Ni/carbon nanotube composite film via a novel cyclic voltammetric route

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Yu Jun Yang

    2012-08-01

    Ni/multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) composite films were deposited on the glassy carbon electrode (GCE) by a Ni plating bath containing homogeneously dispersed MWCNTs using polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) as dispersion additive. Incorporation of MWCNTs into Ni matrix was greatly enhanced by the application of cyclic voltammetric (CV) deposition technique. The structure and nature of the Ni/MWCNT were characterized by field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The results show that the content of MWCNT and the morphology of the deposited Ni/MWCNT composite film can be controlled by selecting the appropriate electroplating conditions. Further study indicates that the obtained Ni/MWCNT showed excellent electro-catalytic activity for the oxidation of ethanol in alkaline solution.

  3. The fabrication of a label-free electrochemical immunosensor using Nafion/carbon nanotubes/charged pyridinecarboxaldehyde composite film.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiangyang; Shen, Youming; Shen, Guangyu; Wang, Sha

    2016-07-01

    A label-free electrochemical immunosensor based on Nafion/carbon nanotubes (CNTs)/charged pyridinecarboxaldehyde composite film was developed for the detection of hepatitis B surface antigen. Nafion/CNTs/charged pyridinecarboxaldehyde nanocomposites were prepared by dispersing charged pyridinecarboxaldehyde and CNTs in Nafion solution. The nanocomposites were cast on the electrode surface to form aldehyde-terminated composite film that can covalently bind antibody on the film without using other reagent. The immunosensor response was linearly changed with hepatitis B surface antigen concentration in the range from 0.1 to 25 ng ml(-1) with a detection limit (signal/noise ratio = 3) of 0.04 ng ml(-1). Some important advantages such as simple preparation, good stability, reproducibility, and selectivity of the immunosensor were achieved. PMID:27060531

  4. Conducting carbonized polyaniline nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mentus, Slavko; Ćirić-Marjanović, Gordana; Trchová, Miroslava; Stejskal, Jaroslav

    2009-06-01

    Conducting nitrogen-containing carbon nanotubes were synthesized by the carbonization of self-assembled polyaniline nanotubes protonated with sulfuric acid. Carbonization was carried out in a nitrogen atmosphere at a heating rate of 10 °C min-1 up to a maximum temperature of 800 °C. The carbonized polyaniline nanotubes which have a typical outer diameter of 100-260 nm, with an inner diameter of 20-170 nm and a length extending from 0.5 to 0.8 µm, accompanied with very thin nanotubes with outer diameters of 8-14 nm, inner diameters 3.0-4.5 nm and length extending from 0.3 to 1.0 µm, were observed by scanning and transmission electron microscopies. Elemental analysis showed 9 wt% of nitrogen in the carbonized product. Conductivity of the nanotubular PANI precursor, amounting to 0.04 S cm-1, increased to 0.7 S cm-1 upon carbonization. Molecular structure of carbonized polyaniline nanotubes has been analyzed by FTIR and Raman spectroscopies, and their paramagnetic characteristics were compared with the starting PANI nanotubes by EPR spectroscopy.

  5. Conducting carbonized polyaniline nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mentus, Slavko; Ciric-Marjanovic, Gordana [Faculty of Physical Chemistry, University of Belgrade, Studentski trg 12-16, 11158 Belgrade (Serbia); Trchova, Miroslava; Stejskal, Jaroslav [Institute of Macromolecular Chemistry, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Heyrovsky Square 2, 162 06 Prague 6 (Czech Republic)], E-mail: gordana@ffh.bg.ac.rs

    2009-06-17

    Conducting nitrogen-containing carbon nanotubes were synthesized by the carbonization of self-assembled polyaniline nanotubes protonated with sulfuric acid. Carbonization was carried out in a nitrogen atmosphere at a heating rate of 10 deg. C min{sup -1} up to a maximum temperature of 800 deg. C. The carbonized polyaniline nanotubes which have a typical outer diameter of 100-260 nm, with an inner diameter of 20-170 nm and a length extending from 0.5 to 0.8 {mu}m, accompanied with very thin nanotubes with outer diameters of 8-14 nm, inner diameters 3.0-4.5 nm and length extending from 0.3 to 1.0 {mu}m, were observed by scanning and transmission electron microscopies. Elemental analysis showed 9 wt% of nitrogen in the carbonized product. Conductivity of the nanotubular PANI precursor, amounting to 0.04 S cm{sup -1}, increased to 0.7 S cm{sup -1} upon carbonization. Molecular structure of carbonized polyaniline nanotubes has been analyzed by FTIR and Raman spectroscopies, and their paramagnetic characteristics were compared with the starting PANI nanotubes by EPR spectroscopy.

  6. Temperature and voltage dependent current-voltage behavior of single-walled carbon nanotube transparent conducting films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ze-Chen; Geng, Hong-Zhang; Wang, Yan; Yang, Hai-Jie; Da, Shi-Xun; Ding, Er-Xiong; Liu, Juncheng; Yu, Ping; Fu, Yun-Qiao; Li, Xu; Pan, Hui

    2015-11-01

    High purified single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) were dispersed in water and transparent conducting films (TCFs) were fabricated by a spray coating. The produced uniform SWCNT-TCFs treated by nitric acid have a relatively low sheet resistance and high transmittance. The current-voltage (I-V) behaviors of the TCFs were measured at room to higher temperature during the heating or cooling process. It was found that the I-V behavior of TCFs strongly dependent on the temperature and applied voltage. The sheet resistance showed semiconductor behavior at low temperature and low voltage, while it showed metallic behavior at high temperature and high voltage.

  7. Temperature dependence of photoconductivity at 0.7 eV in single-wall carbon nanotube films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yukitaka Matsuoka, Akihiko Fujiwara, Naoki Ogawa, Kenjiro Miyano, Hiromichi Kataura, Yutaka Maniwa, Shinzo Suzuki and Yohji Achiba

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Temperature dependence of photoconductivity has been investigated for single-wall carbon nanotube films at 0.7 eV. In order to clarify the effect of atmosphere on photoconductivity, measurements have been performed under helium and nitrogen gas flow in the temperature range from 10 K to room temperature (RT and from 100 K to RT, respectively. Photoconductive response monotonously increases with a decrease in temperature and tends to saturate around 10 K. No clear difference in photoconductive response under different atmosphere was observed. We discuss the mechanism of photoconductivity at 0.7 eV.

  8. FLUIDIZATION OF CARBON NANOTUBES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fei Wei; Cang Huang; Yao Wang

    2005-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) can be fluidized in the form of fluidlike agglomerates made of many three-dimensional sub-agglomerates, having a multi-stage agglomerate (MSA) structure and containing large amounts of twisting CNTs of micrometer magnitude.

  9. Carbon nanotubes: Fibrillar pharmacology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostarelos, Kostas

    2010-10-01

    The mechanisms by which chemically functionalized carbon nanotubes flow in blood and are excreted through the kidneys illustrate the unconventional behaviour of these fibrillar nanostructures, and the opportunities they offer as components for the design of advanced delivery vehicles.

  10. Carbon Nanotubes - Polymer Composites with Enhanced Conductivity using Functionalized Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramasubramaniam, Rajagopal; Chen, Jian; Gupta, Rishi

    2003-03-01

    Individual carbon nanotubes show superior electrical, mechanical and thermal properties [1]. Composite materials using carbon nanotubes as fillers are predicted to show similar superior properties. However, realization of such composites has been plagued by poor dispersion of carbon nanotubes in solvents and in polymer matrices. We have developed a method to homogenously disperse carbon nanotubes in polymer matrices using functionalized nanotubes [2]. Thin films of functionalized single walled nanotubes (SWNT) - polystyrene composites and functionalized SWNT - polycarbonate composites were prepared using solution evaporation and spin coating. Both of the composites show several orders of magnitude increase in conductivity for less than 1 wt thresholds of the composites are less than 0.2 wt nanotubes. We attribute the enhanced conduction to the superior dispersion of the functionalized nanotubes in the polymer matrix and to the reduced nanotube waviness resulting from the rigid backbone of the conjugated polymer. References: [1]. R. H. Baughman, A. A. Zakhidov and W. A. de Heer, Science v297, p787 (2002); [2]. J. Chen, H. Liu, W. A. Weimer, M. D. Halls, D. H. Waldeck and G. C. Walker, J. Am. Chem. Soc. v124, p9034 (2002).

  11. Enhanced electrocatalytic oxygen evolution of α-Co(OH)2 nanosheets on carbon nanotube/polyimide films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yimin; Li, Xin; Wang, Tingxia; Wang, Chunming

    2016-05-01

    The future of energy supply depends on innovative breakthroughs in the development of highly efficient, sustainable and low-cost systems for renewable energy conversion and storage. Water splitting is a promising and appealing solution. In this work, we report Co(OH)2 on the carbon nanotube/polyimide film (PI/CNT-Co(OH)2) as an efficient electrocatalyst for the oxygen evolution reaction (OER). The PI/CNT film allows intimate growth of Co(OH)2 nanosheets on its surface. The nanosheet structure of Co(OH)2 and the underlying PI/CNT film facilitate the good OER performance of the PI/CNT-Co(OH)2 film. Co(OH)2 nanosheets on the PI/CNT film afford an earlier onset of oxygen evolution, a low overpotential of 317 mV and a small Tafel slope of 49 mV per decade in alkaline media. This work applies the PI/CNT film in water splitting to enhance the OER electrocatalytic activity of Co(OH)2, which opens up a promising avenue for the exploration of highly active electrocatalysts that can replace noble-metal based catalysts for the OER.The future of energy supply depends on innovative breakthroughs in the development of highly efficient, sustainable and low-cost systems for renewable energy conversion and storage. Water splitting is a promising and appealing solution. In this work, we report Co(OH)2 on the carbon nanotube/polyimide film (PI/CNT-Co(OH)2) as an efficient electrocatalyst for the oxygen evolution reaction (OER). The PI/CNT film allows intimate growth of Co(OH)2 nanosheets on its surface. The nanosheet structure of Co(OH)2 and the underlying PI/CNT film facilitate the good OER performance of the PI/CNT-Co(OH)2 film. Co(OH)2 nanosheets on the PI/CNT film afford an earlier onset of oxygen evolution, a low overpotential of 317 mV and a small Tafel slope of 49 mV per decade in alkaline media. This work applies the PI/CNT film in water splitting to enhance the OER electrocatalytic activity of Co(OH)2, which opens up a promising avenue for the exploration of highly active

  12. Effect of cross-linkable polymer on the morphology and properties of transparent multi-walled carbon nanotube conductive films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, we fabricated optically transparent and electrically conductive multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) thin films using a spray-coating technique. The transparency and the electrical resistance of thin film are dependent on the nanotube content deposited on the polyethylene terephthalate (PET) substrate. Poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) and poly(N-vinyl pyrrolidone) (PVP) were used as adhesion promoters to improve MWCNT coating more significantly. The cross-linked polymer resulted in a superior bond between the MWCNTs and the substrates. The surface electrical resistance was significantly lower than the original sheet after nitric acid (HNO3) treatment because of the removed surfactant and the increased interconnecting networks of MWCNT bundles, thus improving the electrical and optical properties of the films. Stronger interaction between the MWCNTs and the substrates resulted in lower decomposition of the polymer chain and less amounts of MWCNTs separated into the HNO3 solution. The lower sheet electrical resistance of PVP/PAA-g-MWCNT conductive films on the PET substrate was because of a more complete conductive path with the cross-linked polymer than that without. Such an improved sheet of electrical resistance varied from 8.83 x 104 Ω/□ to 2.65 x 103 Ω/□ with 5.0 wt.% PVP/PAA-g-MWCNT sprayed on the PET after acid treatment.

  13. Effect of cross-linkable polymer on the morphology and properties of transparent multi-walled carbon nanotube conductive films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Yuan-Li; Tien, Hsi-Wen [Department of Chemical Engineering, National Tsing-Hua University, Hsin-Chu 30043, Taiwan (China); Ma, Chen-Chi M., E-mail: ccma@che.nthu.edu.tw [Department of Chemical Engineering, National Tsing-Hua University, Hsin-Chu 30043, Taiwan (China); Teng, Chih-Chun [Department of Chemical Engineering, National Tsing-Hua University, Hsin-Chu 30043, Taiwan (China); Yu, Yi-Hsiuan [Department of Chemical Engineering, National Tsing-Hua University, Hsin-Chu 30043, Taiwan (China); Chemical Systems Research Division, Chung Shan Institute of Science and Technology, Tao Yuan 32546, Taiwan (China); Yang, Shin-Yi [Department of Chemical Engineering, National Tsing-Hua University, Hsin-Chu 30043, Taiwan (China); Wei, Ming-Hsiung [Chemical Systems Research Division, Chung Shan Institute of Science and Technology, Tao Yuan 32546, Taiwan (China); Wu, Sheng-Yen [Department of Chemical Engineering, National Tsing-Hua University, Hsin-Chu 30043, Taiwan (China)

    2011-10-15

    In this study, we fabricated optically transparent and electrically conductive multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) thin films using a spray-coating technique. The transparency and the electrical resistance of thin film are dependent on the nanotube content deposited on the polyethylene terephthalate (PET) substrate. Poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) and poly(N-vinyl pyrrolidone) (PVP) were used as adhesion promoters to improve MWCNT coating more significantly. The cross-linked polymer resulted in a superior bond between the MWCNTs and the substrates. The surface electrical resistance was significantly lower than the original sheet after nitric acid (HNO{sub 3}) treatment because of the removed surfactant and the increased interconnecting networks of MWCNT bundles, thus improving the electrical and optical properties of the films. Stronger interaction between the MWCNTs and the substrates resulted in lower decomposition of the polymer chain and less amounts of MWCNTs separated into the HNO{sub 3} solution. The lower sheet electrical resistance of PVP/PAA-g-MWCNT conductive films on the PET substrate was because of a more complete conductive path with the cross-linked polymer than that without. Such an improved sheet of electrical resistance varied from 8.83 x 10{sup 4} {Omega}/{open_square} to 2.65 x 10{sup 3} {Omega}/{open_square} with 5.0 wt.% PVP/PAA-g-MWCNT sprayed on the PET after acid treatment.

  14. Complexes of carbon nanotubes with oligonucleotides in thin Langmuir-Blodgett films to detect electrochemically hybridization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egorov, A. S.; Egorova, V. P.; Krylova, H. V.; Lipnevich, I. V.; Orekhovskaya, T. I.; Veligura, A. A.; Govorov, M. I.; Shulitsky, B. G.

    2014-10-01

    Self-assembled complexes consisting of thin multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and DNA-oligonucleotides which are able to a cooperative binding to complementary oligonucleotides have been investigated. It was establised a high-performance charge transport in nanostructured Langmuir-Blodgett complexes thin MWCNTs/DNA. A method to electrochemically detect DNA hybridization on the self-organized structures has been proposed.

  15. Nanotube composite carbon fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, R.; Jacques, D.; Rao, A. M.; Rantell, T.; Derbyshire, F.; Chen, Y.; Chen, J.; Haddon, R. C.

    1999-08-01

    Single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) were dispersed in isotropic petroleum pitch matrices to form nanotube composite carbon fibers with enhanced mechanical and electrical properties. We find that the tensile strength, modulus, and electrical conductivity of a pitch composite fiber with 5 wt % loading of purified SWNTs are enhanced by ˜90%, ˜150%, and 340% respectively, as compared to the corresponding values in unmodified isotropic pitch fibers. These results serve to highlight the potential that exits for developing a spectrum of material properties through the selection of the matrix, nanotube dispersion, alignment, and interfacial bonding.

  16. Carbon nanotube network film directly grown on carbon cloth for high-performance solid-state flexible supercapacitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have received increasing attention as electrode materials for high-performance supercapacitors. We herein present a straightforward method to synthesize CNT films directly on carbon cloths as electrodes for all-solid-state flexible supercapacitors (AFSCs). The as-made highly conductive electrodes possess a three-dimensional (3D) network architecture for fast ion diffusion and good flexibility, leading to an AFSC with a specific capacitance of 106.1 F g−1, an areal capacitance of 38.75 mF cm−2, an ultralong cycle life of 100 000 times (capacitance retention: 99%), a good rate capability (can scan at 1000 mV s−1, at which the capacitance is still ∼37.8% of that at 5 mV s−1), a high energy density (2.4 μW h cm−2) and a high power density (19 mW cm−2). Moreover, our AFSC maintains excellent electrochemical attributes even with serious shape deformation (bending, folding, etc), high mechanical pressure (63 kPa) and a wide temperature window (up to 100 ° C). After charging for only 5 s, three such AFSC devices connected in series can efficiently power a red round LED for 60 s. Our work could pave the way for the design of practical AFSCs, which are expected to be used for various flexible portable/wearable electronic devices in the future. (paper)

  17. ZnO nanopowder induced light scattering for improved visualization of emission sites in carbon nanotube films and arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meško, Marcel; Ou, Qiongrong; Matsuda, Takafumi; Ishikawa, Tomokazu; Veis, Martin; Antoš, Roman; Ogino, Akihisa; Nagatsu, Masaaki

    2009-06-01

    We report on ZnO nanopowder induced light scattering for improved visualization of emission sites in carbon nanotube films and arrays. We observed a significant reduction of the internal multiple light scattering phenomena, which are characteristic for ZnO micropowders. The microsized grains of the commercially available ZnO:Zn (P 15) were reduced to the nanometre scale by pulsed laser ablation at an oxygen ambient pressure of 10 kPa. Our investigations show no crystalline change and no shift of the broad green emission peak at 500 nm for the ZnO nanopowder. For the application in field emission displays, we demonstrate the possibility of achieving cathodoluminescence with a fine pitch size of 100 µm of the patterned pixels without requiring additional electron beam focusing and without a black matrix. Moreover, the presented results show the feasibility of employing ZnO nanopowder as a detection material for the phosphorus screen method, which is able to localize emission sites of carbon nanotube films and arrays with an accuracy comparable to scanning anode field emission microscopy.

  18. ZnO nanopowder induced light scattering for improved visualization of emission sites in carbon nanotube films and arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report on ZnO nanopowder induced light scattering for improved visualization of emission sites in carbon nanotube films and arrays. We observed a significant reduction of the internal multiple light scattering phenomena, which are characteristic for ZnO micropowders. The microsized grains of the commercially available ZnO:Zn (P 15) were reduced to the nanometre scale by pulsed laser ablation at an oxygen ambient pressure of 10 kPa. Our investigations show no crystalline change and no shift of the broad green emission peak at 500 nm for the ZnO nanopowder. For the application in field emission displays, we demonstrate the possibility of achieving cathodoluminescence with a fine pitch size of 100 μm of the patterned pixels without requiring additional electron beam focusing and without a black matrix. Moreover, the presented results show the feasibility of employing ZnO nanopowder as a detection material for the phosphorus screen method, which is able to localize emission sites of carbon nanotube films and arrays with an accuracy comparable to scanning anode field emission microscopy.

  19. The fabrication of a carbon nanotube transparent conductive film by electrophoretic deposition and hot-pressing transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A super-flexible single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) transparent conductive film (TCF) was produced based on a combination of electrophoretic deposition (EPD) and hot-pressing transfer. EPD was performed in a diluted SWCNT suspension with high zeta potential prepared by a pre-dispersion-then-dilution procedure using sodium dodecyl sulfate as the surfactant and negative charge supplier. A SWCNT film was deposited on a stainless steel anode surface by direct current electrophoresis and then transferred to a poly(ethylene terephthalate) substrate by hot-pressing to achieve a flexible SWCNT TCF. The SWCNT TCF obtained by this technique can achieve a sheet resistance of 220 Ω/sq with 81% transparency at 550 nm wavelength and a strong adhesion to the substrate. More importantly, no decrease in the conductivity of the SWCNT TCF was detected after 10 000 cycles of repeated bending. The result indicates that the EPD and hot-pressing transfer technique is an effective approach for fabricating a carbon nanotube TCF with excellent flexibility.

  20. Fabrication of air-stable n-type carbon nanotube thin-film transistors on flexible substrates using bilayer dielectrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guanhong; Li, Qunqing; Jin, Yuanhao; Zhao, Yudan; Xiao, Xiaoyang; Jiang, Kaili; Wang, Jiaping; Fan, Shoushan

    2015-11-14

    Single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) thin-film transistors hold great potential for flexible electronics. However, fabrication of air-stable n-type devices by methods compatible with standard photolithography on flexible substrates is challenging. Here, we demonstrated that by using a bilayer dielectric structure of MgO and atomic layer deposited (ALD) Al2O3 or HfO2, air-stable n-type devices can be obtained. The mechanism for conduction type conversion was elucidated and attributed to the hole depletion in SWNT, the decrease of the trap state density by MgO assimilating adsorbed water molecules in the vicinity of SWNT, and the energy band bending because of the positive fixed charges in the ALD layer. The key advantage of the method is the relatively low temperature (120 or 90 °C) required here for the ALD process because we need not employ this step to totally remove the absorbates on the SWNTs. This advantage facilitates the integration of both p-type and n-type transistors through a simple lift off process and compact CMOS inverters were demonstrated. We also demonstrated that the doping of SWNTs in the channel plays a more important role than the Schottky barriers at the metal contacts in carbon nanotube thin-film transistors, unlike the situation in individual SWNT-based transistors. PMID:26451806

  1. Assemblage contrôlé de graphène et de nanotubes de carbone par transfert de films de tensioactifs pour le photovoltaïque

    OpenAIRE

    Azevedo, Joël

    2013-01-01

    This thesis concerns the study of a new solution-based deposition method for the formation of ultrathin carbon nano-object films on surfaces. Based on the transfer of a surfactant-stabilized water film, this method enables the formation and the study of carbon nanotubes and graphene oxide (GO) films with remarkable properties. The efficiency of the developed approach is proven through the fine-tuning of the film properties. This method is particularly well-suited for the assembly of bidimensi...

  2. Carbon nanotubes decorating methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.D. Dobrzańska-Danikiewicz

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The work is to present and characterise various methods of depositing carbon nanotubes with nanoparticles of precious metals, and also to present the results of own works concerning carbon nanotubes coated with platinum nanoparticles.Design/methodology/approach: Electron transmission and scanning microscopy has been used for imaging the structure and morphology of the nanocomposites obtained and the distribution of nanoparticles on the surface of carbon nanotubes.Findings: The studies carried out with the HRTEM and SEM techniques have confirmed differences in morphology, homogeneity and density of depositing platinum nanoparticles on the surface of carbon nanotubes and its structure.Research limitations/implications: The studies conducted pertained to the process of decorating carbon nanotubes with platinum nanoparticles. Further works are planned aimed at extending the application scope of the newly developed methodology to include the methods of nanotubes decorating with the nanoparticles of other precious metals (mainly palladium and rhodium.Practical implications: CNTs-NPs (Carbon NanoTube-NanoParticles composites can be used as the active elements of sensors featuring high sensitivity, fast action, high selectivity and accuracy, in particular in medicine as cholesterol and glucoses sensors; in the automotive industry for the precision monitoring of working parameters in individual engine components; in environmental conservation to examine CO2, NOx, and CH4 concentrations and for checking leak-tightness and detecting hazardous substances in household and industrial gas installations.Originality/value: The comprehensive characterisation of the methods employed for fabricating nanocomposites consisting of carbon nanotubes deposited with Pt, Pd, Rh, Au, Ag nanoparticles with special consideration to the colloidal process.

  3. Enhanced sensitivity for biosensors: Functionalized P1,5-diaminonaphthalene-multiwall carbon nanotube composite film-modified electrode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A homogeneous electroactive poly(1,5-diaminonaphthalene) (P1,5DAN) and multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWNT) composite film-modified electrode was fabricated by cyclic voltammetry and a casting method. The dispersion and morphology of the MWNTs/P1,5DAN composite film were investigated by scanning electron microscopy. The cyclic voltammograms of the electrode modified by the MWNTs/P15DAN composite film strongly depended on the film thickness and pH of the electrolyte solution. Two absolutely isolated oxidation potentials were found as the MWCNTs were immobilized onto the surface of P1,5DAN film in a pH 6.8 buffer solution containing ascorbic acid (AA) and uric acid (UA). Both peak currents linearly increased with increased concentrations. The electrochemical behavior of UA was not interrupted even in the presence of high-concentration AA given that AA had no observable electrochemical changes at the immobilized concentration. The electrocatalytic behavior of H2O2 was also investigated by steady-state amperometry for the immobilization of horseradish peroxidase on the P1,5DAN film. The plot of the response current vs. H2O2 concentration was linear over the wide concentration range of 0.015–5.37 mM.

  4. Enhanced electrocatalytic oxygen evolution of α-Co(OH)2 nanosheets on carbon nanotube/polyimide films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yimin; Li, Xin; Wang, Tingxia; Wang, Chunming

    2016-05-14

    The future of energy supply depends on innovative breakthroughs in the development of highly efficient, sustainable and low-cost systems for renewable energy conversion and storage. Water splitting is a promising and appealing solution. In this work, we report Co(OH)2 on the carbon nanotube/polyimide film (PI/CNT-Co(OH)2) as an efficient electrocatalyst for the oxygen evolution reaction (OER). The PI/CNT film allows intimate growth of Co(OH)2 nanosheets on its surface. The nanosheet structure of Co(OH)2 and the underlying PI/CNT film facilitate the good OER performance of the PI/CNT-Co(OH)2 film. Co(OH)2 nanosheets on the PI/CNT film afford an earlier onset of oxygen evolution, a low overpotential of 317 mV and a small Tafel slope of 49 mV per decade in alkaline media. This work applies the PI/CNT film in water splitting to enhance the OER electrocatalytic activity of Co(OH)2, which opens up a promising avenue for the exploration of highly active electrocatalysts that can replace noble-metal based catalysts for the OER. PMID:27104298

  5. Robust synthesis and continuous manufacturing of carbon nanotube forests and graphene films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polsen, Erik S.

    Successful translation of the outstanding properties of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and graphene to commercial applications requires highly consistent methods of synthesis, using scalable and cost-effective machines. This thesis presents robust process conditions and a series of process operations that will enable integrated roll-to-roll (R2R) CNT and graphene growth on flexible substrates. First, a comprehensive study was undertaken to establish the sources of variation in laboratory CVD growth of CNT forests. Statistical analysis identified factors that contribute to variation in forest height and density including ambient humidity, sample position in the reactor, and barometric pressure. Implementation of system modifications and user procedures reduced the variation in height and density by 50% and 54% respectively. With improved growth, two new methods for continuous deposition and patterning of catalyst nanoparticles for CNT forest growth were developed, enabling the diameter, density and pattern geometry to be tailored through the control of process parameters. Convective assembly of catalyst nanoparticles in solution enables growth of CNT forests with density 3-fold higher than using sputtered catalyst films with the same growth parameters. Additionally, laser printing of magnetic ink character recognition toner provides a large scale patterning method, with digital control of the pattern density and tunable CNT density via laser intensity. A concentric tube CVD reactor was conceptualized, designed and built for R2R growth of CNT forests and graphene on flexible substrates helically fed through the annular gap. The design enables downstream injection of the hydrocarbon source, and gas consumption is reduced 90% compared to a standard tube furnace. Multi-wall CNT forests are grown continuously on metallic and ceramic fiber substrates at 33 mm/min. High quality, uniform bi- and multi-layer graphene is grown on Cu and Ni foils at 25 - 495 mm/min. A second machine

  6. Carbon nanotubes film preparation on 3D structured silicon substrates by spray coating technique for application in solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper firstly reports the preparation of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) film on silicon substrate of three-dimensional (3D) inverted pyramid structure (IPS) by spray coating. The effect of different substrate temperatures, spraying times and opening sizes on CNTs sidewall covering properties were investigated. The results show that the CNTs covering ratio of sidewall is much lower than that of flat surface and gradually decrease with depth. 40μm×40μm opening obtained the best sidewall covering by CNTs suspension of 40μg/ml at 120°C after 30min spraying so that the CNTs can reach the bottom of IPS and cover about 68.9% sidewall area. At last, it is demonstrated that the output power of the CNTs film-Si solar cell can be enhanced 5.7 times by this method compared to that of the plane structure

  7. One-step synthesis of continuous free-standing Carbon Nanotubes-Titanium oxide composite films as anodes for lithium-ion batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • CNTs/TiO2 compoiste films synthesized are continuous and free-standing. • The film can be directly used as flexible, binder-free Lithium-Ion Battery electrode. • The CNTs/TiO2 electrodes exhibit excellent rate capacity and cyclic stability. • Our strategy is readily applicable to fabricate other CNTs-based composite films. - Abstract: Continuous free-standing Carbon Nanotubes (CNTs)/Titanium oxide (TiO2) composite films were fabricated in a vertical CVD gas flow reactor with water sealing by the One-Step Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) approach. The composite films consist of multiple layers of conductive carbon nanotube networks with titanium oxide nanoparticles decorating on carbon nanotube surface. The as-synthesized flexible and transferrable composite films show excellent electrochemical properties, when the content of tetrabutyl titanate is 19.0 wt.%, which can be promising as binder-free anodes for Lithium-Ion Battery (LIB) applications. It demonstrates remarkably high rate capacity of 150 mAh g−1, as well as excellent high rate cyclic stability over 500 cycles (current density of 3000 mA g−1). Such observations can be attributed to the relatively larger surface area and pore volume comparing with pristine CNT films. Great potentials of CNTs/TiO2 composite films for large-scale production and application in energy devices were shown

  8. A facile and low-cost length sorting of single-wall carbon nanotubes by precipitation and applications for thin-film transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gui, Hui; Chen, Haitian; Khripin, Constantine Y.; Liu, Bilu; Fagan, Jeffrey A.; Zhou, Chongwu; Zheng, Ming

    2016-02-01

    Semiconducting single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) with long lengths are highly desirable for many applications such as thin-film transistors and circuits. Previously reported length sorting techniques usually require sophisticated instrumentation and are hard to scale up. In this paper, we report for the first time a general phenomenon of a length-dependent precipitation of surfactant-dispersed carbon nanotubes by polymers, salts, and their combinations. Polyelectrolytes such as polymethacrylate (PMAA) and polystyrene sulfonate (PSS) are found to be especially effective on cholate and deoxycholate dispersed SWCNTs. By adding PMAA to these nanotube dispersions in a stepwise fashion, we have achieved nanotube precipitation in a length-dependent order: first nanotubes with an average length of 650 nm, and then successively of 450 nm, 350 nm, and 250 nm. A similar effect of nanotube length sorting has also been observed for PSS. To demonstrate the utility of the length fractionation, the 650 nm-long nanotube fraction was subjected to an aqueous two-phase separation to obtain semiconducting enriched nanotubes. Thin-film transistors fabricated with the resulting semiconducting SWCNTs showed a carrier mobility up to 18 cm2 (V s)-1 and an on/off ratio up to 107. Our result sheds new light on the phase behavior of aqueous nanotube dispersions under high concentrations of polymers and salts, and offers a facile, low-cost, and scalable method to produce length sorted semiconducting nanotubes for macroelectronics applications.Semiconducting single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) with long lengths are highly desirable for many applications such as thin-film transistors and circuits. Previously reported length sorting techniques usually require sophisticated instrumentation and are hard to scale up. In this paper, we report for the first time a general phenomenon of a length-dependent precipitation of surfactant-dispersed carbon nanotubes by polymers, salts, and their

  9. Dynamic mechanical analysis of single walled carbon nanotubes/polymethyl methacrylate nanocomposite films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ali Badawi; N. Al-Hosiny

    2015-01-01

    Dynamic mechanical properties of nanocomposite films with different ratios of single walled carbon nan-otubes/polymethyl methacrylate (SWCNTs/PMMA) are studied. Nanocomposite films of different ratios (0, 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 weight percent (wt%)) of SWCNTs/PMMA are fabricated by using a casting technique. The morphological and struc-tural properties of both SWCNT powder and SWCNTs/PMMA nanocomposite films are investigated by using a high resolution transmission electron microscope and x-ray diffractometer respectively. The mechanical properties including the storage modulus, loss modulus, loss factor (tanδ) and stiffness of the nanocomposite film as a function of tempera-ture are recorded by using a dynamic mechanical analyzer at a frequency of 1 Hz. Compared with pure PMMA film, the nanocomposite films with different ratios of SWCNTs/PMMA are observed to have enhanced storage moduli, loss moduli and high stiffness, each of which is a function of temperature. The intensity of the tanδ peak for pure PMMA film is larger than those of the nanocomposite films. The glass transition temperature (Tg) of SWCNTs/PMMA nanocomposite film shifts towards the higher temperature side with respect to pure PMMA film from 91.2 ◦C to 99.5 ◦C as the ratio of SWCNTs/PMMA increases from 0 to 2.0 wt%.

  10. Templated Growth of Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siochik Emilie J. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A method of growing carbon nanotubes uses a synthesized mesoporous si lica template with approximately cylindrical pores being formed there in. The surfaces of the pores are coated with a carbon nanotube precu rsor, and the template with the surfaces of the pores so-coated is th en heated until the carbon nanotube precursor in each pore is convert ed to a carbon nanotube.

  11. Determination of the Carbon Nanotube Concentration and Homogeneity in Resin Films by THz Spectroscopy and Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Ole; Busch, Stefan Frederik; Fischer, Bernd Michael; Koch, Martin

    2012-12-01

    We have recorded the concentration dependent extinction coefficient and refractive index of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNT) embedded in a resin fiber matrix using broadband terahertz time domain spectroscopy. The MWNT concentration levels of the samples range from 0.1 to 1 wt%. The good correlation between the measured absolute values of the transmission and the MWNT concentration reconfirms the potential of THz techniques for monitoring the loading levels. Inhomogenieties in the sample lead to strong fluctuations of the detected terahertz signal. We show that THz line scans and THz images, respectively, are therefore well suited to localize and visualize such accumulations.

  12. Multiband microwave absorption films based on defective multiwalled carbon nanotubes added carbonyl iron/acrylic resin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yong; Chen, Changxin; Pan, Xiaoyan; Ni, Yuwei; Zhang, Song; Huang, Jie; Chen, Da; Zhang, Yafei

    2009-05-01

    Defective multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were introduced to the carbonyl iron (CI) based composites to improve its microwave absorption by a simple ultrasonic mixing process. The electromagnetic parameters were measured in the 2-18 GHz range. Microwave absorption of CI based composites with 2 mm in thickness was evidently enhanced by adding as little as 1.0 wt% defective MWCNTs with two well separated absorption peaks exceeding -20 dB, as compared with that of pure CI based and defective MWCNTs composites. The enhancement mechanism is thought due to the interaction and better electromagnetic match between defective MWCNTs and ferromagnetic CI particles.

  13. A sensitive amperometric bromate sensor based on multi-walled carbon nanotubes/phosphomolybdic acid composite film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An amperometric sensor for bromate was developed based on multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs)/phosphomolybdic acid (PMo12) composite film coated on a pyrolytic graphite (PG) electrode. MWNTs are dispersed in PMo12 aqueous solution through spontaneous and strong chemisorption between carbon and polyoxometalate, which results in a homogeneous MWNTs/PMo12 composite. Due to the unique electronic and electrocatalytic properties of MWNTs and PMo12, the combination of MWNTs and PMo12 results in a remarkable synergistic augmentation on the response current. The bromate sensor based on the PG/MWNTs/PMo12 electrode has excellent characteristics, such as a detection limit of 0.5 μM, a sensitivity of 760.9 μA mM-1 cm-2, a response time less than 2 s and a linear range from 5 μM to 15 mM

  14. Enhanced electrochemiluminescence of CdTe quantum dots with carbon nanotube film and its sensing of methimazole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A novel analytical method was reported based on electrochemiluminescence (ECL) of CdTe quantum dots (QDs) using carbon nanotube (CNT) modified glass carbon (GC) electrode. It was found that the CNT film on the GC electrode could greatly enhance the ECL intensity of CdTe QDs dispersed in aqueous solution, and the ECL peak potential and ECL onset potential both shifted positively. Influences of some factors on the ECL intensity were investigated using CNT modified GC electrode, and a high sensitive method for the determination of methimazole was developed under the optimal conditions. The ECL intensity decreased linearly in the concentration range of 1.0 x 10-9 to 4.0 x 10-7 M for methimazole with the relative coefficient of 0.995, which showed finer sensitivity than that at bare electrode. Thus, CNT modified electrode would have a great merit to expand the application of QD ECL

  15. Sensitive voltammetric determination of chloramphenicol by using single-wall carbon nanotube-gold nanoparticle-ionic liquid composite film modified glassy carbon electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A novel composite film modified glassy carbon electrode has been fabricated and characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM) and voltammetry. The composite film comprises of single-wall carbon nanotube (SWNT), gold nanoparticle (GNP) and ionic liquid (i.e. 1-octyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate), thus has the characteristics of them. The resulting electrode shows good stability, high accumulation efficiency and strong promotion to electron transfer. On it, chloramphenicol can produce a sensitive cathodic peak at -0.66 V (versus SCE) in pH 7.0 phosphate buffer solutions. Parameters influencing the voltammetric response of chloramphenicol are optimized, which include the composition of the film and the operation conditions. Under the optimized conditions, the peak current is linear to chloramphenicol concentration in the range of 1.0 x 10-8-6.0 x 10-6 M, and the detection limit is estimated to be 5.0 x 10-9 M after an accumulation for 150 s on open circuit. The electrode is applied to the determination of chloramphenicol in milk samples, and the recoveries for the standards added are 97.0% and 100.3%. In addition, the electrochemical reaction of chloramphenicol and the effect of single-wall carbon nanotube, gold nanoparticle and ionic liquid are discussed

  16. Nano-structural characteristics of carbon nanotube-polymer composite films for high-amplitude optoacoustic generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baac, Hyoung Won; Ok, Jong G.; Lee, Taehwa; Jay Guo, L.

    2015-08-01

    We demonstrate nano-structural characteristics of carbon nanotube (CNT)-polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) composite films that can be used as highly efficient and robust ultrasound transmitters for diagnostic and therapeutic applications. An inherent architecture of the nano-composite provides unique thermal, optical, and mechanical properties that are accommodated not just for efficient energy conversion but also for extraordinary robustness against pulsed laser ablation. First, we explain a thermoacoustic transfer mechanism within the nano-composite. CNT morphologies are examined to determine a suitable arrangement for heat transfer to the surrounding PDMS. Next, we introduce an approach to enhance optical extinction of the composite films, which uses shadowed deposition of a thin Au layer through an as-grown CNT network. Finally, the transmitter robustness is quantified in terms of laser-induced damage threshold. This reveals that the CNT-PDMS films can withstand an order-of-magnitude higher optical fluence (and extinction) than a Cr film used as a reference. Such robustness is crucial to increase the maximum-available optical energy for optoacoustic excitation and pressure generation. All of these structure-originated characteristics manifest the CNT-PDMS composite films as excellent optoacoustic transmitters for high-amplitude and high-frequency ultrasound generation.

  17. Electrosynthesis of polyaniline–mutilwalled carbon nanotube nanocomposite films in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate for glucose biosensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polyaniline–mutilwalled carbon nanotube (PANi–MWCNT) nanocomposites were electropolymerized in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) onto interdigitated platinum-film planar microelectrodes (IDμE). The MWCNTs were first dispersed in SDS solution then mixed with aniline and H2SO4. This mixture was used to electro-synthesize PANi–MWCNT films with potentiostatic method at E = + 0.90 V (versus SCE). The PANi–MWCNT films were characterized by cyclic voltammetry (CV) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results show that the PANi–MWCNT films have a high electroactivity, and a porous and branched structure that can increase the specific surface area for biosensing application. In this work the PANi–MWCNT films were applied for covalent immobilization of glucose oxidase (GOx) via glutaraldehyde agent. The GOx/PANi–MWCNT/IDμE was studied using cyclic voltammetric and chronoamperometric techniques. The effect of several interferences, such as ascorbic acid (AA), uric acid (UA), and acetaminophen (AAP) on the glucosensing at +0.6 V (versus SCE) is not significant. The time required to reach 95% of the maximum steady-state current was less than 5 s. A linear range of the calibration curve for the glucose concentration lies between 1 and 12 mM which is a suitable level in the human body. (paper)

  18. Carbon Nanotubes for Supercapacitor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Jianyi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract As an electrical energy storage device, supercapacitor finds attractive applications in consumer electronic products and alternative power source due to its higher energy density, fast discharge/charge time, low level of heating, safety, long-term operation stability, and no disposable parts. This work reviews the recent development of supercapacitor based on carbon nanotubes (CNTs and their composites. The purpose is to give a comprehensive understanding of the advantages and disadvantages of carbon nanotubes-related supercapacitor materials and to find ways for the improvement in the performance of supercapacitor. We first discussed the effects of physical and chemical properties of pure carbon nanotubes, including size, purity, defect, shape, functionalization, and annealing, on the supercapacitance. The composites, including CNTs/oxide and CNTs/polymer, were further discussed to enhance the supercapacitance and keep the stability of the supercapacitor by optimally engineering the composition, particle size, and coverage.

  19. Hydrogen peroxide biosensor based on electrodeposition of zinc oxide nanoflowers onto carbon nanotubes film electrode

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hui Ping Bai; Xu Xiao Lu; Guang Ming Yang; Yun Hui Yang

    2008-01-01

    A new amperometric biosensor for hydrogen peroxide was developed based on adsorption of horseradish peroxidase at the glassy carbon electrode modified with zinc oxide nanoflowers produced by electrodeposition onto multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) firm. The morphology of the MWNTs/nano-ZnO electrode has been investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and the electrochemical performance of the electrode has also been studied by amperometric method. The resulting electrode offered an excellent detection for hydrogen peroxide at -0.11 V with a linear response range of 9.9 × 10(-7) to 2.9 × 10(-3) mol/L with a correlation coefficient of 0.991, and response time <5 s. The biosensor displays rapid response and expanded linear response range, and excellent stability.

  20. Horizontal carbon nanotube alignment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Matthew T; Cientanni, Vito; Milne, William I

    2016-09-21

    The production of horizontally aligned carbon nanotubes offers a rapid means of realizing a myriad of self-assembled near-atom-scale technologies - from novel photonic crystals to nanoscale transistors. The ability to reproducibly align anisotropic nanostructures has huge technological value. Here we review the present state-of-the-art in horizontal carbon nanotube alignment. For both in and ex situ approaches, we quantitatively assess the reported linear packing densities alongside the degree of alignment possible for each of these core methodologies. PMID:27546174

  1. Carbon Nanotube Solar Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Klinger, Colin; Patel, Yogeshwari; Postma, Henk W. Ch.

    2012-01-01

    We present proof-of-concept all-carbon solar cells. They are made of a photoactive side of predominantly semiconducting nanotubes for photoconversion and a counter electrode made of a natural mixture of carbon nanotubes or graphite, connected by a liquid electrolyte through a redox reaction. The cells do not require rare source materials such as In or Pt, nor high-grade semiconductor processing equipment, do not rely on dye for photoconversion and therefore do not bleach, and are easy to fabr...

  2. Charge-induced actuation in carbon nanotubes and resistance changes in carbon nanotube networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sippel-Oakley, Jennifer Ann

    In 1999 it was demonstrated that macroscopic films comprised of single wall carbon nanotubes exhibited dimensional changes with charge injection onto the films. A fundamental mechanism was proposed for this effect related to the dimensional changes observed in graphite intercalation complexes upon charge transfer doping with the intercalant species. The major fraction of this thesis concerns experiments at the single nanotube level designed to test the validity of this mechanism. The metals compatible with our fabrication processes inevitably p-dope the nanotubes resulting in smaller dimensional changes. Additionally, there are contact barriers that prevent the injection of electrons onto the nanotubes. Although the proposed mechanism may still be responsible for the results seen in the nanotube films, the effect is too small to be consistently measured in individual nanotubes. The conductivity of a carbon nanotube can be varied by exposure to various chemicals having utility in chemical sensing applications. We use thin films of carbon nanotubes to exploit this effect. The films are made sensitive to hydrogen by association with palladium metal. Such sensors operate at room temperature with very low power dissipation of ˜0.25 mV.

  3. Carbon nanotube junctions and devices

    OpenAIRE

    Postma, H. W. Ch.

    2001-01-01

    In this thesis Postma presents transport experiments performed on individual single-wall carbon nanotubes. Carbon nanotubes are molecules entirely made of carbon atoms. The electronic properties are determined by the exact symmetry of the nanotube lattice, resulting in either metallic or semiconducting behaviour. Due to their small diameter, electronic motion is directed in the length direction of the nanotube, making them ideal systems to study e.g. one-dimensional transport phenomena. First...

  4. Electrical Removal Behavior of Carbon Nanotube and Carbon Nanofiber Film in CuCl2 Solution: Kinetics and Thermodynamics Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yankun Zhan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The kinetics, thermodynamics, and isotherms during electrical removal of Cu2+ by carbon nanotube and carbon nanofiber (CNT-CNF electrodes in CuCl2 solution were studied under different solution temperatures, initial Cu2+ concentrations, and applied voltages. The result shows that Langmuir isotherm can describe experimental data well, indicating monolayer adsorption, and higher Cu2+ removal and rate constant are achieved at higher voltage, lower initial Cu2+ concentration, and higher solution temperature. Meanwhile, the thermodynamics analyses indicate that the electrical removal of Cu2+ onto CNT-CNF electrodes is mainly driven by a physisorption process.

  5. Optical Detection of Paraoxon Using Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Films with Attached Organophosphorus Hydrolase-Expressed Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Intae Kim

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In whole-cell based biosensors, spectrophotometry is one of the most commonly used methods for detecting organophosphates due to its simplicity and reliability. The sensor performance is directly affected by the cell immobilization method because it determines the amount of cells, the mass transfer rate, and the stability. In this study, we demonstrated that our previously-reported microbe immobilization method, a microbe-attached single-walled carbon nanotube film, can be applied to whole-cell-based organophosphate sensors. This method has many advantages over other whole-cell organophosphate sensors, including high specific activity, quick cell immobilization, and excellent stability. A device with circular electrodes was fabricated for an enlarged cell-immobilization area. Escherichia coli expressing organophosphorus hydrolase in the periplasmic space and single-walled carbon nanotubes were attached to the device by our method. Paraoxon was hydrolyzed using this device, and detected by measuring the concentration of the enzymatic reaction product, p-nitrophenol. The specific activity of our device was calculated, and was shown to be over 2.5 times that reported previously for other whole-cell organophosphate sensors. Thus, this method for generation of whole-cell-based OP biosensors might be optimal, as it overcomes many of the caveats that prevent the widespread use of other such devices.

  6. Solid phase extraction of chromium(VI) using Aliquat336 immobilized on a thin film of multiwall carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report on a novel and selective method for the preconcentration and determination of Cr(VI) in aqueous samples. Cr(VI) is adsorbed - in a 'batch mode' - on multiwalled carbon nanotubes covered with Aliquat 336 and then determined directly, i.e., on the solid, by X-ray fluorescence spectrometry. This reduces the number of reagents and minimizes sample handling. The method combines the advantages of solid-phase extraction with the benefits of the XRF method in that the large areas required by the carbon nanotubes make them a promising solid sorbent for preconcentration. The enrichment factor was calculated after considering that the thin film obtained from the 10 mL solution of 1 mg L-1 of Cr(VI) has a real thickness of 0.04 mm and a final diameter of 16.7 mm, so that the volume deposited on the pellet is 0.0088 cm3 and the preconcentration factor is 1000. (author)

  7. Photobleaching effect in azo-dye containing epoxy resin films: the potentiality of carbon nanotubes as azo-dye dispensers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz Costanzo, Guadalupe; Goyanes, Silvia; Ledesma, Silvia

    2015-04-01

    Azo-dye molecules may suffer from bleaching under certain illumination conditions. When this photoinduced process occurs, it generates an irreversible effect that is characterized by the loss of absorption of the dye molecule. Moreover, the well-known isomerization of azodye molecules does not occur anymore. In this work it is shown how the addition of a small amount of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) helps to decrease the bleaching effect in a photosensitive guest-host azo-polymer film. Two different systems were fabricated using an epoxy resin as polymer matrix. An azo-dye, Disperse Orange 3, was used as photosensitive material in both systems and MWCNTs were added into one of them. The optical response of the polymeric systems was studied considering the degree of photoinduced birefringence. Photobleaching of the azo-dye was observed in all cases however, the effect is lower for the composite material containing 0.2 wt % MWCNTs. The weak interaction between MWCNTs and dye molecules is less favorable when the material is heated. The optical behavior of the heated composite material suggests that carbon nanotubes can be potentially used as azo dye dispensers. The results are interpreted in terms of the non-covalent interaction between azo-dye molecules and MWCNTs.

  8. Change of surface morphology and structure of multi-walled carbon nanotubes film caused by proton irradiation with 170 keV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rui, Erming; Yang, Jianqun; Li, Xingji, E-mail: fox1225@163.com; Liu, Chaoming

    2013-12-15

    The effects of 170 keV proton irradiation for fluences of 5 × 10{sup 14} cm{sup −2} and 5 × 10{sup 15} cm{sup −2} on surface morphology and structure of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) film were investigated. The pristine and irradiated MWCNTs films were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. SEM analysis reveals that the proton irradiation for the high fluence of 5 × 10{sup 15} cm{sup −2} leads to evident changes in morphology of the MWCNTs film, such as forming uneven film surface, entanglement of nanotubes and the shrinkage of nanotubes. Based on Raman spectroscopic and XPS analyses, it is confirmed that the proton exposure can improve the structural quality of the MWCNTs, and irradiation fluence plays a key role in reducing the disorder of the MWCNTs. This phenomenon could be mainly attributed to restructuring of the defect sites induced by knock-on atom displacements. EPR spectroscopy shows that electrons delocalized over carbon nanotubes increase with increasing irradiation fluence, implying that the MWCNTs film might be sensitive to ionizing radiation to some extent.

  9. Change of surface morphology and structure of multi-walled carbon nanotubes film caused by proton irradiation with 170 keV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rui, Erming; Yang, Jianqun; Li, Xingji; Liu, Chaoming

    2013-12-01

    The effects of 170 keV proton irradiation for fluences of 5 × 1014 cm-2 and 5 × 1015 cm-2 on surface morphology and structure of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) film were investigated. The pristine and irradiated MWCNTs films were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. SEM analysis reveals that the proton irradiation for the high fluence of 5 × 1015 cm-2 leads to evident changes in morphology of the MWCNTs film, such as forming uneven film surface, entanglement of nanotubes and the shrinkage of nanotubes. Based on Raman spectroscopic and XPS analyses, it is confirmed that the proton exposure can improve the structural quality of the MWCNTs, and irradiation fluence plays a key role in reducing the disorder of the MWCNTs. This phenomenon could be mainly attributed to restructuring of the defect sites induced by knock-on atom displacements. EPR spectroscopy shows that electrons delocalized over carbon nanotubes increase with increasing irradiation fluence, implying that the MWCNTs film might be sensitive to ionizing radiation to some extent.

  10. Poly(brilliant green) and poly(thionine) modified carbon nanotube coated carbon film electrodes for glucose and uric acid biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghica, M Emilia; Brett, Christopher M A

    2014-12-01

    Poly(brilliant green) (PBG) and poly(thionine) (PTH) films have been formed on carbon film electrodes (CFEs) modified with carbon nanotubes (CNT) by electropolymerisation using potential cycling. Voltammetric and electrochemical impedance characterisation were performed. Glucose oxidase and uricase, as model enzymes, were immobilised on top of PBG/CNT/CFE and PTH/CNT/CFE for glucose and uric acid (UA) biosensing. Amperometric determination of glucose and UA was carried out in phosphate buffer pH 7.0 at -0.20 and +0.30 V vs. SCE, respectively, and the results were compared with other similarly modified electrodes existing in the literature. An interference study and recovery measurements in natural samples were successfully performed, indicating these architectures to be good and promising biosensor platforms. PMID:25159399

  11. The development of chloride ion selective polypyrrole thin film on a layer-by-layer carbon nanotube working electrode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Lynch, Jerome

    2011-04-01

    A chloride ion selective thin film sensor is proposed for measuring chloride ion concentration, which is an environmental parameter correlated to corrosion. In this work, electrochemical polymerization of Polypyrrole (PPy) doped with chloride ions was achieved on the top of a carbon nanotube (CNT) thin film as a working electrode in an electrochemical cell. The underlying CNT layer conjugated with doped PPy thin film can form a multifunctional "selfsensing" material platform for chloride ion detection in a concrete environment. The paper presents the first type of work using CNT and PPy as hybrid materials for chloride ion sensing. Electrochemical polymerization of PPy results in oxidation that yields an average of one positive charge distributed over four pyrrole units. This positive charge is compensated by negatively-charged chloride ions in the supporting electrolyte. In effect, the chloride ion-doped PPy has become molecularly imprinted with chloride ions thereby providing it with some degree of perm-selectivity for chloride ions. The detection limit of the fabricated chloride ion-doped PPy thin film can reach 10-8 M and selectivity coefficients are comparable to those in the literature. The reported work aims to lay a strong foundation for detecting chloride ion concentrations in the concrete environment.

  12. Highly conductive single-walled carbon nanotube thin film preparation by direct alignment on substrates from water dispersions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azoz, Seyla; Exarhos, Annemarie L; Marquez, Analisse; Gilbertson, Leanne M; Nejati, Siamak; Cha, Judy J; Zimmerman, Julie B; Kikkawa, James M; Pfefferle, Lisa D

    2015-01-27

    A safe, scalable method for producing highly conductive aligned films of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) from water suspensions is presented. While microfluidic assembly of SWNTs has received significant attention, achieving desirable SWNT dispersion and morphology in fluids without an insulating surfactant or toxic superacid is challenging. We present a method that uniquely produces a noncorrosive ink that can be directly applied to a device in situ, which is different from previous fabrication techniques. Functionalized SWNTs (f-SWNTs) are dispersed in an aqueous urea solution to leverage binding between the amine group of urea and the carboxylic acid group of f-SWNTs and obtain urea-SWNT. Compared with SWNTs dispersed using conventional methods (e.g., superacid and surfactants), the dispersed urea-SWNT aggregates have a higher aspect ratio with a rodlike morphology as measured by light scattering. The Mayer rod technique is used to prepare urea-SWNT, highly aligned films (two-dimensional nematic order parameter of 0.6, 5 μm spot size, via polarized Raman) with resistance values as low as 15-1700 Ω/sq in a transmittance range of 2-80% at 550 nm. These values compete with the best literature values for conductivity of SWNT-enabled thin films. The findings offer promising opportunities for industrial applications relying on highly conductive thin SWNT films. PMID:25547120

  13. Changes of structure and electrical conductivity of multi-walled carbon nanotubes film caused by 3 MeV proton irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jianqun; Li, Xingji; Liu, Chaoming; Ma, Guoliang

    2015-01-01

    The effects of 3 MeV proton irradiation for fluences of 3.5 × 1010 cm-2 to 3.1 × 1012 cm-2 on structure and electrical conductivity of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) film were investigated. The pristine and the irradiated MWCNTs films were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), elemental analysis (EA) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy in order to investigate the effects of irradiation on their structure. Electrical conductivity of the MWCNTs films was characterized before and after irradiation. SEM analysis reveals that the proton irradiation for the high fluence (more than 3.6 × 1011 cm-2) leads to evident changes in morphology of the MWCNTs film, such as forming uneven film surface, curve, shrinkage and fragmentation of nanotubes. Based on Raman, XPS, FTIR and EA analyses, it is confirmed that the 3 MeV protons with high fluence (more than 3.6 × 1011 cm-2) can damage the structure of the MWCNTs, including increase of the disorder and the formation of functional groups. EPR spectroscopy shows that the electrons delocalized over carbon nanotubes increase with increasing irradiation fluence, implying that the MWCNTs film might be sensitive to ionizing radiation to some extent. With increasing the irradiation fluence, the electrical conductivity of the MWCNTs film decreases due to the structural and morphological damage.

  14. Transport Through Carbon Nanotube Wires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anantram, M. P.; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation deals with the use of carbon nanotubes as a transport system. Contact, defects, tubular bend, phonons, and mechanical deformations all contribute to reflection within the nanotube wire. Bragg reflection, however, is native to an ideal energy transport system. Transmission resistance depends primarily on the level of energy present. Finally, the details regarding coupling between carbon nanotubes and simple metals are presented.

  15. Carbon nanotubes: synthesis and functionalization

    OpenAIRE

    Andrews, Robert

    2007-01-01

    This thesis focuses on two of the major challenges of carbon nanotube (CNT) research: understanding the growth mechanism of nanotubes by chemical vapour deposition (CVD) and the positioning of nanotubes on surfaces. The mechanism of growth of single–walled nanotubes (SWNTs) has been studied in two ways. Firstly, a novel iron nanoparticle catalyst for the production of single–walled nanotubes was developed. CVD conditions were established that produced high quality tubes. These optimised C...

  16. Carbon nanotube cathode with capping carbon nanosheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xin; Zhao, Dengchao; Pang, Kaige; Pang, Junchao; Liu, Weihua; Liu, Hongzhong; Wang, Xiaoli

    2013-10-01

    Here, we report a vertically aligned carbon nanotube (VACNT) film capped with a few layer of carbon nanosheet (FLCN) synthesized by chemical vapor deposition using a carbon source from iron phthalocyanine pyrolysis. The square resistance of the VACNT film is significantly reduced from 1500 Ω/□ to 300 Ω/□ when it is capped with carbon nanosheet. The VACNT capped with carbon nanosheet was transferred to an ITO glass substrate in an inverted configuration so that the carbon nanosheet served as a flexible transparent electrode at the bottom and the VACNT roots served as emission tips. Because all of the VACNTs start growing from a flat silicon substrate, the VACNT roots are very neat and uniform in height. A field emission test of the carbon nanosheet-capped VACNT film proved that the CNT roots show better uniformity in field emission and the carbon nanosheet cap could also potentially serve as a flexible transparent electrode, which is highly desired in photo-assisted field emission.

  17. Ion-modulated nonlinear electronic transport in carbon nanotube bundle/RbAg4I5 thin film composite nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jia-Lin; Zhang, Wei; Wei, Jinquan; Gu, Bingfu

    2014-01-01

    We have explored the ion-modulated electronic transport properties of mixed ionic-electronic conductor (MIEC) composite nanostructures made of superionic conductor RbAg4I5 films and carbon nanotube (CNT) bundle spiderwebs. Our experimental and theoretical studies indicate that the formation of ion-electron bound states (IEBSs) leads to strong ion-electron interference effect and interesting electronic transport of CNT, such as nonlinear current-voltage (I-V) characteristics and novel temperature dependence of the current. With increasing temperature, the hybrid nanostructures show rich phases with different dependence of current on temperature, which is related to the structural phase transition of RbAg4I5 and the transition of dissociation of IEBSs. The ion-modulation of the electric conductivity in such MIEC composite nanostructures with great tunability has been used to design new ionic-electronic composite nano-devices with function like field effect transistor.

  18. Near-infrared photoconductive and photovoltaic devices using single-wall carbon nanotubes in conductive polymer films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazaoui, S.; Minami, N.; Nalini, B.; Kim, Y.; Hara, K.

    2005-10-01

    We have fabricated prototypical Al/single-wall carbon nanotube (SWNT)-polymer/indium tin oxide thin-film devices that exhibit promising photoconductive and photovoltaic responses in a broad spectral range, typically from 300 to 1600 nm. This achievement was made possible by finely dispersed SWNT powders in polymer matrices such as poly-phenylene-vinylene and poly-thiophene. These devices utilize (i) the intrinsic near-infrared light harvesting properties of semiconducting SWNTs, (ii) the electronic transport properties of both semiconducting and metallic SWNTs in combination with those of the polymer matrices, and (iii) probably charge/energy transfer processes between SWNTs and the polymers. By selecting different sources of SWNTs and polymers, we have shown that the optoelectronic properties of these devices are potentially tunable. To support our investigation, several techniques including spectrally resolved photoconductivity, optical absorption, and photoluminescence spectroscopy were utilized.

  19. Wearable and sensitive heart-rate detectors based on PbS quantum dot and multiwalled carbon nanotube blend film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Liang; Dong, Dongdong; Qiao, Keke; Cheng, Yibing; Tang, Jiang, E-mail: jtang@mail.hust.edu.cn, E-mail: songhs-wnlo@mail.hust.edu.cn; Song, Haisheng, E-mail: jtang@mail.hust.edu.cn, E-mail: songhs-wnlo@mail.hust.edu.cn [Wuhan National Laboratory for Optoelectronics (WNLO), Huazhong University of Science and Technology, 1037 Luoyu Road, Wuhan, Hubei 430074 (China); He, Jungang; Li, Min; Liu, Huan [School of Optical and Electronic Information, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, 1037 Luoyu Road, Wuhan, Hubei 430074 (China); Cao, Furong [Air Force Early Warning Academy, Wuhan, Hubei 430019 (China)

    2014-10-13

    Wearable and sensitive photodetectors (PDs) have been demonstrated based on a blend film of PbS quantum dots (QDs) and QDs modified multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). Owing to the synergetic effect from high light sensitivity of PbS QDs and excellent conductive and mechanical properties of MWCNTs, the blend PDs show high sensitivity and flexibility performance: device responsivity and detectivity reach 583 mA/W and 3.25 × 10{sup 12 }Jones, respectively, and could stand large number (at least 10 000 cycles) and wide angle (up to 80°) bending. Furthermore, the wearable and sensitive PDs have been applied to measure the heart rate in both red and near infrared (NIR) ranges. The presented PDs are expected to work as sensor candidates in integrated electronic skin.

  20. Wearable and sensitive heart-rate detectors based on PbS quantum dot and multiwalled carbon nanotube blend film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wearable and sensitive photodetectors (PDs) have been demonstrated based on a blend film of PbS quantum dots (QDs) and QDs modified multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). Owing to the synergetic effect from high light sensitivity of PbS QDs and excellent conductive and mechanical properties of MWCNTs, the blend PDs show high sensitivity and flexibility performance: device responsivity and detectivity reach 583 mA/W and 3.25 × 1012 Jones, respectively, and could stand large number (at least 10 000 cycles) and wide angle (up to 80°) bending. Furthermore, the wearable and sensitive PDs have been applied to measure the heart rate in both red and near infrared (NIR) ranges. The presented PDs are expected to work as sensor candidates in integrated electronic skin.

  1. Electrochemical properties of double wall carbon nanotube electrodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pumera Martin

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstractElectrochemical properties of double wall carbon nanotubes (DWNT were assessed and compared to their single wall (SWNT counterparts. The double and single wall carbon nanotube materials were characterized by Raman spectroscopy, scanning and transmission electron microscopy and electrochemistry. The electrochemical behavior of DWNT film electrodes was characterized by using cyclic voltammetry of ferricyanide and NADH. It is shown that while both DWNT and SWNT were significantly functionalized with oxygen containing groups, double wall carbon nanotube film electrodes show a fast electron transfer and substantial decrease of overpotential of NADH when compared to the same way treated single wall carbon nanotubes.

  2. Carbon Nanotubes/Gold Nanoparticles Composite Film for the Construction of a Novel Amperometric Choline Biosensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baoyan Wu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This study develops a facile method to fabricate a novel choline biosensor based on multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs and gold nanoparticles (AuNPs. Chitosan, a natural biocompatible polymer, was used to solubilize MWCNTs for constructing the aqueous Chit-MWCNTs solution. Then Chit-MWCNTs were first dropped on the surface of a cleaned platinum electrode. Finally, a thiolated silica sol containing AuNPs and choline oxidase (ChOx was immobilized on the surface of the Chit-MWCNTs-modified electrode. The MWCNTs/AuNPs/Pt electrode showed excellent electrocatalytic activity for choline. The resulting choline biosensor showed high sensitivity of choline (3.56 μA/mM, and wide linear range from 0.05 to 0.8 mM with the detection limit of 15 μM. In addition, good reproducibility and stability were obtained.

  3. Light-weight free-standing carbon nanotube-silicon films for anodes of lithium ion batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Li-Feng; Hu, Liangbing; Choi, Jang Wook; Cui, Yi

    2010-07-27

    Silicon is an attractive alloy-type anode material because of its highest known capacity (4200 mAh/g). However, lithium insertion into and extraction from silicon are accompanied by a huge volume change, up to 300%, which induces a strong strain on silicon and causes pulverization and rapid capacity fading due to the loss of the electrical contact between part of silicon and current collector. Si nanostructures such as nanowires, which are chemically and electrically bonded to the current collector, can overcome the pulverization problem, however, the heavy metal current collectors in these systems are larger in weight than Si active material. Herein we report a novel anode structure free of heavy metal current collectors by integrating a flexible, conductive carbon nanotube (CNT) network into a Si anode. The composite film is free-standing and has a structure similar to the steel bar reinforced concrete, where the infiltrated CNT network functions as both mechanical support and electrical conductor and Si as a high capacity anode material for Li-ion battery. Such free-standing film has a low sheet resistance of approximately 30 Ohm/sq. It shows a high specific charge storage capacity (approximately 2000 mAh/g) and a good cycling life, superior to pure sputtered-on silicon films with similar thicknesses. Scanning electron micrographs show that Si is still connected by the CNT network even when small breaking or cracks appear in the film after cycling. The film can also "ripple up" to release the strain of a large volume change during lithium intercalation. The conductive composite film can function as both anode active material and current collector. It offers approximately 10 times improvement in specific capacity compared with widely used graphite/copper anode sheets. PMID:20518567

  4. Light-Weight Free-Standing Carbon Nanotube-Silicon Films for Anodes of Lithium Ion Batteries

    KAUST Repository

    Cui, Li-Feng

    2010-07-27

    Silicon is an attractive alloy-type anode material because of its highest known capacity (4200 mAh/g). However, lithium insertion into and extraction from silicon are accompanied by a huge volume change, up to 300%, which induces a strong strain on silicon and causes pulverization and rapid capacity fading due to the loss of the electrical contact between part of silicon and current collector. Si nanostructures such as nanowires, which are chemically and electrically bonded to the current collector, can overcome the pulverization problem, however, the heavy metal current collectors in these systems are larger in weight than Si active material. Herein we report a novel anode structure free of heavy metal current collectors by integrating a flexible, conductive carbon nanotube (CNT) network into a Si anode. The composite film is free-standing and has a structure similar to the steel bar reinforced concrete, where the infiltrated CNT network functions as both mechanical support and electrical conductor and Si as a high capacity anode material for Li-ion battery. Such free-standing film has a low sheet resistance of ∼30 Ohm/sq. It shows a high specific charge storage capacity (∼2000 mAh/g) and a good cycling life, superior to pure sputtered-on silicon films with similar thicknesses. Scanning electron micrographs show that Si is still connected by the CNT network even when small breaking or cracks appear in the film after cycling. The film can also "ripple up" to release the strain of a large volume change during lithium intercalation. The conductive composite film can function as both anode active material and current collector. It offers ∼10 times improvement in specific capacity compared with widely used graphite/copper anode sheets. © 2010 American Chemical Society.

  5. A comparison between powders and thin films of single-walled carbon nanotubes for the adsorption behaviors of phenylalanine and glycine by XANES study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    IBRAHIM; Kurash

    2010-01-01

    We have compared the adsorption behaviors between single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) powders and thin films with amino acids such as phenylalanine and glycine by using the X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy. On SWCNT powders very weak adsorption occurs as confirmed also by studies at high solution concentrations. The comparison of the adsorption behaviors with previous reports for thin films of SWCNTs shows that, due to their compact structure, thin films favor the adsorption of amino acids and represent themselves good candidate for a reliable evaluation of the interaction among amino acids and SWCNTs.

  6. Electromagnetic interference shielding effectiveness of composite carbon nanotube macro-film at a high frequency range of 40 GHz to 60 GHz

    OpenAIRE

    Zi Ping Wu; Ming Cheng; Wen Jing Ma; Jing Wei Hu; Yan Hong Yin; Ying Yan Hu; Ye Sheng Li; Jian Gao Yang; Qian Feng Xu

    2015-01-01

    The electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding effectiveness (SE) of carbon nanotube (CNT) macro-film that is adhered to common cloth to maintain the light weight, silk-like quality, and smooth surface of the material for EMI shielding is investigated. The results show that a high and stable EMI SE of 48 dB to 57 dB at 40 GHz to 60 GHz was obtained by the macro-film with a thickness of only ∼4 μm. The composite CNT macro-film is easily manipulated, and its EMI property is significantly diff...

  7. Printed thin film transistors and CMOS inverters based on semiconducting carbon nanotube ink purified by a nonlinear conjugated copolymer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wenya; Dou, Junyan; Zhao, Jianwen; Tan, Hongwei; Ye, Jun; Tange, Masayoshi; Gao, Wei; Xu, Weiwei; Zhang, Xiang; Guo, Wenrui; Ma, Changqi; Okazaki, Toshiya; Zhang, Kai; Cui, Zheng

    2016-02-01

    Two innovative research studies are reported in this paper. One is the sorting of semiconducting carbon nanotubes and ink formulation by a novel semiconductor copolymer and second is the development of CMOS inverters using not the p-type and n-type transistors but a printed p-type transistor and a printed ambipolar transistor. A new semiconducting copolymer (named P-DPPb5T) was designed and synthesized with a special nonlinear structure and more condensed conjugation surfaces, which can separate large diameter semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes (sc-SWCNTs) from arc discharge SWCNTs according to their chiralities with high selectivity. With the sorted sc-SWCNTs ink, thin film transistors (TFTs) have been fabricated by aerosol jet printing. The TFTs displayed good uniformity, low operating voltage (+/-2 V) and subthreshold swing (SS) (122-161 mV dec-1), high effective mobility (up to 17.6-37.7 cm2 V-1 s-1) and high on/off ratio (104-107). With the printed TFTs, a CMOS inverter was constructed, which is based on the p-type TFT and ambipolar TFT instead of the conventional p-type and n-type TFTs. Compared with other recently reported inverters fabricated by printing, the printed CMOS inverters demonstrated a better noise margin (74% 1/2 Vdd) and was hysteresis free. The inverter has a voltage gain of up to 16 at an applied voltage of only 1 V and low static power consumption.Two innovative research studies are reported in this paper. One is the sorting of semiconducting carbon nanotubes and ink formulation by a novel semiconductor copolymer and second is the development of CMOS inverters using not the p-type and n-type transistors but a printed p-type transistor and a printed ambipolar transistor. A new semiconducting copolymer (named P-DPPb5T) was designed and synthesized with a special nonlinear structure and more condensed conjugation surfaces, which can separate large diameter semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes (sc-SWCNTs) from arc discharge

  8. Carbon Nanotube Thin Films for Active Noise Cancellation, Solar Energy Harvesting, and Energy Storage in Building Windows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Shan

    This research explores the application of carbon nanotube (CNT) films for active noise cancellation, solar energy harvesting and energy storage in building windows. The CNT-based components developed herein can be integrated into a solar-powered active noise control system for a building window. First, the use of a transparent acoustic transducer as both an invisible speaker for auxiliary audio playback and for active noise cancellation is accomplished in this work. Several challenges related to active noise cancellation in the window are addressed. These include secondary path estimation and directional cancellation of noise so as to preserve auxiliary audio and internal sounds while preventing transmission of external noise into the building. Solar energy can be harvested at a low rate of power over long durations while acoustic sound cancellation requires short durations of high power. A supercapacitor based energy storage system is therefore considered for the window. Using CNTs as electrode materials, two generations of flexible, thin, and fully solid-state supercapacitors are developed that can be integrated into the window frame. Both generations consist of carbon nanotube films coated on supporting substrates as electrodes and a solid-state polymer gel layer for the electrolyte. The first generation is a single-cell parallel-plate supercapacitor with a working voltage of 3 Volts. Its energy density is competitive with commercially available supercapacitors (which use liquid electrolyte). For many applications that will require higher working voltage, the second-generation multi-cell supercapacitor is developed. A six-cell device with a working voltage as high as 12 Volts is demonstrated here. Unlike the first generation's 3D structure, the second generation has a novel planar (2D) architecture, which makes it easy to integrate multiple cells into a thin and flexible supercapacitor. The multi-cell planar supercapacitor has energy density exceeding that of

  9. A Novel Electrochemical Sensor for Probing Doxepin Created on a Glassy Carbon Electrode Modified with Poly(4-Amino- benzoic Acid/Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes Composite Film

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji-Lie Kong

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available A novel electrochemical sensor for sensitive detection of doxepin was prepared, which was based on a glassy carbon electrode modified with poly(4-aminobenzoic acid/multi-walled carbon nanotubes composite film [poly(4-ABA/MWNTs/GCE]. The sensor was characterized by scanning electron microscopy and electrochemical methods. It was observed that poly(4-ABA/MWNTs/GCE showed excellent preconcentration function and electrocatalytic activities towards doxepin. Under the selected conditions, the anodic peak current was linear to the logarithm of doxepin concentration in the range from 1.0 ´ 10−9 to 1.0 ´ 10−6 M, and the detection limit obtained was 1.0 × 10−10 M. The poly(4-ABA/MWNTs/GCE was successfully applied in the measurement of doxepin in commercial pharmaceutical formulations, and the analytical accuracy was confirmed by comparison with a conventional ultraviolet spectrophotometry assay.

  10. An evaluation of chondrocyte morphology and gene expression on superhydrophilic vertically-aligned multi-walled carbon nanotube films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antonioli, Eliane, E-mail: eliane.antonioli@einstein.br [Research and Education Institute, Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Lobo, Anderson O., E-mail: aolobo@univap.br [Laboratory of Biomedical Nanotechnology, Universidade do Vale do Paraiba, Sao Jose dos Campos, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Ferretti, Mario, E-mail: ferretti@einstein.br [Research and Education Institute, Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Ortophedic Division, Federal University of Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Cohen, Moises, E-mail: m.cohen@uol.com.br [Research and Education Institute, Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Ortophedic Division, Federal University of Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Marciano, Fernanda R., E-mail: femarciano@uol.com.br [Laboratory of Biomedical Nanotechnology, Universidade do Vale do Paraiba, Sao Jose dos Campos, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Corat, Evaldo J., E-mail: corat@las.inpe.br [Laboratorio Associado de Sensores e Materiais, Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais, Sao Jose dos Campos, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Trava-Airoldi, Vladimir J., E-mail: vladimir@las.inpe.br [Laboratorio Associado de Sensores e Materiais, Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais, Sao Jose dos Campos, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2013-03-01

    Cartilage serves as a low-friction and wear-resistant articulating surface in diarthrodial joints and is also important during early stages of bone remodeling. Recently, regenerative cartilage research has focused on combinations of cells paired with scaffolds. Superhydrophilic vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (VACNTs) are of particular interest in regenerative medicine. The aim of this study is to evaluate cell expansion of human articular chondrocytes on superhydrophilic VACNTs, as well as their morphology and gene expression. VACNT films were produced using a microwave plasma chamber on Ti substrates and submitted to an O{sub 2} plasma treatment to make them superhydrophilic. Human chondrocytes were cultivated on superhydrophilic VACNTs up to five days. Quantitative RT-PCR was performed to measure type I and type II Collagen, Sox9, and Aggrecan mRNA expression levels. The morphology was analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and confocal microscopy. SEM images demonstrated that superhydrophilic VACNTs permit cell growth and adhesion of human chondrocytes. The chondrocytes had an elongated morphology with some prolongations. Chondrocytes cultivated on superhydrophilic VACNTs maintain the level expression of Aggrecan, Sox9, and Collagen II determined by qPCR. This study was the first to indicate that superhydrophilic VACNTs may be used as an efficient scaffold for cartilage or bone repair. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Chondrocytes were cultivated on Superhydrophilic Vertically Aligned Multiwall Carbon Nanotubes (VACNT). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We have shown a correlation between gene expression and thermodynamics aspects. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Superhydrhophilic VACNT will be an excellent substrate for cartilage and bone tissue regeneration.

  11. An evaluation of chondrocyte morphology and gene expression on superhydrophilic vertically-aligned multi-walled carbon nanotube films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cartilage serves as a low-friction and wear-resistant articulating surface in diarthrodial joints and is also important during early stages of bone remodeling. Recently, regenerative cartilage research has focused on combinations of cells paired with scaffolds. Superhydrophilic vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (VACNTs) are of particular interest in regenerative medicine. The aim of this study is to evaluate cell expansion of human articular chondrocytes on superhydrophilic VACNTs, as well as their morphology and gene expression. VACNT films were produced using a microwave plasma chamber on Ti substrates and submitted to an O2 plasma treatment to make them superhydrophilic. Human chondrocytes were cultivated on superhydrophilic VACNTs up to five days. Quantitative RT-PCR was performed to measure type I and type II Collagen, Sox9, and Aggrecan mRNA expression levels. The morphology was analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and confocal microscopy. SEM images demonstrated that superhydrophilic VACNTs permit cell growth and adhesion of human chondrocytes. The chondrocytes had an elongated morphology with some prolongations. Chondrocytes cultivated on superhydrophilic VACNTs maintain the level expression of Aggrecan, Sox9, and Collagen II determined by qPCR. This study was the first to indicate that superhydrophilic VACNTs may be used as an efficient scaffold for cartilage or bone repair. Highlights: ► Chondrocytes were cultivated on Superhydrophilic Vertically Aligned Multiwall Carbon Nanotubes (VACNT). ► We have shown a correlation between gene expression and thermodynamics aspects. ► Superhydrhophilic VACNT will be an excellent substrate for cartilage and bone tissue regeneration.

  12. Carbon nanotube IR detectors (SV)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leonard, F. L.

    2012-03-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia) and Lockheed Martin Corporation (LMC) collaborated to (1) evaluate the potential of carbon nanotubes as channels in infrared (IR) photodetectors; (2) assemble and characterize carbon nanotube electronic devices and measure the photocurrent generated when exposed to infrared light;(3) compare the performance of the carbon nanotube devices with that of traditional devices; and (4) develop and numerically implement models of electronic transport and opto-electronic behavior of carbon nanotube infrared detectors. This work established a new paradigm for photodetectors.

  13. From Carbon Nanotube Crystals to Carbon Nanotube Flowers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Zhengjun; ZHAO Ye; ZHOU Ya

    2005-01-01

    We have investigated the very initial deposition stages of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) with ferrocene (Fe(C5H5)2) and xylene (C8H10) for growing carbon nanotubes, and made clear that the mechanism for the self-organization behaviors of nanotubes at different growth stages by this approach. For instance, the organization of nanotubes into flower-like structures at prolonged deposition is developed from the crystal-like structures formed at early growth stages, both of which are closely related to and determined by the very initial deposition stages of this CVD approach. Based on this approach, ways have been established to build up different architectures of carbon nanotubes, by controlling the initial deposition stages of the CVD process, with which we have realized the selective growth of self-organized carbon nanotube structures. This study provides a new idea for growing carbon nanotube architectures by CVD.

  14. New amperometric glucose biosensor by entrapping glucose oxidase into chitosan/nanoporous ZrO2/multiwalled carbon nanotubes nanocomposite film

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEI Wan-zhi; ZHAI Xiu-rong; ZENG Jin-xiang; GAO Yan-ping; GONG Shu-guo

    2007-01-01

    A new nanocomposite material for construction of glucose biosensor was prepared. The biosensor was formed by entrapping glucose oxidase(Gox) into chitosan/nanoporous ZrO2/multiwalled carbon nanotubes nanocomposite film.In this biosensing thin film.the multiwalled carbon nanotubes can effectively catalyze hydrogen peroxide and nanoporous ZrO2, can enhance the stability of the immobilized enzyme. The resulting biosensor provides a very effective matrix for the immobilization of glucose oxidase and exhibits a wide linear response range from 8 μmol/L to 3 mmol/L with a correlation coefficient of 0.994 for the detection of glucose.And the response time and detection limit of the biosensor are determined to be 6 S and 3.5 μmaol/L.respectively. Another attractive characteristic is that the biosensor is inexpensive. stable and reliable.

  15. Changes of structure and electrical conductivity of multi-walled carbon nanotubes film caused by 3 MeV proton irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Jianqun; Li, Xingji, E-mail: lxj0218@hit.edu.cn; Liu, Chaoming; Ma, Guoliang

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: • 3 MeV protons could lead to evident changes in morphology of the MWCNTs film. • 3 MeV protons damage the structure of the MWCNTs, including increasing the disorder and the formation of functional groups. • With increasing the irradiation fluence, the electrical conductivity of the irradiated MWCNTs film by 3 MeV protons decreases. - Abstract: The effects of 3 MeV proton irradiation for fluences of 3.5 × 10{sup 10} cm{sup −2} to 3.1 × 10{sup 12} cm{sup −2} on structure and electrical conductivity of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) film were investigated. The pristine and the irradiated MWCNTs films were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), elemental analysis (EA) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy in order to investigate the effects of irradiation on their structure. Electrical conductivity of the MWCNTs films was characterized before and after irradiation. SEM analysis reveals that the proton irradiation for the high fluence (more than 3.6 × 10{sup 11} cm{sup −2}) leads to evident changes in morphology of the MWCNTs film, such as forming uneven film surface, curve, shrinkage and fragmentation of nanotubes. Based on Raman, XPS, FTIR and EA analyses, it is confirmed that the 3 MeV protons with high fluence (more than 3.6 × 10{sup 11} cm{sup −2}) can damage the structure of the MWCNTs, including increase of the disorder and the formation of functional groups. EPR spectroscopy shows that the electrons delocalized over carbon nanotubes increase with increasing irradiation fluence, implying that the MWCNTs film might be sensitive to ionizing radiation to some extent. With increasing the irradiation fluence, the electrical conductivity of the MWCNTs film decreases due to the structural and morphological damage.

  16. Thermoelectric power in ultrathin films, quantum wires and carbon nanotubes under classically large magnetic field: Simplified theory and relative comparison

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We study the thermoelectric power under classically large magnetic field (TPM) in ultrathin films (UFs), quantum wires (QWs) of non-linear optical materials on the basis of a newly formulated electron dispersion law considering the anisotropies of the effective electron masses, the spin-orbit splitting constants and the presence of the crystal field splitting within the framework of k.p formalism. The results of quantum confined III-V compounds form the special cases of our generalized analysis. The TPM has also been studied for quantum confined II-VI, stressed materials, bismuth and carbon nanotubes (CNs) on the basis of respective dispersion relations. It is found taking quantum confined CdGeAs2, InAs, InSb, CdS, stressed n-InSb and Bi that the TPM increases with increasing film thickness and decreasing electron statistics exhibiting quantized nature for all types of quantum confinement. The TPM in CNs exhibits oscillatory dependence with increasing carrier concentration and the signature of the entirely different types of quantum systems are evident from the plots. Besides, under certain special conditions, all the results for all the materials gets simplified to the well-known expression of the TPM for non-degenerate materials having parabolic energy bands, leading to the compatibility test.

  17. Super-hydrophobic transparent surface by femtosecond laser micro-patterned catalyst thin film for carbon nanotube cluster growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, M.; Hong, M. H.; Choo, Y. S.; Tang, Z.; Chua, Daniel H. C.

    2010-11-01

    In this work, super-hydrophobic surfaces were fabricated by femtosecond laser micro-machining and chemical vapor deposition to constitute hybrid scale micro/nano-structures formed by carbon nanotube (CNT) clusters. Nickel thin-film microstructures, functioning as CNT growth catalyst, precisely control the distribution of the CNT clusters. To obtain minimal heat-affected zones, femtosecond laser was used to trim the nickel thin-film coating. Plasma treatment was subsequently carried out to enhance the lotus-leaf effect. The wetting property of the CNT surface is improved from hydrophilicity to super-hydrophobicity at an advancing contact angle of 161 degrees. The dynamic water drop impacting test further confirms its enhanced water-repellent property. Meanwhile, this super-hydrophobic surface exhibits excellent transparency with quartz as the substrate. This hybrid fabrication technique can achieve super-hydrophobic surfaces over a large area, which has potential applications as self-cleaning windows for vehicles, solar cells and high-rise buildings.

  18. Effect of hydrogen plasma irradiation of catalyst films on growth of carbon nanotubes filled with iron nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, Hideki, E-mail: sato@elec.mie-u.ac.jp; Kubonaka, Nobuo; Nagata, Atsushi; Fujiwara, Yuji [Graduate School of Engineering, Mie University, 1577 Kurima-machiya-cho, Tsu 514-8507 (Japan)

    2014-03-15

    Carbon nanotubes filled with iron (Fe-filled CNTs) show shape anisotropy on account of the high aspect ratio of magnetic nanowires, and are promising candidates for various applications, such as magnetic recording media, probes for scanning force microscopy, and medical treatment for cancer. The ability to appropriately control the magnetic properties of CNTs for those applications is desirable. In this study, the authors investigated magnetic properties of Fe-filled CNTs synthesized by thermal chemical vapor deposition for the purpose of tuning their coercivity. Here, the authors implemented hydrogen plasma irradiation of catalyst film that was previously deposited on a substrate as a catalyst layer. This treatment activates the catalyst film and thus enhances the growth of the Fe-filled CNTs. It was confirmed that the H{sub 2} plasma irradiation enhances the growth of the CNTs in terms of increasing their length and diameter compared to CNTs without irradiation. On the other hand, the coercivity of Fe-filled CNTs dropped to approximately half of those without H{sub 2} plasma irradiation. This is probably due to a decrease in the aspect ratio of the Fe nanowires, which results from the increase in their diameter. Furthermore, the crystal structure of the Fe nanowires may affect the coercivity.

  19. Design of a Prussian Blue Analogue/Carbon Nanotube Thin-Film Nanocomposite: Tailored Precursor Preparation, Synthesis, Characterization, and Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husmann, Samantha; Zarbin, Aldo J G

    2016-05-01

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) filled with different species of cobalt (metallic cobalt, cobalt oxide) were synthesized by a chemical vapor deposition method through cobaltocene pyrolysis. A systematic study was performed to correlate different experimental conditions with the structure and characteristics of the obtained material. Thin films of Co-filled CNTs were deposited over conductive substrates through a liquid-liquid interfacial method and were used for cobalt hexacyanoferrate (CoHCFe) electrodeposition by an innovative route in which the Co species encapsulated in the CNTs were employed as reactants. The CNT/CoHCFe films were characterized by different spectroscopic, microscopic, and electrochemical techniques and presented high electrochemical stability in different media. The nanocomposites were applied as both an electrochemical sensor to H2 O2 and a cathode for ion batteries and showed limits of detection at approximately 3.7 nmol L(-1) and a capacity of 130 mAh g(-1) at a current density of 5 A g(-1) . PMID:27010671

  20. Dynamics of charge migration in poly(para-phenylene vinylene) films and nanocomposites with single walled carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulazzi, E; Galli, D E; Lefrant, S; Wéry, J; Massuyeau, F; Faulques, E

    2016-02-01

    We present in this paper a comprehensive study of the migration dynamics of the charges underlying transient photoluminescence (PL) processes in poly(para-phenylene vinylene) (PPV) samples from room temperature to 13 K. In order to interpret experimental data, we have modelled the long-time PL decays (from 100 to 1000 ps) using a time function proportional to [Formula: see text] in which the parameter α is evaluated in a Monte Carlo simulation on polymeric chains. The one dimensional chains (2000 sites long) are formed by random sequences of long and short conjugated segments whose bimodal distributions have been elaborated in previous works in order to reproduce the PL band shapes and peak positions. Intra-chain and inter-chain dynamics are taken into account in the migration of the photogenerated charges from short to long conjugated segments. The statistical analysis is performed by averaging over a total of 10(6) trials for each initial conditions. The values of α have been determined for pristine PPV films and PPV composite films with single-walled carbon nanotubes. This theoretical analysis is in good agreement with experimental data and provides a coherent description for the migration of the photogenerated charges in such inhomogeneous polymeric systems. PMID:26744381

  1. Optimizing processes of dispersant concentration and post-treatments for fabricating single-walled carbon nanotube transparent conducting films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Jing; Wang, Wen-Yi; Chen, Li-Ting; Cui, Li-Jun; Hu, Xiao-Yan; Geng, Hong-Zhang, E-mail: genghz@tjpu.edu.cn

    2013-07-15

    This study evaluated the effect of sodium dodecyl benzene sulfonate (SDBS) as dispersant for the dispersion of purified single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) in water in terms of dispersibility dependence on electrical conductivity of SWCNT transparent conducting film (TCF) performance. SWCNT TCFs were prepared by different proportions of CNTs/SDBS solution to find out the optimum SDBS concentration according to the film resistance of pristine and after post-treatment by nitric acid. TCFs fabricated with the aqueous solution by the ratio of CNTs/SDBS 1:5 gave the lowest sheet resistance and the highest transmittance. The TCFs were then further treated with thionyl chloride to improve their conductivity. Low sheet resistance (86 Ω/□, 80%T) was achieved. The dispersion condition of CNTs/SDBS aqueous solution was characterized by field-emission scanning electron microscopy, while the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy confirmed the dispersion and doping mechanism treated with nitric acid and thionyl chloride.

  2. Electrostatic layer-by-layer a of platinum-loaded multiwall carbon nanotube multilayer: A tunable catalyst film for anodic methanol oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A simple layer-by-layer (LBL) electrostatic adsorption technique was developed for deposition of films composed of alternating layers of positively charged poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride) (PDDA) and negatively charged multiwall carbon nanotubes bearing platinum nanoparticles (Pt-CNTs). PDDA/Pt-CNT film structure and morphology up to six layers were characterized by scanning electron microscopy and ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy, showing the Pt-CNT layers to be porous and uniformly deposited within the multilayer films. Electrochemical properties of the PDDA/Pt-CNT films, as well as electrocatalytic activity toward methanol oxidation, were investigated with cyclic voltammetry. Significant activity toward anodic methanol oxidation was observed and is readily tunable through changing film thickness and/or platinum-nanoparticle loading. Overall, the observed properties of these PDDA/Pt-CNT multilayer films indicated unique potential for application in direct methanol fuel cell

  3. Carbon nanotube core graphitic shell hybrid fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahm, Myung Gwan; Lee, Jae-Hwang; Hart, Amelia H C; Song, Sung Moo; Nam, Jaewook; Jung, Hyun Young; Hashim, Daniel Paul; Li, Bo; Narayanan, Tharangattu N; Park, Chi-Dong; Zhao, Yao; Vajtai, Robert; Kim, Yoong Ahm; Hayashi, Takuya; Ku, Bon-Cheol; Endo, Morinobu; Barrera, Enrique; Jung, Yung Joon; Thomas, Edwin L; Ajayan, Pulickel M

    2013-12-23

    A carbon nanotube yarn core graphitic shell hybrid fiber was fabricated via facile heat treatment of epoxy-based negative photoresist (SU-8) on carbon nanotube yarn. The effective encapsulation of carbon nanotube yarn in carbon fiber and a glassy carbon outer shell determines their physical properties. The higher electrical conductivity (than carbon fiber) of the carbon nanotube yarn overcomes the drawbacks of carbon fiber/glassy carbon, and the better properties (than carbon nanotubes) of the carbon fiber/glassy carbon make up for the lower thermal and mechanical properties of the carbon nanotube yarn via synergistic hybridization without any chemical doping and additional processes. PMID:24224730

  4. High-performance local back gate thin-film field-effect transistors using sorted carbon nanotubes on an amino-silane treated hafnium oxide surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wafer-scale fabrication and characterization of local back gate semiconducting nanotube thin-film transistors (SN-TFTs) are reported in this paper. The local back gate voltage of the corresponding SN-TFT controls the individual transistor switching. In order to achieve high performance, a high-k dielectric material is employed as a gate oxide and this helped to achieve low-voltage operations, much steeper sub-threshold voltage swings and higher transconductance values. A simple procedure to deposit a high-density single-walled carbon nanotube thin film on an amino-silane-treated hafnium oxide (HfOX) surface is suggested such that a good density of nanotubes is realized without degrading the device on–off current ratio and mobility values. The density of the nanotubes achieved on the silanized HfOX surface is about 40–45 nanotubes µm−2. SN-TFTs exhibit an excellent p-type output characteristic with distinct linear and saturation regions. Local back gate SN-TFTs exhibit an on–off current ratio exceeding 104 and a steep sub-threshold slope of 400 mV/decade. SN-TFTs achieve a maximum current density of 13 μA µm−1, an average threshold voltage of −0.5 V, a maximum normalized transconductance of 18.5 μS µm−1 and exhibit a maximum carrier mobility of 60.6 cm2(Vs)−1

  5. Amperometric bienzyme glucose biosensor based on carbon nanotube modified electrode with electropolymerized poly(toluidine blue O) film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Wenju [Department of Chemistry, Hong Kong Baptist University, Kowloon Tong (Hong Kong); Wang Fang [Department of Chemistry, Hong Kong Baptist University, Kowloon Tong (Hong Kong)] [Department of Chemistry, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Yao Yanli [Department of Chemistry, Hong Kong Baptist University, Kowloon Tong (Hong Kong); Hu Shengshui [Department of Chemistry, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Shiu, Kwok-Keung, E-mail: kkshiu@hkbu.edu.h [Department of Chemistry, Hong Kong Baptist University, Kowloon Tong (Hong Kong)

    2010-09-30

    The amperometric bienzyme glucose biosensor utilizing horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and glucose oxidase (GOx) immobilized in poly(toluidine blue O) (PTBO) film was constructed on multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWNT) modified glassy carbon electrode. The HRP layer could be used to analyze hydrogen peroxide with toluidine blue O (TBO) mediators, while the bienzyme system (HRP + GOx) could be utilized for glucose determination. Glucose underwent biocatalytic oxidation by GOx in the presence of oxygen to yield H{sub 2}O{sub 2} which was further reduced by HRP at the MWNT-modified electrode with TBO mediators. In the absence of oxygen, glucose oxidation proceeded with electron transfer between GOx and the electrode mediated by TBO moieties without H{sub 2}O{sub 2} production. The bienzyme electrode offered high sensitivity for amperometric determination of glucose at low potential, displaying Michaelis-Menten kinetics. The bienzyme glucose biosensor displayed linear response from 0.1 to 1.2 mM with a sensitivity of 113 mA M{sup -1} cm{sup -2} at an applied potential of -0.10 V in air-saturated electrolytes.

  6. Anticorrosion Coating of Carbon Nanotube/Polytetrafluoroethylene Composite Film on the Stainless Steel Bipolar Plate for Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshiyuki Show

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Composite film of carbon nanotube (CNT and polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE was formed from dispersion fluids of CNT and PTFE. The composite film showed high electrical conductivity in the range of 0.1–13 S/cm and hydrophobic nature. This composite film was applied to stainless steel (SS bipolar plates of the proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC as anticorrosion film. This coating decreased the contact resistance between the surface of the bipolar plate and the membrane electrode assembly (MEA of the PEMFC. The output power of the fuel cell is increased by 1.6 times because the decrease in the contact resistance decreases the series resistance of the PEMFC. Moreover, the coating of this composite film protects the bipolar plate from the surface corrosion.

  7. Effects of single-walled carbon nanotubes on the optical and photo-conductive properties of their composite films with regio-regular poly(3-hexylthiophene)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of a small admixture of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) HiPCO (high pressure carbon monoxide) (from 0.5 to 2 wt%) on the supramolecular structure in regio-regular poly(3-hexylthiophene) (RR-P3HT) thin films is studied and their optical and photoconductivity properties are investigated. It is demonstrated that the presence of such small amounts of nanotubes improves the structural organization in the films as evidenced by X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies. This is confirmed by UV–visible optical absorption investigations which clearly show a better conjugation of P3HT in the presence of nanotubes. In Raman spectra of composites, changes in intensities and frequencies of the radial breathing modes are observed upon addition of nanotubes. This can be rationalized by a modification of the resonance conditions caused by a selective dispersion and wrapping of SWNTs via π-interaction (π-stacking). As a consequence of these interactions, a dramatic photoluminescence (PL) quenching is observed which becomes more and more pronounced with increasing the nanotube content. This implies a fast photo-induced electron transfer favoured by a large area of the SWNTs/P3HT interface and strong interactions between these two components. An increase in the composite photocurrent by at least one-order of magnitude, as compared to the case of pure P3HT film, is the most pronounced effect of this electron transfer. These two effects are of crucial importance for the application of the investigated composites in bulk hetero-junction photovoltaic cells (BHJPCs) and organic photo-detectors (OPDs). - Highlights: • Optical properties of single-walled carbon nanotubes/P3HT films are investigated. • The insertion of SWNTs leads to an improvement of structural organization. • Composite films shows photoluminescence quenching at low SWNTs concentration. • Existence of a fast photo-induced electron transfer between SWNTs and P3HT. • These two effects are of crucial

  8. Single-walled carbon nanotube-induced crystallinity on the electropolymeric film of tetraaminophthalocyaninatonickel(II) complex: Impact on the rate of heterogeneous electron transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillay, Jeseelan; Ozoemena, Kenneth I.

    2007-06-01

    We present a fundamental investigation on the impact of single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) on the film structure and redox behaviour of tetraaminophthalocyaninatonickel(II) complex (NiTAPc) electropolymer immobilized on a basal plane pyrolytic graphite electrode (BPPGE). SWCNT induces crystallinity on the NiTAPc electropolymeric film structure and increases its apparent electron transfer rate constant ( kapp). We proved that there is potential advantage of using electrode based on the SWCNT- poly-NiTAPc hybrid for catalytic and sensing applications as it enhances the catalytic current for the detection of nitric oxide more than twice compared to bare BPPGE, BPPGE-SWCNT and other electrodes without SWCNTs.

  9. Teslaphoresis of Carbon Nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bornhoeft, Lindsey R; Castillo, Aida C; Smalley, Preston R; Kittrell, Carter; James, Dustin K; Brinson, Bruce E; Rybolt, Thomas R; Johnson, Bruce R; Cherukuri, Tonya K; Cherukuri, Paul

    2016-04-26

    This paper introduces Teslaphoresis, the directed motion and self-assembly of matter by a Tesla coil, and studies this electrokinetic phenomenon using single-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs). Conventional directed self-assembly of matter using electric fields has been restricted to small scale structures, but with Teslaphoresis, we exceed this limitation by using the Tesla coil's antenna to create a gradient high-voltage force field that projects into free space. CNTs placed within the Teslaphoretic (TEP) field polarize and self-assemble into wires that span from the nanoscale to the macroscale, the longest thus far being 15 cm. We show that the TEP field not only directs the self-assembly of long nanotube wires at remote distances (>30 cm) but can also wirelessly power nanotube-based LED circuits. Furthermore, individualized CNTs self-organize to form long parallel arrays with high fidelity alignment to the TEP field. Thus, Teslaphoresis is effective for directed self-assembly from the bottom-up to the macroscale. PMID:27074626

  10. Influence of the diameter of single-walled carbon nanotube bundles on the optoelectronic performance of dry-deposited thin films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimmo Mustonen

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The optoelectronic performance of thin films of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs was studied with respect to the properties of both individual nanotubes and their bundles. The SWCNTs were synthesized in a hot wire generator aerosol reactor, collected by gas filtration and dry-transferred onto various substrates. By thus completely avoiding liquid dispersion steps, we were able to avoid any artifacts from residual surfactants or sonication. We found that bundle lengths determined the thin-film performance, as would be expected for highly resistive bundle–bundle junctions. However, we found no evidence that contact resistances were affected by the bundle diameters, although they did play a secondary role by simply affecting the absorption. The individual SWCNT diameters and their graphitization level as gauged by the Raman D band intensity did not show any clear correlation with the overall performance.

  11. Enzyme biosensor based on plasma-polymerized film-covered carbon nanotube layer grown directly on a flat substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muguruma, Hitoshi; Hoshino, Tatsuya; Matsui, Yasunori

    2011-07-01

    We report a novel approach to fabrication of an amperometric biosensor with an enzyme, a plasma-polymerized film (PPF), and carbon nanotubes (CNTs). The CNTs were grown directly on an island-patterned Co/Ti/Cr layer on a glass substrate by microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition. The as-grown CNTs were subsequently treated by nitrogen plasma, which changed the surface from hydrophobic to hydrophilic in order to obtain an electrochemical contact between the CNTs and enzymes. A glucose oxidase (GOx) enzyme was then adsorbed onto the CNT surface and directly treated with acetonitrile plasma to overcoat the GOx layer with a PPF. This fabrication process provides a robust design of CNT-based enzyme biosensor, because of all processes are dry except the procedure for enzyme immobilization. The main novelty of the present methodology lies in the PPF and/or plasma processes. The optimized glucose biosensor revealed a high sensitivity of 38 μA mM(-1) cm(-2), a broad linear dynamic range of 0.25-19 mM (correlation coefficient of 0.994), selectivity toward an interferent (ascorbic acid), and a fast response time of 7 s. The background current was much smaller in magnitude than the current due to 10 mM glucose response. The low limit of detection was 34 μM (S/N = 3). All results strongly suggest that a plasma-polymerized process can provide a new platform for CNT-based biosensor design. PMID:21678995

  12. Binder free MoO3/multiwalled carbon nanotube thin film electrode for high energy density supercapacitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Greener alternative method for electrode preparation. • The composite electrode exhibits an energy density of 7.28 Wh kg−1. • The composite electrode exhibit high power density of 4930 W kg−1 at high current rates. • Potential energy storage material for portable and consumer electronics. - Abstract: MoO3/multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) composites were prepared by Magnetron sputtering in Ar/O2 atmosphere. This will provide a greener alternative for the fabrication of binder free composite electrode for supercapacitor applications. MWCNT provides good support for the growth of MoO3 thin films. This integrated composite electrode exhibited specific capacitance of 93 F g−1 and a corresponding energy density of 7.28 Wh kg−1 in non-aqueous electrolyte, which is almost fourfold increase compared to the bare MWCNT. Also the electrode maintains high power density of 4930 W kg−1 at high current rates, suggesting a potential energy storage material for portable and consumer electronics

  13. Encapsulate-and-peel: fabricating carbon nanotube CMOS integrated circuits in a flexible ultra-thin plastic film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fabrication of single-walled carbon nanotube thin film (SWNT-TF) based integrated circuits (ICs) on soft substrates has been challenging due to several processing-related obstacles, such as printed/transferred SWNT-TF pattern and electrode alignment, electrical pad/channel material/dielectric layer flatness, adherence of the circuits onto the soft substrates etc. Here, we report a new approach that circumvents these challenges by encapsulating pre-formed SWNT-TF-ICs on hard substrates into polyimide (PI) and peeling them off to form flexible ICs on a large scale. The flexible SWNT-TF-ICs show promising performance comparable to those circuits formed on hard substrates. The flexible p- and n-type SWNT-TF transistors have an average mobility of around 60 cm2 V−1 s−1, a subthreshold slope as low as 150 mV  dec−1, operating gate voltages less than 2 V, on/off ratios larger than 104 and a switching speed of several kilohertz. The post-transfer technique described here is not only a simple and cost-effective pathway to realize scalable flexible ICs, but also a feasible method to fabricate flexible displays, sensors and solar cells etc. (paper)

  14. Investigation of liquid sensing mechanism of poly(lactic acid)/multi-walled carbon nanotube composite films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The liquid sensing mechanism of melt-processed poly(lactic acid) (PLA)/multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWNT) composite films was investigated for the influence of MWNT loading, solubility parameters of solvents used, solvent transport behaviours, resultant electrical resistance changes, as well as crystallization of the PLA matrix. The diffusion, sorption and permeation coefficients of neat PLA and the composites were estimated, indicating that MWNT network structures block solvent molecules from penetrating into the polymer matrix. Solvent-induced crystallization of the polymer matrix was observed. Isothermally crystallized composites showed reduced resistances, a significant decrease of sorbed solvent content and a reduction of the resulting resistance changes on the solvent contact. In the context with sensing results on MWNT mats, it was proposed that the liquid sensing mechanism of PLA/MWNT composites consists of the overall electrical resistance changes caused by the structural variation of the conductive MWNT network in the polymer matrix and additional interactions between the MWNT and solvent molecules

  15. Logic circuits composed of flexible carbon nanotube thin-film transistor and ultra-thin polymer gate dielectric

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dongil; Yoon, Jinsu; Lee, Juhee; Lee, Byung-Hyun; Seol, Myeong-Lok; Bae, Hagyoul; Jeon, Seung-Bae; Seong, Hyejeong; Im, Sung Gap; Choi, Sung-Jin; Choi, Yang-Kyu

    2016-05-01

    Printing electronics has become increasingly prominent in the field of electronic engineering because this method is highly efficient at producing flexible, low-cost and large-scale thin-film transistors. However, TFTs are typically constructed with rigid insulating layers consisting of oxides and nitrides that are brittle and require high processing temperatures, which can cause a number of problems when used in printed flexible TFTs. In this study, we address these issues and demonstrate a method of producing inkjet-printed TFTs that include an ultra-thin polymeric dielectric layer produced by initiated chemical vapor deposition (iCVD) at room temperature and highly purified 99.9% semiconducting carbon nanotubes. Our integrated approach enables the production of flexible logic circuits consisting of CNT-TFTs on a polyethersulfone (PES) substrate that have a high mobility (up to 9.76 cm2 V‑1 sec‑1), a low operating voltage (less than 4 V), a high current on/off ratio (3 × 104), and a total device yield of 90%. Thus, it should be emphasized that this study delineates a guideline for the feasibility of producing flexible CNT-TFT logic circuits with high performance based on a low-cost and simple fabrication process.

  16. Logic circuits composed of flexible carbon nanotube thin-film transistor and ultra-thin polymer gate dielectric.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dongil; Yoon, Jinsu; Lee, Juhee; Lee, Byung-Hyun; Seol, Myeong-Lok; Bae, Hagyoul; Jeon, Seung-Bae; Seong, Hyejeong; Im, Sung Gap; Choi, Sung-Jin; Choi, Yang-Kyu

    2016-01-01

    Printing electronics has become increasingly prominent in the field of electronic engineering because this method is highly efficient at producing flexible, low-cost and large-scale thin-film transistors. However, TFTs are typically constructed with rigid insulating layers consisting of oxides and nitrides that are brittle and require high processing temperatures, which can cause a number of problems when used in printed flexible TFTs. In this study, we address these issues and demonstrate a method of producing inkjet-printed TFTs that include an ultra-thin polymeric dielectric layer produced by initiated chemical vapor deposition (iCVD) at room temperature and highly purified 99.9% semiconducting carbon nanotubes. Our integrated approach enables the production of flexible logic circuits consisting of CNT-TFTs on a polyethersulfone (PES) substrate that have a high mobility (up to 9.76 cm(2) V(-1) sec(-)1), a low operating voltage (less than 4 V), a high current on/off ratio (3 × 10(4)), and a total device yield of 90%. Thus, it should be emphasized that this study delineates a guideline for the feasibility of producing flexible CNT-TFT logic circuits with high performance based on a low-cost and simple fabrication process. PMID:27184121

  17. Preparation of isolated carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Carbon nanotubes are of great interest for a large range of applications from physical chemistry, solid state physics to molecular quantum optics. We propose the preparation of molecular beams of isolated carbon nanotubes for future matter wave experiments, as well as for applications in the material sciences and spectroscopy. Carbon nanotubes may be particularly interesting for quantum experiments because of their low ionization threshold, high mechanical stability and high polarizability. This is expected to facilitate the cooling, coherent manipulation and efficient detection of such molecular beams. For this purpose we are investigating different methods of solvation, isolation and shortening of carbon nanotubes from commercial bundles. Length and diameter distributions are recorded by SPM whereas the unbundling of the tubes is determined by absorption spectroscopy. Established methods from physical chemistry, such as laser desorption are currently being modified and studied as potential tools for generating beams of nanotubes in the mass range of around 50.000-100.000 amu. (author)

  18. Preparation of electrochemically reduced graphene oxide/multi-wall carbon nanotubes hybrid film modified electrode, and its application to amperometric sensing of rutin

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Uling Yang; Gang Li; Meifang Hu; Lingbo Qu

    2014-07-01

    Through a facile electrochemical method, we prepared an electrochemically reduced graphene oxide (ERGO)/multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) hybrid film modified glassy carbon electrode (GCE), and characterized it by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and x-ray diffraction (XRD) The experimental results demonstrated that ERGO-MWNTs/GCE exhibited excellent electrocatalytic activity toward rutin as evidenced by the significant enhancement of redox peak currents in comparison with a bare GCE, ERGO/GCE and MWNTs/GCE. This method has been applied for the direct determination of rutin in real samples with satisfactory results.

  19. Nonenzymatic sensing of glucose using a carbon ceramic electrode modified with a composite film made from copper oxide, over oxidized polypyrrole and multi-walled carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A carbon ceramic electrode was modified with a thin film composed of over oxidized polypyrrole, CuO and multi-walled carbon nanotubes. The surface morphology, electrochemical properties and electrocatalytic activity towards the oxidation of glucose of the modified electrode were studied in detail. Benefiting from the high electrocatalytic activity of CuO, the selectivity of OPpy film, and the fast electron transfer rate promoted by MWCNTs, this modified electrode displays good stability, selectivity, high electrocatalytic activity and a low detection limit for the determination of glucose in pH 13 solution. Under the optimum conditions, the linear range for the determination of glucose by cyclic voltammetry is from 20 μM to 10 mM, and the detection limit is 4.0 μM (at an SNR of 3). The amperometric calibration plot covers the 0.20 μM to 2.0 mM concentration range, and the detection limit is 50 nM. The highest sensitivity for the determination of glucose is 3922.6 μA mM−1 cm2. (author)

  20. Boron carbide nanolumps on carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lao, J. Y.; Li, W. Z.; Wen, J. G.; Ren, Z. F.

    2002-01-01

    Boron carbide nanolumps are formed on the surface of multiwall carbon nanotubes by a solid-state reaction between boron and carbon nanotubes. The reaction is localized so that the integrity of the structure of carbon nanotubes is maintained. Inner layers of multiwall carbon nanotubes are also bonded to boron carbide nanolumps. These multiwall carbon nanotubes with boron carbide nanolumps are expected to be the ideal reinforcing fillers for high-performance composites because of the favorable morphology.

  1. Density controlled carbon nanotube array electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Zhifeng F.; Tu, Yi

    2008-12-16

    CNT materials comprising aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with pre-determined site densities, catalyst substrate materials for obtaining them and methods for forming aligned CNTs with controllable densities on such catalyst substrate materials are described. The fabrication of films comprising site-density controlled vertically aligned CNT arrays of the invention with variable field emission characteristics, whereby the field emission properties of the films are controlled by independently varying the length of CNTs in the aligned array within the film or by independently varying inter-tubule spacing of the CNTs within the array (site density) are disclosed. The fabrication of microelectrode arrays (MEAs) formed utilizing the carbon nanotube material of the invention is also described.

  2. Electrochemical determination of dopamine in the presence of ascorbic acid based on the gold nanorods/carbon nanotubes composite film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng Chunyan, E-mail: dengchunyan81@126.com [Key Laboratory of Resources Chemistry of Nonferrous Metals, Central South University, Changsha, 410083 (China); Chen Jinzhuo; Yang Minghui [Key Laboratory of Resources Chemistry of Nonferrous Metals, Central South University, Changsha, 410083 (China); Nie Zhou [State Key Laboratory of Chemo/Biosensing and Chemometrics, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Si Shihui [Key Laboratory of Resources Chemistry of Nonferrous Metals, Central South University, Changsha, 410083 (China)

    2011-10-01

    Highlights: > The GNR/CNT/GC electrode was fabricated simply. It has higher catalytic activity towards the oxidation of DA and ascorbic acid (AA). The selective determination of DA was carried out with low detection limit (0.8 nM, S/N = 3). The proposed method was feasible to detect the concentration of DA in human blood serum. - Abstract: In this paper, the gold nanorods (GNRs)/multiwalled carbon nanotubes (CNT) composite film-modified glassy carbon (GC) electrode was fabricated simply by the electrostatic interaction between the positively charged GNRs and the negatively charged CNT. And the GNRs/CNT/GC electrode was used for the selective and sensitive determination of dopamine (DA) in the presence of ascorbic acid (AA). It was found that the GNRs/CNT/GC electrode had higher catalytic activity towards the oxidation of DA and ascorbic acid (AA) comparing with the bare GC and CNT/GC electrodes. It may be due to the synergic effect of GNRs and CNT, because the surface area of the GNRs/CNT/GC electrode increased, the edge plan sites presented on the CNT surface can improve the electron transfer between the modified electrode and DA, and the rod-shaped gold may be served as the mediator for the oxidation of dopamine and provided the electrocatalytic ability. Moreover, the voltammetric peaks of AA and DA were separated enough at the GNRs/CNT/GC electrode, which was sufficiently enough for the selective determination of DA. Thus, the selective determination of DA was carried out with low detection limit (0.8 nM, S/N = 3). Also it was obtained that the proposed method was feasible to detect the concentration of DA in human blood serum. Therefore, it can be concluded that the GNRs/CNT modified electrode may be advantageous for the DA determination.

  3. Differential pulse voltammetric determination of methyl parathion based on multiwalled carbon nanotubes-poly(acrylamide) nanocomposite film modified electrode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeng, Yanbo [Department of Chemistry and Shanghai Key Laboratory of Green Chemistry and Chemical Process, East China Normal University, 3663 Zhongshan Road(N), Shanghai, 200062 (China); College of Biological, Chemical Sciences and Engineering, Jiaxing University, Jiaxing 314001 (China); Yu, Dajun; Yu, Yanyan [Department of Chemistry and Shanghai Key Laboratory of Green Chemistry and Chemical Process, East China Normal University, 3663 Zhongshan Road(N), Shanghai, 200062 (China); Zhou, Tianshu [Department of Environmental Science, East China Normal University, 3663 Zhongshan Road(N), Shanghai, 200062 (China); Shi, Guoyue, E-mail: gyshi@chem.ecnu.edu.cn [Department of Chemistry and Shanghai Key Laboratory of Green Chemistry and Chemical Process, East China Normal University, 3663 Zhongshan Road(N), Shanghai, 200062 (China)

    2012-05-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A sensitive electrochemical sensor for detecting methyl parathion in environmental samples. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The preparation, characterization and application of this novel MWCNTs-PAAM nanocomposite. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The MWCNTs-PAAM/GCE exhibited a high adsorption and strong affinity toward methyl parathion. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Wide linear range and low detection limit of the proposed method for detecting methyl parathion. - Abstract: A sensitive electrochemical differential pulse voltammetry method was developed for detecting methyl parathion based on multiwalled carbon nanotubes-poly(acrylamide) (MWCNTs-PAAM) nanocomposite film modified glassy carbon electrode. The novel MWCNTs-PAAM nanocomposite, containing high content of amide groups, was synthesized by PAAM polymerizing at the vinyl group functionalized MWCNTs surface using free radical polymerization. The MWCNTs-PAAM nanocomposite was characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, thermal gravimetric analysis and scanning electron microscopy. Electrochemical behavior and interference studies of MWCNTs-PAAM/GCE for methyl parathion were investigated. The experimental results demonstrated that the MWCNTs-PAAM/GCE exhibited a high adsorption and strong affinity toward methyl parathion compared with some metal ions and nitroaromatic compounds, which exist in environmental samples. The adsorbed amount of methyl parathion on the MWCNTs-PAAM/GCE approached the equilibrium value upon 5 min adsorption time. A linear calibration curve for methyl parathion was obtained in the concentration range from 5.0 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -9} to 1.0 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -5} mol L{sup -1}, with a detection limit of 2.0 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -9} mol L{sup -1}. The MWCNTs-PAAM/GCE was proved to be a suitable sensing tool for the fast, sensitive and selective determination of methyl parathion in environmental water samples.

  4. Investigation on single walled carbon nanotube thin films deposited by Langmuir Blodgett method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langmuir Blodgett is a technique to deposit a homogeneous film with a fine control over thickness and molecular organization. Thin films of functionalized SWCNTs have been prepared by Langmuir Blodgett method. The good surface spreading properties of SWCNTs at air/water interface are indicated by surface pressure-area isotherm and the monolayer formed on water surface is transferred onto the quartz substrate by vertical dipping. A multilayer film is thus obtained in a layer by layer manner. The film is characterized by Atomic Force Microscope (AFM), UV-Vis-NIR spectroscopy and FTIR.AFM shows the surface morphology of the deposited film. UV-Vis-NIR spectroscopy shows the characteristic peaks of semiconducting SWCNTs. The uniformity of LB film can be used further in understanding the optical and electrical behavior of these materials

  5. Investigation on single walled carbon nanotube thin films deposited by Langmuir Blodgett method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vishalli,, E-mail: vishalli-2008@yahoo.com; Dharamvir, Keya [Department of Physics, Panjab University, Chandigarh (India); Kaur, Ramneek; Raina, K. K. [Materials Research Laboratory, School of Physics and Materials Science, Thapar University, Patiala (India)

    2015-05-15

    Langmuir Blodgett is a technique to deposit a homogeneous film with a fine control over thickness and molecular organization. Thin films of functionalized SWCNTs have been prepared by Langmuir Blodgett method. The good surface spreading properties of SWCNTs at air/water interface are indicated by surface pressure-area isotherm and the monolayer formed on water surface is transferred onto the quartz substrate by vertical dipping. A multilayer film is thus obtained in a layer by layer manner. The film is characterized by Atomic Force Microscope (AFM), UV-Vis-NIR spectroscopy and FTIR.AFM shows the surface morphology of the deposited film. UV-Vis-NIR spectroscopy shows the characteristic peaks of semiconducting SWCNTs. The uniformity of LB film can be used further in understanding the optical and electrical behavior of these materials.

  6. High-performance thin-film-transistors based on semiconducting-enriched single-walled carbon nanotubes processed by electrical-breakdown strategy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aïssa, B., E-mail: aissab@emt.inrs.ca [Centre Énergie, Matériaux et Télécommunications, INRS, 1650, boulevard Lionel-Boulet, Varennes, Quebec J3X 1S2 (Canada); Qatar Environment and Energy Research Institute (QEERI), Qatar Foundation, P.O. Box 5825, Doha (Qatar); Nedil, M. [Telebec Wireless Underground Communication Laboratory, UQAT, 675, 1" è" r" e Avenue, Val d’Or, Québec J9P 1Y3 (Canada); Habib, M.A. [Computer Sciences and Engineering Department, Yanbu University College, P.O. Box 30031 (Saudi Arabia); Abdul-Hafidh, E.H. [High Energy Physics Department, Yanbu University College, P.O. Box 30031 (Saudi Arabia); Rosei, F. [Centre Énergie, Matériaux et Télécommunications, INRS, 1650, boulevard Lionel-Boulet, Varennes, Quebec J3X 1S2 (Canada)

    2015-02-15

    Highlights: • We selectively burn metallic single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) by electrical breakdown. • We successfully achieve a semiconducting enriched-SWCNT in TFT configuration. • High performance, like On/Off of 10{sup 5} and a subthreshold swing of 165 mV/decades were obtained. • After PMMA coating, the SWCNT–TFTs were found stables for more than 4 months. - Abstract: Over the past two decades, among remarkable variety of nanomaterials, single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) remain the most intriguing and uniquely well suited materials for applications in high-performance electronics. The most advanced technologies require the ability to form purely semiconducting SWCNTs. Here, we report on our strategy based on the well known progressive electrical breakdown process that offer this capability and serves as highly efficient means for selectively removing metallic carbon nanotubes from electronically heterogeneous random networks, deposited on silicon substrates in a thin film transistor (TFT) configuration. We demonstrate the successful achievement of semiconducting enriched-SWCNT networks in TFT scheme that reach On/Off switching ratios of ∼100,000, on-conductance of 20 μS, and a subthreshold swing of less than 165 mV/decades. The obtained TFT devices were then protected with thin film poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) to keep the percolation level of the SWCNTs network spatially and temporally stable, while protecting it from atmosphere exchanges. TFT devices were found to be air-stable and maintained their excellent characteristics in ambient atmosphere for more than 4 months. This approach could work as a platform for future nanotube-based nanoelectronics.

  7. High-performance thin-film-transistors based on semiconducting-enriched single-walled carbon nanotubes processed by electrical-breakdown strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • We selectively burn metallic single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) by electrical breakdown. • We successfully achieve a semiconducting enriched-SWCNT in TFT configuration. • High performance, like On/Off of 105 and a subthreshold swing of 165 mV/decades were obtained. • After PMMA coating, the SWCNT–TFTs were found stables for more than 4 months. - Abstract: Over the past two decades, among remarkable variety of nanomaterials, single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) remain the most intriguing and uniquely well suited materials for applications in high-performance electronics. The most advanced technologies require the ability to form purely semiconducting SWCNTs. Here, we report on our strategy based on the well known progressive electrical breakdown process that offer this capability and serves as highly efficient means for selectively removing metallic carbon nanotubes from electronically heterogeneous random networks, deposited on silicon substrates in a thin film transistor (TFT) configuration. We demonstrate the successful achievement of semiconducting enriched-SWCNT networks in TFT scheme that reach On/Off switching ratios of ∼100,000, on-conductance of 20 μS, and a subthreshold swing of less than 165 mV/decades. The obtained TFT devices were then protected with thin film poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) to keep the percolation level of the SWCNTs network spatially and temporally stable, while protecting it from atmosphere exchanges. TFT devices were found to be air-stable and maintained their excellent characteristics in ambient atmosphere for more than 4 months. This approach could work as a platform for future nanotube-based nanoelectronics

  8. Effective post treatment for preparing highly conductive carbon nanotube/reduced graphite oxide hybrid films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ranran; Sun, Jing; Gao, Lian; Xu, Chaohe; Zhang, Jing; Liu, Yangqiao

    2011-03-01

    SWCNT-reduced graphite oxide hybrid films were prepared by a filtration method. An efficient post-treatment procedure was designed to reduce GO and remove dispersants simultaneously. The sheet resistance decreased significantly after treatment, by a factor of 4-13 times. Films with excellent performance (95.6%, 655 Ω per square) were obtained and had great potential applications. PMID:21132173

  9. Torsional Electromechanics of Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joselevich, Ernesto; Cohen-Karni, Tzahi; Segev, Lior; Srur-Lavi, Onit; Cohen, Sidney R.

    2007-03-01

    Carbon nanotubes are known to be distinctly metallic or semiconducting depending on their diameter and chirality. Here we show that continuously varying the chirality by mechanical torsion can induce conductance oscillations, which can be attributed to metal-semiconductor periodic transitions. The phenomenon is observed in multi-walled carbon nanotubes, where both the torque and the current are shown to be carried predominantly by the outermost wall. The oscillation period with torsion is consistent with the theoretical shifting of the corners of the first Brillouin zone of graphene across different subbands allowed in the nanotube. Beyond a critical torsion, the conductance irreversibly drops due to torsional failure, allowing us to determine the torsional strength of carbon nanotubes. Our experiments indicate that carbon nanotubes could be used as self-sensing torsional springs for nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS). [1] E. Joselevich, Twisting nanotubes: From torsion to chirality, ChemPhysChem 2006, 7, 1405. [2] T. Cohen-Karni, L. Segev, O. Srur-Lavi, S. R. Cohen, E. Joselevich, Torsional electromechanical quantum oscillations in carbon nanotubes, Nature Nanotechnology, 2006, 1, 36.

  10. Photoresponse from noble metal nanoparticles-multi walled carbon nanotube composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scarselli, M.; Camilli, L.; Castrucci, P.; De Crescenzi, M. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Roma Tor Vergata, Via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, 00133 Roma (Italy); Matthes, L. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Roma Tor Vergata, Via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, 00133 Roma (Italy); Institut fuer Festkoepertheorie und optik, Friedrich Schiller Universitaet, Max-Wien Platz 1, Jena (Germany); Pulci, O. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Roma Tor Vergata, Via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, 00133 Roma (Italy); ETSF, MIFO, and CNR-ISM, Via del Fosso del Cavaliere, Roma (Italy); Gatto, E.; Venanzi, M. [Dipartimento di Scienze e Tecnologie Chimiche, Universita di Roma Tor Vergata, Via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, 00133 Roma (Italy)

    2012-12-10

    In this Letter, we investigated the photo-response of multi wall carbon nanotube-based composites obtained from in situ thermal evaporation of noble metals (Au, Ag, and Cu) on the nanotube films. The metal deposition process produced discrete nanoparticles on the nanotube outer walls. The nanoparticle-carbon nanotube films were characterized by photo-electrochemical measurements in a standard three electrode cell. The photocurrent from the decorated carbon nanotubes remarkably increased with respect to that of bare multiwall tubes. With the aid of first-principle calculations, these results are discussed in terms of metal nanoparticle-nanotube interactions and electronic charge transfer at the interface.

  11. Functionalization of Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khare, Bishun N. (Inventor); Meyyappan, Meyya (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    Method and system for functionalizing a collection of carbon nanotubes (CNTs). A selected precursor gas (e.g., H2 or F2 or CnHm) is irradiated to provide a cold plasma of selected target species particles, such as atomic H or F, in a first chamber. The target species particles are d irected toward an array of CNTs located in a second chamber while suppressing transport of ultraviolet radiation to the second chamber. A CNT array is functionalized with the target species particles, at or below room temperature, to a point of saturation, in an exposure time interval no longer than about 30 sec. *Discrimination against non-target species is provided by (i) use of a target species having a lifetime that is much greater than a lifetime of a non-target species and/or (2) use of an applied magnetic field to discriminate between charged particle trajectories for target species and for non-target species.

  12. Carbon nanotube optical mirrors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Peter C.; Rabin, Douglas

    2015-01-01

    We report the fabrication of imaging quality optical mirrors with smooth surfaces using carbon nanotubes (CNT) embedded in an epoxy matrix. CNT/epoxy is a multifunctional composite material that has sensing capabilities and can be made to incorporate self-actuation. Moreover, as the precursor is a low density liquid, large and lightweight mirrors can be fabricated by processes such as replication, spincasting, and three-dimensional printing. Therefore, the technology holds promise for the development of a new generation of lightweight, compact "smart" telescope mirrors with figure sensing and active or adaptive figure control. We report on measurements made of optical and mechanical characteristics, active optics experiments, and numerical modeling. We discuss possible paths for future development.

  13. Carbon Nanotube Electron Gun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Cattien V. (Inventor); Ribaya, Bryan P. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    An electron gun, an electron source for an electron gun, an extractor for an electron gun, and a respective method for producing the electron gun, the electron source and the extractor are disclosed. Embodiments provide an electron source utilizing a carbon nanotube (CNT) bonded to a substrate for increased stability, reliability, and durability. An extractor with an aperture in a conductive material is used to extract electrons from the electron source, where the aperture may substantially align with the CNT of the electron source when the extractor and electron source are mated to form the electron gun. The electron source and extractor may have alignment features for aligning the electron source and the extractor, thereby bringing the aperture and CNT into substantial alignment when assembled. The alignment features may provide and maintain this alignment during operation to improve the field emission characteristics and overall system stability of the electron gun.

  14. Carbon nanotube biconvex microcavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butt, Haider, E-mail: h.butt@bham.ac.uk; Ahmed, Rajib [Nanotechnology Laboratory, School of Mechanical Engineering, University of Birmingham, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Yetisen, Ali K.; Yun, Seok Hyun [Harvard Medical School and Wellman Center for Photomedicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, 50 Blossom Street, Boston, Massachusetts 02114 (United States); Dai, Qing [National Center for Nanoscience and Technology, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2015-03-23

    Developing highly efficient microcavities with predictive narrow-band resonance frequencies using the least amount of material will allow the applications in nonlinear photonic devices. We have developed a microcavity array that comprised multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) organized in a biconvex pattern. The finite element model allowed designing microcavity arrays with predictive transmission properties and assessing the effects of the microarray geometry. The microcavity array demonstrated negative index and produced high Q factors. 2–3 μm tall MWCNTs were patterned as biconvex microcavities, which were separated by 10 μm in an array. The microcavity was iridescent and had optical control over the diffracted elliptical patterns with a far-field pattern, whose properties were predicted by the model. It is anticipated that the MWCNT biconvex microcavities will have implications for the development of highly efficient lenses, metamaterial antennas, and photonic circuits.

  15. Enhanced Carbon Nanotube Ultracapacitors Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed innovation utilizes carbon nanotubes (CNTs) coated with pseudo-capacitive MnO2 material as nano-composite electrode and ionic electrolyte for the...

  16. One-step electrochemical composite polymerization of polypyrrole integrated with functionalized graphene/carbon nanotubes nanostructured composite film for electrochemical capacitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: A novel one-step electrochemical co-deposition strategy was first proposed to prepare unique polypyrrole/reduced graphene oxide/carbon nanotubes (PPy/F-RGO/CNTs) ternary composites, where F-RGO, CNTs, and PPy were electrodeposited simultaneously to construct a three-dimensional (3-D) highly porous film electrode. Highlights: ► Isolated, water-soluble graphene was obtained through benzenesulfonic functionalization. ► PPy/F-RGO/CNTs ternary composite film was prepared via one-step electrochemical co-deposition route. ► PPy/F-RGO/CNTs film shows 3-D highly porous nanostructure and high electrical conductivity. ► PPy/F-RGO/CNTs film exhibits high capacitance, good high-rate performance with a remarkable cycling stability. - Abstract: A novel one-step electrochemical composite polymerization strategy was first proposed to prepare unique polypyrrole/reduced graphene oxide/carbon nanotubes (PPy/F-RGO/CNTs) ternary composites, where F-RGO, CNTs, and PPy were electrodeposited simultaneously to construct a three-dimensional (3-D) highly porous film electrode. Such ternary composite film electrode exhibits a high specific capacitance of 300 F g−1 at 1 A g−1 as well as a remarkable cycling stability at high rates, which is related to its unique nanostructure and high electrical conductivity. F-RGO and CNTs act as an electron-transporting backbone of a 3-D porous nanostructure, leaving adequate working space for facile electrolyte penetration and better faradaic utilization of the electro-active PPy. Furthermore, the straightforward approach proposed here can be readily extended to prepare other composite film electrodes with good electrochemical performance for energy storage.

  17. Molybdenum Disulfide Sheathed Carbon Nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu Chun SONG; Zhu De XU; Yi Fan ZHENG; Gui HAN; Bo LIU; Wei Xiang CHEN

    2004-01-01

    Single and double layered MoS2-coated multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNs) were successfully prepared by pyrolyzing (NH4)2MoS4-coated multiwalled carbon nanotubes in an H2 atmosphere at 900℃. MoS2-coated MWCNs would be expected to have different tribological and mechanical properties compared to MoS2, so it may have potential applications in many fields.

  18. Selective functionalization of carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strano, Michael S. (Inventor); Usrey, Monica (Inventor); Barone, Paul (Inventor); Dyke, Christopher A. (Inventor); Tour, James M. (Inventor); Kittrell, W. Carter (Inventor); Hauge, Robert H. (Inventor); Smalley, Richard E. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    The present invention is directed toward methods of selectively functionalizing carbon nanotubes of a specific type or range of types, based on their electronic properties, using diazonium chemistry. The present invention is also directed toward methods of separating carbon nanotubes into populations of specific types or range(s) of types via selective functionalization and electrophoresis, and also to the novel compositions generated by such separations.

  19. Carbon nanotubes for coherent spintronics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuemmeth, Ferdinand; Churchill, H O H; Herring, P K;

    2010-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes bridge the molecular and crystalline quantum worlds, and their extraordinary electronic, mechanical and optical properties have attracted enormous attention from a broad scientific community. We review the basic principles of fabricating spin-electronic devices based on individual......, electrically-gated carbon nanotubes, and present experimental efforts to understand their electronic and nuclear spin degrees of freedom, which in the future may enable quantum applications....

  20. Carbon nanotubes for coherent spintronics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Kuemmeth

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanotubes bridge the molecular and crystalline quantum worlds, and their extraordinary electronic, mechanical and optical properties have attracted enormous attention from a broad scientific community. We review the basic principles of fabricating spin-electronic devices based on individual, electrically-gated carbon nanotubes, and present experimental efforts to understand their electronic and nuclear spin degrees of freedom, which in the future may enable quantum applications.

  1. CARBON NANOTUBES AND PHARMACEUTICAL APPLICATIONS

    OpenAIRE

    Ram Pavani; Kodithyala Vinay

    2011-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are often described as a graphene sheet rolled up into the shape of a cylinder. These have fascinated scientists with their extraordinary properties. These compounds have become increasingly popular in various fields simply because of their small size and amazing optical, electric and magnetic properties when used alone or with additions of metals. Carbon nanotubes have potential therapeutic applications in the field of drug delivery, diagnostics, and biosensing. Funct...

  2. Spray coating of carbon nanotube on polyethylene terephthalate film for touch panel application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Chul; Kim, Seok Won; Lee, Yun-Su; Lee, Sung Ho; Song, Kyu Ho; Park, Lee Soon

    2012-07-01

    From a technical perspective, the major limiting factors for the wide adoption of CNT films are the DC conductivity, uniformity of sheet resistance and good adhesion of CNT on film substrate. In this study, the effects of sonificator and process time on the zeta potential and sheet resistance of the CNT-PET film show that although the dispersing power of horn-type sonificator is stronger than that of bath-type, the SWCNT solution obtained with horn-type sonificator agglomerates faster. Likewise, it has been noted that the SWCNT solutions with low enough zeta potentials exhibit higher sheet resistance after making CNT-PET films due to the damage to SWCNTs caused by high dispersion force. Since the spray coating of SWCNT solution gives the SWCNT-SDS composite layer on PET film after drying, the excess SDS should be washed off. The removal of excess SDS was conducted by dipping in the 3 N HNO3 and SOCl2 solution and washing with deionized water followed by heat treatment in a 120 degrees C convection oven for 30 min. The lift-off of SWCNT-SDS composite layer after 40 min dipping in the 3 N HNO3 solution appeared to be due to the continued permeation leading to swelling of the SDS layer by the 3 N HNO3 aqueous solution. It was found that ten times of spray coating cycle gave CNT-PET film the sheet resistance of 310 Ω/[square] and transmittance of 81%. The TSP made with CNT-PET film exhibited a performance equal to the one made with ITO-PET film. PMID:22966570

  3. Poly (3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) and poly (3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)-few walled carbon nanotube (PEDOT-FWCNT) nanocomposite based thin films for Schottky diode application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Transparent, conductive films of poly (3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) and poly (3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)-few walled carbon nanotube (PEDOT-FWCNT) nanocomposite were synthesized by in-situ oxidative polymerization and investigated for their Schottky diode property. The prepared films were characterized by UV–Vis spectroscopy, thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA), surface resistivity, cyclic voltametery, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). SEM reveals the formation of homogeneous and adhesive polymer films while HRTEM confirms the uniform wrapping of polymer chains around the nanotube walls for PEDOT-FWCNT film. Improved thermal stability, conductivity and charge storage property of PEDOT in the presence of FWCNT is observed. Among different compositions, 5 wt. % of FWCNT is found to be optimum with sheet resistance and transmittance of 500 Ω sq−1 and 77%, respectively. Moreover, the electronic and junction properties of polymer films were studied and compared by fabricating sandwich type devices with a configuration of Al/PEDOT or PEDOT-FWCNT nanocomposite/indium tin oxide (ITO) coated glass. The measured current density-voltage characteristics show typical rectifying behavior for both configurations. However, enhanced rectification ratio and higher forward current density is observed in case of PEDOT-FWCNT based Schottky diode. Furthermore, reliability test depicts smaller hysteresis effect and better performance of PEDOT-FWCNT based diodes. - Highlights: • Single step synthesis of PEDOT and PEDOT-FWCNT nanocomposites films via in-situ oxidative polymerization. • Thermal, electrical and electrochemical properties of films show positive effect of FWCNT on PEDOT films. • Schottky diodes based on metal Al/PEDOT or PEDOT-FWCNT composites/ITO glass are fabricated. • Improved electrical characteristics with better reliability is achieved for PEDOT-FWCNT based diodes

  4. Poly (3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) and poly (3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)-few walled carbon nanotube (PEDOT-FWCNT) nanocomposite based thin films for Schottky diode application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, Bhavana, E-mail: bgupta1206@gmail.com [Surface and Nanoscience Division, Materials Science Group, Indira Gandhi Centre of Atomic Research, Kalpakkam, Tamil Nadu 603102 (India); Mehta, Minisha, E-mail: mehta.mini@gmail.com [Surface and Nanoscience Division, Materials Science Group, Indira Gandhi Centre of Atomic Research, Kalpakkam, Tamil Nadu 603102 (India); Melvin, Ambrose [Catalysis Division, CSIR-National Chemical Laboratory, Dr. Homi Bhabha, Pune 411008 (India); Kamalakannan, R.; Dash, S.; Kamruddin, M.; Tyagi, A.K. [Surface and Nanoscience Division, Materials Science Group, Indira Gandhi Centre of Atomic Research, Kalpakkam, Tamil Nadu 603102 (India)

    2014-10-15

    Transparent, conductive films of poly (3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) and poly (3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)-few walled carbon nanotube (PEDOT-FWCNT) nanocomposite were synthesized by in-situ oxidative polymerization and investigated for their Schottky diode property. The prepared films were characterized by UV–Vis spectroscopy, thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA), surface resistivity, cyclic voltametery, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). SEM reveals the formation of homogeneous and adhesive polymer films while HRTEM confirms the uniform wrapping of polymer chains around the nanotube walls for PEDOT-FWCNT film. Improved thermal stability, conductivity and charge storage property of PEDOT in the presence of FWCNT is observed. Among different compositions, 5 wt. % of FWCNT is found to be optimum with sheet resistance and transmittance of 500 Ω sq{sup −1} and 77%, respectively. Moreover, the electronic and junction properties of polymer films were studied and compared by fabricating sandwich type devices with a configuration of Al/PEDOT or PEDOT-FWCNT nanocomposite/indium tin oxide (ITO) coated glass. The measured current density-voltage characteristics show typical rectifying behavior for both configurations. However, enhanced rectification ratio and higher forward current density is observed in case of PEDOT-FWCNT based Schottky diode. Furthermore, reliability test depicts smaller hysteresis effect and better performance of PEDOT-FWCNT based diodes. - Highlights: • Single step synthesis of PEDOT and PEDOT-FWCNT nanocomposites films via in-situ oxidative polymerization. • Thermal, electrical and electrochemical properties of films show positive effect of FWCNT on PEDOT films. • Schottky diodes based on metal Al/PEDOT or PEDOT-FWCNT composites/ITO glass are fabricated. • Improved electrical characteristics with better reliability is achieved for PEDOT-FWCNT based diodes.

  5. Effect of nanoscale surface texture on the contact-pressure-dependent conduction characteristics of a carbon-nanotube thin-film tactile pressure sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report on a novel tactile pressure sensor structure that transfers the vertical pressure applied to the sample's surface to lateral strain in the carbon-nanotube thin film embedded in an elastomer by using a 'wavy' structured substrate contact surface. When pressure was applied to the poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) surface, it was transferred to a carbon-nanotube thin film (CNTF) underneath, where it stretched to conform to the wavy substrate surface. This resulted in an elongation, or lateral strain, in the CNTF layer, their reducing its conductance. The measurements showed that with an applied vertical pressure of 30 kPa, a 15% reduction in conductance was achieved with only a 500-nm deflection in the CNTF, and repeatedly applied pressures for 3,600 cycles (12 hours) resulted in only a 2% reduction in sensitivity, demonstrating the their film's high sensitivity and reliability. The mechanical stability and high sensitivity of the CNTF/PDMS hybrid with wavy substrate structures may make possible applications to future tactile pressure sensors.

  6. Effect of nanoscale surface texture on the contact-pressure-dependent conduction characteristics of a carbon-nanotube thin-film tactile pressure sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Chaehyun; Lee, Kunhak; Choi, Eunsuk; Kim, Ahsung; Kim, Jinoh; Lee, Seungbeck [Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-01-15

    We report on a novel tactile pressure sensor structure that transfers the vertical pressure applied to the sample's surface to lateral strain in the carbon-nanotube thin film embedded in an elastomer by using a 'wavy' structured substrate contact surface. When pressure was applied to the poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) surface, it was transferred to a carbon-nanotube thin film (CNTF) underneath, where it stretched to conform to the wavy substrate surface. This resulted in an elongation, or lateral strain, in the CNTF layer, their reducing its conductance. The measurements showed that with an applied vertical pressure of 30 kPa, a 15% reduction in conductance was achieved with only a 500-nm deflection in the CNTF, and repeatedly applied pressures for 3,600 cycles (12 hours) resulted in only a 2% reduction in sensitivity, demonstrating the their film's high sensitivity and reliability. The mechanical stability and high sensitivity of the CNTF/PDMS hybrid with wavy substrate structures may make possible applications to future tactile pressure sensors.

  7. Light polarizer in visible and THz range based on single-wall carbon nanotubes embedded into poly(methyl methacrylate) film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arutyunyan, N. R.; Kanygin, M. A.; Pozharov, A. S.; Kubarev, V. V.; Bulusheva, L. G.; Okotrub, A. V.; Obraztsova, E. D.

    2016-06-01

    Poly(methyl metacrylate) samples with uniformly dispersed single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) were mechanicaly stretched up to 4 times at 150 °C. As a result, SWCNTs were oriented preferentially along the stretch direction. The width of the angular distribution of the SWCNT orientation determined by polarized Raman scattering and THz absorption spectroscopy was 15 and 12°, respectively. Both methods revealed a high anisotropy of optical response of the composite film. Its application as an efficient polarizer in a wide spectral range from visible to THz is promising.

  8. Scalability of carbon-nanotube-based thin film transistors for flexible electronic devices manufactured using an all roll-to-roll gravure printing system

    OpenAIRE

    Hyunmo Koo; Wookyu Lee; Younchang Choi; Junfeng Sun; Jina Bak; Jinsoo Noh; Vivek Subramanian; Yasuo Azuma; Yutaka Majima; Gyoujin Cho

    2015-01-01

    To demonstrate that roll-to-roll (R2R) gravure printing is a suitable advanced manufacturing method for flexible thin film transistor (TFT)-based electronic circuits, three different nanomaterial-based inks (silver nanoparticles, BaTiO3 nanoparticles and single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs)) were selected and optimized to enable the realization of fully printed SWNT-based TFTs (SWNT-TFTs) on 150-m-long rolls of 0.25-m-wide poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET). SWNT-TFTs with 5 different chann...

  9. Chemically Functionalized, Well-Dispersed Carbon Nanotubes in Lithium-Doped Zinc Oxide for Low-Cost, High-Performance Thin-Film Transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Gi-Cheol; Chee, Sang-Soo; Jun, Ji-Hyun; Son, Myungwoo; Lee, Sun Sook; Choi, Youngmin; Jeong, Sunho; Ham, Moon-Ho

    2016-04-13

    Surface-functionalized carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are introduced into lithium-doped ZnO thin-film transistors (TFTs) as an alternative to the conventional incorporation of an expensive element, indium. The crucial role of surface functionalization of CNTs is clarified with the demonstration of indium-free ZnO-based TFTs with a field-effect mobility of 28.6 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) and an on/off current ratio of 9 × 10(6) for low-cost, high-performance electronics. PMID:26856958

  10. Spray deposition of LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanoparticle-decorated multiwalled carbon nanotube films as cathode material for lithium-ion batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, H.P. [Department of Control and Instrumentation Engineering, Korea University, Jochiwon, 339-700 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, M.S. [Department of Advanced Materials Chemistry, BK21 Research Team, Korea University, Jochiwon, 339-700 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Y.H. [Department of Biomicrosystem Technology, Korea University, Seoul, 136-701 (Korea, Republic of); Yu, J.S. [Department of Advanced Materials Chemistry, BK21 Research Team, Korea University, Jochiwon, 339-700 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, C.J. [School of Electrical Engineering, Korea University, Seoul, 136-710 (Korea, Republic of); Min, N.K., E-mail: nkmin@korea.ac.kr [Department of Control and Instrumentation Engineering, Korea University, Jochiwon, 339-700 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-11-29

    We prepared LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanoparticle-decorated multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) films as a cathode electrode for lithium-ion batteries using a spray-deposition method. The surface morphologies and structures of the films were characterized using scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis. The results revealed that fairly homogeneous spinel LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanopowder-based films with the grain size of 20–50 nm were successfully formed on the surface of the MWCNTs. Cyclic voltammetry confirmed the presence of typical spinel LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4} structure on the MWCNTs with showing stronger oxidative peaks of better reversibility as compared to a pure LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4} electrode. The spray-deposited LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4}-decorated MWCNT film was also found to have a higher discharge capacity (97.2 mAh/g) than the as-deposited LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4} film (75.2 mAh/g) as well as excellent cycling stability. These characteristics are due to the fact that MWCNTs provide the cathode with multiple electron tunneling pathways and a mechanically strong framework. - Highlights: • This study discusses LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4}(LM)-coated multiwalled carbon nanotube film (MWCNT) • LM-coated MWCNT electrodes are deposited using spray-coating methods. • LM-coated MWCNT electrodes show high discharge capacity. • LM-coated MWCNT electrodes show cycle stability. • MWCNT framework maintains the structure of LM during the electrochemical reaction.

  11. Spray deposition of LiMn2O4 nanoparticle-decorated multiwalled carbon nanotube films as cathode material for lithium-ion batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We prepared LiMn2O4 nanoparticle-decorated multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) films as a cathode electrode for lithium-ion batteries using a spray-deposition method. The surface morphologies and structures of the films were characterized using scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis. The results revealed that fairly homogeneous spinel LiMn2O4 nanopowder-based films with the grain size of 20–50 nm were successfully formed on the surface of the MWCNTs. Cyclic voltammetry confirmed the presence of typical spinel LiMn2O4 structure on the MWCNTs with showing stronger oxidative peaks of better reversibility as compared to a pure LiMn2O4 electrode. The spray-deposited LiMn2O4-decorated MWCNT film was also found to have a higher discharge capacity (97.2 mAh/g) than the as-deposited LiMn2O4 film (75.2 mAh/g) as well as excellent cycling stability. These characteristics are due to the fact that MWCNTs provide the cathode with multiple electron tunneling pathways and a mechanically strong framework. - Highlights: • This study discusses LiMn2O4(LM)-coated multiwalled carbon nanotube film (MWCNT) • LM-coated MWCNT electrodes are deposited using spray-coating methods. • LM-coated MWCNT electrodes show high discharge capacity. • LM-coated MWCNT electrodes show cycle stability. • MWCNT framework maintains the structure of LM during the electrochemical reaction

  12. Connecting carbon nanotubes using Sn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittal, Jagjiwan; Lin, Kwang Lung

    2013-08-01

    Process of Sn coating on mutiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) and formation of interconnections among nanotubes are studied using high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). Surface oxidation of nanotubes during heating with HNO3 prior to the SnCl2 treatment and the bonding between functional groups and Sn are found to be responsible for the coating and its stability. Open nanotubes are filled as well as coated during tin chloride treatment. Coating and filling are converted into the coatings on the inner as well as outer walls of the nanotubes during reduction with H2/N2. EDX studies show the formation of intermetallic compounds e.g., Cu6Sn5 and Cu3Sn at the joints between nanotubes. Formation of intermetallic compounds is supposed to be responsible for providing the required strength for bending and twisting of nanotubes joining of nanotubes. Paper presents a detailed mechanism of coating and filling processes, and interconnections among nanotubes. PMID:23882800

  13. Carbon nanotube-polymer nanocomposite infrared sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradhan, Basudev; Setyowati, Kristina; Liu, Haiying; Waldeck, David H; Chen, Jian

    2008-04-01

    The infrared photoresponse in the electrical conductivity of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) is dramatically enhanced by embedding SWNTs in an electrically and thermally insulating polymer matrix. The conductivity change in a 5 wt % SWNT-polycarbonate nanocomposite is significant (4.26%) and sharp upon infrared illumination in the air at room temperature. While the thermal effect predominates in the infrared photoresponse of a pure SWNT film, the photoeffect predominates in the infrared photoresponse of SWNT-polycarbonate nanocomposites. PMID:18333623

  14. A carbon nanotube/polyvanillin composite film as an electrocatalyst for the electrochemical oxidation of nitrite and its application as a nitrite sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report a simple method for the stable dispersion of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) in water by vanillin and controllable surface addition onto carbon fiber microelectrodes (CFE) via electropolymerization. We have characterized these polyvanillin-carbon nanotube (PVN-MWNT) composite films with techniques including scanning electron microscopy (SEM), infrared spectroscopy (IR) and voltammetry. These investigations showed that the films have a uniform porous nanostructure with a large surface area. This PVN-MWNT composite-modified CFE (PVN-MWNT/CFE) exhibited a sensitive response to the electrochemical oxidation of nitrite. Under optimal working conditions, the oxidation peak current of nitrite linearly increased with its concentration in the range of 0.2 μM-3.1 mM, with the system exhibiting a lower detection limit of 50 nM (S/N = 3). We successfully applied the PVN-MWNT/CFE system to the determination of nitrite from lake water. The efficient recovery of nitrite indicated that this electrode was able to detect nitrite in real samples.

  15. A carbon nanotube/polyvanillin composite film as an electrocatalyst for the electrochemical oxidation of nitrite and its application as a nitrite sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng Dongyun [College of Chemistry and Molecular Science, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); State Key Laboratory of Transducer Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences (China); Hu Chengguo [College of Chemistry and Molecular Science, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); State Key Laboratory of Transducer Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences (China)], E-mail: cghu@whu.edu.cn; Peng Yanfen [College of Chemistry and Molecular Science, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); State Key Laboratory of Transducer Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences (China); Hu Shengshui [College of Chemistry and Molecular Science, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); State Key Laboratory of Transducer Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences (China)], E-mail: sshu@whu.edu.cn

    2009-08-30

    We report a simple method for the stable dispersion of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) in water by vanillin and controllable surface addition onto carbon fiber microelectrodes (CFE) via electropolymerization. We have characterized these polyvanillin-carbon nanotube (PVN-MWNT) composite films with techniques including scanning electron microscopy (SEM), infrared spectroscopy (IR) and voltammetry. These investigations showed that the films have a uniform porous nanostructure with a large surface area. This PVN-MWNT composite-modified CFE (PVN-MWNT/CFE) exhibited a sensitive response to the electrochemical oxidation of nitrite. Under optimal working conditions, the oxidation peak current of nitrite linearly increased with its concentration in the range of 0.2 {mu}M-3.1 mM, with the system exhibiting a lower detection limit of 50 nM (S/N = 3). We successfully applied the PVN-MWNT/CFE system to the determination of nitrite from lake water. The efficient recovery of nitrite indicated that this electrode was able to detect nitrite in real samples.

  16. Unexpected Li2O2 Film Growth on Carbon Nanotube Electrodes with CeO2 Nanoparticles in Li-O2 Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chunzhen; Wong, Raymond A; Hong, Misun; Yamanaka, Keisuke; Ohta, Toshiaki; Byon, Hye Ryung

    2016-05-11

    In lithium-oxygen (Li-O2) batteries, it is believed that lithium peroxide (Li2O2) electrochemically forms thin films with thicknesses less than 10 nm resulting in capacity restrictions due to limitations in charge transport. Here we show unexpected Li2O2 film growth with thicknesses of ∼60 nm on a three-dimensional carbon nanotube (CNT) electrode incorporated with cerium dioxide (ceria) nanoparticles (CeO2 NPs). The CeO2 NPs favor Li2O2 surface nucleation owing to their strong binding toward reactive oxygen species (e.g., O2 and LiO2). The subsequent film growth results in thicknesses of ∼40 nm (at cutoff potential of 2.2 V vs Li/Li(+)), which further increases up to ∼60 nm with the addition of trace amounts of H2O that enhances the solution free energy. This suggests the involvement of solvated superoxide species (LiO2(sol)) that precipitates on the existing Li2O2 films to form thicker films via disproportionation. By comparing toroidal Li2O2 formed solely from LiO2(sol), the thick Li2O2 films formed from surface-mediated nucleation/thin-film growth following by LiO2(sol) deposition provides the benefits of higher reversibility and rapid surface decomposition during recharge. PMID:27105122

  17. Fabrication and optoelectronic properties of novel films based on functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotubes and (phthalocyaninato)ruthenium(II) via coordination bonded layer-by-layer self-assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Wei; Tong, Bin; Shi, Jianbing; Pan, Yuexiu; Shen, Jinbo; Zhi, Junge; Chan, Wai Kin; Dong, Yuping

    2010-10-19

    4-(2-(4-pyridinyl)Ethynyl)benzenic diazonium salt (PBD) was used to modify multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) by the self-assembly technique. After the decomposition of the diazonium group in PBD under UV irradiation, the PBD monolayer film covalently anchored on multiwalled carbon nanotubes is very stable. The obtained pyridine-modified MWCNTs (Py(Ar)-MWCNTs) have good solubility in common organic solvents. Furthermore, the layer-by-layer (LBL) self-assembled fully conjugated films of Py(Ar)-MWCNTs and (phthalocyaninato)ruthenium(II) (RuPc) were fabricated on the PBD-modified substrates, and characterized using UV-vis absorption spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and electrochemistry. The UV-vis analysis results indicate that the LBL RuPc/Py(Ar)-MWCNTs self-assembled multilayer films with axial ligands between the ruthenium atom and pyridine group were successfully fabricated, and the progressive assembly runs regularly with almost equal amounts of deposition in each cycle. A top view SEM image shows a random and homogeneous distribution of Py(Ar)-MWCNTs over the PBD-modified silicon substrate, which indicates well independence between all Py(Ar)-MWCNTs. Moreover, the opto-electronic conversion was also studied by assembling RuPc/Py(Ar)-MWCNTs multilayer films on PBD-modified ITO substrate. Under illumination, the LBL self-assembled films on ITO showed an effective photoinduced charge transfer because of their conjugated structure and the ITO current density changed with the number of bilayer. As the number of bilayers was increased, the photocurrent increases and reaches its maximum value (∼300 nA/cm(2)) at nine bilayers. These results allow us to design novel materials for applications in optoelectronic devices by using LBL self-assembly techniques. PMID:20853832

  18. Probing Photosensitization by Functionalized Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) photosensitize the production of reactive oxygen species that can damage organisms by biomembrane oxidation or mediate CNTs' environmental transformations. The photosensitized nature of derivatized carbon nanotubes from various synthetic methods, and thus ...

  19. Synthesis of Aligned Carbon Nanotubes by Thermal Chemical Vapor Deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Gang; ZHOU Ming; MA Weiwei; CAI Lan

    2009-01-01

    Single crystal silicon was found to be very beneficial to the growth of aligned carbon nanotubes by chemical vapor deposition with C2H2 as carbon source. A thin film of Ni served as catalyst was deposited on the Si substrate by the K575X Peltier Cooled High Resolution Sputter Coater before growth. The growth properties of carbon nanotubes were studied as a function of the Ni catalyst layer thickness. The diameter, growth rate and areal density of the carbon nanotubes were controlled by the initial thickness of the catalyst layer. Steric hindrance between nanotubes forces them to grow in well-aligned manner at an initial stage of growth. Transmission electron microscope analysis revealed that nanotubes grew by a tip growth mechanism.

  20. Quantum transport in carbon nanotubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laird, Edward A.; Kuemmeth, Ferdinand; Steele, Gary A.;

    2015-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes are a versatile material in which many aspects of condensed matter physics come together. Recent discoveries, enabled by sophisticated fabrication, have uncovered new phenomena that completely change our understanding of transport in these devices, especially the role of the spin...... of Pauli blockade. This can be exploited to read out spin and valley qubits, and to measure the decay of these states through coupling to nuclear spins and phonons. A second unique property of carbon nanotubes is that the combination of valley freedom and electron-electron interactions in one...... and valley degrees of freedom. This review describes the modern understanding of transport through nanotube devices. Unlike conventional semiconductors, electrons in nanotubes have two angular momentum quantum numbers, arising from spin and from valley freedom. We focus on the interplay between the...

  1. Carbon Nanotube Based Molecular Electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Deepak; Saini, Subhash; Menon, Madhu

    1998-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes and the nanotube heterojunctions have recently emerged as excellent candidates for nanoscale molecular electronic device components. Experimental measurements on the conductivity, rectifying behavior and conductivity-chirality correlation have also been made. While quasi-one dimensional simple heterojunctions between nanotubes with different electronic behavior can be generated by introduction of a pair of heptagon-pentagon defects in an otherwise all hexagon graphene sheet. Other complex 3- and 4-point junctions may require other mechanisms. Structural stability as well as local electronic density of states of various nanotube junctions are investigated using a generalized tight-binding molecular dynamics (GDBMD) scheme that incorporates non-orthogonality of the orbitals. The junctions investigated include straight and small angle heterojunctions of various chiralities and diameters; as well as more complex 'T' and 'Y' junctions which do not always obey the usual pentagon-heptagon pair rule. The study of local density of states (LDOS) reveal many interesting features, most prominent among them being the defect-induced states in the gap. The proposed three and four pointjunctions are one of the smallest possible tunnel junctions made entirely of carbon atoms. Furthermore the electronic behavior of the nanotube based device components can be taylored by doping with group III-V elements such as B and N, and BN nanotubes as a wide band gap semiconductor has also been realized in experiments. Structural properties of heteroatomic nanotubes comprising C, B and N will be discussed.

  2. Multiscale Modeling with Carbon Nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maiti, A

    2006-02-21

    Technologically important nanomaterials come in all shapes and sizes. They can range from small molecules to complex composites and mixtures. Depending upon the spatial dimensions of the system and properties under investigation computer modeling of such materials can range from equilibrium and nonequilibrium Quantum Mechanics, to force-field-based Molecular Mechanics and kinetic Monte Carlo, to Mesoscale simulation of evolving morphology, to Finite-Element computation of physical properties. This brief review illustrates some of the above modeling techniques through a number of recent applications with carbon nanotubes: nano electromechanical sensors (NEMS), chemical sensors, metal-nanotube contacts, and polymer-nanotube composites.

  3. Kondo physics in carbon nanotubes

    OpenAIRE

    Nygard, Jesper; Cobden, David Henry; Lindelof, Poul Erik

    2000-01-01

    The connection of electrical leads to wire-like molecules is a logical step in the development of molecular electronics, but also allows studies of fundamental physics. For example, metallic carbon nanotubes are quantum wires that have been found to act as one-dimensional quantum dots, Luttinger-liquids, proximity-induced superconductors and ballistic and diffusive one-dimensional metals. Here we report that electrically-contacted single-wall nanotubes can serve as powerful probes of Kondo ph...

  4. Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes for Flexible Electronics and Sensors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiuyun SUN; Yugang SUN

    2008-01-01

    This article reviews the use of electronic quality single-walled carbon nanotubes grown via chemical vapor deposition (CVD) approaches at high temperatures as building blocks for fabricating flexible field-effect devices, such as thin-film transistors (TFTs) and chemical sensors. Dry transfer printing technique is developed for forming films of CVD nanotubes on low-temperature plastic substrates. Examples of TFTs with the use of nanotubes and thin dielectrics and hydrogen sensors with the use of nanotubes decorated with palladium nanoparticles are discussed in detail to demonstrate the promising potentiality of single-walled carbon nanotubes for building high performance flexible devices, which can find applications where traditional devices on rigid substrates are not suitable.

  5. Cytotoxicity of carbon nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Ying; LI WenXin

    2008-01-01

    With large-scale production and application at large scale, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) may cause ad-verse response to the environment and human health. Thus, study on bio-effects and safety of CNTs has attracted great attention from scientists and governments worldwide. This report briefly summa-rizes the main results from the in vitro toxicity study of CNTs. The emphasis is placed on the descrip-tion of a variety of factors affecting CNTs cytotoxicity, including species of CNTs, impurities contained,lengths of CNTs, aspect ratios, chemical modification, and assaying methods of cytotoxicity. However,experimental information obtained thus far on CNTs' cytotoxicity is lacking in comparability, and some-times there is controversy about it. In order to assess more accurately the potential risks of CNTs to human health, we suggest that care should be taken for issues such as chemical modification and quantitative characterization of CNTa in cytotoxicity assessment. More importantly, studies on physical and chemical mechanisms of CNTs' cytotoxicity should be strengthened; assaying methods and evaluating criteria characterized by nanotoxicology should be gradually established.

  6. Cytotoxicity of carbon nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    With large-scale production and application at large scale, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) may cause ad-verse response to the environment and human health. Thus, study on bio-effects and safety of CNTs has attracted great attention from scientists and governments worldwide. This report briefly summa-rizes the main results from the in vitro toxicity study of CNTs. The emphasis is placed on the descrip-tion of a variety of factors affecting CNTs cytotoxicity, including species of CNTs, impurities contained, lengths of CNTs, aspect ratios, chemical modification, and assaying methods of cytotoxicity. However, experimental information obtained thus far on CNTs’ cytotoxicity is lacking in comparability, and some-times there is controversy about it. In order to assess more accurately the potential risks of CNTs to human health, we suggest that care should be taken for issues such as chemical modification and quantitative characterization of CNTs in cytotoxicity assessment. More importantly, studies on physical and chemical mechanisms of CNTs’ cytotoxicity should be strengthened; assaying methods and evaluating criteria characterized by nanotoxicology should be gradually established.

  7. Cross-stacked carbon nanotube film as an additional built-in current collector and adsorption layer for high-performance lithium sulfur batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Li; Kong, Weibang; Li, Mengya; Wu, Hengcai; Jiang, Kaili; Li, Qunqing; Zhang, Yihe; Wang, Jiaping; Fan, Shoushan

    2016-02-01

    Cross-stacked carbon nanotube (CNT) film is proposed as an additional built-in current collector and adsorption layer in sulfur cathodes for advanced lithium sulfur (Li-S) batteries. On one hand, the CNT film with high conductivity, microstructural rough surface, high flexibility and mechanical durability retains stable and direct electronic contact with the sulfur cathode materials, therefore decreasing internal resistivity and suppressing polarization of the cathode. On the other hand, the highly porous structure and the high surface area of the CNT film provide abundant adsorption points to support and confine sulfur cathode materials, alleviate their aggregation and promote high sulfur utilization. Moreover, the lightweight and compact structure of the CNT film adds no extra weight or volume to the sulfur cathode, benefitting the improvement of energy densities. Based on these characteristics, the sulfur cathode with a 100-layer cross-stacked CNT film presents excellent rate performances with capacities of 986, 922 and 874 mAh g-1 at cycling rates of 0.2C, 0.5C and 1C for sulfur loading of 60 wt%, corresponding to an improvement of 52%, 109% and 146% compared to that without a CNT film. Promising cycling performances are also demonstrated, offering great potential for scaled-up production of sulfur cathodes for Li-S batteries.

  8. Oxygen Evolution Assisted Fabrication of Highly Loaded Carbon Nanotube/MnO2 Hybrid Films for High-Performance Flexible Pseudosupercapacitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hongyuan; Zeng, Sha; Chen, Minghai; Zhang, Yongyi; Zheng, Lianxi; Li, Qingwen

    2016-04-01

    To date, it has been a great challenge to design high-performance flexible energy storage devices for sufficient loading of redox species in the electrode assemblies, with well-maintained mechanical robustness and enhanced electron/ionic transport during charge/discharge cycles. An electrochemical activation strategy is demonstrated for the facile regeneration of carbon nanotube (CNT) film prepared via floating catalyst chemical vapor deposition strategy into a flexible, robust, and highly conductive hydrogel-like film, which is promising as electrode matrix for efficient loading of redox species and the fabrication of high-performance flexible pseudosupercapacitors. The strong and conductive CNT films can be effectively expanded and activated by electrochemical anodic oxygen evolution reaction, presenting greatly enhanced internal space and surface wettability with well-maintained strength, flexibility, and conductivity. The as-formed hydrogel-like film is quite favorable for electrochemical deposition of manganese dioxide (MnO2 ) with loading mass up to 93 wt% and electrode capacitance kept around 300 F g(-1) (areal capacitance of 1.2 F cm(-2) ). This hybrid film was further used to assemble a flexible symmetric pseudosupercapacitor without using any other current collectors and conductive additives. The assembled flexible supercapacitors exhibited good rate performance, with the areal capacitance of more than 300 mF cm(-2) , much superior to other reported MnO2 based flexible thin-film supercapacitors. PMID:26929042

  9. Hybrid Composite of Polyaniline Containing Carbon Nanotube

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Carbon nanotube-polyaniline hybrid material was synthesized by emulsion polymerization in-situ. The morphology of hybrid material was studied by TEM and X-ray diffraction. The conductivity of nanocomposite increases with the increasing of carbon nanotube content because of the new conductivity passageways formed by carbon nanotubes.

  10. Synthesis and Application of Carbon Nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qun Zeng; Zhenhua Li; Yuhong Zhou

    2006-01-01

    Owing to the unique structure, the superior physical and chemical properties, the super strong mechanical performances, and so on, carbon nanotubes have attracted the attention of researchers all over the world. In this article, the basic properties and the main production processes of carbon nanotubes are introduced in brief, and the progress of applied research for carbon nanotubes is reviewed.

  11. Dispersions of Carbon nanotubes in Polymer Matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wise, Kristopher Eric (Inventor); Park, Cheol (Inventor); Siochi, Emilie J. (Inventor); Harrison, Joycelyn S. (Inventor); Lillehei, Peter T. (Inventor); Lowther, Sharon E. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    Dispersions of carbon nanotubes exhibiting long term stability are based on a polymer matrix having moieties therein which are capable of a donor-acceptor complexation with carbon nanotubes. The carbon nanotubes are introduced into the polymer matrix and separated therein by standard means. Nanocomposites produced from these dispersions are useful in the fabrication of structures, e.g., lightweight aerospace structures.

  12. Effect of Nanotube Type on the Enhancement of Mechanical Properties of Free-Standing Polymer/Nanotube Composite Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadek, M.; Coleman, J. N.; Blond, D.; Fonseca, A.; Nagy, J. B.; Szostak, K.; Béguin, F.; Blau, W. J.

    2003-10-01

    In this work it will be shown that the mechanical reinforcement of polymer composites using carbon nanotubes is dependant on the total surface area of carbon nanotubes dispersed into the polymer matrix. Furthermore, it will be shown that the total length of carbon nanotubes dispersed in the polymer matrix does not have any influence on the mechanical properties. Four differently produced carbon nanotube samples were introduced into a polyvinyl alcohol matrix and it can be reported that the sample with the smallest diameter, thus the nanotube sample with the highest surface area, increased mechanical properties such as tensile modulus by 120% while adding less than 1wt% of carbon nanotubes. Measurements were accomplished on bulk free standing polymer films by tensile testing.

  13. Thermal Spreading in Carbon Nanotube Coating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Duckjong; Shin, Dong-Sig; Yu, Jeonghwan; Kim, Haesik; Kim, Jae-Hyun; Woo, Chang-Su

    2015-11-01

    Carbon nanomaterials, such as carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and graphene, have attracted significant attention as good candidates for next-generation heat-spreading materials because of their high thermal conductivity, mechanical flexibility, etc. Regarding the thermal spreading performance of carbon-based nanofilms, remarkable test results have been reported mainly from the industrial side, but their validity and the physical mechanism underlying the heat transfer enhancement are still under debate. In this study, we assess the thermal spreading performance of a multi-walled CNT film on a copper foil using a non-contact characterization method in a simple and methodical manner, and discuss the possibility of carbon nanofilms as heat spreaders based on the experimental and numerical results. This study provides useful information on heat transfer enhancement by carbon nanofilms and could contribute to the development of high-performance carbon-based heat-spreading coatings. PMID:26726629

  14. Adsorption on the carbon nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DING Yi; YANG Xiao-bao; NI Jun

    2006-01-01

    Adsorption on single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) is a subject of growing experimental and theoretical interest.The possible adsorbed patterns of atoms and molecules on the single-walled carbon nanotubes vary with the diameters and chirality of the tubes due to the confinement.The curvature of the carbon nanotube surface enlarges the distance of the adsorbate atoms and thus enhances the stability of high coverage structures of adsorbate.There exist two novel high-coverage stable structures of potassium adsorbed on SWCNTs,which are not stable on graphite.The electronic properties of SWCNTs can be modified by adsorbate atoms and metal-semiconductor and semiconductor-semi-conductor transitions can be achieved by the doping of alkali atoms.

  15. Terahertz response of carbon nanotubes and graphene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The terahertz (THz) research field is expected to serve as a new platform for studying low-energy excitation in solids and higher-order structures in large molecules, and for realizing applications in medicine, agriculture, security, and high-capacity communications. The THz frequency region, however, is located between the electronic and photonic bands, hampering the development of basic components like detectors and sources. This article presents an overview of basic background information about THz waves and THz detector applications and describes the THz response of carbon-based low-dimensional systems, such as single carbon nanotubes (CNT), CNT-array films, and graphene. (author)

  16. Load transfer and deformation mechanisms in carbon nanotube-polystyrene composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, D.; Dickey, E. C.; Andrews, R.; Rantell, T.

    2000-05-01

    Multiwall carbon nanotubes have been dispersed homogeneously throughout polystyrene matrices by a simple solution-evaporation method without destroying the integrity of the nanotubes. Tensile tests on composite films show that 1 wt % nanotube additions result in 36%-42% and ˜25% increases in elastic modulus and break stress, respectively, indicating significant load transfer across the nanotube-matrix interface. In situ transmission electron microscopy studies provided information regarding composite deformation mechanisms and interfacial bonding between the multiwall nanotubes and polymer matrix.

  17. An enhanced biosensor for glutamate based on self-assembled carbon nanotubes and dendrimer-encapsulated platinum nanobiocomposites-doped polypyrrole film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang Longhua [Key Laboratory for Ultrafine Materials of Ministry of Education, School of Materials Science and Engineering, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China); Zhu Yihua [Key Laboratory for Ultrafine Materials of Ministry of Education, School of Materials Science and Engineering, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China)]. E-mail: yhzhu@ecust.edu.cn; Yang Xiaoling [Key Laboratory for Ultrafine Materials of Ministry of Education, School of Materials Science and Engineering, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China); Li Chunzhong [Key Laboratory for Ultrafine Materials of Ministry of Education, School of Materials Science and Engineering, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China)

    2007-07-30

    An enhanced amperometric biosensor based on incorporating one kind of unique nanobiocomposite as dopant within an electropolymerized polypyrrole film has been investigated. The nanobiocomposite was synthesized by self-assembling glutamate dehydrogenase (GLDH) and poly(amidoamine) dendrimer-encapsulated platinum nanoparticles (Pt-DENs) onto multiwall carbon nanotubes (CNTs). {zeta}-Potentials and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) confirmed the uniform growth of the layer-by-layer nanostructures onto the carboxyl-functionalized CNTs. The size of Pt nanoparticles is approximately 3 nm. The (GLDH/Pt-DENs) {sub n}/CNTs/Ppy hybrid film was obtained by electropolymerization of pyrrole onto glassy carbon electrodes and characterized with scanning electron microscopy (SEM), cyclic voltammetry (CV) and other electrochemical measurements. All methods indicated that the (GLDH/Pt-DENs) {sub n}/CNTs nanobiocomposites were entrapped within the porous polypyrrole film and resulted in a hybrid film that showed a high electrocatalytic ability toward the oxidation of glutamate at a potential 0.2 V versus Ag/AgCl. The biosensor shows performance characteristics with high sensitivity (51.48 {mu}A mM{sup -1}), rapid response (within 3 s), low detection limit (about 10 nM), low level of interference and excellent reproducibility and stability.

  18. Carbon nanotube-polymer composite actuators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gennett, Thomas; Raffaelle, Ryne P.; Landi, Brian J.; Heben, Michael J.

    2008-04-22

    The present invention discloses a carbon nanotube (SWNT)-polymer composite actuator and method to make such actuator. A series of uniform composites was prepared by dispersing purified single wall nanotubes with varying weight percents into a polymer matrix, followed by solution casting. The resulting nanotube-polymer composite was then successfully used to form a nanotube polymer actuator.

  19. Cross-stacking aligned carbon-nanotube films to tune microwave absorption frequencies and increase absorption intensities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Hao; Che, Renchao; You, Xiao; Jiang, Yishu; Yang, Zhibin; Deng, Jue; Qiu, Longbin; Peng, Huisheng

    2014-12-23

    Aligned carbon-nanotube (CNT) sheets are used as building blocks to prepare light-weight, frequency-tunable and high-performance microwave absorbers, and the absorption frequency can be accurately controlled by stacking them with different intersectional angles. A remarkable reflection loss of -47.66 dB is achieved by stacking four aligned CNT sheets with an intersectional angle of 90° between two neighboring ones. The incorporation of a second phase such as a metal and a conducting polymer greatly enhances the microwave-absorption capability. PMID:25338951

  20. CVD growth of carbon nanotubes on thin-film Ni20Ti35N45 alloy catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gromov, D. G.; Pavlov, A. A.; Skorik, S. N.; Trifonov, A. Yu.; Shulyat'ev, A. S.

    2015-12-01

    The possibility of forming carbon nanotube (CNT) arrays on a Ni-Ti-N catalytic alloy with low nickel content by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) is demonstrated. Adding nitrogen to the Ni-Ti alloy composition favors the formation of TiN compound and segregation of Ni on the surface, where it produces a catalytic effect on the CNT growth. It is found that, using CVD from acetylene gas phase at a substrate temperature of 650°C, a CNT array of 9-µm height can be grown for 2 min.

  1. Evolution of gold thin films to nanoparticles using plasma ion bombardment and their use as a catalyst for carbon nanotube growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigate the evolution of Au thin films to nanoparticles caused by plasma ion bombardment and report their validity as a catalyst on the growth of carbon nanotubes (CNTs). The Au thin films having 1–50 Å thickness ranges were precisely prepared by electron beam deposition. The plasma ion bombardments with the plasma power from 5 to 15 W were performed at 500 °C for 10 min under 1.33 × 102 Pa of Ar to investigate the effects of plasma power on the surface structures. It is interesting that the mean size of Au nanoparticles increased as plasma power gets high in the thinner film cases, which might be the results of sputtering and surface diffusion-related aggregation. On the contrary, the mean particle size of the thicker films decreased at lower plasma power regime due to the sputtering, then, increased again at the highest plasma power, which might be caused by the diffusion-induced aggregation of the films. Finally, to investigate the catalytic ability of the thin film-induced Au nanoparticles, we grew CNTs by a thermal chemical vapor deposition with a methane source. It was found that the Au nanoparticles obtained from the plasma-treated 5 Å thick films act as an efficient catalyst for the growth of single-walled CNTs. - Highlights: • We report the evolution of Au thin films to nanoparticles by plasma treatment. • The mean size of Au nanoparticles increased with increasing plasma power. • The nanoparticle size increases by sputtering and diffusion-induced aggregation. • The plasma-treated 5 Å thick films act as an efficient catalyst for SWNTs growth

  2. MWNT Surface Self-Assembling in Fire Retardant Polyethylene-Carbon nanotubes nanocomposites

    OpenAIRE

    Bocchini, Sergio; Frache, Alberto; Camino, Giovanni

    2008-01-01

    Multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWNT) were melt blended at different concentration with linear low density polyethylene (LLDPE). The nanotubes impart the fire-retardant characteristics to the polymer by formation of a thin protective film of MWNT/carbon char generated on the surface of the nanocomposites. The film formation mechanism is discussed

  3. Carbon Nanotube Flexible and Stretchable Electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Le; Wang, Chuan

    2015-08-01

    The low-cost and large-area manufacturing of flexible and stretchable electronics using printing processes could radically change people's perspectives on electronics and substantially expand the spectrum of potential applications. Examples range from personalized wearable electronics to large-area smart wallpapers and from interactive bio-inspired robots to implantable health/medical apparatus. Owing to its one-dimensional structure and superior electrical property, carbon nanotube is one of the most promising material platforms for flexible and stretchable electronics. Here in this paper, we review the recent progress in this field. Applications of single-wall carbon nanotube networks as channel semiconductor in flexible thin-film transistors and integrated circuits, as stretchable conductors in various sensors, and as channel material in stretchable transistors will be discussed. Lastly, state-of-the-art advancement on printing process, which is ideal for large-scale fabrication of flexible and stretchable electronics, will also be reviewed in detail.

  4. Gears Based on Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffe, Richard; Han, Jie; Globus, Al; Deardorff, Glenn

    2005-01-01

    Gears based on carbon nanotubes (see figure) have been proposed as components of an emerging generation of molecular- scale machines and sensors. In comparison with previously proposed nanogears based on diamondoid and fullerene molecules, the nanotube-based gears would have simpler structures and are more likely to be realizable by practical fabrication processes. The impetus for the practical development of carbon-nanotube- based gears arises, in part, from rapid recent progress in the fabrication of carbon nanotubes with prescribed diameters, lengths, chiralities, and numbers of concentric shells. The shafts of the proposed gears would be made from multiwalled carbon nanotubes. The gear teeth would be rigid molecules (typically, benzyne molecules), bonded to the nanotube shafts at atomically precise positions. For fabrication, it may be possible to position the molecular teeth by use of scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) or other related techniques. The capability to position individual organic molecules at room temperature by use of an STM tip has already been demonstrated. Routes to the chemical synthesis of carbon-nanotube-based gears are also under investigation. Chemical and physical aspects of the synthesis of molecular scale gears based on carbon nanotubes and related molecules, and dynamical properties of nanotube- based gears, have been investigated by computational simulations using established methods of quantum chemistry and molecular dynamics. Several particularly interesting and useful conclusions have been drawn from the dynamical simulations performed thus far: The forces acting on the gears would be more sensitive to local molecular motions than to gross mechanical motions of the overall gears. Although no breakage of teeth or of chemical bonds is expected at temperatures up to at least 3,000 K, the gears would not work well at temperatures above a critical range from about 600 to about 1,000 K. Gear temperature could probably be controlled by

  5. Confinement in single walled carbon nanotubes investigated by spectroscopic ellipsometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thick films of single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) with different diameter and chirality distributions are characterized by combining transmission electron microscopy and spectroscopic ellipsometry. The dependence of the dielectric function with the increase of the SWCNT diameter occurs with a drastic redshift of the S11, S22 and M11 transition energies. The transfer integral parameter γ0 of SWCNT is also evaluated and analyzed. We demonstrate that parts of the optical properties of SWCNTs are attributed to a one dimensional confinement effect. - Highlights: • Ellipsometric measurements are performed on carbon nanotube thick films. • The complex dielectric functions of conventional carbon nanotubes are given. • Confinement effects explain the variations of dielectric function of nanotubes

  6. Confinement in single walled carbon nanotubes investigated by spectroscopic ellipsometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Battie, Y., E-mail: yann.battie@univ-lorraine.fr [LCP-A2MC, Institut Jean Barriol, Université de Lorraine, 1 Bd Arago, 57070 Metz (France); Jamon, D. [Université de Lyon, Université Jean Monnet, EA 3523, Laboratoire Télécom Claude Chappe, 25 rue du Dr Rémy Annino, 42000 Saint Etienne (France); Lauret, J.S. [Laboratoire Aimé Cotton, UPR 3321, ENS Cachan, 94245 Cachan (France); Gu, Q.; Gicquel-Guézo, M. [FOTON, UMR 6082, INSA, Avenue des Buttes de Coësmes, 35043 Rennes (France); En Naciri, A. [LCP-A2MC, Institut Jean Barriol, Université de Lorraine, 1 Bd Arago, 57070 Metz (France); Loiseau, A. [Laboratoire d' étude des microstructures, ONERA-CNRS UMR 104, 29 Av. de la Division Leclerc, 92322 Chatillon (France)

    2014-11-28

    Thick films of single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) with different diameter and chirality distributions are characterized by combining transmission electron microscopy and spectroscopic ellipsometry. The dependence of the dielectric function with the increase of the SWCNT diameter occurs with a drastic redshift of the S{sub 11}, S{sub 22} and M{sub 11} transition energies. The transfer integral parameter γ{sub 0} of SWCNT is also evaluated and analyzed. We demonstrate that parts of the optical properties of SWCNTs are attributed to a one dimensional confinement effect. - Highlights: • Ellipsometric measurements are performed on carbon nanotube thick films. • The complex dielectric functions of conventional carbon nanotubes are given. • Confinement effects explain the variations of dielectric function of nanotubes.

  7. CMOS Integrated Carbon Nanotube Sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been gaining their importance as sensors for gases, temperature and chemicals. Advances in fabrication processes simplify the formation of CNT sensor on silicon substrate. We have integrated single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) with complementary metal oxide semiconductor process (CMOS) to produce a chip sensor system. The sensor prototype was designed and fabricated using a 0.30 um CMOS process. The main advantage is that the device has a voltage amplifier so the electrical measure can be taken and amplified inside the sensor. When the conductance of the SWCNTs varies in response to media changes, this is observed as a variation in the output tension accordingly.

  8. Study of Carbon Nanotube-Substrate Interaction

    OpenAIRE

    Soares, Jaqueline S.; Ado Jorio

    2012-01-01

    Environmental effects are very important in nanoscience and nanotechnology. This work reviews the importance of the substrate in single-wall carbon nanotube properties. Contact with a substrate can modify the nanotube properties, and such interactions have been broadly studied as either a negative aspect or a solution for developing carbon nanotube-based nanotechnologies. This paper discusses both theoretical and experimental studies where the interaction between the carbon nanotubes and the ...

  9. Epoxide composite materials with carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Methods of formation and physical properties of epoxide composite materials reinforced with carbon nanotubes are considered. An analogy is made between the relaxation properties of carbon nanotubes and macromolecules. The concentration dependences of the electrical conductivity of the epoxy polymers filled with single-walled and multi-walled carbon nanotubes are discussed. Modern views on the mechanism of reinforcement of polymers with nanotubes are outlined. The bibliography includes 143 references.

  10. Comparative study on different carbon nanotube materials in terms of transparent conductive coatings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhongrui; Kandel, Hom R; Dervishi, Enkeleda; Saini, Viney; Xu, Yang; Biris, Alexandru R; Lupu, Dan; Salamo, Gregory J; Biris, Alexandru S

    2008-03-18

    We compared conductive transparent carbon nanotube coatings on glass substrates made of differently produced single-wall (SWNT), double-wall, and multiwall carbon nanotubes. The airbrushing approach and the vacuum filtration method were utilized for the fabrication of carbon nanotube films. The optoelectronic performance of the carbon nanotube film was found to strongly depend on many effects including the ratio of metallic-to-semiconducting tubes, dispersion, length, diameter, chirality, wall number, structural defects, and the properties of substrates. The electronic transportability and optical properties of the SWNT network can be significantly altered by chemical doping with thionyl chloride. Hall effect measurements revealed that all of these thin carbon nanotube films are of p-type probably due to the acid reflux-based purification and atmospheric impurities. The competition between variable-range hoping and fluctuation-assisted tunneling in the functionized carbon nanotube system could lead to a crossover behavior in the temperature dependence of the network resistance. PMID:18251555

  11. Synthesis of carbon nanotubes and nanotube forests on copper catalyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The growth of carbon nanotubes on bulk copper is studied. We show for the first time, that super growth chemical vapor deposition method can be successfully applied for preparation of nanotubes on copper catalyst, and the presence of hydrogen is necessary. Next, different methods of copper surface activation are studied, to improve catalyst efficiency. Among them, applied for the first time for copper catalyst in nanotubes synthesis, sulfuric acid activation is the most promising. Among tested samples the surface modified for 10 min is the most active, causing the growth of vertically aligned carbon nanotube forests. Obtained results have potential importance in application of nanotubes and copper in electronic chips and nanodevices. (paper)

  12. Modified carbon nanotubes and methods of forming carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heintz, Amy M.; Risser, Steven; Elhard, Joel D.; Moore, Bryon P.; Liu, Tao; Vijayendran, Bhima R.

    2016-06-14

    In this invention, processes which can be used to achieve stable doped carbon nanotubes are disclosed. Preferred CNT structures and morphologies for achieving maximum doping effects are also described. Dopant formulations and methods for achieving doping of a broad distribution of tube types are also described.

  13. Preparation and properties of chitosan nanocomposite films reinforced by poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)-poly(styrenesulfonate) treated carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu Tongfei; Pan Yongzheng; Bao Hongqian [School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, 639798 (Singapore); Li Lin, E-mail: mlli@ntu.edu.sg [School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, 639798 (Singapore)

    2011-10-03

    Highlights: {yields} Chitosan-based nanocomposites prepared from PEDOT-PSS treated MWCNTs. {yields} PEDOT-PSS served as a bridge to improve the dispersion of MWCNTs and interfacial compatibility between MWCNTs and chitosan. {yields} The mechanical properties of chitosan were significantly improved by PEDOT-PSS treated MWCNTs at a small loading. - Abstract: Carbon nanotube-based nanocomposites of chitosan were successfully prepared by a simple solution-evaporation method. Multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were treated by poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)-poly(styrenesulfonate)(PEDOT-PSS) in water before mixed with a chitosan solution to improve the dispersion of MWCNTs and interfacial compatibility between MWCNTs and chitosan. The morphological and mechanical properties of the prepared PEDOT-PSS/MWCNT/chitosan nanocomposites have been characterized with field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and tensile tests. MWCNTs were observed to be homogeneously dispersed throughout the chitosan matrix. As compared with the neat chitosan, the tensile strength and modulus of the nanocomposite were greatly improved by about 61% and 34%, respectively, with incorporation of only 0.5 wt.% of MWCNTs into the chitosan matrix. The comparison of mechanical properties for PEDOT-PSS/MWCNT/chitosan and pristine MWCNT/chitosan nanocomposites has been made. The hardness of the nanocomposites was also evaluated by nanoindentation.

  14. Preparation and properties of chitosan nanocomposite films reinforced by poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)-poly(styrenesulfonate) treated carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → Chitosan-based nanocomposites prepared from PEDOT-PSS treated MWCNTs. → PEDOT-PSS served as a bridge to improve the dispersion of MWCNTs and interfacial compatibility between MWCNTs and chitosan. → The mechanical properties of chitosan were significantly improved by PEDOT-PSS treated MWCNTs at a small loading. - Abstract: Carbon nanotube-based nanocomposites of chitosan were successfully prepared by a simple solution-evaporation method. Multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were treated by poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)-poly(styrenesulfonate)(PEDOT-PSS) in water before mixed with a chitosan solution to improve the dispersion of MWCNTs and interfacial compatibility between MWCNTs and chitosan. The morphological and mechanical properties of the prepared PEDOT-PSS/MWCNT/chitosan nanocomposites have been characterized with field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and tensile tests. MWCNTs were observed to be homogeneously dispersed throughout the chitosan matrix. As compared with the neat chitosan, the tensile strength and modulus of the nanocomposite were greatly improved by about 61% and 34%, respectively, with incorporation of only 0.5 wt.% of MWCNTs into the chitosan matrix. The comparison of mechanical properties for PEDOT-PSS/MWCNT/chitosan and pristine MWCNT/chitosan nanocomposites has been made. The hardness of the nanocomposites was also evaluated by nanoindentation.

  15. Synthesis, structural and field emission properties of multiwall carbon nanotube-graphene-like nanocarbon hybrid films grown by microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Multiwall carbon nanotube (MWCNT)-graphene-like nanocarbon hybrid films were directly deposited on nickel substrate without any pre-treatment in a single-step by microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (MW PECVD) technique at 600 °C. The effects of hydrogen partial pressure on the growth of MWCNT-graphene-like nanocarbon hybrid films and their structural, morphological and field emission properties were investigated. High resolution scanning electron microscope revealed MWCNT structure. High resolution transmission electron microscope images and Raman spectra revealed graphene-like nanocarbon film. Raman spectra showed 2D, G, D and D + G peaks at approximately 2690, 1590, 1350 and 2930 cm−1, respectively. The minimum threshold field for electron emission was found to be 3.6 V/μm corresponding to 1 μA/cm2 current density for the MWCNT-graphene-like nanocarbon hybrid film deposited at 20 Torr pressure whereas the maximum current density of 0.12 mA/cm2 and field enhancement factor of ∼3356 was obtained for the sample deposited at 5 Torr pressure. - Highlights: • MWCNT-graphene-like nanocarbon hybrid films were synthesized by MWPECVD technique. • Effect of pressure on the structural and field emission properties has been studied. • FESEM revealed MWCNT and HRTEM revealed graphene-like nanocarbon film structure. • Minimum ET = 3.6 V/μm with β = 3164 has been obtained in the film deposited at 20 Torr. • Maximum J = 0.12 mA/cm2 with β = 3356 has been obtained in the film deposited at 5 Torr

  16. Fabrication of the single-wall carbon nanotube compound polymer film electrode and the simultaneous electrochemical behavior of aminophenol isomers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We describe a simple, rapid and selective voltammetry for simultaneous determination of electroactive isomers using nanometer composite electrode. The electrode was constructed by electropolymerization of 4-aminopyridine at single-wall carbon nanotubes modified glassy carbon electrode (SWNTs/POAPE). The configuration and electrochemical properties of SWNTs/POAPE were characterized by scanning electronic micrographs (SEM) and voltammetry. The SWNTs/POAPE showed an excellent electrocatalytic activity to the oxidation of aminophenol isomers and capability of determining three aminophenol isomers simultaneously. The oxidation peak potential difference between m-aminophenol and o-aminophenol was 416 mV, o-aminophenol and p-aminophenol 119 mV, indicating that the o-, m- and p-aminophenol could be identified entirely at the SWNTs/POAPE. The proposed electrode has been applied to the simultaneous voltammetric determination of aminophenol isomers in mixture without previous chemical or physical separations.

  17. Electrochemical sensing of DNA immobilization and hybridization based on carbon nanotubes/nano zinc oxide/chitosan composite film

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Zhang; Tao Yang; Da Ming Huang; Kui Jiao

    2008-01-01

    A novel electrochemical DNA biosensor based on zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs)for DNA immobilization and enhanced hybridization detection is presented. The MWNTs/nano ZnO/chitosan composite filmmodified glassy carbon electrode (MWNTs/ZnO/CHIT/GCE) was fabricated and DNA probes were immobilized on the electrodesurface. The hybridization events were monitored by differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) using methylene blue (MB) as anindicator. The sensor can effectively discriminate different DNA sequences related to PAT gene in the.transgenic corn, with adetection limit of 2.8×10-12 mol/L of target sequence.2008 Kui Jiao. Published by Elsevier B.V. on behalf of Chinese Chemical Society. All rights reserved.

  18. Field emission from hybrid diamond-like carbon and carbon nanotube composite structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanin, H; May, P W; Hamanaka, M H M O; Corat, E J

    2013-12-11

    A thin diamond-like carbon (DLC) film was deposited onto a densely packed "forest" of vertically aligned multiwalled carbon nanotubes (VACNT). DLC deposition caused the tips of the CNTs to clump together to form a microstructured surface. Field-emission tests of this new composite material show the typical low threshold voltages for carbon nanotube structures (2 V μm(-1)) but with greatly increased emission current, better stability, and longer lifetime. PMID:24224845

  19. Quantum transport in carbon nanotubes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laird, E.A.; Kuemmeth, F.; Steele, G.A.; Grove-Rasmussen, K.; Nygard, J.; Flensberg, K.; Kouwenhoven, L.P.

    2015-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes are a versatile material in which many aspects of condensed matter physics come together. Recent discoveries have uncovered new phenomena that completely change our understanding of transport in these devices, especially the role of the spin and valley degrees of freedom. This revie

  20. Carbon nanotube-chalcogenide composite

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Stehlík, Š.; Orava, J.; Kohoutek, T.; Wágner, T.; Frumar, M.; Zima, Vítězslav; Hara, T.; Matsui, Y.; Ueda, K.; Pumera, M.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 183, č. 1 (2010), s. 144-149. ISSN 0022-4596 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/08/0208 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : carbon nanotubes * chalcogenide glasses * composites Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry Impact factor: 2.261, year: 2010

  1. CARBON NANOTUBES AND PHARMACEUTICAL APPLICATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ram Pavani

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanotubes (CNTs are often described as a graphene sheet rolled up into the shape of a cylinder. These have fascinated scientists with their extraordinary properties. These compounds have become increasingly popular in various fields simply because of their small size and amazing optical, electric and magnetic properties when used alone or with additions of metals. Carbon nanotubes have potential therapeutic applications in the field of drug delivery, diagnostics, and biosensing. Functionalized carbon nanotubes can also act as vaccine delivery systems.Carbon nanotubes (CNTs are considered to be one of the innovative resources in nanotechnology with possible use in wide range of biomedical applications viz. cancer treatment, bioengineering, cardiac autonomic regulation, platelet activation and tissue regeneration. The effect of CNTs on cells and tissues are extremely important for their use in various complex biological systems. With the increasing interest shown by the nanotechnology research community in this field, it is expected that plenty of applications of CNTs will be explored in future.

  2. Thermoelectrics: Carbon nanotubes get high

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crispin, Xavier

    2016-04-01

    Waste heat can be converted to electricity by thermoelectric generators, but their development is hindered by the lack of cheap materials with good thermoelectric properties. Now, carbon-nanotube-based materials are shown to have improved properties when purified to contain only semiconducting species and then doped.

  3. Real time macrophage migration analysis and associated pro-inflammatory cytokine release on transparent carbon nanotube/polymer composite nano-film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khang, Dongwoo

    2015-08-01

    Surface chemistry and nanoscale surface morphology are both influential factors for cell adhesion, growth, and differentiation. In particular, cell migration is one of the major markers of initial immune response activation to implanted biomaterials. Despite their indication, it has been difficult to directly examine macrophages on nanoscale materials, because most nanomaterials possess greater thicknesses than nanoscale. This study developed transparent films comprising a carbon nanotube and polymer composite with controlled surface stiffness and nanoscale roughness. As nanoscale surface topography can incite immune cell activation, analysis of the real-time cell migration (including velocity) of macrophages due to changes in nanoscale surface topography of a biopolymer can support the direct relationship between initial macrophage dynamics and corresponding pro-inflammatory responses. Through real-time analysis, we have identified that surface chemistry and surface nanoscale topography are both independent factors mediating macrophage interactions, and, thus, immune cell behavior can be further controlled by the systematic variation of nanoscale surface topography for a given surface chemistry. Considering that the initial immune response can determine the fate and lifetime of implanted biomaterials, this study presents the direct relationship between initial macrophage dynamics and subsequent inflammatory cytokine release on transparent carbon nanotube polymer composites.

  4. Mode-locked soliton erbium-doped fiber laser using a single-walled carbon nanotubes embedded in polyethylene oxide thin film saturable absorber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, F.; Harun, S. W.; Nor, R. M.; Zulkepely, N. R.; Muhammad, F. D.; Arof, H.; Ahmad, H.

    2014-03-01

    We demonstrate a simple, compact, and low cost mode-locked erbium-doped fiber laser (EDFL) using a single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) embedded in polyethylene oxide (PEO) thin film as a passive saturable absorber (SA). The film with a thickness of 50 μm was fabricated using a prepared homogeneous SWCNT solution with 0.1% loading percentage, which was mixed with a diluted PEO solution and casted onto a glass Petri dish to form a thin film by evaporation technique. The film is sandwiched between two fiber connectors to construct a SA, which is then integrated in an EDFL cavity to generate a self-started stable soliton pulses operating at 1558 nm. The soliton pulse starts to lase at pump power threshold of 17.6 mW with a repetition rate of 50 MHz, pulse width of 0.67 ps, average output power of 0.158 mW, pulse energy of 3.16 pJ, and peak power of 4.43 W.

  5. A Mode-Locked Soliton Erbium-Doped Fiber Laser with a Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Poly-Ethylene Oxide Film Saturable Absorber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Z. R. R. Rosdin, R.; F., Ahmad; M. Ali, N.; M. Nor, R.; R. Zulkepely, N.; W. Harun, S.; Arof, H.

    2014-09-01

    We present a simple, compact and low-cost mode-locked erbium-doped fiber laser (EDFL) using single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) embedded in a poly-ethylene oxide (PEO) thin film as a passive saturable absorber. The film is fabricated by using a prepared homogeneous SWCNT solution, which is mixed with a diluted PEO solution and cast onto a glass Petri dish to form, by evaporation, a thin film. The 50 μm-thick film is sandwiched between two fiber connectors to construct a saturable absorber, which is then integrated in an EDFL cavity to generate self-started stable soliton pulses operating at 1560.8 nm. The soliton pulse starts to lase at a pump power threshold of 12.3 mW with a repetition rate of 11.21 MHz, a pulse width of 1.02 ps, an average output power of 0.65 mW and a pulse energy of 57.98 pJ.

  6. Electromagnetic interference shielding effectiveness of composite carbon nanotube macro-film at a high frequency range of 40 GHz to 60 GHz

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zi Ping Wu

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The electromagnetic interference (EMI shielding effectiveness (SE of carbon nanotube (CNT macro-film that is adhered to common cloth to maintain the light weight, silk-like quality, and smooth surface of the material for EMI shielding is investigated. The results show that a high and stable EMI SE of 48 dB to 57 dB at 40 GHz to 60 GHz was obtained by the macro-film with a thickness of only ∼4 μm. The composite CNT macro-film is easily manipulated, and its EMI property is significantly different from that of traditional electromagnetic shielding materials that show a lower EMI SE with increasing frequency. For example, the EMI SE of Cu foils decrease from 75 dB to 35 dB as frequency increases from 25 GHz to 60 GHz. Considering their stable and outstanding EMI SE and easy manipulation, the composite CNT macro-films are expected to have potential applications in shielding against millimeter waves.

  7. Carbon nanotube forests growth using catalysts from atomic layer deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Bingan; Zhang, Can; Esconjauregui, Santiago; Xie, Rongsi; Zhong, Guofang; Robertson, John [Department of Engineering, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB3 0FA (United Kingdom); Bhardwaj, Sunil [Istituto Officina dei Materiali-CNR Laboratorio TASC, s.s. 14, km 163.4, I-34012 Trieste (Italy); Sincrotone Trieste S.C.p.A., s.s. 14, km 163.4, I-34149 Trieste (Italy); Cepek, Cinzia [Istituto Officina dei Materiali-CNR Laboratorio TASC, s.s. 14, km 163.4, I-34012 Trieste (Italy)

    2014-04-14

    We have grown carbon nanotubes using Fe and Ni catalyst films deposited by atomic layer deposition. Both metals lead to catalytically active nanoparticles for growing vertically aligned nanotube forests or carbon fibres, depending on the growth conditions and whether the substrate is alumina or silica. The resulting nanotubes have narrow diameter and wall number distributions that are as narrow as those grown from sputtered catalysts. The state of the catalyst is studied by in-situ and ex-situ X-ray photoemission spectroscopy. We demonstrate multi-directional nanotube growth on a porous alumina foam coated with Fe prepared by atomic layer deposition. This deposition technique can be useful for nanotube applications in microelectronics, filter technology, and energy storage.

  8. Comparative Study of Different Cross-Linking Agents for the Immobilization of Functionalized Carbon Nanotubes within a Chitosan Film Supported on a Graphite−Epoxy Composite Electrode

    OpenAIRE

    Pauliukaite, Rasa; Ghica, Mariana Emilia; Fatibello-Filho, Orlando; Brett, Christopher M. A.

    2009-01-01

    The effectiveness of immobilization of functionalized carbon nanotubes into chitosan using different cross-linking agents has been evaluated. The cross-linkers used were glyoxal (GO), glutaraldehyde (GA), epichlorohydrin (ECH), and 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide together with N-hydroxysuccinimide (EDC-NHS), and the nanotubes were retained on graphite epoxy resin composite electrodes. The nanotube modified electrodes have been characterized by cyclic voltammetry (CV) and electr...

  9. Attachment of Gold Nanoparticles to Carbon Nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xi Cheng MA; Ning LUN; Shu Lin WEN

    2005-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes were initially chemically modified with an H2SO4-HNO3 treatment,and subsequently activated with Pd-Sn catalytic nuclei via a one-step activation approach. These activated nanotubes were used as precursors for obtaining gold nanoparticles-attached nanotubes via simple electroless plating. This approach provides an efficient method for attachment of metal nanostructures to carbon nanotubes. Such novel hybrid nanostructures are attractive for many applications.

  10. Noncovalently functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotubes by chitosan-grafted reduced graphene oxide and their synergistic reinforcing effects in chitosan films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Yongzheng; Bao, Hongqian; Li, Lin

    2011-12-01

    Water-soluble chitosan-grafted reduced graphene oxide (CS-rGO) sheets are successfully synthesized via amidation reaction and chemical reduction. CS-rGO possesses not only remarkable graphitic property but also favorable water solubility, which is found to be able to effectively disperse multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) in acidic solutions via noncovalent interaction. The efficiency of CS-rGO in dispersing MWCNTs is tested to be higher than that of plain graphene oxide (GO) and a commercial surfactant, sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). With incorporation of 1 wt % CS-rGO dispersed MWCNTs (CS-rGO-MWCNTs), the tensile modulus, strength and toughness of the chitosan (CS) nanocomposites can be increased by 49, 114, and 193%, respectively. The reinforcing and toughening effects of CS-rGO-MWCNTs are much more prominent than those of single-component fillers, such as MWCNTs, GO, and CS-rGO. Noncovalent π-π interactions between graphene sheets and nanotubes and hydrogen bonds between grafted CS and the CS matrix are responsible for generating effective load transfer between CS-rGO-MWCNTs and the CS matrix, causing the simultaneously increased strength and toughness of the nanocomposites. PMID:22091530

  11. A Comparative Study of Three Different Chemical Vapor Deposition Techniques of Carbon Nanotube Growth on Diamond Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Betty T. Quinton

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper compares between the methods of growing carbon nanotubes (CNTs on diamond substrates and evaluates the quality of the CNTs and the interfacial strength. One potential application for these materials is a heat sink/spreader for high-power electronic devices. The CNTs and diamond substrates have a significantly higher specific thermal conductivity than traditional heat sink/spreader materials making them good replacement candidates. Only limited research has been performed on these CNT/diamond structures and their suitability of different growth methods. This study investigates three potential chemical vapor deposition (CVD techniques for growing CNTs on diamond: thermal CVD (T-CVD, microwave plasma-enhanced CVD (MPE-CVD, and floating catalyst thermal CVD (FCT-CVD. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM were used to analyze the morphology and topology of the CNTs. Raman spectroscopy was used to assess the quality of the CNTs by determining the ID/IG peak intensity ratios. Additionally, the CNT/diamond samples were sonicated for qualitative comparisons of the durability of the CNT forests. T-CVD provided the largest diameter tubes, with catalysts residing mainly at the CNT/diamond interface. The MPE-CVD process yielded non uniform defective CNTs, and FCT-CVD resulted in the smallest diameter CNTs with catalyst particles imbedded throughout the length of the nanotubes.

  12. The effect of local polarized domains of ferroelectric P(VDF/TrFE) copolymer thin film on a carbon nanotube field-effect transistor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We produced local polarized domains of ferroelectric P(VDF/TrFE) copolymer thin films on a carbon nanotube field-effect transistor (CN-FET) channel by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The drain current versus gate voltage (Id-Vg) curves measured after forming the local polarized domains showed a shift in the threshold voltages. We also found that the amount of the shifts in the threshold voltages gradually decreased during the measurement of this characteristic over 100 h after forming the polarized domains. The mechanisms of the shifts in the threshold voltages and their decreasing behaviour were explained in terms of the excessive charges that were induced upon the formation of the polarized domains

  13. The effect of local polarized domains of ferroelectric P(VDF/TrFE) copolymer thin film on a carbon nanotube field-effect transistor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishio, Taichi [Department of Electronic Science and Engineering, Kyoto University, Katsura, Nishikyo, Kyoto 615-8510 (Japan); Miyato, Yuji [Department of Electronic Science and Engineering, Kyoto University, Katsura, Nishikyo, Kyoto 615-8510 (Japan); Kobayashi, Kei [Innovative Collaboration Centre, Kyoto University, Katsura, Nishikyo, Kyoto 615-8520 (Japan); Ishida, Kenji [Department of Chemical Science and Engineering, Kobe University, Rokkodai, Nada, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan); Matsushige, Kazumi [Department of Electronic Science and Engineering, Kyoto University, Katsura, Nishikyo, Kyoto 615-8510 (Japan); Yamada, Hirofumi [Department of Electronic Science and Engineering, Kyoto University, Katsura, Nishikyo, Kyoto 615-8510 (Japan)

    2008-01-23

    We produced local polarized domains of ferroelectric P(VDF/TrFE) copolymer thin films on a carbon nanotube field-effect transistor (CN-FET) channel by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The drain current versus gate voltage (I{sub d}-V{sub g}) curves measured after forming the local polarized domains showed a shift in the threshold voltages. We also found that the amount of the shifts in the threshold voltages gradually decreased during the measurement of this characteristic over 100 h after forming the polarized domains. The mechanisms of the shifts in the threshold voltages and their decreasing behaviour were explained in terms of the excessive charges that were induced upon the formation of the polarized domains.

  14. The effect of local polarized domains of ferroelectric P(VDF/TrFE) copolymer thin film on a carbon nanotube field-effect transistor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishio, Taichi; Miyato, Yuji; Kobayashi, Kei; Ishida, Kenji; Matsushige, Kazumi; Yamada, Hirofumi

    2008-01-23

    We produced local polarized domains of ferroelectric P(VDF/TrFE) copolymer thin films on a carbon nanotube field-effect transistor (CN-FET) channel by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The drain current versus gate voltage (I(d)-V(g)) curves measured after forming the local polarized domains showed a shift in the threshold voltages. We also found that the amount of the shifts in the threshold voltages gradually decreased during the measurement of this characteristic over 100 h after forming the polarized domains. The mechanisms of the shifts in the threshold voltages and their decreasing behaviour were explained in terms of the excessive charges that were induced upon the formation of the polarized domains. PMID:21817562

  15. The effect of extended polymer chains on the properties of transparent multi-walled carbon nanotubes/poly(methyl methacrylate/acrylic acid) film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Yuan-Li; Tien, Hsi-Wen; Ma, Chen-Chi M; Yu, Yi-Hsiuan; Yang, Shin-Yi; Wu, Sheng-Yen [Department of Chemical Engineering, National Tsing-Hua University, Hsin-Chu 30043, Taiwan (China); Wei, Ming-Hsiung, E-mail: ccma@che.nthu.edu.tw [Chemical Systems Research Division, Chung Shan Institute of Science and Technology, Tao Yuan 32546, Taiwan (China)

    2010-05-07

    Optically transparent and electrically conductive thin films composed of multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) reinforced polymethyl methacrylate/acrylic acid (PMMA/AA) were fabricated using a wire coating technique. Poly(acrylic acid) controls the level of MWCNT dispersion in aqueous mixtures and retains the well-dispersed state in the polymer matrix after solidification resulting from extended polymer chains by adjusting the pH value. The exfoliating the MWCNT bundles by extended polymer chains results in the excellent dispersion of MWCNT. It causes a lower surface electrical resistance at the same MWCNT content. The hydrophilic functional groups (-COO{sup -}NA{sup +}) also caused a decrease in the crystallization of PMMA and led to an increase in the transmittance.

  16. Largely improved tensile properties of chitosan film via unique synergistic reinforcing effect of carbon nanotube and clay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Changyu; Xiang, Lixue; Su, Juanxia; Wang, Ke; Yang, Changyue; Zhang, Qin; Fu, Qiang

    2008-04-01

    In this work, a great synergistic effect of 2D clay platelets and 1D carbon nanotubes (CNTs) on reinforcing chitosan matrix has been observed for the first time. With incorporation of 3 wt % clay and 0.4 wt % CNTs, the tensile strength and Young's modulus of the nanocomposites are significantly improved by about 171 and 124%, respectively, compared with neat chitosan. This could be understood as due to the formation of much jammed fillers network with 1D CNTs and 2D clay platelets combined together, as indicated by rheological measurement. Our work demonstrates a good example for the preparation of high performance polymer nanocomposites by using nanofillers of different dimension together. PMID:18335921

  17. Advanced Physical Chemistry of Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jun; Pandey, Gaind P.

    2015-04-01

    The past decade has seen a surge of exciting research and applications of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) stimulated by deeper understanding of their fundamental properties and increasing production capability. The intrinsic properties of various CNTs were found to strongly depend on their internal microstructures. This review summarizes the fundamental structure-property relations of seamless tube-like single- and multiwalled CNTs and conically stacked carbon nanofibers, as well as the organized architectures of these CNTs (including randomly stacked thin films, parallel aligned thin films, and vertically aligned arrays). It highlights the recent development of CNTs as key components in selected applications, including nanoelectronics, filtration membranes, transparent conductive electrodes, fuel cells, electrical energy storage devices, and solar cells. Particular emphasis is placed on the link between the basic physical chemical properties of CNTs and the organized CNT architectures with their functions and performance in each application.

  18. Spontaneous and specific myogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells on polyethylene glycol-linked multi-walled carbon nanotube films for skeletal muscle engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Chunyan; Andersen, Henrik; Ozyilmaz, Barbaros; Ramaprabhu, Sundara; Pastorin, Giorgia; Ho, Han Kiat

    2015-10-01

    This study explored the influence of polyethylene glycol-linked multi-walled carbon nanotube (PEG-CNT) films on skeletal myogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). PEG-CNT films were prepared with nanoscale surface roughness, orderly arrangement of PEG-CNTs, high hydrophilicity and high mechanical strength. Notably, PEG-CNT films alone could direct the skeletal myogenic differentiation of hMSCs in the absence of myogenic induction factors. The quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) showed that the non-induced hMSCs plated on the PEG-CNT films, compared to the negative control, presented significant up-regulation of general myogenic markers including early commitment markers of myoblast differentiation protein-1 (MyoD) and desmin, as well as a late phase marker of myosin heavy chain-2 (MHC). Corresponding protein analysis by immunoblot assays corroborated these results. Skeletal muscle-specific markers, fast skeletal troponin-C (TnC) and ryanodine receptor-1 (Ryr) were also significantly increased in the non-induced hMSCs on PEG-CNT films by RT-PCR. For these cells, the commitment to specific skeletal myoblasts was further proved by the absence of enhanced adipogenic, chondrogenic and osteogenic markers. This study elucidated that PEG-CNT films supported a dedicated differentiation of hMSCs into a skeletal myogenic lineage and can work as a promising material towards skeletal muscle injury repair.This study explored the influence of polyethylene glycol-linked multi-walled carbon nanotube (PEG-CNT) films on skeletal myogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). PEG-CNT films were prepared with nanoscale surface roughness, orderly arrangement of PEG-CNTs, high hydrophilicity and high mechanical strength. Notably, PEG-CNT films alone could direct the skeletal myogenic differentiation of hMSCs in the absence of myogenic induction factors. The quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) showed

  19. Structure, electronic properties, and aggregation behavior of hydroxylated carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a combined experimental and theoretical study to analyze the structure, electronic properties, and aggregation behavior of hydroxylated multiwalled carbon nanotubes (OH–MWCNT). Our MWCNTs have average diameters of ∼2 nm, lengths of approximately 100–300 nm, and a hydroxyl surface coverage θ∼0.1. When deposited on the air/water interface the OH–MWCNTs are partially soluble and the floating units interact and link with each other forming extended foam-like carbon networks. Surface pressure-area isotherms of the nanotube films are performed using the Langmuir balance method at different equilibration times. The films are transferred into a mica substrate and atomic force microscopy images show that the foam like structure is preserved and reveals fine details of their microstructure. Density functional theory calculations performed on model hydroxylated carbon nanotubes show that low energy atomic configurations are found when the OH groups form molecular islands on the nanotube's surface. This patchy behavior for the OH species is expected to produce nanotubes having reduced wettabilities, in line with experimental observations. OH doping yields nanotubes having small HOMO–LUMO energy gaps and generates a nanotube → OH direction for the charge transfer leading to the existence of more hole carriers in the structures. Our synthesized OH–MWCNTs might have promising applications

  20. Carbon nanotubes: controlled growth and application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang Liu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Notable progress has been made on the synthesis, properties and uses of carbon nanotubes (CNTs in the past two decades. However, the controlled growth of single-wall CNTs (SWCNTs with predefined and uniform structures remains a big challenge, and making full use of CNTs in applications still requires great effort. In this article, our strategies and recent progress on the controlled synthesis of SWCNTs by chemical vapor deposition are reviewed, and the applications of CNTs in lithium-ion batteries, transparent conductive films, and as connectors of metal atomic chains are discussed. Finally, future prospects for CNTs are considered.

  1. Quantum transport in carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laird, Edward A.; Kuemmeth, Ferdinand; Steele, Gary A.; Grove-Rasmussen, Kasper; Nygârd, Jesper; Flensberg, Karsten; Kouwenhoven, Leo P.

    2015-07-01

    Carbon nanotubes are a versatile material in which many aspects of condensed matter physics come together. Recent discoveries have uncovered new phenomena that completely change our understanding of transport in these devices, especially the role of the spin and valley degrees of freedom. This review describes the modern understanding of transport through nanotube devices. Unlike in conventional semiconductors, electrons in nanotubes have two angular momentum quantum numbers, arising from spin and valley freedom. The interplay between the two is the focus of this review. The energy levels associated with each degree of freedom, and the spin-orbit coupling between them, are explained, together with their consequences for transport measurements through nanotube quantum dots. In double quantum dots, the combination of quantum numbers modifies the selection rules of Pauli blockade. This can be exploited to read out spin and valley qubits and to measure the decay of these states through coupling to nuclear spins and phonons. A second unique property of carbon nanotubes is that the combination of valley freedom and electron-electron interactions in one dimension strongly modifies their transport behavior. Interaction between electrons inside and outside a quantum dot is manifested in SU(4) Kondo behavior and level renormalization. Interaction within a dot leads to Wigner molecules and more complex correlated states. This review takes an experimental perspective informed by recent advances in theory. As well as the well-understood overall picture, open questions for the field are also clearly stated. These advances position nanotubes as a leading system for the study of spin and valley physics in one dimension where electronic disorder and hyperfine interaction can both be reduced to a low level.

  2. Gold nanoparticles/water-soluble carbon nanotubes/aromatic diamine polymer composite films for highly sensitive detection of cellobiose dehydrogenase gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeng Guangming, E-mail: zgming@hnu.cn [College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Key Laboratory of Environmental Biology and Pollution Control (Hunan University), Ministry of Education, Changsha 410082 (China); Li Zhen, E-mail: happylizhen@yeah.ne [College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Key Laboratory of Environmental Biology and Pollution Control (Hunan University), Ministry of Education, Changsha 410082 (China); Tang Lin; Wu Mengshi; Lei Xiaoxia; Liu Yuanyuan; Liu Can; Pang Ya; Zhang Yi [College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Key Laboratory of Environmental Biology and Pollution Control (Hunan University), Ministry of Education, Changsha 410082 (China)

    2011-05-01

    Highlights: > Gold nanoparticles/multiwalled carbon nanotubes/poly (1,5-naphthalenediamine) modified electrode was fabricated. > The sensor was applied for the detection of cellobiose dehydrogenase genes. > An effective method to distribute MWCNTs and attach to the electrode was proposed. > The composite films greatly improved the sensitivity and enhanced the DNA immobilization. > The DNA biosensor exhibited fairly high sensitivity and quite low detection limit. - Abstract: An electrochemical sensor based on gold nanoparticles (GNPs)/multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs)/poly (1,5-naphthalenediamine) films modified glassy carbon electrode (GCE) was fabricated. The effectiveness of the sensor was confirmed by sensitive detection of cellobiose dehydrogenase (CDH) gene which was extracted from Phanerochaete chrysosporium using polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The monomer of 1,5-naphthalenediamine was electropolymerized on the GCE surface with abundant free amino groups which enhanced the stability of MWCNTs modified electrode. Congo red (CR)-functionalized MWCNTs possess excellent conductivity as well as high solubility in water which enabled to form the uniform and stable network nanostructures easily and created a large number of binding sites for electrodeposition of GNPs. The continuous GNPs together with MWCNTs greatly increased the surface area, conductivity and electrocatalytic activity. This electrode structure significantly improved the sensitivity of sensor and enhanced the DNA immobilization and hybridization. The thiol modified capture probes were immobilized onto the composite films-modified GCE by a direct formation of thiol-Au bond and horseradish peroxidase-streptavidin (HRP-SA) conjugates were labeled to the biotinylated detection probes through biotin-streptavidin bond. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and cyclic voltammetry (CV) were used to investigate the film assembly and DNA hybridization processes

  3. Roping and wrapping carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ausman, Kevin D.; O'Connell, Michael J.; Boul, Peter; Ericson, Lars M.; Casavant, Michael J.; Walters, Deron A.; Huffman, Chad; Saini, Rajesh; Wang, Yuhuang; Haroz, Erik; Billups, Edward W.; Smalley, Richard E.

    2001-11-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes can be dispersed into solvents by ultrasonication to the point that primarily individual tubes, cut to a few hundred nanometers in length, are present. However, when such dispersions are filtered to a thick mat, or paper, only tangles of uniform, seemingly endless ropes are observed. The factors contributing to this "roping" phenomenon, akin to aggregation or crystallization, will be discussed. We have developed methods for generating "super-ropes" more than twenty times the diameter of those formed by filtration, involving the extraction of nanotube material from an oleum dispersion. Nanotubes have been solubilized in water, largely individually, by non-covalently wrapping them with linear polymers. The general thermodynamic drive for this wrapping involves the polymer disrupting both the hydrophobic interface with water and the smooth tube-tube interaction in aggregates. The nanotubes can be recovered from their polymeric wrapping by changing their solvent system. This solubilization process opens the door to solution chemistry on pristine nanotubes, as well as their introduction into biologically relevant systems.

  4. Pyrolyzed thin film carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tai, Yu-Chong (Inventor); Liger, Matthieu (Inventor); Harder, Theodore (Inventor); Konishi, Satoshi (Inventor); Miserendino, Scott (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A method of making carbon thin films comprises depositing a catalyst on a substrate, depositing a hydrocarbon in contact with the catalyst and pyrolyzing the hydrocarbon. A method of controlling a carbon thin film density comprises etching a cavity into a substrate, depositing a hydrocarbon into the cavity, and pyrolyzing the hydrocarbon while in the cavity to form a carbon thin film. Controlling a carbon thin film density is achieved by changing the volume of the cavity. Methods of making carbon containing patterned structures are also provided. Carbon thin films and carbon containing patterned structures can be used in NEMS, MEMS, liquid chromatography, and sensor devices.

  5. High frequency carbon nanotube devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goffman, M. F.; Chimot, N.; Mile, E.; Monteverde, M. C.; Bourgoin, J.-P.; Derycke, V.

    2008-08-01

    We investigate high frequency electrical and mechanical performances of carbon nanotube based devices. Using configurations with multiple single-wall nanotubes in parallel, we show that HF nanotube transistors with intrinsic cut-off frequencies as high as 30 GHz can be obtained on rigid substrates. Adapting our process to plastic substrates, we also obtained highly flexible HF transistors showing constant transconductances up to at least 6 GHz, as-measured cut-off frequencies as high as 1 GHz (5-8 GHz after de-embedding) and stable DC performances upon bending. We probed electromechanical properties of individual suspended carbon multiwall nanotubes by using a modified AFM. DC deflection measurements on different devices are in agreement with a continuum model prediction and consistent with a Young's modulus of 0.4 TPa. Preliminary HF measurements on a doubly clamped device showed a resonant frequency of 200MHz consistent with a Young's modulus of 0.43 TPa. This implies that built-in mechanical stress in the case of MWNTs is negligeable.

  6. Fabrication of carbon nanorod from the irradiation of proton beam on carbon nanotube and characterization of its resistance variation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fabrication method of the transparent carbon nanotubes film on the glass with the transparency of 50 ∼ 80 % and the sheet resistance of 500 ∼ 2000 Ω/sq is developed based on the established study of the enhancement of the conductivity. Deformation of the bundle-type single-walled carbon nanotubes are analyzed with the variation of the energy transfer in the carbon nanotubes by the variation of the dose of the 10 MeV proton beam. Construction of the variation of the conductivity of the carbon nanotube network and the variation of the transparency of the glass are used for the feasibility of the fabrication of the transparent electrode using carbon nanotubes network. Transparent carbon nanotubes film are fabricated using spray method and the sheet resistance and transparency are controlled by the control of the quantity of the dispersion. Accumulated energy on the carbon nanotubes are controlled by the dose of the 10 MeV proton. Proton irradiation creates defects on the carbon nanotubes by particle collision and the recombination of the defects generates the decrease of the diameter of the carbon nanotubes. Ejection of the carbon from the carbon nanotubes generates not only the formation of the connection between carbon nanotubes but also between carbon nanotube bundles. These connections decrease the resistance between carbon nanotube networks and 2.5 times increase is measured. Although the electrical conductivity is increased by the proton irradiation, sulfuration of the glass is increased. Variation of the transparency is caused by the positive ion irradiation and the transparency is decreased with the dose due to the increase of the energy transfer on the glass

  7. Engineered Molecular Chain Ordering in Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes/Polyaniline Composite Films for High-Performance Organic Thermoelectric Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liming; Yao, Qin; Xiao, Juanxiu; Zeng, Kaiyang; Qu, Sanyin; Shi, Wei; Wang, Qun; Chen, Lidong

    2016-06-21

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs)/polyaniline (PANI) composite films with enhanced thermoelectric properties were prepared by combining in situ polymerization and solution processing. Conductive atomic force microscopy and X-ray diffraction measurements confirmed that solution processing and strong π-π interactions between the PANI and SWNTs induced the PANI molecules to form a highly ordered structure. The improved degree of order of the PANI molecular arrangement increased the carrier mobility and thereby enhanced the electrical transport properties of PANI. The maximum in-plane electrical conductivity and power factor of the SWNTs/PANI composite films reached 1.44×10(3)  S cm(-1) and 217 μW m(-1)  K(-2) , respectively, at room temperature. Furthermore, a thermoelectric generator fabricated with the SWNTs/PANI composite films showed good electric generation ability and stability. A high power density of 10.4 μW cm(-2)  K(-1) was obtained, which is superior to most reported results obtained in organic thermoelectric modules. PMID:27123885

  8. The effect of purification of single-walled carbon nanotube bundles on the alcohol sensitivity of nanocomposite Langmuir Blodgett films for SAW sensing applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penza, M.; Tagliente, M. A.; Aversa, P.; Re, M.; Cassano, G.

    2007-05-01

    HiPco (high-pressure CO dissociation process) single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) bundles containing Fe particles were purified in a two-step purification process by thermal annealing in oxygen and post-treatment in HCl. Nanocomposite films of pristine and purified SWCNTs embedded in an organic matrix of cadmium arachidate (CdA) were prepared by a Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) molecular engineering technique with a fixed weight filler content of 75 wt% onto a surface acoustic wave (SAW) transducer operating as an oscillator at a frequency of 433 MHz. The raw and purified samples were characterized at various stages of the purification process using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM), along with energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and x-ray diffraction (XRD). Functional characterizations of the SWCNT-nanocomposite-based SAW sensors were investigated towards methanol, isopropanol and ethanol, and demonstrated high sensitivity, reversibility, fast response and ppm level detection at room temperature. Results indicate that the sensitivity of the SAW sensors based on a nanocomposite film of oxygen-annealed SWCNTs is enhanced to the alcohols tested at room temperature. Purification of the SWCNTs in the nanocomposite film affects the SAW sensitivity to alcohol by modulating the sensing properties. The sensing mechanisms are analysed and discussed.

  9. Effect of Nanotube Film Thickness on the Performance of Nanotube-Silicon Hybrid Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel D. Tune

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The results of measurements on solar cells made from randomly aligned thin films of single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs on n-type monocrystalline silicon are presented. The films are made by vacuum filtration from aqueous TritonX-100 suspensions of large diameter arc-discharge SWCNTs. The dependence of the solar cell performance on the thickness of the SWCNT film is shown in detail, as is the variation in performance due to doping of the SWCNT film with SOCl2.

  10. High-performance glucose biosensor based on chitosan-glucose oxidase immobilized polypyrrole/Nafion/functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes bio-nanohybrid film.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, Bishnu Kumar; Ahmad, Rafiq; Mousa, Hamouda M; Kim, In-Gi; Kim, Jeong In; Neupane, Madhav Prasad; Park, Chan Hee; Kim, Cheol Sang

    2016-11-15

    A highly electroactive bio-nanohybrid film of polypyrrole (PPy)-Nafion (Nf)-functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (fMWCNTs) nanocomposite was prepared on the glassy carbon electrode (GCE) by a facile one-step electrochemical polymerization technique followed by chitosan-glucose oxidase (CH-GOx) immobilization on its surface to achieve a high-performance glucose biosensor. The as-fabricated nanohybrid composite provides high surface area for GOx immobilization and thus enhances the enzyme-loading efficiency. The structural characterization revealed that the PPy-Nf-fMWCNTs nanocomposite films were uniformly formed on GCE and after GOx immobilization, the surface porosities of the film were decreased due to enzyme encapsulation inside the bio-nanohybrid composite materials. The electrochemical behavior of the fabricated biosensor was investigated by cyclic voltammetry (CV), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), and amperometry measurements. The results indicated an excellent catalytic property of bio-nanohybrid film for glucose detection with improved sensitivity of 2860.3μAmM(-1)cm(-2), the linear range up to 4.7mM (R(2)=0.9992), and a low detection limit of 5μM under a signal/noise (S/N) ratio of 3. Furthermore, the resulting biosensor presented reliable selectivity, better long-term stability, good repeatability, reproducibility, and acceptable measurement of glucose concentration in real serum samples. Thus, this fabricated biosensor provides an efficient and highly sensitive platform for glucose sensing and can open up new avenues for clinical applications. PMID:27485503

  11. Emerging Carbon Nanotube Electronic Circuits, Modeling, and Performance

    OpenAIRE

    Ashok Srivastava; Yao Xu; Sharma, Ashwani K.

    2010-01-01

    Current transport and dynamic models of carbon nanotube field-effect transistors are presented. A model of single-walled carbon nanotube as interconnect is also presented and extended in modeling of single-walled carbon nanotube bundles. These models are applied in studying the performances of circuits such as the complementary carbon nanotube inverter pair and carbon nanotube as interconnect. Cadence/Spectre simulations show that carbon nanotube field-effect transistor circuits can operate a...

  12. Characterization methods of carbon nanotubes: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon nanotubes due to their specific atomic structure have interesting chemical and physical properties according to those of graphite and diamond. This review covers the characterization methods of carbon nanotubes which are most employed today. The structure of carbon nanotubes is first briefly summarized followed by a description of the characterization methods such as STM, TEM, neutron diffraction, X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, infrared and Raman spectroscopy. The most interesting features are indexed for each technique

  13. Structure and properties of carbon nanotubes

    OpenAIRE

    MEYER, Jannik

    2006-01-01

    The properties of nanoscopic objects depend critically on the position of each atom, since finite-size and quantization effects play an important role. For carbon nanotubes, the electronic, mechanical, and vibrational properties vary significantly depending on their structure. For example, a carbon nanotube can be metallic or semiconducting with varying band-gaps depending on its lattice structure. Yet, most investigations on individual carbon nanotubes are carried out on objects with unknown...

  14. Single wall carbon nanotubes and their electrical properties

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    薛增泉; 刘惟敏; 侯士敏; 施祖进; 顾镇南; 刘虹雯; 赵兴钰; 张兆祥; 吴绵雷; 彭练矛; 吴全德

    2000-01-01

    Single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) were synthesized and purified. A water colloid of SWCNTs was prepared and used to assemble SWCNTs onto a gold film surface. Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) images showed that short SWCNTs stood on gold film surfaces. Using STM tips made of SWCNTs, a crystal grain image of a gold thin film and an atomic resolution image of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite were successfully obtained. The electrical properties of short SWCNTs, which stood on the surface of gold film, were measured using STM. That SWCNTs stand on gold thin films is a promising technique for studying structures and properties of carbon nanotubes, as well as assembling and fabricating high-intensity coherent electron sources, field emission flat panel display, tips for scanning probe microscopes, new nanoelectronic devices, etc.

  15. Photonics based on carbon nanotubes

    OpenAIRE

    Gu, Qingyuan; Gicquel-Guézo, Maud; Loualiche, Slimane; Pouliquen, Julie Le; Batte, Thomas; Folliot, Hervé; Dehaese, Olivier; Grillot, Frederic; Battie, Yann; Loiseau, Annick; Liang, Baolai; Huffaker, Diana

    2013-01-01

    Among direct-bandgap semiconducting nanomaterials, single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) exhibit strong quasi-one-dimensional excitonic optical properties, which confer them a great potential for their integration in future photonics devices as an alternative solution to conventional inorganic semiconductors. In this paper, we will highlight SWCNT optical properties for passive as well as active applications in future optical networking. For passive applications, we directly compare the effi...

  16. Photoluminescence Study of Carbon Nanotubes

    OpenAIRE

    Han, H. X.; Li, G. H.; Ge, W. K.; Wang, Z. P.; Xu, Z. Y.; Xie, S. S.; Chang, B H; Sun, L. F.; Wang, B S; G. Xu; Su, Z.B.

    2000-01-01

    ultiwalled carbon nanotubes, prepared by both electric arc discharge and chemical vapor deposition methods, show a strong visible light emission in photoluminescence experiments. All the samples employed in the experiments exhibit nearly same super-linear intensity dependence of the emission bands on the excitation intensity, and negligible temperature dependence of the central position and the line shapes of the emission bands. Based upon theoretical analysis of the electronic band structure...

  17. OPPORTUNITIES OF BIOMEDICAL USE OF CARBON NANOTUBES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. V. Mitrofanova

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Nanomaterials  –  materials,  whouse  structure  elements  has  proportions  doesn’t  exceed  100  nm.  In superdispersed state matter acquire new properties. In the last decade, carbon nanotubes become the most popular nanomaterials, that cause attention of representatives of various scientific field. The сarbon nanotubes offer new opportunities for biological and medical applications: imaging at the molecular, cellular and tissue levels, biosensors and electrodes based on carbon nanotubes, target delivery of various substances, radiation and photothermal therapy. The most promising of carbon nanotubes in the context of biomedical applications is their ability to penetrate the various tissues of the body and carry large doses of agents, providing diagnostic and therapeutic effects. Functionalized nanotubes are biodegradable. Other current direction of using carbon nanotubes in medicine and biology is to visualize objects on the molecular, cellular and tissue level. Associated with carbon nanotubes contrasting substances improve the visualization of cells and tissues, which can detected new patterns of development of the pathological process. Due to the vagueness of the question of biocompatibility and cytotoxicity of carbon nanotubes possibility of their practical application is hampered. Before the introduction of carbon nanotubes into practical health care is necessary to provide all the possible consequences of using nanotubes. High rates of properties and development of new nanostructures based on carbon nanotubes in the near future will lead to new advances related to the application and development of new parameters that will determine their properties and effects. In these review attention is paid to the structure, physico-chemical properties of nanotubes, their functionalization, pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics and all aspects of using of carbon nanotubes.

  18. Flexible high-performance carbon nanotube integrated circuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Dong-ming; Timmermans, Marina Y; Tian, Ying; Nasibulin, Albert G; Kauppinen, Esko I; Kishimoto, Shigeru; Mizutani, Takashi; Ohno, Yutaka

    2011-03-01

    Carbon nanotube thin-film transistors are expected to enable the fabrication of high-performance, flexible and transparent devices using relatively simple techniques. However, as-grown nanotube networks usually contain both metallic and semiconducting nanotubes, which leads to a trade-off between charge-carrier mobility (which increases with greater metallic tube content) and on/off ratio (which decreases). Many approaches to separating metallic nanotubes from semiconducting nanotubes have been investigated, but most lead to contamination and shortening of the nanotubes, thus reducing performance. Here, we report the fabrication of high-performance thin-film transistors and integrated circuits on flexible and transparent substrates using floating-catalyst chemical vapour deposition followed by a simple gas-phase filtration and transfer process. The resulting nanotube network has a well-controlled density and a unique morphology, consisting of long (~10 µm) nanotubes connected by low-resistance Y-shaped junctions. The transistors simultaneously demonstrate a mobility of 35 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) and an on/off ratio of 6 × 10(6). We also demonstrate flexible integrated circuits, including a 21-stage ring oscillator and master-slave delay flip-flops that are capable of sequential logic. Our fabrication procedure should prove to be scalable, for example, by using high-throughput printing techniques. PMID:21297625

  19. Linear and nonlinear optical properties of carbon nanotube-coated single-mode optical fiber gratings

    OpenAIRE

    Villanueva Ibañez, Guillermo Eduardo; Oton Nieto, Claudio José; Matres Abril, Joaquin; Pérez Millán, Pedro; Jakubinek, M.B.; Simard, B.; L. Y. Shao; Albert, J.

    2011-01-01

    Single-wall carbon nanotube deposition on the cladding of optical fibers has been carried out to fabricate an all-fiber nonlinear device. Two different nanotube deposition techniques were studied. The first consisted of repeatedly immersing the optical fiber into a nanotube supension, increasing the thickness of the coating in each step. The second deposition involved wrapping a thin film of nanotubes around the optical fiber. For both cases, interaction of transmitted light through the fiber...

  20. Carbon nanotube atomic force microscopy probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamanaka, Shigenobu; Okawa, Takashi; Akita, Seiji; Nakayama, Yoshikazu

    2005-05-01

    We have developed a carbon nanotube atomic force microscope probe. Because the carbon nanotube are well known to have high aspect ratios, small tip radii and high stiffness, carbon nanotube probes have a long lifetime and can be applied for the observation deep trenches. Carbon nanotubes were synthesized by a well-controlled DC arc discharge method, because this method can make nanotubes to have straight shape and high crystalline. The nanotubes were aligned on the knife-edge using an alternating current electrophoresis technique. A commercially available Si probe was used for the base of the nanotube probe. The nanotube probe was fabricated by the SEM manipulation method. The nanotube was then attached tightly to the Si probe by deposition of amorphous carbon. We demonstrate the measurement of a fine pith grating that has vertical walls. However, a carbon nanotube has a problem that is called "Sticking". The sticking is a chatter image on vertical like region in a sample. We solved this problem by applying 2 methods, 1. a large cantilever vibration amplitude in tapping mode, 2. an attractive mode measurement. We demonstrate the non-sticking images by these methods.

  1. Heteronuclear carbon nanotubes: applications to study carbon nanotube growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Synthesis of heteronuclear carbon nanotubes and their application for a variety of studies is presented. SWCNTs peapods encapsulating highly 13C enriched fullerenes and double wall carbon nanotubes (DWCNTs) based on the peapods were prepared. Raman studies indicate that the inner tubes are highly 13C enriched with no carbon exchange between the two walls during the synthesis. The material enables the straightforward identification of the inner and outer tube vibrational spectra. An inhomogeneous broadening, assigned to the random distribution of 12C and 13C nuclei is observed and is explained by ab initio vibrational analysis. The growth of inner tubes from organic solvents was proven by the use of 13C labeled organic materials such as toluene. The simultaneous encapsulation of fullerenes with the solvents was found crucial as these prevent the solvents from evaporating during the high temperature synthesis of the inner tubes. Nuclear magnetic resonance on the peapods and DWCNTs with highly 13C enriched fullerenes or inner walls proves the significant contrast of the isotope enriched SWCNTs as compared to other carbon phases. The NMR experiment on the DWCNTs yield direct information on the electronic properties of small diameter SWCNTs. The significantly different chemical shift of the inner tubes is related to a curvature effect. Relaxation data on the inner tubes shows a deviation from a Fermi-liquid behavior. (author)

  2. Nanoengineering of carbon nanotubes for nanotools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have developed a well controlled method for manipulating carbon nanotubes. The first crucial process involved is to prepare a nanotube array, named a nanotube cartridge. We have discovered ac electrophoresis of nanotubes by which nanotubes are aligned at the knife-edge. The nanotubes used were multiwalled and prepared by an arc discharge with a relatively high gas temperature. The second important process is to transfer a nanotube from the nanotube cartridge onto a substrate in a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Using this method, we have developed nanotube tips and nanotube tweezers that operate in a scanning probe microscope (SPM). The nanotube probes have been applied for the observation of biological samples and industrial samples to clarify their advantages. The nanotube tweezers have demonstrated their motion in an SEM and have operated to carry nanomaterials in a SPM. We have also developed the electron ablation of a nanotube to adjust its length and the sharpening of a multiwall nanotube to have its inner layer with or without an end cap at the tip. For the sharpening process, the free end of a nanotube protruding from the cartridge was attached to a metal-coated Si tip and a voltage was applied to the nanotube. When a high voltage was used in the saturation current regime, the current decreased stepwise in the temporal variation, indicating the sequential destruction of individual nanotube layers. The nanotube was finally cut at the middle of the nanotube bridge, and its tip was sharpened to have an inner layer with an opened end. Moving up the cartridge before cutting enables us to extract the inner layer with an end cap. It is evidenced that the maximum current in each layer during the stepwise decrease depends on its circumference, and the force for extracting the inner layer with ∼5-nm diameter is ∼4-nN

  3. Draw out Carbon Nanotube from Liquid Carbon

    OpenAIRE

    ZHANG, SHUANG; Hoshi, Takeo; Fujiwara, Takeo

    2006-01-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) is expected for much more important and broader applications in the future, because of its amazing electrical and mechanical properties. However, today, the prospect is detained by the fact that the growth of CNTs cannot be well controlled. In particular, controlling the chirality of CNTs seems formidable to any existing growth method. In addition, a systematic method for a designed interconnected network has not been established yet, which is focused particularly in nan...

  4. Improving the Sound Pressure Level of Two-Dimensional Audio Actuators by Coating Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes on Piezoelectric Films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Um, Keehong

    2015-10-01

    As devices for amplifying or transforming electronic signals into audible signals through electromechanical operations, acoustic actuators in the form of loudspeakers are usually solid structures in three dimensional space. Recently there has been increasing demand for mobile electronic devices, such as mobile phones, to become smaller, thinner, and lighter. In contrast to a three dimensional audio system with magnets, we have invented a new type of flexible two dimensional device by utilizing the reverse piezoelectric effect in certain piezoelectric materials. Crystalline piezoelectric materials show electromechanical interaction between the mechanical state and the electrically-charged state. The piezoelectric effect is a reversible process in that materials exhibiting the direct piezoelectric effect (the internal generation of electrical charge resulting from an applied mechanical force) also exhibit the reverse piezoelectric effect (the internal generation of a mechanical strain resulting from an applied electrical field). We have adopted the plasma surface treatment in order to put coating materials on the surface of piezoelectric film. We compared two kinds of coating material, indium tin oxide and single-walled carbon nanotube, and found that single-walled carbon nanotube shows better performance. The results showed improvement of output power in a wider range of operating frequency; for the surface resistance of 0.5 kΩ/square, the single-walled CNT shows the range of operating frequency to be 0.75-17.5 kHz, but ITO shows 2.5-13.4 kHz. For the surface resistance of 1 kΩ/square, single-walled CNT shows the range of operating frequency to be 0.81-17 kHz, but ITO shows it cannot generate audible sound. PMID:26726368

  5. Photovoltaic device using single wall carbon nanotubes and method of fabricating the same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biris, Alexandru S.; Li, Zhongrui

    2012-11-06

    A photovoltaic device and methods for forming the same. In one embodiment, the photovoltaic device has a silicon substrate, and a film comprising a plurality of single wall carbon nanotubes disposed on the silicon substrate, wherein the plurality of single wall carbon nanotubes forms a plurality of heterojunctions with the silicon in the substrate.

  6. Imprinted propyl gallate electrochemical sensor based on graphene/single walled carbon nanotubes/sol-gel film.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Guilin; Chi, Yu; Li, Lu; Liu, Shouhua; Kan, Xianwen

    2015-06-15

    A novel imprinted sol-gel electrochemical sensor for the determination of propyl gallate (PG) was developed based on a composite of graphene and single walled carbon nanotubes (GR-SWCNTs). It was fabricated by stepwise modifying GR-SWCNTs and molecularly imprinted polymers and stored in 0.10 mol L(-1) phosphate buffer solution pH 6.0, which endowed the sensor good sensitivity and selective recognition towards template molecules. The morphology and specific adsorption capacity of the sensor was characterized by scanning electron microscope and electrochemical methods, respectively. Under the optimized conditions, a linear range of the sensor to PG was 8.0 × 10(-8)-2.6 × 10(-3)mo lL(-1) with a limit of detection of 5.0 × 10(-8)mol L(-1) (S/N=3). The sensor exhibited specificity and selectivity towards template molecules as well as excellent reproducibility, regeneration and stability. Furthermore, the sensor could be applied to determine PG in edible oils, instant noodles and cookies with satisfactory results. PMID:25660855

  7. Enhancement of the optical response in a biodegradable polymer/azo-dye film by the addition of carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new biodegradable photoresponsive material was developed using poly(lactic acid) (PLA) as the matrix material and Disperse Orange 3 (DO3) as photoisomerizable azo-dye. It was observed that the addition of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) leads to a new phenomenon consisting of an enhancement of the optical anisotropy in a wide range of temperatures. In particular, the optical anisotropy increases 100% at room temperature. Moreover, the material containing MWCNTs shows a faster optical response that is evidenced as an increase in the growth rate of optical anisotropy. Spectroscopic data is provided to study the interaction among DO3, MWCNTs and PLA. The enhancement of optical anisotropy obtained with the addition of MWCNTs was related to the glass transition temperature (Tg) of each material. Maximum optical anisotropy was obtained 15 °C below the Tg for both materials. Results are interpreted in terms of the interactions among DO3, MWCNTs and PLA and the packing density of the dye into the polymer chains. (paper)

  8. Study of Carbon Nanotube-Substrate Interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaqueline S. Soares

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Environmental effects are very important in nanoscience and nanotechnology. This work reviews the importance of the substrate in single-wall carbon nanotube properties. Contact with a substrate can modify the nanotube properties, and such interactions have been broadly studied as either a negative aspect or a solution for developing carbon nanotube-based nanotechnologies. This paper discusses both theoretical and experimental studies where the interaction between the carbon nanotubes and the substrate affects the structural, electronic, and vibrational properties of the tubes.

  9. Fundamental and harmonic soliton mode-locked erbium-doped fiber laser using single-walled carbon nanotubes embedded in poly (ethylene oxide) film saturable absorber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosdin, R. Z. R. R.; Zarei, A.; Ali, N. M.; Arof, H.; Ahmad, H.; Harun, S. W.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a simple, compact and low cost mode-locked Erbium-doped fiber laser (EDFL) using a single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) embedded in poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) film as a passive saturable absorber. The film was fabricated using a prepared homogeneous SWCNT solution, which was mixed with a diluted PEO solution and casted onto a glass petri dish to form a thin film by evaporation technique. The film, with a thickness of 50 μm, is sandwiched between two fiber connectors to construct a saturable absorber, which is then integrated in an EDFL cavity to generate a self-started stable soliton pulses operating at 1560.8 nm. The soliton pulse starts to lase at 1480 nm pup power threshold of 12.3 mW to produce pulse train with repetition rate of 11.21 MHz, pulse width of 1.02 ps, average output power of 0.65 mW and pulse energy of 57.98 pJ. Then, we observed the 4th, 7th and 15th harmonic of fundamental cavity frequency start to occur when the pump powers are further increased to 14.9, 17.5 and 20.1 mW, respectively. The 4th harmonic pulses are characterized in detail with a repetition rate of 44.84 MHz, a transform-limited pulse width of 1.19 ps, side-mode suppression ratio of larger than 20 dB and pulse energy of 9.14 pJ.

  10. Strain Dependence of Photoluminescense of Individual Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolaev, Pavel N.; Leeuw, Tonya K.; Tsyboulski, Dmitri A.; Bachilo, Sergei M.; Weisman, Bruce; Arepalli, Sivaram

    2007-01-01

    We have investigated strain dependence of photoluminescense (PL) spectra of single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNT). Nanotubes were sparsely dispersed in a thin PMMA film applied to acrylic bar, and strained in both compression and extension by bending this bar in either direction in a homebuilt four-point bending rig. The average surface strain was measured with high accuracy by a resistive strain gage applied on top of the film. The near infrared imaging and spectroscopy were performed on the inverted microscope equipped with high numerical aperture reflective objective lens and InGaAs CCD cameras. PL was excited with a diode laser at either 658, 730 or 785 nm, linearly polarized in the direction of the strain. We were able to measure (n,m) types and orientation of individual nanotubes with respect to strain direction and strain dependence of their PL maxima. It was found that PL peak shifts with respect to the values measured in SDS micelles are a sum of three components. First, a small environmental shift due to difference in the dielectric constant of the surrounding media, that is constant and independent of the nanotube type. Second, shift due to isotropic compression of the film during drying. Third, shifts produced by the uniaxial loading of the film in the experiment. Second and third shifts follow expression based on the first-order expansion of the TB hamiltonian. Their magnitude is proportional to the nanotube chiral angle and strain, and direction is determined by the nanotube quantum number. PL strain dependence measured for a number of various nanotube types allows to estimate TB carbon-carbon transfer integral.

  11. CARBON NANOTUBES: PROPERTIES AND APPLICATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, John, E.

    2009-07-24

    Carbon nanotubes were discovered in 1991 as a minority byproduct of fullerene synthesis. Remarkable progress has been made in the ensuing years, including the discovery of two basic types of nanotubes (single-wall and multi-wall), great strides in synthesis and purification, elucidation of many fundamental physical properties, and important steps towards practical applications. Both the underlying science and technological potential of SWNT can profitably be studied at the scale of individual tubes and on macroscopic assemblies such as fibers. Experiments on single tubes directly reveal many of the predicted quantum confinement and mechanical properties. Semiconductor nanowires have many features in common with nanotubes, and many of the same fundamental and practical issues are in play – quantum confinement and its effect on properties; possible device structures and circuit architectures; thermal management; optimal synthesis, defect morphology and control, etc. In 2000 we began a small effort in this direction, conducted entirely by undergraduates with minimal consumables support from this grant. With DOE-BES approval, this grew into a project in parallel with the carbon nanotube work, in which we studied of inorganic semiconductor nanowire growth, characterization and novel strategies for electronic and electromechanical device fabrication. From the beginnings of research on carbon nanotubes, one of the major applications envisioned was hydrogen storage for fuel-cell powered cars and trucks. Subsequent theoretical models gave mixed results, the most pessimistic indicating that the fundamental H2-SWNT interaction was similar to flat graphite (physisorption) with only modest binding energies implying cryogenic operation at best. New material families with encouraging measured properties have emerged, and materials modeling has gained enormously in predictive power, sophistication, and the ability to treat a realistically representative number of atoms. One of

  12. Effect of Electron Drag on Performances of Carbon Nanotubes as Flow Sensors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    L(ü) Jian-wei; WANG Wan-lu; LIAO Ke-jun; CAO Chun-lan; LIU Cang-lin; ZENG Qing-gao

    2004-01-01

    Experimentally, the electron drag effect on carbon nanotube surface in flowing liquids was investigated. It was found that electric current could be generated in metallic carbon nanotubes immersed in the liquids. Carbon nanotubes were synthesized on Si substrate by hot filament chemical vapor deposition. The experimental results showed that the flow-induced current on the surface of carbon nanotube films was closely depended on the flow rate, concentration, properties and temperature of liquids. The flow-induced current was increased with the increasing of flow rate, concentration and temperature of liquids. The obtained results were discussed in detail.

  13. Glucose biosensor based on covalent immobilization of enzyme in sol-gel composite film combined with Prussian blue/carbon nanotubes hybrid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Guanglei; Yue, Xiuli; Dai, Zhifei

    2011-05-15

    A novel electrochemical glucose biosensor was developed based on in situ covalent immobilization of glucose oxidase (GOx) by one-pot chitosan (CS)-incorporated sol-gel process in the presence of Prussian blue deposited multi-walled carbon nanotubes hybrids (PB/MWNTs) using 3-isocyanatopropyltriethoxysilane (ICPTES) as both a sol-gel precursor and a covalent coupling agent for GOx and CS. The electrode modified with the PB/MWNTs-GOx-CS-ICPTES sol-gel composite film showed good electrical conductivity and effective low-potential electron transfer mediation toward H2O2 reduction attributed to the incorporation of PB/MWNTs. The biosensor exhibited a linear response to glucose in the concentration range from 2.5×10(-5) to 1.3×10(-3) M with a correlation coefficient of 0.9998, a detection limit of 7.5×10(-6) M, a low response time (10s ), good sensitivity and high anti-interference ability. Compared with the control biosensor based on the traditional tetraethoxysilane derived sol-gel composite film, the biosensor showed a similarly small apparent Michaelis-Menten constant of 3.67 mM but much higher electrochemical and biosensing stability. PMID:21478008

  14. Distinct electrical effects of multi-walled carbon nanotubes in two composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Leizhi; Wang, Hua; Datta, Timir; Yin, Ming; Tian, Xingyou

    2014-11-01

    The temperature dependent conductivity of multi-walled carbon nanotube film (MWNT) is reported and the different electrical properties of nanotubes in two composites are compared. Due to the disordered structures, our carbon nanotube film displays variable range hopping behavior. While the geometric distributions of carbon nanotubes in the conducting polyaniline (PANI) and insulating polyamide (PA66) are similar, charge carriers transport distinctly. The conductive PANI, following one-dimensional variable range hopping, dominates the electrical properties of MWNT/PANI composites. The effect of MWNTs becomes prominent only at low temperature range. However, the contact junctions composed by adjacent carbon nanotubes, instead of nanotubes themselves or the polymer matrix, determine the electrical properties of MWNT/PA66 composites, showing the fluctuation induced tunneling characteristic.

  15. Functional Materials based on Carbon Nanotubes

    OpenAIRE

    Jung, Adrian Thomas

    2007-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes, no matter if they are single-walled or multi-walled, are an integral component in the vastly growing field of nanotechnology. Since their discovery by TEM and the invention of numerous large-scale production techniques, nanotubes are close to making their way into industrial products. Although many properties and modification processes are still under intensive research, the first real-market applications for carbon nanotubes have already been presented. However, if function...

  16. Dielectrophoretic assembly of carbon nanotube devices

    OpenAIRE

    Dimaki, Maria; BØGGILD, Peter

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this project has been to assemble single-walled carbon nanotubes on electrodes at the tip of a biocompatible cantilever and use these for chemical species sensing in air and liquid, for example in order to measure the local activity from ion channels in the cell membrane. The electrical resistance of carbon nanotubes has been shown to be extremely sensitive to gas molecules. Dielectrophoresis is a method capable of quickly attracting nanotubes on microelectrodes by using an ele...

  17. Amorphous Carbon-Boron Nitride Nanotube Hybrids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae Woo (Inventor); Siochi, Emilie J. (Inventor); Wise, Kristopher E. (Inventor); Lin, Yi (Inventor); Connell, John (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A method for joining or repairing boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs). In joining BNNTs, the nanotube structure is modified with amorphous carbon deposited by controlled electron beam irradiation to form well bonded hybrid a-C/BNNT structures. In repairing BNNTs, the damaged site of the nanotube structure is modified with amorphous carbon deposited by controlled electron beam irradiation to form well bonded hybrid a-C/BNNT structures at the damage site.

  18. Mechanics of filled carbon nanotubes

    KAUST Repository

    Monteiro, A.O.

    2014-04-01

    The benefits of filling carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with assorted molecular and crystalline substances have been investigated for the past two decades. Amongst the study of new structural phases, defects, chemical reactions and varied types of host-guest interactions, there is one fundamental characterisation aspect of these systems that continues to be overlooked: the mechanical behaviour of filled CNTs. In contrast to their empty counterparts, the mechanics of filled CNTs is a subject where reports appear far and apart, this despite being key to the application of these materials in technological devices. In the following paragraphs, we review the work that has been carried out up to the present on the mechanics of filled CNTs. The studies discussed range from experimental resonant frequency essays performed within electron microscopes to modelling, via molecular dynamics, of three-point bending of nanotubes filled with gases. (C) 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Glucose oxidase immobilization onto carbon nanotube networking

    CERN Document Server

    Karachevtsev, V A; Zarudnev, E S; Karachevtsev, M V; Leontiev, V S; Linnik, A S; Lytvyn, O S; Plokhotnichenko, A M; Stepanian, S G

    2012-01-01

    When elaborating the biosensor based on single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs), it is necessary to solve such an important problem as the immobilization of a target biomolecule on the nanotube surface. In this work, the enzyme (glucose oxidase (GOX)) was immobilized on the surface of a nanotube network, which was created by the deposition of nanotubes from their solution in 1,2-dichlorobenzene by the spray method. 1-Pyrenebutanoic acid succinimide ester (PSE) was used to form the molecular interface, the bifunctional molecule of which provides the covalent binding with the enzyme shell, and its other part (pyrene) is adsorbed onto the nanotube surface. First, the usage of such a molecular interface leaves out the direct adsorption of the enzyme (in this case, its activity decreases) onto the nanotube surface, and, second, it ensures the enzyme localization near the nanotube. The comparison of the resonance Raman (RR) spectrum of pristine nanotubes with their spectrum in the PSE environment evidences the creat...

  20. Carbon nanotubes composites for microwave applications

    OpenAIRE

    Herrero Fernández, Diego

    2015-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes have become a focus of study due to the great applications you can have and its excellent properties. In this thesis the compounds formed by a host and a percentage of carbon nanotubes are modelled. The models used are the Debye model, the Maxwell Garnett model and McLachlan model. These models have been implemented in ...

  1. Carbon nanotube flow sensor device and method

    OpenAIRE

    Sood, Ajay Kumar; Ghosh, Shankar

    2004-01-01

    A method and device for measuring the flow of a liquid utilizes at least one carbon nanotube. More particularly, the velocity of a liquid along the direction of the flow is measured as a function of them current/voltage generated in at least one carbon nanotube due to the flow of the liquid along its surface.

  2. An electrochemical sensor for warfarin determination based on covalent immobilization of quantum dots onto carboxylated multiwalled carbon nanotubes and chitosan composite film modified electrode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method is described for the construction of a novel electrochemical warfarin sensor based on covalent immobilization of CdS-quantum dots (CdS-QDs) onto carboxylated multiwalled carbon nanotubes/chitosan (CS) composite film on the surface of a glassy carbon electrode. The CdS-QDs/CS/MWCNTs were characterized by field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transform infra-red (FTIR) spectroscopy, XRD analysis and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The sensor showed optimum anodic stripping response within 90 s at an accumulation potential of 0.75 V. The modified electrode was used to detect the concentration of warfarin with a wide linear range of 0.05–80 μM and a detection limit (S/N = 3) of 8.5 nM. The proposed sensor has good storage stability, repeatability and reproducibility and was successfully applied for the determination of warfarin in real samples such as urine, serum and milk. - Highlights: • A new sensitive sensor for warfarin determination was developed. • The sensor was constructed based on covalent immobilization of CdS-QDs on the chitosan/MWCNTs/GCE. • The parameters affecting the stripping analysis of warfarin were optimized. • The proposed sensor is used for trace determination of warfarin in urine, serum and milk

  3. Amperometric biosensor based on tyrosinase immobilized onto multiwalled carbon nanotubes-cobalt phthalocyanine-silk fibroin film and its application to determine bisphenol A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yin Huanshun [College of Chemistry and Material Science, Shandong Agricultural University, Taian 271018, Shandong (China); College of Resources and Environment, Shandong Agricultural University, Taian 271018, Shandong (China); Zhou Yunlei; Xu Jing [College of Chemistry and Material Science, Shandong Agricultural University, Taian 271018, Shandong (China); Ai Shiyun, E-mail: ashy@sdau.edu.cn [College of Chemistry and Material Science, Shandong Agricultural University, Taian 271018, Shandong (China); Cui Lin [College of Chemistry and Material Science, Shandong Agricultural University, Taian 271018, Shandong (China); Zhu Lusheng, E-mail: lushzhu@sdau.edu.cn [College of Resources and Environment, Shandong Agricultural University, Taian 271018, Shandong (China)

    2010-02-05

    An amperometric bisphenol A (BPA) biosensor was fabricated by immobilizing tyrosinase on multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs)-cobalt phthalocyanine (CoPc)-silk fibroin (SF) composite modified glassy carbon electrode (GCE). In MWNTs-CoPc-SF composite film, SF provided a biocompatible microenvironment for the tyrosinase to retain its bioactivity, MWNTs possessed excellent inherent conductivity to enhance the electron transfer rate and CoPc showed good electrocatalytic activity to electrooxidation of BPA. The cyclic voltammogram of BPA at this biosensor exhibited a well defined anodic peak at 0.625 V. Compared with bare GCE, the oxidation signal of BPA significantly increased; therefore, this oxidation signal was used to determine BPA. The effect factors were optimized and the electrochemical parameters were calculated. The possible oxidation mechanism was also discussed. Under optimum conditions, the oxidation current was proportional to BPA concentration in the range from 5.0 x 10{sup -8} to 3.0 x 10{sup -6} M with correlation coefficient of 0.9979 and detection limit of 3.0 x 10{sup -8} M (S/N = 3). The proposed method was successfully applied to determine BPA in plastic products and the recovery was in the range from 95.36% to 104.39%.

  4. Hydrogen peroxide biosensor based on gold nanoparticles/thionine/gold nanoparticles/multi-walled carbon nanotubes-chitosans composite film-modified electrode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Shenfeng; Zhu Xiaoying; Zhang Wei; Xie Guoming [Key Laboratory of Laboratory Medical Diagnostics, Ministry of Education, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400016 (China); Feng Wenli, E-mail: fengwlcqmu@sina.com [Key Laboratory of Laboratory Medical Diagnostics, Ministry of Education, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400016 (China)

    2012-01-15

    In this paper, an amperometric electrochemical biosensor for the detection of hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}), based on gold nanoparticles (GNPs)/thionine (Thi)/GNPs/multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs)-chitosans (Chits) composite film was developed. MWCNTs-Chits homogeneous composite was first dispersed in acetic acid solution and then the GNPs were in situ synthesized at the composite. The mixture was dripped on the glassy carbon electrode (GCE) and then the Thi was deposited by electropolymerization by Au-S or Au-N covalent bond effect and electrostatic adsorption effect as an electron transfer mediator. Finally, the mixture of GNPs and horseradish peroxidase (HRP) was assembled onto the modified electrode by covalent bond. The electrochemical behavior of the modified electrode was investigated by scanning electron microscope, cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometry. This study introduces the in situ-synthesized GNPs on the other surface of the modified materials in H{sub 2}O{sub 2} detection. The linear response range of the biosensor to H{sub 2}O{sub 2} concentration was from 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -7} mol L{sup -1} to 1.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3} mol L{sup -1} with a detection limit of 3.75 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -8} mol L{sup -1} (based on S/N = 3).

  5. Amperometric biosensor based on tyrosinase immobilized onto multiwalled carbon nanotubes-cobalt phthalocyanine-silk fibroin film and its application to determine bisphenol A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An amperometric bisphenol A (BPA) biosensor was fabricated by immobilizing tyrosinase on multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs)-cobalt phthalocyanine (CoPc)-silk fibroin (SF) composite modified glassy carbon electrode (GCE). In MWNTs-CoPc-SF composite film, SF provided a biocompatible microenvironment for the tyrosinase to retain its bioactivity, MWNTs possessed excellent inherent conductivity to enhance the electron transfer rate and CoPc showed good electrocatalytic activity to electrooxidation of BPA. The cyclic voltammogram of BPA at this biosensor exhibited a well defined anodic peak at 0.625 V. Compared with bare GCE, the oxidation signal of BPA significantly increased; therefore, this oxidation signal was used to determine BPA. The effect factors were optimized and the electrochemical parameters were calculated. The possible oxidation mechanism was also discussed. Under optimum conditions, the oxidation current was proportional to BPA concentration in the range from 5.0 x 10-8 to 3.0 x 10-6 M with correlation coefficient of 0.9979 and detection limit of 3.0 x 10-8 M (S/N = 3). The proposed method was successfully applied to determine BPA in plastic products and the recovery was in the range from 95.36% to 104.39%.

  6. An electrochemical sensor for warfarin determination based on covalent immobilization of quantum dots onto carboxylated multiwalled carbon nanotubes and chitosan composite film modified electrode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gholivand, Mohammad Bagher, E-mail: mbgholivand2013@gmail.com; Mohammadi-Behzad, Leila

    2015-12-01

    A method is described for the construction of a novel electrochemical warfarin sensor based on covalent immobilization of CdS-quantum dots (CdS-QDs) onto carboxylated multiwalled carbon nanotubes/chitosan (CS) composite film on the surface of a glassy carbon electrode. The CdS-QDs/CS/MWCNTs were characterized by field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transform infra-red (FTIR) spectroscopy, XRD analysis and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The sensor showed optimum anodic stripping response within 90 s at an accumulation potential of 0.75 V. The modified electrode was used to detect the concentration of warfarin with a wide linear range of 0.05–80 μM and a detection limit (S/N = 3) of 8.5 nM. The proposed sensor has good storage stability, repeatability and reproducibility and was successfully applied for the determination of warfarin in real samples such as urine, serum and milk. - Highlights: • A new sensitive sensor for warfarin determination was developed. • The sensor was constructed based on covalent immobilization of CdS-QDs on the chitosan/MWCNTs/GCE. • The parameters affecting the stripping analysis of warfarin were optimized. • The proposed sensor is used for trace determination of warfarin in urine, serum and milk.

  7. Conducting carbonized polyaniline nanotubes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mentus, S.; Ciric-Marjanovic, G.; Trchová, Miroslava; Stejskal, Jaroslav

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 20, č. 24 (2009), 245601/1-245601/10. ISSN 0957-4484 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/08/0686; GA AV ČR IAA400500905 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : conducting polymers * polyaniline * carbonization Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 3.137, year: 2009

  8. Simulation and fabrication of carbon nanotubes field emission pressure sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A novel field emission pressure sensor has been achieved utilizing carbon nanotubes (CNTs) as the electron source. The sensor consists of the anode sensing film fabricated by wet etching process and multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) cathode in the micro-vacuum chamber. MWNTs on the silicon substrate were grown by thermal CVD. The prototype pressure sensor has a measured sensitivity of about 0.17-0.77 nA/Pa (101-550 KPa). The work shows the potential use of CNTs-based field-emitter in microsensors, such as accelerometers and tactile sensors

  9. Light Emission in Silicon from Carbon Nanotubes

    CERN Document Server

    Gaufrès, Etienne; Noury, Adrien; Roux, Xavier Le; Rasigade, Gilles; Beck, Alexandre; Vivien, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    The use of optics in microelectronic circuits to overcome the limitation of metallic interconnects is more and more considered as a viable solution. Among future silicon compatible materials, carbon nanotubes are promising candidates thanks to their ability to emit, modulate and detect light in the wavelength range of silicon transparency. We report the first integration of carbon nanotubes with silicon waveguides, successfully coupling their emission and absorption properties. A complete study of this coupling between carbon nanotubes and silicon waveguides was carried out, which led to the demonstration of the temperature-independent emission from carbon nanotubes in silicon at a wavelength of 1.3 {\\mu}m. This represents the first milestone in the development of photonics based on carbon nanotubes on silicon.

  10. Development of supercapacitors based on carbon nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马仁志; 魏秉庆; 徐才录; 梁吉; 吴德海

    2000-01-01

    Block-type electrodes made of carbon nanotubes were fabricated by different processes. The volumetric specific capacitance based on such electrodes reached 107 F/cm3, which proves carbon nanotubes to be ideal candidate materials for supercapacitors. The composite electrodes consisting of carbon nanotubes and RuO2 ·xH2O were developed by the deposition of RuO2 on the surface of carbon nanotubes. Supercapacitors based on the composite electrodes show much higher specific capacitance than those based on pure carbon nanotube ones. A specific capacitance of 600 F/g can be achieved when the weight percent of RuO2· xH2O in the composite electrodes reaches 75% . In addition , supercapacitors based on the composite electrodes show both high energy density and high power density characteristics.

  11. Development of supercapacitors based on carbon nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Block-type electrodes made of carbon nanotubes were fabricated by different processes. The volumetric specific capacitance based on such electrodes reached 107 F/cm3, which proves carbon nanotubes to be ideal candidate materials for supercapacitors. The composite electrodes consisting of carbon nanotubes and RuO2.xH2O were developed by the deposition of RuO2 on the surface of carbon nanotubes. Supercapacitors based on the composite electrodes show much higher specific capacitance than those based on pure carbon nanotube ones. A specific capacitance of 600 F/g can be achieved when the weight percent of RuO2.xH2O in the composite electrodes reaches 75%. In addition, supercapacitors based on the composite electrodes show both high energy density and high power density characteristics.

  12. Liquid surface model for carbon nanotube energetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solov'yov, Ilia; Mathew, Maneesh; Solov'yov, Andrey V.;

    2008-01-01

    In the present paper we developed a model for calculating the energy of single-wall carbon nanotubes of arbitrary chirality. This model, which we call as the liquid surface model, predicts the energy of a nanotube with relative error less than 1% once its chirality and the total number of atoms are...... an important insight in the energetics and stability of nanotubes of different chirality and might be important for the understanding of nanotube growth process. For the computations we use empirical Brenner and Tersoff potentials and discuss their applicability to the study of carbon nanotubes. From...... the calculated energies we determine the elastic properties of the single-wall carbon nanotubes (Young modulus, curvature constant) and perform a comparison with available experimental measurements and earlier theoretical predictions....

  13. Multifunctional Carbon Nanotube Sensors for Environmental Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yu

    As a one dimensional material, a Single-walled Carbon Nanotube (SWNT) is made of a rolled up graphene sheet. With a diameter of 1˜2 nm, the SWNTs exhibit many unique properties, such as high aspect ratios, ballistic carrier transport, high mechanical strength and thermal stability. These properties enable SWNTs to have superior performances in various applications including electronics and sensors. SWNT based sensors are extremely sensitive to slight electrostatic changes in their environment and have a fast response where conductance of an SWNT is observed to change in less than 2 sec upon exposure. In addition, SWNT sensors have size advantage over traditional sensors. Hence, SWNTs have been widely explored as active sensing elements for chemical and biomolecule detection. Despite high sensitivities observed from nanotube sensors, one drawback is their lack of selectivity. The conductance of SWNTs is susceptible to many gas molecules in air, including oxygen and moisture which are abundantly present in the ambient environment. Due to this nonspecificity, the presence of any type of gas vapors can possibly interfere with the induced signals from the target gas vapors and hence reduce S/N ratio during detection. To minimize the effects of undesirable interference signals from the environment, several functionalization methods have been developed to customize the affinities of SWNTs to specific targets, including metal nano particles, conducting polymers and biomolecules. The objective of this thesis is to utilize SWNTs in environmental applications. The proposed research topics include: investigating the sensing characteristics of RNA oligomers on carbon nanotubes; analyzing the sensing characteristics of DNA with different sequence lengths on carbon nanotubes; integration of DNA decorated SWNTs onto CMOS chip for toxic and explosive gas monitoring; building nanosensor array based on multi-functionalized SWNTs for air quality monitoring and exploring the sensing

  14. Formation of a robust and stable film comprising ionic liquid and polyoxometalate on glassy carbon electrode modified with multiwalled carbon nanotubes: Toward sensitive and fast detection of hydrogen peroxide and iodate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A robust and stable film comprising n-octylpyridinum hexafluorophosphate ([C8Py][PF6]) and 1:12 phosphomolybdic acid (PMo12) was prepared on glassy carbon electrodes modified with multiwall carbon nanotubes (GCE/MWCNTs) by dip-coating. The cyclic voltammograms of the GCE/MWCNTs/[C8Py][PF6]-PMo12 showed three well-defined pairs of redox peaks due to the PMo12 system. The surface coverage for the immobilized PMo12 and the average values of the electron transfer rate constant for three pairs of redox peaks were evaluated. The GCE/MWCNTs/[C8Py][PF6]-PMo12 showed great electrocatalytic activity towards the reduction of H2O2 and iodate. The kinetic parameters of the catalytic reduction of hydrogen peroxide and iodate at the electrode surface and analytical features of the sensor for amperometric determination of hydrogen peroxide and iodate were evaluated.

  15. Growing carbon nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshinori Ando

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available The discovery of ‘fullerenes’ added a new dimension to the knowledge of carbon science1; and the subsequent discovery of ‘carbon nanotubes’ (CNTs, the elongated fullerene added a new dimension to the knowledge of technology2;. Today, ‘nanotechnology’ is a hot topic attracting scientists, industrialists, journalists, governments, and even the general public. Nanotechnology is the creation of functional materials, devices, and systems through control of matter on the nanometer scale and the exploitation of novel phenomena and properties of matter (physical, chemical, biological, electrical, etc. at that length scale. CNTs are supposed to be a key component of nanotechnology. Almost every week a new potential application of CNTs is identified, stimulating scientists to peep into this tiny tube with ever increasing curiosity.

  16. Improved synthesis of carbon nanotubes with junctions and of single-walled carbon nanotubes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    F L Deepak; A Govindaraj; C N R Rao

    2006-01-01

    Pyrolysis of thiophene over nickel nanoparticles dispersed on silica is shown to yield Yjunction carbon nanotubes with smaller diameters than those obtained by the pyrolysis of organometallicthiophene mixtures. In the presence of water vapour, the pyrolysis of organometallic-hydrocarbon mixtures yields single-walled nanotubes, as well as relatively narrow-diameter carbon nanotubes with Y-junctions. Pyrolysis of organometallic-hydrocarbon mixtures, in the absence of water vapour, only gives nanotubes with T- and Y-junctions.

  17. Carbon nanotube growth density control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delzeit, Lance D. (Inventor); Schipper, John F. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    Method and system for combined coarse scale control and fine scale control of growth density of a carbon nanotube (CNT) array on a substrate, using a selected electrical field adjacent to a substrate surface for coarse scale density control (by one or more orders of magnitude) and a selected CNT growth temperature range for fine scale density control (by multiplicative factors of less than an order of magnitude) of CNT growth density. Two spaced apart regions on a substrate may have different CNT growth densities and/or may use different feed gases for CNT growth.

  18. Novel capacitance-type humidity sensor based on multi-wall carbon nanotube/SiO2 composite films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Xiaowei; Zhao Zhengang; Li Tuo; Wang Xin

    2011-01-01

    A novel capacitance-type relative humidity (RH) sensor based on multi-wall carbon nanotubc/SiO2 (MWCNTs/SiO2) composite film is reported.Details of the fabrication process,possible sensing mechanism and sensing characteristics,such as linearity and sensitivity,are described.The capacitance of the MWCNTs/SiO2 composite film shows typical concentration percolation behavior with increasing MWCNT loading.At loadings below the percolation threshold (1.842wt%),the sensor capacitance increases obviously with increasing MWCNTs.The water condensed in the MWCNTs/SiO2 layer can lower the percolation threshold and increase the sensor capacitance.The sensor with MWCNT concentration of 1 wt% has the best properties.The sensor has a humidity sensitivity of about 673 pF/% RH and a linearity correlation of 0.98428.The response time of the sensor to RH is about 40 s and the recovery time is about 2 s.

  19. Tailored semiconducting carbon nanotube networks with enhanced thermoelectric properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avery, Azure D.; Zhou, Ben H.; Lee, Jounghee; Lee, Eui-Sup; Miller, Elisa M.; Ihly, Rachelle; Wesenberg, Devin; Mistry, Kevin S.; Guillot, Sarah L.; Zink, Barry L.; Kim, Yong-Hyun; Blackburn, Jeffrey L.; Ferguson, Andrew J.

    2016-04-01

    Thermoelectric power generation, allowing recovery of part of the energy wasted as heat, is emerging as an important component of renewable energy and energy efficiency portfolios. Although inorganic semiconductors have traditionally been employed in thermoelectric applications, organic semiconductors garner increasing attention as versatile thermoelectric materials. Here we present a combined theoretical and experimental study suggesting that semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes with carefully controlled chirality distribution and carrier density are capable of large thermoelectric power factors, higher than 340 μW m‑1 K‑2, comparable to the best-performing conducting polymers and larger than previously observed for carbon nanotube films. Furthermore, we demonstrate that phonons are the dominant source of thermal conductivity in the networks, and that our carrier doping process significantly reduces the thermal conductivity relative to undoped networks. These findings provide the scientific underpinning for improved functional organic thermoelectric composites with carbon nanotube inclusions.

  20. Tailored Semiconducting Carbon Nanotube Networks with Enhanced Thermoelectric Properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avery, Azure D.; Zhou, Ben H.; Lee, Jounghee; Lee, Eui-Sup; Miller, Elisa M.; Ihly, Rachelle; Wesenberg, Devin; Mistry, Kevin S.; Guillot, Sarah L.; Zink, Barry L.; Kim, Yong-Hyun; Blackburn, Jeffrey L.; Ferguson, Andrew J.

    2016-04-04

    Thermoelectric power generation, allowing recovery of part of the energy wasted as heat, is emerging as an important component of renewable energy and energy efficiency portfolios. Although inorganic semiconductors have traditionally been employed in thermoelectric applications, organic semiconductors garner increasing attention as versatile thermoelectric materials. Here we present a combined theoretical and experimental study suggesting that semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes with carefully controlled chirality distribution and carrier density are capable of large thermoelectric power factors, higher than 340 microwatts m-1 K-2, comparable to the best-performing conducting polymers and larger than previously observed for carbon nanotube films. Furthermore, we demonstrate that phonons are the dominant source of thermal conductivity in the networks, and that our carrier doping process significantly reduces the thermal conductivity relative to undoped networks. These findings provide the scientific underpinning for improved functional organic thermoelectric composites with carbon nanotube inclusions.